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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01383
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: February 19, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01383
System ID: UF00028308:01383
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






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Saturday, February 19, 201 I ww.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 25 N 75 cents


BATTLE'S ON1!


TONY BRITT
2-20-11Lake City Reporter
River City Homeschool
Adventures students
Macgregor Langston
(from left), Wyatt
Greenbaum and Garret
Greenbaum learn about
Civil War-era guns from
Tara Greenbaum.


Students visit

Olustee battlefield

on'education day'


PATRICK SCOTT/Lake City Report
Confederate soldiers mount a counterattack, attempting to repel a Union advance in the opening skirmish of the Battle of
Olustee re-enactment. This proved to be the biggest battle fought in Florida during the Civil War, with the percentage of
casualties making it one of the bloodiest of the war.


Olustee's opening

skirmish proves a

realistic depiction


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Shots thundered, one
volley after another.
Bodies littered the
landscape as one
side pushed.for-
ward, only to be repulsed by
the other.
The re-enactment of the
opening skirmish of the
Battle of Olustee, played
out Friday on banks of Lake
DeSoto, went beyond uni-
forms and musket rounds.
There was a doctor who ran
to help the wounded, while a


boy served as the flagbearer
for the Southern troops.
And much like the actual
battle, corpses were every-
where.
"This makes it real," said
Tony Buzzella, Blue/Grey
Army major general. "You'
hear the cannons and smell
the gunpowder. It makes it
real, and you understand the
harshness of war."
The skirmish was just a pre-
view of what is to come at the
Olustee Battlefield today and
Sunday.
SKIRMISH continued on 3A


More than 4,000
kids learn about
Civil War life.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
OLUSTEE The
Olustee Battlefield Historic
State Park was alive with
activity Friday with at least
4,000 school-age children,
teachers and parents par-
ter ticipating in the park's edu-


Its an annual
affair tlat's proven
worth the trip.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
After 22 consecutive
years, Saundra and Dennis
Williams didn't think about


cation day.
Bob Giarda, a park ser-
vice specialist at Olustee
Battlefield Historic State
Park, said 4,000-5,000 chil-
dren attended the park's
education day, which took
place from 9 a.m. 2 p.m.
Friday.
Park service registra-
tion paperwork indicates
groups from Jacksonville,
St. Augustine, Gainesville
STUDENTS continued on 3A


the rancid smell of black
powder, the explosions and
gunbatfle. All they could
talk about was their excite-
ment meeting their repeat
customers.
"We have customers that
bought for their children
and now their children are
VENDORS continued on 3A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A Confederate soldier carries an injured comrade to
safety during a re-enactment of a skirmish Friday at
Lake Desoto.


Those who fell remembered


7- a


ASSOCIATED PRESS
First Florida, Company C, 2nd Battalion Hardy's Brigade
members David Dubi (second from right) and Tyler Dasalvia,
retire the flags at the conclusion of the Oaklawn Cemetery
Memorial Service Friday.


Johnson honors the-

many who perished


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Attendees gathered at
Oaklawn Cemetery, not to
glorify the Civil War but
to remember the soldiers
buried there, according to
Wendell Johnson, City of
Lake City manager.
He was the keynote
speaker at the Blue/Grey
Army Oaklawn Cemetary
Memorial Service Friday.
The ceremony was
at the gravesite of the
Olustee Battle's unknown
soldiers, where more than
100 rest.
The ceremony was a
tribute to the soldiers who
fought and died at the
Battle of Olustee. The men
who died and were buried
in the cemetery fought


to protect their families,
Johnson said. They fought
as patriots of their respec-
tive cause.
"These men knew if they
fell on Olustee their death
would be anonymous and
their identity known only
to God," he said.
Not with a sense of
pride, but with a sense of
sadness, was homage paid
to the valiant soldiers.
A wreath was placed
at the monument for
unknown soldiers and
Taps was played.
Immediately follow-
ing the Blue/Grey Army
memorial service was a
program hosted by the
Battle of Olustee Camp
1463 Sods of Confederate
MEMORY continued on 3A


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Dennis Williams (left) of Tallahassee shows Max Gaylard, 6,
of Lake City how to use a marshmallow shooter blowgun at
his vendor booth.


OLUSTEE BATTLE
FESTIVAL
Schedule of
Events Saturday
Downtown
9 a.m. Blue-Grey
One Mile Fund Run
around Lake Desoto).
9 a.m.-6 p.m. -
Vendor booths including
arts, crafts and collect-
ibles, food, public ser-
vices and commercial.
9 a.m.-6 p.m. -
Entertainment
10:30 a.m. -
Annual Olustee Battle
Parade.
Noon Visiting dig-
nitaries, parade marshal,
recognition of Olustee
Family, Miss Olustee


Festival winners on main
stage downtown.
7:45 p.m. Blue/
Grey Square Dance,
Rountree Moore Toyota
Showroom, 1252 W. U.S.
Highway 90.
Olustee Battlefield
Events
9 a.m. -
Presentation of colors..
9 a.m.-6:15 p.m. -
Park open to the public.
Admission, $7 for adults,
$3 for school-age children,
pre-school children free.
1 p.m. Medical
demonstration.
2:30 p.m. Period
music concert
3:30 p.m. Mini-
battle at battlefield.


1 I42640oz 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


79
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


- V


O pinion ................ 4A
. Around Florida ........... 2A
Obituaries .............. 3A
Advice & Comics ......... 2B
Puzzles ................. 3B
A~i


TODAY IN
FAITH
C lur.ir h fiit-IT .
h -, l _-- :


COMING
SUNDAY
C lu,.Ree i1..tle
F i i.d,


Year after year,

vendors keep

returning for fest


-.11








LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2011


Friday:
Afternoon: 4-7-5
Evening: 4-5-7


Friday:
Afternoon: 2-4-8-4
Evening: 5-5-2-0


t Thursday:
P IZ 4-18-21-33-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Reporter speaks about speech problem


LOS ANGELES
A TV reporter who lapsed
into gibberish during
a live shot outside the
Grammys said she was
terrified when it hap-
pened and knew something was
wrong as soon as she opened her
mouth.
KCBS-TV reporter Serene
Branson's incoherence Sunday
fueled Internet speculation that she
suffered an on-air stroke.
But doctors at the University of
California, Los Angeles ruled it out
They said she suffered a type of
migraine that can mimic symptoms
of a stroke.
Branson told CBS' "The Early
Show" in an interview Friday that
she was terrified, scared and con-
fused, and didn't know what was
going on.
She said she intended to report
that Lady Antebellum swept the
Grammys, but the words wouldn't
come out right.
Branson returned to the KCBS-TV
newsroom on Thursday.

Jury begins deliberations
in Buju Banton trial
TAMPA A federal jury in
Florida will begin deliberations in
the drug trial of Grammy-winning
reggae singer Buju Banton.
The 37-year-old Banton, whose
given name is Mark Myrie, is on trial
for conspiring with two other men in
setting up a drug deal in December
of 2009. His album "Before the
Dawn" won a Grammy on Sunday for
best reggae album.
Federal Judge James Moody is
scheduled to give the jury delibera-
tion instructions Friday morning.
This is Banton's second trial; a
jury deadlocked in his first trial last
year. If convicted of all the charges,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sunday file photo provided by KCBS in Los Angeles, veteran TV journal-
ist Serene Branson reports on the Grammy awards show outside the Staples
Center in Los Angeles. Branson's speech became incoherent during the stand-up,
which fueled Internet speculation that she suffered an on-air stroke. Doctors ,said
Thursday that she suffered a migraine, the symptoms of which can mimic a stroke.


he faces up to life in prison.

CBS News veteran Paul
Friedman leaving
NEW YORK Veteran news
executive Paul Friedman is leaving
CBS News as part of the division's
management shake-up. *
The 66-year-old Friedman is the
division's executive vice president
and was the top deputy to CBS News
President Sean McManus. CBS-
announced earlier this month that
McManus, who also served as CBS
*Sports president, was going back
to sports full time as the division's
chairman.
Jeff Fager, who is "60 Minutes"
executive producer, was named CBS
News chairman and hired David
Rhodes from Bloomberg as his new
right-hand man. Fager announced
management changes in an internal
memo to staff on Friday.


Fager also said that Barbara
Fedida, the news division's top talent
recruiter, would also. be leaving.

Diane Kruger takes
action turn in 'Unknown'
BERLIN Diane Kruger resisted
the temptation to call in a stuntwom-
an for a challenging action scene in
the thriller "Unknown."
Kruger stars alongside Liam
Neeson in the movie, which
screened out of competition Friday
at the Berlin Film Festival
She plays Gina, a taxi driver
and illegal immigrant who saves
Neeson's character from drowning
after her cab skids off a bridge into
a river.
Kruger said she "would have been
very happy to let a very capable
stunt lady take over from me."

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Singer Smokey Robinson
is 71.
* Singer Bobby Rogers
(Smokey Robinson & the
Miracles) is 71.
SActress Carlin Glynn is 71.
* Rock musician Tony lommi
(Black Sabbath, Heaven and
Hell) is 63.
* Actor Jeff Daniels is 56.
* Actor Ray Winstone is 54.

Daily Scripture


* Actor Leslie David Baker
(TV: "The Office") is 53.
* NFL Commissioner Roger
Goodell is 52.
* Britain's Prince Andrew is
51.
* Country musician Ralph
McCauley (Wild Horses) is
47.
* Actor Benicio Del Toro is


"For I am convinced that nei-
ther death nor life, neither
angels nor demons, neither the
present nor the future, will be
able to separate us from the
love of God that is in Christ
Jesus our Lord."
I, Romans 8:38-39


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher: U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter,' P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....)754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
I(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ................755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32'
24 Weeks.... ..............$48.79
52 Weeks..... ......... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks............... . $41.40
24 Weeks ................... $82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CORRECTION


In a story on Friday, the headline should have indicated
Rhonda Bellamy Tellier received 10 years probation in a case
involving federal tax fraud. r


Divorce for mom
accused of killing
TAMPA The hus-
band of a Tampa mother
accused of killing their two
children said he went to
the jail Friday to tell her
he wants a divorce.
It was the first meeting
between Army Col. Parker
Schenecker and his wife,
Julie, since her Jan. 27
arrest on charges that she
;planned and carried out
the killings of their 16-
year-old daughter, Calyx,
and 13-year-old son, Beau.
She told detectives she ,
did it because the children
were talking back and
being "mouthy," according
to a Tampa police spokes-
woman.
In a statement sent to
reporters Friday, Parker
Schenecker said the meet-
ing with his wife was "emo-
tional and productive," but
he did not go into detail
about their discussions. He
said the meeting "focused
mostly on how so many
people continue to honor
and remember the lives of
Calyx and Beau.".
"I felt it was important
and proper to inform her
in person about my need
to focus on the future, and
my intention to file for
divorce," the statement
said. "Clearly the events of
January 27th have taken
Julie and me on different
paths."


Man set on fire
during fight
FORT LAUDERDALE
- An attack behind a fast
food restaurant in South
Florida has left one man
severely burned.
Fort Lauderdale Police
Detective Travis Mandell
said a 49-year-old man was
set on fire early Friday
during a fight with another
man behind a Burger King
restaurant.
Mandell said William


Patrick Scott/Lake City Reporter

Sampling fare at Olustee Festival

Shelby Coar of Live Oak (middle) and Krista Megahee (right)
of Lake City buy.some tea from'Debra Camiel at Mr. T's BBQ
Friday during the Olustee Battle Festival downtown celebra-
tion in downtown Lake City. The fair was scheduled to con-
tinue all day Saturday.


Stouffer was doused with
some kind of accelerant
before the other man lit
him on fire.
Stouffer was hospital-
ized in Miami in critical
condition. Police are
searching for the man who
attacked him.

