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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01384
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: February 20, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01384
System ID: UF00028308:01384
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








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Battle of Olustee Re-enactment displays






BLOODBATH


Poor military strategies and tactical

maneuvers reflect huge casualties


By C.J. RISAK
crisak@lakecityreporter.com
technology is often the greatest
beneficiary of war, while mankind
is the greatest victim.


The Civil War provided evidence
of both, and both were on display
at Saturday's opening round in
the 35th annual Battle of Olustee
Re-enactment.
Tactics and strategies that didn't
keep pace with the weaponry were
used. Example: "The Enfield Model
1853 was the most prolific rifle'used
in the Civil War," said Ken Wammack,
a re-enactor from Tallahassee who


owns several
of the weap-
ons. "It was
a .58-caliber
rifle."
Rifling was
an important
techno-
logical step,
improving an
infantryman's
accuracy
considerably,
Wammack
said. "It went
from 100
yards to 300
yards. This
was the first
production
rifle that did
that. Others
were smooth
bores."
Technology
kept improv-
ing, making
the rifle even


JASON MATTHEW WAL
A blood-soaked Union so
knees as he struggles to
front line.


more dangerous, and that was evi-
dent during Saturday's re-enactment.
Soldiers could strike from greater
distances, but tactics remained the
same, with soldiers shooting from
standing positions one major rea-
son for the high casualty rate (40 per-
cent for the Union, 20 percent for the
Confederacy).
Reloading a musket rifle was a
chore, although an experienced rifle-


man could get three shots
off a minute. '4
"It was a 10-step process."
explained Wammack. Those
steps started with opening and
then pouring gunpowder dio%%n
the barrel, packing it with a ramirod.
opening and putting the bullet down
the barrel, packing it, opening
the weapon's flintlock, printing
and placing a percussion cap.
aiming and fir-
ing.
Technologyp
changed the
process, allb,-
ing the bullet
and powder to
be inserted in
the weapon
just in front of
the flintlock.
After that.
all that. '
need be
done was
place a per-
cussion cap,
aim and fire.
"It reduced
it from 10 steps
to about three,"
LKER/Lake City Reporter noted Wamnniack.
Idier falls to his By the end of
return to the the war, the mus-
ket was at thi
end of its day.
replaced by
repeating rifles
like the Winchester. The Civil

BLOODBATH continued on 3.4 .

JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City F,,:n, i
A Southern soldier offers a -,
prayer to honor those who
sacrificed their lives during
the Battle of Olustee.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Union artillerymen brace themselves after firing a cannon ball
upon a mass of Confederate fighters.

Doctors encounter

crude war surgery

at LC re-enactment

By C.J. RISAK
-r,1.4 2t . r.,.por r,:r ,-ore
0ns4>-.e and fle Siill.:m
S" urge ins and butchers.
( )ne and the same.
At least that's lhow Civil
\War-era doctors were
described by many of the
.wounded who went under the knife.
There wa- no glamour attached to
this job.
"This will demonstrate what
surgeons had to do in the tield"
explained Jim Eller prior to
Saturday's medical performance.
vhich \%.as part oft the 3:5th Annual
Battle of Olustee Re-enactment.
"We will be showing you the crude-
ness of surgery in the CMil War"
S. Eller can be considered an expert
on the subject. Now 71-. this was the
24th visit to O(lustee for the native of
Blountville, Tenn It is one of 12 similar
re-enacunents he does each year.
-jWt try to be as realistic as
possible in showing what we
did to save a soldier's life," he
said.
DOCTORS continuedtd ,.,n 3.4

OLUSTEE
BATTLE
FESTIVAL
Schedule of Events
SUNDAY
8:30 a.m. -
Preenitaiuon or coor wi
9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Park ,.,peri to putiic
.drissc nr 1,, f or aJults
$3 tor chc ,iol-ai e hil-
drer pre-s h:,,l rh idrer,
tree
1:30 p.m nnriual
Q'u1t..lEv B.PliI4 Re -r, 3Ct-
re t 1ih a r. r r,
of r,atile


L ;

JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
A group of parade attendees shield their eyes from the sun while watching parade floats pass by.


Battle Festival sparks


explosion of nostalgia

By LEANNETYO "I think it brings people together
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com and it exposes a lot of children
Call it time travel. to the past."
For 33 years there has
been an Olustee Battle Brandi Keen
Festival, and the annual Lake City resident
parade has been a part of it.
And as long as there's been
a parade, Karen Raymond ered along South Marion were new to the event,
of Wellborn has traveled to Avenue and U.S. Highway while others treated it like
see it. 90 West to watch dozens a tradition.
'"We come up every year," of Civil War re-enactors "There's a little nostalgia
Raymond said. marching or riding on there for the Old South,"
She wasn't alone horseback through the
Saturday. Spectators gath- heart of Lake City. Some FESTIVAL continued on 3A


CALL US:
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
00021 8 Fax: 752-9400


7 7
Early Fog
WEATHER, 2A


i


Opinion ................ 4A
Business ................ I C
Obituaries .............. 6A
Advice . . . . . . . 3D
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Nettles builds beef
processing plant.


COMING
TUESDAY
Olustee Battle
Re-enactmet.


Sunday, February 20, 2011


-1


isv








LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011


A$H3. ,41 FLORIDA
SezMatc .3A, -

Friday: Friday: Saturday; Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
14-19-22-26 19 1-18-10-34-36 Afternoon: 8-9-5 Afternoon: 1-9-1-4 8-16-17-26-45-47 9-13-21-23-48 24
Evening: 1-0-6 Evening: 1-3-0-1


AROUND FLORIDA



Girl, 16, dies after Tampa bullriding accident


. TAMPA A 16-year-old girl
thrown from a bull and kicked in
the chest has died in Tampa.
Brooke Ann Coats of
Riverview was riding a bull at
the 301 Rodeo in Tampa on
Friday night, when she was
thrown from the animal and
then kicked in the chest The
Hillsborough County Sheriff's
Office said she was able to stand
and walk out of the ring, but
then had trouble breathing and
collapsed.
She was transported to Tampa
General Hospital but died at
about 10 p.m. Friday.
An investigation is ongoing.

Man, 69, dies after
motorcycle hits cow
BRADENTON A man is
dead after he crashed his motor-
cycle into a cow in the Tampa
Bay area.
The Florida Highway Patrol
said 69-year-old Maurice
Anthony Fugere of Cottage
Grove, Minn., was riding his
Harley-Davidson motorcycle
Friday night on U.S. Highway
41 wheahe struck a cow in the
road.
Authorities said the impact
sent the man flying. He was pro-
nounced dead on the scene.

Huge schools
of sharks spotted
WEST PALM BEACH
- Huge schools of sharks
are being spotted off of South
Florida as they migrate north.
The blacktip and spinner
sharks have been most visible
off Palm Beach County as they
migrate from the Caribbean.
Officials said they're gener-


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Balloons released during funeral service for 18-year-old
Nicole Van den Berg (center), mother of Melissa Bergstein, with son Bryan Bergstein (left), watch as family
and friends release balloons with handwritten messages during the funeral service for Melissa Bergstein at the
Spanish River Church in Boca Raton on Friday. Melissa Bergstein,18, a senior soccer star at American Heritage
School, died Monday afternoon from injuries she suffered during a crash early Sunday in Lake Worth. She was a
passenger in a car driven by her boyfriend, Mateo Londono, 17.


ally not aggressive, but that the
threat of bites still exists for
swimmers.

New Busch Gardens
coaster debuts in May
, TAMPA The newest roller
coaster at Busch Gardens in


Tampa will use magnets to
propel it from 0-to-60 mph in 4
seconds.
The theme park said this week
that the Cheetah Hunt coaster
will open May 27 in the center
of an exhibit featuring live chee-
tahs. The park is pouring more
than $20 million into the new 3
1/2-minute ride and seven-acre


exhibit.
Power surges created by mag-
netic linear induction motors
propel the coaster uphill at three
different places along the 4,429-
foot track. The ride is 102 feet at
its highest point
Busch Gardens said 90 per-
cent of the track is installed
and 12 of the 14 cheetahs have


arrived for the exhibit It's been
in the works for the last year and
a half.

Dealer imprisoned
for machine guns
FORT PIERCE A Florida
gun dealer has been sentenced
to more than three years in
prison for selling parts to con-
vert weapons into fully automatic
machine guns.
A federal judge in Fort Pierce
imposed the sentence Friday on *
47-year-old Edward Todd Basile
of Okeechobee. Basile pleaded
guilty to two federal firearms
charges in December.
Prosecutors said Basile sold
an informant parts to convert
legal semiautomatic weap-
ons, such as an AR-15 rifle,
into automatic machine guns.
The informant was working
with an undercover Bureau of
Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms
and Explosives agent. These
parts also must be registered
and numbered. Prosecutors
said Basile did neither and also
helped the informant falsify fed-
eral firearms transaction forms.

Man gets 30 months
for in-law's death
MELBOURNE An Arizona
man originally charged with kill-
ing his mother-in-law in central
Florida has been sentenced to 30
months in prison after accepting
a plea deal for a lesser charge.
A Brevard County judge sen-
tenced 76-year-old Ronald Bozik
on Friday. He pleaded no contest
last month to accessory after the
fact to second-degree murder.

. Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Bieber wins MVP at celeb game


LOS ANGELES
J ustin Bieber finally won a tro-
phy in LA
The teen singing sensation,
who was shut out at the
Grammys, was chosen most
valuable player despite playing
for the losing team in the NBA All-
Star celebrity game on Friday night
Bieber had eight points, four assists
and two rebounds for the West
team, which lost 54-49 to the East at
the Los Angeles Convention Center.
Hall of Famer Scottie Pippen
led the Magic Johnson-coached
East team with 17 points in a game
whose defensive highlight might
have been Pippen's third-quarter
block of Bieber.
'he vertically challenged Bieber
scampered up and down the court,
his famous shaggy 'do bouncing
with every step-as girls shrieked at
the sight.
"He has the softest hair," mar-
veled former Los Angeles Laker
Rick Fox, who patted his West
teammate Bieber on the head dur-
ing the game.
Wearing a black T-shirt under his
red-and-white jersey, Bieber spent
most of the game hitching up his
shorts that fell well below the knee.
His pregame stretching included
trying, but failing, to touch his toes.
Bieber showed off some slick
moves, dribbling behind his back,
and driving and dishing to taller
teammate and ESPN analyst Jalen
Rose. Bieber fed AC. Green for the
game's first basket, and the singer
later hit a 3-pointer.
"I'm just running back and forth,"
Bieber said during an in-game inter-
view. "I'm controlling this whole
team. I'm just kidding."
With actor Jamie Foxx and
Lakers star Lamar Odom watch-
ing, Bieber missed a 3-pointer that
would have tied it with 30 seconds
to go. Afterward, the 16-year-old
was hurried off the court by burly
security guards.
Bieber's week began when
he lost out on his two Grammy
nominations at Staples Center. But
things picked up with another TV


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Singer Justin Bieber (center) makes his way down the court during a BBVAAll-
Star celebrity basketball game at the NBA All Star Weekend in Los Angeles on
Friday.


guest appearance on "CSI" and his
"Never Say Never" concert movie
was No. 2 at the box office.

Jackson's estate earned
$310M since death
LOS ANGELES Despite more
than $310 million in earnings since
his death, Michael Jackson's lav-
ish spending habits still haunt his
legacy and have required lawyers
to create new deals and restructure
old debts, court records show.
Jackson died more than $400 mil-
lion in debt, and attorneys are still
trying to resolve several pending
lawsuits, according to documents
filed Thursday by his estate.
The report also states Jackson's
estate spent $159 million between
the singer's June 2009 death and
the end of 2010, with some of the
money used for his funeral, burial
and to buy the Jackson family's
home in the San Fernando Valley
north of Los Angeles.
According to the filing, many of


Jackson's debts, including his 4nter-
ests in a music catalog that features .
works by The Beatles and other'
top-earning musicians, have been
restructured.
While Jackson's attorneys have
resolved numerous debts and
lawsuits, several cases are still
unresolved, including disputes over
Jackson's "Thriller" music video.

Elizabeth Taylor's health
shows improvement
LOS ANGELES Elizabeth
Taylor's health is improving, but the
Oscar winner is still hospitalized in
Los Angeles.
A spokeswoman for the 78-year-
old actress said Taylor "has contin-
ued to show great improvement,
and her family and friends are
very pleased with her progress."
Publicist Jamie Cadwell said Friday
that Taylor will remain under
observation at Cedars-Sinai Medical
Center "for the time being."
* Associated Press


* Fashion designer Gloria
Vanderbilt is 87.
* Actor Sidney Poitier is 84.
* Racing Hall of Famer
Bobby Unser is 77.
* Racing Hall of Famer
Roger Penske is 74.
* Newspaper heiress
Patricia Hearst is 57.
E.Basketball Hall-of-Famer


Daily Scripture


' harles-Barkley is 48.
* Model Cindy Crawford is
45.
* Actor Andrew Shue is 44.
* Actress Lauren Ambrose
is 33.
* Actor Jay Hernandez is
33.
M Country musician Coy
Bowles is 32.


"Dear friends, since God so
loved us, we also ought to love
one another. No one- has ever .
seen God; but if we love one
another, God lives in us and his
love is made complete in us."
I John 4:11-12



Lake City,Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
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Fax numberi...............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online,.. www.lakecityreporter.com
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Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
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City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
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sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Peporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418
(twilson @ lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
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(twilson @ lakecityreporter.com)


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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011


Man stops Lake City robbery by firing pistol


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn

A man fired a pistol shot into
the ground in a field near Lake
City's Red Lobster restaurant
Friday night while pursuing a
man suspected of taking a wom-
an's purse out of her car, Lake
City police said.
The LCPD launched a robbery
investigation and are still look-
ing for the suspect, said Captain
John Blanchard, public informa-
tion officer.
Robert Mitchell fired the "warn-
ing shot" and an affidavit was
forwarded to the state attorney's


office for review for improper
exhibition of a firearm, the police
report said.
"We know that a shot was
fired," Blanchard said. "We don't
believe anybody was hurt, but
we still haven't found the suspect
to make sure he wasn't shot or
anything else that might develop
in the investigation.".
At approximately 10:44 p.m.
Friday, officers responded to Red
Lobster, 4367 NW U.S. Highway
90, in reference to a robbery with
shots being fired, according to
reports.
Reports said Sharon Van Meter,
the incident's victim, stated she


and her daughter a minor
- were in their car talking with
Mitchell in the Red Lobster park-
ing lot when an unknown white
male opened the car's passenger
door, reached across her daugh-
ter and stole Van Meter's purse.
The LCPD report did not
list Van Meter's or Mitchell's
addresses or ages.
Van Meter chased the suspect
in her car around the parking lot
and into the field, where Mitchell
confronted the suspect. Van
Meter stated she heard a gun-
shot and saw Mitchell detaining
the suspect and calling the police,
reports said.


Mitchell stated he fired a shot
into the ground, according to
reports, which stopped the sus-
pect from running.
After Mitchell began to help
Van Meter pick up her belong-
ings, which had been dropped
by the suspect, the suspect disap-
peared, reports said.
"He (Mitchell) told the suspect
to sit on the bumper of his truck,
as I recall," Blanchard said. "He
went to help Van.Meter pick up
her belongings and when he
turned around, he (the suspect)
was gone."
Reports said the suspect was
described as a white male in his


late teens to early 20s wearing a
white baseball cap and a camou-
flage jacket.
"We did find some items that we
believed belong to the suspect,"
Blanchard said. 'We are going to
send it off to the FDLE for testing,
which may help us identify the
suspect"
Blanchard said it does not
appear that anything was missing
from Van Meter's belongings.
Mitchell's weapon was retained
at the scene because the investiga-
tion is ongoing.
Anyone having information
about this incident can contact the
LCPD at (386) 719-2068.


FESTIVAL: Bands played


Continued From Page 1

said Irv Rae of Crescent
City, who said the parade's
period costumes and the
history it represents drew
he and his wife, Elaine, to
watch the parade for the
first time.
Michael and Stephanie
Carpenter of Vero Beach,
who both grew up in Lake
City, attended the parade
with their daughter,
Catherine, 6.
"We came to visit our
family and we always try
to come home this week-
end," Stephanie Carpenter
said.
As long as the Olustee
Battle Festival Parade
has been held, Karen
Raymond of Wellborn has
been attending.
This year's Saturday
morning parade was' no
different.
A couple of longtime
Lake City residents who
are well-acquainted with
the parade were this
year's marshals, Herbert
and Ann Darby. Civil War
soldiers followed them,
bearing flags and weap-


ons as they marched
rhythmically to the beat
of the drummerboys
while following their
commanding officers'
orders.
Other parade elements
from another time were
the half-dozen antique
cars, and the state, coun-
ty and city officials who
waved from horsedrawn
carriages.
Local gymnastics
teams did handsprings,
cartwheels and other
tricks as the audience
applauded, and various
local schools' marching
bands performed.
Brandi Keen of Lake
City, who watched with
her son, Kyler, 2, said
the parade is a histori-
cal part of the Olustee
Festival and an enjoyable
event to attend.
"I think it brings peo-
ple together and it expos-
es a lot of children to the
past," Keen said, "things
they may not have been
. aware of. And it's fun. It's
a parade."


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Mayor Stephen Witt (from right), Blue/Grey Army commanding general, presents Herbert Darby, city attorney, and his wife, Ann
Darby, with a framed print of this year's Duffy Soto Olustee poster at Olustee Park's main stage Saturday to honor them for
serving as the Olustee Battle Festival parade marshals. Also pictured is Jodi Witt.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Ken Wammack of Tallahassee points to a 'blow out' spot on the side of an 1853 Enfield,
which is commonly seen on rifles that have been fired a great number of times. Wammack
said that thEo .58-caliber rifle was 'the most prolific rifle used during the Civil War.'


BLOODBATH
From Page 1A

War also served as the
introduction for the first
machinegun, the Gatling. |%RU
While technology
evolved, battlefield tac- .1' ,r. Robert J. Har
tics did not The Union .
prevailed in Saturday's Dr. Rameek McNiM
engagement, managing
to outflank the Southern
forces and drive them back
into the woods as cannon
thundered from both sides.
The noise of such battles
was deafening. "We used 19
cannons (for both sides),"
explained an artilleryman"Soft-Touch Initial Exam
for the South. "We had a *"Soft-Touch"Initial Exam
Panoramic X-Ray :.) ,,
half-pound of black powder '. Diagnosis .,, .-.,
for each shot. Some of the D In, .
bigger bore cannon use a . ,,..,, r,,, ' ,,,
full pound." 16 e.' I
The bodies that littered ...... ...... ,,
the field at the end of the "h' .... ..... ., .
re-enactment proved that
while technology during w.'/ .- crB^
the war kept improving,
tactics did not.


DOCTORS: Graphic demonstration


Continued From Page 1A
Saturday's graphic dem-
onstration included the
process involved in remov-
ing bullets from head and
stomach wounds, the treat-
ment of an eye wound, and
the amputation of a leg.
Those who were treated
wore bandages stained with
imitation blood (a mixture
of baby shampoo and corn
syrup, according to Eller)
and had to be restrained by
several men.
'The reason? "We're all
out of chloraform," said
Adrian Cox McCabe, whose
role was superintendent of
nursing and surgeon major
with the Southern Guard
Brigade out of Virginia.
Eller told the audience
that, although they were
called butchers, surgery -
which often meant amputa-
tion saved lives.
"Eighty-five percent sur-
vived right after the ampu-
tation," he said. "But of
those, within two or three
weeks 50 percent died from
infection."
Lack of sanitation led to


i Gift T oSYo WeA r-eOffer ing


disease and, often, death.
More soldiers died of infec-
tion and disease in the Civil
War than on the battlefield.
The demonstration
included an explanation
of how a field hospital
worked. It started in the
triage, or treatment, area,
where nurses and doctors
would determine what the
wound was.
Some wounds,. like a
bullet in the gut that pen-
etrated the storpach, were
considered nearly incur-
able. Many times, soldiers
with stomach wounds were
not even treated but left
propped against a tree to
suffer a slow, agonizing


death, Eller said.
Others would start with
the removal of the object,
followed by the use of a hot
iron to seal the wound. And
often this was done without
any anesthesia.
The demonstration had
its affect, and not just on
those in attendance.
"I don't know why," Eller
said. "But I get out here
playing this, and I still get
worked up a bit"
He keeps up his re-enact-
ment schedule in hopes of
inspiring a younger gen-
eration to read learn more
bout the Civil War, to find
out the reasons so many
fought and died.


Pastor H. Rios, M.D.

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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424











OPINION


Sunday, February 20, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR
OPINION



Trip back

in time


triggers a

reminder

Cities throughout
Florida have
themes for their
street fairs, ranging
from artwork to
motorcycles and everything in
between. But none can match
the flavor of Lake City's Annual
Olustee Battle Festival.
Of course it too features
those distinct odors emanating
from the barbecue and all sorts
of sugared treats, and the dif-
ferent musical acts bellowing
throughout But while those
elements are a welcome part of
any celebration, let's face it It
is standard street fair fare.
What makes Lake City's ren-
dition so memorable isn't that
stuff. It'fsthe mixture of gun-
powder and cannonfire, musket
rounds and rifle shots, which
give this festival its flavor. The
Battle of Olustee is a trip into
the past, remembering those
who fought in the largest battle
of the Civil War within Florida's
borders.
It is studying history with,
thousands of re-enactors act-
ing as teachers. It goes beyond
textbook learning, drawing
you in by appealing to all your
senses, with the overpowering
sights, smells and sounds of a
battle from that time period.
And it's done with precision.
This year the 33rd Annual
Olustee Battle Festival .and
35th Annual Olustee Battle Re-
enactment has thus far been
as flawless as the weather. The
organization that puts these
events together, the Blue/Grey
Army, should be commended
for both the authenticity of the
production and the willingness
of those involved to answer any
and all questions about battles
of the era.
The object of the event is to
remind people of the terrible
sacrifices made by so many to
preserve our country. More
Americans lost their lives in
the Civil War than any other in
our history. A trip back in time
such as this not only allows us
to remember those who per-
ished, but reminds us the hor-
rific nature of war.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Social Security halts debt cut plans


inning the war
against the defi-
cit depends not
on President
Barack Obama's
anemic proposal to cut a trifling
$1.3 trillion in spending over
the next decade but on whether
both Congress and the White
House have the courage to tack-
le the unimpeded growth of the
nation's entitlement programs
on a bipartisan basis.
I'm betting they don't since
they haven't so far.
Even the president has con-
ceded his 2012 budget is a far
cry from what is needed and
without Republican help there is
little solution.
Good luck on that seeing how
far the highly regarded debt
commission got with its recom-
mendations.
The debt panel headed by
Erskine Bowles and former Sen.
Alan Simpson saw the enemy
and as the furry philosopher
Pogo said, "it is us"- the mil-
lions who see Social Security
as an inviolable program that is
forever immune from correc-
tions no matter how perilous
to our national welfare it has
become.'
The entitlement programs,
including Medicare, are now
two thirds of the budget or
$2.14 trillion with revenues for
2012'projected at $2.6 trillion.
The proposed budget is $3.7
trillion, leaving a shortfall $1.1
trillion. The interest on the debt
is $242 billion almost enough
to run the government not too
many years ago.
Before everyone above the
age of 65 or nearing it begins to
wail at my audacity, I'm not talk-
ing about tearing up your Old
Age Survivors Insurance plan,
just curtailing its acceleration,
through some common sense
adjustments.


