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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01382
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: February 18, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01382
System ID: UF00028308:01382
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Victory Gained
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000016 12051] ****3-DIGIT p :2
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTOR- -Y-
PO BOX 1 F1700-7
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
CAINESVILLE FL 32611--1943


ake


'4


1
1


First Win
Tigers club Robert E. Lee
in baseball, 10-0.

Sports, I B


Reporter


Friday, February 18, 2011


Skunkie Acres gets license


Petting zoo can
now exhibit
exotic animals.
By C.J. RISAK
crisak@lakecityreporter. corn
The news that reached
the Haake family at Skunkie
Acres Wednesday was a
relief. It was not greeted


with the same level of grati-
tude by their. neighbors.
On Feb. 3, the inspector
for the U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Animal and
Plant Health Inspection
Service made her third stop
at Skunkie Acres for a pre-
license inspection. Skunkie
Acres, a petting zoo located
in Columbia County south
of White Springs that has


more than 100 animals on
its nearly 5-acre lot, had
lost its USDA license last
June.
Without a license, the
Haakes were not supposed
to exhibit their exotic ani-
mals, which range from
water buffalo and an
ostrich to alligators and
wolves. That license, which
Bernie Haake said expired


through an oversight, was
reinstated and will become
effective once the licensing
fee is paid.
"Everything's back,"
Haake said. "They said
we're legal. We're ready to
go. It was just a bump in
the road and now we're
ready to go."
ACRES continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Some of the animals as they get fed in their pen at Skunkie
Acres.


GETTING


Olustee Citizen

Support Organization

drives re-enactment


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
OLUSTEE .- The
Olustee Citizen Support
Organization has been
described as the engine
that runs the Olustee Battle
Re-enactment each year.
The assertion was
made by Bob Giarda, a
park service specialist at
Olustee Battlefield Historic
State Park, who also.
said the Olustee Citizen
Organization is the heart
of local volunteer organiza-
tions that make the Olustee
Battle Re-enactment a reality.
The Olustee CSO does


fundraising, organizing,
registrations of re-enactors,
volunteer-recruitment and
maintains the site for each
year's battle re-enactment
"Everything we see leads
back to the citizen support
organization at Olustee," he
said. "It's involvement can't.
be understated."
Mitzi Nelson, Olustee
CSO secretary, said years
ago she and her young chil-
dren watched a few soldiers
take to the battlefield and
play around and have a re-
enactment
"Now with the coop-
VOLUNTEERS continued on 3A


OLUSTEE Hundreds
of children and thousands
of people, including re-
enactors and park patrons
will tour Florida's first state
park today and the remain-
der of the weekend as part
of the 35th Annual Olustee
Battle Re-Enactment.
Although the re-enact-
ment only takes place for a
short period of time, prep-,
aration work at the park
has taken months.
. Bob Giarda, a park ser-
vice specialist at Olustee
Battlefield Historic State
Park, said the Olustee
Battle Re-Enactment is one
of only four battle re-enact-
ments in the United States
that is done on the original
battlefield.
"The significance there
to be able to do the re-
enactment where the


READY


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Gerry D. Turner and Raymond Stowe, re-enactors from
Marietta, Ga., get registration forms from Olustee Citizen
Support Organization staff volunteers Mitzi Nelson and
Mark Merritt at the Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park.


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
AmeriCorps volunteers Claudia Baez (from left), Monica Middleditch, Keith Miller and
Vance Cross set up fencing in front of the Olustee Battlefield Friday as they finalize prepa-
rations for this weekend battle re-enactment.


original event took place
is remarkable and rare,"
he said. "People have been
working on this since the


last re-enactment ended. agencies, we've been able
Through a lot of good to make it come together."
volunteerism and partner-
ships with local and state PREPARED continued on 3A


Man, woman charged in meth lab bust


Anonymous tip leads
authorities to lab's
secret location.
From staff report
Authorities arrested two people
in a central Columbia County home
Wednesday after an anonymous tip
led area law enforcement officers to
a secret drug lab.
Dwayne D. Culpepper and


Christina L. Rivers
face multiple drug
related charges after
the officers found
the methamphet-
amine lab, where
they seized illegal
drugs. Columbia Culpepper
County Sheriff's
Office reports indicate the two were
arrested before midnight.
Culpepper, 38, of 10015 SW


County Road 240,
was charged with
manufacture and
possession of meth-
amphetamine and
possession of listed
chemicals in relation
to the incident. He Rivers
is being held in the
Columbia County Detention Facility
METH LAB continued on 3A


The Christies:


Family with a


long history

Ancestors date back

before Olustee to

American Revolution


From staff reports
The descendants of
Robert Christie, honored
at this year's Olustee
Festival, can likely
trace their ancestry to
the Kingdom of Fife in
Scotland, with French,
Welsh and predominantly
English ancestry added
later. Robert Christie's
great-great-grandfather is
first docu-
mented in
Virginia
around
1730, per- -*
haps enter-
ing through
a Maryland
port The
Christies Christie
headed to
the Carolinas.
After the American
Revolution, Robert's grand-
father (also Robert) settled
in Edgefield District, S.C.,
in what is now Saluda
County. He begat a trail
of Christie's, from South
Carolina through Georgia
to Florida.
Robert Christie was
born July 25, 1830, west of
Macon in Upson County,
Ga., the son
of Josiah Accordir
Allen Christie pension ap
and Nancy Robert en
Cureton. Both Ware Cou
his tombstone fall of 1862
at Hopewell vate in wh
Church in become C
Columbia become
County and F, otherwi.
his Civil as the Ge
War Pension Dragoons,
Application Battalion.
indicate a
birth year of
1820; however, in 1848, he
received his legacy from
his legal guardian one
day after what would have
been his 18th birthday.
He presumably married
Emily Tuggle before he
was 18 and already had a
daughter, Mary Ann, by
the time he received his
inheritance.
Between 1850 and 1860,
Robert and Emily followed
two of his older brothers
to South Georgia only
Emily and their daughter,


Mary, appear next door
to her parents' home in
the 1860 Thomas County
Census. According to
his pension application,
Robert enlisted in Ware
County in the fall of 1862
as a private in what would
become Company F,
otherwise known as the
Georgia Dragoons, of the
3rd Battalion. He was a
teamster, like his grandfa-
ther had been during the
Revolution. Robert fought
with his unit in the Battle
of Olustee on February 20,
1864.
In 1865, Robert marAed
Elizabeth Wheeler (1841-
1904), the daughter of
Charles and Jane Wheeler
of Appling County, Ga.
About 1867, he followed
the Wheelers to an area
north of Benton around
Bay Creek in northern
Columbia County. In 1880,
Robert and Elizabeth were
living at Suwannee Shoals
east of White Springs,
and by 1900 they were
at Belmont in Hamilton
County just across the
Suwannee River from
Benton. Robert died on


ng to his
plicationn,
listed in
nty in the
2 as a pri-
at would
company
se known
orgia


c


Feb. 14, 1907.
Members of
the extended
Christie fam-
ily moved
between the
two counties
for thirty
years, while
opportunity
took others to


)f the 3rd Jacksonville
and Tampa
and even
New York.
Benton was one of the
more important small com-
munities in the northern
Columbia County. It was
located on the banks of
the Suwannee River some
21 miles north of Lake
City and had a population
of around 100 during the
1880's. Benton was only
connected to Lake City by
a twice-weekly stage coach
before the Watertown
Northern Railroad was
built around 1889. Benton
FAMILY continued on 3A


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THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
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79
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................ 4A
. W orld.................. 6A


Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


5A
4B
2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
". cl. CC.i els Out
,'11lFI Ti"Dl3 I


COMING
SATURDAY
Battle of Olustee
Festival coverage.


Vol. 137, No. 24 E 75 cents


Battlefield ready for weekend


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com


k C









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2011


Play.
"


Friday:
Afternoon: 0-2-7
Evening: 0-4-4


Friday:
Afternoon: 1-2-0-1
Evening:2-2-2-3


v Thursday:
3-10-17-18-32


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Vick cancels 'Oprah' appearance


CHICAGO

Philadelphia Eagles quar-
terback Michael Vick will
not be appearing on "The
Oprah Winfrey Show"
after all.
A show spokesman said
Wednesday representatives of the
NFL star called late Tuesday to can-
cel his appearance for personal rea-
sons. The daytime talk show host's
interview with Vick was set to air
Thursday, Feb. 24. -
The interview was to cover Vicl's
time in prison, his work with the
Humane Society and his return to
the NFL
Vick missed two seasons and
served 18 months in federal prison
for a dogfighting operation based on
'his property in Surry County, Va.
He was reinstated to the NFL for
the 2009 season and has been doing
public service work, including with
the Humane Society.

'Seinfeld' actor who
played Uncle Leo dies
LOS ANGELES Len Lesser, the
veteran character actor best known
for his scene-stealing role as Uncle
Leo on "Seinfeld," died Wednesday.
He was 88.
Lesser's family said in a statement
that he died in Burbank, Calif., from
cancer-related pneumonia.
Lesser's lengthy list of televi-
sion credits included parts on "Get
Smart," "That Girl," "The Munsters,"
'The Monkees," "The Rockford
Files," "thirtysomething," "ER,"
and "Everybody Loves Raymond,"
which featured Lesser in a recurring
role as the arm-shaking Garvin. His
film credits included "Outlaw Josey
Wales," "Kelly's Heroes," "Birdman
of Alcatraz" and "Death Hunt." He
most recently appeared on the TV
drama "Castle.".


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 15 file photo, Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick celebrates
after throwing a touchdown pass. After missing two seasons serving a federal sen--
tence for dogfighting, Vick was back at his best in 2010. He was to appear on the
'Oprah Winfrey Show,' but had to cancel.


Jessica Alba says she's
. pregnant with baby No. 2
NEW YORK Jessica Alba and
her husband, Cash Warren, are .
expecting their second child.
Alba announced the news
Wednesday on her Facebook page
and Twitter account
The 29-year-old actress wrote on
the social networking site: "I thought
I'd drop by to let you all in on some
exciting news. Honor is going to be
a Big Sister!"
She added: "Cash and I are
thrilled."

Waka Flocka Flame
asked about shooting
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Rapper .
- Waka Fl&cka Flame and three other


men were questioned Wednesday
after a shootout at a car stereo store
in which one person was wounded,
police said.
The 24-year-old rapper, whose real
name is Juaquin James Malphurs,
was at Car Stereo Warehouse on
Charlotte's east side to have the
sound system on his tour bus
upgraded, The Charlotte Observer
reported.
A police spokesman said two vehi-
cles drove into the store's parking lot
as the rapper spoke with fans. Men
in at least one car and people in the
rapper's party exchanged gunfire,
according to police.
One person was shot in the shoul-
der and was taken for treatment of
non-life-threatening injuries, police
said.

11 Associated Press.


Celebrity Birthdays


* Former Cosmopolitan edi-
tor Helen Gurley Brown is 89.
* Actor George Kennedy is
86.
* Movie director Milos
Forman is 79.
* Singer Yoko Ono is 78.
* Singer Irma Thomas is 70.
* Actress Sinead Cusack is
63.
* Actress Cybill Shepherd


is 61.
* Singer Juice Newton is 59.
* Rock musician Robbie
Bachman is 58.
* Rock musician Larry Rust
(Iron Butterfly) is 58.
* Actor John Travolta is 57.
* Game show host Vanna
White is 54.
* Actor Matt Dillon is 47.
* Rapper Dr. Dre is 46.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number....... (386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction In whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056..
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
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Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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In Columbia County, customers should
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vice error for same day re-delivery. After
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vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where homb delivery
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Circulation ..............755-5445
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(Tuesday through Sunday)
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Rates indude 7% sales tax.'
Mail rates
12 Weeks................. $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks ..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


111 charged in
Medicare scams
MIAMI Federal
authorities charged more
than 100 doctors, nurses
and physical therapists in
nine cities with Medicare
fraud Thursday, part of a
massive nationwide bust
that snared more suspects
than any other in history.
More than 700 law
enforcement agents fanned
out to arrest 111 people
accused of illegally bill-
ing Medicare more than
$225 million. The arrests
are the latest in a string of
major busts in the past two
years as authorities have
struggled to pare the fraud
that's believed to cost the
government between $60
billion and $90 billion each
year. Stopping Medicare's
budget from hemorrhag-
ing that money will be key
to paying for President
Barack Obama's health
care overhaul.
Among those indicted:
In Miami, two doctors
and several nurses were
charged with swindling
$25 million by writing
fake prescriptions rec-
ommending nurses and
other expensive aids to
treat homebound patients,
authorities said. The ser-
vices were never provided.

DCF says mother
may be charged
MIAMI The state
Department of Children
and Families said it
expects charges to be
filed against the mother of
twins involved in a grisly
highway attack.
Jacqui Colyer, a
regional director for the
agency, said Thursday that
Carmen Barahona is likely
to face charges related to
an alleged cover-up for her
husband, Jorge Barahona.
He is charged with
aggravated child abuse for
critical injuries to his son,


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter

Regional Science Fair project

Kelly Gray, a Union County junior, shows a model of an air
foil, or air plane wing, during the Suwannee Valley Regional
Science Fair. Top award-winners at the fair, which was hosted
by Florida Gateway College, were announced Wednesday.


Victor, after the boy was
found in a truck parked
along Interstate 95, having
been doused in a chemical.
The deteriorated body
of the boy's twin sister was
later found in the bed of
the truck.


killed the passenger. No
officers were injured dur-
ing the 1:45 a.m. incident
near the intersection of
Main Street and U.S. 19 in
New Port Richey.


Small plane


Pasco deputy kills crashes in ocean


man at traffic stop
NEW PORT RICHEY -
A Pasco County Sheriff's
deputy shot and killed a
man who opened fire dur-
ing a traffic stop.
Officials said the deputy
was backing up a New
Port Richey police officer
during the traffic stop
early Thursday when a
passenger in the vehicle
opened fire.
The deputy shot and


NEW SMYRNA BEACH
- A pilot's log book, a
wheel and other pieces of
wreckage have washed
ashore after a single-
engine plane crashed into
the Atlantic Ocean.
The Phoenix East
Aviation flight school said
an instructor and a student
were alboard the plane that
crashed Wednesday about
150 yards offshore.


THE WEATHER


AM FOG, "AM FOG PARTLY PARTLY' CHANCE
L SUNNY CLOUDY CLOUDY -STORMS


H179L049 HI 78 LO 51 HI 79 LO 51 HI 77 LO 55 HI 78 L 50
I .


Valdosta
81/49


Pensacla
70/53


Tallahassee*
80/47 ,
" P 2g. / -
Panama City
78/52


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


7a Friday lp


* Jacksonvile


Cape Canaveral


Lake City 77/51 Daytona Beach
79/49 Ft. Lauderdale
Gainesville DayqiqarBeach Fort Myers
A.80/49 71W54 .otyem
Gainesville
', Ocala Jacksonville
'"0/50 Key West
Orlando Ca Canaveral Lake City
., 80/54 Lake City
80/547 Miami
Tainnp \ Naples
80/57; West Palm Besch Ocala
79/62 Orlando
F \ FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers, 78/66. 4 Pensacola
81/59 Naples Tallahassee
80/58 M ani Tampa
S 7/65 Valdosta
Key"e " W. Palm Beach
76/67


79
61
70
45
85 in 1928
23 in 2007

0.00"
3.59'"
7.27"
2.02"
5.53"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonisettom.
Moonset torn.


7:08 a.m.
6:21 p.m.
7:07 a.m.
6:22 p.m.

7:04 p.m.
7:01 a.m.
8:13 p.m.
7:39 a.m.


Feb. Feb. March March
18 24 4 12
Full Last New First


9:71111-17 1


7p la 6a
SaturdayI


-Fmu.ws tlulntmpm *Fuh e". tumnre


On this date in
1987, a small
but intense low
pressure system
combined with
northerly upslope
winds to produce
eight inches of snow
in five hours at
Meeteetsie, Wyo.,
located southeast
of Cody.


