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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01378
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: February 13, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01378
System ID: UF00028308:01378
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Who's Next?
Big names in the mix for new CHS coach. Sports, I B


Mubarak gon,




Lak


000014 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943





e City


TODAY'S



$ 11.200/
, Iii iit Reporter
Samdenfouranry13 2611


7A


Reporter


Sunday, February 13, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 20 M $ 1.00


County unveils new economic development plan


Board members will
be asked to facilitate
specific areas.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn
Columbia County's new eco-
nomic development department
board of directors will be asked
to embrace and implement a


detailed manage-
ment plan when
it meets for the
first time in
March.
Commission
Chairman Jody DuPree
DuPree unveiled
an overview of the plan and said
economic development has two
"facets" recruitment of new


industries to Columbia County
and facilitation of those compa-
ny's needs to relocate. Under
the recruitment segment, the
management plan will identify
"layers" essential to economic
development, such as utilities
infrastructure, workforce, roads,
land and mitigation, he said.
Once the management
plan's layers are discussed and
approved by the county commis-


sion, the econom-
ic development
board's appoint-
ed commission-
ers Stephen
Bailey and Rusty
DePratter will
assign individual Bailey
economic devel- .
opment board members 'to each
layer of the management plan
and they will be asked to work on


specific strategies, he said.
Board members will be
assigned to a layer based on their
experience and expertise in that
area, DuPree said.
"The whole secret to success
is engagement," DuPree said. "If
people sit on this board think-
ing they meet once a month and
they get to sit there and listen
PLAN continued on 3A


WHAT'S WRONG WITH



SEATBELTS?


Statistics prove they save
lives, yet people don't use
them with tragic results.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
Florida Highway
Patrol statistics
indicate there are
more than 500,000
people involved in
vehicle crashes each year,
ranging from minor fender-
benders to full-blown wrecks
with fatalities.
The reports also indicate
that roughly eight people are
killed and 600 injured daily in
Florida traffic crashes. There
have been five fatalities on
Columbia County roadways
in 2011, compared to three
fatalities for the same period
of time in 2010. FHP reports
also indicate that six out of 10
children killed in car crashes
are unrestrained.
Law enforcement authori-
ties believe that properly
utilizing seatbelts could
potentially reduce some of
the fatalities.
"Nobody can say seatbelts
will save your life 100 percent
of the time, however, what we
do know is that the percent-
ages show the number of
times the seatbelt will save
you from serious injuries
or death you're better to
wear your seatbelt," said Lt.
Pat Riordan, FHP Troop B
public affairs officer.
According to FHP sta-
tistics, using safety belts
(child restraints) reduce the
chances of motorists injury
or death by approximately 45


Photos by PATRICK SCOTT/Lake City Reporter
Top: A head-on collision resulted in one dead and one critically injured last Friday in Columbia
County. The driver in the car on the left was killed; he was not wearing his seatbelt.
Above: Two Lake City people died, including a 10-year-old boy, when this Ford Mustang, driven by a
14-year-old boy, went off the road and struck two trees on Jan. 16. No one in the vehicle was wearing
a seatbelt..


percent.
Riordan said there's been a
seatbelt law in Florida since
at least 1986, which requires
all motorists to be buckled-.
up.
In 2009 Florida laws gov-
erning seatbelt use tightened
when legislators passed
an amended version of the


state's seatbelt law giving
law enforcement officers the
authority to enforce the seat
belt law without witnessing
another primary offense
. -making non compliant
seatbelt violations a primary
offense.
"It means motorists can be
stopped simply for no other


violation other than not wear-
ing a seatbelt," Riordan said.
Through the years, law
enforcement has continued
its attempt to emphasize the
importance of wearing seat-
belts.
"We keep repeating the
SEATBELTS continued on 3A


Prominent black

leader featured

on Olustee stamp


Anna Julia Haywood
Cooper grew up
during CivilWar.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The Postal Stami
Cancellation committee
wanted a change for the 201
Olustee envelope.
'We've always seen the fla
or purple heart," said Adria


1 .. I -


d Cox McCabe, committee co-
chair. "As much as I respect
the flag and purple heart, it
was time for something dif-
ferent."
The committee .chose the
canceled stamp of Anna Julia
Haywood Cooper because of
ip her accomplishments, said
*e Brad Cox, committee chair.
11 Cooper was a child during
the Civil War and later became
1g
in STAMP continued on 3A


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
The stamp for the 2011 Olustee envelope will feature Anna Julia
Haywood Cooper, who was a child during the Civil War but would
rise to become a prominent black leader.


Founder's

Day program

a success for

NAACP
Remembering the history
of an organization that
battles for equal rights.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The importance of history, from the
founding of an organization to chronicling
its continued fightfor Civil Liberties and fair
and equal treatment for all citizens, were
the topics of discussion during an NAACP
Founder's Day .. ,
Observance
Pro gram a.
Saturday. .
The program, :.
celebrating the.
102nd birthday
of the NAACP,
was held at New
Day Springs
Missionary
Baptist Church,
with more than
100 people in TONY BRITTILake.City Reporter
attendance. Karla Rodriguez (from
The" program left) and Drayona.
focused on the Denson get pocket cal-
organization's endars from Columbia
national history, County NAACP Branch
but also featured secretary Glynnell
information about Presley.
the Columbia
County Branch of the organization.
The NAACP was founded by three
white Americans in 1909 as the result of
race riots in 1908, when several blacks
were killed and injured. The founders
NAACP continued on 3A


More than 40

girls attend

Altrusa Girls

Summit

Variety of subjects featured,
from leadership skills to
managing your finances.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.corn
Learning leadership, social and finan-
cial skills.isn't typically what teenage girls
focus on during their weekends away
from school.
However, members of Altrusa
International Inc. of Lake City had more
than 40 local students attend the 13th
Annual Altrusa Girls Summit Saturday at
the local school board office.
Nancy Holliday Fields and Donna
MacRae, co-chairs for the Girls Summit,
said the summit served as an event
for middle-school girls to learn about
SUMMIT continued on 3A


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Be-., -.eller, :n
',, a e i.- i ^ :iw # ." 'J .


COMING
TUESDAY
Pr-e.ie.. .:ft the Battle


CALL US: Opinion ................ 4A
(386) 752-1293 0 ife .................... ID
SUBSCRIBETO Sunny Stocks.................. 3C
THE REPORTER: UN Advice & Comics......... 3D
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 8A Puzzles................. 2B








LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011


,CAH3. PIay FOIDA

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
19-23-35-42 17 13-15-19-20-35 Afternoon: 9-6-4 Afternoon: 3-0-7-0 3-11-24-29-35-51 7-11-39-42-51 PB 30
Evening: 8-8-5 Evening: 5-3-4-7


AROUND FLORIDA



House Speaker reacts to Scott's budget proposal


ST PETERSBURG
F lorida House
Speaker
Dean Cannon
embraces Gov.
Rick Scott's
philosophy and work ethic,- .
but he's keeping some of
Scott's biggest proposals
at arm's length.
While calling the gov-
ernor "gracious" and
"smart" Friday during an
hour meeting with the St.
Petersburg Times editorial
board, Cannon described
Scott's budget as an
"unorthodox" plan that
he's "perplexed by."
"I think, again, a lot of
people including me, as -
you see the proposal and
you roll it out in Eustis, it Florida house speaker De
was a weird, no one knew Wednesday in Tallahasse(
quite what to make of it in
many respects," Cannon,
said. Other issues where.
"But I haven't had any Cannon has questions:
signal that he's trying to Scott originally said
pick a fight. I haven't had education would be spar
any signal that he's doing from cuts in his budget.
anything other than trying But his proposal cuts pe
to make good on what he pupil funding by $703 ai
said he was going to do on Cannon said the spend-
the campaign trail." ing plan needs scrutiny.
Cannon, R-Winter Park, "I think the notion of ju,
raised questions about not replacing the federal
the chances and frame- stimulus money is I third
work of prominent parts a bitter pill, I mean its t<
of the budget proposal by big a pill," he said.
Scott, a former health care Scott also has propose(
executive. For example, collapsing the Departm
Cannon reiterated that of Community Affairs th
tax cuts Scott seeks will state's growth manage-
be very difficult this year ment arm and combining
because of the state's tight it with the Department (
finances. Environmental Protecti(
While Cannon backs Cannon cautioned again
Scott's planned reorganiza- the restructuring, though
tion of, economic develQp-... be said development de
ment agencies, Canfion' sins need to be made
ruled little else out or in. ,w'swifter. "I think that it's


ASSOCIATED PRESS
an Cannon, R-Winter Park speaks at a news conference on
Se '


red

;r-
nd


st
al
ik


ed
ent
he

ig
of
)n.
tst
ch
ci-


more important that we
look at the regulations
"themselves than we
move agency deck chairs
around. I would rather '
focus at leaving agen-
cies intact" and rewriting
regulations, Cannon said.
'They approve 95 percent
of the things that come
to them, but they take 13
months to do it."
Cannon left open the
possibility of backing
President Barack Obama's
offer to let the state delay
paying back billions of dol-
lars borrowed for jobless
benefits. On Wednesday,
Scott balked atit, but..,
Cannon called it "intrigu-
ing."
Cannon downplayed any
hardening of his relation-
ship with Scott, saying
they hav' difftentle -


in government. Staff mem-
bers talk regularly, and
Cannon said he believes
iim Scott's "bbna fides."
But Scott's arrival as an
outsider in Tallahassee has
created questions about
how their relationship will
be going forward.

'Twilight' fan
charged with lying
'MARATHON --A
Florida Keys teen has,
admitted to police that bite,
marks on -her body came
from vampire role-playing
and hot an attack that she
had previously reported.
The'Monroe County
Sheriff's Office reported
that the 15-year-old girl
was charged Thursday
With making a false report


and was released to her
mother's custody.
Authorities said the girl
is a fan of the vampire-
based 'Twilight" movies
and books. After engaging
in fantasy biting with a 19-
year-old man in August,
she worried about her
mother seeing marks on
her neck, arms-and back.
'She called her mother and
said she had been attacked
while jogging.
When deputies couldn't
find evidence of the attack
and pushed for more
details, the girl eventually
revealed what really hap-
pened.
No charges have been
filed against the 19-year-
old man.

Mother leaves
baby in car
ST. PETERSBURG -
An officer used a stun gun
on a woman who resisted
arrest after leaving her 7-
month-old daughter in the
car while she went into a
tanning salon.
St. Petersburg Police
said 19-year-old Ashley
Agerenza was charged
Friday with child abuse,
resisting arrest and bat-
tery on a law enforcement
office. -:
:.'Police said Agerenza
first took the child inside
the salon, but was.told"she
could not leave the baby
in the salon While she '
tanned. She took the child
to the car, placed her min a
car seat and turned on the
engine.
AWitness called 911. A


responding officer said the
baby had almost pushed
herself out the car seat
and had spit up. The moth-
er told police the child's
father had been with her,
but witnesses didn't see
him.
Police say Agerenza
was stunned after she
hit an officer while being
arrested.

Girlfriend accused
of burning car
DELRAY BEACH A
Delray Beach woman is
accused of setting her
boyfriend's car on fire.
An arrest report said
25-year-old Tochara
Stephens was arrested
Wednesday on a charge
of second-degree arson
for setting the car on fire
at a car dealership where
her boyfriend worked
as a mechanic. She was
released from the Palm,
Beach County Jail the next
day on $10,000 bond.
Stephens declined to
comment Saturday when
reached by phone by The
Associated Press.
The arrest report said
firefighters put out flames
that engulfed the empty
car belonging to the boy-
friend. The fire spread to
two others cars and caused
nearly $8,000 in damage.
No one was injured.
The report also said an
officer found Stephens
near the dealership with
two red gas containers and
a ,baseball bat in her car.

* Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Whalum gets 4 Grammy nods


NEW ORLEANS
SAjazz saxophonist up for
four Grammys on Sunday
in three categories and
none of them in jazz?
Kirk Whalum doesn't
find that strange at all.
In fact, after nearly 30 years in the
business, Whalum says he's finally
getting a handle on who he is, and
that's reflected in his music, which
has been nominated in three catego-
ries pop, urban and gospel.
'The older you get, you end up
getting closer to who you are,"
Whalum said in a telephone inter-
view prior to Sunday's Grammys.
'And, in my case, I find that I'm
spreading out a little bit instead of
narrowing down."
Already nominated eight times
in his career, the Memphis, Tenn.,
native was nominated this year for
best pop instrumental album for
"Everything is Everything: The
Music of Donny Hathaway"; best
male R&B vocal performance for
"We're Still Friends," a collaboration
on the Hathaway recording with
Musiq Soulchild; best gospel per-
formance for "He's Been Just That
Good" featuring Lalah Hathaway;
and best gospel song for "It's What
I Do" with Jerry Peters, both on
Whalum's "The Gospel According to
Jazz: Chapter III."
"It's all pretty doggone cool,"
Whalum said when asked about his
peers' recognition of his work.

Liz Tqylor treated for
congestive heart failure
LOS ANGELES Elizabeth
Taylor has been hospitalized for
treatment of congestive heart failure.
The Oscar-winning actress was
at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Saturday, her spokeswoman Sally
Morrison said.
The 78-year-old Taylor first dis-
closed in November 2004 that she
suffered from congestive heart fail-
ure. The condition was compounded
with other ailments including spinal
fractures and the effects of scoliosis.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jazz saxophonist Kirk Whalum was nominated for several Grammys this year
including best pop instrumental, album for "Everything is Everything: The Music
of Donny Hathaway"; best male R&B vocal performance for "We're Still Friends,"
a collaboration on the Hathaway recording with Musiq Soulchild; best gospel
performance for "He's Been Just That Good" featuring Lalah Hathaway; and best
gospel song for "It's What I Do" with Jerry Peters, both on Whalum's "The Gospel
According to Jazz: Chapter III."


Morrison did not know how long
Taylor would be in the hospital.

Grammy weekend begins
with Streisand tribute
LOS ANGELES Stevie Wonder,
Tony Bennett and a trio of "Glee"
stars led Barbra Streisand on a musi-
cal journey through her nearly 50-
year career.
They joined Faith Hill, Barry
Manilow and Seal in launching


Grammy weekend by honoring the
Oscar-winning singer and actress
as MusiCares Person of the Year on
Friday night.
Streisand, who turns 69 in April,
was singled out for her musical
achievements and philanthropic work.
"I said yes because it's such a
wonderful organization that takes
care of their own the people who
actually create the music," she told
the audience.

* Associated Press


* Former test pilot Charles E.
"Chuck" Yeager is 88.
* Actress Kim Novak is 78.
* Actor George Segal is 77.
* Actress Carol Lynley is 69.
* Singer-musician Peter Tork
(The Monkees) is 69.
* Actress Stockard
Channing is 67.
* Talk show host Jerry


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
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Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate6df
Community Newspapers Inc., Is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Ass6ciated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction In whole or
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sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes
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Lake City, RFa. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Assistant Editor CJ Risak. .754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecltyreporter.com)


Springer is 67.
* Actor Bo Svenson is 67.
* Singer Peter Gabriel is 61.
* Actor David Naughton is
60.
* Rock musician Peter. Hook
is 55.
Actor Matt Salinger is 51.
Actor Neal McDonough
* is 45.


Reporter

CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reportercorrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture


"Love does not delight in evil
but rejoices with the truth. It
always protects, always trusts,
always hopes, always perse-
veres."

I Corinthians 13:6-7


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011


NAACP: Founder's
Continued From Page 1A

discussed the unrest and decided the orga-
nization needed to be bi-racial. The National
Association for the Advancement of Colored
People was founded on Feb. 12, 1909.
During Saturday's program, event orga-
nizers chronicled instances where the
NAACP fought for changes in legislation
seeking equal rights for blacks.
Glynnell Presley, Columbia County
Branch NAACP secretary, said the program
was a success in teaching people about the
organization's history.
'"We wanted to call attention to the found-
ing of the NAACP," he said. '"We have the
Founder's Day program to commemorate
that, plus use it as an opportunity to educate
our citizens. It's important to know your his-
tory because if you don't know your history,
you don't know where you're going."
Presley noted there was a large amount of
participation by area youths in the program,
which ranged from praise dances to singing,
step dancing and musical performances.
"The program was beautiful and it was
well attended by the youngsters," he said.
'Today the children really took the spot-
light. Those youngsters really put on a
show. I'm proud of them. They just really
made my heart feel glad."


SUMMIT: Learning process
Continued From Page LA


leadership, social development,
responsibility, financial respon-
sibility and how to give back to
the community.
Event organizers said 41 girls
from local schools, including two
girls from Suwannee County,
attended this year's summit.
'"The attendance is a little bit
lower than normal, we think
because it's Valentines Day
weekend and there's a lot of
activities this month in Lake
City," MacRae said, noting 51
girls registered for the event,
but some did not attend because
they were sick.
The theme for this year's
event was: "Health, Wealth and
Happiness".
"We were trying to focus on
that so the .girls could learn to
be all-around people," Fields
said.
During the summit the girls
took part in several arts and
crafts sessions and listened to
several guest speakers, who
talked about self esteem and
learning how to manage their
money.


The event's keynote address
was given by Lake City Police
Department Police Chief
Argatha Gilmore, with Audre
Washington, who handles com-
munity relations with the Lake
City Police Department, also
participating in the event's open-
ing ceremony.
"We did several things to get
the girls excited so they could
feel positive about themselves,"
MacRae said.
Fields said it's important to
hold a summit of this nature
because some of the girls don't
get a lot of exposure to those
topics in schools.
"The schools have such an
agenda that is so tightly packed
with things they have to learn
for the Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Tests, math and
reading, that the girls don't get
social development as much
as they used to," she said.
"Everybody that belongs to
Altrusa is a professional and I
think the girls get exposure to
certain people who they might
not otherwise."


PLAN: New economic development course
Continued From Page 1A


to somebody tell them a
lot of pretty stuff and then
they leave, they're on the
wrong board, cause that
ain't gonna be happening."
DuPree said once the
economic development
board members are pre-
sented with the. plan, he
thinks they'll want to be a
part of it.
County Manager Dale
Williams agreed.
"I think the people on
the old IDA (Industrial
Development Authority)
board individually and col-
lectively are very smart
people," Williams said. "I
think cream rises to the
top. And I think once they
realize that there's no ulte-
rior motive here the only
motive is to make Columbia
County and keep Columbia
County in the forefront of
economic developmienif
they'll buy in."
All commissioners and
some county staff mem-
bers will also be assigned
work tasks to assist with
the plan's layers, DuPree
said.
"Everybody's got to be
engaged or we won't suc-
ceed," DuPree said. "Once
you design the chart" and
identify all those areas, all
the strategies have got to
be worked out. Now when-
ever we go and facilitate,
we know exactly what's
available to us, we know
what it takes to make it
work, all we gotta do now is
go and recruit And now we
know what our strategies
are. It's a huge endeavor.
It's going to take a lot of
work."
The strategies of the plan
will remain constant, but
the plan itself can change,
DuPree said.
"The plan will evolve,"
he said. "Its a living docu-
ment"
Even with so many people
involved, the confidentiality
of potential industries locat-
ing to the county will be a
top priority, Williams said.
"We'll continue to main-
tain that to the highest


SEATBELTS:

From Page 1A
message because it's
an important message,"
Riordan said, noting there
is a new crop of drivers
hitting the roads each
year.
"We've got people 15
years-old who are getting
their learner's permit and
every year we've got new
drivers and they need to
hear the message," he said.
Riordan said the FHP
also uses its Seatbelt
Convincer, a device where
people can see what hap-
pens in a wreck where
the vehicle overturns and
passenger is not properly
restrained as a teaching tool
for proper seatbelt use.


level," he said. "Say some-
one is in the layer dealing
with utilities. They don't
need to know it's company
X. All they need to know
is, what is the flow require-
ment? What is the need?
So it's not a confidential-
ity issue as much as it is
a preparation issue. You've
got a toolbox. Depending
on what your needs are,
you look in the toolbox.
If they're locating at this
particular site, then you
already know what your
objective has to be in order
to make that particular
business work at that site."
Both Williams and
DuPree said the intent of
creating the new depart-
ment and its board is


improvement.
"The intent here is to be
better," Williams said. "It's
not to destroy. It's not to take
a step back by any means ....
I don't want anybody what-
soever to ever have the opin-
ion that the IDA has not
been successful because I
think they have. I think what
I've understood my board
to say is, we want to give
them more tools and more
resources to make them
even more successful. We're
talking about putting more
resources toward this."
Williams also said the for-
mer IDA's Rudder Team, an
advisory group, most likely
would be dissolved. "Do we
keep the Rudder Team? I
don't see the need, but it


will be open for discussion,"
Williams said.
DuPree said there must
be cooperation for the plan
to flourish.
"For me to sit here and
say I've got all the answers,
I absolutely do not," DuPree
said. "There's people smart-
er than me. All I know is
that I have the responsibil-
ity as a commissioner to do
everything in my power to
make sure that jobs are cre-
ated in Columbia County. All
I can do is say 'OK, I have
some ideas about it,' but let
me pull people together and
let's expound on everyone's
experiences to try to devel-
op the best plan we can.
And that's been the goal, to
achieve that"


....................... 8th A n n u a l

NORTH OM



&PATIO SHOW


LAKE CITY


2


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Columbia County Fairgrounds

Saturday, March 5th
4 9 a.m. 5 p.m.

Sunday, March 6th
10 a.m. 4 p.m.


Co-Sponsored by:


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magazine


NEWSOTALK W i'e94F.

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UNSTATE
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STAMP: Prominent leader
Continued From Page 1A


a prominent black leader
in Washington D.C. and an
activist for equality.
"When we saw Ms.
Cooper's stamp, we just
said, 'This is perfect,'" Cox
McCabe said. 'What better
representation of the time
for people than someone
that lived through it?"
She was one of the first
black women to get a Ph.
D. and wrote a book about
her life in 1892 entitled, "A
Voice from the South: By a
woman from the South."
Cooper is also famous for
the slogan that appears on
U.S. passports: "The cause
of freedom is not the cause
of a race or a sect, a party
or a class it is the cause
of human kind, the very
birthright of humanity."
She lived to be a 105.
'"That was a long life of
getting stuff done," Cox
McCabe said.
As a black female, Cooper


was able to overcome
obstacles to reach signifi-
cant accomplishments, Cox
said.
"She's a piece of history,"
he said.
The 2011 Olustee enve-
lopes will feature the stamp,
along with a miniature ver-
sion of the annual festival
poster by local artist Duffy
Soto. Only 100 of the enve-
lopes will be sold
Stamps will be available
while supplies last dur-
ing the festival, starting
at 9 a.m. Feb. 19 at the
Columbia County Tourist
Development Booth.
Envelopes are $2 apiece
or three for $5. Each will be
signed, dated and numbered.
"It's a one time oppor-
tunity to have her stamp
along with the envelope,"
Cox McCabe said. "It's a
piece of history, an impor-
tant piece of history."


Pastor H. Rios, M.D.

Gynecology

Office Gynecology only

449 SE Baya Dr. Phone 755-0500
Go Gators!




REVIVAL!"
Carroll Robertson will be at Shiloh
Baptist Church for a mini revival,
February 15th and 16th, Tuesday .
and Wednesday evening
at 7:00 P.M.
Brother Carroll is recognized for his singing, but Carroll's
real passion is the Bible. We would like to invite our corn-
munity to come hear Brother Carroll sing and preach
God's word.
Shiloh Baptist Church
173 SW Shiloh St.
Ft, White......
For more information contact Brother Earl at 386-454-4978.





DAWOMEN S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN S TOUHMD
WOMEN S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN 5 TOUCH


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* Non-Invasive Laparoscopic
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New Patients Welcome
Call today for a
personal appointment:
386-755-0500
449 SE iea,a Dr.,e
laoke CI FloIda 32025
e www.dainagrenenmd.com


The family of




- f .


jjj1.


We would d like to express our appreciation
and our heart felt thanks to everyone. The cards,
flowers, food, most of all the love we felt from
family, friends, neighbors and our church family.
Our little Cheyenne touched so many in her short
life of 3 years, 3 months. She loved to sing "Jesus
Loves Me". She lo'ed her church family. She
loved her big brother Taylor.
Again we thank everyone.
The Family
Don & Emma Hart
Sheree & Jennifer Morgan
Floyd Morgan, III
Tina Hart / Teresa Beaver
Rusty & Pam Hart
Papa Doyle
Archie & Jessica Brown


d


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


, ,-, i,, -er. .I,..