Wind energy
company coming
ST. LOUIS-A St.
Louis wind energy busi-
ness has signed on to
develop a $250 million
wind project in Florida.,
The 150-megawatt wind
farm is being developed in
West Palm Beach County
by Wind Capital Group,
which has developed proj-
ects totaling more than
300 megawatts of generat-
ing capacity in northwest
Missouri. The Florida
project is planned for more
than 10,000 acres in an
area used for growing sug-
arcane.
The company said
it intends to lease the
required land from sugar-
cane growers, who would
be able to continue to rais-
ing crops.
The St. Louis Post-


Dispatch reported Friday
that if it's completed, the
Wind Capital project would
be a first for Florida.

Cartwright:
Protests to spread
TALLAHASSEE Gen.
James Cartwright believes
protests like the one that
led to the fall of Egyptian
leader Hosni Mubarak will
continue to spread across
Northern Africa and the
Middle East.
Cartwright, vice chair-
man of the Joint Cliiefs of
Staff, told the Economic
Club of Florida on Friday
that nations in the region
are not meeting the needs
of their citizens and pro-
tests are likely to spread.
Cartwright said, "It is
moving through Northern
Africa, the Middle East at
a pace that is just unheard
of."
Anti-government pro-
tests have also brought
. down Tunisian dictator
Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.
There are currently pro-
tests in Bahrain, Yemen
and Libya.


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fori Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
81/56 74/58 Lake City
Miami
\ Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
77/62 Orlando
,i Ft. Lauderdalo Panama City
S 78/64 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
80/57 Miami Tampa


On this date in
1987, a winter
storm over the
southern and cen
Rockies produce
28 inches of sno
at Echo Lake, Co
and two feet of
snow at Gascon
Los Alamos, N.M


Forecasts, data and
graphics 2011 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com





tra Ge Co ecte
w

and


* Associated Press


-WH 3


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


PARTLY ) PARTLY ISO.
CLOUDYDY CLOUDY T-STORMS


H I76 LO 53 HI78 56 H177W49


MOSTLY
SUNNY


HI 73 LO 47


E I I' FOEAT A b Stra, er1


Tallahassee *
80/51 ...
S.... ."" :
Pensao a P"/_
74/53


*


lacksonville
76/51

Daytona Beach
7B6,.56
\ .


aldosta
81/51


Lake City*
79/50
Gainesville .
.81/51
Ocala
<0/51

Tamipa,
78,/57


*


Sunday
75 62 -
75/ 60/ pc
79/69/pCf
82/58/s
76/54/pc
72/58/pc
78/68/s
76/53/pc
79/67/pc
80/59/s
77/54/pc
79/59/pc
72/55/pg
71/59/pc
75/54/pc
76/60/s
73/56/pc
79/66/pc



FL Myei
81/56


Monday
78 62 4.
79,61/
79/69/pc
83/61/pc
78/57/pc
76/58/pc
79/70/s
78/56/pc
80/69/pc
82/65/pc
79/58/pc
82/60/s
69/58/pc
73/60/pc
76/57/pc
78/62/pc
79/58/pc
80/68/pc


Key West,
76/67


Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


8
ViflfHK
15 midesimbum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


81
50
70
45
85 in 1962
21 in 1958


0.00"
3.59"
7.27"
2.14"
5.65"


7.07 a.m.
6:22 p.m.
7:06:a.m.
6:23 p.m.

8:13 p.m.
7:39 a.m.
9:22 p.m.
8:18 a.m.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


30C
Feb. March March
24 4 12
Last New First


0
March
19
Full


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Saturday


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S-- Fauai tmamhnui F-*mika eburwm


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


k?'T I&;


UKE CRY ALMANAC
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wwwslakeiypotrcm
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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 19, 2011


SKIRMISH: Shots rang out


as South battled North


Continued From Page 1A

The ironclad S.S.
Virginia, also known as the
Merrimac, fired away from
Lake DeSoto.
Replicas of the Monitor
as well as the Merrimac
were built several years ago
by Ken Hohmann, of Lake
City.
It was an honor to have
his work a part of the skir-
mish, he said.
"It's a real nice re-enact-
ment," Hohmann said. "I've
talked to re-enactors and
they've said it's one of the '
best to go to in this area."
This was his first time
seeing the skirmish, said
Bo Howard of Lake City.
"It was very thrilling and
fun to watch," he said.
Soldiers from both sides
went back and forth before
a clear winner was evident,
Howard said. The skirmish
demonstrated an important
aspect of history. PATRICK SCOTTr/Lake City Reporter
"You can always learn Union troops celebrate as they rip the Confederate flag from the young flagbearer's hands
from history," he said. during Friday's re-enactment of a skirmish before the Battle of Olustee.


VENDORS: Plenty to choose from at Olustee festival

Continued From Page'lA


buying for their children,"
Saundra Williams said.
"So we're now servicing
the next generation."
The husband-and-wife
team drive annually to
Lake City from Tallahassee
to host a vendor booth,
offering wooden toys at
the Olustee Festival. They
joined around 150 arts and
crafts vendors and about
30 food vendors offering
their wares and goods to
festival-goers downtown
Friday. The festival con-
tinues today and vendor
booths will be open from
9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Billie Williams of Raiford
and her husband, Bob,
have hosted their Olustee
Festival booth that sells
wooden laser portraits


Reedus Norman Burnham
Reedus Norman Burnham, 75,
a resident of Lake City, Florida
passed away February 17, 2011
at the Suwan-
nee Valley Care B
Center, Lake
City, Florida. -.
Mr. Burnham -.
was a lifelong resident of Lake
City, Florida and is the son of
the late Homer Leland and Oda
Lucille Danley Burnham. Mr.
Burnham was a member of the
camera club in Lake City and
Branford. He was also a mem-
ber of the Geri Actors club at the
Senior Enrichment Center, Lake
City, Fl. He was a veteran of the
Korean War serving in the U.S.
Army and a member of the Fel-
lowship Baptist Church, Lake
City. He is preceded in death by a
daughter, Norma June Burnham.
Survivors include his wife of
forty-nine years, June Burnham,
Lake City, Fl. Two daughters:
Ellen (Mitch) Downing and
Kathy Burnham both of Lake


and plumeria and pitcher
plants. They've been doing
it for about five years.
"It's close to home," Billie
Williams said.
They most enjoy the peo-.
ple that they encounter and
interact with, she said.
"It's a good crowd," Billie
Williams said. "It's good
hometown family fun."
While some Olustee
Festival vendors are sea-
soned, the festival attracted
newcomers, too.
Tim Hamilton of Archer
and his wife, Debbie, ran
their Hamilton House Jams
booth selling jellies, jams
and butter for the first time
at the festival.
"We just heard it was a
good festival and it sound-
ed like it was a lot of fun,"


OBITUARIES

City, Fl.. One sister: Ellen
Cavins, Illinois. Seven grand-
children, Alisa (Ben) Keen,
Steve (Becky) Downing, Patricia
(C.J.) Ford, Ashley Lord, Austin
Lord, Leslie (Steve) Nettles and
Brittany Charles. Nine Great
grandchildren also survive.
Memorial services for Mr. Burn-
ham will be conducted Monday,
February 21, 2011 at 3:00 P.M.
in the Fellowship Baptist Church
with the Rev. Glen Lawhon and
the Rev. Ray Shaw, officiating.
Interment will be at a later date.
'GUERRY FUNERAL HOME,
2659 SW. Main Blvd. Lake City
is in charge of arrangements.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.guerryfuneralhome.net.

James Leroy Van Pelt
Mr. James Leroy Van Pelt, 89,
resident of Lake City, FL. died
Wednesday February 16, 2011
at his residence following an
extended illness. He was the
son of the late Eddie and An-


'' .



LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Ginger Bellinger (left) of Lake City and Debbie Hamilton of
Archer laugh as Hamilton shows Bellinger a jar of her family's
peanut butter jam she had for sale at the Olustee Festival
downtown Friday.

Tim Hamilton said. said. "We're not doing
"We're enjoying it," he bad."


STUDENTS: Learning

Continued From Page 1A


and Tallahassee visited
the park Friday.
Students visited sutler's
row where they could view
artifacts that were used
during the 1850s-1860s,
saw medical demonstra-
tions, listened to musical
performances with period
music, listened to a presen-
tation detailing the lives of
people of color during the
Civil War and the students
were also allowed to go
into the encampments and
interact with the soldiers.
"This event is all about
education," Giarda said.
"It's based on education
and it's a living history
event. The opportunity to
walk-in as if you were a
time traveler and experi-
ence what it was like to be
a soldier, doctor, musician
or civilian that lived in that
era is remarkable. To be
able to do that and have
it in your own backyard is
a luxury that few people
have."
Tara Greenbaum, a
home schooler from St.
Augustine, was at the park
with 30 students from
River City Homeschooling
Adventures.
"The students did a lot
of re-enacting with guns,"
she said. "They absolutely
loved it."


Greenbaum said the
homeschoolers and stu-
dents used the event as
part of a lesson.
She said they read a
booklet about the Battle of
Olustee before they came
to the park and that's
how the students learned
enough about the historic
battle to do their own re-
enactment
Anna Ingley, who is a
re-enactor, and her friend
Melanie Warren and her
children walked around
the park and listened to
the living historians and
re-enactors.
Ingley said she has
attended the battle re-
enactment for close to five
years and the event allows
her to portray family life
from that time period.
Warren said she came
to Olustee last year as a
spectator and fell in love
with the event, and this
year she returned as a re-
enactor with her family.
"We just enjoy doing
it as a family," she said.
"Very few things you can
do as a family, so we do
it as a family and the kids
get to play all weekend,
get dirty and they love
that. They learn really
good things because it's
living history."


MEMORY: Honoring

Continued-From Page 1A


Veterans, dedicated to
Confederate soldiers who
were killed in action during,
the battle.
Each of the fallen sol-
diers' names were read as
part of the program.
The soldiers defended
what they believed in, said
UDC 2nd Lt Commander
Bill Schreiber. Honor was
something to be defended
at all costs even if it meant


their life.
The soldiers believed
in something greater than
themselves, he said. The
UDC has a charge to pre-
serve the history and name
of the Confederate soldiers
that fought in the battle for
future generations.
"That is why you see us
here every year honoring
the heroism of these brave
men," Schreiber said.


nie Tanner Van Pelt. He had
lived in Lake City for the past
forty years. He enjoyed build-
ing things. He was preceded, in
death by his wife, Delphia Van
Pelt and daughter, Regina Heath.
He is survived by, one daughter,
Patsy Reynolds (Larry), West
Lebanon, IN.; three brothers
and three sisters, five grand-
children, eight great grandchil-
dren and one great-great grand-
child. Services will be held
Monday, February 21, 2011, at
l l:00A.M.at Forest Lawn Me-
morial Gardens Cemetery in
Lake City, Florida with Chaplin
Lynwood Walters officiating.
Arrangements are under the
direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 S. HWY 441,
Lake City. (386) 752-1954.
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


IN CONCERT






KINGDOM HEIRS

Thursday, February 24

at 7:00pm

Westside Baptist

Church
10000 West Newberry Road,
Gainesville, FL
Tickets are $10 per
person and can be
purchased at the door

For more info:
352-317-4039
386-496-3629
352-333-7700


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427












OPINION


Saturday, February 19, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Cigarettes

should


be priced


very high


turers are basi-
cally drug-push-
ers. They want
young Americans
to become hooked on highly
addictive nicotine, so they will
crave cigarettes and be reliable
customers for years to come.
The manufacturers don't
seem to care that their prod-
ucts cause 400,000 premature
deaths in America each year,
plus billions in medical costs
for suffering victims.
The best way to save teens
from addiction is to raise the
price of cigarettes beyond their
reach. The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention says
boosting the cost per pack is
"one of the most reliable and
effective strategies" to avert
smoking disease and death.
For each 10 percent rise in
cost, the CDC says, there's a
3 to 4 percent drop in adult
puffing and twice as much
among teens.
Once again, health-minded
legislators are trying to add
$1 per pack to West Virginia's
cigarette tax, both to save lives
and to raise an extra $133 mil-
lion yearly state revenue. The
proposal also would hike taxes
on snuff and chewing tobacco.
Bravo.
Only about 20 percent of
Americans still smoke, mostly
lower-income and less-educated
folks. Shamefully, West Virginia
has the nation's worst rate
- 27 percent and the worst
level of pregnant women who
damage their babies by smok-
ing. Researchers say nicotine
addiction costs West Virginia
$1.3 billion yearly in medical
expense, plus $1.1 billion in
lost productivity.
Smoking is a worthless habit
that provides nothing of value.
It's America's worst cause of
avoidable disease and death.
We hope the Legislature does
the right thing and takes a bold
stride against nicotine addic-
tion.

