The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01364
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: January 28, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01364
System ID: UF00028308:01364
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Tiger Returns
Woods shoots a 69 in first
tournament of season.
000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611--1943



LanKeu uit


Friday, January 28, 201 I1 www.lakecity


TOP EMPLOYEE


e~.

F s~


Hero honored
Kirkman to have
his number retired.

Sports, I B





orter


Vol. 136, No. 318 75 cents


It's official:

County lands

$750,000 grant


Informational
meeting on how
to apply Tuesday.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
County officials received
a $750,000 Community
Development Block Grant
to help low to moderate
income residents make
upgrades to their home
or connect to the Ellisville
Utility.
The funding is fed-
eral money from the U.S.
Department of Housing
and Urban Development.
The funds are adminis-
tered through the Florida
Department of Community
Affairs.
County officials have


scheduled an information
meeting to inform resi-
dents about the grant and
eligibility status for apply-
ing for funding. The meet-
ing is scheduled for 6 p.m.
Tuesday at the Mason City
Community Center.
David Kraus, Columbia
County Commission
senior staff assistant, said
the county can use the
funds for two types of proj-
ects either residential
rehabilitation for low and
moderate income family
homes or for water connec-
tions in Ellisville.
"If you have a home that
has some problems and
you're in a low to moder-
ate income family, you can
apply for funds to fix your
GRANT continued on 3A


JAMoUNiMA IIMI T nHlV V MLn-rI,./Lda LUy Repou[tr
Antonio Harris, a student care attendant from Westside Elementary School, receives a certificate after being named the 2011
School-Related Employee of the Year Thursday. Pictured are Columbia County School Board Member Steve Nelson (from
left), Harris, School Superintendent Mike Millikin and Dorothy Spradley, the volunteer education and marketing .coordinator for
the Columbia County School District.

Westside's Harris.earns district honor


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.comrn
Antonio Harris,
student care
attendant
at Westside
Elementary
School, was named the
2011 Columbia County
School-Related Employee
of the Year on Thursday.
Harris, who has worked
in his position for three
years, beat out 14 other
school employees for the
award.
"I was very surprised,"
he said after the award cer-
emony and luncheon held
at the Lake City Church
of Christ. "There was a lot
of good competition. I was
speechless."


Harris said the credit
goes to his "Westside
family."
"This is not my award,"
he said. 'This is our
award. This is a recogni-
tion that we have."
The honor, estab-
lished by the Florida
Department of Education,
is given annually to a
school-related employee
like a paraprofessional
or a custodian, said
Dorothy Spradley, district
volunteer education and
marketing coordinator. It
recognizes outstanding
education support person-
nel for their school and
community contributions,
she said.
EMPLOYEE continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Nominees for the 2011 School-Related Employee of the Year
pose for a photo after the luncheon on Thursday. Pictured
are Henry Williams (front row, from left), Nancy Rolfe, Susan
Borchardt, Harris, Celeste Belvin Bradley, Hideko Sadowski,
Barbara LaChance, Scharlotte Stewart (back row, from left),
Jorge Granados, Lisa Griffin, Lisa Park, Donna Lee, Lisa
Lofton, Wendy McIntosh and Maureen Ledbetter.


Local real

estate market

breaking even


However, median
prices of homes
slips 8 percent.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The local real estate mar-
ket is at a break-even point
compared to this point last
year, as local Realtors sold
36 homes in December -
the same sold in December
2009, according to the
Florida Sales Report.
However, in December
2009, the median sales price
for a home was $125,450
compared to $116,000 in
2010, an 8 percent decrease
in the median sales price.
"We were flat-lined in
sales last month," said Dan


Gherna, executive vice
president of the Lake City
Board of Realtors.
The Florida Sales Report
tracks what was done last
December compared to
sale and price numbers
from December 2009. The
report tracks monthly sales
(number of units sold) and
the median sales price
for single-family, site-built
homes.
Gherna said in 2010
there was an 11 percent
increase in the number of
homes sold, but there was
an 11 percent decrease in
the median sales price.
"Some of the explanation
for that in the median sales
prices in 2009, 30 percent
REAL ESTATE continued on 3A


Top Talents in dancing

get ready to compete


Best on their feet
will be chosen
No. 1 in County.
By A.C. GONZALEZ
agonzalez@lakecityreporter.comrn
Watch out, dancing stars:
Local students will display
their hottest moves when
Columbia's Top Talent com-
petition returns on Friday.
"These kids have been
dancing for years, but this
is the first show where they
get to show off dancing,
specifically, before other
students," event organizer
Ronnie Collins said.
Seven acts have made it
through the auditions. The
competitors will face judges
and a large audience while


performing their rehearsed
dance routines.
Collins said they'll be'
plenty of excitement dur-
ing the show, which begins
at 6 p.m. at the auditorium
of Columbia High School.
Seating starts at 5:30 p.m.
Tickets are $5 per student
and $7 per adult.
Mercedes Moore and
Carltonette Claridy will be
performing a dance routine
together.
"It feels awesome to have
the chance to perform,
because this is our first
time here," Moore said.
"It's also kind of nerve-
racking, since I've never
been up in front of this
school before."
Claridy agreed with
Moore. "I'm still nervous,"


she said. "But being ner-
vous- just gives me the
energy and drive to bring
it harder."
Collins said that the
event, hosted by Audr6
Washington, will also
include special perfor-
mances.
Other performers will
include CHS seniors Colby
Craig and Caitlin Edie;
Small Town, a singing trio
of young -men from Fort
White High School; The
Golden Divas Step Team;
and the Richardson Middle
School Step Team.
Alex Williams, a college
student,,will.also perform a
song dedicated to her father
serving in Afghanistan with
DANCERS continued on 3A


.a


A.C. GONZALEZ/Lake City Reporter
Event organizer Ronnie Collins (from left) instructs competitors Carltonette Claridy and
Mercedes Moore while practicing before the Columbia's Top Talent competition. Claridy and
Moore will be performing as a dancing duo during the event, which begins at 6 p.m. Friday at
the Columbia High School auditorium.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


64
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................ 4A
People.................. 2A
Obituaries .............. 4A
Advice & Comics ......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
FLORIDA
Gingrich faults
Obama's speech.


COMING
SATURDAY
Columbia County a
Six Pillars Community.


I 'kAlti,64, 10 a I. -)


lil .











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011


ASH 3 Thursday:
Afternoon: 1-1-2
Evening: 2-4-3


Thursday:
Afternoon: 1-5-9-4
Evening: 8-2-8-4


WezWadCh
Wednesday:
5-9-16-17-21


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



For Brown, focus is on his music


NEW YORK


Two years ago, the
Grammy Awards
appeared to mark the
end of Chris Brown's
career. This year, it is
serving as a new beginning.
Life for the multiplatinum sensa-
tion dramatically changed on the
eve of music's biggest night in 2009,
when he assaulted then-girlfriend
Rihanna and both were forced to
bow out of the ceremony. In the
months that followed, he saw his
reputation tarnished, he had to plead
guilty to a felony, and his comeback
CD, "Graffiti," was a commercial dis-
appointment.
But with the success of his brush-
off anthem "Deuces," three nomina-
tions at this year's Grammys (includ-
ing best contemporary R&B album),'
an upcoming CD and an Australian
tour in April, the focus on Chris
Brown has returned to his music,
without adding the Rihanna-prefix.
Brown, now 21, is serving five
years of probation after pleading
guilty to felony assault for the attack
on Rihanna in the early morning
hours before the 2009 Grammys.
The Virginia native was commended
in November for completing more
than one-third of the required 180 '
days of community service and for
almost finishing his domestic vio-
lence counseling.

Perry: '90210' guys
remain close friends
. NEW YORK Luke Perry said
having his former "90210" co-star
Jason Priestley direct his new TV film
wasn't exactly a reunion because they
stayed close friends even after moving
on from the teen drama.
Perry said he and Priestley "always
talk on the phone," and his other male
co-stars, including Ian Zering and


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this June 27 file photo, singer Chris Brown accepts the AOL Fan-Demonium
mention at the BET Awards in Los Angeles.


Brian Austin Green, were a "really
good, strong core group" while the
show aired from 1990 to 2000. He said
they maintain close ties to this day.
Perry stars in and Priestley directs
the Hallmark Movie Channel's
"Goodnight for Justice," which pre-
mieres Saturday at 7, p.m. Eastern.
Perry plays a judge in Wyoming in the
late 1800's.
Perry said the friendship and trust
he shared with Priestley created a sort
of "shorthand" when it came to film-
ing.

Will Ferrell to visit
'The Office' for an arc
NEW YORK Will Ferrell is
coming to "The Office."
Ferrell will play a visiting branch
manager over an arc of several
episodes. NBC announced the cast-
,ing Wednesday with the promise
that Ferrell's character will be "just


as inappropriate" as Steve Carell's
Michael Scott.
Carell's -farewell is expected four
episodes before the season finale of
"The Office." In preparation of his
exit, NBC is bringing in high-profile
guests, including "The Office" cre-
ator Ricky Gervais, reprising his role
as David Brent.
Gervais will make a cameo in
Thursday's episode, which airs at 9
p.m. EST.

Sheen hospitalized
with abdominal pain
LOS ANGELES Charlie Sheen's
publicist said the actor has been hos-
pitalized in Los Angeles with severe
abdominal pains;
Publicist Stan Rosenfield gave no
other details of the 45-year-old's con-
dition.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Musician-composer Acker
Bilk is 82.
* Actor Nicholas Pryor is 76.
* Actor Alan Alda is 75.
* Actress Susan Howard is
69.
* Actress-singer Barbi
Benton is 61.
* French President Nicolas
Sarkozy is 56.
* Rock musician Dave Sharp


is 52.
* Rock singer Sam Phillips
is 49.
* Country musician Greg
Cook (Ricochet) is 46.
* Gospel singer Marvin
Sapp is 44.
* Actress Kathryn Morris
("Cold Case") is 42.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Anthony Hamilton is 40.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
.10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................... $26.32
24 Weeks................... $48.79
52 Weeks................. $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks ............... $41.40.
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks .................. $179.40


CORRECTION

Skunkie Acres is located in Columbia County but has a
White Springs mailing address.


Gingrich derides
Obama speech
BOYNTON BEACH
- Weighing his own presi-
dential bid, former House
Speaker Newt Gingrich
on Thursday derided the
State of the Union speech
by President Barack
Obama as "shallow and
lacking in seriousness."
In a visit to Bethesda
Memorial Hospital in
Boynton Beach,, the
Republican said he didn't
find humor in Obama's
biggest laugh Tuesday
night: A joke about federal
salmon laws to illustrate
the massive government
bureaucracy.
"It's not a joke,"
Gingrich said of the size of
government. "It's too big."
Gingrich effusively
praised-Rep. Paul Ryan of
Wisconsin, who delivered
the official Republican
response to Obama's
speech, saying the con-
gressman was "a very
serious, thoughtful person
who offered a very sober
and honest analysis."
He went less far in his
support of Republican Rep.
Michele Bachmann of
Minnesota, who delivered
the tea party rebuttal to
Obama. Gingrich called
her "a very aggressive
articulator" and said "she
has done a very good job
of representing the anger
and the frustration and
concern of the tea party."
The politiciari later exalt-
ed the tea party as a force
for "having more money in
your pocket and more time
in your life."

Scott: Restore
Commerce Dept.
TALLAHASSEE -
Business leaders Thursday
were quick to applaud
Gov. Rick Scott's pro-
posal for reviving Florida's
Commerce Department to
streamline economic devel-


THE WEATHER


SUNNY



HI 64LO


SUNNY'


HI 69 LO


. Valdosta Ci
.; C l .il


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Newt Gingrich speaks to a group of health care officials at
Bethesda Memorial Hospital in Boynton Beach Thursday after
he visited a patient undergoing hyperbaric treatment. He was
at the hospital to speak on the tropic 'Heathcare reform, what
happened and what's still needed' to health care officials .


opment efforts.
The new Republican
governor announced his
proposal at a board meeting
of Enterprise Florida, a pub-
lic-private partnership that
assumed the department's
economic development role
when it was dissolved in
1996.
Associated Industries
of Florida president and
CEO Barney Bishop said
attracting new businesses
and jobs requires a different
approach than what Florida
is doing now.
Scott was short on details
but said he wants the agen-
cy's head to have an office
near his own in the Capitol
rather than in a-separate
building.
The governor later issued
a statement saying the new
department would consoli-
date economic, workforce
and community develop-
ment functions "under
one roof and make our
efforts more efficient." He
plans, though, to maintain
Enterprise Florida as a sepa-
rate entity.
Scott said it would be
a step toward fulfilling a
campaign promise to create
700,000 new jobs in seven
years. Those would be in
addition to about a million
new jobs expected to result


from economic recovery
over that span even if the
state d6es nothing.

Mom of beaten
daughter sues
MIAMI The mother
of a girl who authorities
said was savagely punched
and stomped on the
grounds of a middle school
by another teen wearing
steel toe boots filed suit
Thursday against a South
Florida school board.
.Hilda Gotay, the mother
of 16-year-old Josie Lou
Ratley, alleges that the
Broward County school
board was negligent by
failing to provide adequate "
security and student
supervision at Deerfield
Beach Middle School,
where the attack occurred
in March, 2010.
The lawsuit, filed in a
Florida circuit court, states
that Ratley was left "perma-
nently and totally disabled."
Investigators said Wayne
Treacy, a high school stu-
dent, punched and stomped
on Ratley, striking her with
his boots. Treacy, now 16,
has been charged as an
adult with attempted mur-
der.


u Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
Tallahassee Lake City 64 40 Daytona Beach
6'5 .37 64 Ft. Lauderdale
Pensacola Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
64 46 Panama City 64 4 Gainesville
64- 44 Ocala Jacksonville
6 40 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
66 4 65 44 Lake City
Miami
Tampa Naples
66. 91 West Palm Beach Ocala
hh 4I, Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 9 51 Pensacola
I 47 Naples Tallahassee
67 4 Miami Tampa
t 0 51 Valdosta
Key West w. Palm Beach
66bt' '


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high'
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


59
31
67
43
89 in 1943
18 in 1940

0.00"
3.68"
3.68"
3.03"
3.03"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tornm.


