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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01380
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: February 16, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01380
System ID: UF00028308:01380
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Opening

Woes
Melody r'-;'in knocks off : .
C H 'S LIB OF FLORIDA .... pIG :.
CH iA *-DIGIT
PO BO 117007 HISTOy
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVITLLE FL 3261i-43


Swinging

Tigers
Columbia opens season
with 30-2 softball win over Bell.
Sports, I B


iLT -Reporter
^^ S-ba-


Wednesday, February 16, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 22 E 75 cents


Local man faces drugs, weapons charges


Convicted felon
arrested after search
yields drugs, pistols.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
A Lake City man was arrested
Monday and faces multiple drug-
related and weapons charges
after authorities, armed with a
search warrant, allegedly found
two pistols, cocaine and mari-
juana at his home, authorities


said Tuesday.
Keith A. Walker, 40, of 141
NW Canine Court, was charged
with possession of firearms by a
convicted felon,
possession of
cocaine with
intent to sell, pos-
session of more
than 20 grams of
marijuana, pos-
session of drug
Walker paraphernalia
and possession of a weapon dur-
ing the commission of a felony
stemming'from the warrant. He


"The investigation by the Multi-Jurisdictional
Task Force was initiated after the sheriff's
office received complaints from
concerned citizens."

Sgt. Ed Seifert
Public information officer
Columbia County Sheriff's Office

is being held at the Columbia Jurisdictional Task Force exe-
County Detention Facility on a cuted a search warrant at 141
$101,000 bond. NW Canine Court and reportedly
The Columbia County Multi- seized about 15 grams of cocaine,


more than 100 grams of mari-
juana and two handguns.,
Sgt. Ed Seifert, public infor-
mation officer of the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office, said
Walker was arrested Monday
afternoon.
"The investigation by the
Multi-Jurisdictional Task Force
was initiated after the sheriff's
office received complaints from
concerned citizens," he said.
'The Task Force acted upon this
information and they were able to
develop probable cause to have
the search warrant issued."


INQUIRING MINDS


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
David Murdock looks at the research of Franco Ruiz of Fort White during the Suwannee Valley Regional Science Fair Tuesday
at the Florida Gateway College gymnasium.


Science Fair attracts students

from several nearby counties


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
Researching for
science fair
projects is a
stepping stone
to a career
at NASA or The Boeing
Company for Kelly Gray,
a Union County junior.
"It's fun for me," she
said. "I love it."
Gray was among
the more than 60 par-
tic pants in the Suwannee
Valley Regional Science
Fair Tuesday at the
Florida Gateway College
gymnasium.
Students from
Columbia, Bradford,
Hamilton and Union
counties are scheduled to
participate in the competi-
tion, said Missie Minson,
Suwannee Valley Regional
Science Fair co-director.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Dalton Sweat of Fort White, Kiersten Davison of Union
County and Tony Anderson of Lake City discuss their
Science Fair projects.


Suwannee County did
not have a science fair
this year and was unable
to attend the regional
event, Minson said.
The students worked
hard on their presenta-


tions and provided an
excellent quality of work,
she said.
There were fewer
entries, but the quality
remained at the fair, said
David Murdock, judging


coordinator.
"Some of the projects
are really mind-boggling,"
he said.
The fair encourages
young people to pursue
science, Murdock said.
This is Lindsey
Saunders sixth year par-
ticipating in the regional
science fair. She is a
senior at Union County
High School.
"I love to just talk with
the judges and share my
hard work," she said.
Participating in the fair
provides constructive
criticism on her work,
Saunders said.
Winners will go on
to the state science fair
in Orlando, said Renae
Allen, co-director. Two
winners will also be
selected to go on to the
international fair in Los
Angeles.


Search for new

Columbia EDD

chief launched


Commissioners
approve hiring
of company.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County for-
mally launched the search
on Tuesday for a new
Columbia County Economic
Development Department
executive director.
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners unani-
mously approved the start
of the search by hiring a
firm specializing in finding
select individuals for specif-
ic jobs. The executive will
replace Jim Poole, who cur-
rently serves in the posi-
tion and recently submitted


his retirement intent.
Dale Williams, county
manager, made the recom-
mendation to the board. He
said the search should be
for an "up-and-coming" can-
didate and not limited to
the state of Florida to cast
a -broader
net" in find-
ing quali-
fied candi-
dates.
"I think
it's a very
important
Poole position
and one that commands a
lot of attention on our part,"
Williams said.
Commissioners
agreed that hiring a firm
would be -the best solu-
EDD continued on 3A


PATRICK SCOTTILake City Reporter
Wendell Johnson, city manager for Lake City (left) receives a
2011 Olustee poster from Jodi Witt, Blue-Grey commanding
general Stephen Witt and Blue-Grey Army executive director
Faye Bowling-Warren during the 2011 Olustee Battle Festival
sponsorship reception Tuesday at First Federal Bank of Florida.


Olustee Battle

Fest reception

draws crowd


Event organizers
formally recognize
festival sponsors.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter, corn
The 33rd Annual Olustee
Battle Festival is only days
away and its sponsors, pro-
moters and volunteers held
a private kickoff for the
event Tuesday night.


Tuesday evening festival
sponsors were recognized
during the annual Sponsors
Reception at the First
Federal Bank of Florida
with more than 100 people
in attendance.
Members of the Blue-
Grey Army, the organiza-
tion which hosts the annual
battle festival, as well as

RECEPTION continued on 3A


1 84>2640002 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


70
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles .................
Around Florida...........


4A
5A i
3B
2B
2A "
Url /'


DAILY
BRIEFING
'COi js:'Hannah Montana'
ruined family.


COMING
THURSDAY
Olustee Parade
preview. *


Lake


.400


u










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2011


Celebrity Birthdays


ASH 3. Tuesday:
Afternoon: 9-6-3
Evening: 9-0-5


f L4" '_ Tuesday:
Afternoon: 6-6-6-8
Evening: 6-9-2-3


ezmatch-
Monday:
3-5-10-17-33


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Cyrus: 'Hannah Montana' ruined family


NASHVILLE, Tenn.


Billy Ray Cyrus said
the Disney TV show
"Hannah Montana"
destroyed his family,
causing his divorce and
sending daughter Miley Cyrus spin-
ning out of control.
In a December interview pub-
lished in the Feb. 22 issue of GQ
Magazine, Cyrus said he wished the
show that launched his daughter to
pop stardom had never happened.
"I hate to say it, but yes, I do.
Yeah. I'd take it back in a second,"
Cyrus said. "For my family to be
here and just be everybody OK, safe
and sound and happy and normal,
would have been fantastic. Heck,
yeah. I'd erase it all in a second if I
could."
Cyrus and his wife, Tish, filed for
divorce in October.
Billy Ray Cyrus said when he
asked about the rumored video foot-
age of his daughter smoking from a
bong at her 18th birthday party in
December, he was told "it was none
of my business." He initially refused
to attend the party, saying "it was
wrong" to have it in a bar.
Cyrus, a native of Flatwoods, Ky.,
had his own success as a country
and gospel singer beginning in the
early 1990s with his huge hit "Achy
Breaky Heart."
He told the magazine that he is
scared for his daughter and com-
pared her current path to those of
other stars whose lives ended tragi-
cally, including Kurt Cobain, Anna
Nicole Smith and Michael Jackson.
He said the Cyruses and their six
children were all baptized before
leaving Tennessee for Los Angeles
to inure themselves against evil and
he believes Satan is attacking his
family.
"Ifs the way it is," Cyrus said.
'"There has always been a battle
between good and evil. Always will
be. You.think, 'This is a chance to


ASSOCIATED PRE
In this April 23, 20Q9. file photo, singer and actress Miley Cyrus and her father,
musician Billy Ray Cyrus, arrive for the British Premiere of the film 'Hannah
Montana' at a Leicester Square cinema in London.


make family entertainment, bring
families together...' and look what
it's turned into."

Obama lauds Medal
of Freedom recipients
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama recognized a former
president, a basketball legend and
a civil rights hero Tuesday among
the 15 recipients of the Medal of
Freedom.
During a ceremony at the White
House, Obama said the recipients
represent, "the best of who we are
and who we aspire to be."
The Medal of Freedom is the
nation's highest civilian honor, and
is presented to people who have
made important contributions to
U.S. national security, world peace,
culture or other significant public or


private endeavors.
Among the recipients honored
Tuesday were former President
George H.W. Bush, former basket-
ball star Bill Russell, businessman
Warren Buffett and civil rights activ-
ist Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga.

Newton-John to host
concert honoring Denver
BROOMFIELD, Colo. Olivia
Newton-John is set to host a benefit
concert celebrating the late John
Denver as he becomes the first
inductee of the Colorado Music Hall
of Fame on April 21. Newton-John,
Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Lee Ann
Womack and John Oates are among
those scheduled to perform at the
concert, which will be held in the
Denver suburb of Broomfield.

* Associated Press


* Singer Patty Andrews is
93.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
James Ingram is 59.
* Actor LeVar Burton is 54.
* Actor-rapper Ice-T is 53.
* Actress Lisa Loring is 53.
* International Tennis Hall of
Famer John McEnroe is 52.
* Rock musician Andy



Daily ScriDture


Taylor is 50.
* Rock musician Dave
Lombardo (Slayer) is 46.
* Rock musician Taylor
Hawkins (Foofighters) is 39.
* Olympic gold medal run-
ner Cathy Freeman is 38.
* Singer Sam Salter is 36.
* Rapper Lupe Fiasco is 29.
* Actor Mike Weinberg is 18.


"This is love: not that we loved
God, but that he loved us and
sent his Son as an atoning
sacrifice for our sins."
I John 4:10


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher, U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak. .754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
,should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..........;.....755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks................. $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks................. $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks ............. .. .$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this.space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


US indicts 20
in $200M fraud
MIAMI Federal
prosecutors said 20 people
have been indicted in
Miami on charges related
to a $200 million Medicare
fraud scheme.
The 38-count indictment
released Tuesday involves
false claims for mental
health services tha0were
unnecessary or not pro-
vided at all. Some charges
involve kickbacks paid
so that patients would be
delivered to specific facili-
ties. Still other charges
concern money-laundering
for the kickbacks.
The case revolves
around Miami-based
American Therapeutic
Corp., which operated
mental illness treatment
centers at seven loca-
tions in Florida. Its top
executives were origi-
nally charged with fraud
in October. They have
pleaded not guilty and are
awaiting trial.
Three doctors were
among those charged in
Tuesday's indictment.

State Farm seeks
rate hikes
TALLAHASSEE
- Insurance giant State
Farm is back before
Florida insurance regula-
tors asking for significant
increases in homeowners
premiums.
State Farm Florida is
seeking a hike of nearly
28 percent in homeowners
policies and one approach-
ing 96 percent for cover-
age that protects against
multiple perils for busi-
nesses and homes or com-
bines property and liability
coverage in one policy.
State Farm represen-
tatives told regulators
Tuesday that losses in
sinkhole claims were a big
part of its rate request.
Sinkhole claims, which are


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dalai Lama's nephew killed
The Dalai Lama's nephew, Jigme Norbu (left) and brother,
Thubten Norbu, hold the Freedom Torch, which is carried
in protest of China's treatment of Tibetans, at the Tibetan
Cultural Center in Bloomington, Ind. in this 2008 photo.
Jigme Norbu, 45, of Bloomington, Ind., was struck and killed
Monday on a Florida highway at Palm Coast, while on a
Valentine's Day 'Walk for Tibet' from St. Augustine to West
Palm Beach.


approaching $2 billion over
the past five years, have
exploded at a great cost to
the insurance industry.
State Farm is the largest
private property insurer in
Florida.

Board OKs
intervention plans
BRADENTON The
State Board of Education
has approved intervention
plans for 15 of the state's
lowest performing schools
if they don't make needed
improvements.
Meeting in Bradenton
Tuesday, the board voted
unanimously in favor of
turnaround plans that
include closing and
reopening as a charter
school or replacing the
principal and other staff.
The plans would be
applied if the schools don't
make significant improve-
ments, including on the
annual school grades
based largely on the


Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test.

Jury deliberating
in gory case
TALLAHASSEE -
Jurors have begun delib-
erating a verdict in the
trial of a convicted killer
charged with a second
decapitation murder.
The case against Gary
Michael Hilton went to the
12-member jury at 12130
p.m. Tuesday after lawyers
made their closing argu-
ments.
The 64-year-old drifter
could get a death sen-
tence if convicted of
murdering 46-year-old
nurse Cheryl Dunlap of
nearby Crawfordville in the
Florida Panhandle.
He's already serving a
life sentence after plead-
ing guilty to murdering
24-year-old hiker Meredith
Emerson in northern
Georgia.
* Associated Press


PARTLY, : MOSTLY
CLOUDY: SUNNY


HI 70LO.K HI76 LOJ7
-. ., '.


Pensacola
*67/53


S Valdosta
68/51 j
Tallahassee* Lake City*
69/48 70/48
. Gainesville *
Panama City 71/50
65/50 Ocala *


S3/ 531


Tampa, *
7A /17 '


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


I"/-


73
41
69
45
85 in 1932
21 in 1943


0.00"
3.59"
7.27"
1.78"
5.29"


7a Ip 7p la 6a
Wednesday Thursday


*. Focastd tmprate "Feis ie tumpate


MOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY
SUNNY SUNNY CLOUDY


HI 78 LO 49 I76W501 H1I74L047


cksonville
"69/50

Daqona Beach
70/56
4


Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
SGalnesvllle
Jacksonville


Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral ty
74/56 71/58 Lake City
Miami
Naples


West Palm Beach Ocala
76/64 Orlando
S FL Lauderdale Panama city
Ft. Myers. 77/68 0 Pensacola
76/58 Naples Tallahassee
79/58 Miami Tampa
K West 78/66 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
76/67


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:10 a.m.
6:20 p.m.
7:09 a.m.
6:20 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 4:45 p.m.
Moonset today 5:38 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 5:55 p.m.
Moonset tom. 6:21 a.m.


Feb. Feb. March March
18 24 4 12
Full Last New First


On this date in
1899, Washington
D.C. received-1.26
inches of rain in six
hours atop a snow
cover more than 30
inches deep, making
it the soggiest day
of record.


6

30mnuDmestolb I
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Thursday Friday


75/56/pc
75/54/s
78/67/s
81/57/s
76/48/pc
74/50/s
75/66/pc
76/47/pc
79/65/s
81/58/s
77/49/pc
78/54/s
68/54/s
69/57/pc
72/46/s
78/58/s
74/46/pc
77/63/s


76/56/pc
76/55/pc
78/66/pc
81/58/pc
78/49/s
75/51/pc
78/68/s
78/49/pc
79/66/s
80/60/pc
78/49/s
80/55/pc
69/54/pc
70/55/pc
76/49/pc
78/59/pc
76/50/pc
79/63/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.co


j Forecasts, data and
graphics 2011 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
\ J www.weatherpubllsher.com


iet Connected

rZf^


J 'n ~ nllI'ill:]


Adlmffimmmlv


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2011


Man pleads guilty in Dixie County deputy's killing


From staff reports

John William Kalisz pled guilty
to first-degree murder for the
shooting death of Capt. Chad
Reed of the Dixie County Sheriff's
Office, officials said Tuesday.
As part of Kalisz' plea agree-
ment with the state, officials have
agreed to not seek the death
penalty and to recommend a sen-
tence of life without the possibil-
ity of parole.


On Jan. 14,2010, Kalisz shot and
killed Reed while Dixie County
law enforcement officers were
attempting to take him into cus-
tody for offenses that occurred in
Hernando County.
"This decision by the state was
made only after serious consid-
eration of the facts and the appli-
cable law," said Robert "Skip"
Jarvis, Third Judicial Circuit
State Attorney, in a prepared
statement.


Jarvis said the decision was


Reed and Dixie


reached after
holding talks
with Dave
Phelps and
John Weed, the
assistant state
attorneys han-
dling the case,
Capt. Reed's
parents and his
widow, Holly
County Sheriff


Dewey Hatcher.
"It was the desire of Capt.
Reed's widow to bring this matter
to a conclusion and allow her and
her children to begin rebuilding
their lives," Jarvis said.
"I am fully aware that my deci-
sion to agree to this plea will be
questioned and the subject of dis-
cussion by members of the Dixie
County Sheriffs Office for a long
time," Jarvis said. "I am also
aware that it will not be accept-


ed readily by law enforcement
around the state who believe that
Kalisz should receive the death
sentence for the killing of a law
enforcement officer."
Kalisz is also facing additional
charges in the shooting deaths
of several of his family mem-
bers.
The Third Judicial Circuit is
composed of Columbia, Dixie,
Hamilton, Madison, Lafayette,
Suwannee and Taylor counties.


J.C. Walker, a World War II veteran from Branford, gets a dish garden from Altrusa mem-
bers Sandy Furches (from left), Cheryl Morgan, Marilyn Rossborough and Wanda Toner,
Tuesday at the Lake City VA Medical Center. The presentation was held in observance of
National Salute to Veterans Week.


