The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01355
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: January 18, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01355
System ID: UF00028308:01355
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







District play
Fort White girls soccer
meets Williston.


000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943



Lake
R-je ul


CHS tumbles
Lady Tigers' season ends
in district opener.

Sports, I B






reporter


Tuesday, January 18, 2011


www.lakecityT


orter.com Vol. 136, No. 309 1 75 cents


Two DIE IN CRASH


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Lake City Reporter
A 26-year-old woman and a 10-year-old boy were both killed when the driver of the car reportedly lost control and went off the
road, first hitting a dirt embankment and then striking two trees. No one in the vehicle was wearing a seat belt, according to
officials.

FHP reports: 14-year-old boy was driving


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A vehicle driven by 14-year-
old Lake City boy rolled
over and struck an oak
tree, killing two of the
vehicle's four passengers,
including a 10-year-old boy Sunday
afternoon. The driver and the vehi-
cle's surviving passenger were criti-
cally injured in the wreck, reports
said.
Julian Little, 14, the car's listed
driver and Joseph Grant,- 6, were
taken to a Gainesville hospital.
Jennifer Ann Grant, 26, and Ronnie
Bias, 10, both of Lake City, died as a
result of injuries they suffered in the
wreck.
The wreck occurred 6:35 p.m.
Sunday on Southwest Haltiwanger
Road, about one mile south of County
Road 349.
According to Florida Highway
Patrol reports, Little was driving
a 1994 Mustang with Jennifer Ann
Grant, Joseph Grant and Bias as


'I don't have an
answer. It will defi-
nitely be a question
we hope to get an
answer for in our
investigation.'

Lt. Patrick Riordan
FHP Troop B public affairs officer
when asked why the boy was driving.

his passengers, heading south on
Southwest Haltiwanger Road.
Little reportedly lost control of the
car and it traveled onto the road-
way's east shoulder striking a dirt
embankment with its left front. The
car continued heading southbound
on the roadway's shoulder and struck
a small tree, which resulted in the
car making a clockwise spin. The car
then began to roll over side-to-side as
it spun clockwise and then struck a
large oak tree with its roof.


Jennifer Ann Grani and Bias died
from their injuries while Little .and
Joseph Grant were taken to Shands
at the University of Florida for treat-
ment.
Authorities are attempting to deter-
mine why the 14-year-old was driving
the vehicle.
"I don't have an answer," said Lt.
Patrick Riordan, FHP Troop B public
affairs officer. "It will definitely be a
question we hope to get an answer for
in our investigation."
Riordan said, authorities have not
yet determined the cause of the
wreck.
"We do know that at some point for
unknown reasons the vehicle trav-
eled onto the east shoulder," he said.
"Control was lost and subsequent to
losing control it hit the dirt embank-
ment and a small tree. It began to roll
and came to rest against a large oak
tree with its roof."
Riordan said, noting he was uncer-
tain how long investigators were at
CRASH continued on 3A


Skunkie Acres no longer a refuge


Closes door to cats
and dogs, blames
'harassment.'
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn
Cats and dogs can no lon-
ger find refuge at Skunkie
Acres in White Springs,
the farm's manager said
Monday.
According to a Skunkie
Acres news release, the
nonprofit no-kill animal
shelter will stop rescuing
dogs and cats because of
"harassment."
"It's because of harass-
ment," said Bernard
Haake, organization man-
ager whose wife, Barbara,
and daughter, Megan, own
the establishment. "It really
is a terrible issue and the
whole family is in counsel-
ing because of all the stress


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Bernard Haake (center), owner of Skunkie Acres, reacts to
complaints made by neighbors about the business in a meet-
ing held at Springville Community Center on Thursday.


that's been going on. It's
just too much."
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners organized
a meeting Jan. 13 at the


Springville Community
Center for residents to
express their concerns
regarding Skunkie Acres
to the county and various
environmental agencies.


At the meeting, residents
complained of the farm's
smell, barking dogs, loose
animals and loud music.
Sheriff Mark Hunter also
said at the meeting that
since 2007, the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office had
received almost 80 calls
and had 15 incident reports
filed concerning Skunkie
Acres.
Haake said the "harass-
ment" his family has expe-
rienced is the complaints
that have been made.
Discontinuing the cat and
dog rescue will ease those
complaints, he said.
"It will take pressure off
of us because they can no
longer say the dogs are
barking and no longer say
the loose dogs are ours,"
Haake said.
Of the complaints made,
ACRES continued on 3A


King's memory

recalled with

service, speeches


Parade rained out
but crowds gather
to honor a legend.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Rain showers didn't
keep Katrina Dunmore of
Lake City from attending a
church commemoration for
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
"I always come to par-
ticipate," she said.
Dunmore and other
community members
,attended the Northeast
Florida Leadership
Council Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. celebra-
tion service Monday at
Mt. Pisgah AME Church.
The annual parade
scheduled to precede the
service was postponed
due to rain showers.
The parade will be
rescheduled enough time
in advance for partici-
pants to attend, said Ron
Williams, NEFLC presi-
dent.
"We were disappointed
not to have the parade,
but that wasn't in our::L
hands," he said. "It was
best to cancel it for health
and safety reasons'."
The Rev. Wyndell
Wallace, pastor of
Fellowship Missionary
Baptist Church, was the


JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter
Members of the Compassion
Love Center Choir perform
a number of musical selec-
tions Monday during the MLK
Celebration Service.

speaker.
Today black and white
people are able to sit a
the same lunch counter or
drink from the same water
fountain, Wallace said.
"Isn't that evident that
we are free at last," he
said. "But are we really
free?
"In our quest to be free
at last we must first secure
freedom that lasts."
True freedom comes
from turning to Jesus, when
KING continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Pastor Wyndell Wallace of Fellowship Missionary Baptist
Church gives a sermon at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Celebration Service held at New Mt. Pisgah AME Church on
Monday.


Branford man

killed when truck

strikes trailer


Driver dies after
his vehicle collides
with trailer wheels.
From staff reports
A Suwannee County man
was killed Saturday after-
noon when his truck col-
lided with the rear wheels
of a transfer truck's trailer.
Anthony David Espiscito,
44, of Branford, was killed in
the wreck which occurred
around 6:45 p.m. Saturday
on County Road 349 near
176th Street in Suwannee
County.
The driver of the transfer
truck, Johnathan Wesley
Hause, 34, of Branford was
not injured in the wreck.
According to Florida


Highway Patrol reports,
Espiscito was driving a 1996
Chevrolet truck north on
County Road 349 as Hause
was traveling southbound
on the roadway in a 2000
Freightliner Tractor.
The vehicles were
approaching a curve in the
roadway and Espiscito's
truck ran partly off the
right side of the roadway
and then came back onto
roadway and crossed into
the southbound lane.
Espiscito's truck collided
into the left rear tandem
wheels of the semi-trailer
being towed by Hause's
vehicle. At the time of the
collision Hause's vehicle
TRUCKS continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


5- Opinion .........
S" Around Florida....
Chance of showers Obituaries .......
Advice & Comics..
WEATHER, 2A Puzzles..........


TODAY IN
SCHOOL
F:,.rt .'. hit-
'-_tn,:l-,it..:.t-,


COMING
WEDNESDAY
F-:.rt .'. hitt Libr ir











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2011


4. *


CASH I Monday:
Afternoon: 3-8-3
Evening: 6-3-0


Monday:
Afternoon: 6-5-7-4
Evening: 8-3-7-6


ezmatch-
Sunday:
10-19-21-28-30


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Kidman, Urban have child through surrogate


NASHVILLE, Tenn.
Nicole Kidman and Keith
Urban have added a sec-
ond daughter to their
family, born through a
surrogate mother.
The couple announced Monday
the arrival of Faith Margaret
Kidman Urban, born on Dec. 28 at a
Nashville, Tenn., hospital.
Kidman and Urban released a
statement saying they are "truly
blessed" and thanked everyone for
their support, "our gestational car-
rier" in particular.
The couple also has a 2-year-old
daughter, Sunday Rose. Kidman
credited her first daughter's unex-
pected appearance to swimming
in the waters of a small Australian
Outback town during the filming
of "Australia." She and six other
women became pregnant after swim-
ming in Kununurra.
No other details about Faith
Margaret were available.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs
takes medical leave
SEATTLE Apple Inc. co-found-
er and CEO Steve Jobs sent a note
Monday to employees saying he's
taking his second medical leave of
absence in two years so he can focus
on his health.
No further information about his
current condition was provided.
Apple spokesman Steve Dowling
would not directly answer questions
about Jobs' health or whereabouts,
referring only to the text of the brief
note.
Jobs said he will continue as CEO
and be involved in major decisions
but has asked chief operating officer
: Tim Cook to be responsible for all
day-to-day'operations.
"I love Apple so much and hope
to be back as soon as I can," Jobs
wrote.


Nicole Kidman arrives with her husband
Sunday in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Apple has a long history of
secrecy when it comes to the iconic
CEO's health, disclosing major ill-
nesses only after the fact. Jobs was
"cured" of a rare form of pancreatic
cancer called an islet cell neuroendo-
crine tumor in 2004, but his surgery
and recovery were not made public
until afterward.
Then, during a six-month medi-
cal leave from January to June 2009,
Jobs had a liver transplant

Actress Daryl Hannah
rides with Oregon police
PORTLAND, Ore. Actress
Daryl Hannah, an activist against l


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Keith Urban for the Gplden Globe Awards


child sex slavery, rode with police
in Oregon over the weekend as
they patrolled strip clubs and areas
known for prostitution.
KGW reports Hannah was in
Portland for a weekend conference
against sex trafficking. She said she
was shocked to learn a majority of
the girls in the strip clubs are repre-
sented by pimps.
Hannah is supporting a bill spon-
sored by Sen. Ron Wyden that would
fund shelters for young women to
help them escape sex trafficking.
Hannah's credits include "Kill
Bill," "Blade Runner" and "A Walk
To Remember."

N AssOciated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Movie director John
Boorman is 78.
* Singer-songwriter Bobby
Goldsboro is 70.
* Comedian-singer-musician
Brett Hudson is 58.
* Actor-director Kevin
Costner is 56.
* Country singer Mark Collie
is 55.
* Actress Jane Horrocks is

Daily Scripture


47.
* Comedian Dave Attell is
46.
* Actor Jesse L. Martin is 42.
* Rapper DJ Quik is 41.
* NAACP President and
CEO Benjamin Todd Jealous
is 38.
* Actor Derek Richardson
is 35.
* Actor Jason Segel is 31.


"Do everything without grum-
bling or arguing, so that you
may become blameless and
pure, 'children of God without
fault in a warped and crooked
generation."'


- Philippians 2:14-16


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US BUSINESS
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Fax number .............752-9400 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate pf Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. a.m. on Sunday.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the permis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
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(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
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CORRECTION,

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Sen. Rubio visits
Afghanistan
TALLAHASSEE U.S.
Sen. Marco Rubio said
Monday during a trip to
Afghanistan that success
in American efforts to sta-
bilize the region shouldn't
be measured in troop with-
drawals.
Rubio praised efforts
to establish structured
government in many areas
and said progress is being
made in training Afghan
security and police forces,
though he said there is
still a long way to go.
"What we heard repeat-
edly, that it is important
that the United States is
committed to seeing it
through, otherwise the
Taliban and al-Qaida are
just waiting for us to leave
and come in," he said.
Rubio was with a group
of Republican senators that
included Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell of
Kentucky, Lindsey Graham
of South Carolina, Richard
Burr of North Carolina,
Kelly Ayotte of New
Hampshire, Ron Johnson
of Wisconsin and Pat
Toomey of Pennsylvania.
The group also visited
Pakistan. Rubio left for the
region just a week after
being sworn in.
The delegation met
with Army Gen. David
Petraeus, Afghan
President Hamid Karzai,
Foreign Secretary Salman
Bashir of Pakistan, and
Pakistani Gen. Ashfaq
Parvez Kayani.
NATO sent 30,000
additional troops, mostly
American, to Afghanistan
last year to focus on fight-
ing back the Taliban in
southern Afghanistan.
Rubio said the effort is
clearly working, with
Taliban's momentum
being thrown into reverse.
The U.S. now plans to
begin withdrawing troops
this summer, but there is
concern that recent prog-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vice President Joe Biden administers a ceremonial Senate
oath during a mock swearing-in ceremony to Sen. Marco
Rubio, R-Fla. (left), accompanied by his wife, Jeanette, Jan. 5.


ress could be lost.
There is hesitancy
among people to partici-
pate in government opera-
tions because they don't
want to be punished if the
United States leaves and
the Taliban returns, Rubio
said.
'They want to know that
we're committed and we
have to show that we're
.committed," Rubio said.
NATO has set a goal
of having Afghan forces
assuming full responsibil-
ity for security by 2014.

Accused war
criminal deported
ST. PETERSBURG
- A St. Petersburg man
accused of committing war
crimes in Bosnia has been
deported.
Officials said Branko
Popic was put on a com-
mercial flight to Sarajevo
over the weekend, after
a U.S. immigration judge
ordered his removal. The
judge concluded that the
62-year-old was a mem-
ber of a military brigade
responsible for the mas-
sacre of more than 8,000
Muslim civilians in the
town of Srebrenica in July
1995.
Popic was among a
group of nine people sus-
pected of being involved


in the massacre who
were tried in Tampa
federal court. After two
hung juries, prosecutors
dropped the charges
against Popic.

12-year-old drives
SUV into canal
LOXAHATCHEE -
Authorities said a 12-year-
old boy drove his family
into a South Florida canal
during a driving lesson.
The Palm Beach
County Sheriff's Office
said the boy's father let
his son take the driver's
seat Sunday in the fami-
ly's SUV. The boy's moth-
er, 1-year-old sister and
6-year-old brother were in
the back seat.
The sheriff's office
said the boy then acci-
dentally put the vehicle
in gear and accelerated.
The SUV plunged into
a Loxahatchee canal and
flipped over.
The sheriff's office
said the boy's mother,
sister and brother were
hospitalized in critical
condition Sunday. The
father suffered minor
injuries and the boy was
unhurt.
All were wearing seat
belts.