7:23 a.m.
6:04 p.m.
7:23 a.m.
6:05 p.m.

2:50 a.m.
1:16 p.m.
3:49 a.m.
2:10 p.m.


o0
Feb. Feb. Feb.
2 11 18
New First Full


5
ME
30 aiitesto bun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
, '=..: 310 tr.:_]Ti n
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Feb.
24
Last


tv Saturday Sunday 4


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An exclusive
service

our readers
by
The W iltle:




weather.com


Forecasts, data and graph-
i" ics 2011 Weather Central
LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllisher.com


7a ilp 7p ta 6a
Friday Saturday "'. - .. ...
Frd y pr tur readrg
of 30.55 inches at
Miami, Fla., 30.66
Inches at Tampa,
Fla. and 30.72 inch-
S--.,.. es at Apalachicola,
"" .. Fla. were all-time
Record high readings ; ,,. ,
for those locations.

Farucastd lneaprate F eels Irenteemgerature -


* Associated Press


Daily Scripture


"For our struggle is not against
flesh and blood, but against the
rulers, against the authorities,
against the powers of this dark
world and against the spiritual
forces of evil in the heavenly
realms."
Ephesians 6:12-13


AROUND FLORIDA


ISOLATED PARTLY ISOLATED
SHOWERS' CLOUDY i SHOWERS


HI68LO HI167LO, HI67 LO:


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


.:ig~~~


'*











Page Editor: C.J. Ri~ak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011


\YV i, ,-'.


From staff reports

Membership is the life blood of the
NAACP, according to officials.
The Columbia County Branch of the
NAACP is kicking-off its annual Church
Freedom Bell membership contest.
The contest was initiated in 1996 and has
contributed to the branch being known as
the "small branch with the large mem-
bership" by state, regional and national
offices.
The NAACP was founded in 1909 by
black and white citizens and is the nation's
oldest and largest civil rights organization.
Its adult and youth members through-
out the United States and the world are
premier advocates for civil rights in their
communities, conducting voter mobiliza-
tipn and monitoring equal opportunity in
the public and private sectors.
The local branch received numerous
letters, e-mails, faxes, telephone calls, and
personal appearances from troubled indi-
viduals asserting discriminatory practices,
unfair treatment and unjust terminations.
"Without fanfare, this branch has settled
many cases, one case for $60,000, and
reached satisfactory financial settlements
and other solutions," said President John
Mayo. "We will continue to be the voice for


the voiceless, and do those things that are
for the betterment of all humanity."
The church that collects the most adult
NAACP memberships between now and
April 7 will earn the opportunity to dis-
play the gold Freedom Bell throughout
2011. The bell will be engraved with the
name of the church, the pastor, and the
year.
The winner will be announced at the
annual NAACP Freedom Fund Luncheon
12 p.m. April 23. .
Past winners include: 1996 and
1997, Community Revival Center, the
Rev. Clyde Douglas; 1998, New Bethel
Missionary Baptist Church, the Rev.
Alvin Baker; 1999 2004, Philadelphia
Baptist Church, the Rev. .Isadore
Williams; 2005 and 2006 Union A.M.E.
Church, the Rev. Fred Wallace; and
2007 -2010 New Bethel.
NAACP officers and members are also
challenged to individually solicit NAACP
memberships.
"All NAACP members are volunteers,
and they serve communities without pay.
Yes, free," Mayo said. "We encourage
each of you to please support the cause
for freedom. A yearly membership is
only $30. A life membership is $750."


GRANT: Information meeting Tuesday

Continued From Page 1A


home," Kraus said. "As
long as you commit to
staying in that house for
five years, you can get the
grant."
Under the grant guide-
lines, Ellisville residents
who have bad water, may
need a new well, or have
water quality-related
issues where they may
have to hook-up to the
Ellisville Utility in the
future, can apply for the
grant funds.
"Even if you just want
to hook-up to the Ellisville
Utility, this grant will give
you the funds to take of


everything," Kraus said.
"From the plumbing in
your house, to the, instal-
lation of a meter, to the
tie-in to the lines, capacity
fees and connection fees
- at that point all you
would be responsible for
is your monthly bill."
Columbia County
received a2009 Community
Development Block Small
Cities grant.
County officials applied
for funding in early in
2010 and in November
they were notified they
were grant winners.
Since January, the


county has been accepting
applications for the allo-
cation of those funds to
residents. He said a total
of 12-15 applications have
already been submitted
requesting grant funds for
either project.
Kraus said the county
will continue to accept
applications until at least
Feb. 25.
"We encourage people to
attend especially those
in Ellisville that may need
the water and sewer con-
necti6n," he said. "We'll
bWe there to answer any
questions."


EMPLOYEE: District's best is chosen

Continued From Page 1A


About 700 support personnel are on
staff with the school district The 15 nomi-
nees for Thursday's award represent-
ing each county school and the Columbia
County School District administrative
complex collectively totaled nearly 200
years of experience in their professions. -
Nominees included Celeste Belvin
Bradley, Challenge Learning Center;
Wendy McIntosh, Columbia City
Elementary; Henry Williams, Columbia
High School; Scharlotte Stewart, Eastside
Elementary; Barbara LaChance, Five
Points Elementary; Maureen Ledbetter,


Fort White Elementary; Hideko
Sadowski, Fort White Middle/High;
Lisa Park, Lake City Middle; Susan A.
Borchardt, Melrose Park Elementary;
Lisa Lofton, Niblack Elementary; Lisa
Griffin, Pinemount Elementary; Jorge
Granados, Richardson Middle; Nancy
Rolfe, Summers Elementary; and Donna
C. Lee, CCSD administrative complex.
All nominees received a certificate and
$125 from the district. Harris received an
additional $125, will receive $200 from the
DOE and was presented with a key to the
city by Lake City Mayor Stephen Witt.


REAL ESTATE: Breaks even

Continued From Page 1A


of the homes sold were dis-
tress sales (foreclosure or
short sales)," he said. "In
2010 we were close to 40
percent in distress sales."
(Short sales are when a
homeowner owes more
than the actual market value
of the home and the bank
is willing to accept current
market prices for the home
in lieu of foreclosure.)
Although the market is
slow, it's not entirely stag-
nant
"The $150,000 and
below market is actually
doing very well right now,"
Gherna said. 'The $150,000
range and below constitut-
ed 70 percent of the 2010
sales."
He said the $150,000-
$200,000 market only
constituted 16 percent of
the 2010 sales, while the
$200,000-$300,000 market
constituted 12 percent of
the 2010 sales. The over
$300,000 market was only 2
percent of the 2010 sales.
"Our low end market is
a healthy market and the
mid-range market is soft,"
Gherna said. "We have
about a 15-16 month inven-



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tory in the mid-range mar-
ket and the high end of the
market is slow. There's not
a lot of activity in the high
end market."
Gherna encouraged peo-
ple looking to purchase a
hometo do so now, in the
higher end of the market
"If anyone is in looking to
upgrade and buy that dream
home in the $200,000-
$300,000 range, I've never
seen a better time to buy,"
he said. "There's a lot of
bargains out there. This is
a buyer's market because
there isn't a lot of compe-
tition for the high-priced
homes."


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Lake City Reporter

Two-vehicle crash results in person. hospitalized
Emergency responders from the Lake City Fire Department and Columbia County Fire
Rescue transport the driver of a Ford Thunderbird to an area hospital,-after she was struck by
a Chevy pick-up truck around 8:15 a.m. Thursday. The collision occurred at the intersection
of Southwest Alachua Avenue and Southwest Camp Street. The Lake City Police Department
was also on scene.


DANCERS: Columbia's best on display

Continued From Page 1A


the military. Williams was
the winner of last year's
Columbia's Top Talent
competition.
D'vante McCall, a 17-
year-old CHS student who
produces his own music
using electronic key-
boards and computer soft-
ware, will be among the
last special performers.
"I make music like hip-


hop and rock," McCall
said, "and I've been mak-
ing beats and songs for
the show."
. The intermission will
feature McCall displaying
some of his tunes.
Collins said that the
winners will move on to
the finals April 8. There
they will compete against
other winners from the


senior division.
There will be a dance
for students in the gymna-
sium, until midnight after
the competition.
"With the dance'follow-
ing the competition, I'm
sure it's going to be a pret-
ty nice evening," Collins
said. "The kids are going
to love it."


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LAE IT EPRTR LOCAL FIAJNAY2,21


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427














OPINION


Friday, January 28, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
0


THEIR
INION


Proposal

to arm

teachers

backfires

How far out on
the fringe is
Sen. Mark
Christensen's
proposal to allow
teachers and other-school
employees to carry concealed
weapons?
Consider this:
There's apparently only
one school in the country that
allows teachers to tote fire-
arms.
In 2007 trustees of the small
Harrold Independent School
District in Texas approved
a policy that allows school
employees to carry concealed
weapons. Employees must be
authorized by the district, have
a Texas concealed weapon
license, have received training
in crisis management and hos-
tile situations and use ammuni-.
tion with a low risk of ricochet.
Some school employees
already carry guns, of course.
But those guns are carried
openly by personnel whose pri-
mary role is public safety. For
example, in the recent shooting
at Millard South High School
an armed school resource offi-
cer was on the grounds, but
unable to intervene.
Most school security experts
suggest that other security
measures, such as metal detec-
tors,, should be given higher
priority than allowing teachers
the right to carry a pistol.
Statistics show, however,
that the actual risk of a school
shooting is far lower than pub-
lic perception.
The average school can
expect such a school shooting
only "about once every 12,800
years," even when the projec-
tion is based the worst 10-year
period for school violence from
1992-3 to 2001-02, according to
the Youth Violence Project.
There's no need for senators
to act rashly.
We hope senators quickly
toss this idea in the trash and
move on to more worthy legis-
lation.

* Lincoln (Neb.) Journal Star


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
.This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY.
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Playing nice is hard work


Not to interrupt any
punch-ups, but the
call has gone out
across America
for a toning down
of violent or harsh political
rhetoric. This is easier said than
done.
Still, thanks must go to
House Majority Leader Eric.
Cantor (R-Va.) for setting a
fine example.
Appearing Sunday on NBC's
"Meet the Press," he was asked
about the "birther" movement,
which seeks President Barack
Obama's birth certificate as
the knights of Camelot sought
the Holy Grail except the
birthers have a more medieval
defiance of logic.
To the relief of stuffy, old-
fashioned types like me who
prize reason in public life,
Cantor said he believes Obama '
is a citizen and suggested this
is not an issue for the American
people. Phew! However, the
official confirmation that the
Republican Party is not really
that crazy is not the big news,
as startling as that revelation
may be. Even more interesting
was that Cantor refused to call
people who question Obama's
citizenship "crazy."
"I don't think it's nice to call
anyone crazy," he said.
That is so true, although it
probably means "barking mad"
is out, too, and that does have a
nice ring to it.
On the other hand, who wants
to be accused of being "nice?"
It is the most anemic of descrip-
tions. In fact, I understand from
lexicographers the learned
folks who compile dictionaries
so well they can afford a new
Lexus every year that "nice"
often hangs out with "namby-
pamby" in the dictionary and
both are bullied by the aggres-
sive adjectives.
Why, if anybody dares call me
"nice" at my funeral, I am going


LETTER


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gaze te.corn
to leap out of the casket to com-
plain, and.several of the larger
pallbearers will have to sit on
the lid to contain me. "Nice?
Nice?" my muffled cries will say.
"Can't you people do better than,
that? If you said I was famous
for having expressive eyebrows,
at least that would be something
remarkable."
But I guess we are stuck with
"nice" here in the land of the
living, courtesy of the supposed
new tide of civility. As a cur-
mudgeon, I am not necessarily
against this, because it Would
make for a nice (that word
again) change.
Yet the rediscovery of courte-
sy does leave un-nice people of
all political persuasions in a bit
of a bind as Cantor's exqui-
site sensitivity to the birthers
illustrates.
What are we to call people
whose cranial cavity has becom-
ing totally filled with political
nonsense? Presidential birth
certificate hobbyists? Wishful
thinkers? Let's face it, if you
can't call these people crazy,
who or what is left? It would be
just wrong to leave members of
the Flat Earth Society as the last
objects of our scorn.
So how do we play our proper
part, watching our p's and q's
and our R's and D's, so that no
fisticuffs break out and little
bunnies gambol beside political
podiums? I suggest the adoption
of euphemism, which is not to
be confused with euphonium,
which is a musical instrument,
although both are designed


to take brassy interludes and
impart to them a sweeter sound.
It wduld be wrong to suggest
that name-calling hasn't been
used in this column in the sorry
past. Some readers have suf-
fered an attack of the vapors as
the result of my use of the term
"ratbag," a venerable Australian
word, which translatesas "bag,
full of rats," which maybe you
guessed. It is amazing how
many people it describes.
Unfortunately, the political
correctness of courtesy will
have to-strike that colorful word
from my vocabulary, but, talk-
ing of ratbags just one last time
for nostalgia's sake, I remem-
ber when Rush Limbaugh
denounced me on his radio
show a few years back.
While he was objecting
to the theme of my column
infused as it was with the
wisdom of liberal thought and
thus guaranteed to irritate those
who deserve to be irritated
he was not pleased that I had
grouped him with other con-
servatives who "seem to take
pride in resembling the nether
quarters of horses." Rush asked
his listeners if I was calling him
a horse's -.
Here he said an uncouth
* word, which I will not repeat
because that would not be nice.
But to belatedly answer his
question, yes, I was.
This is the euphemism I
speak of. We must use it all the
time from now on. It will require
a little more work and a sense
of humor, which has lately been
in short national supply. But the
Committee of Raging Archivists
with Zany Yearnings (CRAZY)
should be warned that we are
not going to play nice even as
we speak nice. Big Stupid (BS)
must always be resisted in force-
ful terms.

E Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


TO THE EDITOR


RVers make Walmart parking lot safer


No overnight parking
signs went up at our
Walmart recently.
RVers come to
Lake City just for
the overnight parking. Check
out walmartrving@yahoogroups.
com. They plan their stops from
up north and spend money not
only at Walmart, but also local
restaurants and shops, want-
ing to stretch their legs after
a long day's drive. Those folks
(snowbirds) will not go to a local
campground, as they are want-


ing to get down here as soon as
possible and see no reason to
pay for just sleeping.
Once they find the Lake City
Walmart is NOP, or no overnight
parking, they will go elsewhere.
So the ban doesn't help anyone.
In fact, other than the few prob-
lem RVers who want to 'camp'
at Wally World for the winter,
RVers actually make the parking
lot safer more eyes with cell
phones at hand.
Also, what business is it of
the government how Walmart


polices their parking lot as long
as there are no safety issues?
Walmart says they want RVers
to be able to park and will not
turn overnighters away, but
warn the government has made
a no-overnight parking regula-
tion.
Is there a bonafide reason
for government to intrude upon
the property rights at Walmart?
Maybe your property might be
next.
Frank Walter
Lake City


road back to solvency by insist-
ing our political leaders be hon-
est with us.
* Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


4A


- I c :


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@nationalpress.com


Straight"


talk on


budget


deficit


have a fiscal crisis;
not one of our big-
name politicians is
being straight with
us on what to do about it.
Right after President Barack
Obama's pleasantly platitudi-
nous but decidedly anemic State
of the Union "Sputnik-moment"
speech, we were told that the
projected deficit for this year
will be $1.5 trillion, the highest,
adjusted for inflation, since the '
end of World War II.
Obama's solution is to "out-
innovate, out-educate and out-
build the rest of the world." To
soothe Republicans, he said
he'd veto earmarks, those pesky
little set-asides that legislators
put in the budget for their own
districts. Nice sentiment but it
won't save much. He proposed
freezing government spend-
ing, which he also promised
last year. He said nothing new
or specific about curbing the
soaring cost of Medicare. He
did not say .hpw to pay for the
wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
He did not address the rapidly
approaching crisis of confidence'-
in the U.S. ability to pay its
debts.
David Walker is the former
U.S. comptroller general (audi-
tor) under Republican and
Democratic presidents who is
aggressively vocal about facing
up to our structural economic
deficiencies. He said Obama's '
speech.on style, tone and deliv-
ery rated "A." On substance,
Walker gave the speech a solid
"D," saying the president failed
to educate the public on our
options.
Americans were asked what
spending they'd cut. Hands
down, they answered foreign
aid. We spend about $25 billion
on foreign aid out of a $3.7 tril-
lion budget. Defense accounts
for 19 percent of the budget,
but most Republicans do not
want major cuts in defense
spending. Nor do Americans
want cuts in costly entitlement
programs.
Two days after Obama's
speech, the bipartisan Financial
Crisis Inquiry Commission
released a book-length report
on the 2008 financial system
collapse. It blames everybody
- presidents, inept govern-
ment regulators, banks' appall-
ing mortgage lending practices,.,
Wall Street greed. It concludes .
the crisis was avoidable, but
only six of the ten commis-
sion members (all Democrats)
endorsed its findings. Yet
another warning dumped on the
proverbial shelf. Little is being,
done to prevent another crisis,
and some propose eliminating
even the mild financial industry
regulations just signed into law.
Meanwhile, we have passed
another milestone we owe
$14 trillion. It may rise as high
as $19.6 trillion in four years.
Right now, interest only on the
debt consumes 8 percent of
our budget. Our national debt
and those rising annual deficits
are crushing us. The problem
is so huge it won't be solved
by either/or solutions such as
higher taxes vs. spending cuts.
We should start this long












Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011 5A


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., com.


Friday
Golf tournament

The Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce
is hosting a golf tournament at 1
p.m. Friday at the Country Club
of Lake City. The title sponsor
is Gulf Coast Financial. Lunch is
before the tournament at noon.
The entry fee for the tournament
is $60. Call the chamber for more
information at 386-752-3690.

Saturday
Pancake breakfast benefit
A benefit breakfast for Ronnie
"Boo" Bias is 8-10 a.m. Saturday
at Applebee's. Tickets are $8
and will be available at the door.
Proceeds go to the family for
funeral expenses.

Blood drive
LifeSouth Blood Centers has
an emergency need for donors.
A blood drive is 11 a.m. to 6
p.m. Saturday at Lake City Mall.
Donors receive backpacks and a
chance to win an iPad.

Annual dinner,

The Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce
annual dinner begins with cock-
tails at 6 p.m. Saturday at the
Columbia County Fairgrounds
Banquet Hall. The title sponsor
is Rountree-Moore Automotive
Group. Tickets for the annual
dinner are $50 per person. Call
the chamber for more informa-
tion at 386-752-3690.

Virtual Cruise

The SS Country Club embarks
on a virtual cruise around Lake
Harris at 6 p.m. Saturday. Enjoy
an evening of dining, music, danc-
ing and cruise ship games. A din-
ner service will take place from 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. and music will be
provided by Tom Elmorie. Dodr'
prizes and drink specials' will be
available all night.' Forr eserva-'


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Newspaper recognizes Independent Carrier of the Year
Joe Smith, circulation district sales manager at the Lake City Reporter, (right) awards Carrie Holloway with a
plaque to recognize her as 2010 Independent Carrier of the Year. Holloway is joined by her husband, Ron. 'I'm
stunned actually,' said Carrie Holloway, who was named the Carrier of the Month in November 2010. 'I'm thrilled,
but I'm shocked. We work our routes everyday and talk with our customers. There is a lot of customer service.'


tions, call 386-752-0721 ext. 25.

Parade of Paws

The Lake City Humane Society
is having a "Parade of Paws" 11
a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday at the Lake
City Mall. Adoptable shelter dogs
will be brought out to visit with
the public to finding them forever
homes. Call 386-752-3191.

Sunday
Bridal show
Your Perfect Day Bridal Show
is at noon until 4 p.m. Sunday at
the Holiday Inn & Suites. Vendors
include The Rose Mary Catering
Company, David's Bridal, Dream
Day Cakes, Lake City Florist and
Design, Joye's Gems & Things,
and more.,The event will feature
door prizes, complimentary food
tasting, and' cash bar. Advance


.ticket prices are $5; day of event,
$7. Tickets can be purchased at
the Holiday Inn & Suites, 213
SW Commerce Dr. Call Theresa
Lastinger at (386) 754-1411.

Tuesday
Opening ceremony
Black History 2011 opening
ceremony is 6 p.m. Tuesday at
Richardson Community Center.
The event is sponsored by It's
About My Efforts. The month-
long theme is "Self Sufficiency
is Key." Visit www.itsaboutmyef-
forts.org or call 386-697-6075 for
details.

Grand opening

The grand opening of the nrew
Remote Control Track is 3:30
p.m. Tuesday at the Southside
Recreation Complex. There will


be a ribbon cutting and demon-
strations of RC vehicles.

MADDfest meeting
'MADDfest meeting is 6
p.m. Tuesday at the Columbia
County Public Library. The
two-day event is March 25 and
26. MADDFEST Spring Arts
Festival is at Olustee Park. All
arts-and-crafts booths, food
vendors will surround the park
facing the main stage gazebo.
Contact Tony@MADDFEST.com
or 386-965-9256.

Wednesday
Newcomers luncheon
The February Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomers' -and.- Friends -is
11:30 a.m. Wednesday at the
Porterhouse Grill, located at 894


S.W. Main Blvd.. All members,
guests and friends are welcome.
Call 438-8100 or 754-7227.

Thursday
Zumba Atomic Class
The. Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department invite
you to Zumba Atomic Class for
children beginning Thursday,
Thursday at Teen Town from 5:30.
p.m. to 6:15 p.m. Zumba Atoniic
is the newest class in exercis-
ing for children ages 7-12 years,,
meant to be a fun way to burn fat,,
tone and sculpt bodies. The cost
is $30 per month, per student.
Contact Zumba Atomic instructor
Sarah Sandlin at sjsandlin@yahoo.'
corn or Heyward Christie at 386-
754-3607.

Saturday, Feb. 5
Youth Talent Explosion
Black History 2011 Youth
Talent Explosion is' noon to 4.
p.m. Feb. 5 at Olustee Park. The,
event will be followed by the
Movie Festival 4-8 p.m. Both
events are sponsored by It's
About My Efforts. The month-
long theme is "Self Sufficiency;
is Key." Visit www.itsaboutmyef-
forts.org or call 386-697-6075.

MLK Parade

The annual MLK Parade is
10 a.m. Feb. 5 starting at DOT.
The parade is sponsored by the
Northeast Florida Leadership
Council.

Annual Celebration

The West Virginia Natives'
annual WV Day celebration
is at noon Saturday, Feb. 5.
The festivities take place at
Epiphany Church located at
1905 SW Epiphany Court.
All attendees should bring a
covered dish of their favorite
"Hillbilly" food to share. RSVP
no later,than Sunday Iby' on-'
tacting 386-754-1760. ,


OBITUARIES


Frances Barfield
Bergmann
Mrs. Frances Barfield Bergmann,
91, died on Wednesday, January
26, 2011 at Avalon Health and
Center. Mrs.
Frpnces was
the daughter
of the late,
Orel Clifton
& Katherine
Cline Barfield. "
She was a .
life long resident of Columbia
County who retired from the
City of Lake City after 30 years
of service, was a member of the
BlueGrey Army, the Lake City
Newcomers Club and the Ava-
lon Red Hat Society. A loving
wife, mother, grandmother and
great grandmother, who devoted
her time to her family and her
church family at the First Presby-
terian Church. She was preceded
in death by her husband, Harold
Bergmann, son, Michael Berg-
mann and her sister, Grace Green.
Survivors include her sons,
Thomas C. (Laura) Bergmann
of Ponte Vedra Beach, FL and
Alan L. Bergmann of Rex, GA;
Daughter Patty "PJ" Melgaard
of Lake City, FL; daughter in
law, Alisa Bergmann of Villa
Rica, GA; brother in law, Robert
Louis (Dot Jean) Green; nephew,
Robin (Karen) Green; and great
niece, Stephanie Grace Green all
of Lake City, FL; grandchildren,
Quinton (Danielle) Melgaard of
Vero Beach, FL, Richard Berg-
mann of Jonesboro, GA, Russell
Bergmann of Kennesaw, GA and
Mills Bergmann of Villa Rica,
GA; great grandchildren, Chris-
tian Melgaard of Lake City, FL
and Krista Melgaard of Vero
Beach, FL; "adopted daughters",
Cricket, Ann, Sister, Lucille,
Elaine & Kathy also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Berg-
mann will be conducted at 1:00
p.m. on Saturday, January 29,



Hang On
a minutes b

Our customers receive
a Complimentary
copy of the
Lake City Reporter
a when they drop off&
pickup their cleaning
While Su) lies Last


2011 at the" First Presbyterian
Church with the Reverend Dr.
Roy A. Martin Jr. officiating.
Interment will follow in Forest
Lawn Memorial Gardens. Visi-
tation with the family will be
Friday, January 28, 2011 from
'5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. at
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596
South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City,
FL 32025, (386) 752-1954.
please sign our guestbook at
www.gatewayforestiawn. comr


Charlotte "Janie" Connett
Mrs. Charlotte "Janie" Con-
nett, 78, a resident of Bron-
son, Florida, died late Tuesday
evening, January 25, 2011 in
the Shands at the University of
Florida Hospital following an
extended illness. A native and
longtime resident of Lake City,
Mrs. Connett had been a resident
of Bronson for the past thirty
years. She was the daughter of
the late Arthur Francis Roberts
Sr. and Ardelia Luke Roberts.
Mrs. Connett had been a home-
maker and was of the Baptist
faith. In her spare time she en-
joyed buying and selling all sorts


,. of items but especially antiques.
Mrs. Connett is survived by her
sons, Arthur R. "Butch" Terry
of Green Cove Springs, Florida;
and Carl Terry of Cleveland,
Georgia; and her sisters, Lula
Mae Richardson of Lake City,
Florida and Lisa Mae Pippens
of Hastings, Florida. Seven
grandchildren and nine great-
grandchildren also survive.
Graveside funeral services for


Mrs. Connett will be conducted
at 11:00 A.M., Friday, January
28, 2011 at Corinth Cemetery
with Rev. Randy Ogburn of-
ficiating. Interment will im-
mediately follow. The family
will receive friends at the fu-
neral home for one hour prior
to the service. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY


FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 752-1234 please sign our
on-line family guestbook at www.
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


REMEBER
YOUR FEX PLA
INSURANCE

CIVR EYEARE


LAE IT RPOTE LCAL


5A


FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter

Bar Association donates dictionaries
Members of the Third Circuit Bar Association donated 85 Merriam-Webster dictionaries to
Richardson Middle School on Wednesday. Susan Williams, reading coach, said classes had
been short of the dictionaries and the school is appreciative of the donation. Helping Williams
unload the books are Tina Seifert, association secretary; and Roberta Getzan, member.
Getzan's son is a student at the school and she heard of the need for dictionaries during a
school advisory council meeting.



Pet food and supply drive

to benefit animal shelter


By A.C. GONZALEZ
agonzalez@lakecityreporter. corn

A pet food and supply
drive will take place outside
the front doors of Winn
Dixie and the Tractor
Supply Company from 1:30
p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday.
Sam Martin, a Life
Scout and coordinator of
the event, said the event
will benefit the Lake City
Animal Shelter.
"We will basically be sit-
ting outside of those .two
stores," said Martin, "and
taking donations of pet


food, bowls, beds and sup-
plies in general to support
the animal shelter."
Martin has coordinated
the event as a means to
complete an Eagle Scout
service project, which will
award him his Eagle Scout
status.
"This isn't only for my
Eagle Scout project," he
said. "I really want to raise
awareness for the needs of
the animal shelter.
"Myself and a few other
scouts will be setting up
a booth and telling people
about how they can help,


and about everything that
the shelter does to help the
community."
He said that the animal
shelter would possibly send
over two dogs in support of
the supply drive.
All sorts of donations for
animals will be accepted.
However, Martin said that
bowls, beds and food are
the most prominent of the
shelter's necessities.
"I am optimistic about
the drive and I hope as
many people as possible
will come out to support a
great cause," he said.


