The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01363
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: January 27, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01363
System ID: UF00028308:01363
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Columbia ousted
Tigers soccer season
ends with OT loss.


Sports, I B


00 0 cicic iK
OF I01
PO0 BOX
SMA


ake


Thursday, January 27, 201 I


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I I. I'5 **** 1) I 'l' ,2 6
1"'IOR 1DA HISTORY
I '/007
UNIV OF1 l.,'ORIDAl)\
II,1E ,' L 32611 -1 .-l1 3


www~la'ke;et-t~yy~'pror te r.c


Indians tumble
Fort White falls
in district soccer opener.

Sports, I B





reporter



Vol. 136, No. 317 E 75 cents


No


City ordinance

prohibits RVs'

overnight visits

to Walmart.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.conmi
Enforcing a City of Lake
City law for no recre-
ational vehicle camping in
commercial parking lots is
an issue of fairness, said
Cecil Shaw, owner of E-Z Stop RV
Park.
"The only thing I ask is you be fair
about it," he said. "Enforce the law
where RV park owners can make
their money."
Overnight parking has been an
issue Shaw has battled for several
years, but he is finally t.irt tin-': to see
results, he said. Signs have recently
been put up in Walmart's pl.rking
lot indicating the ordinance to RV
travelers.
The decision to enforce the ordi-
nance has elicited some negative
responses from travelers. In an e-mail
addressed to Lake City Reporter pub-
lisher Todd Wilson, Gary Campbell
wrote:
"Just to let vou know that I have
just learned about the placement t
No Overnight Parking (sign) in the
local Walmnart parking lot. You will be
happy to know that I will not be stop-
ping anywhere in Iaike City to spend
any money and I will request that any
person who is a friend of mine (do
the same. If your town is going to be
unfriendly to long-distance travellers,
we are going to vote against you with
our wallets. Want our money, open
the parking lot. Simple as that."
Cities from Sacramento, Calif., to
Nova Scotia, British Columbia, have
ordinances on the books that prohibit
overnight camping, Shaw said.
Shaw sits on the Tourist
Development Council board, said
Harvey Campbell, TDC executive
director. He brought the existing
ordinance to the board's attention.
It was in place, but not necessarily
enforced. I
Lake City's Walmart is conveni(ent-
ly located near a major interstate,
Campbell said. He's seen a range of a
few to around 35 RVs camping in thel
parking lot over the years.
RV parks pay an occupation license(
fee, assessment on property taxes
and more, whereas Walmnart doesn't
have these associated costs, Shaw
said. RV park owners lose money
when RV travelers park in comtni(er-
cial parking lots.


CAMPING


JASON MATTHEW WALKERLake City Reporter
Tabitha Haake, 13, rakes up loose goose and duck feathers
from a pen Monday morning.


Hopes are high

for license at

Skunkie Acres


USDIA's Monday
inspection foutind
'minor issues.'

By C.J. RISAK

()Illi allv. tlwt v rdlict still
remains ui)llt oil Skunkic
A cres' ;1 tt ii|lpt to i) I, .ill
its .S. Dcpartllnt of
Atrictul iur l lic inse tho
tr- !n >rd tlti 1 ;,; illwho to el. l
'r with his wifr. !arbara.
manllag,.. the c'olumbia
County v l);is tlic'vt's thi 'chlict's iar'
'h(' attciltion Skunikic
Acr s- ; i llonprti't ltacil-
it locatlcd onil -l.'3 acres otl
lad south tlf aorl Whlite
- has received in llth )iast
miontli li has not heen lposi-


JASON MATTHEW WALKER... ,
This picture shows a sign posted at the Walmart Supercenter that says '), r,.
should be no RV camping or sleeping in the store's parking lot.


"We have an ordinance we have to
go by and abide by just like any other
company or business and they don't
have to have .ii'. thing." he said.
Most RV travelers stop at Walmart
to buy supplies, but they also put
their jacks down, cook meals and
more, Shaw said.
"It's .amill ing really," he said.
Tourists in a car make arrange-
ments to find lodging if huIpphiii
through town to rest. Shaw said. RV
parks are available just thlie same for
overnight accommodations.
Th e ordinance is not just singling
out Walmart, said City Manager
Wendell Johnlsoni. 'li law affects anyl
commercial area not designated as a
cainpground.
Walmart has been the only 11ne
allowing RV travelers setting tiup


there, lie said.
"RVs have a tendency to use
Walmart as campground and that's
not something the law allows."
Johnson said.
The city has no problem with RV
travelers stopping at the stOl' to to akt
a break and buy groceries, or visit
local shops and restaurants, lie said.
'11he problem occurs when they set
ill) camp.
"If you get right down to it. Walmart
is not a tcaniIpgrolt lnd." ohnlsotn said.
Nationally. Walmnart is known as
RV-frienldly, liw said.
Walmart does not ofltr electrical
service or acconnlodations typically
necessary or RV travelers, hut val
Ies and considers thel l' alolli inI. its
SIGNS continued on 'i'l


tive. Adding to the turmoil
was thl expiration of their
I'SI)A license last June.
something Bernard Hlaake
called an oversight.
Skunkite Acres is not
allowed to exhibit exotic
animals without a I'SDA
license. 'nie llaakes reap-
plied, but iln tll ir first pre-
license inspection Dec. 8
more than a dozen infrac-
tions wereVl noted by Kiml
hutfiine. ;ian nima! care
inspector eor tilh I'SDA's
Animal and Plant llealth
Inspection Service.
Ilaake said the results
of Ithl first inspection were
anticipated. "Thley com,
out to glive you an estimate
otl wlhat they wantt donlle."
hle said.
ilhe sCeclod prelicelse
SKUNKIE continued on 11i






Megan Haake, 25.
feeds milk to an
Australian water
buffalo and a doe
while completing her
chores at Skunkie
Acres on Monday.





JASON MATTHEW WALKER
t" i(' C6 rpotler


Dunn headlines Suwannee Jam Local unemployment falls


Concerts celebrating
20th anniversary
slated for April 27-30.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
LIVE OAK Ronnie Dunn,
formerly lead singer with legend-
ary country duo Brooks & Dunn,
will unveil his new solo tour and
headline April's 2011 Suwannee
River Jam.
Gary Allan, Lee Brice, Luke
Bryan, LoCash Cowboys,
Jerrod Nieman, Kellie Pickler,
Blackberry Smoke, Phil Vassar
and Darryl Worley also will
perform during the 20th annual
event.
The Suwannee River Jam, the
..........'. ........'L.LL. U


CALL US.:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
SFax: 752-9400


Live Oak resident
Jo Moffitt, 61, has
been attending the
Suwannee River
Jam concerts ever
since the Spirit of
h.the Suwannee Music
'Park has hosted
them.
JASON MATTHEW WALKER
la it 'H'l h


Spirit of the Suwannee Music
Park's annual country music fes-
lival, will mark its 20th anniver-
sary with n more than 20 artists
slated to perform on April 27-30(
in live Oak.
General admission tickets for


58
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


th(e Suwannee River Jamn are $1 10
and available in like City at S&S
Food Stores, said Tlena I'eavey,
marketing director of tlhe Spirit
of the Suwanni'ce Music Park.
SUWANNEE continued on ,'/1

Opinion ...... ......... 4A
H health .................. 6A
O bituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics ......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


Nox\ c ielber rate slips
by 0.6 percellit to 10.7
in December.L

By TONY BRITT

The Columbhia County unil
ployment rate (dropp))ed to 10.7
percent in ecember as :2012 more
local residents had jobs compared
to Novcmblllr, according to infor-
mntion released from tllt Florida
Crown Workforce Ioard.
Whilh il c local inemlployiyent
average dropped, it still remainsnh
above (tlhie national average.l .
The national unemliployllment
averaTge is 9).1 percent and tlih
RATES 'contlim'd on ,'iA


F


JASON MAT1HEW WALKER I ik title Repo'tel
Linda Fu, a Wagner Peyser
program manager with Florida
Crown Workforce, assists
Victor Rivero, 24, in completing
applications on Wednesday.


COMING
FRIDAY
ofl tllt' ',u


TODAY IN
FLORIDA
i i l, 1 11' ( l ii t ll 11 'i 1
ii.1, 11. p o ll, 'I )(' 1


"










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2011


Wednesday:
- Afternoon: 0-2-2-9
Evening: 5-1-1-9


:ewHUtch.-
Tuesday:
1-8-11-27-33


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS




Cruz, Bardem have a son


NEW YORK

Penelope Cruz and Javier
Bardem are proud parents
of a baby boy.
A spokeswoman for
the actress confirmed
Wednesday that Cruz gave birth to
a boy last week. She said "both par-
ents and baby are doing great." She
provided no other details.
The couple were married at the
beginning of July in the Bahanmas.
The 36-year-old Cruz and the -11-
year-old Bardem are from Spain.
They appeared together in the 2008
Woody Allen romantic comedy
"Vicky Cristina Barcelona." Cruz
won a supporting-actress Oscar for
her role.
Bardem is nominated for best
actor this year for his role in the
Spanish-language drama "Biutiful."
He won a supporting-actor Oscar for
the 2007 crime thriller "No Country
for Old Men."

Bret Michaels released
after heart procedure
PHOENIX Officials at a
Phoenix hospital said rock star Bret
Michaels has been released from
their care following a successful
heart procedure.
St. Joseph's.Hospital and Medical
Center said Wednesday that
Michaels left the hospital. The doc-
tor who treated him reported the
procedure to fix a hole in his heart
produced excellent results.
Dr. Mansour Assar said the singer
is expected to be able to return to
normal activities in a few weeks.
Doctors discovered the hole in
Michael's heart in April while treat-
ing him for a brain hemorrhage.
Surgeons Monday inserted a cath-
eter into a vein in Michaels' groin
with a closure device attached.
Doctors said the closure device


Celebrity Birthdays


* Sin(jor Bobby "Blue" Bland
is 81.
* Aclor James Crorrwoll is
71.
* Actor Jot n Witherspoon
is 69.
* Rock musician Nick Mason
(Pink Floyd) is 66.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Nedra Talley (The Ronettes)
is 65.

Daily Scripture


* B I.11ii star Mikhail
B r, i I ,l. I is 63.
* Country singer Cheryl
White is 56.
* Actress Mimi Rogers is 55.
* Commentator Keith
Olbermann is 52.
* Rock musician Gillian
Gilbert is 50.
* Actress Bridget Fonda is
47.


"Humble yourselves before the
Lord, and he will lift you up."


James 4: 10


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this May 23 file photo, actor Javier Bardem and actress Penelope Cruz arrive
during the awards ceremony at the 63rd International Film Festival, in Cannes,
southern France.


will stay in Michaels' heart perma-
nently to stop abnormal blood flow
between two chambers of his heart.


Motley Crue singer
pleads guilty to DUI
LAS VEGAS Motley C ru e sing-
er Vitnce Neil avoided the media and
quietlyy pleaded guilty \Wednesday to
driving drunk last summer near the
l.as \Ve as Strip illn a case that drew
denials that lie received prcferenitial
trealilt'lrnl.
A\ tIpifolrary juidg.v who took Ilit-
plea b-tforc reporters arrived soll-
tencr d Neil toI 15 days in the Clark


Cotmty jail and 15 days on house
arrest under terms of an agreed-uixon
plea deal that spared him a trial on a
misdemeanor driving under the influ-
ence charge. Ntil could have laced up
to six months in jail il convicted.
Court officials said thle *t-yar-old
rocker was ordered to hegitn serving
his sentence lFeb. 15, a week after
his 5lthi birthday.
Neil said nothing iore than
"guilty" to tlihe charge against him,
Price said. tHe was also fined $585
and ordered to attend drunken driv-
ing abatement sctrhool and to view a
victim impact video onlilne.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All maternal herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter. PO Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla 32056
Publisher Todd Wilson ..... 754-0418
(twilsoni 'lakeotyreporler com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Rlsak ..754-0427
, After 100( p in
S(cnsakrilakeortyroporer corm)
ADVERTISING
Dlroctlo Kathryn Peerson. 754-0417
(kpoletson irkucrvwporte corni
CLASSIFIED
To plo na classified ad. call 755-5440


CORRECTION


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(corculaton i'lakeatyreporler.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks $26.32
24 Weeks $48.79
52 Weeks $8346
Rates rude 7% sales tax
Mall rates
12 Weeks $41.40
24 Weeks $82 80
52 Weeks $17940


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space And thanks for reading.


Officers weep for
fallen colleagues
ST. PETERSBURG -
St. Petersburg police Maj.
Michael Kovacsev held
onto a drawing made by
the 8-year-old daughter of
one of his slain colleagues
Wednesday as he tearfully
remembered the two offi-
cers gunned down while
trying to apprehend a fugi-
tive earlier this week.
The sketch by the
daughter of 38-year-old
Officer Jeff Yaslowitz wis
of a face with falling tears.
It said: "Dad, I miss you.
You will be dearly loved."
"He was one of the
greatest guys you could
ever ask to be friends
with," Kovacsev said of the.
colleague they all called
"Yaz." "He didn't deserve
this. He died doing what
he loved."
Yaslowitz and Sgt.
Thomas J. Baitinger, 48,
were killed Monday try-
ing to roust Hydra Lacy
Jr., from his hiding place
in the attic of his St.
Petersburg home. The 39-
year-old Iacy opened fire
on officers who went up in
the attic after him. He also
was killed in the gunfight.
The police department
said a viewing for the offi-
cers is scheduled from 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday at
the First Baptist Church,
1900 Gandy Blvd. in St.
Petersburg. A joint memo-
rial service will follow at 11
a.m. Friday at the church.


Man says ex threw
mom's ashes
GAINESVILLE A
Florida woman faces charg-
es after her ex-boyfriend
accused her of hitting him
and throwing his mother's
.ashes through a window
during an argument.
SGainesville policed said
22-year-old Ashley lenee
Oxendine was retrieving
her belongings Monday


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A firefighter walks among the rubble of a house Monday
where two St. Petersburg police officers were shot and killed
while trying to serve an arrest warrant earlier in the day.


from a home where their
former couple had lived.
'They got into an argument
that police( said( escalated-
into physical violence
when Oxen(line scratched
the man and hit liini in the
face.
Police said Oxendine
then picked up llthe urn
containing (lie dead
woman's ashes and threw
it at a window. The window
broke and some( of the
ashes spilled.
Oxendine was arrested
and charged with domestic(
battery and criminal mischief.
She was released Tuesday on
her own recoginizan Ice.


Hospital patient
makes bomb threat
TAMPA- Authorities
said a man made a hoIbom
threat after a nurse at a
Gulf Coast hospital told
him lie couldn't smoke.
Police said 2:3-year-old
Brett G(. Vanraalt e face's
one felony count (')f pos-
session of a ioax )bomb.
He was arrested Saturday
and was still inll tl
Hillsborougli County Jail
Wednesday afternoon.
Authorities said
Vanraalte suffered head
injuries in a fight onil
Saturday and soltglt reat-
Illent at Tama Gelerial


Hospital.
Officials said lihe asked
a nursI if lih could step
outside and sinoke aand
bcatme ulps,'l when shlI
ciled :a ne(w policyy Ithalt pro
hilbits smoking o()t hlospilal
properly.
hI'li Iim rs.e told police'
thie lan got upsel, put l is
oversized bag on tle coun-ll
ter and told ir heTi had
a bomb inside. No homb
was located and he was
arrested.

Transient charged
in woman's death
IARGO -- Policn have
charged a transiitl mall
in th(e dallih of a Tanmpa
IB;ay-;w('a; honelel('ss Wo()IanI
whose burned body was
found in a tIrash bin.
Police arrested 37-year-
old Jeffrey Robert Grant
Tuesday after lie was
spoiled in St. Petersburg
and charged 'lihi wilh first-
deg(re ( murder.
Authorities said 26-year-
old.lennifer I.e Guthrie
was folunld dadl Oct. 9)in
a bIurnt Iraslh bin behinId a
largo banIk. She had gaso
line in her lungs, and a
witness told police he saw
a man holing a milk jug
in his hand and pouring
something onto the fire.


THE WEATHER


4.


SUNNY SUNNY MOSTLY PARTLY PARTLY
SUNNY CLOUDY CLOUDY


HI58 LO 30 HI 64 LO 35 HI 671039 HI 670 LO 37 HI 63 L0 38


desto
57/32
Tallahssee Lake City
57 32 58/'30
0 ~Gaines
paalmaCRtY 59/3
56"40~


Tan
61/


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Rcorld low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Monlh total
Yea) total
Noi1 .l month o ntate
Normal yeat to date





,!rsd ,a .. J
'T;thrsdayp


65
,14
67
43
85 in 1950
18 in 1.905


0.00"
3.68"

2.91"
2.9:1"


-.


Fom srttusld titlpers1h ohe u-abs


aadon Cape Canaveral
Y, 58/33 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
ae Daytona Beach Fort Myers
32 6039 Gainesville
ocala Jacksonville
60 33Key West
Oriando Cape Canaveral Key West
63/41 61/42 Lake City
Miami
pa Naples
'44 West Palm Beach Ocala
68/14 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers i9/4.9 Pensacola
66/45 Naples Tallahassee
6b/,16 Miami Tampa
10/49 Valdosta
Key West* Palm Beach


SUN
Sunrise today 7:24 a.m.
Sunset todxv 6:0,3 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 7:23 a,.ni.
Sunset tomt. 6:04 p.m.

MOON
Moonrise today :1:48 a.m.
Moonset today 12:27 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 2:50 a.m.
Moonset tom. 1:16 p.m.


Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb.
2 11 18 24
Now Firt Full Last


On this dlatQ il
S198 , a powiel ul
stoim movingI into
the w'stolln U.S.
produced 1 Inilches
of snow af D).'1,.ett

Caiscade Molarliiillns
of i(hr''',o.i, Winld(s
guiis d to 6ii1 Iph it
Reno, Nev. und wind
glusts in Oireoni
exceeded 811 mph.
.1 o I <


nuLM itf mujl
radiortron risk
tor the,' a: ea on)
ar sCie tronr 0
t0 l0+,


Friday
64,44/s
65,44/s
71 /51 s
68/47/s
64/37,'s
63,38/s
64 55i s
64/35/s
72 51 's
66'47/s
65, 38/s
66/44/s
63/43,/s
63/44. s
65/38, s
65/419/s
63 39/s
69/46, s


Saturday
68/49/s
69 '48/s
73/55/s
72 52/s
67/40/s
66/42/s
67/59/s
67/39/s
73/56/s
70,50/s
68 40/s
71/48/s
63 44/s
67/148/s
68/40/s
69/52/s
68,42/s
70 51/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


weathr.com
weather corn


I ,. Forocsnts, datn and graph-
Ic s c 2011 Weather Central
S.w'w". LLC. Madlsonrl. Wis.
\ wrv.wonthorpuitblsheor.conr


* A; ((:i;lc (l I'Pro ;!;


A$H3


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 1-2-3
Evening: 5-9-8


AROUND FLORIDA


~-~aar*PI i~ar~l-~-cr Ir~---r -rr -- ---


t


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


[28 RIDJA


k SATUiti


SUNIEM


[31 MON


Lake City Repo 01,
1 :4 I-loi-11.