THE WEATHER


CHANCE MOSTLY' ISO. CHANCE PARTLY
. OF SUNNY '": ,j OWNERS .- OFJ 0 CLOUDYl
SHOWERS: LATE, SHOWERS "

HI 65 LO HI66LO HI 670 LO HI 65LO HI,61LO
fr'


Pensacola
b6 4?


Al"

Valdosta
S63ao8 nCity Wednesday Thursday
6,3' Jacksonville Cape Canaveral 7I 53 pr: 2 59
Tallahassee Lake City. 64 50 Daytona Beach 69 48 ;. 5. p, |
r"- ._,ayo.n_, 4-
1:* *l 'Ft. Lauderdale E1 63 6. p,:
* Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers .. ,
Panama City cala Gainesville 3 p,: c -. p.: ,
O1 1 Cacala Jacksonville ':. .- 45. p.
Orlando CapeCanaeral Key West 7J .4 77 67.
Or do CpeCan 9 Lake City 6.. 6 p ,: J < p,
Miami 64 rA.E p,:
Tampa Naples 4 ;. r0 ,: p,
West Palm Beach Ocala 691,; : 71:1 4 ,r,: f
77 5" Orlando .7 l 4 5C5 p.:
FL Lauderdale Panama City 61. J4, .. 2 : p.:
Ft Myers ;9 61 Pensacola 6.0 41 -' Si. p,:
5 5'7 Naples Tallahassee he. '. .. 44 p.:
73 ami Tampa 70u r2 71 56 i:.
7 .2 Valdosta .4 ;4 p.: .4 J0 :.r,
Key West* W. Palm Beach 7 60 ,


TEMPERATURES
Hig., %l onr.
rior ial niigh
Norncnal lo,',
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date





da Ip
Tuesday







Farecarted Imperaturi


4'_

42
87 in 1943
23 in 1959

0.64"
1.68"
1.68"
1.83"
1.83"


SUN
Sunnse troa.

Surrset om:.
-urS6, Lrunhi.


7:27 a.m.
5 5' -. p.m
7.27 a.m.
5:56 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 4:53 p.m.
Moonset today 6:15 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 6:01 p.m.
Moonset tom. 7:05 a.m.


Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb.
19 26 2 11
Full Last New First


7p la 6at
Wednesday







S "Fertlsli ke" tempera e


3
MODEOWE
45 mntes tob
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

1: -- a..aw .


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The .it,
Channel.



weather.com


x Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics 2011. Weather Central
SLLC, Madison, Wis.
' www.weatherpubllsher.com


www.lkeci t porte. com
Lake Cit report


* Associated Press


AROUND FLORIDA


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2011


CRASH: Woman, boy killed in rollover accident
Continued From Page 1A


the crash site. "The first
call that we received was at
6:40 p.m."
Riordan was uncertain if
the roadway was blocked
because of the wreck.
"The most dramatic
events occurred on the
road's shoulder, so I don't
know if the road was


blocked or not," he said.
Jennifer Grant's body was
sent to the medical examin-
er's office in Jacksonville.
'"That's pretty much stan-
dard," Riordan said. "If we
have someone that dies
on the scene, the medical
examiners office is gener-
ally the next stop for an


autopsy. The autopsy is
part of our homicide inves-
tigation report. It deter-
mines the cause of death
and that's part of our inves-
tigation."
Reports said none of the
car's occupants were wear-
ing seat belts or restraints
at the time of the wreck.


"Seat belts don't guar-
antee survivability, but we
do know they increase the
chances of surviving and
they lesson the injuries,"
Riordan said.
Charges in connection
with the wreck are pend-
ing completion of an FHP
investigation.


KING: Remembered with service and speeches
Continued From Page 1A


all people accept the fatherhood of
God and brotherhood of mankind,
Wallace said.
Parade grand marshals Joyce
Tunsil and Walter "Polk" Jones were
honored during the program.
Tunsil was a Columbia County
teacher who filed and won, a suit
against the school system for breach
of contract and discrimination during
school desegregation.
Jones served in the United States
Navy during World War II as one of
the first black "frogmen" or combat
scuba diver.
The Columbia County Branch
NAACP also hosted its 26th Annual
Martin Luther King Jr. Observance
Program Sunday at Mt. Pisgah.
The Rev. J. T. "Billie" Simon,
pastor of Greater Popular Springs
Missionary Baptist Church in


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Joyce Parnell Tunsil, 83, one of the
marshals for the Northeast Florida
Leadership Council Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Parade, speaks during the cel-
ebration ceremony.

Jasper, was the speaker.
King was one of America's great-
est sons, he said.


"He loved people," Simon said.
There are several things needed
in order for the community to get
where it needs to be, including
return to Jesus, get fathers back
home and in the church and remem-
ber the name of the game is not
mediocrity but excellence, he said.
"It seems so many of us are. sat-
isfied with just getting by," Simon
said.
Parents should strive for excel-
lence in themselves as well as their
children, he said.
Attending services to honor King
helps the community know their
history, said Tramel Lucas of Lake
City.
"For the younger generation it
encourages us to know what they
went through so we could have free-
dom," he said.


ACRES: No more rescue work for dogs and cats
Continued From Page 1A


Haake said he has no cita-
tions and no warnings.
"They find nothing
wrong," he said. "They
give us a clean bill of
health. Every complaint
has been answered and
there's nothing that we
are doing wrong."
Hunter said officers and


deputies have responded
to complaints from both
residents and Skunkie
'Acres.
"It's gone both ways
where we've had depu-
ties go out and deal with
complaints from residents
and deputies go out and
deal with complaints from


TRUCKS: Collision death
Continued From Page 1A


was entirely within the
southbound lane.
After the collision
Espiscito's truck continued,
traveling forward for 89
feet and then ran off the


left side of the road, travel-
ing 343 feet before striking
an oak tree.
Hause's truck came to
a controlled stop following
the collision.


Skunkie Acres," he said.
'They were investigated
and reported through the
state attorney's office as
needed."
Skunkie Acres which
provides riding stables, a
skunk and exotic animal
rescue and an exotic ani-
mal zoo is' currently


home to about 25 res-
cued dogs and 15 res-
cued cats.
Haake said the dogs
and cats will remain' at
Skunkie Acres until they
are adopted by people
who will give them good
homes. Dogs are $15 and
cats are free.


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Police: No explosives

discovered in Miami

airport plane check


Holder for
detonators found,
leading to search.
Associated Press
MIAMI Authorities
said an empty holder for
detonators used in con-
struction or oil drilling
prompted a bomb squad
inspection of an American
Airlines plane that
arrived Monday at Miami
International Airport from
Brazil.
A Miami-Dade Police
bomb squad was dis-
patched to the plane after
baggage handlers found
a suspicious item in the
cargo hold of Flight
930 from Sao Paolol.
Authorities said the hold-
er was discovered rattling
around inside a container
during an inspection of the
plane's cargo shipments.
All of the flight's 169


passengers had already
deplaned.
"They found what
appeared to be detona-
.tor devices, but it turned
out to be empty contain-
ers that are made to hold
detonators. There were no
explosives inside them,"
said police spokeswoman
Det. Edna Hernandez.
American Airlines
spokesman Tim Smith
called the detonator hold-
er "nothing threatening."
He said the item could be
used in construction or oil
drilling.
"It was doing routine pro-
cess that they opened it
up and said 'this doesn't
look right.' This one was
not packed like they usually
are," Smith said, adding that
the airlines would review
how and why the item was
shipped from Brazil.
The flight arrived around
8:30 a.m. Monday.


Robert Woodard Edward Jones
Financial Advisor MAKSENSE OF INVESTING

148 North Marion Ave Downtown
Lake City, FL 32055-3915
Bus. 386-752-1215 TF Fax 800-217-2105
TE 888-752-1215
robert.woodard@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com




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^\














OPINION


Tuesday, January 18, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Obama

struck

right note

in Tucson

President Obama said
what needed to be
said last week at a
service for the slain
and injured of the
Tucson, Ariz., shooting ram-
page.
Because the victims included
a congresswoman, now fighting
for her life, and a federal judge,
who lost his, it was impossible
for many to view this sense-
less crime outside of a political
context Because our political
culture is polarized, many were
tempted to make the logical leap
of blaming that polarization for
this tragedy.
As soon as the first reports of
the shooting started to circulate,
people were already offering
theories of how this fit in some
larger context of recent, hard-
fought political campaigns.
Unlike the 9/11 terrorist attacks
or the Oklahoma City bomb-
ing, which temporarily halted
political divisiveness, the Tucson
shootings inflamed them.'
. Obama asked us all to step
back. A lack of civility in politics
is bad because it prevents us
from working together to solve
common problems, he said. But
no one knows what drove an
apparently disturbed young man
to violence. And the finger-point-
ing that followed the killings just
further divides Americans.
"At a time when our discourse
has become so sharply polarized
- at a time when we are far too
eager to lay the blame for all that
ails the world at the'feet of those
who think differently than we do
it's important for us to pause
for a moment and make sure
that we are talking with each
other in a way that heals, not a
way that wounds."
We've all heard politicians
decry partisanship before, but
they almost always define it as
something that the other party
is doing. Its rare to hear a
message that could be equally
applied to either side of the
political divide. Not every
news story should be seen as a
potential wedge issue.
0 Portland (Neb.) Press Herald
Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words, and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


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ACCUS


TAHER.
7E COLUVlBOS P WA
2011


Campaign fights 'black genocide'


Campaign launched
in Los Angeles this
week seeks to raise
awareness to what is
becoming known
as "black genocide" the
devastation occurring in black
America as result of abortion.
It's modeled after a highly
successful similar campaign
conducted in Atlanta earlier this
year by Georgia Right to Life
and the Radiance Foundation.
According to just released
data from the Guttmacher
Institute, 1.21 million abortions
were performed in the United
States in 2008. Some 30 percent
of these abortions were per-
formed on black women. With
blacks accounting for about 12
percent of the U.S. population,
the tragic disproportionate rate
of abortion in this community is
clear.
' Seventy billboards will be
posted around Los Angeles,
with focus on neighborhoods
with high percentage black pop-
ulation. The billboards show the
face of a beautiful black child
with a headline that says: "Black
Children are an Endangered
Species." I
The campaign is timed to
coincide with March for Life,
which notes the anniversary
of the 1973 Roe v Wade deci-
sion legalizing abortion, and
with black history month in
February.
Abortion, of course, is a
plague on the whole nation. But,
as with all problems, the most
vulnerable communities get hit
the hardest.
A widely held assumption in
our national discourse today is
that there is "economic issues"
and "social issues" that are sepa-
rate, unrelated concerns. The


LETTER


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org
fact that many actually believe
that our nation's economic vital-
ity has nothing to do with the
condition of the American family
or our general attitudes toward
life and personal responsibility
is a symptom of rather than an
answer to our problems.
Realities in black America
speak to this issue.
The 25 percent of this
population in which poverty is
entrenched and passed on from
generation to generation is the
portion of the population in
which traditional family struc-
ture has been most broken and
lost.
Study after study, for instance,
shows that the biggest factor in
earning power is education and
the biggest factor in educational
success is family background
and the values prevailing in the
home of the child.
A'Rand study concluded that
$500 billion would be added
annually to our GDP if test
scores of black and Latino chil-
dren reached national averages.
Anyone that has overcome
a personal background of a
broken and dysfunctional fam-
ily can testify to how important
family is in a child's life. Often
those who dismiss its central
importance take for granted the
values transmitted to them from
their families and arrogantly
take complete personal credit
for their success.


Personal responsibility is cen-
tral to a functioning free society.
The Roe v Wade decision legal-
izing abortion, enshrining sex
for amusement and the illusion
of sex without consequences,
was a frontal assault on our cul-
ture of personal responsibility.
In 1969, three years before
Roe v Wade, 68 percent of
Americans said premarital sex is
wrong. Today 32 percent say it
is wrong.
Removing marriage as the
framework for sex and children
has produced results that don't
surprise. There have been 50
million abortions since 1973.
And we've gone from 10 per-
cent of American babies born
to unwed mothers in 1970 to 40
percent today.
A black child has a 50-percent
chance of being aborted and, if
born, a 70-percent chance of liv-
ing in a single parent home.
Planned Parenthood, who
provides a third of our nation's
abortions, gets $300 million
annually from the federal gov-
ernment that they use to set up
in black neighborhoods to per-
petuate this dismal reality.
The Issues4Life Foundation
and the Radiance foundation are
fighting back. The idea is that
the beginning of solving any
problem is building awareness.
The goal for the billboard
campaign is to plant seeds in
the minds of blacks and all
Americans that the future for all
of us can only be in a culture of
life, family, and personal respon-
sibility.

Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition on Urban
Renewal and Education
' (www.urbancure.org) and author
of three books.


