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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01388
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 08/01/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01388
System ID: UF00028308:01388
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




Rockies rock
Colorado sets
Major League record.
Sports, 3B

L i F .' L' F F, H i -I:'
i LL i L -







Sunday, August 1, 2010


Florida reopens
Gulf fishing
23-mile stretch off Escambia
open for saltwater fish harvest.
Nation, 7A


rter


lakecityreporter.com


Inland port project costs uncertain


County's role
still unknown,
officials say.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
An inland port, a facility
where freight containers
are moved from railcars to
trucks and vice versa, is a


concept that local officials
believe can solidify the
county and region's eco-
nomic development foun-
dation.
For the past few years,
design and concept work
has been done to establish
an inland port property in
eastern Columbia County
along U.S. Highway 90 as
part of a public and pri-
vate partnership with Plum


Creek, the state's largest
private landowner. The


..

[2

Williams


plan calls
for local
warehous-
es, dis-
tribution
centers
and manu-
facturing
opera -


tions that will be construct-
ed on 2,500 acres owned


by Plum Creek.
Construction of the pro-
posed warehouses and
other buildings, as well as a
rail spur, will cost millions
of dollars. However, Plum
Creek and local officials
say the final costs associ-
ated with the project have
not yet been determined.
It's uncertain what finan-
cial role Columbia County
will have in making the


concept a reality.
Dale Williams, Columbia
County manager, said the
county has not been asked
to fund any portions of the
inland port project.
"As of right now I do
not know of anything that
Columbia County is spe-
cifically being requested to
fund," he said.
INLAND continued on 3A


Crash kills
2 Lake City
residents

From staff reports *

PEMBROKE PINES
- Two Lake City residents
died in a three-vehicle traf-
fic crash early Saturday,
according to police reports.
Franklin Claridy, 46,
CRASH continued on 3A


DANGER AHEAD


County traffic deaths climbing


Donations raised
for Give Kids the
World Village.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Ice cream and sherbet,
along with toppings like
brownies, whipped cream
and gummy bears adorned
the breakfast table at the
Lake City Holiday Inn Hotel
and Suites Saturday.
The hotel hosted an Ice
Cream for Breakfast social,
which raised $600 in dona-
tions from more than 100
event guests for Give Kids
the World Village.


:. III I I IJASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Motorists reduce their speed as a Florida Highway Patrol trooper drives along State Road 247 in this recent file photo.


Interstates head list of roadways

with most fatalities, officials say


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
s driving on
Florida's state and
local roads more
dangerous this year
than in years past?
Recent statistics suggest
the answer is, yes, and
highway officials say
sloppy driving habits are
largely to blame.
The number of fatal
wrecks on local road-
ways in 2010 has nearly
reached the total from last
year although there are
five months remaining in
the calendar year.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol statistics,
troopers have conducted
investigations on 16 fatal
crashes that killed 17 peo-
ple during the past seven
months in Columbia


1 j' .. i,.. 'I I


CALL US:
(386) 752-12
SUBSCRIBE
THE REPORT
Voice: 755-54
Fax: 752-9.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
In this June 1 file photo, Columbia County Fire Rescue
and ShandsCair Flight Crew personnel load a patient into
a helicopter for transport to Shands at the University of
Florida in Gainesville after a fatal two-vehicle wreck on
U.S. Highway 47.


County. In 2009, 22 people
died in wrecks in the
county.
Of the 16 fatal crashes
this year, three occurred
on Interstate 10, two on

-- 96
"TO T-Storm Chance
RTER:
400 WEATHER, 8A


Interstate 75 and two on
State Road 47.
While many of the-fatal
wrecks happened under
a variety of weather con-
ditions, Lt. Pat Ribrdan,


public affairs officer of the
Florida Highway Patrol
Troop B said the most
common element in the
fatal wrecks appears to be
careless driving.
"Looking through the
statistics and some of the
information that we have
... the one common thing
is careless driving was
the most prevalent viola-
tion," he said. "About half
of those crashes were
caused by careless driv-
ing."
Florida Statutes define
careless driving as driv-
ing without regard to the
width, grade, curves, cor-
ners, traffic and all other
attendant circumstances
so as not to endanger the
life, limb or property of
any person.
DANGER continued on 3A


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Brien Boudreaux (center), 9, of Lake City holds his ice cream
bowl while his father, Francis, serves him whipped cream at a
Give Kids the World Village Ice Cream for Breakfast fundraiser
at the Lake City Holiday Inn Hotel and Suites Saturday. Also
pictured are Deena Dorosheff (from left) of Lake City, Aidan
Boudreaux, 6, and Malia Boudreaux, 10.

Local hotel finds

cool way to back

nonprofit resort


Give Kids the World
Village is a nonprofit resort
in Central Florida that offers
children with life-threat-
ening illnesses and their
families the opportunity to
take a week-long vacation,
including amusement park
tickets, at no cost.
The Ice Cream for
Breakfast fundraiser is a
national campaign that
occurred throughout July
and the Holiday Inn is a
"big supporter," said Rod
Butler, the hotel's general
manager in Lake City.
Butler said he wanted to
host the event at his hotel
COOL continued on 5A


Local park sparkles

with improvements

from Lowe's heroes


Store's product
suppliers also
donate materials.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityrepor ter. corn
Fresh coats of paint and
new' bathroom sinks were
just a few of the improve-
ments that about 20 Lake
City Lowe's employees and
volunteers gave to Youngs
Park Saturday.
"We're getting it cleaned
up," said Bonnie Dunn, a
receiving clerk at the local
Lowe's who has spearhead-
PARK continued on 5A


Opinion .. .... 4A
Business .. ... IC V h


Obau.inres ..
Advice .........
Life ........ ..


.. 6A
. 3D
. ID


SUNDAY
REPORT
... IF' IP


LEANNE TYOILake City Reporter
Stephanie McDonald, a
product service associate at
the Lake City Lowe's home
improvement store, kneels
down as she paints a wall at
Youngs Park Saturday.


COMING
TUESDAY
,-",1 t I lp i ', t-'l n


136, No. 167 0 $1.00








LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
6-17-32-42 15 7-18-22-24-36 Afternoon: 8-8-7 Afternoon: 8-4-2-0 4-7-9-11-30-41 1-11-20-25-27-2
Evening: 8-1-8 Evening: 0-3-8-7


AROUND FLORIDA


'Road scholar's' odyssey: From big rig to Harvard


By LUIS ZARAGOZA
Orlando Sentinel

Call Kerry
Anderson a

with a unique
view of education.
Anderson's first learning
venture came in the cabin
of her tru'ck-driver mom's
big rig, where she was
home-schooled while criss-
crossing America.
She continued her
education at Valencia
Community College,
where her can-do charac-
ter and irrepressible drive
dazzled everyone and led
to honors and the role
of graduation speaker in
2007.
Now the 26-year-old
from Apopka can say she
has viewed the world from
the ivy-covered environs
of Harvard University. She
earned a bachelor's degree
in government from
Harvard a few weeks ago
after winning a full scholar-
ship that seemed to come
out of nowhere.
The road ahead prom-
ises even wider vistas.
Long interested in poli-
tics, she is contemplating
law school and a career in
foreign policy and interna-
tional relations. Studying
the history of nations such
as Iran while at Harvard
gave her insight into how
"the domino effect of just
one decision long ago can
affect the dynamic of the
entire world."
' "You need to understand
how things started in
order to learn how to fix


4

4


'C,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This recent file photo shows Kerry Anderson (right) with her mother, Linda Anderson, who works as a truck driver; just after
arriving back in Orlando from Chattanooga. Kerry will .be the main student speaker at Valencia Community College com-
mencement. She has excelled at VCC and hopes to continue her education in political science.


things," Anderson says.

Street smarts
It's been an eventful few
years for someone who,
at age 12, decided to skip
the school dances and
cafeteria lunches at public
schools in favor of hitting
the road with her mom,
Linda, a cross-country
truck driver.
Kerry Anderson's
younger brother, Steven,
was aboard too.
The kids received more
than book learning in the
basics of reading and writ-
ing. They saw places most
kids know only through


books or TV. Occasional
trips through Canada and
Mexico spiced their tray-
els.
Linda Anderson recalls
that Kerry and her brother
helped plan travel routes
and calculate how long it
would take to reach each
new destination on their
mom's itinerary, a practi-
* cal education in math and
geography.
By the time she
was ready for college,
Anderson was ready to
experience learning in a
more conventional way.
She took a break from the
road and dived into her
formal classroom studies


at Valencia, earning a place
on the dean's list while
becoming active in campus
activities and in commu-
nity service projects.
For her dedication,
Anderson was named
2007's distinguished grad-
uate by Valencia's Alumni
Association, giving her the
right to address more than'
4,500 classmates at gradu-
ation.
"She had a very unusual
childhood and told us
about having to come out
of her shell," said Tammy
Lamm, a member of the
alumni panel that chose to
honor Anderson.
Her key attribute was


her steely confidence,
Lamm said at the time.
After graduating from
Valencia, Anderson
vowed to take her time in
deciding her next step.
She knew she wanted to
continue her studies, but
wasn't exactly sure where
to go.
It wasn't long after her
story of achievement at
Valencia made the news
back in 2007 that she
received an e-mail from
someone claiming to be a
Harvard-recruiter.
At first, she and her
mom thought the invita-
tion might be a scam.


Would Kerry con-
sider attending Harvard
University for free?

No joke
Mother and daughter
spent considerable time
researching the unbeliev-
able offer and concluded it
was genuine. The disbelief
gave way to shock and
then celebration.
Harvard turns away
thousands of applicants
every year and seldom
takes transfer students.
But her story touched
recruiters who liked her
history and wanted her
experience to become part
of the university's.
Anderson's route
from Central Florida to
Cambridge, Mass., became
a topic of discussion dur-
ing classes at Harvard,
mostly because she had
transferred from a commu-
nity college.
"I definitely stuck out,"
Anderson says.
Though she was sur-
prised at the unexpected
offer, her mom saw it as
fateful.
"My mom told me how
when I was 3 or 4 years
old I told her that I was
going to go to Harvard,"
Kerry recounted. "She
says I sounded very deter-
mined."
Anderson says she
doesn't remember making
that declaration. In any
case, she gives her mom
much of the credit for
helping make that forgot-
ten dream come true.
"She got me there,"
Anderson says.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Crowd on VIP alert at Chelsea's wedding


RHINEBECK, N.Y

Chelsea Clinton was
poised to marry her
longtime boyfriend at an
exclusive estate along
New York's Hudson
River after weeks of secrecy and
buildup that had celebrity watchers
flocking to the sn-all village for the
Saturday evening nuptials.
The crowd began forming mid-
morning after weeks of intrigue and
secrecy about a ceremony with a
VIP guest list said to include such
luminaries as Oprah Winfrey and
Steven Spielberg.
The 30-year-old daughter of
Bill Clinton and Hillary Rodham
Clinton was expected to wed her
boyfriend, investment banker -
Marc Mezvinsky, at a ceremony
with 400 to 500 guests. Details of
the wedding were kept fanatically
close to the vest, with shopkeepers,
innkeepers; vendors and restaura-
teurs sworn to secrecy. Roads were
blocked off, the skies were closed
over the estate and inconvenienced
neighbors were soothed with a com-
plimentary bottle of wine.
Donna Vena drove 50 miles to
Rhinebeck from her home of Mount
Kisco, N.Y., in the hopes of spotting
a celebrity.
"Why not?" she asked Saturday
morning, a camera slung over her
shoulder. "Big story. Maybe see
Oprah."
Hundreds of people gathered
outside the hotel where many of the
guests are staying were rewarded
Friday night when the Clintons
exited a van arm-in-arm outside the
Beekman Arms Hotel.
Shortly before 11 p.m., the for-
mer first lady, wearing a long green
dress, waved to the cheering crowd
waiting behind metal barricades
and quickly went into the hotel. She
left with the former president about
a half-hour later.

Snooki of 'Jersey Shore'
arrested in NJ town
SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. -
"Jersey Shore" cast member Nicole


I ~ '- us'


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bill and Hillary Clinton leave a party in honor of Chelsea Clinton and Marc
Mezvinsky Friday in Rhinebeck, N.Y.


"Snooki" Polizzi has been arrested
in the New Jersey beach town
where the MTV show is based.
Seaside Heights Police Chief
Thomas Boyd says Polizzi was
arrested at around 3:25 p.m. Friday


Snooki


and charged with
disorderly conduct
after other beach-
goers reported
she was bothering
them.
.Polizzi was pro-
cessed at police
headquarters and
released on a sum-


mons. The show focuses on the
escapades of a group' of hard-party-
ing, 20-something Italian-Americans
at a shore house.

Sound of Schreker's
opera heard at Bard
ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON,
N.Y. His name is all but forgot-
ten today, but a century ago Franz
Schreker was considered perhaps
the most important operatic com-
poser since Richard Wagner.


Now Leon Botstein, an ener-
getic excavator of neglected music,
has brought Schreker's 1912
"Der Ferne Klang" ("The Distant
Sound") to the campus of Bard
College for its-first fully staged pro-
duction in the U.S.
Friday night's premiere,
played superbly by the American
Symphony Orchestra with Botstein
conducting, revealed a richly inven-
tive work, full of lush melodies and
dissonant harmonies, sometimes
suggestive .of Richard Strauss.
Schreker wrote his own libretto,
a feverish tale of a penniless young
composer, Fritz, who abandons his
sweetheart, Grete, to pursue an
elusive "sound," while she drifts
into prostitution. Although they
are reunited, he dies as the curtain
falls a twist on the usual operatic
scenario where it's the heroine who
succumbs. There are fine solos
for the main characters and lovely
orchestral interludes. But the
highlight is the second act, set in a
Venetian bordello, where Schreker
introduces competing textures that
include soloists and an orchestra.
*Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


M Actor-director Geoffrey
Holder is 80.
* Singer Ramblin' Jack Elliott
is 79.
* Cartoonist Tom Wilson
(retired creator of "Ziggy")
is 79.
* Basketball Hall of Fame
coach Roy Williams is 60.
* Blues singer-musician


Daily Scripture


Robert Cray is 57.
* Singer Michael Penn is
52.
* Rapper Coolio is 47.
* Actor John Carroll Lynch
is 47.
* Country singer George
Ducas is 44.
* Singer Ashley Parker
Angel is 29.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, 'Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein Is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
In part Is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecltyreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Publisher Todd Wilson ..... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecltyreporter.com)


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION *
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with.your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
'vice related credits will be Issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters. .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................... $48.79
52 Weeks ................... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks ... ........... $41.40
24 Weeks ................... $82.80
52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor., Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


"Yet to all who received him, to
those who believed in his name,
he gave the right to become
children of God children born
not of natural descent, nor of
human decision or a husband's
will, but born of God."
-John 1:12-13


Lake City Reporter


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & 'NATION SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


JASON MAT ITHEW WALKER/LaKe City Reporter
A passing motorist (left) drives on an overpass above Interstate 75 on Friday.

DANGER: FHP to deploy aircraft


Continued From Page 1A
"Driving is an activ-
ity where you haye to be
mindful of a lot of different
conditions," Riordan said.
"If you don't pay attention
to the different factors,
the worst-case scenario
can be fatalities because
of careless driving. It may
not seem significant to
everyone, but we know out
of 17 people that died in
Columbia County, it was
very significant issue."
Riordan said the FHP is
involved with several pro-
grams designed to reduce
the number of fatal wrecks
on Florida's roads. Several
of the programs have been
implemented in Columbia
County.
"We've got a DUI grant


that we're utilizing addi-
tional monies for having
people work a DUI shift,"
he said. "We have people
working that shift from 7
p.m. to 3 a.m. We feel like
that's the window where
we are most likely to catch
someone who is driving
impaired."
The FHP also has a
Statewide Overtime Action
Response program in
which troopers can work
overtime on targeted road-
ways, such as interstates
and busy county roads
where a.history of high
crash activity has been
documented.
In addition, the FHP
has added two unmarked
Dodge Charger patrol


units.
"We use those primar-
ily on the interstates to
address aggressive driving
and some of the extreme
speeds we see out there,"
Riordan said.
The local interstates will
also be patrolled with an
FHP aircraft.
"The plane is a real good
tool because some of the
things you can see from
up there is pretty phenom-
enal," said Riordan, who
noted use of the patrol
plane was severely limited
in the area after a trooper,
Sgt. Andy Brown, was
killed several years ago.
"We're excited to have
the plane back here," he
said.


INLAND: Officials push paperwork


Continued From Page 1A

Jim Poole, executive
director of the Columbia
County Industrial
Development Authority,
said officials have been
working on the inland port
concept for about 3-4 years
-with two goals in mind, but
noted the project doesn't
currently have a budget.
One goal is to come up
with a concept that would
take advantage of Columbia
County's location, Poole
said. The other goal, he
said, involves the Rural
Area of Critical Economic
Concern and North Florida
Economic Development
Partnership in developing
an idea that would gener-
ate the greatest economic
impact for the region.
At this point, the county
has had no cost incurred
on the project because of
the involvement of the 500-
acre catalyst site and the
county's partnership with
Plum Creek, he said.
"On the catalyst site
we've received a grant from
the state to do our initial
due-diligence on the prop-
erty," said Poole. 'We've
received a $300,000 grant,
and anything beyond that
on the remainder of the
property, Plum Creek has*
underwritten the costs for
us."
Poole said he expects
that to change as the proj-
ect moves forward during
the next few months.
"Down the road as we get
into development and we


truly lay it out, we're going
to be looking at funding
sources, not only from the
county, but from the state
and any federal sources
that might be possible and
any other private sources
that we can go to," he said.
"It's not a project that the
county ... could underwrite
on its own it's a major
project."
The inland port project,
which is scheduled to have
two phases of construction,
remains in the planning
stages as Plum Creek repre-
sentatives, state officials and
county officials continue to
work on the paperwork nec-
essary to make the project
a reality, including land use
amendments and the proper
planning and zoning permit-
ting documentation.
However, so far most of
the investment Columbia
County has contributed to
the project financially has
been through the IDA staff
time and work.
The IDA staff has helped
to secure funding through
the state grant as well as
gaining the catalyst site
designation.
"We've also been able
to work with Rep. Debbie
Boyd and Sen. Charlie Dean
and others on the enter-
prise zone an'd develop the
partnership," Poole said.
"Other than our normal
operating budget, we've
not incurred any additional
costs.".
Williams said the


amount of money poten-
tially requested from the
county would be used as
the determining factor in
how the county decides to
fund the request.
He said the county does
have several options when
it comes to funding por-
tions of the project.
"Within the IDA, there
is an economic develop-
ment fund balance and that
money could be utilized,"
he said. "The county also
'has some nonrestricted
reserves that it could use
and the county has the
capacity to borrow or bond
money. As of right now, no
one has indicated to the
board of county commis-
sioners that they're going
to have to participate finan-
cially."
Williams said the larg-
est economic development
project the county was pre-
viously involved with was
the .'Target project years
ago."
"This inland port project
has a lot of state funding
and a lot of private funding
in it," he said. "This proj-
ect will be bigger than the
Target project, but it won't
be bigger in terms of what
portion Columbia County
is having to fund."





Sat., Aug. 7, 2010 9 A.M.
Statenville, GA


20* ACRES.
*AIl Wooded Land
*9 Tracts to sell dMvdec or whole
Very Seduded
Arivestment Property l
Development Polentla
*POmww Fkncng *.
R.E, .Hwy. 129 S to Hester Rd.,
leh to Ouail Lane Lor f4 signs.





Cosignmenis witn.come &
accepted until 2pm Fri., AAug, i
&10 B.P, IN'Y, IINC
Drive by anld Pime, 'Call f
intlifnalion a ndeor hrhqlr s,
Curt Mathis. S Sai- Minagcr,
229-D7- WI3. Visit us ( fiuh
wO) L kt t111iodip.coi al

Z1NIT['I AUCTION
& RLo.AI.TY, INC.
Donald Pallen, CA],
Auclionetr
R0-1Q t ,07 '251
P 10, L akd.lUl, GA 316351
229-.182-211 (1


Rangel using 3-way

defense vs. charges


By LARRY MARGASAK
Associated Press
WASHINGTON To
rebut a lengthy list of
alleged ethical misdeeds,
Rep. Charles Rangel is
trotting out this three-way
defense: I didn't do it. I
did it, but was inattentive.
Others lawmakers were
allowed to do the same
thing without penalty.
It's an approach that
nervous Democrats are
watching closely in one of
the most politically explo-
sive cases in years.
Should it go to a public
trial this fall, smack in
the middle of the election
season, and should his
defense fall short, that
won't help Democratic can-
didates forced to defend
their party's ethics against
Republican campaign
attacks.
The GOP already is
demanding that specific
Democratic candidates


give up contributions pro-
vided by Rangel's political
organizations, and about
a half-dozen Democrats
have asked the 20-term
lawmaker to resign.
He's facing 13 counts
of wrongdoing, including
providing official favors in
return for donations, hid-
ing income and assets, and
failing to pay taxes.
If Rangel's predica-
ment wasn't bad enough
for Democrats, there's an
added complication on the
ethics front Rep. Maxine
Waters, D-Calif., also may
face an ethics trial this fall
on allegations of improp-
erly trying to help a bank,
where her husband owned
stock, that was seeking a
federal bailout
Rangel, 80, is a former
chairman of the tax-writing
House Ways and Means
Committee. Waters, 71, is a
prominent member of the
House Financial Service's
Committee. .


CRASH:
From Page 1A

141 SE James Ave., and
Roshama Claridy, 30, 437
NE Martin Luther King
St., were pronounced
dead at the scene of an
accident near the inter-
. section' of U.S. Highway
27 and Johnson Street at
7:10 a.m., according to
Pembroke Pines Police
Department
According to reports,
a commercial garbage
truck was stopped for a
red traffic light on U.S.
Highway 27 when a 2003
Chevrolet SUV, driven
by Franklin Claridy with
Roshama Claridy as a pas-
senger, struck the rear of
the truck at a high rate of
speed.
The driver of the
garbage truck was not
injured.
A third vehicle, directly
in front of the garbage'
truck, received minor
damage. The ,driver of
that vehicle also was not
injured in the wreck.


WORKSHOP MEETINGS

CITY OF LAKE CITY-CITY COUNCIL

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council for the City of Lake City, Florida will
hold a workshop meeting on Wednesday, August 4,2010 and Thursday, August 5,2010
The meetings are scheduled for 6:00 p.m. at City Hall, 205 North Marion Street, Lake City,
Florida. The purpose for each meeting is for budgetary workshop.


All interested persons are invited to attend. No official action \ ill be taken during the
meetings.


SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services for any of the meetings
identified above, as addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the City
Manager's Office at (386) 719.5768.


AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk










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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 .













OPINION


Sunday, August 1, 2010


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Do not be

driven to

distraction

riving along with-
out a care in the
world? Well, it's
your life.
But it's also the
life of every passenger you
carry and every motorist with
whom you interact.
That's the problem.
Local highway officials tell
us that careless driving driv-
ing while distracted, otherwise
occupied or as if you alone own
the road is the No. 1 cause
behind traffic fatalities in our
county.
Disturbingly, that cause is
on the rise. In 2009, Columbia
County registered 22 traffic
deaths. As of today, the county
has had 17 traffic fatalities,
and that's not counting deaths
by association such as the
two Lake City residents killed
Saturday in Broward County.
Again, careless driving driv-
ing city streets at a high rate of'
speed was the contributing
factor in that fatal wreck, early
reports indicate.
As a county filled with motor-
ists, we are not trending cor-
rectly. It is beyond distressing
that we are near last year's total
number of traffic fatalities with
almost half the year ahead of
us.
It's more distressing that in
many cases these are deaths
that didn't have to happen.
This is not a situation to
explain away by our proximity
to the interstates. Of the 16 fatal
wrecks we've had this year,
interstates 10 and 75 account
for only five. The remaining
deaths occurred on the myriad
roadways we all travel daily.
When it comes to traffic fatal-
ities, many factors are out of a
motorist's control. One thing
we can all do is to recognize
this and drive like we care.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTO RY
Today is Sunday, Aug. 1, the
213th day of 2010. There are
152 days left in the year. "
On Aug. 1, 1944, an upris-
ing broke out in Warsaw,
Poland, against Nazi occupa-
tion; the revolt lasted two
months before collapsing.
In 1714, Britain's Queen
Anne died at age 49.

