The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01354
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: January 16, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01354
System ID: UF00028308:01354
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







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Sunday, January 16, 2011


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Vol. 136, No. 308 E $1.00


Gun goes off in Walmart


Pistol fell to floor
from holster and
discharged.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
A band of police officers
swarmed the Walmart store
Friday night after reports of
a customer firing a gun in
the store were dispatched
to area law enforcement
officials.
A Walmart patron was
allegedly carrying a con-
cealed weapon and the gun
dropped and discharged
one round in the store,
authorities said.
LJ Johnson, 59, 237
Campus Place, was charged


with culpable negligence
and improper exhibition
of a firearm in connection
with the incident. He was
booked into the Columbia
County Jail on $2,000 bond.
According to Lake City
Police Department reports,
around 10:28 p.m. Friday,
officers were dispatched
to Walmart, 2767 NW U.S.
Highway 90, in reference to
a shot being fired inside the
store by a customer.
Officer David Broom
spoke to Walmart staff and
they identified L.J. Johnson
as the customer who had
a concealed firearm and
holster, which fell out and
landed on the floor.
WALMART continued on 5A


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Lake City Reporter
Lake City Police officers David Broom (left) and Brian
Bruenger (right) place L.J. Johnson under arrest late Friday
night outside the Lake City Walmart after Johnson dropped
his pistol inside the store and it discharged.,


A PRAYER ANSWERED


Good Shepherd
helps families
find homes..
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
W workingg with
The Good
Shepherd
of
Northeast
Florida helped Marvin
Anthony of Lake City and
his family move into their
new home just before
Christmas.
"I'm glad to have a
home;" he said. "There
are a bunch more people
that want to own a home.
You've got to do what I do,
pray, clear up your credit
and hopefully you'll get
one."
Anthony is the most
recent of five families to
have received assistance
from the nonprofit organi-
zation.
Good Shepherd is hop-
ing to help many other
local families move into
a home by applying for
$299,998 from the United
States Department of
Agriculture Rural Self-
help Housing Technical
Assistance. .
The financial assistance
is provided to qualified
nonprofit organizations
that aid needy individu-
als and their families to


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Marvin Anthony Sr. tickles his sons while relaxing on the couch Friday afternoon.


build homes in rural areas
by the self-help method.
Money awarded can be
used to hire personnel to
carry out self-help hous-
ing programs, pay for
office and administrative,
expenses, purchase or rent
equipment and pay fees for
training.
Good Shepherd began
three years ago because
of the need to show local
people that they too can
own a home, said Blondell
Johnson, executive direc-


tor.
"They don't always have
to live the way they are liv-
ing," she said. "They don't
have to rent forever."
It offers a self-help hous-
ing program and serves
as a resource for families
buying or repairing a
home through funding,
from the USDA's Rural
Development Single
Family Housing DireGt
Loan Programs. There is
also a program to aid in
home repairs for senior


citizens.
'"We're kind of the*
in-between man," said
Deborah Morehead, board
president.
The organization is com-
pletely volunteer-based,
but volunteers can o0nly
do so much, Johnson said.
The federal assistance
would help pay for the
salaries of three staff mem-
bers director clerical/
bookkeeper and building
HOUSES continued on 5A
JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


H Davon Smith (center)
watches his brothers,
Michael Anthony and
Marvin Anthony, play
WWE SmackDown
vs. Raw 2011 in
their room. 'It's cool
to have fun with my
brothers,' Marvin
Anthony Jr. said. 'I
like the new house
because it's comfort-
able. We've been
praying for this house
and God answered
us.'


Bomb technician

needed to dispose

of old railway

detonators

White Springs
woman found
torpedoes in shed.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
An Alachua County bomb
squad technician was called
to Lake City Saturday after-
noon for the disposal of
close to 20 pounds of rail-
road torpedoes an explo-
sive detonator used from
the 1880's-1950's in the rail- on t
road industry.
Frank Armijo, Lake City
Fire Department assistant TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
fire chief, said a woman An Alachua County bomb
from White Springs brought squad technician places old
the detonators to the fire railroad torpedoes into a
departmentat 3:44 p.m. He secure canister for disposal
said she found them in a Saturday afternoon. A woman
shed at a relative's home. from White Springs brought
"A citizen brought in a fom White Springs brought
popcorn tin that was three- close to 100 railroad torpe-
fourths filled with railway does to the Lake City Fire
Department after she found
DETONATOR continued on 5A them in a relative's shed.


Bandit makes

off with $11,000

worth of jewelry

from Mall kiosk


While employee
was busy, thief
took pendants.
From staff reports
Law enforcement officials
are searching for a suspect
accused of walking up to
a Lake City Mall vendor's
kiosk and walking away
with a gold pendant dis-
play containing more than
$11,000 worth of jewelry,
police department officials
said.
According to Lake City
Police Department reports,
officers were dispatched
to Jewels and Gold, 2469
NW U.S. Highway 90. in
the Lake City Mall, around


12:48 p.m. Friday, in refer-
ence to the theft of gold
pendants.
LCPD investigators were
able to use surveillance
video from the mall and
view an unknown black
man wearing a tan hat, pre-
scription glasses, tan suit
jacket with black pants and
white tennis shoes, walk-
ing away with the pendant
display.
"The suspect walks up
to the counter of Jewels
and Gold where the display
of yellow gold pendants
is, picks up the display
and walks out the mall's
office exit," said Capt. John
JEWELS continued on 5A


Legal proceedings

against Foxx,

Crews under way


Accused of taking
funds from police
department.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Legal proceedings
against a former Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
employee and the depart-
ment's comptroller, who
are accused of misappropri-
ating funds, are set to take
place within weeks, accord-
ing to court documents.
In August, a Columbia


County Grand Jury indict-
ed former sheriff's office
employee Pamela Foxx
with one count of grand
theft of more than $100,000
and one count of official
misconduct and comptrol-
ler Kelly Crews with six
counts of grand theft and
one count of official mis-
conduct.
A Change of Plea
Hearing for Foxx has been
scheduled for 9 a.m., Jan.
31 in the Columbia County
Courthouse.
FUNDS continued on 5A


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011


fMASY :4- FLORIDA

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Saturday:
10-15-20-33 21 1-14-15-21-25 Afternoon: 7-4-0 Afternoon: 8-7-7-4 4-5-12-19-23-49 19-21-23-40-48 PB27
Evening: 2-6-8 Evening: 3-8-1-3


AROUND FLORIDA



Florida Republicans elect Bitner as new chair


LAKE BUENA VISTA
The Republican
Party of Florida
elected former
state Rep. Dave
Bitner as its
new chairman Saturday
and he immediately
looked toward defeating
Democratic Sen. Bill
Nelson and President
Barack Obama in the 2012
election.
Bitner takes over a party
that had one of its best
election years ever, fol-
lowing tumultuous times
.inside the party itself. He
beat state GOP vice chair
Debbie Cox-Roush in a
runoff election after nar-
rowly failing to get more
than 50 percent of the
initial vote in the five-way
race for chairman.
Bitner, 61, served in the
state House from 1992 to
2000, representing Port
Charlotte. He is a former
owner of the Charlotte
Sun-Herald and now
lives in Monticello near
Tallahassee.
In brief remarks after
the vote, Bitner choked up
as he thanked the crowd.
He also pumped up activ-
ists for the next election.
"We are taking our coun-
try back. There is unity
here," Bitner said. "Bill
Nelson is out."
That was a sentiment
repeated by several speak-
ers at the state GOP meet-
ing, where Gov. Rick Scott
addressed the group for
the first time since taking
office this month.
"Hold us accountable,
stay really active, write
the letters and let every-


.L.L..7



t &


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Newly-elected Florida Republican Party Chairman Dave Bitner of Monticello (second from
right) hoists hands with three of the GOP officials he defeated for the state party's top spot
Saturday in Lake Buena Vista. Congratulating Bitner were Sarasota County Chairman Joe
Gruters, Palm Beach County Chairman Sid Dinerstein and Hillsborough County Chairwoman


Deborah Cox Roush of Tampa.

body know you support
our causes," Scott told the
group. "I'm going to do
everything I can to make
you proud, I'm going to
do everything I can to
make sure this is the best
Republican Party in all 50
states."
Less than a year ago the
party was going through
internal turmoil as then
Chairman Jim Greer was
getting ready to resign
under pressure amid alle-
gations he misused party
money. Greer was later
indicted on felony grand
theft, money laundering
and fraud charges.


Bitner will replace
Sen. John Thrasher, who
replaced Greer. Thrasher
said when he was elected
in February that he would
only serve long enough to
stabilize the party through
the November election,
which turned out to be
enormously successful for
Republicans.
In addition to Scott's
victory, Republican Marco
Rubio was elected sena-
tor and the GOP won all
three Cabinet seats and
made gains in the state
Legislature and Congress.
Several people are con-
sidering a run for Senate


against Nelson, who has
served since 2000.

Man with gun gets
into courthouse
FORT LAUDERDALE,
- A man distraught over
child support payments
snuck into the Broward
County courthouse and
held a gun to his chin.
A deputy chased Marin
Stroia upstairs Friday
where he sat on the floor
- a single bullet in the
gun. Judge Joel Lazarus
pleaded with Stroia to
put the gun down so they


could talk. The 59-year-
old surrendered and was
charged with aggravated
assault.
Lazarus said he was
upset about his divorce
and needed someone to
listen.
Witnesses said earlier
they watched Stroia step
out of line and try to
bypass courthouse metal
detectors. He slipped
through the exit door as
someone was leaving.
Court deputies said they
frequently stop people
from trying to enter
through the exits. They're
advocating to have lock-
able, one-way revolving
exit doors installed.

