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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01372
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: February 6, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01372
System ID: UF00028308:01372
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text


000014 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL i
Hor
Tim Jernigan named to
Parade All-America team.

Sports, IB





Lake CitM


School Safety
Security measures to protect students.
News, 6A

Family Act
Mother, daughter in class together.




Reporter


Sunday, February 6, 2011 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 14 0 $1.00


Victim's husband lives in Texas


In-laws found out about
the crime on Facebook
Thursday morning.
By C.J. RISAK
crisak@lakecityreporter.com
The misery caused by the firing
of several shots that took the lives of
Monica Hudson, Kevin Tucker and
Nichole Cervantez late Wednesday
night has now claimed another vic-
tim.


Cervantez was
apparently married to
Larry"Jay"Fleetwood,
of Cleveland, Texas.
The baby she was car-
rying when she was
murdered was alleg- e-
edly his. Cervantez
"Her father lives
in Lake City," said, Jim Moore,
Fleetwood's step-father. "They sepa-
rated about a month ago and she
went to stay with her dad. He had
just talked to her at about 10, 10:30


that night and told her he got another
job.
"He was just waiting for her to
come back."
Cervantez, who's married name is
Fleetwood according to her mother-
in-law, Debra, left Texas to come
to Lake City shortly after their first
anniversary on Dec. 14. Her 5-year-
old daughter was with her.
According to Columbia County Sgt.
Ed Seifert, just who Cervantez was
VICTIM continued on 3A


FATAL



MISTAKES

A pair of auto wrecks

leave two people dead


BEAUTY ON DISPLAY


Olustee royalty
crowned during
Saturday pageant.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
O lustee Battle
Festival his-
tory was made
Saturday night
when the 2011
Olustee Festival Pageant
queens were crowned in
front of a standing-room
only crowd at the local
school board auditorium.
Kylie Elise Kennon, of
Lake City, was crowned
the 2011 Miss Olustee.
"It's really exciting to be
the 2011 Miss Olustee,"
she said, shortly after
getting her crown. "I was
really surprised and I'm so
excited."
Kennon, 20, took the
title in the Miss Olustee
category as Ashley -
Thomas was tapped as
first runner-up and Caitlin
Eadie earned second run-
ner-up honors.
"I like being the 2011
Miss Olustee because
I can be a positive role
model," Kennon said. "A


Policy against
overnight parking
will be reworked.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The RV community
spoke and the City of Lake
City listened.
Signs posted at Walmart
that announced "No RV
Camping or Sleeping
Enforced," were removed


Feb. 3.
"It's just the right thing
to do," said City Manager
Wendell Johnson.
Previously a flood of let-
ters and e-mails were sent
to the Lake City Reporter, as
well as Johnson, opposing
the enforcement.
A letter was sent to
Lake City Walmart District
Manager Michael Brown
that morning stating, "You
SIGNS continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City City Manager Wendell Johnson bends a sign
outside of the local Walmart Supercenter that restricted RV
camping in Walmart parking lots. 'This was a learning experi-
ence for everyone who had an interest in this,' Johnson said.


MLK Parade a success


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Byron D. English Jr. (from left) and Jahla
Shack ride a four-wheeler with Lakasia
Portee-Jones, Mikhiya Hendon and
Jamaceha Sheppard on a go-cart.


Rescheduled event still
draws a spirited crowd
to downtown Lake City.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The damp weather hovering over
Columbia County didn't dampen the
spirit and mood of people taking
part in the annual Martin Luther


King Junior parade Saturday.
The parade, which was postponed
last month because of inclement
weather, featured several youth,
church and adult groups with mem-
bers who were proud to say they
took part in the annual parade.
Rev. Isadore Williams, pastor of
Philadelphia Baptist Church, said
the church has participated annu-
MLK continued on 3A


PATRICK SCOTT/Lake City Reporter
First responders from the Florida Highway Patrol and
Columbia County Fire Rescue examine the scene of a fatal
wreck late Friday. The wreck occurred about a quarter mile
south of the 1-75 overpass on C.R. 341 (Southwest Sisters
Welcome Road). Road closure was over two hours. The
Columbia County Sheriffs Office and the Lake City Fire Dept.,
were also on scene.

Lake City man

killed in head-on

collision Friday


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
2011 Olustee Festival Pageant winners: Gracie Lyn Ahrens (from left), Tiny Miss Olustee;
Laney Grinstead, Miniature Miss Olustee; Jaiden Elizabeth Barrs, Little Miss Olustee; Morgan
Elizabeth Royals, Petite Miss Olustee; Jillian Cara Hodges, Pre-Teen Miss Olustee; Savannah
Del-Rae Thomas, Junior Miss Olustee and Kylie Elise Kennon, Miss Olustee.


little girl just came up and
asked me to take a picture
with her and that was bet-
ter than being crowned I
think. She was so excited
to take a picture with me."
Kennon has competed
in past Miss Olustee pag-
eants, but this was the first
time she has won the title.


"It feels really good to
win," she said. "This is
the last year I could do it,
so I'm really excited that
I won this year my last
year. It was my turn."
More than 50 girls com-
peted in seven categories
hoping to take away a
variety of Olustee Festival


Pageant honors.
Gracie Lyn Ahrens
is the 2011 Tiny Miss
Olustee. Masden Graham
was the first runner-up and
Kenslee Vickers was the
second runner-up.
Laney Grinstead
PAGEANT continued on 3A


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Area roadways turned
deadly Friday night when
a Columbia man and three
other county residents
were injured in two sepa-
rate wrecks that occurred
just an estimated 20 min-
utes apart.
A Columbia County man
is dead and another coun-
ty man is listed in serious
condition at a Gainesville
.hospital after their vehicles
collided in a crash Friday
night.
David Wayne Caudill, 52,
of Lake City, was killed in
the wreck.
Bernard Mayo, 47, of
Lake City, suffered seri-
ous injuries and is still
receiving medical atten-
tion. Authorities have not
released any additional
details regarding his condi-
tion.


The wreck occurred
around 10:30 p.m. Friday on
County Road 341 (Sisters
Welcome Road), about
two-tenths of a mile south
of Southwest Ford Feagle
Place.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
Caudill was driving a 2001
Olds four-door south on
County Road 341 and wit-
ness accounts said he was
swerving from lane to lane
and at times driving south-
bound in the northbound
lane.
Mayo was driving a 2002
Chevrolet four-door north
on the roadway.
Reports said physical
evidence at the scene indi-
cated Mayo took evasive
action and steered his car to
the left into the southbound
lane as Caudill also steered
back into the southbound
CRASH continued on 3A


Suwannee youth

dies in single

vehicle crash


From staff reports

A 16-year-old Suwannee
County youth was killed
in a single-vehicle crash
Saturday morning when
the truck he was driving
ran off the road and struck
a large Oak tree.
. Devon Allen Bozeman,
16, of Branford, was killed
in the crash.
The wreck occurred
around 5 a.m. Saturday on
State Road 247 (Branford
Highway) just across the
Suwannee County line, 11
miles south of Lake City.
According to Florida


Highway Patrol reports,
Bozeman was driving a
1993 Ford Ranger pickup
truck south on State Road
247. The truck went into
the northbound lane, up
and over a driveway access,
and then went airborne as
it was spinning clockwise
to the right. The truck then
hit a large oak tree on the
northbound edge of the
roadway near the driver's
door.
Bozeman was pro-
nounced dead at the scene
by Suwannee County emer-
gency medical services per-
sonnel, reports said.


1 8426 0021 8
1 a 264CC02


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


65
Scattered showers
WEATHER, 8A


O pinion ................ 4A
Business ................ I C
,' S Obituaries .............. 6A
-. ,. *, Advice & Comics ......... 3D
'* Puzzles ................. 2B


J


TODAY IN
FLORIDA
Gov. Scott unveils
budget plan.


COMING
TUESDAY
Governor reveals
budget strategy.


Signs come down:

City responds to

RV visitors' outcry


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011


Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
11-22-30-44 11 5-6-15-16-18 Afternoon: 6-3-9 Afternoon: 6-9-7-1 4-5-20-23-38-48 15-37-41-56-59
Evening: 8-0-8 Evening: 8-8-3-5


AROUND FLORIDA


Gov. Rick Scott to propose 2-year state budget


HOLLYWOOD


Gov. Rick Scott
will propose a
two-year bud-
get for Florida
rather than
just an annual one because
he thinks it's more for-
ward-looking, a spokesman
said Friday.
The governor appeared
before a group of South
Florida business leaders
Friday to seek their sup-
port for his spending plan,
which he said will slash
business and property
taxes by more than $2 bil-
lion. The state faces a pro-
jected budget shortfall of
$3.6 billion to $4.6 billion.
Scott spokesman Brian
Burgess wrote in an e-mail
to The Associated Press
that the governor's busi-
ness experience leads him
to believe that it's best to
look beyond the immedi-
ate impact of financial
decisions, which is why he
favors the two-year model.
"He will unveil two years
worth of budget projec-
tions that can be examined
together or separately,"
Burgess wrote later.
The Florida
Constitution, though,
requires legislators to,
adopt annual budgets.
Lawmakers are not bound
by the governor's budget
recommendations.
Burgess said he did not
know whether Scott would
push legislation to switch
Florida to a two-year bud-
get process.
Scott plans to release
his first budget proposal
Monday at a tea party rally
'in Eustis.
, The new Republican


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gov. Rick Scott talks to reporters after a business confer-
ence in Hollywood Friday. Scott is to reveal his budget


Monday.
governor, a multimil-
lionaire former hospital
CEO, addressed a group
of investors in Hollywood
a day after giving a similar
outline of his budget aims
at a Tampa manufacturing
plant.
He said it's all part of
his plan to lure more busi-
nesses to the state. During
his campaign last fall, Scott
promised to create 700,000
additional jobs over seven
years. Those jobs would be
on top of about 1 million
that economists expect to
be created in that time as
Florida's, economy recov-
ers.
"I'm calling companies
all the time. People are


very interested in com-
ing to Florida," Scott told
business leaders at the
Florida Venture Capital
Conference. "We are going
to be the winner. We are
going to be the state that's
No. 1 in job creation."
Scott spent the week
traveling the state offering
glimpses of his budget rec-
ommendations. He wants
to reduce spending in the
$70.4 billion budget by
about $5 billion.
He's said he expects to
save $1 billion over two
years by streamlining the
state government and con-
solidating agencies.
Scott also has proposed
saving the state $2.8 billion


over two years by cutting
pension benefits for state
workers, teachers and
some local government
employees and requir-
ing them to contribute 5
percent of their salaries
to the Florida Retirement
System.
He's been vague about
other spending cuts,
though.
Legislative leaders have
expressed skepticism
about cutting taxes given
the budget shortfall. But
Scott says his budget pro-
posal will be balanced.

Bath salts ban ,
trims center calls
TAMPA- Officials
at the Florida Poison
Information Center said
a statewide ban on a syn-
thetic designer drug com-
monly labeled as "bath
salts" has led to a drop in
calls about the substance.
Attorney General Pam
Bondi last week temporar-
ily banned the drug called
MDVP. The so-called bath
salts usually are snorted
like cocaine but also can
be smoked and injected.
The medical director
of the Tampa-based infor-
mation center said the
90-day emergency order
has meant fewer people are
being exposed to the drug,
so fewer people are calling
poison control centers seek-
ing help after snorting it
Bondi's order makes the
sale or possession of the
drug a third-degree felony
punishable by up to five
years in prison.
Legislative leaders said


they plan to pass a law
permanently banning the
substance.

Elderly woman
dies in fire
PALMETTO An 81-
year-old Tampa Bay-area
woman has died in a house
fire likely sparked by a
cigarette left burning by
her son.
Fire officials in
Palmetto, south of Tampa,
said Eva Mae Pompey was
found dead near the back
door of the burning home
early Friday.
Officials said the fire
started in the front of the
single-story residence,
where the woman lived
with her son. The cause
was likely a cigarette the
son accidentally left burn-
ing.

Corrections
officer charged
WEST PALM BEACH
- A South Florida correc-
tions officer is accused of
tampering with the victim
of an attempted murder.
The Palm Beach County
State Attorney's Office
said Friday that 22-year-old
Latrishia Mone Laws met
with a shooting victim in
October and tried to per-
suade him to sign a letter
stating that he misidenti-
fied the man charged with
attacking him.
The victim had identi-
fied his attacker as 23-
year-old Charles Coney,
with whom Laws has a
child. According to a prob-
able-cause arrest affidavit,


Laws said she would pay
the victim $500 to sign the
letter.
Coney is being held the
Palm Beach County jail
after being charged with
a June 1 shooting in Belle
Glade.
Laws was an officer at
the Glades Correctional
Institution. She was being
held Saturday on $100,000
bond. Jail records did not
show whether she had an
attorney.

8 nurses prison-
bound for fraud
MIAMI Eight Miami-
Dade County nurses have
been sentenced to prison
and ordered to pay restitu-
tion for helping two agen-
cies fleece millions from
Medicare.
The nurses worked
for two home health care
agencies, ABC Home
Health and Florida Home
Health Care Provider.
According to the Justice
Department; each of the
eight nurses pleaded
guilty last year to one
count of conspiracy to
commit health care fraud.
The nurses admitted fal-
sifying patient records for
Medicare beneficiaries
to make it seem like they
qualified for services from
the two agencies.
The nurses' prison
sentences range from five
months to 2 1/2 years.
Each has been ordered
to pay restitution. Those
amounts range from
roughly $66,000 up to
$699,000.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Obama hosts Super Bowl bash


WASHINGTON

Bears aren't in the big
game, but President
Barack Obama is swal-
lowing hard and throw-
ing a Super Bowl party anyhow, in a
bipartisan celebration of the nation's
biggest sporting event.
But it's hard to know which part
bf the evening will give him more
heartburn seeing the Bears'
archrivals, the Green Bay Packers,
clashing with the Pittsburgh Steelers
for football's crown, chewing on the
Wisconsin sausage the mayor of
Milwaukee is bringing or sitting for
a pregame interview with Fox's Bill
O'Reilly.
The conservative show-host and
pundit has been granted the inter-
view since Fox is broadcasting this
year's game from Cowboys stadium
in Arlington, Texas. It's certainly
not out of love for Fox, which has
been denounced by Obama aides as
a vitriolic mouthpiece for his foes.
Last year, when CBS had the game,
Obama was interviewed by Katie
Couric.
Ahead of his interview, O'Reilly
forecast it'll be "the most watched
that's ever been done in the history
of mankind."
Despite the sometimes hard
feelings, it's hardly Obama's first
interview with Fox, and not even his
first with O'Reilly. The two faced off
in September 2008 when he was a
candidate.
Still, the interview, which was
being taped during the day Sunday,
fit neatly into Obama's theme for this
year's Super Bowl bash: an above-
the-fray albeit somewhat resigned
good fellowship.

'Glee' actors make
Super Bowl scene
DALLAS "Glee" star Chord
Overstreet said the episode of the
series airing after the Super Bowl is
"action packed."
He said there is "a lot of suspense
with the cheerios," referring to the
fictional school's cheerleading team.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama receives an autographed Green Bay Packers Charles
Woodson from Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (center) and Green Bay Mayor Jim
Schmitt (left) upon his arrival in Green Bay, Wis., Wednesday.


He said a couple of them get fired
out of cannons in the episode that
airs Sunday on Fox.
Overstreet made an appearance
Friday night at the Audi Forum
Dallas party.
Other "Glee" stars were also mak-
ing the Super Bowl scene. Later,
Matthew Morrison of "Glee" joined
the festivities. And Lea Michele of
"Glee" was set to sing "America the
Beautiful" at the game Sunday.

Jamie Oliver reality show
dumped from LA schools
LOS ANGELES Jamie Oliver


won't be cooking another course of
his reality TV show in Los Angeles
schools. The filming permit for the
celebrity chef's ABC series "Jamie
Oliver's Food Revolution" was ter-
minated this week, said Los Angeles
Unified School District spokesman
Robert Alaniz. He said Oliver had
been filming for two weeks at one
school but the decision was made
to ban him from others because he
failed to submit a proposal about his
plans to officials.
A spokeswoman for the net-
work said production on "Food
Revolution" would continue.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Zsa Zsa Gabor is
94.
* Actor Patrick Macnee is
89.
* Actor Rip Torn is 80.
Actress Mamie Van Doren
is 80.
* Former NBC News anchor-
man Tom Brokaw is 71.
* Singer Fabian is 68.


Daily Scripture


* Actress Gayle Hunnicutt
is 68.
* Actor Michael Tucker is 67.
* Singer Natalie Cole is 61.
* Actor-Jon Walmsley is 55.
* Actress Kathy Najimy is
54.
* Actor-director Robert
Townsend is 54.
* Actor Barry Miller is 53.


"For the word of the Lord is
right and true; he is faithful in
all he does.The Lord loves righ-
teousness and justice; the earth
is full of his unfailing love."

Psalm 33:445


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Lake City Reporter
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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011


'Mark Twain' visits County Library VICTIM: Was married


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

Community members
will have the opportunity to
see the persona of American
author Mark Twain come
to life Sunday.
The Friends of the
Columbia County Public
Library will hold its 2011
Annual Meeting at the
library system's main
branch, followed by a pro-
gram titled "An Afternoon
with Mark Twain" featur-


ing actor Dave Ehlert of
Branson, Mo.
"This is something he
(Ehlert) does in Branson,"
said Debbie Paulson,
library director, "so he
does a number of other per-
sonas and we just thought
it would be fun to have him
here as Mark Twain. He'll
probably tell stories, sort of
a one-man show."
At the business meet-
ing, both Paulson and the
Friends of the Library
president will give separate


reports and the organiza-
tion's board members will
be recognized.
Friends of the Library is
an organization that funds
purchases the county bud-
get cannot cover and the
libraries' special programs,
Paulson said.
The business meeting
and the program are open
to the public.
. Forms to join Friends of
the Library will be avail-
able. Membership for a
year costs $5 per person


and $10 per family.
"I think it's certainly a
good idea to support an
important institution such
as a public library," Paulson
said. "It's very inexpensive
and it does show a lot of
good support for the things
that we do because the pub-
lic library is for everyone."
The meeting and pro-
gram will begin at 2 p.m. at
the main branch in down-
town Lake City, 308 NW
Columbia Avenue. Call
(386) 758-2101.


SIGNS: City removes Walmart 'No Parking' for RVs

Continued From Page 1A


are in no way obligated to have these
signs posted and may remove them at
your convenience."
The signs were first displayed in
January after the city was asked to
enforce itslawbythe Columbia County
Tourist Development Council.
According to Section 4.2.16 of the
City's Land Development Regulations,
"No major recreational equipment
shall be used for living, sleeping or
housekeeping purposes when parked
or stored on a lot in a residential
direction or any other location not
approved for such use." Columbia
County has an identical regulation.
The issue of RV camping has been
ongoing for more than three years,
Johnson said. It was first brought
to his attention after becoming city
manager in 2009.
It came up again at a TDC meeting
in October, and Johnson contacted
the Walmart manager to discuss a
possible solution which led to the
signs being posted.
There was a tremendous reaction
from the RV community, locally and
nationwide, once the signs went up,
Johnson said.
"For the most part it was negative,"
he said. "It cast a terrible reflection
on Lake City."


Based on the feedback, he and
Mayor Stephen Witt felt something
had to be done, Johnson said.
"We thought the best thing to do
would be to take (the signs) down,"
he said.
A letter was sent July 7, 2009 from
the TDC to the city which represents
its thoughts, said Harvey Campbell,
executive director. Either the ordi-
nance should be enforced or taken
off the books.
The TDC has no intention of push-
ing the issue any further either way
or to criticize the city, he said.
"The city has taken an action it
believes in the best interest of the
community and we support that,"
Campbell said. "We're ready to move
on."
Already calls have come in from
RVers with positive comments,
Johnson said. Overall camping at the
store has never been a problem.
The intent of the law is to keep
someone from living in unauthorized
areas, he said. It wasn't intended
to prohibit RVers from stopping at
Walmart.
"We as city leaders have to be wise
in interpretation of the law," he said.
"The law has a spirit and intent to
prohibit conditions contrary to public


interest."
It is not a problem with him for
RVers to stop in the city to stretch
their legs, catch a few hours napping
and visit local businesses, Johnson
said.
"It's difficult to please everybody,"
he said. "Looking at what would be
required and what has been asked to.
.enforce the law creates a condition
contrary to the best interest of the
community, and not just Lake City
but Columbia County."
The law can't be done away with
because it will create problems and
people will take advantage of the
situation, he said. "We've got to have
some standards," Johnson said.
If there is a problem with someone
camping for an extended number of
days the law will be enforced on a
case-by-case basis, he said.
Suggestions are welcomed if some-
one thinks there is a better way to
handle the situation, Johnson said.
Putting the signs up created a worse
problem.
'We want RVers to view Lake City
as a friendly place to stop," he said.
"We don't want any tourists coming
through thinking we're unfriendly."


w W,


Continued From Page 1A

married to was unknown
until Friday morning.
Debra Moore said her son
heard about Cervantez's
death on Facebook.
"He's in denial," Jim
Moore said of Fleetwood.
"He would say she's in the
hospital, in critical condi-
tion. I had to tell him, 'Jay,
she's gone.'"
Moore could not say
what Cervantez was doing
in a home on Baya late
Wednesday night, a home
belonging to the parents
of Alan Lucas Strattan.
Strattan has been charged
with three counts of first
degree murder and a single
count of willful killing of an
unborn child.
Strattan had a child with
Hudson and, although


PAGEANT: Olustee

Continued From Page 1A


was crowned the 2011
Miniature Miss Olustee.
Gracelyn Bell Thomas was
the first runner-up and
Taylor LaRae Carroll was
the second runner-up.
Jaiden Elizabeth Barrs
is the 2011 Little Miss.
Olustee. Logan Lloyd was
the first runner-up and
Paige Waters was the sec-
ond runner-up.
Morgan Elizabeth
Royals is the 2011 Petite
Miss Olustee. Ashlund
Gardner was first run-
ner-up and Spencer Grace
Todd as the second run-
ner-up.
Jillian Cara Hodges is
the 2011 Pre-Teen Miss
Olustee. Buie Patricia


MLK: Parade

Continued From Page 1A


ally in the MLK parade for
more than two decades.
"It was fantastic," he
said. "It's an honor to be
a part of such a great tra-
dition honoring a great
man."
Williams said taking
part in the parade holds a
special meaning for him.
"It means it's great to
be a part of the legacy
Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr., set forth in his dream,
because we are realizing
that dream," he said. "We
are thankful the Lord has
blessed us to be here long
enough to see the dream
come true. We're still look-
ing for, more progress."
Several hundred resi-
dents lined the streets to
watch as parade entries
headed south on Marion
Avenue.


Summerlin was the first
runner-up and Savannah
Amparo was the second
runner-up.
Savannah Del-Rae
Thomas is the 2011 Junior
Miss Olustee. Sydney
Martinez was the first run-
ner-up and Lorrae Blalock
was the second runner-up.
Elaine Owens, pageant
director, said this year's
pageant went really well
and the contestants did
their thing.
"They were so organized
and we have a lot of good
people to work with," she
said. "It takes a lot of hard
work to put the pageant
together, but it's all worth-
while."


a success


."The parade was fantas-
tic," said. Lakasia Portee-
Jones. "Even though .it
was cloudy there was still
a pretty decent turnout."
The parade was spon-
sored by the Northeast
Florida Leadership
Council and the organi-
zation's president, Ron
Williams estimated there
was 80 percent participa-
tion of the listed parade
entries.
"The parade was set
back for two weeks but
we had a great parade,".
he said, noting about 6
a.m. Saturday there was a
"pretty good" rain in the
area. "It was one of those
things where the rain held
off. We got a few sprinkles
and waited a little bit' to
begin."


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lane when he two vehicles
approached each other.
Then the front of
Caudill's vehicle struck
the right front of Mayo's
car and the collision
caused Caudill's car to
spin clockwise, where it
stopped across both lanes
of the roadway.
Mayo's vehicle stopped
partially in the south-
bound lane and on the
shoulder of the road.
Caudill was pronounced.
dead at the scene by
attending Columbia
County EMS personnel.
Reports said he was not
wearing a seatbelt.
Mayo, who was wearing


a seatbelt at the time of
the wreck, was taken to
Shands at the University
of Florida.
Charges in connection
with the wreck are pend-
ing completion of an FHP
traffic homicide investiga-
tion, reports said.

Two injured when SUV
leaves road
Earlier in the eve-
ning, around. 10:10 p.m.,
two Columbia County
residents were seriously
injured when they'were
tossed from a sports util-
ity vehicle after it ran off
the road into a tree line.


The wreck occurred
on Interstate 10 in Baker
County.
Brian ShaneWilliamson,
22, was driving a 1994
GMC Jimmy eastbound on
1-10 with Kathryn Lynch,
24, both of. Lake City, as
his passenger.
According to reports,
for unknown reasons,
,the vehicle drifted into
the left side of the road-
way onto the paved apron
and Williamson counter-
steered to the right, caus-
ing the vehicle to travel
across both eastbound
lanes, the emergency lane
and the ditch.
When the vehicle hit'


the ditch it was spinning
clockwise and as it was
leaving the ditch it went
airborne and traveled into
a tree line where it struck
a medium-sized pine tree
along the area of the front
windshield.
The impact resulted in
the vehicle violently rotat-
ing clockwise and both
Wililamson .and Lynch
were tossed from the
vehicle.
Williamson and Lynch
were both taken to Shands
Jacksonville.
Williamson has been
charged with careless
driving, FHP reports said.


