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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01371
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: February 5, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01371
System ID: UF00028308:01371
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text



000014 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943



Lak e


Reporter


Saturday, February 5, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 13 E 75 cents


THE


P


Suspect in triple slaying had 23 cases


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Reporter
Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter (left) exchange
information with investigators Thursday.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com

The nagging, unanswered ques-
tion is 'why?'
Columbia County Sheriff's inves-
tigators continue to search for a
motive that turned a friendly get
together among four friends into a
violent bloodbath that left three of
the four dead from multiple gun-
shots around midnight Wednesday.
Then, the alleged shooter
methodically turned himself in at
Lake City Police Department head-
quarters while at -the same time


safely delivering one of the victim's
5-year-old child to law enforcement
officers.
Alan Lucas
Strattan, 25, 1506
SE Baya Drive,
faces charges of
three counts of
first-degree mur-
der and one count
of willful killing of
Strattan an unborn child in
connection with the shooting deaths
of his friends, Monica Hudson, 27;
Nichole Cervantez, 25 and Michael
Kevin Tucker, 32. Cervantez was
about five months pregnant, inves-


tigators said.
Sheriff's investigators and staff
members from State Attorney Skip
Jarvis' office spent time piecing
together findings from the case
and officially booked the charges
on Friday.
"All of the charges are capital
offenses," said Sgt. Ed Seifert,
:Columbia County Sheriff's Office
public information officer.
Strattan had his first court
appearance on the murder charges
Thursday morning by jail video
conference with County Judge Tom
SUSPECT continued on 3A


Hudson

stepdad

demands

answers

By C.J. RISAK
crisak@lakecityreporter. corn
A ay after his step-
daughter, Monica
Hudson, had been
murdered, Dustin
Bass had more
questions than answers.
"I just feel numb," he said,
trying to make sense of the
triple murder that.took the
life of Hudson as well as
Kevin Tucker and Nichole
,Cervantez.
Early Thursday morn-
ing, Alan Lucas Strattan of
Lake City turned himself
in at the Lake City Police
Department following the
shooting deaths of Hudson,
Tucker and Cervantez. He
has been charged with three
counts of first-degree murder
and a single count of willful
killing of an unborn child.
Cervantez was believed to be
five months pregnant.
According to Bass, Hudson
had two children from a pre-
vious relationship, both liv-
ing with their father in Iowa,
and a third with Strattan.
Hudson's youngest daughter
will celebrate her first birth-
day later this month, Bass
said, who together with his
wife, Mary, are the child's
guardians.
The questions Bass wanted
answers to each filtered down
from one basic query: How
could this happen?
Since June 2001 and
December 2010, Strattan had
been charged nine times with
domestic violence or bat-
tery. Each time, the charge
was dismissed. On July 12,
STEPDAD continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Greg Appelt (left) and Roger German, both of Jacksonville, bow their heads in silence during a candle-
light memorial held in Olustee Park in downtown Lake City on Friday, The vigil was held to honor the
memory of Monica Hudson, Nichole Cervantez, Michael Tucker and Jodi Wood.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Mary Bass (left photo, right), mother of Monica Hudson, cries out during the candlelight memorial at
Olustee Park in downtown Lake City Friday night. Dustin Bass, Hudson's stepfather, gestures as he
speaks to the crowd.


LC vigil

honors

4 local

victims

By A.C. GONZALEZ
agonzalez@lakecityreporter.com

domestic violence,
including three
who were mur-
dered Thursday,
were remembered in a
candlelight vigil Friday at
Olustee Park.
Donna Fagan, executive
director of Another Way, Inc.,
said Thursday's murders hit
so close to home she felt they
needed to put something
together quickly to honor the
victims' families.
"We had just decided to do
the memorial and everyone
in Lake City was on top of
it," she said. 'We made fliers,
which people then copied and
spread throughout the town."
The people gathered in
memory of Monica Hudson,
Nichole Cervantez and
Michael Tucker, who died
Thursday, and Jodi Wood,
killed last summer. The
emotion of the those in atten-
dance ranged from grief to
anger towards the way offi-
cials dealt with those accused
of the crimes before they
were committed.
"Everybody I've-talked to is
horrified that this happened
in Lake City and it's time that
the people of Lake City held
their elected officials respon-
sible," Fagan said. "If they
(officials) aren't doing what
they're supposed to, then
don't elect them anymore."
Dustin Bass, Hudson's
father, and Cecil Ratliff, Sr.,
Tucker's father, agreed with
VICTIMS continued on 3A


Three people face drug charges


Mobile meth lab found
at back of truck in
store's parking lot.
From staff reports
Three people were arrested and
face multiple drug-related charges
after local authorities busted a secret,
mobile methamphetamine laboratory
Friday during a traffic stop.
Thomas Flavil Rucker Jr., 42, 3164
Ravines Road, Middleburg; Deborah
Shiver, 34, 101 Hillside Drive, Dothan,
>!M Sl' 1 ^ ~ a i.'' ,*:


(386)752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1111 1 Fax: 752-9400
1 :.- uii i 11 a l' W


Ala., and Shiloh Stamper, 32, 2452 SW
Nautilus Road, were arrested and
bdoked into the Columbia County
Detention Facility in relation to the
case.
Rucker is charged with the manu-
facture of methamphetamine, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia and
possession of listed chemicals.
Shiver is also charged with the
manufacture of methamphetamine,
possession of drug paraphernalia and
possession of listed chemicals.
Stamper is charged with resist-
ing an officer without violence and


62
Rain Likely
WEATHER, 2A


possession of a controlled substance
without prescription, in connection
with the case.
According to Columbia County
Sheriff's Office reports, around 4
p.m. Friday, agents with the Columbia
County Multi-Jurisdictional Task
Force conducted a traffic stop on a
1983 Ford Ranger at the Lake City
Walmart Parking lot.
The Columbia County Multi-
Jurisdictional Task Force is com-

DRUGS continued on 3A


Opinion ................ A
Obituaries ............ 5A
Advice & Comics......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B
Faith ................... 61-


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Reporter
Columbia County Sheriff Deputies Shawn Skies (left) and
Greg Horn place a female suspect under arrest Friday in the
Walmart parking lot.


FAITH &
VALUES
Church presents
international talents.


COMING
SUNDAY
Mother, daughter
nurse their dreams.


I


I










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2011


Friday:
Afternoon: 9-3-7
Evening: 6-6-5


Friday:
Afternoon: 1-1-1-0
Evening: 2-7-8-2


Thursday:
15-20-26-29-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Colbert to auction his portrait


NEW YORK
S1 tephen Colbert is trying a
new role: art dealer.
Comedy Central
announced Friday that
the host of "The Colbert
Report" is,putting one of his por-
traits up for auction. Colbert has
repeatedly had himself painted in
comically self-aggrandizing style.
This one is referred to as "Portrait 5,
Stephen(s)."
But it's potentially the most valu-
able: Artists Frank Stella, Shepard
Fairey and Andres Serrano each
added their touch to the work in
December.
It will be sold March 8 by auc-
tion house Phillips de Pury &
Company, with proceeds going to
DonorsChoose.org, which helps class-
room projects.
Another Colbert portrait was hung
in Washington's National Portrait,
Gallery in 2008. Despite his conser-
vative pundit's disregard for high
culture, Colbert has increasingly
embraced the art world. He recently
claimed to be the elusive graffiti art-
ist Banksy.

Ed Asner glad to be the
'crab' on 'Working Class'
LOS ANGELES Ed Asner, a busy
actor at age 81, waves away any com-
parison to Betty White, Hollywood's 89-
year-old champion of the work ethic.
"She's not the female me. She's the
big cheese. She certainly is the mark I
shoot for," Asner said.
While White has shaken up her
image by hosting "Saturday Night
Live" and with the TV Land sitcom
"Hot in Cleveland" "showing them
all that jazz that she's got stored up in
her," as Asner puts it he says audi-
ences are used to "the usual crab ele-
merit I'm known for."
It's true that Asner is in full and


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this painting released by'Comedy Central, a portrait of Stephen Colbert, host of
'The Colbert Report,' is shown. The painting, which has been enhanced by artists
Frank Stella, Shepard Fairey and Andrew Serrano will be sold on March 8, with
proceeds going to DonorsChoose.org.
familiar grouchy glory in his latest employment in any field, and he's off
role, a grocery store worker who acts and running.
as adviser and foil to a single mom, "It sucks, doesn't it?" he said. "I can
Carli, in-CMTs "Working Class," star- understand how they don't want to see
ring Melissa Peterman. It's territory an old fart in front of the camera, but
he plowed in the animated movie when they start ruling out directors
"Up," and in TVs '"The Mary Tyler and cinematographers and produc-
Moore Show" and spinoff "Lou Grant" ers and writers because they're too
But he does it so awfully well, on old, there's something wrong in the
screen and in life. world."
Mention that he's lucky to work
when older people can struggle for, Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Country singer Claude
King is 88.
E The Rev. Andrew M.
Greeley is 83.
* Baseball Hall-of-Famer
Hank Aaron is 77.
* Actor Stuart Damon is 74.
* Actor David Selby is 70.
* Singer-songwriter Barrett
Strong.is 70.
* Football Hall-of-Famer


Roger Staubach is 69.
* Singer Cory Wells (Three
Dog Night) is 69.
* Movie director Michael
Mann is 68.
* Rock singer Al Kooper is
67.
* Racing Hall-of-Famer
Darrell Waltrip is 64.
* Actress Barbara Hershey
is 63.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., Is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All rpaterial herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecltyreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 100 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday; and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
. In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through'Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks.................$48.79
52 Weeks....................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Giffords would
embrace decision
HOUSTON The
astronaut husband of Rep.
Gabrielle Giffords said
Friday his wounded wife
would embrace his decision
to rocket into space in two
months and he expects her
to be well enough to be at
his launch.
Space shuttle commander
Mark Kelly refused to say
whether the congress-
woman took part in his deci-
sion and declined to go into
details about her condition
or whether she can com-
municate.
"I know her very well and
she would be very comfort-
able with the decision that I
made," Kelly told reporters.
His decision, announced
Friday, comes just four
weeks after Giffoirds was
shot in the head outside a
Tucson, Ariz., supermarket
His.choice to lead space
shuttle Endeavour's final
voyage was made easier,
he said, by his wife's rapid
progress in rehab.
The 46-year-old astronaut
said he never imagined in
the immediate aftermath of
the shooting that he would
ever fly the two-week mis-
sion. He immediately quit
training after the Jan. 8
shooting.
Kelly said he told her
mother there was no way
he'd leave Giffords' side.
Gloria Giffords responded,
'What, are you kidding
me?"

Killer on trial for
Panhandle slaying
TALLAHASSEE
- Plastic beads, blood,
boots, charred bones and a
bayonet will be key pieces
of evidence as a convicted
killer goes on trial for
a second decapitation
murder, a prosecutor said
Friday.
Chief Assistant State
Attorney Georgia


THE WEATHER


RAIN R PARTLY
LIKELY CLOUDY


162L043 H164L048


" SUNNY PARTLY
L*' CLOUDY


HI 60LO36 HI 64L050


..I.. f d ,F
ht gh/S^MfRi nlg.t'S low^j fifn^ ^^^^^^iH


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Astronaut Mark Kelly prepares to discuss his decision to com-
mand the final flight of the Space Shuttle Endeavor during'
a news conference at Johnson Space Center on Friday in
Houston. Kelly's wife, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, is recuperating
from a gunshot wound to the head in a Houston hospital.


Cappleman told jurors in
her opening statement that
Gary Michael Hilton's own
words on a self-made
video and in statements
to police and a fellow
inmate also will help
prove the drifter killed
Cheryl Dunlap, a 46-year-
old nurse from nearby
Crawfordville.
The balding, wiry
Hilton, 64, already is serv-
ing a life prison sentence
after pleading guilty to
murdering 24-year-old
hiker Meredith Emerson
in Georgia. He faces a pos-
sible death sentence if con-
victed of kidnapping and
murdering Dunlap. The
trial could take up to three
weeks.
Both victims were
decapitated and their
bodies dumped in for-
ested areas. Hunters
found Dunlap's remains
the Apalachicola National
Forest southwest of
Tallahassee in December
2007. Emerson's were
discovered the next month
in the Dawson Forest
Wildlife Management Area
near the north Georgia
town of Cumming.
Authorities also suspect
Hilton in at least three
other slaying in North
Carolina and Florida.


Assistant Public
Defender Ines Suber told
jurors most of the state's
evidence is circumstantial
and won't prove "beyond
a reasonable doubt" that
Hilton killed Dunlap.
Cappleman said-Dunlap
had gone to the National
Forest planning to read
a book and later meet a
friend when she disap-
peared on Dec. 1, 2007.

Deputies arrest
33 on drug charges
TAMPA Hillsborough
Sheriff's deputies have
arrested 33 people on
charges of dealing pre-
scription medications.
Officials said those
arrested on Thursday
range in age from 19 to
74 and are from different
socio-economic back-
grounds in all parts of
Hillsborough.
Records show that some
of the people got the pills
legitimately and sold them.
Others went "doctor shop-
ping" for them. Deputies
plan to interview each
suspect in the hopes that
those arrested will lead
them to other dealers and
unscrupulous clinics.


ensac5la
51/35


Tallahassee *
57/33 ,-

Panama City
52/36


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


7a turda
Saturday


Vidosta
58/36
Lake City.
62/43
', Gainesvlle
\.63/47
Ocala.
\66/49
Tap


Tamp
70/5


F


72
48
68
43
87 in 1957
18 in 1917

0.01"
1.36"
5.04"
0.48"
3.99"


City


* lacksonville Cape Can
63/46 Daytona B
Bea Ft. Lauder
Dana Beach Fort Myern
,7'50 Gainesville
0 Jacksonvll
.* .Key West
Orlando Cppt Canaveral Key West
7Fi/53 73/52 Lake City


averal
each
dale
s,
le


Miami
a .* Naples
2 West Palm Beach Ocala
80/60 Orlando
r Ft Lauderdale Panama City
LMyers: 80/63 *; Pensacola
77/60 Naples Tallahassee
,76/60 Mami Tampa
KeyWest 80/64 Valdosta
Ke79/67 W. Palm Beach
'79167


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moondse torn.
Moonset tornm.


7:19 a.m.
6:11 p.m.
S7:18 a.m.
6:12 p.m.

8:26 a.m.
8:42 p.m.
8:55 a.m.
9:34 p.m.


Feb. Feb. Feb. March
3. 18 24 4
First Full Last New


7p Yaunday 6a


- FmWast daltHpiO .F* :Flbibe hwnde


CrllEli I


On this date in
1990, winds in
Oregon gusted to
60 mph at Cape
Disappointment,
and wind gusts in
Washington State
reached 67 mph
at Bellingham. Ten
inches of snow also
fell at Timberline,
Ore.*


3

45 nites to n
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
.,


Sunday
68, 56, pc
65/52/sh
79/68/pc
74/58/pc
65/53/pc
61/51/pc
73/65/pc
64/48/pc
79/68/pc
77/63/.pc
65/53/pc
68/58/sh
58/49/pc
59/46/s
63/48/pc
67/53/sh
63/46/s
77/66/pc


Monday
74; 53, sh
71/48/sh
82/56/pc
74/56/sh
62/33/sh
63/34/sh
71/64/sh
62/32/sh
80/57/pc
76/52/c
64/36/sh
71/51/sh
62/40/pc
57/35/pc
64/31/sh
69/52/sh
60/35/sh
78/50/sh


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather corn


'-- I -" Forecasts, data and graph-
_" Ics 2011 Weather Central
LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.corn


et Connected



L____


* Associated Press


Daily Scripture


"For the director of music. Of
David the servant of the Lord.
He sang to the Lord the words
of this song when the Lord
delivered him from the hand
of all his enemies and from the
hand of Saul."
Psalm 18:1-2


Lake City Reporter


AROUND FLORIDA


M 0 NHflB


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


12 TES


WEDNESIDA


ME CITY ALMANAC


I


F


4 1-








P LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2011


SUSPECT
From Page 1A
Coleman. The Third Judicial
Circuit Public Defender's
Office was appointed to
represent Strattan. He was
denied bond and is being
held at the Columbia County
Detention Facility.
Court records indicate
that on Monday, Strattan
was sentenced to one year of
probation after being found
guilty of a misdemeanor
battery charge. In direct
relation to being charged in
connection with the three
murders and the unborn
infant's death, Strattan was
charged with violation of
probation. Strattan was then
ordered to be held with-
out bond for the violation of
probation charge at a sepa-
rate appearance before the
judge on Friday.
With the charges in
place, sheriff's investigators
continued to try and make
sense of what yill go down
in history as one of Lake
City's most grisly murder
scenes.
The time of the shoot-
ing has been pinpointed
at around 11:55 p.m.
Wednesday in the kitch-
en area at the home of
Strattan's parents, where he
also lived. All of the victims
were found in the kitchen
area, Seifert said; Strattan's
parents were not at home at
the time of the incident
"Detectives still believe
that a verbal argument
occurred prior to the shoot-
ing," Seifert said. What the
argument was about and
why the topic escalated to
the point of such carnage,
investigator's would not say.
Sheriff's deputies recov-
ered a pistol as they combed
the area near the home look-
ing for evidence. The gun
authorities recovered was a
Springfield .40 caliber semi-
automatic. Seifert said bal-
listics testing will confirm
whether it was the same fire-
arm used during the killing
spree. All three victims were
shot multiple times, he said.
Columbia County Sheriff
Mark Hunter, on Thursday,
said the type of violence
exhibitedThursdayisuncom-
mon.
'"We're not accustomed to
this in Columbia County,"
.he said. "We've got a very
good community here. Last
year, we had one homicide
and so this is very unusual -
for our county."
Strattan and Hudson
were reported, to be on-and-
off boyfriend and girlfriend,
Seifert and Hudson's step-
father, Dustin Bass. Bass
also noted the two have a
child together. The two also
share a history of domestic
violence, according to docu-
ments filed at the Columbia
County Clerk of Courts
office.
Clerk of Court records
show Hudson filed an injunc-
tion for protection (restrain-
ing order) against Strattan
in July 2010 for domestic vio-
lence accusations.
Clerk office records indi-
cate Strattan had 23 cases
in Columbia County courts
from June, 2001 Dec. 2010.
He was charged with sev-
eral moving violations and
has nine domestic violence
or battery cases,.
Tucker recently returned
to the area after serving time
inprison.Tuckerwasreleased
from Mayo Correctional
Institute, a minimum custody
facility, Jan. 22, according to
the Florida Department of
Corrections. Tucker served
time for possession of a con-
trolled substance and was in
state custody from March 31,
2010- Jan. 22, 2011.
Cervantez also had a
criminal record in Columbia
County. Clerk of Court
records indicate that
Cervantez had seven cases


on record, including charges
ranging from no valid driver's
license to a petit theft charge.
The last case against her was
in 2007.
Cervantez autopsy was
completed Friday.
"Preliminary autopsy
results show the cause of
death to be .(gunshots),"
Seifert said. The autopsy of
Michael Tucker and Monica
Hudson are expected to be
completed during the week-
end.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Rhonda Whitford, Another Way Inc. shelter coordinator, Michael Tucker's mother Cathy Ratliff, and her daughter-in-law Tracy Ratliff stand in silence as they
mourn those who died Wednesday.


