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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01381
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: February 17, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01381
System ID: UF00028308:01381
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








Jackson Declines
Fort White coach won't
pursue CHS opening.

000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


lKa


Thursday, February 17, 201 I


Net Victories
Tigers boys, girls tennis
teams collect wins.


Sports, IB





Sorter



Vol. 137, No. 23 E 75 cents


PARADE OF THE PAST


FILE PHOTO
Among the guests at the 2010 Battle of Olustee Festival Parade were President Abraham Lincoln, played by Tad Allen, and
General Robert E. Lee.

Olustee event will feature 45 participants


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Members of the com-
munity will once
again have the
chance to see Civil
War re-enactors in
period garb march through Lake
City in the annual Olustee Battle
Festival parade Saturday.
The parade begins at 10: 30 a.m.
on Marion Avenue between the
Lake City VA Medical Center and
Winn-Dixie. From that starting
point, participants will march north
on Marion Avenue, turn left onto
U.S. Highway 90 going west and
end at the Columbia County School
Board Administrative Complex.
City Attorney Herbert Darby and
his wife, Ann, will lead the parade as
this year's Parade Marshals.
"They were specifically chosen
this year by the Blue/Grey Army
executive committee to honor them


"My favorite thing is seeing
the reenactors because that's
what the parade is about."
Scarlet Frisina
Parade Chairwoman
for being supportive members of
the community for so many years,"
said Commissioner Scarlet P.
Frisina, parade chairwoman.
Approximately 45 participants will
be in the parade, Frisina said.
"I think that there's a few more
than usual in the line-up as opposed
to last year's line-up," Frisina said.
"There's some new ones that have
never participated before."
Participants include county, city
and state law enforcement and
emergency vehicles; state, county
and city elected officials; several
Civil War re-enactment groups;
local school marching bands; First
Federal Bank of Florida, parade
sponsor; 2011 Miss Olustee pageant


winners; 2012 Columbia County
School District Teacher of the Year;
and other various community orga-
nizations and businesses.
The parade is held each year for
residents who don't get the opportu-
nity to attend the Battle of Olustee
re-enactment at Olustee*Battlefield
Historic State Park, Frisina said.
"It's a chance for them to get to
see all of the reenactors and men
in their uniforms and hear the guns
fire and see everybody dressed up
in their outfits," she said.
Ultimately, the parade is held in
honor of the soldiers who fought in
the Battle of Olustee, Frisina said.
"My favorite thing is seeing the
reenactors because that's what the '
parade is about," she said. "It's in
remembrance of the battle and
those who believed in something
enough to fight for it from both
sides, Union and Confederate, and
the sacrifices that they made for
US."'


Officials attend Social Media seminar


Class focuses
on seven hidden
liability traps.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
More than 50 City of
Lake City officials and
employees attended a
one-day seminar on the
Liabilities of Social Media
Wednesday at the Price
Creek Water Treatment
Facility. Also in attendance
were nine members of the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Department, including
Sheriff Mark Hunter.
Mark Fiedelhotlz of
Effective Coinmunication
Inc. led the seminar which
focused on the seven hid-
den social media and e-mail
liability traps. The seminar
focused on areas such as

CALL US:
(386) 752-12
SUBSCRIBE
THE REPORT
Voice: 755-54
1 ... . 1 Fax: 752-9'
0?'"^ ? '''^- -^ A''^ '^1 :'


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
City of Lake City officials and employees listen and take
notes during a seminar on the Liability of Social Media


Wednesday.
unprotected Internet opin-
ions and failing to under-
stand social media libel.
Participating in the sem-
inar shows how much the
city cares about the issue
of social media liability,
Fiedelhotlz said.
The seminar was very
informative said Mayor


93 77
TO Mostly sunny
TER:WEATHER, 2A
4 WEATHER, 2A


Stephen Witt. Government
entities as well as private
businesses need to edu-
cate their employees on
social media.
"It's a new area of law
changing things rapidly,"
Witt said.
The Internet can be a
great tool if used properly


but it can also create liabili-
ty issues, he said. Seminars
such as this teach employ-
ees to keep their personal
and business lives sepa-
rate.
This is the first social
media training the city has
had, said Audrey Sikes,
city clerk. The city clerk's
office initiated the train-
ing after she and several
other employees attend-
ed the. same .seminar in
December.
Ultimately the city wants
to train each and every
employee as well as board
members on social media
liabilities, Sikes said.
"I'm very excited to have
had such a great turnout,"
she said. "It's a very impor-
tant issue, and there were a
lot of great questions from
those in attendance."


Opinion ................ 4A
Around Florida........... 2A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics ...... . 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


Patrick Scott/ Lake City Reporter

Rollover accident injures two

Lake City Police Officer Louis Troiano investigates a two-
vehicle crash that involved a Ford Explorer and a Ford Edge
Wednesday. First responders from Columbia County Fire
Rescue treat the driver of the Ford Explorer that overturned.
The crash occurred at the intersection of Highway 90 East
and the 1-75 southbound exit around 5:50 p.m. The Ford
Edge was reportedly exiting the ramp and attempting to turn
left (west onto Highway 90) when the Explorer crossed the
intersection, heading east on Highway 90. The Explorer over-
turned and came to rest facing west on the median on the
southbound side of Highway 90. A passenger in the Explorer
was also injured. Both patients were taken to an area hospital.



Simmons selected

to represent

Columbia County


One of 20 North
Florida school
district students.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Jacob Simmons' academ-
ic strengths and talents lie
in subjects like math and
science.
Those abilities earned
him the honor as the only
student to represent the
Columbia County School
District at the Department
of Education's Sunshine
State Scholars program
- an awards and Florida
college recruitment event
- in Orlando today and
Friday.
Simmons, 18, a Columbia
High School senior, was
chosen along with almost
20 other student represen-
tatives from North Florida's
school districts based on
their achievements in sci-
ence, technology, engi-
neering and mathematics
(STEM).


AIIF


LEANNE TYOILake City Reporter
Jacob Simmrions, 18,
solves a calculus equation
at Columbia High School
Wednesday.

"It's an honor," Simmons
said. "Of all the bright
young students in the dis-
trict, it's a wonderful feel-
ing (to be chosen)."
District administrators
chose Simmons to repre-
sent the district based on
-SIMMONS continued on 3A


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Best Overall Project winners

Franco Ruiz from Fort White Middle School and Lindsey
Saunders from Union County High School were Best Overall
Project winners for the junior and senior division respec-
tively in the Suwannee Valley Regional Science Fair Awards
Program Wednesday at Florida Gateway College. RESULTS
ON PAGE 3A.


TODAY IN
HEALTH
The danger of
e, e|, I drinks.


COMING
FRIDAY
Battle of Olustee
Festival begins.









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011


~H3


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 6-6-8
Evening: 8-0-6


ayA4 Wednesday:
Afternoon: 8-3-6-0
a. Evening: 5-1-0-1


Tuesday:
- 7-8-14-25-33


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Med students parody 'Bad Romance'


HOUSTON
Some medical school stu-
dents in Houston used haz-
ardous waste disposal bags
and gaudy wigs in their
costumed parody of the
Lady Gaga hit "Bad Romance."
The Internet-popular video called
"Bad Project" shows the Baylor
College of Medicine students danc-
ing in labs, dreaming of good scien-
tific data and complaining that "there
ain't no getting out of here."
The Houston Chronicle reported
Tuesday that the video was choreo-
graphed, shot and edited last month
for an upcoming school contest. A
bad project can be anything from
a worthless experiment to a study
topic that drags on indefinitely.
Associate dean Dr. Scott Basinger
says the video shows that the stu-
dents "are incredibly creative."
Gaga's song "Bad Romance" on
Sunday won Grammy awards for
best female pop vocal performance
and best short form music video.

'Glee' surpasses Elvis
for most 100 singles
NEW YORK The act with the
most songs on the Billboard Hot
100 chart isn't the Beatles, Elvis
or Michael Jackson. It's the cast of
"Glee."
In just 18 months of appearing on
the charts, the Fox TV series has set
the record for the most songs on the
Billboard chart in the chart's 52-year
history.
This week, "Glee" debuts six.
songs on the chart, giving them 113
songs in total five more than the
now second-place Elvis Presley, who
had 108.
Lady Gaga also makes history
on the chart this week; her new
- song, "Born This Way," becomes its
1,000th No. 1 song.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lady Gaga, whose song 'Bad Romance' is parodied by Baylor medical students, is
congratulated as she wins the award for best pop vocal album at the 53rd annual
Grammy Awards on Sunday in Los Angeles.


The Grammy winner calls the
milestone the "greatest honor of my
career."

Letterman's 'booking' of
Lohan a boo-boo
NEW YORK Maybe "Late Show
With David Letterman" should pres-
ent the Top Ten ways it should be
more careful booking its guests.
Just hours after CBS announced
on Tuesday that Lindsay Lohan
would appear on Thursday's show
to present the Top Ten list, Lohan
tweeted: "I am NOT going to be
doing David Letterman, I'm not sure
how this happened, but I am sorry
for the confusion..."
Wednesday morning, a spokesman
for Letterman's production company
acknowledged that "Late Show" had
been duped.
"We made a mistake," said
Worldwide Pants' Tom Keaney in


a statement. "Someone purporting
to be a friend of Lindsay's reached.
out to the show yesterday, allegedly
on her behalf, and booked her to
appear.
"Clearly, this person was not
authorized to make commitments on
her behalf," the statement continued.
"We wish Lindsay well, and look for-
ward to having her on the show in
the future."
Lohan, who has been on the show
four times in the past, now would
seem to have more urgent matters to
which to attend. Most recently, the
troubled actress was arraigned. on
felony charges for the alleged theft
of a $2,500 necklace from a jewelry
store.
Meanwhile, her travails have been
a source of humor for Letterman.
But thanks to this week's book-
ing boo-boo, for once, the joke's on
Dave.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Bandleader Orrin Tucker
is 100.
* Actor Hal Holbrook is 86.
* Mystery writer Ruth
Rendell is 81.
* Country singer-songwriter
Johnny Bush is 76.
* Football Hall-of-Famer Jim
Brown is 75.
* Actress Mary Ann Mobley
is 72.

Daily Scripture


* Actress Brenda Fricker is
66.
* Actress Rene Russo is 57.
* Actor Lou Diamond Phillips
is 49.
* Basketball Hall of Famer
Michael Jordan is 48.
* Movie director Michael Bay
is 46.
* Olympic gold medal skier
Tommy Moe is 41.


"[More on Love and Hatred]
For this is the message you
heard from the beginning:We
should love one another." I
John 3:11

Author,
Author's information


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Senrvice
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10.30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks................... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.
24 Weeks............... $82.80
52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION

. In Tuesday's edition, a story about a pedestrian killed in a
traffic accident incorrectly said Kerry R. Stephens was home-
less.


Scott scraps high-
speed rail plan
TALLAHASSEE
- Florida Gov. Rick Scott
canceled plans for a high-
speed train line between
Orlando and Tampa pro-
moted by President Barack
Obama, saying Wednesday
it would cost the state too
much even with $2.4 bil-
lion in federal help.
,Cost overruns could put
Florida on the hook for
another $3 billion and once
completed, there's a good
chance ridership won't
pay for the operating cost,
meaning the state would
have to pump more money
into the line each year,
Scott said.
"The truth is that this
project would be far too
costly to taxpayers and I
believe the risk far out-
weighs the benefits," the
Republican governor said
in a press release issued
after he informed U.S.
Transportation Secretary
Ray LaHood of his decision.
LaHood later released
a statement that contra-
dicted Scott's assessment
of the risk.
"We worked with the
governor to make sure
we eliminated all financial
risk for the state,'instead
requiring private busi-
nesses competing for the
project to assume cost
overruns and operating
expenses," he said.
The move comes a week
after Scott, a former CEO
who took office in January,
proposed state spending
cuts of $4.6 billion in the
next budget and tax and
fee cuts totaling close to $2
billion as Florida grapples
with the effects of the
recession and continued
high unemployment
* Scott said if the rail proj-
ect failed, the state would
have to return the money
to the federal government.
"My background is
in business, not politics.
But you don't have to be


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida governor Rick Scott arrives with the parents of Staff
Sgt. Robert J. Miller at the Medal of Honor Headstone
Dedication Ceremony honoring Staff Sgt. Miller, in


Casselberry Jan. 22.

an economics expert to
understand that if you
spend more money than
you take in, your business
will fail," Scott said.
LaHood said he was dis-
appointed; but that other
states would be happy.to
get Florida's money.

Guilty plea in
wreck that killed 3
MIAMI A 42-year-old
man faces up to 45 years
in prison for a 2009 drunk
driving wreck that killed
three children.
Gabriel Delrisco pleaded
guilty Wednesday to three
counts of DUI manslaugh-
ter and awaits an April 28
sentencing.
Officials said Delrisco's
blood alcohol level was
nearly three times the
legal limit on Jan. 25,
2009, when he crashed
into Hector Serrano's
Ford minivan at a stop-
light Serrano's children
- 10-year-old Hector Jr.,
7-year-old Esmerelda and
4-year-old Amber died
at the scene.
A tearful Delrisco said
he was sorry during
Wednesday's hearing. But
Serrano said the apology
came too late.
"He came and destroyed


our whole family," Serrano
said.