Seafood sales get a military boost


By MARY FOSTER
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Sales
of Gulf of Mexico seafood
are getting a boost from the
military after being ham-
mered by last year's BP oil
spill, which left consumers
fearing the water's bounty
had been tainted.
Ten products includ-
ing fish, shrimp, oysters,
crab cakes, and packaged
Cajun dishes such as jam-
balaya and shrimp etouffee
are being promoted at 72
base commissaries along
the East Coast, said Milt
Ackerman, president of
Military Solutions Inc.,
which is supplying seafood
to the businesses.
Gulf seafood sales fell
sharply after BP PLC's Gulf
well blew out in April, spew-
ing millions of gallons of
oil into the sea. Consumers


have long feared that fish,
oysters and other products
could be tainted by oil and
chemicals used to fight the
spill, even though extensive
testing has indicated the
food is safe. The perception
has lingered along with
the poor sales.
Bobby Barnett, a shrimp-
er in Pass Christian, Miss.,
said he was glad the U.S.
government was embracing
domestic and not imported
seafood.
"Every sale helps us out,
and we need some help to
come back," Barnett said.
"You would have thought
they would have been buy-
ing U.S. seafood all along."
The Defense
Department-run Defense
Commissary Agency -
known as DeCa sells
groceries to military per-
sonnel, reservists, retirees
and their families at cost


plus a 5 percent surcharge.
The stores have empha-
sized healthy diets as part of
first lady Michelle Obama's
"Let's Move" fitness and
health campaign.
"What fits in with that
better than seafood?"
Ackerman said.
The Gulf promotion
begins Tuesday at Belle
Chasse Naval Air Station,
La., where chefs from the
military and New Orleans'
restaurants will cook up
Gulf delicacies. Some 20,000
.people have commissary
privileges at the air base
just outside New Orleans.
'We're doing dishes that
the home cook can take


home and cook easily," said
Chef Tenney Flynn of GW
Fins' French Quarter res
taurant, who will prepare
black drum with tomato
sauce.
Commissary shoppers
will be able to take home
the recipes.
The commissaries deal
was brokered by Ready 4
Takeoff, a group that has
worked since Hurricane
Katrina to help the Gul
Coast, and Navy Secretary,
Ray Mabus. Mabus was
appointed by Presideni
Barack Obama in June tc
oversee the Gulf's recovery
from BP's massive oil spill,
which began in April.


-1


CRASH: Head-on collision ends in death


Continued From Page 1A


Flip s C o m i n I n ..

10 P


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Hudson had taken a restrain-
ing order out against him
- which she was trying
to have withdrawn she
was visiting Strattan at his
house. Jim Moore said
Cervantez called Hudson
"her cousin. I don't know if
she was a blood cousin or
by marriage."
Cervantez's 5-year-old,
who according to police was
in the house when the mur-
ders occurred, was dropped
off at the Lake City Police
Department by Strattan
when he turned himself in.
The child was unharmed
and was taken to her grand-
mother's.
Jim Moore said their fam-
ily was planning to come to
Lake City Monday.













OPINION


Sunday, February 6, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR
OPINION


Reversing

RV ban the

right move
ity officials did
the right thing in
reversing a two-
week-old decision
to enforce a ban
on all camping and overnight
parking at Walmart in Lake
City. Government's approach to
handle any potential long-term
camping violations on a case-
by-case basis is a logical move
that we support
A few days after signs ban-
ning parking lot camping went
up at Walmart, the outcry
from offended RV travelers
from California to Canada
was heard as RV Internet bul-
letin boards were choked with
negative comments about Lake
City being unfriendly toward
RV travelers because of the
Walmart parking ban. It was
shocking to hear and read the
calls and emails we received at
the Lake City Reporter. Most of
these ripped our community and
promised to bypass us and spend
tourism dollars elsewhere.
Columbia County Tourist
Development officials had
asked the city to enforce the
overnight parking ordinance
that has been on the books for
some time. The TDC took this
position at the request of a few
of its members who own and
operate designated RV parks.
The city agreed to enforce the
ordinance, but thought better
of it after the backlash from the
RV community. The spirit of the
law is not to prevent a weary
traveler from resting.
A boycott by RV operators
who stop for a few hours in
Lake City could be costly. Most
who stop for a few hours to
take a nap, buy fuel, groceries,
supplies and eat in our restau-
rants. It adds up to significant
sales tax revenue that was in
jeopardy of going somewhere
else.
Government works best
when it listens to the people.
Sometimes what appears to be
an effective ordinance on the
books, just doesn't produce the
intended result when carried
out City officials acted in a logi-
cal manner, saw the big picture
and rectified the situation by
deciding to back away from the
parking ordinance. The city
took the high road for the ben-
efit of everyone and it was the
right decision.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
*the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Reagan's stature rises


Martin Anderson
works in an
ivory tower -
literally. From
high above
Stanford University's Hoover
Institution, Anderson contem-
plates Ronald Reagan's legacy
as his centennial arrives on Feb.
6.
Asked if he thinks Reagan's
stature has risen since he left
office in 1989, Anderson says, "I
don't just think so. I know so."
Reagan's reputation has
grown, largely thanks to the
scholarship of Anderson and
his wife, Annelise, both former
Reagan aides and Hoover col-
leagues of mine. Like prospec-
tors panning for gold, they
routinely sift through boxes and
boxes of Reagan's papers. Their
findings have pleasantly sur-
prised even the most stalwart
Reaganites.
America's 40th president
succeeded, in part, by not
challenging the widespread
belief that he was a committed
conservative who mainly sold
free-market reforms while oth-
ers fretted over their details
and implementation. Reagan's
critics considered him gregari-
ous, perhaps, but ultimately a
mere actor who read whatever
lines he was handed by such
advisers as Ed Meese and the
late Mike Deaver. The equally
late Democratic eminence
Clark Clifford famously dis-
missed Reagan as "an amiable
dunce."
The Andersons' book,
"Reagan in His Own Hand,"
detonated this myth. They
discovered 670 scripts for
commentaries that the former
California governor aired on 236
radio stations from 1975 to 1979.
Reagan offered his specific pre-
scriptions on taxes, regulation,
peace through strength, and
even oceanic mineral content as
concerned the Law of the Sea
Treaty. These scripts consisted


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.com
of sheets of yellow paper brim-
ming with Reagan's own hand-
writing.
Rather than a mere mouth-
piece for his staff, Reagan him-
self researched and addressed
topical issues with philosophical
consistency and concrete evi-
dence to bolster his opinions.
The Andersons cross-tabu-
late, highlight, color-code, and
digitize copies of Reagan's
documents, both from Hoover's
archives and the Reagan
Library in Simi Valley, Calif.
Reagan's prolific pen still keeps
them busy.
"We published about a thou-
sand of his letters in 'Reagan:
A Life in Letters,'" Martin
Anderson says. '"There are
about 10,000 Reagan letters.
We're still finding more."
The Pentagon declassified
additional papers that helped
the Andersons explain how
Reagan won the Cold War while
barely firing.a shot. Here again,
Anderson says Reagan pursued
precisely the policy that he
wanted. His deputies worked
hard,to follow him not the
reverse.
Reagan was driven, Anderson
believes, by something he
learned at a Dec. 3, 1981,
National Security Council meet-
ing. "Right now in a nuclear war
we'd lose 150 million) people,"
Reagan told his diary. "The
Soviets could hold their loss
down to less than were killed in
W.W. II" some 25 million.
In short, 40 percent of
America's population would
bury the other 60 percent


before returning to the radioac-
tive rubble. Reagan wanted to
do better.
"He was the only person who
was smart enough to know what
to do," Anderson says. "And he
did it"
Thus, Reagan launched a
tax-cut-fueled economic expan-
sion and an aggressive military
buildup, including missile-
defense research. After seven
exhausting decades of "scien-
tific socialism," the USSR could
not keep up.
Reagan also engaged Russia
in high-stakes diplomacy, which
finally succeeded after Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev con-
cluded that resistance was futile
and accepted deep arms reduc-
tions.
When, exactly, did Reagan
win the Cold War? Anderson
cites the June 1, 1988, comple-
tion of Reagan and Gorbachev's
Moscow summit. They jointly
declared "their solemn convic-
tion that a nuclear war cannot
be won and must never be .
fought ... and their disavowal of
any intention to achieve military
superiority."
This reflected Reagan's
singular desire to end Mutual
Assured Destruction. Like most
of his other policies, this sprang
,from his well-honed intellect
and his deep-seated faith in
America's abilities. He governed
with focused self-confidence.
As Reagan told his very first
'National Security Council meet-
ing on Feb. 6, 1981: "I will make
the decisions."
"People used to say, 'Reagan
was a nice guy. But who was
handling all of this stuff for
him?' Martin Anderson mar-
vels. "We didn't know. And now
we do: He was."
* New York commentator Deroy
Murdock is a columnist with the
Scripps Howard News Service and
a media fellow with the Hoover
Institution on War, Revolution and
Peace at Stanford University.


ANOTHER OPINION

Obama suggestion to amend existing health

care law with GOP ideas makes good sense


his past week's rul-
ing by a federal judge
in Florida that the
Obama health care
plan is unconstitu-
tional brings this issue one step
closer to its final legal destina-
tion: The United States Supreme
Court
The ruling energized Senate
Republicans to push for scrap-
ping the entire health care reform
approved by Congress last year
and signed into law by President
Barack Obama, but the effort
went down in partisan fashion.
We recognize the duty that
GOP leaders feel to follow up on
campaign pledges to do away
with "Obamacare" made to their
voters in November's elections.
A similar plan to repeal the
president's health care insurance


reform plan had earlier passed
the U.S. House in a party-line vote.
These votes are largely sym-
bolic, given the president's power
of the veto, which Obama says he
will not hesitate to use. As a prac-
tical matter, efforts to deep-six
the whole reform plan are going
nowhere in the political arena
.as long as Democrats hold the
White House.
While the issue proceeds along
the judicial track at a mostly
unknowable pace, we believe
that the country and indi-
vidual Americans with a variety
of urgent health care concerns
- will be best served by a bipar-
tisan approach in the political
arena. Congress can and should
make changes in the existing law
as Republicans and Democrats
can agree on them.


The foundation for such an
approach was laid by Obama in
last week's State of the Union
address. Obama's invitation to
congressional Republicans to
identify areas where the plan can
be improved and present them
for discussion and debate seems
reasonable and constructive a
middle way forward in the spirit
of bipartisanship that members of
both parties have declared they
support following the tragedy in
Tucson, Ariz.
There are some obvious places
to begin. Tort reform is one. In
his State of the Union, the presi-
, dent emphasized his willingness
to work with GOP leaders to
achieve this goal, which propo-
nents argue will be a major cost-
saver in health care.
Houston Chronicle


Obama's

policies hurt

response

in Egypt
The upheaval in
Egypt would be a
dilemma for any-
American adminis-
tration. But the poli-
cies President Barack Obama
has followed the past two years
have made his task more chal-
lenging in three ways.
The signature policy of
Obama's predecessor, George
W. Bush, was the "freedom
agenda." His administra-
tion pushed for democratic
reforms around the world and
that contributed to the Cedar
Revolution in Lebanon in 2005,
as well as Georgia's Rose
Revolution in 2003, Ukraine's
Orange Revolution in 2004
and, of course, the Purple
Revolution of Iraq in 2005
and perhaps, too, the Green
Revolution in Iran, which
began in 2009 and may not be
entirely extinguished yet
If Obama had main-
tained that policy, the Lotus
Revolution in Egypt and
the Jasmine Revolution that
immediately preceded it in
Tunisia might have been
seen as waves on an American-
generated tide. Instead,
Obama rejected Bush's policy.
He took the view, shared by
most European leaders, that
in such regions as the Middle
East, stability trumps liberty,
As a result, those marching
in the streets now do not view
Obama as a proponent of hope
and change.
Second: Less than two years
ago, Obama chose Cairo as the
venue for his pivotal speech to
the Arab and Muslim worlds.
That sent the message that he
saw Egypt as the capital' of the
Arab and Muslim worlds. His.
speech was primarily an apol-
ogy for America's past sins. He
did not emphatically appeal to
the region's rulers to reform.
As a result, any calls he now
makes in favor of reform ring
hollow.
Third: When Iranians rose
up against the tyrannical
regime that has ruled them for
more than 30 years, the presi-
dent mostly held his tongue,
reluctant to jeopardize his
policy of "outreach" to Iran's
rulers. Can Obama now be
more supportive of Egyptians
as they confront a regime that,
while authoritarian, is nowhere
near as oppressive and brutal
as the one in Tehran?
The above is grist for the
historian's mill. For policy
makers, the question that
matters is this: What does the
president of the United States
do now?
The military is Egypt's most
respected institution. After
all these years of providing
funds, equipment and train-
ing to Egypt's military, the
Pentagon has cultivated allies
Egyptian officers who are
disciplined and capable, who
want to see their country
become free, democratic and
prosperous, and who do not
want to find themselves taking
orders from mad mullahs and
scowling Islamist intellectuals.
They also grasp Egypt's need
for continuing U.S. military
aid.
Obama ought to be empow-
ering American officers to'
reach out in confidence to
their Egyptian colleagues, urg-
ing them to take charge. Their
duty is to prevent anarchy after
President Hosni Mubarak's
long-awaited retirement, which
they should arrange to begin
as soon as possible.
Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
. focusing on terrorism.


4A








LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD & NATION SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011


Health care fraud: Not a


faceless crime any longer


By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Health care
fraud once was a faceless crime. Now
it has a mug shot, even a smile.
Medicare and Medicaid scams cost
taxpayers more than $60 billion a
year, but bank holdups are more
likely to get greater attention.
The government wants the pub-
lic's help in trying to catch more
than 170 fugitives wanted for fraud,
so it's developed a new health care
most-wanted list, with its own website
- http://www.oig.hhs.gov. Most are
dour; some sport smiles.
One name on the list is Leonard
Nwafor, convicted in Los Angeles of
billing Medicare more than $1 mil-
lion for motorized wheelchairs that
people didn't need. One person who
got a wheelchair was a blind man
who later testified he couldn't see to
operate it.
Facing time in federal prison,
Nwafor disappeared before his sen-
tencing.
"We're looking for new ways to press
the issue of catching fugitives," said
Gerald Roy, deputy inspector general
for investigations at the. Health and
Human Services Department "If some-
one walks into a bank and steals $3,000
or $4,000, it would be all over the news-
paper. These people manage to do it
from a less high profile position, but
they still have a tremendous impact."
Even though motorized wheel-
chairs can cost up to $7,000 apiece,
Nwafor's scam was on the low end
when compared with others who
made the most-wanted list
Sisters Clara and Caridad Guilarte
allegedly submitted $9 million to
Medicare in false and fraudulent
claims for pricey infusion drugs that
were never provided to.patients. They
are accused of offering cash and other
rewards for beneficiaries to visit their
clinic in Dearborn, Mich., and sign
forms that said they /received ser-
vices that they never got
An alleged accomplice was arrested
in the Dominican Republic recently,
but the sisters remain at large.
Scammers "often utilize their ties


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo Michael Dobrushin is led in handcuffs from FBI headquarters in
New York. Dobrushin is one of 73 people across the country charged by federal
prosecutors in a scheme to cheat Medicare out of $163 million, the largest fraud
by one criminal enterprise in the program's history, U.S. authorities said. Medicare
and Medicaid scams cost taxpayers more than $60 billion a year, but the average
bank holdup is likely to get more attention.


to a particular community," said Roy.
"They take advantage of ethnic com-
munities based on language barriers
or lack of knowledge about how the
medicare system works. These folks
are exploiting low-income communi-
ties."
Fugitive Susan Bendigo is accused
of billing California's Medicaid pro-
gram for $17 million in nursing care,
much of which was performed by
staffers who -weren't licensed. A regis-
tered nurse, Bendigo was the nursing
director for a company that provided
personnel for home health agencies.
Allegedly, she was fully 'aware that
she was required to send licensed
nurses to care for patients.
Topping the list are Miami broth-
ers Carlos, Luis and Jose Benitez.


Owners of a string of medical clinics,
they allegedly scammed Medicare
out of $119 million by billing for
costly HIV drugs that patients never
received or did not need. Authorities
say they bought hotels, helicopters
and boats before fleeing to Cuba.
The FBI has the marquee most-
wanted list, but the Environmental
Protection Agency and other federal
agencies also maintain their own.
Roy said he hopes this newest
list will raise awareness about the
importance of combatting health care
fraud. Medicare and Medicaid, which
provide care for about 100 million
people in the U.S., are in serious
financial trouble and can't afford to be
hemorrhaging tens of billions a year
because of fraud.


Hundreds protest

Egypt leader in

several US cities


ALAN SAYRE
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS -
Hundreds calling for the
ouster of Egypt's president
peacefully demonstrated
in several U.S. cities on
Saturday to show their
support for the anti-gov-
ernment throngs that have
taken over a sprawling pub-
lic square in Cairo.
About 150 people gath-
ered outside the New
Orleans federal building
to demand that Egyptian
President Hosni Mubarak
step down. Meanwhile,
about 180 people demon-
strated in Atlanta outside
the headquarters of CNN.
In Washington, more than
100 marched from the
Egyptian Embassy to the
White House, following
protests in that city on
Tuesday and last Saturday.
Rallies were also held in
New York and Seattle.
At the New Orleans
demonstration, the group
waved signs aid Egyptian
flags and chanted "Get
up, stand up! Stand up for
your rights."
"That's a drop in the
bucket," Egypt native Reda
Bakeer, a 57-year-old engi-
neer, said of the protest he
joined. "I have friends who
are dying. We have joined
a party here."
Some protesters
expressed concern about
the increasingly dan-
gerous situation in the
country, where anti-gov-
ernment protesters and
Mubarak supporters have
clashed in the streets.
Bakeer, a naturalized
U.S. citizen since 1991,
said he was concerned
about family members in
Egypt, including his elder-
ly mother. But he added:


"It's bigger than my fam-
ily."
Ahmed Bayoumi, a 42-
year-old engineer who
came to the United States
to study in 1999, said the
Egyptian dissidents have
taken to the streets for
the same reason he left
the country a lack of
opportunity. He said that
the Mubarak regime had
"corrupted the souls of
Egyptians."
"It has been pushing
the thought that if you're
well-connected and have
money, you will have pros-
perity," he said.
In Washington, the
rally had mostly conclud-
ed by early evening, but
some protesters said they
planned to stay overnight
at Lafayette Square across
from the White House, in
solidarity with the thou-
sands in Cairo's Tahrir
Square.
Earlier in the day, an
organizer with a mega-
phone led the sign-carry-
ing group in chants that
included "Hey Mubarak,
pack your stuff!"
Some protesters
came from far beyond
Washington. The Flint
Journal newspaper
reports about 50 people
in Michigan boarded a
bus Friday to join the pro-
test, picking up others in
Detroit and Toledo, Ohio.
.In Seattle, about 200
people gathered carrying
signs that said "step down
now" and "free Egypt" to
show their solidarity with
antigovernment protest-
ers.
Many of the protesters
at Seattle's Westlake Park
were of Egyptian descent
and called for Mubarak to
step down.


Visitation set for officer


DEFUNIAK SPRINGS
The former colleagues
of a Florida Panhandle
corrections officer slain
in a gun battle with an ex-
convict say he was dedi-.
cated to his family and
his fellow officers.
A visitation for Col.
Greg Malloy was sched-
uled Saturday evening
at Walton Senior High
.School in Defuniak
Springs. His funeral
and burial were set for
Sunday.
1Malloy, a K-9 officer
with the corrections
department in Holmes
County, died Wednesday
when he and other offi-
cers exchanged fire with
Wade Andrew Williams
in a wooded area near
Gritney.
Malloy insisted on join-
ing his men in the hunt
for Williams, which was
unusual for an officer of
his rank, said Holmes
Correctional Institution
Warden John Whitfield.
Whitfield said Malloy
walked into his office
with his fatigues under
his arm and said, "Boss,
I've got to go with them.
This is a dangerous run
and they're my en and
I need to be with them.
We've got to get Williams
locked up before he kills
someone else."
"Normally a colonel
doesn't tell the warden
what he is going to do,
but that is how strongly
he felt about his respon-
sibility to his men on that
day," Whitfield said.
According to the other
K-9 team members,
Malloy constantly cau-
tioned them about stay-
ing safe during their run
through the woods track-
ing Williams, Whitfield
said.
Authorities in three
states had been search-
ing for Williams, 35, since
his parents were found
dead in their Cottondale
home last week.


The News Herald
reported Saturday that,
according-to a complaint
affidavit, Williams had
bought ammunition the
same day his parents
were found. Police have
not said how the couple
died.
Williams also was
killed in Wednesday's
shoot-out. Police said he
-ambushed the officers
tracking him after he
wounded a hunter who
came across his camp-
fire.
Another officer,
Arthur Teal, was wound-
ed. Department of
Corrections Secretary
Walt McNeil said Teal
has been released from
the hospital.
Malloy had been a
corrections officer since
1988. He was promoted
to colonel in July.
The former warden
at the Holmes County
prison says Malloy used
to stand at the front gate
twice a day to greet staff
coming on duty or leav-
ing for home.
He even got the heads
of other departments at


the prison to stand with
him on different days,
said Mary Ellen Dayan,
who is now retired.
"Line staff became
used to having a chance
to speak with him each
day or just to say, 'Hi,"
and he had a remark
or kind word for every-
one one of them," Dayan
said.
Malloy also was known
for trying to make all
his daughter's sporting
events, even the out-
of-town games, McNeil
said in a statement to
corrections staff Friday.
"This department
lost one of its shining
stars. And the state of
Florida lost an outstand-
ing public servant, and
an honest-to-God hero,"
McNeil wrote.
It has been a deadly
year for law enforce-
ment officers around the
country and especially
in Florida, where two
St. Petersburg police
officers and two Miami-
Dade County detectives
died in two separate
shootings last month.


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


AV' I I r








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011


Plans put in place to


assure safety at school -


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn
t the Columbia
County School
District schools
and Florida
Gateway
College procedures are in
place to maximize the safety
of students.
Almost four weeks ago, six
people were killed and more
than 13 others were injured
including Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords in a shooting
rampage outside a super-
market in Tucson, Ariz. The
suspected gunman, Jared
L .ughner, 22, had taken
classes at Pima Community
College. Laughner's former
schoolmates reported that
Laughner would behave
strangely and disrupt
classes, according to the
Associated Press.
Chuck Hall, FGC presi-
dent, said that if a student is
disruptive in an FGC class-
room, the faculty member
would ask him or her to
leave the class. Campus
security or the dean would
be notified if the student
refused, but if the situation
escalated and could not be
handled by security or if the
student had a weapon, the
Columbia County Sheriffs
Office would be called imme-
diately, Hall said.
'We're very lucky in that
the sheriffs office is a min-
ute or two from here," he
said, "and any time we've
had an instance, and we've
had some things from time
to time, the sheriffs office is
here as soon as we put the
*e down."
a student is disruptive
in a district classroom, that
student will be sent to the
discipline office, he or she'
would be written up with a
countywide referral form the
teacher fills out and the situ-
ation would be handled by
a school assistant principal
who deals with discipline,
said Gloria Spivey, CCSD
safe schools coordinator.
Policy states what type of
discipline is given based on
the disturbance, she said.
"It gives them (admin-
istration) a perimeter on
what they're supposed to
do based on the infraction,"
Spivey said. 'They try to be
as consistent as they can
throughout the district and I
feel they do a very good job
of that It "ives them a little
play room, but it also gives
them that perimeter and it
.makes us consistent across
,the cc, mty."


David Duane Massingill
David Duane Massingill, 42 of
Moultrie, GA, formerly of Lake
City, FL and Panama City, FL
passed away at his residence
Tuesday, Feb 1, 2011. Born Sept
8, 1968 in Panama City, FL. He
moved to Lake City, FL in 1995
and was part owner of the Bingo
Station. David was a true Ga-
tor fan and enjoyed all sports.
He was pre-
ceded in death
by his father,
William Mass-
ingill. David
is survived by
his wife, Pais-
ley, Mother
Sharon, broth-
er Matt (Ashley) and sis-
ter Melanie Massingill.
He also leaves to cherish his
memory, his daughters Heather
.and Jelaine Massingill, and sons
Taylor and Tyler Massingill.
He will be missed by his niec-
es Sierra, Alyssa, Lexi and
Maddie, his nephews Mal-
colm and Dakota and great
nieces Kaliyah and Rayonna.
David is being cremated and
services will be held Monday,
Feb 7, 2011 at Straightway
Ministries, 5031 N. Star Ave,
Panama City, FL at 4:00 P.M.
All friends are invited to attend.