Man shot during
robbery dies
DEERFIELD BEACH
- A South Florida man
has died after being shot
during a robbery attempt
at a golf course.
Authorities said 35-year-
old Lataurus Randall was
shot in the back Thursday
evening by two masked
men on the 17th hole of
the course at the Deerfield
Country Club. Randall
died Friday from his inju-
ries.
Police said Randall was
playing alongside another
man when two men in ski
masks approached and
attempted to rob them.
Randall was shot by one of
the men during that alter-
cation. Randall's golfing
partner was unharmed.
The suspects fled into a
nearby neighborhood.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Octomom admits she was baby addict


LOS ANGELES
ctomom" Nadya
Suleman told Oprah
Winfrey she was addict-
ed to having children
and was "self-medicat-
ing through babies" when she gave
birth to octuplets in 2009.
Suleman appeared on "The Oprah
Winfrey Show" Friday for a financial
intervention from money guru Suze
Orman. She has been plagued with
money problems and threatened
with eviction from her Southern
California home.
Suleman said she felt a "hole" after
six children and wanted more, but
that after 14 kids the hole remains.
When Suleman said she paid for
in vitro fertilization through savings,
Orman replied, "Lie, lie, lie!" and
said she had seen Suleman's financ-
es and insisted she had borrowed
the money.
Orman heatedly urged Suleman to
give up private school and excessive
gifts for her children, and a personal
trainer and manicures for herself.


Aretha Franklin says her
health is 'superb'
DETROIT A month after sur-
gery in Detroit for an undisclosed .
ailment, Aretha Franklin says her
health is "superb." Franklin called in
to Wednesday's installment of "The
Wendy Williams Show," telling the
host she was relaxing at a casino
hotel in her hometown and hopes to
begin traveling soon, saying she'll
be "looking for a fabulous beach."
She said she has two more weeks
of down time as she continues her
recovery.
The legendary singer also vowed
to reschedule the concert dates she
missed.
Franklin's voice was strong and
steady during the interview, and she
hinted she was dating someone.
With the exception of written
statements and print interviews with
Jet magazine, this was one of the first
times the 68-year-old Franklin has
been heard since the Dec. 2 surgery.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this 2009 file photo, Nadya Suleman, the mother of octuplets, leaves her
home in Whittier, Calif. Suleman may be able to avoid eviction from her Southern
California home for at least a month. The co-founder of adult film company Vivid
Entertainment has offered to pay her February mortgage while he considers
whether to buy the La Habra home.

Report: Gabor recovering blood clots throughout her body.
Blanchette said the wounds wouldn't
well after surgery heal, so doctors had no choice but to
LOS ANGELES Doctors are operate.
LOS ANGELES Dotors are "Ms. Gabor needed an amputa-
keeping a close watch on Zsa Zsa tion above her nee due to poor
Gabor who was resting comfortably circulation and a large ulcerated
as she recovered from surgery to area on her right leg," Rigberg said.
amputate her right leg an opera- "After on hsuting with her husband,
tion that doctors said was necessary Frederic Prnsinz von Anhalt, we felt
to save her life, her publicist says. this was the best medical course of
Gabor's blood pressure and heart action."
rate were normal and she was doing In August, Gabor was in critical
wel late Friday In August, Gabor was in critical
well late Friday, John Blanchette condition and asked for a priest dur-
said. He said she'll be in the hospital ing a hospital visit. She recovered '
for another week or two and hopeful- and returned home.
ly will be home by her 94th birthday Gabor has used a wheelchair since
on Feb. 6. she was partially paralyzed in a 2002
'The surgery today (Friday) went car accident, and she had a stroke in
well, however, she is in frail health ri2005.
so we will continue to monitor her She retreated from the spotlight
closely," said Dr. David Rigberg, a he accident and stroke. She
associate professor of vascular liked staying home and watching
surgery at Ronald Reagan UCLA soap operas gahome shows and oldw
Medical Center. He said there were soap operas, husband von Anhalt told
no complications during the surgery. reporters in July. She detested hav-
Gabor broke her hip and had reporters in July. She detested ha-
replacement surgery in July, and ing her picture taken by the paparaz-
replacement surgery in July, and zi while she was in her wheelchair.
has been hospitalized several times
since for swelling in her legs and 0 Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Author William Kennedy,
is 83.
* Author-editor Norman
Podhoretz is 81.
* Opera singer Marilyn
Horne is 77.
* Hall of Fame auto racer
A.J. Foyt is 76.
* Singer Barbara Lynn is 69.
* Country singer Ronnie


Milsap is 68.
* Country singer Jim Stafford
is 67.
* Movie director John
Carpenter is 63.
* Actress-dancer-choreogra-
pher Debbie Allen is 61.
* Actor David Chokachi is
43.
* Actress Josie Davis is 38.


Daily Scripture

"To the Jews who had believed
him, Jesus said,'If you hold to
my teaching, you are really my
disciples.Then you will know
the truth, and the truth will set
you free."


-John 8:31-32


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Lake City Reporter
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82.80
79.40


Police continue to
search for both assailants.

Jail deputy injured
in inmate fight
TAMPA A Tampa jail
deputy is recovering after
breaking his leg while try-
ing to break up an inmate
fight.
Thirty-five year-old
deputy Greg. Brown tried
to radio for help after two
inmates began fighting
Friday. Authorities said
Brown tackled one of the
inmates to the floor and
broke his leg in the pro-
cess.
.The inmates were
removed from the general
population. Detectives are
investigating to see wheth-
er to file charges against
the inmates.
Brown was taken to the
hospital and may need
surgery.

1 person dead in
early house fire
PLANT CITY An
early morning fire has
left one person dead at a
southwest Florida home.
Hillsborough County
Fire Rescue said it took 20
minutes to extinguish the
blaze engulfing the wood-
frame Plant City home
Saturday. Rescuers found
one person dead inside.
It's not clear whether they
were a resident.
Authorities are inves-
tigating what caused the
fire.

* Associated Press


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













Youth event honors King's legacy

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter

Love A Horse Project meeting
Ronen Daar (from left), gets instructions from 4-H Horse Club
group leader Jennifer Powers on how to make a fossil print,
as Jacob Merritt, Ora Daar and Beyonce Jones-Reed look
on. The children were attending a Love A Horse Project Club
meeting Saturday at the Columbia County extension service
office.



Former IDA could

get more funds

under county rule


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

The Columbia County
Industrial Development
Authority now known
as the Columbia County
Economic Development
Department could
receive more funding since
it is under county control,
officials said recently.
The entity officially
became a county depart-
ment Wednesday.
Since the IDA is no longer
a dependent taxing district,
the new department could
have resources within the
county budget reallocated
to it, said Dale Williams,
county manager.
When the county unani-
mously adopted the IDA
transition plan Jan. 6, it
adopted the same budget
for the new department
that the IDA had for fiscal
year 2010 to 2011 about
$540,000.
"MThiee's been "a 'long,
ongoing debate about
whether the IDA is proper-
ly funded or not," Williams
said. "I'm kind of in hopes
that by working more
closely with Jim (Jim Poole,
department executive direc-
tor), we can make sure that
he gets the resources that
he needs to do the job as
best as it can be done."
Taxes would not be
raised to accomplish that,
Williams said.
"No, I don't think so, not
in this economy (would
taxes be raised)," Williams
said, "but Jim may get a
bigger share of what's out
there. The county commis-
sion has made it pretty clear
that they've joined a lot of
other politicians in saying
they want to do as much
as they can to help with


employment. I think if they
feel like better funding a
department will do that, not
that they will increase taxes
to do it, but they will cer-
tainly reallocate the money
they have to do it."
The IDA will most likely
no longer appear on the
next tax bill, Williams
said.
"The Board of County
Commissioners' mill-
age rate would increase
because you're folding the
IDA, but the IDA's mill-
age rate would go away'
or decrease at the same
number," he said.
Poole has been charged
with informing the county
if he needs more staffing
in the economic develop-
ment department, Williams
said.
Gina Reynolds, IDA dep-
uty director and Poole's
only staff member, will
leave the IDA since she
was recently hired as the
new chief executive offi-
cer for Florida's Heartland
Regional Economic"
Development Initiative
Inc.
"Gina's position is
obviously funded in this
year's budget, so we 'know
that money is inclusive,"
Williams said. "As far as
more than one addition-
al staff person, it has to
depend on the justifica-
tion. We have to see what
we're trying to accomplish
and then we try to justify
what we need based on
the goal."
Poole's title in the
department will stay the
same, Williams said, and
he will serve as a depart-
ment head.
"I have no intention
of changing his title," he
said.


Public hearing

scheduled for natural

gas rate adjustments


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Residential customers
could see a decrease in
their natural gas prices.
The City of Lake City
Council is holding its first
public hearing for proposed
adjustments to the natural
gas rates and charges at 7
p.m. Tuesday at City Hall.
A rate study began in
2008 for natural gas and
was continued in 2009 after
finding some problems,
said City Manager Wendell
Johnson.
The study ultimately
discovered that resident
customers paid a high rate
compared to the average
of their peer group, or
similar size cities, he said.
Commercial rates a lower
than members of their peer
group.
In the -proposed ordi-
nance the monthly custom-
er charge would be $10 per
month for residential and
$25 for commercial.
Two hearings will be
held for the community


to express any thoughts
or concerns on the ordi-
nance.
Johnson said he thinks,
residential customers will
be pleased with the pro-
posed decrease.
If approved, the new
rates would go into effect
March 1.
"This is something we
needed for quite a while
to establish equity for the
.structure with residential
and commercial," he said.
Other business to be
discussed:
Council will consid-
er a contract to receive
access to the Everbridge
Mass Communication
System for delivery of mes-
sages to multiple members
through multiple commu-
nication paths between the
city and Everbridge Inc.
for $13,034.
A staff recommenda-
tion to contract with an
online utility exchange
debt collection agency will
be considered.
The fire union con-
tract will be discussed.


A local celebration honoring the
Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. has
become an annual tradition.
The tradition continued Saturday when
local youths sang, performed praise
dances and listened to stories about how
Dr. King and his dream impacted the
lives of Lake City residents, as well as
people across the globe.
The program, The Presley Lane
Community Youth Group Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. birthday observance
Youth Extravaganza, was held at
Olivet Missionary Baptist Church
with several people in attendance.
Former City of Lake City council
member Bettye Lane gave the young-
sters a brief history of Dr. King as she
delivered the event's occasion.
Lane told the audience what she
was doing and described the atmo-
sphere of Lake City when local resi-
dents learned that King had been
shot on April 4, 1968.
"I got a feeling in the bottom of
my stomach," she said. "It was like
that all over Lake City. I never felt so
angry and never felt so much frustra-
tion. It was a bad feeling."
Lane's comments, which empha-
sized King's legacy and his influence
around the world, were followed by
the program's events.
Schara Wilson, a youth direc-
tor and musician at Faith Temple
Ministry, sang a selection during the


.




TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Members of the New Day Springs Missionary Baptist Church Youth Choir perform
a praise dance during the Presley Lane Community Youth Group Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Birthday Observance Youth Extravaganza.


program. She later explained why she
'felt it was important to take part in
the program.
"I feel that it was important to let
my light shine for the youth and to
let them know there is a good time in
serving the Lord and there's purpose
in it," she said. "It's important to have
an event like this because kids need
to be aware of the importance of us as
a people; who we are, what our foun-
dation is -and where we come from.
It's very important that we instill it
from generation to generation as a
culture, so we can carry those val-


ues and beliefs and remain and stay
strong."
Jordan Hill, of the Faith Temple
Harvest of Life Ministry, performed
a praise dance and sang during the
program.
She said she was motivated to take
part in the event to help inspire local
youths so they could learn about Dr.
King and their culture.
"It was fun participating in the
event," she said. "I got to dance,
show my talent and sing, so I enjoyed
myself. It's good for us kids to learn
about Dr. King."


^frHabitat fQr IHmanity,.qe,
S-- CtyCoumbia County, Inc. or'
Habitat for Humanity of Lake CitylColumbia County, Inc". 'For


o rOs: fa i ,J e S. * S I








Habitat for Humanity List of Donors


A.C.E. Heat & Air Glen Maples


Lake City Christian Center


A-1 Electric Lake City Industries Building Services
Abe Pallas Lake City Management Group
Al's Painting Al Ringer Lake City Medical Center
American Society of Civil Engineers Lake City Reporter
Anderson Columbia Lake City/Columbia County Young
ASC Geosciences, Inc. Larry & Janet Lee
Carole B. Brown Emerging Professionals (YEP)
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Lowes
City of Lake City Marcotek Xerox Digital Office Solutions
Columbia Concrete Ready Mix Mini Storage of Lake City
D. W. Turner Moe's Southwest Grill
Darrell W.' Hunt Morrells
Debra Robarts Natash Day Cintas
Evacheck's Tree Service Newman Media 96.5 Bill Madden/John Newman
First Federal Keith Leibfred Parkview Baptist Church
First Presbyterian Church Paul LeClair
Florida Pest Control Pelioni's Plumbing '
Freeman Design Group Pure Plumbing Service
Ft. White Middle School Student Council Sally Huggins
Gary & Christine Noland Scott Lamb
Gateway Safety Severn Trent Services
George & Sheila Burnham Sherwin Williams Paint
Home Depot Smart Liquidations
Imperial Countertops & Design Southland Waste Services
James & Mary Ellen Bolton Square D Electric
James Montgomery Steve Thomas Electric
Jimmy Johnston/Hometown Homes Target Distribution Center
John & Mary Melum Wayward Ministries
John Bispham Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church
Kurt Ruppert Tree Service Whirlpool Corp
Lake City Board of Realtors Yale Residential Security Products, Inc.


.- Habitat for Humanity
Habitat for Humanity of Lake City/Columbia County, Inc. j

For more information on Habitat for Humanity, visit our web site at www.hfhlakecity.org, leave a message
on our answering machine at 386-755-0014, write to us at Habitat for Humanity of Lake City/Columbia
County, Inc., PO Box 487, Lake City, FL 32056, or email us at musicladylo@windstream.net.


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011'


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













OPINION


Sunday, January 16, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


OTHER
OPINION


Oil disasters

cost more

than

prevention

Offshore oil disas-
ters, more expen-
sive than preven-
tion
The BP
Deepwater Horizon oil spill
put nearly 5 million barrels
of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.
Congress has a presidential
panel's report to guide reme-
dial efforts to improve industry
operations and ensure credible
regulatory oversight.
Congress controls the future
of offshore drilling. Even in an
era of budget cutting and deficit
control, the federal government
must invest in an overhaul of
drilling regulation and over-
sight.
The April 2010 disaster in the
Gulf of Mexico is consuming
vastly more money to repair
the damage than it would cost
to prevent another oil rig explo-
sion, with its grievous loss of
life and environmental and eco-
nomic catastrophes.
The scariest conclusion of
the presidential panel investi-
gating the disaster is that it was
not a typical accident grounded
in reckless behavior, fatigue or
poor training.
Instead it was the byproduct
of corner-cutting choices made
by BP, Transocean, Haliburton
and subcontractors seeking'
to speed up production and
save money. Bad practices
and procedures went unchal-
lenged inside the companies,
the industry and by a veneer of
regulation.
The final report of The
National Commission on the
BP Deepwater Horizon Oil
Spill and Offshore Drilling is
398 pages, but the theme of
the report is summed in these
words:
... changes in safety and
environmental practices, safety
training, drilling technology,
containment and cleanup tech-
nology, preparedness, corpo-
rate culture, and management
behavior will be required if
deep water energy operations
are to be pursued in the Gulf
- or elsewhere."
Failure to learn from this
disaster is not an option.
* Seattle Times


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Hard to feel sorry for DeLay


WASHINGTON
Ifs not easy to like former
Rep. Tom DeLay, given
his Kung Fu approach
to politics during the
years in this town he
served as the leader of House
Republicans, years in which he
made a major contribution to
the atmosphere of incivility that
exists in Congress today. He
gave no quarter and asked for
none and he clearly skirted the
edge of propriety if not legality
in his dealings with lobbyists.
But the Justice Department,
after a lengthy investigation,
decided not to prosecute him
for his relationship with the
notorious K Street influence
peddler Jack Abramoff. And,
like it or not, there are no laws
for viewer relief for the Texas
"Hammer's" performance on
television's "Dancing with the
Stars."
DeLay's Democratic oppo-
nents in his home state took
umbrage at his manipulative
nature and the election of
Republicans to the state's leg-
islature and now the former
king of the Hill faces a term in
prison. A famously aggressive
Democratic prosecutor, Ronnie
Earle, and DeLay's other ene-
mies seized on a Texas law obvi-
ously aimed at drug dealers and
won a conviction on a charge
of conspiracy to commit money
laundering.
For those not following this
bizarre case, the ex-congress-
man was nailed for channeling
$190,000 worth of corporate
contributions through the
Republican National Committee
to sanitize it, a practice that
goes on daily in politics where
money is shifted frequently. The


Dan K.Thomasson
same amount was then sent
back to Texas to support candi-
dates for the legislature there.
Corporate contributions to those
running for the legislature are
illegal in Texas. The result of
this alleged sleight of hand was
a GOP legislature and passage
of congressional redistricting
that favored the Republicans.
Earle's successor in the prose-
cutor's office continued the case
and won the conviction that a
judge recently translated into
10 years probation on one count
and three years in prison on
another.
The unrelenting prosecutors
actually had wanted a 10-year
sentence so that during the
appeal process DeLay would not
be eligible for parole. But that
was a bit severe even for the
judge, who may have rejected
the notion that she was dealing
with the crime of the century.
DeLay after all had not been
accused by anyone of personally
profiting from his maneuvers.
There was no charge of bribery
or other corruption. DeLay's
attorneys believe the conviction
will be over turned. There cer-
tainly is substantial opinion that
the money laundering law was
stretched to the breaking point
in this case, that its intent was
not to criminalize politics.
The former congressman's
contention that he is a victim


of political retribution seems
also to have some validity. The
Democrats were infuriated
by their loss of control of the
redistricting process and there
is little doubt they vowed to
do something about it. On the
other hand, DeLay left himself
wide open by his own admitted
arrogant behavior and shifty
deals. But he said that he is
being persecuted for his politi-
cal prowess and not something
he did wrong and about which
he can't be remorseful. His fam-
ily, his fortune and his career
have been seriously damaged
by all this.
It is difficult, however, to feel
terribly sorry for DeLay or to
applaud the brand of liver-incis-
ing politics that'he practiced so
well for so many years. It is also
not easy to like the prosecu-
tors in this matter, particularly
those who initiated the action
under highly suspicious motiva-
tion. Texas is a state with a his-
tory of wild and woolly politics.
Remember Lyndon Johnson
won a Senate seat on the
strength of a missing ballot box.
One probably shouldn't
expect a quick answer to this.
The appeal will take some time
and depending on the outcome
possibly move through more
.than one court. His lawyers
contend the conviction will not
stand and DeLay is free on bond
until the appeal process has
taken its course.
Meanwhile, it seems, rightly
or wrongly one should not
ignore that famous old admoni-
tion not "to mess with Texas."

* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


t' ' ** '*/
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OTHER OPINION

Shutting Guantanamo would enhance US safety


The tug of war
between President
Obama and
Congress over the
military-run prison
at GuantAnamo became stickier
last month when the president
felt obliged to sign a defense
authorization bill barring the
use of Defense Department
funds to transfer terror suspects
to the United States for trial.
Mr. Obama reluctantly signed


the bill, but insisted his hand
was being forced by Congress
and vowed to continue efforts to
close down the island prison.
An argument can be made that
the president was wrong to cave
in to this legislative bullying he
could have vetoed the bill and
dared lawmakers to withhold
funds for the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan if they refused to
send him a clean bill. That would
have set the stage for a messy


political confrontation, though.
Or he could have issued a
Bush-style "signing statement"
declaring that he would ignore
those provisions of the bill that
he did not agree with. We disap-
proved of this tactic when it was
used by Mr. Bush because it is a
provocative extension of execu-
tive power into the legislative
realm. Mr. Obama is right to
steer clear of such tricks.
E Miami Herald


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com


The Chinese

model of

raising

children?

