The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01357
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: January 20, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01357
System ID: UF00028308:01357
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text









Lady Tigers Fall
Columbia takes Lady Bulldogs
to their limit.
000015 120511 ****3-DIGIT
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Lals i


326


Senior Shutout
Tigers blank Newberry.
Sports, IB






Porter


Thursday, January 20, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 136, No. 311 75 cents


t,.


Bond set at $1 million for Lake City man


Agents arrest suspect
on sexual battery
warrant fromAlachua.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City man wanted in con-
nection with an Alachua County
warrant for sexual battery was
arrested in his home by U.S. mar-
shals Friday and is being held
on $1 million bond, officials said


Wednesday.
Nicholas Edwin Harrell, of
810 SE St. Johns St., is being
held in the Columbia County
Detention Facility, according to
the Columbia County Sheriff's
Office.
Art Forgey, public information
officer at the Alachua County
Sheriff's Office, said Harrell was
arrested by The North Florida
Regional Fugitive Task Force,
members of which are deputized
by the US Marshals Service.


Because a lot of investigations
cross jurisdictional boundaries,
Forgey said, the Task Force
-,* involves officers
who are depu-
tizedthroughthe
U.S. Marshals
Work ing
Marshal1Is
Harrell Service, the offi-
cers are able to affect arrests
outside their jurisdiction.


"Ifs a resource when we have a
large scale investigation that they
are able to operate under the
supervision of this task force,"
Forgey said.
Harrell was also arrested on
a Columbia County warrant for
violation of probation on original
charges of grand theft, as well
as. a Suwannee County warrant
for, failure to appear for charges
of battery and disorderly intoxi-
cation. He has no bond on the
Columbia County case and a $250


bond for the Suwannee County
warrant.
The sexual battery arrest war-
rant was issued after an alleged
sexual attack that began on New
Year's Eve.
"It started off on New Year's
Eve when a group of people went
to a local pub in Gainesville,"
Forgey said. '"They met Harrell
and some friends and ended up
going back to the victim's
SUSPECT continued on 3A


MARCH FOR BABIES


5 JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Joshua Johnson kisses his 8-month-old son, Tripp, Thursday at the Suwannee Valley March for Babies 2011 Executive
Luncheon held at the Country Club of Lake City. Tripp Johnson was born prematurely with his esophagus partially developed.
'It's crazy, (the doctors) perform miracles,' Johnson said. 'If not for them, he wouldn't be alive.'


Business executives,

team leaders agree

to help raise $100K


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn

The North Central
Florida Division of the
March of Dimes set a
goal to raise $100,000 in
time for the Suwannee
Valley March for Babies.
About 35 team leaders and
executives from local businesses
attended the Suwannee Valley
March for Babies 2011 Executive
Luncheon on Wednesday at the
Country Club of Lake City to kick-
off the fundraising campaign.
To accomplish the goal, local
families, businesses and schools
formed different community
CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 .... .. 1 Fax: 752-9400


teams to raise money for the event
in various ways, said Kathy
McCallister, community director of
the Suwannee Valley for the North
Central Florida Division of the
March of Dimes.
The community raised $88,000
for the event in 2010.
According to the March for
Babies website, money raised for
this year's event, which will be
held at Olustee Park on April 16,
will go toward community pro-
grams that help women have full-
term pregnancies. It will also fund
research for the March of Dimes
mission improving the health of
babies by preventing birth defects,
BABIES continued on 3A


Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Rhonda Sherrod, chairwoman of the 2011
Honorary March for Babies and CEO of
Shands LakeShore Regional Medical
Center, speaks at the March of Dimes
fundraising campaign kickoff.

O pinion ................ 4A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B
Health.................. 6A


Council OKs

rescheduling

of MLK parade


Tribute to civil
rights leader will
take place Feb. 5.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
Participants will have to
wait a little longer to march
in the annual Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. Parade.
The City of Lake City
council, during its meeting
Tuesday, approved resched-
uling the parade for 10 a.m.
Feb. 5, contingent on all


requirements being met.
The parade will start at
the Florida Department of
Transportation and is host-
ed by the Northeast Florida
Leadership Council.
Originally, the parade
was scheduled for Monday,
but officials postponed the
event due to rain.
"It was a little heartbreak-
ing," said Anthony Newton,
parade coordinator. "So
much work went into it."
This is the first year the
MLK continued on 3A


Officials to tackle

issues on unified

.communications


Kinks involving
contract to be
ironed out.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The unified Columbia
County Emergency 911
Dispatch Communication
Center is slated to go "live"
within a few days, but in the
meantime local officials are
feverishly working to iron
out contract agreements
and other concerns.
The center is designed
to provide a unified com-


munication system for the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office, Columbia County
Fire/Rescue Department
and Lake City Fire
Department. The Lake City
Police Department is slated
to join at a later date.
On Wednesday after-
noon, more than 20
local officials attended a
Unified Columbia County
Emergency 911 Dispatch
Communication Center
executive committee meet-
*ing at the Columbia County
Emergency Operations
UNIFIED continued on 3A


Commissioners

to discuss Public

Works positions


Director filed
request to fill
three vacancies.
From staff reports
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners will dis-
cuss filling three vacant
Public Works Department
positions its only two
agenda items plus the con-
sent agenda at its meet-
ing today.

: AROUND
FLORIDA
h i [ : el,:n .lF,
t.. :, .1 I.[-eleI ,-


According to county
memorandums, Public
Works Director Kevin Kirby
requested the vacancies be
filled to provide adequate
service and help within the
department. The vacant
positions are two equip-
ment operator I jobs and a
Mechanic II job.
Kirby requested the
Mechanic II position be
advertised to the general
public, since no applica-
tions were received when it
was posted in-house.

COMING
FRIDAY
:. Coverage of County
-n. commission meeting.










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2011


Play ,


CA$H 3 Wednesday:
Afternoon: 8-8-1
Evening: 6-0-6


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 7-8-6-5
Evening: 3-9-7-2


.IL 1Tuesday:
1-13-16-18-30


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Obamas host jazzy state dinner


WASHINGTON
t was jazz on the stage and a
mix of Hollywood A-listers,
big business types and promi-
nent Chinese-Americans in
the audience Wednesday
night as Michelle and Barack
Obama threw a "quintessentially
American" state dinner for Chinese
President Hu Jintao. What was for
dinner at the hottest event in town?
Meat and potatoes, washed down
with apple pie and ice cream for
dessert, of course.
Singer Barbra Streisand, her
hubby-actor James Brolin and action
film star Jackie Chan supplied
some of the celebrity star power for
the A-list guest list. Big business
turned out in force, too, including
Microsoft's Steven Ballmer and
JP Morgan Chase's Jamie Dimon,
among others. Other big names:
fashion's Vera Wang, Vogue's Anna
Wintour, artist Maya Lin, Olympic
figure skater Michelle Kwan, and
Supreme Court Justice Stephen
Breyer to add some gravitas. Bill
Clinton made the cut, too.
The dinner's all-star jazz lineup
included trumpeter Chris Botti, two-
time Grammy Award-winning vocal-
ist Dee Dee Bridgewater, jazz icon
Herbie Hancock, rising star Lang
Lang and four-time Grammy-win-
ning vocalist Dianne Reeves.
Jazz pianist Peter Martin, part of
the entertainment lineup, prepped
for his appearance by springing for
a tux.
"I'm finally a grown-up, graduated
from renting to owning," Martin
tweeted.
New this state dinner: The 225
guests were spread out among
three rooms: the State Dining
Room, Blue Room and Red Room,
then all shuttle to the East Room for
the entertainment.
Also new: This was the Obamas'
first state dinner where they've


AOUUAIAtU KPREbS
President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama welcome China's
President Hu Jintao during a state arrival on the South Lawn of the White House
in Washington on Wednesday.


opted against bringing in a high-
profile guest chef, instead put-
ting White House Executive Chef
Cristeta Comerford in charge.

Gervais to appear
on NBC's 'The Office'
NEW YORK NBC said Ricky
Gervais will make a cameo appear-
ance on "The Office" next week,
reprising the role he played in the
original British version that he
helped create.
NBC said Wednesday that
Gervais' brief appearance on Jan. 27
will be as David Brent That's the
smart-alecky paper salesman who
inspired the character of Michael
Scott, portrayed by Steve Carell on
NBC's successful adaptation of the
comedy.
Gervais, who caused a stir as the


insult-slinging host of the Golden
Globes earlier this week, serves
as an executive producer of NBC's
"The Office."

Middleton wannabes
gather at palace
LONDON Call it a royal art
project.
With 100 days to go before the
royal wedding, 13 young women
have decided to mark the occasion
by dressing as Kate Middleton
and gathering at the gates outside
Buckingham Palace.
The unannounced arrival of the
wannabes wearing identical copies
of the dark blue dress Middleton
wore when her engagement to
Prince William was revealed gave
tourists a jolt Wednesday.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Singer Slim Whitman is 87.
* Actress Patricia Neal is 85.
* Director David Lynch is 65.
* Guitarist Paul Stanley of
Kiss is 59.
* Actor Lorenzo Lamas is
53.


* Actor James Denton is 48.
* Actor Rainn Wilson is 45.
* Actress Stacey Dash
(Clueless) is 44.
* Actor Skeet Ulrich is 41.
* Drummer Rob Bourdon of
Linkin Park is 32.


Daily ScriDture


"So in everything, do to others
what you would have them do
to you, for this sums up the Law
and the Prophets."


Matthew 7:12


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Sen. Nelson to
seek re-election
TALLAHASSEE U.S.
Sen. Bill Nelson said
Wednesday he'll seek
a third term, and that
he's confident he and
President Barack Obama
will fare well with the
state's voters in 2012
when Florida will have
29 electoral votes in the
presidential election.
"I have a great deal of
optimism that the presi-
dent will be re-elected and
he will carry Florida," the
68-year-old'Melbourne
Democrat told about 120
editors and reporters
attending The Associated
Press' annual legislative
meeting. "The president is
already benefiting by the
fact that the people sense
the economy is improv-
ing. That will continue
for him as the economy
improves."
Several Republicans,
buoyed by the 2010 elec-
tion results, are already
considering a run against
Nelson. They include
state Senate President
Mike Haridopolos of
Merritt Island, U.S. Rep.
Connie Mack of Fort
Myers, former U.S. Sen.
George LeMieux of Fort
Lauderdale and former
state Rep. Adam Hasner
of Delray Beach.

Gay Miami man
adopts two boys
MIAMI A homo-
sexual Miami man has
officially adopted two
brothers in a case that
overturned Florida's
three-decade ban on gay
adoptions.
Martin Gill and his part-
ner were the boys' foster
parents for six years. Gill
officially adopted the two
boys Wednesday.
: Gill and the American
Civil Liberties Union filed
a lawsuit against the state,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. Senator Bill Nelson answers a question at a news
conference on Wednesday in Tallahassee.


calling the ban unconsti-
tutional. The 3rd District
Court of Appeal agreed
in a ruling last year.
The state decided not to
appeal.
Gill said he is thrilled
they are "officially a fam-
ily in the eyes of the law."
The prohibition was
enacted in 1977 and court
records indicate ift's the
only law of its kind in the
United States.

Ex-GOP chair's
book sealed
ORlANDO A judge
has agreed to temporarily
seal a book manuscript
by the former chairman
of the Republican Party
of Florida, who has been
charged with funneling
party money into his per-
sonal accounts.
Orange-Osceola
Circuit Judge Marc'Lubet
ordered the writings
temporarily sealed on
Wednesday.
Jim Greer was arrested
last year on six felonies,
including theft, organized.
fraud and money launder-,
ing. He has pleaded not
guilty and is currently


awaiting trial.
Greer had asked the
judge to stop. prosecutors
from using the document,
which was found on one
of several computers
agents confiscated from
his home when he was
arrested.

Haridopolos says
cuts are priority
TALLAHASSEE
Florida's new Senate
president says he'd like
to cut taxes in addition to
slashing more than $3 bil-
lion from the state budget.
Republican Mike
Haridopolos of Merritt
Island said Wednesday
that his chief priority for
the upcoming legislative
session that begins in
early March is balancing
the state budget which
is required by law with-
out any tax increases.
Haridopolos, the final
speaker at The Associated
Press' annual meeting of
media executives, said
much of the savings will
come by cutting state
employee pay and pension
benefits.

* Associated Press


PARTLY
" CLOUDY


HI 69 LnO i


Pensacola
62/43


MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY SUNNY


HI 56L027 HI 61L0 35


Tallahassee*
67/48 ....
Panama City
62/48


Valdosta
69*/48 knvCity
Lak Jacksonve Cape Canaveral
Lake City 70/52 Daytona Beach
69/52 Ft. Lauderdale
Gainesville Dayona Beach Fort Lauders
,70/54 7561 s
\05.4..... Ocala ", Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
7 Orlando Capk Canaveral Key West
78/60 75/62 Lake City
T Miami
73/Tampa \ Naples
73/61 V West Palm Beach Ocala
80/66 0 Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers. 81/68 Pensacola
78/62 *Naples Tallahassee
78/63 Miami Tampa


Key. W est 8 e/68 Valdosta
8et W. Palm Beach


78/70 W. Palm Beach


A A 'A A


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low
PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
'Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


68
51
66
42
85 in 1937
20 in 1977

0.04"
1.73"
1.73"
2.07"
2.07"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.
MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


7:27 a.m.
5:57 p.m.
7:26 a.m.
5:58 p.m.

7:10 p.m.
7:49 a.m.
8:18 p.m.
8:30 a.m.


