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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01376
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: February 11, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01376
System ID: UF00028308:01376
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Saying Goodbye
CHS coach bids
farewell to players. *

000014 120511DA ****3-D1
PO BOX 117007 SoR
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL O3,2-T
pW ^ "^M-6
^^^^10RI?A


Lake


143

u I


Mubarak Won't Quit
But hands power over to VR
World, 3A


Fast Start Victory
Early run propels FSU to win.
Sports, I B



Reporter



er.com Vol. 137, No. 18 E 75 cents


GETTING AN UPGRADE



AND SAVING MONEY



. .' .?-



Larry Wilson, City
of Lake City pur-
S -- ... chasing specialist,
p ~ shows off one of
the new trucks in
the vehicle fleet.






ANTONIA ROBINSON
Lake City Reporter


New leasing plan provides rotation of

general-purpose vehicles every 5 years.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

There's a new
look for the
City of Lake
City vehicle
fleet.
The first wave of new
general purpose vehicles
for the city's fleet pre-
miered Monday.
The City Council
approved a leasing and
management program with
Enterprise Fleet Services
Inc. in April. The program
provides a five-year rota-
tion of all general purpose
vehicles
"This is one of the best
and most innovating ideas
the city has implemented
in a long time," said City
Manager Wendell Johnson.
"I'm really excited."
There are 106 vehicles
in the city's general pur-
pose fleet, with more than
half 10 years or older, he
said. The vehicles serve
all departments except for
public safety.
The exchanged vehicles
for the first addition were
among the oldest in the
fleet, Johnson said.
A total of 44 vehicles
will be taken out of opera-
tions this first year of the
program, he said. All but
12 will be replaced with a


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
The City of Lake City began replacing its vehicle fleet on Monday. Some were more than
10 years old, said Larry Wilson, purchasing specialist.


new vehicle.
The 2011 vehicles are
Ford Rangers, F-150s,
F-250s and F-150s, said
Larry Wilson, purchasing
specialist. They are metal-
lic blue with the city's logo
instead of the existing
white ones.
"The public will know
us," he said. "The city and
(Columbia) county vehi-
cles and emblems were
close in appearance. Now
there will be no question.


Citizens can identify us."
Strobe lights are on the
vehicles to enhance safety
for crews working, he said.
Back up alarms are also
included on the vehicles.
."They're very nice,"
Wilson said.
Johnson said he's heard
very positive feedback
from employees about the
new vehicles.
"Certainly the employ-
ees are excited," he said.
"For the longest time many


departments were saddled
with vehicles as much as
20 years old."
The idea behind replac-
ing the city's fleet is two-
fold, Johnson said. It will
produce great efficiency
in operation and reduce
maintenance of the fleet.
The city will also have a
good image with the qual-
ity of the general purpose
vehicles.
LEASING continued on 3A


Annie's Project: Helping female farmers


Six-week classes aimed
at making women
farmers better partners.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
Local agricultural women looking
to become better business partners
can learn about resources available
through Annie's Project.
The next series of six-week classes
begins March 1 in Columbia County.
Registration deadline is Feb. 23.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


Annie's Project is
an educational pro-
gram designed to
help women make
decisions in their
farming or ranch-
ing operations, said
Nichelle Demorest, Demorest
Columbia County
extension agent,
The project was named in honor
of Annie Fleck, a woman who lived
in a small town in Illinois. She spent
her lifetime learning how to be an
involved business partner with her


60
Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


husband, a farmer.
Her daughter, Ruth, also married a
farmer and works for the University
of Illinois Extension as a farm busi-
ness management and marketing
educator and began the program to
reach other farm women.
Last year was ,the first time the
program was offered in the state
of Florida and Columbia County,
Demorest said. Programs are held
in quite a few other states in the
Midwest.
ANNIE'S continued on 3A


Opinion .........
Around Florida ....
Obituaries .......
Advice & Comics..
Puzzles ..........


2A
S 5A
4B
2B


Regional

Science Fair

coming to FGC


District winners
next step on road
to state finals.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
Students who did well
enough in the local sci-
ence fair to move to the
next level of competition
will get to show off their
projects in the regional
science fair competition
next week.
The Suwannee Valley
Regional
Science Fair "The n
is scheduled
for Monday for w
- Wednesday is the
at the Florida Scienc
Gate wa y Orla
College gym-
nasium. Missie
From 3 5 Regional
p.m. Monday, co-di
the science
projects will
be set up in the gymna-
sium; from 9 a.m. 2 p.m.
Tuesday, the students will
present their projects and
the projects will be judged.
An awards program
has been scheduled for
Wednesday at the Alfonso
Levy Performing Arts
Center.
Students from Columbia,
Bradford, Hamilton and
Union counties are sched-
uled to participate in the
competition.
Nearly 70 students from
the four counties are sched-
uled to participate in the


regional science competi-
tion.
"Suwannee County is
not participating this year,
they did not have a science
fair," said Missie Minson,
Suwannee Valley Regional
Science Fair co-director.
Students are slated to
compete in categories such
as botany, engineering,
chemistry, biochemistry,
environmental, Earth and
space, physics, zoology,
medicine and health and
several other categories.
"The next step for win-
ners is the


ext step
winners
e state
e Fair in
ndo."
Minson
Science Fair
director


state Science
Fair in
Orlando,"
Minson said,
noting that
competition
is scheduled
to take place
in March.
"Some win-


ners go
straight
there and we'll choose two
winners to go on to the
International Fair in Los
Angeles in May."
She said regional science
organizers are interested in
having some local business-
es sponsor special awards
or categories as part of the
competition.
"They could donate the
money to help support the
prizes for that category or
even special awards," she
said. 'That's one thing
we're always looking for,
someone that can help with
sponsorship."


NAACP planning

a Founder's Day

celebration


Honoring the
102nd year since
its creation.
From staff reports

The Columbia County
Branch of the NAACP is
hosting a Founders Day
celebration in honor of
Black History Month 3
p.m. Saturday at New
Day Springs The NAAC
Missionary remove
remove al
Baptist racialdis
Church. racialdis
TheNAACP throat
was founded democrat
Feb. 12,1909,
partly in response to the
continuing horrific practice
of lynching and the 1908
race riot in Springfield, Ill.
It is the nation's largest
and most widely recog-
nized grassroots-based civil
rights organization. The
organization's members
and supporters are premier
advocates for civil rights in
their communities and cam-
paigning for equal opportu-
nity and voter mobilization.
According to the NAACP,


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
P :it-l _r: hi ,-i, T:
1 .' Iili


its principal objective is to
ensure the political, educa-
tional, social and economic
equality of all citizens of
the United States and elimi-
nate race prejudice.
The NAACP seeks to
remove all barriers of racial
discrimination through the
democratic processes.
While much of NAACP
history is chronicled in
books, pamphlets, articles


CP seeks to
I barriers of
:ri'mination
igh the
c processes.


and maga-
zines, the
organization
believes its
true move-
ment lies in


the faces of its
diverse multiracial army of
ordinary women and men.
The NAACP's goal is to
remain vigilant in its mis-
sion until the promise of
America is a reality for all
Americans.
The public is invited to
attend the Founders Day
event
Individual students or
groups interested in partici-
pating should call 7524074.
The church is located at
1213 Long Street.


COMING
SATURDAY
i- -. _"n C t .'.hF-,? -'


Friday, February I I,'201 I


1 . 8










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011


ASH 3 Thursday:
Afternoon: 9-5-5
Evening: 0-5-8


PIay 44r Thursday:
-S Afternoon: 9-7-9-2
-.--. Evening: 7-8-8-4


A. Wednesday:
S 3-7-11-15-24


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Matthews to present Grammy award


GREEN BAY, Wis.
So what does Green Bay
Packers linebacker Clay
Matthews have in com-
mon with Jennifer Lopez,
Ryan Seacrest and Keith
Urban?.
They'll all be presenters at the
Grammy Awards on Sunday night
Matthews and other Packer play-
ers have been in the spotlight this
week following their Super Bowl
victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers
on Sunday. Grammy officials also
say will.i.am of the Black Eyed Peas,,
who performed at halftime; will be a
presenter at the music awards.
Matthews, who drew nearly as
much attention for his long hair as
for his skills on defense, has a busy
week with appearances scheduled
for "The Tonight Show with Jay
Leno" and "The Ellen DeGeneres
Show."

Kathy Griffin is taking
her jokes to Broadway
NEW YORK Kathy Griffin is
clearing space on her mantel for a
Tony Award.
The often provocative come-
dian, who already has a couple of
Emmy Awards, is making her way
to Broadway next'month for an
eight-show stand shamelessly called
"Kathy Griffin Wants a Tony."
The 50-year-old Griffin announced
the move Thursday on her website.
She said each show will have fresh
material "due to the revolving door
of pop culture, political and celebrity
missteps."
Performances begin March 11
and run through March 19 at the
Belasco Theatre. It will be the
Broadway debut for Griffin, who
achieved fame on the NBC sitcom
"Suddenly Susan" and her reality
show, "My Life on the D-List.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Green Bay Packers' Clay Matthews celebrates after the Packers beat the
Pittsburgh Steelers in the NFL football Super Bowl XLV game Feb. 6. Matthews
will present a Grammy award Sunday night.


Judge grants Kelsey
Grammer divorce in LA
LOS ANGELES A judge has
granted Kelsey Grammer a divorce,
clearing the way for the actor to
remarry later this month.
Los Angeles Superior Court Judge
Maren Nelson agreed Thursday to
grant Kelsey and Camille Grammer
a divorce and settle financial issues
at a later date.
Camille Grammer has estimated in
court filings that the former couple's
shared property may be worth $20


million.
Kelsey and Camille Grammer
were married in 1997 and have two
young children together.
Attorneys for the former "Frasier"
star and Camille Grammer, who
appears on "The Real Housewives of
Beverly Hills," told Nelson they will
set aside $2.3 million while financial
arrangements are handled.
The 55-year-old actor told David
Letterman last month that he plans
to marry Kayte Walsh sometime in
February.

Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Conrad Janis is 83.
* Actress Tina Louise is 77.
* Actor Burt Reynolds is 75.
* Actor Sonny Landham is
70.
* Bandleader Sergio
Mendes is 70.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Otis Clay is 69.
* Actor Philip Anglim is 59.
* Actress Catherine Hickland

Daily Scripture


is 55.
* Rock musician David
Uosikkinen (The Hooters) is
55.
* Actress Carey Lowell is 50.
* Singer Sheryl Crow is 49.
M Former Alaska Gov. Sarah
Palin is 47.
* Actress Jennifer Aniston
is 42.
* Actor Damian Lewis is 40.


"If I give all I possess to the
poor and give over my body to
hardship that I may boast, but
do not have love, I gain noth-
ing" '

I Corinthians 13:1-3


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online,.. www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub--
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, RFla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
dion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson ..... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 100 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityrepqrter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
, Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.A., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other countiesWihere home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks............... $48.79
52 Weeks.................... .$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks.................$41.40
24 Weeks ................... $82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Haridopolos
softens on cuts
TALLAHASSEE
- Senate President Mike
Haridopolos softened his
stance on tax cuts Thursday
but said he still thinks
Florida lawmakers first
must focus on spending
reductions.
The Merritt Island
Republican previously
expressed doubts Florida
could afford tax cuts
because the state is facing a
potential $3.6 billion short-
fall more if lawmakers
increase the state's reserve
funds in the budget year
beginning July 1.
Haridopolos said the dif-
ference now is that Gov.
Rick Scott has rolled out
a $65.9 billion budget pro-
posal that includes nearly $2
billion in tax and fee cuts.
"Obviously, there's going
to be some tax relief within
this because the governor's
asking for it, and this is a
give and take," Haridopolos
said at a news conference.
Haridopolos, who is seek-
ing the GOP nomination
for the U.S. Senate, said he
never took tax cuts off the
table and that lawmakers
want to be "team players."

Scott tours
troubled agency
TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott has had a first-
hand look at a troubled
state agency he wants to
expand.
Scott gave employees
a pep talk Thursday after
touring the Department of
Management Services. It
oversees a variety of func-
tions including building
construction, purchasing
and personnel.
The new Republican
governor said their jobs
are difficult and easy to
criticize, but he's counting
on them to help stream-
line government and cut
spending.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida senate president Mike Haridopolos (R-Melbourne)
speaks at a news conference on Wednesday in Tallahassee.


The agency has come
under fire for building an
opulent Tallahassee court-
house critics have dubbed
a '"Taj Mahal."
Scott wants many com-
mon state agency activi-
ties consolidated under
Management Services
including finance and
accounting; fleet, grants
and property management;
procurement, and mail dis-
tribution.

Grand jury indicts
mom in killings
TAMPA A grand jury
indicted a Tampa mother
on two charges of first-
degree murder Thursday
after finding sufficient evi-
dence to send her to trial
for allegedly shooting her
teenage children to death
because they were talking
back.
Julie Schenecker, 50,
was arrested Jan. 28 on
preliminary charges, and
the Hillsborough County
grand jury formally
charged her with two
counts of premeditated
first-degree murder, which
could carry the death pen-
alty if she is convicted.
Her arraignment is set


for Feb. 16.
The day Schenecker
was arrested, her mother
had called police from
Texas and asked officers
to check on her daughter,
who had been depressed
and complaining about her
children, 16-year-old Calyx
and 13-year-old Beau.
Records showed that the
family had been in counsel-
ing and police were called
to investigate an abuse
. claim after Calyx told the
counselor that her mom hit
her on two occasions.
A search-warrant affi-
davit filed with the court
said two police officers
found Schenecker uncon-
scious on the screened
back porch of the upscale
Tampa home, her white
robe covered with dried
blood.
One of the officers
found the covered body
of Schenecker's daughter,
Calyx, in a bed upstairs,
the affidavit said. The body
of her son Beau was found
in a van in the garage,
also covered with a blan-
ket. She told detectives
she killed them for being
"mouthy."


THE WEATHER


SI3.

MOSTLY
)CLOUDY


HI 60 LO 31


Rt* NLFkCS MAPIfor FidaI erur


Tallahassee *
57/31
Pensacola
53/28 Panama ity
55/35


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


Medssta
58/31
Lake City
60/31
Gaines'
"63/3
\


Tan
66/


57
46
68
44
86 in 1957
24 in 1947

0.48"
3.59"
7.27"
1.18"
4.69"


City
Jacksoville Cape Canaveral
* ;60/34 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Mille Dayna Beach Fort Myers
13 68o42 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
'"66/35 a Key West
i Oriando Ca CanaveralLake City
/ 69/45 69/48 Miami
pa Naples
'4 West Palm Beach Ocala
77/57 0 Orlando
,,i FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers, 78/60 Pensacola
72/49 Naples Tallahassee
,72/55 Miami Tampa
Key West 78/60 Valdosta
7/64 : W. Palm Beach
73/64. -


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


7:14 a.m.
6:16 p.m.
7:13 a.m.
6:17 p.m.

11:47 a.m.
1:12 a.m.
12:35 p.m.'
2:09 a.m.


