The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01360
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: January 23, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01360
System ID: UF00028308:01360
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Reaching 100
Family helps celebrate
-~nil birthday.


-Li.

;. r


ake


Football Family
Fort White HS holds end
of year banquet.

Sports, IB






porter


Sunday, January 23, 201 I


!cityreporter.com


Vol. 136, No.314 M $1.00


Skunkie Acres needs license to exhibit


Must first pass USDA
inspection to show
exotic animals.
By C.J. RISAK
crisak@lakecityreporter.com
Not everything is above board
at Skunkie Acres at present.
The not-for-profit corporation
.in White Springs that is man-
aged by Bernard and Barbara
Haake does not have a valid oper-
ating license, according to the
United States Department of


Agriculture. The license needed
to exhibit exotic animals expired
"last June," Barbara Haake esti-
mated. They have reapplied with
the USDA, but now must pass a
prelicense inspection before their
license is approved.
"We have had a license,"
Bernard Haake said. "It was a
foul up in the paperwork. It's
just like a corporation if you
don't file on time, you lose your
license.
"It's just a technicality."
According to Bernard Haake,
it was an oversight that led to the


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Bernard Haake listens to the crowd
at the Jan. 13 meeting.

license expiring, and once it did,
a process must be followed to
reacquire one.


The Haakes have been trying,
but their first prelicense inspec-
tion went poorly.
That inspection, conducted on
Dec. 8 by Kim Duffiney of the
USDA's Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service, had more
than two dozen notations of vio-
lations. Several dealt with the,.
overall upkeep of the site and
the cages the animals were kept
in including different animals
sharing the same cage, such as
rabbits, armadillos and squirrels.
Her report also noted that
"there is not adequate separa-


tion of facilities to accommo-
date the unregulated animal res-
cue and wildlife rehabilitation
from the regulated zoo animals"
and that rescued cats and dogs
were "allowed to roam freely."
Documentation of veterinarian
care, including vaccinations, was
also incomplete.
"They did not do very well
the first time, as you can see,"
said Dave Sacks, the USDA's
media representative. 'They had
housekeeping and cleanliness
SKUNKIE continued on 3A


Savings available

at property

appraiser's office


Deadline to file for
homestead status
is approaching.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The deadline for filing
for homestead and other
tax exemptions is quickly
approaching for residents
seeking a tax break on their
2011 taxes.
Doyle Crews, Columbia
County property appraiser,
said his office had taken
about 160 homestead appli-
cations before Jan. 1, and
taken in an additional 100
applications in the first
three weeks of the month.


He said the average sav-
ings by a resident whb gets
a homestead exemption
often ranges between $400-
$700, depending on the
assessed property value of
their home.
Residents can apply for
homestead status through
the Columbia County
Property Appraisers office,
135 NE Hernando Ave.,
Suite 238, until March. 1.
The deadline can be extend-
ed up to mid-September for
residents with extenuating
circumstances.
Homestead exemption
requirements include meet-
ing certain criteria, such as
EXEMPTION continued on 3A


MEANT TO


BE


The deadline to file for homestead and other exemptions for
2011 taxes has been set at March 1. Doyle Crews (from left),
Columbia County property appraiser, looks on as homestead
coordinator Gail Matthews, helps Kimberley Brown and Jason
Brown file for their exemption.


Reporter partners

with tourism group to

produce vacation guide

SBigger 2011 issue
features state
parks and more.
From staff reports
The second annual
Suwannee River Valley
Vacation Guide debuted
last week and showcas-
es tourism opportunities
and vacation ideas in the
region.
The 2011 edition grew
in number of pages and
content offering from the
original 2010 publication.
The guide is a 44-
page, digest-sized, full-
GUIDE continued on 3A


1 I .: .:I


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


57
Sunny
WEATHER, 6A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Richardson Middle School educational paraprofessional Takesha Armstrong (right), 25, offers her mentee, Columbia High
School freshman Allison Durem, 14, advice about school, college and anything else that she has on her mind. Armstrong said
she spends Friday mornings with Durem.

Mentors provide direction to kids in need


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Work and classes keep
Takesha Armstrong
of Lake City busy
during the week, but
her schedule slows
down every Friday morning for a
special person her mentee.
"It feels good (being a mentor),"
she said. "I look at her and think,
'That was me in school."'
In Columbia County, 70 students
are paired with mentors as part of
the Take Stock In Children program,
said Dorothy Spradley, Columbia
County School District volunteer and
education marketing coordinator.
'They meet weekly with the kids
and help keep them on the straight
and narrow," she said.
Take Stock in Children is a non-
profit organization in Florida that
provides students college scholar-
ships based on fulfilling specific
performance standards, such as
maintaining good grades, exhibiting
good behavior and regularly meeting
with a mentor.
Serving as a mentor brings
Armstrong, who was a mentee in the
program, full circle.
"It feels good because I was on the
receiving side, and now I'm on the
giving side," she said.
Coming from a family of six, col-

Opinion ................
Business ................
Obituaries ..............
\ / Advice & Comics.........
S" Puzzles .................


lege was in the back of her mind but
she knew financial reasons could
possibly keep her from attending,
Armstrong said. Then she joined
Take Stock In Children and was
paired up with Spradley.
Spradley, her mentor from seventh
through 12th grade, never missed
a session and als6 came to support
Armstrong at school events.
"She was an awesome mentor,"
she said. "She was that extra voice in
the background to inspire me."
The two women still remain in
contact.
"I was so blessed to have her as
a mentor," Armstrong said. "She is
family."
Mentors learn from their mentees


as much as they help, said Chad
Crews. He has been a mentor for
seven years and first heard about the
program from Spradley.
"It sounded like a great program,"
he said. "I thought it would be a
great way to give back a little."
The best part of being a mentor
is seeing a mentee grow as student,
he said. His first mentee graduated
from college with a degree in crimi-
nal justice.
"It was good to see him grow from
a 10th grader, go.through college
and now he has a job," Crews said.
Crews was lucky to have his par-
ents as strong role models growing
MENTOR continued on 3A


Takesha Armstrong
. speaks with her
Mentor, freshman
Allison Durem. 'We
talk about school
stuff,' Durem said.
'It's cool to be able
to talk to some-
one who is here
and different from
friends and family.'

JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Bridal show has
unique vendors.


COMING
TUESDAY
Fort .'.hi-te Library
has a book passing.









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 2011


A$-4 FLORIDA


Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
1-12-19-24 10 5-9-28-29-31 Afternoon: 2-0-7 Afternoon: 9-3-5-7 9-12-14-33-35-52 22-36-51-56-59 PB32
Evening: 3-5-0 Evening: 2-1-3-0


AROUND FLORIDA



Board of Medicine passes pain clinic rules


MIAMI
regulations on
Florida pain-
management
clinics that
will impose an
estimated $65 million in
costs on the private sector
passed the Florida Board
of Medicine unanimously
on Friday, despite Gov.
Rick Scott's edict to ban
rule-making this year.
Board members asked
their staff to send letters
to both the Legislature
and the governor's Office
of Fiscal Accountability
and Regulatory Reform,
explaining the need for
immediate implementation
of these rules, given the
Significant threat to pub-
lic health and safety that
some "pill mills" have cre-
ated in the state.
The four rules adopted
on Friday set out the
requirements for stan-
dards of care, inspections,
accreditation and training
in pain-management prac-
tices.
Several members, who
met by conference call,
mentioned that they sup-
port Scott's call for a halt
to rule-making to make
sure that the process
doesn't unduly impose
a burden on small busi-
nesses and the public.
In fact, the board voted
unanimously to suspend
rule-making other than the
regulations on pain clinics.
The $65 million in esti-
mated cost derives almost
entirely from the require-
ment that clinics perform
periodic urine screens.
The estimate came from


ASSOCIATE
Florida Gov.-elect Rick Scott (right) and Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll (center background) tal
students Arianna Davis and Mike Laelante, from the Frontline Outreach program Dec. 2
Orlando.


a study by the Center for
Economic Forecasting and
Analysis at Florida State
University. The Department
of Health commissioned the
study after the Legislature
required them for all pend-
ing rules with at least a
$200,000 impact on busi-
ness.
The Center churned out
the study in just one month
in order to leave time for
the board to decide whether
to submit the rules by the
Feb. 4 deadline foi consid-
eration during this year's


legislative session.
Paul Sloan, a clinic owner
in southwest Florida who
helped the Center gather
information, said he knew
the total would be sub-
stantial, but even he was
surprised.
'The number's far higher
than I expected," he said.
On the other hand, he
said, the regulations are
necessary to stamp out pill
mills that are just about
profit and feeding the addic-
tion pipeline. "Its worth
doing," he said.


Those who are horr
by the toll of phony pa
management practices
it's unfair to look only
down side of regulation
this case, rules could
money in law enforcer
and reduce the death
from the narcotic pain
prescribed and often d
pensed by "pill mills."
In its report, the Ce
noted that it was askec
only to count the cost
the regulations for priN
companies and govern
agencies, not the offset


savings that might accrue if
the rules were imposed.
About seven deaths a day
in Florida are caused by
overdoses of prescription
drugs, such as the pain-
killer oxycodone, according
to state officials. Lax laws
in Florida have made it the
destination for addicts and
drug dealers from other'
states.

McCain to visit
for son's winging
, 7 PENSACOLA Former
1 presidential candidate
John McCain plans to visit
the Florida Panhandle next
week to attend a Navy
flight training winging cer-
emony for his son.
S The Arizona senator is
also scheduled to speak
at the Friday event at
S Whiting Field Naval Air
Station. McCain served in
ED PRESS the Navy for 22 years and
Ik with was a prisoner of war in
7 in Vietnam. His son, Ensign
McCain, is one of about 16
graduates who will receive
their "Wings of Gold" for
ifed helicopter training.
in-
s said
at the 2 panthers found
ns. In dead in Florida
save
nent NAPLES Two Florida
toll panthers have been found
killers in southwest Florida.
lis- The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
enter Commission reported that
d an 8-month-old uncollared
of male panther was found
vate dead in Collier County
nment Friday along Interstate 75.
tting The death appeared to be


caused by a vehicle colli-
sion.
Also Friday, a 10-month
old collared male was
found dead in Hendry
County. Officials believe
he was killed by another
panther.
Both carcasses will
go to the FWC Wildlife
Research Lab in
Gainesville for a complete
necropsy.
A total of five panthers
have been killed in 2011.
Biologists estimate the
panther population in
Florida to be between 100
and 120.

Enterprise zones
aren't attracting
TALLAHASSEE A
legislative study shows
Florida's 59 enterprise
zones are attracting rela-
tively few new businesses
and jobs to economically
distressed areas.
The report Friday by the
Office of Program Policy
Analysis & Government
Accountability suggested
lawmakers should con-
sider making changes in
the program so it'll be
effective or scrapping it
That would save taxpayers
about $18 million a year.
The state has spent
$187 million for various
business incentives in the
enterprise zones over the
past five years, mostly in
Miami-Dade County.
That included $29 mil-
lion in jobs tax credits for
about 8,000 new jobs.

- Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Olbermann gives MSNBC abrupt goodbye


NEW YORK
K eith Olbermann,
MSNBC's most suc-
cessful and contro-
versial personality for
his outspoken liberal
prime-time program, gave an abrupt
goodbye to viewers and said Friday
was his last show.
It was not immediately known
if he quit or was fired. Olbermann
did not address the question, and
MSNBC said only that they and
Olbermann had ended their contract.
He signed a four-year contract two
years ago.
"MSNBC thanks Keith for his
integral role in MSNBC's success
and we wish him well in his future
endeavors," the network said in a
statement
A spokesman said Phil Griffin,
MSNBC's president, would not com-
ment on Olbermann's exit. Spokesman
Jeremy Gaines said only that the
acquisition of NBC Universal by
Comcast, which received regulatory
approval this week, had nothing to do
with the decision.
Olbermann was suspended with-
out pay from the network for two
days in November for donating
-to three Democratic candidates,
which violated NBC News' policy on
political donations. Olbermann com-
plained that he was being punished
for mistakenly violating an incon-
sistently applied rule that he had
known nothing about.
The host apologized to fans but
not to the network.
MSNBC essentially molded the
network in Olbermann's image. His
program is MSNBC's top-rated, gain-
ing in viewers after his evolution
from a humorous look at the day's
headline into a combatively political
show in the latter days of the Bush
administration. MSNBC decided that
point-of-view programming was the
way to go, and hired Rachel Maddow
and Lawrence O'Donnell both
occasional subs for Olbermann to
fill out its prime-time lineup.
His exit was so sudden that
MSNBC didn't have time to change
its ads; a "Lean Forward" promotion
for the network featuring Olbermann


'ASSOCIATED PRESS
This frame grab fror MSNBC video, shows Keith Olbermann on 'Countdown'
Friday. Olbermann returned from one last commercial break on 'Countdown' to tell
viewers it was his last broadcast, and read a James Thurber short story in a three-
minute exit statement.


aired within a half-hour of his final
goodbye.
Olbermann, before leaving the
show with a final signature toss
of his script toward the camera,
thanked his audience for sticking
with him. As was often his habit
on Friday nights, he read a James
Thurber short story, this one titled
"Scottie Who Knew Too Much" and
published in 1940.
The story's final line: "It is better
to ask some of the questions than to
know all of the answers."
He thanked a series of people,
including the late Tim Russert, but
pointedly not Griffin or NBC News
President Steve Capus.

Ivanka Trump says she
and husband expecting
NEW YORK Ivanka Trump and
her husband are expecting their first
child.
The "Celebrity Apprentice" co-host
announced Friday on Twitter that
she's pregnant. In 2009, she married
Jared Kushner, a New York real estate
scion and publisher of The New York
Observer weekly newspaper.
The 29-year-old Trump hasn't said


when she's due.
Trump, the daughter of Donald
Trump and his former wife Ivana, is
a vice president at her father's real
estate company and has a jewelry
company. She graduated from the
University of Pennsylvania.
Kushner's father was a prominent
Democratic political donor who
pleaded guilty to campaign and tax
law violations.

Marley's heirs win image
case in Nevada court
LAS VEGAS A federal jury has
sided with Bob Marley's family in
ruling against a Nevada company
accused of making and selling apparel
featuring the reggae icon's image.
The Las Vegas Review-Journal
reported Friday that jurors ruled
against AVELA and owner Leo
Valencia, awarding $300,000 in dam-
ages to a company owned by Marley's
family.
U.S. District Judge Philip Pro is
expected to award more damages after
determining how much profit was lost
because of unfair competition.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg,
D-N.J., is 87.,
* Actress Jeanne Moreau
is 83.
* Actor Gil Gerard is 68.
* Actor Rutger Hauer is 67.
* Rhythm-and-blues
singer Jerry Lawson (The
Persuasions) is 67.
* Sen. Thomas R. Carper, D-


Daily Scripture


Del., is 64.
* Actor Richard Dean
Anderson is 61.
* Rock musician Bill
Cunningham is 61.
* Rock singer Robin Zander
(Cheap Trick) is 58.
* Princess Caroline of
Monaco is 54.
* Singer Anita Baker is 53.


"Ask and it will be given to you;
seek and you will find; knock
and the door will be opened
to you. For everyone who asks
receives; the one who seeks
finds."


- Matthew 7:7-8


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


,


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40.

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5445


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427










Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 2011


EXEMPTION: Still time

Continued From Page 1A


being a Columbia County
resident, living in the home
by Jan. 1, and owning the
home by Jan. 1.
"There is homestead,
disability, widow, seniors
and veterans exemptions,"
Crews said. "There are
a lot of exemptions that
folks may be entitled to
that they can come in and
apply for."
Properties are appraised
as of Jan. 1 each year.
"We arrive at those val-
ues using the prior year
sales," Crews said.
The Columbia County
PropertyAppraiser's office
has staff available from
8 a.m. 4:30 p.m. daily
to help with the applica-
tions. Every Wednesday in
January and February, a
property appraiser's office
staff member will be at the
Fort White branch office
from 8:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
to help residents in the
south end of the county
who want to apply for
exemptions.
"All the information
obtained on these applica-
tions is confidential, used
only by my office," Crews
said.
The Homestead
Exemption exempts the
taxes from the first $25,000
of a home's assessed prop-
erty value. A few years
ago, through a Florida
Constitutional amend-
ment, voters passed a sec-
ond $25,000 exemption on
homes with an assessed
value of more than $75,000.
The biggest advantage
for filing for homestead
and other exemptions is
the property tax break,


Crews said. He said by
filing for a homestead
exemption, the following
year the person's home
is placed under the "Save
Our Homes" program that
caps the amount the prop-
erty tax can be increased
each year.
The Save-Our-Home
benefit is a 3 percent cap
on the assessed value of a
homestead property and a
$25,000 homestead exemp-
tion on qualified homes.
A homeowner who has
a home with an assessed
value of $100,000 would
pay an estimated $1,732
in property taxes without
a homestead exemption.
With the exemption, the
property taxes for the same
home would be $1,064 if
the home is located in the
unincorporated area of the
county. The tax savings
would be slightly higher in
the City of Lake City due
to the city's higher millage
rate.
Crews said people who
filed for homestead exemp-
tion or any other exemp-
tion last year should have
already received their auto-
matic renewal receipt by
mail.
He said anyone who
applied and did not get the
postcard receipt should call
his office.
"I encourage people to
hang on to their receipt
because that's proof their
exemption has been
renewed for the current
year," he said.
For more information,
call 758-1083 or go to www.
appraiser columbiacounty-
fla. com.


SKUNKIE: License needed

Continued From Page 1A


issues. There were quite a
few noncompliant issues
in there."
He added that there is
a 90-day window for the
license applicant to pass
one of three prelicense
inspections. If they fail all
three, they must wait six
months before reapplying.
During that time span,
they are not to exhibit exot-
ic animals to the public.
Skunkie Acres, however,
remains open to the pub-
lic, Bernard Haake said,
and often conducts tours to
school groups.
Should a facility ignore
citations issued by the
USDA, monetary fines
could be imposed, with
- as a final resort the
animals taken away, should-
inspectors find they are not
being properly cared for,
Sacks said.
"If you're exhibiting (ani-
mals) to the public, you
need a license," Sacks said.
"Are you providing humane
care to those animals?"
Skunkie Acres has been
under fire from neighbors
throughout its more than
three years of existence,
with neighbors claiming
rescued dogs and cats
roam freely throughout the
neighborhood and that the
smell and noise is over-
whelming allegations
the Haakes deny.
At present, Skunkie
Acres has an estimated
100 exotic animals on its
5-acre lot, including wolves,
a water buffalo, an ostrich
and alligators. It also offers
horseback riding and was
rescuing cats and dogs,
temporarily housing them
until they can be adopted.
The dog and cat rescue has
been temporarily suspend-
ed, Haake said, due to the
"harassment" of neighbors.
Haake has insisted
that no official citations
have been issued against
Skunkie Acres by law
enforcement, despite
more than 80 calls and
15 incident reports to the
Columbia County Sheriffs'
office.
At a public meeting
Jan. 13 in White Springs,
more than 50 residents
gathered, many with com-
plaints against Skunkie


Acres. Terry Marques,
director of the Lake City's
Humane Society, had
asked residents to fill out
affidavits detailing com-
plaints against -Skunkie
Acres and, since the meet-
ing, a dozen have been
returned.
The Humane Society
has no jurisdiction over
the exotic animals, nor the
horses (which are under
the sheriff office's con-
trol), but Marques said he
has definite concerns for
the cats and dogs housed
at the facility. He said he
thought he had an agree-
ment with Bernard Haake
in 2009 to get out of the cat
and dog rescue business,
but that Haake reneged.
Although USDA preli-
cense inspections are sup-
posed to be random, the
Haakes were expecting
their second one Monday.


Award-winning author to give talk
By ANTONIA ROBINSON 1997. The center's mission is "explor- self and north Florida writers Arthur
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com ing, documenting, and celebrating Spencer Jr., James Abbot, and Guy
north Florida's peoples and their con- Miles. The book's title is "Alachua: The
Award-winning Florida author Sudye nections to the land." Place of Our Remembrance.
Cauthen will bring her passion for oral It is important for people to know This is the first time the historical
history to Columbia County. their own stories, Cauthen said. society has gone outside the commu-
Cauthen is the guest speaker at the "If we don't know our own we can't nity for a speaker, said Sean McMahon,


Columbia County Histoncal society
meeting 7 p.m. Monday at the Columbia
County Public Library main branch.
"It's quite an opportunity for me," she
said. "I haven't delved into Columbia
County history."
Cauthen grew up hearing stories of
her father's community, Monteocha
which first started a love of collecting
oral history, she said.
She founded the North Florida
Center for Documentary Studies in


appreciate stones oi people adiferent
from us," she said.
Cauthen's first book, "Southern
Comforts: Rooted in a Florida Place,"
won a Florida Book Award. She has also
received two State of Florida Individual
Artist Fellowships in Literature and a
Glimmer Train award for fiction.
She wrote "The Salvation of Maggie
Rider Stories from Nokofta." Currently
Cauthen is working on an anthology
featuring out of print works from her-


president
"This is a great opportunity to hear
from a writer in touch with nature and
old time Florida," he said.
A question and answer session will
follow Cauthen's speech, McMahon
said. Her books will also be available
for purchase.
The lecture is free and open to the
public. Contact McMahon at 7544293
or at sean. mcmahon@fgc. edu.


GUIDE: Lists top places to visit in tri-county area

Continued From Page 1A


coloi magazine produced
through a partnership
between the Suwannee
River Valley Tourism Group
and the Lake City Reporter
The SRVTG includes
Columbia, Hamilton and
Suwannee counties and
is focused on promoting
tourism and the activities
in these counties. The
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council coor-
dinated the project.
The Lake City Reporter
produced andprinted40,000
of the vacation guides that
will be distributed by tour-
ism officials at trade shows
and events throughout the
Southeast to help attract


visitors to the area. It also
is a mailer piece for those
who throughout the year
request information about
the region.
"Last year's vacation
guide was very good and
this one is even better,"
said Harvey Campbell,
executive director of the
SRVTG and the Columbia
County TDC. "It's a great
piece and through the
course of the year, we will
distribute all of them."
The vacation guide is
free and available locally
at many hotels and tour-
ism partners in Lake City.
It is also being distributed
to Chambers of Commerce


in all three counties.
"We've already heard a
lot of positive feedback
on this vacation guide
and it certainly is a mag-
azine that invites people
to spend time here and
-relax," said Todd Wilson,
publisher of the Lake City
Reporter. "I want to thank
all of our advertisers for
their support and for capi-
talizing on the broad reach
of this product. We have a
lot of recreational oppor-
tunities to offer here in
the Suwannee River Valley
and this vacation guide
does an excellent job to
showcase it."
Included in the vacation


guide are feature stories
about all of the major state
parks and tourism attrac-
tions in the three counties.
This year's content also
was expanded to include
organized youth sports
tournament information,
the Florida Birding Trail,
mountain biking and
cycling information. The
2011 edition also includes
an expanded calendar of
events listing, plus tri-
county parks, camping
and lodging information.
"It's really a great
looking magazine," said
County Commissioner
Ron Williams. "It's very
well done."