OPINION


Sunday, February 13, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Think before

acting with

unknown

devices
C all it a quirk of
human nature -
when our common
sense tells us one
thing, and our insa-
tiable curiosity tells us just the
opposite. Often we give in to
curiosity, our desire to explore
the unknown.
But knowing when not to
surrender to that urge is imper-
ative.
Last month, a woman from
White Springs found a popcorn
tin in, a shed with nearly 20
pounds of what was called rail-
road torpedoes, or detonators
used by the railroad industry.
She packed them up and deliv-
ered them to the Lake City Fire
Department.
Last week, a Lake City man
spotted something on the side
of the road that looked inter-
esting. He stopped, scooped it,
up, threw it in his car and took
it home. He showed it to his
11-year-old son and planned to
keep it, but his wife suggested
he get it checked out first, just
to make sure it was safe.
So he took it to the Lake City
Police Department An exami-
nation revealed it was indeed
dangerous a 1960s-era
rocket warhead packed with
2.3 pounds of TNT and Semtex.
And it was live.
In both cases, a bomb squad
had to be summoned. And in
each case, nothing bad hap-
pened. In fact, the residents
involved could be commended
for eliminating perilous devices.
And yet, while they may have
had the best of intentions, the .
execution of their plans could
have been devastating.
Handling anything that looks
potentially explosive is. wrong.
The simple instruction from
trained professionals who deal
with these devices: Don't touch
them. Don't move them. A
bump, a change in elevation, an
alteration of their balance could
cause a detonation. Call the
police, the sheriff, or the fire
department
Curiosity can be wonderful.
It has defined mankind, prod-
ding him through the ages to
find answers to the mysteries
that surround him. But curios-
ity can be lethal, too.
Know when to say no.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Love means skating on thin ice


V valentine's Day is on
Monday and today's
column is meant as
a timely reminder
to those who may
forget. In many cases, those for-
getful ones will be the nation's
absent-minded husbands and
hapless boyfriends.
In matters of romance,
women never seem to forget.
They are like elephants and,
no, you don't look fat in that
dress. Unfortunately, they have
selective memory. They have
no brain space for the many
kindnesses men perform but
they can cite the actual day and
hour when a well-meaning man
grabbed the last wilted carna-
tion in the convenience store.
Those foolish fellows
who think they can blow off
Valentine's Day as a Hallmark
holiday-are courting roman-
tic doom. For as it has been
famously observed, hell hath
no fury like a woman scorned
by the absence of candy and
flowers on certain occasions.
Friends, Feb. 14 is one of those
occasions.
-1But are we mice or men? Are
we to be driven to chocolatiers
and florists, even jewelry stores,
by implied threats of female ret-
ribution? Well, squeak, squeak.
It seems to me, however,
that a more manly reason for
Valentine's Day needs to be
advanced, so that men can


LETTERS


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com
go happily about the task of
observing Feb. 14 in ways pleas-
ing to women. This is where I
may be of some assistance.
To understand the romance
in life, you must first understand
life. Men, you will like my anal-
ogy for life because it involves
skating, and so conjures up win-
try visions of frozen ponds and
sporting lads hitting each other
with hockey sticks and some-
times remembering to shoot the
puck. -
Life is not like a box of choco-
lates, as Forrest Gump said,
although it is certainly tempt-
ing to think so on Valentine's
Day. The problem is that life is
dangerous why, people don't
-gett of it alive. But choco-
lates are only dangerous to the
extent that they are fattening. It
is no small thing to be fat, but in
America at least you don't look
out of place. (And rest easy,
you still don't look fat in that
dress.) No, life is like skating
on a frozen pond. Oh, and the
ice is always cracking as you


skate along. It isn't really like a
hockey game I just said that
to get you fellahs interested
-it's more like a race.
As you skate over the ice, it
immediately cracks and breaks
into fragments and melts behind
you into the past like so many
memories. To your left and
right, to your front and rear,
other skaters are continually
falling through the ice to dis-
appear into the depths of the
pond.
It is terrifying to contem-
plate skating on the thin silver
surface of life, always just one
movement ahead of disaster, but
don't dare stop to think about it.
Just keep skating fast.
You may wonder what this
chilly analogy has to do with
Valentine's Day. Is there a florist
or candy store located at the
end of the pond? Not in this
analogy. There is only the cer-
tain knowledge that skating with
a partner is more fun and takes
your mind off the fact that life's
progress is mighty "slippy,"
as they say here in Pittsburgh
- just ask the Steelers.
So on Valentine's Day think of
that candy, those flowers, those
festive underpants with the little
hearts on them, as little life
jackets thrown from one caring
skater to another as insurance
against the ever-cracking ice.
0 Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


TO THE EDITOR


There are too many reckless drivers


lr he high speed and
I reckless driving in
Lake City has to
come to a halt. Too
many of us have
looked into our rearview mir-
rors to see a car barreling down
on us when we are doing the
speed limit. Then the driver
flashes his lights as though they
want you to get off the road or
break the law like they are.
Just such an incident hap-
pened to me today and nearly
scared me to death. I checked
my mirror and there was a
small red car coming so fast
I knew the driver was going
to smash into the rear of my
Buick. I looked out the wind-
shield and realized that the car
in the oncoming lane was too
close for the driver to pass me
and make it back into the lane.
But the car kept coming at
that high rate of speed only to
whip out into the oncoming
lane (over a double-yellbw line),
then force the oncoming driver
to hit the brakes and me to hit
the brakes so -that the young
woman driving could get back
into the proper lane without
causing a three-car pile up.
When something like this
happens do we have recourse?
Is it legal for law-abiding
drivers to take down the tag
number and turn the offender
in to the Sheriff's Department
or Lake City Police? Would any-
thing be done about the offense
or the offender?
This is not just wrong and
illegal driving, it's highly dan-


gerous for so many innocent,
law-abiding people.
I'm praying something will be
done to stop these life-threaten-
ing drivers.
Usina M. Markham-Noton
Lake City

Insight behind
state employee
compensation
It appears there are some
misconceptions regarding
the pay and benefits received
by employees of the State of
Florida.
This is not New York or
Chicago where you have strong
unions and high retirement
compensation. A person going
,to work on a survey crew with
the State Road Department
(now DOT) in 1963 was paid
less than the minimum wage of
$1.15 per hour. His day did not
begin when he arrived at the
SRD office, but when he arrived
at the job site at 8 a.m., no mat-
ter how far away that site was.
He worked until 5 p.m., or as
late as necessary that day, then
started the long ride home. He
was not paid for the 2-5 hours
he was traveling in a State vehi-
cle (there were no interstates to
get you there quickly), nor the
extra hours he worked, includ-
ing half-day on Saturday. He
was paid a flat monthly salary
of $232.
Eventually pay went up, but
there were many lean years dur-


ing which there were no raises.
It was during those times that
the state started paying the
employees retirement in lieu of
a raise. As of June 30, 2010, the
average annual pension payout
for someone in the "Regular
Class" was $15,567.00.
Retirees also pay their own
insurance, though there is a
small stipend to help with that.
A "Regular Class" retiree on
Medicare, with a spouse that
is not, paid $9547.12, last year
for insurance with the State
(going up another $960 this
year). That retiree on Medicare
would also have paid $1,158
for Medicare coverage. So you
see, that would not leave a lot of
money left over from that pen-
sion.
The problem with the pen-
sion system is not the average
state employee. The "Senior
Management Service Class", is
terribly bloated, and not only
gets extra benefits in pay and
leave while working, but is also
granted a larger pension basis
than the "Regular Class". The
average annual pension for this
class was $41,975, as of June 30,
2010.
In closing, I ask that our
legislators please don't try to
balance the budget on the backs
of retirees or the "average" state
employee as has happened in
the past. Their pension plan
needs to be sacred and not be
touched, nor done away with to
try to balance the budget.
Judith Lee
Lake City


Bonnie Erbe
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com


Working

women:

The debate

continues

Anew report has
reenergized the
debate over why
there continue to
be fewer women
than men in science, technol-
ogy, engineering and math, or
so-called STEM jobs.
The typical answer to that
question is derived by assum-
ing that these professions are
so male-laden, it is virtually
impossible for women to break
through to top jobs and so
they leave. But a new National
Academy of Sciences report
by Professors Stephen Ceci
and Wendy Williams of Cornell
University states otherwise.
Ceci and Williams culled 20
years of data on women and
STEM jobs. They concluded
the following, according to
USA Today:
"Instead of outright male
chauvinism, 'free or constrained'
choices largely related to raising
a family, now put the big breaks
on a woman's science careers,"
the authors said. "Thus, the
ongoing focus on sex discrimi-
nation in reviewing, interview-
ing, and hiring represents costly,
misplaced effort. Society is
engaged in the present in solv-
- ing problems of the past, rather
than in addressing meaningful
limitations deterring women's
participation in science, technol-
dgy, engineering, and mathemat-
ics careers today."
Concluding that women
voluntarily take themselves
out of the running so they can
raise children is not in and of
itself a new position (conserva-
tives have been hawking it for
decades.) That said, there is
something new and interesting
in this report It is that society
is wasting time and resources
studying discrimination that the
authors believe no longer exists.
Perhaps that is so. And
while I find merit in some
of the report's claims, I also
believe that women who
choose not to have children so
they may compete and work
every bit as hard as men in
STEM jobs would tell you an
entirely different story.
First, no answer to this ques-
tion is cut and dried. There
are diaphanous fragments of
answers that flow through
and contradict each other. For
example, while many women
do take time off from work to
raise families, or quit entirely
for their kids, not all do.
Conversely, not all men want
to become corporate execu-
tives or high-level scientists
or highly paid for that matter.
So I wonder when research-
ers compare men overall to
women overall, whether they
are targeting the wrong demo-
graphic. Shouldn't they be
comparing ambitious, career
driven men to ambitious,
career-driven women to collect
accurate data?
There are certainly at this
point more women than men
who want to be fulltime home-
makers. But one-sided decla-
rations that lack of women's
advancement in STEM jobs is
due solely to this or that factor
seem outdated.
Why do Rodney King's infa-
mous words, "Can't we just all
get along," keep echoing inside
my head? Both sides make
fabulous points in the STEM
debate, and the answer is prob-
ably a gorgeous melange of
the two with a sprinkling of
other factors to boot.
* Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps
Howard News Service.


4A







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011


World-acclaimed pianist

to play at Friends of Music


From staff reports

The next to last per-
formance of the season
in the 2010-2011 Friends
of Music Annual Concert
Series, hosted by the First
Presbyterian Church, will
feature GrigoriosZamparas,
a world-acclaimed pianist.
Zamparas, who has had a
versatile performing career
sa a recitalist, orchestra
soloist and chamber musi-
cian in Greece, Bulgaria,
Yugoslavia, Russia,
throughout Latin America
and the United States, will
perform at 7:30 p.m. Friday
in the church sanctuary.
The concert is free and
open to the public, with a
reception following.
An assistant professor of
music at the University of
Tampa, Zamparas has per-
formed atthe NewportMusic
Festival, the Artist Series of


COURTESY PHOTO
Grigorios Zaparas will perform at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the First
Presbyterian Church.


Sarasota, the Salon of the
Arts (Sofia, Bulgaria) and
the Mainly Mozart Festival.
In 2009, he performed with
the Swiss Wind Quintet in
the opening concert of of
their first American Tour in
15 years.
He has been featured


as a soloist in more than
20 piano concert with
orchestras in the U.S. and
Europe.
The Friends of Music
Series will conclude with
the Grasse String Quartet
7:30 p.m. March 28 at the
First Presbyterian Church.


CHS student chosen for DC trip


From staff reports

TALLAHASSEE Chelsey Hendry, a
junior at Columbia High School, is one "of
the four high school juniors selected to
go to Washington, D.C. in June as 'a win-
ner of Clay Electric's 2011 Youth Tour to
Washington contest
"We're pleased to be able to offer
these students the opportunity to visit
Washington, D! C.," said Henry Barrow,
the cooperative's director of Member &
Public Relations. "Helping these students
learn about the government and how it
impacts their lives is important to develop-
ing good citizenship. Clay Electric's Youth
Tour program allows us to give something
back to the communities we serve. These
students have a great future and we're


very proud of them."
The winners were selected based on
their combined scores from a speech and
written quiz. A group of 21 students, select-
ed by their respective high schools to par-
ticipate in the Youth Tour program, visited
Tallahassee Feb. 8-10 to participate in the
selection process, tour state government
buildings and learn how the government
operates. The Youth Tour to Washington
event lasts a week.
The other three winners' are: Lily
Greenstein ofWilliston High School, Natalie
Jones of P K Yonge (Gainesville) and Anna
Shao of Orange Park High School. The
alternates are Hannah Emerson of Santa
Fe 'High School (Alachua) and William
Stokes of St. Johns Country Day School
(Orange Park).


Chamber to honor both local

businesses and Citizen of the Year


From staff reports

The strength and accomplishments of
the local business community will be rec-
ognized during an expanded Lake City-
Columbia County Chamber of Commerce
Business of the Year honors luncheon on
March 30.
The Lake City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce will expand the
traditional award to honor two Chamber
member businesses in their respective
size categories fewer than 10 employ-
ees and more than 10 employees.
This year, a third award
- Citizen of the Year -
will be revived to honor
an individual who is a
Chamber member with
a distinguished record
of business leadership 'A
and a history of civic and
volunteer, service in the Folsom
community.
The Chamber's Business Enhancement
Committee, with approval from the
Chamber of Commerce's board of direc-
tors, proposed the business awards expan-
sion and presentation as the focal point
of the Chamber's first quarter Better
Business Series luncheon.
'Traditionally, we've presented an
award during the annual business meet-
ing, but this year, we expanded the num-
ber of awards and decided to give the
winners a show all of their own," said
Steve Smith, chairman of the Chamber's
Business Enhancement Committee. "It's
a major accomplishment for a business
to win a Chamber award. We want the
spotlight on the winners to give them all
the attention they deserve."
This year's Business of the Year awards
will expound on the Chamber's former


Small Business of the Year award and
bring back the Citizen of the Year award,
a traditional honor in Lake City's history.
"After consideration, we realized many
businesses who were worthy of recogni-
tion were being omitted because they
did not meet the qualifications of a small
business under our old criteria," said
Dennille Folsom, Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce Executive
Director. "We wanted to give all Chamber
member businesses in Columbia County,
as well as those individuals who do so
much in our community a chance to
receive the recognition they deserve."
The Chamber's Business Enhancement
Committee currently is accepting nomi-
nations for the three awards. Guidelines
for nominations are the following:
Chamber Business of the Year
Award: Category 1: 10 employees or
fewer; Category 2: More than, 10 employ-
ees.
Criteria: Must be a Chamb'er Member;
In Business atleastthreeyears; Supportive
and involved in the Community
Chamber Citizen of the Year Award:
Criteria: Must be a Chamber Member;
Must have a distinguished record of busi-
ness leadership; Must have a history of
civic and volunteer service.
Nominations should be compiled in
written form and detail how the business
meets the criteria, then offer a detailed
explanation as to why the business is an
exceptional candidate for the award.
Nominations should be delivered to the
Chamber office, 162 S. Marion Ave., Lake
City, FL 32055, by 5 p.m. Wednesday.
For more information, contact Dennille
Folsom, executive director, at (386) '752-
3690 or dennille@lakecitychamber.com.


MATTRESS


CLEARANCE


CENTER
FA A B A


Arrest Log
The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement 'agencies.'
The following people have
been arrested but not con-
victed. All people are inno-
cent unless proven guilty.

Friday, Jan. 21
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
William Edward
Dudley, 31, 139 NE Rastus
Court, warrant: Violation of
domestic violence injunc-
tion.
Michael Anthony
Marino, 58, 509 Palamoi
Drive, Pensacola, war-
rant: Violation of proba-
tion on original charges of
grand theft, forgery (three
counts) and uttering a forg-
ery (two counts).
Bobbie Jean Green, 41,
418 SE Jefferson Glen, High
Springs, fraudulent use of
personal identity informa-
tion, forgery, uttering a
forgery and petit theft.
SDouglasJohn Swanson,
52, 1917 E. Duval St., war-
rant: Selling/transporting/
delivering a motor vehicle
without obtaining proper
certificate (eleven counts).

Lake City
Police Department
Joseph Lee Van Ocker,
no age given, 194 SW Wall
Terrace, burglary.

Saturday, Jan. 22
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Albert Richard Allen
Jr., 27, 690 SW Gull Road,
possession of controlled
substance, possession of
prescription medications
without prescription, war-
rant: Violation of proba-
tion on original charge of
possession of a controlled
substance, alter/deface/
removal of prescription
from container and posses-
sion of drug parapherna-
lia.
Timothy Matthew
Parker, 26, 222 SW Cardnel
Place, possession of ammu-
nition by a convicted felon.
James Lawrence
Lorton Jr., 21, 144 SW
Reginald Place, aggravat-
ed assault with a deadly
weapon.
Joshua Allen Hauss,
19, 143 NE Howard Street,


burglary and criminal mis- warrants: Violation of pro-
chief. bation on original charge of


Lake City
Police Departmeht '
Nadene Janigan, no age
given, 338 NE Menlo Glen,
aggravated assault (domes-
tic violence), warrant:
Trespassing and disorderly
conduct and simple battery
(domestic violence).

Sunday, Jan. 23
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Miranda Nicole Hall,
24,723 SW Sebastian Circle,
warrant: Violation of proba-
tion on original charges of
grand theft and resisting an
officer without violence.
Jerry Edward Osteen,
18, 1449 SE October Road,
warrants: Burglary of a
dwelling and grand theft.

Monday, Jan 24
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Shawn M. Harmon, 23,
2830 SW Windsong Court,


dealing in stolen property,
'"violatiofl of probation on
original charge of posses-,,
sion of less than 20 grams
of marijuana and violation
of probation on original
charge of possession of
drug paraphernalia.
Larry W. Knight, 45,
162 SW Jupiter Lane, war-
rant: Violation of probation
on original charge of bur-
glary of a structure.
Jason Patrick Morgan,
32, 1365 SW Spruce St.,
Fort White, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charges of uttering
a forgery and third-degree
grand theft.

Lake City
Police Department
Lucas C. Richardson,
no age given, 677 NW
Redding Andrew Gonzalez
1/27/11 Report says (LKA)
in place of street identifica-
tion., burglary of a church.


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POLICE REPORTS


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


CallforDetail

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
HSCT production
The High Springs
Community Theater
presents "Sherlock's Last
Case," a play by Charles
Marowitz at 2 p.m. Sunday.
The theater is located
in High Springs at 130
NE First Ave. The play
centers on a death threat
against Sherlock Holmes
by the supposed son of his
late nemesis, Professor
Moriarty. Tickets are
available at The Framery
in Lake City on Baya, 386-
7 4-2780, at The Coffee
Clutch in High Springs,
386-454-7593, online at
highspringscommunitythe-
ater.com or at the door..
Prices are $11 adults, $8
youth 12 and younger; and
Seniors Sunday only $9.

Community Concert
Community Concerts
of Lake City present John
Davidson in person at 2:30
p.m. on Sunday. Davidson
is a star of TV, theatre
and film, and performs
vocal and banjo favorites.
Guaranteed early seating
is available for members
at 1:50 p.m. All others can
purchase tickets at the
door at $18 per adult and
$5 per student, with seat-
ing beginning at 2 p.m.
For more information go
to www.communityconcerts.
info, or call 386-466-8999.

Monday
Jes Gala
Black History 2011
Singles Valentines Day
Gala is 6 10 p.m. Monday.
The event is sponsored by
It's About My Efforts. The
month-long theme is "Self
Sufficiency is Key." Visit


www. itsaboutmyefforts., org
or call 386-697-6075 for
details.

Tuesday
NARFE Meeting
The monthly meeting
of the National Active and
Retired Federal Employees
takes place at 1 p.m. on
Tuesday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center on
East Baya Avenue. The
Columbia County Fire
Department will be giving
fire safety tips and teach-
ing how to use a fire extin-
guisher. For more informa-
tion, contact Jim Purvis at
386-752-8570.

Thursday
Camera Club meeting
The Branford Camera
Club is meeting at 7 p.m.
Thursday at the Branford
Public Library. Humberto
Castellanos is speaking
about "Picasa," an easy-to-
use, free software program
from Google that helps
you organize, edit, and
share photos. Homework
this month is "Scene on
the Street" Choose your
favorite two or three pic-
tures to share with the
group, either digitally or
as a printed photo. Bring
other recent photos to
share with the group.
Contact Carolyn Hogue,
program chairwoman, 386-
935-2044.

Vegetable Gardening
The monthly "Garden
Talk" at the new Fort
White Library is at 5:45
p.m. Thursday. Learn
about preparing soil and
choosing varieties for
North Florida. Find out


how to use fertilizer and
pesticides while protect-
ing the environment
Bring questions and enjoy
spending time with other
gardeners.This is a free
workshop and open to
everyone. Call 752-5384 for
information.

Friday
Teen summit
Black History 2011
Teen Summit is 3 12 a.m.
Friday at Florida Gateway
College. The event is spon-
sored by Ifs About My
Efforts. The month-long
theme is "Self Shfficiency
is Key." Visit www.itsabout-
myefforts.org or call 386-
697,6075 for details.

Community Outreach
Event
Food Distribution &
SNAP applications will be
collected for Columbia,
Hamilton, Lafayette,
Suwannee & Union coun-
ties 8 -11 a.m. Friday
at Catholic Charities.
Catholic Charities and
DCF case managers and
supervisors will be on site
to assist with the comple-
tion of applications for
SNAP (Food Stamps),,
Medicaid and TANE
Guidelines have changed
and all should apply to
receive additional support
The office is located at 258
NW Burk Ave. For more
information call 386-754-
9180.

Dance Social
Love goes on even
after Valentine's Day. The
order of the Eastern Star's
Gold Standard Chapter 48
presents a social/dance
event from 7 p.m. 2 a.m.


Friday. The event will take
place next to the Huddle
House restaurant off of
exit 414 from Interstate
75. Refreshments will be
served all night, and tick-
ets will be sold in advance
for $10, and at the door for
$15. For tickets or other
information contact Marva
Udell at 386-984-2303.

Saturday
Spring Vegetable
Gardening Workshop
Master Gardener.
Library Education Series
is 2 p.m. Saturday at
Columbia County Public
Library in downtown Lake
City. Learn about fertil-
izing and irrigation, what
varieties to plant, how to
combat weeds and insects,
and how to garden without
harming the environment.
Bring all of your vegetable
gardening questions and
enjoy spending time with
other-gardeners who share
your interests. Free and
open to everyone.

Basketball tournament
Black History 2011 3-on-
3 basketball tournament
is 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Saturday
at Annie Mattox Park. It


will be followed by a 70s
party from 4 8 p.m. The
events are sponsored by
It's About My Efforts. The
month-long theme is "Self
Sufficiency is Key." Visit
www. itsaboutmyefforts. org
or call 386-697-6075 for
details.

Zumbathon Charity
Event
All are invited to
join the Party Hearty
Zumbathon charity event
from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. Saturday at the
Lake City Fairgrounds
Banquet Facilities located
at 438 SW County Road
247. The event will ben-
efit the American Heart
Association's "Go Red
for your Heart" program.
There is a $10 entrance
fee, which includes the
price of the Zumba class.
Raffle ticket sales begin at
9:30 a.m. and the Zumba
class will begin at 10 a.m.
Don't forget to wear red.
For more information con-
tact Sarah Sandlin at 386-
758-0009.

Founder's Day
Celebration
First Baptist Church
of Lake City hosts


its Founder's Day
Celebration from 2 p.m.
- 4 p.m. Saturday. The cel-
ebration will begin with
an Open House in the
Fellowship Hall. There
will be a morning service
at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, with
the congregation asked to
wear their best old-fash-
ioned clothes.

Tuesday, Feb. 22
Dixie Dancers
New classes for Dixie .
Dancers will begin at 6:45
p.m. February 22 at Teen
Town, across from Youngs
Park. Call 752-1469 or 754-.
1478. This a great way to
meet new people and have
fun.

MADDfest meeting
MADDfest meeting
is 6 p.m. Feb. 22 at the
Columbia County Public
Library. The two-day
event is March 25 26.
MADDFEST Spring Arts
Festival is at Olustee Park.
All arts-and-crafts booths,
- food vendors will surround
the park facing the main
stage gazebo. Contact
Tony@MADDFEST.com or
386-965-9256.


Ronsonet Buick GMC is proud to
announce the addition of Jeff Mosley
as a Sales Representative. Jeff invites all
his friends to stop in for a visit.