Dan K.Thomasson
One of these, of course, is to
advance the retirement age to a
level that reflects more realisti-
cally our increased longevity,
thereby doing away once and
for all with the 65 benchmark
established in the 19th century
by Otto von Bismarck for the
German populace. That age
was effectively so high that few
Germans were able to collect it.
The debt panel's dynamic duo
of Bowles and Simpson recom-
mended upping the age .to 67
and then 68, raising the hackles
on every gray head in America.
It would save billions in
the coming years as the Baby
Boomers increasingly come to
the last quarter of their lives.
There are other tweaks that
combined with an increase in
the payroll tax could slow the
runaway growth without tearing
up the original blueprint.
For years Congress increased
benefits without paying for.
them, avoiding the political
repercussions of raising taxes
and reaping the votes of older
Americans enjoying the yearly
pay raise.
When I was covering,
Congress, the last thing on
the agenda every year was the
Social Security increase which
frequently kept us up all night.
Finally to relieve the pres-
sures of having to deal with
the annual demand for more,
the lawmakers established an
automatic annual cost of living
increase for recipients. The
problem was that the action


was based on faulty projections.
So when there was double-
digit inflation during the late
'70s, seniors were the only
Americans keeping up and the.
strain on the system began to
show dramatically, including a
rapid acceleration of the num-
ber of taxpayers it was taking to
support one recipient.
It seems amazing to me that
in looking to eliminate red ink,
the president has concentrated
on the programs where the
returns are minimal, espe-
cially if one largely excludes the
Pentagon.
There just isn't enough dis-
cretionary spending to dent the
deficit.
Perhaps remembering Ronald
Reagan's orders to his budget
director not to even whisper
the words Social Security in his
office, Obama has treated the
program like the political poi-
son it is. Only George W. Bush
sincerely sought a solution with
his abortive plan to privatize a
portion of it.
It was too radical for most,
but at least he tried.
' Unfortunately, but not sur-
prisingly, the debt commission
has been ignored by Capitol
Hill and the White House after
a flurry of national attention.
Bowles and Simpson made the
rounds to promote their ideas
only to watch the whole effort
go to the usual burial ground
for these things.
The deficit like the weather
remains only a great talking
point
What do we do? Well, to
paraphrase Will Rogers we all
should gas up our limousines
and drive to the poor house.

* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


When schoolchil-
dren think of
Presidents Day,
assuming they
think about it
at all, their thoughts probably
run to wigs made of cotton balls
powdered with flour or log cab-
ins made of pretzel sticks.
When adults think about
Presidents Day they think,
"Hurray, a three-day weekend."
On further reflection, they may
envision a car salesman dressed
in Revolutionary War garb, wav-
ing a hatchet and promising
to chop prices the way young
George Washington chopped
down his father's cherry tree.
Like some of our other nation-
al holidays, Presidents Day has
drifted rather far from its origi-
nal purpose. Washington was a
towering figure in 19th century
America. In 1885, when his
birthday, Feb. 22, was declared
a federal holiday he had been
dead only 86 years.
And every February school
children were subjected to


Parson Weems' syrupy and
wholly untrue tales of young
Washington, like the cherry
tree fable: "I can't tell a lie, Pa;
you know I can't tell a lie. I
did cut it with my hatchet." All
but the most credulous pupils
surely sensed that at some level
these stories were bogus.
America in the second half of
the 20th century did not idolize
and celebrate Washington the
way 19th and early 20th century
America did. Certainly the inteh-
sity diminished, and in 1971 the
Uniform Federal Holiday Act
moved Washington's Birthday
- still, by the way, the official
name of the holiday to the
third Monday in February, giv-
ing us a three-day weekend and
coincidentally guaranteeing that
the observance would never fall
on the first president's actual
birthday.
Although some states
observed Abraham Lincoln's
Feb. 12 birthday as a holiday, it
was never a federal holiday. The
congressional committee draft-


ing the Holiday Act considered
including Lincoln in the honor ,
but never got around to it
Despite that oversight,
Lincoln increasingly became
a participant in Washington's
Birthday and, pushed by busi-
nesses that preferred the more
inclusive term, the three-day
weekend has generally, if
unofficially, become known as
Presidents Day, Thus, the presi-
dent who freed the slaves and
won the Civil War is honored
but technically as an after-
thought.
Both men should be hon-
ored on their artificial holiday
- it will never fall on Lincoln's
actual birthday either and
some attempt made to introduce
them in a meaningful way to our
schoolchildren, perhaps with
a special tip of the top hat to
Lincoln. Just around the corner
is March 4, the 150th anniver-
sary of his first inauguration.
Happy Presidents Day.
* Scripps Howard News Service


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@notionalpress.com


Congress

may really

deal with

the deficit

(K, the first round
of the budget
shenanigans is
concluded, and
everybody looks
bad. But, really, folks, there
might be hope.
President Barack Obama
presented a budget that doesn't
touch the real offenders in the
current humongous budget
deficit crisis Medicare,
Medicaid and defense. (Social
Security must be addressed
separately but isn't contribut-
ing to today's deficit)
Instead, he proposed to cut
funding for projects that actual-
ly work apd make life better for
millions in order to score a PR
advantage over Republicans.
Thus they can't say they are
the only ones willing to cut
domestic spending. But pro-
grams where Obama and the
GOP want to make deep cuts
or ax completely amount to
only 12 percent of the federal
budget
House Speaker John
Boehner looks the worst of all
for his blithe "so be it" over
the fact that his proposed
budget cuts could eliminate
as many as 650,000 jobs. At
the same time he was fight- '
ing to save construction of an
alternate engine for the F-35
Joint Strike Fighter, which
consecutive White Houses and
the Pentagon have tried to kill.
Killing the engine would save
up to $3 billion but eliminate
1,000 General Electric and
Rolls-Royce jobs in Boehner's
home state of Ohio and in
Indiana.
Tea Partiers helped push a
233 to 198 House vote to kill
the engine, but Boehner has
not given up.
In another infuriating devel-
opment, big oil companies are
reporting billions of dollars in
profits even as it is disclosed
they evaded billions in taxes
and drilling fees through
legal loopholes devised by
Congress.
Nonetheless, there is a seri-
ous new tone in Washington
that stems from the recog-
nition that soaring annual
deficits and the $14 trillion
national debt are a national
security threat more danger-
ous than any terrorist group.
As Boehner succinctly says,
"We're out of money." So why
is he still pushing an airplane
engine that Pentagon officials
say is extravagant and unnec-
essary?
Obama says budget nego-
tiations will be necessary to
get a realistic budget And
behind the scenes, half a dozen
Republican and Democratic
senators are working on a
plan to set mandatory spend-
ing reductions that if not met
would trigger new taxes and
less spending.
The problem is that nobody
wants to be first to step for-
ward and demand cuts in
Medicare or defense because
next year is a big presidential
election. If Obama proposes
big cuts in defense (hard to do
with two wars ongoing), he'll
be savaged. If Republicans
anger seniors by suggesting
big cuts in Medicare, they'll be
dumped.
That's why Obama is right
that there has to be a quietly
devised bipartisan proposal
that could convince voters next
year that the nation is finally,
factually and fairly addressing
its money problems.
* Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


4A


OTHER OPINION'


Two presidents came to share Monday








Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011


FACES & PLACES
Scenes from Battle of Olustee events on Saturday.


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter











Abraham Lincoln impersonator Tad Allen (below) waves to a
crowd of people while riding in a horse-drawn carriage during
the Battle of Olustee Parade Saturday morning.


A group of Confederate soldiers reload and reposition them-
selves as a fellow soldier writhes in agony.


Students from Bard Gymnastics perform somersaults during
the parade on Saturday.


Wl V.A- .-" .: r-i.?j.*i .r "rMjrFlty- a fl 4Ijia Mii l3. g-?
A soldier dies from his wounds as Union fighters encroach
Confederate territory.


Re-enactors wave to thousands of people, as they walk
down U.S. Highway,9O Saturday during the'Battle of Olustee
Parade.


A medical team holds down a wounded soldier while Adrian Cox McCabe, a superintendent of
nursing and surgeon major with the Southern Guard Brigade of Virginia, uses a saw to ampu-
tate an unrecoverable leg during a medical demonstration Saturday.


OLUSTEE Toys are
designed to entertain and it
takes a special touch to rep-
liclate toys that were used
more than 100 years ago.
Monty Davies, owner of
Mr. Monty'sToy Emporium,
has a tent on sutlers row
at the Olustee Battle Re-
enactment where he shows
his skills making toys from
the Civil War era.
"We have just about any
toy a child would play with
in the mid 1800s," he said.
"If it's out there we try to
grab it."
The toys include a Jacob's
Ladder, corn-husk dolls,
wooden swords, Union and
Confederate troop hats,
cup and balls, jewelry, cap
guns, bullwhips, slingshots
and Victorian fans.
Bob Giarda, a park ser-
vice specialist at Olustee
Battlefield Historic State
Park, said sutlers row
includes vendors and exhib-


the Civil War era.
Around 50 sutlers are
selling goods and wares
during the 2011 Olustee
Battle Re-enactment. They
sell clothing, photography,
blacksmithing, Confederate
money, weapons and other
artifacts.
Giarda said sutlers add a
touch of civilian life to the
annual re-enactment.
'"The experience you have
in sutlers row is so different
from the battle itself where
you are bystanding and
watching," he said. "Here, in
sutlers row, you can pick-up,
taste, touch, smell and feel
things. Its just an amazing
experience."
Davies, who is from
Homeland, 'has had a toy
store on sutlers row for
about eight years as part of
the annual Olustee Battle
Re-enactment He makes it a
family business with his wife
and his mother.
Davies said his wife,


then, they've continued the
tradition. .
"When we met we met at
a re-enactment and we want-
ed to do something together
and we decided to do a sut-
lery and we've been growing
on it since then," he said.
The Davies often mani-
facture their wooden toys
in a warehouse near their
home. They normally make
hundreds of the toys during
a single run and later put the
pieces together.
Although Davies and his
wife make several of the toys
they sell, he didn't list that as
one of his top challenges.
'"The challenges as a sut-
ler is gas (prices) and the
overall expenses," he said.
"The challenges with kids is
trying to have the toys that
the kids want having the
right toy at the right time
can make or break you."
He also noted that the
economy has an impact on
the sutlery.


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By TONY BRITT itors who present artifacts Terry, 'got him interested .
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com for sale and exhibit from in being a sutler and, since ..


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


-.


:1


4 .



t0l







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011


Today
Olustee Battle Reenactment
The 35th Olustee Battle
Reenactment opens to the public
from 9 am. to 3 p.m. today. The
Annual Olustee Battle Reenactment
147th Anniversary of original battle
is 1:30 p.m. Admission is $7 for
adults and $3 for school age chil-
dren. Preschool children are free.

HSCT production
The High Springs Community
Theater present Sherlock's Last
Case, a play by Charles Marowitz at
2 p.m. today. The theater is located
in Historic High Springs at 130 NE
First Ave. Tickets are available at
The Framery in Lake City on Baya,
386-754-2780, at The Coffee Clutch
in High Springs, 386454-7593,
online at highspringscommunity-
theatercom or at the door. Prices
are $11 adults, $8 youth 12 and
younger; and Seniors Sunday$9.

Monday
African-American Read-in
Richardson Middle School is
participatingin the National African
American Read-In 8:30 am. to 9:30
a.m. Monday. Guest readers from
the community are invited to partici-
pate in the event and read African
American literature. To participate
call 7558130.

Tuesday
e Dancers classes
New classes for Dixie Dancers
will begin at 6:45 on Feb. 22 at Teen
Town, across from Youngs Park.
Call 752-1469 or 754-1478. This a
great way to meet new people and
have fun.

MADDfest meeting
MADDfest meeting is 6 p.m.
Tuesday at the Columbia County
Public library. The two-day event
is March 25 and 26. MADDFEST
Spring Arts Festival is at Olustee
Park. All arts-and-crafts booths, food
vendors will surround the park fac-
ing the main stage gazebo. Contact
Tony@MADDFESTcom or 386-965-
9256.

Thursday
Annual meeting
SOS Annual Membership
Meeting, Feb. 24, with Florida
Singer/Songwriter Tom Shed. It
is a free musical event hosted by
Save Our Suwannee, Inc. for the
SOS membership drive, at the High


PATRICK SCOTT/Lake City Reporter

Paying tribute to Civil War-era soldiers through songs
'Seven Pounds of Bacon' members Joe Kurtright (left), Dee and Craig Wolford sing and perform Civil War-era
music at the Oaklawn Cemetery Memorial Service Friday morning. The ceremony paid tribute to the soldiers
who fought and died at the Battle of Olustee.


Springs Opera House, 7:30 p.m.,
Feb. 24.

Friday
HSCT production
The High Springs Community
Theater presents "Sherlock's Last
Case," a play by Charles Marowitz,
8 p.m. Friday. The theater is located
in Historic High Springs at 130 NE
First Ave. Tickets are available at
The Framery in Lake City on Baya,
386-754-2780, at The Coffee Clutch
in High Springs, 386454-7593,
online at highspringscommunitythe-
atercom or at the door. Prices are
$11 adults, $8 youth 12 and younger
and Seniors Sunday only $9.

Fort White CF Car Show
The Fort White CF Car Show
to benefit the Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation is at 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. March 5 at the Fort White
Community Center. Pre-register by
Friday for $20. Day of the show reg-
istration is $25. Call 386497-1481.

Saturday
The Two and Only
A one show only of "Jay Johnson:
The Two and Only" is 7 p.m.
Saturday in the Levy Performing


Arts Center of Florida Gateway
College, 149 SE College Place.
Tickets are $15 for adults, $14 for
seniors (age 55 and older) and $13
for students. For tickets or further
information, call the box office at
(386) 7544340.

4th Annual Bridal Expo
Everything a bride needs for a
successful wedding is on display 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Lake City
Mall. The event will feautre caterers
with food samples, florists, carriage
and limousine services, wedding
planners a bridal gown fashion
show and more. Free admission.

HSCT production
The High Springs Community
Theater presents "Sherlock's Last
Case," a play by Charles Marowitz, at
8 p.m. Saturday The theater is locat-
ed in Historic High Springs at 130
NE FirstAve. Tickets are available at
The Framery in Lake City on Baya,
386-754-2780, atThe Coffee Clutch *
in High Springs, 386454-7593, online
at highsprngscommunilytheatercom
or atthe door. Prices are $11 adults,
$8 youth 12 and under, and Seniors
Sunday only $9.

Fund-Raising Banquet
The Greater Lake City


Community Development
Corporation, Inc. presents their
6th annual fund-raising banquet
beginning at 6 p.m. on Saturday at
the Columbia County Fairground
Exhibition Hall located at 438 SW
County Road 247. This black-tie
affair will feature a social mixer,-
dinner, silent auction and will end
the evening with music and danc-
ing. Keynote speaker will be Kurt
B. Young Ph. D., and tickets will
sell for $30 per person, or $55 per
couple. For ticket information or
any questions, call 386-752-9785.

Rubies and Rodeos Ball
American Cancer Society's
Rubies and Rodeos Cattle Barons'
Ball is 6:30 p.m. Saturday at Camp
Weed Cerveny Youth Conference
Center in live Oak. It will feature
an evening full of fun and entertain-
ment, including live music, dinner,
live and silent auctions and a casino.
A VIP reception begins at 5:30 p.m.
For tickets or more information,
contact (352)376-6866 ext. 5061.

Sunday
HSCT production
The High Springs Community.
Theater presents "Sherlock's Last
Case," a play by Charles Marowitz 2


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


OBITUARIES


Patricia Ann "Pat" Nail
Mrs. Patricia Ann "Pat" Nail,
73, of Lake City, passed away
peacefully while surrounded
by her family on Friday, Feb-
ruary 18, 2011 at her resi-
dence following a very brief
illness. A native of Lakeland,
Florida, Mrs. Nail had been
a resident of Lake City since
1960 having
moved here
frdm Plant
City, Flor-
ida. Mrs.
Nail was
the daughter
of the late
Heyward
and Jewell
Pat Nail Webb Glass.
Mrs. Nail
had been a homemaker and
had supported her husband
and then her son in their busi-
ness "RedbudEnterprises" for
many years. In her spare time
Mrs. Nail very much enjoyed
riding horses, spending time
and fishing at Suwannee, and
cooking. She was a member
of the Watertown Congrega-
tional Methodist Church. She
was much loved by her large
family and many friends
and will be greatly missed.
Mrs. Nail is survived by her
husband of fifty-seven years,
W.E. "Buddy" Nail; her sons,
Richard Nail and Steven Nail
both of Lake City; her former
daughter-in-law, Ann Clark
of Lake City; her three grand-
children, John Wayne Hop-
kins of Wellborn, Florida;
Stephanee (Lance) MacDon-
ald of Lake City; Tina (Eric)
Jackson of Jacksonville,
Florida and her two great-
grandchildren, Peyton Mac-
Donald and Rylee Jackson.
A memorial gathering will
be announced at a later date.
In lieu of flowers the family
requests that memorial dona-
tions be made in Patricia's
name to the Haven Hospice
of the Suwannee Valley, 6037


U.S. Highway 90 West, Lake
City, FL 32055. Cremation
arrangements are under the
direction of the DEES-PAR-
RISH FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025 752-
1234 please sign our on-line
family guestbook at www.par-
rishfamilyfuneralhome. corn
James Leroy Van Pelt
Mr. James Leroy Van Pelt,
89, resident of Lake City, FL.
died Wednesday February 16,
2011 at his residence follow-
ing an extended illness. He
was the son of the late Eddie
and Annie Tanner Van Pelt.
He had lived in Lake City
for the past forty years. He
enjoyed building things. He
was preceded, in death by
his wife, Delphia Van Pelt
and daughter, Regina Heath.


He is survived by, one daugh-
ter, Patsy Reynolds (Larry),
West Lebanon, IN.; three
brothers and three sisters,
five grandchildren, eight
great grandchildren and one
great-great grandchild. Ser-
vices will be held Monday,
February 21,2011, at 11:00A.
M.at Forest Lawn Memorial
Gardens Cemetery in Lake
City, Florida with Chaplin
Lynwood Walters officiating.
Arrangements are under
the direction of GATE-
WAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596
S. HWY 441, Lake City.
(386). 752-1954. Please
sign the guest book at www.
gatewayforestlawn. com.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


- Smill to extra large- BEAUTIFUL
fireplaces in stock- PIgRPLA S!

Dozens of
*."sizes and
styles
Wood Gas
-. Electric
Great Prices


36" WOODBURNING FIREPLACE
with 12' basic chimney parts


COER EYEAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.

p.m. Sunday. The theater is located
in Historic High Springs at 130 NE
First Ave. Tickets are available at
The Framery in Lake City on Baya,
386-754-2780, at The Coffee Clutch
in High Springs, 386454-7593,
online at highspringscommunitythe-
atercom or at the door. Prices are
$11 adults, $8 youth 12 and young-
er; and Seniors Sunday $9.

Monday
Closing ceremony
. Black History 2011 closing cer-
emony and elders banquet is 6 p.m.
Feb. 28 at Richardson Community
Center. The event is sponsored by
It's About My Efforts. The month-
long theme is "Self Sufficiency is
Key." Visit www.itsaboutmyefforts.org
or call 386697-6075 for details.

Columbia FFA meeting
The Columbia FFA Booster/
Alumni is meeting at 6:30 p.m.
Feb. 28 at the agriculture land lab
located on the CHS campus. All
FFA students, parents, alumni and
community leaders are invited to
attend. Please bring a covered dish
for dinner. The group meets on the
fourth Monday of every month to
help promote agriculture education
among the local community and
provide support to the FFA chap-
ters in Columbia County.

March 1
Annie's Project
Annie's Project is being offered in
Columbia and Suwannee Counties
for women farm/ranch owners and
partners on Tuesdays 1 p.m. to
4:30 p.m., March 1 through April
5. Location will alternate between
Lake City and Live Oak Extension
Offices. Topics covered include:
business plans, alternative enter-
prises, estate planning, marketing,
insurance, accounting, financial
records, among others. For more
information visit http://programs.
ifas.ufl.edu/anniesproject. Limited
to 20 participants so register early.
Contact Mary at'386-362-2711.'
A $40 fee covers books, refresh-
ments, materials and software.

March 12
Police Ball
The 18th Lake City Police
Department Ball is 7 p.m. to mid-
night March 12 at the Lake City
County Club. All proceeds from
this year's ball will go toward the
purchase of a Firearms Training
Simulator. Tickets are $50 a person.
Contact Destiny Hill at 758-5484 or
Samantha Driggers at 758-5483.


|wwi'dwoodsl']Tove (lor:]i d K-[,]om


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011


BRIEFS

House votes
to cut spending
WASHINGTON The
Republican-controlled
House voted to shield
greenhouse-gas polluters
and privately owned colleg-
es from federal regulators
on Friday, strengthening
the pro-business empha-
sis of legislation that also
would chop $61 billion
from government spend-
ing.
But as a final vote neared
on the sweeping measure,
newly elected conserva-
tives suffered a rare set-
back when a split among
rank-and-file Republicans
sank a move to cut an addi-
tional $22 billion.
"The American people
have spoken. They demand
that Washington stop
its out-of-control spend-
ing now, not some time
in the future," declared
Rep. Tim Huelskamp, R-
Kan., one of the 87 newly
elected Republicans who
have moved aggressively
to attack federal deficits
and reduce government's
reach.
But for other
Republicans, the extra $22
billion was a step too far.
"Rather than make care-
ful decisions on specific
program the. amendment
hits everything indiscrimi-
nately in a heavy-handed
way," said Rep. Hal Rogers,
R-Ky., and principal author
of the broader measure.
"We were elected to make
choices, not run on auto-
matic pilot"

Scientist: Gulf
bottom still oily
WASHINGTON Oil
from the BP spill remains
stuck on the bottom of the
Gulf of Mexico, according
to a top scientist's video
and slides that she said
demonstrate the oil isn't
degrading as hoped and
has decimated life on parts
of the sea floor.
That report is at odds
with a recent report by the
BP spill compensation czar
that said nearly all will be
well by 2012.
At a science conference
in Washington, marine
scientist Samantha Joye of
the University of Georgia
aired early results of her
December submarine dives
around the BP spill site.
She went to places she
had visited in the summer
and expected the oil and
residue from oil-munching
microbes would be gone by
then. It wasn't
"There's some sort of
a bottleneck we have yet
to identify for why this
stuff doesn't seem to be
degrading," Joye told the
American Association
for the Advancement of
Science annual confer-
ence in Washington. Her
research and those of her
colleagues contrasts with
other studies that show a
more optimistic outlook
about the health of the gulf.