Jean Waters
Jean Waters, 61, a thirty year
resident of Lake City, died
Wednesday, February 2, 2011
at Shands at Lake Shore Hospi-
tal. She was the daughter of the
late Scriven & Doris Lee Down-
ing. A loving wife, mother and
grandmother who enjoyed cook-
ing, putting together puzzles and
most of all loved her grandchil-
dren. She was a member of Su-
wannee Springs Baptist Church.
Survivors include her husband,


Keith Hatcher, Fort White
High principal, said disrup-
tive students at his school
can be sent to another class-
room through a "teacher
buddy system" if that other
teacher is without a class.
"If that doesn't work,
they're referred to the dis-
cipline office and then we
have progressive discipline
from there that may include
in-school or out-of-school
suspension and then an
assignment to the Challenge
Learning Center," he said.
For major classroom dis-
turbances at Columbia High
School, a teacher can call the
office and a School Resource
Officer, assistant principal or
principal will immediately
go to the room, said Terry
Huddleston, CHS principal.
The student would then be
removed from the room and
taken to the discipline office.
School officials will investi-
gate and discipline would be
applied based on the disci-
pline policy, he said.
CHS teachers have and
know code words, to use
when calling the office to
notify administration and
the SRO if a student has a
gun, weapon or bomb in the
classroom, Huddleston said.
"We would treat that
situation as a very serious,
serious situation and we're
going to that classroom, .to
take somebody down," he
said. "If those teachers call
us and say the magic words,
we're going down there to
do business. We're going in
on a whole different level of
awareness because we're not
going to take any chances.
We will not take any chance
for anyone to get hurt"

IF A TEACHER OR STUDENT
FEELS UNCOMFORTABLE IN
THE CLASSROOM
A district teacher that
might feel uncomfortable in
a classroom would have to
validate- his or her feelings
to the' administration with
something that has hap-
pened on a consistent basis,
Spivey said.
"The teacherwould report
back to the administration
and give a valid reason for-
that feeling with background
information," she said. .
A student who felt uncom-
fortable in the classroom
could report it to their teach-
er, guidance counselor or
.administration, Spivey said.
If the feeling is found to be
legitimate after administra-
tor investigations, then the
school principal could move
the student to another class-


OBITUARIES

Harley Waters of Lake City, FL;
son, Harley (Wendy.) Waters
Jr. of Lake City, FL; daughters,
Kimberly Waters of Lake City,
FL, Lori (Brian) Schichler of
Germany, & Misty (John) Har-
vey of Lake City, FL; brothers,
Don Downing of Micanopy, FL,
Gary Downing of Ft. White,
FL, Edward Downing of Lake
City, FL and Mike Downing
of Live Oak, FL; sisters, Betty
Johnson of Lake City, FL, Rita
Mimms of Ft. White, FL &
Ninkie Waters of Valdosta, GA;
13 grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Jean Wa-
ters will be conducted at 2:00
p.m. on Tuesday, February 8,
2011 with Pastor Randy Og-
burn officiating in the chapel of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596
South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake
City, FL 32025 (386) 752-1954.
Interment will be in Friend-
ship Baptist Church Cem-
etery, in Live Oak, Florida
Visitation with the family will be
held from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00
p.m. Monday evening, Febru-
ary 7, 2011 at the funeral home.
Please sign our guestbook at
www.gatewayforestlawn, corn
Mrs. Jeanie Faye Randall
Mrs. Jeanie Faye Randall, 49, of
White Springs, died early Friday
morning, February 4, 2011 in the
Haven Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley. Mrs. Randall was a native
of the Lake City area and had
spent most of her life here; she


was the daughter of the late L.B.
and Taney Skinner Brannen. Mrs.
Randall was a Past President of
the VFW's Ladies Auxiliary
and was of the Pentecostal faith.
She is survived by her husband
of thirty-three years, Willard E.
"Will" Randall; her daughters,
Wendy Randall of Fort Bragg,
North Carolina, and Audra
'Shepherd (Michael) of India-


room, she said.
"We don't want to leave
anyone in a room where
they feel uncomfortable,
especially if they feel uncom-
fortable for a safety reason,"
Spivey said.
Huddleston said when he
meets with the students at
the beginning of the school
year, he reminds them of
how they can report a situ-
ation.
"They have been told that
if they see or hear or know
of something that is not cor-
rect, they report that to their
teacher or come see one of
us and tell us," he said. "We
also make it very clear that
we do not disclose identities
and we protect the identities
of those who clue us in to
potential situations that may
arise on campus."
Hatcher encouraged stu-
dents feeling uncomfortable
in a class to either report
it to their teacher or their
parents, who could bring the
report to the administration.
He noted a formal process
is in place where a teacher
can request that a student be
removed from the classroom
and put into another perma-
nently if there is repeated
disruption or personality
conflict between the student
and teacher.
In the case of an emer-
gency or if a teacher or
student was uncomfort-
able in an FGC classroom,
telephones are provided in
every room to use, Hall said.
Some classrooms also have
hidden emergency buttons
and there is a siren on cam-
pus with directional "blasts"
- like if people needed to
stay in a room or evacuate
the building, he said.
"Ifs just issue by issue,"
Hall said. "We have tele-
phones, emergency buttons
and sirens on campus to
notify people."

* IF A STUDENT
EXPERIENCES AN UNWANTED
ADVANCE ON CAMPUS
Hall said FGC has a
security force on patrol. If
a student experiences an,
unwanted advance on cam-
pus, security will be around.
"We would hope a student
would turn on their (car)
lights or hit the panic button
on their car or key fob, honk
the horn, or shout," he said.
A student can call security
in that situation or if it is after
dark and they feel uncom-
fortable walking to their car
alone, Hall said.
"We have a service that
say, if ifs 10 p.m. and you're


napolis, Indiana; her brothers,
Kenneth, Claude and David;
her sisters, Willene, Hazel,
Marilyn, Rachael, Karen and
Frankie and her two step-daugh-
ters, Vickie and June. Eight
grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Ran-
dall will be conducted TODAY,
Sunday, February 6, 2011 in
the chapel of the Dees-Parrish
Family Funeral Home with
Rev. Charles Meadows offi-
ciating. Interment will follow
in the Williams Cemetery. The
family will receive friends for
one hour prior to the funeral
service. In lieu of flowers the
family requests that memorial
donations be made to the Ha-
ven Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley, 6037 U.S. Highway 90
West, Lake City, FL 32055.
Arrangements are under the
direction of the JDEES-PAR-
RISH FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025 752-
1234 please sign our on-line
family guestbook at www.par-
rishfamilyfuneralhome. corn
Nichole Cervantez
Monica Hudson
Kevin Tucker
Nichole Cervantez 25; Monica
Hudson 27, and Kevin Tucker
32 all of Lake City, were the
victims of the tragic homicide
that occurred earlier this week.
Funeral arrangements are in-
complete at this time due to the
continuing investigation. Final
arrangements will be announced
as soon as they are available.
Arrangements are under the
direction of the DEES-PAR-
RISH FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave.,
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida Gateway College students Eddie Wuest (from left), 27, Cameo Lance, Courtney
Peruyero, 18, and Kellen Vincent, 18, walk past an emergency call box stationed across the


current library on campus.
concerned, you can call secu-
rity, they'll walk you to your
car and make sure you get in
and drive off," he said.
"They're there to help,"
Hall said. "Ift's a positive
thing. Security is positive to
support the students, faculty
and everyone."
Fort White High has
adults who man "duty sta-
tions" where the majority
of students are when they
are not in class, such as in
the parking lot, Hatcher
said. Students can report
an unwanted advance to the
nearest adult, who would
escort them or send them to
the discipline office to file a
complaint, he said.
"Then we would locate the
student ... and then investi-
gate," Hatcher said.
Huddleston said an
unwanted advance at CHS
can be reported to any SRO,
security, teacher, staff mem-
ber or administrator.
"Come to us," he said.
"Let us help solve your prob-
lem."

E INSTRUCTOR TRAINING
While CHS does not have
specific training for teach-
ers on how to pick up clues
if something just isn't right
with a student, Huddleston
said building relationships
with students will help.
"What I preach to teach-
ers is we have to develop
relationships with stu-
dents," he said. "Developing
relationships with students
is your first and foremost
line of defense."
Spivey said district
administrators are trained
throughout the year on
such issues as bullying pol-
icy or gangs.
Hatcher said the dis-
cipline policy and the
processes to follow are


I


reviewed with teachers
during preplanning. Most
formal training takes place
at the college level, he
said, but all new teachers
go through an orientation
that includes the discipline
policy.
Hall said it would be a
beneficial idea to imple-
ment awareness training
after the Tucson shooting.'
"I would think at this
point, there is not (train-
ing) specifically for that,"
he said, "but now that it's
happened, it's probably
something we need to do."

AVAIABLE COUNSELING
If a student seemed to be
having problems and was in
need of counseling, Hall said
FGC offers a college-paid
counseling program that
allows a number of visits to
an outside counselor on the
college's expense.
Spivey said district stu-
dents have school guidance
counselors available to them,
but if a higher level of coun-
seling is needed, students
can be referred to Project
CATCh Columbia Acting
Together for Children.
If referred to Project
CATCh, a case manager, the
referring home school coun-
selor and the students par-
ents will meet to devise an
action plan, Spivey said. The
district has contracts with
both Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare and University
of Florida's Department of
Psychology t'o provide stu-
dent or family counseling,
she said. .
Huddleston said if there
are psychological concerns,
the student can be referred
to the districts Exceptional
Student Education depart-
ment.


* REPORTING SITUATIONS
ANONYMOUSLY
The district has an anon-
ymous telephone hotline.
- the Save a Friend hotline
.- available for students to
report situations, as well as a
line for text messaging.
Students and parents can
also report situations anony-
mously on the districts web-
site, Spivey said.
Huddleston said students
can approach the adminis-
tration in private.
FGC employs a program
called "'Write Me," Hall said.
It allows students to anon-
ymously write down their
concerns on cards that are
supplied in' every building
and mail the card with post-
age paid by the college. Hall
said he receives each card.
"The health and safety of
our students is at the top
of our list of concerns, Hall
said. 'We want to be sure
that students can attend::a
college in a safe, positive
environment and we do
everything we can to make
that situation happen. If' a
student wants or needs help,
we want to work with them
to find that help." '
"Safety in our school dis-
trict is really our number onie
priority," Spivey said. "We
take safety very importantly
and we are constantly work-
ing to provide a safe environ-
ment for our students and
employees."

E IMPORTANT INFORMATION
The FGC security office
can be.reached at (386) 754-
4426 or on its mobile line at
(386) 623-2398.
For the districts anony-
mous Save a Friend hotline,
call 1-866-295-7303. To anon-
ymously report a school dis-'
trict situation by text mes-
sage, text (386) 754-7099.


Put a little lose in someone's heart this Valentine's Day nith the
Lake Ciht Reporter's *Lose Lines.' Make it a special day for those
sou lose b, writing a message to your sweetheart. He'll include it on
our Valentine Lose Line' page on February 13th.
-%'~ ^. l&. *AJ'ta..H ^ A ; Mt i :L't{Si x* ,- -.*'* -*^, A&.lJ .hBllA~L i-^- .!;f-m< ~*-J iLE^t


Roses are red, violets are blue, send Love Lines


to show them that your [ove is true.

The Lake City Reporter
Presents: C


ve


es


Love Line Rates are as follows:
35 WORDS or less for 112.00 Each additional word 15
Add a photo for s3.00

Malachi,
S Tlhk you for loving me 'm
"f i,- 1k tn i lil n < n 1t i u l "'ra tin g th e re t
(- o' I 1 ht i W it:h11 11 11 0 i rt r I 'V
,g hlcbn, tgi 11 -M
Print your message here: Maria


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Mail to: Lake City Reporter, Classited Department
PO Bo 1709, Lake City, FL 32056 ~ 755-5440
ALL ADS MUST BE PAID AT
THE TIME OF PLACEMENT.
DEADLINE IS FEB. 8, 2011

SLake City Reporter
lakectyreporter.:.' m F CI I IN T ,g.aT r


i XAT-&k.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011 7A


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., com.


Today
Friends of the Columbia
County
The 2011 Annual
Meeting of the Friends
of the Columbia County
Public Library is 2 p.m.
today at the Main Library
in downtown Lake City. A
brief business meeting will
be followed by a program,
"An Afternoon With Mark
Twain." Call 758-2101.

Monday
Tae Kwan Do
The Lake City
Recreation Department is
resuming the popular Tae
Kwan Do classes begin-
ning Monday. These class-
es will meet 7 to 8 p.m.
Monday and Wednesday
nights at Teen Town and
are open to anyone ages
8 and above. Teresa and
Jeff Foster, Tae Kwan Do
instructors, will teach all
classes and the cost is
$40 per month. For more
information or to regis-
ter, please call Heyward
Christie at 386-754-3607.


Tuesday
High school reunion
A reunion is being
planned for Baldwin High
School attendees from
1950-1969. The event is
scheduled for June 17
- 19 at the Quality Inn, I-
295 and Commonwealth
Avenue. For more infor-
mation call 904-724-3580
or 904-266-4253 and leave
your name and contact
information or e-mail your
request to lulah@mind-
spring.com.

Volunteers Needed
The Lighthouse Gift
Shop is looking for volun-
teers at all times to help
in the shop located at
Lake City Medical Center.
There are several shifts
available, and a free meal
is provided each time "
worked. Applications are
available at the Gift shop
or the hospital front desk,
or call Linda Butler at 386-
719-9008 for more informa-
tion.


Wednesday
The Gainesville District
Dietetic Association
The Gainesville District
Dietetic Association .:. "',
is meeting 5:30 p.m. i A
Wednesday at Haven
Hospice in Gainesville.- ".
All registered dietitians,
dietetic technicians-reg- .
istered and students are
invited to attend. The
meeting is sponsored
by Yakult and Barnes
Home Health Care. Ana
Rosales, RD, LDN will be ., I
providing a presentation
on "Why Probiotics are 1 .
Important in Nutrition."
Attendees can receive 1.5
CEUs. Please visit www.
eatrightgainesville.org for
more information.
COU
Lake City Newcomers Health and Wellness Fair attracts a crowd
and Friends Regular
Meeting The Richardson Community Center was the site of the annual Health and Wellness
(Znf, ,_.4i, ''l i, h,. l;l r" ,, ,, ,,, -,';',,n nort' ntr DtriDt oRtin Ai; I Lni d 'C ld I ll


The regular meeting of
the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends is 11 a.m.
Wednesday at Quail
Heights Country Club,
on Branford Highway.


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter

American Family Fitness has grand opening
Beth Campbell (from left) and A.J. Yarbrough workout Saturday as Michael Morrison (stand-
ing), a personal trainer at American Family Fitness Center, gives them tips on how to properly
exercise. American Family Fitness Center, 4578 SW Heritage Oak Circle, opened Jan. 5, but
.held a grand opening party from 11 a.m. 4 p.m. Saturday. The facility has free weights, a full
line of cardio equipment, a full line of circuit equipment and offers more than 15 aerobic class-
es a week, including Zumba. "We held the grand opening party to show everyone around and
help the veterans," Morrison said.


RTESY PHOTO


Fair
llE- .,tt


Saturday. Coumbia County ecrea on eparmen ecrea on e
screenings were available for a number of possible ailments.


Luncheon costs $10. The
program for this month
will be Patriot Music by
the Reflections. All mem-
bers, guests and friends
are welcome. For more
information, please call
752-4552 or 755-4051

Thursday
The local Sons of the
American Revolution
The local Sons of the
American Revolution
is joining the Edward
Rutledge Daughters of
the Revolution Chapter
along with the North
Central Florida Regents
Council for a George
Washington Birthday
Celebration Luncheon
11 a.m.Thursday at Quail
Heights Country Club
Registration is 10:30 a.m.
James Montgomery "Mr.
Mont" is the guest speak-
er. The cost of the buffet
lunch is $15 per person.
DAR members are asked
to stay afterwards for a
brief meeting to vote on
several important business
items.

Free Medicaid workshop
Teresa Byrd Morgan
of Morgan Law Center


for Estate & Legacy
Planning is hosting a free
Medicaid workshop 2 p.m.
Thursday in the Lifestyle
Enrichment Center (628
S.E. Allison Court.) The
workshop on Medicaid
planning will discuss the
myths and opportunities
available. Call Shana Miller
at 386-755-1977.

Friday
HSCT production
The High Springs
Community Theater
present "Sherlock's Last
Case," a play by Charles
Marowitz 8 p.m. Friday.
The theater is located in
Historic High Springs at
130 NE First Ave. The play
centers on a death threat
against Sherlock. Holmes
by the supposed son of
his late nemesis Professor
Moriarty. Tickets are
available at The Framery
in Lake City on Baya, 386-
754-2780, at The Coffee
Clutch in High Springs,
386-454-7593, online at
highspringscommunitythe-
ater.com or at the door.
Prices are $11 adults, $8
youth 12 and under; and
Seniors Sunday only $9.


Saturday
Fort Mose trip
The Black History 2011
trip to Fort Mose is leav-
ing 7 a.m. Saturday from
Richardson Community
Center. The event is spon-
sored by It's About My
Efforts. The month-long
theme is "Self Sufficiency
is Key." Visit www. itsabout-
myefforts.org or call 386-
697-6075 for details.

HSCT production
The High Springs
Community Theater
presents "Sherlock's Last
Case," a play by Charles
Marowitz 8 p.m. Saturday.
The theater is located in
Historic High Springs at
130 NE First Ave. The play
centers on a death threat
against Sherlock Holmes
by the supposed son of
his late nemesis Professor
Moriarty. Tickets are
available at The Framery
in Lake City on Baya, 386-
754-2780, at The Coffee
Clutch in High Springs,
386-454-7593, online at
highspringscommunitythe-
ater.com or at the door.
Prices are $11 adults, $8
youth 12 and under; and
Seniors Sunday only $9.


"As the owner of a new business
"Psychic Reading by Jennifer" in
Lake City, Florida, advertising in
the Lake City Reporter has brought
me many clients. I highly recom-
mend that local businesses use the
Reporter for their advertising needs.
You will see results. It Works."


Jnifi-- l-- r
Jennifer Miller


FOR PSYCHIC READING BY JENNIFER

Whether you have a new business or an existing business,
advertising in the Lake City Reporter will bring results.


Find out more by
calling 752-1293.


Vif Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS Magazine


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INSURANCE.]


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427











LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011


THE WEATHER



SCATERE -STORMS SUNNY
SHOWERS


"I H165L047 HI63LO HI58LO -


SCATTERED
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HI 64 LO


SCATTERED
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NATIONAL FORECAST: Areas of snow will develop across the northern Plains today. Snow will
also be possible in portions of the Great Lakes, with a chance of lake effect snow downwind
of Lakes Superior and Michigan. A developing storm system in the southern Plains will bring
rain and snow showers to portions of Texas and Oklahoma.


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62 42
Tallahassee Lake City
62 45 ..' ;
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61 47 Ocala
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61 51

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62' 5


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FtL Lauderdale Panama City
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;7 r.1 Miami Tampa


79 67 Valdosta
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High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


69
59
68
43
86 in 1957
18 in 1996


0.03"
1.38"
5.06"
0.60"
4.11"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


Feb.
11i
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7:18 a.m.
6:12 p.m.
7:17 a.m.
6:12 p.m.


8:55 a.m.
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10:27 p.m.


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Atlanta
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Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
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Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago

Cleveland
Columbia SC
S, Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


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High: 870, Melbourne, Fla. Low: -130, Berlin, N.H.


Saturday, Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
34/19/0
23/9/.23
53/15/0
0/-15/0
45/32/.29
32/14/.07
77/65/0
59/24/0
29/26/.33
45/28/0
70/50/.07
34/8/0
68/45/0
43/23/0
61/47/0
36/30/0
81/71/0
25/14/0
48/34/0
49/32/0
36/31/0
45/12/0


HI/Lo/W CITY
32/13/sn Omaha
31/27/sn Orlando
50/27/pc Philadelphia
1/-31/pc Phoenix
53/32/s Pittsburgh
34/17/pc. Portland ME
80/68/r Portland OR
65/38/pc Raleigh
35/26/sn Rapid City
60/36/pc Reno'
61/51/pc Richmond
35/17/c Sacramento
65/45/pc St. Louis
46/30/sh Salt Lake City
71/51/s San Antonio
50/32/c San Diego
79/67/pc San Francisco
29/12/sf Seattle
60/31/pc Spokane
62/41/pc Tampa
42/29/pc Tucson
37/24/sn Washington


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
36/16/0
81/62/0
35/30/.20
57/36/0
37/26/.09
34/4/.01
50/44/0 .
47/35/.92
42/35/0
54/28/0
45/34/.21
72/36/0
37/25/.20
42/32/0
63/23/0
64/48/0
66/46/0
45/43/.07
44/27/0
72/62/.02
59/29/.20
38/34/.13


HI/Lo/W
30/10/sn
68/58/sh
43/29/pc
70/45/s
36/28/c
37/17/sn
55/41/sh
53/32/s
24/4/sn
59/30/pc
51/33/s
68/42/s
36/27/sn
39/32/rs
61/31/pc
72/53/s
66/49/s
52/44/sh
37/32/is
67/56/pc
68/38/s
48/31/pc


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
32/7/.12
40/19/0
16/8/0
48/37/.09
36/33/.23
44/34/.01
41/33/0
35/30/.18
50/32/0
37/22/0
32/21/.08
63/45/.83
47/34/.10
50/35/.83 -
36/31/0
28/4/0
39/31/.20
32/18/.04
51/39/.49
52/17/0
79/68/.02
40/31/.02


HI/Lo/W CITY
35/16/pc Des Moines
40/14/pc Detroit
21/6/pc BEPaso
54/39/s Fairbanks
45/30/pc Greensboro
29/14/sn Hartford
55/38/pc Honolulu
22/-6/sn Houston
45/31/rs Indianapolis
38/23/pc Jackson MS
31/26/sn Jacksonville
58/43/s Kansas City
44/33/pc Las Vegas
54/33/s Uttle Rock
27/16/sn Los Angeles
31/22/sn Memphis
41/29/c Miami
35/26/c Minneapolis
56/36/s Mobile
41/29/rs New Orleans
62 '57/sh New York
34/23/sf Oklahoma City


CAMPUS CMN VISA Platinum Card


BALANCE TRANSFER SPECIAL


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APR1


Pensacola
57 35


Monday
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YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


I









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakeatyreportercom


SPORTS


Sunday, February 6, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Fort White
sign-up today
Fort White Girls
Softball Association's
spring softball season
registration for ages 6-16
is at the concession stand
in the South Columbia
Sports Complex from
noon to 2 p.m. today,
and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday.
For details, call Jay
Harvey or Lynn Harvey
at 365-2797 or 365-5688.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday
in the teacher's lounge
at the high school.
Nominations for club
officers will be received
at the meeting, for all
members.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.
WOMEN'S SOFTBALL
Board meeting
on Tuesday
Columbia County
Women's Softball has a
board meeting planned
for 6:30 p.m. Tuesday
at the meeting hall next
to the playground at
Southside Recreation
Complex.
For details, call
Casandra Wheeler at
365-216.
ADULT BASEBALL
Men's league
forming in area
The MLBA in North
Florida and South
Georgia would like to
form a team from this
area for the 2011 season.
Age is 55 and younger.
For details, visit
www.leaguelineup.comn/
northfloridamabl.
N From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Lee High in
District 4-5A tournament,
7:30 p.m.
Tuesday
Fort White 'High
boys basketball vs. Santa
Fe High in District 5-3A
tournament at Williston
High, TBA : .
Fort White High
softball at Gainesville
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High
baseball vs. Branford
High in; preseason game
at Suwannee High,
7 p.m.

High in preseason game,
7:30 p.m.
Thursday
Columbia High
softball vs. Ridgeview
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High
baseball in preseason
game at Suwannee High,
7 p.m.
Fort White High
baseball vs. P.K. Yonge
School in preseason
game, 7:30 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
tennis at Suwannee High,
3:30 p.m.
Saturday
Columbia High's
Tiara Robinson-Smith
and Fort White High's
Brett Sealey in state
finals weightlifting at
Kissimmee Civic Center,


10:30 a.m.


Lake City Reporter Publisher Todd Wilson presented Florida State University signee
Timriy Jernigan with the PARADE 2011 All-American High School Football Team certificate
Friday morning at Columbia High School. Pictured are Athletic Director Dennis Dotson (from
left), Assistant Principal Donnie Harrison, Wilson, Jernigan, Principal Terry Huddleston and
head football coach Craig Howard.


Back in the


Clark completes
first year as scout
for Chicago Cubs.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
When Florida
Gateway
College
dropped
sports,
it not only deprived local
baseball fans of a great
product it sent coach Tom
Clark into a tailspin.
"I felt like I had lost my
identity as a man," Clark
*said on Thursday. "I had
always been the player, the
coach. I need to be around
athletics."
Clark continued as a
teacher at the college, but
it was no fun for a man
with 685 college wins in
20 years at Gordon Junior
College in Georgia and
then-named Lake City
Community College.
Before junior college, Clark
had coached baseball and
football in high school in
Michigan and Georgia for.
eight years."
Clark taught another
year at Florida Gateway
College, and volunteered
in football and baseball
at Columbia High to stay
involved in coaching. As
a grandfather, his interest
in the few baseball jobs he
applied for was tempered.
"It was very frustrating,"
Clark said. "Just like

CLARK continued on 2B


Jernigan named

to PARADE All-

American team


CHS senior one
of 53 to receive
national honor.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.comrn
The accolades continue
for Lake City football player
Tim Jernigan.
The Columbia High
senior, whose scholar-
ship signing with Florida
State on Wednesday was
televised live on ESPNU,
achieved more national rec-
ognition by being named
to the PARADE 2011


All-American High School
Football Team.
PARADE Magazine's
48th annual edition of its
All-American team is the
cover story in today's
issue. PARADE magazine
is included each Sunday in
the Lake City Reporter.
Lake City Reporter
Publisher Todd Wilson pre-
sented Jernigan with his
award at CHS on Friday.
"We have been honored
to report on and share this
magical season with Timmy
Jernigan and as a PARADE
JERNIGAN continued on 2B


business


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Chicago Cubs scout Tom Clark shows
off his Cubs' jersey (top) and tries on a
Cubs hat for size (left).