Lake City Reporter,
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns-are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Child hunger: Congress must act


For most, "hunger" is
a metaphor for a list
of wants rather than
needs. We hunger for
more more time,
more money, more of what the
next guy has. Even in refer-
ence to food the term becomes
hyperbole. If we go more than
five or six hours in any busy day
without a meal, we declare, "I'm
starving!" just before we bite
into our super-sized sandwiches.
Imagine the physical and
emotional distress of true hun-
ger. Now imagine suffering
that pain' as a child. An empty
stomach makes a child feel
empty emotionally, overlooked
and forgotten. Even worse, it
stunts their growth, harms their
school test scores, spurs behav-
ioral problems and increases
school nurse visits.
Nearly 17 million American
children struggle against hun-
ger. For these children, school
food programs are sometimes
the only access they have to
food. At the same time, one in
three American kids is over-
weight or suffering from child-
hood obesity, because their
families simply cannot afford
fresh, nutritious foods. School
food systems are one of the only
level playing fields we have to
provide good nutrition to all of.
our kids.
Every five years or so,
Congress reviews and revises
the Child Nutrition Act through
a process commonly known as
Child Nutrition Reauthorization.
This process sets rules and
funding levels for the major
school-lunch and other food
programs. Rather than passing
a new bill last year when the old
one expired, Congress passed
a one-year extension, which
is set to expire at the end of
September.
To truly end child hunger
and reduce obesity, nutrition
advocates estimate that a new
bill would need an additional
$4 billion per year. That would
go toward improving meal qual-
ity by boosting reimbursement
rates and increasing the number
of kids fed. President Obama
proposed a significant down


Rachel Ray


payment towards this goal,
requesting an extra $1 billion
per year in his budget for CNR
improvements.
Versions of a new child
nutrition bill have passed the
relevant committees in both the
House and the Senate. While
both bills would increase meal
reimbursements and expand
access to food programs to
some extent, neither meets the
president's proposed $1 bil-
lion per year. And, as children
across the country are return-
ing to school, we also run the
real risk that Congress will end
its session before passing a bill
at all.
What can you do? What can
we do? The answer is a lot. For
starters, we can join the first
lady in her Let's Move cam-
paign, and join our president
in his commitment to ending
childhood hunger by 2015. Call
your state's two U.S. senators
and your representative in the
U.S. House and tell them to
pass and adequately fund
- a child nutrition bill imme-
diately. The Senate bill is the
Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act
of 2010 (S.3307); the House bill
is the Improving Nutrition for
America's Children Act of 2010
(H.R. 5504).
Any child nutrition bill that
passes will continue the school
lunch and breakfast programs,
as well as other vital efforts
such as the WIC Program,
which provides special packages
of healthy food to low-income
pregnant women and their small
children. But a truly strong and
adequately funded bill would
significantly increase the num-
ber of children receiving meals
at school, during the summer
and in after-school programs,


as well as significantly improve
the nutritional quality of'those
meals.
Our communities want and
welcome our support as active
citizens. In my own commu-
nity, Mayor Bloomberg and
the Mayor's Fund in New York
City have welcomed Yum-o!
- my nonprofit organization
that empowers kids and their
families to have a healthy rela-
tionship with food and cooking
- as a partner in our public
school programs, providing sup-
port from the cafeteria to school
gardens.
My grandfather, Emmanuel
Scuderi, suffered all his life
from Type 1 diabetes, the
causes of which are believed to
be environmental and genetic.
He battled it with a good, bal-
anced Mediterranean diet and
as much physical exercise as his
body could bear. As I was for-
tunate enough to have shared a
home with him as a small girl, I
benefited by developing a palate
similar to his: fish, kale, olive
oil, garden vegetables and, oh,
the tomatoes! It would have
boggled his mind and broken
his food-and-family-loving heart
to see fully one-third of this
country's children at risk of or
suffering from Type 2 diabetes,
which is largely preventable
with a healthy diet and regular
exercise.
Child hunger and malnutri-
tion in the world's wealthiest
nation is morally unacceptable.
The U.S. economy loses at least
$28 billion per year due to poor
school performance and long-
term health care spending due
to poor child nutrition. We can
all do the math: pay now or pay
a much greater price in every
sense later.
I have a dog no human
kids. But I care about this issue
because our children are our
collective investment in the
future. As a nation, we need to
create a new "golden rule" if we
are to ensure a healthy future
in every way possible. The rule:
You have to eat well to be well
- period.
0 Rachel Ray is a best-sell-
ing cookbook author and Emmy
Award winner.


OTHER OPINION

Cutting taxes or deficit can't have both


hen President
George W.
Bush took
office in 2001,
he inherited an
annual budget surplus of more
than $200 billion and a 10-year
projected surplus of $5.6 trillion.
He used those numbers to jus-
tify tax cuts of about $2 trillion
over the next decade.
Between the tax cuts, open-
handed spending by the then-
GOP-dominated Congress, the
wars and the dot-com bust, the
annual surplus disappeared and
soon afterward so did the fore-
cast of $5.6 trillion in the bank.
Instead, the government began
running ever-increasing deficits
that this year will reach a record
$1.47 trillion, meaning that 41
cents of every dollar Congress
spends is borrowed.
Deficits are now back as a
political issue, and so are the
Bush tax cuts. The Bush tax
cuts of 2001 and 2003 are set


to expire in January unless
Congress extends them. Bush
and the Republicans set the tax
cuts to expire at a date certain
to make them look more afford-
able than they really were.
Congressional Republicans
. are set on making the tax cuts
permanent, at a cost of nearly
$3 trillion over the decade.
President Barack Obama would
extend most, but not all of the
tax cuts. Middle- and lower-
income taxpayers would keep
their Ipwer rates, but individuals
making more than $200,000 a
year and couples making more
than $250,000 would revert to
the old top rates. The adminis-
tration would also let the 15 per-
cent capital-gains tax revert to
20 percent Even so, the Obama
plan won't come cheap $2.5
trillion over the next decade.
Republicans are charging that
sticking with their original game
plan to let the tax cuts expire
is a Democratic-inspired tax


increase, and they plan to spend
the August recess denounc-
ing "the Democrats' 2011 tax
hikes."
Further adding to the cog-
nitive dissonance is a new
Republican fixation on the defi-
cit. GOP lawmakers last week
opposed extending unemploy-
ment benefits on the grounds
it would add $34 billion to the
national debt. And they have
begun insisting that Democratic
spending plans be financed with
budget cuts elsewhere. But
faced with actually making cuts
in an overly generous Veterans
Affairs bill, the Republicans
folded. The bill passed, 411-6.
Simply put, the only way the
Bush tax cuts can be sustained
under either the Republicans'
plan or Obama's is to add to the
national debt and borrow the
money. It's either the tax cuts
or the deficit. The Republicans
can't have it both ways.
* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


9TAIER rA ,
"(H SUS plISew2-oro. 2 0 A I HOA-r W .. \
AKE T11r riATr \IIAC~ \ fn^SS ^^r~t


Todd Wilson
twilson@lakecityreporter.com


Business

moving

in right

direction

This past week was
one of our most
exciting business
development weeks
in a long time. The
announcement of several new
additions and expansions in
our retail and service industry
community is a good sign our
economy continues to move
slowly in the right direction.
TJ.Maxx and Big Lots will
be a boost for two vacant, high-
profile retail locations along
U.S. Highway 90. T.J.Maxx will
fill the front-line anchor posi-
tion, facing the highway, in the
Lake City Mall and Big Lots
will occupy the former Publix
location just off the highway
and east of the mall location.
Both are welcomed additions
to our retail community.
1st Street Music & Sound
Company opened its new
expanded showroom on
Southwest Main Boulevard
(formerly 1st Street) last week
with two open house events
that included catered food, live
music and experts on hand to
answer questions on just about
any type of musical instru-
ment.
Steve Briscoe, who owns
the business, has truly cre-
ated a gem of a showroom
at 1st Street Music. If you
missed the open houses and
you or anyone in your fam-
ily has even a vague interest
in musical instruments and
equipment, go by and check
out this store. It's setup is
worthy of any big city and it's
right here in our town. Briscoe
has always shown a commit-
ment to the Columbia County
business community and the
music store he designed is
loaded with top-quality music
and sound equipment. It also
features private lesson rooms
along a decorated stretch of
"1st Street," an area custom-
designed and decorated for the
new store. Parents waiting on
their children can relax in a
park setting inside the store.
We're seeing positive gains
in our business community.
Overall, the climb back may be,
slow, but that's the economic
world we live in now. We can-
not find new success if we
continually fixate on what has
changed and gone away. All
things considered, a large por-
tion of America would trade
its economy for the one we all
share in Columbia County. If
-we continue to work together,
shop together and support
each other, we all will grow
together. If we don't patronize
our local business community,
who will?
Let's focus on the positives
we have seen in these busi-
ness developments in our local
economy during the past week.
Let's build on this great news,
take care of business, and look
forward to the next positive
announcement.
Todd Wilson is publisher of the'
Lake City Reporter.













City Council to decide on

revenue bonds resolution I


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The City of Lake City is
one step closer to repackag-
ing utility revenue bonds.
City Council will consid-
er a resolution to authorize
the issuance of a new util-
ity system revenue bonds
during the regular meeting
at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Before
the meeting is a council
workshop at 6:30 p.m. on
the utilities bond.
The money for the util-
ity system revenue bonds
will be for utility upgrades,
improvements at the
St. Margaret's wastewa-


ter treatment plant, and
construction of the new
Kicklighter plant, said
Wendell Johnson, city man-
ager.,
In May, the city closed
on a sale tax bond to gener-
ate money for the general
fund, he said.
The utility bonds will
generate $18 million for the
plant, Johnson said. Bond
closing is scheduled for
Aug. 25 and money will be
deposited by Aug. 26.
In other business:
The airport committee
meets at 6:15 p.m. before
the city council.
Council will consider


a resolution that if adopted
would enter the city into
a short-term aircraft han-
gar rental agreement with
Monavie Aircraft Leasing,
LLC and Monavie, LLC
for the rental of Hangar
D-4 at the airport.
M A resolution to
re-establish "prelimi-
nary" Fire Protection
Assessment Rates previ-
ously imposed by a reso-
lution, direct the prepa-
ration of the City's Fire
Protection Assessment
Roll and reaffirm Fire
Protection "notto exceed"
assessment rates will be
considered.


LEANRE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Louann Black (from left), Lake City Lowe's human resources manager, Stephanie
McDonald, local Lowe's product service associate, and David Black of Lake City help to
paint a building at Youngs Park Saturday as part of a Lowe's Heroes program project to
improve Youngs Park.

PARK: Completion before Nov. 1


Continued From Page 1A
ed a community project at
Youngs Park, funded by
Lowe's Heroes program.
The Heroes program
provides- $1,200 in com-
pany money every year
to each Lowe's home
improvement store. The
money is used to purchase
materials at cost at Lowe's
to put toward a commu-
nity development project
of each store's choosing.
Dunn noted that some
Lowe's product suppliers
also donated materials for
the job.
The project at Youngs
Park will yield new paint
jobs, redone bathroom
plumbing, new bathroom
sinks and faucets, a mural


and graffiti wall, new pro-
tective lighting in the park
shelters and a shaded,
mother's butterfly garden.
Work began at the park
on July 24 and will be com-
pleted on or before Nov. 1.
Dunn said the local
Lowe's chose Youngs Park
for its Heroes program
project because the park
is heavily used and has
"been around forever."
"We're doing it so our
kids have a safe, clean
place to come," she said.
"A safer,, neater, nicer,
more sanitary place."
The City of Lake City
has been "more than help-
ful" in assisting with the
project, Dunn said, and the


volunteers working on the
job have been "awesome."
Louann Black, local
Lowe's human resources
manager, said the project
is a way to thank the com-
munity for its "support" of
Lowe's.
"It's a community event
and we want to give back to
the community what they
give us," she said. "And
there's a lot of support that
they give us coming to our
retail environment."
Black also said the
teamwork from the Lowe's
employees and volunteers
as they donate their time
is "exhilarating."
"It's helping hands work-
ing together," she said.


LEANNE T-YO/Lake City Reporter
Sisters Emily Butler (from left), 11, and Sophia Butler, 6, of Gainesville sit with Haleigh
Henegan, 9, of Lake City while they eat ice cream sundaes at an Ice Cream for Breakfast
'social at the Lake City Holiday Inn Hotel and Suites Saturday. More than 100 people attended
the fundraiser, which raised $600 for Give Kids the World Village, a nonprofit Central Florida
resort that pays for children with life-threatening illnesses and their families to take a week-
long vacation at the resort and surrounding theme parks.


COOL: Families among beneficiaries


Continued From Page 1A
location after researching
Give Kids the World and its
impact on children.
"As I read more about
the organization, I began'
to understand the value
of what they offer to kids
around the world," he said.
Butler noted that after
speaking with Village staff,
he learned that 10 fami-
lies from Columbia County
have benefited from the
organization. The informa-
tion reinforced his decision
to hold the event, he said.
"That makes it more per-


sonal," he said, "this being
a small community."
"By raising this money,
we're enabling more fami-
lies to take the trip," Butler
said. "We can help other
families enjoy .what we
already enjoy."
Deena Dorosheff and
Francis Boudreaux of
Lake City, co-workers'at
Children's Medical Center,
brought their children to
the event to support the
organization's cause.
"I think it's good for the
kids to understand about


supporting other kids that
are less fortunate than our-
selves," Dorosheff said.
"We want to help little
children at all times,"
Boudreaux said.
Margo Litzenberg 'and
her husband, Shane, of
Pensacola came to the
social after staying a night
at the hotel.
"I couldn't not come
out and support the kids,"
Litzenberg said. "What a
beautiful event. And how
cool is it to eat ice cream
for breakfast?"


CITY OF LAKE CITY
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
Lake City Fire and Rescue Association

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Lake City shall hold a public
meeting at 2:00 PM on Wednesday, August 4, 2010 in the City Council
Chambers located on the second floor of City Hall at 205 North Marion
Avenue, Lake City, Florida.

The purpose of this public meeting is to begin contract negotiations for the
IAF, Lake City Fire and Rescue Association Local 2288.

All interested persons are invited to attend.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services as


addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the
Office at (386) 719-5768.


City Manager's


AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


Same^^^^^

Da~y Service

I Includes S^atura


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Nature photographer gives credit to memory of famed diver
Popular local nature photographer John Moran snaps a picture during a memorial service for famed diver Wes Skiles on July
28. Skiles died July 21 while diving near Palm Beach. The service was held Wednesday at Ginnie Springs. 'Wes was our
underwater astronaut,' Moran said. Photography has been around for 150 years and we thought we had seen it all. Then he
arrived on the scene and showed us a world we never could have imagined. He's a personal hero to me. He lived-life large.'



Paperwork nightmare: Struggle to fix law


By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON -
Tucked into the nation's
massive new health care
law is a requirement that
could become a paperwork
nightmare for nearly 40


million businesses.
The rule: They must file
tax forms for every vendor
that sells them more than
$600 in goods.
The goal is to prevent
vendors from underreport-
ing their income to the
Internal Revenue Service.


The government must
think vendors are omitting
a lot, because the filing
requirement is estimated
to bring in $19 billion over
the next decade.
Business groups say it
will swamp their members
in paperwork, and Congress


Harold Cline vacuums up oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill that recently washed up in a cove in
of Louisiana, Saturday.


is listening. Democrats and
Republicans want to repeal
it, but getting them to work
together on the issue is
proving difficult in an elec-
tion year.
The House rejected a
bill Friday that would have
repealed the provision.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Barataria Bay on the coast


Companies squabble over how to plug well


By MICHAEL KUNZELMAN
and RAY HENRY
Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS On
shore, BP, Halliburton and
Transocean are engaging in
a billion-dollar blame game
over the blown-out oil well
in the Gulf of Mexico. At
sea, they're depending on
each other, to finally plug
up the environmental disas-
ter.
Workers say the com-
panies' adversarial rela-
tionship before Congress,
in public statements and
maybe one day in the courts
isn't a distraction at the site
of the April 20 rig explo-
sion, where Transocean
equipment rented by BP
is drilling relief wells that
Halliburton will pump
cement through to perma-
nently choke the oil well.
, "Simply, we are all too
professional to allow dis-
agreements between BP
and any other organiza-
tion to affect our behav-
iors," Ryan Urik, a BP well
safety adviser working on


the Development Driller II,
which is drilling a backup
relief well, said in an e-mail
last week.
But at least one expert
said government probes
and potential for lawsuits
can't help but chill com-
munication between the
companies.
Urik's rig was in a hold-
ing pattern Saturday, await-
ing progress by its sister
rig, the Development
Driller III, which is drilling
the primary relief well and
ran into a minor snag while
preparing for a procedure
known as a static kill that
will make it easier to stop
the gusher for good.
The DDIII is clearing out
debris that fell in the bot-
tom of the relief well when
crews had to evacuate the
site last week because of
Tropical Storm Bonnie.
Once the debris is
cleared, engineers plan to
start as early as Monday
on the static kill, which
involves pumping mud and
possibly cement into the
blown-out'well throttgh the


temporary cap. If it works,
it will take less time to com-
plete another procedure
known as a bottom kill, the
last step to permanently'
sealing the well by pump-
ing mud and then cement
in from the bottom, which
could happen by mid- to
late August.
Workers know all about
the clashes among theiiw
respective employers, "but
the crews have done an
excellent job of focusing on
getting these relief wells
finished safely," Dennis
Barber, a Transocean
senior toolpusher aboard
the DDII, said last week in
an e-mail from the rig.
The roles of the three
companies in the relief
kill effort are much the
same as they were on the
Deepwater Horizon, the
exploratory rig that blew
up soon after a temporary
cement cap was placed on
its well, killing 11 workers.
The conflicts began almost
as soon as oil started flow-
ing.
"Transocean's blowout


preventer failed to oper-
ate," BP executive Lamar
McKay said in Senate tes-
timony in May, referring to
the massive safety device
atop the well that was sup-
posed to bottle up the oil in
an emergency.
Transocean CEO Steven
Newman shifted blame in
the same hearing, saying
"all offshore oil and gas
production projects begin
and end with the operator,
in this case BP" He also
noted that Halliburton was
responsible for encasing
the well in cement, while
Halliburton executive Tim
Probert said his company's
work was completed 20
hours before the rig went
up in flames.
President Obama called
the finger-pointing testimo-
ny a "ridiculous spectacle "
The Justice Department
has opened civil and crinmi-
nal investigations into the
spill. Attorney General Eric
Holder has indicated that
BP isn't the only company
that could be held liable.


work on gusher
NEW ORLEANS
- Tropical Storm Bonnie
left crews working to plug
the Gulf oil gusher a little
memento that is expected
to push their work back
about a day.
Crews found debris in
the bottom of the relief
well that ultimately will be
used to plug the leak for
good, retired Coast Guard
Adm. Thad Allen said
Friday. The government's
point man on the spill
said the sediment settled
in the relief well last week
when crews popped in a
plug to keep it safe ahead
of Bonnie.
"It's not a huge prob-
lem," Allen said, but
removing the debris will
take 24 to 36 hours and
likely push a procedure
known as a static kill back
to Tuesday. Earlier that
work had been expected
to begin late Sunday or
early Monday.
The static kill involves
pumping mud, and pos-
sibly cement, into the
blown-out well through
the temporary cap that
has kept it from leaking
for more than two weeks.
Then comes the so-called
bottom kill, in which
cement pumped in from
below the leak using the
relief well will plug the
gusher for good. The bet-
ter the static kill works,


BRIEFS


Arizona governor
might change law
PHOENIX A federal
appeals court has decided
not to step into the contro-
versy over Arizona's tough
immigration law until
November, leaving state
officials to consider other
steps they- might take in
the meantime.
Republican Gov. Jan
Brewer, who signed the
law and appealed a ruling
blocking its most con-
troversial sections, said
Friday she would consider
changes to "tweak" the
law to respond to the parts
U.S. District Judge Susan
Bolton faulted.
"Basically we believe
(the law) is constitutional
but she obviously pointed
out faults that can possibly
be fixed, and that's what
we would do," Brewer told
The Associated Press. She
said she's talking to legisla-
tive leaders about the pos-
sibility of a special session,
but said no specific chang-
es had been identified.
In her temporary injunc-
tion Wednesday, Bolton
delayed the most conten-
tious provisions of the law,
including a section that
required officers to check
a person's immigration sta-
tus while enforcing other
laws. Bolton indicated the
federal government's case
has a good chance at suc-
ceeding in its argument
that federal immigration
law trumps state law.
Brewer has said she'll
challenge the decision all
the way to the Supreme
Court.


the less time it will take
to complete the bottom
kill.

Workers find
'black box' data
ISLAMABAD Recov-
ery workers on Saturday
found the "black box"
flight data recorder from
the wreckage of Pakistan's
worst-ever plane crash, and
it appeared to be in good
condition, officials said.
The discovery could
provide clues to why the
Airblue flight crashed
Wednesday into the hills
overlooking the Pakistani
capital, Islamabad, killing
all 152 people onboard
including two Americans.
The answers may take
weeks to get, however,
because Pakistan will likely
send the apparatus to
another country for proper
decoding.
The black box was found
during a difficult recovery
effort hampered by rain,
mud and a lack of proper
roads in the heavily for-
ested Margalla Hills. It
has been handed to avia-
tion officials, said Ramzan
Sajid, a spokesman for
the Capital Development
Authority, a government
agency. He said the box
was found in wreckage of
the plane's tail section.
Pakistan does not have
the proper expertise to
decode information stored
on the recorder, so it
plans to send it elsewhere,
according to the Civil
Aviation Authority.

Germany holds


DUISBURG, Germany
- Germany held a
memorial service
Saturday for the victims
of the Love Parade tech-
no music festival, where
21 people were crushed
to death and 500 injured
in a tunnel that was the
only entrance to the
.event.
The memorial at
Salvator Church, which
opened with somber
organ music, was
shown on screens in a
football stadium and a
dozen other churches
in the western city of
Duisburg. Several TV
stations carried the
service live, and flags
across the country flew
at half-mast.

Obama: $30B bill
blocked by GOP
WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
said Saturday that the GOP
stance on a small business
lending bill is proof the
country "can't afford the
do-nothing policies"
Obama's election-year
desire for additional jobs
measures suffered a new
setback earlier this week
when Senate Republicans
blocked a proposal to cre-
ate a $30 billion govern-
ment fund to help open up
lending for credit-starved
small businesses.

