The Lake City reporter
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01366
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: January 30, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01366
System ID: UF00028308:01366
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Health&Wellness
Guide


Fir
LakE


"health j-

c WELLNESS


120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007FL A
205 SA UNIV OFFLORID
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Latie


city


Kirkman's Number Retired
Rangers' star honored at Purple and
Gold game.
Snorts. I B


SRVers speak out
Enforcing sign ordinance upsetting.
Letters to the Editor, 4A



Reporter


Sunday, January 30, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 8 $ 1.00



Ichetucknee report issued

Indicates water with the Florida State Parks a member of Three Rivers (the energy basis support-
clarity already n Association described it, Trust, explained that ing theaquatic food chain)
clarity already a The next step is up to the limited funds and the due to changes in light
serious problem. DEP" Ichetucknee's need altered availability and to reduce
The report, which the focus of the Trust to the aesthetic experience
By C.J. RISAK came out Friday, is enti- that river. for human users."
crisak@lakecityreporter.com tled, "Ichetucknee River, In the report's conclu- One of the five conclu- t
Florida; Assessment of sion, it states, "The data sions noted in the report ..,
The report neces- Effects of Human Use on and other observations said, "Water-dependent
sary to convince the Turbidity." It was prepared presented in this report human uses .(principally
Florida Department of by the Three Rivers Trust demonstrate that water- tubing, wading, and swim-
Environmental Protection FNPC, an organization dependent human uses do ming) have a measurable -
to take action to protect based on an endowment have an effect on turbidity" effect on turbidity and JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
the, Ichetucknee River has which originally was estab- and that "Turbidity in turn water clarity." A mother and her children addle and tube down the
been delivered. listed to fund studies for has the potential to det- Tubing from the upper A mother and her children paddleandtube down the
Now, as Jim Stevenson the Suwannee and Santa Fe rimentally affect aquatic Ichetucknee River, something that's been a tradition for
- a former chief naturalist rivers as well. Stevenson, plant primary productivity RIVER continued on 3A decades in Columbia County.

First-ever


Chamber Ball

draws full house


Yvette Mickens


John L. Cole


Brian Weekley


Kristi Robinson


Trevor Tyler


1 84264 0002I 8


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Teachers across
the school dis-
trict have been
nominated for
consistently
putting hard work, com-
mitment, selflessness and
creativity into their jobs.
On Thursday, one of those
nominees will receive the
district's highest honor
by being named the 2012
Columbia County School
District Teacher of the Year.
Teachers from each of
the 14 district schools, who
have been named Teacher of
the Year at their respective
posts, are contending for the
title.
The award will be
announced at 4 p.m. at First
Presbyterian Church, 697
SW Baya Drive. It is an open
event to the public.
Cheryl Conley, 2011
Florida Teacher of the Year
and one of four finalists
vying for the 2011 National
Teacher of the Year, will be
the event's featured speaker.
Teacher of the year nomi-
nees are elected by their
peers at the school level.
Nominees include:
Rhonda Rogers, a third
grade elementary educa-


Margie Pollock;,


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


FILE ART
Brandi Keen, a third grade
teacher at Summers
Elementary School, received
a a standing ovation as she
is named the 2011 Columbia
County School District Teacher
of the Year last year.
tion teacher at Fort White
Elementary, with 14 years of
teaching experience.
Timothea Williams, who
teaches special education for
grades three through five
at Niblack Elementary. She
has been teaching for seven
years.
Yvette Mickens,
an Exceptional Student
Education teacher in science


Kay Osteen-Green


Laura Folsom


education for grades six
through 12 at the Challenge
Learning Center. She has
two and a half years of teach-
ing experience.
Teresa McCullough, a
third grade elementary edu-
cation teacher at Five Points
Elementary, with three years
of teaching experience.
Laura Folsom, a sixth
grade life science teacher
at Lake City Middle, with
17 years of teaching experi-
ence.
John L. Cole, a sixth
grade language arts and
social studies teacher at
Richardson Middle, with 10
and a half years of teaching
experience.
Nancy Glass, who
instructs fourth grade writ-
ing at Eastside Elementary
and is certified in elemen-
tary education for grades
kindergarten through six.
She has been teaching for 22
years.
Brian Weekley, an
intensive reading teacher for
11th and 12th grades at Fort
White High, with five and a
half years of teaching experi-
ence.
Kristi Robinson, a
kindergarten teacher at
Summers Elementary, with
CRIST continued on 3A


Veronica Bennett


Opinion
Life ... .....
Obituaries
Advice & Comics . .
Puzz'es ..


Drawdy 'passes
the buck' to Haley
as new president.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce* coupled its
annual meeting with a first-
time, semi-formal event
Saturday.
About 375 members of the
community enjoyed an eve-
ning of dinner, dancing and
fellowship at the Chamber's
inaugural Chamber Ball


at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds, an event that
sold out two weeks early. A
silent auction and live band
were also featured.
During the annual meet-
ing, Jenny Drawdy, 2010
Chamberpresident, "passed
the buck" to William Haley,
2011 Chamber president,
a tradition signifying the
change in the presidency.
Both Haley and Drawdy
said the Chamber has bal-
anced its budget. In the
upcoming year, Haley
said the Chamber plans to
CHAMBER continued on 3A


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
William Haley, 2011 Lake City-Columbia County Chamber
of Commerce president, speaks at the Chamber's inaugural
Chamber Ball at the Columbia County Fairgrounds Saturday.


Epiphany starts

its week-long.

celebration


'Catholic Schools
are A+ for America'
nationwide theme.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Epiphany Catholic
School will be taking part
in a national celebration
beginning today that rec-
ognizes the role a Catholic
school education can play
in young peoples' lives.
That celebration:
Catholic Schools, Week
2011, which the school will
commemorate with a vari-
ety of daily events starting

EPIPHANY continued on 3A


I.-.


TODAY II
BUSINESS
Builder of th
Year honore(


JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter
Rita Klenk (from right),
Epiphany Catholic School
principal, congratulates
Kaylee Stuart, 10, as she
awards her a Certificate of
Achievement during an Honor
Roll Ceremony on Friday.


N COMING
S TUESDAY
e New remote control
d. track opens.


Teresa McCullough


Rhonda Rogers Timothea Williams


TEACHER OF THE



YEAR NOMINEES

2011 selection announced Thursday


Malinda Cembruch


71
Fog early, clearing
WEATHER, 2A


7,:*









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011


FLORIDA
towi


Saturday:
Afternoon: 2-3-8
Evening: 4-9-9


Saturday:
Afternoon: 5-5-0-8
Evening: 9-8-7-4


Wednesday:
7-18-19-23-35-52


Wednesday:
4-5-36-47-58 PB6


AROUND FLORIDA



Mom charged in kids' slaying treated at hospital


TAMPA
he woman
who authori-
ties said killed
her teenage
daughter and
son because she was fed
up with them talking back
and being mouthy will not
appear in court Saturday
because she's being
treated at a hospital for an
unknown condition.
Authorities said Julie
Powers Schenecker was
taken to Tampa General
Hospital shortly after
midnight'Saturday to be
treated for a medical con-
dition that existed before
she was taken to jail.
Hillsborough Sheriff's dep-
uties who oversee jail
inmates said they could
not reveal Schenecker's
medical condition, citing
health care privacy laws.
An arrest affidavit said
Schenecker shot her son
twice in the head in the
family car "for talking
back" as she drove him
to soccer practice. The
report said Schenecker
then drove to their upscale
home and shot her daugh-
ter in the face inside the
home.
Schenecker's mother
called police Friday morn-
ing, and told then she
was concerned after her
daughter had sent an
e-mail saying she was
depressed. Officers found
Schenecker drenched in
blood on her back porch
- and once they saw the
teens, the scene was so
troubling that a stress
team was called to counsel
the responding officers, a
police spokeswoman said.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Friday photo, a Tampa Police officer escorts Julie Powers Schenecker to Orient Road
Jail in Tampa. Police said Julie Powers Schenecker admitted to killing her teenage daughter
and son after officers found her covered in blood on the back porch of her home Friday morn-
ing, police spokeswoman Laura McElroy said.


Calyx, the girl, was
16 and a cross country
running star at her high
school. The 13-year-old
son, Beau, was in eighth
grade.
Investigators believe the
teens "never saw it com-
ing," said police spokes-
woman Laura McElroy.
Both were killed with
a .38-caliber pistol. The
arrest affidavit said the
weapon was purchased
five days earlier.
Schenecker's husband,
Parker Schenecker, is
a career Army officer
attached to U.S. Central
Command in Tampa. He
was working in the Middle
East when the shootings
happened.
In 2008, the fam-


ily moved to Tampa and
bought a $448,000 home
in a quiet, upscale subur-
ban neighborhood. As the
sun set Friday evening,
residents walked by crime
scene tape that sealed
off the cul-de-sac that the
Schenecker family lived
on.

No challenge
to remapping
TALLAHASSEE
- House Speaker Dean
Cannon said he has no
plans to challenge the
second of two new state
constitutional amendments
on redistricting at least
not yet.
The Winter Park


Republican on Friday said
he's waiting to hear from
the House's legal team
before making any deci-
sion on the citizen initia-
tive.
The Fair Districts
amendment prohibits ger-
rymandering legislative
districts to favor incum-
bents or a particular politi-
cal party.
The House earlier
this week asked to join
a lawsuit challenging a
similar amendment on
congressional redistrict-
ing. The suit was filed by
U.S. Reps. Corrine Brown,
D-Jacksonville, and Mario
Diaz-Balart, R-Miami.
Cannon said it's impor-
tant to determine if that
amendment conflicts .with


federal law.

Victim released
after shark attack
WEST PALM BEACH
- A man attacked by a
shark in the Bahamas has
been released from a West
Palm Beach hospital.
Fifty-two-year-old Jim
Abernethy walked out of
St. Mary's Medical Center
on Friday, having escaped
any serious damage to his
nerves or arteries.
The dive boat operator
was bit on the right arm by
a reef shark Wednesday,
just north of West End,
Bahamas.
One of his doctors said
he's "lucky, very lucky."

Tay cd- aarne


FORT LAUDERDALE
- A Florida man has been
slapped with a 10-year pris-
on sentence for promoting
a tax avoidance scheme
in which people claim
they are sovereigns and
immune from taxation.
Prosecutors said Friday
the sentence was imposed
by a federal judge in Fort
Lauderdale on Michael
D. Beiter Jr. Beiter was
convicted of several tax
charges in an August 2010
trial.
Court documents show
that Beiter sold at least 100
tax avoidance packages
in which people claimed
as sovereign entities they
could avoid ordinary obli-
gations such as paying .
debts and taxes.


Teen arrested for
marijuana cookies
SPLANTATION-A
South Florida teen has
been arrested for allegedly
bringing marijuana-laced
cookies to school.
The student was arrest-
ed Friday and charged
with delivery of a con-
trolled substance near a
school and possession of
marijuana.
Police said the boy
brought two chocolate
chip cookies to school,
sharing one with two other
students. But the school
caught on to the cookies'
contents when one of the
students went to the office,
saying they felt sick.
All three students face
10-day suspensions.


trailer crushes him
HOBE SOUND A
Boynton Beach man is dead
after being crushed by a
trailer while setting up for a
car show.
The Martin County
Sheriffs Office said 61-
year-old Bruce Hemley
was pinned under a 31-foot
trailer and crushed to death
at The Pine School in Hobe
Sound at about noon Friday.
A spokeswoman said
Hemley was trying to dis-
connect the trailer when he
became pinned beneath it
The sheriffs office and
a representative from the
Occupational Safety and
Health Administration are
investigating.

* Associated Press


Lowe experiencing
PARK CITY, Utah
R ob Lowe is shaking
things up in his career
and so far the moves are
paying off.
The 46-year-old has a
new film called "I Melt With You,"
which debuted at the Sundance
Film Festival this past week. He
left the ABC drama "Brothers and
Sisters" last spring and joined NBC's
Thursday-night sitcom "Parks and
Recreation." He also has a guest spot
on the new season of Showtime's
"Californication." And on top of all
that, he's releasing a memoir in May.
"At the moment, I feel really
fulfilled," Lowe said, but is also
aware show business can be a roller
coaster ride. "The thing about a
long career is you go through peri-
ods where you're unfulfilled, you
go through periods where you're Rob Lowe, a ca
hot and you're cold. If you're lucky the 2011 Sundi
enough to stick around, you go
through all of it." of America aw
"I Melt With You," which also almost always
stars Jeremy Piven and Thomas directing prize
Jane, is about a group of guy friends Tom Hoope
who get together for a yearly bond- King's Speech
ing weekend. The trip turns serious Oscars with 12
when they open up and begin to is up for the g
question the way their lives have Darren Arono
unfolded. Christopher N
The film ha received mixed and David 0.1
reviews at Sundance, which Lowe Fighter."
said is fine with him. "So much of
our business today is safe," he said. DempseyI
'"They'll sacrifice quality, humor,
drama, budget, you name it, and of produce
throw it under the bus to add one
more set of eyeballs. This movie PARK CITY
doesn't." Dempsey want
"completely dil
film "Flypaper,
Fincher, Hooper vying of its producer
for Directors Guild prize While promos
Sundance Film
LOS ANGELES The makers "Grey's Anator
of Academy Awards' favorites 'The experience as
Social Network" and "The King's where there w
Speech" were among those compet- to show up." Ir
ing for top honors Saturday night at pushing himse
the Directors Guild Awards in Los zone was a goc
Angeles, one of Hollywood's last "Flypaper,"
prize shows before the Oscars. bank robbery,
"The Social Network" filmmaker and Tim Blak
David Fincher was considered the believes the o0
front-runner for the Directors Guild ence was "ver


highs over latest roles


ASSOCIATED PRESS
ast member in the film '1I Melt with You,' poses for a portrait during
ance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, Wednesday


vards, whose winner
goes on to claim the
e at the Oscars.
r director of "The
," which leads the
2 nominations also
uild honor, along with
fsky for "Black Swan,"
rolan for "Inception"
Russell for "The


takes on role
er in new film
Utah Actor Patrick
ted to do something
fferent" with his new
" so he signed on as one
s.
voting the movie at the
n Festival this week, the
ny" actor described the
sometimes "painful,"
ere days he "didn't want
the end he believes
If outside his comfort
)d thing.
a comedy about a
also stars Ashley Judd
e Nelson. Dempsey
outcome of the experi-
y good" and would


"probably" produce another film in
the future.

'Housewives' has
'grueling' reunion
PARK CITY, Utah For fans
who tuned in to see drama and
catfights during Part 1 of "The
Real Housewives of Beverly Hills"
reunion special on Bravo Thursday
night, one of its cast members said
the final product was edited down
from a long, grueling day of, well
- even more drama and catfights.
On a visit Friday to the Sundance
Film Festival, Adrienne Maloof
recalled it took 15 hours to shoot
the Beverly Hills reunion, which has
been broken into two one-hour parts.
"It was physically grueling, men-
tally draining. When you pack a
whole season into 15 hours you have
to relive everything," she admitted.
The women have had a lot of
rehashing to do, with the season focus-
ing on feuds between Kim and Kyle
Richards and between Kyle Richards
and Camille Grammer. Recent epi-
sodes also featured Camille's marriage
to actor Kelsey Grammer.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Dorothy Malone
is 86.
* Actor Gene Hackman is
81.
* Actress Vanessa Redgrave
is 74.
* Chess grandmaster Boris
Spassky is 74.
* Country singer Jeanne
Pruett is 74.


Daily Scripture


* Country singer Norma
Jean is 73.
* Rhythm-and-blues musi-
cian William King (The'
Commodores) is 62.
* Singer Phil Collins is 60.
* Actor Charles S. Dutton
is 60.
* Actor Christian Bale is 37.
* Actor Jake Thomas is 21.


"Sitting down, Jesus called the
Twelve and said, 'Anyone who
wants to be first must be the
very last, and the servant of
all.'"


Mark 9:35


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 CLASSIFIED
Fax number .............. 752-9400 To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
Circulation ...............755-5445 BUSINESS
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The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of (sbrannon@lakecltyreporter.com)
Community Newspapers Inc., Is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 CIRCULATION
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
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City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or problems with your delivery service.
in part is forbidden without the permis- In Columbia County, customers should
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ADVERTISING 12 Weeks................ $41.40
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(kpeterson@lakecilyreporter.com) 52 Weeks.................. $179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Friday:
1-16-30-34 1


Friday:
4-6-16-27-32


IdU sLamel nl Sl u1
10-year sentence Man dies after


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


pir3V 3 -









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011


RIVER: Itchetucknee's turbidity a serious problem
Continued From Page 1A


Ichetucknee has been an issue with
those wishing to protect the river
for decades. Limits on how many
could tube the river were established
after a report in 1977 that studied
the river's carrying capacity, with
the number initially set at 3,000 in
1978. In 1983, tubing started from
the river's midpoint with 3,000 still
the daily maximum, but just 1,500
from the upper Ichetucknee. That
figure was cut to 750 from the upper
river in 1989.
Last month, Stevenson approached
the Columbia County commissioners
with a resolution, asking their back-
ing to ban tubing from the upper
Ichetucknee. The commissioners
refused, saying there wasn't enough
scientific data to go with the resolu-
tion to support it. They did, how-
ever, say they would send a letter to
the DEP asking for action. Since the
upper Ichetucknee is a state park, the
DEP must make the ruling.


"The report just came out offi-
cially (Friday)," Stevenson said.
"They're the managers, they're in
charge."
The study, Stevenson said, started
last June, the busiest part of the tub-
ing season, and ended in December,
when the season was over, "for com-
parison." It focused on turbidity,
something the 1977 report didn't do
(it's focus, Stevenson said, was the
river's carrying capacity for tubing).
Results from another study taken
from 1983-85 were not computer-
ized and have not been recovered.
The overall effect of increased
turbidity on the river's ecology was
the latest study's aim. It's finding
that diminished water clarity, which
according to the study has hampered
the growth of aquatic plants, should
make this an issue with the DEP
- or so Stevenson hopes.
But the health of the river isn't the
only reason to prohibit tubing from


the north end. Traffic control has
been troublesome, he said, although
finding official records to support
the claim is difficult.
"There's more to this," he said.
"Public safety is an issue. There
have been traffic problems."
He added state money spent on
shuttle buses that take tubers from
one end of the river to the other
could be saved. And since the daily
number of tubers would not change,
revenue could actually increase with
more people canoeing and kayaking
on the upper Ichetucknee.
"We could reduce expenditures
and increase revenue," Stevenson'
said. "It's a win-win situation."
And yet, he was not anticipat-
ing any action to be taken prior to
Memorial Day, the start of heavy
tubing on the river.
"It doesn't look hopeful," he said.
"I don't expect anything to happen
this year."


EPIPHANY: Celebrates Catholic Schools Week


CHAMBER: Inaugral Ball
Continued From Page 1A


improve the budget and
better serve both the cham-
ber members and the com-
munity.
"We're looking to the
future and we want you to
help us for the future," he
said.
Jim Stevenson was rec-
ognized for his dedica-
tion and devotion to pro-
tecting the Ichetucknee
Springs for more than 20
years. John Wheeler of The
Ichetucknee Partnership
presented Stevenson with
a watercolor painting of the
springs by Gainesville art-
ist Annie Pais.
Retiring chamber direc-
tors Charlene Brown, Brad
Wheeler and Lee Ann Hires
were also recognized.
Dennille Folsom,
Chamber executive direc-
tor, said the organization
chose to have its annual
meeting with the inau-


gural Chamber Ball as a
celebration of the com-
munity.
Despite the economy,
Folsom said the Chamber
held 20 ribbon-cuttings for
new or expanding business-
es in 2010 and has held six
ribbon-cuttings thus far in
2011.
"We wanted to celebrate
the positive things we do
have," she said.
The Chamber Ball was
planned as a commemorative
occasion, which it turned out
to be, Folsom said.
"The atmosphere and the
vibe in the room is happi-
ness and positive and that's
what we were hoping to
accomplish tonight," she
said.
"We hope that this will
lay the foundation for years
to come and that we can
build upon this,". Folsom
said.


Continued From Page 1A


today and ending Friday.
Organized by the
National Catholic Education
Association and themed
"Catholic Schools are A+
for America," the week will
be celebrated by Catholic
schools across the country,
said Rita Klenk, Epiphany
principal and teacher.
"The message that we're
trying to deliver is that
Catholic schools provide
A+ service to the nation,"
Klenk said. "The strong
academic and moral foun-
dation they (students)
receive while they're
young from attending a
catholic school has been
proven in statistics in that
it enhances their success
later in life both in their
chosen career fields as
well as their service to
community and country."
Events and activities
Epiphany will hold orga-
nized by Klenk, student
representatives arid the
student council will cele-
brate the contributions the
school has received from
parents, grandparents,
teachers, the student body
and both religious and
community leaders, Klenk
said. The events will also
give the school a chance to
return those contributions,
she said.
"I think that this week
really on a local level is
our dedication and commit-
ment to continually giving
back to the community,"
Klenk said.


TEACHER
From Page 1A
four years of teaching
experience. Robinson is
certified in elementary
education for grades kin-
dergarten through six.
Kay Osteen-Green,
a fourth grade elemen-
tary education teacher at
Melrose Park Elementary,
with five years of teaching
experience.
Trevor Tyler, a
10th through 12th grade
marine science teacher at
Columbia High, with seven
and a half years of teaching
experience.
Margie Pollock, a third
grade elementary educa-
tion teacher at Westside
Elementary, with 20 years
of teaching experience.
Malinda Cembruch,
a second grade elemen-
tary education teacher at
Columbia City Elementary.
She is also certified in
Educating Students of
Other Languages and to
teach reading for grades
kindergarten through 12.
Cembruch has been teach-
ing for 15 years.
Veronica Bennett,
who serves as the educa-
tional media specialist for
grades pre-kindergarten
through five at Pinemount
Elementary. She has 12
years of teaching experi-
ence and is certified in
elementary education,
early childhood education
and ESOL.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Epiphany eighth-grader Justin Torres (center) jokes with
Sister Chaneparambil and classmate Scott Willis, 12.


Daily activities include
holding a penny battle to
raise funds for Catholic
Charities; holding appre-
ciation days for parents,
grandparents, students
and teachers; and collect-
ing new or gently used
shoes at the school to
donate to Soles4Souls, an
organization that will give
the shoes to needy people
worldwide.
Epiphany's involvement
in Catholic Schools Week
will focus on thanking the
community.


"It isn't a week of
events," Klenk said. "It's
really about ways that we


BELKCOM


bCe


can extend that 'thank
you' to our community."
"We're celebrating that
we're 50 years and count-
ing in this community
and going strong," she
said, "providing a faith-
filled environment and an
academically challenging
education. Ultimately, our
gratitude goes out to our
church parish because
they provide so much of
our support, but also to
our local community of
business owners because
they've been so generous
over the years to our non-
profit."


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


i


' I














OPINION


Sunday, January 30, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR
OPINION


No overnight

RV parking

issue deserves

discussion

Perhaps, as a com-
munity, we should
rethink this "no RV
overnight parking
ordinance" that has
exploded across North America
into a firestorm of negative pub-
licity about Lake City.
Those in power should listen
to the criticism and think this
issue through.
Yes, there's a "no overnight
parking allowed" ordinance on
the city's books that prohibits
big trucks and RVs from park-
ing on commercial lots for the
purpose of sleeping overnight
Until recently, it wasn't marked
with signs or enforced at
Walmart. Walmart has a nation-
al RV-friendly policy that allows
RVs to stay overnight, provided
it's within the guidelines of its
host city's ordinance.
: Recently, the issue was
pushed and signs proclaiming
the ordinance were posted on
poles at Walmart. That's all it
took. Visiting RV patrons saw
the signs and lit up Internet
bulletin boards, blogs and RV
user group Web communities,
and the Lake City Reporter
with accusations about how
unfriendly Lake City is. We
all know that's unfair and inac-
curate, but with what you read
on the Internet, you usually get
a pinch of fact and a pound of
fiction. The problem remains,
credible or not, the words on-
line float around forever with
very little accountability.
Regardless, our community
suddenly has a perception prob-
lem among some in the RV
community. Should we care?
Tourism officials and govern-
ment leaders must decide if
the threatened RV avoidance
of Lake City equates to a size-
able amount of lost sales tax
revenue.
Don't blame city officials
for this issue ballooning. The
age-old ordinance is on the
books and if an ordinance is on
the books, then it's the city's
responsibility to support it and
enforce it. The city now has
several options.
We believe the first question
that deserves a discussion point
is this: Is the ordinance worth
it?

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


LETTERS


TO


THE EDITOR


Overnight parking ordinance



results in much reaction


EDITOR'S NOTE: These
are among the several responses
we have received regarding the
enforcement of a city ordinance
banning overnight parking for rec-
reational vehicles at Walmart. As
always, your opinion is welcome.