@,co
Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb.
26 2 11 18
Last New First Full


3
MOREM
45nilesiolun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
,%-. ':' "v:.


Friday
71,'49'sn
67/43/sh
82/61/t
76/55/sh
63/34/sh
62/35/pc
72/61/t
62/30/sh
82/63/t
76/58/t
65/37/s h
71/46/sh
58/30/pc
55/27/pc
59/27/pc
68/44/sh,
58/28/pc
80/58/t


Saturday
64/43. pc
62/38/pc
76/53/pc
66/44/pc
56/29/pc
56/31/pc
71/63/sh
56/27/pc
75/53/pc
69/46/pc
59/31/pc
64/39/pc
51/31/s
54/32/s
53/26/s
60/40/pc
53/28/s
73/45/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


,. f < Forecasts, data and graph-
S- Ics 2011 Weather Central
.w w LLC, Madison, WIs.
'.J ~ www.weatherpubllsher.com


JS | \ 'i:'^


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US BUSINESS
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Fax number .............752-9400 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. a.m. on Sunday.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the permis-' vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
No. 310-880. vice related credits will be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Lake City, Fa. 32056. vice related credits will be issued.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS Home delivery rates
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427 (Tuesday through Sunday)
After 1:00 p.m. 12 Weeks................. $26.32
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52 Weeks................... $83.46
ADVERTISING Rates indude 7% sales tax.
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(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks.............. $41.40
CLASSIFIED 24 Weeks ................ $82.80
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440. 52 Weeks.................$179.40


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


m


1!2- SATR ;mi


SUNDi


k4 w^^^^MONAY


www.lakeci(yreporter.cotii
Lake City Reporter


-- I ......................... 1-


weather.com i










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2011


SUSPECT
From Page 1A
apartment Some time after
midnight the friends that
were with Harrell and the
female left, leaving Harrell
and the victim alone at the
apartment At that time, she
alleged that he sexually bat-
tered her and then left the
location."
Forgey said the victim
alleges that Harrell deleted
his phone number out of her
phone and gave her a ficti-
tious name and claimed he
was a member of the armed
forces.
The victim and her friend
were able to pickup informa-
tion throughout the evening
and used it to identify Harrell
through his Facebook
account.
"Once detectives had that
information, they were able
to put together a photo line-
up where Harrell was posi-
tively picked out," Forgey
said. "Along with a prelimi-
nary analysis of some of
the evidence at the scene,
they got an arrest warrant
for Harrell and arrested him
Friday."
The alleged sexual assault
occurred in the unincorpo-
rated area of Gainesville in
the Haile Plantation neigh-
borhood and was reported to
the Alachua County Sheriff's
Office on Jan. 1.
"It took several days to
get Harrell positively identi-
fied and to get some initial
forensics analysis, so detec-
tives were able to obtain the
warrant," Forgey said. "They
looked for him several days
before they found him."
Forgey said the area was
briefly under surveillance
when authorities saw Harrell
left the house to throw the
trash. "Sometimes it's better
to be lucky than it is to be
good," Forgey said.
According to Lake City
Police Department reports,
officer Kevin Johns was dis-
patched to the area of Ermine
and Duval Street Friday after-
noon.
Johns reported Harrell,
was secured in handcuffs and
taken to jail without incident
after authorities confirmed
the warrants.


UNIFIED: More meetings expected


Continued From Page 1A
Center. They discussed
the interlocal agreement,
which will allow the proj-
ect to become a reality.
The meeting was sched-
uled to serve as a prelude
to future communication
meetings.
Columbia County Sheriff
Mark Hunter talked about
the importance of meet-
ing face-to-face, without
sending letters and elec-
tronic messages, which
has resulted in additional
questions.
However, city and coun-


ty officials have additional
questions and concerns
about the interlocal agree-
ment, which they believe
need to be addressed to
make the project a success.
The city has asked coun-
ty officials to answer ques-
tions about governance
of the combined commu-
nication center; establish-
ing performance metrics
to measure efficiency;
combined communication
center operations, proce-
dures that will be used
to enhance operations and


problem resolution and
the roles and responsibili-
ties of the communication
center stakeholders.
On the other hand the
county wants know the
city's goals and objec-
ti-ves of the communica-
tion center; learn about
management of the 911
center and 911 surcharge
revenue; the development
of the communication cen-
ter technology master plan
and the cost breakdown
of the center, including
recurring costs.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Tari Johnson shows off a blood pressure cuff made for premature babies that her son wore
on his leg while in the hospital. While the cuff easily fits around her thumb, its loosely fitted
Tripp's leg.

BABIES: Fundraising goal set at 100K
Continued From Page 1A


premature birth and infant mortality.
At the luncheon, attendees received
encouragement from special speakers to
participate in the walk and fundraising
for it .
"By participating in the March for
Babies, we're trying to give every baby
a healthy start," said Rhonda Sherrod,
2011 Honorary March for Babies chair-
woman and chief executive officer of
Shands LakeShore Regional Medical
Center.
Tari Jdhnsdn of Lake City and her
husband, Josh, were the luncheon
ambassador speakers. The Johnsons.
shared the story of their son, Tripp,
describing how they spent almost six


months in a neonatal intensive care unit
and how the March of Dimes' programs
and research helped them through the
experience.
"No baby should have to fight that
hard to live at the beginning of their
life," Tari Johnson said.
Teams also made pledges and chal-
lenged one another to raise certain
amounts of money.
To sign up for the walk, call
McCallister at (386) 755-0507 or (386)
623-1507 or e-mail kmccallister@mar-
chofdimes.com. Visit marchforbabies.org.
"You are looking at helping babies,"
said Irv Crowetz, March of Dimes vol-
unteer.


Organizers: Booths

available for Florida

Home & Patio Show


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn
Booth spots are still
available for the Eighth
Annual North Florida
Home and Patio Show, but
businesses don't want to
delay in signing up.
"The show has always
sold out," said Mike
Gordon, show chairman.
"In the past, we've had
to tell folks, 'Sorry, we've
reached industry limit.'"
The event is 9 a.m. -
5 p.m. March 5 and 10
a.m. 4 p.m. March 6
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds.
The Rotary Club of
Lake City Downtown is
the presenting spofisor.
Co-sponsors are the Lake
City Reporter, Sunstate
Federal Credit Union and
Newman Media.


Vendors include home
and patio-related business-
es, such as landscaping,
kitchen work and more
from Columbia County and
other parts of Northeast
Florida. Attendance at the
show over the two days is
more than 12,000 people.
Organizers try to create
a balance by limiting the
number of businesses in
a specific area, which ven-
dors seem to appreciate,
Gordon said.
'We don't want to have
too many of one kind of
business," he said.
The show provides an
opportunity for an estab-
lished business to keep its
name out in the commu-
nity, Gordon said. A new
business can get its name
out.
"It's one stop shopping,"
he said.


MLK: Parade in February


Continued From Page 1V
parade has been rained
out.
"It's rained before the
parade but stopped in time
for line up," he said.
Before the vote, Newton
asked council to consider
approving the parade for
Saturday. The leadership
council did not want par-
ticipants to lose interest by
pushing the. parade back*
too far, he said.
Inclement- weather
might have damaged
floats, said Councilman
Eugene Jefferson. Some
groups would have to start
from scratch to get a float
together by Saturday.
Lake City Police Chief
Argatha Gilmore said her
department tries to let its
officers know 14 days in
advance for events, in addi-
tion to coordination efforts
with the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office and DOT.
Staging the parade on a


more distant date would
put the department in a
better position logistically
for staff purposes and pre-
planning
"It will give us enough
peace of mind," she said.
The leadership council
understood the concerns
of parade participants who
wanted to go on despite
the rain, Newton said.
Many children were par-
ticipating in the event, and
officials did not want to
risk their health and safety
by continuing the event'
Moving the parade, to
February will allow it to
be used as an opening for
Black History Month, he
said. New participants will
still be accepted for the
parade.
Contact Ron Williams at
(386) 867-0468 or Audre'
Washington at (386) 344-
9915 for more informa-
tion.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424














OPINION


Thursday, January 20, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Slashing

defense

spending

not easy

ifty years ago this
week, just days
before President
Dwight D.
Eisenhower left
office, he made a speech warn-
ing of the distorting political
and financial power of the "mil-
itary-industrial complex."
Today, with the United
States facing a financial crisis,
it's important to remember
Eisenhower's warning and to
look at military spending ratio-
nally.
Too often, objections to
reductions or changes in mili-
tary spending are about jobs
and the clout of corporate
lobbyists, not about making
America safer. The military-
industrial complex has grown
stronger since Eisenhower
coined the phrase in 1961 and,
since that time, it's expanded
to become a military-industrial--
congressional complex.
Today's fiscal realities
require that military spend-
ing be trimmed. Any serious
effort to cut the U.S. budget
deficit requires some cuts to
entitlement spending Social
Security, Medicare and
Medicaid as well as military
spending, which at $720 billion
a year is the largest part of
discretionary spending in the
federal budget.
Still, military spending must
be examined from the perspec-
tive of defense and whether
spending is effective at increas-
ing the security of the United
States in today's world. The
debate over cuts to military
spending should be about
defense and national security
not about employment and
not about defense contractors'
campaign contributions and
lobbying.
Eisenhower's warning in his
farewell speech is more true
today than in 1961. And com-
ing from a five-star general,
his concerns over the power of
the military-industrial complex
should be taken seriously as
Americans watch the coming
debate over military spending.
The Butler (Pa.) Eagle

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
'Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Obama delivers good message


O official Washington
and ordinary
America, hav-
ing paused and
grieved, have now
appropriately moved on. Even
Tucson, where the pain of trag-
edy and loss will never be for-
gotten, has gotten to the point
where its citizens can pick up
and carry on with life.
We are led, in our moving
on, by Rep. Gabrielle Giffords,
whose determination to live and
recover has inspired us all. And
we have been counseled, wisely
and eloquently, by President
Obama, who may have reached
the apex of his presidential lead-
ership at a moment where we
perhaps needed it most.
For until he spoke, we had
let the act of an assassin who
killed six and wounded a dozen
more on Jan. 8, become our
excuse for descending into a
bitter politics of grief through
recrimination that had begun
fueling the fires of hate it sought
to extinguish.
Now we are at the tipping
point Obama had counseled
us about: The beginning of the
rest of our private and (for a
news-dominating few) public
lives. So we all are watching,
listening and hoping that the
politicians in our midst have the
restraint and willingness to heed
Obama's call that we honor the
Tucson victims by living up to
their example. Especially, by
living up to the expectations of
the youngest victim, 9-year-old
Christina Taylor Green, who
had just been elected to her
school student council and had
been brought to the event so
she could meet her congress-
woman.
"I want to live up to her
expectations," said the president
at the Tucson memorial event.


(. '
Martin Schram
mrnortin.schrom@gmail.com
"I want our democracy to be as
good as Christina imagined it. I
want America to be as good as
she imagined it."
Obama's speech, its concep-
tual framework to its eulogizing
eloquence watched by 31 million
on TV and a crowd of more than
14,000 live, was as personal and
inspirational as most of his oth-
ers since assuming office had
been perfunctory and pedagogi-
cal. He lectured misbehaving
politicians in a way fhat was nei-
ther lecturing nor political. (He
mainly seemed to be cautioning
fellow liberals about blaming
conservative pro-gun rhetoric
and symbols for the Tucson
gunman's actions, since after
all there was no evidence the
suspect was ever aware of such
comments.)
We can only hope politicians
of all persuasions got it. But now
we have evidence that at least
the nonpoliticians who make up
ordinary America seem to have
heard Obama's message and
have taken it to heart.
On Tuesday, a Washington
Post-ABC News poll taken just
after Obama spoke in Tucson
reported Obama's overall
approval rating has now reached
54 percent the highest per-
centage since last April, while
just 43 percent of respondents
said they disapproved of the
way Obama is handling his job.
By comparison, last September,
during the midterm election


campaign, Obama's approval rat-
ing stood at 46 percent approval
and 52 percent disapproval.
But Obama's political strat-
egists would be wise not to
get too gleeful about this lat-
est polling turn for the bet-
ter because much of his
improvement was among voters
who are still unlikely to vote
for him for re-election. Among
those who identified themselves
as Republican voters, Obama
received 22 percent approval
rating for the job he is doing
in the latest survey while
last fall only eight percent of
the Republican respondents
approved of Obama's job perfor-
mance.
In the latest poll, 78 percent
of respondents approved of
the president's response to the
Tucson shootings. Included
in that were 71 percent of
Republicans who said they
approved of Obama's response
to the Tucson tragedy.
"If this tragedy prompts
reflection and debate as it
should let's make sure it's
worthy of those we have lost,"
Obama said in Tucson. "Let's
make sure it's not on the usual
plane of politics and point-scor-
ing and pettiness that drifts
away in the next news cycle."
This week, the politicians of
both parties have rather cau-
tiously gone back to business.
The Republican-led House,
where Gaby Giffords' chair is
temporarily vacant, is taking up
a vote to repeal Obama's health-
care reform.
The rest of us, meanwhile,
are just watching and waiting.
We are taking Washington's new
civility one news cycle at a time.
* Martin Schram writes
political analysis for Scripps
Howard News Service.


OTHER OPINION

A sweeping regulatory review


President Barack
Obama has ordered
a governmentwide
review of federal
regulations. The
agencies have 120 days to sub-
mitplans to root out rules that are
outdated, pose an unreasonable
burden on business, conflict with
other regulations, aren't worth the
cost or, in the president's words,
"that are just plain dumb."
The political considerations of
the announcement are clear: The
president wants to make nice with
the business community after the
traumatic battle over health care
and financial regulation.
Obama has hired former busi-
ness executive William Daley as
his chief of staff. Next month he
will address the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce, which has opposed
his principle legislative initiatives.


