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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01370
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: February 4, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01370
System ID: UF00028308:01370
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

000016 120511 ****3 DIGTT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SNIA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611 1943



Lake II


Reporter


Friday, February 4, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 12 E 75 cents


PATRICK SCOTTn
Special to the Reporter
Columbia
County
investrga-
tors gather
evidence at
1506 SE Baya
Drive, where
three persons,
including two
women, were
found dead.






TRA


"They all met
at the house
to hang out.
They all knew
each other."

Mark Hunter
Columbia County Sheriff


PATRICK SCOTT/
Special to the Reporter
Sheriff deputies
deploy dogs as
they search for
more evidence
throughout the
day Thursday
after the sus-
pect, Alan Lucas
Strattan, tumed
himself in to the
LCPD.


SUSPECT:


Alan Lucas Strattan






LYA


Three shot dead; suspect surrenders to authorities

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A 25-year-old Lake City man allegedly shot
dead three of his friends early Thursday then
.. gently scooped up the 5-year-old daughter of
". one of the victims, drove to the Lake City Police
*, Department, turned himself in and delivered
the child safely to authorities.


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Reporter
Sheriff's deputies scour the yard at 1506 SE Baya Drive where three people were shot dead Thursday.


Throughout the. day
Th1 u rsd ay and into the night,
Columbia County Sheriff's
investigators* continued to
piece together evidence
from the scene to try and
make sense of one of the
most grisly crime scenes in
Lake City history.
The victims, one believed
to be five months pregnant,
were found dead just after
midnight at 1506 SE Baya
Drive. Each of the victims
had gunshot wounds.
Found dead at the scene
were: Monica Hudson, 27;
Michael Kevin Tucker, 32
and Nichole Cervantez, 25.
Cervantez was believed to
be five months pregnant. .
Alan Lucas Strattan, 25,
1506i SE Baya Drive, was
charged with three counts
of first-degree murder in
the case. He is being held
in the Columbia County
Detention Facility without
bond and was scheduled to
make his first appearance
in court today.
Strattan turned himself
in at the LCPD headquar-
ters shortly after midnight
Thursday and because the
incident location is in the
county, sheriff's deputies
were immediately called to


were noti-








Tucker said. "As
eStrattanwas
unarm p ed
and arrest-
ed without
incident.
Hudson W e
were noti-
fied of his
actions,"
Columbia
County
Believed to be the murderiff
Mweapon was recovered neark
the crime scene. Hunter
Tucker said. "As
DEATHS continuedfar as the
events, how
they played
out ... all
the pieces
of the puz-
zle are in
place."
Cervantez Sheriff's
officials
said it is believed that an
argument occurred shortly
before the shootings, but
what prompted the shoot-
ings was unclear. Ahandgun
believed to be the murder
weapon was recovered near
the crime scene. Hunter
said his investigative team
DEATHS continued on 3A


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Reporter
Deputies cordon off the crime scene with police tape.


CALLUS: 6 4 Opinion......... 4A
(386)75-19 Obituaries .............. 5A
SUBSCRIBE TO Isolated T-Storms Advice & Comics ......... 4B
THE REPORTER: Puzzles . ...
Voice: 755-5445 Puzzles ................. 2B
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A / / State ................... 6A


TODAY IN
STATE
'-.cott stumps
lor tax cuts.


COMING
SATURDAY
Candlelight memorial
for homicide victims.


1 842641 0002 1








LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2011


3 Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-7-0
Evening: 3-3-1


Thursday:
Afternoon: 5-9-1-7
Evening: 2-9-7-1


Wednesday:
4-11-16-23-30


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



'Last Tango in Paris' star dies


aria Schneider, the
French actress
who was Marlon
Brando's young co-
star in the steamy
1972 film "Last Tango in Paris," has
died at age 58.
Schneider died in Paris on
Thursday "following a long illness,"
a representative of the Act 1 talent
agency said, but declined to provide
details.
Schneider was 19 when she
starred opposite Marlon Brando in
Bernardo Bertolucci's racy "Last
Tango in Paris." In it, she played
Jeanne, a young Parisian woman
who takes up with a middle-aged
American businessman, played by
Brando.
Full of explicit sex scenes, "Last
Tango" was banned in Italy for
obscenity for nearly two decades,
returning to cinemas there only
in 1989. In the United States, the
movie still has an NC-17 rating for
its sexual content, meaning it can't
be seen by children under 17 years
of age.
In a statement Thursday,
French Culture Minister Frederic
Mitterrand said Schneider had
remained even nearly four
decades after "Last Tango" -
4Brando's at once seductive, inno-
cent and severe co-star."
"She will remain a singularly
strong image of today's woman,".
Mitterrand said, adding she was "a
cinema icon.

Jagger to perform
on Grammy stage
NEW YORK The Recording
Academy is finally getting some
satisfaction, with Mick Jagger's first
appearance on the Grammy stage.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
French actress Maria Schneider, who became famous with Bernardo Bertolucci in
his 1972 scandal-movie 'Last Tango in Paris,' walks the catwalk with Italian stylist
Luciano Soprani after the unveiling of his men's collection in Milan in this Jan. 14,'
1997, file photo. Schneider died in Paris on Thursda following a long illness. She
was 58.


The Rolling Stones frontman will
perform at the Feb. 13 ceremony
as part of a tribute to soul great
Solomon Burke, who died last year..
The Rock and Roll Hall of Famer
opened for the Rolling Stones sever-
al times during his career comeback
late in life.
Jagger will per-
formwith soul
singer Raphael
Saadiq during
the 53rd annual
Grammy Awards,
aggr which will air live
Jagger on CBS from the
Staples Center in
Los Angeles (8 p.m. EST).
"We're thrilled, delighted, excited
and very much looking forward
to Mick doing his debut on the
Grammy stage," said Neil Portnow,
president and CEO of the Recording
Academy. "It's extraordinary to
many of us that the fact is, this will


be the first time; he has never per-
formed on the Grammy stage."
This won't be Jagger's first
appearance on a Grammy telecast
In 1986, the Rolling Stones were
. given a lifetime achievement award
by Eric Clapton, and they per-
formed on the show by satellite.

Sheen' wants to resume
work this month
LOS ANGELES Charlie Sheen
wants to get back to work this
month on 'Two and a Half Men," a
spokesman said Thursday.
The 45-year-old actor remains in
rehab but hopes to return to TV's
top-rated comedy by the end of
February, publicist Stan Rosenfield
said. That's a "target" projection,
Rosenfield said.

N Associated Presi


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor William Phipps is 89.
* Former Argentinian
President Isabel Peron is 80.
* Actor Gary Conway is 75.
* Movie director George A.
Romero is 71.
* Rock musician John Steel
(The Animals) is 70.
* Singer Florence LaRue
(The Fifth Dimension) is 67.
* Former Vice President Dan


Daily Scripture


Quayle is 64.
* Rock singer Alice Cooper
is 63.
* Actor Michael Beck is 62.
* Football Hall-of-Famer
Lawrence Taylor is 52.
* Singer Clint Black is 49.
* Rock musician Noodles
(The Offspring) is 48.
* Boxer Oscar De La Hoya
is 38.


"But I will sing of your strength,
in the morning I will sing
of your love; for you are my
fortress, my refuge in times
of trouble."
Psalm 59:1 6




Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US BUSINESS
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Fax number .............752-9400 (sbrannon@laketyreporter.com)
Circulation ..:............755-5445
Online... www.iakecHyreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. am. on Sunday.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia .Cunty,,customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction In whole or call before 10.30 am. to report a ser-
In part is forbidden without the permis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
No. 310-880. vice related credits wll be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
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Lake City, Fla. 32056. vicerelated credits will be issued.
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(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-5445
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion', please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
.in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


Father of slain Tampa teens:

Remember how they lived


TEMPLE TERRACE
The father of two slain
Tampa teenagers said he
is humbled by the support
he's received since his son
and daughter were found
fatally shot last week,
allegedly by their mother.
Army Col. Parker
Schenecker thanked those
who attended a 90-minute
"celebration of life" service
Wednesday night in honor
of his children, 13-year-
old Beau and 16-year-old
Calyx. Police have alleged
that his wife, 50-year-old
Julie Powers 'Schenecker,
fatally shot the pair last
week for being "mouthy."
There was no mention of
her at the service.
Parker Schenecker, wvho
is stationed at the head-
quarters of U.S. Central
Command at MacDill Air
Force Base in Tampa, was
in Qatar at the time of the
killings, police said.
During the service,
friends and teachers
stepped to the podium to
share memories of the
Schenecker children.
Outside, in the church
lobby, a long line formed
to write "messages to the
siblings, whose photos
were perched on a table.
The grieving father sat
in the front row, listening
to the tribute. As each stu-
dent left the stage, he was
there to offer.a hug.
When it was his turn,
Parker Schenecker spoke
of his appreciation for the
memorial. He also asked
his children's friends to
carry on their memories.
"Please don't forget how
they lived," he said.
Allison Newton, who
taught language arts
to Beau Schenecker at
Liberty Middle School,
said she has already come
up with a way to remem-
ber the child.


THET SEUNDAT


ISOLATED
HlSTO RMS

HI 64 LO 52


PARTLY CHANCE MOSTLY
CLOUDY T-STORMS SUNNY


M 64L044 BH170L 55. H163L041


REG.IOA FOE, TMFi : -I, .


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A pool image made from video shows Army Col. Parker
Schenecker (center back) as he hugs teachers and students
after they spoke at the memorial service for his children,
13-year-old Beau and 16-year-old Calyx Schenecker at First.
Baptist Church on Wednesday in Temple Terrace.


Police: Man runs
over officer's foot
BOYNTON BEACH
- A South Florida man
faces charges after authori-
ties say he crashed into a
police cruiser and drove
over an officer's foot
Boynton Beach police
said a sergeant was on
patrol Wednesday night
when 32-year-old Michael
Brazier rear-ended his car.
The officer initially had
Brazier sit on his car's
hood. At some point, police
say Brazier jumped back
into his car, locked the
door and began to drive
away. Officials said the offi-
cer tried unsuccessfully to
stop Brazier, but the man
accelerated and ran over
the officer's foot.
Police caught up to
Brazier a short time later
at a home, where he was
found hiding in the bath-
tub.
Brazier was arrested and
charged with aggravated
battery on a raw enforce-


,ment officer and resisting
arrest. He was being held
without bail.

Man gets life
for killing woman,
ORLANDO A central
Florida man has been sen-
tenced to life in prison for
killing a woman during the
burglary of a church.
An Orange County judge
sentenced Rafael Florian
on Thursday after a jury
convicted him of first-
degree murder. Florian
admitted killing the
woman, but his attorney
argued for a lesser second-
degree murder verdict
Prosecutors said Florian
was burglarizing Iglesia
Adventista del Septimo
Dia in March 2004 when
he spotted 51-year-old
Margarita Hidalgo, who
cleaned the church in the
mornings.
Florian told authorities
he killed Hidalgo because
she recognized him.
U.Associated Press


Tall
.5
-\


S48/40


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday "
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday.
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date'


52/49 City
52/49 JacksonMile Cape Canaveral
ahassee* Lake Ci 62/53 Daytona Beach
3/48 ,.-.. 64/52 Ft. Lauderdale
Cainesville Daykoaa Beachd Fort Myers
.W ia City .69/56 75 62 Gainesville
51/46 O\aa \ Jacksonville
ao CaCanaerKey West
So/ 80/62 C ,/62 Lake City
802 Miami
%79/63/ \ Naples
7/3/,~ Wst Panlm i Ocala
80/66 Orlando
S Ft. Laudenlal Panama City
FI. Ilyk.. 79/66 *, Pensacola
S 80/62 Naples, Tallahassee
41/,63 Mimi Tampa
e 80/68 Valdosta
KeyWe* s W. Palm Beach


ILAK=E CITYAiLMANAC


56
48
67
43
87 in 1950
17 in 1917

1.26"
1.32"
5.00"
0.36"
3.87"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.


7:19 a.m.
6:10 p.m.
7:19 a.m.
6:11 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 7:57 a.m.
Moonset today 7:49 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 8:26 a.m.
Moonset tom. 8:42 p.m.


Feb. Feb. Feb. March
11. 18 24 4
First Full Last New


On this date in
1990, snowfall
totals in Maine
ranged up to 13
inches at Gorham,
with 11 inches
reported at Portland.
Totals in New
Hampshire ranged
up to 14 inches at
Franconia, with 13
inches reported at
Portsmouth.


