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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01387
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: February 24, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01387
System ID: UF00028308:01387
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







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Thursday, February 24, 201 I www.akecit


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Vol. 137, No. 28 E 75 cents


School district earns high honors


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn
The Columbia County School
District received an excellent
performance review Wednesday
and earned a recommendation
for overall districtwide accredita-
tion.
District administrators and
principals gathered at the
Columbia County School Board
Administrative Complex audito-
rium for a special school board
meeting to hear arid receive the
findings from an eight-person


review team from AdvancED, an
international company delivering
school improvement and accredi-
tation services.
Those findings based on the
AdvancEd standards rubric:
"Operational" marks across the
board, with the operational mark
being second only to "highly
functional."
Lucille Wolfrey, Quality
Assurance Review team chair-
woman, presented the findings
and said it is "rare" for a district
to receive all operational marks.
Through actions like interviews


with community business lead-
ers and parents, district presenta-
tions and school visits, the team
performed a comprehensive,
three-day evaluation of the dis-
trict to determine if it would be
recommended for accreditation.
The team looked to see if and
how the district was dedicated
to continuous improvement
and growth on both a school
level and district level based
on various areas and the seven
AdvancEd standards: Vision and
purpose; governance and lead-
ership; teaching and learning;


documenting and using results;
resources and support systems;
stakeholder communications and
relationships; and commitment to
continuous improvement.
Based on the district's opera-
, tional marks, Wolfrey said it will
be recommended for accredita-
tion through AdvancEd.
"Columbia County has just
shown us a lot of good things and
wve could not be more pleased
to give you this accreditation
award," she said.
The district's accreditation
will become official subject to


the AdvancEd Committee on
Accreditation's approval at a June
meeting, Wolfrey said.
The review team also left the
district with several required
actions to improve on, such as
developing a process to build
internal administrative leadership
at all levels, which the district will
work on and report to AdvancEd
in two years.
Mike Millikin, superintendent
of schools, said being accredited
as a district will allow the district
and its schools to move forward
as a whole.


COLOR OF DANGER


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County resident Micah Tillotson (from left) tells his sons Jaiden, 8, and Bronsen, 6, the difference between a coral
snake and a scarlet kingsnake Wednesday afternoon. Tillotson killed the coral snake with a shot to the head.


LC man kills long coral snake


By C.J. RISAK
crisak@lakecityreporter. com
t started as a bit
of frivolity, a few
kids playing on the
trampoline in the
backyard. It ended
with a close encounter.
With a rather long east-
ern coral snake.
'We got off the trampo-
line and we were walking
back to the house, and
Zack (Abbott) said, 'I see
a snake,'" said 8-year-old
Jaiden Tillotson.
Fortunately for Jaiden,
his 6-year-old brother
Btonsen, and Zack and his
twin brother Sam, both 8,
Micah Tillotson was with
them Sunday. The father
of Jaiden and Bronsen,
Micah retrieved his shot-
gun from the house and
shot the snake.
It was after killing the


"The boys were playing on the
trampoline, and the spot it was
crawling I was just standing there
five minutes before."
Micah Tillotson
LC resident


reptile that they discov-
ered how large it actually
was: 33 inches after losing
its head.
"I had never seen one
out of captivity," said
Micah. "The boys were
playing on the trampoline,
and the spot it was crawl-
ing I was just standing
there five minutes before.
He was in low grass just
crawling across the yard.
It wasn't moving very
fast." -
The eastern coral
snake, recognizable for its
brightly-colored stripes of


red and yellow with black
bands and a black head,
is poisonous. An adult will
grow up to 20-30 inches,
making this particular
snake a lengthy one. It
can be found throughout
Florida, in any type of.
environment. It is not an
aggressive reptile, usually
found hiding under piles
of leaves or debris, or in
a hole.
"I didn't know the
saying, but I shot it first
anyway," said Micah.
He was referring to the
rhyme used to tell the dif-


ference between a scarlet
kingsnake and a scarlet
snake and the coral snake.
The kingsnake has similar
coloring, but its red stripe
touches the black band;
the scarlet snake has a
solid, light-colored belly,
and, like the kingsnake, it
has a red snout.
The rhyme: "If red
touches yellow, it can kill
a fellow (the coral snake);
If red touches black, it is a
friend of Jack (kingsnake
and scarlet snake)."
"I just wanted to make'
sure," Micah said of his
shot to the reptile's head.
Asked if any others might
be near by, he replied,
'"The next day my wife
had me out there going
through everything.
"I usually don't go look-
ing for them. Now I'll be
happy if I never see one
again."


City officials


seeK options


on EMS issue


County reviews'
proposals to
privatize service.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City officials
launched urgent moves
Wednesday in a bid to
address the possible loss
of Emergency Medical
Services after county offi-
cials prepared plans to dis-
continue providing EMS
for the entire county.
Columbia County offi-
cials reviewed proposals
Wednesday to privatize its


EMS service in the unin-
corporated areas of the
county and in the Town of
Fort White.
Lake City manager
Wendell Johnson said the
next step
in the EMS
process
involves
respond-
ing to the
county's
Johnson letter noti-
fying city
officials about the county's
privatization plans.

EMS continued on 3A


Business leader,

community icon

Rountree dies


Community pays
tribute, expresses
sadness over loss.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

Jackson Bartow "Jack"
Rountree, former partner of
the Rountree-Moore Ford
dealership in Lake City and
known for his community
involvement, died Tuesday
from health complications,
family members said. He
was 80.
A Lake City native and
Columbia HighSchool grad-
uate, Rountree graduated
from Vanderbilt University.
He spent four years serving
in the U.S. Navy after his
college graduation.
Rountree met his wife,
Joan, in Bethesda, Md. dur-
ing his time in the Navy,
said Beth Rountree Owens,
Jack Rountree's oldest
daughter. They married in
1954.
Rountree returned to
Lake City in 1956, joining
his father, Andrew Jackson
Rountree, in the family
business of Rountree Motor
Company, a local vehicle


dealership now known as
Rountree-Moore Ford.
Andrew Jackson
Rountree started the com-
pany in 1924. He ran it with
the late Jim Moore, Jack
Rountree's brother-in-law.
Jack Rountree and Jim
Moore eventually became -
partners of the dealership.
Jack Rountree was named
as the cor-
poration's
president
in 1968. In
1999; Andy
Moore, his
nephew,
acquired
Rountree the busi-
ness from
him and Jack Rountree
retired in 2004.
"He was wonderful to
work with," Andy Moore
said. "He enjoyed the car
business. ... He was very
good to me and made our
buy-out arrangement pos-
sible for me because in
1999, the car business was
very tough. I definitely owe
him a debt of gratitude for
working with me in the pur-
chase."

ROUNTREE continued on 5A


II I1111 CALLUS:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
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77
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ............... . 4A
Obituaries. ............5A
Advice & Comics......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B
Health.................. 6A


AROUND
FLORIDA
Discovery ready
for final launch.


COMING
FRIDAY
State Supreme
Court justice visits.


omx


^^^AL my


M ^ J ^ | ,jJ j









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 8-6-5
Evening: 6-5-2


Paay4) Wecdriesday:
S Afternoon: 4-4-1-9
Evening: 1-9-1-1


ewnatch.-
Tuesday:
2-14-17-19-22


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Judge to Lohan: Day of reckoning coming


LOS ANGELES
A judge on Wednesday
gave Lindsay Lohan
roughly two weeks to
decide if she will fight
or take a plea deal in a
felony grand theft case, but either
decision could send the troubled
starlet back behind bars.
Superior Court Judge Keith
Schwartz told Lohan he would
sentence her to'jail if she accepted
a plea deal involving the theft of a
$2,500 necklace from an upscale jew-
elry store.
"If you plead in front of me, if this
case is resolved in front of me, you
are going to jail," Schwartz said.
"Period."
Lohan, 24, has pleaded not guilty
to the charge.
Rejecting the deal would trigger
a hearing during which prosecu-
tors would present some of their
evidence to another judge. Schwartz
said that judge would sentence
SLohan for a probation violation if she
determined Lohan should stand trial.
That could mean Lohan is sen-
tenced to jail even before the theft
case'is tried.
Schwartz has said he thinks the
actress violated her probation in a
2007 drunken driving case, and two
other judges have warned Lohan she
faced a return to jail if she got into
trouble again.
That was before police began
investigating the "Mean Girls" star
last month after the necklace was
reported missing from the store in
the Venice area of Los Angeles. The
necklace was given to detectives
by an unidentified Lohan associate
before police could serve a search
warrant

Whoopi: Lack of black
Oscar nominees no trend
NEW YORK Whoopi Goldberg


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lindsay Lohan (left) appears in Los Angeles Superior Court Wednesday with her
attorney, Shawn Chapman Holley, where a judge is to decide whether an allega-
tion that the actress stole a $2,500 necklace can be resolved without going to trial.


said the lack of black nominees in
the major categories at this year's
/ Academy Awards doesn't reflect a
trend in the film industry.
Speaking at an exhibit of Oscar
statues Wednesday at New York
City's Grand Central Terminal,
Goldberg underscored that five
black actors have won Academy
Awards since 2002.
Goldberg recently said on "The
View" that she was upset about an
article in The New York Times cit-
ing the lack of black nominees this
year because it didn't mention her
supporting actress Oscar for 1990's
"Ghost." The Times later said she *
read the story "incorrectly." She
apologized for calling the reporting
sloppy.
She said Wednesday that it's inac-
curate to think there's "something
wrong" with the way blacks are rep-
resented at the Oscars.


Emmys honor former
Atlanta Mayor Young
NEW YORK Former U.S.
Ambassador and Atlanta ex-Mayor
Andrew Young is being honored by
the Emmy Awards for television work
more than 50 years ago.
As a young minister living in New
York, Young made frequent appear-
ances on the CBS-TV show "Look Up
and Live" from 1957 to 1960.
The National Academy of Television
Arts & Sciences said Wednesday
that Young was one of the first black
Americans with a regular television
presence. He hosts the syndicated
show "Andrew Young Presents."
The academy said it is giving Young
an award for lifetime achievement
on Friday, presented by former NBC
anchor Tom Brokaw.

M Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Abe Vigoda is 90.
* Actor Steven Hill is 89.
* Movie composer Michel
Legrand is 79.
* Actor James Farentino is
73.
* Actor Barry Bostwick is 66.
* Actor Edward James
Olmos is 64.
* Singer-writer-producer
Rupert Holmes is 64.


* Rock singer-musician
George Thorogood is 61.
* Actress Helen Shaver is
60.
* News anchor Paula Zahn
is 55.
* Country singer Sammy
Kershaw is 53.
* Singer Michelle Shocked
is 49.
* Actor Billy Zane is 45.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twllson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Rlsak. .754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
......................... 752-1293
(dkimler@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-.
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation .............755-5445
(circulation@lakecjtyreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12Weeks ............... $26.32
24 Weeks ............... $48.79
52 Weeks................. $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks............... $41.40
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Discovery ready
for final launch
CAPE CANAVERAL
- After 143 million miles
and nearly a year all told
in orbit, space shuttle
Discovery is poised to
blast off Thursday one last
time.
It promises to be a senti-
mental journey for the six
astronauts assigned to the
mission as well as the sup-
porting cast of thousands
who have painstakingly
prepped the world's most
traveled rocketship.
Once more, NASA's
fleet leader is paving a
new road, one that leads
to shuttle retirement and
an uncertain future for
America's space program.
When Discovery returns
from the International
Space Station, it will be
the first of the three
surviving shuttles to be
decommissioned this
year and shipped off to a
museum. The Smithsonian
Institution has first dibs on
this one.
But the end of the 30-
year shuttle program is
still months down the
road. For now, NASA'
prefers to focus on
Discovery's last hurrah, an
11-day mission to deliver
a bundle of space station
supplies and an experi-
mental humanoid robot
that will become the first
of its kind in space.
"Discovery is the most
flown spacecraft in his-
tory," NASA Administrator
Charles Bolden told The
Associated Press. "People
don't understand. They say
it matter-of-factly. There is
no other multi-flown space-
craft than the shuttle."
It's been an uncharac-
teristically bumpy exit for
Discovery.
Fuel tank cracks one
of the most challenging
problems to strike the
shuttles cropped up
during the initial count-
down in early November.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Tuesday, July 26, 2005 file picture, crowds watch as
Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off from Kennedy Space Center
in Cape Canaveral.


Launch director Mike
Leinbach said Discovery
has been "a great ship ...
an amazing machine."

Lawmakers tackle
education issues
MIAMI Major cuts to
school budgets as federal
stimulus funding dries up.
Tying teacher evaluations
to student performance
on standardized tests.
Expanding vouchers and
virtual school programs.
The upcoming legisla-
tive session is likely to be
a pivotal one in shaping
the future of education in
Florida.
On the table again this
spring will be the issue of
how teachers are paid and
evaluated. Jacksonville
Republican Sen. Stephen
Wise has introduced a bill
that would make 50 percent
of a teacher's evaluation
based on student growth on
the Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test The leg-
islation would also get rid
of tenure for new teachers
and provide performance
pay for those hired after
July 2014 that are rated
highly effective or teach in
a school that is low-income
or under-performing.


Wise and others sup-
porting his legislation
believe the state, with
a new governor and
Republican-controlled
Legislature, is ready to
take up the issue again. If
passed, Florida would join
a handful of other states
that have enacted reforms
tying teacher pay and eval-
uations to test scores and
weakening the protections
of tenure.
But teacher unions have
already pledged to fight
the bill.

Man finds WWII
bazooka round
JACKSONVILLE A
man found a World War II
era bazooka round while
tearing down a shed and
alerted the Jacksonville
Sheriff's Office.
Bomb squad techni-
cians examined the device
Wednesday morning and
determined it was not in
danger of exploding.
Lt. Andy Morgan says
the device, which was
discovered in the city's
San Marco neighborhood,
appears to have been inert
for some time.


THE WEATHER


- ,I.
A--.


PARTLY PARTLY \ PARTLY
CLOUDY CLOUDY CLOUDY


HI 77L053 H179L053 HI77L053


CHANCE
-STORMS


HI 178 LO 51


IE"Ri** i I M P orThrsay.Fbrar8 2


Pensacola
74/62


Tallahassee *
75/55

Pama City
70/601


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date






Thursday


S / ..



. '
'.i-. i-j w w td j ws w


SVald
75,
Lake
77,
GCa


77
59
71
46
87 in 1962
24 in 1978


dosta City
/56 Jacksonvie Cape Canaveral
5City \74/55 Daytona Beach
'53 Ft. Lauderdale
ainesville DaitmaBeadi Fort Myers
77/54 76J59 Galnesville
Ocala \ Jacksonville
78/55 Key West
Orlando Capk Canaveral ake City
80/59 76/62 Miami
Tampa Naples
78/6< West Palm Beach Ocala
\ 80/67 I Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers: 80/68 Pensacola
82/60 *Naples Tallahassee
81/62 Miami Tampa
80/67 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
78/69


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today


7:02 a.m.
6:26 p.m.
7:01 a.m.
6:26 p.m.