Why Chinese
WMothers Are
Superior"' is
the provoca-
tively titled
piece by Amy Chua that ran
recently in The Wall Street
Journal. The article was
excerpted from her new mem-
oir, "Battle Hymn of the Tiger
Mother."
The Yale law professor
writes that her teenage daugh-
ters are wildly successful.
Why? Because they were
raised the Chinese way in the
United States.
The piece unleashed a fire-
storm, and no wonder. Chua
says that her girls were never
allowed to have a play date,
have a sleepover, play anything
but the piano and violin, com-
plain about playing the piano
or violin, get anything less -
than an "A" in any academic
subject, choose their own
extracurricular activities, show
disrespect to their parents, and
so on.
That's why one daughter has
already played the piano to an
audience at Carnegie Hall.
It's exhausting just reading
the piece. And as a mom of
four kids, probably none of
whom knows what Carnegie
Hall is, there's a bit of a "dial-a-
letdown" element.
Chua writes: "What Chinese
parents understand is that
nothing is fun until you're
good at it To get good at any-
thing you have to work, and
children on their own never
want to work, which is why it
is crucial to override their pref-
erences."
Wow. I've long argued that
the Western model for raising
children has become deeply
flawed and indulgent. The
Chinese culture may have a
lot to teach us in particular
about the nonsensical "self-
esteem" movement, perhaps
one of the most self-destruc-
tive parenting and educational
trends of recent Western gen-
erations. (According to Chua,
Chinese parents aren't afraid
to tell their children that they
stink at something.)
But the Chinese model? No,
thanks.
For starters, I often say that
my ultimate goal for my chil-
dren isn't Harvard, but heaven.
So, obsessively focusing on
and valuing academic and
musical success, idolizing it for
its own sake, holds no appeal
to me in any event.
But that aside, the Chinese
model is not necessarily "supe-
rior" even on the face of it.
Clearly, it can produce a lock-
step mindset that means that
communism was able to take
hold in China during much
of the 20th century. That may
be essentially over and their
economy increasingly success-
ful, but that same inside-the-
box thinking is why Bill Gates,
Steve Jobs, Michael Dell and/
or a cure for cancer will never
come from China.
We've long raised children as
individuals. Now, in recent years
I've become less convinced that
that's a great thing in and of
itself. I think that without the
right spiritual grounding, indi-
vidualism can become narcis-
sism pretty quickly
At some level, I think even
Chua would agree. I've noticed
that she teaches at a U.S. uni-
versity and brought her daugh-
ters up in the United States,
not in China.


* Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes
a Parent" radio show on
WYLL-AM 1160 in Chicago.


4A


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FUNDS: Legal proceedings against alleged thieves

Continued From Page IA A.


Foxx previously
entered a written
plea of not guilty,
but during a Nov. 19
pretrial conference,
her attorney indi-
cated Foxx would be
changing her plea on Crews
Jan. 31 as part of a
plea agreement.
The indictment against Foxx
alleged that between 2002 and April
2010, Fox:x stole cash that had been
entrusted to her from the sheriff's


The pistol discharged
through the holster and
the bullet went into an
unknown location.
"The immediate area
and the surrounding areas
were searched for evi-
dence of where the bul-
let had traveled. No one
was injured," said Capt.
John Blanchard, Lake City
Police Department public
information officer, in a
prepared statement.


office. It also charged .
Foxx with making
false entries on offi- ,
cial records dealing .
with those funds. ..
Foxx was arrested
early in the investiga-
tion, April 24, after Fox
admitting during an
interview with detectives to taking
funds to which she had access and
depositing them into her personal
account, according to police reports.
Crews, who was placed on admin-


LCPD Capt. Robert
Smith said the gun was a
silver, .22-caliber pistol.
Smith said Johnson was
close to the food section of
the store, about 30-40 yards
from the front of the store,
when the gun fell and dis-
charged.
"He (Johnson) was walk-
ing towards the bathrooms
of the store," Smith said.
Authorities were uncer-
tain how many people were


in the immediate vicinity
of Johnson when the inci-
dent occurred, but Smith
said the store was opened
for business and there was
customers in the area.
Although customers
were near the area when
the gun went off, authori-
ties said there was no rush
of customers attempting to
flee from the store at the
sound of gunfire.
"People were ducking


istrative leave without pay from the
sheriff's office pending the outcome
of the case, is scheduled to have her
pretrial hearing 9 a.m. Feb. 7.
She is charged with six counts of
grand theft and one count of official
misconduct in her case. Crews was
arrested in August.
William Whitley, the assistant state
attorney prosecuting the case, said
Crew's case remains in the discovery
phase and her attorney is taking depo-
sitions from the state's witnesses.


DETONATOR: Found explosive devices in shed

Continued From Page 1A


detonators (railroad torpe-
does)," he said. "She brought
them in not knowing exactly
what they were and we took
the container, isolated it and
marked-off an area just south
of the fire department."
The container had close
to 100 railroad torpedoes
and Armijo estimated that
40 percent of that was the
explosive portion of the
devices.
"It was about 15 16
pounds of devices, but only
about 4-6 pounds of explo-
sives," Armijo said.
Officials used yellow police
tape to cordon off close to
an acre in the parking area


near the fire department and
waited for a member of the
Alachua County Bomb Squad
to arrive to handle the devic-
es.
Armijo said Lake City
Fire Department Battalion
Chief Tim Wes4bury
researched the Internet for
hazardous materials and
was able to get some facts
on railroad torpedoes.
After fire department offi-
cials learned of the dangers
associated with the devic-
es, the Columbia County
Emergency Management
office was notified and its
acting director, Columbia
County Fire Chief Tres


Atkinson, notified state
officials and the Lake City
Police Department.
'The Lake City Police
Department called the
bomb squad from Alachua
County and he responded
immediately and took pos-
session of the explosive tor-
pedoes," Armijo said.
He said the railroad tor-
pedoes are loud enough
for a railroad conductor in
the 1800's to hear over a
locomotive's engine.
"It takes the weight of
the training running it over
to make it go off," Armijo
said. "Had they detonated
they would be loud enough


to do some damage to
buildings surrounding
us as far as windows and
structural stuff, that's what
the Alachua County bomb
technician is telling me."
The Alachua County
bomb technician, which
arrived shortly after 5
p.m., placed the devices in
secured containers and car-
ried them to the Alachua
County Law Enforcement
facility, Armijo said.
Officials cautioned any-
one who finds explosives
to leave them where they
are found and to call emer-
gency responders as soon
as possible.


and they were concerned
about the noise," Smith
said, noting there was no
stampede or anything of
that nature. "I would char-
acterize it as a bunch of
concerned individuals who
heard a gunshot."
Johnsonwas arrested and
booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility.
His pistol was placed into
evidence, reports said.


COURTESY PHOTO

CHS stars at All-American Game
Columbia High students Timmy Jernigan and Colleen Heeney
wait for the U.S. Army All-American Game to begin 6n Jan. 9.


HOUSES: Good Shepherd

Continued From Page 1A


co-coordinator and other
approved expenses.
Receiving funding for
personnel will help Good
Shepherd focus even more
on getting 16 families into
homes within the next two
years, Morehead said. She
and Johnson have both had
to use personal funds to
support the organization.
"We've been trying to
get Good Shepherd on
the road for quite a while
now," she said. "This is the
first step forward."
The organization wants
to improve the living stan-
dards and quality of life for
people in the community,
Johnson said. Owning a
home is an important goal
for many families.
"People want to leave
something to their families
and not pay rent consis-
tently for years and not


have anything they can call
their own," she said.
The financial assistance
could come within the next
six months, Morehead
said. Good Shepherd wants
to help as many families
as possible get into homes
before funding is eliminat-
ed with government cuts.
'We hope to be a very
positive thing for the com-
munity," she said.
The Good Shepherd
of Northeast Florida
wants it programs to con-
tinue to grow, not only in
Columbia but Suwannee
and Hamilton counties,
Johnson said.
"If we all think back on
where we've been, we have
to be able to grow, and
that's the goal," she sad.
'"The goal is to help these
families, grow and create a
better life."


JEWELS: Bandit escapes

Continued From Page 1A


Blanchard, LCPD public
information officer, in a pre-
pared statement.
Law enforcement author-
ities have indicated local
pawn shop have been noti-
fied and a be on the lookout


advisory was issued to sur-
rounding counties for law
enforcement assistance.
Anyone having informa-
tion about the incident can
call the Lake City Police
Department anonymously


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Eating healthy foods.


A daily helping of exercise -

And regular wellness screenings.

Cancer stay out of my way!


COMMUNITY
CANCER CENTER
OF NORTH FLORIDA


GAINESVI.LE.* LAKE CITY

(386) 755-0601 cccnf.com


WALMART: Gun dropped and goes off in store

Continued From Page 1A


,, Ray za,md POOa 4.ta,,e


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


4










.LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011 Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today
Blood drive
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is coming to
Ole Times Country Buffet
11 a.m. 6 p.m. today.
Each donor receives a free
backpack, 10 percent off
the buffet and a chance to
win an Apple iPad.

MLK Observance
Program
The 26th annual
Martin Luther King Jr.
Observance Program is
4 p.m. today at Mount
Pisgah A.M.E. Church.
The program is hosted
by the Columbia County
Branch NAACP and hon-
ors king, a slain-civil rights
leader. The keynote speak-
er for the event is the Rev.
J. T. "Billie" Simon, pastor
of Greater Popular Springs
Missionary Baptist Church
in Jasper. The church
is located at 924 NE
Washington St.

Painting exhibit
The Art League of
North Florida is sponsor-
ing an exhibit of paintings
by member Kathleen
Giddens from now
until Feb. 4 at the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
Levy Center hours are 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday.

Monday
"-'"-ue items wanted
,ie Ohio Valley
Refinery & Roadshow is 9
a.m. 6 p.m. Jan, 17-21
at Fairfield Inn & Suites,
538 SW Corporate Drive.
The roadshow travels
across the globe in search
of rare and unique items.
Local residents will have
the opportunity to sit with
experts from around the
world and sell their items
to collectors. Call 217-726-
7590.