The president chose to announce
his regulatory review in an op-ed
commentary in The Wall Street
Journal, a leading critic of his eco-
nomic policies.
The Obama administration's
own review of regulations will
also somewhat defuse a similar
campaign by Rep. Darrell Issa,
the California Republican and new
chairman of the House Oversight
and Government Reform
Committee. Issa has been polling
businesses and trade associations
to find out which regulations they
believe most impede job creation.
The impact of any dramatic find-
ings by Issa's panel will be greatly
diminished if Obama's people get
there first
Reading between the lines,
Obama surely hopes to get the
business community invested in
writing the new regulations for
health care and financial reform


- regulations that have to be
written to implement those laws.
He instructed the agencies to
seek more input from business in
writing new rules.
The regulator that business
most wants to rein in is the
Envirorunental Protection Agency.
But the EPA is one of the agen-
cies Obama's liberal base feels
strongest about
In any event, this is a regular
review of the government's regu-
latory apparatus. Thus, it may
seem a little churlish that there
is already is an agency charged
with reviewing proposed federal
regulations for effectiveness,
efficiency and cost effectiveness.
It's the White House Office of
Management and Budget, just
across the driveway from the Oval
Office.
* Scripps Howard News Service


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandall.com


Grandma

creates

special

bond

Of all the "mamas"
who helped shape
me a tag-team
effort that includ-
ed my mother, her
eight sisters, several teachers
and the mothers of a few of my. .
friends no one meant more
to me than my grandmothers.
My mother's mother was a
preacher's wife who lived in .
town, rarely went to church
and never missed a chance to
speak her mind. A mischievous
woman with a dark sense of
humor, she wore white gloves
to go shopping, cheated openly
at cards and swore under her
breath like a sailor.
My father's mother was a
farmer's wife who lived on a
mountain that she seldom left,
except to go to church every
Sunday. She grew dahlias and
tomatoes, hiked for miles to *-
pick wildflowers, read novels,
wrote poetry, painted sun-
sets on stones and traveled
*through the pages of National
Geographic and her own imagi-
nation.
They were as different from
each other as two women could
be. The one thing they shared
in common was a boundless
and abiding love for me. I was
each woman's favorite grand- .:-
child, a fact that will be disputed
by my siblings and cousins, but
I had no doubt: They loved me --
best.
I always thought I knew my
grandmothers pretty well. But
lately I've been seeing them :
or, rather, my memories of :
them in a new and different --
light.
Apparently, with grandmas, it ,-
takes one to know one. That is
what I am now, a grandmother.
I joined the club five months
ago when my youngest and his ,.
wife gave birth to a strong boy .
with red hair and blue eyes and
a steel-trap grip on my heart.
His name is Randy. He lives
in California with his parents.
I live 500 miles away in Las
Vegas, with my husband, who
calls from work several times a
day to see if I'm still home.
I spent three weeks with
Randy after he was born, plus a ,
few days at Thanksgiving. And
he and his parents came to visit
after Christmas.
Today, while his mom was
shopping, I pushed his stroller
about the store and entertained
him by making faces that kept
him in stitches. I hate shopping,
but I'm good at making faces.
Later, his mom let me feed
him bananas.'He didn't find that
nearly as funny. Most of the
bananas ended up in my hair.
After his mom cleaned him
up, we played, he and I, on the
rug in his room and I told him
about his great-great grand-
mothers.
"They were different," I said,
"and I am different, too. But the
best thing about them was they
loved me best. And that is how I
will love you."
He grabbed my nose and
tried to put it in his mouth.
"Someday," I continued, in a
twangy, pinched-ntse, painful
voice, "you might have a baby ,
sister or a bunch of squirrelly
cousins who'll say I love them
best. And they'll be right." '
He let go of my nose and
looked into my eyes.
"But just remember," I said, '
resting my face on his belly. "I
loved you best first."
Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


4A











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Today
Inaugural reception
The Howard T. Odum Florida
Springs Institute will hold an
inaugural reception 7 9 p.m.
today at the High Springs Opera
House, 65 N. Main St. The cost
of the event is $30 per attendee.
People planning to attend need
to register in advance at www.
FloridaSpringsInstitute. org.
A variety of hors d'oeuvres
will be provided for guests and
there will be a cash bar avail-
able throughout the evening.
The Howard T. Odum Florida
Springs Institute was founded to
promote springs restoration and
protection.

Branford Camera Club
The Branford Camera Club is
meeting 7 p.m. Thursday at the
Branford Public Library. The
program is "Exposure: The basics
and more." Terry Hancock will
present the material and lead the
discussion; members and guests
may participate regardless of level
of expertise. The homework this
month is "Clouds." Choose two
to three photos to share with the
group, either digitally or printed.
Also, bring other recent photos to
share with the group. An introduc-
tion to the "Picasa" photo software
program presented by Humberto
Castellanos is Feb. 17. Call
Carolyn Hogue, program chair-
woman, 386-935-2044.

Blood drive
The LifeSouth Bloodmobile is
stopping 12 to 6 p.m. Thursday
at Pizza Boy Pizza. All donors
receive a free large cheese pizza,
a backpack and a chance to win
an Apple iPad.

Public Meeting
Healthy Start of North Central
Florida holds its Board meet-
ing at 2 p.m. on Thursday. The
public is invited to this meeting
taking place at the WellFlorida
Council Conference Room in
Gainesville. For more informa-
tion, call Celia Paynter at 352-
313-6500, extension 118.

Retired Educators
The Columbia County Retired
Educators meet at 1 p.m. on
Thursday at the School Board


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Expert gets goosebumps over antiques and collectibles
Bob DeFebbo of Inverness tells Lake City resident Verna Saxon about the grade of an 1878 silver dollar coin
from her collection Wednesday at the Ohio Valley Refinery Reclamation Drive at the Fairfield Inn & Suites. 'I
enjoy looking at collectibles,' DeFebbo said. 'I get goosebumps just talking about this stuff.' *


Adult Center, room 120. Any
retired person interested in edu:
cation is invited to join. For more
information call Will Brown at
386-752-2431.

Friday
Blood drive
The LifeSouth Bloodmobile
is stopping 2 to 8 p.m. Friday
at Panda-Moni-Yum. All donors
receive 500 sweepstakes credits,
a back pack and a chance to win
an Apple iPad.

Public Meeting
Healthy Start of North Central
Florida holds its Board meeting
at 2 p.m. on Jan. 20. The public
is invited tothis meeting taking
place at the WellFlorida Council
Conference Room in Gainesville.
For more information, call Celia
Paynter at 352-313-6500, exten-
sion 118.

Retired Educators
The Columbia County Retired


Educators meet at 1 p.m. on
Thursday at the School Board
Adult Center, room 120. Any
retired person interested in edu-
cation is invited to join. For more
information call Will Brown at
386-752-2431.

Antique Show and Sale
Pilot Club of Jacksonville
is hosting its 62nd annual
Charities Antique Show and
Sale from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan.
21 and 22, and from 11 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Jan. 23. The event
takes place at the Jacksonville
Fairgrounds Expo Center
located at 510 Fairgrounds Place
in Jacksonville. Admission is 10
dollars per person, and parking
is free. For advance tickets, call
386-752-6575.

Volunteers Needed
The Lighthouse Gift Shop
is looking for volunteers at all
times to help in the shop located
at Lake City Medical Center.
There are several shifts avail-


able, and a free meal is provided
each time worked. Applications
are available at the Gift shop or
the hospital front desk, or call
Linda Butler at 386-719-9008 for
more information.

Saturday
Class Meeting
The Richardson High School
Class of 1970 hosts their month-
ly class meeting at 1 p.m. on
Saturday, Jan. 22. The meeting
will take place in the Richardson
Community Center, and all class-
mates are urged to attend. For
more information, contact Macy
at 386-752-3471.

Craft Rendezvous
The 8th Annual Craft
Rendezvous is 10 a.m. 4 p.m.
Jan. 22 at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park in
White Springs.. Visitors can
participate in a variety of work-
shops including child and adult
blacksmithing, pottery,, weaving,


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Russian egg dying and more.
William Good, an environmental-
ist and guitar virtuoso, will pro-
vide entertainment in the Craft
Square. Admission to the event
is free with paid park admission
of $5 per vehicle for up to eight
people. Contact the Craft Square
& Gift Shop at (386) 397-1920 or
visit www.stephenfosterCSO.org.

Real Diamonds in concert
The REAL Diamonds per-
form 2:30 p.m. Jan. 22 at
Florida Gateway College Levy
Performing Arts Center. Tickets
are available at the door 1:30
p.m. Call 386-466-8999.

Monday
Historical Society meeting
Award-winning Florida author
Sudye Cauthen will give a talk to
the Columbia County Historical
Society at 7:00 p.m. Monday
at the downtown library. The
lecture is free and open to the
public. For information con-
tact Society President Sean
McMahon at 754-4293 or at sean.
mcmahon@fgc.edu

Academic Recognition
Presley EXCEL and Scholars
Program Academic Recognition
Program is 6:30 p.m. Jan. 24 in
the Richardson Middle School
Auditorium.. The program is
for students in kindergarten
through 12th grade whose
second nine weeks report card
has no grade less than a B or
S. The speaker for the occasion
is the Honorable Circuit Judge
Leandra G. Johnson.

Tuesday
Olustee Festival Pageant
Contestants are being sought ,
for the 2011 Olustee Festival
Pageant. The pageant is Feb. 5
and open to girls ages 13 months.
20 years who reside or attend
school in Baker, Columbia,
Hamilton, Union or Suwannee
Counties. Applications are avail-'
able at the Columbia County
Library, Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce, Emily
Taber Library, Suwannee.Regional
Library or by contacting Elaine
Owens at 386-965-2787. Deadline
for entries is Jan. 25.


Ceremony to recognize McDuffie


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Known for his love of
the outdoors and commu-
nity involvement, William
C. "Billy" McDuffie will
be honored at the Florida
Arbor Day Ceremony at
11 a.m. Friday in Olustee
Park.
Coordinated by the City
of Lake City/Columbia
County Beautification
Committee, the ceremo-
ny honors a person, living
or dead, who has made
substantial contributions
to the community, said
Bettye Lane, committee
chairwoman.


"He enjoyed teaching people to learn
about the outdoors."

Lee McDuffie
son of William McDuffie


Billy McDuffie founded
McDuffie's Marine and
Sporting Goods in 1950,
she said, and he readily
shared his knowledge of
sports and the outdoors. .
The outdoors was his
life, said his son, Lee
McDuffie, adding that his
father spent as much time
as he could on the water
fishing or out in the woods
hunting.
"He enjoyed teaching


people to learn about the
outdoors," he said.
During the ceremony,
the mayor will read a
proclamation declaring it
Florida Arbor Day. James
Montgomery will offer
reflections on McDuffie
and Dr. Ian Rodriguez will
talk about trees and their
importance.
A live oak tree and a
marker will also be pre-
sented to the family, Lane


said. The tree will be plant-
ed at Southside Recreation
Center.
The family is very appre-
ciative of the honor, Lee
McDuffie said. He said
his father would be very
proud and happy about the
tribute. "It's one of the nic-
est honors he's gotten,"
he said.
The community is invit-
ed to participated in the
Florida Arbor Day festivi-
ties.
"They can, remember
and in .their own way pay
honor to a gentleman and
contribut;ig member of
our community and learn
about trees," Lane said.


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OBITUARIES


Ronnie Ellet Bias
Ronnie Ellet Bias, 10,
passed away tragically, Sun-
day, January 16, 2011.
Ronnie was a fun and tender-
hearted little boy who liked play-
ing soccer for the Steelers, lover
of animals and
most of all
loved his baby
sister. He was
a fourth grade ,~
student at Co-
lumbia City El-
ementary and a '-
child of God. *
He is survived by his parents:
Everett & Bobbie Jo Bias; broth-
ers: Julian Little and Michael
Bias; baby sister: Kiauna Bias
all of Lake City, FL; grandpar-
ents: Ronnie Bias & Olive Bias,
Ralph McCullough, Rick and
Susan Parker. Numerous aunts,
uncles, and cousins also survive.
Funeral services for Ronnie
will be conducted at 2:00 p.m.
on Sunday, January 23, 2011
in the chapel of Gateway-For-
est Lawn Funeral Home, 3596
U.S. Hwy 441 S. Lake City, FL.
32025 (386) 752-1954. Visita-
tion with the family is Satur-
day, January 22, 2011 from
5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the


funeral home. Interment will be
in Forest Lawn Memorial Gar-
dens. An account has been set
up at First Federal Bank in Lake
City to help with funeral ex-
penses. GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME is
in charge of all arrangements.
Please sign the guest book at
wikw.gatewayforestlawn. com.

Nicholas James Carter
Nicholas James Carter, 30, passed
away unexpectedly, Saturday,
January 8, 2011 at his home. He
was a lifelong resident of Colum-
bia County who enjoyed reading,
working out, and martial arts.
He was a loving son and broth-
er who will be greatly missed.
Survivors include his parents,
William & Elsie Carter of Lake
City, FL; sister, Charity Gall of
Lake City, FL, and her fiance
Guy Minshall of Orlando, FL;
maternal grandparent, Jo Ann
Carter; and niece, Erica Gall of
Lake City, FL. two aunts, Bren-
da Barton of Lake City, FL and
Cheryl Marcho of Sidell, LA;
three uncles, John (Cecile) Bar-
ton ofMiami, FL, Craig Barton of
Lake City, FL and Edward Carter
of Interlachen, FL also survive.


Memorial services will be con-
ducted at 2:00 p.m. on Sat-
urday, January 22, 2011 at
the First Christian Church of
Lake City. 403 West Duval
Street, Lake City, FL 32055
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME 3596
U.S. Hwy 441 S. Lake City,
FL 32025(386) 752-1954 is
in charge of arrangements

Christopher James "Chris"
Ratliff
Mr. Christopher James "Chris"
Ratliff, 25, of Lake City, died
late Thursday evening October
7, 2010 of injuries sustained in
an automobile accident. A native
of Lake City, Chris had lived in
both the Lake City and Olus-
tee, Florida areas all of his life.
He worked with his dad in the
pulpwood and timber industries.
Chris was an avid Florida Gator
football fan and enjoyed hunting
and fishing. He was a Christian
and had attended the Olustee
Baptist Church and more re-
cently the Watertown Congre-
gational Methodist Church.
Chris is survived by his mother,
Ruth Tillman of Olustee; his
father, James "Lucky" Ratliff


of Lake City, Florida; his sis-
ter, Rachel Hodgson of Glen St.
Mary, Florida; a daughter, Kyra
Leanne Brady of Lake City; his
niece, Hailey Elizabeth Hodgson
of Glen St. Mary, Florida; his
grandmothers, Alma Johnson of
Lake City and Betty Ruth Walk-
er of Zolfo Springs, Florida; his
grandfather, Glenn Ray Tillman
Sr. of Lake City; and his great-
grandmothers, Sue Alford of
Lake City and Ruth Elizabeth
Collier of Zolfo Springs, Flori-
da. Chris was preceded in death
by his grandfather, Cecil Ratliff.
Graveside funeral services will
be conducted at 1:00 P.M. Sat-
urday, October 22, 2011 in the
Olustee Cemetery in Olustee
Florida with Rev. Randy Og-
bum officiating. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Mar-
ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025.
(386)752-1234. Please sign
the on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. com


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


20 years of Social Security Disability Experience
I _www.GBISOnline.com


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY JANUARY 20. 2011


ON HEALTH '


Errors lead surgeons to consider suicide


Dr. Peter Gott


Reader:

Can meds

bring out

insomnia?