12:42 a.m.
11:13 a.m.


0.00" Moonrise tom. 1:44 a.m.
3.59" Moonsettom. 12:07 p.m.
7.27"

6.25" 7 OO
Feb. March March March
24 4 12 19
Last New First Full


On this date in
7p lriday 6a 1987, snow pellets
whitened coastal
areas of Orange
County and San
Diego County, with
three inches report-
ed at Huntington
Beach. The winter
storm also produced
thunderstorms with
hail and water-
spouts.


8

15 iinestolbum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
.4 ','' y
A,-__


Friday
78, 60, pc
80/60/pc
83/65/s
82/60/s
80/54/pc
80/54/pc
79/69/s
79/53/pc
82/65/s
80/60/s
80/56/pc
83/59/pc
73/55/sh
75/54/pc
77/50/sh
76/60/s
79/52/pc
83/61/s


Saturday
76,60, pc
78/58/pc
81/68/pc
81/61/pc
78/55/pc
75/55/pc
78/69/pc
77/53/pc
81/68/pc
82/61/pc
80/55/pc
82/60/pc
71/59/pc
70/59/pc
76/55/pc
76/61/pc
76/53/pc
80/67/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


Sweather.com


Forecasts, data and
Graphics 201.1. Weather
S- w Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
\f" www.weatherpubllsher.com


Get Connect


l


* Associated Press


A$H3.
'-Ci


Daily Scripture



"Do not those who plot evil
go astray? But those who plan
what is good find love and faith-
fulness."

-Proverbs 14:22


AROUND FLORIDA


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


FRI:AY]


r26 STURKt
m^M^^^^ m^^


[27 SUN


LM








Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011


40 residents celebrate black history

by reading African-American books


School hosts read-in
to promote literature
among local students.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn
Betty Kelly knows the power
of the written word. She
understands the chapter
in children's lives when
seeing adults reading
books for them can spark inspiration.
That's why she took the time to read
to a Richardson Middle School class
Wednesday.
"I think it's good for children to
see adults reading," Kelly said. "I
was happy to have the opportunity to
encourage them."
In honor of Black History Month,


Kelly, a Lake City resident, joined 40
local African-Americans who spent
time in RMS classrooms reading liter-
ature to the school's students for the
National African-American Read-In.
The read-in, coordinated by
Bernice Presley, is sponsored by
the National Council of Teachers of
English. It aims to make the celebra-
tion of African American literacy a tra-
ditional part of Black History Month
activities.
Every classroom, including physi-
cal education, had guest readers
Wednesday morning, said school
principal Bessie Whitfield.
"We had a great turnout," she
said.
The event shows students the
importance of reading, helps to pre-
pare them for reading exams on the
Florida Comprehensive Assessment


Test and encourages them to read,
Whitfield said.
"Reading is so very important in
our society and our world," she said.
"We'll do anything that we can to
encourage students to read."
Whitfield also noted that having
guest African-American readers
exposes the children to diversity.
Patricia Carter of Lake City said
she volunteered to inspire students
to read.
"Reading is important because
some of the kids at this age, they're
not reading," she said, "and just to
encourage them to better themselves
in life." Beverly Pope of Lake City
signed up to read with her husband,
Allen, to help prepare students for
their futures.
"Reading can only* extend their
knowledge," she said.


LEANNE TYOILake City Reporter
Betty Kelly (left) of Lake City reads an excerpt from 'Chicken
Soup for the African American Soul' to a class.of seventh-
grade language arts students at Richardson Middle School
Wednesday. The school participated in the National African
American Read-In, hosting 40 guest African-American readers.


EMS: City officials begin assessing main options on emergency
Continued From Page 1A


"I'm going to express
in the letter that it's very
disappointing that the
county and the city could
not come together in a
collaborative effort to dis-
cuss the variety of options
for mutual participation
and benefits in privatizing
EMS and life support ser-
vices," he said. "I think in
doing that collaboratively
that we could have come
up with the very best pos-
sible service for all resi-
dents in Columbia County
as a whole."
Johnson said city offi-
cials have started assess-
ing their choices and
noted there were three
main options:
The city could evalu-
ate who the county selects
as its service provider,
review the agreements
and possibly look to begin
negotiations with the same
service provider;
The city could con-
duct its own Request For
Proposals and evaluations
of potential service pro-
viders; and
The city would assess


going into the EMS busi-
ness on its own.
Ad Valorem taxes, state
revenue sharing dollars,
general fund revenues and
EMS fees would be used
to subsidize the service if
the city decided to run its
own EMS services.
According to an inde-
pendent study by Johnson,
based on local EMS data,
there was approximately
$1.2 million collected
in ambulance fees in
Columbia County in 2009.
Insurance payments were
$1.1 million for 6,946 calls
in 2009. Of the top eight
EMS call locations in the
county, 47 percent were
within city limits.
Johnson said if the city
opted to establish its own
EMS service with its fire
department, without any
restrictions and exclusive
rights to operate within
the incorporated areas
of Lake City, the service
would pay for itself.
Columbia County
Commission Chairman
Jody DuPree said the
county will not include the


city if EMS services are
privatized.
Johnson said city council
members are concerned
the letter indicates the city
needs to make alternative
arrangements. County
officials did not indicate
how much time. the city
would have to make its
decision before the, ser-
vices were privatized.
Also, council members
wondered if there would
be restrictions on issuing
the city a Certificate of
Need to provide EMS ser-
vices.
Columbia County
currently has the statu-
tory authority to issue
Certificates of Need.
"I just hope county offi-
cials will be fair, not only
to the city council, but
to the 12,000 -plus resi-
dents that live in this city
and pay Columbia County
taxes," Johnson said.
DuPree said he assumes
EMS calls which originate
from within the city lim-
its would go through the
dispatching system and
get "dialed-down" to the


appropriate service pro-
vider. He said there has
* been no discussion by' city
and county officials about
the possibility of a part-
nership for EMS privatiza-
tion.
Johnson said he and
Lake City Major Stephen
Witt discussed the pos-
sibility of establishing a
committee, with Johnson,
Grayson Cason, key staff
members and a few citi-
zens to address the city's
plan to find a solution to
the EMS dilemma.
While some residents
may -fear there will be an
interruption of services,
Johnson laid those wor-
ries to rest.
"'That is not going to
happen," he said. "I know
the city and the county
are not going to allow that
to happen. I would hope
they would give us ade-
quate time to do the very
best thing for our citizens
and I trust they will."
Although the EMS ser-
vices will be privatized,
DuPree said he imagines
there would be agree-


ments in place where units
providing services in the
county would respond to
calls inside city limits if
the need arises.
"I don't know what the
city intends to do," DuPree
said. "I don't know if they're
going to get into the EMS
business and go buy some
trucks. I don't know what
they are going to do, but
I'm certain whatever they
do there will be some sort
of agreement if they need-
ed the county .provider to
assist them, I'm certain we
would do that."
Columbia County
officials received four
responses from prospec-
tive EMS service providers
Wednesday through the
county's (RFQ) Request
For Qualifications.
The RFQ's will be
reviewed by Ben Scott,
Tres Atkinson, Rusty Noah,
David Kraus and Dale
Williams on Friday.
Each will independent-
ly review and rank the
responses and give a copy
of the submittals to Scott.
Scott will tabulate the infor-


services


nation and give the docu-
ments to Williams. The
tabulations are expected
to be completed by Friday
night.
The response receiv-
ing the highest rating will
enter negotiations with the
county for a potential con-
tract.
County officials expect
to have the information
presented by the sec-
ond Columbia County
Commissioner's meeting
in March.
DuPree said it would
be possible for the City of
Lake City to negotiate a
contract with the same ser-
vice provider the county
selects.
"I would think that
would be what they would
want to do at least in
the interim," he said. "Our
negotiation is just for us
and the Town of Fort
White. I can't imagine why
whatever company we efid
up negotiating with would
not want to negotiate with
the city. I think that would
be a smart thing for the
city to do."


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OPINION


Thursday, February 24, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Wisconsin

in center

of national

debate


Yemen, now
Madison. The
Mideast is on fire,
and apparently
America's Midwest is, too.
We're half joking, of course,
but we're not alone in noting
the substantial crowds -
reportedly approaching 70,000
people that have converged
on Wisconsin's state capitol
and the streets surrounding
to protest not only Gov. Scott
Walker's budget-cutting efforts
but his aggressive attempt to
restrict collective bargaining
rights for most public employ-
ees, including teachers.
:- It has put Wisconsin in the
center of a national debate on
the role and scope of govern-
ment, what services it ought to
be providing, at what t, and
what to do about the debt that
government at almost every
level has accumulated in stagger-
ing proportions. The Republican
Walker has vowed to do what-
ever is necessary to balance
budgets now estimated at $3.6
billion in the red over the' next
two years.
Ultimately this battle is
not exclusive to Wisconsin.
Conversation has begun in
Illinois as to whether teachers
should have rights to tenure and
to strike. Advocates for eliminat-
ing or curtailing both made the
rounds of Illinois editorial boards
late last fall. With Democrats in
control in Springfield, it doesn't
seem to be gaining much trac-
tion, for now.
In fact the recession of a
lifetime and the ongoing slip-
page of the middle class have
caused a seismic shift in the way
Americans perceive the econom-
ic landscape, the haves and have-
nots, the imbalance between
public and private sectors.
The traditional parties are
failing Americans by utterly
refusing to sit down and govern
together, to make the decisions
that must be made to get us out
of this morass.
Where have all the states-
men gone?

Journal Star (Peoria, III.)

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Undoing of Libya's oily despot


The Devil wears pet-
rol.
He dresses as he
acts crudely
and yet his oil
somehow has allowed him to
get away with all manner of
hellish deeds from the skies
above Lockerbie to the shores
of Tripoli.
He is a known mass murder-
er and yet, one way or another,
the West always found a way to
give him a pasg and then buy
his gas. His guilt has never
,been in doubt and yet he never
really felt the full lash of global
justice for his crimes.
Until, perhaps now. Libya's
despotic Colonel Moammar
Gaddafi whose apparatchiks
blew Pan Am flight 103 out of
the sky over Scotland in 1988,
killing 270 people, and who
sponsored terrorist acts includ-
ing the 1986 bombing of a West
Berlin disco filled with U.S.
military personnel may have
finally gone too far with his
murderous ways.
This time he has killed
hundreds of his own people.
Genocide was his response
of choice to the wave of pro-
democracy protests rolling
across the Middle East autocra-
cies. Troops fired live ammo
at protesters. And military
helicopters and jets swooped in
and sprayed the masses with
gunfire.
Two Libyan fighter jets flew
to Malta, with the crews asking
for asylum, saying they wouldn't
obey orders to slaughter their
own people. More importantly:
Two of Libya's top diplomats,
the ambassador in Washington
and deputy ambassador at the
United Nations, resigned and
publicly called for Gaddafi to
resign. To which the 68-year-old


Martin Schram
martirn.schrom@gmail.com
despot went on TV and, during
a ramble that lasted more than
an hour, declared: "I will not
leave the country, and I will die
as a martyr."
Which Western diplomats
might see as an overdue but
workable outcome. Never mind
that Gaddafi has a history of
making promises but then
breaking them. And the West
has a history of being shocked,
shocked every time.
We say "the West" here
because that is the diplomatic
way of saying we aren't talk-
ing predominantly about the
United States but the fact that
the Europeans have a history
of going soft on Libya and then
striking a deal of Libyan oil.
In the mid-1990s, when Sen.
Ted Kennedy added Libya to
a bill clamping oil sanctions
on Iran, the European Union
strongly criticized any effort to
clamp sanctions on firms that -
do business with Libya. France
was especially vehement in its
objections. In 1999, Italy's state
oil company ENI signed an
agreement with Libya to invest
$5.5 billion to develop oil and
gas reserves.
Gaddafi, under duress due to
the U.S. sanctions, knew how '
to play the West. He acknowl-
edged Libya's responsibility for
the bombing of Pan Am 103 and
agreed to pay compensation to
victims' families. He agreed to
end Libya's nuclear, chemical


and biological weapons pro-
grams and got more accolades
from President George W. Bush
and British Prime Minister
Tony Blair. Then Blair went to
Tripoli and announced a $200
million deal to explore oil and
natural gas in Libya. The U.S.
took Libya from its list of states
sponsoring terrorism.
Then, in 2009, Scotland
released from a life sentence
the convicted Lockerbie
bomber, Libyan Abdel Basset
Ali at-Megrahi, on humanitarian
grounds that he had cancer and
had just months to live. Gaddafi
promised a restrained return
to Libya but then feted the
mass murderer to a huge hero's
homecoming. Megrahi, by the
way, is still alive.
Then-Prime Minister Gordon
Brown denied his Labor gov-
ernment influenced the deci-
sion and said no oil deal was
involved. But this month, Prime
Minister David Cameron's gov-
ernment issued a report saying
while there was no overt pres-
sure from the government or
BP Oil, Labor did take steps to
make it easier for the Lockerbie
bomber to be released.
Across the pond, Sen. Charles
Schumer (D-N.Y.) translated
all that into real-speak. "This
report confirms what many
of us have long suspected,"
Schumer said, as reported by
Reuters. "The British govern-
ment and BP wanted Megrahi
released so that an oil deal
being negotiated with Libya
could go forward."
Perhaps we are nearing the
end of a shameful era of the
West's placating Libya's murder-
ous, unrepentant oilman.

* Martin Schram writes
political analysis for Scripps
Howard News Service.


OTHER OPINION


Gadhafi kills to stay in power


Sooner or later, a dicta-
torship confronts this
dilemma: How willing
is it to kill its own
people in order to stay
in power?
This week, Libya's Moammar
Gadhafi convincingly answered
that question, showing why,
at 42 years in power, he is one
of the world's longest-serving
leaders. The Gadhafi family
threatened "rivers of blood" if
the protests against his regime
didn't stop.
They didn't, and instead
spread. Benghazi, the second-
largest city, and much of the
eastern part of the country
are said to be in demonstra-
tors' hands. But in Tripoli, the
capital, and elsewhere, Gadhafi


unleashed warplanes, helicop-
ter gunships, pro-government
militias and what are said to be
mercenaries from other parts of
Africa.
Truckloads of armed sup-
porters roamed through Tripoli,
shooting at anybody they found
in the streets and firing at peo-
ple watching from the windows
of their homes.
Gadhafi's behavior, always
eccentric, seems to have
become more bizarre as the
demonstrations wore on. To
counter widely believed rumors
that he had fled the country, he
appeared on TV for 30 seconds,
holding an umbrella; he was half
in and half out of a car.
He followed that with a lon-
ger address. Speaking from '


the ruins of his former home,
destroyed in a 1986 U.S. bomb-
ing raid, he called on the people
to attack the demonstrators.
Conflating himself with his
country, as he is wont to do,
Gadhafi said, "Libya wants
glory, Libya wants to be at the
pinnacle, at the pinnacle of the
world. I am a fighter ... I will die
as a martyr at the end."
There are signs that his long-
running rule is beginning to
fray. There have been defections
at various levels of the govern-
ment and the armed services.
Maybe Gadhafi will make good
on his promise to die a martyr,
but, really, simple exile will do.