Will bypass Lake City
in all trips to Florida
To the Editor:
We travel by RV quite fre-
quently when my wife, who's
stationed at Andrew's Air Force
Base in Maryland, has leave
or an extended weekend. We
tend to stay at military fam-
ily campgrounds, Corps of
Engineer campgrounds, and
sometimes privately-run
campgrounds. The last is a
lesser option because most are
not well kept, have poor ratings
and seem to seek high dollars.
On the way, we usually rest
overnight (six hours or so) in
Walmart parking lots or other
friendly OP sites. Most of the
businesses recognize that
though we might not spend
the dollars we do at our des-
tination, we always visit the
store for numerous items we
seem to need. Are you aware
that Walmart is one of the few
nationwide department stores
with a dedicated RV section?
It- is my understanding that
Lake City is now enforcing a
10-year-old ordinance against
overnight parking at the Lake
City Walmart. I want to inform
you, we will be bypassing Lake
City in all our trips to Florida
this spring. I have campsites
reserved further south and will
seek another stop to rest and
resupply along the way.
David "B" Bernheim
Andrews Air Force Base,
Maryland

Sign affects image of
entire county
To the Editor:
I have mixed feelings about
the city ordinance prohibiting *
RVs from overnight stays at
Walmart. First, the city will be
enforcing an ordinance that
will take work from policemen
who will be better doing some-
thing else in 'the city.
Second, we will be getting
more bad publicity than any
good that we can get by prevent-
ing someone that is passing by
from camping one night at any
public place. Yes, I know that
some "progressive" cities have
ordinances that prohibit "camp-
ing" in their cities, but, if they
do, RVers take their business
elsewhere. Those cities show
up in every RV publication and
newsletter as being "anti-RV."
Are we headed that way,
can you hear John Doe say-
ing, "Don't stop in Lake City,
Florida, they don't like RVs?"
You see, something like this
affects not only the city but the
whole county image.
Third, it is another loss of
freedom from doing as we wish
to do, just another regulation.
The regulation will also hurt
some stores, like Walmart and
restaurants in the area, from
getting a little more revenue.
I think that we lose more than
we gain with this regulation.
Jose Tepedino
Lake City

Will spend money
elsewhere, not in LC
To the Editor:
I have spent more than 200
nights away from home in my
RV in the last year. I frequent-
ly stop overnight at Walmarts
while traveling from one place
to the other, but go to a camp-
ground for weeks at a time
when I reach my destination.
Every time I stay at a Walmart,
I shop there, find a place to eat
in that town, get gas, grocery
shop and get vehicle repairs.
Staying at a campground


doesn't make sense when all
one needs is a place to sleep;
especially when it can be a has-
sle going to one. They may be
hard to find, have erratic qual-
ity, may be closed after hours,
have cranky or rude staff, and
are usually pricey. I've been
in areas where motels have a
similar rate. I could stay at a
motel but I'm self-contained
and my bed has my own uncon-
taminated-by-bed-bugs linen.
Why should I pay $30 or more
to get off the road for 10 hours
at a campground? Your local
campgrounds charge around
$30-$40 a night with tax. There
are lists online giving Watlmart
locations and whether over-
night parking is allowed.
Ninety-five percent of the time,
when it is not allowed, it is due
to a local ordinance usually ini-
tiated by campground owners.
Bottom line is, if a town has
no overnight parking, I drive
right by and spend my money
elsewhere.
Carl Buick
Wenatchee, WA

Difficult to maneuver
into campground
To the Editor:
I understand you are writing
a story on overnight parking by
RV owners at Walmart. As an
RV owner I wanted to give you
my perspective. We live in South
Carolina and make a trip to Fort
Meyers four times each year. We
always stop in Lake City along
the way and spend the night at
the Walmart. While there, we
always buy groceries and sup-
plies, fuel our coach, eat break-
fast at a local restaurant and of
course, shop at Walmart.
We typically arrive late at
night so staying in a camp-
ground is not an option. It's too
difficult for us to maneuver into
a campground slot after dark
and they are usually closed at
our arrival time.
The hassle of hooking up elec-
tric, water, and other hookups
at that late hour isn't worth the
effort. Since we make the round
trip four times each year, we stay
and shop in your city eight times
each year.
Walmart is easy to find, well
lit, and they never close. Rain
or shine, it's easy to find their
lot and and stop. I belong to an
RV club in my area, many of the
members stop in your city while
traveling to Florida, I can assure
none of them will be coming
your way anymore.
I will spend extra money to
avoid your town now because
obviously I am not welcome.
Larry Rhodes
Fort Mill, SC

Won't be stopping in
Lake City to stay
Dear Editor:
Just to let you know that I
have just learned about the
placement of No Overnight
Parking (signs) in the local
Walmart parking lot.
You will be happy to know that
I will not be stopping anywhere
in Lake City to spend any money
and I will request that any per-
son who is a friend of mine do
the same.
If your town is going to be
unfriendly to long distance trav-
ellers I/we are going to vote
against you with our wallets.
Want our money, open the
parking lot. Simple as that.
Gary Campbell
Tampa

Full-time RVer will
bypass Lake City
To the Editor:
In response to the "No
Camping" article in your news-
paper on Jan. 28, I'd like to
pass on a few comments.
My wife and I are full time RV
users, having retired in 1994. I am
the group owner of an internet
discussion group on overnight


parking at Walmart. The group
membership is currently over
6,000 members and growing.
When campground owners
see RVs in the Walmart park-
ing lot, they apparently feel
they are missing that many
paid users of their camp-
ground. Wrong! If the RVs
had to move, 95 to 99 percent
of them would not move to a
commercial campground. They
would continue down the road.
In summary, as a member of
our group said some time ago,
the Walmart parking lot is easy
to find, close to the major high-
way, the entry is well-illuminat-
ed, the office is always open,
all of the sites are pull-through,
the lot is decently level and
usually has night security. If we
need some travel supplies, the
store is always open. That's all
we need for a night's rest.
Many RV users feel as we
do, we will take our money to
another community that does
not have parking restrictions.
Thank you for letting me
respond to the article in
Friday's paper.
Gene Teggatz
From the road

Thought Florida
welcomed RVers
To the Editor:
We are a family of four
from Ontario, Canada. We are
taking our family on a RV trip
to Florida this spring. I have
been researching on the various
forums to get more information
on ONP (overnight parking)
at Walmart. We choose to do
Walmart because how friendly
they are in Ontario to RVers. It
is very discouraging to see that
Lake City is so against ONE I
did do a satellite check on the
campgrounds in the area and
most look scary and reviews
aren't very appetizing either.
Why would I want to spend $30-
$50 to stay at a campground
to have dinner, go to sleep, eat
breakfast and leave (10 hrs.).
Lake City was one of the
last ONP on our route, then we
were going to stay at a camp-
ground a little further south for
a couple of days before making
our way back home. We had
aways heard that, in the past,
Florida rolled out the welcome
mat for RVers, but I am hear-
ing it's become a thing of the
past. For now, we will just move
on to the next Walmart that does
allow ONEP.
Jim and Laurena Boyse
Ontario, Canada

Full-time travelers
bypassing Lake City
To the Editor:
We travel full time in a
motorhome. When we visit an
area,we stay a day or a month,
depending on hospitality,
weather and scenery. While we
might stay one night at Walmart,
anything longer will be in an Rv
park. However,we will NOT stay
or buy anything in a city that dis-
criminates against RVers. Also,
are semitrucks allowed to park
all night at Walmart? Thanks for
your non-hospitality.
Lloyd Jackson
Livingston, Texas

Don't ruck stops
allow overnights?
To the Editor:
I just want to inform you
that Lake City's policy of no
overnight RV stays at Walmart
makes no sense. Almost all
truck stops (like Flying J, etc.),
Kmart, Cracker Barrel all allow
overnight parking. In addition,
Walmart allows semi-trailers
to park and stop overnight (a
safety and economic benefit).
Also, there is a direct economic
benefit to Walmart because most
RVers buy their dinner from
the store rather than set up and


cook. There is no electric or
hook up's provided so Walmart
benefits from most who stop
for a quick overnight and a
meal. The reason this works is
because there is no set up, just
pull in, stay and leave in the am,
Simple!! Walmart is not the
only company catering to RVers
but if Lake City wants RVers to
move on and not spend money
in its town, this is the way to
accomplish it. Some RVer
groups will boycott the camp-
grounds and cities that support
this kind of targeted legislation
and move on. I know we will
and my wife and I stop in Lake
City each return trip during our
summer travels.
Jim Seeley
On the road

Stayed in Lake City
before, but not again
To the Editor:
Just thought we would let
you know that we have stopped
in Lake City a number of times
in the past, staying at Oaks '.n
Pines RV Park. During that time
we have patronized local stores
and restaurants.
After reading about the RV
unfriendly attitude of your city
we will find some other town to
stop in the next time we come
through the area.
FYI (for your information), we
do utilize Walmart occasionally
when we come in off the road
late in the evening and are leav-
ing early the next morning.
Why not enforce an ordinance
that allows quicky overnight
stops, but not extended ones?
Gee, I guess that would require
judgement on the part of some
public servant and we all know
they are much more comfort-
able with "no tolerance" type of
rules eliminates the need for
thinking.
Dennis Murphy
Nancy Beck
Somewhere on the Road

Forums are getting
word about Lake City
To the Editor:
I was just directed to the
recent article in your newspaper
(Jan. 28th) regarding the enforce-
ment of no parking at the local
Walmart in Lake City. I was
sent the link to your article after
reading one of the larger RVing
forums on the Internet
I am a member of FMCA,
Escapees, and the Good Sam
groups. I will do my best to
spread the "word" about the short
sighted decision by your City's
council concerning this matter.
I will urge every RVer I come in
contact with to bypass Lake City,
FL and continue on to a more RV
friendly town and/or city. NONE
of my money will be spent in Lake
City in the future.
Steve Fischer
On the road

Hotel cheaper to stay
at than campground
To the Editor:
This is to inform Lake City
that the word is out about the
new RV laws in place, which are
absurd. It's cheaper to stay at a
hotel than an RV park. This is
just a ploy for more money to go
to the RV park owners.
As far as the Walmart,
I stopped shopping at any
Walmart that has these no camp-
ing signs. It's just a matter of
time before they will feel the
impact of these boycotts. I will
not be staying anywhere near
Lake City, keeping those dol-
lars for more RV friendly towns.
Also, remember how many
people are out of work and have
no where else to stay. Shame on
you who enforce it. This country
is going to the dogs!
James Sackaris
Rockville Center, New York


4A










Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011


FACES AND PLACES


Deborah Hill and Jake Hill.


The Lake City Chamber of
Commerce hosted is first-ever
Chamber Ball Saturday, in
conjunction with its annual
meeting. The Ball sold
out two weeks in advance,
drawing a packed house.


Photos by Leanne Tyo
Lake City Reporter


Jessica Davis and Kyle Dcks


Jamie Mott (left) and Marjorie Carmichael.


Matt Vann (from left), Paula Vann, Jennie Vann and Paul
Vann.


Patricia Stuart and Greg Stuart.


Lane Briscoe and Charles Briscoe.


Debbie Osborne and Steve Osborne. Sandy Thompson and Jeff Thompson.


Sunday, January;
Bake Sale and stud

Monday, January
Penny Battle begin
Catholic Charities

Tuesday, February
Parent/Grandparen
Parents and/or Gra
lunch with their ch
K-3rd grade will eat f
4th-8th grade will ea

Wednesday, Febn
Student Appreciatio
Students will be all
clothes.


Catholic Schools Week Schedule Epiphany Catholic School
30 Bingo and other games will be played in the Social Hall at
lents will be speaking at all Masses. 11:00am

31st Thursday, February 31d
s. All funds collected will be donated to Teacher Appreciation Day

Friday, February 41*
y 1t Mass Day
t Appreciation Day Students may change into red shirts and jeans after Mass
ndparents are invited to come and eat to kick off Heart Health Month & Jump Rope for Heart
ild.
from 11:00am-11:30am Other Activities Include:
t from 11:30am-12:00pm Collecting new or gently used shoes the entire week to be
donated to Soles4Souls. Students are also encouraged to donate
wary 2n $1 toward the organization.
on Day Several classes will be involved in cleaning up the Stations of
lowed to wear appropriate dress down the Cross are behind school.


Helping Dreams Come True...
One Smile at a Time


701 SW SR 47 Lake City, FL 32025
ORTHODONTICS
CELIA MARTIN, D.M.D



DI















S4 DENNIS CONKLIN



Electrical Contractor
Lirened & Insured EC 13003800
S Residential & Commercial
,w, f Remodels Power Poles.
Service Changes. Additions. Rewiring,.
SGenerator Hook-Ups, Trenching Available



ALL TYPES OF SEWING
ALTERATIONS & REPAIRS
UNIQUE GIFTS
Yvonne McRae
132 SE Hernando Ave
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 755-49(1 7 36
5(386) 266-7246
Across romn Lake City Museum


Top Reasons to Choose Catholic Schools

In challenging economic times, why should parents choose a
Catholic education for their children? NCEA President Karen
Ristau asked, the sixty members of NCEA's various department
executive committees to give us answers. Take these reasons
and tailor them to fit your school and be proactive in letting
parents know the outstanding education your institution offers
in both faith and academics.
Catholic elementary and high schools offer:
Catholic tradition and academic excellence in a
community grounded in a common faith
A balanced curriculum including art and music
Learning with a moral purpose educating students
to serve others and develop leadership
A high graduation rate (99%)
Strong preparation for further education
A safe and disciplined environment
Exceptional faculty who help students reach their
highest potential
Good stewardship of resources
The NCEA offers many resources to help educators manage
issues such as enrollment, staffing, tuition, strategic planning,
board development and fundraising. More information is
available in the Institutional Services area of our Web site:
http://www.ncea.org/services/index.asp.
The NCEA, founded in 1904, is a professional membership
organization that provides leadership, direction and service
to fulfill the evangelizing, catechizing and teaching mission of
the church. NCEA members include elementary schools, high
schools, parish religious education programs and seminaries.




John Kasak CLU CPCU, Agent
... 904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy
Lake City, FL 32025
Bus: 386-752-7521





MERCANTILE BANK


1 60 NW Main Blvd, Lake City, Florida


E EYE CENTER of NorthFlorida EyeExams
SGeneral Eye Care & Surgery
Dr. Eduardo M. Bedoya yeglass
Ophthalmologist Sunglasses
Dr. Patricia L. Bailey Contact Lenses
Optometrist
386-755-7595 CMtmactSurgely
Toll Free 866-755-0040
876 SW State Road 247 Glaucoma








0 FOODTORES












Sid Thompson
Financial Advisor

www.edwardjones.comn ,.i ,i\ ?"
846 SW Baya Dr.
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 752-3545 .ni


i ,/:


/ : / .)

Dr.: 7rriAndrews and Dr. Lorrie Wheeler
(386) 752-3043 272 SW Bentley Place, Lake City, FL
We accept cash, Visa, Mastercard, American Evpress, Discover, Care Credit


6> /


.......


C. I-FTQlsLIg:









I fhr A 1 AMI n


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LUV~ ML O& VVI./LL/ SUNDAY, JAN



Egypt's president names deputy


By HAMZA HENDAWI
Associated Press


CAIRO With protests
raging, President Hosni
Mubarak named his intel-
ligence chief as his first-ever
vice president on Saturday-
setting the stage for a suc-
cessor as demands for the
longtime leader's ouster
showed no sign of abating.
The death toll rose from five
days of anti-government pro-
tests rose sharply to 74.
The capital descended fur-
ther into chaos, with gangs
of thugs setting fires and
looting shops and homes.
Residents and shopkeepers
in affluent neighborhoods
were boarding up their hous-
es and stores against the
looters roaming the streets
with knives and sticks and
gunfire was heard in some
,neighborhoods.
Tanks and armored per-
sonnel carriers fanned out
across the city of 18 million,
guarding key government


N 1.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
An Egyptian anti-government activist kisses an Egyptian
army officer, center back, in Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt,
Saturday.


buildings. Egyptian televi-
sion reported the army was
deploying reinforcements to
neighborhoods to try to con-
trol the lawlessness.
The military was protect-
ing major tourist and archae-
ological sites such as the
Egyptian Museum, home to
some of the country's most
treasured antiquities, as well
as the Cabinet building. The


military closed the pyramids
on the outskirts of Cairo
- Egypt's premiere tourist
site.
Thousands of protest-
ers defied the curfew for
the second night, standing
their ground in the main
Tahrir Square in a resound-
ing rejection of Mubarak's
attempt to hang onto power
with promises of reform and


a new government
Police protecting the
Interior Ministry near the
site opened fire at a funer-
al procession for a dead
protester as it was passing
through the crowd, possi-
bly because it came too
close to the force. Clashes
broke out and at least two
people were killed.
A 43-year-old teacher,
Rafaat Mubarak, said the
appointment of the presi-
dent's intelligence chief and
longtime confidant Omar
Sulieman as vice president
did not satisfy the protest-
ers.
"This is all nonsense.
They will not fool us any-
more. We want the head
of the snake," he said in
the Mediterranean port
city of Alexandria. "If he
is appointed by Mubarak,
then he is just one more
member of the gang. We
are not speaking about a
branch in a tree, we are
talking about the roots."


In turnabout,

Dems say GOP has

dropped job focus


CHARLES BABINGTON
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Republicans won dozens
of elections last fall after
claiming Democrats had
focused too little on creat-
ing jobs. Now GOP law-
makers stand accused of
the same charge, using
their new House major-
ity to push to repeal the
president's health care law,
restrict abortions and high-
light other social issues
important to their most
conservative supporters.
Republican leaders say
they have a jobs agenda,
kicked off by their attempt
to unravel what they call
the Democrats' "jobs-kill-
ing" health overhaul.
Democrats scoff at this
notion, and they're hound-


ing Republicans to show
how they can put more
people to work.
"It's astonishingto mehow
tone-deaf the Republicans
have been in the first weeks
of the session," said Rep.
Jim McGovern, D-Mass.
"They've talked about
everything but jobs."
Few were surprised
when House Republicans
moved quickly and voted
to overturn the law, but
the Democratic-controlled
Senate will block that
effort.
Heads turned when
Speaker John Boehner, R-
Ohio, presented the next
item on the agenda: writ-
ing into law a perennially
renewed ban on federal
dollars for abortion, and
to specify that it applies to
health plans.


OBITUARIES


Mrs. Theda Holcomb DeVoe


Otto of Lake City and her gra
children, Tammy Gainey (Rya


Mrs. Theda- Holcomb DeVoe, Todd Carter (Carrie), Rich
91, of Lake City, passed away "Ritch" DeVoe (Tammy)
peacefully on Friday, January 28, Karen (Don) Bailey. Eight gre
2011, at the Haven Hospice ofthe grandchildren also survi
Suwannee Valley following an Funeral services for Mrs. De
extended illness. A native of Ap- will be conducted at 11:00 A.
pleton. Wisconsin, Mrs. DeVoe on Monday, January 31. 2011
had been a resident of Lake City the chapel of the Dees-Parr
_for the past twenty years having Family Funeral Home with R
moved here from Englewood Dusty Bailey officiating. Ini
Beach, Florida. She moved to ment will follow at 2:00 P.M
Miami, Florida from Wisconsin the Forest Meadows Cemet
in 1957. She was a homemaker Central location on 39th Aver
and a 25 year member of the in Gainesville. Florida. The fa
Order of the Eastern Star. Mrs. ily will receive friends for
DeVoe was a past member of the hour prior to the funeral serve
Lake City American Legion Post on Monday. In lieu of flowers
d';7 and the American Legion family requests that memo]
n's Auxiliary. In her spare donations be made to the I lav
Irs. DeVoe enjoyed paint- Hospice of the Suwannee V
ing and walking on the beach but ley 6037 U.S. Highway 90 We
her -favorite time was that spent Lake City, FL 32055. Arran
with her grandchildren and her ments are under the direct
great-grandchildren. Mrs. De- of the DEES-PARRISH FA
Voe was of the Methodist faith ILY FUNERAL HOME, 4
and was preceded in death by her S. Marion Ave., Lake City,
husband, William F. DeVoe Jr. 32025 752-1234 please sign c
Mrs. DeVoe is survived by her on-line family guestbook at iw
children, Richard "Rik" DeVoe parrishflnoil/iineraiilhon.c
(Barbara) .-,I ..: ill. Pl'6idaf" ;
and Debi Carter (Chet) of Lake Mrs. Virginia Ellen Vaughn
City, Florida; her sister, Clarice Graham


nd-
an),
ard
and
eat-
ve.
Voe
.M.
in
rish
.ev.
ter-
. in
ery
nue
im-
one
ice
the
rial
Nen
val-
est,
ge-
ion
M-
458
FL

omn


Mrs. Virginia Ellen Vaughn
Graham, 77, of rural Columbia
County, passed away Saturday
morning at her residence due to
complications from Parkinson's
Disease. Mrs. Graham was born
in Alachua County March 2,
1933, to Samuel E. and Myrtle
Malphurs Vaughn. She lived
most of her life in Columbia
County. She was a retired tele-
phone operator with Southern
Bell and a homemaker. Mrs.
Graham was a member of Provi-
dence Baptist Church. She was
predeceased by her parents; a
sister, Joanna V. Green; a great
grandson, Bryce Patrick Gay.
Mrs. Graham is survived by her
husband of 58 years, Nevin W.
Graham Sr. of rural Columbia
County; one daughter, Dwayne
(husband Michael) Bestoso of
Lake City; two sons, Nevin W.
Graham, Jr. and Kevin E. (wife
Donna) Graham, all of Lake
City; six grandchildren, Shauna
Molchan, Lindsey Graham, Ja-
mic Graham, Sierra Graham,
Adam Graham and Christoper
Norris; and three great grand-
children, Kaylec Molchan,
Macy I winter and I lydee Norris.


'**; .." ";'' . ..... "" ^ .-"-'-
r ----- '-- - -- ----- -- -- --------.--- 4
SSPECIAL- BRING IN A PARTNER ,

2 for the price of 1 ,
I OFFER GOOD IHRU 2-1,-11 WITH THI AD \ DD \ FAMILY MEMBER FOR JL'ST '2(1 I
.--- ------ - - : --- -" :---- -- ----- ---- '-
,, ,. .. .


/-


/
'di
4


"..
,,-,S,.. .*


A.F.F.C



4578 SV Herilage Oak Circle, Suite 102
Lake City, FLt 2024 i.tartedm inthe Fx liin Plazal
(386) 438-5703


R I ILS11I 1r i ni l i d tid

t n urn iiial~liin
%L! Urt ,1 1


ut %%ni I lien
I IIV, .is.111.11IiL'
(,r'niiuIxindl ( rln-1.1Iu


I tii,l'i kurnH.r ihll sI
koi-' u ii .11'd I l


Accepting New Patients
Specializing in adult medical care including.
S* Primary Care Ardiritis
S* High Blood Pressure Low Back Pain
* Heart Disease Full Dizziness,
* lung Disea.se vertigo and balance
* Gastrointestinal diagnosis and
* High Cholesterol treatment
* Diabetes Optifast' Weight
* Women's Health Loss System
Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance
plans aL.epted, worker compensationn
.......5


Funeral services will be held at
11 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 1 at the
Philippi Baptist Church in Co-
lumbia County. Burial will fol-
low at Philippi Cemetery. Archer
Funeral Home of Lake Butler is


in charge of arrangements. The
family will receive friends at
ARCHER FUNERAL HOME
from 6-8 p.m. In lieu of flowers
donations may be made to Haven
HospiceorGideonsInternational.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


High Springs' Newest
' a s Assisted Living Community


Enjoy a carefree lifestyle for one all inclusive monthly rate!
* Beautiful studio apartments Medication supervision
* Gracious lounges Library Nurse on staff
* Chef- nreared meals served Emeoreonw Call cstem


restaurant-style
* Art, music and pet therapy
* Beauty/Barber salon
* Patio and gardens
* Activity and exercise programs


Assis






Senior Living Residence


On site Home Health Care
*Housekeeping and
laundry services
Social events, cultural outings
And much, much more!


'ted Living Senior Day Program Short-Term Stays
Assisted Living Facility License # Pending
201 NE 1st Avenue
High Springs, FL 32643

(386) 243-2022
HighSpringsSeniorLiving.com,


The Columbia County Tobacco Free
Partnership and the Columbia County
Health Department have come together
to form a partnership in order to create a
fre tobacco free community. This year, the
C Cf partnership is focusing on polices that
OO 11 effect our youth. We are working to-
wards developing 100% tobacco free
schools. Please come join us and help
protect our youth.
All community members, service
workers, and school aged youth...are in-
vited to attend.


Columb^iaCounty

Tobacco, Free Pa rtnerIship


Event: Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership
Meeting
When: Wednesday, February 2, 2011
Where: Central School Board Office Room 153
372 West Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055
Time: 1:30-2:30pm


All partnership meetings are open to the public.
For more information on how to become involved
in you local Tobacco Free Partnership, please
contact:
Kyle Roberts
Columbia County Health Department
386-754-7083 or Kyle_Roberts@doh.state.fl.us.


-


HEALTH


--


UARY 30, 2011


f









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Bridal show
Your Perfect Day
Bridal Show is at noon
until 4 p.m. today at the
Holiday Inn & Suites.
Vendors include The
Rose Mary Catering
Company, David's Bridal,
Dream Day Cakes, Lake
City Florist and Design,
Joye's Gems & Things,
and more. The event will
:'feature door prizes, com-
.plimentary food tasting,
.and cash bar. Advance
ticket prices are $5; day
of event, $7. Tickets
can be purchased at the
Holiday Inn & Suites,
213 SW Commerce Dr.
Call Theresa Lastinger at
(386) 754-1411.


Tuesday
Opening ceremony
Black History 2011
opening ceremony
is 6 p.m. Tuesday at
Richardson Community
Center. The event is spon-
sored by It's About My
Efforts. The month-long
theme is "Self Sufficiency
is Key." Visit www.itsabout-
myefforts.org or call 386-
.697-6075 for details.

Grand opening
The grand open-
ing of the new Remote
Control Track is 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday at the Southside
Recreation Complex.
There will be a ribbon cut-
ting and demonstrations of
RC vehicles.

MADDfest meeting
MADDfest meeting
is 6 p.m. Tuesday at
the Columbia County
Public Library. The


Farm Bureau delivers cabbage plants to stuck
The Columbia County Farm Bureau Board of Directors, together with their families
and in conjunction with Bonnie Plants, delivered cabbage plants to every third-grad
in Columbia County approximately 1,000 of them on Jan. 1J. Bonnie Plants v
share the love of vegetable gardening and will award a $1,000 scholarship with this


to one student from each state.
two-day event is March
25 and 26. MADDFEST
Spring Arts Festival
is at Olustee Park. All
arts-and-crafts booths,
food vendors will sur-
round the park fac-
ing the main stage
gazebo. Contact Tony@
MADDFEST.com or
386-965-9256.