MENTOR: Helping school kids find their direction

Continued From Page 1A


up, he said. Mentors feel
the void for students who
are lacking in that area.
"Its important to pro-
vide that for some kids
that might not get it in
some other places," Crews
said.
Firsthand knowledge
about the influence of men-
tors led Bobby Simmons
to join the program after
he retired from the school
system.
"Several kids were
selected as part of the
program while I was
principal (at Fort White
High School)," he said. "I
recognized the value of
the program and what it
means to the young people
impacted."
Mentors are friends
to the young people and
someone they can count
on, Simmons said.
The sessions with his
mentee include encourag-
ing him to keep up his
grades, talking about
sports and just staying
interested in his life, he
said.
"He's a special young


Attention:


Southeastern Rehabilitation

Medicine Patients


person and I want to
see him have success,"
Simmons said.
January is National
Mentoring Month, which
is an annual campaign to
recruit mentors for stu-
dents.
More mentors are need-
ed right now in Columbia
County to reach students
at CHS and Fort White,


4&12A


Dr. Guy S. Strauss, D.O.,FA
Board Certified Internal Medic
Board Certified Critical Car
AUllison B. Baris, A.RN.


Spradley said. Every
year 15 new students join
the local Take Stock In
Children program.
The program is tailored
to the specific needs of
each students, she said.
Mentors provide guidance
for social, emotional and
academic needs without
preaching to the students.
"Most times these chil-


dren need to know there
is someone who cares and
will listen," Spradley said.
Being a mentor doesn't
require any special skills
or talents, Crews said. All
that is needed is at least 30
minutes of a person's time
a week to meet with stu-
dents on campus. Contact
Spradley for more informa-
tion at (386) 755-8041.


.n-A


T


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What makes OPTIFAST Program

unique?

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


~k~i~k~t~












OPINION


Sunday. January 23, 201 I


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Change, but

don't destroy,

health care

s expected,
Republicans in
the House of
Representatives
made repeal of
health-care reform their first
priority. The measure to repeal
passed Wednesday night
Giving old arguments a new
airing doesn't improve their qual-
ity. The House debate is point-
less because Democrats who
control the Senate do not plan
to bring the repeal up for a vote.
Nor would President Obama
sign it in the unlikely event that it
reached his desk.
The nonpartisan score-
keepers of the Congressional
Budget Office estimate that
the Republican plan to repeal
health-care reform would add
$230 billion to the deficit This is
the same CBO that Republicans
applauded when it said back
during the Clinton years that the
former president's reform effort
would vastly increase the budget,
which helped to sink the bill.
Now that the CBO's estimate
doesn't support the view that
health-care reform decreases the
deficit, however, Speaker John
Boehner has blithely dismissed it
as just another opinion.
Not so fast As awkward as
it may be for Mr. Boehner to
accept, the CBO's numbers are
generally acknowledged as cred-
ible and legitimate, no matter
how politically inconvenient that
may be. It's also inconvenient for
supporters of repeal, who claim
they have a mandate from the
public to roll back the overhaul,
to see results of the latest polls.
While Americans remain
somewhat divided over the law,
the strength and intensify of the
opposition have diminished as
some of its provisions have taken
effect Indeed, only one in four in
an Associated Press-GfK poll say
they want it repealed, and 43 per-
cent say they wish the law would
do more.
The health-care reform act is
by no means perfect If the fight
over repeal opens the door to an
honest debate over its flaws and
ways to make improvements,
both Republicans and Democrats
should seize the opportunity to
move forward rather than engag-
ing in political dramas that lead
nowhere.

Houston Chronicle

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Here's a call to change


'stupid' climate of hate


s one who has been
called every bad
name under the sun
and most planetary
'Abodies and these
people are not even married
to me! I am in a better posi-
tion than most to write about
the so-called "climate of hate"
abroad in the nation.
I should quickly add that
the climate of hate seems
not to have influenced Jared
Loughner, the alleged perpe-
trator of the shooting atrocity
in Tucson, who gave rise to
this dispiriting debate about
American society. His mind
appears to dwell among the
aforementioned planets,
beyond the reach of cultural
signals from our world.
Even so, plenty of people
say hateful things they would
not say if they stopped a few
seconds to think. The absence
of thought is the very culprit I
want to bag today.
You see, I wonder whether
the climate of hate is actu-
ally less a force and a worry
than the climate of stupid in
America today. To add to Big
Government, Big Media, Big
Oil, Big Pharm and Mr. Big
from "Sex in the City," let us
riot forget Big Stupid in the
annals of bigness.
It is hard to tell what makes
we the people so stupid. It
could be the entertainment
industry, the education system
or the mass media (editor's
note: not newspapers, surely)
but stupidity does seem to
find its biggest expression in
politics.
In the first place, we have
assorted hot heads on talk
radio and TV outdoing them-
selves in saying dumb things
and egging everybody on.
That this dialogue is often
hate-filled goes to the first
problem stupidity is always
the handmaiden of hatred.
Smart people tend not to be
haters. They know better.


LETTERS


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com
To cater to this seeming
constituency of the brain-dead,
various vacuous politicians-
- you know who they are
- have sprung up spouting
nonsensical nuggets of ideol-
ogy that bear only passing
relation to reality. Sound bites
and slogans have come to sup-
ply the background noise of
our culture.
Now, this is the part of the
column where someone levels
the charge of elitism against
me. Well, if elitism is about
support for more thinking,
then I am happy to plead guilty
as charged.
The irony is that the biggest
elitists are the party chiefs and
spin doctors who treat the vot-
ing public as so many.hayseeds
to be conned, even as they pre-
tend it's really their party's crit-
ics who are looking down their
noses in a superior way.
Let me pluck the prime
example from the recent head-
lines.
As stupid as it was to assume
that Jared Loughner picked up
the stain of everyday hate like a
human paper towel, those poli-
ticians and pundits who have
in the past stupidly hinted at
"Second Amendment" remedies
as reasonable steps to politi-
cal reverses should be smart
enough now not to whine about
the alleged libel done to them.
No, we can't say they made
Jared Loughner do it. He alone
is responsible, if indeed the
state of his sick mind can be
held responsible for anything.
But, yes, we can see what
they meant now by Second
Amendment remedies or hints


at secession, which is why
those who gave voice to such
thoughts ought to just shut up.
We get it now: Dead people
are what they were speaking
of a child, a judge and other
good souls. Jared Loughner
probably didn't hear, he just
took the remedy they had so
flippantly proposed.
Thus, in the spirit of rec-
onciliation, forgive me for
not believing as much as I
should politicians who have
made total protestations of
innocence, because somehow
I can't stop hearing the voice
of Saucy Sally from the House
of Fun and Frolic speaking on
the virtues of marital fidelity.
I can't stop thinking that
Big Stupid wins when every-
body says nothing can be
done about this tragedy, that
we can't balance Second
Amendment rights with old-
fashioned common sense so
addled people can't buy semi-
automatic weapons with ease.
Go on, call me names, but
it won't change the truth. Just
before Christmas, although
not quite in the spirit of the
holiday, an aggrieved reader
told me that he intended to
taste alert here relieve
himself on my grave.
I was polite, of course. I said
that was fine but he should
bring a life jacket because I
intended to be buried at sea.
In response, he sent me back
a jolly e-mail that struck a note
of goodwill.
In my experience, some
Americans say hateful things
but few are completely con-
sumed by hatred. A joke, an
understanding word, a sign of
respect, and people are smart
enough to respond positively.
Climate of hate? It is the
climate of stupid that is the
problem, and thinking beyond
political catchphrases is the
antidote.
Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


TO THE EDITOR


Delighted with selection of marshals


I was delighted to see in
(Friday's) paper that
Herbert and Ann Darby
have been selected to the
position of Grand Marshal
of this year's Olustee Festival
parade. My congratulations to
the selection committee.
Herbert Darby has been my
personal attorney for 55 years,
and he has been in the limelight
enough that everybody already
knows all about Herbert.
As to Mrs. Ann Darby, I
remember her as an absolutely
gorgeous majorette (and indeed
drum major) for the Columbia
High School band. So by no
means will this be her first par-
ticipation in a parade, as she
has been out front leading the


Columbia High School band in
parades for probably a total of
at least 100 miles, with myself
and the rest of the band follow-
ing behind and grabbing every
glimpse of her that we could
possibly get without stumbling
over our instruments. I even
considered switching from
trumpet to trombone in order to
march in the first rank where I
could see her all the time.
Some of my fellow band mem-
bers are still around, and will
appreciate the truth of what I
am saying. They include, among
others, Herbert Bohrman,
Thomas Trammell, Albert
Bonney, Mary Lou Summerall,
Pat Summerall, Glenn Jones and
Harry Robarts. Some of the oth-


ers that will still be remembered
by some local old-timers, but
who have since passed on, are
Earl Haltiwanger, Jr., Jim Buck
Lanier, Kenneth Rhodes, Jake
Baumstein, Jimmy Ives, Lloyd
Swilley, H.G. Cochran, Adel
Shingler, Barbara Shepperd,
Randy Chalker, Robert Lord,
Bobby Dupriest and Mason
Joye.
At my age, I usually avoid
parades. As a former high
school band director I have
been in my share. This year,
I wouldn't miss it because of
Mary Ann Mathis, now known
as Mrs. Ann Darby.

Lenvil H. Dicks
Lake City


4A,


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Let's see

scientific

evidence


Ichetucknee River
is a priority we sup-
port and everyone
should embrace.
The springs and river are
the lifeblood of our soul in
Columbia County.
Several environmental
groups united to present a
case to the Columbia County
Commission recently to ask
the board to support a resolu-
tion to eliminate summer tub- -
ing on the upper half of the
river. It would have been the .
first step in a process to ask
the state, the overseer of the
state park, to make the restric-
tion official.
The reason presented? The
river is so shallow on the north
end that tubers drag their feet
and disturb the sandy bot-
tom of the river. This creates
murky water conditions and
kills off aquatic plant life to
the extent the fragile river eco-
system cannot heal during the
offseason.
Commissioners listened to
the presentation, but did not
support it because of what
they said was a lack of scientif-
ic evidence presented with the.
request. Advocates of the river .
say the data does exist, even if
it wasn't presented formally.
The matter was summarily
sidestepped and an attempt
at a solution turned into the
commission's offer of a letter
of concern written from the
county to the Department of
Environmental Protection.
Also, the river's supporters
have taken a circuitous route
to this point. They bypassed
The Ichetucknee Partnership
(TIP), a volunteer group
dedicated to many of the same.
goals.
So we're at an impasse and
we need more facts.
If any of the environmental
partners have the scientific evi-
dence, it should be presented
immediately and a healthy
discussion launched. If there's.
reason for concern, let's
address it in specific terms and'
if action is necessary, take it If
it needs it, rescue the river and
continue with the plan to allow.
tubing only from the midpoint.
south.
All of the parties involved
seem sincerely interested in
examining the data and know-
ing the details about the river's;
plight We think it's important
to move quickly to get this
information into the arena of
public discussion with TIP, the
Columbia County Commission,
and the DEP so that, if neces-
sary, a unified action plan can
be launched.
Our precious Ichetucknee -
River is a resource too valuable'
to chance without knowing all
the facts.


HIGHLIGHTS.
IN HISTORY"
On Jan. 23, 1961, word
reached the world that the
Portuguese ocean liner Santa .
Maria, with some 600 pas-
sengers aboard, had been
seized in the Caribbean by
two dozen hijackers led by
Henrique Galvao, an opponent
of Portugal's leader, Antonio de
Oliveira Salazar. (The drama
ended on Feb. 2 with the sur-
render of the hijackers off
Brazil.)

In 1968, North Korea
seized the Navy intelligence
ship USS Pueblo, charging
its crew with being on a spy-


ing mission. (The crew was
released 11 months later.)

m In 1973, President Richard,
M. Nixon announced an accord'
had been reached to end the
Vietnam War.










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY JANUARY 23. 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Monday

Book pass
The new Fort White
Branch Library opens
with a ceremonial book
pass 10:30 a.m. Monday.
The book pass will be on
the route between the old
branch and new one. A
Grand Opening Ceremony
is 11 a.m. at the new
library. The new location is
17700 SW State Road 47.

Historical Society
meeting
Award-winning Florida
author Sudye Cauthen will
give a talk to the Columbia
County Historical Society
at 7 p.m. Monday at the
downtown library. The
lecture is free and open to
the public. For information
contact Society President
Sean McMahon at 754-
4293 or at sean.mcmahon@
fgc.edu

Academic Recognition
Program
Presley EXCEL and
Scholars Program
Academic Recognition


Program is 6:30 p.m.
Monday in the Richardson
Middle School Auditorium.
The program is for stu-
dents in kindergarten
through 12th grade whose
second nine weeks report
card has no grade less
than a B or S. The speaker
for the occasion is the
Honorable Circuit Judge
Leandra G. Johnson.

Tuesday

MADDfest meeting
MADDfest meeting is
5:15 p.m. Tuesday at the
Columbia County Public
Library. The two-day
event is March 25 and 26.
MADDFEST Spring Arts
Festival is at Olustee Park.
All arts-and-crafts booths,
food vendors will surround
the park facing the main
stage gazebo. Contact
Tony@MADDFEST.com or
386-965-9256.

Blood donors
LifeSouth Blood Centers
has an emergency need for
donors. A blood drive is 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday at
Walmart. Donors receive


backpacks and a chance to
win an iPad.

Author program
Irene Ziegler, author,
actor, and playwright from
Deland, is speaking at 7
p.m. Tuesday. The pro-
gram is sponsored by the
Friends of the Columbia
County Public Library
and refreshments will be
served. For more informa-
Stion, please call 758-2101.

Olustee Festival
Pageant
Contestants are being
sought for the 2011
Olustee Festival Pageant
The pageant is Feb. 5
and open to girls ages 13
months 20 years who
reside or attend school
in Baker, Columbia,
Hamilton, Union or
Suwannee Counties.
Applications are available
at the Columbia County
Library, Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce,
Emily Taber Library,
Suwannee Regional
Library, Hamilton County
Library, Union County
Public Library or by con-


acting Elaine Owens at
386-965-2787. Deadline for
entries is Tuesday.

Wednesday

Baldwin HS reunion
If you graduated or
attended Baldwin High
School between the
years of 1950 and 1969, a
reunion is being planned.
The event is scheduled
for June 17 19 at the
Quality Inn, 1-295 and
Commonwealth Avenue.
If you would like to be
placed on the notification
list telephone, letter or
e-mail please call 904-724-
3580 or 904-266-4253 and
leave your name and con-
tact information or e-mail
your request to lulah@
mindspring.com.

Blood donors
LifeSouth Blood Centers
has an emergency need for
donors. A blood drive is 1
p.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 26 at the
Lake City Reporter. Donors
receive backpacks and a
chance to win an iPad.


Friday
Golf tournament
The Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce is hosting a golf
tournament at 1 p.m. Friday
at the Country Club of Lake
City. The title sponsor is
Gulf Coast Financial. Lunch
is before the tournament at
noon. The entry fee for the
golf tournament is $60 per
golfer. Call the chamber for
more information at 386-
752-3690.


ing them forever homes.
Call 386-752-3191.

Annual dinner
The Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce annual dinner
begins with cocktails at 6
p.m. Jan. 29 at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds Banquet
Hall, and the title sponsor is
Rountree-Moore Automotive
Group. Tickets for the annual
dinner are $50 per person.
Call the chamber for more
information at 386-752-3690.


Saturday, Jan. 29 Sunday, Jan. 30


Blood donors
LifeSouth Blood Centers
has an emergency need
for donors. A blood drive
is 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Jan. 29
at Lake City Mall. Donors
receive backpacks and a
chance to win an iPad.

Parade of Paws
The Lake City Humane
Society is having a "Parade
of Paws" 11 a.m. 2 p.m.
Jan. 29 at the Lake City
Mall. Adoptable shelter
dogs will be brought out to
visit with the public to find-


Bridal show
Your Perfect Day Bridal
Show is 12 4 p.m. at
the Holiday Inn & Suites.
Vendors include The Rose
Mary Catering Company,
David's Bridal, Dream Day
Cakes, Lake City Florist
and Design, Joye's Gems
& Things, and more.
Advance ticket prices
are $5; Day of Event $7. -
Tickets can be purchased-;
at the Holiday Inn &
Suites, 213 SW Commerce
Dr. Call Theresa Lastinger
at (386) 754-1411.


OBITUARIES


Mr. Trevett N. Dickson
Mr. Trevett N. Dickson 89, of
Lake City, passed away Fri-
day morning, January 21, 2011
in the V.A. Medical Center in
Gainesville, Florida following
an extended illness. A native of
Scranton, Penn-
sylvania, Mr. '"
Dickson had
been a resident
of the Robert -
H. Jenkins Vet-
erans Domiciliary for the past
seven years having moved here
from Macclenny. Following a
tour of duty as a radio opera-
tor and waist gunner on a B-26
Martin Marauder in the United
States Army-Air Corp. during
W.W. II, Mr. Dickson returned
to the United States and gradu-
ated from seminary in 1949.,
He served as an Assembly of
God interim pastor all over the
United States for more than fifty
years. While living in Alabama,
he also taught at a local Christian
school. Mr. Dickson served as
President of the Residents Asso-
ciation and the domiciliary and
even performed the marriage of
a couple of residents there. Mr.
Dickson was a history buff and
had been featured on a televi-
sion program and had worked
with students from the Univer-
sity of Florida. He was preceded
in death by his wife, Willow.
Mr. Dickson is survived by a
son and daughter-in-law, Roland
& Laurie Dickson of Pageland,
South Carolina; three grand-
children, Richard Dickson,
Winnsboro, Louisiana; Sgt.
Samuel Westbrooks, U.S. Ma-
rine Corp. Okinawa, Japan; and
Amanda Vinson of Sylvester,
Georgia. Two great-grandchil-
dren, Allana Westbrooks and
Mason D. Vinson also survive.
Graveside funeral services
with full Military Honors will
be conducted at 2:00 P.M. on
Wednesday, January 26, 2011
in the Florida National Cem-
etery in Bushnell, Florida. The
family will receive friends at
the funeral home from 4-6:00
Tuesday evening. Arrange-
ments are under the direction
of the DEES-PARRISH FAM-
ILY FUNERAL HOME, 458
S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
wwwparrishfamilyfimeralhome.com
Jennifer Ann Grant
Jennifer Ann Grant, 26, spread
her wings and flew up to heaven,
Sunday,January 16,2011. Shewas
the daughter of Mr. John A Prive
and the late Veronica C. Prive.
A native of Connecticut
she had lived in Columbia
County for the past 22 years.
She was a loving wife and moth-
er who liked bowling, the out-
doors, animals, especially hors-
es, collected dolphins & angels
but loved and adored her family.
She leaves behind her husband
of 10 years, Mark W. Grant; son,
Joey W. Grant; father, John A.
Prive; brother, Ronald "Ron"
(Jessie) Cole all of Lake City,
FL; sister, Christine A. (Wil-
liam) Sintrion of Homestead,
FL; and friends, Dallas (John)
Nicely, B.J. (Everett) Bias, and
J.J. McCullough of Lake City, FL
Funeral services for Mrs. Grant
will be conducted at 11:30 a.m. on
Tuesday, January 25, 2011 in the
chapel of GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 U.S. Hwy 441 South, Lake
City, FL 32025 (386) 752-1954.
Visitation with the family will
be one hour prior to services.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com


John Melum -
John Melum,
passed away
peacefully at
his home Friday, January 21st.
John married Mary Burdette
on May 6, 1957 after meeting
her on an Air Force base. He
served 20 years in the USAF and
enjoyed working on aircraft.
John and Mary were fulfilled in
their work with the Habitat for
Humanity where they selected
the families and supported them.
John loved fishing, gardening,
and golf. He was a member of
American Legion Post 57, VFW
Post 2206, and was affiliated
with the WayWord Ministries.
Survivors incl!dea, so ,J.polhn,
David, Sister Lyann Glen of Ta-
'coma, WA, Aunt Ellie Cooper
of Portland, OR, 3 grandchil-
dren, and 1 great-grandchild.
In lieu of flowers, donations to
Lake City Habitat appreciated.
Memorial service at WayWord
Ministries Tuesday, January
25, at 10:30 AM. Arrange-
ments by ICS CREMATION
AND FUNERAL HOME.
Dorothy (Dot) Ann Woodruff


SPECIALIZING IN:
* Non-Invasive Laparoscopic
Gynecological Surgery
* Adolescent Gynecology
* High and Low Risk Obstetrics
* Contraception
* Delivering at Shands lake Shore


Dorothy (Dot) Ann Woodruff,
age 79 of Lake City, passed away
Wednesday January 19, 2011
at Avalon HealthCare Center.
Dorothy was born in Edward-
ville, IL. and grew up in Dalton,
IL. She married and raised her
family in Orlando, FL., and later
moved and resided in Lake
City for 30 years. She worked
.for Green Thumb, Eckerd
Drug Store, and the Blanch
Hotel. She loved people
and was a friend to many. She
enjoyed crossword puzzles and
watching tennis. She attended
Bethel United Methodist Church.
She is survived by her sisters:
Doris Herman (twin),, Joyce
Robbins, Carol Barnett, and her
son Randy Greenwood, daughter
Cyndy Boyer and three grandchi I-
dren. A speical thank you for all
who were involved in Dorothy's
health care and being her friend.
Justin Thomas Brown
Justin Thomas Brown, 29, of
Lake City. Visitation, Tuesday
January25,2011 from 5 p.m.until
7 p.m. Funeral services, Wednes-
day January 26, 2011 at GATE-
WAY-FOREST LAWN FU-
NERAL HOME. 3596 S. U.S.
Hwy 441 Lake City, FL 32025


New Patients Welcome
Call today for a
personal appointment:
386-755-0500
449 SE Baya Drive
taer City Florida 32025
www.dainagreenemd.com


(386) 752-1954 Full obituary
will run in Tuesday's edition.
Murray Arnold Whiddon
Murray Arnold Whiddon,
79, of Marianna went to be
with the Lord Friday, Jan. 21,
2011, at his home in Marianna.
A native of Sylvester, Ga., Mr.
Whiddon was a former employ-
ee of Gay Plumbing and Heat-
ing in Albany adn of the Veteran
Administration of Lake City,
Florida. A member of the East
Side Baptist Church of Marianna
where he loved his church fam-
ily and Bible study group. He
had resided in Marianna since
1999. Mr. Whiddon was known
for his love of his family and
enjoyed spending time withhis
children, grandchildren adn he
loved gardening, fishing, hunting
and his five rat terrier puppies.