Pirates hijack
4 Americans
MOGADISHU, Somalia
- An American couple that
has sailed the world with
a yacht full of Bibles was
hijacked by Somali pirates,
and the U.S. said Saturday
it is assessing possible
options.
Pirates say the yacht will
make landfall in Somalia
on Sunday, which would
reduce the chances of a
fast rescue dramatically.
A British sailing couple
hijacked by pirates was
held hostage in a stiflingly


hot Somali region for
more than a year. Pirates
hijacked the yacht Quest
on Friday, two days after
a Somali pirate was sen-
tenced to 33 years in prison
by a New York court for
the 2009 hijacking of the
Maersk Alabama. That
case ended in a spectacular
rescue when Navy sharp-
shooters killed two pirates
holding the ship's captain,
Richard Phillips.
* Associated Press


Confederate descendants honor Davis


By PHILLIP RAWLS
Associated Press
MONTGOMERY, Ala.
C confederate
descendants
and re-enactors
dressed in sol-
diers' uniforms
and hoop skirts marched
down the main avenue in
Montgomery on Saturday
to mark the 150th anniver-
sary of the inauguration
of Confederate President
Jefferson Davis.
They started at a
fountain where slaves
were once sold, past the
church that Martin Luther
King Jr. led during the
Montgomery Bus Boycott,
and ended at the Capitol
steps, where Alabama's old
and modern history often
collide.
It's the spot where
former Gov. George C.
Wallace proclaimed "seg-
regation forever" in 1963
and where King concluded
the historic Selma-to-
Montgdmery voting rights
march in 1965.
The city no longer rolls
out the red carpet for
the Sons of Confederate
Veterans like it did 50 years
ago, when the centennial of
Davis' inauguration was a
state-coordinated celebra-
tion with past and present
governors and officials
from all ranks.of govern-
ment
On Saturday, state and
city officials gave permis-
sion for the SCV to march,
but had no role in the
events. Elected officials
from the governor to the
mayor chose to stay home
or go to other events.
The reception was
even colder from African-
American leaders in the
state.
"The whole celebration
is akin to celebrating the
Holocaust," state NAACP
President Benard Simelton
said.
Simelton said elected
officials stayed away
because they knew atten-
dance would be viewed as


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Members of Sons of Confederate Veterans fire their rifles in celebration Saturday in Montgomery, Ala., following the
re-enacting of the swearing in ceremony of CSA President Jefferson Davis on the steps of the Alabama State Capitol.


a slap in the face to African-
Americans, who make up
one-fourth of Alabama's
population.
Black leaders had
discussed holding a pro-
test like the one held in
December at a Secession
Ball in Charleston, S.C., but
decided against it.
'We didn't want to give
them more publicity," said
Rep. Alvin Holmes, the lon-
gest serving black member
of the Alabama Legislature.
A downtown shop-
per, Shirley Williams of
Montgomery, who is black,
shook her head as she
walked by the parade. She
said she was offended the
parade occurred during
Black History Month.
"It represents things
in the past that were not
positive. Some things ought
to be remembered, but
this brings up too many
painful things people went
through," she said.
Sons of Confederate


Veterans members, who
trace their history to ances-
tors who fought in the war,
call it the "War Between
the States" or the "War of
Secession" rather than the
Civil War. They say its ori-
gins have been distorted by
modern historians.
SCV member Randy
Beeler said he drove from
Paducah, Ky., to "send
a message the war was
fought over states' rights.
Slavery was an issue, but it
was not the main issue."
One of the organizers,
Chuck McMichael, a past
national commander of the
SCV, called the comparison
of the march to celebrating
the Holocaust ludicrous.
"In many ways the Union
Army acted more like the
German army of the 1940s
with its scorched earth
policy," said McMichael, a
high school history teacher
from Shreveport, La.


PACKAGE INCLUDES:
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Members of Sons of Confederate Veterans march in
Montgomery, Ala. on Saturday during the re-enacting of the
swearing in ceremony of CSA President Jefferson Davis.


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SCHOOL READINESS OPEN ENROLLMENT

LIMITED FUNDING, LIMITED AVAILABILITY!

Need Childcare, Afterschool Care, Extended
Care for your childrenn?

Parents will be able to apply for the Early Learning
Coalition of Florida's Gateway, Inc., School Readiness
Program during Open Enrollment, effective immediately.
Open enrollment is first come, first serve and parents
need to call 866-752-9770 or go to www.elc-fg.org for
a complete list of items to bring for school readiness
enrollment.

SCHOOL READINESS OPEN ENROLLMENT

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1104 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025
866-752-9770

School Readiness is a state and federally funded program
targeting children birth through age 12 from low income
families in Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, Suwannee
and Union counties. School Readiness programs
provide quality learning experiences and instruction for
children. There is limited enrollment space, so parents are
encouraged to apply now.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011


S HI 76


, ,. ii ? ,iS.
w p


Vdosta
76/53 *

laasse Lake Cit
76/48 77/53
Gainesville ,
Paa City m77/55
69/53 Ocala
77/56


Tam
76/


City
Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
74/55 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
73J59 Gainesville
Jacksonville
* Key West
ando Cape Canaveralake City
S 7/B Lake City


I / / Miami
ipa; Naples
59 West Palm Beach Ocala
78/65 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers, 78/67 Pensacola
82/57 Naples Tallahassee
80/62 Miami Tampa
KyWest 79/67 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


f 1/0o


Monday
78/62/s
79/61/s
79/66/s
82/61/s
79/56/pc
79/56/s
78/67/s
79/55/pc
80/67/s
79/64/s
80/57/pc
82/60/s
.72/59/s
72/59/pc
76/54/s
75/62/s
77/55/pc
80/63/s


Tuesday
76/59/pc
78/56/pc
82/65/pc
82/58/pc
77/51/pc
76/50/pc
80/68/pc
78/48/pc
81/67/pc
78/62/pc
78/52/pc
81/58/pc
73/47/pc
70/46/pc
77/42/pc
77/61/pc
75/43/pc
81/63/pc


NATIONAL FORECAST: A lengthy frontal boundary stretched across the United States will be
responsible for widespread precipitation today. Rain and higher elevation snow showers will
be likely in the Southwest. Snowfall associated with this system will extend from parts of the
Northwest, across the northern Plains and Upper Midwest and into the Great Lakes.


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES H igi: 896, Laredojexas Low: -17, Int'l Falls, Minn.


Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


81
51
70
45
88 in 1924
23 in 1958


0.00"
3.59"
7.27"
2.26"
5.77"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom:r


7:06 a.m.
6:23 p.m.
7:05 a.m.
6:24 p.m.


9:22 p.m.
8:18 a.m.
10:30 p.m.
8:57 a.m.


Feb. March March March
24 4 12 19
Last New First Full


6

30nmitestobum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
*,, '


our readers









weather.com
byas-wsss-a


. Forecasts, data and
graphics 2011 Weather
SCentral, LP, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
'Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY


37/21/.01
69/45/0
14/1/0
74/50/0
53/47/0
9/3/0
75/51/0
10/4/0
40/32/0
47/31/0
36/23/.03
77/50/0
54/40/0
69/47/0
51/21/0
34/25/0
53/34/0
38/31/0
75/47/0
73/55/0
75/51/0
63/26/0


29/19/pc
54/23/c
19/13/pc
65/52/pc
47/35/pc
I 10/1/sf
75/56/pc
8/-7/sn
39/19/sf
35/24/s
28/21/sn
66/53/pc
56/48/c
60/48/pc
32/13/sf
40/29/i
53/52/c
35/35/sn
64/50/pc
75/59/c
73/59/s
41/14/c


Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
ULittle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
47/29/0 61/25/r Omaha
38/27/0 32/30/i Orlando
77/42/0 72/41/pc Philadelphia
0/-28/0 10/5/sn Phoenix
66/42/0 59/45/pc Pittsburgh
50/28/0 35/26/pc Portland ME
78/69/0 80/69/r Portland OR
76/58/0 74/61/fg Raleigh
51/30/0 56/48/c Rapid City
77/52/0 75/59/pc Reno
79/50/0 74/55/s Richmond
50/43/0 73/28/c Sacramento
56/48/.05 52/36/sh St. Louis
71/56/0 72/56/c Salt Lake City
56/48/0 58/43/sh San Antonio
72/57/0 74/58/pc San Diego
79/62/0 79/67/s San Francisco
27/10/0 28/17/sn Seattle
76/57/0 73/57/pc Spokane
74/57/0 74/60/pc Tampa
52/35/0 42/32/pc Tucson
76/57/0 75/33/pc Washington


Hi/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W


53/33/0
82/56/0
54/43/0
73/51/0
42/33/0
43/30/0
47/34/.01
68/52/0
19/15/0
36/29/.09
66/46/0
51/37/.17
54/37/0
45/38/.12
70/61/.07
59/55/.28
44/40/.66
41/34/0
39/26/0
74/56/0
75/55/0
57/50/0


58/19/r
77/57/s
43/34/pc
55/41/sh
40/38/sh
28/13/pc
45/31/s
60/46/pc
9/-i/sn
38/16/pc
55/41/pc
52/37/pc
69/42/c
38/26/sh
74/58/c
58/47/sh
53/41/pc
45/32/s
33/19/pc
76/59/s
57/36/pc
47/39/pc


IOr,. thi4 date in
p7a- _7p 6ai f
_. 1, ~.eaa


j Sunday Monday


8iOrO, eaistern
Wisconsin espe-
riernced their big-
gest snowstormn
of record. Racine
receied thirty
iriches, and drift.s
around Milwauvee
measured fifteen
feet rnign.


* A a


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
84/68/0 87/71/pc
39/34/0 42/35/sh
53/44/.02 60/41/pc
73/59/0 75/65/sh
54/19/0 47/25/pc
28/27/0 30/21/pc
79/68/0 80/64/pc
73/63/0 72/57/pc
45.30'0 44/36/sh
79/54/0 83/54/pc
9/-11/0 5/-7/pc
57/52/.15 66/61/sh
81/73:10 83)"7/pr


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
48/41/.03
81/66/0
43/37/.65
50/43/.34
77/41/0
34/16/.03
9/-12/0
81/63/0
75/63/0
73/50/0
21/-2/0
88/75/0
43/34/.34


Today
HI/Lo/W
54/40/sh
84/69/pc
52/42/pc
57/38/pc
70/43/pc
18/13/pc
5. 15.
81/54/t
80/68/pc
75/52/pc
22/6/pc
88/75/t
50/40/pc


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
93/72/0
61/45/0
81/70/.21
82/72/.12
82/54/0
45/19/0
90/77/.07
90/72/0
79/52/0 .
46/41/0
30/21/0
37/32/0
27/21/.11


KEY TO CONDmONS c -,oc.i,. air-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s=sunny,
' nowers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorrns, w-windy.


CAMPUS CMN VISA Platinum Card


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THE WEATHER


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H177 L053 H179LO55 1 '78L48
MnM -- M ,Ao ,n ,ii iii i 1 00f lii iii r i iii


70/56


Ta
I


Today 1
HI/Lo/W
82/75/pc
48/32/sh
81/73/sh
82/70/sh
77/49/pc
45/27/s
89/76/t
88/73/r
61/51/sh
54/41/sh
28/19/sf
35/27/rs
20/5/sf


L AKE CITY A iLm mc%-


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


plot ponnoolod



Q: :4


-..,. .-....... -' .... ^


0


I


i









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421


SPORTS


Sunday, February 20, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday
in the teacher's lounge at
the high school. Election
of officers will be
conducted; all members
are encouraged to attend.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.
FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Team at Publix
for donations
Fort White High
baseball players will be
seeking donations at
Publix in Lake City on
Saturday.
For details, call coach
Chad Bonds at 590-7362.

RUNNING
Tortoise 5K at
O'Leno Park
The third annual Race
the Tortoise 5K/walk is
8 a.m. March 5 at O'Leno
State Park. Entry fee is
$14 for age 14 and
younger and $25 for
others. The race is
limited to 300 registrants.
To register, go to www.
floridastateparks. org/
oleno/Events. cfm.
For details, call Park
Manager V. Morgan
Tyrone at (386) 454-0723.
ADULT SOFTBALL
League sign-up
begins Feb. 28
The Lake City
Recreation Department
has church, commercial
and women's adult
softball league
registration from Feb. 28
to March 18. Registration
is 8:30 to 5 p.m.
weekdays at Teen Town
Recreation Center. Fees
are $350.for a minimum
of 10 games. Rosters and
fees are due March 18.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3609.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Columbia High boys
tennis vs. Eastside High,
3:30 p.m.
Columbia High JV
baseball vs. Baker County
High, 5 p.m.
Tuesday
Columbia High
baseball vs. Lincoln High,
7 p.m. (JV-4)
Fort White High
baseball vs. Union County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30)
Fort White High
softball vs. Ed White
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Wednesday
Columbia High girls
tennis vs. Eastside High,
3:30 p.m.
Thursday
Columbia High
tennis at Middleburg
High, 2:30 phm.
Fort White High JV
baseball at Gainesville
High, 4 p.m.
Columbia High
softball at Middleburg
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High
softball at Taylor County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Friday
Fort White High
baseball at Suwannee
High, 5 p.m.
Columbia High JV
baseball at. Gainesville
High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High
softball vs. Williston High,


7 p.m. (JV-5) I


Another solid showing


for former CHS golfer


Barber takes fifth
place at Gator
Invitational.
From staff reports

Former Columbia High
player Blayne Barber
helped lead the 10th-ranked
Auburn men's golf team
to its fourth consecutive
top-two finish at the Gator
Invitation in Gainesville on
Feb. 13.
Florida claimed the team
title with an 844 finish to
beat the Tigers by nine
strokes.
Barber (73-69-69) fin-
ished in a tie for fifth with
fellow Tiger Niclas Carlsson
as both golfers finished the
weekend off with scores of


Florida's Andres
Echavarria earned individ-
ual medalist honors with a
score of 210 to edge Barber
by one stroke.
"We want to put ourselves
in position to win champion-
ships," Auburn head coach
Nick Clinard said. "We've
been doing that. With us
it's just a matter of closing.
We need to work on our
putting down the stretch.
The team that putts the best
always gives themselves in
a better chance to win. We
also need to be mentally
tougher down the stretch.
I've challenged the guys to
improve on both of these
things."
The Tigers trailed by
10 shots following the
first round and gained
four shots back on the


Lookin


Columbia down
to seven names
for coaching job.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
The names are in
place. All that's left is the
theatrics. Columbia High
will look to have a coach
named within the next 10
days as the interview pro-
cess is set to begin this
week.'
There are some famil-
iar names on the docket,
starting with three names
the public should be very
familiar with. Current
Columbia defensive coor-
dinator Dennis Dotson,
former Columbia player
Antonio Bradwell and for-
mer Columbia, Florida State
and NFL player Brian Allen
headline an all-star crew.
Other names in the mix of
seven candidates to be inter-
viewed are Bobby Johns and
Frankie Carroll. Two other
coaches will be interviewed,
but their names could not be
released at this time.
Interviews will start on
Thursday and the process
will take place over two
days. The first four appli-
cants will meet with a com-
mittee beginning at 5 p.m.
on Thursday. The commit-
tee will review applications
from 3:30-5 p.m.
Principal Terry
Huddleston kept the names
of the committee private at
this time.
"I'll be glad to release the
names of the committee on
Friday," he said. "I want the
guys to be able to come in
here with a clean slate. If we
were to release the names,
their phones would ring off


the hook all weekend."
Huddleston intends the
interview process to nar-
row the coaching search
down to two names, but
said a clear candidate could
emerge as well.
"It's hard to say at this
time," he said, 'We usually
try to talk it down to two,
but in the past it has been
so unanimous there was no
need."
Donnie Harrison, assis-
tantf principal in charge of
athletics, outlined the quali-
ties that Columbia is looking
for in the next head coach.
"We want to find the right
fit for Columbia High School
and the kids," he said. "We
want someone who will deal
with them fairly, who will
work them hard and hold
them accountable. We're
looking for someone to put
a good product on the field
and that starts with disci-
pline. We want that Tiger
pride and tradition. He
CHS continued on 2B


Gators with a 278 on the
second day. Florida held
tough on the final day, how-
ever, and defended its home
course.
Barber's Auburn team
now has a win at the Jerry
Pate and runner-up show-
ings at the Gary Koch
Invitational and Bridgestone
Collegiate. The Tigers lead
the conference in top-two
finishes.
Auburn is 52-7 on the sea-
son and has a Southeastern
Conference leading scor-
ing average at 285.13 per
round.
Florida had three of
the top four golfers with
Echavarria, Bank Vongvanij
and Phillip Choi. Florida
State's Drew Kittleson also
finished in a tie for first
before the playoff.


t" ''" . .' I

COURTESY PHOTO
Former Columbia High player Blayne Barber finished fifth at
Gator Invitational.


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Repbrter

ABOVE: Columbia High
defensive coordinator Dennis
Dotson (right) directs his
defense during a game
played last season. Dotson
is one of the finalist for
the Tigers' head coaching
vacancy.

LEFT: Columbia High
players Danny Ratliff (right)
and Jordan Morris hold up
the Old Oaken Bucket Trophy
after beating Suwannee High
last season.


Florida State blows


past Wake Forest 84-66


Seminoles earn
19th win of
season in win.
By AARON BEARD
Associated Press
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.
- Florida State needed
a half to find the energy
and intensity to hand the
Atlantic Coast Conference's
worst team another ugly
loss.
Bernard James scored 15


points while the Seminoles
pulled away in the second
half to beat Wake Forest
84-66 on Saturday, keeping
Florida State in sole pos-
session of third place in the
league standings.
Freshman Ian Miller
and Deividas Dulkys each
added 14 for the Seminoles
(19-7, 9-3), who trailed
by two at halftime before
dominating the rest of the
way against the last-place
Demon Deacons (8-19,
1-11).


Florida State used a 13-2
run to push ahead by dou-
ble figures, then increased
the margin to 20 points
by attacking the rim while
Wake Forest seemed to
grow steadily more pas-
sive.
"Just intensity and ener-
gy, man," James said. "We
picked both of them up and
we really got in sync. In
the first half, at times we
were clicking and at other
FSU continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wake Forest's Tony Chennault scores over Florida State
players Bernard James, Okaro White, and Derwin Kitchen at
'LJVM Coliseum Saturday in Winston-Salem.


for a cham









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
Noon
FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
Daytona 500, at Daytona Beach
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Avantha
Masters, final round, at New Delhi (same-
day tape)
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Northern Trust
Open, final round, at Pacific Palisades,
Calif. ,
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Northern Trust
Open, final round, at Pacific Palisades,
Calif.
TGC Honda LPGA Thailand, final
round, at Chonburi, Thailand (same-day
tape)
7 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, ACE Group
Classic, final round, at Naples (same-day
tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
I p.m.
CBS Ohio State at Purdue
ESPN Florida at LSU
ESPN2 Cleveland St. at Old
Dominion
5:30 p.m.
FSN N.C State at Maryland
7:30 p.m.
FSN Georgia Tech at Duke
10 p.m.
FSN UCLA at California
MEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE
3 p.m.
ESPN Duke vs. Notre Dame, at
Jacksonville
NBA BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m.
TNT All-Star Game, at Los
Angeles
NHL HOCKEY
6 p.m.
VERSUS Heritage Classic, Montreal
at Calgary (McMahon Stadium)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Maryland at Florida St.
FSN Stanford at.UCLA
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Ohio St. at Purdue
Monday
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL.
7 p.m.
ESPN Syracuse atVillanova
9 p.m.
ESPN Oklahoma St. at Kansas
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. .
VERSUS -Washington at Pittsburgh
.WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Georgia atTennessee
9 p.m.
ESPN2 -Texas at Iowa St.


BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
NBAAII-Star Game, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled

APTop 25 schedule
.Today's Games
No. 2 Ohio State at No. II Purdue,
I p.m.
No. 5 Duke vs. Georgia Tech, 7:45 p.m.
No. 10 Wisconsin vs. Penn State,
6 p.m.
No. 14 Florida at LSU, I p.m.
No. 23 Temple vs. Saint Joseph's,
4 p.m. '

AUTO RACING

Race week
NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Daytona 500
Site: Daytona Beach
Schedule: Today, race. I p.m. (FOX,
noon-5 p.m.).
Track: Daytona International Speedway
(tri-oval, 2.5 miles).
Race distance: 500 miles, 200 laps.

Daytona 500 lineup
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach
Race today
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (88) x-Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
186.089.
2. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
185.966.
3. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 184.896.
4. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
185.071 ,.
5. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
183.681.
6. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
185.223.
7. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
184.74.
8. (15) Michael Waltrip, Toyota,
183.966.
9. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 184.102.
10. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 183.595.
II. (4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 183.602.
12. (92) Brian Keselowski, Dodge,
177.581.
13. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
184.763.
14. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
183.685.
15. (43) A J AlImendinger, Ford,
184.29.
16. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
184.008.
17. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
184.991.
18. (II11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
181.316.
19. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,


185.422.
20. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
183.456.
21. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
185.002.
22. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 184.475.
23. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
184.687.
24. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
184.019.
25. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
184.911.
26. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 184.911.
27. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota, 183.557.
28. (37) Robert Richardson Jr., Ford,
181.466.
29. (09) Bill Elliott, Chevrolet,
184.532.
30. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 182.12.
31. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
183.576.
32. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 185.445.
33. (46) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 180.977.
34. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 184.612.
35. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford,
184.748.
36. (77) Steve Wallace, Toyota,
182.574.
37. (71). Andy Lally, Chevrolet,
180.828.
38. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 183.206.
39. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 182.697.
40. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 184.271.
41. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
184.222.
:42. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
183.793.
43. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, Past
Champion.
Failed to Qualify
44. (64) Derrike Cope," Toyota,
177.894.
.45. (97) Kevin Conway, Toyota,
182.949.
46. (60) Todd Bodine,Toyota, 183.057.
47. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
182.434.
48. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 182.867.
x-Earnhardt will start from position
43, after wrecking his primary race car
in practice.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Saturday's Games
Edmonton 5,Atlanta 3
Ottawa atToronto (n)
Los Angeles at N.Y. Islanders (n)
New Jersey at Carolina (n)
Florida at Tampa Bay (n)
Anaheim at St. Louis (n)
Phoenix at Nashville (n)
Dallas at Vancouver (n)
Colorado at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
Washington at Buffalo, 12:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 12:30 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 12:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Chicago, 3:30 p.m.
Montreal at Calgary, 6 p.m.
Monday's Games
Floirda at N.Y. Islanders, I p.m.
Chicago at St. Louis, 2 p.m.
Washington at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.