Water rules' stand
goes national
TALLAHASSEE
- Opposition to federal.
water pollution rules pro-
posed for Florida has gone
national.
Seventy-six companies
and organizations repre-
senting national and state
business and agriculture
interests outside Florida
on Tuesday sent a letter to
members of Congress.
They asked lawmakers
for assurance the "the rest
of the country does not
suffer Florida's fate."
Environmental
Protection Agency spokes-
woman Betsaida Alcantara
on Wednesday said there
are no plans to impose
such rules in other states.
She noted the Florida
rules were drafted to settle
a lawsuit.
Environmentalists say
the rules are needed
because pollution from
farms and urban cause
algae blooms that are
choking Florida's waters.
Opponents argue compli-
ance would cost too much.


4 idhAV


MOTY MOSTLY MOSTLY M. PARTLY PARTLY
SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY CLOUDY CLOUDY


HI 77LO 51 H179L049 HI79L050 H1I78L050 H1I78L052
- 4-1PTI


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday,
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


Valdosta
76/49 *Jcksonville
Lake City \74/53
77/51
SGainesville Dayt7na Beach
\,77/52 76 56
Ocala *
78/52 *
Orlando Cape Canaveral
f 79/56 74/61
Tampa
~77 ,zCS/


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
Lake City
Miami
Naples


/ West Palm Beach Ocala
78/63 *, Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama C
Ft. Myers 78/67 0 Pensacol;
80/57 *Naples Tallahass
79/58 Miami Tampa
.-... Wad 78/65 Valdosta


1958, a snowsto
produced 30 inch
of snow in inte-
rior New England
including more
than 19 inches ir
24 hours at the
Boston Airport. T
same storm pro-
duced up to three
feet of snow in th
Mid-Atlantic Coas
region.


forecasts, data and
S- :' graphics 2011 Weather
S .. Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com



r GemConnected



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'he


* Associated Press


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


i


Pensacola
69/53


Tallahassee *
75/44 ,..

Panama City
71/50


II/


Friday
75/58/s
76/54/s
78/66/s
81/57/s
79/50/s
77/52/s
76/68/s
79/49/pc
79/66/s
81/60/s
79/50/s
79/54/s
75/53/s
71/53/s
79/46/s
79/57/s
79/49/s
78/63/s


Saturday
15/58/s
77/56/s
78/67/pc
81/58/s
. 78/51/s
75/53/pc
78/69/s
79/50/pc
79/66/s
81/59/pc
78/51/s
80/57/s
73/53/s
71/52/pc
77/46/s
77/58/s
76/50/s
78/63/s


ney nest
77/68


city
a
ee

Beach


W. Palm I


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


76
49
69
45
84 in 1990
23 in 1916


0.00"
3.59"
7.27"
1.90"
5.41"


7.09 a.m.
6:20 p.m.
7:08 a.m.
6:21 p.m.


5:55 p.m.
6:21 a.m.
7:04 p.m.
7:01 a.m.


7

Emismi~omun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


Feb. Feb. March March
18 24 4 12
Full Last New First


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011


Teen Summit an

opportunity to

improve academics


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Students in the com-
munity will have the
opportunity to receive
empowerment, informa-
tion and entertainment
at the Lake City Teen
Summit, scheduled from
3 p.m. until midnight
Friday at the Florida
Gateway College Howard
Conference Center.
Registration begins at
2 p.m.
The summit is an
opportunity for teens in
Columbia County and
surrounding areas to
obtain resources and
information to prepare
themselves for academ-
ic excellence, said Bea
Coker, event organizer.
Summit activities will
include a workshop on
attitudes, peer pressure
and college preparation
for students, she said.
A parent workshop on
financial aid for college
is at 2:30 p.m.
Resources about select-
ing colleges, dual enroll-
ment and ACT and SAT
testing will be available.


But the day won't
just include workshops,
Coker said. Food will be
provided by Krystal's
and Publix.
The event will also fea-
ture mock trials by Florida
Coastal Law School stu-
dents and entertainment
by musical group Dem
Shelton Boyz.
Students will have the
opportunity to complete
an essay on self-sufficien-
cy for scholarship awards,
Coker said.
Transportation to
Florida Gateway College
can be provided by calling
Cokerat386-867-1601. Pick
up will be available from
Richardson Community
Center at 2 p.m.
Event registration is $20
but fee waivers are avail-
able for students in need.
More information on the
event is available by call-
ing Shawyn Lockley at
386451-0722.
"It's an opportunity for
students to spend some
time with their peers in
our general region and an
opportunity to received
valuable information,"
Coker said.


Baptist Church celebrates anniversary


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn
First Baptist Church of Lake City
will be commemorating its wealth of
history with a weekend celebration
marking the 145th anniversary since
the church's post-Civil War reorgani-
zation.
The church will hold a first-ever
Founder's Day Celebration with
Saturday and Sunday events to honor
that history.
"This was one special occasion
to celebrate our actual age," said
Virginia Poarch, church historical
committee chairwoman.
While the church was founded in
1843 by Sterling Scarborough, its
members scattered during the Civil
War to seek safety from the war's
fighting, Poarch said.
On Feb. 25, 1866, the church reor-
ganized, with Scarborough's wife,
Susan, as an active member once


again.
"Therefore, we know it was the
same congregation," Poarch said.
The church originally began meet-
ing in the Scarborough's home, then
built a log church with Rev. Kinsey
Chambers as its first pastor. After the
reorganization, the church's build-
ings went from an 1869 frame church,
an 1894 brick church and its present
building off Lake DeSoto, built in
1925.
All of the buildings were in the
same general area where the church's
present building stands now, Poarch
said, at 700 Fourth Street near Lake
DeSoto.
On Saturday, the church will host
an open house in its fellowship hall
from 2 to 4 p.m. Pictures of the old
church buildings will be on display,
a video of its history will be running,
1800s churns will be on display and
hostesses will be dressed in Civil
War period costumes, Poarch said.


Refreshments will also be served.
"We're hoping to get people to real-
ize how our church has played such a
history in Lake City," Poarch said.
At its 10:15 a.m. Sunday morning
service, the church's longest continu-
ous members will be honored, the
oldest of which has been a member
since 1939, Poarch said. The sanctu-
ary will be decorated with oil lamps, a
historical pump organ and attendees
are encouraged to wear their best old-
fashioned clothes.
Poarch said the event will honor
the church's founders, families and
history.
"So many families were tied to this
church in the past, families that are
still in the community," she said.
It also has connection with the
Olustee Battle festival, Poarch said.
"It ties in with Olustee weekend
because it (the church) was estab-
lished before the Civil War and re-
established after the Civil War."


Suwannee Valley Regional Science Fair award winners


From staff reports
Top finishers were
named at the Suwannee
Valley Regional Science
Fair Awards Program
Wednesday at Florida
Gateway College.
Schools represented
in the fair were from
Bradford, Columbia,
Hamilton and Union coun-


ties. More than 60 stu-
dents participated in the
annual event.
The categories and win-
ners are:
Third Place Awards:
Junior Behavioral/
Social, Brenan Clyatt
- Lake Butler Middle
School Effects of Font
Size on Scores; Junior
Biochemistry, Samantha


Massey LBMS The
Truth About Cigarettes;
Junior Chemistry, Lane
Underhill LBMS Does
"Green" Really Clean?;
Junior Engineering,
Megan Zahnie Epiphany
Catholic School Spin
It Up!; Junior Medicine/
Health, Alyssa Davison
- LBMS Swish,
Swish, Swish; Junior


Environmental, Rachel
Ricker Bradford Middle
School What is the
Most Effective Way to
Remove Oil from Water?;
Junior Physics,' Dalton
Sweat Fort White Middle
School Down With the
WINNERS continued on 5A


SIMMONS: One of 20 chosen from North Florida school districts
Continued From Page 1A


established criteria, like
expressing an interest in
STEM-related studies,
pursuing postsecondary
education opportunities
in Florida and a weighted
Grade Point Average of
4.0 or higher.
Kay Dekle, CHS assis-
tant principal, said the
school chose to recom-
mend Simmons because
of recognition from his
teachers, his interest in
math and science and his
desire to pursue a career
in those fields.
"He's a very intelligent


young man and excels
in both, of those areas,"
Dekle said.
Simmons, who is cap-
tain of the CHS Robotics
Team and a member of
the CHS Academic Team,
said his favorite sub-
ject is calculus. He was
recently accepted to the
University of Florida and
plans on double-majoring
in engineering and math.
Students selected
for the Sunshine State
Scholars program will
convene Thursday at
the Doubletree Hotel at


Entrance to Universal
Orlando at a welcome
reception with keynote
speakers.
On Friday, students
will hear speeches by the
chancellors of both the
Florida College System
and the State University
System, attend a recruit-
ment fair with more than
25 Florida public colleges
and universities, attend
an awards luncheon with
guest speaker Mark
Woodbury, Universal
Creative president,
and enjoy free passes


to Universal Orlando
Resort.
"It's a good chance to


see what's out there as
far as educational oppor-
tunities," Simmons said.


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













OPINION


Thursday, February 17, 201 1


www.lakecityreporter.com


OTHER
OPINION


Civil War

shaped

what the US

became
The United States
was born in the
Revolutionary War,
but the nation as we
know it today was
largely shaped and defined by
the Civil War, whose sesquicen-
tennial we begin observing this
year.
That war, fought from 1861 to
1865, remains the bloodiest in
our history. Of some 4 million
who enlisted on both sides, at
least 620,000 died, most of them
from disease rather than battle.
One in five white men in the
South died.
Statistically, the war should not
have dragged on as long as it did.
The Union had 23 states with two-
thirds of the population, while the
11 Confederate states were largely
rural and agricultural. Most tell-
ingly, the North had the manufac-
turing capacity 110,000 factories
with more than 1.2 million workers
compared to the South's 18,000
plants employing 100,000.
But drag on it did, and in the
end, the South was left devastat-
ed 90 percent of its rail lines
and two-thirds of its ships and
riverboats were ruined.
Still, the South not only recov-
ered, but set the stage for a great
national expansion.
The war abolished the institu-
tion of slavery, freeing 4 million
people and removing the single
greatest impediment to national
progress. With the influence of
the agrarian .South in Congress
temporarily diminished,
Northern Republicans, who had
seen their industries boom dur-
ing wartime, were free to adopt
economic policies that encour-
aged expansion.
Within a few years, national
industrial production increased
75 percent, and the great farm-to-
city migration greatly accelerat-
ed. By 1870, less than half of the
national work force was in farm-
ing. In 1870, 15 percent of the
nation's 39 million people lived in
urban areas; today, nearly 80 per-
cent of our 308 million people do.
By 1870, people who had once
thought of themselves in terms
of their home states increas-
ingly thought of themselves as
Americans. The Civil War and
the rest of the 1860s were indeed
a defining moment
Scripps Howard New Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!",
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
'BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


'Gay conservative' is oxymoron


C PAC, the
Conservative
Political Action
Conference, has
been an annual gig
for me for years. But this year I
concluded it was not my place
and I declined to participate in
the various venues at the event
for which I was invited.
Yes, the reason I declined
was the inclusion of GOProud, a
group identifying itself as repre-
senting "gay conservatives and
their allies," as a sponsor of the
event
And it's the reason why some
of the nation's most important
conservative organizations -
- the Heritage Foundation, the
American Family Association,
Concerned Women of America,
Family Research Council,
Media Research Center, and
the National Organization for
Marriage did not participate.
The founder and chairman
of GOProud removed any
doubt on my part that not
participating was the correct
decision by dismissing these
groups as "losers," "clowns,"
and "not relevant."
In our culture today that
views material prosperity as
the ultimate barometer of suc-
cess, the truth is becoming
unfortunately lost that the evil
man can prosper. And if there
is nothing more than what is
before our eyes in this world,
what does it matter?
When I understood how the
culture of welfare state materi-
alism was destroying not just
my life, but also all of black
America, there was no divid-


LETTERS


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org
ing line in my mind between
"social issues" and "economic
issues." The only dividing line
I saw was between right and
wrong, good and evil.
The idea of "gay conserva-
tive" is an oxymoron.
"Gay" is everything that
"conservative" is not.
The foundation of the world-
view that so-called "gay con-
servatives" embrace has far
more in common with liberal-
ism than with conservatism.
It's a worldview that is man-
centered rather than God-cen-
tered. It is a worldview that
rejects eternal truths passed
on from the beginning of time.
Although the worldview that
"gay conservatives" choose to
invent may diverge from the
worldview of liberals, their
common ground is they make
it all up.
And it is here where "gay
conservatives" and "liberals"
fundamentally depart from
conservatives.
Conservatives believe that
there are objective and eternal
truths, not of the product of
any individual human mind,
that are transmitted through
the generations. Culture is not
like HDTV or iPhones where


the newest model is the best.
These eternal truths pro-
vide the light in the fog that
keeps us from crashing on the
rocky shores where our base
instincts lead us.
"Gay" is liberal, not conser-
vative, regardless of what their
stand may be on government
spending or taxes.
It's why, like all liberals,
they use language to create
reality, rather than appreciate
that words have meaning that
reflect reality.
So they have re-invented
the word "gay," re-invented
the word "marriage", and now
they want to re-invent the
word "conservative."
Finally, we will re-invent the
word "freedom" and we'll put
the final stamp on the idea
that a free society, rather than
being the path to truth; is :the
path to meaninglessness.
What individuals choose in
private, and for which they
bear personal responsibility, is
separate from what we sanc-
tion publicly for which we all
must bear responsibility.
A value-neutral government
is impossible. The central
battle in our country today
is about values and how we
understand freedom. It is a
battle for our very soul. And,
as we learned from CPAC,
it's not a struggle that is'
just between Democrats and
Republicans.
* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author of
three books.