* Associated Press


OBITUARIES


Eddie Lee Minter
Eddie Lee Minter, 64, a resident
of Lake City, Florida passed
away Thursday July 29, 2010
in the Shands
of Lake Shore
Hospital with
his family by
his side. He
was born in
Lake City,
Florida to the
late Percy
Thomas Minter, Sr. and Elouise
Williams Minter. He worked at
Clay Electric for twenty-three
years and he farmed all of his life.
He was the fourth in line of six
children. Hie was a hard working
man and loved his family dearly.
He is preceded in death by three
brothers, David Duncan, Mose
Newton and Wandell Minter and
one sister, illa Louise Minter.
Survivors include his loving
wife, Beth Craigo Minter, Lake
City, Florida. One Brother:
Percy (Geraldine)' Minter, Jr.,
Lake City, Fl. His children: Xa-
via (Tina) Minter, Valdosta, Ga.,
David (Mary) Brink, Lake City,


Fl., Shawn Shingletoii and Sher
Jones both of Lake City, Fl.
Survivors include his grandchil-
dren, Crashawnda, rcis, Xavia
Jr. "Lil Man", Brittany, Kaitlyn,
Danielle, David Jr.. Branch,
Cameron, Maria, Brenda "Baby-
doll", James, Hanna, Harry
"Turtle", Jaycob, Jamari, Shayla
"Puddin Pie", Mother in Law
Georgia Craigo, and numerous
extended family and friends.
Funeral services for Mr. Minter
will be conducted Monday, Au-
gust 2, 2010 at 11:00 A.M. in the
Mt, Tabor AME Church with the
Rev. Johnny J. Smith, officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in the
Mt. Tabor AME Cemetery. The
family will receive friends Sun-
day August 1, 2010 from 6:00-
8:00 P.M. at the funeral home.
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME
2659 SW. Main Blvd. Lake City
is in charge of arrangements.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


memorial service
nakris cetse arclk


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


U^aA1







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


Florida reopens Gulf


- for limited fishing


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida is reopening Gulf
waters off Escambia County
for the harvesting of saltwa-
ter fish.
The 23-mile stretch was
closed June 14 to fishing,
but the restriction never
affected clams, oysters or
mussels.
The Florida Fish arid
Wildlife Conservation
Commission approved the
reopening after lab tests
proved local fish safe and
oil-free. The sampling and
analysis were overseen by


the U.S. Food and Drug
Administration and National
Oceanic Atmospheric
Administration.
The change, announced
late Friday, was scheduled
to take effect just after mid-
night Saturday morning.
The reopened area spans
from the Alabama state line
to the Pensacola. Beach
water tower, up to nine nau-
tical miles from the shore-
line.
Shrimp and crab harvest-
ing is still not allowed' in
the area, pending addition-
al tests.


LEANNE TYOILake City Reporter

4,000 books: Summer camp story sounds like a good read
Joseph Aymond (second from left), 10, of Lake City reads to fellow New Mount Pisgah church's summer reading camp
readers at a fundraiser for the camp at Save-A-Lot on Saturday. More than 20 children are enrolled in the camp and have
read more than 4,000 books, which 'boosts their reading abilities and keeps them actively learning over the summer,' said
Cynthia Robinson, camp director. Also pictured'are Joshua Aymond (from left), 12, Samuel Aymond, 11, A'niya Colson, 9, and
Joeanne Gilmore, 13, of Lake City. The church will host a camp-end party at noon on Aug. 13 at 345 NE Washington Street.



FDOT roadwork to impact local drivers


From staff reports
The following road-
work now under way by
the Florida Department of
Transportation may impact
traffic.

Columbia County
Interstate 75: Daytime
lane closures for north-
bound traffic north of
Interstate 10 on Tuesday'
and Wednesday to replace
asphalt from the Suwannee
Valley Road overpass to the
Suwannee County line.Also,
various lanes will be closed
Monday and Tuesday
nights between 8:30 p.m.
and 5 a.m. at the north-
bound ramp to Interstate 10
westbound and Wednesday
and Thursday nights at
the southbound ramp to I-
10 eastbound for routine
bridge maintenance.
Interstate 75: Various
southbound lanes will be
closed at the U.S. 90 over-
pass on Wednesday and
Thursday nights from 8:30
p.m. to 5 a.m. for routine
bridge maintenance.
U.S. 90: Daytime lane
closures after 8:30 a.m. at


By LARRY.MARGASAK
Associated Press
WASHINGTON A
second House Democrat,
Rep. Maxine Waters of
California, could face an
ethics trial this fall, further
complicating the election
outlook for the party as it
battles to retain its major-
ity.
People familiar with the
investigation, who were
not authorized to be quot-
ed about charges before
they are made public, say
the allegations could be
announced next week. The
House ethics committee
declined Friday to make
any public statement on the
matter.
Waters, 71, has been
under investigation for a
possible conflict of inter-
est involving a bank that
was seeking federal aid.
Her husband owned stock
in the bank and had served
on its board. .
New York Democrat Rep.
Charles Rangel also faces
an ethics trial this fall on
charges that include fail-
Sure to disclose assets and


Southwest Birley Avenue
for construction of a new
westbound turn lane.

Alachua County
Archer Road (State
Road 24): Daytime lane
closures between the Levy
County line and Southwest
13th Street (U.S. 441) to
repaint the roadway mark-
ings.
East University Avenue
(State Road 26): Daytime
lane closures from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. from Waldo Road
(State Road 24) to Main
Street for traffic signal and
concrete work
Hawthorne Road (State
Road 20): Possible daytime
lane closures just east of
Southeast 24th Street
for driveway and median
modifications at the Dollar
General.
Newberry Road (State
Road 26): Daytime lane clo-
sures between the Gilchrist
County line and Northwest
34th Street (State Road
121) to repaint the road-
way markings.
South Main Street
(State Road 329): Daytime
lane closures at Southeast
10th Avenue for pavement


income, nonpayment of
taxes, and doing legislative
favors for
donors to
a college
center

after him.
Waters
Waters a n d
Rangel
are prom-
inent members of the
Congressional Black
Caucus and the trials would
be an embarrassment for
the group. Dual ethics trials
would also be a major politi-
cal liability for Democrats,
forcing them to defend
their party's ethical con-
duct while trying to hold on
to their House majority.
Waters came under scru-
tiny after former Treasury
Department officials said
she helped arrange a meet-
ing between regulators and
executives at Boston-based
OneUnited Bank without
mentioning her husband's
financial ties to the institu-
tion.


markings for the new bicy-
cle ,trail crossing. Also, traf-
fic is detoured around an
area just north of Depot
Avenue using Fourth
Avenue and Sixth Street
while the roadway is recon-
structed. Local traffic has
access and all businesses
in the area are open and
accessible.
State Road 26 Traffic
has been shifted onto tem-
porary lanes both east and
west of U.S 301 so crews
can work on the road that
will connect to the new
overpass.
U.S. 301: Daytime lane
closures Thursday through
Saturday (Aug. 7) for work
at the new" overpass just
south of State Road 26 in
Orange Heights.

Baker County
South Fifth Street


(State Road 228): The road
will be totally- closed'from
Monday until Aug. 13 while
the railroad crossing just
south of Macclenny Avenue
(U.S. 90) is replaced. All
through traffic is detoured
to Lowder Street (County
Road 23A) and South Sixth
Street (State Road 121). All
pedestrians will be detoured
to West Mclver Avenue or
Railroad Avenue.
Interstate 10: Daytime
lane closures after 8:15 a.m.
Wednesday and Thursday
(postponed for last two
weeks) for eastbound and
westbound traffic from
west of State Road 121 in
Macclenny to the Nassau
County line for asphalt
repairs.
U.S. 90: Daytime lane
.closures from Sanderson to
Glen St. Mary to resurface
the roadway.


SAugusot Mex10, 1944-Augusfromhe effect 1, the oil spill200











h into since you left me to



S - S shared in life. I loved

5, l' "\ you and in death still
Sin my heart you hold
S, - a place no one can
Severfill.

Your loving wife
Elizabeth Jackson
Children & grand
& great-grands


S . . ..int m --


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California Rep. Waters

may face ethics trial

over conflict of interest


I .'.-'y p itZ .,,
Eve'tPaI geof rlh r apvp'.
w cp,r Pg,,Jg ., p ,


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428








LAKE CITY REPORTER. WEATHER SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


THE WEATHER


CHC. OF '. CHC. OF
T-STORMS -STORMS



HI 98LO76 HIS9L7'


. CHC.OF
-STORMS



HI195L074


CHC.OF -" CHC.OFI
T-STORMS -STORMS



HI94L.073 Hi193L073
h- ^ .- j ...j


9 I. it:FREASMA


Pensacola
96/80


W&aW
95

Tallahassee Lake
96/77 98/

Panama City
93/79


L CIT rAL"AN


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday 96
Low Saturday 77
Normal high 90
Normal low 71
Record nign 98 in 1999
Record low 64 in 1914

PRECIPITATION 0
Saturday 0.00"
Month total 4.77"
Year total 31.49"
Normal month-to-date 6.10"
Normal year-to-date 30.13"


desta
/75 .j


Jacksonville
(IA 17


City Monday
Cape Canaveral 90, 78, pc


92/78/t
91/80/t
93/77/t
97/76/t
94/77/t
91/82/t
98/76/t
93/80/t
93/76/t
96/76/pc
94/77/t
95/79/t
95/80/pc
99/76/t
93/79/t
99/73/t
92/78/t


*eQiD I/ Daytona Beach
/76 Ft. Lauderdale
ainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
98/76 937 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
97/77 '* Key West
i Ordando Cape Canaveral Lke cit
94/77 90/77 Lake City
\ Miami
Tampa Naples
92/79 West Palm Beach Ocala
93/79 Orlando
t FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers, 92/81 Pensacola
93/77 Naples Tallahassee
'91/78 Miami Tampa
93'80 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
91/80


I


SUN
Sunnse today
Sunset today
Sunnse tom.
Sunset torn.


6:49 a.m,
8:24 p.m.
6:50 a.m.
8:23 p.m.


Tuesday
91 76 pc
91 76 pi
90 8(1. p:
93 77 I
- ;3 p,'
2 76 p.:
90 S0 I
95/74/pc
91/79/t
92/77/pc
94/74/pc
94/76/pc
97/80/pc
95/80/pc
99/77/pc
93/79/pc
97/73/t
91/78/t


,A excluS ,ve
seric6i
10brought to
vIit our rfeaters
10omf iest .D t
Toda ''s .


MOON ultr&violet TheWeater
Moonrise today 11:47 p.m. radiation rnis Chanrm4.
Moonset today 12:35 p.m. for te area on
Moonrise tom. a scale from 0
Moonnse tom to 1.
Moonset tom. 1:31 p.m. dl 0 'ml



Aug. Aug. Aug. Aug. ( Forecasts, data and graph-
3 9 16 24 '- Ics 0 2010 Weather Central
Last New First Full ~ LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


-. a *% J. I : i




bet~onnedted

. ^
>. ^^^^^^^^^


NATIONAL FORECAST: Showers and thunderstorms will be likely over the Desert Southwest
and into the Central Rockies as monsoonal moisture flows into the area. Further north, scat-
tered showers and thunderstorms will extend from the northern Rockies into the northern
Plains. Periods of showers and thunderstorms are also likely along the East Coast from
Florida into southern New England.


Cola Front
Warm Fiont

SfdtlanarV
Front
Occiddeo
F omr


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Bolse
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver




CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
BeSing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W
3,'50,"'0 79/64/t
82/68/.01 88/67/t
58/54/.20 65,,53 sh
93/75/0 93/76/pc
85/65/0 86/67/t
89/64/0 89/59/t
97/77/0 99/77/pc
88/60/0 91/63/t
88/68/0 89/53/s
72/61/0 78/63/pc
77/59/0 78/64/pc
89/77/0 88/76/t
79/65/0 88/66/pc
83/74/0 86/69/t
82/56/0 89.,59, pc
76/64/.68 86/67/pc,
80/67/0 86/68/pc
78/65/0 83/65/pc
90/77/0 93/72/t
97/78/0 104/80/s
95/79/0 93/77/t
83/61/0 93/66/t



Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
88/79/0 91/78/t
70/61/.01 70/58/sh
87/69/0 90/74/s
59/41/0 58/51/sh
90/77/0 85/74/c
79/55/0 75/59/sh
54/41/0 47/30/pc
97/77/0 103/77/pc
82/50/0 83/62/t
90/70/0 91/74/t
73/63/.01 73/58/pc
91/84/0 92/81/t
88/79/0 88/78/t


High: 103, Andalusia, Ala. Low: 36, Saranac Lake, N.Y.


Saturday Today


CITY
Des Moines*
Detroit
E Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu,
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


CITY
La Paz
Uma
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


HI/Lo/Pcp.
85/71/0
79/68/0
88/73/0
70/54/0
75/70/.08
80/61/0
82/77/0
94/78/0
76/69/0'
97/73/0
97/78/.86
88/72/0
99/88/0
99/78/0
71/59/0
96/79/0
93/79/.04
79/68/0
971 78,0
95/80/0
83/66/0
98/74/0


Saturuay
HI/Lo/Pcp.
55/27/0
63/57/0
75/63/.14
99/66/0
72/57/.75
72/50/0
91/64/0
72/57/0
95/82/0
80/75/.10
70/59/0
86/77/.70
84/64/.04


HI/Lo/W CITY
88/70/pc Omah
82/69/pc Orlan
93/71/pc Philad
80/59/pc Phoen
80/67/sh Pittsb
79/64/t, Portla
87/75/pc Portia
99/77/pc Raleig
87/67/pc Rapid
102/78/pc Reno
94/78/t Richm
90/75/s Sacra
103/83/s St. Lo
100/77/pc Salt L
68/62/pc San A
99/81/pc San D
93/80/t San F
86/70/pc Seattl
98/78/pc SpokA
97/80/pc Tampa
83/68/t Tucso
101/74/s Washi


Tuoay
HI/Lo/W
54/31/sh
63/58/s
70/58/sh
97/66/s
79/56/pc
80/58/s
92/66/s
72/55/sh
92/81/pc
90/80/t
67/58/sh
87/77/t
74/58/sh


ah
do
lelphia
mix
eurgh
nd ME
nd OR
gh
City

nond
mento
uls
ake City
Artonio
lego
rancisco
le
ine
a
In
Ington


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


HI/Lo/Pcp.
87/73/0
95/80/0
85/68/0
92/75/.13
81/63/0
73/51/0
60/57/0o
78/68/0
94/62/0
84/56/0
86/650
76/55/0
85/74/0
94/71/0
91/75/0
67/61/0
66/56/0
58/53/0
72/62/.08
92/84/0
81/70/.03
86/71/0



Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
88/68/0
84/57/.51
91/80/0
89/80/0
50/34/0-
86/77/0
88/77/.94
70/55/0
91/82/0
88/79/0
75/57/0
75/59/0
77/61/.06


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


Apply online at campuscu.com or call 754-2219 today! CAMPI

Membership is open to everyone in Alachua, U
Clay, Columbia, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties! W (lit I l



1 Offer does not apply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offer is for new loans only. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuation (maximum LTV of 70%), and first
mortgage position are required. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes; certain other restrictions apply. Property and flood insurance may be required. Example: a $100,000 loan at 3.99%
for years: 60 monthly payments of $1,842.20; total finance charge of $10671.06; total payments of $110,472.06; amount financed: $99,801.00; ANNUAL PEPF'-EITA'G, RATE of 4.071%, 2 On loans
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LaeCiy13 WBscmNrrsD. vle .Caps120S 5hAv.W Cm u 10 W 4hSt oesil 17N 10hTerce HnersW lk51 N 3d t owrSuae525S 50 t
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8A


Saturday Today


HV/Lo/W.
90/72/pc
94/77/t
84/70/t!
99/81/pc
82/62/pc
74/59/pc
76/58/pc
80/67/sh
96/66/t
92/58/s
85/69/c
90/56/s
92/73/s
90/69/pc
98/74/s
69/63/pc
62/54/pc
70/56/pc
82/56/pc
92/79/t
91/72/pc
86/67/t



Today
HI/Lo/W
86/68/s
83/67/s
90/80/pc
89/77/s
55/36/sh
88/78/t
87/77/t
58/44/sh
92/78/pc
88/79/t
79/62/t
81/57/pc ,
76/61/t


US


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M.l . . . . . ommumo


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@Jakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Sunday, August I, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
CHS FOOTBALL
Season tickets
at McDuffie's
The ColumbiawCounty
Quarterback Club has.
season tickets, parking
passes and gifts available
at McDuffie Marine &
Sporting Goods.
For details, call Blake
Lunde at 754-5810 or
Mike Black at 752-2599.

Player fundraiser
CHS Football players
will be at Winn Dixie
on Monday bagging
groceries from 4-5
p.m. wearing football
jerseys. There will be
approximately 20 players
in attendance.

Mandatory
Parent Meeting
Parents of all
Columbia High football
players must attend
a mandatory meeting
at 7 p.m. on Aug. 10
in the Auditorium at
Columbia High School.
The meeting is for all
freshman, junior varsity
and varsity parents.
For more information
contact coach Craig
Howard at 755-8080 or
Blake Lunde at 754-5810.
INDIANS FOOTBALL
Mandatory
parent meeting
Parents of Fort White
High football players ,
must be at a mandatory
meeting at 6 p.m. on
Aug. 8 at the high school
gym at Fort White.
The meeting is for all
junior varsity and varsity
parents.
For more information
contact coach Demetric
Jackson at (386) 365-.
3304.
BASEBALL CAMP
Sign-ups Aug.
9-13
Fundamental
development baseball
camp sign-ups for ages
6-8 are Aug. 9-13 at
Brian's Sports. Only
26 spots are available.
Camp will be held at
the Babe Ruth practice
field on Monday through
Wednesday at 3 p.m.
Contact Josh Wehinger
for more information at
(386) 623-3628.
CHS VOLLEYBALL
Tryouts set
The tryout date for the
Varsity Volleyball team
will be from 9-11 p.m.
on Aug. 9 and the Junior
Varsity tryouts will be
from 4-6 p.m. on Aug. 12 I
Participants must bring
a copy of their up-to-date
physical to tryouts.
For more information
contact coach Casie
McCallister at casiek32@
hotmail.corn
ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games at
Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays.
Cost is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
623-4817 or Mario
Coppock at 754-7095.


* From staff reports


Marshall bonding

with fans in Miami


Pro Bowl wide
receiver making
impression.
By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press.
DAVIE A grueling
practice in steamy weath-
er had just concluded
Saturday, and Brandon
Marshall lingered at the
fence behind the sideline,
chatting with young fans
as he signed caps, helmets
and other Miami Dolphins
souvenir gear.
Marshall appreciated the
requests. Growing up in
Orlando, he was an akuto-
graph-seeker himself.
"I've still got autographs
from guys like Curtis


Martin, Shaquille O'Neal,
Cris Carter," Marshall
said. "I can go on and on
- Phil Simms and Brett
Favre, when they .were in
the quarterback challenge
in Orlando. I got all those
guys. I love signing auto-
graphs for the kids, because
that's something they'll.
remember for a long time."
As training camp begins,
the -Dolphins' new Pro
Bowl receiver is bonding
with fans and teammates
as well, especially quarter-
back Chad Henne. Marshall
caught two long passes from
Itenne during the opening
practice Friday, drawing
whoops from spectators.
Coach Tony Sparano
MIAMI continued on 4B


Tigers


Howard names
Atkinson starter
at quarterback.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
A lot can change
between now and the Aug.
27 kickoff classic between
Columbia High and Fort
White, but Tigers' coach
Craig Howard has seen
enough to name a starting
quarterback.
What started as a three-
man race turned into a
battle of two over the sum-
mer months, but Columbia
has now entrenched junior-
to-be Nigel Atkinson as the
starting quarterback.
Nothing is guaranteed
as Atkinson has yet to start
a game for the Tigers, but
Howard liked what he saw
over the summer enough
to name him the starter on
Saturday.
"Nigel goes in as the
starter," Howard said.
"Jayce (Barber) needs to
be ready, and he will be
ready. My biggest concern
now is that we have no
junior varsity quarterback.
We have two on the var-
sity, but I don't know who
is going to-take snaps on


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Dolphins wide receiver Brandon Marshall signs autographs after NFL football training
camp, Saturday in Davie.


earn


stripes


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
*Columbia High coach Craig Howard talks to the Tigers' football team prior to kickoff of-the spring game against Ocala Trihity
Catholic in Ocala. Howard named junior-to-be Nigel Atkinson the starting quarterback at the conclusion of summer practice on


CHS continued on 2B Saturday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Trainers arrive to assist as Dallas Cowboys wide receiver
Dez Bryant reacts while grabbing his right ankle following a
play at afternoon practice at Cowboys training camp Friday.