FSU: Displays attacking mindset
Continued From Page 1B


times we were individuals.
The second half, I think we
played as a team just one
single unit."
It was Florida State's
first game without Chris
Singleton, a 6-foot-9 junior
who was leading the team
in both scoring (13.8) and
rebounding (7.1) before
suffering a broken right
foot last weekend against
Virginia. He had surgery
on Monday and is out indef-
initely.
"We tried to just develop
a mindset that you can't
be overly concerned about
-those things you have no
control over," Florida State
coach Leonard Hamilton
said. "And what we do have
control over is the approach
is we taken each and every
day in practice. We under-
stand we have to perform
with the team we have avail-
able."
On Saturday, that meant
turning in a second-half per-
formance that was reminis-
cent of its 85-61 home win


against the Demon Deacons
on Feb. 1. In that game, the
Seminoles scored 54 points
in the second half, scored
27 points off 24 turnovers
and: took a 47-33 rebound--
ing advantage that led to 21
second-chance points.
This time, the Seminoles
shot 53 percent in the sec-
ond half and .scored 53
points after the break. In
addition, after the- Demon
Deacons protected the bas-
ketball and stayed even on
the boards in the first half,
the Seminoles controlled
the boards while scoring
18 points off turnovers after
halftime.
Florida State also kept
getting point-blank looks
by driving the ball into the
paint, with Miller's basket.
in transition over Ty Walker
capping the 13-2 run that
gave the Seminoles a 50-39
lead with 12:18 left.
A few minutes later,
Okaro White (13 points) had
a sequence that illustrated
FSU's attacking mindset.


First came his reverse layup
in traffic while drawing a
foul for a three-point play.
Then he stole the inbound
pass and beat two Demon
Deacons to a loose rebound
while falling out of bounds
before driving by Travis
McKie for a layup to end
that possession.
* "I've got to come with my
energy and I wasn't coming
with my energy in the first
half," White said. "I wanted,
to prove I was still focusing
on the game and I could
make certain plays.'?
Minutes later, Michael.
Snaer assisted on White's
short jumper from the left
corner, then assisted on
James' layup to make it 67-
47 with 6:24 left.
Compare that to the
first half, when the Demon
Deacons fought to a 33-31
lead at the break for their
first halftime lead since the
High Point game on Jan. 5,
a span of 11 straight games.
But they came out with two
straight turnovers.


CHS: Interviewing familiar faces


Continued From Page 1E

needs to be able to. work
with the community and
have them excited about
football again."
With some of the names
on the interview list, some
might feel that Columbia
could be looking to move
back to the Wing-T style
offense. That's not neces-
sarily the case according to
Harrison.
"Frankie and Bobby both
run variations," he said.
"We want to win and if that
means getting back to the
hard-nosed football and put-
ting our hand on the ground,
that's what we need to do.
Dennis has talked about
running the option, I-form
and isolation. I don't know
what Brian Allen runs, but


that's where the dog and
pony show comes in to play.
The main thing is we want
to get back to the playoffs."
Each candidate brings in
quality experience to the
coaching front. Allen has
NFL experience, which will
help his chances and has
coached at Lake Howell
as the defensive coordina-
tor more than four years.
Bradwell has head coach-
ing experience at West
Gadsden's Quincy High.
Dotson, though he doesn't
have head coaching experi-
ence, brings in 21 years of
coaching knowledge and is
familiar with the program.
Johns has the most head
coaching experience of the
group with multiple stops


including Baker County
and Milton high schools
most recently. Carroll was
at Madison County for eight
seasons.
Multiple candidates could
turn into assistant coaching
candidates if not offered the
head coaching position.
"Frankie told Dennis
that he'd like to come on
as an assistant if he didn't
get it, so that's possible
as well," Harrison said. "If
Brian didn't get it, I'd like
to have him come on, and
who knows, down the road
things could bend his way."
The pieces are in place
for Columbia not only to
hire an excellent head
coach, but the staff could
fill in as well.


COURTESY PHOTO

Lady Falcons softball
Members of the 2011 Lake City Middle School softball team are (front row, from left)
Kamdyn Kvistad, Valeri Enriquez, Morgan Hartopp, Leslie Ann Ronsonet, Tatum Morgan,
Maddie Kennon and Ivory Maltby. Back row (from left) are coach Machon Kvistad,
Malia Hogue, Callie Ward, Ashley Shoup, Lexus Eaker, Emily Harvey, Morgan Cushman,
Kaleigh Sanderson, ErinAnderson and Breland Phelps. Coach John Kvistad is not pictured.



NFL, union hold 2nd day


of mediated negotiations


By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press

WASHINGTON NFL
Commissioner Roger
Goodell, union executive
director DeMaurice Smith
and members of their nego-
tiating teams participated
in a second consecutive
six-hour session with a fed-
eral mediator Saturday, try-
ing to spur progress less
than two weeks before tfie
league's labor deal expires.
They're finally talking to
each other but they're
not revealing how well it's
going.
"I have nothing to say,
obviously," Jeffrey Kessler,
a lawyer for the NFL
Players Association, said
on his way out of the meet-
ing. "We're in a cone of
silence."
For the second day in
a row, the two sides con-
vened at the office of
George Cohen, director of
the Federal Mediation and
Conciliation Service, a U.S.
government agency. They
' met with Cohen for the first
time Friday after agreeing
to the mediation, which is
riot binding but is meant as
a way to initiate progress
in the 'slow and sometimes


ACROSS

1 Survey chart
5 Mantra chants
& Poke
11 Den dweller
12 -- grip!
14 Famous Khan
15 Fence-sat
17 ATM codq
18 Steeple
19 Frame of mind
21 Adjust a guitar
23 Singer -
King
24 Gulf
27 Is situated
29 Holm or
Fleming
30 Pub furnishing,
34 Overpasses
37 Sheep sound
38 To - (pre-
cisely)
39 Wildlife refuges
41 Game with mal-
lets
43 & The
Belmonts


contentious bargaining.
The plan calls for sev-
eral days of negotiations
with Cohen, who asked
participants to not make
any public comments on
the process.
Neither Goodell nor
Smith stopped to take ques-
tions as they left Saturday's
meeting.
Asked while he got into
a waiting car if he were
sure he didn't want to com-
ment at all about the nego-
tiations, Goodell replied,
'That, I'm sure of."
The current collective
bargaining agreement
runs out at the end of the
day March 3. The players
believe that team owners
are preparing to lock them
out as soon as the following
day, which could threaten
the 2011 season. The NFL
has not lost games to a
work stoppage since 1987.
Among those join-
ing Goodell on Saturday:
NFL counsel and lead
labor negotiator Jeff Pash;
league senior vice presi-
dent and treasurer Joe
Siclare; and outside lawyer
Bob Batterman, who was
working for the NHL when
it lost its entire 2004-05 sea-
son to a lockout.


45 Arm muscle
47 Some assets
50 Have a bite
51 Headlong
54 Map dir.
55 Sight for a psy-
chic
56 Declare
57 Rug rat
58 Precious stone
59 Fewer

DOWN

1 "Nova" network
2 Tolerates
3 Seniors' org.
4 Characteristics
5 Nash of humor-
ous poems
6 "Mad Max"
Gibson
7 Pipe handle
8 Bonsai's land
9 Acrobatic
10 of one's
existence
13 Unfired bricks
16 Metal container


Smith was accompanied
by at least a dozen people,
a much larger union contin-
gent than was seen Friday.
In addition to Kessler and
another lawyer, Richard
Berthelsen, the union was
represented by Indianapolis
Colts center Jeff Saturday,
NewYorkJets fullbackTony
Richardson, Pittsburgh
Steelers quarterback
Charlie Batch, and former
players Pete Kendall and
Sean Morey.
None would reveal any-
thing about what went on
during Saturday's talks, but
Saturday noted: "Nothing
can be done without com-
municating."
Indeed, the start of medi-
ation could be a positive
sign after several months
of infrequent negotiations
- and frequent rhetoric,
including charges from each
side that the other was hop-
ing for a work stoppage.
The league and union
went more than two months
without any formal bargain-
ing until Feb. 5, the day
before the Super Bowl. The
sides met again once last
week but called off a sec-
ond meeting that had been
scheduled for the following
day.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


MIIEU OODLES
ESTEEM INDENT
MOOG PJS SOS


GUM YES UREY
ORACLE PLATED


LIMN ROT APE



HEATHS- UNROLL
ENDOWS NEATLY
A( p


Take ten
On cloud nine
Not mil.
Yes, in Tokyo
Literary compi-
lation


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


28 Returns org.
30 Prior to yr. 1
31 Kimono sash
32 Galley slave's
tool
33 Vegas lead-in
35 Broad valley
36 Imaginary
island
39 Booty
40 Summer
flower
41 Chopin's
instrument
42 Two quartets
44 Skyscraper
part (hyph.)
45 Purple veg-
etable
46 Self-satisfied
48 Took the
plunge
49 Prefers
charges
52 Before, in
combos
53 Almost grads


2-21 2011 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER BASKETBALL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Los Angeles Lakers' Kobe Bryant (24) drives between
Cleveland Cavaliers' Anthony Parker (18) and Ramon
Sessions (right) in the first quarter of an NBA basketball
game in Cleveland on Wednesday.


Celtics, Heat go

to Kobe's house

for All-Star game


By BRIAN MAHONEY
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Kobe
Bryant needed only a quick
survey -of the All-Star ros-
ters for the names to jump
out at him.
"We're playing the Celtics
and the Heat," he said. "And
the Hawks."
Forget that last one. It's
those first two that should
spice up Sunday night's
game on Bryant's home
floor, particularly the pres-
ence of a record-tying four
players from that hated
team in green.
"I think there will some
boos in the stands. I'm
expecting that," said San
Antonio's Gregg Popovich,
who will coach the Western
Conference.
Boston's Doc Rivers
will lead an East team that
includes Kevin Garnett,
Paul Pierce,, Ray Allen and
Rajon Rondo. He also gets
Miami's Big Three, includ-
ing LeBron James and
Dwyane Wade in his start-
ing lineup.
"I can get used to that,"
Rivers said.
Chicago's Derrick Rose,
Orlando's Dwight Howard
and New York's Amare
Stoudemire are the other
East starters, with Atlanta's
Joe Johnson and Al Horford
rounding out the reserves.
But most eyes will be on
the Celtics and Heat, both
of whom already won at
Staples Center this season.
Bryant denied gaining
extra motivation from see-
ing them again, insisting
he gets up to play anybody.
But Lakers -fans might feel
differently if Rivers goes
ahead with his previously
mentioned plan and puts
the four Celtics on the floor
together.
"Four of them going out
there, it might get your
blood going," said former
Celtics All-Star and cur-
rent Turner Sports analyst
Kevin McHale. "I'm sure
they'll look out and think
the Celtics are invading
again."
The Lakers beat the


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
E
HUMOT t

2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
AWREY



GLAITH i



SELLING
S\ / B
__^ ^__^a


Celtics in Game 7 of last
year's NBA finals at Staples
Center. An exhibition game
could never replace that,
but Rivers and his play-
ers would love to walk off
their longtime rivals' court
as winners ahead of the
chance they really want in
June.
That will require the
Celtics and Heat, develop-
ing their own rivalry, to play
nice for a night. James said
that's no problem, recall-
ing that his East winners
in 2006 had four Detroit
Pistons, the only other team
to have four players picked
by.the coaches as reserves.
"For that weekend, as
hard as it is, we'll kind of
put the rivalries and the
dislikes aside for the better
of the fans and the better of
the game," James said.
Rivers is glad to hear it
even if he doesn't neces-
sarily buy it.
"I've always been amazed
by it,. even when you know
guys don't like each other,"
he said. "In this case, I don't
know .if that's true, but
there are certain guys on
different teams that don't
like each other. And then
they're in the All-Star game.
I've always laughed when
you see 'em like laughing
and joking. You know, boy,
they're so ... phony right
now. That's what you want
to say. But that's good. As
long as we win the All-Star
game, too, that'll be fine."
Joining Bryant in the
West lineup will be the
Hornets' Chris Paul, NBA
scoring leader Kevin Durafit
of Oklahoma City, Denver's
Carmelo Anthony yes,
he's still in the West, at
least for now and San
Antonio's Tim Duncan,
whom Popovich chose
Thursday night to replace
Yao Ming. The Houston
center was voted in by fans
despite being injured.
Among the west forwards
are Dallas' Dirk Nowitzki,
the Lakers' Pau Gasol and
the Clippers' Blake Griffin,
the first rookie picked for
the All-Star game since Yao
in 2003.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Upset Saturday on hardwood


Associated Press

LINCOLN, Neb. -
Brandon Richardson hit a
pair of free throws with 7.2
seconds left, and Nebraska
beat a team ranked in the
top three for the first time
since 1994.
The Cornhuskers' sec-
ond win over a Top 25
opponent this season
broke Texas' school-record
Big 12 winning streak of 11
games. Nebraska downed
then-No. 13 Texas A&M.
57-48 on Jan. 29.
Richardsonrled Nebraska
(18-8, 6-6) with 15 points,
including 10 in the second
half. Jordan Hamilton and
J'Covan Brown each had
18 to top Texas (23-1, 11-1),
while Cory Joseph had 13.

St. John's 60,
No. 4 Pittsburgh 59
NEW YORK Dwight
Hardy's underhanded flip
with 1.2 seconds to play
gave St. John's its fifth win
over a highly ranked team
this season.
Hardy, who finished with'
19 points, started near mid-
court, drove to the right,
then went baseline for the
shot. It gave the Red Storm
(17-9, 9-5 Big East) another
marquee win to go with
those against then-No. 13


Georgetown, No. 9 Notre
Dame, No. 3 Duke and
No. 10 Connecticut
Ashton Gibbs, who
missed the last three
games with an MCL inju-
ry, came back to score
26 for. the Panthers (24-3,
12-2), who had won five
straight overall.

No. 7 BYU 79, TCU 56
FORT WORTH, Texas
-Jimmer Fredette scored
23 points despite a t6ugh
shooting game, and the
Cougars had four other
players score in double
figures in the rout.
BYU (25-2, 11-1
Mountain West) took
control with an 18-4 run
to end the first half after
Garlon Green's 3-pointer
got the Frogs (10-18, 1-12)
within 27-24.

West Virginia 72,
No. 8 Notre Dame 58
MORGANTOWN, W.Va.
- Truck Bryant broke out
of a slump by scoring 24
points and West Virginia
took command early in the
second half to snap the
Irish's seven-game winning
streak.
Joe Mazzulla added 16
points, and Kevin Jones had
14 points and 10 rebounds


WERW


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nebraska's Lance Jeter is carried on shoulders as he
celebrates with fans Nebraska's 70-67 win over No. 3 Texas,
n an NCAA college basketball game, in Lincoln, Neb.,
Saturday.


for the Mountaineers (17-9,
8-6 Big East).
Ben Hansbrough led
Notre Dame (21-5, 10-4)
with 19 points.

No. 15 Villanova 77,
DePaul 75, OT
ROSEMONT, Ill. -
Corey Fisher scored a
career-high 34 points, nail-
ing the tying 3-pointer near
the end of regulation and
boosting the Wildcats in
overtime.
Maalik Wayns added 17


ii


Z N A W Y T G E R A L D F O R D T M J J
G L N T H P E D P E N O W N M H I A R N
Z O A B A R A C K O B A M A E L M Q' 0 E
Q C G W E S F U V V H O R O L E T T G I
V N A M I F N B Z S X T D A S N G D G W
R I E M H D S K L R I O R G A N I P E Y
M L R R V L F Y O N R D AR I L VL O M
Y M D K L R W C V E F R G H O M 0 Y R Q
L A L K F N Z A R I F S S O I R B Z G G
G H A S B G N O L I S A C O Z J R-M E C
U A N X A B O L E E W N N T U F I U B N
A R O R U S M L S E I 0 R T F G Q, F U D
W B R R E O D S G V X E N K Y Q V L S H
E A E V R P Y R L I C S'D V I F X C H D
Q N E E C L O A N H A R R Y T R U M..A N
T L P J U E C D O N O T N I L C L L I B
T F B J G F R Y D E N N E K N H O J J W
V D X F R A N K L I N R OO S E V E L T
V B G X H R N O S L I W W O R D 0 0 W Y
X R N C X A Q R E T R A C Y M M I J W R
B J I O V J O H N Q U I N C Y A D A M S
L R V R E W O H N E I S E T H G I W D U.
F S T S E Y A H B D R OF R 'E H T U R X
O Q V M Z A C H A R Y T A Y L O'R A X D
S1,- F T'. rE 6 I' IE F
ii 1 U C f, t L F L A' C





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Now arrange the circled letters
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Ans: IT "
(Answers tomorrow)
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points as Villanova (21-6,
9-5) escaped with a tough
win over the Big East's last-
place team.

No. 17 Syracuse 84,
Rutgers 80
SYRACUSE, N.Y. Kris
Joseph scored six of his 21
points in overtime, and the
Orange held on by making
seven free throws in the 63
seconds of the extra session.
The game was tied at 70
after regulation, and Joseph
gave the Orange (22-6, 9-6).



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LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011


Uncertainty dominates


Daytona 500 season opener

By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press I A


DAYTONA BEACH
-The fans will stand in
silence, three fingers
raised toward the sky, on
the third lap of the Daytona
500 in honor of the late
Dale Farnhardt.
The tribute to mark the
10-year anniversary of
Earnhardt's fatal accident
is the only certainty going
into Sunday's season-
opening race. Everything
from the style of racing,
the dominant drivers and
what it will take to win
NASCAR's biggest race
of the season remained a
mystery after one of the
more eventful Speedweeks
in recent history.
Then again, the drivers
have accepted that nothing
ever goes as planned lead-
ing into the Great American
Race.
"Speedweeks always
seems to have a scenario
that pops up and you have
to adjust to it," said 2007
Daytona 500 winner Kevin
Harvick.
The latest dilemma is a
radically new style of tan-
dem racing that has domi-
nated the three events lead-
ing into the 500. Drivers
figured out that hooking
up in two-car packs is the
fastest way around the
freshly paved Daytona
International Speedway,
and boy were they right:
Michael Waltrip topped
out at 206 mph in the first
race of Speedweeks, send-
ing NASCAR scrambling to
slow down the cars.
A smaller restrictor plate
issued midweek brought
the speeds back under con-
trol, but NASCAR has yet
to break apart the two-car
packs that are apparently
the new norm. A series
of technical changes have


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Drivers Dale Earnardt, Jr. (88) and Martin Truex, Jr. (56) test drafting techniques during
practice for Sunday's NASCAR Daytona 500 auto race at Daytona International Speedway
in Daytona Beach on Saturday.


limited how long the cars
can stay hooked in pairs
before their engines begin
to overheat, but the drivers
have mastered a leapfrog-
ging system that allows
them to simply swap posi-
tions and resume the two-
car push.
Establishing partners
and figuring out whom
to trust became the most
important goal of every
on-track session. Kurt
Busch seemed to mas-
ter the new style fastest,
parlaying it into victories
in both the exhibition
Budweiser Shootout and
the first qualifying race,
while others learned valu-
able lessons:
'There weren't any sin-
gle people left; they were all
married," Greg Biffle said
of becoming separated from
teammate Carl Edwards in
his qualifying race.
."I was kind of left out
on that island. The rose
ceremony ended quickly
for me."
The drivers seem to like
the new racing, but fans
aren't sold, frustrated that
the white-knuckle pack rac-
ing they love will be absent


from Sunday's race. How
big of a concern is it? Clint
Bowyer said he fell asleep
on his couch while watch-
ing the first of Thursday's
twin 150-mile qualifying
races.
The competitors insist
Sunday will be unpredict-
able, in part because there
has yet to be an event with
all 43 cars on the track, and
because there's too much
at stake with the Daytona
500 title on the line.
"I still don't think we
know exactly what's going
to happen," Harvick said.
"We know the two-car stuff
is going to work, but we
haven't been out there with
the whole pack, so there's
still some unknbwns."
That includes what kind
of day it will be for Dale
Earnhardt Jr., who was
scheduled to start from the
pole and likely would have
been leading the field dur-
ing the Lap 3 tribute to his
father. But NASCAR's most
popular driver wrecked his
car during an earlier prac-
tice session and switching
to a backup means he'll
go to the back of the field
when the green flag falls.


Starting his fourth
season with Hendrick
Motorsports, Earnhardt
came to Daytona with his
third crew chief in three
years and hopes that a fresh
voice in his ear can snap
a 93-car winless streak. It
would be fitting if it came at
Daytona, where the griev-
ing continues 10 years after
the elder Earnhardt's fatal
accident on the last lap of
the 2001 race.
Earnhardt Jr. is respect-
ful of the anniversary, but
eager to get the attention
on racing.
"I'm here-to race. I under-
stand the situation, and I'm
looking forward to seeing
how my father's remem-
bered and honored," he
said. "I just want to focus on
my job, what I need to do
every single corner, every
single lap, what's best for
me at this moment, what
gets me closer to Victory
Lane on Sunday.
That's all I'm going to
concern myself with."
So he's giving no thought
to the conspiracy theorists
who believe it's already set
up for him to win on Sunday
in an anniversary fix.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tony Stewart celebrates in victory lane after winning the
DRIVE4COPD 300 NASCAR Nationwide series auto race at
Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach Saturday.