7p a









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2011


SUWANNEE: Dunn heads concert schedule for River Jam
Continued From Page 1A


The event's performers were
announced Wednesday during
the event's annual media day
festivities.
Festival organizers said they
have also added several com-
nemorative attractions.
A disco tent has been added,
as well as a shirt-shack wall,
where T-shirts will be given to
patrons.
"We'll also have bounce
houses for the kids and a mini-
karaoke stage," Peavey said.
James Cornett, president
and CEO of the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park, said
Suwannee River Jam organiz-
ers are pleased with the event's
lineup.
"I think we've got pretty
much an all-star cast," he said.
"With Ronnie Dunn coming
out on a solo tour, lie's going
to wind up being a far more
energized artist than we've
seen in the past with Brooks
& Dunn."
He said artists Gary Allan,
Luke Bryan, Jerrod Nieman,
Kellie Pickler and LoCash


Radio personalities
Kevin Thomas (right)
and Scott Berns
announce some of
the singers that will
be performing at the
Suwannee River Jam,
which will take place
on April 27-30. There
will be a total of 20
acts, including Ronnie
Dunn, Kellie Pickler, the
LoCash Cowboys and
Gary Allan.

JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


Cowboys are emerging in their
careers.
"It's a tremendous line-up
and when you add larryl
Worley and Phil Vassar to the
mix with their string of hits, I
feel like it's probably the best
lineup we've had," Cornett said.
"Any show that lasts 20 years is
a heck of a testimony to the
event itself. We went all out
in search of some of the best


RATES: Unemployment
Continued From Page 1A


state average is 12 percent.
The current unemployment
rate for Columbia County is
based on the latest statistics
released by the Bureau of
Labor.
Columbia County's unem-
ployment rate dropped from
11.3 percent in November.
The number of Columbia
County residents listed as
unemployed in November
was 3,509 people. Columbia
County had 3,307 people
unemployed in December.
'To the best of my knowl-
edge, these figures only rep-
resent the number of people
receiving unemployment com-
pensation,",saidFlorida Crown
Workforce Board operations
manager Anna Schneider. "If
they have already dropped-


off the unemployment rolls,
are long-term unemployed, or
have accepted a part time job,
they won't be counted in that
figure."
Compared to the 10 most
populous states. Florida had
the second highest unem-
ployment rate, 12 percent in
December.
"I know that we are higher
than the national average,"
she said. "We're doing very
badly."
However, Schneider said
there is job growth in the state.
"On the positive side,
Florida gained 43,5(X) jobs
during the past 12 months,"
she said. "llicy are cutting
jobs andu the people who are
left employed are doing more
work."


talents for the show because
it's the 20th year and I feel like
we've done a good job."
Jo Moffit, a Suwannee
County resident, has attended
the Suwannee River Jam each
year since its inception. She
said if event organizers could
bring that many artists to the
area, she could travel to see
them perform.
"I live five miles down the


road if Cornett was going to
go to all that trouble to bring
them that close, I could travel
the last five miles to see them,"
she said. "I can't wait for the
next one. We buy tickets every
year and can't wait for them
to go on sale so I have my
seat for the following year. You
know it's going to be a good
show and I've never been dis-
appointed."


SIGNS: No Walmart camping
Continued From Page 1A


best customers, according to the
store's website. It does permit RV
parking on the store lots as it is
able. Permission to park is extend-
ed by individual store managers,
based on availability of parking
space and local laws.
RV travelers are asked to con-
tact management in each store
to ensure accommodations before
parking.
WValmart is responsible for -colm-
plying with the laws of the city.
Johnson said. 'Tlie local Walmart
lias been very cooperative ini
upholding the law by jxsting the
signs.
.Several out-of-town RV travel-
ers have contacted the TI')C, say-
ing they are going to alert their
groups that Like City is not RV-
friendly, Caunplx'll said. lil trav-
elers will no longer six-'nd money


at local restaurants and shops or
visit the area.
There are examples of RV
groups blacklisting a community.
"We'd hate to have people boy-
cott the community," he said.
ILake City isn't the only com-
munity dealing with this issue,
C(unpbell said. He recently spoke
with the executive director of the
'lorida Ca.nlpground Association,
who indicated other cities also
have similar regulations.
"It's one tough issue with argu-
mnents on either side," he said.
I ultimatelyy lie thinks the impact
of the ordinance will be mininial.
Johnson said. Eventually people
will accept the law.
"People traveling in RVs know
where they can stop," he said. "We
want them to stop in Lake City and
they can find a place to park."


SKUNKIE: License
Continued From Page 1A

inspection was Monday, and although
official results could take up to three
weeks before being posted, Haake said
only a couple of minor issues needed
to be tended to before approval was
granted.
"There's abuilt-in, 21-day lag," explained
USDA spokesman David Sacks. "It allows
the facility 21 days to appeal anything on
the report. They have a right to appeal as
an applicant.
'They need to pass that inspection
before we give them a license."
As Sacks explained, the facility that's
applying has three chances within a 90-
day window to pass a prelicensing inspec-
tion. A failure on all three attempts means
the facility will not be able to exhibit
exotic animals, and a new license applica-
tion cannot be submitted for six months.
He also said the inspectors were to
arrive unannounced, so they could exam-
ine the property as it would look on any
day. However, the Haakes knew well in
advance when they would be inspect-
ed and had, indeed, scheduled it for
Monday.
In a visit to Skunkie Acres, Haake was
quick to put the improvements made
between the first and second inspections
on display. The cleanliness of the cages
had been addressed, subsequently help-
ing eliminate any overwhelming smell
Haake's neighbors had complained about
- a claim Haake refuted. The dogs and
cats that Skunkie Acres had "rescued"
were, for the most part, confined within
kennel cages at the eastern end of the
site.
The continuous howling of the dogs
was absent, as well.
Haake called the complaints leveled
against Skunkie Acres by irate neighbors
"harassment" and said he had contem-
plated getting out of the business..
"How do you fight lies?" he asked, then
answered, "With the truth. I spend my
own money on this, I don't make a dime.
All the harassment we've been getting
lately makes me wonder why I'm doing
this.
"It's the love of the animals. I want to
donate the last few years of my life to the
animals."
Still, doubts remain. Ron Williams, the
Columbia County commissioner who
served as a member of the panel con-
ducting the public meeting Jan. 13, would
not take a side in the dispute, but did
say, "This goes deeper than a community
feud."


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


I














OPINION


Thursday, January 27, 201 I


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


IRS needs

to lock up

tax refunds

for inmates



does pay when
Uncle San is the
victim. That needs
to end now.
Four senators are upset the
Federal Bureau of Investigation
and Internal Revenue Service
have not cracked down on pris-
on inmates who receive income
tax refunds improperly.
Throughout the nation,
enterprising convicts have
conned the IRS out of a whop-
ping $123 million during the
past five years, the senators
point out. The IRS itself admits
that in 2009, 45,000 fraudulent
tax returns were filed by prison
inmates.
That is outrageous.
IRS officials claim they are
doing all in their power to curb
tax fraud by inmates. But pris-
on systems, state and federal,
are not required to provide the
agency with tax status informa-
tion on convicts, the IRS notes.
Congress should change that
immediately. Then. lawmakers
should hold the IRS account-
able for policing the system
and should insist convicts who
bilk the government be pros-
ecuted and punished.

The Marietta (Ohio) Times

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY

Today is Thursday, Jan. 27,
the 27th day of 2011. There are
338 days'left in the year.
In 1756, composer
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was
born in Salzburg, Austria.
In 1880, Thomas Edison
received a patent for his electric
incandescent lamp.
In 1945, Soviet troops lib-
erated the Nazi concentration
camps Auschwitz and Birkenau
in Poland.
In 1951, an era of atomic
testing in the Nevada desert
began as an Air Force plane
dropped a one-kiloton bomb on
Frenchman Flat.



Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman



LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Remaking Reagan-O'Neill summit


S o here we are, feeling
like we've seen this
movie before. But
wondering whether
we can finally get
snmart enough to change the
ending.
We're watching yet another
"State of the It'nion Week"
movie about the promise and
perils of divided government:
one party controlling the White
House, the other thie louse
of Representative,. We've just
seen today"s democraticc and
Republican stars extolling hipar-
tisan service as th(e key to fix-
ing America's ongoing budget
crisis.
But we know a plot twist is
coming. After all, those noble
promises about bipartisanship
weren't really about public ser-
vice. Just lip service.
Is this a rerun of that 1995
flick about the headstrong
Republican-run House that shut
down government rather than
compromise with a Democratic
president? That GOP plot, co-
starring Bill Clinton and then-
Speaker Newt Gingrich. back-
fired, big-time.
Or could this be a new-gen-
eration remake of the 1982 clas-
sic that starred two famously
friendly foes of the golden age
of Hollywood on the( Potomac?
"What Ronald Reagan and Tip
O'Neill could teach Washington
today" last week's Washington
Post headline jogged my1
memory in a way it never was
intended to do. It was atop a
commentary by television news-
talk host Chris Matthews, who
wrote in the wake of the tragedy
in Tucson about how hatefully
partisan our democracy has
become. Matthews recalled how
his old boss, former Speaker
Thomas "Tip" O'Neill, and the
Republican president remained
pals even as they fought over
issues.
But it reminded me of the
day in 1982 when they did more
than spar as friends the day
they convened a budget summit


Martin Schram

that collapsed due to excessive
political and policy game play
ing,
It sc inis clear hlial it ht.
'l011 "State of tlie unionn Week"
niovie is really a remake, there
is an important lesson that
today's sulXr'stars -- Presidlent
Barack Obaa. Sixaker Johnii
Boehner -- cain learn front thte
litthle-rienembered tale of what
really transpired behind closed
doors at that budget summit.
The L'sson: Even two
friends will doom their negotia-
tions to failure if they remain
determined to gain political
advantage at a budget policy
summit. That's the lesson I
discovered in May 1982 when.
as a national correspondent for
The Washington Post. I pieced
together a detailed account of
direct quotes from both sides
at the Capitol budget sununit of
Reagan, O'Neill and their advis-
ers.
After a harangue about which
advisers would be allowed
inside andr who would sit whireL'
Reagan began by telling ant off-
color joke. followed by a plea
for compromise by both sides.
)'Neill said Reagan's 1981 tax
cuts and budget cuts liad done
serious ldamnage to manly social
programs.
Reagan lectured O'Neill that
"our defense spending as a per-
centage of the budget is miiuich
lower than in John E Kennedy's
day." O'Neill said "thie tines are
not the same now," and Reagan
was advocating "trickle-down
economics" with an "unfair"'
budget.
"I've heard all that crap,"
Reagan replied, and his defense


of his 1981 budget impressed
D leimocrats.
Then tailings got worse.
A Reagan-tean work-
shleet lmade it seen that only
l eitiocrats raised tilte possibil-
ity of cuts and delays in Social
Security cost-ol-living. increases.
IDemlocrats Ituled. "\\e've got
to gel away Iromi flaying games
on Soi:al Security." said Reagan.
adding that his side urged only
a one t-ime cost-of-living delay.
i) lll r t.( dclI,i\ S.
But IDavid Stockmian. who
was director of tihe Office of
Maliilclnagement anld lBudget.
adinittllcd that Reagan's sidl
also proposed the three C )lA
delays.
1 luring a recess. O'Neill
learned that White House
reporters had just been told
by a Reagan aide' that the only
Social Security COLA' cuts on
the table were proposed by
Democrats. O'Neill was furious
when the summit resumed.
IThe House Democratic leader.
Jim Wriglit. proposed trimming
defense spending and adding
a surtax. Reagan rejected that
with the unmistakable phrasing
of a great communicator: "Well,
\you may make me crap a pine-
apple, but you won't make me
crap a cactus."
tile suminit had collapsed.
e't no one stood to leave.
Neither side wanted to be cited
in news reports as being the
first to leave. So they sat inl
silence. Finally. Reagan chief of
stallf James IBaker suggested:
"I.el's all get up at the same
time." And that is how it ended.
Fast forward to today. We do
not yet know whether we are
watching a mire r'niemake of that
1982 classic witli a youtinger cast.
Or whether this miighlit be a low-
budget indie flick an ind'-
pendent fihm 1geri with a sniart,
savvy ending that could shake
iup) Hollywood on the Potomac.

* Martin Schram writes
political analysis for Scripps
Howard News Service.


LETTER TO THE EDITOR


Repeal Patient Protection Act


S should we repeal the
Patient Protection and
Affordable Care Act?
Being it is more costly
than health insurance,
yes.
If it's repealed, lhen a new bill
that states coverage should be
available for all, even those will
pre-existing conditions, could
replace it.
Insurance companies should
pay out 80 to 85 percent of ipre-
iniumns for claims. If services are
provided for those that chose


not to have coverage andl they
don't pay for services received,
then liens should be put on their
wages, homes, etc. That way
the provider has a way to collect
and the niajority of us within some
form of health insurance aren't
paying for those that opt out.
Also, TO)RT Reformi and
medical malpractice should hbe
addressed.
In today's world, many frivo-
lous lawsuits are filed. Tlhey are
paid because it cost more to


de'fenId tlhain pay.
If this issue were to be
addressed, tlien all insurance
companies (auto, health and
lhomeiow\vers) would save sub-
stantial dollars allowing tthelm to
possibly lower rates or at least
stalili/e (l 'il .
Could this Ie done? The
answer is yes. Will it be done?
( )nly your elected officials canll

Irv Crowetz
Like City


4A


Sharon Randall
www h onalrl(lll.(.oi n


Isn't that

what

neighbors

are for?


When the door-
bell rang, I
almost didn't
answer it.
It was early
(for us nocturnal types) and I
looked bad.
I don't mean a little bad. I
mean seriously, plug-ugly bad.
But I was expecting a delivery
I didn't want to miss. So I took
a swig of coffee, pulled on ratty
sweats and ran to open the
door.
It was my neighbor, Brett. I
didn't know that until he told
me. He said his name and I
blinked a few times until lie
pointed to the house across tile
street and I remembered.
Four years ago, when my
husband and I moved here,
Brett was thlie only soul on the
block who welcomed us to the
neighborhood. In time, we'd
meet others on the street or
over the fence, but he was the
only one who came to our door
to offer a neighborly hand.
Isn't that what neighbors
are for? Brett scored big with
nme for that. He told me that he
and his wife had bought the
place across from us as a sec-
oInd hore. but seldom got to
use it. She was suffering from
Alzheinmer's, he said, so they
spent riost of their time at their
home in Arizona.
I wanted to hear more of his
story and hoped for a chance
to talk again. At times. I'd see
a car in the driveway or lights
that suggested someone was
home. But four years passed
and I never saw him again until
today.
Four years is a long time.
Given how I looked. I'm sure he
thought I'd aged considerably.
"I want to thank you." he
said, "for watching out for my .
house."
When I shook my head, he
grinned and said his nephew
had told him what I'd done.
Oh, that. One evening, I spot-
ted a truck in Brett's driveway.*
Someone who was not Brett
was cleaning out his garage.
Without giving it much thought.
I stuck my head out the door
and yelled. "Hello?"
Turns out it was Brett's ieph-
ew, who swore to me hlie was
acting with permission, I'i not
sure what I'd have done if lie
had said, "Actually, I'm robbing
this guy blind, andl when I finish
with himu, you're next."
I grinned back at Brett. "It
was nothing," I said. "Isn't that
what neighbors are for?"
I was about to ask about his
wife, when he told nme she had
passed away soie milonlths ago.
"Oh," I said, "I'm so sorry."
"She was ill for 10 years," he
said, "so I had plenty of time to
grieve. I still miss her, but it's
not like a sudden loss."
I nodded. "My first husband
died of cancer. He was ill for
four years," I said. "Grieving
is hard. But it's easier in soni
ways than living in dread."
We talked for a while. saying
more with our eyes than with
onur words, the way people do
wlien they share in colunion
soietlhing sacred.
"Next time you're here," 1
said, "we'll have you over for
dinner."
"You don't need to do that."
"1 know," I said, laughing, as
I hu.ggedI him goodbye, "but it

And isn't tlia whial neighboi's
are for?
* Snronl Randall cnn bo con-
tacted at P.O. Box 77739.1,
Henderson, NV 89t)77.










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2011


Bank of America to close downtown branch


By A.C. GONZALEZ
agonzalez@tlakecityreporter. corn

Bank of America will be clos-
ing its downtown branch at 164
NW Madison St., with employees
relocated to its two other loca-
tions in Lake City, officials said.
Christina Toth, Bank of
America's Southeast media rela-
tions manager, said corporate
officials decided after completion
of a retail network evaluation that
consolidating was the best move
for the bank.
"If consolidation is in our best


interest from a business stand-
point, and nearby locations will
offer the same or greater level
of convenience to our current
customers," Toth said, "we will
likely move forward with that
decision."
In the case of the Madison
Street banking center, it is sched-
uled to close at 2 p.m. Friday,
April S. Toth said that customers
were notified earlier this month
so they would have time to make
adjustments and become familiar
with the new locations.
Customers will continue to have


access to a full range of consumer
banking services at the South 1st
Street Baking Center located at
355 SW Bentley Place, about 1.7
miles away; or the Gleason's Mall
office, 2 miles away, Toth said.
Melissa Thomas, a Madison
Street branch customer since
2007, said she received a let-
ter informing her of the branch
closing. '"They sent me an extra
letter, along with my statement,
telling me they were closing,"
she said.
"This is the closest office to
me and my mother, and I'm not


happy that they're moving,"
Thomas said. She added that
her mother, though elderly, was
able to use the Madison Street
branch's services with little dif-
ficulty throughout the years. The
closure of that branch would
make banking tougher.
'The mileage isn't so bad for
me," Thomas said, "but my moth-
er is a different story."
"They told us in the letter we
could use the Internet to do our
banking, but that doesn't help
her either since it's hard for
elderly people to use computers,"


she said.
Toth said that letters were sent
to all customers who do their
banking at the Madison Street
branch.
"'The letter is a heads up," Toth
said. "We want people to be pre-
pared when the time comes, and
to be informed."
"It is important to note that all
nine associates from the current
banking center will move to one
or the other of the alternate loca-
tions," Toth said,."so customers
will continue to see the same
familiar faces."


Audit shows improved accounts reporting at schools


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityvreporte. comt

The Columbia County School
District has seen an improvement
in its 2009 to 2010 fiscal year audit
findings from the prior year.
Richard Powell, of Powell &
Jones CPAs, the district's con-
tracted internal auditor, said
individual school's audit findings
improved about 40 to 60 per-
cent from the 2008 to 2009 fiscal
year. Powell gave a report of the
schools' annual internal accounts
audit on Tuesday at the Columbia
County School Board's regular
meeting, where the board unani-
mously adopted the audit.
Mary Loughran, district direc-


"Our own board policy was causing audit
criticisms that were too restrictive on the
bookkeepers to get their work done.... For
the amount of work they have to do and
compile this, they couldn't make it."