Reid prepares fight with Obama

over targeted spending projects


By CHARLES BABINGTON
Associated Press

WASHINGTON If any-
one thought Sen. Harry
Reid's near-death political
experience last fall would
chasten the Senate major-
ity leader, think again. The
Nevada Democrat is back
in his familiar perch, direct-
ing the Senate's actions and
firing shoot-from-the-lip
zingers at powerful politi-
cians, including President
Barack Obama.
Shortly before Obama
used his State of the Union
A Put a little Iose
Lake City Repo
)ou lose b) .riti


our 'a


speech to say he would veto
any bill with lawmaker-tar-
geted spending projects,
known as "earmarks," Reid
struck pre-emptively.
The president "has
enough power already,"
he told reporters, and
Obama's effort was just a
"lot of pretty talk."
A day after Obama's
speech, Reid was no more
diplomatic. The president
should "back off' on his
earmarks push, Reid told
NBC Nightly News.
White House press sec-
retary Robert Gibbs said


Thursday that the disagree-
ment is serious for a presi-
dent and his party's Senate
leader. Asked whether
Obama and Reid would
have a "come to Jesus
meeting," Gibbs quipped:
"I don't know who would
be Jesus."
Turning serious, Gibbs
said Obama was clear about
curbing earmarks. "We're
going to make some very,
very tough decisions," he
said.
Reid's freewheeling rhe-
torical style touches foreign
policy, too.


e in someone's heart this Ialentine's Da with the
rter's 'Love Lines.' Mfake it a special day for those
ng a message to .our sneetheart. He'll include it on
lentine Love Line' page on February 13th.
'" .i _i.r^ ~ fr "** r''ilnf i -M nimlt h. ^f.i. * --'. _-' ^ -^' ,_-' C 4- -- ^ -!- -' .-'-


Company pays $10K


for ag chief's kid's cake


Associated Press

LAKELAND A fertil-
izer company paid a record
$10,000 for a cake at the
Polk County Youth Fair
Auction baked by the 9-
year-old daughter of state
Agriculture Commissioner
Adam Putnam.
The Ledger of Lakeland
reported Thursday that
Mosaic, a large contribu-
tor to the annual agricul-
tural fair and one of Polk
County's largest employ-
ers, paid $10,000 this week
for Abigail Putnam's hazel-
nut chocolate cake.
Fair officials say the
cakes are often sold for
$200 to $500, with the
second-highest this year
going for $600. One year, a
cake sold for $1,000, they
said.
Putnam, who took office
Jan. 3, said Abigail donated
$9,000 back to the youth
fair.
"Even my 9-year-old
knows a cake isn't worth
$10,000," he said. "I am
proud of my daughter and
proud of her cake. She
feels good about her deci-
sion and is excited about


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Agriculture commissioner Adam Putnam answers questions
during a news conference last week in Tallahassee.


it. It's going to help a lot
of kids."
Mosaic spokesman
'Russell Schweiss agreed
that $10,000 paid Tuesday
was "outside of the normal
range."
He said an employee had
been given a lump sum to
purchase items at the fair.
For example,the company
spent $17,000 on pigs with
the meat being given to
charity.
"This situation is
embarrassing for Mosaic


and our employees and is
not characteristic of how
the company represents
itself. We've initiated an
aggressive investigation to
understand exactly what
happened at the fair so
that we may take swift
and appropriate actions,"
Schweiss said in an e-mail
to The Associated Press.
Putnam said the pur-
chase put him in an awk-
ward position. "The one
that it's most awkward for
is Abbie," he said.


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Roses are red, violets are blue, send Love Lines
to show them that your love is true.
The Lake City Reporter
C4-0-) Presents: (- C


ve


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Add a photo for 13.00

l l.ai-hlacin




i Maria r

Print your message here: __


nes


Your Name:
Phone:_
Address:
City/State/Zip:
Mail to: Lake City Reporter, Classified Department
PO Bo 1709, Lake City, FL 32056 755-5440
ALL ADS MUST BE PAID AT
STHE TIME OF PLACEMENT.
AM DEADLINE IS FEB. 8,2011.


" Mon.-Fri. IOAM-6PM Sat. IOAM-5PM
Same Day Delivery Available


BS -




The Columbia County Tobacco Free
Partnership and the Columbia County
Health Department have come together
to form a partnership in order to create a
,C free tobacco free community. This year, the
SCCO partnership is focusing on polices that
O effect our youth. We are working to-
-C O wards developing 100% tobacco free
schools. Please come join us and help
protect our youth.
All community members, service
workers, and school aged youth...are in-
vited to attend.


Coumia Cunt

Tobacco Free PartnershJ ip.i


Event: Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership
Meeting
When: Wednesday, February 2, 2011
Where: Central School Board Office Room 153
372 West Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055
Time: 1:30-2:30pm


All partnership meetings are open to the public.
For more information on how to become involved
in you local Tobacco Free Partnership, please
contact:
Kyle Roberts
Columbia County Health Department
386-754-7083 or Kyle_Roberts@doh.state.fl.us.


HEALTH


--- --- --------


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


www10kMyPVWCO









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421 ,
tkirby@lakeatyreportercom


SPORTS


Friday, January 28, 201 I


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS







Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom

Shemwell

still on

the court
March
Madness
is the
focal
point for
college basketball, but
February is the crunch
month for hoops.
Columbia High and
Fort White don't send as
many basketball
players to college as in
some other sports.
Currently, Byron
Shemwell is the only
active alumnus from
either school playing
college hoops. Shemwell
is a junior guard at
Edward Waters College
in Jacksonville, which
makes him still a Tiger.
Shemwell is averaging
11.83 points per game,
second on the team, and
has a team-high game of
24 points this season. He
is 20 of 52 from 3-point
range and shoots .776
from the free throw line.
Ed Waters plays in
the Gulf Coast Athletic
Conference. The Tigers
are hosting Northwood
University at 7 p.m.
Saturday. The game will
be at the Adams-Jenkins
Community Sports &
Music Center on the
EWC campus.
Former Columbia
player Jakeem Hill is at
Webber International
University. Hill, who
played at St. Johns River
State College, is in a
redshirt season and will
have two years of
eligibility remaining.
E
Plowing through a
list of Florida players in
Division III turned up
Fort White's Edward
Alexander at
Baldwin-Wallace College
in Berea, Ohio. Playing
in the Ohio Athletic
Conference, the Yellow
Jackets were 7-3 in 2010.
*
Despite his promise to
play, Pittsburgh Steelers
center Maurkice Pouncey
appears to be out for the
Super Bowl with the high
ankle sprain suffered in
the NFC championship.
A UF release noted
this is the ninth
consecutive season a
former Gator will be
on one of the Super
Bowl rosters. At least
one Gator has appeared
in 28 of the 45 Super
Bowls played. There are
13 former Gators who
have combined to win 13
Super Bowl rings.
The girls soccer teams
that advanced to the
state playoffs from the
local districts are Santa
Fe (champion) and
Suwannee (runner-up) in
5-3A and Fleming Island
(winner) and Buchholz
(runner-up) in 4-5A.
The first round was
player on Thursday.
Matchups were: Santa
Fe vs. Crystal River;
Suwannee at Trinity
Catholic; Fleming Island
vs. Leon; Buchholz at
Chiles.


* Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods watches his tee shot on the 13th hole of the North Course at Torrey Pines
during the first round of the Farmers Insurance Open in San Diego, Thursday.


Woods starts

year with 69,

trails by 5 shots


Kang's 8-under
gives rookie lead
at Torrey Pines.
By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press
SAN DIEGO Tiger
Woods began his new sea-
son with no bogeys, no
birdies on the par 5s and
no drama.
Looking for a new start
after a disastrous year on
and off the golf course,
Woods felt little stress
Thursday in the Farmers
Insurance Open with a
3-under 69 on the North


KIRKMAN TO HAVE NUMBER



RETIRED AT ALUMNI GAME


-- - -- - - - -- - "- a
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Former Columbia High player Michael Kirkman (left) reacts with Tad Cervantes (middle) as his father, Scotty, unveils a
street sign for a walkway at the Babe Ruth Baseball Complex named in his honor on Nov. 15. Kirkman played in the 2010
World Series for the Texas Rangers against the San Francisco Giants.


Purple and Gold to follow


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
The hometown hero will
have his number retired
by his hometown team
on Saturday as Michael
Kirkman returns to
Columbia High.
Kirkman's number will


be retired by the Tigers as
part of the team's opening
festivities to the 2011 sea-
son. It will be the center-
piece of a day-long event.
Registration begins at
10:30 a.m. for the Alumni
Game, which will feature
Kirkman and Home Run.
Derby. The derby begins at


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Switzerland's Roger Federer waves as he leaves Rod
Laver Arena after his loss to Serbia's Novak Djokovic at the
Australian Open in Melbourne, Australia on Thursday.


11:30 a.m. and will be fol-
lowed by the Alumni Game
at 1 p.m.
Kirkman will have his
number retired between
the Alumni Game and
Purple and Gold Game,
which starts at 3:30 p.m.
"We're expected to have
about 30 players," coach


J.T. Clark said. "It's free,
so we're hoping for a good
attendance from word
of mouth. We'll split the
teams between people who
graduated in odd and even
years. It's mainly a chance
for us old guys to relive
ALUMNI continued on 2B


Course that left him five
shots behind South Korean
rookie Sunghoon Kang.
If the setting was famil-
iar for Woods, so was his
middle-of-the-pack position.
In four of his six wins at this
tournaments, he has been
at least five shots behind
after the opening round.
"I'm happy with the way I
played, absolutely," Woods
said. "I could have been a
lot better if I took care of
the par 5s a little bit more,
but obviously, I didn't do
that."
Kang, a 24-year-old
WOODS continued on 3B


Titans,

Fisher


part

ways

Coach, franchise
split after 16 NFL
seasons together.
By TERESA M. WALKER
Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn.
- The Tennessee Titans
have parted ways with Jeff
Fisher, who just complet-
ed his 16th full season as
the NFL's longest-tenured
coach.
The team said in a news
release Thursday night that
"Fisher will no longer be
the head coach of the team."
The Titans announced the
move within an hour of a
report by SI.com that they
were negotiating Fisher's
departure,
The
in o ve
o n Ily ,:


o w ner
B u d Fisher
Adams
announced Fisher would
stay on for the final year of
his current contract, a move
that would have left Fisher
coaching for his future.
The team also said a
news conference will be
FISHER continued on 3B


Djokovic beats Federer

to reach Australian final


Defending
champion falls
in three sets.
By JOHN PYE
Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Australia
- Roger Federer saved
a parting shot for anyone
who thinks his time is up
and a changing of the guard
in tennis awaits.
"Yeah, I mean, they say
that very quickly. ... Let's
talk in six months again,"
he said.
The heavily hyped duel
between Federer and Rafael
Nadal will not happen in
Melbourne, opening a rare
window for someone else.


Federer, the defending
champion, lost to Novak
Djokovic 7-6 (3), 7-5, 6-4 in
the Australian Open semi-
finals Thursday night. It
marks the first time since
2008 neither of tennis' most
dominant men will play in
a Grand Slam final. Less
than 24 hours earlier, an
ailing Nadal's pursuit of a
Rafa Slam evaporated in a
quarterfinal loss to fellow
Spaniard David Ferrer.
Djokovic will play Ferrer
or Andy Murray in the
final. On the women's
side, the title match is set
with Kim Clijsters facing
Li Na. Clijsters beat Vera
Zvonareva 6-3, 6-3, and
Li eliminated top-ranked
Caroline Wozniacki 3-6,


7-5, 6-3.
Federer and Nadal have
combined to win 21 of the
last 23 majors. This is also
the first time since 2003
that Federer, a 16-time
Grand Slam winner, will not
hold at least one of the four
major trophies.
The Swiss great was out-
played by Djokovic, who
reveled in the cooler night
weather. It was the second
straight time Federer has
lost to the Serb he had
match points before losing
in the U.S. Open semifi-
nals.
"It's disappointing and it
hurts in the moment itself,"
Federer said. "I wish I could
TENNIS continued on 3B


- I I I











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
II p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, pole qualifying
for All-Star Showdown, at Irwindale, Calif.
ATHLETICS
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Millrose Games, at New
York
BOXING
10 p.m.
ESPN2 Heavyweights, Chris
Arreola (29-2-0) vs.JoeyAbell (27-4-0), at
Temecula, Calif.
EXTREME SPORTS
Noon
ESPN2 X Games, at Aspen, Colo.
7 p.m.
ESPN X Games, at Aspen, Colo.
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Volvo
Champions, second round, at Bahrain
(same-day tape)
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance
Open, second round, at La Jolla, Calif.
NBA BASKETBALL
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Boston at Phoenix
TENNIS
3 a.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open,
women's championship match

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

Conference Championships
Green Bay 2L Chicago 14
Pittsburgh 24, N.Y.Jets 19
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 6
AtArlington,Texas
Pittsburgh vs. Green Bay, 6:30 p.m.
(FOX)

Pro Bowl
Sunday
At Honolulu
AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (FOX)

College all-star games


Saturday
At Mobile,Ala.
Senior Bowl, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Saturday, Feb. 5
At San Antonio
Texas vs. The Nation
Challenge, 2 p.m.


All-Star


BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
ew"Jeri4e at lndina','7 p.m:
Memphis at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Toronto, 7 p.m.
NewYork at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Denver at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Miami, 7:30 p.m.


Orlando at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Washington at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Utah, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Sacramento at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Boston at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Indiana at Chicago, 8 pim.
Washington at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
New Jersey-at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Houston at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Charlotte at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule

Saturday's Games
No. I Ohio State at Northwestern,
6 p.m.
No. 2 Pittsburgh at Rutgers, 8 p.m.
No. 4 San Diego State vs. Wyoming,
10 p.m.
No. 5 Connecticut vs. No. 23 Louisville,
Noon
No. 6 Kansas vs. Kansas State, 7 p.m.
No. 7 Texas vs. No. II Missouri,
9 p.m.
No. 8Villanova vs. No. 21 Georgetown,
Noon
No. 9 BYU at New Mexico, 4 p.m.
No. 9 Syracuse at Marquette, 3 p.m.
No. 12 Purdue vs. No. 16 Minnesota,
I p.m.
No. 13 Texas A&M at Nebraska,
2 p.m.
No. 14 Kentucky vs. Georgia, 4 p.m.
No. 17 Wisconsin at Penn State,
4 p.m.
No. 19Vanderbilt vs.Arkansas, 6 p.m.
No. 22 Florida State at Clemson,
Noon
No. 24 Florida at Mississippi
State, I p.m.

