The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01356
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: January 19, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01356
System ID: UF00028308:01356
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text











ndians Falter
r)nl- Hnll beats Fort While, 5-3.
000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Eliminated
Fort White girls lose
district opener.
Sports, I B


Lake


Wednesday, January 19,2011


'i.i


-ww.


porter


Vol. 136, No. 310 I 75 cents


Gun permit: What you should know


Pistol that went off
atWalmart owned
by man with license.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityrepor ter. com
oncealed-weapons
permits give Florida
,, residents the legal
privilege to carry self-
defense sidearms in
a non-threatening manner in a


"It was a crime when he failed to maintain
proper control of the gun and it fell out of his
pants and it discharged. He would have
been fine if the gun was properly secured
on his person."

Capt. Robert Smith
Lake City Police Department'

variety of public places. ity expected from the person who
But that privilege hinges on a qualifies for the license, then car-
high level of personal responsibil- ries a firearm in public.


On Friday night, a Lake City
man was arrested while inside
Walmart after his concealed
.22-taliber pistol fell out of his
pants, struck the floor and fired
a round.
No one was injured in the
incident, but the gun owner was
charged with culpable negligence
and improper exhibition of a fire-
arm in the incident.
Lake City Police Department
GUNS continued on 3A


BY THE NUMBERS
Concealed Weapon and
Firearm license holders
by selected county
As of Jan. 1, 2011
COLUMBIA ......... 2,737
BROWARD ....... 62,344
PALM BEACH ... 51,005
SARASOTA ............14,414
SUWANNEE ............ 2,084
Source: FDACS


War of the words:

Columbia brains

polish spell skills


13 area students
to test prowess
in competition.
By LEANNE TYO
ltyo@lakecityreporter.com
Local students will face
off Thursday in a compe-
tition requiring a special,
specific skill.
That skill: the ability to
s-p-e-l-l.
Thirteen students rep-
resenting each district ele-
mentary and middle school


and Covenant Community
School will compete in the
annual Florida Times-Union
Columbia County Spelling
Bee. The winner will move
on to the Scripps Regional
Spelling Bee Feb. 19 in
Jacksonville.
Students participating at
the county level won spell-
ing bees previously held
at their respective schools,
said Brandi Keen, bee coor-
dinator.
The County Bee will
SPELL continued on 3A


Council OKs first

step to amending

natural gas rates


Expect changes
in distribution
monthly charges.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The City of Lake City
Council approved on
Tuesday the first reading
of an ordinance amend-
ing natural gas rates and
charges.
The council held a public
hearing for the proposed


adjustments prior to the
first reading.
City Manager Wendell
Johnson said the ordinance
- aims to
... address
someissues
that were in
place with
the existing
rates and
charges. A
Johnson rate study.
began in 2008 for natural
GAS RATES continued on 3A


Comcast receives

government OK

to take over NBC


Lake City cable
provider gets
FCC approval.

By JOELLE TESSLER
AP Technology Writer
WASHINGTON The
government on Tuesday
cleared the way for Comcast
Corp., the country's larg-
est cable company, to take
over NBC Universal in a
deal certain to transform
the entertainment industry
landscape.
Comcast is buying a
51 percent stake in NBC


1 iii~i.i. ii 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-129
SUBSCRIBE
THE REPORT
Voice: 755-54
Fax: 752-94


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Comcast logo is dis-
played on a TV set in this
recent file photo.
Universal, home of the
NBC television network,
from General Electric Co.
for $13.8 billion in cash and
COMCAST continued on 3A

- 68
To Mostly Sunny
SWEATHERER: 2A
45too WEATHER, 2A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lottie Davis reshelves books at the Fort White branch of the Columbia County Public Library Tuesday afternoon. 'We are
greatly excited,' Davis said, referring to the move to a new location. 'We are running out of room here. There will be nice
areas in the new library.'


Fort White public library shutters

old location to prepare for move


By A.C. GONZALEZ
agonzalez@lakecityreporter. corn
The Fort White
public library
closed its old
location after
business hours
on Tuesday evening, pre-
paring for the move to its
newly constructed build-
ing.
Since 1998, the Fort
White branch of the
library ran the operations
from its old location at 118
SW Wilson Springs Road,
with Patti Street as branch
manager.
"The plans for a new
library have been in the
works for years," Street
said. "Within the last
couple of years, we have
known it was definite
though."
Lack of space was
the issue librarians, and
patrons, were dealing with
at the old location. "I've
been bugging them for
years for more space,"


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Jonathan Stokes, 9, reads 'A Series of Unfortunate Events' by
Daniel Handler.


Street said. With a new
facility and more square
footage to operate in, busi-
ness will run smoother
than ever, she said.
Street said that the
library will be closed
for the rest of the week.
Moving out and into the
new location at 17700 SW
State Road 47 will take up
all of the staff's business
hours during the next few
days.


O pinion ................ 4A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics......... 3B
K -- /-- Puzzles ............... 2B
- .-,< Around Florida........... 2A


"Ift's a simple process,
like moving out of a house
really," Street said. 'We
have to pack and move
all of the books from one
location to the other, and
then unpack and set them
all up."
Street added that mov-
ing in would be a tedious
portion of the process,
but that they would have
enough time to get it all
done correctly during the

TODAY IN
NATION
Gun in backpac
JI fires; 2 wounded


rest of the week.
The library hired
Library Systems, based
out of White Springs, to
move the packed books
to the new location. The
company scheduled the
move for 8 a.m. today,
and the plan is to begin
unpacking immediately
after the move.
"I think we're ready
for them, as ready as
we're going to be, any-
way," Street said. "We've
got plenty of books, and
the next three days after
the move will be spent
unpacking and putting
the books in order for the
grand opening Monday."
Street added, "Moving
will not be the most dif-
ficult part of this process,
however. We have to let
the people know that the
library will be closed for
the week, and let them
know about our new loca-
tion. We count on adver-
FORT WHITE continued on 3A

COMING
THURSDAY
k Diamonds perform
d. at FGC.


NEW CHEAPER











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2011


H 3 Tuesday:
Afternoon: 8-0-9
Evening: 6-8-8


Play4 Tuesday:
Afternoon: 3-3-0-3
Evening: 2-1-7-0


ezA.'Atch -

Monday:
1-25-27-29-30


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS




Regis announces retirement


NEW YORK
V veteran broadcaster Regis
Philbin is retiring from
his weekday talk show.
Philbin made the
announcement at the
start of Tuesday morning's "Live
With Regis and Kelly," which he has
hosted for more than a quarter-cen-
tury, most recently sharing hosting
duties with Kelly Ripa.
Philbin said he would be stepping
down from the show around the end
of the summer, but he didn't specify
a departure date.
"I don't want to alarm anybody,"
he began, then declared, "This will
be my last year on the show.
"It's been a long time. It's been 28
years," he continued, "and it was the
biggest thrill of my. life to come back
to New York, where I grew up as a
kid watching TV in the early days,
you know, never even dreaming that
I would one day have the ability, or
whatever it takes, to get in front of
the camera and talk to it.
"There is a time that everything
must come to an end for certain
people on camera especially cer-
tain old people!" cracked Philbin,
who is 79.
"I think I can only speak for
America and all of us here," respond-
ed Ripa, "when I say it has been a
pleasure and a privilege and a dream
come true. And I wish I could do
something to make you change your
mind."
"Now wait a minute," Philbin said
slyly.

Rock promoter Kirshner
dies in Florida at age 76
LAS VEGAS A business associ-
ate said rock promoter Don Kirshner
has died of heart failure at a Florida
hospital at age 76.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this June 27, 2010 photo, host Regis
Philbin arrives at the 37th Annual
Daytime Emmy Awards in Las Vegas.
Veteran broadcaster Philbin says he's
retiring from his weekday talk show.
Philbin made the announcement at the
start of the morning show "Live With
Regis and Kelly," Tuesday.

Promoter Jack Wishna told The
Associated Press in Las Vegas that the
man Time magazine once dubbed
the "Man With the Golden Ear" died
Monday at a Boca Raton hospital
where he was being treated for an
infection.
Wishna called Kirshner an icon
who touched many lives in the music
industry.
Kirshner was behind the TV show
"Don Kirshner's Rock Concert" in
1972, and gave national exposure to
musicians including Billy Joel and
The Police.
He also boosted careers of comics,


including Billy Crystal, Arsenio Hall
and David Letterman.

Aniston: 'The Rachel'
was 'the ugliest haircut'
NEW YORK -.Jennifer Aniston
said the haircut she inspired in the
mid-1990s wasn't worth the following
it built
The 41-year-old former star of
"Friends" said in the February issue
of Allure magazine that "The Rachel"
was not her best look.
She said: "How do I say this? I
think it was the ugliest haircut I've
ever seen."
Aniston wore the style on the
show's first and second season, and
it quickly caught on at salons across
America. It was named for her char-
acter, Rachel Green.
Aniston's longtime hairstylist
Chris McMillan came up with "The
Rachel." He still works with her
today.

'Twilight' star talks
privacy, money in 'Vogue'
NEW YORK Kristen Stewart
is living an atypical life for a 20-year-
old.
Ever since she took on the role of
Bella Swan in the 'Twilight" films,
she's crossed over into youth-idol,
status where emotions run high and
she has zero privacy.
The actress says in the February
issue of Vogue magazine that she
can't go to a shopping mall and that
it bothers her she can't be outside
often.
Stewart is working on the final two
films in the saga and says her wish
is for the fans to be happy with the
outcome.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Former U.N. Secretary-
General Javier Perez de
Cuellar is 91.
* Actress Jean Stapleton is
88.
* Actor Fritz Weaver is 85.
* Actress Tippi Hedren is 81
* Singer Phil Everly is 72.
* Actress Shelley Fabares
is 67.
* Country singer Dolly


Parton is 65.
E TV chef Paula Deen is 64.
N Singer Dewey Bunnell
(America) is 59.
0 Actor Desi Arnaz, Jr. is 58.
N Rock musician Jeff Pilson
(Foreigner) is 53.
E Actor Shawn Wayans is 40.
E Actor Logan Lerman is 19.
0 Olympic gold medal gym-
nast Shawn Johnson is 19.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reiorter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.... ............ $26.32
24 Weeks................... $48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks ..................$82.80
52 Weeks ............... ... $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications wilrrun
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Reporters say
rules too tight
TALLAHASSEE
Journalists who
cover Florida's capital
complained to industry
leaders Tuesday that the
new administration of
Gov. Rick Scott is skirt-
ing free-press traditions
and attempting to control
their work by limiting
access to events and
being slow to provide
public records.
Speaking to the board
of the Florida Society
of News Editors, nine
Tallahassee correspon-
dents said Scott's team
is imposing an unprec-
edented level of control
over access to Scott and
to events that previously
would have been consid-
ered open. The gover-
nor's office also has tried
to "cherry-pick" reporters
to provide pooled reports
to the rest of the press
corps, instead of allowing
the journalists to choose.
Bob Rathgeber, senior
staff writer for The News-
Press of Fort Myers, said
Scott, a former health
care executive, apparently
wants to continue operat-
ing as if he were still in
the private sector, not
public office.
The journalists pointed
to several examples,
including a post-inaugu-
ration reception held on
the scenic 22nd floor of
the state Capitol, where
Scott's staff restricted
access to only a select
few.
The event was in a
public building and the
entire state Legislature
had been invited, noted
Mary Ellen Klas of The
Miami Herald. "That, on
its surface, struck me as
a public meeting. There's
no reason they should be
shutting the public out."
But Klas and others,
including an AP reporter,
were booted out.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Outgoing Florida Gov. Charlie Crist (left) shakes hands with
new Gov. Rick Scott after his swearing in at the inauguration
Jan. 4. Journalists are saying Scott is trying to control their
work by limiting press access.


25 states join
Florida in lawsuit
PENSACOLA Six
more states joined a law-
suit in Florida against
President Obama's health
care overhaul on Tuesday,
meaning more than half of
the country is challenging
the law.
The announcement
was made as House mem-
bers in Washington, led
by Republicans, debated "
whether to repeal the law.
The six additional
states, all with Republican'
attorneys general, joined
Florida and 19 others in
the legal action, Florida
Attorney General Pam
Bondi said.
"It sends a strong mes-
sage that more than half
of the states consider the
health care law unconsti-
tutional and are willing to
fight it in court," she said
in a statement.
The states claim the
health care law is uncon-
stitutional and violates
people's rights by forcing
them to buy health insur-
ance by 2014 or face penal-
ties.
Government attorneys
have said the states do not
have standing to challenge
the law and want the case
dismissed.
Lawsuits have been
filed elsewhere. A federal
judge in Virginia ruled in


December that the insur-
ance-purchase mandate
was unconstitutional,
though two other federal
judges have upheld the
requirement. It's expected
the Supreme Court will
ultimately have to resolve
the issue.

Commissioner to
handle class sizes
PENSACOLA
- Florida's Board of
Education said the state's
education commissioner
and the Legislature will
deal with school districts
violating class-size limits.
Meeting in Pensacola
Tuesday, board members
said the commissioner will
work with districts to dis-
cuss fines and penalties.
For the first time this
school year, Florida is
enforcing class-size caps
of 18 students for pre-
kindergarten through
third grade, 22 in fourth
through eighth grade
and 25 in high school. So
far, 25 of the 35 districts
found in violation have
appealed.
Critics have complained
the cost of compliance is
too high. The Legislature
last year put an amend-
ment on the ballot to
loosen the caps, but voters
rejected that proposal.


THE WEATHER



MOSTLY ? PARTLY MORNING F MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY, CLOUDY OWNERS SUNNY SUNNY


S HI68LO .| HI72LO:v, HI62 LO | HI59LO, HI62LO35




Valdosta


City
Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
67/42 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytna Beach Fort Myers
7 52 Gainesville
Jacksonville
Oriando Cape Canaveral Key West
76/54 72/58 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
78/63 Orlando
* Ft Lauderdale Panama City
rs 80/65 0 Pensacola
8 Naples Tallahassee
75/60 Miami Tampa


t today 7:05 a.m. fo
e tom. 7:10 p.m. as
t tom. 7:49 a.m.


Jan. Feb. Feb.
26 2 11
Last New First



On this date in
1990, heavy snow
spread from the
central and south-
ern Rockies into
the Great Plains.
Storm totals in New
Mexico reached 36
inches at Gascon.
Totals in the central
Plains ranged up
Sto 15 inches near
McCook, Neb., and
.: Garden City, Kan.


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


* Associated Press


Daily Scripture



"No temptation has overtaken
you except what is common to
mankind. And God is faithful;
he will not let you be tempted
beyond what you can bear."


I Corinthians 10:13


AROUND FLORIDA


U


Tallahassee *
66/42
Pensacola "
60/48 Panama CRty
.61/47


67.41
Lake City,
68/42
Gainesville .
,70/44
Ocala
,71/47


Tampa *
7') /P;7 ,


72/


FL Mye
77/5E


Thursday
i5/63/pc
74/59/pc
79/69/sh
78/65/sh
73/56/pc
70/56/pc
74/67/pc
72/54/pc
79/69/sh
79/66/sh
75/56/pc
76/59/pc
61/50/pc
65/42/sh
64/50/pc
73/64/pc
68/50/pc
78/68/sh


Friday
i2/48/pc
70/44/pc
80/62/sh
76/55/pc
64/36/sh
64/36/sh
74/65/t
62/32/sh
79/64/sh
77/58/sh
67/39/sh
72/46/pc
58/40/sh
52/26/pc
59/27/sh
70/44/pc
58/30/sh
81/59/sh


KeWest 80/66 Valdosta
KeyWest* W. Palm Beach
78/68


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today


7:27 a.m.
5:56 p.m.
7:27 a.m.
5:57 p.m.


6:01 P.m.


65
55
66
42
85 in 1937
20 in 1977


0.01"
1.69"
1.69"
1.95"
1.95",


5

30 ates to bun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk


r the area on
scale from 0
10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


Moonse
Moonris
Moonse

0
Jan.
19
Full


S, Forecasts, data and graph-
-- Ics 2011 Weather Central
S--' LLC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


www.lakecitrpre. com

. L ^k^eCitvReprte


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2011 3A


Officials continue search

for clues from fatal wreck


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Law enforcement offi-
cials on Tuesday said they
are continuing their inves-
tigation into the fatal wreck
where two people died in a
car driven by a 14-year-old
boy.
Jennifer Ann Grant, 26,
and Ronnie Bias, 10, both
of Lake City, died as a result
of injuries they suffered in
the wreck on Sunday.
Julian Little, 14, the car's
listed driver and Joseph
Grant, 6, were taken to a
Gainesville hospital. They
were listed in critical condi-
tion Sunday. No additional
details have been released
on their conditions.
One of the key questions


in the investigation is why
was the 14-year-old driving
the vehicle.
Lt. Patrick Riordan, FHP
Troop B public affairs offi-
cer, said Jennifer Ann Grant
had a valid drivers license,
but noted authorities have
not been able to determine
whether she was incapaci-
tated and unable to drive.
Grant was the mother of
Joseph Grant.
Authorities did not say
whether the other people in
the vehicle were related to
each other.
According to Florida
Highway .Patrol reports,
Little was driving a 1994
Mustang with Jennifer Ann
Grant, Joseph Grant and
Bias as his passengers,
heading south on Southwest


Haltiwanger Road.
Little reportedly lost con-
trol of the car and it traveled
onto the roadway's shoulder,
striking a dirt embankment
before hitting a small tree.
There is a possibility that
Little could face charges in
connection with the wreck,
authorities said.
"Charges are pending
a complete and thorough
investigation that may take
as long as 90 days," Riordan
said.
Officials are uncertain
whether Little could face
charges as an adult since
there was a death in the
case. "It depends on what
facts are revealed and can
be proved upon conclu-
sion of the investigation,"
Riordan said.