* Scripps Howard News Service


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandall.com


Workshop

touches

on telling

your story

How did you get
your start?
Recently I spoke
at a conference in
Spartanburg, S.C.,
for First Steps, a program that
aims to help preschool teach-
ers prepare children for school.',
It is daunting, not to men-
tion arrogant, to speak to a
gathering of people for whom -
you.have so much respect and
admiration.
To me, there is no higher,
more important or more
demanding calling than help-
ing children get a good start
in life.
I say this from experience,
both as-a mother of three and
as someone who once spent an
entire summer doing day care,
filling in for a friend who was
taking a break to have a baby.
My youngest child was then
3 years old. Each morning, as
parents brought children p ,.
the walk, he'd stick his head '
out the door and yell,'"Go
home!"
That 3-year-old now teaches
third grade and has a 6-month- ,
old child of his own. Which'
only affirms my long-held
belief that God has both a
sense of justice and a sense of
humor.
What do you say to a group
of professionals who know
more than you will ever know
about caring for children?
-I told them to take care of
themselves. People who are
good at taking care of others
aren't always good at taking
care of themselves, but it's
important that they at least try.
After the talk, I led a work- .
shop called "Reading and
Wi-iting and Changing the
World." We talked about read-
ing, how it changes a child's
world in ways other things
cannot
Then I gave them a writ-
ing assignment Tell me your
story, I said, to the age of 6, by
answering the following:
1. What's your first memory?
I was 2 years old, sitting on my
tricycle on my grandparents'
patio, wearing a red sweater,
brown pants and black Mary
Janes. My hair was red, curly,
tangled. Sky was blue, air was
cool, sun felt warm on my face.
It was autumn, leaves were
falling. I watched them swirl,
red and yellow, on the breeze.
Then I heard footsteps, looked
up and saw my daddy coming
to get me. And I was happy.
2. What was your favorite
book/song/story/TV show?
"Uncle Remus"/"Jesus Loves
Me"/any story I ever heard/
'The Howdy Doody Show."
3. What sight/sound/taste/
touch/smell do you recall best?'
Thunderstorms/train whistles/'
biscuits/bee stings/the back of'
my baby brother's neck.
The point of the workshop
was to invite participants to
write a story about themselves
that they can share with a child"
one of their own, or one in .
their care.
The point of my telling you :
about it is to invite you to do
the same. Write a story about
yourself (using those questions
or any others you prefer) and
then tell it to a child.
If you're lucky, maybe the
child will tell you one in return.
Every good story begs
another.

* Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


4A













ROUNTREE: Generous contributor
Continued From Page 1A


Jack Rountree's civic involvement
included his 51-year-long membership
with the Rotary Club of Lake City, of
which he served as the club's president
in 1977. He also served as president of
the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber
of Commerce in 1967.
Owens noted that her father enjoyed
the sport of golf, his favorite hobby. "He
was an accomplished amateur golfer,"
she said. "Golf was his passion."
Morris Williams, Rountree's friend
since high school, described him as one
of North Florida's top amateur golfers.
"He loved the game of golf," Williams
said. "He was always glad to help other
people learn to play the game."
Owens and her sister, Susie Rountree
Hall, said their childhood memories of
their father recall a sense of family.
"Our dad taught us family is first," Hall
said. "We were taught respect, rot to give
up, no such thing as quitting," Owens


said. "You finish what you start and wher-
ever you go, always remember where you
came from."
Rountree will be remembered not only
as an upstanding business partner, but
for the person he was, Andy Moore said.
"He was a fine young man and he
was a wonderful adult in the commu-
nity," Williams said, who also described
Rountree as an outstanding high school
student who was active in extracurricular
activities.
"He always did his best at whatever
he could do and that best was excellent,"
Williams said. "In the community, he was
an outstanding businessman and gener-
ous contributor to charitable and civic
organizations.
"Everything that I know or can say
about Jack Rountree is excellent,"
Williams said. "Just an A-plus kind of per-
son and I feel a deep, personal sadness at
his passing."


RMS principal welcomes read-in participants

Bessie Whitfield, Richaidson Middle School principal, welcomes the guest readers to the
read-in Wexnesday at the school's Media Center.


OBITUARIES


Doretha Helene Holcomb
Burgess
Doretha Helene' Holcomb
Burgess, the only child of the
lAte Mr. and Mrs. Albert and Ma-
mie Holcomb, passed away on
February 16.
She was prede-
ceased by her
husband, John
H. Burgess,
of Lake City.
She earned a
B.S. Degree
from Florida
A and M University and played
tennis and basketball for-the Rat-
tlers. Subsequently, she earned
a Master's degree from Tuske-
gee institute and completed post
graduate studies in chemistry
at the University of Illinois.
Mrs. Burgess began teaching
in White Springs, Florida at
Carver High School where she
also coached the girl's basket-
ball team. The remainder of her
educational career was served
in Columbia County. She was
a beloved teacher, coach, men-
tor and friend. Richardson High
School girl's basketball team
won state championships while
she was coaching and constantly
competed at the highest levels.
She won the Star Teacher Award
and the Florida Outstanding
Chemistry Teacher Award while
teaching at Columbia High
School. Her science students
continually received academic
acclaim for their projects each
year. She served as pianist for
the Trinity United Methodist
Church youth gospel chorus and
the Union AME Church. She
was a member of Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority, Inc. and served
honorably in numerous church,
civic and social organizations.
Survivors include: two sons,
Jonathan (Joy) and Michel;
three daughters, Sonya (Harold),
Wanda (McKinley), and Bon-
nie Burgess; two grandchildren,
JaJuan Burgess and Langston
Burgess; great granddaughter
Noel Burgess; brother, James
Andrews; sister-in-law Venda
R. Burgess; cousins, Julia Nun-
ally, Vancilla Williams (Donald),
cousin Marguerite; four nieces
Doris Mims (Larry), Laura Pat-
ton (David), Elaine Godwin
(Isaac), Sheila Burgess; nine
nephews, Leroy Mobley, El-
liot Reedes (Christine), Joseph
Hightower III, Alwyn Burgess,
Calvin Burgess (Sandra), Ly-
mus Burgess, Taurean Thomp-
son, Eugene Thompson, Donald
Williams, Jr., three godchildren,
LaConia Turner, Sherwin Fore-
man, Boney Watson; and many
other relatives and friends.
Family will receive friends from
6:00-8:00 p.m., Friday, February
25 at Trinity United Methodist,
248 NE Martin Luther King St.
Funeral Services will be 11:00
a.m. Saturday at First United
Methodist Church, 973 S. Mar-
ion St. Interment will follow at
the Garden of Rest Cemetery.
MIZELL FUNERAL HOME
365 N.W. Washington Street,
Lake City is in charge of ar-
rangements. Ph# '(386) 752-
3166, Email rudolmize@aol.
com Please sign "guest register
at www.mizellfuneralhome.com

Andrew Copeland, Sr.

Andrew Charles Copeland, Sr.
51, passed away February 17,
2011 after an extended illness.
Andrew was
born Decem-
ber 17, 1959
in Lake City,
Florida to the
pare leadership of



Father, James Copeland, Sr.;
land, Sr.' and
Frances Rich-erish memories,
ardson. He
was a graduate of Columbia
High School Class of 1977. He
was a member of Good Shep-
drew CoTabeland, Jler.Ch (Dchiedre),



thAndre adCopeland (Sharon), Je-
Copeland. Precedents in death:ree
Father, James Copeland, Sr.;
two brothers, Hugh Edward Co-
peland and Willie B. Stewart;






(Vince), Lateri Taylor (Thy-


ron), Angelica Copeland; lov-
ing mother, Frances Richardson;
step-father, Freddie Richardson;
seven brothers, Rev. Willie Co-
peland (Edith), James Copeland,
Anthony Copeland' (Joyce),
Ricky Stewart (Suzanne), Stan-
ley Stewart (Scharolette), Kevin
Stewart (Sarah), Hugh Edward
Stewart (Marie), all of Lake
City, FL.; seven sisters, Beverly
Dallas (Curtis), Patricia Graves
(Malcolm), Felecia Stewart,
all of Lake City, FL., Veronica
Stewart (Lau Don), Live Oak,
FL., Gwendolyn Wilson(Lee
Roy), Shirley Cherry (Don),
Teresa Broom, all of Lake City,
FL.; 21 grandchildren; hosts of
aunts, nieces, nephews, other
relatives and sorrowing friends.
Funeral services for Mr. Co-
peland- will be 11:00 A.M.
Saturday, February 26, 2011
at Olivet Missionary Baptist
Church, 541 NE Davis Av-
enue, Lake City, FL. Rev. Ron-
ald V. Walters, Pastor, Bishop
Kenneth Troupe, officiating.
Visitation with the family will
be Friday, .February 25, 2011
from 5-7 pm at Good Shepherd
Tabernacle Church. 504 NW
Dixie Street. Lake City, FL.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Oma Lee Edwards
Oma Lee Edwards, 87, a resi-
dent of Lake City, Florida passed
away Wednesday February 23,
2011 at the Suwannee Valley
Care Center, Lake City, Florida.
Mrs. Edwards was born in St.
Albans, West Virginia and has
resided in Lake City, Florida for
the past ten years. Prior to living
in Lake City she had resided in
Loxahatchee, Florida and is the
daughter of the late Okey and
Georgia Ball Ballard. She was a
homemaker and a member of the
First Baptist Church, Lake Worth,
Florida. She was past President
of the Florida State Firemans
Womens Auxiliary, a member
of the Florida Board of Realtors
and she taught Sunday School
and vacation Bible School.
Survivors include her loving
husband of sixty-eight years,
Buford J. Edwards, Lake City,
Fl. Two sons and daughters-in-
laws, John (Donna) Edwards,
West Palm Beach, Florida and
Danny (Suzanne) Edwards, Lake
City, Florida. One sister: Betty
Pierce, Boynton Beach, Fl. Two
Grandchildren, Stacey Brews-
ter and Cherie Castle and five
great grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Ed-
wards will be conducted Friday,
February 25, 2011 at 2:00 P.M.
in the Chapel of Guerry Funeral
Home with the Rev. John Har-
rison, officiating. Interment
will follow in the Salem Primi-
tive Baptist Cemetery, Lake
City, Florida. The family will
receive friends Friday from 1-
2:00 P.M. just prior to the service
at the funeral home. In lieu of
flowers donations may be made
to the charity of your choice.
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME,
2659 SW. Main Blvd. Lake City,
Florida is in charge of all arrange-
ments. Please sign the guest-
book at guerryfuneralhome.net

Samuel Jones

Mr. Samuel Jones, 87, native
resident of Lake City, Florida de-
parted this life Friday, February
18, 2011 in Haven Hospice Care
Center follow-
ing an extend- ---
ed illness. Mr.
Jones was born
July 4, 1923
in. Lake City,
FL., to Mable
Jones. Mrs.
Jones preceded .
him in death. He was a member
of Mt. Pisgah AME Church. Mr.
Jones, affectionately known as
"Mr. Sammy", retired from Lake
Shore Hospital after having
worked there for twenty years.
Among other interest, he enjoyed
fishing. He leaves to cherish his
memories, two daughters, Mary
Jernigan and Maude Jenkins,
Lake City, FL; two sons, Sonny
Jenkins, Clifford Jenkins, Lake
City, FL; two sisters-in-law, Ju-


lia Mae Lewis, Delores Tillman,
Lake City, FL.; 5 grandchildren;
11 great grandchildren; devoted
friends, Ruby Johnson, Rosa
Mae Walter, Henrietta Brown,
Gwendolyn Bennett-Reed and
family; a host of nieces, neph-
ews, other relatives and friends.
Funeral services for. Mr. Jones
will be 2:00 P.M. Saturday, Feb-
ruary 26, 2011 at Mt. Pisgah
AME Church. 519 NE Wash-
ington Street. Lake City, FL.
The family will receive friends
Friday, February 25, 2011 from
5-7 PM at the funeral home.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq CombsTurner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Jackson Bartow "Jack"
Rountree
Jackson Bartow "Jack" Roun-
tree, 80; of Lake City, Florida
passed away Tuesday, February
22, 2011. He 4O
was a native of
Lake City and ,
a graduate of .
Columbia High ""-
School where he played football
for the CHS Tigers. He gradu-
ated from Vanderbilt University
in Nashville, TN where he was
a member of Sigma Alpha Epsi-
lon fraternity and captain of the
golf team. After graduation, he
served in the United States Navy
and then returned to Lake City
and began working in the family
business. He was an active mem-
ber of the Rotary Club of Lake
City and recognized for 51 years
of outstanding service. He served
as President of the Rotary Club
1977/1978 and was a Paul Harris
Fellow and also served as Presi-
dent of the Lake City/Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce
in 1967. His leadership service
continued as he served as Di-
rector of the Florida State Golf
Association 'from 1992-1994.
He was the President of Rouin-
tree-Moore before retiring from
the family business, and was a
member of First Presbyteriah
Church. Jack's love for his fam-
ily and passion for golf, hunting,
field trails, dogs, photography
and Gator sports fulfilled his life.
Mr. Rountree is survived by
his wife of fifty-six years, Joan
Rountree of Lake City; two
daughters, Beth R. Owens (Skip)
of Fayetteville, GA. and Susan
R. Hall of Tallahassee, FL.; four
grandchildren, Hannah and Katie
Hall qfTallahassee, FL., and Erin
and Kelly Owens of Fayetteville,
GA.; his sister, Susan R. Moore
of Lake City; nephew, Andrew
Moore (Linda) of Lake City;
niece, Kathy M.Wagoner, of Port
Angeles, WA; nephew, Dr. John
Wolf of Ft. Lauderdale, FL.;
brother-in-law Ralph Morgen of
Dallas, TX; nephew Bruce Mor-
gen (Diane) of Raleigh, NC; and
niece Mary Ross (Ralph) of Dal-
las, TX. Preceding Jack in death
was his father Andrew Jack-
son, mother Dorothy Rountree,
his sister Dorothea R.Daniel,
niece Libba Newton and broth-
er-in-law James H. Moore.
Memorial services for Mr. Roun-
tree will be conducted on Mon-
day, February 28, at 11:00 A.M.
at the First Presbyterian Church
of Lake. City with the Rev. Dr.
Roy Martin, Jr. officiating. A
reception will follow the memo-
rial at the church fellowship hall
and all friends and family are
invited. In lieu of flowers dona-
tions may be made to the Jack
Rountree GLP scholarship at
Florida Gateway College, The
Foundation for Florida Gateway
College, 149 SE College Place,
Lake City, Florida 32025 write
Jack Rountree Scholarship in
the memo line; or to Haven
Hospice Suwanee Valley Hos-
pice Care Center 6037 US Hwy
90W, Lake City, Florida 32055;
or the First Presbyterian Church,
P.O. Box 469, Lake City, FIl
32056. Arrangements are under
the direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 South HWY
441, Lake City. (386) 752-1954.
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn. corn