4
MOOME
45nidtbtlui
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+

'


Saturday
72/49/sh
69/47/sh
80/60/pc
77/55/sh
66/39/sh
64/39/sh
75/65/pc
63/36/sh.
81/61/pc
76/53/sh
68/42/sh
71/48/sh
53/37/c
52/36/pc
58/30/c
68/49/sh
58/31/sh
80/55/pc


Sunday
68/55/pc
69/50/pc
76/67/pc
74/57/pc
66/42/pc
62/40/pc
73/65/c
64/44/pc
7/167/pc
75/61/pc
67/45/pc
71/52/pc
59/51/pc
60/50/s
63/47/pc
70/53/pc
61/43/pc
76/65/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.cm


p! Forecasts, data and graph-
SIcs 2011 Weather Central
S LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


I Oonnected


7a fdc '*


"a '--6a


- rFmdimhh. 'u iy
-Ti Jr~ ^-Tiigtrh


WEAMER BY-WHOUR


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


TUES!JA


I


S.










Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2011


County eyes private


entity to provide EMS


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. com

A private entity could soon be the
one to provide local Emergency Medical
Services in lieu of the county.
The Columbia County Board of County
Commissioners unanimously approved
issuing a Request for Qualifications for
interested companies regarding the deliv-
ery and privatization of EMS in the coun-
ty's unincorporated area and the town of
Fort White at its meeting Thursday.
Michael Grogan, the county's labor
attorney and lead negotiator with unions
within the county, recommended the
RFQ issuance to the board.
"I suggest we should explore this
approach," he said.
Grogan said privatizing EMS services
can "save lives" because it can improve
the performance of EMS response and
provide for a better system design and
better billing practices.
Negotiations between the EMS union
and county on items like increasing
wages and overtime calculations have
not been successful, Grogan said.
Commissioner Ron Williams said the
negotiations have reached a "stalemate"


and moved to accept Grogan's recom-
mendation.
Dale Williams, county manager, said
through the RFQ, the county can com-
pare what it's spending on EMS with the
cost of privatization.
'The whole idea here is to see what
we're spending versus what we can have
the service provided for," he said.
In other discussion and action:
The board unanimously approved an
agreement with the state Department of
Corrections, subject to County Attorney
Marlin Feagle's review on the agree-
ment's liability, to help those sentenced
to community service find area work
sites.
Dennille Folsom, Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce executive
director, addressed the board and said
she was not made aware of a visit the
Florida Chamber Foundation made to
the county to award it as the state's first
"Six Pillar" community. Board members
said they also were not made aware of the
meeting in a timely fashion.
The board asked Dale Williams to
address the communication issue with
the county's new Economic Development
Department.


Fire damages Lake City Home


Staff Report

A Lake City home sus-
tained heavy damage when
a fire gutted a front por-
tion of the home Thursday
night. No one was injured
in the blaze.
The fire occurred around
7 p.m. at 443 NE Levy Way.
Units from the Lake City
Fire Department, Columbia
County Fire Rescue and
Lake CityPolice Department
responded to the scene.
Frank -Armijo, Lake City
Fire Department assistant
chief, said the fire was con-
tained to the room where it
originated.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
A Lake City firefighter peeks out of a window Thursday
night after crews put out a fire in a three-bedroom home
at 443 NE Levy Way.


- ~
-~ I


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Beth Bullard and James Montgomery (right) congratulates Columbia High School marine
science teacher and soccer coach Trevor Tyler, who was named the 2012 Columbia County
Teacher of Year on Thursday. 'This is a very humbling and honoring experience,' Tyler said.


Tyler is Teacher of the Year


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Sharing the con-
cepts of marine
science with his
students is a pas-
sion of Trevor
Tyler, a Columbia High
School teacher.
"I try to give the best I
can in the classroom," he
said.
His passion earned him
the honor of being named
the 2012 Columbia County
School District Teacher of
the Year Thursday at First
Presbyterian Church.
"I do feel great about
it," he said. "It's very hum-
bling."
Tyler has seven and
a half years of teaching
experience and also coach-
es varsity boys soccer for
CHS.
Receiving the distinction
is very special to him, he
said. Tyler grew up in the
community, and many of
the people gathered at the


event taught and inspired
him.
Teacher of the year
nominees are elected
by their peers at the
school level, said Dorothy
Spradley, district volun-
teer/education marketing
coordinator. A selection
committee reviewed the
Florida Department of
Education Teacher of the
Year packet, which includ-
ed essay responses and
a DVD of the nominee's
teaching.
Tyler will now compete
for one of five regional
spots for Florida Teacher
of the Year.
"We feel very confident
he will represent the coun-
ty and all the teachers of
Columbia," she said.
It's wonderful to even
be mentioned with the 13
other nominees in the dis-
trict, Tyler said. Each one
shares a passion for the
classroom.
"It's about the kids," he
said. "That's what we're


here for and what we do."
The recognition is
a great honor not only
for Tyler but Columbia
High School as well, said
. Principal Terry Huddleston.
A celebration is scheduled
in his honor at the school
today.
"He's a very special
teacher," Huddleston said.
Tyler's marine science
class is highly requested by
students, Huddleston said.
Some students have been
turned away.
"He would be an asset to
any campus," he said. "He's
a fantastic teacher, great
coach and wonderful role
model for students."
Cheryl Conley, 2011
Florida Teacher of the Year
and one of four finalists for
the 2011 National Teacher
of the Year, shared encour-
aging words to all the teach-
ers.
"As a teacher, know you
have great power," she said.
"You can change the world
with just a few words."


DEATHS: Authorities describe a horrific crime scene S U
Continued From Page 1A


and the investigators from
the state attorney's office
would finish compiling all
of their evidence today.
The looming, unan-
swered question was how
a friendly- gathering could
turn violent so quickly.
'They all met at the
house to hang out," Hunter
said. "They all knew each
other."
Hunter said the scene
officers discovered inside
the home was troubling.
"It was a horrific scene for
any seasoned law enforce-
ment officer," Hunter said.
"Anytime you have three
fatalities on one scene, it's
tragic.",
CounmbiaCountySheriffs
Office public information
officer Sgt Ed Seifert said
a 5-year-old daughter of
Cervantez was present in
the home when the murders
occurred. The child was not
harmed and is currently in
the care of her grandmoth-
er.
All of the bodies of the
victims were sent to the
Medical Examiner's Office
in Jacksonville for autop-
sies.
Authorities said Strattan
lived at the Baya Avenue
home with his parents.
"Basically they had a get
together here at the home,"


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While.Su lies Lastv


MEMORIAL FOR VICTIMS
Another Way Inc. has scheduled a 7 p m candlelight
memorial for the shooting victims at Olustee Park.


Hunter said.
Tucker and his three
children lived with his par-
ents, Cecil "Red" and Cathy
Ratliff, in the Five Points
area. He lived with them
for about four years.
"He liked playing with
his kids," Cathy Ratliff said.
"That was his main thing.
His kids were everything
to him."
Thursday afternoon sev-


eral family friends visited
the Ratliff residence offer-
ing condolences to the fam-"
ily.
"He was very well known
and had plenty of friends,"
Cathy Ratliff said. "Me and
Red raised him with plenty
of values and good morals
and it don't surprise me he
tried to save them girls."
She said Tucker and
Cervantez just started see-


ing each other four days
ago.
They' said Cervantez
recently came to the area
from Texas.
"He texted somebody to
come get him because he
said the crap was getting
too deep around there,"
Ratliff said, noting by the
time Tucker's ride arrived
there it was too late.


'CVR EYEARE


Valley
E electric
Cooperative

STATEMENT OF
NONDISCRIMINATION

Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc. is the re-
cipient of Federal financial assistance from the Rural
Utilities Service, an agency of the U.S. Department
of Agriculture, and is subject to the provisions of
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amend-
ed, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973,
as amended, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975,
as amended, and the rules and regulations of the
U.S. Department of Agriculture which provide that
no person in the United States on the basis of race,
color, national origin, sex, religion, age, or disability
shall be excluded from participation in, admission
or access to, denied the benefits of, or otherwise be
subjected to discrimination under any of this organi-
zation's programs or activities.

The person responsible for coordinating this organi-
zation's nondiscrimination compliance efforts is the
Executive V.R/CEO. Any individual, or specific class
of individuals, who feels that this organization has
subjected them to discrimination may obtain further
information about the statutes and regulations listed
above from and/or file a written complaint with this
organization; or write USDA, Director, Office of Civil
Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Inde-
pendence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-
9410, or call (202)720-5964 (voice or TDD). "USDA
is an equal opportunity provider and employer."
Complaints must be filed within 180 days after the
alleged discrimination. Confidentiality will be main-
tained to the extent possible.


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424












OPINION


Friday, February 4, 201 1


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


End era

of rampant

oppression

in Egypt

The enlightened
world can't help.btit
cheer the sight, so
exhilarating and
so hopeful, of sus-
tained protests on the streets of
Cairo and Alexandria. Another
authoritarian regime is chal-
lenged in the Mideast, a part
of the world where prospects
for organized dissent for so
long seemed so daunting. First
Tunisia, followed by Yemen *
and Jordan. Now Egypt
In the absence of competitive
elections and other essential
trappings of democracy, popu-
lar will prevails nonetheless.
Hosni Mubarak shows every
sign of being in the final days,
if not the last hours, of his
three decades of heavy-handed
rule. Even the Egyptian mili-
tary acknowledges the legiti-
macy of escalating demonstra-
tions calling for his removal.
This, then, is when the West,
so secure in the comfort that
its democracies do function,
peacefully and generally free
of oppression, might pause to
wonder what it might be like
in Egypt when the euphoria
subsides and the reality of the
post-Mubarak era sets in.
The most reasonable of
hopes for a secular gov-
ernment that reaches out to
the rest of the Mideast and
the world, rather than try-
ing to intimidate won't be
realized easily. Secretary of
State Hillary Rodham Clinton-
issued an appropriate warn-
ing to Egypt, not to make the
sort of cosmetic changes that
bring about democracy for
"six months or a year," before
"evolving into a military dicta-
torship."
An early yet critical test
of that will be the free, open
and legitimate elections that
Egypt already has scheduled
for September and in which
Mr. Mubarak can't be allowed
to compete. An uprising that
appealed to the best of ideals
must be held to high standards,
even in this early, unwieldy
stage.
Egyptians need to end an era
of oppression and corruption,
not create another one.
* Times Union (Albany, N.Y.)

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Insight on bipartisan smoking


The annual .State of
the Union Address
isn't always as inter-
esting as the details
that surround it
I like watching the senators
and representatives applaud
and refuse to applaud, rising in
response or sitting in silence
along partisan lines. I espe-
cially like watching the Supreme
Court march into the chamber
together in their robes and, in
their impartiality, sit without
reaction (usually) to all presi-
dential remarks.
The television's perspective on
the President's speech is interest-
ing, as well. In the background
during the recent address, over
the President's shoulder, Vice
President Joe Biden sat on the
left (appropriately). On the
right of the screen sat the newly
installed Speaker of the House,
John Boehner.
Their contrasting reactions
to President Obama's remarks
were worth studying, but I was
distracted by the consideration
that among these three men
the President, the man who
would succeed the President in
the case of incapacity or death,
and the man who would suc-
ceed the Vice President to the
highest office in the land two-
thirds of them are cigarette
smokers.
The president is a clandestine
smoker, appropriately abashed
and a habitual quitter. John
Boehner is unapologetic; he
admits that smoking is a perni-
cious habit, but he says that it's
part of who he is. He's not about
to quit.
The bipartisan bad habit on
display at the State of the Union
Address provides the occasion
for consideration of the ideas


OTHER


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmar.edu
of Richard Klein, a professor
of French literature at Cornell
and author of "Cigarettes are
Sublime." In an essay entitled
"The Case Against Health,"
published recently in The
Chronicle of Higher Education,
Klein argues that health itself
has become a commodity and
an industry in our country. In
spite of the recession, spend-
ing for health care continues to
grow, he says, while our nation
persistently trails many other
countries including Britain
and France in every measure
of public health..
Consider the dieting industry,
Klein says: In 2006 Americans
spent $35 billion on diets and
diet services, At any given time
some 50 percent of all American
women are on diets and 95 per-
cent of all diets fail. Yet, amid
the dieting, the proliferation
of bland, low-fat foods, and the
fetishism of exercise, we only
grow more obese. And some
evidence suggests that yo-yo
dieting actually weakens the
immune system.
In short, the cure, with its
"constraints and privations," has
become the disease.
For insight, Klein turns to
Epicurus, the Greek philoso-
pher whose name provides us
with the adjective Epicurean,
which implies the oversimpli-
fied principle that pleasure is
the greatest good. In modern


America, we're conflicted
between the old-fashioned
Puritanism embedded in our
heritage and the basic hedonis-
tic impulse to enjoy ourselves,
with food, drink, television,
music, sports, drugs, and even
tobacco.
In theory, and in public,
Puritanism usually wins out, and
we heap considerable disdain
on Epicurean self-indulgence
and the pursuit of sensual sat-
isfaction. Yet, Klein points out,
Thomas Jefferson referred to
himself as an Epicurean.
In short, Klein calls for a bet-
ter understanding of Epicurus
and the relationship between
pleasure and health. Epicurus
was more interested in moder-
ate, simple pleasures food,
drink, conversation with friends
- than in debauchery, and
for him health was a means to
pleasure rather than an end in
itself. For us, better health, both
public and private, has led to
longer lives, but the question of
whether longer lives have pro-
duced more or less pleasure is
unresolved.
Do not misunderstand: I don't
smoke and don't plan to start
Neither should you. Statistically,
both the President and John
Boehner have reasonable
chances of experiencing shorter
lifetimes because they smoke.
But smoking is only one of the
worst among a number of habits
and practices that influence the
delicate balance between a long
life and the adult pleasures that
attract us.
A better understanding of that
balance might convince us that
the longest life is not necessarily
the best lived.
* John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.