TO THE EDITOR


Don't believe all that is pitched


Here we go again.
America, once
again we are at a
crossroad, having
to decide on which
direction we are going to take
and who will be charge in order
for us to get to where we want
to be. The only problem with
this is that we do not have a real
choice. I make this statement
concerning the fact that we are
only permitted to choose from
those who the elite decide. The
manner in which they decide is
whomever can raise the most
money and spin the most stuff


on the issues. They are allowed
to go forward. These individu-
als, as well as groups, look upon
America as a business and are
only concerned with the bottom
line.
Most Americans perceive our
country as a home. The individu-
als you are about to encounter in
the upcoming campaigns do not,
for the most part, even run their
own homes, they have others do
it for them. They do not concern
themselves with budgeting, how
much they are paying for grocer-
ies, how much their power bills
are, or whether they will have


enough to do all the things it
takes to operate a household.
They have plenty and od not have
to concern themselves wit the
tasks of running a household.
If the government were oper-
ated as a household and not as
a business, we would see real
change and progress in address-
ing the issues we face. Please
remember this one important
fact: Do not believe everything
they say because they will say
anything in order to get deeper
into the machine of politics.
Gene Weatherford
Lake City


I WU
Sharon Randall
wwwsharonrondall.com


We don't

always get,

what we

choose

W writing a person-..
al column is ar.:
odd way to eke
out a living. I
know because
I've been doing it, or trying, at
least, for 20 years. ,
Sometimes it can feel a little
naked. But I like to believe, as
personal as it may seem, I am
writing not just about my own
life, but life in general. I love
hearing from readers who say
they share in that belief.
People often ask how I keep
finding things to write about
It's easy. If your job is to write
about things that happen in life,
you just have to stay alive and
pay attention, and things will
keep happening. I try to stay
alive. I try to pay attention. And
I wake up each day curious to
see what will happen next
Sometimes they're things I
don't want to happen, but they
happen sooner or later to most
of us, to some more than others.
We can't always choose what
we get, good or bad. We can
only choose what we do with it
That is the choice, isn't it?
What we do with what we're
given is the difference between
being alive or just passing, time.
Recently I took a day off
from writing to attend a memo-
rial service for my father-in-
law, a man I fell in love with
years before I married his son.
And once again, as in the
past when I lost someone I
loved my mother, my dad,
my first husband, friends who .
died too young I began hear-
ing from readers around the
country who wrote to offer
their condolences and prayers,,
and love.
People are good. If you
doubt it, try writing a personal"
column and see for yourself.
We humans are incredibly
human. As often as we screw
things up, we also have a great
capacity for caring.
My father-in-law, a self-
described "newspaperman," ,
was raised by a single mother,
who scrubbed floors to buy
cornmeal to make tortillas. As
.a boy, he delivered the news- .
paper for which he would one
day become publisher.
After high school, he joined
the Navy, fought in World War
II, finished college and mar-
ried the girl of his dreams. His
rise from paperboy to publish-
er to corporate executive is the
kind of success story we all
love to point to with pride and*
say, "Only in America."
But that is not why he was
loved. He was loved because
he loved. And because he had
an uncanny ability to make you :
believe in yourself.
At his memorial service,
I met dozens of people who
told me their stories of what
he meant to them and how he
had somehow made them feel
important
My husband concluded the .
perfect eulogy he delivered for '
his father with the last words
his dad said to us: "Be good to
each other."
Those are good words, don't :
you think, both to sum up one
life and begin moving forward
with our own?
To those of you who sent
your kind wishes, please know
we are grateful beyond all sing-
ing of it.
Death casts a dark shadow
that cannot linger long in the .
lovely light of a life well lived.
* Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394
Henderson NV 89077.


4A









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011


WINNERS: Suwannee Valley Regional Science Fair honorees at FGC

Continued From Page 1A


Sound; Junior Zoology,
Treavor Gilliam BMS
- Humid Incubation;
Senior Behavioral/Social,
Trey Norris Hamilton
County High School The
Accuracy of Eyewitness
Testimony; Senior Botany,
Lindsey Hanson Union
County High School
- Which Acidic Substance
Allows for the Most
Plant Growth?; Senior
Environmental Chemistry,
Angela Cameron HCHS
- Clean-Up Catastrophe;
Senior Medicine &
Health, Raeann Meyerhoff
- FWHS Effect of
Different Music Genres on
Blood Pressure and Heart
Rate; and Senior Physics,
Kayli Kvistad Columbia
High School Stride Out
Second Place Awards,
Junior Behavioral/
Social, Charlie Parker
- Richardson Middle
School Handedness;
Junior Biochemistry,
Emma Tucker Lake -
City Middle School Still
Burnin'; Junior Chemistry,
Andrea Bedoya ECS -
It's Getting Colder!; Junior
Engineering, Noah Tinsler
- BMS Does Having
Wheels Add Distance to a
Trebuchet Throw?; Junior
Earth and Space; Tessa
Ricker BMS What.
Lived in Your Backyard 50
Million Years Ago?; Junior
Medicine and Health,
Kayla Andrews LBMS -
Who Has the Greater Lung
Capacity, Boys or Girls?;
Junior Environmental,


Justin Young FWMS
- Blockin da Rays; Junior
Physics; Montana Parrish
- LBMS Expensive
Ammunition vs.
Inexpensive Ammunition;
Junior Zoology, Billy
Hunter LBMS Does
Homemade Horse Fly
Spray Work as Well as
Store Bought Spray?;
Senior Behavioral/Social,
Hetal Thakor HCHS
- Short Term Memory:
Honors vs. Regular; Senior
Botany, Sierra Williamson
- HCHS Plants and
Different Electromagnetic
Wavelengths; Senior
Environmental Chemistry,,
Charles Cameron .
- HCHS Fuel Frenzy;
Senior Computers and
Engineering, Colton Kelley
- UCHS Total Halo
Muon Rate vs. Pure Halo
Muon Rate for Different
Fills of the Large Hadron
Collider; Senior Medicine
and Health, Kiersten
Davison Union CHS
- The Effects Age Has
on the Diameter of the
Human Blind Spot; and
Senior Physics, Caroline
Rimes Union CHS -
Microwave and Cell Phone
Radiation.
*First Place Awards:
Junior Behavioral/Social,
Timothy Dotson LCMS
- Student/Athlete Success;
Junior Biochemistry,
Franco Ruiz FWMS
- Yeast Growth with
Sugar Substitutes;
Junior Chemistry, Masi
Williams ECS Dissolve


to Resolve; Junior
Engineering, Chance
Oody LBMS Football
Helmets Year 2: Padded
for the Occasion; Junior
Earth and Space, Lauren
Mixon LCMS Water in
the Wind; Junior Medicine
and Health)
Savannah Thomas
- LCMS Are Fingerprint
Patterns Inherited?;
Junior Environmental,
Maggie Camp LCMS
- Absorb This; Junior
Physics, Reonna Woods
- FWMS What a
Drag; Junior Zoology,
Case Emerson LBMS
- Does the Palatability
of Grass-Fed Beef Differ
from the Palatability of
Grain-Fed Beef?; Senior
Behavioral/Social, Lindsey
Saunders UCHS The
Influence of Phrase-
Spaced Text on Reading
Comprehension in Stroke
Patients; Senior Botany,
Tyler Warrel HCHS
- The Effect that Dish
Soaps Have on Plants;
Senior Environmental
Chemistry, Holly Tucker
- UCHS Which Common
Biomass Feedstock
Will Produce the Most
Energy 2nd Year Study;
Senior Computers and
Engineering, Chris
Johnson UCHS
- Using Digital Games
to Educate Students
about the Principles of
Biotechnology: The Next
Step in Modern Education;
and Senior Medicine and
Health, James Brown


- UCHS A Comparative
Test of Coordination
Between Musicians and
Athletes; and Senior
Physics, Kelly Gray
- UCHS Optimization
of DBD Plasma Actuator
Geometry for Maximum
Force Production.
Special Awards were
presented to several stu-
dents:
E American
Meteorological Society,
Lauren Mixson; American
Psychological Association,
Lindsey Saunders; ASM
Materials Science Award,
Kelly Gray; Association
of Women Geoscientists,
Maggie Camp; Intel
Excellence in Computer
Science Award, Chris
Johnson; Mu Alpha
Theta, Kiersten Davison;
National Society of
Professional Engineers,
Collin Ulmer; National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration Award
'Taking the Pulse of the
Planet," Holly Tucker;
RICOH-Sustainable
Development Award for
Environmental/Pollution
Prevention, Amanda
Diaz; US Metric, Charlie
Parker; Society for In
Vitro Biology, Franco
Ruiz; Yale Science and
Engineering Award, Kelly
Gray; Stockhoim Junior
Water Prize, Angela
Cameron, Rachel Ricker
and Maggie Camp; Florida
Association of Science
Teachers, Caroline Rimes;
Harris Corporation Future


Female Scientist award,
Emma Tucker; and US Air
Force Awards, Kelly Gray,
Lindsey Saunders, Holly
Tucker and James Brown.
The I-SWEEP 4th
International Sustainable
World Project Olympiad
is May 4-9 in Houston,
Texas.
Kelly Gray was nomi-
nated by region judges to
apply for the competition
and receive the I-SWEEP
Recognition Award. Holly
Tucker was selected as
the region's I-SWEEP
representative and trip
winner for receiving the
Outstanding Award.
The Florida State
Science and Engineering
Fair is March 23-25 in
Orlando.
Junior Division State
Delegates and Alternates
are Timothy Dotston
- LCMS; Charlie Parker
- RMS; Franco Ruiz -
FWMS; Emma Tucker
- LCMS; Masi Williams
- ECS; Andera Bedoya
- ECS; Chance Oody
- LBMS; Lauren Mixson
- LCMS; Maggie Camp
- LCMS; Justin Young -
FWMS; Savannah Thomas
- LCMS; Kayla Andrews
- LBMS; Reonna Woods -
FWMS; Montana Parrish -
LBMS; and Case Emerson
- LBMS. Alternates are
Dalton Sweat FWMS;
Alyssa-Davison LBMS;
Rachel Ricker BMS;
Noah Tinsler BMS;
Megan Zahnie ECS and
Collin Ulmer LBMS.


Senior Division State
Delegates and Alternates
are Lindsey Saunders
- UCHS; Hetal Thakor
- HCHS; Trey Norris
- Hamilton CHS; Tyler
Warrel HCHS; Sierra
Williamson HCHS; Holly
Tucker UCHS; Charles
Cameron HCHS; Angela
Cameron HCHS; Chris
Johnson UCHS; James
Brown UCHS; Kierston
Davison UCHS; Raeann
Meyerhoff FWHS; Kelly
Gray UCHS; Caroline
Rimes UCHS; and Haley
Libby UCHS. Alternates
are Kayli Kvistad of CHS
and Lindsey Hanson of
UCHS
Best Junior Division
Project award winners
were: Best Physical
Science Project, Masi
Williams; Best Biological
Science Project: Maggie
Camp; and Best Overall
Project, Franco Ruiz.
Best Senior Division
Project award winners
were: Best Physical
Project, Kelly Gray; Best
Biological Project, Holly
Tucker; and Best Overall
Project, Lindsey Saunders.
Gray and Saunders'
projects were selected as
the top two to advance
to the Intel International
Science and Engineering
Fair taking place in May
in Los Angeles, Calif. The
students received $1,000
sponsorships from Florida
Power and Light Company
and Lindsey sponsored by
PCS Phosphate.


OBITUARIES


Willie B. Bryant
Mr. Willie B. Bryant, 84 of Fort
White, Florida passed on Friday,
February 11,2011 athisresidence.
Funeral service for Mr. Bry-
ant will be held on Saturday,
February 19, 2011 at 11:00AM
at Antioch Missionary Baptist'
Church, Fort White, Rev. Don-
nell Sanders, Pastor. Burial .
will follow- in Philadelphia.
Cemetery, Lake City, Florida.
Visitation will be Friday
6-8PM at funeral home.
Arrangements Entrusted to
A. JEROME BROWN
FUNERAL' HOME
1560 N W 1st Avenue,
High Springs, Florida.