STEPDAD: Anguish


JAOUN MAE I Inw wAL I:KILaKe Uly Reporter
Wayne Webb, 18, and Brooke Smith, 17, attempt to wrap their heads around the recent
shooting tragedy.


"They could
have stopped
this and they


Continued From Page 1A
2010, Hudson filed for an
injunction for protection (a
restraining order) against
Strattan in the Columbia.
County Clerk of the
Court's office. But as Bass
described it, Hudson's
mental state was tenuous;
she kept getting back
together with the person
hurting her, he said.
"It's some kind of syn-
drome," he estimated.
"Monica was his girlfriend.
But there were several
cases of battery against
himn. Mentally, she had to
be there.
"All I know is, this could
have been stopped a long
time ago."
Bass said he and his
wife had tried to help. "She
was in child services, we
did put her in some pro-
grams," he said. "But the
programs are obviously


not working.
"This is something my
wife and I have been wor-
ried about."
At Friday's candlelight,
memorial service at
Olustee Park, Bass said
it was the system that
failed.
"This couldn't have
been at a more appropri-
ate place," he said, wav-
ing toward City Halll and
the county courthouse.
"They could have stopped
this and they should have
stopped this."
Bass then questioned
how Strattan managed
to evade jail after he was
charged so many times.
"How did he get away
with that?" he asked.
But there were no
answers, only his one basic
question that lingered:
"How does this happen?"


should have VICTIMS: Remembered


stopped thi

Dustin Bass
Monica Hudson's
stepfather



JASON MATTHEW WALKER

Jack Exum and his son
13, bow their heads dur
the vigil as they rememi
the victims on Friday nic
'We are part of the hum
family,' Jack Exum said.
'When one hurts, we all
Or at least that's the wa
should be.'


is.


Continued From Page 1A


Fagan's condemnation of
city officials.
"The choices made in
that building are what
put all these people in
the ground," Bass said,
pointing at the County
Courthouse. "That court-
'Lake City house decided to let him
Reporter (Strattan) go. He's been
Alex, arrested for domestic vio-
ing lence several times before,
ber and they just kept letting
ght. him out."
an Ratliff said, "It's a shame
that law enforcement lets
hurt. people go that have done
ly it stuff like that. This would
all have been avoided if
the law was different. I


now have a granddaughter
asking me if I can call her
daddy because she wants
to speak with him, and I
just don't know what to tell
the child."
After Bass and Ratliff
spoke, a prayer was spo-
ken by Jack Exum, Jr.,
minister of New Horizon
Church of Christ. Fagan
ended the memorial by
reminding the people
gathered that those living
in domestic violence had a
way out through Another
Way, Inc.
To contact the people at
Another Way, call 386-719-
2700.


DRUGS: Mobile meth lab's driver had active arrest warrants
Continued From Page 1A


posed of detectives from
the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office, Lake
City Police Department,
Florida Department
of Law Enforcement
and the United States
Drug Enforcement
Administration.
The driver of the truck,
Rucker, had active arrest
warrants and no valid
drivers license.
As law enforcement
officers searched the
vehicle they reportedly
discovered chemicals and
paraphernalia consistent
with the clandestine man-
ufacture of methamphet-
amine.
Rucker, was arrested
without incident, as was
Shiver, who was a passen-
ger in the vehicle.


When the initial traffic
stop was conducted on
Rucker's vehicle, a sec-
ond vehicle believed to
be traveling with the
Ford Ranger stopped
nearby. As detectives
attempted to talk to the
driver of the second
vehicle, later identified
as Stamper, he fled on
foot.
Detectives chased
Stamper through the
Walmart parking lot
and apprehended him
a short time later.
Stamper also had active
arrest warrants and was
arrested without further
incident.
As first responders
secured the area, they
cordoned off a portion
of the Walmart parking


area for several hours to disposal contractor from nalia and will dispose of
ensure public safety. Tallahassee collected the the materials at an out of
A hazardous materials chemicals and parapher- county disposal site.

This notice paid for with public donations

FREE to the public

Weight Loss & Stop Smoking Hypnotherapy
Dave Miller is providing hypnotherapy for weight loss, stop smoking, & stress relief. For
many people, this therapy reduces 2 to 3 clothing sizes and/or stops smoking. Funding
for this project comes from public donations. Anyone who wants treatment will receive
professional hypnotherapy free from charge. An appointment is not necessary. Sign in
and immediately receive treatment. Dave Miller is a retired counselor and has been
conducting hypnosis seminars for over 30 years. He has helped thousands stop smoking
and lose weight or both without any side effects or dieting. A modest $5 donation when
signing in is appreciated. Only one 2-hour session is needed for desirable results.
Sign In 30 minutes early. All meetings begin at 7:30 PM
Tue. Feb 8 LIVE OAK Garden Club 1300 11 th St. SW
Wed. Feb 9 LAKE CITY Fairfield Inn 538 sw Corporate Dr.
Fri. Feb 11 MACCLENNY Woman's Club 144 S. 5th St.

David Miller S.W. C.Ht. 231-288-5941 www.DMSeminars.com


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


v













OPINION


Saturday, February 5, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


TH
IN


ER
ION


Jobless

rate's drop

sends good

signals

politically important
measure of unem-
ployment impor-
ant because ifs the
one nuimnber politi-
cians and the voters pay atten-
tion to dropped significantly
in January, to 9 percent from
9.4 percent the month before.
In all, the jobless rate has fallen
eight-tenths of a percent over
the past two months. According
to the Associated Press, that's
the steepest two-month drop in
nearly 53 years.
If that drop continues, ifs
good news for the Obama
administration and certainly the
rest of us. But another workforce
measure, economically impor-
tant if less publicized, didn't
fare so well. Another govern-
ment survey showed that only
36,000 new jobs were created
last month, well below what is
needed simply to keep up with
population growth let alone
replace the 8 million jobs lost in
the recession years 2008-2009.,
Perhaps as a result, the labor
participation rate the percent-
age of the population working or
looking for work fell to a 26-
year low of 64.2 percent, accord-
ing toAP
Still, there was improvement
in another politically sensitive
metric: The "underemployment
rate" fell sharply in January from
16.7 percent to 16.1 percent The
underemployment rate, which
some think gives a truer picture
of the job market, includes part-
timers who want but can't find
full-time work and discouraged
workers who have given up look-
ing altogether. One encouraging
figure was the 49,000 jobs added
in manufacturing. On the other
side of the equation, government
employment fell by 13,000 posi-
tions.
The harsh winter weather had
a depressing effect on job cre-
ation construction and trans-
portation employment fell by a
combined 70,000 jobs so ifs
not unreasonable to expect that
the job market as a whole will
pick up as the weather warms.
Another reason to welcome the
coming of spring.
N Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City' Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
, BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.


BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


School overreacts to 'weapon'


uns, knives and
even explosives
are everywhere in
America today and
it seems another
atrocity is never far away,
demanding the utmost vigilance
from us all, especially school
officials. But the diligence
shown at a Virginia high school
in shortstopping a possible
disaster is, as they say, above
and beyond.
The wise authorities at
Spotsylvania High School,
located in a place of Civil War
prominence where once echoed
the sounds of extraordinary bat-
tle, have confiscated a "lethal"
weapon and apprehended and
expelled the 14-year-old fresh-
ran student who dared chal-
lenge the institution's zero toler-
ance policy for such things.
Andrew Mikel II, an ROTC
student with aspirations for
military service like his father, a
Marine, was caught red handed
with a tube from a pen from
which he blew a few small,
round plastic pellets at a couple
of buddies in a moment of bore-
dom. It was reported that in one
lunch period he scored three
hits and his targets horrors -
flinched and looked annoyed,
Just in time, however, he was
caught and punished, before
scoring any more hits, averting
a potential Columbine moment.
His admission that what he
had done was stupid and his
apology failed to mollify the
outraged school administrators.
A deputy sheriff was summoned
and Andrew was charged with
three criminal misdemeanors.
Just having the charges on his
record, his father says, probably
will end his aspirations of an
appointment to the U.S. Naval
Academy. Who would believe


Dan K.Thomasson
his actions were that inconse-
quential, after all? He can clear
the charges if he participates in
a year of diversion classes.
At the moment, Andrew is
being home schooled while he
awaits an appeal to the county
circuit court. An earlier appeal
to the county school board's dis-
ciplinary committee received a
unanimous rejection despite the
opinion of the school's hearing
officer that he wasn't comfort-
able with the decision. No one
can say that the school folks in
Spotsylvania County don't have
their priorities straight They
obviously know a thing or two
about danger, even the kind that
masquerades under what used
to be called a very minor child-
ish prank if it was recognized
at all.
But that was before the fed-
eral Gun-Free Schools Act man-
dating expulsion for students
who take handguns, explosive
devices and projectile weapons
to school, prompting more
and more educators across the
country to categorize even the
blandest of devices, including
those we once used to shoot spit
balls at one another, as possess-
ing the potential to wreak havoc
on the classroom. And that was
before zero tolerance brought
the demise of common sense.
In defending its actions, the
board labeled the small plastic
tube as metal and the pill like
pellets as BBs, making one won-


der how long ago it had been
since its members owned a Red
Ryder special. It is just fortunate
for Andrew that in the zeal to
protect the innocent from this
criminal fiend the board didn't
demand he be tried as an adult
and sent to the slammer for the
rest of his teen years.
Andrew joins an elite group
of victims of academic builders
of mole hills, those who are
unable to discern the difference
between normal childhood sil-
liness and something far more
dark and dangerous so they
institute blanket policies that
don't allow for the use of judg-
ment of which they obviously
have very little.
A small boy returns from
a camping trip and goes off
to school on Monday without
removing his Boy Scout knife
from his backpack. When he
remembers it, he immediately
turns it into the principal's office
and is instantly expelled. The
list of petty violations of the
policy and the distorted results
grows daily.
No one should trivialize the
seriousness of keeping our
schools safe in an age when
access to firearms and truly
lethal weapons are so available.
At the same time, over reactive
school officials who treat "pea
shooters" like six guns or some-
thing worse are doing just that.
Andrew's offense was being an
immature kid, nothing more.
All of us have been in the same
position, popped .or popping
'away with a paper wad or a pea
or a rubber band. It's hardly a
federal offense. Whatever hap-
pened to detention?

* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


OTHER OPINION


Arabs distrust U.S. intentions


We forget how
messy democra-
cy is. We're still
caught off guard
by the tremen-
dous strength of its lure. We're
surprised by the insidiousness
of the lust for power and how
few relinquish it willingly.
As the Mideast ignites,
once again totally realigning
politics around the globe, former
Pentagon chief Donald Rumsfeld
is publishing his version of
how we came to be in Iraq and
Afghanistan for the better part of
the last decade and the foresee-
able future.
Its an amazing portrait of how
narrow-minded and shortsighted
politicians can be and how dan-
gerous the consequences. But the
timing is propitious, as longtime
U.S. ally Egypt erupts in violence
after 30 years in an official state of
emergency. Rumsfeld's memoir,
acquired by news media before
its official publication Feb. 8,
admits to some mistakes, such
as his flippant dismissal of "Old
Europe" and his insistence the
United States knew where the illu-


sory weapons of mass destruction
were hidden in Iraq. But, overall,
the tome is a measured but defen-
sive defense of the determination
to go to war, no matter what
Rumsfeld said former President
George W. Bush asked to see mil-
itary plans for an invasion of Iraq
just 15 days after Afghanistan-
based al Qaeda's 9/11 attack on
us. The Bush administration was
determined to topple Saddam
Hussein's regime and to use
imposition of democracy in Iraq
as a justification for preemptive
war.
Rumsfeld quarreled non-stop
with the Bush administration's
secretaries of State Colin
Powell, a former general, and
Condoleezza Rice about how to
handle post-war Iraq. Rumsfeld
glosses over how he bulldozed
away opposition to his plans.
Nobody knows how the chaos
in the Mideast will be resolved
or how far its tentacles will
travel into other countries such
as Jordan and Yemen. But even at
this early stage, we can figure out
some lessons.
Because of the Bush adminis-


tration's ill-thought-through inter-
vention in Iraq and its resolve to
"spread democracy" no matter
how destabilizing, the United
States has lost much of its global
influence. Egyptian President
Hosni Mubarak was openly defi-
ant of President Barack Obama
during their recent phone calls.
Mubarak's use of thugs to battle
pro-democracy protesters showed
his disdain.
The Arab "street" distrusts U.S.
intentions, both for its image as
a "puppet-master" for Mubarak
despite obvious proof of his tyr-
anny and the belief.that the U.S.
government is more interested
in stability and Egypt's detente
with Israel. Our intervention in
Mideast politics is almost always a
source of enmity against us.
In a complicated world, as a
wealthy nation we will always be
resented and even hated. But
we are also respected for our
might and our principles. When
we shave those principles, we
face increased distrust and irrel-
evance.
* Scripps Howard News Service


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com


The case


against


teenage


romance


.V alentine's Day is just
around the corner.
I myself will be
celebrating Feb. 14
by going to a David
Cassidy concert (seriously, I
couldn't resist!) with my almost-
12-year-old daughter, Madi.
But this isn't about anything
to do with my romantic life. It's
about how I'm encouraging my
children to look at romance
- on Valentine's Day and every
day.
My kids are now 16, 14, 11
and 9. And I still believe what
I've been saying for years: I
don't want them in serious dat-
ing relationships when they are
not in a position to get married.
My view? Date, alot, when mar-
riage is at least an option. In the
meantime, enjoy lots of friends
of the opposite sex, go to danc-
es, 'have fun, socialize in groups.
But pairing off into exclusive
romantic relationships as young
teens? No, thanks.
Naturally, my children find
my view completely at odds
with civilization in general, and
even with many folks who are
like-minded with me on other
things. My older children in
particular are trying to convince
me to change my thinking.
But I keep saying what
I've always said: Romantic
relationships are wonderful
things designed by God. But
he also designed us, and we're
designed to want the whole
deal, the intimacy, exclusivity
and (what should be) the per-
manence of "marriage. It seems
to me that having a romantic
relationship deliberately stops
short of how God designed it by
engaging in one that can't result
in marriage in a reasonable
time frame i.e., an intense
high-school romance.
Yes, we all know the rare
high-school sweethearts who
went on to a long-term mar-
riage. But it's unusual that real
good comes out of exclusive
romantic teen relationships.
Rather than really learn about
the other gender in all facets
- a common rationalizatipn I
hear in favor of teen romance
- kids in such relationships are
learning about the opposite sex
primarily within the confined
roles of romantic or sexual part-
ners. That seems too narrow to
me.
They also typically learn a
lot about breaking up better
practice for divorce than mar-
riage.
And the sexual tension (what-
ever any actual activity), the
emotional distress, it's all so
intense. How can 15- or 16-year-
olds possibly be expected to
wisely handle what many adults
can't?
Tempted to disagree?
Consider this: I've never known
a responsible parent who said
anything along the lines of "I so
hope my children will fall madly
in love with someone in high
school!"
In some ways, I'd love for my
kids to convince me to change
my mind. But I don't expect
them to.
In the meantime, I'm happy
to be celebrating Valentine's
Day with Madi. A "tween" vol-
unteering to accompany her
mom to a David Cassidy con-
cert?
Now, that's true love.
Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


4A








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Health and Wellness
Fair
The annual Health
and Wellness Fair is 9
a.m. to noon Saturday at
Richardson Community
Center. Health screenings
will be available for blood
pressure, breast cancer,
diabetes, cholesterol and
fitness. Disease manage-
ment strategies will be
presented on back pain,
asthma, diabetes, cancer,
obesity and hypertension.
The center is located at
255 NE Coach Anders
Lane.