EAR DR.
GOTr: For
more than
a year now,
I have had
insomnia nightly for two
or more hours; dry mouth
(for which I use Biotene,
which helps a little); night
sweats that cause me to
change my bedclothes
every night and sometimes
twice; muscle discomfort
from my elbow to my
shoulder when my arms
are out or above my head;
gas (for which I use Beano,
which only prevents gas
when taken just before
eating); and constipation,
missing a day or two of
evacuation on occasion.
For my dry mouth, my
doctor thought Allegra
could be the cause. I
stopped taking the Allegra,
but it didn't help.
I have osteoarthritis,
RA, diverticulitis, a hiatal
hernia, GERD, gastritis and
microvascular ischemic
disease. My medications
include prednisone, metho-
trexate, Synthroid, Prilosec,
Lipitor, folic acid, senna S,
Viactin and calcium with
vitamins D and K2. I have
a morphine pain pump and
still have 10 Ambien left
from a 2009 prescription.
I'm allergic to niacin and
cortisone and cannot take
aspirin or aspirin products
because of the methotrex-
ate. All medications except
the morphine have been
taken for years, and during
periods of insomnia, I have
something to eat.
My primary doctor does
extensive fasting lab work
every six months. My
rheumatologist orders lab
testing every eight weeks,
and my pain consultant
says the morphine can be
causing the gas but doesn't
believe it has anything to
do with my other problems.
All lab work has always
come back normal. Please
help!
DEAR READER: Let's
start at the beginning.
Insomnia can be the result
of a chemical imbalance in
the brain such as depres-
sion, stress and/or anxiety;
medical conditions such as
pain, arthritis, GERD, an
overactive thyroid; nicotine
and eating too much too
late in the evening; medica-
tions to include antidepres-
sants, allergy medications,
antihistamines, deconges-
tants; and, finally, simply
bad sleeping habits. You
already qualify for a num-
ber of the causes. Beyond
that, you may be unaware
that you have sleep apnea
or restless-legs syndrome,
which can interfere with
sleep patterns. Testing to
rule out these conditions
can be performed at a
sleep center if necessary.
Dry mouth is often a
side effect of medication,
specifically blood-pressure
reducers, muscle relaxants,
antidepressants, antihis-
tamines and anti-anxiety
drugs. The use of tobacco
can also cause or contrib-
ute to the problem. Use a
fluoride rinse or brush a
fluoride gel onto your teeth
before bedtime. Don't use
alcohol-containing mouth-
washes. Avoid foods that
are high in acid or sugar.
Limit your intake of caf-
feine, and try an over-the-
counter saliva substitute.
* Dr. Peter Gott is a retired
physician and tle author of
the book "Dr. Gott's No Flour,
No Sugar Diet," available at


most chain and independent
bookstores, and the recently
published "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Cookbook."


By LINDSEY TANNER
AP Medical Writer
CHICAGO
Study suggests medi-
cal errors, job burnout
and depression lead
surgeons to contem
plate suicide at high-
er rates than the general public,
and they're much less likely to
seek help.
Fear of losing their jobs con-
tributes to surgeons' reluctance
to get mental health treatment,
according to the study. Nearly
8,000 surgeons participated.
About 6 percent reported
recent suicidal thoughts; the
rate was 16 percent among those
who'd made a recent major
medical error although it wasn't
known if that was the reason.
Only about one-fourth of those
with suicidal thoughts said they'd
sought professional mental
health. By contrast, among the
general population, about 3 per-
cent have suicidal thoughts and
44 percent of them seek mental
health treatment, other studies
have shown.
"Surgeons reported a great
deal of concern about potential
repercussions for their license
to practice medicine," and many
admitted self-medicating with
antidepressant drugs, said lead
author Dr. Tait Shanafelt of the
Mayo Clinic.
Arkansas Dr. Robert
Lehmberg, 63, said it took prod-
ding from close friends to finally
get him to seek treatment for
depression and suicidal thoughts
several years ago. Though he
feared losing his license and
being stigmatized, neither hap-


p ...


ef
rf



. P-


.&WWI


V


__- _-_ --- --- -_ -- .--- --- - ---.- _. -
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dr. Robert Lehmberg is seen in Little Rock, Ark., in this April 29, 2008 file
photo. A study shows surgeons are more likely than others to contemplate
suicide, yet few seek help. Lehmberg, 63, said it took prodding from lose
friends to finally get him to seek treatment for depression and suicidal
thoughts several years ago. He feared losing his license and being stigma-
tized, neither happened, and he said medication and psychotherapy have
greatly helped.


opened, and he said medication
and psychotherapy have greatly
helped.
Working 60 to 80 hours weekly
in a busy Little Rock, Ark. plastic
surgery office contributed to his
depression, but Lehmberg said
he was careful to avoid medical
errors.
"Surgeons are taught that the
patient is their responsibility,
period. So absolutely, if some-
thing goes wrong, the surgeons


I know take it very personally,"
Lehmberg said. He was not
involved in the study. Lehmberg
now works in palliative care,
helping ease suffering in dying
patients.
The study appears in the
January issue of Archives of
Surgery. It was commissioned
by the American College of
Surgeons and surveyed members
of that group by e-mail. Answers
were anonymous.


Surgeons were questioned
about whether they'd had suicidal
thoughts within the past year.
They weren't asked about suicide
attempts but the authors said as
many as 50 percent of people who
think about suicide also make an
attempt.
The research didn't address
specific reasons why they had
contemplated suicide but strongly
suggests depression, job burnout
and medical errors were contrib-
uting factors. To a lesser extent,
being unmarried, divorced and
childless also were linked with
contemplating suicide. Other fac-
tors also could have contributed
to a risk for suicidal thoughts.
Results published previously
from the same survey showed
almost 9 percent of participat-
ing surgeons said they'd -made
a recent major medical error.
Overall, surgeons queried worked
60 hours per week on average; 40
percent felt burned out; and 30
percent had symptoms of depres-
sion. Most said their work left
little time for personal and family
life.
Few who worked less than
40 hours weekly had suicidal
thoughts.
Editorial authors Kelly McCoy
and Sally Carty, both surgeons
at the University of Pittsburgh's
medical school, said these issues
are too often ignored.
Surgeons work long, irregular
hours in an environment that hon-
ors self-denial, prizes resilience,
"and tends to interpret imperfec-
tion as failure," they said. -
The survey only queried sur-
geons so it is not known if they
have a higher rate of suicidal ten-
dencies than other doctors.


Two drugs offer new hope for hepatitis C


By.LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer

WASHINGTON -
There's new hope for an
overlooked epidemic: Two
powerful drugs are nearing
the market that promise to
help cure many more peo-
ple of liver-attacking hepa-
titis C even though most
who have the simmering
infection don't know it yet
Surprisingly, two-thirds
of hepatitis C sufferers are
thought to be baby boom-
ers who've harbored since
their younger, perhaps wild-
er, years a virus that can
take two or three decades
to do its damage.
What could be a treat-
ment revolution is spurring
the government to consider
if its time to start screen-
ing aging baby boomers for
.hepatitis C, just like they
get various cancer checks.
"We're entering a whole
new era of therapy," says Dr.
John Ward, hepatitis chief
at the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.
'We really want to. begin
that clarion call for action
for this population who's
at risk."


0


Today's two-drug treat-
ment for hepatitis C cures
only about 40 percent of
people with the most com-
mon variety of the virus,
and causes some grueling
side effects. Now major
studies show that adding
a new drug _either Vertex
Pharmaceuticals' telaprevir
or Merck & Co.'s bocepre-
vir can boost those cure
rates as high as 75 percent
And they allow some peo-
ple to cut treatment time
in half, to six months, thus
lessening how long they
must deal with those side
effects.
If the Food and Drug
Administration approves
the drugs a decision
widely expected this sum-
mer they would be the
first that work by directly
targeting the hepatitis C
virus. Specialists draw com-
parisons to the early 1990s
when potent combination
therapies emerged to treat
AIDS. Many recently diag-
nosed patients are postpon-
ing therapy to await these
new drug cocktails in hopes
of a better chance at a faster
cure, says Dr. Paul Pockros,
who helped test telaprevir.


VITAMINS


AT DISCOUNT PRICES




f FREE Bottle Vitamin C
100 Count) with purchase of 25 og more
k 386-752-1600
2057 SW Main Blvd
Hwy 41 South
(across from Honda)
Licensed Nutritionist here to help
you with best vitamin selection.
Mon.-Fri. 10am-5pm


EYE CENTER oi North Florida
G- general E -y Care & Surqervy


-Lr .
W I 1k ,


Eye Exams
Eyeglasses
Contact Lenses
Cataract Surgery
Diabetic Care
Glaucoma


Dr. Eduardo M. Bedoya Dr. Patricia L. Bailey


Ophthalmologist


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dr. Paul J. Pockros, head of Division of Gastroenterology/ Hepatology at Scripps Green
Hospital in San Diego, talks with patient Loretta Roberts as they view her information on a
computer screen in his exam room on Thursday.

Put a little lose in someone's heart this valentine's Da) with the
Lake City Reporter's 'Love Lines.' Make it a special day for those
iou lose bi w riling a message to sour sweetheart. We'll include it on
our *Valentine Lowe Line' page on February 13th.


'Roses are red, viokts are blue, send Love Lines
to show them that your love is true.


The Lake City Reporter
/ Presents:


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Mail to: Lake City Reporter, Classified Department
PO Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056 ~ 755-5440
\LL ML,% MI'T BE PI'lD T
THiff TIME OF PLACEMENT.
i DE .DLINF I, FEB. 8.21111.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


a %7 -










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421 '
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday, January 20, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
YOUTH BASEBALL
Spring league
registration set
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
has registration for its
spring season from
5-7 p.m. Friday and
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.'
Saturday at the Babe
Ruth Baseball building
in the Southside Sports
Complex. Cost of $75
includes jersey, cap,
socks and insurance.
Five leagues are offered
for ages 4-15; a parent or
guardian must provide a
copy of the player's birth
certificate.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810
or David Williams at
(904) 219-4577. Online
registration is at Icccyb.
baberuthonline. com.
GATORS
Wine tasting
for scholarships
The North Florida
Gator Club has its 4th
Annual Wine Tasting
Event from 6:30-9 p.m.
Feb. 3 at The Country
Club at Lake City. Cost
of $22 includes hor
d'oeuvres, door prizes
and wine stations from
several countries. There
will be a silent auction
featuring an autographed
basketball by Billy
Donovan. Gator wine
glasses will be sold for
.35. Proceeds go to
support the club's
schWsi'tiplfund in the
five:county area.
For details, call Bob at
752-3333.
FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Dugout Club sets
parents meeting
The Fort White High
Dugout Club has a
parents meeting and pot
luck supper planned for
6:30-8:30 p.m. Monday in
the high school
cafeteria. All players are
encouraged to attend and
their families are asked
to bring a covered dish to
share for the meal.
For details, call coach
Chad Bonds at
590-7362, or visit the Fort
White Baseball page on
Facebook.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Hamilton
County High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 6:30 p.m.
(JV-3:30)
Fort White High boys
soccer at North Marion
High, 6:30 p.m.
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Union
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 8 p.m.
(JV-5)
Friday
Fort White High
boys soccer vs. Hamilton
County High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Williston
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-3:30)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Hawthorne
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High .girls
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 3:30 p.m.
Columbia High boys
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 7:30 p.m.


(JV-6)


Jordan

making

his own

name

Namesake more
than that for
Central Florida.
By KYLE HIGHTOWER
Associated Press
ORLANDO Marcus
Jordan has always wanted
to make a name for himself
on the basketball court, and
not be just known as the
son of NBA great Michael
Jordan.
He found the place to
do it at Central Florida.
Though not exactly known
for its basketball tradition,
JORDAN continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 29 file photo, Central Florida guard Marcus.
Jordan celebrates a score against Furman in Orlando. The
second-born son of NBA great Michael Jordan, Marcus has
led the team to.its best ever Division 1 start.


Senior


Columbia High's Josh Davis


Free fall continues

for Knights as they

lose third straight


Seminoles survive
scare against
rival Hurricanes.
AssQciated Press

ORLANDO Jontae
Sherrod scored 21 points
and had nine rebounds
as East Carolina handed
Central Florida its third
straight defeat, beat-
ing the Knights 74-62 on
Wednesday night.
Er.in Straughn hit four
3-pointers and scored 12
points for the Pirates.
Isaac Sosaled the Knights
(14-3, 0-3) with 16 points,
Keith Clanton contributed
12 and Marcus Jordan 11.
Straughn drilled his
fourth 3-pointer to cap a
16-4 run that gave East


shutout


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
(21) converts on a goal-past the Newberry High goalie in a game.on Wedhesday in Lake City.


Tigers blank Newberry, 3-0


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
It didn't take long for
Columbia High to break
out of its funk on Senior
Night. The Tigers scored
their first goal within two


minutes and cruised to a
3-0 victory against
Newberry High at Tiger
Stadium in Lake City.
Josh Davis converted
on a goal from within the
18-yard line early in the
contest for Columbia's


first goal, and the Tigers
would add two more scores
before the half.
Conner Widergren's
goal with 18:48 remaining
made it 2-0 and C.J. McRae
converted on a penalty kick
for the final 3-0 margin.


The Tigers honored
nine seniors at halftime
including Davis, Kyle
Dooley, Grayson Housch,
Kyle Katona, Colton
Marvin, McRae, Nick
Tuttle, Drew Waller and
Widergren.


Carolina a 62-45 lead with
10:47 left.
The Knights cut the
deficit .to 63-55 on Taylor
Young's 3-pointer with 3:46
to play, but that was as close
as UCF would get.
East Carolina led 25-14
after hitting its first six
3-point attempts, includ-
ing three by Straughn.
The Pirates turned their
attack inside and built the
lead to 41-26 after Darrius
Morrow's layup with 2:17
left in the half.