TENNIS

Australian Open

At Melbourne Park
Melbourne,Australia
Thursday
Singles
Men
Semifinals
Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, def. Roger
Federer (2), Switzerland, 7-6 (3), 7-5, 6-4.
Women
Semifinals
Li Na (9), China, def. Caroline
Wozniacki (I), Denmark, 3-6,7-5, 6-3.
Kim Clijsters (3), Belgium, def. Vera
Zvonareva (2), Russia, 6-3, 6-3.
Doubles
Men
Semifinals
Bob and Mike Bryan (I), United States,
def. Eric Butorac, United States, and Jean-
Julien Rojer, Netherlands Antilles, 6-3, 6-2.
Mahesh Bhupathi and Leander Paes
(3), India, def. Max Mirnyi, Belarus, and
Daniel Nestor (2), Canada, 7-6 (5), 4-6,
6-3.
'Mixed
Quarterfinals
Katarina Srebotnik, Slovenia, and
Daniel Nestor (2), Canada, def. Anastasia
Rodionova, Australia, and Mahesh
Bhupathi, India, walkover.


ChanYung-jan,Taiwan,and Paul Hanley,
Australia, def. Chuang Chia-jung. Taiwan,
and Dick Norman, Belgium, 6-2, 4-6. 10-7
tiebreak.
Junior Singles
Boys
Quarterfinals
George Morgan (4), Britain, def. Jeson
Patrombon (8), Philippines, 5-7, 6-2, 6-3.
Jiri Vesely (I), Czech Republic, def.
Mitchell Krueger, United States, 6-2, 6-2.
Roberto Carballes Baena (6), Spain,
def. Mac Styslinger, United States, 6-3, 6-2.
Luke Saville, Australia, def. Lucas
Pouille, France, 7-5, 7-5.
Girls
Quarterfinals
Eugenie Bouchard (14), Canada, def.
Anna Schmiedlova, Slovakia, 6-2,6-3.
An-Sophie Mestach (2), Belgium, def.
Danka Kovinic (II), Montenegro, 6-1,6-3.
Monica Puig (5), Puerto Rico, def.
Christina Makarova, United States, 7-5,
6-2.
Caroline Garcia (8), Fpance, def. Irina
Khromacheva (4), Russia, 6-1, 6-3.
Junior Doubles
Boys
Semifinals
Filip Horansky, Slovakia, and Jiri Vesely
(2), Czech Republic, def. Joris De Loore,
Belgium, and Mate Delic (4), Croatia, 7-6
(4), 6-4.
Ben Wagland and Andrew Whittington
(3),Australia, def. Mitchell Krueger, United
States, and Karue Sell (8), Brazil, 6-7 (5),
6-2, 11-9 tiebreak.
Girls
Semifinals
Eri Hozumi and Miyu Kato, Japan,
def. Denisa Allertova and Klara Fabikova,
Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-4.
An-Sophie Mestach,Belgium,and Demi
Schuurs (6), Netherlands, def. Natalija
Kostic, Serbia, and Ilona Kremen (3),
Belarus, 7-6 (2), 3-6, 10-1 tiebreak.
Wheelchair Singles
Men
Semifinals
Stephane Houdet (2), France, def.
Stefan Olsson, Sweden, 6-1I,6-4.
Shingo Kunieda (I), Japan, def. Robin
Ammerlaan, Netherlands, 6-4, 6-4.
Women
Semifinals
Daniela di Toro (2), Australia, def.
Marjolein Buis, Netherlands, 6-3, 6-2.
Esther Vergeer (I), Netherlands, def.
Jiske Griffioen, Netherlands, 6-2, 6-2.
Quad
Championship
David Wagner (I), United States, def.
Peter Norfolk (2), Britain, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4.
Third Place
Andrew Lapthorne, Britain, def. Nick
Taylor, United States, 7-6 (4), 6-4.
Wheelchair Doubles
Quad
Championship
Andrew Lapthorne and Peter Norfolk,
Britain, def. DavidWagner and NickTaylor,
United States, 6-3, 6-3.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Thursday's Games
No games scheduled
Today's Games
No games scheduled


BRIEFS


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Joyce
Hooper 219; 2. (tie) Lori Davis, Staci
Greaves 204; 4. Mary Lobaugh 178.
1. Tom Sewejkis 242; 2. Bill Dolly 234;
3. Dave Ward 229.
High scratch series: 1. Lori Davis
528; 2. (tie) Joyce Hooper, Staci
Greaves 523; 4. Mary Lobaugh 486.
1. Bill Dolly 637; 2. Zech Strohl 633;
3. George Mulligan 607.
High handicap game: 1. Joyce
Hooper 268; 2. Lori Davis 244;
3. Lorie Niquette 241. 1. Gary
Hamilton 268; .2. Dave Ward 266;
3. Tom Sewejkis 254.
High handicap series: 1. Staci
Greaves 700; 2. Karen Moody 658;
3. Beth Koppa 609. 1. Frank Miller
711; 2. Bill Dolly 685; 3. (tie) Bill Price,
George Mulligan 679.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
179. 1. Zech Strohl 204.
(results from Jan. 18)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(60-32); 2. Farmers (56-36); 3. Jo's
Crew (50-42).
High scratch game: 1. (tie) Roberta
Giordano, Amy Musselwhite 171;
3. Barbara Griner 168.1. Earl Hayward
244; 2. Dan Ritter 217; 3. Art Joubert
213.
High scratch series: 1. Barbara
Griner 480; 2. Roberta Giordano
471; 3. Joanne Denton 432. 1. Ross
Meyers 589; 2. (tie) Earl Hayward, Art


SCOREBOARD


BOWLING

Joubert 581.
High handicap game: 1. Janie
Posey 231; 2. Amy Musselwhite 227;
3. (tie) Pat Hale, Roberta Giordano
225. 1. Earl Hayward 271; 2. Dan
Ritter 243; 3. Jim Hawkins 239.
High handicap series: 1. Sabrina
Herbster 640; 2. Barbara Griner 639;
3. Vy Ritter 632. 1. Ross Meyers
688; 2. Art Joubert 662; 3. Johnnie
. Croft 631.
High average: 1. Betty Brown
146.07; 2. Louise Atwood 144.95;
3. Yvonne Finley 144.54. 1. Dan Ritter
172.19; 2. Earl Hayward 171.67; 3. Art
Joubert 171.41.
(results from Jan. 25)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Neil Hoffman's
Auto (66-24); 2. Bias Well Drilling (59-
31); 3. Rountree-Moore Ford (55-35).
High scratch game: 1. Daniel Adel
268; 2. Zech Strohl 267; 3. Mike
Panza 247.
High scratch series: 1. Daniel Adel
726; 2. Ted Wooley 677; 3. Wally
Howard 648.
High handicap game: 1. Richard
Tompkins 281; 2. Daniel Adel 279;
3. Mike Panza 278.
High handicap series: 1. Daniel
Adel 759; 2. Dann Shepard 749;
3. Richard Tompkins 730.
High average: 1. Dale Coleman
217.18; 2. Zech Strohl 215.54; 3. J.J.
Hilbert 207.17.
(results from Jan. 17)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Gamblers
(54-30); 2. Golden Niners (50-34);
3. Knock 'em Down (46-38).


Florida running back coach


Drayton headed to Ohio State


Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio
- Stan Drayton, who has
been an assistant at nine
colleges, is Ohio State's
new wide receivers coach.
Coach Jim Tressel
announced the hiring on
Thursday.
Drayton replaces Darrell
Hazell who recently took


the head coaching job at
Kent State..
Drayton served as
Florida's running backs
coach and recruiting coor-
dinator last season. The
Ohio native also served as
Florida's running backs
coach from 2005-07, and
held the same position at
SEC schools Tennessee
(2008) and Mississippi


State (2004).
He also has coached at
Syracuse '(2009), Bowling
Green (2000), Villanova
(1996-2000), Pennsylvania
(1995), Eastern Michigan
(1994) and his alma
mater, Allegheny (1993).
From 2001-03, he was an
assistant special teams
coach for the Green Bay
Packers.


ALUMNI: Kirkman to be featured

Continued From Page 1B


glory days and talk a little
trash."
While Kirkman will be
the featured player, others
expected to play are: Kevin
Jackson, Andy Bennett,
Jonathan Ulsh, Daryl
Cribbs (the returning
Home Run Derby cham-
pion), and Clark.
Kirkman isn't expected


to play throughout the
game, but will make a brief
appearance.
"I don't think of it as
being a big deal," Kirkman
said. '"To me, I haven't really
done anything yet. It's just
a chance to come home. I
love to come back."
The jersey retirement
will feature many of those


that have helped Kirkman
along the way, including
Bennett, his former high
school coach, who will be
part of the presentation.
Tad Cervantes and his
father Scotty Kirkman will
also be on hand for the
presentation. Clark expects
the presentation to take
place around 3 p.m.


FLAG FOOTBALL
7-on-7 sign-up
ends today
The Lake City
Recreation Department's
registration for its Adult
7-on-7 Flag Football
League ends today with
rosters and entry fees due.
Entry fee is $585 per team
for a minimum of 10 games
at Memorial Stadium.
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607.

YOUTH BASEBALL
Spring league
registration today
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball has
registration for its spring
season from
5-7 p.m. today, 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Saturday, and
5-7 p.m. Monday and
Tuesday at the Babe Ruth
Baseball building in the
Southside Sports Complex.
Cost of $75 includes jersey,
cap, socks and insurance.
Five leagues are offered
for ages 4-15; a parent or
guardian must provide, a
copy of the player's birth
certificate.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810 or
David Williams at
(904) 219-4577. Online
registration is at
lcccyb. baberuthonline. corn.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Girls softball
registration set
The Girls Softball
Association of Columbia
County has registration
(ages 4-17) open for the
spring season. Sign-up at
the softball complex is
5-7 p.m. Thursday and
Feb. 8, and noon to 2 p.m.
Feb. 5. Registration forms


also are available at Brian's
Sports and completed
forms can be dropped off
there. Coaches are being
sought
For details, call
755-4271 or go to
information@girlssoftball
association., org.

GATORS
Wine testing
for scholarships
The North Florida Gator
Club has its 4th Annual
Wine Tasting Event from
6:30-9 p.m. Thursday at
The Country Club at Lake
City. Cost, of $22 includes
hors d'oeuvres, door prizes
and wine stations from
several countries.
There will be a silent
auction featuring an
autographed basketball by
Billy Donovan. Gator wine
glasses will be sold for $5.
Proceeds go to support the
club's scholarship fund in



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. J

VEFER I


the five-county area.
For details, call Ian at
(352) 316-4305, Angela at
758-8801, Ron at
(386) 397-3378 or Bob
at 752-3333.

YOUTH BASKETBALL
USSSA travel
teams tryouts
The Lake City
Recreation Department
is offering tryouts at
Richardson Community.
Center for 12-under and
15-under USSSA travel
teams.
Tryouts for 12-under are
5:30-7 p.m. Feb. 3, 4, 8, and
10; tryouts for 15-under
are 5:30-7 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday, and Feb. 7, and 9.
Permission/waiver forms
are required before
participating in tryouts.
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607.

E From staff reports
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


EEPPUK I E '
WHEN THE BUCK
5POTTE THE
/ HUNTER, HE RAN
DAYMAL I FOR ---
SNow arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
-- 0 suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: L I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: ANISE WAGER MEMOIR JANGLE
Answer: What she wanted to get for her mother -
A SON-IN-LAW


ACROSS

1 Heavy string
5 Cheyenne's st.
8 Gleeful shout
11 Tara's
owner
13 Smoke-detec- .
tor output
14 Pentagon VIP
15 Reasoning
16 Broken
to bits
18 Shoestring
20 Where
Florence is
21 Pilfer
23 Kind of grin
24 Beat the field
25 Villain in Shake-
speare
27 Aberdeen kids
31 Kitchen pest
32 Pretty soon
33 Gate
34 Hindu attire
36 Mock fanfare
(hyph.)
38 Driving hazard


39 Walk heavily
40 Utopia
41 Party fabric
42 Produce eggs
44 Tall and lanky
46 Type of bee
49 European capi-
tal
50 Exchanging
52 Old cattle town
56 Shuttle's desti-
nation
57 Wire gauge
58 Eva or Zsa Zsa
59 Butter serving
60 Pub pint
61 Knock flat

DOWN


Blimp title
Melodramatic
cry
Scold
Bore a hole
Not foolish
- Kippur
Radio studio
sign (2 wds.)


Answer to Previous Puzzle

MIAIRCH TAUP
AFAR I ERRET
ANE T RONI

AERIE CLA


ASLEEP OLIV E
N ILS REELED

KNOAHUIALD

ACC NAB
L T H E D GE
TROOPS MUTUAL
DEPUT N NALS
-SILEIDS ST AL E


8 Khan
9 Dressy shoe
10 Rooney or Gibb
12 Locust
tree
17 Fashion


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


19 Salt's ditty
21 Newspaper
edition
22 Emcee's
remarks
23 Feels
curious
24 Yellow jacket
26 Incite
28 Dismissal
29 Uncertain
30 Proofer's
word
35 Laid off
37 Not digital
43 Feminine
principle
45 Herd follower
46 Nongeneric
swab (hyph.)
47 Bear, to
Brutus
48 Right, on a
map
49 Give the eye
51 None
53 Honest prez
54 Ad com-
mittee
55 Ozarks st.


1-28 2011 by UFS, Inc.