Jim Fulton
Jim Fulton, 68, a resident of
Lake City, Florida passed Feb-
ruary 10, 2010 in'Shands Hos-
pital of Gainesville, FL. after a
brief illness.
Jim was born
June 6, 1942
in Branford,
Florida to Al-
vin and Annie
Laura Morgan-
Fulton. Both
preceded him
in death. He was employed,
with Daniel's Lumber Com-
pany and worked there until his
health failed. Others preced-
ing him in death; two brothers,
A.C. Fulton and Dallas Fulton.
He leaves to cherish memories;
four brothers, George Fulton,
Daniel Fulton (Mildred), Frankie
Fulton (Patricia), Bobby Fulton,
all of Lake City, FL.; six sisters,
Gertha Mae Perry (Alton), Laura
Turner (Sylvester), Rosa Lee
Clark, Mary Ann Johnson, Jaca-
lyn Fulton, all of Lake City, FL.,
Virginia George (Lorenzo), Cross
City, FL.; two aunts, Aleen Ca-
son (Allen), Orlando, FL, Min-
nie Bell Scott, San Diego, CA.;
devoted cousins, Morris Morgan
(Crese), Lake City, FL., spe-
cial friends, Mazell Patterson,
Mable Lucas, Elder U. Taylor;
hosts of nieces, nephews, other
relatives and sorrowing friends.
Funeral services for Mr. Fulton
will be 11:00 a.m. Saturday, Feb-
ruary 19, 2011 at True Church of
God And Unity. 1037 NE Annie
Mattox Street. Lake City, FL.
The family will receive friends
Friday, February 18, 2011 from
5:00-7:00pmatthefuneralhome.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Dorothy Suber Goree
Dorothy Suber Goree, 95, died
on Tuesday, February 15, 2011
at Avalon Health & Rehabili-
tation after a lengthy illness.
Born in South Carolina to the
late John and Sara Rabb Suber,
she spent a number of years in
Jacksonville before moving to
Lake City in 1997. She was very
artistic, having interest in basket
weaving, crocheting, and pot-
tery making. Dorothy was also
an accomplished seamstress and
bridge player. She enjoyed rais-
ing flowers, as well as fruits and
vegetables. Her kind, generous


spirit brought much laughter and
happiness to family and friends.
She was a member of Arlington
United Methodist Church in
Jacksonville, from 1951-1997,
where she was a member of the
Friendship Sunday School Class,
and was currently a member of
First Baptist Church of Lake
City and a member of the Char-
ity Sunday Schodl Class. She
was preceded in death .by her
husband, Virgil Goree in 1997.
Survivors include her daugh-
ter, Joan '(George) ard of
Lake City, FL., and' her grand-
children Chris Ward of Jack-
sonville, FL., Jeffrey Ward of
Lake City, FL., and Stephen
Ward of Jacksonville, FL.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 11:00 a.m. on Sat-
urday, February 19, 2011 in
the chapel of Gateway-Forest
Lawn Funeral Home with the
Rev. Robert K. Davis officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in
Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens.
Visitation with the family will be
one hour prior to service time.
(10:00 a.m. 11:00 a.m.). In
lieu of flowers, the family asks
that donations be made in Mrs.
Dorothy's honor to the Suwan-
nee Valley Care Center (Ha-
ven Hospice) 6037 U.S. Hwy
90 West, Lake City, FL 32055.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME 3596
South U.S. Hwy. 441, Lake
City, FL 32025 (386) 752-1954
is in charge of arrangements.
Please sign our guestbook at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com

Kerry Russell Stephens
Kerry Russell Stephens, age 48,
died Sunday morning, February
13, 2011, from injuries sustained
in a vehicle crash in Lake City.
For the past 24 years he had
resided in Columbia Coun-


ty, having moved here from
the' Tampa/Plant City area.
Kerry was of the Baptist faith
and enjoyed
woodworking,
cooking. His
cheesecakes
were the -best!
He was a
structural 9A
pipe fitter by.
trade and his previous em-
ployers .,included Tampa
Steel and Quality Industries.
Kerry was preceded indeathby his
patents, Russell and Lucille Ste-
phens, a sister and two brothers.
'He is survived by his son,
Darien Stephens, Lake City
and two sisters, Barbara Riles
and Sandra Higdon, both of
Plant City. He also is survived
by a daughter, Ashley and a
granddaughter, Savannah and
many other nieces, nephews,
family members and friends.
A Celebration of Life will be
held this Sunday, February 20 at
3 p.m. at Church on the Way, cor-
ner of US 441 and County Road
252 (by CHS). All those who
knew Kerry or know his fam-
ily are invited,to attend. Those
who knew him know he would
not want anything fancy so a
casual and colorful dress code
is encouraged. Afterward, the
family invites everyone to their
home for dinner and fellowship.
This notice was paid for and
provided by Kerry's fam-
ily. May Kerry now rest in
peace and keep his family in
your thoughts and prayers.

Bernice Parrish Suggs
Bernice Parrish Suggs, of Lake
Butler passed away peacefully
February 15, 2011, into eternal
life surrounded by her loving
and devoted family at her home


Ii


Date: June 2, 2009
Time: 4 PM
Place: Josh's House
off Hwy 252

Please RSVP
386-555-5555 for details.


Call today to place an
invitation ad for your
child, grandchild,
God child or anyone
you think deserves
something extra on
their special dayl


t l


Call

755.5440 or

755.5441
between 8am & 4pm


10Deadline:
Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days prior
to appearance in the Lake City Reoorter.


in rural Lake Butler. She was
born in Lake Butler the daugh-
ter of the late Willie Lee Parrish
and Linnie
Bell Green
Parrish. She
was a home-
maker, lov-
ing her family
and friends.
She was pre- .
ceded in death
by 2 sisters: Edna Douglas and
Virgie Brogdon; five Broth-
ers Cecil Parrish; Olen Parrish;
Leon Parrish; G.W.' Parrish;
and David Parrish, an infant
daughter; Jeri Denise Suggs.
She is a member of the Grace
Christian Fellowship Church.
She is survived by her lov-
ing husband of 43 years: Jerry
Suggs. Her daughter: Barbara
Matchett of Gainesville. Her two
sons: J. R. Eddy and Josh Suggs
both of Lake Butler. Her Sister:
Joyce Osteen and her husband
James of Glen St. Mary. Sister-
in-law Aliene Parrish of Ala-


chua. Very close friends: Debbie
Poole. Six Grandchildren; Bobby
Lynn Faulk; Morgan Eddy; Jes-
sie Eddy; Rusty Eddy; Madison
Suggs and Ryley Steven Suggs.
Four Great Grandchildren. Fu-
neral services will be held Friday
at 1:00 PM in the Grace Christian
Fellowship Church With Rev.:
*Terry Elixson' and BrO. Arthur
Peterson officiating. Burial will
follow in Elzey Chapel Ceme-


tery under the care of ARCHER,-
FUNERAL HOME OF LAKE
BUTLER. Family will received.
friends from 6 to 8 Thursday
evening at the funeral home.'



Obituaries are .paid. advertise,' !
ments. For details, call the .Lake,
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293. ."L;


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GBIS Disability, Inc. Free Consultation



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with great results. It's a good way to
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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427










LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011


ON HEALTH


Report details energy drink risks


Dr. Peter Gott


Tennis-

elbow

surgeryin

question

D ear Dr. Gott.
I have been
suffering with
tennis elbow
for almost
a year with little relief. I
have tried physical therapy,
used Aleve, heat, cold and
had cortisone shots. Right
now, I am trying deep-tis-
sue massage that seems to
help some. I continue to do
stretching exercises.
I have an office job and
spend a good portion of
the day using a computer.
My elbow started to bother
me last winter after we had
more than a foot of snow
and I shoveled a lot. Are
there activities I should
avoid or take part in to
help? I don't want to have
surgery to correct this, as
I've heard there is no guar-
antee of results. Do you
have any suggestions?

Dear reader: Tennis
elbow, technically known
as lateral epicondylitis, can
result from a number of
causes but is common fol-
lowing repetitive motion of
the arm and wrist such
as when executing a tennis
or other racket-sport back-
hand improperly, shoveling
snow, using a computer
mouse, or swinging a ham-
mer for a living.
Pain results from physi-
cal stress, overuse and
inflammation that can radi-
ate from the outer portion
of the elbow to the wrist
and hand. This may, in
part, be the. result of small
tears in the tendons that
attach the muscles of the
forearm to the outside of
the elbow.
Diagnosis can often be
made by physical exam and
verbal history of events
that preceded the pain.
Should questions remain,
your physician might order
an MRI or EMG to rule out
nerve impingement. X-rays
are not generally helpful
because they don't reveal
tendon tears, but they can
rule out other conditions.
Initial treatment is, as
you attempted, with over-
the-counter nonsteroidal
anti-inflammatory pain
relievers, followed by
gentle stretching exercises,
wearing a brace, or discon-
tinuing the activity tempo-
rarily (two to three weeks)
to allow the tendons to heal
on their own. The use of
an ice pack up to six times
a day, an Ace bandage,
acupuncture, massage
or physical therapy, or a
cortisone injection might
provide relief. Devise meth-
ods to allow you to function
throughout the day with
reduced pain. A
When all else fails, speak
with your physician regard-
ing the pros and cons of
surgery. He or she will
likely want to know that
you have attempted con-
servative measures for at
least six months because
invasive surgery involves
trimming tendon sheaths
or releasing a tendon from
bone.


LINDSEY TANNER
AP Medical Writer

CHICAGO Energy
drinks are under-stud-
ied, overused and can be
dangerous for children
and teens, warns a report
by doctors who 'say kids
shouldn't use the popular
products.
The potential harms,
caused mostly by too much
caffeine or similar ingre-
dients, include heart pal-
pitations, seizures, strokes
and even sudden death, the
authors write in the medi-
cal journal Pediatrics. They
reviewed data from the
government and interest
groups, scientific literature,
case reports and articles in
popular and trade media.
Dakota Sailor, 18, a
high school senior in Carl
Junction, Mo., says 'risks
linked with energy drinks
aren't just hype.
Sailor had a seizure and
was hospitalized for five
days last year after drink-
ing two large energy drinks
- a brand he'd never tried
before. He said his doctor
thinks caffeine or caffeine-
like ingredients may have
been to blame.
The report says some
cans have four to five times
more caffeine than soda,
and Sailor said some kids
he knows "drink four or five
of them a day. That's just
dumb."I
Sailor has sworn off the
drinks and thinks other kids
should, too.
The report's authors want
pediatricians to routinely ask
patients and their parents
about ,energy drink use and
to advise against drinking
them.
"We would discourage
the routine use" by children
and teens, said Dr. Steven
Lipshultz, pediatrics chair-
man at the University of
Miami's medical school. He
wrote the report with col-
leagues from that center.
The report says energy
drinks often contain ingre-
dients that can enhance the
jittery effects of caffeine
or that .can have other side
effects including nausea and
diarrhea. It says they should
be regulated as stringently
as tobacco, alcohol and pre-
scription medicines.
"For most children, ado-
lescents, and young adults,
safe levels of consumption
have not been established,"
the report said.
Introduced more than 20
years ago, energy drinks
are the fastest growing
U.S. beverage market; 2011
sales are expected to top
$9 billion, the report said.
It cites research suggesting
that about one-third of teens
and young adults regularly
consume energy drinks.
Yet research is lacking on
risk from long-term use and
effects in kids especially
those with medical condi-
tions that may increase the


OiGEYE


A %


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo, Dakota Sailor, who suffered a siezure after consuming sev
eral Nos energy drinks, poses for a photograph in Carl Junction, Mo. Energy drinks are under-studied, overused and can be,
dangerous for children and teens, warns a report by doctors who say kids shouldn't use the popular products.


dangers, the report said.
The report comes amid a
crackdown on energy'drinks
containing alcohol and caf-
feine, including recent Food
and Drug Administration
warning letters to manufac-
turers and bans in several
states because of alcohol
overdoses.
The report focuses on
nonalcoholic drinks but
emphasizes that drinking
them along with alcohol is
dangerous.
TheAmericanAssociation
of Poison Control Centers
adopted codes late last year
to start tracking energy
drink overdoses and side
effects nationwide; 677 cases
occurred from October
through December; so far,
331 have been reported this
year.
Most 2011 cases involved
children and teens. Of the
more than 300 energy drink
poisonings this year, a quar-
ter of them involved kids
younger than 6, according
to a data chart from the poi-
son control group.
That's a tiny fraction of the
more than 2 million poison-
ings from other substanc-
es reported to the group
each year. But the chart's
list of reported energy
drink-related symptoms is
lengthy, including seizures,
hallucinations, rapid heart
rate, chest pain, high blood
pressure and irritability, but
no deaths.
. Monday's paper doesn't
quantify drink-related com-
plications or deaths. It cites
other reports on a few
deaths in Europe of teens or
young adults who mixed the
drinks with alcohol, or who
had conditions like epilepsy
that may have increased the
risks.
Maureen Storey, senior
vice president of science
policy at the American
Beverage Association, an


industry group, said the
report "does nothing more
than perpetuate misinforma-
tion" about energy drinks.
Many of the drinks con-
tain much less caffeine
than coffee from popular
coffeehouses, and caf-
feine amounts are listed
on many of the products,
she said in a written state-


ment.
Caffeine is safe, but those
who are sensitive to it can
check the labels, she said. .
A clinical report on
energy drinks is expected
soon from the American
Academy of Pediatrics
that may include guide-
lines for doctors.
Dr. Marcie Schneider,


an adolescent medicine
specialist in Greenwicljh
Conn., and member of the
academy's nutrition com-
mittee, praised Monday'.s
report for raising aware-
ness about the risks.
"These drinks have no
benefit, no place in the
diet of kids," Schneider
said.