Local Altrusa Club makes

blooming gesture for vets


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Veterans receiving med-
ical services in Serenity
Place, the Lake City VA
Medical Center's hospice
unit, had a moment of
cheer in their day Tuesday
when members of Altrusa
International Inc. of Lake
City gave them dish gar-
dens as room decora-
tions.
The plants were given
to the veterans in observa-
tion of National Salute to
Veterans Week.
"All over the country
people are having ceremo-
nies, announcements and
proclamations trying to
honor the veterans and
thank them for the ser-
vice they've contributed to
our country," said Nancy
Holliday-Fields, chair-
woman of the committee
that started the Altrusa
Girls Summit
As partofthe local obser-
vation, eight members of
Altrusa International Inc.
of Lake City, hand-deliv-
ered the plants to veterans
in the hospital's hospice
unit.
Fields said Altrusa
members wanted to give
the dish gardens to a
local non-profit agency
and they decided to give
them to veterans at the VA
Medical Center.
Middle School students
attending the Altrusa Girls
Summit during the week-
end, made the dish gar-
dens as part of the event's
art and crafts learning

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

Guess Who's 9



f58i












Always Love You f
f Edna Copeland


"Everybody is aware of all the
conflicts around the world and how
many new people are being injured
and we just wanted to do some-
thing that would reflect our con-
cern and caring for them."

Nancy Holliday-Fields
Altrusa International Inc.
of Lake City


session on Saturday.
Altrusa club members
took 18 dish gardens to the
Lake City Medical Center
VA's hospice unit.
During the Altrusa
member's visit, nine veter-
ans were given the dish
gardens and the remaining
nine dish gardens were to
be given as decorations for
the dinning room and fam-
ily rooms.
Fields said she wanted
the VA Medical Center to
be the nonprofit agency
chosen because her hus-
band is a disabled veteran
and she works as an attor-
ney who handles disabled
veterans cases.
"Everybody is aware of
all the conflicts around the
world and how many new
people are being injured
and we just wanted to do
something that would
reflect our concern and car-
ing for them," Fields said.


Cindy Gaylord, assis-
tant public affairs officer
of the North Florida/.
South Georgia Veterans
Healthcare System, said
the plant donations by
Altrusa coincides with the
Valentine's Day cards given
to veterans by local school
children.
"Basically these dona-
.tions let our service men
and women know that
people still care and people
are grateful for the sacri-
fices they have made and
continue to make for our
country," she said.
Fields said Altrusa mem-
bers were honored to be
able to give the veterans
the dish gardens and at
times it was emotional.
"I think we are just as
overwhelmed as they are,"
she said. It's very emotion-
al for some of us. We just
hope they enjoy the dish
gardens."


RECEPTION: Sponsors receive posters.


Continued From Page 1A
many reception visitors
wore period-correct cos-
tumes to the event td pro-
mote the festival.
City of Lake City Mayor
Stephen Witt, commanding
general for this year's festi-
val; and his wife, Jodi, wel-
comed the audience and
thanked and recognized
volunteers, committee
chairs, re-enactors, special
guests, elected officials and
everyone who took part in
planning for this weekend's
festival.
Witt's remarks were fol-
lowed by comments from
judge Tom Coleman, last
year's commanding gener-
al, who read a listing of this
year's event sponsors. The
sponsors were later given
framed 2011 Olustee post-
ers.
"I think we've done well
with this year's sponsor
reception, especially with
the way the economy is,"
Witt said, following the 90-
minute event. "The spon-
sors have always come
through for us and I appre-


ciate it."
Witt said he was looking
forward to this year's festi-
val and related activities.
"I think we are going
to have beautiful weather
at this year's festival and
that's going to get every-
body out," he said. "There's
going to be a lot of food and
entertainment at the festi-
val and I particularly like
the food."
Witt said the annual fes-
tival is an event that should
draw lots of people because
its activities are not expen-
sive.
"The festival is something
that in a tough economy is
free," he said. "People can
get out and enjoy things
and bring their kids."
Faye Bowling-Warren,
Blue-Grey Army executive
director, said the sponsor's
reception went well and
she believes more people
attended this year's recep-
tion than ever before.
"We certainly had more
elected officials, which
appears that they're getting


more interested in what
we're doing and trying to
help any way they can."
She said the sponsors
reception is an important
part of the annual battle
festival.
"I think it's important
that we acknowledge the
cooperation from the com-
munity and the sponsor-
ship reception is one way
we can do that," she said.
The 33rd Olustee Battle
Festivalofficialprogramwas
dedicated to the memory
of former Lake City mayor
Thomas Gerald Witt and
former Lake City Reporter
columnist Margaret Wuest,
who both died in 2010.
"Mr. Witt was impor-
tant to us because he was
always attending our meet-
ings and would do any-
thing we asked him to do
when he was the mayor,"
Warren said. "Margaret
was always writing stories
about different events we
had and making sure we
were presented in a posi-
tive manner."


EDD: Former IDA officials appointed.


Continued From Page 1A
tion. Commissioner Ron
Williams said Poole will be
hard to replace.
"With Jim retiring, we
need the best we can find to
lead Columbia County into
the future," he said..
Commissioner, Jody
DuPree, board chairman,
was absent during the reg-
ular meeting.
The commission also
unanimously approved re-
appointing the five former
Columbia County Industrial
Development Authority
board members who con-
firmed their desire in con-
tinuing to serve Charles
Hall, Marc Vann, Gus
Rentz, Suzanne Norrisand
Jeff Simmons as mem-
bers of the new Economic
Development Department
board.
Since Donna Brown
and Carlton Jones chose
not to be re-appointed, the
commission unanimously
approved the recommen-
dations of Glenn Owens
and N. Terry Dicks to fill
the two vacant board posi-
tions.
The recommendations
were made by Lisa Roberts,
assistant county manager,
and DuPree after they
reviewed four resumes
submitted for the spots.


Commissioners Stephen
Bailey and Rusty DePratter
will also serve on the new
board, per a commission
decision in a previous coun-
ty meeting. The board will
also act as the IDA board
- without its two commis-
sioners when industrial
revenue bonds need to be
issued.
Dale Williams said
he would notify Poole to
set the new Economic
Development Department
board's first meeting,
which will most likely fol-
low the old IDA board's
meeting schedule and be
held March 2.
In other discussion and
action:
The commission unan-


imously approved calling
for public hearings at its
March 17 meeting on four
,separate, tax abatement
ordinances for the counm
ty's four companies it has
employment agreements
with New Millennium
Building Systems, Hunter
Panels, Mayo Fertilizer and
Target Distribution Center.
Three Lake, City resi-
dents Marsha Moon,
Toby Witt and Michael
Anderson publicly spoke
against the county's recent
decision to issue a Request
for Qualifications regarding
the delivery and privatiza-
tion of Emergency Medical
Services in the county's
unincorporated area and
the town of Fort White.


OB/ YN

DANNA GREENE, MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH


*Meet with a provider the day you come in
*Same day/next day OB appts.
*Dr. Greene is chief medical officer at Pregnancy
Care Center
*Free pregnancy tests
Call for appt. Mon.-Thurs. 8am-5:30pm
755-0500 449 SE Baya Dr. Lake City
Accepts All Insurance


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













OPINION


Wednesday, February 16, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Floridians

should

have their

say on ban


Here's some good
news: Former
Gov. Charlie Crist,
who ran for the
U.S. Senate and
lost, and former Chief Financial
Officer Alex Sink, who ran
for governor and lost, still
know where to find Northwest
Florida.
In Tallahassee, that's no
small feat State officials once
OK'd a map of Florida for
inclusion in a British travel
guide that lopped off the entire
Panhandle.
In 1993, Okaloosa County's
economic development chief
joked that offices in the Capitol
don't have any windows facing
west
Proposed transportation
improvements such as a high-
speed rail system routinely
ignore this part of the state.
Crist and Sink aren't ignor-
ing us. When they launched a
petition drive aimed at amend-
ing Florida's constitution with a
ban on drilling in state waters,
it was clear they remember the
agony that last year's BP.oil .
spill caused for the state's west-
ernmost residents.
Most of those Floridians, of
course, were right here. The oil
spill had scant impact east of
Panama City and no impact at
all on Florida's Atlantic Coast.
That geographical stroke
of luck niay account fdr the
Legislature's disinterest in
a constitutional drilling ban.
The spill's effects were oh,
somewhere over there in the
Panhandle.
If oily goop had slathered
beaches at Clearwater or Fort
Lauderdale, we suspect law-
makers would be in a bigger
hurry to prohibit near-shore
drilling.
We appreciate Crist and
Sink's desire that the 2010 oil
spill not be quickly forgotten.
As for a constitutional drilling
ban, the goal of their petition
drive is to allow Floridians to
vote on the issue.
That's what we've favored all
along.
The people of Florida should
have their say.
* Northwest Florida Daily News

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
thie Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Extremists drive out politicians


WASHINGTON
I don't personally know Dick
Wadhams, the Colorado
Republican chairman
whose decision not to run
for re-election was based
on having had enough of "the
nuts" in his party who "are
obsessed with seeing conspira-
cies around every corner." But
as one who has been writing
about politics for more than 50
years, the first five of those in
Denver, I can certainly empa-
thize with his views.,
*It has become increasingly
difficult to make much sense
out of the maelstrom of modern
politics where rational thought
is not only in short supply, those
who offer it are the object of
derision. Wadhams had the
votes for another term according
to press reports, but obviously
was tired of those whom he said
believed that moderation was a
blight on conservatism and that
all the GOP had to do was unite
behind the Right That may not
be exactly how he put it, but that
was the gist of it.
Wadhams took the step after
a Tea-Party candidate finished a
poor last behind a Democrat and
an Independent, who had been a
centrist Republican, in last fall's
gubernatorial race, .proving once
again what my old friend and
political mentor the late Bob Lee
taught me about Colorado vot-
ers: They don't buy into a lot of
off-the-wall stuff. Bob held the
GOP chair in the state during
the early '60s and he was key to
electing John Love to the gover-
norship, ousting one of the most
popular figures in the state's
history, Democratic incumbent
Steve McNichols in 1962.
While he worked for Barry


LETTER


Dan K.Thomasson
Goldwater in 1964, he had no
illusions about the conserva-
tive icon's chances and in 1968,
while working for Richard
Nixon, he warned me that
Nixon's choice of Spiro Agnew
might come back to haunt him
and that he feared Nixon was
loafing through the campaign.
He, of course, was right about
both. Vice President Hubert
Humphrey nearly won despite
Vietnam. Bob's work as a
consultant in New Jersey turn-
ing the state legislature into a
Republican bastion was legend-
ary and he did the same thing
for the governorship of Florida,
electing a Republican candidate
who was trailing until Bob came
on the scene and told him to go
fishing while he pulled the cam-
paign together.
Bob Lee was a conservative.
There's no doubt about that
But he was a practical politician
with a clear understanding that
voters are never too far left or
right. They may stray once in a
while as they did in the last U.S.
House election, but generally
they don't get far out of the main
stream. That I think is the hur-
dle members of the tea party fac-
tion face in their insistence that
any variation from their mantra
calls for instant repudiation.
While Bob and John Love
weren't always cordial in fact
they were downright hostile to


one another at times Bob
was quick to realize Love's char-
ismatic appeal to voters. Love
was, he told me once somewhat
grudgingly, a good candidate.
Knowing that difference is
what made Bob and apparently
Wadhams the kind of profes-
sionals that always have been
the backbone of sound politics.
These are the guys who real-
ize that demanding unforgiving
ideological purity can lead to
electoral disaster.:
It's my belief that Bob Lee .
would be enormously proud of
Wadhams and just the opposite
of those who forced Utah Sen.
Bob Bennett out of office in
November's midterms and will
now try to do the same to his fel-
low Republican colleague Orrin
Hatch who recently was heckled
at a Conservative Political Action
Conference for his earlier sup-
port of the Wall Street bailout
Hatch has sensible old-line con-
servative credentials, the kind
that allow for roomito compro-
mise on key issues. Republican
Mike Lee who ousted Bennett
won't endorse him however even
though Hatch said he probably'
was wrong to back the Street's
fiscal relief.
The shame here is that the
Wadhams of both parties are
fading away when they are most
needed. Listening to the cacoph-
ony of hate and stupidity aimed
by radio talkers at the lowest
common denominator in the
electorate while driving recently,
I suddenly remembered Bob's
last call to me. "It ain't my game
anymore," he said.
* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


TO THE EDITOR


America is Egypt's symbol of hope


raise God! The
Egyptian people are
free! Egyptians wit-
nessed the American
people, in a free elec-
tion, choosing Barack Obama as
president.
Then Obama went to Eygpt
and gave a speech that projected


America as peacemakers, not
terrorists.
Obama won their hearts and
they wanted their freedom. One-
and-a-half years later, they got it
with a nonviolent revolution, a
better way to spread democracy
than having us invade Iraq and
a half-million people losing their


lives, thus helping bankrupt our
national treasury and making
our people suffer.
The world is not in fear of
America anymore. Once again,
we are the hope in their eyes
and hearts. Way to go America!
Fred McGill
Lake City


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmaredu


Bush can't

run from

his record

on torture

Former President
George W. Bush was "
looking forward to,
delivering a speech
on February 12 in
Geneva, Switzerland, at an'
event organized by the United..'
Israel Appeal. A spokesman for '
the president said that he had&'
intended to speak about free-
dom and to reflect on his time-;
in office.
But on February 5, James
Risen of the New York Times
reported that the speech
had been cancelled by the
international Jewish charity
"because of "security concerns."
A number of human rights
groups, including Amnesty
International, have asked the'
Swiss government to inves-
tigate President Bush for
violation of international con-
ventions banning torture, espe-
cially in light of the president's
admission, during interviews
about his new book "Decision
Points," that he had personally
authorized the waterboarding
of alleged terrorists.
The Swiss government said
that it has no plans to prose-
cute President Bush. But large
demonstrations were a pos-
sibility at the site of the speech
and the event organizers could
not guarantee security. The
Times reported that protest
organizers had encouraged
demonstrators to bring shoes
to the event, presumably to
throw them in the direction of
the president
In the meantime, the former
president was a featured guest
at the Super Bowl, along with
Condoleezza Rice and other
friends 'and representatives of
the administration that perpe-
trated the Iraq War, the dubi-
ous detentions at Guantanamo,.
and the practice that is the
source of the consternation in
Geneva, waterboarding.
Am I suggesting that we
should prosecute, rather than
honor, a former president
who freely admits to authoriz- .
ing what civilized people and
international law consider a
war crime? Not necessarily.
But I wonder if we're holding
ourselves and our leaders to a
sufficiently rigorous standard
of accountability by so quickly =
forgiving and forgetting the
deliberate authorization of an
act that, by any standard, is
torture.
Somehow we've gotten the
idea that waterboarding is a
more benign form of torture,
probably because it doesn't
leave scars at least, not
physical ones. In fact, all in all
most of us, if we had a choice,
would probably choose water-
boarding over bamboo splin-
ters under the fingernails or a
session on the rack.
Waterboarding is torture and
a war crime. Along with other
hideous practices it character-
izes the darkest periods of
colonial oppression. ,
President Bush authorized
waterboarding even as he pub- *
licly contended, "The United -
States does not torture." This '
sounds like a lie. '
The only puzzle is why we
don't feel more like throwing :
our shoes at him than honor- -=
ing him on book tours and at
the Super Bowl. :

* John M. Crisp teaches in the .
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.


4A


pvZpdvl2 --B w7-o---- 2 --- -S









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 16, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today
Poster contest
The Town of Fort White
and The Ichetucknee
Partnership are co-spon-
soring a water conserva-
tion poster contest for Fort
White community schools.
The contest encourages
students to create posters
depicting a water conser-
vation idea, in slogan form,
drawing form, or both.
There are five divisions in
the contest Grades K-lst;
Grades 2-3; Grades 4-5;
Grades 6-8; and Grades 9-
12. All poster entries must
be received by March 1.
For more information,
contact Cindy Johnson,
TIP coordinator, at 386-
362-1001.

Thursday
Olustee play
performance
A performance of
"Our American Cousin"
presented by Forth
White High School
students and Alligator
Community Theater is 7
p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday
at the Columbia County
School Administration
Auditorium. There'will be
a musical performance
and a special appearance
of "Abraham Lincoln."
Admission is free.


Library. Learn about pre-
paring soil and-choosing
varieties for North Florida.
Find out how to use fertil-
izer and pesticides while
protecting the environ-
ment Bring questions and
enjoy spending time with
other gardeners. This is a
free workshop and open to
everyone. For information,
call the Extension Office at
752-5384.


Camera club meeting Friday


The Branford Camera
Club is meeting at 7 p.m.
Thursday at the Branford
Public Library. Humberto
Castellanos is speaking
about "Picasa," an easy-to-
use, free software program
from Google that helps
you organize, edit, and
share photos. Homework
this month is "Scene on
the Street" Choose your
favorite two or three pic-
tures to share with the
group, either digitally or
as a printed photo. Bring
other recent photos to
share with the group. .
Contact Carolyn Hogue,
program chairwoman, 386-
935-2044. ,

Retired Educators
Meeting
The Columbia County
Retired Educators meet
at 1 p.m. on Thursday at
the School Board Adult
Center, room 120. All
attending are asked not to
forget to bring their volun-
teer reports. Any retired
person interested in educa-
tion may join. For more
information, contact Will.
Brown at 386-752-2431. *

Home-Grown Vegetable
Gardening
Monthly 'Garden Talk'
is 5:45 p.m. Thursday
at the new Fort White


Civil War Memorial
Service
The annual Civil War
Memorial Service is 9
a.m. Friday at Oaklawn
Cemetery. Wendell .
Johnson is the speaker.