SPELL: Students to showcase talents
Continued From Page 1A


COMCAST: Opponents reject approval


Continued From Page 1A
assets.
Comcast is Lake City's
cable provider.
The Justice Department
and five state attorneys gen-
eral said Tuesday that they
have reached a court settle-
ment allowing the compa-
nies to proceed with their
combination, subject to con-
ditions intended to preserve
competition among video
providers.
In addition, the
five-member Federal
Communications


Commission on Tuesday
voted 4-1 to approve the
transaction, subject to simi-
lar but broader conditions.
Among other things, the
government is requiring
Comcast to make NBC
programming available to
competitors such as satel-
lite and phone companies,
as well as new Internet
video services that could
pose a threat to the compa-
ny's core cable business.
Officials want to guarantee
that online video services


from companies such as
Netflix Inc., Amazon.com
and Apple Inc. can get the
movies and TV shows they
need to grow and poten-
tially offer a cheaper alter-
native to monthly cable
subscriptions.
'This will ultimately mean
higher cable and Internet
bills, fewer independent
voices in the media, and
less freedom of choice for
all American consumers,"
Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.)
said in a statement.


GAS RATES: Ordinance initially OK'd
Continued From Page 1A


gas and the findings were
presented in August.
Residential rates were
higher than others in the
Florida Gas Utility peer
group and Commercial
rates were lower, he said.
There also was no recur-
ring capital improvement


program or rate stabilization
fund. The new ordinance
will address the issues.
In the ordinance the
monthly customer charge
would be $10 per month for
residential and $25 for com-
mercial. The distribution
charge for residential cus-


tomers will decrease from
$0.62012 a therm in 2010 to
$0.59099 2011. The rate will
continue to decrease in 2012
to $0.5684. The distribution
charge for commercial cus-
tomers will increase from
$0.32177 a therm in 2010 to
$0.36194 for 2011.


take its competing students
through anumberofrounds,
giving them opportunities
to spell words, Keen said.
Students will be eliminated
as words are misspelled,
bringing the match to the
Championship Word the
last word when the compe-
tition is down to its two final
students, she said.
"The person who wins the
Bee will be the person who
spells the Championship
Word correctly," Keen
said.


District employees and
retired educators will vol-
unteer at the Bee in various
roles, such as judges, a pro-
nouncer and a dictionarist.
The Spelling Bee allows
students to demonstrate
their skills in both spelling
and verbal communication,
Keen said.
"Some students are
really talented in spelling
and phonics and this gives
them an opportunity to
showcase it and represent
their school," she said.


"I think it's also a good
opportunity for them to
be in friendly competition
with other schools," Keen
said. "Verbal competition is
so important in the world
today and this is just one
opportunity for them to
experience it firsthand."
The Spelling Bee will
start at 10 a.m. at the
Columbia County School
Board Administrative
Complex auditorium, 372
W Duval St. It is an open
event.


FORT WHITE: New facility, more books


Continued From Page 1A

tising, fliers, and word of
mouth to make the public
aware."
Street said the old build-
ing will be converted for
use as some other sort of
government entity.
The grand openingof
the new building takes
place at 10:30 a.m. Monday
and will be climaxed by a
book-passing ceremony,
Street said. "I want people


to know about the book
passing," she added. "It's
been a lot of work, but
we were able to coordi-
nate with the elementary,
middle, and high school to
have students line up on
the sidewalks, to pass the
last book hand-to-hand,
person-to-person, from the
old building all the way to
the new one."
Street said she believes


the general public will
also be in attendance, and
that she has contacted the
Sheriff's Office to have
deputies present for traffic
control and parking, assis-
tance.
"I am excited about the
ceremony," Street said. "It
will be wonderful to see
that book passed all the
way through the doors of
the new building."


GUNS: 2,737 permits in Columbia
Continued From Page 1A


Capt. Robert Smith said the
man involved in Friday's
incident at Walmart pre-
sented a valid Concealed
Weapon or Firearm
License issued by the state
of Florida.
Smith said the man was
legally permitted to carry a
gun inside the store.
"It was a crime when he
failed to maintain proper
control of the gun and it fell
out of his pants and it dis-
charged," Smith said. "He
would have been fine if the
gun was properly secured
on his person."
Capt. John Blanchard,
Lake City Police
Department public infor-
mation officer, said the man
wasn't charged with carry-
ing a concealed weapon.
"If he would not have
had a weapons permit,"
Blanchard said, "he would
have been facing another
charge and a different bond
amount."
Police said license hold-
ers can break the law if, in
any situation, they fail to
responsibly handle the con-
cealed weapon or firearm.




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The Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services issues permits to
carry concealed weapons
to .qualified individuals.
The Florida Legislature
defines a concealed weap-
on as a handgun, electronic
weapon or device, tear gas,
knife or billie (club).
Anyone 'applying for a
concealed-weapon permit
must meet a battery of
requirements, including a
background check show-
ing the applicant has not
been found guilty of a felo-
ny crime or misdemeanor
crime of domestic violence.
Fingerprints will also be
taken and the applicant is
required to attend a shoot-
ing class with a certified
instructor.
The license is holo-
graphic with a state seal
and contains a photo iden-


tification, expiration date
and the licensee's personal
information. The license is
valid for seven years, which
is renewable after payment
of fees.
In 2005, there were
347,350 active permits
statewide.
As of this year, that
number has swelled to
about 780,595, according
to official state records. In
Columbia County, there are
2,737 residents with con-
cealed-carry permits.
The counties with the
number of permits issued
include Broward County,
with 62,344; and Palm
Beach, with more than
51,000.
Under the principle of
reciprocity, Florida permit
holders can carry their fire-
arms, with certain restric-
tions, in 35 other states.


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Monday, January 24, 2011
Anytime between 5:00 7:00 pm.

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160 NW Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32055.



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OPINION


Wednesday, January 19, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Focus


on gun


control


issues


leaders contin-
ue to lash out
at the media
and each other
for suggesting that hyped,
inflammatory political speech
was somehow to blame for the
Tucson, Arizona massacre that
left six dead and more wound-
ed, a much clearer and obvious
concern demands America's
attention.
Just like Columbine,
like Virginia Tech, like the
Binghamton shootings, Tucson
shooting suspect Jared Lee
Loughner was an obviously
psychologically ill man who
would not, or could not, and
certainly did not get help.
Instead, he easily got a gun.
Those are the problems that
America needs to focus on.
There's no doubt that there
will be a never-ending supply
of deeply disturbed people.
It's a sad part of human his-
tory.
But Americans have been
warned again and again to
pay close attention to mentally
ill people to not only protect
those who are handicapped by
their psychological problems,
but to protect the rest of soci-
ety as well.
It's tragic to discover that
Loughner appeared to be so
mentally ill that he was not
allowed to attend classes at
a local community college.
Despite that, he apparently
never received the psychologi-
cal treatment he desperately
needed.
This really isn't about the
fulminations of infotainers
like Sarah Palin and Rush
Limbaugh.
It's about a long-standing
problem the United States has
had in providing for adequate
treatment of the mentally ill
and effective gun control.
Aurora (Colo.) Sentinel


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman



LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Shootings test death-penalty beliefs


The Oklahoma City bomber,
Timothy McVeigh, fit that cate-
gory. And, if convicted, so would
Loughner.
This would then seem to
mitigate keeping the penalty for
certain classes of crimes that
are so egregious as to constitute
an enormous affront to civilized
society.
These are instances, it seems,
when even the gentlest, God-
fearing among us becomes so
outraged our demand for ven-
geance is almost irresistible.
One could argue all night
about allowing ourselves to
be dragged into such nor-
mally abhorrent feelings, but it
wouldn't change the anger and
despair.
As a father and grandfather
watching the funeral of that
little girl, I confess that I wanted
nothing more than to fly to
Tucson, go to the jail and find
some way to end the miserable
life of that miserable wretch.
Admittedly, the prospect of
feeding, clothing and housing
Loughner for the rest of his life
is distasteful.
It is akin to rubbing salt in the
wounds of not only his victims
but all humanity. Examining his
motives and recalling missed
opportunities to have headed
him off (and there were some)
seem utterly irrelevant.
The only salient fact is that
there are dead and wounded
by his hand, and that can't be
changed or excused in any man-
ner. Eradication may be the only
true justice. Before it is over,
this case may test the convic-
tions of all of us.
Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


he tragedy of the
ucson massacre
reinforces those who
support the death'
S penalty and strains
the convictions-of those who
don't. In the aftermath of such
an unspeakable crime, one
searches for answers as to why
this occurred only to con-
clude that what really matters
is that it did and probably will
again.
So what happens now to
Jared Lee Loughner, who in
plain sight opened fire out-
side a supermarket on Jan. 8?
Nineteen people were shot, six
of them fatally. Are we to give
him a fair trial and then hang
him, which would have been
the case in Arizona not too long
ago? Or should we consider his
seeming mental instability as an
extenuating circumstance that
saves him from the death penal-
ty but incarcerates him at public
expense for the rest of his life?
And how-long will the-pro-
ceedings take, putting the par-
ents of a lovely 9-year-old girl
through the excruciating pain
of watching as they play out?
Isn't the prospect of a lifetime
of missing her enough, without
adding to that burden by know-
ing her slayer survives?.
Loughner's court-appointed
defenders probably will argue
that he did not know right
from wrong under the so-called
McNaughton rule or that he
was subject to incontrollable
impulses, the basic tests for a
successful insanity plea. That,
of course, is their job, and from
the reputation of at least one of
his attorneys, it is one she does
quite well.
With some similar atroci-
ties, motives were blurred by


OTHER


Tucson revives echoes of MLK Jr.


here is a certain grim
coincidence to the
Tucson shootings
and'the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr.'s
birthday falling a week apart
Both King and Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords, D-Ariz., were fully
exercising the prerogatives
of our democracy; King to
speak out on behalf of striking
Memphis sanitation workers,
Giffords to meet informally with
her constituents.
King was killed in an ambush
by a lone gunman of malevolent
motives; Giffords was gravely
wounded from behind by a
deranged gunman with deeply
twisted motives. Both incidents
set off a round of national soul
searching, raising the possibility
that our society had wandered
badly off course. In the course
of the King shooting, that was


certainly true.
The members of the U.S.
House of Representatives
chose to begin the year by
reading the U.S. Constitution
aloud. In another grim coinci-
dence, Giffords read the First
Amendment, whose rights of
speech and assembly guaran-
teed her and King's activities on
those days.
The reading was done
for political purposes, but it
might not be a bad thing if the
Congress from time to time read
aloud from our essential docu-
ments.
One of them would certainly
be King's "I Have A Dream"
speech, given on the steps of the
Lincoln Memorial in 1963.
He gave perhaps the best and
most succinct summations of a
vital promise in the Constitution,
still unfulfilled but far closer to


being realized than when King
spoke.
King showed that there is a
place for eloquence in politics;
it does not have to be all sound
bites and invective; it can be a
soaring appeal to the best in us
and our form of government.
When Giffords recovers
- and, as one fervently hopes,
returns to politics perhaps
she'll come back to a stage
where, as President Barack
Obama said at a memorial ser-
vice for the Tucson victims, "we
are talking with each other in a
way that heals, not in a way that
wounds."
King would approve. To quote
the refrain with which he con-
cluded his "Dream" speech, "Let
freedom ring!"

* The Commercial Appeal
(Memphis, Tenn.)


Dan K.Thomasson
the perpetrators' deaths. That
was the case with the killings
at Colorado's Columbine High
School in 1999 and at Virginia
Tech in 2007. The Fort Hood,
Texas, disaster in 2009, in which
the shooter lived after being
wounded, may take years to
conclude.
Actually, there never can be
true closure in these cases. The
relatives of those slain outside
the Tucson supermarket and
those victims who miraculously
survived, like Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords (D-Ariz.) can never be
compensated for their losses,
although watching Loughner
pay the supreme price for all
this carnage might help some.
The death penalty has right-
fully come under attack at a
time when enhanced science
has proven again and again that
the criminal justice system is
not flawless.
Innocent people have been
convicted and probably some
have been executed.
The list of those who have
been released from death row
through DNA testing grows,
resulting in several venues
declaring moratoriums on their
executions and a. slowing of the
sentencing rate in others.
Yet there are cases so hei-
nous and the identity of those
who commit them so irrefutable
.that they virtually cry out for
capital punishment.


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmar edu


Deep

change

inevitable

at colleges

I 've written several col-
umns in the past about
why being a college pro-:
fessor is one of the best.
jobs in the world. The
workload is heavier and the pay
is less than many imagine, but
the job has enormous compen-,
sations. It's an opportunity to .
do something good for the next
generation, and, best of all, it
provides a chance to start over.
with a clean slate with every '
new semester. In short, ift's hard
for me to imagine a better way'
to have spent the past 25 years
of my working life.
The other day, the college
where I work offered me a big
chunk of money to stop doing
what I'm doing.
I don't take it personal. My.
college, like nearly all colleges
and universities everywhere,,.
is looking for ways to save
money. The Texas Legislature,
convened its biennial session'
this month, and its first order -
of business is grappling with a'
staggering budget shortfall that
could reach $27 billion.
The problem has been sev- -.
eral years in the making, and.
the state has .already pressured
public institutions to produce.
spare, frugal budgets. Higher'.
education has never been lav-
ishly endowed in Texas, so
when the governor asked col-
leges and universities to cinch
up their belts a little tighter,
many of them were already
close to the last notch.
Many colleges, not just in
Texas, but nationwide, are
deciding to spend money
to save money by incentiv-
izing their best-compensated
senior professors to retire and
replacing them with lower-
paid junior faculty. Reporters
David Mildenberg and Janet
Lorin documented this trend
recently for Bloomberg News:
Early-retirement incentive pro-
grams are being implemented
in Florida, Nebraska, Missouri,
Illinois and other states.
Recently, Harvard offered
incentives to 176 professors; 46
retired.
The math is straightforward:
If a longtime-tenured profes-
sor with an annual salary of
$75,000 retires and is replaced
by a junior faculty member at
$40,000, the savings, minus the
cost of the incentive, will mani-
fest themselves quickly.
Critics of retirement-incen-
tive programs argue, however,.
that they are short-term, false
economies that merely push the
cost of instruction further down
the road when, one hopes,
economic conditions will have
improved.
Furthermore, such programs
flirt with the temptation to capi-
talize on the potential savings
by replacing full-time, tenure-
track college teachers with
part-time, poorly compensated
adjuncts.
You don't have to be a finan-
cial genius to see that this is
where the real savings reside.
But it's a delusion to imagine
that the changes now occurring
in the foundations of higher
education are not deeply trans-
formational.
The public needs to be aware
of what should be obvious:
Quality in education, like nearly
everything else, is essentially
connected to the resources that
we are willing or able to commit
to it
John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar,
College in Corpus Christi, Texas,


4A


OPINION











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2011


Today
Roadshow
The Ohio Valley Refinery &
Roadshow is 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
today until Jan. 21 at Fairfield
Inn & Suites, 538 SW Corporate
Drive. The roadshow travels
across the globe in search of
rare and unique items. Local res-
idents will have the opportunity
to sit with experts from around
the world and sell their items to
collectors. Call 217-726-7590.


Scholars program
The deadline to submit report
cards for the Presley Excel
and Scholars Program is today.
The program honors students
-in kindergarten through 12th
'grade whose second nine-week
report card has no grade less
than a B or S. Send a copy of the
report card and a contact tele-
phone number to: Mrs. Bernice
D. Presley, PO. Box 402, Lake
City, FL 32055, fax 719-4389
or e-mail berniceEXCEL@aol.
com. Call 752-4074. The theme
is "Knowledge Is Contagious."
Qualifying students are asked to
bring a book to exchange or give
away.

Thursday
Branford Camera Club
The Branford Camera Club is


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Mike Belle, executive director of the CARC Advocates for Citizens with Disabilities Inc. (left), mingles with
Toby Strawder (center) and Esther Mehl at a meet-and-greet session Tuesday. 'I think the possibilities for people
,with disabilities in the CARC are endless and that's exciting to me,' Belle said. 'I really feel like this is the right
place for me. It instantly clicked for me.'


meeting 7 p.m. Thursday at the
Branford Public Library. The
program is "Exposure: The basics
and more." Terry Hancock will
present the material and lead the
discussion; members and guests


may participate regardless of level
of expertise. The homework this
month is "Clouds." Choose two
to three photos to share with the
group, either digitally or printed.
Also, bring other recent photos to


share with the group. An introduc-
tion to the "Picasa" photo software
program presented by Humberto
Castellanos is Feb. 17. Call
Carolyn Hogue, program chair-
woman, 386-935-2044.


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Rufus Hiram Harry, Jr
Mr. Rufus Hiram Harry, Jr., 42,
resident of Middleburg, FL.,
died January 14, 2011 in Tampa,
FL. He was the son of the late
Rufus Hiram Sr. and Bertie Bax-
ter Harry. He had been living in
Clay County since 1996 after
moving there from Troy, Ala-
bama. He was a member of Tab-
ernacle Baptist Church, he was a
member of the Middleburg Ma-
sonic Lodge F&AM, involved in
Student Government in College,
enjoyed football, music, fihing.-
building things, and most of alli
he enjoyed life to the fullest...
He is survived, by his wife, of
twenty-one years Miranda Har-
ry, Middleburg, FL.; two broth-
ers Bill Harry (Vicki), Lake City,
FL.; Robert Avery Harry (Jean-
nie), Live Oak, FL.; three sisters
Karen Strickland (Robert) Lake
City, FL.; Ann Muriel (Wayne),
Lake City, FL.; and Marlene"
Harry, Lake City, FL.; one sister-
in-law Gynne Phillips, Middle-
burg, Fl.; A host of nieces and
nephews also survive. Funeral
services for Mr. Harry, Jr. will
be conducted on Thursday Janu-
ary 20, 2011 at 3:00 P.M. at
Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral
Home with Pastor Mike Nor-
man officiating. Visitation with
the family will be 6ne hour prior
to service time at the funeral
home. GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 S. US Hwy 441, Lake
City, FL 32025 (386-752-1954)
is in charge of arrangements.
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn. com.