CENTER of North Florida
al Eye Care & Surgery
S ,. Eye Exams


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Call Today for an Appointment


1961 0 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


ff,


I









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakeatyreportercom


SPORTS


Thursday, February 17, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Moe's Night
fundraiser today
The Fort White High
Dugout Club has a
Moe's Night fundraiser
from 5-8 p.m. today at
Moe's Southwest Grill
in Lake City.
For details, call Chad
Bonds at 590-7362.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday
in the teacher's lounge at
the high school. Election
of officers will be
conducted, and all
members are encouraged
to attend.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954 or
e-mail shaynetrayne@
hotmail.com.
OLUSTEE 5K
Registration
ends today
The 2011 Olustee
5K Run/Walk is 7 a.m.
Saturday. Individual or
team registration is
available at www.step
fitnessonline.com. Entry
forms can be picked
up at the-Step Fitness
corporate office in the
Carquest building on
Pinemount Road. Today
islre'deadline for
registration. Proceeds
go t benefit March of
Dimes.
For details, call
Michelle Richards at
(386) 208-2447.
ADULT SOFTBALL
League sign-up
begins Feb. 28
The Lake City
Recreation Department
has church, commercial
and women's adult
softball league
registration set for
Feb. 28 to March 18.
Registration is 8:30 to
5 p.m. weekdays at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
Fees are $350 for a
minimum of 10 games.
Rosters are available at
Teen Town and due with
fees by March 18.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3609.
* From staff reports


Jackson to remain

head coach at

Fort White High


.COURTESY PHOTO
Fort White head coach Demetric Jackson speaks with officials in a game last season. He
announced Wednesday he would not apply for the Columbia High opening.


Decision came
down to loyalty
to his players.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Character was one of the
fundamentals preached by
outgoing Columbia High
head coach Craig Howard.
Fort White High head
coach Demetric Jackson
displayed of that character
on Wednesday by withdraw-
ing his name from consid-
eration as the next Tigers
coach.
"It came down to my play-
ers," Jackson said. "I love
this community. It's truly


Champion of the hunt

Lake City dog ., "' -
wins 57th fox K .) t .


hound state trial.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Fox hunting stays in your
blood and proper training
techniques never go out of
,style.
Paul Bullard of Lake,
City- receritly won the-2011
Florida State Fox Hound'
Field Trial championship.
Bullard first won the com-
petition in 1983, in Perry,
which was the 57th running
of the trial.
Thelma, who will turn 2
in March, was champion in
a field that began with more
than 200 dog. She compet-
ed in the All Age category
"I trained her from a
puppy," Bullard said. "I
started her out in puppy
hunts and she has a good
field trial record. She has
placed in six of nine field
trials, just had never been a
champion."
Bullard said the trial
consists of three days of
running five hours per day.
Dogs are judged on hunting,
trailing, speed and drive,
and endurance. Owner's
are not allowed inside the
enclosure to mingle with
the 25 or so judges.
"It is an accumulation of
BULLARD continued on 2B


COURTESY PHOTO
Lake City's Paul Bullard shows off Thelma, the 2011 Floirda State Fox Hound Field Trial
champion in the All Age category.


like a family."
Jackson was thought to
be one of the leading candi-
dates for the Tigers' open-
ing, but instead he will con-
tinue building what he has
started in Fort White.
The Indians have been
in the playoffs the previ-
ous three seasons under
Jackson.
Despite getting recogni-
tion for his achievements,
Jackson made sure that the
players receive the credit.
"Some of these guys have
never really been a part of
anything," he said. "If it's
a way to reach them, that's
what matters to me. They
JACKSON continued on 2B


Tigers

sweep

Panthers

Columbia
boys dominate
Ridgeview High.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
It was a clean sweep
for Columbia High's boys
tennis team as the Tigers
won 7-0 against Ridgeview
High. on, Wednesday in
Lake City.
The Tigers won 56 of
the 65 games played to
pick up their second win
of the year in as many
matches.
"I'm very, pleased with
the way we're playing,"
Columbia High coach
Russell Waters said. "I
didn't really know what to
expect coming in against
Ridgeview."
The doubles team of
Octavious Buiey and
Carter Jackson won 8-2 at
the No. 1 position.
"They came off the
court saying its the best
they've played together
in their history," Waters
said.
Anthony Broome
and Shyam Patel also
dominated in their dou-
bles match with an 8-2
victory.
Singles saw the same
CHS continued on 2B


GAMES


Today
Columbia High girls
tennis vs. Gainesville
High at Jonesville Tennis
Center, 3:30 p.m.
Columbia High
baseball vs. Lee High,
5 p.m. (JV-3:30 p.m.
at Melody Christian
Academy)
Columbia High
softball vs. Gainesville
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Friday
Columbia High's Cole
Schreiber, Monterance
Allen in wrestling state
finals at The Lakeland
Center, 10 a.m.
Columbia High
baseball vs. Union County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4)
Fort White High
softball vs. Bradford High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High
baseball vs. Bradford
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Saturday
Columbia High's Cole
Schreiber, Monterance
Allen in wrestling state
finals at The Lakeland
Center, 9 a.m.


Columbia survives


district challenge


Lady Tigers defeat
Lady Panthers 4-3
in Lake City.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Last season, Columbia
High and Ridgeview High
went back and forth until
the Lady Tigers finally came
out on top in the regional
tournament. The first leg
of their 2011 competition
began Wednesday with the
Lady Tigers defeating the
Lady Panthers, 4-3, in Lake
City.
The two teams split dou-
bles to begin the match
with Columbia taking the
top-seeded spot.
Chrissie Reichert and
Susy Romero teamed up for
an 8-2 victory at the No. 1
position.


The newly formed No.
2 team of Kelsey Mercer
and Taylor Owens pushed
Ridgevie* to the limit, but
fell 5-8.
After losing the No. 5 sin-
gles match, Columbia was
down 1-2. Kristin Sharp fell
in that spot 2-8.
An injury at the No. 4
position to Jessie Bates left
the Lady Tigers needing
all three of the remaining
matches to come out with
the victory. Bates injured
her shoulder and was forced
to retire.
The top three positions
held steady in single's
competition, however, and
the Lady Tigers would
bounce back to win the
match.
Reichert made easy
work of her opponent
with an 8-0 victory at the
No. i position. Susy Romero


picked up an 8-3 victory
at the No. 2 position, and
the match came down to a
tightly-contested No. 3
battle.
Kelsey Mercer picked up
the win 9-8 (9-7) in a tie-
breaker to help Columbia
secure the win.
"Ridgeview had won all
of their matches so far,"
Columbia High coach
Tabatha McMahon said.
"This let us see how we
stack up against the best
team in our district, in our
mind. We had to win this,
because it sets us up with
confidence for the' next
match. We're neck-and-
neck, so we'll have to play
well."
Columbia (2-0) contin-
ues its district schedule at
3:30 p.m. today at Jonesville
Tennis Complex against
Gainesville High.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High's Chrissie Reichert returns a serve against
Suwannee High last week.


I .










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
10 a.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, practice for DRIVE4COPD 300, at
Daytona Beach
Noon
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
practice for NextEra Energy Resources
250, at Daytona Beach
2 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Duel
at Daytona, at Daytona Beach
6:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR,Truck Series, pole
qualifying for NextEra Energy Resources
250, at Daytona Beach
GOLF
9:30 am.
TGC European PGA Tour, Avantha
Masters, first round, at New Delhi (same-
day tape)
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Northern Trust
Open, first round, at Pacific Palisades,
Calif.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Minnesota at Penp St.
ESPN2 Clemson at N.C. State
8:30 p.m.
FSN -Washington St. at Arizona
9 p.m.
ESPN Alabama at LSU
ESPN2 DePaul at Providence
10:30 p.m.
FSN UCLA at Stanford
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
TNT San Antonio at Chicago
10:30 p.m.
TNT Dallas at Phoenix

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
San Antonio at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Friday
All-Star Celebrity Game, 7 p.m.
All-Star Rookie Challenge, 9 p.m.

All-Star rosters
(x-denotes starter; y-injured)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
No. Player Pos Ht Wt A-S


20 Ray Allen, Bos G 6-5 205 10
I Chris Bosh, MiaF-C 6-10 230 6
5 K. Garnett, Bos F 6-1 I 220 14
15Al Horford,Atl F-C 6-10 245 2
12x-D. Howard, Orl C 6-1 I 265 5
6x-L. James, Mia F 6-8 250 7
2 JoeJohnson,Atl G 6-7 235 5
34 Paul Pierce, Bos F 6-7 235 9
9 Rajon Rondo, BosG 6-1 171 2
Ix-Derrick Rose, ChiG 6-3 190 2
Ix-A. S'demire, N.Y.F-C6-10 245 6
3x-D.Wade, Mia G 6-4 210 7
Head Coach: Doc Rivers, Boston
Assistant Coaches: Lawrence Frank,
Armond Hill, Kevin Eastman', Mike
Longabardi, Roy Rogers,Tyronn Lue
Athletic Trainer: Scott McCullough,
-Toronto
WESTERN CONFERENCE
No. Player P Ht Wt A-S
15x-C.Anthony, DenF 6-8 230 4
24x-K. Bryant, L.A.L.G 6-6 205 13
21 Tim Duncan, S.A. F 6-1 I 260 13
35x-K. Durant, Okd F 6-9 230 2
16 Pau Gasol, L.A.L. F 7-0 227 4
20 Manu Ginobili, S.A.G 6-6 205 2
41 Dirk Nowitzki, DalF 7-0 245 10
3x-Chris Paul, N.O.G 6-0 175 4
32 B. Griffin, L.A.C. F 6-10 251 I
7 R.Westbrook, OklG 6-6 211 I
8 D.Williams, Uta G 6-3 209 2
II x,y-Yao Ming, HouC 7-6 310 8
Head Coach: Gregg Popovich, San
Antonio
Assistant Coaches: Mike Budenholzer,
Don Newman, Brett Brown, Chip
Engelland, Chad Forcier, Jacque Vaughn
Athletic Trainer: Jasen Powell, L.A.
Clippers

NBA calendar
Friday-Sunday All-Star weekend
(Los Angeles).
Feb. 24 -Trade deadline, 3 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 12 Arizona vs. Washington State,
8:30 p.m.
No. 23 Temple vs. Richmond, 7 p.m.
Friday's Game
No. 13 Connecticut at No. 16
Louisville, 9 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week
NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Daytona 500
Site: Daytona Beach


Schedule: Today, Gatorade Duel at
Daytona 150-mile qualifying races,
2 p.m. (Speed, 1-5:30 p.m., replay 9 p.m.-
12:30 a.m.); Friday, practice (Speed,
I I a.m.-2 p.m.); Saturday, practice (Speed,
10:30 a.m.-noon); Sunday, race, I p.m.
(FOX, noon-5 p.m.).
Track: Daytona International Speedway
(tri-oval, 2.5 miles).
Race distance: 500 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: Subway Fresh Fit 500.
Feb. 27, Phoenix International Raceway,
Avondale,Ariz.
Online: http://www.nascar.com
NATIONWIDE
DRIVE4COPD 300
Site: Daytona Beach
Schedule: Today, practice (ESPN2,
10 a.m.-noon); Friday, qualifying (ESPN2,
4-6 p.m.); Saturday, race, 1:15 t.m. (ESPN2,
noon-4 p.m.).
Track: Daytona International
Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles, 120 laps.
Next race: Bashas' Supermarkets 200,
Feb. 26, Phoenix International Raceway,
Avondale,Ariz.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
NextEra Energy Resources 250
Site: Daytona Beach
Schedule:Today, practice (noon-I p.m.),
qualifying (Speed, 6:30-8 p.m.); Friday, race,
7:30 p.m. (Speed, 7-10 p.m.).
Track: Daytona International Speedway
(tri-oval, 2.5 miles).
Race distance: 250 miles, 100 laps.
Next race: Lucas Oil 150, Feb. 25,
Phoenix International Raceway, Avondale,
Ariz.
OTHER RACE
U.S. AUTO RACING CLUB: Sprint
Car, Bubba Army Sprint Nationals, Today-
Saturday, Ocala Speedway, Ocala. Online:
http://www.usacracing.com

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Today's Games
Boston at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. *
Detroit atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Montreal at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Atlanta at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Washington at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.


Pujols deadline passes


Associated Press

JUPITER The St.
Louis Cardinals made
Albert Pujols what they
said was their best offer.
It wasn't enough.
So get ready, baseball:
Pujols seems headed for
the open market next fall.
The deadline Pujols set


for the Cardinals to reach
a new contract agreement
passed Wednesday with
no deal, making it likely
the three-time MVP will
become a free agent after
the World Series. The
Cardinals said they will
respect Pujols' wishes and
not request more talks dur-
ing the season, unless their


first baseman surprisingly
changes his mind.
"A difference of opinion
in determining Albert's
value simply could not
be resolved," said Pujols'
agent, Dan Lozano.
The Cardinals would not
reveal their offer, though it
was believed to be some-
where around $200 million.


JACKSON: Will still cheer for CHS
Continued From Page 1B


believe in what we teach. I
get the credit, but it really
goes to these guys."
Jackson appreciated
being thought of as one
of the top candidates, but
his heart remained in Fort
White.
"We've got a special
thing going, and to do it
for myself would be self-
ish," he said. "I realize we
might not be stacked with
numbers, but there's a con-
nection with them."
The Fort White coach
didn'twantto endorse a can-
didate for the Tigers' open-
ing, but did say that he'll
be rooting for Columbia
football this fall.
"I'm a die-hard Tiger,"
he said. "If there's a situ-
ation where they're in the


playoffs and we're not
in it, I'm going to watch.
There's only two times that
I haven't rooted for them
and that's when we played
them. I wish them well, and
I hope they hire the next
coach for the right reasons.
They need someone who
can bond the team and the
community."
Jackson noted that if it
had not been for his play-
ers, the decision might
have been different.
"If we didn't have such
a great group of guys, it
might not have been a dif-
ficult decision," he said.
"I wish them the best I
hope we have both pro-
grams back in the playoffs.
There's enough talent in
this county to have two


solid programs."
And to the people of Fort
White, Jackson gave his
thanks for patience through
the process.
'To the Tawahe family,
I'd like to thank the people
for understanding that this
truly is a family," Jackson
said. "I thank you all for the
support and prayers."
He also asked that the
animosity between the two
schools end.
"It's time to quit the
animosity," Jackson
said. "We always want
to be treated fair, but
sometimes the bickering
can cause more animos-
ity. Let's let the state know
that there are two fierce
programs in Columbia
County."