COO30
Feb. Feb., Feb. March
11 18 24 4
First Full Last New


7a Fday lp 7p aa tur 6a








Fmorecastemtetwatue "Feee ten~erabn


* Associated Press


On this date in
2010, the second
winter storm to
affect the mid-
Atlantic within a
week produced
another 12 inches
of snow across the
Washington, D.C.
metro area.


4

45 Mites to bun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
*^. -: .


Saturday
63, 45,'s
62/40/s
72/57/pc
70/42/pc
62/32/s
62/33/s
69/61/sh
64/31/s
73/57/pc
71/46/pc
63/31/s
64/40/s
58/35/s
58/39/s
63/30/s
66/42/s
65/32/s
71/52/pc


Sunday
67 44, s
65/42/s
73/56/s
71/45/s
67/40/s
66/40/s
69/60/s
67/38/s
74/56/s
71/49/s
68/39/s
69/43/s
61/42/s
63/43/s
64/36/s
67/46/s
65/37/s
72/49/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics 2011 Weather Central
SLLC, Madison, Wis.
\'' www.weatherpublisher.com


CetCwneted



L __


AROUND FLORIDA


SATURDAYk


f1|UNEl


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


TUEi
ILY


''! WTALMANAC
M KE


ERHss oRYSPOSED aBY


9









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011


Egypt's Mubarak refuses to quit,

hands power to vice president


By HAMZA HENDAWI
and SARAH EL DEEB
Associated Press

CAIRO President Hosni
Mubarak refused to step down or
leave Egypt and instead handed most
of his powers to his vice president
Thursday, enraging protesters who
warned the country could explode in
violence and pleaded for the military
to take action to push him out.
The rapidly moving events raised
the question of whether a rift had
opened between Mubarak and the
military command over the uprising
demanding the president's resigna-
tion. Hours earlier, a council of the
military's top generals announced it
had stepped in to secure the country,
and a senior commander announced
to protesters in Cairo's Tahrir Square
that all their demands would soon
be met, raising cries of victory that
Mubarak was on his way out.
Several hundred thousand had
packed into Tahrir Square, ecstatic
with expectation that Mubarak would
announce his resignation in his night-
time address. Instead, they watched
in shocked silence as he spoke, hold-
ing their foreheads in anger and dis-
belief. Some broke into tears. Others
waved .their shoes in the air in con-
tempt. After the speech, they broke
into chants of "Leave, leave, leave."
Organizers called for even larger
protests on Friday. After Mubarak's
speech, around 2,000 marched on the
state television headquarters several
blocks away from Tahrir, guarded by
the military with barbed wire and tanks.
"They are the liars," the crowd shouted,
pointing at the building, chanting, "We
won't leave, they will leave."
Hundreds more massed outside
Mubarak's main administrative pal-
ace, Oruba, miles away from Tahrir
in the Cairo district of Heliopolis, the
first time protesters have marched
on it, according to witnesses and
TV reports. The residence where


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A protester is overcome by emotion
as he and others prematurely cel-
ebrate prior to the televised speech
of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak,
in which they believed he would step
down.

Mubarak normally stays when he is
in Cairo is inside the palace, though it
was not known if he was there. .
Prominent reform advocate and
Nobel Peace laureate Mohamed
ElBaradei, whose supporters were
among the organizers of'the 17-day-
old wave of protests, issued a Tweet
warning: "Egypt will explode."
"The army must save the country
now," he said. "I call on the Egyptian
army to immediately interfere to res-
cue Egypt. The credibility of the army
is on the line."
President Barack Obama appeared
dismayed by Mubarak's announce-
ment. He said in a statement that it
was not clear that an "immediate,
meaningful" transition to democracy
was taking place and warned that too
many Egyptians are not convinced


that the government is serious about
making genuine change.
"The Egyptian government must
put forward a credible, concrete
and unequivocal path toward genu-
ine democracy, and they have not
yet seized that opportunity," Obama
said.
Hours before Mubarak's speech,
the military made moves that had all
the markings of a coup.
The military's Supreme Council,
headed by Defense Minister Field
Marshal Hussein Tantawi, announced
on state TV that it was in permanent
session, a status that it takes only in
times of war. It said it was explor-
ing "what measures and arrange-
ments could be made to safeguard
the nation, its achievements and the
ambitions of its great people." That
suggested Tantawi and his generals
were now in charge of the country.
The statement was labeled
"Communique No. 1," language that
also suggests a military coup.
Footage on state TV showed
Tantawi chairing the council with
his chief of state Gen. Sami Anan
and around two dozen of his topmost
generals, sitting stern-faced around
a table. Mubarak and Suleiman, a
former army general and intelligence
chief named to his post after the pro-
tests erupted Jan. 25, were not pres-
ent, the strongest indication during
the day of a rift.
But there was no immediate reac-
tion from the military following
Mubarak's speech, and their position
remained ambiguous.
In his address on state TV, Mubarak
showed the strategy he has followed
throughout the days of upheaval,
trying to defuse the greatest chal-
lenge ever to his nearly three-decade
authoritarian rule. So far, he has made
a series of largely superficial conces-
sions while resolutely sticking to his
refusal to step down immediately or
allow steps that would undermine the
grip of his regime.


LEASING: New plan to lease vehicles will save.

Continued From Page 1A


Maintenance of the vehi-
cles will be done through a
local dealership, Johnson
said.
The budget amount in the
first year of the program is
about $148,000 compared
to paying $162,000 over the
last 10 years for the fleet,
he said. The program is
already showing a reduc-
tion in costs for the city.
."That was the logic over


the leasing program, the
cost advantage," Johnson
said.
The new fleet will ben-
efit the city overall and
save money for taxpayers,
Wilson said. Repair costs
will drastically decrease.
"We won't have as many
maintenance problems with
the new ones," he said.
Lake City is the first city
in Florida to have such


a vehicle arrangement
according to Enterprise,
Johnson said. Other gov-
ernmental agencies have
used a smaller number of
vehicles.
Several cities are await-
ing to see how the program
works here.
"What's done here will
be a model for many com-
munities to go follow," he
said.


Next year 14 more vehi-
cles will be replaced in the
fleet, Johnson said. It will
be about the same numbers
for the years after that.
"I'm just really happy for
employees to have good
quality vehicles and safe
ones," he said. "Citizens
can be pleased we are giv-
ing them a good return on
their tax dollars."


"What we did was take
the Midwest program and
develop it into a program
that would work for Florida
women," she said.
There was a good
response from local
women about the pro-
gram, Demorest said.
Participants ranged from
young farm wives wanting
to learn more about busi-
ness and widows, whose
husbands never shared
business details, to women
who wanted to start or had
started farm-related busi-
nesses.
"Theywere reallypleased
with what they learned,"
she said. "They didn't real-
ize what they had available
to them for resources."
Topics during the pro-
gram include financial
statements, business plan-
ning, marketing, alterna-
tive enterprises and insur-
ance.
"We have panels come
in who are experts on
these areas," Demorest
said. "They talk about what
farmers need and answer
questions."
Participants should feel
a lot more free and less
intimidated to ask farming
questions during the class-



Adv, Tlx on Sale I AM NUMBER FOUR
JUSTIN BIEBER: NEVER SAY IN REALD 3D -
EVENT PRICE N(G) (130) 400 700 930
JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13) (140) 440 740 1020
GNOMEO AND JULIET (G)
(100) 310 520 730 940
SANCTUM IN REALD 3D EVENT
PRICING (R)- ID REO'D (110) 410 710 1000
THE RITE (PG-13) (120) 420 720 1010
NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R) IDREQ'D
S(150)4307501030


es, she said.
The program is limit-
ed. to 20 participants, and
registration is $40 which
includes software and a
notebook full of resources,
among others.
Class will be held week-
ly on Tuesday afternoons.

,s k eog" (nftnlerja'nmen t-.J
l 3Sfue7'o/o9


Lovin Jaz
wit Wayne Levj's -
1' j Organic Soul

Saturday Night
February 12t 8pr
Women's Club of Lake (
257 SE Hernando Sr.
1, Cost: $20
Cocktail Time 7pm'
Show Time 8pm
Reserve tickets & seating
(386) 344-5928


A certificate will be issued
upon completion of the pro-
gram.
Call Demorest at (386)
752-5384 or e-mail dndemor-
est@ufl.edu to sign up for
Annie's Project.
"It is for women and it's
targeted just for women,"


JUSTIN THOMAS BROWN
11-7-81 1-21-1 I1


I ba~v kissed you good ye... "
but you will always be with me in rny heart
Always and Forever,
Mamga, Daddy, Daniel, Michelle, Briley, Kendall, Hunter, Jusdn and Gage
t1c zpurin of kidamnssexpressed to our famiy during this sad n=e has been
iyo so ~muc L The calls, cards, flowers, food and donations
app A spcal tqnk'you to the Deep Creek Communily
Ted qerry at Gaeway Forrest Lawn

-'


she said. '"They can also
build a support system of
women in the community."


COURTESY PHOTO
Suwannee River Water Management District Governing
Board Chairman Don Quincey (from-left) presents an award.
to Jerry Bowden for 10 years of service, as Jon Dinges,
district director of water supply and resource management,
looks on. The award was given during Tuesday's SRWMD
Governing Board meeting.


Water Management

District honors Lake

City employee


From staff reports

LIVE OAK- Suwannee
River Water Management
District employee Jerry
Bowden was recently
honored for 10 years of
outstanding service to the
agency.
Bowden, a senior pro-
fessional engineer with
the agency, received a
plaque during the Water
Management District's
Governing Board meeting
Tuesday.
As a senior professional
engineer with the Water
Management District,
Bowden works in the
Department of water sup-
ply and resource manage-
ment. He inspects com-


mercial and subdivision
development projects to
ensure they are in com-
pliance with permitting
requirements and assists
with the implementation
of drainage and .alternative
water supply projects.
Bowden, a Lake City
resident, joined the Water
Management District in
February 2001 and has
35 years of consulting and
design experience in the
areas of soil and water
resources. Prior to employ-
ment with the District, he
worked for 11 years as a
consultant and 14 years as
the president and owner
of an engineering and
construction company in
Southwest Florida.


POLICE REPORTS


Arrest Log
The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agen-
cies. The following people
have been arrested but
not convicted. All people
are innocent unless prov-
en guilty.

Sunday, Feb. 6
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Talon Andrew
Binney, 20, 313 SW
Mabrey Glen, warrant
Violation of probation on
original charges of bur-
glary of a structure and
third-degree grand theft
of specified property..

Tuesday, Feb. 8
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Bradford Keith Gary,
18, 4423 NW 41 First
Lane, Gainesville, warrant
Sexual battery on victim
over 12 years of age.


Kevin J. Ogburn,
35, 811 NW Indian Shore
Drive, possession of
cocaine.
Amanda Nicole
Roberts, 26, 7100 S.
Orangeblossom Trail,
Orlando, warrants:
Violation of probation on
original charge of grand
theft, violation of proba-
tion on original charges
of burglary of a dwelling/,
occupancy/conveyance
and grand theft
Stephen Everald
Hugh Singh, no age
given, 6377 SW Old Wire
Road, Fort White, tamper-
ing with evidence.
Maurice Lavon
Thomas, 34,1258 SW
Haygood Loop, warrants:
Sexual battery, (force
not likely to cause seri-
ous injury) and violation
of probation on original
charge of driving while
license suspended/
revoked.


182 N.E. Justice Street Lake City, FL 32055
Phone: 386-752-5422


ANNIE'S: Six-week classes will help female farmers.

Continued From Page 1A


You're qnvitedro


Touncder's Day i


CeTe ration

Tirstr Baptist Church

Lake City, TL
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor
Music Rev. Ken Baxley

The celebration will begin

Saturday, Tebruary 19
with an Open House in the Fellowship Hall
From 2:00-4:00o.m.

Sunday, Tebruary 20
9:15 a.m. Sunday School 10:30 a.m. Morning Service
The Sanctuary will be decorated with oil lamps and an
old-time pump organ as we celebrate the anniversary of
the post-civil war reorganization of First Baptist.
Please plan to wear your best old-fashioned clothes.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













OPINION


Friday, February I I, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Implement

health care

reform law

A Florida judge has
Ruled that the fed-
eral Affordable Care
Act's mandate to
L force all
Americans to buy health insur-
ance is unconstitutional.
The health care law is
expected to end up in the U.S.
Supreme Court.
With public policy as con-
troversial as the federal health
care law, everyone knows that
the recent ruling by a Florida
judge is merely a step on a
journey to the U.S. Supreme
Court.
Still, a few of the 26 states
who challenged the law's
constitutionality are using the
Florida judge's decision as a
chance to stop implementing
the law.
South Dakota, as one of the
states that joined the lawsuit,
has the same opportunity,
state Attorney General Marty
Jackley said. But Gov. Dennis
Daugaard's decision to con-
tinue implementing the law
anyway is a prudent one, not
for political reasons but for fis-
cally practical ones.
Even with the Florida ruling
- as well as Jackley's inter-
pretation of it there's con-
siderable legal confusion about
which parts of the health care
law remain enforceable. And
ignoring that reality for politi-
cally expedient purposes could
foolishly put some of South
Dakota's Medicaid,aad other ..,
federal money in jeopardy.
Fortunately, Daugaard is tak-
ing a wiser approach to allow
the legal challenges to run
their course, and legislators in
Pierre who might be consider-
ing any wordings in state legis-
lation related to the health care
law need to adopt the same
approach.
The plain truth is that
regardless of political sides
regarding the health, care law,
the overall legal fight surround-
ing the legislation is far from
over.
There would be no reason
for any state official execu-
tive, legislative or otherwise
to proceed blindly as if the
battle isn't over.