He was preceded in death by
his parents, Green Manasas and
Maggie Arnold Whiddon; sis-
ters and brothers in law Florence
Anna and Cullen Odom and
Ruby Marie and Eddie Trout.
He leaves to cherish his memo-
ries, his wife of 44 yearsPhyllis
Ward Whiddon of Marianna;
one son, Gary Wayne Whiddon
of Jacksonville; one daughter,
Leisha Whiddon Lavender and
husband Gene of Tifton, Ga.;
one grandson, Matthew Murray
Whiddon of Tallahassee, Fla:;
one granddaughter, Kayla Mc-
Crary Jones and husband David
of Leesburg, Ga.; one sister,
Virginia Whiddon Morgan and
husband Bob of Villa Rica, Ga.;
one step grandson, Robert Lav-
ender of Cordele, Ga.; one step
granddaughter, Melissa Grif-
fin and husband Jessie of Grif-
fin, Ga.; two great grandsons,


Noah Jones of Leesburg, and
Slade Griffin of Cordele, Ga.
Funeral services will be 10
a.m. CST Monday, Jan. 24,
2011 at James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel with
Dr. Steve Canada and Rev.
Craig Walker officiating. Ad-
ditional graveside funeral ser-
vices will be at 3:30 p.m. EST'
Monday in Red Oak Cemetery
in Sylvester, Ga., with BANKS
FUNERAL HOME OF SYL-
VESTER, GA., and JAMES
& SIKES FUNERAL HOME
OF MARIANNA directing.
The family will receive friends
from. 9 a.m. till funeral time
Monday at Maddox Chapel.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Oq(iCtOfl C ~c~ii~ \jlirc

Ie- -2 11ilcof"-r


Two magical weekends
S Alahua County Fairgrounds, Gainesville, FL
ILCheer battling knights, birds of prey and human chess games.
6 Visit the marketplace where artisans sell theirwares.;
4-i Performances by magicians, musicians and sisters.


OB/ YN

DAINAGREENE MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH


rAD


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON ENACTMENT
OF ORDINANCE BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE

CITY OFLAKE CITY, FLORIDA

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ordinance, which title hereinafter
appears, will be considered for enactment on second and final reading by the
City Council of the City of Lake City, Florida, at public hearing on February 7,
2011, at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matters can be heard in the
City Council Meeting Room, City Hall located at 205 North Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055. Copy of said ordinance may be inspected by any
member of the public at the Office of the City Clerk, City Hall, located at
205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida'32055, during regular business
hours. On the date, time and place first above mentioned, all interested
persons may appear and be heard with respect to the ordinance.

CITY COUNCIL ORDINANCE NO. 2011-2006

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA,
AMENDING AND RESTATING SECTION 102-161 THROUGH SECTION
102-169 OF ARTICLE V, CHAPTER 102 OF THE CODE OF THE CITY OF
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, RELATING TO RATES AND CHARGES FOR
NATURAL GAS; PROVIDING FOR APPLICATION FOR GAS SERVICE
AND METER DEPOSIT; PROVIDING FOR MONTHLY GAS RATES
FOR RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL CUSTOMERS; PROVIDING
FOR PERIODIC ADJUSTMENT IN GAS RATES; PROVIDING FOR
SEASONAL DISCONNECT AND RECONNECT CHARGES; PROVIDING
FOR COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL RATES; PROVIDING FOR
PENALTIES FOR DELINQUENCY; PROVIDING FOR ADDITIONAL
CHARGES TO REREAD AND TEST METERS; PROVIDING FOR
SERVICE CHARGES; PROVIDING FOR INCENTIVE PROGRAMS;
PROVIDING FOR ALLOCATIONS TO THE. GENERAL FUND;
PROVIDING FOR THE REPEAL OF ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT WITH
ANY OF THE PROVISIONS OF THIS ORDINANCE; PROVIDING FOR
A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; PROVIDING FOR THE INCLUSION OF
THIS ORDINANCE IN THE CITY CODE; AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.

The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates.
Any interested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any
continuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the public
hearing and that no further notice concerning the matter will be published.

All persons are advised that, if they decide to appeal any decision made
at the public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings.and, for such
purpose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding
is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based. In accordance with fhe Americans With Disabilities
Act, if any accommodations are needed for persons with disabilities, please
contact Joyce Bruner, Office of City Manager, 1-386-719-5768.

AUDREY E.SIKES
City Clerk

Notice Published On: January 23, 2011


~ ..i


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427











LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JANUARY 23. 2011


THE WEATHER



SUNNY I PARTLY CHANCE
S CLOUDY, I OF
SSHOWERS

S HI 571.0 i H HI 63LO HI 611
aI.^ 2.1Ijy 'w.rao -.mv *-


adosta
56/27


Pensaola
57/44


* Jacksonville


Tallaassee Lake City 54/32
56/27 57/29
Gainesville Daytona Beach
Panama City 57/30 59439
54/36 Ocala


8/32 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
62/42 61/44 Miami
Tampa Naples
60/43 West Palm Beach Ocala
65/52 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 68/54 0 Pensacola
65/45 Naples Tallahassee
63/46 Miami Tampa
68/55 Valdosta
Key Wes*t W. Palm Beach


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


54
41
66
42
84 in 1937
17 in 1985


0.00"
1.84"
1.84"
'2.43"
2.43"


65/59b


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset torm.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:26 a.m.
5:59 p.m.'
7:25 a.m.
6:00 p.m.


10:32 p.m.
9:45 a.m.
11:37 p.m.
10:22 a.m.


Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb.
26 2 11 18
Last New First Full


MOSTLY
SUNNY



HI L


PARTLY
CLOUDY


I"~


H


Monday
69/55/pc
68/51/pc
72/59/s
71/51/s
64/42/pc
62/45/pc
70/65/pc
63/41/pc
73/58/s
68/55/s
65/44/pc
71/52/s
57/45/pc
60/47/sh
60/42/pc
66/49/s
64/40/sh
71/59/s


5
MOODREE
S30 mutes tobl
.5 T .l ., _-


Irr re ,ar. orn
.a ,.-alE rr.,.rn 1.1 .1





S Forecasts, dat
I-cs @ 2011We
LLC, Madison,
www.weatherp


NATIONAL FORECAST: Scattered rain and snow showers will be likely over eastern portions
of the Plains today as the result of a low pressure system moving through the area. Lake
effect snow showers will be possible throughout the Great Lakes, with some light snow show-
ers extending into the far- Northeast.



M .. -- '"


I-1 LU jf

I /

F 50s
Salt
FrmncsMo
Tuesday 63'47
72/54/sh
71/49/sh LO 6
75/54/pc e'i
75/50/sh --
63/39/sh
61/39/sh
73/62/t
61/36/sh
75/53/pc
72/52/pc
65/40/sh
73/50/sh
58/32/sh -
58/40/r
61/27/sh YESTERDAY
68/50/sh
58/30/sh
75/51/pc C
CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
-" Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham.
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
SCharleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
asyhrrrrnt I Dallas
-... -". Daytona Beach
Denver


a and graph-
eather Central
Wis.
Dubllsher.com


rSorms







Cold Front

Warm Front


1.6r


S NATIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
20/2/0
50/23/0
25/23/.06
43/25/0
25/12/0
41/30/0
44/24/0
8/-5/0
37/27/0
24/17/0
16/7/.03
47/34/0
27/9/0
38/25/0
39/24/0
17/7/.01
23/-4/0
16/-1/0
44/30/0
60/25/0
57/48/0
47/24/0


Hi/Lo/W
15/-10/sf
47/21/pc
18/17/sn
49/32/pc
29/13/s
38/22/pc
51/35/pc
30/19/c
41/28/s
19/0/pc
9/-4/sf
52/34/pc
26/17/pc
47/27/pc
36/23/s
18/11/pc
23/13/c
16/0/s
51/27/pc
52/29/c
59/39/s
45/21/s


High: 750, Palm Springs, Calif. Low: -350,Wasklsh, Minn.


Saturday Today


CITY
Des Molnes
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


HI/Lo/Pcp.
21/12/0
15/5/0
65/32/0
-11/-15/.04
34/23/0
22/3/0
80/67/0
60/30/0
22/2/0
49/27/0
53/43/0
34/14/0
63/43/0
49/25/0
67/50/0
42/26/0
70/64/0
6/0/0
50/25/0
51/32/0
24/13/0
57/20/0


HI/Lo/W
16/10/sn
16/7/pc
54/25/pc
-15/-25/pc
42/25/pc
18/-7/s
81/67/s
64/39/c
21/14/pc
58/38/pc
54/32/s
21/14/sn
60/41/s
48/32/sh
71/51/s
45/35/sh
68/55/s
10/9/pc
59/43/s
59/45/pc
25/7/s
39/21/pc


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis .
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
27/10/0
60/52/0
22/14/0
68/44/0
18/-1/0
23/6/0
48/41/0
32/23/0
34/20/.12
54/35/0
27/20/0
62/38/0
33/14/0
43/33/.02
63/28/0
64/51/0
58/44/0
47/40/0
42/26/0
57/51/0
70/39/0
27/17/0


HI/Lo/W
16/6/sn
62/42/s
26/11/s.
69/42/s
17/3/s
17/-5/sf
47/35/pc
43/23/pc
39/23/pc
54/23/s
36/18/s
61/40/s
25/20/sn
41/26/s
60/35/pc.
74/49/s
61/45/s
48/42/sh
36/30/pc
60/43/s.
67/35/po
30/18/s


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CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
SAthans
Auckland
Beljing
Berlin
Buenos Alres
Cairo
Geneva.
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston,


AI A
bum,.


Saturday
HI. Lo. Pcp.
i 6.1 ",


6!4 I ii
34/27/0
S90/63/0
68/48/0
3b/28/0,
77/63/0
25/16/.10
57/50/0
81/i; I :1


Today
HI Lo W
J.* 3j, o,:
6i JJ r..
61. 9.,"
30/12/s
35/26/sf
86/71/s
69/55/s
35/17/s.
73/55/pc
2 .- ,/
66/52/s
"f ~, 3 [.:


KEYTO CONDMTIOINS: r-'cioudv .,1. I.,,i r g. s rs..,... .:'. .,jiIj. jI..I], r-rain, s-sunny,
__ lt ir .~ ',,3L~PLa flde4'',lrrlT: ''tr'd1


OUR LOWEST




RATE EVER!


thra










da


Jan. 27th


thru Jan. 29th


Cars, Boats, Bikes a


Home Equity Loans...


even Mortgages


yP Apply Today! r
Stop by any of our Service Centers, call
754-9088 :- press 4 or ;*'.. r-.!:'re at campuscu.com!


CAMPUS


USA
[ (. i (?(rl i union


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


CITY
La Paz
Uma
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
Hi. Lo Pcp.
s59 4 u
4J5 3] 0
45/25/0
-75/43/0,
9/-2/0
18/10/.30
79/57/0
7'9 73 :1
59/59/0
23/10/0
86/73/0
41/32/0


Today
HI. Lo, W
92 33r
', c. t"
46. :; .:
37/21/s
73/42/s
-2/-13/s
17/4/c
82/61/s
72/63/pc
68/48/c
32/13/c
87/73/pc
I :3. e.


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI Lo Pcp.


84/69/0
90/57/0
30/16/0
88/75/0
84/70/0
68/48/0
50/37/0
16/5/0
32/28/0
30/27/0


Today I
HI Lo W
91 ,5 l
J2 :1 ,
-2 .3 ir,
83/72/sh
S86/57/s
32/12/sf
86/75/c
80/67/pc
69/49/s
48/37/pc
3/-6/s
33/28/s
33/21/sf


- ---- --- -- ---- M


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~


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Ely;~K ..


i


i


1.1 .:










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby9Iokeotyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday. january 23 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Dugout Club
pot luck Monday
The Fort White High
Dugout Club has a
parents meeting and pot
luck supper planned for
6:30-8:30 p.m. Monday in
the high school
cafeteria. All players are
encouraged to attend and
their families are asked
to bring a covered dish
to share for the meal. A
Moe's Night fundraiser
is 5-8 p.m. Thursday at
Moe's Southwest Grill in
Lake City.
For details, call coach
Chad Bonds at 590-7362.
FLAG FOOTBALL
Adult 7-on-7
registration set
The Lake City
Recreation Department
is accepting registration
for its Adult 7-on-7 Flag
Football League. Entry
fee of $585 per team
includes FRPA
registration, trophies,
officials, scorekeepers
and clock operators for
a minimum of 10 games
at Memorial Stadium.
Roster forms may be
picked up at the Teen
Town Center. Deadline
for rosters and entry
fee is Friday. A coaches
meeting/rules clinic is
6:30 p.m. Thursday at
Teen Town.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
YOUTH SOFTBALL
Sliders 14U
tryouts today
North Florida Sliders
14-under softball has
tryouts for a spring and
summer competitive
team at 4 p.m. today at
Columbia High.
For details, call Mitch
Shoup at 288-5170.
ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays.
Cost is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
623-4817.
* From staff reports

GAMES


Monday
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Branford
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Tuesday
Columbia High
boys soccer vs. Wolfson
High in District 4-5A
tournament at Ridgeview
High, 5 p.m.
Fort White High
boys soccer vs. Santa
Fe High in District 5-3A
tournament at Newberry
High, 5 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Trenton
High, 6 p.m.
Columbia High boys
basketball at Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Friday
Fort White High boys
basketball at Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High,
Fort White High girls
weightlifting in District
4 qualifying meet at
Belleview High, 8 a.m.
Columbia High
wrestling at Buchholz
High, TBA


CYSA honors founding fathers


Crane, Famell
were pioneers
of area soccer.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia Youth Soccer
Association paid tribute to
two of its founding fathers
on Saturday.
Steve Crane and Mason
Farnell are pioneers of
youth soccer in Columbia
County and each had a
CYSA field named in his
honor.
Play was stopped for the
presentation, and hundreds
of players, parents and fam-
ily members gathered.
"Twenty-five years


ago some individuals in
Columbia County decided
we needed a soccer pro-
gram and we are here
today to honor two who
helped make this success-
ful," CYSA secretary T.D.
Jenkins told the gathering.
"We are so proud of these
two individuals and the
board wanted to do some-
thing special for them."
CYSA president Scott
Everett led the crowd to
the area of the dedication
markers, where Crane and
Farnell unveiled them.
County Commissioner
Scarlet Frisina, whose
District, 5 contains the
CYSA complex, joined in
CYSA continued on 3B


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia Youth Soccer Association dedicated playing fields to founding fathers Steve Crane
and Mason Farnell in a ceremony on Saturday. Joining in the dedication were CYSA
president Scott Everett (from left), Crane, Commissioner Scarlet Frisina, Farnell and CYSA
secretary T.D. Jenkins.


football


family


Fort White High's major award winners at the banquet are: Donnell Sanders, Most Versatile (from left); JR Dixon, Most Valuable Player;
coach Demetric Jackson; Andrew Baker, Most Outstanding Offensive Player and Trey Phillips, Most Outstanding Defensive Player


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White head


Fort White celebrates season at awards banquet


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
FORT WHITE A Fort
White High football team
that came together for a suc-
cessful season celebrated
that success with an awards
banquet at the school on
Saturday.
Shayne Morgan, the
Voice of the Indians, served
as master of ceremonies,
and head coach Demetric
Jackson summed up a sea-
son that included a trip to
the playoffs.
"I am extremely proud
of the season we had,"


Jackson said. "We talked
about being a family and
the players bought into
doing their part. The
seniors led by example; I
couldn't have asked for a
better group. I want to thank
the players for buying in
and thank you parents for
allowing us to coach your
sons."
Players and coaches were
introduced and Jackson
gave a shout-out and
report on Athletic Director
John Wilson, who is
undergoing treatment for
cancer.
"Coach Wilson is doing


fine," Jackson said. "He
is midway through his
therapy sessions. I talked
with him and he said he
loves you guys and thanks
the community for all the
support and prayers."
Award winners were:
JR Dixon, Most Valuable
Player and 2010 Captain;
Andrew Baker, Most
Outstanding Offensive
Player and Academic
Award; Trey Phillips, Most
Outstanding Defensive
Player; Donnell Sanders,
Most Versatile; Dylan
Newman, Indian Award and
2010 Captain; Wesley Pitts,


Florida State defeats


Boston College, 67-51


Seminoles share
league lead with
Duke at 5-1.
By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Derwin Kitchen's 16 points
led a balanced Florida
State scoring attack as the
Seminoles blew open a close
game in the second half and
defeated Boston College 67-
51 Saturday night.
Four players finished


in double figures for the
Seminoles (15-5, 5-1
Atlantic Coast Conference),
who share the league lead
with fourth-ranked Duke
(18-1, 5-1).
Joe Trapani's 19 points
and 12 rebounds led Boston
College (14-6, 4-2), which
was held to its lowest scor-
ing total of the season. The
Eagles came into the con-
test averaging 75.5 points
a game.
BC's Reggie Jackson,
the ACC's second leading
scorer, was scoreless until


the final second of the half
when he sank three free
throws after being fouled
on a 3-point attempt. The
free throws pulled the
Eagles to within 29-27 at the
break. He finished with 13
points.
Michael Snaer scored
13 points, Bernard James
12 and freshman Okaro
White added 11 off the
bench for Florida State.
James and Kitchen led
the Seminoles to a 36-22
rebounding advantage with
seven apiece.


Comeback Award; Zach
Cormier, Warrior Award;
Darius Pollard, Coach's
Award; Zack Bentley,
Coach's Award; Colton
Jones, Special Team Award;
Soron Williams, Special
Team Award; Kurtis Norris,
Most Improved IYefensive
Player; Kyle Leland,
Most Improved Offensive
Player; Josh Faulkner,
Best Linebacker; Adonis
Simmons, Best Defensive
Lineman; A.J. Legree, Best
Receiver; Xavier Wyche,
Best Defensive Back;
Jonathan Dupree, Best
Offensive Lineman; Alexis


Blake, 2010 Captain; Kevin
Poteat, 2010 Captain; Kellen
Snider, Academic Award;
Wes Osterhoudt, Fort
White Quarterback Club
Spirit Award.
Junior varsity award
winners were: Melton
Sanders, Best Offensive
Player; Chris Waites, Best
Defensive Player; Caleb
Bundy, Indian Award and
Academic Award; Shayne
SNewman, Coach's Award;
A.J. Kluess, Coach's Award
and Academic Award;
Joseph Chatman, Warrior
Award; Robert Bias, Iron
Man Award.


Gators cruise to

victory against

,SEC foe Arkansas


Florida blows
out Hawgs at
home, 75-43.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE -
Kenny Boynton scored 20
points, Vernon Macklin
added 13 and Florida rolled
Arkansas, 75-43, Saturday
night for the team's sev-
enth win in eight games.
The Gators dominated


from the opening tip, scor-
ing at will in the paint while
building a double-digit lead
and never letting up.
Alex Tyus chipped in 13
points and seven rebounds
for Florida, and Chandler
Parsons added a career-
high 15 boards.
The Gators (15-4, 4-1
Southeastern Conference)
followed their best open-
ing half of the season
with an equally impres-
sive performance after the
break.


III I - I -1 - -


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 23. 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
EXTREME SPORTS
4 p.m.
NBC Winter Dew Tour, at
Killington,Vt (same-day tape)
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Abu
Dhabi Championship, final round, at Abu
Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (same-day
tape)
4 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Bob Hope Classic,
final round, at La Quinta, Calif.
7:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Mitsubishi
Electric Championship, final round, at
Ka'upulehu-Kona, Hawaii
NFL FOOTBALL
3 p.m.
FOX Playoffs, NFC Championship
Game, Green Bay at Chicago
6:30 p.m.
CBS Playoffs, AFC Championship
Game, N.YJets at Pittsburgh
NHL HOCKEY
12:30 p.m.
NBC Philadelphia at Chicago
TENNIS
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, round of
16, at Melbourne, Australia
3:30 am.
ESPN2 Australian Open, round of
16, at Melbourne,Australia
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
I p.m.
FSN Oklahoma at Kansas
3 p.m.
FSN Oregon St at Oregon
5 p.m.
ESPN2 North Carolina at
Maryland
FSN Duke at N.C. State

Monday
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Notre Dame at Pittsburgh
9 p.m.
ESPN Baylor at Kansas St.
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS N.Y. Rangers at
Washington
TENNIS
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open,
quarterfinals, at Melbourne,Australia
3:30 am.
ESPN2 Australian Open,
quarterfinals, at MelbourneAustralia
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Iowa at Ohio St.

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

Wild Card
Seattle 41, New Orleans 36
N.Y.Jets 17, Indianapolis 16
Baltimore 30, Kansas City 7
Green Bay 21, Philadelphia 16
Divisional Playoffs
Pittsburgh 31, Baltimore 24
Green Bay 48,Atlanta 21
Chicago 35, Seattle 24
N.Y.Jets 28, New England 21
Conference Championships
Today
Green Bay at Chicago, 3 p.m. (FOX)
N.Y.ets at Pittsburgh, 6:30 p.m. (CBS)
Super Bowl


Sunday, Feb. 6
At Arlington,Texas
AFC champion vs. NFC champion,
6:30 p.m. (FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 30
At Honolulu
AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m.(FOX)

College all-star games

Saturday, Jan. 29
At Mobile,Ala.
Senior Bowl, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Saturday, Feb. 5
At San Antonio
Texas vs. The Nation All-Star'
Challenge, 2 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 33 9 .786 -
NewYork 22 20 .524 II
Philadelphia 17 25 .405 16
Toronto 13 30 .302 20'h
New Jersey 12 31 .279 21'A
Southeast Division
W L Pet GB
Miami 30 13 .698 -
Orlando 28 15 .651 2
Atlanta 28 16 .636 21
Charlotte 17 24 .415 12
Washington 12 29 .293 17
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 19 14 .674 -
Indiana 16 23 .410 II
Milwaukee 16 24 .400 I11'
Detroit 15 28 .349 14
Cleveland 8 34 .190 20'h
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 37 6 .860 -
Dallas 27 15 .643 9h
New Orleans 28 16 .636 9h
Memphis 20 23 .465 17
Houston 20 24 .455 17'A
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 27 15 .643 -


Utah 27 16
Denver 24 18
Portland 24 20
Minnesota 10 33
Pacific Division
W L
L.A. Lakers 32 13
Phoenix 20 21


.628 a
.571 3
.545 4
.233 17h

Pct GB
.711 -
.488 10


Golden State 19 23 .452 I11
L.A. Clippers 16 26 .381 14'/
Sacramento 9 32 .220 21
Saturday's Games
Atlanta 103, Charlotte 87
Dallas 87, New Jersey 86
Washington 85, Boston 83
Detroit 75, Phoenix 74
Miami 120,Toronto 103
Philadelphia 96, Utah 85
Cleveland at Chicago (n)
San Antonio at New Orleans (n)
NewYork at Oklahoma City (n)
Orlando at Houstn (n)
Memphis at Milwaukee (n)
Indiana at Portland (n)
Golden State at LA. Clippers (n)
Today's Game
Indiana at Denver, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cleveland at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Washington at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at New Orleans,


8 p.m.
Sacramento at Portland, 10 p.m.
San Antonio at Golden State,
10:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 18 Wisconsin at Northwestern,
I p.m.
No. 21 West Virginia vs. South
Florida, 2 p.m.