James Vance Sharp

James Vance Sharp, "Kits", was
born July 17, 1924 in Reidsville,
NC to Annie Britt Blackwell
Sharp and James
Merrite Sharp.
In high school
he enjoyed mu-
sical studies on -
the clarinet and piano, played
baseball and football, and earned
the BCA rank of Eagle Scout.
He attended NC State College
in Raleigh but was drafted in
1942 to the US Navy Reserve.
He entered the Navy Reserve
Active Duty-and the Navy V-12
program at Duke University lat-
er completing his medical train-
ing at Wake Forest University's
Bowman Gray School of Medi-
cine in 1948. After subsequent
surgical training, he entered pri-
vate practice in Reidsville, NC.
In 1964 he entered the United
States Navy. His duty stations
included St. Albans, NY; Viet
Nam as Commander of 1st Med-
ical Battalion where he achieved
the rank of Captain, and at Na-
val Hospital Jacksonville as
chief of surgery. Between 1969
and 1975 he had the honor
of serving on and leading the
NASA DOD Emergency Surgi-
cal Team. This group of highly
trained medical specialists was
assigned to handle any medical
emergencies that might occur
during the launches of the Apol-
lo, Skylab, and Apollo-Soyuz
missions. This duty earned him
the Joint Service Commenda-
tion Medal. Other assignments
included Chief of Surgery and
Director of Clinical Services at
the USN'Hospital in Naples, It-
aly ('75-"78) and Thoracic Sur-
geon and Chief of Surgery at the
USN Hospital, Charleston, SC
('78 '85). A veteran of three
wars (WWII, Korea, and Viet
Nam), he was awarded the Le-
gion of Merit with Combat "V".
Upon retiring from the Navy in
1985, he continued his surgical
practice as Chief of Surgery for
the VA Hospital in Lake City,
FL, and as a Clinical Professor
of Surgery at the University of
Florida's College of Medicine.
From there, he and his family
settled in a home on the St. Johns
River in Green Cove Springs.
At every location, he sought
and enjoyed the fellow-
ship of other musicians and
the opportunity to perform.
He is survived by his wife of
56 years, Gwen Roberts Sharp,
and four children: Sally. Paulis-
sen (Chris) of League City, TX;
Molly Sharp of Jacksonville,
FL; James Sharp (beborah) of
Yadkinville, NC; Annie Dah-
men (John) of Fredericksburg,
VA, and four grandchildren:
Zachary Paulissen of Pittsburgh,
PA; JordAn, Carleigh and James
Dahmen of Fredericksburg,
VA. A passionate believer in
the blessings of strong fam-
ily values his love and lead-
ership will be' sorely missed.
A Memorial Service will
be held at 10:00 am on Fri-
day, February 25, 2011 in the
Broadus-Raines Chapel with
Rev. Pearl Boles officiating.
Visitation will be in the chapel


one hour prior to the service.
Following the service, the family
will receive friends at the Village
ImprovementAssociation, 17Pal-
metto Ave., Green Cove Springs.
Interment with military honors
will be held at 2:30 pm Friday,
February 25, 2011 at Jack-
sonville National Cemetery.
Memorials may be
made in his name to:
Florida United Meth-
odist Children's Home
51 Children's Way, Enter-


ts!

9248 129th ROAD LIVE OAK
(386) 362-2333
Monday thru Friday 9:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Closed
"For Over 30 Years"
www.noblesgreenhouse.com


prise, FL 32725 386-668-4774
www.allchildrenfirst.org
Please sign the fami-
ly's online guestbook at
www.broadusraines.com. Ar-
rangements are under the 6are
of BROADUS-RAINES
FUNERAL HOME, 501
Spring St., Green Cove
Springs, FL (904) 284-4000.

Obituaries are. paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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John W Burns III, Agent
234 SW Main Boulevard
Lake City, FL 32056
Bus: 386-752-5866
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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011


Friend asks: Is it

a hematoma or

a hamartoma?


EAR DR.
GOT: I
spoke with a
friend recent-
ly who said
she was diagnosed with a
hamartoma in her chest
cavity. I corrected her
and said she likely had a
hematoma, but she was
convinced she heard her
doctor correctly. Can you
tell me the right word?
DEAR READER:
Without knowing your
friend and her medical
condition, I can only
assume she is correct.
I will outline the differ-
ences between the two
words.
A hamartoma is a
benign growth composed
of an abnormal mixture of
epithelial and mesenchy-
mal elements. It is a part
of any tissue that either
grows faster or without
the usual organization
of its neighbor cells. It
results from faulty devel-
opment. Their growth is
limited, so they are not
actually tumors, even
though they are often
referred to as such. They,
are more common in men
than women, and most
people so diagnosed are
smokers. Growths vary in
size from 1 to 9 centime-
ters and consist of lobules
of cartilage, fat, fibro-
myxoid tissue and, on
occasion, smooth muscle
and bone. The growth of
these lesions is extremely
slow, perhaps 3 millime-
ters per year.
A hematoma, on the
other hand, develops
from injury such as from
a fall or banging one's
arm or leg against a hard
object. Blood vessels
under the skin tear, blood
leaks into the surround-
ing tissue, and a bruise
or contusion results. The
lesion will often turn
purple, dark red, yel-
low/green and a variety
of colors as the blood is
absorbed back into the
body. The process can
take up to four weeks.
There are some that do
not reabsorb and need to
be removed by a physi-
cian. If not removed, they
may calcify. In an extrem-


ON HEALTH


Dr. Peter Gott

ity, they cause pressure to
build and cut off circula-
tion.
Generally speaking,
bruises are not a cause
for concern, and a person
is generally fully aware of
why a hematoma devel-
ops.
Older adults, on the
other hand, have less fat
under the skin, and they
tend to bruise easily.
Aspirin and anticoagu-
lants can cause bruising.
Disorders that cause
bleeding or a clotting dis-
order include hemophilia,
thrombocytopeni., lupus,
liver disease, leukemia
and other less common
disorders.
Because your friend
referred to her chest
cavity, she likely has a
harmless hamartoma. My
guess is her physician
will continue to monitor
it on a periodic basis to
ensure it does not change
in appearance.
DEAR DR. GOTT:
Would you address the
link between aluminum
and Alzheimer's disease?
And if there is truly a
link, why do deodorants
contain it? Thank you.
DEAR READER: I
wish I could provide a
direct answer. There have
been a number of books
written and a great deal of
research done about a pos-
sible link, but after numer-
ous years of research, sci-
entists remain unsure what
role if any aluminum
plays in Alzheimer's dis-
ease.

* Dr. Peter Gott is a
retired physician and
the author of the book
"Dr. Gott's No Flour, No
Sugar Diet," available at
most chain and indepen-
dent bookstores, and the
recently published "Dr.
Gott's No Flour, No Sugar,
Cookbook."


Doctors order tests out of fear


of lawsuits, research confirms


By MARILYNN MARCHION
Associated Press .

SAN DIEGO

pricey imaging tests
are often more for the
doctor's benefit than the
patient's, new research
confirms.
Roughly one-fifth of tests that
bone and joint specialists order
are because a doctor fears being
sued, not because the patient needs
them, a first-of-its-kind study in
Pennsylvania suggests.
The study comes a day after
President Barack Obama began
a push to overhaul state medical
malpractice laws as a way to reduce
unnecessary tests that drive up
health care costs.
"This study is a glimpse behind
the curtain of what's happening in
a doctor's mind," said its leader, Dr.
John Flynn of Children's Hospital of
Philadelphia. If doctors sense you
might second-guess them or cause
trouble, "you could potentially be
risking more tests being done."
Results were reported Wednesday
at an American Academy of
Orthopedic Surgeons conference in
California.
Patients expect the highest level
of care. and think this means the
most advanced technology, Flynn
said. Many patients feel better when
a doctor orders lots of tests until
they get the bill.
Besides hurting your wallet and
adding to health care costs, unnec-
essary tests can expose people to
radiation that accumulates over a
lifetime and can raise the risk of
cancer. Ordinary X-rays are rarely
a concern, but an MRI, or magnetic
resonance imaging scan, can cost
$1,000 or more. And super-sharp
X-rays called CT scans involve rela-
tively large radiation doses.
Yet doctors often order tests they
don't really think a patient needs
because they fear being sued if the
diagnosis was wrong or they miss
detecting a problem.
Previous studies of how often this
happens have relied on doctor sur-
veys. This is the first one to enlist
doctors in advance to track their
decisions over time.
It involved 72 orthopedic sur-
geons throughout Pennsylvania who
tracked tests they ordered on 2,068
patients, mostly adults, in ordinary
office visits, emergency rooms and
other settings. Doctors checked a
box saying a test was either required
for clinical care or done "for defen-
sive reasons."
Defensive imaging accounted for
20 percent of total tests 11 per-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
MRI Technologist Autumn Alexander gives Retta Watkins an M.RI at Auburn
University's new MRI center in Auburn, Ala. in this Jan. 31 photo. According to
new research, MRIs and other pricey imaging tests are often more for the doctor's
benefit than the patient's.


cent of X-rays, 38 percent of MRIs,
33 percent of CT scans, 57 percent of
bone scans and 53 percent of ultra-
sounds.
Defensive medicine also account-
ed for 35 percent of costs, nearly all
of it from MRIs.
One example: a torn meniscus, a
knee cartilage injury that is a lead-
ing reason for knee surgery. Studies
have shown that a doctor's judgment
based on symptoms and an exam is
even better than an MRI to diagnose
the condition. Yet patients hardly
ever go to surgery without having
the imaging test, Flynn said.
Surprisingly, the study found that
newer doctors were less likely to be
defensive.
"'Tat's counterintuitive," Flynn said.
"You would expect when you're new in
practice, not as trustful of your clinical


judgment, you'd order more."
Doctors who have been sued in
the last five years were more likely to
order tests defensively, said Robert
Miller, a Temple University medical
student who helped lead the study and
presented the results at the confer-
ence. The authors said similar studies
are needed on defensive imaging in
other specialties.
Dr. Lawrence Wells, a Philadelphia
surgeon who participated in the study,
said doctors learn to develop "a radar"
for problem patients.
"It's disheartening" to be sued, he
said. "Someone's accusing you of a
bad outcome or a wrong," and that
can affect how a doctor behaves the
next time he sees a similar case.
Patients need to trust their doc-
tor's judgment on what is needed,
Wells said.


21,000 with whooping cough last year


By MIKE STOBBE
AP Medical Writer

ATLANTA More than
21,000 people got whoop-
ing cough last year, many
of them children and teens.
That's the highest number
since 2005 and among the
worst years in more than
half a century, U.S. health
officials said Wednesday.
They are puzzled by the
sharp rise in cases. The
vaccine against whooping


cough is highly effective
in children, and vaccination
rates for kids are good.
.The disease is very con-
tagious and in rare cases
can be fatal, especially for
babies too young to be vac-
cinated.
Whooping cough starts
like a cold but leads to
severe coughing that can
last.for weeks.
California appeared to
be the hardest-hit state last
year, with state health offi-


cials reporting more than
8,300 cases, including the
deaths of 10 babies.
Nationally, there were at
least 26 deaths, the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention said.
The national case count
is preliminary and may
wind up being higher. The
numbers were reported
Wednesday at a vaccine
advisory committee meet-
ing.
Health officials believe


contagious adolescents
are a worrisome threat to
vulnerable infants.
About 95 percent of
children have had at least
three shots against whoop-
ing cough. But because a
whooping cough vaccine
for adolescents and adults
was not licensed until 2005,
vaccination rates for those
groups are much lower.
One study estimated that
only 6 percent of adults are
fully immunized.


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Researchers: 10,000 babies

suffer crib injuries each year


Associated Press

CHICAGO About
10,000 infants and toddlers
are hurt in crib and play-
pen accidents each year,
according to the first nation-
wide analysis of emergency
room treatment for these


injuries.
Most injuries were from
falls in toddlers between
ages 1 and 2 general-
ly old enough to attempt
climbing out of a crib or
playpen.
Researchers who studied
19 years of ER data say


better prevention efforts
are needed, but that recent
safety measures including
a ban on drop-side cribs
likely will reduce those
numbers. The study found
a gradual decrease in the
injury rate between 1990
and 2008.


EOOOSTORES 3
1961 2011
PTO WRiES

VISIT US ONLiN.
www.scaf s .cf$' ,fj


: ,,ered
Ercd
R'in or


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakeatyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


ThursdayFebruary


24.2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FISHING
Brody Stevens
Open March 5
The Brody Stevens
Open Bass Tournament
is March 5 at Clay
Landing in Chiefland.
Entry fee is $70 plus a
$10 optional big bass pot.
For details, call Derriel
Cribbs at 965-0720.

ADULT BASEBALL
Men's league
forming in area
The MLBA in North
Florida and South
Georgia would like to
form a team for 2011.
Age is 55 and younger.
For details, visit www.
leaguelineup.com/
northfloridamabl.

CHS FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club will
meet at 6 p.m. Monday in
the Jones Fieldhouse to
discuss fundraisers and
the 100-year anniversary
activities.
For details, call Blake
Lunde at 867-0296.

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Team at Publix
for donations
Fort White High
baseball players will be '
seeking donations at
Publix in Lake City from
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.
For details, call coach
Chad Bonds at 590-7362.

RUNNING
Tortoise 5K at
O'Leno State
Park
The third annual Race
the Tortoise 5K/walk is
8 a.m. March 5 at O'Leno
State Park. Entry fee
is $14 for age 14 and
younger and $25 for oth-
ers. The race is limited to
the first 300 registrants.
To register, go to
www.floridastateparks.
org/oleno/Events. cfrn.
For details, call Park
Manager V. Morgan
Tyrone at (386) 454-0723.

* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High
tennis at Middleburg
High, 2:30 p.m.
Fort White High
track at Suwannee High,
3:30 p.m.
Fort White High JV
baseball at Gainesville
High, 4 p.m.
Columbia High
softball at Middleburg
High, 6 p.m. (JV-4)
Fort White High
softball at Taylor County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Friday
Fort White High
baseball at Suwannee
High, 5 p.m.
Columbia High JV
baseball at Gainesville
High, 6 p.m.
Columbia High JV
softball at Keystone
Heights High, 7 p.m.
Fort White High
softball vs. Williston High,


7 p.m. (JV-5)


Maryland too

much for Florida

State in ACC clash


Seminoles still
looking for 20th
win after loss.
By DAVID GINSBURG
Associated Press
COLLEGE PARK, Md.
- Freshman Terrell
Stoglin scored 17 points,
and Maryland used a strong
second half to beat Florida
State 78-62 Wednesday
night and severely damage
the Seminoles' pursuit of
their first ACC title.
The Terrapins (18-10, 7-
6) had five players score
in double figures. Jordan


Williams had 11 points and
11 rebounds, Dino Gregory
scored 14, Adrian Bowie
added 12 and Sean Mosley
chipped in 10 in Maryland's
eighth straight home win
over Florida State.
It was the 21st double-
double of the season for
Williams, who became the
seventh sophomore in ACC
history to collect at least
600 rebounds in his career.
Derwin Kitchen scored
16 and Deividas Dulkys had
14 points for the Seminoles
(19-8,9-4). The loss dropped
Florida State three games
behind first-place Duke
with three games to play.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Maryland's Cliff Tucker (second from right) fights for the ball against Florida State's Deividas
Dulkys (left) and Derwin Kitchen (right) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball
game on Wednesday in College Park, Md.