Cowboys' Bryant injured


Dallas rookie to
be replaced by
Crayton in lineup.
By STEPHEN HAWKINS
Associated Press
SAN ANTONIO With
rookie receiver Dez Bryant
out until perhaps the regular
season, the Dallas Cowboys
will certainly need that $2


million insurance policy
named Patrick Crayton.
Bryant had already sup-
planted Crayton as the
No. 3 receiver even before
impressing throughout the
first week of training camp.
But the first-round draft pick
is out four to six weeks with
a high right ankle sprain,
pushing Crayton back up
BRYANT continued on 4B


Jaguars searching for

another starting receiver


Sims-Walker
is Jacksonville's
go-to threat.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE The
Jacksonville Jaguars have
spent the past decade try-
ing to replace star receivers
Jimmy Smith and Keenan
McCardell.
They used first-round
draft picks on R. Jay
Soward (2000), Reggie
Williams (2004) and Matt,
Jones (2005). They spent
millions on free agents
Dennis Northcutt (2007),
Jerry Porter (2008) and
Torry Holt (2009). None
of them panned out. All of
them moved on.
And the search contin-
ued.
Jacksonville may
have solved half its long-
standing problem last
year, when Mike Sims-


Walker emerged as David
Garrard's go-to guy and a
legitimate big-play threat.
As for the other half? The
Jaguars are hoping to fig-
ure that out in training
camp.
It's one of the most
intriguing position battles
going on in Jacksonville,
with everyone keeping a
close eye on young receiv-
ers Jarett Dillard, Clarence
Denmark, Nate Hughes,
Mike Thomas and Tiquan
Underwood. Throw in vet-
erans Kassim Osgood and
Troy Williamson, anti the
Jaguars have numerous
options to play alongside
Sims-Walker this fall.
"It's so wide open that
training camp and these
preseason games are prob-
ably going to determine
who's the starter and who
gets cut," Hughes said
Saturday.
Dillard and Thomas are
considered front-runners
for the starting spot. They


contributed as rookies last
season and looked dynamic
at times, but they also have
been slowed by injuries.
* A fifth-round pick from
Rice in 2009, Dillard missed
the final seven games after
breaking his right ankle
in November. He also sus-
tained a stress fracture in
his left foot in June and
opened camp on the physi-
cally unable to perform
list. He expects to return
in a couple of weeks, but it
could be a setback.
Thomas, a fourth-round
pidk from Arizona in 2009,
missed most of offseason
workouts because of a
nagging hamstring injury,
Nonetheless, he showed
so much promise last sea-
son that.lickoii-nville didn't
hesitate to part ways with
Holt a seven-time Pro
Bowler brought in to men-
tor the young guys.
Thomas caught 48 pass-
-JAGUARS continued on 2B











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, Hungarian
Grand Prix, at Budapest, Hung-ry
I p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
Pennsylvania 500, at Long Pond, Pa.
EXTREME SPORTS
I p.m.
ESPN2 X Games, at Los Angeles
7 p.m.
ESPN2 X Games, at Los Angeles
1:30 a.m.
ESPN2 X Games, at Los Angeles
(delayed-tape)
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Irish
Open, final round, at Killarney, Ireland
10 a.m.
ESPN Women's British Open, final
round, at Southport. England
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, The Greenbrier
Classic, final round, at White Sulphur
Springs,WVa.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, The Greenbrier
Classic, final round, at White Sulphur
Springs,W.Va.
4 p.m.
NBC USGA, U.S. Senior Open
Championship, final' round, at Redmond,
Wash.
HORSE RACING
5 p.m.
ABC NTRA, Haskell Invitational, at
Oceanport, N.J. '
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
TBS N.Y.Yankees at Tampa Bay
2 p.m.
WGN Oakland at Chicago White
Sox


ESPN
Francisco


8 p.m.
- L.A. Dodgers at San


MOTORSPORTS
5 p.m.
SPEED FIM World Superbike, at
Silverstone, England (same-day tape)
RODEO
3 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, U.S: Air Force
Invitational, at San Antonio
TENNIS
3 p.m.
ESPN2 WTA Tour, Bank of The
West Classic, championship, at Stanford,
Calif.
5 p.m.
ESPN2 ATP World Tour, Farmers
Classic, championship, at Los Angeles

BASEBALL

AL standings


Ne
Ta
Bo
To
Ba


Cl
Mi
De
Cl
Ka


Te
La
Lo
Se


East Division
W L
ewYork 63 36
mpa Bay 61 38
oston 58 44
)ronto 52 49
altimore 31 69
Central Division
W L
hicago 55 44
innesota 56 46
etroit 51 48
eveland 42 58
ansas City 42 59
West Division
W L
xas 59 41
akland .50 49
s Angeles 52 52
battle 39 62
Friday's Games
Toronto.8, Cleveland I
Detroit 6, Boston 5
Tampa Bay 3, N.Y.Yankees 2
Kansas City 7, Baltimore S


Pct GB
.636 -
.616 2
.569 6'A
.515 12
.310 32'A

Pct GB
.556 -
.549 'h
.515 4
.420 13'A
.416 14

Pct GB
.590 -
.505 8'k
.500 9
.386 20'k


Chicago White Sox 6, Oakland I
Minnesota 5, Seattle 3
LA.Angels 9,Texas 7
Saturday's Games
Cleveland 2,Toronto I
Detroit at Boston (n)
Oakland at Chicago White Sox (n)
Baltimore at Kansas City (n)
N.Y.Yankees atTampa Bay (n)
Seattle at Minnesota (n)
Texas at L.A.Angels (n)
Today's Games
Cleveland (J.Gomez 1-0) at Toronto
(Litsch 1-4), 1:07 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 12-6) at Boston
(C.Buchholz I 1-5), 1:35 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Sabathia 13-4) at Tampa
Bay (J.Shields 9-9), 1:40 p.m.
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 9-6) at Chicago
White Sox (Floyd:6-8), 2:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Millwood 2-10) at Kansas
City (Chen 5-5), 2:10 p.m.
Seattle (French 0-1) at Minnesota
(Liriano 9-7), 2:10 p.m.
Texas (CI.Lee 9-4) at L.A.Angels (Jer.
Weaver 9-7), 3:35 p.m. ,
Monday's Games
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Atlanta 59 44
Philadelphia 56 47
Florida 52 51
NewYork 52 51
Washington 45 58
Central Division
W L
St. Louis 57 46
Cincinnati 58 47
Milwaukee 48 56
Chicago 46 57
Houston 43 59
Pittsburgh 36 66
West Division
W L
San Diego 60 41
San Francisco 60 45
Los Angeles 54 50
Colorado 53 50
Arizona 38 65


Pct GB
.553 -
.552 -
.4629 1/2
.447 11
.4221311/2
.353201/2

Pct GB
.594 -
.571 2
.5197 1/2
.515 8
.369 23


Friday's Games
Washington 8, Philadelphia I
Arizona 9, N.Y. Mets 6
Atlanta 6, Cin;innati 4. 10 innings
Houston 5, Milwaukee 0
St. Louis I, Pittsburgh 0, 10 innings
Colorado 17, Chicago Cubs 2
Florida 4, San Diego 2'
San Francisco 6, LA. Dodgers 5
Saturday's Garpes
Cincinnati 5,Atlanta 2
San Francisco 2, LA. Dodgers I
Milwaukee at Houston (n)
Philadelphia at Washington (n)
Arizona at N.Y. Mets (n)
Pittsburgh at St. Louis (n)
Chicago Cubs at Colorado (n)
Florida at San Diego (n)
Today's Games
Arizona (D.Hudson 0-0) at N.Y. Mets
(Niese 7-4), 1:10p.m.
Atlanta (Hansol 8-7) at Cincinnati
(Volquez I-I), 1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 7-7) at
Washington (Lannan 2-5). 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Ra.Wolf 7-9) at Houston
(W.Wright 0-1), 2:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Duke 5-9) at St. Louis
(Wainwright 14-6), 2:15 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Silva 10-4) at Colorado
(De La Rosa 3-3),3:1O.p.m.
Florida (Jo.Johnson 10-3) at San Diego
(Garland 9-7), 4:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Kershaw 10-5) at San
Francisco (M.Cain 8-8), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m,
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago.Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Houston at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Washington at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
SanmDiego at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


FOOTBALL

Sunday,Aug. 8
Hall of Fame Game: Cincinnati vs.
Dallas at Canton, Ohio. 8 p.m. (NBC)
Week I
Aug. 12
New Orleans at New England, 7:30
p.m.
Carolina at Baltimore, 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Oakland at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Aug.13
Buffalo at Washington, 7:30 p.m.
Jacksonville at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Kansas City at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
Aug. 14
Tampa Bay at Miami.,7 p.m. .
Detroit at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Green Bay, 8 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Chicago at San Diego, 9 p.m.
Tennessee at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Aug. 15
San Francisco at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Denver at Cincinnati, 7 p.m.
Aug. 16
New York Giants at New York Jets,
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Week 2
Aug.19
Indianapolis vs. Buffalo Bills atToronto,
7:30 p.m.
New England at Atlanta, 8 p.m. (FOX)
Aug.20
Philadelphia at Cincinnati,' 8 p.m.
(FOX)
Aug.21
Baltimore at Washington, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New York Giants,
7 p.m.
Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
New York Jets at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Oakland at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Dallas at San Diego, 9 p.m.
Detroit at Denver, 9 p.m.
Green Bay at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Aug. 22
Minnesota at San Francisco, 8 p.m.
(NBC)
Aug. 23
Arizona at Tennessee, 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Week 3
Aug.26
St. Louis at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Indianapolis at Green Bay, 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Aug. 27
Atlanta at Miami, 7 p.m.
Washington at New York Jets, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Kansas City., 8 p.m.
San Diego at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
(CBS)
Aug.28
Cleveland at Detroit, 5:30 p.m.
Cincinnati at Buffalo, 6:30 p.m.
Jacksonville atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
New York Giants at Baltimore, 7:30
p.m.
Seattle at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Tennessee at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Houston, 8 p.m. (CBS)
Arizona at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
San Francisco at Oakland, 9 p.m.
Aug.29
Pittsburgh at Denver. 8 p.m. (FOX)
Week 4
Sept. 2
Buffalo at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 7 p.m.
New England at New York Giants.
7 p.m.
Atlanta at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
New York Jets at Philadelphia, 7:30


Baltimore at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 8 p.m.
Denver at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Green Bay at Kansas Cit, 8 p.m.
Miami at Dallas, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Houston, 8 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 10 p.m.
Washington at Arizona, 10 p.m.


CHS: Howard expects strong defense


Continued From Page 1B

Thursday nights."
Howard is confident in
both of his varsity quarter-
backs, and the dedication
they showed over the sum-
mer. Neither quarterback
missed a practice, and
Howard feels that led to
significant improvements.
' "We feel like all the play-
ers that made all the work-
outs made big advances,"
he said. "I've seen some
players work out as hard
as any players I've ever
seen."
That improvement
wasn't limited to the
offensive side of the ball,
as Howard feels there are
some talented defensive
players ready to step up.
"Ben Bell, our safety,
is ready to have a really
good year," Howard said.
"Then there are guys
like Justin Kennedy, who
coach (Dennis) Dotson
said has really improved.
You look at guys like
Cameron Wimberely and
Devontae Bell as guys
who have really (made a
commitment)."
The defense could be
the strong point of this
year's team, much like
the offense last season.
Howard feels that the
Tigers can go as far as the
defense takes them.
"They have to be (our
strength)," Howard said.


"I hope so, and they have to
be. We're going to be brand
new on offense other than
Danny Ratliff and Jordan
Morris returning on the
offensive line and Adrian
Hill as our skill-position
player. Our defense has to
be strong and keep us in
games, especially early on
in the season."
One player that has flew
under the radar this sum-
mer is defensive tackle


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

ANCKK i

.
02010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.








zLu


771 ~<


Timmy Jernigan, who is
widely regarded as one
of the top players in the
country. He will anchor a
defensive line that could be
among the best in the area.
'Timmy has worked
really hard," Howard said.
"The recruiting just hasn't
stopped. We're very fortu-
nate to have him for one
more year."
Regular-season practices
begin at 8 a.m. on Aug. 9.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Arglrlon and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: HE I
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday'sI Jumbles: GUEST NOTCH PELVIS LACKEY
I Answer: The college football player gave up the pigskin
when it was time for this THE SHEEPSKIN


Steelers still big on Roethlisberger


ALAN ROBINSON
Associated Press

LATROBE, Pa. His No.,
7 hasn't changed. Neither
has his place in the offense.
Ben Roethlisberger is the
Steelers' starting quarter,
back, and that was quickly
evident during their first
practice of training camp.
What is different, team-
mate Hines Ward said, is
Ben Roethlisberger.
Roethlisberger, whose
image and popularity were
badly damaged during a
March night of barhopping
in which he was accused
of assaulting a college stu-
dent, took the first public
steps Saturday in trying to
reconnect with his team-
mates.
, Roethlisberger, admit-
tedly not a good teammate
at times during his first six
NFL seasons, was more
outgoing and animated than
usual during the first of the
day's two practices. Ward
said the disgraced quarter-
back was clearly working
to improve his relationship
with. his teammates.
Drawing a six-game sus-
pension a punishment
that could be trimmed to


' i


'1' *i~'


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger throws
a pass during the first practice session at the NFL football
team's training camp in Latrobe, Pa., Saturday.


four and the public reac-
tion to his aberrant behav-
ior in Georgia apparently
convinced Roethlisberger
that changes were need-
ed, some teammates
suggested.
"For many years, people
didn't know what was really
going on with Ben," Ward
said. "He's starting to open


up and be more personal
with guys."
During the Steelers' off-
season workouts, Ward
said Roethlisberger should
apologize to his teammates
for getting suspended.
However, Ward said no such
apology was made during a
busy team meeting Friday
night.


JAGUARS: Wide receivers spots open

Continued From Page 1B


es for 453 yards and a touch-
down in '09. He also car-
.ried 12 times for 86 yards,
and returned kickoffs and
punts.
"We just need somebody
to say, 'I'm stepping up."'
Garrard said.
Denmarkand Underwood
stepped up during orga-
nized team activities. They
stood out in those spring/
summer workouts and got
a big confidence boost.
"It's been a huge differ-
ence," said Underwood, a
seventh-round pick from
Rutgers in 2009. "I'm more
confident this time arotmd.
I know what to expect I can
go about training camp like
a veteran."
Osgood and Williamson
are the veterans of the
group.
Osgood spent the past
seven seasons in San Diego
and made three Pro Bowls


ACROSS

1 Pelican or
finch
. 5 Ashen
8 Hear clearly
11 Indiana neigh-
bor
12 A Great Lake
114 Sonnet kin
15 Yellow trum-
pets
17 Rx monitor
18 Clear the wind-
shield
19 Rich pastry
21 Dueler's sword
23 Attendee's
shout
24 Rigs, as dice
27 Delight
29 Back muscle
30 Bookstore visi-
tors
34 Piece of jewel-
ry
37 Shrill bark
38 Refreshments
.39 Us, to Pogo


as a special teams ace. He
signed a three-year con-
tract worth $.675 million
with Jacksonville in March.
He received nearly $3 mil-
lion guaranteed, but got no
promises of more playing
time.
After catching just five
passes the past five years,
Osgood wants a bigger role.
But he has dropped several
passes thrown his way.
"It's all about being con-
sistent," Underwood said.
'We all have the talent to do
it. It's going to come down
to who's the most consis-
tent."
Williamson showed the
most consistency last pre-
season. The former first-
round bust in Minnesota
caught 12 passes for 247
yards and a touchdown,
and earned a starting spot
opposite Holt. But he tore
his right labrum in the'sec-


41 Hwys.
43 Miffed
45 Food tidbit
47 Like a he-man
50 Forest grazer
51 Natural magnet
54 Aurora locale
55 Walk heavily
56 Pub pints
57 Mountain curve
58 Physician's
org.
59 Break


DOWN


1 Slangy.
physique
2 - no idea!
3 Overrun with
4 Removed
5 Pack tightly
6 Jackie's
tycoon
7 Shade of green
8 Succeed (2
wds.)
9 A funny
Murphy


ond game of the season,
spent the rest of the year on
injured reserve and opened
the door for Sims-Walker.
Sims-Walkerfinished with
63 receptions for 869 yards
and seven touchdowns.
The Jaguars expect more
from him-this season, but
they realize they need
someone opposite him to
make it work like it did with
Smith and McCardell.
Hughes could be the guy.
He's certainly the under-
dog. Hughes surprisingly
earned a roster spot last
season, only to get waived
after dropping a fourth-
quarter pass in the end
zone against Arizona in
Week 2. He-'was in tears
after the game and couldn't
sleep after getting cut. But
he turned down several
offers to sign elsewhere and
rejoined Jacksonville's prac-
tice squad.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

PEC K PRE E N
CELLOS LOUVRE
ASSISI OTTERS
ROAN G ER SST
KENNEDY
FLA DOE YURT
WEDI LERE BEMOAN


TEABAGS


BBB ASK HENS


ETERNE RH ENO N
DAZ ED GENOW


Muscle injury
Forgo
Sorry!
Wine sediment
Departure
Attorney's deg.


25 Boathouse
gear
26 - standstill
28 Building site
30 Diner sand-
wich
31 Hurricane cen-
ter
32 NFL player
33 Observe
secretly
35 High notes
36 Art stands
39 Epochs
40 Flower prod-
uct
41 Castles for
Deep Blue
42 Deuce beaters
44 Psi follower
45 Dept. store
inventory
46 Entertainer -
Falana
48 Golfer's. target
49 Binary system
digits
52 Monk's title
53 DC zone


8-2 @2010 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


y


?I,









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


Rockies amaze Cubs with major league record


By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press

DENVER-The Chicago
Cubs don't want to hear
anything about the humi-
dor making Coors Field a
pitcher's park.
The Colorado Rockies
made it look like the old
Coors Canaveral launch-
ing pad when they batted
around three times and
nearly a fourth in a 17-2
romp of the Cubs on Friday
night
The game was still tight
- 5-2 with runners at
the corners and two'outs
in the bottom of the eighth.
Rockies closer Huston
Street was warming up in
the bullpen, ready to go for
a save.
Then, the Rockies set
a major league record by
pounding out .11 consecu-
tive hits.
By the time Ian Stewart
flied out to deep center with
the bases full to end the
inning, the Rockies had set
several franchise records:
a dozen runs in the inning
on 13 hits, eight of them
for extra bases, in 18 plate
appearances.
According to STATS
LLC, the 12 two-out runs is
the most since March 21,
1956, when the Kansas City
Athletics scored 13 times
with two outs in the second
inning of a game against the
Chicago White Sox. And
the eight extra-base hits
in the eighth inning tied a
major league mark set by


Cleveland last season.
The 12 runs tied the NL
record accomplished twice
by the Dodgers when they
played in Brooklyn, the
last time coming on.Aug. 8,
1954, against Cincinnati.
The Rockies fell one hit
shy of 12 straight in a game,
a record set by the 1920 St.
Louis Cardinals and tied by
the Dodgers a decade later.
The Rockies' previous best
was seven straight hits in
an inning.
The Boston Red Sox were
the last team to bat around
twice in an inning, on June
26, 2003, when they scored
14 in the first inning against
Florida. ,
Colorado established a
number of other franchise
records in the 17-2 rout:
12 extra-base hits in a
game (old mark seven).
8 extra base hits in an
inning (six).
12 runs in an inning
(11).
13 hits in an inning
(nine).
18 plate appearances in
an inning (16).
seven players with
multiple RBIs (five).
"This game makes you
twirl your head some-
times," said winning pitch-
er Jeff Francis. "There's no
reason .for something like
that to happen. This is a
team that's been looking
for some hits for a long time
now and you pound out 13
in one inning?
"It's just nuts. Those guys
are major league pitchers."


The Rockies batted
around twice in the inning
against relievers Sean
Marshall, Andrew Cashner
and Brian Schlitter. Troy
Tulowitzki had two dou-
bles and three RBIs, Clint
Barmes and Melvin Mora
also had two hits and Brad
Hawpe and Chris lannetta
reached base twice in the
inning. Dexter Fowler and
Ian Stewart both hit two-
run homers.
Every batter got at least
one hit in the eighth.
"I haven't seen anything
like that at any level,"
Tulowitzki said. "That was
special, something you'll
never see again."
After all, Carlos Gonzalez
had two strikes on him with
two outs when he started
the streak with an RBI sin-
gle to right that made it
6-2.
"You're just trying to
extend the inning, not try
to do too much, put the ball
in play," Tulowitzki said.
And they did, over and
over and over.
All the hits were squared
up, too. There were no
cheap flares or batters stick-
ing their bats out and reach-
ing base on bloops between
fielders.
Even the last out was hit
hard.
"Those were good pitch-
ers they're throwing out
there," Tulowitzki said. "It
wasn't like they're guys that
just got called up. Those
guys had good numbers."
"Had" being the opera-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Colorado Rockies' lan Stewart falls to the ground after being brushed back by Chicago Cubs'
pitcher, Brian Schlitter; in the eighth inning of a baseball game at Coors Field in Denver, Colo.
on Friday.


tive word.
Marshall allowed five
earned runs in two-thirdi
of an inning. Cashner
allowed six earned runs
without recording an out
and Schlitter allowed a hit,
two walks and a run before
dousing the rally.
By the time the Cubs got
the third out about half
an-hour after the inning
started Clint Barmes was
on deck about to bat for the
third time in the inning.
Mora, who pinch-hit early
in the eighth, worked up a
sweat.
"I told Mora he played
a helluva game tonight,"
Rockies manager Jim Tracy


cracked. "You don't get to
do that very often. Two at-
bats 'and he blisters two
balls."
The Cubs couldn't
believe what had happened
to them.
"You don't expect an
inning like that, a big one,
.anywhere," Cubs manager
Lou Piniella said. "This is
a tough park to pitch in
at times. Sometimes the
breaking ball doesn't break
as well up here in the light
air."9
Piniella said he felt sorry
for his pitchers, who had'no
answers.
"It was as dumbfounding
for us as it was people to


watch the game," Marshall
said. "You hate to be on
the receiving end. Nobody
has ever seen anything like
this. I don't think it's going
to happen again."
It might have looked
like batting practice, but
both the Cubs pitchers and
Rockies hitters insisted the
pitches weren't grooved.
"They made some good
swings on some pretty
good pitches," Marshall
said. "Gonzalez hit a ball
that almost bounced and
Tulowitzki hit a ball that was
down. This is a tough place to
pitch. The ball doesn't break
quite- as much as anywhere
else. It was a crazy inning."


Westbrook, Ludwick, Lilly,


Wood move, Berkman goes


By BEN WALKER
Associated Press

Former -All-Stars Jake
Westbrook, Ted Lilly, Ryan
Ludwick and Kerry Wood
were traded Saturday as
pennant contenders played
a game of beat-the-clock.
Lance Berkman went to
the World Series cham-
.pion New York Yankees
after rejecting the Chicago
White' Sox.
Octavio Dotel, Rick
Ankiel, Kyle Farnsworth,
Chad Quails and Ryan
Theriot also joined the
playoff chase and Ryan
Church highlighted a five-
player deal between last-
place teams.
The swaps came as
clubs scrambled before the
4 p.m. deadline for mak-
ing trades without waivers.
It was a day full .of deals
between haves and have-
nots veterans for pros-
pects, mostly.
The NL Central-leading
St. Louis Cardinals were
the prime players in a
three-team trade, getting
Westbrook from Cleveland
and sending Ludwick to NL
Central-leading San Diego.
"I'm excited to go to a
club that's contending for
a playoff spot and pitch
in some meaningful ball-
games," Westbrook said.
"That's why you play the
game, to get a chance to
play in the playoffs and
I look forward to doing
that."
Westbrookwas scratched
before he was set to start
at Toronto. Ludwick leaves
a crowded outfield in St.
Louis.
The Yankees, plucked
Wood from Cleveland,
shortly after finishing off
the deal to get Berkman
from Houston. The
Astros sent $4 million and
Berkman, the Yankees'
new designated hitter, for
reliever Mark Melancon
and minor league infielder
Jimmy Paredes.
The AL Central-leading
White Sox had a deal in
place for Berkman, general
manager Kenny Williams
said. But because Berkman
is a. 10-and-5 player 10
years in the majors, the last
five with the same team
- the slugger could turn
it down. Instead, he chose


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Newly-acquired New York Yankees' Lance.Berkman meets
with the media prior to a baseball game against the Tampa
Bay Rays, Saturday, in St. Petersburg.


the Yankees.
"What, is the most frus-
trating part is we actually
did get something done
and unfortunately the
player had other ideas and
wanted to be somewhere
else. But we did come to
an agreement on a deal and
you're at the mercy of con-'
tract sometimes," Williams
said.
"He sent me a message
and said it wasn't personal
but he had already had
conversations with Andy
Pettitte and their best friend
and that's kind of what was
in his mind, his family's
mind," Williams said.
In other deals:
NL East-leading
Atlanta acquired outfielder
Rick Ankiel, reliever Kyle
Farnsworth and cash from
Kansas City for pitchers
Tim Collins and Jesse
Chavez and outfielder
Gregor Blanco.
The Los Angeles
Dodgers, seven games
behind San Diego, got the
left-handed Lilly, Theriot
and about $2.5 million
from the Chicago Cubs for
infielder Blake DeWitt and


minor league right-hand-
ers Kyle Smit and Brett
Wallach. The Dodgers
also boosted their bullpen
by obtaining Dotel from
Pittsburgh.
AL West-leading Texas
traded catcher Jarrod
Saltalamacchia to Boston
for pitcher Roman Mendez,
first baseman Chris
McGuiness, a player to be
named later and cash.
Tampa Bay got Qualls
from Arizona for a player to
be named. The 31-year-old
righty reliever was 1-4 with
12 saves and an 8.29 ERA.
San Francisco sent
pitcher Joe Martinez and
outfielder John Bowker to
Pittsburgh for left-handed
reliever Javier Lopez.
Arizona sent catcher
Chris Snyder, minor league
shortstop Pedro Ciriacp
and cash to the Pirates
for outfielder Church, for-
mer AL Rookie of the Year
Bobby Crosby and right-
hander D.J. Carrasco in a
trade between last-place
teams.
Detroit traded out-
fielder Wilkin Ramirez to
Atlanta for a player to be


named or cash.
Florida got lefty
reliever Will Ohman
from Baltimore for
minor league righty Rick
VandenHurk.
Texas also completed its
trade for Cristian Guzman,
getting the infielder and
cash from Washington
for right-handers Tanner
Roark and Ryan Tatusko.
The active Rangers made.
several deals in the days
leading up the dead-
line, acquiring ace Cliff
Lee and infielder Jorge
Cantu.
Earlier this week,
Houston traded ace Roy
Oswalt to Philadelphia,
Cleveland sent outfield-
er Austin Kearns to the
Yankees, Kansas City
moved outfielder Scott
Podsednik to the Dodgers
and Minnesota got All-
Star reliever Matt Capps
from Washington.
Teams still can' make
trades for the rest. of the
s season, but it gets more
tricky. Players must first
pass through waivers,
meaning any club can get
an opportunity to claim
them before a deal is
done.
Deals must be completed
before Aug. 31 for a player
to be eligible for the post-
season with his new team.
Westbrook was set to
start for the Indians, but
aware a deal might be
brewing. He left the club-
house for a flight to St.
Louis.
The 32-year-old righty
was 6-7 with a 4.65 ERA for
Cleveland. Ludwick, a 32-
year-old outfielder, hit .281
with 11 home runs and 43
RBIs this season.
Cleveland sent .cash to
the Cardinals and Padres,
and got minor league pitch-
er Corey Kluber from San
Diego the 24-year-old
righty led the Texas League
in strikeouts. St. Louis also
acquired minor league lefty
Nick Greenwood from San
Diego.
"We've been looking for
a quality starting pitcher
to add to our rotation for
some time," Cardinals
general manager John
Mozeliak said in a state-
ment. 'Westbrook is some-
one we've had our eyes on
for a good period of time."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
-Washington Redskins quarterback Donovan McNabb warms
up at the NFL football team's training camp, Saturday at
Redskins Park in Ashburn, Va.