OPINION


Healthcare vote a waste of time


In a vote that was doomed
from the start, and thus
was arguably a waste of
time, Senate Republicans
failed on a party-line vote,
47-51, to repeal the new national
health care law.
The Republicans said the
vote had symbolic importance
and they wanted to get the
Democrats on record.
Enough already.
We know they oppose it and
we know the Democrats favor
it.
This debate has only been
going on for two years now
and even the densest among
us have gotten the idea.
In another health care-relat-
ed action, the Senate voted
81-17 to remove from the law
an excessively burdensome
reporting requirement on busi-
nesses that all sides realized
was a mistake almost as soon
as it was enacted.
That proved that, in a better
world, the two parties could
work together to improve a
needed overhaul of health
care.


But the Republicans are
determined to kill the law.
Their best course would be to
wait until the challenges to the-
law reach the Supreme Court
and hope the justices rule their
way.
Or they could hope the vot-
ers give them control of the
Senate with a veto-proof mar-
gin in 2012.
Instead the Republicans
are talking about nickel-and-
diming the law to death by
blocking the funds needed to
implement it, a time-consum-
ing tactic.
The Democrats will respond
by forcing votes on the law's
most popular provisions, just to
get the Republicans on record,
etc., etc.
Here's a better idea: Just do
your work.
The last Congress, when the
Democrats were in full control,
didn't.
It never passed a budget or
the requisite spending bills
to run the government, all of
which was supposed to have
been done by last Sept. 30 at


the latest.
Congress will have to deal
with that pile of unfinished
business when the last of its
temporary measures expires
next month. And then comes a
critical and contentious vote on
raising the debt ceiling.
Meanwhile, Congress should
be prepared to go to work on
its own budget and readying
the 12 spending bills that run
the government rather than
puttering about with health
care because this year they
don't have much time to do
their regular business.
House Republican leader
Eric Cantor has laid out a
legislative calendar that pro-
vides the lawmakers generous
amounts of time to go home
and campaign. Cantor has the
House at work 123 days over
32 weeks.
That comes to just short of
a four-day work week when
they're in Washington so
there's no time to waste on
doomed "symbolic" votes.
* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com


Millions


look to


a rodent


for relief-

T he hopes of mil-
lions in the storm- '
weary Midwest and'
Northeast rode on a,
large drowsy rodent-.
in Punxsutawney, Pa.
It is a renowned groundhog
named Punxsutawney Phil and
it is widely believed that his
behavior on Wednesday pre-
dicted the remaining length of
winter. Feb. 2 was and still.
is a religious observance
but just as All Saints Eve has
become Halloween, Candlemas
has morphed in Groundhog Day.
And, as an old English rhyme
has it
"If Candlemas be fair and
bright
"Winter will have another '
flight
"If Candlemas be cloud and
rain
'Winter will be gone and not.,
come again."
The Germans who settled
in Pennsylvania brought with ','
them from the old country the ,
custom of letting a groundhog.
determine if the weather was fail';
or foul.
Thus, upon emerging from
winter hibernation in his bur-
row, if the groundhog doesn't
see his shadow, winter will be
over soon, but if it's sunny and
he sees his shadow, the ground-
hog will return to his burrow
and hole up for another six'
weeks of winter.
It's a superstition of course
but it's a safe bet that people
from the Rockies to New
England will embrace this harm-
less pagan belief if the ground- -
hog promises them relief from
the storms that have hammered
them with disheartening regu-
larity this winter.
And they're about to get ham-
mered again, just in time for
Groundhog Day with a storm
that will affect a third of the
nation. The' weather service was
warning about snow drifts of 5
to 10 feet and winds of 60 mph
in the vicinity of Lake Michigan
before the storm moves on to
bury the Northeast The rodent
could make a lot of people happy
by saying this is the end of it
Groundhog Day is the occa-
sion for a large and raucous
party in Punxsutawney, justly
celebrated by the 1993 film of
the same name. The happy
custom has many imitators; one
website lists 22 woodchucks in
the prognostication business.
People who ridicule this harm-
less fun should be required to
spend a January and February
in central Pennsylvania. The
people of the Midwest and
Northeast will understand.
* Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Friday, Feb. 4, the 35th
day of 2011. There are 330 days
left in the year.

* In 1783, Britain's King George
III proclaimed a formal cessation
of hostilities in the American
Revolutionary War.

* In 1789, electors chose George"
Washington to be the first presi-
dent of the United States.

* In 1976, more than 23,000 peo-
ple died when a severe earth-
quake struck Guatemala with a
magnitude of 7.5, according to
the U.S. Geological Survey.


I ---I








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2011


Saturday
Four Rivers Audubon
ALU-Walk
The monthly ALLI-Walk is
from 8 to 11 a.m. Saturday
at Alligator Lake. Jerry
Krummrich, biologist, Virlyn
Willis, avid birder, and others
will share their knowledge.
Bring a hat, sunscreen, water,
binoculars and a snack. No fee
is charged. All levels of par-
ticipation and knowledge are
welcome. Enter Alligator Lake
at the County Park on Country
Club Road (east side of lake).
Drive in and around to the park-
ing area in front of the lake near
the new construction: Call Loye
Barnard at 497-3536 for more
information.

American Family Fitness
Grand Opening
American Family Fitness will
celebrate its grand opening start-
ing at 10 a.m.Saturday at its new
location at 4578 SW Heritage
Oaks Circle in Lake City. The
Mercy Mountain Boys will pro-
vide the entertainment. Chicken
and rice dinners are available for
$6. All proceeds will benefit the


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

CHS senior Jernigan announces his college choice
Columbia High School senior Timmy Jernigan is swarmed by members of the media after announcing his com-
mitment to Florida State University at a signing event at the school auditorium on Wednesday.


Veterans Assistance Foundation.
A blood bank will also be on
location. The American Family
Fitness is located off Highway 90
next to the Food Lion. For more


information, call 438-5703.

Youth Talent Explosion.
Black History 2011 Youth


Talent Explosion is noon to 4
p.m. Saturday at Olustee Park.
The event will be followed by
the Movie Festival 4-8 p.m.
Both events are sponsored


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


OBITUARIES


Leonard F. Murray
Mr. Leonard F. Murray, 75,. a
lifelong resident of Columbia
County died early Wednesday
morning, February 2, 2011 in the
Suwannee Health Care Center
following an extended illness.
The son of the late Daniel N.
"Dutch" and Lula Milton Mur-
ray, Mr. Murray had worked as
a self-employed truck driver for
many years. He had been dis-
abled for the past thirty years
having suffered several strokes.
Prior to his ill health Mr. Murray
had enjoyed farming, dirt track
racing and still enjoyed Florida
Gator football. He was of the
Baptist faith. Mr. Murray was
preceded in death by his wife,
Barbara Murray, a son, Timmy
Murray his grandchildren,' An-


issa Sapp and Levy Sapp III and
his son-in-law, Levy Sapp, Jr. all
victims of the 1993 "Storm of the
Century" and most recently by
his daughter, Melinda Johnson.
Mr. Murray is survived by his
sons, Danny Murray (Shannon) of
Wellborn; Jerry Murray of Well-
born; and Jason Murray (Ree) of
Lake City; his sister, Julia Mur-
ray Travis of Lake City and his
six grandchildren, Robbie Mur-
ray, Brad Murray, Kellyn Mur-
ray, Miranda Johnson, Meghan
Johnson and Hollyn Murray.
Funeral services for Mr. Murray
will be conducted at 11:00 A.M.
on Saturday, February 5, 2011 in
the Gateway Baptist Church with
Rev. Bo Hammock and Rev. Rick
McCall officiating. Interment
will follow in the Beulah Bap-
tist Church Cemetery in Well-


born. The family will receive
friends for one hour prior to the
service at the church. Arrange-
ments are under the direction
of the DEES-PARRISH FAM-
ILY FUNERAL HOME, 458
S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL.
32025 752-1234 please sign our
on-line family guestbook at www.
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Virgil "Tiny" Leonard
Smith
Mr. Virgil "Tiny" Leonard
Smith, departed this life on
Tuesday, February 01, 2011.
He was born on June 12, 1948
in Fort White, Florida, to the
late Lacy Smith and Sally
Smith. Educated in the Colum-
bia County School System. He


8th Annual

NORTH OME
RIDA OH SHOW


IO SHOW


CITY


2 BIG


graduated from Richardson High
School with the class of 1966.
He served his country during the
Vietnam Era in the U S Army.
Worked for Cooper Sales Or-
ganization and Austin Di-
versified Product Company.
A member of Antioch Mis-
sionary Baptist Church.
Those left to cherish his memo-
ries are children Angela Smith
Coppock (Mario) Regina Kirk-
sey all of Lake City, and Robert
Phillips of Jacksonville, FL; 2
brothers of Tallahassee; grand-


children lan Smith, Jordan Cop-
pock, Demario Merrick; Darrian
Hollie, De'Alviana, and Shamer-
iya Alexander; Aunt Ladion
Hammonds of St. Petersburg,
FL., uncle Thomas Murray Pax-
ton of Daytona Beach, FL; sister
in law Zella Robertson of Geor-
gia; special cousin Willetta Jack-
son (Willie) of Fort White, FL;
and a host of cousins and friends.
Funeral services for Mr. Smith
will be Saturday, February 5,
2011 at 11:00 AM at Antioch
MB Church, Fort White, Rev.


Donnell Sanders, Pastor. Visi-
tation will be Friday 6-8PM at
funeral home. Burial will fol-
low in Heavenly Rest Cemetery.
Arrangements Entrusted to
A. JEROME BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
1560 N W 1st Ave-
nue, High Springs, FL.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


This notice paid for with public donations

FREE to the public

Weight Loss & Stop Smoking Hypnotherapy
Dave Miller is providing hypnotherapy for weight loss, stop smoking, & stress relief. For
many people, this therapy reduces 2 to 3 clothing sizes and/or stops smoking. Funding
for this project comes from public donations. Anyone who wants treatment will receive
professional hypnotherapy free from charge. An appointment is not necessary. Sign in
and immediately receive treatment. Dave Miller is a retired counselor and has been
conducting hypnosis seminars for over 30 years. He has helped thousands stop smoking
and lose weight or both without any side effects or dieting. A modest $5 donation when
signing in is appreciated. Only one 2-hour session is needed'for desirable results.
Sign In 30 minutes early. All meetings begin at 7:30 PM
Tue. Feb 8 LIVE OAK Garden Club 1300 11 th St. SW
Wed. Feb 9 LAKE CITY Fairfield Inn 538 SW Corporate Dr.
Fri. Feb 11 MACCLENNY Woman's Club 144 S. 5th St.

David Miller S.W. C.Ht. 231-288-5941 www.DMSeminars.com


Put a little love in someone's heart this Valentine's Day with the
Lake City Reporter's "Lore Lines.' Make it a special day for those
you lose by writing a message to your sweetheart. We'll include it on
our "Valentine Love Line' page on February 13th.


R9(ses are red, vio z ts are blue, send Love Lines
Sto show them that your love is true.
The Lake City Reporter
4-- 1" 'Presents: (-C


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Love Line Rates are as follows:
35 WORDS or less for s12.00 Each additional word 150
Add a nhntnfr sf3. 00


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Columbia County Fairgrounds

Saturday, March 5th
9 a.m. 5 p.m.

Sunday, March 6th
10 a.m. 4 p.m.


Co-Sponsored by:


NWSOTR 9 4.3


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Print your message here: __


Your Name:
Phone:
Address:
City/State/Zip:
Mail to: Lake City Reporter, Classified Department
PO Bo 1709, Lake City, FL 32056 755-5440
ALL ADS MUST BE PAID AT
THE TIME OF PLACEMENT.
DEADLINE IS FEB. 8,2011.

Lake City Reportei
r,. lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS mapzir

VB.


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.

by It's About My Efforts. The
month-long theme is "Self
Sufficiency is Key." Visit www.
itsaboutmyefforts.org or call 386-
697-6075 for details.

MLK Parade
The annual MLK Parade is 10
a.m. Saturday starting at DOT.
The parade is sponsored by the
Northeast Florida Leadership
Council.