BULLARD: Eyeing West Florida hunt
Continued From Page 1B


points over three days,"
Bullard said. "They cut
them down to about 140
dogs on the last day."
Once a fox or coyote is
treed or caught, the dogs
are quickly pulled off and
have to continue to hunt.
A dog that lays down and
quits is eliminated.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission no longer
allows enclosed hunts,
so the trial was moved to
the Okefenokee Training
Enclosure in Perry, Ga.
"The Florida State Fox
Hunting Association did
a lot of work in Georgia,"
Bullard said. "It was like
a joint effort, but the trial


could not have been possi-
ble if the Georgia State Fox
Hunters Association had
not allowed this tradition to
continue. We have to give
the Georgia association a
special thanks for that"
Bullard's 1983 trial win
was in open woods, which
is still permitted in Florida.
He said it takes a different
kind of dog for the open
and the enclosed hunts.
When Florida went to
enclosed hunting, Bullard
got out of fox hunting for
several years.
"I quit it," Bullard said.
"I raised and hunted deer
dogs. I got back into fox
hunting 5-6 years ago."
Bullard owns Handicap


Deer and Fox Hound
Kennels in Lake City with
his son, Rick Bullard, and
Nancy Howell. He breeds
and sells fox hounds and
keeps a few deer dogs for
personal use.
Bullard went to a recent
open trial in Ocala, but has
warmed up to enclosed
hunts. Dogs now wear GPS
devices and are safe from
theft in enclosed hunts.
Bullard is eyeing an
upcoming hunt in West
Florida and has made more
than one trip to Georgia.
"I have several other
dogs that have placed,"
said Bullard, who: might
just chase the state cham-
pionship again next year.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Cdlumbia High's Carter Jackson charges the net during the Tigers match against Ridgeview
High in Lake City on Tuesday.


CHS: Tigers host Eastside Monday
Continued From Page 1B


outcome for the Tigers.
Octavious Buiey returned
to the No. 1 position for the
district matchup and came
away with an 8-1 victory.
The No. 2 and No. 3 sin-
gles matches both ended in



Armstrong

officially

retires
Associated Press

Lance Armstrong is call-
ing this one "Retirement
2.0."
Almost a month after
finishing 65th in his
last competitive race in
Australia, and nearly six
years removed from the
last of an unprecedented
seven straight Tour de
France titles, the 39-year-
old cyclist made clear there
is no reset button this
time.
This time, he's leaving
professional racing behind
for good.


clean sweeps. Broome won
at No. 2 and Patel finished
off his opponent at No. 3.
Jackson and George
Parker each won their No. 4
and No. 5 single's matches
with identical scores of 8-2.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. I
AWNTY I


The Tigers host Eastside
High on Monday in Lake
City.
"They are suppose to be
the big dogs, so this should
be our first challenge,"
Waters said.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


THUMPS trI
THOUPS WHEN THE SPRING
| PL-ANTING WAS
I COMPLETE,
S THE FARMER
YABSUW SAi IT WAS-- ,
/ "~ Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: DRAWL BASIS VANITY CAUCUS
I Answer: Why they staged a sit-in to save the trees -
IT WAS A "STAND"


.ACROSS,

1 Puppy plaint
4 Forked over
money
8 Young beef
12 Freud topic
13 Poet Khayyam
14 Arm bone
15 Source of
wealth (2 wds.)
17 Can opener tar-
gets
18 Bunches
19 Clever
21 GI's dinner
23 Poolroom sup-
ply
24 Synagogue
leader
27 Duke or count
29 Not rainy
30 - for keeps
32 Montreal ath-
lete
36, Pencil end
38 Banjo cousins
40 Escorted
41 Country cousin


43 Take a sip
45 Halt
47 Like khaki
49 Encouraged
strongly
51 Waylay
55 Rum-soaked
cake
56 Playgoers
58 Slippery -
eel
59 Pizza crust
option
60 Roofer's gunk
61 Fruit peel
62 Vast region
63 Mantra chants

DOWN

1 Safecracker
2 1939 Lugosi
role
3 Water sport
4 City buried by
Vesuvius
5 Wrong
6 Scottish for
John


Answer to Previous Puzzle

JOWL ALIG LOMA
OBIE ZOO LEVEL
GO GO TIBETANS
ESPIED SULU
AKC TSP
ENTRE MUESLI
TIED PANS USO
ALE VANE LATIR
EMAILS CAUSE
MOI EHS
HAUL APIAR Y
BADLANDS GOUT
ALOE AZO NAR SD
HOISTGE M AMT


7 Took a card
8 Non-finicky
eater
9 Jet set
10 Rooney and
Warhol


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


11 Refrain sylla-
bles
16 Kind of luck
20 Chill
22 Like golf
shoes
24 Hwys.
25 It may be
abstract
26 Provo sch.
28 Riviera sum-
mer
31 Main point
33 Really big tees
34 Household
member
35 Work by Keats
37 Outlaw
39 Endurance
42 Sporty truck
44 Xavier's ex
45 Virtual
46 Kind of sprawl
48 Half diameters
50 Disk contents
52 A law -
itself
53 Ponzi scheme,
for example
54 Towel word
55 High jump
equipment
57 Cousins of
"um"


2011 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011


OUTDOORS


Deep Creek community

celebrates for good cause


By MONTY STEPHENS
Special to the Reporter
T he Deep Creek
Community
Center hosted
an Outdoor
Celebration on
Feb. 5.
"We hold this event
annually to raise funds
for a good cause," said
Shannon Hall, Deep Creek
Community Center
secretary. "This year the
event is dedicated to Justin
Thomas Brown. Our hearts
and minds are focused on


helping his family. Justin
tragically passed away
Jan. 21 following an
accident."
Activities at the Deep
Creek Outdoor Celebration
were many.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission conducted
Buck Scoring and entry
into the Florida Trophy
Buck Registry.
The FWC landed and
departed after displaying
its Bell helicopter.
Horseback riding was
provided by Ruff Riders,


and there were wildlife
taxidermy displays, a cake
auction, barbecue,
activities for the children,
and drawings for outdoor
items. Live music was
provided by XTREME.
Many deer were brought
in for scoring. The big
buck of the day was taken
by Donnie Feagle of Lake
City in Hamilton County.
The 10-pointer scored 141
5/8 points.
* Monty Stephens, an avid
hunter and fisherman, lives in
Lake City.


TOP: Geiger family
members Christopher
(from left), Katlynn and
Eddie, of Lake City were
successful this year.

LEFT: Capt. William Sargent
of the FWC Reserves (left)
scores a trophy buck for
Craig R. White of Lake City.

BELOW: The Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission landed and
departed its Bell helicopter at
the Deep Creek Community
Center Outdoor Celebration
on Feb. 5.

Photos by
Monty Stephens


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Feb. 9, 2001 file photo, NASCAR drivers Dale Earnhardt (left) and his son
Dale Earnhardt Jr., standing together during a break in practice, at the Daytona
International Speedway in Daytona Beach. The 10-year anniversary of his father's death
weighs heavily, almost preventing Earnhardt from enjoying the start of a new season.

Shadow looms for Junior


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH
- There's a restaurant
outside North Carolinai
Speedway where all the
racers used to go for steak
and socializing whenever
NASCAR was in town.
Dale Earnhardt Jr. knew
the routine, had lived it
with his famous father.
But he was a reluctant
participant when he began
his racing career, once
recruiting his publicist
to skip the steak in favor
of peanut butter and, jelly
sandwiches in their motel
room.
Earnhardt didn't think it
would be a problem until
his father came through
the door of their adjoin-
ing room, saw the half-
eaten loaf of bread and his
son watching "Batman"
reruns. The Intimidator lit
into him.
"As he was opening
the door, he was holler-
ing, Tall got 15 minutes
to get ready to go and
eat,"' Earnhardt recalled,
"and once he opened the
door to see what we were
doing, he was really upset
because, we weren't more


professional. He thought
we should do what other
drivers do, and what he
was doing is the best thing
to do. So he thought we
were kind of lazy.
'Tons of moments like
that ... where we would be
lazy, do something goofy,
and Dad would just get
so mad for us not taking
things more seriously."
Those are the memories
of Dale Earnhardt his son
has chosen to .share in the
days leading up to Friday,
the 10th anniversary of
his father's death on the
last lap of the Daytona 500.
He's chosen to keep to him-
self the personal thoughts,
feelings and heartache that
accompany that violent
afternoon, and the decade
of difficulties it created for
NASCAR's most popular
driver.
Try as he might, he
can't replicate the success
of his father. He's stuck
in the shadow. He goes
by "Dale," and that's what'
his circle calls him, but
he's just "Junior" to most
people.
He can't please a rabid
fan base, much of it inher-
ited, that demands a cham-
pionship.


Worst of all, he can't
shake the pressure that
comes from being the
namesake of an icon who
was polarizing in ltte but
has become mythical in
' death.
It clearly weighed on him
in his preseason appear-
ances, each one a pepper-
ing of questions about his
father. With a blank stare
and monotone answers,
he patiently sat through
every session, trying to be
respectful but making it so
very clear he can't wait
for the annivei sary to pass.
He seemed fired almost
absent -- but insisted he's
"happy inside."


Instead of leading the
field to the green flag in
the Daytuna 500, Dale-
Earnhardt Tr. will start
from the ba,.K of the pack
after wrecking his primary
race car in practice.
Earnhardt still could win
Sunday's season-opening
race he'll just have his
work much harder to do
so.
Earnhardt mangled his
pole-winning car in prac-
tice Wednesday.


8th Annual

NORTH HO
LORIDA'

&PATIO SHOW


- 4,L,


i,:. R(ITARY C tIP. LAKF
'.. T - .. . ...._. -.-.. .


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
State bound for Hoop Shoot
North Regional Hoop Shoot winners Jordan Coppock (from left), Ryan Guyton and
Destiny Murray are joined by Benevolent and Protective Order of the Elks No. 893
representative and Hoop Shoot local chairman Trey Hosford as they prepare for the state
competition in Umatilla on Saturday. Coppock, an eighth-grader at Lake City Middle School,
won the 12-13 boys age group, while Guyton of Eastside Elementary (fifth grade) won the
10-11 boys age group and Murray of Pinemount Elementary (fourth grade) won the 8-9 girls
age group. The families will be housed at the Florida Elks Youth Camp and the Lake City
Elks Club gave each family $100 for expenses. The local winners will face two other regional
champions in the state competition.


2


BIG


DAYS


FREE TO THE PUBLIC
8th Annual

SColumbia County Fairgrounds
NORTH FLORID
HOM E Saturday, March 5th
&PATIO9 a.m. 5 p.m.


SHOW Sunday, March 6th
,' R iMiIi |B 10 a.m. 4 p.m.




Co-Sponsored by I 1


Co-Sponsored by:


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS m -V.me


r/. .,i SUNSTA\TE
ms^ ~~~II *^~ jfI~i


www.rotarycluboflakecity-downtown.com


CITY


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 4B


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


Traditional
Anniversary



for Couples
with Kids

BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


WHAT WILl- HAPPfN IF PRODUCTION
= =; OF COINS IS PRIVATIZfDl1


DEAR ABBY


Family celebrations leave

hurt feelings in their wake


DEAR ABBY: My fam-
ily was invited to my cousin
"Kirk's" wedding a small af-
fair for family and close friends
only.
My brother "Ryan" and
his wife, "Dawn," decided to
schedule their daughter's first
birthday party on the same
day and not attend the wed-
ding. The birthday party was
at 4; the wedding at 6. The
locations were an hour apart.
We attended the birthday cel-
ebration and left early to get
to the wedding on time, as did
Mom and Dad.
As a gift, we chipped in to
get Kirk and his bride, "Kal-
lie," an upgrade on their cruise
cabin. They loved it. Ryan and
Dawn contributed as well. The
bridal couple asked that, since
Ryan and Dawn didn't attend,
I thank them although they
planned to send written formal
thank-yous after their honey-
moon. I called Ryan the next
day to tell him Kirk and Kallie
were appreciative, the wed-
ding and reception were beau-
tiful, and they were missed.
Six weeks have passed
and my brother and sister-in-
law refuse to speak to me. I
learned they felt the phone call
I placed after the wedding was
"inappropriate." I was "throw-
ing the wedding in their faces"
and "had no right" to leave the
birthday party. I apologized,
but they still won't talk to me,
though they're speaking to
our parents. Ryan and I were
inseparable as kids, but now
what? HURT SIBLING IN


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
MICHIGAN
DEAR HURT SIBLING:
Unless there is more to the
estrangement than what you
have written, the problem
could be that your brother has
displaced his anger at your
parents for not staying at the
birthday party and directed
it solely at you because it's
"safer." Is it wrong? Yes. Child-
ish? Yes. Can you do anything
more than you already have to
fix it? Probably not
Your parents might take a
moment to remind Ryan that
they also left to attend the wed-
ding, and that it would have
been better to schedule the
festivities earlier so that every-
one could have stayed longer.
But if Ryan and Dawn choose
to hold a grudge, nothing you
can do will change that until
they're ready to let it go.
DEAR ABBY: My sister
"Mimi" died two years ago.
Throughout her 40-year mar-
riage she and her husband
lived away, from family and
barely kept in touch, although
we were close while growing
up. Since her death, my hus-
band and I have tried to keep
in touch with her husband,


"Clint."
The problem is, when I
call him, all he talks about is
the past, when we were all in
school. That's OK, but it invari-
ably has some kind of sexual
overtone about what I wore
or did as a teen. I have tried re-
directirg the conversation to
Mimi anything to no avail.
Now I'm wondering if my
sister kept Clint away from'
the family for a reason. He was:
always like this to a degree,
but it was under more control
when she was alive.
What do I do when the
conversation heads in this di-
rection? I don't want to lose
contact with him and their
children. UNCOMFORT-
ABLE IN NEW MEXICO
DEAR UNCOMFORT-
ABLE: The next time it hap-
pens, tell Clint in plain English
that he's making you uncom-
fortable and tell him to quit
dwelling on the past because
it's boring. If that doesn't dis-
courage him, call him only'
with your husband on another
extension.
And as to staying in contact
with your sister's children if
their parents were married for
40 years, they are adults now,
Contact them directly and let
them know you care about
them and want them to be a
part of your lives because you?
are all family.
S Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Your philan-
thropic attitude will set you
apart from anyone trying
to outdo you. A serious
look at a partnership will
reveal whether or not you
should cut ties or try to
make it work. Don't take on
more than you can handle.