Four Rivers Audubon
ALLI-Walk
The monthly ALLI-Walk
is from 8 to 11 a.m. Feb.
5 at Alligator Lake. Jerry
Krummrich, biologist,
Virlyn Willis, avid birder,
and others will share
their knowledge. Bring
a hat, sunscreen, water,
binoculars and a snack.
No fee is charged. All
levels of participation and
knowledge are welcome.
Enter Alligator Lake at the
County Park on Country
Club Road (east side of
lake). Drive in and around
to the parking area in front
of the lake near the new
construction. Call Loye
Barnard at 497-3536 for
more information.

American Family Fitness
Grand Opening
American Family
Fitness will celebrate its
grand opening starting at
10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 5
at its new location at 4578
SW. Heritage Oaks Circle
in Lake City. The Mercy
Mountain Boys will pro-
vide the entertainment,
with chicken and rice
dinners available for $6.
All proceeds will benefit
the Veterans Assistance
Foundation. A blood bank
will also be on location.
The American Family
Fitness is located off
Highway 90 next to the
Food Lion. For more infor-
mation, call 438-5703.

Youth Talent Explosion
Black History 2011
Youth Talent Explosion is
noon to 4 p.m. Feb. 5 at
Olustee Park. The event
will be followed by the
Movie Festival 4-8 p.m.
Both events are sponsored
by It's About My Efforts.
The month-long theme is
"Self Sufficiency is Key."
Visit www.itsaboutmyef-
forts.org or call 386-697-
6075 for details.

MLK Parade
The annual MLK Parade
is 10 a.m. Feb. 5 starting at
DOT. The parade is spon-
sored by the Northeast
Florida Leadership
Council.

Olustee Festival
Pageant
The 2011 Olustee
Festival Pageant is Feb. 5
at the Columbia County
School Administration
Building auditorium. Girls
13 months to 20 will com-
pete. Ages 13 months-to
9 compete at 4 p.m. Agest
10-20 compete at 6:30 p.m.
Tickets can be purchased
at the door for $5. Contact
Elaine Owens at 386-965-
2787.

Annual Celebration
The West Virginia
Natives hold their annual
WV Day celebration at 12
p.m. Feb. 5. The festivities
take place at Epiphany
Church located at 1905
SW Epiphany Court, and


all attendees should bring
a covered dish of their
favorite "Hillbilly" food to
share. RSVP no later than
Jan. 30 by contacting 386-
754-1760.

Sweetheart Dance


The Columbia County
Women's Club, located
at 655 NE Martin Luther
King Street, presents a
Sweetheart Dance from 8
p.m. to midnight Feb. 5.
Tickets are $10 per per-
son, and hors'd'oeu'vres
will be served through-
out the evening. Contact
Lynda Gail (Caldwell)
Elliot at 867-6600. Contact
Eddie McKenzie at 623-
1714 for membership
opportunities.


Sunday
Friends of the Columbia
County
The 2011 Annual
Meeting of the Friends
of the Columbia County
Public Library is 2 p.m.
Feb. 6 at the Main Library
in downtown Lake City. A
brief business meeting will
be followed by a program,
"An Afternoon With Mark
Twain." Call 758-2101.

Monday
Tae Kwan Do
The Lake City
Recreation Department is
resuming the popular Tae
Kwan Do classes begin-
ning Feb. 7. These classes
will meet 7 to 8 p.m.
Monday and Wednesday
nights at Teen Town and
are open to anyone ages
8 and above. Teresa and
Jeff Foster, Tae Kwan Do
instructors, will teach all
classes and the cost is
$40 per month. For more
information or to regis-
ter, please call Heyward
Christie at 386-754-3607.

Tuesday
High school reunion
A reunion is being
planned for Baldwin High
School attendees frorp
1950-1969. The event is
scheduled for June 17
- 19 at the Quality Inn, I-
295 and Commonwealth
Avenue. For more infor-
mation call 904-724-3580
or 904-266-4253 and ,leave
your name and contact
information or e-mail your
request to lulah@mind-
spring.com.

Volunteers Needed
The Lighthouse Gift
Shop is looking for volun-
teers at all times to help
in the shop located at
Lake City Medical Center.
There are several shifts
available, and a free meal
is provided each time
worked. Applications are
available at the Gift shop
or the hospital front desk,
or call Linda Butler at 386-
719-9008 for more informa-
tion.

Wednesday
The Gainesville District
Dietetic Association
The Gainesville District
Dietetic Association
is meeting 5:30 p.m.
at Haven Hospice in
Gainesville. All registered
dietitians, dietetic techni-
cians-registered and stu-
dents are invited to attend.
The meeting is sponsored
by Yakult and Barnes
Home Health Care. Ana
Rosales, RD, LDN will be
providing a presentation
on "Why Probiotics are
Important in Nutrition."
Attendees can receive 1.5
CEUs. Please visit www.
eatrightgainesville.org for
more information.

Lake City Newcomers
and Friends Regular
Meeting
The regular meeting of


the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends is 11 a.m.
Feb. 9 at Quail Heights
Country Club, on Branford
Highway. Luncheon costs
$10. The program for
this month will be Patriot
Music by the Reflections.
All members, guests and


Community Theater
present Sherlock's Last
Case, a play by Charles
0 Marowitz 2 p.m. Feb. 13.
The theater is located in
Historic High Springs at
130 NE First Ave. The play
centers on a death threat
COLUMBIA COUNTY against Sherlock Holmes
by the supposed son of
04 .Chis late nemesis Professor
Moriarty. Tickets are
.available at The Framery
'in Lake City on Baya, 386-
754-2780, at The Coffee
Clutch in High Springs,
386-454-7593, online at
highspringscommunitythe-
atercom or at the door.
Prices are $11 adults, $8.
youth 12 and under; and
.Seniors Sunday only $9.

JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter Monday, Feb. 14

County opens its remote-control vehicle trpck Singles Gala


Columbia County Landscaping and Parks Director Clint Pittman (from right) watches as
James Montgomery and Columbia County Commissioner Scarlet Frisina unveil the sign for
the Columbia County R.C. Track.


friends are welcome. For
more information, please
call 752-4552 or 755.-4051

Thursday
The local Sons of the
American Revolution
The local Sons of the
American Revolution
is joining the Edward
Rutiledge Daughters of the
Revolution Chapter along
with the North Central
Florida Regents Council
for a George Washington
Birthday Celebration
Luncheon 11 a.m. Feb.
10 a.m. at Quail Heights
Country Club Registration
is 10:30 a.m. James
Montgomery "Mr. Mont"
is the guest speaker. The
cost of the buffet lunch
is $15 per person. DAR
members are asked to
stay afterwards for a brief
meeting to vote on several
important business items.

Free Medicaid workshop
Teresa Byrd Morgan of
Morgan Law Center for
Estate & Legacy Planning
is hosting a free Medicaid
workshop 2 p.m. Feb. 10 in
the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center (628 S.E. Allison
Court.) The workshop on
Medicaid planning will
discuss the myths and
opportunities available.
Call Shana Miller at 386-
755-1977.

Friday
HSCT production
The High Springs
Community Theater
present Sherlock's Last
Case, a play by Charles
Marowitz 8 p.m. Feb. 11.
The theater is located in
Historic High Springs at
130 NE First Ave. The play
centers on a death threat
against Sherlock Holmes
by the supposed son of
his late nemesis Professor
Moriarty. Tickets are
available at The Framery
in Lake City on Baya, 386-
754-2780, at The Coffee
Clutch in High Springs,
386-454-7593, online at
highspringscommunity-
theater.com or at the door.
Prices are $11 adults, $8
youth 12 and under; and
Seniors Sunday only $9.


Saturday
Fort Mose trip
Black History 2011
trip to Fort Mose is leav-
ing 7 a.m. Feb. 12 from
Richardson Community
Center. The event is spon-
sored by It's About My
Efforts. The month-long
theme is "Self Sufficiency
is Key." Visit www.itsabout-
myefforts.org or call 386-
697-6075 for details.

HSCT production
The High Springs
Community Theater
present Sherlock's Last
Case, a play by Charles
Marowitz 8 p.m. Feb. 12.
The theater is located in
Historic High Springs at
130 NE First Ave. The play
centers on a death threat
against Sherlock Holmes
by the supposed son of
his late nemesis Professor
Moriarty. Tickets are
available at The Framery
in Lake City on Baya, 386-
754-2780, at The Coffee
Clutch in High Springs,
386-454-7593, online at
highspringscommunitythe-
ater.comn or at the door.
Prices are $11 adults, $8
youth 12 and under; and
Seniors Sunday only $9.

Charity Ball
The 18th Lake City
Police Department Charity
Ball is 7 p.m. to midnight
Feb. 12 at the Lake City
County Club. All proceeds
from this year's ball will
go toward the purchase
of a Firearms Training
Simulator. Tickets are
$50 a person.The black
tie event will feature
finger food, entertain-
ment, music, dancing
and door prizes. Contact
Destiny Hill at 758-5484 or
Samantha Driggers at 758-
5483 for ticket information.

50s Rock-n-Roll and
Sock Hop Dance
Mike Mullis 50s Rock-n-
Roll Show and Valentines
Sock Hop Dance is 8 p.m.
Feb. 12 at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Hall.
The event is a live musi-
cal performance. Prizes
awarded for Best 50s


OBITUARIES


Myrtle Mae Lindsey Bundy
Myrtle Mae Lindsey Bundy, 76
lifetime Fort White resident,
passed away Thursday, Feb.
3rd at Shands at U.F. in Gaines-
ville. She was a devoted wife of
53 years, a mother and a friend
to all and never met a stranger.
She was a longtime mem-
ber of Philippi Baptist Church
and a graduate of Fort White
High School, class of 1954.
Survivors include husband,
Leonard Bundy, Fort White; two
sons, Kenneth (Sammi) Bundy,
LaBelle, FL and Gregory Bundy
of Lake Butler; two daughters, Pa-
tricia (Mitchell) Taylor, O'Brien,
FL, Sherry (Terry) Petrillo of
Athens, Tenn.; five brothers;
Levis Lindsey of LaCrosse;
James Lindsey of Alachua; Vir-


gil Lindsey of Branford; Ed-
ward Lindsey of'LaCrosse and
Ellis Lindsey of High Springs;
two sisters' Margaret Brook
and Minmnie Rizer of Fannin
Springs; eight grandchildren
and ten great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be Sat. Feb 5,
2011 from 5:00 to 7:00 PM at
Evans-Carter Funeral Home in
High, Springs (386-454-2444).
Funeral services will be conduct-
ed at 3:00 PM, Sun., Feb. 6th at
Philippi Baptist Church,
County Road #18.
Arrangements are under the
care of EVANS-CARTER
FUNERAL HOME
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the. Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


costume, Hula Hoop chal-
lenge, trivia and Wipeout
dance contest. Contact
the Music Hall at 386-364-
1703. Reservations are
highly recommended.

Committee Meeting
Richardson High School
Alumni confer in a com-
mittee meeting at noon
on Saturday, Feb. 12. All
RHS Alumni are invited
to attend the event taking
place at the Richardson
Center. For more informa-
tion contact Ms. Jones at
386-752-0815.

FACS Valentine's Party
All 2011 active Filipino
American Cultural Society
members and guests are
invited to attend the FACS
Valentine's Day party
and dance taking place
from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. onr
Saturday, Feb. 12. Come
and enjoy an evening of
dancing, cultural food
and more at the Epiphany
Catholic Church social
hall, and remember to
bring a covered to dish to
share. For more informa-
tion contact Bob Gavette at
386-965-5905.

Charity Walk/Run
A walk/run for a cure
for juvenile diabetes in
memory of the late Lindsi
Young will take place
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on
Saturday, Feb. 12 on the
Suwannee High School
track. All walkers/runners
are asked to collect dona-
tions to support their walk,
and bring those donations
to the event to help find a
cure for juvenile diabetes.
Registration for the walk
begins at 8:30 a.m. at the
track.

Sunday, Feb. 13
HSCT production
The High Springs


Black History 2011
Singles Valentines Day
Gala is 6 -10 p.m. Feb.
14 at El Potro. The event
is sponsored by It's
About My Efforts. The
month-long theme is "Self
Sufficiency is Key." Visit
www. itsaboutmyefforts.org
or call 386-697-6075 for
details.

Friday, Feb. 18
Teen.summit
Black History 2011 Teen
Summit is 3 12 a.m. Feb.
18 at Florida Gateway
College. The event is spon-
sored by.It's About My
Efforts. The month-long
theme is "Self Sufficiency
is Key." Visit www.itsabout-
myefforts.org or call 386-
697-6075 for details.

Community Outreach
Event
Food Distribution &
SNAP applications will be
collected for Columbia,
Hamilton, Lafayette,
Suwannee & Union coun-
ties 8 -11 a.m. Feb. 18 at
Catholic. Charities. Catholic
Charities and DCF case
managers and supervisors
will be on site to assist with
the completion of applica-
tions for SNAP (Food
Stamps), Medicaid and
TANE Guidelines have
changed and all should
apply to receive additional
support The office is locat-
ed at 258 NW Burk Ave.
For more information call
386-754-9180.

Saturday, Feb. 19
Basketball tournament
Black History 2011 3-on-
3 basketball tournament
is 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Feb. 19
at Annie Mattox Park. It
will be followed by a 70s
party from 4 8 p.m. The
events are sponsored by
It's About My Efforts. The
month-long theme is "Self
Sufficiency is Key." Visit
www. itsaboutmyefforts. org
or call 386-697-6075 for
details.


Date: June 2, 2009 Y
Time: 4 PM
Place: Josh's House
off Hwy 252
Please RSVP
386-555-5555 for details.


Call today to place an I
invitation ad for your 7R


child, grandchild.
God child or anyone
you think deserves
something extra on
their special day!


w- .'





'-A


call

Un il nr


755.5441
between 8am & 4pm

Z Deadline:
Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days prior
to annpearance in the Lake City Renorter


- -, .-1- --


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-047












FAITH


Saturday, February 5, 2011 w


&


VALUES


Nww.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATTERS


Angie Land
o angieland3@windstream.net


Genesis

records

cases of

rivalries

D id you hear
about the
man whose
wife wanted
him to send
away his oldest son, born
of a previous relationship,
and leave him without any
inheritance?
What about the case of
sibling rivalry so severe
that a brother was kid-
napped and left for dead?
While these cases could
easily be heard on the
morning news, they actual-
ly are recorded in Genesis,
the Biblical book of begin-
nings.
While every generation
thinks that its struggles
are unique, a quick browse
through the scriptures tells
1her story.
wo examples given
here have something in
common that continues to
be a struggle in today's cul-
ture. Abraham, Sarah, and
Ishmael, and Joseph and
his brothers both belonged
to blended families.
I Webster's dictionary
defines the word "blend"
as: "to combine into an
integrated whole ... to pro-
duce a harmonious effect"
This sounds easy
enough, if you are follow-
ing a favorite recipe, but
for those working toward
"blending" a family, the
task is anything but simple.
Rarely is the result instant-
ly harmonious.
The "insider/outsider"
dynamic is a unique char-
acteristic in stepfamilies.
The "L .,iders" are those
biologically related, while
obviously the "outsiders"
are those that are not
This visible line drawn
between the two in a step-
family home becomes a
fault 1'ne under stress.
Understanding that this
is a normal phenomenon
helps stepfamilies then
take the next steps in con-
flict resolution instead of
getting sidetracked by this
issue.
Loyalty issues are also
distinct for stepfamilies;
loyalty to children over the
new spouse, as well as a
child's loyalty to the absent
parent.
Children are naturally
torn between their parents,
even if no obvious hostil-
ity exists, and loyalty to
the biological parent who
is not in the home is often
disguised as resistance to a
stepparent's authority.
If these issues are
ignored, they will erode
the marriage relationship.,
which is critical to the
success of the family as a
whole.
Blended families have
an additional measure of
stress and problems that
are unique to each family
situation, but just as He did
for the families of Abraham
and Joseph, God has a plan
and a purpose for our lives
and our families.

* Heart Matters is a weekly
column written by Angie
Land, director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where
she teaches bible studies,
leads marriage and family
conferences, and offers bibli-
cal counseling to individuals,
couples and families.