0 The Argus Leader (S.D.).

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Justice's wife puts him at risk


It seems to me one thing
for the spouse of a high-
ranking public official
to work for a nonprofit
educational foundation
or in a personal endeavor that
is unlikely to pose a possible
conflict of interest for his or her
mate. It seems quite another for
that spouse to be involved as a
consultant on matters that obvi-
ously have a high potential ethi-
cal risk for the husband or wife,
especially is if he is an associate
justice of the highest court-in
the land.
Virginia "Ginni" Thomas, wife
of Justice Clarence Thomas,
has launched a new business to
lobby for conservative causes
that clearly raises questions
about the impact it might have
on her husband's ability to
render independent decisions.
It could as a result limit his
voice and vote on myriad issues
before the court including elec-
tion reform, healthcare and
immigration -all matters that his
wife might have an active role,
in advocating for or lobbying
against.
She announced recently that
in her new consulting position
she would be tackling such
conservative causes as limited
government and free enterprise,
using her connections to help
"liberty loving citizens" raise
money and increase their politi-
cal impact, according to recent
press reports.
The decision has set off a
howl from legal ethicists who
see it as having a clear possibil-
ity of becoming a serious breach
of ethics for Thomas, about
whom questions of impartial- *
ity were raised earlier when
his wife founded the web site
Liberty Central, with strong Tea
Party links, in 2009. She has


Dan K.Thomasson
since stepped down from her
leadership of that enterprise.
Not too many years back, it
was difficult to find a Supreme
Court justice who didn't strive-
to keep clear of such entangle-
ments. Even activities such as
lecturing or speaking on current
affairs or meeting with special
interest groups were discour-
aged. Justice Antonin Scalia,
however, has been severely criti-
cized lately for meeting with Tea
Party activists.
When potential ethical gaffes
did occur in the past they
brought about a swift negative
reaction. Justice Abe Fortas was
denied elevation to the post of
chief justice of the United States
after it was discovered that he
had been advising President
Lyndon Johnson on Vietnam
and was involved in a number
of other activities including paid
lectures at a major university.
He later was forced to resign
from the court for advising a
Wall Street figure who had been
convicted of violating securities
regulations.
Another justice, William 0.
Douglas, was heavily criticized
when he did some work for a
foundation based on a fortune
made from selling restaurant
furniture, much of it in mob
controlled Las Vegas. But unlike
Fortas, Douglas managed to
survive the criticism. Actually,
Douglas's long tenure on the
court was marred by his life-


style which at times seemed to
mirror his liberal judicial phi-
losophy. That included multiple
marriages and his open support
for environmental causes.
For whatever reason, Mrs.
Thomas seems oblivious to
the appearance of impropriety
her job might cause. She has
been quoted as saying she
was looking forward to lobby-
ing Congress. Does she not
understand that there is nothing
before Congress that might not
also end up before her husband
and that her involvement might
bring about a challenge to his
participation in a decision? She
either is naive politically or cal-
lously unconcerned about how
this looks. She made news last
year by phoning her husband's
confirmation tormentor of years
ago, Anita Hill, and leaving a
please retract and apologize
message on Hill's office phone.
Hill lost no time in bringing
the entire matter to the press,
undoubtedly to Clarence
Thomas's embarrassment
Sadly, this newest example
of spousal independence leaves
one wondering about Thomas's
influence in such matters. He
must have approved the ven-
ture. Inside the court, Thomas
is quite popular despite the fact
he never has asked a question
during oral arguments and
rarely if ever strays from the
opinions of Scalia. But he is fre-
quently shunned by the African
American community because
of his conservative positions
on affirmative action and other
social issues.
His wife's latest venture could
further tarnish his image.
* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


OTHER OPINION


Scott must respect people's will


We criticized state
lawmakers and
Gov. Rick Scott
for their reluc-
tance to imple-
ment Amendments 5 and 6, the
redistricting reform measures
that Florida voters approved
back in November. The amend-
ments will refine the way legisla-
tive and congressional district
lines are drawn by outlawing
gerrymandering to favor politi-
cal parties or incumbents.
Naturally, a lot of politicians
yelped at the very idea. Some
are still yelping.
Their resistance to reform
isn't winning many friends.
Our online poll asks whether
lawmakers should continue to
fight the Fair Districts amend-
ments. As of the morning of
Feb. 7, 83 percent of respon-
dents were saying no.


No, presumably, to Scott's
withdrawal of Amendments 5
and 6 from federal review. No to
the House leadership's endorse-
ment of a lawsuit to block
Amendment 6.
No to Tallahassee thumbing
its nose at voters.
Laggard lawmakers could
learn a few things from Sen.
Don Gaetz (R-Niceville). He,
too, fought Amendments 5 and
6 before the election. But now
he's chairman of the Senate
Reapportionment Committee
and he's supposed to make the
new rules work.
In a Nov. 28 guest column,
Gaetz referred to his earlier
opposition and to the continu-
ing legal challenges: 'There's
a huge difference between
supporting a cause you believe
in before the matter is decided
and funding a lawsuit to over-


turn a constitutional provision
you're obliged as a committee
chairman to try to implement,
however difficult that may be.
Both are legal but the latter
is something I did not do and
would not do."
Gaetz pledged that his com-
mittee "will operate with more
transparency than any previous
redistricting effort, with hear-
ings across the state to listen
to voters and an opportunity
for every citizen to use demo-
graphic software to propose
districts that make sense."
Gaetz still doesn't like
Amendments 5 and 6, but he's
not trying to trash them.
Scott and the other foot-
draggers in Tallahassee ought
to join him in respecting the
will of the people.
* Northwest Florida Daily News


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com


Help kids

wise up


to TV ads


Though person-
ally I loved the .
spot featuring the
little "Darth Vader" :
fellow, this Super
Bowl didn't win high marks for
advertising hits.
Maybe our expectations for
Super Bowl commercials show
us just what a powerful medium.
advertising is in our culture. In
fact, recently, I've found myself .
following and talking about
clever ad campaigns with my
kids. That's because car-insur- ,
ance commercials, in particular,, .
have really had my kids and me
howling. And the E-Trade baby?,-,
Can't get enough of him.
Advertising sometimes
works on me. I fully admit that .4'
if the words "clinical trials" and
"wrinkles" are used in the same.:;
sentence, I'm particularly vulnetr-,'
able.
But that's the point Do we
understand how the advertising; -
industry seeks to manipulate
our emotions and decisions? Do -
our children? I'm not blaming
the industry that's its job. But-..-.
as parents, it's great to know a
little more about what we are
dealing with.
The fascinating special "The
Persuaders," a PBS "Frontline"
show, looked at how advertis-
ing radically changed toward
the end of the last century. It
debuted in 2004, but its message
fully resonates today. You can
find it online.
Advertising executive
Douglas Atkin explained that it:,
used to be a brand manager who
oversaw developing a product,
its packaging and so on. Ads
demonstrated that one detergent
got clothes whiter than another.
But now all detergents get
clothes clean. So what to do?
"Emotional branding." In the
early 1990s, there was a shift
to the "pseudo-spiritual," one
expert explained. Creating a
sense that the.product was about.
"a way of life."
Atkin said that the brand man-
ager and the advertising agency
now have a new calling to
"create and maintain a whole
meaning system for people
through which they get identity
and understanding of the world."'
Think Benetton, Starbucks, Nike
or Apple products. Atkin said
he started hearing people in
industry focus groups talk about
products in a way that sounded
cultish. He got the brainstorm
to actually study cults to better
understand what made advertis-
ing effective.
This is where parents need to',
be alert What might be shaping
our children's consumer deci-
sion-making, and what do we
want influencing it? The answer
is not to keep advertising out of
our homes which we can't
do, in any event Besides, Apple,
products really have changed
people's lives for the better, and
I have to admit I think Disney .
World is a pretty magical place.
Good for them.
But I do think it is important
to talk about what's going on
with our kids. I think we should
enjoy great Super Bowl ads the .
years they are great And I don't
believe we have to fear that
advertising will somehow con- "
trol us. Ad agencies clearly don't'
have that formula. Ultimately,
we can't stop our emotional
responses to advertising. But
working to help our children
become wise consumers and
wise consumers of advertising? ,
I'm sold!
Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a,
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AMv1
1160 in Chicago. 7


4A,









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., com.


Today
HSCT production
The High Springs Community
Theater presents "Sherlock's
Last Case," a play by Charles
Marowitz 8 p.m. Friday and
Saturday. The theater is located
in Historic High Springs at 130
NE First Ave. The play cen-
ters on a death threat against
Sherlock Holmes by the sup-
posed son of his late nemesis
Professor Moriarty. Tickets are
available at The Framery in
Lake City on Baya, 386-754-2780,
at The Coffee Clutch in High
Springs, 386-454-7593, online
at highspringscommunitytheater.
corn or at the door. Prices are
$11 adults, $8 for youth 12 and
younger; and Seniors Sunday
only $9.

Saturday
Riding Club meeting,
The Columbia County Riding
Club meets at 6 p.m. Saturday at
the Columbia Resource Rodeo
Arena. The club meets second
and fourth Saturday of each
month. Free admission for spec-
tators. Bring your horses and
families for a night of fun. Fee
required for riders. Cook shack
on site. For more information,
go to www.columbiacountyriding-
club.com.

Founders Day celebration
The Columbia County Branch
NAACP is hosting a Founders
Day celebration in honor of
Black History Month 3 p.m.
Saturday at New Day Springs
Missionary Baptist Church.
Individual students or groups
interested in participating should
call 7524074. The church is
located at 1213 Long St.

Fort Mose trip
Black History 2011 trip to
Fort Mose is leaving at 7,a.,., .


Saturday from Richardson
Community Center. The event
is sponsored by It's About My
Efforts. The month-long theme
is "Self Sufficiency is Key." Visit
www.itsaboutmyefforts.org or call
386-697-6075 for details.

'50s Rock 'n' Roll
and Sock Hop Dance
Mike Mullis' '50s Rock 'n'
Roll Show and Valentines Sock
Hop Dance is at 8 p.m. Saturday
at the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Hall. The event is a live
musical performance. Prizes
awarded for Best '50s costume,
Hula Hoop challenge, trivia and
Wipeout dance contest. Contact
the Music Hall at 386-364-1703.
Reservations are highly recom-
mended.

Committee Meeting
Richardson High School
Alumni confer in a committee
meeting at noon on Saturday. All
RHS Alumni are invited to attend
the event at the Richardson
Center. For more information,
contact 386-752-0815.

FACS Valentine's Party
All 2011 active Filipino
American Cultural Society mem-
bers and guests are invited to
attend the FACS Valentine's Day
party and dance taking place-
from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.
Come and enjoy an evening of
dancing, cultural food and more
at the Epiphany Catholic Church
social hall, and remember to
bring a covered to dish to share.
For more information, contact
Bob Gavette at 386-965-5905.

Charity Walk/Run
A walk/run for a cure for juve-
nile diabetes in memory of the
late Lindsi Young will take place
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday
on the Suwannee High School
track. Registration for the walk
begins.at. 8:30. a.m. at.the track. ,
I


All walkers/runners are asked to
collect donations to support their
walk, and bring those donations
to the event to help find a cure
for juvenile diabetes.

Youth dance
Pre-Valentine Dance is 6:30 to
10:30 p.m. Feb. 12 at Richardson
Community Center. Admission
is $3 before 7:30 and $5 after.
The dance is open to ages 7 to
16. The first 15 girls get a rose.
The event is sponsored by the
Columbia County Recreation
Department.

Valentines Sock Hop
The Valentine's Sock Hop
at the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park is 8 p.m. Saturday.
The Mike Mullis Band will be
performing live music, and there
will be several contests through-
out the evening, with a grand
prize being awarded. Doors will
open at 6 p.m. and tickets will be
sold prior to the event at $40 per
couple, and at the door for $50
per couple. Ticket price includes
a prime rib and shrimp buf-
fet. To make reservations or to
reserve a cabin call 386-364-1683
or visit www.musicliveshere.com.

FACS Valentine's Party
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake City
hosts a Valentine's Day party
and dance at the Epiphany
Catholic Church social hall from
6 p.m. 10 p.m. on Saturday.
All FACS members are asked
to bring a covered dish to the
event, and the dinner will begin
promptly at 6:30 p.m. For more
information, contact Bob Gavette
at 386-965-5905.

Suwannee River Hike
Get outside and enjoy a
hike through the beautiful
Florida woods, past Big Shoals,
Robinson Branch Falls, Bell
Springs and Little Shoals, all
along the famous Suwannee


River. Those interested can
choose between the 2.5, 6, 8.5 or
the entire 12.5 mile trail to the
Suwanne Valley Campground.
Comfortable shoes, water and
a packed lunch are suggested
for the hike. The hike can be
enjoyed at anytime throughout
the year for only $20 per person.
For reservations or other infor-
mation, e-mail: ididahike@gmail.
corn, or call 386-755-7544.

Sunday
HSCT production
The High Springs Community
Theater presents "Sherlock's
Last Case," a play by Charles
Marowitz at 2 p.m. Sunday.
The theater is located in High
Springs at 130 NE First Ave. The
play centers on a death threat
against Sherlock Holmes by the
supposed son of his late nem-
esis, Professor Moriarty. Tickets
are available at The Framery in
Lake City on Baya, 386-754-2780,
at The Coffee Clutch in High
Springs, 386-454-7593, online at
highspringscommunitytheater corn
or at the door. Prices are $11
adults, $8 youth 12 and younger;
and Seniors Sunday only $9.

Community Concert
Community Concerts of Lake
City present John Davidson in
person at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday.
Davidson is a star of TV, theatre
and film, and performs vocal
and banjo favorites. Guaranteed
early seating is available for
members at 1:50 p.m. All others
can purchase tickets at the door
at $18 per adult and $5 per stu-
dent, with seating beginning at 2 ,
p.m. For more information go to
www.communityconcerts.info, or
call 386466-8999.

Monday
Singles Gala
Black History 2011 Singles
Valentines Day Gala is 6 10
p.m. Monday. The event is spon-


scored by Ifs About My Efforts.
The month-long theme'is "Self
Sufficiency is Key." Visit ivww.
itsaboutmyefforts.org or call 386-
697-6075 for details.

Tuesday
NARFE Meeting
The monthly meeting of the
National Active and Retired
Federal Employees takes
place at 1 p.m. on Tuesday
at the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center on East Baya Avenue.
The Columbia County Fire
Department will be giving fire
safety tips and teaching how to
use a fire extinguisher. For more
information, contact Jim Purvis
at 386-752-8570.

Thursday
Camera Club meeting
The Branford Camera Club
is meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday
at the Branford Public Library.
Humberto Castellanos is speak-
ing about "Picasa," an easy-
to-use, free software program
from Google that helps you
organize, edit, and share photos.
Homework this month is "Scene
on the Street." Choose your
favorite two or three pictures to
share with the group, either digi-
tally or as a printed photo. Bring
other recent photos to share
with the group. Contact Carolyn
Hogue, program chairwoman,
386-935-2044.

Vegetable Gardening
The monthly 'Garden Talk'
at the new Fort White Library
is at 5:45 pm. Thursday. Learn
about preparing soil and choos-
ing varieties for North Florida.
Find out how to use fertilizer
and pesticides while protecting
the environment Bring questions
and enjoy spending time with
other gardeners. This is a free
workshop and open to everyone.
Call 752-5384 for information. .


OBITUARIES


Dorothy Cole
Mrs. Dorothy Cole, a resident of
Lake City, Florida, passed away
on February 5, 2011. She is sur-
vived by three
daughters, La- V
Verne' Cole, 7 ,
Carlean Cole -
and Francene
(Roderick)
Ruffin; one
brother, Her- '
man Taylor
(Carrie); and six grandchildren.
Funeral services for Mrs. Cole
will be Saturday, February 12,
2011 at 11:00 AM at New Beth-
el Missionary Baptist Church,
550 NE Martin Luther King,
Jr. Street, Lake City, Florida.
Visitation for family and
friends will be on Friday, Feb-
ruary 11, 2011 from 5:00 PM
to 7:00 PM at New Bethel
Missionary Baptist Church.
Burial will be in New Hope
Cemetery, Jasper, Florida.
Rev. Alvin J. Baker, pas-
tor and teacher, will officiate.
D.M. Udell and Sons of D.M.
UDELL FUNERAL HOME
are in charge of all arrange-
ments. Contact D.M. Udell
and Sons at 386-362-4189
or -on cell at 386-209-0223.