Wednesday
Newcomers luncheon
The February
Friendship Luncheon of
the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends is 11:30
a.m. Wednesday at the
Porterhouse Grill, located
at 894 S.W. Main Blvd..
All members, guests and
friends are welcome. Call
438-8100 or 754-7227.


Thursday
Zumba Atomic Class
The Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
invite you to Zumba
Atomic Class for children
beginning Thursday at
Teen Town from 5:30 p.m.
to 6:15 p.m. Zumba Atomic
is the newest class in exer-
cising for children ages
7-12 years, meant to be a
fun way to burn fat, tone
and sculpt bodies. The
cost is $30 per month, per
student. Contact Zumba
Atomic instructor Sarah
Sandlin at sjsandlin@yahoo.
corn or Heyward Christie
at 386-754-3607.


Saturday
Youth Talent Explosion
Black History 2011 Youth


Location is everything. 4br/4ba 4br/3ba brick home w/large Gorgeous 4br/3ba TWMP with
home located near school, bank- screened in front/back porches, many extras. Looks brand new
ing and shopping. Large rooms screened in-ground pool, 4 stall w/fireplace, screened porch, new
w/closets, 2 fireplaces, cozy detached carport w/loft on 5 ac unit, new carpet, eat in kitchen
sun room, 2 AC units, 2 water and 4 landscaped & fenced acres.
heaters, 2 car garage and large acres of pure beauty w/grand- $119,000 #72654
Quonset building w/concrete daddy oaks. $249,900 #72440
floor. $175,000. #75915


Price reduced
home in Old
floor plan an
#68421
Priced to sel
wannee Rive
Just a little TLC needed to make for only $6,00
this charmer a keeper. 3/1 with
real pine paneling all warm and Buildable cit
cozy in the dining & living rooms, high school it
screened in side porch, carport $17, 000 #768
on 2 city lots. Priced to sell at
$75,000 # 76002

3 acre lot close to Withlacoochee River. Old
trees wllots of wildlife $16,000 #69372
.83 acre lot in the town of Mayo for only $12,500.
#74310
5 acre flag lot off CR132 $35,000 #76924


Bring your horses and move in on
the 12 acre farm with a spacious
4/2 mfg home with front & back
porches. Very comfortable coun-
try setting. $129,900 #74086


Pretty 4 acres in O'Brien w/well, septic, power
pole and lots of trees $35,000 #76354
5 acre flag lot. off CR250 for only $12,500
#70342
Commercial lots on US90 beginning at $275,000.
#76691


Talent Explosion i
4 p.m. Saturday at
Park. The event w
lowed by the Mov
4-8 p.m. Both eve
sponsored by It's.
Efforts. The mont
theme is "Self Suf
is Key." Visit www.
myefforts.org or ca
6075.


MLK Parade
The annual MLK
;;" Parade is 10 a.m. Saturday
starting at DOT. The
parade is sponsored by
the Northeast Florida
Leadership Council.

Annual Celebration
The West Virginia
Natives' annual WV Day
celebration is at noon
Saturday. The festivities
take place at Epiphany
Church located at 1905
SW Epiphany Court. All
attendees should bring
a covered dish of their
favorite "Hillbilly" food to
share. RSVP no later than
Courtesy photo Sunday by contacting 386-

Jents 754-1760.
and staff Sweetheart Dance
e student The Columbia County
Nants to Women's Club, located
3 program at 655 NE Martin Luther
King Street, presents a
Sweetheart Dance from
is noon to 8 p.m. to midnight on
Olustee Saturday. Tickets are
vill be fol- $10 per person, and
ie Festival hors'd'oeu'vres will be
nts are served throughout the
About My evening. Contact Lynda
h-long Gail (Caldwell) Elliot at
ficiency 867-6600. Contact Eddie
v.itsabout- McKenzie at 623-1714 for
l 386-697- membership opportunities.


Dr. Guy S. Strauss, D.O.,FAC.O.I
Board Certified Internal Medicine
Board Certified Critical Care
Allison B. Baris, A.R.N.P


Monday, Feb. 7
Tae Kwan Do
The Lake City
Recreation Department is
resuming the popular Tae
Kwan Do classes begin-
ning Monday, Feb. 7.
These classes will meet on
Monday and Wednesday
nights from 7 p.m. to 8
p.m. at Teen Town and
are open to anyone ages
8 and above. Teresa and
Jeff Foster, Tae Kwan Do
instructors, will teach all
classes and the cost is
$40 per month. For more
information or to regis-
ter, please call Heyward
Christie at 386-754-3607.


Wednesday, Feb. 9
Newcomers Regular
Meeting
The regular meeting of
the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends is 11 a.m.
Feb. 9 at Quail Heights
Country Club, on Branford
Highway. Luncheon costs
$10. The program for'
this month will be Patriot
Music by the Reflections.
All members, guests and
friends are .welcome. For
more information, please
call 752-4552 or 755.-4051.


S


T


ight loss "
ST Program


unique

Optifast treats the whole you not just your
weight. By combining comprehensive lifestyle
' education and medical monitoring with a
great-tasting meal replacement diet, the
Optifast Program can help enhance your
health, vitality and enjoyment of life.


Many type 2 diabetics and hypertensive
patients can reduce or eliminate their medicine.



SOINTERNAL MEDICINE
INTERNAL MEDICINE


Cal fr n aponten
Loae nteLk iyMdpe uli~' 0 alo aeDie aeCtF
386-79-254


"We are a customer oriented busi-
ness with service and value being
our main goal. With Lake City
Reporter as our partner in
advertising, they have made
Somewhere in Time a success. We'
hear daily from new customers as
well as our regular visitors how they
see our specials in the Reporter

Thanks again to all of our
customers and friends as well as the
Lake City Reporter."


Mayra Masters
Owner, Somewhere in Time


c4,-
A OPTIFA

The serious solution for we
What makes OPTIFA


Home of the Week


Attention Horse Lovers!!


Exquisite horse property on 11 acres with 3/2 mfg home
and 200' cabin. Property is fenced and cross fenced wlwa-
ter to each pasture. 60'x48' 6-stall horse barn w/tack & work
rooms w/concrete center aisle, 40'x32' workshop, green-
house, 40'x32' farm shelter and much more. Located near
the Suwannee River w/lots of riding trails for your enjoy-
ment. Bring the kids, grandma and the horses for the best
in country living. #77184


I on this 412 mfg
Sugar Mill. Split
id only $99,500

II 2 lots in Su-
r Park Estates
00 #76758
y lots near the
n Branford only
91


FOR SOMEWHERE IN TIME


Somewhere in Time has found success using the
Deal-of-the-Week promotion that runs twice
weekly in the Lake City Reporter


Find out more by
calling 752-1293.


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS Magazine


* * Nelda Hatcher, Realtor
m (386) 688-8067
/f neldah@poolerealty.com

127 East Howard Street
-M E H Live Oak, FL 32064


Page Editor: C.J.Risak, 7541-0427


P











LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011


PARTLY PARTLY j CHANCE CHANCE
CLOUDY CLOUDY -I SHOWERS' I I SHOWERS



HI 72 LO HI 73LO HI 72 LO i HI59LO


Valdesta
Valdosta City Monday
S69 acksonville Cape Canaveral 3 5. p.:

Tallahassee Daytona Beach 2 2p..
S'0 46 .] 4 Ft. Lauderdale 76 65 p.,
Pensacola Cainesville Daytona Beach Fort er 7 5
e.3 Panama City 71 4 Gainesville 7I J4, [.:
5 'j Ocala Jacksonville r.8 JS i:.
S1 19 Key West 6 .i p.
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West ;6 6 1
5 7 50 Lake City ,2 4.5 ,
7 Miami 77 6~. p.
fampa Naples 57
70 52 West Palm Beach Ocala 73 46 p,"
7 Orlando 7' 5i p,:
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City 6 3'51 .
Ft. Myers 74J 59 Pensacola 69 51 .4
I4 52 Naples Tallahassee 70 )45 p,
'3 Miami Tampa 73 1t6 p.
74 9 ,Valdosta 71 4_ p,7
Key West* W. Palm Beach 76 ,3 p.:
;2 63


TEMPERATURES SUN
High Saturday 73 Sunrise today 7:22 a.m.
Low Saturday 37 Sunset today 6:06 p.m.
Normal high 67 Sunrise tom. 7:22 a.m.
Normal low 43 Sunset tom. 6:06 p.m.
Record high 85 in 1950
.Record low 21 in 1940 MOON
Moonrise today 4:43 a.m..


PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


0.00"
3.68"
3.68"
3.27"
3.27"


Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


Feb.
2
New


3:07 p.m.
5:32 a.m.
4:05 p.m.


*.. . ..

Feb. Feb. Feb.
11 18 24
First Full Last


9::
6. "J,

rusds,:n to bumI'-


, j:31"- rrorhO C

I


I Forecasts, da
-: Ics 20LI
LLC, Madison
; www.weather


V Tuesday




7357 p,
77 Eq p,
91.1 j O

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01 Ihr "or

ata an graph
Weather Cnta
n,-Wis.
trpbihrco


NATIONAL FORECAST: Light snow will be seen in some locations in the Northeast interior
today. A low pressure system will bring rain and perhaps a few thunderstorms to the Gulf
Coast and lower Mississippi Valley. Rain and snow showers can be expected from California
to Nevada, while a frontal boundary will be the focus for snow falling from the northern
Rockies to the northern High Plains.

S --,


* Seatile
39/31


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES

Saturday Today


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerqu
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birminghar
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston
Charleston
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia S
Dallas
Daytona Be
al Denver




j CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdamr
Athens
Auckland
BelJlng
Berlin
Buenos Air
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY


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SC
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5C

each


32/21/0
51/26/0
25/21/0
70/34/0
34/20/0
32/26/0
72/33/0
23/9/.06
40/25/0
37/26/0
25/21/.01
65/32/0
52/23/0
62/27/0
47/34/0
34/26/0
43/21/0
31/24/.06
66/28/0
75/39/0
72/41/0
56/30/0


29/6/c
58/32/s
26/20/pc
66/49/pc
39/22/pc
19/-3/sn
64/48/pc
-2/-10/sn
45/32/c
31/14/c
23/10/c
67/50/pc
44/29/pc
63/40/pc
46/13/pc
29/20/pc
37/23/pc
29/13/sf
67/43/pc
66/38/t
70/50/s
50/24/pc


Des Moines
Detroit
El paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
JacksonvJlle
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


AM FOG,
CLEARING



I HI 71 LO


High: 79, Alice, Texas Low: -8. Krerrmmling, Colo.


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
35/24/0
73/42/0
34/24/0
68/45/0
33/23/.02
34/20/0
54/47/0
58/24/0
35/24/0
49/32/0
51/25/0
48/43/.01
45/31/0
36/30/0
73/49/0
63/49/0
54/50/0
48/46/.20
42/35/0
68/50/0
69/39/0
37/29/0


HI/Lo/W
19/14/pc
73/50/s
37/20/pc
70/46/pc
31/13/c
30/10/c
49/36/c
58/37/pc
16/-2/sn
40/26/sn
51/31/pc
52/38/sh
37/26/pc
40/27/rs
78/52/pc
59/53/c
54/42/sh
39/31/rs
29/9/sn
70/52/s
70/42/s
41/26/pc


Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today ;
HI Lo Pcp. HI Lo W CITY HI Lo Pcp. HI Lo W CITY HI Lo Pcp. HI Lo W'j
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: 7 : 1 Nassau 6' : t Tel Aviv : 1. : r.
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: : Panama : : Vienna 1 I I .
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1ii h- F ... l- 11.ii i-. i -i h-1111 1 f-h'eill : iI I n i ll l ,


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THE WEATHER


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DC
--41-/26
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74 59


holic City Itepoacrum l


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
37/24/0 21/15/pc Omaha
29/24/.11 26/11/pc Orlando
64/31/0 64/35/s Philadelphia
5/-5/0 6/-14/s Phoenix
57/24/0 57/37/pc Pittsburgh
34/21/0 31/11/c Portland ME
78/67/0 81/64/s Portland OR
73/50/0 72/56/t Raleigh
34/22/0 34/19/pc Rapid City
73/36/0 61/51/t Reno
70/39/0 71/50/pc Richmond
40/29/0 30/21/pc Sacramento
59/42/0 61/41/pc St. Louis
76/39/0 58/42/t Salt Lake City
62/47/0 56/46/c San Antonio
71/47/0 58/40/t San Diego
71/48/0 74/59/s San Francisco
32/21/0 15/7/c Seattle
72/36/0 67/52/t Spokane
67/46/0 67/54/t Tampa
36/29/0 37/19/c Tucson
75/36/0 44/33/pc Washington


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OWN-









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Sunday. lanuary 30 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

GATORS
Wine tasting for
scholarships
The North Florida
Gator Club has its 4th
Annual Wine Tasting
Event from 6:30-9 p.m.
Feb..3 at The Country
Club at Lake City. Cost
of $22 includes hours
d'oeuvres, door prizes
and wine stations from
several countries.
There will be a silent
auction featuring an
autographed basketball
by Billy Donovan. Gator
'wine glasses will be
sold for $5. Proceeds
go to support the club's
scholarship fund in the
five-county area.
For details, call Ian at
(352) 316-4305, Angela
at 758-8801, Ron at (386)
397-3378 or Bob at 752-
3333.

YOUTH BASKETBALL
USSSA travel
teams offered
The Lake City
Recreation Department
is offering tryouts at
Richardson Community
Center for 12-under
and 15-under USSSA
travel teams. Tryouts
for 12-under are 5:30-7
p.m. Feb. 3, 4, 8,'and 10;
tryouts for 15-under are
5:30-7 p.m. Jan. 31, Feb.
2, 7, and 9. Permission/
waiver forms are
required before tryouts.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at 754-
3607.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Girls softball
registration set
The Girls Softball
Association of Columbia
County has registration
(ages 4-17) open for the
spring season. Sign-up at
the softball complex is 5-
7 p.m. Feb. 3 and Feb. 8,
and noon to 2 p.m. Feb.
5. Registration forms also
are available at Brian's
Sports and completed
forms can be dropped off
there. Coaches are being
sought.
For details, call
755-4271 or visit
information@
girlssoftballassociation.
org.


Interest sought
for 10-under
girls
Athletes interested in
playing 10-under girls
softball year-round are
being sought.
For details, call Butch
Lee at 965-6002 or Tim
Blackwell at 623-1826.

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Feb. 7
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Feb. 7
in the teacher's lounge
at the high school.
Nominations for club
officers will be received
at the meeting, so all
members and potential
members are encouraged
to attend. Election of
officers will be at the
meeting on Feb. 21.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954 or
e-mail shaynetrayne@
hotmail.com.


* From staff reports


Clijsters wins

Australian Open

championship


Player claims
second Grand
Slam Title.
By DENNIS PASSA
Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Australia
- Kim Clijsters won her
second straight Grand Slam
title and the fourth of her
career, struggling early
before beating Li Na 3-6,
6-3, 6-3 on Saturday in the.
Australian Open final.
The loss ended an out-
standing run by Li, who
became the first Chinese
player to reach a Grand
Slam singles final.


Li appeared to become
upset with some of the
Chinese spectators in the
crowd, in the third set and
asked the chair umpire to
intervene. She later com-
plained about the flashes
from photographers at cen-
ter court.
The win for Clijsters, the
reigning U.S. Open cham-
pion, came in what was
likely her last appearance
at Melbourne Park she
said 2011 could be her last
full year on the tour.
"I finally feel like you ASSOCIATED PRESS
guys can call me Aussie
Kim because I won the Belgium's Kim Clijsters poses for photographers with her Australian Open trophy at
Melbourne's Brighton Beach in Australia. Clijsters defeated China's Li Na in the final on
TENNIS continued on 3B Saturday.


KIRKMAN'S NO. 16 RETIRED


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Texas Rangers' pitcher Michael Kirkman (center) receives a framed Columbia High jersey at the Purple and Gold Game on
Saturday as his Tigers' No. 16 was retired. Columbia coaches Joey Edge (left) and head coach J.T. Clark (right) were
presenters.

Purple and Gold event, alumni launch season


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
The old gave way to
the new at Columbia High
on Saturday as baseball's
alumni game preceded an
8-6 win for the Gold in the
Purple and Gold game.


The alumni game fea-
tured Texas Rangers'
pitcher Michael Kirkman
as he returned home to
the Tigers for a special
appearance. In between
the games, coach J.T. Clark
honored Kirkman for his
achievement and dedica-


tion to the Columbia base-
ball team.
Kirkman is the first
Columbia High player to
pitch in the World Series
after appearing with the
Rangers this postseason.
His No. 16 was framed for
retirement at Columbia,


and Kirkman considers it
one of his biggest life hon-
ors.
"It really is an honor,"
he said. "I've never had
anything like that. I thank
everyone for the support
CHS continued on 4B


Tigers


upset


FSU,


62-44

Seminoles suffer
only second
conference loss.

By PETE IACOBELLI
Associated Press
CLEMSON, S.C. -
Florida State found out
from Clemson what it's like
to play against a stifling
defense.
Jerai Grant had 14 points,
Demontez Stitt added 12 and
the Tigers used their defense
to upset No. 22 Florida State
62-44 Saturday.
Clemson (15-6, 4-3
Atlantic Coast Conference)
forced 22 turnovers and
held the Seminoles (15-6,
5-2) to less than 33 percent
shooting from the field,
numbers Florida State's
opponents have typically
put up this season.
Seminoles coach Leonard
Hamilton had little expla-
nation for his team's poor
FSU continued on 4B


Mississippi State


beats Florida, 71-64


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mississippi State forward Renardo Sidney (center) tries to
fight off the defense of Florida forward Erik Murphy (33) and
guard Scottie Wilbekin (5) in the second half of an NCAA
college basketball game in Starkville, Miss. on Saturday.


Gators suffer first
loss after breaking
back into rankings.
By DAVID BRANDT
Associated Press
STARKVILLE, Miss. -
Dee Bost might be missing
some teeth. He's definitely
found his legs, though.
The Mississippi State
junior, playing with his
front teeth glued together
after taking an elbow to the
face earlier in the week,
scored 24 points ias the
Bulldogs beat No. 24
Florida 71-64 on Saturday
afternoon at Humphrey
Coliseum.
"Our chemistry keeps
getting better and better,"
Bost said. "We just need to
keep fighting and getting
these wins."
Bost was playing in just
his sixth game this season
after missing the first 14.
He lost five games due to
academic issues and then


served a nine-game NCAA
suspension after failing to
pull out of the NBA Draft by
the deadline.
The rust was apparent in
some of his early games, but
the 6-foot-2 point guard was
efficient against the Gators,
making 8 of 14 shots from
the field, including 4 of 8
from 3-point range. He also
added five assists and three
rebounds.
Kodi Augustus and"
Renardo Sidney each scored
16. The Bulldogs (11-9, 3-3
Southeastern Conference)
have won four of the last
five against the Gators.
Only four Mississippi
State players scored, but all
of them finished in double
figures. Ravern Johnson
scored 15 points, includ-
ing 13 in the first half, as
the Bulldogs beat a ranked
team for the first time this
season.
The Bulldogs won despite
being outrebounded 43-37
and giving up 17 offensive
rebounds.


Florida (16-5, 5-2) trailed
5142 early in the second
half, but went on a 13-1 run
to take a 55-52 lead. The
game was tight from there,
with five lead changes. But
the'Bulldogs pushed ahead
in the final minute, making
6 of 6 free throws to seal the
victory.
The clutch play was a
stark contrast from barely
36 hours ago, when the
Bulldogs led for most of the
game before losing to No.
19 Vanderbilt.
"The things that beat us
on Thursday night didn't
beat us tonight," Stansbury
said. "No missed block
outs, no turnovers down
the stretch."
Florida came into the
game with the SEC's best
conference record, but was
hurt by. a 9-of-19 perfor-
mance (47.4 percent) at
the free throw line, includ-
ing several crucial misses
in the final minutes. It's a
familiar problem for the
Gators.


_ i I I L L I












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
9 a.m.
SPEED Rolex Sports Car Series,
24 at Daytona, finish of race, at Daytona
Beach, Fla.
BOWLING
2 p.m.
ESPN2 PBA, EarlAnthony Memorial
Classic, at Dublin, Calif.
EXTREME SPORTS
12:30 p.m.
ESPN X Games, at Aspen, Colo.
7 p.m.
ESPN X Games, at Aspen, Colo.
I 1:30 p.m.
ESPN2 X Games, at Aspen, Colo.
(same-day tape)
FIGURE SKATING
4 p.m.
NBC U.S. Championships, at
Greensboro, N.C.
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Volvo
Champions, final round, at Bahrain (same-
day tape)
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance
Open, final round, at La Jolla, Calif.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance
Open, final round, at La Jolla, Calif.
7 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Skins Game,
final round, at Lahaina, Hawaii
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
I p.m.
CBS Duke at St.John's
5:30 p.m.
FSN Miami atVirginiaTech
7:30 p.m.
FSN Maryland at Georgia Tech
10 p.m.
FSN -Washington atWashington St.
NBA BASKETBALL
I p.m.
ABC Miami at Oklahoma City
3:30 p.m.
ABC Boston at L.A. Lakers
10 p.m.
ESPN Utah at Golden State
NFL FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
FOX Pro Bowl, at Honolulu
NHL HOCKEY
4 p.m.
VERSUS All-Star Game, at Raleigh,
N.C.
RODEO
2:30 p.m.
NBC PBR,Jack Daniel's Invitational,
at Indianapolis (same-day tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
I p.m.
FSN Baylor at Texas A&M
3 p.m.
FSN -Washington St. at Washington
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Georgia at LSU


FOOTBALL


NFL playoffs

Wild Card
Seattle 41, New Orleans 36
N.Y.Jets 17, Indianapolis 16
Baltimore 30, Kansas City 7
Green Bay 21, Philadelphia 16
Divisional Playoffs
Pittsburgh 31, Baltimore 24
Green Bay 48,Atlanta 21
Chicago 35, Seattle 24
N.Y.Jets 28, New England 21
Conference Championships
Green Bay 21, Chicago 14
Pittsburgh 24, N.Y. Jets 19
Super Bowl
Sunday
At Arlington,Texas
Pittsburgh vs. Green Bay, 6:30 p.m.
(FOX)

Pro Bowl
Sunday
At Honolulu
AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (FOX)

Pro Bowl MVPs

2010 Matt Schaub, QB, Houston
2009 Larry Fitzgerald,WR,Arizona
2008 Adrian Peterson, RB,
Minnesota
2007 Carson Palmer, QB,
Cincinnati
2006 Derrick Brooks, LB, Tampa
Bay
2005 Peyton Manning, QB,
Indianapolis
2004 Marc Bulger, QB, St. Louis
2003 Ricky Williams, RB, Miami
2002 Rich Gannon, QB, Oakland
2001 Rich Gannon, QB, Oakland
2000 Randy Moss,WR, Minnesota
1999 Keyshawn Johnson,WR, New
York Jets, and Ty Law, CB, New England
1998 -Warren Moon, QB, Seattle
1997 Mark Brunell, QB,
Jacksonville
1996 lerrv Rice. WR. San


Francisco
1995 -
Indianapolis


Marshall Faulk, RB.

Marshall Faulk, RB,


1994 -Andre Rison,WR,Atlanta
1993 Steve Tasker,WR, Buffalo
1992 Michael Irvin,WR, Dallas
1991 Jim Kelly, QB, Buffalo
1990 jerry Gray, CB, Los Angeles
Rams
1989 Randall Cunningham, QB,
Philadelphia
1988 Bruce Smith, DE, Buffalo
1987 Reggie White, DE,
Philadelphia
1986 Phil Simms, QB, New York
Giants
1985 Mark Gastineau, DE, New
York Jets
1984 Joe Theismann, QB,
Washington
1983 Dan Fouts, QB, San Diego,
and John Jefferson,WR, Green Bay
1982 Lee Roy Selmon, DE,Tampa
Bay, and Kellen Winslow, TE, San Diego
1981 Ed Murray, PK, Detroit
1980 Chuck Muncie, RB, New
Orleans
1979 Ahmad Rashad, WR,
Minnesota
1978 Walter Payton, RB, Chicago


1977 Mel Blount, DB, Pittsburgh
1976 Billy "White Shoes" Johnson,
WR, Houston
1975 James Harris, QB, Los
Angeles
1974 Garo Yepremian, PK, Miami
1973 O.J Simpson, RB, Buffalo
1972 Back-Jan Stenerud, PK, Kansas
City; Lineman-Willie Lanier, LB. Kansas
City
1971 Back-Mel Renfro,WR, Dallas;
Lineman-Fred Carr, LB, Green Bay


Pro Bowl scores

2010-AFC 41, NFC 34
2009 NFC 30,AFC 21
2008 -'NFC 42,AFC 30
2007--AFC 3 1,AFC 28
2006 NFC 23,AFC 17
2005 -AFC 38, NFC 27
2004- NFC 55,AFC 52
2003 -AFC 45, NFC 20
2002-AFC 38, NFC 30
2001 -AFC 38, NFC 17
2000-- NFC 51,AFC 31
1999 -AFC 23, NFC 10
1998 -AFC 29, NFC 24
1997 -AFC 26, NFC 23, OT
1996 NFC 20,AFC 13
1995 -AFC 41, NFC 13
1994 -NFC 17,AFC 3
1993 -AFC 23, NFC 20, OT
1992-- NFC 21,AFC I5
1991 -AFC 23, NFC 21
1990 NFC 27,AFC 21
1989 NFC 34,AFC 3
1988 -AFC 15, NFC 6
1987 -AFC 10, NFC 6
1986 NFC 28,AFC 24
1985 -AFC 22. NFC 14
1984 NFC 45,AFC 3
1983 NFC 20,AFC 19
19812-AFC 16, NFC 13
1981 NFC 21,AFC 7 ,
1980 NFC 37,AFC 27
1979 NFC 13,AFC 7
1978-- NFC 14,AFC 13
1977 -AFC 24, NFC 14
1976 NFC 23,AFC 20
1975-NFC 17,AFC 10
1974 -AFC 15, NFC 13
1973 -AFC 33, NFC 28
1972 -AFC 26, NFC 13
1971 NFC 27,AFC 6


College all-star games
Saturday
At Mobile, Ala.
Senior Bowl, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Saturday
At San Antonio
Texas vs. The Nation All-Star
Challenge, 2 p.m.