Florida State 55,
Miami 53
Terrance Shannon scored
10 points and Florida State
improved to 4-1 in the ACC
for the first time since 1990
with a 55-53 win at Miami.


Rex lacks

talk for

AFC title

game

Father, Buddy,
makes his own
predictions.
By JIM LITKE
Associated Press
With his son out of the
prediction business this
week, Buddy Ryan jumped
in feet first.
"Jets and Bears," he
answered quickly, sound-
ing more like the horse-
man and handicapper he's
become in retirement than
the head coach and revo-
lutionary defensive mind
that Ryan was for a lifetime
before that.
"The Jets gave me my
first job 'and my son's the
coach, so it makes that one
easy," he said about New
York's AFC matchup at
Pittsburgh.
Picking the Bears over
the Packers wasn't much
harder, for many of the
same reasons. Ryan served
as defensive coordinator
for Green Bay's NFC divi-
sion rivals in Minnesota and
Chicago .after leaving New
York and before the first
of his two head-coaching
stints in Philadelphia.
After playing the Packers
RYAN continued on 3B


Lady Tigers fall

in overtime to

Suwannee High


Columbia takes
Lady Bulldogs
to their limit.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
It took overtime, but
Suwannee High escaped
Columbia High with a 55-51
win on Wednesday.
The Lady Tigers trailed
30-28 entering the final
quarter, but were able to
force overtime by hold-
ing the Lady Bulldogs
with a chance to win it in
regulation.
Justice Campbell led all
Lady Tigers with 15 points.
Simone Williamson also


tapped into double digits
with 10 points in the contest.
Briya McGuire had eight
points. Shaniqua Henry and
Mariah Harrington each
scored six points.
Coach Michele Bissacia
missed the game with an
illness, so junior varsity
coach Tara Perry pulled
double duty.
"I'm very proud of them,"
she said. "I'm not their nor-
mal coach, but they played
very hard. I think Suwannee
came in at 14-4, so we knew,
we'd have to play tough to
keep up with them. We may
not have came out on top,
but there's nothing to be
ashamed of when you play
like that."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Briya McGuire (10) looks for a hole to run through in a game against
Hamilton County on Jan. 3.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
GOLF
9:30 a-m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Abu *
Dhabi Championship, first round, at Abu
Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (same-day
tape)
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Bob Hope Classic,
second round, at La Quinta, Calif.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Florida atAuburn
ESPN2 South Florida at Rutgers
9 p.m. -
ESPN Indiana at Wisconsin
ESPN2 -Virginia Tech at Maryland
10:30 p.m.
FSN -Arizona at Washington
NBA BASKETBALL
8:15 p.m.
TNT Dallas at Chicago
10:30 p.m.
TNT LA. Clippers at Portland
TENNIS
II p.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, early
round, at Melbourne,Australia
3 a.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, early
round, at MelbourneAustralia

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

Wild Card
Seattle 41, New Orleans 36
N.Y.Jets 17, Indianapolis 16
Baltimore 30, Kansas City 7
Green Bay 21, Philadelphia 16
Divisional Playoffs
Pittsburgh 3 I, Baltimore 24
Green Bay 48,Atlanta 21
Chicago 35, Seattle 24
N.Y.Jets 28, New England 21
Conference Championships
Sunday
Green Bay at Chicago, 3 p.m. (FOX)
Pittsburgh vs. N.Y. Jets, 6:30 p.m. (CBS)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 6
AtArlington,Texas
AFC champion vs. NFC champion,
6:30 p.m. (FOX)

Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 30
At Honolulu
AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (FOX)

College all-star games


Saturday
At Orlando
East-West Shrine Classic, 4 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 29
At Mobile,Ala.
- Senior Bowl, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Saturday, Feb. 5
At San Antonio
Texas vs. -The Nation All
Challenge, 2 p.m.


1-Star


Early NFL Draft entries

The 56 players granted special eligibil-
ity for the 2011 NFL Draft on April 28-30
in New Yorkl
Darvin Adams, wvrAuburn
Marvin Austin, dt, North Carolina
Akeem Ayers, lb, UCLA
Jon Baldwin, wr, Pittsburgh
Da'Quan Bowers, de, Clemson
DeAndre Brown, wr, Southern Miss
Brandon Burton, db, Utah
Jurrell Casey, dt, Southern Cal
John Clay, rb,Wisconsin
Nick Claytor, ot, Georgia Tech
Randall Cobb, wr, wr, Kentucky
Marcell Dareus, dll,Alabama
Tandon Doss, wr, Indiana
Darren Evans, rb, Virginia Tech


Nick Fairley, d, Auburn
Blaine Gabbert, qb, Missouri
A.J. Green, wr, Georgia
Tori Gurley, wr, South Carolina
Lawrence Guy, dt,Arizona State
Jamel Hamler, wr, Fresno State
Jamie Harper, rb, Clemson
Brandon Harris, cb, Miami
Will Hill, db, Florida
Justin Houston, lb, Georgia
Henry Hynoski, fb, Pittsburgh
Mark Ingram, rb, Alabama
Julio Jones, wr.Alabama
Thomas Keiser Ilb, Stanford
Mikel Leshoure, rb, Illinois
Dion Lewis, rb, Pittsburgh
Javes Lewis. db, Orgeon
Greg Little,wr, North Carolina
Corey Uuget, dt, Illinois
Ryan Mallett, qb,Arkansas
Rahim Moore, db, UCLA
Cam Newton, qb,Auburn
Zane Parr, de,Virginia
Patrick Peterson, db, LSU
Robert Quinn, de, North Carolina
Stevan Ridley, rb, LSU
Jacquizz Rodgers, rb, Oregon State
Kyle Rudolph, te, Notre Dame
Robert Sands, s, West Virginia
Tyler Sash, db, Iowa
Sealver Siligi, dt, Utah
Aldon Smith, de, Missouri
Torrey Smith, wr, Maryland
Tyron Smith, ot, Spouthern Cal
Jerrard Tarrant, db, Georgia Tech
Jordan Todman, rb, Connecticut
ShaneVereen, rb, California
J.J.Watt, de,Wisconsin
Muhammad Wilkerson, dtTemple
Aaron Williams, db,Texas
Ryan Williams, rb,VirginiaTech
Martez Wilson, lb, Illinois

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Wednesday's Games
Phoenix 106, Cleveland 98
New Jersey 103, Utah 95
Orlando 99, Philadelphia 98, OT
Boston 86, Detroit 82
Washington at Milwaukee (n)
Memphis at New Orleans.(n)
New York at Houston (n)
Toronto at San Antonio (n)
Oklahoma City at Denver (n)
L.A. Lakers at Dallas (n)
Portland at Sacramento (n)
Indiana at Golden State (n)
Minnesota at LA. Clippers (n)
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Chicago, 8 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Detroit at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Phoenix atWashington, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Utah at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at Memphis, 8 p.m.
New York at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Golden State,
10:30 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Denver, 10:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 18 Wisconsin vs. Indiana, 9 p.m.
No. 20 Washington vs. Arizona,
10:30 p.m.

TENNIS

Australian Open singles

At Melbourne Park
Melbourne, Australia
Wednesday
Men
Second Round
Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, def. Lukasz
Kubot, Poland, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4.
Kei Nishikori,Japan, def. Florian Mayer,
Germany, 6-4, 6-3, 0-6, 6-3.


Tommy Robredo, Spain, def Mardy
Fish (16), United States, 1-6, 6-3, 6-3, 6-3.
Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic.
def. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, 4-6,
6-2, 6-3, 6-4.
Andy Roddick (8), United States, def.
Igor Kunitsyn, Russia, 7-6 (7), 6-2, 6-3.
Richard Gasquet (28), France, def.
Adrian Mannarino, France, 6-3, 7-6 (4),
6-4.
Ivan Ljubicic (17), Croatia, def. Benoit
Paire, France, 6-3, 6-7 (2), 6-4, 7-6 (5).
Fernando Verdasco (9), Spain, def.
Janko Tipsarevic, Serbia, 2-6, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6
(0), 6-0.
Robin Haase, Netherlands, def. Juan
Monaco (26),Argentina, 6-4, 6-4, 3-6, 6-2.
Xavier Malisse, Belgium, def. Albert
Montanes (25), Spain, 6-4, 6-0, 6-1.
Nicolas Almagro (14), Spain, def. Igor
Andreev, Russia, 7-5, 2-6, 4-6, 7-6 (10),
7-5.
Viktor Troicki (29), Serbia, def. Nicolas
Mahut, France, 6-4, 6-2, 1-6, 6-3.
Stanislas Wawrinka (19), Switerland,
def. Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, 7-5, 6-3,
6-3.
Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, def. Ivan
Dodig, Croatia, 7-5, 6-7 (8), 6-0, 6-2.
Gael Monfils (12), France, def.
Frederico Gil, Portugal, 6-4, 6-3, 1-6, 6-2.
Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def.
Gilles Simon, France, 6-2, 6-3, 4-6, 4-6,
6-3.
Women
Second Round
Justine Henin (I I), Belgium, def. Elena
Baltacha, Britain, 6-1, 6-3.
Caroline Wozniacki (I), Denmark, def.
Vania King, United States, 6-I, 6-0.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (23), Russia, def.
Arantxa Rus, Netherlands, 6-I, 6-4.
Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, def.
Regina Kulikova, Russia, 6-4, 4-6, 7-5.
Victoria Azarenka (8), Belarus, def.
Andrea Hlavackova, Czech Republic,
6-4, 6-4.
Dominika Cibulkova (29), Slovakia, def.
Alberta Brianti, Italy, 6-1,4-6, 6-2.
Monica Niculescu, Romania, def.
Tsvetana Pironkova (32), Bulgaria, 6-4,
6-1.
Maria Sharapova (14), Russia, def.
Virginie Razzano, France, 7-6 (3), 6-3.
Francesca Schiavone (6), Italy, def.
Rebecca Marino, Canada, 6-3, 5-7, 9-7.
Vesna Manasieva, Russia, def. Marion
Bartoli (15), France, 3-6, 6-3, 6-0.
Julia' Goerges, Germany, def. Kaia
Kanepi (20), Estonia, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4.
Venus Williams (4), United States, def.
Sandra Zahlavova, Czech Republic, 6-7
(6), 6-0, 6-4.
Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, def.Yanina
Wickmayer (21), Belgium, 6-4, 6-2.
Andrea Petkovic (30), Germany, def.
Anne Keothavong, England, 2,6; 7-5, 6-0.
Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech
Republic, def. Jelena Dokic, Australia, 7-6
(3),6-1.
Li Na (9), China, def. Evgeniya Rodina,
Russia, 6-3, 6-2.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Wednesday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 7,Toronto 0
Columbus 3, Florida 2, OT
Minnesota at Calgary (n)
Today's Games
Buffalo at Boston, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New Jersey,7 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Detroit at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Nashville at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
San Jose at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Phoenix at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
N.Y. Islanders at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Montreal at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Calgary, 9 p.m.


JORDAN: Knew UCF was perfect fit


Continued From Page lB


the 6-foot-3, 205 pound
guard knew UCF was the
program for him.
"It was the first and last
visit I made," Jordan said.
"I just loved it. The facilities
were new and it was defi-
nitely a place where I could
go in and play right away.
I think that was the big-
.gest thing. Me and (UCF
teammate) AJ. (Rompza)
sat down and said we can
start something new and
create our own little legacy
here.
"I just wanted to come
in a make an impact right
away and throughout my
four years leave something
that UCF had never seen
before."
Less than two years later,
that conversation between
the best friends and former
Whitney Young high school
teammates in Chicago is
turning into prophecy.
Jordan not only led
the Knights to a Division
I-best 14-0 start, but the
sophomore is the face of
a program in fast transi-
tion under first-year coach
Donnie Jones. Jordan is
making basketball relevant
at the school.
After finishing non-con-
ference play unbeaten and
achieving the program's
first-ever Top 25 ranking
with wins over Florida,


Miami and South Florida,
UCF dropped out of the poll
this week following back-to-
back losses. The Knights
(14-2, 1-2 Conference
USA) will look to recover
Wednesday night when
they host East Carolina
(9-7, 1-1).
"They are definitely one
of the big stories of the
season no question,"
CBS Sports college bas-




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. A

I PERIT I


ketball analyst Seth Davis
said. "Marcus may not be
the freakish athlete that his
dad was, and nobody is,
but he's definitely a capable
scorer that is making his
own name."
While he has never shied
away from the spotlight that
comes along with being
Michael Jordan's son -
Marcus is clearly his own
person.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


WHEN THEY FOUNP
OUT WORKOUT FEES
WERE INGREASEQP,
S IT---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: A "

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: PUTTY PARKA SYSTEM ROTATE
Answer: A co-worker who takes his time can do
this TAKE YOURS


FALCONS SOCCER BANQUET


COURTESY PHOTO
Lake City Middle School boys who received awards at the 2010-11 soccer banquet (front
row, from left) are: Brock Edge, Outstanding Defender; Brant Nelson, Outstanding Midfielder
and Captain Award; Hunter Houston, Young Gun and Captain Award. Back row (from left)
are: Jake Thomas, Most Improved; Will Bowen, Spirit Award; Tristan O'Steen, Most Valuable
Player, Captain Award and Scoring Leader; Dustin Carwile, Coaches Award;
Kyle Richardson, Outstanding Forward; Jacob Strickland, Coaches Award.


l~kj -- 7--











COURTESY PHOTO
Lake City Middle School girls who received awards at the 2010-11 soccer banquet (front
row, from left) are: Brittany Lee, Most Valuable Player and Outstanding Midfielder;
Chase Broome, Most Improved; Morgan Hartopp, Scoring Leader and Captain/Third Year
Player Award; Kyrsteh Giebeig, Young Gun; Ashton Lee, Coaches Award; Tatum Morgan,
Coaches Award; Savannah Thomas, Spirit Award. Back row (froni left) are: Haley Roberson,
Coaches Award; Bianca Irzarry, Coaches Award; Emily Hall, Outstanding Forward and
Captain/Third Year Player Award; Malia Hogue-Pua, Coaches Award; Emily Harvey,
Goalkeeper Award; Hanna Baker, Outstanding Defender and Captain/Third Year Player'
Award.