Murrell Harrell Cray, Sr.
Murrell H. Cray, Sr. 58, departed
this life, February 6, 2011 in
Milledgeville, Georgia after a
brief illness.
He was born
August 1, 1952
in Wellborn,
Florida, the
son of Joel and
Carrie Jackson
Cray. Murrell
attendedschool
in Columbia
County, graduat- f
ing from Colum-
bia High School -
with the class of
1971. He served in the US Army
and later was employed by Occi-
dental Chemical Company. He is
preceded in death by a daughter,


Tandra Cray. Survivors include
four children, Marquita Cray,
Tampa, FL., James Crusaw,
Murrell Cray, Jr., Lake City, FL.,
Michael Donaldson, Raiford,
FL.; three sisters, Hester Miller,
Camphill, PA., Sally Campbell,
Harrisburg, PA., Lucile Hop-
kins (Sylvester), Hopkins, SC.;
seven brothers, James (Estella),
Amos (Eula), both of Gaines-
ville, FL, Coy, Sterling (Alice),
Selvin (Thelma), Carl (Mabel), t.
Bishop Zane Cray, all of Lake
City, FL.; five grandchildren; a
host of nieces, nephews, cous-
ins, other relatives and friends.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street,


Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Gertrude Elizabeth
DuBose
Gertrude Elizabeth DuBose,
63, passed away peacefully on
Wednesday, February 9, 2011, at
the home of her aunt and uncle,
Constance & Marris Saunders,
after a courageous battle against
cancer. She was born in Jack-
sonville, FL and lived all her life
in Lake City. She attended Co-
lumbia High School where she
graduated in 1966. She worked


I







Date: June 2, 2009
Time: 4PM
Place: Kaitlyn's House
off Hwy 47
Please RSVP
386-555-5555 for details.
*^::=:7^--.^^


Call today to place an
Invitation ad for your
child, grandchild,
God child or anyone
you think deserves
something extra on
their special dayl


Call

755.5440 or

755.5441
between 8am & 4pm


10Deadline:
Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days prior
to aDoearance in the Lake City Reporter.


at G.E. in Alachua for many
years and, more recently, for
Hugh Wilson. She was an active
member of First Presbyterian
Church and sang in the church
choir. She was preceded in death
by her father, A. D. DuBose.
She is survived by her mother,
Gordene DuBose, brother, Da-
vid (Marlene) DuBose, nieces,
Angela DuBose & Amy (Jerry)
Gutzke, great nephews, Chris-


tian, Andrew, and Coen, Great
Nieces, Hayes and Riley, aunts,
LaVerta Roper, Constance (Mor-
ris) Saunders, and Trudie (Wal-
lace) Johns, and several cousins.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted Friday, February 11, 2011
at 2:00. In the First Presbyterian
Church with the Dr. Roy Martin,
officiating. Interment will fol-
low in Memorial Cemetery. Do-
nations may be made to Haven
Hospice, 6037 W. US Hwy 90,


LAke City, FL. 32055. The fam-
ily will receive friends Thurs-
day, February 10, 2011 from 5-7
at the funeral home. GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, Lake City
is in charge of arrangements.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


'We have advertised exclusively in the
Lake City Reporter for the past years.
They have been greatly instrumental in
assisting us to make our business
the success it is today.

Advertising in the Reporter has
always produced great results for our
business and the process is even better
with the expertise ofjeffPressley, our Susan Brown
sales representative. Owner, Island Shack

Thank you Lake City Reporter."










FOR ISLAND SHACK TANNING SALON



The success of our customers is key
for the Lake City ReporterRU D

Our expert sales staff will assist you
in finding the best way to
market your business.




Find out more by
calling 752-1293. ./

752-497O



Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com r CURRENTS Magazine


- II 1.,1 1 ." , -


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424







6A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011


LAST


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Valentine's Day









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Friday, February 11, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS







Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Pay to

play on

the way

C chickens
coming home
to roost sticks
in my mind
each time a
proposed budget cut is
announced by the
governor's office.
It's the no-tax notion in
action: cut $2.5 billion from
education $7 million of
that coming from Columbia
County; shut down state
parks including Olustee,
the focal point of next
week's annual festival.
Nothing is sacred when
it comes to the budget
bulldozer.
With all that
government has meant
to this area, it is hard to
figure local complaining.,
Many of our families
have members past
and present employed
by the Department of
Transportation, the VA.
Hospiital..the Fish and ...
Wildlife Office, Columbia
County's school system,
the National Guard, Florida
Gateway College, state
parks, the prison system,.
and with the county and
city.
These folks contribute
to all of us and honorably
earn their money.
We have people who
benefitted from the soil
bank program, some paid
by the government not to
grow crops and others who
get help to grow pine trees
and such.
We have families
receiving Social Security,
Medicare and Medicaid,.
with many of them
supplementing a
government retirement.
Tear it all down. We're
overtaxed, though
raises for personnel have
not busted any budgets.
When they begin
coming after the schools,
extra-curricular activities
will be the first on the
chopping block and that
starts with sports. Band
and chorus might last a
little longer.
It's bad enough now.
We ask kids to uphold the
honor of our schools and
communities and provide
bragging rights, but do it
on the cheap.
You can't buy
groceries without a school
sports team outside the
store asking for a handout.
Area restaurants offer
many fundraising nights to
offset sports expenses.
The supplements paid
coaches are silly, if you
look at all the time they are
expected to spend on what
has evolved into year-round
training.
School sports are
headed for a pay-to-play
plan. That's fine for travel
teams, but it is not what
we sign up for in a school
system.
Students deserve a
chance to make it on talent,
not their bankroll.
To keep our way of life,
we must be willing to dig
down and pay up.

* Tim Kirby is sports editor


of the Lake City Reporter.


FSU uses early run to

beat Georgia Tech, 72-63


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Georgia Tech guard Maurice Miller (3) grabs a rebound as
Florida State guard lan Miller (30) looks on Thursday in
Atlanta.


m


Tigers coach
Howard leaving
forcollege job.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@iakecityreporter. corn
Columbia High will
have a new coach this
season as Craig Howard
made official his inten-
tion to become the next
head coach at Southern
Oregon University on
Thursday.
Howard met with his
players at the beginning
of school on Thursday
to discuss his future and
wish the Tigers well.
"It was a bittersweet,
tough day," Howard said.
"I wished them all well,
and we talked about the
choices we make."
Following the meeting,
Howard spent the day
answering and returning
phone calls.
"My phone hasn't
stopped ringing," he said.
"It started with congratu-
lations. There were guys
wanting jobs at Southern
HOWARD continued on 2B


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High coach Craig Howard speaks with the Tigers' football team after practice last season. He said will accept the
job at Southern Oregon.


Sloan steps down


Jazz coach
retires after 23
NBA seasons.
Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY -
Hall of Famer Jerry Sloan
stepped down Thursday
after 23 seasons and 1,127
wins as head coach of the
Utah Jazz.
Longtime assistant Phil
Johnson, who also was in
his 23rd season with the
Jazz, also resigned.
Sloan said during a news
conference that stepping
down was his decision and
that the team had tried to
talk him out of it. But he
said it's time to move on.
Jazz assistant Tyrone
Corbin will be the next
coach.
The moves come on the
heels of an emotional 91-86
loss Wednesday night to


the Chicago Bulls, Utah's
10th in the last 14 games.
Sloan, the longest-ten-
ured coach in the four
major professional sports,
hinted that something was
in the works after delaying
his postgame press con-
ference Wednesday night
for more than 30 minutes
because of what he said
was a meeting with Jazz
general manager Kevin
O'Connor.
Sloan said he made his
decision to leave early
Thursday.
Sloan just recently
signed a one-year contract
extension to carry him
through the 2011-12 sea-
son, but he also indicated
that he would not make
anything official until after
the current season.
The team started
15-5 but fell to 31-23 after
the loss to Chicago, the
only other team Sloan has


coached (he was 94-121 in
nearly three seasons with
the Bulls). The Chicago
loss was the third straight
at home, where the Jazz
are only 17-11 this season.
Sloan was asked after
Wednesday's game if there
was need for a shake-up.
"I don't think there's
any great need for panic,"
he said. "Kevin is always
evaluating what we can do
or what someone wants to
do with another team and
that's part of the business.
Every day that's part of his
job."
Though Sloan has been
with the Jazz since 1983,
first as a scout, he knows
how tenuous professional
sports can be.
Even before
Wednesday's game he
made that clear..
He has made a habit of
SLOAN continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Utah Jazz head coach Jerry Sloan (right) questions
offiical Josh Tiven about a foul call against the Sacramento
Kings in a NBA game in Sacramento, Calif. on Monday.


Singleton scores
16 to pace
Seminoles.
Associated Press

ATLANTA Bouncing
back from a 20-point loss
to North Carolina, Florida
State got 16 points from
Chris Singleton, 15 from
Michael Snaer and used an
early 14-0 run to beat strug-
gling Georgia Tech 72-63
Thursday night
The Seminoles (17-7, 7-3
Atlantic Coast Conference)
desperately needed a win
to beef up their NCAA
resume, especially after
the 89-69 rout by North
Carolina and an ugly 62-44
loss at Clemson the week
before that.
They came to the right
place.
For the second straight
game, Georgia Tech (10-
13, 3-7) had a devastating


scoreless stretch in the
early going. Last weekend,
Clemson put together a 22-
0 run on the way to a 65-
56 victory. This time, the
Yellow Jackets went nearly
7 minutes without scor-
ing, a dreadful display that
included 11 straight missed
shots and five turnovers.
Iman Shumpert led
Georgia Tech with 25
points, and Glen Rice Jr.
had 24.
Georgia Tech has lost
four in a row and five out
of six, putting more heat
on embattled coach Paul
Hewitt. In addition to poor
results on the court, the
administration can't be too
thrilled about playing one
ACC game after another in
a half-filled arena.
Florida State turned in a
sloppy performance,, turn-
ing it over 17 times and
letting Georgia Tech hang
around despite shooting
just 30 percent (23-of-77).


But the Seminoles were
never seriously threatened
by a team with few offensive
weapons beyond Shumpert
and Rice.
The rest of the Yellow
Jackets roster produced
only 14 points. None of the
other three starters scored
at all.
Singleton also had 10
rebounds, while Snaer fin-
ished off the Yellow Jackets
with a couple of nifty drives
in the closing minutes.
Okaro White added 12
points for Florida State.
Trailing 17-2, Georgia
Tech finally broke the
14-point run with Mfon
Udofia's third-try lay-in, fol-
lowing two straight offen-
sive rebounds. The Yellow
Jackets finished 7-of-36
in the first half, not even
cracking 20 percent from
the field. But at least they
had plenty of chances to
pad their rebounding stats
in the opening half.








Fell


fare










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
5 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup. prac-
tice for Budweiser Shootout, at Daytona
Beach, Fla.
6:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
final practice for Budweiser Shootout, at
Daytona Beach, Fla.
8:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
Budweiser Shootout Selection Show, at
Daytona Beach. Fla.
BOXING
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Welterweights, Antonin
Decarie (24-1-0) vs. Shamone Alvarez
(21-3-0), at Montreal
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Dubai
Desert Classic, second round, at Dubai,
United Arab Emirates (same-day tape)
12:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Allianz
Championship, first round, at Boca Raton,
Fla.
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Pebble Beach
National Pro-Am, second round,at Pebble
Beach, Calif.
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN L.A. Lakers at New York
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Phoenix at Utah
PREP BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Oak-Hill Academy (Va.) vs.
Christ School (N.C.), at Durham, N.C.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Wednesday's Games
Detroit 103, Cleveland 94
Indiana 104, Charlotte 103
New Jersey 103, New Orleans 101,
OT
Orlando 99, Philadelphia 95
SanAntonio I1 I.Toronto I100
Washington 100, Milwaukee 85
LA. Clippers 116, New York 108
Chicago 91, Utah 86
Dallas 102, Sacramento I100
Golden State 116, Denver 114
Thursday's Games
LA. Lakers at Boston (n)
Golden State at Phoenix (n)
Dallas at Denver (n)
Today's Gamines
New Jersey at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Indiana, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Orlando, 7 p.m.
San Antonio at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Portland atToronto, 7 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Memphis, 8 p.mn .
LA. Lakers at New York, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Utah, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 10 Connecticut vs. St. John's at
Madison Square Garden, 7 p.m.
No. 23 Vanderbilt vs.Alabama, 9 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. I Ohio State at No. 13 Wisconsin,
2 p.m.
No. 2 Kansas vs. Iowa State, 4 p.m.
No. 3 Texas vs. Baylor, 4 p.m.
No. 4 Pittsburgh at No. 9 Villanova,
9 p.m.
No. 6 San Diego State at UNLV,
8 p.m.
No.7 BYU vs. Utah, 6 p.m.
No. 8 Notre Dame at South
Florida, Noon
No. 12 Syracuse at No. 16 Louisville,
Noon
No. 17 Florida vs. Tennessee,
6 p.m.
No. 18 Kentucky at No. 23 Vanderbilt,


No. 19 Missouri vs. Oklahoma,
1:30 p.m.
No. 20 North Carolina at Clemson,
I p.m.
No. 21 Utah State vs. Fresno State,
9:05 p.m.
No. 22 Texas A&M at Texas Tech,
1:30 p.m.
No. 24Temple at Dayton, I p.m.
No. 25 West Virginia vs. DePaul,
4 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 5 Duke at Miami, 6:45 p.m.
No. 10 Connecticut vs. Providence,
7 p.m.
No. II Georgetown vs. Marquette,
I p.m.
No. 14 Purdue at Illinois, I p.m.
No. 15 Arizona at Arizona State,
9 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Budweiser Shootout
Site: Daytona Beach
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
5-6 p.m., 6:30-7:30 p.m.), draw party
(Speed, 8:30-10 p.m.); Saturday, race,
8 p.m. (FOX, 8-10 p.m.)
Track: Daytona International Speedway
(tri-oval, 2.5 miles).
Race distance: 187.5 miles, 75 laps
(25- and 50-lap segments, with 10-minute
pit stop).
Fast facts: Five-time defending series
champion Jimmie Johnson and the other
II Chase qualifiers top the field.... Daytona
500'front-row qualifying is Sunday.
Next race: Daytona 500, Feb. 20.
Online: httpJ//www.nascar.com
OTHER RACE
ARCA RE/MAX SERIES: Lucas Oil
Slick Mist 200, Saturday (Speed, 4:30-
6:30 p.m.), Daytona International
Speedway, Daytona Beach. Online: http://
www.arcoradng.com.