Fed Court: Judge

can't display Ten

Commandments


By LISA CORNWELL
Associated Press
CINCINNATI An
Ohio judge violated the
U.S. Constitution by
displaying a poster
containing the Ten
Commandments in.
his courtroom, a fed-
eral appeals court ruled
Wednesday.
A three-judge panel
of the 6th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals upheld a
federal district court's rul-
ing that Richland County
Common Pleas Judge
James DeWeese violated
the constitutional separa-
tion between church and
state by displaying the
poster.
DeWeese's attorney,
Francis Manion, said he
and his client disagree
with the ruling and are
considering their options.
They could ask the full
appeals court for a hear-
ing or appeal to the U.S.
Supreme Court.
The judge hung the
poster in his courtroom
in Mansfield, north of
Columbus, in 2006 after
the U.S. Supreme Court
let stand lower-court rul-
ings that another Ten
Commandment poster he
hung in 2000 violated sep-
aration between church
and state. The latest post-
er titled "Philosophies of
Law in Conflict" shows the
Ten Commandments in a
column listed as "moral
absolutes" and secular
humanist principles in


another column listed as
"moral relatives."
DeWeese attached
a commentary to the
poster that said he sees a
conflict of legal philoso-
phies in the United States
- between moral absolut-
ism and moral relativism
- and that he believes
legal philosophy must
be based on fixed moral
standards. At the bottom
of the poster frame, read-
ers are invited to obtain a
pamphlet further explain-
ing DeWeese's philosophy.
The American Civil
Liberties Union of Ohio
Foundation filed suit
against DeWeese, and the
district court agreed with
the ACLU that the display
endorsed religious views
and was unconstitutional.
The ACLU also sued in
the case of the first poster.
Attorneys for DeWeese
argued before the appeals
court that the latest
display was different
from the first one, when
DeWeese hung a poster
of the Bill of Rights next
to a poster of the Ten
Commandments.
But the appeals judges
said that "replacing the
word religion with the
word philosophy does not
mask the religious nature"
of DeWeese's purpose.
The poster is not merely
a courtroom display of
the Ten Commandments,
but it "sets forth overt
religious messages and
religious endorsements,"
the judges said.


COURTESY PHOTO
Performers from Chile and Romania will take the spotlight on Sunday at the Wesley
Memorial United Methodist Church.


International performers

to share music in Lake City


From staff reports

A cultural mix of music and missions
event is coming to Lake City.
A New Song International is perform-
ing 10 a.m. Sunday at Wesley Memorial
United Methodist Church. The concert's
theme is "Life Your Eyes."
The group of eight young adults is
from Chile and Romania and is a part
of Friendship International Ministries,
an American-based mission organization
in Colorado Springs, Colo. which works
primarily in Central and Eastern Europe
and Chile.
The group is on tour seven weeks in the
United States. It is celebrating the 10th
anniversary of Friendship International's
work in Chile with a special multimedia
presentation.


- The first part of the concert, in addi-
tion to an ethnic music performance, Will
include sharing about their country aid
culture.
The second half will feature music in
English with a wide variety of musical
styles for the entire church. It will focus
on the way God has been working in their
country and the challenges of being a wit-
ness for the Lord.
The group's purpose is to be an encour-
agement to and challenge their listening
audience. The community is invited to
attend the free cultural music and mis-
sions event.
A free-will offering will be collected at
the end of the concert.
The church is located at 1272 SW
McFarlane Ave., next to Summers
Elementary School. Call (386) 752-3513.


CHURCH NOTES


Sunday
Gospel Sing
"The. Light Soldiers Ministries"
perform at 6 p.m. Sunday at
Eastside Baptist Church. This
trio of mother, son and grandson
from Middleburg sings southern
gospel music. A love offering will
be taken during the event, and
refreshments will be served after
the concert. For more informa-
tion call 386-752-7248.

Concert at Hopeful
This Hope is performing 6:30
p.m. Sunday at Hopeful Baptist
Church. The group of five young
men present ministry through
music. They formed in the harsh
environment of the Alaska fron-
tier.

Duo concert
The Singing Doutts perform
2 p.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Feb.
7-9 at The Voice of Deliverance


on E. Washington Street. More
info on the husband and wife duo
from Jonesboro, Tenn. is available
online at www.shoutlife.com/sing-
ingdoutts. !Call 386-3444-3874.

Monday
Revival services
Revival services are 6 p.m.
Monday to Wednesday at the
Church of God in Fort'White.
Monday's speaker is the Rev. Vep
Hudson. Tuesday's speaker is the
Rev. Dale Thigpen. Wednesday's
speaker is the Rev. Mary Ann
Kirby. The church is located at
339 SW Bryan Ave. in Fort White.

Tuesday
Ugandan Thunder
Shiloh Baptist Church is pre-
senting Ugandan Thunder at 7
p.m. Tuesday. The group includes
18 boys and girls, ages 8-11, from
Uganda, East Africa. The concert


will feature singing, dancing and
African drums. The children
will also share their experience
about growing up in a land that
has been ravaged by 20 years of
war, poverty, AIDS, and malaria.
Shiloh Baptist Church is located
at 173 SW Shiloh St., Fort White.

Wednesday
Revival services
Two Nights of Holy Ghost
Anointed Preaching by Rev. Jay
Waldon are 7 p.m. Wednesday
and Thursday at First Full Gospel
Church. The church is located at
U.S 90 east to Jonesway across
from the Boys Club. Call Pastor
Stan Ellis at 752-2618.

Friday
Gospel Concert
"The Hyssongs" present a
concert of Gospel music 7 p.m..
Friday at Lulu Advent Christian


Church, located at 354 SE Gillen
Terrace. "The Hyssongs" are
a well-known Southern Gospel
Music family who sing and travel
extensively throughout the United
States and Canada. Contact Miles
Nelson at 386-755-6574.

Saturday
Homecoming Celebration
New Beginning Church
celebrates its Homecoming
Celebration at 6 p.m. Saturday
with musical guests, "The
Kirklands." Sunday School is 9:30
-10:25 a.m. Feb. 13 with George
Fulgham. Then worship service
is 10:30 a.m. with a message
by Earl Green, Jr. of the Mercy
Mountain Boys and special music
by The Kirklands. A covered
dish luncheon will be held in the
Fellowship Hall immediately fol-
lowing the service on Sunday.
The church is located on CR 242
Between Sisters Welcome and the
Branford Highway.


Jonah's first command in the Bible is to 'go'


Now the word
of the Lord
came to
Jonah, the son
of Amittai,
saying ... (Jonah 1:1).
Thus opens the door of
one of the most controver-
sial and misunderstood
books in the entire Bible.
It is amazing that a
little book with only
1,328 words (King James
Version) could cause so
much controversy.
No book of the Bible
has been subject to more
scorn and ridicule by
skeptics; yet no book in
the Bible is better authen-
ticated.
The Lord Jesus Himself
authenticates it by using
it as a type of His own
death and resurrection.
Matthew 12:40 says: "For
as Jonah was three days


BIBLE STUDY
.77


Hugh Sherrill Jr.
ems-hugh43@comcastnet
and three nights in the
belly of the great fish,
so will the Son of Man
be three days and three
nights in the heart of the
earth (NKJV) (Also see
Luke 11:29-30). These pas-
sages of scripture lift the
Book of Jonah above the
realm of fiction.
Jonah gives us a
picture of the Gospel
(I Corinthians 15:1-4)
about 800 years before


Christ was born.
Some facts about Jonah
(First of all, it is a book of
miracles.)
Most only talk about
the great fish, but there
was also the miracle of
the gourd, the worm, the
revival of Ninevah, and the
east wind.
In Jonah we find so
much of the gospel found
in the New Testament.
The name Jonah means
"Dove."
He is the son of Amittai,
which means 'Truth." So
it could be said that The
Dove of Truth is called by
God to go to Ninevah.
(The dove was known
as the poor man's offer-
ing.) The message that
Jonah is to carry is the
Message of Repentance
and Judgment. Jonah 1:2
says "Arise go to Ninevah,


that great city, and cry out
against it; for their wicked-
ness is come up before
me." Jonah's command
was to "go."
In all four of the gospels
the command was to "go"
(see Matt 28:19-20; Mark
16:15; Luke 24:46-48; John
17:28, 20:21).
Then Acts 1:8, the
last message Jesus gave
before He ascended was
"But you shall receive
power when the Holy
Spirit has come up on you;
and you shall be witnesses
to me in Jerusalem, and in
all Judea and Samaria, and
to the end of the earth."
(NKJV)
Those who are saved
are commanded to take
the truth of the gospel
to the world, starting in
Jerusalem.
Our "Jerusalem" is the


area in which we live.
We all need to be more
active, sharing the gospel
in our community. It is
easy to write a check and
send it to some mission
board.
Some think that fulfills
their great commission. It
does not.
We who are children of
God have the command
to "go" and take the mes-
sage of salvation to a lost
and dying people. Every
church certainly has this
command.
Every church ought
to have its own Outreach
Program.
Every Sunday School
class ought to have an
Outreach Program. How
else will we reach the
world for Christ?
* Hugh Sherrill is a retired
preacher in Lake City.










LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVERTISEMENT


Li



/^^c" j^-5


Photo credit: skynesher


L ove is limitless! The more we give, the

more we have to give. If we love those whose

lives we touch each day, they will know it and pass

it on. 1 John 4.8 tells us, "God is love." This is the

way He manifests Himself on Earth. With His help

we can truly love one another as He commands us

to. Give yourself a Valentine this year...worship

God each week. You will learn to give love...

and you will receive love that knouws no bounds.


Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
',2011, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, PO Box 8187, Charlcttesville. VA 22906, www.kwnews com


91 S -Q PS. -.-


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



Supercenter
LO\ PRICES EAERI DAI"
Ius 90 WEST 755-2427

GWHunter, Inc.
Chev Chevron Oil
Jobber




Ho~llyaectlicJ Inc.
"Quality work at a reasonableprice"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
I can do all things through Cinsi thich stlrnglhenich me"
Philippans :13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RICK'S RANGEE SERVICE
Located at 25A & ,''
(Old Valdosta Hwy) l
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


First Advent Christian
1881 SW McFarlane Ae
38H-752-390iu
Sunday School: 9.4,AM
Sunday Service. 11 A00AM
Wednesday Service- 7:00PM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake lefer Road
,386-752-062fi
Sunday WorAhip 10 30AM & PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7 00PM
"A church htere iESUS is Real"

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S* 755.0900
Sunday School 9 30AM
SundayWorship Il0-45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Ete Service 7PM
Pastor: Larry E. Sweat
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE lames Ave.'386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship ItlAM &6PM
Wed. Prayer Mig/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G. Win
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9 15AM
Sunday Worship 10 30AM & 6:00PM
Wed 6.00PM Prayer Service, ,&
Chuldren. Ministry 6:15PM
Dow:iown Lake City 752'422
Rte Stephen Ahrens, Pastor
OLu'ET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E Davis Steet
138f 752-1990
Ronald V Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM"
In Gods Word. Will &day"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake leffery Rd. 752-0681
Lake City. Florida 32055
www.pbric com
Sunday School 8:30,9i45 IIIAM
Sunday Worship 945 & IIAMi 6PM
AWANA 5 3U PMN
Evening Worship 6 6Oi PM
Wed Eve Schedule
Family Supper Reservanoni 5PM
Children's Ministry PM
Youth Worship b6 o PM
Prayer Meering 6 0U fPM
Thursday Evening Schedule- St. 8/21/08
Parkview Edge 8:30PM
Pastot Michael A. Tatem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989NUSHwy441.
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids &Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10 30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
252-1 t$8
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 SE Bava Dnve 755-5553
Sunday


Bible Study
Morning Worshp
SEveningWorshiup
Wednesday:
AW VN A
Prayer & Bible Study


9 15IAM
10.30AM
6.15PM
5-45PMi
SIF, PM


TABERNACLE BAPIiST CHURCH
independent BapusilS
144 SE Montrose Ave *752-4274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun Morn Worship 11 ,AM
Sunday Eve 6 F'M
Wed. Prayer Meenng 7-30 PM
Pastor MiLe Norman

EPIPHANY CATHOiJC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphanv Court- ;52-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5.00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:154AM. 1030AM,
5.00 PM iSpamnsl/Englishi
Sunday School/Religious Educaidon
9:00 AM. 1015 AM

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave
Sunday Service I 1-00 AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7 30 PM
LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S 755-9436
Sunday School 9 30 AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meering PM

NEWHORIZON
Church of Christ
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St. 752-5965
Sunday Schoul j45,AM
Sun. Worship 'li-3AM l601PM
Wed Family Night 7 PM
Wed louth Serice P PM
Pastor Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
71.1SW Monnitor Glen* 755 19(9
Sunday Sc hjul 945 ,AM
SundayWorship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
3oys and Grls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stjamesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon: The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2011


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERANI
LCMS
112 miles S. of 1-75 on SR
755-4299
Sunday Services
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hot
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkir
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHI
Hwy 90,1.5 milesWest of 1-75 '
Sunday Worship
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM ; Wors
-Vicar John David Bryan


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST
4869 US 441 South
Sunday Worship Service
Traditional Services 830 & 11
386-755-1353
mvbt:helum,: cm
First United Methodist Ch
973 S. Marion Ave
386-752-4488
Sunday School
Sunday Morning Worship
Contemporary Service
Additional Service
Program opportunities availab
teeas for all ages.
For a complete schedule
conmai church office a
752-4488
WESLEY MEMORIAL UNT
1272 SW McFarlane 752-:
(Adiacent to Summers Sch
A New Song in Concert
Sunday School
Nursery provided
Praise & Worship
AWANA tWednesLdjt
Pa[Ior The Re I Lowe Ma
wavw.weleyTneiri com
WATERTOWN CONGREGA(I
METHODIST CHURCH
U 5 911 E rum or, onrte (ne.1 i
ind I nghri or tkinjawa
Sunday Schoul
Sun. Worship l LAN
Wed Night Service
Pastor, Randy Ogbum


LAKE CM'CHURCH OF THE N
Serices'-
Sunday b':ho'cl
Sunday Worship 10:451AM
Wednesday
Aduli, buth Minimsr, Children'6
Pastor. Craig Hendersor
Nursery Provided
SW SR 4andA alea Patk

FIRST PRESBTERIAN CHI
6q9SW Bjya Dr ine' 752. 0
Sunday Conmemporarn
Sunday School
Tradicainal Serce I
NURSE PRO170 ED
Pastor: D[[ Roy A. Mari
Director orf Mu.ic Bill Por

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHU
NE lonesWay & NE Washingt
Sunday School 1
Momrng Worhiup I
Evangelisrlc Serce
Youth Servles 'Wednesdad
Mid -w ek Serv.ice Wednesday
For ink, call 7'.w3t Everyoner
Pastor Rev Stan Ellis


CHRIST CENTRAL MINIST
Leadership Serv-ies
Sunday Morning
Wednesday Service
217 Dyal Ave.. ifrm Hwy 90
Sisters Wekome Rd., gu mile
church on len. 755.2"52
Lead Point Lonnie lohr
"A hurch on the Move
CHRISTIAN'HERITAGE CHU
Corner SR. 47 & Hudson Ci
Sunday Celebration 1
Pdtor Iris iJones* 752-9
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road *755-0
First and Third Sundays 9:30
second and Fourth Sirndid,,.
Pastor Rev Chery'l R Pin


- ff lay Electric Cooperative, Inc
S j Competitive rates, non-profit,
(right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com


CHURCH
R47
9:30AM
ur

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PRAN
752-3807
10:00AM
ship 7PM
it


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9:45,A1
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3513
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9 45 AM
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7 PM


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9:1514M
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9 fflAM
10 00AMI
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100 AM
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752 1293!


Toaderis i-tisChrc irecor Cll 55540


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday


ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL .INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
'752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

O HARRY'S
..m i. Heatrng S Air Condilioning Inc
M n',' &fL. ,'l F,=:-l,3, 1-. l


1Puon 752-2308 'mUf

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia Coun) s Feed Headquarters
FFED PEI SUPPLIES L %N & GARDEN
,.NINM HLLTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKEL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
),-ur Laon & Gjiden He.dqiiarer'
MOERS CHAIN ,A%% S r TRIMMER.
Il :15 i.'S n ,W ST L. LE I1 FL
386-752-8098




71701 S l Ut
ste. 755-7050


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



.
A:.
/ ,


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
S755-5440

BAYWAYja.itoria services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residentiad & Commercial
755-6142








To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


North Florida
Pharmacy
Locabons to Sene \ou
La ,,_-itr, Ft Vh te Br:ira.rd
Chj..tand fi .a a e, ,.t.ne Hei-hlt,


To List





Your





Church





on the





Church












8A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2011


CELEBRATE MARDI GRAS

WITH "FAT TUESDAY"

.....ALL DAY LONG


Ne w Orleans may be thle
official home of Mardi Gras,
but-you don't have to live
in the Big Easy to enjoy
the party. Nlardi Gras, or
literally, "Fat Tuesday," is the final day
of the Carnival celebration., the festive
season that occurs before Lent.
While some people associate Mardi
Gras wilh lavish parades and French
Quarter parties, food is an integral part
of the tradition. In fact, nany locals skip
the parades and spend tnme at home
feasting with friends and family instead.
Join the Fat Tuesday frenzy by throwing
your ovn party.
"I love sharing the spirit of this season,"
said John Besh, Louisiana native and
nationally acclaimed chef. "It's so easy
to bring the fun of Mardi Gras home --
wherever you are. Whip up sonse tasty
New Orleans-Style meals, hang up some
beads and masks for decoration, then
invite folks over for good times all around."
Celebrate like a true New Orleanian
by jazzing up an entire day's menu with
popular and ahtthentic dishes. Start with a
savory brunch, a true Southern tradition
Snack on a creamy dip in the afternoon as
you decorate and welcome guests. Then,
dish out a traditional New Orleans-Style
jambalaya, perfect for a Mardi Gras crowd.
Finish thie meal with a cupcake version of
the official dessert of the Carnival season,
tie King Cake. Tradition states that who
ever found the fava bean or small trinket
in their slice of cake was charged with
bringing the cake to next year's party.
Share the fun with all your guests by
including a fava bean in each cupcake.
These tried-and-true recipes will ensure
your party will start a tradition to be cel-
ebrated for years to cone. For more inform-
ation on New Orleans-Style cuisine, visit
wsww.facebook.cons/zatarnins.