...3 Blocks East Of Downtown Lake City


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427








LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD & NATION SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011


Protesters press for voice in Egypt


By BEN HUBBARD and
HADEEL AL-SHALCHI
Associated Press

CAIRO On Egypt's
first day in nearly 30 years
without Hosni Mubarak as
president, its new military
rulers promised Saturday
to abide by the peace treaty
with Israel and eventually
hand power to an elected
government. Protesters,
still partying over their vic-
tory in pushing Mubarak
out, now pressed for a voice
in guiding their country's
move to democracy.
The protesters' first act
was deeply symbolic of their
ambition to build a new Egypt
and their determination to
do it themselves: Thousands
began cleaning up Cairo's
central Tahrir Square, the
epicenter of their movement
The sprawling plaza was bat-
tered and trashed by 18 days
of street battles and rallies
by hundreds of thousands.
Even as thousands
flowed in to celebrate,
broom brigades fanned
out, with smiling young
men and women some in
stylish clothes and earrings
sweeping up rubble and
garbage. Others repaired
sidewalks torn apart for
concrete chunks to use
as ammunition in fighting
with pro-regime gangs.
Young veiled girls painted
the metal railings of fences
along the sidewalk. "Sorry
for the inconvenience, but
we're building Egypt," read
placards many wore.
"We are cleaning the
square now because
Jit is ours," said Omar
7Mohammed, a 20-year-old
.student. "After living here
-for three weeks, it has
.become our home ... We're
,going to leave it better than
before."
- A coalition of youth
.groups that organized the
protests issued their first
cohesive list of demands
for handling the transi-
tion to democracy. Their
focus was on ensuring they
- not just the military or
members of Mubarak's
regime have a seat at
the table in deliberations
shaping the future.
Among their demands:
lifting of emergency law;
creation of a presidential
council, made up of a mili-
tary representative and
two "trusted personalities";
the dissolving of the rul-
ing party-dominated parlia-
ment; and the forming of
a broad-based unity gov-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
An Egyptian voulnteer paints the colors of the national flag on
the face of a boy at Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday.


ernment and a committee
to either amend or rewrite
completely the constitu-
tion.
"The revolution is not
over. This is just a begin-
ning. We are working on
how to move into a second
republic," said Shady el-
Ghazali Harb, the represen-
tative on the coalition from
one of the youth organiz-
ing groups, the Democratic
Front.
Protesters were debat-
ing whether to lift their
24-hour-a-day demonstra-
tion camp in Tahrir. The
coalition called for it to end
and be replaced by weekly
mass demonstrations every
Friday to keep pressure on.
But many in the square
argued to remain. One man
on a megaphone encour-
aged everyone to stay until


all their demands were met,
while others chanted "the
people want the square to
be cleared," referring to
public grumbling that the
protest camp is disrupting
life downtown.
Many in the square were
pouring love on the mili-
tary: Families put babies
on the laps of soldiers on
tanks for photos, crowds
cheered when a line of sol-
diers jogging by. But there
was also realism that the
military's ultimate inten-
tion is unclear.
"We don't know what
they'll do, they might keep
hanging on to power," said
Muhammed Ali, a 22-year-
old archaeology student
who argued for the protests
to continue.
With Mubarak gone,
Egypt's future will likely


be shaped by three pow-
ers: the military, the pro-
testers, and the sprawling
autocratic infrastructure
of Mubarak's regime that
remains in place, dominat-
ing the bureaucracy, the
police, state media and
parts of the economy. Right
now, the protesters' inten-
tions are the clearest of the
bunch.
The Armed Forces
Supreme Council is now
the official ruler after
Mubarak handed it power
on Friday, consisting of the
commanders of each mili-
tary branch, the chief of
staff and Defense Minister
Hussein Tantawy. It has
not explicitly, canceled the
constitution drawn up by
Mubarak's regime, but
the constitution seems to
have effectively been put
in a cupboard for the time
being until it is decided
what to do with it.
The military seized
power after pleas from pro-
testers, and it has repeat-
edly promised to ensure
democratic change, mak-
ing it highly popular with
the movement.
But on the face of it, the
elderly generals are no
reformers, and their move
to push out Mubarak may
have been more to ensure
the survival of a ruling sys-
tem the military has been
intertwined with since a
1952 army coup.


Obama wields

scalpel to budget,

avoiding pain


ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON
- President Barack
Obama's budget submis-
sion on Monday will take
a surgical approach to a
deficit problem that his
Republican rivals say war-
rants a meat ax.
As Obama seeks $53
billion for high-speed rail
over the next few years,
House Republicans are
trying to pull back $2.5
billion that's already been
promised. He's seeking
increases for his "Race
to the Top" initiative that
provides, grants to bet-
ter-performing schools;
Republicans on Friday
unveiled a five percent cut
to schools serving the dis-
advantaged.
Monday's release of
next year's budget plan
will be likely ignored by
resurgent Republicans
intent on cutting $100 bil-
lion from the president's
old budget.
The GOP drive to slash
2011 spending and much
of the savings sought by
Obama involve just a small
piece of the budget pie
- the annual domestic


agency budgets that make
up just one-tenth of fed-
eral spending. Tea party-
backed House Republicans
are trying to. slash tens of
billions of dollars in such
programs to return them
to levels when Obama first
took office.
. Obama's promise to
freeze budgets of domes-
tic agencies at 2010 levels
for five years an austere
plan by itself looks gen-
erous by comparison.
On Saturday, he prom-
ised the government will
have to tighten its belt
'This budget asks
Washington to live with-
in its means, while at
the same time investing
in our future," the presi-
dent said Saturday in his
weekly radio and Internet
address. "It cuts what we
can't afford to pay for what
we cannot do without.
That's what families do
in hard times. And- that's
what our country has to
do too."
But Obama is likely to
ignore the most painful
recommendation of his
bipartisan budget com-
mission when releasing
his $3.5 trillion-plus bud-
get on Monday.


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Fred,
After 56 years, you still treat me as your
bride, and I love you for being so devoted.
Ardelle


B.J., Dale, Tiffany and Aaron,
We have had to endure so many things but God prevails and
HIS Glory reigns forever! I appreciate that you have stuck.
through all the bad times so we can get to the GREAT ones!
I LOVE MY KIDS!!!
Love Mom

Michael, Mesha, Makayla, Marynna and Dalton
When I prayed for renewal in my family, I never dreamed
God would give me you guys. Thanks for the Laughter,
Dancing, Water Spouts, Coffee, and the Zebra Stripes.
Looking forward to SO MUCH MORE!!!
Love, Mary


Jeri,
With a smile like that we can't help
but say "Happy Valentine's Day".
We Love You! Derrianna, Ramihah,
Erica, Karrie and the twins from
Rodney


Wes, After 3 children and
40 years, I guess you could
say, I'm all yours!

Love Darlene.


Andy, I've loved you since the 3rd
grade. Now we're old and gray
(well one of us is anyway) And I'll
love you till my dying breath.
Nessa


Lake City Reporter

Presents


*


LJt


^ 0*- i 7


Erne,
You were beautiful last year. This year you are-
more beautiful. I Love You Erne. You are a
darling. Thanks for our 55 years of marriage.
Love Fred


Sally,
There is only one key to my heart, and
you have it. I Love You,
Flossy


Chuck,
Words can't begin to touch how I feel for you. I'm
blessed to have you as my friend and husband. Our
ruff spots will only make us stronger. Love you always
and forever.
Donita


Rick,
Thank you for loving me. I'm looking forward to
spending he rest of our lives together. You are the
greatest man I could have ever found.
Love Kym.


Dewey,
Thank you for loving me. I am looking
forward to spending the rest of my life
with you. You are truly a blessing to
me Happy Valentine's and also
Happy 63rd Anniversary


"Bobby Cowart"
Thank you for loving me. I'm looking forward
to spending the rest of my life with you. You
are truly a blessing to me. I love you.


Mitch,
Somehow you always make me feel .
like the luckiest girl in the world. I'm
ri ery thankful you're a big part
S' of my life. You're my Valentine
Always and Forever. I Love You Baby.
Chelsey


Medicare Bluc Cros and most insurance
plans accepted, worked compensation


Happy 9th Birthday, Rain Rogers,
We love you more than anything
in the world. You are the best
Valentine's Day gift ever!
Love, Mom, Dad &
all ofyour family


S. Edgar-
True Love Stories never have endings.
Happy Anniversary.
I Love You always!
Mandy


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427











LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011


THE WEATHER




SUNNY MOSTLY; MOSTLY,
SUNNY SUNNY



HI 65 LO 34 HI 6910 H1i70LO


62
36
69
44
84 in 1950
25 in 1926


0.00"
3.59"
7.27"
1.42"
4.93"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonnse tom.


7:13 a.m.
6:17 p.m.
7:12 a.m.
6:18 p.m.


1:30 p.m.
3:05 a.m.
2:31 p.m.


, ," PARTLY

CLOUDY ,



HI 71 LO*
*. ni ^.J*A/'->-^&**.^


IMOUMIE.
-30 milesibk m
STo oday's
. ultraviolet
H radiation nrsk. '
& for me area or, .
a scale from 0
Slo 10 .


PARTLY
- CLOUDY



HI 74 LO


* e~ I'
I 5~ ~t
* ,~ .4


Tallahassee *
64/33
Pensacola 0
62/44 .Panaia City
60/41


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


Monday
69/48/s
69/47/s
74/55/s
72/47/s
69/39/s
69/42/s
70/59/pc
69/38/s
74/55/s
72/47/s
69/41/s
71/47/s
63/43/s
65/46/s
68/39/s
70/51/s
68/35/s
72/50/s


Tuesday
69/55/s
68/52/s
75/63/pc
75/52/s
70/43/pc
65/46/pc
72/63/s
70/42/pc
76/62/s
76/55/pc
71/45/pc
73/51/s
62/46/s
66/47/s
67/39/s
73/54/s
67/42/s
73/60/s


Moonset tomrn. 4:00 a.m.

OO eatner corn


Feb. Feb. March March
18 24 4 12
Full Last New First


NATIONAL FORECAST: A series of storm systems will ignite rain and snow across portions of
the Northeast today. This same series of storms will ignite snow in the far northern fringes of
the Midwest, as well. A different storm system far to the west will promote areas of rain and
mountain rain/snow mix in the Pacific Northwest.









4 17 /414 '- '(4I go .3inne.i ...
l-40s 120s

3 IsR n d 4 s D


Sa S r- 508 4T-Sorm

Fra i sbo i D SILa -A Bi W Igion Ra I
61149 56/3 .

\ 721 iu n u6ue s Okiaho
69152 Phoen64/34 Charlotte
S79/14 --- Atlata 60/34
S 60 60s dront
"Mll .70s 70/4 0
Houstrn orland0 Warm Front
68/50 *--X 65/40
Miami ,
71'56
Fror, r


High: 81 , Lompoc, Calif. Low: -18, Gunnison, Colo.


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
43/24/0
34/25/0
58 21 0

54 27.0
36 13 ,.,
,7,68 u
6-" 28 C(
38/27/0
58/22/0
60/33/0
47/21/0
63/41/0
59/26/0
8 51 0
5'5, ;', 1:
63/53/.08
37/18/0
59 23 0
*9 ;9 o
39/31/0
61/24/0


HI/Lo/W
45/28/s
36/30/rs
65/34/s
-19/-41/pc
60/33/s
36/27/c
80/67/sh'
68/50/s
4 ? 32 .
66/41/s
64/37/s
52/31/s
72/47/s
61/35/s
69/52/s
61/40/s
71/56/s
40/26/pc
64/41/s
62/44/s
40/34/pc
64/34/s


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


HV/Lo/Pcp.
47/22/0
63/41/0
42/22/0
76/44/0
36/25/0
34/6/0
54/41/0
56/24/0
58/26/0
60/26/0
53 23 0'
'J. 35,
50/30/0
48/27/0
6J 27 0
i Jl ,
5 -13 ',
., J.1: 1
50/39/0
62/41/0
74/46/0
47/23/0


HI/Lo/W CITY
33 26 sr, Des Molnes
58/28/s Detroit
10/-4/pc El Paso
60/39/s Fairbanks
53 35 p, Greensboro
47/28/pc Hartford
62 3 Honolulu
J 3, -2 p,: Houston
50/32/c Indianapolis
34/30/sn Jackson MS
37'34 r- Jacksonville
61/44/s Kansas City
52 3i pc Las Vegas
.,0 34. Uttle Rock
56 30 oe Los Angeles
39. 29. pc Memphis
4 7, 36 pc Miami
39, 3.1 rMinneapolis
E-.436 3 Mobile
, JO). New Orleans
63.39' New York
,1. "8 Oklahoma City


8 &
Saturday ioaay asturaay ioeay oeouroay motley u


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
BeUing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
84/72/0
46/37/.49
63/46/0
79/68/0
28/10/0
36/28/0
84/61/0
66/52/0
50/28/0
68/64/0
14/5/.03
61/54/0
82/73/0


'Today
HI/Lo/W
89/7q/s
46/37/c
59/48/s
76/68/s
28/7/pc
34/27/sf
87/62/s
68/58/s
48/30/pc
73/61/pc
10/-4/pc
64/48/sh
82/73/pc


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
59/39/0
79/70/0
52/41/.07
59/30/0
72/48/0
28/19/.14
12/7/.07
88/55/0
75/72/0
81/48/0
14/-6/0
90/73/0
52/43/.11


Today
HI/Lo/W
57/42/sh
83/70/pc
48/36/sh
57/36/c
73/47/s
25/21/sn
9/3/sn
90/65/pc
75/65/c
84/57/pc
16/12/pc
89/73/t
48/45/sh


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp
95/77/0
57/36/0
83/74/0
85/73/0
75/54/0
28/14/0
91/77/0
73/68/0
64/48/0
39/34/0
28/23/0
52/28/.07
34/23/.04


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h.-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


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ShnstU om prnhls Cm os 9200NW 3th Av. ,.cla 07SWClee d 0at l 44 .SlvrSrng ld W s aion1115S 3d outRd S*m ri 790S Hy.44


SVadosta city
64/35 Jsoe Cape Canaveral
Lake^ Cty" 64/37 Daytona Beach
65/34 Ft. Lauderdale
Ga nesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
65/34 63J39 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
66/34 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
65/40 64/41 Miami
mTanpa Naples
67/44 West Palm Beach Ocala
70/48 Orlando
S Ft Lauderdale Panama City
FLMyers 71/56 0 Pensacola
71/43 0 [Naples Tallahassee
69/45 Miami Tampa
KeyWest 71/56 Valdosta
6Ke Wt* W. Palm Beach
67/58


ana usurammers
YESTERIMPS NAHONAL EMiltEMES


Saturday Today


Saturday Today


CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 34/11/0
Albuquerque 50/19/0
Anchorage 8/4/0
Atlanta 55/29/0
Baltimore, 44 16 0
Billings J6., 35* 0
Birmingham :5. 23 0
Bismarck 4.3 24. 0
Bolse 58/29/0"
Boston 39/21/0
Buffalo 29/25108
Charleston SC '.9, ;2, I,
Charleston WV 43/24/0
Charlotte 57/21/0
Cheyenne 16 28.0
Chicago 34/24/0
Cincinnati J46 3u 0)
Cleveland -i. 2. 1'I1
Columbia SC 59/27/0
Dallas 65/27/0
Daytona Beach 56 3 '7.0
Denver 53/22/0


HI/Lo/W
53/27/s
65/40/s
46/32/pc
79/46/s
40/31/pc
27/25/sn
51/44/sh
61/34/s
59/27/pc
65/33/s
60/37/pc
64/42/s
56/36/s
51/32/pc
71/46/s
67/52/s
60/46/s
47/41/sh
4.. 33 p.:
67/44/s
80/41/s
53/37/pc


Forecasts, data and graph-
-- le o s @ 2011 Weather Central
l .3t> LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubilsher.com







nd
ias
in

ted
ain


Today
HI/Lo/W
89/76/s
55/39/s
t 83/73/t
83/73/t
79/61/s
32/18/c
88/75/s
73/68/sh
62/50/s
45/34/pc
37/34/rs
34/27/sf
28/18/s


, mm ,


ah Repor


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


I


I


"I :










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakeatyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday. February 13. 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-bback Club
meeting Feb. 21
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Feb. 21 in
the teacher's lounge at
the high school. Election
of officers will be
conducted, so all
members are encouraged
to attend.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954 or
e-mail shaynetrayne@
hotmail.com.
FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Moe's Night
fundraiser set
The Fort White High
Dugout Club has a
Moe's Night fundraiser
from 5-8 p.m. Thursday
at Moe's Southwest Grill
in Lake City.
For details, call Chad
Bonds at 590-7362.
OLUSTEE 5K
Registration for
Feb. 19 run
The 2011 Olustee 5K
Run/Walk is 7 a.m.
Feb. 19. Individual or
team registration is
available at www.step
fitnessonline.com. Entry
forms can be picked up
at the Step Fitness
corporate office on
Pinemount Road.
Proceeds go to benefit
March of Dimes.
For details, call
Michelle Richards at
(386) 208-2447.
ADULT BASEBALL
Men's league
forming in area
The MLBA in North
Florida and South
Georgia would like to
form a team from this
area for the 2011 season.
Age is 55 and younger.
For details, visit www.
leaguelineup. corn/
northfloridamabl.
0 From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Fort White High
baseball vs. Melody
Christian Academy,
7 p.m. (JV-4:30)
Columbia High
softball vs. Bell High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Tuesday
Columbia High
baseball vs. Melody
Christian Academy,
5 p.m.
Columbia High
softball at Trinity Christian
Academy, 6 p.m.
Fort White High
softball at Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Wednesday
Columbia High
tennis vs. Ridgeview
High, 3:30 p.m.
Thursday
Columbia High girls
tennis vs. Gainesville
High at Jonesville Tennis
Center, 3:30 p.m.
Columbia High
baseball vs. Lee High,
5 p.m. (JV-3:30 p.m.
at Melody Christian
Academy)
Columbia High
softball vs. Gainesville
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Friday
Columbia High
baseball vs. Union County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4)
Fort White High
softball vs. Bradford High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High
baseball vs. Bradford


High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5)


- Columbia native

returns to Rangers

with different plan


Photo courtesy of The Dallas Morning News
Michael Kirkman pitches for the Texas Rangers in the American League Championship
Series.


Kirkman leaves
Lake City for
spring training.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Michael Kirkman is head-
ing to spring training with a
different mindset.
Last year, the Columbia
High graduate was looking
to make the roster of the
Texas Rangers. This year,
he has a place to protect.
Kirkman was called up
to the Rangers from their
Triple AAA farm club in
Oklahoma City, Okla., last
August and went on to pitch
in the American League


Championship Series and
the World Series.
Kirkman and wife, Lorie,
are flying to Surprise Ariz.,
today.
"I hate to leave home,
but I am ready to get this
thing going," Kirkman said
Wednesday, before heading
over to watch the Tigers
play Suwannee High. "We
will arrive Sunday at noon
and start on Wednesday."
The Kirkmans are taking
a little bit of Lake City with
them they shipped their
truck out on Tuesday.
Kirkman got a taste of
spring training with a four-
day trip to Arlington, Texas,
KIRKMAN continued on 4B


Columbia has

big names in

coaching search


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
he coaching
search at
Columbia
High will be
a swift one,
according to principal
Terry Huddleston, as the
job will remain posted
through the school board
until Wednesday.
The job has been open
since last Wednesday
and already some
interesting candidates
have turned their name
into Huddleston, including
current Columbia
defensive coordinator
Dennis Dotson, former
Columbia assistant Bobby
Johns, former Madison
head coach Frankie Carroll
and former Florida State
player Brian Allen.
One candidate that
hasn't applied, but has had
his named mentioned with
the opening, is Fort White
head coach Demetric
Jackson. Jackson plans
on making a decision on
whether he will apply by
Monday.
"Demetric is a name I've
heard more than anybody,"
Huddleston said. "He's


a CHS grad, a former
Florida football player and
a role model. His teams
have always played tough
football and a lot of times
last year played teams
tougher than we did. He
has good qualities, like
morals and faith, that are
positive. He's certainly a
viable candidate and I hope
to hear from him."
Jackson thinks highly
of the Columbia job, but is
equally comfortable with
his current role as Indians'
head coach.
"I'm considering it, but
I want to keep my options
open," Jackson said. "I
don't want my players
to read it and think I'm
leaving. I just have to
weigh the odds, because
you never know if this
opportunity will come
along again."
Jackson said he will sit
down with his wife and
parents before making the
,final decision,
One coach that has
already made that decision
is Dotson, who applied
through the school board.
"I am very interested,
but would rather hold
CHS continued on 3B


First-year coach

looks for Tigers to

contend in district


Bailey will
lead Columbia
pitching rotation.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfiqley@lakecityreporter.comrn
It may be his first year
as head coach of Columbia
High, but J.T. Clark has,
been around the program
for a long time. Taking ovei'
for Greg Gillman, the for-
mer assistant is taking on a
new role in his first season.
"It takes a little adjust-
ment," he said. "As an assis-


tant I could be more friend-
ly, not a buddy, but if the
players needed someone, I
was that guy. Now, every-
thing falls on me, so I've got
to keep things in line."
Lucky for Clark, he
returns a group of players
that are coming off a dis-
trict-championship perfor-
mance last season.
Kellan Bailey will lead a
pitching staff that's thinner
than last year with the loss
of Blake King and Jacob
Tillotson, but Clark expects


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Fort White head
coach Demetric Jackson
hasn't applied for the
Columbia High head
football coaching vacancy,
but is one of the names
being tossed around as a
possible replacement for
Craig Howard.
Photo courtesy of The Florida Times-Union
LEFT: Former Baker County
head coach Bobby Johns
(left) has applied for the
Columbia head coaching job.


~b 2*
**
QJ~ ~
~- A~ ~ ~,





I ~


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the 2010 Columbia High baseball team are Trey Lee (front row, from left),
Jacob Robinson, Andrew Nettles, Austin Barber, Travis Brinkley, Michael Craft,
Blaine Courson, Michael Kirkman, Ryan Thomas, (back row, from left) head coach J.T. Clark,
Dylan Alvey, J.T. Gilliam, Seth Thomas, Jason Plyn, Kellan Bailey, Zach Espenship, and


TIGERS continued on 3B assistant coach Joey Edge.









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
I p.m.
FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Daytona 500, at Daytona
Beach
BOWLING
3 p.m.
ESPN PBA, USBC Masters, at Reno,
Nev.
EXTREME SPORTS
3 p.m.
NBC Winter Dew Tour, Toyota
Championships, at Huntsville, Utah
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Dubai
Desert Classic, final round, at Dubai,
United Arab Emirates (same-day tape)
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Pebble Beach
National Pro-Am, final round, at Pebble
Beach, Calif.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Pebble Beach
National Pro-Am, final round, at Pebble
Beach, Calif.
7 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Allianz
Championship, final round, at Boca Rat6n
(same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
I p.m.
CBS Purdue at Illinois
ESPN Marquette at Georgetown
6:30 p.m.
FSN Duke at Miami
9 p.m.
FSN -Arizona at Arizona St.
NBA BASKETBALL
I p.m.
ABC Miami at Boston
,3:30 p.m.
ABC LA. Lakers at Orlando
8 p.m.
ESPN Oklahoma City at Golden
State
NHL HOCKEY
12:30 p.m.
NBC Los Angeles at Washington
RODEO
8 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, WinStar World
Casino Invitational, at Oklahoma City
(same-day tape)
RUGBY


4:30 p.m.
NBC Sevens World Series, at Las
Vegas
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Regional coverage, LSU
at Kentucky, East Carolina at Houston,
Michigan at Michigan St. or Georgetown
at St. John's 4 p.m.
FSN -Arizona St. at Arizona
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Regional coverage, West
Virginia at Louisville, Kansas St. at Iowa
St., Auburn at Arkansas or N.C. State at
Georgia Tech
Monday
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN -WestVirginia at Syracuse
9 p.m.
ESPN-- Kansas at Kansas St.
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
VERSUS -Washington at Phoenix
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Chelsea
at Fulham
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Oklahoma at Connecticut
9 p.m.
ESPN2 -Texas A&M at Baylor

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
Miami at Boston, I p.m.
LA. Lakers at Orlando, 3:30 p.m.
Denver at Memphis, 6 p.m.
Washington at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Portland at Detroit, 6 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Golden State, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
LA. Lakers at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
San Antonio at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Portland at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Denver at Houston, 8:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule


Today's Games
No. 5 Duke at Miami, 6:45 p.m.
No. 10 Connecticut vs. Providence.
7 p.m.
No. I I Georgetown vs. Marquette,
I p.m.
No. 14 Purdue at Illinois, I p.m.
No. 15 Arizona at Arizona State,
9 p.m.