Annell Tuten Morgan
Mathers
Annell Tuten Morgan Mathers,
age 84, of Jasper, FL. passed
away Sunday, January 16,2011 at
Kindred Hospital in Green Cove
Springs, FL. following an illness
of some time. Annell was born in
Madison County, FL. on Octo-
'ber 13, 1926 to the late Burt and
Idell Tuten. She lived most of her
life in Hamilton County, FL. and
was a member of Corinth Baptist
Church. Annell was preceded in
death by her first husband and
the father of her children Mr.
Collis Morgan in 1982 and her
son, Charles F. Morgan in 1984.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Clarence T. Mathers,
Jasper, FL.; one son, Clyde 0.
Morgan (Karen), Jasper, FL.;
one daughter, Frances DuBose
(John), Lake City, FL.; one
brother, Clifford Tuten, Live
Oak, FL.; six grandchildren
and ten great grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held at
11:00 a.m. Wednesday, Janu-
ary 19, 2011 at Corinth Baptist
Church near Jasper. Intermentwill
follow in the church cemetery.
HARRY T. REID
FUNERAL HOMe, Jasper, FL.
is in charge of arrangements.

Mary Mattox
Mary Mattox, age 76, ofLive Oak,
Florida passed away early Mon-
day morning, January 17, 2011
at Haven Hospice in Lake City,
FL following a lengthy illness.
'The South Hampton, Eng-
land native moved to Live
Oak, FL thirty years ago from
Jacksonville, FL. Mary worked
with the Florida Sheriffs Youth
Ranches for many years and
in her spare time enjoyed play-
ing BINGO and spending time


OBITUARIES

with her family and friends.
She was a member of the Su-
wannee Station Baptist Church.
Survivors include one son,
Michael (Michelle) Mattox
of Live Oak, FL; her sister,
Margaret Chandler and fam-
ily, South Hampton, England;
four grandchildren, Jamie
Turner, Jennifer Salary, Brent-
ley Wood and Mahlon Wood
all of Live Oak. Mary will also,
be missed by her favorite dog
"Checkers" who she lavished
with love and Hardees biscuits.
- '-Visitationwillbebeld;We.dnesdpay.
from 5 to 7 PM atthe funeralhome.
,,Funeral services -will.,be. held,..
11:00 AM, Thursday, Janu-
ary 20, 2011 at the Suwan-
nee Station Baptist Church
with Brother Wilbur Wood of-
ficiating. Interment will fol-
low in the church cemetery.
In lieu of flowers the family has
requested contributions be made
to Haven Hospice, 6037 Hwy 90
W., Lake City,FL 32055; Flor-
ida Sheriff's Boys Ranch, P.O.
Box 2000, Live Oak,FL 32064
or Suwannee Station Baptist
Church Cemetery Fund, 3289
101st Lane, Live Oak,FL 32060.
Please sign the guestbook at
www. harrisfuneralhomeinc. net.
HARRIS FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATIONS, INC.,
Live Oak, FL,386-364-5115 is
in charge of all arrangements.

Myrice Louise McCollum
Mrs. Myrice Louise McCol-
lum, 65, died on Monday, Janu-
ary 17 at Shands in Live Oak
after a brief illness. Known as


"Peachie" to her friends and
family, she had resided for sev-
eral years at the Advent Chris-
tian Village in Dowling Park
Florida. Born in Glasgow, Mon-
tana, Peachie grew up in Jack-
sonville, Florida. She graduated
from Robert E. Lee High School
and attended college at the Uni-
versity of Missouri in Columbia.
She later lived for many years in
Lake City. Her father, E. Wilbur
McCollum; her mother, Bernice
Davant McCollum and her sister,
Kathleen preceded her in death.
Mrs. McCollum is survived by her
cousin, Willene Davant Mang-
.ham,.of. St. Cloud, Minnesota.
A memorial service for Mrs.
McCollum will be held 11:00
AM Friday, January 21, 2011 at
the Advent Christian Village in
Dowling Park. The family will
receive friends at the funeral
home Saturday morning from
10:00 11:00 AM. Follow-
ing the visitation at the funeral
home the graveside committal
service will be held at Memorial
Cemetery in Lake City. In lieu
of flowers the family requests
memorial donations be made
to the American Cancer Soci-
ety, 2119 SW 16th St, Gaines-
ville, FL 32608. Arrangements
are under the direction of ithe
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERALHOME, 458 S,Mar-
ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025.
(386)752-1234. Please sign the
on-line family guestbook at
parrishfaniilyfuneralhomie. corn
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Publix


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*Same day/next day OB appts.
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Call for appt. Mon.-Thurs. 8am-5:30pm
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* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
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e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.

Blood drive
The LifeSouth Bloodmobile is
stopping 12 to 6 p.m. Thursday
4t Pizza Boy Pizza. All donors
receive a free large cheese pizza,
a backpack and a chance to win
an Apple iPad.

Public Meeting
Healthy Start of North Central
Florida holds its Board meet-
ing at 2 p.m. on Thursday. The
public is invited to this meeting
taking place at the WellFlorida
Council Conference Room in
Gainesville. For more informa-
tion, call Celia Paynter at 352-
313-6500, extension 118.

Retired Educators
The Columbia County Retired
Educators meet at 1 p.m. on
Thursday at the School Board
Adult Center, room 120. Any
retired person interested in edu-
cation is invited to join. For more
information call Will Brown at
386-752-2431.

Friday
Blood drive
The LifeSouth Bloodmobile
is stopping 2 to 8 p.m. Friday
at Panda-Moni-Yum. All donors
receive 500 sweepstakes credits,
a back pack and a chance to win
an Apple iPad.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2011


Obama orders review of rules to boost economy


By TOM RAUM
Associated Press

WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama, in another move
to smooth frayed ties with cor-
porate America, ordered a far'-
reaching review of federal regu-
lations Tuesday with the goal of
weeding out rules that hurt job
growth and creation. Republicans
and business groups welcomed
the step but suggested he do
even more.
Business groups have bitterly
complained that new regulations
carrying out health care and
financial overhaul, among oth-
ers, are holding back hiring and


economic growth.
Despite Obama's directive,
there was no indication that
the White House will pull back
from the biggest regulatory
fights ahead: the Environmental
Protection Agency's plans to reg-
ulate greenhouse gases and rules
carrying out Obama's health care
overhaul.
Obama said his executive order
would "strike the right balance"
between economic growth and
regulations protecting the envi-
ronment and public health and
safety. Agencies have 120 days to
submit a plan for how they intend
to review existing regulations.
The move was the latest


"Regulations do have costs; often as a
country, we have to make tough decisions
about whether those costs are necessary."

President Obama


outreach by the president to
repair relations with the busi-
ness community following
last November's midterm con-
gressional elections, in which
Republicans gained control of
the House and increased. their
numbers in the Senate. Some
of Obama's critics have accused
him of overstepping his federal
power via rules and regulations


and of being anti-business.
The president announced the
regulatory review in an opin-
ion piece in The Wall Street
Journal. Sometimes rules and
regulations "have gotten out of
balance, placing unreasonable
burdens on business bur-
dens that have stifled innovation
and have had a chilling effect
on growth and jobs," Obama


wrote.
"Regulations do have costs;'
often as a country, we have
to make tough decisions about
whether those costs are neces-
sary. But what is clear is that we
can strike the right balarice."
The executive order instruct-
ed federal agencies to scour
their books for rules that place
an unreasonable burden on
businesses. Specifically, Obama
said regulations must reduce
uncertainty, be written in plain
language, be btfilt upon public
participation, and identify the
"least burdensome tools" for
achieving the goals of the new
government rules.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This frame grab from video made available by ABC7.com, shows a person being taken into
custody at Gardena High School in Gardena, Calif. According to officials, a number of stu-
dents were wounded in a shooting at the high school.


Two wounded at LA school

when gun in backpack fires


By THOMAS WATKINS
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES A Los
Angeles police official said
the two students wound-
ed in a shooting at a high
school were hit by one bul-
let that was fired when a
gun in a backpack appar-
ently went off by accident
Deputy Chief Patrick
Gannon said a 15-year-old
Gardena High student was
shot in the head Tuesday
and is hospitalized in criti-
cal condition.
The other victim is a 15-
year-old who was hit in the
neck. Gannon described it
as a "through-and-through"
wound.
Gannon said the student
who brought the gun said
he was sorry after it went
off, and a teacher in the
classroom said it appeared
to be an accident.
The student with the gun
ran to another room and
police took him into cus-
tody.


Numerous law enforce-
ment agencies_ responded
to the shooting at the 2,400-
student campus located in
the city of Los Angeles adja-
cent to the city of Gardenra.
Gardena police Lt. Steve
Prendergast said a teacher
called 911 at 10:41 a.m. and
Gardena officers initially
responded. The investiga-
tion was being turned over
to Los Angeles city and
school district police.
A handful of frantic par-
ents rushed to the school
after hearing about the
shooting on the news.
They paced nervously as
they waited behind police
tapes for word from their
children.
"I've never heard of
anything like this before,"
said Thomas Hill, whose
16-year-old and 18-year-old
children attend the school.
"You're going to have con-
frontations between kids
but never this."
A mother who was wait-
ing to hear from her 14-


___l __ December 22, 2010
To Those \\hom I Lo'e and Those who Loie Me
%Vhenr, I i gone. release me. let me go.
i r-,i e :c. rn.ir,:, things tI ee and do'
'ul muot not ie ),:,urself t10 me .,suh tears,
be happy that I have had so many years.
I gave you my love, you can only guess,
how much you gave me in happiness.
I thank you for the love each has shown,
but it is time I traveled on alone.
So grieve a while for me, if grieve you must,
then let your grief be comforted by trust.
It is only for a while that we must part,
so bless the memories in your heart.
I will not be far away, for life goes on.
So if you need me, call and I will come.
Though you cannot see or touch me, I will be near.
And if you listen with your heart you will hear,
all of my love around you soft and clear.
Then, when you must come this way alone,
I will greet you with a smile and a Welcome Home.


The family ofAnn Redish would like to thank you for your
prayers, positive thoughts, phone calls, cards, food, or any act
of kindness shown to us during the passing of our wife,
mother, grandmother and great grandmother.
V ila. her Aind and gentle spirit soar on angel wingsE


-


year-old son. Michael, said
.the school has a reputation
for gang violence. Lupe
Contreras said she has
been trying to get her son
out of the school.


cnoeialtV'


ODeinc- gird e .


Prac ticeO h "'. ...

386-46O wt 11
35,e lie robtal Icor
....... L 2rt a


un erSt, usc -.-o
ResidencY T n -n. 1't 'e(."clog 3no
O e l"rna,, l L
feprl 113orla


pedrilne


The beauty of obstetrics and gynecology is that it covers all ages, stages and phases of women's
health -from the reproductive years to post menopausal. And, these days, there's so much our
OB/GYN experts can do to help you stay healthy.
Dr. Mohan and Dr. Atta chose Shands Lake Shore. Now that you have two Emory-trained choices
in doctors, you can get the most personalized and professional OB/GYN care available.


a68 N.. Franklin Street / Lake City, FL / 386-292-8000 Regional Medical Center


H1I Ii l ; t YiIi E ID



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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkhrby@Jakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


WednesdayJanuary I 9 2 I


V j.--%--,, -.-- -


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Middle school
tryouts today
Fort White High
baseball has middle
school tryouts at
3:30 p.m. today at the
South Columbia Sports
Complex fields. A
current physical is
required.
The Fort White High
Dugout Club has a
parent meeting and pot
luck supper planned for
6:30-8:30 p.m. Monday in
the high school
cafeteria. All players are
encouraged to'attend and
their families are asked
to bring a covered dish
to share for the meal.
For details, call Chad
Bonds at 590-7362.
CHS FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meets Thursday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club will
meet at 6 p.m. Thursday
in the Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call Blake
Lunde at 754-5810.
FLAG FOOTBALL
Adult 7-on-7
registration set
The Lake City
Recreation Department
is accepting registration
for its Adult 7-on-7 Flag
Football League.
Entry fee of $585 per
team includes FRPA
registration, trophies,
officials, scorekeepers
and clock operators for
a minimum of 10 games
at Memorial Stadium.
Roster forms may be
picked up at the Teen
Town Center. Deadline
for rosters and entry fees
is Jan. 28.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
YOUTH SOFTBALL
Interest sought
for O1U girls
Athletes interested in
playing 10-under girls
softball year-round are
being sought.
For details, call Butch
Lee at 965-6002.
M From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Thursday
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Hamilton
County High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 6:30 p.m.
(JV-3:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Union
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 8 p.m.
(JV-5)
Friday
Fort White High
boys soccer vs. Hamilton
County High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Williston
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-3:30)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Hawthorne
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High girls
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 3:30 p.m.
Columbia High boys
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 7:30 p.m.


(JV-6)


Fort White loses



to Oak Hall, 5-3


Basketball team
falls, 52-51, to
Newberry High.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. corn
FORT WHITE Fort
White High's soccer team
twice led by two goals, but
eventually lost to Oak Hall
School, 5-3, on Tuesday.
The Indians wrapped
goals by Trevor Stout and
Colton Jones around the
first half water break. Oak
Hall cut the lead to 2-1, and
Matt Waddington punched
in a ball that was mishan-
dled by the keeper to get
the lead back to two.
Oak Hall scored on a pen-
alty kick in injury time and
took control of the match in
the second half. The Eagles
scored eight minutes into
the second half and added
goals in the 53rd and 67th
minutes.


"We had no energy or
desire before the game, so
we had a meeting," Coach
Pete Blanchard said. "We
came out and played well,
we just can't continue
it when the other team
scores, it is a whole differ-
ent game."
Stan Brockington had a
hat trick for Oak Hall, and
Sam Malnik and Joseph
Weintraub also scored
goals.
Fort White (3-13) plays at
North Marion at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday.

Fort White basketball
Fort White's basketball
team went down to the
wire in quest of its first
district win. A three-point
heave from half court by
Wes Osterhoudt still left the
Indians a point short in a 52-
51 home loss to Newberry
High.
The teams played even


for a half, with Newberry
holding a 23-21 lead at inter-
mission.
Spurred by a couple
of dunks by AJ. Legree,
Fort White had a 12-0 run
early in the third quarter.
Jordan Talley took over
and added seven points to
Legree's eight points, and
the Indians led 41-36 at the
end of the third quarter.
The game was tied with
2:05 left. Melton Sanders
put Fort White up by two
points, then the teams
exchanged field goals.
Newberry's Chris Gillyard
hit a 3-pointer and Anthony
Manlove followed with
two free throws. Bacarius
Dinkins made one-of-two
free throws with six sec-
onds left to put the game
out of reach.
Scoring for Fort White:
Talley, 14, Sanders, 13,
Legree 10, Trey Phillips,
6, Ousterhoudt, 6, and Raul
Colon. 2.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White senior Matt Waddington (1) gains control of the
ball from Oak Hall's Chan Park in a game on Tuesday.


Down at districts


Lady Indians
eliminated
against Williston.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
SUWANNEE Fort
White High's playoff hopes
ended on Tuesday as the
Lady Indians fell in the dis-
trict soccer tournament
The Lady Indians battled
Williston High to a score-
less first half, but the Lady
Devils scored three goals
in the second half on their*
way to a 3-1 victory.
Jessica Garcia broke the
scoreless tie only minutes
into the second half and
scored her second goal
with 19:09 remaining in the
game.
After building a 2-0 lead,
Fort White answered with
Lync6 Stalnaker scoring.
It was too late, however, as
Williston would hang on
for the victory.
"We come back from
the break winning four in
a row, so we thought we
had a pretty good chance,
but we ran into a buzzsaw
tonight," Fort White coach
Perry Sauls said. "They
outhustled us."
Williston had 12 shots
on goal, while the Lady
Indians had six on goal.
Fort White finishes the
season at 7-8-1.
Williston moves on to
play Suwannee High.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Ashley Turner battles a Williston High defender for the ball during district
tournament play at Suwannee High on Tuesday. The Lady Indians were eliminated from the


tournament after a 3-1 loss.

Columbia soccer

Columbia High played to
a scoreless tie at Eastside


High on Tuesday. The
draw makes the Tigers
13-7-3 heading into Senior
Night.


Columbia will host
Newberry High at 6 p.m.
tonight at Tiger Stadium in
Lake City.


Packers,

Jets show

low seeds

can win

Teams .raking,
Super Bowl push
as No. 6 seeds.
By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press
NEW YORK Just get
in.
If ever that philosophy
about the NFL playoffs rang
true, it's this year, when
two No. 6 seeds are in the
conference championship
games. Nobody would be
shocke d to see both the
Green Bay Packers and
New York Jets in the Super
Bowl.
Nor would the NFL be
upset by so many upsets.
What better evidence could
there be that the "anybody
can win at any time" mantra
is accurate?
Long shots going far in
the playoffs, even winning
Super Bowls, is not unheard
of. Consider that since the
league went to six playoff
teams in 1990 there were
three divisions and three
wild cards until 2002 wild
cards have made the title
game 13 times. Counting
the Packers and Jets, eight
of those have occurred
since, 2005. Two of those
wild cards, the 2005 Steelers
and 2007 Giants, won the
whole thing.