* Charleston (W.Va.) Gazette

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!'
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


STILL WA\IRE.TIO LL\WATCI l&


Obama grants


NEW YORK
wenty-eight of
these United States
encompassing 164
million people, 53
percent of America's
population, and 285 Electoral
College votes are suing the
federal government to stop
ObamaCare. This litigation
challenges the constitutionality
of ObamaCare's mandate that
individuals purchase health
insurance. The U.S. Supreme
Court likely will decide, once
and for all, if the Constitution's
Commerce Clause empowers
Congress to force Americans to
conduct commerce.
Shattering the ObamaCare
Death Star, however, may
require slamming it from
multiple directions. Hence, an
additional legal strategy should
address this law's apparent vio-
lation of the 14th Amendment's
Equal Protection Clause.
ObamaCare is not being
enforced equally at all. As of
Feb. 9, the Obama administra-
tion had granted 915 waivers,
mainly to influential organiza-
tions, major companies, and
pro-Democratic labor unions.
Those less lucky.or connected
have a different option: Obey
ObamaCare.
According to the Health and
Human Services Department,
the waiver recipients claim that
complying with new "annual
dollar-limit requirements"
would cost their group health
plans "either a large increase
in premiums or a significant
decrease in access to coverage."
But unlike the objective income
brackets that trigger diverse tax
rates, "large" and "significant"
are subjective criteria. This
gives HHS bureaucrats ample
opportunity to treat the insured
unequally.
Major waiver recipients
and their enrollees include
the Carpenters Health and
Welfare Fund (20,500), Service
Employees International Union
Local 25 (31,000), Darden


Deroy Murdoc
deroy.murdock@gmai.com
Restaurants (34,000), A
(209,423), CIGNA (265,
and the United Federat
Teachers (351,000). Un
members represent 43.
cent of the 2,443,047 en
included in these waive
"ObamaCare was sol
all benefit no downs
Rep. Cliff Stearns (R-F1
Wednesday at a waiver-
House oversight hearing
And now, "2.5 million p
literally need to be prot
from the devastating ef
ObamaCare."
"The selective dispen
tions to ObamaCare's r
dates that Obama so fa
given to various special
ests especially his ui
friends fly in the fac
Constitution's Equal Pr
Clause," says Roger Pil
libertarian Cato Institut
president for legal affai
they're just the other si
the 'Cornhusker Kickb
the 'Louisiana Purchasi
other last-minute shena
that Obama and congre
Democrats employed t(
this travesty passed in
place."
'The very interests v
supported this law and
ram it through Congre,
now applying for waive
Betsy McCaughey, pre
Defend Your Healthcar
dyourhealthcare.us), tol
Conservative Political I
Conference in Washing
Feb. 12. "If government
the power to grant wai
has the power to deny
and destroy any busine
Americans never should


exceptions

f to slink and slither to the White
House for exemptions, like sup-
plicants."
0 McCaughey will ask
President Barack Obama to
give waivers to everyone who
requests them via her website.
While Democrats hail this
:k new law as the greatest medi-
cal innovation since the tongue
etna depressor, these 915 waivers
,000) may be the most compelling
ion of argument against ObamaCare
lion yet. After Democrats ignored
1 per- the screams of the populace and
rollees jammed this catastrophe down
irs. our throats, they argued that
drs. Americans soon would love this
ide," gargantuan law.
a.) said "It's very obvious that people
focused have a lack of understanding
of our health care reform bill,"
1g. Senate Democratic Leader
tected Harry Reid of Nevada said last
fects of August. 'The more people learn
about this bill, the more they
like it."
nsa- Democrats have it backward.
Shans With ObamaCare, familiarity
inter breeds contempt. Nearly one
unionn year since its enactment, 57
e of the percent of Americans want
otection ObamaCare repealed, while
Ion, the only 38 percent disagree,
the's vice according to a Feb. 12-13
rs. "But Rasmussen Reports survey of
rs. But 1,000 likely voters.
de of Meanwhile, rather than clam-
ack,' or to accelerate ObamaCare,
e,' and unions, corporations, and other
anigans prominent players secure the
essional priceless waivers that are their
o get passport out of this mess.
the first Instead of cheerful passengers
aboard a luxury liner, those
vho who know ObamaCare best
helped resemble terrified Vietnamese
ss are huddled atop the U.S. Embassy,
rs," praying for seats aboard the
sident of last chopper out of Saigon, just
re (defen- steps ahead of the marauding
d the Viet Cong.


Action
,ton on
it has
vers, it
them
ss.
Id have


* New York commentator Deroy
Murdock is a columnist with the
Scripps Howard News Service and
a media fellow with the Hoover
Institution on War, Revolution and
Peace at Stanford University.


OTHER OPINION

Pipeline warning: More oil must flow


W ho could have
imagined the
day would come
when the trans-
Alaska oil pipe-
line might actually be a threat?
But that's the word from the
federal Pipeline and Hazardous
Materials Safety Administration,
which said the 34-year-old pipe-
line is a potential public safety
hazard and a danger to the envi-
ronment Problems related to
corrosion, wax buildup and ice
accumulation need to be fixed,
the agency said.
The federal agency gave
Alyeska Pipeline Service Co. a
list of actions it wants undertaken
to reduce that risk. An Alyeska
spokesman said the company,
a consortium of oil companies
that operate on the North Slope,


believes the 800-mile pipeline is
sound.
This should be a wake-up for
Alaska's leaders, who need to
focus on the source of the con-
cerns about the pipeline:
Too little oil flowing through it
That's right, the pipeline is car-
rying but a fraction of its capacity.
Output stands at an average of
475,000 barrels per day so far in
2011. Compare that to the one-
day high of 2.14 million barrels
on Jan. 14, 1988 and you see the
problem.
Ifs not getting any better,
either. The amount of oil flowing
through the pipeline continues
to decline. But finding the proper
incentives to increase produc-
tion of Alaska's oil isn't an easy
task for whoever occupies the
governor's chair or sits in a seat


in the Legislature. Alaska can't be
giving away too much in its bid to
get production going again, but
it's clear that something needs to
be done and soon.
And compounding things is a
simple truth: Alaska risks becom-
ing desperate the longer the state
takes to come up with a plan that
will truly get more oil flowing.
The-warning from the Pipeline
and Hazardous Materials Safety
Administration is not just a
warning about the physical
nature of the trans-Alaska oil
pipeline. It's also an unwritten
warning about the future of
this state. The governor, every
member of the Legislature and
all Alaskans should take it as
such.
N Fairbanks Daily News-Miner


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com


Winter

brings out

the worst

inall of us

tS o much for adversity
pulling folks together.
Maybe I'm just a
cynic, but why am
I not surprised to
see the recent Wall Street
Journal headline, "As Weather
Worsens, So Do Manners"?
In my city of Chicago after
our recent blizzard, the case of
a woman taking a shovel from
a fellow's front porch, clearing
her car, but then not returning
the item became well known,
thanks to his revenge. Having
caught the "perpetrator" on a
surveillance camera, he actual-
ly spent time snow-blowing her
car right back under. That took
her another three hours to dig
out All proudly displayed on
YouTube video by him.
His actions were largely
cheered in the blogosphere.
Really? I'm not defending the
woman, but I had to believe
if she was digging a car out
in the dark of night after a
blizzard, she must have been
pretty desperate. Maybe she
was just a jerk. Or who knows?
Maybe she was a single mom
working two jobs, meant to
return the shovel, but was just
too exhausted to do so.
He's the guy with the snow
blower, and he's cheered for
giving that kind of a hard time
to a gal with only a shovel?
Nice. Or rather, so very not
nice. Apparently, the shovel
was eventually returned.
Anyway, as snowfall
records were set around the
country, so apparently were
new accounts of rudeness.
According to the Journal piece,
call-in talk shows, blogs and
city halls have been "inundated
with gripes about amateur
winter drivers, people who
see snow on the ground as
a license not to pick up after
their dogs, and cars flying
down the road looking like
igloos."
In Washington, D.C., the
City Council is weighing
the "Winter Sidewalk Safety
Amendment Act of 2011."
Shovel the sidewalks in front of
your home or get fined. There
has to be a law for that? I guess
so. Now, for the most part I
just think folks need to lighten
up and cut each other some
slack.
OK, maybe this winter's
extra rudeness doesn't "prove"
it in the strict sense of the
word at least not in the
same way that observing a
clique of seventh-grade girls
does. But, wow, it lends cre-
dence to the idea. Here's the
point It's relatively easy to be
nice when we're rested and
happy and not stressed out.
But the minute we become less
than content and our protective
barriers get dropped, the more
"real us" comes out. And it's
often not pretty.
In any event, given that
we've got weeks of winter left
and who knows but that
more deluges might be part of
it all how about we resolve
to give each other a bit of a
break? If you are a guy, and
during the next blizzard a
woman takes your shovel to
clear her car out in the middle
of the night, how about giving
her a hand instead of giving
her a hard time?
It won't change my view of
human nature. But it will make
one guy at least seem a little
kinder.

Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


4A












FAITH


Saturday, February 19, 201 Iv


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATTERS


Church group fights homelessness


Angie Land
angielond3@windstream.net


Ugandan

girls strike

a thunder

of concern

Our family
recently had
the profound
blessing of
having two
little girls from Uganda,
Africa visit in our home.
Miriam, 8, and Gertrude,
10, along with about 15
other children traveled
to America as part of a
children's choir called
"Ugandan Thunder."
These two precious little
girls loved peanut butter,
had infectious giggles, and
begged to stay up till the'
last second before bedtime.
Their interest in literally
everything produced tons
of questions ... until their
eyes landed on an album
full of pictures my husband
and I took on a mission trip
to Guatemala.
Most of the pictures
were of children living at
the malnutrition center we
visited.
Miriam and Gertrude
poured over and over these
pictures asking about each
child.
I saw compassion and
concern in their faces
beyondlany that I have ever
witnessed in children their
age.
As we talked, they began
to share with me struggles
they have faced: friends
who have died, family
members who were sick,
and conditions that were a
challenge.
Every motherly instinct
in my body kicked into
overdrive and I so wanted
to protect them from such
suffering.
It makes, you wonder:
why? Why-are there so
many hungry children in
the world? Why so much
sickness in places where
medical help is not acces-
sible? Why do parents in
other countries struggle to
feed their children while
we struggle not to give
ours too much?
While God isn't obligated
to answer our "why" ques-
tions, the Bible records a
conversation Jesus held
with his disciples that
sheds some light on this
dilemma:
"As he (Jesus) went
along, he saw a man blind
from birth. His disciples
asked him, 'Rabbi, who
sinned, this man or his
parents, that he was born
blind?'
"Neither this man nor
his parents sinned," said
Jesus, "but this happened
so that the work of God
might be displayed in his
life." John 9:1-3
Foolishly, we may also
be tempted to blame God
for the suffering we see
around us, or even what we
experience.
Instead, Jesus declared
the reason for this man's
blindness was so that he and
others could experience God
at work in his life.