8

15midtestoblu
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
-. .-


Saturday Sunday


7.1 59, s
74/56/pc
79/67/pc
81/56/s
78/51/s
74/53/pc
75/66/pc
78/51/pc
79/65/pc
80/58/s
78/51/s
80/55/pc
76/54/s
71/55/s
80/49/s
78/58/s
80/53/pc
78/63/pc


76. 60,s
77/58/s
79/68/pc
82/58/pc
78/52/pc
76/53/pc
77/69/s
79/51/pc
78/66/pc
80/61/pc
79/52/pc
80/59/s
72/56/s
71/59/pc
75/50/pc
77/60/pc
76/52/pc
78/66/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather corn
m


j Forecasts, data and
,^.'- graphics 20.11 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


fiet Connected


. i - 1
.~


* Associated Press


W113


Daily Scripture

"Who shall separate us from
the love of Christ? Shall trouble
or hardship or persecution or
famine or nakedness or danger
or sword? No, in all these things
we are more than conquerors
through him who loved us."
Romans 8:35,37


AROUND FLORIDA


RDAY


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


BIl^MWPMlmiB B


F 8 FRI II


LAKE CITY ALMANAC


I









Page Editor: Cd. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2011


FAMILY: Long history that includes Olustee battle


Continued From Page 1A
had a large general store, a cotton
gin, a saw mill and a grist mill. Near
Benton and Hopewell was the camp
of the East Coast Lumber Company,
builders of the railroad, and Moore's
Head Turpentine Still.
Robert, Elizabeth and many of their
descendants are buried at Hopewell
Church near Bay Creek. Several of
their grandchildren were charter
members and officers of Hopewell
Church in 1920. In 1925, Robert's
son Benjamin (B. E) donated land to
expand the cemetery at Hopewell.
Even though Robert never owned
much of anything of value, his son
and grandson adopted the opportun-
ism and ambition of his ancestors
to establish their mark in Columbia
County's history. In 1925, B. F
Christie leased out 1,140 acres of
timber north of Benton for harvesting
the gum or resin for turpentine, get-
ting paid 10 cents per cup. His entre-
preneurial spirit was instilled in his
son, Ralph, who owned vast amounts
of real estate, timber and cattle, and
invested in several business ventures
in Columbia County. The Christie's
have a rich heritage in agriculture and


COURTESY PHOTO
Ancestors of Robert Christie, a family whose history can be traced back to the
Battle of Olustee and all the way to pre-Revolutionary War days.


timber.
Robert and Elizabeth had three
sons and three daughters who gave
them 54 grandchildren, half of whom
he never knew:
Charles James Christie was
born Oct. 8, 1866, and died Sept 27,
1935; he married Martha Adaline
Davis on Sept. 10, 1884, and Mary
Elizabeth Ogburn on July 29, 1906;
he had 21 children.
Priscilla "Silla" Christie was
born Jan. 5, 1869, and died April
30, 1942; she married John M.
Chambers on Oct 3, 1888, and had
five children.
Benjamin Franklin Christie was


born Oct 21, 1872, and died Feb.
7, 1946; he married Lutie Crews on
Dec. 25, 1898, and had 12 children.
William Asbury "Scrap" Christie
was born May 23, 1875, and died
Jan. 9, 1944; he married Ruby Bryan
on March 25, 1906, and had two chil-
dren.
Eliza Christie was born Sept
8, 1877, and died Nov. 19, 1950; she
married Sidney Blair Freeman on
Jan. 16, 1901, and had six children.
Elizabeth "Wealthy" Christie
was born Dec. 14, 1883, and died
Dec. 17, 1947; she married John
North on April 4, 1904, and had
eight children.


SKUNKIE: USDA license to display exotics obtained
Continued From Page 1A


It was actually several
bumps in the road, and had
that last bump not been
cleared the zoo would not
have been licensed to exhib-
it for at least six months, the
time span before it could
reapply. Three pre-license
inspections are all that are
allowed per application.
"I don't think its right,"
said Stewart Fissell. "I know
a group went through there
last week, when they didn't
have a license. Why have
(licensing) if they're not
going to follow through on
it?
"(The Haakes) don't care.
They're not going to listen
anyway. They're going to do
what they want"
. The Haakes had their first
pre-license inspection Dec. 8,
and a multitude of problems
with the zoo were chronicled


- all of which Haake mini-
malized as an expected out-
come, supplying them with
a list of things to work on.
However, the second inspec-
tion on Jan. 24, while getting
better results, still came up
short, among the problems
noted animals digging their
way out underneath the
fence and' outside animals
getting into the zoo.
Corrections apparently
were completed and' the
third inspection was passed.
Now that Skunkie Acres
is licensed, unannounced
inspections will come at
least once a year, according
to USGA spokesman David
Sachs.
"We're going to do what
we do best, and that's take
care of animals," said Haake.
'We've been trying to get
along with our neighbors.


They've already started
something else with this
helmut thing."
The "helmut thing" has to
do with the horseback riding
provided by Skunkie Acres.
Neighbors photograhed
a group led by a younger
member of the Haake family
with several youthful mem-
bers of the party rot wearing
helmets, which is required
for those under 16 years-
old.
Fissell and other neigh-
bors, among them George
Whitaker, have complained
about animals from Skunkie
Acres roaming freely about
the neighborhood. Whitaker
said he has found a horse
in his yard more than once;
unpon returning it to the
Haakes, he said he was told
the horse did not belong to
them.


"(Officials) are going to
wait until someone gets hurt
of killed," Fissell said. "They
treat them like they're just a
nuisance.
"Am I the only one who
doesn't understand? I'm so
frustrated with this, ifs ridic-
ulous."
Dozens of complaints have
been filed against those asso-
ciated with Skunkie Acres.
Haake insisted he was try-
ing to implement changes to
satisfy his neighbors, includ-
ing a suspension of rescuing
stray dogs and cats.
'We'll stick to the exotics
and the zoo," Haake said.
"For the time being, we'll
stay away from the cats and
dogs.
"People are going to have
to accept us. We're not going
anywhere."


8.th Annual

NORTH HOME
KORIDA SHOW

&PATIO SHOW


METH LAB: Pair arrested
Continued From Page 1A


on $45,000 bond.
Rivers, 29, of 7711 NE
Waldo Rd., Gainesville, was
charged with manufacture
of methamphetamine and
possession of listed chemi-
cals. She is being held at the
Columbia County Detention
Facility on $35,000 bond.
According to informa-
tion from Columbia County
Sheriff's Office reports, an
anonymous tip from a con-
cerned citizen led deputies


to the home at 10015 SW
County Road 240. Deputies
searched the home after
receiving consent from the
homeowner.
"Deputies discovered
materials, chemicals and
paraphernalia used in the
clandestine manufacture of
methamphetamine," said
Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
public information officer.


eration of all the different
agencies, including the
Blue-Grey Army Inc., the
U.S. Forest Service, the
Florida Park Service and
the CSO, the re-enactment
has grown into this won-
derful event that-it is today,"
she said. "I don't think this


event could come together
without everybody working
together as we do."
Nelson noted that re-
enactors from all over the
United States come to the
Olustee Battlefield Historic
State Park to take part in
the annual re-enactment


PREPARED: Battle ready
Continued From Page 1A


Giarda said more law-
enforcement agencies, U.S.
Forest Service, Florida,
Park Service and more than
2,000 volunteers, including
the Olustee Citizen Support
Organization prepare the
historic park for each year's
re-enactment
Joey Santiago,
AmeriCorps North Region
coordinator, said the agen-
cy had 24 student volun-
teers who helped prepare
the park for this year's
re-enactment He said the
group comes annually to
help prepare the park for
the weekend of events.
The Olustee Battlefield
Historic State Park was
Florida's first state park
and special preparation
goes into making sure the
venue is properly prepared
to host the re-enactment as
'UE ?lZm


well as maintain the park's
historic integrity.
Preparation work for the
upcoming battle re-enact-
ment included cutting grass
on the battlefield, removing
prickly pear cactus, road
improvements, dead tree
and stump removal and
ensuring the protection of
gopher tortoise burrows.
Gopher tortoise is an
endangered species and
Giarda said plywood was
placed over 20-30 burrows
to protect them.
Preparation for re-enac-
tors scheduled to take part
in demonstrations and this
weekend's re-enactment
included firearm certifica-
tion.
Giarda said the safety of
park visitors, re-enactors,
as well as the general pub-
lic, remains a top priority.


1 ROTARY .CuB OF LAKE CITY
DOW)\NTOWN




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DAYS


FREE TO THE PUBLIC
8th Annual

SF Columbia County Fairgrounds
NORTH FLORIDA

7HOME Saturday, March 5th
H ATOME 9a.m. 5 p.m.
PATIO
& SHOW. Sunday, March 6th
R CI (IIw ( IBy10a.m.- 4p.m.







Co-Sponsored by:


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magazine


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94.3


UNSTATE
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VOLUNTEERS: Many help
Continued From Page 1A


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













OPINION


Friday, February 18, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Pathetic

state of

nation's

finances

President Barack
Obama released his
budget plan for fis-
cal 2012 Monday,
and in the process
underlined not only the sorry
state of America's finances but
;also the dysfunctional politi-
cal relationship between the
administration and Congress,
the Republicans and the
Democrats.
It's worth noting that
Congress has not yet passed
the appropriations bills for
fiscal 2011, which began Oct.
1. The country is now five
months into the budget year.
Another catastrophe looms
in the national debt limit, which
is set by law at $14.7 trillion.
The debt continues to climb
and now stands at $14.1 tril-
lion. The flow of red ink c6uld
hit the ceiling by early March,
triggering a federal govern-
ment shutdown if the limit isn't
raised.
The Republicans, especially
their tea party contingent,
profess to be ready to see that
occur.
Obama's budget proposal is
tentative, politically calculated
and does not take into account
the pathetic state of the gov-
ernment's finances. It proposes
$3.73 trillion in spending and
a $1.1 trillion deficit It offers
cuts, including some in spend-
ing areas normally shielded by
Democrats. It offers very mod-
est deficit reduction, stretched
out over a decade.
Its hard to predict the level
of wrath that might be shown
by Americans if a shutdown
comes to pass, but it could turn
the Washington Mall into a
mini version of Cairo's Tahrir
Square.
What is certain is that the
public's fury at a government
- executive and legislative,
Republicans and Democrats
- that can't get its financial act
together will be considerable
and will probably last through
the next election.
0 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -'Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters'
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Curious talk of the deficit hawks


I am sorry to report that my
old pal, Professor Marmot
Sinecure of Groundhog
University (formerly
College) in Punxsutawney,
Pa., has gone over to the dark
side.
Formerly a liberal, he spent
his recent sabbatical not doing
research but listening to Glenn
Beck instead.
He came back to campus a
changed man, having decided
that right-wing political thought
is impervious to reason and
therefore unstoppable. He now
believes his future is best served
by using his own chalkboard to
promote the conservative ideol-
ogy.
Word of his conversion has
spread fast, and this week
he was asked to address the
American Society for Useful
Deficits at its annual banquet in
New York City.
His lamentable remarks are
an insight into the real situa-
tion in America, as revealed in
a private forum of movers and
shakers (motto: "We move, you
shake"). Here is the transcript,
with audience reaction in brack-
ets:
Mr. society president, dis-
tinguished guests, members
and other wealthy people: It is
my great honor and privilege
to address you tonight As
you know, President Obama
("Phooey!") has sent to
Congress a $3.73 trillion bud-
get that cuts many domestic
programs (cheers) but includes
tax hikes for the rich ("For
shame!"). Mr. Obama calls his
budget one of "tough choices"
("Awww!').
My friends, everything is
going entirely to plan (wild
cheering and hugging).
Those of you who long ago
formed the theory of "starv-
ing the beast," by increasing
spending while cutting taxes,
predicted the glorious day
would come when the federal
government couldn't afford


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com
another dime's worth of the
welfare state. Friends, that day
is dawning! The beast is about
to be starved (general swoon-
ing)! I see Grover Norquist out
there in the audience. It was this
wise conservative activist who
famously said, "My goal is to cut
government in half in 25 years,
to get it down to the size where
we can drown it in the bathtub."
Grover, the water is drawn.
The bathtub is ready. Bring on
the beast (blowing of whistles
and horns)! Remember, this is
the American Society of Useful
Deficits you do not support
any deficits unless they are
useful in changing the political
system in our favor ("That's
right!"). Your deficits have been
so useful that the government
will soon have to be so small it
can operate on the second floor
of a Kinko's building, just as the
Founding Fathers envisaged
(chant of "American exceptional-
ism, American exceptionalism").
We have so many to thank
tonight. Dear Ronald Reagan,
who was able to criticize spend-
ing like drunken sailors even
as he ran up the government's
chit (reverential murmuring and
adulation).
While the fiscal responsibil-
ity of Bill Clinton derailed the
grand plan temporarily ("Boo!"),
George W Bush ("Never heard
of him") came back to save
the day with buckets of useful
red ink. And what a card Vice
President Cheney was when he
said deficits didn't matter. Of
course he knew they promote
the starve-the-beast strategy.
He is in an undisclosed location


tonight, but bless him.
Now we have President
Obama ("Phooey!"), who as a
Democrat can't help himself in
spending our money. He has
swollen the deficit in his own
socialistic way, and dofi't let
those liberals tell you it was
because he inherited a failed
economy ("Excuses, excuses").
Obama has tried to lay a
political trap by doing only some
fine surgery on spending and
sending the fat-laden budget
on to our faithful butchers in
the Congress, in the hopes that
they will get the blame. This
president just doesn't get it. This
is the moment we have long
sought ("Yes!").
I see some concerned faces
in the audience. You, the gentle-
man in the tuxedo jacket and
overalls one of America's
great farmers. Let me just say
that we are not going to bring
depression to every rural Dairy
Queen in America by cutting
farm subsidies too much. And
you, sir, the gentleman wearing
the general's stars, there will
always be room in our hearts
for a military-industrial complex
("Hurray! Hurray!").
But are we going to turn into
a nation of pseudo French peo-
ple whizzing through the coun-
tryside in high-speed trains? Are
we to coddle poor people with
heating in winter?
Are we to subsidize kids going
to school in summer when they
could be goofing off? ("No, no
and no!") Finally, I would just
like to thank the Tea Party folks
for waking up to the deficit prob-
lem only when Obama became
president, and also the American
people for being oblivious to
our master plan hidden in plain
sight
(Rapturous applause inter-
rupted only by a strange moan-
ing. Is that a beast or a poor
child crying?)
* Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Pqst-Gazette.