Columbia wrestlers

place at Billy Saylor

Invitational tourney


Tigers' Schreiber,
Henderson each
7-0 at event.
From staff reports

Columbia High's wres-
tling team competed in the
Billy Saylor Invitational at
Suwannee High on Friday
and Saturday. The Tigers
posted good individual
results, but placed ninth out
of 12 teams in the dual-style
tournament field.
Arnold High of Panama


City Beach won the tour-
nament, with Tallahassee's
Lincoln High in second
place.
Columbia's Cole
Schreiber (103-pound
weight class) and Isaac
Henderson (152 pounds)
were both 7-0 for the event.
Henderson's seven wins
were all by pinfall.
Jacob Dicks (112 pounds),
Daniel Graham (145
pounds) and Monterance
Allen (189 pounds) were
CHS continued on 2B


,-, ._.

-F


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High's Isaac Henderson (top) waits for the referee to signal one of the seven
pinfalls he scored at the Billy Saylor Invitational in Live Oak on Friday and Saturday.


I











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
GOLF
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Bob Hope Classic,
first round, at La Quinta, Calif.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Duke at N.C. State
ESPN2 Cincinnati at Notre Dame
9 p.m.
ESPN2 -Texas A&M at Texas
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN LA. Lakers at Dallas
TENNIS
II p.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, early
round, at Melbourne,Australia
3 a.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, early
round, at Melbourne.Australia

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

WHd Card
Seattle 41, New Orleans 36
N.Y.Jets 17, Indianapolis 16
Baltimore 30, Kansas City 7
Green Bay 21, Philadelphia 16
Divisional Playoffs
Pittsburgh 31, Baltimore 24
Green Bay 48,Atlanta 21
Chicago 35, Seattle 24
N.Y.jets 28, New England 21
Conference Championships
Sunday
Green Bay at Chicago, 3 p.m. (FOX)
Pittsburgh vs. N.Y. Jets, 6:30 p.m. (CBS)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 6
At Arlington, Texas
AFC champion vs. NFC champion,
6:30 p.m. (FOX)

Super Bowl odds


Green Bay
Pittsburgh
Chicago
N.Y. Jets


Current
I-I
8-5
9-2
9-2


Opening
15-1
12-1
35-1
25-1


College all-star games

Saturday
At Orlando
East-West Shrine Classic, 4 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
Phoenix at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Utah at New Jersey, 7 pm..
Philadelphia at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Bostor, 7:30 P.m.
Washington at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Memphis at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
New York at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Denver, 9 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Portland at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Indiana at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Minnesota at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Philadelphia at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Chicago, 8 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Portland, 10:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Ohio State vs. Iowa, 6:30 p.m.
No. 4 Duke at N.C. State, 7 p.m.
No. 6 San Diego State vs. Air Force,
10 p.m. "
No. 10 Texas vs. No. II Texas A&M,
9 p.m.
No. 14 Purdue vs. Penn State,
8:30 p.m.
No. 16 Notre Dame vs. No. 25
Cincinnati, 7 p.m.
No. 19 Louisville vs. St. John's, 7 p.m.
No. 21 West Virginia vs. Marshall at
Charleston (W.Va.) Civic Center, 8 p.m.
No. 22 Saint Mary's, Calif. vs. San
Diego, 10:30 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
Bob Hope Classic
Site: La Quinta, Calif.



Raiders hire

Jackson
Associated Press

ALAMEDA, Calif Hue
Jackson revitalized the dor-
mantOakland Raiders offense
in one season as coordinator.
That performance earned
him a promotion to head
coach.



CHS

Continued From Page 1B

6-1.
Daniel Devers (160
pounds) was 5-2, while Joe
Fields (171 pounds) was
4-3 and Bryan Piercy (215
pounds) ras 3-4.
Columbia's scheduled
match on Saturday at
Ridgeview High has been
canceled. The Tigers are
scheduled to visit Buchholz
High on Jan. 29.


Schedule: Today-Sunday.
Courses: PGA West, Arnold Palmer
Private Course (6,930 yards, par 72); PGA
West,Jack Nicklaus Private Course (6,95 I
yards, par 72); La Quinta Country Club
(7,060 yards, par 72); SilverRock Resort,
Palmer Course (7,553 yards, par 72).
Purse: $5 million. Winner's share:
$900,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Today-Friday,
3-6 p.m., 9 p.m.-midnight; Saturday-Sunday,
4-7 p.m., 10 p.m.-I a.m.).
Online: httpdlwww.pgatour.com
PGA EUROPEAN TOUR
Abu Dhabi Golf Championship
Site:Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Abu Dhabi Golf Club (7.510
yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.7 million. Winner's share:
$450,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; -Saturday-
Sunday, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., 1:30-3:30
p.m.).
Online: http://www.europeantour.com
CHAMPIONS TOUR
Mitsubishi Electric Championship
Site: Kaupulehu-Kona, Hawaii..
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Hualalai Resort Golf Club
(7,107 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.8 million. Winner's share:
$305,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday, 6:30-9
p.m.; Saturday, 12:30-3 a.m., 7:30-10 p.m.;,
Sunday, 1:30-4 a.m., 7:30-10 p.m.; Monday,
1:30-4 a.m.).

TENNIS

Australian Open singles

At Melbourne Park, Australia
Tuesday
Men
First Round
Eduardo Schwank, Argentina, def.
Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, 6-2, 6-0, 6-4.
Bernard Tomic, Australia, def. Jeremy
Chardy, France, 6-3, 6-2, 7-6 (5).
Rafael Nadal (I), Spain, def. Marcos
Daniel, Brazil, 6-0, 5-0, retired.
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez (32), Spain,
def. Michael Berrer, Germany, 6-4, 6-4,
3-6, 6-3.
Mikhail Youzhny (10), Russia, def.
Marsel Ilhan,Turkey, 6-2, 6-3, 7-6 (5).
Feliciano Lopez (31), Spain, def.
Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 6-3, 7-6 (6),
6-3.
Marin Cilic (15), Croatia, def. Donald
Young, United States, 6-3, 6-2, 6-1.
Michael Russell, United States, def.
Matthew Ebden, Australia, 6-3, 6-2, 5-7,
7-6(9).
Jurgen Melzer (I I),Austria, def.Vincent
Millot, France, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2.
Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, def. Kevin
Anderson, South Africa, 2-6, 6-4, 7-6 (4),
7-6 (5).
Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, def.
Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 6-3, 6-2,
6-4.
David Ferrer (7), Spain, def. Jarkko,
Nieminen, Finland, 6-4, 6-3, 1-6, 6-2. .
Jan Hernych, Czech 'Republic, def.
Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 6-3, 6-4, 3-6,
6-2.
Thomaz Bellucci (30), Brazil, def.
Ricardo Mello, Brazil, 7-5, 7-5, 4-6, 3-6,
6-3.
Pere .Riba, Spain, def. Carsten Ball,
Australia, 1-6,7-6 (5), 6-2,2-6, 6-4.
Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, def. Rui
Machado, Portugal, 6-4,6-3, 5-7, 6-I1.
Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina, def.
Dudi Sela, Israel, 7-6 (13), 6-4,6-4.
Andy Murray' (5), Britain, def. Karol,
Beck, Slovakia, 6-3, 6-1, 4-2, retired.
Ryan Sweeting, United States, def.
Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, 6-4, 6-4, 6-1.
Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def.
Denis Gremelmayr, Germany, 6-3, 6-2,
6-3.
Illya Marfchenko, Ukraine, def. Ruben
Ramirez Hidalgo, Spain, 6-3,6-4, 6. I.
Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, def. Simon
Stadler, Germany, 6-3, 7-6 (5), 6-4.
, John Isner (20), United States, def.
Florent Serra, France, 6-3, 7-6 (8), 6-3.
Robin Soderling (4), Sweden, def.'
Potito Starace, Italy, 6-4, 6-2, 6-2.
Benjamin Becker, Germany, def. Ernests
Gulbis (24), Latvia, 7-6 (5), 6-2, 6-4.
Richard Berankis, Lithuania, def.
Marinko Matosevic, Australia, 6-4, 6-2,
7-5.
Marcos Baghdatis (21), Cyprus, def.
Grega Zemlia, Slovenia, 3-6, 7-5, 6-1,
4-6,6-2.
Milos Raonic, Canada, def. Bjorn Phau,
Germany, 7-6 (3), 6-3, 7-6 (8).
Michael Llodra (22), France, def. Juan
Ignacio Chela,Argentina, 6-3, 3-6, 6-2, 6-4.
Andreas Seppi, Italy, def. Arnaud
Clement, France, 3-6, 2-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-2.
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (13), France, def.
Philipp Petzschner, Germany, 4-6, 2-6,


6-2, 6-3, 6-4.
David Nalbandian (27), Argentina, d
Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, 3-6, 6-4, 3
7-6 (1), 9-7.
Women
First Round
Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, d
Johanna Larsson, Sweden, 6-2, 6- 1.
Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, def. Sybi
Bammer,Austria, 6-2, 6-I.
Petra Kvitova (25), Czech Republ
def. Sally Peers, Australia, 6-2, 6-4.
Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, d
Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain, 6-0, 6-
Anna Chakvetadze, Russia, def. 01
Govortsova, Belarus, 6-3, 6-4.
Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, def. Cha
Kai-chen,Taiwan, 7-5,6-1I.
Petra Martic, Croatia, def. Soph
Ferguson,Australia, 7-6 (6), 0-6, 6-3.
Agnieszka Radwanska (12), Poland, di
Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, 6-4, 4-6,7-
Peng Shuai, China, def. Katery
Bondarenko, Ukraine, 2-6, 6-3, 8-6.
Sam Stosur (5), Australia, def. Laur
Davis, United States, 6-1,6-1I.
Jelena Jankovic (7), Serbia, def. A
Kudryavtseva, Russia, 6-0, 7-6 (5).
Flavia Pennetta (22), Italy, def.Anasta.
Rodionova,Australia, 6-2,6-1.
Alize Cornet, France, def. Co(
Vandeweghe, United States, 6-2, 6-1.
Ayumi Morita, Japan, def. Alexand
Dulgheru (27), Romania, 6-4, 6-4.
Lucie Safarova (31), Czech Repub
def. Zhang Shuai, China, 7-5,4-6, 6-1.
Maria Kirilenko (18), Russia, d
Romina Oprandi, Italy, 6-3, 5-7, 8-6.
Nadia Petrova (13), Russia, def. Ksei
Pervak, Russia, 6-2, 6-I1.
Simona Halep, Romania, def. An
Kremer, Luxembourg, 6-3, 3-6, 6-2.
Sorana Cirstea, Romania, def. Mirja
Lucic, Croatia, 6-4, 6-2.
Alicia Molik, Australia, def. Rober
Vinci, Italy, 1-6, 6-3, 8-6.
Klara Zakopalova, Czech Republ
def. Melanie Oudin, United States, 6
3-6,6-1.
Shahar Peer (10), Israel, def. Mathil
Johansson, France, 6-1I, 6-1I.
Lesya Tsurenko, Ukraine, def. Pat
Schnyder, Switzerland, def. 6-2, 6-3.
Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, def. A
Ivanovic (19), Serbia, 3-6, 6-4, 10-8.
Kim Clijsters (3), Belgium, def. Din;
Safina, Russia, 6-0, 6-0.
Kristina Barrois, Germany, def. Akg
Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, 6-4, 6-2.
Caroline Garcia, France, def. Varvw
Lepchenko, United States, 7-5, 4-6, 6-3.1
Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez (2
Spain, def. Greta Arn, Hungary, 6-3, 4
6-2.
Vera Dus'hevina, Russia, def. Ma
Elena Camerin, Italy, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (16), Rus:
def. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, 6-4, 7-6 (
Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, c
Christina McHale, United States, 4
6-3,6-4.
Alisa Kleybanova (24), Russia, def. Iri
Falconi, United States, 6- 6-0.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule -

Today's Games
Toronto at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Buffalo at Boston, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m
Ottawa at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Detroit at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Nashville at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
San Jose atVancouver, 10 p.m.
Phoenix at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.

HORSE RACING

Eclipse Awards

Horse of the Year Zenyatta
2-year-old male Uncle Mo
2-year-old filly -Awesome Feathel
3-year-old male Lookin At Luck)
3-year-old filly Blind Luck
Older male Blame
Older female Zenyatta
Male sprinter Big Drama
Female sprinter Dubai Majesty
Male turf horse Gio Ponti
Female turf horse Goldikova
Steeplechase horse Slip Away
Owner -WinStar Farm
Breeder Adena Springs
Trainer-Todd Pletcher
Jockey Ramon Dominguez
Apprentice Jockey: Omar Moreno


GOLF REPORTS



Chet Carter cleans up in blitz


The Wednesday Blitz
had a field of 20, but it was
Chet Carter who topped
the field.
Carter placed third in
the A Division, won two
of the six skins scored and
claimed the pot hole bundle
on Ponds No. 7.
Blitz winners were:
A Division Mike
Kahlich -2, first; Frog
Niewisch -3, second; Chet
Carter -4, third;


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Tammy Gainey

B Division Ronnie
Ash even, first; Terry Shay
-3, second; Joe Herring and
Keith Denmark -4, tied for
third;
C Division Ricky
Crawford Jr. +12, first;
Gerald Smithy +6, sec-
ond; Jimmy Dempsey and


Jerry Perkins Even, tied
for third.
Kahlich also had a pair
of skins, with one each for
Keith Hudson and Todd
Carter.
Tim .Tortorice won the
Top of the Hill at +4, with
Joe Herring in second at
+1.
The MGA .Reverse
Scramble is Feb. 5. Players
can sign up in the pro
shop.


Ladies make return to links


The LGA finally returned
to action with two matches,
beginning with a Nassau
format contest.
The winners were
Caroline Stevens on the
front, Nancy Edgar on the
back and Cathy Steen with
the best 18-hole score.
The second match was
low net scores. Carole
Felton took the winner's
spot followed by Cathy
Steen in second place and
Natalie Bryant in third.
Bob Randall had the best
of this week's blitz action.
He followed up a win at
+6 on Wednesday with -a
second place finish at +2
on Saturday. Keith Shaw
took the second spot on
Wednesday with +1.
Bruce Gibson shot a +8
on Saturday for an easy six-
shot victory over Jordan
Hale and Randall.
Nine players shared the
skins pot on Wednesday,
led by Buddy Slay with a
winner on No. 13 that took
the pot hole prize. Keith
Shaw was the only mul-
tiple winner with two skins.
Eddy Brown, Chad Hunter,
Travis Timmons, Charlie
Timmons, Jonathan Allen
and Randall each had one.
The Saturday skins game
also had nine winners, led
by Terry Hunter and Steve
Peters with two apiece.
Trey Jackson, Richard
Francis, Jim Carr, Gibson
and Hale rounded out the
winning group.
The Good Old Boys were
limited to one three-way
match, but it was a close,


ACROSS

1 Clenched hand
5 Dove's sound
8 Baby carriage
12 Run in
neutral
13 Yuck!
14 River to the
Seine
15 Mix batter.
16 Sarcastic
18 Flammable gas
r 20 Hel --the
way
21 Work unit
22 Earth (pref.)
23 Bedside noise
26 Outdoor meal
29 Short flights
30 au lait
31 Grant approval
33 Weathervane
dir,
34 Blowgun pro-
jectile
35 Duke or count
36 Urge strongly
38 Disordered


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

high-scoring affair.
Marc Risk, Bobby
Simmons and Tom Elmore
eked out the win with
9 team points. Ed Snow,
Nick Whitehurst, Howard
Whitaker and Dan Stephens
trailed the winners by a
lone point. The team of Eli.
Witt, Joe Persons and Tony
Branch was another shot
back.
Risk (37-36-73), Snow
(40-37-77) and Stan
Woolbert (41-37-78) led the
18-hole medalist contest.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I UPTYT I


In nine-hole play, Witt
won the front side with 37.
Simmons fired 39 to take
the back side.
The Chamber of
Commerce scramble is Jan.
28 with a 1 p.m. shotgun
start
The Super Bowl
Scramble is Feb. 6 with a 9
a.m. shotgun'start. Format
for the 18-hole event is two-
man scramble with gross
and net winners. Entry fee
is $50 for members and
$60 for non-members, plus
an optional skins game. A
special event party is
planned for 7 p.m. Feb. 5.
Call Carl Ste-Marie at
752-2266 or 623-2833.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


S Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: L I X
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: APRON COACH GENTRY JURIST
Answer: When the shoppers felt the model's gown,
the designer said it was "TOUCHING"'


39 Afr. neighbor
40 Fluffy's doc
41 Seafpod entree
43 Equipped
46 More coura-
geous
48 Viking name
50 Volcano god-
dess
51 ER personnel
52 Motion picture
53 Floored
54 Large green
parrot
55 Quick-witted

DOWN

1 White lie
2 fixe
3 Chair-back
piece
4 Ties up a horse
5 Prompter's job
6 Hideous giant
7 Aha!
8 Venom
9 Wealthy,
to Pablo


Answer to Previous Puzzle

W1I_1G FEED COLT
H AM ALT ALO
AGE CIES RIF
MONET o0LOOT
R N GEL
E YED ACRE SSP-A
BOA S SRA TIPTI
B UR COT -SAPS
S RS LAICENTIRIEE


SIWI IIPEAEG IS
CAMP B CK LASH
URAL RI E NEO
DEINY OD N GE T


10 Hot -- oven
11 Brooks or Allen
17 Female
relative
19 Tattoo site
22 Nice surprise


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


23 Happy sighs
24 Misplace
25 Summit
26 Component
27 Henri's aits
28 Average
grades
30 Singer Vikki
32 Make
an effort
34 Question
35 Erstwhile fad
(2 wds.)
37 Made warm
38 Give--
break
40 Vice -
41 Deck hands
42 Vex
43 Heredity fac-
tor
44 Nadelman or
Ducommun
45 Hamlet, e.g.
46 Student stat
47 Get one's
goat
49 Boggy ground


2011 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2011 3B


DILBERT

THANKS FOR SPENDING
THE DAY INTERVIEWING
WITH US. I CAN NOW
REVEAL THE NATURE
OF THE OB3 AND THE -
SALARY RANGE.