Olustee Festival Pageant
The 2011 Olustee Festival
Pageant is Saturday at the
Columbia County School
Administration Building audito-
rium. Girls 13 months to 20 will
compete. Ages 13 months-to 9
compete at 4 p.m. Ages 10-20 com-
pete at 6:30 p.m. Call 386-965-2787.

Annual Celebration
The West Virginia Natives
hold their annual WV Day cel-
ebration at noon Saturday. The
festivities take place at Epiphany
Church located at 1905 SW
Epiphany Court and all attend-
ees should bring a covered dish
of their favorite "Hillbilly" food
to share. Contact 386-754-1760.


DAYS


FREE TO THE PUBLIC


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magaine.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


I I L7X%44 PLAq


-,pro








LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE & WORLD FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 4, 2011


Scott stumps for property tax cuts


By MITCH STACY
Associated Press
TAMPA Gov. Rick
Scott stumped for his pro-
posed business and prop-
erty tax cuts at a Tampa
manufacturing plant
Thursday but said he won't
take money from schools
to pay for them.
The new Republican gov-
ernor also said in a Wall
Street Journal interview
that he would propose $5
billion in spending cuts in
his budget recommenda-
tions to the Legislature on
Monday. Florida's budget
for the current fiscal year,
which runs through June
30, is $70.4 billion.
Scott said he wants to
cut school property taxes
by $1.4 billion and reduce
Florida's corporate income
tax from 5.5 percent to 3
percent. That would push
the total to more than $2
billion. Scott eventually
wants to eliminate the cor-
porate tax. Florida has no
personal income tax.
"By putting money back
into your hands and putting
that money back into busi-
ness owners' hands we'll
get more jobs in this state,"
Scott told about two dozen
employees at Chromalloy
Manufacturing, a supplier
of turbine engine compo-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gov. Rick Scott and his wife, Ann, tour a house under construction while making a budget


announcement in The Villages.
nents.
Scott has been on the
road this week talking
about what he promises
will be a fiscally conserva-
tive state budget.
Already he has proposed
plans to consolidate some
government functions and
cut pension benefits to
state employees, teachers
and some local government
workers while requiring
they contribute 5 percent of


their salaries to the Florida
Retirement System.
The tax cuts and propos-
als to reduce spending and
regulations are designed to
make Florida more busi-
ness friendly in the hope
that'll bring more jobs to the
state. Scott campaigned on
a promise to create 700,000
new jobs over seven years.
That's besides the 1 mil-
lion job economists expect
Florida to add as its econ-


omy recovers over that
span even if the state does
nothing.
"No company in this
country is even going to
consider doing business in
another state," Scott said.
Scott's tax cuts would be
on top of a potential short-
fall of $3.6 billion to $4.6
billion Florida is expend-'
ing in the next budget year
to pay for high priority and
critical spending needs.


Gangs attack foreigners in Egypt mayhem


By MAGGIE MICHAEL
Associated Press
CAIRO Menacing gangs backing
President Hosni Mubarak attacked
journalists and human rights activists
Thursday in an ugly turn in Egypt's cri-
sis as government opponents pushed
supporters out of Cairo's main square
in second day of battles. Organizers
called for protesters trying to topple
the regime to fill every square in the
huge capital on Friday.
The new vice president, widely con-
sidered the first successor Mubarak
has ever designated, fueled anti-for-


eign sentiment by going on state
television and blaming outsiders for
fomenting unrest. The government
has accused media outlets of being
sympathetic to protesters who want
the president to quit now rather than
serve out his term, as he has vowed
to do.
Mubarak, 82, told ABC television
in an interview that he was fed up and
wants to resign. But he said he can't
for fear the country would sink into
chaos. He said he was very unhappy
about the two days of clashes in cen-
tral Tahrir square.
"I do not want to see Egyptians


fighting each other," he said.
The uncontrolled violence that had
been concentrated in Tahrir spread
around the city of 18 million, with a
new wave of arson and looting.
A light contingent of soldiers and
tanks, mainly protecting govern-
ment buildings and important insti-
tutions, remained passive as it has
since replacing police on the streets
almost a. week ago. Few uniformed
police have been seen around the
city since last Friday, and protesters
allege many of them have stripped off
their uniforms and mixed in with the
gangs of marauding thugs.


Creative Arts In

The Park Day
Sat., Feb. 5 10am-4pm
In the Craft Square
Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park
Visit with Florida's artists and craftsmen as theq
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IN j FACTORY :


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes 754-0424









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkjrby@lakeatyreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Friday, February 4, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS






Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Famous

son gets

his due
Super Bowl XLV
is in his
adopted
home and Pat
Summerall is
making the rounds.
The former NFL player
and broadcasting star
made an appearance on
Mike & Mike this week,
where he was gushed
over by Greenle and
Golic. Summerall also got
a mention on'Around the
Horn. He deserves all
the accolades.
The Legends for
Charity banquet,
which benefits St Jude
Children's Research
Hospital, was Thursday
and the annual Pat
Summerall Award was
presented to the entire
NFL on Fox team.
Summerall has his
share of honors, but
his greatest moniker is
"Lake City's Own."
Summerall was born
here in 1930 and
graduated from
Columbia High in 1948.,
Summerall's given name
is George Allen, but
he was nicknamed Pat
as part of a childhood
friendship teain.
Summerall was a
member of Columbia's
one state championship
basketball team and
signed to play football
with Arkansas. He went
on to a 10-year career in
the NFL.
Summerall played for
the New York Giants in
the 1958 championship
game that the Baltimore
Colts won in overtime.
. During the football
offseason, Summerall
returned to Lake City
and worked. He played
softball in the fast-pitch
leagues and had a sports
show on WGRO radio.
Summerall taught
English at Lake City
Junior High. It was
during the semester
break in 1962 that
Summerall left for New
York to try broadcasting.
He made good.
Summerall
broadcast NFL games
for 41 years, including
his teaming with John
Madden. Before moving
with Madden to FOX,
Summerall was a regular
on CBS golf especially
the Masters and U.S.
Open tennis. ,
As his fame rose,
Summerall always had
locals tugging at his
sleeve when he came to
town. He was gracious,
whether saying a few
words at halftime on a
Tiger football game or
helping get a ticket to a
big-time sporting event
Summerall received a
life-saving reprieve with
a liver transplant and he
has been humbled and
thankful for the blessing.
He is the most famous
citizen to come out of
Lake City and he
continues to make the
home folks proud.

* Tim Kirby is sports editor


of the Lake City Reporter.


EADI






SHO


Columbia falls to
Suwannee High's
3-point shooting.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High burst out
the gate against Suwannee
High with a 7-2 run, but
the Bulldogs bounced back
with a 16-4 run and never
looked back.
The Bulldogs hit eight
3-point shots through-
out the duration of the
game, including six in the
first half to down the Tigers
66-52.
Javonte Foster and Nigel
Atkinson hit back to back
3-point shots with 3:13
remaining, in the first half
to cut the lead to 26-23.
Suwannee responded with
a 6-0 run to end the half and
went into the locker room
with a 32-23 lead.
Columbia mounted a sec-
ond run spanning the end of
the third and beginning of
the fourti quarter to cut the,
lead within 40-36. Marquez'
Marshall then converted on
an old-fashion three-point
play to cut the Bulldogs'
lead to one.
Again Suwannee respond-
ed with a run, however, as
the Bulldogs outscored the
Tigers 26-12 the rest of the
way. The run began when
Suwannee converted on its
ninth three-point basket of
the game.
Marshall led the Tigers
with 17 points in the con-
test. Nigel Atkinson also
broke into double digits.
with 13 points.
Columbia '(6-16) ends
the regular season with a
rematch against Fort White
High at 7:30 p.m. today in
Lake City.
Lady Tigers basketball
Columbia High's Lady
Tigers basketball team,
ended its season against
Gainesville High in the
district tournament on
Tuesday.
The Lady Hurricanes
cruised to a 86-24 victory
over the Lady Tigers.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Marquez Marshall (left) and Fort White High's A.J. Legree battle for a
rebound in a game on Dec. 4. The two teams meet again at 7:30 p.m. tonight in Lake City.


Fort White loses
to Hawthorne
High 81-76.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com.
FORT WHITE Fort
White High's basketball
team came out on the short
end of an 81-76 scorefest to
Hawthorne High.
Seniors Karl Dowda, Wes
Osterhoudt, Jordan Talley
and Donnell Sanders were
recognized before the game
and all started.
Osterhoudt and Talley
came out like gangbusters,
scoring 12 arid eight points,
respectively in the first
quarter. A 13-2 sprint to end
the quarter saw Fort White
in the lead, 22-10.
Hawthorne used a 13-1
run in the second quarter to
tie the game at 32-32. Fort
White scored the final four
points of the quarter to take
a lead into halftime.
The Indians opened the
Third quarter on-an 8-3',spi,'I
but" "lt6biie scorec'l 1
of the last 13 points and it
was knotted 53-53 at the
buzzer.
The momentum swung
back and forth in the fourth
'quarter and the-game was
still tied at 70-70. Hawthorne
played the best down the
stretch, despite finishing
the last minute with four
players.
Talley (20) and
Osterhoudt (19) led Fort
White in scoring. Trey
Phillips scored 14 and
Melton Sanders added
eight points. AJ Legree
scored seven points, with
four apiece from Donnell
Sanders and Raul Colon.
For the Hornets (10-12)
Willie O'Neal and Leaman
Wilson each scored
20 points. Tony Ivey scored
15 points and Armond
Pittman scored 14.
Fort White (4-12) travels
to Columbia for a 7:30 p.m.
game today.
The Indians will play in
the District 5-3A tourna-
ment Tuesday as the No. 5
seed. Williston High is the
top seed.


District wrestling

tourneys begin

today for FW, CHS


Columbia set to
host 2-2A field
on Saturday.
From staff reports

District wrestling tourna-
ments for Fort White High
* and Columbia High are this
week. The top four wres-
tlers in each weight class
advance to region.
FortWhite High's District
1-2A tournament is today at
Suwannee High. Wrestling
begins at 2 p.m.
Other district teams are
Baker County High, Florida
High, Godby High, Rickards
High and Wakulla High..
Columbia High is hosting


District 2-2A on Saturday.
Following weigh-in and a
seeding meeting, wrestling
begins at 11 a.m.
Joining CHS in the district
are Paxon School, Stanton.
Prep and Chiles, Ed White,
Forrest, Leon, Lincoln and
Lee high schools.
Columbia has a scaled
down contingent with seven
varsity wrestlers participat-.
ing this season, and all have
solid records.
The Tiger wrestlers are
(by weight class):
103 Cole Schreiber,
sophomore, 36-3;
112 Jacob Dicks,
freshman, 16-12;
DISTRICT continued on 3B


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High wrestler Joe Fields (top) works to pin an opponent from Sandalwood High at
the Clay County Rotary Invitational on Jan. 7-8. Columbia is hosting the District 2-2A
tournament at 11 a.m. Saturday.


FOR


DO











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2011 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
*TGC European PGA Tour, Qatar
Masters, second round, at Doha, Qatar
(same-day tape)
4 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Phoenix Open,
second round, at Scottsdale,Ariz.
BOXING
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Middleweights, Sergio Mora
(27-1-2) vs. Bryan Vera (17-5-0), at Fort
Worth,Texas
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN.- Dallas at Boston
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Utah at Denver

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs
Conference Championships
Green Bay 21, Chicago 14
Pittsburgh 24, N.Y.Jets 19
Super Bowl
Sunday
AtArlington,Texas
Pittsburgh vs. Green Bay, 6:30 p.m.
(FOX)

Super Bowl MVPs
2010-Drew Brees, QB, New Orleans
2009-Santonlo Holmes, WR,
Pittsburgh
2008-Eli Manning, QB, N.Y. Giants
2007-Peyton Manning, QB,
Indianapolis
2006-Hines Ward,WR, Pittsburgh
2005-Deion Branch, WR, New
England
2004-Tom Brady, QB, New England
2003-Dexter Jackson, FS,Tampa Bay
2002-Tom Brady, QB, New England
2001-Ray Lewis, LB, Batimore
2000--Kurt Warner, QB, St. Louis
1999--john Elway, QB, Denver
1998-Terrell Davis, RB, Denver
1997-Desmond Howard, KR, Green
Bay
1996-tarry Brown, CB, Dallas
1995-Steve Young, QB, San
Francisco
1994--Emmitt Smith, RB, Dallas
1993-Troy Aikman, QB, Dallas
1992-Mark Rypien, QB,Washington
1991-Ottis Anderson, RB, N.Y.
Giants
1990-Joe Montana, QB, San
Francisco
1989-erry Rice,WR, San Francisco
1988-Doug Williams, QB,
Washington.