Dulac Dirty Rice Mini Frittatas
Prep Tine: 20 minutes / Cook Time: 45 minutes
Makes 12 (2 mini frittata) servings
1 pound bulk pork sausage
1 package Zatarain's Dirty Rice IMix, Original
1/2 cup raisins
1/4 cup toasted chopped pecans
14 eggs, lightly beaten
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup thinly sliced green onions
1/4 cup each chopped red and yellow bell pepper


Dulac Dirty Rice Mini Frittatas
Cook and stir sausage in large skillet on medium-high heat
5 minutes or until no longer pink. Drain fat. Prepare rice
mix as directed on package with sausage. Stir in raisins and
pecans. Set aside.
Preheat oven to 350aF. Spray 2 (12-cup) muffin tins
generously with no stick cooking spray. Set aside. Mix eggs
and milk in large bowl until well blended. Add onions ,and
bell peppers; mix well. Place 1/4 cup of the rice mixture into
each" muffin cup. Pour egg mixture evenly into each cup.
Bake 20 minutes or until eggs ard set. Run small knife or
spatula around each cup to loosen frittatas. Let stand 5 min-
utes before serving.


Carnival Jambalaya
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Makes 12 (1-cup) servings
5 cups water
1/4 cup oil (optional)
2 packages Zatarain's Jambalaya Mix,
Original
1 pound boneless skinless chicken
breasts, cubed
1 pound smoked sausage, 1/4 Inch
thick
1/2" cup sliced green unions (optional)
Bring water and oil to boil in large saucepan.
Stir in Rice Mixes, chicken and sausage; return
to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simrner
25 minutes or until rice is tender.
Remove from heat. Let stand 5 minutes.
Sprinkle with green onions before serving.
Red Bean and Rice Party Dip
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Makes 60 (2-tablespoon) servings
3 cups water
1 package Zatarain's Red Beans
and Rice
1 cup salsa
2 tablespoons chopped Jalapefio
peppers
2 packages (8 ounces each) cream
cheese, softened
2 cups (8 ounces) shredded cheddar
cheese
Prepare rice mix as directed on package, using
3 cups water instead of 3 1/4 cups.
Reserve 1/4 to 1/2 cup of the shredded
cheese to garnish dip, if desired. Stir remaining
ingredients into rice mixture. Place mixture into
food processor or blender; cover. Process or
blend until smooth.
Keep dip warm in a chafing dish or slow
cooker, if desired.


King Cake Cupcakes
Chef John Besh, Besh Restaurant Group
Prep Time: 1 hour
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Cool Time: 1 hour "
Yields 10 to 12
Yellow Butter Cake
1/4 pound butter
3/4 cup sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 large eggs
1 1/4 cup cake flour
1/2 tablespoon baking powder
3/4 cup milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
In a mixer at medium speed, cream butter,
sugar, and salt together until light and fluffy.
Add eggs one at a time while the mixer is
running, making sure each egg is totally mixed
in before adding another. Beat mixture until
light and fluffy, making sure to scrape the
sides and bottom of the mixing bowl carefully.
In a separate mixing bowl, combine flour
and baking powder using a wire whisk to sift
and combine them. Irt another separate bowl,
mix the milk-and vanilla.
Alternate adding wet and dry ingredients to
butter mixture, starting and ending with the dry
L'redi- i,: Do r,.t over mix, as batter should
I'c t.i l.k and l'iir Spoon into lined c-tpcake
pans, filling each cup about 2/3 full a. B,- at
i SOcF 'for 2 tso t14 minutes or until do.-e.


K.ng Cake C upcakts filled irth Creole Creamn Cheese F.lUng wnIh Root Beer and rosled
Ih Ron. Beer Frosting .


Creole Cream Cheese Filling with Root Beer
1 pound softened Creole or regular cream cheese
1/2 cup shortening
1/4 pound powdered' sugar
1/4 teaspoon Zataraln's Root Beer Extract
Dried fava beans (set aside)
Combine shortening and cream cheese in mixer at medium
speed and whip with paddle until smooth.
Add powdered sugar and whip until fluffy; mix in root beer
extract until well combined.
Root Beer Frosting
1 pound powdered sugar
1/4 pound butter
1/2 cup shortening
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup water
Pinch of salt
1 teaspoon Zatarain's Root Beer Extract
Combine all ingredients in bowl of mixer. Beat together at
medium speed until light and fluffy.
To assemble cupcakes: Use a 1/4 teaspoon measuring
spoon to scoop out the center of completely cooled cupcakes
from the top to about halfway down.
With a piping bag, or plastic bag with the corner snipped
off, fill the hole with filling.
Insert a dried fava bean into filling of each cupcake.
Note: fava bean is for decoration only and should not be eaten.
Using a star tip and separate piping bag, pipe frosting
starting on, the outside, working your' way to the center in one
continuous motion. Top with green, purple and yellow or gold
sprinkles or decorative sugar like on a traditional King Cake.


8o Annual .

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DEADLINE IS FEB. 8,2011.

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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakeatyreportercom


SPORTS


Saturday, February 5, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE






Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@iakecityreportercom

Jernigan

continues

tradition

Jernigan
became
the fourth
Columbia
High athlete to sign a
Division-I scholarship
on Wednesday as the .
Tiger did the Tomahawk
Chop to signify his
commitment to the
Seminoles of Florida
State. With the signing,
he' became the most
recent Tiger to make the
trek to Tallahassee.
Jernigan will try to
carry on the tradition
of excellent football
players from the Tiger
program to move onto
the tradition-rich 'Noles.
He joins the likes of
Reinard Wilson, Kendyll
Pope, Brian Allen and
Jerome Carter. Each had
outstanding careers with
the Seminoles, and each
played in the NFL.
The last four years,
Jernigan has carried
around the weight of.t.e;h
Tigers with his college
selection. The defensive
tackle was named to the
PARADE All-American
team (story in the Lake
City Reporter tomorrow),
played in the U.S. Army
All-American Game and
declared nationally on
ESPNU. He said there
hasn't been a day since
seventh grade when he
wasn't asked where he
would attend school.
If he makes it to the
next level, the choice will
not be his own, but first
things first.
Hell enroll in Florida
State this summer in
an attempt to become
acclimated with the
program prior to the
start of the fall season.
Jernigan figures to see
playing time his freshman
year, but will have to deal
with a solid defensive
front that includes Jacobi
McDaniel, Everett
Dawkins, Anthony
McCloud and Demonte
McCallister.
McDaniel was able to
break the Florida State
lineup as a freshman and
earned starting honors.
Jernigan is as highly
touted as the former
Madison County High
standout It's possible
that Jernigan could break
into the rotation early,
but McDaniel came to
Florida State at a time
when the defensive front
was depleted. Jernigan
walks into one of the
best defensive fronts in
the nation.
The thing about
Jernigan though is that
he thrives off pressure.
He continually played
his best in the biggest
games and will feed
off the competition. If
there's one thing I've
learned about Jernigan
it's that when he sets his
mind to something, he's
going to accomplish it.
He has his sights set
on playing his first year. I
have no doubt he'll play,
and he'll do well.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City


Reporter.


Sparks takes reins of


Lady Indians softball


Fort White has
veteran squad in
tough district.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.comrn
FORT WHITE Fort
White High softball enters
the 2011 season with a new
head coach and the same
high expectations.
Cassie Sparks has taken
over for the Lady Indians,
moving up from coaching
the middle school team last
year.
Sparks is in her sec-


ond year teaching at Fort
White's middle school.
Sparks graduated from
Bradford High in 2005 and
played college softball at
College of Central Florida
and Thomas University.
She also played on the col-
legiate USA Team during a
two-week tour in Australia.
"I played softball for
13 years," Sparks said on
Thursday. "Before that, I
played baseball and was
the only girl on the team.
I will do anything to spread
the knowledge and love of
the game to young female
athletes."


Role

Tigers avenge
early season loss
against Indians.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. com
Columbia High came into
Friday's Senior Night with'
revenge on its mind and got
it against Fort White High
in a county rivalry, 63-44.
The game was close
throughout the first half as
'CColumnbia held onto:a'six-
point edge heading into the
half, 28-22.
Fort White cut the lead
to 33-32 'with three min-
utes remaining in tlhe third
quarter. The teams would
go back and forth over the
beginning of the fourth
quarter with Columbia
hanging on to a 43-40 lead.
The Tigers then exploded
with an 11-0 run to make it
54-40 and never looked
back.
Nigel Atkinson and
Marquez Marshall each
had 19 points to lead the
Tigers. Fort WHite was led
by Jordan Talley with 20.
"I challenged Marshall
to play with the intensity
of someone like Solomon
Poole (whom he faced
earlier in the season),"
Columbia coach Horace
Jefferson said. "He's good
enough to take over, and
tonight he did. It was an
emotional game tonight."
Columbia plays host
to Robert E. Lee at
7:30 p.m. Monday in the Columbia
district tournament. Tigers 63


That knowledge is vast.
Sparks said she has played
every position with an
emphasis on pitching, sec-
ond base and first base. At
Thomas, she was the MVP
her senior year and led the
team in hitting as a junior
and senior.
She graduated from
Thomas with honors, and
stresses school.
"I am a high advocate
of academics," Sparks said.
"I require progress reports
every two weeks. If a player
is failing a class, I will not
INDIANS continued on 2B


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Cassie Sparks is the new head coach for the Fort White High
softball team. The Lady Indians begin play on Tuesday.


reversal


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
i High's Nigel Atkinson (left) attempts to block a shot by Wes Osterhoudt in the
-44 win against the Indians on Friday in Lake City.


Pouncey

out for

Super

Bowl

Steelers will turn
to backup with
center injured.
Associated Press

DALLAS Maurkice
Pouncey is sidelined for the
Super Bowl.
The Pittsburgh Steelers
center has-a high left ankle
sprain that has kept him
out of practice since he was
injured nearly two weeks
ago in the AFC champion-
ship game.'
Now, the rookie Pro Bowl
selection will miss the big
game against the Green
Bay Packers on Sunday.
"He's out," Steelers coach
Mike Tomlin told a reporter
Friday after the team com-
pleted its final full practice
indoors at TCU.
Backup Doug Legursky
will play in his place in
what will be his first NFL
start as a center. Signed
as an undrafted free agent
out of Marshall in 2008,
Legursky started four
games at guard earlier this
season.
"The NFL is made up
of lots of players like him:
guys who somehow got an
opportunity and seized it,"
Tomlin said. "We're com-
pletely confident that he
will seize this opportunity
and, play well. That's why
we're not changing what we
do."


Boynton's stingy defense

has been key for Gators


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida guard Kenny Boynton (1) goes up for a 3-pointer as
Vanderbilt's Steve Tchiengang defends during overtime in
Gainesville on Tuesday. Florida defeated Vanderbilt 65-61.


Florida takes
on No. 10
Kentucky tonight.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE -
Florida's Kenny Boynton
has been asked to guard
some of the Southeastern
Conference's top scorers,
including John Jenkins,
Chris Warren, Scotty
Hopson, Bruce Ellington
and Rotnei Clarke.
For the most part,
Boynton has held his own
in those matchups. And his
defense is a big reason the
Gators are atop the Eastern
Division.
His toughest challenge
could come Saturday night
against No. 10 Kentucky. It
certainly will be Boynton's


most familiar opponent.
Boynton and Kentucky
point guard Brandon
Knight grew up together
in South Florida, played
for rival high schools and
teamed up to win consecu-
tive Amateur Athletic Union
championships.
"I'm sure (Boynton's) got
some real excitement going
through his mind right now
and I'm sure he's going to
come ready to play," team-
mate Chandler Parsons
said.
The Gators (17-5, 6-2 SEC)
probably need Boynton at
his best. Knight is aver-
aging 17.2 points for the
Wildcats (16-5, 4-3) and is
shooting better than 40 per-
cent from 3-point range.
Boynton realizes he will
have his hands full.
"He's always been a smart
player," Boynton said of


Knight. "When he's on the
court, he makes the right
plays. When he's open, he
takes the shot or he tries
to get to the rim. And when
he sees the open man, he's
a great passer."
But if anyone on Florida's
roster can slow Knight
down, it's Boynton.
The 6-foot-2 sophomore
guard has emerged as the
team's best defender. His
hustle and relentlessness
have the Gators ranked sec-
ond in the league in scoring
defense.
"When they ask me to
disrupt the other team's
best player, I try my best to
disrupt them, whether it's
contesting shots, getting
through screens or forcing
them to drive," .Boynton
said.
GATORS continued on 3B










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Qatar
Masters, third round, at Doha, Qatar
(same-day tape)
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Phoenix Open,
third round, at Scottsdale, Ariz.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Phoenix Open,
third round, at Scottsdale,Ariz.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN -West Virginia atVillanova
ESPN2 Butler at Cleveland St.
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage, St. John's at
UCLA or Illinois at Northwestern
2 p.m.
ESPN Baylor at Texas A&M
ESPN2 Rhode Island at Temple
4 p.m.
ESPN Memphis at Gonzaga
ESPN2 Iowa at Indiana
FSN -Washington at Oregon
VERSUS UNLV at BYU
6 p.m.
ESPN N.C. State at Duke
ESPN2 Mississippi at Arkansas
FSN -Arizona St. at Stanford
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Loyola Marymount at Saint
Mary's, Calif.
9 p.m.
ESPN Kentucky at Florida
NBA BASKETBALL
10:30 p.m.
WGN Chicago at Golden State
NBA DL BASKETBALL
II p.m.
VERSUS Tulsa at Texas (same-day
tape)
PREP BASKETBALL
10 p.m.
ESPN2 Bishop Gorman (Nev.) vs.
Long Beach Poly (Calif.), at Santa Ana,
Calif.
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Sunderland
at Stoke City
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
1:30 p.m.
FSN Iowa St. at Oklahoma

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

Conference Championships
Green Bay 21, Chicago 14
Pittsburgh 24, N.Y. ets 19
Super Bowl
Sunday
At Arlington,Texas
Pittsburgh vs. Green Bay, 6:30 p.m.
(FOX)uper Bowl composite

Super Bowl composite


San Francisco
Baltimore Ravens
New Orleans
N.Y. Jets
Tampa Bay
Pittsburgh
Green Bay


L Pct. PF
0 1.000 188
0-1.000 34
0 1.000 31
0 1.000 16
0 1.000 48
I .857 168
I .750 127


N.Y. Giants 3
Dallas 5
Oak.-LA. Raiders 3
Washington 3
New England 3
Indianapolis-Balt. 2
Chicago I
Kansas City I
Miami 2
Denver 2
St. Louis-L.A. Rams I
Arizona 0
Atlanta 0
Carolina 0
San Diego 0
Seattle 0
Tennessee 0
Cincinnati 0
Philadelphia 0
Buffalo 0
Minnesota 0


I .750 83
3 .625 221
2 .600 132
2 .600 122
3 .500 121
2 .500 69
I .500 63
I .500 33
3 .400 74
4 .333 115
2 .333 59
1 .000 23
I .000 19
I .000 29
I .000 26
I .000 10
I .000 16
2 .000 37
2 .000 31
4 .000 73
4 .000 34


College all-star games


Today
At San Antonio
Texas vs. The Nation
Challenge, 2 p.m.