* Heart Matters is a weekly
column written by Angie
Land, director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where
she teaches bible studies,
leads marriage and family
conferences, and offers bibli-
cal counseling to individuals,
couples and families.


By GILLIAN FLACCUS
Associated Press
ANAHEIM, Calif
Diana Gonzalez lives
in an encampment
of grimy tents and
overstuffed shopping
carts in an alley less
than three miles from Disneyland.
Her life is a world apart from the
fairy tales of the Happiest Place
on Earth.
For Gonzalez, mundane details
such as the hours of the public
restrooms at the community park
down the street are obsessions
necessary for survival.
"You've gotta smell sometimes
because it's so cold," Gonzalez
said, shivering in the chilly night
air. "Where are you gonna shower
if the bathrooms are closed?
Where are you going to go the
bathroom? Where are we sup-
posed to go?"
A recently formed interfaith
group called the Poverty Task
Force hopes to answer those
questions as it fights homeless-
ness in Anaheim, a city that is
quietly wrestling with a street
population rarely seen by the
millions of tourists who flock to
Disney's resort each year.
Anaheim's diverse churches
and mosques have long worked
together informally to fill the
gaps with emergency shelter and
food, but each realized they were
only providing temporary fixes.
Their faith required more, said
Deacon Doug Cook, a member of
the coalition from San Antonio de
Padua Church.
"We're not even scratching the
surface of the city and I really
think it needs to be faith-based.
It's what we're about," he said.
"How many churches are there in
Anaheim? There's hundreds and
you're looking at about 15 of us
on the Poverty Task Force. We're


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Diana Gonzalez talks about her life near a makeshift encampment in Anaheim, Calif. The city of Anaheim is quietly
wrestling with a street population rarely seen by the millions of tourists who flock to Disney's resort each year.


probably 10 percent or less. What
if we had the other 90 percent?
Think what we could do."
The congregations have their,
work cut out for them.
The city's humming tourism
industry creates an abundance
of low-wage jobs that keep many
residents just a medical bill or
car repair away from eviction in
one of the most expensive rental
markets in the nation, said Bob
Murphy, general manager for
American Family Housing, a non-
profit that runs several homeless
programs.
Seventy percent of Orange
County's homeless are women
and children, a fact reflected in
last year's HBO documentary


series "Homeless: The Motel
Kids of .Orange County." Total
homelessness has jumped 600
percent since 1989, with between
21,000 and 35,000 people on the
streets, according to statistics
compiled by the interfaith group
based on homeless counts and
county tracking systems.
The average rent for a two-
bedroom apartment in Orange
County is $1,350 a month, which
requires an income of $25 an
hour and most people make
half that, Murphy said.
"People see Orange County as
beaches and wealth, and I think
a lot of what we're doing is about
educating the public," said Kerry
Gallagher, an organizer with the


CHURCH NOTES


Today
Founder's Day
First Baptist Church of
Lake City hosts Founder's
Day Celebration from 2
p.m. to 4 p.m. today. The
celebration will begin
with an Open House
in the Fellowship Hall.
There will be a morning
service at 10:30 a.m. on
Sunday, Feb. 20 with the
congregation asked to
wear their best old-fash-
ioned clothes.

Sunday
Black History Program
The Annual Black
History Program is 4
p.m. Sunday at The True
Church of God. & Unity.
The theme is "African
Americans & the Civil
War." Minister Sam
Daniels is the speaker.


The church is located at
1037 NE Annie Mattox St,

Church Anniversary
Huntsville Baptist
Church is celebrating its
church anniversary at
10:45 a.m. Sunday. James
Giant Croft is the speaker.
The church is located at
5720 NW Lake Jeffrey
Road.

Tuesday


SMinistry. Worship services
are 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. '
Sunday. Call 386-623-6819.

Church revival
21 Days of Alblaze,
begins at 7:30 p.m. Feb..
22-28 and March 1-15
at Miracle Tabernacle
Church. The church is
located at 1190 S.W. Sister
Welcome Road.

Feb. 27


Anniversary celebration BHM celebration


The second anniver-
sary celebration for Rev.
Lantz G. Mills Sr. is 7 p.m.
Tuesday to Thursday
at New Dayspring
Missionary Baptist
Church. A Roast and Toast
is at 5:30 p.m. Saturday at
the Olivet Baptist Church
Fellowship Hall. Ticket for
the roast and toast are $10
from the Shepherds Care


Shiloh Missionary
Baptist Church is cel-
ebrating its Annual Black
History Celebration 11:30
a.m. Feb. 27. The church
is-located at 948 NE
Aberdeen Ave.

March 3
Yard Sale
Lake City Church of


God is having a Kids Club
Yard Sale 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.
March 3 in the Family
Life Center. The church is
located at 173 SE Ermine
Ave.

March 6
Homecoming services
Homecoming services
begin at 11 a.m. March
6 at Trinity Praise &
Worship. Ron Brewer is
the guest singer. Dinner
is on the grounds follow-
ing the morning worship.
Call 752-3706. The'church
is located on Hwy. 90 East
pass the college caution
lights.
Submit Church Notes
items in writing no later
than 5 p.m. Monday the
week prior to an event by
e-mail to arobinson@lake-
cityreporter.com, fax to
(386) 752-9400 or drop-
off at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City.


Orange County Congregation
Community Organization; "A lot
of people from Orange County
don't want to admit it because
it will tarnish our image. If we
respond, we are recognizing our
problem."
That attitude is something proj-
ect leaders are bracing for as they
ramp up publicity for their ideas
in the coming weeks. Leaders of
the Catholic, Protestant, Muslim
and Unitarian congregations that
make up the task force have used
their pulpits to preach about the
need for homeless services in
the city.. Earlier this month, they
launched a petition drive before
a March 8 presentation to the
newly elected city.counacil,.....


'Dr. Phil' Maynard
coming to town

Dr. Phil Maynard will
transform you into a believ-
er and become a disciple of
Christ Maynard will deliver
a speech at 8 a.m. Feb. 26
at Wesley Memorial United
Methodist Church.
His interactive presenta-
tion, "I'm -A Believer, Now
What?" will
help attend-
ees explore
their jour-
ik m tI ney toward
maturity as
a disciple of.
Jesus Christ
Maynard and dis-
cover the next steps in that
journey.
He will teach how the
church can support the dis-
cipline process.
Maynard has served for 20
years in local congregations
and is now the director of
the Office of Congregational
Transformation for the
Florida United Methodist
Conference.


What is your reasonable service?


"I beseech you
therefore, brethren,
by the mercies of God,
that you present your
bodies a living sacrifice,
holy, acceptable to God,
which -is your reasonable
service. And do not be
conformed to this world,
but be transformed by the
renewing of your mind,
that you may prove what
is that good and and accept-
able and perfect will of
God." (Romans 12:1-2,
NKJV)

ow lightly
we consider
these verses,
and how
much the
impact would be on us if
we placed the importance
on them that we should!
Many who call them-


BIBLE STUDY
.T


Hugh Sherrill Jr.
ems-hugh43@comcost.net
selves Christian give God
very little, if any, of their
time. What we usually give
to God is only a few hours
a week. Too many today
are so involved in worldly
affairs that they have no
time for God.
Paul urges us to present
our entire being to God's
service.
The word for body
here means "the body as


a whole, the instrument
of life." The fact that we
are not to be conformed
"not fashioned like" the
world is almost ridiculous
to most. Many ask: How
shall we function if not by
the rules of the society in
which we live? We must
live in the world but not
of the world.
Our citizenship is not
going to be in heaven
someday; it is there today
(Phil 3:20).
Our minds should be
transformed.
That is formed across
the great divide between
heaven and earth, so that
the way we look at earthly
issues should always be
from a heavenly perspec-
tive. But the pull of the
world is strong, and we


are weak. And the price
of non-conformity to the
world is very high, and
the world continues each
year to increase that costs.
Yet it is not as high as the
cost of non-conformity to
the Word of God. This is
why Paul had such a dif-
ficult struggle with sin
(Romans 7:15), and it is
why we do. We want to
serve God, but so many.
times we let the world get
in our way.
So many believe that
being a "good Christian" is
about being good; it is not.
As if we could actually
be good. Being a "good
Christian" is about serving
God.
The KJV calls the liv-
ing sacrifice of our bodies
our "reasonable service,"


some translations call
it our spiritual service.
Either will 'work.
The point is, we are in
the world, but not of the
world, and the world con-
tinually attempts to seduce
us to itself.
And we also seduce our-
selves to it. We cannot all
be pastors and teachers,
else who would the pas-
tors and teachers serve?
But we each have an indi-
vidual ministry through
which we should serve
God throughout each day,
and to that we are called.
So, bottom line, we who
profess to be Christians
all have a ministry. What
is your ministry? What is
your reasonable service?
N Hugh Sherrill is a retired
preacher in Lake City.


5A









6A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2011


The Human Connection

i6 .,.... ... .,.. l ++.. .- ..-,

M ostof us can remember a time when

we spoke to people instead of recordings,

when addresses were for physical places and did

-not consist of www.com, when "service" station

did not mean self-service. We spoke person to

person and eye to eye on nearly every occasion.

Today when you are face to face with someone, let

your spirit shine through. Visit God's house each

week and greet your fellow worshippers warmly.

Make the most of your human connections.





Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
02011, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P.O. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


HolySJectnc; Inc.
"Quality ,aork at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Dual St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
[ can do all hn through Ch hh srngthcncth me"
Philpp.in 13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RICK'S CRANE SERVICE
Located at 25A ..
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


First AAent Christian
1881 SWMcFarlane Ave.
Sunday i(hool 3 15AI
Sunday Service .110ikM
Wednesday Service 7 00PM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
99' i" Liake letlery Rowd
J86-75:'-ii2:0
Sundiayvq irp 1ii0 113AM 1'PM
Wed fani )ibl S.rud. 7NiPNM
"A charrh there JESIJS Uis Real

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Schil 9 t301M
Sunday WiOfup 10i153 & 6hPM
Wednesday Eve ser ice 7PM
Pjisitur: Larry'E Sw'ee]l
EASTbNDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE lames Ate.' 386.752-2860
Suri Bible Srud. 9 15I
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed PrjyerMig'BibleSrud ', 6PM
Rev Brardon G. Win
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible SVudy -15^M
Sunday wo-rup 11.13i11AM .& 6O00PM
Wed,. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
ihlildren Mlrinrr, 6:15PM
[irwnitvn Lake rCity 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahirjs. PJa(irO
OLVETT MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street
1311I- 752. 1l9511I
Ronald V' \allies, Psior
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday MoniingWorship, 11:00AM
WVed Mid Week wsi..hip 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake Jeffery Rd. 752-0681
Lake City, Florida 32055
www.pbclc.com
Sunday School 8:30, 9:45 & 11AM
Sunday Worship 9:45 & 11AM & 6PM
AWANA 5:30 PM
Evening Worship 6:00 PM
Wed. Eve. Schedule
Family Supper (Reservation) 5 PM
Children's Ministry 6PM
Youth Worship 6:00 PM
Prayer Meeting 6:00 PM
Thursday Evening Schedule St. 8/21/08
Parkview Edge 8:30PM
Pastor: Michael A. Tatem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM-
Sunday Worship 11AM&6PM
Wed. Kids &Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Semces 10 30 AM
P.tonr Elder Herrran inffin
7524198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
',88 S.E BaaJ Drive' 755.5553
Sunday:


Bible Srud)
,)mriig Air'rship
Evnirng Wnrhip
Wednesday.
AWAN B
Practri Bible Srud


9 15 AM
10 30iAM
6 15PM
545PM
6 1i' 'M


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
independenml Baprisi
144 SE M,.ntrise Ate 752 4274
Sunday School 10 AM41
Sun Mtirn Wiship 11I AM
Sunday Eve. 6 PM
Wed Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pa.ior- Mike Norman