BASEBALL

MLB calendar
Saturday Voluntary reporting date
for non-pitchers and non-catchers.
March 2 Mandatory reporting
date.
March 2-11 Teams may renew
contracts of unsigned players.
March IS Last day to place a
player on unconditional release waivers
and pay 30 days termination pay instead
of 45 days.
March 29 Last day to request
unconditional release waivers on a player
without having to pay his full 2011 salary.
March 31 Opening day, active
rosters reduced to 25 players.
July 12 -All-Star game, Phoenix.
Sept. 30 or Oct. I -- Playoffs begin.
Oct. 19 -World Series begins.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Saturday's Games
Los Angeles 4,Washington I
Ottawa 5, Edmonton 3
Toronto at Montreal (n)
Carolina at Tampa Bay (n)
Colorado at Nashville (n)
Chicago at Phoenix (n)
St. Louis at Minnesota (n)
Calgary atVancouver (n)
Today's Games
Boston at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Buffalo, 3 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 3 p.m.
Columbus at Dallas, 3 p.m.
Los Angeles at Philadelphia, 3 p.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, 5 p.m.
San Jose at Florida, 5 p.m.
Anaheim at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Vancouver at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Washington at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Colorado, 10 p.m.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the Columbia High junior varsity baseball team are are Caleb Hill (front row, from
left), Caleb Vaughn, Andrew Johnson, Jimmy Blakely, Brent Stalter, Denis, Lacayo,
Dalton Mauldin, head coach Matt Turner (back row, from left), Alex Milton, Jayce Barber,
Alan Espenship, Daniel Woods, Levi Hollingsworth and Sam Bass. Not pictured is assistant
coach Tad Cervantes.


TIGERS: Look for depth on mound


Continued From Page 1B
Bailey to be one of the best
arms in the district.
"He's a three-year starter
who was second on our team
in wins as a sophomore," he
said. "He's our only pitcher
with experience, but when
he's up we expect him to
pick up the win. He's got to
get the win."
Bailey has added to the
amount of pitches he can
.throw, according to Clark,
and now can execute the
fastball, curveball, slider
and change-up with equal
precision. He also has a
quick pick-off move to first
as a left-hander.
Behind Bailey, Clark is
still looking for depth on
the mound.
'That's our key concern,"
he said. "We have to find
support for Bailey. J.T.
Gilliam will start out as our
No. 2 and Ryan Thomas can
compete. Blaine Courson
and Seth Thomas will pitch
as well. Thomas is more of
a reliever, and we're also
working Dylan Alvey, who
has the strongest arm on
the team throwing close to
86, 88 miles per hour."
Where the Tigers won't
be hurting is from the plate
as a solid group of batters
return. Zach Espenship hit
over .400 as a junior and
is expected to hit in the
two-spot on his fourth year
with the varsity.
"He's also one of the best
catchers in the state," Clark
said.
Mikey Kirkman will
play centerfield after mov-
ing from right field over
the last two seasons. Clark
always saw him as a natu-


ral centerfielder playing the
right side due to the teams
luxury of having two solid
players at that position last
season.
"He was voted team cap-
tain, because he does all the
right things," Clark said.
"He's not a vocal guy, but
he does the little things. It
was a unanimous vote."
Gilliam will give the
Tigers versatility as he'll
play multiple positions
throughout the season
including pitching, play-
ing second, shortstop and
third. Clark believes he's
also the best pure hitter on
Columbia's roster.
Taking over in right field
for Kirkman is Alvey, who
Clark said will be solid in
his first year as a varsity
starter.
"I don't expect to see
many ball hit the ground
on the right side," he said.
"He's also got a strong arm
and has put on a lot of mus-
cle from working hard in
the weight room."
JackRichardson, Courson
and Andrew Nettles are also
expected to bring power to
the lineup towards the bot-
tom.
One player that has the
coach pleasantly surprised
is freshman Jason Plynn.
At 6-foot-3 and 240 pounds,
Clark said that he's in a
grown man's body as a
freshman.
"He's going to start in the
six hole to get use to varsity
pitching," Clark said. "We
don't want to put too much
pressure on him early, but
he hits the ball so hard
it doesn't matter where he


hits it."
As always, Buchholz is
expected to contend for the
district title. Clark believes
Columbia and Fleming
Island are the other teams
at the top of the district.
"Ron Brooks takes over
at Buchholz from Santa
Fe and he says they don't
have a lot, which usually
means they're loaded," he
said. "Fleming Island is
led by Don Soriano, who
has more than 550 career
wins. They're one of those
teams that doesn't really
have a stud, but they have
nine guys that do the little
things." I
Districts will be held at
Middleburg again this sea-
son, and Clark likes the
decision.
"It kind of fit's the mid-
dle of our district, hence
the name Middleburg, so
it was the logical choice,"
Clark said., "They have a
great setup there with the
fans so close and it's an
electric atmosphere."
Clark hopes his
competitive fire pushes
the Tigers to a second-con-
secutive district champion-
ship.
"I hope they feed off me,"
he said. "I'm so competitive
and I hate to lose. We're
going to try to put pres-
sure on the other teams
and move the guys around.
I was never able to steal a
base so I like to see others
do it We're not going to
be afraid of getting thrown
out. We're trying to bring
back the bring your lunch-
box to work mentality to
Columbia."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wisconsin's Jordan Taylor celebrates with fans after beating undefeated N6. 1 Ohio State
-71-67 in an NCAA college basketball game in Madison, Wis on Saturday.


Wisconsin knocks off


unbeaten Ohio State, 71-67


Associated Press

MADISON, Wis. -
Jordan Taylor scored 21 of
his 27 points in the sec-
ond half to rally No. 13
Wisconsin from a 15-point
deficit to beat, previously
unbeaten No. 1 Ohio State
71-67 on Saturday.
Wisconsin (19-5, 9-3 Big
Ten) beat a No. 1 opponent
for the first time since 1962,
when it was also Ohio State
(24-1, 11-1). The Badgers
joined Florida as the only
programs to knock off the
same No. 1 school in both
football and men's basket-
ball in the same academic
year. The Gators also beat
Ohio State in both sports
in 2006-07.
Fans at the Kohl Center
stormed the court, just like
when they rushed the field
at Camp Randall Stadium
following the Badgers' 31-
18 win there over then-No.
1 Ohio State on Oct. 16.

No. 8 Notre Dame 78,
South Florida 55
TAMPA Jack Cooley
came off the bench during
an early 22-0 run and fin-
ished with a career-high 18
points to lead .Notre Dame.
, The victoryis the seventh
straight for the Fighting
Irish (21-4, 10-3), who have
won three straight Big East
road games for the first
time in 10 years.
Cooley made his first
nine shots giving him
a stretch of 14 consecutive


1
4
8

11

12
13

14
16
17

18 1
20
21
1


field goals over two games
- before missing a 15-foot-
er in the closing minutes.

No. 16 Louisville 73,
No. 12 Syracuse
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Kyle
Kuric scored 23 points,
Preston Knowles added 22.
and Peyton Siva dropped in
the clinching free throws in
the final moments to lead
Louisville.
The Cardinals (19-6, 8-4
Big East) continued their
mastery of the Orange (20-
6, 7-6) behind some hot
3-point shooting and just




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. L
I RANGL i


LAFTUR/

IE I I

NEETIC _
/^S ^ '^ ^


enough defense to beat
Syracuse for the seventh
.straight time.

No. 23 Vanderbilt 81,
No. 18 Kentucky 77
NASHVILLE, Tenn.
Vanderbilfs John Jenkins
scored a career-high 32 points,
including six 3-pointers.
With the win, the
Commodores (18-6,
6-4) swept a three-game
homestand that will
keep them tied for sec-
ond in the Southeastern
Conference's Eastern
Division.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: 1 1
Tis comes out during adbat -i\ v i y


Saturday's Jumbles:
Answer:


ACROSS 35 Quebec neigh-
bor
Tenet 38 Goose cries
Beat a retreat 39 Haze
Corporate 40 Wetland area
abbr. 41 Transmission
Snowmobile components
part 44 Pounds
County events 48 Vintage
Above, in 49 Harvard, et'al.
verse (2 wds.)
Speakers 51 Pistons' org.
Decent grade 52 Comforter
Was in store stuffing
for 53 Mammal's
Moving right need
Doze off 54 Herd of whales
Caustic solu- 55 Cattail
tion 56 Double helix


22 Bucket of song
25 Gave a hard
time
29 RN assistants
30 Hr. part
31 Be in debt
32 IX opposite
33 Droll
34 "Runaround
Sue" singer


DOWN

1 Cuba, to Castro
2 Slant unfairly
3 Isinglass
4 Made out
5 Committed per-
jury
6 Goof up


This comes out during a debate -
YOUR OPINION


Answer to Previous Puzzle


(Answers tomorrow)
LYING UNHOOK INFIRM


B' ULB ASIP ELBA
E R IE AL ROAN
L.AMA SLU G GUARD
ALOUD IRA DAY
SELVAGE
GIS NEAL NIKE
LOCUST HONEY
AWAKE POWDER
DAME SNAG OLE
SEMINAR
KGB GIN NAK ED
WRANGLED CAMO
AUDI ETE ELMO
IBEX D YE REAM


Themes
Crazy, to Pedro
Mall frequenter
Remnant
Japanese mat-
tress


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books,
at QuillDriverBooks.com


15 Antler prongs
19 "- Girls"
21 Delicate
22 Mixed bag
23 Could hear -
drop
24 Do socks
25 Knight,
often
26 Pork cut
27 Jedi ally
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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011.


Spring forecast: Bats,

balls, sun and eternal hope


By BEN WALKER
Associated Press

The Super Bowl hit a
deep freeze, NBA ,teams
got stranded in blizzards,
an NHL game was iced by a
snowstorm.
Most everywhere, the
winter weather is wicked.
Good thing the weekend
forecast in Arizona and
Florida calls for sunny skies
and temperatures in the
70s: King Felix, Joe Mauer
and friends are coming.
Spring training is starting
up. Let's trade ski masks for
catcher's masks. And pitch-
ers, take off your mittens
and put on those mitts.
Just in time, right?
"I would say there might
be some of them from the
Midwest or Northeast who
might go to their respec-
tive spring training places
and accelerate the real
estate market," Colorado
Rockies manager Jim Tracy
said. "Unless they really
like being behind a snow
blower."
Even before the sun-
screen mixes with pine tar,
Bruce Bochy is eager.
World Series champions
always want to get going.
The San Francisco Giants
manager and his players
are among the many teams
opening camp in the next
few days.
' "Especially some of them
who have been in this harsh
weather we've had this win-
ter, they're looking forward
to getting to spring train-
ing," Bochy said.
"I also think when you
get two or three weeks off,
you start getting a little bit
itchy. Then when it gets to
late January, you're ready.
You're ready to get back
and see your teammates,
getting back on the field


and getting ready for the
season," he said.
In many places, that
means new pals.
Cliff Lee, back in
Philadelphia after a one-year
absence. Manny Ramirez
and Johnny Damon, taking
their hair-raising antics to
Tampa Bay. Carl Crawford
and Adrian Gonzalez,
now swinging for Boston.
Vladimir Guerrero, Jayson
Werth, Vernon Wells, Dan
Uggla and World Series
MVP Edgar Renteria, all
switching uniforms.
"It makes you feel good
to come here and know
they wanted me to play
there. It's awesome," said
strikeout-prone slugger
Mark Reynolds, traded
from Arizona to Baltimore.
'"This is kind of a fresh
start."
Shaun Marcum already
is looking way ahead.
Traded from Toronto to
Milwaukee, he was part of
the Brewers' busy winter
- they also acquired for-
mer Cy Young winner Zack
Greinke from Kansas City.
"Nothing againstToronto
as an organization, but this
is the first time I've gone
through the offseason
working out and thinking
that I'm going to be pitch-
ing in October and not end-
ing my season Oct 2. I'm
working hard knowing that
I'm going to be pitching
Oct 23, Oct. 24 just
throwing those dates out
there," Marcum said.
But there's plenty of
time until then. A lot to do,
in fact, before the pitching-
rich Phillies host Florida
State on Feb. 24 in the
first exhibition game of the
year.
A host of new managers
need to meet and greet
their guys.


Don Mattingly with the
Dodgers, Ron Roenicke
of the Brewers and John
Farrell of the Blue Jays will
be managing for the very
'first time. In all, 12 teams go
into opening day on March
31 with a different skipper
than they started with last
season. Gone are four long-
timers, each leaving with
glittery rings Joe Torre,
Bobby Cox, Lou Piniella
and Cito Gaston.
Also missing this spring,
baseball's newest retirees:
Postseason wins champ
Andy Pettitte, career saves
leader Trevor Hoffman and
former World Series MVP
Mike Lowell.





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Boston Red Sox pitcher Tim Wakefield walks to the clubhouse after a workout at the Red Sox


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BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Former Columbia High and Florida State player Brian Allen
has sent in his application to be the next head coach of the
Tigers' football team.


CHS: Looks for coach


Continued From Page 1B

further comment until after
the decision is made," he
said. "Whether it happens
or not, I hope the
decision is the best for
the kids and I'll be at CHS
either way. I plan to be at
Columbia as long as they'd
have me."
Dotson didn't rule out
staying on as an assistant
for another coach if he's
not chosen as Craig
Howard's replacement.
Huddleston believes
that whatever the role,
Dotson is important to the
foundation of Columbia
athletics.
"Coach Dotson has
applied and I can tell you
he's one of the hardest
working coaches I know,"
he .said. "I've seen him
up at the field house
studying film at all hours
of the.night He's a viable
candidate and kind of
running things in the
interim.
Right now, the process is
in the hypothetical stage,
but Huddleston knows the
qualities he will look for in
a coach.


"We're looking for
someone who can come
in and motivate," he said.
"We want someone who
will have a well disciplined
team both academically
and athletically. We want
someone with contacts
that can help as many
young men as possible
play beyond high
school. They must be
able to embrace all the
athletic programs and be
supportive."
Huddleston expects
to receive more than 25
applications before it
closes on Wednesday.
Howard speculated that
there could be as many as
150 apply before leaving
for Southern Oregon
University.
Huddleston wants to
interview around five
candidates, but said the
number could be more
depending on the
number of applications
received. No timetable
has been set for filling the
position, but Huddleston
would like to have a coach
in place by mid-March.


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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011


Last-second score lifts


Gators over Vols, 61-60


By KYLE HIGHTOWER
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Erving
Walker hit a driving
layup with 14 seconds
left and No. 17 Florida
overcame a six-point
halftime deficit to beat
Tennessee 61-60 on
Saturday.
Walker led the Gators with
16 points and Kenny Boynton
and Vernon Macklin each
added 12. Alex Tyus
chipped in 10 for Florida
(20-5, 9-2 Southeastern
Conference), which has
won four straight and seven
of eight.
Tennessee got 22
points from Scotty
Hopson and 11 from Brian
Williams.
The Volunteers (15-10,
5-5) lost their third con-
secutive game and sec-
ond in a row since coach
Bruce Pearl returned
from an eight-game SEC
suspension for lying
to NCAA investigators
about a secondary viola-
tion.
The win also kept the
Gators in control of the SEC
East.
Florida began the day
with a 2k'-game lead over
'four teams tied for second
place.


KIRKMAN
Continued From Page 1B
for some winter workouts.
"I was able to get an idea
of where everybody was,"
Kirkman said. "It is good
to know where the guys
are that I will be competing
with, and I'm ready to go."
Kirkman said there are
6-7 pitchers fighting for 2-3
spots and, though every-
thing is up for grabs, he
has a better handle on the
procedure.
'"There is no telling what
will happen in the spring,"
Kirkman said. "Last year
was my first time in big
league camp and I knew I
wouldn't make "the" team.
This year is different
knowing I might make a
starting spot or at least the
bullpen."
Kirkman was Pitcher of
the Year and an all-star in
the Pacific Coast League
in 2010, with the accolades
coming for his work as a
starter. After joining the
Rangers, he pitched in
relief. He will get a shot at
both jobs.
"I would be the No. 4 or
No. 5 man, if everything
worked out perfectly,"
Kirkman said. "The biggest
thing is I will know what is
going on on a day-to-day
basis. I know the routine
and I know the guys. It will
be easy to go out there and
perform."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida guard Erving Walker (11) shoots as Tennessee's
Jeronne Maymon (34) defends in Gainesville on Saturday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State coach Leonard Hamilton (center) talks with official Ed Corbettduring the
second half of an NCAA college basketball game earlier this season.


FSU stops Virginia


rally for 63-56 win


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE
- Florida State held off
Virginia 63-56 Saturday, but
lost star Chris Singleton
with a fractured right foot
The 6-foot-9 Singleton,
the Seminoles' top scorer
and rebounder, will have
surgery Monday, coach
Leonard Hamilton said.
Michael Snaer scored
16 points, including four


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straight free throws in the
final 20 seconds, when
Florida State repelled a late
Virginia rally.
Singleton, last year's
Atlantic Coast Conference
defensive player of the
year, already had 11 points
when he was hurt 10 min-
utes into the game. He
scored Florida State's first
nine points before Xavier
Gibson's put-back with
11:36 left in the half.
Florida State (18-7, 8-3


ACC) led 34-23 at halftime
on its way to a second ACC
win in less than 48 hours
and fifth straight over the
Cavaliers. The Seminoles
were coming off a 72-63
win Thursday night at
Georgia Tech.
Virginia- (12-12, 3-7
ACC) fought back from a
16-pointdeficitinthesecond
half and pulled to within
56-53 with 1:11 left on
Joe Harris' short running
jumper.


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
cnsoak@lakeactyreporter com


BUSINESS


Sunday, February 13, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Valentine's Day sales expected to bloom


By LEANNE TYO
ltyo@lakecityreporter. com

Customers on
the hunt for
a Valentine's
Day gift this
February have
still been after the tradi-
tional tokens of affection
local businesses have to
offer.
Red roses are still the
most popular at Sunshine
Florist, said owner Frankie
Stalvey, but yellow roses
are also heavily requested.
"It's kind of surpris-
ing," Stalvey said. "Just
no doubt, red roses will
always be the number one
seller, but yellow is coming
up in popularity this year."
Another popular
Valentine's Day flower
arrangement is large pink
lilies mixed with spray
roses, Stalvey said. She
said tulip vases and calla
lily bouquets are also sell-
ing for the holiday.
Flowers have always
been a staple Valentine's
Day gift, Stalvey said.
"They're just so tradi-
tional and they say love,"
she said.
At Hair Graphics Salon,
facials have been the most-
sought service in prepara-
tion for Valentine's Day,
said Katee Becker, salon
receptionist.,
The salon decided to
offer a new Valentine's
Day package to custom-
ers this year, Becker said.
The package consists of
a shampoo and style, an
hour-long facial and the
customer's choice of eye-


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Teresa Cobb, holiday help at Sunshine Florist, puts the finishing touches on a flower arrangement of red roses for a
Valentine's Day order at the shop Friday. Frankie Stalvey, Sunshine Florist owner, said roses are the most common choice
because they are liked by both men and women.


lash extensions or an eye-
brow wax for $75.
"Who doesn't love a
facial and a good style?"
Becker asked.
"It's a phenomenal deal,"
she said, "and it gives .
people the chance to try


something that they've
never done before."
Business increases
around Valentine's Day
through popular services
like styles and pedicures,
Becker said.
. "Not only is Valentine's


Day a day you want to look
good, but it's tax season,
too," she said. "We see a
lot of increase with people


getting their tax returns,
so Valentine's Day is
always a prime time for
hair."


Charlie Murray of
Furniture and Furnishings
said his store offers vases,
glassware, silk flower
arrangements and bed-
room and living room
suites for Valentine's Day
gifts.
"I would think that if
somebody's got a wish list.
for a new bedroom suite or
a new living room suite; It
would be a good place to
come and see and make
somebody's wish come
true," he said.
Murray noted that all
store items will be 20
percent off onn Feb. 14
through 18.
Customers at Ward's
Jewelry & Gifts have been
consistently purchasing
the Mariana line of jewelry
* for Valentine's Day. The
jewelry line is handmade
in Israel with antique sil-
ver, Swarovski crystals and
mineral stones, said owner
George Ward.
"It's been one of the
hottest things we've ever
had," he said. 'There's a
lot of really pretty pink and
red pieces for Valentine's
Day."
The store's Chamilia
jewelry line, pearls and
diamond earrings are also
February sellers, Ward
said.
Jewelry always sells well
around Valentine's Day, he
said.
"I've never seen many
women that don't like jew-
elry," Ward said.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS


Kicking Corporate Tires
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bt entered nimo a drawing for a nifty prize!
2011 TlE MOTLEY FOOlDisBT. BY UN


Trash Those Faxes
In 2008, I got two broadcast faxes
touting "can't miss" investments. I
bought 300 shares of the first stock,
at $3.21 each, and 1,750 shares of
the second, at $1.69. Talk about
dumb. I had no idea what I was
doing and no business risk-
ing nearly $4,000 of my
retirement savings. Both
stocks were low, so I
thought they would surely go up. In
fact, both went down to nothing in
short order. I didn't have the good
sense to sell on the way down,
either, afraid of missing a rebound.
I left them in my portfolio and -
there they stay, daily reminders of
how dangerous a lack of knowledge
and trusted investment information
can be. I have since made other;
wiser investments and made up
most of my losses, but the sting
remains. Lori, Bridgeport, WVa.
The Fool Responds: If a stock
is being hawked via fax spam-
ming, it's probably not a high-qual-
ity investment. Stocks trading for
less than $5 per share are penny
stocks. They can be particularly
volatile and risky, tied to shaky
companies and easily manipulated
by con artists.
Do you have an embarrassing
lesson learned the hard way?
Boil it down to 100 words (or
less) and send it to The Motley Fool do My
Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked?
Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we
print yours, you'll win a Fool's cap!


LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
Based in North Carolina and with a production capacity topping 26 mil-
lion tons, I'm America's largest steel producer, its largest scrap processor
and North America's largest recycler. I operate Harris Steel and David J.
Joseph, as well. While other steelmakers have clung to expensive tradi-
tional integrated steel mills, I've succeeded with electric arc furnaces and
mini-mills. I have been one of the most profitable companies in my indus-
try, turning scrap into structural steel, steel bars, reinforcing bars, joists,
girders, decks, sheets, wire, wire mesh and plates. I pay my people well, yet
have low labor costs. Who am I? (Answer: Nucor)
Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries
tb Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
Motley Fool. Sorry, we can providee individual financial advice.
IVERSAL UCULK (FOR RELEASE 2/10/2011)


BRIEFS

SEC files fraud
charges vs. execs
WASHINGTON
- Federal regulators have
filed civil fraud charges
against three former
executives of the parent of
IndyMac Bank, accusing
them of misleading inves-
tors about the mortgage
lender's finances before it
collapsed in 2008.
The Securities and
Exchange Commission
announced the charges
Friday against Michael
Perry, former chief execu-
tive of Pasadena, Calif.-
based IndyMac Bancorp,
and former chief financial
officers, Scott Keys and
Blair Abernathy. Abernathy
agreed to settle, paying a
$100,000 fine and $26,592
in restitution plus interest.
He neither admitted nor
denied wrongdoing.