Mary Loughran
District director of finance


tor of finance, said one audit
improvement resulted from the
board changing a previous policy
to allow more time for individual
school bookkeepers to turn in
monthly reports.
"Our own board policy was
causing audit criticisms that were


too restrictive on the bookkeep-
ers to get their work done," she
said. "For the amount of work
they have to do and compile this,
they couldn't make it. We extend-
ed that time and all of those
monthly reports were turned in
timely."


Charles Maxwell, board mem-
ber, said he noticed in Powell's
report that individual sponsors
or teachers were not turning col-
lected monies in to bookkeepers
in a timely fashion.
Powell said the issue was not
one of missing money, but adher-
ence to policy.
Based on Florida Department
of Education and school board
policy, those monies collected for
events like field trips or club
activities should be turned in
at the end of the business day,
Loughran said.
' "The majority of them are just
a few days late," she said.
Mike Millikin, superintendent
of schools, said new employ-


ees are unfamiliar with policies,
and that can result in those mon-
ies being turned in late, which
becomes a recurring audit criti-
cism for the district.
The district is working on tack-
ling the issue with individuals,
Loughran said.
"It's a weakness we need to
address," she said.
Loughran also noted that work-
shops are being conducted for dis-
trict bookkeepers so they can work
on improving audit findings.
"It gives them an opportunity to
meet the people doing the same
thing and each one of them has
different ways of doing it and new
ideas," she said. "It's a great net-
working experience."


OBITUARIES


Kimiyo S. Conner

Mrs. Kimi, o S. Conner, SI, died
January 24, 2011 at the Suwan-
nee Valley Care ('enter in Lake
City, FL. She was the daughter
of the late Kurakichi and Kou
Suzuki Serizawa. She had lived
in Lake City for the past tent\
-one years.she was preceded in
death hb her sister Katuse Ma-
latesta. She was, of the Buddhist
faith, ws as a member of the quilt-
ing build and enjoyed sewing.
She is survived b\ her hius-
hand of 'lortyi-ceght years. I.eo
Conner, lake Cilty. I'1. one
daughter Flora liaru (WVingard)
Columbia, SC. two sisters Ili-
sac Serizawa, Tnmnmae Kanda,
two grandchildren lIauren and
Brandon Wingard. A host of
nieces and nephew s also sur iv e.
Funeral services for her will be
conducted Saturday at 11:001
A.M. at Gateway forestt Lawn
Funeral Home with Chaplin
Lynwood Walters. Interment
will follow at 3:00 P.M( CST) in
Shady Grove Cemetery, in Gran-
dridge. Florida. In lieu of flow-
ers family ask that donations
be made to the Suwannee Val-
ley Care Center 6037 US Hwy
90 West Lake City, FL. 32055.
Visitation will be held one hour
prior to service time. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S.
Hwy 441, Lake City. (386) 752-
1954. Please sign the guest book
at www gaitewatorestlawn corn

Charlotte "Janie" Connett

Mrs. Charlotte "Janie" ('Con-
nett, 78, a resident of Bron-
son. FHorida, died late Tuesday
evening, January 25. 2011 in
the Shands at the IUniversity of
Florida Ilospital following an
extended illness. A native and
longtime resident of I.ake City,
Mrs. Connett had been a resident
of Bronson for the past thirty
years. She was the daughter of
the late Arthur Francis Roberts
Sr. and Ardelia Luke Roberts.
Mrs. Connett had been a home-
maker and was of the Baptist
faith. In her spare time she en-
joyed buying and selling all sorts
of items but especially antiques.
Mrs. Connett is survived by her
sons, Arthur R. "Butch" Terry
of Green Cove Springs, Florida;
and Carl 'lerry of Cleveland,
Georgia; and her sisters, Lula
Mac Richardson of Lake City,
Florida and Lisa Mac Pippens
of Hastings, Florida. Seven
grandchildren and nine great-
grandchildren also survive.
Graveside funeral services for
Mrs. Connett will be conducted
at 11:00 A.M., Friday, January
28, 2011 with Rev. Randy Og-
burn officiating. Interment will
immediately follow. The fam-
ily will receive friends at the
funeral home for one hour prior
to the service. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISII FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., l.ak'e City, FL,
32025 752-1234 please sign our
on-line family guestbook at www.
parri.'shfamily/iteralhome.comn

Arlisha Kay Duckworth-
Easterwood

Mrs. Arlisha Kay Duckworth-
I:asterwood, 45, of' lake City,
went home to be with the fLord
on Iiuesday morning, January
2'), 2011 in the NorthI Florida


Regional Medical ('enter in
Gainesville. Floridai following
an extended illness She .i.s
bornt on Jiul\ I. 1IOt5 to Marga-
ret Muller &.: Jim )Duckworth \A
longtime resident of C'olumbia
Counts -\rlisha f .is a menimber
of the '.If S. class of lt1S- and
went on to work as a caregi\er.
a profession -tshe de.rly loCed
Arlislia spent her spare time .it-
tending church. talking to and
helping people. volunteering in
schools and spending times with
tier fanm ll) -\rlisha will fore eri
be ricie icrcd t or her contii-
gious "1,1silc .rntl lo t n: m ie it eet-
ing ai stranger NShe w.is anienlter
of the (itea .i Baptist Church
She w as preceded in death b\ hert
grandparents. (Cillord ('hidcster
Woodrow .ind let. Ducki north,
her step-lather. Richa.ird Muller
and tier uncle. Donald Chidc,,ter
Shie is sutiri d i t hier sont. Bri-
anr Keith NMcine.r, tier mother.
Margaret Muller, her huiisb.nd.
Brian :a.stersood all ot' lake
City; her grandmother. Betts
Chidester of Parkersburrg. West
Virginia; a brother. Edward
Duckworth of Lake City; four
sisters. Betty Muller, Manr
Johnston. and Lynn Muller ail
of Lake City and Sandra Mull-
er of Fort Carson, Colorado.
Several nieces nephews, aunts.
uncles and other family mem-
bers and friends also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. fast-
er-wood will be held 2:00 PMI
Friday, Januar. 28, 2011 at
Gateway Baptist Church sitht
Reverend Rick McCall otliciat-
ing. Interment will follow the
service in Mount Carmel Baptist
Church Cemetery. The family
will receive friends .it the funer-
al home Thursday evening from
5 7:00 PM. Arrangements are
under the direction oflthe I)EES-
PARRISHI FAMIIYI
FUNERAL HOME. .158 S
Marion Ave.. Lake ( it. I I1
32025 752-1214 please sign
our on-line family guesthook at
paurrishii/mil'ti/unII',ri/Ihomc IIcom

James A. "Gator"
Gardner, Sr.
Mr. James A. "(Gator" Gardner,
Sr., 67, of Lake C'ity, died un-
expectedly Tuesday. January
25, 2011 at his
residence. A
native of Tib-
bie, Alabama,
Mr. ( iardner
had been a res-
ident of I.ake
('ity for the
past fifty-two
years. Mr. Gardner was the son
of the late Steve Washington and
Ola Parmnel iardner. lie worked
for many years in the construc-
tion industry as a carpenter and
electrician. In his spare time, Mr.
Gardner was an avid deer and tur-
key hunter and loved to fish. IH is
favorite time was the time that
he spent with his much beloved
grandchildren. Mr. Gardner was
a member of the Watertown ('Con-
gregational Methodist Church.
Ice is survived by his wife of
forty-six years, Becky Bran-
non Gardner; his sons, Tommy
Lee (Lisa) of lake City; Jinmmy
Gardner (Lisa) of Wellborn;
his daughter, Diane Gardner
Douglas (Ilenry) Lake Butler;
his grandchildren, Jamie Gard-
ner leatherer; Ilayley I.arson;
Lyndsey Gardner; Tyler Barrs
and Madison Douglas; his great-
grandchildren, Lindsey and
Kaydence Gardner; his brothers,
Mose Gardner, Jerry Gardner
and anrrell Gardner all of Fair-


\ iew. .\Al.banii aind oIm G(iard-
ner of t\% ilner,. Alab.a.i and hiis
sisters. ,Pauline McIlll.w.iun of
Iibbic. Alah.ania; Mand I l-
kle oft ,iir iew.\ Al.ibata.i and
Judy' liall of Mobile, A.lab.At.i
Numerous other linll nicir-
irs anild friends also sur i\ce
Funeral serr ices flor MI (i.irdner
will t"b conducted at I 1 0il \ M .,
Saturda,ti Januiariy 20l. 2 1 it
thie w atert\iown (tonlgic.'giltioll
Methodist Chu('rch with Pi'.iastir
RaindIy tughurn olhrnitin ill Inti-
ienl will follow in the cltln-
shil,' f .iptis' t ( lf li h ( iniit'l,.e'n in
tsimw illnciic I' ( ouin I fit- l.liinl
will recci\ce l ricnds ltrim -" i0)
I rida. es'niing it tIhe chl.pcl olf
the tuner.il hiliom I lowcits .lie
welcomee butin le I.nil\ p'lci'es
th.atl ncill rial don.tiatllions bt itldc
atill n\ M erc.itile 11.nik loia..tui'
lfo Rc tccca.i (ai.i lilt's' ionl til-
ued ledict.il tc\pst' s A .llingc-
menlts .are undtit the dclc- tiion
ol the t)EE.S-PARRIS FANIM-
I1.Y FUNERAL IIOME, 45S
S. Marion A.\e. .iake (cCit, '1
32025 752-1234 please sign our
on-line failm\i guestbook at u nit
parrtshfiamilttim'cralh mti' corn

Cecil William Holland

Cecil Williamr Holland. -)
passed awa a Saturday. Jan. 22.
2011, at home with his tIarily al
his side. Cecil
leild folught a
courageous
hbttle \ ith
leukemriaI. Their
son of late
Jasper and
Ruth Nelms
IIt o iland I t
Cecil had been a lifelong
resident of Isle of Wilht,
Ie ss iIll he renie ibercd ,Iai f,1nn1-
is main ll 'ecil lc'al\es to cherish
its memories lhis w ife. lotlmnic
Stcele I hllandt.; his siol. Micihael
I olland and i il his w ic. I ind.
of" /lili; two grinidtlaiuhti tlers.
Meghan PIhillips aind lthe hus-
band. Michael, and Ra;chel I 1101


land; tour stepclildren. Wa Inei
Robinson, Keith Robinson, and
C.ia. Matchett .ind tier husi.shand,
Paliul .ill ol I Akc Citi\. I lI. and
lonitii Robitson of Atlanta.i
(1, ntne step grandchildelI.rn iid
three sIep-grc.it-r.iindchilditen
I the Scrteis were iceld lutedsl.
J.anu.a 2' .it Centra.il Ihll .1ap-
tisl huitch willit the Rc\t Roger
Johlinsoni oflci.atilin., wiheir M
lHoll.lnd ist .i lfetilc te itncilbf
( ondolanuc n 111.1 Ir- scntil lto
lon nlill Holla idf. s 1 '" I cti
Ilo c' lRd /Ilm. \ \ ;SS

IEdith i Frances ('lick
Rutherford

I dthl I lia.ces ( I k Ruthtc -
loid. St. of 'oossc Ridgte.
Riihnionul. k\ wlow ol P'rIs-
tin Riulthcilold, p.isscd iwts.i\
Mold.i\. J.lntlAIX 2.4. .01 I
Shite wais born ini Kib\ Ktnoli
(Jickson Co I. K, on Sept. 15i
'192" to the late lerertr C.ar-
los and M\rtle I races Stew art
Click. .ind was the eldest of thir-
teen children. She \was a faithful
member of the Gilead Baptist
churchh She is as a caregiNer to
the cIderl\ and a lo\ ing mother.
I dithl was an avid I'K Basket-
ball fan iand \\as well known
for her delicious jam cakes.
Sur\isors include her children.
BIonnic Got tee (Bill). former
Sheriff of I ake Cily. FI, arbara
A\nn Brradle \(Williatm "lBill"). of'
Richmlond" ShirIrl Marie Can-
field, of I akeland. FI Darlcnei
lsther Rutherford. of Riclimond.
and Daniel Preston Rutliertird
(Karon). of Richmnond; 8 Grand-
children; 15 (reat-grandchildren.
Iiuneral Services \\ill be con-
ducted at I 00 1'. M Frida.\. Jan.
28. 201 1. i 'Combs. Parsons &
Collins F unicil IHomlic. Rich-
mond. Kv.. with Iho. Mark (Gali-
haitti inli l.o. I arri I reemnl.i
oticifl ing Ihirial will follow\ inl
the Madison Mcinoiiial G.irdeniis
w w w c 1C I II co in


John W Burns III, Agent S wy Ste Ia u,
234 SW Main lhlSoowhyS Fa nsu
lakeC (iiy,11 i :20() toot drivers than Goico aind
[his. 386:(i/5 / ill P ogrossivo combined. Git ,i
lo ii in)nlll s i :lln ) l)Sthitol ll l I lll
soIlvic., plu tl disCOUintl of
up lo 40 poiontl."
Like a good neighbor,
Stato Farm is there.'
CAllI Oil A OUOl 2,1//





SStateFarm


I'It l sl l M v.nI y t y i Il.it ; y
Slal0 Inl) M Ihl nd m iily0Cnnipnuh hlIIIh inqiiin 11
*lte[,'ln m( u m1it {alllfly,[]0ns lqa!I


innl11


Sam .1. Shade, Str.

Sa .n J Sh,ide. .r age 1.' oIfl Iake
mCyI. I lorida dcp.irted this life
Ion lu csda.\
J.itni.i 18.IS.
2011 ifiti .in
ctenudcd ill-
ness 'Mi SIm "n
J Shidc SN
wis bom on O1l

itt sItockloil
Al.ilb.un. to he latc WilelhI Shade
.i tl \ ul \ \\cick I I was, unitlcd
it hol'l\ itl.ill tnii\ to l is w ile
ol 5s \c.s Dotolii\ M Slhade.ic.
I lice 'biothci'i,. thic I.le (IG orge
I nighshl HIcnr sh.ldt'. mind len
Ni.hidcit ptoed hliim n dclthl.
I o sistt'o also preceded
hi in l in dctitli. Rcnncr lilr-
Moin. iAnd ('.llic Maic Shade
Iic lci\cs to cherliusIt lis nmlcmio-
r., Irns lo\ingt wile D)otolh\ M,
SNhladi. Iie soons Rolrtn Vainn
(Minnie). n S.iShadc Jr (l).iis\ ).
\\ illic (htltlid Sh.ide (Deborah).
Samuel Shi.de. \\illie Shade,
(Alona). one daughter; Shree
('opeland (Andrew\'s all of Lake
Cit. FIloridai 1I\o brothers:
George Sihade. arid Issac Shade
(I.ate 'helestine): 1\\o sisters:
I \la Cromcadie. Ida Mac Drake:
llhree sisters-in-lass: Geraldine
Jordan. Ann tltall (Wa\ nie) Cale-
thal: One brother-in-law\: John
Jordan: Twel\c Grandchildren:
I cola Jones. Melod\ Bedford.
Anita Ta\ lor. Qtuatress Il.ol-
gills. Co'(relius Shiade, Inmari
Shade. Andre\ Copeland Jr..
larimcka Copeland. I ateri l a\ or
I(Th\ron). Angelica Copel.ind.
WVillie ('. Shade Jr.. /ebabiahl
Atwell. l)'Niya. Shade: Thiirt\
Great Grandchildren, and a host
of nieces, nephews. and other
relatives and sorrmoing friends.
Funeral setr ices for the late IMr.
Sam J. shade Sr. \\ill be 11:00
anm Saturday. Janutna 29. 2)011
ait Olivet Missionar\y aptist
Church. Rev. Ronald V. Walters.
IPaslor and Re\. John D)\e. Otfi-
cialing. lice fIamily \\ill receive
friends Ifrom 7-8 pin Fridav at the
Cooper iuner.ial Home 'Chapel.
A'rringemctenis Inl rusted
Io: COOPER FIt NERAI,


Nothing can

change the

hands of time...

So today, our
Ian- f..im. fl0


HOME. 251 N.E. WVashing-
ton Street, I ake ('it. Florida
32055. Willis 0. Cooper. L.F.D.

Charlie C'. Small

Biishop Charlie C. Small. age 74.
passed away Januars 20. 2011
at his home. Bishop Small \\as
the Pastor of Faith Deli\erance
Outreach in BBaldwin, FI and re-
tired from Gaines\ille Regional
I 'ilities. lie
is sur'ii\ed
IN Irs s\ ife;
N I a it Ic rm lis.

I11. children;
(C harles Smtall,
I lallahassee.
II Martha
Sm.ill. Macclennt Fl. and Me-
liss Sma.ill. iaines tille. I1 sib-
hlngs; Feli\ Small. Gaines\ille.
I I Willic C'. Mitchell. Da\. son.
(GA, Christine Rogers. Cuthhert.
GA., and Reoja larne\. Stuart.
IT., eight grandchildrenr. sc\en-
teen great grandchildren, and
six great, great grandchildren.
Funeral ser icesd for Bishop
Small \\ill be held. 12:00nooni.
Saturday January 29. 2011
at Passage Fafnil Church,
2020 N. T. I15th St.. Gaines-
ville. FL. Pastor George Dix.
officiating: burial swill fol-
low in Everercen Cemetery.
Gainesville. Fl., Arrancements
entnisted to CHESTNUT
FUNERAL HOME, INC.. 18
N. W. Sth Ave.. Gainesville. FL.
Bishop, Small will repose in
the (I hestInut Memorial Cha-
pcl on Friday, Januars 28, 2011
from l-3:00dpm, and Emanuel
Church of God In Christ. Mac-
clenny. IT.. from 6-8:00pm.
and on Saturday at the Church
from I lami until the hour of
service, Famil\ and friends are
asked to meet at the home of
Bishop and Mrs. Small. 410
Nil K D)r.. It/ 7. Macclenn.. FL
at 10:15amn to form the cortege.
"A CH('IISTNI'T SIRVICF:"
Obituaries are paid advertise-
monts. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
rment ;at 752-1293.


n't Wait Unlil


's Too Late!


CALL Mary
or Bridget
TODAY to place a
surprise ad for
someone you Lovel

755-5440 o

755-5441
botwoon 8:00am1 & .5:00pim


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


juan xurns ou.