OTHER OPI UNION

Iraqi 'curveball' now admits he lied


An Iraqi defector
whose claims that
Saddam Hussein had
both biological weap-
ons and the means
to manufacture them were a key
part of the Bush administration
rationale for going to war now
admits he lied.
And, he insists after two days
of interviews with the British
newspaper The Guardian, that
he is proud of the subterfuge,
which ultimately resulted in the
loss of over 100,000 of his fellow
Iraqis.
"I had the chance to fabri-
cate something to topple the
regime," he said, later adding,
"Believe me there was no other
way to bring freedom to Iraq."
The story of Rafid Ahmed


Alwan al-Janabi, whose code
name "Curveball" turned out
to be unfortunately accurate,
should be a cautionary tale for
the need for skepticism, caution
and restraint in weighing the
factors to justify a war, espe-
cially one of choice.
Al-Janabi, who was in fact a
chemical engineer, sought asy-
lum in Germany in late 1999.
German intelligence began
interrogating him in 2000 and,
according to the interview, he
began regaling his interviewers
with tales of mobile bio-weapons
factories. Indeed, he claimed to
have supervised one.
The Germans relayed this
information to the CIA and it
began working its way up the
intelligence chain. Meanwhile,


the Germans began to doubt
al-Janabi's veracity and passed
their doubts on to the CIA. The
top CIA agent in Europe began
to have his doubts too.
But the top levels of the Bush
administration were so deter-
mined to make the case for war
they ignored the red flags. One
of them was that the Germans
wouldn't allow the CIA to ques-
tion al-Janabi directly, meaning
we had no assessment from our
own experts as to his credibility.
Al-Janabi's belated admission
absolves the Bush administra-
tion of the charge of having
deliberately lied to get us into
war but finds it was willfully,
deliberately gullible.
* Scripps' Howard News Service


Phil Hudgins
phudgins@cninewspopers.com


Reporters

are just

ordinary

people


Things I have
learned working,
at newspapers
for most of my life:
U Newspaper
reporters and editors are just
ordinary people. Most of them
got into the business because
they enjoy the written word
and want to report what's
going on in the world, or their
part of the world. They also
want to get it right. Yes, they
make mistakes; yes, a few are
biased and show it; yes, some
of them are full of themselves.
But, for the most part, they're
good, decent people who
bend over backward to be fair,
people who have the same
fears, the same trials, the same
hopes that.you have. And some
of them get a bad rap.
News people do not have
magical powers when it comes
to open records and open
meetings. If they're supposed
to be open to reporters, they're
supposed to be open to you,
too. It's just that news people
typically show more concern ,.
when public officials try to pull
one over on their constituents.
And they do something about it
Are the news media more
liberal than other organiza-
tions? It depends on what you
mean by the media. Some of
the national media certainly
are more liberal and show
a liberal bias. But I've never
worked with the national media
unless you consider the
four months I was on loan as a
reporter for USA Today and
most of my colleagues haven't,
either. In truth, we don't even
consider ourselves as part of
the media. We're newspaper
folks in small towns and cities.
That's all.
*' Most of the veteran news-
paper people I know are no
more cynical than anyone else.
They may sound like it some-
times, but perhaps it's because
they've heard and seen how
things are supposed to work
and how they actydly do work.
They hear and read the prom-
ises of politicians as about as
hopeful as a dose of Epsom
salts.
In writing an opinion
piece, it's best not to judge why
a public official or anyone
else takes an action. We
must comment only on his
action, not his motive. Often
we don't know the motive. I
learned that from my first edi-
tor, Sylvan Meyer.
News people believe
we are most effective and
unbiased when we are dispas-
sionate about our stories. We
remain cool and unfazed. That
may be true sometimes. But
who was unfazed following
' 9/11? Who is unfazed when
abuse is inflicted on the inno-
cent? Who is unfazed when
a child drowns? No one with
a heart is unfazed. We are
human beings first, reporters
second.
Most of us newspaper
reporters, despite what you
may surmise from television
news, don't give a tinker's
damn about Lindsay Lohan.
These are just a few things I
know from working with news-
paper people, lo, these many
years. Overall, they're a good
bunch of folks. And as I enter
the twilight of my career, I
know I'm a more caring person
for having known them.
Phil Hudgins is senior editor of
Community Newspapers Inc.


4A











Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today
Civil War Memorial
Service
The annual Civil War
Memorial Service is 9
a.m. Friday at Oaklawn
Cemetery. Wendell
Johnson is the speaker.

Olustee Battle Festival
The 33rd Annual
Olustee Battle Festival
is 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday
in downtown Lake City.
Opening ceremonies are at
noon. The festival will fea-
ture vendor booths, enter-
tainment, a children's.area
and re-enactors. The annu-
al Civil War Skirmish on
the shore of Lake Desoto
and battle of ironclads
Monitor and Merrimac is
5 p.m.

Lake City Columbia
County Museum
The Lake City Columbia
County Historical Museum
will be open all day
Friday after the Civil War
Memorial Service Friday.
Call 755-9096.

Teen summit
Black History 2011
Teen Summit is at 3 p.m.
to midnight on Friday at
Florida Gateway College.
The event is sponsored by
Ifs About My Efforts. The
month-long theme is "Self
Sufficiency is Key." Visit
www. itsaboutmyefforts.org
or call 386-697-6075.

Community Outreach
Event
Food Distribution &
SNAP applications will be
collected for Columbia,
tamilton, Lafayette,
Suwannree& Unio'n' '


counties 8 a.m. to 11
a.m. Friday at Catholic
Charities. Catholic
Charities and DCF case
managers and supervi-
sors will be on site to
assist with the completion
of applications for SNAP
(Food Stamps), Medicaid
and TANE Guidelines
have changed and all
should apply to receive
additional support. The
office is located at 258
NW Burk Ave. For more
information, call 386-754-
9180.

Social event
Love goes on even after
Valentine's Day. The order
of the Eastern Star's Gold
Standard Chapter 48 pres-
ents a social/dance event
from 7 p.m. to 2 a.m. on
Friday. The event will take
place next to the Huddle
House restaurant off of
exit 414 from Interstate
75. Refreshments will be ,
served all night, and tick-
ets will be sold in advance
for $10, and at the door
for $15. For tickets or
other information, contact
Marva Udell at 386-984-
2303.

Saturday
Olustee Battle Festival '
The 33rd Annual
Olustee Battle Festival is
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday
in downtown Lake City.
The festival will feature
vendor booths, entertain-
ment, a children's area
and more. The annual
Olustee Parade is at 10:30
a.m. beginning at South
Marion Street to U.S. 90
West. Parade marshals are
Herbert and Anne Darby.
Visiting dignitaries, parade
marshall and Olustee fam-
ily will be recognized at 12


p.m. Miss Olustee Pageant
winners will also be intro-
duced. The Blue/Grey
Square dance is 7:45 p.m.
at Rountree Moore Toyota
showroom.

Battle Re-enactment
The 35th Olustee Battle
Re-enactment opens to
the public from 9 am.
to 6:15 p.m. Saturday. A
presentation of colors is
9 a.m. Medical demon-
stration is 1 p.m. Period
Music Concert is 2:30 p.m.
Mini battle is 3:30 p.m.
Admission is $7 for adults
and $3 for school age chil-
dren. Preschool children
are free.

Lake City Columbia
County Museum
The Lake City
Columbia County
Historical Museum will
be open all day Saturday
after the parade. There
will be a short dram
aboit "Victoria's Diary,"'
a young girl reflecting
her experiences during
the war at 1 and 4 p.m.
on the front porch. Call
755-9096.

Spring Vegetable
Gardening Workshop
Master Gardener
Library Education Series
is 2 p.m. Saturday at the
Columbia County Public
Library main branch.
Learn about fertilizing and
irrigation, what varieties
to plant, how to combat
weeds and insects, and
how to garden without
harming the environment
Bring all of your vegetable
gardening questions and
enjoy spending time with
other gardeners who share
your interests. Free and
open to everyone.


Basketball tournament
Black History 2011 3-on-
3 basketball tournament
is 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Saturday
at Annie Mattox Park. It
will be followed by a 70s
party from 4 8 p.m. The
events are sponsored by
It's About My Efforts. The
month-long theme is "Self
Sufficiency is Key." Visit
www.itsaboutmyefforts.org
or call 386-697-6075.

Charity Event
All are invited to
join the Party Hearty
Zumbathon charity event
from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. Saturday at the
Lake City Fairgrounds
Banquet Facilities, located
at 438 SW County Road
247. The event will ben-
efit the American Heart
Association's "Go Red
for your Heart" program.
There is a $10 entrance
fee, which includes the
price of the Zumba class.
Raffle. ticket sales begin at
9:30 a.m. and the Zumba
class will begin at 10 a.m.
Don't forget to wear red.
Contact Sarah Sandlin at
386-758-0009.

Founder's Day
Celebration
First Baptist Church
of Lake City hosts their
Founder's Day Celebration
from 2 p.m. 4 p.m.
Saturday. The celebration,
will begin with an Open
,House in the Fellowship
Hall. There will be a morn-
ing service at 10:30 a.m.
on Sunday, with the con-
gregation asked to wear
their best old-fashioned
clothes.

Sunday
Olustee Re-enactmentn


The 35th Olustee Battle
Re-enactment opens
to the public from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday.
The Annual Olustee
Battle Re-enactment
147th Anniversary of
original battle is 1:30 p.m.
Admission is $7 for adults
and $3 for school age'
children. Preschool chil-
dren are free.

Tuesday
Dixie Dancers
New classes for Dixie.
Dancers will begin at 6:45
p.m. Tuesday at Teen
Town, across from Youngs
Park. Call 752-1469 or
754-1478. This a great way
to. meet new people and
have fun.

MADDfest meeting
MADDfest meeting
is 6 p.m. Tuesday at the
Columbia County Public
Library. The two-day
event is March 25 and 26.
MADDFEST Spring Arts
Festival is at Olustee Park.
All arts-and-crafts booths,
food vendors will surround
the park facing the main
stage gazebo. Contact
Tony@MADDFEST.com or
386-965-9256.

Thursday, Feb. .24
SOS Annual
Membership Meeting
The SOS Annual
Membership Meeting will
be Feb. 24, with Florida
Singer/Songwriter Tom
Shed. This is a free musi-
cal event hosted by Save
Our Suwarinee, Inc., to
benefit our membership
drive. It will be at the High
Springs Opera House at
7:30 i.m:'Febfr6d 4.
S -. :., ..... ,, '. i c,


Saturday, Feb. 26
Fund-Raising Banquet
The Greater Lake City
Community Development
Corporation, Inc. presents
their 6th annual fund-rais-
ing banquet beginning at 6
p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 26,
at the Columbia County
Fairground Exhibition Hall,
located at 438 SW County
Road 247. This black tie
affair will feature a social
mixer, dinner and silent
auction, and will end with
music and dancing. Keynote
speaker will be Dr. Kurt B.
Young Ph. D., and tickets
will sell for $30 per person,
or $55 per couple. Call 386-
752-9785.


Monday, Feb. 28
Closing ceremony
Black History 2011 clos-
ing ceremony and elders
banquet is 6 p.m. Feb. 28
at Richardson Community
Center. The event is spon-
sored by It's About My
Efforts. The month-long
theme is "Self Sufficiency
is Key." Visit www.itsabai-
myefforts.org or call 386-697-
6075 for details.

Columbia FFA meeting
The Columbia FFA
Booster/Alumni is meeting
6:30 p.m. Feb. 28 at the ag-
riculture land lab located on
the CHS campus. All FFA
students, parents, alumni
and community leaders are
invited to atte n,. Please
bring a covered dish for
dinner. The group meets
on the fourth Monday
of every month to help pro-
mote agriculture education
among the local community
and provide support to the
. FFA chapters inColumbia.
r:M ",; ??tm ) 41!t,., 'ir A" r.i'


OBITUARIES


Alien S. Adams
Allen S. Adams, age, 82, of Jas-
per, FL. passed away at his home
Wednesday, the morning of Feb-
ruary 16, 2011. Mr. Adams was
born on September 17, 1928 in
Waycross, GA. ......,
to the late Allen ?
and Murrell Ad-
ams. Mr. Adams -
served in the "
United States Marine Corps and
went on to make a living for his
family in Lakeland, FL. before
moving to Jasper in 1966. He
retired from Occidental Chemi-
cal Company and proceeded to
do what he really loved in life
which was playing golf with his
friends. Mr. Adams was pre-,
ceded in death by his wife Betty
W. Adams in January of 1992.
Survivors include two daugh-
ters, Terry Lee Reese (Moody),
Grovetown, Ga. and Patricia
Ann Merritt (Butch), Lake Park,
GA.; one son, Warren Adams
(Becky), Live Oak, FL.; seven
grandchildren and five great
grandchildren. Also surviving
are his close personal friends,
Gene Rogers of Lakeland, FL.,
Robbie Lamb, Jasper, FL. and
Marjorie Dedge also of Jasper.
Funeral- services will be held
at 11:00 a.m. Saturday, Febru-
ary 19, 2011 at the First United
Methodist Church in Jasper.
Interment will follow in Ev-
ergreen Cemetery in Jasper.
The family will receive
friends between the hours of
6:00-8:00 P.M. Friday, Feb-
ruary 18th at Harry T. Reid
Funeral Home, Jasper, FL.
HARRY T. REID FU-
NERAL HOME is in


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charge of arrangements.

Lucille Claude Bishop
Mrs. Lucille Claude Bishop,
89 of Lake City passed away
on Wednesday, a
February' 16;.
2011. A native.
of Albert Lea, :L -
Minnesota, Mrs.
Bishop moved to Lake City dur-
ing World War II while she was
in the Navy and stationed at the
Lake City Naval Air Station.
* She worked for Rountree-Moore
Ford as the office manager
and retired with over 30 years
of employment. Mrs. Bishop
was of the Catholic faith and a


longtime member of Epiphany
Catholic Church. She was pre-
ceded in death by her husband of
35 years and father of her chil-
dren, Harry Mole Rivers in 1982
and her second husband of 20
years, Vernon Bishop in 2006.
Mrs. Bishop is survived by her
son and daughter in law, Charles
C. and Wendy Rivers, Lake City
and her daughter and son in law,
Margaret Rivers and Larry Mor-
rell, LoAgwood, Fl. Four grand-
children, Mari Patrice Morrell,
Longwood, Fl, Bridget Preston,
Jeremy Rivers and Nicholas
Rivers all of Lake City -and five
great grandchildren also survive.
A funeral mass for Mrs. Bishop
will be conducted on Saturday,
February 19, 2011 at 11:QO AM


at Epiphany Catholic Church
with Father Michael .Pender-
graft officiating. Interment will
follow at Memorial Cemetery
with military honors. Visitation
with the family will be Friday
evening from 6-8:00 PM at the
funeral home. Following the
visitation a reception will be
held at Mrs. Bishop's home. In
lieu of flowers donations may
be made to Catholic Charities at
258 NW Burk Ave.,, Lake City,
FI 32055. Arrangements are un-
der the direction of GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, Please
sign the guestbook at
www.guerryfuneralhome.net.


182 N.E. Justice Street Lake City, FL 32055
Phone: 386-752-5422


Patricia Jean McGraw
Miss Patricia Jean McGraw,
died Wednesday, February 16,.
2011 at the Select Specialty
Hospital in Gainesville, FL af-
ter an extended illness. She had
lived in Lake City for the past
twenty-three yeals after mov-
ing here from Jasper, FL. She is
the daughter of the late Fred G.
and Martha H. Dubose McGraw.
She is survived by one sister,
Gwen Adams, nephew Koby
Adams and wife Cindy, nephew
Mike Adams and wife Rebecca,
one niece Theresa Hudson and
husband Eric. Miss Patricia
had three great nephews, Mi-
chael and Daniel Adams and


Gabriel Hudson, four great
nieces Alexis Pieczarka with
husband Joshua, Ashley Roach
with husband Walter, Erin and
Cassidy Hudson and one great
grand nephew Frank Pieczarka.
A private memorial service will
be held at a later time. Crema-
tion Arrangements are under
the direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 S: HWY 441,
Lake City. (386) 752-1954.
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn. com.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


You're invitedto



Tounder's Day



Ceebration

Tirst Baptist Church

Lake City, ELC

Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor
Music Rev. Ken Baxley

The celebration will begin

Saturday, Tebruary 19
with an Open House in the Fellowship Hall
From 2:oo-4:00o .m.

Sunday, Tebruary 20
9:15 a.m. Sunday School 10:30 a.m. Morning Service
The Sanctuary will be decorated with oil lamps and an
old-time pump organ as we celebrate the anniversary of
the post-civil war reorganization of First Baptist.
Please plan to wear your best old-fashioned clothes.


SCHOOL READINESS OPEN ENROLLMENT

LIMITED FUNDING, LIMITED AVAILABILITY!

Need Childcare, Afterschool Care, Extended
Care for your childrenn?

Parents will be able to apply for the Early Learning
Coalition of Florida's Gateway, Inc., School Readiness
Program during Open Enrollment, effective immediately.
Open enrollment is first come, first serve and parents
need to call 866-752-9770 or go to www.elc-fg.org for
a complete list of items to bring for school readiness
enrollment.