* Williams


expects 'Year


of the Tiger'


COURTESY PHOTO
Members of the 2011 Columbia High softball team are (from left) Peyton Sund,
Keeley Murray, Ashley Blodgett, Kayli Kvistad, Jordan Williams, Jessica Keene,
Michaela Burton, Stephanie Pilkington, Brandi Morgan, Hollianne Dohrn, Lauren Eaker and
Holly Boris.


Columbia coach
looks for CHS to
be in title hunt.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
Columbia High coach
Jimmy Williams has won
89 games with the Lady
Tigers, but he believes he'll
have his best team in 2010.
With an 89-43 record,
Williams has seen his best
softball teams in the past
two seasons since the arriv-
al of this year's junior class.
Those two teams have com-
bined for a 40-15 record.
With the district tourna-


ment set to take place in
Lake City this year, Williams
expects the Lady Tigers to
contend for that title and
maybe more.
"I think we're a final four
team," Williams said. "We
have a group of freshman
four freshman that could be
as good as the ones we got
a few years ago."
The four freshman (Kayli
Kvistad, Hollianne Dohrn,
Brandi Morgan and Lauren
Eaker). will join the junior
class of Peyton Sund,
Jessica Keene, Stephanie
Pilkington and Michaela
Burton on a quest to win
CHS continued on 2B












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Qatar
Masters, final round, at Doha, Qatar
(same-day tape)
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Phoenix Open,
final round, at Scottsdale,Ariz.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Phoenix Open, final
round, at Scottsdale,Ariz.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
I p.m.
CBS Michigan St. at Wisconsin
2 p.m.
ESPN Ohio St. at Minnesota
FSN Florida St. at North Carolina
NBA BASKETBALL
2:30 p.m.
ABC Orlando at Boston
NFL FOOTBALL
6 p.m.
FOX Super Bowl XLV. Pittsburgh
vs. Green Bay, at Arlington,Texas
NHL HOCKEY
12:30 p.m.
NBC Pittsburgh at Washington
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
4 p.m.
FSN UCLA at Southern Cal
Monday
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Pittsburgh atWestVirginia
9 p.m.
ESPN Missouri at Kansas
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS N.Y. Rangers at Detroit
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Duke at North Carolina
9 p.m.
ESPN2 -Tennessee at Kentucky

FOOTBALL

Super Bowl


Today
At Arlington,Texas
Pittsburgh vs. Green
(FOX)


Bay, 6:30


p.m.


Super Bowl lineups
Green Bay Packers
Offense
WR 85 Greg Jennings; 87 Jordy
Nelson; 16 Brett Swain
LT -74 Chad Clifton; 70 T.J. Lang
LG 73 Daryn Colledge; 70 T.J. Lang;,
62 Evan Dietrich-Smith
C 63 .ScottWells; 72 Jason Spitz; 67
Nick McDonald
RG 71 Josh Sitton; 70 T.J. Lang; 67
Nick McDonald
RT 70 T.J. Lang; 75 Bryan Bulaga
TE 84 Andrew Quarless; 83 Tom
Crabtree; 86 Donald Lee
WR 80 Donald Driver; 89 James
Jones; 16 Brett Swain
QB -' 12 Aaron Rodgers; 10 Matt
Flynn; 6 Graham Harrell
RB 32 Brandon Jackson; 30 John
Kuhn; 44 James Starks; 23 Dimitri Nance


FB 35 Korey Hall; 45 Quinn
Johnson; 30 John Kuhn
Defense
LDE 79 Ryan Pickett; 98 C.J.
Wilson
NT 90 B.J. Raji; 79 Ryan Pickett; 95
Howard Green
RDE 77 Cullen Jenkins; 95 Howard
Green; 94 Jarius Wynn
LOLB 52 Clay Matthews; 53 Diyral
Briggs,
LILB 50 A.J. Hawk; 57 Matt
Wilhelm
RILB 55 Desmond Bishop; 49
Robert Francois
ROLB 93 Erik Walden; 58 Frank'
Zombo; 49 Robert Francois
LCB 21 Charlds Woodson; 37 Sam
Shields; 28 Brandon Underwood
RCB 38 Tramon Williams; 22 Pat
Lee; 40 Josh Gordy
SS -- 26 Charlie Peprah; 20 Atari
Bigby
FS 36 Nick Collins; 24 Jarrett Bush
Special Teams
K 2 Mason Crosby; 8 Tim Masthay
P 8 Tim Masthay
H 8 Tim Masthay; 10 Matt Flynn
PR 38 Tramon Williams; 85 Greg
Jennings; 87 Jordy Nelson
KR 37 Sam Shields; 44 James Starks;
22 Pat Lee
LS 61 Brett Goode; 71 Josh Sitton
Pittsburgh Steelers
Offense
WRI 86 Hines Ward; 82 Antwaan
Randle El; 84 Antonio Brown
LT 72 Jonathan Scott; 66 Tony Hills
LG 68 Chris Kemoeatu; 79 Trai
Essex
C 53 Maurkice Pouncey; 64 Doug
Legursky
RG 73 Ramon Foster; 79 Trai
Essex
RT 71 Flozell Adams; 61 Chris
Scott
TE-83 Heath Miller; 89 MattSpaeth;
85 David Johnson
RB 34 Rashard Mendenhall; 21
Mewelde Moore; 33 Isaac Redman; 27
Jonathan Dwyer
FB 85 David Johnson
QB 7 Ben Roethlisberger; 4 Byron
Leftwich; 16 Charlie Batch
WR2 17 Mike Wallace; 88
Emmanuel Sanders; 81 Arnaz Battle
Defense
LDE 96 Ziggy Hood; 91 Aaron
Smith
NT 98 Casey Hampton; 76 Chris
Hoke; 69 Steve McLendon
RDE 9 Brett Keisel; 93 Nick
Eason
LOLB 56 LaMarr Woodley; 97
Jason Worilds -
LILB 51 James Farrior; 57 Keyaron
Fox
RILB 94 Lawrence Timmons; 50
Larry Foote; 55 Stevenson Sylvester
ROLB 92 James Harrison
LCB 20 Bryant McFadden; 37
Anthony Madison; 23 Keenan Lewis .
FS --25 Ryan Clark; 29 Ryan Mundy
SS 43 Troy Polamalu; 26 Will Allen
RCB 24 Ike Taylor; 22 William Gay;
28 Crezdon Butler Special Teams
P 13 jeremy Kapinos
K 6 Shaun Suisham ,
LS 60 Greg Warren; 72 Jonathan
Scott; 92 James Harrison
H 13 Jeremy Kapinos; 82 Antwaan
Randle El
KR 84 Antonio Brown; 88
Emmanuel Sanders; 21 Mewelde Moore
PR 84 Antonio Brown; 82 Antwaan
Randle El; 21 Mewelde Moore


NFL Rookie of the Year
NEW YORK Voting for the 2010
NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year select-
ed by The Associated Press in balloting by a
nationwide panel of the media:
Sam Bradford, QB, St. Louis 44
Mike Williams,WR,Tampa Bay 4
Maurkice Pouncey, C, Pittsburgh 2
NEW YORK -Voting for the 2010.
NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year select-
ed by The Associated Press in balloting by a
nationwide panel of the media:
Ndamukong Suh, DT, Detroit 48
Devin McCourty, CB, New England 2

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Saturday's Games
Dallas at Charlotte
Atlanta at Washington
Portland at Cleveland
L.A. Lakers at New Orleans
Memphis at Houston (n)
Detroit at Milwaukee (n)
Denver at Minnesota (n)
Oklahoma City at Utah (n)
Chicago at Golden State (n)
Today's Games
LA. Clippers at Miami, 12 p.m.
Indiana at New Jersey, 12 p.m.
Philadelphia at New York, 12 p.m.
Orlando at Boston, 2:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Boston at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Portland, 10 p.m.
Utah at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Phoenix at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. I Ohio State at No. 18 Minnesota,
2 p.m.
No. 9 Notre Dame vs. Rutgers, Noon
No. 19 Wisconsin vs. Michigan State,
I p.m.
No. 23 North Carolina vs. Florida
State, 2 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Today's Games
San Jose 2, Boston 0
Montreal 2, N.Y. Rangers 0.
Anaheim 3 Colorado 0
Buffalo 6,Toronto 2
N.Y. Islanders 5, Ottawa 3
Philadelphia 3, Dallas I
Carolina 4,Atlanta 3, OT
Columbus 4, Edmonton 3
Nashville 3, Detroit 0
Phoenix I, Minnesota 0
Los Angeles at Calgary (n)
Today's Games
Pittsburgh at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Montreal, 3 p.m.
St. Louis atTampa Bay, 3 p.m.
Monday's Games
Atlanta at Toronto, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Colorado at Phoenix, 9:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Vancouver, 10 p.m.


CLARK: Works for Cubs organization


SCOREBOARD


Continued From Page
anybody else, I was out
of a job. I didn't want to
go very far away just to
take something else. I
wanted it to be the right
situation."
The right situation
presented itself and Clark
was perfect for the job.
Clark signed on
as an area scout for
the Chicago Cubs in
November 2009. Clark
said Keith Stohr left the
job to become a pro scout
and it was left vacant for a
year while the sale bf the
Cubs was under way.
Tim Wilken, Scouting
Director for the Cubs, and
East Coast Supervisor
(cross checker) Charlie
Aliano knew Clark 54
of his players had been
drafted and gave him
the job.
"I recommend players
and paint a picture for the
club as to what the player
looks like and plays like,"
Clark said. Typically, I
will watch a kid 3-6 times
and send in a weekly
report on each player
and an injury update. I
grade their strengths and
weaknesses and compare
them to current or former
major leaguers."
During the spring, Clark
attends high school, NAIA,
junior college and Division
I games. During the
summer he has six minor
league teams he visits
for five-day stints. His
territory is North Florida,
from coast to coast and
south to State Road 44,
and all of Alabama.
"I go,to showcases and
scout days and create a
follow list," Clark said.
"There are now 85 players
to try and see, then create
a preference list to rank
them. If they are drafted,
it is my job to sign them.
With the minor league
teams, you write up every
single player and prep
them. That is how trades
are made."
Clark had a major
success his first year with
the signing of Reggie
Golden of Wetumpka /
(Ala.) High, who was
drafted in the second
round. His comparison
of Golden was "a small


Bo Jackson." Clark also
had signing with eighth-
rounder Cam Greathouse
of Gulf Coast College and
23rd-rounder Matt Loosen
of Jacksonville University.
A catch like Golden
brings some perks and he
and Clark were invited to
Wrigley Field to meet the
team.and watch a couple
of games. The opponent
happened to be rival St.
Louis and Clark saw Albert
Pujols, Mark McGwire and
all the Cardinals.
Clark had an even
bigger treat while walking
the halls of the clubhouse.
Ernie Banks was visiting
and Clark asked to meet
him. Banks spent 15
minutes regaling his
guest with' stories. Clark
departed with a tribute
to Mr. Cub, using Banks',
famous "Let's play.two"
call to arms.
'"The whole weekend
was a thrill for me," Clark
said. "I was happier than
Reggie was. It is a thrill
for me to be back in the
game, and working for
the Cubs is a dream come


true. They are a great
organization from the
owners on down."
Clark is already on
the road the season. He
logged 40,000 miles on
his car last year and spent
135 nights in motels.
Despite getting paid to
watch baseball games,
the work is hard and the
responsibilities great. He
wouldn't have it any other
way.
"I believe a man has to
have a passion for what
he does and my passion
is baseball and athletics,"
Clark said. "That is what I
have to be around."








0 N L I N ijE
a,


JERNIGAN: Named All-American
Continued From Page 1B


magazine partner, we're
honored to present his All-
American award," Wilson
said. '"We are proud of his
accomplishments as a Tiger
and we look forward to the
excitement he will bring
to the Seminoles. We wish
him the best of luck at the
college level."
Kendyll Pope is the only
other Columbia player to
be named to the PARADE
All-American High School
Football Team. C.J. Spiller
of Union County High was
an honoree in 2006. This is
the third time the Lake City
Reporter has been a pre-
senter in its coverage area.
Jernigan paid tribute to
family and former coaches
upon accepting the award.
"Once again the Lord has
blessed me," Jernigan said.
"My family has raised me
well my mama, daddy
arid uncles. I feel like God
has picked me to represent


my community, school and
family. I plan to do a great
job."
Columbia coach Craig
Howard joined the presen-
tation.
"It is a culmination of
events," Howard said. "A
day after signing, Timmy
gets another award. He is
very deserving. Not only
does this honor him, but
Columbia High and Lake
City. It puts us on the map. I
am proud of him.. His future
looks bright."
Howard was one of-sev-
eral head coaches Jernigan
thanked, going back to
Little League Football days.
He included coaches Danny
Green, Doug David, Donnie
Thomas and Jeff Tyre.
"I have been around great
coaches," Jernigan said. "I
feel like I was in the right
place at the right time. My
whole career, coaches have
done so much for me."


Athletic Director Dennis
Dotson is a coach that
saw Jernigan up close as
Columbia's defensive coor-
dinator.
"It is a great honor, not
only for Tim, but the high
school and community,"
Dotson said. "He was one
. of the most productive play-
ers at CHS. He follows a
long list of great athletes
at Columbia High. It seems
like they all go to Florida
State and we wish him the
best at FSU."
Principal Terry
Huddleston was pleased for
his student and his school.
"It is another great honor
for Timmy and it is great
to have Columbia High
mentioned in PARADE,"
Huddleston said. "I read the-
All-American team every
year and am tickled to
death to have Timmy listed
as a PARADE All-American
recipient."


CHS: Softball expected to contend


Continued From Page 1B
a district tournament after
being upset by Middleburg
in last year's playoffs.
"The group understands
what it means to be a team,"
Williams said. "They're will-
ing to give up their time to
make the us better. It's a
different atmosphere this
year. We have chemistry."
With only one senior, the
Lady Tigers lack a lot of
experience, but Williams
believes that Columbia
has a coach on the field in
Jordan Williams.
"She's kind of the mom
of the team," Williams said.
"The girls respect her.


She's definitely a coach's
daughter in that she knows
the game and strategy. She
does all the little things that
people don't notice."
Williams will fill in on
the mound when Keene's
arm tires, but the starters'
arm is expected to carry
Columbia.
"Jessica gets better every
year," Williams said. "She's
added another pitch, so she
now has the drop, change
and curve."
The Lady Tigers also
pack a punch at the plate
with a lineup that goes top
to bottom. Williams expects


ACROSS

1 Zodiac sign
4 Ketch cousin
8 Deep water
11 Goddess' statue
13 Fix typos
14 ICU units
15 Ottoman
title
16 Shoals
18 Liberate
20 - for one's
money
21 Maybes
22 Toss
24 Cowboy show
27 Films on cas-
sette
30 Love, to Pablo
31 Cry of fright
32 Gunk
34 Gift for Dad
35 Clothing cate-
gory
36 Willowy
37 Attributes
39 Coal and
kerosene


40 Prefix for form
41 "Big Blue"
42 Allot
45 Vitamin B com-
ponent
49 Banisters
53 Morse inven-
tion
54 Codgers'
queries
55 Deal with it
56 Fodder storage
57 Kind of
reaction
58 Q.E.D. part
59 Boggy ground

DOWN

1 Fibber, plus
2 Perimeter
3 Appreciative
sighs
4 Da and oui
5 Oklahoma town
6 Triumph
7 Corporate abbr.
8 Lasting impres-
sion


Answer to Previous Puzzle

UM AIRT F0LIK
N NU FRE EENW
RISK EST LUS
X ENON ELS
ER ABO
PILED LE WA1Y
UTA STAR SLOW
SPEND IONS AWE
MAYANS PAILS
EG0G URIL
CU JO TAMED
TORO BAT ISTES
SLAB AMEN NAG
EELS APR AFT


9 Pantyhose
shade
10 Org.
12 More frilly
17 Legendary ox.
19 Pilot's sighting


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


the freshman group to add
to the squad with their abil-
ity to hit for power.
"I fully expect five or six
girls to hit home runs this
year," he said. "Kvistad and
Pilkington will have a cou-
ple of the top bats in the
area. We can manufacture
runs if we have to as well." .
With 24 games on the
schedule, the Lady Tigers
will have to find a way to win
the close ones if Columbia is
going to reach Williams' goal
of 20 wins. The season begins
against Ridgeview High in a
district game at 7 p.m. on
Thursday in Lake City.


22 Facial features
23 Type of poem
24 Wharf denizen
25 Skip
26 Active sort
27 French wines
28 Gawk at
29 Muddy up
31 Sasquatch
cousin
33 Mantra chants
35 Max opposite
36 Wild shrubs
38 Novelist Jean
39 Hoover's org.
41 Map within a
map
42 Remnant
43 Molokai neigh-
bor
44 Shopper's
guide
46 Hair style
47 Unfounded, as
rumors
48 Garish sign
50 Swelling
reducer
51 Mail-motto
word
52 Student stat


2011 by UFS, Inc.


COURTESY PHOTO
Tom Clark took this cell picture of himself with Chicago Cubs
Mr. Baseball Ernie Banks. Banks spent 15 minutes regaling
his guest with stories. Clark departed with a tribute to
Mr. Cub, using Banks' famous "Let's play two" call to arms.
"The whole weekend was a thrill for me," Clark said.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER WRESTLING SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011


Alien, Schreiber



claim district



titles for CHS


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comrn

Columbia High placed
third in the District 2-2A
wrestling tournament
on Saturday in Lake City
due to the finish of two
champions.
Cole Shreiber (103)
defeated Lincoln High's
Resean McArthur, 12-1, to
claim the Tigers' first cham-
pionship of the day.
Monternces Allen (189)
was also victorious in his
weight class with a 9-3
decision against Ed White
High's Jaylen Lee.
Two wrestlers from
Columbia finished second
in their respective weight
classes.
Daniel Graham (145) fell
to Gregorio SanGregorio of
Chiles High in an 11-8 deci-
sion. Cody Woolam (171)
defeated Joseph Fields in
a tightly-contested match
that came down to a 7-6
decision.
Columbia also had


two wrestlers .finish: in
third place after taking.
home their consolation
matches.
Isaac Henderson (152)
defeated Kenneth Barber
of Lincoln High by pin at
1:39. Daniel Devers (160)
followed it up with a pin
of his own against Paxon
High's Douglas Bennett.
Other individual winners
by weight class include:
Vinson Demps (112)
- Lincoln
Jonathan Danforth
(119) -.Chiles
Triston Nerland (130)
- Lincoln
Tyler Nerland (130)
- Lincoln
TJ. Alexander (135)
- Leon
Connor Funderburke
(140) Lincoln
Akeem Mahone (152)
- Forrest High
Joshua Coleman (171)
- Lincoln
Joshua Gilmore (215)
- Lincoln
Kaleb Johnson (285)


- Ed White
Consolation


winners


include:
BrandonNguyen (103)
- Chiles
Bailey Westbrook (112)
- Ed White
Alex Driver (119) -
Lincoln
Armond Holmes (125)
- Robert E. Lee High
Joshua Bell-Calloway
(130) Leon
Dakota Cantrell (135)
- Chiles
Jordan Ross (140) -
Chiles
Javonte Johnson (145)
- Lincoln
Benjamin Baker (171)
- Paxon
Marc Lollie (189) -
Lincoln
Robert Parland (215)
- Ed White
Justin Lott (285) -
Lincoln
Lincoln won the overall
championship with a score
of 239. Chiles was second
at 154.50 and Columbia fin-
ished third at 107.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Monternces Allen (left) grapples for position against Ed White High's
Jaylen Lee during the 189-pound championship in the District 2-2A wrestling championship on
Saturday in Lake City. Allen won the championship 9-3.


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BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Joseph Fields (bottom) attempts to escape a
hold by Lincoln High's Cody Woolam during the District 2-2A
wrestling championship on Saturday in Lake City. Woolam
won a decision, 7-6, to take the 103-pound weight class.


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Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
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E N E K G I'H R M R U I Z 0 I
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CALL JUNK JOE I Find all 24 of the 'Heart'related words hidden in the word search above.
C L UN O .. I Words can be found in the banners on the ads shown here. Complete the
#We .Pal puzzle and return it to the Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval Street, Lake

icensd Ao in hLake City Reporter
e.. .a I lakecityreporter.com n CURRENTS magazine
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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011


Roethlisberger's

biggest asset is

ability to extend


By JIM UTKE
Associated Press


DALLAS After seven
seasons and enough
trouble to derail most
careers twice that long,
Ben Roethlisberger still
does one thing better thni
anyone who ever stepped
between the white lines: He
extends plays.
It's a gift that's hard to
quantify, but easy to marvel
at, just one manifestation
of a stubborn streak a mile
long that goes to the core of
who Roethlisberger is, not
just as a quarterback, but as
a man. Time after time, at
that moment in a play when
all seems lost, he emerg-
es from a swarm of angry
defenders like a drowning
man breaking the surface,
eyes locked on the horizon
and the football defiantly
still in his grasp.
Roethlisberger ducks
beneath some would-be
tacklers and shakes off oth-
ers, sometimes with seem-
ingly no more effort than it
takes to free a coat snagged
by a door handle. Every so
often, though, he absorbs
the full brunt of the col-
lision and careens toward
the next one, like a pinball.
"I don't know where a lot of
things I do came from. I just
think it's playing the game,"
Roethlisberger said earlier
this week. "It's not like, obvi-
ously, you do drills where you
practice 'things like that.
"A lot of things, I think,
it's just having that clock
that goes off in your head
and says, 'It's time to get
out of here, get out of the
pocket run, scramble, do
what you got to do."
It's never as easy as that,
though.
"He's so dang big and
strong," said John Elway, one
of the best ever at the position
and a pretty fair escape artist
himself, "that I can't think of
another quarterback that was
harder to bring down."
It's no coincidence
that Roethlisberger still
wears No. 7 in honor of


his boyhood hero, even if
their career arcs couldn't
be much more different.
Elway lost the first three
Super Bowls he went to and
eight years after the last of
those, won two in a row.
Roethlisberger became the
youngest quarterback to
win the NFL's biggest game
in only his second season,
then did it again just two
seasons later.
A third win would give
Roethlisberger entree into
an exclusive class that
includes Troy Aikman and
Tom Brady. Terry Bradshaw
and Joe Montana are the
only QBs to win four.
"I'm the wrong guy to ask
whether it's better to win
them early or late," Elway
said. "I was just thrilled
I got there and won one
before I ran out of gas.
"But I'll say this: What
Ben better watch out for is
never to take those things
for granted. No matter how
hot your team looks, things
can turn around in a hurry,"
he added. "Then it can seem
like forever before you get
back."
Yet the obstacles strewn
in Roethlisberger's path
along the way to his third
Super Bowl this Sunday
'.against the Green Bay
Packers had nothing to do
with his teammates. He put
those there himself.
"When you're faced with
challenges in life you find
ways to try to overcome
them," Roethlisberger said.
"Just like when there were
doubters and naysayers that
challenged me in a football
sense. It challenges me to
rise above."
He almost didn't get the
chance. Following a booze-
fueled birthday outing with
several teammates last
March, Roethlisberger was
hit with a second allega-
tion of sexual misconduct in
less than two years. Though
neither incident resulted
in charges, Commissioner
Roger Goodell slapped
him with a four-game
suspension.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 23 file photo, Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger (right) avoids New York Jets linebacker Josh
Mauga during the second' half of the AFC Championship game in Pittsburgh. The thing Roethlisberger does better than
just about any quarterback ever is hard to quantify, but easy to marvel at: He extends the play. Whether it requires ducking
beneath an defender's outstretched arms, slipping from the grasp or simply pinballing from collision to collision, nobody does
it better.


8th


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FIOSRIDA HO.


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"Movi

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Sanders, Faulk

make football

Hall of Fame


OF LAKE (CITY







mG


7


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press
DALLAS Deion
Sanders and Marshall Faulk
lead a class of seven voted
into the Pro Football Hall of
Fame on Saturday.
Joining them are Shannon
Sharpe, Richard Dent, Ed
Sabol, Les Richter and
Chris Hanburger.
Sanders, the outstanding
cornerback/kick returned
and sometime wide receiv-
er known as "Prime Time"
with five teams, is a two-
time Super Bowl winner
and Defensive Player of the
Year in 1994.
Faulk won a Super Bowl


with the 1999 Rams, was
the 1994 Offensive Rookie
of the Year, 2000 NFL MVP
and a three-time Offensive
Player of the Year (1999-
2001).
Sharpe heldleague records
for a tight end in receptions,
yards and touchdowns when
he retired in 2001.
Bears defensive end Dent
was the MVP of the 1986
Super Bowl and finished
with 137'/2 career sacks.
Richter played nine sea-
sons as a linebacker for
the Rams and Hanburger
spent 14 seasons with the
Redskins.
Sabol founded NFL
Films.