TENNIS

Australian Open singles

At Melbourne Park
Melbourne,Australia
Saturday
Men
Third Round
Robin Soderling (4), Sweden, def. Jar
Hernych, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-1, 6-4.
Milos Raonic, Canada, def. Mikhail
Youzhny (10), Russia, 6-4,7-5,4-6, 6-4.
David Ferrer (7), Spain, def. Richard
Berankis, Lithuania, 6-2, 6-2, 6-1.
Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, def.
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (13), France, 3-6, 6-3,
3-6,6-1,6-1.
Andy Murray (5), Britain, def. Guillermo
Garcia-Lopez (32), Spain, 6-1,6-1, 6-2.
Marin Cilic (15), Croatia, def. John
Isner (20), United States, 4-6, 6-2, 6-7 (5),
7-6 (2), 9-7.
Jurgen Melzer (I ),Austria, def. Marcos
Baghdatis (21), ,Cyprus, 6-7 (5), 6-2, 6-1,
4-3, retired.
Rafael Nadal (I), Spain, def. Bernard
Tomic.Australia, 6-2,7-5, 6-3.
Women
Third Round
Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, def. Lucie
Safarova (31), Czech Republic, 6-3, 7-6
(9).
Agnieszka Radwanska (12), Poland, def.
Simona Halep, Romania, 6-1, 6-2.
Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, def.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (16), Russia,
6-3, 1-6,7-5.
Peng Shuai, China, def. Ayumi Morita,
Japan, 6-1, 3-6,6-3.
Kim Clijsters (3), Belgium, def. Alize
Cornet, France,'7-6 (3), 6-3.
Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, def. Nadia
Petrova (13), Russia, 6-2, 3-6, 8-6.
Flavia Pennetta (22), Italy, def. Shahar
Peer (10), Israel, 3-6, 7-6 (3), 6-4.
Petra Kvitova (25), Czech Republic,
def. Sam Stosur (5),Australia, 7-6 (5), 6-3.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Saturday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 3,Atlanta 2, SO
New Jersey 3, Philadelphia I
Chicago 4, Detroit I
Boston 6, Colorado 2
Washington 4,Toronto I
Pittsburgh 3, Carolina 2
Anaheim at Montreal (n)
N.Y. Rangers at Atlanta (n)
Columbus at St. Louis (n)
Los Angeles at Phoenix (n)
Calgary atVancouver (n)
Minnesota at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Chicago; 12:30 p.m.
Florida at New Jersey, 3 p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Islanders, 3 p.m.
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 5 p.m.
Nashville at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Toronto at Carolina, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers atWashington, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.
Dallas atVancouver, 10 p.m.


Preseason testing brings


buzz back to NASCAR


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH -
There's a buzz at Daytona
International Speedway,
and it's more than the cars
humming around the track.
A three-day testing
session that concluded
Saturday brought fans to
the storied speedway a full
month before season-open-
ing Daytona 500 on Feb. 20.
They were treated to auto-
graph sessions, question-
and-answer forums, and, of
course, practice laps, from
every driver in attendance.
For new track president
Joie Chitwood, it was the
perfect kickoff for what he
hopes is a frantic month
of ticket sales leading into
NASCAR's biggest race of
the season.
"We want testing all
the time because it's the
best promotional opportu-
nity any track could have,"
Chitwood said Saturday.
"Believe me, Ill be asking
for it every year."
Chitwood shouldn't hold
his breath.
NASCAR banned testing
after the 2008 season at any
sanctioned track as a cost-
cutting measure for the
race teams. Because the
powerhouse organizations
were outspending the little
teams by millions of dol-
lars on testing programs,
NASCAR figured a quick


way to even out that finan-
cial disparity was to put the
brakes on testing.
The unintended conse-
quence, though, was the
lack of action the last two
offseasons. The four tradi-
tional professional sports
leagues all have train-
ing camps and preseason
competition to build some
excitement leading into the
'start of their seasons.
NASCAR missed that
the last two years with no
Daytona testing. And this
week's session was only
held because the track was
repaved for the first time
since 1979 after a pothole
marred last year's Daytona
500.
NASCAR had to let tire
supplier Goodyear test -
that session drew 17 driv-
ers in December then
opened the speedway this
week for all teams to get
a chance to turn laps on
the new surface before they
report next month for the
Daytona 500.
NASCAR vice presi-
dent of competition Robin
Pemberton shook his head
no when asked if testing
could be reinstated, and
said this week's session was
held only to prepare for the
new track surface.
Regardless of the reason,
having cars on the track
after NASCAR's abbrevi-
ated two-month offseason
has reignited fan interest


at a time when the sport
is fighting to stop a slide
in attendance and televi-
sion ratings. The week was.
marked by healthy debate
over NASCAR's consider-
ation of a new points sys-
tem, as both competitors
and fans wait for chairman
Brian France's announce-
ment Wednesday on chang-
es to the scoring and cham-
pionship formats.
And since drivers have
been on the new track sur-
face, they've gotten a good
sense of what the racing
will be like next month.
"It's going to be an excit-
ing Daytona 500 for sure,"
said three-time Daytona
500 winner Jeff Gordon.
"The drafting (is) a lot
more like what you have in
Talladega, but yet with the
uniqueness that Daytona
still brings to it I think it's
going to be very exciting,
a lot of grip, a lot of three-
wide racing."
Agendas have differed
over the three days, as
teams worked on specific
items.
Few had any interest in
participating in drafting ses-
sions, and the occasional
two-car hookup punctuated
all of Friday and Saturday's
first session. Kevin
Harvick said Richard
Childress Racing didn't
think drafting was worth
the risk of wrecking a race
car.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chicago Bears head coach Lovie Smith (center) watches his team during an NFL Football
practice at Halas Hall, Friday, in Lake Forest, Ill. The Bears are scheduled to host the Green
Bay Packers in the NFC Championship game on Sunday.


Final Four chase



Super Bowl history


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

PITTSBURGH Next
step, the Super Bowl.
The NFL's final four
has a strong connection
to the big game, from the
first champion (Packers)
to the winner of perhaps
the most significant game
(Jets). And from possibly
the best Super Bowl team
(1985 Bears) to the most
dominant franchise of the
era (Steelers).
Any matchup in Dallas
next month will feature
plenty of history.
So much so that Green
Bay coach Mike McCarthy
has emphasized wanting to
put up a photo of these
Packers on the wall next
to the other championship
teams including the first
two Super Bowl winners
(1966 and'67 seasons), and
the 1996 squad.
"We've never lost sight
of it because it's always
right behind me every
day when- I speak to the
team," McCarthy said of his
Packers, who face 90-year
rival Chicago at Soldier
Field on Sunday for the NFC
title. "I pointed to that again


ACROSS

1 Isinglass
5 Egyptian boy-
king
8 Invite
11 Objective
12 Shrink's reply
(2 wds.)
14 Heat unit
15 Cows and
sheep
17 Feminine pro-
noun
18 Very serious
19 Bounced back
21 Some CDs
23 Over-50 org.
24 Mural
undercoat
27 WNBA broad-
caster
29 Banjo kin
30 Come before
34 Old-fashioned
chest (2 wds.)
37 Narrow inlet
38 Pakistan's lan-
guage


... we're halfway there. We
talked about 16 quarters as
a football team. We've com-
pleted eight of them. And
we need to capture these
four in Chicago, and it puts
us closer to getting that pic-
ture' on the wall.
"It's a goal that's still in
front ofus and it was a goal
when we started and it's
still a goal today."
That the Packers
(12-6) face the Bears (12-5)
for the 182nd timed with
a spot in the Super Bowl
on the line adds another
historic chapter to the lon-
gest series in pro football.
Should the Bears win, they
would earn their third trip
to the big game, one fewer
than Green Bay, which is
3-1 in Super Bowls. Chicago
is 1-1, having lost to the
2006 Colts.
No one is comparing
these Bears to the '85 ver-
sion that shtiffled its way
through and over nearly
everyone, then pummeled
the Patriots 46-10 for
the crown. That team is
considered by many the
best of all the 44 Super
Bowl winners.
Should Chicago even
approach that level Sunday,


39 Sleeve part
41 Towel off
43 Marquette's
title
45 Lifts, as morale
47 "Platoon" actor
50 Long time
51 Choppers'
pads
54 Flower adorn-
ment
55 What the suspi-
cious smell (2
wds.)
56 Be a parent
57 Rainbow shape
58 Hard wood
59 Sphagnum

DOWN

1 Dept. head
2 Promises to
pay
3 Hunter's garb
4 Excuses
5 Jeweled coro-
net
6 Mil. branch


it probably will be packing
for Big D.
"I think everyone in the
locker room knows the
magnitude of this game,
knows what we're going
up against," quarterback
Jay Cutler said, "but at the
same time we're going to
enjoy it, we're going to be
loose, we're going to play
our game. And we can't
worry about what is going
to happen afterward if we
win, we lose, we just have to
go out there and play.
"It's a huge game for
Chicago and Green Bay.
Just the number of times
we've played each other,
how familiar the two cities
and the two teams are with
each other, it's almost like a
little mini-Super Bowl. But I
know Chicago will be really
disappointed if we don't win
this game."
The Steelers have
only a 7-7 record in AFC
title games. But they are
6-1 in Super Bowls, one
more championship than
San Francisco and Dallas
own. The Steel Curtain
carried them to four NFL
crowns in the 1970s, and
the 2005 and 2008 Steelers
won it all.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

D UIBIS BIRIO TH
CURLER SI ERRA
DEDUCE ECLAIR
TIEC ILIA I P


DNA TAT DAYS
RADI A LPETI T
P-A As
ASTI BIL EMS


USO ERS AHOY
KETTLE PHI EVE
EATS IN SULLEN

SLOPS EISPN


Pierre's noggin
More than dis-
like
Precipitous
Mountain-
dweller of Iraq


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


13 Slip away
16 "Quo Vadis?"
role
20 Hired laborer
22 Parody (hyph.)
24 Clean a fish
25 Make ends
meet
26 Continent
divider
28 Sow's pen
30 Explain further
31 Onassis nick-
name
32 Poet's con-
traction
33 Wolf, say
35 Mugs
36 Motown's
Franklin
39 Fur stole
40 Make over
41 Suitor
42 Column order
44 Bunker or Piaf
45 Composer
Bartok
46 ER supply
48 Hydrox rival
49 LAX guess-
es
52 Refrain sylla-
bles
53 Almost-grads


1-24 2011 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY JANUARY 23, 2011


' CYSA: Fields dedicated in Crane, Farnell's honor


Continued From Page 11
the celebration.
"Some adults were kick-
ing a ball around at the
Boys' Club and we got it
in our heads we ought to
start a youth program,"
said Crane, who served as
the first CYSA president in
1986. "We put some articles
in the paper and people
were interested and put it
together."
Crane, who played soc-
cer in high school and in
the Air Force, met with
Julian Collins to establish
CYSA as a non-profit cor-
poration, and elicited sup-
port from the state soccer
association.
Farnell stumbled across
soccer as a student at
the University of South


Florida, and played club
ball in Tampa.
"When I came to Lake
City in 1969, I started soc-
cer in the RE. program at
Eastside," Farnell said.
"The kids loved it; it was
all they wanted to play."
Farnell said Father
Kelly of Epiphany Catholic
School saw the Eastside stu-
dents playing one day and
the two arranged matches
between the schools.
"It took people mov-
ing in and wanting to see
something else besides
football," Farnell said. "It
was a long process and I
was glad to be along for the
ride. There are so many
people Steve and I could
mention that made this


thing go."
Crane said all the
businesses that were
approached supported the
venture and there were 16
teams with 200 kids partici-
pating the first year.
"We had in the bylaws
that every child had to play
at least 50 percent of the
game," Crane said. "I think
the parents loved to see
the kids out there running
around."
From the CYSA begin-
nings evolved travel teams
and eventually soccer at
Columbia High and Lake
City Middle School. Crane
coached the Tigers for a
couple of years and Farnell
was a long-time coach for
boys and girls at the mid-


dle school level.
"We had to have coaches,
money, referees and some-
where to play and most
of those duties the early
founders took on them-
selves," Jenkins said. "Now
there are more than 1,000
players in CYSA."
Jenkins noted that in hon-
oring Crane and Farnell,
the board also decided
there would be no other
field dedications for at least
five years.
"I am grateful they
remember how it got
started," Crane said.
"It has developed into a
great program with people
dedicated to it over the
years. It makes me happy
to see it."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Illinois' Jereme Richrnond (22) shoots as Ohio State's David
Lighty (23) defends during an NCAA college basketball game
at Assembly Hall in Champaign, III. on Saturday.


Buckeyes survive

Illini scare, 73-68


Associated Press

CHAMPAIGN, Ill.
- Jared Sullinger had 27
points and 16 rebounds,
and top-ranked Ohio State
scored 14 straight points
in the second half to rally
past No. 23 Illinois 73-68 on
Saturday.
Aaron Craft made two
free throws with 15 seconds
left and Jon Diebler forced
an Illinois turnover with 4
seconds on the clock to help
the unbeaten Buckeyes (20-
0, 7-0 Big Ten) hold on.
The Buckeyes trailed by
eight with 12:51 left before
going on a 14-0 surge.
Tisdale's 3-pointer brought
Illinois within 69-68 with 16
seconds left, but Craft's free
throws and Diebler's strip
preserved the win.

No. 10 Texas 74,
No. 2 Kansas 63
LAWRENCE, Kan.
- J'Covan Brown scored
23 points and keyed a sec-


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SEMYS


DOLIBY



ULSSET



Answer:

I Jumbles: AXIOM


ond-half Texas surge that
erased a 15-point deficit and
snapped Kansas' 69-game
home winning streak.
Kansas scored the game's
first 10 points and led by
as many as 15. But Texas
(16-3, 4-0 Big 12) outscored
the Jayhawks 36-13 while
turning a 12-point halftime
deficit into a 59-48 lead on a
3-pointer by Cory Joseph.
The Jayhawks (18-1, 3-1)
had not lost at home since
Feb. 3, 2007.

No. 7 Villanova 83,
No. 3 Syracuse 72
SYRACUSE, N.Y. -
Maalik Wayns scored 17 of
his 21 points in the first half
as Villanova took a big lead
and then held on to beat
Syracuse in front of .a rau-
cous Carrier Dome crowd.
Kris Joseph, who missed
the Pitt game with a
head injury, finished with
23 points. Rick Jackson
had 16 points and 15
rebounds.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

I He knows how to tell a story


A JOKE WILL
GET THE MOST
LAUGHS WHEN.
THE ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

IT
(Answers tomorrow)
DOGMA UNSAID HELMET


aLUlUdIy s I Answer: What they ended up with at the greyhound
races "HOT" DOGS


-----------------------------1


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A T O N S G O H W
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L A N. 'P O E Z S D
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A Z Y E 1 O0 O R Y
E I S T S W K D R
P D N O I T N O I
M T U S E R C G C
ID H W X E K I E H
F Q R P Y T J C A
E I E G M E I X R
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ENTRY FORM

Name:_
i fAMOUS Phone Number: ___

/(i>-. LJANUARY Address: __.._

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER NFL SUNDAY. JANUARY 23, 2011


Smarts, not schemes, are what make Rex so sexy

By JIM LITKE Along the way he made If it was up to me." Ran
Associated Press them pick up dirty laundry said, "they'd i probab


Rex Ryan is a better talk-
er than any of his peers
- glib, self-assured and
sly as a fox and that's
just his R-rated material. If
games were decided in the
interview room instead of
on a field, you could hand
the Super Bowl trophy to
the Jets right now.
Guys who play for him
swear he's even funnier
when the cameras are off,
more profane and a whole
lot more persuasive. But
Rex wasn't always so sexy.
"Pffff!" Buddy Ryan
practically snorted into the
phone the other day. "You
never saw the two of them
when they were kids."
The retired head of the
more-famous-by-the-day
family still chuckles remem-
bering Rex, older by five
minutes, and twin brother,
Rob, taking in the scenery
during his own wild-and-
woolly coaching odyssey
across the college and NFL
ranks.
If nothing else, Buddy
was determined to provide
an unvarnished picture.


oIf locKer room foors, worK
the sidelines as ballboys
and sit in the back of his
office through hundreds of
film sessions and meetings.
Instead of being bored, they
studied the schemes, got
hooked on the camaraderie
and learned how to curse
up a storm.
"I made sure they put in
the time to learn the ABCs
everywhere they went with
me," Ryan recalled. "All
the other kids there were
always playing grab-ass or
just fooling around. Not
Rex and Rob. They were
paying attention."
A month shy of his 77th
birthday, his own reputation
as one of the game's best
defensive coaches already
secure, Buddy still feigns
surprise that his sons fol-
lowed him into the busi-
ness (Rob Ryan is defen-
sive coordinator for the
Dallas Cowboys). He was
head coach of the Eagles in
the late 1980s, when both
were finishing up college
and offered spots in a food
industry management-train-
ing program.


be going to scluool.
When he got outvoted,
Buddy piled Rex and Rob
into his car and drove to
a motel not far from his
family home in Oklahoma.
He spent the next two days
teaching them everything
he knew, especially about
the "46" scheme he per-
fected with the 1985 Super
Bowl champion Chicago
Bears. Then Buddy wished
them good luck and told
them to call once they
found work.
Every coach who makes
his way onto an NFL staff
knows how to draw up a
scheme. But real schemers
- the ones clever or cal-
culating enough to sell the
blueprint to their players
week in and week out are
rare. It didn't take long for
Highlands University coach
George Martinez, who gave
Rex Ryan one of his first
jobs and later became an
NFL assistant himself, to
figure out which one he had
on his hands.
"He didn't have to inter-
view 10 minutes and I knew
he was the guy," Martinez


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 19 file photo, New York Jets coach Rex Ryan (right) greets Pittsburgh Steelers
coach Mike Tomlin after the Jets 22-17 win in an NFL football game in Pittsburgh. The
Steelers are scheduled to host the Jets in the AFC Championship game today.


told ESPN.com recently. "I
knew when I hired him that
this guy is big-time stuff."
Martinez turned out to
be right.
A half-dozen jobs and


some 20 years later, Ryan
is back at the NFL's version
of the final four alongside
rivals Pittsburgh's Mike
Tomlin, Chicago's Lovie
Smith and Green Bay's


Mike McCarthy whose
low-key approach guaran-
tees that few fans outside
of their towns would even
recognize them on the
street.


As Steelers rise,

Roethlisberger

affection returns


We've restocked

New Guy Harvey

Shirts

Mens .VWomenis


By TED ANTHONY
Associated Press

PITTSBURGH You
see it all around town these
days. The "Big Ben" signs
gradually returning to the
windows in working-class
hillside neighborhoods.
The No. 7 jerseys on the
backs of suburban conve-
nience-store clerks, grade-
school teachers even,
strikingly, children.
Most prominently, you
see it in how the discussion
unfolds when talk turns to
Steelers quarterback Ben
Roethlisberger. Instead of
phrases like "criminal inves-
tigation," "NFL suspension"
and "bad example," the
words today are back to
what they were a couple
years ago: Completed pass-
es. Makes things happen.
Leader.
With the Steelers one
green-and-white obstacle
away from reaching their
latest Super Bowl, the NFL


star turned hero in free fall
is, in the eyes of Pittsburgh
fans, on the rise again -
albeit gradually and, to hear
some people tell it, provi-
sionally.
"I was surprised," says
Ray Skoff, 41, a lifelong
Pittsburgher and Steelers
season-ticket holder for two
decades. "Behavior and
attitude-wise, I believe he's
done a total 180, how he
presents himself on and off
the field. It seems totally
different."
Roethlisberger sat out the
season's first four games
on the orders of the NFL,
which said he had violated
the league's personal con-
duct policy an outgrowth
of a college student's accu-
sations that he sexually
assaulted her in Georgia
last March. The
quarterback was never
prosecuted over what
was the second such set
of allegations against
him.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 15 file photo, Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben
Roethlisberger celebrates a touchdown pass to Heath Miller
in the second halfof an NFL divisional football game against
the Baltimore Ravens in Pittsburgh. Love him or hate him,
Roethlisberger has guided the Steelers to a win over the Jets
from reaching the Super Bowl for the eighth time. In the Steel
City, where winning makes everything good again, it is indeed
good again


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Page Editor: Brandon Finley. 754-0420











Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
crrsakoci@/keat/reporrerror


Lake City Reporter






BUSINESS


Sunday, January 23, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


COUNTY TOURISM


Bridal show promises unique vendors


Harvey Campbell
386-758 1397


Tourism

goes for

sporting

home run

How do sports
tournaments
work for
Columbia
County &
Tourism? Everyone is a
winner.
If you've read local
sports news over the past
24 months, you've probably
noticed several articles and
photographs touting tour-
naments and special sport-
ing events at the Southside
Recreation Complex. All-
in-all, sports tournaments
represent a big economic
boost to our community.
In 2010, the facility host-
ed more than 20 baseball,
softball and soccer tour-
naments, each attracting
30-60 teams to Lake City
and Columbia County: At
present, we already have
21 tournaments booked for
2011.
Teams typically include
12-15 players, three coach-
es, umpires, along with
parents, siblings and grand-
parents. Many of the teams
and their entourage come
from outside our immedi-
ate area and spend nights
in hotels, eat meals at res-
taurants, purchase gasoline
and spend money in local
retail establishments.
If you haven't explored
the Southside Recreation
Complex recently, you'll be
amazed by the number of

TOURISM continued on 3A


Put a little lose
Lake fir) Repor
You lose hb rritinl
our 'al


By A.C. GONZALEZ
agonzalez@lakecityreporter. com

Prospective
brides will
encounter more
than a dozen
vendors for the
first "Your Perfect Day"
bridal show hosted by
Holiday Inn and Suites in
Lake City.
Theresa Lastinger,
sales and catering man-
ager at Holiday Inn, said
the show, scheduled
from noon to 4 p.m. on
Sunday, Jan. 30, aims to
give the local community
the option to see vendors
with unique products and
services.
"We also have a unique
location here at Holiday
Inn," she said, "with a
beautiful grand staircase,
lounge and our Suwannee
Banquet Hall."
Vendors that will be
present at the show
include David's Bridal,
Cupcakes Vintage
Pinups, GeGee's Studio,
AP Limousine, Dove
Chocolate Discoveries,
Grand Rental Station,
Dream Day Cakes, Belk,
Cruise Ship Center,
Joye's Gems & Things,
Bailey's Mobile DJ, Lake
City Florist, Rose Mary
Catering and Mike & Ann
Visual Story Tellers.
"We are excited to
have David's Bridal as
.our bridal company," she
said. "They are doing
something special for the
community by coming
out of their territory in
Gainesville to serve the
people in Lake City."
Each participating ven-
dor has prepared a special
door prize for the brides
who have registered for
the event. Door prizes will
include discounts on live
music services, gift certifi-
cates ranging from $50 to
$100, and a prize valued
at $200 to be given by
Cupcakes Vintage Pinups.
"I urge brides to pre-


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
John See, owner of Lake City Florist and Design, arranges a bouquet in preparation for the 'Your Perfect Day' Bridal Show
that will take place at the Holiday Inn & Suites on Jan. 30. 'We like to do these events because we get to meet with the
brides in a one-on-one situation,' See said. 'It's a more relaxed type of environment.'


register for the event,"
Lastinger said. "Every
bride who registers at the
Holiday Inn can buy tick-
ets in advance at the hotel
for only five dollars. Their
registry information will
be given to the vendors to
be put in for the drawing
for the door prizes and
special offers."
Tickets will also be sold
on the day of the event for
$7 at the door to all brides
who haven't preregis-
tered.
"We want to give Lake
City and the brides
something special," she
said. "We want to help
out in any way we can to
make sure they have a
perfect wedding, and we
are willing to basically
hold their hands through
their wedding."
She said preregistra-
tion will help the Holiday
Inn through its planning
stages. She said Holiday


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Inn will give the brides
their own personalized
help packets, designed to
help them with the organi-
zation of their wedding.
"We strongly urge
the brides to bringtheir
bridesmaids as well,"
Lastinger said.
Cupcakes Vintage
Pinups offers minises-
sions and bachelorette
party events that the
bridesmaids can attend,
allowing them to plan a
great party before the
wedding, Lastinger said.