MLK Parade
The Northeast Florida
Leadership Council is
hosting its Annual Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Parade 10 a.m. Jan. 17
beginning at DOT. The
parade will end at the field


TODD WILSON/Lake City Reporter

Lake City Reporter staff members awarded

Lake City Reporter photographer Jason Matthew Walker (center) and reporter Antonia
Robinson (left) receive certificates of appreciation from the Daughters of the American
Revolution at the local chapter's meeting Thursday at the Guandong Restaurant. Presenting
the certificates was Betsy Burch (left), regent of the Edward Rutledge Chapter.


next to Memorial Stadium.
The Theme this year is:
"Celebrating the Legacy of
a King." The Grand Parade
Marshals are Mr. Walter
"Polk" Jones and Mrs.
Joyce Tunsil.

MLK service
A Church
Commemoration service
honoring Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. is 11:30
a.m. Monday at Mt.
Pisgah AME Church. The
Speaker for the occasion is
the Rev. Wyndell Wallace,
pastor of Fellowship
MBC. Guest Choir is
Compassion Love Center.

Tuesday
Tony & Tom
A "How to homeschoolf
class" is 7 p.m. Tuesday
at Artworks Studio, 122
SW Midtown Plaza suite
103. Visit http://www.art-
worksstudio. net/Aboutus.
html for directions.
Information on the home-
school requirements in
Florida and how to meet
those requirements will be
available. Veteran home-
schoolers will be on hand
to answer questions and
help parents who want to


take charge of their child's
education. Call or e-mail:
Colleen 386-758-9346,
mdfinley@juno. corn

Meet and Greet
The CARC Board of
Directors- Advocates for
Citizens with Disabilities
Inc. is hosting a meet
and greet for .new
Executive Director Mike
Belle 4 p.m. Tuesday. Belle
will be discussing his ideas
for the organization during
the event.

NARFE Meeting
The monthly meet-
ing of National Active
and Retired Federal
Employees takes place at
1 p.m. on Tuesday, at the
Life Enrichment Center
on East Baya Avenue. For
more information contact
Marian at 386-755-0907 or
Jim at 386-752-8570.

Community Meeting
The community is invit-
ed at 7 p.m. on Tuesday to
Deep Creek Community
Center for a public meet-
ing. The meeting will
deal with the issue of
rezoning 20 acres in Deer
Run Preserve for a camp
ground/day camp called


Camp La Llanada. All inter-
ested are invited to attend.
For more information call
Sally at 386-365-3895.

Wednesday
Scholars program
The deadline to sub-
mit report cards for
the Presley Excel and
Scholars Program is
Wednesday. The program
honors students in kin-
dergarten through 12th
grade whose second nine
weeks report card has no
grade less than a B or S.
Send a copy of the report
card and a contact tele-
phone number to: Mrs.
Bernice D. Presley, P.O.
Box 402, Lake City, FL
32055, fax 719-4389 or e-
mail berniceEXCEL@aol.
corn. Call 752-4074. The
theme is "Knowledge Is
Contagious." Qualifying


-I


Put a little love in someone's heart this Walentine's Day with the
Lake City Reporter's 'Lore Lines.' Make it a special da) for those
you lose by writing a message to your sweetheart. Ie'll include it on
our 'Valentine Lore Line' page on February 13th.
+,+. ..+ .* ++ L ** <. +, I ,-- .WS !^ :il^ .,.,+. :+.i +^.-. -..f.^ ,. i... *J .^ .. ,,:{ ftri.i .+..i'.,t^ .,m:.;.. .+.'1:^:.!.'-


Roes are red, violets are blue, send Love Lines
to show them that your love is true.
The Lake City Reporter


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ALL ADS MUST BE PAID AT
S'- THE TIMF OF PL CEMENT.
DEDLINFE.P IFEB. S.2011.


Brenda Bagan lost a lot of weight after Bariatric Surgery at North Florida
Regional Medical Center. She chose the least.invasive surgery, outpatient
gastric banding. Nearly at her goal weight, the Lake City woman thinks
often about what she has lost. 186 pounds. And what she has gained.
A happier and healthier life.


Upcoming Information Session:

Thursday January 20 at 7:00 p.m.

Lake City Medical Center Classroom Enter through Main Lobby
For information and registration, call Consult-A-Nurse.
1-800-611-6913
www.Journey2ANewYou.com


1SF


Lake City Reporter
lakie:ityreporyer nCrr, C k II R F NT' ,.ia, ..


CENTER FOR OBESITY
SURGERY AND TREATMENT


NORTH FLORIDA REGIONAL HEALTHCARE


I


students are asked to
bring a book to exchange
or give away.

Thursday
Branford Camera Club
The Branford Camera
Club is meeting 7 p.m.
Thursday at the Branford
Public Library. The pro-
gram is "Exposure: The
basics and more." Terry
Hancock will present
the material and lead the
discussion; members and
guests may participate
regardless of level of
expertise. The homework
this month is "Clouds."
Chose two to three pic-
tures to share with the
group either digitally or
printed photo. Also, bring
other recent photos to
share with the group.
An introduction to the
"Picasa" photo software
program presented by
Humberto Castellanos
is Feb. 17. Call Carolyn
Hogue, program chair,
386-935-2044; Dick Bryant,
Technical Consultant, 386-
935-1799; Dick Madden,
Technical Consultant, 386-
935-0296; or Skip Weigel,
Technical Consultant, 386-
935-1382.

Blood drive
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is stopping
12 to 6 p.m. Thursday at
Pizza Boy Pizza. All donors
receive a free large cheese
pizza, a backpack and a
chance to win an Apple
iPad.

Public Meeting
Healthy Start of North
Central Florida holds
its Board meeting at
2 p.m. Thursday. The
public is invited to this
meeting taking place at
the WellFlorida Council
Conference Room in


,LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011


Page,Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


\


lw .. .


Gainesville. For more
information, call Celia
Paynter at 352-313-6500,
extension 118.

Friday
Blood drive
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is stopping 2
to 8 p.m. Friday at Panda-
Moni-Yum. All donors
receive 500 sweepstakes
credits, a back pack and
a chance'to win an Apple
iPad.

Antique Show and Sale
Pilot Club of
Jacksonville is hosting
its 62nd annual Charities
Antique Show and Sale
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan.
21 and 22, and from 11
a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 23. The
event takes place at the
Jacksonville Fairgrounds
Expo Center located at
510 Fairgrounds Place in
Jacksonville. Admission
is 10 dollars per person,
and parking is free. For
advance tickets, call 386-
752-6575.

Saturday
Class Meeting
The Richardson High
School Class of 1970 hosts
their monthly class meet-
ing at 1 p.m. on Saturday.
The meeting will take
place in the Richardson
Community Center, and
all classmates are urged to
attend. For more informa-
tion, contact Macy at 386-
752-3471.

REAL Diamonds
The REAL Diamonds
perform 2:30 p.m. Saturday
at Florida Gateway College
Levy Performing Arts
Center. Tickets are available
at the door 1:30 p.m. Visit
communityconcerts.info or
call 386466-8999.


__ A











Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011


Son suggests


Reagan had


Alzheimer's


as president


Associated Press

NEW YORK Ronald
Reagan's son suggests in
a new book that his father
suffered from the begin-
ning stages of Alzheimer's
disease while he was still in
the White House.
The memoir quotes
excerpts from Ron Reagan's
book "My Father at 100,"
published by Viking, an
imprint of Penguin Group
(USA).
Reagan's son writes that
he believes his father would
have left office before his sec-
ond term ended in 1989 had
the disease been diagnosed
then. U.S. News & World
Report was the first to break
the publishing embargo.
"I've seen no evidence
that my father (or anyone
else) was aware of his med-
ical condition while he was
in office," Reagan writes.
"Had the diagnosis been
made in, say 1987, would
he have stepped down? I
believe he would have."
Ronald Reagan was diag-
nosed with Alzheimer's in
1994, five years after leav-
ing office. The popular
Republican president died
in 2004 at age 93 from com-
plications of the disease.
The younger Reagan
recalls how his father
became uncharacteristical-
ly lost for words and looked
"lost and bewildered" dur-
ing the 1984 presidential
debates with Democratic
rival Walter Mondale. He
says his father may have
suspected the onset of
Alzheimer's in 1986 when he
was flying over familiar can-
yons north of Los Angeles


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ron Reagan, son former
President Ronald Reagan,
suggests in a new book
that his father suffered from
the beginning stages of
Alzheimer's disease while he
was still in the White House.

and became alarmed that
he could no longer remem-
ber their names.
But Reagan says the issue
of his father's health should
not tarnish his legacy as
the nation's 40th president.
"Does this delegitimize
his presidency? Only to
the extent that President
Kennedy's Addison's dis-
ease or Lincoln's clinical
depression undermine
theirs," Reagan writes.
"Better, it seems to me, to
judge our presidents by
what they actually accom-
plish than what hidden fac-
tors may be weighing on
them."
He continues: "That
likely condition, though,
serves as a reminder that
when we elect presidents,
we elect human beings with
all their foibles and weak-
nesses, psychological and
physiological."


Many pitfalls lurking

ahead for Obama's

education focus


ERICA WERNER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Signs
of trouble are arising for
President Barack Obama's
plan to put education over-
'haul at the forefront of his
agenda as he adjusts to the
new reality of a divided gov-
ernment.
Giving students and
teachers more flexibility is
an idea with bipartisan sup-
port. Yet the debate about
the overdue renewal of the
nation's chief education
law, known as No Child Left
Behind, is complicated by
political pressures from the
coming 2012 presidential
campaign and disputes over
timing, money and scope of
the update.
While education might


offer the best chance for
the White House to work
with newly empowered
Republicans, any consen-
sus could fade in the piti-
less political crosscurrents,
leaving the debate for
another day, perhaps even
another presidency.
If so, parents, teachers
and students would labor
under a burdensome set
of testing guidelines and
other rules that many say
are lowering standards.
"No one I'm talking to is
defending the status quo,"
Education Secretary Arne
Duncan said in an inter-
view. "Everyone I talk to
really shares my sense of
urgency that we have to
do better for our children.
We're fighting for our coun-
try here."