TO THE -EDITOR


An urgent call to the black church


One evening I stood
on a'corner and
watched a lot of
young black males
sell drugs while a
caravan of cars pulled up to the
same house as if they were plac-
ing orders at a fast food pickup,
window.
Directly across the street, I
saw a black church. The mem-
bers were in the parking lot
greeting one another before
they attended service. No one
bothered to even look across the
street.
I don't think Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. would have
turned his head to the negative
activity in his backyard were he
alive today. He probably would
have walked across the street
and talked to the black males
and found out what kind of
level they were on before try-
ing to raise their conscience.
I wouldn't have been surprised
either if many of them stopped
their activities to at least hear
what he had to say.
At the turn of the century, sec-
ular organizations The National


Association for the Advancement
of Colored People (NAACP),
The Garvey Movement, and the
Nation of Islam became promi-
nent proponents for the black
cause. The black church was
referred to as do-nothing institu-
tion because its influence had
waned.
The civil rights movement
sparked a resurgence in the
black church. The movement
was led by Dr. King, who trans-
formed it from a passive institu-
tion to an instrument for social
change. Dr. King preached and
argued that religion has a social
as well as a spiritual mission,
and that it should be concerned
with the whole person and not
just the soul.
During the Jim Crow era the
black church became the most
important economic institu-
tion in the black community. It
had to steel itself against the
economic woes brought on by
the Jim Crow laws. As a result,
insurance companies, mutual
associations, banks, and educa-
tional institutions were created.
When the Civil War ended,


the black church immediately
stepped forth to construct edu-
cational institutions for the black
community.
The same impetus is needed
now more than ever if the black
church is to become a great
institution producing programs
and solutions for our ravished
and impoverished communities.
Long before the government
implemented social and welfare
programs the black church
was serving as a social institu-
tion, a social clearing house for
the betterment of its people.
It might benefit the black
community to delve into the civil
rights era and understand better
the role the black church played
socially in our communities. We
could probably create more solu-
tions to combat the social ills
that fluctuate daily in our com-
munities. After all, Dr. King's
dream wasn't only about civil
rights or race; it was also tar-
geted at the chaos in the black
community.
Bruce A. Davis
Gainesville


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com


2010 ties


warmest

year on


record

It seems counterin-
tuitive considering the
Northeast and Europe
are being hammered by
snow and the South by
ice, but the U.S. government
says the world has indeed been
getting warmer.
The latest data from
the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
says 2010 tied 2005 for being
the hottest year on record, 1:12
degrees above the 20th century
average of 57 degrees.
2010 was also the wettest
year on record, according to
records going back to 1880.
The contiguous United States
had it a little better than some
parts of the world.
For us, 2010 was our fourth
hottest summer and 23rd hot-
test year.
But globally the pattern for
the start of the 21st century is
clear: nine of the 10 warmest
years have occurred since 2000.
The exception was 1998,
which went into the books as
the third hottest year after 2005
and 2010. Global temperatures
have now been above the 20th
century average for 34 straight
years.
NOAA's temperature graph
shows temperatures well below
the 20th century global average
from 1880 until the end of the
1930s when the average annual
temperature began fluctuating
between slightly above and
slightly below the 57-degree
benchmark.
But since 1980 the trend has
been incrementally, if unevenly,
upward.
Most climatologists-attribute
the gradual warming to the
buildup of heat-trapping green-
house gases in the atmosphere
although there are some scien-
tists who say the change is part
of a long-term cyclical variation.
NOAA cast a wide net in
gathering the data. It came
from weather stations, ships
and ocean buoys.
In all, more than 200 coun-
tries contributed to the findings.
There may be disagreement
about how fast and what is caus-
ing it, but there. seems little
disagreement that the Earth is
getting Warmer.

Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY

On Jan. 18, 1911, the first
landing of an aircraft on a ship
took place as pilot Eugene B.
Ely brought his Curtiss biplane
in for a safe landing on the deck
of the armored cruiser USS
Pennsylvania in San Francisco
Harbor.
On this date:
In 1778, English navigator
Captain James Cook reached
the Hawaiian Islands, which he
dubbed the "Sandwich Islands."
In 1862, the 10th president
of the United States, John Tyler,
died in Richmond, Va. at age 71.
In 1871, William I of
Prussia was proclaimed German
Emperor in Versailles, France.
In 1943, during World
War II, the Soviets announced
they'd broken through the long
Nazi siege of Leningrad (it was
another year before the siege


was fully lifted).


4A













Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY JANUARY 18, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Today
Homeschool class
A "How-to-homeschool
class" is 7 p.m. today at
Artworks Studio, 122
SW Midtown Plaza suite
103. Visit http://www.art-
worksstudio. net/Aboutus.
html for directions.
Information on the home-
school requirements in
Florida and how to meet
those requirements will be
available. Veteran home-
schoolers will be on hand
to answer questions and
help parents who want to
take charge of their child's
education. Call or e-mail:
Colleen 386-758-9346,
mdfinley@juno. com.

Meet and Greet
The CARC Board of
Directors Advocates for
Citizens with Disabilities
Inc. is hosting a meet
and greet for new Executive
Director Mike Belle 4 p.m.
today. Belle will be discuss-
ing his ideas for the organi-
zation during the event





COURTESY PHOTO

CCBA presents Builder of the, Year award
Roger Whiddon, president of the Columbia County Builders' Association (left), presents the
Builder of the Year award to Sammy Keen of SLK Construction. The award is presented to a
member for dedication to the promotion and well-being of the CCBA and commitment to the
community.


NARFE Meeting
The monthly meet-
ing of National Active
and Retired Federal
Employees takes place at 1


p.m. today at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center on
East Baya Avenue. For
more information, contact
Marian at 386-755-0907 or


Jim at 386-752-8570.

Community Meeting
The community is invit-
ed at 7 p.m. today to Deep


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter, com.


theme is "Knowledge Is
Contagious." Qualifying
students are asked to
bring a book to exchange
or give away.

Thursday
Branford Camera Club
The Branford Camera
Club is meeting 7 p.m.
Thursday at the Branford
Public Library. The pro-
gram is "Exposure: The
basics and more." Terry
Hancock will present the
material and lead the dis-
cussion; members and
guests may participate
regardless of level of exper-
tise. The homework this
month is "Clouds." Choose
two to three photos to
share with the group, either
digitally or printed. Also,
bring other recent photos
to share with the group. An
introduction to the "Picasa"
photo software program
presented by Humberto
Castellano$ is Feb. 17. Call
Carolyn Hogue, program
chairwoman, 386-935-2044.


OBITUARIES


John V. Dow, Sr.
Mr. John V. Dow, Sr., 72 of Lake
City passed away on Friday, Jan-
uary 14, 2011. He was a native of
Malone, NY and the oldest child
to the late John F. and Irene Yad-
dow Dow. Mr. Dow had lived
in Lake City since 1998 having
moved here from Springhill,
Florida. He retired from Gen-
eral Motors in 1988 as a Mill-
wright Mechanic after 32 years
of employment. Mr. Dow was
currently working for Rountree-
Moore coordinating drivers and
transporting vehicles. He was a
man who enjoyed his work. Mr.
Dow loved woodworking, gar-
dening and working in his yard.
He is survived by his wife of 54
years, Mrs. Janet A. Dow, Lake
City; Two sons, John V. Dow
(LaGina), Live Oak and Terry
Dow (Mona), Brushton, NY and
two daughters, Jill Guiles (Pe-
ter), Star Lake NY and Tracy
LaMarca (Joseph), Ft. Worth,
TX. Two brothers, Eugene
Dow (Lorraine), Plattsburg,
NY and Lyndon Dow (Mary),
Rochester, NY; One sister, Jane
Patnode, Beacon, NY; Twelve
grandchildren and five great
grandchildren also survive.
Memorial services for Mr. Dow
will be conducted on Wednes-
day, January 19, 2011 at 2:00
p.m. in the Chapel of Guerry Fu-
neral Home with Pastor George
Swearengin, Pastor of Pine
Grove United Methodist Church,
Live Oak officiating. In lieu of
flowers donations may be made
to the Columbia County Fire
and Rescue at 508 SW SR 241,
Lake City, Fl 32024 in memory
of Mr. Dow. Arrangements are
under the direction of GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, 2659 SW
Main Blvd., Lake City. 752-
2414 Please sign the guestbook
at www.guerryfuneralhome.net

Edwin Dale Perry, Sr.,
Edwin Dale Perry, Sr., age 72 of
McAlpin, passed away Sunday,
January 16, 2011 at E.T. York
Hospice Care Center in Gaines-
ville. He was born December 7,
1938 in Avon Park, Florida to
Walter Adolf and Essie Shaw
Perry. He was a 1957 graduate of
Gainesville High School and then
went on to graduate from Univer-
sity of North Florida. He was em-
ployed by the National Defense
as a computer systems analyst.
He is survived by his wife of 50
years, Elizabeth Prevatt Perry;
sons, Dale (Kathie) Perry of Key-
stone Heights and Keith (Patty)
Perry of St. Augustine; grand-
children, Megan, Savannah and
Sierra and 4 nephews and 1 niece.
Graveside Services will be held
Wednesday, January 19, 2011
at 1:00 p.m. at Memorial Park
Central with Pastor Bob Meyer
officiating. The family will re-
ceive friends Tuesday, Janu-
ary 18, 2011, 5:00 p.m. to 6:30
p.m. at WILLIAMS-THOMAS
FUNERAL HOME DOWN-
TOWN 404 North Main Street.
For further information, please
contact Williams-Thomas
Downtown (352) 376-7556
Ella Mae Ruis
Mrs. Ella Mae Ruis, age 76, of
Lake City, Fl. died Sunday, Janu-
ary 16, 2011 in the North Florida
Regional Med-
ical Center,
Gainesville,
FL. following ..
an extended
illness. She
was a native
of Winnabo,
North Carolina
and had resided in Fort White and
High Springs, Fl. before moving
to Lake City in 1974. She was
the daughter of the late Edward
Stewart and Goldie Francis
Spence Stewart and the widow
of the late Benjamin F. Ruis. She


had worked as a certified nursing
assistant with the V.A. Medical
Center, Lake City; Fl. before ill
health forced her retirement. She
was of the Holiness Faith, loving
and reading and spending quiet
time with her family. She is sur-
vived by four sons; Donald (De-
nise) Crosby of Hawthorne, Fl.,
Tom Robertson of Wacho, Ken-
tucky, Edward Hanson of Bell,
Ft and James R. Davis of Lake
City, Fl. One step-son, James F.
(Mary) Ruise of Lake City, FL.
Seven grandchildren and eight
great-grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 7P.M. Thursday, Janu-
ary 20, 2011, in the Chapel of
Guerry Funeral Home with Rev.
Randy Ogburn, Pastor of Water-
town Congregational Methodist
Church, officiating. Visitation
will be from 6-7 P.M. Thursday
(one hour before services) at
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME,
2659 S.W. Main Blvd., Lake City,
FL. Please sign the guest book at
www.guerryfuneralhome.net

Mr. Theodore Marvin
(Little Bear) Sirmans,
Mr. Theodore Marvin (Little
Bear) Sirmans, 73, passed away
Sunday, January 16, 2011 at his
daughters residence in Valdo-
sta following a extended illness.
Mr. Sirmans was born Sept. 26,
1937, in Valdosta, GA, to the late
Lott Sirmans and Emma Allen
Sirmans. He owned and oper-


ated the 94-441 Service Station
and was a member of Masons.
He was preceded in death by his
wife Emma Roe Sirmans, and
one brother Chester Wheeler.
Survivors are four daughters
and sons-in-law: Sherylann Sir-
mans & Grant Mullins, Valdo-
sta, Theresa & Rich Mulder, Las
Vegas, Sandy Pitts & Mark Hill,
Valdosta and Debbie Sirmans,
Fargo, Carl Smith, Iraq; three
brothers George Allen Sirmans,
Jacksonville, GA, Hammond
Sirmans, Fargo, and John Glenn
Wheeler, Fargo. Nine grandchil-
dren, Samantha Smith, Fargo,
Jeannie Smith, Homerville, Em-
ily & Brandon Corbitt, Fargo,
Charlie & Teresa Pitts, Homer-
ville, Brian & Tabitha Pitts, Tur-
key, Megan Smith, Las Vegas,
Austin Gibbs, Valdosta, Emma
Gibbs, Valdosta, and McKenna
Smith, Homerville, three great
grandchildren, Dalton Smith,


Fargo, Grant Tucker, Homer-
ville, and Levi Abe Corbitt,
Fargo, and several other relatives.
Services for Mr. Sirmans will
be held Wednesday, January 19,
2011 at two o'clock at Bethel
Primitive Baptist Church, Fargo.
Interment will be at
Boney Bluff cemetery.
The family will receive
friends Tuesday from 6 un-
til 8 at the Funeral Home.
Sympathy may be expressed
by signing the, online registry at
www. rouridtreefuneralhome. net
Donations may be made to
the American Cancer Soci-
ety or The Shriners Hospital.
ROUNDTREE FUNER-
AL HOME will be serv-
ing the Sirmans family.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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GUARANTEED EARLY SEATING FOR MEMBERS AT 1:50 PM
Buy tickets only at the door one hour before show for seating at 2 PM.
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Visit www.communityconcerts.info or call (386) 466-8999


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


Creek Community Center
for a public meeting. The
meeting will deal with the
issue of rezoning 20 acres
in Deer Run Preserve for
a camp ground/day camp
called Camp La Llanada.
All interested are invited,
to attend. For more infor-
mation, call Sally at 386-
365-3895.

Wednesday
Scholars program
The deadline to sub-
mit report cards for
the Presley Excel and
Scholars Program is
Wednesday. The program
honors students in kin-
dergarten through 12th
grade whose second nine-
week report card has no
grade less than a B or S.
Send a copy of the report
card and a contact tele-
phone number to: Mrs.
Bernice D. Presley, P.O.
Box 402, Lake City, FL
32055, fax 719-4389 or e-
mail berniceEXCEL@aol.
com. Call 752-4074. The


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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS & EDUCATION TUESDAY. JANUARY 18, 2010 Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


Bulletin Board

NE S BO0,UR SC OOL


CAMPUS

BRIEFS


Fort White
Elementary
Fort White ended 2010
with a Polar Express pajama
day on the Friday prior to
winter break.
The school presented a
Christmas program with its
chorus performing a song
and dance prograni set in a
1950s soda shop.
Ginger Norris, the
school's music teacher, orga-
nized the entertainment.
t Upon returning from
winter break, kindergarten
students have been help-
ing Tuggles find a peaceful
place.
Tuggles, a bear puppet
that helps kindergartners
learn how to be peacemak-
ers and not troublemakers,
goes with the program 'Too
Good for Violence."
Kindergarten teachers
chose to teach the program
in January this year.
It has been correlating
great with the school's les-
sons on Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr.

Melrose Park
Elementary
Melrose Park second-
graders will be performing
play titled "Why I
Love America" at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday for PTO.
Melrose Park first-graders
will be having fun learning
about balance and motion in
science.
Students will be balancing
things on their fingers, the
table and making mobiles.
Students are learning
about author's purpose and
point of view in reading.
They are also counting
forward and backward to
100 in math.
Students are learning to
write narrative stories dur-
ing process writing.
Second-graders are
learning how to subtract
two-digit numbers.
They are also learning
about the setting of a story
and reviewing author's pur-
pose.
They are learning why
about weather and how a
weather report is made.
The kindergarten stu-
dents have come back to
school rested and ready to
begin another semester.
They are very excited
about the new science unit:
space.
They have learned that
our sun is a star and the
earth is the only planet with
living things.
The students cannot wait
to see what they will learn
next.