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Cvun 752.-,4i
Saturday Vigdl Mass 5S1ill PM1
Sunday Mas 8.15 AM, Ini 304J.
',:(HJ PM ISpanih/ErigLhsh)
Sunday SchooliRelIgicus Educati.n
9.(0 kl1-10:15 A,

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
2'39 SE Biaa Ave.
Sunday Service 1 jn i 1
Wednesday Evening Servie 7 ill PM
LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwvy l24 .' 755.9136
Sunday School I 9.30 AM
Sun. Morn Wiship IlJ-30AM
Wed Pd yer Meerng 7 PM

NEW HORIZON
Church of Christ
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister

LAKE CTY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St. 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sun.Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night V PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen *755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, FH 32025 386-752-2218
Email: stjamesepis330@belsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon: The Rev. Jimmie Hunsinger
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy

1,, rW^l
15 ^ ^

i --^ .^-^/


OUR REDEEMER LUTHEILAN CHURCH
LCMS
11.2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor. Rev. BruceAlkire
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
\icar John David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South -
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-1353
mvbethelumccom
Firsi United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 4 45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Contemporary Service 8 W4AM
!radadonal Service I l:O1,AM
Program opporrunries available in all
areas for all ages
For a complete s,:hedule
cumnlaci thirch office ai
752-4488
WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW\MeFarlane 75235[3
tAdlacein to Summers School
Worship 8 fil.& in i0)A41
Sunida School 9 JiJAN
Nursrr provided
Praie & Worship 6 160PM
AW0,A Wednesday 5l tiPM
Pasior The Rev I Lowe Mabiev
www.esleymem.om.(

WAITERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U S 9J turun on Conez 'ne-t io Qualm'
Ind i righi on Olnaiva
Sunday School 9.45 AM
Suari Worship ii.AM & 6PMI
Wed Night Semrce 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn

LAKE Cm' CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services
Sunday Srchool 9 45AM
Sundav Worship 10:45AM, 6:X3iPM
Wednesday 6.30PM
Adult, Youth Mnaistry, Children'i Muisry
Pasior: raig Hendeson
Nuisery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
62, SW Bay r ve 52.-0ti.'0
Sunday~ Contemporary 9.UUIAM
Sundjvay Schooll 10.011AM
raditional Service l :00LAM
NURSERY) PROLIDEDL
Pastor Dr Roy A. Martin
Director oif Music: Bill Popkn

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE lones Way & NE Wasuington St
Sunday School 1000 AM
Morning Worship I l J AM
Eiangelisnt Sernice 6 00 PM
'l,)uh S'emces Wednesday 7'.00PM
Mid week Service Wednesday 7 00 PM
Fur mlu cajll 75. 408,' Ever)ineWdtLorie
Pajior Rev Stan Ells


CHRISIT CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Leadeirhip Services 9:1OilAM
Sunda,, Mumng I:0lAM
Wednesday Service 7 00PM
2.' 1 Dyal Ale., from Haw 90 take
Sister, welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South.
ditnh dhn left.' 755 2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie johns
'A Church n the Muie"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Corner SR 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebranon 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones *752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 AM.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor Rev. CherylR.Pingel


To List





Your





Church





on the





Church


Call


752-1293!
mJULJJ


Toadetienths hrc iretoy a ll75-54


iW lay Electric Cooperatve, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL .INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

HARRY'S
-- &- ,Sid. -Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President

PL. 752-2308 'wi

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this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098




s. 755-7050


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this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

J -
Q-
- ,! '": ,,/*


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

BAYWAYjanitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Commercial
755-6142







To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


MAYMN"



US 90 Westt


or every need.
across from Wal-Mart
752-0054


Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights

N O, ;,.


W fll, Ng oMi.ni

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this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Supercenter

"LOWPRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST755-2427










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter






SPORTS


Saturday, February 19, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
10:30a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup.
"Happy Hour Series," final practice for
Daytona 500
1:15 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, DRIVE4COPD 300
BOXING
9:45 p.m.
HBO Welterweights, Mike Jones
(23-0-0) vs. Jesus Soto-Karass (24-5-3);
champion Fernando Montiel (44-2-2) vs.
Nonito Donaire. (25-1 -0), for WBC/WBO
bantamweight title, at Las Vegas
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Avantha
Masters, third round, at New Delhi (same-
day tape)
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Northern Trust
Open, third round, at Pacific Palisades,
Calif.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Northern Trust
Open, third round, at Pacific Palisades,
Calif.
TGC Honda LPGA Thailand, third
round, at Chonburi, Thailand (same-day
tape)
6:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, ACE Group
Classic, second round, at Naples (same-
day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN Pittsburgh at St.John's
I p.m.
CBS Georgia atTennessee or Notre
Dame at West Virginia
2 p.m.
ESPN Colorado at Kansas
4 p.m.
ESPN Boston College at UNC
FSN Oregon St. at Oregon
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Missouri St. at Valparaiso
,6 p.m.
ESPN -Washington atArizona
7 p.m.
ESPN2 George Mason at N. Iowa
9 p.m.
ESPN Illinois at Michigan St.
ESPN2 Utah St. at Saint Mary's,'
Calif.
II p.m.
ESPN2 Montana at Long Beach St.
MOTORSPORTS
10:30 p.m.
SPEED AMA Supercross, at San
Diego
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
TNT Exhibition, Shooting Stars,
Skills Challenge,Three-Point Contest, and'
Slam Dunk Competition. at Los Angeles
RODEO
9 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, Iron Cowboy
Invitational, at Arlington.Texas
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
1:30 p.m.
FSN Baylor at Texas Tech
6 p.m.
FSN -Texas at Oklahoma

BASKETBALL

APTop 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. I Kansas vs. Colorado, 2 p.m.
No. 3 Texas at Nebraska, 1:30 p.m.
No. 4 Pittsburgh at St.John's, Noon
No. 6 San Diego State at Air Force,
2 p.m.
No. 7 Brigham Young at TCU,
4:30 p.m. -
No. 8 Notre Dame at West Virginia,
I p.m.
No. 9 Georgetown at South
Florida, 7 p.m.
No. 12 Arizona vs.Washington, 6 p.m.
No. 15 Villanova at DePaul, Noon
No. 17 Syracuse vs. Rutgers, 4 p.m.
No. 18Vanderbilt at Auburn, 4 p.m.
No. 19 North Carolina vs. Boston
College, 4 p.m.
No. 20 Missouri at Iowa State,
1:45 p.m.
No. 21 Texas A&M at Oklahoma State,
9 p.m.
No. 22 Kentucky vs. South Carolina,
4 p.m.
No. 24 Xavier vs. Fordham, 8 p.m.
No. 25 Utah State at Saint Mary's,
9 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 2 Ohio State at No. II Purdue,
I p.m.
No. 5 Duke vs. Georgia Tech, 7:45 p.m.
No. 10 Wisconsin vs. Penn State,
6 p.m.
No. 14 Florida at LSU, I p.m.
No. 23 Temple vs. Saint Joseph's,
4 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week
Site: Daytona Beach
SPRINT CUP
Daytona 500
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
10:30 a.m.-noon); Sunday, race, I p.m.
(FOX, noon-5 p.m.).
Track: Daytona International Speedway.
Race distance: 500 miles. 200 laps.
NATIONWIDE
DRIVE4COPD 300
Schedule:Today, race, 1:15 p.m. (ESPN2,
noon-4 p.m.),


Race distance: 300 miles, 120 laps.


Lady Tigers remain unbeaten


CHS defeats 4 said. "It was just another
district rival solid game. It was a good,
solid win."
Gainesville, 13-2. Four Columbia bat-
ters had multiple hits
From staff reports (Michaela Burton, Keene,
Peyton Sund and Ashley
ColumbiaHighremained Bodgette) to help lead the
undefeated on the season Lady Tigers.
after picking up a 13-2 road Burton scored two
win against Gainesville runs, had- two RBIs and
High on Thursday. two stolen bases. Keene
Jessica Keene gave the helped her own cause with
Lady Tigers a solid pitch- two doubles, three rurls
ing performance as she and two RBIs. Sund had a
went four innings, allowing double, two runs and an
two hits, two walks, two RBI. Blodgette had two
runs and striking out two RBIs.
batters. Jordan Williams Williams didn't have a
closed out the game in the hit in the game, but did
fifth inning with a strike- reach base four times off
out walks. She also scored a
The story of the game, run.
however, were the bats of Stephanie Pilkington
the Lady Tigers. scored two runs.
"Our bats are pretty The Lady Tigers (3-0)
dang hot right now," head host Ed White High at
coach Jimmy Williams 7 p.m. on Friday.


FILE PHOTO
Columbia High's Michaela Burton (88) slides into home last
season against Suwannee High.


CHS wins Tiger fight


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Ryan Thomas (4) and Mikey Kirkman (18) watch from the dugout as Jayce Barber slides into home
against Robert E. Lee High on Thursday in Lake City.


Two mercy rules in a row for varsity


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

In a Tiger fight, it was
Columbia High that was
hailed the victor after a
10-0 mercy-rule win against
Union County High on
Friday in Lake City.
Seth Thomas allowed one
hit through four innings of
work to pick up the win for
Columbia. He struck out
three batters and walked
three. Blaine Courson
threw one inning of relief
without allowing a hit and
striking out one batter.
But the Tigers weren't
just hot on the mound.
CHS (2-1) lit up the score-
board for the second night
in a row, starting in the first
inning with four runs.


Mikey Kirkman led off
'the game with a single.
Two batters later and the
bases were loaded off a
fielding error, which
allowed Courson to reach,
and Zach Espenship was
hit by a pitch.
J.T. Gilliam helped pro-
vide the first run of the
inning with a sacrifice fly to
deep center field to bring
in Kirkman.
After a Dylan Alvey walk,
the bases were reloaded
with Jacob Plynn at the
plate. He hit a ground ball
to first, which brought in
Courson. With runners
at second and third, Ryan
Thomas delivered with a
single to bring in Alvey and
Espenship.
After scoreless second


and third innings, the
Tigers added two more in
the fifth. Plynn doubled
to lead off and Daulton
Mauldin hit a shot to cen-
ter to bring him in from
second. Later in the inning,
Ryan Thomas scored a run
off a Kirkman sacrifice fly.
The fifth inning saw the
Tigers score four more
runs to close out the
game.
Zach Espenship started
it off with a single before
stealing second. An error
on the throw helped him
reach third. A fielding error
on a ball hit to third by
Alvey scored Espenship.
J.T. Gilliam, who walked
earlier in the inning, scored
on the next at-bat by Ryan
Thomas on a blooper to cen-


terfield. The onslaught con-
tinued with Trey Lee deliv-
ering on a hard hit to bring
in Alvey for a 9-0 lead.
Needing one run with a
runner on third, freshman
Jacob Plynn delivered to
bring in Kirman 'for the
mercy-rule win, 10-0.
"For the first time all year
we started fast with four
runs in the first inning,"
Columbia High head coach
J.T. Clark said. "We swung
well, stole bases and
played aggressively. That's
the best we've played all-
around."
Columbia hosts Lincoln
High at 7 p.m. Tuesday.
"It's a perennial-playoff
team that year in and out
is a good measuring stick,"
Clark said.


Lady Indians knock off Tornadoes


FortWhite
baseball beats
Bradford, 6-4.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Fort
White High softball beat
Bradford High, 8-2, on
Friday in a matchup of 2-0
teams.
The game was tied at two
all through 3/2innings, then
the Lady Indians exploded
for 10 hits and six runs in
their final three trips to the
plate. .
Holly Polhill and Brett
Sealey were both perfect at
the plate for Fort White.
Polhill sprayed hits all


over the outfield in a 4-for-
4 effort. She had a double
and scored two runs.
Sealey pounded left field
for her three hits. She had
a double and RBI.
Cecile Gomez got the win
with five innings of work.
She gave up three hits, two
runs, one walk and struck
out nine. Gomez helped
her cause on offense with
a double and RBI single.
Taylor Douglass pitched
the last two innings with
two hits, one walk and two
strikeouts. She had an RBI
in Fort White's two-run
first inning.
Ali Wrench(RBI, run
scored), Kayla Williams
(RBI), Sam McCroy (run
scored) and Stacie Scott


(RBI, two runs scored)
each had one hit.
Ashley Johnson had two
singles, a home run and
both RBIs for Bradford.
Fort White (3-0) plays
at Taylor County at 7 p.m.
Thursday.