High handicap game: 1. Joyce
Hooper 252; 2. Shirley Highsmith 245;
3. Ruth Lott 234. 1., Jerry Ellis 252;
2. Thomas Young 245; 3. Earl
Hayward 241.
High handicap series: 1. Dee Dee
Young 671; 2. Joanne Denton 659;
3. Janie Posey 620. 1. Jack Stanfield
650; 2. Art Joubert 646; 3. Vernon
Black 630.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
154.02; 2. Elaine Nemeth 151.27;
3. Jane Sommerfeld 151.18. 1. David
Duncan 186.43; 2. Bill Dolly 184.78;
3. Lee McKinney 180.9.
(results from Jan. 20)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Alley Oops
(11-1); 2. The Sandbaggers (9-3);
3. Lucky Strikers (7-5).
High handicap game: 1. Cythe
Shiver 269; 2. Karen Gardner 255;
3. Angie Meek 251.
High handicap series: 1. Cythe
Shiver 667, 2. Karen Gardner 659;
3. Cathy Pelley 653.
(results from Jan. 25)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. TAZ (9-3);
2. McGhghy's Navy (8-4, 49,845 pins);
3. Spare Us (8-4, 47,578 pins).
High scratch game: 1. Liz Randall
198; 2. Liz Randall 197; 3. Norma
Yeingst 196. 1. Bill Duncan 244;
2. Matt Stephan 236; 3. Robert Pond
226.
High scratch series: 1. Liz Randall
541; 2. Cheryl Jacks 516; 3. Norma
Yeingst 502. 1. Joe Cohrs 624; 2. Matt
Stephan 616; 3. Bill Duncan 602.
(results from Jan. 23)


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421














James, Wade joining each


other on NBA All-Star team


By BRIAN MAHONEY
Associated Press

NEW YORK LeBron
James and Dwyane Wade of
the Miami Heat are headed
to the NBA All-Star game
together, and Derrick Rose
gave the Chicago Bulls their
first starter since Michael
Jordan.
They will be joined in
the Eastern Conference
starting lineup by Amare
Stoudemire, who will
become the first New York
Knicks player to start in
nearly two decades, and
Orlando center Dwight
Howard, the leading
vote-getter in the con-
ference with nearly 2.1
million.
The Lakers' Kobe Bryant
earned his 13th straight
All-Star selection for the
Feb. 20 game at his home
arena. He is one shy of the
record held by Jerry West,
Shaquille O'Neal and Karl
Malone.
Bryant, a three-time MVP
of the All-Star game, was
the overall leading vote-get-
ter with more than 2.3 mil-


lion.
The other starters
announced Thursday were
Hornets guard Chris Paul,
forwards Kevin Durant of
Oklahoma City and Carmelo
Anthony of Denver, and
Houston center Yao Ming,
who is injured and will be
replaced on the roster by
a player of commissioner
David Stern's choosing.
James and Wade, who
both received more than
2 million votes from fans,
-will become the first set of
teammates to start for the
East since Wade and O'Neal
represented the Heat in the
2007 game in Las Vegas.
"We try to represent our
team, try to represent our
franchise the right way
every time we go out on the
basketball court, and the
fact that we've had so many
votes by these fans, like I
said it's very humbling and
we appreciate it," James
said before the Heat faced
the New York Knicks.
Rose beat 'out Celtics
guard Rajon Rondo to earn
his first All-Star start and
the first by a Chicago play-


er since Jordan started the
1998 game.
"I think it's recognition
for the job he's done this
year," Bulls coach Tom
Thibodeau said. "All-Star
games, those are great. He
certainly earned it, but ...
I'm more concerned with
what he's done for our
team. And he's done a lot
for the team."
Fans voted for the start-
ers, but the reserves will be
chosen by the head coach-
es in their respective con-
ferences. Their votes must
be submitted to the league
office by next Tuesday,
and the announcement will
come next Thursday night.
Stoudemire has revital-
ized the Knicks since arriv-
ing from Phoenix in the
summer. He beat out peren-
nial starter Kevin Garnett
for the second forward spot
and is just the fifth Knicks
player to be selected a
starter since fans began
voting in 1974-75. Patrick
Ewing was the last one to
start in 1992, though he
was elected again in 1997
but couldn't play because of


a strained left groin.
In a rarity in All-Star bal-
loting, the fans nailed it in
the East. Stoudemire, James
and Wade all rank among
the league's top five in scor-
ing, and Rose and Howard
are right there with them as
MVP candidates.
Wade was the MVP of
last year's game in Dallas
Cowboys Stadium and
hit the winning shot in
the East's 2006 victory in
Houston.
"It's an honor," Wade
said of his election. "It's
not as big a deal as it was
when I first came in. It was
like my heart was racing
the day of the final vote
hoping I get in. It contin-
ues to be an honor to get
the same respect from the
fans."
The West vote was flawed
by the election of Yao, who
despite missing nearly the
entire season continues
to earn a huge vote total
from his native China. West
coach Gregg Popovich of
the San Antonio Spurs will
pick one of his reserves to
start.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Heat's LeBron James dunks in the first quarter against
the New York Knicks in New York on Thursday.


NHL shakes up All-Star


game with unique draft


By IRA PODELL
Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. -While
the NFL and NBA are fac-
ing labor uncertainty, the
NHL is taking a moment
to, puff. out its chest as
it heads into an AllStar
weekend unlike any
other. '
Six years after a full
season was lost, the NHL
finds itself in a unique posi-
tion of negotiated calm and
unprecedented success.
Hockey will never enjoy
the revenue streams the
NFL produces, but the little
brother league can relate to
the uncertainty that threat-
ens upcoming football. and
basketball games.
The NHL certainly likes
its current view, far away
from the storm.
As it takes the midsea-
son spectacle to Raleigh for
the first time, the NHL said


it is on pace to break rev-
enue records. The league
expects total revenue to
rise for the fifth straight
year to nearly $2.9 billion.
League generated revenue
is believed to be going up
by 14 percent an 85
percent jump over the past
four years.
'The league is extreme-
ly well positioned,' NHL
Commissioner Gary
Bettman said. "The vital
signs are good and we antic-
ipate continued growth and
momentum. The strong
numbers are a testament
to a great product on the
ice, a growing fan base
that loves our game, and a
strategy that provided
a path for corporate
America to reach that fan
base."
And now the NHL is
pushing the envelope.
While the league and
the game will take a big


hit because Pittsburgh
Penguins captain Sidney
Crosby the face of the
league and its most popu-
lar player is out with ,a
concussion, at least there
is another hook to draw
people in.
Outside of taking the
All-Star game outside a
la the Winter Classic on
New Year's Day it is
hard to envision a more
radical change to the
format that seemingly
worked for years. This
year's teams will be cho-
sen by a televised draft on
Friday.
"You look around the
leagues, the concept is
pretty much the same:
voted in or picked by fans
or hockey personnel,"
Phoenix Coyotes defense-
man Ed Jovanovski said.
"I'd say this caught people
probably 90 percent off-
guard."


TENNIS: Federer admits bad play


Continued From Page 11

have won here again for
the fifth time. But wasn't
possible tonight. It's not
the end in any way. It's a
start for many other tour-
naments after this."
Federer said he didn't
play the key points well.
He f6ll behind quickly in
the first-set tiebreaker on
backhand errors, giving
Djokovic four set points.
In the second set, he got
up a break. Djokovic was
scrambling, twice tumbling
to the court and losing his
racket as he tried to stay in
rallies. But Federer, so used
to moving in for the kill, let
a 5-2 lead slip and dropped
the set. From there it was
just about over.
"Every time I had slight
opportunity, either ILdidn't
play my best or he played
his best," Federer said. "It
was a tough night from
this standpoint. Those are
sometimes the way match-
es go."
Nadal limped away from
his match, saying he had
a small muscle tear in his


upper left leg and casting
doubt on his readiness
for at least a few weeks.
Federer has no ailments to
speak of.
"I feel very good. I'm
very optimistic about the
next 15 tournaments, how-
ever many I'm playing,"
he said. "I've barely lost
matches lately really, so
I'm happy with where my
game is at, with where my
condition is at.
"I'm really excited for
what's to come. This is
obviously a bit of a blow.
At the same time, I played
a good tournament. I have
no regrets."
Djokovic planned to
relax and eat popcorn while
watching Friday night's
semifinal between Murray,
the 2010 finalist, and No.
7-ranked Ferrer.
Murray was leading
Nadal in the quarterfi-
nals last year when the
Spaniard retired in the
third set because of a knee
problem that put him off
the tour until March. Nadal


returned to the tour in
March and went on to win
the French, Wimbledon
and U.S. Open titles.
When he arrived in
Melbourne, he was aiming
to be the first player since
'Rod Laver in 1969 to hold
all four men's majors at
once. Now, Murray is hop-
ing to be the first British
man since 1936 to win a
major.
Clijsters has three Grand
Slam titles but is seek-
ing her first outside the
United States. Li already
has broken new ground by
becoming the first Chinese
to reach a Grand Slam sin-
gles final. Li saved a match
points against Wozniacki
and rallied from from a set
and a break down.
Victory would put her in
the top five in the rankings,
and possibly have great
repercussions at home.
The official Xinhua News
Agency says a Grand Slam
win by Li would "inspire a
rush of new tennis players
in China."


GOLF: Mickelson opens with 67


Continued From Page 11

rookie, finished with back-
to-back birdies on the
North Course for an 8-
under 64, giving him a one-
shot lead over fellow rookie
Chris Kirk, Alex Prugh and
Rickie Fowler.
Phil Mickelson shot 32
on the back nine for a 5-
under 67 to match the best
score on the tougher South
Course, which hosted the
2008 U.S. Open that Woods
won in a playoff. Also at 67
on the South was John Daly,
whose last win came in 2004
at this tournament. He is
the last player to win at
Torrey Pines when Woods
was in the field.
"This place means a lot
to me," Daly said. "The top
golfers play here every year.
That says something."
Woods no longer is No. 1
- he has slipped to No. 3 in
the world ranking and can't
improve on that this. week
- but he has not played, the
public course he has practi-
cally owned since that U.S.
Open in 2008. He" missed
the next year because of
knee surgery, and last year
while in a Mississippi addic-
tion clinic after being caught
in extramarital affairs.
"Welcome back to


Torrey," was a .popular
phrase from the gallery
throughout his round, in
which Woods played solidly
except on the greens. He
made only two putts longer
than 3 feet a 10-foot par
save on No. 8, and a 25-
foot birdie putt on the par-3
sixth that bounced along
until catching the right cor-
ner of the cup.
"I didn't leave myself
any putts," Woods said. "I
kept leaving myself above
the hole. And I didn't take
advantage of the par 5s."
The North Course is not
the pushover it has been in
past .years because of some
new length, and not just in
distance. Along with being
some 90 yards longer, the
rough was allowed to grow
and is thicker than the grass
found on the South Course.
"I didn't know the North
was as long as the South,"
Ben Curtis said after a 70.
He knows better, but it felt
that way if tee shots did not
stay in the narrow, canted
fairways.
Woods was in shorter
grass on half of his 14 tee
shots, although four of
those misses came on the
par 5s. He couldn't get to


the green in two, and didn't
make the birdie putts.
Even so, he looked more
like the Woods who ended
last year with a playoff
loss at the Cnevron World
Challenge, not the guy
who played so poorly for
so much of the year that
he didn't win on the PGA
Tour for the first time in his
career.
It felt like a typical season-
opener for Woods, including
his position on the leader-
board. In his last four trips
to this PGA Tour-event, he
has trailed by seven, six,
five and two shots after the
opening round and went on
to win them all.
Even so, scoring on
the North was lower, and
Woods will need to pick
up the pace on the South
Course. He is playing the
first two days with Anthony
Kim and Rocco Mediate,
whom Woods defeated in
that epic U.S. Open, playoff
at Torrey Pines.
Mediate was chattering
away, as usual, but there
wasn't much conversation
about that 19-hole playoff
from 2008.
'We didn't play that golf
course," Woods said.


FISHER: Couldn't be reached by AP


Continued From Page 1E

held to discuss the Titans'
first coaching change since
the franchise relocated to
Tennessee from Houston in
1997.
A team spokesman did
not immediately respond
to messages from The
Associated Press. Fisher did
not answer a message left
on his cell, and his agent
also did not respond to mes-
sages from the AP.
The move caught most of
the NFL by surprise.
Though Fisher had been
derided locally as "Coach
.500" or "Coacho Ocho,"
he seemingly had just sur-
vived a battle with quarter-
back Vince Young. Adams
decided to either release
Young or trade him on
Jan. 5.The owner announced
two days later that he would
be keeping Fisher, leaving


the coach to head into the
2011 season needing a play-
off berth.
But Fisher didn't help
himself when he fired his
defensive coordinator
Chuck Cecil a week ago
after giving him a contract
for the 2011 season.
Fisher has coached more
NFL games for one fran-
chise than all but six Hall
of Famers: George Halas,
Tom Landry, Don Shula,
Chuck Noll, Curly Lambeau
and Bud Grant.
Fisher ranks third
among active coaches in
career wins with a record
of 147-126, behind only Bill
Belichick (176) and Mike
Shanahan (160), and he is
20th all-time in coaching
victories.
Adams promoted Fisher
from defensive coordinator


to interim coach with six
games left in the 1994 sea-
son after firing Jack Pardee.
Adams removed the interim
tag after that season and .
has stayed with Fisher loh-
ger than any other coach
with the franchise the bil-
lionaire founded.
Fisher oversaw the team's
relocation from Houston
in which the Oilers played
in four different stadiums
between 1996 and 1999
before moving into their
current home.
Since 1999, Tennessee
ranks seventh in the NFL
in winning percentage with
a 110-82 record. The Titans
also are tied for fourth
with six playoff seasons
since 1999, though a sec-
ond straight miss this past
season will drop the team
down that list.


/'/

^>/


OIL-


EVERY SUNDAY!

New Winners Each Week!


-I -1 ~I I


LAE IT EPRTR SPORTS FIAJNAY2,21


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
HOW ARE WERE HAVING
THINGS GOING COMMUNICATION
WITH KeLLV? DIFFICULTIES! SHE
KEEPS TELLING ME
S TO CALL HER OR
POST SOMETHING
SWEET 'ON TWITTER
~-IOR FACS.OOK!
'"! i!,\o,-r ...?