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY. JANUARY 27, 2011


ON HEALTH






Dr. Peter Gott


Young

diabetic

takes

charge

D FAR DR.
GOTI: l am
a 13-year old
diabetic'. I have
good control
of iny diabetes, but right
around Christmas, I began
having unreasonably high
blood-sugar readings and
I'm still having them now.
The lowest sugar I have
had since is 140, and the
highest is 281.
I am not sick. 1 have no
fever and I anm not vomit-
ing. I do not have a cough.
I have checked my ketones
multiple times, and they
were all negative. My insu-
lin is not expired. I even
did a control test on my
meter, and it came out to
101.
I asked my parents, and
they believe it's the meter.
It is about 1-1/2 years old.
A while ago, another one of
my meters did something
like this. It would give me
readings in the 20s and 30s
when I was completely fine.
But the control test on that
one said it was normal, too.
My dad recently ordered
a new meter, but what is
your opinion on what could
be causing these highs?
Normally, I rarely have a
sugar over .-'111, butt low it's
every day. I want to fix myx
sugars! In case this helps.
my meter is the FreeStyle
Lite and mll insulin is
N ... 'm.
I also have tlad asthma,
but it is mild and I lever
use an inhaler. I think I out-
grew it.
DEAR READER: I
must begin by ... in .,ltll.t
ing you on your medical
education. I constantly tell
my readers that they need
to remain informed. They
can't simply sit back and
take a physician's word for
something. You appear at
the top of your game, and !
commend you for being in
control and so knowledge-
able.
While your current
problem began around
Christmas, I strongly doubt
you indulged in goodies
that may have been at your
disposal so I will bypass
tluat possibility. However,
could you have modified
your (ex('rcis'e program,
do you eat dinner later ini
tlhe evening, or have you
had any dietary changes
that you might not have
considered relevant? This
product is fast acting. Are
you eating within five to 10
minutes of an injection? As
with all insulin, the dura-
tion of action of this medi-
cation varies according to
the dose, site of injection,
blood flow, activity levels
and more. Could any of
these conditions have been
modified? Perhaps you are
administering it in your
thigh or upper arm as a
change, when you previ-
ously used your abdomen.
I'm not making light (of
this, but you seem to 1be
so well-informed that I'm
attempting to think outside
the box for an explanation.
Because meters vary, I
recon1iendi that you make
an appointment with your
endocrinologist for a check
on a regular basis. Bring
your unit with you, and test
it against the one in your
doctor's office immediately
following his or her test.
* rr f'otor G( tl i'; ; retired
l)hy,',i ;in inl ti(; i rtFhor of
<, btook "[r (.t( ';' No Flour,
1[ 0 1' in j.ir |)iJ;l," V;v ll;i ble ;il


150 years of diet fads provide no fix


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Wtitot

Before there was D)r.
Atkins, there was
William Banting. He
invented the low-carb
diet of 1863. Even then
Americans were trying out advice
that urged fish, mutton or "any
meat except pork" for breakfast,
lunch and dinner hold the
potatoes, please.
It turns out our obsession with
weight and how to lose it dates
back at least 150 years. And while
now we say "overweight" instead
of "corpulent" and obesity has
become epidemic a look back
at dieting history shows what
hasn't changed is the quest for an
easy fix.
"We grossly, grossly underes-
timnate" the difficulty of changing
behaviors that flel obesity, says
Clemson tUniversity sociologist
Ellen Granberg, after examnin-
ing archives at the library of
Congress. She believes it's impor-
tant to show "we're not dealing
with some brand new, scary phe-
nomenon we've never dealt with
before."
Indeed, the browning docu-
ments are eerily familiar.
Consider Englishman William
Banting's account of losing
almost 50 pounds in a year. He
did it by shunning "bread, butter,
milk, sugar, beer and potatoes,
which had been the main (and
I thought innocent) elements of
my existence" in favor of loads of
meat.
His pamphlet. "Letter on
Corpulence. Addressed to the
Public." quickly crossed teli
Atlantic and become so popular
here tlhat "banting" became slang
for dieting. (Granberg says.
While' obesity has rapidly
surged in tilhe last lew decades.
we first chlange.d fromil a nation
where being plump was desirable
into a nation ot oIl-again, otf-againm
dieters around the endl of the
19th century. Grallberg says.
before then. people figured
a little extra weight miglit ih'lp
withstand infectious diseases


'Iy l iuwi v I ot, A pill ,1,
Myou I I IA limW *oil -k,'P
l1ne %iull h m




of o C tongresort Bitl Btanst lwhich offered t l g i
hfn o i ut o 'e ml it f o. r ah hh ,
*on VIfA I( Filitt. 4YAWI11 AliI












ASSOCIATED PRESS
A 1940s advertisement provided by The Advertising Archives via Library
of Congress for Bile Beans, which offered the World War II generation an
unsafe laxative approach to slim down even as the first ideal height-
and-weight charts arrived. A look back at diet history shows what hasn't
changed is the quest for an easy fix.


that vaccines and antibiotics later
would tame. It also was a sign
of prosperity. But just as doctors
today bemoaln a highli-'ech, ilillo-
bilc society, the 'iemelrgcence of
trolleys, cars and ollier inachin-
cry in the late 191t century
scaled back thle shCeer number
of calories people oince.' burned.,
Granberg explains. Increasing
prospl-rity iiant l easier access to
food.
"An excess o1 flesh is to be
looked iponl as one of tIe most
objectionahble forms of disease."'
tie l'hiladelphia Cook/,ook'


declared in 19wo. Low-cal cook-
books hadn't arrived yet: the calo-
ric wasn't quile in vogue.
By 9193. I.a I';iarl obesity soap
that "never tails to reduce flesh"'
was selling at a pricey SI a bar.
1'lie Louisenblhad Reduction Salt
pledged to "wash away your fat."
Soon calime alln exercise milachiine,
tle Graybar Stiniulitor to jiggle
tlie pounds. Bile Bteans iprolmoted
a; laxative approach.
As thlie govterlent prepares
to update .S. dietary guide
ilnes nllxl wc k. tlhle L.ibraryi o
Sonlgress culled its archives


and, with Weight Watchers
International, gathered experts
recently to discuss this country's
history of weight loss.
Granberg recounted how real
nutrition science was born.
The government's first advice
to balance proteins, carbohy-
drates and fat caine in 1894. A
few years later, life insurance
companies reported that being
overweight raised thle risk of
death. In 1916, the Department of
Agriculture came u| with the five
food groups. Around World War
II, charts showing ideal weight-
for-heighlit emerged, surprisingly
close to what today is considered
a healthy body Imass index.
Diet foods quickly followed, as
did weight loss support groups
like Overeaters Anonymous
and Weight Watchers putting
today's diet infrastructure in
place by 1970, Granberg says.
Yet fast-forward and two-thirds
of Americans today are either
overweight or obese, and child-
hood obesity has tripled in the
past three decades. Weight-loss
surgery is skyrocketing. Diet pills
have been pulled from the market
for deadly side effects, with only
a few possible new ones in the
pipeline.
More and more, specialists
question how our society and cul-
ture fuel overeating.
"Should it be socially desirable
to walk down the street with a
30-ounce Big Gulp)?" asks Patrick
O'Neill, president-elect of The
Obesity Society and weight-man-
agement director at tle Medical
tI diversity of South Carolina.
Negotiating a weight-loss menu
tor a familV within different food
pr(e'rences is a mllinlfield that
affects how people feel about
themselves and their relation-
ships with loved ones, adds
(c'lemson's Granberg, who began
studying tIhe sociology of obesity
after losing 120 pounds herself.
"If what you need is a nutrition-
ally sound, healthful weight-loss
plan. you can get 100 of them."
sihe says. "hllalt, we have figured
out in the last 100 years. It's how
to do all this other stuff that I
think is lthe real challenge."


Smoking, obesity why US lifespans lag a bit


WASHINGTON -- THie
U.S. spends mlore on health
care than any other nation
yet has worse life ('expec-
tancy than many andI a
new report blames smok-
ing and obesity.
IThat may sound surpris-
ing, considering that public
- n,,l.iic is being stamix'd


(


out heret while it's common
in parts otl urop'. And obe-
sity is a growing problem'
around the world.
But the ('.S. led those
unhealthy trends, lighting
up and fattening up a few
decades ahead of other
high-inconme countries. And
the long-term consequenc-
es are life expx'ctancy a fewv


years shorter thlian parts
ot uroo' and Japan, tihe
National 'Research Council
re prh'edl uwesday.
In the I'.S., life expcc-
t.uicv at birth was 8O.8 years
for women and ;75.; yeru's
for menll in '7. In France.
life expectancy for women
was 84.4 years and 77.-1 for
men. Auid in .lapan. it was


Put a little love in someone's heart this alentine' Day with the
Lake City Reporter's 'Love Line.' Make It a special day for thove
tou lote bt writing a message to Your ,eetheart. 4e'll include it on
our 'Valentine Love Line' page on February 13lb.


R(ses are red, violets are bLue, setd Love ines
to show them that your ove is ini'.
The Lake City Reporter
( ie Presents: (7


ve


nes


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Mail to: Lake City Reporter, Classified I)epartment
PO Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056 ~ 755-5440
TiII TIMIF (IP I%(TIMI NT
DIM I 1 INI. I. 1 % ,IX 20, 1
jake jfjily Relorter


nearly SVi years tor wonIC
and 7 l9.2 or ie Cii.
uit lith.nks to the de'clinei
in smoking over lthe last 2(0
years, tllI lte ex'Kectancy
of I'.S. men is expected to
rapidly improve in coming
decades. Thllat improvement
will be a little slower for


V.S. wolleni, \\wlose l'ak
snioking rates occurred
several years alter ment'ie's. In
countries where women's
life expectancies are par-
ticularly high. women never
smlloked as mluchl as men,
said gerontologist Eileen
Crilimmins.


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1Mon, -Fri. 10.int 5pni


I.Iii'(I I hr (foil"', Ho
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Page Editor: Roni loldaners, /54-04Nl~r


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkQtNb\(k(keoit) tIepol tel.Colw


SPORTS


Thursday, january 27, 201 I


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Moe's Night now
set for Feb. 17
The Fort White High
Dugout Club's Moe's
Night fundraiser has
been changed to Feb. 17.
For details, call coach
Chad Bonds at 590-7362.
FLAG FOOTBALL
Adult coaches
meeting today
The Lake City
Recreation Department
is accepting registration
for its Adult 7-on-7 Flag
Football League. Entry
fee is $585 per team for
a minimum of 10 games
at Memorial Stadium.
Roster forms may be
picked up at the Teen
Town Center. Deadline
for rosters and entry
fee is Friday. A coaches
meeting/rules clinic is
6:30 p.m. today at Teen
Town.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
GATORS
Wine tasting
for scholarships
The North Florida
Gator Club has its 4th
Annual Wine Tasting
Event from 6:30-9 p.m.
Feb. 3 at The Country
Club at Lake City. Cost
of $22 includes hors
d'oeuvres, door prizes
and wine stations from
several countries. There
will be a silent auction
featuring an autographed
basketball by Billy
Donovan. Gator wine
glasses will be sold for
$5. Proceeds go to
support the club's
scholarship fund for the
five-county area.
For details, call Bob at
752-3333.
CHS BASEBALL
Alumni game
set for Saturday
Columbia High
baseball's annual alumni
game is Saturday at the
CHS field. Registration
begins at 10:30 a.m.
There will be a home run
derby at 11:30 a.m., with
the alumni game at
1 p.m. and the Purple and
Gold game at 3 p.m.
For details, call J.T.
Clark at 365-1754 or Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Spring league
registration set
Lake City .Columbia
County Youth Baseball
has registration for its
spring season from
5-7 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Saturday, and

Ruth Baseball building
in the Southside Sports
Complex. Cost is $75.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Friday
Fort White High boys
basketball at Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High,
Fort White High girls
weightlifting in District
4 qualifying meet at
Belleview High, 8 a.m.
Columbia High
wrestling at Buchholz


High, TBA


Santa Fe High


beats Indians


for third time


Fort White soccer
eliminated by
Raiders in district.
By TIM KIRBY
thirb) @ldkecityrieporter.corn
NEWBERRY Fort
White High's soccer season
ended Wednesday with a
5-1 loss to Santa Fe High
in the District 5-3A tourna-
ment hosted by Newberry
High at Panther Stadium.
Santa Fe (14-8-3) advanc-
es to the tournament final
at 7 p.m. Friday, where the
No. 2 tournament seed is
expected to face top-seed
Suwannee High.
Fort White, which ended
the season 4-16-0, had to try
to defeat the Raiders with-
out the Indians' top offen-


sive player, Trevor Stout.
Coach Pete lIclanchard said
lie knew only thai Stout
had not been at school this
week.
"1 think they were down a
little bit, not having Trevor,"
Blanchard said. "We made
a few mistakes and got
down early. Santa Fe is a
good team. They are much
more skilled than we are,
but we kept on working. I
am proud of our guys. The
seniors played hard."
One of those seniors,
Matt Waddington, capped
his final game with a goal in
injury time to prevent the
shutout.
In the late attack Fort
White fired two shots
that were deflected by
INDIANS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER Lake City Reporter
Fort White High senior Matt Waddington (left), battling Oak Hall School's Chan Park (12)
for the ball in a game on Jan. 18, scored the Indians' goal in the district tournament match
against Santa Fe High on Wednesday.


goal


Columbia's
Tigers i1ll 2- 1
against Wolfson
in overtime.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@/at ee teor:e" con
ORANGE PARK -
Columbia High fell vic-
tim to the golden goal on
Wednesday, as the Tigers
were eliminated from post-
season play in District 4-5A
tournament play.
Columbia fell to Wolfson
Higl in the first period of
extra time, 2-1, at Ridgeview
High. The Wolfpack advance
to take on Fleming Island
High at 5 p.m. today for a
chance to play in the state
tournament.
T'he Tigers had their
chances as the first half was
scoreless for the first 341
minutes. In that time, Nick
Tuttle watched as his shot
from 20--plus yards boiiiiced'(l
off the goal post.
The Wolfpack struck
when Adrian Frani connect t-
ed with 6:28 remaining in
the first half.
Columbia controlled pos-
session throughout iinu Columbia High's Nick Tuttle (17) works the ball up the field ac
CHS continued on 21 Wednesday.


Laver surprised Nadal

falls short of'Rafa Slam'


Ferrer shocks
Spaniard behind
injured leg.
By BERNIE WILSON
Associated Press
SAN I)IE(;()O- Tennis
great Rod I iver, the last
man to win lthe (Grand Slanm,
was surprised to hear that
Rafael Nadal's attempt to
win the "Rafa Slam" was
over.
The injured Nadal lost in
lheAustralian Open quarter-
finals 6-4,6-2,6-3 Wednesday
to fellow SpaniardI )avid
Ferrer at Rod Liaver Arena
in Melbourne. Nadal was
trying to win his flo rtli


straight Randd Slam tourna-
iienit over two seasons.
"That's disappointing for
him, really," thle 72-year-old
Liver told Th' Associatr'd
Press from his liomei in
Carlsbad in iiorlierin Sanl
D)iego countyy "Ill a way,
that was an effort to put all
those toiurnaiienits together
through last year. It really
was a good performances. 1
had hiiim as being favored.,
(vein to I)eat Fedrer, thli
way lie was playing. IH e just
has got a game that's dif-
ficult for Roger.
"I'll be darned. I thought
he'd come all lthe way
through, but lie didn'tl"
Liver said. "They were all
counlting that;l lie was going


to Ie tile l'efending champi-
on in all four toiurnla eilts."
I iver said lie knew Nadal
had been ill recently and
that ol(ne of his knees has
given hiim trouble.
"11t looked like lie was
playing well," iwver said.
I wver is lthe last man to
will a true Randd Slaml, Ilade
upl) of Ille Australian Open,
FIrench Open. Wimbledon
anmd tlie U.S. Open in a cal-
enldar y;ear. 11He did it twice,
as an amateur in 19('l 62and
again illn 1969.
For Nadal to fall short
of holding all four Grand
Slam titles at ilie sanlli
time shows what anl
NADAL continued on 2P?


ends


season


BRANDON FINLEYl ,akr Clv Reporter
against Wolfson High in the Tigers' 2-1 loss at Ridgeview High on


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Spain's Rafael Nadal is attended to by a trainer during his
quarterfinal match against compatriot David Ferrer at the
Australian Open in Melbourne, Australia on Wednesday.


Golden











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
EXTREME SPORTS
Noon
ESPN2 X Games, at Aspen, Colo.
9 p.m.
ESPN X Games, at Aspen, Colo.
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Volvo
Champions, first round, at Bahrain (same-
day tape)
3 p.m.
TGC PGATour. Farmers Insurance
Open, first round, at La Jolla, Calif.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Michigan at Michigan St.
ESPN2 -Vanderbilt at Mississippi St.
9 p.m.
ESPN2 UCLA at Arizona
I I p.m.
ESPN2 Saint Mary's. Calif. at
Gonzga
FSN Oregon St. at California
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
TNT Miami at New York
10:30 p.m.
TNT Boston at Portland
TENNIS
3:30 a.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open. men's
semifinal, at Melbourne, Australia
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
FSN Stanford at Oregon

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs
Wild Card
Seattle 41. New Orleans 36
N.Y.Jets 17, Indianapolis 16
Baltimore 30, Kansas City 7
Green Bay 21, Philadelphia 16
Divisional Playoffs
Pittsburgh 3 I. Baltimore 24
Green Bay 48.Atlanta 21
Chicago 35, Seattle 24
N.Y Jets 28, New England 21 I
Conference Championships
Green Bay 21. Chicago 14
Pittsburgh 24. N.Y Jets 19
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 6
At Arlington.Texas
Pittsburgh vs Green Bay. 6 30 p m
(FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday
At Honolulu
AFC vs NFC.I pmin (FOX)

College all-star games
Saturday
At Mobile. Ala




NASCAR


scraps


points


system


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
NASCAR is replacing the
complicated scoring system
it has used since 1975 with
a more straightforward for-
mat.
None of the changes for
the 2011 season announced
by chairman Brian France
at the NASCAR Hall of
Fame on Wednesday came
as much of a surprise.
NASCAR officials had been
briefing teams for almost
two weeks on the changes
in an effort to give competi-
tors feedback on the direc-
tion being taken.
A race winner will receive 43
points under the new system,
and the points will decrease
down to 1 for the 43rd-place
driver. There will be three
bonus points for the winner,
one bonus point for every dri(v-
er who leads a lap, and one
bonus point to the driver that
leads the most laps.
The maximum points
available now will be 48.
"Now everyone will know,
when a driver is down by
10 points, that he needs to
pass 11 more cars to take
the lead in the point stanld-
ings," France said.
NASCAR also tweaked
the eligibility requirements
for the 12-driver Chase for
the Sprint Cup champion-
ship field.


The top 10 in points after
the( 26th race of the season
will make tlhe Chase field,
while hlie final two spots will
be "wikI cards" designated
for Ihl' highest race win-
niers not already eligible.
'IThlie wild cards will only go
to driv(.rs i lllkedI inside till
top 20 ill points.