CHS stomps Eastside


Lady Tigers move
to 4-0 with win
over Lady Rams.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High's Lady
Tigers tennis team contin-
ued its undefeated run on
a quest to make a second-
consecutive state-champi-
onship run with a 7-1 win
against district foe Eastside
High Wednesday.
The Lady Tigers hosted
the match and played like
it was their home court,
falling in only the No. 4
single's position.
Doubles action began the
day with Chrissie Reichert
and Susy Romero team-
ing for Columbia's No. 1
position. The newly-formed
team had no trouble dust-
ing off their opponent with
an 8-4 victory.
.Columbia also had
an impressive win in the
No. 2 doubles match.
Taylor Owens and Kelsey
Mercer teamed for an 8-0
victory.
"Our girls are in a groove
in doubles," Columbia head
coach Tabatha McMahon
said. "Kelsey and Taylor are
playing very well togeth-
er, and Chrissie and Susy
have formed an alliance
very quick. I'm confident in
CHS continued on 2B


Photos by BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Columbia High's Chrissie Reichert uses a backhand to return a shot against
Eastside High on Wednesday.

BELOW: Susy Romero follows through on a serve against Eastside High.


Labor


talks


enter


Day7

Active players join
NFL in ongoing
deliberations.
By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press
WASHINGTON NFL
Players Association execu-
tive committee mem-
bers Brian Dawkins, Jeff
Saturday, Mike Vrabel
and Brian Waters partici-
pated in labor negotiations
Wednesday, the sixth con-
secutive day of federally
mediated talks between the
league and union.
Denver Broncos safety
Dawkins, Indianapolis Colts
center Saturday, and Kansas
City Chiefs linebacker
Vrabel and guard Waters,
along with former player
Sean Morey, arrived in the
morning at the Federal
Mediation and Conciliation
Service, a U.S. government
agency.
They joined NFL
Commissioner Roger
Goodell and NFLPA execu-
NFL continued on 2B


NCAA pegs

Pearl, Kiffin, Vols

with violations


Final decision
on sanctions
soon to follow.
By BETH RUCKER
Associated Press
KNOXVILLE, Tenn.
- The NCAA says both
Tennessee basketball coach
Bruce Pearl and former
football coach Lane Kiffin
committed recruiting viola-
tions and failed to promote
an atmosphere of compli-
ance of NCAA rules within
their programs.
Following its 22-month
investigation of the athletic
program, the NCAA notified
Tennessee of a dozen rules
violations by the coaches,
their assistants and the
university itself in a letter
released by the school on
Wednesday. Kiffin, who is
now at Southern California,
received a separate notice


of the allegations against
him.
Tennessee's baseball pro-
gram was included in the
investigation, but was not
accused of any violations.,,
The university has until
May 21 to respond to the
NCAA's allegations and
is expected to appear at a
June 10-11 meeting of the
Committee on Infractions.
A final decision by the
NCAA and any sanctions
likely would come several
weeks after that.
"Receipt of the NCAA's
notice of allegations by the
University of Tennessee is
another step in bringing
this matter to conclusion,"
Tennessee athletics direc-
tor Mike Hamilton said in a
statement. "Our institution
has operated in complete
cooperation with the NCAA
since April 2009 as they
VOLS continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 26, 2010 file photo, Tennessee head coach Bruce Pearl (right) and associate
head coach Tony Jones react during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game
against Villanova in the finals of the NIT Season Tip-Off in New York. The NCAA charges
Tennessee with at least a dozen rules violations committed by the basketball and football
programs. Among the charges are basketball coach Bruce Pearl acting unethically and former
football coach Lane Kiffin failing to monitor his staff.


.,..- -I _ ./ ,I .- f










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
GOLF
11:30 a.m.
TGC LPGA, HSBC Women's
Champions, first round, at Singapore
(same-day tape)
2 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour/WGC, Accenture
Match Play Championship, second round,
at Marana.Ariz.
6:30 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Mayakoba Classic,
first round, at Riviera Maya, Mexico
(same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Marquette at Connecticut
ESPN2 Georgia at Florida
9 p.m.
ESPN -WestVirginia at Pittsburgh
ESPN2 Penn St at Northwestern
II1 p.m.
ESPN2 Gonzaga at Saint Mary's,
Calif.
FSN -Arizona St. at UCLA
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
TNT Miami at Chicago
10:30 p.m.
TNT Boston at Denver

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Charlotte 114,Toronto 101
Indiana II 3,Washington 96
Hquston 108, Detroit 100
Miami 117, Sacramento 97
Milwaukee 94, Minnesota 88
Oklahoma City I11I, LA. Clippers 88
Denver 120, Memphis 107
Boston 115, Golden State 93
L.A. Lakers 104,Atlanta 80
Wednesday's Games
San Antonio 109, Oklahoma City 105
Houston 124, Cleveland 119
Indiana 102, Detroit 101
Sacramento Ill, Orlando 105
Philadelphia II 7,Washington 94
Toronto 118, Chicago 113
NewYork 114, Milwaukee 108
Memphis at Minnesota (n)
Utah at Dallas (n) i
Atlanta at Phoenix (n)
LA. Clippers at New Orleans (n)
LA. Lakers at Portland (n)
Today's Games
Miami at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Boston at Denver, 10:30 p.m.

NBA calendar

Today -Trade deadline, 3 p.m.
'April 13 -- Regular season ends.
April 14 Rosters set for playoffs,
3 p.m.'
April 16 Playoffs begin.
May 17 NBA draft lottery.
June 2 NBA Finals begin (possible
move up to May 31).
June 16 Latest possible date for
the finals.



CHS
Continued From Page 1B

where we're at with doubles
right now."
McMahon should also
have confident in her sin-
gle's players as the Lady
Tigers took four of the five
match points.
Reichert capped off her
double's win with another
8-4 win in single's action at
the No. 1 position.
Romero was flawless in
the No. 2 position with an
8-0 victory.
Kelsey Mercer allowed
her opponent only one point
in an 8-1 win at the No. 3
single's spot
The only loss for the Lady
Tigers came at the No. 4
position, but Taylor Owens
was playing up due to the
injury to Jessie Bates.
Owens fell down 6-2 early
in the match, but rallied
back to make the final 8-5.
Heather Benson earned
her first district win as a
Lady Tiger with an 8-2 show-
ing at the No. 5 position.
McMahon plans to con-
tinue to rotate players lower
in the seeding today when
the Lady Tigers travel to
Middleburg for a 2:30 p.m.
meet Heather Rountree will
take over the No. 5 position
as Columbia tries to work
on its depth.
"Eastside was a good
opponent," McMahon said.
"I believe that a lot of them
were playing up a position
with their No. 1 player miss-
ing. I'm hoping that we may


see them at full strength in
our second matchup."
Columbia will have its
rematch against the Lady
Rams on March 21 at the
Jonesville Tennis Complex
in Gainesville. It will also be
practice for the district tour-
nament which Jonesville
Tennis Complex will also
host on April 6-7.


GOLF

Golf week

WORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPS
Accenture Match Play
Championship
Site: Marana,Ariz.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: Dove Mountain, The Ritz-
Carlton Golf Club (7,791 yards, par 72).
Purse: $8.5 million. Winner's share:
$1.4 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Today, noon-
6 p.m., 7:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Thursday,
2-6 p.m., 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Friday,
2-6 p.m., 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Saturday,
noon-2 p.m., 9:30-11:30 p.m.; Sunday,
9 a.m.-l p.m., 9:30-11:30 p.m.) and NBC
(Saturday-Sunday, 2-6 p.m.).
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
PGA European Tour site: http://www.
europeantour.corm
PGATOUR
Mayakoba Golf Classic
Site: Playa Del Carmen, Mexico.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course:Mayakoba Resort, El Camaleon
Golf Club (6,923 yards, par 70).
Purse: $3.7 million. Winner's share:
$666,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
6:30-8:30 p.m.; Friday, 1-3 a.m., 6:30-
8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2-4 a.m., 6:30-
8:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1-3 a.m., 7-9:30 p.m.;
Monday, 1-3 a.m.).
LPGATOUR
HSBC Women's Champions
Site: Singapore.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Tanah Merah Country Club,
Garden Course (6,547 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.4 million. Winner's share:
$210,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, I I a.m.-I p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-
noon; Sunday, 2-4 p.m.).
Online: http:/www.lpga.com
NATIONWIDE TOUR
Panama Championship
Site: Panama City.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Golf Club of Panama (7,102
yards, par 70).
Purse: $550,000. Winner's share:
$99,000.
Television: None. ,
CHAMPIONS TOUR
Next event Toshiba Classic, March
11-13, Newport Beach Country Club,
Newport Beach, Calif.

World Golf Ranking
I. Lee Westwood Eng 8.21
2. Martin Kaymer Ger 7.54
3.Tiger Woods USA 6.46
4. Graeme McDowellNIr 6.36
5. Phil Mickelson USA 6.27
6. Paul CaseyEng 6.03
7. Rory Mcllroy NIr 5.67
8. Steve Stricker USA 5.57
9. Luke Donald Eng 5.27
10.Jim Furyk USA 5.23
I I. Ernie Els SAf4.97
12. lan Poulter Eng 4.83
13. Matt Kuchar USA 4.78
14. Dustin Johnson USA 4.50
IS. Retief Goosen SAf 4.40
16. Francesco Molinari Ita 4.38
17. Robert Karlsson Swe 4.30
18.HunterMahan USA 4.13
19. BubbaWatsonUSA 4.03


20. Louis Oosthuizen SAf 3.81
21.Alvaro QuirosEsp 3.80
22.Tim Clark SAf 3.76
23. Miguel Angel Jimenez Esp 3.65
24. Edoardo Molinari Ita 3.60
25. Charl Schwartzel SAf 3.57

BASEBALL

College polls

Collegiate Baseball
TUCSON, Ariz. The Collegiate
Baseball poll with records through Feb. 20,
points and previous rank. Voting is done
by coaches, sports writers and sports
information directors:


Record
I. Florida 3-0
2. UCLA 3-0
3.TCU 2-1
4,Vanderbilt 4-0
5. Oklahoma 4-0
6. Clemson 2-1I
7.Texas 3-1
8.Texas A&M 3-0
9. Stanford 2-1
10. Arizona State 3-0
I I. Florida State 3-0
12. South Carolina 3-0
13. LSU 3-0
14.Virginia 3-0
I5. Oregon' 1-2
16. Louisville 3-0
17. Arizona 3-0
18. North Carolina 4-0
19. Cal State Fullertonl-2
20. Miami 2-1
21. Georgia Tech 2-1
22. Rice 1-2
23.Wichita State 3-0
24. Coastal Carolina3-1
25. Connecticut 1-2
26.Auburn 2-1
27. Arkansas 3-0
28. Fresno State 2-0
29. St. John's 2-1
30. UC Irvine 3-0
30. Hawaii 2-1I


HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Tuesday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 4, Carolina 3, SO
Toronto 2, N.Y. Islanders I
Phoenix 3, Philadelphia 2, OT
Columbus 4, Nashville 0
San Jose 4, Detroit 3
Minnesota 4, Edmonton I
Colorado 4, St. Louis 3
New Jersey 1, Dallas 0
Boston 3, Calgary I
Montreal 3,Vancouver 2
Wednesday's Games
Buffalo 4,Atlanta I
Ottawa 5, Florida I
San Jose 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT
Tampa Bay 8, Phoenix 3
Edmonton at Colorado (n)
Los Angeles atAnaheim (n)
Thursday's Games
N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Nashville, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Minnesota at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


VOLS: Kiffin has support at USC'


SCOREBOARD


Continued From Page 1B

have pursued their investi-
gations. We take these alle-
gations seriously and most
items noted in this docu-
ment have already been
reported broadly."
Pearl has been charged
with unethical conduct after
misleading NCAA investiga-
tors in a June 14 interview
about hosting high school
juniors at a cookout at .his
house on Sept. 20, 2008, and
phoning John Craft, father
of recruit Aaron Craft, dur-
ing the probe in an effort
to influence Craft's state-
ment to investigators about
the cookout. Craft is now a
freshman at Ohio State.
"Throughout this process
we have recognized that we
made significant mistakes,
and we look forward to
concluding this matter with
the NCAA," Pearl said in a
statement. "The penalties
imposed on our program to
date have been severe, but
I want to commend our stu-
dent-athletes and staff for
staying focused and work-
ing through these potential
distractions."
Tennessee reduced
Pearl's his salary by $1.5
million over four seasons in
September and banned him
from off-campus recruiting
for a year. The Southeastern
Conference also weighed in,
suspending him for eight
"conference games, which
he has already sat out.
The NCAA alleged that
Pearl's assistants, Tony
Jones, Steve Forbes and


Jason Shay "violated the
NCAA's principles of hon-
esty" by not providing com-
plete information to inves-
tigators about the cook-
out. Tennessee lowered-
each assistant's salary and
banned them from off-cam-
pus recruiting for various
lengths of time for their
role in the scandal.
Pearl, Jones and Forbes
are also accused of making
a total of 96 impermissible
phone calls to 12 recruits
or relatives .of recruits
between Aug. 1, 2007, and
July 29, 2009. Tennessee
has been charged with fail-
ure to monitor the coaching
staff's telephone contacts
during that time.
"Any allegation from the
NCAA is a serious matter
for us, and we will address
these issues in a timely man-
ner," said Jimmy Cheek,
chancellor of Tennessee's
Knoxville campus. "As an
institution we have been
proactive in dealing with
these allegations, and we
will continue to cooperate
fully with the NCAA."
Kiffin and his assistants
are also accused of mak-
ing improper phone calls
to recruits even after
Tennessee officials had
warned them against mak-
ing such phone calls. Kiffin
made impermissible phone
calls to recruits from Jan.
3-9, 2010, just days before
ending his 14-month tenure
at Tennessee and leaving for
USC. Among the recipients


NFL: Will hold meeting with GMs


Continued From Page 1B
tive director DeMaurice
Smith and their respec-
tive negotiating teams for
the talks 'that consumed
35 hours over the first'
five days. The mediation
is scheduled to continue
Thursday -- making for a
full week.
Also on Thursday, at the
NFL's annual scouting com-
bine in Indianapolis, the
league is holding a meet-
ing with general managers,
coaches and other officials
from all 32 teams.
"It's a normal part of
the combine, which is