The bridal show will
also feature a cash bar
and lounge from which
guests can purchase ,
drinks throughout the
event.
. Holiday Inn will be
showcasing champagne
and special wines in
the cash bar. All drinks
served at the event are
also available for purchase
for any wedding event,
said Lastinger.
She said that Holiday
Inn will also be offering all
brides a honeymoon suite


"The honeymoon suites
have a huge jacuzzi right
in the room," she said,
"they really are beautiful
rooms."-
More information about
tickets and pre-registra-
tion is available at the
Holiday Inn & Suites at
213 SW Commerce Drive.
Those interested can call
the hotel at 386-754-1411.
"I've had a lot of brides
calling me already, and a
lot of response just from
word-of-mouth and adver-
tising," Lastinger said.
I


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 2011


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giving him poor marks in this
area.
The Associated Press-GfK poll
underscored the selling job .
that confronts the president as
he prepares to seek a second
term: People like Obama person-
ally, but just 35 percent say the
economy's gotten better during
his tenure.
Appearing in Schenectady,
N.Y., on Friday, Obama
announced that he was naming
GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt as the
head of a Council on Jobs and


Competitiveness, his latest move
to court a business commu-
nity that he's clashed with amid
continued high unemployment
Addressing workers at a General
Electric plant, Obama recommit-
ted himself to spending the next
two years trying to speed up the
economic recovery. His success
or failure there is likely to be the
central issue of the coming 2012
presidential campaign..
"Our job is to do everything
we can to ensure that businesses
can take root, and folks can find
good jobs," the president said.
"We're going to build stuff,
and invent stuff," said Obama,
emphasizing the need to boost
American exports to countries
around the world, an issue that
was a focus during the visit of
Chinese President Hu Jintao to


the White House this week.
"That's where the customers
are. It's that simple," Obama
said.
His choice of Immelt to head
the competitiveness panel won
applause from the Chamber of
Commerce, which called it a
"promising step" toward creating
jobs and enhancing U.S. com-
petitiveness.
SBut the Alliance for American
Manufacturing condemned the
choice, dismissing Immelt as
"an outsourcing CEO" whose
appointment would "alienate
working class voters." That
underscored a fine line for
Obama in pushing for growth
into the global marketplace
while still looking out for the
interests of U.S. workers.
The competitiveness panel


replaces Obama's Economic
Recovery Advisory Board, which
had been chaired by former
Federal Reserve Chairman Paul
Volcker. Obama announced
late Thursday that Volcker, as
expected, was ending his tenure.
The change in the advisory
board signals Obama's inten-
tion to shift from policies that.
were designed to stabilize the
economy after the 2008 financial
meltdown, to a renewed focus on
increasing employment
The White House said the
board's mission will be to help
generate ideas from the private
sector to speed up economic
growth and promote American
competitiveness.
The shift in focus is aimed
at winning over a public that
remains skeptical of the admin-


istration's economic policies.
Over half of those surveyed in
the AP-GfK poll disapprove of
how Obama has handled the
economy, and 75 percent rate
the economy as poor. However,
three-quarters do say it's unre-
alistic to expect noticeable
improvements after two years;
they say it will take longer.
Mindful of those sentiments
Obama told listeners Friday
that "it's a great thing that the
economy's growing but it's
not growing fast enough."
For Obama, the visit to
General Electric Co. was also an
opportunity to claim credit for
tax, trade and energy policies
pursued by his administration as
the nation attempts to recover
from the worst recession since
the 1930s.


TOURISM: Southside Recreation Complex offers 'win-win-win' scenarios
Continued From Page 1A


fields we have, the qual-
ity of the facilities and
great access to lodging
and restaurants. In addi-
tion, the Columbia County
Landscaping and Parks
'Department does an out-
standing job of maintaining
the complex, along with
facilities at the Fort White
Sports Complex, Winfield
Recreation Center, Mason
City, Alligator Lake,
Falling Creek and others.
In addition, the facili-
ties in Columbia County
are complimented by top-
notch facilities in both Live
Oak and Jasper.
The Southside
Recreation Complex
alone includes 13 base-
ball and T-ball fields (five
are lighted), eight girls
softball fields (all are
lighted), four adult softball
fields (all are lighted) and
seven soccer fields (five
are lighted). In addition,
there are 15 batting cages,
nearly 1,000 paved parking


spaces, central concession
and restroom buildings,
a large meeting building
and a tram transportation
system, recently donated
by Century Ambulance
Service.
We will always defer
to local sports league
play. Tournaments are
not allowed to utilize the
Southside Sports Complex
if they negatively impact
local league play, either
for our children or adult
sports. The Board of
County Commissioners
has adamantly insisted this
policy be followed.
So how does the money
and the process work?
Here is a brief overview of
an example event.
Someone wants to bring
a 40-team baseball tour-
nament to the Southside
Recreation Complex. They
provide the dates of the
proposed event and we
provide the regulations,
including fee structure and


insurance requirements.
We distribute the proposed
dates to the affected local
sports organization and
the Landscaping and Parks
Department. If there are
no objections, a contract is
executed and the promoter
begins attempting to sign-
up teams to play.
The tournament promot-
er gets the entry fee from
the teams. The promoter
can charge a gate entrance
fee and bring in vendors
for items such as t-shirts
and photographs. The pro-
moter gets no money from
food or beverage conces-
sions. The promoter buys
and provides the baseballs
for the tournament, tro-
phies and pays for the
umpires.
The local sports orga-
nization has always pro-
vided the "sweat equity"
to run league play and
typically invest in upgrad-
ing facilities. The local
sports group gets all of the


income from the conces-
sion stands and is paid
$25 per field, per game,
for use of the fields. For
a typical 40-team tourna-
ment, the "rental" fee for
the fields is around $1,400
and that money is paid to
the local sports organiza-
tion. Between the "rental"
fee and net concession
incomes, it's common
for our local sports orga-
nization to make $3,500
to $4,500 for allowing a
tournament to be played
at the Southside Sports
Complex.
We don't allow promot-
ers or our local volunteers
to run equipment, rake
fields, maintain restrooms,
empty garbage or conduct
those types of activities
for a tournament. Well-
intentioned volunteers just
won't provide the even
quality of cleanliness for
restrooms or safe and
appropriate use of expen-
sive equipment. Personnel


from the Columbia County
Landscaping and Parks
Department staff the tour-
nament and provide all of
the services shown above.
* Those personnel are paid
time-and-a-half salary for
their overtime efforts.
The Columbia County
Tourist Development
Council (TDC) obtains an
assurance that at least half
of the participating teams
in the tournaments will
spend one or more nights
in local hotels. That pro-
vides room revenue to the
hotel, local sales tax and
generates revenues from
the Local Option Tourist
Development Tax (bed
tax) that provides funds for
tourism promotion, which
sports tournaments rep-
resent The TDC provides
an interagency transfer
of funds to the Columbia
County Landscaping
and Parks Department
payroll accounts to cover
overtime pay, workman's


comp costs, retirement
contribution and FICA
costs. In addition, the TDC
provides the collections of
the new 1-cent addition to
the bed tax (approximately
$80,000) to the Landscape
and Parks Department for
capital outlay for mainte-
nance equipment, among
others.
We believe that the tre-
mendous asset represent-
ed by the Southside Sports
Complex creates one of
the ultimate "win-win-win"
scenarios for our com-
munity in many regards
with sports tournaments.
From the youth and adults
playing baseball, softball
and soccer ... to retail
establishments and hotels,
everyone comes out a
winner with our first-class
recreational facilities.
N Harvey Campbell is the
executive director of the
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council. He can
be reached at 386-758-1397.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 7540424













Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 7540424


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


The Week in Review


- ";


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


SNYSE Amex

105.75 -68.37 2,125.88 -59.63


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
EvergErs 2.55 +.53 +25.9 ChiMetRur 4.30 +1.27 +41.7
Bitauton 11.02 +2.17 +24.5 PemixTh 10.15 +2.58 +34.1
MSS&P6-1112.14+2.14 +21.4 Gainsco 7.27 +1.67 +29.8
iPSER2K 40.62 +6.20 +18.0 HMG 6.31 +1.11 +21.3
WamerMus 6.01 +.82 +15.8 EstnUCap 4.55 +.54 +13.5
Lentuon 6.56 +.89 +15.6 HeraldNB 239 +.26 +12.2
PnsaAn 10.32 +1.39 +15.6 PacOIfPT 3.35 +.35 +11.7
MLFact7-1210.16 +1.26 +14.2 Ever-Glory 2.35 +.23 +10.8
DrxSOXBr 13.39 +1.65 +14.1 Uranerz 4.77 +.43 +9.9
PampaEng 18.88 +2.28 +13.7 SamsO&G 214 +.19 +9.7


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Voltlnfo f 6.00 -2.87 -32.4
FstBcPR rs 5.36 -1.74 -24.5
GerovaFrs 20.96 -6.34 -23.2
MGIC 9.07 -2.46 -21.3
PMIGrp 3.22 -.81 -20.1
Nautilus h 2.29 -.52 -18.5
AIGwt 16.00 -3.55 -18.2
RadianGrp 7.86 -1.72 -18.0
AmbwEdn 9.80 -2.13 -17.9
CapTr12pf 2.15 -.46 -17.6

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
Citigrp 34780660 4.89 -.24
BkofAm 9353771 14.25-1.00
S&P500ETF5243180128.37 -.93
GenElec 4249164 19.74 +.92
SPDR Fnd3293330 16.46 -.26
FordM 2694753 17.95 -.70
iShEMkts 2479866 46.48-1.45
iShR2K 2162348 77.19-3.35
SprintNex 2021057 4.31 -.14
JPMorgCh1815023 45.29 +.38

Diary
Advanced 1,090
Declined 2,058
New Highs 396
New Lows 85
Total issues 3,189
Unchanged 41
Volume 19,727,123,985


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Inuvors 3.12 -.99 -24.1
ChinaShen 6.30-1.84 -22.6
Hyperdyn 5.50 -1.54 -21.9
Bamwell 5.93 -1.32 -18.2
Endvrlntrs 11.86 -2.15 -15.3
Rubicon g 4.82 -.86 -15.1
AoxingPrs 2.28 -.39 -14.6
VimetX 12.69 -2.12 -14.3
VistaGold 2.40 -.40 -14.3
ChiGengM 2.93 -.48 -14.1

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
NAPallg 224123 6.82 -.61
Hyperdyn 208411 5.50-1.54
NovaGldg 205225 12.93 -.70
RareEleg 194499 12.95 -.45
SamsO&G 190897 2.14 +.19
DenisnMg 163102 3.41 +.08
NthgtMg 159103 2.65 -.13
Taseko 157746 5.51 -.36
ChinaShen 155589 6.30-1.84
KodiakOg 151490 5.62 -.66

Diary
Advanced 227
Declined 310
New Highs 40
New Lows 39
Total issues 552
Unchanged 15
Volume 720,674,582


Y 2,689.54 -65.76


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MarshErsh 2.90 +1.85 +175.7
StarBufhlf 2.04 +1.05 +106.1
BioLase 3.02 +1.54 +104.1
SterBcwt 3.20 +1.25 +64.1
GoodTimrs 2.81 +.81 +40.5
FarmCB 6.81 +1.81 +36.2
Sky-mobin 6.83 +1.78 +35.2
HughesCm 60.86+15.70 +34.8
TechRsh 5.16 +1.26 +32.3
GenebcTh 4.09 +.95 +30.0

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MannKd 5.76 -3.88 -40.2
SyntaPhm 4.93 -1.77 -26.4
F5Netwks 109.97-34.20 -23.7
TESSCO s 12.50 -3.84 -23.5
LodgeNet 3.34 -1.02 -23.4
Vivus 8.74 -2.46 -22.0
Sypris 4.16 -1.14 -21.5
Escalade 5.36 -1.41 -20.8
LifeParts 11.82 -3.08 -20.7
L&LEgyn 7.51 -1.88 -20.0

Most Active ($1 more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ272853155.68-1.32
Microsoft 2186203 28.02 -.28
Intel 2120073 20.82 -.26
Cisco 1922193 20.73 -.49
MicronT 1555314 9.84 +.13
Apple Inc 1551600326.72-21.76
Orade 1320883 32.51 +1.27
FifthThird 1258919 14.60 -.35
Nvidia 1208409 22.22-1.37
SiriusXM 1191739 1.55 -.01

Diary
Advanced 637
Declined 2,159
New Highs 366
New Lows 44
Total issues 2,851
Unchanged 55
Volume 8,443,357,598


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
Wkly Wkly YTD Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg%Chg
AT&Tlnc NY 1.72 28.33 -.10 -0.4 -3.6 Lowes NY 44 25.01 +.01 ... -.3
AMD NY 7.54 -.66 -8.0 -7.8 MGM RstsNY 15.00 -1.76-10.5 +1.0
Alcoa NY .12 15.79 -.18 -1.1 +2.6 McDnlds NY 2.44 75.01 +.95 +1.3 -2.3
Apple Inc Nasd .. 326.72-21.76 -6.2 +1.3 Merck NY 1.52 33.90 -.33 -1.0 -5.9
AutoZone NY .. 252.13 -.49 -0.2 -7.5 MicronT Nasd .. 9.84 +.13 +1.3 +22.7
BkofAm NY .04 14.25 -1.0 -6.6 +6.8 Microsoft Nasd .64 28.02 -.28 -1.0 +.4
BobEvansNasd .80 32.36 -.68 -2.1 -1.8 NY Times NY .. 10.35 +.12 +1.2 +5.6
CNBFnPANasd .66 13.72 -1.23 -8.2 -7.4 NextEraEnNY 2.00 54.42 +.27 +0.5 +4.7
CSX NY 1.04 67.64 -1.57 -2.3 +4.7 NobityH Nasd -. 8.06 ... .. -.6
Chevron NY 2.88 93.78 +.95 +1.0 +2.8 Nvidia Nasd .. 22.22 -1.37 -5.8 +44.3
Cisco Nasd ... 20.73 -.49 -2.3 +2.4 OcciPet NY 1.52 97.97 +.65 +0.7 -.1
Citigrp NY 4.89 -.24 -4.7 3.4 race Nasd .20 32.51 +1.27 +4.0 +3.9
CocaCI NY 1.76 62.77 -.36 -0.6 -4.6 Penney NY .80 30.34 -.06 -0.2 -6.1
Delhaize NY 2.02 78.06 +2.62 +3.5 +5.9 PepsiCo NY 1.92 65.87 -.91 -1.4 +.8
DirFnBear NY .. 8.57 +.31 +3.8 -9.3 Pfizer NY .80 18.36 +.02 +0.1 +4.8
DrxFBulls NY ... 30.10 -1.36 -4.3 +8.1 Potash NY .40 164.25 -7.55 -4.4 +6.1
EMCCp NY ... 23.98 -.56 -2.3 +4.7 PwShs QQONasd .33 55.68 -1.32 -2.3 +2.2
FamilyDIr NY .72 43.80 +.58 +1.3 -11.9 Ryder NY 1.08 49.49 -1.94 -3.8 -6.0
FifthThird Nasd .04 14.60 -.35 -2.3 -.5 S&P500ETFNY 2.37 128.37 -.93 -0.7 +2.1
FordM NY .. 17.95 -.70 -3.8 +6.9 SearsHldgsNasd ... 74.57 +1.34 +1.8 +1.1
GenElec NY .56 19.74 +.92 +4.9 +79 SiusXM Nasd ... 1.55 -.01 -0.6 -4.9
HomeDp NY .95 36.51 +.62 +1.7 +4.1 SouthnCo NY 1.82 38.25 -.25 -0.6 +.1
HuntBnk Nasd .04 7.02 -.23 -3.2 +2.2 SprinNex NY ... 4.31 -.14 -3,1 +1.9
iShEMkts NY .64 46.48 -1.45 -3.0 -2.4 SPDRFndNY .16 16.46 -.26 -1.5 +3.2
iShR2K NY .89 77.19 -3.35 -4.2 -1.3 TimeWam NY .85 32.79 -.34 -1.0 +1.9
Intel Nasd .72 20.82 -.26 -1.2 -1.0 USNGsFdNY ... 6.40 +.30 +4.9 +6.7
JPMorgChNY .20 45.29 +.38 +0.8 +6.8 WalMart NY 1.21 55.73 +.92 +1.7 +3.3
LVSands NY .. 45.34 -2.73 -5.7 -1.3 WellsFargoNY .20 32.51 -.24 -0.7 +4.9

Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and eamings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late fing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks, pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. it = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wi =
When issued. wt= Warrants.
Mulual Funa Foo itron r. = F ., .. ,r,' i .-.:. iu rT, lur..] ~-.; ,3 = C i- r -i l, eij f, i 'r.J3r ,:
l i. i n.i-,,,o F.,.. I 1 1fi- ^r.1 I r..,a 1i iiT. izi M .ia.rt. I- A A -N. Aa = C.C r ?A 3, 1-,. r.,r.i : rf ia-r'.sjjal
ii :.:-l .lu : = ur d ,I 'ii .r ,ur',j -ni = r,,i- ..'J I ] rt.nrjl.,i ur. .ji.r irA *.a) Gainers and
Losers m,.u:i C .- n : r i i : j i ij l :i3 t ir-.l ai l i i n Most AdiciesI i.u i r e*:,.ir .it i4,l Si v.:iiu,6 iir
r.n-. in.l r.!: ri,-: Source Tr,&e .-.al.,- r I.a: .r"u.; iii urjirii.,oi


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 11,871.84
1-week change: 84.46 (0.7%)
1 nnn .


9,500


A S


CLOSED 50.55 -12.64 -2.49 49.04


MON TUES WED THUR FRI


S N D J


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pc Mm itn
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
lIMCOTotRetls CI 138,794 10.84 +0.7 +7.1/B +7.9/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 66,101 30.79 +1.5 +13.8/D +2.2/C 5.75 250
Fidelity Contra LG 61,430 67.94 +0.1 +18.4/B +4.4/A NL 2,500
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 58,576 50.10 +1.1 +9.8/D +4.1/C 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStdx LB. 56,062 32.11 +1.9 +18.6/A +3.0/B NL 3,000
American Funds CpWdGrlA m WS 55,060 36.25 +1.9 +11.2/D +4.8/B 5.75 250
Vanguard Instldxl LB 54,685 117.46 +2.4 +17.3/B +2.5/B NL 5,000,000
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 52,074 16.75 +1.7 +13.2/B +4.3/B 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 51,437 118.30 +2.4 +17.3/B +2.5/B NL 10,000
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 48,788 28.68 +2.2 +12.8/E +2.5/B 5.75 250
languardTotStlAdm LB 47,190 32.12 +1.9 +18.7/A +3.1/B NL 10,000
v ,u.i'r.ard Tei. d FB 45,190 15.88 +2.4 +12.7/C +4.1/B NL 3,000
::.. 'j 1i,5th FV 43,406 36.14 +2.2 +16.1/A +4.8/A NL 2,500
.",.e l i.:.. ) i. LV 43,037 111.54 +3.6 +15.1/C +0.3/D NL 2,500
,T.,-n,:n;aFundrEurPi.'i r m FB 39,209 41.56 +1.3 +11.9/C +5.2/A 5.75 250
AT,,n,:,,i, Fur,.diWAMuu,,A m LV 38,821 27.67 +2.1 +14.9/C +2.2/B 5.75 250
Fri t Temr-F, rlih,,,,n I. A m CA 34,273 2.22 +3.3 +14.4/A +6.0/A 4.25 1,000
Mi.", T(RtA.1m t Cl 33,684 10.84 +0.6 +6.8/B +7.7/A NL 1,000,000
V aiuiluaililF lui LB 33,642 117.47 +2.4 +17.3/B +2.5/B NL200,000,000
men.r,:a,, Fund; -.'ewPS m WS 33,224 28.65 +0.7 +14.1/C +5.6/A 5.75 250
4T,en'.,r,I r,iSFr.nlri. m LB 33,088 37.19 +1.9 +15.3/C +4.0/A 5.75 250
Vanguard5001nv LB 31,904 118.29 +2.4 +17.1/B +2.4/B NL 3,000
American Funds BalA m MA 31,408 18.22 +2.2 +13.4/B +4.1/B 5.75 250
Fidelity GrowCo LG 28,621 84.51 +0.7 +22.8/A +5.5/A NL 2,500
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl 27,199 10.56 0.0 +4.8/D +5.7/B NL 10,000
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 27,179 54.70 +2.4 +12.4/C +5,8aA NL 50,000
Fidelity LowPrStk d MB 27,094 38.64 +1.6 +19.7/0 +4.9/B NL 2,500
A-Conservave Allocation, CI -Itenediate-Tenn Bond, ES -Europe Sloc FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foren
largee Value, IH -World Alocaon, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Lage Vale, MA Mderate Alocaon, MB -Md-Cap end, M -
idCap Value, SH -Spedaty-heath, WS World Stock Total Return: C in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank How fund perfoned vs.
others wit same objedive: A isin top20%, Ein bottom 20%. MinIni nvt:Minimu neededto netn fund. Source:Momngsar.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AES Cor ...
AFLAC 1.20
AK Steel .20
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72
AbtLab 1.76
Accenture .90
AMD
Aetna .04
Agilent
Agnico g .64
AlcatelLuc .
Alcoa .12
Aldlrish
Allstate .80
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52
AmBev s .99
AEagleOut .44
AEP 1.84
AmExp .72
AIG wt
AmlntlGrp..
AmTower
AmeriBrgn .40
Anadarko .36
AhalogDev .88
Annaly 2.65
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .40
ArchDan .60
AssuredG .18
ATMOS 1.36
Avon .88
BB&TCp .60
BakrHu .60
BcBilVArg .55
BcoBrades .82
BcoSantand .78
BcoSBrasil .45
BkofAm .04
Bklrelnd 1.04
BkNYMel .36
Barclay .28
BariPVixrs ...
BarrickG .48
Baxter 1.24
BeazerHm
BerkH B ...
BestBuy .60
Blackstone .40
BlockHR .60
Boeing 1.68
Borders
BostonSci
BrMySq 1.32
CB REllis ...
CBS B .20
CIGNA 004
CMS Eng .84
CSX 1.04
CVS Care .50
Cameron ..
CapOne .20
CardnlHIth .78
Carnival 1.00
Caterpillar 1.76
Cemex .43
CenterPnt .79
CntryUnk 2.90
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.88
Chicos .16
Chimera .69
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .56
Coach .60
CocaCE .48
CocaCI 1.76