S arable www.lakecityreporter.com
., Ads onlil -- Lake City


ACROSS

1 Cool
4 Short
play
8 Painted
tinware
12 Website
13 Little Joe's bro
14 Melville opus
15 Botched
(2 wds.)
17 Nota-
18 Jessica of
"Murder, She
Wrote"
19 Footlights
21 Wapitis
23 Disfigure
24 Fluid rock
27 He played Obi-
Wan
29 Even one
30 Home,
to Jose
32 Charges it
36 Dr.'s magazine
38 Furtive whis-
per


40 So far
41 Fence opening
43 Latches
45 Changed color
47 Frosh's digs
49 Rips apart
51 Insulted wittily
55 Predicament
56 Sphere or
domain
58 Greek letter
59 Raspberry
stem
60 Playful bark
61 Bikini halves
62 Made cheddar-
better
63 Famous
mummy

DOWN


Answer to Previous Puzzle

FIST C00 PRAM
IDLE UG U H OISE
BEAT IRONICAL








ETHANE ISON
ERG GEO LA






PHEOLES NFSE I INJET
SSE ART PEERN


1 story-telling
dance 7 Sugar amts.
2 Fe, commonly 8 Peace-pipe filler
3 Outlet insert 9 Alpha opposite
4 Wood finish 10 Company
5 Early camera avoider
6 Ames inst. 11 Job-ad letters


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


16 Look like
20 Mao--tung
22 Mouthed
off
24 Capt.'s
superior
25 Wheel buy
(2 wds.)
26 Locker locale
28 Cruces,
N.M.
31. Well-put
33 Grand Teton
St.
34 Response to a
rodent
35 Ave. crossers
37 Schedules
39 Flourished
42 Increase the
number
44 Old Dodge
model
45 Less damp
46 Gossipy one
48 UV blocker
50 Pet lovers' gp.
52 Tiny fly
53 Pantyhose
shade
54 Light-fingered
55 Consumer
org.
57 Scrap of cloth


2011 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


COTESK




TASHAG
7 3 - c -
*^~ ~ ~ ^ /









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2011


Can No. 6 seeds make Super Bowl?


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

As illogical at it seems,
a 6-6 parlay might be a
winner in this weekend's
championship games. The
Packers and Jets aren't run-
of-the-mill wild cards.
Does that mean a pair
of non-division winners are
headed to the Super Bowl?
Read on.

NFC Championship
Green Bay (minus 3) at
Chicago
Yes, the sixth-seeded
Packers are favored at
Soldier Field in the sec-
ond postseason matchup
of these 90-year rivals and
first since 1941. That's how
impressive Aaron Rodgers
and his team have been in
the last month, with wins
over the Giants and Bears
at Lambeau Field to get
into the playoffs, then vic-
tories at Philadelphia and
No. 1 seed Atlanta in the
playoffs.
Rodgers is performing at
a championship level, and
he has the surrounding
talent to keep this surge
going. Green Bay (12-6)
nearly won at Chicago in
Week 3, stymied by a team-
record 18 penalties as much
as anything. The Packers
have been far more efficient
recently, with Rodgers reg-
ularly finding his impres-
sive receiving corps, led
by Greg Jennings, Donald
Driver and James Jones.
They will present matchup
problems for Chicago's cor-
nerbacks.
Green Bay's defense


.. _- ..'. -, ..- .- ,
o .






ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 2 file photo, Green Bay Packers cornerback Tramon Williams tackles Chicago Bears wide receiver Devin Hester
during a NFL football game in Green Bay, Wis. The Packers let Hester slip away for a touchdown in their first meeting with the
Bears this season, then did a pretty good job bottling him up in the regular season finale. The pressure will be on the Packers'
special teams again in Sunday's NFC championship game in Chicago.


also has become formi-
dable, just as dominating
as Chicago's can be. The
Bears (12-5) have playmak-
ers Brian Urlacher, Lance
Briggs, Julius Peppers and
Israel Idonije. The Packers
counterwith Clay Matthews,
Charles Woodson,
Tramon Williams and B.J.
Raji.
Perhaps the Bears' dif-


ference maker will be the
dynamic Devin.Hester. The
record-setting kick returned
has a strong history in the
postseason, and it would
be wise for the Packers to
avoid kicking his way.
The last time the Bears
got this far was 2006, when
they won the NFC title,
then lost in the Super Bowl,
to Indianapolis. Green Bay


was in the 2007 champion-
ship matchup, losing to the
Giants a wild-card.
Going with the wild card
again.
PACKERS, 23-21

AFC Championship
New York Jets (plus 4) at
Pittsburgh
After disposing of Peyton


Manning and the Colts,
then Tom Brady and the
Patriots, the Jets (13-5) try
for the trifecta of champi-
onship QBs against Ben
Roethlisberger and the
Steelers.
Rex Ryan might be bom-
bastic, but in his two sea-
sons as Jets coach he also
has been brilliant, leading
them to four road playoff


victories in five attempts.
Roethlisberger made note
of that Wednesday, but
veteran receiver Hines
Ward mentioned that his
quarterback gets away from
the rush better and stays
up longer when hit than
Manning or Brady.
Still, the Steelers want
to be a run-first offense
and need to prosper on
the ground' to beat the
Jets. New York corner-
backs Darrelle Revis and
Antonio Cromartie match
up well against Pittsburgh's
wideouts, although Ward
has a penchant for big plays
in the biggest games.
Don't forget that the
Steelers are stingier defen-
sively than the Jets, par-
ticularly against the run.
That means Mark Sanchez,
who is rapidly growing
into a clutch quarterback,
must be as effective as he
was in Foxborough, where
he threw for three touch-
downs. One of those was to
Santonio Holmes, the hero
of the Steelers' Super Bowl
win two years ago and now
the Jets' game-brea ing
receiver.
New York won 22-17 at
Heinz Field in December, a
game that two key Steelers
missed. Star safety Troy
Polamalu and TE Heath
Miller are back, and the
Jets can struggle down
the middle covering tight
ends.
Are the returns of
Polamalu and Miller enough
to make up that five-point
deficit and spoil a 6 vs. 6
Super Bowl matchup? We
think so.
STEELERS, 20-17


Record 56 players leave


college early for NFL Draft


Associated Press

NEW YORK Cam
Newton and Nick Fairley of
national champion Auburn
are among 56 non-seniors
who applied for April's
NFL draft a record total,
but only three more play-
ers than left college early a
year ago.
The uncertainty sur-
rounding the league's labor
situation does not appear
to have had a significant
effect on underclassmen
opting to declare for the
draft. The NFL released
the names on Wednesday,
and it's the fifth time in
the past seven years that
more than 50 players were
granted what the league
calls "special eligibility."
There were 53 players in
2010 and 2008, the previ-
ous high; 52 in 2006; 51 in
2005.
Newton, a quarterback,
and Fairley, a defensive
tackle, are joined by three
other All-American juniors
heading to the draft:
Kentucky receiver-return-
er Randall Cobb, Clemson
defensive end Da'Quan
Bowers and LSU corner-
back Patrick Peterson.
There weren't any
surprising additions to
the list or omissions.
Most underclassmen who
were deciding whether to
enter the draft had made
their choices public by
Saturday's deadline to tell
the NFL they wanted to
leave school early. Players
then had 72 hours to with-
draw their names, but no
significant players changed
their minds.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Auburn's Cam Newton reacts after a touchdown during the first half of the BCS National
Championship game against Oregon on Jan. 10 in Glendale, Ariz.


One top underclassman
not on the list: Stanford
quarterback Andrew Luck,
who had said he would be
returning to school. His
father, former NFL quar-
terback and current West
Virginia athletic director
Oliver Luck, said they dis-
cussed the possible lock-
out in the league but that
wasn't a decisive factor in
Andrew's choice.
The draft is April 28-30,
even if there is no new col-
lective bargaining agree-
ment to replace the one
that expires in early March.
If owners lock out the play-
ers as the union expects
- rookies wouldn't be able
to sign contracts until a
new CBA is in place.
Among the factors
underclassmen might have


considered:
It's possible there
won't be a 2011 NFL sea-
son at all, so players leav-
ing college could wind up
sitting out an entire year.
Even if an agreement
is reached in time for next
season to be played,, the.
timing of a deal might
result in shortened training
camps or no minicamps,
so a rookie would have
less time to learn his new
team's system and prove
he deserves to start or,
in some cases, even make
the roster.
Owners are intent
on having a rookie wage
scale be part of a new
CBA. Commissioner Roger
Goodell wrote about "the
outrageous sums paid to
many unproven rookies" in


a recent letter sent to fans
about the labor situation,
and such a change could
apply to the 2011 draft
class.
Entering the pros
sooner starts a player's
NFL "clock" sooner, mov-
ing him closer to his second
contract and free agency,
which could be particularly
attractive if a rookie wage
scale is created.
Still, in a telephone inter-
view before last weekend's
deadline, agent Peter
Schaffer said he didn't
think a potential lockout.
was affecting decisions.
"I really don't believe the
uncertainty of the labor
situation is skewing deci-
sions one way or another in
any significant proportion,"
Schaffer said.


Daboll is Dolphins' new offensive coordinator


By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press

DAVIE New Miami
Dolphins offensive coor-
dinator Brian Daboll
strayed from the lectern
as he began to speak more
excitedly. He chopped the
air with his hands, waved


his arms and clapped to
emphasize a point.
The animated Daboll
actually appeared ready
for kickoff. He was intro-
duced Wednesday by the
Dolphins, two days after
their decision to hire him
was first reported.
Daboll was the Cleveland


Browns' offensive coordi-
nator the past two years,
and he comes to Miami
with a reputation as a
high-energy coach. Dan
Henning departed after
three seasons as Miami's
offensive coordinator.
'Today we feel we took
a great step toward cor-


reacting some of the prob-
lems we've obviously had,"
coach Tony Sparano said.
The move is the first by
the Dolphins since owner
Stephen Ross considered
hiring Jim Harbaugh as
head coach, then instead
gave Sparano a two-year
extension.


RYAN: Expects defense
Continued From Page 1B


twice every year over that-
stretch, Ryan says ,'he can't
help but harbor a grudge.
"It was a great rivalry,
even when both of us
weren't any good," he
recalled. "They both have.
good quarterbacks now,
but down deep those games
were always about the same
thing: who's toughest. At
some point, this one prob-
ably will be, too.
"The first couple times
we went up there, it was
easy to be impressed, espe-
cially if you were a young
coach. There was all this
history and tradition, Vince
Lombardi and all that,"
Ryan said. "But after they
rubbed it in a few times, it
gets under your skin.
"So, yeah," he added,
"there were some games
when we were more inter-
ested in making points than
scoring them."
Ryan once explained his
delight in blitzing every
opponent relentlessly this
way: "So we could find out
who the second-string quar-
terback was." But in a late
1980s regular-season game
against the Packers, he
seemed determined to go
even farther than that.
The Bears led 61-7 late in
the game, yet Ryan kept the
blitz package going full-tilt
against Green Bay's third
string. Thirty years later, he
couldn't recall the specifics
even as he chuckled at the
memory.
'Well, I was the defensive
coordinator then and that
sure sounds like me. But it
wasn't my job to take it out.
It was their job," Ryan said
defiantly, "to do something
about it."
Buddy's proprietary inter-
est in the success of son Rex
and his former employers
in Chicago extend beyond
emotional ties. His trade-
mark defense, named the
"46" because that was the
number frequently blitzing
safety Doug Plank wore,
operated out of a 4-3 set
- four defensive lineman
and three linebackers.
Rex Ryan's Jets often
line up in a base 3-4 forma-
tion, but employ many of
the unorthodox schemes
Buddy employed to send
eight or nine attackers


after the quarterback. The
Steelers and. Packers play a
much more traditional ver-
sion of the 3-4 defense.
"Both of those defenses
do everything well and
Capers (Green Bay defen-
sive coordinator Dom) has
designed some great ways
to send extra guys," Ryan
said. "But I got to be honest
- I like complicated, I like
going after the quarterback
just about every time, and it
looks like Rex mostly does,
too.
"And the way the league
has set up the rules to pro-
tect those quarterbacks
these days," he added, "you
got to make sure you get
your shots in every chance
you get."
Nobody ever called
Buddy or Rex conservative,
but the elder Ryan said he
understood why his son is
keeping a relatively low pro-
file this week.
"I said last week he was
smart to let his players talk.
You need something some
weeks to get them get riled
up. But underneath, I think
it was personal' between
the Jets and Patriots," Ryan
said. "It's a little different
between them and the
Steelers."
Buddy said he never
minded being the villain,
and he doubts Rex does,
either.
"Look, both my boys
know how this thing is sup-
posed to be run," he said.
"They lived it growing up."
Rex and his twin brother,
Rob, who just took over as
defensive coordinator in
Dallas, have followed their
father through coaching
stints in a half-dozen NFL
towns.
"They know you move a
lot and get booed a lot. They
know you only get so many
chances," the patriarch said.
"Simetimes, you got some-
thing up your sleeve, other
times you play it straight.
Both these (championship
games) have enough going
on around them as it is.
"It might be quiet all
week," Ryan said final-
ly, "probably because
there's not going to be a
moment's peace for any-
body once they start it up
Sunday."


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


TH'
LAST THING
YORE MAW
(OR YORE AUNT LOWEEZY')
WANTS
TO HEAR...

a me


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


02011 John L. Hart FLP l'Zo "- ---- -- -
FRANK & ERNEST

,, AL.' AL' ALPHAW T 50UP
_/N ".. 61COIN6
THROUGH
C" : '"S pA P A 0

77: 3
-~P


DEAR ABBY


Lesson backfires on student

who pulls ill-conceived prank


HALF I KNOW! I
A CAN'T JAIT
A DAY?! FOR MY NEXT
LUCKY! USELESS
INTERVIEW!