TAURUS' (April 20-
May 20): You'll be forced
to deal with a one-sided sit-
uation. If it will help you out
professionally, proceed but,
if not, walk away. You don't
want to become emotion-
ally entangled in something
that infringes on your time
and possibly your code of
ethics. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Offer advice or
alternatives to what's be-
ing presented and you will
gather a following as well.
as the support you need to
get your own ideas up and
running. A celebration with
someone you share your
secrets with will enhance
your relationship. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Ask someone
who is up to date with the
latest craze or technology
to help you integrate your
personal and professional
lifestyle to meet current
standards. Love is in the
stars but so is disappoint-
ment. Don't let negativity


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

lead to loneliness. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Let everyone know
what your plans are and you
will receive help getting to
where you want to go. There
is money to be made and
deals to be struck. A pro-
posal you weren't expect-
ing will catch you off guard.
Don't hesitate. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Secrets are being with-
held. You have to dig deep
in order to know exactly
what you are dealing with.
Focus more on home, fam-
ily and your own emotional
well-being and you will fig-
ure out what's required to
improve your life and your
relationships. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): The encounters you
have with friends and col-
leagues will help you make
an important decision, in-
fluencing your personal
life, relationships and cur-
rent residence. Consider
the feelings of those your
decision will affect. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You'll be caught
in the middle of an emotion-
al situation that can disrupt
your home, family and emo-
tional well-being. You have
to look past current circum-


stances if you are g6ing to
reach your goals. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Extra cash
is heading your way. Job
interviews, advancement
and taking on greater re-
sponsibility will all help to
improve your life and bring
you in contact with people
who have more to offer you
personally and profession-
ally. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You will burn
out fast if you take on too
much. Limitation and frus-
tration are apparent if you
have to deal with someone
negative or with authority
figures that have the poten-
tial to make your life miser-
able. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't let poor fi-
nancial or emotional choic-
es stand in the way. You can
excel if you are disciplined
about work, finances and
trying to make the most
out of your life. A good of-
fer should be accepted. Do
what's best for you. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Being un-
predictable can be to your
advantage sometimes, but
it can also cause people
to keep their distance. Be
careful what signal you
send. You may find it hurts
your reputation and your
chance to advance. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: W equals X
"OU JROBD Y DY BDIERT FRTR Y
CTRTR ZP OIOER E K JROBD Y
G P IOVOYB E N RTR 'S J R Y H KE H R I I
VRHHK GPIOV, UKT RWYGCHR."
DTRD DOTYHSK
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Some people feel the rain. Others just get wet."
"You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 2-17


FOR BETTER OR WORSE

rrBY-I-BLIEVEI I. MUCH -U I
i ^- LDra\ClN I I --^ -F,-- so
ALL-IiE1~I BOFDER~S OrA~
I..,,ct0x0 Fl


RTiIS STUFF w EH'yO
lWP_ tE.A/BR iHAD ALL
WE UEFE-IHEIR,



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WHY ,',Ft: 50YI
IT Now!



ZC.--l'^.


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Monday through Friday from 8:00
Sunday. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
portertcom




























required regarding payments or
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These deadlines arthe subright to change without notice
























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immediately for prompt correc-
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Cancellation of advertisements ordertiin










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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 10-000271-CA
REGIONS BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
EDMUND ACCARDI,
EDDIE ACCARDI MOTOR
COMPANY, and TENANT #1 and
TENANT #2, representing tenants in
possession,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant
to a Uniform Final Judgment of
Foreclosure, entered in the above-
styled cause on February 9, 2011, in
the Circuit Court of Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida the Clerk of Columbia
County will sell the property situated
in Columbia County, Florida, descri-
bed as:
Description of Mortgaged and Per-
sonal Property
Lot 3, FAIRWAY VIEW UNIT 3, a
subdivision according to the plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book 5 at
Page 27-27A, in the Public Records
of Columbia County, Florida.
The street address of which is 225
NW Mallard Place, Lake City, Flori-
da 32055.
at a Public Sale, the Clerk shall sell
the property to the highest bidder, for
cash, except as set forth hereinafter,
on March 23, 2011, at 11:00 A.M. on
the third floor f the Columbia County
Courthouse, 173 N.E. Hemando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, in
accordance with Chapter 45, Florida
Statutes.
Dated February 10, 2011
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus funds from the sale, if
any, other than the property owner,
as of the date of the Lis Pendens,
must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
P DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

05525129
February 17, 24, 2011
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT
ORDINANCE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
The Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County, Florida will at
its regular meeting on March 3,
2011, in the Columbia County
School Board Administration Build-
ing, 372 West Duval Street, Lake
City, Florida at 7:00 p.m. consider
the adoption of an ordinance entitled:
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND
ORDINANCE NO. 2007-17 AL-
LOWING FOR THE EXEMPTION
OF SMALL INVESTOR-OWNED
WATER, WASTEWATER, AND
EFFLUENT RE-USE SYSTEMS
FROM REGULATION BY CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY UNDER SAID
ORDINANCE; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVID-
ING FOR REPEALER;
PROVIDING FOR CODIFICA-
TION; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.
The substance of the above-named
ordinance is as provided in its name.
Copies of the proposed ordinance are
available for inspection at the office
of the County Manager located in the
County Administration Complex,
135 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Any interested party
may appear and be heard at this pub-
lic hearing.
In the event any person decides to
appeal any decision of the Board of
County Commissioners with respect
to any matter relating to the consid-
eration of the ordinance at the above
references public hearing, a record of.
the proceedings may be needed and
in such event, such person may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of
the public hearing is made, which re-
cord includes the testimony and evi-
dence on which the appeal is to be
based.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, a person need-'
ing special accommodations or an m-
terpreter to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa Roberts
386/752-1006 or T.D. Services
386/758-2139, at least seven (7) days
prior to the date of the hearing.
DATED thisllth day of February,
2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
04543522
February 17, 2011

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 2006-445-CA
DIVISION:
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY FKA BANK-
ERS TRUST COMPANY OF CALI-
FORNIA, N.A. NOT IN ITS INDI-
VIDUAL CAPACITY, BUT SOLE-
LY AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF
VENDEE MORTGAGE TRUST
1994-3,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DORA J. JOHNSON, et al
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated FEBRUARY
11, 2011 and entered in Case NO.
2006-445-CA of the Circuit Court of
the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and
for COLUMBIA County, Florida
wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NA-
TIONAL TRUST COMPANY FKA
BANKERS TRUST COMPANY OF
CALIFORNIA, N.A. NOT IN ITS
INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY, BUT
SOLELY AS A TRUSTEE ON, is
the Plaintiff and DORA J. JOHN-
SON; DISCOVERY MARKETING
AND DISTRIBUTING, INC., are
the Defendants, The Clerk of the
Court will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at FRONT STEPS
OF THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on
the 16th day of MARCH, 2011, the
following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE SE 1/4
OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, AND
RUN EASTERLY ALONG SEC-
TION LINE TO THE WEST EDGE
OF RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE
ROAD NO. 247; THENCE
NORTHEASTERLY PARALLEL
TO AND 50 FEET ON A PERPEN-
DICULAR FROM THE CENTER-
LINE OF SAID STATE ROAD NO
247, 2054.73 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 48 DEGREES 30 MI-
NUTES WEST 18.99 FEET TO
THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF SAID STATE
ROAD NO. 247, AS NOW LOCAT-
ED AND TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE CONTINUE
NORTH 48 DEGREES 30 MI-
NUTES WEST 378.47 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 30
MINUTES EAST 151.90 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 30
MINUTES EAST 397.46 FEET TO
THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-
WAY ,LINE -OF SAID STATE
ROAD NO. 247; THENCE SOUTH
49. DEGREES 34 MINUTES 02
SECONDS WEST, ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, 153.08
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. BEING A PART OF THE
NORTH 1/2 OF SOUTHEAST 1/4
OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST.
A/K/A 1222 SOUTHWEST STATE
ROAD 247, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on February 11, 2011.
P DeWitt Cason
'Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper,
Court Administration at 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake
City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at
least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F06017711-NMNC-CONV--Team 1
05525127
February 17,24, 2011
PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE OF PROPOSED BOARD
ACTION TO CONSIDER
ORDER APPROVING IN-
CREASED WATER RATES FOR
COLLEGE MANOR WATER
COMPANY, INC.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
The Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County, Florida will at
its regular meeting on March 3rd,
2011, in the Columbia County
School Board Administration Build-
ing, 372 West Duval Street, Lake
City, Florida at 7:00 p.m. hold a pub-
lic hearing to consider a Proposed
Board Action entitled:
PROPOSED BOARD ACTION BY
THE BOARD OF COUNTY COM-
MISSIONERS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY FLORIDA ORDER AP-
PROVING INCREASED WATER
RATES FOR THE COLLEGE
MANOR WATER COMPANY,
INC.
The substance of the above-named
ordinance is as provided in its name.
Copies of the proposed ordinance are
available for inspection at the office
of the County Manager located in the
County Administration Complex,
135 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Any interested party
may appear and be heard at this pub-
lic hearing.
In the event any person decides to
appeal any decision of the Board of
County Commissioners with respect
to any matter relating to the consid-
eration of the ordinance at the above


references public hearing, a record of
the proceedings may be needed and
in such event, such person may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of
the public hearing is made, which re-
cord includes the testimony and evi-
dence on which the appeal is to be
based.


Legal

In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, a person need-
ing special accommodations or an in-
terpreter to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa Roberts
386/752-1006 or T.D. Services
386/758-2139, at least seven (7) days
prior to the date of the hearing.
DATED this 11th day of Feb., 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
04543523
February 17, 2011


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found







Lost Female Dog on 2/12 Sat.,
near Richardson Middle School.
Medium sized brown/black, looks
like a fox, Reward, 386-752-8920

100 Job
10 Opportunities

04543539
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
INSIDE SALES
Ideal candidates with previous
experience with outbound sales.
Must have excellent telephone
skills. Individual must be
enthusiastic, outgoing, have
excellent computer skills and be
able to perform in a fast pace
me nt. Please fax resume
to 386-758-0984 or email to
greajobs(LCjobs.info.