Westside
Elementary
Westside Elementary
would like to congratulate
its Third Six Weeks Writing
Winners.
First-grade winners:
Ethan Cruz, Farrah Baldwin,
Noah Morris, Halleigh Ray
Harris, Brody Green and
Mayar Fadhel.
Second-grade win-
ners: Megan Edge, Chloe
Conner, Kinley Keen, Micah
Rentz, Zachary Williams and
Joseph Richards.
Third-grade win-
ners: Lexie Trussell, Tyler
Shelnut, lance Minson,
Jenna Burns, Jessie Altman,
Avona Randolph.
Fourth-grade winners:
Taygen Cribbs, William
Burns, Owen Sims, Anna
Blanton, Irene Carrillo.
Fifth-grade win-
ners: Joshua Lewis,


Malorie Ronsonet, 'lamer
McDaniels, Brooke Milito,
Caleb Strickland and
Reginald Sharp.


COURTESY PHOTO

Fort White Elementary students recognized
Pictured are the November 'Caught Being Good' student winners at Fort White Elementary
School. Officials from the elementary school said they are 'always extremely pleased with
the great behavior, hard work and dedication' of the little Indians.


STUDENT PROFILE


Name: Malia Hogue-
Pua
Age: 14
Parents: April Hogue
and Wesley Pua
School and grade:
Lake City Middle School,
eighth grade
Achievements: "A"
Honor Roll, Presidential
Award and member of the
softball, soccer and volley-
ball teams
What clubs or orga-
nizations do you belong
to? National Junior Honor
Society
What do you like best
about school? Hanging
out with friends while


COURTESY PHOTO


Malia Hogue-Pua

learning.
What would you like
to do when you com-
plete your education?


Attend college to study
criminal justice.
Teacher's comments:
Malia is a shining example
of a great student. She
does well with her aca-
demics and balances extra-
curricular activities, too.
Principal's com-
ments: Malia has great
academic and athletic tal-
ents. She is well-liked by
her peers. She is an asset
to our school, district and
community.
Student's comments
concerning honor: I was
surprised and honored to
have been chosen for the
student focus.


Obama's plan to overhaul

education faces big hurdles


By ERICA WERNER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON-- Signs
-of trouble are arising for
President Barack Obama's
plan to put education over-
haul at the forefront of his
agenda as he adjusts to the
new reality of a divided
government.
Giving students and
teachers more flexibility is
an idea with bipartisan sup-
port Yet the debate about
the overdue renewal of the
nation's chief education
law, known as No Child
Left Behind, is complicated
by political pressures from
the coming 2012 presiden-
tial campaign and disputes
over timing, money and
scope of the update.
While education might
offer the best chance for
the White House to work
with newly empowered
Republicans, any con-
sensus could fade in the
pitiless political crosscur-
rents, leaving the debate
for another day, perhaps
even another presidency.
If so, parents, teachers
and students would labor
under a burdensome set
of testing guidelines and
other rules that many say
are lowering standards.
It's that scenario that the
president and his adminis-
tration intend to invoke as
a way to rally public sup-
port and spur lawmakers
and interest groups into
action against long odds.
"No one I'm talking to is
defending the status quo,"
Education Secretary Arne
Duncan said in an inter-
view. "Everyone I talk to
really shares my sense of
urgency that we have to
do better for our children.
We're fighting for our
country here."
Duncan said Obama's
State 'f the Union address
on Jan. 25 will reflect his
commitment to education.
Obama ias spoken
about the effect on the


U.S. economy and com-
petitiveness from lag-
ging student test scores.
Lawmakers and advocates
will watch to see whether
he keeps the issue in the
spotlight in- the months
ahead.
"I don't think there's
any substitute but for
him to be out front,"
said Rep. George Miller
of California, the top
Democrat on the House
Education and Workforce
Committee.
Some Republicans,
wary of another giant bill
like health care, would
prefer a series of small
measures to the broad
rewrite of No Child Left
Behind favored by the
administration.
Democrats ,and many


outside advocates say
Congress must enact an
overhaul this year, before
the 2012 campaign. For
some in the GOP, getting
it right is more important
than getting it fast, and
they refuse to spend any
new money to do it.
"There's room to make
cuts, and I think pretty
substantial cuts, that
would enable us to use
some of those savings on
things we think work,"
said Rep. Duncan Hunter,
a California conservative
who's the new chairman
of a House Education and
Workforce subcommit-
tee. "I like the piecemeal
approach. ... If you do it
in bite-size pieces, you
can tell what needs to be
tweaked as you go."


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Duncan criticizes

NC school board

over bus program


By TOM BREEN
Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. The
nation's top education
official on Friday joined a
chorus of criticism target-
ing a decision last year by
North Carolina's largest
school district to end its
busing for diversity pro-
gram.
"America's strength
has always been a func-
tion of its diversity, so it
is troubling to see North
Carolina's Wake County
school board take steps
to reverse a long-stand-
ing policy to promote
racial diversity in its
schools," U.S. Secretary
of Education Arne Duncan
wrote in a letter to The
Washington Post that
was also provided to The
Associated Press.
The federal education
agency's Office for Civil
Rights is investigating
the board's decision, fol-
, lowing a complaint filed
with the department last
year by the state chapter
of the NAACP and other


groups.
They allege that ending
a policy in which some of
the district's 140,000 or
so students were bused
to achieve socio-econom-
ic balance in the school
district amounts to a roll-
back of civil rights-era
changes that integrated
the schools.
Duncan's three-para-
graph letter didn't neces-
sarily endorse that posi-
tion, but it did urge other
school boards to think
twice before using Wake
County's new policy as a
model.
"I respectfully urge
school boards across
America to fully consider
the consequences before
taking such action,"
Duncan wrote. "This is no
time to go backward."
John Tedesco, one of
the Wake County board
members who voted to
end the policy in favor
of allowing students to
attend schools as close as
possible to their homes,
said he was disappointed
by Duncan's letter.


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SCHOOLS & EDUCATION TUESDAY JANUARY 18, 2010 Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


6A LAKE CITY REPORTER


.1


aashm
dr-- 1%











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2011 7A
M GELLC 8 00 FREEDOM AE (AN QN OU 4
Q274


92011 UNIVERSAL MEDIA SYNDICATE, INC. SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE


i FREE MIRACLE HEATERS ARE ON THE WAY: Everyone wants to stay warm and save money on their hat bills this winter. These trucks are being loaded full of new Heat Surge Roll-n-Glow
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by calling 1-866-861-7284 to order the fireplace mantles are actually getting the Heat Surge miracle heaters with new Convecta-red Heat technology absolutely.free.



Floridians have just 48 hours to get free heaters

New Miracle Convecta-red heaters are being given away free to the first 7,631 readers who beat the order deadline for

real Amish fireplace mantles handmade for the breakthrough invention that drastically slashes heat bills


Save money: uses about the same electric as a coffee maker, so turn your thermostat way down and never be cold again


BY R.K. BERRY
Universal Media Syndicate
UMS Have you heard about the free heater
giveaway that's sweeping across the state?
Well listen up because here it is and we'll
even give you the number to call.
Starting at precisely 8:30am this morning,
brand new Convecta-red miracle heaters are
actually being given away free to the general
public for the next 48 hours.
The ohly thing today's readers need to do is
call the Toll Free Hotline before the 48-hour
deadline with their order for the handmade
Amish Fireplace Mantle. The first 7,631 read-
ers who do will instantly be awarded the Heat
Surge miracle heater with new Convecta-red
Heat technology absolutely free.
This is all happening to announce the new
Heat Surge Roll-n-Glow Convecta-red fire-
place which actually rolls from room-to-room
so you can turn your thermostat way down and
never be cold again. That way, everyone who
gets them first can immediately start saving
on their heat bills.
Now that the bitter cold winter weather is
here, portable Amish encased fireplaces are
being delivered directly to the doors of all
those who beat the deadline.
These remarkable new Convecta-red heat-
ers are being called a miracle because they















AMISH QUALITY: Amish craftsmen take
great pride in their workmanship. Each Amish
fireplace mantle is hand crafted to the highest
standards and is built to last a lifetime. With four
finishes to choose from they are sure to make
any room look like a million bucks.


SAFE: The new Heat Surge Convecta-red
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have the patent-pefiding Fireless Flame tech-
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real fire but without any flames, fumes, ashes
or mess. Everyone is getting them because all
you do is plug them in.
And here's the best part. Readers who beat
the 48-hour order deadline are getting their
new Convecta-red miracle heaters free when
encased in the Amish built real wood fireplace
mantles. The mantles are being handmade in
Ohio, right in the heart of Amish country where
they are beautifully hand-rubbed, stained and
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You just can't find custom made Amish man-
tles like this in the national chain stores. That
makes the oak mantle a real steal for just two
hundred ninety-eight dollars since the entire
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The Amish handmade- mantle actually lets
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room-to-room. These fireplaces are so com-
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instant heat wave in any room. And they only
use about the same electric as a coffee maker,
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house for just pennies a day.
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SAVES ON BILLS: Everyone gets lower h
bills and still stays warm. The new Heat Su
Convecta-red heater only uses 9 an hou
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an instant heat wave in any room to keep
warm all day long for just pennies.


DELIVERED FULLY ASSEMBLED: Ev
Heat Surge Roll-n-Glow fireplace comes f
assembled by Amish craftsmen and is deliver
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plug it in and relax in front of the Fireless Flai


heater only uses about 9v an hour of electricity
on the standard setting, the potential energy
savings are absolutely incredible," said Laura
Rich, Operat.ons Director.
"We're trying to make sure no one gets left
out, but you better hurry because we only have
7,631 new Cmvecta-red miracle heaters to
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On the worldwide web:
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How to get your free heater
Readers reed to call the Toll Free Hotlines beginning at 8:30am this morning. If lines are
busy keep trying, all calls will be answered. However, if you miss the deadline you will be
turned away from this free offer and forced to wait for future announcements in this or
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The first 1,631 readers who beat the 48-hour deadline to order the Amish made fireplace
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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2011




Hundreds Prepare To Cash In Their Gold and Silver Today


At The Fairfield Inn & Suites Here In Lake City!


By DAVID MORGAN
STAFF WRITER

Corporate Spokesperson
for Ohio Valley Gold and
Silver Refinery said, "We're
ready to spend the money." It
has become a frenzy for the
Ohio Valley Gold and Silver
refinery who opened up for
business Monday. Jason
Horner, one of the show
managers, said that based
on previous show history, he
expects to see a lot of broken
and unwanted jewelry as that
is what has been uncovered at
similar events. Horner said,
"Dozens of people every
day cash in on old jewelry
and walk out of their events
with hundreds of dollars per
transaction."
Tish McCutcheon, a
customer from Lancaster,
Ohio who we spoke to on
the phone, attended a recent
event and walked away with
$412.87 from a little jewelry
dish with unwanted and
broken jewelry. "I think this
is great. I have had the stuff
in my dresser for years and
knew not to throw it away,
but never 'knew what to do
with it. I think there were two
rings, a class ring, a broken
herringbone bracelet, and two
necklaces that grandma had.
.I would have thought maybe
50.00 bucks would be great
but $412.87 is a whole lot
better," McCutcheon said.
Hundreds of calls
come into our office from
residents wanting to deal
directly with the refinery on


Above Ohio Valley Gold and Silver Refinery comes to town. People can relate to this stimulus package.


their contracts, but in most
cases that is not possible. The
local residents this week will
be in the unusual situation
to do just that. What an
unbelievable opportunity for
this community.
Gold is currently trading
at over $1,200.00 per ounce
and silver is just under
$19.00 per ounce. Anyone
can check the current market
prices on gold and silver on
the Internet. Ohio Valley
Refinery also has a live
feed with up-to-the minute
market prices displayed at the
event.
The event is also opened


Above One local business cashes in over $6,400 worth of gbld and
silver on the first day of the event.




Cash for Coin.

Dozens prepared to cash in

old silver and gold coins today

in Lake City.


By DAVID MORGAN
STAFF WRITER

The first day of the 5
day reclamation drive in
Lake City was a hit with those
looking to sell their gold and
silver coins. Representatives are
on hand all week purchasing all
types of coins dated 1964 and
earlier. Silver dollars, halves
and quarters are expected to
arrive in large quantities. Lots
of gold coins are expected to
arrive as well. Rebecca Hughes
of Florence walked away with
over $1200.00 after selling a
$20 gold piece from 1888 at a
previous event.
At the event, they will be
accepting: all types of gold


and silver scrap, sterling silver,
silver bars, gold jewelry from
the bottoms of jewelry boxes
and piles of sterling silver items
like old flatware sets and tea
pots. One gentleman rolled a
cart in with 3 boxes full of silver
coins and walked away with
$1850.00 in Florence as well.
Company officials are expected
to spend over $200,000 the first
day of the event. Brian Eades
with Ohio Valley said, "We have
had an overwhelming number
of calls and we expect to get
busier every day this week."
The event started Monday
and runs through Friday. The
event is free and the public is
welcome.


to local businesses that deal
with precious metals. Jewelry
stores, pawn shops, dentists,
medical laboratories, and
some industrial manufacturing
plants use or deal with
precious metals. If your
business deals with precious
metals and you would like to
discuss doing business direct
with Ohio Valley Refinery
you should call ahead to
make an appointment. They
offer several dealer programs
and always looking for new,
long term clients. You can
reach Ohio Valley Refinery
during open times by calling
(386) 466-1014.


Amazement as

Collectors provide
a stimulus package

to Lake City.


They are paying out right on the
spot for my stuff Unbelievable!!