All-Star


BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Friday's Games
Miami 109, Charlotte 97
Indiana 100, Portland 87
Philadelphia 100, NewYork 98
Toronto I11 I, Minnesota 100
Orlando I I0,Washington 92
Detroit 92, New Jersey 82
Cleveland at Memphis (n)
Dallas at Boston (n)
Oklahoma City at Phoenix (n)
San Antonio at Sacramento (n)
Utah at Denver (n)
Today's Games
Dallas at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 7 p.m.
Portland at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
LA. Lakers at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Denver at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m. -
Oklahoma City at Utah, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Dallas at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Atlanta atWashington, 7 p.m.
Portland at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
LA. Lakers at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Denver at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Utah, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
LA. Clippers at Miami, 12 p.m:
Indiana at New Jersey, 12 p.m.
Philadelphia at New York, 12 p.m.
Orlando at Boston, 2:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 2 Kansas at Nebraska, 4 p.m.
No. 3 Texas vs.Texas Tech, 9 p.m.
No. 4 Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati, 6 p.m.
No. 5 Duke vs. N.C. State, 6 p.m.
No. 6 Connecticut at Seton Hall,
7 p.m.
No.8 BYU vs. UNLV, 4 p.m.
No. 10 Kentucky at Florida,
9 p.m.
No. 12 Villanova vs. No. 25 West
Virginia, Noon


No. 13 Georgetown vs. Providence.
Noon
No. 14 Missouri vs. Colorado,
7:30 p.m.
No. 15 Louisville vs. DePaul, 8 p.m.
No. 16 Texas A&M vs. Baylor, 2 p.m.
No. 17 Syracuse at South Florida,
2 p.m.
No. 20 Washington at Oregon. 4 p.m.
No. 21 Arizona at California, 8 p.m.
No. 22 Utah State vs. Boise State,
9:05 p.m.
No. 23 Vanderbilt vs. South Carolina,
1:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. I Ohio State at No. 18 Minnesota,
2 p.m.
No. 9 Notre Dame vs. Rutgers, Noon
No. 19 Wisconsin vs. Michigan State,
I p.m.
No. 23 North Carolina vs. Florida
State, 2 p.m.

BASEBALL

MLB calendar

Feb. 14 Voluntary reporting date
for pitchers, catchers and injured players.
Feb. 19 Voluntary reporting date
for other players.
March 2 Mandatory reporting
date.
March 2-11 Teams may renew
contracts of unsigned players.
March 15 Last day to place a
player on unconditional release waivers
and pay 30 days termination pay instead
of 45 days.
March 29 Last day to request
unconditional release waivers on a player
without having to pay his full 2011 salary.
March 31 -- Opening day, active
rosters reduced to 25 players.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Friday's Games
Florida 4, New Jersey 3, OT
Pittsburgh 3, Buffalo 2
Columbus at Detroit (n)
Washington at Tampa Bay (n)
Edmonton at St. Louis (n)
Chicago atVancouver (n)
Today's Games
San Jose at Boston, I p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, 2 p.m.
Anaheim at Colorado, 3 p.m.
Toronto at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Columbus, 7 p.m. ,
Detroit at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
San Jose at Boston, I p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, 2 p.m.
Anaheim at Colorado, 3 p.m.
Toronto at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Columbus, 7 p.m.
.Detroit at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Pittsburgh at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Montreal, 3 p.m.
St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 3 p.m.


League reports

Results of Lake City Bowl league
play fellow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Staci
Greaves 223; 2. (tie) Lori Davis,
Debbie Walters 185; 4. Mary Lobaugh
176. 1. Dess Fennell 235; 2. (tie)
Luke Milton, Zech Strohl 231; 4. Tom
Sewejkis 226.
High scratch series: 1. Staci
Greaves 505; 2. Lori Davis 478;
3. Mary Lobaugh 486. 1. Zech Strohl
655; 2. Mark Davis 587; 3. Tom
Sewejkis 579.
High handicap game: 1. Debbie
Walters 240; 2. Cathey Creel 227;
3. Beth Koppa 226. 1. Dess Fennell
260; 2. Luke Milton 255; 3. (tie) Willie
Frazier, Jesse Camacho 248.
High handicap series: 1. Staci
Greaves 682; 2. Lori Niquette 664;
3. Linda Oliver 647. 1. Dave Ward
669; 2. ZechStrohl 664; 3. (tie) Rudy
Nyssen, George Mulligan 659.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
180. 1. Zech Strohl 207.
(results from Feb. 1)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(63-33); 2. Farmers (60-36); 3. Pin
Droppers (51-45).
High scratch game: 1. Louise
Atwood 174; 2. Betty Brown 171;
3. Barbara Griner 170. 1. Dan Ritter
208; 2. Joe Peterson 194; 3. Art
Joubert 193.
High scratch series: 1. Louise
Atwood 473; 2. Betty Brown 470;
3. Barbara Griner 454. 1. Dan Ritter


SCOREBOARD


BOWLING

557; 2. Joe Peterson 521; 3. Morrell
Atwood 518.
High handicap game: 1. Pat Hale
233; 2. Louise Atwood 224; 3. Yvonne
Osborn 223. 1. C.W. Reddick 253;
2. Morrell Atwood 242; 3. Dan Ritter
233.
High handicap series: 1. Barbara
Croft 624; 2. Betty Brown 614;
3. Barbara Griner 610. 1. Joe Peterson
674; 2. Keith Herbster 646; 3. (tie) Jim
Belgaard, Charles Pressler 619.
High average: 1. Betty Brown
146.73; 2. Louise Atwood 145.56;
3. Yvonne Finley 144.68. 1. Dan Ritter
172.75; 2. Art Joubert 171.06; 3. Earl
Hayward 170.54.
(results from Feb. 1)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Neil Hoffman's
Auto (93-27); 2. Team 8 (73.5-46.5);
3. G-N Construction (72.5-47.5).
High scratch game: 1. Curtis
Gutzmer 268; 2. Steve Madsden 266;
3. Zech Strohl 258.
High scratch series: 1. Curtis
Gutzmer 701; 2. Zech Strohl 698;
3. Bobby Smith 682.
High handicap game: 1. Steve
Madsden 284; 2. Curtis Gutzmer 275;
3. Grant Spears 273.
High handicap series: 1. Curtis
Gutzmer 722; 2. Bobby Smith 703;
3. Grant Spears 699.
High average: 1. Dale Coleman
217.18; 2. Zech Strohl 216.44; 3. J.J.
Hilbert 207.24.
(results from Jan. 24)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Gamblers
(55-33); 2. Golden Niners (53-35);
3. Knock 'em Down (50-38).


INDIANS: Opening game Tuesday

Continued From Page 1B


play them even if a scout is
in the stands."
Fort White qualified for
the postseason in 2008
and won a playoff game,
but has fallen short of that
promise the past two sea-
sons. The 2011 team has
seven seniors who either
played on the playoff team
or know the history.
"We have extremely high
expectations and the good
thing is they are work-
ing so hard," Sparks said.
"They are used to every-
thing being one way, so it
is different for them. They
have gotten on board and
are busting their butts. You
have to play every game
like it is your last."
Taylor Douglass, a
returning starter and
pitcher, has been joined
by Columbia High transfer
Cecile Gomez.
"They are both our No. 1
pitcher," Sparks said. "We
have a great combination
with the two and a lot of
times they will be splitting


games. They are a team
within themselves. They
both are great utility play-
ers and can swing a bat"
All-around player Alison
Wrench is another junior
that Sparks is looking to for
leadership.
Holly Polhill is back
behind the plate. Other
returnees are outfielders
Sarah Conners, Stacie Scott
and CaitlinJones. Samantha
McCrory is working at third
base and Kayla Williams at
second. Brett Sealey can
play infield or outfield.
Catherine Trisch has come
out for softball after playing
basketball.
Gary Williams and
Sparks' dad, David Sparks,
are assistant coaches.
Late-season swoons have
plagued the Lady Indians
the last two years and
Sparks hopes to overcome
that
"What I want to instill
is play the game and not
the opponent," Sparks said.
"It is never a good game


unless it is a tough game
and we need to work hard
and fight through it to get
where we need to be.
"No matter who it is,
play the game and play it
respectfully."
Fort White's District
5-3A requires that dedica-
tion. Defending champion
Williston High advanced
to the state final four last
year. Runner-up Santa Fe
High, Newberry High and
Suwannee High also are
formidable.
Sparks welcomes the
challenge for the Lady
Indians.
"I was blessed with the
talent of playing and I want
to pass that along," Sparks
said. "I enjoy coaching var-
sity so much. I can relate
to them and I know what
it takes to get to the next
level. I really love the girls I
am working with. I couldn't
ask for a better situation."
Fort White opens the
season at Gainesville High
at 7 p.m. Tuesday.


ACROSS


BRIEFS


BABE RUTH BASEBALL Fort White spring

Evaluations moved registration today
tn nm 'ak- 129


Lake City Babe Ruth
Baseball evaluations,
originally scheduled for
today, have been
changed to 3 p.m.
Feb. 12 at the Southside
Baseball Complex.
For details, call league
president Tad Cervantes at
365-4810.

YOUTH BASEBALL


Fort White Girls Softbll
Association's spring
softball season
registration for ages 6-16 is
at the concession stand in
the South Columbia Sports
Complex from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. today, noon to 2 p.m.
Sunday, and 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Feb. 12.
For details, call Jay
Harvey or Lynn Harvey at
365-2797 or 365-5688.


Fort White league
registration today QaFORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Quarterback Club


Fort White Youth
Baseball league
registration at the
concession stand at South
Columbia Sports Complex
is noon to 4 p.m. today, and
4-7 p.m. Wednesday. Late
registration is 9 a.m. to
noon on Feb. 12 at an
additional fee; availability is
not guaranteed.
For details, call Tammy
Sharpe at 867-3825.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Girls softball
registration today
The Girls Softball
Association of Columbia
County has registration
(ages 4-17) at the softball
complex from noon to
2 p.m. today, and 5-7 p.m.
Tuesday. Registration
forms also are available
at Brian's Sports and
completed forms can be
dropped off there. Coaches
are being sought.
For details, call
755-4271 or visit
information@
girlssoftballassociation. org.


meeting Monday

The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday in
the teacher's lounge at the



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. -

I LAURR i


high school. Nominations
for club officers will be
received at the meeting.
For details, call Shayne,
Morgan at 397-4954 or
e-mail
shaynetrayne@hotmail. com.

OLUSTEE 5K
Registration open.
for 2011 event
The 2011 Olustee 5K
Run/Walk is 7 a.m. Feb.
19. Individual or team
registration is available at
www.stepfitnessonline.com.
Entry forms can be picked
up at the Step Fitness
corporate office on
Pinemount Road. Proceeds
go to the March of Dimes.
For details, call Michelle
Richards at (386) 208-2447.

From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


N AI I IN- I suggested by the above cartoon. '0

Answer: = I 52
(Answers Monday) ---
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: QUASH LURID BRANCH AROUND
I Answer: The manicurist said nails are this -
"HARD" ON THE HANDS 2-5


1 Shaggy flower
4 Oils et al.
7 Guthrie's
genre
11 Safari animal
12 Not tied up
13 Plenty, to a
poet
14 Least certain
16 Verdant
17 Inert gas
18 Is there any-
thing -?
19 Historical
period
20 Jeer
21 Heaped up
24 Room to
maneuver
27 Ms. Hagen
28 Black hole,
once
30 Unhurried
32 Await action
34 Charged
particles
36 Stun


37 Pyramid '
builders
39 Buckets
41 Omelet
ingredient
42 Web site
43 Stephen King,
novel
45 Like circus
lions
48 Bullring bull
49 Sheer fabrics
52 Thick hunk
53 Revival shout
54 Faultfinder
55 Lampreys
56 Spring mo.
57 Behind, at sea

DOWN

1 Exec
2 PC operating
system
3 Think on
4 Sports palace
5 Home, in the
phone book
6 Lunar new year


Answer to Previous Puzzle


B-[AS Ij ER A SE AL



DAY BREAK ATEN
EYE HYPER
PALLE YOSELS
I P EM LTEANC
SLE S NAP BOA
ON IB C ES PN
SENO Q TS0
UK ES B LU EICHII P
MOLE LO01NIN UREF
PALL YORE LOS
S LY P ET AN T


Chaps
Heavy burden
Forfeit
Elec. measure
Norwegian bays
Leg part


18 Want-ad
letters
20 City near
Zurich
21 Kind of tent
22 Gossip tidbit
23 "The Sweater
Girl"
24 Burma
neighbor
25 Jai -
26 Wail
29 Bell sound
31 NBA coach -
Unseld
33 Salon
requests
(2 wds.)
35 Ankle injury
38 Back when
40 Poor-box
donations
42 Put into words
43 Merry old king
44 Europe-Asia
range
46 Famed lava
spewer
47 Like
Beethoven
48 Mao -tung
49 Pasture sound
50 Current meas.
51 PFC boss


2011 by UFS, Inc.


High handicap game: 1. Jane
Sommerfeld 252; 2. Aggie Mumbauer
241; 3. June Pat Klock 225. 1. Sal
Annello 274; 2. Dan Ritter 250;
3. Thomas Young 235.
High handicap series: 1. Shirley
Highsmith 634; 2. Dee Dee Young
627; 3. Yvonne Finley 622. 1. George
Mulligan 683; 2. Sandy Sanders 667;
3. David Duncan 665.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
154.79; 2. Jane Sommerfeld 151.6;
3. Elaine Nemeth 151.47. 1. David
Duncan 187.48; 2. Bill Dolly 183.88;
3. George Mulligan 181.82.
(results from Jan. 27)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Alley Oops
(15-1); 2. The Sandbaggers (10-6,
560 average); 3. Lucky Strikers (10-6,
534 average).
High handicap game: 1. Karen
Gardner 247; 2. Susan Mears 244;
3. Betty Carmichael 243.
High handicap series: 1. Angle
Meek 653; 2. (tie) Cythe Shiver 667,
Ruth Helms, Betty Carmichael 642.
(results from Feb. 1)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. TAZ (13-3);
2. McGhghy's Navy (11-5); 3. Train
Wreck (9-7).
High scratch game: 1. Liz Randall
214; 2. Norma Yeingst 187; 3. Liz
Randall 184. 1. (tie) Joe Cohrs, Mark
Moore 255; 3. Mike Rutter 246.
High scratch series: 1. Uz Randall
570; 2. Cheryl Jacks 492; 3. Norma
Yeingst 487. 1. Joe Cohrs 655;
2. Mark Moore 638; 3. A.J. Dariano
587.
(results from Jan. 30)


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2011


PACKERS
No. Player Pos Ht Wt
2 Mason Crosby K 6-1 207
6 Graham HarrellQB 6-2 215
8Tim Masthay P 6-1 200
10 Matt Flynn QB 6-2 225
12 Aaron Rodgers QB 6-2 225
16 Brett Swain WR 6-0 200
20 Atari Bigby S 5-1 I 213
21 Chas.WoodsonCB 6-1 202
22 Pat Lee CB 6-0 196
23 Dimitri Nance RB 5-10 218
24 Jarrett Bush CB 6-0 200
26 Charlie Peprah S 5-1I 203
28 B. Underwood CB 6-1 191
30 John Kuhn RB 6-0 250
32 Brandon JacksonRB 5-10 216
35 Korey Hall RB 6-0 236
36 Nick Collins S 5-1 I 207
37 Sam Shields CB 5-11 184
38 Tramon WilliamsCB5- I 191
40 Josh Gordy CB 5-11 190
44 James Starks RB 6-2 218
45 Quinn Johnson RB 6-I 263
49 Rob Francois LB 6-2 255
50 A.J. Hawk LB 6-1 247
52 Clay Matthews LB 6-3 255
53 Diyral Briggs LB 6-4 230
55 Desmond BishopLB 6-2 238
57 Matt Wilhelm LB 6-4 245
58 Frank Zombo LB 6-3 254
61 Brett Goode C 6-1 255
62 E. Dietrich-SmithG 6-2 308
63 Scott Wells C 6-2 300
67 Nick McDonald G 6-4 316
70T.J.Lang T 6-4 318
71 JoshSitton G 6-3 318
72 Jason Spitz G 6-3 305
73 Daryn Colledge G 6-4 308
75 Bryan Bulaga T 6-5 314
76 Chad Clifton T 6-5 320
77 Cullen Jenkins DE 6-2 305
79 Ryan Pickett DE 6-2 340
80 Donald DriverWR 6-0 194
81 Andrew QuarlessTE 6-4 252
83 Tom Crabtree TE 6-4 245
85 GregJennings WR 5-11 198
86 Donald Lee TE 6-4 248
87 Jordy Nelson WR 6-3 217
89 James Jones WR 6-1 208
90 BJ. Raji NT 6-2 337"
93 ErikWalden LB 6-2 250
94 Jarius Wynn DE 6-3 285
95 Howard Green DT 6-2 340
98 C.J.Wilson DE 6-3 290


Tomlin says Steelers about


ready to go against Packers


By DENNIS WASZAK Jr.
Associated Press

DALLAS Mike Tomlin
stood stone-faced behind
the Lombardi Trophy as
a few dozen cameras fired
away.
"Smile, Mike!" one pho-
tographer yelled out.
"Nah," the Pittsburgh
Steelers coach said without a
hint of a grin on another cold,
snowy Friday in Big D.
He eventually cracked
a smile, but this is seri-
ous stuff for Tomlin as the
Steelers go for the seventh
Super Bowl title in franchise
history Sunday against the
Green Bay Packers.
"We're putting the finish-
ing touches, of course, on
our plan here," Tomlin said
in a sparsely attended final
media session that lasted
barely five minutes. "It's
been a good week, but of
course, like the Green Bay
Packers, I'm sure we're all
getting a little antsy and
getting ready to play."
Tomlin will keep an eye
on his guys during the next
few days to make sure they
remain even-keeled with so
much at stake.
But what about the 38-
year-old coach who .could


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin answers questions during a news conference
at the Super Bowl XLV Media Center in Dallas on Friday.


be hoisting that trophy for
the second time in his four
seasons?
"I'm a robot," Tomlin
said. "I'm just going to ride
the wave."
And it could carry him to
a special place among NFL
coaches. He would become'
only the 13th coach in
league history to win mul-
tiple rings.