17 -.13
13 +.44
39 -.75
... -1.28
8 -.10
12 +1.03
19 +1.04
12 -.66
8 -.61
22 -1.15
37 -.89
.. -.09
69 -.18
... -.04
15 +.64
64 -3.82
13 -.07
... -1.00
17 +.47
13 +.99
15 -.25
... -3.55
... -2.72
57 +.67
16 +.67
44 -2,28
16 +.17
13 -.11'
12 +.56
42 -2.43
12 -.06
3 -2.49
15 -.15
19 -.19
25 +.61
39 -.61
... +1.06
... -.88
... +.91
-.81
21 -1.00
... -.05
16 -.42
... -.44
... +.66
17 -.13
13 -.82
.. -.73
17 -1.20
11 -.51

10 +.97
15 +1.61
-.22
-.37
13 +.22
36 +.62
33 +.76
9 +.94
16 +.13
18 -1.57
14 +.46
24 -1.95
8 +.79
15 +.71
19 -1.73
31 -.82
... -.43
14 +.20
12 -2.11
19 +.14
11 +.95
17 +.15
6 +.07
14 -.24
14 -7.18
21 -1.38
15 -.49
19 -.36


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Comerica .40 1.0
ConAgra .92 3.9
ConocPhil 2.20 3.3
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ConEd 2.38 4.8
ConstellEn .96 3.0
Coming .20 1.0
Covidien .80 1.7
DRHorton .15 1.2
DTE 2.24 4.8
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.40 1.6
DelMnte .36 1.9
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DevonE .64 .8
Dillards .16 .4
DrSCBear rs...
DirFnBear ...
DrxFBull s ..
DirxSCBull .11 .2
DirxLCBear ...
Discover .08 .4
Disney .40 1.0
DollarGen ...
DomRescs1.97 4.5
DowChm .60 1.7
DukeEngy .98 5.4
ECDangn ...
EMC Cp ...
ElPasoCp .04 .3
Elan
EldorGldg .10 ..
EmersonEl 1.38 2.4
Emulex
EnCana g .80 2.5
Exelon 2.10 4.9
ExxonMbl 1.76 2.2
FairchldS ...
FstHorizon .04 .3
FirstEngy 2.20 5.6
FordM ...
FMCG. 2.00 1.8
FrontierCm .75 8.2
GameStop ...
Gap .40 2.0
GenGrPrn ...
GenMillss 1.12 3.1
GenMot n ...
GenOnEn ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .32 2.3
GlaxoSKIn 2.00 5.4
GoldFLtd .16 1.0
Goldcrpg .36 .9
GoldmanS 1.40 .8
Goodyear :.
Hallibrtn .36 .9
HartfdFn .20 .7
HIMgmt ...
HeclaM ...
Hertz
Hess .40 .5
HewlettP .32 .7
HomeDp .95 2.6
Honwlllntl 1.33 2.4
HostHotls .04 .2
Huntsmn .40 2.5
IAMGIdg .08 .
iShGold s .
iShBraz 2.53 3.4
iSh HK .45 2.3
iShJapn .14 1.3
iSTaiwn .29 .
iShSilver
iShChina25 .63 1.5
iSSP500 2.36 1.8
iShEMkts .64 1.4
iShB20 T 3.86 4.2


50 -2.75
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Name Div
iSEafe 1.42
iShR2K .89
iShREst 1.97
ITW 1.36
IngerRd .28
IBM 2.60
Intl Coal
IntlGame .24
IntPap .75
Interpublic ...
Invesco .44
ItauUnibH .65
Ivanhoe rt ...
JPMorgCh .20
Jabil .28
JanusCap .04
JohnJn 2.16
JohnsnCtl .64
JonesGrp .20
JnprNtwk
KB Home .25
Keycorp .04
Kimco .72
Kinross g .10
KnghtCap ...
Kohls
Kraft 1.16
LDK Solar .
LSI Corp
LVSands ...
LennarA .16
illyEli 1.96


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
2.4 ... -.21 +1.8 59.24
.1.2 ... -3.35 -1.3 77.19
3.5 ... -.05 +.7 56.35
2.5 17 -1.25 +2.5 54.71
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1.7 13 +5.50 +6.0 155.50
83 -.77 +6.6 8.25
1.3 24 -.52 +3.3 18.28
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34 -.16 +3.0 10.94
1.8 27 -1.08 -.6 23.92
2.9 ...-1.45 -6.4 22.36
... -.05 +24.3 1.74
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... 32 -.46 -3.8 5.76
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5.6 8 -.15 -.8 34.76


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Limited .60
LizClaib .
LloydBkg ..
LaPac
LyonBasA ...
MBIA
MEMC
MFAFncl .94
MGIC
MGM Rsts..
Macys .20
MagHRes ...
Manpwl .74
MarathonO 1.00
MktVGold .40
MktVRus .18
Marshlls .04
Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
McMoRn ..
McAfee
MedcoHlth .
Medtrnic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
MitsuUFJ
MobileTels ...
Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12
Moodys .46
MorgStan .20


15 -.43
... -.60
-.12
-.35
.-1.56
.. -.57
-.86
9 +.02
... -2.46
... -1.76
15 +.06
... -.90
42 -2.81
14 -.55
.. -.94
... -.65
... -.11
-.72
-2.67
.. -1.24
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31 -4.22
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12 +1.03


Wkly YTh Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Mosaic .20
MotrlaSoln ...
MotrlaMon ...
NCRCorp ..
Nabors
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 7.04
NOilVarco .44
NatSemi .40
NYCmtyB 1.00
NewellRub .20
NewmtM .60
NextEraEn 2.00
NiSource .92
NobleCorp .90
NokiaCp .56
NorflkSo 1.44
Novartis 1.99
Nu'cor 1.45
OcciPet 1.52
OfficeDpt..
OilSvHT 2.40
PG&E Cp 1.82
PMIGrp ..
PNC .40
PPLCorp 1.40
PatriotCoal ... ,
PeabdyE .34
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.92
Petrohawk ..
PetrbrsA 1.20
Petrobras 1.20
Pfizer .80
PhilipMor 2.56
Potash .40
PS Agri
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ ...
ProUltSP .43
ProUShL20 ...
ProUShtFn ...
ProUSR2K ...
ProUSSP500...
ProUltCrude..
ProUSSIvrs...
ProgsvCp 1:16
ProLogis .45
Prudentl 1.15
PulteGrp ...
QntmDSS .
OwestCm .32
RAIT Fin .03
RadianGrp .01
RangeRs .16
Raytheon 1.50
RegionsFn .04
ReneSola .
RiteAidh .
SLM Cp ...
SpdrDJIA 2.92
SpdrGold ..
S&P500ETF2.37
SpdrHome .33
SpdrKbwBk .13
SpdrKbw RB .35
SpdrRetl .49
SpdrMetM .38
Safeway .48
SandRdge ...
SaraLee .46
Schlmbrg .84
Schwab .24
SemiHTr .56
SiderNac s .58
SilvWhtng ...
SouthnCo 1.82
SwstAir .02


17 -9.77
... -1.13
... +1.11
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S-.08
... +.05
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-.37
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-.67
-.54
48 -1.13
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83.48
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-21.7 30.57
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Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


SwstnEngy ...
SprintNex ...
SP Malls 1.17
SP HIhC .57
SPCnSt .78.
SP Consum .49
SP Engy .99
SPDR Fncl .16
SP Minds .60
SPTech .32
SP Util 1.27
StateStr .04
StillwtrM
Suncorgs .40
Sunoco .60
Suntech
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TCF Fncl .20
TJX .60
TaiwSemi .47
Talbots
TalismE g .25
Target 1.00
TeckResg .60
TenetHlth ...
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texlnst .52
Textron .08
TimeWam .85
TitanMet
Total SA 3.13
Transocn ..
Travelers 1.44
TrinaSolar...
Tycolntl .86
Tyson .16
UBS AG
USAirwy ...
UnionPac 1.52
UtdContl ...
UtdMicro .08
UPSB 1.88
US Bancrp .20
USNGsFd ...
US OilFd .
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .50
ValeSA .76
Vale SApf .76
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VerizonCm 1.95
ViacomB .60
VimpelC n .46
Visa .60
Vonage
Walgm .70
Weathflnll ...
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .08
WDigital .
WstnOnion .28
Weyerh .60
WmsCos .50
WT India .15
XLGrp .40
Xerox .17
Yamanag .12
YingliGm
YumBmds 1.00


-1.21 +2.0
-.14 +1.9
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Nasdaq Most Active


+1.6 38.95
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Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


CitrixSys
Clearwire
Coinstar
Comcast
Come spcl
Compuwre
Conexant
CorinthC
Cree Inc
Crocs
CypSemi
Dell Inc
Dndreon
Depomed
DirecTV A
DiscCm A
DishNetwk
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DryShips
eBay
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Enerl
EntropCom
EicsnTel
Expedia
ExpScrips
F5Netwks
FfthThird
Finisar
FstNiagara
Fextrn
FosterWhl
FresKabi rt
GT Solar
GileadSci
Google
Hologic
HudsCitv


... 46 -2.82
... -.18
.30 -.19
1.6 18 +.81
1.7 18 +.77
.26 -.48
... 6 -.08
3 -.02
... 27-12.51
... 24 -1.05
... 42 -1.09
... 12 -.58
... ... -2.11
... ... -1.31
... 25 -.66
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... 11 +.20
.. 18 +1.54
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... +.54
... 56 -1.00
2.4 ... +.21
1.1 17 -1.32
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... 33 -3.71
4.3 21 -.62
... 16 -.38
... 19 -.96
... +.00
... 13 +.93
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... 23-12.35
... +.05
5.3 10 -1.94


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-26.8 41.31
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.04
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+2.1 19.22
-11.7 11.25


Name Div YId
HumGen
IntgDv
Intel .72 3.5
Intuit
JA Solar .
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
Level3
LnearTch .96' 2.8
MIPS Tech ...
MannKd
MarvellT
Mattel .83 3.5
Maximlntg .84 3.2
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .64 2.3
NetApp
Netflix
NetSolTch ...
NewsCpA .15 1.0
NewsCpB .15 .9
NorTrst 1.12 2.1
Novell
Nvidia
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .20 .6
Oxigene h ...
PDLBio 1.00 20.5
PMC Sra
PattUTI .20 1.0
PeopUtdF .62 4.7
PlugPwrh ...
Polycom
Poniard h
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ.33 .6


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
... -2.28 +2.8 24.57
39 -.60 -5.7 6.28
10 -.26 -1.0 20.82
27 -.12 -4.9 46.86
7 +.23 +6.9 7.40
... -1.75 +10.7 16.02
20 -.45 -3.9 6.35
-.14 +15.3 1.13
16 -1.34 -.2 34.53
36 -1.90 +1.2 15.35
... -3.88 -28.5 5.76
22-1.79 +8.2 20.08
13 -.44 -7.6 23.51
31 +.14 +10.6 26.13
... -.28 +14.3 7.27
5 +.13 +22.7 9.84
7 -.28 +.4 28.02
37 -3.71 +1.5 55.77
68 -9.39 +3.6 182.09
25 +.32 +18.2 2.21
15 +1.15 +5.2 15.32
16 +.97 +3.0 16.91
19 -2.97 -4.5 52.91
6 ... +.3 5.94
62 -1.37 +44.3 22.22
16 -.79 +9.8 10.85
24 +1.27 +3.9 32.51
... -.03 -12.4 .21
6 -.61 -21.8 4.87
23 -.45 +1.2 8.69
71 +.22 -3.8 20.73
40 -1.22 -5.8 13.20
.. +.07 +112.9 .79
57 +2.27 +13.1 44.08
... +.09 +23.1 .64
-.08 +2.5 3.22
16 +.03 +5.3 10.74
... -1.32 +2.2 55.68


Name Div
Powrwav ...
QiaoXing
Qlogic
Qualcom .76
RF MicD ..
Rdiff.cm
RschMotn ...
Riverbed s.
SanDisk
Satcon h
SeagateT
SifyTech .
Slcnware .41
Sina
SirusXM .
SkywksSol ..
Sonus
Staples .36
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .30
SterlBcsh .06
SunPowerA ...
Symantec
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .75
TibcoSft .
TriQuint
UranmRs ...
VirgnMda h .16
Vivus ...
Vodafone 1.33
Windstrm 1.00
Xilinx .64
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... -.29 +40.2 3.56
... -.21 -11.5 2.51
... 25 -.66 +2.1 17.37
1.5 26 -.81 +3.5 .51.24
.18 -.58 +4.8 7.70
... -.05 +52.6 8.07
... 11 -3.22 +5.9 61.55
... ...-3.30 +2.8 36.14
... 10 -2.80 +.2 49.97
... ... -17 +10.2 4.96
4 -.98 -11.6 13.28
... -.04 +25.7 2.84
6.3 ... +.34 +9.4 6.51
... 11 -9.41 +14.4 78.76
... 78 -.01 -4.9 1.55
... 32 -3.32 +2.0 29.19
... -.29 +7.5 2.87
1.5 20 -.01 +2.6 23.37
1.6 27 +.50 +3.3 33.20
1.7 25 -.52 -3.2 17.72
.6 ... +1.60 +32.5 9.30
... 33 +.25 +9.5 14.05
18 +.33 +6.6 17.85
1.0 20 -.35 +6.9 20.30
1.2 12 -.36 +1.0 6.85
1.4 16 -1.40 +1.4 52.86
.. 46 +.13 +7.3 21.15
... 13 -1.31 +11.2 13.00
... ... -.32 -18.2 2.78
.6 ... -.27 -8.5 24.93
... ... -2.46 -6.7 8.74
4.7 ... +.76 +6.9 28.27
7.8 20 -.35 -8.6 12.74
2.0 13 -.41 +7.9 31.28
... 21 -.85 -4.0 15.97
.2 ... -.28 +.3 24.31


AMEX Most Active


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-r .-


Weekly Dow Jones


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.16 0.14
6-month 0.19 0.17
5-year 2.01 1.92
10-year 3.41 3.33
30-year 4.57 4.53


Currencies
Last Pies Day
Ausualia 1.0105 1.0119
Britain 1.6002 1.5910
Canada .9948 .9976
Euro .7352 .7425
Japan 82.60 83.04
Mexico 12.0740 12.0510
Switzerlnd .9590 .9679
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


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ASML Hid .27
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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


BUY I
1 I I -

ELU


FIND IT
L- -


One item per ad Eachaddonal
4 lines 6 daysines 10
Rate applies to private individuals selling
I persona ,erchandise tota S es
Each item must include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad d d o
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ate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
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One Item per ad 1 J
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personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less.
Each item must Include a price.








This a onreudable rate.
One Item per ad




4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise total ling 4,000 or less.













Includes 2 m must ional|t.00 p.
Limited to service type advertis-











ad for each Wednesday insertion.
Some peoplies to priaefer to place their





classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-













ment. Our office is located at 180

You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-94a00 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.cories will require prepay-





Ads to Ap Callso fax orby: Fax/Email byil your ad
Tuesday Mt o the Reportn, 10:00a.m. Mn, 9:0 a.m.
WednFAX: 386-752-94.00 Plea se Mn., 9:00 a.m.
dir et your copy to the Classifi.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.






Friday Thurs.,1000a.m. Thurs.,9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.mn.-
Sunday Fri., 10:0 a.m. Fri.,9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-


ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

wIw.ai i P .- .. . .: .'!'


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

Keys Found
week of January 10thin TCBY
plaza, please call to identify
386-628-9352


060 Services
Senior Assistant/Companion.
I will sit with & care for your
elderly. Drive to Doctor appts. &
shopping. References avail.
386-288-3776 or 386-754-8721

100 Job
Opportunities
04542849
Wanna Go West? Let's Go!
CDL A Operators Wanted for
Lease with a Lease Purchase
Plan, Spouse and Pet Rider
Policy, Health and Life
Insurance Available. 12-15 day
trips, No New England States,
You get 100% fuel surcharge,
O/O's and PTDI
Certified Students Welcome
CALL TODAY TO JOIN US
AND START
THE NEW YEAR
OFF RIGHT !
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

04543107
Welder/TIG
Immediate job opening. Tig
Welding experience 2 yrs
minimum. Tig Welding Test
required. Excellent fringe
benefit package, which includes
paid vacations, paid holidays,
group health insurance, and a
401K plan. Stainless fabrication
at Hunter Marine on
Highway 441 in Alachua.

04543151
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you:
Priorfinancial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, FI
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE ,
Drug Free Workplace

04543193
NOW HIRING!!!
Be home everyday, While
making excellent pay! We are
now hiring experienced
Class A Drivers to haul
petroleum locally.
Excellent benefits package
including health, dental
and 401K.
All applicants MUST Have:
Class A CDL with X
endorsements.
1 yr tractor-trailer experience
with a t/t school certification or
2 yrs. tractor-trailer experience
without the certification.
25 yrs or older
Please apply online at
floridarockandtanklines.com
or call 1-866-352-7625

CDL Driver 2 yrs exp clean MVR
wanted for local company
247 NW Hillandale Glen,
Lake City No phone calls







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale.
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance


100 Opportunities

04543203
Aaron's Lake City store is now
hiring Retail Manager's at
Salary+ Comm.& Bonuses
Sunday Off & Full Benefits
Must have 2 yr. mgmt exp. or
college, NO criminal history,
pass drug test. 21
yrs., or older clean mvr apply at:
www.aarons.com/careers key-
words type "lake city"

05524921




Managers Needed,
competitive wages, advance-
ment opportunities, complete
training program, health, dental
& life benefits, DFWP/EOE
Please send resume to
bbqm@heritagemanagement.net
or fax to 352-387-0011

05524936
Professional and Courteous
Class A CDL Driver needed

United States Cold Storage
Lake City
Immediate openings due to
fleet expansion
Florida region deliveries

Qualified Class A
CDL Drivers must:

*Have a valid Class A CDL
with an acceptable driving
safety record
*Be 23 years of age
*Have 2 years verifiable
tractor trailer experience

We offer our Class A
CDL Drivers
*Bi-weekly pay
*Benefits

Apply in person or
send resume to
USCS
211 NECMcCloskeyAve
Lake City, FL 32055

DRIVER/COUNTER SALES
Valid DL. DFWP. Benefits, 401K,
P/T to'F/T, Apply at 986 E. Duval
St. Lake City 386-466-0177,

DUMP TRUCK Driver
w/Asphalt experience
Drug-free, clean driving record
386-497-3131

Experienced Legal
Secretary/Paralegal
5 yrs exp, including
civil litigation, email resume and
salary requirements to: '
sportsroof@yahoo.com

Experienced Stylist
needed, apply at
Southern Exposure Salon
386-752-4614

Food Service Sales Representative,
Territory includes Lake City &
Live Oak. Experience preferred!
E-mail pcucinella@seabreezefood-
service.com or call 850-567-1523

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.

FLORIDA
GATEWAY
S COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
MATHEMATICS
164 Duty Days Tenured Track
to Commence Fall 2011
Teach college-level and preparatory
mathematics courses; work with
colleagues for the advancement of
departmental goals. Requires
Master's degree in appropriate area
related to mathematics; or Master's
degree with minimum of 18 graduate
credit hours in course work centered
on mathematics.
Salary: Based on degree and
experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 217/111
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation,
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanrafgocedu

vi AiD,.I A^ ;O Coli ge( ill ;iducanounI ill
Emnplo'nlent


ARI


E YOU OUR/A



Comfortable
i .orA
environmenL-




SOpportunities .

... .


Apply Online or In Person!


SiTEL


100 Jb0
100 Opportunities

Two Hair Stylist needed.
with clientele for Branford salon,
please call Maggie.
386-935-4059

Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

12 A Medical
1 0 Employment

05524935



MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
RN's
PRN/1 yr experience
CNA
F/T & PRN

ARNP Outpatient Svcs
Starke/Tri County

Recovery Specialist
Prevention Specialist
Starke/Lake City

Bachelors Therapist
Support
Masters Therapists
Adult Substance Abuse
(Licensed)
Lake City

Job Coach
Bachelors/Experience Required
Lake City

Adult Case Manager
Live Oak

Psychiatrist
Outpatient clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City

Custodial
Lake City

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
www.mbhci.org
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP

05524946-
URGENT NEED for RN with
Home Care Oasis Experience to
help cover several counties! Top
pay with possibility of full time
employment in near future if
desired. Please call Suwannee
Home Care at 386-755-1544
or fax your resume to.
386-755-7828.
Homecare LPN's &
Homecare CNA's needed for cli-
ent in Lake City, call
Maxim Healthcare Services
352-291-4888

Medical Billing,
several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance Bill-
ing required. Please email resume
to admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net
or fax to 386-755-2169


140 Work Wanted

We Run Errands!
Your personal errand service to
help those in need at rates you can
afford Call Dawn 386-249-9426

240 Schools &
24 Education

04542861
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/17/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

AKC GERMAN SHEPPARD
puppy. Born 12/13.
Parents on site. $400.
386-496-3654 or 352-745-1452


MISSING PIECE?


,Your skills
"and
posithie artitude


tionI


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

Maytag Washer & Dryer Set,
exc cond, like new, white
$460 obo
386-752-9645


407 Computers

DELL COMPUTER
$80. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture
ASHLEY DINING ROOM
TABLE w/6 chairs and leaf.
$150.00 Great Deal!!!
386-344-5706


420 Wanted to Buy
DON'T SCRAP
that appliance.
I'll buy it or move it.
386-365-1915

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

2 Burner Coleman Camping Grill
Good Shape $35 obo
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387

Black Amana Range
$100. obo
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387
Frost Free Refrigerator
Nice w/top freezer.
White $225. obo
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387
Hamilton Beach Large Roaster
Goes up to 500 degrees $40.
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387
Old Dish cabinet. Hutch with
glass doors. Solid wood. Possible
med oak. $85.00 obo
386-292-3927 or 386-984-0387
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422

3/2 DWMH. back porch/carport,
nice area of Picadilly Park, $675
month, l1st/last/$300 dep,
Call -386-752-6333
Clean, quiet 3/2 ($625 mo) &
2/1 ($450 mo.) both in Branford
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114


Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003


63 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water.
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
S386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Nice 4br/2.5 ba. 3 ac. Fenced
Cross Fenced, paved rd., huge
deck, private. McAlpin area. $900
dep. & $950. m6. 386-867-1833

640 Mobile Homes
for Sale
$569 mo 3Bd/2Ba Modular
1/2 acre Deck, energy efficient,
appliances, drive, w/$12K down
($640 mo w/ $6K down).
Avail in March
Owner finance or rent to own???
Call (386) 758-9824 hurry
05524743
Palm Harbor Homes
Short Sales/Repo's/Used Homes
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
Won't Last!! $3,500 40k
John 800-622-2832 Ext. 210

05524745
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Liquidation Sale
2009 Model Homes MUST GO!
Call for FREE color brochures
800-622-2832


71 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

05524833
Get up to $2011 in 2011!
Call for Details
Windsong Apts
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 bedroom Apartments &
mobile homes,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423,
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $500. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SDI
386 965-0276
Large 2br/2ba Duplex.in
nice area with W/D hookup.
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
.Spacious 2br/lba house. In town
Close to shopping.
$625. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

y730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04543053
403 Baya Ave...First month's
rent discounted 50%! 3/2
remodeled home on Baya Ave.
1440 sf. with side deck. Pets '
considered. $790./mo +
$790./ security
642 SW Chris Terrace...
Located in a nice wooded
subdivision, beautiful 3/2
upscale rental close to Lake City
but far enough out to enjoy your
privacy. $1150./mo plus
$1150. secuirty
315 Piedmont Live Oak...older
4/2 home in downtown Live
Oak. Kitchen remodeled.
$850./mo plus $825. security
881 SW Sunview...Gorgeous
4/2 country home between Lake
City and Ft. White just off SR
47. Mobile home situated on 5
acre corner lot. $900./ mo. plus
$900. security
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co. @
386-365-5884
http://springsrus.com/
Learn about Lake City!