Same faces, new places


* By DENNIS WASZAK Jr.
Associated Press

Call it training camp with
* a twist: plenty of old faces in
new places this summer, all
looking for fresh starts.
It's making for some
strange sights around the
NFL, starting with it's
still weird to see in print -
Washington Redskins quar-
terback Donovan McNabb.
"Obviously, this is a dif-
ferent change from what
I'm used to," said McNabb,
who went from Philadelphia
to fling footballs for a team
he once loved to beat. "But
there are days in life you go
through change and find
out sometimes there's a
positive light on the other
side of the tunnel."
Jason Taylor is also
behind enemy lines now,
in camp with the New York
Jets after years of trading
.insults with them and their
fans while in Miami.
"The first few days," the
NFL's active sacks leader
said with a grin, "were a
little strange."
Think watching Brett
Favre in a Vikings uniform
last season and maybe
this one, too was just
plain weird? How about
LaDainian Tomlinson as a
member of the Jets, trying
to prove he still has plenty
left? Several other estab-
lished players have joined


Tomlinson and Taylor
in New York, including
Santonio Holmes, Antonio
Cromartie, Brodney Pool
and Mark Brunell.
"I can't wait to get to train-
ing camp in Cortland, when
we put the pads on and
see those guys out there,"
coach Rex Ryan said.
The Jets have also sent a
handful of big names pack-
ing, including Thomas Jones
(Chiefs), Leon Washington
(Seahawks), Lito Sheppard
(Vikings) and a trio of new
Cardinals in Alan Faneca,
Kerry Rhodes and Jay Feely.
This from a team that fell one
win short of a Super Bowl
appearance last season.
"Chemistry issues, I don't
think we'll have those,"
quarterback Mark Sanchez
said. 'With Rex, he's the
great equalizer. We'll be
fine."
Terrell Owens was one
free agent who waited
around a while before sign-
ing with Cincinnati earlier
this week. Although he's on
the downside of his 'career,
Owens might be rejuvenat-
ed by the thought of team-
ing with his buddy, Chad
Ochocinco.
"I think to myself: When's
the last time you had two
receivers on the same field
of this caliber on the same
team at the same tinm?"
said an excited Ochocinco.
"This is going to be scary."


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









4B

MIAMI
Continued From Page 1B

resisted any temptation to
whoop, but he smiled when
asked what impressed him
about Marshall in the first
two practices.
"He does have great
physical ability," Sparano
said. "You don't always get
a chance to watch a real
topflight big receiver."
Sean Smith agreed. He
was the cornerback burned
by Marshall's combination
of finesse and strength on
both long completions.
"He showed me some-
thing new I'd never seen
before," Smith said. "He's
a vet. He has been around
and showed me some new
tricks out there."
That rare talent is the
reason Miami traded two
second-round draft picks
to the Broncos in April for
Marshall, then gave him a
four-year contract extension
worth an average of about
$10 million a year through
2014.
In Denver, Marshall
caught at least 100 passes
each of the past three years
and made the Pro Bowl in
2008-09, yet still wore out
his welcome. He clashed
with coach Josh McDaniels,
and a long legal record'
leaves him one strike from a
yearlong NFL suspension.
Marshall says he learned
from his mistakes, and he
has received an A in com-
portment since joining the
Dolphins. Sparano praises
Marshall's work ethic 'and
leadership, as well as his
skills.
"You'll see himn with his
arm around some of these
young players, and he's
talking them through some
of the things he has done,"
Sparano said. "He has been
unselfish. That's something
I appreciate and have been
impressed with."
For the Dolphins,
Marshall's most important
relationship will be with
Henne, and it's a work in
progress. Hip surgery in
May curtailed Marshall's
offseason regimen, and tim-
ing between a receiver and
quarterback only comes
with time.
"We've got a long way
to go," Marshall said, "but
the first game isn't until
September. This is what the
preseason is for. We have a
lot of time to get it right."
Henne is familiar with
the rewards of a rangy
receiver as a freshman
at Michigan, he threw
15 touchdown passes to
Braylon Edwards. In his
first year as an NFL starter
last season, Henne worked
with an unimposing pass-
catching group, and he's
quick to recognize the 6-
foot-4 Marshall as an invit-
ing target.
"Brandon is very
smooth," Henne said. "He
understands how to run the
routes, and he understands
how to use his body. You can
tell that you've got a really
good guy out there that can
glide and is very smooth
throughout his cuts."
In the Dolphins' first two
seasons under Sparano,-
they've been a run-orient-
ed, ball-control team. Their
wideouts totaled six touch-
downs last season; Marshall
had 10 in Denver.
Sparano has tweaked
the playbook, eager to take
advantage of his big offsea-
son catch and improve on
last season's 7-9 record.
"When we got Brandon,"
Sparano said, "I told the
offensive coaches, 'I want
you to put together all the
things that this guy does
well.' You go through the
film, and all of a suidden


you're at 40 or 50 plays.
You watch him on tape'at
Denver, you see some of the
things he really does well.
Some of these concepts
weren't completely in our
offense, so we were able to
take some of those things."
On a team lacking star
power, Marshall has quick-
ly become the face of the
franchise. Because his
familiar No. 15 was taken,
he switched to No. 19, and
it's already a popular jersey
number with spectators at
training camp.


LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


BRYANT: Cowboys have wide receiver depth with Crayton


Continued From Page 1B

the depth chart for now.
"I'm glad he's here,"
receivers coach Ray
Sherman said after the first
practice Saturday. "I tell
you what, he is valuable."
Cowboys owner Jerry
Jones described Bryant as
being "disappointed" and
"bothered" that he will miss
preseason games after get-
ting hurt late in practice
Friday.
Though the Cowboys
have an extended camp
with five preseason games,
beginning with the Hall
of Fame game next week-
end, the injury could keep


Bryant from playing until
the regular season. The
last preseason game is at
home Sept. 2, which is less
than five weeks away. The
season opener is Sept. 12 at
Washington.
"It's a very typical high
ankle, but very stable,"
Jones said. "So it should,
without any surgery, mend
completely and be ready to
go. He's a young guy and
you'd bet that he'd be on
the downside of it"
Just before the team's
second practice started
Saturday afternoon, Bryant
was wearing a protective


Save


boot on his right foot when
he momentarily came out
of the tunnel onto the field.
He waved to cheering fans
on his way back out of
sight.
The day after Bryant
got hurt, Crayton made a
one-handed grab on a pass
from Tony Romo and later
got wide open to catch a
touchdown on a halfback
pass from Marion Barber.
After the Cowboys draft-
ed Bryant 24th overall in
April, Crayton was given
permission to seek a trade
and indicated that he want-.
ed to be released from his


contract that goes through.
next season. The seventh-
year receiver skipped most
voluntary offseason work-
outs but was at all manda-
tory workouts this summer
and has worked hard as
always during camp.
"He's got a contract, and
that's been my stance from
the very beginning," Jones
responded, when asked if
Bryant's injury guarantees
Crayton a spot on the 53-
man roster.
"People have got to
understand the value. He's
not a flashy type player.
He's a guy who goes about


it in a workmanlike fash-
ion and just goes about and
does his job," Sherman said.
"He just took care of his
business and got himself
in great shape. He didn't
worry about what's being
said,or this or that. That's
what you've got to do.
"It's a business.
Sometimes things happen.
He's still here, and I'm glad
he's here."
Crayton had. declared
himself a $2 million "insur-
ance policy" his sala-
ry for 2010 after the
Cowboys didn't trade or
release him. I


here.


Let's face it. Right now, we're all looking to save. And


you probably don't expect to save in the same place


where you find great quality; and get treated nicely. But


actually, at Publix you'll find thousands of items on sale


every day-clearly marked, easy to find, with savings


highlighted on the shelf and again on your receipt. You'll


notice Publix brand products, priced lower than national


brands without compromising quality. And along the


way, you'll get helpful service you can't quite put a price


on. So, even when you're shopping on a budget, you


don't have to give up the experience you deserve.


Love to shop here. Love to save here.




Publix.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


1. '..'...g4,* '. .-.. '', i '^ i 1 -'1 "^
,. *,:; ', r ', '. "
"i .. . ." ' -. .' .;-'"-. ;
', : .. ,











Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@lakeatyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


Sunday,August I, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


CHAMBER CORNER


Dennille Folsom
(386) 752-3690


Chamber's

value for

members

class where the topic
was "Providing value
to your chamber
members."
It was emphasized in my
class that as a chamber, we
must be an advocate for
our members and provide
training and leadership
opportunities.
A chamber must be a
source for information
on important issues and
events that will affect .
our community. A cham-
ber must also search for
informed speakers and
classes to provide its mem-
bers the ability to learn
and grow and ultimately
increase the success of
their businesses.
The Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber is pleased
to announce that it has
three ways to provide its
members value by offering
advocacy, information and
training opportunities.
The Lake City Columbia
County Chamber wants its
members to be informed
on the candidates and
issues in the upcoming
election.
In conjunction with
Florida Gateway College
and The Lake City Reporter,
the chamber is proud to be
able to present Candidate
Forum 2010.
This program will allow
voters the opportunity to
see and hear from the can-'
didates running for public
office. It also provides vot-
ers with a chance to get a
better idea of where the
candidates stand on today's
critical issues.
During this primary
Candidate Forum, voters
will hear from Republican
candidates running for
State Representative
District 11, City Council
District 10, County
Commission District 2
and County Commission
District 4.
The program will air live
from 7 to 9 p.m. on Aug.
3 on the Florida Gateway
College channel, which is
Comcast channel 8, and
will continue to be replayed
until the primary elections
on Aug. 24. Do not forget
early voting will begin on
Aug. 9.
Take advantage of the
opportunity to vote!
The third installment of
the Better Business Series
will be presented 7:30 to 9:30
a.m. on Aug. 19 at Florida
Gateway College gym. Greta
Schulz will be speaking on,
"How to turn every chamber
event into an opportunity for
more business."
Tickets for members are
$15 (nonmembers $20) and
includes breakfast. Tickets
may be purchased by calling
the chamber.
Finally, the chamber
would like to encourage
everyone to find out more
information about the Dale
Carnegie class being pre-
sented by the Lake City-
Columbia County Chamber
and The Lake City Reporter
For more information
on becoming a chamber
member or any of the events
above, please give me a call
at 752-3690.

* Dennille Folsom is the
executive director of the
Lake City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce.


Bob Rinehart (left), 64, and his grandson Josh Calleaux, 23, stack boxes in the garage of a three-bedroom, two-bathroom home that Rinehart closed on last
week. Rinehart moved into the 2,078-square-foot brick ranch home, located at 259 Southwest Ventura Lane, on Wednesday.


RD


TRE


Government aid for first-time buyers


helps spur sales in real estate market


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Realtor sales in
the Lake City-
Live Oak mar-
ket increased
from 32 in June
2009 to 44 for June 2010,
according to the Florida
Sales Report for single-
family, existing homes.
"It's a pretty significant
jump," said Dan Gherna,
executive vice president
and CEO of the Lake
City Board of Realtors.
"Basically
that is "A I
because
June 30 prope
was the have not
original because
date for
the home- were r
buyer tax rushing t
credit. That's wl
People was a si
were rush- a s
ing to increase
close sales numb
by June
30." Dan Gt
The mar- Executive vic
ket follows and C
a statewide Lake City Boar
trend with
the major-
ity of markets seeing
some increase.
President Barack
Obama signed a bill on
June 30 to extend the
closing of sales until Sept.'
30.
"A lot of properties
have not closed because
people were really rush-
ing to close," Gherna
said. 'That's why there
was a significant increase
in the numbers."
The numbers are a'
very good thing for the
area thanks to the tax
credit, Gherna said.
"It was a great deal
that really pushed and
propelled some of the
fence sitters to jump off
the fence and buy their
dream home," he said.
The median sales price
of homes saw a slight
decrease of three percent
this quarter. For June
2010 it was $119,500 com-
pared to $122,950 in 2009.
Statewide, there was


a 5 percent decrease of
$141,000 in June 2010
compared to $147,700 in
2009.
Nearby markets,
Jacksonville and
Gainesville also had price
decreases.
Gainesville went
down by 4 percent
from $178,300 in 2009
to $171,000 in 2010.
Jacksonville had a 9 per-
cent decrease of $162,100
to $147,5000.
The economy played a
part in the median sales


At of
rties
closed
people
really
:o close.
iy there
nificant
a in the
ers."

herna
e president
EO0
d of Realtors


prices in
Lake City-
Live Oak,
Gherna said.
"Because
we did have
a lot of first-
time home
buyers, they
were buying
homes under
the $150,00
range," he
said. '"The
homes sold
were in the
lower price
range."
The
$150,000


and below market prices
have somewhat stabilized,
but the higher-end prices,
which is $200,000 and up,
have deceased, Gherna
said.
"There is not a market
for those homes," he said.
"There is a lot of supply
but little demand."
The Lake City-Live Oak'
market is lagging behind
the rest of the state
because it doesn't have
the same amount of dis-
tress sales, which include
foreclosures.
A broker in Orlando
told Gherna that 70
percent of his sales are
distress properties, he
said. Only about 30 to 33
percent of the sales in the
Lake City-Live Oak area
are distress sales.
"We don't have the bar-
gain inventory," Gherna
said. "We're a smaller
market.
The area had a period
of boorling sales between
2004 and 2006, he said.


But now there is a lot
of supply and very lntk
demand.
The Florida Sales Report


Sue Towns


is based on a survey of tions. Only homes sold in
MNultiple Listing Service the area that went through
sales levels from Florida's the service are listed in the
Realtor boards and associa- report.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


Investing in Do-Gooders T I yI

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Chrysler to add 900 jobs to midsize-car plant


By TOM KRISHER
Associated Press
DETROIT Chrysler
Group LLC said Friday
that it will add nearly 900
jobs at a factory in subur-
ban Detroit and spare it
from a planned closure.
The decision is a show of
optimism that consumers
will embrace the compa-
ny's refurbished midsize
sedans.
The automaker made
the announcement at anoth-
er Detroit-area plant just
before President Barack
Obama spoke there about
the success of the govern-
ment-funded auto industry
bailout
The jobs will staff a
second shift at Chrysler's
assembly plant in Sterling
Heights, Mich., just north
, of Detroit, which makes the
slow-selling Dodge Avenger
and Chrysler Sebring mid-
size sedans.
In the fall, the company .
plahs to start selling new
versions of the cars that it
says will be updated from
top to bottom. The sec-
ond shift will begin in the


first quarter of next year,
Chrysler said.
Chrysler CEO Sergio
Marchionne told reporters
that the Sterling Heights
factory will stay open
beyond its planned closing
date in 2012. In addition
to the updated Sebring
and Avenger, the plant will
get the next-generation
Chrysler midsize car that
will be on a new undercar-
riage, Marchionne said.
Companies that make
parts for the Sebring and
Avenger, and the Sebring
convertible, which also is
built at the plant, are expect-
ed to add 500 jobs.
The announcement was
made at the Jefferson North'
factory in Detroit where
the Jeep Grand.Cherokee
is made. Obama toured the
plant and later Friday was
to visit a General Motors
factory that makes the
Chevrolet Volt rechargeable
electric car.
The company "probably"
will add a third shift to
the Jefferson North plant
after it starts making a new
Dodge Durango sport utility
vehicle in the fourth quar-


ter. But that will depend on
demand for the new vehicle,
Marchionne said.
It recently added about
1,100 workers at the plant
for a second shift to make
the Grand Cherokee.
Marchionne said the
additional jobs at Sterling
Heights would be a combi-
nation of laid-off workers
from other factories and
new hires. He said he did
not know how many jobs
would be created but said
some of the new hires will
make around $14 an hour,
about half the pay of older
workers.
Workers from factories
that Chrysler is closing
in Twinsburg, Ohio, near
Cleveland; Racine, Wis.,
near Milwaukee; and in
Detroit will be offered
jobs in Sterling Heights,
Chrysler spokeswoman
Jodi Tinson said.
The number of new hires
depends on how many
workers from the plants
that are closing decide to
move or retire, she said.
Through June, Chrysler
sold just over 42,000
Sebrings and Avengers


combined. But that was far
behind the 154,000 midsize
Camrys sold by Toyota
Motor Corp. The Camry
is the top-selling car in the
U.S.


The 1,270 workers at the
Sterling Heights plant
have had to worry about
the plant closing since
Chrysler's bankruptcy.
But they were thrilled


with the company's
announcement of a solid
future, said Russell
Phillips, a union official
and 24-year Chrysler
employee.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama examines the car door during his tour Friday of the Jefferson North
Chrysler Plant in Detroit, where the Jeep Grand Cherokee is assembled.


1 Matthew N. Greene, CFP
Certified Financial PlannerTM
Sln:cilmert Professionals, Inc.
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1


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


<
1











Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW oTHE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW





The Week in Review


A NYSE
6,998.99 +33.88


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AtlasPplH 8.94 +3.57 +66.5
AtlasPpin 18.04 +5.50 +43.9
GrtAtiPac 3.46 +.85 +32.6
GrmrcypfA 12.27 +2.95 +31.7
MSEngy12 22.59 +5.39 +31.3
Stonerdg 10.71 +1.98 +22.7
GIbSAIIW n21.85 +3.85 +21.4
ChinaMM 2.58 +.44 +20.6
ConsEP 3.78 +.60 +18.9
K-Sea 6.70 +1.04 +18.4

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Covance 38.76-13.10 -25.3
ComScop 20.34 -6.31 -23.7
PMI Grp 3.13 -.72 -18.7
MEMC 9.56 -2.12 -18.2
EKodak 3.97 -.88 -18.1
Valhi 13.97 -2.99 -17.6
SeaBrght 8.19 -1.70 -17.2
LSI Corp 4.03 -.82 -16.9
BIdBear 6.05 -1.09 -15.3
NoahEduc 2.90 -.52 -15.2

Most Active (st or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citigrp 18729252 4.10 +.08
S&P500ETF8917842110.27 -.14
BkofAm 6874847 14.04 +.30
SprintNex 5143629 4.57 -.12
FordM 4469540 12.77 +.05
SPDR Fnd3382510 14.71 +.15
GenElec 3308187 16.12 +.41
iShR2K 3207289 65.02 +.04
iShEMkts 2679818 41.40 +.25
Pfizer 2584210 15.00 +.42

Diary
Advanced 1,884
Declined 1,285
New Highs 461
New Lows 53
Total issues 3,215
Unchanged 46
Volume 21,815,995,856


Amex 3 Nasdaq
1,894.43 -14.18 2,254.70 -14.77


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Augustag 2.19 +.46 +26.6
FiveStar 3.65 +.74 +25.4
ChiMetRur 2.25 +.35 +18.4
EastemCo 16.64 +2.54 +18.0
TravelCtrs 2.71 +.40 +17.3
ASpecRtos 12.01 +1.66 +16.0
Aerosonic 3.70 +.50 +15.6
EvolPetrol 5.65 +.76 +15.5
HstnAEn 10.73 +1.39 +14.9
LGLGrp 12.56 +1.55 +14.1

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
HMG 3.44 -.91 -20.9
OrienPapn 4.45 -.78 -14.9
ChinaNet 4.10 -.71 -14.8
StreamGun 5.57 -.93 -14.3
ProlorBio 5.95 -.80 -11.9
CAMAC n 3.60 -.40 -10.0
GpoSimec 6.69 -.71 -9.6
Tofutti 3.20 -.30 -8.6
EngySvcs 3.15 -.26 -7.6
SDgo pfB 16.05 -1.25 -7.2

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
AmO&G 374467 7.32 +.80
VantageDrI 347843 1.33 +.21
GoldStr g 102782 4.09 -.06
SamsO&G. 94214 1.26 -.01
NovaGldg 93128 6.19 -.23
NwGoldg. 73184 4.97 -.06
OrienPapn 68132 4.45 -.78
Kemet 59152 3.22 -.03
KodiakOg 58715 3.35 -.05
DenisnM g 54780 1,52 +.29

Diary
Advanced -336
Declined 196
New Highs 36
New Lows 22
Total issues 563
Unchanged 31
Volume 379,720,657


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SumFWV 3.40 +.00 +41.6
BeasleyB 5.57 +1.63 +41.4
Exceed wt 2.85 +.83 +41.1
TxCapBwt 9.40 +2.60 +38.2
InnovSol 6.03 +1.63 +37.0
ArenaPhm 7.95 +2.04 +34.5
HSW Intrs 5.91 +1.51 +34.3
Primoridswt 2.29 +.54 +30.9
ValleyRn 4.58 +1.08 +30.9
TmbrindBc 3,95 +.90 +29.5

Losers ($2 or more)'
Name Last Chg %Chg
TeleNav n 5.44 -3.54 -39.4
BioScrip 4.25 -2.25 -34.6
VistaPrt 33,05-17.16 -34.2
NtwkEq 3.12 -1.21 -27.9
EdacTech 3.97 -1.50 -27.4
DJSPEnt 3.73 -1.25 -25.1
CapBNC 2.50 -.83 -24,9
Wowjoint 2.63 -.82 -23.8
AsialnfoL 20.40 -6.13 -23.1
MackFn 5.20 -1.55 -23.0

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ351466545,81 -.25
Microsoft 3451677 25.81
Intel 3048799 20.60-1.09
SiriusXM 2338386 1.03 +.05
MicronT 2118606 7.28-1.20
Cisco 2062219 23.07 -.28
Oracle 1587434 23.64 -.86
Nvidia 1531005 9.19 -1.17
MarvellT 1195254 14.92-1.55
Comcast 1170203 19.47 +.15

Diaryz
Advanced 1,500
Declined 1,316
New Highs 182
New Lows 94
Total issues 2,890
Unchanged 74
Volume 10,562,969,252


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg


AT&T Inc NY 1.68 25.94
AMD NY ... 7.49
AutoZone NY ... 211.57
BkofAm NY .04 14.04
BobEvans Nasd .72 26.22
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 12.07
CSX NY .96 52.72
Chevron NY 2.88 76.21
Cisco Nasd ... 23.07
Citigrp NY 4.10
CocaCI NY 1.76 55.11
Delhaize NY 2.02 74.43
DirFnBear NY ... 13.82
DrxFBull sNY .15 22.61
ExxonMbI NY 1.76 59.68
FamilyDIr NY .62 41.35
FordM NY ... 12.77
GenElec NY .48 16.12
HomeDp NY .95 28.51
iShEMkts NY .59 41.40
iShR2K NY -.77 65.02
Intel Nasd .63 20.60
JPMorgCh NY .20 40.28
LVSands NY ... 26.86
Lowes NY .44 20.74
MGM Rsts NY ... 10.86
MarvellT Nasd ... 14.92
McDnlds NY 2.20 69,73


+.40
-.33
+4.57


+1.6 -7.5
-4.2 -22.6
+2.2 +33.8
+2.2 -6.8
+1.7 -9.5
+8.7 -24.5
+0.1 +8.7
+3.7 -1.0
-1.2 -3.6
+2.0 +23.9
+0.7 -3.3
-2.7 -3.0
-3.2 -28.9
+2.9 -8.5
-0.1 -12.5
+4.8 +48.6
+0.4 +27.7
+2.6 +6.5
+0.9 -1.5
+0.6 -.2
+0.1 +4.1
-5.0 +1.0
+1.1 -3.2
+5.2 +79.8
-1.8 -11.3
+3.2 +19.1
-9.4 -28.1
-0.2 +11.7


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex DIv Last Chg %Chg %Chg


MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .52
Motorola NY
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd ...
Nvidia Nasd ...
OcciPet NY 1.52
Oracle Nasd .20
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .40,
PwShso QQQNasd .26
PrUShS&PNY
QwestCm NY .32
RegionsFn NY .04
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.22
SearsHIdgsNasd ...
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY
SPDR FnclNY .17
TimeWam NY .85
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo'NY .20
YRC Wwd h Nasd ..