Fort White baseball

Fort White's baseball
team held off Bradford,
6-4, in the other half of
Friday's baseball/softball
double-header.
Kevin Dupree started for
Fort White and gave him-
self a big lead with a grand
slam home run in the sec-
ond inning. Cody Spin and
Robbie Howell were hit
by pitches, while Brandon


Sharpe and Bryce Beach
walked to set the stage.
Beach's walk produced a
run before Kevin Dupree
hit his homer.
Bradford got close, scor-
ing two runs in both the
third and fourth innings.
Ryan McKeown had triples
in both innings and drove in
three runs. Kendal Norman
added an RBI single for the
Tornadoes.
Kevin Dupree walked
and scored in the fourth
inning, when Jonathan
Dupree's ground ball to
short was thrown into right
field.
Howell pitched the last
three innings and was
backed up by excellent
defense.


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@akecityreportercom


.Williams

unsung

hero

of CHS
lot is made
of the four
juniors
and four
freshman on
Columbia High's softball
team.
Since the juniors'
arrival the Lady Tigers
have won a district title
and won 18 games last
season.
This year's crop of
freshmen have added
a spark to the team as
witnessed in the 30-2
drumming of Bell High
on Monday.
Still, there's one senior
on the softball team
who lacks the credit she
deserves.
Jordan Williams does
the little things for the
Lady Tigers. As a coach's
daughter, she's the coach
on the field.
Her father, head coach
Jimmy Williams, is
usually relfCtant to show
favoritism to Jordan, but
sometimes the
numbers speak for
themselves.
Last year, Williams
had a .439 on base
percentage and batted
.306 for the season. She
reached base in 29 of the
49 attempts she was up
to bat
So far this season,
Williams has drawn
seven walks in three
games.
Patience is one of her
biggest assets. She's
able to pick and choose
pitches without the
worry of beirg behind in
the count.
Williams also brings
versatility to the team.
She's been cemented
at first base since her
arrival, but she's also
able to pick up innings
when starting pitcher
Jessica Keene's arm'
needs the rest.
Her innings on the
mound should pay
dividends for the Lady
Tigers this season as
Keene will be able to stay
fresh into the district
tournament, which will
take place at Columbia.
It's not that Jordan
seeks the attention. She
doesn't, but her play
often times gets lost in
the limelight
But the little things
win games as well. Sure;
four walks might not
be as exciting as seeing
a single ripped by the
short stop's glove, but '
she reaches base just the
same.
Fans might not even
notice some of the other
things she does behind
the scenes from picking
up opposing players'
signs to helping provide
coaching wisdom on
the field to some of the
younger plays.
Fans might not notice,
but the Columbia softball
team surely does.


Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.








Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE &


DILBERT
I CAN'T HELP ON YOUR
PROJECT THIS WEEK
BECAUSE WE'RE MOVING
TO A NEW OFFICE.
*


BABY BLUES


Traditional
Anniversary



for Couples
with Kids

BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


NONAGCNAA.IAM


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Temper tantrums take toll

on otherwise happy couple


DEAR ABBY: I have been
in a relationship with "Betsy"
for more than three years. For
the most part, we get along
well, laugh a lot, and have a
good relationship.
However, Betsy has an aw-
ful temper. She gets angry
easily and becomes verbally
abusive, saying ugly, hateful
things that hurt me deeply. I
never know what tiny thing
will set her off. Although she
usually apologizes later, I still
feel the hurt she inflicted on
me during her rage.
Abby, I'm in a quandary. I
love Betsy very much and am
normally happy with her. But
these abusive rants are begin-
ning to take a toll on me and
on our relationship.
How do you know when
it's time to leave someone -
especially when you still love
that person? TIRED OF
THE TIRADES IN TEM-
ECUIA, CALIF.
DEAR TIRED: You and
Betsy are overdue for a seri-
ous talk. She may have emo-
tional problems or she may
simply be verbally abusive.
Give her a choice: Seek help
for her problem or the two of
you are history. No one has a
right to do to someone what
she's doing to you. Unless the
problem is 'resolved, this is
the atmosphere in which your
children will grow up if you
should marry her.
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 15-
year-old girl. I go to a private
school where everyone gets


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
really nice cars for their 16th
birthday. I have a 2001 com-
pact economy car. It's noth-
ing compared to the cars my
peers get. I know if I start to
drive this car when I turn 16,
people will make fun of me
- behind my back and to my
face. I don't want to be seen
in it.
I know I should be thank-
ful I have a car at all, but it's
hard when you know you'll be
made fun of mercilessly. I told
my parents that I don't want to
get my license because of this
problem, but I really do want'
it. I think the reason they're
not getting me another car is
because of financial difficul-
ties, so it would be unfair of
me to ask for a different one.
Should.I deal with the car I
have and put up with the kid-
ding, orwait two orthree years
to get my driver's license? -
DRIVING MYSELF CRAZY
IN ST. LOUIS
DEAR DRIVING YOUR-
SELF, CRAZY: You need to
grow up. You're crying pov-
erty with a loaf of bread under
both arms. You attend 4 pri-
vate school, which isn't cheap,
and your parents have given


you a car. Be grateful for what
you have; most teens are .not
so lucky. Or consider getting
a job so you can start saving
for an auto upgrade. .
DEAR ABBY: When I go
to someone's home for dinner,
I often take a dessert or bev-
erage for everyone to enjoy,
being careful not to "outdo"
my host. I would never, for ex-
ample, bring an entree.
I recently met a young lady
who always brings not only
an entree, but also a side and
one or two desserts to our
host's home, and this seems
to be causing a bit of tension
with our host Am I wrong
in believing this young lady
is being rude? A GOOD
GUEST IN TEXAS
DEAR GOOD GUEST:
When invited to. someone's
home for dinner, it is appropri-
ate to ask, "May I bring some-
thing?" If the answer is yes,
then you should bring what
the host asks for. If the an-
swer is "Just bring yourself,"
itis considered good manners
to bring a small gift such as
candy, an assortment of nuts
or a bottle of wine if you know
your hosts imbibe.
Itis not appropriate to bring
an entrpe, sides or a dessert
that has not been requested.
Are you sure the young lady
you mentioned wasn't asked
to do what she did?
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't push too
hard or whatever you are
trying to achieve will back!
fire. A live and let live atti-
tude will help to minimize
confrontations. You can
work quietly on the projects
you feel are most important
and can bring the highest
returns. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Gatherings will
lead to intimate discussions
about your intentions. Chil-
dren will play a role in a
decision you have to make
and a health issue or minor
injury must be taken care
of quickly. *****
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20):'Don't let anyone
push you. If someone is go-
ing to take command, let
that person be you. Spruc-
ing up your surroundings
or visiting a place that will
help inspire you should be
on your agenda. **
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Love is in the
stars but you must make
the first move. Whether
you are in a relationship or
not, it's important for you
to show your feelings and
share what you want with
your partner or someone
you meet who interests
you. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You'll have plenty of
ideas to share with friends,


THE LAST WORD.
Eugenia Last

peers or anyone else you
spend time with. An inter-
esting offer will give you
reason to consider a new
direction. Visit a place you
find conducive to deep
thought and you will reduce
stress and decide your next
move. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You'll have a decision
to make that can change the
course of your life. Money,
your location and your love
life will all be subject to
choices. Love is in the stars
and socializing will help yofu
realize what you should do
next. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Stop being so seri-
ous. Distance yourself from
worry, stress and whoever
causes you grief. Get out
with friends or do some-
thing that makes you feel
good about who you are
and what you have to offer.
Incorporate rest and relax-
ation into your day. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Don't let person-
al changes at home cause
confusion. Go with the flow
and do the best you can.
Now is not the time to be
vague about the way you
feel or about your expecta-
tions. A change of scenery
or people will inspire you.


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Chang-
ing your mind, at the last
minute will cause relationL-
ship problems. Confusion
and delays while traveling
can leave you in a vulner-
able situation. Take care of
physical or emotional prob-
lems before .things spin out
of control. **
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): There are.
all sorts of plans that can
be put into motion if you
look at your current finan-
cial and personal situation.
Solutions to cut costs or
make a strategic move cant
be found that will stabilize
your home and family life.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): The choices you
make about money and
your personal and profes-
sional future will lead to
greater stability. You'll have
a better chance to achieve
goals that you have been
unable to accomplish in the
past ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You'll be intui-
tive and should base what-
ever decision you make on
the way you feel. Don't be
afraid to show your emo-
tions and to share your
plans with someone you
consider to be special. Love
is in the stars. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: H equals P
"FW ARV.CPZT SVFKG MPNGKTN FJ
GCT PFX, ARVX URXB JTTL JRG ST
KRNG... JRU H V.G GCT WRVJLPGFRJN


VJ LTX G CTI."


CTJXA L. GCRXTPV


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "It only takes a room of Americans for the English and
Australians to realize how much we have in common." Stephen Fry
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 2-19


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


IT
SOUNDS I LIKE TO
WJEIRD THROW IN
BECAUSE A REAL ONE
8 IT'S EVERY NOW
TRUE. AND THEN.


YOU MIGHT WANT TO
SAVE THAT ATTITUDE
FOR THE NEXT ROUND.
Ej
_C


COMICS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2011


CLASSIC PEANUTS









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2011


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


jBW




IND, I


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


'.0.


Legal


One Item per ad 250
4 lines 6 days Each additional
lra ne $S25
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totaling $1ot r les.
Each item must include a price.
This is a non-refundablerate.





" mlione$1.1
One Item per ad c dia
4 lines 6 days i 1s0o
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
Each te include a price.
This s fund able rate.





4 lines a,6 ,day, Each additional
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4 lines 6 days $1.
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $,5000 or less.





4 lines 6 days ch additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less.
Each item must Include a price,
This is a non-refundable rate.



One Item per ad 27
4 lines 6 days additional
| Rate applies to private Individuals seling
personal merchandise totalling 4,000 or ess.
Each item must Include a price.
This Isa on-refundable rate





4 lines 6 days Eahadiioa
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less.
Each Item must Include a pri
This isa nonrefundable a.


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month.:..s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You .can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad Is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed.,9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m. Thurs., 9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri.,10:00a.m. Fi.,9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors-. Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for a.ny general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
WWW. ;I'i..: M -, .. ..:.* ;i;Com


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 10-293-CP
Division PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF PHYLLIS S.
WHITAKER
Deceased.
NOTICETO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
PHYLLIS S. WHITAKER, de-
ceased, whose date of death was Au-
gust 17, 2010, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 173 NE Hemando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055.
The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE FOR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication is Febru-
ary 12, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representative
By:/s/ MATTHEW C. MITCHELL
Attorney for Frederick Stephen Whi-
taker
Florida Bar Number: 0028155
Brannon, Brown, Haley & Bullock,
PA
P.O. Box 1029
Lake City, FL 32056
Telephone: (386) 752-3213
Fax: (386)755-4524
E-Mail: mcm@bbattomeys.com
Personal Representative:
Frederick Stephen Whitaker
4600 Number 2 Canyon Road
Wenatchee, Washington 98801
04543497
February 12, 19, 2011
To Whom It May-Concern, you-arei.
hereby notified that I will offer for
sale and sell at public sale to the
highest and best bidder for cash the
following described livestock, a
small brown horse, at 12:00 pm. on
the 26th day of February at the North
Florida Live Stock Market to satisfy
a claim in the sum of $390.40 for
fees, expenses for feeding and care
and costs hereof.
February J9, 2011
By:/s/ Mark Hunter, Sheriff
Columbia County, Florida
04543626
February 19, 2011


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

HYBUS


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found
Di ouLoe oehig?