ACROSS

1 Blows hard
6 Exploding stars
11 Zany Raye
12 Manly
13 Birches
14 Most capable
15 Demoted planet
1.6 Lhasa-
17 A kiss in
Granada
19 Giza's river
23 Natural elev.
26 Gumbo ingredi-
ent
28 Pinch
29 Diamond-like
gem
31 Hiawatha's
boat
33 Marriage
34 Peaceful
.35 Head, slangily
36 Pledge
39 Bride's new
title
40 Gossip tidbit
42 Remnant


always filled with meetings
galore," NFL spokesman
Greg Aiello wrote in an e-
mail to The Associated Press
after ESPN.com first report-
ed about the GMs-coaches
session. "There was such
a meeting last year. It's not
the first time."
Still, with the current
collective bargaining agree-
ment set to expire next
week, the NFL is expect-
ed to update attendees
on the labor negotiations
- although Goodell and
general counsel Jeff Pash
would be in Washington, not


44 500
46 Tequila cactus
51 Menu choice
54 Not right or
wrong
55 Go back over
56 Falls to
57 Disturb
58 Wash out


DOWN


Impudence
Lahore lan-
guage
Proofer's word
More than ache
Stockholm car-
rier
Robin beaks
Acrylic fabric
Compete for
Unser and
Gore
Salon request
Traveler's
guide
Fog or steam
Make inquiry


Indianapolis, on Thursday.
The union called off
a meeting it was sup-
posed to hold Thursday
in Indianapolis with some
player agents, citing the
ongoing mediation. Instead,
the NFLPA will host agents
on Friday.
The four active players
who showed up Wednesday
in Washington, and Morey,
are on the NFLPA's executive
committee; at least nine of
that panel's 11 members have
been present at some point
during the talks in the office
of mediator George Cohen.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

SIOHIO FLEET
FAVORS FLAMES
AGENDA IODINE



SPEC K WENDED
ALCOA EASEL
WORMY AISLE
TUBERS K NEES
DESIST
V.W INN ICON
BEMOAN CHEAPO
ANNOYS HOSTED
STTLE ETON


L-o-n-g time
Deeply felt
Pride members
Fencing weapon
North Dakota
city


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" Pooks
at QuillDriverBooks.com


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I FRYOE I


WREABE E
S HOW THE NOVICE
S5KIER FELT WHEN HE
z 5TARTE P PWN
SNIPOO THE L-OPE.
SNow arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: HE IT
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: ALIVE CHAOS POTTER JUMPER
Answer: What the radio commentator gave the
soldiers "AIR" SUPPORT


24 Lodge
dwellers
25 Drill sgt.
27 Poker card
29 Pueblo people
30 Lennon's wife
32 Give a rifle
34 That ship
37 Found the
sum
38 Endeavor
41 Thick muds
43 Pluckier
45 Not cluttered
47 Disco dancer
(hyph.)
48 Rarely rained
on
49 Barn topper
50 Subway oppo-
sites
51 Be mistaken
52 Paleo- opp.
53 Play about
Capote
54 Homer
Simpson's
dad


of the calls was Seantrel
Henderson, who signed
with USC after Kiffin was
hired but was later released
form his commitment
"On the advice of my
legal counsel, we cannot
comment other than to say
we look forward to working
through the process with
the NCAA," Kiffin said in a
statement.
Kiffin and recruiting
intern Steve Rubio also vis-
ited a Florida high school
on Oct. 12, 2009, after
Tennessee officials warned
the coach that Rubio was
not permitted to make on-
campus visits.
Kiffin's failure to moni-
tor charge also stems from
trips taken by members
of the school's athletics
hostess program to visit
recruits.
"The NCAA enforce-
ment process provides for
Tennessee and Lane to
address those charges. Until
that process is completed, it
would be unfair and pre-
mature for me or USC to
comment on this matter,"
Southern California athlet-
ics director Pat Haden said
in a statement "However,
I will say this: Since his
return to USC last year as
our head football coach,
Lane has been vigilant in
making sure he and the
football program follow the
NCAA's rules and compete
the right way. Lane has my
support as our head football
coach."


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011


NASCAR's Tebow? Faith is driving force for Bayne


By CHRIS JENKINS
Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH -
After Trevor Bayne shocked
the NASCAR world by
winning the Daytona 500,
his celebration was decid-
edly PG-rated. He rode a
skateboard and shot hoops
with his buddies. In a quiet
moment, he wrote himself
a note.
According to Bayne's
father, Rocky, it said: "How
do I stay grounded in my
faith, when I am so high on
winning this race?"
Bayne's note might have
been personal, but the
religious sentiment it con-
tained is something Bayne
is driven to share. Since
rocketing into the spotlight
with his big win at Daytona
on Sunday, the 20-year-old
Bayne has made it clear
that he intends to use suc-
cess in racing as a platform
to talk about his faith.
Recently, Bayne sat down
with his father and busi-
ness advisers to figure out
his long-term goals. While
winning was on the list, it
wasn't at the top.
"I told them that the goal
was not to be the best race
car driver or the most mar-
ketable or most popular,"
Bayne said. "It is none of
those things. It is to build
a platform and let God use
us on the platform that He
is building which might
require me to become the
best race car driver or be
the most marketable or
most popular or whatever
it is. I just want to stand on
the platform that He is put-
ting under me."
And if Denver Broncos
quarterback Tim Tebow
can talk about faith through
football, Rocky Bayne
believes his son can do


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Trevor Bayne (center), Eddie Wood (left), and Leonard Wood (right) raise the trophy after Bayne won the Daytona 500
NASCAR auto race at Daytona International Speedway on Sunday.


the same in NASCAR, cit-
ing Tebow's No. 15 being
among the NFL's best-sell-
ing jerseys last season as
evidence that an athlete
with strong religious views
can attract fans.
'I think these young kids
today, they need something
to look up to, and I think
Trevor can be that kid," said
Rocky Bayne. "But he's not
doing it for that. He's doing
it because he wants to be
real. This is who Trevor
Bayne is."
There was a time not too


long ago that it was almost
a cliche for a NASCAR driv-
er to climb out of his car in
victory lane and thank his
crew, his sponsor and God.
Given the sport's tradition-
al Southern roots, it didn't
seem out of the ordinary.
But like so many things in
NASCAR, that has changed
over the past decade or so.
While many races still
begin with a religious fig-
ure reciting a prayer before
the green flag, and veteran
driver Morgan Shepherd
uses his car to promote his


faith, NASCAR's religious
overtones have been muted
to some extent. Today, it's
rare to hear a driver talk
openly about his faith.
Rocky Bayne, who
says his family is Baptist,
believes that's a function
of more high-profile, image-
conscious sponsors getting
involved in the sport.
"I think the sport, as a
whole, has kind of stifled
that out a lot," he said. "I
think with corporate spon-
sors, sometimes, a lot of
sponsors don't want to see


that. And that's just being
honest. But there are spon-
sors that do want to see it.
This country was. founded
on God, and I think there's
a place for it in our sport."
Even after winning
Daytona, theWoodBrothers
team Bayne drives for still
needs additional sponsor-
*hip to run the full Sprint
Cup Series schedule this
season.
Most brands involved in
NASCAR try to appeal to the
broadest possible audience
without alienating anybody.


Some companies might
view a driver with strong
religious views as a poten-
tially polarizing figure.
"They certainly look at
it," said Greg Busch, execu-
tive vice president at GMR
Marketing, which repre-
sents several major spon-
sors involved in NASCAR.
"I think it can be a little
polarizing to some degree."
But from a sponsor's per-
spective, Bayne has a lot
of upside. He's young, he's
good-looking, he's charis-
matic -.and his win has
been a jolt for NASCAR.
"I think it's resonating,"
Busch said. "Short of (Dale
Earnhardt) Junior winning,
this might have been the
next-best thing for the sport
It's captivating people."
Certainly, Bayne is in
much better position to
attract sponsors than an
athlete involved in scandals.
And there could be compa-
nies who desire a spokes-
man with strong religious
views.
"It's possible, but I think
you're really limiting your
marketability," Busch said.
Rocky Bayne says Trevor
is just being himself, and
isn't going to change even if
it might hurt his career.
"He would just teW1 you
that, 'Hey, if I don't get
to run but half a season
because people don't want
to be a part of it, then that's
what the Lord wants,"'
Rocky Bayne said. "That's
what he'd say. God's got a
bigger plan."
Trevor Bayne wants to use
his story to inspire others.
"My faith is obviously a
big part of .this and that's
really the reason I'm here,
and I think that's the reason
why all of this worked out,'
he said. "I'm just a normal
kid."


Nets acquire Williams in trade


By LYNN DeBRUIN
Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY
- The New Jersey Nets
have acquired All-Star point
guard Deron Williams from
the Utah Jazz in exchange
for rookie Derrick Favors
and point guard Devin
Harris.
The Jazz also will receive
the Nets' first-round pick
in 2011, which could be a
lottery pick, and Golden
State's 2012 first-round pick
draft pick.
"We are very excited to
add a player the caliber of
Deron Williams to our ros-
ter," Nets general manager
Billy King said Wednesday
in confirming the block-
buster trade.
"He is one of the premier
point guards in the NBA,
and his skill and talent level
will bolster our franchise as
we continue to build towards
our goal of becoming a cham-
pionship-caliber team."
The 6-foot-3 Williams was
selected third overall in the
first round of the 2005 NBA
draft by Utah from Illinois.
He is in his sixth NBA
season and holds career
averages of 17.3 points, 3.2


rebounds, 9.1 assists and
1.0 steals in 35.6 minutes
per game.
In 439 career games,
including 406 starts, he has
shot .466 (2,725-5,848) from
the field, .358 (511-1,427)
from three-point range and
.808 (1,615-1,998) from the
free throw line. In 44 career
postseason games, Williams
has averaged 21.1 points, 3.7
rebounds, 9.6 assists and
1.2 steals in 40.4 minutes,
while shooting .458 (308-
672) from the field and .796
(238-299) from the line.
Jazz general manager
Kevin O'Connor also con-
firmed the deal, saying it
was a "win-win" situation
for both teams.
"We feel that we've
addressed a current need
at point guard with Deron's
departure, as well as the
future with draft picks and
a big man," said O'Connor.
'To do so we had to give up
an All-Star, but we feel like
this is a win for both sides."
The deal comes two days
after the Nets failed to land
Carmelo Anthony, who was
acquired by the New York
Knicks as part of a block-
buster deal with the Denver
Nuggets.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 26 file photo, Utah Jazz guard Deron Williams
(center) attempts to score over Spurs' guard Tony Parker
(left) and Spurs' forward DeJuan Blair (right) during the
second half of an NBA basketball game in Salt Lake City.


NFL urging youth concussion laws


By FREDERIC J. FROMMER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
NFL wants all 50 states and
the District of Columbia to
pass legislation that could
help cut down on concus-
sions suffered by young
football players.
A quicker route would
be through federal legisla-
tion, and the NFL backs a
bill pending in Congress.
But the GOP-led House
is unlikely to support that
kind of federal role in local
matters, so the league sees
a bigger opening at the
state level.
The suicide of a former
NFL player just last week
highlighted the urgency of
this issue.
Former Chicago Bears


safety Dave Duerson died
of a self-inflicted gunshot
wound to the chest, and
The New York Times
reported that he asked that
his brain be examined for
chronic traumatic encepha-
lopathy, a degenerative dis-
ease caused by repeated
blows to the head that is
tied to depression, demen-
tia and suicide.
The Center for the
Study of Traumatic
Encephalopathy at Boston
University School of
Medicine, which will study
Duerson's brain for signs
of the disease, says that
more than 300 athletes,
including 100 current and
former NFL players, are on
its brain donation registry
The effort is part of a
shift by the NFL, which


for years has been on the
defensive from Congress
and the media about how it
handled head injuries. As
recently as 2009, Goodell
was grilled by lawmak-
ers when he would not
acknowledge a connection
between head injuries on
the football field and later
brain diseases.
Goodell told lawmakers
that he was "changing the
culture" of football when
it came to player safety,
and last season, the NFL
started slapping players
with five-figure fines for
illegal hits in an attempt to
cut down on serious head
injuries. Goodell says he
has committed "substan-
tial resources" to getting
the youth concussion laws
passed across the country,


although the league said it
didn't have an estimate on
what the effort will cost.
The league says it has an
obligation to use its clout
to help cut down on con-
cussions among America's
youth. But it also wants to
keep a large pool of poten-
tial players healthy.
'We're fortunate that we
have more than 3.4 million
young athletes playing foot-
ball, and we want to contin-
ue to keep our player source
strong and keep it large,"
said Joe Browne, a senior
adviser to Commissioner
Roger Goodell.
There are other motiva-
tions as well, said Gabe
Feldman, director of the
Sports Law Program at
Tulane University Law
School.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods yells 'Fore!' after driving off the seventh tee
while playing against Thomas Bjorn during the first round of
the Match Play Championship golf tournament Wednesday in
Marana, Ariz.


Woods ousted


after first round


of match play


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

. MARANA, Ariz. The
slow road back for Tiger
Woods took another detour
Wednesday when he fol-
lowed a clutch birdie with a
shocking shot into the des-
ert and lost to Thomas Bjorn
in the first round of the
Match Play Championship.
It was only the second
time that Woods, the No.
3 seed, had been eliminat-
ed in the first round. But
this was stunning even to
Woods.
Moments after he made
an 8-foot birdie putt on the
18th hole to extend the
match, he hit a 3-wood so
far to the right that it landed
in a desert bush. It took two
shots just to get it back onto
the grass. After badly miss-
ing an 18-foot bogey putt,
he conceded to Bjorn.
"I blew it," Woods said.
Twice he had simple
chips on the back nine and


failed to convert them into
birdies, losing his lead on
the 13th and falling behind
on the 15th. He missed a 10-
foot birdie on the 17th that
he figured he should make
"every time."
And then came No. 1, the
first extra hole.
"It's easy to put the ball
in the fairway and I couldn't
even do that," Woods said,
so visibly upset that he was
stumbling over his words.
The other top seeds didn't
have that much trouble.
Top-ranked Lee
Westwood never trailed
in his 3-and-2 victory over
Henrik Stenson, while PGA
champion Martin Kaymer
had the shortest match of
the opening round, a 7-and-6
win over 19-year-old Seung-
yul Noh of South Korea.
Phil Mickelson, the No.
4 seed who. only decided
to play this World Golf
Championship two weeks
ago, won 6-and-5 over
Brendan Jones.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











46 E CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY FEBRUARY 24, 2011 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT
THERE'S A GUY IN THE I APPARENTLY, YOU
LOBBY WHO SAYS HE'S I SIGNED A SOFTWARE
HERE TO HARVEST YOUR SERVICES AGREE-
ORGANS. KENT WITHOUT FULLY
UNDERSTANDING IT.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
WHAT'S IT'S A WAIVER EXEMPTING
THIS? US FROM ANY INJURY TO
YOUR TONGUE OUE t
THE INTENSItY OF THE
'A-lt


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
P'Roi, Al/WAM OW ,
PRW OF r- B N
6. A WOMAI'J *