FREE TO THE PUBLIC


8th- Annual

Columbia County Fairgrounds
NORTH FLORIDA
Saturday, March 5th
E9 a.m. 5 p.m.

SHOW I Sunday, March 6th

.- "'"lrmbv I I10 a.m. 4 p.m.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gators survive Kentucky
Florida's Scottie Wilbekin (5) and Kenny Boynton (1) try to
get possession of the ball carried by Kentucky's Brandon
Knight (12) in Gainesville on Saturday. No. 23 Florida beat
No. 11 Kentucky, 70-68, for its second-consecutive win over a
top 25 team.


Lake City Reporter
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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
crisak@akecityreportercom


BUSINESS


Sunday, February 6, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


County sets sights on battle's economic impact


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia
County will
be busy with
activity from
the 33rd
Annual Olustee Battle
Festival and 35th Olustee
Battle Re-enactment in just
a couple of weeks.
"It's grown into one of
the premier festivals in
the.state and southeast,"
said Harvey Campbell,
executive director of the
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council.
Studies from Florida
State University and the
University of Florida have
indicated the financial
impact in direct spending
is in excess of $4 million
from the two events, he
said.
"It's the single biggest
event in terms of bringing
people from outside the
community," Campbell
said.
As many as 60,000
people attend the festival
and reenactment each
year, he said. People come
from allbover the state as
far as Mississippi, Maine
or Illinois.
Re-enactors and attend-
ees start arriving in town
as early as the weekend
before.
"They affect every facet
of the business community
here," Campbell said.
There is a loyal follow-
ing of more than 2,000 re-
enactors each year at the
festival.
"I've heard a re-enac-


FILE PHOTO


Fort White resident Alexi Hodson (left) and her mother, Laurie, gaze into displays of
Himalayan salt lamps at the Olustee Festival in downtown Lake City.


tor refer to Olustee as the
Super Bowl of Re-enact-
ments," he said. "It's cer-
tainly extremely flattering
to have it viewed in that
light."
Most of the hotels are
filled the whole weekend
in Columbia County, said
Faye Bowling-Warren,
executive director of
the Blue Grey Army
Olustee Battle Festival.
Restaurants, gas stations


and other businesses reap
the rewards of all the visi-
tors..
Some re-enactors and
attendees are regulars at
the event, she said.
Bowling-Warren said
she gets calls during the
year from across the state
of people asking about
the festival.
"Many of the people
have never been to Lake
City before and want to


know the best way to get
here," she said. "I know
we have new people com-
ing in every year."
The festival features
more than 130 arts and
crafts booths and more
than 20 food vendors.
'That brings a lot of
people into the communi-
ty," Bowling-Warren said.
There are people in the
state that follow festivals
on a regular basis, she


FILE PHOTO
Country Newbern (left) and Marc LaMonte unload some art-
work on a sidewalk alongside Marion Avenue while setting up
for the Olustee Festival last year.



"I've heard a re-enactor refer
to Olustee as the Super Bowl
of Re-enactments. It's certainly
extremely flattering to have it
viewed in that light."

Harvey Campbell
Executive director
Columbia County Tourist Development Council


said.
Tourists attend the
events to learn of the his-
tory and heritage of the
community.
"We haven't forgotten
it," she said. "We don't
want to glorify it, but we
want to recognize it and
keep it going."
Weather has included
cold and rainy conditions
on both days in the past,


but "We're hoping God
shines on us in a good
way and we have a good
weekend and are able
to perform the activities
we've planned for the
public," Bowling-Warren
said.
"We encourage people
to come downtown and
enjoy the festival," she
said. "Enjoy the whole
weekend."


More

Possibilities.




Same

Hometown Commitment.


We're proud to be part of the TD Bank family. Backed by one of
the safest and strongest banks in North America.


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SAFE


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www.bankmercantile.com


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mr;,, FDIC Mercantile Bank is a trade name of TD Bank, N.A. TD Bank Group is a trade name for The Toronto-Dominion Bank. Used with permission. For detailed
credit ratings for The Toronto-Dominion Bank and TD Bank, NA. visit https://www.td.com/investorlcredit.jsp. Credit Ratings are not recommendations to purchase,
sell, or hold a financial obligation inasmuch as they do not comment on market price or suitability for a particular investor. Ratings are subject to revision or
withdrawal at any time by the rating organization.


--I








LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011


ABCs of CEOs
and COOs
QWhat do a company's CEO
and COO actually do? -
EM, Sioux City, Iowa
A It varies somewhat from
company to company, but in a
nutshell, the chief executive officer
(CEO) of a corporation with a board
of directors is responsible for seeing
that the strategy of the board is car-
ried out, The president and chief
operating officer (COO), who are
often the same person at many
companies, are responsible for
executing the strategy.
A CEO typically focuses on
overall strategy, communicating
with the media, employees, share-
holders and customers. She'll spend
a lot of time networking or negotiat-
ing with other companies' execu-
tives, meeting with financial part-
ners, and trying to get the public
and investors interested in the com-
pany and confident about its future.
Meanwhile, the COO/president
manages the day-to-day operations.
He'll deal with consultants, cus-
tomers, and employees in sales,
marketing, finance and more. He and
the CEO will work with the CFO
(chief financial officer) to make sure
the firm is financially healthy.

QHow can I track my portfolio
online, and should I? K.P.,
Hickory, N.C.
A Yes, you should. Doing so
can help you spot big gains
or trouble quickly. Many online
services, such as AOL or Yahoo!,
Finance, offer portfolio tracking.
At such sites, you can enter the
various stocks and funds you own,
the prices at which you bought
them, and the purchase dates and
commission costs as well.
From then on, you can check in
any time to see the latest value of
your individual holdings, as well as
your overall portfolio. Your broker-
age's website should also show your
holdings. You can even track stocks
on your watch list by adding them to
.a fictional online portfolio
-*^Gotarquestion-for4he Fool? Send i i ,
se Write to Us
.t.- -2'.- ,'1 e.., L,.; Dp I a ,


Allocating Your Assets
We all allocate our assets,
between categories such as stocks,
bonds and cash. The theory is that
diversification will protect us:
When one segment falls, another
may rise. By diversifying, you min-
imize your downside risk while
achieving necessary growth.
As each category grows at a dif-
ferent rate, your allocation mix will
shift. Thus, it's smart to periodically
rebalance your investments to
restore your desired proportions.
How much should you park in
each category? Well, con-
ventional wisdom long -_
held that you should sub-
tract your age from 100
and devote that portion to stocks.
So a 50-year-old would have 50
percent of her portfolio in stocks
and a 70-year-old only 30 percent.
As people started living longer,
the number to subtract from
became 110. Some studies suggest
that a 60-40 stock-bond mix is a
good ratio in retirement.
But there's no formula that's right
for everyone. Assess your own situ-
ation carefully to determine your


best allocation mix one that will
allow you to sleep well at night
while still generating the income
and portfolio growth required for
the rest of your life.
It can be helpful to jot down how
much you have, how quickly you
expect your nest egg to grow
invested in your various options,
how much you want to withdraw
each year, and how long your
money needs to last. Know that the
stock market has averaged a gain of
about 7 or so percent annually over
many decades, adjusted for infla-
tion, while fairly conservative bonds
have offered up to about 3 percent.
Cash, though, actually loses value
over time, owing to inflation.
Figure out which mix fits your
risk tolerance for losing money yet
still achieves your objectives (such
as growth and income). A major
factor to consider is your desired
withdrawal rate from your portfolio,
a topic we'll cover next week.
A financial planner, ideally fee-
based and not commission-based,
can help you with this. You can find
some at www.napfa.org. Meanwhile,
learn more about retirement invest-
ing at www.fool.com/retirement/
index.aspx and
http://money.cnn.com/retirement.


Not Too Late
Back in 1981, my wife
convinced me that we should
invest in an aggressive mutual
fund that her parents had
made a lot of money in ,
over many years. It had
provided them with.both
income and growth. We invested
$6,200 and it started growing. I
considered selling to realize the
profit, but decided to just let it
ride. Over the next 18 years, we
got $12,500 out of it, and the
investment was still worth around
$9,000, well above our initial
investment. This shows that you
don't have to get into a great
investment at the beginning. -
K.T., Worthington, Ohio
The Fool Responds: That's
very true. With both stocks and
funds, many solid performers
can reward investors over many
decades. Some companies may
run into trouble, though, such as
when new competitors or tech-
nologies emerge. And funds may
lose talented managers over time,
or those managers may lose their
tnoc.h It's imnnrtant tn oketn an


'The Motley Fool'

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


eye on your investments to make ian fare tothe mainstream and adopt-
Name That Company : sure they still seem promising. ing animal welfare ratings for meat
,, .,/,' \ You want your money invested in suppliers. Conventional grocers have
y '.' Based in North Carolina and the best ideas you can find. now begun to offer similar labeling
f at their own meat counters.
With a production capacity top- Do you have an embarrassing The grocery segment is a low-
1 ping 26 million tons, I'm America's lesson learned the hard way? margin, highly competitive corner
S..w. of retail. In general, investors
,,/ largest steel producer, its largest Boil it down to 100 words (or should shop elsewhere for healthy
scrap processor and North Amer- less) andsend it to The Motley Fool o My profit growth. But thanks to its
: Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? innovations, Whole Foods, a "Mot-
ica's largest recycler. I operate Harris : Submit to My Smartest Investment. Ifwe ley Fool Stock Advisor"recommen-
Steel and David J. Joseph, as well. i print yours, you'll win a Fool's cap! dation, is well worth considering.
While other steelmakers have clung LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER '
Sto expensive traditional integrated steel I was created in 1971 by a fellow who wrote a college term paper on
mills, I've succeeded with electric arc fur- overnight delivery. Based in Memphis, Tenn., today I rake in about $35
naces and mini-mills. I have been one of the billion annually. I set up my. first drop box in 1975 and introduced the
Overnight Letter in 1981. I bought Kinko's in 2004. In 2003,1 I delivered
most profitable companies in my industry, more than 400,000 copies of the latest Harry Potter book in a single
,- turning scrap into structural steel, steel bars, day. I have transported giant pandas, sea turtle eggs and parts of the
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you'll be entered into a drawing for a nifty prize! Motley Fool. Sorry, we can't provide individual financial advice.
2011 THE MOrLEY FOOL/DIST. BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK (FOR RELEASE 2/3/2011)


Facebook founder got computer exposure early


By BETH J. HARPAZ
Associated Press
NEW YORK Mark
Zuckerberg's father said in a
radio interview Friday that an
early exposure to computers
inspired his son's interest in
technology, and he encour-
aged parents to support their
children's strengths and pas-
sions with a balance of "work
and play."
"My kids all grew up around
the office and were all exposed
to computers," said Dr. Edward
Zuckerberg, a dentist. "There
are advantages to being exposed
to computers early on. That cer-
tainly enriched Mark's interest
in technology."
Zuckerberg said he computer-
ized his offices in 1985. His son


Mark Zuckerberg, cofounder
and CEO of Facebook, was
born in 1984 and was raised in
the house where his father's
dental offices are located in
Dobbs Ferry, N.Y., in suburban
Westchester.
The dentist spoke for an hour
on Westchester station WVOX
in an interview with Paul Feiner,
supervisor of Greenburgh.
Dobbs Ferry is a village in the
town of Greenburgh.
The dentist said his own com-
puter science background was
"limited" he majored in biol-
ogy in college but he said
he's "always been techniologi-
cally oriented in the office" and
"always had the latest high-tech
toys," including an early Atari
800.
"It came with a disk for pro-


gramming," he said. "I thought
Mark might be.interested and
I imparted that knowledge to
him. From there it took off."
He said Mark got a book on
programming, but "ultimately
his ability to program was self-
taught."
Feiner and a number of call-,
ers to the live radio program
asked Zuckerberg for advice on
parenting.
"Probably the best thing I
can say is something that my
wife and I have always believed
in," he said. "Rather than
impose upon your kids or try
and steer their lives in a certain
direction, to recognize what
their strengths are and support
their strengths and support
the development of the things
they're passionate about."


AUECuIAI Eu rE,
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg talks about the social network site's
new privacy settings in Palo Alto, Calif., in this May 26, 2010, file photo,
Dr. Ed Zuckerberg, father of Mark Zuckerberg, said in a radio interview-
that Mark's early exposure to computers helped inspire his interest and
expertise in technology.


Survey

conflicts

with labor

numbers

WASHINGTON The
unemployment rate is sink-
ing at the fastest pace in half
a century because a surpris-
ingly large number of people
said they're finding work.
The decline conflicts with
a survey of businesses that
showed weak job growth
last month. But that sur-
vey doesn't count the self-
employed and likely under-
counts the nation's small-
est businesses. Also, harsh
weather disrupted business
payrolls in January. The
unemployment rate dropped
sharply last month to 9 per- '
cent, based on a government 4'
survey that found that more ASSOCIATED PRESS
thana hlf-mllin pepleASSOCIATED PRESS
than a half-rsmillion people Jorge Garcia waits for.work at the Day Worker Center
found work. A separate Labor
Department survey of cor- r'of Mountain View in Mountain View, Calif. in this Feb. 1
Department survey of com-
pany payrolls showed 36,000 photo. The unemployment rate dropped sharply last month
net jobs created. to 9 percent, the lowest level in nearly two years, but the
0 Associated Press economy generated only 36,000 net new jobs.


Clay Electric trustees


approve $5 million


Capital Credits refund


KEYSTONE HEIGHTS,
Fla. Clay Electric
Cooperative's board of
trustees has announced a
$5 million Capital Credits
refund to entitled members
of the co-op who received
service between 1986 and
2009.
General Manager/CEO
Ricky Davis said the trust-
ees considered a variety
of financial and economic
conditions before deciding
to make the refund. This
will be the cooperative's
37th consecutive refund of
Capital Credits.
Clay Electric is a non-
profit cooperative, so any
profits (margins) left over
at the end of the year
after expenses are paid
are assigned to members
on a pro-rata basis, to be


refunded at a later date as
Capital Credits. Last year,
the co-op refunded $5 mil-
lion in Capital Credits to
entitled members. These
refunds help offset the cost
of power for members of
the cooperative.
Current members of the
cooperative who are enti-
tled to a refund (133,500
members) will receive a
credit on their March bills.
Members entitled to a
refund but who are no lon-
ger receiving service from
the co-op will be mailed a
refund check in mid-March.
These checks should be
cashed within 90 days. The
cooperative encourages
members who move off
Clay Electric's lines to keep
the co-op informed of their
new addresses, so they'll


receive future Capital
Credits that they may be
entitled to.
"The refund of Capital
Credits is a tangible and
unique benefit of receiving
service from a non-profit
electric cooperative," Davis
said. "Other utilities that
have margins left over after
expenses are paid return
these funds to stockhold-
ers as dividends. Municipal
utilities return their margins
to the city government cof-
fers."
Capital Credits are a
source of equity for coopera-
tives. Capital Credits enable
cooperatives to reduce the
amount of money they must
borrow for a variety of proj-
ects and purchases. This
means less borrowed money
and less interest payments.


N:T11!T7TT


What Is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
Remember Shakespeare?
Remember "As You Like It"?
In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only
people who could get away with telling the
truth to the King or Queen.
The Motley Fool tells the truth about invest-
ing, and hopes you'll laugh all
the way to the bank.
.............................................................................


Healthier Times Ahead
Prepared foods have been a great
boon to Whole Foods Market (Nas-
daq: WFMI). Its new "Health Starts
Here" initiative plans to offer health-
ier pre'-fab options, limiting add-ons
such as refined flour and sugar, added
oil and processed ingredients. It will
also include nutritional scorecards.
This is an unconventional angle
that traditional grocers likely won't
rush to adopt. And huge, sprawling
discounters can only go so far with
similar initiatives in their grocery
sections, since rock-bottom food
prices leave little room for such cus-
tomer-friendly, touchy-feely "frills."
"Health Starts Here" isn't Whole
Foods' first foray into encouraging
better eating among its shoppers. It
has hired healthy eating specialists
for each store to provide tips and
demonstrations, while adding on
services such as wellness clubs and
dietary education.
Whole Foods has often been
ahead of the curve on emerging
trends in consumer tastes and
beliefs. Beyond the rise of natural
and organic foods' popularity, it's
also led the pack in bringing vegetar-


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW -THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


A NYSE Amex
8,288.50 +225.86 2,256.45 +116.16


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
KVPhmA 3.68 +2.15 +140.5 TravelCtrs 12.00 +7.94 +195.6
KVPhBIf 3.65 +1.90 +108.6 Fronteerg 14.46 +4.62 +47.0
EvergErs 4.45 +1.86 +71.6 Hyperdyn 5.25 +1.34 +34.3
Manitowoc 18.66 +5.28 +39.5 Uranerz 5.77 +1.33 +30.0
Magnetekh 2.43 +.65 +36.5 ClaudeRg 2.54 +.58 +29.6
Unisys 36.50 +8.85 +32.0 CheniereEn 8.01 +1.67 +26.3
SFNGrp 12.57 +2.98 +31.1 MinesMgt 3.63 +.61 +20.2
WstnRefin 14.99 +3.47 +30.1 SamnsO&G 2.62 +.44 +20.2
DiceHldg 16.13 +3.24 +25.1 ChiGengM 3.17 +.52 +19.6
AlonUSA 8.79 +1.65 +23.1 Crosshgrs 2.22 +.36 +19.4


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
CenPacFrs24.92 -8.68 -25.8
BarcShtD 18.05 -4.83 -21.1
CSVS2xVxS38.13 -7.98 -17.3
BiPLSpxVM15.63 -3.23 -17.1
Lentuon 6.09 -1.25 -17.0
AegeanMP 8.84 -1.71 -16.2
DrxSOXBr 10.59 -1.97 -15.7
FumBrds 3.82 -.68 -15.1
C-TrCVOL 43.50 -7.27 -14.3
Feihe Intl 8.41 -1.21 -12.6

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Cibgrp 18206447 4.82 +.10
FordM 8619736 15.72 -.55
BkofAm 7439272 14.29 +.69
S&P500ETF5919202131.15+3.43
iShEMkts 3896621 46.50 +1.17
Pfizer 3546463 19.30+1.35
SprintNex2781606 4.40 -.05
SPDR Fnd2751558 16.61 +.36
GenElec 2443542 20.56 +.36
iShR2K 2123930 79.87+2.46

Diary
Advanced 2,409
Declined 743
New Highs 534
New Lows 31
rotal issues 3,203
Unchanged 51
Volume 22,001,195,076


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ChiMarFd 3.50 -.56 -13.8
Ever-Glory 2.26 -.30 -11.7
PemixTh 9.75 -1.15 -10.6
BovieMed 2.76 -.30 -9.8
LGLGrp 20.07 -2.11 -9.5
WellsGard 2.47 -.23 -8.5
Flanign 7.82 -.67 -7.9
OrionEngy 3.93 -.31 -7.4
NewEnSys 6.09 -.48 -7.3
LucasEngy 2.11 -.16 -7.0

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
NthgtMg 278165 2.69 +.07
NovaGldg 269517 14.73 +1.Q6
Fronteerg 267988 14.46 +4.62
DenisnM g 238110 3.97 +.57
RareEleg 195545 14.01 +1.06
SamsO&G 195219 2.62 +.44
CheniereEn189064 8.01 +1.67
TravelCtrs 168552 12.00+7.94
ChinaShen 166176 6.42, +.18
NwGoldg 165595 9.12 +.95

Diary


Advanced
Dedined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


355
175
38
6
545
15
756,311,314


Nasdaq
2,769.30 +82.41


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SilvedreafR 2.43 +1.08 +80.0
DermaSdcin 10.74 +4.11 +62.0
SupcndTch 2.43 +.90 +58.8
Depomed 9.87 +3.63 +58.2
HansenMed 2.19 +.68 +45.0
DblEgl 10.54 +3.25 +44.6
NaviSte 5.49 +1.57 +40.1
Opnext 2.57 +.71 +38.2
Brightpnt 12.19 +3.22 +35.9
BroadSftn 35.69 +9.26 +35.0

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Orexigen 3.61 -4:72 -56.7
ChinaMda 13.89 -6.97 -33.4
Zoo Entn 3.88 -1.42 -26.8
OptiBkrsh 2.60 -.94 -26.6
BkCarol 2.39 -.72 -23.2
Axcelis 2.78 -.71 -20.3
LiveDealrs 4.71 -1.12 -19.2
OnTrack 3.11 -.69 -18.2
ChelseaTh 4.89 -1.07 -18.0
USecBcCA 2.87 -.63 -18.0

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SiriusXM 4235152 1.75 +.14
PwShs QQ0Q278783357.38+1.65
Intel 2742471 21.68 +.41
Microsoft 2720257 27.77 +.02
Orexigen 2370639 3.61-4.72
Cisco 2337271 22.05+1.12
MicronT 1547292 11.05 +.68
Oracle 1277065 32.62 +.62
Nvidia 1220634 25.67 +1.91
Yahoo 1205064 16.79 +.96

Diary
Advanced 1,848
Declined 935
New Highs 396
New Lows 78
Total issues 2,849
Unchanged 66
Volume 10,146,627,668


The Week in Review


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Name Ex Div Last
AT&T Inc NY 1.72 27.97
AMD NY ... 8.40
AlcatelLuc NY 3.42
Alcoa NY .12 17.14
AutoZone NY ... 258.70
BkofAm NY .04 14.29
BobEvans Nasd .80 32.70
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 13.90
CSX NY 1.04 69.70
Chevron NY 2.88 97.11
Cisco Nasd ... 22.05
Citigrp NY ... 4.82
CocaCI NY 1.76 62.56
Delhaize NY 2.02 77.58
DrSCBear rsNY ... 14.34
ExxonMbl NY 1.76 83.28
FamilyDIr NY .72 41.51
FordM NY ... 15.72
GenElec NY .56 20.56
HomeDp NY .95 36.80
iShJapn NY .14 11.35
iShEMkts NY .64 46.50
iShR2K NY .89 79.87
Intel Nasd .72 21.68
JPMorgCh NY .20 44.59
LVSands NY ... 46.03
Lowes NY .44 24.71
McDnlds NY 2.44 74.05


Wkly Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg %Chg
+.48 +1.7 -4.8
+.91 +12.1 +2.7
+.11 +3.3 +15.5
+1.04 +6.5 +11.4
+7.64 +3.0 -5.1
+.69 +5.1 +7.1
+1.28 +4.1 -.8
+.22 +1.6 -6.1
+.42 +0.6 +7.9
+3.74 +4.0 +6.4
+1.12 +5.4 +9.0
+.10 +2.1 +1.9
+.35 +0.6 -4.9
-.63 -0.8 +5.3
-1.49 -9.4 -8.1
+4.29 +5.4 +13.9
-.97 -2.3 -16.5
-.55 -3.4 -6.4
+.36 +1.8 +12.4
+.10 +0.3 +5.0
+.43 +3.9 +4.0
+1.17 +2.6 -2.4
+2.46 +3.2 +2.1
+.41 +1.9 +3.1
+.05 +0.1 +5.1
+.43 +0.9 +.2
-.54 -2.1 -1.5
+.77 +1.1 -3.5


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg
MicronT Nasd 11.05 +.68 +6.6 +37.8
Microsoft Nasd .64 27.77 +.02 +0.1 -.5
NY Times NY ... 10.61 +.08 +0.8 +8.3
NextEraEnNY 2.00 54.74 +.71 +1.3 +5.3
NobltyH Nasd ... 8.20 -.40 -4.7 +1.1
NokiaCp NY .55 11.06 +.49 +4.6 +7.2
Nvidia Nasd ... 25.67 +1.91 +8.0 +66.7
OcciPet NY 1.52 97.51 +3.70 +3.9 -.6
Oracle Nasd .20 32.62 +.62 +1.9 +4.2
Orexigen Nasd ... 3.61 -4.72 -56.7 -55.4
Penney NY .80 31.59 -.70 -2.2 -2.2
PepsiCo NY 1.92 63.84 -.56 -0.9 -2.3
Retrobras NY 1.20 38.04 +2.63 +7.4 +.5
Pfizer NY .80 19.30 +1.35 +7.5 +10.2
Potash NY .84 181.44 +7.28 +4.2 +17.2
PwShsQQQNasd .33 57.38 +1.65 +3.0 +5.4
PrUShS&PNY ... 21.79 -1.22 -5.3 -8.3
RegionsFnNY .04 7.84 +.96 +14.0 +12.0
Ryder NY 1.08 50.39 +2.66 +5.6 -4.3
S&P500ETFNY 2.37 131.15 +3.43 +2.7 +4.3
SearsHldgsNasd ... 83.66 +7.58 +10.0 +13.4
SiriusXM Nasd 1.75 +.14 +8.4 +7.4
SouthnCo NY 1.82 37.34 +.03 +0.1 -2.3
SprintNex NY 4.40 -.05 -1.1 +4.0
SPDRFndcNY .16 16.61 +.36 +2.2 +4.1
TimeWam NY .94 35.92 +4.20 +13.2 +11.7
WalMart NY 1.21 56.03 -.67 -1.2 +3.9
Yahoo Nasd ... 16.79 +.96 +6.0 +.9


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h = Does not meet continued-liting standards.
if = Late filing with SEC. n = New In past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wl =
When Issued., wt= Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs Is paid from fund assets, d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front toad (sales charges)., rm = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galnera and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume In
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Tr aciruLae


3-month 0.15 0.14
6-month 0.17 0.15


5-year 2.27 1.92
10-year 3.65 3.32
30-year 4.73 4.52


-.,- ,.- .' .' .r"
,, . . .. .... ., .