Olustee Battle Festival
The 33rd Anitual :
Olustee Battle Festival
is 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday
in downtown Lake City..
Opening ceremonies are at
noon. The festival will fea-
ture vendor booths, enter-
tainment, a children's area
and re-enactors. The annu-
al Civil War Skirmish on
the shore of Lake Desoto
and battle of ironclads
Monitor and Merrimac is
5 p.m.

Lake City Columbia
County Museum.
The Lake City Columbia
County Historical Museum
will be open all day
Friday after the Civil War
Memorial Service Friday.
Call 755-9096.

Teen summit
Black Historiy 2011
Teen Summit is at 3 p.m.
to midnight on Friday at
Florida Gateway College.
The event is sponsored by
It's About My Efforts. The


month-long theme is "Self
Sufficiency is Key." Visit
www. itsaboutmyefforts.org
or call 386-697-6075 for
details.

Community Outreach
Event
Food Distribution &
SNAP applications will be
collected for Columbia,
Hamilton, Lafarette,
Suwannee & Union
counties 8 a.m. to 11
am. Friday at Catholic
Charities. Catholic
Charities and DCF case
managers and supervi-
sors will be on site to
assist with the completion
of applications for SNAP
(Food Stamps), Medicaid
and TANE Guidelines
have changed and all
should apply to receive
additional support. The
office' is located at 258
NW Burk Ave. For more
information, call 386-754-
9180.

Social event
Love goes on even after
Valentine's Day. The order
of the Eastern Star's Gold
Standard Chapter 48 pres-
ents a social/dance event
from 7 p.m. to 2 a.m. on
Friday. The event will take
place next to the Huddle
House restaurant off of
exit 414 from Interstate
75. Refreshments will be
served all night, and tick-
ets will be sold in advance
for $10, and at the door
for $15. For tickets or
other information, contact
Marva Udell at 386-984-
2303.


.in downtown Lake City.
The festival will feature
vendor booths, entertain-
ment, a children's area
and more. The annual
Olustee Parade is at 10:30
a.m. beginning at South
Marion Street to U.S. 90
West. Parade marshals are
Herbert and Anne Darby.
Visiting dignitaries, parade
marshall and Olustee fam-
ily will be recognized at 12
p.m. Miss Olustee Pageant
winners will also be intro-
duced. The Blue/Grey
Square dance is 7:45 p.m.
at Rountree Moore Toyota
showroom.

Olustee Battle
Reenactment
The 35th Olustee Battle
Reenactment opens to
the public from 9 a.m.
to. 6:15 p.m. Saturday. A
presentation of colors is
9 a.m. Medical demon-
stration is 1 p.m. Period
Music Concert is 2:30 p.m.
Mini battle is 3:30 p.m.
Admission is $7 for adults
and $3 for school age chil-
dren. Preschool children
are free.

Lake City Columbia
County Museum
The Lake City
Columbia County
Historical Museum will
be open all day Saturday
after the parade. There
will be a short dram
about "Victoria's Diary,"
a young girl reflecting
her experiences during
the war at 1 and 4 p.m.
on the front porch. Call
755-9096.


Saturday Spring Vegetable
Gardening Workshop
Olustee Battle Festival


The 33rd Annual
Olustee Battle Festival is
- 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday


Master Gardener
Library Education Series
is 2 p.m. Saturday at the
Columbia County Public


United Way of Suwannee Valley gets grants


From staff reports

The United Way of
Suwannee Valley's appli-
cation to renew its fund-
ing from the Department
of Housing and Urban
Developmentwasapproved,
it was announced Friday.
The funding will go toward
local homeless assistance
programs, which offer
needed housing and ser-
vices to homeless persons
and families.
The United Way of
Suwannee Valley also
received a one-year


renewal of $32,146 to
maintain the Homeless
Management Information
System. While HUD
requires .local homeless
coalitions to maintain, a
homeless information
management system for
homeless service provid-
ers to receive grant funds,
the local United Way mini-
mized .expenses associat-
ed with this requirement,
so funds would be avail-
able to provide services.
UnitedWay of Suwannee
Valley's HUD applica-
tion included a one-year


renewal for $125,789 for
the Volunteers of America
of Florida's scattered-site
supported housing units
for chronically homeless
veterans. The grant pro-
vides for 11 units.
United Way of
Suwannee Valley serves
as the lead agency for
the Homeless Services






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Network of Suwannee
Valley, which serves the
counties of Columbia,
Suwannee, Lafayette and
Hamilton.


Library main branch.
Learn about fertilizing and
irrigation, what varieties
to plant, how to combat
weeds and insects, and
how to garden without
harming the environment
Bring all of your vegetable
gardening questions and
enjoy spending time with
other gardeners who share
your interests. Free and
open to everyone.

Basketball tournament
Black History 2011 3-on-
3 basketball tournament
is 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Saturday
at Annie Mattox Park. It
will be followed by a 70s
party from 4 8 p.m. The
events are sponsored by.
It's About My Efforts. The
month-long theme is "Self
Sufficiency is Key." Visit
www.itsaboutmyefforts.org
or call 386-697-6075 for
details.

Zumbathon Charity
Event
All are invited to
join the Party Hearty
Zumbathon charity event
from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. Saturday at the
Lake City Fairgrounds
Banquet Facilities, located
at 438 SW County Road
247. The event will ben-
efit the American Heart
Association's "Go Red
for your Heart" program.
There is a $10 entrance
fee, which includes the
price of the Zumba class.
Raffle ticket sales begin at
9:30 a.m. and the Zumba
class will begin at 10 a.m.
Don't forget to wear red.
For more information con-
tact Sarah Sandlin at 386-
758-0009.

Founder's Day
Celebration
First Baptist Clhrch
of Lake City hosts their
Founder's Day Celebration
from 2 p.m. 4 p.m.
Saturday. The celebration
will begin with an Open
House in the Fellowship
Hall. There will be a morn-
ing service at 10:30 a.m.
on Sunday, with the con-
gregation asked to wear
their best old-fashioned
clothes.

Sunday
Olustee Battle
Reenactment
The 35th Olustee Battle
Reenactment opens
to the public from 9


a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday.
The Annual Olustee
Battle Reenactment
147th Anniversary of
original battle is 1:30 p.m.
Admission is $7 for adults
and $3 for school age chil-
dren. Preschool children
are free.

Tuesday
New classes for Dixie
Dancers
New classes for Dixie
Dancers will begin at 6:45
p.m. Tuesday at Teen
Town, across from Youngs
Park. Call 752-1469 or
754-1478. This a great way
to meet new people and
have fun.

MADDfest meeting
MADDfest meeting
is 6 p.m. Tuesday at the
Columbia County Public
Library. The two-day
event is March 25 and 26.
MADDFEST Spring Arts
Festival is at Olustee Park.
All arts-and-crafts booths,
food vendors will surround
the park facing the main
stage gazebo. Contact
. Tony@MADDFESTcom or
386-965-9256.

Thursday, Feb. 24
SOS Annual
Membership Meeting
The SOS Annual
Membership Meeting will-
be Feb. 24, with Florida
Singer/Songwriter Tom
Shed. This is a free musi-
cal event hosted by Save
Our Suwannee, Inc., to
benefit our membership
drive. It will be at the High
Springs Opera House at
7:30 p.m. February 24.

Saturday, Feb. 26
Fund-Raising Banquet
The.Greater Lake City
Community Development
Corporation, Inc. presents
their 6th annual fund-rais-
ing banquet beginning at 6
p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 26,
at the Columbia County
Fairground Exhibition Hall,
located at 438 SW County
Road 247. This black tie
affair will feature a social
mixer, dinner and silent
auction, and will end with
music and dancing. Keynote
speaker will be Dr. Kurt B.
Young Ph. D., and tickets
will sell for $30 per person,
or $55 per couple. For ticket
information or any ques-
tions call 386-752-9785.
C


OBITUARIES


Betty Jean Cubbage
Betty Jean Cubbage, of Dowl-
ing Park, passed away on Feb-
ruary 10th, 2011, from a brief
illness. Betty

surance policy
due to her
past medical
problems and
the family has
asked that if
possible to make a donation;
please make donations to: First
Federal Bank of Florida On
behalf on Betty Cubbage to
account number 1966095.
Any questions, please call


David at 386-963-4409.
It was Betty's wish to be laid to
rest in Virginia where she was
born and any donations made
will go towards her final ar-
rangements, payments, and last
wishes. Thank you for your do-
nations. A memorial service will
be held at the John Hall Com-
munity Center on Duval Street in
Live Oak, Florida, across from
the fire station on March 6th at
3 pm for those wishing to attend.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Columbia County's Most Wanted
Cory Blair Dominic Terrell
Bannister Brantley
DOB: 12/29/90 DOB: 1/4/90
Height: 5' 3' Height: 5' 9" Weight: 160 lbs.
Weight: 120 Ibs. Hair: Black- Eyes: Brown
-- Hair: Brown Eyes: Hazel Wanted For: VOP Robbery by
Tattoos: Black-Flower; Left Foot- Sudden Snatching, Battery on Law
Apple; Right Arm-Butterfly Enforcement Officer, Harassing
.. Wanted For: VOP Dealing in Stolen Witness Victim
SProperty **History of Violence, Prior
pe Resisting Arrest"
WANTED AS OF 2/14/111
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.


CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
IF COLUMBIA COUNTy www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Nicole Trowell (from left), Lauren Revoir, Taquisha Hampton and Mary Brown listen to instruc-
tions from Marilyn Rossborough, a member of Altrusa International Inc. of Lake City, as they
make dish gardens for the Lake City VA Medical Center Hospice patients. The students made
the dish gardens during the 13th Annual Altrusa Girls Summit Saturday.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 16, 2011


Olustee to feature American Cousin'


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Comedy and mystery will
unfold on stage during a
production of "Our America
Cousin" at 7 p.m. Thursday
at the Columbia County
School Administration
Auditorium.
The play is a kick-off event
for the 33rd Annual Olustee
Battle Festival, hosted by the
Blue-Grey Army.
"Our American Cousin,"
an English comedy from
the mid-1800s, gained noto-


riety as the play President
Abraham Lincoln was
watching when he was
assassinated by John
Wilkes Booth.
The play's plot involves
a British family and an
America cousin, thought
by the family to be uncouth
and savage, said Jeanie
Wilks, Blue-Grey Army
entertainment committee
official. The cousin has
come to claim his family
inheritance, which was pos-
sibly lost.
The production is direct-


ed by Frank Hubert and
features more than 30 cast
members, Wilks said. The
cast includes the Fort White
High School Thespians
Guild and Alligator
Community Theater.
This is the first time a
play has been featured as
a part of Olustee weekend,
Wilks said. Practice began
in late September and the
majority of the cast had to
learn British accents, she
said.
"Anytime you do a play
you do a lot of learning,"


she said.
Tadd Allen as Lincoln
will be watching the per-
formance. He will sit in
the presidential box dur-
ing the performance, but
unlike history he won't be
shot, Wilks said. But there
will be some disturbance
provided by members of
the 1st Florida Infantry
Company C reenactment
group.
The event is free and
the community is invited
to attend.


A. .

I *tl


I



IiJ~ ~J


Cody Gray
(from left),
Jeanie Wilks
and David
Dubi wore
period dress
to promote
Olustee
Battle Festival
events,
including the
production of
'Our American
Cousin'
Thursday.

ANTONIA ROBINSON
Lake City Reporter


Scott to state workers:


Focus is private jobs


By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott on Tuesday told
the state employees whose
jobs may be among the
most vulnerable to budget
cuts that his focus is on
creating private sector jobs
and their agency is one he
heard complaints about
while campaigning last fall.
Scott spoke to
Department of Community
Affairs employees, many
of whom could be out of
work if Scott carries out
his proposal to place
the agency's functions
under the Department of
Environmental Protection.
He said he'd do whatever
he could to help them find
jobs elsewhere in govern-


ment
But he also said the
agency, which enforces the
state's growth-management
laws, is part of the problem
when it comes to attracting
businesses to Florida.
"On the campaign trail,
all they wanted to complain
about is how fast you guys
did permitting for growth
management," said Scott,
who added in the same
breath that he also hears
that the employees do great
work.
One employee was con-
cerned he might be laid
off with six months to go
before reaching full retire-
ment. Another had con-
cerns about the level of
unemployment compen-
sation laid-off employees
could expect. And one


worker questioned whether
Scott's proposal to cut cor-
porate income taxes would
actually create jobs rather
than just line the pockets of
business owners.
The Republican governor
said his top goal is creating
private-sector jobs and that
government needs to shrink
in size and cost The state
also needs to get rid of regu-
lations that make it more
difficult to do business.
"If you're going to start
a business, what are you
going to complain about?
Why do people complain
about government? Here's
what they complain about-
One, why are there so many
rules?" Scott said. "If you're
too much of a pain in the
rear, I'll just go someplace
else."


Court reviews Orlando's

rules for feeding homeless.


GREG BLUJESTEIN
Associated Press

ATLANTA A federal
appeals court in Atlanta
is taking another look at
whether Orlando, Fla. was
right to restrict groups
who give food to the needy
in a public park. The free
speech case could test the
limits of city ordinances
aimed at the homeless.
The Orlando chapter of
the group Food Not Bombs
challenged a 2006 ordi-
nance that required groups
have a permit to feed 25 or
more people in one of the
42 parks located in a down-
town district. The rules
also restrict the groups to
two permits per year for
each park.
The charity group,
along with a local church,


House

extends

Patriot Act

provisions

By JIM ABRAMS
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
House on Monday agreed
to a 10-month extension of
three key law enforcement
powers in the fight against
terrorism that some privacy
advocates regard as infringe-
ments on civil liberties.
The House measure,
passed 275-144, would
extend authority for the USA
Patriot Act-related provi-
sions until Dec. 8. Common
ground must be found with
the Senate before the provi-
sions expire on Feb. 28.
At issue are two provisions
of the post-Sept. 11 law that
give counterterrorism offic-
es roving wiretap authority to
monitor multiple electronic
devices and court-approved
access to business records
relating to a terrorist inves-
tigation. The third "lone
wolf' provision of a 2004 law
permits secret intelligence
surveillance of non-U.S.
individuals not known to be
linked to a specific terrorist
organization.


contended in arguments
Tuesday that the city's
rules violate their ability
to spread the message that
having food is a basic right.
They also contend that the
permit restrictions block
them from sharing food in
a more consistent way that
can attract the needy.
A federal judge originally
blocked the city from enforc-
ing the ordinance, ruling
that it violated the groups'
freedom of speech and reli-
gion. But a three-judge panel
reversed the ruling by a 2-1
vote, finding that the city's
rules were both reasonable
and constitutional.
The oral arguments
Tuesday seemed to expose
a rift in the court on the
issue. Several judges sug-
gested that feeding people in
the park shouldn't be consid-


ered protected free speech.
Others noted how the act of
breaking bread has signifi-
cant religious meaning that
needed to be protected.
City attorneys, mean-
while, pressed a separate
issue: They said there was
a substantial government
interest at stake in protect-
ing the park. They argued
that allowing the routine
mass feedings caused safe-
ty and sanitary problems,
strained city resources'and
led to more wear and tear.
Jacqueline Dowd, an
attorney for Food Not
Bombs, countered that the
city offered no evidence
that the ordinance actu-
ally protected the interest
of the park, and suggested
in court documents that
the feedings could help
decrease, crime.


For so long, this area has been without an orthopaedic surgeon. Now, with
Dr. Cohen's new practice, patients can get the care they need. Right here. His
osteopathic training allows him to treat patients holi.lii:ally, which can help

them recover quickly and do well following surgery. For 20 years, he's provided
compassionate orthopaedic care for entire families. And now he's here for you.


Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center
348 N.E. Methodist Terrace, Suite 101 Lake City, FL 386-755-4007


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakectyreportercom


SPORTS


Wednesday, February 16, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FORT WIT E FOOTBAU.
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday
in the teacher's lounge at
the high school. Election
of officers will be
conducted.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.
al WSOFIAt
League sign-up
begins Feb. 28
The Lake City
Recreation Department
has church, commercial
and women's adult
softball league
registration set for
Feb. 28 to March 18.
Registration is 8:30 to
5 p.m. weekdays at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
Fees are $350 for a
minimum of 10 games.
Rosters are available at
Teen Town and due with
fees by March 18.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3609.
RFSHnNG
Brody Stevens
Open March 5
The Brody Stevens
Open Bass Tournament
is March 5 at Clay
Landing in Chiefland.
Entry fee is $70 plus a
$10 optional big bass pot
.For details, call Chris
Starling at (386) 984-5639
or Derriel Cribbs at
965-0720.
OLUSTEE 5K
Registration
ends Thursday
The 2011 Olustee
5K Run/Walk is 7 a.m.
Saturday. Individual or
team registration is
available at www.step
fitnessonline.com. Entry
forms can be picked
up at the Step Fitness
corporate office in
the Carquest building
on Pinemount Road.
Proceeds go to benefit
March of Dimes.
For details, call
Michelle Richards at
(386) 208-2447.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High
tennis vs. Ridgeview
High, 3:30 p.m.
Thursday
Columbia High girls
tennis vs. Gainesville
High at Jonesville Tennis
Center, 3:30 p.m.
Columbia High
baseball vs. Lee High,
5 p.m. (JV-3:30 p.m.
at Melody Christian
Academy)
Columbia High
softball vs. Gainesville
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Friday
Columbia High's Cole
Schreiber, Monterance
Allen in wrestling state
finals at The Lakeland
Center, 10 a.m.
Columbia High
baseball vs. Union County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4)
Fort. White High
softball vs. Bradford High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High
baseball vs. Bradford
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Saturday
Columbia High's Cole
Schreiber, Monterance
Allen in wrestling state
finals at The Lakeland


Center, 9 a.m.