Senior Bowl, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Saturday, Feb. 5
At San Antonio
Texas vs. The Nation All-Star
Challenge, 2 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Wednesday's Games
Orlando I1, Indiana 96
New Jersey 93, Memphis 88
Philadelphia 107,Toronto 94
Denver at Detroit (n)
Atlanta at Milwaukee (n)
Oklahoma City at Minnesota (n)
LA. Clippers at Houston (n)
Charlotte at Phoenix (n)
San Antonio at Utah (n)
New Orleans at Golden State (n)
Today's Games
Miami at New York. 8 p.m.
Houston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m
Boston at Portland, 10:30 p mi
Friday's Games
New jersey at Indiana. 7 pmi
Memphis at Philadelphia, 7 pm
Milwaukee at Tor onto. 7 p m,
New York at Atlanta. 7 30 pm
Denver at Cleveland, 7:30 pmin
Detroit at Miami. 730 p.m
Orlando at Chicago, 8 p .m
Washington at Oklahoma City. 8 p in
Minnesota at Utah, 9 pm
Charlotte at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Sacramento at LA. Lakers, 10.30 p.m
Boston at Phoenix. 10:30 p.mr

APTop 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 3 Duke vs Boston College, 8 pm
No. 19 Vanderbilt at Mississippi St..
7 pm.
No. 20 Illinois at Indiana. 9 p m
No. 25 Michigan State vs Michigan.
7 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No I Ohio State at Northwestern.
6p.m.
No. 2 Pittsburgh at Rutgers. 8 p.rn
No 4 San Diego State vs Wyoming.
10 p.m
No S Connecticut vs No 23 Louisville.
Noon
No 6 Kansas vs Kansas State. 7 p i
No 7 Texas vs No I I Misourl,
9 p m
No 8Villanova vsi No 2! Ge-or otvvnwi
Noon
No 9 BYU at No, MeM.KO, 4 pm
No 9 S;yacuse at Maiquette. 3 p r
No 12 Purid.-e vs No 16 Maniesota.


I p r
No


13 Texas A&M at Nebraska.


No 14 Kentucky *vs Guorga. 4 p rn
Nuo 17 Wiscomsm at Pcnu State.
4 p ri
Nu 19 Vanderb,it v Arkanuas.6 p m
No. 22 Florida State at Clemson.
Noon
No. 24 Florida at Mississippi
State. I p.m.
Sunday's Gamnes


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

SAN DIEGO Tiger
Woods at Torrey Pines felt
like the start of any other
season on the PGA Tour,
except when he awoke at
3:30 a.m. Wednesday and
realized he had plenty of
time on his hands.
(;one was the crack-of-
dawn tee time in lthe pro-
am that had belonged to
hiim for so many years, a
product of being Ilie No. I
player. IHe was 68tlh on the
money list last year and no
longer gets first pick of the
best tee times.
"I get to sleep in a little
bit," Woods said. "Got up
at 3:30 this morning not
knowing what to do."
He isn't the defending
champion, even though]
Woods hasn't lost at
Torrey Pines since 2004.



Unscramblo these four Jumbles, .
one lettller to each square,
to form four ordinary words

SNAIE I


No. 3 Duke vs. St. John's at Madison
Square Garden, I p.m.
No. 18 Washington at Washington
State, 10 p.m.
No. 25 Michigan State vs. Indiana,
6 p.m.

TENNIS

Australian Open

At Melbourne Park
Melbourne, Australia
Wednesday
Singles
Men
Quarterfinals
Andy Murray (5), Britain, def.Alexandr
Dolgopolov. Ukraine, 7-5, 6-3, 6-7 (3).
6-3.
David Ferrer (7), Spain, def, Rafael
Nadal (I). Spain, 6-4, 6-2. 6-3.
Women
Quarterfinals
Vera Zvonareva (2). Russia. def, Petra
Kvitova (25), Czech Republic, 6-2.6-4.
Kim Chjsters (3), Belgium, def.
Agnieszka Radwanska (12), Poland, 6-3,
7-6 (4).
Doubles
Men
Quarterfinals
Mahesh Bhupathi and Leander Paes
(3). India. def Michael Llodra, France, and
Nenad Zimonjic (8), Serbia. 6-4, 6-4.
Max Mirnyi,Belarus, and Daniel Nestor
(2). Canada. def Mariusz Fyrstenberg and
Martin Matkowski (5), Poland, 7-6 (3),
6-3.
Women
Semifinals
Victoria Azarenka, Belarus, and Maria
Kinrlenko (12). Russia. def. Kveta Peachke,
Czech Republic. and Katarina Srebotnik
(2). Slovenia. 6-2.6-4.
Gisela Dulko. Argentina and Flavia
Pennetta (1). Italy, def. Liezel Huber.
United States Nadia Petrova (4). Russia.
6-4. 7-5
Mixed
Quarterfinals
Maria Kirienko, Russia, and Nenad
Zimonpic (3). Serbia. def Meghann
Shaughnessy. United States, and Andy
Ranm. Israel. 6.1 I. 7.6 (I)
Bethanie Mattek-Sands. United States.
and Hona Tecau. Romania. def Sally Peer(
and Catcn Ball.Auuahl4. 7-5. 6-4

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Wednesday's Games
Boston 2. Florla I
Carolin 4 4, N Y Ilander c 2
Atlanta I.Wahingt-on 0
Ne- Jer-y at Hrtotn (n)
Edrmoiton at Dalltn (n)
'bovn.x at ( ,,ltado (n)
SLt t oi" at ( algary rin)
Nahill at Vairomw- (r )
S at ,-. An.clr (n)
Today's Ganr m
No gainesi h.ieiule


Then again, lie hasn't
played since 200(8 because
of knee surgery, followed
by an imploding personal
life last year.
Woods said he is look-
ing forward to the Farmers
Insurance Open, which
can be interpreted so many
ways.
It's a new year, and he
would just as soon forget
about the last one. Woods
failed to will anywhere in
ithe world for the first time
in his pro career while
going through a divorce
brought on by his extra-
marital affairs.
I I also feels that he has
restored a sense of bal-
ance to his life, and hlie's
eager to see how that will
translate to golf.
"I think in order to play
this game at a high level,
it helps to have a clear
mind," Woods said.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
b)y Mikr Arluiin aid iluff Knurok


GRAWE



IMMORE
WHAT SHE WANTED)
T T TO GET FOR
HER MOTH'ER
GLAJEN
-- -- \ lNow miarr l io the cicld lettil rs
to form Iho sulrpriso inllswo, .is
-suggslted by tho abovo cirltoon.

Answer: A -L I
(Answers tomorrow)
Y(!'.;Ird;l,!; .Jmblr,. MINOH COMFT FROI IC DEBTOR
AYiwiwi I low 11n li'oons; de(lcril)b d lthe horror movio
I IIt I( 1 II IIC


NADAL: Doesn't come up with slam


SCOREBOARD


Openi. Otherwise, it doesn't
qualify as the Grand Slam.
"Again, the same thing
applies with what he
did. It takes an unbeliev-
able effort. You've got to
be fortunate not to have
any injuries or any bloody
sicknesses. You've got to
prepare yourself to play in
four matches. Depending
on the draw you've
got, that could give you
trouble. There are a lot
of little things that come'
along."


Two years ago, the
four men Laver beat with
his powerful left arm in
his 1969 Grand Slam -
Spaniard Andres Gimeno
and fellow Aussies Ken
Rosewall, John Newcombe
and Tony Roche joined
Rocket Rod at a lunch at
the Australian Open to cel-
ebrate the 40th anniversary
of his second Slam. Laver
also presented Nadal with
the trophy after he beat
Roger Federer in the title
match.


INDIANS: Raiders play Suwannee


Continued From Page 1B

(lefendlers, thenWaddington
was there to rip the second(
rebound into the net.
Santa Fe scored in the
6th minute when Jarrod
Bradley took a pass from
the wing andt blasted in a
left-foot shot from 20 yards
out.
Fort White just missed
the equalizer in the 13th
minute. Colton Jones made
a throw-in in front of the
goal but the header by the
Indians was punched over
the net by the Santa Fe
keeper.
Fort White keeper
Brandon Sharpe made
a run at (;opal (Ghosh to
stop a breakaway shot
inl tle saluet' Illinute, but


Ghosh got his goal three
minutes later when he
recovered a loose ball
in front of the goal and
steered it in.
In the 30th minute,
Bradley centered a perfect
ball from the left side and
Fransisco Falla headed it
in the net.
Sharpe was a save
machine in the second half,
recording nine and dodging
another shot that deflected
off the sidebar.
Sharpe couldn't keep out
two penalty kicks, which
was how Santa Fe scored
in the second( half. Laks
Magyer (19thI minute) and(
Ananta Sacasa (75th min-
lite) did t (li dallnage.


"I was pleased with the
play," Raiders coach Gizmo
Cifuentes said. "We had
plenty of opportunities to
put them in there and you
can't ask for any more. We
were trying to keep control
of the ball."
Santa Fe now faces on
Friday the same task that
Fort White had knock-
ing off a team after losing
to them twice.
"It was a good game
to get us motivated and
we look forward to play-
ing Suwannee," Cifuentes
said. "They are very good;
that's why they are No. 1
in our district. High school
soccer is all about who
shows up."


CHS: Blakely ties game in 2nd half


Continued From Page IB

of thet second (Itall, which


()ver tiller tlidring tlhe dis-


included tour corner kicks, Irici toluriiaiin'cit consists of
but it wasn't until 16:2'' two extra sessions with 10t
reinil iliinrg in t(he gam;lll u11111111tts in it'll ci 'riod. but
when ilth Tigcrs finally the t Wolfpack would get tie'
collit''ted il tll tir illrst gorldeh goal from T'1immyv
goal. Jimmy Blakely scrt'd( I )aSilva in ltle first over-
()l ;a brcak;iawavy. I alad ;a tinte It seal the it ;:nic'.
chlialrct to give thl I ig sl "\Vof-'OU n is l .i (lhi(l it'iii
th le ead littr ill the halt,. id ('e played welll" coach
but thei second .tteliipt just Trevoi Tylir said. "It was
missd. 1 2 lth last tince we played


Surf's Up- ,..
t" A&


ACROSS 44 Back muscles
46 Yard enclosure
1 Parade tune 51 Soldiers
6 Hosiery shade 54 Held in com-
11 Bwana's trip mon
12 Search out 55 Barney Fife,
13 Neptune or for one
Venus 56 Chronicles
14 Satirical, 57 Toboggans
maybe 58 Hackneyed


15 Eagle's lair
16 Quahog, for
one
17 Urgent
19 Realty unit
23 "Big Blue"
26 Candle lover
28 Fodder grass
29 Zonked out
31 Martini extra
33 Picture holders
34 Walked
unsteadily
35 Sunflower st.
36 Waikiki setting
39 Feel crummy
40 OK in any outlet
42 Takes into cus-
tody


DOWN

1 Steer or ram
2 Remote
3 Punjab
princess
4 Doctrine
5 Whack
6 Prefix for "tril-
lion"
7 Savory smell
8 Coffee brewer
9 Architect I.M.
10 Common abbr.
11 Resort
12 Remove the
bones
16 --Magnon man


iC


thle,m. and( we took them to
the wire tonight. We had
balls bouncing off the bar,
but we kept our compo-
sure. We worked hard, but
we've got to finisli when we
have the chance."
C'oliumbia will have a
clia;icu to finishI next sea-
son as 13 starters return.
'lli" Tigers ended the regu-
lar season 15-8-2.


r t w inkoctyrvo portsr.comn
ni1 s---_ In.rke (City



Answer to Previous Puzzle


18 Mischief-maker
20 Hot pepper
21 "Bolero" com-
poser
22 Took a good
look


23 Newton or
Asimov
24 Hunter's sta-
tion
25 Gibson of
"Lethal
Weapon"
27 Work the soil
29 "Diana" singer
30 That, in Spain
32 Meadow
34 Give a mas-
sage
37 Fidgety
38 Acquired
41 Thunderhead
43 Railroad
switch
45 Condo units
47 Long-active
volcano
48 Two-way
49 Big blow
50 Metro RRs
51 NFL stats
52 Aunt or bro.
53 Unlatch, to a
bard
54 Graduate
degs.


1-27 .O101 1 bv l S, IncI


Continued From Page IB


accomlplisilhmlent it was tfor
L.aver, who's still known as
"Rocket."
Liver has always ilplo-
matically maintained that
it's harder to win a true
Grand Slam than to win
four straight Grand Slam
tournaments over two sea-
sons.
"It is certainly tougher lo
win in the calendar year,"
laver said. 'I here's a line
frame. You don't have any
chance unless you start
off winning the Australian


Woods looks


for fresh start


at Torrey Pines


R! I M'E T TAIW NTY
TOTEMS DITHER
ALE RTS ENTERS
TERT TIC NED
NASSAU
SAGE T I C
RERUN ARROW
REN EE BE ALE
DOSIDO LANES

RED LIE MALA
DANUB E SMI LED

ORDERS SALONS
E SLA PL ED


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420






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Not an AARP member?
If you're 50 or over, request a FREE quote
and more information today!


JAARP
wI


Auto Insurance
Program roin,,


THE 1.
HARTFORD

'Savings amounts are based (ill information from Il hie lailloird's AAIIP Auto Insurance l'riiii a clustomeiis who eiae lnw r laotoil insaice policiholdeis bttwe'en ,'/1/0i ii ai ti,3010/ and Iroiide'd data
regarding their savings and prior carrier. Your savings may vaiy.
'Thel AAHP' Automobile Insurance: Prograin Ifromn I I halF Fiforrd is iisnilerwr+ittirii byI li a rll d ile Inlsiuiniiice (F:iiiiip iy .ilv its afliliat hs (nl 1 u1 [ol Iold ii, I lI d <' lil'.te i ( A Iicit se /S l '. I \In VW ashigiiitnl.
thfe Program is nderwrit ten by Hartford Casualty Insurance (miipi niiy. In 'iexis, the P oitgluiii is iiiiileiwvil ln liy Sioutllhe'ill ( C niiiiv Mutual lsimiint'c ( oiipaniii ,' i ough Iinti 1 ll Hii t ( n(ciiil Aget'Nu '. Ilatfl'oul
Fire Insurance Company and its affiliates aret not financially responsible for insitlli'ce pronducs iuniii il;i1n i dl issued by Soinlliii ( Counil Miinal Ins.iuiitice ( oilpolin, i hi.s Plni'illom is plovidt'd hi'
'I he I larlford, not AA PI' or its affiliates. FPaid endorse ent. 'IThe larlifoid pays a royalty Fee to AA fI' li hi liu ise of AAlI's intitellectual uit roll 1 ltie' e ri's i' e used fli It lhie tenril plul poses of AAltRP AA\RP
rinimmler'shiip is required for Program eligibility in most states. Applicants are individually undeiwilltte andl some maly nol qualify Speci'flic luteales. cdits, aiml dinliounis mai\ va' u nil mv \'riot Il, available
in all states in accordance with state filings iand applicable law.
I If you iai age 50 r or older, once you're insured i throfingh this Program lor at least (i60 days, yVou cannot he refused liinewal as long as apiFlica >le pieinliinis e paid w'hlo due Also, you laud oilli clstlomaivNi
drivers of your vehicles mIstl retain valid lii enses remain physically and mentally capable of'operalting an automobile, have no convict lions lfot diivingl whilel inlioa ,tled and musni t 1 lit have obllwd N111ol |ot oli'v
ilrillghV matleial risrepiesenlationll enetil currently 'not available in hliwaii, Michlglan, New Ilamipshirie, Nortii Calrolinait an Soutli taolina.i.


LAKE CITY REPORTER








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JANUARY27, 2011


DILBERT


ASOK. I NEED YOU
TO GO TO ELBONIA.
IT S TOO COLD FOR
AIRPLANES TO OPERATE
THERE, SO YOU'LL NEED
TO USE THE UNDER-
GROUND ROUTE. AA


BABY BLUES
,U 'ot- :\\ / I4.\S i^' ~c N % ^ AWiiN.
, -r- ," :" vi .e fvgs


" ]'," o t


FLY INTO SWITZERLAND
AND FOLLOW THE SEWER
SYSTEMS FROM THERE.
STICK TO THE SIDE OF
THE SEWER WHERE IT'S
DRYER.


IT'S A YOU'LL
SEWERSIDE NEED A
MISSION! JARIM
JACKET
AND A RAT
HAMMAER.


'AI\c wNI~T 60Y YOU 6~~N,~UP

N


BLONDIE
I WONDER IF THE NETWORKS I WONDER WHEN SOMEONE
WILL EVER RUN OUT OF WILL PUT ONE ON THE
S GIMMICKS FOR THESE AIR THA-' S REALSTIC
SURVIVOR R REALITY
,j -SHOWS


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
F'k5FMA-R rIF 1ML 4AIpud16 WF4: PtAAqrEC'0Q4'
OaR l4EPPIAI, JC AY 7-0 b5Y/f 90U. 6-rZl f E RO W-"4
L ANPL2 9rQefN&7,4 OF cOUR MARIA&E 2


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


S- JA


.2JtYATF~KfC~ThL
-; c~t)~ic4J?
--ii -

I


B.C.

i OLF AN'D r AFI'-P DYU, -AAID-K -/k
o~FF (, UNT SON\E 'Y'O UtAt'N IDIOT I F"ALiI~~~~tT
r-I AF, TOKF- OLFC

;K I-"


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Giving alcohol as a gift can

have disastrous consequences


DEAR ABBY: You ad-
vised "Susan in Southern
Oregon" (Dec. 1), who
asked about the appropri-
ateness of giving alcohol as
a gift at an office party, that
"the only time that alcohol
would be an inappropriate
gift is when the giver knows
the recipient doesn't use it."
As a former psychiatric so-
cial worker, I would say that
the only time alcohol would
be an APPROPRIATE gift is
when th(lie giver knows the
recipient would use it, and
do so responsibly.
People aren't always
forthcoming about their
views and experiences
regarding alcohol, so it's
best to play it safe. Many
people abstain from alcohol
because they are recover-
ing alcoholics or have seen
the devastating results that
alcoholism has had on a
loved one's life. Others
have religious reasons for
not imbibing.
Giving alcohol as a gift
may not only dismay the re-
cipient, it could also lead to
worse results if the giftee is
someone who is struggling
to stay sober. AMY IN
DOVER, DEL
DEAR AMY: You have
raised many valid points.
Most of my readers dis-
agreed with my answer, and
tthiir reasons have made


Abigail Van Buren
www, der(aobby.coi n
nme reconsider my advice to
Susan. I was wrong. (Mea
culpa.) Read on:
DEAR ABBY: Imagine
receiving a bottle of alcohol
after growing up in a home
with an abusive father who
drank. Not only would you
not want it, you wouldn't
want to give it to anyone
else. Imagine receiving a
bottle of alcohol after hav-
ing lost a child in an auto-
mobile accident caused
by a drunk driver. Would
you want that reminder, or
would you want to regift
it to someone who might
get drunk with that bottle
and cause someone else's
death? JOE IN BIR-
MINGHAM, ALA.
DEAR ABBY: Many
alcoholics choose not to re-
veal their disease. It is called
Alcoholics ANONYMOUS
for a reason. A person may
have been in recovery for
nany years and mIay not
wish to tell anyone except
close family and longtinie
friends.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): You'll have to
think fast and make sure
everything you do is suit-
able for .ill aftected by
your decision. Making a
wrolig move could jeopar-
di/c utuire plans. A sudden
chalinge in your incolitme will
push you in a direction that
brings greater happiness.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): D)on't confuse
what you want with what
you need. It's important
to keep things in perspec-
tive. An emotional issue
with someone you are con-
cerned with may be more
your problem than his or
hers. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Refrain from
making impulsive moves.
Discipline and hard work
will enable you to bypass
rash actions that put your
timing off. It's crucial that
you stick to a set strategy
in order to be victorious.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Don't blame oth-
ers when it's ui t)o you to go
after your goals. You have
what's required to make
gains and can d(to much bet-
ter following your owni path.
Separate yourself from the
crowd and focus on what
you have to offer. A * *


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

11J'0() (July 23-Aug.
22): You'll he all revved up)
and ready to l h a partici-
pant. Your ability to Surpass
;ai Co()ii x'lition looks favor-
able. h'l oltionail troubles ill
your personal lite will lead
to change lihat will event u-
ally put youil in la better posi
tion. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Do what you can andl
don't worry about what
doesn't get done. Right now
it's important to do a good
job. A change at home may
not be welcome but it will
be necessary, so accept the
inevitable and keep mov-
ing. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-
Oct. 22): Stability is what
you must strive for both at
home and at work. Whatev-
er is depressing you should
be eliminated or dealt with
in one way or another. You
cannot function or be cre-
ative if you have too much
hanging over your head.
***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You'll have to
drive a hard bargain if tyout
want to reach your goals
without too muich interfer-
Onceli. Solmeonle will nol
le totally honest with you
regarding his or her emo


tional outlook. Don't miss
out because i -yoiu ate bhitl
miiade to leel guilty **
SAG(;ITI'ARII 'S (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You cainnol
let anyone else mi,;aku choic-
es for youi it yol lltlo w\\inll.
('hlingit' is tupon \)( hM u : '
ip) to \ilu ilto decide \w hl.l I1"<
going to be. 'ak.e tih lc.ul
early alnd stay thllrc. *t* *
('CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): N(ut e\'Tv
one will he happy \1 itlh your
decisions but \you hlvc io
do what's necessary ito b
a leader in your ticld. lion'i
take on somelthini ll.g h'
doesn't tit your game plan.
Don't allow an emotional is-
sue from your past to intelr-
fere. ****
AQUARIUM S (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Put your teelingfs
on the backburnier so you
have a better shot t what
you need to get done. Don't
learn tlhe hard way by mak-
ing mistakes. Do less and
do it well. Ktnolion.l dlec'p-
tion is apparent. *
PISCES (Felb. 19-
March 20): Seipa.ratc vour
personal and protfessionll
lives. A money dc l', is :p'-
piarent it you call ilin taivor
that's owed. Don't hesitate
even it you llfel someone
is relcltanit to .tivc ill. Yourl
perIsistence \\ill pi\ ol.