By DAVID MORGAN
STAFF WRITER
Spokesperson for the event
said he expects to spend in
excess of $200,000.00 this week
for vintage items and precious
metals from local residents.
At previous events, when
interviewed, these transactions
stood out:
One person sold an old Gibson
guitar, that was purchased in the
1960's for less than $250.00,
to a collector at the event for
$2175.00
Another person had a pocket
watch collection that sold for
$4600.00, with one of the watches
in this collection bringing
$375.00 of the $4600.00 talley.
A husband and wife brought
in a box of old Jewelry,
wristwatches, coins, and two
German daggers from WW2 and
left $785.00 richer
This is cool that something
like this would come here to
our town. Where else would this
stuff ever be sold? The refinery
has teamed up with the collectors
for a 24 month tour of the United
States, both big and small towns
to dig up hidden gems.

Items we will accept include:
Scrap Jewelry
Dental Gold
Sterling Silverware
Sterling Silver Tea Sets
Silver Dollars
All Coins Dated 1964:& Earlier
Industrial Scrap
All forms of Platinum


If you go:

WHO: Ohio Valley Refinery
Reclamation Drive
WHAT: Open to public to sell
gold and silver.
WHEN: January 17th 21st
WHERE: Fairfield Inn & Suites
538 SW Corporate Dr.
(1-75 Exit 427, W. on Hwy 52,
S. on Access Rd.)
Lake City, FL 32024
TIMES: MONDAY-FRIDAY
9:00am 6:00pm
Every Day.
SHOW INFO: (217) 523-4225



We Buy Guns &
All War Memorabilia














Items of Interest:
Vintage Guitars:
Martin, Gibson, Fender, National,
Rickenbacker, Gretsch, Mandolins,
Banjos and others.
Pocket Watches:
Hamilton, Illinois, Waltham, Patek
Phillipe, Ball, Howard, South Bend,
Elgin and others
Wrist watches: Omega, Accutron,
Longines, Hamilton, Breitling and
many more.
Old paper money: United States,
Confederate States, Blanket Bills,
$1000.00 bills and more.
Antique Toys: Trains, Tin wind-
ups, Mechanical Banks, Robots,
Pressed Steel trucks, and many
more.
War Memorabilia: Swords,
Bayonets, Helmets, German,
Confederate, Union, USA, and
others.
Local records reveal to our research
department that recent vintage guitar
sold for $2400.00 and another for
$12,000.00 to a collector that will be
tied into the event this week via live
database feed.


Top Five Items
S To Bring
>\6 Si Go/in


Sterlirn
Silve,


Coins
7g pocet
r \Nakces









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Tuesday, January 18, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Tryouts pushed
back to today
Fort White High
baseball tryouts for
varsity and junior varsity
players were rained out
Monday and will be at
3:45 p.m. today at the
school field. Middle
school tryouts are
3:45 p.m. Wednesday
at the South Columbia
Sports Complex fields.
A current physical is
required to participate.
For details, call coach
Chad Bonds at 590-7362.

CHS TENNIS
Tryouts today
for girls, boys
Columbia High
tennis tryouts for girls
and boys is 3:30 p.m.
today at the CHS courts.
Students must have a
completed physical form.
For details, call coach
Tabatha McMahon
(girls) at 755-8103 or
coach Russ Waters
(boys) at (386) 697-4114.

GATORS
Wine tasting
for scholarships
The North Florida
Gator Club has its 4th
Annual Wine Tasting
Event from 6:30-9 p.m.
Feb. 3 at The Country
Club at Lake City. Cost is
$22. Proceeds go to
support the club's
scholarship fund.
For details, call Ian at
(352) 3164305.

N From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Fort White High
boys soccer vs. Oak Hall
School, 6 p.m.
Fort White High
girls soccer vs. Williston
High in District 5-3A
tournament at Suwannee
High, 7 p.m.
Columbia High boys
soccer at Eastside High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Newberry
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Eastside
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Wednesday
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Thursday
M Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Hamilton
County High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 6:30 p.m.
(JV-3:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Union
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 8 p.m.
(JV-5)
Friday
Fort White High
boys soccer vs. Hamilton
County High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Williston
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-3:30)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Hawthorne
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling at Ridgeview
High, TBA
Columbia High girls
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 3:30 p.m.
Columbia High boys
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 7:30 p.m.


(JV-6)


Griffin's 47 leads Clippers


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chicago Bulls' Kyle Korver (left) drives
to the basket by Memphis Grizzlies'
Rudy Gay during an NBA basketball
game in Memphis, Tenn., on Monday.


Vince Carter cracks
20,000-point plateau
as Phoenix beats N.Y.
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Blake Griffin
had a career-high 47 points and 14
rebounds for his 27th consecutive
double-double, and the Los Angeles
Clippers rallied to beat the Indiana
Pacers 114-107 on Monday.
It was Griffin's 33rd double-
double of his rookie season, and
his 19 field- goals made were a
career best.
Danny Granger scored 32 points,
making 10 of 11 free throws, 'and
former UCLA star Darren Collison
added 30 points and eight assists
for the Pacers.

Hawks 100, Kings 98
ATLANTA-Joe Johnson scored
a season-high 36 points, including
two free throws with 0.6 seconds


remaining to help Atlanta recover
after trailing most of the game.
Johnson drove past three defend-
ers for a layup with 23 seconds
remaining to give Atlanta a 98-96
lead. Carl Landry answered with a
tying basket.
Following a timeout, Johnson
was fouled by Tyreke Evans on a
drive and made both free throws.
Al Horford added 23 points, nine
rebounds and seven blocks for
Atlanta.

Suns 129, Knicks 121
NEW YORK Vince Carter
scored 29 points, including the
20,000th of his career, and Phoenix
matched a season high with its
third straight victory.
Grant Hill added 25 points for the
Suns, who overcame a season-high
41 points from former Phoenix
All-Star Amare Stoudemire and
handed the Knicks their third loss
in a row. Steve Nash finished with
15 points and 11 assists.


CHS falls in district


Lady Tigers lose
to Fleming Island
in soccer opener.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High's girls
soccer team was knocked
out of the District 4-5A
tournament in the rain on
Monday.
The Lady Tigers were the
No. 7 seed and lost to No. 2
Fleming Island High, 7-0, at
Middleburg High.
The tournament contin-
ues through the champion-
ship game at 7 p.m. Friday.

Lady Indians soccer
Fort White High's girls
soccer team opens District
5-3A tournament play at
7 p.m. today at Suwannee
High.
The Lady Indians
dropped their last three dis-
trict games to finish 2-5-1
and are the No. 4 seed.
The opponent is No. 5-
seed Williston High, which
Fort White beat twice this
season.
With a victory the Lady
Indians, who are on a four-
game winning streak, would
face top-seed Suwannee on
Wednesday.

Fort White basketball
Fort White's boys
PREP continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Amber Simms kicks the ball in a game against Buchholz High on Nov. 16.


Pistons 103, Mavericks 89

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -
Rodney Stuckey scored 20 points
to help Detroit send Dallas to its
sixth consecutive loss.
Tayshaun Prince added 19
points and rookie Greg Monroe
had 16 points and nine rebounds
for Detroit.
Dirk Nowitzki scored 32 points
for Dallas in his second game back
from a sprained right knee.

Hornets 85, Raptors 81
NEW ORLEANS David West
had 23 points and 10 rebounds
to help New Orleans win its fifth
straight.
West's jumper with 31.7 seconds
left put the Hornets ahead 83-81.
He then preserved the lead with
a block on Amir Johnson in the
paint, got the rebound, was fouled
and hit two free throws for the final
NBA continued on 2B


Ohio St.

moves

to No. 1
Buckeyes take
over from Duke
in APpoll.

Associated Press

The last time Thad
Matta's -Ohio State
. Buckeyes topped The
Associated Press Top 25,
they reached the national
championship game.
Could the same karma
take place in 2010-11?
"It did happen that
way before and it would
be great for it to hap-
pen again," Matta said
Monday, hours after the
Buckeyes replaced Duke
at No. 1. "I'd trade it right
now for better defense.
But it's great for our
program."
The Buckeyes (18-0)
moved up one spot to
replace Duke, which was
No. 1 in the preseason
Top 25 and the first nine
polls of the regular sea-
son, including six weeks
as the unanimous pick.
The Blue Devils'
loss at Florida State on
Wednesday opened the
way for the Buckeyes,,
who are No. 1 for the
third time in school his-
tory. Ohio State was No. 1
for all of 1960-61/1961-62,
a run of 27 straight polls,
and for three weeks at the
end of 2006-07.


Federer, Djokovic start


fast at Australian Open


No. 1 Wozniackd,
Venus Williams
win in first round.
By JOHN PYE
Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Australia
- Roger Federer was sub-
lime at times in his open-
ing win. Novak Djokovic
was businesslike and to the
point.
Their messages to Rafael
Nadal on Monday were
no doubt the same: The
Spaniard will have to be
at his very best to com-
plete his "Rafa Slam" at the
Australian Open.
Defending champion
Federer dismantled Lukas
Lacko 6-1, 6-1, 6-3, mixing


some classic touch and
angled shots with aggres-
sive groundstrokes in the
third match at Rod Laver
Arena.
Federer is aiming to
become only the second
man to win the Australian
Open five times; Roy
Emerson won six. Retaining
the title at Melbourne Park
would stall the prospect of
knowing what it's like not
to hold any of the major
trophies. He's won at least
one of the four each year
since'2003.
At the moment, Nadal
owns three winning the
French, Wimbledon and
U.S. Open crowns last year
to get himself into position
to be the first man to win
four consecutive majors


' since Laver completed the
calendar Grand Slam in
1969.
He starts today against
Marcos Daniel of Brazil.
Djokovic took no chanc-
es against Granollers on
Monday night, soundly
beating- the 24-year-old
Spaniard 6-1, 6-3, 6-1. He
thinks it's premature for
anyone to be talking about
winning the title.
"I try to think about
myself and my matches,
the opponents that I have
to face, not about the other
guys," he said. "Of course,
all the credit to Rafa and
Roger. They are deserv-
edly the two biggest favor-
ites to.win this tournament.
OPEN continued on 2B


N\


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Women's No. 1 seed, Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark,
returns to Argentina's Gisela Dulko during their first-round
match at the Australian Open tennis championships in
Melbourne, Australia, on Monday.













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2011 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Michigan St. at Illinois
ESPN2 Colorado at Nebraska
9 p.m.
ESPN Kentucky at Alabama
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Montreal at Buffalo
TENNIS
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, early
round, at Melbourne,Australia
3 a.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, early
round, at Melbourne,Australia

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

Wild Card
Seattle 41, New Orleans 36
N.Y.Jets 17, Indianapolis 16
Baltimore 30, Kansas City 7
Green Bay 21, Philadelphia 16
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday
Pittsburgh 31, Baltimore 24
Green Bay 48,Atlanta 21
Sunday
Chicago 35, Seattle 24
N.Y.Jets 28, New England 21
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 23
Green Bay at Chicago, 3 p.m. (FOX)
Pittsburgh vs. N.Y. Jets, 6:30 p.m. (CBS)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 6
At Arlington,Texas
AFC champion vs. NFC champion,
6:30 p.m. (FOX)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 30 9 .769 -
New York 22 18 .550 8'h
Philadelphia 17 23 .425 13'h
Toronto 13 28 .317 18
New Jersey 10 31 .244 21
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 30 12 .714 -
Orlando 26 14 .650 3
Atlanta 27 15 .643 3
Charlotte 15 24 .385 13'h
Washington 12 27 .308 16'h
Central Division /
W L Pct GB
Chicago 28 13 .683 -
Indiana 16 22 .421 10'h/
Milwaukee 14 24 .368 12'A
Detroit 15 26 .366 13
Cleveland 8 32 .200 19'/
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 35 6 .854 -
Dallas 26 14 .650 8%
New Orleans 26 16 .619 9%'
Memphis 19 22 .463 16
Houston 19 23 .452 16'A
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 27 13 .675 -
Utah 27 14 .659 'A
Denver 23 17 .575 4
Portland 21 20 .512 6'h
Minnesota 10 31 .244 17'A
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 30 12 .714 -
Phoenix 18 21 .462 10'%
Golden State 17 23 .425 12
L.A. Clippers IS 25 .375 14
Sacramento 9 30' .231 19'A
Monday's Games
Chicago 96, Memphis 84
Phoenix 129, NewYork 121
Washington 108, Utah 101
Philadelphia 96, Charlotte 92, OT
Houston 93, Milwaukee 84
New Orleans 85,Toronto 81
L.A. Clippers 114, Indiana 107
Detroit 103, Dallas 89
Golden State 109, New Jersey 100
Atlanta 100, Sacramento 98
Orlando at Boston (n)
Minnesota at Portland (n)
Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers (n)
Today's Games -
Atlanta at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at' Chicago, 8 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Phoenix at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Utah at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Memphis at New Orleans, 8 p.m.


OPEN

Continued From Page 1B

They're the two best play-
ers of the world.
"(But) definitely this per-
formance gives me more
confidence and gives me
enough reason to think that
I can beat anyone."
Caroline Wozniacki start-
ed her first major tourna-
ment as the No. 1-ranked
woman with a 6-3, 6-4 vic-
tory over Argentina's Gisela
Dulko.
Fourth-seeded Venus
Williams advanced 6-3, 6-2
over Sara Errani of Italy
6-3, 6-2. She's the only
Williams sister in the draw
after defending champion
Serena withdrew with an
injured foot.
Justine Henin struggled
against Sania Mirza before
winning 5-7, 6-3, 6-1.