1987-Phil Simms, QB, N.Y. Giants
1986-Richard Dent, DE, Chicago
1985-Joe Montana, QB, San
Francisco
1984-Marius Allen, RB, LA Raiders
1983--ohn Riggins, RB,Washington
1982-Joe Montana, QB, San
Francisco
1981--im Plunkett, QB, Oakland
1980-Terry Bradshaw, QB.
Pittsburgh
1979-Terry Bradshaw, QB,
Pittsburgh
1978-Randy White, DT and Harvey
Martin, DE, Dallas
1977-Fred BiletnikoffWR, Oakland
1976-Lynn Swann,WR, Pittsburgh
1975-Franco Harris, RB, Pittsburgh
1974-Larry Csonka, RB, Miami
1973-Jake Scott, S, Miami
1972-Roger Staubach, QB, Dallas
1971-Chuck Howley, LB, Dallas
1970-Len Dawson, QB, Kansas City
1969-Joe Namath, QB, N.Y. Jets
1968--Bart Starr. QB, Green Bay
1967--Bart Starr, QB, Green Bay

NFL Coach of the Year
NEW YORK The voting for the
2010 NFL Coach of the Year selected
by The Associated Press in balloting by a
nationwide panel of the media:
Bill Belichick, New England 30
Raheem Morris,Tampa Bay I I 'A
Todd Haley, Kansas City 4'
Mike Smith,Atlanta I
Andy Reid, Philadelphia I
Lovie Smith, Chicago I
Steve Spagnuolo, St. Louis I

College all-star games
Saturday
At San Antonio
Texas vs. The Nation All-Star
Challenge, 2 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Portland at Indiana, 7 p.m.
New York at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Orlando atWashington, 7 p.m.
LA Clippers at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Boston, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
San Antonio at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Utah at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Dallas at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Atlanta atWashington, 7 p.m.
Portland at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
LA Lakers at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Houston, 8:30 p.m.


Detroit at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Denver at Minnesota. 8:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Utah. 9 p.m.
Chicago at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule
Saturday's Games
No. 2 Kansas at Nebraska., 4 p.m.
No. 3 Texas vs.Texas Tech, 9 p.m.
No. 4 Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati, 6 p.m.
No. 5 Duke vs. N.C. State, 6 p.m.
No. 6 Connecticut at Seton Hall,
7 p.m.
No. 8 BYU vs. UNLV, 4 p.m.
No. 10 Kentucky at Florida,
9 p.m.
No. 12 Villanova vs. No. 25 West
Virginia, Noon
No. 13 Georgetown vs. Providence,
Noon
No. 14 Missouri vs. Colorado,
7:30 p.m.
No. 15 Louisville vs. DePaul, 8 p.m.
No. 16 Texas A&M vs. Baylor, 2 p.m.
No. 17 Syracuse at South Florida,
2 p.m.
No. 20 Washington at Oregon, 4 p.m.
No. 21 Arizona at California, 8 p.m.
No. 22 Utah State vs. Boise State,
9:05 p.m.
No. 23 Vanderbilt vs. South Carolina,
1:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. I Ohio State at No. 18 Minnesota,
2 p.m.
No. 9 Notre Dame vs. Rutgers, Noon
No. 19 Wisconsin vs. Michigan State,
I p.m.
No. 23 North Carolina vs. Florida
State, 2 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Thursday's Games
Boston 6, Dallas 3
Toronto 3, Carolina 0
New Jersey 3, N.Y. Rangers 2
Philadelphia 3, Nashville 2
Calgary 4,Atlanta 2
Minnesota at Colorado (n) |
Today's Games
Florida at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
San Jose at Boston; I p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, 2 p.m.
Anaheim at Colorado, 3 p.m.
Toronto at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Calgary, 10 p.m.


BRIEFS


FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Quarterback Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday in
the teacher's lounge at the
high school. Nominations
for club officers will be
received at the meeting, so
all members and potential
members are encouraged
to attend. Election of
officers will be at the
meeting on Feb. 21.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 3974954 or,
e-mail
shaynetrayne@hotmail.corn.

OLUSTEE 5K
Registration open
for 2011 event
The 2011 Olustee 5K
Run/Walk is 7 a.m.
Feb. 19. Individual or team
registration is available
at www.stepfitnessonline.
com. Entry forms can
be picked up at the Step
Fitness- corporate office in
the Carquest building on
Pinemount Road. Varsity
and junior varsity running
teams will receive free
entry, but must register in
advance. Proceeds go to
benefit March of Dimes.
For details, call race
director Michelle Richards
at (386) 208-2447.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Interest sought
for 10-under girls
Athletes interested in
playing 10-under girls
softball year-round are
being sought
For details, call Butch
Lee at 965-6002 or Tim
Blackwell at 623-1826.

WOMEN'S SOFTBALL
Board meeting
planned Tuesday
Columbia County
Women's Softball has a
board meeting planned for


6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the
meeting hall next to the
playground at Southside
Recreation Complex. All
those interested in
women's slow pitch softball
are encouraged to attend.
For details, call Casandra
Wheeler at 365-216.

DANCE
Angels accepting
new members
The DFC Angels
Competitive Dance Team
is currently accepting
new team members for
the 2011-12 dance season.
Tryouts are open to
dancers ages 12-16.
Interested members
should contact coach
Whitney Parks-Massey to
set up a tryout or for more
details at (386) 292-9048 by
Feb. 11.

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Moe's Night
fundraiser Feb. 17

The Fort White High
Dugout Club has a Moe's
Night fundraiser is 5-8 p.m.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
HASUQ I


CRAHNB



UNDOAR z



Ans: ,

V......,..' I Jumbles: SMOKY


Feb. 17 at Moe's Southwest
Grill in Lake City.
For details, call coach
Chad Bonds at
590-7362.

YOUTH BASKETBALL
USSSA 12-under
tryouts today
The Lake City.
Recreation Department
has tryouts at Richardson'
Community Center for a
12-under USSSA travel
team from 5:30-7 p.m.
today, Tuesday and
Feb. 10.
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607.

ADULT BASEBALL
Men's league
forming in area
The MLBA in North
Florida and South Georgia
would like to form a team
from this area for 2011.
Age is 55 and younger.
For details, visit www.
leaguelineup. comr/
northfloridamabl.

From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
ON
THE
(Answers tomorrow)
DERBY FAULTY BYGONE


Yeterday 's Answer: Occasionally a family does this to make ends
meet ENDS MEAT


OUTDOORS


MONTY STEPHENS/Lake City Reporter
Harold Berry (left) and Daniel Jenkins of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission score a rack at Scott's Gunsmithing & Sales on Saturday. Jimmy Raulerson
(right) waits on his buck to be scored.


Local antlers score big


By MONTY STEPHENS
Special to the Reporter

Scott's Gunsmithing &
Sales hosted the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission buck scoring
event on Saturday.
"The State of Florida
maintains a registry for
trophy bucks taken in
Florida with an antler score
of 100 or more," said Scott
Johns, Wildlife Biologist
with the FWC.
Scoring is completed
by individuals who are
specially trained in the
Boone and Crockett Club
measurement techniques.
Hunters with trophy deer
receive a certificate from
the State of Florida and are
enrolled in the Florida Big
Buck Contest.
Law enforcement officer
Harold Barry explained the
scoring.
"There are many
measurements taken In
order to arrive at the score,
but basically the length of
the main beam is taken,
circumference of several
areas of the main beam,
individual point length, and
inside/outspread," Barry
said.
"The cumulative score of
these areas, minus deduc-
tions for non-symmetry


1
4
7
10
11

13
14 W
15
16
17
19 T

20 C
21 (
23 H
26 F

28 C


MONTY STEPHENS/Lake City Reporter
Dave Lenhart of Jacksonville shows his 114e buck.


equals the final score."
During the day's event,
many trophy racks were
brought in. The highest
scoring buck of the day was
taken in Calhoun County
by Mike Gaff of Cross City
and scored 141%.
Other notable bucks
included one taken by
Raymond Peeler of Lake
City, who harvested an
eight-point 1312% buck
from Alachua County on
New Year's Day. Also,
Jimmy Raulerson of Lake
City brought in a heavy


ACROSS 42; Pitman pupil
44 Oil amts.
Kid's ammo 46 Luau
A Gershwin instruments
Body of water 47 Low-risk
Seance sound investment
'Alice" (2 wds.)
waitress 52 CIA figure
Pipe fittings 53 Pork cut
Make a typo 54 "Where Eagles
Viking war god Dare" actress
Dalai 55 Lose interest
Dawn 56 Distant past
Two fives for 57 Part of LAX
58 Sneaky
Center 59 Furry
Overexcited companion
Hideous giant 60 Grasshopper's
Painter rebuker
Grandma -
Clue DOWN


29 Belief
30 Filter
34 They run on
runners
36 Short sleep
38 Anaconda
39 Column order
41 Sports network


Raised cattle
Silents vamp
Theda -
Agile
Elephant tusk
Cashes in
Moffo solo


antlered six-point buck
taken in Columbia County
that scored 1142.
Another buck scor-
ing event is from 8 a.m.
to 3 p.m., this Saturday at
Milton's Country Store on
U.S. Highway 441 north in
Columbia County.
Games and refreshments
will be available, along with
a wildlife display by the
FWC.

* Monty Stephens, an avid
hunter and fisherman, lives in
Lake City.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


vuJ LILM6LI0-AIL M vi UJA
S' IR I T I I O W L

NE V AFR PATI
AERE SLAT MENU
EO MSIG
o n TA -r v e ri


7 List of
candidates
8 "- Gantry"
9 Hot -- oven
12 Pharaohs'
. amulets


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


13 Pass by
18 Pollen
gatherer
22 Canine noise
23 Signs off on
24 Hair goop
25 Bread buy
27 Old Dodge
model
29 Has the stage
(2 wds.)
31 Tummy
muscles
32 PD member
33 Leia's rescuer
35 Fuel for big
rigs
37 Get
40 Selflessly
41 PC button
42 Common
toast
43 Brit's TV
45 Doctrine
46 Strike callers
48 Flier's feat
49 Story-telling
dance
50 Metallic
element
51 Persistent
annoyer


2011 by UFS, Inc.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421











Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2011


Tussle for blue-chips



down to the deadline


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

Alabama and Auburn
were at it again on national
signing day.
The Iron Bowl rivals tus-
sled for blue-chip recruits
on the first day high school
football players could make
their college choices offi-
cial.
The Crimson Tide and
Tigers, who have won the
last two national champion-
ships, each landed recruit-
ing classes the experts
adore and went head-to-
head for several top pros-
pects none bigger than
offensive tackle Cyrus
Kouandjio from DeMatha
High School in Maryland.
Rated one of the top-10
recruits in the country
by Rivals.com, Scout.comrn
and ESPNU, Kouandjio
on Wednesday said he
was picking Auburn over
Alabama, where his broth-
er, Arie, plays.
But just because a recruit
makes an announcement
on national television,
doesn't mean he's made up
his mind. Cyrus Kouandjio
did not sign a binding letter
of intent with Auburn or
Alabama or for that mat-
ter with New Mexico, his
odd other finalist and
there is no indication when
he will make his decision
official.
Seantrel Henderson, the
top-rated offensive line-
man coming out of high
school last year, pulled a
similar move, committing
to Southern California on
television but not signing
on the first day of the sign-
ing period. He ultimately
ended up at Miami.
But what Kouandjio did
was different. Henderson
wanted to go to USC, but
changed his mind when
NCAA sanctions hit the
Trojans.
"I think Cyrus picked a
school that he -didn't know
he wanted to go to," Rivals.
corn national recruiting
analyst Mike Farrell said.
Another top recruit,
linebacker Brent Calloway
from Russellville, Ala., first
committed to Alabama
then switched to Auburn,
but ended up signing with
Alabama.
"Probably the most inter-


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Clinton and Lavern Bell and a group of Columbia High School football players includ-"
ing Timmy Jernigan, (standing center) who signed with Florida State University, look on
as Davante Bell, 18, (center) signs a letter of commitment to LaGrange College at the
Columbia High School auditorium on Wednesday.


testing story in this year's
recruiting derby is Auburn
vs:Alabama,"Allen Wallace,
national recruiting editor
for Scout.com and publish-
er of SuperPrep magazine.
Kouandjio isn't the
only five-star recruit who
is going to take a few
more days to cement his
decision.
Maybe the most herald-
ed prospect in the nation,
defensive end Jadeveon
Clowney, from Rock Hill,
S.C., said in an interview
with ESPNU he probably
won't sign until his birth-
day, Feb. 14 Valentine's
Day. He said his choices are
South Carolina, Clemson
and Alabama.
Generally, signing day
is about the rich getting
richer. The top-rated play-
ers tend to flock to the tra-
ditional powers. So it was
no surprise to see Texas,
Florida State, Southern
California, LSU, Ohio State
and Notre Dame come
away with classes highly
ranked by the recruiting
gurus.
Oregon, fresh off its first
appearance in the national
title game, also got high
marks.
A couple of teams that


had mediocre 2010 seasons,
Georgia and Clemson, gave
their fans reason to believe
better days are ahead with'
classes packed with top
prospects.
And in a day full of tire-
some what-hat-will-he-pick
news conferences at high
schools all over the coun-
try, running back Isaiah
Crowell of Columbus, Ga.,
might have started a new
trend.
After declaring that he
was staying close home and
going to. Georgia, Crowell
pulled out a bulldog puppy
in a red sweater. No going
back on that. ,
A look around the nation
at some of the other top
stories of signing day. .