-


DEAR ABBY: I live in
a dorm at a large university
where a former friend, "Glen,"
also lives. We are no longer
on speaking terms because
of an incident that happened
last year.
One day during pre-finals
week, I left my room briefly to
get something from a friend's
room down the hall. I left my
door unlocked because I'd be
back soon. When I returned a
few minutes later, my laptop,
my cell phone and several
books full of class notes were
missing. I was distraught al-
most to the point of a break-
down.
Later that night, Glen
knocked on my door and re-
vealed that he had hidden the
items in his room to "teach.
me a lesson" about not lock-
ing my door. I was speechless
that a "friend" could do such a
thing to me.
I notified the police and of-
ficials at the university. Glen
was arrested for theft and
charged with a misdemeanor.
The university terminated
his scholarship, and he was
sentenced to community ser-
vice.
Glen is now blaming me
for what happened. He claims
what he did wasn't really
"stealing" and that I ruined
his life. He's harassing me
at every opportunity and
spreading misinformation to
my friends. .
I believe I acted justly


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't feel pres-
sured to make changes you
aren't ready to make. Too
much, too soon will be the
problem. Focus more on
enjoying the people with
whom you share common
interests. Love is in the
stars. *****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You need a vaca-
tion or something that will
get your mind in a positive
place. Feeling hopeful will
inspire and motivate you to
take on a new challenge or
to strive to reach the goals
you set. Self-improvement
will lead to confidence. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Go after your
goals. Taking action is half
the battle. What you learn
right now will be easily
implemented into your fu-
ture. There are profits to be
made but don't overspend.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Getting involved
in what's going on around
you will make you a part of
something important and
will help you make difficult
decisions. You'll have the
discipline and the added
determination to follow
through. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You don't want to give
away your secrets before


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

you are ready to launch
your plans. Socializing
should be fun, not a chore.
Someone you care about
will give you a much better
indication where you stand.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Look at the positive
and take advantage of what-.
ever is available to you.
Change is heading your
way but it's up to you what
you do with it. Make the
most of it and you will pros-
per; let the negative seep in
and you will not. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Only you can decide
whether to move back-
wards, sit idle or take a leap
forward. You need greater
diversity in your life and
putting a push on what you
want will help you progress
in a life-changing direction.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21); It's about change
and viewing life differently.
A trip or a change of scen-
ery for the day will open
your mind up to a world of
opportunities. It's time to
get things moving instead of
watching what you've done
become outdated. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Tread care-;
fully around the people most
critical of your every move.
Offer love, affection and
good wishes to everyone
around you if you expect to
get positive response. A re-
lationship can help you out
emotionally and financially.
if you play your cards right.

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't limit
what you can do. A change
in your community or
neighborhood may need to
be addressed.' Be forceful
but intelligent in the way
you handle whatever situa-
tion you face. You want to
win, not destroy. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't let your
emotions cause problems
in your relationships. If you
are too vocal about what
you want or expect, you
will meet with opposition
or hurt someone's feelings.
Positive actions will lead to
the same in return. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You've got a
lot to learn if you think you
can bully someone into do-
ing things your way. It will
take compromise and coax-
ing to come to an under-
standing suitable to a col-
lective group, allowing you
to move forward. Focus on
personal alterations. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: Y equals M
"FT AWI MPVZ V CWFGP UFXMFO AWI


NVA 'AWI GVOOWX HVFOX,


VRR YPVON HVFOX, VOE XMVX
CWFGP UF.RR SP NFRPOGPE." CVO
B W B M

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "When I'm hungry, I eat. When I'm thirsty, I drink.
When I feel like saying something, I say it." Madonna
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 1-20


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
ToHN- I BOUgHT FH ,THIS ISTHE
PIECE-OF ART IN ONLyONE LEFT
BRIDiGEToWjN" OM IT-IE ILPFND
SI AND TyRE FAMTErST
ISN'T MfilKlNG-

Wl~h- I; 61^


CLASSIC PEANUTS


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
to what was plainly a case
of theft. Am I wrong? How
should I act in the case of
Glen's current behavior? -
VICTIM IN TEXAS
DEAR VICTIM: Your for-
mer friend appears to be emo-
tionally disturbed. He has no
one to blame but himself for
what has happened to him. If
you haven't already done so,
warn him to stop the harass-
ment and if he doesn't,
report it to the authorities.
And don't worry about the
misinformation he is trying to
spread among your friends. If
they are truly your friends,
they'll believe you when you
tell them they're being lied
to.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band and I have been arguing
about his leaving the lights on
throughout our house. He's
convinced that it adds little to
our electric bill, but it bothers
me that every single light is
left burning. I realize there
is a cost difference between
incandescent and fluorescent
lighting, but leaving all the
lights on seems unnecessary
and wasteful to me. Could you'


X M P 0 S A


4B LAKE CITY REPORTER


please "shed some light" on
our argument? LIT UP IN
JOHNSON CITY, TENN.
DEAR LIT UP: Accord-
ing to the Renewable Energy
Policy Project (REPP) in
Washington, D.C., leaving a,:
100-watt incandescent bulb
on for 12 hours a day for one,
month will add $40 per year
to your electric bill. Multiply
that by the number of bulbs:
in your home and it can add,
up quickly.
Fluorescent bulbs use
fewer watts than incandes-
cent bulbs, but turning them
on ages the filaments so
if they'll be turned on again
within a minute or two, leave
them on. (This is not a rec-,
.ommendation to leave fluo-
rescent bulbs burning con-:
stantly, just a suggestion that
if they won't be needed after
a few minutes, to turn them?
off.)
LED bulbs are more ex-
pensive to buy, but they last
longer, use less wattage and
emit brighter light. Howev-
er, when the illumination is
no longer needed, they, too,'
should be extinguished.
P.S. Since your husband
has money to burn, why not
invest in motion sensors so
hell have light wherever he,
Goes without inflating your
energy bills?

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JANUARY 20,2011












Classified Department: 755-5440


MW
linagr

BUYITmn


SEiLL I


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


One item per ad In
4 lines 6 days ch additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal erhandise otalling 00 or less.
This is a non-refundable rate.




One item per ad ditiona
4 lines 6 daysne$1.10
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personal merchandise totalling 500 or less.
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personal merchandise totalling 1,000 or less.
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One Item per ad
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Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $,00 orless.
Each Item must Include a price. ,



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One Item per ad ty i s
4 lines 6 days a tional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling



personal merchandise total ling S4,000 orless.
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This Is a non-refundable rate.








ing only ad
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ad for each Wednesday insertion.


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a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or e-mail your ad



Department.
a .e s to 5:00 p.m.










porter.com


Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wd., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs. 10:00a.m. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
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on the first day of publication.
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Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
w 'ww.lalkeltyrelprter.eon


Legal

BARNES HEATHCARE SERV-
ICES
Dear Valued Customers:
Barnes Healthcare Services, located
at 4251 NW American Lane Suite
102 Lake City, FI 32055 will be
close on February 11, 2011.
As our commitment to quality cus-
tomer service continues, we will pro-
vide service to the Ocala coverage
area from Gainesville, Florida loca-
tion. You may contact our staff at the
Gainesville office by calling 352-
333-2525 or 877-423-2360. We are
- on Call 24 hours a day for sales and
service. Barnes Healthcare Services
is located at 1700 NW 80th Blvd.,
Gainesville, FL 32606. If required,
you may obtain copies of your re-
cords or have them forwarded to
your choice of providers by contact-
ing our Medical Records Department
at 229-245-6039, extension 370 for
Mandy Pearson. Or, send a written
request to Barnes Healthcare Serv-
ices, PO Box 160, Valdosta, GA
31603 Attention: Mandy Pearson.
Thank you for allowing Barnes
Healthcare Services to meet your
healthcare needs. "We Take Care of
People"
04543040
January 20, 27, 2011
February 3, 10, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No. 10-152-CA
HERMAN E. MARTIN and MAR-
GARET E. MARTIN,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
JIMMIE L. HAGAN; BETTY R.
HAGAN; ANY AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIM-
ANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE
DOE AS KNOWN TENANTS IN
POSSESSION:
Defendants)
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-
DER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated January
13, 2011, in the above-styled cause, I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash, at the front door of the
COLUMBIA County Courthouse,
173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on Febru-
ary 16, 2011, the following described
property:
Lot 11, FAIRVIEW ESTATES; a
Subdivision according to Plat thereof
recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 83,
public records, Columbia County,
Florida.
Together with a 1981 FIES Mobile
Home ID#FDGAM1443
LESS AND EXCEPT: The North
109 feet of Lot 11, Fairview Estates
Subdivision, Columbia County, Flor-
ida: Together with a 15 foot ease-
ment for ingress, egress and utilities
along the East boundary line of Lot
11, Fairview Estates Subdiyision,
Columbia County, Florida.
Parcel ID No.: 26-7S-16-04323-011
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er then the property owners as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated: January 13, 2011
P. DBWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE
I CERTIFY that a true and correct
copy of the foregoing Notice of Sale
under F.S. Chapter 45 has been fur-
nished by United States Mail on Jan-
uary 13, 2011, to each of the follow-
ing: Jimmie L. Hagan, 27107.SW 46
Avenue, Newberry, FL 32669; Betty
R. Hagan, 295 SW Nantucket Place,
Fort White, FL 32038; Herman E.
Martin,and Margaret E. Martin, P.O.
Box 328, Fort White, FL 32038;
LLOYD E. PETERSON, JR., 905
SW Baya Drive, Lake City, FL
32025, and Suwannee Valley Fore-
closure Mediation, Inc. P.O. Box
6126, Live Oak, FL 32064
/s/ B. Scippio
Court Clerk
05524897
January 20, 27, 2011









Lake City Reporter







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks / Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.
Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF BENNIE C.
GLASSCOCK
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Or-
der of Summary Administration has
been entered in the estate of Bennie
C. Glasscock, deceased, File Number
11-07-CP, by the Circuit Court for
Columbia County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 173
NE Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
FL 32055; that the decedent's dateof
death was September 8, 2010; that
the total value of the estate is
$137,871.00 and that the names and
addresses of those to whom it has
been assigned by such order are:
Name: Joseph M. Glasscock
Address:
5940 Ricker Rd.
Jacksonville, FL 32244
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the de-
cedent and persons having claims or
demands against the estate of the de-
cedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made
in the Order -of Summary Adminis-
tration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PE-
RIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTH-
ER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
Notice is January 20, 2011.
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
By:/s/ Joy N. Owenby, Esquire
Florida Bar Number: 0551791
Brenda A. Drake, Esquire
Florida Bar Number: 0040942
Attorneys for Joseph M. Glasscock
Law Office of Joy N. Owenby, P.L.
6136 Atlantic Blvd.
Jacksonville, FL 32216
Telephone: (904)359-5115
Fax: (904) 359-5116
E-Mail: Joy@OwenbyLaw.com
Person Giving Notice:
By:/s/ Joseph M. Glasscock
5940 Ricker Rd.
Jacksonville, Florida 32244 .
04543061
January 20, 27, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 10-332-CA
GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC,
1400 TURBINE DRIVE, SUITE 200
RAPID CITY, SD 57703,
Plaintiff
v.
JOHN T. NESSMITH,A/K/A JOHN
NESSMITH, IF LIVING, BUT IF
DECEASED, -THE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,LIE-
NORS, TRUSTEES OF JOHN T.
NESSMITH, A/K/A JOHN NES-
SMITH, DECEASED, AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE NAMED DE-
FENDANTS,
TENA L. NESSMITH AND CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
THAT, pursuant to Plaintiff's Final
Summary Judgment 'Of Foreclosure
entered in the above-captioned ac-
tion, I will sell the property situated
in Columbia County, Florida, descri-
bed as follows, to wit:
LOT 10 OF DAVIS SUBDIVISION
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
4, PAGES 11 AND 11A, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-
BIA COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO-
GETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN
1998 60 X 24 SPRINGHILL MO-
BILE HOME, SERIAL NUMBER:
GAFLV34AB26507SH21
Commonly known as: 1065 NW Ev-
erett Terrace, White Springs, Florida
32096 at public sale, to the highest
and best bidder, for cash at the Court
Room I of the Columbia County
Courthouse, 173 NE Hemando
Street, Lake City, Florida 32055, at
11:00 AM (EST), on the 16th day of
February, 2011.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
/s/ By: B Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Notice to Persons With Disabilities:
If youth are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the Court Ad-
ministrator's Office not later than
seven days prior to the proceeding.
05524901
January 20, 27, 2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: FORT
WHITE AUTOMOTIVE gives No-
tice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent
to sell these vehicles on 02/01/2011,
08:00 am at 8493 SW US Hwy 27
Forth White, FL 32038, pursuant to
subsection 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes. FORT WHITE AUTOMO-
TIVE reserves the right to accept or
reject any and/or all bids.