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


MARY
BETH
STUDIES
HARD
It
L **


ZITS


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Tales of bedroom antics are

bad topic for conversation


YOU KNOW MiY CURRENT
SALARY AND YET YOU
WASTED MY ENTIRE DAY
INTERVIEWING iME FOR
A 3JOB THAT PAYS LESS.
YOU ARE EITHER EVIL OR
INCONSIDERATE.


SO... IT'S A
NOT AS TIE. I'LL
GOOD AS NEED TO
YOUR TEST THE
CURRENT COrMMUTE
3 JOB? ONE MORE
S TIfE.


DEAR ABBY: I am a
fairly conservative young
woman, and also somewhat
shy. I have been dating a
young man who comes
from a much more casual
culture than I do. This has
its benefits he laughs
often and deeply, and easily
connects with people. But it
also has its downside.
"Mac" has a terrible hab-
it of talking publicly about
what we do in the bedroom.
He means it in a teasing way,
and he's never insulting.
He can't understand why it
upsets me, although he is
always remorseful when he
realizes I'm angry. He wor-
ries that I'm ashamed of
him and what we do, but I'm
not. I just don't want it to be
a topic of public discussion,
especially with people from
my church. I find it embar-
rassing to have my love life
made public.
Mac is never mean-spir-
ited, only vulgar, which to
him is acceptable. I love
him. He's a strong, kind and
generous man. But I do not
feel respected. The truth is,
he just doesn't know how to
treat me with respect What
can I do? WOMAN OF
CHARACTER
DEAR WOMAN OF
CHARACTER: Mac is
"always" remorseful? You


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't take
chances if they might create
a negative influence on your
personal or professional sta-
tus. If you are too vocal, you
will limit the possibilities.
Keen perception and diplo-
macy will be required. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Talks will lead
to decisions that will allow
you to move ahead. Do not
let anyone upset your plans.
Change is your friend, not
the enemy, so embrace what
comes your way and make
it work for you. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Focus on your future
and on stretching your
money. If whatever you are
spending your money on is
not going to help you earn
more, don't do it Prudence
will make you feel better,
spending on frivolous items
will not. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July22): Ifyou feelyou can-
not accomplish something
on your own, get some help.
A partnership can make all
the difference. Compromise
may be required but will be
worth your while. Now is a
good time to implement the
changes you've been talk-
ing about ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You don't need to have
a meltdown to get others


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

to listen. Put your plan to-
gether and present it with
dignity and diplomacy.
Anger will only cause you
to overlook something or
someone important to your
future. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): The effort you put
into your home will pay off.
Socializing more will bring
you in contact with some-
one who can help you make
positive changes to your
future. Be a participant in-
stead of a spectator. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): There will be plenty
of turmoil going on around
you and it's important to be
the friendly observer who
can bring peace and order
to the chaos. Focus on your
own creative endeavors
while you oversee what ev-
eryone around you is do-
ing. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Get back to ba-
sics. Once you get rid of
any unnecessary items and
chores, you will have more
time to spend on what re-
ally can make a difference
in your life. It's your life, so
take control and do what's
best for you. *****
SAGHlTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Go at your
own pace financially, emo-
tionally and physically if
you want to get to the finish
line. Love is in the stars but
you have to be honest about
whether 6t not you are '.Ie
to give whats, required,,to
make it work. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You've got
the right attitude .and you
can make a difference. Try
to be upfront about what
you expect from others and
what you are willing to give
back. An unusual change
will come as a surprise.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Slow down. Act-
ing in haste will cause more
harm than good. Ifs better
to work as a team player
and be included. Make the
right choice and love will
flourish; making the wrong
one will alienate you from
those you care about most

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You may think
you have all the answers
but when faced with pres-
sure or even a little forceful
action, you will be second-
guessing some of the deci-
sions you've made in the
past. Concentrate more on
personal changes and with
whom you can connect with
socially. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: I equals 0
"OPHV X'L PJVMDB, X HZE. OPHV

X'L EPXDAEB, X CDXVT. OPHV X

UHHR RXTH AZBXVM AILHEPXVM, X

AZB XE ." LZCIVVZ
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The only rule is don't be boring and dress cute
wherever you go. Life is too short to blend in." Paris Hilton
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 1-19


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


ITS GENINE,HRiND MRDE
-I'LL WKRIAPIT,PUT
T:Nt6Ow N IT...
I 'LL. 'I


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
should not have had to tell
him more than once that
his talking about your sex
life made you uncomfort-
able. He appears to crave
attention any way he can
get it His lack of sensitiv-
ity for your feelings is a red
flag.
Mac may be funny,
strong, kind and generous,
but because he doesn't un-
derstand boundaries, he
isn't likely to change. What
you must do is ask yourself
if this is the way you want
the rest of your life to be,
because if you continue
this relationship, this will
be your reality and noth-
ing will be kept private.
DEAR ABBY: "Clyde"
and I dated as teenagers.
After we separated, he mar-
ried someone else. We met
up again and had an affair,
which resulted in two chil-
dren. I ended it because
it was going nowhere and
raised-the children alone.
Clyde and I have now
come full circle. After sep-


rating from his wife, he
sought me out. I have loved
only him my entire life. We
have been living together
for several years now, and
I have an engagement ring
with no hope of marriage.
He keeps telling me his wife
is holding up the divorce.
Abby, how long can one
person hold up a divorce? I
have waited 25 years for this
man, and I don't know if I
. will wait forever. TIRED
OF WAITING IN NEW
JERSEY
DEAR TIRED OF
WAITING: Clyde may not
have been completely hon-
est with you. I ran your let-
ter by a family law specialist
who informed me that here
in the U.S.A. no one can
be forced to stay married
against his or her will. A
divorce is a court proceed-
ing. A spouse can stall sign-
ing an agreement the
division of property would
be an example but not a
court process.
As for your being unwill-
ing to wait for Clyde "for-
ever" you have already
done that Twenty-five years
of waiting for a man who's
unavailable is forever.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


1 6


--------------- ju.









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2011


Local residents in amazement yesterday as


Collectors provide a stimulus package to


Lake City!


They are paying out right on the

spot for my stuff Unbelievable!!

By DAVID MORGAN
STAFF WRITER


Spokesperson for the event
said he expects to spend in
excess of $200,000.00 this week
for vintage items and precious
metals from local residents.
Here are some examples of
what is going on in the event
that started Monday in the
Fairfield Inn & Suites:
One person sold an old Gibson
guitar that was purchased in the
1960's for less than $250.00
to a collector at the event for
$2175.00
Another person had a pocket
watch collection that sold for


If you go:
WHO: Ohio Valley Refinery
Reclamation Drive
WHAT: Open to public to sell
gold and silver.
WHEN: January 17th 21st
WHERE: Fairfield Inn & Suites
538 SW Corporate Dr.
(1-75 Exit 427, W. on Hwy 90,
S. on Access Rd.j
Lake City, FL 32024
TIMES: MONDAY-FRIDAY
9:00am 6:00pm
Every Day
SHOW INFO: (217) 523-4225


$4600.00, with one of the watches
in this collection bringing $375.00
of the $4600.00 talley.
A husband and wife brought
in a box of old Jewelry,
wristwatches, coins, and two
German daggers from WW2 and
left $785.00 richer.
This is cool that something
like this would come here to our
town. Where else would this stuff
ever be sold? The refinery has
teamed up with the collectors for
a 24 month tour of the United
States, both big and small towns
to dig up hidden gems.


Items we will
accept include:

Scrap Jewelry
Dental Gold
Sterling Silverware
Sterling Silver Tea Sets
Silver Dollars
All Coins Dated 1964 & Earlier
Industrial Scrap
All forms of Platinum


Silver and Gold Coin Prices

Up During Poor Economy.


Collectors and
Enthusiasts in
Lake City with
$200, 000 to
Purchase Yours!


By DAVID MORGAN
STAFF WRITER
Got Coin? It might be just the
time to cash in. This week, starting
Monday and continuing through
Friday, the International Collectors
Association, in conjunction with the
Ohio Valley Gold & Silver Refinery,
will be purchasing all types of silver
and gold coins direct from the public.
All types are welcome and the event
is free.
Collectors will be on hand to
identify and sort your coins. Then the
quality or grade will be determined.
According to collectors I talked with,
the better the grade the more they
are worth. With the current silver
and gold markets, prices are up for
older coins too. Any coins minted in
1964 and before in the U.S. are 90%
silver, except nickels and pennies.
The coins worth is determined
by the rarity and the grade. Old silver
dollars are worth a great premium
right now. Even well worn and heavy
circulated ones are bringing good
premiums. Franklin and Kennedy
halves, Washington quarters and
Mercury and Roosevelt dimes are all
worth many times their face value.
While older types like Seated Liberty,
Standing Liberties, and Barber coins
are worth even more.
Gold coins are really worth a
lot right now according to Brian
Eades of the International Collectors
Association. "This country didn't
start minting coins until 1792," says
Eades. "Before that people would
trade goods using gold dust and
nuggets. Some shop keepers would
take more gold than needed to pay
for items purchased. There was no
uniform system of making change."


The government opened the
first mints and began distributing
the coins in 1792. By the beginning
of the 19th century, coins and paper
currency were wide spread and our
monetary system was here to stay. In
1933, Roosevelt required all banking
institutions to turn in all gold coins.
Once all banks turned in this
gold, the president raised the gold
standard from $20.00 per ounce to
$33.00 per ounce. This was his way
of stimulating the economy during
the great depression. However, gold
coins were never redistributed after
the recall. Not all gold coins were
turned in. Many folks during that
time didn't completely trust the
government and chose to keep their
gold.
These gold coins are sought after
by collectors today and bring many
times the face value. Any gold coins
with the mint marks of CC, D or 0
will bring nice premiums. Collectors
at the event will be glad to show you
where to look. Other types of coins
will also be purchase including:
foreign coins, Indian head cents, two
cent pieces, half dimes, three cent
pieces and buffalo nickels to name a
few.
Collectors warn people against
trying to clean their coins as
significant damage can be done and
the coins value lessened.


Items we will
accept include:
Scrap Jewelry
Dental Gold
Sterling Silverware
Sterling Silver Tea Sets
Silver Dollars
All Coins Dated 1964 & Earlier
Industrial Scrap
All forms of Platinum


"I'm glad I came in! I really need the money"
CLAUDIA MCDONALD says, who received $825 for a gold coin minted in 1986.


Dozens cash in yesterday with jewelry,

railroad watches and guitars. An estimated


$200,000 in Lake City!

By DAVID MORGAN
STAFF WRITER


The first days of the 5 day
reclamation drive in Lake City will
be a hit with those looking to sell their
gold and silver. Representatives are on
hand this week purchasing all types
of unwanted and broken jewelry. An
estimated 55 people left the event
with over $200 dollars from old class
rings, wedding bands, herringbones,
and gold teeth. Coins dated 1964 and
earlier were bringing big premiums
as well. Silver dollars, halves and
quarters arrived in large quantities.
Lots of gold coins were also brought
in. Rebecca Hughes walked away
with over $1200.00 after selling an
original $20 gold piece from 1888.

Items of

Interest:
Vintage Guitars:
Martin, Gibson, Fender,
National, Rickenbacker,
Gretsch, Mandolins, Banjos
and others
Pocket Watches:
Hamilton, Illinois, Waltham, .
Patek Phillipe, Ball, Howard,
South Bend, Elgin and others
Wrist watches: Omega,
Accutron, Longines, Hamilton,
Breitling and many more
Old paper money: United
States, Confederate States,
Blanket Bills, $1000.00 bills
and more
Antique Toys: Trains, Tin
wind-ups, Mechanical Banks,
Robots, Pressed Steel trucks,
and many more
War Memorabilia: Swords,
Bayonets, Helmets, German,
Confederate, Union, USA, and
others
Local records reveal to our
research department that recent
vintage guitar sold for $2400.00
and another for $12,000.00 to a
collector that will be tied into
the event this week via live
database feed.


On the other side of the room were
representatives from the Antique
Association. They were purchasing
all types of guitars, large currency
bills dated before 1923, military
items and pocket watches. One
watch was purchased by a collector
in Montana for $835 dollars. There
were piles of sterling silver items
like old silverware sets and tea pots.
One gentleman rolled a cart in with 3
boxes full of silver coins. Company
officials reported spending over
$80,000 the first day of the event,
alone. Brian Eades with Ohio Valley
said, "We have had an overwhelming
turnout this first day and we expect
to get busier every day this week."
The event continues today and runs
through Friday. The event is free and
the public is welcome.


Local Residents are

ready to cash in!

International antique buyers
in town this week and ready to
stimulate economy!


By DAVID MORGAN
STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of phone calls
from local residents this week to
the corporate office of the Ohio
Valley Gold and Silver Refinery
pour in inquiring about items to
be purchased all this week by the
team of antique buyers that is on
site with OVGSR.
The team of buyers this week
are purchasing a vast array of
vintage items (see left) along with
coins, gold jewelry, and sterling
silver items the refinery deals in.
It is a Local shot in the arm for
our economy. The spokesperson
for the event expects to spend in
excess of $200,000.00 this week
at the Fairfield Inn & Suites
paying local residents on the spot.
The spokesperson for the company
explained that these collectors are
paying collector price for vintage
items. It's a great way for people to
get a great value for their items.


Top Five Items
To Bring


Silver
Coins :i"

Sterling -O
Silver a\e1 -



Refinery representatives will be on
hand through Friday to purchase all
gold, silver and platinum items, as
well as coins. Public welcome!


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421














olumbia

Your marketplace source for Lake City,


and Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2011 1C


Southwest Family Dentistry keeps patients at ease


Patient care is the first
priority at Southwest
Family Dentistry.
The office special-
izes in preventive,
restorative and cosmetic ser-
vices.
Dr. John A. Batffle III, D.M.D,
bought the practice from Dr.
Robert Marks, D.D.S., in
December 2009.
Initially, he was not looking to
buy a practice, Batlffle said. He
had been helping another dentist
in town for three months and
was impressed with the people
in Lake City and Columbia
County. ,
Marks heard about him and
invited him over and they've
been the best of friends ever
since, Batle said.
"It's been a privilege to follow
in his footsteps," he said. "It's
big shoes to fill."
The two work together to
discuss cases and solutions for
patients.
Batlle retired from the Navy
Reserves on Oct 1 after 26 years
and two months.
"I can focus 100 percent on
Southwest Family Dentistry," he
said.
The walls of the office include
photographs taken by Batlle
while on different missions in
the Navy Reserves.
"I've done a lot through the
Navy Reserves and brought a
camera along," he said.
Battle developed an interest at
an early age in dentistry.
Visits to the family physi-
cian often required stitches and
shots, but the dentist was a more
pleasant experience.
"My dentist would give me a
pat on the back and tell me what
a great job I was doing," he said.
"I would get something out of
his treasure chest."
Batlffle is able to utilize artistic


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Local dentist John Batlle examines a patient at the Southwest Family Dentistry building located at 389 SW Chapel Hill Street.


and scientific abilities in the
practice, he said. He gets to
work with his hands and pay
close attention to detail on a
patient's care.
Studies show oral health
is related to overall systemic
health, Batlffle said. He tries to
make things as harmless and
comfortable as possible for
patients.
"I'm careful and take my
time," he said. "I provide treat-


ments as painless as possible.
I'm not in a rush and work at a
moderate pace."
The office has undergone
remodeling and modernizing of
the equipment and interior, he
said.
The patients are one of the
best parts about working at
Southwest, Batlle said.
"It's a privilege to serve the
residents of Lake City and sur-
rounding counties," he said.


Patients can receive outstanding
care with moderate fees at the
office.
In the future the office will
start placing implants in selected
cases, Batlle said.
Advertising in the Lake City
Reporter helps introduce himself
as well as the staff to the com-
munity, hesaid. A total of seven
staff members work at the office.
"I inherited a great staff from
Dr. Marks as well as added oth-


ers," Batlle said.
The community can know
what services the office provides
that fit with their dental needs.
Southwest Family Dentistry
is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
- Friday and located at 389 S.W.
Chapel Hill St. The number is
386-751-1220.
"It's a friendly, positive atmo-
sphere with an emphasis on cos-
metic, preventive and restorative
care," Batile said.


Put a little lote in someone's heart this Valentine's Day nith the
Lake Cit, Reporter's *Lose Lines.'" Make it a special da* for those
you lose bk writing a message to your sweetheart. We'll include it on
our I-alentine Love Line'page on February 13th.
:. ...l i ,: .,"_ :z..-. -..-a.> : --. ... .. .. .-,- .. -. -- ... *- -.


Grab your Sweetheart!


fRoses are red, violets are blue, send Love Lines
to show them that your love is true.
The Lake City Reporter
Presents:


ve


Love Line Rates are as follows:
35 WORDS or less for 112.00 Each additional word 150
Add a photo for $3.00

SMawlachi.
SlrhIlk vou t In /,,IIi'lg I',I I..


) / ,.1 Hl, i'.d t o h' lres

Print your message here: ___


nes


12, 2011 Show Starts at 8:00 PM


Your Namne:
Phone:_______' __' _'
Address:
City/State/Zip:


Mail to: Lake City Reporter, Classified Department
PO Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056 ~ 755-5440


Homes. Land.Commercial
North Florida


ROSES FOR T-W '

Prime Rib & Shrimp Buffet
$40 per Couple $50 per Couple at Door i

Doors Open at 6 p.m.