Sprint Cup schedule

Feb. 12 x-Budweiser Shootout,
Daytona Beach
Feb. 17 x-Gatorade Duel I & 2,
Daytona Beach
Feb. 20 Daytona 500, Daytona
Beach
Feb. 27 Subway Fresh Fit 500,
Avondale,Ariz.
March 6 Kobalt Tools 400, Las
Vegas
March 20 Food City 500, Bristol,
Tenn.
March 27 Auto Club 500, Foptana,
Calif.
April 3 Goody's Fast Relief 500,
MartinsvilleVa.
April 9 Samsung Mobile 500, Fort
Worth,Texas
April 17 -Aaron's 499,Talladega,Ala.
April 30 Crown Royal 400,
Richmond,Va.
May 7 Showtime Southern 500,
Darlington, S.C.
May 15 Dover (Del.) 400
May 21 x-Sprint Showdown,
Concord, N.C.
May 21 x-AII-Star Challenge,
Concord, N.C.
May 29 Coca-Cola 600, Concord,
N.C.
June 5 Kansas Speedway 400,
Kansas City, Kan.
June 12 Pocono 500, Long Pond,
Pa.
June 19 Heluva Good! Sour Cream
Dips 400, Brooklyn, Mich.
June 26 Toyota/Savemart 350,
Sonoma, Calif.
July 2 Coke Zero 400, Daytona
Beach
July 9 Kentucky 400, Sparta, Ky.
July 17 LENOX Industrial Tools
301, Loudon, N.H. *
July 31 Brickyard 400, Indianapolis
Aug. 7 Pennsylvania 500, Long
Pond, Pa.
Aug. 14 Helluva Good! Sour Cream
Dips at the Glen,Watkins Glen, N.Y.
Aug. 21 CARFAX 400, Brooklyn,
Mich.


Aug. 27 Irwin Tools 500, Bristol.
Tenn.
Sept. 4 Labor Day Classic 500,
Hampton, Ga.
Sept. 10 One Last Race to Make
the Chase 400, Richmond,Va.
Sept. 18 LifeLock.com 400, Joliet,
Ill.
Sept- 25 SYLVANIA 300, Loudon,
N.H.
Oct. 2 -AAA 400, Dover, Del.
Oct. 9 Kansas 400, Kansas City,
Kan.
Oct. 15 Bank of America 500,
Concord, N.C.
Oct. 23 Talladega 500, Talladega,
Ala.
Oct. 30 TUMS Fast Relief 500,
Martinsville.Va.
Nov. 6 -AAA Texas 500, FortWorth,
Texas
Nov. 13 KobaltTools 500,Avondale,
Ariz.
Nov. 20 Ford 400, Homestead
x-non-points race

BASEBALL

MLB calendar
Today -Voluntary reporting date for
pitchers, catchers and injured players.
Feb. 19 Voluntary reporting date
for other players.
March 2 Mandatory reporting
date.
March 2-11 Teams may renew
contracts of unsigned players.
March 15 Last day to place a
player on unconditional release waivers
and pay 30 days termination pay instead
of 45 days.
March 29 Last day to request
unconditional release waivers on a player
without having to pay his full 2011 salary.
March 31 Opening day, active
rosters reduced to 25 players.
July 12 -All-Star game, Phoenix.
July 24 Hall of Fame induction,
Cooperstown, N.Y.
July 31 Last day to trade a player
without securing waivers.
Aug. 15 Last day to sign selections
from 2011 amateur draft who have not
exhausted college eligibility.
Sept. I Active rosters expand to
40 players.
Sept. 30 or Oct. I Playoffs begin.
Oct. 19 -World Series begins.
November Free agent period to
sign exclusively with former teams, first
15 days after World Series ends.
Dec. I Last day for teams to offer
salary arbitration to their former players
who became free agents.
Dec. 5-8 -Winter meetings, Dallas.
Dec. 7 Last day for free agents
offered salary arbitration to accept the
offers.
Dec. II :- Collective bargaining
agreement expires.
Dec. 12 Last day for teams to offer
2012 contracts to unsigned players.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Wednesday's Games
Boston 8, Montreal 6
San Jose 3, Columbus 2
Nashville 4, Detroit I
Minnesota 3, Colorado 2
Phoenix 3, Dallas 2, OT
Calgary 5, Ottawa 2
Chicago 4, Edmonton I
Anaheim 4,Vancouver 3
Thursday's Games
Philadelphia 2, Carolina I
Pittsburgh 2, Los Angeles I, OT
New Jersey at Toronto (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Montreal (n)
Buffalo at Florida (n)
Today's Games
Detroit at Boston, 7 p.m.
San Jose at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Columbus, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Calgary, 9 p.m.


BRIEFS


BABE RUTH BASEBALL
Evaluations set
for Saturday
Babe Ruth Baseball
evaluations are scheduled
for 3 p.m. Saturday
at Southside Baseball
Complex.
For details, call league
president Tad Cervantes at
365-4810.

DANCE
Angels accepting
new members
The DFC Angels
Competitive Dance Team
is accepting new team
members for the 2011-12
dance season. Tryouts are
open to dancers ages 12-16.
Interested members
should contact coach
Whitney Parks-Massey for
more details at (386)
292-9048 by today.

ADULT BASEBALL
Men's league
forming in area
The MLBA in North
Florida and South Georgia
would like to form a team
from this area for the 2011
season. Age is 55 and
younger. Games begin in


April and are played on
Sunday.
For details, visit www.
leaguelineup.com/
northfloridamabl.

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Moe's Night
fundraiser set
The Fort White High
Dugout Club has a Moe's
Night fundraiser from
5-8 p.m. Thursday at Moe's
Southwest Grill in Lake City.
For details, call coach
Chad Bonds at 590-7362.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Fort White
registration set
Fort White Girls Softball
Association's spring
softball season registration
for ages 6-16 is at the.
concession stand in the
South Columbia Sports
Complex from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday.
For details, call Jay
Harvey or Lynn Harvey at
365-2797 or 365-5688.

Softball players
sough for team
Athletes interested in
playing 10-under girls


softball year-round are
being sought
For details, call Butch
Lee at 965-6002,or Tim
Blackwell at 623-1826.

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Feb. 21
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Feb. 21 in
the teacher's lounge at the
high school.
Election of officers
will be conducted, so all
members are encouraged
to attend.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 3974954 or e-mail
shaynetrayne@hotmail.com.

ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays. Cost
is $3 .per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
6234817 or Mario Coppock
at 754-7095.

* From staff reports


HOWARD: Has replacement in mind


SCOREBOARD


Continued From Page 1B

Oregon. There were also
guys calling me to ask ques-
tions about the Columbia
job."
Howard said that he
hasn't selected a date to
officially make the move to
Oregon, but that it will be
within the week. When he
gets there, his first job will
be putting a staff together.
He said he won't be raiding
the cupboard of Columbia.
"I'm going to pretty much
be putting together a new
staff," he said. "I've had a list
of about 15 contacts before
I got it. I've had between 30
and 50 people contact me
about it since then, even
when I was in the final four
for the job."
Making the return to
Southern Oregon will be
a bit of a strange circum-
stance for Howard as he'll
be the head man at his
former school's rival. He
coached Oregon Tech at
the beginning of his career.


'"That used to be our big
rival," Howard said. 'They
were the No. 2 team in the
nation one year, and we
were up against the wall.
We came in and knocked
them off, 55-14, and put
them out of the playoffs."
Still, the coach has roots
with the program.
"When I was growing
up, I almost went there,"
he said. "This is the level
that I love coaching at. The
players that go there love
football. It's their chance to
keep playing. It's not quite
as big time and there aren't
the fancy uniforms, but
they appreciate the game
more."
Howard spoke of his
commitment to helping
Columbia players continue
their careers and would like
to bring some players with
him.
"I certainly would want
to if they're willing to go
that far," he said. "I would


SLOAN: Third in all-time victories
Continued From Page 1B


conducting his pre-game
news conferences next
to a large plastic garbage
receptacle in the concourse
.at EnergySolutions Arena
rather than from behind a
podium.
"You never know when
you might be in it," he
quipped Wednesday. "It's
why I stand here. You take
what you get."
Sloan began working for
the Jazz as a scout in 1983,
became assistant to coach
Frank Layden on Nov. 19,
1984, and was named the
sixth coach in franchise
history on Dec. 9, 1988,
when Layden resigned:
He is the only coach in
NBA history to win 1,000
games with one team, a
feat he accomplished Nov.
7 against Oklahoma City.
Sloan's other wins came
with the Chicago Bulls
from 1979 to 1982.
While he has headed the
Jazz, there have been 245
coaching changes around
the league 13 alone by
the Los Angeles Clippers,
and five current NBA


ACROSS

1 Dust cloth
4 Head covers
8 Ump's call
11 Minuscule
12 Reason to
cram
13 Slangy pal
14 Kuwaiti leader
15 Dictionaries
17 Held up
19 Lock or curl
20 Vacation acqui-
sition
21 T'ai ch'uan
22 Twitter
25 Rumors,
often
20 Potpie veggie
29 Hauls into
court
31 Make prepara-
tions
33 "Mona -"
35 Earns as profit
37 WNW opposite
38 Gives feedback
40 Undue speed


teams (Charlotte, Memphis,
Toronto, Orlando and
Minnesota) did not even.
exist when Sloan took the
helm in Utah.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

CALLII


2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
PYMUB



TRULIA



QUALEP
S- 11 L
__ _ __ ^ __ Cs


He ranks third all-
time in NBA wins (1,221)
behind Don Nelson
(1,335) and Lenny Wilkens
(1,332).

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans: A


Yesterday's Jumbles:
Answer:


42 Sweater letter
43 Ill-mannered
one
44 Mead's island
47 Performed
feats of dexter-
ity
51 Bureaus
53 Luau entertain-
ment
54 Cruise or
Clancy
55 Sword part
56 Woeful cry
57 Kind of trip
58 Is down with
the flu
59 Role for
Whoopi

DOWN

1 Frosty coating
2 Indigo plant
3 Whirl
4 Reddy or
Keller
5 Gave the pink
slip,


(Answers tomorrow)
QUAKE SIEGE BUSILY CANINE
What the poker player had when the royals
joined the game KINGS AND QUEENS


Answer to Previous Puzzle


HIPPO R FT
ORALLY SUNLIT
DECADE OSCARS
CENSUS WEE
LEES CLEF
HAl TEA TACO
MI'DI RFD WHAM
O REO AFR NASH
DRUB OYL FEZ
SEAL OFFS
O W[L DEDUCE
WEAKER HARMED
ENRICO STAPLE
DAN K EL GIN


6 Payment to the
government
7 Anvil users
8 Bassoon cousin
9 Coffee dis-
pensers


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


10 Mix the salad
11 Guitarist
Nugent
16 Invigorating
18 Barks shrilly
21 Expense
22 Mil. rank
23 Next in line
24 Maneuver
slowly
25 A few thou
26 Dots in "la
mer"
27 Memoir topic
30 Till
32 Bridal notice
word
34 Hammerin'
Hank
36 Thick carpet-
ing
39 Cugat's forte
(hyph.)
41 Type of hound
43 Deposes
44 Cloy
45 Enthralled
46 Short note
47 Thicken
48 Dilly
49 Vivacity
50 "-
Rheingold"
52 VI halved


2-11 201.1 by UFS, Inc.


like to set up a scholarship
for Columbia football play-
ers, but I haven't spoken
with any of the players yet
about that. I haven't had the
chance."
Locally, the attention will
turn to finding Howard's
replacement. He left a sug-
gestion for who he would
like to see as his replace-
ment.
"I think they will get
between 150 and 200 appli-
cants," Howard said. "I hope
the first guy they consider
is Dennis Dotson. He's not
going anywhere and he's as
solid of a coach as there is
in this game. It's his'turn."
With a 19-14-1 record at
Columbia, Howard leaves
after winning one district
championship. He also
leaves with memories.
"I enjoyed all of my three
years here," he said. "I will
'always look back on my
time in Columbia County
fondly."


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011


The 3-point arc hits 25 years


By JOHN MARSHALL
Associated Press

LAS VEGAS One of
the most significant chang-
es in college basketball his-
tory was met with disdain,
called a novelty, even silly.
Down in the desert, not
far from where fortunes
can be won or lost with the
flick of a wrist, a rebel
leading a bunch of Rebels
was among the handful of
coaches who embraced the
new rule.
Not only did UNLV's
Jerry Tarkanian like the
3-point shot, he saw it as
a game-changing weapon,
had his players cast 'em
up whenever they got the
chance.
And the Rebels haven't
missed since, hitting at
least one in every game,
796 and counting.
'"We're a team that shoots
a lot of 3s over the years,"
current UNLV coach Lon
Kruger said. '"We've probably
been attempting fewer this
year than we have over the
last few years, but still shoot
it pretty freely from 3."
It's been 25 years since
the 3-point shot was insti-
tuted by the NCAA amid
harsh criticism from coach-
es across the country.
Look at it today and it's
hard to imagine the game
without the arc.
The 3-point shot has,
after a few get-a-feel-for-it
years, become as much a
part of the game as the
dunk, adding excitement
while altering everything
from recruiting to the way
basketball is played and
coached at all levels.
"The 3-point line is very
popular, it's here to stay,"
said Maryland coach Gary
Williams, among those ini-
tially reluctant to add the
arc. "But it has changed the
game."
That's an understate-


ment.
An argument can be made
that the 3-point shot is the
most significant change in
the modern era of college
basketball.
Other than repealing the
dunking ban in 1976-77, add-
ing the shot clock in 1985-86
and perhaps freshman eligi-
bility in 1972, no. other rule
change has affected college
basketball as much since
the early days of the game,
when they were cutting the
bottom of the nets off so the
ball could go through and
moving the backboards out
so players couldn't jump off
the walls.
While the dunk has more
wow-power, the 3-pointer is
more of a power shifter.
Just by adding one point,
the 3-point shot made the
game more entertaining by
spreading the floor and cre-
ating more opportunities to
get into transition off the
long rebounds.
It gave trailing teams a
no-lead-is-safe hope they
might not have had going
two points at a time; leading
teams wield a spirit-crush-
ing dagger.
It forced coaches to alter
tactics, getting their players
to guard the entire floor
instead of just clogging the
lane, inside-out not neces-
sarily the preferred offense
anymore.
It expanded players' skill
sets, everyone, including
the biggest ones on the
floor, learning how to shoot
from the perimeter.
Trey, triple, trifecta -
whatever you want to call it,
the 3-pointer has reshaped
basketball for good.
"It's more exciting
because of the 3-point shot
- much more exciting,"
said Louisville's Rick Pitino,
one of the first coaches to
embrace the shot. "There's
much more strategy to
the game offensively and
I


defensively because of the
3-point shot. Yes, I think it
has helped the game."
The 3-point shot was
adopted by the NBA in 1979
and had been an experiment
in numerous college confer-
ences before being added
by the NCAA in 1986.
Before the arc was
installed, teams were set if
they had a dominant center,
such as Georgetown with
Patrick Ewing or Virginia
with Ralph Sampson.
These days, the game
has stretched, making
the perimeter player just
as important as the post
player. Nearly everyone on
the roster can shoot from
downtown, even players
6-foot-9 and taller, some-
thing unheard of in the pre-
arc days.
It's changed recruiting,
too.
Coaches aren't always
looking for that beefy cen-
ter, not just because there
are so few out there now,
but because they want mul-
titalented players who can
fit into a college game that's
put a premium on ball han-
dling and long-range shoot-
ing.
"Every team basically
plays three guards just
about now, and a lot of
teams are going to almost
a fourth guard that's 6-5 or
6-6 and can shoot the ball
to take advantage of the
3-point line," Williams said.
The 3-point shot also has
altered the possibilities.
Used to be, a double-digit
lead with three or four min-
utes left was insurmount-
able.
Now, 10 points with 60
seconds left isn't safe.
Duke staged one of the
most memorable come-
backs in college basketball
history in 2001, overcoming
a 10-point deficit in the final
54 seconds to beat Williams
and the Terps in overtime