Report: Borders
filing bankruptcy
NEW YORK Borders
Group. Inc. may file for
bankruptcy reorganiza-
tion as early as Monday
or Tuesday, according to
a report in the Wall Street
Journal.
The No. 2 traditional
bookstore in the U.S. also.
plans to close about 200
of its 674 stores and cut
thousands of jobs, the
newspaper reported on
Friday, citing sources it did
not name.
The story also says
Borders is hearing pitches
from Bank of America
Corp. and General Electric
Co.'s finance arm for $450
million in financing to keep
operating under bankrupt-
cy protection.
GE Capital had no com-
ment. Bank of America
could not be immediately
reached.
Associated Press


Drilling method opens vast US oil fields


By JONATHAN FAHEY
AP Energy Writer

A new drilling technique is open-
ing up vast fields of previously out-
of-reach oil in the western United
States, helping reverse a two-decade.
decline in domestic production of
crude.
Companies are investing bil-
lions of dollars to get at oil depos-
its scattered across North Dakota,
Colorado, Texas and California. By
2015, oil executives and analysts
said, the new fields could yield as
much as 2 million barrels of oil a
day more than the entire Gulf of
Mexico produces now. '
This new drilling is expected to
raise U.S. production by at least 20
percent over the next five years.
And within 10 years, it could help
reduce oil imports by more than
half, advancing a goal that has long
eluded policymakers.
"That's a significant contribution
to energy security," says Ed Morse,
head of commodities research at
Credit Suisse.
Oil engineers are applying what
critics say is an environmentally
questionable method developed


in recent years to tap natural gas
trapped in underground shale. They
drill down and horizontally into the
rock, then pump water, sand and
chemicals into the hole to crack the
shale and allow gas to flow up.
Because oil molecules are sticky
and larger than gas molecules, engi-
neers thought the process wouldn't
work to squeeze oil out fast enough
to make it economical. But drill-
ers learned how to increase the
number of cracks in the rock and
use different chemicals to free up
oil at low cost "We've completely
transformed the natural gas indus-
try, and I wouldn't be surprised
if we transform the oil business
in the next few years too," says
Aubrey McClendon, chief execu-
tive of Chesapeake Energy, which
is using the technique.
Petroleum engineers first used
the method in 2007 to unlock oil
from a 25,000-square-mile formation
under North Dakota and Montana
known as the Bakken. Production
there rose 50 percent in just the
past year, to 458,000 barrels a day,
according to Bentek Energy, an
energy analysis firm..
It .was first thought that the


Bakken was unique. Then drill-
ers tapped oil in a shale formation
under South Texas called the Eagle
Ford. Drilling permits in the region
grew 11-fold last year.
Now .newer fields are showing
promise, including the Niobrara,
which stretches under Wyoming,
Colorado, Nebraska and Kansas; the
Leonard, in New Mexico and Texas;
and the Monterey, in California.
"It's only been fleshed out over
the last 12 months just how con-
sequential this can be," says Mark
Papa, chief executive of EOG
Resources, the company that first
used horizontal drilling to tap shale
oil. "And there will be several addi-
tional plays that will come about in
the next 12 to 18 months. We're not
done yet."
Environmentalists fear that fluids
or wastewater from the process,
called hydraulic fracturing, could
pollute drinking water supplies. The
Environmental Protection Agency
is now studying its safety in shale
drilling. The agency studied use
of the process in shallower drilling
operations in 2004 and found that it
was safe.
In the Bakken formation, pro-


duction is rising so fast there is
no space in pipelines to bring'the
oil to market. Instead, it is being
transported to refineries by rail and
truck. Drilling companies have had
to erect camps to house workers.
Unemployment in North Dakota
has fallen to the lowest level in the
nation, 3.8 percent less than half
the national rate of 9 percent The
influx. of mostly male workers to
the region has left local men lament-
ing a lack of women. Convenience
stores are struggling to keep
shelves stocked with food.
The Bakken and the Eagle Ford
are each expected to ultimately pro-
duce 4 billion barrels of oil. That
would make them the fifth- and
sixth-biggest oil fields ever discov-
ered in the United States. The top
four are Prudhoe Bay in Alaska,
Spraberry Trend in West Texas, the
East Texas Oilfield and the Kuparuk
Field in Alaska.
The fields are attracting billions
of dollars of investment from for-
eign oil giants like Royal Dutch
Shell, BP and Norway's Statoil,
and also from the smaller U.S.
drillers who developed the new
techniques.


Nokia, Microsoft in pact to rival Apple, Google


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stephen Elop CEO of Nokia (left) with CEO of Microsoft
Steve Ballmer, speaking in London, as he announces the
strategic partnership with Microsoft on Friday.


By MATTI HUUHTANEN
Associated Press

HELSINKI Technology
titans Nokia and Microsoft
are combining forces to
make smart phones that
might challenge rivals like
Apple and Google and
revive their own fortunes in
a market they have strug-
gled to keep up with.
Nokia Corp., the world's
largest maker of mobile
phones, said Friday it plans
to use Microsoft Corp.'s
Windows Phone software
as the main platform for its
smart phones in an effort
to pull market share away
from Apple's iPhone and
Android, Google's software


for phones and tablets.
The move marks a
major strategy shift for
Nokia, which has previously
equipped devices with its
own software. Analysts said
the deal was a bigger win
for Microsoft than Nokia,
whose CEO Stephen Elop
in a leaked memo this week
compared his company to
a burning oil platform with
"more than one explosion ...
fueling a blazing fire around
us."
Nokia said the partner-
ship would "deliver an eco-
system with unrivaled global
reach and scale." However,
it warned that the new strat-
egy would also bring "signifi-
cant uncertainties," and said


it expects profit margins to
be hit by strong competition
from rivals.
Nokia's share price
plunged 9 percent to $10.11
in afternoon trading in
Helsinki.
Elop, a Canadian nation-
al, joined Nokia from a
senior executive position at
Microsoft last year. The first
non-Finn to lead Nolda, he
is under intense pressure to
reverse the company's mar-
ket share losses to North
American and Asian com-
petitors.
"Nokia is at a critical
juncture, where significant
change is necessary and
inevitable in our journey for-
ward," Elop said.


What Is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
Remember Shakespeare?
Remember "As You Like It"?
In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only
people who could get away with telling the
truth to the King or Queen.
The Motley Fool tells the truth about invest-
ing, and hopes you'll laugh all
the way to the bank



Textron, a Rising Star
The recession led to many compa-
nies postponing capital equipment
purchases. There's now a record
amount of cash sitting on balance
sheets, and as purse strings start
loosening, Textron (NYSE: TXT)
stands to benefit.
The company has four major pro-
duction divisions: Cessna (business
jets), Bell (commercial and military
helicopters), Textron Systems (mili-
tary hardware) and Industrial (auto
parts and specialized vehicles such
as golf carts). Three divisions have
begun to see sales rising, while
Cessna expects a turnaround soon.
The market hasn't quite caught onto
this yet, judging from the stock's
low valuation.
Textron has managed to grow free
cash flow by an average of 12 per-
cent a year for the past five years
and should continue to grow.
So what could go wrong? The
economic recovery could stall, but
Textron's customers are way beyond
when they would normally replace
and upgrade. That can only be
delayed so much.
And to sweeten the pot for
Cessna, Textron has introduced a
now jet that's more fuel efficient,
appealing to companies worried
about costs. Defense Department
cutbacks could also hurt, but our
military remains very busy.
Given the turnaround in sales, the
growing interest in business jets,
opportunities tied to automakers
and the company's cost-cutting,
Textron is looking rather attractive.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011


0













Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


A NYSE A Amex
8374.89 +86.39 2,266.46 +10.01


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
RehabCG 36.64+11.45 +45.5 Emergent 8.41 +2.35 +38.8
SWS Grp 6.25 +1.85 +42.0 UQM Tech 3.63 +.88 +32.0
AlcatelLuc 4.69 +1.27 +37.1 NovaBayP 2.36 +.49 +26.2
CenPacFrs32.72 +7.80 +31.3 NIVSIntT 2.48 +.45 +22.2
MediaGen 6.97 +1.54 +28.4 GorrnanR 38.16 +6.71 +21.3
UNTVh 6.08 +1.34 +28.3 BovieMed 3.26 +.50 +18.1
MauiLnd h 7.40 +1.56 +26.7 Uibbey 17.76 +2.32 +15.0
KindredHlt 24.12 +4.90 +25.5 AvalRaren 7.47 +.97 +14.9
CaptfTr 2.32 +.45 +24.1 OpkoHfth 4.54 +.55 +13.8
ServiceCp 11.08 +2.10 +23.4 Procerars 7.55 +.85 +12.7

Losers ($2 or more) Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
AmrRlty 4.56 -1.56 -25.6 iBio 4.06 -1.44 -26.2
GerovaFrs 15.14 -4.27 -22.0 Quepasa 11.10 -2.30 -17.2
AmbwEdn 7.82 -1.82 -18.9 FulIHseR 4.08 -.84 -17.1
TmsRty 4.19 -.89 -17.5 SearchMed 2.71 -.52 -16.1
CSVS2xVxM51.21 -9.65 -15.9 CagleA 6.65 -1.23 -15.6
CallonPh 7.75 -1.44 -15.7 InfuSystem 2.54 -.43 -14.5
BiPLSpxVM 13.22 -2.41 -15.4 SearchMun 3.10 -.51 -14.1
BarcShtD 15.27 -2.78 -15.4 NewConcEn 3.30 -.53 -13.8
NokiaCp 9.36 -1.70 -15.4 Bamwell 6.41 -1.01 -13.6
ParTech 5.12 -.89 -14.8 NDynMng 18.17 -2.85 -13.6

Most Active ($1 or more) Most Active ($1 or more
Name Vol (00) Last Chg Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citigrp 18876087 4.68 +.06 NthgtMg 322217 2.92 +.23
BkofAm 7254948 14.77 +.48 AvalRare n 256261 7.47 +.97
S&P500ETF5608865133.11+1.96 NovaGld g 217221 14.37 -.36
iShEMkts 4601357 45.63 -.87 GoldStrg 197543 3.94 +.06
FordM 3937876 16.38 +.66 MadCatzg 194313 1.45 +.35
SprintNex 3385903 4.60 +.20 Taseko 180233 5.94 -.02
NokiaCp 3320723 9.36-1.70 DenisnMg 179988 4.14 +.17
AlcatelLuc 2792969 4.69+1.27 RareEleg 169242.13.72 -.29
SPDR Fncl2645249 17.08 +.47 ChinaShen 164852 6.70 +.28
GenElec 2503116 21.33 +.77 RexahnPh 141675 1.74 +.26

Diary Diary
Advanced 2,255 Advanced 289
Declined 896 Declined 246
New Highs 628 New Highs 53
New Lows 36 New Lows 8
Total issues 3,206 Total issues 548
Unchanged 55 Unchanged 13
Volume 20,431,139,323 Volume 781,535,504


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Las


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20
AK Steel .20
AMR
AOL
AT&T Inc 1.72
AU Optron ..
AbtLab 1.76
AMD
Aetna .60
Agilent
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12
Aldlrish
Allstate .80
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52
AmBevs .99
AMovilL .52
AmAxle
AEagleOut .44
AEP 1.84
AmExp .72
AmintlGrp ...
Ameriprise .72
Anadarko .36
Annaly 2.65
Apache .60.
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .40
ArchDan .64
ATMOS 1.36
Avon .92
BB&T Cp .60
BakrHu .60
BcoBrades .82
BcoSantand .78
BcoSBrasil .45
BkofAm .04
Bklreind 1.04
BkNYMel .36
BariPVixrs...
BarrickG .48
Baxter 1.24
BeckCoult .76
BerkHB ...
BestBuy .60
BigLots
Blackstone .40
BlockHR .60
Boeing 1.68
Borders
BostonSci ...
BoydGm ...
BrMySq 1.32
CB REIlis
CBSB .20
CMS Eng .84
CVS Care .50
CapOne .20
Caterpillar 1.76
Cemex .43
CenterPnt .79
CntryUnk 2.90
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.88
Chicos .16
Chimera .69
Citigrp
Citigp wtA ...
Clorox 2.20
CocaCE .48
CocaCI 1.76
ColgPal. 2.12
CompSci .80
ConAgra .92
ConocPhil 2.64
ConsolEngy .40
ConEd 2.40


16 +.03 +2.2
11 +.05 +1.4
... +.02 -3.4
... +.29 -6.3
.... -.72 -10.5
8 +.50 -3.1
... -.82 -11.7
12 -.56 -4.9
13 -.12 +1.2
9 +.23 +23.4
23 +2.03 +8.7
... +1.27 +58.4
76 +.23 +12.9
... +.03 -11.4
18 +.04 -1.5
67 +.70 -10.4
13 +.44 -.7
... -.12 -14.8
17 -.73 -1.0
10 +.24 +14.5
19 +1.32 +10.6
14 +.70 -.3
14 +2.93 +8.9
... +1.63 -13.8
15 +5.97 +11.0
52 +.17 +3.1
13 +.29 +.2
14 +2.89 +.4
12 +1.74 -.7
32 -.56 -6.0
12 +.13 +20.4
17 +.43 +7.4
21 +.20 +1.3
25 +.68 +10.8
34 -.68 +17.4
... +1.01 -6.2
... -.07 +12.9
... +.64 -13.2
22 +.48 +10.7
... +.02 -12.5
16 +1.15 +6.5
...-1.19 -25.5
17 -.62 -10.7
14 +3.16 +2.1
22 +7.61 +10.0
18 +1.74 +6.0
10 -1.64 -2.0
15 +7.62 +36.5
... -.04 +21.3
9 +.43 +11.3
16 +1.18 +10.5
... -.14 -72.0
... -.11 -9.1
64 +1.47 +15.0
14 -.48 -4.8
38 +.58 +19.8
35 +1.72 +15.2
16 -.08 +3.6
13 +.36 -5.0
.9 +3.35 +22.3
25 +3.95 +10.5
... -.08 -12.0
15 +.05 +3.0
13 +1.46 -2.3
21 +.78 +19.0
10 -.66 +5.7
19 +.62 -.2
6 -.10 +1.2
14 +.06 +3.2
... +.01 +5.3
16 +5.60 +12.6
16 +.43 +4.8
13 +1.01 -3.3
17 +2.68 -1.8
9 -7.84 -3.4
15 -.26 -.3
11 -.09 +5.1
27 -2.33 -3.6
15 +.51 +1.1


Name Div
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
Covidien .80
CypSharp 2.40
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.24
Danaher s .08
DeanFds ...
DeltaAir ...
DenburyR ...
DrSCBear rs...
DirFnBear ...
DrxFBulls ...
DirxSCBull .11
DirxLCBear...
Disney .40
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
EMC Cp ...
ElPasoCp .04
Elan
EldorGld g .10
EmersonEl 1.38
EnCana g .80
ENSCO 1.40
EvergE rs ...
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.76
FstHorizon .04
FirstEngy 2.20
FordM
FordM wt ...
FMCG s 1.00
FrontierCm .75
FrontierOil ...
GMXRs ...
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .40
GenGrPrn ...
GenMarit .04
GenMills s 1.12
GenMot n ...
GenOnEn ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .32
GlaxoSKIn 2.04
GoldFLtd .16
Goldcrp g .36
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...,
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .40
HftMgmt ...
HeclaM
Hertz
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .95
Honwlllntl 1.33
HostHotis .04
HovnanE ...
IAMGId g .08
ICICI Bk .53
iShGold s
iSAstla .82
iShBraz 2.53
iSCan .50
iShGer .29
iSh HK .45
iShJapn .14
iSh Kor .44
iSMalas .34
iShMex .54
iShSing .43
iSTaiwn .29
iSh UK .43
iShSilver ..
iShChina25 .63


2,809.44 +40.14


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Intphse 4.10 +2.20 +115.8
XetaTech 5.41 +1.61 +42.4
MetroCpB 6.57 +1.72 +35.5
Mercerlnti 11.39 +2.97 +35.3
Tengionn 4.17 +1.05 +33.7
Clearfield 6.33 +1.52 +31.6
IPG Photon 46.55+10.86 +30.4
CtrVABcsh 2.12 +.49 +30.1
FalconStor 4.78 +1.10 +29.9
Sinclair 12.14 +2.79 +29.8

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Vertro rs 3.53 -1.82 -34.0
SmitMicro 8.56 -4.40 -33.9
IdenixPh 2.89 -1.37 -32.2
MannKd 3.79 -1.36 -26.4
Tekelec 8.55 -3.03 -26.2
SierraWr 11.14 -3.16 -22.1
ChiCache n 17.14 -4.55 -21.0
YRCWwrs 3.58 -.90 -20.1
Pacerlntl 5.22 -1.19 -18.6
QuantFurs 7.18 -1.62 -18.4

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Cisco 9532481 18.70-3.35
Microsoft 3136833 27.25 -.52
PwShs QQQ249982358.44+1.07
Intel 2344017 21.76 +.08
MicronT 2291344 11.32 +.27
SiriusXM 1955078 1.84 +.09
Nvidia 1415929 23.47-2.20
JDS Uniph1300785 28.16 +5.40
ActivsBliz 964398 10.78 -.96
Apple Inc 931782356.85+10.35

Diary
Advanced 1,808
Declined 999
New Highs 490
New Lows 70
Total issues 2,862
Unchanged 55
Volume 10,068,746,103





Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


11 -1.27 +2.5
10 -1.01.+15.7
... +1.64 +10.6
17 -.38 -4.3
89 +.82 +4.9
13 +.64 +3.6
19 +3.63 +9.4
10 -.39 +12.8
13 +.50 -5.6
29 +.48 +11.9
... -1.18 -15.7
.. -.66 -20.1
... +2.55 +20.9
... +6.46 +14.1
... -.37 -16.8
19 +2.70 +15.7
14 +.51 +3.3
21 +1.37 +12.4
12 +.08 +.2
31 +1.35 +18.1
13 -.21 +21.4
... +.23 +19.7
43 -.24 -11.7
22 +1.32 +7.7
17 -.62 +8.0
12 -1.48 -.8
... -.46 +513.8
14 -.16 +1.0.
13 -.02 +13.3
... +.08 +.6
15 +.11 +7.3
8 +.66 -2.4
... +.56 -5.3
12 -3.24 -10.9
16 +.12 -2.3
... +2.21 +36.8
... -.32 -19.7
8 +.23 -11.4
7 +.40 +13.1
12 +1.30 -2.9
+.49 -.2
-.28 -12.9
15 +.36 +.9
... -.14 -1.1
... -.05 +5.8
59 +.68 +3.4
... +.30
+,36 -3.7
3 -.31 -12.6
... +1.34 -6.5
9 +1.83 -.9
... +1.54 +20.7
22 -1.28 +9.3
10 +.52 +12.3
15 +.11 -.5
95 -.13 -15.3
48 +1.48 +13.3
13 +1.21 +15.5
20 +.68 +6.9
26 +.86 +9.1
.. +.72 +10.6
... +.22 +9.5
42 -.42 +14.3
.. +2.25 -10.5
+.07 -4.6
-.07 +1.4
-.15 -7.1
... +.01 +3.9
... +.55 +8.4
... -.92 -1.3
... -.03 +3.8
... -3.84 -3.1
... -.38 -1.5
... -.73 -1.0
... -.53 -3.6
... -1.05 -4.2
... +.16 +5.1
... +.81 -3.2
.. -1.19 -3.3


The Week in Review


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg


AT&T Inc NY 1.72 28.47
AlcatelLuc NY ... 4.69
Alcoa NY .12 17.37
AutoZone NY ... 260.88
BkofAm NY .04 14.77
BobEvans Nasd .80 33.44
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 13.93
CSX NY 1.04 73.24
Chevron NY 2.88 96.45
Cisco Nasd ... 18.70
Citigrp NY 4.88
CocaCI NY 1.76 63.57
Delhaize NY 2.02 76.82
DrSCBearrsNY 13.16
DirFnBear NY ... 7.55
DrxFBull s NY ... 33.67
EMC Cp NY ... 27.04
Fami]yDir NY .72 44.16
FordM NY ... 16.38
GenElec NY .56 21.33
HomeDp NY .95 37.48
iShJapn NY .14 11.33
iShEMkts NY .64 45.63
iShR2K NY .89 82.07
Intel Nasd .72 21.76
JDSUniphNasd ... 28.16
JPMorgCh NY .20 46.57
LVSands NY ... 47.22


+.50 +1.8 -3.1
+1.27 +37.1 +58.4
+.23 +1.3 +12.9
+2.18 +0.8 -4.3
+.48 +3.4 +10.7
+.74 +2.3 +1.5
+.03 +0.2 -5.9
+3.54 +5.1 +13.4
-.66 -0.7 +5.7
-3.35 -15.2 -7.6
+.06 +1.2 +3.2
+1.01 +1.6 -3.3
-.76 -1.0 +4.2
-1.18 -8.2 -15.7
-.66 -8.1 -20.1
+2.55 +8.2 +20.9
+1.35 +5.3 +18.1
+2.65 +6.4 -11.2
+.66 +4.2 -2.4
+.77 +3.7 +16.6
+.68 +1.8 +6.9
-.03 -0.2 +3.8
-.87 -1.9 -4.2
+2.20 +2.8 +4.9
+.08 +0.4 +3.5
+5.40 +23.7 +94.5
+1.98 +4.4 +9.8
+1.19 +2.6 +2.8


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg


Lowes NY .44
MGM Rsts NY
McDnlds NY 2.44
MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobityH Nasd
NokiaCp NY .55
Nvidia Nasd ...
OcciPet NY 1.84
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .80
Potash NY .84
PwShs QQQNasd .36
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.37
SearsHldgs Nasd ...
SirdusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY
SPDR FncINY .16
TimeWamr NY .94
US NGsFd NY
VangEmg NY .82
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20


25.09 +.38 +1.5
15.54 +.73 +4.9 +4.6
76.14 +2.09 +2.8 -.8
11.32 +.27 +2.5 +41.2
27.25 -.52 -1.9 -2.4
10.46 -.15 -1.4 +6.7
55.06 +.32 +0.6 +5.9
8.27 +.07 +0.9 +2.0
9.36 -1.70 -15.4 -9.3
23.47 -2.20 -8.6 +52.4
99.74 +2.23 +2.3 +1.7
36.30 +4.71 +14.9 +12.3
63.87 +.03 ... -2.2
18.83 -.47 -2.4 +7.5
188.30 +6.86 +3.8 +21.6
58.44 +1.07 +1.9 +7.3
49.31 -1.08 -2.1 -6.3
133.11 +1.96 +1.5 +5.9
91.20 +7.54 +9.0 +23.7
1.84 +.09 +5.1 +12.9
38.03 +.69 +1.8 -.5
4.60 +20 +4.5 +8.7
17.08 +.47 +2.8 +7.1
36.54 +.62 +1.7 +13.6
5.31 -.55 -9.5 -11.5
45.93 -1.14 -2.4 -4.6
55.69 -.34 -0.6 +3.3
33.76 +1.01 +3.1 +8.9


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars., h = Does not meet continuad-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New In past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by al
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi =
When issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets, d = Deterred sales charge, or
redemption tee. f = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galners and
Loser ,rs ,u-l It a w rr. 1i i) I ;i 2 1 ru i. i , i r. i -i t.I al I, t Most Activel s irT iu e ire l .51 leas : I1 volum- irn
rurirtem ca-r, r i Source Tr.u1:j,.,r.i g- ue. ii re, s ir ..ifm il


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.12 0.15
6-month 0.16 0.17
5-year 2.36 2.27
10-year 3.64 3.65
30-year 4.71 4.73


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9982 .9961
Britain 1.6024 1.6092
Canada .9878 .9958
Euro .7385 .7357


Japan
Mevicn


83.49
12.9 0512


83.32
12.0790


Dow Jones Industrials
Close: 12,273.26
1-week change: 181.11 (1.5%)
1 3 ,0 0 0 ........... .. .........


Name Div
AbdAsPac .42
AdvPhot ..
AntaresP ..
ArcadiaRs ...
ArmourRsdl.44
Augusta g ...
AvalRaren ...
BarcUBS36 ...
BarcGSOil ...
BrclndiaTR ..
Brigus grs ...
CelSci
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn ...
ChiGengM ...
ChinNEPet ...
ChinaShen ...
ClaudeR g ...
Crossh g rs...
Crystallx g ...
DenisnM g ...
EndvSilv g ...
EntGaming ...
Fronteer g ...
GascoEngy ...
GenMoly ...
GoldStr g ..
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasG g ..
GtPanSilvg ...
Hyperdyn ...
Bio ...
InfuSystem ..
KodiakOg ...
MatdCatzg ...
Metalico
MdwGoldg ...
NIVS IntT ...


Wkly YTD
YId PE Chg %Chg
6.2 ... -.01
... ... +.21 +29.0
... ... +.18 +5.9
... ... -.10 -43.5
19.1 ... -.09 -3.7
... ... +.02 +21.0
... ... +.97 +19.7
... ... -.42 +.2
... ... -.86 -7.5
... ... -.56 -17.0
... ... -.04 -20.5
... ... -.00 -13.5
.1 ... +.37 -4.7
... ... +.22 +49.1
... 23 -.13 -41.0
... 3 -.55 -18.4
... 19 +.28 -20.2
... ... -.12 +10.5
... ... +.06 -9.7
... ... -.10 -55.4
... ... +.17 +21.1
... ... -.01 -8.0
... ... +.06 +19.2
... ... +.18 +24.8
... ... -.04 +32.9
... ... -.06 -16.4
... 39 +.06 -14.2
... ... -.07 +10.9
... ... -.17 -11.5
... ... +.17 -6.0
... ... -.41 -2.4
... ... -1.44 +28.5
... ... -.43 +9.0
... ... -.15 -8.2
... 8 +.35 +42.2
... 30 +.30 +1.2
... ... +.20 +66.7
... ... +.45 +9.7


69.48 71.52 6.74 -10.60 43.97


MON TUES WED THUR FRI


12,000

11,000


1 0 ,0 0 0.. . . . .. .. .. .. .. . . .. .. .. ... .