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


End of longtime friendship

causes overwhelming pain


DEAR ABBY: How do I
cope with the ending of a very
long friendship? I saw warn-
ing signs for a couple of years,
and tried many times to talk
to my best friend about what
seemed to be happening. Her
values and priorities ard mov-
ing in other directions now. I
no longer feel appreciated as
her friend.
My heart is breaking. We
have been friends for half our
lives. This is more devastat-
ing than any divorce, death or
hurricane I have ever experi-
enced. She is how I have got-
ten through my life this far.
There are support groups
out there for everything un-
der the sun, exceptforlosing a
best friend due to indifference
and lack of caring. Please ad-
vise me. -THROWN AWAY
IN PASADENA, TEXAS
DEAR THROWN AWAY:
I know you are hurting, and
I am sorry. But friendships
are not just made up of help-
ing each other through the
hard times; there is also a
component of celebrating the
good ones. While she may
have been your leaning post,
you need to examine what
you were to her. If the load
became too much to carry,
it's understandable that she
would need to back off.
While there are no sup-
port groups for people in
your situation, there are coun-
selors who can help you sort
through your feelings and


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
because this experience has
been devastating, you should
talk with one.
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 16-
year-old girl from a religious
home. When I was 7, my fa-
ther got very drunk and mo-
lested me. It had a terrible
impact on me.
He has apologized for
what happened and knows I
hate him for it and can't for-
give him. It hasn't happened
since, and I know he's telling
the truth. I feel the next step
in my healing is to confide
in my friends and ask them
to pray for me. But if I do, I
know they won't look at me
the same. I'm afraid they'll
get their parents to intervene
and something will happen
to Dad. That's the last thing I
want. Should I tell? -NEEDS
SUPPORT IN PHILLY
DEAR NEEDS SUP-
PORT: You appear to be an
idealistic, intelligent young
woman. But it's important you
understand that apologizing
for committing a crime against
someone is not enough. The
person must also be willing
to accept the consequences


of his actions. Drop by an el-
ementary school and look at
the 7-year-olds on the* play-
ground. That's how small and
vulnerable you were when
your father molested you.
Ask yourself: Did he quit;
drinking and get help for his
alcohol problem? Did he talk
to his minister and confess:
what he did? Did he seek
professional help of any kind?'.
Are there little girls in your,
extended family? 5
You are exhibiting two:
classic signs of an abuse,
victim. One is thinking that:
people will regard you differ-
ently if you disclose that you,;
were victimized. Another is
the impulse to "protect" your
abuser.
I'm all for the power of
prayer, but rather than tell
your girlfriends, is your moth-
er aware of what happened? If
she is unavailable to you, then:,
you should talk to your min-
ister or a trusted counselor!
at school. If you're afraid this
will "betray" your father, call',
the Rape, Abuse and Incest,
National. Network (RAINN),
toll-free at (800) 656-4673.
You can speak to one of the
counselors there in complete
confidence. They are expe-
rienced and can guide you
about what -or what not
to do next.

Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Take advantage
of a moneymaking oppor-
tunity. Don't let past jobs
or people you have worked
with cause you to shy away
from a similar deal. A part-'
nership that was a prob-
lem in the past can now be
used to your advantage.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You'll feel like
you are in a tug of war if
you allow others to manipu-
late your territory. Stand
strong and defend your po-
sition and your assets. Do
your homework before you
volunteer time or money.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): You've got a lot
going on but, by practicing
efficiency, you can accom-
plish your goals and master
a new set of skills. Love is
apparent and an emotional
connection can be enhanced
by an act of thoughtfulness.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Set your sights
high but don't go over-
board. A change in your
financial status due to a job
interview, advancement or
coming into an unexpected
gift or payoff of some sort is
evident ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): The more you interact


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

with friends, peers or peo-
ple 'who. share your inter-
ests, the more you will gain
in knowledge and encour-
agement There is plenty
to look forward to, so plan
your next trip or consider
taking a course. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): With a little push and
help from your friends, you
can accomplish anything
you set out to do. Prepare to
put in long hours and hard
work and the payoff will
come your way. Don't let
anyone who is not support-
ive stand in your way. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Learn more about
what your community offers
and how you can be a part of
it. The interaction you have
today will give you ideas
regarding a service you
can offer. There is money
to be made if you invest in
your own ability and talent

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
.Nov. 21): Take a leap of
faith. The idea is not bad,
it's the way others have
gone about doing it that has
caused them to fail. You can
learn and make minor ad-
justments, allowing you to
be the one who finds suc-'
cess in a challenging field.


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Emotions
will be running high and the
chance of making a mistake
is likely. Change is upon you
but, to ensure that it is favor-
able, take each step carefully
and make sure you are get-
ting exactly what you want.
Love is in the stars. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.'
22-Jan. 19): You may be
fooled by your own short-
sightedness. Look beyond,
ask questions and find out
the facts required to make
the right choice. Taking on
more than you can handle
will lead to a struggle that
will not end in your favor.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Contracts,. in-
terviews, settlements or
investing in something you
believe in will all pan out
Focus on love late in the day.
Your original and trendy ap-
proach will attract people
who can offer you equality
and support ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You are po-
sitioned and poised, for
success. You can convince
others to have an interest
in your ideas. Using your
timing and expertise to the
fullest will lead to your per-
sonal and professional hap-
piness. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
'Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: S equals K
" FDWD PA FC I I H LCCN, HCV JTA
TJGVTIIH RDG T UTWWPTRD
IPJDAOD KWPAGDN CA TA DGJF-T-


SS D G J F. "


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "There is so little difference between husbands you
might as well keep the first." Adela Rogers St. Johns
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 1-28


FOR BETTER ORWORSE CLASSIC PEANUTS


BECAME OF ER IMR STANCE,
HEY WILL BE 5RO IN COLOR


C


dlICH IS WOR5E, A GRN
FAULT, A BLUE FAULT
OR A PINK FAULT?

ci


SODON'T NEED ELECTRONIC GADGETS
TO HAVE COMMUNICATION
POEMS o WHAT
DID YOU


BUT I'D MUCH RATHER JUST TEXT!
010 YOU EVER HAVE THOSE KINOSOF
COMMUNICATION
S I PROBLEMS, OAD?

I I


NDAAPO UPIIDW


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415












Classified Department: 755-5440


IBU-I

FIND I


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


- ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
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copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
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Thursday Wed., 10:00a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Tlurs., 10:00 a.m. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
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on the first day of publication.
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the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
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deadlines apply for cancellation:.
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ferred to the accounting depart-
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Advertising copy is subject to
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reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
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omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
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ever, the first word of each ad may
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In Print Online
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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 11-12-CP
DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM PORTER TYLER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
William Porter Tyler, deceased,
whose date of death was October 16,
2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, .Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OFR
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED "
The' date of first publication of this
notice is January 28, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/ Katherine B. Schnauss Naugle
Attorney for William Tyler
Florida Bar Number; 514381
Naugle & Smith P.L.
810 Margaret Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32204
Telephone: (904) 366-2703
Fax: (904) 366-3704
E-Mail: knaugle@jaxlawteam.com
Personal Representative
/s/ William Tyler
5154 Saddlehom Drive South
Jacksonville, Florida 32257
05524961
January 28,2011
February 4, 2011
NOTICE OF ACTION'
BEFORE THE BOARD OF NURS-
ING
IN RE: The license to practice nurs-
ing of
Aranda E. Williams, C.N.A.
1166 S.E. St. Johns Street Lot #2
Lake City, Florida 32025
CASE NO.: CNA 136466
The Department of Health has filed
an Administrative Complaint against
you, a copy of which may be ob-
tained by contacting, Casey Cowan,
Assistant General Counsel, Prosecu-
tion Services Unit, 4052 Bald Cy-
press Way, Bin #C65, Tallahassee
Florida 32399-3265, (850)245-4640
If no contact has been made by you
concerning the above by November
24, 2010, the matter of the Adminis-
trative Complaint will be presented
at an ensuing meeting of the Board
of Nursing in formal proceeding.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the individual or agency
sending this notice not later than sev-
en days prior to the proceeding at the
address given on the notice. Tele-
phone: (850)245-4640, 1-800-955-
8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770 (v),
via Florida Relay Service.
04543253
January 28, 2011
February 4, 11, 18, 2011


RECYCLE

YOUR

PAPER


Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS
CONCERNING A
VARIANCE AS PROVIDED FOR
IN
THE LAKE CITY AIRPORT HAZ-
ARD ZONING ORDINANCE
BY THE JOINT CITY OF LAKE
CITY/COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AIRPORT HAZARD
ZONE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT
OF COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that, pursuant to City of Lake City
Ordinance No. A-369 and Columbia
County Ordinance No. 77-3, herein-
after referred to as the Lake City Air-
port Hazard Zoning Ordinance, com-
ments, objections and recommenda-
tions concerning the following de-
scribed variance as provided for in
the Lake City Airport Hazard Zoning
Ordinance, will be heard by the joint
City of Lake City/Columbia County,
Florida, Airport Board of Adjust-
ment, at public hearing on February
8, 2011 at 12:00 p.m., or as soon
thereafter as the matters can be
heard, at City Hall, City of Lake
City, located at 205 North Marion
Avenue, Lake City, Florida.
1.) AHV 003, a petition by Tower
Corn III, LLC, as agent for the City
of Lake City, to request a variance be
granted to increase the height of a
proposed telecommunications tower
within the horizontal zone as provid-
ed for in Section VII(4) of the Lake
City Airport Hazard Zoning Ordi-
nance submitted as part of a petition
dated December 20, 2010, to be lo-
cated on the property described, as
follows:
A parcel of land lying within Section
35, Township 3 South, Range 17
East, Columbia County, Florida. B.e-
ing more particularly described, as
follows: A parcel of land located
within Lot 2, Lake City Industrial
Park, an unrecorded subdivision and
said parcel being more particularly
described as follows, commence at
the Southwest comer of said Lake
City Industrial Park, an unrecorded
subdivision; thence South 52008'59"
East along the Northeasterly right-of-
way line of State Road 100 a dis-
tance of 289.68 feet; thence North
37051'01" East 624.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning; thence North
33016'43" East 100.0 feet; thence
South 56'43'17" East 100.0 feet;
thence South 33016'43" West 100.0
feet; thence North 56043'17" West
100.0 feet to the Point of Beginning.
Containing 0.23 acre, more or less.
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future dates. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
cerning the:matterwill.be published .,.
At the aforementioned public hear-
ing, all interested parties may appear
to be heard with respect to the pro-
posed variance.
Copies of the proposed variance are
available for public inspection at the
Office of the County Planner, Build-
ing and Zoning Department, County
Administrative Offices, 135 North-
east Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida, or phone 758-1008 during
regular business hours.
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ing, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation or an
interpreter to participate in the pro-
ceeding should contact Joyce Bruner,
at least seven (7) days prior to the
date of the hearing. Ms. Bruner may
be contacted by telephone at
(386) 719-57168.
05524959
January 28, 2011


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

FOUND: Boston Terrier.
West side of town.
Call 386-752-3272
to identify.


060 Services
L wssm


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks / Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


Senior Assistant/Companion.
I will sit with & care for your
elderly. Drive to Doctor appts. &
shopping. References avail.
386-288-3776 or 386-754-8721

100 J0
Opportunities

04543193
NOW HIRING!!!
Be home everyday, While
making excellent pay! We are
now hiring experienced
Class A Drivers to haul
petroleum locally.
* Excellent benefits package
including health, dental
and 401K.
All applicants MUST Have:
* Class A CDL with X
endorsements.
* 1 yr tractor-trailer experience
with a t/t school certification or
2 yrs. tractor-trailer experience
without the certification.
* 25 yrs or older
Please apply online at
floridarockandtanklines.com
or call 1-866-352-7625


100 Jo0
100 Opportunities

04543203
Aaron's Lake City store is now
hiring Retail Manager's at
Salary+ Comm.& Bonuses
Sunday Off & Full Benefits
Must have 2 yr. mgmt exp. or
college, NO criminal history,
pass drug test, 21
yrs., or older clean mvr apply at:
www.aarons.com/careers key-
words type "lake city"

04543279
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
For mature individuals seeking
long-term employment. Must
be self motivated and flexible
with work days.
HOUSEKEEPING ROOM
ATTENDANT
Hampton Inn & Suites
Lake City
This full time position offers in-
dustry standard benefits to in-
clude holiday pay, vacation, and
more. Hotel experience prefer-
red but not required.
Apply in person
MONDAY 1/31/11 or
TUESDAY 2/1/11
Between 10am & 4pm ONLY
Hampton Inn & Suites Lake
City
450 SW Florida Gateway Drive
U.S. 90 and 1-75, exit 427

05524921




Managers Needed,
competitive wages, advance-
ment opportunities, complete
training program, health, dental
& life benefits, DFWP/EOE
Please send resume to
bbqm@heritagemanagement.net
or fax to 352-387-0011

05524962
Comcast Outside Sales
Contractor for Comcast needs
outside sales reps to sell
cable to homeowners.
Earn $600+ weekly, will train.
Call (866) 323-9416