Stewart wins

Nationwide race

at finish line
By JENNA FRYER about is 'Man, here we go
Associated Press with another Saturday that
we win, and we'll have bad
DAYTONA BEACH luck (Sunday),"'Stewart said.
- Tony Stewart has mas- Stewart,had bad luck on
tered how to win at Daytona Saturday a flat tire that
International Speedway on forced him to give up sec-
Saturdays. ond place for a late pit stop
Now, if he could only under caution. It dropped
figure out how to win on him to 11th on the restart,
Sunday. with six laps to go, and he
Stewart continued hooked up with Landon
his domination of the Cassill to charge his way
Nationwide Series season through the field.
opener, overcoming a late Bowyer, the pole-sitter, led
pit stop to fix a flat tire the field with Dale Earnhardt
to catch Clint Bowyer at Jr. pushing him around the
the finish line. It was his track. Bowyer and Earnhardt
fourth consecutive win in took off in a two-car pack,
the opener for NASCAR's with Stewart and Cassill
second-tier series and sixth hooked up, and Kyle' Busch
in the past seven seasons. and Joey Logano paired. The
He's been unable to carry three two-car packs put on a
that success into the main thrilling show up to the final
event, the Daytona 500, a lap, when the Busch-Logano
race he's yet to win in 12 tandem ended with Busch
previous starts. hitting the outside wall and
S"The first thing I thought spinning down the track.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor


BUSINESS


754-0427
C ., reporner.co '

Sunday, February 20, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Section C


COUNTY TOURISM


Nettles Sausage wraps up expansion


Harvey Campbell
386-758-1397


A busy


winter,


spring


season

As expected, the
New Year kicks-
off an especially
busy season
for the Tourist
Development Council staff
and our hospitality indus-
try. We always see a sig-
nificant influx of visitors in
February, March and April
due to a number of high
profile events in our area
and throughout Florida.
In addition, many north-
erners come to Florida in
this time frame to escape
from the harsh winter
weather.
This is also an extremely
busy time for nearly two
dozen consumer tour-
ism shows in Florida and
Georgia, which representa-
tives from the Suwannee
River Valley Marketing
Group (SRVMG) attend
and distribute information
TOURISM continued on 2C


Beef processing
plant to offer
custom facility.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn

gish economy:
Americans
have reduced
their visits to
restaurants and, instead,
cook their meals at home.
Nettles Sausage has
benefited from the cook-
at-home mentality and,
as a result, the local
processing company has
expanded its facility and is
adding a new business.
Billy Nettles owns
Nettles Beef Processing,
which will offer area resi-
dents a custom slaughter
facility. The beef process-
ing plant, located across
the street from the sau-
sage plant, will be a sepa-
rate business.
"People can bring their
cows in and we'll (do the
processing) and cut and
wrap them for the freez-
er," Nettles said.
Construction work and
plans for the beef process-
ing plant have been ongo-
ing for more than a year.
It is expected to be opera-
tional within two weeks.
"The beef plant will be
a standalone facility for
nothing but beef," Nettles
said.
The plant's cooler
will be capable of stor-
ing about 150 processed
cows.
"We should be able to


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Billy Nettles, owner of Nettles Beef Processing, stands at a holding pen at the new processing plant, expected to open
within weeks.


run about 50 heads of cat-
tle a week," Nettles said.
With the new process-
ing plant, they'll be able to
process beef on site from
youth fairs all across the
state, Nettles said.
"It will be a big service
to not just Lake City, but
the entire state," he said.
"We should have every-
thing completed within |
the next two to three


weeks. We're actually
going to start processing
some beef next week."
In addition to the new
beef processing plant,
the Nettles Sausage facil-
ity has also expanded its
operation with a 13,500
square-foot building
that will be used mainly


for refrigerated storage The warehouse expan-
space. The warehouse is sion project is expected to
located behind the Nettles be completed in about a
Sausage retail market. month.
"We needed the room "We'll be moving all of
for the sausage plant the packaging line and
and this will be the only the warehousing into the
beef processing plant new building for the sau-
in Columbia County,"
Nettles said. NETTLES continued on 2C


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LAKE CITY REPORTER


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


Fund Losses
Q Can I lose all of my money
in a mutual fund? G.K.,
Norwalk, Conn.
AWhile some stocks can and
do fall to zero, mutual funds
rarely do, since they contain many
different holdings. (Most stocks
aren't huge gambles, though: If
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Lockheed Martin's
T T A I-"1,


S uul tr atl. Trips wit connecting One of my dumbest investments Upward Future
may be flights can be cheaper than direct was in Friedman's, at one time the
costs money. flights. Using the second-closest third-largest jewelry chain in the When investing for your future,
ey on future airport may save you money, too. US. The stock had tanked when an you should think about ... the future.
om/travel At sites such as Priceline.com investigation by the Securities and Your goal is to assemble a team of
and Hotwire.com, you can grab Exchange Commission (SEC) was high-quality "core stocks" that will
line extra-low prices if you're willing to announced. I figured the investiga- stand the test of time. Consider
parison- give up a little control. Consider tion was informal and the stock was Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT).
ions for air- using an experienced travel agent, cheap, but the price just kept falling Why? Well, Lockheed recently
itals at sites too, especially if you're too busy to after I bought, and the company announced fourth-quarter net
otels.com, do much research or have some eventually filed for bankruptcy pro- profits up an astounding 26 per-
dia.com, specialized needs, section, wiping out my investment. I cent over 2009 levels, and it's
tep.com, and Take advantage of group learned to flee from SEC investiga- not slowing down. The company
eral, since discounts. Many airlines, hotel tions. It's like turning on the lights in booked $20.5 billion in new
led only on a chains and car rental agencies offer the kitchen at night and finding a business in the quarter, too.
les. You can reduced rates to special groups. cockroach: There's always more than Meanwhile, a key reason to
directly Senior citizens, for starters, get one cockroach lurking somewhere, own Lockheed Martin is its plan
airlines, car some discounts, as do members of Felix, Singapore to build the plane that U.S. Joint
hotel chains. AARP and AAA. Discounts are The Fool Res Chiefs Chairman Adm. Michael
facts, tips often available for young people and The Fool Responds: It can be Chiefs Chairman Adm. Michael
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for some leads). You may also qual- that crashes, but remember that manned fighter"jet ever to be
ify for some discounts through your stocks often crash for good reasons. built: the F-35 Lightning II.
employer or a professional or social Just because a stock is down, say, 80 Israel has announced its desire to
organization. Even membership in a percent, doesn't mean it won't be buy $1.8 billion worth ofF-35s, a
warehouse club can present you down 90 percent by next week. number that may eventually swell to
with some special deals. Some SEC investigations don't $15.2 billion worth of F-35 hardware
'om and Look before you leap. The world go anywhere, but it's much safer and ancillary services. Canada plans
com. is not a uniformly friendly place wtoa to stick with healthy and growing to buy 65 jets for $9 billion. Mean-
om.things travelers. Get the latest in travel advi- companies rather than troubled while, concern over China's new J-20
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.otelelstate.gov. Bon voyage! troubles very well. In 2008, Fried- such as Japan, South Korea and Sin-
yed. Hotel www.travelstate.gov. Bon voyage. man's CEO was convicted of secu- gapore, very interested in the F-35.
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NameT ha Co r pation in accounting fraud. Patience, grasshopper. Don't fret
Name That CompanyDo.you have an embarrassing Pentagon budget cuts. Lockheed's
/ lesson learned the hand way? only getting better with time. This
I was born in a California garage t company has a hand in everything
in 5 an m f Boil it down to 100 words (or President Eisenhower ever warned
pt n 1945, and my first products were less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My you about the military-industrial
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okus, Polly Pocket, Outburst, Uno, and more. Raid, OFF, Saran and Grand Prix. I've offered paid vacations since 1900 and
V Barbie debuted in 1959 and my Hot Wheels introduced profit sharing for all in 1917. 1 removed chlorofluorocarbons from
my aerosol products three years before the U.S. mandate. I donate 5 per- *
968. I bought Fisher-Price in 1993 and Tyco cent of pre-tax profits to charitable causes and have won awards for social
in 1997, and sold The Learning Company in and environmental responsibility. Frank Lloyd Wright designed several of my
.... h. Iild rtinb \Alhn im I /Anf...r-q C' lInh)r


02 00.
'
I m working wi o


u ngs. o am ( nswer: o )


w 1 -. ... -........... I.... -. . -W L .- ir ..... S
games based on my toys. Who am I? Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
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2011 THE MOTLEY FOOLDLS. BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK (FOR RELEASE 2/24/201I)


Unemployment benefits

jump to 410,000 last week


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON More
people applied for unem-
ployment benefits last
week, one week after
claims had fallen to the
lowest level in nearly three
years.
The big drop a week ear-
lier had occurred largely
because bad weather in
many parts of the coun-
try had kept people from
applying for benefits.
The Labor Department
said Thursday that 410,000
people sought unemploy-
ment assistance last week,


a jump of 25,000 from the
previous week. The rise
was much larger than
economists had expected.
Applications are well
below their peak of
651,000, reached in March
2009, when the economy
was in the depths of the
recession.
Applications below
425,00 are viewed as a sig-
nal of modest job growth
but they would need to dip
consistently to 375,000 or
below to indicate a signifi-
cant and steady decline in
the unemployment rate.
The big jump in benefit
applications followed a


week in which the appli-
cations had fallen to a
revised 385,000, the lowest
level since July 2008. -
* That improvement had
reflected severe winter
weather in much of the
country that forced the
closing of government
offices and prevented peo-
ple from filing applications
for benefits.
Economists had been
looking for a rebound last
week as a catch-up from
the weather disruptions
although the consensus
view had been that claims
would only rise to around
400,000.


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
The Nettles Beef Processing Plant will be ready to serve Columbia residents in several weeks.


NETTLES: 3 meat-related businesses


Continued From Page 1C

sage plant," Nettles said.
FNettles said they'll
hire about 10 additional
employees at both the
warehouse and the new
beef processing plant.
"This has been a big
undertaking," Nettles
said. "We started over
three years ago with the


planning, permitting and
everything."
The addition of the
two expansion projects
will result in the Nettles
family having three meat-
related businesses at the
site; a beef processing
'plant, retail market and
the sausage plant/ware-


house.
This is the first time
the Nettles family has
had an expansion project
with two facilities at once.
Nettles Sausage has been
a Columbia County busi-
ness since 1945.


TOURISM: LC sports events return


-Continued From Page I

about events and activities
in our area.

Sports events will get
under way this month
After a lull of a couple
of months, sports tourna-
ment action returns to
Lake City with three tour-
naments scheduled dur,
ing February. Through
the end of July, 30 tourna-
ments are scheduled. We
encourage area hotels to
get in contact with the
point person on the tour-
naments to increase your
share of the additional
business that is coming to
town.

New Suwannee River
Valley Vacation Guide
We are proud to
announce that the second
edition of the Suwannee
River Valley Vacation
Guide has arrived and is
available for distribution.
We have again ordered
40,000 of the digest-sized
guides, which increased
to 44 pages this year.
The guide contains an
overview of attractions
and special events in the
three-county area and also
has a comprehensive cal-
endar of events and direc-
tory of all hotels, motel
and campgrounds in the
Suwannee River Valley. In
addition to being distrib-
uted during our normal
run of filling brochure
racks, you can also obtain
additional copies by call-
ing Brenda Clemente in
our office at 758-1312.

Press trip upcoming
for the Suwannee River
Press familiarization
trips (FAMS) continue
to be one of our most
productive methods of
marketing our area. We


pre-qualify journalists
for these tours of the
Suwannee River Valley
based on their areas of
interest and a proven
record of having their
articles published in
newspapers and maga-
izines. As of this writing,
we have four journalists
booked for d FAM trip
during the week of March
28-31 and are interview-
ing a couple of additional
writers to fill the final slot
for the press trip.
The group will be
staying at the cabins
on the Suwannee River
Wilderness Trail in White
Springs and activities
will include kayaking
on both the Suwannee
River and at Ichetucknee
Springs State Park. The
group will also visit Spirit
of the Suwannee Music
Park, tour the Stephen
Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park, O'Leno
State Park and the Lake
City- Columbia County
Historical Museum. The
press trip we hosted in
mid-October of 2010 has
already resulted in nearly
20 articles being printed
and distributed on the
Internet

Tourism Day scheduled
in Tallahassee
The Florida Legislature
will begin meeting on
March 8.
S In addition to setting
the budget for the State
of Florida for the fiscal
year beginning July 1, the
session includes oppor-
tunities to lobby the leg-
islature about key issues
in our state. One of the
most important events is
Tourism Day which will
be March 22.
A contingent headed by
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council mar-
keting director Paulette
Lord and Holiday Inn &


Suites general manager
Rod Butler will travel to
Tallahassee to. participate
in Tourism Day.
If you are interested in
joining our group, please
call 758-1367.
In addition to lobbying
for the funding for the
state's tourism agency,
VISIT FLORIDA, well also
be lobbying to keep open
the state parks that have
been identified for possible
closure. Included on that
list is Olustee Battlefield
State Park, Big Shoals
State, Nature & Heritage
Tourism Center, Suwannee
River Wilderness Trail and
Peacock Springs. These
state parks are an impor-
tant component of afford-
able recreation for our resi-
dents and visitors and are
a key part of our tourism
product in the Suwannee
River Valley.
Several of our legisla-
tors have already spoken
publicly about their sup-
port for'keeping the parks
open. Your input is also
important and we urge you
to contact your legislators
about keeping these state
parks open.

Tourism research
project is upcoming
The Suwannee River
Valley was awarded a
$5,000 grant by VISIT.
FLORIDA for a pair of
tourism research projects.
The first will be done dur-
ing the weekend of March
18-19 and will be done
at the Lake City Holiday
Inn, Days Inn and Cabot
Lodge, along with Oaks &
Pines Campground. The
surveys will assist us in
our marketing efforts.
* Harvey Campbell is the
executive director of the
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council. He
can be reached at 386-758-
1397.


I AsktheT















THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


r. -.
0
~
* .. .*-~.. ~ m*r2~
.~


The Week in Review


,, .. ,A . .
.-: .^ "
-. '. *. " .- ^ ^-,-'. - '.,. ., z-' :


Weekly Stock Exchange s


I' I- - --g ---


A NYSE A Amex Nasdaq
8,507.90 +133.01 2,346.81 480.35 2,833.95 +24.51


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
KV PhmA 9.86 +5.48 +125.1
KVPhBlf 9.87 +5.46 +123.6
WtWatch 64.72+20.76 +47.2
Revlon 14.65 +4.41 +43.1
LaZBoy 11.25 +2.98 +36.0
OwensCwtB3.88 +.86 +28.5
TimberInd 37.08 +8.17 +28.3
Boisewt 2.11 +.45 +27.1
ION Geoph 12.17 +2.48 +25.6
K-Sea 6.49 +1.16 +21.8

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GerovaF rs 6.57 -8.57 -56.6
Gerova un 3.75 -.95. -20.2
BIdBear 6.78 -1.50 -18.1
RosettaStn 16.76 -3.56 -17.5
ProUSSIvrs 8.37 -1.63 -16.3
VishPrecn 16.80 -3.10 -15.6
Primedia 4.57 -.73 -13.8
OfficeMax 14.69 -2.31 -13.6
CenPacFrs28.33 -4.39 -13.4
XuedaEd.n 8.57 -1.28 -13.0

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
CiAigrp 15881402 4.91 +.03
BkofAm 5441515 14.75 -.02
S&P500ETF5097198134.53+1.42
FordM 3006578 15.77 -.61
IShEMkts 2990201 48.31 +.69
AlcatelLuc 2761681 5.00 +.31
SprintNex 2722729 4.50 -.10
NokiaCp 2355601 9.19 -.17
GenElec 2028414 21.44 +.11
AMD 1991830 9.18 +.90

Diary
Advanced 2,184
Declined 968
New Highs 703
New Lows 29
Total issues 3,213
Unchanged 61
Volume 19,463,412,621


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AccelrB 2.70 +1.22 +82.4
NewConcEn 4.68 +1.38 +41.8
GIbIScape 2.69 +.64 +31.1
Solitario 4.20 +.87 +26.1
Hyperdyn 6.09 +1.25 +25.8
Procerars 9.13 +1.58 +20.9
AdvPhot 2.50 +.41 +19.6
OrientPap 6.27 +.92 +17.2
GtPanSilvg 3.07 +.43 +16.3
MinesMgt 3.90 +.53 +15.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
TravelCtrs 9.32 -2.75 -22.8
Express-1 2.28 -.41 -15.2
Engex 4.35 -.76 -14.9
BovieMed 2.86 -.40 -12.3
PHC Inc 2.23 -.28 -11.1
Uranerz 4.85 -.5 -.55 -10.2
EngySvcun 5.40 -.55 -9.2
PaKcOiPT 2.36 -.24 -9.1
CagleA 6.20 -.45 -6.8
Rubicon g 5.21 -.38 -6.8

Most Active ($1 or more
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
MadCatzg 337316 1.83 +.38
VantageDi 279648 2.06 +.15
AvalRare n 229519 7.63 +.16
NAPallg 223131 7.63 +.45
Hyperdyn 193205 6.09+1.25
CheniereEn188082 9.31 +1.08
KodiakOg 166839 6.39 +.33
GoldStrg 160308 4.06 +.12
NovaGldg 15890 6 14.40 +.03
DenisnMg 148466 4.14 ..

Diary
Advanced 319
Declined 217
New Highs 55
New Lows 6
Total issues 553
Unchanged 17
Volume 754,837,930


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
CVD Eqp 12.43 +4.34 +53.7
Geeknetrs 29.59 +9.82 +49.7
Datawatch 5.19 +1.68 +47.9
Intphse 5.84 +1.74 +42.4
3DSys 48.14+13.99 +41.0
Menimnrs 4.016 +1.16 +40.0
UmelghtN 8.03 +2.03 +33.8
Cyanotch h 3.62 +.89 +32.6
ThrshdPhl 2.34 +.57 +32.2
TdiusTh n 5.57 +1.27 +29.5

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
vjSeahawk 4.40 -3.50 -44.3
engionn 2.91 -1.26 -30.2
QuantFu rs 5.08 -2.10. -29.2
DiscLabrs 2.16 -.81 -27.3
TastyBak 2.39 -.76 -24.0
DermnnaSci 9.66 -2.90 -23.1
Ultralife 5.43 -1.54 -22.1
SCmtyll pf 4.18 -1.0-7 -20.4
AcelRxTn 3.65 -.90 -19.8
Zion wtl1-12 4.17 -1.03 -19.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SiLiusXM 4717276 1.81 -.03
Cisco 4483757 18.85 +.15
Microsoft 2936582 27.06 -.03
Intel 2533922 22.14 +.38
Dell Inc 2142638 15.43+1.46
PwShs QQ210617958.73 +.29
Nvidia 2066760 25.63+2.16
BrcdeCm 2009846 6.38 +.50
MicronT 1836185 11.70 +.38
Level3 1802427 1.46 +21

Diary
Advanced 1,659
Declined 1,155
New Highs 536
New Lows 68
Total issues 2,867
Unchanged 53
Volume 10,227,147,470


Hr II, -


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg
AT&TInc NY 1.72 28.57 +.10 +0.4 -2.8
AMD NY ... 9.18 +.90 +10.9 +12.2
AlcatelLuc NY ... 5.00 +.31 +6.6 +68.9
Annaly NY 2.65 17.60 -.35 -1.9 -1.8
AutoZone NY ... 255.64 -5.24 -2.0 -6.2
BkofAm NY .04 14.75 -.02 -0.1 +10.6
BobEvans Nasd .80 32.22 -1.22 -3.6 -2.2
BrcdeCm Nasd ... 6.38 +.50 +8.5 +20.6
CNBFnPANasd .66 13.86 -.07 -0.5 -6.4
CSX NY 1.04 74.76 +1.52 +2.1 +15.7
Chevron NY 2.88 98.72 +2.99 +3.1 +8.2
Cisco Nasd ... 18.85 +.15 +0.8 -6.8
Ciaigrp NY ... 4.91 +.03 +0.6 +3.8
CocaCola NY 1.88 64.55 +.98 +1.5 -1.9
Delhaize NY 2.02 78.72 +1.90 +2.5 +6.8
Dell Inc Nasd ... 15.43 +1.46 +10.5 +13.9
ExxonMbI NY 1.76 84.50 +1.68 +2.0 +15.6
FamilyDIr NY .72 52.55 +8.39 +19.0 +5.7
FordM NY ... 15.77 -.61 -3.7 -6.1
GenEJec NY .56 21.44 +.11 +0.5 +17.2
HomeDp NY .95 38.48 +1.00 +2.7 +9.8
iShSiver NY ... 31.79 +2.58 +8.8 +5.3
iShEMkts NY .64 46.31 +.69 +1.5 -2.8
iShR2K NY .89 83.35 +1.28 +1.6 +6.5
Intel Nasd .72 22.14 +.38 +1.7 +5.3
JDSUniphNasrd ... 25.20 -2.96-10.5 +74.0
JPMorgChNY .20 48.00 +1.43 +3.1 +13.2
Level3 Nasd ... 1.48 +.21 +16.8 +49.0


Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Chg %Chg %Chg
26.30 +1.21 +4.8 +4.9
14.82 -.72 -4.6 -.2
76.13 -.01 ... -.8
11.70 +.38 +3.4 +45.9
27.06 -.03 -0.1 -3.0
10.68 +.22 +2.1 +9.0
54.59 -.47 -0.9 +5.0
8.02 -.25 -3.0 -1.1
9.19 -.17 -1.8 -10.9
25.63 +2.16 +9.2 +66.4
107.37 +7.63 +7.6 +9.4
37.02 +.72 +2.0 +14.6
63.41 -.46 -0.7 -2.9
19.19 +.36 +1.9 +9.6
180.00 -8.30 -4.4 +16.3
58.73 +.29 +0.5 +7.8
6.79 -.55 -7.5 -10.8
49.41 +.37 +0.8 -6.1
134.53 +1.42 +1.1 +7.0
93.03 +1.83 +2.0 +26.1
1.81 -.03 -1.6 +11.0
37.87 -.16 -0.4 -.9
4.50 -.10 -2.2 +6.4
17.18 +.10 +0.6 +7.7
38.18 +1.64 +4.5 +18.7
55.38 -.31 -0.6 +2.7
32.64 -1.12 -3.3 +5.3
17.6t +.81 +4.8 +6.2


Weekly Dow Jones


-41.55


TUES


61.53 29.97 73.11


WED THUR FRI


Dow Jones Industrials
Close: 12,391.25
1-week change: 117.99 (1.0%)
13,000 .........


12,000

11,000. ................................................


JOO O ^* 10,000**' ...... .. ... .. ...


9,000 AX


S............... ......... N .......... ...... ................. .....