9,000 ...... ....-


0 N.. . . D


.J.. . .F "


MUTUAL FUNDS


Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct MIn nit
Name ObJ ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCOTotRetIs
American Funds GrthAmA m
Fidelity Contra
American Funds CaplncBuA m
Vanguard TotStldx
Vanguard Instldxl
American Funds CpWIdGrlA m
American Funds IncAmerA m
Vanguard 500Adml
American Funds InvCoAmA m
Vanguard TotStlAdm
Vanguard Tointl d
Dodge & Cox Stock
Dodge & Cox IntgStk
American Funds WAMutlnvA m
American Funds EurPacGrA m
FrankTemp-Frankiln Income A m
Vanguard InstPlus
American Funds FnlnvA m
American Funds NewPerspA m
PIMCO TotRetAdm b
Vanguard 5001nv
American Funds BalA m
Fidelity GrowCo
'Vannuard WelitnAdmr


Fidelity LowPriStk d
Harbor IntlinsUl d


138,398
66,607
60,959
58,498
57,503
56,277
55,337
52,903
52,841
49,487
48,887
44,091
44,056
43,842
39,232
38,777
35,395
35,202
33,807
33,217
33,105
32,431
31,913
28,894
28,058
27,383
27,375


+7.0/B
+21.9/E
+27.6/C
+13.3/D
+27.7/A
+25.7/B
+17.6/D
+18.6/B
+25.7/B
+20.1/E
+27.9/A
+20.3/C
+24.6/B
+22.7/A
+22.0/D
+18.5/D
+20.5/A
+25.7/B
+24.5/C
+22.2/C
+6.7/B
+25.6/B
+18.6/B
+34.3/A
+17.6/C
+27.0/E
+23.3/A .


+8.0/A
+3.0/D
+5.6/A
+4.0/C
+3.7/B
+3.2/0
+4.6/B
+4.5/B
+3.1/B
+2.9/C
+3.8/B
43.8/B
+0.9/D
+4.7/A'
+2.6/B
+5.1/A
+6.3/A
+3.2/B
+4.6/A
+6.1/A
+7.7/A
+3.0/B
+4.5/B
+6.8/A
+6.1/A
+5.4/8
+6.8/A


NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
4.25 1,000
NL 200,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 .250
NL 1,000,000
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 50,000
NL 2,500
NL 50,000


Switzerlnd .9739 .9696 CA -ConservativeAlocation Cl -Intennedat-Term Bond, ES -rope Stock FB -Foreignn La ndrowG-Fol, F V-oreon
LargeValue. IH -World Allcart, LB Lrge Blend, LO Growth, LV -Lar Va, MA -Moderate Alocatio, ,MB4 4 a pBlend, -
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth- Mid-Cp Value, SH -Spedaly4ealth, WS -World Stck. Ttal Returnm: Cng in V wit dividends reinvesed. R How fund peoedvs.
ers show dollar in foreign currency. othewith sameoobjec*ive:A Ishitop2%, E hibotlorn20%M ni lnvt run $ needed investinfund. er


New York Stock Exchanae


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Name
iShEMkts
iShB20T T
iS Eafe
iShR2K
iShREst
IngerRd
IBM
Intl Coal
IntlGame
IntPap
Interpublic
Invesco
ItauUnibH
JPMorgCh
JanusCap
JohnJn
JohnsnCtl
JnprNtwk
KB Home
Keycorp
Kimco
KindMor n
KindredHIt
Kinross g
Kohls
Kraft
LDK Solar
LSI Corp
LVSands
LennarA
UllyEli
Limited


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
.64 1.4 ... -.87 -4.2 45.63
3.85 4.3 ... +.65 -5.0 89.46
1.42 2.3 ... +.04 +4.5 60.83
.89 1.1 ... +2.20 +4.9 82.07
1.97 3.3 .. +1.50 +6.1 59.36
.28 .6 28 -.41 +.8 47.49
2.60 1.6 14 +.50 +11.6 163.85
.42 +.92 +20.2 9.30
.24 1.4 23 +.01 -1.0 17.52
.75 2.6 20 +.31 +7.7 29.34
... 38 +.56 +15.9 12.31
.44 1.7 29 +.35 +7.0 25.75
.65 3.0 ... +1.10 -8.3 21.91
.20 .4 12 +1.98 +9.8 46.57
.04 .3 16 +.94 +6.9 13.86
2.16 3.6 13 -.14 -1.9 60.70
.64 1.5 19 +3.22 +8.4 41.41
... 51 +3.35 +17.6 43.41
.25 1.7 ... +.89 +9.6 14.79
.04 .4 21 +.09 +7.8 9.54
.72 3.9 81 +.18 +2.9 18.56
... ... ... ... ... 31.05
... 17 +4.90 +31.3 24.12
.10 .6 25 -.51 -13.3 16.44
... 15 +1.57 -2.9 52.75
1.16 3.8 13 -.53 -2.7 30.66
... 13 +.09 +27.7 12.92
... ... +.12 +8.2 6.48
... 94 +1.19 +2.8 47.22
.16 .8 41 +1.39 +11.5 20.91
1.96 5.7 7 -.52 -1.5 34.52
.80 2.4 18 +1.16 +7.5 33.03


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ASML HId .54
ActivsBliz .17
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT
AllscriptH
AlteraCp If .24
Amazon
Amgen
AmkorT If ...
Apple Inc
ApIdMatI .28
ArmHId .12
Arnis
Atheros
Atmel
AvagoTch .07
AvanirPhm ...
Axcelis
Baidus ...
BeaconPw ...
BioFuelEn ..
BioSante ...
BrigExp
Broadcom .36
BrcdeCm
CAInc .16
Cadence ...
CpstnTrbh ..
Celgene
Cephin
ChkPoint ...
ChinaMda ...
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco
CitzRepBh ...
Clearwire ...
CoanizTech...


... +.11 +13.6 43.54
35 -.96 -13.3 10.78
23 +.31 +9.4 33.67
46 -6.45 -11.9 41.43
67 +.60 +14.4 22.05
17 +.45 +16.4 41.40
75+13.32 +5.1 189.25
11 -1.46 -2.1 53.74
8 -.66 +1.2 7.50
20+10.35 +10.6 356.85
23 -.48 +14.0 16.01
... +.19 +42.9 29.64
24 +.72 +22.2 13.71
60 +.14 +24.5 44.71
18 +1.20 +30.8 16.12
20 +2.09 +17.2 33.29
... -.27 -7.1 3.79
+.07 -17.6 2.85
86+11.90 +34.2 129.58
... -.01 +31.8 .29
... +.11 -39.7 1.05
... +.25 +40.9 2.31
... +2.70 +17.4 31.99
22 -2.19 +.2 43.63
23 -.20 +11.2 5.88
17 +.51 +2.3 25.00
16 +.54 +21.4 10.03
... +.20 +57.3 1.51
28 +.70 -12.1 51.99
11 -1.40 -5.1 58.56
25 +4.41 +7.8 49.88
3 -1.97 -24.7 11.92
... +.94 +32.3 27.84
18 -.55 +51.8 24.26
14 -3.35 -7.6 18.70
... +.07 +27.3 .78
... +.05 +14.4 5.89
32 +.08 +3.0 75.50


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Comcast .38
Comc spcl .38
Conexant ...
CorinthC ..
Cree Inc
Ctrip.com ...
CypSemi ...
Dell Inc
DirecTVA ..
DishNetwk ...
DryShips ..
ETrade rs ...
eBay
EagleBulk ...
ElectArts ...
Emcorelf ...
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .28
Expedia .28
ExpScrips ...
F5 Netwks ...
FifthThird .04
Finisar
Flextm ...
FresKabi rt ..
FuelCell ...
GSI Cmmrc ...
GT Solar ...
Genzyme ...
GileadSci ..
GluMobile ...
GreenMtCs...
Hologic
HudsClty .60
Intel .72
Intersil .48
IvanhoeEn ...
JA Solar


19 +.73 +9.7
18 +.65 +9.1
61 +.38 +50.6
... +.07 -6.1
30. +2.71 -16.0
47 +1.51 +6.2
46 +.23 +26.8
13 +.08 +3.1
26 +.68 +8.9
11 +1.56 +19.0
24 +.03 -8.3
... +.72 +11.8
25 +2.30 +24.0
10 -.10 -15.9
.. -.02 +11.2
.. +.52+112.0
14 -.40 -14.7
... -.09 +9.9
14 -3.94 -15.1
30 +1.14 +7.8
59 +2.98 -2.7-
.25 +.07 +5.3
45 +4.04 +44.9
16 +.07 +2.4
... +.03+100.0
... +.04 -18.6
.. -1.12 -8.4
10 +.10 +22.8
... -.85 +1.9
12 -.40 +5.9
... +.15 +69.1
82 +3.85 +32.3
... +.68 +7.2
11 +.34 -9.9
11 +.08 +3.5
62 -.11 -14.9
... -.12 +22.1
8 +.48 +11.7


Name Div
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
KLA Tnc 1.00
Level3
lululemn g ..
MIPS Tech...
MannKd
MarinaBrs ...
MarvellT ...
Mattel .92
Maximlntg .84
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .64
Motricityn
NasdOMX ..
NetApp
Netflix ...
NewsCpA .15
NewsCpB .15
Novell
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia
OnSmcnd ...
OpenTable ...
Opnext
Oracle .20
Orexigen
Oxigene h ...
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .48
PacEthh ...
PattUTI .20
PeopUtdF .62
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ0 .36
Qualcom .76


Wkly YTD W kly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


.. +5.40
20 +.27
20 +1.30
... +.03
63 +7.35
30 +.75
... -1.36
... -.28
22 +.01
14 +.31
32 +.50
... -.18
6 +.27
7 -.52
... -2.92
13 +1.56
40 +2.67
78+11.00
17 +.52
17 -.05
6 -.01
82 -1.41
65 -2.20
15 -.22
...+10.37
... +.73
25 +.85
... -.29
... -.01
23 +.11
42 +1.92
... -.08
34 +.46
40 -.06
... -.02
9 -.38
... +1.07
27 +2.37


+94.5 28.16
-8.2 6.07
+21.5 46.93
+27.6 1.25
+23.2 84.31
-6.3 14.22
-53.0 3.79
-47.1 .82
+6.5 19.75
+.5 25.56
+12.8 26.64
+12.9 7.18
+41.2 11.32
-2.4 27.25
-8.2 17.05
+18.5 28.12
+10.3 60.60
+31.5 231.07
+19.5 17.40
+11.6 18.33
+.5 5.95
+4.1 18.93
+52.4 23.47
+14.6 11.32
+34.7 94.95
+87.5 3.30
+6.9 33.47
-58.9 3.32
-31.6 .16
-3.7 8.27
-8.4 52.52
+1.1 .73
+19.6 25.78
-6.3 13.13
+6.1 3.33
-12.9 8.88
+7.3 58.44
+16.4 57.60


Name Div
UncNat .20
UoydBkg
LaPac
LyonBasA ...
MBIA
MEMC
MF Global ...
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .20
Manitowoc .08
Manpwl .74
Manulifeg .52
MarathonO 1.00
MktVGold .40
MktVRus .18
MarlntA .35
Marshlls .04
Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
Medtrnic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
MobileTels ...
Molycorp n ..
Monsanto 1.12
MonstrWw ..
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
MotriaSol n ..
MotriaMon ...





Name Div
RF MicD
RschMotn ...
Riverbed s ...
SanDisk
SeagateT
Sequenom ...
SiriusXM
SkywksSol ...
SmithMicro
Staples .36
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .30
SterlBcsh .06
SunPowerA...
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .20
TakeTwo
Tekelec
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .78
TiVo Inc
TriQuint
UranmRs ...
UrbanOut
Veecolnst ...
Verisign 3.00
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.33
WholeFd .40
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 1.00
Xilinx .64
YRC Wwrs ...
Yahoo
Zalicus
ZionBcp .04


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
.6 13, +.85 +14.2 31.75
... ... +.15 +3.4 4.25
... ... +.75 +19.0 11.26
... ... +.90 +7.8 37.07
... ... +.51 -5.9 11.28
92 +.42 +21.9 13.73
... .. +.19 +1.8 8.51
S+1.69 -1.4 10.05
... .. +.73 +4.6 15.54
.8 16 +1.80 -2.7 24.62
.4 ... +.53 +46.4 19.19
1.1 ... -1.08 +7.7 67.59
... ... -.91 +5.8 18.17
2.2 13 +.62 +25.5 46.48
.7 ... -.38 -9.3 55.73
.5 ... -.89 +3.5 39.23
.8 40 +1.22 -.8 41.22
.5 ... +.13 +6.6 7.38
2.1 ... +.15 +11.9 14.17
.4 ... +.69 +17.6 63.09
2.3 12 +.45 +7.0 39.69
4.6 16 +.18 -8.2 33.07
1.5 15 +.89 +8.5 48.23
.. 22 +.11 +3.4 13.06
... 34 +.26 -5.3 19.77
... ... -3.53 -4.3 47.77
1.5 33 +.39 +7.8 75.05
... ... +1.10 -28.2 16.96
.7 12 +.31 +10.8 30.16
.2 20 +5.79 +15.7 88.32
... ... +.03 +3.4 39.34
... ... -.19 +7.0 31.15




Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... 18 +1.00 +10.2 8.10
... 11 +3.18 +15.0 66.87
... ... +4.76 +19.1 41.87
... 9 +2.98 +2.3 51.01
5 +.06 -4.3 14.39
+.03 -12.8 7.00
92 +.09 +12.9 1.84
.. 40 +1.63 +27.7 36.55
37 -4.40 -45.6 8.56
1.6 19 -.32 -2.3 22.25
1.6 24 +.91 +3.8 33.35
1.6 29 -.13 +2.8 18.82
.7 ... +.27 +31.5 9.23
... 37 +1.03 +25.0 16.04
... 24 +.28 +10.2 18.44
.9 21 +.36 +11.2 21.12
... 18 +1.70 +29.0 15.82
... 23 -3.03 -28.2 8.55
1.4 14 +.31 -14.6 5.79
1.5 15 -2.84 -2.1 51.04
... +24.8 10.77
... 12 -.01 +16.4 13.61
... ... -.23 -8.5 3.11
... 23 +2.85 +5.0 37.61
... 6 +7.90 +22.1 52.47
... 8 +1.43 +12.4 36.71
.6 ... +1.49 +.7 27.42
4.6 ... +.02 +10.5 29.21
.7 37 +6.67 +17.9 59.67
7.6 20 +.16 -5.4 13.19
.8 ..+11.04 +24.3 129.19
1.9 14 +.32 +16.6 33.78
... ... -.90 -3.8 3.58
... 19 +.07 +1.3 16.85
... 8 +.27 +48.7 2.35
.2 ... +.36 +3.0 24.96


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Wkly YTD Wkly-
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Neoprobe ...
Neuralstem ...
Nevsun g ...
NDragon
NwGold g ...
NAPallg ...
NDynMng ..
NthnO&G ...
NthgtM g ...
NovaGId g ...
Ollsandsg ...
OpkoHIth
ParaG&S ...
PionDrill
Protalix ...
PudaCoal
Quepasa ...
RadientPh
RareEleg
Rentech
RexahnPh ...
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G ...
SulphCo ...
Taseko
TimbednR
TmsatlPet...
TravelCtrs ..
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UQM Tech ...
Uluru
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UranlumEn ...
VantageDr ...
WizzardSft ...
YM Bioq ...


... +.23 +55.3
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... +1.87 +5.2
24 +.23 -8.8
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-.07 +2.3
... +.01 -5.9
-.00 -1.6
... +.15 +6.9


,. -


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


BUY IT


SELL T.


aFIND ITIT


O.Mw l r 77M$250





4 lines 6 days ah additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.
S Eaci Ite usnclud pe




One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days ch additional




Rate applies to private Individuals selling
Personal merchandise totalling 500 or less.



Each Item must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.





4 lines 6 days ling$1.15
Rate applies to private individuals selling



pers l merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.



Each l tem most Ici a raco.
This is a non-reundable rate.












One item per ad
4 lines 6 daysia $ additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
persona merchandise ttai 00 or ess.
m Each pe t include a ptice. h
This isa non-refundable rate.




One item per ad n p
4 lines 6 daysEah additional
line $1.658
Each Item must Include a price.







4o ine$ 50em

Includes Z S igns E at adt i nal si 65



Limited to service type advertis-

4 lines, one month....92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per




You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or e-mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is toAppear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00a.m. Wedll .,9:00a.m.
Friday Thurs, 10:00a.m. Thui s,9:00a.m.
Saturday Fi., 10:00a.m. Fi.,9:00a.t.
Sunday Fri, 10:00a.m. Fli.,9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lIcation. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion

which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,

Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard


abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and O0nline
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Legal

FLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE
BID# 11-1-03
HUMAN PATIENT SIMULATORS
FLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE
DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUSTEES
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
The Board of Trustees of Florida
Gateway College is inviting interest-
ed eligible bidders to submit bids for
Human Patient Simulators. The cost
of the acquisition of this equipment
is funded by a grant provided by the
United States Department of Health
and Human Services.
BID DATE AND TIME
Sealed bids for Florida Gateway Col-
lege ITB 11-1-03 Human Patient
Simulators will be accepted at the
Florida Gateway College Purchasing
Office, Florida, until 2:00 P.M. (lo-
cal time) Thursday March 10, 2011.
PLACE FOR RECEIVING BIDS
Bids may be mailed to:
Purchasing Department
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Bids may be hand delivered to:
Purchasing Department
Florida Gateway College
198 S.E. Staff Way
Administration Building 001, Room
138
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
All bids must arrive and be date/time
stamped by a Purchasing Department
representative prior to the specified
bid date/time. Bids received after
that time will not be accepted. The
College will not be responsible for
Postal or other delivery service de-
lays that cause a bid to arrive at
Room 138, Building 001 after the
designated bid opening date/time.
Bids that are mailed must be clearly
marked on the outside of the enve-
lope:
BID # 11-1-03, HUMAN PATIENT
SIMULATORS
Florida Gateway College, Lake City,
Florida
BID OPENING: 2:00 P.M. THURS-
DAY, MARCH 10, 2011.
Bids will be opened and read aloud
in a public bid opening in Room 101,
Building 001.
BID PACKAGE
Interested bidders may obtain a Bid
Package from Bill Brown, Director
of Purchasing for Florida Gateway
College by any of the following
methods.
By email:
bill.brown@fgc.edu
By USPS: Request sent certi-
fied mail to:
Purchasing Department
Florida Gaieway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Walk-in Pick Up:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
198 S.E. Staff Way
Administration Building 001, Room
138
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
ELIGIBLE BIDDERS
Eligible bidders are defined as those
bidders who are not excluded from
bidding according to the Federal
Government's Excluded Parties List
(www.epls.gov
) or by. Sec-
tion 287.133, Florida Statute.
BID AWARD
The College reserves the right to re-
ject any or all bids, and/or accept that
bid(s) that is in the best interest of
the College with price, qualifications
and other factors taken into consider-
ation. This bid requests prices for
multiple items. The College reserves
the right to award the bid, by item, to
the Bidder(s) which, in the sole dis-
cretion of the College, is the most re-
sponsive and responsible Bidder(s),
price, qualifications and other factors
considered for that item. The College
will advertise this bid notice for a
minimum of three (3) weeks and will
make the bid package available to
bidders during that time.
RIGHT TO WAIVE IRREGULARI-
TIES AND TECHNICALITIES
Florida Gateway College reserves
.the right to waive minor irregulari-
ties and/or technicalities associated
with this solicitation. The Director
of Purchasing of Florida Gateway
College shall be the final authority
regarding waivers of irregularities
and technicalities.
Bill Brown
Director of Purchasing
Florida Gateway College
04543507
February 13, 16. 20, 2011


010 Announcements




U.YT WN!


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


020 Lost & Found








LOST KEYS, Feb 3, 2011
Black, Blue & White Ford Key
chain, if found, please call
386-867-9353

100 Job

100 Opportunities

04543275
Wanna Go West? Let's Go!
CDL A Operators Wanted for
Lease with a Lease Purchase
Plan, Spouse and Pet Rider
Policy, Health and Life
Insurance Available. 12-15 day
trips, No New England States,
You get 100% fuel surcharge,
0/0's and PTDI
Certified Students Welcome
CALL TODAY TO JOIN US
AND' START
THE NEW YEAR
OFF RIGHT !
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

04543458
Family Services Analyst
Non-Profit organization is
seeking highly motivated
professional for
VPK/School Readiness/Parent
Education Position. Experience
in Social Services or related
field preferred salary
$9.62-$12.98 plus benefits.
Fluently Bilingual in
English/Spanish preferred
Send resumes by
February 14, 2011 to:
Early Learning Coalition
Attn: HR, 1104 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025 or fax to
386-752-8094

05525065
THE HEALTH CENTER
OF LAKE CITY
Has a full-time opening for
Maintenance Director, Excellent
Salary EOE/ADA/
Drug Free Workplace
Apply in person or
send resume to:
560 SW McFarlane Avenue
Lake City, FL 32025
Fax: 386-961-9296
Email: healthcenter@thehealth
center.comcastbiz.net

05525120
s Travel Coountry RV Center
is looking for a F/T
Auto Body Painter
exp in paint mixing, fiberglass
& collision repair a must
We offer complete medical
benefits, plus 401K retirement
Please call James Harris
@ 386-752-3723


FLORIDA
A GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
PROGRAMS
224 Duty Days Tenured Track
(Revised and Re-advertised)
InstrUctor to teach and assist the
EMS Coordinator and Executive
Director of Public Service Programs
in various aspects of program
development, planning and
implementation of the EMT-Basic,
Paramedic, and EMS Associate
Degree programs, as well as
Firefighter programs. He/she
maintains a close relationship with
clinical sites and part-time faculty,
and assists in program expansion and
student recruitment; also assists
Coordinator in maintaining state and
national program accreditation.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
Bachelor's degree in emergency
medical services or closely related
field. Master's degree preferred. .
KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, ABILITIES
REQUIRED: Paramedic certification
either at the state or national level
(must have Florida state license
within six months of hire). Four years
experience as a paramedic with an
ALS provider. Must have two years
experience (full or part-time) teaching
EMS. Must be able to establish and
maintain effective working
relationships with others. Knowledge
of EMS equipment. DESIRABLE
QUALIFICATIONS: Master's degree
in emergency medical services or
closely related field, or Master's
degree with 18 graduate hours in the
emergency medical services or
closely related field. Minimum three
years teaching experience at the
technical school or community college
level. ACLS, PALS, and PHTLS
instructor certification. Experience
with program accreditation process.
Experience with American Heart
Association accreditation and
credentialing. Fire/rescue experience.
Knowledge of firefighter equipment
and certification.
Salary: Based on degree and
experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 2/28/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City FI 32025-2007


100 Jb0
100 Opportunities
A/C SERVICE Tech
Min 5 yrs experience
F/T with benefits
Please call 386-454-4767
Auto Technician wanted, must
have lots of experience and own
tools, up to $1500 per week
call 386-758-4757
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Cable Technicians wanted in
Lake City and the surrounding
areas. Must pass background
check and drug screen and have a
valid driver's license.
Call 877-393-6356
CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Certified VPK Teacher needed.
Please do not call if you
are not certified. 386-755-7677
6:30a-5:30p or 344-5363 after 5:30
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who.
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.
Farm Workers
Planting, cultivating and
harvesting crops, 40hrs/wk 8:00am
- 4:00pm. $9.94 hr. Overtime + 1/2
after 60hrs. 5 temp. jobs March -
mid Nov. Homestead Farm
guarantees to offer worker work
for at least 3/4 of the workdays of
the contract period. Transportation
& Subsistence expenses to
worksite provided upon
completion of 50% Work
Contract. Housing provided at no
cost for those living a long
distance from permanent
residence. Tools, supplies, and
equipment provided at no cost.
Call Homestead Farm, Poolesville,
MD (301-926-6999) between
9AM-1PM for appointment. Or
apply for this job at the local State
Workforce Agency using job
listing Number MD0328720.
PT Clerical position 8-12p M-F.
Must be a people person w/good
organizational, phone & customer
skills. Must multi task. Send
resume & ref's to Box 04108, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

12A Medical
1 U Employment

04543460
Cancer Care of North Florida is
currently seeking a
MEDICAL ASSISTANT for a
fast paced work environment
Requires HS Diploma and
excellent Phlebotomy skills
with certification
Intergy Experience and
excellent verbal/written
communication skills.
Qualified candidates please
email resume to:
jpapesh(cancercarenorthflori-
da.com

05525050

Medical Personnel


RN's for Med/Surg &
Telemetry, Top Daily pay,
Local Medical Centers,
1-877-630-6988

05525076
Nurse On Call
Home Health Agency,
Medicare certified, is now
hiring RN, LPN, PT & ST
Sign on bonus for F/T
352-395-6424,
Fax 352-395-6519

Client Service Representative
for busy Clinical Lab
Please submit resume to
hr@chclabs.com or
fax to 386-758-1791
Medical Assistant/ Phlebotomist
for busy urology practice.
Send Resume' to Bush Urology.
386-752-4189


1 Medical
120 Employment

05525103l




MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
RN's
PRN/1 yr experience
CNA
F/T & PRN

ARNP Outpatient Svcs
Starke/Tri County

Prevention Specialist
Starke

Bachelors Therapist
Rehab/Support
Masters Therapists
Adult Substance Abuse
(Licensed)
Lake City

Adult Case Manager
Child Case Manager
Live Oak/Lake City
Lake Butler
Psychiatrist
Outpatient clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
www.mbhci.org
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP

PT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.