05524832
New Years Dream "Surprise
Why Rent? Lease to own.
New model home 2 miles S off
47. 3000 sq ft, 4/3, 5% int, is
tax deduc, consider trade-in
386-752-1364

3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.


$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1000 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303. No Pets


Pool Leaks / Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


SADvantage









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY. JANUARY 23, 2011


7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3/2 Brick home w/great rm, approx
2500 sq ft, bonus rm 300 sq ft.
upgrades thru-out, on 1.5 ac
fenced yard, detached Ig storage. 2
car garage, Exec level home,
$1500 mo, 1st, last & sec. will
lease w/option 386-527-0895
4BR/2BA on 1 acre.
In Cul-de-sac. Close to I-10.
$700. mo and $700. security
deposit. 386-965-3567
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus bonus
room. w/1.5 bath. Quail Heights
CC. $750. mo plus $250 damage
dep. 386-752-8553
Turnkey rental, 3/2 split,2 CG, 1/2
acre, quiet neighborhood, close to
1-75, $1050 per month, Ist/last/sec,
386-454-2826 or 954-895-1722

750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
Great locations on SW Main Blvd.
Retail, Wholesale, Distribution,
Office. 1200+ sf only $950. per
mo. Includes Utilities 752-5035
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd, owner fin, no
down pym't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.
This nice 4.5 acre parcel has
septic, power & well, older MH
$39.900 MLS 76182
Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty

810 Home for Sale
2br/2ba Eastside Village.
Unique floor plan. Lg utility/
work room. Screened front porch.
$55,000 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
3/1 on 4.43 acres, metal roof,
pond on property, '
Lease option available
$129,888 Results Realty,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
3br/2ba 80'X125' lot. 1,200 sqft.
Kitchen & bath remodeled, metal
roof, Ig fenced back yard. Close to
amenities. $79,900 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Brick home w/1,934 sqft
in Piccadilly Park. 1/2 acre. Lg
playroom, fenced yard. Reduced to
$139,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Custom home. on 5 ac.
where deer & turkey roam.
Lg barn w/enclosed workshop.
$219,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
4/2 in Sub-div, open floor
plan,florida room, porch, fenced,
$150,000 call Missy Zecher
@Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
4/2 on 4 acres,.open floor plan, 2
living rms, rec room w/wet bar
$89,900 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
4/3 farm house on 3.95 acres
w/private pond, surrounded by
oaks $689,000 Charlie Sparks,
Westfield Realty MLS#76149
386-755-0808 .


810 Home for Sale
4br/2ba. 5 ac.. 2069 sqft. Ig family
& florida rm. den. Covered patio.
workshop. $229,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba. remodeled, views of the
lake. Formal LR. dining room &
family room. Many upgrades.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
67.5 acre farm, fenced, workshop,
pole barn and two ponds. MH
(1984 sq ft) $299,000
call Patti Taylor at
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Affordable, clean home in sub-div,
Freshly painted interior,
This is a'must see!
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
BRAND new home, lrg master
suite, 2 miles from US 90,
$179,900 MLS #76449
Carrie CasonWestfield Realty
386-623-2806
Brick home on 5 acres,
country feel close to town!
Must See! Results Realty
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
Clean, cozy, well maintained 3/2
on 1.05 acres, lots of shade trees,
built in 2007, $135,900
Call Patty Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Country Club. 4br/4ba. New roof,
AC, windows. Pool, hot tub,
& greenhouse. $229,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Custom Brick, 5+ ac. 5br/4ba.
4412 sqft. 3 car garage, pool; hot
tub, 3 fireplaces, more. $569,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lori Giebeig Simpson 365-5678
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home
w/oversized garage.
Eastside Village Realty, Inc
386-752-5290
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home
2br/2ba, I car garage,.
Eastside Village Realty $83,000
386-752-5290
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home lots of
amenities; clubhouse, pool, spa.
Eastside Village Realty
$89,500 386-752-5290
Excellent area. 3br/2ba home.
1620 sqft. w/covered patio. Lg
front porch & 1 car carport
Lori Giebeig. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
Snew cabinets/appliances, close to
schools, $65K 478-391-1592
Large 3/2 brick home w/basement.
2 living areas. porch on 2 lots
$129,900 MLS #74118
386-623-2806 Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty
* Large entertaining home, w/pool,
gazebo, huge workshop,
$285,000 Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Large home w/acre of land, Irg
family & florida rooms,
covered porch,
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Move In Ready. 3br/2ba w/1,225
sqft. Comer lot, great S/D.
12x16 workshop w/elec.
Upgrades. $75,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
Nice 3/2 home on 4 acres
close to town $168,000,
Motivated seller MLS#73410
Carrie Cason Westfield Realty
386-623-2806
Nicely remodeled 3/2 on 2 acres,
partially fenced $115,888
Nancy Rogers @
Results Realty
386-867-1271
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Woodcrest S/D Super location,
nice back yard. 3br/2ba home,
cov-
ered back porch. New AC in 2010
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
WOODGATE VILLAGE.
3br/2ba DWMH.
Close to dew elementary
school. $27,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc


T N WHEELS & WATERCRAFT 5


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-623-9026


* .10D

ONL




$41-I*


820 Farms &
S Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69.900. S613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancine.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well. Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! S69.900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190
Commercial property situated
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya Ave 3.27 acres,
$398,888 Results Realty
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
Property (corner location), easy
access corer, close to downtown,
$94,000 Charlie Sparks
Westfield Realty
386-755-0808 MLS#74814

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802






950 Cars for Sale
2003 Cadillac, Sedan Deville,
Pearl White,excellent condition,
84 K Miles, Reduce to $5,500
386-527-0895

951 Recreational
951 Vehicles







2004 Rialta 23 Ft Self contained
Excellent Condition
$13,500.
Call 386-752-9057
952 Vans & Sport
95 Util. Vehicles
1995 Dodge Van Conversion,
very clean $1500, 1998 Dodge
Van,$1200 both in good condition
Hafner's Falling Creek Rd
755-6481


.. '





2006 EF250 Ford Van, 3/4 ton,
metal work shelves/ladder rack
60K miles, exc-cond, $10,500
386-623-9026

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

ToG t' Your

Vehicle SoldC'all.
Mayo rde


published monthly by

Lake City
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'- '-~


Ki)


you read the newspaper today7

6 days a week you'll find it here...
Lake City Reporter


coa.752.l 21)
386-752-12933


Clear the Clutter &



Make Some Cash!







^(1















s .* ". .









Advertise your Garage Sale



with the Lake City Reporter




ONLY $1750


4 Lines 3 Days 2 Free Signs


(386)755-5440


Classified Department: 755-5440


m--


a I









LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY. JANUARY 23. 2011


0Dinner





THE TAX STATION
(next to The Money Man) TAX PREpARBTON
- No APProNTMET NECESSARY ELECTRONIC FIIfBG
- ALL FIS CAN BE DEDUTED -RE ND AmPAONLoAN* Come find
HEPMG THOUSANDS NOW fOR 2 oECAUES i EnING TilE ARREST RETUi THE AE TITLED out what
BRING THIS AD WITH YOU FOR 20% OFF ON PREPARATION FEES! !, the new year l i
CALL THE TAX HOTLINE 758-0959 has in store PsychRea
for you.'.."Psychic Readings Jennifer Miller
ST X T XST ION or you. Helps In All Problems Psychic
(nexttoThe Money Man)
1010 SW MAN BLVD. LAKE CYRTY, F fL 2 ^886e : ii.n m.<
AT Rue APam stamn Fa wa o am R m a mR Cam s (ERAC) AmEamm- w Reue D s (ERDuO ). A Rus Amami (L
owKAm= a sman x=noiToMB c anmERC aRERD AmND w AFN ewm o*FRNCE OM EACCiEDOITTWE5reNW FIWXL Apmy. Ru, ERs L18 E t lSreta keCImmmr Htl I Bai F
ME mNeuasW VWm BrB RoucB=em& T UMr utw. Caemwnwm mm aw lax mBER ABOUT TAl REna FGm opmS.


Exam iand Necessarn N-raN s


?$ I

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www.aspenlakecity.c(


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... ... ,'OVERSTODC.
EUROTOP SUPREME SUPER BUYS
19 $ l A *AIi ^Bi PLUS EXTRA
ROLLBACK CSAVINGS!!OM fO T CO
OVESTOC PRICEREDUCTIONS FIRM M 1.: r
TWIN SET $499 254 TWIN SET 197
$LLSET 5 FULL SET rc &247
tKINGSET s999S QUEENSET ,O 257
KING SET $397 $447


M@DG)I0v0 FDOGG 00 GOMCD
[Dm W f[
BEDASS, F, IR1. tEU


1678 US Hwy 90 W
Lake City, FL
PH: 75.4-4654


Al AAAAR VII] Fz


88 GMC SIERRA


01 BUICK LASABRE 02 BUICK LASABRE 03 BUICK LASABRE
CUSTOM CUSTOM CUSTOM


. all
^ 3 w B


00 BUICK LESABRE
CUSTOM

2005 FORD
FREESTYLE LIMITED


00 CHEVY
SILVERALDO 1500 LS


2007 GMC
SIERRA EXT. CAB


2007 BUICK
LUCERNE cx



$135911
; Ds^S? ~t~J


2005 CHEVY
EXT CAB LS


2007 GM C
YUKON SLT-1


~- -lL---s~d4a~ll~8b~~'


386752 2,180
Hwy 90 East, 3 Blocks-East of Downtown Lake:City
Buick* OM C. .*Plus Dealer Fee, Tax, Tog and Title,


~f,9~%















Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
cnsaki@iOkeityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, January 23, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Citrus

for North

Florida

gardens


assumethat
if you live
in Florida,
you must
have a citrus tree right out-
side your back door. Right?
Our winters may limit suc-
cess with most citrus trees,
but by selecting the right
cold-hardy cultivar and root-
stock, you really can have
that back yard tree.
The satsuma tangerine,
also known as the satsuma
mandarin, is a citrus that
grows well in our northern
Florida climate.
Being well adapted to
regions with warm sum-
mers and cool winters, this
tree won't tolerate warm
winters in the southern
part of the state.
Although satsumas origi-
nated in China, they were
first reported growing in
Japan more than 700 years
ago.
They were introduced
into Florida and the United
States in 1876.
From 1908-1911, nearly
one million satsuma trees
were imported from Japan
and grown throughout the
lower Gulf Coast states.
This large tangerine indus-
try was short lived, how-
ever, due to the occasional
severe freezes.
There are over one hun-
dred cultivars that differ in
maturity dates, fruit shape,
color and quality. The three
satsumas that are recom-
mended for our area are
'Owari', 'Silverhill', and
'Kimbrough.'
The best cold hardiness
is attained when trees are
grafted to trifoliate orange
rootstock.-
Mature satsuma trees on
these rootstock have sur-
vived winter temperatures
as low as fifteen degrees.
'Owari' satsuma is the
variety most widely avail-
able in Florida. This is a
small to medium size tree
with a wide weeping shape.
The trifoliate orange
rootstock also provides the
benefit of dwarfing the size
of the tree, making it much
more adaptable to home
gardens.
Even with its smaller
size, this tree is a heavy
producer in November and
December.
The fruit is a delight to
pluck from the tree and
eat not only because of
the tangy flavor, but also
because of the loose rind
and lack of seeds.
Unlike other citrus, sat-
sumas don't hold well on
the tree after ripening, so
harvest promptly.
Use hand pruners to pick
the fruit because some of
the skin tends to remain on
the stem if pulled, causing
the fruit to rot For more
information, go to http://
edis. ifas. ufl. edu/ch 116.

E D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


People came from several states to celebrate

Lake City woman's centennial milestone


*


RONI TOLDANES/Lake City Reporter
Father Robert Trujillo congratulates Beatrice England before giving her a blessing as her daughter, Jeannette Besso, 79, looks on.


By RONI TOLDANES
rtoldanes@lakecityreporter.comrn

Beatrice England captured their
attention. The young and the old
intently listened when her brother
prodded her to share her secret.
"I have no secret, whatsoever,"
England said, smiling, as she quickly traveled
through 100 years of memory. "I've had a good
life, that's all."
Around 80 people, including a preponder-
ance of family members, gathered for about
four hours on Saturday, Jan. 15, at the Epiphany
Catholic Church in Lake City. Many of them
drove for hours from other Florida cities.
Some came from South Carolina, some from
Rhode Island. And some traveled from as far
away as New Hampshire.
They all came to hug, celebrate and pay
tribute to a woman who had a simple life and
only one daughter, but produced so many
offspring.
England's daughter, Jeannette Besso, 79,
pulled out a yellow sticky note to make sure
she got the numbers right: Seven grandchil-
dren, 17 great-grandchildren and 14 great-
great-grandchildren.
"And we're not even done yet," Besso told
the crowd, chuckling.
Was it because her family tree had strong
roots? Perhaps. Her mother died at 93. But
her father was in his 50s when he was stricken
with cancer.
Vegetarian? No, she told a journalist.
Eat pizza? "Yes."
Eat burger? "Yes."
Smoke? "For about two months in 1929,"
she said.
Drink? No response, a smile adding an extra
wrinkle, before picking up a half-empty plastic
cup in front of her.
"Beer is the secret," said Father Robert
Trujillo, giggling, as he wrapped his arms
around England before leading a prayer.
England took only a small amount of beer dur-
ing special occasions, her daughter said.
England believes that living a simple life,
less stress, may have helped her become a
centenarian, one of at least four in Lake City.
"We had clean entertainment," she said
during an interview in her room last week at
Still Waters West, where she moved from Fort
Pierce around six years ago.
When England was born in Rhode Island in
1911, China was still under the Qing dynasty.
She was born just a few months after Mark
Twain died. The best things in America were
made in America.
England's daughter recalled that when they
first had a telephone, England was terrified
to use it. Technology stupefied her. During
her birthday, someone showed England an
iPhone. It was manufactured in China.


RONI TOLDANES/Lake City Reporter
Beatrice England takes a call from a cell phone
while four generations stand behind her (top).
Her daughter, Jeannette Besso, (above) shows
her an iPhone.
In the past 100 years, the United States has
had 18 presidents, from William Howard Taft
to Barack Obama.
There were no DVDs when England was
a teen. No Xbox. Not even a PlayStation.
They went to the Royal Theater in downtown
Providence to watch silent movies. It cost 10
cents.
In her lifetime, England saw changes in the
popular modes of teen entertainment: from
radio to television, the Internet and video
games. She was around when science intro-
duced the cellular phone. Google and the iPad.
And she lived through the Great Depression,
two world wars and the end of a millennium.
When England was in grade school, many
homes in America still had no electricity. No
refrigerators. Frigidaire introduced its first
"self-contained unit" in 1923 and it cost more
than $700, according to Wikipedia. At that
time, a 1922 Model-T Ford sold for $450, it
said.
But people weren't preoccupied with the
typical frivolous items like most people these
days. They used kerosene lamps and rode a
horse and buggy.
Back then, England said young men
impressed the girls with their talents. Her
husband, Emile, was no different. He played
the piano, banjo, ukulele and other musical


instruments. They married in 1930.
England said her husband, who worked as
a letter carrier for 29 years, took her ballroom
dancing during the weekends. They danced
at home, too, listening to vinyl long-playing
albums.
"He was romantic," she said, "right till the
day he died."
Her memory catapults her to the fun days:
When she basked under the sun while at the
Caribbean and in Hawaii with her husband.
But good memory also brings back the sad-
dest chapter of her life' when cancer snatched
her husband in 1991.
"We had a good life," England said, softly
running her index finger around her framed
picture with Emile. "I was just hoping my hus-
band would have lived longer."
England, who worked at a yarn mill in Rhode
Island, was the third oldest of eight children.
The others are gone, except for her youngest
sister, Blanche Sherman, 88, of Fort Pierce;
and youngest brother, Norman Bernier, 85, of
Port St. Lucie.
Before England cut the cake and blew its
three candles shaped like a 1 and two zeros
- her daughter, Besso, delivered her heartfelt
and eloquent remark, reflecting on life in a
household full of music.
She told the well-wishers that her father
died 20 years ago.
"Mom misses him everyday," Besso said.
"She'll be happy when she can live with him
someday."
But that won't happen soon.
Remarkable as England's centenarian status
may seem, she's hardly alone.
Latest Census figures are not immediately
available, but as of 10 years ago, Lake City is
home to 945 seniors, 65 to 74 years old; and
257 who were more than 85 years old.
In 2008, Census recorded about 80,000 cen-
tenarians in the United States. By the year
2050, officials estimate that America could have
as many as four million centenarians due to
modern advances in technology and medicine.
England is an example.
The birthday girl, wearing a sparkling
"Sleeping Beauty" tiara, flitted from table to
table, aided by a four-wheel walker while wear-
ing leather shoes. Her hearing isn't very good,
but she hears everything.
Her concealed hearing-aid helps a lot while
asking the names of the boys and girls in her
party. Young teens snapped pictures with their
cell phones and e-mailed them to their friends,
who couldn't believe that England is 100.
The younger generation made England
happy on Saturday.
They made her think about old technology
and induced her to recall great swaths of life
with her husband.
"I remember everything about him," she
said. "He was the best man who walked the
earth."


~ I














My other motorcycle is a tractor


Eight years ago
I bought a 1993
Honda Shadow
600cc motorcy-
cle with 9,400
miles.
I had smaller motor-
cycles while I was in high
school and college, but
I gave up motorcycles
as I moved to military
service with Antarctic
Development Squadron
Six, went to graduate
school at Colorado State
University and moved to
Lake City Community
College (now Florida
Gateway College) to
become the landscape
instructor in the Golf &
Landscape Operations
department
At 54 and with children
out of the house, I thought
this was my last chance.
After reactions of disbelief
- "You are buying what?"
- I bought the Honda; no
Harleys for me.


I still have my Honda
Shadow which now has
over 50,000 miles on it.
Yes, I have done some
riding. I still really enjoy
getting on the back coun-
try roads in north Florida
and south Georgia on a
nice sunny day.
It is my time to enjoy
the fresh air and country
scenery. I have been on
roads that I would have
never travelled just for fun,
but at 50 to 60 miles per
gallon, I can discover our
area at low cost.
Riding is dangerous, and
I usually ride by myself.
My wife, Kay, does not
enjoy it, and I really would
not want both of us on one
bike in case something did
happen.
Motorcycle riding does
make you more aware of
what others are doing on
the road, but it is still more
dangerous than being in
a car. I wear blue jeans, a


John Pierson
john,piersol@fgc. edu
coat,'and full-face helmet,
so I have reasonable pro-
tection.
Like many motorcycle
owners, I get thoughts of
buying a bigger motor-
cycle, but that Shadow 600
really does everything I
need it to do.
It has decent accelera-'
tion, can go 70 mph all day
long, is relatively light
weight, very maneuver-
able, and fun to ride. It
is perfect for my one-day
weekend rides.
So, where does the
tractor enter the picture?
When I worked landscap-
ing in high school and


college in Pennsylvania,
the company owner had
a 1950s Ford 8N tractor,
which was small and very
maneuverable around
houses for landscape grad-
ing.
I used that tractor a lot, .
and it was a great piece of
equipment.
When the business was
sold, I was always sorry
that I could not buy that
Ford 8N.
I would sometimes see
Ford 8N tractors for sale
as I was motorcycle riding,
and I would notice them
for sale in all varieties of
condition at farm supply
businesses.
I searched on the
Internet, and I found that
there were quite a few
of them around and that
there was a lot of informa-
tion about the 8Ns.
I also discovered that
parts were quite available
for repair and maintenance


of these tractors that were
built between 1947 and
1952.
There were about
520,000 8Ns built and
many are still in operation
on farms, mowing fields,
and some with collectors.
Then, our first grand-
child was born in October
2009, and thoughts of our
children and grandchild
visiting us and going on
hayrides entered my head.
I thought, rather than
buy a bigger motorcycle,
why not buy a Ford 8N
tractor. Makes sense,
right?
There is always a good
way to justify a new toy
if you just think long
enough.
I did buy a 1949 8N last
October, and, of course,
I needed a trailer to haul
it and to use for hayrides.
Like a lot of used equip-
ment, the tractor needed
more repair work than I


first thought, but it runs
well and looks good now.
We had a ball at
Christmas, and our grand-
daughter, Bryn, from
Shelbyville, Ky., got her
first hayride here in Lake
City.
There were many pic-
tures taken of the outing,
and Kay put them together
with the help of Snapffsh
into an unbelievable hard
cover book f6r Bryn
* called, "My first Hayride
with Grampy."
It was all worth it, and I
am glad my other motor-
cycle is a 1949 Ford 8N
tractor.
John R. Piersol is the
director of golf and land-
scape operations at Florida
Gateway College, where he
has been since 1974. He
has a bachelor's in plant
science from the University
of Delaware and a master's
in horticulture from Colorado
State University.


ENGAGEMENTS


Johns Shaw
Pastor Lonnie and
Tammie Johns of Lake City
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Angelica
Carrissa Johns of Lake
City, to William Seth Shaw
of Wellborn. He is the son
of Dusty and Joan Shaw of
Wellborn.
The bride-elect is a 2006
graduate of Columbia High
School and a 2010 graduate
of the University of Florida
with a degree in Family
Youth Community Sciences
and a minor in Human
Services. She is employed
at Still Waters West as the
human resources/public
relations director. She is
also the head coach of the
Florida Heat All-Stars.
The future groom is a
2005 graduate of Suwannee
High School and a 2010


Johnson Perry

Carl and Connie Johnson
of Lake City announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daugh-
ter, Heather Dyan Johnson
of Winter Gardens to
Joseph Raymond Perry of
Lake City. He is the son of
Lisa Schlink of Lake City.
The bride-elect is a 2003
graduate of Columbia
High School and a 2005
cardiovascular technology
graduate' from Santa Fe
Community College.
The future groom is a
2003 graduate of Columbia
High School, 2007 graduate
of the University of Florida
and is director of ware-
house and. transportation
for Aldi Inc.
The wedding is planned


COURTESY PHOTO
Angelica Carrissa Johns and William Seth Shaw.


graduate of Saint Leo
University with a degree in
psychology.
He ; is employed
at Windstream
Communications as a CST.