Suspect's violent descent


JUSTIN PRITCHARD
and MICHAEL R. BLOOD
Associated Press

TUCSON, Ariz. Jared
Loughner's descent into
violence took place on a
furious all-night excursion
through the dark streets
of his hometown, mean-
dering from one store to
another as he prepared to
take revenge on a world
from which he had become
progressively alienated.
He checked into a down-
and-out motel. He picked
up photos showing him
holding a Glock 19 while
wearing only a bright red
G-string. He bought ammu-
nition on one of three trips
to two different Walmarts.
He called a high-school
pot-smoking buddy, ran
away from his father into
a cactus-dotted desert
and updated his MySpace
profile to say, "Goodbye
friends."
Michelle Martinez ran
into Loughner during his
rambling odyssey. She and
some friends were hang-
ing out in the neighbor-
hood when a sullen figure
emerged from the dark-
ness in a black hooded
sweatshirt and startled
them. Loughner picked
his way through the group
rather than walk around
them, offering a deep, dis-
tant "What's up?" He then
quickened his pace and
disappeared into the dark-
ness.
"I had a feeling he was
thinking about something,"
said Martinez, who knew
Loughner from their school
days. "It was just kind of
weird."
The encounter epitomiz-
es Loughner's final hours
as he became increasingly
unhinged, culminating
with him opening fire on a
crowd of people at an event
for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.
Six people were killed and
13 were wounded amid a
barrage of bullets from a
Glock 19.
Authorities do not know
what pushed the 22-year-
old mentally disturbed


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 8 file photo, emergency personnel move Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., after she
was shot in the head outside a shopping center in Tucson, Ariz.


loner over the edge, but
interviews, records and a
police chronology released
Friday provide a fuller pic-
ture of his movements that
in many ways reflect his
scattered mind.
It would all play out with-
in a few miles from the
modest, single-story home
where he grew up and lived
all his life save for a brief
attempt he made at living in
an apartment by himself.
The chaotic night,
according to the official law
enforcement chronology,
began at 11:35 p.m. when
he dropped off a roll of 35
mm film at a Walgreens.
In the next hour he
stopped at a Circle K gas
station/convenience store
and checked into a Motel
6, a $37.99-a-night spot
popular with truckers near
a Long John Silver's and
other fast-food restaurants.
If he slept at all that night,
it wasn't for long.
At 1:45 a.m., he was back
outside his parents' home,
where'he ran into Martinez
and her friends.
At about 2 a.m.,
Loughner called an old
friend, Bryce Tierney.
They had been confidants


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
This photo shows a man
identified as Jared L.
Loughner at the 2010 Tucson
Festival of Books in Tucson,
Ariz. '
in high school but hadn't
talked for months anoth-
er in a series of friends with
whom Loughner severed
ties amid his increasingly
bizarre behavior.
Loughner used to bang
the drums in Tierney's
garage while his friend
jammed on the guitar.
They used to talk'-philoso-
phy, about how the modern
world was draining people
of individualism. They got
high, as police found out
when they pulled the two


over in September 2007
and Tierney admitted they
smoked a joint in a van on
the way back from a conve-
nience store.
Early Saturday, Tierney
was up watching a real-life
ghost chasers show on TV.
When his cell phone rang,
the incoming number was
listed as blocked, so he
didn't answer.
Tierney picked up the
message immediately. It
had a melancholy tinge:
"Hey Bryce, it's Jared.
We had some good times
together. Peace out."
After the call, Loughner
headed back to the
Walgreens, where at
2:19 a.m. he picked up
the developed photos. 'And
15 minutes later, he stopped
to make more purchases
at yet another convenience
store.
At 4:12 a.m. Loughner
was at a computer key-
board in an unknown loca-
tion, typing a farewell bul-
letin on his MySpace page
- "G,. :dbl\,c friends."
Authorities said the photo
included in that posting
was from the shots devel-
oped at Walgreens hours
earlier.


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------


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


nce


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A female Arab League observer for the Southern Sudan
referendum talks to local observers in a polling center in the
suburb of al-lnkaz in Khartoum, Sudan Friday.

Final day of voting

in South Sudan's

independence test


JASON STRAZIUSO
Associated Press

JUBA, Sudan A small
handful of voters cast bal-
lots Saturday, the final day
of Southern Sudan's week-
long independence referen-
dum, as officials and observ-
ers noted high turnout and
praised the mostly peaceful
voting process.
Polls closed Saturday eve-
ning, and are expected to
be followed by celebrations
from southerners excited
about the birth of their new
nation.
Results will start trickling
in immediately after polls
close, but there is little sus-
pense. Almost everyone
expects the south to vote
overwhelmingly to break
away from the north, cleav-
ing one of Africa's larger
nations in two to create the
world's newest country.
Officials and observers
reported high voter turnout
Mohamed Ibrahim Khalil,
the chairman of the south's
referendum commission,
said 83 percent of those reg-
istered in the south and 53
percent of those registered
in the north had cast their
votes. He also cited a 91
percent turnout rate among
Sudanese voters in eight
other countries. Officials had
said there were some 3.9 mil-
lion registered voters.
Khalil said he believed the
referendum would be judged
as "a good result by any
international standard," not-
ing that the commission set
up the vote in four months.
"We have come a long
way, making long strides to
reach the stage where we


are today," said Khalil, a law-
yer from northern Sudan
who is 90 years old.
Southern Sudanese voter
Naima Mubarak, 23, cast
her vote on the last day of
polling because she had just
flown back with her husband
and family from Khartoum,
the northern capital, where
she has lived for the past
decade.
Asked if she and her fam-
ily would be returning to the
north, she shook her head.
'We will now stay and settle
here," she said.
Sudan's ruling party
in the north said Friday it
was ready to accept south-
ern independence. Border
demarcation, oil rights and
the status of the contested
region of Abyei still have to
be negotiated.
If the process stays on
track, southern Sudan will
become the world's newest
country in July.
The weeklong vote was
mostly peaceful, but there
were scattered attacks the
previous weekend. Polling
stations in Juba were jammed
Sunday and Monday, but
slowed to a trickle in later
days.
The referendum com-
mission also announced
Saturday that polling would
be extended in parts of
Australia, where flooding had
prohibited some Sudanese
voters from getting to the
polls.
The proposal needs only a
simple majority to pass.
Individual polling sta-
tions will begin posting their
results on Sunday. Official
results will be released early
February.


-Iraqi kills US soldiers while training


LARA JAKES
Associated Press

BAGHDAD Two U.S.
troops were killed Saturday
by an Iraqi soldier who
apparently smuggled real
bullets into a training exer-
cise and opened fire, rais-
ing fresh concerns about
insurgents worming into
the nation's security forces
as the Americans prepare
to leave by the year's end.
A U.S. military official
said the shooter was imme-
diately killed by American
soldiers who were running
the morning drill at a train-
ing center on a U.S. base in
the northern city of Mosul.
The U.S. official said the
exercise was not meant to
involve live ammunition,
and an Iraqi army officer
said the shooting appeared
to have been planned.
Both officials spoke
on condition of anonym-
ity because, they were not
authorized to release the
information. A U.S. state-
ment confirmed that two
soldiers were killed and
a third was wounded by
small-arms fire by what the
military described as "an
individual wearing an Iraqi
army uniform."
"This incident occurred
during a training event
being conducted by U.S.
forces as part of their
advise and assist mission
with Iraqi security forces,"
the U.S. military said in a
statement.
The Americans were not
identified pending notifica-
tion of next of kin, and the
statement provided few other
details. The U.S. troops were
from the 4th Brigade, 1st
Cavalry Division, based at
Ft Hood, Texas.
Additionally, another
American soldier was killed


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this 2009 file photo, an Iraqi Army soldier and a U.S. Army soldier stand guard during a
joint patrol in Mosul, 225 miles northwest of Baghdad, Iraq. Two U.S. soldiers were killed
Saturday by an Iraqi trooper who opened fire on them during a training exercise. Another U.S.
soldier was killed Saturday during a military operation in central Iraq, making it one of the
deadliest days for U.S. forces in the country in months.


Saturday during an unre-
lated military operation in
central Iraq, making it one
of the deadliest days for
U.S. forces in the country
in months. A U.S. military
statement offered no details
about that death.
The Mosul attack under-
scores the threats that U.S.
forces continue to face in
Iraq even though most of
the estimated 47,000 troops
no longer go on regular
combat missions. The vast
majority of American troops
left down from nearly
170,000' in 2007 are all
but confined to bases where
they help train Iraqi police,
soldiers and pilots how to
protect the country from
threats like insurgents and
invasions.
Saturday's drill was
designed to show secu-
rity forces how to launch
attacks and capture sus-
pects, said an Iraqi mili-
tary official, and it aimed
to showcase U.S. training
efforts before a Monday


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visit by top U.S. and Iraqi
generals.
Both nations have been
eager to highlight Iraq's
forces before U.S. troops
leave the county at the end
of the year after eight years
of war, as required by a secu-
rity agreement brokered in
2008 by Washington and
SBaghdad.
Details about the deadly
exercise were sketchy
Saturday afternoon. A pair
of Iraqi security officials said
two assailants were captured
after the shooting. The U.S.
military official disputed that
account Such confusion is
common immediately fol-
lowing a deadly event
Iraqi defense spokesman
Maj. Gen. Mohammed al-


Askari declined comment,
saying he had not yet
received an official, report
about the shooting.
An officer with Third
Iraqi Army Division, which
was participating in the
training, said real bullets
had been banned from the
drill meaning the Sunni
Muslim soldier smuggled
in the ammunition with the
intent to attack. The officer
also spoke on condition of
anonymity.
Sunnis formed the back-
bone of the insurgency in
Iraq, and the fact that the sol-
dier who opened fire on the
Americans was Sunni rein-
forces suspicion the attack
may have had an insurgent
link.