140 Work Wanted

We Run Errands!
Your personal errand service to
help those in need at rates you can
afford Call Dawn 386-249-9426

170 Business
170 Opportunities
Liquor License
Columbia County
Will Finance
561-252-0495

240 Schools &
240 Education

0(4543248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
a Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/14/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/14/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

Boxer Puppy, AKC, H/C
fawn w/black mask,
$500
904-653-1839
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware. Costume Jewelry.


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 .Furniture

Love Seat-Broyhill. Blue/gray,
matching pillows and arm covers.
Good condition. $95.
386-454-4947


420 Wanted to Buy

I BUY WORKING AND
NON WORKING
APPLIANCES!
CALL 386-365-1915
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


WANTED TO BUY
Garage Door -
7'X9'
386-755-1937


430 Garage Sales












PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

463 Building
63 Materials

ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available


530 Marine Supplies

1986 Mercury Outboard, 50 HP, -
hydraulic tilt, with controls,
$500,
386-623-3923

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
pets ok, $500 dep $575 mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2006 SWMH 3/2 on
2.5 acres, fenced, in Olustee,$700
mo,includes W/D, safe & quiet
Call 904-349-5192






Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water.
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547


Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621 64 Mobile Homes

REPORTER Classifieds 640 for Sale
*Lot Model Sale*
In Print and On Line Save 1,000's @ Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
www.Iakecityreporter.com For Model Info and Details


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?


p. --'
Comfortable ...
virk /
( environment ou
*',- l .. our skills
_I and
posiise attitude


Apply Online or In Personl


SiTEL


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


055249410
Palm Harbor Homes
Short Sales/Repo's/Used Homes
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
Won't Last!! $3,500 40k
John 800-622-2832 Ext. 210

1985 SWMH. 1/1,
$1,000
Is able to move
386-209-7691
Come in and see the
Future in Manufactured Homes.
Royals Homes making
people smile
386-754-6737
Come See all New Lot Models
Royals Homes. Honesty! Integrity!
Customer Satisfaction
386-754-6737
Looking for a Modular?
Come see the Specialists
at Royals Homes and ask for Bo
386-754-6737


Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr(o.fqc.edu
I iUC is accredited b Ih omissionon on C oCllges o
Ihe S holhehn As ,Tcalon ornr (lleg0 e 1 ind Schonls
VPi'ADAI.AT,.O illge in I dutlcl an-
[+----- lInnplouvIn cnl ------


- ADvantage


I











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
Handy man special, Ft White area,
4/2 plus den, Fleetwood DWMH
on 1 acre, river access, owner
financing, $69.900, $1000 down,
$605 month 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
New 2011 Homes are Here
3BR/4BR at Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
Homes Built Your Way!
New,2010 MH,never been
occupied, front & back deck,
$99,900 MLS#76635 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
@ Westfield Realty
Owner Fin, 3/2, DWMH, new-
paint,carpet, small down $625mon
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Royals Homes is Quality!
We treat you like Family.
Stop in or Call Catherine
386-754-6737

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
105524833
No Application Fee +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 bedroom Apartments &
mobile homes,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Gatorwood on the Westside
Rent $650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $500. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Gorgeous Lake View. 2 br Apt
Water included. $545. mo plus
deposit. Close to shopping.
386-344-0579
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Move In Special.2/1 w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
Quail Heights 2br/lba duplex.
Secluded, private, safe. W/D
hookup. $700. mo. $500 security.
386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec..
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,'
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
SHome For Rent
3/2 on 2.1 acres, 2 car garage,
ceramic tile, front & rear porches,
$995 mo, plus 2 mo sec.
Lease with the option to buy
386-758-9996
3/2, fenced back yard, nice
neighborhood, near CHS.
$800 per month.
386-623-2848.
4/3 Refurbished Home w/CH/A
for Rent or Sale,
on East side of town
Call 386-294-2494 for details
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
CH/A, carport. $650/mo. + sec.
Includes all utilities & satellite TV.
Pets OK. (386)758-2408
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $675 mo,
$600 sec., 386-497-4699
Nice, private, quiet, 2/1, 4 miles S
of Lake City, $500 dep, $550 mo
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

750 Business &
v Office Rentals
1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!


750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
Great locations on SW Main Blvd.
Retail, Wholesale, Distribution,
Office. 1200+ sf only $950. per
mo. Includes Utilities 752-5035
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet andfsafe environment
Security available 386-752-4072

780 Condos for Sale
3 bdrm Condo Nit, back patio,
HOA fees include ext maintenance
of home, lawn & pool MLS#76797
$110,000, Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237

805 Lots for Sale
1 acre lot outside the city limits .
Homes only subdivision. Priced
below the assessed value with the
county, $16,900 Hallmark Real
Estate 386-867-1613
2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613
Beautiful 5+ acre lot, partially
cleared w/large oaks, Homes only,
$38,000, MLS 75038 Call Roger
Lovelady @ Westfield Realty
386-365-7039
Charming Turn of the Century,
property, close to
downtown,MLS# 74814
$94,900 386-755-0808
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Nice 4.5 acre parcel w/S/P/W
older SWMH $39,900
MLS# 76182 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal .
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale.
2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
3/2 home w/1t758 sq ft, Storage
bldg, enclosed patio & deck,
$168,000 Call Carrie Cason @
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
MLS# 73410
3/2 w/over 1700 sq ft, fireplaces,
modem kitchen, fenced yard, 2
sheds, convenient location
$89,500 MLS#73861 Call Patti
@Access Realty 386-623-6896
4 bdrm + office, 2 living & dining
areas, front & back porch
$279,900 MLS# 72831
Call Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty 386-755-0808
4/2 2300 plus sq ft,Palm Harbor
Home on 2 lots, Good Condition
$69,888 Call Nancy Rogers @
386-867-1271 Results Realty
4/2 1,800 sq ft on 10.5 acres,
newly remodeled inside, detached
garage, above ground pool
$189,888, Call Nancy,
Results Realty 386-867-1271
5 bedroom Home on 5 acres south
of Lake City, Big Rooms
lots of space $229,500
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
MLS# 72928 Westfield Realty
5/2, 180Qsf, 24 acres, family rm,
screened back porch, RV i
parking,newly painted close to VA
& DOT, Call Pam @ Remax.
386-303-2505
5/3 Triplewide MH (2200) sq ft,
w/2 master bdnnrms, on 10 fenced
acres, fireplace. MLS# 76226
$75,000 Call Patti Taylor
386-623-6896 Access Realty
AFFORDABLE 3BR/2BA mfg
home in Woodgate Village only
$27,000 #76741
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110
Beautifully Landscaped 3/1 on
1.11 ac, 16x24 detached garage,
screen perched bldg, water
purification system, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505


810 Home for Sale
BANK OWNED ON-SITE
Real Estate Auction
Live Oak
1223 S. Ohio Ave.
5br/3ba. 3296 sqft. on .36 acres
Sale Date: Sat. Mar 19 at 12 noon.
FREE COLOR BROCHURE
www.AuctionServicesIntl.com
Jay Lloyd AU2073/AB 1172
Brick home with 2,700 sqft under
roof. Large master w/bath on .5
acres completely fenced. $167,500
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613
Brick, .59 ac. 3br/2ba w/large
spacious rooms. Split floor plan.
2 car garage & storage $222,900.
Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Close to town, 2 story home
w/stone, fireplace, downstairs
master bdrm, $144,900
MLS# 77050 Call Carrie Cason
386-623-2806 Westfield Realty
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, Woodcrest. Great area, split
plan. Screened back porch. Elaine
K. Tolar. 386-755-6488 $139,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba. 3 Fireplaces. 39.7 acres
included. Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Reduced, brick w/over 2,000 sqft,
5 ac. 3br/2ba.Lots of extras. Elaine
K. Tolar 755-6488 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lakeview home in town, Old
charm w/many upgrades Elaine K.
Tolar. 386-755-6488 $189,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2 Story, 4br/2.5ba-2160 sqft. Spa-
cious plan w/garage Lori Geibeig
Simpson 365-5678 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba close to town. 1620 sqft
w/covered patio& more. Lori Gei-
beig Simpson 365-5678 $117,900
Coral Shores Realty 2004
Custom built home, 23 fenced ac.
1700 ft paved frontage. Lg
kitchen/pantry, master/bath.
386-965-5905 Bob Gavette
Comer lot in Piccadilly Park.
Newly painted in/out. New carpet
/vinyl. 2 car garage. Inground
pool. $133,500. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
CUSTOM-BUILT 4BR mfg
home w/screen porch, front deck,
shed $87,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #73893
Cute 3/2 nicely remodeled home,
2 acres, partially fenced
$115,888
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473
Derington Properties, LLC
3/2 MH, large deck and
screened porch, 5 ac.
$46,500 -386-965-4300 ,
Derington Properties, LLC
DWMH, 5 ac. Screened front/back
porches. 20x40 shop fully equip-
ped w/bath. $74,900. 965-4300
Family home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Great Investment Property!
House needs lots of TLC, close to
-shopping and schools, $35,000,
Bring all offers, Results Realty
Call Brittany 386-397-3473
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg
home near Wellborn on
5+ acres ONLY $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76768,
Log Cabin home, located on
5 acres, wrap around porch
$199,000 MLS#75550
'Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax Realty
Lrg Brick Home, well-established
neighborhood, in town,
$129,900 MLS#77016
Call Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
Must See! 4/2 2368SF Home,
island kitchen, den, fire place,
storage, auto gate entry,
Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfect starter home. Quiet area.
Wood laminate floors, Ig dining,
French doors. 1 car garage/work-
shop $84,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfection! Marion Place, gated,
brick 3/2 over 1800 sqft. Screened
lanai $158,900 386-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
Qualified General Contractor
dding top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.


810 Home for Sale
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $55,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75210
REDUCED TO $61,500 in
Eastside Vlg! Immaculate
2BR/2BA w/lg rooms
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76753
Solid Home! Needs updating.
Country eat in kitchen & formal
dining.Some windows replaced.
$70,000 Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
SPACIOUS 2BR/2BA home on 1
ac w/attached garage &
2-story shed $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76887
Totally refurbished 2/2 w/
workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Very Nice 4/2 on 4 acres w/open
floor plan, 2 living rooms, eat in
kitchen, dining rm and rec rm
w/wet bar $89,900 Call Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well maintained 3/2 DWMH,
1568 sq ft, acres, new roof,
$65,000, MLS#76187
Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
820 Farms&
82 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down; $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
8 Property
Aprox 4000 sq ft Commercial
bldg, 4 bay/2 car lift shop, show-
room/office area, $1000 a month
lease or will sell for $128,000.
Call Martin @ 386-697-9950
Coral Shores Realty. Prime
commercial, located on Hwy 41 &
Gibson Ln. 26X54 concrete block.
$76,000 386-965-5905
Call Bob Gavette
Downtown & borders 3 streets.
Aprox. 10,000 sqft fenced parking.
"as is" Bob Gavette. $73,000. 386-
965-5905 Coral Shores Realty
Prime Commercial Property
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya 3.27 acres, room for building
$398,888 386-867-1271
Call Nancy @ Results Realty

930 Motorcycles


2008 Honda 750 C2 Spini, 4900
miles, windshield, engine guard,
backrest, luggage rack, like new
$3800 386-365-3658


940 Trucks
.1995 TOYOTA P/U Extra'Cab.
Auto., fibergalss topper, AC.,
4 cyl 22R. Real nice, 180k mi.
$3500.00 (352)339-5158
.97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802









It's Tax Time, Work Truck
1990 Ford F350 Dually,
5th Wheel White, Automatic
$1500 obo 386-965-2215


950 Cars for Sale
Cf"FlT' I" A 'TTI rTIIAV A7 II


NEED HELP!


Foryu! cu755544Oo~yA


Contact us

at the paper.






CLASSIFIED ADS
386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293


ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO
ads@lakecityreporter.com

Mon.-Fri.: 8 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.


for your car, truck, van or SUV. THS REPORT WORKSFOR W
(Running or not). Call anytime.
(229)412-0380 lA Cit y R epo,
REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line 180 East Duval St.
www.Ilakecityreporter.com Lake City, Forida 32055


S- U-








Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


IEIEL~E~
irnuI.m~ur~n


Have you read the newspaper today


6 days a week you'll find it here...

LAk Ciy Reportr
.... mmOm-
'(^ ''((n^


2008 Honda 750
C2 Spirit
Windshield, engine guard,
backrest, luggage rack,
like new, 4900 miles.
$3,800
Call
386-365-3658


TO lae Yor A, Cal
HEELS & WATERCRAFT

B,


$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

To^ e y^Tl 1*IB
Vehice [*Td Call


Classified Department: 755-5440










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011


BEER TOBACCO OUTL


..- Full Synthetic



Includes up to 5 quarts
of 1Oil and Filler
wwl 1 1P IM IT I.


Most cars & trucks
expires 2/28/11


Rotate &
Balance
Tires
Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
Not valid with any other offer
expires 2/28/11


L V 4' i



TiH '1 S TION
(next to The Money Man)
SNO AI'PjNiMfTEN N[:..SSARY Er rr NIAR FI IN,
-ALl. Fri C \N B. DEDUCTrD ~ RF n AN ir .ic 'i I ANs*
HELPING THOUSANDS ow Fon 2 BECAODS IN fIflTfi THE LRGEST fisIH THEY AIE m fliTm
Bl(It,. I rIf'. AD \V'ITIil ',(1 IOR 0% OP oN( I' f.i'fAI't.11A N R' IN i1
CALL THE TAX HOTLINE 7 9
THE TAX NATION -
(next to The Money Man) r ,.' -
1010 SW MAIN BLVD. LKF CIlY, FL
A A Tu RIev.uo Acmimui;TArn! Fu WToL ALTO Elam nc s Ritu. rC c> (ERCI Ao ELf.-MOjc REsm.s DEPOsm (ERDt A Rrruw A awarwon lo. RAL)
MA BE *APtLID FO IN ADDTIoo t AX ERC ol ERO, "D I, otIoED FlAiawcE GU.'* *.AN C f-BrT TI rrT roTI N EF TiiL Aavy ERC ERDT is RAL3
A nwooircrs 'oubs, i RE'usuc B ItI & TQu-r Co*w,. ComSwUI'' AT oup T Ar PEmArE Aiow Am A. ornm riLN.O Ormags


JOU-I JJ- .VUU
950 SW MAIN BLVD


!WECAS- H A X .F"N.- .C" '
S .., '. ,, -" J ,
,' '...' '


m












Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
crisak@lokecltyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, February 13, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl. edu


Growing

a local

farm

market

arming isn't
an easy job. It
requires long
hours, seven-day
work weeks, and
ifts always at the mercy
of unpredictable weather.
Not everyone has the time,
resources or skills to pro-
duce nutritious fruits and
vegetables.
Luckily, we can still get
that quality produce at a
farmer's market.
When we buy locally, we
can expect certain benefits.
Fruits and vegetables that
are harvested and sold at
their peak have better fla-
vor and nutritional value.
People usually say that
the fresh taste of just
picked produce is the main
reason that they shop at a
farmer's market.
The U.S. Department of
Agriculture estimates that
produce travels an average
of 2,000 miles from the
farm to its destination in
the supermarket.
Wouldn't you prefer to
buy fresh produce that
was grown right here from
neighbors in Columbia
County?
When you think about
it, American farmers feed
our country and the world.
These farmers are all local
farmers to a community
somewhere.
Why ship off all local
produce and eat food that
has traveled across the
county for days?
Buy and sell some direct-
ly to neighbors at a farm
market.
So what's the fuss over
fresh fruits and vegetables?
They are critical to good
health because they con-
tain vitamins, minerals, and
fiber.
To get the amount
that's recommended, most
people need to increase the
amount of fruits and veg-
etables they eat every day.
We need to eat different
colors of produce to get
a wide range of nutrients.
Some examples are green
spinach, orange sweet
potatoes, black beans, yel-
low corn, purple plums,
red watermelon, and white
onions.
A group of community
leaders with vision are
planning to start a produce
farm market in Lake City
this spring. Fruit and veg-
etable growers-are needed.
If you are a grower, or are
thinking about growing for
a farm market, give me a
call at (386) 752-5384.
Don't miss our Spring
Vegetable Garden presenta-
tions this week; 5:45 p.m.,
Thursday, Feb. 17, at the
new Fort White Library
and 2 p.m., Saturday, Feb.
19, at the Lake City down-
town library. Bring your
questions for the Master
Gardeners.

* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Charlette Hines receives a Valentine's Day gift from her friend Brandon Hurst. Valentine's Day is a great time to show love to your friends, Hurst said.







Sweet eats


LC residents show various ways to mark Valentine's Day


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Sometimes it's the little
things that makes
a Valentine's Day
memorable for a person.
Receiving cards from her fellow class-
mates provided fond memories for Rebah
Solomon of Lake City.
Teachers provided lists of everyone's
name in the classroom and parents pur-
chased boxes of cards with different char-
acters, she said. Her favorite character
was "Beauty and the Beast."
Students would beforehand make giant
paper hearts to hold all the cards.
Solomon received similar Valentine's
Day cards from random friends while in
college.
"I used to get cards in my mailbox,"
she said. "It was surprising."
One year Solomon gave out puppy and
kitty cards which could be used for book-
marks, she said. The cards were from a
pack at Target and only cost about $3.
"They loved their cards a lot,"
Solomon said.
Each Valentine's Day with
his wife is memorable for Matt
Brandon of Lake City.
"It's just an extra day I give my wife
the love and respect she deserves," he
said.
Brandon might not bring her flow-
ers everyday, but she receives them on
Valentine's Day.
The couple don't plan on going out and
doing the full-blown commercial side of
the holiday this year, he said.
"We're both off of work Monday and are
going to spend the day together," he said.
Making Valentine's Day memorable isn't
just for a couple.
"If you don't have a significant other to
show love toward, show it to someone else
you normally might not," Brandon said.
"Not everyone has a person to spend the
day with."
E Originality is the key to making each
Valentine's Day memorable, said Tanza
Williams of Lake City. -
"It's not just the normal dinner and mov-
ies," she said.
Williams and her husband will be enjoy-
ing dinner with other couples at their
church this year for the holiday.
'"That should be fun," she said.
Valentine's Day boils down to one key
concept for anyone celebrating love.
"It's all out of love," she said.


V fV


"If you don't
have a ANTONIA ROBINSON/
significant Lake City Reporter
other to show Charlette Hines


love toward,
show it to
someone else
you normally
might not."
Matt Brandon
Lake City resident


receives a
Valentine's Day
gift from her friend
Brandon Hurst.
Valentine's Day
is a great time to
show love to your
friends,
Hurst said.









LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011


African-Americans in the Battle of Olustee


p his week, Lake
City and the
surrounding
community
all commemo-
rate the 1864 Civil War
Battle of Olustee. This
Confederate victory late
in the war prevented the
Union from conquering
Florida and thus continued
Confederate access to
resources such as Florida
beef and salt
The Florida railroad also
was a crucial supply line
for troops and goods going
north to the front
Union records indicate
that after Ocean Pond and
then Lake City, the next
target would have been
the railroad bridge at the
present-day Columbia-
Suwannee County line.
After that, the next cam-
paign would have been
for control of Tallahassee.
But a decisive setback
at Ocean Pond sent
the Union back toward
Jacksonville, never again
to challenge for control of
the state.


Locally there will be
many events in and around
downtown.
This weekend the
Olustee festival features
music, food, crafts, and a
parade on Saturday morn-
ing.
Out at the Olustee
battlefield, living historians
will re-enact military life
both behind the lines and
at the front. There will be
lectures to civic groups
and a free lecture for the
public on Wednesday, Feb.
16 at Florida Gateway
College.
This lecture corre-
sponds not only with the
Battle of Olustee but also
with events in February
to celebrate Black History
Month.
The Battle of Olustee
was a true demonstration
of bravery for African-
American troops.
Late in the war, the
Union began to use
so-called "Colored
troops" such as the 54th
Massachusetts Regiment,
made famous in the movie


Dr. Sean McMahon
sean.mcmahon@fgc.edu
"Glory."
Initially used for labor
details well behind the
front lines, black troops
proved that they could
fight alongside their white
comrades.
A notable early cam-
paign was the battle seen
in the climax of the movie,
at Battery Wagner in
South Carolina.
As the call went out to
Union soldiers to converge
in north Florida in early
1864, African-American
troops earned an oppor-
tunity to fight right at the
front They took advantage
of this .opportunity and
served with great distinc-
tion.
The 54th Mass.
Regiment arrived to


strengthen the Union
attack at Olustee. Joining
them was the 8th U.S.
Colored unit, which includ-
ed about 550 men. After
withering fire, the 8th U.S.
lost over half of its ranks
on the battlefield. Yet as
their regimental surgeon
recalled, these men did not
back down from a tough
situation.
The sacrifices made by
the 8th and the 54th made
a huge statement to all.
"Here they stood," he
wrote, "under one of the
most terrible fires' ever
witnessed" right at the
front lines, fighting an
entrenched Confederate
force at Ocean Pond. "On
the field of Olustee," the
surgeon continued, "it was
decided whether the col-
ored man had the courage
to stand and risk the dan-
gers of the battlefield."
The fate of those
African-American troops
who were captured will
be the topic of a-free
lecture by author Bob
O'Connor at 11:30 a.m. on


Wednesday, Feb. 16 at the
Lake City Medical Center,
Auditorium in the Dr.
Barney E. McRae Allied
Health Complex on the
campus of Florida Gateway
College. The lecture is
open to everyone.
Nationally recognized
Civil War author Bob
O'Connor will be returning
to our area for a second
time. The West Virginian,
author of six books,
will talk about the U. S.
Colored Troops at Olustee
and the incarceration of
about 50 of those men
in Andersonville Prison.
Based on his book "The
U.S. Colored Troops at
Andersonville Prison" that
was published in early
2010, O'Connor will tell
of the formation of the
Bureau of Colored Troops
in early 1863 and how men
from four colored regi-
ments got sent to Olustee.
Through his research,
O'Connor found that out
of over 200,000 black sol-
diers in the Union army,
only 776 ever made it into
Confederate prisons.


The other men captured
were returned to slavery
or killed. O'Connor has
learned since his book was
published that there wer6
also two black soldiers
from white regiments
incarcerated in the famed
Rebel prison and the
author has added those
two men to his book.
One of those two black
soldiers is someone that
most of the audience will
know. O'Connor was at
Olustee in 2009 and gave
the talk at the Memorial
Service during the com-
memoration.
He will have all his
books available and for
sale at the college presen-
tation and at the reenact-
ment. For additional infor-
mation about the author
and his books, please visit
www. boboconnorbooks. com.
Please come out to
some qf the local events
and enjoy Olustee Week!
Dr. Sean McMahon is pro-
fessor of history at Florida
Gateway College. She can be
reached at 386-754-4293.


New iPhone, iPad app helps you keep track of sins


Associated Press
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Can
your iPad or iPhone bring you
closer to God? A new applica-
tion for the devices aims to help
Roman Catholics who haven't
been to the confessional booth in
a while keep track of their sins,
one Commandment at a time.
The $1.99 "Confession: A
Roman Catholic App" can't grant
forgiveness you still need
to receive the sacrament from
a real, live priest like always.
The app's designers and some
believers see it as a way to spur
Catholics back into the habit of
repenting.
'There's a reason we designed
it for these mobile devices: We
want you to go to confession,"
said Patrick Leinen, one of the
developers and a co-founder of
the company Little iApps.