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
( iohl illy Cipholi crvptlo mll I'i'all' o tt lu i d fo lllquottlionflo y l tllo : t oplo. pb:,t l pI<':,l
I 0 1l lottoel ill thI tlptlil stlnl ds for oll Ithl(
l(aiV' s c i/ A e('lqul.s ;
"R V LH L K M M N Z K R R Z L E K D D L H LS G L
YLRILLS VOMYCSEM FNO PKXVR CM


ILZZ ALLT RVL D K H M R "


C E L Z C


HNXLHM MR. BNVSM

PR[VIOUJS SOl UTION: "Whnft con be tiddod to the luiuppiuo:;n; et 11,i 1 \vlih
is in health. out of debt. and lins al cloit co( sci(not ?"O Ad In Stitli
(c) 201 1 by NI A. Inc. 1 2'/


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
M \rHRE.L, wrTH ELiznf ezint, I ',
FV 'Kt-lln i t-O U, t-teN BED,
1" F}I )' K1 X'"-- .



"\p.1


CLASSIC PEANUTS


I f-11< (Ah )Y')lI
A t' li11


Page Editor: Etnoqenr-, Graham, PA 04 1 1,I'


Agift of alcohol would be
a temptation to any r(co'(O
ering alcoholic, one ihal is
hard to resist. Thie mind can
easily rationalize: "It was ;t
gift. I might as well get rid
of it. I can share it with oti
ers, so it's not so b)ad." I le
slope grows .steeper i hoit
there. ANONYM(OU)JS
IN SAN ANTONI(
DEAR AIBY: I lave you
any idea what it is like to get
knocked across a root be-
cause you asked your (ldad-
dy to play with youi? l;ave
you seen your (Christmias
tree knocked over because
your mother and father
were having a fistfight?
My father owned one of
the largest businesses in
our town. We belonged to
the country club. Yet my
parents (lied in poverty
because of alcohol. Of the
four siblings, I am the only
one who doesn't have an al-
cohol abuse problem.
I am frequently asked
to attend functions so I can
be the designated driver. I
think the slogan "Friends
don't let friends drink and
drive" should be changed
to "Real friends don't try to
shift their responsibility"
- A SURVIVOR IN IAS
VEGAS

* Write Dear Abby at
www DearAbby corn or
PO. Box 69440, Los
Angeles. CA 90069


l5tM













Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take Al)vantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!


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ing only
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Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion



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Some people prefer to place their
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You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
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EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter com






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Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations Standard
abbhrviaiorn's aro acceptable; how.
over, the fir't word of each ad may
not be atbrovitloed

In Prinli (3l On{line


~2~01~8311~


Pool Ieaks / Pool Repairs
I 'luida IL isuile Pool & Spa
152 'l. 1 0612
('C 14'115721/9


Legal

BARNES IHEATHCARE SERV-
ICES
Dear Valued Customers:
Barnes I lealthcare Services, located
at 4251 NW American Lane Suite
102 Lake City, FI 320(55 will be
close on February 11, 2011.
As our commitment to quality cus-
tomer service continues, we will pro-
vide service to the Ocala coverage
area front Gainesville, Florida loca-
tion. You may contact our staff at the
Gainesville office by calling 352-
333-2525 or 877-42 2360(. We are
onl Call 24 hours a day for sales and
service. Barnes lleallicate Services
is located at 17(X) NW 80th 1 lvd.,
(iainesville. I1. 32006. 11f equiled,
yOU lmay obtain copies of your re
cords 01 have them orsaided to
your choice of plovidels xby contact
1ttg oui Medical Recoids ID'pailnientt
at 229.2-t5-t03I, extension 370 for
Mandy Pearson. Or, send a written
request to Barnes lealthcare Serv-
ices, PO Box 1)., Valdosta, GA
31003 Atention: Mandy Pearson.
Thank you tor allowing Barnes
lealthcare Services to meet your
healthcare needs. "We Take Care of
People"

04543040
January 20, 27. 2011
February 3, 10t), 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No. 10-152-CA
HERMAN E. MARTIN and MAR-
GARET E. MARTIN.
Plaintiffs.
vs.
JIMMIE L. HAGAN; BETTY R.
HAGAN: ANY AND ALL LUN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH. UNDER AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DE-FENDANTnSI
WHO ARE NOT KNOW N TO BE:
DEAD OR ALIVE,I WillHEIT1ER
SAID UNKNOWN PARI'lE.S MAY
CLAIM AN INTERIM SI AS
SPOUSIES. HEIRS. OlVISIES.
(iRANTI'ES OR O I'IHR CLAIM
ANTS. JOHN 1D01 AND JA\N:
DIXE AS KNOW N I'l NAN IS IN
POSSESSION

CLERK'S NO)lICE OF S:\ALE N
DER I. S CHAtIER 45
NO)l'CE IS GIVEN th.lt, in assord
twice with the SutinI Ftinal Judlg
mient ot Foreclosure dated Ja.nuar
I ', 201 1. in the .,Ka xc sItNled cause. 1
Sill sell to the highest and h ct bid
dcr lot cah, .t thlie root dxr ot theic
COL(.'MBIA 'ount ('ourthourc.
171 NE Ilemriando Acnue. .ikec
("II ilornl.i 1 1 0 .1 ( I)n on I-bc l,
.11I 10. 2011. the h-lo n ,i nld

I.ot 11. IAIRVII W S.NAI'n.,S. a
SUlh', isi'nIt .i.odltsg to Platl thctrcol
te.ot lded itn Plat l io .I. I'a.s c SI.
public records. ( ColuI bi,.i (ounlll).
'lorilda
I'ogcther %ilth .1i I0 1- I'IES Mobilc
Iltl c 11 1'1Xi.\M I --I I
ItESS AND EXC'F-PT lc Norlh
I IN feet ol l.ot 11. FaIr'N ie li.siaic
Subtihs ion. Columbia C'ountl., tlor-
ida Together with a 15 tIoot casc-
meni for ingress, egress and untlities
along the E1i.st boundary line of Lot
II, Fair\view' Estates Subdivision,
Columbia Count,. Flonda
Parcel ID No.: 26-7S-16-(1323-011I
Any person claiming ui interest in
the surplus from the sale. if any. oth-
er then the propeny owners as of the
date of the Ihs pendens must file a
claim within (60 dais after the sale
Dated January I 2011
P. DEWITI' CASON
'Ilerk of ('ounr
By B. Scipplo
Deputy Clerk
('I:RTIFICATF (I O SIRVI('CE
I ( ERTIFY thli a true and correct
copy of the foregoing Notice of Saile
under F.S. Chapter .5 has been hur-
rished by 1 ;uited States Mail ion Jan
uary 13, 2011 Io each ol thile follow
ing. Jtnnmie I. I lagan. 27107 SW 461
Avenue. Newlerry, FI. 1261. licll'
R Ilagain. 29 SW Ninltucket Pilace.
Fort While,. -I 120(). I lernian IE
Marlillnand Margaret I' Mairtin. 'PO
iox t22. tFort Winte. II. 21( H.
IIOY E PI f':ET RSON, JR 9 iS
SW Haya )Ilve. Iakc ( ity. Fl.
32025, iand Suwannee Valley Iorie
closure Medialton. Inc PI'O Hox
6126,. Live Oak, IIF L2(X4
/s/ H. Scippi(
Court Clerk

05524897
January 20, 27, 2011








Home Improvements


C'arpentlry, reitodeling, paint,
repairs, additions. Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 IREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-10 (137


Lawn & Landscape Service

('lean Pine Straw,
You pick it tip, $1. .85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,'
3.86-688-9156


Services


DIVOR('E, nANKRIII'TCY,
RESIIMES.
other cnourl approved fortis-
386-961- 5896.



Pool Maintenance


this 24th day of January, A.I). 2011.
hIy:/s/ KATll ,FN A. R10TITO

an55a24 621
hInuaiv 27. 2011


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT' FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.
Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF BENNIE C.
GLASSCOCK
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS IIAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THIl ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified Ithal an (O
der of Suninuay Administration has
been enileled in thie estate ofi lienlie
C. tilasscock, deeCsed,. File Numberi
11 0(17 C, by the 'Cicuit (Cout for
Cohiluntia Counly, Floridai, Probate
Division, the address of which is 173
NE Hlernando Avenue, L.ake City,
Fl. 32055; that the decedent's date of
death was September 8, 2010; that
the total value of the estate is
$137,871.00 iuand that the nantes and
addresses of those to whom it has
been assigned by such order are:
Name: Joseph M. Glasscock
Address:
5940 Ricker Rd.
Jacksonville, FL 32244
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THI AT:
All creditors of the estate of the de-
cedent and persons having claims or
demands against the estate of the sde-
cecdent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made
in the Order of Summary Adminis-
tration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PE-
RIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTH''
ER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD.
ANY CLAIM FILED) TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFFI:TR T1111
DECF)-NT'S IDA:TE 01: DEAHI
IS BARRED
lthe da.le it first publication of this
Notice is JJ nui.u i 20., 2011
Attorney for Person Giving NotiLe
t\ /'I/ Jo\ N Owenbh. Els:quute
Flontd.i .lar NunbeSl 0551701
Brenda A )rake, Estlquinre
Hlonda Bar Nunint' (iXi 0-12
Attolinc's to Jfioseph M. Glass
Law Otlicte io Joy N Owienb. 1'PL
ril 6A, llantic Bhlvd
Jackson', ll il 122 It
Telephone (0)1)45)1.5) 5115
Fa OXi ) I 519 5116
I: M.ul Ioi (n Ow'enilty Law coilt
Personxt G intg Notitce
I) ', Johsph M G ;lass ok
S-l40i Rikcet Ril
JaLkson lli.e Flortida. 12244
JuKI IO tl e.l
Jaliu. ti', .' ;, .'2 1 I

IN ill' ('IRC IT COURI OF I II1111
IIIIRID JUDICIAL. CIRCuIT,. IN
AND) IR COLUMBIA N I'NIY.
ILORIDA
CASE NO 10 2. (' CA
G(RIEIN FREEI SIRVI'ING I ; .C.
I.1(X) IIRBINE DRIVE. ST 11.'1 XI
RAPID ITY. S1) 5770 1.
Plauntiff

JOHN 1 NESSMH'll.A/K/A JOHN
NESSMITHI. IF .IVINGI. HT I IF
DECEASED. TIlE UNKNOWN
HEIRS. DEVISEES. GRANTEES.
ASSIGNEES. CREDITORS.LIIE:
NORS, TRUSTEES OF JOHN T
NESSMITH, A/K/A JOHN NES-
SMITH. DECEASED, AND :\LI.
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING
BY, THROUGHH, UNDER. AND
AGAINST THE NAMED DE-
I"ENDANTS,
TENA 1. NI.SSMITH AND ('CO
I.UMBIA COUNTY, F1L.ORIDA.
Decfendants
NOTICE OF SAI.E
NO I I'E IS IIHEREBY I;IVEN
THAT. pursuant to lPlaintiff's Finali
Sunnmmary Judgment Of Foreclosure
entered in the above captiontcd ac
lion, I i ll sell tihe property sli atced
i Columbia Counly, Floridta. dIecsri
tied as follows. to wit
.LOT II0 OF DAVI SlUBDIVISION
AS REC('ORI)DEDl) IN PI.AT A HI(K
.. PAGES II AND IIA,. 01' TIll
PUBLIC RI:ECORDS O1. COLUMN
IIlA COUNTYY FLORID)l. TO()
(IETIIIIR WITH THAT CERTAIN
1998 S) X 24 SPRIN(;ill.I. MN()
BIllf.'E HOMEP. SERIAl. NUMBER
GAl.V / I4Al265079SI 2
Connnmmonly known as' l(iS NW E\
eretl Terrace. White Springs. FhIloun
32096 al public sale, t thlie lughest
and best bidder, for cash l t he 'Couit
Roomt I oft Ihe ('Columbia County
Courthouse, 173 NE Hernanido
Street, Lake City, Florida 32055, al
11 :(L AM (ST), oin the 16thll day of
February, 2011.
Clerk of the Circuitl (ourtl
/s/ BBy B Scippio
Deputy ('lerk
Notice to Persons With Disabilities:
If ytou re a Iprson with li disability
who needIs iany 'acsonunodaliotiu iii
order hito participate in this ptiocecd
ing, you are enlilled, atl ino cosi Il
you. to ithe provision itof certain assis
lice. It lease contactt he C 'turt Ad
iniliislriilta r's Office nol lath'r thtit
seven days prior IoI the proceeding.

05524901
January 20, 27, 2011

Registration or Ficlitiois Names
We the uundersigned, being duly
sworn, hdo herhy declare uiuder ointh
thlial the names of' all persons inleresi
ed in Ihe business tor profession cal i
ried otn tundel the t naime of PINEY
WOODS ICHA ER OF THEIF
II,(ORIDA NAIVE PLIANT SOCI'
lITY aii PO BOX 896, IAKE CITY,
Fl. 32056


C'onlactI Pluuione Nunilhiei: 8t6 7521
1(26 anti Ithe cxtieni of thle inleresi of
eachl, is as fhlloiws:
Natiue: JAMES W. FIIEFR'IT
Exielt of ltleisi: 100%
by:/s/ James W.Flegcli

STATE OF FILORIIDA
('COU INTY OF C'OI1IUMBIIIA
Sworn to aund subscrtibed before nies


Schleduling Foreclosule Sale enleled
on 1/1ll/11 in this case noi lpendingi
in said Coutil,. lie tyle ofi which is
inulicated above.
I will sell to the highest and best bid
(le0 flo cash in llthe COLUMBIA
Counly Coullhouse. onl the illid


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-305-CA
DIVISION:
VANDERBIIl MORTG(AG(IE AND
FINANCE, INC.,'etc.,
Plaintiff
vs.
ALBRIliT R. SIIPIES, ei al.
Defendants
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SAL
PIIRSIIANT TO SECTION 15.031
(1), F LORIDAA S'ITA'ITES
T1 WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE'I is liebchy given that pur
suatil to the Final Judgenti eulciled
onil Jauay 13, 2011, in 'Case No. 10
305 C'A of the (C'icuit Court, Coluin
bii County, Florida, in which Van-
derbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc.,
etc., is phlainiff and Albeirt R. Shipes,
et al. are the defendants, the C(leik of
this Coutl will sell atl public sale lthe
following described property:
Exhibit A
EXHIBIT "A"
PART OF Till'i SE 1/4 OF TiHE: SW
1/4 OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIIP 3
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FL.ORIDA,
MORE PARTICULARLY DES('RI-
BED AS FOI.I.OWS:
BEGIN AT THE SW CORNER OF
THIE SE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 9, THENCE N
01'25'53" W, ALONG THE WEST
LINE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF THE SW
1/4 A DISTANCE OF 375.50 FEET;
THENCE N 87"52'36" E, 508.16
FEET TO THE WEST OCCUPIED
RIGIIT-OF-WAY LINE OF DOU-
BLE RUN ROAD (A 40 FOOT
WIDE RIGHT-OF-WAY AS PRES-
ENTLY (X'OCCUPIED) SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE: BEING;
DEFINED BY A CURVE (ON-
CAVE TI' TII. WE-ST. IIHAVING A
RADIUS 01F 770 15 FIS :1' AND A
CENTRAL. AN(;I.E (01 055'4' 2"'.
A.NI) tIING St1ITE:NDII) BY A
('IIORDI IIAVIN(G A. BLARING 01(
S 12'S 11i) W AND) A '11ORD)
1.FNG Il OS IS (,I FE:I.T,
I IlENCL: SOl HIllRIY A ON(;
SAIDl RI;II I 01 WAY LINE AN
ARC ID)1SIANCI1 01 il 5 NS2 I'11 I
I1) IHS INII'RSEIIHON WITH'
fill' SOl 111 1 INI' OF (ISAIID Sl
Ilu)N '9, 1IIIN(T NS '" 2' ''l" \ .
Al.ONG; SAIDl SolI11 1 I.NIL.
412 17 IEl I lET l 1f1111. IOINT I' ( -
llt ;INNING;
I10 ; I1I.ll.R 1111 A 199' S2'X.'\ S
S11VI RRICRSI MOHI11 I 110IMI.,
SI RIAl NO1 II 1.Irl.l' ,Al
[lic s.ale ill It hiIc on l It cI tuar I,.
.' l1, a I I1 ll .1 i o ll e highest
.und c ti 'idd li It .is'h. ,.i the lir til
steps ,to lile "olu bi,'a oiun, Ctouil
Ihuse. I 'I NI llirualno AVe Lake
0 0it. I loiild. iI a, t. iln.ut' wi lt Ne
II, -], 1 Ill 'I tIh Ih Holla. Sltlult r
\N'i I'TRKMN t I AIMINNi, AN IN
II-RI NI IN 1111 St R' I I I SROM
l1111. SA11 I II ANY. 0 1111'.R
IIIAN THill PROPRI'Y OWNF.R
AS OF' 1111 DAIF 1' THE1' I IS
PINDEINS M SNI I'11.1. A CLAIM
WHIIIN il0 IIAYS AFI'.R H111
SAI1
11 ollu .ri .\ person with .1 disable, lits I
%who needs I.l% .1ma iiinill, 'tu11t ll ti to
p.utllicilpl.itc in thi pl ccd nllg, so
.ru entill cs 1it no ost to oull. to the
prosion ot cen.0 n .imst. lkWAc
Pleis conflict ADA Cix'diniator.
1171 NI'. eninildo A\c I ike ('Cit\.
Fl. 32055 (So1I1)0 757 .it least
da'.% before 'ou sc'hcduled count ap
pearance. or ininiediatel\ upon ire
ceiling this notifcatiicaon if the limet
before the -scheduled appearance is
less than 7 daN,'. f \ou arr hecanng or
so ic impaired, call 711
Dated this I 1 da\ of Januarm, 2011
P DEW)IVTT- 'CASON
CLERK OF SAID COURtF
1% is/c/I SCIPPIOt
As DepIuly CIClerkt
L ance P 'ohen
172 I llindiing Bl\d Suiic 102
Jacksonmile. FI 12210
(813USS (65(X)
AlllloeY fol I'lalntllft