Lady Tigers


come out


swinging


Columbia opens
season with 30-2
win over Bell.
From staff reports

After a week of delays,
the Columbia High soft-
ball team finally threw out
the first pitch on the 201.1
season. The Lady Tigers
showed no signs of rust on
Monday.
Inthefirstgame, Columbia
dominated Bell High from
the opening pitch with a
14-run first inning. By the
end, the Lady Tigers had
a 30-2 margin on the score-
board with the mercy rule'
taking effect in the bottom
of the fifth.
Following a night domi-
nated by hitting, the Lady
Tigers used pitching and
defense against Trinity
Christian Academy to pick
up a 2-0 win on Tuesday.
'Every player on the team
scored at least one run
against Bell before head


coach Jimmy Williams start-
ed pulling players from the
base early for force outs.
Kayli Kvistad led all hit-
ters with a 3-for-3 night. She
hit a home run, triple and
double to go along with four
RBI's and three runs.
Stephanie Pilkington
had three RBI's and three
runs to go along with a
1-for-1 nightwith four walks.
Peyton Sund was 3-for-3 at
the plate with two RBI's and
four runs. Jordan Williams
scored four runs off a dou-
ble and three walks. She
also pitched three innings
in relief of Jessica Keene.
Keene went 2-for-2 with
three RBI's and four runs to
help her effort.
Against Trinity Christian,
Keene's pitching was the dif-
ference. She threw a complete
game with five strikeouts and
allowed only two hits.
Williams knocked in
Kvistad in the fourth for the
go-ahead run and Pilkington
scored off an error in the
sixth for the 2-0 margin.


Opening


Three-run first
inning spoils
Tigers debut.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High fell into a
3-0 hole that it wasn't able tb
digits way out.of on open-
ing day as the Tigers fell to
Melody Christian, 3-1.
The Wildcats scored
each of their three runs in
the first inning off of Ryan
Thomas. He settled down
afterwards to go 4A innings,
allowing five hits, two walks
and striking out one batter.
Murphy Chancey'
reached on a walk in the
first inning and scored after
Josh Lessman singled. A.J.
Smith knocked in Lessman
on the next at-bat and
Preston Norris' double
gave the Wildcats a 3-0 with
a double to bring in Smith.
The Wildcats turned
to their pitching after-
wards and Cole Whorton
pitched a gem of a game.
The senior struck out nine
Tigers, including the first
five batters he faced, while
CHS continued on 2B


FILE ART
Columbia High's Stephanie Pilkington (right) prepares to steal a base against Suwannee High
in a game played last season.


Day woes


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Ryan Thomas delivers a pitch against Melody Christian Academy on Tuesday in Lake City.


Fort White edges Suwannee, 4-3


Lady Indians win
district opener
over Lady Dogs.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.comrn
LIVE OAK Fort
White High's softball team
squeezed out a 4-3 district
win over Suwannee High in
Live Oak Tuesday.
Fort White scored two
runs in the third inning
and two more runs in the
sixth. The Lady Indians
needed all the insurance,
as Suwannee scored one
run in the third inning and


matched Fort White's two
runs in the sixth.
The Lady Dogs had the
tying run on third base
with one out in the seventh
inning. Cecile Gomez got
out of the jam to preserve
the win.
Taylor Douglass got the
victory for Fort White. She
went four innings with three
hits, one run, no walks and
five strikeouts.
Gomez finished up with
three hits, two runs, one
walk and three strikeouts in
three innings.
Fort White was fac-
ing Marshanna Boyette,
who recently signed with


Seminole State College.
Stacie Scott walked to
lead off the third inning
for the Lady Indians. Brett
Sealey sacrificed Scott to
second base and she scored
on a single by Caitlin Jones.
Gomez followed with
an RBI double to deep
centerfield.
Gomez started the rally
in the sixth inning' with
a single off the pitch-
ers' glove. Douglass
singled to send pinchrun-
ner Catherine Trisch to
second base. Trisch took
third on a pickoff throw
to first and Douglass soon
stole the open base. Holly


Polhill delivered a two-
out single to score both
runs.
Polhill also had a two-out
single in the fourth inning
and Scott singled in the
fifth.
"That's what they work
for every day is these type
ballgames," Fort White
head coach Cassie Sparks
said. "Everybody was doing
their job. They got in scor-
ing position and we were
making it happen. They
need to know we can win
these close ballgames. It is
amazing to go into district
with a win."
Emily Ross singled and


scored Suwannee's run in
the third inning. She was
moved to second by Jessie
Tenbrock, then stole third
and scored on a passed
ball.
In the sixth inning
Nicole Roper walked and
Tinsley Smith followed
with an infield hit. Two wild
pitches scored Roper and
Boyette added an RBI
single for her second hit of
the game.
Suwannee fell to 1-2 with
the loss, while Fort White
improved to 2-0. The Lady
Indians host Bradford High
at 7 p.m. on Friday in Fort
White.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
10:30 a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Daytona 500, at Daytona
Beach
1:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup.
practice for Daytona 500, at Daytona
Beach
4:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series.
practice for NextEra Energy Resources
250, at Daytona Beach
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Louisville at Cincinnati
ESPN2 Duke at Virginia
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Oklahoma St. at Texas
II p.m.
ESPN2 Saint Mary's, Calif. at San
Diego
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN Denver at Milwaukee
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
VERSUS Minnesota at Chicago

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Miami 110, Indiana 103
Charlotte at Chicago (n)
Philadelphia at Memphis (n)
Sacramento at Oklahoma City (n)
Utah at Phoenix (n)
New Orleans at Golden State (n)
Today's Games
Washington at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Miami atToronto, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Cleveland, 7i30 p.m.
Indiana at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Golden State at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at Milwaukee, 9 p.m.
New Orleans at Portland, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
San Antonio at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.

NBA calendar

'Feb. 18-20 All-Star game (Los
Angeles).
Feb. 24 -Trade deadline, 3 p.m.
April 13 Regular season ends.
April 14 Rosters set for playoffs,
3 p.m.
April 16 Playoffs begin.,
Ma I'1 -N'BA draft lottery
June '-. NBA Finals begin (possible
move up to May 31).
June 16 Latest possible date for
the finals.

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 3 Texas vs. Oklahoma State,
9 p.m.
No.4 Pittsburgh vs.South Florida,
7 p.m.
No..5 Duke atVirginia, 7 p.m.
No. 6 San Diego State vs. New Mexico,
10:30 p.m.
No. 9 Georgetown at No. 13
Connecticut, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Wisconsin at No. II Purdue,
6:30 p.m.
No. 16 Louisville at Cincinnati, 7 p.m.
No. 18Vanderbilt at Georgia, 7 p.m.
No. 21 Texas A&M vs. Iowa State,
'8 p.m.
No. 24 Xavier at Spint Joseph's, 7 p.m.
No. 25 Utah State vs. Montana-
Western, 9:05 p.m.
Thursday's Games
No. 12 Arizona vs. Washington State,
8:30 p.m.
No. 23 Temple vs. Richmond, 7 p.m.
Friday's Game
No. 13 Connecticut at No. 16
Louisville, 9 p.m.

USA Today/ESPN Top 25

The top 25 teams in the USA Today-
ESPN men's college basketball poll, with
first-place votes in parentheses, records


through Feb. 13, points
ranking:
Record
1. Kansas (14) 24-1
2.Texas (13) 22-3
3. Ohio State (3) 24-1
4. Pittsburgh (I) 23-2
5. Duke 23-2
6. San Diego State 25-1
7. Notre Dame 21-4
8. Brigham Young 24-2
9. Georgetown 20-5
I .Wisconsin 19-5
I I.Purdue 20-5
12. Connecticut 19-5
13.Arizona 21-4
14.Villanova 19-6
15. Florida 20-5
16. Louisville 19-6
17. Texas A&M 19-5
18.Vanderbilt 18-6
19. North Carolina 18-6
20. Syracuse 20-6
2 1. Missouri 19-6
22. Kentucky 17-7
23. Saint Mary's 22-4
24. Utah State 23-3
25.Temple 19-5


and previous

Pts Pvs
753 2
746 3
706 I
697 4
647 5
623 6
588 7
560 8
526 II
460 14
458 12
405 9
363 16
359 10
341 19
332 15
201 22
188 24
186 21
185 13
159. 20
140 18
139 23
129 17
58 NR


Others receiving votes: George
Mason 30; Coastal Carolina 19; Xavier
13;Washington I I;Texas-EI Paso 8; UCLA
8; Wichita State 7; St. John's 5; Virginia
Commonwealth 5; West Virginia 5;
Florida State 4; Minnesota 4;Valparaiso
4; Cleveland State 2; Baylor I.

AUTO RACING

Gatorade Duel lineups

At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach
Sunday qualifying; race Thursday
(Car number in parentheses)
Duel I


1. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
186.089.
2. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
185.422.
3. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
185.002.
4. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
184.991.
5. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
184.911.
6. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 184.896.
7. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
184.763.
8. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 184.748.
9. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
184.74.
10. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
184.687.
II. (09) Bill Elliott, Chevrolet,
184.532.
12. (43) A J Alimendinger, Ford,
184.29.
13. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
184.222.
14. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 184.102.
15. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
183.793.
16. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
183.681.
17. (4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 183.602.
18. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
183.576.
19. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota, 183.557.
20. (97) Kevin Conway, Toyota,
182.949.
21. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 182.697.
22. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
182.434.
23. (46) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 180.977.
24. (71) Andy Lally, Chevrolet.
180.828.
Duel 2
1. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
185.966.
2. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 185.445.
3. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,'
185.223.
4. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
185.071.
5. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 184.911.
6. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 184.612.
7. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 184.475.
8. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 184.271.
9. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
184.019.
10. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
184.008.
II. (15) Michael Waltrip, Toyota,
183.966.
12. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
183.685.
13. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 183.595.
14. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
183.456.
15. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 183.206.
16. (60) Todd 6odine,Toyota, 183.057.
17. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 182.867.
18. (77) Steve Wallace, Toyota,
182.574.
19. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 182.12.
20. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 181.492.
21. (37) Robert Richardson Jr., Ford,
181.466.
22. (II) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
fal.3F6fi *l . . ,
1723. 9(4) Derrike Cope, Toyota,

24. (92) Brian Keselowski, Dodge,
177.581.

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
Northern Trust Open


ACROSS 38 Gro
39 Mis
1 Dewlap woi
5 Trial cousin 40 Coi


8 Linda, Calif.
12 Tony's kin
13 Hectic place
14 Mr. Knievel
15 Energetic
(hyph.)
16 Himalayan'
dwellers
18 Glimpsed
20 Kirk's helms-
man
21 Canine registry
22 Sugar means.
23 nous
26 Granola kin
29 Neck and neck
30 Prospects for
gold
31 Bob Hope
sponsor
33 Dark brew
34 Barn topper
35 Den
36 PC notes
(hyph.)


Site: Los Angeles.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Riviera Country Club (7,325
yards, par 71).
Purse: $6.5 million. Winner's share:
$1.17 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
3-6 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Friday, midnight-
3 a.m., 3-6 p.m.., 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Saturday,
2-5 a.m, 1-2:30 p.m., 9:30-11:30 p.m.;
Sunday, 1-2:30 p.m., 9:30-11:30 p.m.) and
CBS (Saturday-Sunday, 3-6 p.m.).
Online: http//www.pgatour.com
LPGATOUR
Honda PTT LPGA Thailand
Site: Pattaya, Thailand.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Siam Country Club, Pattaya
Old Course (6,477 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.45 million. Winner's share:
$217,500.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday, 12:30-
2:30 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 3-5 p.m.).
Online: http'Jlwww.lpga.comn
CHAMPIONS TOUR
ACE Group Classic
Site: Naples
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course:The Quarry (7,094 yards, par
72).
Purse: $1.6 million. Winner's share:
,$240,000.
Television: .Golf Channel (Friday,
6:30-8:30 p.m.; Saturday, midnight-2 a.m.,
6:30-9:30 p.m.; Sunday, midnight-2 a.m.,
7-9:30 p.m.; Monday, midnight-2 a.m.).
PGA EUROPEAN TOUR/
ASIAN TOUR
Avantha Masters
Site: New Delhi.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: DLF Golf & Country Club
(7,156 yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.43 million. Winner's share:
$405,400.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Sunday. 9:30 a.m.-12:30' p.m.).
Online: http:llwww.europeantour.com
Asian Tour site: http:/lwww.asiantopr.
corn I
OTHER TOURNAMENTS
Men
NGA HOOTERS TOUR: Members
Only Shootout, Today-Friday, Black Bear
Golf Club, Eustis. Online: http://www.
ngahooterstour.com

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Tuesday's Games
Toronto 4, Boston 3
Buffalo at Montreal (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa (n)
Philadelphia at Tampa Bay (n)
San Jose at Nashville (n)
Vancouver at Minnesota (n)
Dallas at Edmonton (n)
Today's Games
Toronto at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Carolina at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Lqs,Angeles at Columbus.7 pm..
Philadelphia at Flor,da 7 30 pm
Minnesota atvChicago 8'p.m.
Pittsburgh at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Washington atAnaheim, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Boston at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Montreal at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Atlanta at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Washington at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


pounds
;s Piggy's,
rd
doers'


queries
41 Tote
43 Drone's home
46 Dakota region
48 Toe woe
50 Lotion
ingredient
51 Nitrogen,
in combos
52 Ancient oint-
ment
53 Throw a party
54 Ruby, e.g.
55 Lb. and oz.

DOWN

1 Run for fitness
2 Wind instru-
ment
3 Hairpieces
4 Clouded or
snow -
5 Montezuma's
empire


GOLF REPORTS



Hudson scores big in blitz


Keith Hudson scored big
in the Wednesday Blitz.
Hudson posted plus-3
to win the B division, and
added two winners in the
skins game.
Hudson also won the
pot hole, which was Dunes
No. 6.
Wednesday Blitz
winners:
A Division Rocky Ford


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Tammy Gainey

+7, first; Emerson Darst +4,
second; Mike Kahlich +2,
third;
B Division Keith
Hudson +3, first; Bob
McGraw +2, second; Frog
Niewisch +1, third;


C Division Gary
Dampier and Jerry Perkins
+4, tied for first; Larry
Boone +3, third.
There was seven skins,
led by Chet Carter and
Hudson with two apiece.
Bob Wheary, Shelton Keen
and Kahlich each had one
skin.
The Canadian Open is
Feb. 28.


Gaines enjoys blitz success


Eddy Brown had to break
out his best game to over-
come a birdie barrage from
several players for victory
in the Wednesday blitz.
Brown finished with a
+10, good enough for a one-
shot margin over Richard
Gaines.
John Raulerson (+5) and
Jordan Hale (+3) took the
third and fourth spots.
Despite the outbreak of
birdies, only two held up
in the skins game. Charlie
Timmons and Gaines had
the winning skins to share
a nice payoff.
The pot hole continued
to build for the fifth week.
Richard Gaines round-
ed out a good week in
blitz play, following up
on Wednesday's second-


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

place finish with a win in
Saturday play. His +6 out-
scored Dennis Crawford
and Dave Mehl who tied
for second place at +2.
Gaines also picked up
two winners in the skins
"game. Don Howard, Terry
Hunter and Jerry West had
one each.
Both Good Old Boys
team matches were
decided by three strokes
this week.
Jerry West, Mike
Spencer, Merle Hibbard
and Dan Stephens start-
ed the 'action with a 7-4
edge in Match 1, winning


over Stan Woolbert, Tom
Elmore, Joe Persons and
Don Christensen.
In Match 2, Marc Risk,
Jim Bell, Tony Branch,'
Nick Whitehurst and Eli
Witt walked away with a 9-6
victory over Ed Snow, Jim
Stevens, Bobby Simmons
and Howard Whitaker.
Risk topped medalist
play with a 37-36-73. West
and Snow battled to a
second place tie with iden-
tical rounds of 37-39-76.
Christensen, with 40-38-
78, rounded out the list of
top scorers.
Witt took nine hole
action on the front with a
37, followed by Bell (38)
and Simmons (39).
Stevens won the back
nine with a 39.