- a rally that wouldn't have
been possible without Jay
Williams' pair of 3-pointers
in a 13-second span.
In the 2008 national cham-
pionship game, Kansas
benefited when Memphis
missed all those free throws
at the end of regulation,
but the Jayhawks wouldn't
have won the title in over-
time if Mario Chalmers'
last-second shot had been
worth two points, instead
of three.
When Butler's Gordon
Hayward rimmed out a half-
court heave in last year's
title game against Duke, it
was for the win, not the tie.
"The 3-point shot
changed basketball for-
ever, from the standpoint
you have so many spurts,
you have so many runs; I
mean three shots and you
make up a 10-point deficit,"
Baylor coach Scott Drew
said. "You want to have peo-
ple that are capable of mak-
ing them because if you
don't, life becomes hard at
the end of the day. Two 3s
are a lot easier to get some-
times than three 2s."
When the 3-point shot
was first introduced,
numerous coaches spoke
out against the new rule,
taking the why-mess-with-a-
good-thing approach.
Even when it was first
instituted, coaches were
hesitant to take advantage:
NCAA Division I teams
attempted an average of 9.2
3-point attempts making
3.5 per game in 1986-87,
compared to 18.2 in 2009-
10, the first season the line
was moved back a foot to 20
feet, 9 inches.
A few coaches, though,
saw the 3-pointer as a
new weapon, an equalizer
against bigger teams':
Pitino, then at Providence,
was among them, instruct-
ing his players to shoot
from beyond the arc when-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Missouri forward Laurence Bowers shoots a 3-point basket
during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game
against Kansas in Lawrence, Kan. on Monday. Bowers
scored 19 points. Kansas defeated Missouri 103-86. It's been
25 years since the 3-point shot was instituted.


ever they got the chance.
The philosophy allowed
the Friars to keep up in the
burly Big East, where coach-
es such as John Thompon
at Georgetown, Rollie
Massimino at Villanova
and Lou Carnesecca at St.
John's were reluctant to
shoot the 3.
"They didn't like it.
They were basketball pur-
ists," said Pitino, who will
stop practice at Louisville
when someone passes up
an opener 3-pointer. "They
thought the strategy was to
go inside and go backdoor
and I was just delighted
with the fact that they didn't
want to take it."


At UNLV, Tarkanian had
his team shooting 3s in the
very first game of the. 1986-
87 season, and the coaches
who followed, up to Kruger
now, have kept the Rebels
firing them up.
They're proud of the mon-
umental streak at UNLV,
but once the ball goes up
during a game, the Rebels
don't pay much attention
to it.
The crowd, though, is
keenly aware of when streak
is in jeopardy, buzzing and
calling for 3-pointers when
it's late in the game and the
Rebels haven't made one,
including a couple of times
this season.


,q4


Rory Mcllroy plays a shot on 18th hole during the first round of Dubai
Club in Dubai, United Arab Emirates on Thursday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Desert Classic golf tournament at the Emirates Golf


Mcllroy's 65 takes lead in


Dubai,Woods struggles to 71


By. MICHAEL CASEY
Associated Press

DUBAI, United Arab
Emirates Rory McIlroy
upstaged the world's top
three golfers with a 7-
under 65 Thursday to take
the first-round lead at the
Dubai Desert Classic, four
shots better than No. 1
Lee Westwood and Martin
Kaymer and six ahead of an
inconsistent Tiger Woods.
McIlroy, whose only
European Tour win came
in Dubai two years ago, had
eight birdies to go with one
bogey at the Emirates Golf
Club. The seventh-ranked
McIlroy took the early lead
and held it. Sergio Garcia
(67) and Thomas Aiken
(67) trailed by two shots in
windy conditions.
"I really had a lot of iron
shots and got away with a
couple of drives that I was
quite fortunate to 'make


birdies from," the 21-year-
old Mcllroy said. "I had a
putt for a 64 on the last that
didn't quite go in. But I'll'
take 65 in these conditions
any day."
Woods shot a 71 and had
problems early in the day,
twice going to 2 over. But
he eagled the 18th hole
after hitting a 3-wood about
250 yards to the green.
"I. struggled today with
ball flight," he said. "My
trajectory wasn't what I
wanted on a lot of shots,
and consequently, I could
never get a ball pin high
especially when the wind is
blowing this hard."
Much of the buzz com-
ing into the opening round
centered on the grouping
of the top three golfers.
Westwood made several
putts en route to four bird-
ies. But he faltered toward
the end, three-putting on
17 to miss out on another


birdie and scoring a lone
bogey on the 18th when his
approach shot fell short of
the green and nearly rolled
into the water.
"I played solidly. I didn't
make too many mistakes,"
Westwood said. "It was dis-
appointing to shoot 1 over
for the last two holes. One
under would have been
nice. All in all, 69 was. a
pretty good score."
Kaymer's approach shot
on the ninth hole hit the
grandstand and ended up
in the water, leading to a
double bogey. He finished
with six birdies, including
one on the 17th where his
drive cut the corner on the
359-yard hole and ended up
on the green. He narrowly
missed an eagle putt.
"Yeah, it was OK,"
Kaymer said. "I hit a lot
of good shots, and was a
little bit unfortunate on the
ninth."


Woods had trouble and
flashes of brilliance during
his round. The troubles
were obvious by his body
language he swore after
an approach shot drifted
left and slammed a club
into the ground on way-
ward shot that led to his
double bogey on the 12th
hole.
He let out a sigh when a
birdie putt came up short
on the 13th. He badly
missed an 80-yard chip
on the 17th that ended up
in the back of the green,
leaving him with a 45-foot
birdie putt.
"That was awful. Awful,"
he said of the chip. "It's
something that I'm still
working on technique, and
unfortunately, sometimes
I think about technique
instead of feel."
Mcllroy was runner-up
in last month's Abu Dhabi
Championship.


NFL, players'

union cancel 2nd

day of talks in DC


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Negotiations to prevent an
NFL lockout took a grim
.turn Thursday with the can-
cellation of the second day
of a planned two-day bar-
gaining session.
"We wish we were nego-
tiating today," NFL Players
Association spokesman
George Atallah said. "That's
all I can say."
There are just three
weeks to go before the col-
lective bargaining agree-
ment expires on March 3.
The NFL said it would not
comment on CBA meetings
at this point. The league did
confirm that Commissioner,
Roger Goodell has canceled
an owners' meeting sched-
uled for next Tuesday in
Philadelphia.
The collapse of the
talks came as a surprise.
The two sides got togeth-
er Wednesday -for the
second time in five days,
the previous negotiations
taking place in Dallas on
Saturday before the Super
Bowl. Neither Atallah nor
NFLPA executive direc-
tor DeMaurice Smith
-would comment on why
Thursday's session was
called off.
The union sent a memo
Thursday to player agents
updating the status of dis-
cussions on a rookie wage
scale. A union proposal to
decrease the maximum
length of rookie contracts
to four years for players
selected in the first three
rounds, and three years for
players chosen after that,
also included a limit on
financial incentives and sal-
ary escalators that could be
included in rookie deals.
Those limits would, the
NFLPA claims, provide the
cost certainty the league is
seeking for its rookie salary
pool.


According to the memo
seen by The Associated
Press, the NFL's response
was a five-year wage scale
with base salary escalators.
That would virtually elimi-
nate individual negotiation
of rookie contracts.
Owners opted out of the
current CBA in 2008 and
are seeking a bigger cut
of the league's revenues,
which are. roughly $9 bil-
lion, as well as the rookie
wage scale. They also want
to increase the regular sea-
son by two games to 18,
while dropping. two pre-
season games.
The players are happy
with the status quo.
The NFL has had labor
peace since a 1987 play-
ers' strike that led to three
games with replacement
players, but some sort of
labor stoppage appears a
genuine possibility this year
because of the slow pace of
negotiations. The talks at
the Super Bowl were the
first formal discussions
since November.
Meanwhile, the NFLPA
continued to present its
side of the argument to the
public. The union brought
in a beer vendor from Ford
Field in Detroit as part of
a news conference in the
nation's capital aimed at
demonstrating the effects a
lockout would have on the
economy.
"Football and other major
sporting events are some of
the only things that bring
people to downtown Detroit
after 5 p.m.," said John
Marler, who has worked at
the stadium since 2007.
Kimberly Freeman
Brown, executive director
of American Rights at Work,
said the NFL and union are
fussing over many of the
same issues faced by many
workers: pay cuts, longer
working hours, workplace
safety and health care.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420








Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011


DILBERT
I DOGBEPRT CONSULTS


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


FRANK & ERNEST


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


DEAR ABBY


Teenage outcast can't learn

social skills all by himself


DEAR ABBY: You assured
"Overwhelmed in Ohio" (Dec.
18) that fellow student "Dan"
will "move on and start build-
ing a life" after high school
is over. On what base might
he build? Because "Over-
whelmed" says Dan is an "out-
cast" whom everyone treats as
invisible, and he has attached
himself to the one person who
has befriended him, it appears
he has completely missed the
normal teen social-learning
process. How, then, is he sup-
posed to have acquired the so-
cial skills necessary for build-
ing connections later in life?
There's a difference be-
tween being unpopular and
being ostracized. An unpopu-
lar kid can participate in social
situations with similar kids. A
kid who is shunned cannot.
Unfortunately, Dan may be on
a path toward lifelong social il-
literacy and isolation.
What needs .to happen
before "Overwhelmed" pulls
away is for the adults in charge
of this school to figure out why
Dan has been ostracized, and
develop an effective remedy
for the situation one that
gets Dan into normal relation-
ships with other people. And
there should also be lessons
about empathy provided to the
students who are shunning
him. KNOWS FROM EX-
PERIENCE
DEAR KNOWS: Thank
you for your insight. You are
by no means the only reader
who felt compelled to chime in


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
on this sad situation. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: High school
can be a cruel time for many
young people, especially those
deemed "outcasts" by their
peers. I had a friend in high
school who truly suffered. I
made it my mission to make
sure he felt he had a friend
and wasn't completely alone. I
hung out with him at lunch, at
the library on weekends, and
tried to include him in activi-
ties I was involved in. I defend-
ed him to those who called
him names, and although I
was younger than he, I felt like
his protector.
Now, eight years later and
living in different states, we
are still friends. He told me re-
cently that I was the only rea-
son he didn't attempt suicide
in high school. He said I had
saved his life by just taking a
few moments out of my day
to say hello or hang out with
him. At the time I didn't real-
ize the lifeline I was extending.
- LUCY IN OAKLAND,
CALIF.
DEAR ABBY: My teenage
son was similarly "invisible"
to most of his classmates and
it led to deep depression and


anxiety. He is now at a school
with other kids who have social
learning disorders a broad
class that includes Asperger's
syndrome and a general fail-
ure to observe and respond to
social cues.
If Dan falls into this catego-
ry, he needs the help of both
the adults and teens in his life.
There is also effective therapy
available for social learning
disorders, and a decent school
counselor should be able to
help Dan and his parents find
it. MOM OF A FORMER-
LY INVISIBLE TEEN
DEAR ABBY: Dan might
be autistic, which could ex-
plain his behavior. I have an
autistic son who is high func-
tioning. His social skills seem
immature and he appears
"geeky." People have shunned
and teased him because of it.
After managing to develop
some friendships in band
(which, by the way, has some
of the best geeky kids who ac-
cept others) and a church high
school group, his social skills
improved. But he needs those
kids who overlook his quirki-
ness and befriend him to help
him build confidence. They do
exist; you just have to some-
times search for them. If Dan
starts feeling more accepted
by others, it may lessen his de-
pendence on "Overwhelmed."
-JANN IN TEXAS
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Take care of any
red tape, rules or regula-
tions before you move for-
ward. Don't let your emo-
tions lead you in a direction
that will be difficult to
change'if your plans get un-;
expectedly altered. ***-.
TAURUS (April 20-.
May 20): You'll be emo-
tional, causing you to miss
out on something great if
you are stubborn or unrea-
sonable. Let others make
their own mistakes and
focus on doing your best,
getting ahead, learning,
traveling and engaging in
conversations about the fu-
ture. ***
GEMINI (May21-June
20): You have more going
for you than you think and
can make a difference to
the outcome of your future
by aggressively going after
your goals now. A financial
gain will help you make a
crucial decision that influ-
ences your personal life.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Don't be nonpro-
ductive because you are
surprised or in denial about
something going on around
you. You must shake your-
self off and proceed to a
new plan of action that en-
sures success. Start mov-
ing. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You need a change of


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

scenery. Mental stimulation
will get you thinking and
you can make some inter-
esting changes. Do the re-
search required to ensure
your success. A relationship
you have with someone will
try your patience. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Have more fun. Col-
laborating with others will
stimulate your mind and
get you moving in new di-
rections. Love is in the stars
and you can make positive
changes to your current re-
lationship or meet someone
new who will fit into your
lifestyle. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Pick your battles.
Make sure you surround
yourself with compatible
people who understand
what you are aspiring to
achieve. Positive support
will lead to your success.
Don't let negative influ-
ences infiltrate your game
plan. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Outsiders will
have a better perspective
on what you are up against
and what you want than
those closest to you. When
it comes to your home and
family, your vision will be
cloudy and your insight
totally off-center. Refrain


from moving forward if you
are uncertain. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Get involved
in activities, events, travel
opportunities or any kind
of learning process that will
help you move in a direc-
tion suited to your needs
and abilities. A relationship
problem is not likely to
settle in your favor. Be pre-
pared to give up something
you treasure. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't limit
what you can do because of
the responsibilities or de-
mands being put on you by
friends, neighbors or rela-
tives. You have to say no
if it doesn't fit your plans.
Taking on too much will
lead to broken promises.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You have the
ticket to your next destina-
tion. Don't let an emotional
situation stop you from fol-
lowing through with your
plans. A secret plan or in-
volvement will cause more
damage than just being up-
front and honest. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't try to
get by without taking note
of any rules or regulations.
Shortsightedness will hold
you back in the end. There
is too much at stake to make
a mistake. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: G equals C
"KR'M KPTNHRCSR RN RCZA CYNOR
ZNJKSX FNOHMLZD CSE ZNNAKSX CR
FNOH RHCXLEKLM CSE RVL MRODD


RVCR PCALM FNO XHNI."