1FMZU32P4WZC07403
1998 FORD

04542949
January 20, 2011


Get Connected


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-305-CA
DIVISION:
VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND
FINANCE, INC., etc.,
Plaintiff
vs.
ALBERT R. SHIPES, et al.
Defendants
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031
(1), FLORIDA STATUTES
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE is hereby given that pur-
suant to the Final Judgment entered
on January 13, 2011, in Case No. 10-
305 CA of the Circuit Court, Colum-
bia County, Florida, in .which Van-
derbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc.,
etc., is plaintiff and Albert R. Shipes,
et al. are the defendants, the Clerk of
this Court will sell at public sale the
following described property:
Exhibit A
EXHIBIT "A"
PART OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SW
1/4 OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRI-
BED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT THE SW CORNER OF
THE SE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 9; THENCE N
01'25'53" W, ALONG THE WEST
LINE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF THE SW
1/4 A DISTANCE OF 375.50 FEET;
THENCE N 87'52'36" E, 508.16
FEET TO THE WEST OCCUPIED
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF DOU-
BLE RUN ROAD (A .40 FOOT
WIDE RIGHT-OF-WAY AS PRES-
ENTLY OCCUPIED) SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE BEING
DEFINED BY A CURVE CON-
CAVE TO THE WEST, HAVING A
RADIUS OF 3770.15 FEET AND A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05'54'32",
AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A
CHORD HAVING A BEARING OF
S 1250'10" W AND A CHORD
LENGTH OS 388.64 FEET;
THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE AN
ARC DISTANCE OF 388.82 FEET
TO ITS INTERSECTION WITH
THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SEC-
TION 9; THENCE S 87'52'36" W,
ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE,
412.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH A 1999, 52X28
SILVERCREST MOBILE HOME,
SERIAL NO. FLA14614236AB
The sale will be held on February 16,
2011, at 11:00 a.m. to the highest
and best bidder for cash, at the front
steps to the Columbia County Court-
house, 173 NE Hernano Ave., Lake
City, Florida in accordance with Sec-
,tion 45.031 of the Florida Statutes.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation to
participate in this proceeding, you
are entitles at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance.
Please contact ADA Coordinator,
1173 NE Hernando Ave., Lake City,
FL 32055 (386)719-7576 at least 7
days before you scheduled court ap-
pearance, or immediately upon re-
ceiving this notification if the time
before the scheduled appearance is.
less than 7 days; if you. are hearing or
voice impaired, call 711.
Dated this 13 day of January, 2011
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF SAID COURT
By:/s/ B. SCIPPIO
As Deputy Clerk
Lance P. Cohen
1723 Blanding Blvd. Suite 102
Jacksonville, FL 32210
(904)388-6500
Attorney for Plaintiff

04543097
January 20, 27, 2011


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

Keys Found
week of January 10th,in TCBY
plaza, please call to identify
386-628-9352


100 Opportunities

- 04543107
Welder/TIG
Immediate job opening. Tig
Welding experience 2 yrs
minimum. Tig Welding Test
required. Excellent fringe
benefit package, which includes
paid vacations, paid holidays,
group health insurance, and a
401K plan. Stainless fabrication
at Hunter Marine on
Highway 441 in Alachua.

DRIVER/COUNTER SALES
Valid DL. DFWP. Benefits, 401K,
P/T to F/T, Apply at 986 E. Duval
St. Lake City 386-466-0177
DUMP TRUCK Driver
w/Asphalt experience
Drug-free, clean driving record
386-497-3131
Experienced Legal
Secretary/Paralegal
5 yrs exp, including


civil litigation, email resume and
salary requirements,to:
sportsroof@yahoo.com
Experienced Stylist
needed, apply at
Southern Exposure Salon
386-752-4614


100 Job
100 Opportunities

New Generation Christian School
is hiring an elementary teacher.
Minimum of bachelors degree in
education, psychology or other
related field is required.
Please fax application to:
(386) 758-5597 or e-mail to
pgorman@newgenerationschool.org
6 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Orville Hail, Jr.
Somerset, Ky. Tobacco,, Straw
/Hay, & Row Crop, Row Cop -
Produce, Greenhouse/Nursery &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 03/15/11 -01/15/12. Wage
of $9.7 1/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools pro-
vided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting work-
ers. Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in ydur
area and reference Job Oider
#KY0419186
5 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Todd Clark
Farms, Inc. Lexington, KY Tobac-
co, Straw/Hay, & Row Crop, Poul-
try & Alternative Work. Employ-
ment Dates: 03/01/11 12/31/11.
Wage of $9.71/hr. Worker guaran-
teed 3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when ,50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Center
in your area and reference Job
Order #KY0417494.
Two Hair Stylist needed,
with clientele for Branford salon,
please call Maggie,
386-935-4059
Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chiis. @ 386-755-0630
8 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: William &
Lynn Gamett Farms. Hopkinsville,
KY, Tobacco, Straw/Hay, & Row
Crop Production & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates:
03/01/11 12/15/11. Wage of
$9.71/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference Job Order
#KY0417453.

120 Medical
120 Employment

04543116
Weekend CNA
7-3 and 3-11 shifts.
: Weekends only.
Dietary
Need cooks and aides,
full time and part time.
Apply Baya Pointe Nursing
& Rehabilitation Center
587 SE EnnrmineAve.,
Lake City, Fl 32025.

05524758
RN NEEDED
7:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m.
The Health Center of Lake City
has an opening for an RN with
good assessment skills
Excellent Salary
EOE/ADA/Drug
Free Workplace
Apply in person or
send resume to:
The Health Center
of Lake City
560 S.W. McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025

Homecare LPN's &
Homecare CNA's needed for cli-
ent in Lake City, call
Maxim Healthcare Services
352-291-4888
Medical Billing,
several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance Bill-
ing required. Please email resume
to admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net
or fax to 386-755-2169
Physician's Assistant or Nurse
Practitioner needed for new Ur-
gent Care Center in Alachua area,
ER or Urgent Care experience a
plus, but not required. Contact
Paul @ 352-258-4452


140 Work Wanted

We Run Errands!
Your personal errand service to
help those in need at rates you can
afford Call Dawn 386-249-9426

2 Schools &
240 Education

04542861
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/17/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies


AKC GERMAN SHEPPARD
puppy. Born 12/13.
Parents on site. $400.
386-496-3654 or 352-745-1452


310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shbts and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

Maytag Washer & Dryer Set,
exc cond, like new, white
$460 obo
386-752-9645


407 Computers

DELL COMPUTER
$80. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture

ASHLEY DINING ROOM
TABLE w/6 chairs and leaf.
$150.00 Great Deal!!!
386-344-5706


420 Wanted to Buy

DON'T SCRAP
that appliance.
I'll buy it or move it.
386-365-1915
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hirdj -od _,d:.,
Cypress. Large or small trqcts.
Call 386-961-1961..:
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

Fri & Sat, 8-4, comer of St Johns
& Lamond (behind Say A Lot),
bed frames, bookshelves, hutch,
pots/pans 386-438-5630
MOVING SALE, Everything
must go! Sat 8-?, 3187 216 St,
One mile W of 247, on Market Rd
386-984-0876






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or"
386-719-4802

630 Mobile Homes
6O3 for Rent

2 br/2 full bath' SWMH
ready to rent Ft White
$600.mo
386-497-1464 or 365-1705
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
Clean, quiet 3/2 ($625 mo) &
2/1 ($450 mo.) both in Branford
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Mobile Homes for.rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114






Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Niced4br/2.5 ba, 3 ac. Fenced
Cross Fenced, paved rd., huge
deck, private. McAlpin area. $900
dep. & $950. mo. 386-867-1833


To place your
classified ad call

1 MIMP -] t~ -q, t .,,,. .,










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2011


S640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
$569 mo 3Bd/2Ba Modular
1/2 acre Deck, energy efficient,
appliances, drive, w/$12K down
($640 mo w/ $6K down).
Avail in March
Owner finance or rent to own???
Call (386) 758-9824 hurry
05524745
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Liquidation Sale
2009 Model Homes MUST GO!
Call for FREE color brochures
800-622-2832

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

05524833
Get up to $2011 in 2011!
Call for Details
Windsong Apts
386-758-8455
2br/lba house. In town
Close to shopping.
$500. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Large 2br/2ba Duplex.in
nice area with W/D hookup.
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Studio Apt. Private. Rent includes
utilities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets For info
call. 386-963-4767 or 292-0385

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
05524832
New Years Dream "Surprise"
Why Rent? Lease to own.
New model home 2 miles S off
47. 3000 sq ft, 4/3, 5% int, is
tax deduc, consider trade-in
386-752-1364


730 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent

(4541051
403 Baya Ave...First month's
rent discounted 50%! 3/2
remodeled home on Baya Ave.
1440 sf. with side deck. Pets
considered. $790./mo +
$790./ security
642 SW Chris Terrace...
Located in a nice wooded
subdivision, beautiful 3/2
upscale rental close to Lake City
but far enough out to enjoy your
privacy. $1150./mo plus
$1150. secuirty
315 Piedmont Live Oak...older
4/2 home in downtown Live
Oak. Kitchen remodeled.
$850./mo plus $825. security
881 SW Sunview...Gorgeous
4/2 country home between Lake
City and Ft. White just off SR
47. Mobile home situated on 5
acre comer lot. $900./,mo. plus
$900. security
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co. @
386-365-5884
http://springsrus.com/
Learn about Lake City!

2 br/lba w/Laundry room
w/yard, near airport, $500. mo,
1st, last & $300 sec.
386-752-0335 M-F 8-4
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1000 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport, $825 mo, 1st,
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
4BR/2BA on I acre.
In Cul-de-sac. Close to 1-10.
$700. mo and $700. security
deposit. 386-965-3567
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Three Rivers Estates, 2/1, CH/A,
2010 W2 and ref's from current
landlord required, $700 month, &
$700 sec dep, 386-497-4699
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus bonus
room. w/1.5 bath. Quail Heights
CC. $750. mo plus $250 damage
dep. 386-752-8553
Turnkey rental, 3/2 split,2 CG, 1/2
acre, quiet neighborhood, close to
1-75, $1050 per month, 1 st/last/sec,
386-454-2826 or 954-895-1722

750 Business &
Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
S1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd, owner fin, no
,down pym't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
This nice 4.5 acre parcel has
septic, power & well, older MH
$39.900 MLS 76182
Roger Levelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference.
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex.
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

2br/2ba Eastside Village.
Unique floor plan. Lg utility/
work room. Screened front porch.
$55,000 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
3/1 on 4.43 acres, metal roof,
pond on property,
Lease option available
$129,888 Results Realty,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
3br/2ba 80'X125' lot. 1,200 sqft.
Kitchen & bath remodeled, metal
roof, Ig fenced back yard. Close to
amenities. $79,900 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Brick home w/1,934 sqft
in Piccadilly Park. 1/2 acre. Lg
playroom, fenced yard. Reduced to
$139,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Custom home. on 5 ac.
where deer & turkey roam.
Lg barn w/enclosed workshop.
$219,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
4/2 in Sub-div, open floor
plan,florida room, porch, fenced,
$150,000 call Missy Zecher
@Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
4/2 on 4 acres, open floor plan, 2
living rms, rec room w/wet bar
$89,900 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
4/3 farm house on 3.95 acres
w/private pond, surrounded by
oaks $689,000 Charlie Sparks,
Westfield Realty MLS#76149
386-755-0808


4br/2ba, 5 ac., 2069 sqft. Ig family
& florida rm, den. Covered patio,
workshop. $229,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba, remodeled, views of the
lake. Formal LR, dining room &
family room. Many upgrades.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488


67.5 acre farm, fenced, workshop,
pole barn and two ponds, MH
(1984 sq ft) $299,000
call Patti Taylor at
Access Realty 386-623-6896


810 Home for Sale
Affordable, clean home in sub-div.
Freshly painted interior.
This is a must see!
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
BRAND new home. Irg master
suite, 2 miles from US 90.
$179,900 MLS #76449
Carrie CasonWestfield Realty
386-623-2806
Brick home on 5 acres,
country feel close to town!
Must See! Results Realty
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
Clean, cozy. well maintained 3/2
on 1.05 acres, lots of shade trees,
built in 2007, $135,900
Call Patty Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Country Club. 4br/4ba. New roof,
AC, windows. Pool, hot tub,
& greenhouse. $229,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Custom Brick, 5+ ac. 5br/4ba.
4412 sqft. 3 car garage, pool, hot
tub, 3 fireplaces, more. $569,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lori Giebeig Simpson 365-5678
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home
w/oversized garage.
Eastside Village Realty, Inc
386-752-5290
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home
2br/2ba, 1 car garage,.
Eastside Village Realty $83,000
386-752-5290
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home lots of
amenities; clubhouse, pool, spa.
Eastside Village Realty
$89,500 386-752-5290
Excellent area. 3br/2ba home.
1620 sqft. w/covered patio. Lg
front porch & 1 car carport
Lori Giebeig. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdi/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances, close to
schools, $65K 478-391-1592
Large 3/2 brick home w/basement.
2 living areas. porch on 2 lots
$129,900 MLS #74118
386-623-2806 Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty
Large entertaining home, w/pool,
gazebo, huge workshop,
$285,000 Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Large home w/acre of land, Irg
family & florida rooms,
covered porch,
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com


Move In Ready. 3br/2ba w/1,225
sqft. Comer lot, great S/D.
12x16 workshop w/elec.
Upgrades. $75,000.386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
Nice 3/2 home on 4 acres
close to town $168,000,
Motivated seller MLS#73410
Carrie Cason Westfield Realty
386-623-2806
Nicely remodeled 3/2 on 2 acres,
partially fenced $115,888
Nancy Rogers @
Results Realty
386-867-1271


Open House Sat. 01/22. 10a-4p
215 NW Fairway Hills Glen. Fully
remodeled condo, Unit #9. Golf
Coarse view. Introductory price
$125,000. 386-397-3800/697-1334


810 Home for Sale
Two story MH. located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces. 9 bdrms/3bths
$163.900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Woodcrest S/D Super location.
nice back yard. 3br/2ba home,
cov-
ered back porch. New AC in 2010
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
WOODGATE VILLAGE.
3br/2ba DWMH.
Close to new elementary
school. $27,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc

820 Farms &
82 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
830 Propertyo
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190
Commercial property situated
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya Ave 3.27 acres,
$398,888 Results Realty
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
Property (comer location), easy
access comer, close to downtown,
$94,000 Charlie Sparks
Westfield Realty
386-755-0808 MLS#74814

940 Trucks
2007 Nissan Titan Crew Cab
only 25,000 miles stock #F28
386-365-7431 Steve Bonesio
Rountree-Moore Ford
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802






950 Cars for Sale
2008 Cadillac DTS, only 15,000
miles, stock # 245108, pls ask for
Myron Wruble @ 386-755-0630
#292, Rountree-Moore Ford
2010 Grand Marquis, 3 to choose
from stock #F292 Myron Wrubel,
386-755-0630 #292
Rountree-Moore Ford
2010 Hyundia Sonata GLS,
4dr, $12,999, warranty, auto, stock
#F307 Dwight Twiggs Rountree-
Moore Ford'386-755-0630 #219
Gas Saver, 07 Sporty Honda Fit,
stock #293G, 31 city 40 hwy,
Tommie Jefferson @ 386-209-
8680 Rountree-Moore Ford


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within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
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credit card. Just include a snapshot-or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.





2006 EF250 In Print,
Ford Van & Online
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves adder rack One Low
60K miles, exc. cond. O w

$10o,500oo Price!
Call
386-623-9026


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