Sunshine state shuffle

Florida State is rolling
under Jimbo Fisher. The
Seminoles are coming off
10-win season and the first
recruiting class Fisher can
truly call his own drew rave
reviews.
Rivals.com, Scout.corn
and ESPNU all had Florida
State's class rated in the
top five in the nation.
Running back James
Wilder Jr., son and name-


sake of the former NFL star
who played for Tampa Bay,
and defensive back Karlos
Williams from Davenport
were two of the Seminoles'
biggest scores.
With new coaches at
rivals Florida and Miami,
Fisher was able to clean up
in state.
'"They did most of their
damage when Urban Meyer
was (at Florida)," Farrell
said. "Certainly, they took
advantage of a weakened
Miami. But they went head-
to-head with Urban Meyer
and they were winning."
While Meyer spent
signing day working as
an analyst for ESPNU, his
replacement at Florida,
Will Muschamp, was secur-
ing another top-20 class for
the Gators.
New Miami coach Al
Golden had lots of catching
up to do in a short time when
he arrived in Coral Gables,
from Philadelphia, where
he had been the coach at
Temple. The Hurricanes'
class was generally ranked
in the 30s nationally.
'There is a sense of
accomplishment because
we only had about 15 actual
days on the road," Golden
said.


Steady. Steelers stay on



the four-decade plan


By EDDIE PELLS
Associated Press

DALLAS Instead of
focusing on the eight Super
Bowl trips and six Lombardi
trophies, Steelers defensive
line coach John Mitchell
likes to talk about these
numbers: four and nine.
That's four players he's
coached on the Pittsburgh
roster for nine or more sea-
sons.
Mitchell's veteran line-
men Casey Hampton,
Brett Keisel, Aaron Smith
and Chris Hoke may not
be the Steel Curtain of the
1970s, but they speak to
a larger truth. They were
brought to the team, given
time to develop and never
jettisoned when the going
got tough. And through it
all, they were coached to
play a single, specific, hard-
nosed style.
In short, that's the
"Steeler Way" an unwav-
ering devotion to getting
one kind of player and
playing one brand of foot-
ball that has resulted in
one outcome more often
than any other over the
past 40 years: The season
ending with the Steelers
holding the Super Bowl
trophy.
They play Green Bay
on Sunday in search


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pittsburgh Steelers safety Troy Polamalu answers questions during a news conference on
Thursday in Fort Worth, Texas. The Steelers will play the Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl
XLV on Sunday.


of their seventh NFL
championship.
"In the '70s, when you
had the Steel Curtain, those
guys were there for a long
time," Mitchell said. "They
had continuity with the
scheme, the coaches, the
ownership, and you look
at it, and it's those same
reasons we're playing very


well today. I don't think
there's many teams in this
league that can say they've
had four players with
the same assistant coach
for nine years or more.
That's the thing. Because
the Rooneys, they don't
panic."
The Rooney family, of
course, has owned the


Steelers since the begin-
ning, back in 1933. They
do more than talk the talk
about "family." To build a
sense of togetherness, they
like to eat with the players
in the team cafeteria. When
it comes to the big picture,
they run an organization
that loves stability but isn't
fond of drama.


FLORIDA
x-Mike Blakely, RB. 5-9, 205, Manatee
HS, Bradenton, Fla.
x-Clay Burton, DL, 6-4, 245, Venice
(Fla.) HS
x-Kyle Christy, P. 6-1, 185, Brownsburg
(Ind,) HS *
x-Jeff Driskel, QB, 6-4, 238, Hagerty
HS, Oviedo, Fla.
Jabari Gorman, DB, 5-11, 170,
Monsignor Pace HS, Miami
Chris Johnson, DB, 5-10, 198, Trinity
Catholic HS, Ocala, Fla.
Tommy Jordan, OL, 6-4, 297, Ridgefield
(Conn.) HS
Hunter Joyer, FB, 5-11, 237, Wesley
Chapel (Fla.) HS
x-A.C. Leonard,TE, 6-4,245, University
Christian HS, Jacksonville, Fla.
x-Javares McRoy,WR, 5-8, 170, Lakeland
(Fla.) HS
Loucheiz Purifoy, DB, 6-0. 171. Pine
Forest HS, Pensacola, Fla.
Marcus Roberson, DB, 6-1, 175, St.
Thomas Aquinas HS, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
x-De'Ante "Pop" Saunders, DB, 5-8,
173, DeLand (Fla.) HS
Valdez Showers, DB, 5-11, 192, Madison
HS, Madison Heights, Mich.
Graham Stewart, LB, 6-1, 216, Xavier
HS, Middletown, Conn.
Ja'Juan Story, WR, 6-4, .196, Nature
Coast Technical HS, Brooksville, Fla.
Trip Thurman, OL, 6-6, 302, Dover
(Del.) HS
Tevin Westbrook, DL, 6-5 268, North
Broward Prep, Coconut Creek, Fla.
x-already enrolled
FLORIDA STATE
Austin Barron, g, 6-3, 280, St. Thomas
Aquinas, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Kelvin Benjamin, wr, 6-6, 210, Glades
Central HS, Belle Glade, Fla.
Eric Beverly, rb, 5-9, 216, First Coast
HS, Jacksonville, Fla.
Lamarcus Brutus, db, 5-11 ,185,Treasure
Coast HS, Port St. Lucie, Fla.
Cornelllus "Tank" Carradine, de, 6-5,
249, Butler CC, Cincinnati
Ruben Carter, ol, 6-4, 285, Jackson
HS, Miami
Jacob Coker, qb, 6-5, 210, St. Paul's
Episcopal HS, Mobile,Ala.
Jake Fahrenkrug, g, 6-4, 321, NDSCS,
Robbinsdale, Minn.
Devonta Freeman, rb, 5-8, 195, Miami
Central HS
Rashad Greene, wr,6-0,175, St.Thomas
Aquinas HS, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Bobby Hart, ol, 6-5, 298, St. Thomas
Aquinas HS, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Arrington Jenkins, Ib, 6-2, 225, Coral


By DAVID CRARY
Associated Press


NEWYORK- BySunday
night, Ben Roethlisberger
could be in rarefied com-
pany as a three-time Super
Bowl-winning quarterback.
Yet even if he joins the
likes of superstar Tom
Brady and Hall of Famer
Troy Aikman, marketing
experts say the Steelers
QB probably won't over-
come his off-the-field
notoriety including two
sexual assault accusations
- and pick up the flurry of
endorsements NFL champs
typically enjoy.
"You don't build back
trust with a one-game per-
formance, even if it's the
Super Bowl," said Bill Glenn,
senior vice president of the
Dallas-based sports-busi-
ness firm The Marketing
Arm. "I'd be surprised if
there's a long line outside
his agent's office even if he
wins MVP."
Roethlisberger has had a
minimal presence in adver-
tising since he was accused
in March of sexually assault-
ing a 20-year-old college
student the second time
since 2008 that he faced
assault allegations. Georgia
authorities declined to bring
charges, but he received a
four-game suspension at the
start of this season for violat-
ing the NFL's personal con-
duct policy.
His sturdy play since his
return, particularly in the
playoffs, has won back the
hearts of some Pittsburgh
fans who had soured on
him. But nationally, accord-
ing to marketing experts,
his image remains tar-
nished, and he needs more
time to rehabilitate it.
"The best thing


Park HS, Miami
Timmy Jernigan, dt, 6-2, 275, Columbia
HS, Lake City, Fla.
Nile Lawrence-Stample, de, 6-1, 297,
Nova HS, Davie, Fla.
Sterling Lovelady, ol, 6-2. 273. Navarre
(Fla.) HS
Josue Matias, ol, 6-5, 290, Union City
(N.J.) HS
Derrick Mitchell, dt. 6-4, 285, First
Coast HS, Jacksonville, Fla.
Giorgio Newberry, de, 6-6, 255, Fort
Pierce (Fla.) Central HS
Nick O'Leary, te, 6-4, 235, Dwyer HS,
Palm Beach, Fla.
Trey Pettis, ol, 6-5, 327, Deland (Fla.)
HS
Jordan Prestwood, ol, 6-5, 287, Plant
* City (Fla.) HS
Keelin Smith, db, 6-3, 185, Treasure
Coast HS, Port St. Lucie, Fla.
Terrance Smith, Ib, 6-3, 215, Southwest
Dekalb HS, Decatur, Ga.
Nick Waisome, cb, 5-10, 171, South
Lake HS, Groveland, Fla.
James Wilder Jr., rb, 6-2, 219, Plant HS,
Tampa, Fla.
Karlos Williams, db, 6-2, 210, Ridge
Community HS, Davenport. Fla.
MIAMI
Dalton Botts, p: 6-3, 198, Moorpark
CC,Taft. Calif.
Anthony Chickillo, de, 6-4, 248,Alonso
HS,Tampa, Fla.
Dallas Crawford, cb, 5-9, 193, South
Fort Myers HS, Fort Myers, Fla.
Phillip Dorsett, wr, 5-9. 170, St.Thomas
Aquinas HS, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Thomas Finnie, cb, 5-10, 168, Central
HS, Miami
Taylor Gadbois, ot, 6-7, 292, East
Paulding HS, Dallas, Ga.
Matt Goudis, k, 6-6, 160, Chaminade
HS,West Hills, Calif.
Jalen Grimble, de, 6-2, 280, Bishop
Gorman HS,.LasVegas
Kevin Grooms, ath, 5-9, 165, South
Broward HS, Hollywood, Fla.
Eddie Johnson, ath, 6-1, 2?C, North
Atlanta'HS,Atlanta
Antonio Kinard, lb, 6-3, 215, Hargrave
Military,Youngstown, Ohio
Gionni Paul, Ib, 6-0, 230, Kathleen HS,
Lakeland, Fla.
Denzel Perryman, lb, 6-0, 217, Coral
Gables (Fla.) HS
Olsen Pierre, de, 6-4, 256, Fork Union
Military, Rahway, N.J.
Rashawn Scott, wr, 6-2,198, Melbourne
(Fla.) Central Catholic
Ricardo Williams, de, 6-5, 220,
Homestead (Fla.) Senior HS


Mr. Roethlisberger can do
is have a very quiet week
off the field and a very
loud week on the field,"
said Kevin Adler, CEO of
the Chicago-based sports
consulting firm Engage
Marketing.
Even with a champion-
ship, Adler said, "there's a
significant percentage of cor-
porate America that would a
still be a little gun-shy.
"But with good game and
a quiet offseason, there's
an opportunity to develop a
maturation of his brand in
the future."
The challenge facing
Roethlisberger is starkly
illustrated in the so-called
N-Scores which the Nielsen
Co. compiles to rate ath-
letes' endorsement poten-
tial based on their appeal,
name recognition and other
factors. His score has plum-
meted from above 140 in
2008 to 24 in the wake of
the assault cases; by com-
parison, Green Bay quarter-
back Aaron Rodgers' score
is 39 and Peyton Manning's
is 262.
A comparable rating sys-
tem run by The Marketing
Arm the Davie Brown
Index shows Rodgers
ahead of Roethlisberger
in endorsement potential
and trust, even though the
Steeler star is better known.
Chris Anderson, a
Marketing Arm spokes-
man, said Roethlisberger's
trust levels were on par
with celebrities such as
Snoop Dogg, Allen Iverson
and Kim Kardashian.
John Sweeney, a profes-
sor of sports communica-
tion at the University of
North Carolina's School
of Journalism, noted that
Roethlisberger was never
in Manning's league.


DISTRICT: Allen is 31-8
Continued From Page 1B


145 Daniel Graham,
senior, 27-8;
152-Isaac Henderson,
junior, 27-7;
160 Daniel Devers,


freshman, 23-11;
171 Joe Fields,
junior, 28-15;
189 Monterance
Allen, junior, 31-8.