Name Ex Div
Lowes NY .44
MGMRstsNY
McDnlds NY 2.44
MicronT Nasd ...
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
NextEraEnNY 2.20
NobltyH Nasd ...
NokiaCp NY .55
Nvidia Nasd ...
OcRdPet NY 1.84
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .80
Potash NY .84
PwShsQQQNasd .36
QwestCm NY .32
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.37
SearsHldgs Nasd
SiriusXM Nasd ..
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY
SPDR FndNY .16
TimeWamrn NY .94
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20
Yahoo Nasd ...


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Retun/Rank Pct Min Init
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRetIs CI 138,398 10.83 0.0 +7.6/B +8.0/A NL '1,000,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 66,607 32.33 +3.5 +20.5/E +3.2/C 5.75 250
Fidelity Contra LG 60,959 71.69 +3.1 +25.6/C +5.5/A NL 2,500
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 58,498 50.95 +1.4 +13.2/D +4.1/C 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStldx LB 57,503 33.83 +3.9 +25.6/A +3.6/B NL 3,000
Vanguard Instldxl LB 56,277 123.13 +3.9 +23.8/B +3.0/8 NL 5,000,000
American Funds CpWIdGrLA m WS 55,337 37.22 +2.1 +17.5/D +4.9/B 5.75 250
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 52,903 17.25 +2.9 +18.01/ +4.4/B 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 52,841 124.01 +3.9 +23.81B +3.0/B NL 10,000
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 49,487 29.80 +3.5 +18.7/E +2.91B 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 48,887 33.84 +3.9 +25.7/A +3.7/8 NL 10,000
Vanguard TotlnMl d FB 44,091 16.40 +2.0 +20.2/C +4.3/1 NL 3,000
Dodge& Cox Stock LV 44,056 117.81 +5.4 +23.9/B +1.01D NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 43,842 37.48 +2.3 +23.2/A +5.1/A NL 2,500
American Funds WAMutinvA m LV 39,232 28.77 +3.7 +20.6/C +2.4/B 5.75 250
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 38,777 42.91 +1.8 +18.8/D +5.5/A 5.75 250
Fr,,i.,rT,Tip-Fi~r.j,.n IromiA m CA 35,395 2.27 +2.8 +19.7/A +6:1/A 4.25 1,000
vari.gurdi Pinliu. LB- 35,202 123.14 +3.9 +23.8/B +3.1/B NL 200,000,000
Arn'rn.ar. Furn.l Frlr.vA m LB 33,807 39.25 +4.3 +23.4/B +4.8/A 5.75 250
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 33,217 30.08 +3.2 +21.3/C +6.4/A 5.75 250
PIMCOTotRetAdm b CI 33,105 10.83 0.0 +7.3/8 +7.8/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard 500lnv LB 32,431 123.99 +3.9 +23.6/8 +2.9/B NL 3,000
American Funds BalA m MA 31,913 18.78 +2.5 +17.7/B +4.4/B 5.75 250
Fidelity GrowCo LG 28,894 89.94 +2.7 +31.1/A +6.5/A NL 2,500
Vanguard WelItnAdm MA 28,058 56.25 +2.6 +16.8/C +6.1/A NL 50,000
Fidelity LowPdStk d MB 27,383 40.69 +3.5 +26.0/E +5.4/9 NL 2,500
Harbor IntllnsOt d FB 27,375 62.91 +1.5 +21.5/B +6.8/A NL 50,000
CA -Conservaive Albocaon, CI -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES Europe Stock FB -Foreg Lage Blend, FG -Foreign LUaeo FV
Lae Vaue, IH -Wodd lton, LB -Lge Blend, LG -L2ge -Owth,.LV -Large Vaue, MA-4derateAlocato, MB4d -kdCap BMd .
MdlOap Value, SH -Spedalty4heatl, WS -World Stock Tot Retum: Chug i NAV witi drmdends reinvesld. Rank How feund pfod vs.
otherswithsameobjecbve:Asnop2%, E in botm20%.Mn nil Invt orm$needdoinvestrind.Source:M rrgstar.


Stock Footnotes:g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does'notmeet continued-lsting standards.
If = Late MBng with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock spit
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt flight to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. v = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi =
When Issued. wt = Warants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b'= Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption tee. f = front load (sales charges). m = Mulpte fees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous days
net asset value. s = fund split shares during the week: x = fund paid a distribution during the weelk.Galner arind
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates-
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.09 0.12
6-month 0.14 0.16
5-year 2.27 2.36
10-year 3.58 3.64
30-year 4.70 4.71


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yfd PE Chg %Chg Last


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20 2.0
AK Steel .20 1.2
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72 6.0
AU Optron ...
AbtLab 1.92 4.1
AberFdc .70 1.2
AMD ... ...
Aetna .60 1.6
Agilent
Airgas 1.16 1.8
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 .7
Allstate .80 2.5
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52 6.1
AEagleOut .44 2.8
AEP 1.84 5.1
AmExp .72 1.6
AmIntlGrp ...
AmTower ...
Anadarko .36 .4
AnalogDev .88 2.1
Annaly 2.65 15.1,
Apache .60 .5
ArcelorMit .75 2.0
ArchCoal .40 1.2
ArchDan .64 1.7
ATMOS 1.36 4.0
Avon .92 3.2
BB&TCp .60 2.1
BHP BillLt 1.74 1.9
BakrHu .60 .8
BcoBrades .82 4.2
BcoSantand.78 6.2
BcoSBrasil .45 3.6
BkofAm .04 .3
BkNYMel .36 1.1
BariPVix.rs... ...
BarrickG .48 .9
Baxter 1.24 2.3
BerkH B ... ...
BestBuy .60 1.8
Blackstone .40 2.3
BlockHR .60 4.1
Boeing 1.68 2.3
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.32 5.2
CB REllis ...
CBS B .20 .9
CIT Grp ...
CSX 1.04 1.4
CVS Care .50 1.5
CablvsnNY .50 1.3
Cameron ...
CampSp 1.16 3.5
CdnNRsgs .30 ...
CapOne .20 .4
CapitlSrce .04 .5
Caterpillar 1.76 1.7
CGemex .43 ...
CntryUnk 2.90 7.0
ChesEng .30 1.0
Chevron 2.88 2.9
Chicos .16 1.3
Chimera .69 16.2
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .56 .6
Clorox 2.20 3.2
CocaCola 1.88 2.9
ColgPal 2.12 2.7
ConAgra .92 4.0
ConocPhil 2.64 3.4
ConsolEngy .40 .9
ConEd 2.40 4.9
ConstellEn .96 3.1
Coming .20 .9
Covidien .80 1.6


17 +.43 +5.7 12.88
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Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


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Anadigc
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Atmel
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Cadence
CpstnTrb h...
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
CentAl
ChkPoint ...
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Cisco
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GameStop ...
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GenMot n ..
GenOn En ...
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ExpScrips ...
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JnprNtwk ...
KV PhmA ...
KeyEngy
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JDS Uniph ...
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MannKd
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MicronT
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Micrvisn
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MetroPCS ...
MitsuUFJ ...
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Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12
MonstrWw ..
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
MotrlaMo n ..




Name Div
Questcor ...
RF MicD ...
RschMotn ...
Riverbeds ...
Rovi Corp ..
STEC
SanDisk
SavientPh ..
SeagateT
vjSeahawk
Sequenom ...
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
SonicSolu ...
Sonus
Staples .36
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SunPowerA...
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .20
TalecrisBio
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ThrshdPhm ...
TriQuint
UranmRs ..
ValueClick ..
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DIv Yld PE Chg %Chg


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Name Dlv YId PE
NCR Corp ... ... 16
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OilSvHT 2.40 1.0 ...
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PS Agri ... ... ...
Pridelntl ... .,. 30
PrUShS&P ... ... ...
ProUtQQQ ... ......
PrUShQQQ ... ......
ProUltSP .43 .8 ..
ProUShL20 ... ......
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ProUltCrude... ... ...
ProUSSIv rs... ... ...
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Name DIv
AbdAsPac .42
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ArmourRsd1.44
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CelSci
CFCda g .01
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ChinNEPet...
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+.39 +1.4 16.91


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
6.1 ... +.08 +1.2 6.83
... ... +.41 +54.3 2.50
... ... +.01 -16.9 2.17
... ... +.85 -1.7 8.05
...... +.55 -8.0 4.35
... ... -.16 -3.5 1.64
... ... +.01 -41.9 .18
19.7 ... -.22 -6.5 7.30
... ... +67 +38.6 5.28
+.74 +2.7 7.52
... ... +.16 +22.3 7.63
... ... -.06 +16.3 1.00
...... +.20 -6.7 23.89
... ... -.05 -22.9 1.62
... ... -.07 -18.4 .31
... ... -.01 -14.4 .70
... ... +1.14 +.8 20.89
... ... +1.08 +68.7 9.31
... 24 +.02 -40.6 3.06
... 3 +.62 -7.7 5.32
... 18 -.35 -24.4 6.35
... ... -.11 -13.9 2.17
... +.06 -36.9 .20
... ... ... +21.1 4.14
... ... +.55 -.5 7.30
... 15 -.41 -10.9 2.28
. -.08 +24.1 14.56
... +.00 +34.0 .47
... -16.4 5.42
.. 41 +.12 -11.5 4.06
.:. -.01 +10.8 8.92
... +.15 -6.4 2.77
.. +.43 +9.3 3.07
... +1.25 +22.8 6.09
.. +.33 -3.2 6.39
4 -.05 -5.8 2.44
10 +.38 +79.4 1.83
33 +.60 +11.4 6.55


Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg


SilvWhtng ...
SouthnCo 1.82
SwstAid .02
SwstnEngy...
SpectraEn 1.04
SprintNex ...
SP Matls 1.17
SP HIthC .57
SP CnSt .78
SP Consum .49
SP Engy .99
SPDRFncI .16
SP Inds .60
SPTech .32
SP Util 1.27
StdPac
StateStr .04
Suncor gs .40
Suntech
SuhTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TaiwSemi .47
TalismE g .25
Target 1.00
TataMotors .32
TeckRes g .60
TenetHlth ....
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texinst .52
3M Co 2.20
TimeWam .94
TollBros
Transocn ..
Travelers 1.44
TrinaSolar
Tycolnti .86
US Airwy
UtdContl ...
UtdMicro .08
UPS B 2.08
US Bancrp .20
US NGsFd ...
USOilFd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .50
Vale SA .76
Vale SApf .76
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VerizonCrn 1.95
ViacomB .60
Visa .60
Vonage
Walgm .70
WalterEn .50
Weathflntl ...
WtWatch .70
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .08
WDigital ...
WstnRefin ...
WstnUnion .28
Weyerh .60
WmsCos .50
WT India .15
Wyndham .48
XL Grp .40
Xerox .17
Yamana g .12
YingliGm ...
YumBmds 1.00


Name DIv YId PE
MdwGoldg ... ... ...
NIVS IntT ... ... ...
Neoprobe ... ... ...
NDragon ... ... ...
NwGold g ......
NAPallg ... ... ...
NDynMng ... ... ...
NthnO&G ... ... ...
NthgtM g ... ... 25
NovaGldg ... ... ...
Oilsands ... ... ...
OpkoHith ... ...
ParaG&S ......
PionDrill ... ...
PlatGpMet ... ... ...
PudaCoal ... ... 11
RadientPh ... ... ...
RareEleg
Rentech
RexahnPh ... ... ...
Rubicon g ... ... ...
SamsO&G... ......
SinoHub .... ... 5
SulphCo ... ... ...
Taseko ... ... ...
TimberinR ... ... ...
TmsatlPet ... ... ...
TravelCtrs ... ... ...
USGeoth ... ... ...
Ulum ... ... ...
Ur-Energy ... ... ...
Uranerz ... ... ...
UranlumEn ... ... ...
VantageDr ... ... ...
VistaGold ... ... ...
WizzardSft ... ... ...
YM Bioo ... ... ...


YTD Wkly
%Chg Last


61 +4.96 +.4
16 -.16 -.9
21 +.18 -3.2
21 -.46 -2.6
17 +.40 +5.0
... -.10 +6.4
... +.40 +4.8
+.43 +4.2
+.22 +1.7
... +.43 +7.0
... +2.91 +12.8
.. +.10 +7.7
+.20 +9.1
... +.10 +7.2
... -.09 +1.8
... +.02 -5.2
15 -.86 -.5
34 +4.08 +17.3
... +1.80 +33.7
... -.79 +7.6
+.54 -8.8
-.15 +3.0
15 +.40 -2.6
-.13- +2.2
... +1.96 +10.6
14 -2.24 -13.7
... -10.0
... -3.73 -10.9
4 +.01 +4.8
10 +.90 +34.8
11 +2.23 +30.3
14 +.61 +11.5
17 +1.71 +7.7
16 +1.64 +18.7
... +.38 +14.9
11 +6.17 +20.0
9 +1.93 +9.4
10 +2.04 +25.6
20 +1.04 +14.2
4 -.41 -2.9
17 -.37 +13.0
9 +.03 -2.2
21 +1.15 +5.4
18 +.19 +5.9
... -.11 -13.2
... +.31 -6.8
... +2.94 +5.9
10 +.46 +18.6
... +.66 +1.3
... +.38 +.7
63 +1.50 +27.2
... +.97 -2.6
28 +.23 +2.3
15 +.36 +14.9
18 +.90 +7.7
... +.59 +90.2
19 +.34 +9.7
17 +2.88 -4.6
63 +.81 +12.5
25+20.76 +72.6
15 -1.12 +5.3
44 +.02 +5.4
7 -1.18 -1.9
... +1.31 +60.1
16 +.26 +16.6
... -.04 +32.9
23 +3.38 +22.9
... +.71 -12.1
17 +1.92. +7.0
24 +1.41 +13.0
16 +.35 -1.7
29 +.60 -3.4
10 +1.20 +35.0
20 +1.40 +4.3


Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last
+.15 +84.5 1.55
+.18 +17.7 2.66
+.48 +78.6 3.68
-.01 +4.4 .05
+.32 -2.4 9.53
+.45 +9.9 7.63
+1.46 +37.4 19.63
-.78 +2.4 27.85
+.06 -6.9 2.98
+.03 +.9 14.40
-.02 +24.3 .52
-.02 +23.2 4.52
+.35 -2.0 3.91
+1.19 +22.0 10.75
+.13 -7.1 2.47
+.18 -16.1 11.96
+.14 -33.7 .67
-.83 -19.7 12.89
+.02 +6.6 1.30
-.11 +45.5 1.63
-.38 -8.8 5.21
+.13+108.3 2.75
+.40 +18.8 3.10
+.01 -15.9 .14
+.03 +13.7 5.97
+.05 -5.0 1.13
+.13 -5.4 3.15
-2.75 +147.2 9.32
-.12 -12.0 1.03
... -18.2 .09
-.15 -1.0 2.96
-.55 +21.6 4.85
-.15 -.2 6.03
+.15 +1.5 2.06
+.28 +25.5 3.00
+.03 +8.8 .27
-.04 +5.2 2.45


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9857 .9877
Britain 1.6246 1.6174
Canada .9868 .9848
Euro .7307 .7351
Japan 83.10 83.33
Mexico 12.0294 12.0103
Switzerind .9456 .9498
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


AMEX Most Active


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011

Lake City. Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


BUY ITl



SELL T


laFINDITIT


Legal


4 lines 1 i 50
3 days i
Includes 2 Signs -,l and ulli e 165



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....192.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00-per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located, at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appeal: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00;a.m. Wed., 9:00a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Thurs,, 9:00a.m.
Saturday FK., 10:00 am. F., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject' to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word cf each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
wWlvW.likccitvyreporteIr.coni


one emper a
4 lines 6 days "nal
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
Each item must include a price,
This is a non-refundablerate.



oins- 9 16 I
4One Item per ad ditona
4 lines 6 days Eac a1t0a
Rate applies to private iduals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
This is a non-refundable rate.c




One Item per ad B16
4 lines 6 Each additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,500 or less.
This isa -refundable rat e. t




One Item per ad $2 7



On lin te m 6 ,p r ,,a Each additional
Slines 6 days ne 1.5



Rat applies to private invidualselling




personal merchandise totalling $6,00 or less.
Each Item must include a price.
-This Isa nonrefundable rate.




4 On Item per ad $ c 2 |o
4 lines 6 days s aie1. I
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less.
Each item must include a price'
This isa non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $6,00 or less.0
Each item must include a price.
This Is a non-rfundabl ae


other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


010 Announcements


FLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE
BID# 11-1-03
HUMAN PATIENT SIMULATORS
FLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE
DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUSTEES
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
The Board of Trustees of Florida
Gateway College is inviting interest-
ed eligible bidders to submit bids for
Human Patient Simulators. The cost
of the acquisition of this equipment
is funded by a grant provided by the
United States Department of Health
and Human Services.
BID DATE AND TIME
Sealed bids for Florida Gateway Col-
lege ITB- 11-1-03 Human Patient
Simulators will be accepted at the
Florida Gateway College. Purchasing
Office, Florida, until 2:00 P.M. (lo-
cal time) Thursday March 10, 2011.
PLACE FOR RECEIVING BIDS
Bids may be mailed to:
Purchasing Department
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place'
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Bids may be hand delivered to:
Purchasing Department
Florida Gateway College
198 S.E. Staff Way
Administration Building 001, Room
138
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
All bids must arrive and be date/time
stamped by a Purchasing Department
representative prior to the specified
bid date/time. Bids received after
that time will not be accepted. The
College will not be responsible for
Postal or other delivery service de-
lays that cause a bid to arrive at
Room 138, Building 001 after the
designated bid opening date/time.
Bids that are mailed must be clearly
marked on the outside of the enve-
lope:
BID # 11-1-03, HUMAN PATIENT
SIMULATORS
Florida Gateway College, Lake City,
Florida
BID OPENING: 2:00 P.M. THURS-
DAY, MARCH 10, 2011.
Bids will be opened and read aloud
in a public bid opening in Room 101,
Building 001.
BID PACKAGE
Interested bidders may obtain a Bid
Package from Bill Brown, Director
of Purchasing for Florida Gateway
College by any of the following
methods.
By email:
bill.brown@fgc.edu
By USPS: Request sent certi-
fied mail to:
Purchasing Department
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Walk-in Pick .Up:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
198 S.E. Staff Way
Administration Building 001, Room
138
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
ELIGIBLE BIDDERS
Eligible bidders are defined as those
bidders who are not excluded from
bidding according to the Federal
Government's Excluded Parties List
(www.epls.gov
) or by Sec-
tion 287.133, Florida-Statute.
BID AWARD
The College reserves the right to re-
ject any or all bids, and/or accept that
bid(s) that is in the best interest of
the College with price, qualifications
and other factors taken into consider-
ation. This bid requests prices for
multiple items. The College reserves
the right to award the bid, by item, to
the Bidder(s) which, in the sole dis-
cretion of the College, is the most re-
sponsive and responsible Bidder(s),
price, qualifications and other factors
considered for that-item. The College
will advertise* this bid notice for a
minimum of three (3) weeks and will
make the bid package available to
bidders during that time.
RIGHT TO WAIVE IRREGULARI-
TIES AND TECHNICALITIES
Florida Gateway College reserves
the' right to waive minor irregulari-
ties and/or technicalities associated
with this solicitation. The Director
of Purchasing of Florida Gateway
College shall be the final authority
regarding waivers of irregularities
and technicalities.
Bill Brown
Director of Purchasing
Florida Gateway College
04543507
February 13, 16, 20, 2011

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440

-I







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224


Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.


020 Lost & Found







LOST Black Male, Toy Poodle,
on Tues 2/15, in the 252 & Coun-
try Club area.Reward being
.offered Please call 386-752-9300

Lost Female Dog on 2/12 Sat.,
near Richardson Middle School.
Medium sized brown/black, looks
like a fox, Reward, 386-752-8920

100 Job
Opportunities

04543275
Wanna Go West? Let's Go!
CDL A Operators Wanted for
Lease with a Lease Purchase
Plan, Spouse and Pet Rider
Policy, Health and Life
Insurance Available. 12-15 day
trips, No New England States,
You get 100% fuel surcharge,
0/0's and PTDI
Certified Students Welcome
CALL TODAY TO JOIN US
AND START
THE NEW YEAR
OFF RIGHT!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

04543538
Family Services Analyst
Non-Profit organization is
seeking highly motivated
professional for
VPK/School Readiness/Parent
Education Position. Experience
in Social Services or related
fiell preferred salary
$9.62-$12.98 plus benefits.
Fluently Bilingual in
English/Spanish preferred
.Send resumes by
February 14, 2011 to:
Early Learning Coalition
Attn: HR, 1104 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025 or fax to
386-752-8094

A/C SERVICE Tech
Min 5 yrs experience
F/T with benefits
Please call 386-454-4767

FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
f'n, meriv i.k f1 Community( ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
SPRING 2011
CDL PROGRAM
CDL instructors needed for growing CDL
program at Florida Gateway College.
Qualified individuals must hold a CDL
and have at least four years of driving
experience with a clean driving record.
Prefer individuals with teaching
experience in a truck driving school
setting. Email resumes to Stephanie
Glenn at Stephanie.GlennAfqac.edu or
call the Global Logistics Banner Center at
386-754-4492 for more information.
Coluege application and copies of ranscripts
rei/tiirei. Al folbreignt transcripts must be
ubmithted with trtianiaction id eralntion.
Application available at ;www.ic
Vii i, accr'rdled 1> Iliei Sihi sci tonloll>f, olillsegec ond
VPADA, ,LO (oinkes in ltn aloln & oil>pk i 1


FLORIDA
+ GATEWAY
S COLLEGE
r O "*
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
HEATING VENTILATION AND AIR
CONDITIONING (HVAC)
224 DUTY DAYS
GRANT FUNDED
To teach at Columbia Correctional
Institution. Responsible for the
development and implementation of
the HVAC curriculum based on the
provided course objectives. The
instructor is required to use any tools,
equipment, or textbooks provided for
the program. Prepare all class
materials, syllabi, exams, etc.
Prepare students for employment in
the HVAC industry. Maintain all
course records (attendance and
grades) to meet audit requirements.
Requires four years experience in the
HVAC industry. Must become
NCEER Certified HVAC Instructor
and receive a Proctors License to
give the EPA exam. Must have prior
teaching experience and be
comfortable working in a
government-regulated environment.
Knowledge of basic teaching
concepts and proficient in
troubleshooting, installing and
repairing HVAC equipment required.
Desirable Qualifications: A.S. Degree
in Industrial Maintenance or related
work area preferred with teaching
experience. Salary: Based on degree
and experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadline:
Open Until Filled
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 SrE. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386)754-4314


100 'Opportunities

04543539
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
INSIDE SALES
Ideal candidates with previous
experience with outbound sales.
Must have excellent telephone
skills. Individual must be
enthusiastic, outgoing, have
excellent computer skills and be
able to perform in a fast pace
environment. Please fax resume
to 386-758-0984 or email to
greaiobs(@LCjobs.info.