Anderson Columbia is accepting
applications for a certified
electrician with experience in
motor and motor control repair.
Please come by 871 Guerdon Rd,
Lake City, FL to fill out an appli-
- cation or email your resume to-
wassont@andersoncolumbia.com.
Equal Opportunity Employer
Cloth Cutter
for small sewing operation,
Hafner's
386-755-6481
Cosmetologist wanted. Cut N Up
Family Hair Salon has 3 stations
available for rent. Call Sharon
386-365-8402 or 752-1777
DRIVER/COUNTER SALES
Valid DL. DFWP. Benefits, 401K,
P/T to F/T, Apply at 986 E. Duval
St. Lake City 386-466-0177
Experienced Legal
Secretary/Paralegal
5 yrs exp, including
civil litigation, email resume and
salary requirements to:
sportsroof@yahoo.com
26 Temp Farmworkers needed.
2/28/11 11/1/11. Workers will
plant, cultivate, harvest, grade &
pack produce according to
supervisor's instructions.
Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
Work tools, supplies, equip.
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided for non-commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed to worker
upon completion of 50% of
contract, or earlier, if appropriate.
$9.11/hr plus piece rates.
Worksites in Greenville & Oconee
Co's SC. Report/Send resume to
the nearest FL Agency of Work-
force Innovation office & ref. job
order # SC 494634. Family Farm
Friendly and helpful person for
part time retail sales in the pool -
business. Experience helpful.
Weekends with possibility more
during the week. Send request to:
info@actioninc.biz
Full Time Maintenance Person
needed for medical office,
Send reply to Box 05059, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
8 Temp. Nursery Workers needed
2/28/11 11/14/11. Workers will
plant, cultivate, harvest, grade,
store, ship container & field grown
horticultural products. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools,
supplies, equip, provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier, if appropriate. Worksite in
Boardman Township, MI.
$10.57/hr. Report or send resume
to the nearest FL Agency of
Workforce Innovation office &
ref. job order # 2984583.
Lucas Nursery
18 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Pleasure View
Farms, LLC. Henry County, KY.
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row Crop,
& Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 03/15/11 -01/15/12. Wage
of $9.71/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools


provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Center
in your area and reference
Job Order #KY0418880.


ioo Job
Opportunities

04543216
LINCARE, leading national
respiratory company seeks
results driven Sale
Representative. Create working
relationships with MD's, nurses,
social workers and articulate our
excellent patient care with
attentive listening skills.
Competitive Base + un-capped
commission. Drug-free
workplace. EOE.
Fax resume to center manager
(386)754-2795


Teacher (Lawton's, Early Head
Start Lake City, Birth to 3 yrs old)
HS Dip/GED, Must have FCCPC
/CDA; three years of classroom
experience working with
infants/toddlers preferred; Bilin-
gual (Spanish/English) preferred,
5 Hour Literacy, Must pass physi-
cal/DCF background screening,
Current First Aid/CPR preferred.
Excellent Benefits-Paid Holidays,
Sick/Annual Leave. Apply in
person at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637,
by email: arobinson@sv4cs.org
Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE
Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

120 Medical
0 Employment

04543244-
RN
Full time, 11-7 shift.
Excellent pay and benefits
Please apply Baya Pointe Nurs-
ing & Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025

04543276
SENIOR REGISTERED
NURSE
The Columbia County Health
Department is seeking a Senior
Registered Nurse, PSN
#64080175. Must have a Florida
RN license. Must be
fingerprinted and drug screened.
This employer uses E-Verify.
May be required to work during
or beyond normal work hours or
days in the event of an
emergency. Applications will be
accepted online at
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/
State of Florida applications
may be mailed to State of
Florida, People First, Staffing
Administration, PO Box 44058,
Jacksonville, Fl 32231 or faxed
to (904)-636-2627 by 2/2/11.
EEO/AA/VP Employer

05524946
URGENT NEED for RN with
Home Care Oasis Experience to
help cover several counties! Top
pay with possibility of full time
employment in near future if
desired. Please call Suwannee
Home Care at 386-755-1544
or fax your resume to
386-755-7828.

Homecare LPN's &
Homecare CNA's needed for cli-
ent in Lake City, call
Maxim Healthcare Services
352-291-4888
Internal Medicine of Lake City
is looking for N.P. or P.A.
Please contact Dr Bali @
386-755-1703


130 Part Time

Farm Coordinator. PT.
Ag experience required.
References. Bilingual. McAlpin
area. 941-302-1974 Paul'


140 Work Wanted

We Run Errands!
Your personal errand service to
help those in need at rates you can
afford Call Dawn 386-249-9426

240 Schools &
24v Education.

04543248
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/14/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/14/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.Iom



310 Pets & Supplies

Lab, Black, AKC,
health cert, born 11/24/10,
$250
386-935-3036 or 935-0105

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they


have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


310 Pets & Supplies

Yorkie Puppy, male,
health certificate, CKC papers,
$700,
386-688-7777


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques. 386-963-2621


407 Computers

DELL COMPUTER
$80: firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

ASHLEY DINING ROOM
TABLE w/6 chairs and leaf.
$150.00 Great Deal!!!
386-344-5706

412 Medical
Supplies
Medline Adult Diapers, fitted
briefs, size medium'(32-44),
30 dozen, will sell by dozen or
whole lot for $90 386-752-2572


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

Moving Sale. Every Sat thru Feb
26th. 7am to noon except 1/29/11
W on 90 turn left on CR 252B, 1
mi to Phillips Cr. Look:for signs.







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

Jazzy, Electric Wheelchair,
.like new
$500 obo
386-752-2572
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

610 Mobile Home
610 Lots for Rent

Beautiful 3/2 DWMH onl acre,
fenced back yard, double carport,
near college & shopping,$850 mo
avail Feb 1st 386-697-1013

630 Mobile Homes
30v for Rent

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
Clean, quiet 3/2 ($625 mo) &
2/1 ($450 mo.) both in Branford
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114






Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003
SWMH 2 BR/1BA. Washer/
Dryer. In country on 2 acres. Off
of SR 47. $450. mo + deposit.
386-961-9990 before 9pm.
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Nice 4br/2.5 ba, 3 ac. Fenced
Cross Fenced, paved rd., huge
deck, private. McAlpin area. $900
dep. & $950. mo. 386-867-1833
64O Mobile Homes
v for Sale

$569 mo 3Bd/2Ba Modular


1/2 acre Deck, energy efficient,
appliances, drive, w/$12K down
($640 mo w/ $6K down).
Avail in March
Owner finance or rent to own???
Call (386) 758-9824 hurry


I I.- Al !P- .' -- "











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011


7 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans:
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
05524931
Get up to $2011 in 2011!
Call for Details
Windsong Apts
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 bedroom Apartments &
mobile homes,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $500. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Large 2br/2ba Duplex.in
nice area with W/D hookup.
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Move In Special.2/1 w/garage
on the east side of town. '
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly_
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
72U For Rent
lbr Apt. incl. water, elec, & cable.
$595. mo. Close to college. Good
area in Lulu. References & sec.
req'd. No pets. 386-719-4808
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04543053
403 Baya Ave...First month's
rent discounted 50%! 3/2
remodeled home on Baya Ave.
1440 sf. with side deck. Pets
considered. $790./mo +
$790./ security
642 SW Chris Terrace...
Located in a nice wooded
subdivision, beautiful 3/2
upscale rental close to Lake City
but far enough out to enjoy your
privacy. $1150./mo plus
$1150. secuirty
315 Piedmont Live Oak...older
4/2 home in downtown Live
Oak. Kitchen remodeled.
$850./mo plus $825. security
881 SW Sunview...Gorgeous
4/2 country home between Lake
City and Ft. White just off SR
47. Mobile home situated on 5
acre comer lot. $900./ mo. plus
$900. security
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co. @
386-365-5884
http://springsrus.'com/
Learn about Lake City!

05524832
New Years Dream."Surprise"
Why Rent? Lease to own.
New model home 2 miles S off
47. 3000 sq ft, 4/3, 5% int, is
tax deduc, consider trade-in
386-752-1364


r


730 Unfurnished
730 ome For Rent
3/2, 2-car garage, fenced back
yard. convenient in-town location
near Summers school.
$1050 per mo. 386-623-2848

3/2, 2000 sq ft Brick Home in
Stonehenge on 1/2 acre lot, for
rent or sale. $1175 mon, + sec or
$174,900 Call 850-380-3937
3br/lba w/yard,
near airport, $500. mo,
1st, last & $300 sec.
386-752-0335 M-F 8-4
Cozy Cottage Ibr/lba S. Hwy. 41
CH/A, carport. $650/mo. +sec.
Includes all utilities & satellite TV.
Pets OK. (386)758-2408
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+Retirement Living,
Site built home
2br/2bth For Lease
Large 3br/2ba house near
downtown Lake City; FR, DR,
fenced yd, screened pool; No pets;
$800/mo + sec dep;623-2642
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Remodeled, 3br/lba, fenced, new
deck, shop, cabinets, apple, close to
schools, $600 mo, $400. dep. 386-
752-5948, 984-5856;478-391-1592
Spacious 2br/lba house. In town
Close to shopping.
$625. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
Three Rivers Estates, 2/1, CH/A,
2010 W2 and ref's from current
landlord required, $675'month, &
$600 sec dep, 386-497-4699
Turnkey rental, 3/2 split,2 CG, 1/2
acre, quiet neighborhood, close to
1-75, $1050 per month,lst/last/sec,
386-454-2826 or 954-895-1722

750 Business &
Office Rentals
2Yr Old Office Space for Rent.
2750 sqft, Office, Kitchen, Phone,
Security, Internet, Utilities, Trash
all included. Upstairs to be isolated
or downstairs for public traffic.
Email for pictures and more
information, todd@r3global.com
Great locations on SW Main Blvd.
Retail, Wholesale, Distribution,
Office. 1200+ sf only $950. per
mo. Includes Utilities 752-5035
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-"
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

This nice 4.5 acre parcel has
septic, power & well, older MH
$39.900 MLS 76182
Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty


810 Home for Sale
2br/2ba Eastside Village.
Unique floor plan. Lg utility/
work room. Screened front porch.
$55.000 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
3/1 on 4.43 acres, metal roof.
pond on property,
Lease option available
$129,888 Results Realty.
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
3b/2ba, 1545 sq ft on 1/2 acre.
338 SWrWise DrLake City
Reduced to $179,900. Call 386-
752-3078 or 352-281-4003
3br/2ba 80'X125' lot. !.200 sqft.
Kitchen & bath remodeled, metal
roof, Ig fenced back yard. Close to
amenities. $79,900 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Brick home w/1,934 sqft.
in Piccadilly Park. 1/2 acre. Lg
playroom, fenced yard. Reduced to
$139,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Custom home. on 5 ac.
where deer & turkey roam.
Lg barn w/enclosed workshop.
$219,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
4/2 in Sub-div, open floor
planflorida room, porch, fenced,
$150,000 call Missy Zecher
@Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
4/2 on 4 acres, open floor plan, 2
living rms, rec room w/wet bar
$89,900 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
4/3 farm house on 95 acres w/pri-
vate pond, surrounded by oaks
$689,000 Charlie Sparks,
Westfield Realty MLS#76149
386-755-0808
4br/2ba, 5 ac., 2069 sqft. Ig family
& florida rm, den. Covered patio,
workshop. $229,900.-Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-568 '
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba, remodeled, views of the
lake. Formal LR, dining room &
family room. Many upgrades.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
67.5 acre farm, fenced, workshop,
pole barn and two ponds, MH
(1984 sq'ft) $299,000
call Patti Taylor at
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Affordable, clean home in sub-div,
Freshly painted interior,
This is a must see!
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
BRAND new home, Irg master
suite, 2 miles from US 90,
$179,900 MLS #76449 "
Carrie CasonWestfield Realty
386-623-2806
Brick home on 5 acres,
country feel close to town!
Must See! Results Realty
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
Clean, cozy. well maintained 3/2
on 1.05 acres, lots of shade trees,
built in 2007, $135,900
Call Patty Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Country Club. 4br/4ba. New roof,
AC, windows. Pool, hot tub,
& greenhouse. $229,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Custom Brick, 5+ ac. 5br/4ba.
4412 sqft. 3 car garage, pool, hot
tub, 3 fireplaces, more. $569,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lori Giebeig Simpson 365-5678
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
3BR/2BA
$99,999
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
Fully furnished 2br/2ba @
$83,000
Excellent area. 3br/2ba home.
1620 sqft. w/covered patio. Lg
front porch & 1 car.carport
Lori Giebeig. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty


810 Home for Sale
Large 3/2 brick home w/basement.
2 living areas, porch on 2 lots
$129.900 MLS #74118
386-623-2806 Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty
Large entertaining home, w/pool,
gazebo. huge workshop.
$285,000 Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Large home w/acre of land, Irg
family & florida rooms,
covered porch.
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Move In Ready. 3br/2ba w/1,225
sqft. Comer lot, great S/D.
12x16 workshop w/elec.
Upgrades. $75,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
Nice 3/2 home on 4 acres
close to town $168,000,
Motivated seller MLS#73410
Carrie Cason Westfield Realty
386-623-2806
Nicely remodeled 3/2 on 2 acres,
partially fenced $115,888
Nancy Rogers @
Results Realty
386-867-1271
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Woodcrest S/D Super location,
nice back yard. 3br/2ba home,
cov-
ered back porch. New AC in 2010
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
WOODGATE VILLAGE.
3br/2ba DWMH.
Close to new elementary
school. $27,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc

820 Farms&
S Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
83OJ Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190
Commercial property situated
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya Ave 3.27 acres,
$398.888 Results Realty
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
Property (comer location), easy
access comer, close to downtown,
$94,000 Charlie Sparks
Westfield Realty
386-755-0808 MLS#74814


I-~~~ -* ^


2004 Rialta
23ft. self-contained,
excellent condition.
$13,500
50O


940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
2007 Chevy Regular Cab, 6 cyl,
auto, a/c, only 41,000 miles,
Rountree Ford Myron Wrubel
386-755-0630 x 292 $12.888
2008 F-450 King Ranch
Diesel Duelly, 36K miles,
Tommie Jefferson 386-209-8680
Rountree Moore Ford $39,995
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802






950 Cars for Sale
2007 Mercury Grand Marquis GS
25K miles, stock #7300, only
$12,888, call Myron Wrubel @
Rountree Moore Ford 755-0630
2010 Ford Escape Limited, V6,
auto, moon roof, white, 21K miles,
stock # F263 Dwight Twiggs
Rountree Moore Ford 755-0630
2010 Toyota Corolla, 8153K
miles, 35 MPG, stock #24598A,
$13,995, Call Tommie Jefferson
@ Rountree Moore Ford 209-8680

Q951 Recreational
951 Vehicles







2004 Rialta 23 Ft Self contained
Excellent Condition
$13,500.
SOLD


ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER
Only
$ 75o

4 LINES 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS!

(386) 755-5440


HEELS & WATERCRAFT '' 1


10 ] Il

ONL



.$4

A., *1


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

T*oGe tYour
Veh/^icl Sold Call j^ i^
Mary or Bridget


I:W


E T-www.lakecityrepoer.com



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