IF 7


The wedding is planned
for 5 p.m. Feb. 19 at Christ
Central. A reception will
follow at the church.
All friends and family are
invited.


W'


What happens when


a mom unplugs her


teens for 6 months?


By BETH J. HARPAZ
Associated Press

NEW YORK Susan
Maushart lived out every
parent's fantasy: She
unplugged her teenagers.
For six months, she
took away the Internet,
TV, iPods, cell phones and
video games. The eerie
glow of screens stopped
lighting up the family
room. Electronic devices
no longer chirped through
the night like "evil crick-
ets." And she stopped car-
rying her iPhone into the
bathroom.
The result of what
she grandly calls "The
Experiment" was more
OMG than LOL and
nothing less than an
immersion in RL (real
life).
As Maushart explains
in a book released in the
U.S. this week called "The
Winter of Our Disconnect"
(Penguin, $16.95), she
and her kids rediscovered
small pleasures like
board games, books, lazy
Sunday, old photos, fam-
ily meals and listening to
music together instead of
everyone plugging into
their own iPods.
Her son Bill, a video-


game and TV addict, filled
his newfound spare time
playing saxophone. "He
swapped Grand Theft Auto
for the Charlie Parker song-
book," Maushart wrote.
Bill says The Experiment
was merely a."trigger" and
he would have found his
way back to music even-
tually. Either way, he got
so serious playing sax
that when the gadget ban
ended, he sold his game
console and is now study-
ing music in college.
Maushart's eldest, Anni,
was less wired and more
bookish than the others,
so her transition in and out
of The Experiment was the
least dramatic.
Her friends thought
the ban was "cool." If she
needed computers for
schoolwork, she went to
the library. Even now, she
swears off Facebook from
time to time, just for the
heck of it.
Maushart's youngest
daughter, Sussy, had the
hardest time going off
the grid. Maushart had
decided to allow use of the
Internet, TV and other elec-
tronics outside the home,
and Sussy immediately
took that option, taking her
laptop and moving in with


her dad Maushart's ex-
husband for six weeks.
Even after she returned
to' Maushart's home, she
spent hours on a landline
phone as a substitute for
texts and Facebook.
But the electronic
deprivation had an impact
anyway: Sussy's grades
improved substantially.
Maushart wrote that her
kids ."awoke slowly from
the state of cognitus inter-
ruptus that had character-
ized many of their waking
hours to become more
focused logical thinkers."
Maushart decided to
unplug the family because
the kids ages 14, 15 and
18 when she 'started The
Experiment didn't just
"use media," as she put it.
They "inhabited" media.
Maushart began The
Experiment with a drastic
measure: She turned off
the electricity completely
for a few weeks candles
instead of electric lights,
no hot showers, food
stored in a cooler of ice.
When blackout boot
camp ended, Maushart
hoped the "electricity is
awesome!" reaction would
soften the kids' transition
to life without Google and
cell phones.


COURTESY PHOTO
Heather Dyan Johnson and Joseph Raymond Perry.

for 4 pnm. March 12 at the Columbia County
Parkview Baptist Church. Fairgrounds Reception
A reception will follow a Hall. *


Wise-Brickert
Kelly and Brenda Wise
of Lake City announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daugh-
ter, Callie Marie Wise of
Lake City, to Daniel Lyle
Brickert of Lake City.
He is the son of Mary
and Brad Fiene and the late
Donald Brickert of Lake
City.
A wedding is planned for
February.


Daniel Lyle Brickert and Callie Marie Wise.


COURTESY PHOTO


LAK CTYREORER LIFE SNAJNAY2.21


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


,.rr4










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 2011


DEAR ABBY



Wife is sick of house guest


who's regained his health


DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band gave a friend of his I'll
call him "Fred" a place to
stay and nursed him back to
health after Fred was criti-
cally injured while driving an
ATV. Fred was drunk at the
time.
That was six years ago,
and Fred is still here. While
he has helped my husband
with a few chores, he does
not work. My husband pro-
vides him with a travel trailer,
utilities, food and beer mon-
ey. Fred is 47 years old and
perfectly capable of working.
I feel he is being disrespect-
ful, and I want to set some
ground rules getting a job
and staying out of our house
when we are not home, for
starters.
My husband doesn't seem
able to have a discussion with
Fred. Am I selfish and un-
Christian? This is straining
my marriage. Please help.
FEELING USED IN
ARIZONA
DEAR FEELING USED:
I'll try. Although your hus-
band may have had the no-
blest of motives in taking his
injured friend in after his in-
jury and nursing him back to
health, he's doing the man no
favors by continuing to foster
his dependence. While I can
see what Fred is getting out
of this, it's time your husband
explained to you what HE is'
getting out of it.
Under the circumstances,
your feelings of being en-


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com

croached upon are 100 per-
cent valid. And unless you
want the rest of your married
life to be a family of three, you
will have to draw the line.
DEAR ABBY: I am a
foster mother to four chil-
dren of different races. One
is African-American, two are
Hispanic and one is Cauca-
sian. My husband and I are
Caucasian, and we have two
children of our own.
Abby, my kids may have
different colors and origins,
but they are all our very
own. They have chores, go
to school and are responsible
kids. We love them dearly
and would move a mountain
one pebble at a time for each
one if needed.
When I am out and about
with all six kids, I get nasty
looks and nastier comments
about them. I am tired of
people looking down. on me
for our "weird" family. One
person even suggested that
I get my tubes tied and stop
sleeping around!
Do I ignore these com-
ments? I refuse to tell people
that they are foster kids. They


have been hurt enough and
do not need to be reminded
about their parents living
elsewhere. Please help me
before the comments reach
the ears of my precious kids.
- FOSTER MOM AMAN-
DA
DEAR AMANDA- People
tend to look at anything that
is "different" A rainbow co-
alition of children is bound
to draw a second look, and
by now you should know
it comes with the territory.
That does .not, however, jus-
tify the rude personal attack
you received from the one
person. And in my opinion
you should have shamed him
or her by responding that you
are a foster parent, because it
happens to be the truth.
DEAR ABBY: When
women are being married,
they usually start showing off
their engagement/wedding
ring(s). I have very selective
taste, and I find many of them
to be gaudy or downright
ugly. What am I supposed to
say when these women are
expecting me to tell them,
"How lovely"? UNEN-
THUSED IN ERIE, PA.
DEAR UNENTHUSED:
Try this: "Oh! Look at how
it sparkles! You must be
thrilled!" Then look the B-2-
B in the eye and give her a
warm smile.
N Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Do your own thing re-
gardless of what others want
you to do. Don't give in to de-
mands when it's vital you en-
sure your own advancement.
A sudden change in your
position shouldn't alter your
plans. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): What you learn from ob-
serving and listening to others
will be incredibly valuable. By
experiencing what's going on
around you, you will instinc-
tively know how to apply what
you discover to your own per-
sonal situation. *****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Find something you feel
can be turned into a service
needed in your community.
Do whatever it takes to ac-
commodate your plans. It
may be difficult initially but,
once you get started, will lead
to an enjoyable and lucrative
future. **
CANCER (June 21-July.
22): Rely on your intuition to
guide you. Follow your heart
and you will find happiness.
Don't let anyone guilt you into
making the wrong choice.
Reconsider your relationship
with anyone who does not en-

CELEBRIT

by Luis C
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from q
Each letter in the ciphe
Today's clue:
" OF BG RF B R Y WE Y E
R Y B H G 0 W'M SW D B L
WGL ECPPBL FHR G
TH WG Z. PZ P FZT
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Don't marry a
schools are for." Mae West
(c) 2011 by NE,


HOROSCOPES


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last
courage you. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Look for opportunities
and take part in activities or
events and you will make new
friends. A partner may need
reassurance if you have been
neglectful or too busy' taking
care of business. All you need
to'do is include him or her.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You may be coerced
into spending too much or
taking on responsibilities you
haven't got the time or the
money to handle by yourself.
Focus on delegating. The only
way you will ever get ahead is
to concentrate on the most
important jobs and leave the
rest to others. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct.
22): Do what's expected of
you and you will avoid getting
into trouble. An opportunity
to make money or to join a
project that interests you will
turn up if you make people
aware of your capabilities and
your desire to get involved. 3


Y CIPHER

Campos
uotalions by famous people, past and present.
r stands for another.
C equals U
3 L Y Z TKWM ,
ZOG TBERZGWKKM
WDB ZVV YFB
B
man to reform him that's what reform

A, Inc. 1-24


SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): Take time out, to
help someone in need. Your
talent and your ideas can be
put to good use. The way you
find and implement solutions
will lead to a proposal. Don't
let compliments cause you
to give away all your secrets.

SAGfITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Accept the in-
evitable and keep on moving.
You cannot change what you
don't control. Getting out with
friends or taking an interest
in someone you find enter-
taining will help you move
forward and.forget about the
past. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jah. 19): Don't let anyone
stifle you or shut you down.
It's you that people will fol-
low if you show strength and
determination. A change of
plans can be costly but in the
end should be to your benefit.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Use your energy
wisely. You'll be tempted to
show your anger if you don't
get your way but that will be
a waste of valuable time. Lay.
your plans out and let whoev-
er is interested get involved.
Someone from your past can
make a difference to your fu-
ture goals. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Take note of who is do-
ing and saying what. A sud-
den change of heart may
cause you to alter your per-
sonal lifestyle. Don't let this
set you back. It was probably
overdue. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


A RIVER PUNS THROUGH IT By Joon Pahk / Edited by Will Shortz 1- |2 -|31415-I6 17 8 19 -10 11 12 113 -14 115 116 i17 |18


Across
* 1 Most'debonair
8 Cookie with a
geographical
name
14 Chocolate
substitute
19 More than ju-st
leaning toward
21 The Ducks of the
N.C.A.A.
22 Basketmaking
material
23 & 24 Why a
Midwest river
has so many
tributaries?
26 Big name in
bubbly 1
27 Attacks dinner
29 Popular Ford
30 Devour, with
"up" or "down"
32 She's prone to
brooding
33 Exemplary
35 Fop who makes
idle sketches of
a Chinese river?
42 They're checked
at ch'eck-in
45 Move, in Realtor-
ese
46 Literary title
character from
the planet
Antiterra
47 See 69-Down
48 "If you don't
meet my
demands within
24 hours, I'll
blow up a
Russian river"?
55 Corner
56 Not give ___
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


57 Start of a Beatles,
refrain
58 Pained
expression?
60 Aunt of 1960s TV
61 "I Shot Andy
Warhol" actress
Taylor
62 Fail to notice
64 Old-timey oath
66 Life vest worn on
a Korean border
river?
71 Piranhas in a
German border
river?
76 Speed of sound
77 ___ spell
79 One often going
by limo
80 "American
Beauty" director
Mendes
83 Corporate
shuffling, for
short
85 Stand-up guy?
89 ___ dixit
90 Workers
92 Request to an
Alaskan river to
return to its
headwaters?
95 Played one's part
97 Can of Cornwall?
98 Provoke
99 Atlanta-based
cable inits.
100 Aggressive
posturin' on an
English river?
107 The merchakit of
Venice
108 Stephen of "The
End of the
Affair"
109 Tad
113 Bookish
116 "Buon___"
119 Dull discomfort


120 & 123 What
minor rivers of
Pakistan say at
their junctions?
125 Train track
beam
126 Channel crosser
Gertrude
127 Connected, as
circuit elements
128 Fountain orders
129 Team whose
home ice is the
prudential
Center
1,30 V.M.I. athletes

Down
1 N.F.L.
commentator
Phil
2 Labor party?
3 Adrift, say
4 Priests' changing
room
5 U2 collaborator on
"Passengers:
Original
Soundtracks 1".
6 Hold 'em
.alternative
7 Tubes, e.g.
8 Illinois home of
Black Hawk
College
9 With 11-Down,
prehistoric
period
10 "My Name is
Asher ___"
11 See 9-Down
12 Snacked
13 Reachable by
pager
14 Cold war term of
address
15 Hopeful
16 Narrow inlets
17 Sommelier's
prefix
18 __ Mawr
20 One who doesn't
retire early


25 Shield border, in
heraldry
28 "___ you!"
31 Jamie of
"M*A*S*H"
33 Pop
34 Lickspittle
36 Last Julio-
Claudian
emperor
37 Semiliquid lump
38 California
governor who
was recalled in
2003
39 Workers' rights
org.
40 Christine __
"The Phantom of
the Opera"
heroine
41 "Wow!"
42 2006 World Cup
champion
43 Andrea _.,
famous
shipwreck
44 Minute
49 "Confessions of
an English __-
Eater"
50 Pinpoint; say
*51 Works on copy
52 Actress Skye
53 It has a big
mouth
54 Father, as a
mudder
59 H as in Hera
63 "I thought __!"
("My feeling
exactly!")
65 "Shrek!" author
William
67 Unsettle
68 ___-deucey
69 With 47-Across,
onetime Chinese
premier
70 2009 sci-fi role
for Chris Pine
72 -
73 Hemingway, once


74Fly catcher
75 Whiff
78 Expensive bar
80 Silly singing
81 Main
82 Prefix with
carpal
84 ___ apparatus
(cell organelle)
86 School whose
motto is Latin
for "Never tickle
a sleeping
dragon"
87 "Typee" sequel


88 Rock, in modern
lingo
91 Cry of
accomplishment
93 Neighborhood
west of the
Bowery
94 Kicks in
96 Stonewallers'
statements
101 Acronym for a
small-runway
aircraft
102 Sent to the free-
throw line


103 Like some jokes
and jobs
104 Van Gogh
painting that
sold for a record
$53.9 million in
1987
105 Prefix with con
106 Cut a fine
figure?
110 Earth shade
111 0.2% of a ream
112 Tends, as sheep


113 1960s dance,
with "the"
114 Trillion: Prefix
115 Risk territory
east of Ukraine
116 Rook
117 Cozy corner
118 Look badly?
121 The Silver
State: Abbr.
L22 Soft &
124 Ice cream mogul
Joseph


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
P I1E 0 P P' A T T W 0 FIEBRS WlEIB
IDS ALIAS REFIN ES AL L
SATURDAYKNI TF E V ER L LB0
CHOPS MEAN NIL STOW
00PS EYEWHI ITENESSNEWS
PAP GLEN AREAS TAR
0 NEP I NT DARNS N 0 RMAL
SLIGFHTS~ RT S TANLINE
SOUL 0EAT TRADE GUM
F ATAL SOL ID A MTS 0
SODE Z I P 0LITTER TIN



TIEPINS A FRAIDO H ITS
STRATA PRA ONR mEL cF
V1 I C 0 AL NE N MCIB0
BRIGHT ISHAI RWAYS EBON
ROTE ANT COAT SCENE
ADA THEMSFI T TI NGWORDS
G E L MER N T 0 R R E E L S
S 0 S YE AN I NG S N A R E D Y E


7 5


1 3 6


2 8 7 9 1


73 5


6 9 3 5


53 926


4 5 2 8


8 6 4


1 2 9


6 ..9 Z .9 1 V L L 9 S





S9 Z I 8C V
S89Zl9~L6I7


9Z6L8C9Vi


9 L L 6 V 9 Z





Ll7C6L8~99


L 9 8 V 91Z CL 6


IZ161 1C 9 it L


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415













LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE ~'jrjmAY. JANUARY23. 2011 Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


*.t're .- ~


FAMILY F RATURES
When there's a chill in the
air, cozy up to the table
with dishes that feed
the soul as well as the
stomach. This melt-in-
your-mouth Slow Cooker Pot Roast with
Onions is a complete dinner with very
little fuss. A bowl of Broccoli, Bacon and
Cheddar Chowder makes a hearty lunch or
simple dinner in no time. And this recipe
for Quick and Healthy Potato Casserole
serves up a creamy, comforting side dish
from the microwave in minutes.
Onions and Wisconsin potatoes add a
savory quality to these three recipes. Best
of all, onions and potatoes are good sources
of pntaxilirn fiber and vitamin C and cost
rI r,.- -, r.ir. i,


Quick & Healthy Potato Casserole
Serves 6 Spray an 8-inch microwave-safe baking dish with nonstick cook-
1 1/4 pounds Wisconsin Yukon Gold ing spray. Place 1/3 of the potatoes and 1/2 of the onions of the onions on
potatoes, very thinly sliced bottom of dish and sprinkle with 1/3 of the cheese and 1/2 of the
1 cup quartered and thinly sliced herbs. Repeat layers, then top with the last 1/3 of the potatoes,
onion layering potatoes so that there is a solid layer of potatoes with no
1 cup shredded reduced-fat sharp gaps; sprinkle with remaining cheese.
cheddar cheese Stir together stock, Dijon and garlic salt and pour over potatoes.
1/2 teaspoon Italian herb seasoning Cover with plastic wrap and microwave on HIGH for 20 minutes.
1/2 cup stock or reduced-sodium Use oven mitts to remove dish from microwave; carefully remove
broth cover from dish (due to steam build-up) and serve.
1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard Optional: Preheat oven to 400F and place casserole in oven for
1/2 teaspoon garlic salt 5 to 10 minutes or until casserole is golden brown before serving.


* Pot ltoe, can be stored tul per-
roiated plt-Ire hays or paper
b'lags to cten.id iheir heif -,'ce
Il I. l- l. C I'-I L laI b .i .r
.ni.' emertA Irducei ed tC Iragce IItr
- -''i r ar dash potatoes or
nioni i or .u"- prodLace for
Ihil m'llrI hblf, rC ,'rlning
Lh)antpi,.. -ill pr. mirna ceail

be Aorcd ini A -saled container
in .,,Lr refligcraiti for up to
d, .


Slow Cooker Pot Roast with Onions
Serves 4 to 6
1 (2 1/2-pound) boneless beef sirloin
tip or chuck roast
1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
1 1/2 pounds yellow onions, trimmed
and cut into 1/2-inch slices
1 pound Wisconsin red potatoes,
trimmed and halved
1/2 pound carrots, trimmed, peeled
and cut into 2 to 3-inch pieces
2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves,
stripped from stems
1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary
(stems removed)
2 cups tomato juice
1 cup low-sodiuna beef broth
1/2 cup red wine (or additional beef broth)
2 tablespoons flour
Pepper and salt to taste (optional)
Trim fat from beef roast. Place roast in bottom of
5 to 6-quart slow cooker. Spread horseradish over
surface of meat. Top and surround roast with
onions, potatoes, and carrots. Sprinkle with thyme
and rosemary and pour in tomato juice and beef
broth. Cover and cook on high setting for 6 to 8
hours or until beef is fall apart tender.
Mix wine (or beef broth) with flour and pour
mixture around meat in slow cooker. Gently
stir flour mixture into existing sauce without dis-
turbing the meat. Replace cover and cook on high
setting for 15 minutes or until thickened. Before
serving, season with pepper and salt to taste and
garnish with sprigs of rosemary.
Broccoli, Bacon and
Cheddar Chowder
Serves 6
8 slices bacon, chopped
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 onion, finely chopped
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
Dash cayenne pepper
3 cups milk
2 cups chicken or vegetable stock
12 ounces Wisconsin red skinned
potatoes, cut into 1/2-inch dice
2 cups cheddar cheese, shredded
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce,
if desired
2 10-ounce boxes frozen chopped
broccoli, thawed
Heat large pot over medium heat. Add bacon and
cook until crispy, about 5 minutes. Rernove bacon
with slotted spoon and transfer to paper towel
lined plate and reserve. Pour off all but 2 table-
spoons fat. Add butter and onion and cook for
6 minutes or until softened. Add flour and cook,
stirring for another 2 minutes or until foamy.
Whisk in salt, cayenne pepper, milk and
chicken stock and cook until it becomes smooth
and creamy, about 3 minutes. Add potatoes and
cook for 10 to 15 minutes or until potatoes are
tender.
In bowl, toss cheddar with flour to coat.
Stir in cheese, a handful at a time, whisking
after each addition until smooth. Add in hot
pepper sauce if using. Add thawed broccoli and
stir to heat. Do not boil. Taste for seasoning and
adjust if necessary.
Ladle soup into heated bowls and garnish with
reserved bacon.
Recipe excerpt used with permission. Text copyright 300
Sensational Soups Carla Snyder and Meredith Deeds
2008 Robert Rose Inc.


Michelle Obama


wears McQueen


to state dinner


By SAMANTHA CRITCHELL
AP Fashion Writer

NEW YORK Michelle
Obama chose a red
Alexander McQueen gown
with black details for
the state dinner she and
President Barack Obama
hosted Wednesday night, in
honor of Chinese President
Hu Jintao.
The gown seemed typi-
cal of Mrs. Obaina's atypi-
cal first-lady fashion sense:
The gown featured an
asymmetrical neckline and
a petal-print silk organza
fabric, and she wore a nar-
row wrap around her arms
as she posed for photos in
front of the White House.
The Alexander McQueen
label is one of the most
respected in style circles.
McQueen committed sui-
cide a year ago, but the
brand has continued under
the stewardship of his for-
mer assistant Sarah Burton,
who, like McQueen, is a
Londoner who shows her
collections in Paris.
"This dress is very glam-
orous," said Kate Betts,
author of the new book
"Everyday Icon: Michelle
Obama and the Power of
Style."
"Red is an obvious color
because in the Chinese
color it means good luck,
but you expect an American
or an American-based
designer for an occasion
like this," said Betts, also a
contributing editor at Time
magazine. "But she's always
surprising, and that's why
we're all riveted by her."


--i f r --
. .. ( / ,. 1..... 1.... 12




Sunday, January 30, 2011


12 Noon until 4:00 p.m.

at the Holiday Inn & Suites

213 SW Commerce Dr., Lake City, FL 32025


ASSOCIATED PRESS
First lady Michelle Obama
poses at the North Portico of
the White House Wednesday
while preparing for the State
Dinner with China's President
Hu Jintao.


The choice of McQueen
further adds to Mrs.
Obama's fashion credibility,
said Betts. She's known as a
champion of up-and-coming
talent, but also mixes and
matches top designers with
mass retail brands.
Fashion was further rep-
resented at the evening's
A-list event with designer
Vera Wang and Vogue edi-
tor-in-chief Anna Wintour
both on the guest list.


* Cash Bar Door Prizes
* Complimentary Food Tasting



For more information, please call


386.754.1411








CATERING *COMPANY


Florist


me


Mike@Ann
V; S S T :O Y L L E R S
AtfTFNTIK ORGANIC TItWFIl.


DAVID'S BRDAL
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-- C ~-~m~-'CIZ


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


I; :;r


LIFE Eu CA.JNAY2.21




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