04543622
Customer Service Rep.
Handle inbound customer calls,
schedule appointments,
document actions, place calls to
renew service. Great pay and
benefits. keyboard skills a must.
Send resume to
fjobs@flapest.com, fa4 to 386-
752-0171 or mail to 536 SE
Baya Drive. Lake City 32025
EOE, M/F, DFWP. H, V.

05525143
S & S Office is hiring
a full-time receptionist.
Duties included: typing &
computer work
(must be proficient in Microsoft
works programs),multi-line
phones, filing, 10-key, etc.
Benefits include: vacation, sick
leave, credit union, profit shar-
ing,dental, health and'
life insurance.
Drug Free Workplace EOE
Apply in person at
S & S Office
134 SE Colbum Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025

05525171
Raymond James Financial
Services located at
First Federal Bank of Florida
is currently seeking a
full-time qualified
Administrative/Sales Assistant
to service financial advisors
of a full service investment
program. Minimum
requirements include strong
interpersonal and organizational
skills; excellent computer,
grammar and mathematical
abilities. Send resumes to:
Human Resources, RJFS,
4424 NW American Lane, Ste
102, Lake City, FL 32055.

05525172



Now accepting applications for
servers and cashiers
Apply in person at
3177W Hwy 90 Lake City
DFW/EOE

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies


FLORIDA
A GATEWAY
-, COLLEGE
* * *
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
GRAPHIC DESIGN, GAMING, AND
SIMULATION
164 Duty Days Tenured Track
to Commence Fall 2011
Teach a variety of courses in the
Computer Science Department to
include digital media, gaming, and
computer programming. Minimum
Qualifications: Master's Degree in
Graphic Design, Computer
Programming, Instructional Systems
or related field with emphasis on
gaming and simulation. Demonstrated
background and understanding in the
application of software in the areas of
design, web, interactive media, game,
audio, and video. Desirable
Qualifications: Doctorate in Graphic
Design, Computer Programming,
Instructional Systems or related field
with emphasis on gaming and
simulation. Demonstrated skills in
Maya, Motion capture, 2D and 3D
computer modeling and animation.
Salary: Based on Degree and
Experience
Application Deadline: 3/18/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr(5fgc.edu
fGc" i,, accrieditedl b thc ollmri on on Ctllcge o o l
the Southemr As'ioc.ation el Coiiegea aid School,
VP: AIX./ AS TO i 'licoc in l "dic; ______ I ipllp ln ein ______


100 Job
Opportunities

05525174
MARKETING ASSISTANT
Marketing Director of dynamic
consulting firm needs individual
with marketing experience
strong organizational skills,
strong computer skills,
MS OFFICE and a
desire to succeed.
We have DOUBLED our client
base in the last 18 months.
Will train in our niche market
industry to increase client base
and to participate in client
training and follow-up.
Home office in
White Springs Florida.
Please forward resume
and references to:
hr@speced.org

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.
Hiring Certified Teachers for all
ages. Please do not call if you
are not certified. 386-755-7677
6:30a-5:30p or 344-5363 after 5:30
P/T Class A CDL
Drivers needed. A CLEAN record
and a flexible schedule required.
Call 386-935-1705 to apply.
P/T Farm Tractor Operator
simple mechanic work,
clean license
Call 386-935-1705
Sewing Machine Operator with
recent experience.
GOOD HOURLY WAGE
Call Hafner's 386-755-6481
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com
Teacher (Lawton's, Early Head
Start Lake City, Birth to 3 yrs old)
HS Dip/GED, Must have FCCPC
* /CDA; three years of classroom
experience working with
infants/toddlers preferred; Bilin-
gual (Spanish/English) preferred,
5 Hour Literacy, Must pass physi-
cal/DCF background screening,
Current First Aid/CPR preferred.
Excellent Benefits-Paid Holidays,
Sick/Annual Leave. Apply in
person at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637,
by email: arobinson@sv4cs:org
Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris..@ 386-755-0630
WANTED: Row slash and .long
leaf pines 4-6 years 8-12
Top Dollar PAID References
avail. Call David 352-281-0235

120 Medical.
120 Employment

05525167
Nurse On Call
Home Health Agency,
Medicare certified, is now
hiring OT, PT & ST
Sign on bonus for F/T
352-395-6424,
Fax 352-395-6519

05525177
Medical Billing
several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance
Billing required.
Please email resume to
admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net
or fax to 386-755-2169

SUPERVISORY MEDICAL
TECHNOLOGIST:
Qualifications: Prefer experienced
generalist supervisory medical
technologist familiar with
Laboratory automation, safety,
quality control, manual testing,
and LIS operation. Knowledge of
inventory control, quality control
review and evaluation, instrument
maintenance and personnel
management. Must be able to
lift up to 40 pounds and will be
exposed to hazardous materials.
Forty hours M-F with Saturday
rotation, 3PM to 11:30 PM.
Require State of Florida License as
a Laboratory Supervisor.
Please submit resume to
npatel@chclabs.com

AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Case Managers for
community based program work-
ing w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.


Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


1 Medical
120 Employment

05525178




MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
RN's
PRN/1 yr experience
CNA
F/T & PRN

ARNP Outpatient Svcs
Starke/Tri County

Family Intervention Specialist
Bachelors plus lyr exp
(substance abuse exp preferred)

Bachelors Therapist
Support/Rehab
Masters Therapists
Adult Substance
Abuse/Outpatient
(Licensed)
Lake City

Child Case Manager
Adult Case Manager
Live Oak/Lake City
Lake Butler

Psychiatrist
Outpatient clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
www.mbhci.org
to see our current needs and
'online applications
EOE, DFWP

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST:
Qualifications: Prefer experienced
generalist technologist familiar
with Laboratory automation,
safety, quality control, manual
testing, and LIS operation. Must
be able to lift up to 40 pounds and
will be exposed to hazardous
materials. Forty hours M-F with
Saturday rotation. Require State of
Florida License as a Medical Tech-
nologist. Please submit resume to
npatel(@)chclabs.com

PT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.

ift'Schdols & '.
24 Education

04543248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/14/10

.Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/14/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies

Barn Kept Hay for Sale
Bermuda or Bahaia
$20 Roll, Lee, FL
850-971-4344


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques. 386-963-2621


408 Furniture

Love Seat-Broyhill. Blue/gray,
matching pillows and arm covers.
Good condition. $50
386-454-4947


420 Wanted to Buy

I BUY WORKING AND
NON WORKING
APPLIANCES!
CALL 386-365-1915

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?















Apply Online or In Person! 1152 SW Business Point Dr
SLake City, FL 32025
s g-rE Lo 386.754.8562
S IT E L www.sitel.com EOE


Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: hurnuman.r ced
thl Suthe, SAw. ilinIIcliof Colege and Shool
G C i ) n si on [w- i,, D, in
-Hmo'mucnltI


- ADvantage










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER, CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011


430 Garage Sales











PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous
Lowery Parade. Organ.
Slot Machine, Chipper Vac.,
Small Generator. Call 386-754-
0800 or 755-7773 for details.
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

4 Buildin
463 Materials
ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing.
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available


520 Boats for Sale
Bass Tender Boat 2 Seater
10'2",can fit in back of truck
$500 386-965-2215
Great for pond or lake!

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/1 w/screen porch. Lg yard in
quiet, clean, safe, well maintained
10 unit park. Water, garbage incl.
$475.mo $475.dep. 386-965-3003
3/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
pets ok, $500 dep $575 mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2 SW on 1 ac off 41 on 246.
Between 1-10 & 75. Just renovated
$600 mo plus security. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 after 5pm
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-623-3404






Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rept incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean Remodeled 3br/2ba
DWMH on 2 ac. 10 mi. SW of LC.
Private. NO PETS!
$750.mo. + sec.. 386-984-7478.

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$216 a month remodeled,
like new, 2Bd/2Ba S Wide
Delivered & blocked, appliances,
A/C $2500 down, 8 year fin.
Possible owner financing. Ready
now. Call Gary 386 758-9824
*Lot Model Sale*
Save 1,000's @ Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
For Model Info and Details
05524941
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers Save
up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832

12 X 56, 2/1 SWMH,
axles avail, tongue attached
$2,500 OBO
386-965-1882
3/2 SW on 1 ac off 41 on 246. Be-
tween I-10 & 75. Just renovated
$32k obo. Ideal rental. NO owner
finance. 386-330-2316 after 5pm
Come in and see the
Future in Manufactured Homes.
Royals Homes making
people smile
386-754-6737
Come See all New Lot Models
Royals Homes. Honesty! Integrity!
Customer Satisfaction
386-754-6737
Looking for a Modular?
Come see the Specialists
at Royals Homes and ask for Bo
386-754-6737
New 2011 Homes are Here
3BR/4BR at Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
Homes Built Your Way!
Royals Homes is Quality!
We treat you like Family.
Stop in or Call Catherine
386-754-6737


Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
New,2010 MH.never been
occupied, front & back deck.
$99,900 MLS#76635 Call -
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
@ Westfield Realty

'710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

5524833
No Application Fee +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments
& Mobile Homes
starting at $350 per month
386-755-2423
2 br Apt. Close to shopping
and the VA Medical Center.
$525. mo plus deposit.
386-344-0579
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Gatorwood on the Westside
Rent $650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can.Love!
2 br Apts $500. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
. Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Move In Special.2/1 w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & se,c.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Quail Heights 2br/lba Duplex.
Secluded, private, safe. W/D
hookup. $700. mo. $500 security.
386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's.
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call-Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Apt, Ft. White, FL 2/1,
screen porch, W/D hook up,
$550 mo plus Sec Dep,
386-497-1116
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04543633
LANDLORDS, let our gold
standard work for you!
Call today for additional
information on managing your
residential rentals.
16884 53rd Wellborn
3/2 well kept DWMH with great
floor plan and 2 car garage
$850./mo. + $800 security
642 Chris Terrace Lake City
Nice upscale 3/2 with 1623 sf.
Close to Town but far enough
out for privacy. $1150./mo
$1150./security.
143 Zebra Terrace Lake City
3/2 well maintained brick home
on 1 acre +. Bonus room. could
be 4th bedroom or nice family
room. $900./mo. +
$900. security.
B.J. Federico 386-365-5884
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650
(habla espaiol)
Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.

3 or 4br. Lg bedroom, den w/fire-
place. Screen porch. Privacy patio.
1.09 ac. Quiet area, cul-de-sac.
Rent/lease option. 386-697-6534
3/2 on 2.1 acres, 2 car garage,
ceramic tile, front & rear porches,
$995 mo, plus 2 mo sec.
Lease with the option to buy
386-758-9996 or 386-365-5434
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced back yatd. $825. mo
$825. dep. References req'd.
386-364-2897 or 941-920-4535
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+Retirement Living,
Site built home
2br/2bth For Lease
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A; 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $675 mo,
$600 sec., 386-497-4699
House for rent. Everything new.
4br/2ba plus study. Carport,\great
location $1100 mo last plus
security. 386-867-2283


730 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water.
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072

770 Condos For Rent

*04543558
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1200/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.


780 Condos for Sale
3 bdrm Condo Nit, back patio,
HOA fees include ext maintenance
of home, lawn & pool MLS#76797
$110,000, Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237

805 Lots for Sale
1 acre lot outside the city limits.
Homes only subdivision. Priced
below the assessed value with the
county, $16,900 Hallmark Real
Estate 386-867-1613 Call Jay S
2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will'finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Beautiful 5+ acre lot, partially
cleared w/large oaks, Homes only,
$38,000, MLS 75038 Call Roger
Lovelady @ Westfield Realty
386-365-7039


Charming Turn of the Century,
property, close to
downtown,MLS#,74814
$94,900 386-755-0808
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Nice 4.5 acre parcel w/S/P/W
older SWMH $39,900
MLS# 76182 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
3/2 home w/1758 sq ft, Storage,
bldg, enclosed patio & deck,
$168,000 Call Carrie Cason @
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
MLS# 73410
3/2 w/over 1700 sq ft, fireplaces,
modern kitchen, fenced yard, 2
sheds, convenient location
$89,500 MLS#73861 Call Patti
@Access Realty 386-623-6896
4 bdrm + office, 2 living & dining
areas, front & back porch
$279,900 MLS# 72831
Call Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty 386-755-08M0
4/2 2300 plus sq ft,Palm Harbor
Home on 2 lots, Good Condition
$69,888 Call Nancy Rogers @
386-867-1271 Results Realty
4/2 1,800 sq ft on 10.5 acres,
newly remodeled inside, detached
garage, above ground pool
$189,888, Call Nancy,
Results Realty 386-867-1271
5 bedroom Home on 5 acres south
of Lake City, Big Rooms
lots of space $229,500
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
MLS# 72928 Westfield Realty


mm%


810 Home for Sale
5/2. 1800sf. 24 acres, family rm.
screened back porch. RV
parking,newly painted close to VA
& DOT, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
5/3 Triplewide MH (2200) sq ft,
w/2 master bdrms, on 10 fenced
acres, fireplace. MLS# 76226
$75,000 Call Patti Taylor
386-623-6896 Access Realty
AFFORDABLE 3BR/2BA mfg
home in Woodgate Village only
$27,000 #76741
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110
BANK OWNED ON-SITE
Real Estate Auction
Live Oak
1223 S. Ohio Ave.
5br/3ba. 3296 sqft. on .36 acres
Sale Date: Sat. Mar 19 at 12 noon.
FREE COLOR BROCHURE
www.AuctionServiceslntl.com
Jay Lloyd AU2073/AB 1172
Beautifully Landscaped 3/1 on
1.11 ac, 16x24 detached garage,
screen porched bldg, water
purification system, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Brick home with 2,700 sqft under
ropf. Large master w/bath on .5
acres completely fenced. $167,500
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Brick, .59 ac. 3br/2ba w/large
spacious rooms. Split floor plan.
2 car garage & storage $222,900.
Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Close to town,,2 story home
w/stone, fireplace, downstairs
master bdrm, $144,900
MLS# 77050 Call Carrie Cason
386-623-2806 Westfield Realty
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Briok, Woodcrest. Great area, split
plan. Screened back porch. Elaine
K. Tolar. 386-755-6488 $139,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba. 3 Fireplaces. 39.7 acres
included. Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Reduced, brick w/over 2,000 sqft,
5 ac. 3br/2ba.Lots of extras. Elaine
K. Thlar 755-6488 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lakeview home in town, Old
charm w/many upgrades Elaine K.
Tolar. 386-755-6488 $189,900.


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2 Story, 4br/2.5ba-2160 sqft. Spa-
cious plan w/garage Lori Geibeig
Simpson 365-5678 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba close to town. 1620 sqft
w/covered patio& more. Lori Gei-
beig Simpson 365-5678 $117,900


Coral Shores Realty 2004
Custom built home, 23 fenced ac.
1700 ft paved frontage. Lg
kitchen/pantry, master/bath.
386-965-5905 Bob Gavette
Comer lot in Piccadilly Park.
Newly painted in/out. New carpet
/vinyl. 2 car garage. Inground
pool. $133,500. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16)20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
CUSTOM-BUILT 4BR mfg
home w/screen porch, front deck,
shed $87,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #73893
Cute 3/2 nicely remodeled home,
2 acres, partially fenced
$115,888
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473
Derington Properties, LLC
3/2 MH, large deck and
screened porch, 5 ac.
$46,500 386-965-4300
Derington Properties,.LLC
DWMH, 5,ac. Screened front/back
porches. 20x40 shop fully equip-
ped w/bath. $74,900. 965-4300
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
Fully furnished 2br/2ba @
$83,000
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
23DR/2BA
$99,999
Family home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Great Investment Property!
House needs lots of TLC, close to
shopping and schools, $35,000,
Bring all offers, Results Realty
Call Brittany 386-397-3473
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg
home near Wellborn on
5+ acres ONLY $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,.
INC. 386-755-5110 #76768
Log Cabin home, located on
5 acres, wrap around porch
$199,000 MLS#75550
Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax Realty


2002 Fleetwood
Revolution 40'
Prestine cond. New tires &
flushed trans., kept covered.
Will sell tow vehicle.
$75,000
Call
386-752-6090
365-1903


810 Home for Sale
Lrg Brick Home. well-established
neighborhood, in town.
$129.,900 MLS#77016
Call Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
Must See! 4/2 2368SF Home,
island kitchen, den, fire place.
storage. auto gate entry,
Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfect starter home. Quiet area.
Wood laminate floors, Ig dining,
French doors. 1 car garage/work-
shop $84,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfection! Marion Place, gated,
brick 3/2 over 1800 sqft. Screened
lanai $158,900 386-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $55,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75210
REDUCED TO $61,500 in
Eastside Vlg! Immaculate
2BR/2BA w/lg rooms
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76753
Solid Home! Needs updating.
Country eat in kitchen & formal
dining.Some windows replaced.
$70,000 Century 21/The Darby
*Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
SPACIOUS 2BR/2BA home on 1
ac w/attached garage &
2-story shed $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76887
Totally refurbished 2/2 w/
workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story Mi, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Very Nice 4/2 on 4 acres w/open
floor plan, 2 living rooms, eat in
kitchen, dining rm and rec rm .
w/wet bar $89,900 Call Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well maintained 3/2 DWMH,
1568 sq ft, acres, new roof,
$65,000, MLS#76187
Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001

82 0 Farms&
Acreage
10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

83O Commercial
Property
Aprox 4000 sq ft Commercial
bldg, 4 bay/2 car lift shop, show-
room/office area, $1000 a month
lease or will sell for $128,000.
Call Martin @ 386-697-9950
Coral Shores Realty. Prime
commercial, located on Hwy 41 &
Gibson Ln. 26X54 concrete block.
$76,000 386-965-5905 -
Call Bob Gavette
Downtown & borders 3 streets.
Aprox. 10,000 sqft fenced parking.
"as is" Bob Gavette. $73,000. 386-
965-5905 Coral Shores Realty
Prime Commercial Property
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya 3.27 acres, room for building
$398,888 386-867-1271
Call Nancy @ Results Realty


940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually,
5th Wheel White, Automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215







950 Cars for Sale
FOR SALE. 2006 PT Cruiser, full
power, burgundy. 24k mi.
14 city 24 hwy. $7,995.00
386-758-9629 Leave message
GET CASH TODAY !!
For your car, truck, van or SUV.
(Running or not). Call anytime.
(352)653-5691


2008 Honda 750
C2 Spirit
Windshield, engine guard,
backrest, luggage rack,
like new, 4900 miles.
$3,800
Call
386-365-3658


951 Recreational
95 Vehicles







02 Fleetwood Revolution 40'.
Prestine. New tires, flushed trans..
kept covered. Will sell tow vehi-
cle. $75K 752-6090 / 365-1903


1977 GMC Motor Home Classic
Palm Beach Model,Self-
Contained, $18,500 or
obo or trade 386-754-6693




Contact us

at the paper.






CLASSIFIED ADS
386-755-5440


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386-755-5445


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180 East Duval St
Lake City, FLorida 32055


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2006 EF250
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LIFE


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427


Sunday, February 20, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK







Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


It's too

early to

fertilize

the lawn

We've just
experi-
enced
some
pretty nice
weather, so it feels and
looks a lot like spring.
Many homeowners
become anxious and think
they can jump start a green
lawn now.
It is too early to fertil-
ize the lawn, however. It's
best to wait until your lawn
is completely green and
you have mowed a couple
times.
Here in North Florida,
that will be around mid-
April.
The nights are still cool
and the soil temperature is
not warm enough for the
grass to grow.
If you spread fertilizer
before the plants can use it,
the rains will simply leach
tlhelutrients on down past
the root zone. And that's
the'slame as throwing your
money away.
Spring is not the time to
save steps and apply fertil-
izer and pre-emergent her-
bicides at the same time.
Many 'weed and feed'
products are on the mar-
ket. These should be
avoided unless you want to
throw away some of your
hard-earned money.
Pre-emergent weed kill-
ers can be applied when
we get 4 or 5 consecutive
days in the 70's. Timing is
critical to achieve control,
however. We normally get
those higher temperatures
somewhere from mid-
February and the first of
March.
If you use the 'weed and
feed' product as early as
mid-February or March,
it's too early for the grass
to use the 'feed' part.
Oops. Just flushed your
money.
If you use that product
after the grass greens up
in April, it's too late for the
pre-emergent weed control.
Oops, more money down
the drain.
If you have had trouble
in the past with weeds
coming up along with your
new spring lawn, the bet-
ter option is to apply the
pre-emergent weed killer
alone.
Check the label before
you use any herbicide.
Make certain that your
lawn grass is listed on the
label as well as the weeds
that you are combating.
Some pre-emergent
herbicides on the market
include benefin (Balan,
Hi-Yield Crabgrass
Preventer), oryzalin
(Surflan), bensulide
(PreSan, Betasan) or pen-
dimethalin (Pendulum,
Pre-M). The use of trade
names does not imply
endorsement.
Gardening questions?
Call the UF/IFAS Master
Gardeners at 752-5384.

D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and


Agricultural Sciences.


A.C. GONZALEZ/Lake City Reporter
Huntsville First United Methodist Church is a hand-built southern architecture building. It was built on land donated by the late William W. Havird. The
church is located at 214 NW Huntsville Church Drive.





Built by faithful


Lake City church has deep roots in community


By AC. GONZALEZ.
agonzalez@lakecityreporter. corn
It was 1855, a quiet
year in the pre-war
South. The attack
on Fort Sumter
was six years away
and Abraham Lincoln
was a little known lawyer
from Illintis. In those
days before the Civil
War, a group of farmers
had formed a community
northwest of Lake City.
The Methodists in this
new community donated
land for a church and
cemetery. The land was
from resident farmer
William W. Havird and
his wife, Isabella. The
Methodists held a few
services under what was
known as brush arbor
until a church raising
could be held.
Havird's great grand-
daughter, Carolyn
Townsend, still attends
the Sunday services along
with her daughter, Cathy
Townsend, at Huntsville
Methodist, the church
constructed on that site.
The first minister was
. the Rev. W.H. Hunt, aka
"Uncle Billy Hunt" to his
parishioners. The church
and its surrounding area -
was named Huntsville in
his honor.
Huntsville Methodist


Church is a textbook
example of rural Southetrn
architecture: a plain,
rectangular, whitewashed
building with rows of tall
windows on three sides
that provided a breeze
during summer services.
The unadorned high
ceilings caught the cool
air and there was a wood-
burning stove for heat in
the winter. The handmade
pews are still used in the
church. Except for air
conditioning and a front
porch, the building has
not been modernized. It
stands today as a remnant
of a distant time.
In the adjoining cem-
etery, the Rev. Hunt,
William Havird and many
of their descendants are
b.uried. Gravesites of
deceased soldiers from
the Civil War, World War
I and World War II can ,
also be seen. Several sites
are so old they are simply
marked with a crude, oval
piece of wood.
Cathy Townsend
said that as generations
passed, the cemetery
changed in appearance
and by necessity for
upkeep. The tradition
of cleaning the sites
has been passed down
through her family for
generations.