LOST Black Male, Toy Poodle,
on Tues 2/15, n the 252 & Coun-
try Club area.Reward being
offered Please call 386-752-9300

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeft Knurek

Can you tell
me what
-5 |,, happened? 411


Ans: TO
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: DUCAT WAFER SCHEME PIRATE
I Answer: What the picnickers did during the tug of
war TRIED TO "WREST"


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CASE NO. 10000328CA
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION SUC-
CESSOR IN INTEREST TO
WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK
F/K/A WASHINGTON MUTUAL
BANK F.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
EDWARD M. BECKER, et. al.
Defendants
TO: EDWARD M. BECKER
Whose residence is: 260 NE JACK-
SONVILLE LOOP, LAKE CITY,
FL 32055 & 3505 US HWY 90 E,
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL 32433 &
1147 OAKWOOD LAKES BLVD,
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL 32433
TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ED-
WARD M. BECKER
Whose residence is: 260 NE JACK-
SONVILLE LOOP, LAKE CITY,
FL 32055 & 3505 US HWY 90 E,
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL 32433 &
1147 OAKWOOD LAKES BLVD,
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL 32433
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming an interest by, through, un-
der or against EDWARD M. BECK-
ER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ED-
WARD M. BECKER and all parties
having or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the property descri-
bed herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Foreclosure of Moitgage on the
following described property:
SE 1/4 OF BLOCK 9 AS LIES
SOUTH OF THE PUBLIC ROAD
LEADING FROM LAKE CITY TO
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA, IN A
SUBDIVISION OF THE NW 1/4
OF NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33,
TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST, AS SURVEYED AND
MAPPED BY A. B. BROWN FEB-
RUARY 5, 1913, LYING IN CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
CONTAINING ONE ACRE, MORE
OR LESS. a/k/a 260 NE JACKSON-
VILLE LOOP, LAKE CITY, FL
322055
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on Di-
ana Chung, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 2901 Stirling Road,
suite 300, Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312 within 30 days after the first
publication of this notice, and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's at-
tomey or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 11 day of February,
2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
A copy of this Notice. of Action,
Complaint and Lis Pendens were
.sent to the defendants and address
named above.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a reasonable accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should,
no later than seven (7) days prior,
contact the Clerk of the Court's disa-
bility coordinator at 9049582163. PO
BOX 1569, LAKE CITY, FL.
32056. If hearing impaired, contact
(TSS) 8009558771 via Florida relay
System.
This is an attempt to collect a debt.
Any, information obtained will be
used for hat purpose.
04543557
February 19, 26, 2011


ACROSS 39
42
1 Chicken feed '
5 Watches 45
10 Surroundings 46
12 Lots and lots 50
13 High regard
14 Hit the Tab key 53
15 Synthesizer 55
Inventor
16 Nightwear 56
18 Coast Guard
alert 57
19 Beg and plead 58
23 Magna laude
26 Okay!
27 Heavy hydro-
gen discoverer
30 Seer 1
32 Like an 2
armadillo 3
34 Middle of an
atoll 4
35 Absorbedly 5
36 Sketch
37 Pierre's 6
monarch 7
38 Orangutan, for 8
example 9


020 Lost & Found
Lost Female Dog on 2/12 Sat.,
near Richardson Middle School.
Medium sized brown/black, looks
like a fox, Reward, 386-752-8920

100 Job
SOpportunities

04543538
Family Services Analyst
Non-Profit organization is
seeking highly motivated
professional for
VPK/School Readiness/Parent
Education Position. Experience
in Social Services or related
field preferred salary
$9.62-$12.98 plus benefits.
Fluently Bilingual in
English/Spanish preferred
Send resumes by
February 14, 2011 to:
Early Learning Coalition
Attn: HR, 1104 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025 or fax to
386-752-8094

04543539
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
INSIDE SALES
Ideal candidates with previous
experience with outbound sales.
Must have excellent telephone
skills. Individual must be
enthusiastic, outgoing, have
excellent computer skills and be
able to perform in a fast pace
environment. Please fax resume
to 386-758-0984 or email to
greajobs(LCiobs.info..

04543540
FULL TIME VICTIM
ADVOCATE-GRANT
FUNDED POSITION
in Lake City Guardian ad
Litem Office, salary
$26,000-$28,000yr-no benefits
Bachelors Degree in Social
Work, Criminology, Psychology
or two years comparable service
in advocacy. Excellent
Communication skills, ability to
work independently and well
with others of various ages,
.professions and backgrounds
must maintain a strong commit-
ment to Victims of Crime and
respect confidentiality of
victims. State application must
be submitted by February 23,
2011 to Tammie C. Williams at
213 Howard Street East Live
Oa,; Florida 32064, EOE

05525172



Now accepting applications for
servers and cashiers
Apply in person at
3177 W Hwy 90 Lake City
DFW/EOE


Flight paths
Garden hose
plastic
Earlier
Bird abode
Low ever-
greens
Put down a rug
Grants, per-
haps
In an orderly
manner
Thin, as clouds
Casual
farewells

DOWN

Japanese soup
Low voice
Attack on a
castle
- -haw
Cohort of Boris
and Bela
Goofy
Fiesta cheers
Numbers game
Fast jets of yore


100 Opportunities

04543622
Customer Service Rep.
Handle inbound customer calls,
schedule appointments,
document actions, place calls to
renew service. Great pay and
benefits, keyboard skills a must.
Send resume to
fjobs@flapest.com, fax to 386-
752-0171 or mail to 536 SE
Baya Drive. Lake City 32025
EOE, M/F, DFWP. H, V.

05525143
S & S Office is hiring
a full-time receptionist.
Duties included: typing &
computer work
(must be proficient in Microsoft
works programs),multi-line
phones, filing, 10-key, etc.
Benefits include: vacation, sick
leave, credit union, profit shar-
ing,dental, health and
life insurance.
Drug Free Workplace EOE
Apply in person at
S & S Office
134 SE ColbumAve.,
Lake City, FL 32025

05525174
MARKETING ASSISTANT
Marketing Director of dynamic
consulting firm needs individual
with marketing experience
strong organizational skills,
strong computer skills,
MS OFFICE and a
desire to succeed.
We have DOUBLED our client
base in the last 18 months.
Will train in our niche market
industry to increase client base
and to participate in client
training and follow-up.
Home office in
White Springs Florida.
Please forward resume
and references to:
hr@speced.org

A/C SERVICE Tech
Min 5 yrs experience
F/T with benefits
Please call 386-454-4767
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
10 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Charles M.
Skaggs Todd Co, KY. Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Row Crop, &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 04/01/11 -01/31/12. Wage
of $9.71/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Center
in your area and reference Job
Order #KY0420362.
Hiring Certified Teachers for all
ages. Please do not call if you
are not certified. 386-755-7677
6:30a-5:30p or 344-5363 after 5:30


Answer td Previous Puzzle

HERDS DREAM
USURPS DEBIBONE
NATURE ORI ENT

CAV N B Y FLAD

E E T A Y ROME
LI NSE D P RE S
L A, IR GLIOBU L E

R YE ORTS AT
SUR CHIS


R OC IET P T
A M A S
T.. ,.... A


10 Dues payer, for
short
11 Lots
12 Belgian river
17 PSAT takers
20 Quick-dry fabrics


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDriverBooks.com


21 Cafe--
22 Lobster pot
23 Mil rank.
24 Eurasian
range
25 Astrologers of
old
28 James
or Kett
29 Shrill
bark
31 Vegetative
state
32 Me or them
33 Beautician's
coloring
37 Not decaf.
40 Mama Elliot
41 Wander off
course
42 Relieved sigh
43 "I came," to
Caesar
44 Rotters
47 By heart
48 Plumbing
bends
49 Ron who
played Tarzan
51 Sleep like a -
52 Rte.
54 Beak of a bird


100 Opportunities
3 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Fayette
Gardens Jessamine Co, KY.
Greenhouse/Nursery & Alternative
Work Employment Dates:
04/01/11 01/01/12. Wage of
$9.71/hr. Worker guaranteed. 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference Job Order
#KY0420385.
17 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Frog Farms,
LLC Daviess Co, KY. Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Row Crop, Row-
Crop-Produce & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates:
04/01/11 12/20/11. Wage of
$9.71/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference Job Order
#KY0420238..
15 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Furnwood
Farm LLC Harrison Co, KY.
Tobacco & Row-Crop &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 04/01/11 02/01/12. Wage
of $9.71/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation & .
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Center
in your area and reference
Job Order #KY0420239.
16 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Kevin Smith -
Shelby Co, KY. Tobacco, Row
Crop & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 04/01/11 -
01/15/12: Wage of $9.71/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference Job Order
#KY0420312.
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630
P/T Class A CDL
Drivers needed. A CLEAN record
and a flexible schedule required.
Call 386-935-1705 to apply.
P/T Farm Tractor Operator
simple mechanic work,
clean license
Call 386-935-1705


Classified Department: 755-5440








Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2011


100 Job
100 Opportunities
18 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: L & H Farms,
LLC Trigg Co, KY. Tobacco &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 04/01/11 12/31/11.
Wage of $9.7 1/hr. Worker
guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference Job Order
#KY0419776.
37 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Little River
Leaf, LLC Christian Co, KY.
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row
Crop, Row Crop-Produce,
Greenhouse/Nursery & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates:
04/01/11 -01/31/12. Wage of
$9.71/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference Job Order
KY0419811
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com
Teacher (Lawton's, Early Head
Start Lake City, Birth to 3 yrs old)
HS Dip/GED, Must have FCCPC
/CDA; three years of classroom
experience working with
infants/toddlers preferred; Bilin-
gual (Spanish/English) preferred,
5 Hour Literacy, Must pass physi-
cal/DCF background screening,
Current First Aid/CPR preferred.
Excellent Benefits-Paid Holidays,
Sick/Annual Leave. Apply in
person at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637,
by email: arobinson(sv4cs.org
Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE
WANTED: Row slash and long
leaf pines 4-6 years 8-12
Top Dollar PAID References
avail. Call David 352-281-0235

12 Medical
120 Employment

05525167
Nurse On Call
Home Health Agency,
Medicare certified, is now
hiring OT, PT & ST
Sign on bonus for F/T
352-395-6424,
Fax 352-395-6519

05525177
Medical Billing
several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance
Billing required.
Please email resume to
admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net
or fax to 386-755-2169

AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Case Managers for
community based program work-
ing w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST:
Qualifications: Prefer experienced
generalist technologist familiar
with Laboratory automation,
safety, quality control, manual
testing and LIS operation. Must
be able to lift-up to 40 pounds and
will be exposed to hazardous
materials. Forty hours M-F with
Saturday rotation. Require State of
Florida License as a Medical Tech-
nologist. Please submit resume to
npatel@chclabs.com
PT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.
SUPERVISORY MEDICAL
TECHNOLOGIST:
Qualifications: Prefer experienced
generalist supervisory medical
technologist familiar with
Laboratory automation, safety,
quality control, manual testing,
and LIS operation. Knowledge of
inventory control, quality control
review and evaluation, instrument
maintenance and personnel
management. Must be able to
lift up to 40 pounds and will be
exposed to hazardous materials.
Forty hours M-F with Saturday
rotation, 3PM to 11:30 PM.
Require State of Florida License as
a Laboratory Supervisor.
Please submit resume to
npatel@chclabs.com

240 Schools &
Education

04543248
interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/14/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/14/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


330 Livestock &
330 Supplies
Barn Kept Hay for Sale
Bermuda or Bahaia
$20 Roll, Lee, FL
850-971-4344

361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005

401 Antiques
CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621


408 Furniture
Love Seat-Broyhill. Blue/gray,
matching pillows and arm covers.
Good condition. $50
386-454-4947


420 Wanted to Buy
I BUY WORKING AND
NON WORKING
APPLIANCES!
CALL 3867365-1915

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales





Large 3 family Sale Sat 8am ?,
Something for everyone! 119 SE
Travis Glen, 252 by High School
to Forest & comer of Travis)






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

SAT ONLY 8-4, New Windows,
Doors, Construction Tools &
equipment, bedding & much more,
559 SW Legion Dr (off of 247)


440 Miscellaneous
Lowery Parade. Organ.
Slot Machine, Chipper Vac.,
Small Generator. Call 386-754-
0800 or 755-7773 for details.

Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

463 Building
S Materials
ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available


520 Boats for Sale

Bass Tender Boat 2 Seater
10'2",can fit in back of truck
$500 386-965-2215
Great for pond or lake!

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386--752-6422
2/1 w/screen porch. Lg yard in
quiet, clean, safe, well maintained
10 unit park. Water, garbage incl.
$475.mo $475.dep. 386-965-3003
3/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
pets ok, $500 dep $575 mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2 SW on 1 ac off 41 on 246.
Between I-10 & 75. Just renovated
$600 mo plus security. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 after 5pm
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-623-3404






Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale

$216 a month remodeled,
like new, 2Bd/2Ba S Wide
Delivered & blocked, appliances,
A/C $2500 down, 8 year fin.
Possible owner financing. Ready
now. Call Gary 386 758-9824

*Lot Model Sale*
Save 1,000's @ Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
For Model Info and Details


640 rMobile Homes
640 for Sale

12 X 56. 2/1 SWMH.
axles avail, tongue attached
$2,500 OBO
386-965-1882
3/2 SW on 1 ac off 41 on 246. Be-
tween I-10 & 75. Just renovated
$32k obo. Ideal rental. NO owner
finance. 386-330-2316 after 5pm
Come in and see the
Future in Manufactured Homes.
Royals Homes making
people smile
386-754-6737
Come See all New Lot Models
Royals Homes. Honesty! Integrity!
Customer Satisfaction
386-754-6737
Looking for a Modular?
Come see the Specialists
at Royals Homes and ask for Bo
386-754-6737
New 2011 Homes are Here
3BR/4BR at Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
Homes Built Your Way!
New,2010 MH,never been
occupied, front & back deck,
$99,900 MLS#76635 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
@ Westfield Realty
Royals Homes is Quality!
We treat you like Family.
Stop in or Call Catherine
386-754-6737

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

05524833
No Application Fee +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments
& Mobile Homes
starting at $350 per month
386-755-2423 '
2 br Apt. Close to shopping
and the VA Medical Center.
$525. mo plus deposit.
386-344-0579
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Gatorwood on the Westside
Rent $650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $500. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Move In Special.2/1 w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2I For Rent
Apt, Ft. White, FL 2/1,
screen porch, W/D hook up,
$550 mo plus Sec Dep,
386-497-1116
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04543633
LANDLORDS, let our gold
standard work for you!
Call today for additional
information on managing your
residential rentals.
16884 53rd Wellborn
3/2 well kept DWMHI with great
floor plan and 2 car garage
$850./mo. + $800 security
642 Chris Terrace Lake City
Nice upscale 3/2 with 1623 sf.
Close to Town but far enough
out for privacy. $1150./mo
$1150./security.
143 Zebra Terrace Lake City
3/2 well maintained brick home
on 1 acre +. Bonus room. could
be 4th bedroom or nice family
room. $900./mo. +
$900. security.
B.J. Federico 386-365-5884
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650
(habla espalol)
Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.

3 or 4br. Lg bedroom, den w/fire-
place. Screen porch. Privacy patio.
1.09 ac. Quiet area, cul-de-sac.
Rent/lease option. 386-697-6534
3/2 on 2.1 acres, 2 car garage,
ceramic tile, front & rear porches,
$995 mo, plus 2 mo sec.
Lease with the option to buy


386-758-9996 or 386-365-5434
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced back yard. $825. mo
$825. dep. References req'd.
386-364-2897 or 941-920-4535
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+Retirement Living,
Site built home
2br/2bth For Lease
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $675 mo,
$600 sec., 386-497-4699
House for rent. Everything new.
4br/2ba plus study. Carport, great
location $1100 mo last plus
security. 386-867-2283


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water.
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072


770 Condos For Rent

04543558
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1200/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.


780 Condos for Sale
3 bdrm Condo Nit, back patio,
HOA fees include ext maintenance
of home, lawn & pool MLS#76797
$110,000, Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237

805 Lots for Sale
1 acre lot outside the city limits.
Homes only subdivision. Priced
below the assessed value with the
county, $16,900 Hallmark Real
Estate 386-867-1613 Call Jay S
2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Beautiful 5+ acre lot, partially
cleared w/large oaks, Homes only,
$38,000, MLS 75038 Call Roger
Lovelady @ Westfield Realty
386-365-7039
Charming Turn of the Century,
property, close to
downtown,MLS# 74814
$94,900 386-755-0808
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Nice 4.5. acre parcel w/S/P/W
older SWMH $39,900
MLS# 76182 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of I8. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
3/2 home w/1758 sq ft, Storage
bldg, enclosed patio & deck,
$168,000 Call Carrie Cason @
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
MLS# 73410
3/2 w/over 1700 sq ft, fireplaces,
modem kitchen, fenced yard, 2
sheds, convenient location
$89,500 MLS#73861 Call Patti
@Access Realty 386-623-6896
4 bdrm + office, 2 living & dining
areas, front & back porch
$279,900 MLS# 72831
Call Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty 386-755-0808
4/2 2300 plus sq ft,Palm Harbor
Home on 2 lots, Good Condition
$69,888 Call Nancy Rogers @
386-867-1271 Results Realty
4/2 1,800 sq ft on 10.5 acres,
newly remodeled inside, detached
garage, above ground pool
$189,888, Call Nancy,
Results Realty 386-867-1271
5 bedroom Home on 5 acres south
of Lake City, Big Rooms
lots of space $229,500
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
MLS# 72928 Westfield Realty
5/2, 1800sf, 24 acres, family rm,
screened back porch, RV
parking,newly painted close to VA
& DOT, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505


5/3 Triplewide MH (2200) sq ft,
w/2 master bdrms, on 10 fenced
acres, fireplace. MLS# 76226
$75,000 Call Patti Taylor
386-623-6896 Access Realty
AFFORDABLE 3BR/2BA mfg
home in Woodgate Village only
$27,000 #76741
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110
Beautifully Landscaped 3/1 on
1.11 ac, 16x24 detached garage,
screen porched bldg, water
purification system, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Brick home with 2,700 sqft under
roof. Large master w/bath on .5
acres completely fenced. $167,500
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears


810 Home for Sale
Brick. .59 ac. 3br/2ba w/large
spacious rooms. Split floor plan.
2 car garage & storage $222,900.
Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Close to town, 2 story home
w/stone, fireplace, downstairs
master bdrm, $144,900
MLS# 77050 Call Carrie Cason
386-623-2806 Westfield Realty
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, Woodcrest. Great area, split
plan. Screened back porch'. Elaine
K. Tolar. 386-755-6488 $139,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba. 3 Fireplaces. 39.7 acres
included. Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Reduced, brick w/over 2,000 sqft,
5 ac. 3br/2ba.Lots of extras. Elaine
K. Tolar 755-6488 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lakeview home in town, Old
charm w/many upgrades Elaine K.
Tolar. 386-755-6488 $189,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2 Story, 4br/2.5ba-2160 sqft. Spa-
cious plan w/garage Lori Geibeig
Simpson 365-5678 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba close to town. 1620 sqft
w/covered patio& more. Lori Gei-
beig Simpson 365-5678 $117,900


Coral Shores Realty 2004
Custom built home, 23 fenced ac.
1700 ft paved frontage. Lg
kitchen/pantry, master/bath.
386-965-5905 Bob Gavette
Comer lot in Piccadilly Park.
Newly painted in/out. New carpet
/vinyl. 2 car garage. Inground
pool. $133,500. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575


Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
CUSTOM-BUILT 4BR mfg
home w/screen porch, front deck,
shed $87,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #73893
Cute 3/2 nicely remodeled home,
2 acres, partially fenced
$115,888
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473
Derington Properties, LLC
3/2 MH, large deck and
screened porch, 5 ac.
$46,500 386-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
DWMH, 5 ac. Screened front/back
porches. 20x40 shop fully equip-
ped w/bath. $74,900. 965-4300
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
Fully furnished 2br/2ba @
$83,000
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
3BR/2BA
$99,999
Family home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Great Investment Property!
House needs lots of TLC, close to
shopping and schools, $35,000,
Bring all offers, Results Realty
Call Brittany 386-397-3473
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg
home near Wellborn on
5+ acres ONLY $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76768
Log Cabin home, located on
5 acres, wrap around porch
$199,000 MLS#75550
Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax Realty
Lrg Brick Home, well-established
neighborhood' in town,
$129,900 MLS#77016
Call Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
Must See! 4/2 2368SF Home,
island kitchen, den, fire place,
storage, auto gate entry,
Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfect starter home. Quiet area.
Wood laminate floors, Ig dining,
French doors. 1 car garage/work-
shop. $84,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfection! Marion Place, gated,
brick 3/2 over 1800 sqft. Screened
lanai $158,900 386-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $55,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75210


2002 Fleetwood
Revolution 40'
Prestine cond. New tires &
flushed trans., kept covered.
Will sell tow vehicle.
$75,000
Call
386-752-6090
365-1903


810 Home for Sale
REDUCED TO $61,500 in
Eastside Vlg! Immaculate
2BR/2BA w/lg rooms
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76753
Solid Home! Needs updating.
Country eat in kitchen & formal
dining.Some windows replaced.
$70,000 Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
SPACIOUS 2BR/2BA home on 1
ac w/attached garage &
2-story shed $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76887
Totally refurbished 2/2 w/
workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Very Nice 4/2 on 4 acres w/open
floor plan, 2 living rooms, eat in
kitchen, dining rm and rec rm
w/wet bar $89,900 Call Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well maintained 3/2 DWMH,
1568 sq ft, acres, new roof,
$65,000, MLS#76187
Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001

820 Farms &
Acreage
10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

830 Commercial
Property
Aprox 4000 sq ft Commercial
bldg, 4 bay/2 car lift shop, show-
room/office area, $1000 a month
lease or will sell for $128,000.
Call Martin @ 386-697-9950
Coral Shores Realty. Prime
commercial, located on Hwy 41 &
Gibson Ln. 26X54 concrete block.
$76,000 386-965-5905
Call Bob Gavette
Downtown & borders 3 streets.
Aprdx. 10,000 sqft fenced parking.
"as is" Bob Gavette. $73,000. 386-
965-5905 Coral Shores Realty
Prime Commercial Property
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya 3.27 acres, room for building
$398,888 386-867-1271
Call Nancy @ Results Realty


940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually,
5th Wheel White, Automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215






950 Cars for Sale
FOR SALE. 2006 PT Cruiser, full
power, burgundy. 24k mi.
14 city 24 hwy. $7,995.00
386-758-9629 Leave message
GET CASH TODAY!!
For your car, truck, van or SUV.
(Running or not). Call anytime.
(352)653-5691

Recreational
,95 Vehicles


-..-_ .i -. .n. -"
1977 GMC Motor Home Classic
Palm Beach Model,Self-
Contained, $18,500 or
obo or trade 386-754-6693


Lake City Reporter


2008 Honda 750
C2 Spirit
Windshield, engine guard,
backrest, luggage rack,
like new, 4900 miles.
$3,800
Call
386-365-3658


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