J.maii 20. 27. 2011
NOTICE 01- HOARD MIIETING
1I' WHOM IT MAY CONC(TRN
IThe I itlc It oald iof Ilnusltes. I'loti
da G(alew I College. will hold n pub
Ia In i eling ail .14 (X p Ill on Itieslday.
I ch.liy R ,01I. ali thlie Icaker (Coun
ly Shliill's O)lhice Comnplex. I She
ill's Ollithce n c. Mao leniv. IFloli
i I I 11s ie ttling % iis piev.
ously scheduled loti II 0 a i oni
ili same I dale. t as a, t hlangei'd
(tie Boaid al (tie Jailllul' 211 1 lneel
till A ieceplion will I' lield at 1 I0
p ill pi it l o lie miieeliing
Tloplics of collnsidleiatlion will I lo
line college business. In addillion toi
rloline college business tlie atppioval
of Ihe 2011 2012 Academiuc ('alien
dar will be colisideied Any poison
wishing to hbe liheard on any agenda
mallei w-ill be provided an oppoi1u-
nity ito do sot by appearing 'ifoie ithe
FIGC (' Ioird at thie BIaker ( 'ouniv
Shierifl's Offlce meeting room iln
M1 cch'nny. s I hti lly a
All iliectilions lo this notice and puo
liiely of iheI scheduled meeting
should lie filed with Flotida (latewtay
College priol lo noon, Fliday Feblu
ary 4. 2011. All legal issues should
Ite roughly to lie Tiuslees' atitenlion
alnd iani alli'enipt nitade o resolve themit
priii to Ihe meeting.
Please notify lihe Itesident's Ofice
inunediahely if you require accomn
nodatlion loi pailicipalion in the
feeling.

lauanay 27, 20111
IN TIIllF ('IR('I'l' ('OURT OF T IF
20Tril JllIlCIAIL C'IR'CUIT IN
ANI) FOIR ('OLUMIllA COUNTY,

S'ASI N. 09 ('A ll(}lt)rl I
NOTI' O'll'F SAl ,E
SINTRI IST MORTGAGE, INS
I n'l t ilfl ,
vs.
JAMII'E I. STO'NI', al ,
I)Deelatiinl(s(.
NOTIE I IHIIREI.'Y GIVEN phu
ilalill to 1n O)icl ii Final ludgmienl


tC'itInnuItIit ig wol ikei's.
'Iaispohill otat si & sitshence
reilibuised whien 50i' ol contract
is inel. Apply ftor this job a thlie
nearest iOne Stop C(enter in youi
area and reference Job Orlder
#KY0(4 o64 3.


Legal

floor of the Columbia County Court-
house al 173 N.E. I lernando Avenue,
Lake City, Florida al 11:0() a.mi ., onti
Ihe 23 day of February, 2011I, lie
Itollowing described property as set
Iorlth in said Order or Final Judg-
inent, to wit:
LOT 7. LOCK B,. IIOLLIN(GS
WORTH IEFS'ITAI'S, ACCORDING
TO T IIF MAP OR PLA'I T'IHERE
OF AS RECORDED IN PIAI'
HOOK 5, PAG(;I 122-122A, OF TIIIE
PUBLIC R('ORDS 01F COLUM-
BIA COUNTY, FLORIIDA.
a/k/a 286 SW BRIGHTON COURT,
FT. WHITE, FLOII)DA 32038
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
T'IREST IN TI IF SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IIF ANY, OTHER
THAN TilE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF TillF DATE OF THE LIS
PIENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER TIlE
SALE.
ENTERED at COLUMBIA County,
Florida, this 20 day of January, 2011.
IP. Dewitt Cason
As Clerk, Circuit Court
COLUMBIA, Florida
By: B. Scippiot
As Deputy Clerk
SPEAR & IHOFFMAN P.A.
Dadeland Executive Center
97(X) South Dixie Highway, Suite
610
Miami, Florida 33156
Telephone: (305) 670-2299
STS-C-5754/op

05524948
January 27, 2011
February 3, 2011

Registration of Fictitious Names
We ihe undersigned, being duly
sworn., do hereby declare under oalh
that the names oi all l persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car
tried on iundier the name of (X)ONTIEI
KIN(;., at 5219 SIL I.EISI.II W(O)D
I.N .1 I.i F1 I 12061


C(ont.ilI Phone Numnlci 186i752
S121 iand the e\lcell of the lntcicsi of
e.ihi, is as tollow'I
Namite JOHN II.ANAG(AN
I.xieni ol Intie si l(X)'"i
b, 's, John |'lau gan

S IA11. t01 I RIl)..DA
(l'N0 I I Y 1 'COINIMBIA
SwoIn to and subancdlKd I'loic me
Iht s ,', d. of ol Janu.iu A 1) 2t(X)
bI s. KAHIt.I:N A RI01Tl)o


Janu.ih 27. .O1 I



010 Announcements










060 Sen prices

Senior Assislant.''ompanion.
I will sit with & cir ftor your
elderly Drive to Doctor appts. &
shopping Reference-s a'ail.
386-288-3'76 or 386-754-8721

l0` Job
Opportunities

9 Temp Fumn'.iorkers needed
2/22/11 122/22/11. Workers \\ ill
seed. set. cut. house, & strip
tobacco Cuaraniecd 3/4 of
contract hours Tools. supplies.
equip, provided at no citost.
Free housing provided for
tinon-coutniuIuting workers.
TransIpolation & subsistence
reinibursed to % worker upon
completion of 50(' of contract or
earli er, if appropriate. $9.71 /lir.
Report or send resume to hlie
ntcalest 1:1l Agency of Workforce
Innovation n oft ice & ref. job ordei
# KY (0174118
liltel. Hiltlel, & I illiel
Ow% enshorso. KY

.101 le'tporialy Faunn Wuorkels
netCedi Emiployeti 1) & II Fanis,
1.1,( Christian ('Co KY. liobacco.
Sltiaw/I lay, & Row ('rotp, &
Alc'inaltive iWolk. Etliploymenti
Ial's: 0l/0I1/11 121/31/11. Wage
iol $9, 1 I/I. Vw olkci'f, gilalluilced
3/4 of conltricl hours. liTls
provided al no cost, Flee hlionsing.
provide to 1101 nn cotiintinlingt
workers, Tianlsporltation & subsis
lence reiiiibursed when 50"i% of
conltricl is met. Apply for this
lob at Ite nearest One Stop (Cenlr
in yonut area anid Iel'I'rnce Job
Order # KY(M 16449.
12 Teinporary Fainti Woirke rs
needed. Eniployter: Joe Ryan.
Ilocalion: logan C'ounty, KY.
'lIobacco. Straw/I llhay, & Row'
(' rop. (reenhtioiise/Nursery &
Allernalive Work. Einploymenit
DIales: 0./15/I11 12/31/11. Wage
oi1 $)9.71 /hr. Wotrker guaranteed
3/.14 of contract hours. lTooils
provided al no cost. Free housing
provided to nolt commutingt
workers. Tlanspotlhlion &
subsistence reimiiiursed when 50<9;
of ctontiact is Inel. Apply for Ihis
ijob a l tihe nearesl O(ine Slop C'enter
in voiu area aund refe'r'nce Jobl
S Order # KYIh 1024S8.
25 TImiporaly I ain Workeis
needed. E inp>loye: Ilneitass
Nit rsev Inc. I.o'alion: Shelb\
{ounnly, K'. (heenhouse/
Nuitse, yi, >' Altihinatise Wolk.
I i vpl tynient Dal s: at 3/(5/ 11
09i)/0)5/ I, Wige tul b$).t iI/Itt.
Wolke' gutiitainlicd 1/4 otl contliact
houis. litIs Upovided ati no cost.
Free housing piovyded lo noll


Please collie ib\ S l hcuidon lId,
I ake City, I to 1111l oul alln appli
cation oa i ei n iitl \o it leslinc to
FwasiUil ippuieiso lioll Fiplbt om
l'\lual Oppoatln iil\ miplauin


BUY T



RL 'IT,


FIND T'TIT,1


100l Opportunities



Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit I'Inion seeks all
energetic, creative individual to
help s e epi eet our i goals. Full innte
Member Service Representative
PI'sitioln available atl oiir .ake
('lly branch, Monday I'riday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear frot you.
Prior financial experience is ait
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, FI
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@a)flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace


(A541 191
NOW HIRING!!!
Be home everyday, While
making excellent pay'! We are
now hiring experienced
Class A Drivers to haul
petroleum locally.
Excellent benefits package
including health. dental
and 401K.
All applicants MUST Hitavec
Class A CDL willth X
endorsements
1 yr tractor-trailr c\perience
with a /ti school cenification or
2 yrs. tractlo-lrailer e\perienice
without the certification
25 yrs or older

Please appl\ online atl
ftlorldarts.'kudldahik I tes .cosn
or call 1-8660-352-7125


Aaron's L.ake City stotc is now
luring Rcenl Manager's it
Salar\+ ('onin &- i t B uses
Sundas Oft' & Full Bleneits
Must hlai\e 2 \i nignit e\p or
college. NIO cl initm.i history ,
piss drug test. 21
i r o' older cleai n l it ai pl at
',w w 1 w,% i.iro n s l li c '1 e1 is k e s -
wordst lpe "lk.ke 1 "



REQI EST FOR
(Ol. NTEI'ERS
(COLMIA .('O( INTY
he (Columbiat i ('ounit Ito.ud o
Counl\ (ColnluNsion is
seeking ,toluntects fori thll
follow in poIsitions
ECONOMIC'
DEVEI.OP11MEN'T HOARD
N1)1 STRIAI.
DEVELOPMENT
Al'rTHORITY BOARD
The Econontic De\ elopnient
Board consists s of 0 membet'rs
(7 citu/ens and 2
comnumissioners) w which \%ill act
and make recommendations
only conceniinu ecolnomlic
development within Columbia
County. The Economic
De\ elopment Board less the
tw\ o commissioners) \\ ill act as
the Industrial Devclopiment
Authority\ w. hen needed for the
puIq'iose of issuing Industrial
Revenue tBonds. Vacancies in
the Econontlc De\ elopment
Board nlmemnbership shall be
appointed b lthe Board of
Count Commissioners for the
unexpired tenn of lthe imemnber
affected. A memll'ber itlust be ,
resident of 'Columbia
Count\, No metmbe' r of th
E lcontnlic I)\-elop nlnttstl
HloardIndnustlal Dev elopmtcnt
Authoit il\ oaid shall be a paid
oi elected offliCial tit entiplot c
oit the county. The 'lenlt ol
office shall bet lo llhree
(3) \ eas.
PlANNING AND 'ZONING
BO.ARI)BOARDI OF
ADJII STMENT
t'le P'lanitn and /oning
Ioardl/Hoard olf Adjuslmeillnt
tresiconends principals and
policittes 'li suidingt a llion

counl Reco ieilnIds tio llie
Board ol 'ountol\ Comminssion
tIs Ordinances, reg.ulations and
oilher proposals promoting
orderly dihe'lopnenl along tihe
lInes indicated as deisnable bIl'\
Ise tCoiprehi snsi'e Pilan.
Vacancies in Planning amuiild
Zoning/Jlloardi ol Ad:justmnenl
niembership sliall be appointed
iby the Board of countyyl
'Conunissioners lol the
uinei\pned tcr'ni of the ient'hber
affected. A member niusl hi'e a
resident ol 'Columbia Comnity.
No niemb'ei of thie Planning ilnd
Zoning Hoaud/Ho.ud of
Aljushltm'nl shall I'e a paId
o0 elected oflicial or
employee of llhe coInn\,
The leim of olfice shall be Iou
ihnee (13) \et'S,
Pei lsons intericsted tii
hsvo tnlsteiin i ot apposll inlenl
should subitl tiheu i esinme' to
lhe Columiibia Cotuniiy l oaiid o
tl ouns (' o nnnt ssioltu i s, Pt .l
l)ia \iS Itt1t )t. .i t < { i s\,
Floiida L.'05)( I .i on O1i be
iore 'l\ sdtii lc'i'u ni\ S. .'l01 I

A:inlhrson 'Colnuibiii is 'Icepinit
applicalions itii u cetllied
elecliICin i w a il eo peileih mI1
tiuimbiti anid litlti conlol ibtp.im I











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2011


100 Opportunities

o'S24021




Managers Needed,
competitive wages, advance-
mnent opportunities, complete
training prograun, health, dental
& life benefits, DFWP/EOE
Please send resume to
bbqinl@heritagenianagement.net
or fax to 352-387-0011

CDL Driver 2 yrs exp clean MVR
wanted for local company
247 NW Hillandale Glen
Lake City No phone calls
Cloth Cutter
for small sewing operation,
Hafner's
386-755-6481
Cosmetologist wanted. Cut N Up
Family Hair Salon has 3 stations
available for rent. Call Sharon
386-365-8402 or 752-1777
DRIVER/COUNTER SALES
Valid DL. DFWP. Benefits, 401K,
P/T to F/T. Apply at 986 E. Duval
St. Lake City 386-466-0177
Experienced Legal
Secretary/Paralegal
5 yrs exp. including
civil litigation, e-mail resume and
salary requirements to:
sportsroof@ y)ahoo.comn
91 Temp. Nursery Workers needed
2/19/11 12/31/11. Must have 3
months exp. working in diverse
tree & shrub nursery. Workers
will cultivate, harvest, grade, store,
& ship container & field grown
horticultural products. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Work tools,
supplies, equip. provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier, if appropriate. $10.51/hr.
Worksites in Cuyahoga, Lorain, &
Lake Co's OH. Report or send a
resume to the nearest FL Agency
of Workforce Innovation office &
ref. job order # OH521050
Willowbend Nursery # I -
Flowerland Garden Center of
Cleveland, Inc.
Food Service Sales Representative,
Territory includes Lake City &
Live Oak. Experience preferred!
E-mail pcucinella@seabreezefood-
service.com or call 850-567-1523
6 Temporary Farm Workers need-
ed. Employer: Hayden Landscape
& Design, Inc. Location: Nelsbn
County, KY. Straw/Hay,
Greenhouse/Nursery. &
Altemative Work. Employment
Dates: 03/05/11 12/15/11. Wage
of $9.7 1/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation & subsis-
tence reimbursed when 50% of
contract is met. Apply for this job
at the nearest One Stop Center in
your area and reference
Job Order #KY0417481.
14 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: James Dale
Seay. Location: Christian County.
KY. Tobacco, Row Crop. &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 03/15/11 1/15/12. Wage
of $9.7 1/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Center
in your area and reference Job
Order # KY0419246.
12 Temp Nursery Workers needed
2/21/11 12/5/11. Workers will
plant, cultivate, harvest, propagate,
grade, store, & ship container &
field grown horticultural products.
Subject to random drug testing at
employer's expense. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Work tools,
supplies, equip. provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier, if appropriate. $10.51/hr.
Worksites in S. Russell &
Chesterland OH. Report or send a
resume to the nearest FL Agency
of Workforce lnnovwtion office &
ref. job order # OH 521042.
Landscape Creations Nursery LLC
& Leuty Nursery
10 Temp. Nursery Workers needed
2/22/11 12/02/11. Must have 3
months verifiable exp. working in
a diverse tree & shrub nursery.
Workers will plant, cultivate, &
harvest nursery stock & may be
required to operate farm
equipment. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Tools, supplies,
equip, provided at no cost.
Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier, if appropriate. $10.51/hr.
Report or send a resume to the
nearest FL Agency of Workforce
Innovation office & ref. job order
# OH 520943
LCN Holdings, Inc. Perry, OH
Orchard Agricultural Equipment
Operator 2/28/11 through 11/15/11
at Allenberg Orchards,
Smithsburg, MD. Workers will be
operating pruning equipment,
vegetable planting equipment,


forklifts, tractors, sprayers and
other ag equipment. Wage rate is
$9.94 per hour. Work week is 40
hours, 6 days per week, 3/4 of
workdays guaranteed. Transporta-
tion and subsistence expenses
reimbursed after 50% of contract
completed. Work tools supplied.
Housing provided for non-local
workers. Position is temporary.
5 job openings available. Apply
for this job at your State
Workforce Agency using job
listing MD0503493.
Wanted Highly motivate individ-
ual lIor Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
CGreat lenncits, paid vacation.
F pll. a plhis hill lut t in ccssary,
Call Chiris (1) M8(6 /55 (6030


100\ Job
10 Opportunities

0-M54 1210
LINCARE, leading national
respiratory company seeks
results driven Sale
Representative. Create working
relationships with MD's. nurses,
social workers and articulate our
excellent patient care with
attentive listening skills.
Competitive Base + un-capped
commission. Drug-tree
workplace. HOF.
Fax resume to center manager
(386)754-2795

49 Temp. Nursery Workers needed
2/19/11 7/31/11. Must have 3
months exp. working in diverse
tree & shrub nursery. Workers
will cultivate, harvest, grade, store,
& ship container & field grown
horticultural products. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Work tools,
supplies, equip, provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier, if appropriate. $10.51 /hr.
Worksite in Lake Co. OH1. Report
or send a resume to the nearest FL
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office & ref. job older #
011521051 I
Willowbeud Nursery # 2

1 2l Medical
120 Employment

05524'4 t
URGENT NEED for RN with
Home Care Oasis Experience to
help cover several counties! Top
pay with possibility of full time
employment in near future if
desired. Please call Suw annee
Home Care at 386-755-1544
or fax your resume to
386-755-7828.
Homecare LPN's &
Homecare CNA's needed for cli-
ent in Lake City. call
Maxim Healthcare Sen ices
352-291-4888

Internal Medicine of Lake City
is looking for N.P. or P.A.
Please contact Dr Bali (a
386-755-1703


130 Part Time

Farm Coordinator. FPT
Ag experience required
References. Bilingual McAlpin
area. 041 -302- Il 4 Paul


140 Work Wanted

,We Run Errands!
Your personal erraind senr ice to
help those in need .at rates .ou ca.I
afford Call Da[wis n S -i- 0 42 1,

4 Schools &
240 Education


Interested in a Medical C arecr'
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & cp
Nursing Assistant. $4 to)
next class-02/14/Im)

Phlebotolin national ertiitla
lion, $800 next class.-02; 14 11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, examn
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingse% ices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of v ild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife If ou aire
unsure, contact the local
office for information


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good
Solid 2WD). New front tires.
350hr on 2(015 motor. D)epelndable
$7500. oho. 386-867 (X))5


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling.
Flatware, Costume Jewelry.
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621


407 Computers

DI)ELL COMPUTER
$80. firni
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

HP Computer,.
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170(


408 Furniture

ASHLEY DINING ROOM


TABLE w/6 chairs and leaf.
$150.00 Great Deal!!!
386-344 5706

412 Medical
Supplies

Medline Adult Diapers, fitted
briefs, size medium (32 44),
30 dozen, will sell by dozen or
whole lot for $90 38(-752-2572


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine HI hardwood &
(Cypress. Large or small tracts.
(all W86 961 1961.