BASKETBALL

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 35 II .761 -
NewYork 24 22 .522 II
Philadelphia 20 26 .435 15
New Jersey 14 33 .298 21'k
Toronto 13 34 .277 22'b
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 32 14 .696 -
Atlanta 30 17 .638 2h
Orlando 30 17 .638 2's
Charlotte 20 25 .444 11
Washington 13 32 .289 18'
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 32 14 .696 -
Milwaukee 18 26 .409 13
Indiana 17 26 .395 13'k
Detroit 17 30 .362 15SA
Cleveland 8 38 .174 24
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio .39 7 .848 -
Dallas 30 15 .667 8'h
New Orleans 31 16 .660 8h'
Memphis 23 24 .489 16'h
Houston 22 26 .458 18
Northwest Division


W L
Oklahoma City 30 16
Denver 28 18
Utah 28 19
Portland 25 22
Minnesota 10 36
Pacific Division
W L
L.A. Lakers 33 14
Phoenix 21 24
Golden State 19 27
L.A. Clippers 17 28
Sacramento II 33


Pct GB
.652 -
.609 2
.596 2h
.532 5k
.217 20

Pct GB
.702 -
.467 II
.413 13'
.378 15
.250 20'A


NBA schedule

Today's Games
Miami at Oklahoma City, I p.m.
Boston at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Denver at Philadelphia, 6 p.m.
Detroit at New York, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Utah at Golden State, 10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Toronto at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Denver at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Utah, 9 p.m.
Milwaukee at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.



TENNIS

Australian Open

At Melbourne Park
Melbourne, Australia
Singles
Women
Championship
Kim Clijsters (3), Belgium, def. Li Na
(9), China, 3-6,6-3, 6-3.
junior Singles
Boys
Championship
Jiri Vesely (I), Czech Republic, def,
Luke Saville,Australia, 6-0, 6-3.
Girls
Championship
An-Sophie Mestach (2), Belgium, def.
Monica Pulg (5), Puerto Rico, 6-4, 6-2.
Wheelchair Singles


Men
Championship
Shingo Kunieda (l),Japan, def.Stephane
Houdet (2), France, 6-0, 6-3.
Women
Championship
Esther Vergeer (I), Netherlands, def.
Ianiela di Toro (2),Australia, 6-0, 6-0.
Quad
Championship
David Wagner (1), United States, def.
Peter Norfolk (2), Britain, 6-2, 6-3.


HOCKEY

NHL standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOT Pts
Philadelphia 50 33 12 5 71
Pittsburgh 50 31 15 4 66
N.Y. Rangers 52 29 20 3 61
N.Y. Islanders 49 15 27 7 37
New Jersey 49 16 30 3 35
Northeast Division
GP W LOT Pts
Boston 50 28 IS 7 63
Montreal 50 27 18 5 59
Buffalo 49 23 21 5 51
Toronto 49 19 25 5 43
Ottawa 50 17 25 8 42
Southeast Division
GP W LOT Pts
Tampa Bay 51 31 15 5 67
Washington 51 27 15 9 63
Atlanta 52 24 19 9 57
CaroJina 50 25 19 6 56
Florida 49 22 22 5 49
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOT Pts
Detroit 49 30 13 6 66
Nashville 50 27 17 6 60
Chicago ,50 26 20 4 56
Columbus 49 23 21 5 51
St. Louis 49 22 20 7 51
Northwest Division
GP W LOT Pts
Vancouver 50 31 10 9 71
Colorado 50 25 19 6 56
Minnesota 49'25 19 5 55
Calgary 51 24 21 6 54
Edmonton 49 15 26 8 38
Pacific Division
GP W LOT Pts
Dallas 50 30 15 5 65
Anaheim 52 28 20 4 60
Phoenix 51 25 17 9 59
San Jose 50 25 19 6 56
Los Angeles 50 27 22 I 55


NHL schedule

Saturday's Games
No games scheduled
Today's Games
Team Lidstrom vs.Team Staal, 4 p.m.


GOLF

Farmers Insurance
Open Scores

Saturday
AtTorrey Pines South Course;
7,698 yards; Par 72
AtTorrey Pines North Course;
7,067 yards; Par 72
San Diego
Purse: $5.8 million
Third Round
Phil Mickelson67s-69n-68s- 204 -12
Bill Haas 67n-66s-71s -- 204 -12
Hunter Mahan69s-67n-69s- 205 -II
BubbaWatson7 s-65n-69s- 205 -II
Anthony Kim68n-67s-71s- 206 -10
JhonattanVegas69n-69s-69s- 207 -9
D.A. Points73s-68n-68s 209 -7
Brandt Snedeker70s-69n-70s 209
-7
Kevin Sutherland69s-69n-71s 209
-7
Dustin Johnson69s-69n-71s- 209 -7
Rickie Fowler65n-71s-73s- 209 -7
Fredrik Jacobson67n-69s-73s 209
-7
Blake Adams71 n-68s-7 Is 210 -6
Marc Leishman67n-72s-71s- 210 -6
Billy Mayfalr70s-69n-71s 210 -6
Ben Crane70s-66n-74s 210 -6
David Duval70s-70n-71s 211 -5
Jimmy Walker71n-69s-71s- 211 -5
Y.E.Yang 67n-73s-71s 211 -5
Keegan Bradley67n-74s-70s- 211 -5
Spencer Levin7 n-71s-69s- 211 -5
Tom Gillis72s-70n-69s 211 -5
Pat Perez 69n-70s-72s 211 -5
Joe Durant72n-69s-71s 212 -4
Brandt Jobe67n-73s-72s 212 -4
Zack Miller69n-71s-72s 212 -4
Lucas Glover70s-70n-72s- 212 -4
Kyle Stanley68n-72s-72s 212 -4
Richard S.Johnson73s-67n-72s 212
-4
Paul Stankowski68s-74n-70s 212
-4
Charles Howell 11171n-68s-73s 212
-4
Tim Herron74s-68n-70s 212 -4
Troy Matteson74s-68n-70s- 212 -4
Brendan Steele70s-68n-74s- 212' -4
TigerWoods69n-69s-74s- 212 -4
Greg Chalmers72n-71s-69s- 212 -4
Brian Davis69s-68n-75s 212 -4
John Daly67s-69n-76s 212 -4
Ben Martin68n-72s-73s 213 -3
Hunter Haas70n-70s-73s- 213 -3
Scott Gutschewski72n-69s-72s 213
-3
a-Anthony Paoluccl70s-71n-72s 213
-3
Bobby Gates70s-69n-74s- 213 -3
Bill Lunde71n-71s-71s 213 -3
D.J.Brigman72n-70s-71s 213 -3
Stewart Cink70s-70n-74s- 214 -2
Jamie Lovemark69s-70n-75s 214
-2
CamiloVillegas69n-70s-75s- 214 -2
J.B. Holmes72s-67n-75s 214 -2
Justin Rose72s-70n-72s 214 -2
Tag Ridings71 n-68s-75s 214 -2
Vijay Singh72s-71n-71s 214 -2


Chris Kirk66n-71s-77s 214 -2
Stuart Appleby72s-71n-71s- 214 -2
CharlieWi7ln-72s-71s 214 -2
Matt Jones68s-72n-75s 215 -I
David Mathis68n-73s-74s- 215 -I
Chris Couch70s-71n-74s- 215 -I
Martin Piller70n-7 1s-74s 215 -I
Michael Thompson69s-70n-76s 215


K.J. Choi 72s-69n-74s :
Fabian Gomez67s-74n-74s-
Cameron Tringale71 s-71 n-73s
- I


215 -I
215 -I
- 215


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Kevin Coulson twists his body as the force of the driver sends a golf ball down the green at
the Chamber of Commerce golf tournament on Friday in Lake City.




Ponder shines Senior Bowl


By JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press

MOBILE, Ala. Florida
State's Christian Ponder
threw two touchdown pass-
es, including a clinching
23-yarder to TCU's Jeremy
Kerley in the South's 24-10
Senior Bowl victory over
the North on Saturday.
Ponder completed 7 of
13 passes for 132 yards,
including several big
ones to a one-time rival
Leonard Hankerson of
Miami and the final TD
with 3:04 left.


1

5
8 -
12
13 I
14 1
15 I

16

18 F
20 I
21


Ponder was looking for
a happier transition to an
NFL career after missing
the ACC championship
with an elbow injury and
most of the Seminoles' bowl
game thanks to a concus-
sion. Ponder led scoring
drives on the South's first
two possessions and put on
the finishing touches after
the North rallied from a
17-0 deficit.
Hankerson had 100 yards
on five catches,. including
an 18-yard touchdown and a
48-yarder to set up another
score both from Ponder.


ACROSS 40 1960s
Chairman
Lady's 41 Bright
honorific 44 Chicken coops
Stocky horse 47 Imposing
- spumante estates
Square footage 49 Aching
Make haste 51 Starlet's
Kid dream
Nomad 52 "Most Wanted"
dwelling org.
Sweetheart of 53 von
yore (2 wds.) Bismarck
Public official 54 Drove too fast
Desirous 55 Decent grade
Cached 56 Ghostly noise


22 Qt. parts
23 Luxuriate
26 Acid in milk
29 Over again
30 Former frosh
31 "- Kapital"
33 Alt.
34 Mystique
35 Money or
safety -
36 Stole from
38 Alpaca kin
39 Lend a hand


DOWN


1 Has
permission
2 Make --for


He also caught a 14-yarder
on the clinching drive.
WashiAgton quarter-
back Jake Locker, likely
among the first passers
drafted, led a touchdown
drive but also had offensive
linemen save him by fall-
ing on two fumbles for
the North in an uneven
performance.
Ponder was the first
FSU quarterback to beat
Miami twice since Gary
Huff in 1971 and 1972, but
relied heavily on a former
Hurricanes standout from
'the outset.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

GAMS P S I1 ICH
A T OIN BOO
DAN 0N LINS

AOISIS

RG E





NO0V 1 LA ITU H
A 0L ITO IGDIM
VIADUCTS MATH
AL N SH 0OG E E
NAP TREEE VEST


It
3 Space preced- 7 Foundation
er 8 Finally (2 wds.)
4 Broderick of 9 Pirate's booty
film 10 Microwave set-
5 Musical combo ting
6 Greasy 11 Livy's route


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


17 Command to
Fido
19 Have a cough
22 Storybook
bear
23 Super Bowl
roar
2.4 Cal Tech grad
25 Put the kibosh
on
26 Serf's master
27 I had no -!
28 Quiet
30 Hired a lawyer
32 RR terminal
34 Put up with
35 Develop
successfully
37 Teased
38 Mekong native
40 Spunk
41 TV hookups
42 Flapjack chain
43 Crooner Jerry

44 Bumpkin
45 Oz pooch
46 Sp. miss
48 Pro Bowl let-
ters
50 Untold
centuries


2011 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


'









Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Britain's Andy Murray serves during a practice session at
the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne,
Australia, Saturday. Murray will play Serbia's Novak Djokovic
in the men's final today.


TENNIS: Clijsters wins
Continued From Page 1B


LAKE CITY REPORTER TENNIS SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011 3B



Djokovic vs. Murray for



Australian Open title


By ROHAN SULLIVAN
Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia
- After growing up togeth-
er on the tennis circuit,
Andy Murray and Novak
Djokovic have yet to meet
in a major. That all changes
Sunday at the Australian
Open.
The two men who have
come to be considered the
best of the rest that is,
after Roger Federer and
Rafael Nadal will face
each other for the first time
in a Grand Slam. One will


walk away with the title.
It may seem as though
it's been a long time coming
for Djokovic and Murray,
who in practice sessions
and pickup soccer games
this year have rekindled a
friendship first struck when
they were gangly preteens
on the tour.
That's due in part to
the dominance of Federer
and Nadal, who between
them have won 21 of the
past 23 majors. As consis-
tently high-ranked players
- Djokovic is No. 3 and
Murray No. 5 they invari-


ably start on opposite sides
of the draw at majors, and
that means they are'almost
certain to bump into the
No. 1 or the No. 2 before
they meet each other.
Not this time.
Djokovic beat defending
champion Federer in the
semifinals and an injured
Nadal was ousted in the
quarterfinals by David
Ferrer on the other side
of the draw, leaving the
door open for Murray.
Sunday's final will be the
first time neither Federer
nor Nadal have played in


a Grand Slam final since
the 2008 Australian Open,
when Djokovic defeated Jo-
Wilfried Tsonga to win his
first major.
For Djokovic, it's about
time.
"They have been so dom-
inant, such a strong two
tennis players rhentally, it's
just been fantastic to watch
them' dominate the tennis
on one hand," Djokovic said
Saturday. "On the other
hand, it was frustrating
because you don't have the
opportunity of maybe win-
ning more Grand Slams.


L, A


title," Clijsters said .during
the trophy presentations,
referring to her popularity
that stemmed from a past
relationship with Australian
No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt.
Looking at Li, Clijsters
said: "I think we'll have a
lot more tough battles to
come. Hopefully a few more
Grand Slam finals would be
nice."
Andy Murray will try to
become the first British
man in almost 75 years to
win a Grand Slam singles
title when he plays 2008
champion Novak Djokovic
in the men's final Sunday.
, It was the first night
match for Li at Rod Laver
Arena, where the cooler
temperatures after the
sun sets usually makes
the hard court slower. But
Melbourne warmed up
late Saturday, making even
the night conditions simi-
lar to what Li would have
experienced in cooler day
matches earlier in the tour-
nament.
Li, with her courtside
humor and bubbly personal-
ity, endeared herself to fans
in Melbourne 'and around
the world. Back home, she
was a huge hit.
"The Chinese fans were


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. -
YADIL


prepared to express their
feelings and shed their tears
of excitement. We were
just one step from victory,"
China Central Television
announcer Tong Kexin said'
Saturday. CCTV predicted
that about 15 million people
would watch the match live
on its sports channel.
Clijsters led 4-2 -in head-
to-head meetings before the
match, but Li beat Clijsters
in the Sydney International
final two weeks ago after
th'e Belgian player had led
5-0 in the opening set.
Li and Clijsters weren't
playing any mind games
before the match, jok-
ing and smiling with each
other outside the dressing
room. Li seemed uncharac-
teristically nervous in her
pre-match TV interview,
though, and that translated
to the court.
Clijsters opened the
match with an ace, win-
ning the first game on four
straight points, then break-
ing Li the same way for
a 2-0 lead after just a few
minutes.
But Li found her range
and seemed to lose her ner-
vousness in the third game,
breaking Clijsters and then
holding for 2-2.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


KRABEM

T T TO THE MIN5TREL5
ROBIN HOOP
RUMAID WA5 -
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
A: A
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: YODEL SUITE RENDER BALLET
Answer: What the captain gave the sailors -
A "TALL" ORDER


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ENTRY FORM
Name:
Phone Number:
Address-
Subscriber: I1 Yes I1 No
IDeadline is Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011 at 5:00 p.m.
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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011


Haas, Mickelson tied


for lead; Tiger falters


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press
SAN DIEGO The way
Phil Mickelson likes to play
golf, he didn't have much
fun Saturday at Torrey
Pines.
Based on how he needs
to play the South Course,
Phil was thrilled.
Mickelson gave up on his
swashbuckling style by play-
ing it safe in the Farmers
Insurance Open, making
eight pars and a birdie on
the back nine for a 4-under
68 that gave him a share of
the lead with Bill Haas.
"This course doesn't
reward you for, taking on
any challenge," Mickelson
said. "Any my more con-


servative approach into the
greens, albeit boring, has
led me to be on top of the
leaderboard."
He was joined by Haas,
who kept one shot ahead of
Mickelson for most of the
back nine until his wedge
hopped hard on the firm
green and went just over
the back on the par-5 18th.
He missed a 4-foot par
putt and had to settle for a
1-under 71.
They were at 12-under
204, a stroke ahead of
Hunter Mahan and Bubba
Watson, who each made
eagle on the 18th.
Tiger Woods, who has
not lost at Torrey Pines in
seven years, was nowhere
to be found.


His start to a new sea-
son brought out a familiar
result. Just like so much
last year, Woods goes into
a final round out of con-
tention on a course where
he once dominated. Woods
made bogey from the sec-
ond fairway with a wedge in
his hand, and his day didn't
improve. He shot a 2-over
74, ending his streak of 21
straight rounds at par or
better on the South Course
in a tour event.
"I did not play well at
all today," said Woods, who
was eight shots behind. "It
was a struggle all day, and
I finally found something
at 16. But 15 holes already
had gone by, so that was
pretty frustrating."


CHS: Clark impressed with bats


Continued From Page 11

and love that I'm able to
spend time here. I'd like
to spend as much as I can
with the team and help
them as they continue to
help me."
It was another Kirkman,
Mikey, that started out the
Gold's 8-6 victory in the
Purple and Gold game with
a bang. Mikey Kirkman's
solo shot gave the Purple a
1-0 lead in the first inning,
but the Gold would rally
from a 6-0 deficit for the
win.
After Kirkman's homer,
two more runs came in
off throwing errors in the
first inning. Caleb Vaughn
added the final run of the
first off a Caleb Hill RBI,
and the Purple led 4-0.
The lead was extended


in the second inning as
Alex Milton brought in
Andrew Johnson and Seth
Thomas on a double for
a six-run lead, but that's
when the Gold mounted
their charge.
Andrew Nettles' hit
brought in Ryan Thomas
and Kellan Bailey tagged
up from third on a pop-fly
to end the second inning
down 6-2.
Gold would take the
lead during the bottom
of the third as Jimmy
Blakely began the come-
back after crossing home
off a Travis Brinkley hit.
Brinkley scored off an RBI
by Dennis Lecayo on the
next at-bat.
Blaine Courson deliv-
ered on a triple to score


or ~ib[ Ms o


Brent Stalter and cut the
Purple's lead to one. After
a walk, Courson and Zach
Espenship scored off a
throwing error to take a
7-6 lead.
The Gold would get an
insurance run during the
bottom of the fourth inning
when Jayce Barber connect-
ed on a shot to right field to
bring in Michael Craft on a
triple for the 8-6 final.
"I'm. very pleased with
our hitting today," Clark
said. "We swung well,
didn't have a lot of strike-
outs and were able to bat-
tle. We've got to work on
our defense, but a lot of the
errors can be attributed to
the lack of continuity in
the fielding with the teams
split up."


t www.lakecityreporter.com
SLake City
}flun Reporter


Put a little Iote in someone's heart this Valentine's Da nith the
Lake City Reporter's -Love Lines." Make it a special day for those
you love by writing a message to your sweetheart. We'll include it on
our 'Valentiue Loe .Lie' page on February 13th.


Roses are red; vizhets are blue, send Love Lines
to show them that your love is true.
The Lake City Reporter
"I Presents: C"


ve


nes


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Phil Mickelson blast from a greenside bunker on the par-5 sixth hole of the South Course at
Torrey Pines during the third round of the Farmers Insurance Open golf tournament in San
Diego, Saturday.


FSU
Continued From Page 1B
performance, which fol-
lowed a four-game win
streak that gave them their
best ACC start since 1992-
93. The Seminoles, who
ended Duke's undefeated
season this month, moved
into the poll this week as
the ACC's other ranked
school. That's likely to be
short-lived with the loss.
"We're a big, strong,
physical team," Hamilton
said. "But their physical-
ity knocked us back on our
heels."
And it happened quickly.
Clemson rushed to 22-
6 lead and the Seminoles
never got closer than eight
the rest of the way. It was
the first victory against a
ranked opponent for first-
year Tigers coach Brad
Brownell.
The Seminoles had no
answers for Clemson, with
no player reaching double-
figure scoring. Leading
scorer Chris Singleton man-
aged just two points the first
35 minutes. He hit a pair of
3-pointers down the stretch,
but those came with Florida
State well behind.
Singleton finished with
eight points, nearly seven
fewer than his average.
Bernard James also had
eight points to lead Florida
State.
"We never seemed to be
able to get back to that level
of confidence in our offen-
sive execution," Hamilton
said.
It was a surprising stum-
ble since the Seminoles
entered the game 10-8 in
ACC road games the past
three years, a mark that
trailed only Duke's 11-8
record.
"There are moral victo-
ries and I guess there are
moral losses," Hamilton
said. "Hopefully, we will
learn from this that life on
the road in the ACC this
year will be a lot of these
type ofgames for the visit-
ing teams."
Clemson rallied from 19
points down to beat North
Carolina State, 60-50, at
home Tuesday night and
kept the run going against
Florida State.


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Your Name:
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Address:
City/State/Zip:
Mail to: Lake City Reporter, Classified Department
PO Bo 1709, Lake City, FL 32056 ~ 755-5440
ALL ADS MUST BE PAID AT
THE TIME OF PLACEMENT.
DEADLINE IS FEB. 8, 2011.
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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
crisak@okedtyreporter:com


BUSINESS


Sunday, January 30, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Keen built reputation based on commitment


By A.C. GONZALEZ
agonzalez@lakecityreporter. com

Twelve years
combined ser-
vice, dedication
and leader-
ship to the
Columbia County Builder's
Association landed Sammy
Keen, owner of SLK
Construction, the Builder
of the Year award.
Keen is serving his sec-
ond year as vice president
of the CCBA and served as
its president six years ago.
"We try to do work for
the community in the
CCBA, and chip in where
we can for the people of
this county," Keen said.
Keen was presented
the Builder of the Year
award by CCBA President
Roger Whiddon on Jan. 19
for his "commitment and
dedication to the council
of builders" in the CCBA,
Whiddon said.
"Sammy's been part of
the council for a while and
was chosen by a secret
ballot, which everyone
submitted. Sammy won.
And in my opinion, he's
a good guy and is very
deserving of the award,"
Whiddon said.
Whiddon was happy to
see Keen win the CCBA's
award because Kebn
has always been such a
big part of the associa-
tion. "Anytime I called on
Sammy, he would jump
at the opportunity to get
right in there and do what
was needed of him,"-he
said.
The award, according to


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Sammy Keen, owner of SLK Construction Inc., is seen in the back yard of a 3,400-square-foot house he built for Lake City resident Dolly Robinson. The
house overlooks Overflow Lake. It features a two-car garage, a chimney as well as a second story. 'I love the architectural theme of the house,' Keen said.
'It's part New England/cottage style. It's the type of house I like to build.'


Whiddon, has little to do
with the winner's skills in
construction or previously
built projects. "It's not
about how many houses
they build or how impres-
sive their constructions
are," said Whiddon, "it's


for those that are commit-
ted to the council and the
people of Lake City, like
Sammy."
Keen said that this is
his first award from the
CCBA. "It's nice to be rec-
ognized by your peers in


the construction field," he
said.
Keen said that he has
been building since 1978,
at first for other contrac-


tors and businesses, and
since 1985 for his com-
pany, SLK Construction.
"My company serves
the people of Columbia


County and all other sur-
rounding counties. It's
grown over the years,

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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011 Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


Beware of Bankruptcy
QWhen I see a well-known
company in bankruptcy and
its stock is trading for peanuts, I
wonder whether it might emerge as
a money-making company again.
Might those companies be good
investments? --R.S., Elyria, Ohio
A Usually they're not. When
companies restructure them-
selves while in bankruptcy protec-
tion, holders of common stock tend
to end up with nothing, while credi-
tors and others might get some pen-
nies on the dollar. When companies
emerge from bankruptcy, they often
do so with new stock, leaving the old
shares worthless. It's better to wait
until they emerge and then consider
whether the new stock is promising.

QDo military personnel get any
special tax breaks? D.T.,
Fort Myers, Fla.
A Yes. Check out IRS Publication
3, "Armed Forces' Tax Guide."
Some provisions include the exclu-
sion from gross income of combat
pay and some other allowances and
payments, the ability to use combat
pay as earned income for the Earned
Income Tax Credit, the deductibility
of certain travel expenses for
reservists, the deductibility of certain
moving expenses for active-duty per-
sonnel moving to a ne%% permanent
station, the ability of families of
fallen soldiers to take advantage of
tax-favored accounts, and tax for-
giveness for those who die in active
service in a combat zone or from an
injury received in a combat zone.
Those serving in a combat zone
and certain others can also hae thetr
tax deadlines automatically extended
The Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil
Relief Act of 1940 offers more pro-
tections, such as in some cases from
eviction, the delay of civil court
actions, and reduced interest rates (6
percent maximum) on mortgage
loans and credit card debt.
Leari more at www.defense.gov,
www.irs.gov,
http://www.defense.gov/
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Investing in Retirement
Your investing days don't end
when you retire. Retirees may
wonder, though, where they can
invest their money relatively safely.
The traditional answer has been
to invest in utilities, preferred
stocks, REITs, bonds, and other
dividend-producing, interest-pay-
ing securities. You would collect
the income and let the
principal ride, focusing on
income, not growing the P- y
base of the investment.
Investing for growth meant taking
more risk, and risk was to be
avoided at all costs or at least
so said some advisers.
Times have changed, and that
approach doesn't fit everyone.
Companies cutting dividends in
hard times, the deregulation of utili-
ties, volatile bond markets, low
interest rates, inflation and increas-
ing life spans have all undermined
the security of a "low-risk, income-
only" strategy for retirees.
Many experts believe it may
actually endanger retirees you


may run out of money before you
run out of time to spend it. Not
taking enough risk with your
retirement money may represent
the greatest risk of all.
For example, an all-bond portfo-
lio with an average return of 6 per-
cent might throw off enough
income for a retiree today. But
with a modest annual inflation rate
of, say, 3 percent, every $1,000
produced by that portfolio will be
worth only $554 in 20 years.
Worse, the principal available then
for reinvestment wouldn't have
grown through the years.
As purchasing power declines,
a retiree using such a strategy
almost certainly will have to dip
into principal to sustain her
lifestyle, and the use of that princi-
pal will shorten the life of her
portfolio. Conversely, while an all-
stock portfolio may produce
growth from which one may take
income, stocks can be quite
volatile, and they can drop and
stay down for five years or longer.
That, too, can be devastating.
The solution to this quandary is
asset allocation. Tune in for more
on it next week.