STATE SIGNING


Questions

linger about



Roethilsberger


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE. BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Colleagues suspect forgetful

co-worker is battling dementia


DEAR ABBY: Everyone
knows the economy has hit
hard times and, as a result,
more people are working past
the age of retirement. This
means some in the workplace
are beginning to deal with Al-
zheimer's and other demen-
tia-related illnesses.
"Anita" is in her late 60s
and we are certain she is
showing symptoms of demen-
tia. She has worked in our of-
fice about three years, after
working in this field for more
than 30 years elsewhere. But
if you saw her in our office
today, you would think it was
her first week if not her
first day.
Anita makes multiple mis-
takes every day, then sits at
her desk and cries her eyes
out Our supervisor insists
there is nothing he or HR can
do in regards to talking (gen-
tly) to her because she could
sue the company.
I'm sorry Anita is suffer-
ing, but must we ldt her dete-
riorate for three more years
in our office? That's how long
she is planning on staying,
even though she's eligible
for retirement Her family
lives elsewhere in the state
and may not realize she is ill.
Were she my mother, I would
want someone to do some-
thing. What's the right thing
to do for everyone involved?
- STUMPED IN CALI-
FORNIA
DEAR STUMPED: I dis-.
cussed your question with


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearaobby.com
Nancy Bertrando, a respect-
ed California employment law
specialist, who told me: "If a
person is unable to perform
the essential functions of her
job regardless of the reason
- an employer does not have
the obligation to keep the per-
son in that position. However,
regardless of whether your
supervisor or HR thinks it is
futile, Anita should be coun-
seled and given the opportu-
nity to fix the problem if,
indeed, it is fixable."
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band runs an auto body shop
and has always warned me
to be extra careful in park-
ing lots "People don't pay
attention. They drive too fast.
Everyone's always in a hur-
ry," etc. Well, tomorrow I am
going to the memorial service
for a dear friend, "Mara." She
was only 46.
While Mara- was put-
ting her granddaughter into
a stroller, they were hit A
woman driving too fast hit
a car backing out of a park-
ing space, careened off that
car and ran over Mara. Mara
was pinned underneath the


car until the fire department
arrived and lifted it off her.
Mara's daughter saw it all.
The 3-year-old is still in the
hospital, but will survive.
I realize my friend died
over a parking spot. I hope";
people reading this will see
that we all need to slow down
and pay attention. A car can/
be as lethal as a gun. I didn't
"get it" before, but now I do.
Because of the reckless ac-,
tions of a complete stranger,
you can kiss your husband
goodbye, go shopping and
never return! I hope this
nightmare can help others.
MISSING THE SISTER
OF MY HEART
DEAR MISSING: Please,
know how sorry I am about,
the tragic death of your
friend. I cannot stress enough.
how important it is to remain,
fully present while behind the i
wheel of a vehicle. Our streets,
and highways are filled with
distractions, as are our cars -
billboards, cell phones, stereo
buttons, the GPS, etc. I am
sure the woman who struck
Mara and her grandchild will
never get over the fact that.
she took one life and could ;
have taken another.
Readers, I hope you will re-
view this woman's letter and-'
remember it the next time'
you're "in a hurry." It could'
save a life.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or.
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): There is so
much you can do if you
stop worrying about what
everyone else is doing or
thinking. Take a stance and
stand up for what you want
to see unfold. This is not the
time to compromise. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Don't get caught
in the middle of someone
else's dispute. You will not
be given all. the facts, so
proceed carefully with re-
gard to a personal matter
that will affect your future.
Focus more .on what you
can do to improve your pro-
fessional position. ****
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Keep your emo-
tions tucked away in a safe
place and you will avoid
a personal dispute. You
should be concentrating
on work, money and your
future. Location can play
an important role. Self-im-
provement will pay off. **
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Embrace change
and you will advance. Your
emotional response will
help show others who you
are and what you have to
offer. Love and romance
should be high on your list
and will help determine
your next personal, profes-
sional and financial move.

LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last'

22): You can convince oth-
ers to take part in some-
thing you are pursuing. A
partnership will add stabil-
ity to the foundation you
are building and will en-
sure that you can turn your
dream into a reality. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Make your home your
comfort zone. Change, ren-
ovate and redecorate. Love
is on the rise, so do what is
required in order to be hap-
py and open to the person
you want to spend the most
time with. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Take action. Use your
imagination and discipline
to stretch above and be-,
yond your normal expecta-
tions. Something unique
can bring about a lucrative
financial future when the
time is right. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): Choose care-
fully what you do and
with whom. You will be up
against opposition and must
really be careful not to let
ego lead to stubbornness.
Not everything will be as
it appears. Take your time
and do your best to avoid
arguments. **
SAG1HTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You have


to rely on your past expe-
rience if you are going to
make the right decision
now. Alterations at home
may be unexpected but can
be beneficial. Let what's
happening around you un-
fold naturally and you will:
enjoy the rewards. ****
CAPRICORN. (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't be
too eager to share your
thoughts and ideas just
yet. Put everything in or-
der first Someone you are
close to is likely to disagree,
with you. Personal, physi-
cal, emotional and financial
excess must be avoided.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You have plenty
to think about and choices
to make. You can change
the course of your life if you
are ready to accept, forgive,
forget and move on. A plan'
will give you something to
work toward and a greater
sense of accomplishment.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Emotions will
be close to the surface. Ex-
press your thoughts and
feelings and you will be
surprised by the reaction
you receive. Sharing can be
your best solution and can
lead to bigger and better
opportunities. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: 0 equals P
"SZZ D'RY VYUSKI TSA T.DKU EYRU,

PH LU XSMU EXU TDRYSWU ED

O RY I R U EX U K." LSZE V P IA U N
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "One doesn't recognize the really important moments
in one's life until it's too late." Agatha Christie
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 2-4


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
TrHey'RE GONE ... STILL FEELS LIKE-
.)IE TFW-CHED-THFE THy'KEEmE,1i.TiouH.
'JET ThKE- OFF RFW' I ICRN SMELL GP-MMA'S
ER~Vpum THIN EFUE IN YOUK
^YE~THINo. -^ IOM.


CLASSIC PEANUTS


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 .











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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 4, 2011

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In m 0 .i Online
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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CASE NO. 10000372CA
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE -
MERCHANTILE BANK, A DIVI-
SION OF CAROLINA FIRST
BANK
Plaintiff,
vs.
KIMBERLY L. PETREE A/K/A
KIMBERLY L. JONES et. al.
Defendants
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated January 24, 2011, and en-
tered in Case No. 10000372CA, of
the Circuit Court of the Third Judi-
cial Circuit in and for COLUMBIA
County, Florida, wherein MER-
CHANTILE BANK, A DIVISION
OF CAROLINA FIRST BANK, is a
Plaintiff and KIMBERLY L. PET-
REE A/K/A KIMBERLY L. JONES;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KIM-
BERLY L. PETREE A/K/A KIM-
BERLY L. JONES; COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA; STATE OF
FLORIDA; CLERK OF THE
COURT COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA; NATIONWIDE INSUR-
ANCE; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the
Defendants. P. DeWITT CASON as
The Clerk of the Circuit Court will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at 173 NE HERNANDO AVE-
NUE, COURT ROOM 1, LAKE
CITY, FL 32055, at 11:00 a.m on
March 2, 2011, the following descri-
bed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:
SEE ATTACHED LEGAL DE-
SCRIPTION AS EXHIBIT "A"
EXHIBIT A
LEGAL DESCRIPTION
COMMENCE THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF SE
1/4 SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE N 88'25'56"
E, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID SE 1/4 OF SE 1/4, 69.62
FEET TO THE NORTHEASTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF TOMP-
KINS ROAD (A COUNTY MAIN-
TAINED GRADED' ROAD),
THENCE S 4726'35" E, ALONG
SAID NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT
OF WAY LINE 911.15 FEET TO A
POINT OF CURVE, THENCE
SOUTHERLY ALONG SAID
CURVE CONCAVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
495.35 FEET ALONG A CHORD
BEARING S 36'48'58" W, 181.83
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, THENCE CONTINUE
SOUTHERLY ALONG SAID
CURVE CONCAVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
495.35 FEET ALONG A CHORD
BEARING S 20'29'55" E, 111.14
FEET, THENCE N 88'25'56" E,
301.20 FEET, THENCE N 1'34'04"
W, 105.25 FEET, THENCE S
88'25'56" W, 337.35 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 27 day of January, 2011
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
Dated this 27th day of January, 2011
IMPORTANT
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a reasonable accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should,
no later than seven (7) days prior,
contact the Clerk of the Court's disa-
bility coordinator at 904-958-2163,
PO BOX 1569, LAKE CITY, FL
32056. If hearing impaired, contact
(TDD) 800-955-8771 via Florida Re-
lay System.
Ben-Ezra & Katz, PA.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329
04543335
February 4, 11, 2011

PUBLIC AUCTION
1997 FORD
VIN# 1FMDU32P2VZA98397
CREAMER'S WRECKER SERV-
ICE 290 NE SUNNYBROOK ST.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
COLUMBIA COUNTY
386-752-2861
SALE DATE: February 21, 2011
8:00AM

04543394
February 4, 2011

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

www.Ilakecityreporter.com







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw.
You pick it up. $1.85 a bale.
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 11-12-CP
DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM PORTER TYLER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
William Porter Tyler, deceased,
whose date of death was October 16,
2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 173 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED
The date of first publication of this
notice is January 28, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/ Katherine B. Schnauss Naugle
Attorney for William Tyler
Florida Bar Number; 514381
Naugle & Smith P.L.
810 Margaret Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32204
Telephone: (904) 366-2703
Fax: (904) 366-3704
E-Mail: knaugle@jaxlawteam.com
Personal Representative
/s/ William Tyler
5154 Saddlehom Drive South
Jacksonville, Florida 32257

05524961
January 28,2011
February 4, 2011

Notice is hereby given per Florida
Statue 98.075(2):
McGowan, Demetrous
1211 SE 24th Ave.
Gainesville, FI 32641

Kedra C. Aldridge
222 SW Cardinal PI
Lake City, FI 32025-1376
Thomas Coleman
954 SW Faith Rd.
Lake City, Fl 32025
Vincent A. Gray
584 E Brown St Apt B
Lake City, Fl 32025
Michelle P. Videon
945 Christie Street
Lake City, FI 32024
Francis C. Gray
179 SW Stanley Court
Lake City, F1 32024
Frank T. Kerce
265 SW Beyond Ct.
Lake City, F1 32024
Steven Christie
292 SW Copperhead Lane
Fort White, FI 32038
is potentially ineligible to be regis-
tered to vote. Please respond within
30 days of publication of this notice
by contacting the Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office at the address or phone
number below. If no response is re-
ceived within 30 days of this publi-
cation, it may result in determination
of ineligibility by the supervisor and
removal of the registered voter's
name from the statewide voter regis-
tration system.
Published one time in the Lake City
Reporter
Elizabeth "Liz" P. Home
Columbia County Supervisor of
Elections
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1026
04543302
February 4, 2011

NOTICE OF ACTION
BEFORE THE BOARD OF NURS-
ING
IN RE: The license to practice nurs-
ing of
Aranda E. Williams, C.N.A.
1166 S.E. St. Johns Street Lot #2
Lake City, Florida 32025
CASE NO.: CNA 136466
The Department of Health has filed
an Administrative Complaint against
you, a copy of which may be ob-
tained by contacting, Casey Cowan,
Assistant General Counsel, Prosecu-
tion Services Unit, 4052 Bald Cy-
press Way, Bin #C65, Tallahassee
Florida 32399-3265, (850)245-4640
If no contact has been made by you
concerning the above by November
24, 2010, the matter of the Adminis-
trative Complaint will be presented
at an ensuing meeting of the Board
of Nursing in formal proceeding.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the individual or agency
sending this notice not later than sev-


en days prior to the proceeding at the
address given on the notice. Tele-
phone: (850)245-4640, 1-800-955-
8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770 (v),
via Florida Relay Service.
04543253
January 28, 2011
February 4, 11, 18, 2011


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

Lost Diamond Tennis Bracelet
at Gondolier Restaurant or
Walgreens 1/26/11, Will identify,
Reward 386-963-2271

LOST DOG: $100 Reward. Miss-
ing since week of 01/10 from
Branford Hwy/Emerald Forrest.
Brown Lab/bulldog mix. answers
to Nikkie. 386-288-6786


060 Services

Senior Assistant/Companion.
I will sit with & care for your
elderly. Drive to Doctor appts. &
shopping. References avail.
386-288-3776 or 386-754-8721


1o0 Opportunities

04543193
NOW HIRING!!!
Be home everyday, While
making excellent pay! We are
now hiring experienced
Class A Drivers to haul
petroleum locally.
Excellent benefits package
including health, dental
and 401K.
All applicants MUST Have:
Class A CDL with X
endorsements.
1 yr tractor-trailer experience
with a t/t school certification or
2 yrs. tractor-trailer experience
without the certification.
25 yrs or older
Please apply online at
floridarockandtanklines.com
or call 1-866-352-7625

04543277
Aaron's Lake City store is now
hiring Retail Manager's at
Salary+ Comm.& Bonuses
Sunday Off & Full Benefits
Must have 2 yr. mgmt exp. or
college, NO criminal history,
pass drug test, 21
yrs., or older clean mvr apply at:
www.aarons.com/careers key-
words type "lake city"