New York at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Denver, 9 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Portland at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Indiana at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25

The top 25 teams in The Associated
Press' college basketball poll, with first-
place votes in parentheses, records
through Jan. 16, total points and last
week's ranking-
Record Pts Pvs
1. Ohio St. (49) 18-0 1,606 2
2. Kansas (6) 17-0 1,526 3
3. Syracuse (8) 18-0 1,523 4
4. Duke (1) 16-1 1,393 I
5. Pittsburgh (I) 17-1 1,382 5
6. San Diego St. 19-0 1,294 6
7.Villanova 16-1 1,265 7
8. Connecticut 14-2 1,148 10
9.BYU 17-1 1,057 II
10.Texas 14-3 1,015 12
SI.Texas A&M 16-1 996 14
12. Kentucky 14-3 975 13
13. Missouri 15-3 758 15
14.Purdue .15-3 672 8
15. Minnesota 14-4 513 -
16. Notre Dame 14-4 495 9
17. Michigan St. 12-5 467 --
18.Wisconsin 13-4 448 20
19. Louisville 14-3 438 18
20.Washington 13-4 409 17
21.WestVirginia 12-4 266 -
22. Saint Mary's, Calif.I 6-2 195 -
23. Georgetown 13-5 146 22
23. Illinois 13-5 146 16
25. Cincinnati 16-2 125 25


Others receiving votes: Temple 99,
Georgia 89, Kansas St. 86, Gonzaga 84,
Colorado 78, UNLV 76, Arizona 70,
Florida St. 64, Vanderbilt 46, Florida
42, St. John's 27, Missouri St. 25, Utah St.
22, Baylor 18, UCF 10, Southern Miss. 8,
Marquette 7,Wichita St. 6, James Madison
4, Butler 2, North Carolina 2, Coastal
Carolina I, Penn St. I.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No.9 BYU vs.TCU, 10 p.m.
No. 12 Kentucky at Alabama, 9 p.m.
No. 17 Michigan State at No. 23
Illinois, 7 p.m.
No. 23 Georgetown at Seton Hall,
7 p.m.

TENNIS

Australian Open singles

At Melbourne Park,Australia
Monday
Men
First Round
Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, def. Daniel
Brands, Germany, 6-2,6-3,6-4.
Robin Haase, Nether4ands, def. Carlos
Berlocq,Argentina, 6-4, 6-3, 7-6 (5).
Juan Monaco (26), Argentina, def.
Simon Greul, Germany, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (4),
6-2.
Kei Nishikori, Japan, def. Fabio Fognini,
Italy, 6-I, 6-4, 6-7 (4), 6-4.
Gael Monfils (12), France, def.Thiemo
de Bakker, Netherlands, 6-7 (5), 2-6, 7-5,
6-2,6-1.
Lukasz Kubot, Poland, def. Sam
Querrey (18), United States, 5-7, 6-2,
3-6,6-1,8-6.
Igor Kunitsyn, Russia, def. Michal
Przysiezny, Poland, 6-7 (I), 6-4, 6-4, 7-6
(6).
Adrian Mannarino, France, def. Ryan
Harrison, United States, 6-4, 6-3, 6-4.
Xavier Malisse, Belgium, def. Pablo
Andujar, Spain, 6-1, 6-2, 7-6 (3).
Frederico Gil, Portugal, def. Pablo
Cuevas, Uruguay, 6-4, 6-7 (7),, 4-6, 6-3,
9-7.
Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def.
Lukas Lacko, Slovakia, 6-1, 6-I, 6-3.
Mardy Fish (16), United States, def.
Victor Hanescu, Romania, 2-6, 4-6, 6-3,
7-5, 6-3.
Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Nikolay
Davydenko (23), Russia, 6-3, 4-6, 7-6
.(4), 6-4,
Andy Roddick (8), United States, def.
Jan Hajek, Czech Republic, 6-I, 6-2, 6-2.
Albert Montanes (25), Spain, def.
Dustin Brown, Germany, 6-4, 6-2, 3-6,
2-6, 7-5.
Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, def. Andrey
Golubev, Kazakhstan, 6-1, 6-4, 6-2.
Nicolas Mahut, France, def. Brian
Dabul,Argentina, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4.
Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, def.
Tobias Kamke, Germany, 1-6, 4-6, 7-6 (6),
6-4, 6-4.
Richard Gasquet (28), France, def.
Frank Dancevic, Canada, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4.
Tommy Robredo, Spain, def. Somdev
Devvarman, India, 7-6 (4), 6-3, 6-4.
Stanislas Wawrinka (19), Switzerland,
def. Teymuraz Gabashvili, Russia, 7-6 (3),
6-4, 6-4.
Viktor Troicki (29), Serbia, def. Dmitry




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


TRENGY

7 """"


TRUJIS
1 r -


Tursunov, Russia, 6-2, 3-6, 6-2, 6-0.
Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic,
def. Marco Crugnola, Italy, 6-4, 6-0, 6-2.
Igor Andreev, Russia, def. Filippo
Volandri, Italy, 6-3, 7-6 (3), 6-3.
Nicolas Almagro (14), Spain, def.
Stephane Robert, France, 6-4, 6-3, 6-7
(4), 7-5.
Benoit Paire, France, def.Flavio Cipolla.
Italy, 6-1, 7-5, 6-1.
Gilles Simon, France, def.Yen-hsun Lu,
Taiwan, 6-7 (3), 6-2, 6-4, 6-2.
Janko Tipsarevic, Serbia, def. Mischa
Zverev, Germany, 6-3, 6-1, 6-4.
Ivan Ljubicic (17), Croatia, def. Peter
Luczak.Australia, 6-3, 6-3, 7-6 (2).
Fernando Verdasco (9), Spain, def.
Rainer Schuettler, Germany, 6-1, 6-3, 6-2.
Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, def. Marcel
Granollers, Spain, 6-1, 6-3, 6-1.
Ivan Dodig, Croatia, def. Ivo Karlovic,
Croatia, 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (5), 4-6, 6-4.
Women
First Round
Maria Sharapova (14), Russia, def.
Tamarine Tanasugarn,Thailand, 6-1I, 6-3.
Evgeniya Rodina, Russia, def. Olivia
Rogowska,Australia, 6-3, 6-1.
Alberta Brianti, Italy, def. Lucie
Hradecka, Czech Republic, 6-4, 7-5.
Monica Niculescu, Romania, def.Timea
Bacsinszky, Switzerland, 6-0, 6-3.
Julia Goerges, Germany, def. Edina
Gallovits-Hall, Romania, 6-3,4-6, 6-3.
Francesca Schiavone (6), Italy, def.
Arantxa Parra Santonja, Spain, 6-7 (4),
6-2, 6-4.
Kaia Kanepi (20), Estonia, def.
Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, 2-6,
6-4,6-3.
Dominika Cibulkova (29), Slovakia,
def. Angelique Kerber, Germany, 6-2, 6-7
(4), 6-4.
Caroline Wozniacki (I), Denmark, def.
Gisela Dulko,Argentina, 6-3, 6-4.
Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, def.
Karolina Sprem, Croatia, 4-6,6-4, 6-2.
Sandra Zahlavova, Czech Republic,
def. Renata Voracova, Czech Republic,
6-3,6-1.
Li Na (9), China, def. Sofia Arvidsson,
Sweden, 6-1I, 7-5.
Rebecca Marino, Canada, def. Junri
Namigata, Japan, 6-2,4-6,6-3.
Tsvetana Pironkova (32), Bulgaria, def.
Pauline Parmentier, France, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3.
Andrea Petkovic.(30), Germany, def.Jill
Craybas, United States, 6-1,6-2.
Virginie Razzano, France; def. Elena
Vesnina, Russia, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3.
Marion Bartoli (15), France, def.
Tathiana Garbin, Italy, 6-0, 6-0.
Regina Kulikova, Russia, def. Daniela
Hantuchova (28), Slovakia, 7-6 (3), 3-6, 9-7.
Vesna Manasieva, Russia, def. Laura
Pous Tio, Spain, 7-5, 6-2.
Jelena Dokic, Australia, def. Zuzana
Ondraskova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-2.
SVenus Williams (4), United States, def.
Sara Errani, Italy, 6-3, 6-2.
Vania King, United States, def. Tamira
Paszek,Austria, 6-7 (4), 6-0, 6-3.
Victoria Azarenka (8), Belarus, def.
Kathrin Worle, Germany, 6-0, 6-2.
Andrea Hlavackova, Czech Republic,
def. Patricia Mayr-Achleitner, Austria,
7-5, 6-4.
Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech
Republic, def. Aravane Rezai (17), France,
6-0,3-6,7-5.
Elena Baltacha, Britain, def. Jamie
Hampton, United States, 3-6, 6-4, 7-5.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (23), Russia, def.
Alison Riske, United States, 6-3, 6-2.
Anne Keothavong, England, def Arina
Rodionova, Russia, 7-5, 6-4.
Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, def. Polona
Hercog, Slovenia, 64, 7-6 (5).
Justine Henin (II), Belgium, def. Sania
Mirza, India, 5-7,6-3, 6-lI.
Yanina Wickmayer (21), Belgium, def.
Jarmila Groth,Australia, 6-3, 2-6, 6-4.
Arantxa Rus, Netherlands, def.
Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States,
6-1,3-6,7-5.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Monday's Games
Boston 7, Carolina 0
New Jersey 5, N.Y. Islanders 2
San Jose 4, Phoenix 2
Calgary at Montreal (n)
Atlanta at Florida (n)
Los Angeles at Dallas (n)
Today's Games
Washington at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Boston at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Nashville at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Toronto at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


WHEN THE SHOPPERS
FEL-T THE MOPEL'5
GOWN, THE DESIGNER.
5AIP IT WA5 ---
Now arrange the circled letters


1L k L I I to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon. 50

Answer here: 514
(Answers tomorrow) H
Yesterday's Jumbles: AFIRE COWER VASSAL BISECT 57
Answer: What the doctor used when his desk chair .,,
squeaked CASTER OIL 1-18


Fusion mines gold

The North Florida Fusion 14-under volleyball won gold on Saturday in the team's first
tournament of the year. It is the first gold for Fusion, which also has 18-under and 15-under
teams this season. The eight-team tournament was hosted by Power Volleyball in Pierson.
Members of the 14-under team, from Lake City, Fort White and Lake Butler, are (front row,
from left) Lillie Sims, Hanna Baker, Ashley Cason, Alanis Koberlein and Kayla Andrews.
Back row (from left) are coach Trudy Andrews, Jemma Thompson, Arianna House,
Ashley Shoup, coach Casie McCallister, Jara Courson, Beth Morgan and Grace Harry.



NBA: 24 and 10 for Lee PREP


Continued From Page 1B


margin.
Emeka Okafor had 17
points and a season-high 16
rebounds, tying a Hornets
franchise record with 12
offensive rebounds.

Bulls 96, Grizzlies 84

MEMPHIS, Tenn.-
Derrick Rose returned
to Memphis with his first
career triple-double, and
Luol Deng scored 28 points
to lead Chicago.
Rose scored 22 points,
handed out 12 assists and
grabbed 10 rebounds.

Rockets 93, Bucks 84

HOUSTON Kevin
Martin scored 36 points
and Houston recovered
from its lowest first-half
point total of the season.
Luis Scola had 19 points
and 14 rebounds for the
Rockets.
Corey Maggette scored
a 25 points for the Bucks.

76ers 96, Bobcats 92

PHILADELPHIA -


ACROSS


Hairpiece
Wine and dine
Mare's
offspring
Buffet standby
Low voice
- vera
lotion
Bureaus
Crawling with
Water-lily
painter
Plunders
Mr. Howard
Solidify
Stared at
Land measure
Hot tub
Fluffy wraps
Mexican Mrs.
15%, often
Prickle
Collapsible bed
Drains, as
energy
Almost grads
Blouse trim


39
40
41
43
46
50
51

54
55
i 56


Andre Iguodala hit the
go-ahead jumper with 37.6
seconds left in overtime,
and Thaddeus Young fol-
lowed with a game-saving
steal for Philadelphia.
Iguodala had 16 points
and 10 rebounds, and Elton
Brand added 13 points and
13 rebounds.
Boris Diaw had a triple-
double for the Bobcats with
25 points, 11 assists and 11
rebounds.

Wizards 108, Jazz 101

WASHINGTON John
Wall had 19 points and a
career-high 15 assists to
lead Washington Wizards.
Nick Young scored 25
points, and Andray Blatche
had 21 points and 11
rebounds.

Warriors 109, Nets 100

OAKLAND, Calif. -
Monta Ellis had 26 points
and nine assists to lead
Golden State.
David Lee added 24
points and 10 rebounds for
the Warriors.


Woody plant
Make public
Fawn parent
Steal
Zeus' shield
Rough it
Negative
reaction
Siberian river
Pilaf base
Opposite of
"paleo"
Not admit to
Thor's father
Earn


DOWN

1 Kapow!
2 Othello's foe
3 Feds (hyph.)
4 Ipso-
5 Cotton gin
name
6 Monsieur's
summer
7 John Passos
8 Wassailers'
tune


Continued From Page 1B

basketball team ran its
record against Tigers
team mascots to 3-1
with wins over Union
County High at home on
Thursday and at Trenton
High on Jan. 7.
The Indians had pre-
,viously beaten Columbia
and split the season series
with Union County.
Fort White (3-8, 0-6)
hosts Newberry High in a
district game at 7:30 p.m.
today.

Columbia basketball

The district slide
reached four games for
Columbia's boys basket-
ball team.
The Tigers lost, 66-53,
to Wolfson High at home
on Saturday, following a
59-41 defeat at the hands
of Fleming Island in
Orange Park on Friday.
Marquez Marshall rode
four 3-pointers to a game-
high 23 points against
Fleming Island.
Columbia (5-12, 2-5)
plays at Ridgeview High
at 7:30 p.m. today.


Answer to Previous Puzzle



AB OUGEDEC


EU RWH 1


RA ORANGES
OL TA IT



D D CEO
CO 0 G TA RE D

KIM USAGE SHE
ESP SAKE TOM


9 Mixed bag
10 Garret
11 Golf pegs
16 Computer
whizzes
19 Writer Harper


21 Daytona 500
sponsor
22 Shredded
cheese
23 Diminishes
24 Not mine
25 What the walls
have?
27 Great
reptile
28 Headliner
29 Gas main
30 Nave neighbor
36 Type
of guitar
38 Commit per-
jury
40 Try for a job
42 Of durable
wood
43 Run quickly
44 Kind of mer-
chandise
45 "- Old
Cow Hand"
47 Posse's quarry
48 Palm reader's
opener
(2 wds.)
49 Whiskey mea-
sure
51 Good pal
52 Pitch in
53 201, to
Claudius


2011 by UFS, Inc.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


19 110 11 I


F-


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2011


-1













WOMEN'S FALL SOFTBALL LEAGUE

Winfield won the Lake City Recreation
Department's Women's Fall Softball
League. Team members are (front
row, from left) Cassandra Smith,
.Keata Bryant, Ashley Lucas,
Pam Hart and Teresa Perry.
Second row (frdm left) are
Debra Perry, Lashonda Middleton,
Kesia Hill, Nyreka Smith,
,Shelia Blocker, Altimeka Pressley,
Kim Gaskins, Denise Griffis and
Mia Carter. Back row (from left) are
Clayton Thomas, Tyrone Bones,
COURTESY PHOTO Oat Davis and Mikerl Felton.