"Ifs awesome, it really
is," Tomlin said of the
opportunity. "It's humbling,
it's inspiring, it motivates
you. Its all those things. I
think fortunately for us, we
have what you can't buy,
which is legacy which is
unbelievable standard and
expectation and all those
great things."
The Steelers had their


final full practice at TCU
later Friday, and Tomlin
said the players would
have some free time at
night to spend with family
and friends. They'll have a
"dress rehearsal" Saturday
in their last practice, going
through what Tomlin called
"a mock game" before the
Super Bowl at Cowboys
Stadium.


STEELERS
No. Player Pos Ht Wt
4 Byron Leftwich QB 6-5 250
6 Shaun Suisham K 6-0 197
7 B. RoethlisbergerQB 6-5 241
13 Jeremy Kapinos P 6-1 230
16 Charlie Batch QB 6-2 216
17 Mike Wallace WR 6-0 199
20 B. McFadden CB 6-0 190
21 Mewelde MooreRB 5-11 209
22 William Gay CB 5-10 190
23 Keenan Lewis CB 6-0 208
24 IkeTaylor CB 6-2 195
25 Ryan Clark S 5-1 I 205
26 Will Allen S 6-1 200
27 Jonathan DwyerRB 5-11 229
28 Crezdon ButlerCB 6-0 191
29 Ryan Mundy S 6-1 209
33 Isaac Redman RB 6-0 230
34 R. Mendenhall RB 5-10 225
37 A. Madison CB 5-9 180
43 Troy Polamalu S 5-10 207
50 Larry Foote LB 6-1 239
51 James Farrior LB 6-2 243
53 M. Pouncey C 6-4 304
55 S. Sylvester LB 6-2 231
56 LaMarrWoodleyLB 6-2 265
57 Keyaron Fox LB 6-3 235
60 Greg Warren C 6-3 252
61 Chris Scott T 6-4 319
64 Doug Legursky C 6-1 315
66 Tony Hills T 6-5 304
68 Chris Kemoeatu G 6-3 344
69 Steve McLendonDT 6-4 280
71 Flozell Adams T 6-7 338
72 onathan Scott T 6-6 318
73 Ramon Foster G 6-6 325
76 Chris Hoke NT 6-2 305
79 Trai Essex G 6-5 324
81 Arnaz Battle WR 6-1 208
82A. Randle El WR 5-10 185
83 Heath Miller TE 6-5 256
84 Antonio BrownWR 5-10 186
85 David Johnson TE 6-2 260
86 Hines Ward WR 6-0 205
88 E. Sanders WR.5-11 ,180
89 Matt Spaeth TE 6-7 770
91 Aaron Smith DE 6-5 298
92 James Harrison LB 6-0 242
93 Nick Eason DE 6-3 305
94 L.Timmons LB 6-i 234
96 Ziggy Hood DE 6-3 300
'97 Jason Worilds LB 6-2 262
98 Casey HamptonNT 6-1 325
99 Brett Keisel DE 6-5 285


Rodgers fights off Favre



legacy to build his own


By EDDIE PELLS
Associated Press

DALLAS As the 2005
draft crept uncomfortably
along into hour 2, then hour
3, then hour 4 and beyond,
Aaron Rodgers looked at
the board, saw the words
"Green Bay" up there and
knew there was an outside
chance his long day would
end there.
Then, he heard his name.
In a matter of seconds, he
went-from draft day disap-
pointment to Brett Favre's
backup.
A lot of baggage to carry
up to the Frozen Tundra.
"I never. thought it was
baggage," Rodgers said. "I
was happy someone picked
me."
The Packers are happy,
too.
Despite skeptical fans
and a less-than-welcoming
Favre, Rodgers took over
the starting job three years
ago. This year, he led -the
Pack to the Super Bowl and
is now as revered in Green
Bay as the guy who once
wore No. 4 the quarter-
back they once said was
irreplaceable.
"It was a difficult situa-
tion," Rodgers said. "It was
tough to stand up every day
in front of the media 'not
knowing what questions
were coming at me hnd
how the fans were going
to react that day in prac-
tice. But the whole time,
the organization stood by
me and they told the truth,
and I told the truth, and we
moved on together."
Those who knew him,
had studied his .game
and his slow, steady rise


through the sport could
see this coming.
One of the most savvy
moves Rodgers made was
to contact Steve Young,
who went through a very
similar scenario in San
Francisco when he waited
behind Joe Montana in'the
1990s.
Young's advice: "You
have to take a laser focus
on the opportunity to be on
a good team and play good
football and not worry
about the other stuff. You
try to forget about all the
things that make it hard.
If you go there, you'll find
yourself doing the human-
nature thing and trying to.
get people to understand
how hard it is. That never
works. You never want to
let that happen."
Rodgers comes by that
credo honestly. His whole
career has been about
overcoming one obstacle
or another.
He was a record-setter at
Pleasant Valley High School
in Chico, Calif., but at
5-foot-10, 165 pounds, didn't
get a serious look from
the major colleges. So, he
stayed in the area, enrolled
at Butte Community
College and immediately
won over a group of play-
ers in their 20s who had
as much experience in the
school of hard knocks as
on the football field.
"I think Aaron had
a unique way of kind of
reaching to a different cast
of characters," said Butte
coach Jeff Jordan, who was
Rodgers' position coach
back then. "Whether it
was guys who were there
because of academics or


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Green Bay Packers' Aaron Rodgers (12) and teammates
joke as they take their team photo in Dallas on Friday.
Green Bay will face the Pittsburgh Steelers in the NFL
football Super Bowl XLV on Sunday.


guys who were raised on
the streets or spent time
in the military. It doesn't
mean he hung with them,
but he accepted 'them.
That's kind of why people
maybe gravitated toward
him, even though he was
this young, 18-year-old,
-skinny little baby-faced boy
coming in."
After throwing for 28
touchdowns in one season


at Butte along with start-
ing a growth spurt that
would see him add four
inches and 50 pounds -
. Rodgers made his way to
Cal, where he worked with
coach Jeff Tedford. In two
years there, Rodgers went
14-4 as a starter, threw for
5,469 yards and, for a long
time in the lead-up to the
2005 draft, was being tout-
ed as a possible No. 1 pick.


Strong class vying for Hall of Fame


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

DALLAS Three of the
NFL's top 10 career rush-
ers and one of its most
dynamic cornerbacks lead
a star-studded group of can-
didates for the Pro Football
Hall of Fame.
Curtis Martin, Jerome
Bettis and Marshall Faulk
are the running backs eli-
gible for the first time for
induction into the Canton,
Ohio, hall. Defensive back
Deion Sanders also is a
first-time contender, along
with tackle Willie Roaf.


It's quite a collection for
voters to consider Saturday
- and those are just the
players who reached eligi-
bility this year.
Holdovers include wide
receivers Tim Brown, Cris
Carter and Andre Reed; tight
end Shannon Sharpe; center
Dermontti Dawson; defen-
sive ends Richard Dent, Chris
Doleman and Charles Haley;
defensive tackle Cortez
Kennedy; senior nominees
Chris Hanburger and Les
Richter, both linebackers;
and NFL Films founder Ed
Sabol as a contributor.
At least four and a maxi-


mum of seven nominees
can be elected. If six or
seven make it, two must be
senior nominees.
Sanders won two
Super Bowls and was the
Defensive Player of the
Year in 1994. He had 53
career interceptions and
also was an outstanding
kick returned. In his 14 NFL
seasons, Sanders scored 18
touchdowns on returns, and
played wide receiver.
"I didn't play the game
to go to the Hall of Fame,"
Sanders said. "That's not
the way I thought. I played
the game so I could take


care of my mama for the
rest of her life.
"You play the game
because you enjoy the
game. You play the game
because of what it brings to
you and your emotions."
Sanders was known
almost as much for his cel-
ebratory dances.
"I think people on the
outside, they get caught up
in that persona of "Prime
Time,' and they forget that
Deion. Sanders is a foot-
ball player and did a lot of
things in this league," for-
mer Tampa Bay linebacker
Derrick Brooks said.


SNFL NEWS & NOTES


Union, agents

discussing boycott


Associated Press

DALLAS The NFL
players union has discussed
a boycott of the scouting
combine later this month
with player agents.
Two people familiar with
the talks tell The Associated
Press the union -has sug-
gested keeping potential
2011 draft picks away from
the combine in Indianapolis
and from other draft-relat-
ed activities while there is
no collective bargaining
agreement.

Packers' team photo
finally clicks
DALLAS The Green


Bay Packers' much-dis-
cussed Super Bowl team
picture finally has been
snapped.
According to Friday's
pool report, the
Packers took their team
photo shortly before the
start of practice. Everyone
was in attendance, includ-
ing players on injured
reserve.
Two injured players,
linebacker Nick Barnett
and tight end Jermichael
Finley, complained last
week when it looked like
the photo would be taken
before they were sched-
uled to join the rest of the
team in the Dallas area this
week.


GATORS: Boynton leads
Continued From Page 1B


It hasn't always been
easy, though.
Boynton, a McDonald's
All-American in 2009 who
was touted as coach Billy
Donovan's best scorer since
Mike Miller, has struggled
to keep his head in games
when shots aren't falling.
So it's no surprise the
Gators are 14-1 this season
when Boynton makes at
least two 3-pointers and 3-4
when he doesn't. They also
have won 10 consecutive
games in which Boynton
scores at least 14 points.
He is second on the team
in scoring, averaging 13
points.
"I thought he really made
a great jump coming out of
the Mississippi State game,"
Donovan said. "He had
some really, really goods
looks, some open looks,
and I thought that really
affected him on the defen-
sive end and his energy."
Boynton missed nine
of 11 shots against the
Bulldogs, including all four
3-pointers. On the other
end, Dee Bost seemingly
scored at will and finished
with 24 points most of
them against Boynton.
Boynton was much better
againstJenkins, Vanderbilt's
leading scorer.
"I thought he did a phe-
nomenal job on Jenkins,"
Donovan said. "I know he
scored 22 points, but it
wasn't from the 3-point line,
it wasn't wide-open looks.
I think we made him work
for it. He got to the free-
throw line, he had some


drives. (Boynton) was
locked in defensively to try
to do the best job he could
on Jenkins."
How he handles Knight
should be a key factor
Saturday night
"We compete on the
court, and when it's over, it's
over," Boyhton said. "Our
focus coming into the game
is to win and try to not think
about the matchup."
Knight is taking a similar
approach.
He considered joining
Boynton in Gainesville,
'but ended up signing with
"Kentucky. Still, they remain
close friends and talk occa-
sionally.
"I'm thinking about run-
ning my team and coming
out with a win by focus-
ing on our team as a unit,
not thinking about individ-
ual matches," Knight said.
"It's just another basketball
game, trying to focus in.
I'll have more friends there
than usual, but it's the same
thing as usual just trying
to win."
Wildcats coach John
Calipari needs Knight to
maintain his composure,
e specially on the road,
where Kentucky is 1-3 in
conference play.
"We'll see. We will see,"
Calipari said. "I hope he's
accurate with that state-
ment because I think what
they'll try to do is press him
and get up in him, do some
stuff. He has to have poise
down there because the
place is going to go nuts.
It'll be interesting."


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
5YE, WERE GONNA CHILL OUT YOU KNOW, "CHILL,' RELAX, HANG
DADDY! AT THE MALL! OUT, TAKSAE A GEAK T
CHILLL orur? WA COMORALE
.D IE-STRESSHAVE
DOES14ATw vMA PUN DECOMPRESS

ANAY
I-..


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


1HAY 7r WOULO
vJIICH 5o


DEAR ABBY


Couple's secret wedding


leaves family in the dark


DEAR ABBY: My older
brother "Mike" was married
several months ago. The fam-
ily was informed after the
fact. Mike and his bride, "So-
phie," didn't elope. They had
planned their church wed-
ding for the better part of a
year, and decided to include
only a small group of friends
while completely excluding
the family. Naturally, this has
caused hurt feelings. As far
as I'm concerned, I have lost
a sibling rather than gained
one.
Mike and Sophie are now
throwing themselves a party
in their honor to celebrate
their union. My mother not
only wants me to attend, but
expects me to give them a
gift as well. Mom says he is
"family" and therefore I am
obligated to give a gift. I say
I wasn't invited to their wed-
ding so I'm under no obliga-
tion to give one. I have no de-
sire to reward someone who
thinks so little of me. What do
you say? LEFT OUT SIB-
LING IN WISCONSIN
DEAR LEFT OUT SIB-
..LING: If you haven't already
done so, tell your brother how
hurt you feel to have not been
invited to his wedding, then
listen to what he has to say.
Give him a chance to mend
fences. If that doesn't happen,
then skip the celebration. But
remember that if you don't
attend, the rift that has been
created may never be healed.
DEAR ABBY: I am a high


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
school senior who is worried
about leaving my older sister.
"Jamie" is 10 years older and
moved back home with my
parents and me after she fin-
ished college. She takes med-
ication because of her anxiety
and stays in her room most of
the time.
In the six years that Jamie
has lived here she has made
no friends or acquaintances.
I believe I'm the only person
she has a relationship with
other than her therapist. As
I spend more time on school-
work and projects and less
time with her, she feels ig-
nored and becomes desper-
ate to spend time with me. I
feel I'm her only link to the
outside world. I'm worried
that when I move away she'll
lose that connection and not
make any attempts to find a
relationship or a job.
I care deeply about Jamie,
but I want to go to college.
How can I help her to get
moving? MY SISTER'S
KEEPER IN ILLINOIS
DEAR SISTER'S KEEP-
ER: I can think of two ways.
The first is to not allow your


sister's mental disorder be-
cause that is what you are de-
scribing to keep you from
going to college and having
a life. Your sister has your
parents, so she won't be all
alone. The second is to write a
letter to her therapist explain-
ing your concerns. If anyone
can help your sister, it is her
therapist.
DEAR ABBY: I have a
friend from school who is
very close to me. I only get
to see her at lunch at school.
We have managed to keep
our friendship going through
e-mails and sleepovers.
However, she is often not
available for sleepovers, and
when she is, she must always
leave at 12 a.m.! I know it's
not just me because other
friends of hers have said this,
too. Once I asked her why she
had to leave so early and she
said it was her mom.
Why do you think her mom
is so adamant about early end-
ings? WONDERING IN
ATLANTA
DEAR WONDERING:
It's probably because your
friend's curfew ends at mid-
night or a little after, and her'
mother hasn't given her per-'
mission to attend all-night
sleepovers. But if you want to
be sure have your mother
ask her mother.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Take the initia-
tive to get what you want
Use your imagination and
experience to navigate
your way to the finish line.
If you stay calm and cal-
culate what's required, it
will make your victory that
much sweeter. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20):, Don't let anyone
take you for granted. It's
up to you to say no if you
have other things to do. Be
smart and set your sched-
ule tightly, leaving no room
for someone to play on your
emotions and good nature.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Your versatil-
ity ahd intellect will serve
you well when dealing with
friends and peers. You can
come to decisions regard-
ing your professional future
and -your long-term goals.
You can restructure a set-
tlement or contract. **
.CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Research your
goals via the internet so
there are no surprises
when you make your move.
You know your limitations
and you must stick to what
works for you. Emotional
matters can be resolved if
you speak up. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You should be looking


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

at your relationships with
others considering how
you can make some of them
better and eliminating the
ones that are dragging you
down. Engage in courses,
seminars or talking to ex-
perienced individuals who
can help you better incor-
porate your ideas into your
lifestyle. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Your emotions will
draw the truth out of a situ-
.ation you face with some-
one you care for. Don't
avoid what's happening. It's
important to resolve such
matters so you can keep
moving ahead. Be prepared
to jump if the opportunity
arises. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You have more control
than you realize, so take ad-
vantage of the opportuni-
ties that exist. Dealing with
children or socializing with
people who think outside
the box will help you visual-
ize the possibilities. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You will have
to maneuver through the
debris that others create.
Connecting to your beliefs
and sticking to your stan-
dards will help you reach
your destination in one


piece. Refuse to argue or to
engage in senseless situa-
tions. *****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You have
to go back before you can
move forward. It's time to
make amends and to re-
solve old problems that are
holding you back or play-
ing on your mind. Clear
the path to new beginnings.
**
CAPRICORN "(Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Be bold, act
with confidence and don't
be afraid to make some
rather unusual changes to
position yourself appropri-
ately for the future. You've
been hemming and hawing
too long, in fear of upsetting
others. Make your move.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Stability, equality
and better times are within
your reach. Use your en-
ergy wisely and create your
scenario with compassion
and understanding so that
no one is hurt or upset with
your decisions. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You'll be im-
pulsive, moody and impa-
tient if you are stewing over
things you should have al-
ready taken care of. Be ob-
jective. Consider the advice
being offered before you do
something rash. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: V equals Y
"FGAFCG JDG ZAA YKDJTCG, ZEJZ'I
ZEGPD WJPL ZDAKTCG. Z-E G V S J L Y A
ZAA WKSE ZA ZEGWIGCOGI, ZEGV


CJIZ ZAA CALM."