SCHOOL READINESS OPEN ENROLLMENT

Early Learning Coalition of Flhrida's Gateway, Inc.
1104 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025
866-752-9770

School Readiness is a state and federally funded program
targeting children birth through age 12 from low income
families in Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, Suwannee
and Union counties. School Readiness programs
provide quality learning experiences and instruction for
children. There is limited enrollment space, so parents are
encouraged to apply now.


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2011


BRIEFS


Arkansas rattled
by earthquakes
LITTLE ROCK, Ark.
Jim Sutterfield was
briefly puzzled by a thump-
ing sound that seemed to
slam the back of his office
chair. But when the small-
town Arkansas fire chief
turned and saw no one was
around, he quickly realized
it was just an earthquake
again.
"That was only my sec-
ond time to feel one, but
others here have felt them
for three or four months
now," Greenbrier chief Jim
Sutterfield said after feel-
ing the latest tremor on
Wednesday. "Now when it
happens, people say, 'Well,
there's another one.'"
Several small earth-
quakes ranging in mag-
nitude from 1.8 to 3.8
have rattled the north-%
central Arkansas cities of
Greenbrier and Guy this
week, and the cause is
unknown.
The U.S. Geological
Survey has reported more
than 30 earthquakes in-
the area since Sunday,
including a magnitude 3.8
quake Thursday morn-
ing and at least 16 others
occurring Wednesday, two
of which were magnitude
3.2 and 3.5. More than 700
quakes have occurred in
the region over the past six
months.

Bahrain intensifies
protest crackdown
MANAMA, Bahrain -
Bahrain's leaders banned
public gatherings and
sent tanks into the streets
Thursday, intensifying a
crackdown that killed five
anti-government protesters,
wounded more than 200
and turned a hospital into
a cauldron of anguish and
rage against the monarchy.
bBahrain's streets were
stly empty after the
loody clampdown, but
thousands defied authori-
ties by marching in cities
in Libya and Yemen as the
wave of political unrest con-
tinued in the wake of upris-
ings that toppled leaders in
Egypt and Tunisia.
The tiny kingdom of
Bahrain is a key part of
Washington's military
counterbalance to Iran by
hosting the U.S. Navy's 5th
Fleet

Man, 84, found
alive in desert
,PHOENIX Henry
Morello prayed to Saint
Anthony, the patron saint
of lost things. But as the
84-year-old spent a fifth
night stuck in a ditch in the
Arizona desert, he started
to lose hope.
"My phone went dead,
my battery went dead, and
I went dead," Morello said.
But Morello lived to
tell his tale Tuesday at a
Phoenix hospital, where the
diabetic man was admitted
in good condition despite
drinking windshield wiper
fluid to stay hydrated.
He didn't have water,
Morello said, so he broke
open the wiper fluid contain-
er with a rock and filtered it
with napkin to try to make
it safe.
Morello said he made
a wrong turn while driv-
ing home Feb. 7 from the
Phoenix suburb of Cave
Creek and ended up stuck
in the desert north of the
city, near the state's major
north-south road for Grand
Canyon-bound travelers.
Morello said he became
stranded when realizing
he took a wrong turn he
made a U-turn and wound
up in a ditch. He tried to


crawl out of the car, but did
not get far and returned.
A pack of hikers found
him Saturday morning. He
heard a knock on a window
from a hiker, and suddenly
his long, painful ordeal was
over. "I just kissed him,"
Morello,said of the hiker.
"He looked like an angel to
me.
* Associated Press


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Tracy Ratliff served as one of the jailbirds at the Muscular Dystrophy Association's Lake City Executive Lock-Up
Thursday. Ratliff said she was very honored to be a part of the fundraiser.






JAILED, BAILED



Business execs 'imprisoned' for MDA


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
H e's not
sure who
sent him
there, but
for Chase
Moses of Heritage Bank
of the South his hour in
"jail" was all for a good
cause.
, Moses joined more
than 300 jailbirdss"
who participated in the
Muscular Dystrophy
Association's Lake City
Executive Lock-Up
Thursday 'at Holiday Inn
& Suites.
The event is a fund-
raiser for MDA, said
Allyson Swanson, execu-
tive director.
Participants included
'business and community
leaders who were "arrest-
ed" during, the day and
transported to the hotel
which served as the jail.
Jailbirds were sen-
tenced behind bars for
an hour to call family and
friends to help them raise
bail, which was set at
$3,200, she said.
The overall goal for the
event was $44,000 and
more than $29,000 had
been raised at press time.
"We have a lot of good
jail birds and will hope-
fully reach $44,000,"


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Farren Knighton, Windsor Arms Apartments Office/prop-
erty manager, calls family and friends to raise bond during
the Muscular Dystrophy Association's Lake City Executive
Leck-Up Thursday at Holiday Inn & Suites.


"I'm really impressed with
the support from the Lake City
community.They've gone over
and beyond to-help."

Amberly Head
'MDA event assistant


she said.
Before the event
began, there were two
bail raisers, Joe Lucas
of the Columbia County


Sheriff's Office and Joel
Rosenfield of North
Florida Pharmacy Inc.
"I'm really impressed
with the support from the


Lake City community,"
said Amberly Head, MDA
event assistant "They've
gone over and beyond to
help." .
The money raised
from the everit goes
toward supporting MDA
programs such as clinic
visits, support group ses-
sions and MDA Summer
Camp for children.
The event raises a lot
of money for MD, said
Michael Stone of Lake
City. He has had MD
since he was about a year
old.
"It was great to see so
many people that cared
giving their time and
money," he said.
There are about six
children in the area with
MD, Swanson said. All of
the money raised at the
lockup stays in Columbia
County.
Participating in the
event was a great experi-
ence, Moses said.
Moses called family
and friends to find any-
one willing to donate and
was able to raise about
$2,000.
"It's important to sup-
port the local commu-
nity and charities in this
though economic time,,"
he said. "Some are really
struggling."


Historical Museum to present


battle from child's perspective


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Instead of just sharing the story
of soldiers in the Battle of Olustee,
the historical museum wanted to
present another voice that of a
child.
The Lake City Columbia County
Historical Museum is presenting
the vignette, "Victoria's Dairy," at 1
and 4 p.m. Saturday.
The presentation is about an 11-
year-old child's view of the Civil
War.
It was written collaboratively by
members of the museum and will
star Victoria Horton, granddaugh-
ter of the museum's president,
Jerry Horton.
Through the diary, the child
details her experiences after the


"It brings the.reality
of what took place
after the battle."

Jerry Horton
President
Lake City Columbia County
Historical Museum

Battle of Olustee, Jerry Horton said.
She is uprooted from her home and
has to move in with her grandfather
and aunts in Lake City.
"It brings the reality of what took
place after the battle," Horton said.
Work began on the presentation
last summer, he said.
His granddaughter was work-
ing on a Girl Scout badge, which
required re-enacting a play, and the


idea grew from there to have a spe-
cial presentation for Olustee.
The main thing the museum
wants to do with the play is show
what people forget aside from the
battle, said Pat McAlhany, trea-
surer. They were displaced from
their homes, and yet took care of
wounded soldiers.
The war not only impacted sol-
diers but civilians as well.
"Life as they knew it no longer
existed," she said.
"Victoria's Diary" is an effort to
shed the innermost thoughts of a
child during .that time, McAlhany
said. Victoria didn't observe the
Battle of Olustee, but she did expe-
rience the aftermath.
"People always manage to forget
about kids in times of crisis," she
said.


POLICE
REPORTS


The following information
was provided by local law-
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted.
All people are innocent
unless proven guilty.

Friday, Feb. 11
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Justin A. Bannister,
33, 102 NW Susan Glen,
driving while license sus-
pended/revoked (habitual
traffic offender).
Joyce Cook, 45, 2478
Highway 135, Lake Park,
warrant Violation of proba-
tion on original charges
of uttering a forgery (two
counts).
Richard John
Crawford, 22, 11844 State
Road 51, Live Oak, warrant;
Violation of probation on
original charge of driving
under the influence with
damage to person/prop-
erty.
Willie Fincher m, 25,
1526 NW County Road 280,
Mayo, warrant Violation
of probation on original
charge of third-degree
grand theft (specified prop-
erty).
David Lee Jordan,
26, 726 SW County Road
242A, warrant Failure to
appear on possession of a
controlled substance (two
counts), failure to appear
for charges of possession
of more than 20 grams of
marijuana, failure to appear
for charges of possession
of drug paraphernalia, fail-
ure to appear for charges
of selling/delivering/pur-
chasing of a controlled
substance (two counts)
and failure to appear for
charges of possession of a
controlled substance with
intent to sell or deliver.
'* Kevin J. Ogburn, 35,
118 SE Bracken Way, war-
rant Violation of probation
on original charge of credit
card fraud.
Jerry E. Osteen, 19,
249 Pleasure Place, war-
rant Burglary of a dwell-
ing, grand theft over $300
but less than $20,000 and
burglary of a structure/
conveyance.
Jarell Jamahl White,
22, 914 NE Washington St.,
warrant Attempted rob-
bery.

Saturday, Feb. 12
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Torrey T. Wilcoxson,
34, 7365 U.S. Highway 41,
possession of cocaine, pos-
session of drug parapher-
nalia and warrant Failure
to appear/failure to comply
on charges of no valid driv-
ers license.
Linsday Suzanne
Young, 31,302 Young Road,
Lafolette, Tenn., warrant
Possession of a controlled
substance.
Ossie D. Crusaw,
51, 819 NW Winfield St,
aggravated battery with
a deadly weapon (domes-
tic violence) and battery
(domestic violence).
Joe C. Hughes, 18,
291 SW Lucky Drive, bat-
tery on a law enforcement
officer and resisting arrest
without violence.
Karl Richard Klock,
43, 367 W. Gray St., Elmira,
New York, warrant
Violation of probation on
original charge of posses-
sion of cocaine.
Lester D. Osborne,
37, 798 NW Virginia
Terrace, warrant Sale of a
controlled substance and
possession of a controlled
substance with intent to sell.

Sunday, Feb. 13
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Cory Ray Blasdell,
32, 1765 W. Thatcher
Boulevard, Saford, Az.,
warrant: Conspiracy to
commit trafficking of a con-
trolled substance.


Monday, Feb. 14
Columbia Cdunty
Sheriff's Office
N Terrance A. Glover,
25, 589 NW Sago Glen,
warrant Dealing in stolen
property (tracking).

* From staff reports


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424





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LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


Fed tax fraud

defendant gets

10 years in jail


From staff reports

The third of five individu-
als convicted in a federal tax
fraud case into inmate tax
scams that is being prose-
cuted by the Third Judicial
Circuit State Attorney's
Office in a Taylor County
court was sentenced
Monday in Perry, accord-
ing to court documents.
Skip Jarvis, Third Judicial
Circuit State Attorney,
said the case is an IRS tax
fraud case in which sev-
eral inmates in the Taylor
County Correctional
Institute in Perry were
using other inmates' names
and social security .num-
bers to file false federal tax
returns.
Rhonda Bellamy Tellier,
of Dunnellon, had pre-
viously entered a plea of
guilty and was awaiting sen-
tencing, which had been
delayed until after it was
determined whether her
testimony would be needed
in the prosecution of the
other defendants. All five
defendants have entered
guilty pleas and Tellier
was brought before Circuit
Judge James Roy Bean for
sentencing Monday.
Bean adjudicated her
guilty of the three counts
she had pled to rack-
eteering, money launder-
ing and conspiracy. She
was sentenced to 10 years
probation and a $5,000-fine


for racketeering, five years
probation for money laun-
dering, and five years pro-
bation for conspiracy.
As a part of her plea,
Tellier agreed that any cur-
rency, bank accounts, or
properties seized as part
of the investigation shall
be forfeited under the
guidelines of the Florida
Contraband Forfeiture Act
Illia Alisha Hale, a cor-
rectional officer at the
time, and David Allen
W.ingard were previously
sentenced.
Defendants, Timothy
Coughlin, an inmate at
the Columbia County
Correctional Facility, and
Margaret Wingard Banks,
have not yet been sen-
tenced.
"Although we have con-
victed these five individu-
als and have closed down
this group, this problem
of inmates filing false
tax returns and obtain-
ing bogus refunds from
the Federal Treasury is
shameful," Jarvis said.
"We have found this going
on statewide and believe it
is taking place in prisons
all over this country. This
upsets me because I am a
taxpayer, too, and this is
also my money that they
are stealing."
Jarvis said that several
State Attorneys in other
circuits have now also
filed on these matters.


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ANTONIA'ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Second graders at Summers Elementary School received a surprise visit from Target representatives and students in the
global logistics class at Columbia High School. The CHS students delivered books donated by Target and First Book.


Target, First Book deliver 2,600 books


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County Title 1 schools
are receiving free books to help
encourage students to read.
A total of 2,600 books were donat-
ed to the school district from Target
and First Book.
Students in the global logistics
class at Columbia High School and
Target representatives delivered
some of the books to Summers
Elementary School Thursday.
The global logistics class is in


a partnership with First Book, a
national literacy organization, said
Rebecca Golden, program teacher.
It stores books for the organization
in its warehouse and ships selected
ones to locations across the nation.
Title 1 schools in the county were
able to select the books wanted,
which were then shipped to the
warehouse for delivery, she said.
There were more than eight differ-
ent titles delivered.
Target has committed five percent
of its income to support communi-
ties since 1962, said Bryan Rabakon,


Target senior group leader. That
totals more than $3 million in giving
every week.
The company has pledged $500
million by the end of 2015 to sup-
port education and help children
learn to read, he said.
Summers was excited to be
among the recipients of the books,
said Lisa Lee, curriculum resource
teacher.
"It's an opportunity to supply
teachers with class books," she
said. Books will also be available in
the library.


POLICE
REPORTS


The following information
was provided by local law-
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted.
All people are innocent
unless proven guilty.
Monday, Feb. 14
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Addarius Richard
James, 21, 118 12th St.,
Apopka, warrant Violation
of probation on original
charge of possession of a
controlled substance and
possession of marijuana.
Ricky Dale Kendry, 27,
232 NW Sugar Cane Place,
warrant: Dealing in stolen
property (trafficking).
Darrick Sevone
Lindsey, 22, 3962 SW
Carpenter Road, warrant:
Sell/delivery/purchase of
a controlled substance and
possession of a controlled
substance with intent to
sell or deliver.
* 0 Mark Edward
Newsome, 30, 525 NW 10th
St., High Springs, aggra-
vated assault with a deadly
weapon and criminal mis-
chief.
Lake City
Police Department
Earl Kelly Antonio,
no age given, 820 NE
Richardson Terrace,
driving while license sus-
pended/revoked (habitual
offender).
Tuesday, Feb. 15
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Vince M. Newsome,
26, 767 NW Amanda St.,
felony battery (domestic
violence), grant theft of
a vehicle, false imprison-
ment, resisting arrest with
violence, criminal mischief
(felony), escape during
transport and resisting
arrest without violence.
David Eugene
Brannen, 42, 705 Shortputt
Drive, Macclenny, driving
while license suspended/
revoked (habitual offend-
er).
Christina Denise
Ramirez, 24, 1405 NE
Duval St., Live Oak, war-
rant: Violation of probation
on original charge of child
neglect.
* From staff reports


1 -MONTH/ LEASE**





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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakeatyreporter.com


SPORTS


Friday, February 18, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS


I.'




Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Gator

baseball

begins

Perhaps the
most
anticipated
baseball
season in
University of Florida
history begins today.
The Gators were
preseason ranked No. 1
by Baseball America,
No. 2 by Collegiate
Baseball and No. 3 by
USA Today/ESPN.
Jacob Tillotson is on
the 34-man roster, after
signing while playing for
Columb'ia High.
Jacob's dad, Mike
Tillotson, said Jacob was
likely to redshirt this
season.
Nothing wrong with
that. Florida returns
eight starters from last
year's team that qualified
for the College World
Series. Four of those
were first-team freshman
All-Americans for coach
1eevin O'SulWn. *...
Tillotson's 'media "
guide entry lists his
days as a member of the
USA 16U National Team.
It noted that Tillotson
played for Greg Gillman
at Columbia and was on
the 2010 district
championship team.
The guide listed 2010
as the the third district
championship for CHS.
Not true:
Columbia has won
twice that many,
beginning with a Second'
District championship
back in 1923.
The Tigers also won
district titles in 1968
under coach Steve
Groce, 1990 under coach
Skip Wolf, 1999 under
coach Brian Saunders
and 2004 under coach
Andy Bennett.
Columbia did win
its fourth playoff game
last year, but has never
advanced past the
second round. The
district champion teams
of 1999 and 2004 also
won first-round games.
Columbia has made
the playoffs four other
times as district
runner-up. Coach Billy
Hale's 1996 team is the
only runner-up to win a
playoff game.
' The 1923 team went to
Winter Park to decide a
champion, but Columbia
lost its opening game.
Coach Walker headed
up the team, but was
unable to make the trip.
Columbia's 10-man squad
was made up of Bernard
Brown, Albert Douglas,
Linwood DuRant, John
Finlayson, Halbert Ives,
J.T. Lipscomb, Irvine
McClelland, Alligood
McColskey, James
McColskey and Eugene
Redding.

Columbia graduate
Celeste Gomez has
played in two games
(one start) for Florida
State's softball team.
Gomez is 3-for-4 with a
triple and two RBIs.
* Tim Kirby is sports editor


of the Lake City Reporter.


Lady Tigers net



another victory


Columbia beats
Gainesville, 4-3, in
district matchup.
From staff reports

The reigning district
champions made it 2-0 in
the district this season
as Columbia High's Lady
Tigers tennis teampickedup
a 4-3 win against Gainesville
High at Jonesville Tennis
Complex in Gainesville on
Thursday.
"It was a hard-fought vic-
tory," Columbia head coach
Tabatha McMahon said.
"They have a really strong
No. 1 player, maybe even


stronger than Ridgeview."
. Gainesville's Eve
Sampson was able to defeat
Columbia' No. 1 Chrissie
Reichert, 1-8, for Reichert's
first regular-season loss in
two seasons.'
Reichert was able to
bounce back in doubles
with partner Susy Romero,
however, to take down the
team of Sampson and Cally
Lajva, 8-4. Romero also won
her No. 2 single's match,
8-1, over Lajva.
"It had a lot to do with
them being the better team
players," McMahon said.
"They know what to do
together and how to keep
each other up."


In No. 2 doubles, Taylor
Owens and Kelsey Mercer
teamed to defeat Sara Lima
and Madison Parenti, 8-0.
Mercer's single's vic-
tory was enough to give
Columbia the 4-3 edge in
the match as she defeated
Lima, 8-2.
Owens fell in a tie-break
at the No. 4 single's posi-
tion. Owens played up from
her No. 8 position due to
injury, but forced Parenti
into an 8-9, (5-7) match.
Heather Benson fell, 7-9,
against Breanna Harper in
the No. 5 position.
Eastside High travels to
Columbia at 3:30 p.m. on
Wednesday.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High's Susy Romero returns serve against
Ridgeview High on Wednesday in Lake City.


Tigers pick up first win


Columbia has
mercy on district
foe Robert E. Lee.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
It was a milestone win, if
that includes No. 1.
, Columbia High's base-
ball team beat 'visiting -Lee
High, 10-0, for its first win
of the season.
It was a district win and
the first for new head coach
J.T. Clark. Clark's father,
Tom, was a baseball coach
and had 685 wins at the
junior- college level.
"It feels good to get
that first one out of the
way for the guys," Clark
said. "It was also my first
official high school victo-
ry."
Columbia came into the
game 0-1, and got a strong
pitching performance
from Kellan Bailey. Bailey
pitched five shutout innings
with two hits, one walk
and nine strikeouts. Jayce
Barber pitched one inning
with a hit batter and one
strikeout.
"Kellan came out and
threw strikes," Clark said.
"When something bad hap-
pens behind him, he doesn't
care. We needed him to
go at them. and get us a
victory."
Columbia blew the game
open with a five-run fifth
inning.
Jason Plynn led off with
a walk and stole his second
base of the game. Jacob
Richardson singled with


one out and also stole sec-
ond. Travis Brinkley fol-
lowed with a two-run single
and went all the way to third
on a play at the plate and an
error.
Daulton Mauldin had
an RBI-double and Mikey
Kirkman traded places with
him on a ball that hit the
fence in left field. Blaine
Courson added an RBI-dou-
ble for the fifth hit of the
inning.
Jimmy Blakely walked
in the bottom of the sixth
inning, moved to third opn
-a single by Brinkley. and
scored on a ground out by
Mauldin to bring on the
mercy rule.
"Our bats finally woke up
and we were hitting balls,"
Clark said. "We have still
got to improve offensively."
In the first inning, Barber
singled and moved to third
when the second base-
man booted Courson's hit-
and-run grounder. Barber
scored on a wild pitch.
CHS continued on 3B


Photos by BRANDON FINLEY/
Lake City Reporter

ABOVE: Columbia High's
Jayce Barber swings at a
pitch during the first inning of
the Tigers' 10-0 win against
Robert E. Lee on Thursday
in Lake City.

LEFT: Columbia High pitcher
Kellan Bailey (left) is
congratulated by head coach
J.T. Clark (middle) and
pitching coach Joey Edge
(right) after throwing five
innings, allowing two hits and
no runs for the Tigers.


Ratliff chosen

as high school

All-Star Athlete


Columbia High
player weighing
college options.
From staff reports

Columbia High's Danny
Ratliff was chosen as one
of WJXT Channel 4's All-
Star Athletes. Ratliff was
one of eight students who
were chosen from the
Jacksonville news-viewing
area for the honor.
Ratliff maintained a 3.66
GPA on a 4.0 scale with
honors courses while letter-
ing in football and weight-
lifting. He was interviewed


by Sam Kouvaris. The inter-
view will run in the coming
weeks on WJXT.
"It was a little nerve-
wracking, but I think I han-
dled it pretty well," Ratliff
. said. "They asked me how
smart you have to be to be
an offensive linemen, and
wanted to know why we
point. I told them how we
try to identify the strong
side."
Ratliff has college
offers including Webber
International. He plans on
holding out until March to
make his official decision,
while waiting on an offer
from Georgia Southern.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High's Danny Ratliff (right) was honored as a high school All-Star Athlete by WJXT
Channel 4 in Jacksonville. Pictured with Ratliff are WJXT's Sam Kouvaris, Richard Ratliff and
Trina Ratliff.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
II a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Daytona 500, at Daytona
Beach
12:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Daytona 500, at Daytona
Beach
4 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for DRIVE4COPD
?00, at Daytona Beach
7:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
NextEra Energy Resources 250, at
Daytona Beach
BOXING
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Middleweights, Ferna'do
Guerrero (20-0-0) vs. Derrick Findley
(17-4-0), at Salisbury, Md.
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGATour,Avantha
Masters, second round, at New Delhi
(same-day tape)
12:30 p.m.
TGC Honda LPGA Thailand,
second round, at Chonburi, Thailand
(same-day tape)
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Northern Trust
Open, second round, at Pacific Palisades,
Calif.
6:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, ACE Group
Classic, first round, at Naples (same-day
tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Va. Commonwealth at
Wichita St.
9 p.m.
ESPN Connecticut at Louisville
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
TNT Exhibition, Rookie Challenge,
at,Los Angeles

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
All-Star Celebrity Game, 7 p.m.
All-Star Rookie Challenge, 9 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No games scheduled
Sunday's Game
NBAAII-Star Game, 8 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 13 Connecticut at No. 16
Louisville, 9 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Daytona 500
Site: Daytona Beach
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
II a.m.-2 p.m.); Saturday, practice (Speed,
10:30 a.m.-noon); Sunday, race, I p.m.
(FOX, noon-5 p.m.).


YOUTH SOFTBALL

Fort White sign-up

today, Saturday
The Fort White Girls
Softball Association has
extended its spring league
sign-up. Registration is
5-7 p.m. today and 10 a.m. ,
to 2 p.m. Saturday at the
South Columbia Sports
Park concession stand.
Cost is $45 for T-ball (ages
4-6) and $50 for ages 6-16.
For details, call Lynn
Harvey at (386) 365-5688.

ADULT SOFTBALL

League sign-up

begins Feb. 28
The Lake City
Recreation Department
has church, commercial
and women's adult softball
league registration set
for Feb. 28 to March 18.
Registration is 8:30 to
5 p.m. weekdays at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
Fees are $350 for a
minimum of 10 games.
Rosters are available at
Teen Town and due with
fees by March 18. A
coaches and managers
meeting is 6:30 p.m.
March 3 at the Girls Club
Center.
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3609.

YOUTH GOLF

Junior tour event

in Louisiana

The Arrowhead Junior
Golf Tour Lakewood Junior
Classic is Feb. 26-27 in
New Orleans. The 36-hole
tournament for ages 12-18


Track: Daytona International Speedway
(th'oval, 2.5 miles).
Race distance: 500 miles, 200 laps.
NATIONWIDE
DRIVE4COPD 300
Site: Daytona Beach
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2,
4-6 p.m.); Saturday, race, 1: 15 p.m. (ESPN2,'
noon-4 p.m.).
Track: Daytona International
Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles, 120 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
NextEra Energy Resources 250
Site: Daytona Beach
Schedule:Today, race, 7:30 p.m. (Speed,
7-10 p.m.).
Track: Daytona International Speedway
(tri-oval, 2.5 miles).
Race distance: 250 miles, 100 laps.
OTHER RACE
U.SAUTO RACING CLUB: Sprint Car,
Bubba Army Sprint Nationals, Through
Saturday, Ocala Speedway, Ocala.

Gatorade Duels

At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach
Thursday
(Start position in parentheses)
Duel I
1. (6) Kurt Busch. Dodge, 62 laps, 120
rating, $56,726.
2. (16) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 62,
110.7, $41,713.
3. (9) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 62,
129.6, $36,713.
4. (14) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 62, 116.9,
$31,713.
5. (17) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 62, 99.5,
$29,713.
6. (7) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
62,97.4, $27,313.
7. (12) A J AIlmendinger, Ford, 62, 85,
$26,213.
8. (4) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 62,83.6,
$25,213.
9. (2) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 62, 68.5,
$25,188.
10. (3) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 62,
71.6, $25,163.
I I. (10) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 62,
79.2, $25,138.
12. (5) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 62,
75, $25,113.
13. (I) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
62, 69.1, $25,088.
14. (19) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 62; 57.1,
$25,063.
15. (II) Bill Elliott, Chevrolet, 62,60.8,
$25,038.
16. (18) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 62,
58.1, $25,013.
17. (23) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 62, 44.7,
$24,988.
18. (20) Kevin Conway, Toyota, 62,
.45.4, $24,938.
19. (13) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 62,
40.3, $24,913.
20. (15) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 61,
33.8, $24,888.
21. (8) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 61,
40.7, $24,838.
22. (24) Andy Lally, Chevrolet, 60, 27.4,
$24,813.
23. (22) -Michael McDowell, Toyota,
engine, 53,24.2, $24,763.
24. (21) David Gilliland, Ford,
electrical, 40, 30.8, $24,738.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner:
159.794 mph.
Time of Race: 0 hours, 58 'minutes,
12 seconds.
Margin of Victory; 0.065 seconds.
Caution Flags: 2 for 7 laps.
Lead Changes: 20 among 9 drivers.


BRIEFS


is ranked by the National
Junior Golf Scoreboard.'
Recommended
accommodations are
available at Sleep Inn in
Marrero, La.. Call (504)
309-5700 for reservations.
Registration deadline is
Sunday. To enter, call (318)
402-2446 or enter online at
www.arrowheadjgt.com.

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL


QuarterbacK ClUD wiu
meet at 7 p.m. Monday in
the teacher's lounge at the
high school. Election of
officers will be conducted,
and all members are
encouraged to attend.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.


Duel 2
I. (4) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 60 laps,
132 rating, $56,726.
2. (3) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 60,
114.2, $41,713.
3. (II) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 60,
90.7, $36,713.
4. (13) Kyle Busch. Toyota, 60, 100.3,
$31,713.
5. (24) Brian Keselowski, Dodge, 60,
57.8, $29,713.
6. (12) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 60,
69.3, $27,313.
7. (10) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 60,
74.3. $26,213.
8. (22) Denny Hamlin,Toyota, 60, 85.4,
$25,213.
9. (14) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 60,
73.5 $25,188.
10. (7) Carl Edwards, Ford, 60, 102.7,
$25,163.
11. (9) David Reutimann, Toyota, 60,
76.7,'$25,138.
12. (I)" Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 60,
102.1,$25,113.
13. (8) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 60, 49.7,
$25,088.
14. (23) Derrike Cope, Toyota, 60,
40.4, $25,063.
15. (5) Greg Biffle, Ford, 60, 85.6,
$25,038.
16. (21) Robert Richardson Jr., Ford,
60,33.7, $25,013.
17. (19) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 60,
50.6, $24,988.
18. (20) Terry Labonte, Ford, 60, 35.9,
$24,938.
19. (2) Trevor Bayne, Ford, accident, 59,
84.9, $24,913.
20. (6) David Ragan, Ford, accident, 59,
48.4, $24,888.
21. (16) Todd Bodine, Toyota, accident,
54, 52.6, $24,838.
22. (18) Steve Wallace, Toyota,
accident, 54,37.2, $24,813.
23. (15) Joey Logano, Toyota, accident,
15,50.3, $24,763.
24. (17) (dasey Mears, Toyota, engine,
2, 24.9, $24,738.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner:
136.571 mph.
Time of Race: I hour, 5 minutes, 54
seconds.
Margin ofVictory: 0.005 seconds.
Caution Flags: 5 for 14 laps.
Lead Changes: 22 among 7 drivers.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Thursday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 4, Los Angeles' 3, SO
Boston 6, N.Y. Islanders 3
Detroit 6,Tampa Bay 2
Vancouver at Nashville (n)
Montreal at Edmonton (n)
Atlanta at Phoenix (n)
Washington at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Atlanta at Edmonton, 3:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Florida at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Colorado at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


ADULT BASEBALL

Men's league

forming in area

The MLBA in,North
Florida and South Georgia
would like to form a team
from this area for 201. Age
is 55 and younger.
For details, visit www.
leaguelineup. corn
northfloridamabl.


Athletes interested in
playing 10-under girls
softball year-round are
being sought.
For details, call Butch
Lee at 965-6002.

* From staff reports


COURTESY PHOTO

Lady Falcons coach gets pie

Lake City Middle School girls soccer coach Allen Hartopp
gets a pie in the face from Lady Falcons Hanna Baker,
Bianca Irizarry, Savannah Thomas, Haley Roberson,
Jemma Thompson, Chase Broome, Emily Harvey,
Tatum Morgan, Madison Mello, Brittany Lee, Morgan
Jackson, Krysten Giebeig, Taylor Robinson, Emily Hall,
Alexis Ortega, Morgan Hartopp and Aston Lee.