New York Jets wide receiver Braylon Edwards (17) is tackled by New England Patriots
corerback Darius Butler (28) during an NFL playoff game in Foxborough, Mass., on Sunday.



Jets back up bluster
.... ,.. -'- = _. : =o.. ,. -





conrakDru ute -2)drn n F lyf aein.FoborughMas..on.Sunday. -.. r. 7~, ...



Jesback up blute


By HOWARD ULMAN
Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
- All that trash talk didn't
stop the Jets from winning.
So why not keep it
going?
Soon after New York
stunned the New England
Patriots with a 28-21 upset
Sunday, they were already
wagging their tongue's at
the next team standing
in the way of their Super
Bowl goal, the Pittsburgh
Steelers.
The Jets will go for their
third straight road win this
postseason when they face
the third top quarterback in
their three playoff games,
Ben Roethlisberger.
"Big Ben, he's next on our
list," wide receiver Braylon
Edwards said.
The Jets already have
beaten Peyton Manning of
Indianapolis and Tom Brady
of New England to reach the
AFC championship game.
Now they're going for the
trifecta against a quarter-
back who led Pittsburgh to a
31-24 win over the Baltimore
Ravens on Saturday after
trailing 21-7.
"Mission impossible,"
Jets coach Rex Ryan said.
"Now on to round three on
mission impossible."


The Jets (13-5) disguised
their defenses, sacked a
confused Brady five times
and got the first intercep-
tion against him in his last
12 games. Brady had ended
the season with 335 consec-
utive passes without one, an
NFL record.
Now his season is over
and, lie admitted, it's a
shock. After all, the Patriots'
14-2 record was the best
in the NFL entering the
playoffs.
"It's like you're on the
treadmill running at 10
miles an hour and then
someone just hits the stop
button," Brady said. "I think
we're a pretty good football
team, but not when we play
like today."
Bradylosthisthird straight
postseason game and was
outplayed by second-year
pro Mark Sanchez, who
is 4-1 in his playoff career.
Sanchez threw three touch-
down passes a 7-yarder
to LaDainian Tomlinson, a
15-yarder to Edwards and a
7-yarder to Santonio Holmes
- as the Jets took a 21-11
lead two minutes into the
fourth quarter.
Sanchez completed 16
of 25 passes for 194 yards
and no interceptions. Brady
went 29 of 45 for 299 with
two touchdowns and one


interception, throwing more
than he would have liked
because the Patriots trailed
much of the game.
"We treated them with
respect all week, at least
I did with my comments,"
Sanchez said.
Others didn't.
Antonio Cromartie call-
ing Brady an expletive. Bart
Scott said Wes Welker's
"days in a uniform are num-
bered" after the Patriots
wide receiver used several
foot references a shot at
Ryan's foot-fetish video con-
troversy during a press
conference.
Brady was pressured as
much as ever. The defense
allowed the Jets to have
a balanced attack that
produced 120 yards on
the ground, led by Shonn
Greene's 76 on 17 carries.
By the time he got up
from his football pillow
celebration, the excited but
decidedly slower Ryan had
already run down the side-
line waiting to pat him on
the helmet.
"Maybe everybody else
never believed, but we
believed," Ryan said.
"We're moving on. Same
old Jets, back to the AFC
championship. The only dif-
ference is this time we plan
on winning."


Cutler carves up Seattle

By ANDREW SELIGMAN
Associated Press .. .7"


COURTESY PHOTO
TLR was runner-up in the Lake City Recreation Department's Women's Fall Softball
League. Team members are (front row, from left) Barbi Lachance, Tricia Mimbs,
Keeley Swag Murray, Stephanie Jones and Heather Law. Back row (from left) are
Todd Lahance, Holly Barrs, Sherry Williams, Taylor Douglass, Jordan Williams,
Brittany Shear, Jamie Crews, Sarabeth Barthke-Simmons and Drew Law.


COURTESY PHOTO
McKinley and Beggs was third place in the Lake City Recreation Department's Women's
Fall Softball League. Team members are (front row, from left) Becky Skinner,
Marcy Richardson, Michelle Zuhse, Shirley Allen and Wanda Hill. Back row (from left) are
Tracy Barnes, Derby Buchannan, Stephanie Skipper, Taylor Baldwin, Hannah Fortner,
Carolyn Carlotta, Jennifer Hucko, Misty Baldwin and Emy Delgado.


parchable cs.-
4 ,Ads 00ni0


.. www.Iakecityreporter.com
- ,.., Lake City
S "..,. Reporter


Put a little lote in someone's heart this Valentine's Dav n ith the
Lake City Reporter's 'Lore Lines." Make it a special day for those
you lote b. uiriting a message to tour sweetheart. lHe'll include it on
our "Valentine Lowe Line' page on February 13th.


CHICAGO As if the
league's oldest rivalry need-
ed an extra kick, Jay Cutler
and the Chicago Bears gave
it a big one by beating the
Seattle Seahawks 35-24 in
a divisional playoff game
Sunday.
That means they'll host
Green Bay in the NFC
championship game. That's
right, it's Packers and
Bears again, only this time,
a spot in the Super Bowl is
at stake.
"I'm sure there's going
to be a lot of hype around
this game building up to it,"
Chicago linebacker Brian
Urlacher said.
Well, let the hype begin.
Before they could think
about a rematch with Green
Bay, the Bears did their
part against Seattle in their
first playoff game since the
2006 Super Bowl season.
Cutler threw for two
touchdowns and ran for two
more in his first postseason
appearance, and the Bears
pounded the Seahawks
from the start, jumping out
to a 28-0 lead against the
first division winner with a
losing record.
Now, they're staring at a
rather scary No. 6 seed.
Green Bay dominated
top-seeded Atlanta 48-21 on
Saturday behind a superb
effort by Aaron Rodgers,
who threw for 366 yards
and three touchdowns.
"They looked good and
we knew we had to come
out and kind of make a


Roses are red, violets are blue, send Love Lines
to show them that your love is true.
The Lake City Reporter
c-",l Presents: c-


A I P
AO-CT E R ES
ASSOCIATED PRESS


Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler (6) rushes six yards
for a touchdown against the Seattle Seahawks during an NFL
playoff game in Chicago on Sunday.


statement like they did last
night," Bears tight end Greg
Olsen said, "and I think for
the most part we did."
Olsen did his part with
three catches for 113 yards,
including a 58-yard touch-
down in the opening min-
utes that set the tone.
Cutler threw for 274
yards, completing 15 of 28


passes, and finished with a
111.3 rating. When he wasn't
beating the Seahawks with
his arm, he was doing it
with his feet, running for
two touchdowns.
The Bears defense, mean-
while, shut down an offense
that scored 41 points in a
win over defending champi-
on New Orleans last week.


ve


Love Line Rates are as follows:
35 WORDS or less for s12.00 Each additional word 15
Add a photo for 3.00

1 alachi, i
Prn youkrsank h Ier:/,-)I,, mj M I 't
00 /,,,,kat 1. 1 ,,ui t / p ndl the ,' st
~,,t av lli l lt 1, );,1 11L rr0/'11.



Print your message here:


nes


Your Name:
Phone:
Address:
City/State/Zip:
Mail to: Lake City Reporter, Classified Department
PO Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056 755-5440
-_L.. 1- S ANMl'I BE P3 JDAT
F.-.- THE TIME OF PL\CEMIENT.
DLIDLINE IN, FEl. .2011

SLake City Reporter
Ilecourep,:,rnerc m or, -. n .r, T2 ,n ,warn


SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER


v











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES
Itft6 ?CWOP^OM PMTEt. Y RUR.


PO Ou wLre ITAE EoTmL00-oo
", I mFopb 'i \ e" o To Me. 2?
09 'ICAOA v I


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY -


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST




/,h. YOuR' ,,'OEY
I 4ACK ON.-Y
s I F NrOT
I INiCO/rf'.TeLY
J i' LNuSATISFIEP


DEAR ABBY


Handmade cards are reminders

of true meaning of Christmas


DEAR ABBY: I am writ-
ing in response to "Blue
at Christmas" (Dec. 13).
I think the card-making
tradition she has with her
niece is beautiful. In a time
when so many people are
rushed, and so many of us
are focused on finding the
"best deal" for Christmas, it
is wonderful that "Blue" is
teaching her niece the im-
portance of thinking of oth-
ers and spending time with
loved ones. I hope they will
carry on their tradition be-
cause I'm sure many people
look forward to those hand-
made cards and treasure
them every year. LIND-
SEY IN GRANITE CITY,
ILL.
DEAR LINDSEY: If
the avalanche of mail that
poured into my office is any
indication of how popular
homemade cards, are, the
major greeting card com-
panies had better look out.
Read on:
DEAR ABBY: "Blue's"
niece does not need to
hear that she should quit a
project just because some
miserable, jealous "friend"
makes ugly comments
about it. Insulting other
people's efforts, while at-
tempting nothing on her
own, indicates that the
person is unwilling to \tap
into her own creativity and
is jealous of anyone who
does.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
"Blue" should show
those people how much
their opinion really mat-
ters, which is not at all, and
continue their tradition be-
cause they enjoy creating
the cards together. If they
continue, "Blue" and her
niece can learn two Christ-
mas lessons: Traditions are
worth continuing, and what
THEY think, not what oth-
ers think, 6f their tradition
is what matters. CHRIS
IN ATLANTA
DEAR ABBY: I have
sent homemade cards for
some time, for all major
life events. I consider it my
"ministry" because when I
make them and enclose a
personal note in each one,
I'm thinking of and saying
prayers for the recipient.
That poor buffoon who
doesn't grasp the signifi-
cance of a handmade card
doesn't deserve to get one.
- MARGARET IN THE
SOUTH
DEAR ABBY: I'm ap-
palled that "Blue's" dear
friends didn't appreciate
the handmade Christmas


4r 'W- jt


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Making a per-
sonal change that will boost
your morale or bring you
greater confidence will
brighten your day. Be sin-
cere and follow through
with your promises. Love
is in the stars. Live life fully.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Take note of the
way people handle situa-
tions and you will get a good
lesson in how to make bet-
ter choices. Travel and edu-
cational pursuits will allow
you to explore new avenues
and discuss topics of inter-
est with people who have
more expertise. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Being aware of what
others want and what's ex-
pected of you will be half the
battle. You don't want to be
caught in a no-win situation
that ends up costing you
financially. Discipline and
composure will be required.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): There is plenty to
discuss with family and col-
leagues. Lay your cards on
the table and you will find
out quickly who has some-
thing to add to your plans.
Don't let personal responsi-
bilities or burdens stand in
your way. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You'll have trouble


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

concentrating. A serious re-
lationship will have a great-
er chance to go the distance
if you are willing to share
your feelings and make a
promise. Your assessment
of what you have may not be
up to date. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Acknowledging what
will suit your needs will help
you more than you realize.
Talk over your plans with
anyone who can help or who
might be influenced by the
decisions you make. Sched-
ule a meeting with a poten-
tial partner and you will seal
the deal. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You'llhave mixed emo-
tions regarding your future.
Don't combine personal and
work-related matters. Keep-
ing the peace at home will
be difficult but mustn't stop
you from doing what's ex-
pected. An old .plan can be
reworked. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You need a
change in your life. Your
intuition will help you,make,
the right choice. Learn from
'past mistakes and you will
end up in a good position
that is sure to help you
in all aspects of your life.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. -21): You can't
please everyone, so concen-
trate on those who really
count. If you feel the need&
to make changes to your
personal life, don't hem
and haw. The less time you,
spend lingering over the'
inevitable, the better for ev-.
eryone involved. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Expect to be
faced with emotional issues.;
Someone you are close to
will need your undivided at-
tention. Neglect will lead to
negative responses and will
limit.what you can do in the
future. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Finances will lim-
it what you can do. A couple
of changes to your outlook
and your appearance will
help you attract interest,"'
professionally or personally.
You can stabilize your life
by taking on a project that
will lead to, greater income.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Call the shots
before someone else does.
If you don't. take control,
you will only have yourself
to blame. A meeting with
someone who has some-.
thing you need or want can
work in your favor if you are
straight and fair. Draw up an
agreement that will satisfy
you both. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
.Today's clue: J equals W
"BYF DWMT I A M F OL NDW'B ZF
Z D I OW K RWN N I F L L G A B F J Y F I FCF I
TDA KD. MOUF OL B DD LYDI B BD


ZMFWN OW."


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Even if I knew that tomorrow the world would go to
pieces, I would still plant my apple tree." Martin Luther King, Jr.
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 1-18


CLASSIC PEANUTS


\-00's" .-o Wc.I T- T WgN"
l---opeLE o MNJn U TTI S EW
40 S A(.9p-l ME.


- S RI OL YO M B DW


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


cards she and her niece
created. A pox on them all!
But that's too harsh. Those
people have already been
cursed with the taint of.'
commercialism. If a store-
bought card is what it takes
to impress them, maybe
they'll get all they can
stand. Meanwhile, "Blue"
and her niece should con-'
tinue their creative and lov-
ing efforts and send their
blessings to veterans, our
troops, children or elders
in hospitals and homes, or
to others who will appreci-
ate the value of time and'
love. I know I'd appreciated'
one of those masterpieces.
- ROSEMARY IN MUR-
RELLS INLET, S.C.
DEAR ABBY: In no,
way should they stop their
tradition just because one
"Scrooge" put a damper
on things. This is a great
teaching moment for the
aunt to talk with her niece.
about human nature, how,
some people see the glass'
half-full while others see'
it half-empty. We should'
never allow the "half-emp-
ties" to steal the joy we de- ,
rive from the .little things"
in life. MELISSA IN
SPRINGDALE, ARK.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.