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones Industrials 68.23 148.23 1.81 20.29 29.89
Close: 12,092.15 I 5
1-week change: 268.45 (2.3%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
13 ,0 0 0 ..................... ................. ........................................... ............


12,000 .. ......... ... .. .. .







9 ,0 00 ................ . ...... ... .. : ..... ... ............... ..........
10,000

9,000 A S N D J



MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Retur/Rank Pct MinInit
Name Obi ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCO TotRetls
American Funds GrthAmA m
Fidelity Contra x
American Funds CaplncBuA mI
Vanguard TotStldx
Vanguard Instldxl
American Funds CpWIdGrlA m
Vanguard 500Adml
American Funds IncAmerA m P
Vanguard TotStlAdm
American Funds InvCoAmA m
Vanguard Totlnt d
Dodge & Cox IntlStk
Dodge & Cox Stock I
American Funds EurPacGrA mf
Amenroan Flinde WAMuInvAA m


Fr.-, Timp-FiarrH.Jl I.
Var.juard In rPlus
PIMCO TotRetAimi D
American Funds NewP
American Funds Fnlnv
Vanguard 500Inv
American Funds BalA
Fidelity GrowCo
Vanguard WelitnAdm
Fidelity LowPriStk d
Harbor ntllnstU d


Cl
LG
LG
IH
LB
LB
WS
LB
MA
LB
LB
FB
FV
LV
FB
IL


,;errt A m CA
LB.
Cl
PerspA m WS
rAm LB
LB
m MA
LG
MA
MB
FB


138,794
66,101
60,959
58,576
57,503
56,277
55,060
52,841
52,074
48,887
48,788
44,091
43,406
43,037
39,209
38,821
35,395
35,202
33,684
33,224'
33,088
32,431
31,408
28,894
28,058
27,383
27,375


+6.5/B
+22.6/E
+27.8/C
+14.1/D
+27.8/A
+25.8/B
+18.4/D
+25.8/B
+18.2/B
+28.0/A
+20.4/E
+22.2/B
+22.8/A
+23.7/C
+19.3/D
+21.6/D
+18.7/A
+25.8/B
+6.2/B
+22.6/C
+24.6/C
+25.6/B
+18.4/B'
+35.0/A
+17.2/C
+27.6/E
+24.7/A


NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
4.25 1,000
NL 200,000,000
NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 50,000
NL 2,500
NL 50,000


I I 1


CurrenciesV
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9865 .9857
Britain 1.6098 1.6148
Canada .9881 .9902
Euro .7360 .7332
Japan 82.24 81.63
Mexicon 11 99l5 12.0500


Switzerlnd .9555 .9450 CA -Cseet Altealon, Cl -Internedlte-Tern Bod,ES-Europe Stock FB -Feign Large Blnd, rIG-Foe LargeGrwi FV -Foreign
Large VaIH -k Alo B rge Ble, LargLarge Growlt, LV -Lar-e var, MA -Moderate Aocaion, MBC dCap Blent, MV
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth- Mid-Cap Value, SH -Spedatlya, WS -World Stock, Tot Renm: Chng in V with dividends reinested. Ranch How fund pe ed vs
ers show dollar in foreign currency. otilsers w same oblec*ie: Ais top 2 E 0%Ei 0%. Min nitIn tlt M tnum $ needed toinvesin und. Source:Morningstar


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20
AK Steel .20
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72
AbtLab 1.76
AberFitc .70
AMD
Aetna .60
Agifent
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12
Aldlrish
Allstate .80
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52
AmnAxle
AEagleOut .44
AEP 1.84
AmExp .72
AmlntlGrp ...
Ameriprise .72
AmeriBrgn .40
Anadarko .36
AnnTaylr
Annaly 2.65
Apache .60
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .40,
' ArchDan .64
ArvMerit ...
AssuredG .18
ATMOS 1.36
Avon .92
BB&TCp .60
BPZ Res ...
BakrHu .60
BcoBrades .82
BcoSantand .78
BcoSBrasil .45
BkofAm .04
Bklrelnd 1.04
BkNYMel .36
Bar iPVix rs ...
BarrickG .48
Baxter 1.24
BerkH B ...
BestBuy .60
Blackstone .40
BlockHR .60
Boeing 1.68
Borders ...
BostonSci ..
BrMySq 1.32
CB REIlis ...
CBS B .20
CIGNA .04
CSX 1.04
CVR Engy ...
CVS Care .50
Cameron
CdnNRsgs .30
CapOne .20
CapitlSrce .04
CardnlHIth .78
Carnival 1.00
Caterpillar 1.76
Cemex .43
CenterPnt .79
CntryUnk 2.90
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.88
Chicos .16
Chimera .69
Citigrp
Coach .60
CocaCI 1.76
ColgPal 2.12
Comerica .40


16 +.05 +2.0
11 +.48 +1.8
... +.26 -3.2
-.19 -10.0
8 +.48 -4.8
12 +.63 -3.7
33 +3.07 -10.8
13 +.91 +2.7
9 +4.47 +22.6
22 +2.01 +3.8
... +.11i +15.5
75 +1.04 +11.4
... +.01 -14.4
15 +.20 -1.7
62 -4.79 -11.6
13 +.21 -2.5
12 -.03 +12.7
18 +.30 +1.6
14 -.24 -1.0
13 -.04 +2.1
... -.26 -17.1
14 -2.23 +.9
16 +.56 +7.2
52 +4.14 +2.8
22 +1.90 -13.3
13 -.17 -1.5
14 +2.00 -2.0
11 +.06 -5.2
32 +.28 -4.4
12 +3.33 +20.0
... -2.00 -5.8
3 +.66 -15.9
15 +.45 +6.0
20 +1.19 +.7
24 +1.18 +8.2
... +.72 +24.6
34 +.67 +18.6
... -.94 -11.2
... +.17 +13.5
... -.46 -17.9
22 +.69 +7.1
... +.18 -13.2
15 +.12 +2.6
... -2.89 -22.3
17 +.81 -9.5
14 -.08 -4.1
17 +1.61 +3.8
11 +1.13 +2.8
... +1.62 +21.6
9 +.32 +7.6
16 +2.15 +9.4
... -.46 -56.3
... -7.7
14 -.09 -2.9
37 +2.07 +16.9
33 +.94 +8.1
9 +1.57 +16.8
17 +.42 +7.9
71 +1.07 +16.2
13 -2.13 -6.0
25 +4.53 +12.4
... +1.60 +.5
8 +.52 +14.6
... +.33 +13.2
16 +.79 +9.3
19 +1.18 -.7
24 +3.91 +6.3
... +.04 -11.2
15 +.11 +2.7
12 +.62 -5.5
20 +2.73 +16.0
10 +3.74 +6.4
18 +.34 -5.4
7 +.06 +3.6
14 +.10 +1.9
20 +1.77 -1.3
19 +.35 -4.9
16 -.75 -5.1
49 +.61 -8.6


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


CompPrdS ...
ConAgra .92
ConocPhil 2.20
ConsolEngy .40
ConEd 2.40
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
Covidien .80
Cummins 1.05
DCT Indl .28
DRHorton .15
DTE 2.24
DanaHIdg ...'
Danaher s .08
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.40
DeltaAir ...
DenburyR ...
DevonE .64
DrSCBear rs...
DirFnBear ...
DrxFBulls ...
DirxSCBull .11
DirxLCBear ...
Disney .40
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
EMC Cp ..
ElPasoCp .04
EldorGld g .10
EmersonEl 1.38
EnCana g .80
Energizer ...
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.76
FedExCp .48
FifthSlFin 1.28
FstHorizon .04
FirstEngy 2.20
FordM
FordM wt ...
FMCG s 1.00
FrontikrCm .75
GMX Rs ...
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .40
GenGrPrn ...
GenMills s 1.12
GenMot n ...
GenOnEn...
Genworth ...
Gerdclau .32
GoldFLtd .16
Goldcrp g .36
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
HCP Inc 1.92
HallibrIn .36
Hanesbrds ...
HartfdFn .40
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .95
HonwIllnltl 1.33
Hospira
HostHotIs .04
HovnanE ...
IAMGId g .08
iShGolds ...
iSAstla .82
iShBraz 2.53
iSCan .50
iShGer .29
iSh HK .45
iShJapn .14


...-2.53
15 +.34
11 +1.11
29 +1.50
15 -.48
1 +.51
10 +1.57
... +1.79
21 +4.31
... -.13
84 -.77
13 +.08
... -.45
18 +1.93
11 +.33'
21 +4.30
12 -.43
28 +1.62
8 +3.56
... -1.49
-.58
... +1.90
..+6.58
... -.67
20 +1.86
14 +.22
21 +1.95
12 +.05
29 +1.2.1
13 +1.46
44 +.28
22 +3.63
17 +.19
12 -6.30
14 +.84
13 +4.29
21 +1.26
13 +.20
... +.52
15 +1.41
8 -.55
... -.50
12 +3.68
16 +.32
... -.35
8 -.93
7 +1.47
11 +.90
... +.39
15 +.61
... -.01
... -.01
56 -.94
... +.87
3 +.30
... +.90
9 +3.06
46 +1.10
57 +.22
23 +2.04
11 +3.12
10 +1.54
97 +.58
44 +.51
13 +.83
12 +1.92
20 +.10
26 +1.80
18 -2.25
.. +1.17
-.30
43 +1.13
... +.14
... +1.29
... -.50
... +1.20
... +.39
... +.44
... +.43


-16.2 24.76
+.9 22.78
+5.2 71.67
+1.2 49.33
... 49.59
+6.7 32.67
+21.0 23.37
+7.0 48.87
-.3 109.69
+2.8 5.46
-1.7 11.73
+2.2 46.30
-.9 17.05
+1.7 47.98
+17.2 10.36
+12.2 93.21
-9.5 11.40
+9.4 20.89
+13.0 88.69
-8.1 14.34
-13.1 8.21
+11.8 31.12
+5.2 76.19
-12.5 7.67
+8,5 40.71
+2.1 43.61
+8.4 37.01
+1.1 18.01
+12.2 25.69
+23.0 16.92
-10.1 16.69
+6.0 60.59
+10.1 32.07
-7.6 67.38
+2.7 42.75
+13.9 83.28
-1.4 91.74
+8.9 13.22
-.1 11.77
+7.1 39.63
-6.4 15.72
-12.1 7.16
-5.5 56.76
-3.5 9.39
-13.9 4.75
-12.4 20.05
+10.4 16.66
-8.8 20.10
-3.4 14.96
-.1 35.55
-.7 36.59
+7.1 4.08
-1.8 12.91
-2.1 13.69
-10.9 16.15
-9.4 41.64
-2.0 164.83
+7.7 12.76
-.1 36.77
+12.5 45.92
+1.0 25.65
+10.3 29.23
-14.1 9.67
+3.0 14.93
+7.6 82.34
+12.7 47.43
+5.0 36.80
+7.4 57.12
-6.0 52.35
+8.6 19.05
+4.2 4.26
+16.6 20.76
-5.1 13.19
+1.7 25.86
-6.9 72.05
+3.9 32.21
+6.1 25.39
+3.6 19.60
+4.0 11.35


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
iSh Kor .39 .6 ... +1.78 +3.2 63.14
iShMex .54 .9 ... +1.91 +.2 62.04
iShSing .43 3.1 ... +.15 +.2 13.88
iSTaiwn .29 ... +.42 +2.5 16.01
iShSilver ... ... ... +1.10 -5.9 28.40
iShChina25 .63 1.5 ... +.84 -.5 42.87
iShEMkts .64 1.4 ... +1.17 -2.4 46.50
iShB20T 3.85 4.3 ... -2.79 -5.6 88.81
iS Eafe 1.42 2.3 ... +1.86 +4.4 60.79
iSR1KG .73 1.2 ... +1.74 +4.7 '59.97
iShR2K .89 1.1 ... +2.46 +2.1 79.87
iShREst 1.97 3.4 ... +.58 +3.4 57.86
ITW 1.36 2.5 18 -.46 +1.6 54.25
IngerRd .28 .6 28 +1.78 +1.7 47.90
IBM 2.60 1.6 14 +4.79 +11.7 164.00
Intl Coal ... ... 38 -.48 +8.3 8.38
IntlGame .24 1.4 23 0.14 -1.0 17.51
IntPap .75 2.6 20 +.78 +7.3 29.22
Interpublic ... ... 37 +1.03 +10.6 11.75
Invesco .44 1.7 29 +.74 +5.6 25.40
ItauUnibH .65 3.1 ... -.95 -12.9 20.81
JPMorgCh .20 .4 11 +.05 +5.1 44.59
Jaguarg ... ... ...-.57 -21.7 5.58
JohnJn 2.16 3.6 13 +.83 -1.6 60.84
JohnsnCtl .64 1.7 17 +.50 ... 38.19
JnprNtwk ... ... 47 +3.78 +8.5 40,06
KB Home .25 1.8 ... -.99 +3.0 13.90
KKR n .23 ... ... +2.00 +19.6 16.99
KVPhmA ... ... ...+2.15 +44.3 3.68
Kellogg 1.62 3.0 16 +2.93 +4.6 53.42
Keycorp .04 .4 21 +.66 +6.8 9.45
KimbClk 2.80 4.3 14 +.28 +3.1 65.01


Nasdaq Most Active


Name Div YId
ASML HId .54 1.2
AcmePkt
ActivsBliz .15 1.3
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT
AlteraCp If .24 .6
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 19.4
AmCapLtd ...
'Amgen
Apple Inc
ApidMatl .28 1.7
ArenaPhm ...
-ArmHId .12 .4
AtlasEngy ...
Atmel ...
Autodesk ...
Axcelis
BMC Sft ...
Baidus
BeaconPw ...
Broadcom .36 .8
BrcdeCm ...
CAInc .16 .7
Cadence
CapFdF rs .30 2.5
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
ChkPoint ...
ChinaMda ...
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco
CitzRepBh ...
Clearwire ...
CognizTech...
Coinstar


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE' Chg %Chg Last Name


.. +1.35
...+16.28
16 +.53
22 +.87
57 +.13
16 +3.60
70 +4.79
4 +.18
4 +.36
11 -.09
19+10.40
24 +.72
... +.02
... +4.67
37 +1.79
57 +1.06
51 +3.72
... -.71
19 +1.67
78+11.14
... -.02
23 +1.50
23 +.48
17 +1.15
15 +1.01
30 +.38
... +.17
27 +.11
... -.01
23 -.75
4 -6.97
... +3.40
19 +4.09
16 +1.12
... +.10
... +.55
35 +3.79
25 -2.53


Comcast .38
Comc spcl .38
Compuwre ...
CorinthC ...
Costco .82
Cree Inc
CypSemi ...
Delllnc
Depomed ...
DirecTVA ...
DryShips ...
ETrade rs ...
eBay
ElectArts ...
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .28
Expedia .28
ExpScrips ...
F5 Netwks ...
FifthThird .04
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
FstMerit .64
Rextm
FresKabi rt ...
GT Solar
Genzyme
GileadSci ...
GreenMtCs...
HansenMed...
Harmonic ...
HercOffsh ...
Hologic
HudsCity .60
Infinera.
IntgDv
Intel .72
Intersil .48


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cha %Chg Last


18 +.43
17 +.49
23 +.44
... -.62
24 +2M0O
28 +1.87
46 +2.18
13 +.74
... +3.63
26 +.64
24 +.16
... +.82
24 +1.90
... +3.23
14 -.42
... +.56
16 +.27
29 +.97
58+14.06
25 +.75
41 +6.61
20 +.71
16 -1.42
16 -.09
... +.01
10 +.22
... +2.30
12 +.58
75 +5.85
... +.68
89 +1.69
... +.18
... -.42
10 +.34
... +1.08
28 +1.39
11 +.41
63 -1.53


+6.4 23.27
+6.0 21.95
-6.4 10.92
-7.5 4.82
+2.7 74.13
-20.1 52.65
+25.6 23.33
+2.5 13.89
+55.2 9.87
+7.2 42.81
-8.7 5.01
+7.3 17.17
+15.7 32.21
+11.3 18.23
-11.3 10.71
+10.6 12.76
+.6 25.25
+5.7 57.13
-5.0 123.64
+4.8 15.39
+31.3 38.97
+3.9 14.53
-13.8 17.05
+1.5 7.97
+24.4 .05
+21.7 11.10
+3.1 73.40
+7.0 38.79
+20.5 39.61
+47.0 2.19
+14.8 9.84
+.3 3.49
+3.6 19.50
-12.6 11.14
-18.2 8.45
+15.1 7.67
+3.1 21.68
-13.4 13.23


Name DIv
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
Kulicke
Level3
UfeTech ...
MIPS Tech ...
MannKd ..
MarvellT
Mattel .92
Maximintg .84
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .64
NPS Phm ...
NasdOMX ..
NaviSite ...
NetLogic s ..
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15
NewsCpB .15
Novell
Novlus
Nvidia
OnSmcnd
Oracle .20
Orexigen
Oxigene h ...
PMC Sra
Paccar .48
PattUTI .20
PeopUtdF .62
Popular
Power-One
PwShs QQQ .33
Powrwav
Qualcom .76


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
7 +.45 +4.8 7.26
... +5.84 +57.2 22,76
... 19 -.08 -12.3 5.80
...5 +.25 +34.2 9.66
... ... +.05 +24.5 1.22
22 -.90 -5.4 52.52
29 +.77 -11.2 13.47
... +.11 -36.1 5.15
... 22 +.59 +6.4 19.75
3.6 14 +1.74 -.7 25.25
3.2 31 +.30 +10.7 26,14
-.11 +15,7 7.36
... 6 +.68 +37.8 11.05
2.3 7 +.02 -.5 27.77
+.85 +7.1 8.46
... 12 +2.06 +11.9 26.56
... 18 +1.57 +48.0 5.49
... +6.70 +30.2 40.89
39 +3.90 +5.4 57.93
74 +2.09 +25.3 220.07
.9 16 +1.80 +15.9 16.88
.8 18 +1.68 +11.9 18.38
... 6 -.04 +.6 5.96
14 +3.03 +20.1 38.81
71 +1.91 +66.7 25.67
... 16 +.61 +16.8 11.54
.6 24 +.62 +4.2 32.62
... -4.72 -55.4 3.61
-.03 -27.4 .17
23 +.39 -5.0 8.16
.9 40 -4.22 -11.8 50.60
.8 33 +2.54 +17.5 25.32
4.7 40 +.23 -5.9 13.19
... ... +.17 +6.7 3.35
10 -1.13 -9.2 9.26
.6 ... +1.65 +5.4 57.38
... 54 +.29 +47.6 3.75
1.4 25 +1.49 +11.6 55.23


Name Div
Kimco .72
Kinross g .10
Kraft 1.16
LDK Solar ...
LSI Corp ...
LVSands ...
UllyEli 1.96
ULimited .80
ULincNat .20
MBIA
MEMC
MFA Fncl .94
MGIC
MGM Rsts...
Macys .20
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AMEX Most Active


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,-I I- ,


I








Classified Department: 755-5440


F
IND *JIT


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
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lication. Credit for published errors
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Legal

COLUMBIA COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
POST OFFICE BOX 1529
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32056-
1529
COLUMBIA COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE
COMPLEX
372 WEST DUVAL STREET
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32055
AGENDA
FEBRUARY 15, 2011
7:00 P.M.
Invocation (Commissioner Stephen
E. Bailey)
Pledge to U.S. Flag
Staff Agenda Additions/Deletions
Adoption of Agenda
Public Comments
STAFF MATI'ERS:
HONORABLE JODY L. DUPREE,
CHAIRMAN
(1) Consent Agenda
DISCUSSION AND ACTION
ITEM:
(1) Economic Development
Board/IDA Board Appointments
***COMMISSIONERS COM-
MENTS
ADJOURNMENT
COLUMBIA COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
POST OFFICE BOX 1529
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32056-
1529
CONSENT AGENDA
FEBRUARY 15, 2011
7:00 P.M.
(1) Public Works Request Appro-
val County Road 18 Repairs to
Asphalt, Grassing and Road Strip-
ing $35,000
(2) Suwannee River Economic
Council, Inc. (S.H.I.P.) Release
of Lien Agreement Mary E.
Homsby Summerall $3,000.00
(3). Four Rivers Audubon Society -
Requesting Approval & Use of Pole
Barn -Alligator Lake Spring Festival
- April 9, 2011 from 8:00 A.M. to
4:00 P.M.
(4) Letter of Agreement Contract
for Services Board of County
Commissioners/Ing Consulting
Group, Inc. Recovery Services
(5) Minute Approval Board of
County Commissioners Regular
Meeting- September 16, 2010
04543411
February 6, 2011

NOTICE, OF PUBLIC MEETING
OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
The School District of Columbia
County, Florida announces they will
hold a workshop, to which all per-
sons are invited to attend as follows:
DATE:
Wednesday, February 23, 2011
TIME:
2:00 p.m.
PLACE: Columbia
County School District
Administrative Complex Auditorium
372 West Duval Street
Lake City, FL 32055
PURPOSE:
Receiving findings of the District
Accreditation
Quality Assurance Team.
No action will be 'taken at this meet-
ing. '
Pursuant to the provisions of the
American with Disabilities Act, any
person requiring special accommo-
dations to participate in the above
workshop is asked to advise the
School Board at least 48 hours be-
fore the workshop by contacting
Mrs. Lynda Croft at (386) 755-8003.
School Board of Columbia County,
Florida
By: Michael F. Millikin
Superintendent of Schools
04543376
February 6, 2011

010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found
Lost Diamond Tennis Bracelet
at Gondolier Restaurant or
Walgreens 1/26/11, Will identify,
Reward 386-963-2271

LOST DOG: $100 Reward. Miss-
ing since week of 01/10 from
Branford Hwy/Emerald Forrest.
Brown Lab/bulldog mix. answers
to Nikkie. 386-288-6786

060 Services

Senior Assistant/Companion.
I will sit with & care for your
elderly. Drive to Doctor appts. &
shopping. References avail.
386-288-3776 or 386-754-8721






Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services


100 Job
Opportunities

04543275
Wanna Go West? Let's Go!
CDL A Operators Wanted for
Lease with a Lease Purchase
Plan, Spouse and Pet Rider
Policy, Health and Life
Insurance Available. 12-15 day
trips, No New England States,
You get 100% fuel surcharge,
0/0's and PTDI
Certified Students Welcome
CALL TODAY TO JOIN US
AND START
THE NEW YEAR
OFF RIGHT!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

04543307
HeritageBank of the South
seeks a TELLER in a branch in
Lake City, Florida
Job requirements: cash handling
experience, teller experience
desired, excellent customer
service skills, good organiza-
tional skills with the ability to
prioritorize and multi-task,
professional oral and written
communication skills, proficient
computer skills, keen attention
to details and must be friendly
and professional. High school
diploma or equivalent required.
Salary and benefits commensu-
rate with experience. Interested
candidates should forward
resume with salary history and
requirements to: humanresour-
ces()eheritagebank.com

04543385
NOW HIRING!!!
We are now hiring experienced
Class A Drivers
Excellent benefits package
including health, dental
and 401K.
All applicants MUST Have:
Class A CDL with X
endorsements.
1 yr tractor-trailer experience
with a t/t school certification or
2 yrs. tractor-trailer experience
without the certification.
25 yrs or older
Please apply online at
floridarockandtanklines.com
or call 1-866-352-7625

Anderson Columbia is accepting
applications for a certified
electrician with experience in
motor and motor control repair.
Please come by 871 Guerdon Rd,
Lake City, FL to fill out an appli-
cation or email your resume to
wassont@andersoncolumbia.com.
Equal Opportunity Employer


FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
BURSAR
Manage the activities of Student
Financial Services, including the
student billing system, loan
collections, student financial records
and cash handling. Provide timely
and accurate billings to students and
general users of the College's
services and ensure that payments
and credits are received and properly
applied to each student's account in a
timely manner. Minimum
Qualifications: Bachelor's degree
from a regionally accredited institution
of higher education in business,
finance, or accounting. An
Associate's degree from an
accredited institution with 4 years or
more progressively responsible
experience in accounting for funds in
a school or similar office experience
may substitute. Experience with an
integrated database such as Sungard
SCT Banner software. Desirable
Qualifications: Successful completion
of SCT Banner Accounts Receivable
training.
Salary: $31,937 annually, plus benefits
Application Deadline: 2/16/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail ru. t',. ,u
i......ii.. ,k
tiie SOillihern Assocjiiiii or Colleges elnd Schoon.
V'IADAEA/EU College in Ecducatio n ad '
Imiploy)nini


UDriven by Qualit


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100 Job
-100 'Opportunities

04543409




COTTAGE PARENTS
The Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch is looking for couples to
be full-time Cottage Parents.
Responsibilities include the
direct care and development
of 10 boys, ages 8-18.
Professional skill based training
& support provided.
Help children develop social,
academic, and independent
living skills. Salary $47,000.09
per couple with housing,
utilities, board, and benefits
provided. High school diploma
or GED required. For more
information contact Linda
Mather at (386) 842-5555
lmather@youthranches.org
Fax resume to (386) 842-1029
Employment application on line
at www.youthranches.org
(EOE/DRUG FREE
WORKPLACE)

05525007
SHANDS LAKE SHORE
REGIONAL MEDICAL
CENTER
has the following
positions available:
Director of OR
Director of ER
(Lake Shore and Live Oak
facility)
Director of Rehab Services .
Director of Radiology
Inpatient Coders
Charge Nurse Med/Surg
Competitive salary
and benefit package.
Apply online @
shandslakeshore.com or
Fax resume to 386.292.8295
EOE, M/F/VID
Drug Free Workplace

05525012
Office Assistant
Full time permanent position in
White Springs. Must have solid
computer skills, office
experience a must. Will train
right person in our speciality.
Opportunity for advancement.
Please EMAIL resume o
hr@speced.org

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.
A/C SERVICE Tech
Min 5 yrs experience.
F/T with benefits
Please call 386-454-4767


10 Jb01
100 Opportunities

05525065
THE HEALTH CENTER
OF LAKE CITY
Has a full-time opening for
Maintenance Director, Excellent
Salary EOE/ADA/
Drug Free Workplace
Apply in person or
send resume to:
560 SW McFarlane Avenue
Lake City, FL 32025
SFax: 386-961-9296
Email: healthcenter@thehealth
center.comcastbiz.net

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Bartender needed. Must
have experience & be reliable, &
have your own transportation and
your own phone. 386-752-2412
CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Non-emergeny Drivers needed.
PT, clean driving record.
386-752-2112

PT Clerical position 8-12p M-F.
Must be a people person w/good
organizational, phone & customer
skills. Must multi task. Send
resume & ref's to Box 04108, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630
To place your
classified ad call
755-5440


C.-.rrie luin us ai New Line Transport, ore of Irie souriheast's premier flatbed companies,
a3 we :.:oiinue to grow ai'd eparia AI tJe* Line Transport, our philosophy has always
cenritred ar'oun proviirnigqulity service Currenily e are seeking to lease qualified: "


OWNER OPERATORS
* Regional- Lower Southeast**

Average Gross Revenue
'$3000.00 to $3500.00+ per week

We onfer local ,'rid rl,,egirona llined opporuriiiirn Our experienced Owner-Operators
h3ve plenty 1 wd.' are r,ome e-er vweeke nd.r3 iarae eligible for safety bonuses. Other
DeiniiilnWo-

Diesel fuel $1.99 per gallon!
Home every weekend guaranteed!
Paid orienlation'
*Trailer and all equipment provided at no cost to contractor
Earn up to 70o. of gross revenue!
We have plenty of work'

Reiuiri. onee vre3r ,I :ivir riri, 0.en, :n, slatile ciri r, story and good MVR.