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Saturday, January 22
10am-4pm


Gunmen torch 14 NATO

oil tankers in Pakistan


MATIULLAH ACHAKZAI
Associated Press

CHAMAN, Pakistan -
Gunmen attacked tankers
carrying fuel for U.S. and
NATO forces in Afghanistan
as they sat parked at a road-
side restaurant in southwest
Pakistan on Saturday, setting
14 of the vehicles ablaze, offi-
cials said.
The Pakistani Taliban
claimed responsibility for
the assault, which also left
one driver wounded.
Islamist militants and
criminals in Pakistan fre-
quently attack trucks car-
rying supplies for U.S. and
NATO troops. The supplies
typically arrive in Pakistan's



S( On behalf of my
daughter and
myself, we
\ would like to
thank all of you
who sent flowers
and food and for
all your thoughts,
prayers and
cards during the
recent passing of
our beloved one
David Craig
Stamper
Thank You
Carol Boyette
Stephanie Haley


southern port city of Karachi
and travel overland to neigh-
boring Afghanistan.
The latest attack occurred
in the Baluchistan province,
said Fatteh Mohammed, a
local government official.
The home secretary of
Baluchistan, Akbar Hussain
Durani, said 136 NATO tank-
ers were destroyed in 56
such attacks last year in the
province. Some 34 people
died and 23 were wounded
in the attacks, he said.


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I ip\nd the d\ *,si Jai ,tit FhI, iu .' ar j ,aml ,otrm '? 1 o,
they demonstrate their skill at handicrafts and studio arts.
Browse among the artists and in the gift shop for unique collectibles
and one-of-a-kind items. Blacksmithing, pottery, stained glass, aromatherapy,
basket making, weaving and painting will be among the creative arts showcased.
A wonderful event for the whole family, savvy shoppers and home schooled children.
'' Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park
' t.o1 ii16 Lillian Saunders Drive / Hwy 41
.,White Springs, Florida 32096
877-635-3655 / 386-397-2733
._ Adission 5.oid pea car l Ranger S talio ae
Admission -- S5.00 per car anger StafioonG ase


Cal fr an ppsn'mn

Loatd n heLae it Mdile. uidig 44 .W-.Hal f am Div, ak Cty F


~5


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


TI









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011 9A



Anticipation High as Ohio Valley Gold and Silver Refinery


Opens for Business Tomorrow in Lake City!


By DAVID MORGAN
STAFF WRITER


Been following the gold and
silver market lately? Well if you have a
jewelry box or lock box full of gold or
a coffee can full of old coins you should
be according to Ohio Valley Refinery
spokesperson John Miller. "The gold
and silver markets have not been this
strong for over 30 years" said Miller.
Typically when the U.S. dollar is weak
and the economy is flat gold and silver
markets soar. "That's good news if you
are sitting on a few gold necklaces or an
old class ring" says Miller.
Starting Monday at 9am and every
day through Friday, the Ohio Valley
Refinery will be setting up a satellite
refinery right here in Lake City at the
Fairfield Inn & Suites. During their
5 day stay, anyone can bring gold,
silver or platinum items and turn them
in for immediate payment, explains
John Miller. "Just about everybody
has some amount of gold or silver just
lying around collecting dust and next
week anybody can sell theirs direct to
our refinery. Typically, selling direct
to a refinery is reserved for larger
wholesale customers like jewelry
stores, pawn shops, and laboratories,"
says Miller. "We are changing how
business is done," he explains. "We
want to do business with everybody
so we took our business to the streets.
Our teams visits various cities around
the country hosting 5 day events
allowing the general public to take
advantage of our services. The turnout
has been overwhelming," says Miller.
"Usually each day is busier than the
previous day. It seems once people
come to us and sell something, they
are so amazed by what an old ring or
gold coin is worth that they go home
and start digging around for more and
tell relatives, friends and neighbors. It's
like a feeding frenzy by the third day.
People line up with everything from
gold jewelry to sterling silver flatware


:7. f

Above Refinery representatives will be on hand starting Tomorrow and continuing through Friday to
purchase all gold, silver and platinum items, as well as coins. Public welcome!


sets to old coins. I think during this
bad economy everybody can use extra
money but most people say they are
taking advantage of selling direct to our
refinery because of the higher prices we
pay."
During this special event anyone
is welcome to bring all types of gold,
silver and platinum to the refinery
and turn it in for instant payment. The
types of items they will accept include:
all gold jewelry, gold coins, gold
ounces and dental gold. We also buy
coins dated 1964 and before including:
Silver Dollars, halves, quarters and
dimes. Anything marked "sterling"
is accepted including: flat ware sets,
tea pots, silver bars, silver ounces
and all industrial precious metals.
What should you expect if you
go to the event to sell your gold and/
or silver? Just gather up all gold silver
and platinum in any form. If you are
not sure if its gold or silver, bring it in
and they will test it for free. When you
arrive at the event you will be asked to
fill out a simple registration card and


Silver and Gold Coin Prices

Up During Poor Economy.


Collectors and
.Enthusiasts in
Lake City with
$200,000 to
Purchase Yours!


By DAVID MORGAN
STAFF WRITER
Got Coin? It might be just the
time to cash in. This week, starting
Monday and continuing through
Friday, the International Collectors
Association, in conjunction with the
Ohio Valley Gold &,Silver Refinery,
will be purchasing all types of silver
and gold coins direct from the public.
All types are welcome and the event
is free.
Collectors will be on hand to
identify and sort your coins. Then the
quality or grade will be determined.
According to collectors I talked with,
the better the grade the more they
are worth. With the current silver
and gold markets, prices are up for
older coins too. Any coins minted in
1964 and before in the U.S. are 90%
silver, except nickels and pennies.
The coins worth is determined
by the rarity and the grade. Old silver
dollars are worth a great premium
right now. Even well worn and heavy
circulated ones are bringing good
premiums. Franklin and Kennedy
halves, Washington quarters and
Mercury and Roosevelt dimes are all
worth many times their face value.
While older types like Seated Liberty,
Standing Liberties, and Barber coins
are worth even more.
Gold coins are really worth a
lot right now according to Brian
Eades of the International Collectors
Association. "This country didn't
start minting coins until 1792," says
Eades. "Before that people would
trade goods using gold dust and
nuggets. Some shop keepers would
take more gold than needed to pay
for items purchased. There was no
uniform system of making change."


The government opened the
first mints and began distributing
the coins in 1792. By the beginning
of the 19th century, coins and paper
currency were wide spread and our
monetary system was here to stay. In
1933, Roosevelt required all banking
institutions to turn in all gold coins.
Once all banks turned in this
gold, the president raised the gold
standard from $20.00 per ounce to
$33.00 per ounce. This was his way
of stimulating the economy during
the great depression. However, gold
coins were never redistributed after
the recall. Not all gold coins were
turned in. Many folks during that
time didn't completely trust the
government and chose to keep their
gold.
These gold coins are sought after
by collectors today and bring many
times the face value. Any gold coins
with the mint marks of CC, D or 0
will bring nice premiums. Collectors
at the event will be glad to show you
where to look. Other types of coins
will also be purchase including:
foreign coins, Indian head cents, two
cent pieces, half dimes, three cent
pieces and buffalo nickels to name a
few.
Collectors warn people against
trying to clean their coins as
significant damage can be done and
the coins value lessened.


Items we will
accept include:
Scrap Jewelry
Dental Gold
Sterling Silverware
Sterling Silver Tea Sets
Silver Dollars
All Coins Dated 1964 & Earlier
Industrial Scrap
All forms of Platinum


will be issued a number. Seating will
be available. When your. number is
called you will be escorted to a table
where your items will be examined,
tested and sorted. This only takes a
few minutes using their expertise and
specialized equipment. Items will be
counted and/or weighed. The value of
the items will be determined based on
up to the minute market prices. Live
feeds will be available at the event
displaying current market prices of
all precious metals. If you choose to
sell your items, they will be bagged
and tagged and you will be escorted
to the cashier to collect your payment.
Waiting time to sell your items may
range from just a few minutes to 1
hour so bring something to read.
If you are the owner of a jewelry
store, pawn shop, dentist. office or
a dealer, you are encouraged to call
ahead to make an appointment with
the smelt master to discuss their
special dealer programs. You can call
our venue to make an appointment at
(386) 466-1014.


Items of

Interest:
Vintage Guitars:
Martin, Gibson, Fender, National,
Rickenbacker, Gretsch, Mandolins,
Banjos and others
Pocket Watches:
Hamilton, Illinois, Waltham, Patek
Phillipe, Ball, Howard, South Bend,
Elgin and others
Wrist watches: Omega,
Accutron, Longines, Hamilton,
Breitling and many more
Old paper money:
United States,
Confederate We Buy
States, Blanket All Pre-1934B
Bills, $1000.00 Currency
bills and more
Antique Toys:
Trains, Tin wind-ups,
Mechanical Banks, Robots, Pressed
Steel trucks, and many more
War Memorabilia: Swords,
Bayonets, Helmets, German,
Confederate, Union, USA, and
others
Local records reveal to our
research department that recent
vintage guitar sold for $2400.00 and
another for $12,000.00 to a collector
that will be tied into the event this
week via live database feed.


We Buy Guns &
All War Memorabilia






Q


Ohio Valley Refinery will open
for business Monday from 9am-6pm.
The event continues every day through
Friday. No appointment is needed.



If you go:

WHO: Ohio Valley Refinery
Reclamation Drive

WHAT: Open to public to sell
gold and silver.
WHEN: January 17th 21st

WHERE: Fairfield Inn & Suites
538 SW Corporate Dr.
(1-75 Exit 427, W. on Hwy 52,
S. on Access Rd.)
Lake City, FL 32024

TIMES: MONDAY-FRIDAY
9:00am 6:00pm
Every Day

SHOW INFO: (217) 523-4225


Local Residents are

ready to cash in!


International antique buyers
in-town this week and ready to
stimulate economy!


By DAVID MORGAN
STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of phone calls
from local residents this week to
the corporate office of the Ohio
Valley Gold and Silver Refinery
pour in inquiring about items to
be purchased all this week by the
team of antique buyers that is on
site with OVGSR.
The team of buyers this week
are purchasing a vast array of
vintage items (see left) along with
coins, gold jewelry, and sterling
silver items the refinery deals in.
It is a Local shot in the arm for
our economy. The spokesperson
for the event expects to spend in
excess of $200,000.00 this week at
the Fairfield Inn & Suites paying
local residents on the spot. The
spokesperson for the company
explained ,that these collectors are
paying collector price for vintage
items. It's a great way for people
to get a great value for their items.