Classified Department: 755-5440


SEm
FINDIT~f

1fL-lg


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
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reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
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for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
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special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
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regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
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ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

Il Prinit An Onlein
lvtvv0iolitiid tvronpwtauo'rott


010 Announcements






100 Job

Opportunities
05524764
Suwannee Homecare is seeking
LPN's for an elderly Gainesville
couple for 7am-7pm Days and
weekends will vary This is a
great position to supplement
income Please call Wendy
386-755-1544
Serious inquires only

Experienced Legal
Secretary/Paralegal
5 yrs exp, including
civil litigation, email resume and
salary requirements to:
sportsroof@yahoo.com
Experienced Stylist
needed, apply at
Southern Exposure Salon
386-752-4614
New Generation Christian School
is hiring an elementary teacher.
Minimum of bachelors degree in
education, psychology or other
related field is required.
Please fax application to:
(386) 758-5597 or e-mail to
pgorman@newgenerationschool.org
Residential Carpenters needed.
Must have tools and transporta-
tion. Call 386-623-7063 or
386-496-3873 for information.
Two Hair Stylist needed,
with clientele for Branford salon,
please call Maggie,
386-935-4059
Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630


120 Medical
120 dEmployment

05524758
RN NEEDED
7:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m.
The Health Center of Lake City
has an opening for an RN with
good assessment skills
Excellent Salary
EOE/ADA/Drug
Free Workplace
Apply in person or
send resume to:
The Health Center
of Lake City
560 S.W. McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025

Homecare LPN's &
Homecare CNA's needed for cli-
ent in Lake City, call
Maxim Healthcare Services
352-291-4888

Medical Billing,
several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance Bill-
ing required. Please e-mail resume
to admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net
or fax to 386-755-2169

Physician's Assistant or Nurse
Practitioner needed for new Ur-
gent Care Center in Alachua area,
ER or Urgent Care experience a
plus, but not required. Contact
Paul @ 352-258-4452

240 Schools &
SEducation

04542861
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/17/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


420 Wanted to Buy
DON'T SCRAP
that appliance.
I'll buy it or move it.
386-365-1915
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales


310 Pets & Supplies
AKC GERMAN SHEPPARD
puppy. Born 12/13.
Parents on site. $400.
386-496-3654 or 352-745-1452
Albino Cockatiel w/cage
and supplies $75
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005

401 Antiques
CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621

407 Computers
DELL COMPUTER
$80. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
ASHLEY DINING ROOM
TABLE w/6 chairs and leaf.
$150.00 Great Deal!!!
386-344-5706


440 Miscellaneous

Gas Heater, (four grate)
Dearborn type, $50
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387


440 Miscellaneous
PIGLETS
Black & White
$50 each
386-965-2215
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
719-4802






Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks / Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


728 DUAL SREE AKECTY L 25


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60 etad 586.755.5445 .




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PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JANUARY 18. 2011


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 br/2 full bath SWMH
ready to rent Ft White
$600.mo
386-497-1464 or 365-1705
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
Clean, quiet 3/2 ($625 mo) &
2/1 ($450 mo.) both in Branford
386-590.0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114






Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Nice 4br/2.5 ba, 3 ac. Fenced
Cross Fenced, paved rd., huge
deck, private. McAlpin area. $900
dep. & $950. mo. 386-867-1833

640 Mobile Homes
for Sale

65524745
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Liquidation Sale
2009 Model Homes MUST GO!
Call for FREE color brochures
800-622-2832


710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net


5524833
Get up to $2011 in 2011!
Call for Details
Windsong Apts
386-758-8455
2br/lba house. In town
Close to shopping.
$500. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Large 2br/2ba Duplex.in
nice area with W/D hookup.
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d-hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
2^ For Rent
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Studio Apt. Private. Rent includes
utilities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets For info
call. 386-963-4767 or 292-0385

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04543053
403 Baya Ave...First month's
rent discounted 50%! 3/2
remodeled home on Baya Ave.
1440 sf. with side deck. Pets
considered. $790./mo +
$790./ security
642 SW Chris Terrace...
Located in a nice wooded
subdivision, beautiful 3/2
upscale rental close to Lake City
but far enough out to enjoy your
privacy. $1150./mo plus
$1150. secuirty
315 Piedmont Live Oak...older
4/2 home in downtown Live
Oak. Kitchen remodeled.
$850./mo plus $825. security
881 SW Sunview...Gorgeous
4/2 country home between Lake
City and Ft. White just off SR
47. Mobile home situated on 5
acre comer lot. $900./ mo. plus
$900. security
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co. @
386-365-5884
http://springsrus.com/
Learn about Lake City!

05524832
New Years Dream "Surprise"
Why Rent? Lease to own.
New model home 2 miles S off
47. 3000 sq ft, 4/3, 5% int, is
tax deduc, consider trade-in
386-752-1364

2 br/lba w/Laundry room
w/yard, near airport, $500. mo,
1st, last & $300 sec.
386-752-0335 M-F 8-4
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1000 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport, $825 mo, 1st,
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
S386-269-0123
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Three Rivers Estates, 2/1, CH/A,
2010 W2 and ref's from current
landlord required, $700 month, &
$700 sec dep, 386-497-4699
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus bonus
room. w/1.5 bath. Quail Heights
CC. $750. mo plus $250 damage
dep. 386-752-8553
Turnkey rental, 3/2 split,2 CG, 1/2
acre, quiet neighborhood, close to
1-75, $1050 per month, 1st/last/sec,
386-454-2826 or 954-895-1722

750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd, owner fin, no
down pym't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real- estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.
This nice 4.5 acre parcel has
septic, power & well, older MH
$39.900 MLS 76182
Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty

810 Home for Sale


$569 mo 3Bd/2Ba Moilular
1/2 acre Deck, energy efficient,
appliances, drive, w/$12K down
($640 mo w/ $6K down).
Avail in March
Owner finance or rent to own???
Call (386) 758-9824 hurry
2br/2ba Eastside Village.
Unique floor plan. Lg utility/
work room. Screened front porch.
$55,000 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
3/1 on 4.43 acres, metal roof,
pond on property,
Lease option available
$129,888 Results Realty,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
3br/2ba 80'X125' lot. 1,200 sqft.
Kitchen & bath remodeled, metal
roof, lg fenced back yard. Close to
amenities. $79,900 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Brick home w/1,934 sqft
in Piccadilly Park. 1/2 acre. Lg
playroom, fenced yard. Reduced to
$139,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Custom home. on 5 ac.
where deer & turkey roam.
Lg barn w/enclosed workshop.
$219,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
4/2 in Sub-div, open floor
plan,florida room, porch, fenced,
$150,000 call Missy Zecher
@Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
4/2 on 4 acres, open floor plan, 2
living rms, rec room w/wet bar
$89,900 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
4/3 farm house on 3.95 acres
w/private pond, surrounded by
oaks $689,000 Charlie Sparks,
Westfield Realty MLS#76149
386-755-0808
4br/2ba, 5 ac., 2069 sqft. lg family
& florida rm, den. Covered patio,
workshop. $229,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba, remodeled, views of the
lake. Formal LR, dining room &
family room. Many upgrades.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
67.5 acre farm, fenced, workshop,
pole barn and two ponds, MH
(1984 sq ft) $299,000
call Patti Taylor at
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Affordable, clean home in sub-div,
Freshly painted interior,
This is a must see!
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
BRAND new home, Irg master
suite, 2 miles from US 90,
$179,900 MLS #76449
Carrie CasonWestfield Realty
386-623-2806
Brick home o'n 5 acres,
country feel close to town!
Must See! Results Realty
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473


810 Home for Sale
Clean, cozy, well maintained 3/2
on 1.05 acres, lots of shade trees,
built in 2007, $135.900
Call Patty Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Country Club. 4br/4ba. New roof.
AC, windows. Pool, hot tub.
& greenhouse. $229,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Custom Brick, 5+ ac. 5br/4ba.
4412 sqft. 3 car garage, pool, hot
tub, 3 fireplaces, more. $569,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lori Giebeig Simpson 365-5678
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home
w/oversized garage.
Eastside Village Realty, Inc
386-752-5290
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home
2br/2ba, 1 car garage,.
Eastside Village Realty $83,000
386-752-5290
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home lots of
amenities; clubhouse, pool, spa.
Eastside Village Realty
$89,500 386-752-5290
Excellent area. 3br/2ba home.
1620 sqft. w/covered patio. Lg
front porch & 1 car carport
Lori Giebeig. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
- new cabinets/appliances, close to
schools, $65K 478-391-1592
Large 3/2 brick home w/basement.
2 living areas. porch on 2 lots
$129,900 MLS #74118
386-623-2806 Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty
Large entertaining home, w/pool,
gazebo, huge workshop,
$285,000 Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Large home w/acre of land, lrg
family & florida rooms,
covered porch,
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Move In Ready. 3br/2ba w/1,225
sqft. Comer lot, great S/D.
12x16 workshop w/elec.
Upgrades. $75,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
Nice 3/2 home on 4 acres
close to town $168,000,
Motivated seller MLS#73410
Carrie Cason Westfield Realty
386-623-2806
Nicely remodeled 3/2 on 2 acres,
partially fenced $115,888
Nancy Rogers @
Results Realty
386-867-1271
Open House Sat. 01/22. 10a-4p
215 NW Fairway Hills Glen. Fully
remodeled condo, Unit #9. Golf
Coarse view. Introductory price
$125,000. 386-397-3800/697-1334
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Woodcrest S/D Super location,
nice back yard. 3br/2ba home,
cov-
ered back porch. New AC in 2010
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
WOODGATE VILLAGE.
3br/2ba DWMH.
Close to new elementary
school. $27,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc

820 Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved R4
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190
Commercial property situated
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya Ave 3.27 acres,
$398,888 Results Realty
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
Property cornerr location), easy
access comer, close to downtown,
$94,000 Charlie Sparks
Westfield Realty
386-755-0808 MLS#74814

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
2007 Nissan Titan Crew Cab
only 25,000 miles stock #F28
386-365-7431 Steve Bonesio
Rountree-Moore Ford


97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802






950 Cars for Sale
2008 Cadillac DTS, only 15,000
miles, stock # 245108, pls ask for
Myron Wruble @ 386-755-0630
#292, Rountree-Moore Ford
2010 Grand Marquis, 3 to choose
from stock #F292 Myron Wrubel,
386-755-0630 #292
Rountree-Moore Ford


950 Cars for Sale
2010 Hyundia Sonata GLS.
4dr. S12.999. warranty, auto. stock
#F307 Dwight Twiggs Rountree-
Moore Ford 386-755-0630 #219
Gas Saver. 07 Sporty Honda Fit.
stock #293G. 31 city 40 hwy.
Tommie Jefferson @ 386-209-
8680 Rountree-Moore Ford

952 Vans & Sport
95 Util. Vehicles
2000 DODGE Van. 7pass, Excel..
running cond. Get 22 mph hwy.
Kelly B.B. $5750. Sell for $4550.
386-758-3839 or 386-984-0284
2006 EF250 Ford Van, 3/4 ton,
metal work shelves/ladder rack
60K miles, exc cond, $10,500
386-623-9026


Announcements


Advertise in Over 100 Papers throughout
Florida. Advertising Networks of Florida,
Put us to work for You! (866)742-1373 www.
florida-classifieds.com.

DIVORCE with or without Children
$125.00. With FREE name change docu-
ments and marital settlement agreement. Fast
and easy. Call us 24hrs./7days: (888)789-
0198; www.CourtDivorceService.com


et Connected
-,


www.lakecityreporter.com


;'-' ,, R


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
incflde a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


2008 Johnny Pag
Pink Custom Chopper
200 mi., exc. cond., pink
with white/silver outlined
flames.
$4,500 obo
Call
386-965-0676
Leave message or may text.


In Print,

& Online

One Low

Price!


(877)882-6537 www.oakleytransport.com

Regional Opportunity 100% Owner Op-
erator Reefer Company $1,000.00 SIGN
ON BONUS! Home weekly. Call (800)237-
8288 or visit www.suncocarriers.com

Colonial Life is expanding and looking to
fill 2 positions by January 17- an account
manager and sales manager. Submit resume
to Meredith.Brewer@coloniallife.com or call
(904)424-5697


Miscellaneous


Business Opportunities


DO YOU EARN $800.00 IN A DAY? Your
Own Local Candy Route 25 Machines and
Candy All for $9995.00 All Major Credit
Cards Accepted (877)915-8222 AINB02653


Financial


CASH NOW! Cash for your structured set-
tlement or annuity payments. Call J.G. Wen-
tworth. 1-866-494-9115. Rated A+ by the
Better Business Bureau.

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!!
$$$ As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Drag-
ging? Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs?
Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call
Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.law-
capital.com

Help Wanted

Between High School and College? Over
18? Drop that entry level position. Earn what
you're worth!!!. Travel w/Successful Young
Business Group. Paid Training. Transporta-
tion, Lodging Provided. (877)646-5050.

ASAP! New Pay Increase! 34-46 cpm. Ex-
cellent Benefits. Need CDL-A& 3 mos recent
OTR. (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com

Drivers FOOD TANKER DRIVERS
NEEDED OTR positions available NOW!
CDL-A w/ Tanker REQ'D. Outstanding
pay & Benefits! Call a recruiter TODAY!


AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high
paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if qualified
- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute
of Maintenance (866)314-3769.

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from
Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV certified. Call (877)206-5165,
www.Centura.us.com

Schools & Education

Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program. Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifications and Local Job
Placement Assistance! (877)994-9904


Vacation / Travel


Bring the family! Warm up with our Winter
and Spring specials at Florida's Best Beach,
New Smyrna Beach. See it all at www.NSB-
FLA.com/Specials or Call (800)541-9621





ADOVE tIN NETWORKS OF HOR)iA


(Week of January 17, 2011 )


Fo Mor DtalsCalaar o Bidge

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