Apply online al www.newlinetransport.com or call 888-714-0056 for details.
ECOE DiFWP


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?


;iour sildls?
S . a ud .
posiiyve attitude,
ft .-* *y


Apply Online or In Personi 1152 SW Business Point Dr
SLake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
S 1 I L www.sitel.com EOE


-- -mi


confused?



Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


-,-I


100 Job
100 Opportunities

Teacher (Lawton's, Early Head
Start Lake City, Birth to 3 yrs old)
HS Dip/GED, Must have FCCPC
/CDA; three years of classroom
experience working with
infants/toddlers preferred; Bilin-
gual (Spanish/English) preferred,
5 Hqur Literacy, Must pass physi-
cal/DCF background screening,
Current First Aid/CPR preferred.
Excellent Benefits-Paid Holidays,
Sick/Annual Leave. Apply in
person at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637,
by email: arobinson(asv4cs.org
Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE


120 Medical
1' I.Employment

04543381
Referral Coordinator/
Checkout Clerk
Medical Office is seeking
qualified candidate with Good
Multi-tasking skills and profes-
sionalism. Must have exp.
w/Med. Term & Ins. Referrals
& Auth. Send reply to Box
04109, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 320,56

05525041

RED HILLS
SURGICAL CENTER


New Center in Tallahassee, FL
Red Hills Surgery Center now
accepting applications!
*RNs
*Surgical Technicians, FT/Flex
*Sterile Supply Technician II
Apply online at www.tmh.org
DFWP/EOE


I


I


I









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011


120 Medical
120 Employment

05525050

Medical Personnel


RN's for Med/Surg &
Telemetry, Top Daily pay,
Local Medical Centers,
1-877-630-6988

05525060



MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
RN's
PRN/1 yr experience
CNA
F/T & PRN

ARNP Outpatient Svcs
Starke/Tri County

Prevention Specialist
Starke

Bachelors Therapist
Rehab/Support
Masters Therapists
Adult Substance Abuse
,(Licensed)
Lake City

Adult Case Manager
Live Oak

Psychiatrist
Outpatient clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
www.mbhci.org
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP
Homecare LPN's &
Homecare CNA's needed for cli-
ent in Lake City, call
Maxim Healthcare Services
352-291-4888

Internal Medicine of Lake City
is looking for N.P. or P.A.
Please contact Dr Bali @
386-755-1703
Physical Therapy Assistant
needed in a local physician
office, please fax
CV to 386-719-9662.
PT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.
PT Tech needed for Outpatient PT
Clinic, experience/exercise back-
ground pref but will train,
Apply at HealthWorks @
1206 S.W. Main Blvd,
Lake City 386-752-1652


140 Work Wanted

We Run Errands!
Your personal errand service to
help those in need at rates you can
afford Call Dawn 386-249-9426

240 Schools &
240U Education

04543248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/14/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/14/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books. supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com

04543298
Wanted Career
Motivated Students!
Reinvent yourself for a career in
a high demand field. If you are
seeking a new career or wish to
increase your knowledge in one
of the fastest growing industries
in the nation, then get your
Degree or Certificate in
Logistics & Distribution and
Supply Chain Management!
Instant scholarships available
for qualified students. Classes
start 2/3/2011. Contact Florida
Gateway College at
386-754-4492 or email us at
www.logisticsbannercenter.com
This workforce solution was
funded by a grant awarded
under the President's Communi-
ty-Based Job Training Grants as
implemented by the U.S.
Department of Labor's Employ-
ment and Training Administra-
tion. The solution was created
by the grantee and does not
necessarily reflect the official
position of the U.S. Department
of Labor. The Department of
Labor makes no guarantees,
warranties, or assurances of any
kind, express or implied, with
respect to such information,
including any information on
linked sites and including, but


not limited to, accuracy of the
information or its completeness,
timeliness, usefulness, adequa-
cy, continued availability, or
ownership. This solution is
copyrighted by the institution
that created it. Internal use by an
organization and/or personal use
by an individual for
non-commercial purposes is
permissible. All other uses
require the prior authorization of
the copyright owner.


310 Pets & Supplies

AKC GERMAN SHEPPARD
puppy. Born 12/13.
Parents on site. $400.
386-496-3654 or 352-745-1452


310 Pets & Supplies
Free young male cat
has bob tail,
loving
386-755-0920
PITBULL PUPPY for sale.
7 week old. Parents on site. $250.
GRAND CHAMPION
BLOODLINES. 386-288-0231
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

GE Electric Stove,
White, works great,
$U85. 386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387
Kenmore Washer
White, works great
$100
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387
Large Capacity Clothes dryer
$85.
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
AllOard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

Frost Free Refrigerator
Nice w/top freezer.
White $200. obo
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387
GE DISHWASHER, white.
$75.00 Works good.
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387
GUNSHOW: 02/05 & 02/06
@ The Columbia County
Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City.
Sat 9am 4pm, Sun 9am-3pm.
Info: 386-325-6114
Kitchen or bathroom
floor cabinet. $35.
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

463 Building
63 Materials

ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available

6 Mobile Homes
630 for Rentme
.2/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in.
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
pets ok, $500 dep $575 mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2006 SWMH 3/2 on
2.5 acres, fenced, in Olustee,$700
mo,includes W/D, safe & quiet
Call 904-349-5192
Nice DWMH Nice area
3/2. Back porch/carport, Country
living. $675 month, 1st, last &
$300 dep, Call 386-752-6333

EU WI flWi A WUU


Quiet, Country Branford area
2/1 $400 dep, $450 month
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547

n640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale,.

*Lot Model Sale*
Save 1,000's @ Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
For Model Info and Details


Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$569 mo 3Bd/2Ba Modular
1/2 acre Deck, energy efficient,
appliances, drive, w/$12K down
($640 mo w/ $6K down).
Avail in March
Owner finance or rent to own???
Call (386) 758-9824 hurry
05524746
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers
Save up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832

4/2 DWMH in Retirement Park,
2 Porches, Shed, Extras,
Reduced Price.
386-752-4258
Come in and see the
Future in Manufactured Homes.
Royals Homes making
people smile
386-754-6737
Come See all New Lot Models
Royals Homes. Honesty! Integrity!
Customer Satisfaction
386-754-6737
Looking for a Modular?
Come see the Specialists
at Royals Homes and ask for Bo
386-754-6737
New 2011 Homes are Here
3BR/4BR at Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
Homes Built Your Way!
New,2010 MH,never been
occupied, front & back deck,
$99,900 MLS#76635 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
@ Westfield Realty
Owner Fin, 3/2, DWMH, new- -
paint,carpet, small down $625mon .
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Royals Homes is Quality!
We treat you like Family.
Stop in or Call Catherine
386-754-6737

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

05524833
No Application Fee +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 bedroom Apartments &
mobile homes,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
1/1 apts for rent on Madison St,
$500 month, $200 sec dep,
utilities included, (two available)
386-365-2515
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Gatorwood on the Westside
Rent $650. per month. .
Call 386-867-1212 for details.'
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $500. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Move In Special.2/1 w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

7 0 Furnished Apts.
/ For Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135;
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
Home For Rent

05524832
New Years Dream "Surprise"
Why Rent? Lease to own.
New model home 2 miles S off
47. 3000 sq ft, 4/3, 5% int, is
tax deduc, consider trade-in
386-752-1364

3/2, 2-car garage, fenced back
yard, convenient in-town location
near Summers school.
$1050 per mo. 386-623-2848
3ba/2ba,lg FR,w/LR & DR,fresh
paint, new carpet; 1/2 acre,2 mi
out. Lease req. incl No pets; ten-
ants, favorable history only please.
$850 + dep.752-5025, 752-8696.
4/3 Refurbished Home w/CH/A
for Rent or Sale,
on East side of town
Call 386-294-2494 for details
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
CH/A, carport. $650/mo. + sec.
Includes all utilities & satellite TV.
Pets OK. (386)758-2408
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290


A 55+Retirement Living,
Site built home
2br/2bth For Lease
Gorgeous Lake View. 2 br Apt
Water included. $550. mo plus
deposit. Close to shopping.
386-344-0579
Large 3br/2ba house. In town.
Fenced yard. $800 mo.
1st, last and security.
386-867-1212
LOVELY 3BR/1BA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017. Leave message.
Nice, private, quiet, 2/1,4 miles S
of Lake City, $500 dep, $550 mo
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


730j UUnfurnished
U Home For Rent
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Rent/Sale 3/2 on 9 beautiful
fenced acres. Garage & other out
buildings. $850.mo. plus sec. dep.
Wellborn area. 386-754-0732
Three Rivers Estates, 2/1, CH/A,
2010 W2 & ref's from current
landlord req'd, Access to Rivers
$675 mo, $600 sec., 386-497-4699
Turnkey rental, 3/2 split,2 CG, 1/2
acre, quiet neighborhood, close to
1-75, $1050 per month, Ist/last/sec,
386-454-2826 or 954-895-1722

7 0 Business &
5 Office Rentals

1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!
Coral Shores Realty. Prime
commercial, located on Hwy 41 &
Gibson Ln. 26X54 concrete block.
$76,000 386-965-5905
Downtown & borders 3 streets.
Aprox. 10,000 sqft fenced parking.
Being sold "as is". $73,000. 386-
965-5905 Coral Shores Realty
Great locations on SW Main Blvd.
Retail, Wholesale, Distribution,
Office. 1200+ sf only $950. per
mo. Includes Utilities 752-5035
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072


770 Condos Fol Rent

3BR/2BA Great area, close to
town, pool, no pets. Ref. req'd
$900 mo, $600 dep. 386-752-9144
days, 752-2803,397-3500 after 5p


780 Condos for Sale

3 bdrm Condo Nit, back patio,
HOA fees include ext maintenance
of home, lawn & pool MLS#76797
$110,000, Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237

805 Lots for Sale

1 acre lot outside the city limits .
Homes only subdivision. Priced
below the assessed value with the
county, $16,900 Hallmark Real
Estate 386-867-1613
2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613
Beautiful 5+ acre lot, partially
cleared w/large oaks, Homes only,
$38,000, MLS' 75038 Call Roger
Lovelady @ Westfield Realty
386-365-7039
Charming Turn of the Century,
property, close to
downtown,MLS# 74814
$94,900 386-755-0808
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Nice 4.5 acre parcel w/S/P/W
older SWMH $39,900
MLS# 76182 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status,
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are her eby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
tne toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
2br/2ba Eastside Village.
Unique floor plan. Lg utility/
work room. Screened front porch.
$55,000 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
2BR/2BA home w/1,592 SqFt in
Eastside Village w/huge master
suite, climatized Fla room, Ig
kitchen $61,500 #76753 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC. .


2004 Rialta
23ft. self-contained,
excellent condition.
$13,500


SOUP


810 Home for Sale
3/2 home w/1758 sq ft, Storage
bldg, enclosed patio & deck,
$168,000 Call Carrie Cason @
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
MLS# 73410
3/2 w/ Front deck and large
Florida room. garage and other out
bldgs on 9 beautiful fenced acres.
$139,900. Neg. 386-754-0732
3/2 w/over 1700 sq ft, fireplaces,
modem kitchen, fenced yard, 2
sheds, convenient location
$89,500 MLS#73861 Call Patti
@Access Realty 386-623-6896
3b/2ba, 1545 sq ft on 1/2 acre,
338 SW Wise Dr,Lake City
Reduced io $179,900, Call 386-
752-3078 or 352-281-4003
3br/2ba 80'X125' lot. 1,200 sqft.
Kitchen & bath remodeled, metal
roof, Ig fenced back yard. Close to
amenities. $79,900 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Brick home w/1,934 sqft
in Piccadilly Park. 1/2 acre. Lg
playroom, fenced yard. Reduced to
$139,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Custom home. on 5 ac.
whete deer & turkey roam.
Lg barn w/enclosed workshop.
$219,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
4 bdrm + office, 2 living & dining
areas, front & back porch
$279,900 MLS# 72831
Call Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty 386-755-0808
4/2 2300 plus sq ft MH on
2 lots, Good Condition $69.888
Call Nancy Rogers @
386-867-1271
Results Realty
4/2 1,800 sq ft on 10.5 acres,
newly remodeled inside, detached
garage, above ground pool
$189,888, Call Nancy,
Results Realty 386-867-1271
4br/2ba, 5 ac., 2069 sqft. Ig family
& florida rm, den. Covered patio,
workshop. $229,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba, remodeled, views of the
lake. Formal LR, dining room &
family room. Many upgrades.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
5 bedroom Home on 5 acres south
of Lake City, Big Rooms
lots of space $229,500
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
MLS# 72928 Westfield Realty
5/2, 1800sf, 24 acres, family rm,
screened back porch, RV
parking,newly painted close to VA
& DOT, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
\5/3 Triplewide MH (2200) sq ft,
w/2 master bdrms, on 10 fenced
acres, fireplace. MLS# 76226
$75,000 Call Patti Taylor
386-623-6896 Access Realty
BANK OWNED ON-SITE
Real Estate Auction
Live Oak
1223 S. Ohio Ave.
5br/3ba. 3296 sqft. on .36 acres
Sale Date: Sat. Mar 19 at 12 noon.
FREE COLOR BROCHURE
www.AuctionServicesIntl.com
Jay Lloyd AU2073/AB 1172
Beautifully Landscaped 3/1 on
1.11 ac, 16x24 detached garage,
screen porched bldg, water
purification system, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Brick home with 2,700 sqft under
roof. Large master w/bath on .5
acres completely fenced. $167,500
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613
Brick, .59 ac. 3br/2ba w/large
spacious rooms. Split floor plan.
2 car garage & storage $222,900.
Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Close to town, 2 story home
w/stone, fireplace, downstairs
master bdrm, $144,900
MLS# 77050 Call Carrie Cason
386-623-2806 Westfield Realty


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, Woodcrest. Great area, split
plan. Screened back porch. Elaine
K. Tolar. 386-755-6488 $139,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba. 3 Fireplaces. 39.7 acres
included. Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Reduced, brick w/over 2,000 sqft,
5 ac. 3br/2ba.Lots of extras. Elaine
K. Tolar 755-6488 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lakeview home in town, Old
charm w/many upgrades Elaine K.
Tolar. 386-755-6488 $189,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2 Story, 4br/2.5ba-2160 sqft. Spa-
cious plan w/garage Lori Geibeig
Simpson 365-5678 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba close to town. 1620 sqft
w/covered patio& more. Lori Gei-
beig Simpson 365-5678 $117,900
Coral Shores Realty 2004
. Custom built home, 23 fenced ac.
1700 ft paved frontage. Lg kitch-
en/pantry, master/bath. 965-5905
Comer lot in Piccadilly PA'-k.
Newly painted in/out. New carpet
/vinyl. 2 car garage. Inground
pool. $133,500. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575


0 D


'A55]4


810 Home for Sale
CORNER LOT! Cute 2BR/IBA in
the "heart of Live Oak" ONLY
$51,000 #76940
DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
Country Club. 4br/4ba. New roof,
AC, windows. Pool, hot tub,
& greenhouse. $229,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Cpstom Brick, 5+ ac. 5br/4ba.
4412 sqft. 3 car garage, pool, hot
tub, 3 fireplaces, more. $569,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lori Giebeig Simpson 365-5678
Cute 3/2 nicely remodeled home,
2 acres, partially fenced
$115,888
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473
Derington Properties, LLC
3/2 MH, large deck and screened
porch, 5 ac. Seller financing avail.
$46,500 386-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
DWMH, 5 ac. Screened front/back
porches. 20x40 shop fully equip-
ped w/bath. $74,900. 965-4300
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
3BR/2BA
$99,999
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
Fully furnished 2br/2ba @
$83,000
Excellent area. 3br/2ba home.
1620 sqft. w/covered patio. Lg
front porch & 1 car carport
Lori Giebeig. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
EXCELLENT COND! Use for
home, office, salon; zoned RO; up-
grades thru-out; 1BR/1BA ONLY
$59,000 #76356 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
Family home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Great Investment Property!
House needs lots of TLC, close to
shopping and schools, $35,000,
Bring all offers, Results Realty
Call Brittany 386-397-3473
GREAT STARTER HOME! 1
3BR/2BA in Quail Ridge with
back patio, luscious lawn $84,900
#76432 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224
Log Cabin home, located on
5 acres, wrap around porch"
$199,000 MLS#75550
Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax Realty
.Lrg Brick Home, well-established
neighborhood, in town,
$129,900 MLS#77016
Call Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
Move In Ready. 3br/2ba w/1,225
sqft. Corer lot, great S/D.
12x16 workshop w/elec.
Upgrades. $75,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
Perfection! Marion Place, gated,
brick 3/2 over 1800 sqft. Screened
lanai $158,900 386-965-4300 '
Derington Properties, LLC


ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT










Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl

* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
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* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Var *
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.








Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011


810 Home for Sale
Must See! 4/2 2368SF Home,
island kitchen, den, fire place,
storage, auto gate entry,
Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
NEW FLOORING & FRESH
PAINT! 2-story 3BR/2BA on 1+
acre, Ig kitchen, family rm, fenced
pond $99,900 #75951 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfect starter home. Quiet area.
Wood laminate floors, Ig dining,
F -nch doors. I car garage/work-
shop. $84,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.
SECLUSION on 10+ ac near Live
Oak; 3BR/2BA DWMH w/1,188
SqFt surrounded by rolling land
$54,900 #76656 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
Solid Home! Needs updating.
Country eat in kitchen & formal
dining.Some windows replaced.
$70,000 Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Totally refurbished 2/2 w/
workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Very Nice 4/2 on 4 acres w/open
floor plan, 2 living rooms, eat in
kitchen, dining rm and rec rm
w/wet bar $89,900 Call Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well maintained 3/2 DWMH,
1568 sq ft, acres, new roof,
$65,000, MLS#76187
Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001


810 Home for Sale
Woodcrest S/D Super location.
nice back yard. 3br/2ba home.
cov-
ered back porch. New AC in 2010
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
WOODGATE VILLAGE.
3br/2ba DWMH.
Close to new elementary
school. $27,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
820 Farms &
SAcreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
Q830 Commercial
O Property
Great Investment/Owner Finance
1400 sq ft building on 2 acres
Creative terms, owner flexible.
Call for details. 386-867-1190
Prime Commercial Property
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya 3.27 acres, room for building
$398.888 386-867-1271
Call Nancy @ Results Realty

940 Trucks
2007 Chevy Regular Cab, 6 cyl,
auto, a/c, only 41,000 miles,
Rountree Ford Myron Wrubel
386-755-0630 x 292 $12,888
2008 F-450 King Ranch
Diesel Duelly, 36K miles,
Tommie Jefferson 386-209-8680
Rountree Moore Ford $39,995
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802


940 Trucks




Work Truck 1990 Ford
F350 Dually. 5th Wheel
White. Automatic
$1500 obo 386-965-2215


950 Cars for Sale
2007 Mercury Grand Marquis GS
25K miles, stock #7300, only
$12.888, call Myron Wrubel @
Rountree Moore Ford 755-0630
2008 Nissan Ultima, white, 106K
miles, 20 in. rims, tinted windows,
excellent condition,
take over pymt's 386-984-6366
2010 Ford Escape Limited, V6,
auto, moon roof, white, 21K miles,
stock # F263 Dwight Twiggs
Rountree Moore Ford 755-0630
2010 Toyota Corolla, 8153K
miles, 35 MPG, stock #24598A,
$13,995, Call Tommie Jefferson
@ Rountree Moore Ford 209-8680
GET CASH TODAY!!
for your car, truck, van or SUV.
(Running or not). Call anytime.
(229)412-0380

951 Recreational
S Vehicles
Homestead Ranger Travel Trailer
28ft. One slideout Fiberglass,
Awning, sleeps 8. $11,000.
(850)322-7152


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LAKE CITY, FL 32055
tNext to Shirley's Restaurant "
(386) 243-8027 STORE (386) 867-1133 CELL
m H T u .Waz u .a 'aza




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Most cars & trucks
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Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
crisok@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, February 6, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Local mother and daughter attend classes

at Florida Gateway College. Both are ...


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Green

thumb for

tropical

fruit?

e may not
live in the
tropics, but
we can still
grow tropi-
cal fruit for fun.
Tropicals grown in con-
tainers are mobile and can
be moved indoors during
periods of low, damaging
temperatures.
There are actually quite
a few very interesting tropi-
cal fruits that we can grow
in containers.
Avocado, banana,
limeberry, miracle fruit,
passion fruit, papaya and
Barbados cherry are only a
few of many choices.
But don't expect as
much fruit or the same
well formed plants as those
growing in the tropics.
Containers, such as half
barrels or ceramic pots, are
normally available at gar-
den supply stores.
They must have enough
bottom holesto drain ,,way
excess water.
Soil can be prevented
from washing out by plac-
ing wire mesh over the
holes.
A two-inch layer of gravel
at the bottom of the pot will
also help with drainage.
Bagged potting soils are
suitable for growing your
tropical fruit, but you can
mix your own.
Use one part peat, one
part sand, and one part
bark, perlite or vermiculite.
The final mix should be
loose enough to allow good
drainage while still retain-
ing moisture.
If the roots of, your new
plant are pot-bound, loosen
them by hand, and prune
larger roots.
Plant it at the same
depth, and keep the soil
surface a few inches below
the container rim so you'll
have room for watering.
Most fruit crops grow
best is full sun, so position
your tree where it will get
the most sunlight.
It may need to be moved
seasonally for the best
sun exposure. And move
it inside, of course, during
freezing weather.
Improper watering is the
number one killer of con-
tainer plants.
Plants should only be
watered when needed, so
take time to figure that out.
Many factors such as
the container, soil mix,
growth stage, season, and
location all contribute to
proper watering practices.
Learn more about growing
container fruit crops at the
UF/IFAS site http://edis.
ifas. ufl. edu/mg243
Don't miss the Spring
Vegetable Gardening
Workshop in Fort White
on the Feb. 17 and in Lake
City on the Feb. 19.
Call the Extension Office
for details at 752-5384.

* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


using


a


dream


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Sixteen-year-old Jordan Yarbrough (left) practices an algebraic equation with her mother, Jami, 34, who goes to class with
her at Florida Gateway College. The two strive toward a degree in nursing.


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
It's never too late
or too early
to attend school
at Florida Gateway
College for mother-
and-daughter duo Jami
and Jordan Yarbrough.
Jami Yarbrough, 34,
an artist and stay-at-
home mom, and Jordan
Yarbrough, 16, began
taking FGC's prerequi-
site classes for nursing
together in the summer of
2010 and are in their sec-
ond year.
Attending the college
was a first-time step for
both.
Since Jordan Yarbrough
was homeschooled and
.graduated high school
at age 15, FGC was her
first school. For Jami
Yarbrough, the college
was her first experience
with secondary education.
After much convincing
from her daughter, Jami
Yarbrough said she decid-
ed to join her in going to
school since she would
be driving her daughter
to class, picking her up.
and helping her with her
homework.
"I figured I should get
a degree, too, if I'm going
to have to help her with
her homework," Jami
Yarbrough said.