Name That Company

I was created in 1971
by a fellow who wrote a
*'O ^ college term paper on over-
o.. night delivery. Based in
i Memphis, Tenn., today I rake
in about $35 billion annually. I
set up my first drop box in 1975
and introduced the Overnight
Letter in 1981. I bought Kinko's in
2004. In 2003, I delivered more than
400,000 copies of the latest Harry
Potter book in a single day. I have
transported giant pandas, sea turtle
eggs and parts of the Titanic. I process
more than 8 million shipments daily.
Not everyone sees the big arrow in my
logo. Who am I?


Sl i. .r .. answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and
.' I. entered into a drawing or a nifty prize!
20 1hI[NoI Fm I^ i.i iDIs 1. 11 ii1


Know When
to Fold 'Em


After researching InterDigital in
early 1999, I bought in near $4.50
per share. Nothing happened for
many months, but between October
and December, 'it shot up to
$75' 1 held on. I realize 6
now that this much of a I I
gain in such a short time --
was a fluke and may have
been caused by some manipulation.
It soon dropped sharply. I should
have cashed out at $75. The lesson
here is to not be determined to hold
on for the long haul with penny. ,
stocks. C.H., via e-mail
The Fool Responds: You do
have to be careful with penny
stocks (those trading under $5),
as they're often volatile and can be
manipulated. (It can be best to just
avoid them entirely.) Though many
pennies are not around for long,
InterDigital has grown into a nearly
$2 billion company and has been
trading north of $40 per share.
Your research back in 1999 may'
have suggested that the company
was worth far more than $4.50 per
share, but it probably didn't suggest
* a $75 value. Once a stock surpasses
what you think it's really worth,
consider selling.
Do you have an embarrassing
: lesson learned the hard way?
J Boil it down to 100 words (or
: less) and send it to The Motley Fool do My
Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked?
Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we
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LAST WEEK'S TR


What Is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
Remember Shakespeare?
Remember "As You Like It"?
In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only
people who could get away with telling the
truth to the King or Queen.
The Motley Fool tells the truth about invest-
ing, and hopes you'll laugh all
the way to the bank.
.......................................6 @6......


IBM's Leaders Shine
One of International Business
Machines' (NYSE: IBM) key
strengths is its talented leadership.
Between 2005 and 2009, despite
revenues growing only 5'percent,
IBM, led by longtime CEO Sam
Palmisano, managed to more than
double earnings per share (EPS).
How did IBM do that? By transi-
tioning into higher-margin busi-
nesses, wringing more efficiencies
out of its massive organization and
using profits to buy back shares.
IBM's leadership team has the most
focused road map in all of technol-
ogy. It has a plan in place to deliver
12 percent compounded growth in
EPS over the next five years. With
revenue growth expected to be mod-
est, IBM plans to flex its balance
sheet. It'll plow profits into buying
back shares and will push further into
high-margin areas such as data analy-
sis, where it has a strong presence.
It's an ambitious goal, but given
IBM's track record and the superior
planning and focus compared to its
rivals, it's not crazy. Several of
IBM's peers could learn some
lessons from it.
While IBM has kept its research
and development spending stable
since 2005, it has managed to focus
on many of the key growth areas in
IT spending, and its absolute
spending level still outpaces most
companies'.
Assessing management's ability to
deliver on its goals should help us
determine whether or not the stock's
a winner in the coming years. (The
Fool owns shares of IBM.)

RIVIA ANSWER


I trace my roots back to Michigan's Upton Machine Co. in 1911, which pro-
duced motor-driven wringer clothes washers. In World War II, I made compo-
nents for P-40 Warhawk aircraft. Today I'm a key global home appliance
maker, with annual sales topping $17 billion. I bought KitchenAid in 1986 and
Maytag in 2006. My Duet washer uses 74 percent less water and 80 percent
less energy than many traditional top-load washers. My Duet dryer is very
energy-efficient, too. I donate a refrigerator and range to every new Habitat
for Humanity home built in North America. Who am I? (Answer: Whirlpool)
Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
Smartest) Investmepts (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries
to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
Motley Fool. Sorry, we can't provide individual financial advice.


Taco Bell takes its beef with lawsuit to public


By SARAH SKIDMORE.
and BRUCE SCHREINER
AP Business Writers
Taco Bell went big and bold to
respond to a lawsuit claiming its
taco filling can't be called beef,
buying up newspaper ads Friday
that trumpet 'Thank you for
suing us.".
The company says it is setting
the record straight with. full-page
ads in Friday's editions of the
Wall Street Journal, USA Today
and other papers and a YouTube
campaign.
"Here's the truth about our
seasoned beef," the ads say,
declaring the product is 88 per-
cent ground beef, and the rest a
mixture of spices and common
food additives. Taco Bell is fight-
ing a claim that the meat filling
is only 35 percent beef.
The lawsuit, filed last week
in federal court in California,



BUILDER
From Page 1A
and I have my own team of
builders now," he said.
Dolly Robinson, owner of one
of Keen's recently built homes,
said that she was very pleased
with Keen's work.
"Sammy does a great job.
He's easy to work with and is
eager to please the people he
is building for," she said.
Robinson owns a three-bed-
room, three-bath cottage-style
lake home that included a
Keen-constructed addition to
a much smaller original home,
off Highway 90.
"We also have a house on
the Ichetucknee that Sammy
built for us, and with each
house we have been very
pleased," Robinson said. "I
know he deserves the award.
I recommend him to anyone
that is looking to build a home
and I know Sammy would
make sure they were satisfied
with his work."


"It tastes like ground beef
from any fast-food restaurant to me."

David Carey
Customer


claims calling Taco Bell's filling
"seasoned beef' is false advertis-
ing. The suit alleges the meat
mixture has binders and extend-
ers and does not meet federal
requirements to be labeled beef.
Taco Bell denied those claims
but went further by launching
the advertising campaign after a,
week in which the story spread
like wildfire, making national
headlines, creating an internet
stir and even prompting a bit by
comedian Steven Colbert.
Experts say similar cases
show the tempest in a tortilla is
unlikely to hurt Taco Bell's busi-
ness, but the aggressive counter-
attack is drawing some attention.


"It is unusual for a company
to take this on and challenge
the allegations so boldly,"
said Gene Grabowski, chair-
man of the crisis and litigation
practice at Levick Strategic
Communications in Washington.
"A lot of companies are going to
be watching how this turns out."
The tone and scope of the
campaign indicates Taco Bell is
confident in its facts, Grabowski
said. Companies typically shy
away from taking facts in a legal
dispute public.
The lawsuit, filed by the
Alabama law firm Beasley, Allen,
Crow, Methvin, Portis & Miles,
doesn't specify what percent-


age of the mixture is meat. The
lawyer on the case, Dee Miles,
said the firm had the filling
tested and found it contained 35
percent beef. The firm would
not say who tested the meat or
give any other specifics of the
analysis.
Taco Bell says the filling con-
tains 88 percent USDA-inspected
beef and the rest is water, spices
and a mixture of oats, starch and
other ingredients that contribute
to what it calls the "quality of its
product."
The company said it uses po
extenders to add volume to the
filling.
Customers at a Taco Bell in
parent company Yum Brands'
hometown of Louisville, Ky.,
were unruffled.
"I've eaten it for years," said
Greg Long as he grabbed a
Beefy 5 Layer burrito Friday in
Louisville, Ky. "I don't care."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Sammy Keen, owner of SLK Construction Inc., stands in front of a three-bedroom, three-bath-
room home that he built for Lake City resident Dolly Robinson. Keen, vice president of the
Columbia County.Builder's Association, was honored as Builder of the Year on Jan. 19.


"It tastes like ground beef
from any fast-food restaurant
to me," said David Carey, who
mostly cared it was quick
enough to fit into his lunch
break.
The plaintiffs would have to
prove that most diners believe
they are getting something other
than what Taco Bell serves.
Most customers realize taco
meat has ingredients besides
beef, Williams said.
In addition, the lawsuit cites
U.S. Department of Agriculture
guidelines for labeling ground
beef. The problem? They don't
apply to restaurants.
The USDA's rules apply to
meat processors the com-
panies Taco Bell buys its meat
from.
Tyson Foods Inc., the compa-
ny's largest meat supplier, said
it mixes and cooks the meat at
three USDA-inspected plants.


By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON -
The economic recov-
ery is now consistently
picking up speed, and
American consumers
are the ones pushing
the gas pedal. They
increased their spend-
ing late last year at the
fastest pace since 2006.
The 'question now
is whether they, can
spend enough this year
to make the economy
grow even faster and
finally bring down
unemployment. It's up
to them because the
housing market and
government spending
aren't offering much


help.
A more active con-
sumer was the main
reason the economy
grew at an annual rate
of 3.2 percent in the
final three months of
2010, the Commerce
Department said Friday.
It was tip from 2.6 per-
cent the previous quar-
ter and the best since
the start of last year.
That level of growth
would be great news in
a healthy economy that
only needed to hold
steady.
But with unemploy-
ment still at 9.4 percent
a year and a half after
the Great Recession,
steady is not good
enough.


The Motley Fool

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


Robust spending

helps economy

gain more steam


................. ............. I


W-ITIM4l


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


0 0 0 0 0 00 00 60 00 0 0 0 0 00 00 00 00 0 0 0 *


*


LAK CTYREORERBUSINESS SNAJNAY3,21














Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


BUSINESS SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW,* THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW


The Week in Review


S ;" .,.<

".,' ,f ; '. : ,*~


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights. STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Weekly Dow Jones


Y NYSE A Amex 3 Nasdaq
8062.64 -43,11 2,140.29 +14.40 2,686.89 -2.65


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SmurfStn n 37.37 +9.85 +35.8
BuckTch 24.86 +4.23 +20.5
Natuzzi 3.79 +.63 +19.9
Teradyn 16.23 +2.48 +18.0
VersoPap 4.62 +.69 +17.6
Willbros 11.63 +1.67 +16.8
Flotekh 6.75 +.93 +16.0
PiperJaf 41.79 +5.71 +15.8
RockTen 66.14 +8.96 +15.7
HFFInc 12.00 +1.61 +15.5

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
EKodak 3.64 -1.51 -29.3
QntmDSS 2.76 -1.14 -29.2
MonsmWw 15.95 -5.47 -25.5
ChiXFash n 5.80 -1.90 -24.7
WhitingTr 17.09 -4.59 -21.2
Raythnwt 12.01 -2.64 -18,0
CashStr gn 13.65 -2.80 -17.0
AssuredG 14.22 -2.84 -16.6
FordM wt 7.66 -1.45 -15.9
MotrlaMo n 29.59 -5.29 -15.2

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citigrp 20834529 4.72 -.17
BkofAm 10332665 13.60 -.65
S&P500ETF7238389127.72 -.65
FordM 6896386 16.27-1.68
iShEMkts 4440205 45.33-1.15
GenElec 4340532 20.20.+.46
SPDR Fncl3467579 16.25 -.21
iShR2K 2785154 77.41 +.22
Pfizer 2752015 18.15 -.21
SprintNex 1801231 4,45 +.14

Diary
Advanced 1,728
Declined 1,421
New Highs 454
New Lows 51
Total issues 3,195
Unchanged 46
Volume 23,348,438,203


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Engex 4.54 +.68 +17.6
InfuSystem 2.92 +.42 +16.8
Quepasa 14.22 +1.96 +16.0
Tofutti 2.60 +.34 +15.0
YMBiog 2.45 +.31 +14.5
CCAInds 5.97 +.75 +14.4
InvCapHId 4.95 +.60 +13.8
VantDrlun 2.49 .29 +13.2
HelixBiog 2.95 +.32 +12.2
BIkMDMB 15.55 +1.67 +12.0

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Hyperdyn 3.91 -1.59 -28.9
HMG 5.26 -1.05 -16.6
PacOffPT 2.92 -.43 -12.8
B&HO 3.76 -.52 -12.1
IncOpR 3.40 -.45 -11.7
ContMatls 21.32 -2.40 -10.1
GenMoly 5.06 -.57 -10.1
ChiGengM 2.65 -.28 -9.6
ChinNEPet 5.32 -.54 -9.2
StreamGSv 3.20 -.31 -8.8

Most Active (si or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
NthgtMg 340146 2.62 -.03
NovaGld g 282059 13.67 +.74
KodiakO g 235101 6.11 +.49
Hyperdyn 212569 3.91 -1.59
RareEleg 206254 12.95
NAPallg 191286 6.52 -.30
NwGoldg 184656 8.17 +.61
GoldStrg 165743 3.76 +.08
Taseko 158765 5.61 +.10
ChinaShen 144397 6.24 -.06

Diary
Advanced 275
Declined 254
New Highs 24
New Lows 10
Total issues 549
Unchanged 20
Volume 753,557,148


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ClinicData 27.36+12.33 +82.0
BassettF 6.62 +2.37 +55.8
3ptCable 5.67 +1.97 +53.2
SevemBc 5.50 +1.88 +51.9
Terremk 18.92 +5.94 +45.8
GluMobile 2.94 +.77 +35.5
Accuray 8.91 +2.16 +32.0
MidPenn 9.86 +2.36 +31.5
TuesMm 4,98 +1.16 +30.4
FXEner 9.35 +2.11 +29.2

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
PrincNtl 4.55 -2.29 -33.5
SeneticTh 2.95 -1.14 -27.9
Iridium un 9,62 -3.08 -24.3
Tellabs 5.38 -1.47 -21.5
Infinera 7.37 -1.86 -20.2
CarverBcp 2.17 -.53 -19.6
TesseraT 17.11 -4.15 -19.5
TecOpsSv 7.48 -1.67 -18.3
Cardica 4.19 -.91 -17.8
Momenta 12.49 -2.67 -17.6

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Microsoft 4507810 27.75 -.27
PwShs QQQ332483055.73 +.05
Intel 3192867 21.46 +.64
MicronT 2861816 10.37 +.53
Cisco 2621529 20.93 +.21
SiriusXM 1766173 1.62 +.07
Yahoo 1598082 15.83 -.14
Nvidia 1480684 23.76 +1.54
Oracle 1230726 32.00 -.51
Qualcom 1214697 53.74 +2.51

Diary
Advanced 1,299
Declined 1,493
New Highs 337
New Lows 53
Total issues 2,850
Unchanged 58
Volume 10,295,008,882


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg Name Ex


AT&TInc NY 1.72 27.49 -.84 -3.0 -6.4
AMD NY 7.49 -.05 -0.7 -8.4
Alcoa NY .12 16.13 +.34 +2.2 +4.8
AutoZone NY ... 251.06 -1.07 -0.4 -7.9
BkofAm NY .04 13.60 -.65 -4.6 +1.9
BobEvans Nasd .80 31.42 -.94 -2.9 -4.7
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 13.68 -.04 -0.3 -7.6
CSX NY 1.04 69.28 +1.64 +2,4 +7.2
Chevron NY 2.88 93.37 -.41 -0.4 +2.3
Cisco Nasd ... 20.93 +.21 +1.0 +3,5
Citigrp NY 4.72 -.17 -3.5 -.2
CocaCI NY 1.76 62.21 -.56 -0.9 -5.4
Corning NY .20 21.80 +2,47 +12.8 +12.8
Delhaize NY 2.02 78.21 +.15 +0.2 +6.1
EMCCp NY .24.48 +.50 +2.1 +6.9
EKodak NY 3.64 -1.51 -29.3 -32.1
FamilyDIr NY .72 42.48 -1,32 -3.0 -14.5
FordM NY ,.. 16.27 -1.68 -9.4 -3.1
GenElec NY .56 20.20 +.46 +2.3 +10.4
HomeDp NY .95 36.70 +.19 +0.5 +4.7
iShSilver NY ., 27,30 +.47 +1.8 -9.5
iShEMkts NY .64 45.33 -1.15 -2.5 -4.9
iShR2K NY .89 77.41 +.22 +0.3 -1.1
Intel Nasd .72 21.46 +.64 +3.1 +2.0
JPMorgChNY .20 44,54 -.75-1.7 +5.0
Lowes NY .44 25,25 +.24 +1.0 +.7
MGM Rsts NY ... 14.49 -.51 -3.4 -2.4
McDnIds NY 2,44 73.28 -J.73 -2.3 -4.5


Wkly Wkly YTD
Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg


MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd
NokiaCp NY .56
Nvidia Nasd
OcciPet NY 1.52
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .80
Potash NY .84
PwShs QQQNasd .33
PrUShS&PNY
RegionsFnNY .04
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.37
SaraLee NY .46
SearsHIdgsNasd ...
SiriusXM Nasd
SoulhnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY
SPDR FnclNY .16
TimeWarn NY .85
WalMarlt NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20
Xerox NY .17
Yahoo Nasd


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks, pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
at at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wi =
When issued. wi = Warrants,
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption tee. f = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA= not available. p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week, x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gatners and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.14 0.16
6-month 0.15 0.19
5-year 1.92 2.01
10-year 3.32 3.41
30-year 4.52 4.57


Dow Jones Industrials
Close: 11,823.70
1 -week change: -48.14 (-0.4%)
12,000 .. . . . .. .... "


108.68 -3.33


MON TUES


8.25 4.39 -166.13


WED THUR FRI


11,500

11,000

10,5001

10,000


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assetl Total Return/Rank Pct Min Inn
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRetIs CI 138,794 10.86 +1.5 +7.6/B. +8.1/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 66,101 30.70 +1.1 +17.1/D +1.7/C 5.75 250
Fidelity Contra LG 61,430 67.74 +0.1 +21.4/C +3.9/B NL 2,500
American Funds CaplncBuA m [H 58,576 49.90 +0.5 +11.3/D +3.7/C 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStldx LB 56,062 32.01 +1.4 +21.8/A +2.5/B NL 3,000
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS 55,060 36,02 +1.4 +14.1/D +4.1/B 5.75 250
Vanguard Instldxl LB 54,685 116.84 +1.5 +20.0/B +2.1/B NL 5,000,000
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 52,074 16,75 +1.5 +15.4/B +4.0/B 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 51,437 117.67 +1.5 +20.0/B +2.0/B NL 10,000
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 48,788 28.58 +1.6 +15.9/E +2.1/B 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 47,190 32.02 +1.4 +21.9/A +2.6/B NL 10,000
Vanguard TotIln d FB 45,190 15.79 +1.6 +16.3/C +3.1/B NL 3,000
Dodge & Cox InUStk FV 43,406 35.78 +1.2 +17.8/A +3.8/A NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 43,037 110.41 +2.3 +17.7/C -0.3/D NL 2,500
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 39,209 41.44 +1.1 +15.2/C +4.5/A 5.75 250
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 38,821 27.52 +1.1 +17.3/C +1.7/E 5.75 250
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 34,273 2.22 +2.4 +16,0/A +5.7/A 4.25 1,000
PIMCO TotRetAdm b CI 33,684 10.86 +1.5 +7.3/B +7.9/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard InstPlus LB 33,642 116.84 +1.5 +20.1/B +2.1/B NL 200,000,000
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 33,224 28.64 +0.5 +17.7/C +5.0/A 5.75 250
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 33,088 37.23 +1.6 +19.2/B +3.5/A 5.75 250
Vanguard 50OOnv LB 31,904 117.65 +1.5 +19.9/B +1.9/B NL 3,000
American Funds BaJA m MA 31,408 18.20 +1.9 +15.4/B +3.8/B 5.75 250
Fidelity GrowCo LG 28,621 84.19 +1.0 +27.1/A +5.0/A NL 2,500
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl 27,199 10.60 +1.2 +5.4/D +5.9/B NL 10,000
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 27,179 54.56 +2.1 +14.2/C +5.5/A NL 50,000
Fidelity LowPriStk d MB 27,094 38.74 +1.4 +22.8/E +4.3/B NL 2,500
CA -Conservative Alocation, Cl -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LareGrowth, FV
Large Value, IH -Wodd Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Laure Growth, LV -Lare Value, MA -Moderate Acaon, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, M
Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specially-heath, WS -World Stock Total Returnm: Chng AV with didends reinvested. Rank: How fund perned vs.
others willi same objective: A s in top 20%, E in bottom 20%, Min In nvt: Minimum $ needed to investing fund. Source: Momninor.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wily
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg. Last
ConEd 2.40 4.8 15 +.20 +1.0 5,.,"
ConstellEn .96 3.0 1 +.09 +5.0 3 Vi.
Corning .20 .9 10 +2.47 +12.8 ',1 "I,
Covidien .80 1.7 ... -.43 +3.1 C r-)
DR Horton .15 1.2 89 -.19 +4.8 1 C,
DTE 2.24 4.8 13 -.30 +2.0 C "
Danahers .08 .2 17 -.25 -2.4 C.,.-,
DeanFds ... ... 10 -.43 +13.5 !:''.,
DeltaAir ... ... 13 +.29 -6.1 1 i .
DenburyR ... ... 26 +.70 +.9 1 -"
DevonE .64 .8 8 +1.62 +8.4 E'
DrSCBear rs... ... ... -.24 +1.4 -"
DirFnBear ... ... ... +.22 -7.0 : ,
DrxFBulls ... ... ... -.88 +4.9 3, 4 -
DirxSCBull .11 .2 .. +.29 -3.9 0*
DirxLCBear ... ... ... +.07 -4.9 v
Discover .08 .4 17 -.01 +10.4 2 )r
Disney .40 1.0 19 -.89 +3.6 3'
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DukeEngy .98 5.5 12 -.20 +.8 .
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Dynegyrs ... ... ... +.44 +8.2
EMC Cp ... ... 28 +.50 +6.9 ;3 1
EIPasoCp .04 .3 12 +.98 +12.4 'r.
Elan ... ... ... +.47 +20.8 .
EldorGldg .10 ... 43 +.42 -11.6 1 4t
EmersonEl 1.38 2.4 21 -.58 -.4 f. +,
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Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Wkly YTD
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg
iShR2K .89 1.1 ... +.22 -1.1
iShREst 1.97 3.4 ... +.93 +2.4
InterXion n
IBM 2.60 1.6 14 +3.71 +8.5
IntlCoal ... ... 89 +.61 +14.5
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LVSands ... ... +.26 -.8
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Limited .80 2.8 15 +.24 -5.9
LincNat .20 .7 13 +.06 +4.5
LizClaib ... .. ... +.22 -30.4


Wkly
Last Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


LloydBkg
LaPac
MBIA
MEMC
MGIC
MGM Rsts
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Manpwl 74
MarathonO1.00
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Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
McAfee
Mechel
Medtrnic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MelroPCS
MitsuUFJ
MobileTel s ...
Molycorp n ...
Monsanto 1.12
MonslrWw ...
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
MotrlaSol n ,
MotrlaMo n .
MurphO 1.10
NCR Corp ...


NRG Egy ...
Nabors
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 7.04 6.3
NOilVarco .44 .6
NatSemi .40 2.7
NY CmtyB 1.00 5.5
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NewmtM .60 1.1
NextEraEn 2.00 3.7
NiSource .92 4.9
NielsenHn ...
NobleCorp .90 2.4
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OfficeDpt ...
OilSvHT 2.40 1.1
Owenslll
PG&ECp 1.82 3.9
PMI Grp
PNC .40 .7
PPL Corp 1.40 5.5
PatriolCoal ...
PeabdyE .34 .6
Penney .80 2.5
PepsiCo 1.92 3.0
Petrohawk ...
PelrbrsA 1,20 3.7
Petrobras 1.20 3.4
Pfizer .80 4.4
PhilipMor 2.56 4.5
Potash .84 .5
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ ... ...
ProUItSP .43 .9
ProUShL20 ...
ProUShtFn ...
ProUSR2K ...
ProUSSP500... ..
ProUltCrude...
ProUSSIv rs...
ProgsvCp 1.40 2.0
ProLogis .45 3.0
PulteGrp ...
QntmDSS ...
QwestCm .32 4.5
RadianGrp .01 .1
RadioShk .25 1.6
Raytheon 1.50 3.0
RedHat
RegionsFn .04 .6
ReneSola ...
RioTinto s .90 1.3
RiteAid h ...
RockTen .80 1.2
RylCarb
SLM Cp
SpdrDJIA 2.92 2.5
SpdrGold ...
SP Mid 1.51 .9
S&P500ETF2.37 1.9
SpdrHome .33 1.9
SpdrKbwBk .13 .5
SpdrRetl .49 1.1
SpdrOGEx .20 .4
SpdrMetM .38 .6
Safeway .48 2.3
StJude
Salesforce ..
SandRdge ...
SaraLee .46 2.7
Schlmbrg 1,00 1.2
Schwab .24 1.3
SemlHTr .56 1.6
SiderNacs ,58 3.5
SilvWhtng ...