T D G S E Z
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "All our dreams can come true, if we have the
courage to pursue them." Walt Disney
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 2-5


CLASSIC PEANUTS


WOW, I'M HIPPER THAN I THOUGHT"!!
S ALL THESE YEARS I'VE BEEN
CHILLIN' AND NEVER
EVEN KNEW IT!!
LV KN
Us



*- .


T G D Z A C Z


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2011


Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


ADvantageI


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


I


4ilnes 750
3 days 50
Includes 2 SIgns Ft a Oidim l [o 1l.65


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....$92.00.
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your cbpy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad Is toAppear. Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mol., 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00a.m. Thurs.,9:00a.m.
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These deadlines are suspect to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans,
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakecityreporter.comi


personal merchandise totalling $100 or less
Each Item must Include a price.





4 lines 6 days e additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
Each Item mnus include a price.





Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling s000 or les.



Each item must include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.




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4 lines 6 days Each additional
line $1.15







Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or l.
Each item mst include a price.







One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private Individual selling
personal merchandise toalng $4,00 or less.
Each item must include a price

SOne Item per ad a j
4 lines 6 days Each additional
li ne $1.55







Rate applies to private dividuals lling
personal merchandise totalling $0000 oriess
Each Item must include ap no
SThis Is nanorefundaheblepatem


RECYCLE
YOUR
PAPER


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
FLORIDA THIRD JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 10-679-CA
GLENN FARMS, INC., a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiff,
DIAS SAINT-JEAN
Defendant. "
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant
to Summary Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated January 27, 2011 I will
sell the property situated in Colum-
bia County, Florida, described as
follows:
Lot 6, MAGNOLIA PLACE, accord-
ing to the map or plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 7, Pages 174
through 179, inclusive, of the Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder for cash, at the main entrance
of the Columbia County Courthouse,
173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055, at 11:00 AM on
.the 2nd day of March, 2011.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
of said Court this 31 day of January,
2011.
P. DEWITT CASON, Clerk of Court
BY/s/B. Scippio
DEPUTY CLERK
BEVIN G. RITCH
1418 NW 6th Street
Post Office Box 1025
Gainesville, FL 32602
(352)376-3201
Florida Bar #143762
Attorney for Plaintiff
04543383
February 5, 12, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT; THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DIANE J. BIANCHI,
File No. ll-17-CP
Division:
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
DIANE J. BIANCHI, deceased,
whose date of death was September
22, 2010, and whose social security
number is' XXX-XX-3705, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 173 N.E.
Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL
32056-2069. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is, February 5, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
ROBIN H. CONNER, ESQ.
Fla. Bar No. 353361
3940 Lewis Speedway, Suite 2103
St. Augustine, FL 32084
Tele:(904) 829-0511
FAX:(904) 824-5709
wk/rc/probate/Bianchi.Diane/Notice
to Creditors.wd
Personal Representative:
LISA JOY BIANCHI
515 Tanacrest Drive
Sandy Springs, GA 30328
04543379'
February 5, 11, 2011


Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630


Legal

To Whom It May Concern:
You are hereby notified that the fol-
lowing described livestock, small
brown horse, is now impounded at
the Columbia County Sheriff's Of-
fice and the amount due by reason of
such impounding is $213.90 as of the
date of this posting. For an updated
cost, contact the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office at 386-758-1104.
The above described livestock will,
unless redeemed within 3 days from
date hereof, be offered for sale at
public auction to the highest and best
bidder for cash.
Mark Hunter, Sheriff
Columbia County, Florida
04543386
February 5, 2011


010 Announcements








020 Lost & Found
Lost Diamond Tennis Bracelet
at Gondolier Restaurant or
Walgreens 1/26/11, Will identify,
Reward 386-963-2271

LOST DOG: $100 Reward. Miss-
ing since week of 01/10 from
Branford Hwy/Emerald Forrest.
Brown Lab/bulldog mix. answers
to Nikkie. 386-288-6786


060 Services
Senior Assistant/Companion.
I will sit with & care for your-
elderly. Drive to Doctor appts. &
shopping. References avail.
386-288-3776 or 386-754-8721

o0 Job ,
10 Opportunities

04543385
NOW HIRING!!!
We are now hiring experienced
Class A Drivers
Excellent benefits package
including health, dental
and 401K.
All applicants MUST Have:
Class A CDL with X
endorsements.
1 yr tractor-trailer experience
with a t/t school certification or
2 yrs. tractor-trailer experience
without the certification.
25 yrs or older
Please apply online at
floridarockapdtanklines.com
or call 1-866-352-7625

05525007
SHANDS LAKE SHORE
REGIONAL MEDICAL
CENTER
has the following
positions available:
Director of OR
Director of ER
(Lake Shore and Live Oak
facility)
Director of Rehab Services
Director of Radiology
Inpatient Coders
Charge Nurse Med/Surg
Competitive salary
and benefit package.
Apply online @
shandslakeshore.com or
Fax resume to 386.292.8295
EOE, MIF/VID
Drug Free Workplace

05525012
Office Assistant
Full time permanent position in
White Springs. Must have solid
computer skills, office
experience a must. Will train
right person in our speciality.
Opportunity for advancement.
Please EMAIL resume to
hr@speced.org

A/C SERVICE Tech
Min 5 yrs experience
F/T with benefits
Please call 386-454-4767
Anderson Columbia is accepting
applications for a certified
electrician with experience in
motor and motor control repair.
Please come by 871 Guerdon Rd,
Lake City, FL to fill out an appli-
cation or email your resume to
wassont@andersoncolumbia.com.
Equal Opportunity Employer

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

Bartender needed. Must
have experience & be reliable, &
have your own transportation and
your own phone. 386-752-2412

CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for Ff/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
PT Clerical position 8-12p M-F.
Must be a people person w/good
organizational, phone & customer
skills. Must multi task. Send
resume & ref's to Box 04108, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056


100 Opportunities

Teacher (Lawton's, Early Head
Start Lake City, Birth to 3 yrs old)
HS Dip/GED, Must have FCCPC
/CDA; three years of classroom
experience working with
infants/toddlers preferred; Bilin-
gual (Spanish/English) preferred,
5 Hour Literacy. Must pass physi-
cal/DCF background screening,
Current First Aid/CPR preferred.
Excellent Benefits-Paid Holidays,
Sick/Annual Leave. Apply in
person at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637,
by email: arobinson(S&sv4cs.org
Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE

1 Medical
120 Employment

04543381
Referral Coordinator/
Checkout Clerk
Medical Office is seeking
qualified candidate with Good
Multi-tasking skills and profes-
sionalism. Must have exp.
w/Med. Term & Ins. Referrals
& Auth. Send reply to Box
04109, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056

05525050

Medical Personnel

RN's for Med/Surg &
Telemetry, Top Daily pay,
Local Medical Centers,
1-877-630-6988
Homecare LPN's &'
Homecare CNA's needed for cli-
ent in Lake City, call
Maxim Healthcare Services
352-291-4888
Internal Medicine of Lake City
is looking for N.P. or P.A.
Please contact Dr Bali @
386-755-1703
Physical Therapy Assistant
needed in a local physician
office, please fax
CV to 386-719-9662.
PT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.
PT Tech needed for Outpatient PT
Clinic, experience/exercise back-
ground pref but will train,
Apply at HealthWorks @
1206 S.W. Main Blvd,
Lake City 386-752-1652


140 Work Wanted

We Run Errands!
Your personal errand service to
help those in need at rates you can
afford Call Dawn 386-249-9426

24 Schools &
240 Education

04543248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/14/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/14/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

AKC GERMAN SHEPPARD
puppy. Born 12/13.
Parents on site. $400.
386-496-3654 or 352-745-1452

Free young male cat
has bob tail,
loving
386-755-0920


310 Pets & Supplies
PITBULL PUPPY for sale.
7 week old. Parents on site. $250.
GRAND CHAMPION
BLOODLINES. 386-288-0231
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
- weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo..386-867-0005

401 Antiques
CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
GE Electric Stove,
White, works great,
$185. 386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387
Kenmore Washer
White, works great
$100
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387
Large Capacity Clothes dryer
$85.
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up'CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
421 SW ThompkingsLoop _.
Off 242. Several pieces"df
furniture, kids toys, clothes, etc....
Saturday, Feb. 5th starting @ 7am
Estate Sale. Feb 3, 4, & 5 8am.
Furn, tools, Boyds bears, clothes,
fixtures, lots of misc. ALL GOES!
No early birds. 140 SE Cherokee
Way. Off 252 behind high school.
Moving Sale Fri Sun. 8-?. Beth
Dr. off Cannon Creek behind Pepsi
plant. Look for signs. 10x20 shed,
riding mower, furn. & lots more!






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat & Sun,8a-lp
102 SW Petunia Place in
Azelea Park off 47
Something for everyone!

440 Miscellaneous
Frost Free Refrigerator
Nice w/top freezer.
White $200. obo
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387
GE DISHWASHER, white.
$75.00 Works good.
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387
GUNSHOW: 02/05 & 02/06
@ The Columbia County
Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City.
Sat 9am 4pm, Sun 9am-3pm.
Info: 386-325-6114


Looking for a



CHANGE?

Sitel is one of Columbia County's
largest employers and is now hiring!

Full time, Part time, Temporary -
let us know what you're looking for
and we'll introduce you to our relaxed
atmosphere and the potential to
build a solid new career with...






^STiEL
YOUR COMMUNITY CALL CENTER

Apply online at
www.sitel.com or in person
at 1152 SW Business Point Dr.
Lake City, FL 32025
www.sitel.com
(386).754.8562


440 Miscellaneous
Kitchen or bathroom
floor cabinet. $35.
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

^630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
pets ok, $500 dep $575 mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2006 SWMH 3/2 on
2.5 acres, fenced, in Olustee,$700
mo,includes W/D, safe & quiet
Call 904-349-5192






Quiet, Country Branford area
2/1 $400 dep, $450 month
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Nice 4br/2.5 ba, 3 ac. Fenced
Cross Fenced, paved rd., huge
deck, private. McAlpin area. $900
dep. & $950. mo. 386-867-1833

640 Mobile Homes
40 for Sale
$569 mo 3Bd/2Ba Modular
1/2 acre Deck, energy efficient,
appliances, drive, w/$12K down
($640 mo w/ $6K down).
Avail in March
Owner finance or rent to own???
Call (386) 758-9824 hurry
05524746
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers
Save up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832

4/2 DWMH in Retirement Park,
2 Porches, Shed, Extras,
Reduced Price.
*. 386-752-1258'" '.. '
Owner Fin, 3/2, DWMH, new-
paint,carpet, small down $625mon
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

05524833
No Application Fee +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 bedroom Apartments &
mobile homes,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
1/1 apts for rent on Madison St,
$500 month, $200 sec dep,
utilities included, (two available)
386-365-2515
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Gatorwood on the Westside
Rent $650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $500. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
'Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
386-69773248 or 352-514-2332


SELLIJ


FIND Tl


Classified Department: 755-5440


Waf-g-









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2011


7 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Move In Special.2/1 w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05524832
New Years Dream "Surprise"
Why Rent? Lease to own.
New model home 2 miles S off
47. 3000 sq ft, 4/3, 5% int, is
tax deduc, consider trade-in
386-752-1364

3/2, 2-car garage, fenced back
yard, convenient in-town location
near Summers school.
$1050 per mo. 386-623-2848
3ba/2ba,lg FR,w/LR & DR,fresh
paint, new carpet; 1/2 acre,2 mi
out. Lease req. incl No pets; ten-
ants, favorable history only please.
$850 + dep.752-5025, 752-8696.
4/3 Refurbished Home w/CH/A
for Rent or Sale,
on East side of town
Call 386-294-2494 for details,
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
CH/A, carport. $650/mo. + sec.
Includes all utilities & satellite TV.
Pets OK. (386)758-2408
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+Retirement Living,
Site built home
2br/2bth For Lease
Gorgeous Lake View. 2 br Apt
Water included. $550. mo plus
deposit. Close to shopping.
386-344-0579
Large 3br/2ba house. In town.
Fenced yard. $800 mo.
1st, last and security.
386-867-1212
LOVELY 3BR/1BA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017. Leave message.
Nice, private, quiet, 2/1, 4 miles S
of Lake City, $500 dep, $550 mo
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Rent/Sale 3/2 on 9 beautiful
fenced acres. Garage & other out
buildings. $850.rio. plus sec. dep.
Wellborn area. 386-754-0732
Three Rivers Estates, 2/1, CH/A,
2010 W2 & ref's from current
landlord req'd, Access to Rivers
$675 mo, $600 sec., 386-497-4699
Turnkey rental, 3/2 split,2 CG, 1/2
acre, quiet neighborhood, close to
1-75, $1050 per month, 1st/last/sec,
386-454-2826 or 954-895-1722

750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
Great locations on SW Main Blvd.
Retail, Wholesale, Distribution,
Office. 1200+ sf only $950. per
mo. Includes Utilities 752-5035
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor-

770 Condos For Rent
3BR/2BA Great area, close to
town, pool, no pets. Ref. req'd
$900 mo, $600 dep. 386-752-9144
days, 752-2803,397-3500 after 5p

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
,to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


805 Lots for Sale
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2br/2ba Eastside Village.
Unique floor plan. Lg utility/
work room. Screened front porch.
$55,000 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
3/2 w/ Front deck and large
Florida room. garage and other out
bldgs on 9 beautiful fenced acres.
$139,900. Neg. 386-754-0732
3b/2ba, 1545 sq ft on 1/2 acre,"
338 SW Wise Dr,Lake City
Reduced to $179,900, Call 386-
752-3078 or 352-281-4003
3br/2ba 80'X125' lot. 1,200 sqft.
Kitchen & bath remodeled, metal
roof, Ig fenced back yard. Close to
amenities. $79,900 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Brick home w/1,934 sqft
in Piccadilly Park. 1/2 acre. Lg
playroom, fenced yard. Reduced to
$139,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Custom home. on 5 ac.
where deer & turkey roam.
Lg barn w/enclosed workshop.
$219,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
4br/2ba, 5 ac., 2069 sqft. Ig family
& florida rm, den. Covered patio,
workshop. $229,900. Lorin Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678 '
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba, remodeled, views of the
lake. Formal LR, dining room &
family room. Many upgrades.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
Country Club. 4br/4ba. New roof,
AC, windows. Pool, hot tub,
& greenhouse. $229,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K, Tolar 386-755-6488
Custom Brick, 5+ ac. 5br/4ba.
4412 sqft. 3 car garage, pool, hot
tub, 3 fireplaces, more. $569,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lori Giebeig Simpson 365-5678


Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
3BR/2BA
$99,999
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
Fully furnished 2br/2ba @
$83,000
Excellent area. 3br/2ba home.
1620 sqft. w/covered patio. Lg
front porch & 1 car carport
Lori Giebeig. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty







0NWHEELS WATERCRAFT "
!-^- --cr








Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

To et ou

Ve ileS ld all


ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT


2004 Rialta
23ft. self-contained,
excellent condition.
$13,500
.60 ,


T Y0,




I P'AF 'rry_

.a1* t


810 Home for Sale
Move In Ready. 3br/2ba w/1.225
sqft. Comer lot. great S/D.
12x16 workshop w/elec.
Upgrades. $75.000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
Woodcrest S/D Super location,
nice back yard. 3br/2ba home,
cov-
ered back porch. New AC in 2010
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
WOODGATE VILLAGE.
3br/2ba DWMH.
Close to new elementary
school. $27.000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc

820 Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac..Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

Q83 Commercial
O U Property
Great Investment/Owner Finance
1400 sq ft building on 2 acres
Creative term, owner flexible.
Call for details. 386-867-1190

940 Trucks
2007 Chevy Regular Cab, 6 cyl,
auto, a/c, only 41,000 miles,
Rountree Ford Myron Wrubel
386-755-0630 x 292 $12,888
2008 F-450 King Ranch
Diesel Duelly, 36K miles,
Tommie Jefferson 386-209-8680
Rountree Moore Ford $39,995
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802


Work Truck 1990 Ford
F350 Dually, 5th Wheel
White, Automatic
$1500 obo 386-965-2215


950 Cars for Sale
2007 Mercury Grand Marquis GS
25K miles, stock #7300, only
$12,888, call Myron Wrubel @
Rountree Moore Ford 755-0630
2008 Nissan Ultima, white, 106K
miles, 20 in. rims, tinted windows,
excellent condition,
take over pymt's 386-984-6366
2010 Ford Escape Limited, V6,
auto, moon roof, white, 21K miles,
stock # F263 Dwight Twiggs
Rbuntree Moore Ford 755-0630
2010 Toyota Corolla, 8153K
miles, 35 MPG, stock #24598A,
$13,995, Call Tommie Jefferson
@ Rountree Moore Ford 209-8680
GET CASH TODAY!!
for your car, truck, van or SUV.
(Running or not). Call anytime.
(229)412-0380

9S 1 Recreational
951 Vehicles
Homestead Ranger Travel Trailer
28ft. One slideout Fiberglass,
Awning, sleeps 8. $11,000.
(850)322-7152

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440






Contact us


at the paper.


CLASSIFIED ADS

386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION

386-755-5445



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386-752-1293


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180 East DuvalSt
Lake City, Florida 32055