A.C. GONZALEZ/Lake City, Reporter
Cathy Townsend stands behind the tombstone of her great
great grandparents, William and Isabella Havird. William
Havird has a Confederate States of America marker in front
of the tombstone, to signify his service in the Confederate
army during the Civil War.


Cathy remembers that
when she was a child,
'her mother and other


parishioners would pack a
lunch and spend the day
cleaning the gravesites


with nothing but bundled
.gaulberry bushes. During
those times, the cemetery
had no grass. It was just
dirt.
She said it's easier
to clean the sites these
days. "I come over now
and then to clean up the
church and the graves,
and I can always envision
my great grandma, Josie,
telling me I'm doing a
good job of it."
Cathy said that the
church has a service and
a special message given
on Easter. Beyond its
historical significance,
Huntsville remains a func-
tioning church. Sunday
evening services begin at
6 p.m., "to which every-
.ope is invited, we sing the
old time Methodist hymns
here," said Cathy.
The services are "frver-
ent but informal," Cathy
said, and led by pastor
Jim Messer, "everyone
can come and worship the
Lord."
The church is also avail-
able to those looking for a
beautiful historical church
to be married in.
"I love this place," she
said. "The cemetery is full
of history, and the build-
ing itself matches it by
being so old time. I really
hope people will come and
check us out on Sundays."


Jay Johnson stars as'The Two & Only'


By MARK KIRBY
Special to the Reporter
N o one who has seen
the comic genius
Jay Johnson has
ever forgotten him.
He became famous
for his work on the 1977-81 sit-
com "Soap." As Chuck Campbell,
a ventriloquist who mainly talked
through his puppet, Bob, Jay was
an immediate smash with the
audience and could always be
counted on for belly laughs dur-
ing the show's entire, four-season
run.
After "Soap" Jay continued
with TV guest shots (among
them The Facts of Life, The Love


COURTESY PHOTO
Performing onstage has always been Jay Johnson's true love. The ventrilo-
quist will perform at 7 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 26, in the Levy Performing Arts
Center of Florida Gateway College.


Boat, Empty Nest, CSI, Reno
911!, and That 70s Show, where
he again played "Chuck and Bob


Campbell"), starred in Broken
Badges, playing a depressed
police officer, appeared as a


celebrity guest on many game
shows, and even hosted two of
his own, Celebrity Charades and
So You Think You Got Troubles.
But performing onstage with
his "friends" has always been
Jay's true love, and the many
years of ventriloquism culminated
in "The Two and Only," which Jay
wrote. The show demonstrates
Jay's lifelong obsession with
the art of ventriloquism. It also
serves as a Valentine, not only
to the art, but also to Jay's friend
and mentor, Arthur Sieving, who
created Jay's first professional
puppet.
"The Two and Only," after
JOHNSON continued on 2D













FGC's Test Center boogies into the future


H ae you ever
taken a test
only to run
out of scratch
paper or have
catastrophic pencil breaks?
Thankfully, due to the
rise of the information age,
computer testing is quickly
replacing the traditional
paper booklet tests that
many of us, including me,
took during our school
years.
There have been many
benefits to the computer
replacing those bubble
sheets and thick paper
booklets.
Some include: reducing
the time it takes to give
and score the examina-
tion, reducing setup and
completion time, and, of
course, overall reducing
the cost of the exams.
The one item, however,
that has been in constant
use even during the rise
of computer-based testing
has been the pencil and
scratch paper.
There has never been


a way around using these
items.
Some tests, particularly
math exams, require some
workspace to figure out
the problem. So, paper and
pencil has continued to be
used during the transition
to computer exams.
Recently, however, the
Test Center at Florida
Gateway College, through
a generous grant provided
by the Foundation for
Florida Gateway College,
has acquired electronic
LCD writing tablets called
Boogie Boards.
Finally, there is a solu-
tion to the traditional
pencil and scratch paper
method. The Boogie
Board is a remarkable
innovation, allowing us
here at the Test Center to
effectively replace most of'
our current paper and pen-
cil implements, and provid-
ing a number of benefits to
Florida Gateway College.
The board works just
like paper, no special tools,
equipment, or even the


John Hartzog
john.hartzog@fgc.edu
need to press harder while
writing. Literally, it's a
high-tech notepad.
The Boogie Board is the
size of 5 x 7 notepad and
looks like a tiny handheld
blackboard. Students use
it just like scratch paper.
Benefits are abounding
with this little technologi-
cal marvel.
The Test Center admin-
isters anywhere between
6,000 to 8,000 examina-
tions a year between
College Placement, GED,
Exit Exams, nursing, and
more. Most of these tests
require paper and pencil
at some point during the
session.
Most examinees use
more-than one sheet of


paper and since they are
allowed only one sheet at
a time during testing, they
have to alert their proctor
to get them more.
This problem is elimi-
nated with computer-based
testing in association with
the Boogie Board.
Test-takers have an
unlimited amount of paper
at their disposal. When tes-
ters completely fill up their
boards, they simply press
the erase button at the top
of the screen and, with a
quick flash, the screen is
clear and ready for prob-
lem No. 2.
Another problem elimi-
nated with the use of the
Boogie Board is the use
of lead pencils for most
testing.
The Boogie Board uses
a sleek, telescopic stylus
for writing.
Anything between fin-
gernails or capped pens
can be used to write on
the board, but the stylus
provides a comfortable
experience for the user.


This eliminates the worry
for pencils breaking, and
having to be sharpened. It
keeps test-takers' minds
focused and not worried
about snapping the lead of
their pencil.
While minor concerns
about paper and pencil
may seem insignificant, lit-
tle problems can increase
the pressure felt when
taking a test particularly if
test anxiety rears its ugly
head.
Finally, not only has
the student benefitted
in reducing anxiety and
increasing focus, the Test
Center staff has gained
numerous benefits from
the use of the boards as
well. Initially, setting-up
for tests took somewhere
between 20-30 minutes to
power-on, log-in, initiate
test software, place pencil
and paper down, and clean
the station.
The setup process has
been reduced by half, usu-
ally taking no more than
15 minutes to completely


set up the test stations.
This also reduced our
end of day procedures
such as sharpening pen-
cils, and shredding scratch
paper. Also, in an effort to
be "Green" the use of the
Boogie Boards reduces
the amount of paper and
pencils the Test Center
orders and uses on a
yearly basis.
Technology evolving has
brought several benefits
to the testing arena, and
we are constantly seeking
them out
Whether it is giving a
test on computer to get
faster results or using
a writing tablet to keep
you focused as you tackle
your entrance exam, we
are constantly trying to
be innovative and grow to
provide a better experi-
ence and ensure success
for a brighter future.

* John Hartzog is testing
specialist at Florida Gateway
College. He can be reached
at 386-754-4309.


McRae-Bishop
Mark and Stacy McRae of Lake
City announce the engagement and
approaching marriage of their daughter,
Shannon Michelle McRae of Lake City,.
to Michael Phillip Bishop of Lake City..
He is the son of Phil and Debbie Bishop
of Lake City.
The bride-elect is a 2005 Union
County High School graduate and a 2009
Lake City Community College gradu-
ate with an AA degree. She is currently
studying elementary education at the
University of Phoenix. She is employed
with the Columbia County School Board.
The future groom is a 2005 Columbia
County High School graduate and a 2010
Lake City Community College gradu-
ate with a law enforcement certificate.
He is currently employed at the Florida
Department of Transportation.
The wedding is planned for 5 p.m.
Saturday, March 19 at Parkview Bap.tist
Church. A reception will follow at Lake
City Country Club.


COURTESY PHOTO
Joanna Lee Watson and Dustin Tyler King.


COURTESY PHOTO
Shannon MichellfeMcRae and Michael Phillip
-Bishop.


Watson-King
Ken Watson and Janis Watson of Lake
City announce the engagement and
approaching marriage of their daugh-
ter, Joanna Lee Watson of Lake City, to
Dustin Tyler King of Lake City. He is the
son of Steven and Sherry King of The
Villages.
The bride-elect is a 2003 graduate
of Columbia High School and received
her RN, degree in 2006 from Lake City
Community College School of Nursing.
She is employed at Lake Shore Hospital
as a labor and delivery nurse.
The future groom is s 2003 graduate
of Columbia High School and com-
pleted the irrigation program at Lake
City Community College where he
played for the Timberw6lves. He is cur-
rently employed with the Department of
Corrections.
The wedding is planned for 6:30 p.m.
Friday, April 15 at The White Room in
St. Augustine. A reception will follow at
the same location.


JOHNSON: Winner of LA Ovation


Continued From Page 1A

being played around the
country, opened in New
York and was greeted by
rave reviews.
The Times called it "a
knock 'em dead show"
as it, and other newspa-
pers, praised Jay's talent,
humor, and skill. Topping
the accolades was Jay's
winning a Tony award
in 2007 for Best Special
Theatrical Event, the
only ventriloquist to ever
be nominated and win a
Tony.
After a long, hugely
successful run in New
York, Jay has taken "The
Two and Only" on the
road, playing to wildly
receptive audiences and
critical acclaim. He won
the Los Angeles Ovation
award that city's equiv-
alent of the Tony for
Best Solo Performance,
and as with the Tony, the
only time a ventriloquist
has ever been so hon-
.ored.
"Jay Johnson: The
Two and Only" will be
performed for one show
only at 7 p.m., Saturday,
Feb. 26, in the Levy
Performing Arts Center
of Florida Gateway
College.
Tickets are $15 for
adults, $14 for seniors
(age 55 and older) and
$13 for students. For tick-
ets or further information,


--^H




NN



COURTESY PHOTO
Jay Johnson will perform in Lake City after his successful
shows in New York. He also won the Los Angeles Ovation
award for Best, Solo Performance..


call the box office at (386)
7544340.
Prior to the perfor-
mance dinner will be


served in the college's
Lobo Cafe. Reservations
are required. Call (800)
845-0925 or 438-5440.


Jones Kelsey
Ronald Jones and Phyllis
Wilson of Lake City announce
the engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daughter
Kinekia Verlqnda Jones of Lake
City, to Claude Dewon Kelsey
of Lake City.
He is the son of Claudie and
Vireather Kelsey of Lake City.
The wedding is planned for 4
p.m. Saturday, July 2.


Forshaw Carison
Bette J. Forshaw and
Robert A. Carlson, were
united in marriage Feb.
12 at Epiphany Catholic
Church.
The bride was given in
marriage by her brother-in-
law, Gerald Bickel. Father
Michael Pendergraft offici-
ated the ceremony.
The ceremony was
attended by the bride's 91-
year-old mother who trav-
eled from Syracuse, N.Y.
The bride's wedding
party included: Julie A.
Martin, matron of honor


COURTESY PHOTO
Robert Carlson and Bette
Forshaw.
and daughter of the bride;
CaroleA. Kirwan and Laurie
L. Bickel, sisters of the
bride; Margaret Fox, friend
of the bride; and Gabrielle
Rose Martin, granddaugh-


ter of the bride.
The groom's wedding
party included: Scott
Carlson, best man and son
of the groom; John Cravens
and Dick Dorsche, friends
of the groom; Donald
Martin, son-in-law of the
bride; and Hunter and Riley
Martin, grandsons of the
bride.
A reception was held at
the Holiday Inn of Lake
City.
The bride is the adminis-
trator at Baya Pointe Rehab
& Nursing Center.
The groom is a retired
American Airlines pilot


ENGAGEMENTS


%&PeONLWY

0 *




A D- -Ry a T o it

A'A ND THROWING IT


COURTESY
PHOTO



Kinekia
Vertonda
Jones
and
Claude
Dewon
Kelsey.


WEDDING


.3 '-'~. -


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011 3D


DEAR ABBY


Job loss reveals hard truth

about who's a true friend


DEAR ABBY: After
working 15 years for the
same company, I was let go
last August. I have called my
former co-workers/friends
just to stay in touch. I don't
dwell on what I'm going
through; I just want to enjoy
some companionship.
I have asked if they would
like to meet for coffee before
or after work. Only two ever
seem to want to get together.
It hurts, because we always
shared birthdays, happy
hour outings, etc. My phone
rarely rings, and I am now
seeing a doctor for depres-
sion.
Abby, please let your.
readers know that those
of us who have lost their
jobs are still trying to main-
tain relationships. It's hard
enough not having a job, but
ifs harder realizing friends
have turned their backs on
you. FORGOTTEN IN
KATY, TEXAS
DEAR FORGOTTEN: I
know you're going through
a difficult time, and glad that
you talked to your physician
about your depression. Take
from this experience some
,valuable insight: The people
who get together with you
are your true friends. Those
who no longer want contact
may fear that unemployment
is a communicable disease
and were only acquaintanc-


up-

Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com

es. And now you know who's
who.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band is insecure. I do what
I can to make him feel loved,
but he has a habit that drives
me crazy. Many times over
the course of a day he'll say,
"I love you." He does this es-
pecially if there is any hint of
disagreement.
At first I thought it was
sweet, but after many years
of marriage, I now under-
stand that he just uses the
words to get me to say it
back to reassure him. Some-
times I do, but if I don't, he
becomes increasingly dis-
tressed.
Should I just give himri
what he wants? It makes me
feel like a puppet. TOO
MUCH "LOVE"
DEAR TOO MUCH:
. Instead of "giving him what
he wants," have .you tried
calmly calling him on it? Try
this: "John, you know I love
you. You hear it many times
over the course of a day. But


I find it, frankly, annoying
that when we disagree about
something, you tell me you
love me and become increas-
ingly distressed if I don't feel
like saying it back at that mo-
ment. So, let it go for now."
Your husband needs to
hear you say it almost as
much as you need to get this
off your chest.
DEAR ABBY: My fa-
ther-in-law has liver cancer.
Whenever I use the term
to explain his condition, I
say, "Dad is dying of liver
cancer," which upsets my in-
laws because they don't like
to hear the word "dying."
His cancer will ultimately
take his life, so am I wrong,
or are my in-laws being too
sensitive? JUST BEING
HONEST IN IOWA
DEAR JUST BEING
HONEST: At this point
you are wrong. Unless your
father-in-law is at death's
door he is LIVING with
cancer. When you describe
his condition as "dying,"
you create the impression
that you are rushing him
to the cemetery. He .could
live quite a while, so don't
jump the gun. And no, your
in-laws are NOT being "too
sensitive."
E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): The damage you do to
an important relationship will
be difficult to reverse. Focus
.more on your current profes-
sional goals and you will avoid
getting into trouble in your
personal life. Don't overin-
dulge. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Don't trust anyone try-
ing to get something from you
for nothing. Insincere ges-
tures of friendliness will lead
to an annoying situation that
will be difficult to handle. Sim-
ply say no to someone who
puts unreasonable demands
on you. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Reevaluate your -current
position and consider what
you have to offer and if your
skills are being used to the
fullest. You can reinvent what
you do 'and apply it to other
positions in the job market.
Don't settle for less when you
-can have more. *****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You will have to compro-
mise if you don't want to dam-.
age your relationship with a
friend, lover or relative. You
are inclined to take things the
wrong way and to blow situ-
ations out of proportion. You


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last
may owe someone an apology.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
A day trip or visiting a place
or friend that motivates you
will set a positive mood and
provide the opportunity to
try something new. A burden
you've been carrying will fi-
nally pay off, lowering your
stress. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Take time out to spend
with someone .you love or, if
you are single, to participate
in a social event that will al-
lows you to, meet someone
special. Updating your looks
or the way you do things will
contribute to the compliments
and cooperation you receive
from others. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Avoid getting involved
in a senseless discussion.
Someone will take advantage
of your good nature and try to
guilt you into something you
don't want to do. Decline and
move on quickly to more en-
joyable people and pastimes.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebnty Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present. '
Each letter inthe phe stands for another.
Today's clue: L equals M
" FO OGSTX G XH FVWOH P DTOOTM,
LGK OZ GY SKZJHTAVT F KXOG KOHP
GKA JFOWZRO MTXTMBGOFZK OWGO
WT FX FK TMMZM." GKAMTJ
N G Y S X Z K
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "If you have built castles\in the air, your work need not
be lost... now put the foundations under them." Henry D. Thoreau
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 2-21


21): Change will brighten
your day and bring you new
possibilities. Anger, resent-
ment and revenge are a waste
of time. Reinvent what and
how you use your talent and
skill to reach higher goals.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Larger quar-
ters, more people around you
or visitors bearing gifts or so-
lutions to some of the difficul-
ties you face will all lead to a
better future. You will express
yotr thoughts persuasively
and capture the attention of
someone who can help you
advance. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Be careful what
you say and believe. Noth-
ing you hear will be based on
facts and contributing to false
information will damage your
reputation. Take.a neutral po-
sition and steer clear of any-
one using emotional black-
mail. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Size up your per-
sonal and financial situation
and make whatever changes
are required in order to reach
your goals. Your experience
will help you make the right
choice and keep you from
falling into a trap that some-
one from your past is setting.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): A partnership is likely to
leave you feeling depressed
and unsettled. Go to the
source and find out exactly
what's going on and where
you stand. Then you can .go
about your day without a
heavy burden hanging over
ybur head. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


BARGAINING By Ian Livengood / Edited by Will Shortz 112.3, 41 5 6_7 8 19 10 I11 1 13 [ 14 15 16 17


Across
1 Little reminders
8 Bad record, e.g.
14 Coiled killers
18 Home of Elaine,
in Arthurian
legend
19 Pirate's support
20 Donne piece
22 "Should I say
'Come here
often?' or 'Hey,
babe!'"?
24 Recite, as a
prayer
25 See 23-Down
26 Area banning pub
regulars?
28 Heartache
30 "Before I forget

32 Losing tic-tac-
toe row
33 Actor Penn of
"Van Wilder"
34 Kind of jelly
37 Connecting word
38 Pirate's support?
41 Capitol Records'
parent co.
42 Lines on a Dan
Brown best
seller?
48 "Riddle-me-___"
49 Like some yoga
50 Sworn secrecy
51 Settled (on)
53 E.T.'s ability to
use the lower
part of a
keyboard?
58 Carpet option
61 Subject for
gossip
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


62 Easily swayed
63 ___ Dan (Israeli
archaeological
site)
64 Guidebook
recommendation
67 Not in the
. country
70 N.Y.C. avenue
71 "Welcome to the
Jungle" rocker
73 Support provider
74 Crux
75 Where dimwitted
people pay to
drink?
82 Won
83 Some potatoes
84 Smoothie
ingredients
88 Starts of some
reproductions
90 Like a former 97-
pound weakling?
93 It's bad to be
over it
94 To be, to
Augustus
95 Chemical suffix
96 When Macbeth
asks "Is this a
dagger which I
see before me?"
97 "Holy smokes!,"
to a teen
98 Montr6al's
des Soeurs
100 No. 2: Abbr.
102 Little guy
103 Dramatic
production about
Ivory or Dial?
108 1974 hit whose
title is sung
twice after
"Como una
promesa"
113 Horn of Africa
native


114 Certain cases of
the munchies?
118 Early online
forum
119 Author of the
2009 book
subtitled "A Plan
to Solve the
Climate Crisis"
120 Protest sign
121 Quagmire
122 Midday meeting
123 Chic

Down
1 Mitt
2 Kyrgyzstan city
3 Attica, e.g.,
informally
4 Carry-on
5 Lund of
"Casablanca"
6 Headwear worn
over dreadlocks
7 Eye problem
8 Day ___--
9 Coastal.fliers
10 Home under the
midnight sun
11 Silver-tongued
12 Actress Suvari
13 New ___
14 DreamWorks's
first animated
film
15 Where an
Englishman
might get a
break?
16 George Orwell,
e.g.
17 Agate alternative
20 Storage spot
21 Jet black
23 With 25-Across,
a puzzle
27 Picture,
commercially


28 Small bit of
power
29 Injury-
monitoring org.
31 High-end French
retailer
35 Aid in lost and
found
36 Co-worker of
Homer on "The
Simpsons"
37 Underworld
activities
38 Singer Anthony
39 El Prado
hangings
40.Union deserter,
maybe
43 The King Henry
who founded the
.Tudor dynasty
44 Push
45 Show of pride
46 "Our Gang" girl
47 Spanish hero of
yore
52 Subj. of Form
1040's line 32
54 Tiny complaint
55 How to address a
maj.?
56 Small part of a
pound?
57 Modern
communication
58 Opposite of leg.,
in music
59 Prefix with -pod
60 Annual baseball
events
64 Some campfire
makers
65 Home of Kansai
International
Airport
66 Special delivery
on Sun.
67 Divide up
68 Some sweet
wines


69 Rembrandt van

72 Fraternity
chapter #17
73 Bruised, say
74. Big initials in
news
76 Cries of disgust
77 Betting line
78 Broccoli ___
79 Japanese port
80 Stat for Seaver or
Santana


81 "Ta-___ Boom-
de-ay"
85 Score on a night
out
86 Lamb not found
on a.farm
87 Tried to make it
home, say
88 Pouch bearer
89 Skedaddle
91 Tack
92 A.T.M. button\
98 Suffix with
contempt


99 B6b6's need
100 Match play?
101 Buffalo
N.H.L.'er
104 Roasts
105 Home of the
Bahla Fort and
nearby oasis -
106 Arizona's ___
Verde Nuclear
Generating
Station
107 Hence


109 Eastern
blueblood
110 School near the
Royal Windsor
Racecourse
111 Radio choices:
Abbr.
112 Strained
115 ___ Lingus
116 Kenan's old
partner on
Nickelodeon
117 D.C.-to-Va.
Beach direction


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
APIP A S RLAC IS M DISKS!
L EANMEAT AT 0 N CE ENTER
T OISIEIEIAN E WDOC TOIR P L OIYIS
E N SSPI PRR L A W=
RI 0 LL


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YOUWEREI S EA M 0 U N TLASS ALTO

BERRA WHATDIDYOUTEACH

.EILY SIE AM_ UINT 0 SENS


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8 5 6 7


2 7 5 8


9 2 4


6 8 5


7 3 9 6 8


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Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415






4D LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011



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