7.28 -1.20 -14.2 -31.1
25.81 ... ... -15.2
7.49 -.26 -3.4 -3.5
8.74 -.51 -5.5 -29.3
52.30 -.51 -1.0 -1.C
9.00 ... ... -13.9
,9.19 -1.17 -11.3 -50.8
77.93 -4.21 -5.1 -4.2
23.64 -.86 -3.5 -3.6
24.63 -.43 -1.7 -7.4
64.91 +.46 +0.7 +6.8
15.00 +.42 +2.9 -17.5
104.87 +6.49 +6.6 -3.3
45.81 -.25 -0.5 +.1
32.56 +.04 +0.1 -7.1
5.66 +.02 +0.4 +34.4
7.33 +.68 +10.2 +38.6
43.67 +.42 +1.0 +6.1
110.27 -.14 -0.1 -1.(
71.00 +3.43 +5.1 -14.9
1.03 +.05 +5.2 +71.7
35.33 -.10 -0.3 +6.0
4.57 -.12 -2.6 +24.9
14.71 +.15 +1.0 +2.2
31.46 +.09 +0.3 +8.(
51.19 -.48 -0.9 -4.2
27.73 +.31 +1.1 +2.
.40 +.06 +16.9 -53.1


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks, pt = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units, vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wl =
When issued.' wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets, d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fea. f = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galnera and
Losers must be worth pt least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actlves must be worth at least $1. Volume In
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.14 0.15
6-month 0.19 0.19
5-year 1.59 1.72
10-year 2.90 2.99
30-year 3.97 4.02


Currencies
Last Pvs Day


uj:lrir al.


BE .ra.r, 1t .9' 1 ,.- C
Canada 1.0295 1.0359
Euro .7661 .7646


Japan
Moevicn


86.34 86.98
12.6430 12.7275


Switzerlnd 1.0401 1.0425
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


j Ii


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones Industrials 100.81 12.26 -39.81 -30.72 -1.22
Close: 10,465.94 ) )
3 1-week change: 41.32 (0.4%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
11,500





S 1,500








7 _MUTUAL FUNDS
m0 Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pcl Min In'
n9 ame OIj iSMIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Inft
C l :


P'iMC -', T.:.I llA 11
'. r,,u.,d,ii I. l[Jl, Lb
American Funds GrthAmA m LG
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Fidelity Contra LG
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS
American Funds IncAmerA m MA
Vanguard 5001nv LB
Vanguard Instldxl LB
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB
Dodge & Cox Stock LV
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV
PIMCO TotRetAdm b Cl
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA
Arnr. er, Fu,.j4 J,,1 PerspA m WS
merr,:,n Funr.: 6l3A ,'I MA
Arr,.r.:ar, Fur,.l. F.ilrnA m LB
PIP.MCO T.rRlRA r, Cl
v.il,'r ji,, i T.:,illS .IT, LB
A,T,r-,:jr Fur).; Er,dA m *Cl
V ,.qj v 3vWAIIt, MA
Vanguard 500Adml LB
Fidelity Divrlntl d FB
Fidelity GrowCo LG
Vanguard Totlntl d FB


58,394
52,393
51,938
47,349
46,079
44,145
43,384
42,830
37,018
34,013
33,997
.33,304
33,120
29,810
28,582
28,053
27,888
27,822
27,667
27,417
27,112
26,583
24,666
24,664
23,838


+10.1/D
+9.7/C
+15.2/A
+9.6/D
+15.1/A
+13.7/B
+13.8/B
+10.8/0
+13.0/C
+8.7/B
+13.9/B
+12.3/B
+12.3/A
+17.8/A
+11.4/C
+12.8/B
+12.9/C
+12.0/C
+15.1/A
+11.6/C
+12.1/C
+13.8/B
+6.1/C
+16.5/A
+9.0/B


iJL I *."**',
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 5 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 1,000,000
NL 2,500
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
5.75 250
3.75 1,000
NL 100,000
3.75 250
NL 10,0.3
NL 100,,JO
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
NL 3,000


CA -Conservinve Allocation, Cl -Intermediate-Te Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign
Large Value, IH -World Alocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -arge Value, MA -Moderate Allocaton, MB -Mid-Cap Bend, My -
Mid-Cap Value, SH -Spealtyheath, WS -World Stock, Tot Return: Chng in AVwith dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs.
others with same objective: A is in top20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Inlnvt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund.Source: Momingstar.


New York Stock Exchange


Name Div YId PE


ABB Ltd .48 2.4
ACE Ltd 1.26 2.4
AES Corp ... :
AFLAC 1.12 2.3
AK Steel .20 1.4
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.68 6.5
AbtLab 1.76 3.6
- Accenture .75 1.9
AMD
Aeropostls ... ...
Aetna .04 .1
Agilent
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 1.1
Aldlrish
Allstate .80 2.8
Altria 1.40 6.3
AmbacF h ...
AEagleOut .44 3.6
AEP 1.68 4.7
AmExp .72 1.6
AmlntlGrp ..
AmTower
Americdt
Ameriprise .72 1.7
AfnedBrgn .32 1.1
Anadarko .36 .7
AnalogDev .88 3.0
Annaly 2.61 15.0
Aon Corp .60 1.6
Apache .60 .6
ArcelorMit .75 2.4
ArchCoal .40 1.7
ArchDan .60 2.2
AstraZen 2.30 4.6
ATMOS 1.34 4.6
Avon .88 2.8
BB&TCp .60 2.4
BHP BillLt 1.66 2.3
BakrHu .60 1.2
BcoBrades .51 2.7
BcoSantand .81 6.3
BcSBrasil n .33 2.5
BkofAm .04 .3
Bklrelnd 1.04 ...
BkNYMel .36 1.4
Barclay .22 1.1
BarVixShT ...
BarrickG .48 1.2
Baxter 1.16 2.7
BeazerHm ...
BerkHBs ...
BestBuy .60 1.7
BlockHR .60 3.8
Boeing 1.68 2.5
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.28 5.1
BrkfldPrp .56 3.7
BungeLt .92 1.9
CB RElis ...
CBSB .20 1.4
CMShEng .60 3.8
CSX .96 1.8
CVSCare .35 1.1
Cameron
CapOne .20 .5
CardnlHlt s .78 2.4
Carnival .40 1.2
Caterpillar 1.76 2.5
Cemex .43 ..
ChesEng .30 1.4
Chevron 2.88 3.8
Chicos .16 1.7
Chimera .63 16.3
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .56 1.0
Coach .60 1.6
CocaCE .36 1.3


Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg


+.14 +5.7
+.33 +5.3
-.15 -22.5
-1.32 +6.4
-1.42 -34.5
+.19 -8.4
+.40 -7.5
+.15 -9.1
-.74 -4.5
-.33 -22.6
-2.45 +25.2
-.30 -12.1
-1.37 -10.1
+.26 -10.2
+.12 -30.7
-.04 -28.5
-.04 -6.0
+.04 +12.9
+.09 +.6
-.56 -27.5
+.18 +3.4
-.15 +10.2
+1.70 +28.3
-.53 +7.0
+.10 +26.6
+3.74 +9.2
-.56 +15.0
+.39 -21.2
-1.15 -5.9
-.48 +.3
+1.20 -1.7
+2.79 -7.4
-2.25 -32.9
+1.15 +6.5
-.27 -12.6
+1.82 +7.5
+.02 -1.4
+1.69 -1.2
-.71 -2.1
+.56 -5.7
-.65 +19.2
+.79 +3.1
-.35 -22.3
+.37 -4.4
+.30 -6.8
+.35 -25.8
-.66 -10.4
+1.99 +18.6
-1.08 -33.A
-1.27 +4.4
-.22 -25.4
+.19 -12.6
-.59 +18,9
-1.13 -12.2
+.45 -30.7
+.21 +25.9
-.35 -37.8
+.27 -1.3
-.31 +24.1
-5.43 -22.2
+1.81 +25.3
+.16 +5.2
-.14 +1.7
+.07 +8.7
-.24 -4.7
+1.01 -5.3
+1.49 +10.4
-1.17 +.1
+.49 +9.4
+.44 +22.4
-.38 -16.9
-.78 -18.7
+2.69 -1.0
-.87 -33.3
+.02 -.3
+.08 +23.9
+.67 +22.7
-.40 +1.2
+.19 +35.4


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ADC Tel ...
ASML Hid .27
ATP O&G ...
ActivsBliz .15
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT
AllosThera ...
AlteraCp If .24
Amazon
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
A123 Sysn ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .28
ArenaPhm ...
ArmHId .11
Arris
AsialnfoL ...
Atheros
Atmel
Autodesk ..
AutoData 1.36
BMC Sft ..
Baidu s
BannerCp .04
BedBath
Biogenldc .,
Broadcom .32
BrcdeCm ...
Bucyrus .10
CA Inc .16
CH Robins 1.00
Cadence ...
Celgene
CellTher rsh..
CentAlI
Cephin
CienaCorp...


... +.17+105.0 12.73
... +.08 -5.6 32.19
... +.80 -42.2 10.56
17 +.15 +6.9 11.88
40 -.51 -21.9 28.72
47 -6.69. +51.4 38.36
... -.95 -26.7 4.82
17 -1.17 +22.5 27.72
49 -.98 -12.4 117.89
5 -.08+112.7 5.19
11 +1.78 -3.6 54.53
... +1.36 -52.0 10.78
21 -2.69 +22.1 257.25
34 -.71 -15.4 11.80
... +2.04 +123.9 7.95
... -.70 +80.5 15.45
11 -2.46 -18.5 9.32
24 -6.13 -33.0 20.40
17 -1.57 -22.8 26.44
... -.12 +13.4 5.23
54 +.69 +16.3 29.54
17 -.62 -3.6 41.27
15 -2.59 -11.3 35.58
... +3,35 +98.0 81.41
+.19 -12.3 2.35
15 -.84 -1.9 37.88
14 +2.41 +4.4 55.88
30 -1.73 +14.5 36.03
25 -.09 -35.1 4.95
17 +.54 +10.4 62.22
13 +.18 -12.9 19.56
30 +4.32 +11.0 65.20
... +,43 +16.2 6.96
30 +2.40 -1.0 55.15
... -.03 -65.6 .39
37 -.32 -35.6 10.43
11 -2.76 -9.1 56.75
... -.37 +20.8 13.09


Wkly 4
Last Name


CocaCI 1.76
ColgPal 2.12
ComScop ...
ConAgra .80
ConocPhil 2.20
ConsolEngy .40
ConEd 2.38
ConstellEn .96
CtlAir B
Coming .20
Covidien .72
Cummins 1.05
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.24
Danaher s .08
Deere 1.20
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DrSCBear rs...
DirFnBear ..
DrxFBulls .15
DirxSCBull 4.83
DirxLCBear ...
DirxLCBull 8.17
DirxEnBull 5.17
Discover .08
Disney .35
DomRescs 1.83
DowChm .60
DrPepSnapl.00
DukeEngy .98
DukeRity .68
EMC Cp ...
Edisonlnt 1.26
ElPasoCp .04
EldorGid g .05
EmersonEl 1.34
EvergmEn ...
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.76
FamilyDIr .62
FedExCp .48
FidNatlnfo .20
FirstEngy 2.20
FootLockr .60
FordM
ForestLab ...
FMCG 1.20
FrontierCm .75
Gannett .16
Gap .40
GenMills s 1.12
Genworth ...
Gerdau .21
GoldFLtd .17
Goldcrpg .18
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
GrtAtlPac..
HCPInc 1.86
HSBC 1.70
Hallibdrtn .36
HartfdFn .20
HItMgmt ..
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewittAsc ...
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .95
HonwllntI 1.21
HostHotls .04
ING
iSAstia .81
iShBraz 2.58
iSh HK .48
iShJapn .16
iShSing .38
iSTaiwn .21





Name DIv
Cirrus
Cisco
CitzRepB h ..
CitrixSys ..
CleanEngy ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .38
Come spcl .38
Compuwre ...
Costco .82
Cree Inc
Crocs
Dell Inc
DItaPtr
Dndreon
DirecTV A ..
DiscvLabh ...
DryShips
ETrade.rs..
eBay
ElectArts ...
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .28
Expedia .28
ExpScrips ...
FifthThird .04
Flextrn
FuelCell ..
GenBiotch ...
Genzyme
GileadSci
GreenMtC s...
HIthGrades ..
Hologic
HudsCity .60
IntgDv
Intel .63
Intersil .48


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


17 +.36
17 -4.49
73 -6.31
15 -.25
10 +1.98
18 -1.54
14 -.18
1 -2.55
29 +.77
9 +.11
24 -1.22
21 +2.64
... +.17
13 -1.90
20 +.35
20 +2.18
... +.43
... +.52
-.30
-.45
+.63
+.01
+.03
-.25
+.14
8 +.21
18 -.44
14 -.42
23 +.40
18 -2.27
13 +.16
... +.59
28 -.42
14 +.24
12 -.23
44 -.01
22 -1.03
... +.08
11 +.81
12 -.04
17 +1.88
22 +3.59
19 +.57
13 -.14
25 -.53
7 +.05
12 -.53
9 +.46
13 +.21
6 -.88
'10 -.30
15 -1.32
27 -1.68
-.26
30 +.42
... -1.60
8 +3.44
16 -1.55
... +.85
71 +.34.
... +1.09
23 -.71
8 -.02
12 +.51
38 -.01
51 +.62
11 +.89
18 +1.47
13 -.11
17 +.26
15 -.64
... +.13
... +.57
..5 +.24
... +.91
... +.11
... +.05
... +.22
... +.10


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
iShSilver ... ... -.14 +6.3 17.58
iShChina25 .68 1.6 -.22 -2.4 41.24
;ShEMkts .59 1.4 ... +.25 -.2 41.40
iShB20T 3.73 3.7 .. +.70 +11.8 100.48
iS Eafe 1.38 2.7 ... +.32 -6.1 51.91
iShR2K .77 1.2 .. +.04 +4.1 65.02
iShREst 1.81 3.5 ... +.94 +12.5 51.65
ITW 1.24 2.9 14 +.19 -9.4 43.50
IBM 2.60 2.0 12 +.02 -1.9 128.40
IntlGame .24 1.6 25 -.72 -18.8 15.24
IntPap .50 2.1 53 -.78 -9.6 24.20
Interpublic ... ...34 +.96 +23.8 9.14
ItauUnibH .55 2.5 ... +.46 -1.9 22.39
JPMorgCh .20 .5 12 +.45 -3.2 40,28
JanusCap .04 .4 18 -.23 -22.1 10.48
JohnJn 2.16 3.7 13 +.46 -9.8 58.09
JohnsnCtl .52 1.8 14 -.30 +5.8 28.81
JnprNtwk ... ... 52 -.31 +4.2 27.78
KBHome .25 2.2 ... -.35 -16.8 11.38
Kellogg 1.62 3.2 15 -1.05 -5.9 50.05
Keycorp .04 .5 ... +.43 +52.4 8.46
Kimco .64 4.2 47 +.34 +11.4 15.07
KingPhrm ... ... 35 +.04-28.6 8.76
Kinross g .10 .6 47 -.04 -10.9 16,39
Kohls ... ... 14 -.85 -11.6 47.69
Kraft 1.16 4.0 11 -.41 +7.5 29.21
LSI Corp ... ...13 -.82 -32.9 4.03
LVSands ... ...... +1.32 +79.8 26.86
LeggMason .16 .6 23 -.20 -4.2 28.89
LennarA .16 1.1 87 -.16 +15.7 14.77
Lexmark ... ... 10 +2.76 +41.5 36.75
LillyEli 1.96 5.5 9 +.43 -.3 35.60


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Cha %Cha Last


Limited .60
LUncNat .04
UoydBkg 1.45
LaPac
MBIA
MEMC
MFAFncl .76 1
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .20
Manitowoc .08
Manpwl .74
MaralhonO 1.00
MktVGold .11 ,
MarlntA .16
Marshals .04
Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
McKesson .72
Mechel
MedcoHllh ...
Medtrnic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLIfe .74
MetroPCS ...
Monsanto 1.06
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
Motorola
NCR Corp ...
Nabors
NBkGreece .31 1


16 +.02 +33.3
14 +1.43 +4.7
... +.35 +31.5
... -.77 +4.3
... +.19+118.1
... -2.12 -29.8
7 -.24 -.1
... -.47 +48.6
... +.34 +19.1
17 -.73 +11.3
... -.15 +3.9
... -.77 -12.1
16 +.57 +7.1
... -.99 +4.3
35 +.77 +24.4
-.11 +29.0
... -1.14 -25.6
-.67 -27.2
14 -2.81 +.5
... -.45 +15.7
17 -.52 -24.9
13 +.39 -15.9
11 -.41 -5.7
12 +2.52 +19.0
21 -.19 +17.3
23 -.53 -29.2
9 +.15 -8.8
26 +.85 -20.2
44 -.26 -3.5
14 -.29 +23.1
... -27 -15.9
... +.10 -44.3


Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg


NatGrid 7.17 7.2
NOilVarco .40 1.0
NatSemi .40 2.9
NY CmtyB 1.00 5.8
NewellRub .20 1.3
NewmtM .60 1.1
NextEraEn 2.00 3.8
NiSource .92 5.6
NobleCorp .20 .6
NokiaCp .56 5.9
NorflkSo 1.44 2.6
Novartis 1.99 4.1
OcciPet 1.52 2.0
OfficeDpt
OilSvHT 2.66 2.0
Omnicom .80 2.1
Owenslll
PG&ECp 1.82 4.1
PMI Grp
PNC .40 .7
PPL Corp 1.40 5.1
Pactiv
PatriotCoal ..
PeabdyE .28 .6
Penney .80 3.2
PepsiCo 1.92 3.0
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.18 3.7
Petrobras 1.18 3.2
Pfizer .72 4.8
PhilipMor 2.32 4.5
Potash .40 .4
Pridelntl
PrinFncl .50 2.0
ProShtS&P ...
PrUShS&P ... ...
PrUIShDow ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ ...
ProUItSP .40 1.1
ProUShL20 ...
ProUSRE rs...
ProUShtFn ...
ProUSR2K ...
ProUItR2K .02 ...
ProUSSP500...
ProUltCrude...
ProgsvCp .16 .8
ProLogis .60 5.5
Prudentl .70 1.2
PSEG 1.37 4.2
PulteGrp ...
Questars ...
OwestCm .32 57.
RRI Engy ...
RadianGrp .01 .1
RadloShk .25 1.2
RangeRs .16 .4
Raytheon 1.50 3.2
RedHat
RegionsFn .04 .5
SLM Cp
SpdrDJIA 2.48 2.4
SpdrGold
SP Mid 1.65 1.2
S&P500ETF2.22 2.0
SpdrHome .12 .8
SpdrKbwBk .16 .7
SpdrRetl .56 1.5
SpdrOGEx .23 .6
SpdrMetM .35 .7
Safeway .48 2.3
SandRdge ...
Sanoli 1.63 5.6
SaraLee .44 3.0
Schlmbrg .84 1.4
Schwab .24 1.6
SemtiHTr .52 1.9
SlderNac s .58 3.5


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD
YId PE Chg %Chg
... 23 -.31 +185.9
... 20 -.28 -3.6
... ... -.06 +31.0
... 44 +7.17 +32.2
... ... +1.37 +22.5
29 -.78 +20.4
1.9 15 +.15 +16.2
2.0 14 +.23 +16.0
18 -.03 +13.1
1.4 20 +.76 -4.2
... 63 -1.34 +25.7
... ... +.98 +123.1
... 17 -.27 -7.8
... ... +.01 -21.6
... ... -1,76 +25.2
... 28 +.02 +11.4
... ... +.04 -57.1
... 17 -.06 -22.5
... ... +.27 -16.9
... 11 -.18 -11.1
... ... +.05 -10.3
... 87 +.73 +155.0
,2.5 ... -.28 +19.7
1.2 17 +.72 -11.9
26 +2.11 +4.6
.3 ... +.42 +30.4
... ... -.03 -14,9
... ... +.11 -65.2
... ... +.06 -24.5
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AMEX Most Active


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Name DIv
Qlogic
Qualcom .76
RF MicD
Rambus
RschMotn ..
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Sanmina rs ..
SeagateT ...
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Staples .36
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TD Ameritr ...
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TiVo Inc
TriQuint
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Wkly YTD Wkly
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MagHRes ...
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Minefnd g ...
NIVS IntT ...
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NDragon
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NA Pallg ...
NthnO&G ...
NthgtMg ...
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Oilsands g ...
OpkoHlth ...
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Palatin
ParaG&S ...
PionDrill
PolyMetg ...
ProceraNt ...
Rentech
RexahnPh
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G
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TimberlnR ...
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TwoHrblnv ,95
US Gold ...
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Uranerz
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Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


I-IF


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1 nil-." i 10 3 .









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


IBUIhil




FIN I^


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4 lines 6 days Each additional
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personal merchandise totalling $100 or less
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Rate applies to private individuals selling
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Each item most include
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One item per ad
4 lines 6 days additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less.
This is a non-refundable rate















iclue Eac2 Signs EIncl a pridonllhne j
OnLimited to service type advertis-

















$10.80 each additional line
Incluines *an ays additional $2.ad00 per


















ad for each Wednesday insertion.
Rate applies to privatefer to place their
personalmerchandise toai n person, and some
Each tem must r eet.













ThYou can also fax or e-mail your ad
3 days$ 1750
Include0s2 Sipns F^;Erddtit,,iofi3irie'l65



Limited to service orter advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month. ...9.O0
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
Sunday. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or e-mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
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deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billine~nSuiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be.om
Ad it limits Appear Call by: Fa wi x bemail by:
Tuesday Mon .,10: a.m Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon, 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed, 1:00 an, Wed., 9:01 a.m.
Friday dvertisin,, 10:00 a.m. Thurs., 9:subject ta.m.
appurday l by tri.,he Publisher wh9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:01 a.m. Fri, 9:10 a.m.
These deradines are suigbject to hange without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
ancemis ations- Normal advertising










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Advertising language must omplyn be
requigarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nacredit limits, your call will be trans-
erredpublic accommodauntions. Standepart-


abbreviations arl by the acceptable; how-

eadvertiser on the first word of each ad maypub-






ever, the first word of each ad may


not be abbreviated.

A 4 ., OfnlinfC
wV Wt, t.' ,- .) t*', i' T .l' ,ill


020 Lost & Found

LOST Pointer Bird Dog in the SR
47 area, S. of 1-75 on 7/20. White
w/ black patch. Weighs
about 50 lbs. 386-397-3619

100 Job
Opportunities

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.