04543333
Fleetwood Diner in High
Springs is looking for
experienced short order
cooks, & servers. Apply in
person 615 NW Snate Fe Blvd
(Hwy 441) High Springs


05525001
Administrative Assistant
Good communication, computer
and overall office skills, good
telephone skills for outbound
calling. Experience with Micro-
soft Office Suite. Some graphic
design exp would be a plus,
fax resume to 888-677-8437

05525005
Front Office Receptionist
needed for busy medical
practice. Entry level position,
Call Nancy at (386) 719-2540 or
send resume to
southemrninternalmedicine34@
yahoo.com

05525007
SHANDS LAKE SHORE
REGIONAL MEDICAL
CENTER
has the following
positions available:

Director of OR
Director of ER
(Lake Shore and Live Oak
facility)
Director of Rehab Services
Director of Radiology
Inpatient Coders
Charge Nurse Med/Surg
Competitive salary
and benefit package.
Apply online @
shandslakeshore.com or
Fax resume to 386.292.8295
EOE, M/F/V/D
Drug Free Workplace

05525012
Office Assistant
Full time permanent position in
White Springs. Must have solid
computer skills, office
experience a must. Will train
right person in our speciality.
Opportunity for advancement.
Please EMAIL resume to
hr@speced.org

A/C SERVICE Tech
Min 5 yrs experience
F/f with benefits
Please call 386-454-4767
Anderson Columbia is accepting
applications for a certified
electrician with experience in
motor and motor control repair.
Please come by 871 Guerdon Rd,
Lake City, FL to fill out an appli-
cation or email your resume to
wassont@andersoncolumbia.com.
Equal Opportunity Employer
Bartender needed. Must
have experience & be reliable, &
have your own transportation and


your own phone. 386-752-2412
CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773


100 Job
100 Opportunities

8 Temp Farmworkers needed
3/7/11 11/22/11. Workers will
plant, cultivate, harvest, grade, &
pack produce. Subject to random
drug testing at employer's
expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Work tools,
supplies equip. provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier, if appropriate. $9.94/hr.
Report or send a resume to the
nearest FL Agency of Workforce
Innovation office & ref. job order
# MD 0333070.
Brad's Produce Churchville, MD
7 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Eddie Kirks -
Graves County, KY. Tobacco, &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 03/12/11 12/10/11. Wage
of $9.7 l/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Center
in your area and reference
Job Order #KY0416619.
PT Clerical position 8-12p M-F.
Must be a people person w/good
organizational, phone & customer
skills. Must multi task. Send
resume & ref's to Box 04108, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Teacher (Lawton's, Early Head
Start Lake City, Birth to 3 yrs old)
HS Dip/GED, Must have FCCPC
/CDA; three years of classroom
experience working with
infants/toddlers preferred; Bilin-
gual (Spanish/English) preferred,
5 Hour Literacy, Must pass physi-
cal/DCF background screening,
Current First Aid/CPR preferred.
Excellent Benefits-Paid Holidays,
Sick/Annual Leave. Apply in
person at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637,
by email: arobinson(5)sv4cs.ore
Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE
Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus, but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630
4 Temp. Nursery Workers needed
2/28/11 12/1/11. Workers will
plant, cultivate, harvest, grade,
store, & ship container & field
grown trees & shrubs.
Must have 3 months verifiable
exp. working in a diverse tree &
shrub nursery. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Work tools,
supplies, equip. provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier, if necessary. $10.51/hr.
Worksites in Lake Co. OH.
Report or send a resume to the
nearest FL Agency of Workforce
Innovation office & ref. job order
# OH 521411. W.S. Yoe Nurseries

120 Medical
120 Employment

04543381
Referral Coordinator/
Checkout Clerk
Medical Office is seeking
qualified candidate with Good
Multi-tasking skills and profes-
sionalism. Must have exp.
w/Med. Term & Ins. Referrals
& Auth. Send reply to Box
04109, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056

Homecare LPN's &
i Homecare CNA's needed for cli-
ent in Lake City, call
Maxim Healthcare Services
352-291-4888
Internal Medicine of Lake City
is looking for N.P. or P.A.
Please contact Dr Bali @
386-755-1703
Physical Therapy Assistant
needed in a local physician
office, please fax
CV to 386-719-9662.
PT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.


140 Work Wanted

We Run Errands!
Your personal errand service to
help those in need at rates you can
afford Call Dawn 386-249-9426

240 Schools&
Education

04543248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/14/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/14/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

AKC GERMAN SHEPPARD
puppy. Born 12/13.
Parents on site. $400.
386-496-3654 or 352-745-1452
Free young male cat
has bob tail,
loving
386-755-0920
PITBULL PUPPY for sale.
7 week old. Parents on site. $250.
GRAND CHAMPION
BLOODLINES. 386-288-0231
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

GE Electric Stove,
White, works great,
$185. 386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387
Kenmore Washer
White, works great
$100
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387
Large Capacity Clothes dryer
$85.
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

421 SW Thompkins Loop
Off 242. Several pieces of
furniture, kids toys, clothes, etc....
Saturday, Feb. 5th starting @ 7am
Estate Sale. Feb 3, 4, & 5 8am.
Furn, tools, Boyds bears, clothes,
fixtures, lots of misc. ALL GOES!
No early birds. 140 SE Cherokee
Way. Off 252 behind high school.
Moving Sale Fri Sun. 8-?. Beth
Dr. off Cannon Creek behind Pepsi
plant. Look for signs. 10x20 shed,
riding mower, furn. & lots more!






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat & Sun,8a-lp
102 SW Petunia Place in
Azelea Park off 47
Something for everyone!


440 Miscellaneous

Frost Free Refrigerator
Nice w/top freezer.
White $200. obo
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387
GE DISHWASHER, white.
$75.00 Works good.
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387
GUNSHOW: 02/05 & 02/06
@ The Columbia County
Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City.
Sat 9am 4pm, Sun 9am-3pm.
Info: 386-325-6114
Kitchen or bathroom
floor cabinet. $35.
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

6 Mobile Homes
3 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422


2/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in
small/quiet park, near FGC. Small
pets ok, $500 dep $575 mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


BU I

SELi.14T


^FIND IT


FvIT


*









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 4, 2011


^630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
Nice DWMH near Picadilly Park
3/2. Back porch/carport, Country
living. $675 month, 1st. last &
$300 dep. Call 386-752-6333






Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Nice 4br/2.5 ba, 3 ac. Fenced
Cross Fenced, paved rd., huge
deck, private. McAlpin area. $900
dep. & $950. mo. 386-867-1833
6A0 Mobile Homes
U for Sale
$569 mo 3Bd/2Ba Modular
1/2 acre Deck, energy efficient,
appliances, drive, w/$12K down
($640 mo w/ $6K down).
Avail in March
Owner finance or rent to own???
Call (386) 758-9824 hurry


05524746
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers
Save up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832

4/2 DWMH in Retirement Park,
2 Porches, Shed, Extras,'
Reduced Price.
386-752-4258

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
05524833
No Application Fee +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 bedroom Apartments &
mobile homes,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423 --
1/1 apts for rent on Madison St,
$500 month, $200 sec dep,
utilities included, (two available)
386-365-2515
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Gatorwood on the Westside
Rent $650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $500. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-24217
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & 'bckgrnd chk,
*386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276-
Move In Special.2/1 w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135.
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-'5808

730 Unfurnished
U Home For Rent

05524832
New Years Dream "Surprise"
Why Rent? Lease to own.
New model home 2 miles S off
47. 3000 sqft, 4/3, 5% int, is
tax deduc, consider trade-in
386-752-1364

3/2, 2-car garage, fenced back
yard, convenient in-town location
near Summers school.
$1050 per mo. 386-623-2848
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport, $825 mo, 1st,
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
4/3 Refurbished Home w/CH/A
for Rent or Sale,
on East side of town
Call 386-294-2494 for details
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
CH/A, carport. $650/mo. + sec.
Includes all utilities & satellite TV.
Pets OK. (386)758-2408
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+Retirement Living,
Site built home
2br/2bth For Lease
Gorgeous Lake View. 2 br Apt
$550. mo plus deposit.
Close to shopping.
386-344-0579
Large 3br/2ba house near
downtown Lake City; FR, DR,
fenced yd, screened pool; No pets;
$800/mo + sec dep;623-2642
Large 3br/2ba house. In town.
Fenced yard. $800 mo.
1st, last and security.
386-867-1212
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Corner of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Remodeled, 3br/lba, fenced, new
deck, shop, cabinets, apple, close to
schools, $600 mo, $400. dep.
386-984-5856, 752-5948
Three Rivers Estates, 2/1, CH/A,
2010 W2 and ref's from current
landlord required, $675 month, &
$600 sec dep, 386-497-4699


730 Unfurnished 940 Trucks
730 Home For Rent 940 Trucks


Turnkey rental, 3/2 split.2 CG. 1/2
acre, quiet neighborhood, close to
1-75, $1050 per m6nth,lst/last/sec.
386-454-2826 or 954-895-1722

75O Business &
75 Office Rentals
Great locations on SW Main Blvd.
Retail, Wholesale, Distribution,
Office. 1200+ sf only $950. per
mo. Includes Utilities 752-5035
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales. Inc.
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2br/2ba Eastside Village.
Unique floor plan. Lg utility/
work room. Screened front porch.
$55,000 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.


3b/2ba, 1545 sq ft on 1/2 acre,
338 SW Wise Dr,Lake City
Reduced to $179,900, Call 386-
752-3078 or 352-281-4003
3br/2ba 80'X125' lot. 1,200 sqft.
Kitchen & bath remodeled, metal
roof, Ig fenced back yard. Close to
amenities. $79,900 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
- 3br/2ba Brick home w/1,934 sqft
in Piccadilly Park. 1/2 acre. Lg
playroom, fenced yard. Reduced to
$139,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Custom home. on 5 ac.
where deer & turkey roam.
Lg barn w/enclosed workshop.
$219,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
4br/2ba, 5 ac., 2069 sqft. Ig family
& florida rm, den. Covered patio,
workshop. $229,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba, remodeled, views of the
lake. Formal LR, dining room &
family room. Many upgrades.
Coldwell Banker/Bisliop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
Country Club. 4br/4ba. New roof,
AC, windows. Pool, hot tub,
& greenhouse. $229,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Custom Brick, 5+ ac. 5br/4ba.
4412 sqft. 3 car garage, pool, hot
tub, 3 fireplaces, more. $569,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lori Giebeig Simpson 365-5678
Eastside-Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
3BR/2BA
$99,999
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
Fully furnished 2br/2ba @
$83,000
Excellent area. 3br/2ba home.
1620 sqft. w/covered patio. Lg
front porch & I car carport
Lori Giebeig. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Move In Ready. 3br/2ba w/1,225
sqft. Comer lot, great S/D.
12x16 workshop w/elec.
Upgrades. $75,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
Woodcrest S/D Super location,
nice back yard. 3br/2ba home,
cov-
ered back porch. New AC in 2010
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
WOODGATE VILLAGE.
3br/2ba DWMH.
Close to new elementary
school. $27,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc

82 Farms &
S Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

1830 Commercial
Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190

940 Trucks
2007 Chevy Regular Cab, 6 cyl,
auto, a/c, only 41,000 miles,
Rountree Ford Myron Wrubel
386-755-0630 x 292 $12,888


2008 F-450 King Ranch
Diesel Duelly. 36K miles.
Tommie Jefferson 386-209-8680
Rountree Moore Ford S39.995
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All sen-ice records. S4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802




Work Truck 1990 Ford
F350 Dually. 5th Wheel
White, Automatic
$1500.obo 386-965-2215


950 Cars for Sale
2007 Mercury Grand Marquis GS
25K miles, stock #7300, only
$12,888, call Myron Wrubel @
Rountree Moore Ford 755-0630
2008 Nissan Ultima, white, 106K
miles, 20 in. rims, tinted windows,
excellent condition,
take over pymt's 386-984-6366
2010 Ford Escape Limited, V6,
auto, moon roof, white, 21K miles,
stock # F263 Dwight Twiggs
Rountree Moore Ford 755-0630
2010 Toyota Corolla, 8153K
miles, 35 MPG, stock #24598A,
$13,995, Call Tommie Jefferson
@ Rountree Moore Ford 209-8680
GET CASH TODAY!!
for your car, truck, van or SUV.
(Running or not). Call anytime.
(229)412-0380


0 ON






2004 Rialta
23ft. self-contained,
excellent condition.
$13,500


so%0


WHEELS & WATERCRAFT


10 DIys

ONL



$4


ON WHEELS 8& WATERCRAFTi'.4r

10 Days-







Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


Clear the Clutter &




Make Some Cash!













vs0a B -
,.. ..... ..m. a

































Advertise your Garage Sale





with the Lake City Reporter






ONLY $ 1750




4 Lines 3 Days 2 Free Signs




(386) 755-5440