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


THIS BETTER BE SURE TO SIGN
BE AS GOOD THE EXTRA COPY
AS ADVERTISED j FOR OUR
FITss


DEAR ABBY


Tale of generosity inspires

others to help kids in need


DEAR ABBY: Thank
you for printing the letter
from the woman who paid
for her neighbor's chil-
dren's school lunch bill.
"Lending a Hand in the
Midwest" (Jan. 10) was an-
gry to discover they didn't
qualify for free lunches be-
cause "their parents were
just a couple of dollars over
the limit." To top it off, the
children's father is doing
his second tour in Afghani-
stan.
Because you encour-
aged your readers to con-
tact local schools to give
a few dollars to a child in
need of a meal, it inspired
me to speak to the princi-
pal in our district. Not only
did the principal like my
fundraising idea, he has al-
lowed me time on campus
to promote the fundraiser.
Twenty-seven students
will be joining me after
school in making lollipops
to sell at an upcoming
event. Local businesses
and individuals have do-
nated most of the supplies
necessary to make this a
successful drive to help
the children in need. Our
goal is to raise $1,000 for
this cause.
I want to extend a heart-
felt thank you to "Lending"


I

ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Look over your
books and personal pa-
perwork and you will find
something interesting that
you overlooked. You may
have to argue your concern
with an institution or gor-
ernment agency but it will
be worth it. *****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Don't get rail-
roaded into doing things
for free when you need the
cash. It's important not to
underestimate yourself. A
bad job will result in a poor
review and possible job de-
motion or loss. Call in fa-
vors. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Someone is watching
your every move and, with
the slightest error, you will
be penalized for your short-
sightedness. Emotions will
play a factor in the way you
react personally and profes-
sionally. Be sure you have
the facts -to back you. up.
r ***-
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You don't have
to impress anyone if you
put every effort into doing
your best. Presenting and
promoting what you have
to offer will lead to an op-
portunity. Don't exaggerate
about what you have to of-
fer. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You'll be eager to


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
for sharing a great idea.
- HAPPILY PAYING IT
FORWARD IN HAWAII
DEAR HAPPILY:
Thank you for spreading
the message. "Lending's"
generous act of kindness
elicited many interesting
and thought-provoking re-
sponses. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: I am a
member of the Veterans
of Foreign Wars, the Viet-
nam Veterans of America,
the American Legion and
the American Legion Rid-
ers Association. One of the
main functions of our orga-
nizations is to help our vet-
erans and their families in
any way we can. You would
be amazed at the monies
and help expended to our
veterans, soldiers and their
families that doesn't make
the news because being
"needy" is perceived as
some kind of fault
To respond to a need,
we must KNOW about it
Abby, please tell your read-,


HIOROSCOPES

THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

spend, travel and do what-
ever you can to find a little
adventure and excitement.
Don't let your desires turn
into a costly venture that
will leave you strapped fi-
nancially. Emotional decep-
tion is apparent. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22): Don't be afraid
to make a move or to put
pressure on someone from
whom you need an answer.
Love is in the stars and, if
you are upfront and honest,
you stand a better chance of
receiving what you ask for.
Personal changes will boost
your confidence. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Limit your spending
and don't fall for a fast-talk-
ing salesperson offering a
product that claims unreal-
istic results. Focus on dam-
age control at home where
someone is likely to be over-
indulgent or to overreact.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Put more time
into your personal and
home life, interacting with
the people you love. The
things you do to smooth
over any personal problems
will bring about stellar re-
sults, enabling you to follow
a sought-after creative path.


ers if there is a problem,
contact your local VFW,
American Legion, AmVets,:
etc. and we will respond.
- FRANK IN BURI'
INGTON, WIS.
DEAR ABBY: I am!
currently serving in the:
military and have nev-
er thought to donate to'
school lunches. I'm happy,
knowing people are watch-
ing out for the troops' kids.
As soon as I return home
from Iraq, I will make the
call to see where I can/
help. AIRMAN WHO.
HAS BEEN THERE .
DEAR ABBY: A'lot of0
families are in the same'
situation. We have three
kids and are $8 over thet
"allowed financial amount."
Whafs not taken into con-
sideration is the $100 my.
husband pays for Internet
each month he's serving iqi
Afghanistan so our 8-year-
old son with Asperger's canu,
"see" his daddy. This lessens,
the anxiety, compounded b),
his dad's deployment, that i*
associated with his autism.
God bless "Lending a Hand"}
for her gift to that family. --
ABBLE IN RINEYVLLE,
KY. .

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or ,
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.




SAGIrTARIUS (Nov)
22-Dec. 21): Be honest
with yourself about what
you want and what you don't
want Personal changes are,
necessary. Create the op-
portunity you need to move
forward by eliminating
what isn't working in your
life right now. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You have to
offer what you can to the
groups you feel deserve
help. Once you get involved
in something you believe in,
you will begin to meet peo-
ple who can offer you sone'
thing in return. Ift's time to
mix the past and present to
find your future. **** "
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Stability, hard
work and self-improvement
are all in the stars. Learn-
ing something new about
your past will help you un-,
derstand where you've been
making a mistake. Ifs time
to look honestly at your per'
sonal situation. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Your aggres-
sive, productive and self-
starting approach to both
your personal and profes-
sional lives will send a sig.'
nal to friends and enemies
alike. Don't stop until you
reach your goals. Now is
not the time to rest nor to
let someone get away with
something. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: G equals B
"MVLXMFW I C H F GCFMV J UV... LF'. F
ZOAALHX OHI RJORELHX UP WEBAA
FMOF ZJVOEW UV CBF!" ORFCJ
DOWC H U OJWIV H

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The trouble with telling a good story is that it
invariably reminds the other fellow of a dull one." Sid Caesar
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 2-24


CLASSIC PEANUTS

01IN6 TO STOP D(
I RAINtN6?

L[


I FEEL SO MUCH SAFER SINCE HE
STARTED TAKING THAT ONLINE LAW
SCHOOL
DO I HAVE TO SIGN COURSE

TO GE


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B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


HOvi AR k/ 5UPPO0EP TO TW6 ET
SN 140 AACTMRS
S. W.l4HN ALL. W
CAN USf Aft
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I


ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


4B E CITY REPORTER











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


I ADvantage


ad$250
4 6ines dayss additional
SRa les to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. J
This is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad 1 ti0
4 lines 6 days jn .
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
Each Item must include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.




SOne tem per ad 61
4 lines 6 days Each additional
line $1.15
Rate applies to prvate Indgviduaa selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.
SEach Item must include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad $2370
4 lines 6 daysEach additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. f
Each item must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less.
Each item mUst Includa price.
l This ainon-refundable rate.




|One dem per ad t3 0vr
4inen .ne $
14 eahs adaysditional j
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise total ing 6,000 es.
Earh Iten, mum art e


We -1



ad-or c n ay s e
411 an 7 50,
o3 dayS t F
nomeles 2SignsEacf tadiftnala ne t165



Limited to service type advertise
ing only.
4 lines, one month....'92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. P
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
'You can also fax or e-mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon, 10:00 a Mon, 9:00 ia
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed.,9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00a.m. urs.,9:00 a.m.
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice.


-a
Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard


abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.laktcityvreporter.coin


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 10-000271-CA
REGIONS BANK,
Plaintiff,
V.
EDMUND ACCARDI,
EDDIE ACCARDI MOTOR
COMPANY, and TENANT #1 and
TENANT #2, representing tenants in
possession,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant
to a Uniform Final Judgment of
Foreclosure, entered in the above-
styled cause on February 9, 2011, in
the Circuit Court of Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida the Clerk of Columbia
County will sell the property situated
in Columbia County, Florida, descri-
bed as:
Description of Mortgaged and Per-
sonal Property
Lot 3, FAIRWAY VIEW UNIT 3, a
subdivision according to the plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book 5 at
Page 27-27A, in the Public Records
of Columbia County, Florida.
The street address of which is 225
NW Mallard Place, Lake City, Flori-
da 32055.
at a Public Sale, the Clerk shall sell
the property to the highest bidder, for
cash, except as set forth hereinafter,
on March 23, 2011, at 11:00 A.M. on
the third floor f the Columbia County
Courthouse, 173 N.E. Hemando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, in
accordance with Chapter 45, Florida
Statutes.
Dated February 10, 2011
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus funds from the sale, if
any, other than the property owner,
as of the date of the Lis Pendens,
must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
P DEWrIT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Flbrida
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

05525129
February 17, 24, 2011

Notice is hereby given per Florida
Statue 98.075(2):

Last known address of:
Blue, Ronald T.
490 SE Castillo Ter
Lake City, Fl 32025
WILLIAMS, VERA
800 SYMPHONY LOOP
APT 101 BLD. 15
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32025
ALAN 0. VANSICKLE
1508 NE TRIPLE RUN RD.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
STANLEY, GILBERT L.
131 SW RICHARDS DRIVE
LAKE CITY, FL 32024

CHRYSTEN A. HUDSON
519 NW LAKE CITY AVE.
APT#10
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32055
JERMAINE C. JONES
273 SW MABRY GLEN
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32024
KENNETH L. TAYLOR
1005 SE BARNEY ST
HIGH SPRINGS, FL 32643
DOMINIC T. BRANTLEY
1750 SW CAMELLIA
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
Kenny Stewart
426 N.E. Alpha Ter *
Lake City, Fl 32055
Melton, Misty Cumi
183 N.W. Quientin St.
Lake City, Fl 32055
is potentially ineligible to be regis-
tered to vote. Please respond within
30 days of publication of this notice
by contacting the Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office at the address or phone
number below. If no response is re-
ceived within 30 days of this publi-
cation, it may result in determination
of ineligibility by the supervisor and
removal of the registered voter's
name from the statewide voter regis-
tration system.
Published one time in the Lake City
Reporter
Elizabeth "Liz" P. Home
Columbia County Supervisor of
Elections
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1026
04543559
February 24, 2011


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224


Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 2006-445-CA
DIVISION:
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY FKA BANK-
ERS TRUST COMPANY OF CALI-
FORNIA, N.A. NOT IN ITS INDI-
VIDUAL CAPACITY, BUT SOLE-
LY AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF
VENDEE MORTGAGE TRUST
1994-3,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DORA J. JOHNSON, et al
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE'
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated FEBRUARY
11, 2011 and entered in Case NO.
2006-445-CA of the Circuit Court of
the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and
for COLUMBIA County, Florida
wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NA-
TIONAL TRUST COMPANY FKA
BANKERS TRUST COMPANY pF
CALIFORNIA, N.A. NOT IN ITS
INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY, BUT
SOLELY AS A TRUSTEE ON, is
the Plaintiff and DORA J. JOHN-
SON; DISCOVERY MARKETING
AND DISTRIBUTING, INC., are
the Defendants, The Clerk of the
Court will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at FRONT STEPS
OF THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on
the 16th day of MARCH, 2011, the
following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE SE 1/4
OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, AND
RUN EASTERLY ALONG SEC-
TION LINE TO THE WEST .EDGE
OF RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE
ROAD NO. 247; THENCE
NORTHEASTERLY PARALLEL
TO AND 50 FEET ON A PERPEN-
DICULAR FROM THE CENTER-
LINE OF SAID STATE ROAD NO
247, 2054.73 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 48 DEGREES 30 MI-
NUTES WEST 18.99 FEET TO
THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF SAID STATE
ROAD NO. 247, AS NOW LOCAT-
ED AND TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE CONTINUE
NORTH 48 DEGREES 30 MI-
NUTES WEST 378.47 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 30
MINUTES EAST 151.90 FEET;
, THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 30
MINUTES EAST 397.46 FEET TO
THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF SAID STATE
ROAD NO. 247; THENCE SOUTH
49 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 02
SECONDS WEST, ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, 153.08
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. BEING A PART OF THE
NORTH 1/2 OF SOUTHEAST 1/4
OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST.
A/K/A 1222 SOUTHWEST STATE
ROAD 247, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on February 11, 2011.
P DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper,
Court Administration at 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake
City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at
least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F06017711-NMNC-CONV--Team 1

05525127
February 17, 24, 2011
NOTICE OF BOARD MEETING
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
The District Board of Trustees, Flori-
da Gateway College, will hold a pub-
lic meeting at 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday,
March 8, 2011, in the Board Room
of the Gilchrist County School Board
Office, 310 NW llth Ave. Trenton,
Florida.
Topics of consideration will be rou-
tine college business. Any person
wishing to be heard on any agenda
matter will be provided an opportu-
nity to do so by appearing before the
Board in the Board Room of the Gil-
christ County School Board Office.
All objections to this notice and pro-
priety of the scheduled meeting
should be filed with Florida Gateway
College prior to noon, Friday, March
4, 2011. All legal issues should be
brought to the Trustees' attention
and an attempt made to resolve them
prior to the meeting.
Please notify the President's Office
immediately if you require accom-
modation for participation in the
meeting.
A reception will be held at 3:30 p.m.
in the Gilchrist County School Board
Office prior to the regular Board
meeting.

04543675
February 24, 2011


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLOM-
BIA COUNTY
CASE NO. 10000481CA
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ERNEST H. HARGER et al.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated February 10, 2011, and
entered in Case No. 10000481CA, of
the Circuit court of the Third Judicial
Circuit in and for COLUMBIA
County, Florida, wherein SUN-
TRUST MORTGAGE, INC, is a
Plaintiff and ERNEST H. HARGER;
SARAH REMMERS; UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #2 are the Defendants. P.
DEWITT CASON as The Clerk of
Circuit Court will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at 173 NE
HERNANDO AVENUE, COURT
ROOM 1, LAKE CITY, FL 32055,
at 11:00 AM on May 11, 2011, the
following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
Lot 6, BLAINE ESTATES PHASE
I, according to the plat thereof as re-
cording in Plat Book 7, Pages 21,
Public Records of Columbia County,
Florida.
TOGETHER WITH A 2002 HMMT
DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME
WITH VIN#FLHML3B161125899A
AND VIN#FLHML3B161125899B
SITUATED THEREON.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 16 day of February, 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
Dated this 16 day of February, 2011
IMPORTANT
If you are a person with a person with a disability
who requires accommodations in or-
der to participate in a court proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, the provision of certain assis-
tance. Individuals with a disability
who require special accommodations
in order to participate in a court pro-
ceeding should contact the ADA Co-
ordinator, 173 NE Hemando Ave-
nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL
32055, (386)719-7428, within two
(2) business days of receipt of notice
to appear. Individuals who are hear-
ing impaired should call (800)955-
8771. Individuals who are voice im-
paired should call (800)955-8770
Submitted by:
Ben-Ezra and Katz, P.A
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312
Telephone: ((305)770-4100
Fax: (305)653-2329
04543658
February 24, 2011
March 3, 2011


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found








FOUND DOG,
She is a gorgeous Chocolate
brown with some white markings.
Found on CR 137 between
Hwy 240 & Hwy 242.
Please call to identify. She wants
to go home. 396-963-4120
LOST Black Male, Toy Poodle,
on Tues 2/15, in the 252 & Coun-
try Club area.Reward being
offered Please call 386-752-9300

LOST Purse (Navy Blue ) in
Winn-Dixie Parking Lot
on February 14th
386-755-4791

Lost Female Dog on 2/12 Sat.,
near Richardson Middle School.
Medium sized brown/black, looks
like a fox, Reward, 386-752-8920

Prescription bi-focals LOST @
Columbia Courthouse parking lot
on Wed 2/16, black & white
Please call 386-752-1893


100 Job
SOpportunities

05525172



Now accepting applications for
servers and cashiers
Apply in person at
3177 W Hwy 90 Lake City
DFW/EOE

05525206
Painters Needed
The Health Center of Lake City
has openings for
Temporary Full-Time Painters
EOE/ADA/
Drug Free Workplace
Apply in person at
The Health Center of Lake City
560 SW McFarlane Ave
Lake City, FL 32025


A/C SERVICE Tech
Min 5 yrs experience
F/T with benefits
Please call 386-454-4767


100 Job
Opportunities
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

CDL A Drivers needed for Target
dedicated acct, good pay,
great home time, Call Shawn
904-517-4620/Fred 404-671-6362

Cloth Cutter in small
Sewing Plant
Call Hafner's
386-755-6481 *

Hiring Certified Teachers for all
ages. Please do not call if you
are not certified. 386-755-7677
6:30a-5:30p or 344-5363 after 5:30

Jr & High school Math teacher
needed. Also, daycare teacher,
must have CDA. Please fax
resumes to: 386-758-3018

12 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Kirk Alexander
Mason Co, KY. Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Row Crop, Row
Crop-Produce, & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates:
04/10/11 -02/10/12. Wage of
$9.71/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference
Job Order # KY0419982.