04541096
COLLECTOR CAREER
OPPORTUNITY:
We are looking for energetic
people who enjoy the challenge
of working in collection. If you
are a self-motivated person with
good communication and
organizational skills, please
consider joining our team.
Applicants must posses a high
school diploma or equivalent,
six months of practical payment
collection/clerical experience,
and a valid drivers license. The
position offers competitive
salary and benefit package.
Company requires
pre-employment drug testing.
Apply in person at Farmers
Furniture, 1445 SW Main Blvd.,
Lake City, FL.

04541104
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a part-time Legal Assistant
position available. Performs
legal secretarial duties including
preparing legal papers and
correspondence such as
summonses, complaints,
motions, subpoenas and other
pleadings as needed. Additional
support services for a wide
variety of legal functions.
Ability to multi-task and strong
attention to detail with complete
confidentiality. Minimum two
years previous clerical
experience in a legal setting.
Excellent typing and computer
skills required. Applications
may be obtained from any
First Federal Branch and
submitted to Human Resources,
P.O. Box 2029, Lake
City, Fl. 32056 or e-mail
Turbeville.J(5)ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

04541126


Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch
Secondary Classroom Teacher
Preference will be given to
individuals that have a
bachelor's degree in education
and certification in middle
school integrated curriculum
and/or related certifications.
Consideration will also be given
to applicants with a bachelor's
degree and are eligible to
become certified and have a
background in working with.
at-risk youth. We offer small
class sizes, multidisciplinary
team support and competitive
compensation. For more infor-
mation contact Susan Moffat,
Director of Education
(smoffat@youthranches.org)
386/842-5555'EOE/DFWP ,


31*6.735.3440 o


Marine/Repairs

Bass Tender Boat
10'2", trolling motor optional,
$500 Call for details
386-965-2215


Home Improvements

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.


Services

Do you need a
HOUSEKEEPER?
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.
Cleaning Done Your Way!


Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Bush Hog 5 ac $249. Finish mow-
ing, land clearing, new driveways
& repairs. Gravel or Concrete. Lic.
CBC 013063 & Ins. 386-497-3219


Tree Service

Hazardous Tree Trimming LLC.
Removal & stump grinding.
24 hr Emergency Service
386-590-7798 or 963-3360


o100 Opportunities

04540823
DRIVERS:
CRST NEED YOU!
IMMEDIATE opportunities!
o CDL, No Problems!
CDL Training Available.
Great Benefits &
Start earning $750-800/wk!
Call Today! 1-866-457-6236

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Committed individual to assist
persons w/disabilities to acheive
goals. Reliable transp. Fax resume:
386-935-3591, call 386-647-7123
Experienced body shop tech
contact George @ Nextran Truck
Center 328 SW Ring Ct, Lake City
1 386-754-8822
HR/Fiscal Clerk Prefer 1 yr
AP/Payroll/HR exp. min 5 yrs
computer exp., intermediate/
advanced skill in Word, Excel,
Publisher, & Power Point.
HS Dip/GED
To apply: Submit Cover
Letter & Resume to:
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, 32056,
In person: 236 SW Columbia Ave,
Lake City 32025 By email:
pstephenson@sv4cs.org
Closes 8/6/2010 EOE
Paralegal/Assistant for legal
tasks including reception, litiga-
tion, etc.exp req'd, Pls submit
resume to 934 NE Lake DeSoto
Cir, Lake City 386-754-5100

04540698
Do you get satisfaction from
making something?
Do you get excited about
technology?
Do you like to analyze problems
and come up with creative
solutions?
If so, a degree or certificate in
Engineering Technology
at Florida Gateway College
is for you!
Engineering Technicians are in
demand by manufacturing and
other high-tech industries.
Enroll now for the Fall semester.
Classes begin Aug. 23.
Financial Aid available.
Call 386-754-4442 for details.

Popeye's has Management Op-
portunities, min 2 yrs fast food
mgm't. exp. a must to be consid-
ered, hlth ins & competitive salary
avail For consideration, call
Richard @ 904-254-2666 or send
resume to 121 N Main Blvd
Secretary
Needed FT for a busy
Doctor's office
Excellent skills in MS Word
(speed 60wpm or above), MS
Excel, and QuickBooks.
Fax Resume to 386-755-2169


SUBCONTRACTORS NEEDED
Carpet, Framing, Electrical,
Plumbing, Drywall & Painting to
work in and around the Lake City
area only. Must have liability
insurance of $1 million general
and $2 million aggregate, workers
comp or exempt. Must be
reliable/professional and own
vehicle and tools of the trade.
Please call Travis at
Restoration Specialists
386-438-3201.


WANTED *SE REGIONAL
DRIVERS*HOME WEEKLY!
2yr OTR Required,80%
Drop/Hook, No Force Dispatch,
401K & Insurance,
Referral Bonus, Call RBI at
888-298-6928 x230 or
apply @ www.rbitrucking.com
WE ARE GROWING
VPK Assistant and other CDA
Teachers needed, apply in person
Wee Care Preschool & Daycare
corner of 240 & 47,386-754-5111


120 Medical
Employment

04540425
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD.
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

04541088
Director Medical Records
EMR experience, Certified
DMH Perry, FL
850-584-0635

045410899
RNs AND LPNs NEEDED!
(Full-time, part-time & PRN)
Exciting Home Health
Opportunities for our new
Lake City office. Excellent
salary and benefits.
Send resume to
careers@caretenders.com or
call Lynn at 386-758-3312
for more information.





F/T EXPERIENCED LPN or
MA needed M-F for busy medical
practice. Fax resumi6
to 386-487-1231.
LMT NEEDED P/T
Flexible hours, Competitive Pay.
Experience required.
Fax Resume to (386)752-0939
Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


120 ^Medical
120 Employment

05523412
SHANDS LAKE
SHORE/LIVE OAK
has the following positions
available:
Marketing Director
Degree in Marketing or related
field with 5+ years marketing
experience in healthcare
industry
Purchasing Associate
High school diploma or
equivalent. Must have clerical,
computer and organizational
skills. Experience in
purchasing/receiving and
knowledge of medical
supplies preferred..
Benefit/Disability
Coordinator
Considerable knowledge of
principles and practices of
personnel administration and
Federal and State, laws
governing employment. 1-2
years experience in Human
Resources required.
AS degree preferred

Emergency Room Director
(Live Oak)
BSN required with 5+ years of
experience in ED Nursing

Patient Access Manager
(Live Oak)
Management of busy patient
registration department.
Responsibilities include
management of staff, patient
flow, registration, collections
and insurance verification. AS
degree preferred, 3-5 years in
hospital setting with
management experience
required.

Physical Therapist
Registered Nurse -
Mother/Baby
Registered Nurse Med/Surg
Registered Nurse ICU
Laboratory Technologist

Competitive salary and
benefit package.

Resumes WITH cover letter
may be faxed to (386)292-8295
or email to
angela .altman@hma.com
EOE, M/F/V/D,
Drug Free Workplace.


180 Money to Loan

05523244
PREMIER LOAN SERVICES
Working to achieve your
financial goals
Loans that change lives
Personal loan, Business & Debt
loans Home loan, Auto loan
Fixed rate All credit welcome,
No fees. Quick!
Call 1-877-990-9889


2 Schools &
240 Education

04540812
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-07/26/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/19/10
Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-09/14/10.
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com

Pigs for sale
different ages and sizes,
call for details
386-965-2215


310 Pets & Supplies

ADULT BEAGLES
1 male & 1 female.
$150.ea.
386-719-4802 or 386-623-9427

AKC CHOC LAB Pups. $350.
Available August 1st. Hith Certs
Males/ & Females Parents on
premises 386-965-2231

FREE KITTENS Beautiful and
cuddly. Only 2 left! 8 weeks old.
First shots. Ready to go!
386-961-8354
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


407 Computers


Dell Computer, Many extras,
Complete Computer
$100. firm
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

ATV Versa-Hauler 750#
capacity, fits standard 2" receiver
used once cost $840 selling for
$500 OBO 386-719-6537
GO PIG CRAZY!!!!
ONLY $1,500.
Commercial Smoker,
Tow behind. 386-623-9427, 386-
249-3104 or 386-719-4802

450 Good Things
450 to Eat

GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434


520 Boats for Sale

2000 SeaPro 17ft center console
radio GPS depthfinder, 90hp 541b
thrush trolling motor Excel Cdhd
$6,500 386-752- 5788/365-1845

r3n Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
14 Wide, 3/2-$550.mo, 2/2-$475.
mo. Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 Bedroom
Mobile homes.
$425 $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3/2 DWMH; private on 1/2 acre,
all major apple. mincl. Next to I-10
on 441 N. Good condition. $650
1st mo, $650 Dep. 305-537-8751
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
FT. WHITE area 3br/2ba DW on
40 ac. $725 mo. 1st. last &
security required.
Call 386-312-8371 or 961-6734
Furnished or Unfurnished Clean
3br/lba, In quiet, private park.
Large lot Call: 386-752-6269
lv message if no answer.
LG 3BR/2BA DWMH $700. mo
All electric. Also 3br/lba SW
$600. mo 5 pts area. No Pets.
386-961-1482 $500. dep. req'd
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs. Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-397-1522
or 386-292-0114
Move in special $399, 2/1,
spacious yard, $450 per month,
easy qualifying 386-755-2423 or
386-697-1623
NICE 3BR/2BA on 1/2 ac. fenced
New workshop. Pets ok. $700. mo.
1st and last required.
386-697-6621
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Residential RV lots. Between
Lake City & G'ville. Access to I-
75 & 441 (352)317-1326 Call for
terms. Cottage options avail.
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move In
July Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
386-623-7547 or 984-8448

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$166. MONTH
Remodeled S.Wide (2br/2ba)
New carpet, appliances,
Delivery/set up included. Owner
finance available w/3K down.
Gary Hamilton (386)758-9824
04541029
FOR SALE: 2/2 SW
partially furnished
mobile home on canal
lot in Suwannee, FL.
Excellent location.
Rental income potential.
Price reduced. 229-549-7137


A640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

5 acres w/4br/2ba home.
(manufactured). Ceramic floors,
new metal roof, plywood, 2 porch-
es, utility shed, concrete founda-
tion & some furniture, $119K.
Owner fin @ $695mo. w/5%dn.
Gary Hlamilton 386-758-9824
LAND/HOME PACKAGES
I specialize in Land/Home pkgs
FHA, VA & USDA Loans Avail!
I also have a 2400 sqft Home on
1/2 ac. for only $450. a mo.
owner financing avail!
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452
or jetdec(@windstream.net
Brand New "2011"
4/2 doublewide setup & Del. for
only $39,995. or payments of
$265. a month! Call Eric
@ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec(5windstream.net
"TRADE IN" 28'X44' 3/2
Doublewide with metal roof for
Only $7,000.obo Call 386-752-
1452 jetdec(@)windstream.net
FSBO: Owner Financing. 1 Acre
w/big DWMH, Near Ichetucknee
Springs North entrance. $29,000
$1,000 down. Call (352)356-2563
BRAND NEW 2011
2BR/2BA
For only $22,900
Call John T. 386-344-5234
MUST SELL 2br/lba Singlewide
Set/Del/AC/Skirt/& Step
on your property for $17,500.00
Call John T. 386-344-5234
HUGE 28X80 4br/2ba, Living
room & den. Set/Del/AC
Skirt/Steps .For only $34,837.
Call John 386-344-5234
BRAND NEW 3/2 Home
for only $25,316.00.
Owner Finance Available
Call John 386-344-5234
DON'T MISS THIS
28X66 4br/2ba with set-up, Del,
AC, Skirt Steps. For Only $29,900
Call John 386-344-5234

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
Reduced. Best of both worlds.
Country living, close to town.
1386 sqft DW, 1 ac. 3/2 split. Sm
down & take over FHA mortgage.
Current payments $682.86.
Includes taxes & insurance. Lets
make a deal call 386-965-6958

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent

Voted Best Apartment 2010
Come See Why! Rent from
$499. ZERO down for
Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
1 or 2 Bedroom Apartments.
and
2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423

2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$500 mo. plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Gorgeous Lake View. 2br Apt.
$500. mo plus deposit.
Close to shopping.
386-344-0579
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts.. garage. W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Move in special, $499, 2/1, newly
renovated, in town, includes water
$550 per month, easy qualifying
386-755-2423 or 386-697-1623
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.

NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-Fl, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179+ tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest. Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?


(- -.
amfonable, ..

t\our skills
and
S ,- 1 positive atlttude


Apply Online or In Personl.


s'E.


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


* ADvantage


I .,...








Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


70 Unfurnished
730 HomeFor Rent
lbr/lba small home w/Carport.
W/D avail. Fenced yard S. Hwy.
41 $650/mo. Includes all utilities
& satellite. Pets OK. 386/758-2408
2br/lba house on Hwy 90
partially furnished. Close to
college. $550. mo plus deposit.
Consider Owner finance. 867-1190
3 bdrm/2bath Brick Home,
Hwy 47 between interstate &town,
large yard carport $950/month
$500 dep 386-755-4098
3bd/2ba's
Multiple Locations
Call Brooke for details 7
386-755-3649.
3bdrm home, 1 acre fenced lot
w/carport, in Three River Estates
in Ft White, $600 mo,
336-953-0013
3bedroom/2bath
New paint and carpet.
$600. mo. No Pets!
386-758-0057
3br/2ba Brick. Double Carport
Carpet & tile. CH/A.On small lake
Good area. 2000 sqft. $1000. mo +
sec. 386-752-0118 or 623-1698
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
Very nice older home, 2br/2ba
w/fenced yard, garage, huge Fl.
room. CHA, appli. Application,
credit check & lease req'd. 1st, last
& sec. $650/mo. (904)259-4126

740 Furnished
T Homes for Rent
2/1 Furnished near Lake City,
washer/dryer, $475 mo.
w/water, $400 dep, $250 first mo.
904-673-8089
750 Business &
5v Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$750. sec dep. Tom 386-
961-1086 DCA Realtor
Office Space for Rent 2000 sqft,
5 offices, 1 conference rm, 2ba.
Nice outside .patio area. Located
off Main Blvd. 386-755-3649

805 Lots for Sale
Lot for Sale 2.76 ac, 2.ac, 1.5 ac,
2.5 ac. River Oaks S/D. Timber-
lake S/D. Owner Fianc. Sm down.
386-344-4629 or 344-8929
PRIME LAND for Sale
in Ft. White off Hwy 18.
CASH ONLY.
904-288-1632 or (904)353-9391
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under, the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


805 Lots for Sale
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
FSBO 3br/lba block w/metal roof,
carport. New tile & paint. Ready
now. 3 ac units/gas heat. Double
lot, chain link fence w/privacy in.
back. Access from Monroe St & St
Johns St, dbl drive gates. Room to
park Ig vehicles. Lg storage bldg,
& Ig ydGreat family home or in-
vestment rental. Home appraised
/contracted to sell for $71000 in
09. Now,$65000. Drive by 973 SE
Monroe St. then call 352-371-1709
FSBO: No realtors please.
3br/2ba all brick. 1860 sqft. Built
in 2005. Great S/D. $178,000.
386-697-4136 or 697-4135
SALE/RENT: 3/2 brick'ranch. 8.5
ac. 8 mi form LC. 3 fish ponds,
paved road. Owner Financ. $1000.
mo. 386-344-4629 or 344-8929
Sale/Rent: 4/2 Ranch on 6.5 ac.
10 mi SW of LC. Fenced. Remod-
eled, paved/private drive, owner
Finan. $1000. mo 386-344-8929

82O Farms &
Acreage
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
Property
Former 84 Lumber Store for Sale!
1824 W US Highway 90,
Lake City, FL 32055
Call 724!228-3636 for -
price and info! 0
Great visibility from Hghway 90!!

940 Trucks
1975 Ford 351 Kingcab
All Original Runs Good
$2,000 386-752-5788 or
386-365-1845
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$2500
386-965-2215
95 NISSAN EX Pick up
Extended cab. Cold AC, 5 speed.
Nice truck. $2000. obo
386-755-0360 or 466-5776

951 Recreational
5 Vehicles
2006 DENALI 35 ft 5th Wheel
Camper, w/3slides, 02 Chevy Sil-
verado crew cab P/U w/6.6 Cl
Die-
sel $37,900 for both 386-758-2465
LAKE CITY REPORTER
-T- n-


------- ---------------------


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worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445


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Find all 16 oTIhe 'Life Simplifying' related words hidden Subscriber: L Yes I No
in the word search above. Words can be found in the *
banners on the ads shown here. Complete the puzzle and Deadline is Monday, August 2, 2010 at 5:00 p.m.
return it to the Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval Street,
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--- ----------------------------- ..-


'- rg


2007 Yamaha
Raptor 700
New hole shot tires, power
bomb kit, excellent condition.
$3,500
Call
386-754-5564


2006 35 Ft. Denali
5th wheel camper tow .
truck combo, 3 slides,
many extras, like new with
2002 Chevy Silverado
crew cab PU w/6.6CI turbo
diesel.
$37,900
Call
386-758-2465


1 Low Price!


ADVERTISE YOUR


GARAGE SALE

WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER

Only






4 LINES 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS!



(386) 755-54401


3322 W US Hwy 90
386-755-2502






SEagle

Properties
(386) 752-9226
Office Space
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom (386) 961-1086
DCA Realtor


I Garage Sale I


.TACO
BELL
386-755-9673





IV Y I IIV C
FFiTNESS.
1191 SW Bascom Norris Dr
Suite 103
Lake City, FL
(386) 754-1724
www.anytimefitness.com


Lake City

Kiddg Cldb
"Where learning is fun "
Pre-K & VPK

755-0256
1290 SE Baya Drive
Lake City, FL 32025
Meitt ion

Free TimeB


(386) 752-7034


(386) 364-1000
Lake City -
(386) 755-3558









EaLdie
insurance Agency
4447 NW American Lane
(386) 752-6058


.If A t e.s n 5Beedin * Cie y


orMoe etis-al Mr
I-at3B6.55-540U


I DcSI- 3Z I


ake soe


Lake ity Rporte


-






LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


I
I


-I
. usf.SSO, l tls page,

, pease call,52-1T93


HAVE YOU TRIED IT?
U1 y 4 H '"You guys have the best sub sandwich I
have. ever had!"
Jan Osburne
S u"Willy Ls 12"Italian is so goodslapped
S n io momma when I was done consuming
va, -, A it bad boy!"
Mark Christopher
Florida Pest Control
i Listen to Mix 94.3 and Big 98 to win FREE SUBS!
L iv-e r Open Monday Saturday loam-9pm
Sunday llam.7pm
sS(386) 752-7949 3525 Basicom Norris
IBy r^^ (Am from WalMusioit to.Leweu)s


C ^V-MD
aIM^
S^ vi


3_ _Rotate &
Balance
!-,,, ? ,-, ..--- ,. Tires
A W S Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
("' ',. ' ., -" Not valid with any other offer
expires 8/31/10
;t-: a p
U?^^~t *. ~-


P ------- p-- -- -- --
Se EUROTOP .SUPER
SSetda SUPREME DEAL
I I I : -'" ; -
WAS NOW WAS NOW
TWIN SET %W 244' ,QUEEN SET 140- $374
FULL SET so-o $344, KING SET O% $494
L _-----------J L-------------mmm--J
1678 US Hwy 90 W
@M_ O Lake City, FL


r


1 Large

1 Topping Pizza


$


99


Offer good thru 8/31/2010
Pick up only.
Offer good only at Lake City Location.


2 Large, 3 Topping
Pizzas, Breadsticks and
a 2 Liter Coca Cola


$


99,


Offer good thru 8/31/2010
Pick up and delivery..
Offer good only at Lake City Location.

Order Online www.dominos.com


CALL NOW! 386-758-3130


2372 W. USHwy 90
(Across From'Lake City Mall)


VISA


Any delivery charge is not a tip paid to your driver. Our drivers carry less than $20. You must ask for this limited time offer. Minimum purchase required for delivery. Prices, participation, delivery area and charges may vary. Returned checks, along with
the state's maximum allowable returned check fee, may be electronically presented to your bank.o2010 Domino's IP Holder LLC. Domino'soDomino's Pizzacand fhe modular logo are registered trademarks of Domino's IP Holder LLC


Most cars & trucks
expires 8/31/10


[DEALS OF THE WE


Classified Department: 755-5440


---------- -- I
. - -1


- - - - - - -












Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmoyer@lakeotyreportercom

Sunday, August 1, 2010


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


www.lakecityreporter.com


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl edu


The most

incredible

journey

monarch but-
terflies are
Perhaps the
best known
and most
recognized butterfly. As
students, we learned about
their migration as fact, but
as adults we marvel at the
idea of such an incredible
journey. Although many
monarchs choose to over-
winter in Florida, millions
of migrating butterflies
from the eastern half of the
United States end up in the
same 70 square mile forest-
ed area in central Mexico
every winter.
The ability to navigate
thousands of miles is
genetic and linked to a
type of compass orientation
based on sun and time.
The range of the mon-
arch is dependent on the
availability of milkweed,
which is the only food the
caterpillar will eat. There
are 21 native milkweed
species in Florida, but natu-
rally occurring milkweed
stands are becoming scarce
for several reasons. Urban
and rural developments
are displacing agricul-
tural areas where most of
these plants are usually
found. Many genetically
modified crops are now
herbicide-resistant. Instead
of cultivating for weed
control, growers are able
to use more herbicides on
their resistant crops. And
milkweed plants cannot
become established along
roadways that are frequent-
ly mowed or sprayed.
The colorations of the
monarch butterfly and cat-
erpillar make them easily
recognized by predators.
The colors act as a warning
sign that they are toxic and
won't make a good meal.
Milkweeds contain certain
chemicals that accumulate
in the caterpillar's body
as they devour the plant.
When the larvae changes
into a butterfly, the toxic
chemicals are passed along
and make the butterfly poi-
sonous, also.
Monarchs lay eggs
singly on the underside
of leaves of different milk-
weed plants. It takes less
than one month for the
adult to develop from the
egg stage.
While the previous
generations of butterflies
lived a couple months, the
migrating generation will
live six to eight months.
They feed as they move
south, they rest through
the winter, and then they
begin the long migration
back north.
Read more about this
amazing journey at the
UF/IFAS site http://edis.
ifas.ufl.edu/in780.
Learn how you can cre-
ate or restore monarch
habitats along migration
routes at http://edis.ifas.
ufl.edu/uw311. Call the UF
Master Gardeners for help
with gardening problems:
752-5384.

* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of'the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


I

*


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Alex Wright, 5, watches as violinist/fiddler DeGraff and pianist Wright plays a selection from their concert with Richardson Middle School trumpet player
Ikiey Coker, 17, in this recent file photo.



Season tickets are music to your ears


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Live entertain-
ment is on its
way to Lake
City and sea-
son tickets are
available for showgoers to
purchase.
Community Concerts
of Lake City Inc. is gear-
ing up to present another
season of six entertaining
shows locally. The orga-
nization is calling for the
public to purchase season
tickets, making them a
member of Community
Concerts of Lake City.
The all-volunteer,
nonprofit group has
been bringing shows to
Lake City for more than
50 years, said Harold
Hunziker, the organiza-
.tion's vice president
"I definitely believe it's
something good for the
community," he said. "It
provides you with shows
you just wouldn't see
unless you went to the big
areas, like Gainesville."
Shows presented are
live acts varying from
singing and instrumental


COURTESY PHOTO
Singer John Davidson,
former host of The New
Hollywood Squares and
Hundred Thousand Dollar
Pyramid, will be the last of
the acts and will be per-
forming on Sunday, Feb.
13, at 2:30 p.m.