Bowhunter education course offered


From staff reports

The Florida Bowhunter
Education Course is avail-
able by completing an
online, distance-learning
component and attending
an abbreviated field day.
I According to Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission personnel,
the field day will be 8 a.m.
to noon Saturday at the
Osceola Shooting Range.
The field day is designed
to be a hands-on, construc-
tive learning 'experience
that will include bow setup
and shooting, field walks,
blood-trail exercises, erect-
ing and safely ascending


Answer to Previous Puzzle

VWSET'SARLA D Y
AA 1~ E'A S'E ACRE E
MONARCKS THIAN
IDS AG PA T S



T R S R A L C


FARD sBlAiSC 1 A
U UJ SAA| pE A R
Wc







YO0U IL[L|Bp|R A R
AFLR

LA S YAKOfOBS E M] T E
L I SAT YA Y S SE
E T Ayr AY0 Y0SgSE


6 Burglar's "key"
7 Dollop
8 Pauses
9 Face sketcher's
start
10 Diner's options


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


11 Capp and
Jolson
17 Mountain
curves
19 1950s prez
22 Ballad
23 Depot info
24 Cleopatra's
river
25 Bristle with
26 best friel
27 Roast pig
repast
28 Cow-heade
goddess
30 Sanskrit
dialect
32 Mother lode
34 String-quar
member
35 Pasta dish
37 Charm
38 Windy City,
breezily
40 Sort of salts
41 Moon ring
42 Commotion
43 Woodworki
tool
44 Be a nomad
45 Mongol
dwelling
46 Ebenezer's
outburst
47 Scold
49 QB objective


2011 by UFS, Inc.


nd


d




tet





S


and descending from tree
stands, as well as equip-
ment preparation and sur-
vival techniques.
Participants can expect
to learn all aspects of bow-
hunting, including:
History of bowhunt-
ing;
M Safe and responsible
bowhunting;
I Preparing for the
hunt;
Shot placement and
game recovery;
Use of elevated stands
and other techniques;
Outdoor preparedness.
Students of all ages


In Loving Memor,
You served with
honor, love & pride.
You gave your all
from deep inside.
Now we go on
without you here.
But know our child
we miss you dear.

Your Family


may participate; however,
an adult must accompany
those under the age of 16.
Participants should bring
all equipment, including
bow and arrows.
A small fee to take the
distance-learning course
is payable to the National
Bowhunter Education
Foundation on its website.
Access the online .distance-
learning course at MyFWC.
com/Bowhunt.
Students should pre-
register for the course by
calling the FWC's region-
al office in Lake City at
758-0525.




Honoring


Those We Love!


CALL Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place an
In Memory Ad for
someone you miss!


755-5440 or

755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm




O*1Av^vyV


T THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
JV by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, f -
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. S They've been here
S for 80 year
I LAWRD I -


TIVNAY_


s WHYTHEY TA
ng
ng A IT-IN TO
5AVE THE T EE5.
SAUCCU
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: IT A
'es (Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: MAUVE PAPER STRONG TYPING
Answer: What the electrician discovered when he
traced his family tree THE "GENERATORS"


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2011 3B


DILBERT


DEAR ABBY
IF IT MAKES YOU FEEL
ANY BETTER, THIS WILL
TAKE ONETHIANL Aunt fears sexually active


, I niece is headed for trouble


BABY BLUES


Traditional
Anniversary



for Couples
withKids

BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


t~gE~I


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


I'M STUDYING THE
DEFINITION OF PI,THE
THEORY OF ENERGY,
THE PYTHAGOREAN
THEOREM AND THE
LAW OF GRAVITY


J DEAR ABBY: This is dif-
ficult to write. My sister reads
her children's text messages
after they're asleep. She
bragged to me about how
. popular her daughter "Nao-
mi" my 14-year-old niece
j is because she's giving
j oral sex to the boys.
My sister claims Naomi
isn't "having sex," so she
thinks it's OK! I am shocked
j by her ignorance and ter-
Srified knowing that Naomi
is putting herself at risk for
STDs. My husband says if I
confront Naomi it will drive
her away, but I can't remain si-
lent and watch my niece ruin
her life. What's the point of
reading your children's text
messages if you're unwilling
to stand up and be a parent?
What can I do? TERRI-
FIED FOR MY NIECE IN
THE SOUTHWEST
DEAR TERRIFIED:
Your sister's parenting skills
are appalling. Her daughter
isn't "popular"; she is promis-
cuous and her mother is
allowing it. Do your niece a
favor and talk to her, because
oral sex IS sex, and she is
putting herself at risk for a
number of sexually transmit-
ted diseases.
The Sexuality Informa-
tion and Education Council
has a wealth of information
resources and tools for ad-
dressing this important sub-
ject. Its website, www.fami-
liesaretalking.org, helps with


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
discussing sexuality-related
issues and provides informa-
tion for young people, par-
ents and caregivers.
Other reliable resources
include Planned Parent-
hood's www.teenwire.comrn
and the American Social
Health Association website,
www.iwannaknow.org, which
is also a safe place for teens
to learn about sexual health.
DEAR ABBY: I was
raised a Christian, but now
that I am older I am question-
ing my faith. I consider my-
self an agnostic, borderline
atheist.
The problem is I am mar-
ried and a father. I want to
raise my children to be open-
minded and tolerant, but I
don't know how I should go
about it. How do I answer the
question, "Is there a God?"
when I myself am not sure?
Have you any advice on the
subject? AGNOSTIC
DAD IN SOUTH CARO-
LINA
DEAR AGNOSTIC
DAD: Many deeply spiritual
people are agnostic. The way
to raise open-minded, toler-


ant children is to talk to them
about your values and model
that behavior for them. Par-
ents convey their values ver-
bally and by demonstrating
them. As to the question,
"Is there a God?" you and
your wife should discuss that,
question in advance so she
can have some input and you
can handle this together.
DEAR ABBY: My daugh-
ter-in-law is eight weeks
pregnant. The problem is,
she carries the gene for
cystic fibrosis. One of her
siblings is a carrier and an-
other has multiple sclerosis.
I advised my son that it didn't
seem to be a good idea to get
pregnant, but they both ap-
pear unconcerned about the
repercussions.
Should I mind my own
business and hope for the
best? Or should I be wor-
ried about the future health
of their expected child?
- WORRIED GRAMMA-
TO-BE
DEAR WORRIED: As a
loving grandparent, you will
always be concerned about
your grandchildren's wel-
fare. What you should do is
suggest that your son and
daughter-in-law discuss their
family medical histories with
her OB/GYN and take their
lead from the doctor. (If they
haven't already done so.)
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April .19): Mix business
with pleasure and you can
skillfully find a way to offer
your services to a wider va-
riety of, people. Your serious
but innovative approach to
something you do well will
attract attention and the
support you require to ad-
vance. *****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Someone will try
to take advantage of you.
Don't give in for emotional
reasons. You will lose self-
respect if you don't stand
up for your rights. Taking
on responsibilities that
don't belong to you will end
in disaster. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Size up your
situation and make an hon-
est attempt to reach your
goals. Success awaits you
both personally and profes-
sionally if you play by the
rules, are charming and
take care of business effi-
ciently. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July '22): Evaluate your
relationships with others.
You'll be prone to making
the same partnership mis-
takes you have made in the
past. Do what you canl to
make your home safe, se-
cure and a place of comfort.
You need a place to relax
and relieve stress. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You'll be open to ad-
venture and learning. A
change in the way you do
things or in your surround-
ings will stimulate ideas
that can turn into a profit-
able endeavor. Someone
older will help you move
forward. ***A
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Concentrate on chil-
dren, your lover or, if single,
getting out and socializing
with people of interest A
creative outlet or social net-
working will be conducive
to meeting new people. Up-
date your image. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You'll shine at social
events. Those. looking for
a new way to do things will
welcome your insight and
your progressive action.
You can ensure a secure
place for yourself, socially
and professionally. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov.' 21): You'll have
mixed emotions regarding
a move or change at home.
Rely on your ability, to visu-
alize the possibilities and
you will make the right de-
cision. Change is good and
with it will bring a new life-
style, new friendships and
new beginnings. **


SAGrITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You can learn
a lot if you put your mind to
it. Observe what others do
and use discipline in order
to reach your ggals. Oppor-
tunities are opening up be
ready, willing and able to
take advantage. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Refrain from
taking on too much or let-
ting things get out of con-
trol. Being a team player
will allow you to monitor
what develops. Your input
can make 'the difference
between success and fail-
ure. New techniques will
help limit waste and errors.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Discipline and
hard work will pay off. You
can overcome anything you
put your mind to right now,
so stop procrastinating and
start your journey down a
path that can lead to a bet-
ter future. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You'll have
some remarkable ideas but,
before you try to put them
into motion, make sure you
know what you are doing.
An oversight on your part
will cost you. Be responsi-
ble for the work that needs
doing and you won't be let
down. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: V equals J
"YHBG NGHNAG TGGA S P G XW K O .
H SPGXY VJYS RGS UGS."
"DHJ ZHO'S OGGZ W UGWSPGXBWO
SH FOHU UPKIP UWD SPG UKOZ
LAHUY." LHL ZDAWO
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "One thing vampire children have to be taught early
on is, don't run with wooden stakes." Jack Handey
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 2-16


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


I'M TRYING TOSEE
IF THERE SOME
EXPLANATION .
FOR SARTE



GPe&


"THM AROST A$ A CAPTIVATING
PfgFOgRMANC"--- WHAT 15 TH?
-% W^ i. A -v.- _


CLASSIC PEANUTS










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 16, 2011


Earnhardt's loss still

felt 10 years after death


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH
After 462 races, a sad-
sack losing streak that had
sparined 16 long years,
Michael Waltrip's first trip
to Victory Lane at the
"Daytona 500 no less -
should have been the hap-
piest, moment of his life.
It was, for 15 or so min-
utes, anyway.
Then longtime friend
Ken Schrader stopped
by to speak privately to
Waltrip. Schrader leaned
in and whispered the news
that brought the party to a
crashing halt The accident
on the last lap was bad,
and Dale Earnhardt was in
trouble.
Waltrip at first didn't
seem to hear. So Schrader
again leaned in to Waltrip's
ear. The smile faded from
Waltrip's face, the light in
his eyes darkened, and he
spent the next few hours
simply going through the
motions of a victory cel-
ebration.
When it was time for
the customary champagne
toast, he declined and head-
ed to his motorhome for his
first moments alone with
his wife since crossing the
finish line.
"I remember my-words,
I said to her, 'He's going
to be OK, right?'" Waltrip
recalled. "I was just hoping
she was going to say he's
hurt really bad.
"And she said, 'No, he's
dead.'"
Earnhardt was the tough--
est man to ever climb in
a stock car, the face of
American racing and the
blue collar everyman the
fans could relate to. His
death in a crash that insid-
ers viewed as rather routine
stunned NASCAR, rais-
ing questions about mortal-
ity, safety and moving on.
The 10-year anniversary
of Earnhardt's fatal acci-
dent falls on Friday, just
two days before the sea-
son-opening Daytona 500,
NASCAR's version of the
Super Bowl.
This season, the past has
a chokehold on the season's
biggest race. The typical
excitement and optimism
that comes with each new
year have been overshad-
owed by memories of The
Intimidator, whose death
still very much defines
NASCAR and those he left
behind.
There's Dale Earnhardt
Jr., the prodigal son forced
out of his father's shadow


CHS *
Continued From Page 1B
allowing only two hits.
"He was outstanding
today," Melody Christian
head coach Harvey Williams
said. "He was able to locate
all night, and it was just a
great performance by our
senior."
Columbia had baserun-
ners at second nd third
in the fifth inning after
Mikey Kirkman scored off
a Thomas' hit and error
at second to cut the lead
to 3-1. That was as close
as Columbia would get,
though, as Whorton shut
down the offense for the
rest of the game.
"We've got to get better at
the plate when we have run-
ners in scoring position,"
Columbia High coach J.T
Clark said. "We'll tip our
caps to their pitcher and try
to get better."


the day Dale Sr. died. Savvy
marketing had made the
introverted and sometimes
socially awkward kid a star,
but it didn't prepare him
for the crush of attention
from his father's adoring
fan base. He's been stoic in
facing the anniversary ques-
tions, but it's clear he wants
everyone to move on.
Richard Childress, the
team owner who never
wanted to return to a race
track after the loss of his
best friend, has tried so
hard to block the memo-
ries of that day. The topic
still makes him obviously
uncomfortable, though
he understands the public
interest that still accompa-
nies Earnhardt.
Then there's Waltrip, who
talks freely about the friend
who gave him his big break
at the journeyman age of
38. He found some peace
this past year in writing the
memoir released last month
"In the Blink of an Eye."
For all, Earnhardt's
death remains a raw, open
wound. No matter the
approach to the anniversa-
ry, the reality is the same:
Everything changed the
day Earnhardt died for
the people who loved him
and for the sport he left
behind and it has taken
every bit of the last decade
to recover.


Dale Earnhardt Jr. was
26, starting his second
full season at NASCAR's
highest level, when his
father was killed. Although
he'd won two champi-
onships in NASCAR's
second-tier series, two
2000 Cup races as a rookie
with Dale Earnhardt Inc.,
and was being marketed
like -a rock star by
Budweiser, he was very
much under his father's
thumb.
Big E expected a lot of
Junior. Although there was
always a father's love, he
wasn't exactly easy on his
namesake. Life as the son
of the seven-time champion
was a constant lesson in
where to go, what to do
and how to be more profes-
sional.
When Earnhardt died,
his son had to figure it
out on his own. But there
was no newfound freedom.
Instead he inherited the
responsibility, of safeguard-
ing his father's legacy,
ensuring the health of the
family race team and sat-
isfying the rabid fan base


he'd suddenly inherited.
And of course, he still
had to live up to his last
name.
As NASCAR rolled into
Rockingham, N.C., five days
after Earnhardt's death, his
son wanted to be anywhere
but there.
"After that happened, I
never wanted to see another
race track or race car again.
We went to Rockingham,
and I went because I felt
responsible to be there,"
he said.
When the green flag
fell, Earnhardt Jr. crashed
before finishing even a sin-
gle lap.
"I was embarrassed. It
was embarrassing because
it was on television and in
front of all the fans," he
said. "But I really had no
interest in being there. It
was embarrassing to wreck
a car, tore that car up, but it
didn't break my heart any
worse than it was already
broken. I couldn't feel any
worse than I was already
. feeling."
It took him about a week
to accept his new life and
its tremendous responsi-
bilities. "I got to thinking,
'Well, what else am I going
to do? My dad gave me this
opportunity, and I would be
a fool to squander it,'" he
recalled.
It has ngt been an easy
ride.
There have been*flashes
of success, and one brief
flirtation, in 2004, at winning
a Cup championship. But it
has been pocked by a frag-
mented relationship with
Earnhardt's widow, Teresa,
that ultimately drove Junior
out of DEI at the end of the
2007 season.
A move to Hendrick
Motorsports hasn't trans-
lated into the on-track suc-
cess Earnhardt Jr. desired,
and the last three seasons
have been a confidence-
shattering nightmare for
NASCAR's most popular
driver.
This season is another
fresh start his fourth
make-or-break season. A
new crew chief this year
has renewed hope, and
he'll start on the pole for
Sunday's season-opening
Daytona 500.
The irony of Earnhardt's
son winning the top
starting spot for the 10-
year anniversary race of
Earnhardt's death wasn't
lost on fellow Hendrick
driver Jeff Gordon, who
surmised "things are cer-
tainly lining up in an inter-
esting way."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo taken Feb. 18, 2001, Dale Earnhardt's (3) window pops out of the car
after being hit by Ken Schrader (36) during the Daytona 500 at the Daytona International
Speedway in Daytona Beach. Getting by are drivers Bobby Hamilton (55), Jeremy Mayfield
(12), Bill Elliott (9) and Ricky Rudd (28). Earnhardt had to be cut from his battered car and
was taken to Halifax Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead of head injuries. The
10-year anniversary of Earnhardt's fatal accident falls on Friday just two days before the
season-opening Daytona 500,
.r4,

.-,- .- -*, ,'_

.Exam and Necessary X-rays
D_)5 DO10DO I ) .1
irst-time
patient
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olumbiat (

Your marketplace source for Lake City and Coluimbia Counit


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2011 1,



County purchasing director: Buying is his job


Ben Scott, purchas-
ing director for the
Columbia County
Board of County
Commissioners, con-
siders the opportunity to work
with each county department to
be what he most enjoys about
his job.
"I have to know a little bit about
what each department does in
order to help them out," he said.
Scott has been working for the
county and serving its depart-
ments as the purchasing director
for the past 12 years.
His job is to help each depart-
ment in the county comply with
Florida statutes and county ordi-
nances that pertain to purchasing
for anything the county buys,
Scott said.
"From road projects down to
uniforms for employees," he said,
"it covers the whole gamut of
everything the county needs to
provide the services they do for
the citizens."
County departments will come
to Scott with projects that need
to be completed. If the project's
cost is under $25,000, quotes are
received and bids are reviewed
between Scott and the respective'
department head.
Projects,' costing more than
$25,000 are advertised in the
Lake City Reporter and on the
county website.
If the county is looking to con-
struct a building, a request for
proposals for architects to design
the building is put out, Scott said.
Proposals are ranked, usually
'by a committee, and a contract


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Ben Scott, purchasing director for the Columbia County Board of County Commissioners, poses for a photo-
graph while working on the county's roadside mowing contract bid tabulation page in his office at the Columbia
County Annex building Monday. Scott has been working for the county as its purchasing director for the past 12
years.


is negotiated with the highest-
ranked architect, he said.
After the needs of the building
are determined and bid docu-
ments are compiled, the project
is put out to bid through advertis-
ing, Scott said.
"Once we receive the bids in
my department," he said, "we
review their qualifications. The
lowest, most responsive bidder
will receive the contract and I
make a recommendation to the
board to award the contract."
The county follows a sealed-bid


process, Scott said. Bids will be
submitted in a sealed envelope
by the date and time they're due
and are opened and read aloud in
a public forum.
"Anyone who wants to attend
those bid openings is welcome to
attend them," he said.
Pre-bid meetings are also held
for certain projects, Scott said,
which allow contractors to ask
questions and get clarification on
how the county wants to accom-
plish a project before they submit
their bids.