Over the last several decades,
American Catholics have been
receiving the penitential sacra-
ment less frequently, and many
of them may not know how it's
done.
"As somebody who's heard
thousands of confessions, there
are some people who get so
scared coming in that they lose
their train of thought and they're
not able to remember every-
thing they planned to say," said
the Rev. Dan Scheidt, pastor of
Queen of Peace Catholic Church
in Mishawaka, who advised the
developers.
The text-based app takes
the user through the Ten
Commandments, with a slew of
questions attached to each, a
process known as an examina-
Itf'of conscience, which peni-
tents undergo before confession.
Questions range from "Have


I wished evil upon another per-
son?" to "Have I used any meth-
od of contraception or artificial
birth control in my marriage?"
and users can check a box next
to each sin they've committed.
Once that's done, the app lists
the user's sins and displays a writ-
ten act of contrition, a prayer recit-
ed by the penitent From there, it
walks the user through the rest of
the steps of confession and even
advises when to say "amen."
Melanie Williams is a 17-year-
old Catholic who helped test
the app after co-developer Chip
Leinen asked for volunteers at the
area high school where he runs a
youth group.
Williams said she used to freeze
up whenever the time came to
confess: "I have a horrible time
remembering what I want to say
when I'm actually in the confes-
sional."


With the app, "when I get to the
confessional and I'm able to say
all these things, it makes me feel a'
lot better," she said. "When you're
done, an inspirational message
pops up. Its so cool. It feels like
thafs just what I needed to hear at
that moment"
Religious applications for
mobile devices are nothing new.'
Things like daily inspirational text
messages and digital compasses
that point Muslims in the direc-
tion of Mecca have been around
since the early years of mobile
technology.
But as that technology
becomes a bigger part of daily
life, the faithful are finding ways
to incorporate it into their reli-
gious lives, said Heidi Campbell,
a communication professor at
Texas A&M University who
studies how religious communi-
ties use technology.


"People now are saying, we live
our lives connected to the Internet
24 hours a day, so how do we
highlight our spirituality in the
same way," she said.,
Response to the new app from
the church has been cautious
but positive; the Most Rev. Kevin
Rhoades, bishop of Fort Wayne-
South Bend, gave his imprimatur
to the app, essentially an acknowl-
edgment that it doesn't conflict
with Catholic teaching.
The Vatican weighed in as
word of the app spread through
Catholic circles. A church spokes-
man, the Rev. Federico Lombardi,
stressed that only a priest may
hear confession.
'This cannot be substituted
by any computer application," he
said. "'This must be emphasized
to avoid misunderstandings. One
cannot speak in any way of 'con-
fession by iPhone."'


ENGAGEMENT


McRae-Bishop
Mark and Stacy McRae of Lake City
announce the engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daughter, Shannon
Michelle McRae of Lake City, to Michael
Phillip of Lake City. He is the son of Phil
and Debbie Bishop of Lake City.
The bride-elect is a 2005 Union County
High School graduate and a 2009 Lake
City Community College graduate with
an AA degree. She is currently studying
elementary education at the University
of Phoenix. She is employed with the
Columbia County School Board.
The future groom is a 2005 Columbia
County High School graduate and a 2010
Lake City Community College gradu-
ate with a law enforcement certificate.
He is currently employed at the Florida
Department of Transportation.
The wedding is planned for 5 p.m.
Saturday, March 19 at Parkview Baptist
Church. A reception will follow at Lake
City Country Club.


COURTESY PHOTO
Shannon Michelle McRae and Michael Phillip.


BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS

Samuel Carter Jan. 24 at North Florida 4. Grandparents are
Regional Medical Center Wayne and Susan
Griffis in Gainesville. Griffis of Lake City and
He weighed 7 pounds Stephen and Judy Flake
Nathan and Monique and 14 ounces and mea- of St. Augustine. Great-
Griffis of Lake City sured 20 1/2 inches. He grandmother is Pauline
announce the birth of their joins siblings Cecily, 9, Griffis of Panama City
son, Samuel Carter Griffis, Gabrielle, 7 and Sawyer, Beach.


Ella Grace Bennett, Jan. 24 at North Grandparents are
Florida Regional Hospital Eileen Bennett and Alan
Bennett in Gainesville. Jugar and the late William
Scott and Heather She weighed 8 pounds, 2 Bennett, Madeline Knight
Bennett of Lake City ounces and measured 19.2 and George Brooks.
Bennett of Lakthe City inches. Great-grandmother is
announce the birth of She joins a sister, Nina Great-grandmother is
their daughter, Ella Grace Kay Bennett, 2. Gretel Coursol.


Kenlie Madison
Lindboe
Chelsea and Dakota
Lindboe of Minot, N.D.
announce the birth of their
daughter, Kenlie Madison
Lindboe, Dec. 29, 2010
at Trinity Hospital in


Minot, N.D.
She weighed 7 pounds,
5 ounces and measured 19
1/2 inches.
Maternal grandparents
are Anthony and Elizabeth
Free and Gina Free.
Paternal grandparents
are Amanda and Michael
Lindboe and Dawn Dicks.


Maternal great-grand-
parents are Wayne and
Jean Nash, Hilda Free and
the late James Free.
Paternal great-grandpar-
ents are Donna Lindboe
and the late Morris
Lindboe and Wayne and
Betty Dicks.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Boy seen abusing cat

in desperate need of help


DEAR ABBY: A friend
told me something recently
that was so disturbing I'm
having trouble sleeping.
"Marie" was at a mini-mall
when a man parked his car
next to hers and walked into
one of the stores, leaving a
boy about 8 years old in the
back seat with a cat. Marie
saw the boy abuse and tor-
ture the animal. She said she
could hear the cat howling
through the closed vehicle.
When the man returned to
the car, my friend approached
him and told him what she'd
seen.
Abby, the man did not
say one word. He climbed
into his car and drove off. I
haven't been able to get the
image out of my head. That
child learned his behavior
somewhere, and his father
condones it! If Marie hadn't
been so shocked, she would
have scribbled down the
man's license number and
reported the incident to the
police or the SPCA. HOR-
RIFIED IN WISCONSIN
DEAR HORRIFIED:
What your friend witnessed
was a child in dire need of
emotional help, and a parent
with his head in the sand.
Emotionally healthy children
do not abuse animals. For
the father to have ignored
what your friend told him is
very sad. Of most concern to


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
me is the fact that children
who abuse animals become
increasingly aggressive, and
sometimes go on to abuse
other children. I hope the
father reads my column and
recognizes the fact that this
son desperately needs coun-
seling now!
DEAR ABBY: I just
turned 28. I have a full-time
job and am also pursuing a
career as an actress,. which
takes ud a lot of my spare'
time. I have good friends and
I'm a people person. I'm at-
tractive, have a good person-
ality and consider myself to
be intelligent.
I'm pretty good at put-
ting myself out there. I talk
to guys I see in the grocery
store, in my office building,
anywhere I can. I try to smile
at everyone when I'm out and
about. I ask friends to set me
up, but haven't met any nice
single men who are inter-
ested in dating. Almost all my
close friends are married or
in long-term relationships. At


parties it's usually a bunch of
couples and me. I feel like the
token single friend.
I have a busy life, and the
theater hasn't exactly been a
great place to meet straight
guys, buit where IS a good
place?. I have tried speed
dating, online dating, bar-
hopping and singles events
to no avail. Why can't I find
a nice guy who's ready for a
real relationship? I'm starting
to lose hope. LOOKING
FOR LOVE IN CALIFOR-
NIA
DEARLOOKING: Please
don't lose hope. But let's
review the venues in which
you have been searching. I'm
struck by the fact that all of
those you mentioned require
you to make a "quick sale."
With speed dating you es-
tablish that you're both avail-
able and there's a superficial
attraction, but not much else.
Bars are the worst places I
can think of to look for a se-
rious relationship. No one's
at their best after downing
a couple of shots, and the
noise level isn't conducive
to meaningful conversa-
tion. The Internet has been
known to bring results, but
many people of both sexes
- are wary because so many
users fudge the facts on dat-
ing sites.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April THE LAST WORD
19): Don't let love lead you
astray. What you want must Eugenia Last
be fought for, not given away suit the changing economy.
because of the demands You have to remain competi-
someone is putting on you. ive. ***
If you aren't happy with your. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
decisions, you will blame You need to put as many irons
whoever influenced you dif- in the fire as possible in or-
ferently. **** der to leave yourself multiple
TAURUS (April 20-May options and an inside connec-
20): Now is the time to con- tion. Spread yourself around
centrate on yourself and the and discuss what you have in
ones you love, not offer every mind. Good fortune is head-
last ounce of what you have ing your way. ****
to someone or something VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
that will not benefit you per- 22): Don't let your emotions
sonally. Unless you are being or someone trying to ma-
paid handsomely, take a pass. nipulate you hold you back.
**** Put your plan on paper, pay-
GEMINI (May 21-June ing special attention to detail.
20): You have what it takes Someone with greater vision
to win, advance and take over may want to team up with
if you are astute and willing you. This can be a winning
to put what you have to offer combination. **
on display. You can build a LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
bright future by developing 22): Get everything in posi-
your ideas and plans. Take tion and don't.look back. Now
action. is not the time to procrasti-
CANCER (June 21-July nate or give in to laziness.
22): Take a course or attend The more time you take to
a tradeshow. Abetter future is network, present and discuss
up to you, so take action now potential possibilities, the
by picking up a new skill or better you will do. *****
updating your knowledge to SCORPIO (Oct. 23-

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the Cipher stands for another
Today's clue: A equals Y
"WBGY SJ KTY INDSOSNX KTN K
LC W W J INX BC'K BE TSJ B FX TN I." -
PYX TYOTK
"W BG Y SJ P Y SX'D J K CLS Z
KBD Y KTY M." LNCW G NWY MA
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "1 remember my mother's prayers, and they have
always followed me. They have clung to me all my life." Abraham Lincoln
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 2-14


Nov. 21): You stand to get
ahead financially in an unusu-
al or unexpected way. Home,
property and other valuable
possessions will increase
your ability to turn something
you want to do into a feasible
endeavor. Listen to someone
you trust. ***
SAGITrARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You'll be look-
ing for a new place to spend
time relaxing. The adventure
you pursue will enlighten you
and encourage you to start
something new. Love is in the
picture; show your emotions
if you want it to last. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): The past will
be important to remember.
What 'you have experienced
or learned will play a major
role in whatUyou do next.
There is money to be made
but a move may be required
to take advantage. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): A little will go a
long way, so don't overdo it or
you will miss an opportunity.
There is room for improve-
ment and a chance to make
it happen. Nothing is out of
reach if you are willing to go
the distance. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't confuse being un-
predictable with much-need-
ed and strategically planned
change. You have to fight
hard to win the confidence of
others and stability is one of
the only ways you can make
that happen. Strict rules, dis-
cipline and hard work are re-
quired. **


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


HIGH SCHOOL REUNION By David J. Kahn / Edited by Will Shortz 11 12 -13 14 15 16 17 s8 19 10 11 I12 113, 14 115 16 117 |18


Across
1 Mairy a download
4 "___ well" ,
8 Certain bias
14 Some storage
places
19 Emu, e.g., to a
chef
21 This second
22 Put down
23 A woman went ...
25 Tricks
26 Expressionist
artist James
27 Suffer vertigo
28 Fast-skating #4
29 Scratch
30 Cause of delay
31 In his office, she
noticed a...
36 A superstar might
have a big one
37 Thin overlays
38 No-goodnik
39 Michelle on a
S- fairway
-40 Not allowing
42i She remembered
having a high-
school crush on
a handsome,
dark-haired boy
with ...
47 What's that,
Jose?
48 Khan
51 BP gas brand
52 Voting side
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
$1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


53 However, this
man was
balding, gray-
haired and ...
59 North end?
60 Plains tribe
61 Had room for
65 Michelle's
predecessor
6,8 She thought he
was much too old
to have been her

73 Debussy piece
74 Lands' End rival
76 Bodes
78 Zero
79 Nevertheless, she
asked him if he
had attended her
high school, and
after he said yes,
she asked "...?"
86 Carry
89 Stew
90 "One Mic" rapper
91 Actor McKellen
92 He answered "In
1971. But ..."
95 The Dow and the
Nikkei 225
99 Object
100 Turndowns
101 Go-aheads
105 1969 newlywed
in the news
106 The woman
exclaimed "...!"
111 Chorus girl
112 Spice holder
113 See 48-Down
114 Breather
115 Divorce


116 Hall-of-Famer
with 10 World
Series rings
118 He-looked ather
closely, then
asked "...?"
121 "The Second
Coming" poet
122 Thoroughly
enjoys
123 One wearing
cuffs
124 "Family Ties"
mom
125 Check line
126 Shipped
127 Feminine suffix

Down
1 Not the way it was
2 Some servitude
3 1994 Sondheim
musical
4 From the States:
Abbr.
5 Michele of
"Glee"
6 Midwest capital
7 Plain
8 TV Guide's
Pennsylvania
headquarters
9 From ___ Z
10 Brown shade
11 Emcee's words
12 Disdain
13 113-Across, in
France
14 Exhaust
15 Father of the
bride, say
16 One who goes
free?


17 With 34-Down,
kind of pie
18 Yearbook div.
20 Superbright
24 Trick
29 Soft leather
31 From the top
32 Phoenix hrs.
33 Tail
34 See 17-Down
35 Some jeans
37 Big name in
plastic
41 Still
43 Space movie
villain
44 Rock genre
45 ___ Canals
46 Bother a lot
48 With 113-Across,
landlocked
waters
49 Blown away
50 Mellows
53 Come together
54 Russian/Kazakh
river
55 Brush-off
56 Laptop key
57 Time piece?
58 At birth
62 Sushi fish
63 Take out, maybe
64 Take out.
66 Say "I do" again
67 Spa reaction
69 Unstable particle
70 Rio contents
71 Canal boats
72 Mess up


75 Rome's home
77 Symbols of'piety
80 Hanging piece
81 Joanne of "The
Pride of St.
Louis"
82 Org. in "The
Crying Game"
83 Bad: Prefix
84 Pops
85 Valve opening?


86 Bob ___ 1986
P.G.A. Player of
the Year
87 One of the Three.
Rivers
88 Nine-time world
champion rodeo
cowboy
93 24 bottles of beer
94 Mary -__
cosmetics
95 Coming up
96 Sort


97 Attracts by
design
98 Palliates
102 Cruise lines?
103 Runner's place
104 Snap courses
107 and all
108 Bandleader
Jones of the
1920s-'30s
109 "Cool!"


110 Island near
Quemoy
111 Goons
115 Opposite of 64-
Down
116 "TTYL"
117 Reef denizen
118 "Are ___ pair?"
("Send in the
Clowns" lyric)
119 Bug for
payment
120 Table server


5 2 8 7


618


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3 8 6 1 9


29 7 6


4 3 5


3 8 4


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Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
BRASS9 RED10 HMM WI G
ADRIANI II VEXATIOUS IKE
DRAGGEDON ENTRACTES NEA
8NF8E NGAIO IMSPS 1EAR
GOTSORE ANN MCL ALOOF
NOTARY COOS N ICOLAS
ORCS WACO SHUN ITSADATE
NERO ETTU TIER O0DS ESTA
POWER INJUN ASI PORKY12
BRAND ENDURE DR PINS
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K EA I 0 NIA Z SA ESA ABO0
H OLIEST 0 LDCAR VEN 0 M
SKINS NEV DOORS DEMOC 1
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ICEDANCE HAAG U ELE GAPS
TAPERED ROTC ACROSS
INTWO OWE HUH WAITSON
PEN5 SNOG MAXIM F2ILY
RIG AMARETTOS NEGAT IVES
ENO SALARYCAP GLDENAGE
ZEN END 4TRUN 3WOODS
Answer Key: 1 Rat, 2- Ox, 3 Tiger, 4 Rabbit, 5 -Dragon, 6 Snake, 7 Horse, 8B- Ram, 9 -Monkey,
10- Rooster, 11 Dog, 12- Pig


8 L 9 9 ZL 76


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9 6 ZL 8 L 9 C 7


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Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415









LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011


OMG, when did we start talking like txt msgs?


By JOCELYN NOVECK
AP National Writer
NEW YORK
usan Maushart's
16-year-old daughter
often calls out over her
shoulder as she leaves
the house: "ILY!" Sure,
actual words would be better.
But Mom knows not to com-
plain.
"A mother of teenagers is
pathetically grateful for an
'I love you' no matter what form
it takes," she observes.
Then there are the various
forms of "LOL" that her teens
use in regular parlance it's
become a conjugable verb by
now. And of course, there's the
saltier acronym used by son
Bill: "WTF, Mom?!" But before
you judge, note that former VP
candidate Sarah Palin just used
that one in a TV interview. And
CNN's Anderson Cooper used it
on his show the other night
Acronyms have been around
for years. But with the advent
of text and Twitter-language, it
certainly feels like we're speak-
ing in groups of capital letters
a lot more. It's a question that
intrigues linguists and other
language aficionados even
though they'll tell you they have
absolutely no concrete research
on it
"It's fascinating," says Scott
Kiesling, a socio-linguist and
professor at the University of
Pittsburgh. "What's interesting
to me as a linguist is figuring out
which words get picked up, and
why. What is it that makes OMG
and WTF and LOL so useful that
they spread from the written to
the spoken form?"
One possibility, Kiesling pro-
poses, is that some of these acro-
nyms actually become a whole
new thought, expressing some-
thing different than the words
that form them. For example:
"You wouldn't say, 'OMG, that
person just jumped off a cliff,"'
he explains. "But you'd say,
'OMG, do you see those red
pants that person is wearing?"'
Which brings us to WTF, an
acronym that needs no trans-
lation. When Palin used the
expression recently in a Fox
News interview twice in two


COURTESY PHOTO
This undated file photo courtesy of Frances Andrijich shows Susan Maushart (second from left) with her children
(from left to right) Anni, Sussy and Bill (with cat Hazel) as they play a board game together at the family home in
Perth, Australia, before the family moved to the U.S. Maushart's children frequently use acronyms like 'ILY!' and
'LOL.' Acronyms have been around for years. But when exactly did we start speaking in them?


sentences, actually some pun-
dits were a little shocked. (Palin'
was playing on the president's
"Win the Future" message in his
State of the Union speech.)
S"That's going to be a tough
one for her to come back
from and explain," remarked
conservative commentator
Pat Buchanan on MSNBC's
"Morning Joe." Host Joe
Scarborough simply shook his
head and said: 'Not very presi-
dential."
But the chatter died down
quickly. "I haven't seen any
big blowup," says Kathleen
Hall Jamieson, director of the
Annenberg Public Policy Center
* at the University of Pennsylvania
and an expert on political com-
munication. "It was misplaced
humor. But I assume she
thought it was clever and thus
would not be judged."
Clever may be in the eyes of
the beholder. But Palin is not the
only prominent person to use the
expression on TV recently. On


"Anderson Cooper 360" Monday
night, the host was comment-
ing on rapper B.O.B.'s use of an
airplane's public address system
to perform for the captive pas-
sengers. "WTF, B.O.B.?" Cooper
asked.
Imagine if he'd said the actual
words a quick call from net-
work executives might have
ensued. But WTF seems to have
become a winking way of saying
something with a little edge, a
little bite, without being truly
offensive.
It can also be a good icebreak-
er with an audience. "I do a lot of
public speaking," says Maushart,
the mother of three, who is also
an author (The recent "Winter of
our Disconnect.") "And if there
is one utterance that I always
know will get a laugh, it is WTF.
It establishes that you are kind
of with it. It brings an instant
laugh."
And so she doesn't mind when
her kids (they are 20, 17 and 16)
use it. If only she could keep up


with all their other acronyms.
They've graduated from the sim-
ple LOL and LOLOL to LMAO
- literally, laughing so hard
that part of your body comes off
(for extra credit, use LMAOOTF
- it means it's all happening on
the floor.)
Her youngest, Sussy, 16,
seems particularly advanced.
These days, she has started say-
ing "K-Dot." Translation: OK,
but with a finality to it, as in, end
of discussion, "K" followed by a
period, ergo: "K-Dot."
Not avant-garde enough for
you? Try this: Sussy also is
known to SPEAK a question
mark when asking a question.
As in: "Do you really want me to
do that, question mark?"
All this delights Robert Lane
Greene, author of the upcoming
book "You Are What You Speak"
and a self-described linguistics
nut. Greene doesn't buy in to the
concern that kids are destroying
our language.
"People often think the lan-


guage THEY learned was per-
fect," he says. "But innovation is
generally enriching. It's fascinat-
ing, if you don't pull your hair
out over it."
So just how new is the use
of acronyms? Did this all come
from Internet speak, texting
and the like? "Americans have
always liked abbreviations," says
linguistics professor and author
Deborah Tannen, author of sev-
eral popular-books on language.
"That certainly predates the
Internet."
In fact, acronyms themselves
are an early 20th-century cre-
ation, says Greene. They became
prevalent during the New Deal,
he says, the series of economic
programs passed during the first
term of Franklin D. Roosevelt -
who, of course, became known
by his three initials. They are
also widely used in the military
and today's government bureau-
cracy.
People who think acronyms
are new may be suffering from
what linguists call a "recency
illusion" the illusion that
something is new merely
because one has just noticed it.
They may not realize, for exam-
ple, that the oft-used "snafu,"
in its cruder, more popular ver-
sion, contains the same "F" that
"WTF" does.
But one thing that does seem
genuinely new, Greene says, "is
that these three-letter phrases
from the Internet and twitter-
speak are being spoken out
loud."
And so, maybe you CAN
blame the kids for that.
However, Greene notes,
"People have been complaining
about what the kids are doing
to the language since ancient
times, and Latin. Language is
always changing. It's a fact of
life."
And besides, young people are
always on a search for the next
new thing. And so this whole
spoken-acronym thing may be
a fad, destined for the linguistic
garbage heap in a matter of a
few years.
Remember the word "groovy"?
"One generation's teenage
slang," Greene says, "is the next
generation's "OMG Dad, I can't
believe you said 'groovy."'


Diet soda tied to stroke risk, but reasons unclear


By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
AP Medical Writer
LOS ANGELES It's far
from definitive proof, but new
research raises concern about
diet soda,. finding higher risks
for stroke and heart attack
among people who drink it
everyday versus those who
drink no soda at all.
The beverage findings should
be "a wakeup call to pay atten-


tion to diet sodas," said Dr.
Steven Greenberg. He is a
Harvard Medical School neu-
rologist and vice chairman of the
International Stroke Conference
in California, where the research
was presented on Wednesday.
A simple solution, health
experts say, is to drink water
instead.
Doctors have no chemical or
biological explanation for why
diet soda may be risky. It could


be that people who drink lots
of it also fail to exercise, weigh
more, drink more alcohol or
have other risk factors like high
blood pressure and smoking.
However, the researchers took
these and many other factors
into account and didn't see a
change in the trend.
"It's reasonable to have
doubts, because we don't have
a clear mechanism. This needs
to be viewed as a preliminary


study," said lead researcher
Hannah Gardener of the
University of Miami.
But for those trying to cut
calories, "diet soft drinks may
not be an optimal substitute for
sugar-sweetened beverages,"
she said.
The numbers come from the
Northern Manhattan study,
which enrolled about 2,500
adults over 40 in the New York
area from 1993 to 2001 through


random phone calls. Half are
Hispanic and one-fourth are
black, making it one of the few
studies to look at these risks
in minorities, who have higher
rates of stroke.
Participants filled out a stan-
dard survey about their diets at
the start of the study, and their
health was tracked for nearly 10
years. In that time there were
559 strokes or heart attacks, 338
of them fatal.


Space or

spouse?

Associated Press
NEW YORK Robin
Davidson doesn't know Rep.
Gabrielle Giffords person-
ally, but as a wife herself,
she knows one thing in
her heart The congress-
woman wouldn't want her
astronaut husband's profes-'
sional dreams to become yet
another casualty of the hor-
rific Tucson shooting that
nearly killed her.
And so, as Giffords recov-
ers, Mark Kelly should head
to outer space in peace come
April, said Davidson. "He
needs to make this historic
and honorable mission as
part of their healing pro-
cess," she said.
As a couple's dilemma,
it's almost unfathomable: If
your spouse was recovering
from a bullet wound to the
brain, would you be able to
leave the planet? Of course,
nobody outside the couple's
inner circle knows to what
extent the congresswoman
herself has been able to con-
tribute to Kelly's decision to
fly. Kelly didn't answer that
question directly in a news
conference, saying only: "I
know my wife very well
and I know what she would
want, so that makes the
decision easier."


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424