To Make Reservations or to
Reserve a Cabin for Valentines Day call
Mr I*

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_lads-- :-.:. ,;












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


one Item per ad r
4 lines *is 6 daysEach additional






4 n s line.1250
SRate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
L Each Item must Include a price.








One item per ad al rtis
4 linesac 6 Eayi ach additional
t* ln lne $1.10
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.



Each item must include a price.
One Item per ad h d o




4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise toting $2,500 or less.


4 lines 6 days Each additional



line $1.p5
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totatllng $4,000 or less.



Each Item must include a price.




One Item per ad or al y
4 lines 6 days Each additional




Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less.
Each Item must Include a poo ce.
This Is a non-refundable rate.










Sdays Each additional










limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....e $1.65
A ate applies to private individaXs selling








$10person80 each additionallinorless.









Includes an additional $2.00 per.
ad for each Wednesday insertion.




You can call us at 75 W-a440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

classified adto service typerson, and somertis


ment. Our office is located at 180
ing only







$10.80 each additional linereet.
Includes an additional$2.,00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.











You can also fax or email your ad
copny thro the Reporte om8:r. 00
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please.m.
diret your copyrefer to the Classifiedtheir




Department.
EMAIL: classifiedslakecityronandsome
ad categories will requiredprepay-














Ad is to Appear: Cal l by: FaxEmai l by:your ad
Tuesday on.,10:00theReporter. Mon.,9:00a.
WednesdFAX: 386-752-94MO, 10:00 Plea.m. Mon,9:00a..






directsday our copy to the Classifi Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Saturesday FMon.,10:00a.m. on.,9:00 a.m.


Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri.,9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without no ce




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.

required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-

ment.


Advertising copy is subject to

reserves the right to edit, reject,

appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,

Advertising language must comply

regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard


abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.
.. I , "1 0,,
WWW ,.' [,. : "h l ,,. 7


Legal

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Clarinet I LLC of the following cer-
tificate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 870
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 01
TWN 5S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 03390-014
COMM NE COR OF NW 1/4, RUN
S 419.80 FT, W 423.21 FT FOR
POB, CONT W 210 FT, S 270 FT, E
209.13 FT, N 270 FT TO POB. AL-
SO COMM NE COR OF NW 1/4,
RUN W 262.33 FT FOR POB,
CONT W 165.30 FT, S 420 FT, E
165 FT N 420 FT TO POB, EX RD
R/W. ORB 926-1621
Name in which assessed: BENJA-
MIN & ANNE ZUBER
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 28th day
of February, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing'impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04543002
January 12, 19,26,2011
February 2,'2011
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Alumni Partners II LLC of the fol-
lowing certificate has filed said cer-
tificate for a Tax Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of
the property and name in which it
was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 1615
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 28
TWN 3S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 05713-000 LOT 52 BAYA
SURVEY. CT ORB 955-1212, 970-
1280
Name in which assessed: CHARLES
& JANET BROWN
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 28th day
of February, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you' are 'a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04542992
January 12, 19, 26, 2011
February 2, 2011
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Alumni Partners II' LLC of the fol-
lowing certificate has filed said cer-
tificate for a Tax Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of
the property and name in which it
was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 878
Year of Issuance; 2008
Description of Property: SEC. 01
TWN 5S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 03397-108
LOT 8 COVE AT ROSE CREEK,
WD 1093-2491, CORR WD 1095-
1761
Name in which/assessed: CRAIG &
ANNE NICKELSON '
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless sAid certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 28th day


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks / Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


Legal

of February, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04543006
January 12, 19, 26, 2011
February 2, 2011
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Alumni Partners H LLC of the fol-
lowing certificate has filed said cer-
tificate for a Tax Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of
the property and name in which, it
was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 1773
Year 6f Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 33
TWN 3S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 06826-000
BEG AT SW COR OF SE 1/4, RUN
N 443.98 FT TO POB. RUN N
156.46 FT, E 148 FT, S 156.46 FT
W TO POB. POWER OF ATTOR-
NEY TO ELVA E ORB 755-
2281/UNRECORDED DEATH
CERT/HERBERT PETTIBONE.
Name in which assessed: ELVA PE-
TIBONE
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 28th day
of February, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04543005
January 12, 19, 26, 2011
February 2, 2011
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Alumni Partners II LLC of the fol-
lowing certificate has filed said cer-
tificate for a Tax Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of
the property and name in which it
was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 1269
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 02
TWN 7S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 04111-118 LOT 18 LITTLE
PINE FARMS S/D. WD 1041-2508.
ORB 1120-1669.
Name in which assessed: GEORGE
JACOBS & RENE DELGADO
PROCOPIO
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
.deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 28th day
of February, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04542995
January 12, 19, 26, 2011
February 2,2011
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Robert Summers of the following
certificate has filed said certificate
for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and year of
issuance, the description of the prop-
erty and name in which it was as-
sessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 1320
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 14
TWN 7S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 04211-001
LOT 1 SANDY PINES S/D. LAND
TR DEED 1079-1017
Name in which assessed: LEILA
LINDSEY
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 28th day
of February, 2011, at 11:00A.M.
P. DEWITr CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-


TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-


Legal

tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8711; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04543004
January 12, 19, 26, 2011
February 2, 2011
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
THAT PURSUANT TO a Writ of
Execution issued in the Circuit Court
of Columbia County, Florida, on the
26th day of March 2010 in the cause
wherein Suwannee River Water
Management District as plaintiff and
El Rancho No Tengo, Inc., defend-
ant, case number being 06-203-CA. I
Mark Hunter, As Sheriff of Colum-
bia County, Florida, have this day
levied upon all the right, title and in-
terest of the Defendant El Rancho
No Tengo, Inc., in and to the follow-
ing described Real Property, To-Wit:
SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT "A"
EXHIBIT "A"
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST SECTION 3: W1/2 of
NW1/4;
LESS AND EXCEPT right of way
per Official Records Book 170, page
110; ALSO LESS all of Oak Hill Es-
tates Replat (Plat Book '3, page 52)
and Oak Hill Estates Replat Addition
No. 1(Plat Book 3, page 92); ALSO
LESS lands described in Official Re-
cords Book 203, page 292; Official
Records Book 403, page 257 (cor-
rected in Official Records Book 436,
page 767); Official Records Book
760, page 429; Official Records
Book 575, page 162 (ratified in Offi-
cial Records Book 770, page 2259);
Official Records Book 751, page
2108 (ratified in Official Records
Book 770, page 2133 and Official
Records Book 770, page 2255); Offi-
cial Records Book 270, page 393;
Official Records Book 918, page
2050; Official Records Book 940,
page 805; Official Records Book
998, page 2032; and Official Records
Book 1000, page 1325 of the Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da. (Parcel I.D. No. 03-4S-17-07487-
000)
TOGETHER WITH an Easement for
Ingress and Egress, as reserved in
Official Records Book 998, page
2032, Public Records of Columbia
County, Florida.
AND ALSO:
SECTION 3: W 1/2 of SW 1/4,
LESS AND EXCEPT the E 1/2 of
NE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of SW 1/4
LESS AND EXCEPT Right of Way
per Official Records Book 170, page
110; ALSO LESS lands in Official
Recoids Book 590, page 376; Offi-
cial Records Book 889, page 1171;
Official Records Book '892, page
1036; Official Records Book 1100,
page 1466; ALSO LESS AND EX-
CEPT Lots 1 through 22 of Haight
Ashbury (Plat Book 7, page 185);
ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT lands
in Official Records Book 1148, page
2502; Official Records Book 1171,
page 341; and LESS lands deeded to
Jock Phelps in Official Records
Book 1151, page 1197 (No Legal At-
tached) of the Public Records of Co-
lumbia County, Florida. (Parcel I.D.
No. 03-4S-17-07486-001)
TOGETHER WITH an' Easement for
Ingress and Egress reserved over the
North 60 feet of lands described in
Official Records Book 889, page
1171; Official Records Book 892,
page 1036; and Official Records
Book 1100, page 1466 of the Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da.
I shall offer this property for sale on
February 22, 2011 at the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office Civil Divi-
sion located at 173 NE Hemrnando
Avenue, Room #102 Lake City,
State of Florida. At the hour of 10:00
a.m. or soon thereafter as possible. I
will offer for sale all of the said de-
fendant El Rancho No Tengo, Inc.
right, title, and interest in the afore-
said personal property, at public auc-
tion and sell the same, subject to tax-
es, all prior liens, encumbrances, and
judgments if any, to the highest and
best bidder for CASH IN HAND.
The proceeds to be applied as far as
may be to the payment of cost and
satisfaction of the above described
execution.
Mark Hunter, As Sheriff
of Columbia County, Florida
By: Sergeant Robert Holloway
Deputy Sheriff
Advertisement Dates:
January 19, 2011
January 26, 2011
February 02, 2011
February 09, 2011
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing special accommodation to partic-
ipate in this proceeding should con-
tact the individual or agency sending
notice no later than seven days prior
to the proceedings at 173 N.E. Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055 (386) 758-1109

04543114
January 19, 26, 2011
February 02, 09, 2011
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Clarinet I LLC of the following cer-
tificate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 466
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 12
TWN 3S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 02080-000
BEG SE COR OF SW 1/4 OF SE
1/4, RUN W 200 FT, N 871 FT, E
200 FT, S 871 FT TO POB. ORB
652-467
Name in which assessed: PAUL &
PATRICIA MILLARD


All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 28th day
of February, 2011, at 11:00A.M.


Legal

P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04543003
January 12, 19, 26, 2011
February 2, 2011
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Tarpon IV LLC of the following cer-
tificate $as filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 287
Year of Issuance: 2007
Description of Property: SEC 18
TWN 2S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 01650-000 LOT 26 STEPHEN
FOSTER FOREST S/D ORB 516-
461, 791-091, 791-093, 836-734,
836-735, 851-1014, 970-103, 1051-
1070 & 1051-1072
Name in which assessed: RISCAN
REALTY INVESTMENT INC
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 28th day
of February, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are -voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04542994
January 12, 19, 26, 2011
February 2, .2011..
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
T A X D E E D . . .
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Clarinet I LLC of the following cer-
tificate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 632
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 01
TWN 4S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 02664-118 LOT 8 BLOCK B
QUAIL RIDGE ESTATES UNIT 1.
'ORB 770-1362, 843-1031, 903-
1329, 948-1893, 957-308.
Name in which assessed: TIMOTHY
PARKER
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 28th day
of February, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04542993
January 12, 19, 26, 2011
February 2, 2011











Lake City Reporter


Legal

SALES OF SURPLUS PROPERTY
The Columbia County School Dis-
trict will be holding a Public Auction
on certain material and equipment
and vehicles that have been declared
surplus property. This public auction
will be held Saturday, January 22,
2011 beginning at 9:00 a.m., at the
Support Services Complex located
off U.S. 441 and CR 25A.
All sales are subject to state and lo-
cal sales tax laws. If exempt from
these taxes a sales tax exemption cer-
tificate must be presented at the time
of the sale or you will be required to
pay such taxes. "NO EXCEP-
TIONS."
1. All bidders are required to register
prior to the auction. The Auctioneer
reserves the right to reject bid of
anyone who is not a registered bid-
der.
2. At the time of gale, the buyer's
number and prices of item sold is an-
nounced by the Auctioneer. No
changes in price or quantity can be
made by anyone but the Auctioneer
and at that time only. In any dispute
over price, quantity, or between bid-
ders, the Auctioneer reserves the
right to settle any and all such dis-
putes and his decision shall be final.
3. Announcements made by the Auc-
tioneer on the day of the sale take
precedence over any printed matter
pertaining to this auction. DESPITE
EFFORTS TO AVOID WITH-
DRAWAL OF ITEMS FROM THE
SALE LIST, IT MAY SOMETIMES
BE NECESSARY; THEREFORE
THE SCHOOL DISTRICT RE-
SERVES THE RIGHT TO DO SO.
4. ALL ITEMS ARE SOLD AS IS,
WHERE IS, WITHOUT EXCEP-
TION FOR KNOWN OR UN-
KNOWN DEFECTS, AND WITH-
OUT ANY GUARANTEES OR
WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR
IMPLIED. The item(s) purchased
-immediately become the responsibil-
ity of the purchaser at the tirle it is
"Knocked Down" by the Auctioneer
The surplus property can be inspect-
ed from 8:00 to 3:30 at the Support
Services Complex on January 21,
2011 and until time of sale on Janu-
ary 22, 2011. For additional infor-
mation you may contact Mr. Bill El-
rod at (904) 699-7067. A list of sur-
plus material is available upon re-
quest. Elrod Auctions, A.B. #1698,
Auctioneer, Bill Elrod, A.U. 2214
will conduct auction. www.elro-
dauctions.com
COLUMBIA COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD
MICHAEL F. MILLIKIN
By: R.M. "Mike" Null
Director of Purchasing

04542928
January 12, 19, 2011


100, Job
Opportunities
DRIVER/COUNTER SALES
Valid DL. DFWP. Benefits, 401K,
P/T to F/T, Apply at 986 E. Duval
St. Lake City 386-466-0177


FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
HEATING VENTILATION AND AIR
CONDITIONING (HVAC)
224 DUTY DAYS
GRANT FUNDED
To teach at Columbia Correctional
Institution. Responsible for the
development and implementation of
the HVAC curriculum based on the
provided course objectives. The
instructor is required to use any tools,'
equipment, or textbooks provided for
the program. Prepare all class
materials, syllabi, exams, etc.
Prepare students for employment in
the HVAC industry. Maintain all
course records (attendance and
grades) to meet audit requirements.
Requires four years experience in the
HVAC industry. Must become
NCEER Certified HVAC Instructor
and receive a Proctors License to
give the EPA exam. Must have prior
teaching experience and be
comfortable working in a
government-regulated environment.
Knowledge of basic teaching
concepts and proficient in
troubleshooting, installing and
repairing HVAC equipment required.
Desirable Qualifications: A.S. Degree
in Industrial Maintenance or related
work area preferred with teaching
experience. Salary: Based on degree
and experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 211111
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: h.umanr@ffgc edu
PGC is accrediled 5bythe Coonmission on Colleges or
le Stiutiem A V!iAD'AEA'aEO UnligE ill hduca.aollo ad
EmpilioyVoema


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?





lor IBUT skills

and

. pofitie attitude.







Apply Online or In Personl 1152 SW Business Point Dr
SLake City, FL 32025
T L 386.754.8562
S ITEL www.sitel.com EOE


li~ilr

BUYIfTJl




FIND IT











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2011


100 Jb0
100 Opportunities

04543107
Welder/TIG
Immediate job opening. Tig
Welding experience 2 yrs
minimum. Tig Welding Test
required. Excellent fringe
benefit package, which includes
paid vacations, paid holidays,
group health insurance, and a
401K plan. Stainless fabrication
at Hunter Marine on
Highway 441 in Alachua.

05524886
OFFICE MANAGER
Mini-Storage and Record
Storage of Lake City seeks
energetic and creative individual
with proven customer service
skills and sales skills,
excellent computer skills.
Monday thru Friday and some
Saturday required. Salary
Range $32,500 to $45, 000.
Email resume to:
stephen@lakecitystorage.com or
drop off resume at main office
on: 442 SW Saint Margarets
Street, Lake City, FL 32025

DUMP TRUCK Driver
w/Asphalt experience
Drug-free, clean driving record
386-497-3131
Experienced Legal
Secretary/Paralegal
5 yrs exp, including
civil litigation, email resume and
salary requirements to:
sportsroof@yahoo.com
Experienced Stylist
needed, apply at
Southern Exposure Salon
386-752-4614 /


New Generation Christian School
is hiring an elementary teacher.
Minimum of bachelors degree in
education, psychology or other
related field is required.
Please fax application to:
(386) 758-5597 or e-mail to
pgorman@newgenerationschool.org
Residential Carpenters needed.
Must have tools and transporta-
tion. Call 386-623-7063 or
386-496-3873 for information.
Two Hair Stylist needed,
with clientele for Branford salon,
please call Maggie,
386-935-4059
Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

120 Medical
Employment

04543116
Weekend CNA
7-3 and 3-11 shifts.-
Weekends only.
Dietary
Need cooks and aides,
full time and part time.
Apply Baya Pointe Nursing
& Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave.,.
Lake City, Fl 32025.

05524758
RN NEEDED
7:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m.
The Health Center of Lake City
has an opening for an RN with
good assessment skills
Excellent Salary
EOE/ADA/Drug
Free Workplace
Apply in person or
send resume to:
The Health Center
of Lake City
560 S.W. McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025

Homecare LPN's &
Homecare CNA's needed for cli-
ent in Lake City, call
Maxim Healthcare Services
352-291-4888
Medical Billing,
several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance Bill-
ing required. Please email resume
to admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net
or fax to 386-755-2169
Physician's Assistant or Nurse
Practitioner needed for new Ur-
gent Care Center'in Alachua area,
ER or Urgent Care experience a
plus, but not required. Contact
Paul @ 352-258-4452

240 .Schools &
240 Education

04542861
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/17/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005

To place your
classified ad call
E71MS-.,4dj&


401 Antiques
CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques. 386-963-2621

407 Computers
DELL COMPUTER
$80. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
ASHLEY DINING ROOM
TABLE w/6 chairs and leaf.
$150.00 Great Deal!!!
386-344-5706

420 Wanted to Buy
DON'T SCRAP
that appliance.
I'll buy it or move it.
386-365-1915
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

PIGLETS
Black & White
$50 each
-386-965-2215
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
719-4802

630 Mobile Homes
0 for Rent
2 br/2 full bath SWMH
ready to rent Ft White
$600.mo
386-497-1464 or 365-1705
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
Clean, quiet 3/2 ($625 mo) &
2/1 ($450 mo.) both in Branford
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Nice 4br/2.5 ba, 3 ac. Fenced
Cross Fenced, paved rd., huge
deck, private. McAlpin area. $900
dep. & $950. mo. 386-867-1833

f640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale.