Lynn Wright (left) and Adam DeGraff play together as Pianafiddle during a recent
performance in the Alfonso Levy Performing Arts Center at the Florida Gateway College.
The concert was organized by the Community Concerts of Lake City Inc.


groups to full bands and
celebrity impersonators,
he said.
The upcoming season
begins in September
and ends in February,
including shows such as
The Diamonds and The
Nutcracker Ballet, which
will feature about 50 local
student dancers, in addi-
tion to professional ones.
"We've got some '
great shows coming in,"
Hunziker said. "You're
getting big-city entertain-
ment."
Two of the 2010 to 2011
season shows Greg
Giannascoli and 'The
Legacy of Floyd Cramer"
- are shows designed "
for local school students.
Free student transporta-
tion and admission will be
provided and the shows
are free to the community.
Community Concerts of
Lake City chooses which


COURTESY PHOTO
Bobby Bruce, of the Nearly Neil & the Solitary Band, took
command of the stage in a sold-out performance in 2009.


shows to present, either
by screening different
live acts or reviewing
soundtracks or videos
submitted by agents,
Hunziker said.
He also said the organi-
zation will look at videos
or review soundtracks
submitted by local acts


from the Lake City area.
"If you had a show that
you wanted us to consider,
then certainly we could
consider it," Hunziker
said.
"We're open to any sug-
gestions or recommenda-
tions and we'll consider
them,"'he said.


Upcoming season
shows are the Big
Orange Chorus and .the
Humdingers at 7:30 p.m.
on Saturday, Sept. 11;
"The Legacy of Floyd
Cramer" at 7:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, Oct. 12; Greg
Giannascoli at 7:30 p.m.
on Monday, Nov. 1; The
Nutcracker Ballet at 2:30
and 7:30 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 11; The Diamonds
at 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan.
22; and John Davidson at
2:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 13..
All shows are held
at the Alfonso Levy
Performing Arts Center at
Florida Gateway College
except "The Legacy of
Floyd Cramer," which will
be held at Olustee Park.
Adults can join the
organization as a member
by purchasing a season
ticket for $50. Students,
from kindergarten
through 12th grade, can
become a member by
purchasing a season ticket
for $5. Season tickets are
good for admission to
each 2010 to 2011 season-
show and are available
until Aug. 15.
Single-show tickets'are
$18 for adults and $5 for
students.
Tickets can be pur-.
chased at the Lake
City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce,
or by calling Community
Concerts of Lake City at
(386) 466-8999 or visit-
ing its website at www.
communityconcerts. info.
Single-show tickets are
available on a first-come,
first-served basis at the
door.
Hunziker said purchas-
ing a season ticket and
becoming a member
afford the public a chance
to see a live show locally.
"You can't even go to a
movie for that nowadays,"
he said. "You're seeing
something different any-
ways and with live actors.!'


Section D









LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


Don't expect heroes to be perfect in character


T iger Woods
strayed from
a beautiful
wife. Winona
Ryder was
arrested for shoplifting.
Mark McGwire admitted
to using steroids. Balloon
Boy, the big TV story of
last year, was a hoax.
It seems like we've been
disappointed more and
more with our "heroes"
- actors, politicians, musi-
cians, and entertainers.
. It's in our nature to
look up to leaders, famous
people, those who excel
in sports, entertainment,
politics, or other notewor-
thy characters. We tend to
idolize those people and
to put them on a pedestal.
We usually see only their
strengths, or the good
qualities that we admire in
them. They seem bigger
than life. We hold them up
as role models, as special
people to model our own
lives after. We think, "If
only I could be more like


so-and-so."
But we often forget
that they are only human.
They have characteristics
that may not be so noble,
like addictions, violent
tempers, secret vices, or
things they aren't likely
to divulge to the media.
The resulting image is one
sided, positive and bigger
than life.
Then sometimes secrets
come out, and we tend
to feel hurt or betrayed.
After all, don't they have
everything? Isn't their life
special enough, that they
don't need to pursue less
noble stuff? Didn't Tiger
Woods have a billion-dollar
golf career with endorse-
ments, a wonderful wife
and child, mansion, fame,
and everything anybody
could ask for? Why does
he also want to have
multiple affairs on the
side? How about David
Letterman, host of the
Late Night show, with all
the money and attention


Robert Denny
robert.denny@fgc.edu
anyone could ask for?
Didn't that nice actress,
Winona Ryder, have every-
thing? Why would she be
involved in shoplifting?
Adultery and theft aside,
I still think that in some
ways it's a good thing to
admire and emulate these
people. But how can we
keep this ambition in our-
selves and use it in a posi-
tive way?
During the last 15
years, I've been a licensed
mental health counselor
in Florida, working with
troubled children and
families with serious prob-
lems. Like these people,
if we.are to build happier
and better lives for our-


selves, it's helpful if we
can develop lofty goals and
ideals to strive for. If you
don't know where you're
going, you'll never find
the right path. We all have
strengths, capabilities, and
potential to be so much
more, if we develop those
.skills. ,
So, it's OK to hold
these famous people up as
heroes. But don't feel let
down when their vices or
bad behaviors come out.
Instead of feeling let down
or betrayed, ask yourself
what can I do'with what
I've got to work with, to
build a better, happier life
for myself?
Here are four ideas to
help you think in a more
realistic, satisfying, and
positive way towaids these
"fallen heroes."
M Don't expect your
heroes to be perfect.
Appreciate the good char-
acter you find in them,
and don't judge them too
harshly for their faults.


Realize that every
coin has two sides.
Everyone has many char-
acter traits; we may judge
some traits as "good" and
others as "bad." We can
learn to appreciate and
respect the traits, without
expecting the whole per-
son to be perfect.
List some people that
you know personally, that
you admire and respect.
Identify the specific
character traits that ybu
respect and admire them
for. Is it courage, dedica-
tion, generosity, or just
what traits do you admire
them for? You can strive to
develop those admirable
traits in yourself. You, too,
can develop better char-
acter, but like the heroes
held up to us, don't expect
to be perfect.
Be your own hero.
Decide what character
traits you want to be like,
and work on building
those traits in yourself.
Instead of admiring Tiger's


winning attitude, positive
thinking, and perform-
ing under pressure, you
already have those traits
at some level in yourself.
Work on developing those
traits that you already
have.
We change and learn
and grow all our lives, and
others are on a different
path than what you're
on. Give them a chance
to learn life's lessons, as
they're ready. They may
have had fame and wealth
dropped on them before
they were ready to incor-
porate the means to live
with them.
Don't have unreason-
able expectations of others
around you. Nobody's per-
fect; learn to accept people
for who they are and be
less judgmental. Thank
God, we're all different.
It takes all kinds to
make a world.
N Robert Denny is adjunct
professor of psychology at
the Florida Gateway College.


ENGAGEMENTS


Powers-Johnson
Paula Powers and Frank
Powers of Lake City
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Jessica
Wike Powers of Yulee,
to Eric Paul Johnson of
Ytilee. He is the son of
Paul and Susan Johnson of
Melbourne.
The bride-elect is a 1999
Columbia High School
graduate, 2003 Stetson
University cum laude grad-
tiated with a BA. in psy-
chology and minors in soci-
ology and French and a
2007 University of.Florida
graduate with a masters in
occupational therapy. She
has been employed with
Genesis Rehab Services
in Fernandina Beach
since 2009 as the program
manager and occupation
therapist of an out patient
clinic. The groom-elect
is 2002 Satellite Beach
High School graduate
and 2005 Embry-Riddle
Aeronautical University

Leasure-
Woodworth
John and Nancy
Leasure, of High Springs,
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Lauren
Diane Leasure of Lake
City, to Jacob Matthew
Woodworth of Lake City.
He is the son of Robert
Woodworth and Carol
Woodworth-Glover, of Lake
City.
The bride-elect graduat-
ed from Northwest Rankin
High School in Brandon,
Miss. in 2004. She is
employed at SunState
Federal Credit Union.
The future groom
graduated from Columbia
High School in 2001. He
is employed at Joerns
Healthcare.
The couple love spend-


Evans-Fleming
Sandra Harris of Lake
City announces the engage-
ment and approaching
marriage of her daughter,
Leondra Evans of Lake City,
to James Fleming of Lake
City. She is also the daugh-'
ter of Leon Evans of Los
Angles, Calif. He is the son
of Della Murphy and the
late Frank Fleming of Mayo.
The bride-elect is a 1992
graduate of Columbia
High School and works at
the Lake City VA Medical
Center. She is a member
of New Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church and is the
Associate Matron of Gold
Standard Chapter #48 Order
of the Eastern Star Lake
City.
The future groom is a
j1989 graduate of Lafayette
High School in Mayo and
served in the US. Army. He
is currently employed at the
Department of Corrections.
He also is a member of


COURTESY PHOTO
Jessica Wike Powers and
Eric Paul Johnson.

magna cum laude graduate
with a B.S. in aeronautical
science and a minor in air
traffic management He
has been a licensed pilot
since 2001, certified flight
instructor since 2005 and
employed with the Federal
Aviation Administration
as an air traffic controller
since 2006. The wedding
is at 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct.
10 at The Farmhouse at
the Old Edwards Inn and
Spa in Highlands, N.C. A
reception will follow at The
Farmhouse.


COURTESY PHOTO
Lauren Diane Leasure and
Jacob Matthew Woodworth.

ing time with Woodworth's
2-year-old son, Triston
Matthew Woodworth.
The wedding is planned
for 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
18 at First Presbyterian
Church in Lake City. A
reception will follow at
Holiday Inn and Suites in
Lake City.


4.0


Summerall-Klum
George and Brenda
Hunter and Bardin and Lin
Summerall of Lake City
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage.
of their daughter, Mallory
Brooke Summerall of Lake
City, to Justin Thomas
Klum of Gainesville.
He is the sbn of Mac
and Teresa McCarty of
Gainesville and Frank
Klum Jr. of Clermont.
The bride-elect is a 2007
graduate of Columbia High
School, and 2009 graduate
of Lake City Community
College. She is attending
the University of Central
Florida.
The future groom is
a 2006 graduate of East


Busby-Murray

Margaret Busby of Lake
City announce the engage-
ment and approaching
marriage of their daughter,
Rebecca Jane Busby of Lake
City, to Robert D. Murray of.
Ft. White. Rebecca Jahe is
also the daughter of the late
Craig Busby of Lake City.
He is the son of Angie
Turner and Danny Murray,
of Lake City..
The bride-electgraduated
from Columbia High School
in 2003 and is employed at
Lake City, Medical Center.
' The groom-elect gradu-
ated from Columbia High
School in 2000 and' is
employed at HD Supply


COURTESY PHOTO
Mallory Brooke Summerall
and Justin Thomas Klum.

Ridge High School. He is
currently stationed at Ft. .
Hood in Texas with the
United States Army.
The wedding is
Saturday, Aug. 14 in
Winter Park.


Robert Murray.


in Gainesville. The wed-
ding is at 4 p.m. Oct 23 at
First Presbyterian. Church
in Lake City. A reception
will follow in the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center.


Holly Michelle Helms and Patr


Helms-Hadlock
Rodney Helms of
Lake City announces the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of his daugh-
ter, Holly Michelle Helms
of Lake City, to Patrick
Douglas Hadlock of Lake
Mary.
She is also the daughter
of the late Rachel Bullard
Helms.
He is the son of Douglas
and Dianne Hadlock of
Lake Mary.
The bride-elect is a
graduate of Columbia
High School and the Lake
City Community College
phlebotomy program.
The future groom is
a graduate of Westwood


9


COURTESY PHOTO
Leondra Evans and James
Fleming.

New Bethel, coaches
Little League Football
for the Wolves and is the
Worshipful Master of Gold
Standard Lodge #167 Lake
City.
The wedding is planned
for 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept 4
at New Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church. A reception
will follow at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds
Reception Hall.


~. k..


Hills Christian Acad6my
and Santa Fe Community
College with an Associate
of Arts degree in art
and Associate of Science
degree in graphic design.
The wedding is planned
for Saturday, Aug. 21, at
Salem Primitive Baptist
Church in Lake City. A
reception will follow at
the Women's Club of
Lake City.













China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Jamie Williams
Ronnie Crews
July 31, 2010

Holly Helms
Patrick Hadlock
August 21, 2010

Tifanie Mosely
Garre Miller
September 18, 2010

Hailey Witt
Wes Douglas
September 18, 2010

Jessica Powers
Eric Johnson
October 10, 2010'

Rebecca Busby
Robert Murray
October 23, 2010
We know exactly what they
want In a wedding or shower gift.
We update their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.

WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470 /


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


a
w f I? :.I ..' .,.- '
v -"" J . -*** ,

,' -- !. Ij i r 2 i | l J r I i = b- Ia i i i










Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


DEAR ABBY


Bride blushes at size of gift,


then refuses to accept it


DEAR ABBY: We sent
a check to our niece a
month before her mar-
riage as a wedding gift to
her and her fiance. The
amount was generous,
and we felt any young
couple would be delighted
to receive it. We also
attended their out-of-state
wedding.
Four months after we
sent the check, it had nei-
ther been cashed nor had
we received any acknowl-
edgment that it had been
received. I contacted
my sister to verify that it
hadn't been lost only to
be told that my niece was
"embarrassed by the large
amount of the check and
could not accept it"! Have
you ever heard of such a
thing? We think it is rude
on multiple counts: First,
evaluating the gift; second,
rejecting the gift; and final-
ly, not feeling obligated to
even acknowledge it
I'm boiling mad. My
sister was the one who
suggested "money" when
we asked what the bride
could use as a gift. We
always felt that any gift
- large or small, liked
or not should be gra-
ciously accepted and
acknowledged. Have you
any thoughts on this? -_
FURIOUS IN ARIZONA
DEAR FURIOUS: Yes
- and congratulations.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
Your letter is a first. I have
heard of brides complain-
ing that a gift of money
wasn't large enough but
never that it was "too
large." Could there be
some additional tensions in
the family that prevented
your niece from telling you
that your generosity was
more than she could com-
fortably accept? If so, she
could have returned it with
a note thanking you and
explaining the reason why.
Your thoughts regarding
etiquette are absolutely
correct Any gift or kind
deed should be gra-
ciously acknowledged.
DEAR ABBY: Our
youngest son was honored
at his groom's dinner last
month. As I looked down
our table, six of our guests
were fixated on sending/
receiving text messages
on their cell phones. One
young woman sat staring
off into space because no
one had made any attempt
to engage her in conversa-
tion.
Finally, I remarked that


this was rude and that peo-
ple should shut off their
gadgets and get to know
one another. These people
were invited to honor my
son who was being mar-
ried. It did not go over
well. I got comments like,
"What's wrong with that?"
"Oh, I have taken my knit-
ting to these events," and,
"I do this all the time." My
thought was, "Well, stay
home then and text away!"
I am ... TIRED OF
TECHNOLOGY
DEAR TIRED OF
TECHNOLOGY: Some
people are so "addicted"
to their electronic devices
that they literally go into a
form of withdrawal if they
can't check for messages
every few minutes, .I agree
that what happened was
rude. But having discussed
this subject with more
than one psychiatrist, what
I'm hearing is that many
individuals today who
effectively communicate
on their devices, have
difficulty engaging in eye-
to-eye, one-on-one social
interaction. That may
explain the phenomenon
you observed at the party.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Something fes-
tering behind the scenes
must not be allowed to
grow. Put an end to what-
ever you feel can have a
negative affect on your life
or your future. Be swift to
make whatever change is
needed. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Polishing your
look or updating your
image will have a good
affect on your attitude and
bring compliments your
way. Don't let anyone put
you down. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Your gener-
osity and abundance of
energy and desire to help
others will not go unno-
ticed. The rewards you
receive may not be mon-
etary but you will learn a
valuable lesson regarding
how much you should give
and where to draw the
line. *****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You can fuss
all you want about a situ-
ation you face but, until
you actually do something
about it, you will continue


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last
to face turmoil and regret.

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Take control of what-
ever situation you face.
The changes you bring
about will meet with oppo-
sition but your determina-
tion will outmatch anyone
trying to stand in your
way. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You can outsmart
anyone trying to pres-
sure or push you into
something you don't want
to take part in. Put your
money in a safe place
so you aren't tempted to
donate, lend, or spend
unwisely. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Talk about your con-
cerns and you will be able
to fix any trouble spots.
you encounter. There
are greater opportunities
ahead of you. Recognize
what you have to look for-
ward to. The best is yet to
come. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): Your hard work


CELEBRITY CIPHER
CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms Ire created Irom quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each roller in the cipher stands or another.
Today's chlue: I equals D
" J P F E J C F X E B X W Y EMM . C E U .
XD H X B ECW BPHZZ BXWY MEV
PH C, EC W .FJ HC X Z WH Y ME V
P H CT J CI C W J Z HV PB XVEC F
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "History Is a relentless master. It has no present, only
the past rushing into the future.' John F. Kennedy
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 7-20


will pay off in the recogni-
tion you receive and the
support you get to keep
moving forward. The more
emphasis you put on what
you can offer, the greater.
your opportunity to reach
your goal. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Making
a move or opening your
doors to friends and rela-
tives will help you realize
how. much you have to
offer. Sharing will help you
recognize your potential as
a friend, lover and leader.-
Be honest about what you
need in your life. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't give
in to a bully. You owe it to'
the people you care about-
most to spend time nurtur-
ing your relationships and
building a strong home
base. **
AQUARIUS (Jan..20-,
Feb. 18): Nothing is out.
of reach if you diversify
and try new means and
methods to get involved
with the things you enjoy
'doing most. There is a way
to give back to the people
you've taken from in the
past. Honor your promises.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): The more
you procrastinate, the
more challenging your
chores will become. A
partnership will undergo
some unexpected changes,
causing uncertainty
regarding your future.


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


UP STARTS By Alan Arbesfeld / Edited by Will Shortz 2 3- 4 5 6 7 8- 9 101 12l l IT1316 17T18


Across
1 "Silas Marner"
foundling
6 They're schlepped
on tours
10 Bruce who
played Watson in
Sherlock Holmes
films
15 Equal
19 PBS figure from
1968 to 2001
21 Eyes
22 As well
23 Cause for Adam
to refuse the
apple?
24 Congested-
sounding
25 Weapon in Clue
26 Feature of some
Greek buildings
27 Feudal holding
28 Precamping
preparation?
30 Tests for srs.
32 One-time
connection
34 BMI rival
35 Christmas, for
Christians?
41 Alibi, e.g.
45 Antique
restorer's need,
for short
46 Locale in a 1968
Beatles song
47 Beaks
48 "Really?"
49 British P.M.
during the
creation of Israel'
51 Bountiful
harvest?
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


55 Good source of
protein
56 Saudi Arabian
province
57 _'gin fizz
58 Article in Die
Zeit
59 Robert Downey
Jr. title role
62 Prom rental
65 Place to pray
67 Independence
Day barbecue
serving?
74 Auel heroine
75 Prefix with plasm
76 Girl in a Willa
Cather title
77 Shelter grp.
81 Cut
83 Serving with
gAteau, maybe
85 P.T.A. member?:
Abbr.
86 Unnecessary part
of a jacket?
90 When streetlights
go on
92 Refuse
93 The Road
Runner, for one
94 Freezer brand
96 Caviar
97 Makeshift
stepladder
98 Ultimatum from a
spouse who
wants nicer
d,igs?
102 Single-celled
organism
104 PC key
105 Some chorus
members
106 Refusing to
watch football
on New Year's
Day?
111 Tijuana fare


113 Genesis victim
117 1970s-'80s
horror film
franchise, with
"The"
118 Lofty retreat
J19 Nathan's annual
hot-dog contest,
e.g.?
121 It may be
framed
122 ___ Chaiken,
creator and
writer of "The L
Word"
123 Concerning
124 Eye___
125 Grayer, perhaps
126 Scorch
127 Magnetic
induction unit

Down
1 Pair of ruffians?
2 Rear end
3 Coin with a
profile of Jos6
Maria Morelos
4 Conference clip-
ons
5 Suffix with ranch
6 Ones prejudiced
against 125-
Across people
7 One subjugated by
Cyrus the Great
8 Kind of housing,
for short
9 1040 datum: Abbr.
10 Bar __
11 Self-motivational
mantra
12 Composer Mahler
13 Slip by
14 Eye shadow
shade
15 Property that
costs $350
16 Patron saint of
goldsmiths


17 Where to find
"Baseball
Tonight"
18 Nicolas who
directed "The
Man Who Fell to
Earth"
20 Umbrage
28 Shire in
Hollywood
29 Treasure hunter's
find
31 See 110-Down
33 It's WNW of
Grand Canary
Island
35 Interference
36 Figure at una
corrida
37 Represent
38 Municipal laws:
Abbr.
39 Maker of the
trivia-playing
computer
program Watson
40 Those, in Toledo
42 Longfellow's bell
town
43 "The heat ___"
44 Look down
48 Trinity
component
50 Sally ___
teacakee)
52 Agitate
53 Needing tuning,
maybe
54 Mr. Peanut prop
56 Hunting lodge
decoration bit
60 Bird that is no
more
61 "As I was saying

63 Casual slip-on,
casually
64 Plans
66 Young newt


68 "Cactus Flower"
Oscar winner
69 Alternative to
chestnut
70 1940 Fonda role
71 Hesitant
72 Willowy: Var.
73 Ruth, once
77 Does, say
78 Blog comment
79 First name in
fashion
80 Personal


82 Alternative to
grounding
84 Media exec
Robert
87 Person with a
serious
conviction
88 Sandal's lack
89 Great Lakes
mnemonic
90 Eternal
91 Perfectly


95 There's a
national park
named for one
98 Old phone
company
nickname
99 Scented
100 Station
identification?
101 Alternative to
Cialis
103, Marsh of
mysteries 1
106 "Uh-uh"


107 Big picture?
108 Lawless role
109 Shiraz, for one
110 Look from a 31-
Down
112 Gillette product
114 "On&On" singer
Erykah
115 CPR experts
116 Some summer
births
119 Winter hazard in
Munich
120 Stand-up staple.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT


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/ am from Louisiana and / know our beaches are our home,
our way of life and our livelihood. Protecting the coast and
cleaning up the beaches is very personal to me.
Keith Seilhan, BP Cleanup


This Right


Beaches
Claims

Cleanup

Economic Investment

Environmental Restoration

Health and Safety

Wildlife


At BR we have taken full responsibility for the cleanup in the Gulf.
We are committed to keeping you informed.

Looking For Oil
Crews are cleaning Gulf Coast beaches 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week. When oil is spotted, the Response Command Center is
notified, a Shore Cleanup AssessmentTeam (SCAT) is mobilized
and cleanup begins immediately. Cleanup efforts are being
coordinated from 17 staging areas in Louisiana, Mississippi,
Alabama and Florida. Over 33,000 people are involved in the
cleanup operation.

If you see oil on the beach, please call 1-866-448-5816 and we'll
send a team to clean it up.

Cleaning Up the Beaches
The number of people mobilized to clean up the beaches depends
on the size of the affected area. Individual teams can'number in
the hundreds, and thousands of additional workers remain on-call.
Working with the Coast Guard, our teams continue cleaning up
until the last bit of oil has been removed. As a result, in most
cases when oil reaches a beach, it is even possible to keep it open.

Our Responsibility
Our beach cleanup operations will continue until the last of the oil
has been skimmed from the sea, the beaches and estuaries have
been cleaned up, and the region has been pronounced oil-free.
And none of the costs of our efforts will be paid by taxpayers.

Our commitment is that we'll be here for as long as it takes.
We may not always be perfect, but we will make this right.


For information visit: bp.com
deepwaterhorizonresponse.com
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bp_america
youtube.com/bp


For assistance, please call:
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
www.floridagulfresponse.com


2010 BR E&P


Making


bp


SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


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