. "^

Air
H-- BBlht
*"'" a^1
ms


3am' (\eW) ato ~ot os orga~'S '~OU~


"And it would've been A friend who had gone
really scary for me to go through FGC's nursing
from being homeschooled program encouraged
and then just thrown into Jordan Yarbrough's
college all by myself," interest in the field. For
Jordan Yarbrough said. Jami Yarbrough, nursing
The mother-and-daugh- would still afford her the
ter team both chose to opportunity to work with
start taking classes for children.
nursing in hopes of join- "I did not want to go
ing the health care pro- back to school," Jami
fession, a field most of Yarbrough said, "I wanted
their family works in that to have babies and bake
provides stable jobs, Jami cookies. I just wanted to
Yarbrough said. be a mom and I didn't


have any desire to go
back to school. My hus-
band, friends and Jordan
really pushed me and I
finally convinced myself I
should go back because
I love children, so I can
work as a nurse and work
with children and bring
home a paycheck."
The pair commutes
to and from school
together, takes all their
classes together, will
study for exams together


and belongs to Phi
Theta Kappa, FGC's
International Honor
Society.
By working together,
they balance out each oth-
er's strengths and weak-
nesses and can identify
with one another. Jordan
Yarbrough said she keeps
her mother organized,
but her mother keeps her
from procrastinating.
"Ift's actually really
good because we are each
other's support system,"
Jordan Yarbrough said.
"When she has her
down days, I'll pick her
up and whenever I have
mine, she'll pick me up,"
she said. "And most par-
ents don't really get to go
(to school), .they'll try to
help their kids with their
homework and stuff, but
she actually knows what
ifts like in that class and
how the teacher is."
"I think it's a great
privilege," Jami Yarbrough
said, referring to her
experience attending
school with her daughter.
"I'm excited. I came to see
her succeed and, in turn, I
also get to see myself suc-
ceed."'" *
Jami Yarbrough said
she is a mother to her
daughter first and a
friend second. Attending
school together builds
and strengthens their per-
sonal relationship, Jordan
Yarbrough said.
"It definitely builds,"
Jami Yarbrough said,
"because I see things in
Jordan I didn't see before.
I see her growing into a
beautiful young woman
from my little girl. And
I get to be here and see
every step, just like I
wanted to when she was
a baby, I wanted to see
"every step she took and
now I can really see her
grow."
After the two graduate
with their associate degrees
in the fall, they both plan
to wait to continue their
education until the college
can begin its bachelor's
program in nursing in 2012,
a step FGC is currently
working on.
While their educa-
tion will be the same,
their nursing fields will
probably be different,
Jordan Yarbrough said.
Jami Yarbrough wants
to be either a pediatric
nurse or work in labor
and delivery and Jordan
Yarbrough hopes to work
in an Emergency Room as
either a traveling nurse or
a physician's assistant
Attending school with
her daughter has chal-
lenged her positively, Jami
Yarbrough said.
"I wouldn't have tried
some of the things that
she wanted to," Jami
Yarbrough said. "She
wanted a full load of
classes and I wanted to
just take a few. She's
really encouraged me to
really apply myself and to
think beyond really what I
thought I could do."
Both said when they
graduate with their bache-
lor's degrees, they will miss
their school-time together.
"It has really been a
positive experience," Jami
Yarbrough said. "Well be
sad when we don't go to
school anymore."








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011


Are diamonds really a girl's best friends?


Does every
woman
believe she
should receive
a diamond
engagement ring? Is a
groom-to-be convinced
that he must pay two
months' salary for that
ring? With Valentine's Day
approaching, these are two
good questions to ask.
If you've heard Marilyn
Monroe (1953) or Carol
Channing (1949 on
Broadway) sing this song
in "Gentlemen Prefer
Blondes," you might
believe this is true. It's
listed as the 12th most
important movie song of
all time by the American
Film Institute.
Prior to the 1930s, dia-,
mond rings were rarely
given to symbolize engage-
ment. You can thank
DeBeers Diamond syndi-
cate and a clever Chicago
ad agency for develop-
ing the "A Diamond is
Forever" campaign in
1947, which forever linked
diamonds to romance. It
transformed the diamond
industry and was named


by Advertising Age as the
"slogan of the 20th cen-
tury."
DeBeers used product
placement making sure
movie stars wore large
diamonds to premieres.
Entire sequences in mov-
ies centered around pre-
senting one's fiancee with
a diamond engagement
ring.
Since "A Diamond is
Forever," other ad cam-
paigns convinced buyers
to hold onto their family
diamonds as heirlooms.
This effectively eliminated
the secondary or resale
market.
Thanks to DeBeers, the
public now owns 500 mil-
lion carats of gemstone
diamonds.
The ad agency further
noted that when women <
were involved in the selec-
tion of the engagement
ring, they tended to pick
cheaper rings. So DeBeers
encouraged the "surprise"
engagement, with men
picking the diamond and
popping the question unex-
pectedly.
Are diamonds a good


sheri. carder@fgc.edu
investment?
Not for average Joes like
you and me.
Not one of us has ever
resold a diamond for more
than we paid for it
It's simple: You buy at
retail and you have to sell
at wholesale.
Consider it from an
economic standpoint:
Diamonds really are not
rare; supply exceeds
demand. To maintain the
high prices of diamonds,
DeBeers creates an artifi-
cial scarcity: It stockpiles
mined diamonds and sell
them in small amounts.
The advertising has
been clever. Diamonds
were once rare one
might have found a dia-
mond the size of a skull in
a river in India as far back


as 5,000 years ago. But
the huge finds in the dia-
mond pipes of South Africa
changed all that.
The DeBeer brothers
discovered diamonds on
their farm but they had no
way of protecting the farm
from the "diamond rush"
and the diamond seekers
who came, so they sold
the land and the mines. An
Englishman, Cecil Rhodes
(yes, he established the
Rhodes scholars program)
started selling water
pumps to them. .
Later, he found financ-
ing and started buying out
all the individual miners.
Prior to the 1800s, the
entire world production of
diamonds was only a few
pounds per year.
The DeBeers syndi-
cate had to protect its
investment. Cecil Rhodes
(founder of DeBeers)
said, "Our only risk is the
sudden discovery of new
mines, which will work
recklessly to the detriment
of us all."
Ernest Oppenheimer
(1902) at first refused to
join DeBeers and gave


them a run for their
money.
"Common sense tells
us that the only way to
increase the value of dia-
monds is to make them
scarce," he said. And the
diamond cartel did just
that. DeBeers controlled
80 percent to 90 percent
of the world's rough dia-
monds for most of the 20th
century. As a result, dia-
monds have risen in price
every year since the Great
Depression.
With all this said, dia-
monds are simply carbon.
And, yes, labs can create
diamonds from carbon.
There are companies that
will take your loved one's
cremated ashes and con-
vert them into "diamonds,"
which can be set into
jewelry at a cost of $2,500-
$20,000.
We're still being manipu-
lated by diamond supply
control and marketing.
After a large diamond
strike in Siberia (Russia)
produced many smaller
stones (all less than 1/2
carat), marketing was
developed to use these


smaller stones dia-
mond "tennis" bracelets,
the "eternity" ring with
small diamonds all the
way around the band, the
three-stone "past, pres-
ent, and future" ring as an
anniversary gift, the 2006
"journey" necklace with at
least four diamonds from
large to small "represent-
ing how love grows."
In summary: Diamonds
are the most wanted, and
the most costly, of all
gemstones. And they are
exquisite. If you're fol-
lowing the "two months'
salary" rule, and you earn
$30,000, tradition states
you're on the hook for a
$5,000 diamond engage-
ment ring. Earn $50,000.
and you're looking at
$8,333 of ice.
So, when you're consid-
ering the 4 Cs of diamonds
- cut, carat, color, clarity
- maybe you should add
a fifth c: Cardiac arrest!

0 Dr. Sheri Carder is profes-
sor of marketing and man-
agement at Florida Gateway
College. She can be reached
at 386-754-4407.


ENGAGEMENT


COURTESY PHOTO


Carla -Jean Frese and Stanley Woodson Jr.


Frese Woodson
Mr. Steven Karl Frese of
Live Oak and Mrs. Rebecca
Kathleen Villar of Lake City
announce the engagement
of their daughter, Carla
Jean Frese of Lake City to
Stanley Woodson Jr. of Live
Oak. He is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Stanley Woodson
Sr. of Live Oak.
The bride-elect is a 2006
graduate from Columbia
High School and joined the
United States Air Force in
August 2009 as a weather
forecaster where she is cur-
rently stationed at Davis-
Monthan Air Force Base
in Tucson, Ariz. She is also
continuing her education


Herring Green
Christa and Danny
Herring of Lake City
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Carissa
Herring of Lake City, to
Kyle Green of Lake City. He
is the son of Steve and Lisa
Green of Lake City.
A wedding is planned for
2 p.m. Feb. 12 at First Full
Gospel Church. A recep-
tion will 'follow at Lulu
Community Center.
All friends and family are
invited.



Norris -Burton
Ronald and Barbara
Norris are proud to
announce the engagement
of their daughter, Krystal
Norris, to Gatlin Burton.
He is the son of Dennis
and Sandy Burton of Honea
Path, S.C.
The couple met at Christ
Central Ministries and went
through an internship pro-
gram together.
The bride-elect is current-
ly working at Still Waters
West Assisted Living as the
resident care coordinator.
The future groom also
works at Still Waters as the
activities director. A wed-
ding is planned for April 2 at
Christ Central Ministries.


through the Community
College of the Air Force
with aspirations to receive
her associate's in weather
technology this year. She
enjoys traveling, reading,
horseback riding, hiking,
spending time with her
family and learning new
things.
Thefuturegroomis a 2002
graduate of Suwannee High
School and was employed at
New Millennium Building
Systems in Lake City for
the past five years before
relocating to Tucson, Ariz.
He enjoys playing the gui-
tar and ukulele, listening to
music, reading, photogra-
phy, bicycling, hiking and
hunting.


Grab your computer


mouse, play with a cat


By TERRENCE PETTY
Associated Press

PORTLAND, Ore.
- More than 90,000 cat
lovers from 112 coun-
tries have played with
the kittens at the Oregon
Humane Society since
September wiggling
and yanking on kitty toys
at the shelter's play room.
You'd think such a large
number of people would be
tripping over each other at
the shelter. But- these vis-
its are by remote, thanks
to real-time technology
that lets fans of felines use
their computers to manipu-
late the toys, which dangle
from robotic arms.
It's a game of cat'and
computer mouse.
The kitties whack and
tug at the toys and occa-
sionally 'tumble with each
other while their human
playmates watch via 'cat-
cam. Cats being cats,
sometimes they ignore
the toys.
The technology, called
iPetCompanion, was
invented by a small Idaho
company, Apriori Control,
and was first tested by the
Idaho Humane Society in


Boise last June.
"After launching our
first site live in Idaho, we
received an enormous
response from Humane
Societies around the coun-
try," said Scott Harris,
head of Apriori.
He chose the Oregon
Humane .Society for the
next launch.
"All I had to do was pro-
vide space and kittens,"
said Barbara Baugnon,
communications director
at the Portland shelter.
One purpose of the pro-
gram is to increase cat
adoptions by letting would-
be adopters play with the
cats without having to trav-
el to the shelters. That's
working.
Adoptions are up 16
percent at the Oregon
Humane Society, and have
increased at the Boise
shelter as well.
But there's more going
on here. People overseas
who have played with the
Idaho and Oregon kittens
are probably not about to
book a flight to the Pacific
Northwest to adopt a cat.
Interacting with cats can
have a soothing effect on
humans, even if it is done


remotely. Not everyone is
a cat lover. But for people
who are, using the robotic
arm to play with kittens
can be irresistible.
Some of the, human
playmates are people who
can't own cats, whether
because of building rules,
allergies or other reasons.
Disabled people with lim-
ited mobility also play with
the kitties.
The average interac-
tive time per viewer at the
Idaho shelter is nearly 14
minutes; at the Oregon
shelter it's just shy of 15
minutes, said Harris. The
Idaho site has had more
than 86,000 unique visitors
from 108 countries. For
both shelters, the greatest
number of visitors have
been American, followed
by Germans, Australians,
Canadians, Britons,
Estonians and Swiss. Some
71.3 percent of people who
visit the Idaho site come
back again; that rate in
Oregon is 85.6.
If this is fun for humans,
what's in it for the cats?
Having humans avail-
able to play 24/7 can be
good for their mental and
physical health.


COURTESY PHOTO
Carissa Herring and Kyle
Green.


1( il evs fl1 il i ,. .'-m.:. ., ..-,

IOes KiWA


S. .: ', '*.* .* ** ''
.".- ., ... .








'k.
3; 8 -"= -5. 5" *-*;, . ;.0-'-,. ,. 1
.; ,,-* -. o-. ;, ,. ,:. .
i~ l v. . k. t .. -. : -. .. ., : i.


COURTESY PHOTO
Krystal Norris and Gaitlin
Burton.


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Sarah Butler
Michael O'Rourke
February 26, 2011


Heather Johnson
JR Perry
March 12, 2011


Tiffany Torrans
Kyle Malone
March 19, 2011


Shannon McRae
Michael Bishop
March 19, 2011


Dianna Roberts
Jay Swisher
March 26, 2011.


Dorrie Sloan
James Albritton, Jr.
April 2, 2011


Joanna Watson
Dustin King
April 15, 2011


Christine Moses
David Moor
May 21, 2011
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding or
shower gift, We.update their
list as gifts are purchased,
and gift wrap.
SWARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Waiting room reading could

be hazardous to your health


DEAR ABBY: May I
make a plea to all physi-
cians? Please remove the
magazines and children's
books from your waiting
rooms! Again and again, I
see patients sneezing and
coughing over and around
these materials without
covering their mouths, and
handling them with contam-
inated hands.
The next patient who
innocently touches one of
those items puts him or her-
self at risk of infection. The
same applies'to children's
toys, if they are provided in
waiting rooms.
My advice -to patients,
and to parents of children
with appointments, is to
bring their own reading
materials, iPads, laptops or
needlework to pass the time
waiting for their doctor's ap-
pointment. Parents should
bring a favorite toy for this
purpose.
Let's all work together
to keep our germs to our-
selves. Thank you for get-
ting the word out, Abby.
- EDYTHE IN TENNES-
SEE
DEAR EDYTHE: That's
excellent advice, and some-
thing people rarely think
of. Children frequently put
their hands in their mouths
- and adults who touch the
furniture and doorknobs in
doctor's offices should wash
their hands before touching
their faces. An ounce of pre-


Abigail Van Buren
wwwdearobby.com

vention is worth a pound of
cure and it's less expen-
sive!
DEAR ABBY: Your col-
umns about the kindness of
strangers impel me to relate
a recent experience. As an
80-year-old retired general
contractor, I stay busy by
making custom furniture.
Recently, I picked up a full
load of hardwood planks.
Because some of the
pieces were very long, I
had to keep the tailgate of
my pickup truck down. All
went well until I reached the
first stop sign. When I start-
ed to pull away, my.truck
went forward, but the load
stayed put! Halfway across
the busy intersection with
traffic going all directions, I
panicked. I knew I couldn't
lift those 46 planks by my-
self.
Out of nowhere, two gen-
tlemen rushed through the
traffic, and without a word,
began loading the planks,
two at a time, into my truck.
When they were all loaded, I
offered each young man my
heartfelt thanks. My prof-


fered reward was brushed
aside with a short, "That's
not necessary. Have a good
day!" People are great in
Southern California. -
GRATEFUL IN GARDEN
GROVE, CALIF.
DEAR GRATEFUL:
Actually, people are great
all over. But as another resi-
dent of Southern California,
I second the motion.
DEAR ABBY: I would
like to offer a word of
hope for all those hurting
grandmothers whose sons'
wives have been unkind
or ignored them. Have pa-
tience! Someday those very
same daughters-in-law will
be mothers-in-law. In my
case, my grandson married
a girl just like his mother.
Now my daughter-in-law is
a grandma, too, and she's
getting the same kind of
treatment she gave me. Of
course, I say nothing but
I smile a lot.
Please don't print my
name or town. Sign me ...
SMILING IN ILLINOIS
DEAR SMILING: Yours
may be a knowing smile, but
it proves the truth of that old
song lyric, "When you're
smiling, the whole world
smiles with you." Your letter
is a reminder of how often
events come full circle with
unexpected results.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Settle down, keep
things in perspective and do
not overdo it in any way. You
will be prone to excess and
should think before you act.
Put your time and effort into
working toward a cause you
believe in. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): View how others
live or do things. A good
base for anything requires
equality and balance. Strive
to get along and work your
way through any difficulties
you face and you will come
up with suitable solutions.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You can dazzle and mys-
tify the people you deal with
but remember that heart and
soul must be a part of your
presentation if you want
things to stick. Truth and
sincerity are your friends; ex-
aggeration and ego are your
enemies. **
CANCER (June 21-July
22): .Show your passion-
ate and loving side to oth-
ers and you will win favors.
Make changes based on the
way you feel and you will not


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last
make a mistake. A residen-
tial move or alterations at
home will lead to less stress.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You need to get away, change
your surroundings and find
some adventure. The inspi-
ration and motivation you
get from the experience you
have will enable you to reach
much higher goals. Live,
love, laugh. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Do your best to come
up with ideas, solutions and
plans that will turn your sur-
roundings into a friendlier en-
vironment for you. Or update
your looks so you feel more
confident. Find a new direc-
tion to stabilize your position
in the future. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): Don't waste valuable
time on petty or inconsequen-
tial matters. Look at the big
picture if you want to make
the most of your day. Social-
ize with people you find men-'
tally stimulating. Get the ball


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
S, Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: P equals B *
"V ZE DM TWE Y H AG ZO G ZY F HG U
OH Y F W GM SBE'Y WHG YM PCC Y Y F B
RHU F Y Z V Y F B R Y WER DWABR D'B
LE B W D." I HGSBG Y I W G U Z U F
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "People are too durable, that's their main trouble.
They can do too much to themselves, they last too long." Bertolt Brecht
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 2-7


rolling. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You'll be stifled
by all the turmoil and change
going on in your personal life.
Step outside your immediate
situation and you will find
the clarity you need to make
an important decision. Be-
lieve in your own judgment.

SAGITIARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): The situa-
tion you've been living with
can be altered to better suit
your needs but only if you are
willing to face the music and
make the necessary choices.
With alterations, you can feel
better about the direction
you are moving. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You'll be torn be-
tween what you feel you want
to do and what you know you
should do. Your personal and
professional future will .be
influenced by your choices.
.It's vital you don't let an emo-
tional relationship be the de-
termining factor. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You'll get worked
up over little things that de-
velop. Try to stay calm and
maintain perspective. Noth-
ing is as difficult as you imag-
ine. Don't let your emotions
get the better of you. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Keep things simple and
stick to a conventional path. It
may be tempting to be a little
eccentric but, in order to get
approval and what you need
to get things started, you will
have to conform. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


CIRCLE OF LIFE By Kevin G. Der and Jessica A. Hdi / Edited by Will Shortz 2 1 3 19 I


Across
1 Rum, vodka and
orange juice
drink
7 "Little" barnyard
bird with an
alliterative name
in a classic
Willie Dixon
blues song
11 "Let me think ...
14 Costume party
accessory
17 Pope after,
Marinus I
20 Trying
22 Turner of records
23 Felt like forever
24 Interludes
25 Cultural grp.
26 Viewable, to a
camera operator
27 Author Marsh
29 EarthLink and
others
30 Result of turning
the corner?
31 Became annoyed
34 New England's
Cape ___
35 Roman 1,150
37 Detached
39 Public person?
41 Pillow talk?
42 Cage in
Hollywood
45 Fellowship foes
49 So-called "Heart
of Texas"
50 Eschew
51 "See you then!"
52 Famous fiddler
53'Words to a traitor
54 Steering system
parts
56 bien"
(Spanish for
"It's good")
57 Bit of a muscle
car's muscle
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


59 ___ Joe, "Tom
Sawyer"
character
61 Do-do connector
62 Looney Tunes
character with a
snout
64 Fashionista's
concern
65 Abide
66 Surprise visitors
68 British isle
69 Suffix with
torrent
71. Driller's letters
72 Poker declaration
73 Pound sound
76 Top-rated show
of 2002-05
77 What the 41-
Down has
82 Pooh's young pal
83 Mauna ___
84 Land of
Ephesians.
85 When doubled,
first name in old
Hollywood
86 Spanish "that"
87 ___ system (way
of classifying
blood)
88 Most divine
90 Rattletrap
93 Cobra product
95 Cobra products
98 Ariz. neighbor
99 Swingers in a
saloon
100 Person who
likes the blues?
101 Mottled
102 Soldier's meal
container
104 Very
106 Palliative plant
107 Winter
Olympics
performance
since 1976
110 Den ___,
Nederland
111 Ubangi tributary
112 Phalanx's
weaknesses
113 Thinned out


114 Driller's letters
115 Facing, with
"from'
117 Halved
118 Be shy
119 "What?!"
120 Serves
125 King Arthur's
family name
127 Make out, in
York
129 Old saw
131 With craft
132 Getup
133 Italian liqueurs
136 Strip in a
darkroom
139 "The Lovely
Bones"
composer, 2009
140 Topic at. an
owners/players
meeting
141 Heyday
142 Source of
enlightenment
143 Terminal
144 1960 Updike
novel
145 Four-time
Masters winner
Down
1 Two-letter
combinations
2 Continue, as an
uncontrollFed fire
3 Most common
draw in Scrabble'
4 Comic Caesar
5 Priory in "The Da
Vinci Code".
6 Tomfoolery
7 City NNE of
Tahoe
8 Bus. line
9 Patriotic women's
org.
10 Wakes thrown up
behind
speedboats
11 Revealing 1970s
wear
12 Cereal mixes
13 Ed.'s work pile
14 Portable red or
white holder 'I


15 Low-priced
furniture source
16 Tent or sleeping
bag, e.g. *
17 Take ___ at
(insult)
18 1962 action film
set in Jamaica
19 Finnish
transport?
20 Mark in marble
21 Suffix with
rhythm.
28 Whichever
30 Samaritans
32 Galley figure
33 State in French
35 Peeved pout
36 Hotelier Hilton
38 South American
tuber
40 Be part of, as a
film
41 Collection of
animals featured
in this puzzle
43 Lawyer: Abbr.
44 Fat underwater
creature
45 Like a Mountie
46 Musical echo
47 Dalmatian's
home
48 Like wild oats
50 Strong
51 Dumbness.
55 Foppish courtier
in Hamlet"
58 It may be limited
or late
60 Revelation comes
after it
62 Doctor's orders
63 Away for a while
65 1985.John
Malkovich drama
67 Reggie Miller,
for one
70 People leaving
the company?
73 Breakfast in a
bar
74 High-tech officer
in film


75. Hotel figures
78 Mortgage holder,
e.g.
79 Florist's supply
80 Comparable in
reach .
81 "Hair" co-writer
James
88 See 91-Down
89 Pilot program?
91 With 88-Down,
2000 Ang Lee
film
92 One of the tribes
of Israel


94 Online
publication, for
short
95 Place where a
person may be
itten
96 Director Vittorio
De __
97 Sticking with it
100 number on
(mentally
abuses)
102 Noted Ronald
103 London tourist
stop
105 Dull


108 Works at a
museum
109 Blitzer, e.g.
114 Much-wanted
toon in
Toontown
115 Dumas's "La
Dame ___
Camelias"
116'Combed
(through)
119 Lock plate
121 Cobra products
122 Hindu deity
123 Designer
Cassini


124 Nasdaq.
alternative
125 W. or J.F.K.
126 A, to
Zimmermann
128 60 minuti
129 Grouse
130 ___ Mix
133 Enzyme ending
134 Norse war god
135 The Horned
Frogs, for short
137 Mop & ___
138 Something
about nothing?


8 4 7 9 2


7 6 8


9 8 7 3


6 1 5 2


2 6


5 3 1


4 7 5


5 9 1 3 4


1 8


Answers to
TAL IA
ORI NG
TI LDES
EST RTE JET


last Sunday's Crossword.
VALUE HBOMB
A I LING I IMPAIRS
BRANDO NOS~YTRIL
BAND DDAAN R Y
B A N llJD hU T l AII


MESGMCASN BURN EW AOD
NUS ENS AMASSES ANGLE
SHOTAT MDASH SKY SEW
YACHT T LUMPSUM ETES
NU KES A SIS PA DNA


iDATE WEQD APECTT
C 0M JLl sE0 ST ANS BISH 0 P

I 0DEE W W A SP HPI


BEN A Z I R C H U R R 0

W SA AERDDDAG I Y


SN


C 8 6 9 7 LL 9Z


7 LZ 91 8 8L 6 9


9 L 9 Z 6 L 1V 8


6 L 6 9 9 8 17L


9 9 8 LL L VZ 6


L 1 % 8 Z 6 9 L 9


L 9 CIL 8 9 6 Z 7
8 V 9 69 lZ LL




Z 6 L 17 LS 9 9 8


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


L B IA RYE X0M Y C H R 0


Mw0






4D LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2011


february 14


Dining


&


is kle


*


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CHAMILIA
f'!@ *Ij'F'RE Y.-- ^IR SW- J 4E.
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