+.38 +7.4 20.99
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25.00
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-.40 +4.0 17.79
+.69 +5.7 34.40
-.85 -.3 16.62
+.92 -19.3 31.49


Name Div
SmurfStnn ...
SouthnCo 1.82
SwstAirt .02
SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.04
SprintNex ..
SP Mails 1.17
SP HIthC .57
SP CnSt .78
SP Consum .49
SP Engy .99
SPDR Fncl .16
SP Inds .60
SP Tech .32
SP Util 1.27
StillwtrM ...
Suncor gs .40
Suntech
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TJX .60
TaiwSemi .47
Target 1.00
TeckRes g .60
TenetHith ...
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texlnst .52
Textron .08
3MCo 2.10
TimeWam .85
Total SA 3.13
Transocn
Travelers 1.44
TrinaSolar ...
Tycolntl .86
Tyson .16
UBS AG ...
USAirwy ..
UnionPac 1.52
UtdContl ...
UtdMicro .08
UPS B 1.88
US Bancrp .20
USNGsFd...
USOilFd ..
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .50
Vale SA .76
Vale SApf .76
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VerizonCm 1.95
ViacomB .60
VimpelC n .46
Visa .60
VMware
Walgm .70
Weathfinti ..
WellPoint
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .08
WDigital
WstnUnion .28
Weyerh .60
WmsCos .50
WTIndia .15
XL Grp .40
Xerox .17
Yamanag .12
YirtgliGrn ...
YumBmds 1.00


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... ...+9.85 +46.0 37.37
4.8 16 -.48 -1.2 37.77
.2 19 -.64 -8.1 11.93
... 22 +.62 +3.6 38.79
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1.5 13 +.49 +5.4 34.27
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1.0 8 -.70 -3.9 16.55
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... 5 +.33 +1.5 10.16
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2.5 10 -.10 ... 3.16
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5.5 27 +.68 -.4 35.63
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... 88 -4.87 -3.5 85.79
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1.7 43 -.05 +2.4 ,4.73
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1.1 27 +.21 -12.1 11.25
.. 14 -.06 +14.1 11.27
2.2 20 -1.87 -5.4 46.40


Nasdaq Most Active


+9.8 42.08
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-9.9 11.21
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-3,3 .35
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+11.6 23.50
+29.7 20.72
+3.5 20.93
+.8 .62
-6,8 63.76


Name Div
Clearwire ...
ClinicData ..
Comcast .38
Come spcl .38
Compuwre ...
CorintliC ...
Costco .82
Cree Inc
Ctrip.com ..
CypSemi
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTVA ...
DryShips ..
ETrade rs ...
eBay
EagleBulk ...
ElectArts ...
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .28
Expedia .28
ExpScrips ...
F5 Netwks ..
FifthThird .04
Finisar
FstNiagara .60
Flextrn
FresKabi rt ...
GT Solar ...
Genoptix
GileadSci
GluMobile
Google
GreenMtC s
HanmiFncl
Hologic
HudsCity .60
Inlinera


Wkly YTD
YId PE Chg %Chg
-.22 +2.7
... ...+12.33 +72.0
1.7 18 -.69 +4.4
1.8 17 -.65 +3.6
22 -1.04 -10.2
3 +.40 +4.4
1.1 24 -.84 -.4
27 -.48 -22.9
44 -2.42 +.5
41 +.90 +13.8
12 -.32 -3.0
-.16 -.1
25 +.32 +5.6
23 -.15 -11.7
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S22 +.29 +8.9
10 -.51 -17.5
... ... -.13 -8.4
51 -1.13 -7.9
2.3 ... +.41 +5.8
1.1 16 -1.00 -.4
29 -1.86 +3.9
... 51 -.39 -15.8
.3 24 +.04 -.3
... 34 +1.45 +9.0
4.3 19 +.14
16 +.05 +2.7
... +.01 +12.2
13 -.80 +19.3
20 +5.19 +31.2
12 +.02 +5.4
... +.77 +42.0
23-10.84 +1.2
72 -.71 +2.7
... +.20 +14.8
... ... +.70 +5.8
5.5 10 -.30 -14.1
... ... -1.86 -28.7


Name Div
Intel .72
Intuit
JA Solar
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
KLATnc 1.00
LamResrch ...
Level3
LinearTch .96
MIPS Tech .
MannKd
MarvellT .,
Mattel .83
Maximlntg .84
MelcoCrwn ..
Microchp 1.38
MicronT
Microsoft .64
Momenta ...
NetApp
Nelflix
NewsCpA .15
NewsCpB .15
Novell .
Novius
Nvidia
OnSmcnd
Oracle .20
Orexigen
PMC Sra ...
PanASlv .10
PaIIUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .62
PluristemT ...
Popular
Power-One ...
PwShs QQQ000 ,.33


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
3.4 11 +.64 +2.0 21.46
... 27 -.09 -5.1 46.77
.. 7 -.59 -1.6 6.81
... ... +.90 +16.9 16.92
... 20 -.47 -11.0 5.88
2.3 19 +1.86 +13.1 43.69
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... ... +.04 +19.4 1.17
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... 27 -2.65 -16.3 12.70
.. -.72 -37.4 5.05
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... +20 +17.5 7.47
3.7 20 +.42 +7.8 36.89
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3.9 23 -.60 +2.5 31.69
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... ... +37 118.9 3.13
-.04 +1.3 3.18
... 16 -.35 +1.9 10.39
.6 ... 05 +2.3 55.73


Name Div
Qualcom .76
RF MicD ...
RschMoIn ...
Riverbed s ...
SanDisk
Sanmina
SavienlPh ...
SeagateT .
Slcnware .41
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol
Solarfun
Sonus
Staples .36
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .30
SunPowerA ..
Symahtec ...
TD Amerilr .20
Tellabs .08
Terremk
TovaPhim .75
Ihoratec
TibcoSfl ...
TriQuint
UranmRs ....
UrbanOut ...
Vorisign 3.00
VirgnMdah .16
Vivus
Vodafone 1.33
Windstrm 1.00
Xilinx .64
YRC Ww rs ...
Yahoo
ZionBco .04


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
25 +2.51 +8.6 53.74
15 -.91 -7.6 6.79
10 -1.40 +3.5 60.15
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20 -.05 -9,0 12.69
14 +.91 +11.1 32.19
... +.44 +11,6 4.15
18 -.14 -4.8 15.83
... -.88 -3.3 23.43


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
AbdAsPac .42 6.3 ... +.05 -1.6 6.64
AdeonaPh ... ... -.03 +16.0 1.45
Advntrx rs ... ... ... +.03 -12.3 2.29
AlexcoRg .. ... ... +.61 -18.8 6.65
AldNevG ... ... 52 +.99 -1.7 25.85
AlmadnMg ...... ... -.14 -17.8 3.89
AmApparel ... ... ... -.24 -36.7 1.05
ArcadiaRs ... ... .. -.02 +1.7 .31
ArmourRsdl.44 18.4 ... +.24 +.1 7.82
Aurizon g ... ... ... +.05 -13.3 6.35
AvalRaren ....... +.47 -5.4 5.90
BarcGSOil ... ... ... +.08 -3.4 24.73
Brigus grs ... ... ... -.06 -23.8 1.60
CAMAC En ... ... -.01 -9.0 1.81
CelSci ... ... 14 -.03 -13.5 .71
CFCdag .01 .1 ... +.53 -9.0 18.86
CheniereEn ... ... ... -.13 +14.9 6.34
ChiGengM ... ... 20 -.28 -48.5 2.65
ChinaShen ... ... 18 -.06 -25.7 6.24
Crosshg rs ... ... ... ... -26.2 1.86
DejourEg ... ... ... -.03 -6.3 .30
DenisnMg ... ... ... -.01 -.6 3.40
EndvSilvg ... ... ... +.54 -14.7 6.26
Fronteerg ... ... ... +.57 -16.1 9.84
GascoEngy ... ... .. -.04 +40.0 .49
GenMoly .. -.57 -21.9 5.06
GoldResrc .18 .. ... -1.64 -20.4 23.40
GoldStrg 38 +,08 -18.1 3.76
GranTrra g +.36 +6.2 8.55
GrtBasG g ... +.16 -9.1 2.69
Hyperdyn ..... -1.59 -21.2 3.91
IvaxDiag ... ... ... +.22 +96.5 1.12
KodiakOg ... ... ... +.49 -7.4 6.11
MadCatzg ... .. 7 +.03 -15.5 .86
Metalico ... 27 +.20 -8.7 5.37
Metalline ... ... ... +.08 -14.4 1.07
MdwGoldg ... .... +37 +57.1 1.32
Minefnd ... ... ... -.09 -13.0 9.61


Name Div
Nevsun g ...
NDragon
NwGold g ..
NA Palig ...
NDyoMng ...
NthnO&G ...
NthgtMg ...
NovaGIdg ...
Ollsandsg ...
OpkoHIth ...
ParaG&S ...
PhrmAth ...
PionDrill ...
PudaCoal ...
Quepasa
RadientPh
RareEle g
Rentech
RexahnPh
Rubicon g ..
Sam O&G...
Senesco
SulphCo
TanzRyg ...
Taseko
TmsatlPet ..
TriValley ...
Uluru
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDrl ...
VimetX .50
VistaGold .,
WizzardSft ...
YMBiog ...
ZBB Enav ..


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... +.15 -20.8 5.96
... ... -.01 +51.1 .07
... ... +.61 -16.3 8.17
... ... -.30 -6.1 6.52
... ... +.41 +28.1 18.30
... ... +.43 -3.6 26.23
... 22 -.03 -18.1 2.62
... ... +.74 -4.2 13.67
... ... +.01 +35.7 .57
... ... +,37 +4.9 3.85
... ... +.26 -15.0 3.39
... .. -.20 -23.9 3.22
... ... +.32 -2.8 8.56
... 11 -.24 -14.5 12.18
+1.96 +21.5 14.22
-.20 -33.7 .67
... ... ... -19.4 12.95
... .. ... +.8 1.23
+.16 +30.4 1.46
... ... +.14 -13.1 4.96
... ... +.04 +65.2 2.18
... ... -.01 +7.2 .30
... ... -.01 +12.4 .19
... ... +,26 -11.1 6.49
... ... +.10 +6.9 5.61
... ... -.13 -12.6 2.91
... ... +.02 -24.6 .43
... ..: -.01 -18.2 .09
... ... +.25 +2.0 3.05
... ... -.33 +11.3 4.44
... -.09 -13.1 5.25
... ... -.04 -8.9 1.85
... 9 -.21 -16.0 12.48
... ... +.16 +7.1 2.56
... ... -.00 +4.0 .26
.. ... +.31 +5.2 2.45
... ... -.11 -3.7 1.04


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1,0063 1.0076
Britain 1.5869 1.5935
Canada 1.0004 .9940
Euro .7345 .7284
Japan 82.17 82.82
Mexico 12.1420 12.0300
Switzerind .9423 .9458
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20 2.1
AK Steel .20 1.3
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72 6.3
AbtLab 1.76 3.9
Accenture .90 1.7
AMD
Agnico g .64 .9
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 .7
Aldlrish
Allstate .80 2.6
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52 6.4
AEagleOut .44 3.0
AEP 1.84 5.1
AmExp .72 1.6
AmlntiGrp ...
Anadarko .36 .5
AnalogDev .88 2.3
Annaly 2.65 14.9
Apache .60 .5
ArcelorMit .75 2.1
ArchCoal .40 1.2
ArchDan .60 1.8
Aspenins .60 2.0
AssuredG .18 1.3
ATMOS 1.36 4.2
Avon .88 3.1
BB&TCp .60 2.2
BakrHu .60 .9
BcBilVArg .55 4.6
BcoBrades .82 4.3
BcoSantand .78 6.5
BcoSBrasil .45 3.9
BkofAm .04 .3
Bklrelnd 1.04 ...
BkNYMel .36 1.2
BankUtdn ...
BariPVixrs...
BarrickG .48 1.0
Baxter 1.24 2.6
BerkHB ... ...
BestBuy .60 1.8
Blackstone .40 2.6
BlockHR .60 4.8
Boeing 1.68 2.4
Boise Inc .40
Borders
BostonSci ...
Brinker .56 2.4
BrMySq 1.32 5.1
CB REllis ...
CBSB .20 1.0
CSX 1.04 1.5
CVS Care .50 1.4
CdnNRs gs .30
CapOne .20 .4
Carnival -1.00 2.2
Caterpillar 1.76 1.8
Cemex .43
CenterPnt .79 4.9
CntryUnk 2.90 6.7
ChesEng .30 1.1
Chevron 2.88 3.1
Chicos .16 1.4
Chimera .69 16.4
Citigrp
Citigp wtA ...
Citigp wtB ...
CliffsNRs .56 .7
Coach .60 1.1
CocaCI 1.76 2.8
ColgPal 2.12 2.8
Comerica .40 1.1
ConAgra .92 4.1
ConocPhil 2.20 3.1
ConsolEngy.40 .8


16 -.49
12 -1.12
.. +1.48
... -.15
8 -.84
12 -2.43
19 +.48
12 -.05
38 +.74
... +.08
70 +.34
... -.07
15 -.20
67 +2.66
13 -.30
18 +.05
13 -.58
13 -2.14
... -2.74
42 -3.02
16 -.47
13 +.19
14-10.76
11 -.76
44 +1.61
12 -.69
8 +.10
3 -2.84
15 -.37
19 -.66
23 -1.13
34 +8.32
... -.35
.. -.27
-.47
-.95
21 -.65
... -.29
15 -.98

... -.13
17 +.35
14 -.89
17 +1.11
10 -1.00
... -.38
9 -1.28
16 -2.45
39 +.78
+.01
-.17
14 +2.46
14 -.27
35 -.71
31 -1.42
-17 +1.64
14 -.61
... +.40
8 -.93
18 -1.51
23 +2.93
... -.61
15 +.13
12 +.86
18 -.47
11 -.41
18 +.08
6
13 -,17


14 +1.43
19 -.18
19 -.56
16 -2.01
48 -1.51
15 -.80
11 +2.90
28 -2.30


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ASML Hid .54
Abraxas
AcmePkt ...
ActivsBliz .15
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT
AlteraCp If .24
Amazon
AmCapLtd ..
Amgen
Amylin
ApolloGrp ...
Apple Inc ...
ApIdMatl .28
ArenaPhm ...
ArmHId .12
ArubaNet ...
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.44
Baidus ...
BannerCp .04
BeaconPw ...
BedBath ...
BioSante ...
BrigExp
Broadcom .32
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .16
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
ChinaMda ...
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus ...
Cisco
CilzRepBh .:.
CilrixSvs ...


... +3.13
+.45
96 -.54
15 -.04
22 -.78
57 -1.18
15 +.28
68 -6.28
3 -.13
11 -1.68
... +1.17
11 -1.33
19 +9.38
23 +.76
-.27
-.06
-.51
53 +.22
47 -1.53
20 -1.15
92 +1.44
... +.29
... +.00
17 +,49
... +.01
99 +2,86
27 -.19
22 -.05
16 -1,93

27 -4.85
... -.01
6 +1,21
.. -.10
16 +3.32
15 +.21
... -.05
44 -1.47











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage *


4 lines 6 days $E additional
Rate aplies to private Individuals selling
ePsonE merchandise totalling $100 or less.


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4U.ns d16c
hls is a nonrefjundable rate






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Each Item must include a price.
ThisIsanon-refundablerate.




One Item per ad $ a
4 lines 6 dys Each additional y
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One Item per ad $2
4 lines 6 days Each additional
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p Rate appliesto private Individuals selling






personal merchandise totalling $,00 or less.





4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate appliestoprivateIndividuals ng
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Each Item must Include a price.




This sIaon-refundable rate.


Limited to service type advertis-




4 lines, one month.... 92.o0
SRate applies to private Individuals selling















$10.80 each additional line $6,
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department .
EMAIL: classified@ an additionakecityre-







Ad is oelpear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Men., 10:00a.m. Mn., 9:00a.m.
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Friday Through Fris, 10:00day.m Th from 8.,9:00m.
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classic deadlines ae su in person, ang d some




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publIcation 180
We accept responsib fax or emaility for only
the first Incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-l
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.,
BIllInq Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-.
ment.


Advertising copy is subject toi
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements .under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-lication.
We Icaton. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.


In Print land Online


010 Announcements

PLAY OW
THE LAE CIT
REPORTER'S SUNAY
WOR3SAR5-


020 Lost & Found

FOUND: Boston Terrier.
West side of town.
Call 386-752-3272
to identify.

t 0 J10b
100 Opportunities


09543193
NOW HIRING!!!
Be home everyday, While
making excellent pay! We are
now hiring experienced
Class A Drivers to haul
petroleum locally.
Excellent benefits package
including health, dental
and 401K.
All applicants MUST Have:
Class A CDL with X
endorsements.
1 yr tractor-trailer experience
with a t/t school certification or
2 yrs. tractor-trailer experience
without the certification.
25 yrs or older
Please apply online at
floridarockandtanklines.com
or call 1-866-352-7625

04543277
Aaron's Lake City store is now
hiring Retail Manager's at
Salary+ Comm.& Bonuses
Sunday Off & Full Benefits
Must have 2 yr. mgmt exp. or
college, NO criminal history,
pass drug test. 21
yrs., or older clean mvr apply at:
www.aarons.com/careers key-
words type "lake city"

04543279
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
For mature individuals seeking
long-term employment. Must
be self motivated and flexible
with work days.
HOUSEKEEPING ROOM
ATTENDANT
Hampton Inn & Suites
Lake City
This full time position offers in-
dustry standard benefits to in-
clude holiday pay, vacation, and
more. Hotel experience prefer-
red but not required.
Apply in person
MONDAY 1/31/11 or
TUESDAY 2/1/11
Between 10am & 4pm ONLY
Hampton Inn & Suites Lake
City
450 SW Florida Gateway Drive
U.S. 90 and 1-75, exit 427

04543288
CCSS, Inc, is accepting
applications for PT CNA &
Housekeepers. Must have CPR,
First Aid training. Dependable
transportation. Level II
background screen & drug test
required. Apply in person
628 SE Allison Ct.
Lake City, FL EOE

04543289
CCSS, Inc, is accepting
applications for PT Receptionist.
Must have CPR, First Aid
training. Dependable
transportation. Level II
background screen & drug test
required. Apply in person
628 SE Allison Ct.
Lake City, FL EOE

05524921




Managers Needed,
competitive wages, advance-
ment opportunities, complete
training program, health, dental
& life benefits, DFWP/EOE
Please send resume to
bbqm@heritagemanagement.net
or fax to 352-387-0011








Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks / Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


100 Job
Opportunities

05524962
Comcast Outside Sales
Contractor for Comcast needs
outside sales reps to sell
cable to homeowners.
Earn $600+ weekly, will train.
Call (866) 323-9416

05525001
Administrative Assistant
Good communication, computer
and overall office skills, good
telephone skills for outbound
calling. Experience with Micro-
soft Office Suite. Some graphic
design exp would be a plus,
fax resume to 888-677-8437

Anderson Columbia is accepting
applications for a certified
electrician with experience in
motor and motor control repair.
Please come by 871 Guerdon Rd,
Lake City, FL to fill out an appli-
cation or email your resume to
wassont@andersoncolumbia.com.
Equal Opportunity Employer
Cosmetologist wanted. Cut N Up
Family Hair Salon has 3 stations
available for rent. Call Sharon
386-365-8402 or 752-1777


25 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: David Draper -
Christian County, KY. Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Row Crop,
Greenhouse/Nursery & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates:
03/20/11 12/15/11. Wage of
$9.7 1/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference Job Order
#KY0418895.
DRIVER/COUNTER SALES
Valid DL. DFWP. Benefits, 401K,
P/T to F/T, Apply at 986 E. Duval
St. Lake City 386-466-0177
Drug Free Workplace. Now hiring
experienced P/T servers & cooks.
Smiley faces, good team players
and hard workers. IHOP
Friendly and helpful person for
part time retail sales in the pool
business. Experience helpful.
Weekends with possibility more
during the week. Send request to:
info@actioninc.biz
Full Time Maintenance Person
needed for medical office,
Send reply to Box 05059, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401 K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.
04543216
LINCARE, leading national
respiratory company seeks
results driven Sale
Representative. Create working
relationships with MD's, nurses,
social workers and articulate our
excellent patient care with
attentive listening skills.
Competitive Base + un-capped
commission. Drug-free
workplace. EOE.
Fax resume to center manager
(386)754-2795


Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

FLORIDA
+ GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
HEATING VENTILATION AND AIR
CONDITIONING (HVAC)
224 DUTY DAYS
GRANT FUNDED
To teach at Columbia Correctional
Institution. Responsible for the
development and implementation of
the HVAC curriculum based on the
provided course objectives. The
instructor is required to use any tools,
equipment, or textbooks provided for
the program. Prepare all class
materials, syllabi, exams, etc.
Prepare students for employment in
the HVAC industry. Maintain all
course records (attendance and
grades) to meet audit requirements.
Requires four years experience in the
HVAC industry. Must become
NCEER Certified HVAC Instructor
and receive a Proctors License to
give the EPA exam. Must have prior
teaching experience and be
comfortable working in a
government-regulated environment.
Knowledge of basic teaching
concerts and proficient in
troubleshooting, installing and
repairing HVAC equipment required.
Desirable Qualifications: A S. Degree
in Industrial Maintenance or related
work area preferred with teaching
experience. Salary: Based on degree
and experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 2/11/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation,
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: hu manr c.d
V'"ADAT,' A '0iS o Ci lgi ill I dllc.lll i, llll


1 = i i M Ir-


To place your
classified ad call

A755-5440

iMM iflitN=a


100 Job
100 'Opportunities
Teacher (Lawton's, Early Head
Start Lake City, Birth to 3 yrs old)
HS Dip/GED, Must have FCCPC
/CDA; three years of classroom
experience working with
infants/toddlers preferred; Bilin-
gual (Spanish/English) preferred,
5 Hour Literacy, Must pass physi-
cal/DCF background screening,
Current First Aid/CPR preferred.
Excellent Benefits-Paid Holidays,
Sick/Annual Leave. Apply in
person at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637,
by email: arobinson(a)sv4cs.org
Fax (384) 754-2220. EOE
6 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Wilsons Cedar
Point Farms Pulaski County, KY.
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row Crop,
Produce & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 03/20/11 -
11/30/11. Wage of $9.71/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference Job Order
#KY0418910.

1 Medical
120 Employment

04543244
RN
Full time, 11-7 shift.
Excellent pay and benefits
Please apply Baya Pointe Nurs-
ing & Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025

04543276
SENIOR REGISTERED
NURSE
The Columbia County Health
Department is seeking a Senior
Registered Nurse, PSN
#64080175. Must have a Florida
RN license. Must be
fingerprinted and drug screened.
This employer uses E-Verify.
May be required to work during
or beyond normal work hours or
days in the event of an I
emergency. Applications will be
accepted online at
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/
State of Florida applications
may be mailed to State of
Florida, People First, Staffing
Administration, PO Box 44058,
Jacksonville, Fl 32231 or faxed
to (904)-636-2627 by 2/2/11.
EEO/AA/VP Employer

Internal Medicine of Lake City
is looking for N.P. or P.A.
Please contact Dr Bali @
386-755-1703


FLORIDA
GATEWAY
-COLLEGE
1 * *
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
PROGRAMS
224 Duty Days Tenured Track
(Revised and Re-advertised)
Instructor to teach and assist the
EMS Coordinator and Executive
Director of Public Service Programs
in various aspects of program
development, planning and
implementation of the EMT-Basic,
Paramedic, and EMS Associate
Degree programs, as well as
Firefighter programs. He/she
maintains a close relationship with
clinical sites and part-time faculty,
and assists in program expansion and
student recruitment; also assists
Coordinator in maintaining state and
national program accreditation.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
Bachelor's degree in emergency
medical services or closely related
field. Master's degree preferred.
KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, ABILITIES
REQUIRED: Paramedic certification
either at the state or national level
(must have Florida state license
within six months of hire). Four years
experience as a paramedic with an
ALS provider. Must have two years
experience (full or part-time) teaching
EMS, Must be able to establish and
maintain effective working
relationships with others. Knowledge
of EMS equipment. DESIRABLE
QUALIFICATIONS: Master's degree
in emergency medical services or
closely related field, or Master's
degree with 18 graduate hours in the
emergency medical services or
closely related field. Minimum three
years teaching experience at the
technical school or community college
level. ACLS, PALS, and PHTLS
instructor certification. Experience
with program accreditation process.,
Experience with American Heart
Association accreditation and
credentialing. Fire/rescue experience.
Knowledge of firefighter equipment
and certification.
Salary: Based on degree and
experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 2/28/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Ma I hi uttnrn'cfgoc edu


ARE YOU 7'OUR



4 !Comforiabic, '
worA


( arenC rone



Opp funt ies,


Apply Online or In Personl


SITEL


120 ^Medical
120 Employment

05524982



MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
RN's
PRN/I yr experience
CNA
F/T & PRN

ARNP Outpatient Svcs
Starke/Tri County

Recovery Specialist
Prevention Specialist
Starke/Lake City

Bachelors Therapist
Support
Masters Therapists
Adult Substance Abuse
(Licensed)
Lake City

Job Coach
Bachelors/Experience Required
Lake City

Adult Case Manager
Live Oak

Psychiatrist
Outpatient clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City

Custodial
Lake City

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
www.mbhci.org
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP



130 Part Time
Farm Coordinator. PT.
Ag experience required.
References. Bilingual. McAlpin
area. 941-302-1974 Paul


140 Work Wanted

We Run Errands!
Your personal errand service to
help those in need at rates you can
afford Call Dawn 386-249-9426

240 Schools &
240 s Education

04(5.2.18
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant. $479
next class-02/14/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/14/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


MISSING PIECE?.