- C S S L


V L G V L
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I am ... a mushroom; on whom the dew of heaven
drops now and then." John Ford
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 2-10

CLASSIC PEANUTS











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011

Lake City Reporter





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One lassteifiper ads in person, and some
a4 lines 6 days require prepay-
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TYou cahn also fax or email your ad
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Monday through Friday from 8:00
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You can also fax or e-mail your ad
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direct your copy to the Classified
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In Print and Online
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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CASE NO. 10000372CA
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
MERCANTILE BANK, A DIVI-
SION OF CAROLINA FIRST
BANK
Plaintiff,
vs.
KIMBERLY L. PETREE A/K/A
KIMBERLY L. JONES et. al.
Defendants
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated January 24, 2011, and en-
tered in Case No. 10000372CA, of
the Circuit Court of the Third Judi-
cial Circuit in and for COLUMBIA
County, Florida, wherein MER-
CHANTILE BANK, A DIVISION
OF CAROLINA FIRST BANK, is a
Plaintiff and KIMBERLY L. PET-
REE A/K/A KIMBERLY L. JONES;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KIM-
BERLY L. PETREE A/K/A KIM-
BERLY L. JONES; COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA; STATE OF
FLORIDA; CLERK OF THE
COURT COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA; NATIONWIDE INSUR-
ANCE; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the
Defendants. P. DeWITT CASON as
The Clerk of the Circuit Court will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at 173 NE HERNANDO AVE-
NUE, COURT- ROOM 1, LAKE
CITY, FL 32055, at 11:00 a.m on
March 2, 2011, the following descri-
bed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:
SEE ATTACHED LEGAL DE-
SCRIPTION AS EXHIBIT "A"
EXHIBIT A
LEGAL DESCRIPTION
COMMENCE THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF SE
1/4 SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE N 88*25'56"
E, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID SE 1/4 OF SE 1/4, 69.62
FEET TO THE NORTHEASTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF TOMP-
KINS ROAD (A COUNTY MAIN-
TAINED GRADED ROAD),
THENCE S 47*26'35" E, ALONG
SAID NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT
OF WAY LINE 911.15 FEET TO A
POINT OF CURVE, THENCE
SOUTHERLY ALONG SAID
CURVE CONCAVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
495.35 FEET ALONG A CHORD
BEARING S 36'48'58" W, 181.83
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, THENCE CONTINUE
SOUTHERLY ALONG SAID
CURVE_ CONCAVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
495.35 FEET ALONG A CHORD
BEARING S 20*29'55" E, 111.14
FEET, THENCE N 88"25'56" E,
301.20 FEET, THENCE N 1'34'04"
W, 105.25 FEET, THENCE S
88'25'56" W, 337.35 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
Any person, claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 27 day of January, 2011
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
Dated this 27th day of January, 2011
IMPORTANT
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a reasonable accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should,
no later than seven (7) days prior,
contact the Clerk of the Court's disa-
bility coordinator at 904-958-2163,
PO BOX 1569, LAKE CITY, FL
32056. If hearing impaired, contact
(TDD) 800-955-8771 via Florida Re-
lay System.
Ben-Ezra & Katz, P.A.
Attomeys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329

04543335
February 4, 11, 2011

PUBLIC AUCTION
1997 CHEVY
VIN# 2C1MR2298V6763734

CREAMER'S WRECKER SERV-
ICE 290 NE SUNNYBROOK ST.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055 *
COLUMBIA COUNTY
386-752-2861
SALE DATE: March 8, 2011
8:00AM
05525093
February 11, 2011

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

www. lakecityreporter. com


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

ATTENTION COMCAST CABLE
CUSTOMERS

Effective March 11, 2011, Comcast
will offer Digital Economy video
service. Digital Economy includes
Limited Basic service along with a
subset of channels from Expanded
Basic, select digital programming,
and 46 Music Choice music chan-
nels. Digital Economy will retail for
$39.95 per month as a standalone, or
$29.95 per month when purchased
with any level of XFINITY Voice
and/or Internet service, plus applica-
ble taxes and fees.
Additionally, Comcast will offer the
Economy Triple Play. The Economy
Triple Play Bundle includes Digital
Economy video service, XFINITY
Economy Internet and XFINITY
Voice Local with More. The stand-
ard price for this bundle is $79.85
per month, plus applicable taxes and
fees.
All the above changes affect current
and new residential subscribers serv-
iced by Comcast in Lake City, Live
Oak and surrounding areas.
A digital-ready television set and/or.
digital equipment may be required to
receive certain digital channels or
certain services. Services not availa-
ble in all areas, restrictions apply -
please call for details. For informa-
tion, please call 1-800-934-6489 or
visit www.xfinity.com.
04543483
February 11, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
IN' THE INTEREST OF:
CASE NO.: 2010-18-DP
N.D.
DOB: 8/29/2004
K.W.
DOB: 7/27/2006
MINOR CHILDREN.
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-
VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO: Jemilla Dortly
(address unknown)
WHEREAS, a Petition for Termina-
tion of Parental Rights under oath
has been filed in this court regarding
the above-referenced childrenn, a
copy of which is on file with the
Clerk of the Court,
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMAND-
ED TO APPEAR before the Honora-
ble E. Vernon
Douglas, Circuit Judge, at the Co-
lumbia County 'Courthouse, Lake:
City, Florida, on MARCH 16, 2011,
at 10:20 A.M., for a Termination of
Parental Rights Advisory Hearing.
YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI-
FIED HEREIN.
*****FAILURE TO PERSONAL-
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN)
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE
COURT*****
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on this 8th day of Febru-
ary 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/:Trisha Brewington, Deputy
Clerk
Tracy L. Sorcek, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 46860
Children's Legal Services
1389 West US Highway 90, Suite
110
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437
Special Accommodations. In ac-
cordance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act, if you are a person
with a disability who needs any ac-
commodation in order to participate
in this proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact
Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-
tion, 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at
least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than seven (7)
days. If you are hearing impaired or
voice impaired, call 711.
04543468
February 11, 18,25, 2011
March 4, 2011
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of
1-800-BUNKBED at
156 SW GEORGIA GLEN
FT WHITE, FLORIDA
32038
Contact Phone Number:
904-966-1193 and the extent of the
interest of each, is as follows:
Name: Allan M. Polk
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/Allan M. Polk

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 9th day of February, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO

05525111
February 11,2011


To place your


Legal

NOTICE OF ACTION
BEFORE THE BOARD OF NURS-
ING
IN RE: The license to practice nurs-
ing of
Aranda E. Williams, C.N.A.
1166 S.E. St. Johns Street Lot #2
Lake City, Florida 32025
CASE NO.: CNA 136466
The Department of Health has filed
an Administrative Complaint against
you, a copy of which may be ob-
tained by contacting, Casey Cowan,
Assistant General Counsel, Prosecu-
tion Services Unit, 4052 Bald Cy-
press Way, Bin #C65, Tallahassee
Florida 32399-3265, (850)245-4640
If no contact has been made by you
concerning the above by November
24, 2010, the matter of the Adminis-
trative Complaint will be presented
at an ensuing meeting of the Board
of Nursing in formal proceeding.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the individual or agency
sending this notice not later than sev-
en days prior to the proceeding at the
address given on the notice. Tele-
phone: (850)245-4640, 1-800-955-
8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770 (v),
via Florida Relay Service.

04543253
January 28, 2011
February 4, 11, 18, 2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING A VARIANCE AS
PROVIDED FOR
IN THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
LAND DEVELOPMENT REGU-
LATIONS BY THE BOARD OF
ADJUSTMENT OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to
the Columbia County Land Develop-
ment Regulations, as amended, here-
inafter referred to as the Land Devel-
opment Regulations, as amended,
objections, recommendations and
comments concerning the variance,
as described below, will be heard by
the Board of Adjustment of Colum-
bia County, Florida, at a public hear-
ing on February 24, 2011, at 7:00
p.m., or as soon thereafter as the
matter can be heard, in the School
Board Administrative Complex lo-
cated at 372 West Duval Street, Lake
City, Florida.
V 0283, a petition by Richard W.
Griest and Patricia M. Griest, to re-
quest a variance be granted from the
requirements of Section 4.5.9 of the
Land Development Regulations to
allow for a decrease in the side set-
back requirement for a single family
dwelling unit, from 25.00 feet to
10.00 feet from the Southerly proper-
ty line within an AGRICULTURE -3
(A-3) zoning -district in accordance
with a site plan submitted as part of a
petition filed January 12, 2011, to be
located on property described, as fol-
lows:
A parcel of land lying within Section
12, Township 3 South, Range 15
East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-
ing more particularly described, as
follows: Lot 13, Block B of the Oak
Haven Subdivision Unit 1, as record-
ed in the Public Records of Colum-
bia County, Florida.
Containing 4.20 acre, more or less.
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future dates. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
ceming the matter will be published,
unless said continuation exceeds six
calendar weeks from the date of the
above referenced public hearing.
At the aforementioned public hear-
ing, all interested parties may appear
to be heard with respect to the var-
iance.
Copies of the variance are available
for public inspection at the Office of
the County Planner, County Admin-
istrative Offices located at 135
Northeast Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, during regular business
hours.
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made.
at the above referenced public hear-
ing, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation or an
interpreter to participate in the pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa K. B.
Roberts, at least seven (7) days prior
to the date of the hearing. Ms. Rob-
erts may be contacted by telephone
at (386)758-1005 or by Telecommu-
nication Device for Deaf at
(386)758-2139.

04543461
February 11,2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS
CONCERNING SPECIAL EXCEP-
TIONS AS PROVIDED FOR IN
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY LAND
DEVELOPMENT. REGULATIONS
BY THE BOARD OF ADJUST-
MENT OF COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that, pursuant to the Colum-
bia County Land Development Reg-
ulations as amended, hereinafter re-
ferred to as the Land Development
Regulations, comments, objections
and recommendations concerning the
special exceptions as described be-
low, will be heard by the Board of
Adjustment of Columbia County,
Florida, at public hearings on Febru-
ary 24, 2011 at 7:00 p.m., or as soon
thereafter as the matters can be
heard, in the School Board Adminis-
trative Complex, located at 372 West
Duval Street, Lake City, Florida.
(1) SE 0511, a petition by Maute
Group, LLC, to request a special ex-
ception be granted as provided for in
Section 4.5.7 of the Land Develop-
ment Regulations to allow for a day
camp within an AGRICULTURE-1I
(A-l) zoning district in accordance


with a site plan submitted as part of a
petition dated January 24, 2011, to
be located on property described, as
follows:
A parcel of land lying within Section
8, Township 1 South, Range 17 East,


Legal

Columbia County, Florida. Being
more particularly described, as fol-
lows: The East 1/2 of the Northeast
1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said Sec-
tion 8. Less and except certain lands
lying in the Southeast corner of the
East 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4 of the
Northeast 1/4 of said Section 8 locat-
ed within the 100-year flood zone
AE, based upon the Flood Insurance
Rate Map, prepared by the Federal
Emergency Management Agency,
dated February 4, 2009.
Containing 19.89 acres, more or less.
(2) SE 0512, a petition by Paul A.
McKissock, to request a special ex-
ception be granted as provided for in
Section 4.5.7 of the Land Develop-
ment Regulations to allow for camp-
grounds within an AGRICULTURE-
3 (A-3) zoning district in accordance
with a site plan submitted as part of a
petition dated January 25, 2011, to
be located on property described, as
follows:
A parcel of land lying within Section
20, Township 4 South, Range 17
East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-
ing more particularly described, as
follows: The Northeast 1/4 of the
Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4
of said Section 20.
Containing 10.00 acres, more or less.
(3) SE 0513, a petition by Colin
P. Williamson, to request a special
exception be granted as provided for
in Section 4.5.7 of the Land Devel-
opment -Regulations to allow for
child care center within an AGRI-
CULTURE-3 (A-3) zoning district in
accordance with a site plan dated
April 15, 2008 and submitted as part
of a petition dated January 31, 2011,
to be located on property described,
as follows:
A parcel of land lying within Section
5, Township 4 South, Range 16 East,
Columbia County, Florida. Being
more particularly described, as fol-
lows: The Northwest 1/4 of the
Southeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of
the Northeast 1/4 of said Section 5.
Less and except the North 25 feet of
the Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast
1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of the North-
east 1/4 of said Section 5 lying in the
right-of-way of Southwest Riddle
Lane.
Containing 2.50 acres, more or less.
The public hearings may be contin-
ued to one or more future dates. Any
interested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearings shall
be announced during the public hear-
ings and that no further notice con-
cerning the matters will be publish-
ed.
At the aforementioned public hear-
ings, all interested parties may ap-
pear to be heard with respect to the
special exceptions.
Copies of the special exceptions are
available for public inspection at the
Office of .the County Planner, Coun-
ty Administrative Offices, 135
Northeast Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, during regular business
hours
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ings, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation or an
interpreter to participate in the pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa K. B.
Roberts, at least seven (7) days prior
to the date of the hearing. Ms. Rob-
erts may be contacted by telephone
at (386)758-1005 or by Telecommu-
nication Device for Deaf at
(386)758-2139.

04543473
February 11, 2011



010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

LOST KEYS, Feb 3, 2011
Black, Blue & White Ford Key
chain, if found, please call
386-867-9353


100 Job
Opportunities

04543385
NOW HIRING!!!
We are now hiring experienced
Class A Drivers
Excellent benefits package .
including health, dental
and 401K.
All applicants MUST Have:
Class A CDL with X
endorsements.
1 yr tractor-trailer experience
with a t/t school certification or
2 yrs. tractor-trailer experience
without the certification.
25 yrs or older
Please apply online at
floridarockandtanklines.com
or call 1-866-352-7625

055250(65
THE HEALTH CENTER
OF LAKE CITY
Has a full-time opening for
Maintenance Director, Excellent
Salary EOE/ADA/
Drug Free Workplace
Apply in person or
send resume to:


100 Job
100 Opportunities

04543458
Family Services Analyst
Non-Profit organization is
seeking highly motivated
professional for
VPK/School Readiness/Parent
Education Position. Experience
in Social Services or related
field preferred salary
$9.62-$12.98 plus benefits.
Fluently Bilingual in
English/Spanish preferred
Send resumes by
February 14, 2011 to:
Early Learning Coalition
Attn: HR, 1104 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025 or fax to
386-752-8094

A/C SERVICE Tech
Min 5 yrs experience
F/T with benefits
Please call 386-454-4767
Auto Technician wanted, must
have lots of experience and own
tools, up to $1500 per week
call 386-758-4757
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
15 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Bolinger
Tobacco, LLC Christian Co.,
KY. Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row
Crop, Produce, Greenhouse/
Nursery & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 04/01/11 -
01/31/12. Wage of $9.71/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference Job Order
#KY0419734.
Cable Technicians wanted in
Lake City and the surrounding
areas. Must pass background
check and drug screen and have a
valid driver's license.
Call 877-393-6356
CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Certified VPK Teacher needed.
Please do not call if you
are not certified. 386-755-7677
6:30a-5:30p M4"-5363 after 5:30
"-4 TEMP Farmworkers needed
3/14/11 9/30/11. Workers will
seed, set, plant, cultivate, &
harvest tobacco. Random drug
testing at employer's expense.
Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
Work tools, supplies, equip.
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided for non-commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed to Worker
upon completion of 50% of
contract, or earlier, if appropriate.,
$9.11/hr. Worksite in Sumter Co.
SC. Report or send a resume to
nearest local FL Agency of
Workforce Innovation office &
ref. job order # SC 495308.
Craven Farms
8 TEMP Farmworkers needed
3/14/11 12/1/11. Workers will
plant, cultivate, harvest, grade &
pack produce. Random drug
testing at employer's expense.
Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
Work tools, supplies, equip.
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided for non-commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed to worker
upon completion of 50% of
contract, or earlier, if appropriate.
$9.7 l/hr. Report or send a resume
to nearest local FL Agency of
Workforce Innovation office &
ref. job order # KY 419000.
Gallrein Farms Shelbyville, KY
22 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Maplebreeze
Farms, LLC Christian Co., KY.
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row Crop,
Produce, Greenhouse/Nursery &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 03/25/11 12/31/11. Wage
of $9.71/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Center
in your area and reference
Job Order #KY0419661.
4 TEMP Farmworkers needed
3/14/11 11/20/11. 3 months
verifiable exp pruning dwarf fruit
bearing trees. Workers will plant,
cultivate, & harvest apples, plums,
pears & peaches. Random drug
testing at employer's expense.
Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
Work tools, supplies, equip.
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided for non-commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed to worker
upon completion of 50% of
contract, or earlier, if appropriate.
$10.51/hr. Report or send a
resume to nearest local FL Agency
of Workforce Innovation office &
ref. job order # OH521130.
Patterson Farms -
Chesterland, OH
PT Clerical position 8-12p M-F.
Must be a people person w/good
organizational, phone & customer
skills. Must multi task. Send
resume & ref's to Box 04108, C/O