Scott said his specific job is
assisting departments in develop-
ing specifications for their proj-
ects, so the vendor knows what
it's trying to bid on.
"My job in a nutshell is to try
to help the departments get the
products or services they're look-
ing for," he said.
"If I only said I needed a truck,
I could mean anything from a
dump truck to a fire truck," Scott
said, "so we have to develop those
specifications so they know what
it is we're looking for."


Scott is also responsible for
placing the advertisements,
opening and tabulating bids and
making recommendations to the
Board of County Commissioners
to award the bids.
While Scott's background is in
accounting, he said he ventured
into the procurement field for
diversity.
"Accounting was the same
thing every day," he said, "but
the nice thing about working for
purchasing is there's new things
that come up with the county
every day that make my job inter-
esting. There's always something
new."
The most rewarding aspect of
his job is seeing a project through
to completion that county resi-
dents need, he said, like the new
Fort White Library.
"When you get started and you
start from nothing and all of a
sudden you've got a new build-
ing and you're providing citizens
with a service at the south end of
the county that needed this new
library, that's what's rewarding,"
Scott said.
His current position may lead
to something else in the future,
Scott said, but for now, he is
happy with his job and the chance
to work for the county and its
commissioners.
"I've learned a lot here and I
don't plan on going anywhere in
the near future," he said.
The Columbia County
Purchasing Department is locat-
ed at 135 NE Hernando Avenue,
Room 203. Call (386) 719-2028 or
visit www.columnbiacountyfla.com.


IIT
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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


IBUYI


EIT~llg


FIND IT


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


I,r-MT


One item per ad 250
4 lines 6 days ch addition
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $00 or less.
Each item mus include a price.
This s a -refundable rate.




One tem per ad tona
4 lines 6 days line S1.10
Rate applies to private ndividua selling
pesonal merchandise totalling o r .ess.
Each em must include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.




One item per ad
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling S1,000 or less.
Each item must include a price.
SThis Is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad Each additional
4 lines 6 days line $1.45
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less.
Each item must include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.





4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less.
Each tem must include a price.
This is refundable rate.




One item per ad l7ia
4 lines 6 daysI additional
Rate applies to private IndaIvdu selling g
rpotsona merchandise -telling $6,000 i les.
Each item must Include a price.
This is a non-reundabe rate


I


Inl


lines$ i 50
3 days 1 7
Includes 2 Signs Erti addirindli r~ '1 55


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month.... 92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com




uSimr


Ad is to Appear:
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday


Call by:
Mon., 10:00 am.
Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Wed., 10:00 a.m.
ThMrs., 10:00a.m.
Fri., 10:00 am.
F., 10:00 am.


Fax/Email by:
Mon,, 9:00 a.m.
Mon., 9:00a.m.
Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.


These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion.of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In and Online
ww'sv. otccityreporte'r.con


Legal

COLUMBIA COUNTY BOARD
OF COMMISSIONERS SOLICITA-
TION OF LETTERS OF INTEREST
AND STATEMENTS OF QUALI-
FICATIONS FOR COUNTY WIDE
AMBULANCE SERVICES
PROJECT NUMBER 2011-I
Please be advised that Columbia
County desires to accept letters of in-
terest and statements of qualifica-
tions on the above referenced proj-
ect. Submissions will be accepted
through 11:00 A.M. on February 23,
2011.
Instructions may be obtained by con-
tacting the office of the Board of
County Commissioners, Columbia
County, 135 NE Hemando Ave.
Room 203, Post Office Box 1529
Lake City, Florida 32056-1529 or by
calling (386) 719-2028. Columbia
County reserves the right to reject
any and/or all Submissions and to ac-
cept the submission in the County's
best interest.
Dated this 9th day of, February
2011.
Columbia County Board of County
Commissioners
Jody Dupree, Chairman
04543450
February 9, 16, 2011
INVITATION TO BID
BID NO. 2011-J
LEASE OF AMBULANCES AND
FACILITIES TO HOUSE
AMBULANCES
Please be advised that Columbia
County, as Lessor, desires to accept
sealed bids for the lease of six (6)
ambulances and two (2) facilities to
house the ambulances; one located at
508 SW State Road 247, Lake City,
Florida and one located at 332 SW
Wingate Street, Lake City, Florida.
Bids will be accepted through 2:00
P.M. on March 2, 2011. All bids
submitted shall be on the form pro-
vided.
Specifications and bid forms may be
obtained by contacting the office of
the Board of County Commissioners,
Columbia County, 135 NE Hemando
Avenue, Suite 203, Lake City, Flori-
da 32055, or by calling (386)758-
1005. Columbia County reserves the,
right to reject any and/or all bids and
to accept the bid in the County's best
interest.
Dated this 16th day of February,
2011.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS
COLUMBIA COUNTY
By: /s/ Jody Dupree
Jody Dupree, Chairman
04543534
February 16, 23, 2011
FLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE
BID# 11-1-03
HUMAN PATIENT SIMULATORS
FLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE
DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUSTEES
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
The Board of Trustees of Florida
Gateway College is inviting interest-
ed eligible bidders to submit bids for
Human Patient Simulators. The cost
of the acquisition of this equipment
is funded by a grant provided by the
United States Department of Health
and Human Services.
BID DATE AND TIME
Sealed bids for Florida Gateway Col-
lege ITB 11-1-03 Human Patient
Simulators will be accepted at the
Florida Gateway College Purchasing
Office, Florida, until 2:00 P.M. (lo-
cal time) Thursday March 10, 2011.
PLACE FOR RECEIVING BIDS
Bids may be mailed to:
Purchasing Department
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Bids may be hand delivered to:
Purchasing Department
Florida Gateway College
198 S.E. Staff Way
Administration Building 001, Room
138
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
All bids must arrive and be date/time
stamped by a Purchasing Department
representative prior to the specified
bid date/time. Bids received after
that time will not be accepted. The
College will not be responsible for
Postal or other delivery service de-
lays that cause a bid to arrive at
Room 138, Building 001 after the
designated bid opening date/time.
Bids that are mailed must be clearly
marked on the outside of the enve-
lope:
BID # 11-1-03, HUMAN PATIENT
SIMULATORS
Florida Gateway College, Lake City,
Florida
BID OPENING: 2:00 P.M. THURS-
DAY, MARCH 10, 2011.
Bids will be opened and read aloud
in a public bid opening in Room 101,
Building 001.
BID PACKAGE
Interested bidders may obtain a Bid


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal


Package from Bill Brown, Director
of Purchasing for Florida Gateway
College by any of the following
methods.
By email:
bill.brown@fgc.edu
By USPS: Request sent certi-
fied mail to:
Purchasing Department
Florida Gateway College
, 149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Walk-in Pick Up:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
198 S.F. Staff Way
Administration Building 001, Room
138
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
ELIGIBLE BIDDERS
Eligible bidders are defined as those
bidders who are not excluded from
bidding according to the Federal
Government's Excluded Parties List
(www.epls.gov
) or by Sec-
tion 287.133, Florida Statute.
BID AWARD
The College reserves the right to re-
ject any or all bids, and/or accept that
bid(s) that is in the best interest of
the College with price, qualifications
and other factors taken into consider-
ation. This bid requests prices for
multiple items. The College reserves
the right to award the bid, by item, to
the Bidder(s) which, in the sole dis-
cretion of the College, is the most re-
sponsive and responsible Bidder(s),
price, qualifications and other factors
considered for that item. The College
will advertise this bid notice for a
minimum of three (3) weeks and will
make the bid package available to
bidders during that time.
RIGHT TO WAIVE IRREGULARI-
TIES AND TECHNICALITIES
Florida Gateway College reserves
the right to waive minor irregulari-
ties and/or technicalities associated
with this solicitation. The Director
of Purchasing of Florida Gateway
College shall be the final authority
regarding waivers of irregularities
and technicalities.
Bill Brown
Director of Purchasing
Florida Gateway College

04543507
February 13, 16, 20, 2011


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

Lost Female Dog on 2/12 Sat.,
near Richardson Middle School.
Medium sized brown/black, looks
like a fox, Reward, 386-752-8920


100 JOpportunitie
Opportunities


04543509
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for Maintenance
Technician I, Landscape and
Parks Dept. Supervisory and/or
manual work in directing &
participating in landscape and
park maintenance of County
properties. Minimum
requirements: High School
diploma/G.E.D., 18 years of
age. Two (2) years experience
in a supervisory position of two
or more employees; & one (1)
year experience in grounds
keeping or similar maintenance
work or any equivalent
combination of training &
experience. Valid FL driver's
license. Salary: $10.02 per hour
plus benefits. Successful
applicants must pass
pre-employment physical, drug
screening & criminal
history check. Applications
available on website:
www.columbiacountvfla.com
or the Human Resources Office;
Board of County Commission-
ers, 135 Hernando, Suite 203,
Lake City, FL 32055.
(386)719-2025, TDD (386)758-
2139. Deadline: 03/04/11.
AA/EO/ADA/VP Employer.

04543540
FULL TIME VICTIM
ADVOCATE-GRANT
FUNDED POSITION
in Lake City Guardian ad
Litem Office, salary -
$26,000-$28,000yr-no benefits
Bachelors Degree in Social
Work, Criminology, Psychology
or two years comparable service
in advocacy. Excellent
Communication skills, ability to
work independently and well
with others of various ages,
professions and backgrounds
must maintain a strong commit-
ment to Victims of Crime and
respect confidentiality of
victims. State application must
be submitted by March 23, 2011
to Tammie C. Williams at 213
Howard Street East Live Oak,
Florida 32064, EOE

Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

A/C SERVICE Tech
Min 5 yrs experience
F/T with benefits
Please call 386-454-4767


100 portunities
Opportunities


04543535
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for a Librarian II.
This is full-time professional
library work coordinating and
conducting services and
activities in the Reference area.
Minimum training: MLS or
equivalent from an American
Library Association accredited
University plus two years of
library experience. A
comparable amount of training,
education or experience may be
substituted for the above
minimum qualifications. Valid
FL Drivers License required.
Salary is negotiable within
$14.05- $16.48 hourly range
plus benefits. Successful
applicants must pass
pre-employment physical, drug
screening, and criminal history
background. Applications may
be obtained at the Human
Resources Office, Board of
County Commissioners, 135 NE
Hernando Ave., Lake City, FI
32055, or online at
www.columbiacountyfla.com
(386) 719-2025, TDD (386)758-
2139. Application deadline:
03/04/2011. Columbia
County is an AA/EEO/ADA
/VP employer.

04543539
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
INSIDE SALES
Ideal candidates with previous
experience with outbound sales.
Must have excellent telephone
skills. Individual must be
enthusiastic, outgoing, have
excellent computer skills and be
able to perform in a fast pace
environment. Please fax resume
to 386-758-0984 or email to
greajobs(LCiobs.info.

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies


CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773

Certified VPK Teacher needed.
Please do not call if you
are not certified. 386-755-7677
6:30a-5:30p or 344-5363 after 5:30

Looking for exp., reliable person
. to care for elderly mother, your
home or hers, F/T Resume & Ref's
fax 386-752-4590 386-755-7159


Sewing Machine Operator experi-
ence: 2nd person needed for cut-
ting fabric in the cutting room.
Call Hafner's 386-755-6481

Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
.lakecitymanager@yahoo.com

1 Medical
120 Employment

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST:
Qualifications: Prefer experienced,
generalist technologist familiar
with Laboratory automation,
safety, quality control, manual
testing and LIS operation. Must
be able to lift up to 40 pounds and
will be exposed to hazardous
materials. Forty hours M-F with
Saturday rotation. Require State of
Florida License as a Medical Tech-
nologist. Please submit resume to
npatel(5@chclabs.com

PT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.

FLORIDA
GA17EWAY

Fo-rmrlvake CL v ('mmuttry Clege
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
SPRING 2011
CDL PROGRAM
CDL instructors needed for growing CDL
program at Florida Gateway College.
Qualified individuals must hold a CDL
and have at least four years of driving
experience with a clean driving record.
Prefer individuals with teaching
experience in a truck driving school
setting. Email resumes to Stephanie
Glenn at Stephanie.Glenn(,ifc.edu or
call the Global Logistics Banner Center at
386-754-4492 for more information.
College application and copi.l oIf transcripts
required. All foreign transcripts must be
submitted with a translation and evaluation.
Application available at w, v. vgcdii
( 'A Sin m r. i n
'A1 i VP (..il g TF -igdn in, & l-np l t


120 ^ Medical
120 Employment

SUPERVISORY MEDICAL
TECHNOLOGIST:
Qualifications: Prefer experienced
generalist supervisory medical
technologist familiar with
Laboratory automation, safety,
quality control, manual testing,
and LIS operation. Knowledge of
inventory control, quality control
review and evaluation, instrument
maintenance and personnel
management. Must be able to
lift up to 40 pounds and will be
exposed to hazardous materials.
Forty hours M-F with Saturday
rotation, 3PM to 11:30 PM.
Require State of Florida License as
a Laboratory Supervisor.
Please submit resume to
npatel(@chclabs.com


140 Work Wanted

We Run Errands!
Your personal errand service to
help those in need at rates you can
afford Call Dawn 386-249-9426

240 Schools &
240 Education

04543248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/14/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/14/11

Continuing education ,
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

Boxer Puppy, AKC, H/C
fawn w/black mask,
$500
904-653-1839


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 'Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


FLORIDA
GATEWAY
,COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)"
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
GRAPHIC DESIGN, GAMING, AND
SIMULATION
164 Duty Days Tenured Track
to Commence Fall 2011
Teach a variety of courses in the
Computer Science Department to
include digital media, gaming, and
computer programming. Minimum
Qualifications: Master's Degree in
Graphic Design, Computer
Programming, Instructional Systems
or related field with emphasis on
gaming and simulation. Demonstrated
background and understanding in the
application of software in the areas of
design, web, interactive media, game,
audio, and video. Desirable
Qualifications: Doctorate in Graphic
Design, Computer Programming,
Instructional Systems or related field
with emphasis on gaming and
simulation. Demonstrated skills in
Maya, Motion capture, 2D and 3D
computer modeling and animation.
Salary: Based on Degree and
Experience
Application Deadline: 3/18/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr(afoqc.edu
Fr C is credited by the Commission on Colleges or
VPADAiAT:.0 College in Educaen and
Emonplmcnt


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?


(,<
F-
Vour skills
and
p9ire attitude
P' .j


Apply Online or In Person!


SiTEL


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621

407 .Computers

HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170(


.408 Furniture

Love Seat-Broyhill. Blue/gray,
matching pillows and arm covers.
Good condition. $95.
386-454-4947


420 Wanted to Buy

I BUY WORKING AND
NON WORKING
APPLIANCES!
CALL 386-365-1915

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.
WANTED TO BUY
Garage Door -
7'X9'
386-755-1937


430 Garage Sales







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

Lowery Parade. Organ.
Slot Machine, Chipper Vac.,
Small Generator. Call 386-754-
0800 or 755-7773 for details.

Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

463 Building
4 Materials

ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Robfing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available

FLORIDA
.A. GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
PROGRAMS
224 Duty Days Tenured Track
(Revised and Re-advertised)
Instructor to teach and assist the
EMS Coordinator and Executive
Director of Public Service Programs
in various aspects of program
development, planning and
implementation of the EMT-Basic,
Paramedic, and EMS Associate
Degree programs, as well as
Firefighter programs. He.she
maintains a close relationship with
clinical sites and part-time faculty,
and assists in program expansion and
student recruitment; also assists
Coordinator in maintaining state and
national program 'ac6reditatioi.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
Bachelor's degree in emergency
medical services or closely related
field. Master's degree preferred.
KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, ABILITIES
REQUIRED: Paramedic certification
either at the state or national level
(must have Florida state license
within six months of hire). Four years
experience as a paramedic with an
ALS provider. Must have two years
experience (full or part-time) teaching
EMS. Must be able to establish and
maintain effective working
relationships with others. Knowledge
of EMS equipment. DESIRABLE
QUALIFICATIONS: Master's degree
in emergency medical services or
closely related field, or Master's
degree with 18 graduate hours in the
emergency medical seffrvices or
closely related field. Minimum three
years teaching experience at the
technical school or community college
level. ACLS. PALS, and PHTLS
instructor certification. Experience
with program accreditation process.
Experience with American Heart
Association accreditation and
credentialing. Fire/rescue experience
Knowledge of firefighter equipment
and certification.
Salary: Based on degree and
experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 2/28111
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place


Lake City FI 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanrifgc edu
the Soulhem,, A-,sm-ilon (of college :mI d Schools
VI' AiA I\A 10) (' llAigi in I.luatn an,,d


* ADvantage


I










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 16, 2011


'630 Mobile Homes
,J6 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/1 w/screen porch. Lg yard in
quiet, clean, safe, well maintained
10 unit park. Water, garbage incl.
$475.mo $475.dep. 386-965-3003
3/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
pets ok, $500 dep $575 mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114






Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547

640 Mobile Homes
for Sale
$216 a month remodeled,
like new, 2Bd/2Ba S Wide
Delivered & blocked, appliances,
A/C $2500 down, 8 year fin.
Possible owner financing. Ready
now. Call Gary 386 758-9824
*Lot Model Sale*
Save 1,000's @ Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
For Model Info and Details
05524941
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers Save
up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832

1985 SWMH, 1/1,
$1,000
Is able to move
386-209-7691
Come in and see the
Future in Manufactured Homes.
Royals Homes making
people smile
386-754-6737
Come See all New Lot Models
Royals.Homes. Honesty! Integrity!
Customer Satisfaction
386-754-6737.
Handy man special, Ft White area,
4/2 plus den, Fleetwood DWMH
on I acre, river access, owner
financing, $69.900, $1000 down,
$605 month 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Looking for a Modular?'
Come see the Specialists
at Royals Homes and asl for Bo
386-754-6737
New 2011 Homes are Here
3BR/4BR at Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
Homes Built Your Way!
New,2010 MH,never been
occupied, front & back deck,
$99,900 MLS#76635 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
@ Westfield Realty
Royals Homes is Quality!
We treat you like Family.
Stop in or Call Catherine
386-754-6737

i71f Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2-& 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

105524833 -
No Application Fee +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 bedroom Apartments &
mobile homes,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
3BR/2BA DUPLEX,
Gatorwood on the Westside
Rent $650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Gorgeous Lake View. 2 br Apt
Water included. $545. mo plus
deposit. Close to shopping.
386-344-0579
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Move In Special.2/1 w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Quail Heights 2br/lba duplex.
Secluded, private, safe. W/D
hookup. $700. mo. $500 security.
386-754-1155


The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741

T~AfAr M


710 Unfurnished Apt. 810 Home for Sale
7 0 For Rent__ _ _____ _____


Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

l730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3/2 on 2.1 acres, 2 car garage,
ceramic tile, front & rear porches,
$995 mo, plus 2 mo sec.
Lease with the option to buy
386-758-9996 or 386-365-5434
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $675 mo, .
$600 sec., 386-497-4699

75 Business &
75v Office Rentals
180GSQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!
Great locations on SW Main Blvd.
Retail, Wholesale, Distribution,
Office. 1200+ sf only $950. per
mo. Includes Utilities 752-5035
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072


780 Condos for Sale
3 bdrm Condo Nit, back patio,
HOA fees include ext maintenance
of home, lawn & pool MLS#76797
$110,000, Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237

805 Lots for Sale
1 acre lot outside the city limits.
Homes only subdivision. Priced
below the assessed value with the
county, $16,900 Hallmark Real
Estate 386-867-1613 Call Jay S
2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Beautiful 5+ acre lot, partially
cleared w/large oaks, Homes only,'
$38,000, MLS 75038 Call Roger
Lovelady @ Westfield Realty
386-365-7039
Charming Turn of the Century,
property close to'
downtown,MLS# 74814
$94,900 386-755-0808
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Nice 4.5 acre parcel w/S/P/W
older SWMH $39,900
MLS# 76182 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children-under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


2008 Honda 750
C2 Spirit
Windshield, engine guard,
backrest, luggage rack,
like new, 4900 miles.
$3,800
Call
386-365-3658


2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch.
family rm w/fireplace. detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
3/2 home w/1758 sq ft, Storage
bldg, enclosed patio & deck.
$168,000 Call Carrie Cason @
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
MLS# 73410
3/2 w/over 1700 sq ft, fireplaces.
modem kitchen, fenced yard. 2
sheds, convenient location
$89,500 MLS#73861 Call Patti
@Access Realty 386-623-6896
4 bdrm + office, 2 living & dining
areas, front & back porch
$279,900 MLS# 72831
Call Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty 386-755-0808
4/2 2300 plus sq ft,Palm Harbor
Home on 2 lots, Good Condition
$69,888 Call Nancy Rogers @
386-867-1271 Results Realty
4/2 1,800 sq ft on 10.5 acres,
newly remodeled inside, detached
garage, above ground pool
$189,888, Call Nancy,
Results Realty 386-867-1271
5 bedroom Home on 5 acres south
of Lake City, Big Rooms
lots of space $229,500
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
MLS# 72928 Westfield Realty
5/2, 1800sf, 24 acres, family rm,
screened back porch, RV
parking,newly painted close to VA
& DOT, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
5/3 Triplewide MH (2200) sq ft,
w/2 master bdrms, on 10 fenced
acres, fireplace. MLS# 76226
$75,000 Call Patti Taylor
386-623-6896 Access Realty
AFFORDABLE 3BR/2BA mfg
home in Woodgate Village only
$27,000 #76741
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110
Beautifully Landscaped 3/1 on
1.11 ac, 16x24 detached garage,
screen porched bldg, water
purification system, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Brick home with 2,700 sqft under
roof. Large master w/bath on .5
acres completely fenced. $167,500
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Brick, .59 ac. 3br/2ba w/large
spacious rooms. Split floor plan.
2 car garage & storage $222,900.
Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Close to town, 2 story home
w/stone, fireplace, downstairs
master bdrm, $144,900
MLS# 77050 Call Carrie Cason
386-623-2806 Westfield Realty
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, Woodcrest. Great area, split
plan. Screened back porch. Elaine
K. Tolar. 386-755-6488 $139,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba. 3 Fireplaces. 39.7 acres
included. Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Reduced, brick w/over 2,000 sqft,
5 ac. 3br/2ba.Lots of extras. Elaine
K. Tolar 755-6488 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lakeview home in town, Old
charm w/many upgrades Elaine K.
Tolar. 386-755-6488 $189,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2 Story, 4br/2.5ba-2160 sqft. Spa-
cious plan w/garage Lori Geibeig
Simpson 365-5678 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba close to town. 1620 sqft
w/covered patio& more. Lori Gei-
beig Simpson 365-5678 $117,900
Coral Shores Realty 2004
Custom built home, 23 fenced ac.
1700 ft paved frontage. Lg
kitchen/pantry, master/bath.
386-965-5905 Bob Gavette
Comer lot in Piccadilly Park.
Newly painted in/out. New carpet
/vinyl. 2 car garage. Inground
pool. $133,500. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575


0 NL



$41A


****** We Will e******


UMNE
*** On Presidents' Day ***

Monday, February 21

Lake City Reporter

lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magazine

180 East Duval Street
752-1293


MONDAY
Karaoke
w/Teddy Mac
Doors Open 5pm

All You Can Eat
Whole Catfish


THURSDAY
S Karaoke
w/Teddy Mac
Doors Open 5pm

All You Can Eat
Spaghetti & Meat
Sauce


P V


FRIDAY
Mike Mullis
Variety Show
8pm
Doors Open 5pm

All You Can Eat
Sirloin Steak


810 Home for Sale
CUSTOM-BUILT 4BR mfg
home w/screen porch. front deck.
shed 587.500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #73893
Cute 3/2 nicely remodeled home.
2 acres, partially fenced
$115.888
Call Brittany @ Results Realty'
386-397-3473
Derington Properties, LLC
3/2 MH. large deck and
screened porch. 5 ac.
$46.500 386-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
DWMH, 5 ac. Screened front/back
porches. 20x40 shop fully equip-
ped w/bath. $74,900. 965-4300
Family home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Great Investment Property!
House needs lots of TLC, close to
shopping and schools, $35,000,
Bring all offers, Results Realty
Call Brittany 386-397-3473
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg
home near Wellborn on
5+ acres ONLY $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76768
Log Cabin home, located on
5 acres, wrap around porch
$199,000 MLS#75550
Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax Realty
Lrg Brick Home, well-established
neighborhood, in town,
$129,900 MLS#77016
Call Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
Must See! 4/2 2368SF Home,
island kitchen, den, fire place,
storage, auto gate entry,
Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfect starter home. Quiet area.
Wood laminate floors, Ig dining,
French doors. 1 car garage/work-
shop $84,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfection! Marion Place, gated,
brick 3/2 over 1800 sqft. Screened
lanai $158,900 386-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $55,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75210
REDUCED TO $61,500 in
Eastside Vlg! Immaculate
2BR/2BA w/lg rooms
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
/INC. 386-755-5110,#76753:
Solid Home! Needs updating.
Country eat in kitchen & formal
dining.Some windows replaced.
$70,000 Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575


810 Home for Sale
SPACIOUS 2BR/2BA home on 1
ac w/attached garage &
2-story shed $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76887
Totally refurbished 2/2 w/
workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
S94.900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces. 9 bdrms/3bths
S163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Very Nice 4/2 on 4 acres w/open
floor plan, 2 living rooms, eat in
kitchen, dining rm and rec rm
w/wet bar $89,900 Call Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well maintained 3/2 DWMH,
1568 sq ft, acres, new roof,
$65,000, MLS#76187
Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001

820 Farms &
2 Acreage
10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39.900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

83O Commercial
Property
Aprox 4000 sq ft Commercial
bldg, 4 bay/2 car lift shop, show-
room/office area, $1000 a month
lease or will sell for $128,000.
Call Martin @ 386-697-9950
Coral Shores Realty. Prime
commercial, located on Hwy 41 &
Gibson Ln. 26X54 concrete block.
$76,000 386-965-5905
Call Bob Gavette
Downtown & borders 3 streets.
Aprox. 10,000 sqft fenced parking.
"as is" Bob Gavette. $73,000. 386-
965-5905 Coral Shores Realty
Prime Commercial Property
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya 3.27 acres, room for building
$398,888 386-867-1271
Call Nancy @ Results Realty


930 Motorcycles


SATURDAY

Live Music
8pm
Doors Open 5pm


Prime Rib


Ask About Our Cabin Rentals
Sor Stay the Night In Our Famous Tree House!

lai0104


Featuring Folk Rock, Funk Jazz.

Music starts at 8pm.


940 Trucks

1990 Ford F350 Dually.
5th Wheel White. Automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215

1995 TOYOTA P/U Extra Cab.
Auto., fibergalss topper, AC..
4 cyl 22R. Real nice. 180k mi.
$3500.00 (352)339-5158


950 Cars for Sale

GET CASH TODAY!!
for your car, truck, van or SUV.
(Running or not). Call anytime.
(229)412-0380


1- -a -








Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must includevehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


2008 Honda 750 C2 Spuri, 49100
miles, windshield, engine guard,
backrest, luggage rack, like new


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.





MroBig


Classified Department: 755-5440


w****








iC LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 16, 2011


. ..-.


...... -..-,


--. :,. ._ -. .


BEER. TOBACCO OUTLET
l e t (= if= AmJn':m~nqi It "V ': i ;14


Most cars & trucks
expires 2/28/11


Rotate &
Balance
Tires
Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
Not valid with any other offer
expires 2/28/11


THE TAX STATION
(nexttoThe Money Man) REARATION
No APPOINTMENT NECESSARY ~ R OPIARALING
~ ALL FEES CAN BE DEDUTED ELECTRONICIPATION LOANS
HELPING THOUSANDS NOW f88 2 DECADES IN GflTING THE ILGEST RETURN THEY ABE EHTITIi
BRING THIS AD WITH YOU FOR 20% OFF ON I'RFIA RATION FEEs!!
CALL THE TAX HOTLINE 7,5.-0959
STHZ TAX STATION -
(next to The Money Man)
1010 SW MAIN BLVD. LAKI, CITY, FL
* A TAx R Atiswiuno tF wa ~L To EusomwC Re iP Cmras (ERC) n Etwamc ReujN D ossn (ERD). A Ro mNA nTmion ioma (RA.)
tMe U AsmOW roI in APoorno TO Pa ERC ol ERD, M APoID Ar tso A Osan CHatE ANDt CREDIT INVESi a~ioN WIr e P. ERCs, ERDs ANDo RALs
asM msOOUCrTS ~vo RSUSuc, BANK & TusrF ctiParn. CONSUrT WITH YOUR TAX PWMI ABOUT TAX RELTU tNG OPTIONS.


Come found,,
out today! Psychic Readings Jennifer Miller
:Helps In AI Pridblems Psychic


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.... TOP-OF-THE-LINE Restenic Very Fnnr
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C. Os.


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Wednesday, February 16, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com


Understanding sponsorship
3D

ID


Double


100 birthdays


Baya Pointe hosts special event on Valentine's Day


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Some times, the tim-
ing is just right.
Birthday parties are tradi-
tionally joyous occasions,
but the staff at Baya Pointe
Nursing and Rehabilitation Center
gave new meaning to the phrase
"good timing" on Valentines Day.
What would be a more appropriate
setting to celebrate a person's 100th
birthday than during Valentines Day
- a chance for them to reflect on
100 years of giving and receiving
love.
As part of the facility's 4
Valentine's Day celebration, staff
members and friends of family of
Clariece Witt and Rosa Mott
celebrated the ladies' 100th
birthdays.
Red and while balloons
served as table center
pieces with-candied ,
hearts at each table.
Those hearts could have
served as a symbol for life
and love for the two centenar-
ians.
Mott was born Feb. 5, 1911 and
Witt was born Feb. 17, 1911.
Bette J. Forshaw, Baya Pointe
Nursing and Rehabilitation Center
administrator, said it's not unusual for
the facility to celebrate residents hav-
ing their 100 birthdays because care is
so much improved compared to the past.
"It's unusual to have the 100-year-old
residents be in such good health," she
said. "Both of them are mentally alert,
they're certainly oriented to the facility,
they're lovely individuals and they enjoy
activities and their daily living here. I'm
pleased when you get to be 100 years old
and you can still enjoy life and both of
them do."

________________I


'..e-"Jacksonmille.
brated where she lived
her for several years.
birthday earlier in the While she
month with several of her family mem- enjoyed birthday party treats Monday,
bers from Baker County hosting a party Mott didn't give any secrets to her lon-
at the facility. gevity.
Three of her relatives celebrated with "I don't know how it feels to be 100,"
her again Monday. she said. "Am I 100? I don't believe it"
Mott, was the 11th of 14 children Mott grew up on a farm where she said
and was an Olustee resident before she she worked hard, plowing, planting corn


I don't
know how
it feels to
be 100.
Am I 100?
I don't
believe it."

Rosa Mott


and hoeing peanuts.
"Mrs. Mott enjoys all the activities
here and never misses a time to go in for
activities," Forshaw said. "She wanders all
through the building, knows every part of
the building and she travels on her own
in her wheelchair."
Witt is a Columbia County native and
%went to schoolrin-Fort White and Mason
City. She won't have her official birth-
day celebration with family until later in
the week.
She has four grand children, 11 great
grand children and two great great grand-
children.
She and four of her family members
celebrated her birthday at the facility
Monday as she enjoyed a slice of birthday
cake.
She said she doesn't know how it feels
to be 100, because she hasn't reached
that age yet
"I reckon I'm looking forward to it on
Thursday," she said.
A birthday party has been planned
in her honor for 5 p.m. Thursday at the
Mason City Community Center.
"Mrs. Witt loves to get her hair done
- she's prim and proper," Forshaw said.
"She puts make-up on, has her hair done
routinely every week. She's just a sweet
heart."


"It's unusual to have
the I00-year-old
residents be in such
good health."


Bette J. Forshaw
Administrator
Baya Pointe Nursing
and Rehabilitation Center


'~ N-~


TONY BRITTI
Lake City Reporter

Rosa Mott (left)
and Clariece
Witt celebrate
their 100th
birthdays during
a Valentine's
Day party at
Baya Pointe
Nursing and
Rehabilitation
Center Monday.


TONY BRITT/
Lake City Reporter


Clariece Witt
(sitting) is vis-
ited by her
family mem-
bers Kenneth
Witt (from left),
Louise Witt and
Martha Norris
during a recent
party. She'll
celebrate her
100th Birthday on
Thursday.


TONY BRITT/
Lake City Reporter


James Croft
(front row, from
left) visits with his
great aunt, Rosa
Mott, who cele-
brated her 100th
Birthday Feb. 5.
Mott's relatives
June McKnight
(back row, from
left) and Paulette
Shadd also
took part in the
Valentine's Day
party visit.








LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2011


Retiree, 86, has a yen for Tae Kwon Do


By TONY REID
Associated Press
TAYLORVILLE, Ill.
Just because there is snow
on roof, Grasshopper,
does not mean fire gone
out
Exhibit One is the
remarkable figure of Merle
Micenheimer: The 86-year-old
retired teacher from Taylorville
just earned his black belt from
Grandmaster Perry's School of
Tae Kwon Do and Self-Defense.
It took him five years of solid
work after he was inspired to
give it a try by a granddaughter
who had just earned her black
belt. Micenheimer, who took up
marathon running when he was
60 and didn't quit until he was
about 76, mastered the martial
art step by step with weekly two-
hour lessons. He learned well.
"This is your ready stance,"
he announces, flexing his fit and
wire-taught body while dressed
in a white robe cinched with
the coveted belt "Then you
can pivot this way, down block,
punch right, down block, punch
again ." he flips his body and
arms around with astonishing
ease for an octogenarian, wrap-
ping up his demo by showing
how he might break an assail-
ant's grip with a deft forearm
movement.
"And you can do other things,"
he adds-helpfully, "Like. kick
them in the groin," his right leg


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo taken Feb. 4, Merle Micenheimer, 86, is seen in Taylorville, Ill. After five years of hard work,
Micenheimer has earned his black belt from Grandmaster Perry's School of Tae Kwon Do and Self-Defense.


has already risen with enough
speed to make a visitor wish he
wasn't standing so close, but
Micenheimer stops mid move
with a smile.
"You can do lots of things."


He's living proof of that.'"
The mature martial artist is
being interviewed at Lifestyles
Fitness personal training studio
in Taylorville, where he goes
four times a week for strength


and cardio workouts between his
tae kwon do schedule. He climbs
up onto the "dip machine" and
starts lifting his 170-pound, 5-
feet-10 inch body up .and down
by his arms, knees bent, black


belt flapping, while under the
supervising eye of personal
trainer Eric Bertoldo.
"He's unique, and he doesn't
disappoint," said the 42-year-
old Bertoldo, watching his old-
est client bobbing like a spring.
"He's now my example: When
all these younger ones say, 'I
can't,' I say, 'Well, here's Merle,
who can.' He's got the determi-
nation and the will."
And that brings us back to
the tae kwon, do. While it is no
doubt handy to be able to make
some teenage would-be mug-
ger sing soprano for the rest
of his life, Micenheimer looks
to chop a little deeper into the
guiding philosophy behind a
martial art in which the name,
loosely translated from Korean,
means "the art of the foot and
the fist."
Micenheimer said
Grandmaster Perry's students
study a lifestyle code along
with their kicks and strikes that
talks of arming your soul with
courtesy, integrity, persever-
ance and an indomitable spirit,
among other attributes. The
teacher-turned-student admits
he hasn't always struck the
right notes in his own life and
said a black belt is meaningless
if it doesn't make you want to
become a better person.
"As you get older, your time
is running out," he said. "So
you'd better hurry up and earn
some points."


A small York church delivers food to the elderly


By ANDREW DYS
The Herald of Rock Hill
YORK, S.C.
2 At 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
15 minutes.
before the
doors were scheduled
to open 22 people
waited in line outside
Cornerstone Family
Worship Center.
Ten minutes later, 38
stood in the line that bent
to keep feet out of mud.
Inside, the dozen vol-
unteers who had been
working fori hours stopped
boxing and bagging, and
gathered in a circle.
They held hands, and
the preacher named Jim
Erle, who used to work in
finance in New York City,
prayed.
"Lord, help us increase
what we do here," said
Erie, the 43-member
church's senior pastor. "It


is good but is not enough.
We must do more."
What they do at
Cornerstone is food.
The doors opened and
in came the elderly, the
hungry, the black and
white and Hispanic and
American Indian.
Each got a number on a
cardboard card, handwrit-
ten in marker, laminated
in plastic. Each filled out a
formnto show how needy
each ', after they had
stood inline.
Like they were waiting
for a movie, except when
you are hungry, there are
no movies because there is
not money for movies.
The form is required by
the government, but this is
no government program.
Nobody has ever been
turned away and never
will be Erie said.
The phone number
at the pantry is 803-684-
2273. Look at 2273 on the


telephone keypad. 2273 is
CARE. That is not a coin-
cidence.
Cornerstone is love,
not government or mega-
church.
Huge churches sit
empty on Wednesday
mornings in lots of
small and big places, yet
Cornerstone's muddy lot
in front of the old red-
brick fellowship hall is
filled with old vehicles and
bicycles and the footprints
of people who walked to
get food.
An elderly gray-haired
man with a blue cap that
read "World War II combat
veteran," and one can only
imagine what he did in
those brutal years, waited
for food to stretch through
a month.
Larry Brindle was No.
15 in line. Disabled after
40 years on a cattle farm,
Brindle can't work. He
has seven to feed at home,


including grandkids. ,
"I gotta stretch all I got,
and what I got in a month
doesn't add up to,the
mouths to feed after I pay
the bills for rent and the
lights and the,rest," said
Brindle. "Food comes last.
"Without them here, we
wouldn't have things to
eat, some days."
Brindle and his son-
in-law, Daniel Passmore,
received food and before
they walked out, bags
in each hand, both said,
"Thank you." Thanks, as
they walked back'to their
poverty and hungry fami-
lies after a lifetime of work.
Politicians talk about
"entitlement" programs as'
if those who are old or get
hurt.are thieves.
They never saw a World
War II combat veteran wait
silently for a handout, or
bow-legged Larry Brindle
- who worked 40 years
until he got hurt and can't


work anymore and now
tries to make it on peanuts
- carry bread for his
grandkids out of a food
pantry.
No politician who yells
about handouts ever saw
No. 42 at Cornerstone -
that was Ruth W. Hughes.
After more than 30 years
working in Clover school
cafeterias, Hughes retired.
She saw her first retire-
ment check and knew that
she would not be able to
live on that check. Her
whole life, working, and
she finds in her leisure she
cannot stretch the money
to eat
"This is a wonderful
place, this pantry, these
people," said the lovely
Ruth W. Hughes, whom
the politicians label as an
"entitlement."
Cornerstone labels
nobody. All are welcome.
This little church only
has 43 members. Yet each


month during Wednesday
morning giveaways, the
food pantry helps an aver-
age of 600 families, as
many as 1,800 people if
you figure three people
per family eat from what is
given.
How do they do it?
This little church buys
the food and gives it away.
To strangers.
"Giving is what God is all
abopit," said church mem-
ber Eva Ladrach.
All the money comes in
from tithes from church
members, then pays
Second Harvest Food Bank
in Charlotte to stock the
pantry.
Volunteers load up their
vehicles with food and
bring it back to this tiny
building, every week.
U.S. Department of
Agriculture stocks of
canned goods, free, also
come in to go right back
out to the hungry.


Aging inmates challenge


Missouri prison system


Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo.
- A prison in Missouri's
capital now has a geriatric
wing as state officials con-
front an increasingly elder-
ly inmate population.
The "enhanced care
unit" opened Jan. 1 at the
Jefferson City Correctional
Center, the Columbia
Missourian reported. The
36-bed unit is designed as
a miniature nursing home,
a place where elderly
convicts in wheelchairs,
strapped to oxygen tanks
or struggling with demen-
tia can be segregated from
the general prison popula-
tion.
Prisoners older than 50
represented 6 percent of
Missouri state inmates in
1998; 13 years later, that fig-
ure increased to 15 percent
State officials plan to
open similar units in five
more state prisons and
eventually build a separate
prison hospital for elderly
inmates, complete with a
dementia unit and a dialy-
sis lab.
Missouri Supreme Court
Judge Michael Wolff ques-
tions whether the state can
afford such specialized-
care.
"I don't think the public
is really all that keen on
spending hundreds of mil-
lions of dollars on running


nursing homes in prison for
old dare I say harm-
less guys," he said.
Wolff heads the Missouri
Sentencing Advisory
Commission, an indepen-'
dent body that monitors
the effects of the state sen-
tencing structure and rec-
ommends evidence-based


reforms.' So far, none of
the commission's recom-
mendations have become
law. The rapid growth in
the state's aging prison
population as well as the
overall prison population
- has been driven not by
an uptick in crime but by
state sentencing policies.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER


ACT2


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2011


understanding






nsors.hi




SSmart ways to



make a global



difference


FAMILY FEATURES
ost people have heard stories or seen images depicting
the dire conditions faced by families living in poverty in
developing countries. These stories can make people feel
compelled to get involved, but often they are left with
'questions about the best way to help families in need. '.
Bob Hentzen, president and co-founder of the
Christian Foundation for Children and Aging
(CFCA), believes that child sponsorship is one of
the best ways to connect with and assist families
throughout the world trying to survive in extreme
poverty o- ften on less than $2 per day.
"Sponsorship benefits are designed to meet
critical needs and help families build a path out
of poverty," Hentzen said. "Sponsorship says,
'We are equal and we need each other. We are
interdependent.'"
To shed light on global poverty and the benefits
of sponsorship, Hentzen, who is 74, is currently
on an 8,000-mile walk through 12 countries. (See
sidebar story for more about Walk2gether.)


Basic Sponsorship Models
Child sponsorship programs, like the one offered
by CFCA, give people the opportunity to impact
global poverty through recurring, monthly contri-
butions. Sponsorship donations are then used to
provide families in need with basic resources like
food, education and health care benefits. There are
three basic models, although some organizations
combine two or more of the basic sponsorship
models to carry out their mission.
Community Projects Some organizations
pool the funds from individual sponsorships to
help support larger community projects like the
development of new schools or hospitals. These
organizations also might distribute general goods
like food or clothing to entire communities.


"Sponsorship offers a lot more than financial support," Hentzen said.
"What the child and family really are hearing from you is, 'You are not
alone and I believe in you.'"
.Unlike other charitable options, child sponsorship requires a personal,
long-term commitment from sponsors. This is why it's not only important
to understand how sponsorship works, but also how
Sto find the right partner organization.


"Sponsorship
benefits are
designed to meet
critical needs
and help families
build path
out of poverty."

- CFCA President Bob Hentzen


Direct Support Organizations such as
CFCA connect individual sponsors with children
in need, providing them and their families with resources such as food,
education, vocational training and micro-loans.
Third-Party Support A few organizations use the sponsorship
dollars they collect to support local groups or organizations that already
provide resources for people living in poverty, including schools,
churches, shelters and food-banks.'
In addition to financial support, some sponsorship organizations provide
a way to create a personal connection with sponsored children through
letters. These letters allow sponsors to witness the impact of their contri-
butions and provide a way to offer words of encouragement.


Narrowing the Field
* Research the organization's finances. A recent
study by Hope Consulting showed that 65 percent
of donors don't research an organization before
making a donation. Form 990 is an IRS document
available to the public that provides detailed
information on an organization's operational
activities, including what percentage of financial
contributions are used for program support.
* Review third-party ratings and comments.
Organizations like the American Institute of
.Philanthropy and Charity Navigator rate charities
to ensure they meet financial and accountability
standards. In addition, pay special attention to the
comments made by other sponsors regarding their
overall experience with the organization.
* Evaluate for impact. Program ratios don't tell the
whole story. Look for specific evidence of meaning-
ful impact. Go through each organization's website
and literature carefully. Look for testimonials and
program specifics provided by sponsored families,
donors, volunteers and staff.
* Ensure the organization's values and mission
align with yours. The values and mission of
sponsorship organizations can be very different '
and impact how the organizations operate as well
as the services they offer. Don'tjudge a sponsorship
organization by its name. Instead, focus on how the
organization carries out its mission.


Sponsorship assists with basic needs to help children
and their families break the cycle of poverty seen in
many developing countries.


Christian Foundation for Children and Aging is an international
sponsorship organization serving people of all faiths in 22 developing
countries. CFCA's Hope for a Family sponsorship program connects
individual sponsors with a child, youth or elderly person in need to
provide them with the basic resources and support needed to create
a path out of poverty. More than 94 percent of CFCA's expenses go
toward program support.
Visit www.hopeforafamily.org, or call (800) 875-6564 for more
information. Sponsorship provides people with a unique way to bond
with children in different parts of the world and see the
impact of their contributions.






74-year-old man walks 8,000 miles for kids


On any given day, dozens to hundreds ofmen, women and children make
their way to CFCA's Bob Hentzen to walk at his side and encourage him
in the same way that he does for them.


On Dec., 29, 2009, Bob Hentzen embarked on
Walk2gether, an 8,000-mile walk through 12
countries from Guatemala to Chile.
The trip, which spans about a year and a half, is
Hentzen's unique way of helping counteract the isolation
of people living in poverty, and showing them that
someone cares.
"By walking with people living in poverty, we are
saying, 'You are not alone,'" Hentzen said. "We~are
listening to you and learning from you."
Hentzen's day begins around 2:30 a.m., when he
wakes up in an old Toyota camper. He covers an average
of 20 to 25 miles daily as he makes his way through vast
terrains.
Despite the mental and physical demands required
to complete each day, Hentzen, 74, finds the time and
energy to visit with families CFCA serves many of.


whom make their way to Hentzen to support and
encourage him in the same way that he does for them.
Hentzen hopes that his efforts will inspire people in
the U.S. to sponsor at least one child for each of the
8,000 miles he is walking during Walk2gether.
As a CFCA sponsor, a tax-deductible contribution of
$30 per month provides a child and family with:
a Basic resources such as food, clothing and health care.
a Educational benefits such as school supplies, uniforms,
tuition and other school fees." *
a Recreational activities such as Christmas and birthday
celebrations.
m Literacy training and livelihood programs for parents.
To follow Hentzen's journey or help him reach his
goal, visit www.hopeforafamily.org/kids.









LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT 2 WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 16, 2011


Halibut Baked with Endive,
Leeks and Tarragon
Serves 6
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus more
for drizzling
6 cups thinly sliced leeks
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
6 California endives, halved lengthwise and cored
2 teaspoons chopped fresh tarragon
6 halibut fillets, 5 to 6 ounces each
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
Preheat oven to 425F. In ovenproof skillet or Dutch oven wide'
enough to hold the fish in one layer, -warm butter and olive oil over
moderate heat. Add leeks and season with salt and pepper. Stir well,
then cover, reduce to moderately low and cook, stirring occasionally,
until leeks have softened, 10 to 15 minutes. Do not let them brown.
Cut endive halves crosswise into 1/4-inch-wide pieces. Stir endive
and tarragon into skillet, season with more salt and pepper, cover and
continue cooking until endive has softened slightly, 3 to 4 minutes.
Season halibut fillets-on both sides with salt and pepper. Arrange
them on the bed of vegetables and transfer skillet to the oven,
uncovered. Bake until fish just flakes, 10 to 12 minutes.
Divide vegetables and fish among 6 dinner plates. Top fish with a
generous drizzle of olive oil and garnish with parsley. Serve hot.


Broiled Endive
with a Quick
Caesar Dressing
Serves 6
Dressing:
1/4 cup mayonnaise
(not low fat)
2 tablespoons extra virgin
olive oil
1 clove garlic, finely minced
1 anchovy fillet, finely minced
1 1/2 teaspoons red wine vinegar,
or to taste
Salt and freshly ground black pepp


Salad:
9
2
2
1


large California endives, halved len
tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
tablespoons freshly grated Parmesa
tablespoon minced parsley


Make the dressing: In a small bowl, whisk to
mayonnaise, olive oil, garlic, anchovy and wi
vinegar. Season with salt and pepper. Whisk i
water to make the dressing thin enough to dri
Preheat broiler and place an oven rack in tf
position. Cut a thin slice off the rounded side
endive half so it sits on a baking sheet v
rolling. Put endive halves on baking s
cut side up. Brush with half of olive
season with salt and pepper. Broil
nicely browned in spots, about 1


EAT HEALTHY...


EAT WELL



DISCOVER




ENDIVE


FAMILY FEATURES
Resolving to eat better doesn't have to condemn you to a diet of lettuce
and celery sticks. To make that healthy-eating resolution stick,
think about the pleasures you can add to your menus, not about the
temptations you need to avoid. Serving endive (pronounced "on-
deev") makes a meal seem like a special occasion, yet this prized
member o:f the chicory family contributes only one calorie per leaf. That's a smart
a. to: indulge.
You probably already know that endive leaves make elegant dippers a low-
calone and
fat-free alternative to chips. And maybe you have sliced some endive into a salad
toi dress it up
It pairs beautifully with nuts and cool-weather fruits such as apples, pears and
persimmons
Great cooked
Bit endi% e also shines in cooked dishes. Braised or baked, it's a favorite in
France, although French cooks tend to blanket it with cream or bechamel sauce.
It doesn't need such rich treatment. Use sauteed endive and leeks as a bed for
lean.baked fish. Broil halved endives with olive oil and drizzle with a homemade
Caesar-style dressing. Slow-braise whole endives with fragrant fresh thyme as
a potato replacement alongside roast chicken. With endive on the menu, eating
healthfully means eating well.
At the market
When shopping for endive, look for plump, pale, blemish-free heads. Red endive
tends to be smaller than the white variety, but the two taste the same, so you can
use them interchangeably or mix it up in recipes. At home, store endive
.in your refrigerator's vegetable crisper, wrapped in a damp paper towel inside a
plastic bag. It will last for 10 to 14 days, much longer than other lettuces.
For more useful tips and recipe videos, visit www.endive.com.


Turn endives over,
}er brush with remaining
oil and season with salt
igthwise and pepper. Broil on
rounded side until nicely -
in cheese browned and tender,
about 10 minutes longer.
gether Turn endives over again,
ine raise oven rack to about 6 .
in a little inches from heat, and broil
izzle. briefly to crisp
he lowest the edges.
'of each Transfer endives to a
without serving platter, cut side
sheet up. Drizzle with dressing,
eoil and then garnish with
until Parmesan and parsley. ; 7'
0 minutes. Serve hot.


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