N 1liou skills
: and


piI'.IItim


v arittiude


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com --


Expect the Best

Target.com/careers

An inclusive, energetic culture. Incredible
opportunity. A community-focused company.
And one of the most powerful brands in the world.
You can expect a lot from a career at Target.
MAINTENANCE MECHANIC
* Perform needed repairs on doors, dock plates, lighting, HVAC, plumbing and fire
protection systems to resolve problems and ensure successful operation.
* Perform preventive and corrective maintenance on industrial conveyor systems,
electrical/electronic control systems, mechanical systems, building electrical systems,
electronic forklifts, and other material handling equipment.
* Knowledge of PLCs, PC control systems, 3-phase, 480-volt electricity, and material
handling equipment.
* Ensure the maintenance shop area is organized, neat and clean Identily and act
Immediately regarding any safely hazards, spills, etc. to avoid the risk of accidents.
Use safe lifting techniques and operate power equipment in a safe manner. Abide by all
stated regulations while performing work, i.e., Iockout/tagout pioceduies, etc. Maintain
records to ensure accountability of time, parts and repairs
* Perform carpentry work as required.

REQUIREMENTS:
* High School graduate 01 equivalent; Industrial/Trade school courses and one year
on-the-job training in plant maintenance
* Work independently in a teallm environmennl with a custoinel/giicst locus
* Must exhibit aptitude tli inechanical woik
* Able to be certified to operate powel equipment, operate iiiaienaiince tools. saws, du ills, etc.,
work from blueprints/sketches and lift and cany imate'iiils/eqiiipment necess.iiy to do thei job
* Strong communication skills
1T apply, visit Target.corn/careers
Target is an equal employmeintt opportunity employer and is ai drul'-fre workplace. 0C0ll 1 Target Stories


I


IBUYI


SELL
11 1 IT


FIND I


1


\240 Schools &
240 Education

(14543297
Wanted Career
Motivated Students!
Reinvent yourself for a career in
a high demand field. If you are
seeking a new career or wish to
increase your knowledge in one
of the fastest growing industries
in the nation, then get your
Degree or Certificate in
Logistics & Distribution and
Supply. Chain Management!
Instant scholarships available
for qualified students. Classes
start 2/3/2011. Contact Florida
Gateway College at
386-754-4492 or email us at
www.logisticsbannercenter.com
This workforce solution was
funded by a grant awarded
under the President's Communi-
ty-Based Job Training Grants as
implemented by the U.S.
Department of Labor's Employ-
ment and Training Administra-
tion. The solution was created
by the grantee and does not
necessarily reflect the official
position of the U.S. Department
of Labor. The Department of
Labor makes no guarantees,,
warranties, or assurances of any
kind, express or implied, with
respect to such information,
including any information on
linked sites and including, but
not limited to, accuracy of the
information or its completeness,
timeliness, usefulness, adequa-
cy, continued availability, or
ownership. This solution is
copyrighted by the institution
that created it. Internal use by an
organization and/or personal use
by an individual for
non-commercial purposes is
permissible. All other uses
require the prior authorization of
the copyright owner.



310 Pets & Supplies

Lab, Black, AKC.
health cert. born 11/24/10,
$250
386-935-3036 or 935-0105

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

Yorkie Puppy, male.
health certificate, CKC papers.
$700,
386-688-7777


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011


401 Antiques
CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques. 386-963-2621

407 Computers
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

412 Medical
412 Supplies
Medline Adult Diapers, fitted
briefs, size medium (32-44),
30 dozen, will sell by dozen or
whole lot for $90 386-752-2572

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
S All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Jazzy, Electric Wheelchair,
like new
$500 obo
386-752-2572
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

61O Mobile Home
610 Lots for Rent

Beautiful 3/2 DWMH onl acre,
fenced back yard, double carport,
near college & shopping,$850 mo
avail Feb 1st 386-697-1013

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114






Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
,maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003
SWMH 2 BR/1BA. Washer/
Dryer. In country on 2 acres. Off
of SR 47. $450. mo + deposit.
386-961-9990 before 9pm.
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Nice 4br/2.5 ba, 3 ac. Fenced
Cross Fenced, paved rd., huge
deck, private. McAlpin area. $900
dep. & $950. mo. 386-867-1833

640 Mobile Homes
for Sale
$569 mo 3Bd/2Ba Modular
1/2 acre Deck, energy efficient,
appliances, drive, w/$12K down
($640 mo w/ $6K down).
Avail in Match
Owner finance or rent to own???
Call (386) 758-9824 hurry
n71 AUnfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
[)55248i33l-------
Get up to $2011 in 2011!
Call for Details
Windsong Apts
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 bedroom Apartments &
mobile homes,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $500. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332


710 A Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
Large 2br/2ba Duplex.in
nice area with W/D hookup.
Rbnt $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Move In Special.2/1 w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

7 A 0 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Ibr Apt. incl. water, elec, & cable.
$595. mo. Close to college. Good
area in Lulu. References & sec.
req'd. No pets. 386-719-4808
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

70 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05524832
New Years Dream "Surprise"
Why Rent? Lease to own.
-New model home 2 miles S off
S47. 3000 sq ft, 4/3, 5% int, is
tax deduc, consider trade-in
386-752-1364

3/2, 2-car garage, fenced back
yard, convenient in-town location
near Summers school.
$1050 per mo. 386-623-2848
3/2, 2000 sq ft Brick Home in
Stonehenge on 1/2 acre lot, for
rent or sale, $1175 mon, + sec or
$174,900 Call 850-380-3937
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport, $825 mo, 1st,
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
3br/lba w/yard,
near airport, $500. mo,
1st, last & $300 sec.
386-752-0335 M-F 8-4
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
CH/A, carport. $650/mo. + sec.
Includes all utilities & satellite TV.
Pets OK. (386)758-2408
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+Retirement Living,
Site built home
2br/2bth For Lease
Large 3br/2ba house near
downtown Lake City; FR, DR,
fenced yd, screened pool; No pets;
$800/mo + sec dep;623-2642
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Corner of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Remodeled, 3br/lba, fenced, new
deck, shop, cabinets, appl, close to
schools, $600 mo, $400. dep. 386-
752-5948, 984-5856,478-391-1592
Spacious 2br/lba house. In town
Close to shopping.
$625. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
Three Rivers Estates, 2/1, CH/A,
2010 W2 and ref's from current
landlord required, $675 month, &
$600 sec dep, 386-497-4699
Turnkey rental, 3/2 split.2 CG, 1/2
acre, quiet neighborhood, close to
1-75, $1050 per month, Ist/last/sec,
386-454-2826 or 954-895-1722

750 Business &
Office Rentals
2Yr Old Office Space for Rent.
2750 sqft, Office, Kitchen, Phone,
Security, Internet, Utilities, Trash
all included. Upstairs to be isolated
or downstairs for public traffic.
Email for pictures and more
information, todd@r3global.com
Great locations on SW Main Blvd.
. Retail, Wholesale, Distribution,
Office. 1200+ sf only $950. per
mo. Includes Utilities 752-5035
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.
This nice 4.5 acre parcel has


DR. SHERLOCK WORD HUNT IS ON THE CASE,
BUT THE ONLY WAY TO WIN IS IF YOU PLAY! 4







T. Wif j


septic, power & well, older MH
$39.900 MLS 76182
Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty


810 Home for Sale
2br/2ba Eastside Village.
Unique floor plan. Lg utility/
work room. Screened front porch.
$55,000 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
3/1 on 4.43 acres, metal roof,
pond on property,
Lease option available
$129,888 Results Realty,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
3br/2ba 80'X125' lot. 1,200 sqft.
Kitchen & bath remodeled, metal
roof, Ig fenced back yard. Close to
amenities. $79,900 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Brick home w/1,934 sqft
in Piccadilly Park. 1/2 acre. Lg
playroom, fenced yard. Reduced to
$139,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Custom home. on 5 ac.
where deer & turkey roam.
Lg barn w/enclosed workshop.
$219,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
4/2 in Sub-div, open floor
plan,florida room, porch, fenced,
$150,000 call Missy Zecher
@Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
4/2 on 4 acres, open floor plan, 2
living rms, rec room w/wet bar
$89,900 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
4/3 farm house on 95 acres w/pri-
vate pond, surrounded by oaks
$689,000 Charlie Sparks,
Westfield Realty MLS#76149
386-755-0808
4br/2ba, 5 ac., 2069 sqft. Ig f pmily
& florida rm, den. Covered patio,
workshop. $229,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba, remodeled, views of the
lake. Formal LR, dining room &
family room. Many upgrades.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
67.5 acre farm, fenced, workshop,
pole barn and two ponds, MH
(1984 sq ft) $299,000
call Patti Taylor at
Access Realty 386-623-6896


Affordable, clean home in sub-div,
Freshly painted interior,
This is a must see!
Brittany Stoeckert
SResults Realty 386-397-3473
BRAND new home, Irg master
suite, 2 miles from US 90,
$179,900 MLS #76449
Carrie CasonWestfield Realty
386-623-2806
Brick home on 5 acres,
country feel close to town!
Must See! Results Realty
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
Clean, cozy, well maintained 3/2
on 1.05 acres, lots of shade trees,
built in 2007, $135,900
Call Patty Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Country Club. 4br/4ba. New roof,
AC, windows. Pool, hot tub,
& greenhouse. $229,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Custom Brick, 5+ ac. 5br/4ba.
4412 sqft. 3 car garage, pool, hot
tub, 3 fireplaces, more. 569,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lori Giebeig-Simpson 365-5678
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
3BR/2BA .
$99,999
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
Fully furnished 2br/2ba @
$83,000
Excellent area. 3br/2ba home.
1620 sqft. w/covered patio. Lg
front porch & 1 car carport
Lori Giebeig. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Large 3/2 brick home w/basement.
2 living areas. porch on 2 lots
$129,900 MLS #74118
386-623-2806 Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty
Large entertaining home, w/pool,
gazebo, huge workshop,
$285,000 Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Large home w/acre of land, Irg
S family & florida rooms,
covered porch,
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Move In Ready. 3br/2ba w/1,225
sqft. Comer lot, great S/D.
12x16 workshop w/elec.
Upgrades. $75,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
Nice 3/2 home on 4 acres
close to town $168,000,
Motivated seller MLS#73410
Carrie Cason Westfield Realty
386-623-2806
Nicely remodeled 3/2 on 2 acres,
partially fenced $115,888
Nancy Rogers @
Results Realty
386-867-1271
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Woodcrest S/D Super location,
nice back yard. 3br/2ba home,
cov-
ered back porch. New AC in 2010
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
WOODGATE VILLAGE.
3br/2ba DWMH.
Close to new elementary
school. $27,000. 386-755-5.110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc


- 820 Farms &
820 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake J
Gorgeous Oaks!P
Owner Financing! N


Jeffery Road.
Paved Rd
O DOWN!


$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
j Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


820 Farms &
SAcreage
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

8 Commercial
830 Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190
Commercial property situated
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya Ave 3.27 acres,
$398,888 Results Realty
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
Property (comer location), easy
access comer, close to downtown,
$94,000 Charlie Sparks
Westfield Realty
386-755-0808 MLS#74814

940 Trucks
2007 Chevy Regular Cab, 6 cyl,
auto, a/c, only 41,000 miles,
Rountree Ford Myron Wrubel
386-755-0630 x 292 $12,888
2008 F-450 King Ranch
Diesel Duelly, 36K miles,
Tommie Jefferson 386-209-8680
Rountree Moore Ford $39,995
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802


950 Cars for Sale
2007 Mercury Grand Marquis GS
25K miles, stock #7300, only
$12,888, call Myron Wrubel @
Rountree Moore Ford 755-0630
2010 Ford Escape Limited, V6,
auto, moon roof, white, 21K miles,
stock # F263 Dwight Twiggs
Rountree Moore Ford 755-0630
2010 Toyota Corolla, 8153K
miles, 35 MPG, stock #24598A,
$13,995, Call Tommie Jefferson
@ Rountree Moore Ford 209-8680


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc..cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

T S Y
S l l
Mary r B.ri dget
(386)i 755-5440jp ^^i ^


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G H J 0 A M L G C G M

C N A F U C E E M A 0

Q H I I X B E F F J W T

U E A T U D Y F S [H S

B B C S I U V B A Q U

E R E Q D C 1 I iR Y H C

U A P Y} G U X I L Y L W

V F 0 H F M O E G L S E


B I G V 1N

Lake City
Reporter's
popular weekly
word search is
a great way to
get attention
with a fun new
puzzle every
week at a price
any business
can afford.


F mi.r .r t n a (8 75 4
Deadline isWdedya 0p


and '!aWj
anake some ca$h




ADVERTISE YOUR



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555-5555


Great location.W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276


Classified Department: 755-5440


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011


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Plus tax & supplies
:, , Notvalidwith any other offer 4310 W US HWy 90
expires 1/31/1S (3 8i) 3- 0
Monday-Friday 7am-Spin


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TIETAX STATION
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1010 SW MAIN Bwi-v. LAKE: Crry, FL U
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~ e~.d36 SAVINGS OF $107
ilE %piresJanuar)3 31, 2011


Come find
out what
the new year
has in store
for you... / Psychic Readings Jennifer Miller .
Helps In All Problems Psychic


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~36) 438-5259 4
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Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
crisak@okectyreporter:com


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, January 30, 2011 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK







Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


The fun

side of

growing

spuds

Are you a 'meat
and potatoes'
kind of eater?
Are you one of
the millions of
Americans who have made
the potato our most popu-
lar vegetable? You can sat-
isfy your taste for that 'new'
potato flavor by growing
some in your own garden
this winter.
Potatoes can be planted
in North Florida now
through early March.
This is one of our cool
season crops that do well
when days are warm and
nights are cool. Freeze pro-
tection is still necessary,
however, to protect the
above-ground plant during
any late deviant tempera-
tures.
The relatively short sea-
son varieties that mature in
85-100 days perform well in
our area. Some of the most
popular varieties for home
gardens are Pontiac, Yukon
Gold, Gold Rush and Red
LaSoda. But don't hesitate
to try some of the unusual
and exciting red, blue or
fingerling types that you
can't find in the grocery
store. Just make sure they
are early maturing variet-
ies. The 'seed' pieces that
are planted are actually cut
up potato tubers.
The tubers are cut so
that each piece is about the
size of an egg and has at
least one 'eye' which will
sprout.
Purchase certified dis-
ease-free seed potatoes
from garden supply stores
or mail-order dealers.
Plant potatoes four
inches deep in loose, well
drained soil that is slightly
acidic.
When the sprouts peek
through, mound several
more inches of soil on top
to form the 'hill'.
This keeps the new
potatoes from pushing up
above the soil surface and
turning green.
You may be wonder-
ing how many pounds of
certified seed potatoes to
purchase.
Fifteen pounds will plant
a 100-foot row, with plants
spaced 12 inches apart.
That row will produce at
least 150 pounds.
If you go to the website
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/
hsl83 and follow the direc-
tions for irrigation and fer-
tilization, you might even
harvest 300 pounds.
Two Vegetable
Gardening Workshops will
be held in February by
Master Gardeners at 2:00
p.m., Saturday, Feb. 19,
at the Columbia County
Public Library in down-
town Lake City. Also, at
5:45 p.m., Thursday, Feb.
17, at the new library
branch in Fort White.
Free, fun and informa-
tive.
* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and


Agricultural Sciences.


HECKTES


Two Lake City residents play human chess


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporte r ': on
T here was n,, qi-stiun about what rule.
Stephanie T\yson uf Like City Would audi-
tion for in the living chess gami..
"When I sawI Lady of the Lake on the
character list I said. "That's it. Ihat's nmy
part,"' she said.
Tyson and Jessica "Rocket" Martin. also lif Lakre
City, both portray characters in the 25th Annual
Hoggetowne Medieval Faire's living chess game.
Martin plays head sprite lMisty, one of the hand-
maidens for the Lady it the Like
The game features human chess pieces that tight
opponents to advance i-,n the board
This is Tyson's third year participating in the
game, which includes members from the Thieves'
Guild, a volunteer acting troupe.
She met several members of the guild while
portraying Queen Titania in a production of "A
Midsummer Night's Dream." she said. The
actor playing King Oberon \vas directing ther
chess game that year and asked her to he a
part of his production team.
Tyson went on to pla\ the evil NMorgause M.
in her first living chess game.
"I totally kicked burt th first year I
did it and just came back the nrxt two
years," she said.
Martin is a first-time actor in
the faire. She attended the festi -
val for eight years as an obs-rrv- Al-
er, but says being a participant
is "really cool."
Showing up.at the right
place and time led to her
joining the production
Martin met Tyson
through a mutual friend in
October. The two disc,..- -
ered their shared pas.si.n
for renaissance festivals. '
and Tyson mentioned one ( ',
more sprite was needi-d
for the chess game.
She went to a rehears-
al and hung around v. ith
the other cast members.
By the end of the night,
Martin was announced
as the newest cast
member.
This year's liv-
ing chessboard
production is "The
Tournament for the
Sword of Power."
The Lady of the
Lake has a vision
that the Sword of
Power is ready for .
its rightful owner, 7 '
Tyson said. She i, -'
calls together


tw,, schiuols tli' bad guys. Orkneyv Univers.ii
led by MNI,_,rause: versus the -od guys, Jsph 1:io
Arimatheai School of Chivalry led by Merlin tor a
game ,,f living chess
I"llie person that bear-. the' sord vwuld become
king," shlie said.
Thilt. o sid,-s made- li.p of lanious names truiri
A- thurian legend suchil as Guineveie. Lancelot
and the Black Knight battle each other for the
siorI in a three-part continuing story arc.
"It's set like a CoIlumbia versus Furt hl-ite
football game" Mllartin said
Spectators also join in the fun and excite-
nient of the ganme
"We make the cru.,d particil)ate." she sdad.
"You It-arn u-Ir cheers."
The Lady of the Lake and her sprites are


Af


CHECKMATES .i'nliini,i ai, 21)


'f


JASON MAT-HEW V ALKERL ie '- F-porter
Stephanie Tyson ilefti portrays the Lady of the Lal-e and Misty her head
sprite is played by Jessica Rocl-et Marlin. Tyson and Martin will entertain
visitors at the 25th Annual Hoggetowne Medieval Faire's living chess game,
where the pieces battle each other for a square and a chance to dethrone
the opposing king.


Pet or paramour? Many choose pet


By LEANNE ITALIE
Associated Press
Your sweetheart or
your pet. Which would
you dump if one had
to go?
Most current pet
owners said they would hold
on to their spouse or significant
other (84 percent), but a siz-
able 14 percent picked their pet,
according to an AP-Petside. com
poll.
Put Sally Roland, 53, of Omaha,
Neb., down in the dog-first col-
umn. "I'm divorced, so that might
explain it," she joked.
The unmarried, like Roland,
are more apt to choose their pet
oyer their mate 25 percent
among unmarried pet owners ver-
sus 8 percent among the married.
Count Fidel Martinez, 30, of
Akron, Ohio, as forever loyal to
Killer. That's his mix-breed, 100-
pound rescue dog.
"I would absolutely give up my
girlfriend for him," Martinez said.
"I know it sounds insane but I've
had numerous relationships with
women. My dog has never let me
down."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joan Rosenthal hugs Roxy at the Rosenthal home on Sunday in Missouri
City, Texas. The Rosenthal's last dog, Princess, escaped from their yard
numerous times. Princess went back to the.shelter after a year. 'It was sad
but we knew there was already somebody there to adopt her,' said Joan's
husband Dave Rosenthal!


For the record: Martinez and
Killer have been together for
seven years. Martinez and his
girlfriend have been together for


four. The two-legged pair have no
immediate plans to cohabitate, he
said, but she does like the dog a
lot.


Women are far more likely
than men to say the human-pet
choice would be a tough one (40
percent among women compared
with 26 percent among men).
Both genders were equally likely
to go with their spouse or sig-
nificant other, according to the
poll conducted by GfK Roper
Public Affairs and Corporate
Communications.
There was also no difference
between dog and cat owners: 35
percent of each said the choice
would be a hard one and more
than eight in 10 would choose
their spouse.
Urban dwellers (47 percent)
are more likely to say they'd have
a difficult time choosing than
did suburbanites (35 percent) or
rural residents (25 percent).
Giving up a pet for any reason
can be :, .llh tough unless you
are the owners of Princess the
canine escape artist.
David Rosenthal and his fam-
ily in Missouri City, Texas, were
ready with what they considered
an ideal fenced backyard when
they welcomed the 2-year-old
POLL continued on 21)


- I I










LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011


FGC students plan, interpret scientific research


What is
going on
at Florida
Gateway
College?
The school that was just
renamed from Lake City
Community College last
July offers a wide range of
classes on useful and inter-
esting subjects.
My psychology class
about lifespan develop-
ment helps students
understand the milestones,
problems and challenges
each of us face as we go
through the different
stages of our lives.
Going one step further,
it helps them learn to
understand and interpret
scientific research and
to learn how to do actual
hands-on research.
After reading and dis-
ciissing the first chapter
about doing scientific
research, the class divides
into small groups and is
given an assignment.
I use some ideas
from the Instructor's
Resource Manual from


the Development Across
the Life Span textbook,
by Robert S. Feldman.
(Copyright 2008, Pearson
Education, Inc.)
Each group is given a
question to investigate.
Each group is then given
a step-by-step worksheet
to help them develop
research plans to study
the question they were
assigned.
They are to choose a
research method to use:
experiment, survey, natu-
ralistic observation, open
interview, or case study.
Questions they're assigned
to research: What foods
do children prefer? What
makes adolescents aggres-
sive? Why do kids hang
out at malls? What are
some good ways to quit
smoking? What factors
cause us to fall in love? Do
pet owners live happier or
longer lives?
Research shows that
people learn best when
they are actively involved
and participate in the
learning process. Sharing


Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmoil.com

their ideas and testing
their opinions stretches
their minds. They reach
out of their comfort zones
and use creativity, coopera-
tion, and imagination.
It's enjoyable and inter-
esting to watch the groups
debating what they feel are
the really important ques-
tions they'd like answered,
and ways of using their
research to find answers.
After each group has
developed their own
research plan, they are
given the opportunity to
tell the class about their
ideas. The class gets
to share ideas with the
group, and to offer com-
ments and suggestions.


My jaw falls open with
surprise when I hear some
of these fascinating out-
comes.
The group studying kids
in malls decides that kids
of different ages may hang
out for different reasons.
Some of these reasons
may be loneliness, feel-
ings of rejection, a need
to belong to a group, to
meet the opposite sex,
or even to get in trouble
of one sort or another.
By studying the reasons,
community programs can
be suggested for ways to
meet these needs in a posi-
tive way and help kids stay
out of trouble!
The group investigating
the correlation between
owning a pet and living
a happier and longer life
plans to not limit their
study to folks who have
pets and folks who don't,
but to find out if pets actu-
ally do improve well being
in older populations. They
plan to develop a program
where volunteers bring
pets once a week to visit


retirement homes or nurs-
ing homes that agree to
participate. The volunteer
program they are suggest-
ing might put smiles on
the faces of lots of older
folks!
As to the question of
what makes teenagers
aggressive, that group
chose a hypothesis that
family life and parenting
styles may be a strong
influence on whether a
youth develops problems
with aggression. They
developed a plan to consult
with schools and with juve-
nile detention facilities.
Compiling data from
records, while keep-
ing children's names or
identifying information
confidential, they would
look for correlations in
family issues like insuffi-
cient supervision at night,
abuse or neglect, failure
in school, dropping out of
school, gang involvement,
and other possible factors.
Based on finding factors
that parents could do
something about, sugges-


tions could be presented
in a parenting pamphlet,
presented in school pro-
grams, or in a voluntary
parenting class. Schools
and juvenile facilities could
be presented the results of
the study, and possibly use
the ideas for improving.
their programs.
When students are
given a variety of participa-
tory educational activities,
they have the opportunity
to use imagination; creativ-
ity, and hands-on efforts
to corfie up with new and
helpful ideas and pro-
grams.
They seem to go beyond
what the original assign-
ment was. It's rewarding to
see them as they develop
into educated, successful,
capable and responsible
citizens.
Therein lies a lot of
hope for our country and
for our world!
N Robert Denny is adjunct
instructor in psychology at
Florida Gateway College.
Readers may contact him at
(386) 454-4950.


POLL: Unmarried Americans more apt to choose their pets over mates
Continued From Page 1D


American Eskimo from a shelter
Then things went from pretty
good to not at all.
"She kept getting away," he
said. "She'd dig underneath the
fence, sneak out through every
little crack. It would usually take
about an hour or so to corral
her."
Even worse, the 49-year-old
Rosenthal discovered the hard
way that the bushy sago palm
plants in the backyard were
poisonous to dogs (and humans,
too). Princess sampled them


and nearly died. Treatment cost
about $2,000.
* "Plus she was nipping at kids,"
said Rosenthal, who has three.
"We were told it was friendly to
kids." So off Princess went, back
to the shelter after a year. "It
was sad but we knew there was
already somebody there to adopt
her."
The family now has two other
rescue dogs.,
About six in 10 adults (57 per-
cent) have had to give up a pet
at some point in their lives, with


current pet owners (64 percent)
a bit more likely to have done so.
The most common reasons
had to do with the pet's health:
69 percent said their pet was too
sick to live on, 52 percent too
sick to be cared for at home. But
there are other reasons as well,
including about one in 10 (9 per-
cent) who, like Rosenthal, said
their animal was too dangerous
to keep.
One-third (34 percent) of cur-
rent pet owners said it would be
"extremely" or "very" difficult


if they were forced to choose
between a pet and a family mem-
ber who became allergic. Another
20 percent would find the choice
somewhat difficult and 46 percent
said it would be "not too difficult"
or "not difficult at all."
Christopher J. Hampton, 67,
in Bellingham, Wash., has loved
Pembroke Welsh corgis since he
was a kid. He had a 5-year-old he
had raised from a pup when he
and his wife realized 40 years ago
that their year-old son's asthma
was dangerously exacerbated by


their pet
"I couldn't give up my son, so
that was it," Hampton said.
The AP-Petside.com Poll was
conducted October 13 to 20, 2010
by GfK Roper Public Affairs and
Corporate Communications. It
involved landline and cell phone
interviews with 1,501 adults
nationwide including 1,000 pet
owners. Results among all adults
have a margin of sampling error
of plus or minus 3.3 percentage
points; for results among pet own-
ers it is 4.0 percentage points.