The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com


classified ad call

755.5440
"r^^r^.,^.aLA


560 SW McFarlane Avenue
Lake City, FL 32025
Fax: 386-961-9296
Email: healthcenter@thehealth
center.comcastbiz.net


- ADvantage










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011


100 Job
100 OOpportunities
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

120 Medical
120v Employment

(W543460
Cancer Care of North Florida is
currently seeking a
MEDICAL ASSISTANT for a
fast paced work environment
Requires HS Diploma and
excellent Phlebotomy skills
with certification
Intergy Experience and
excellent verbal/written
communication skills.
Qualified candidates please
email resume to:
jpapesh(cancercarenorthflori-
da.com

(5525050

Medical Personnel


RN's for Med/Surg &
Telemetry, Top Daily pay,
Local Medical Centers,
1-877-630-6988

05525076
Nurse On Call
Home Health Agency,
Medicare certified, is now
hiring RN, LPN, PT & ST
Sign on bonus for F/T
352-395-6424,
Fax 352-395-6519'

Client Service Representative
for busy Clinical Lab
Please submit resume to
hrt chclabs.com or
fax to 386-758-1791
Medical Assistant/ Phlebotomist
for busy urology practice.
Send Resume' to Bush Urology.
386-752-4189
Physical Therapy Assistant
needed in a local physician
office, please fax
CV to 386-719-9662.
PT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.
PT Tech needed for Outpatient PT
Clinic, experience/exercise back-
ground pref but will train,
Apply at HealthWorks @
1206 S.W. Main Blvd,
Lake City 386-752-1652


140 Work Wanted
We Run Errands!
Your personal errand service to
help those in need at rates you can
afford Call Dawn 386-249-9426

17 Business
170 Opportunities

Liquor License
Columbia County
Will Finance
561-252-0495
240 Schools &
Education

04543248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/14/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/14/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

Boxer Puppy, AKC, H/C
fawn w/black mask,
$500
904-653-1839
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621


407 Computers


HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Love Seat-Broyhill. Blue/gray,
matching pillows and arm covers.
Good condition. $95.
386-454-4947

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


420 Wanted to Buy
I BUY WORKING AND
NON WORKING
APPLIANCES!
CALL 386-365-1915
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks. Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.
WANTED TO BUY
Garage Door -
7'X9'
386-755-1937


430 Garage Sales

BIG YARD SALE:. Furniture,
baby and women clothes. Lots of
misc. And Church Pews. Sat. 8-?
334 E. Duval Street.
DON'T MISS THIS: Piano,
women plus size, mens suits,
computer desk, car receiver,
jewlery, new items. 695 SE St
Johns, Sat 8-1
Multi Family Sale. Sat.only 8-?
162 NW Gwen Lake Ave, @
Green Gables Learning Tree
(across from Car Enterprise on 90)






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat & Sun. 9-4. McFarlane to
Chapple Hill to 722 SW Biscayne
Glenn. Fuin., Big screen TV.
Generators, kids stuff, much more!
Saturday Only 8 a.m.
709 NW Horizon St
Lake City
Lots of good stuff!


440 Miscellaneous

Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

463 Building
463) Materials
ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available


530 Marine Supplies

1986 Mercury Outboard, 50 HP,
hydraulic tilt, with controls,
$500,
386-623-3923

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
3/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
pets ok, $500 dep $575 mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice DWMH Nice area
3/2. Back porch/carport, Country
living. $675 month, 1st, last &
$300 dep, Call 386-752-6333






Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
640 Mobile Homes
for Sale
$569 mo 3Bd/2Ba Modular
1/2 acre Deck, energy efficient,
appliances, drive, w/$12K down
($640 mo w/ $6K down).
Avail in March
Owner finance or rent to own???
Call (386) 758-9824 hurry
*Lot Model Sale*
Save 1,000's @ Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
For Model Info and Details
05524940
Palm Harbor Homes
Short Sales/Repo's/Used Homes
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
Won't Last!! $3,500 40k
John 800-622-2832 Ext. 210

Come in and see the
Future in Manufactured Homes.
Royals Homes making
people smile
386-754-6737
Come See all New Lot Models
Royals Homes. Honesty! Integrity!
Customer Satisfaction
386-754-6737
Handy man special, Ft White area,


4/2 plus den, Fleetwood DWMH
on 1 acre, river access, owner
financing, $69.900, $1000 down,
$605 month 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Looking for a Modular?
Come see the Specialists
at Royals Homes and ask for Bo
386-754-6737
New 2011 Homes are Here
3BR/4BR at Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
Homes Built Your Way!
New,2010 MH,never been
occupied, front & back deck,
$99,900 MLS#76635 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
@ Westfield Realty


640\ Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Owner Fin. 3/2. DWMH. new-
paint.carpet. small down S625mon
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Royals Homes is Quality!
We treat you like Family.
Stop in or Call Catherine
3,86-754-6737

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

0552-172S
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1. 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans:
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

No Application Fee +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 bedroom Apartments &
mobile homes,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Gatorwood on the Westside
Rent $650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $500. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Gorgeous Lake View. 2 br Apt
Water included. $545. mo plus
deposit. Close to shopping.
386-344-0579
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Move In Special.2/1 .w/garage
on the west side of town.
"Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
Quail Heights 2br/lba duplex.
Secluded, private, safe. W/D
hookup. $700. mo. $500 security.
386-754-1155 '
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05524832
New Years Dream "Surprise"
Why Rent? Lease to own.
New model home 2 miles S off
47. 3000 sq ft, 4/3, 5% int, is
tax deduc, consider trade-in
386-752-1364

3/2 on 2.1 acres, 2 car garage,
ceramic tile, front & rear porches,
$995 mo, plus 2 mo sec.
Lease with the option to buy
386-758-9996
3/2, fenced back yard, nice,
neighborhood, near CHS.
$800 per month.
386-623-2848
4/3 Refurbished Home w/CH/A
for Rent or Sale,
on East side of town
Call 386-294-2494 for details
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
CH/A, carport. $650/mo. + sec.
Includes all utilities & satellite TV.
Pets OK. (386)758-2408
,Nice, private, quiet, 2/1,4 miles S
of Lake City, $500 dep, $550 mo
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Corner of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Sale/Rent 3br/2ba w/front deck &
Ig Florida room, garage & out
bldgs, 9 beautiful fenced ac. 1st
mo + sec. Wellborn 386-754-0732

75O Business &
7 Office Rentals
1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!
Great locations on SW Main Blvd.
Retail, Wholesale, Distribution,
Office. 1200+ sf only $950. per
mo. Includes Utilities 752-5035
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional


Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072


780 Condos for Sale

3 bdrm Condo Nit, back patio,
HOA fees include ext maintenance
of home, lawn & pool MLS#76797
$110,000, Call Missy Zecher@
Remax 386-623-0237

805 Lots for Sale
I acre lot outside the city limits.
Homes only subdivision. Priced
below the assessed value with the
county. $16.900 Hallmark Real
Estate 386-867-1613


805 Lots for Sale
2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13.500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613
Beautiful 5+ acre lot, partially
cleared w/large oaks. Homes only.
$38.000, MLS 75038 Call Roger
Lovelady @ Westfield Realty
386-365-7039
Charming Turn of the Century,
property, close to
downtown,MLS# 74814
$94,900 386-755-0808
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Nice 4.5 acre parcel w/S/P/W
older SWMH $39,900
MLS# 76182 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
3/2 home w/1758 sq ft, Storage
bldg, enclosed patio & deck,
$168,000 Call Carrie Cason @
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
MLS# 73410
3/2 w/over 1700 sq ft, fireplaces,
modem kitchen, fenced yard, 2
sheds, convenient location
$89,500 MLS#73861 Call Patti
@Access Realty 386-623-6896
4 bdrm + office, 2 living & dining
areas, front & back porch
$279,900 MLS# 72831
Call Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty 386-755-0808
4/2 2300 plus sq ft,Palm Harbor
Home on 2 lots, Good Condition
$69,888 Call Nancy Rogers @
386-867-1271 Results Realty
4/2 1.800 sq ft on 10.5 acres,
newly remodeled inside, detached
garage, above ground pool
$189,888, Call Nancy,
Results Realty 386-867-1271
5 bedroom Home on 5 acres south
of Lake City. Big Rooms
lots of space $229,500
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
MLS# 72928 Westfield Realty
5/2, 1800sf, 24 acres, family rm,
screened back porch, RV
parking,newly painted close to VA
& DOT, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
5/3 Triplewide MH (2200) sq ft,
w/2 master bdrms, on 10 fenced
acres, fireplace. MLS# 76226
$75.000 Call Patti Taylor
386-623-6896 Access Realty
AFFORDABLE 3BR/2BA mfg
home in Woodgate Village only
$27,000 #76741
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110
Beautifully Landscaped 3/1 on
1.11 ac, 16x24 detached garage,
screen porched bldg, water
purification system, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Brick home with 2,700 sqft under
roof. Large master w/bath on .5
acres completely fenced. $167,500
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613
Brick, .59 ac. 3br/2ba w/large.
spacious rooms. Split floor plan.
2 car garage & storage $222,900.
Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Close to town, 2 story home
w/stone, fireplace, downstairs
master bdrm, $144,900
MLS# 77050 Call Carrie Cason
386-623-2806 Westfield Realty
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, Woodcrest. Great area, split
plan. Screened back porch. Elaine
K. Tolar. 386-755-6488 $139,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba. 3 Fireplaces. 39.7 acres
included. Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Reduced, brick w/over 2,000 sqft,
5 ac. 3br/2ba.Lots of extras. Elaine
K. Tolar 755-6488 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lakeview home in town, Old
charm w/many upgrades Elaine K.
Tolar. 386-755-6488 $189,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2 Story, 4br/2.5ba-2160 sqft. Spa-
cious plan w/garage Lori Geibeig
Simpson 365-5678 $149,900


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba close to town. 1620 sqft
w/covered patio& more. Lori Gei-
beig Simpson 365-5678 $117,900
Coral Shores Realty 2004
Custom built home, 23 fenced ac.
1700 ft paved frontage. Lg
kitchen/pantry, master/bath.
386-965-5905 Bob Gavette
Corner lot in Piccadilly Park.
Newly painted in/out. New carpet
/vinyl. 2 car garage. Inground
pool. $133,500. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575


810 Home for Sale
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
CUSTOM-BUILT 4BR mfg
home w/screen porch, front deck,
shed $87,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #73893
Cute 3/2 nicely remodeled home,
2 acres, partially fenced
$115,888
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473
Derington Properties, LLC
3/2 MH, large deck and
screened porch, 5 ac.
$46,500 386-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
DWMH, 5 ac. Screened front/back
porches. 20x40 shop fully equip-
ped w/bath. $74,900. 965-4300
Family home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Great Investment Property!
House needs lots of TLC, close to
shopping and schools, $35,000,
Bring all offers, Results Realty
Call Brittany 386-397-3473
Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg
home near Wellborn on
5+ acres ONLY $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76768
Log Cabin home, located on
5 acres, wrap around porch
$199,000 MLS#75550
Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax Realty
Lrg Brick Home, well-established
neighborhood, in town,
$129,900 MLS#77016
Call Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
Must See! 4/2 2368SF Home,
island kitchen, den, fire place,
storage, auto gate entry,
Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfect starter home. Quiet area.
Wood laminate floors, Ig dining,
French doors. 1 car garage/work-
shop. $84,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfection! Marion Place, gated,
brick 3/2 over 1800 sqft. Screened
lanai $158,900 386-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $55,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75210
REDUCED TO $61,500 in
Eastside Vlg! Immaculate
2BR/2BA w/lg rooms
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76753
Solid Home! Needs updating.
Country eat in kitchen & formal
dining.Some windows replaced.
$70,000 Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
SPACIOUS 2BR/2BA home on 1
ac w/attached garage &
2-story shed $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76887
Totally refurbished 2/2 w/
workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Very Nice 4/2 on 4 acres w/open
floor plan, 2 living rooms, eat in
kitchen, dining rm and rec rm
w/wet bar $89,900 Call Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well maintained 3/2 DWMH,
1568 sq ft, acres, new roof,
$65,000, MLS#76187
Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001

O820 Farms &
OLfU Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
O Property


Aprox 4000 sq ft Commercial
bldg, 4 bay/2 car lift shop, show-
room/office area, $1000 a month
lease or will sell for $128,000.
Call Martin @ 386-697-9950
Coral Shores Realty. Prime
commercial, located on Hwy 41 &
Gibson Ln. 26X54 concrete block.
$76,000 386-965-5905
Call Bob Gavette
Downtown & borders 3 streets.
Aprox. 10,000 sqft fenced parking.
"as is" Bob Gavette. $73,000. 386-
965-5905 Coral Shores Realty
Prime Commercial Property
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya 3.27 acres, room for building
$398,888 386-867-1271
Call Nancy @ Results Realty


930 Motorcycles








21 I, H.nd.,n I.51-1C Spirn -1c0if
miles, windshield, engine guard,
backrest, luggage rack, like new
$3800 386-365-3658

940 Trucks
1995 TOYOTA P/U Extra Cab.
Auto., fibergalss topper, AC.,
4 cyl 22R. Real nice. 180k mi.
$3500.00 (352)339-5158
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802





It's Tax Time, Work Truck
1990 Ford F350 Dually,
5th WheelWhite, Automatic
$1500 obo 386-965-2215


950 Cars for Sale

GET CASH TODAY!!
fpr your car, truck, van or SUV,
(Running or not). Call anytime.
(229)412-0380

951 Recreational-
S Vehicles
Homestead Ranger Travel Trailer
28ft. One slideout Fiberglass,
Awning, sleeps 8. $11,000.
(850)322-7152




Contact us


at the paper.


CLASSIFIED ADS

386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION

386-755-5445


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS

386-752-1293


ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO

ads@lakecityrepor0ter.cG

Mon.-F: 8atm p.ni:






W MEas t ,v -
Lake City F ora3205 '


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!

* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.