720 Furnished Apts. 810 Home for Sale
IU For Rent81 HoefrSl


Studio Apt. Private. Rent includes
utilities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets For info
call. 386-963-4767 or 292-0385

730 'Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent


05524832
New Years Dream "Surprise"
Why Rent? Lease to own.
New model home 2 miles S off
47. 3000 sq ft, 4/3, 5% int, is
tax deduc, consider trade-in
386-752-1364

2 br/lba w/Laundry room
w/yard, near airport, $500. mo,
1st, last & $300 sec.
386-752-0335 M-F 8-4
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423


3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very. private, $1000 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport, $825 mo, 1st,
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
4BR/2BA on 1 acre.
In Cul-de-sac. Close to 1-10.,
$700. mo and $700. security
deposit. 386-965-3567
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1895 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Three Rivers Estates, 2/1, CH/A,
2010 W2 and ref's from current
landlord required, $700 month, &
$700 sec dep, 386-497-4699
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus bonus
room. w/1.5 bath. Quail Heights
CC. $750. mo plus $250 damage
dep. 386-752-8553
Turnkey rental, 3/2 split,2 CG, 1/2
acre, quiet neighborhood, close to
1-75, $1050 per month, lst/last/sec,
386-454-2826 or 954-895-1722

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


05524745 805 Lots for Sale
Palm Harbor Homes
Fact2009 Model Homes MUST GO! Sale1/4 acre, new well, septic and
20 o elome GO! power, paved rd, owner fin, no
Call for FREE color brochures power, paved rd, owner fin, no
800-622-2832 down pym't, $24,900,
-2- ($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
0524833
Get up to $201 in 2011!
Call for Details
Windsong Apts
386-758-8455
2br/lba house. In town
Close to shopping.
$500. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up4 CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
386-697-32,48 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Large 2br/2ba Duplex.in
nice area with W/D hookup.
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
, country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal.opportunity basis:
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaireO is 1-800-927-9275.
This nice 4.5 acre parcel has
septic, power & well, older MH
$39.900 MLS 76182
Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty


810 Home for Sale
$569 mo 3Bd/2Ba Modular
1/2 acre Deck, energy efficient,
appliances, drive, w/$12K down
($640 mo w/ $6K down).
Avail in March
Owner finance or rent to own???
Call (386) 758-9824 hurry
2br/2ba Eastside Village.
Unique floor plan. Lg utility/
work room. Screened front porch.
$55,000 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
3/1 on 4.43 acres, metal roof,
I pond on property,
Lease option available
$129,888 Results Realty,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271


3br/2ba 80'X125' lot. 1,200 sqft.
Kitchen & bath remodeled, metal
roof, Ig fenced back yard. Close to
amenities. $79,900 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Brick home w/1,934 sqft
in Piccadilly Park. 1/2 acre. Lg
playroom, fenced yard. Reduced to
$139,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Custom home. on 5 ac.
where deer & turkey roam.
Lg barn w/enclosed workshop.
$219,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
4/2 in Sub-div, open floor
plan,florida room, porch, fenced,
$150,000 call Missy Zecher
@Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
4/2 on 4 acres, open floor plan, 2
living rms, rec room w/wet bar
$89,900 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
4/3 farm house on 3.95 acres
w/private pond, surrounded by
oaks $689,000 Charlie Sparks,
Westfield Realty MLS#76149
386-755-0808 t
4br/2ba, 5 ac., 2069 sqft. Ig family
& florida rm, den. Covered patio,
workshop. $229,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty


04543053
403 Baya Ave...First month's
rent discounted 50%! 3/2
remodeled home on Baya Ave.
1440 sf. with side deck. Pets
considered. $790./mo +
$790./ security
642 SW Chris Terrace...
Located in a nice wooded
subdivision, beautiful 3/2
upscale rental close to Lake City
but far enough out to enjoy your
privacy. $1150./mo plus
$1150. secuirty
315 Piedmont Live Oak...older
4/2 home in downtown Live
Oak. Kitchen remodeled.
$850./mo plus $825. security
881 SW Sunview...Gorgeous
4/2 country home between Lake
City and Ft. White just off SR
47. Mobile home situated on 5
acre comer lot. $900./ mo. plus
$900. security
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co. @
386-365-5884
http://springsrus.com/
Learn about Lake City!


67.5 acre farm, fenced, workshop,
pole barn and two ponds, MH
(1984 sq ft) $299,000
call Patti Taylor at
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Affordable, clean home in sub-div,
Freshly painted interior,
This is a must see!
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
BRAND new home, Irg master
suite, 2 miles from US 90,
$179,900 MLS #76449
Carrie CasonWestfield Realty
386-623-2806
Brick home on 5 acres,
country feel close to town! ,
Must See! Results Realty
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
Clean, cozy, well maintained 3/2.
on 1.05 acres, lots of shade trees,
built in 2007, $135,900
Call Patty Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Country Club. 4br/4ba. New roof,
AC, windows. Pool, hot tub,
& greenhouse. $229,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Custom Brick, 5+ ac. 5br/4ba.
4412 sqft. 3 car garage, pool, hot
tub, 3 fireplaces, more. $569,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lori Giebeig Simpson 365-5678
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ S'pacious home
w/oversized garage.
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
386-752-5290
< Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home
2br/2ba, 1 car garage,.
Eastside Village Realty $83,000
386-752-5290.
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home lots of
amenities; clubhouse, pool, spa.
Eastside Village Realty
$89,500 386-752-5290
Excellent area. 3br/2ba home.
1620 sqft. w/covered patio. Lg
front porch & 1 car carport
Lori Giebeig. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances, close to
schools, $65K 478-391-1592
Large 3/2 brick home w/basement.,
2 living areas, porch on 2 lots
$129,900 MLS #74118
386-623-2806 Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty
Large entertaining home, w/pool,
gazebo, huge workshop,
$285,000 Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Large home w/acre of land, Irg
family & florida rooms,
covered porch,
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Move In Ready. 3br/2ba w/1,225
sqft. Corner lot, great S/D.
12x16 workshop w/elec.
Upgrades. $75,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
Nice 3/2 home on 4 acres
close to town $168,000,
Motivated seller MLS#73410
Carrie Cason Westfield Realty
386-623-2806
Nicely remodeled 3/2 on 2 acres,
partially fenced $115,888
Nancy Rogers @
Results Realty
386-867-1271
Open House Sat. 01/22. 10a-4p
215 NW Fairway Hills Glen. Fully
remodeled condo, Unit #9. Golf
Coarse view. Introductory price
$125,000. 386-397-3800/697-1334
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Woodcrest S/D Super location,
nice back yard. 3br/2ba home,
cov-
ered back porch. New AC in 2010
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
WOODGATE VILLAGE.
3br/2ba DWMH.
Close to new elementary
school. $27,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc


820 Farms &
S Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


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Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
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WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
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386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
O Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190
Commercial property situated
across from plaza, frontage on
*Baya Ave 3.27 acres,
$398,888 Results Realty
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
Property (comer location), easy
access comer, close to downtown,
$94,000 Charlie Sparks
Westfield Realty
386-755-0808 MLS#74814


940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
2007 Nissan Titan Crew Cab
only 25,000 miles stock #F28
386-365-7431 Steve Bonesio
Rountree-Moore Ford
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802


950 Cars for Sale
2008 Cadillac DTS, only 15,000
miles, stock # 245108, pls ask for
Myron Wruble @ 386-755-0630
#292, Rountree-Moore Ford
2010 Grand Marquis, 3 to choose
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Tommie Jefferson @ 386-209-
8680 Rountree-Moore Ford


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4C LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2011


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Wednesday, January 19, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com


~-'~- ~


Is a will

really

needed?


D.Z. of Cedar
Key asks,
"Due to the
downturn
of our local
economy, I have decided to
take a job out of state for a
while. It involves fairly dan-
gerous work. How impor-
tant is it for me to have a
will made out before I go?
I want everything I've got
to go to my wife anyway, so
do I really need one all that
much?"
Dear D.Z.:
The short answer is
YES, you do. If you were
to die without a will you
would fall into the catego-
ry of dying intestate, which
means without having left
a will.-The law on intestate
succession and wills, as
found at Florida Statute
732.102 reads as follows:
Spouse's share of intes-
tate estate: The intestate
share of the surviving
spouse is:
1. If there is no surviving
descendant of the dece-
dent, the entire estate.
2. If there are surviving
descendants of the dece-
dent, all of whom are also
lineal descendants of the
surviving spouse (meaning
children born to both the
decedent and the surviving
spouse, or their offspring),
the first $60,000 of the
intestate estate, plus one-
half of the balance of the
intestate estate.
Property allocated to the
surviving spouse to satisfy
the $60,000 shall be valued
at the fair market value on
the date of distribution.
3. If there surviving
descendants, one or more
of whom are not lineal
descendants of the surviv-
ing spouse (meaning chil-
dren born to the decedent,
not the surviving spouse)
one-half of the intestate
estate.
What that means is
that IF you have children,
those children will, by
statute, inherit from you
and receive one half of
the estate over and above
$60,000.
Now, maybe that is what
you want and maybe that
is fine with you, but that is
a situation you should be
aware of. That is especially
significant if you have chil-
dren from a prior marriage
or a prior relationship.
Again, the choice is yours
but you should be aware of
the statute and its conse-
quences.-
,Incidentally, although
this doesn't apply to you
since you are married,
Florida
Statute 732.103, entitled
Share of other heirs,
provides the order in
which other relatives of a

WILL continued on 2D


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Joseph Clifford Labar, 96, exercises on the chest fly machine at M&M Fitness. Labar uses about 10 machines twice a week during his routine.:











Lake City is home to a number of senior citizens who still turn

to fitness and exercise for enjoyment and to keep in shape.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Tommasine Griffen, 65, a Pilates instructor at the American
Family Fitness Center, performs a stretch that works out all of
the.core muscles of the body. 'You can do anything that your
body was designed to do,' Griffen said. 'If I can
get you past the mindset that you can t do
then I can enter you in the realm of
L things you can do.' ..*i


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Sandra Plummer of Lake
City was 42 when she
ran her first marathon
in Savannah, Ga. in
1983.
Now at age 70 and four
marathons later Plummer is
still loyal to her love of running
and exercising.
Lake City is home to a number
of senior citizens who still turn
to fitness and exercise for enjoy-
ment and to stay in shape.
"It's a way of life," said
Thommasine Griffen, 65, who
was a personal trainer and aero-
bics instructor at Kelly's Absolute
Fitness for six years and instructs
now at American Family Fitness.
"It's always been our way of life
and it's our love. We have our
love affair with exercising."
Joseph Clifford Labar, 96, of
Lake City goes to M&M Fitness
twice a week for his exercise rou-
tine. He uses about 10 machines
each visit and hits the treadmill
last, said his daughter, Lorry
Evans.
"He does 12 reps to the T'
each time," Evans said. "Not one
over, not one less."
Labar said he has enjoyed exer-
cising his entire life. For Griffen,
her discovery of exercise came in
high school through sports like
basketball and running track.
After becoming more involved


in
fit-
ness dur-
ing nursing
school, Griffen
said her exercising
became a continuous
habit.
"Every decade, I change
the format to fit whatever age
group I'm in," she said.
Tommy Lou Hackney, 86, of
Lake City said she works with a
personal trainer, lifts weights and
uses machines and the treadmill
when she visits M&M Fitness
twice a week.
"I just try to do the best I can,"
Hackney said.
Plummer's routine consists of
running four days a week and lift-
ing weights twice a week.
"It's like getting up and brush-
ing your teeth," she said. "You
wouldn't think about going any-
where without brushing your
teeth and I wouldn't think about
not exercising."
If seniors are interested in
exercising, Griffen said, they
should start with an individual-
ized plan.
"First of all, you have to find
out just what they're capable
of doing," she said. "Then you
devise a plan based on what their
abilities are. But the main thing is
to keep them moving and being
active."


Seniors
should pur-
sue fitness for
mobility and activ-
ity, Griffen said.
"If you stop, that's it," she said.
"The body is designed for move-
ment. It's for activity. If you don't
keep something lubricated and
moving, it'll get rusty. So it's best
to try to keep the joints as active
as you possibly can to what limits
they have."
Plummer said health reasons
motivated her to begin exercis-
ing. She began with walking and
paced herself over the course of
two years until she was ready to
begin running marathons.
'To do anything challenging,
you have to have strokes," she
said.
"It just took determination and


patience,"

said. "You
don't rush.
Yoh She and her
husband take
part in the annual
Gate River Run in
Jacksonville a 9.3 mile
race each year, Plummer
said, and they hope to do it again
in March.
"You're always out there striv-
ing to get better based on where
you are," Griffen said.
Having a healthy heart and
good range of motion are reasons
Plummer exercises. Staying phys-
ically fit even helps with daily
tasks like putting away her cake
mixer, Hackney said.
Labar, Hackney, Griffen and
Plummer all said they plan to
keep exercising until they no lon-
ger can.
"If I can move, then I will be
exercising," Griffen said.
"If you continue working out,
you'll live longer," Labar said.
"I'm trying for 100."


ASK A LAWYER


Pierce Kelley


Slimming Secrets, 3D


ID








LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 19. 2011


WILL
From Page 1D

deceased person would
receive property. It
begins with the mother
and father, then goes to
brothers and sisters and
the descendants of broth-
ers and sisters.
If there are none of
those, it gets a little
more complicated and is
divided into paternal and
maternal relatives and
continues to the point
where if there are abso-
lutely no blood relatives
whatsoever, the prop-
erty would escheat to the
State, which is a situation
no one wants.
As is evident, it is
always better to have a
Will than not having one.
If for no other reason, it
allows you to designate
where things are to go,
but there are many other
good reasons to have a
will that I won't go into
at this time so as to keep
this response as short as
possible.
So, DZ, unless your
estate, meaning every-
thing you own, real prop-
erty, personal property,
and intangible property
(such as stocks, bonds,
etc.) is less than $60,000;
or you have no lineal
descendants whatso-
ever; or everything you
own is titled jointly with
your spouse and will
pass to her upon your
death by operation of
law (such as title to real
property which is held .
as Joint Tenants with
Rights of Survivorship,
or a Tenancy by the
Entireties) executing
a will before you leave
would be a very wise
thing for you to do.
I would also suggest
that you make sure you
have a Living Will indicat-
ing whether or not you
would want to be kept on
life supports in the event
of a catastrophic injury.
You should also have a
Health Care Designate,
meaning that you for-
mally appoint someone
who can make medical
decisions on your behalf
if you are unable to do so.
For example, if a deci-
sion must be made as to
whether or not to under-
go surgery that person
would be authorized to
make that decision for
you.
Also, you should have
the originals of said docu-
ments with you while you
are working out of state,
not back here in Florida
where they would not be
readily accessible.
I hope I have answered
your question, J.Z., and
I hope that you have no
use for any of those docu-
ments. However, as we all
know, we know not when
our time has come and
that is why we plan for
the worst while hoping
for the best.
Any readers with spe-
cific legal questions for
this "Ask a Lawyer" col-
umn are invited to submit
those questions to the
Editor of this newspaper
who will pass it along to
the attorney.
If you need assistance
with a consumer mat-
ter, such as an unfair
and deceptive collection
practice, or garnishment
of wages, a mortgage
foreclosure or other such


things, and you cannot
afford an attorney, call
the Legal Services office
closest to you, which pro-
vides free legal assistance
to qualified individuals,
or call.the Florida Bar
Referral service at 1-800-
342-8011.

* Attorney Pierce Kelley is
a member of the Florida Bar
Association. This column
reflects his personal opinions
and beliefs.


Seniors may have to pay for home health


By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Medicare
recipients could see a sizable new
out-of-pocket charge for home
health visits if Congress follows
through on a recommendation
issued Thursday by its own advi-
sory'panel. Until now, home health
visits from nurses and other pro-
viders have been free of charge to
patients.
But the Medicare Payment
Advisory Commission says a
copayment is needed to discourage
overuse of a service whose cost to
taxpayers is nearing $20 billion a
year amid concerns that fraudsters
are also taking advantage.
The panel did not prescribe an
amount, but its staff has suggested
the charge be $150 for a series of
related visits. Medicare requires
copays for many other services, so


home health has been the excep-
tion, not the rule.
Defying opposition by AARP, the
seniors' lobby, the congressionally
appointed commission voted 13-
1 to recommend that lawmakers
impose the new charge. Two com-
missioners abstained and one was
absent.
"At the extreme, this benefit can
turn into a long-term care social
support system," said commission
chairman Glenn Hackbarth. "A
modest copayment is one tool to
help deal with that problem."
The advice comes as lawmak-
ers face a tough budget year. A
sluggish economy and tax cuts
are draining revenue while defi-
cits soar to ranges widely seen
as unsustainable. Republicans won
control of the House on a promise
to curb spending, yet there's little
hope of that unless Congress and
the president can agree on ways to


restrain health care costs.
More than 3 million seniors and
disabled people on Medicare use
home health services visits
from nurses, personal care atten-
dants and therapists, available to
those who can't easily get out of
the house.
Home health was once seen as a
cost saver, since it's clearly cheap-
er than admitting patients to the
hospital. But it's been flagged as a
budget problem because of rapidly
increasing costs and big differenc-
es in how communities around the
country use the benefit.
Part of the problem appears to
be rampant fraud. In some coun-
ties home health admissions
exceed the number of residents on
Medicare.
Several commissioners said they
worried about the impact of a new
charge on seniors with modest
incomes. Numerous studies have


shown that even small copayments
can discourage patients from get-
ting medical services.
The charge would be collect-
ed for each home health agency
admission, not for every visit by a
nurse or provider. Patients can be
under home health care for weeks
at a time.
The recommendation exempts
low-income patients, whose
copayments would be covered by
Medicaid, as well as those just dis-
charged from the hospital. More
than 30 million beneficiaries in tra-
ditional Medicare would be direct-
ly subject to the fee. Repercussions
for seniors in private Medicare
Advantage plans are uncertain.
The commission was created
by Congress to provide unbiased
expert advice on complicated
issues of Medicare benefits and
financing. It's also known as
MedPAC.