420 Wanted to Buy

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up C(ASII! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260(
After 5pmi 386- 752-3648.


430 (arage Sales

Moving Sale. livery Sat thru I'eb
20th. 7ani to noon except 1/29/1 I
W on 90 turn left on CR 252B, I
nii to Phillips Cr. Look for signs.







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

2 Burner Colemnan Camping (Grill
Good Shape $35 obo
386-292 -3927 or
386-98.1 0387
Black Aminla Range
$100. obo
380-292-3927 or
.186 084 0387
Irost Free Refrigerator
Nice w/top tree/er.
White $225. obo
380-2912-3927 or 386-98-1-0387
Ilamilton Beach Large Roaster
Goes up to 500 degrees $40.
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387
Jazz\. Electric Wheelchair,
like tiew
$5(1 obo
38-752-2 572
.'o -_ --..
Old Dish cabinet. Hutch with
glass doors Solid wood. Possible
med oak S85.00 obo
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387
Tow Behind GrillSmoker
$1.250 OBO
386-249-3104 (or
386-7 l)t-48(2

SMobile Home
610 Lots for Rent

Beautiful 3 2 DWMIl onIl aci e.
tenced back ird. doubNle c.ipolt.
near college & shopping.,500 ino
,%.I.l F1eb ls( isti 6,7 101 J

63 f Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2&; BR M 111 s i so Ill
p'luhis Idep l w\V.ilec A sewer tir
nijhed ( ainnon (reek Mil1'
'S,( "92 6-;22
(717.111, UIc! .' i S .'.' Ilo I
S t. i |Ino 2i st ,sI H in 'l
1, ) 6 it 'l r7 IS l I
w us % 5It, .1i i c'w .il tI\ p o'l~p tti 11i
Mobhiler IIHnes tor t nl in
11 i1C on' Ih f io s i
\'% hill(- S [ [lin .u I[ .ik I ll. ,l I I
Vw i l (- t t.ou l t i S o :.' t .' *. .t
oMl, ,..2 l0114







Reinideled 2, 1 w s imien poul
l.g \.td in quiet, u. IC.le s.Ate. ell
li auidlncd 1(1 uilIt paik .at cil.
garbage i Icl $-I" til 1 dcIp

'Ver clc{n & well ni.nlani.ed 2,'2
unit', in nice park. $591)9.no
$51() dep Rent incl water.
sew er. trash p.l u Close to tlow n
086-S84-8448 or 623-7547
Ver Nice 4br/2 5 ba. 3 ac Fenced
(ross Fenced. paved rd huge
deck. private McAlpin area $9001
dep & $Q50 mOi 186-867-1833

640 Mobile Homes
0 for Sale

$5( o ino 311d,211a Modular
I 2 acre Dectk. energ.s elhcienl.
.applaniCt es 4 w/512K downi
I $(t-lt mo w/ 'S46K down) i
A\a.il in Match
w ner n.a i r or reni to Iown i'
('all 8t 6) 7S8 '182 hunri

71 U nfurnished Apt.
l For Rent

SIPRIN(; I111.I, \ II,1,A(;1
I-xcellent Ihgh1 Spiilpls lh .oitoli
I. 2 & h bcdlllOni lHol pllh s.
smeI w uil gu. ages
'iall 36-454-1469
or s1sit ll i i elisitle
www.s|)ringhilivilliige.nel


(;et up to $2011l in 2011!
Call hor Details
Wi(dIsoing AcpIt;
386-758-8455
I. 2 & 31 bedi toni Aparitiienits &
mobile lniues.
starting al $1509 per nithnli.
386 755 21423
)Duplex w/gUiiiage( spaciouiis. 2/1,
130i sq It. W/D hlook I]|), 'I/A.
$650 plus dIep & bckgrndl chk,
386-69 7- 1248 oi 152-514.1 2 t (
r;eat loc action W of I 75, spacious
deluxe 21R apts., garage. W/I)
holok up. patio. $600 & iup. i Sl).
386 965)0276
Large 2hr/2ha nDuplex.in
nice area wilh W/I) hookup.


Rent $625. per imonlth.
('all 186 867 1212 lor details.
Move In Speciiil.2/1 w/garage
on tile eas side of lown.
Washler/I )yer hookups & moitre.
Call lor details. 386 755 0867
The Lakes Apis. Studios & I Hi's
fromi $1 15/wk. I llil. & cable inicl..
Sec 8 vOitn lihe acit'htle) d.lI iontIlly
rates tavail (*all 186 752 2/1I
Updated apartments w/tile loors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + set.
Call Michelle 386 752 9626
X- CIFAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
collntry Aiet 8 nii to VA, ollff L
.'lf Rd. $500 imo dep. No dogs
)Deck. w/d hookups 186.9.996)181


720 Furnished Apts.
2^v For Rent

Ibr Apt. incl. water, elec, & cable.
$595. ito. Close to college. Good
area in Lualu. References & sec.
req'd. No pets. 386.719-4808
Rooins fior Rent. Ilillcrest, Siands,
Columinbia. All furnished. lilectric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

.73f Unfurnished
7/3 Home For Rent


403 Bayn Ave...First month's
rent discounted 501%o! 3/2
remodeled hlioe on Baya Ave.
14401 s. with side deck. Pets
considered. $790./tno +
$790./ security
642 SW Chris errace...
Located inl a nice wooded
subdivision, beautiful 3/2
upscale rental close to l ake City
buit fa enough out lto enjoy your
privacy. $1150,/mo plus
$115., secuirtly
315 Piedmont Liv, 'e Oak...oldetr
-4/2 Ioe 11lI downtown Live
Oak. Kilchen temiodeled.
$850./nio plus $825, secuiitly
881 SW Sunview...Ciogeous
4/2 counily hlioe between lake
City and Ft. White just off SR
47. Mobile lime situated on 5
acr e corner lot. $90(0./ hi0. plus
$900. security
C('all IlJ IFederico ('Cetury 21
The Darby Rogers C'o. (e
380-365-5884
lill p/jLpriisrus.cont/
.earn about Lake City!

('rSKI' 12
Nesw Years )reann "Surprise"
Why Renti. Lease to own.
News model o01ie 2 miles S off
47. 3000 s(I ft, 4/3, 5'; int, is'
tax deduc. consider trade-in
386-752-1364


3/2 Brick home w/great rmn. approx
250() sq ft. bonus nti 3X0 sq ft,
upgrades thruni-out, on I 5 ac
fenced yard. detached Ig storage. 2
car garage,. Eec level home.
$151 nui Isol. la.st set c illt

S/2. 2OO sq tlit IUnck IIoiie in
Slonehelii ge on I n i t lt" bil. ti
rent oi sale, $11"s mlon. set or)
1 '4l '()1 ('.all 8 1i 80 IS t '3
I'I,/Ib.I m \ urd.
nle.11 .rpol. S tOO lito .
Ist. l.st A,. $ it(I set
i(, 5's2 (is M s4 .4
C'in (ottage I br, Ib.i S hlN\ .11
_\l.A. ,..rpotl t'0 imo ser
lnuilud s ill utilities satl ile I \
I'cts ( )K (i S '"S .'lIiS
I'.islsil, ill.uic R .ealht
'Si, '"',: 8)'K
\ lK ilteli-ir tii ll I i itll',
stir built hoilui
.: .'lh Io 1 c.I,
I'P illl lot a oll n .'bl Ib .
Rcsuitl I t' iint 'I ( 'riiin t e l I.I .1
. M Is .ul.l I ,rN i iO m' $'s 1l C,\

RrnliIK hled. (I l'.i. tIln ,d. iICw
idc k, siop. < .i nticl .lipI. i1 sd l >to*
ho. ols, 1"S I m .. 1 -ll I dlr I 'S(.,
'.s so .'s 01.9 .1 SS1 'S .1 s totI Is tl
'p.aI tiis .'hi lth'. ihou c lll tlo\ ll
('losc to shoppinll
$ I l', utlhi [' Is ldrl ils
S io ;- 1-i 'Q '2
llnir Rlcis Istllc, 2 I. 1('1 A.
2(11 I \\ 2 .ul rc't s trom ii l nr ti
landlord required. o'-5 montllh. x
.6cX1 se" dcp. 386o-4s'-4b111
Tumnkes rental. V2 spit.2 CG. 1 '2
.acre. quel neightIltrhtiol. close Io
1-'5. $1050 p'r monith.i. lt list sec.
3s6'-454-2826 or 954-895 1 -22

7(0 Business &
5 Office Rentals

2Yr Old Olfice Sp.ace for Rent
2750 sqtt. IOthce. Killchen. Phone.
Secitil\. Inenel ti ie. Ittlit 'sr. Irslih
.ill int ludeid I p1 l.rs to l' isol.iled
or downsl,.urs tor public ti.t ic
I nuail Iot policies .uidl l loie
inlf.ration todd(" r3global coin
(iica.i localltions on S\V M.un HIll\ d
Reta.nl. Wholesale. Ditribulion.
Otlike 12t00i st onl\ $S11 per
tio illtilles I llitiles 7S2 (1i(5
i ul.u\s 7 i A u .fl Sa .le' s. i
O)lFFICE' SPAI'(E loi lease
tak Hill I'l.i/a 9t stql
s h "'lIoN'S I11 ;S61 90(11086 DCA Reallo'


805 lo.s for Sale

il ILISIIE'R'S NOTE
All ical esile adlvelNsing Il lhls
I s sipei Is slb t'i. tl to il I thi
hotumsing act wichL makes it N ih',llegal
lo advertise "any pileleenc'e.
hlitatiolltit, or disci ilnllialon based
on racet color religion, sex.
disability, faminulial staiuns or nation-
al origin: or anly inlenlion lo make
such preference, linmitaillon or
discriiiunalion," Familial slalus
includes children under ithe age of
18 living withll parents legal
custodians. p-regnanilt oliten and
people securing tistody of chil
drenl undil ihe age of 18 Thlis
neli spapitr illi not kito\\ingly
actcepi any adveltisting fori real es
lale which is in violations otf he
law. ( )ur readers are hereby in-
liltled Ilhal all dwelhhhnigs adver
lised in this newspaper are availa
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discriniinalion call
II11l) toll free at 1 800 0609 9777.
t ie ltoll fiee
eIclephoine number to Ihe healing
impaired Is 1 800 927 9275.
This nice 4.5 acre pa 'el has
septic, powel s & well, older Mil
$ 19 900 MI S 76182
Ro 'li I I .ov ladv
380) 1(5 /01O9 Wsslletid Realty


81 0 Ihone for Sale

2br/l2ba Iasisile Village.
Unique floor pihlan. I.'g utility/
work room. Screened lifroi pitich
$55,01) 00 386 7/55 0 91
ID)aniel ('rapps Agencty, lie.


810 Home for Sale

3/1 on 4.43 acres, iiietll roof,
pond on lploperlty,
Lease option available
$129,888 Results Realty,
Nancy Rogers 386 867 127 I
3b/2ba, 1545 sq ft on I/2 acre,
338 SW Wise l)r,l.ake City
Reduced to $179,900, ('Call 386-
752-3078 or 352-281-4003
3ibr/21iI 8(1'X 125' lot. 1,200 sqclt
Kitchen & bath remodeled, metal
rool, Ig fenced back yard. Close to
amenities. $79,900 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Brick home w/1,934 sqft
in Piccadilly Park. 1/2 acre. ILg
playroom, fenced yard. Reduced to
$139,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Ienc
3br/2ba Customn honie. on 5 ac.
where deer & turkey roail.
I,.g bar w/enclosedI worksliop.
$219,000. 38( -755 51 11
D)aniel Craipps Agency, Ilnc.
14/2 in Sub-div, open ltloor
pluiiill ida room, porch. lenced,
$150,000 call Missy Zecliert
(i)Reniiax 386-623-01237
www.Iliissyzechler.comi
4/2 oili 4 acres, open floor plan, 2
living nns, itec room w/wet bar
$89,900 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert
386i-397-3473
4/3 taril house on 95 acres w/pri-
vate pond, surrounded by oaks
$()89,)000 ( C'harlie Sparks.
Westfield Realty MLS#76149
386-755-08081
4br/2ba. 5 ac.. 20169 sqlt. Ig family
& florida rill,. (len. Covered patio.
workshop. $229.900. Lori Giebeig
Sinipson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Hishop Realty
4br/3ba. remodeled, views ot the
lake. Formal LR, dining room &
family room. Many upgrades.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488


67.5 acre farm. fenced. workshop.
pole barn and two ponds. MH
(1984 sq ft) $299,X000
call Pauttl Iaylor iat
Access Realty 386-623-0896
Affordable, clean liome in sub-div.
Freshly painted ulterior.
sil s I ,I itist see'
rnltaiii Stoeckerl
Resills Realt \ 8( <"' .1 l7
BRANI.)\ nes hoiuc, ltg .aistet
suil,. 2 nliles tllin I S 00),
S 1711,1)) MI9.S 9 t -i 14
(C.ile C'asionWeshtlid Reall\
I(86 .'.I 28(t,
lrinck hostic onl 5 A.ies.
u Iuntr\ cIrel h loe I to m n'
MuI S' c Resulis Rc.llt\
Illtt i\ Slotv kci

I 'l.ln. on I (Ist .t sc lols I sh.id Ires%.
ibluil it (lilt'. sI I S.1)51
CA.ill Pamil la.\l
\Ci-css Rc.illt ;i1) ('2 b (006
1'ounml In 'llt' .l' .l0 ., Nc, % fool
V\ 1u ,nilto0\ Pool hIol til
& Il>-Trnllio Us- < o;.'".-XHI
( "oldrll Banker Ilishopl Real!t.
'- lainr K. lular 386-755-(.648
I( iisil i ItIl k. *% I s'Ti .11-u
.1- 1 ,' , ll t .u11i, pm-, JK'ol. hIl'
uilT & hnepl. cs. nlorl <.s a.* a(
'old well Btanker Hishlip Reallt
I onI ( ii'c Si npuslu 3nls 'Si
I'aissii v \ l.ia e Re.ill\
A "St Rel'tmltcnt II i\itu'
!iR.'21A

Fl.st.side V\iliage Reilt
386-752-52"Q0
A 55+ Retirement L i\ ting
ulls inumshedt 2t'''b, '(a

I-xcellent area 3br'2ba honie
1020( sqlt. w /coeCred patio, l.g
front porch & I car caqrprt
l.on Gi(;cbeg 386-..',5-56'"
Coldwell Banker Hishop Really
L.. ge ./2 buc k home \w,basement
2 having iarieas. poltch on 2 lots
1290.100 %11 S $'14118
8i6-0623-2806, Carne iCason
Westllield Realt
l.irge enlertainint home. u\/pool.
g.ieho., huge w workshop.
$285.(18) CaIll Miss\ /chelH (d
Rema\ 386-62.110237
\% \% %\ I l ethe CO111
l.atge honlie \\/acre t l land. hg
Iiiil\ : & fltontli Iooms.
co\ etlel poi' h.
MiNss\ /ecihe (o Rcina 18.i
W(.1 0: w / \\ wi niussy/eclhei coin
M o\e In R ,idl\ h( /.'',i \\/I1..'.
,sql l C n II lot. gl' al S/'l)
I ?\l \\ otktlop \t/vhvc
1 lltIlvades '5/I.000O 8( 71i9 5110
Dainiel (riiipps Agencly, Inc


lt- ^ON \







2004 Rialta
23ft. solf-contaiinod,
oxcollont Codittion.
$13,500

Call
386-755-7067


810 Ilome for Sale

Nice 1/2 holie on 4 acres
closer to town $168,000,
Motivated sellei MLS4#73410
C(arrie Cason Westfield Really
386-623 2806
Nicely reinodeled 3/2 on 2 acres,
partially fenced $115,888
Nancy Roger ( @
Results Really
386-867-1271
lTwo story Milf, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3btlhs
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Woodcrest S/D Super location,
nice back yard. 3br/2ba home,
cov-
ered back porch. New AC in 2010
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Bianker/Ilishop Realty
WOO)6D(ATE VFllEAAGE.
lb/2bha DWMI I.
Close to new eleinentlary
school. $27,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel 'rapps Agency, Inc

820 Farms &
SAcreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac..Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots, Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
8 0 Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Famue Dr. 386-867-1190

Commercial property situated
across from plaza, frontage on
Bava Ave 3.27 acres.
S398.888 Results Realty
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
Propels cornerr location), easy
.1cct'SS corner, close to downtown.
14,(I1 ( 'lCharihe Sparks
estield Reilty
(86-755-0808 MLS#74814


940 Trucks

1990 Ford F350 Dually
work iruck. white. aultomlatic
S1501 obo
8s 0, 5- 2215

97 (he\N Z71 -Exteinded cab 3
dool Black '/gold trii 1oc.al 2
)r\ i'[ All dm scice records. $4750
ob St, 2-1l-3 I1(4 / (86-71)-48(02







950 ('ars for Sale
21H.3 ( iadillic. Sedan Ies-\ ille.
P'c.I\l \hiler\cC ellentl cond ntion.
NA4 K Miles. Rcduie to 5.50,$ (
5 St', $2" (ISo5

95i Recreational
Ve5 hicles


2004 Rialta 23 Ft Self contained
Excellent Condition
S13.500.
SOLD


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