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 217; 2. Linda Oliver 205;
3. Lorie Niquette 200. 1. Zech Strohl
235; 2. Dess Fennell 229; 3. (tie) Steve
Fancy, Willie Frazier 225.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 571; 2. Linda Oliver 543;
3. Lori Davis 539. 1. Zech Strohl 660;
2. Willie Frazier 629; 3. Bill Dolly 624.
High handicap game: 1. Lorie
Niquette 263; 2. Maggie Battle 243;
3. Beth Koppa 238. 1. Steve Fancy
259; 2. (tie) Jesse Camacho, Dess
Fennell 253; 4. Luke Milton 245.
High handicap series: 1. Linda
Oliver 711; 2. Lori Davis 652; 3. Mary
Lobaugh 643. 1. Willie Frazier 722;
2. George Mulligan 686; 3. Bill Dolly
672.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
180. 1. Zech Strohl 208.
(results from Feb. 8)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(65-35); 2. Farmers (62-38); 3. Pin
Droppers (54.5-45.5).
High scratch game: 1. Janie Posey
177; 2. Bea Purdy 166; 3. Joanne
Denton 165. 1. Dan Ritter 233;
2. Charles Pressler 199; 3. Earl
Hayward 198.
High scratch series: 1. Yvonne
Finley 450; 2. Bea Purdy 447; 3. Janet
Nash 443. 1. Dan Ritter 575; 2. Earl
Hayward 548; 3. Rick Yates 502.
High handicap game: 1. Janie
Posey 240; 2. Sabrina Herbster 226;
3. Barbara Croft 221. 1. Charles
Pressler 271; 2. Dan Ritter 258;
3. Earl Hayward 225.
High handicap series: 1. Janet
Nash 629; 2. Jeanne Sireci 614;
3. Bea Purdy 606. 1. Wendel Shay
661; 2. Joe Peteyson 637; 3. Keith
Herbster 619.
High average: 1. Betty Brown
146.59; 2. Louise Atwood 145.02;
3. Yvonne Finley 144.89. 1. Dan Ritter
173.51; 2. Art Joubert 171.06; 3. Earl
Hayward 171.04.
(results from Feb. 8)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Neil Hoffman's
Auto (116-34); 2. Team 8 (100-50);
3: Rountree Moore Ford (90-60).
High scratch game: 1. Zech Strohl
267; 2. Ricky Hewett 259; 3. (tie)
Daniel Adel, J.J. Hilbert 258.
High scratch series: 1. Daniel Adel
706; 2. Zech Strohl 683; 3. Ricky
Hewett 675.
High handicap game: 1. Zach
Daughtry 292; 2. Ricky Hewett .275;
3. Brandon Stalvey 273.


SCOREBOARD


BOWLING

High handicap series: 1. Boaty
Boatwright 733; 2. Daniel Adel 730;
3. Zach Daughtry 728.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl
217; 2. Dale Coleman 216.72; 3. J.J.
Hilbert 207.98.
(results from Jan. 31)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Golden Niners
(55-37, 53,829 pins); 2. Gamblers
(55-37, 53,527 pins); 3. Rolling
Thunder (49-43, 54,124 pins);
4. Knock 'em Down (49-43, 53,004
pins).
High handicap game: 1. Betty
Carmichael 238; 2. June Pat Klock
229; 3. Joan Carman'225. 1. Winton
Brewer 259; 2. Chuck Pressler 245;
3. Jack Stanfield 234.
High handicap series: 1. Joanne
Denton 659; 2. Bertha Black 641;
3. Judy Sanders 627. 1. Bill Price 683;
2. George Mulligan 676; 3. (tie) Jerry
Ellis, Sandy Sanders 651.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
154.77; 2. Elaine Nemeth 151.47;
3. Jane Sommerfeld 151.38. 1. David
Duncan 188.2; 2. Bill Dolly 183.74;
3. George Mulligan 182.97.
(results from Feb. 3)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Alley Oops
(18-2); 2. The Sandbaggers (14-6);
3. Spare Us (12-8).
High handicap game: 1. Joanne
Knutsen 238; 2. Betty Carmichael
234; 3. Donna Schneiders 228.
High handicap series: 1. Joanne
Knutson 638; 2. Pat Warne 626;
3. Vicki Baker 623..
(results from Feb. 8)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1.' TAZ (16-4);
2. Fantastic Four (13-7); 3. McGhghy's
Navy (12-8).
High scratch game: 1. Gloria
-Dennis 211; 2. Liz Randall 198;.
3. Donna Duncan 185. 1. Bobby
Trunnell 258; 2. Joe 'Cohrs 243;
3. A.J. Dariano 237.
High scratch series: 1. Gloria
Dennis 536; 2. Donna Duncan 526;
3. Liz Randall 489. 1. Matt Stephan
656; 2. Joe Cohrs 633; 3. Bobby
Trunnell 629.
(results from Feb. 6)
TGIF
Team standings: 1. The Pacers
(14-2); 2. Alvin & The Chickmonks
(11.5-4.5, ;9,879 pins); 3. Couple of
Pairs (11.5-4.5, 9,828 pins).
High scratch game: 1. Brigette
Harrelson 210; 2. Karen Coleman 203;
3. (tie) Pat Gallegos, Bonnie Hood
194. 1. Joe Ganser 256; 2. Rich
Madden 255; 3. Zech Strohl 254.
High scratch series: 1. Karen
Coleman 596; 2. Shannon Brown 559;
3. Brigette Harrelson 555. 1. Zech


Columbia JV softball wins two


From staff reports


Columbia High's junior
varsity softball team opened
the season with a 4-3 win
over Keystone Heights
High on Feb. 11 and a
9-0 win over Bell High on
Monday. The games were
at home.

ACROSS 35 Cir
36 Exi
1 Rounds up, as tur
cattle 37 Cos
6 Pass time in spa
reverie 38 Ble
11 Seizes the wh
throne 39 Ca1
13 Fillet 40 Wa
14 The outdoors 41 Cal
15 Use a compass -
16 Brand of razor 42 Th,
17 Units of wt. 44 Prc
18 Cleveland tal
hoopster 47 Sig
21 Like tweed 51 Wh
23 Craze 52 Cal
26 Time relh
to Celebrate 53 Ge
27 Room service 54 Lis
item
28 Trevi Fountain [
site
29 Product from 1 Ho
flax 2 NA
31 Minute open- cot
ings 3 Mu
32 Clan leader 4 Del
33 Drop or bead 5 Ran


Katie Dooley was the
winning pitcher in both
games.
Dooley struck out
four in a complete game
against Keystone Heights
and fanned seven in four
innings against Bell.
Against Keystone
Heights, catcher Brittany


cle parts
ude mois-
e
smonaut
ice lab
ended
iskey
tegories
s idle
lifornia's Big

at guy's
>vided capi-

in for
iite water
mel
natives
neva's river
zt opus

DOWN

rde member
SA
unterpart
ddy track
feat badly
n fast


Morgan was 2-for-3 with
a home run. Left fielder
Kaitlyn Hill was 2-for-2 with
a clutch, two-out hit.
Against Bell, Jessica
Shimmel was 2-for-2 with
a pair of doubles and three
runs scored. Hill was
1-for-1 with a walk and run
scored.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

YJI PP PAID V EAIL
EGO OMAR ULNA
GOLDMINE LIDS
GROUPS WITTY
ME.SS CE S
RABBIT PEER
DRJY INIT EXIPO
STUB UKES LED
RUBE TASTE
Q UIT DRAB
URGED AMBUSH
BABA AUDIENCE
ASAN THIN TAR
RIND ASIA OMS


6 Churchill Downs
event
7 Slugger's stats
8 Job-ad letters
9 Novelist Beattie
10 Got acquainted


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
**-


12 Fasten tightly
13 Theater sound
system
18 Bottom floor
19 Place for birds
20 Canal city
22 Pester
23 Public meet-
ings
24 Ms. Earhart
25 Saguaro habi-
tat
28 Be a thief
30 Almost-grads
31 Cool treat
34 Deadly
36 Dictionary
entries
39 Type of jacket
41 Hot-dog part
43 Sing like
Fitzgerald
44 Icy remark?
45 Contented
sigh
46 Navy noncom
48 Green-egg
layer
49 Walk barefoot
50 Mao -tung


2-18 @2011 by UFS, Inc.


Strohl 679; 2. Rich Madden 640;
3. Jim Pauwels Sr. 632.
High handicap game: 1. Nina
Howd 249; 2. Bonnie Hood 248;
3. Linda Andrews 243. 1. Joe Ganser
284; 2. Frank Howell 278; 3. Jerry
Howd 275.
High handicap series: 1. Karen
Coleman 665; 2. Bonnie Hood 664;
3. Patti McGrath 663. 1. Jim Pauwels
Sr. 737; 2. Jerry Howd 729; 3. Frank
Howell 707.
(results from Feb. 4)

Youth leagues

MAJORS SCRATCH
Team standings: 1. TEAM 2
(53-27); 3. Scrumdiddlyumptious (51-
29); 2. Bobby's Angels (41.5-38.5).
High scratch game: 1. Sara Sykes
207; 2. Sara Sykes 196; 3. Christine
Peters 180. 1. Garrett Shay 242;
2. Garrett Shay 235; 3. Cody Stuart
215.
High scratch series: 1. Sara
Sykes 569; 2. Courtney Schmitt 478;
3. Christine Peters 477. 1. Garrett
Shay 673; 2. Caleb Meek 559;
3. Madison Stephens 547.
MAJORS
Team Standings: 1. Care Bears on
Fire (49-27, 44,897); 2. Noble Team
(49-27, 44,120 pins); 3. Iron Bowlers
(44.5-31.5).
High handicap game: 1. Linden
Barney 238; 2. Mecenzie Sellers
227; 3. Sara Johns 226. 1. Charile
Phillips 256; 2. Franklin Shepard 254;
3. Jacob Howell 252.
High handicap series: 1. Sara
Johns 659; 2. Mecenzie Sellers
638; 3. Victoria Wise 610. 1. Charlie
Phillips 704; 2. Brandon Willis 664;
S3. David Senokossoff 656.
JUNIORS
Team Standings: 1. Spineless Pins
(47-29); 2. The Clones (45.5-30.5);
3. The Clones (42.5-33.5).
High 'handicap game: 1. Amanda
Dillon 246; 2. Alexis Menna 236;
3. Alyson Everette 205. 1. Avery
Atkinson 215; 2. (tie) Ben Williams,
Blake Lyons 213.
High handicap series: 1. Alexis
Menna 687; 3. Amanda Dillon 650;
3. Alyson Everette 565. 1. Ben
Williams 619; 2. Anthony Cohrs 588;
3. Adam Fralick 580.
BANTAMS
High handicap game: 1. Emily
Wells 160; 2. Biancah iillingsley
147. 1. Josh Kasper 194; 2. Christian
LeRoux 168; 3. Eric Anderson 162.
High handicap series: 1. Emily
Wells 446; 2. Biancah Billingsley
412. 1. Josh Kasper 530; 2. Christian
LeRoux 472; 3. Eric Anderson 435.
(results from Feb. 5)


Q-back Club YOUTH SOFTBALL

meeting Monday Interest sought

The Fort White for 10-under girls


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421











NFL, players'


Union agree


U to mediation


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jeff Burton (31) crosses the finish line ahead of Clint Bowyer (33) to win the second of two qualifying auto races for
Sunday's NASCAR Daytona. 500, at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach on Thursday.


Kurt Busch two-for-two at


Daytona with qualifying win


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH -
Three races down during
Speedweeks and nobody
has any idea what they'll
see in the Daytona 500.
Kurt Busch felt cer-
tain he cemented himself
the favorite after winning
Thursday's first 150-mile
qualifying race, backing up
last weekend's victory in
-the exhibition Budweiser
Shootout.
Jeff Burton, the winner of
the second qualifying race,
respectfully disagreed.
The lack of a clear
front-runner was the least
of NASCAR's problems,
though. Drivers have
locked in on a new style
of tandem racing that has
just about everyone unsure
how Sunday's season-open-
er will unfold.
All three races so far have
been dominated by two-car
packs, as drivers figured


out the fastest way around
the new asphalt at Daytona
International Speedway. It's
vastly different from the
wild pack racing fans adore
at Daytona, and NASCAR
has already made a series
of rules changes this week
in an attempt to separate
the cars.
Most drivers seem daz-
zled by this radical new
racing, but fans are a little
freaked out at the potential
for a boring race.
Burton insisted noth-
ing will be different come
Sunday.
"It's my prediction it will
be the same Daytona 500,"
he said. "When somebody
has a chance to take the
Daytona 500 trophy home,
you do things that you
weren't going to do 100
laps before that It's the
same thing every time we
come down here."
So far, it's hardly been a
wild ride.
As soon as the green flag


fell for each of Thursday's
qualifying races, the field
broke up in two-car packs.
It was a repeat of every
on-track session since the
speedway was paved dur-
ing the offseason, and driv-
ers determined during two
test sessions that hooking
up in pairs is the fastest
way around the track.,
Every minute of prac-
tice has been used by
drivers trying to figure
out who they can work
with, how long they can
stay hooked up, and how
quickly they can swap posi-
tions. NASCAR has tried a
series of technical adjust-
ments this week to break
up the tandems mostly
through changes to the
cooling systems that cause
cars to overheat if they stay
hooked up too long. 1
Several .drivers, Busch
included, have mastered,
the system in a very short
time.
'To find the right drafting


partners out there, make
different things happen,
you're learning every lap,"
said Busch, who worked
with Regan Smith through
most of his qualifying win.
"It's amazing what part-
nerships can do out on the
racetrack, and when two
guys can think the same
way without saying a word,
things are going to happen
for those two guys."
But others are still try-
ing to figure it out.
"Guys, it don't compare
to anything," said two-time
Daytona 500 winner Bill
Elliott, who raced his way
into the field in the first
qualifying race. "I've never
experienced anything like
what you have to do to
make it work. It's the crazi-
est thing I've ever seen. It's
like a bunch of kids play-
ing leapfrog, but they were
doing it in pairs." -
Elliott was one of seven
drivers to earn a spot in the
field Thursday.


COURTESY PHOTO
Michel Moore and Kelly Baucom of the ACR Hunnies warm-up before a bout. The Hunries are taking on the Jacksonville
Roller Girls 7:30 p.m. Saturday.


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

NEW YORK The
NFL and its players' union
agreed Thursday to media-
tion in their labor dispute.
The Federal Mediation
and Conciliation Service, an
independent U.S. govern-
ment agency, will oversee
negotiations in Washington
beginning Friday less
than two weeks before the
collective bargaining agree-
ment between the league
and the players expires.
After holding separate
discussions with represen-
tatives from the league and
the union, FMCS director
George H. Cohen said both
sides agreed to have the
agency get involved in the
stalled talks.
Negotiations broke down
last week, leading to the
cancellation of one planned
session.
"Due to the extreme
sensitivity of these nego-
tiations and consistent with
the FMCS's long-standing
practice, the agency will
refrain from any public
comment concerning the
future schedule and/or the
status of those negotiations
until further notice," Cohen
said.
NFL spokesman Greg
Aiello told The Associated
Press in an e-mail: "We are
now in mediation."
In a statement, NFLPA
spokesman George Atallah
said: "The NFLPA has
always focused on a fair
collective bargaining agree-
ment through negotiations.
We hope that this renewed
effort, through mediation,
will help the players and
owners reach a successful
deal.".
The FMCS website says
it "provides free mediation
services in contract nego-
tiation disputes between
employers and their union-
ized employees. All the par-
ties have to do is make a
request."
Meditation is not bind-
ing, FMCS public affairs


director John Arnold said
in a telephone interview.
"Our agency director will
be working with the parties
to assist them in reaching a
voluntary, mutually accept-
able agreement," Arnold
said.
Cohen said in a state-
ment that the negotiations
will be conducted "under
my auspices."
News of mediation is the
first positive sign after sev-
eral months of infrequent
negotiations. It also comes
only days after the NFL
filed an unfair labor practice
charge against the NFLPA
with the National' Labor
Relations Board. Monday's
filing said the union "con-
sistently has failed to confer
in good faith" during nego-
tiations for a new contract
and the union's "conduct
amounts to surface bar-
gaining and an anticipatory
refusal to bargain."
Aiello told the AP the
mediation would not have
an effect on the NLRB com-
plaint. '
The biggest issue sepa-
rating the sides is how to
divide about $9 billion in
annual revenues. Among
the other significant points
in negotiations: the owners'
push to expand the regu-
lar season from 16 games
to 18 while reducing the
preseason by two games; a
rookie wage scale; and ben-
efits for retired players.
"Our ultimate goal is a
new CBA," Atallah, wrote
Thursday on his Twitter
feed. "I will not discuss
any details about the next
set of negotiations. We are
observing a strict media
blackout"
Some players, however,,
-were commenting moments
after the announcement.
"NFL and NFLPA agree--
ing to meet with a federal.
mediator is a real posi-
tive step," Vikings tackle
Bryant McKinnie said on
his Twitter account. "Let's
see if he can get them to
make actual progress."