Poll: Opposition to health-care law eases


By RICARDO A. ZALDIVAR
and JENNIFER AGIESTA
Associated Press

WASHINGTON As
lawmakers shaken by the
shooting of a colleague
return to the health care
debate, an Associated Press-
GfK poll finds raw feelings
over President Barack
Obama's overhaul have
subsided.
Ahead of a vote on repeal
in the GOP-led House this
week, strong opposition to
the law stands at 30 percent,
close to the lowest level
registered in AP-GfK sur-
veys dating to September
2009.
The nation is divided over
the law, but the strength
and intensity of the opposi-
tion appear diminished. The
law expands coverage to
more than 30 million unin-
sured, and would require,
for the first time, that most
people in the United States
carry health insurance.
The poll finds that 40
percent of those .surveyed
said they support the law,
while 41 percent oppose
it Just after the November
congressional elections,
opposition stood at 47 per-
cent and support was 38
percent.
As for repeal, only about
one in four say they want to
do away with the law com-
pletely. Among Republicans
support for repeal has
dropped sharply, from 61
percent after the elections
to 49 percent now.
Also, 43 percent say they
want the law changed so it
does more to re-engineer
the health care system.
Fewer than one in five say
it should be left as it is.
"Overall, it didn't go as
far as I would have liked,"
said Joshua Smith, 46, a
sales consultant to manu-
facturers who lives in
Herndon, Va. "In a perfect
world, I'd like to see them
change it to make it more
encompassing, but judging
by how hard it was to get
it passed, they had to take
whatever they could get."
His extended family has


ASbUUIAI TU Ht-LSb
In this Jan. 6 file photo, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio (right), accompanied by House
Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va., holds a copy of a proposal to repeal the Health Care Bill
during news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Ahead of a vote on repeal in the GOP-
led House, strong opposition to the law stands at 30 percent, close to the lowest level regis-
tered in AP-GfK surveys dating to September 2009.


benefited from the law. A
sister-in-law in her early 20s,
previously uninsured, was
able to get on her father's
policy. "She's starting out
as a real estate agent, and
there's no health care for
that," said Smith. The law
allows young adults to stay
on a parent's plan until they
turn 26.
Congress stepped back
last week to honor victims
of the rampage in Tucson,
Ariz., that left Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords (D-Ariz.) facing a
long and uncertain recov-
ery 'from a bullet through
her brain.
There's no evidence
the gunman who targeted
Giffords was motivated
by politics, but the after-
math left many people con-
cerned about the venom in
public life. A conservative
Democrat, Giffords had
been harshly criticized for
voting in favor of the health
overhaul, and won re-elec-


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-AINGSNEO NETN


tion by a narrow margin.
House Republican
leaders say they're work-
ing to keep this week's
debate and expected
vote Wednesday from
degenerating into a shout-
ing match, but it depends
on the Democrats, too.
Republicans want a thought-
ful discussion about sub-
stantive policy differences,
said Brad Dayspring, a
spokesman for Rep. Eric
Cantor, the No. 2 GOP lead-
er. The AP-GfK poll was
under way when the attack
in Tucson took place Jan.
8.
Opposition to the law
remains strongest among
Republicans. Seventy-one
percent of them say they're
against it, as compared
with 35 percent of inde-
pendents and 19 percent
of Democrats. Republicans
won back control of the
House partly on a prom-
ise to repeal what they


dismissively term as
"Obamacare."
"I just think that the lib-
eral left is more going for
socialized medicine, and
I don't think that works
well," said Earl Ray Fye, 66,
a farmer from Pennsylvania
Furnace, Pa., and a conser-
vative Republican. "It just
costs too much. This coun-
try better get concerned
about getting more conser-
vative."
One of the major
Republican criticisms of
the law found wide accep-
tance in the poll, suggest-
ing a vulnerability that GOP
politicians can continue to
press.
Nearly six in 10 oppose
the law's requirement that
people carry health insur-
ance except in cases of
financial hardship. Starting
in 2014, people will have to
show that they're covered
either through an .employ-
er, a government program,


or under their own plan.
Rich Johnson, 34, an
unemployed laborer from
Caledonia, Wis., said he
thinks the heart of the
law is good. "The problem
I have with it is mandat-
ing insurance so that you
have to have it or you'll
get fines," said Johnson, an
independent. "I just don't
think people should be
forced to have it. The rest
of it, I have no problem
with."
The individual mandate
started out as a Republican
idea during an earlier
health care debate in the
1990s. More receritly,
Massachusetts enacted
such a requirement under
GOP Gov. Mitt Romney and
the Democratic Legislature.
Nowadays, most conser-
vatives are against it, and
GOP state attorneys gen-
eral are suing to have the
mandate overturned as
unconstitutional.
Other major provisions of
the law, including a require-
ment that insurers accept
people with pre-existing
medical conditions, got
support from half or more
of the public in the poll.
Loralyn Conover, 42 a
former music teacher with
multiple sclerosis, says she
hopes repeal goes nowhere.
Senate Democrats say
they'll block it
' The new law "opens
the door for people like
me to have some kind of
pay-as-you-go health insur-
ance," said Conover, of
Albuquerque, N.M. "It's
nice to be able to have
something and not be
dropped in the cracks of
society." She couldn't get
health insurance when she
was first diagnosed, but is
now covered by Medicare.
The AP-GfK Poll
was conducted Jan. 5-
10 by GfK Roper Public
Affairs and Corporate
Communications. It
involved landline and cell
phone interviews with
1,001 adults nationwide,
and has a margin of sam-
pling error of plus or minus
4.2 percentage points.


D "
.,....... Dr..RameekI


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424







Page Editor: Roni Toldanes. 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


ACT2


WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 19, 2011


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FAMILY FEATURES


14

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NG


SECRETS


bananas on the shelves after a man revealed the secret
of his weight-loss success on a leading social network.
Now a healthier version of his diet is catching on in
America, thanks to the fruit and nutrition experts at Dole. '"
The Go Bananas 2-A-Day Challenge was originally created
in 2009 by the Dole Nutrition Institute as a healthier sequel to
Japan's phenomenally popular Morning Banana Diet.
Dole's expanded version for 2011 is part of larger multimedia
initiative created by Dole Fresh Fruit for Americans looking
for a healthy way to kick off the New Year. The Go Bananas.
Challenge substitutes well-balanced meals and nutritious recipes
instead of the "all-you-can-eat" approach popular in Japan.
Going beyond the original two-banana morning routine,
Dole nutritionists created a comprehensive two-week regiment
of lunches, dinners and snacks to help participants boost their
energy, increase their intake of fruits and vegetables, and
improve their overall health while they lose weight.
"We know that increasing consumption of fruits and vege-
tables in general, and bananas in particular, can help support
healthy, sustainable weight loss," said Nicholas Gillett, Ph.D.,
of the Dole Nutrition Institute. "What we did at Dole was
expand this simple principle into a well-balanced, two-week
plan that can serve as the basis for a long-term healthy lifestyle."
Go Bananas 2-A-Day Challenge participants begin each day
with two bananas and at least eight ounces of water, a combi-
nation that specifically aids in weight loss.
According to Gillett, banana fiber creates extra bulk in the
stomach, allowing participants to feel full longer and less


hungry overall. He says the fiber acts like an internal acceler-
ator that pulls some of the'fat in the stomach through the diges-
tive system before it can be absorbed.
The Go Bananas Challenge follows the morning banana
routine with a medley of 14 lunch and dinner recipes that com-
bine lean chicken or, fish with fresh Dole fruits and vegetables,
low-fat cheeses, wheat pasta, long-grain rice and salads.
While participants can choose among fresh fruit, vegetables
and nuts for their daily afternoon snack, sugar-based desserts
and alcohol are strictly off-limits. The plan also advocates that
followers drink water only with every meal, finish eating by
8 p.m. each day and go to bed by midnight.
"Of course, those taking the Go Bananas 2-A-Day Challenge
also benefit from the banana's status as a superfood. It doubles
as an excellent source of vitamin B6 and a good source of
potassium, fiber and vitamin C," added Gillett.
Special dishes included in the plan range from Curried
Spinach Soup and Warm Thai-style Scallop and Mango Salad
to Spinach and Chicken Stir Fry with Raspberries and Honey
Mustard-glazed Salmon with Fruit Salsa.
For more information on the Dole Banana Diet, or Dole
Bananas in general, including recipes, serving suggestions
and nutritional information, go to www.dole.com/bananas.
You can also follow Dole Bananas on Facebook at
www.facebook.com/DOLEbananas.
Two popular recipes, Caribbean Black Bean and Fruit
Salad and Pineapple Salsa Chicken, are featured in the sample
meal' plan. Remember that at least 8 ounces of water should
accompany each meal.


Sample of a Day's Menu


BREAKFAST MORNING SNACK


2 Dole Banana%
and 8 iIuncflt
iid water


v -,%


5 lict.s D)ol. Pine.applet
13-1 2 inches in dianimler
\ 14 inch~ tihickL


. -a.1-


LUNCH
Caribbean Black Bean and Fruit Salad


can (15 ounces) black beans, drained
tablespoons prepared salsa
tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro
tablespoon finely chopped red onion
teaspoon grated orange peel
tablespoon lime juice
teaspoon ground cumin
ounce feta cheese, crumbled (optional)


1 large Dole Banana, sliced
1 Dole Orange, peeled and sliced
Combine beans, salsa, cilantro, onion, orange
peel, lime juice and cumin in large bowl. Spoon
onto lettuce-lined platter. Sprinkle cheese on top
of salad, if desired. Arrange banana and orange
slices alongside of salad. Squeeze additional lime
juice over bananas.


AFTERNOON
SNACK
14 cup almonds


DINNER
Pineapple Salsa Chicken
6 boneless, skinless chicken
breasts
2 cups chunked, fresh Dole
Tropical Guld Pineapple*
1/4 cup Dole Pineapple juice
I 2 cup finlc chopped Dole
Red Bell Peppers
I 4 cup finely chopped Dole
Green Bell Pepper
I tablespoon chopped Dole
Green Onion
2 Ieaspoons chopped fresh
cilantro or parslv.
2 lablespoons chopped
jalapefio chilies
Grill or broil chicken 5 to 10 min-
utes on each side or until chicken is
no longer pink in the center. Com-
bine pineapple chunks, juice, bell
pepper, onions, cilantro and chilies
in bowl. Serve salsa with grilled or
broiled chicken.
*May substitute 1 can (20 ounces)
Dole Pineapple, chunked, drained.


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Affordable DESIGN Solutions


to Freshen Up


Any Home

FAMILY IEAI RELS
As the colors, smells and textures begin to turn from one
season to the next, many women begin to think about
freshening up the inside of their homes. One easy way
to update any home is to add a fresh scent that matches
the room's decor. Get inspired b, H e arier, of '. ihr.i,
colors and aromas that each season brings and c:r :ite ian .-lih.me cern
experience with Glade Sense & Spray Autorii c Frc .hener M!ricrhmrin
fragrance to the look and style of the room, heiher *.4 h -.. .rriil
new throw pillows or a faux flower arrangementri mr.ke upd.ir. .1
room easy and cost-effective.
Interior designer, home trend expert and frequent,i gue.i .'n H(.T
Erinn Valencich knows exactly how to make snuill chia tha l an
have a big impact. "Scent is a fantastic way .. rrn:,l.e .ran, room teel
welcoming and complete without making ar'. n mior renr. a[ii'on
which can be expensive and permanent," sa .ilencich Familes
today are searching for easy solutions to revamp iheir i, mg -p:cec
without breaking the bank, and my customer; often don't realize
that d6cor and scent are closely connected. Disco.erring a -wir iure
fragrance will tremendously add to a room's d..'-icn bh, cretrg
warm and inviting atmosphere," she notes.
In order to offer budget-friendly tips that ::),mle- can u, soi update
their living spaces, Valencich has partnered .. .h tjl.de Sen,e &A Spr.,
Automatic Freshener. Together, they hope thee utip. ..il rinhjnce
families' at-home scent experience and shoxv h:'.. ff,rdale .and Cas;'.
it can be to update any room by stimulating the ,ene. tih'o.ugh c.'lIor
texture and scent:


1. Think outside the box. Look at-items pu-el. based ,_n cok.'r and
see a room in a whole new light. Valencich -.', painimr, .an accent
wall is one of the easiest ways to get a freill pop ,o- color into a
room. To make the room cohesive, pick three .a.ce' -onre. ,n that
same color and position them around the room in a strangle panerrn
This could be a few new throw pillows or, ihc -.4i3 and ie on
the mantle with a few chic blooms. Coffee table bhol-.- 'ii, jackets
in the accent color work great as styling acce;'sore-. a ".ell
2. Bring the outdoors inside. Greenery is ottcn o, erl,okcd in
home but really gives a room life. If a live rree i 10[0- much of.
commitment, incorporate an artificial tree plant orr arrangement
Use a stylish pot and cover it with moss to create in in'cxpenrie
accessory.
3. Create visual and tactile variety. Achiee a ... rm and in'. iing
atmosphere using soft lighting with lamps and drummers Alo ,'
use a variety of textures in the room. If there a Iloi ':it %ood in
a room already, opt for a side table made tron glass and metal
materials, and choose upholstered dining chairs mini.ed of uirng
additional wood.
4. Don't forget the finishing touch. If a room I.,o.ks hea.ilful tbul
lacks an inviting scent, the effect may fall 11fi To. bng n room
together, don't forget to add fragrance as -he frinrihing touch t('
home decor with Glade Sense & Spray Auiomauiic Fre;hener
The newly designed neutral vase blends into .n', room. .ind the
motion activated sensor provides a signature iracrance to compl- .
ment the room's design and ambiance.
For more quick and easy tips, visit www.GladeScentand'S., Ic conm




Discover Scent Personality with
Interior Designer.Erinn Valencich
"Ha'.ing a beautifully, scented
room encourage guesss to-
linger in the space. reli\ and
enjio thlemnel.es because it
i. a po-ini e reinlorc ment of
the en\ irrnnment I like the
ne- 1 designed Glade Sense
& Spral Automatic Fresbener
because it is dependable and
car nhe incorporated into an%
room', decor The neutral
colored '.ase-like design dill
look nice in an\ room '. while
keeping the home smelling
fresh ,i.th desirable per cn-
alized fragrance "
If a chic d6cor is a personal
favorite, the soft scent of
Lavender & Vanilla will
conipleie the room To
achie'.e this sr le. mil\
Simnige-inspired abris like
florals and stripes with
worn pieces. For an added
touch n'- updating dr 'ser-
and side tables ith nei
knobs for. a custom look
Soft slip-covered sofas and
chairs add a comfortable
and easy-to-care-for
cleuienl
If Nou re desirtnm a la%'ered.
casLal beach-inspired look.
HalI auan Breeze is the
prfiect scent lor a linihming
touch The air, IT flt scent
is laid back and reminiscent
of an ocean breeze Mi\ll
aged wooden piece.. like a
d. rrec ed end table topped
lith sceral old meal cans
holding fresh or artificial flowers. Place this next to a more formal
collection of white intricate floral detailed vases. Bring in island influence
v. ith bamboo furniture of frames. The mix of old and new, with punches of
soft blues and greens, creates a casual elegance.


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For a casual beach-inspired look. mix aged wooden pieces, like a distressed end table., ith a more formal
collection ol whitee sases "ith intricate floral detailing, and pair with the Hawaiian Breeze scent.


Bring the outdoors inside. Greenery is often overlooked in a home but really gives a room life. If a live
tree is too much of a commitment, incorporate an artificial tree, plant or arrangement.


Build a better


LIFESTYLE
AMERICAN FAMILY FITNESS CENTER
SRates for family or individual Group and corporate
24 hour facility rates & discounts
Safe, comfortable and Personal Trainers available
secure facility Kiddie Korner (child care)
Classes available Provided
S. Core Classes Friendly Heloful &


- High impact classes
* Low senior citizen
rates available


knowledgeable staff
COME & CHECK US OUT
Tour Ihe.facility
No Appointment Necessary


R.F.F.C

American

Family Fitness Center
-.. ,;SW Heritage Oak Circle, Suite 102
Lake City, FLt. 32024 (Located in the Food Lion Plaza)
(386) 438-5703


home service iW .'


-I 1~


CHOOSE OMNI HOME CARE

OMNI is a leading provider of exceptional care and service in the
privacy & comfort of your own home. We hire only the very best
licensed or certified professionals. We also conduct the most
extensive background screenings on all of our staff to ensure
your trust and safety at home.

The services we offer include:
Skilled Nursing Physical Therapy
Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy
Home Health Aide Services
Lymphedema & Other Care Management Programs


386-754-6671
License # HHA299991704


HomeCare Elite


Ci AGENCY

OMNI Home Care Was
Awarded in Top 25% of All
Home Care Agencies in the
US!


Lake City
1037 US Highway 90W, Suite 140
Lake City, FL 32055


4 a


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- -."-
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LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT 2 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


"I


4d


OMNI.'o ,,,,,
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T' J /c' -Wi!^




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