2 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Montgomery
Co. Greenhouse Montgomery
Co, KY. Tobacco, Greenhouse
/Nursery, & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 04/04/11 -
12/01/11. Wage of $9.71/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and'reference
Job Order # KY0421233.

SECURITY OFFICERS
FT/PT, Great Pay and Benefits.
Lake City/Alachua Area.
Must have Sec. Lie., clean
background, pass drug screen.
Call: 866-458-9523 EOE

Security Officers ,
needed Lake City Area, must have
current D Security Lie., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED.
Benefits, DFWP EEO Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084

Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com

6 Temporary Farm Workers need-
ed. Employer: Thomas B. Cave -
Taylor Co, KY. Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Row Crop, Row-Crop
- Produce, Greenhouse/Nursery, &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 04/15/11 -02/15/12. Wage
of $9.71/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools pro-
vided ht no cost. Free housing
provided to nod commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Center
in your area and reference
Job Order # KY0421272.

Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

120 Medical
120, Employment

05525197
Front Office/Medical Billing
Several years experience
in medical office and
insurance billing required
Please email resume to
admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net
or fax to 386-438-8628

AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Case Managers for
community based program work-
ing w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.

PT CNA needed.
Send resume to
.826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.


130 Part Time

P/T Janitor/Yard Man,
apply in person, start immediately
3631 E US Hwy 90
Lake City

2 Schools &
240 Education

04543650
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-03/28/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11


310 Pets &-Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621


407 Computers

DELL COMPUTER
$100.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Love Seat-Broyhill. Blue/gray,
matching pillows and arm covers.
Good condition. $50
386-454-4947


416 Sporting Goods

Columbia White Dot Bowling
Ball 13 lbs,caramel, silver & black
in color, used twice, need to sell
$40 386-362-7441


420 Wanted to Buy

I BUY WORKING AND
NON WORKING
APPLIANCES!
CALL 386-365-1915
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH!'Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260:
After 5pri 386-752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






Fri & Sat, 7:30 ?
Tools and Household items,
125 SW Whitetail Cir,
of off 252B, follow signs







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

463 Buildina
4 Materials

ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available


520 Boats for Sale

Bass Tender Boat 2 Seater
10'2",can fit in back of truck
$500 386-965-2215
Great for pond or lake!

630 Mobile Homes
v for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/1 1/2,SWMH, water,sewage,gar-
bage pick up included, screened
deck, $450 mo, $200 dep, NO pets
386-292-0050
2/1 w/screen porch. Lg yard in
quiet, clean, safe, well maintained
10 unit park. Water, garbage incl.
$475.mo $475.dep. 386-965-3003
3/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
pets ok, $500 dep $575 mo'
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3BR/2BA Doublewide on 1 ac.
Lg. Rooms. $750 a month.


1st month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.
Country setting. DWMH 3br/2ba
with washer/dryer on 1 ac.
$700. mo plus $500. security.
Avail March 1st. 386-719-4957


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


BUY IT


SELHL T


laFIND ITIT










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-623-3404






Small Mobile Home at Wilson
Springs in Ft. White. $400. mo or
$100. per week. $200. Deposit
386-623-9026 or 497-1315
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean Remodeled 3br/2ba
DWMH on 2 ac. 10 mi. SW of LC.
Private. NO PETS!
$750.mo. + sec.. 386-984-7478.

640\ Mobile Homes
640 for Sale m5
$216 a month remodeled,
like new, 2Bd/2Ba S Wide
Delivered & blocked, appliances,
A/C $2500 down, 8 year fin.
Possible owner financing. Ready
now. Call Gary 386 758-9824
*Lot Model Sale*
Save 1,000's @ Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
For Model Info and Details
05524942
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Liquidation Sale
2009 Model Homes MUST GO!
Call for FREE color brochures
800-622-2832

12X 56, 2/1 SWMH,
axles avail, tongue attached
$2,500 OBO
386-965-1882
Come in and see the
Future in Manufactured Homes.
Royals Homes making
people smile
386-754-6737
Come See all New Lot Models
Royals Homes. Honesty! Integrity!
Customer Satisfaction
386-754-6737,
Looking for a Modular?
Come see the Specialists
at RoyalR Homes and ask for Bo
386-754-6737 '
New 2011 Homes are Here
3BR/4BR at Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
Homes Built Your Way!
New,2010 MH,never been
occupied, front & back deck,
$99,900 MLS#76635 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
@ Westfield Realty
Royals Homes is Quality!
We treat you like Family.
Stop in or.Call Catherine
386-754-6737

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
sCall 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
U5524833
No Application Fee +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments
& Mobile Homes
starting at $350 per month
386-755-2423
2 br Apt. Close to shopping
and the VA Medical Center.
$525. mo plus deposit.
386-344-0579.
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Gatorwood on the Westside
Rent $650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Quail Heights 2br/Iba Duplex.
Secluded, private, safe. W/D
hookup. $700. mo. $500 security.
386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
SHome For Rent
3 or 4br. Lg bedroom, den w/fire-
place. Screen porch. Privacy patio.
1.09 ac. Quiet area, cul-de-sac.


Rent/lease option. 386-697-6534
3/2 on 2.1 acres, 2 car garage,
ceramic tile, front & rear porches,
$995 mo, plus 2 mo sec.
Lease with the option to buy
386-758-9996 or 386-365-5434
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A A 55+Retirement Living,
Site built home
2br/2bth For Lease
3/2, family rm w/fireplace, 2 car
garage, Irg fenced yard,
near park & schools
Call 386-365-3953
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $675 mo,
$600 sec., 386-497-4699


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04543633
LANDLORDS, let our gold
standard work for you!
Call today for additional
information on managing your
residential rentals.
16884 53rd Wellborn
3/2 well kept DWMH with great
floor plan and 2 car garage
$850./mo. + $800 security
642 Chris Terrace Lake City
Nice upscale 3/2 with 1623 sf.
Close to Town but far enough
out for privacy. $1150./mo
$1150./security.
143 Zebra Terrace Lake City
3/2 well maintained brick home
on 1 acre +. Bonus room. could
be 4th bedroom or nice family
room. $900./mo. +
$900. security.
B.J. Federico 386-365-5884
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650
(habla espaiol)
Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.

TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553

750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072

770 Condos For Rent

04543682
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1200/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.


780 Condos for Sale
3 bdrm Condo Nit, back patio,
HOA fees include ext maintenance
of home, lawn & pool'MLS#76797
$110,000, Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237

805 Lots for Sale
1 acre lot outside the city limits.
Homes only subdivision. Priced
below the assessed value with the
county,.$16,900 Hallmark Real
Estate 386-867-1613 Call Jay S
2 ac lot in River Access
community.. Suwanne River
I mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Beautiful 5+ acre lot, partially
cleared w/large oaks, Homes only,
$38,000, MLS 75038 Call Roger
Lovelady @ Westfield Realty
386-365-7039
Charming Turn of the Century,
property, close to
downtown,MLS# 74814
$94,900 386-755-0808
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Nice 4.5 acre parcel w/S/P/W
older SWMH $39,900
MLS# 76182 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2/1,on nearly an acre, living/dining
rm, kitchen nook, util rm, fenced,.
back porch,2 car carport close to
town, $60,000 386-754-5818
2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
3/2 home w/1758 sq ft, Storage
bldg, enclosed patio & deck,
$168,000 Call Camre Cason @
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806


MLS# 73410
3/2 w/over 1700 sq ft, fireplaces,
modem kitchen, fenced yard, 2
sheds, convenient location
$89,500 MLS#73861 Call Patti
@Access Realty 386-623-6896
4 bdrm + office, 2 living & dining
areas, front & back porch
$279,900 MLS# 72831
Call Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty 386-755-0808
4/2 2300 plus sq ft,Palm Harbor
Home on 2 lots, Good Condition
$69,888 Call Nancy Rogers @
386-867-1271 Results Realty
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, Woodcrest. Great area, split
plan. Screened back porch. Elaine
K. Tolar. 386-755-6488 $139,900


810 Home for Sale
4/2 1,800 sq fton 10.5 acres,
newly remodeled inside, detached
garage, above ground pool
$189,888, Call Nancy,
Results Realty 386-867-1271
5 bedroom Home on 5 acres south
of Lake City, Big Rooms
lots of space $229,500
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
MLS# 72928 Westfield Realty
5/2, 1800sf, 24 acres, family rm,
screened back porch, RV
parking,newly painted close to VA
& DOT, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
5/3 Triplewide MH (2200) sq ft,
w/2 master bdrms, on 10 fenced
acres, fireplace. MLS# 76226
$75,000 Call Patti Taylor
386-623-6896 Access Realty
AFFORDABLE 3BR/2BA mfg
home in Woodgate Village only
$27,000 #76741
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110
Beautifully Landscaped 3/1 on
1.11 ac, 16x24 detached garage,
screen porched bldg, water
purification system, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Brick home with 2,700 sqft under
roof. Large master w/bath on .5
acres completely fenced. $167,500
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Brick, .59 ac. 3br/2ba w/large
spacious rooms. Split floor plan.
2 car garage & storage $222,900.
Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Close to town, 2 story home
w/stone, fireplace, downstairs
master bdrm, $144,900
MLS# 77050 Call Carrie Cason
386-623-2806 Westfield Realty
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba. 3 Fireplaces. 39.7 acres
included. Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Reduced, brick w/over 2,000 sqft,
5 ac. 3br/2ba.Lots of extras. Elaine
K. Tolar 755-6488 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lakeview home in town, Old
charm w/many upgrades Elaine K.
Tolar. 386-755-6488 $189,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2 Story, 4br/2.5ba-2160 sqft. Spa-
cious plan w/garage Lori Geibeig
Simpson 365-5678 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba close to town. 1620 sqft
w/covered patio& more. Lori Gei-
beig Simpson 365-5678 $117,900
Coral Shores Realty 2004
Custom built home, 23 fenced ac.
1700 ft paved frontage. Lg
kitchen/pantry, master/bath.
386-965-5905 Bob Gavette
Comer lot in Piccadilly Park.
Newly painted in/out. New carpet
./vinyl. 2 car garage. Inground
pool. $133,500. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
CUSTOM-BUILT 4BR mfg
home w/screen porch, front deck,
she'd $87,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #73893
Cute 3/2 nicely remodeled home,
2 acres, partially fenced
I $115,888
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473
Derington Properties, LLC
3/2 MH, large deck and
screened porch, 5 ac.
$46,500 386-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
DWMH, 5 ac. Screened front/back
porches. 20x40 shop fully equip-
ped w/bath. $74,900. 965-4300
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
Fully furnished 2br/2ba @
$83,000
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
3BR/2BA
$99,999
Family home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Great Investment Property!
House needs lots of TLC, close to
shopping and schools, $35,000,
Bring all offers, Results Realty
Call Brittany 386-397-3473
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg
home near Wellborn on
5+ acres ONLY $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76768
Log.Cabin home, located on
5 acres, wrap around porch
$199,000 MLS#75550
Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax Realty
Lrg Brick Home, well-established
neighborhood, in town,
$129,900 MLS#77016
Call Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
Must See! 4/2 2368SF Home,


island kitchen, den, fire place,
storage, auto gate entry,
Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfect starter home. Quiet area.
Wood laminate floors, Ig dining,
French doors. 1 car garage/work-
shop $84,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.


810 Home for Sale
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $55,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75210
REDUCED TO $61,500 in
Eastside VIg! Immaculate
2BR/2BA w/lg rooms
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76753
Solid Home! Needs updating.
Country eat in kitchen & formal
dining.Some windows replaced.
$70,000 Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
SPACIOUS 2BR/2BA home on 1
ac w/attached garage &
2-story shed $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76887
Totally refurbished 2/2 w/
workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Very Nice 4/2 on 4 acres w/open
floor plan, 2 living rooms, eat in
kitchen, dining rm and rec rm
w/wet bar $89,900 Call Brittany
.Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well maintained 3/2 DWMH,
1568 sq ft, acres, new roof,
$65,000, MLS#76187
Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001

820 Farms &
820 Acreage
10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752'-4339 www.landnfl.com

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

Q830 Commercial
830 Property
Coral Shores Realty. Prime
commercial, located on Hwy 41 &
Gibson Ln. 26X54 concrete block.
$76,000 386-965-5905
Call Bob Gavette
Downtown & borders 3 streets.
Aprox. 10,000 sqft fenced parking.
"as is" Bob Gavette. $73,000. 386-
965-5905 Coral Shores Realty
Prime Commercial Property
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya 3.27 acres, room for building
$398,888 386-867-1271
Call Nancy @ Results Realty

940 Trucks








950 Cars for Sale

GET CASH TODAY!!
For your car, truck, van or SUV.
(Running or not). Call anytime.
(352)653-5691
951 Recreational
951 Vehicles



AL.4


04 Rialta Motor home 58k mi.
Self contain, generator. Like new.
Too many goodies to list. Open for
offers. $19,800. 386-758-7683







3 . *
1977 GMC Motor Home Classic
Palm Beach Model,Self-
Contained, $18,500 or
obo or trade 386-754-6693


SVans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
2004 GMC Yukon XLT White
with gray leather Int. 169k mi.
3rd row seats. $8,500.
386-755-2276


am ake Some cash


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2010 Puma Travel Trailer 32 ft, 2
slide outs, air awning, King Island
bed, Many Extras $18,900
Call 863-660-8539 will deliver


Bring the picture in or
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* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 addition days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440