CHS: Play again tonight
Continued From Page 1B


Ryan Thomas had a hard-
hit ball to the third baseman
that went for an 'error in the
third inning. Thomas stole
second base and scored on
a triple to deep right field
by Bailey.
Brinkley was nicked
by a pitch to open the
fourth inning. He stole
second base and Mauldin
bunted for a base hit.
Kirkman added an RBI-
single and, after a sacrifice
bunt by Barber, Courson
drove in a run on a ground
out
"We have got to build on
this," Clark said. 'We have


a game tomorrow and we'll
see how we play two days
in a row."
Kelcey Bradley took the
loss for Lee (0-2). He had
a hit, and Tommy Walk
had the other hit for the
Generals.
Both of Lee's hits came
in the fourth inning, when
Bailey had his only walk of
the game. He got out of the.
bases-loaded threat with
a strikeout No other Lee
runner reached second
base.
Columbia (1-1) hosts
Union County High at
7 p.m. today.


Bees and


Bears set to


duel at derby


From staff reports


Bees and Bears will face
off for the first local derby
bout of the season.
The ACR Hunnies take
on the Jacksonville Roller
Girls 7:30 p.m. Saturday at
Skating Palace. Doors open
at 7 p.m.
The Hunnies are a flat-
track roller derby team,
with members in Columbia
and Alachua counties and
Valdosta, Ga. Roller derby is
an aggressive, full-contact
women's sport on skates.
Derby is as hard-hitting
as football or rugby, said
Jennifer Davids, ACR vice


president
One player from each
team, knows as the jam-
mer, tries to skate through
a pack of blockers to score
points for her team. Play
goes counterclockwise on
the track.
Points are scored by jam-
mers lapping around blockers
as many times as possible.
Skating Palace is located
at 357 N.W. Hall of Fame
Drive.
Tickets are $5 in advance
and $7 at the door. Children
under 10 are free.
To learn more about
the Hunnies visit
www. acrderby. org.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
IACTUD


SCEMESH/. .
WHAT THE- PICNICKE-5
7 T -1c POURING THE TUG

TRAPIEz OF WAR.
SNow arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above carton.
A: TO
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: TAWNY FOLIO UPSHOT SUBWAY
Answer: When spring planting was completed, the
farmer said it was SOW, SOW


LAKE VITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420








Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE &


DILBERT
I OFFICE RELOCATION


I COULD MOVE YOU
TO A CUBICLE BETWEEN
A GUY bJHO CLEARS HIS
THROAT ALL DAY AND
A WOMAN WHO LAUGHS
TOO MUCH.


IS THIS BECAUSE I
ONCE SAID YOU AREN'T
SMART ENOUGH TO BE
AN ENGINEER?
K LOOK o JHAT I
ENGINEERED.


1.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
ACCORDING TO TO FINISH ...EXACTLy! OH, I CAN SEE
STHISARTICLE, EACH OTHER'S VES, AND... NO ONLY IT CAN GT WHERE IT WOULD
AFTER A WHILE, SENTENCES THAT, BUT PRETTY... GET VERY
MARRIEDOCOUPLES ANNOYING AT
TEND ... TIMES DEAR




-B

BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Conservative woman needs

to find like-minded friends


YOUR FLOOR PLAN PUTS
ME BETWEEN A LOUD a
TALKER AND A CHRONIC
FLATULATOR.



1^ ^f


DEARABBY: I am a very
conservative woman. I don't
drink, dance, wear makeup or
pants. I enjoy the company of
friends despite our differenc-
es and thought they enjoyed
I mine.
On our most recent outing,
I however, they mocked my re-
| ligious jewelry, commented
H on my "lack of fashion," and
I made me feel guilty for not
wanting to stay out late.
Despite this, they are great
i friends and would help me at
the drop of a hat. I don't bring
up their being overweight,
or that I think some of the
clothes they wear are ugly. I
don't criticize them for sleep-
ing around. I wish they would
accept me for who I am.
I am considering not going
out with them the next time
they ask, but I don't really
want it to come to that. Any
suggestions? JUST AN
OLD-FASHIONED GIRL
DEAR OLD-FASH-
IONED: Just this: It's time
for you to' start cultivating
relationships with people
whose values are more
like your own. The friends
you have described may be
lovely, but their comments
were out of line and folks
are known by the company
they keep. If you spend a lot
of time with the women you
have described, people will
begin to make assumptions
I about YOU.
DEAR ABBY: Two of my
children, ages 28 and 30 and


thinks she's the victim in-
stead of realizing she is the
problem.
She's planning to mar-
ry "Dave," a man she has
known for only six months.
She refuses to consider his
past criminal record of do-
mestic abuse. Abby, this man
.has several children, one of
whom he does not acknowl-
edge.
Am I wrong to be in-
volved' in this wedding? I
feel it would be a mistake to
be "supportive" when I'm
totally against it. Dave has
pushed her already, and I
know what lies ahead for her
if she goes through with this
marriage. Also, her behavior
has changed drastically 'since
she has been involved with
him. TO BE OR NOT TO
BE ... THE MOTHER OF
THE BRIDE
DEAR T.B. OR N.T.B..:
You will always be your
daughter's mother, but you
don't have to bless this mar-
riage with your presence.
Some people have to learn
their lessons the hard way;
and your daughter appears
to be one of them. She needs
to understand that while you
do not approve of Dave, you
love her. Keep the lines of
communication open because
she is going to need you in
the future.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Tie up loose
ends at work or apply for a
position that will bring you
greater stability. Don't let
what other people do or say
bother you. You'll be overly
sensitive and must avoid
overreacting. ***
TAURUS. (April 20-
May 20): Give and take,
sharing ideas and expand-
ing your knowledge with
like-minded people will
help you realize the pos-
sibilities within reach. A
gentle nudge will grab the
attention of someone who
interests you. *****
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Put in a solid
day of work and you will
reap the rewards. Advance-
ment is likely to be offered
in an unusual setting or
while socializing with col-
leagues. Poor health or a
mishap' will occur if you
overdo it physically. **
CANCER (June '21-
July22): Lookforward and
forget about the things you
cannot change, Experiment
with different lifestyles or
ways of doing things. Find-
ing Where and how you fit
in be t will bring beneficial
results. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Don't let confusion
cause you to miss out on
a financial deal. You stand


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

to lose if you aren't upfront
about what you intend to
do. Any emotional decep-
tion around money, con-
tracts, settlements or legal
matters will create a prob-
lem. ***
VIRGO (Aug.. 23-Sept.
22): Spend. more time
with the people you love
or socialize in order to find
someone you want to get
to know better. Love and
romance are evident but,
if you don't make a move,
you aren't likely to enjoy
the moment. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Too much dwelling on
the past or worrying about
what hasn't been working
for you is a waste of time.
Engage in hobbies or inter-
ests you find inspiring or
that will boost your confi-
dence and help you develop
A positive attitude. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21)i Don't let anyone
play emotional mind games
with you. Deception is ap-
parent and must be dealt
with quickly. Change may
be required if you want to
pursue new goals. A****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): The more
involved you become in
something that interests


you, the easier it will be
to incorporate change int6
your personal and profes-
sional life. Friends,.neigh-
bors and relatives can
contribute with advice.

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Keep a close
watch on your belongings,
assets, contracts or pend-
ing settlements or legal
matters. Someoneis likely
to use emotional tactics
to get something from
you. Refrain from making
a move or divulging your
thoughts if you feel uncer-
tain or uncomfortable with
a situation. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Take care of
your health and well-be-
ing. Taking on too much
responsibility can have
negative results. Keeping
a low profile will help you
regain stability in your life
and help you choose.a bet-
ter course of action in the
future. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Your changing
plans and chameleon-like
attitude will send mixed
messages, personally and
professionally. Pick a direc-
tion or a plan that is yours,
not someone else's, and
stick to it or you may dis-
appoint someone you care
about ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: W equals G
" H Y E D I F YZ LG U Z B E EO ET
ZOGBHXZDU TEB YJG GDWIHUJ ZDRi
ZVUYBZIHZDU YE BGZIHSG J EP
OVXJ PG JZKG HD XEOOED." -
UYGMJGD TBF
PREVIOUS SOLUTION; "If being a gangster were a prerequisite to being a
musician, there'd be a lot less cello music, for example." Greg Giraldo
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 2-18


CLASSIC PEANUTS


INSULTSI!AAYS
INSULTS!
A''^^-i-^^C ^


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
college-educated, have what
they call "bill paying anxi-
ety." It doesn't matter if they
have the money or not, they
find it difficult to pay their
bills. They have both lost
their licenses for not paying
traffic tickets, but that hasn't
taught either one of them a
lesson. Any advice on how
to help them? ANXIOUS
MOM IN WASHINGTON
DEAR MOM: How long
have those two been out from
under your roof? Did you pay
all their expenses until recent-
ly? Your "children" aren't
children anymore. They have
reached an age when they
must now learn from their
mistakes. When they're ready
to assume responsibility for
their actions, they'll do what
other adults who are in this
kind of hot water do: They
will seek financial or psycho-
logical counseling and recog-
nize that acting like ostriches
will not fix their problems,
and neither will. Mama.
DEAR ABBY: My 24-
year-old daughter, "Evy," is
falling to the rocky bottom.
She has taken advantage of
everyone in our family. She


AN' HERE'S WHAR IT w-kir eatur-ecom
GITS A LI'L TRICKY..." ) /I \ U

t / I i ^ NO.ONE.
..A (J ALLOWED PAST
^ / THIS, POINT--'
1 j THAT AIN'T GOT
S 9 OTHAR AFFAIRS
^^)--^ IIN ORDER !


COMICS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2011











Classified Department: 755-5440


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2011

Lake City Reporter





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Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

li Print and Online
www.lakeeityvrcporter.coin


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE INTEREST OF:
CASE NO.: 2010-18-DP
N.D.
DOB: 8/29/2004
K.W.
DOB: 7/27/2006
MINOR CHILDREN.
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-
VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO: Jemilla Dortly
(address unknown)
WHEREAS, a Petition for Termina-
tion of Parental Rights under oath
has been filed in this court regarding
the above-referenced childrenn, a
copy of which is on file with the
Clerk of the Court,
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMAND-
ED TO APPEAR before the Honora-
ble E. Vernon
Douglas, Circuit Judge, at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Florida, on MARCH 16, 2011,
at 10:20 A.M., for a Termination of
Parental Rights Advisory Hearing.
YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI-
FIED HEREIN.
*****FAILURE TO PERSONAL-
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN)
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE
COURT*****
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on this 8th day of Febru-
ary 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/:Trisha Brewington, Deputy
Clerk.
Tracy L. Sorcek, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 46860
Children's Legal Services
1389 West US Highway 90, Suite
110
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437
Special Accommodations. In ac-
cordance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act, if you are a person
with a disability who needs any ac-
commodation in order to participate
in this proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact
Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-
tion,' 173 NE Hetnando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at
least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than seven (7)
days. If you are hearing impaired or
voice impaired, call 711.
04543468
February 11, 18, 25, 2011
March 4, 2011

NOTICE OF ACTION
BEFORE THE BOARD OF NURS-
ING
IN RE: The license, to practice nurs-
ing of
Aranda E. Williams,,C.N.A.
1166 S.E. St. Johns Street LCt #2
Lake City, Florida 32025
CASE NO.: CNA 136466
The Department of Health has filed
an Administrative Complaint against
you, a copy of which may be ob-
tained by contacting, Casey Cowan,
Assistant General Counsel, Prosecu-
tion Services Unit, 4052 Bald Cy-
press Way, Bin #C65, Tallahassee
Florida 32399-3265, (850)245-4640
If no contact has been made by you
concerning the above by November
24, 2010, the matter of the Adminis-
trative Complaint will be presented
at an ensuing meeting of the Board
of Nursing in formal proceeding.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities,Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the individual or agency
sending this notice not later than sev-
en days prior to the proceeding at the
address given on the notice. Tele-
phone: (850)245-4640, 1-800-955-
8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770 (v),
via Florida Relay Service.

04543253
January 28, 2011
February 4, 11, 18, 2011







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DONREED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224


Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156


Services


Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING A SPECIAL EX-
CEPTION AS PROVIDED FOR IN
THE CITY OF LAKE CITY LAND
DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS
BY THE BOARD OF ADJUST-
MENTS OF THE CITY OF LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to
the City of Lake City Land Develop-
ment Regulations, as amended, here-
inafter referred to as the Land Devel-
opment Regulations, objections, rec-
ommendations, and comments con-
cerning a special exception, as de-
scribed below, will be heard by the
Board of Adjustments of the City of
Lake City, at a public hearing on
Tuesday, March 1, 2011 at 6:30
P.M., or as soon thereafter as the
matter can be heard, in the City
Council room on -the second floor of
City Hall located at 205 North Mari-
on Avenue, Lake City, Florida.
Pursuant to a petition, SE 11-01, by
Westfield Investment Group, owner,
requesting a special exceptionq be
granted as provided for in Section
4.13.5 (11) of the Land Development
Regulations to permit a Church in a
Commercial Intensive (CI) zoning
district, to be located on property de-
scribed, as follows:
426 SW Commerce Drive, Suite 130
Columbia County Parcel Number
02714-011
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future dates. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time, and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
cerning the matter will be published,
unless said continuation exceeds six
(6) calendar weeks from the date' of
the above referenced public hearing,
At the aforementioned public hear-
ing, all interested parties may appear
to be heard with respect to the
amendment.
Copies of the special exception are
available for public inspection at the
Office of Growth Management, City
Hall, located on the second floor at
205 North Marion Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, during regular business
hours.
All persons are advised that if they
decide 't appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ing, they will need record of the pro-.
ceedings, and that, for such purpose,
they may need to ensure that a verba-
tim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
04543549
February 18, 2011
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly,
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of MGM gra-
fix at 1168 SW Cumorah Hill St.
Ft. White, FL
S32038
Contact Phone Number:
386-288-6547 and the extent of the
interest of each, is as follows:
Name: Julie D. Van Mersbergen
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Julie D. Van Mersbergen.

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 16th day of February, A.D.
2011.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
05525168
February 18,2011

010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found







LOST Black Male, Toy Poodle,
on Tues 2/15, in the 252 & Coun-
try Club area.Reward being
offered Please call 386-752-9300
Lost Female Dog on 2/12 Sat.,
near Richardson Middle school.
Medium sized brown/black, looks
like a fox, Reward, 386-752-8920


100 Opportunities

04543538
Family Services Analyst
Non-Profit organization is
seeking highly motivated
professional for
VPK/School Readiness/Parent
Education Position. Experience
in Social Services or related
field preferred salary
$9.62-$12.98 plus benefits.
Fluently Bilingual in
English/Spanish preferred
Send resumes by
February 14, 2011 to:
Early Learning Coalition
Attn: HR, 1104 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025 or fax to
386-752-8094

05525172


100 Job
100 Opportunities

04543539
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
INSIDE SALES
Ideal candidates with previous
experience with outbound sales.
Must have excellent telephone
skills. Individual must be
enthusiastic, outgoing, have
excellent computer skills and be
able to perform in a fast pace
environment. Please fax resume
to 386-758-0984 or email to
greajobs(@LCjobs.info.