A purrfect flower for cold weather? Try the catkin


By LEE REICH
Associated Press
Plant lovers and
feline lovers
unite: Some
catkins have
come out And
are they a welcome sight,
being pretty much the only
sign of plant activity out-
doors this time of year.
* Okay, I admit the feline
part is a stretch. The "cat"
in "catkin" comes merely
from the way the catkins
droop or poke up from
stems like the furry tails of
cats.
For those unfamiliar
with catkins, allow me to
make the introductions. A
catkin is a long cluster of
very small flowers, none of


which have petals. While
; many flowers tomato,
apple and marigold, for
example have both male
and female parts, catkins
are unisexual, either male
or female.

What are catkins for?
Catkins. are common
among trees and shrubs
native to temperate cli-
mates. The ones catching
my eye this month were
dangling from the stems of
my filbert trees. These are
male catkins so, ih time,.
will be shedding pollen
and plenty of it A single
walnut catkin, for example,
releases about 2 million
pollen grains. The reason
for those copious amounts


is that trees and shrubs
with catkins are pollirlated
by the wind, and wind is
a relatively inefficient way
to transport pollen. Wind
can carry pollen only a few
hundred feet, and then it's
mostly hit or miss whether
that pollen lands on a recep-
tive female flower. Contrast
this with insect pollination,
where pollen might be car-
ried many miles and then
to a specific kind of flower.
Insect pollination is much
more common in the trop-
ics, and representatives of
wind-pollinated, temper-
ate-climate plants typically
become insect-pollinated
when they evolve in the
tropics.
All this pollen does cast
a slight cloud over these


plants. Some people are
allergic to the pollen -
the first outdoor allergen
of the season. Don't worry
yet, though; the catkins
are only now expanding
and have yet to spread
their magic powder about.

Catkin appreciation
begins in winter
Let's let some brightness
shine through that cloud
and look upon the decora-
tive aspect of catkins. Like
any flower, they mark the
progress of the seasons,
winter fading into spring
then on into summer.
, The progress of catkins'
opening does not have
the colorful drama of the
progression from crocuses


to tulips, bleeding hearts,
pinks, daylilies and cone-
flowers. Then again, all
those flowers bloom along
with the distraction of myri-
ad other wild and cultivated
blooms, as well as grasses
and the greens, reds and
yellows of other leaves.
When catkinsbloom,
there's little else going on in
the landscape.
After the filberts
- whose catkins, where
winters are mild, might
start opening in autumn
and hang out all winter
- I expect to see catkins
on willows. Later, spring
warmth will coax catkins
from alders and poplars,
then birches and, later,
hornbeams and oaks.
Not all catkins are cold-


weather ornaments; those
of walnuts, hickories and
chestnuts don't show until
warm weather has settled
in reliably. Even though
chestnut trees are then
in full leaf, their catkins
still are prominent both
for their fetid odor and for
being profuse enough to
airbrush whole trees with
creamy white dollops.
If you need some pizazz
for winter and early
spring, here's a combina-
tion for you: catkins and
contorted stems. Write
yourself a note to plant
Harry Lauder's Walking
Stick, a variety of filbert
whose stems twist around
like corkscrews quite
a sight when also deco-
rated with catkins.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lady of the Lake Stephanie Tyson (left) and head sprite Jessica Martin demonstrate how
to use magic to defend themselves in the event of an attack.


CHECKMATES: Becoming kids again


Continued From Page 1D

members of the neutral
side of the game.
As the Lady of the
Lake, Tyson is the chess
master. She provides nar-
ration, explains the rules
and makes sure everyone
plays fair. The head sprite
is bestowed the honor of
heralding or introducing
each match.
"I'm scrolling the credits
at the beginning of the
movie," Martin said..


Cast members stay in
character throughout the
day and interact with faire
patrons between scenes of
the living chess board.
"It can be tough (to stay
in character) when your
friends come up and want
to talk to you," Tyson said.
"You want to drop charac-
ter and hang out with your
friends."
The Hoggetowne
Medieval Faire continues


10 a.m. to 6 p.m. today,
Saturday and Sunday and
9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday
at the Alachua County
Fairgrounds. Admission
is $14 for adults, $7 for
children 5-17, free for chil-
dren under 5 and half price
Friday.
"It's such a sense of free-
dom there," Martin said.
"It's just a very fun place.
Everybody can be a kid
again."


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Sister-in-law refuses to spill


the beans on recipe's secret


DEAR ABBY: One of my
sisters-in-law has a recipe for
pancakes and puts in a secret
ingredient. She got the reci-
pe from a relative who asked
that the mystery never be
revealed.
Well, the relative died re-
cently, and I'd like to know
what -the ingredient is be-
cause those pancakes are
out of this world! Would my
sister-in-law be betraying
his request by sharing the
secret? She says she made
a promise and is going to
keep it. What do you think?
- CRAVING THE CAKES
IN FLORIDA
DEAR CRAVING: Obvi-
ously, you have raised this
subject with your sister-in-
law and she refused to share
the complete recipe. From
that, I can only conclude that
she plans to take her knowl-
edge of the secret ingredient
to her grave with her.
What do I think? I think
she's acting selfishly because
good food is meant to be en-
joyed by as many people as
possible.
P.S. If you really want to
know what that secret in-
gredient is, you'll have to
smuggle one of her pancakes
out and have it analyzed by a
laboratory..
DEAR ABBY: I have a
friend, "Dina," whom I have
known since we were in kin-
dergarten. (We are in our
early teens now.) Her mom
was in jail when she was a


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com

very young girl because of
drugs, and she abandoned
Dina. Because of this, my
mother won't allow me to go
to her house or let her come
to our house.
Whenever Dina asks if
we can hang out, I have to
make up some excuse. She
says, "You're always busy."
I know it hurts her feelings
when she hears I go tb other
friends' houses.
I know I need to respect
my mother's wishes, but
maybe we can make an
agreement. Can you help
me? DILEMMA WITH
DINA IN SOUTHERN
CALIFORNIA
DEAR DILEMMA: I'll
try, but there are no guar-
antees that what I say will
change your mother's mind.
Blaming Dina for her
mother's mistakes is unfair
to the girl. If your mother
doesn't want you going to
her house because she is
afraid there might be "bad
influences"- her concerns
may be valid.
However, for her to come
to your home and see what a


functional family is like and
learn the values you are be-
ing taught would benefit her
greatly. And it would be no
threat to you. And that's why
I hope your mother will find
it in her heart to relent.
DEAR ABBY: I have an
awesome relationship with
"Jack." He's very attractive,
polite, has a good job and is,
basically, what I am looking
for in a future husband.
My problem? Jack left
his longtime girlfriend for
me,, So how do I know he
isn't going to do the same
thing to me? He swears he
would never do it, but what
if he was telling her the same
thing? DAZED AND
CONFUSED, MISSOUIA,
MONT.
DEAR DAZED AND
CONFUSED: How old are
you two? If you're teenag-
ers, then Jack may still have
acres of wild oats to sow, and
what happened to his former
girlfriend could happen to
you.
However, if you are older
and mature, then surely you
realize that men who are
happy and satisfied-in their
relationships do not usually
leave their girlfriends "for"
someone. They leave be-
cause something they feel is
important is missing.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Back off, say little and
refuse to commit to anything
you aren't sure about. Elimi-
nate whatever isn't to your
advantage and you will feel
better about taking on the re-
sponsibilities that do interest
you. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You can accomplish
your goals if you don't let an
inability to get along with peo-.
ple take over. The chance that
someone will make you angry
is strong, so make up your
mind not to fall into his or her
trap. Remain calm. *****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Look at your options
and apply for positions that in-
terest you. Plant the seed for
future growth. Finding your
niche or practicing something
you enjoy doing should be
your intent. If you can dream
it, you can become it. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You'll be emotional but
don't let that stop you. Quite
often it's when you feel the
most pressured or upset that
you finally go after what you
want or say what you feel.
Nothing is out of reach if you
put effort, time and patience


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last
into your pursuit. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Get a better handle on your
personal goals and stop wor-
rying so much about what ev-
eryone else wants you to do.
Fulfill your own needs. You
haven't got time to waste on
negativity or anyone trying to
hold you back. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Take advantage of the
opportunity being given. Net-
working and sharing your
ideas will help you build a sol-
id future with someone who
can complement your inten-
tions. A change of residence
or surroundings will benefit
you financially, emotionally
and physically. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't take anyone too
seriously. Be aware of where
comments come from and
whether or not what's being
said really pertains to you.
Interacting in activities that
are challenging and stimulat-
ing will make the direction
you should be taking much
clearer to you. -A*


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: W equals H
" JYIM N Z M F D Z GYB
SOOSIKR G FKM. MSR HZG URFAN SG
MYD KYINZ M D DRH H.YDD SI OR K F K D
CZ FARIYD U Y W FG N ." US U C YAA YI
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Cigarette sales would drop to zero overnight if the
warning said 'Cigarettes Contain Fat.'" Dave Barry
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 1-31


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Changes at home
and in your personal life will
be daunting but, if you detach
your emotions from the equa-
tion, you will realize that the
outcome will, in fact, be in
your favor. Don't look back or
spend too much time lament-
ing over the inevitable. ***
SAGIlTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Your hard work
will be recognized. Travel or
a romantic evening will help
you realize what you want
and how to get it. Talk openly
and you will be given sugges-
tions that will help you pick a
brighter future. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't get wrapped
up in something that isn't go-
ing anywhere. You need to ex-
pand your interests and your
circle of friends. It's time to
lighten the load and work to-
ward a more efficient lifestyle.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Show interest and
concern for the underdog.
Love is in the stars and your
ability to offer more than you
have in the past will be,well
received by someone looking
for equality. A job prospect is
apparent. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't let love
get you down. Offer what you
can but don't go into debt or
make promises you cannot
keep to please someone who
is demanding. You may not
like your current options but
another door will open that
holds far more opportunity.
-**


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


LETTER OPENERS By Chris A. McGlothlin / Edited by Will Shortz -1112-[3 14 15- 6 17 18 19 110 III 12 13 114 115 116-


Across
1 Yo, she was
Adrian
6 *Insulation
measure
12 *Weapon first
tested in '52
17 *Gasket type
18 Bedridden, say
19 Debilitates
22 They're found in
afio after afio
24 Oscar snubber of
1972
25 Frequently
pierced place
26 *The Boss's
backers
28 It may go off the
road, briefly
29 *Setting for
"Saving Private
Ryan"
30 Taxco table
31 Winds
32 Nanki-___ of
"The Mikado"
34 *Touch, e.g.
36 *Ace Stories
(old detective
pulp magazine)
38 Swindle, slangily
39 One of the Blues
Brothers
42 N N N
45 N N N
46 Stocks up
49 Slant
50 Shelled
52 *Typography
symbol
53 Pilot's milieu

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


55 Darn
56 Workplace for a
cabin boy
57 Payment type
59 Hot times on the
Riviera
61 12-Across and
the like
62 Tag sale tag
63 Opposite of
guerra
65 ___ Mod.e,
female character
in "The
Incredibles"
67
Kadiddlehopper,
Red Skelton
character
68 *It may be under
a hood
69 The third one is a
shocker
71 Barks
74 Numerical prefix
76 One carrying a
toon?
78 The year 640
79 "Give it ___!"
80 Honoree's place
82 Toyota S.U.V.
84 Small
85.
88 *4x platinum
album of 2001
89 Maurice of
Nixon's cabinet
90 King protector
91 Bottle in the
kitchen or bath
93 Whence the word
"safari"
96 Coach Parseghian
97 Going ___
98 Numbers by a
door?
100 *'Vette option
101 Actress Sofer


103 Light bulb over
one's tate?
104 "Awesome!"
105 Shelter org.
108 Skewer
112 *Beam with a
bend
114 Skeletal
opening?
116 *Women just
don't get it
118 Former
Pakistani P.M.
Bhutto'
120 Spanish pastry
122 Last-second
bidder on eBay
123 Marathoner's
need
124 Mountain homes
125 *House coverer
126 Like a turkey's
wattle
127 *One of Sean
Combs's aliases
128 Steak ___

Down
1 Tribal heads?
2 "___, fair sun, and
kill the envious
moon": Romeo
3 Melodious
speaking tones
4 Cross-dressing
5 Author who won a
posthumous
Pulitzer in 1958
6 Bar mitzvah party
7 Spreading fast on
YohTube
8 Country singer
Jackson and
others
9 Jenny ___ a k a
the Swedish
Nightingale
10 Grand Forks sch.
11 '__ trip


12 Pointer
13 *"Plan 9 From
Outer Space,"
e.g.
14 Saturn's spouse
15 Flatten, in a way
16 Pointers
20 Inlet
21 Like some winks
23 Trig ratio
27 Bunches
28 *Tops
32 Exercise one is
prone to do
33'Places where
some R.N.'s
work
35 Took the part of
37 Deli array
38 Sting's
instrument
40 Repeated cry in
Buster
Poindexter's
"Hot Hot Hot"
41 ___ point
42 *Group with the
2000 #1 hit "It's
Gonna Be Me"
43 *Thing that
won't go off
without a hitch?
44 Hit
46 Mingles (with)
47 They may have
keys
48 Scranton-to-
Philadelphia dir.
51 Like some
amusement parks
52 Shakespeare's
"food of love"
54 *"As Seen on
TV" company
57 Vegas opening?
58 1909 Physics
Nobelist for
work in wireless
telegraphy


60 Some drum parts
64 *3-D graph line
66 The Queen of
Soul, familiarly
68 Colorado ski area
70 Dockworker's
org.
72 *It helps one get
the picture
73 *Midsize Jaguar
75 Coax
77 Harry Shearer's
program on
public radio


78 Kind of income
79 Beelike
81 Call letters'?
83 *Little swab
85 Govt. flu-
fighting org.
86 Mouths
87 ___ Trench
(earth's deepest
depression)
90 Bluegills
92 Obama nickname


94 *I.R.S. form
95 From ___ Z (how
this puzzle
goes?)
96 Oil company
acronym
99 Grasping
102 Town in Umbria
105 Nose-burning
106 Bit
107 Lackluster
109 Old man
110 "Urn ... er ..."


111 Lead/tin alloy
112 Dumbbell abbr.
113 Call, e.g.
115 *Revealing
photo
116 Doctor Zhivago
117 How many
oldies get
rereleased
119 Not go straight
120 Limit
121 "If only ___
listened ..."


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.


INTENTION OREGON OSIER
I N TIOIM T|R 0 I R 0 NJ S I E R
M ISAIOU RIGL OV COMPANY
ME DIGSI IN HARRISON
SNARF HEN STELLAR
YANGTZ EDOoDL|EDAND Y
IDS RELO ADA ENLAl

0RP O LAIDI Y0W1E BEE
TILIE MI S N TRTS







WE EA0I USTOGEATNT



IRAIL E ERLE SO L D E R E D
MA-LT S DE V LS K E Y DET S


8 5 6 4


4. 9 8


9 1 3 5


14 8 2


7 5 8


2 963


7 4 6 8


7 4


1 9 2


99LZ6V LC8


ZSV 8 L L 6 99


68L9 9 C L


C96iVL L98Z


LV89CZ9L6


L Z 19 618 91 L


SL Ict7V L 8 Z6 9


8L9CZ6L 9V


V 6ZL998 L


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415












LAKE CITY REPORTER


LIFE


SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


IR ISH -


pastures


comes a


pot of gold


;i~~ar


FAMILY FEATURES
Yes, there's a pot of gold at the end of the '.ii,
found in each blade of grass growing in Ir,. I.,
pastures. Small herds of cows graze free I .
rich in beta-carotene from the grass, prod... .
cheeses of an exceptionally golden hue.
Thousands of years before the Irish discovered pot r,:
cows, milk and butter were being woven into the fabsi .f
society, according to the Cork Butter Museum in Coi l. .
The Cork Butter Exchange, a market created by the n,.er,
Cork City in 1769, was in its time, the largest butter ,..irk'
world, exporting as far away as Europe and America
Today, dairy products continue to play an importai. i .. I
cooking. Cooperatives of farmers, creameries and che.: -,e
provide delicious Irish butter and cheeses throughout itS.'
the Kerrygold label.
Here are gome iconic recipes from some stars of In l. :
using Kerrygold cheeses and butter. To learn
more about Kerrygold, and for where-to-buy
information, visit www.kerrygold.com/usa.


Roasted Root Vegetable Soup
Serves 4 to 6
"You can substitute pumpkin, turnip or celeriac
for the swede (rutabaga), or just use a mixture -
this is a very flexible recipe."
-Neven Maguire, chef/owner of the renowned
MacNean House and Restaurant in Blacklion,
County Cavan, Ireland; popular TV cooking
star and cookbook author
1 small swede (rutabaga) cut into
cubes
2 carrots, cut into cubes
1 parsnip, cut into cubes
3 tablespoons olive oil
4 tablespoons (1/4 cup) Kerrygold
Irish Butter
1 onion, finely chopped
2 celery stalks, finely chopped
1 garlic clove, crushed
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
1 quart (4 cups) vegetable stock
1/2 cup single cream (or substitute half
and half)
Salt and freshly ground black
pepper
Preheat oven to 4000F. Place swede, carrots
and parsnip on baking sheet and drizzle with
2 tablespoons olive oil. Season generously and
roast for 25 to 30 minutes until golden brown
and tender, shaking baking sheet occasionally
to ensure even cooking.
Meanwhile, heat remaining tablespoon olive
oil and butter in large heavy-based pot, and add
onion, celery, garlic and thyme. Cook for 4 to 5
minutes until softened but not browned, stirring
occasionally.
Add roasted root vegetables to pan and then
pour in stock. Brinng gently to boil, then reduce
heat, cover and simmer for 25 to 30 minutes
until completely tender, stirring occasionally.
Puree with a hand blender until completely
smooth.
To serve, stir cream into soup. Gently heat
through and season to taste, then ladle into
warmed bowls.
Note: You don't have to add the cream if
you're watching the calories, but you might
need a little extra stock to thin the soup.

Cheese Toasties
Serves 4 to 6
4 tablespoons (1/4 cup) Kerrygold
Irish Butter
8 slices firm, country-style white bread
1 package (7 ounces) Kerrygold
Dubliner Cheese, grated
1 tablespoon snipped fresh chives
Salt and freshly ground black
pepper
Butter bread and arrange cheese over half
of the slices, buttered side down. Sprinkle
with chives and cover with remaining slices,
buttered side up.
Preheat a griddle or large non-stick frying
pan and cook sandwiches two at a time 2
minutes each side until golden brown and
cheese has melted. Keep hot.
To serve, cut the cheese toasts into fingers.


5 't


LDuliner *nhepnerd s rie


*


Brown Soda Bread, Roasted Root Vegetable Soup and Cheese Toasti


SRhubarb Crumble


H Bro'wn Soda Bread
P.lake 1. : c
Tr,.,,.r i ..[ r i | i- r. ; ,r ii J : -.h ,.r.: d

.1 I ..

..,l ',,l . 1 i l'. l & n. b' : .I ..
K -,,, ,I. ,I k . t I. r'l, I...
1 I 2 slups sionie-gloutnd %huoltu'
i lientl iour. pircifrabl%
Irish or i ish-s INl
II 2 suips i lphIII|luI. llted slllCe
Iloui. pirefeu'nhh Irish.
or puastr nlour. plus inore
hIr du tling
3.4 t.aspison bihking soda
I lellspliiin sulll
I l ois'Luuin soiftenId Keirrseold
Irish Hlniillr. Plus more foi
g r .mi sing
I i 41 in 2 s.ups i iion-loeniper Irur e
htimet'rruilkh

11 lr 11 r .h .
0iIs 0 ...I~ .i. i llh ., l h l
I',',,, Ie ll Ih m q. l d ,.ll ,..- I'I, ,,
llII',lit I.. p l. I .l : . k ... I .:

es and stir dough slowly but steadily in a
spiral motion, starting in the middle and
working outwards. Dough should be
soft but not too wet or sticky. (Start
with 1 3/4 cups buttermilk, gradually
adding, if necessary, to achieve the right
consistency.)
Turn dough out onto a floured board.
Flour your hands lightly, then shape
dough into a flat rectangle about 2
inches high. Cut dough in half length-
wise with a wet knife, then gently push
each half into a lightly greased glass or
S fil loaf pan. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes,
or until the tops of the loaves are nicely
browned.
ServS e this bread with plenty of
Kerrygold Irish Butter.
A n-L--


Dubliner Shepherd's Pie
r e I. -' .J r: ..r_
O -r I ,, I i,.. L. I ,,1 ln .r, hri r,-. J Fr.?
1Iti r .1 i:- 'g .1 i ,rkit g : r tib at- ie .
b.:*.,,. j ..'..rl .io f -" ,J- :c rr.ilst r,: n..i> .
K 2-, tablepou.nIK Di- err.?. e lke d .- J
f .* rn.1 "r i,-l.,J D .ih irc r... 't.r: r "* i=0 ,r':
D ..ni.l r T,, l, , r ,li_- ..'IJ J rr r".i,,1
Po*iItu To ppl II n I
II -I pol|)( nds rusl el porarOCs
peUleld ancd cubed
2 tablespouns Kerruohld
Irish Bullter
I 3 cup i1ilk
I Lup shredded Kerr gold
Duhliner Cheiese
I 2 teaspoon salt
I llhin;.
I puiund lean ground beef
2 lablispoons Kerr, gold
Irish Butler
I niediuni onion. chopped
4- snall carrolts. peeled and
slated I 4-inch thick
2 uablsspoons fliiur
.1 4 -up (Guinness Sluut
.1 4I up beef' sock
I teaspoon di i'd rh ime
I '2 lenspoon salt
I 2 cup frozen pcas hllated
Preheat oven to 375F and lightly butter
an 11- x 7-inch baking dish. Cook pota-
toes in boiling water for 15 minutes or
until very tender; drain well. Mash with
butter and milk until smooth, then stir in
cheese and salt and set aside.
Crumble beef into a medium skillet and
cook until no longer pink; remove from
skillet and set aside. In same skillet, melt
butter. Add onion and carrots; cook for
10 minutes over medium heat to soften,
stirring occasionally. Stir in flour and
cook for 1 minute more.
Add Guinness, stock, thyme and salt;
cook and stir until mixture is slightly
thickened then stir in peas and cooked
beef. Spoon into prepared baking dish
then spread potato mixture over the top.
Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until top is
lightly browned.


Rhnuoarb Crumblei
Serves 6
"Crumbles are the ultimate comfort food. Vary the fruit according to the season."
- Darina Allen, founder of the world-famous Ballymaloe Cookery School in Shanagarry,
County Cork, Ireland


Filling:
1 1/2 pounds rhubarb, cut in
1/2-inch slices
1/2 cup sugar
Crumble:
4 tablespoons (1/4 cup) Kerrygold
Irish Butter
4 ounces (scant 1 cup) white flour,
preferably unbleached
1/4 cup superfine sugar
Preheat oven to 3500F In bowl, mix
filling ingredients; turn into a 1-quart
(4 cups) capacity pie dish.


Rub butter into flour just until mixture
resembles coarse breadcrumbs, then stir in
sugar.
Sprinkle this mixture over rhubarb in
the pie dish. Bake for 30 to 45 minutes
until topping is cooked and golden. Serve
with whipped cream and soft brown
sugar, or try stirring a little Amaretto into
your cream.
Recipe adapted from the "Ballymaloe
Cookery Course Book" published by
Kyle Cathie.


Do pets


pose


threat to


driving?


Associated Press


LOS ANGELES:- Man's
best friend is not a driver's
best friend.
While lawmakers have
been banning drivers from
texting or using cell phones,
many motorists are riding
around with another danger-
ous risk their dogs.
Experts said an unre-
strained dog whether
curled up on a lap, hanging
out the window or resting its
paws on the steering wheel
- can be deadly. Tens of
thousands of car accidents
are believed caused every
year by unrestrained pets,
though no one has solid
numbers.
"An unrestrained pet can
be hugely distracting if
he is seeking your attention,
putting his face right in front
of yours, starts chewing up
the upholstery or is vomiting
because he is carsick," said
Katherine Miller, director
of science for the American
Society for the Prevention of
Cruelty to Animals.


/''


lAKE. COH~EN~, .


SpecI9~WtV(thopaeilc sufery I
Fdc~ol ev ~0l~ o~ee ot oste0pal"~Ic Med POA e~~''UN


iner~hP:Metropol~~nit Spo~liv

ResidenG Peefleal SurgeW)Me RPo~an Hospit'al CeflrlOII
t nrtrh'ipaedCS -


prnefCan Osteopathic Board 0 h p'p


* 'S.5~.s~.'W's,,. I

5I~, a,. 'I,


*'






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I


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For so long, this area has been without an orthopaedic surgeon. Now, with

Dr. Cohen's new practice, patients can get the care they need. Right here. His

osteopathic training allows him to treat patients holistically, which can help

them recover quickly and do well following surgery. For 20 years, he's provided

compassionate orthopaedic care for entire families. And now he's here for you.


I,


Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center

348 N.E. Methodist Terrace, Suite 101 Lake City, FL 386-755-4007


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