04543540
FULL TIME VICTIM
ADVOCATE-GRANT
FUNDED POSITION
in Lake City Guardian ad
Litem Office, salary
$26,000-$28,000yr-no benefits
Bachelors Degree in Social
Work, Criminology, Psychology
or two years comparable service
S in advocacy. Excellent
Communication skills, ability to
work independently and well
with others of various ages,
professions and backgrounds
must maintain a strong commit-
ment to Victims of Crime and
respect confidentiality of
victims. State application must
be submitted by February 23,
2011 to Tammie C. Williams at
213 Howard Street East Live
Oak, Florida 32064, EOE

05525143
S & S Office is hiring
a full-time receptionist.
Duties included: typing &
computer work
(must be proficient in Microsoft
works programs),multi-line
phones, filing, 10-key, etc.
Benefits include: vacation, sick
leave, credit union, profit shar-
ing,dental, health and
life insurance.
Drug Free Workplace EOE
Apply in person at
S & S Office
134 SE Colbum Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025

A/C SERVICE Tech
Min 5 yrs experience
F/T with benefits
Please call 386-454-4767
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
.Certified VPK Teacher needed.
Please do not call if you
are not certified. 386-755-7677
6:30a-5:30p or 344-5363 after 5:30
Farm Workers
Planting, cultivating and
harvesting crops, 40hrs/wk 8:00am
- 4:00pm. $9.94 hr. Overtime + 1/2
after 60hrs. 5 temp. jobs March -
mid Nov. Homestead Farm
guarantees to offer worker work
for at least 3/4 of the workdays of
the contract period. Transportation
& Subsistence expenses to
worksite provided upon
completion of 50% Work
Contract. Housing provided at no
cost for those living a long
distance from permanent
residence. Tools, supplies, and
equipment provided at no cost.
Call Homestead Farm, Poolesville,
MD (301-926-6999) between
9AM-l1PM for appointment. Or
apply for this job at the local State
Workforce Agency using job
listing Number MD0328720.
Looking for exp., reliable person
to care for elderly mother, your
home or hers, F/T Resume & Ref's
fax 386-752-4590 386-755-7159
Sewing Machine Operator experi-
ence. 2nd person needed for cut-
ting fabric in the cutting room.
Call Hafner's 386-755-6481
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com


Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630


100 Job
Opportunities

280 Temp Farm Workers needed
3/15/11-9/30/11. Workers will
plant, prune, thin, cultivate,
harvest, grade, pack peaches, bell
peppers & broccoli. Worksites in
Saluda, Edgefield, & Aiken Co's
SC. Random drug testing at
employer's expense. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Work tools,
supplies, equip provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier, if appropriate. $9.11/hr.
Report or send a resume to the
nearest FL Agency of Workforce
Innovation office & ref. job order
# 495585.
Titan Peach Farms Ridge
Springs, SC

WANTED: Row slash and long
leaf pines 4-6 years 8-12
Top Dollar PAID References
avail. Call David 352-281-0235

120 Medical
120 Employment

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST:
Qualifications: Prefer experienced
generalist technologist familiar
with Laboratory automation,
safety, quality control, manual
testing and LIS operation. Must
be able to lift up to 40 pounds and
will be exposed to hazardous
materials. Forty hours M-F with
Saturday rotation. Require State of
Florida License as a Medical Tech-
nologist. Please submit resume to
npatel()chclabs.com
PT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.
SUPERVISORY MEDICAL
TECHNOLOGIST:
Qualifications: Prefer experienced
generalist supervisory medical
technologist familiar with
Laboratory automation, safety,
quality control, manual testing,
and LIS operation. Knowledge of
inventory control, quality control
review and evaluation, instrument
maintenance and personnel
management. Must be able to
lift up to 40 pounds and will be
exposed to hazardous materials.
Forty hours M-F with Saturday
rotation, 3PM to 11:30 PM.
Require State of Florida License as
a Laboratory Supervisor.
Please submit resume-to'
npatel(Schclabs.com-

240 Schools &
140 i Education

04543248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/14/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/14/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

Boxer Puppy, AKC, H/C
fawn w/black mask,
$500
904-653-1839

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

I BUY WORKING AND
NON WORKING
APPLIANCES!
CALL 386-365-1915

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260


After 5pm 386- 752-3648.
WANTED TO BUY
Garage Door -
7'X9'
386-755-1937


430 Garage Sales












PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

Lowery Parade. Organ.
Slot Machine, Chipper Vac.,
Small Generator. Call 386-754-
0800 or 755-7773 for details.
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

463 Building
vU Materials
ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace.
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available


520 Boats for Sale

Bass Tender Boat 2 Seater
10'2",can fit in back of truck
$500 386-965-2215
Great for pond or lake!
630 Mobile Homes
3 9for Rento

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422

2/1 w/screen porch. Lg yard in
quiet, clean, safe, well maintained
10 unit park. Water, garbage incl.
$475.mo $475.dep. 386-965-3003
3/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
, pets ok, $500 dep $5,75'mo ,-
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450'
Mobile Horiiesfor rent in -
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114






Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.ro
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547

Mobile Homes
630 for Sale

$216 a month remodeled,
like new, 2Bd/2Ba S Wide
Delivered & blocked, appliances,
A/C $2500 down, 8 year fin.
Possible owner financing. Ready
now. Call Gary 386 758-9824
*Lot Model Sale*
Save 1,000's @ Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
For Model Info and Details
I05524941
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers Save
up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832

12 X 56, 2/1 SWMH,
axles avail, tongue attached
$2,500 OBO
386-965-1882
1985 SWMH, 1/1,
$1,000
Is able to move
o386-209-7691
Come in and see the
Future in Manufactured Homes.
Royals Homes making
people smile
386-754-6737
Come See all New Lot Models
Royals Homes. Honesty! Integrity!
Customer Satisfaction

Handy man special, Ft White area,
4/2 plus den, Fleetwood DWMH
on 1 acre, river access, owner
financing, $69.900, $1000 down,
$605 month 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Looking for a Modular?
Come see the Specialists
at Royals Homes and ask for Bo
386-754-6737
New 2011 Homes are Here
3BR/4BR at Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
Homes Built Your Way!
New,2010 MH,never been
occupied, front & back deck,
$99,900 MLS#76635 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
@ Westfield Realty
Royals Homes is Quality!
We treat you like Family.
Stop in or Call Catherine
386-754-6737


710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

2 br Apt. Close to shopping
and the VA Medical Center.
$525. mo plus deposit.
386-344-0579


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011


710 Unfurnished Apt.
1 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
05524833
No Application Fee +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 bedroom Apartments &
mobile homes,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423

3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Gatorwood on the Westside
Rent $650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Move In Special.2/1 w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Quail Heights 2br/lba duplex.
Secluded, private, safe. W/D
hookup. $700. mo. $500 security.
386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec..
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2 ~For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

073 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3/2 on 2.1 acres, 2 car garage,
ceramic tile, front & rear porches,
$995 mo, plus 2 mo sec.
Lease with the option to buy
386-758-9996 or 386-365-5434
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+Retirement Living,
Site built home
2br/2bth For Lease
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $675 mo,
$600 sec., 386-497-4699

75o Business &
Office Rentals
1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!
Great locations on SW Main Blvd.
Retail, Wholesale, Distribution,
Office. 1200+ sf only $950. per
mo. Includes Utilities 752-5035
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072.


770 Condos For Rent

04543558
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1200/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433..


780 Condos for Sale
3 bdrm Condo Nit, back patio,
HOA fees include ext maintenance
of home, lawn & pool MLS#76797
$110,000, Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237


805 Lots for Sale
1 acre lot outside the city limits.
Homes only subdivision. Priced
below the assessed value with the
county, $16,900 Hallmark Real
Estate 386-867-1613 Call Jay S .


805 Lots for Sale
2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Beautiful 5+ acre lot, partially
cleared w/large oaks, Homes only,
$38,000, MLS 75038 Call Roger
Lovelady @ Westfield Realty
386-365-7039
Charming Turn of the Century,
property, close to
downtown,MLS# 74814
$94,900 386-755-0808
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Nice 4.5 acre parcel w/S/P/W
older SWMH $39,900
MLS# 76182 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number'to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rmn w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
3/2 home w/1758 sq ft, Storage
bldg, enclosed patio & deck,
$168,000 Call Carrie Cason @
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
MLS# 73410
3/2 w/over 1700 sq ft, fireplaces,
modem kitchen, fenced yard, 2
sheds, convenient location
$89,500 MLS#73861 Call Patti
@Access Realty 386-623-6896
4 bdrm + office, 2 living & dining
areas, front & back porch
$279,900 MLS# 72831
Call Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty 386-755-0808
4/2 2300 plus sq ft,Palm Harbor
Home on 2 lots, Good Condition
$69,888 Call Nancy Rogers @
386-867-1271 Results Realty
4/2 1,800 sq ft on 10.5 acres,
newly remodeled inside, detached
garage, above ground pool
$189,888, Call Nancy,
Results Realty 386-867-1271
5 bedroom Home on 5 acres south
of Lake City, Big Rooms
lots of space $229,500
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
MLS# 72928 Westfield Realty
5/2, 1800sf, 24 acres, family rm,
screened back porch, RV
parking,newly painted close to VA
& DOT, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
5/3 Triplewide MH (2200) sq ft,
w/2 master bdrms, on 10 fenced
acres, fireplace. MLS# 76226
$75,0000 Call Patti Taylor
386-623-6896 Access Realty
AFFORDABLE 3BR/2BA mfg
home in Woodgate Village only
$27,000 #76741
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110
Beautifully Landscaped 3/1 on
1.11 ac, 16x24 detached garage,
screen porched bldg, water
purification system, Call Pam @
Rerax 386-303-2505
Brick home with 2,700 sqft under
roof. Large master w/bath on .5
acres completely fenced. $167,500
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
. Brick, .59 ac. 3br/2ba w/large
spacious rooms. Split floor.plan.
2 car garage & storage $222,900.
Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Close to town, 2 story home
w/stone, fireplace, downstairs
master bdrm, $144,900
MLS# 77050 Call Carrie Cason
386-623-2806 Westfield Realty
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, Woodcrest. Great area, split
plan. Screened back porch. Elaine
K. Tolar. 386-755-6488 $139,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba. 3 Fireplaces. 39.7 acres
included. Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $1,200,000


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Reduced. brick w/over 2,000 sqft,
5 ac. 3br/2ba.Lots of extras. Elaine
K. Tolar 755-6488 $149.900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lakeview home in town. Old
charm w/many upgrades Elaine K.
Tolar. 386-755-6488 $189,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2 Story, 4br/2.5ba-2160 sqft. Spa-
cious plan w/garage Lori Geibeig
Simpson 365-5678 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba close to town. 1620 sqft
w/covered patio& more. Lori Gei-
beig Simpson 365-5678 $117,900
Coral Shores Realty 2004
Custom built home, 23 fenced ac.
1700 ft paved frontage. Lg
kitchen/pantry, master/bath.
386-965-5905 Bob Gavette
Comer lot in Piccadilly Park.
Newly painted in/out. New carpet
/vinyl. 2 car garage. Inground
pool. $133,500. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
CUSTOM-BUILT 4BR mfg
home w/screen porch, front deck,
shed $87,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #73893
Cute 3/2 nicely remodeled home,
2 acres, partially fenced
$115,888
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473
Derington Properties, LLC
3/2 MH, large deck and
screened porch, 5 ac.
$46,500 386-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
DWMH, 5 ac. Screened front/back
porches. 20x40 shop fully equip-
ped w/bath. $74,900. 965-4300
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
Fully furnished 2br/2ba @
$83,000
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
3BR/2BA
$99,999
Family home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Great Investment Property!
House needs lots of TLC, close t0
shopping and schools, $35,000,
Bring all offers, Results Realty
Call Brittany 386-397-3473
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg
home near Wellborn on
5+ acres ONLY $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76768 .
Log Cabin home, located on
5 acres, wrap around porch
$199,000 MLS#75550
Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax Realty
Lrg Brick Home, well-established
neighborhood, in town,
$129,900 MLS#77016
Call Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
Must See! 4/2 2368SF Home,
island kitchen, den, fire place,
storage, auto gate entry,
Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575


Perfect starter home. Quiet area.
Wood laminate floors, Ig dining,
French doors. 1 car garage/work-
shop $84,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfection! Marion Place, gated,
brick 3/2 over 1800 sqft. Screened
lanai $158,900 386-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $55,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75210
REDUCED TO $61,500 in
Eastside Vlg! Immaculate
2BR/2BA w/lg rooms
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76753
Solid Home! Needs updating.
Country eat in kitchen & formal
dining.Some windows replaced.
$70,000 Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575


Iofs ,


confused?


Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


810 Home for Sale
SPACIOUS 2BR/2BA home on 1
ac w/attached garage &
2-story shed $89.900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76887
Totally refurbished 2/2 w/
workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94.900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Very Nice 4/2 on 4 acres w/open
floor plan, 2 living rooms, eat in
kitchen, dining rm and rec rm
w/wet bar $89,900 Call Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well maintained 3/2 DWMH,
1568 sq ft, acres, new roof,
$65,000, MLS#76187
Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001

820 Farms &
820 Acreage
10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

4 1/2 acre lot Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018 '
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

830 Commercial
830 Property
Aprox 4000 sq ft Commercial
bldg, 4 bay/2 car lift shop, show-
room/office area, $1000 a month
lease or will sell for $128,000.
Call Martin @ 386-697-9950

Coral Shores Realty. Prime
commercial, located on Hwy 41 &
Gibson Ln. 26X54 concrete block.
$76,000 386-965-5905
Call Bob Gavette
Downtown & borders 3 streets.
Aprox. 10,000 sqft fenced parking.
"as is" Bob Gavette. $73,000. 386-
965-5905 Coral Shores Realty
Prime Commercial Property
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya 3.27 acres, room for building
$398,888 386-867-1271
Call Nancy @ Results Realty


930 Motorcycles


2008 Honda 750
C2 Spirit
Windshield, engine guard,
backrest, luggage rack,
like new, 4900 miles.
$3,800
Call
386-365-3658


TS & WATERCRAFT dCa


755 I544


200.S Honda 750 C2 Spint, 4900
miles, windshield, engine guard,
backrest, luggage rack, like new
$3800 386-365-3658


940 Trucks

1990 Ford F350 Dually,
5th Wheel White, Automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215

1995 TOYOTA P/U Extra Cab.
Auto., fibergalss topper, AC.,
4 cyl 22R. Real nice. 180k mi.
$3500.00 (352)339-5158
lMV AL1K


950 Cars for Sale
FOR SALE. 2006 PT Cruiser, full
power, burgundy. 24k mi.
14 city 24 hwy. $7,995.00
386-758-9629 Leave message

GET CASH TODAY!!
for your car, truck, van or SUV.
(Running or not). Call anytime.
(229)412-0380

O91 Recreational
7 Vehicles






02 Fleetwood Revolution 40'.
Prestine. New tires, flushed trans.,
kept covered. Will sell tow vehi-
cle. $75K 752-6090 / 365-1903


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