04543540
FULL TIME VICTIM
ADVOCATE-GRANT
FUNDED POSITION
in Lake City Guardian ad
Litem Office, salary
$26,000-$28,000yr-no benefits
Bachelors Degree in Social
Work, Criminology, Psychology
or two years comparable service
in advocacy. Excellent
Communication skills, ability to
work independently and well
with others of various ages,
professions and backgrounds
must maintain a strong commit-
ment to Victims of Crime and
respect confidentiality of
victims. State application must
be submitted by February 23,
2011 to Tammie C. Williams at
213 Howard Street East Live
Oak, Florida 32064, EOE

04543622 I
Customer Service Rep.
Handle inbound customer calls,
schedule appointments,
document actions, place calls to
renew service. Great pay and
benefits. keyboard skills a must.
Send resume to
fjobs@flapest.corih, fax to 386-
752-0171 or mail to 536 SE
Baya Drive. Lake City 32025
EOE, M/F, DFWP. H, V.


05525143
S & S Office is hiring
a full-time receptionist.
Duties included: typing &
computer work
(must be proficient in Microsoft
works programs),multi-line
phones, filing, 10-key, etc.
Benefits include: vacation, sick
leave, credit union, profit shar-
ing,dental, health and
life insurance.
Drug Free Workplace EOE'
Apply in person at
S & S Office
134 SE Colburn Ave,,
Lake City, FL 32025

05525171
Raymond James Financial
Services located at
First Federal Bank of Florida
is currently seeking a
full-time qualified
Administrative/Sales Assistant
to service financial advisors
of a full service investment
program. Minimum
requirements include strong
interpersonal and organizational
skills; excellent computer,
grammar and mathematical
abilities. Send resumes to:
Human Resources, RJFS,
4424 NW American Lane,' Ste
102, Lake City, FL 32055.

05525174
MARKETING ASSISTANT
Marketing Director of dynamic
consulting firm needs individual
with marketing experience
strong organizational skills,
strong computer skills,
MS OFFICE and a
desire to succeed.
We have DOUBLED our client
base in the last 18 months.
Will train in our niche market
industry to increase client base
and to participate in client
training and follow-up.
Home office in
White Springs Florida.
Please forward resume
and references to:
hr@speced.org

A/C SERVICE Tech
Min 5 yrs experience
F/T with benefits
Please call 386-454-4767
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies


Hiring Certified Teachers for all
ages. Please do npt call if you
are not certified. 386-755-7677
6:30a-5:30p or 344-5363 after 5:30
P/T Class A CDL
Drivers needed. A CLEAN record
and a flexible schedule required.
Call 386-935-1705 to apply.
P/T Farm Tractor Operator
simple mechanic work,
clean license
Call 386-935-1705
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com
Teacher (Lawton's, Early Head
Start Lake City, Birth to 3 yrs old)
HS Dip/GED, Must have FCCPC
/CDA; three years of classroom
experience working with
infants/toddlers preferred; Bilin-
gual (Spanish/English) preferred,
5 Hour Literacy, Must pass physi-
cal/DCF background screening,
Current First Aid/CPR preferred.
Excellent Benefits-Paid Holidays,
Sick/Annual Leave. Apply in
person at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637,
by e-mail: arobinson(&sv4cs.org
Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE


100i Job
Opportunities
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but-not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

WANTED: Row slash and long
leaf pines 4-6 years 8-12
Top Dollar PAID References
avail. Call David 352-281-0235

120n Medical
120 Employment

05525167
Nurse On Call
Home Health Agency,
Medicare certified, is now
hiring OT, PT & ST
Sign on bonus for F/T
352-395-6424,
Fax 352-395-6519

05525177
Medical Billing
several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance
Billing required.
Please email resume to
admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net
or fax to 386-755-2169

AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Case Managers for
community based program work-
ing w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST:
Qualifications: Prefer experienced
generalist technologist familiar
with Laboratory automation,-
safety, quality control, manual
testing and LIS operation. Must
be able to lift up to 40 pounds and
will be' exposed to hazardous
materials. Forty hours M-F with
Saturday rotation. Require State of
Florida License as a Medical Tech-
nologist. Please submit resume to
npatel(Cchclabs.com

PT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.

SUPERVISORY MEDICAL
TECHNOLOGIST:
Qualifications: Prefer experienced
generalist supervisory medical
technologist familiar with
Laboratory automation, safety,
quality control, manual testing,
and LIS operation. Knowledge of
inventory control, quality control
review and evaluation, instrument
maintenance and personnel
management. Must be able to
lift up to 40 pounds and will be
exposed to hazardous materials.
Forty hours M-F with Saturday
rotation, 3PM to 11:30 PM.
Require State of Florida License as
a Laboratory Supervisor.
Please submit resume to
npatel(lchclabs.com

Schools &
240 Education


04543248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/14/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/14/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed byFlorida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

3 Livestock &
330 Supplies


Barn Kept Hay for Sale
Bermuda or Bahaia"
$20 Roll, Lee, FL
850-971-4344


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front ti.es,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques. 386-963-2621


408 Furniture

Love Seat-Broyhill. Blue/gray,
matching pillows and arm covers.
Good condition. $50
386-454-4947


420 Wanted to Buy

I BUY WORKING AND
NON WORKING
APPLIANCES!
CALL 386-365-1915


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted lunk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.
WANTED TO BUY
Garage Door -
7'X9' ,
386-755-1937


430 Garage Sales


All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

Lowery Parade. Organ.
Slot Machine, Chipper Vac.,
Small Generator. Call 386-754-
0800 or 755-7773 for details.
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

S463 Buildin
Materials
ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCCOQ455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available


520 Boats for Sale

Bass Tender Boat 2 Seater
10'2",can fit in back of truck
$500 _86-.95,-2215.L _
Great for pond or lake!

60A Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/1 w/screen porch. Lg yard in
quiet, clean, safe, well maintained
10 unit park. Water, garbage incl.
$475.mo $475.dep. 386-965-3003
3/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
pets dk, $500 dep $575 mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-623-3404






Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547

640f Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$216 a month remodeled,
like new, 2Bd/2Ba S Wide .
Delivered & blocked, appliances,
A/C $2500 down, 8 year fin.
Possible owner financing. Ready
now. Call Gary 386 758-9824
*Lot Model Sale*
Save 1,000's @ Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
For Model Info and Details
05524941
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers Save
up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832

S12 X 56, 2/1 SWMH,
axles avail, tongue attached
$2,500 OBO
386-965-1882
1985 SWMH, 1/1, '
$1,000
Is able to move
386-209-7691
Come in and see the
Future in Manufactured Homes.
Royals Homes making
people smile
386-754-6737
Come See all New Lot Models
Royals Homes. Honesty! Integrity!
Customer Satisfaction
386-754-6737
Handy man special, Ft White area,
4/2 plus den, Fleetwood DWMH
on 1 acre, river access, owner
financing, $69.900, $1000 down,
$605 month 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Looking for a Modular?
Come see the Specialists
at Royals Homes and ask for Bo
386-754-6737
New 2011 Homes are Here
3BR/4BR at Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
Homes Built Your Way!


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Now accepting applications for
servers and cashiers
Apply in person at
3177 W Hwy 90 Lake City
DFW/EOE










Classified Department: 755-5440


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
New.2010 MH.never been
occupied, front & back deck,
$99,900 MLS#76635 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
@ Westfield Realty
Royals Homes is Quality!
We treat you like Family.
Stop in or Call Catherine
386-754-6737

S710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent

(105524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

No Application Fee +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 bedroom Apartments &
mobile homes,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
2 br Apt. Close to shopping
and the VA Medical Center.
$525. mo plus deposit.
S386-344-0579
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Gatorwood on the Westside
Rent $650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $500. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Move In Special.2/1 w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.;
Sec.8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
Apt, Ft. White, FL 2/1,
screen porch, W/D hook up,
$550 mo plus Sec Dep,
386-497-1116
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

3 or 4br. Lg bedroom, den w/fire-
place. Screen porch. Privacy patio.
1.09 ac. Quiet area, cul-de-sac.
Rent/lease option. 386-697-6534
3/2'on 2.1 acres, 2 car garage,
ceramic tile, front & rear porches,
$995 mo, plus 2 mo sec.
Lease with the option to buy
386-758-9996 or 386-365-5434
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced back yard. $825. mo
$825. dep. References req'd.
386-364-2897 or 941-920-4535
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+Retirement Living,
Site built home
2br/2bth For Lease
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $675 mo,
$600 sec., 386-497-4699
House for rent. Everything new.
4br/2ba plus study. Carport, great
location $1100 mo last plus
security. 386-867-2283

750 Business &
57 Office Rentals
1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072


770 Condos For Rent

04543558
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1200/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.


780 Condos for Sale


3 bdrm Condo Nit, back patio,
HOA fees include ext maintenance
of home, lawn & pool MLS#76797
$110,000, Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237

805 Lots for Sale

1 acre lot outside the city limits.
Homes only subdivision. Priced
below the assessed value with the
county, $16,900 Hallmark Real
Estate 386-867-1613 Call Jay S
2 ac lot in River Access ,
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears


805 Lots for S
Beautiful 5+ acre lo
cleared w/large oaks,
$38,000, MLS 75038
Lovelady @ Westfi
386-365-70


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2011

;ale 810 Home for Sale 830 Commercial

it, partially CUSTOM-BUILT 4BR mfg Aprox 4000 sq ft Commercial
Homes only, home w/screen porch, front deck, bldg, 4 bay/2 car lift shop, show-
8 Call Roger shed $87,500 room/office area, $1000 a month
eld Realty DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY, lease or will sell for $128,000. A
39 INC. 386-755-5110 #73893 Call Martin @ 386-697-9950


Charming Turn of the Century,
property, close to
downtown,MLS# 74814
$94,900 386-755-0808
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Nice 4.5 acre parcel w/S/P/W
older SWMH $39,900
MLS# 76182 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to-make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
1 the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
-call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
3/2 home w/1758 sq ft, Storage
bldg, enclosed patio & deck,
$168,000 Call Carrie Cason @
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806.
MLS# 73410
3/2 w/over 1700 sq ft, fireplaces,
modem kitchen, fenced yard, 2
sheds, convenient location
$89,500 MLS#73861 Call Patti
@Access Realty 386-623-6896
4 bdrm + office, 2 living & dining
areas, front & back porch
$279,900 MLS# 72831
Call Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty 386-755-0808
4/2 2300 plus sq ft,Palm Harbor
Home on 2 lots, Good Condition
$69,888 Call Nancy Rogers @
386-867-1271 Results Realty
4/2 1,800 sq ft on 10.5 acres,
newly remodeled inside, detached
garage, above ground pool
$189,888, Call Nancy,
Results Realty 386-867-1271
5 bedroom Home on 5 acres south
of Lake City, Big Rooms
*lots of space $229,500
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
MLS# 72928 Westfield Realty
5/2, 1800sf, 24 acres, family rm,
screened back porch, RV
parking,newly painted close to VA
& DOT, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
5/3 Triplewide MH (2200) sq ft,
w/2 master bdrms, on 10 fenced
acres, fireplace. MLS# 76226
$75,000 Call Patti Taylor
386-623-6896 Access Realty
AFFORDABLE 3BR/2BA mfg
home in Woodgate Village only
$27,000 #76741
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110


Beautifully Landscaped 3/1 on
1.11 ac, 16x24 detached garage,
screen porched bldg, water
purification system, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505


Brick home with 2,700 sqft under
roof. Large master w/bath on .5
acres completely fenced. $167,500
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Brick, .59 ac. 3br/2ba w/large
spacious rooms. Split floor plan.
2 car garage & storage $222,900.
Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Close to town, 2 story home
w/stone, fireplace, downstairs
master bdrm, $144,900
MLS# 77050 Call Carrie Cason
386-623-2806 Westfield Realty
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, Woodcrest. Great area, split
plan. Screened back porch. Elaine
K. Tolar. 386-755-6488 $139,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba. 3 Fireplaces. 39.7 acres
included. Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Reduced, brick w/over 2,000 sqft,
5 ac. 3br/2ba.Lots of extras. Elaine
K. Tolar 755-6488 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lakeview home in town, Old
charm w/many upgrades Elaine K.
Tolar. 386-755-6488 $W89,9J00.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2 Story, 4br/2.5ba-2160 sqft. Spa-
cious plan w/garage Lori Geibeig
Simpson 365-5678 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba close to town. 1620 sqft
w/covered patio& more. Lori Gei-
beig Simpson 365-5678 $117,900
Coral Shores Realty 2004
Custom built home, 23 fenced ac.
1700 ft paved frontage. Lg
kitchen/pantry, master/bath.
386-965-5905 Bob Gavette
Comer lot in Piccadilly Park.
Newly painted in/out. New carpet
/vinyl. 2 car garage. Inground
pool. $133,500. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575


Cute 3/2 nicely remodeled home,
2 acres, partially fenced
$115,888
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473
Derington Properties, LLC
3/2 MH, large deck and
screened porch, 5 ac.
$46,500 386-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
DWMH, 5 ac. Screened front/back
porches. 20x40 shop fully equip-
ped w/bath. $74,900. 965-4300
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
Fully furnished 2br/2ba @
$83,000
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
3BR/2BA
$99,999
Family home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Great Investment Property!
House needs lots of TLC, close to
shopping and schools, $35,000,
Bring all offers, Results Realty
Call Brittany 386-397-3473
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg
home near Wellborn on
5+ acres ONLY $79,900
- DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76768
Log Cabin home, located on
5 acres, wrap around porch
$199,000 MLS#75550
Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax Realty
Lrg Brick Home, well-established
neighborhood, in town,
$129,900 MLS#77016
Call Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
Must See! 4/2 2368SF Home,
island kitchen, den, fire place,
storage, auto gate entry,
Call Pain @ Remax
386-303-2505
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Dar.by Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfect starter home. Quiet area.
Wood laminate floors, lg dining,
French doors. 1 car garage/work-
shop. $84,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfection! Marion Place, gated,
brick 3/2 over 1800 sqft. Screened
lanai $158,900 386-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don'Reed Construction, Inc.
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $55,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75210
REDUCED TO $61,500 in
Eastside Vig! Immaculate
2BR/2BA w/lg rooms
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76753
Solid Home! Needs updating.
Country eat in kitchen & formal
dining.Some windows replaced.
$70,000 Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575


SPACIOUS 2BR/2BA home on 1
ac w/attached garage &
2-story shed $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76887


Totally refurbished 2/2 w/
workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story MH, located in,
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Very Nice 4/2 on 4 acres w/open
floor plan, 2 living rooms, eat in
kitchen, dining rm and rec rm
w/wet bar $89,900 Call Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well maintained 3/2 DWMH,
1568 sq ft, acres, new roof,
$65,000, MLS#76187
Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001

820 Farms &
S Acreage
10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
.4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


Coral Shores Realty. Prime
commercial, located on Hwy 41 &
Gibson Ln. 26X54 concrete block.
$76,000 386-965-5905
Call Bob Gavette
Downtown & borders 3 streets.
Aprox. 10,000 sqft fenced parking.
"as is" Bob Gavette. $73,000. 386-
965-5905 Coral Shores Realty
Prime Commercial Property
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya 3.27 acres, room for building
$398,888 386-867-1271
Call Nancy @ Results Realty


940 Trucks

1990 Ford F350 Dually,
5th Wheel White, Automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215







950 Cars for Sale

FOR SALE. 2006 PT Cruiser, full
power, burgundy. 24k mi.
14 city 24 hwy. $7,995.00
386-758-9629 Leave message

GET CASH TODAY!!
For your car, truck, van or SUV.
(Running or not). Call anytime.
(352)653-5691

951 Recreational
SVehicles






02 Fleetwood Revolution 40'.
Prestine. New tires, flushed trans.,
kept covered. Will sell tow vehi-
cle. $75K 752-6090 / 365-1903


RECYCLE

YOUR

PAPER


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
.* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4.ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.




Mar orBrige


ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT


2002 Fleetwood
Revolution 40'
Prestine cond. New tires &
flushed trans., kept covered.
Will sell tow vehicle.
$75,000
Call
386-752-6090
365-1903


zuu iHonaa (7u
C2 Spirit
Windshield, engine guard,
backrest, luggage rack,
like new, 4900 miles.
$3,800
Call
386-365-3658


Lake City Reporter