TOp Five items
To Bring


Silver Coi
Coins
Sterling pocet
Silver \Natches


Refinery representatives will be on
hand starting Monday to purchase
all gold, silver and platinum items, as
well as coins. Public welcome!













LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JANUARY 16. 2011


THE WEATHER




MOSTLY RAIN SHOWERS


SUNNY -


HI 62 LO


1. i 7


HI 64 L0 :1 H170LO
H'.C ,H 0L ';


NATIONAL FORECAST: Rain will be likely across much of the Pacific Northwest today as a
powerful upper-level disturbance moves inland. An area of low pressure will produce a mix-
ture of rain and snow across the northern Rockies and northern Plains, while lake-effect
snow showers will be possible over portions of the Great Lakes.


ISOLATED
SHOWERS


HI 65 LO


MOSTLY
SUNNY



HI 66 LO


i..i 4.: .4 r..H.C
., k~ULrs ~ ~. -,


aldosta
59/38

Tallahassee Lake City
59/36 62/38

Pensacola Gaines
56/40 Panama City 63/4
56/39


Tamn
68/


City
Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
S60/40 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
ville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
40 65/50 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
65/44 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
69/51 68/52 Miami
ipa Naples
(53 West Palm Beach Ocala
74/60 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 74/61 0 Pensacola
73/53 Naples Tallahassee
71/56 Miami Tampa
74/62 Valdosta r
10("yWe W. Palm Beach


Monday
72/61/sh
68/54/r
77/67/sh
75/60/sh
65/48/sh
64/48/r
73/66/t
64/45/sh
78/68/sh
76/66/sh
66/51/sh
72/56/r
58/48/c
59/53/sh
60/45/r
68/60/r
61/45/sh
77/66/sh


Tuesday
76/60/sh
75/57/pc B
80/67/pc
77/60/sh
71/50/sh
70/50/sh
74/65/t
70/47/sh
80/67/sh
77/64/pc
72/52/sh
76/57/pc
59/44/pc
68/44/pc
65/43/pc0
72/60/pc l
65/46/sh
80/64/sh


5. *.A & 'a & e.'^. ..


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


64
30
66
42
83 in 1989
20 in 1948


0.00"
1.04"
1.04"
1.60"
1.60"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:27 a.m.
5:53 p.m.
7:27 a.m.
5:54 p.m.


MOON 'ui
PMoonrise today 2:48 p.m. r.,
Moonset today 4:24 a.m. .:
Moonrise tom. 3:48 p.m.
Moonset tom. 5:21 a.m.



Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb.
19 26 2 11
Full Last New First


4

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IT.:,,1 !, :


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Forecasts, data and graph-
ics 2011 Weather Central
- "" LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com


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4y -7gS .... -.i,-_ !












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YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
27/-4/0
49/24/0
7/-3/0
50/26/0
41/24/0
15/4/0
47/24/0
7/2/.06
42/30/0
27/15/0
29/16/.07
54/22/0
42/23/0
50/22/0
43/35/0
24/19/0
40/26/0
34/26/.01
53/23/0
47/39/.05
62/37/0
47/30/0


HI/Lo/W
27/-2/pc
51/26/pc
2/-9/s
49/33/pc
37/21/pc
46/36/sh
49/37/c
19/13/sn
47/37/sh
32/15/pc
18/0/sn
59/37/s
31/20/pc
47/31/pc
45/33/c
21/16/c
27/17/c
19/8/c
51/31/pc
47/39/r
65/50/pc
57/36/pc


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


High: 83'. R'ierside, Calif. Low: -1,: Flaig island, Mr ri


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY
24/14/.01 17/15/c Omaha
29/23/.04 18/8/c Orlando
59/32/0 63/35/s Philadelphia
-12/-25/0 -19/-49/s Phoenix
47/24/0 48/29/pc Pittsburgh
31/1/0 27/7/pc Portland ME
79/70/0 81/63/pc Portland OR
65/46/.03 63/49/t Raleigh
36/26/0 24/18/c Rapid City
52/33/0 53/40/r Reno
60/28/0 60/40/s Richmond
27/21/0 25/24/i Sacramento
63/43/0 64/48/pc St. Louis
55/39/0 42/34/r Salt Lake City
80/51/0 75/55/s San Antonio
53/32/0 39/36/c San Diego
74/57/0 74/62/pc San Francisco
16/7/0 13/12/c Seattle
60/26/0 60/40/pc Spokane
62/36/0 58/48/c Tampa
35/23/0 30/13/pc Tucson
58/24/0 42/32/c Washington


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W


26/15/0
71/45/0
37/21/0
72/48/0
36/24/0
25/-1/0
56/50/.17
50/26/0
14/9/.02
52/28/0
50/24/0
50/40/0
40/32/0
37/26/0
54/48/.47
76/53/0
55/47/0
52/48/0
46/39/0
67/48/0
70/37/0
46/28/0


7a Ip 7p la 6a
Sunday Monday










Forecastemdtenperature Feel li ile' teripaj


r'.i r i rr, ,: ji.e :r
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Get Connected


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
84/70/0
50/45/.06
64/40/0
79/64/0
27/10/0
50/45/0
88/63/0
61/52/.11
54/36/0
77/52/0
16/-6/0
61/50/0
82/75/.11


Today
HI/Lo/W
87/68/s-
48/35/pc
57/48/sh
75/65/pc
26/10/s
51/37/pc
91/68/sh
68/57/s
55/41/s
79/58/pc
33/30/sf
57/53/pc
84/71/t


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
59/45/0
77/68/0
52/45/0
59/34/0
70/43/0
18/7/.02
25/18/0
81/55/0
73/63/0
50/50/0
19/14/.18
84/73/0
54/46/.02


Today
Hi/Lo/W
64/42/shi
77/66/pc
54/45/sh
57/35/s
71/39/s
14/0/pc
21/1/c
84/62/pc
76/64/pc
65/41/s
41/26/rs
87/74/pc
53/41/s


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
90/79/0
59/46/0
81/71/0
85/71/0
82/54/0
18/5/0
86/77/.02
86/72/0
61/52/.62
45/34/0
28/18/.21
54/45/0
46/37/1.16


KEY Td CONDITIONS: c=cloudy, dr=drizzle, f=fair, fg=fog, h=hazy, i ice, pc=partly cloudy, r=rain, s=sunny,
sh-showeis, sn=snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


~a~~Nj$ huE! !E!E~ ~..


-~ '.6w -. ~ ~1. i-


Membership is open to everyone in Alachua,
Clay, Columbia, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties!3


1 Offer does not apply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offer is for new loans only. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuation (maximum LTV of 70'.o, and first mortgage position are
required. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes; certain other restrictions apply. Property and flood insurance may be required Example, a $100,000 loan at 3 99% for 60 months would require 59 monthly
payments of $1842.04 and one final payment of $1787.83, total finance charge of $10,468.19; for a total of payments of $110,468 19 The amount financed is $99,833 00 the APR is 4 072% APR=Annual Percentage Rate
2 On loans over $125,000, title insurance may be required at on additional expense to the borrower. 3 Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 required Mention this ad and we l waive the $15 new member fee


Sa6 6omH *ni l iCmo BN39 Ae Oaa0 SWfilleggd EtO l24 .SilrprigsgBglv
* ..6 I II 6 6* I 5 6 6 6,*B^ Km~ j^M^


20/18/c
69/51/pc
31/18/pc
72/50/pc
21/9/sn
34/9/pc
56/47/r
49/29/pc
43/31/sh
60/37/pc
44/27/pc
60/50/pc
27/24/c
42/33/c
. 59/45/r
70/54/s
57/47/pc
53/47/r
50/38/sh
68/53/pc
73/42/s
39/26/pc



Today
Hi/Lo/W
91/77/t
59/41/s
80/72/t
80/74/t
84/55/s
19/6/pc
84/75/t
80/68/pc
62/51/sh
41/35/s
19/3/s
46/32/pc
41/33/sh


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, january 16, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Tryouts set for
Monday, Tuesday
Fort White High
baseball has tryouts for
varsity and junior
varsity players set for
1 p.m. Monday at the
school field. Middle
school tryouts are
3:30 p.m. Tuesday at the
South Columbia Sports
Complex fields. A cur-
rent physical is required
before participating.
For details, call coach
Chad Bonds at 590-7362.

CHS TENNIS
Tryouts Tuesday
for girls, boys
Columbia High
tennis tryouts for girls
and boys begins at
3:30 p.m. Tuesday at the
CHS courts.
For details, call coach
Tabatha McMahon
(girls) at 755-8103 or
coach Russ Waters
(boys) at
(386) 697-4114.

CHS FOOTH LL
Q-back Club
meeting
Thursday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club will
meet at 6 p.m. Thursday
in the Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call Blake
Lunde at 754-5810.

From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Fleming Island
High in District 4-5A
tournament at Middleburg
High, 2 p.m.
Tuesday
Fort White High
boys soccer vs. Oak Hall
School, 6 p.m:
Fort White High
girls soccer vs. Williston
High in District 5-3A
tournament at Suwannee
High, 7 p.m.
Columbia High boys
soccer at Eastside High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Newberry
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Eastside
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Wednesday
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Thursday
*. Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Hamilton
County High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 6:30 p.m.
(JV-3:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Union
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 8 p.m.
(JV-5)
Friday
Fort White High
boys soccer vs. Hamilton
County High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Williston
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-3:30)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Hawthorne
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling at Ridgeview
High, TBA
Columbia High girls
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 3:30 p.m.
Columbia High boys
basketball at Hamilton


County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)


Rough patch for Tigers


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Conner Widergren (10) beats Fort White
High Bobby Trimble (15) to the ball in a game on Nov. 9.


Columbia soccer
winless in last
three games.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

With a 13-7-2 record,
Columbia High is one of
the better soccer programs
in the area. The Tigers
haven't played like it lately,
however, losing two of its
last three games.
The Tigers' struggles
began against Fleming
Island High on Monday as
Columbia fell 3-0.
On Thursday, Columbia
bounced back to force a 1-1
tie against Chiles High.
Jimmy Blakely scored
the Tigers' only goal of the
week with an assist from


Cooper Hall.
Columbia


ended the


week with a 4-0 loss against
Suwannee High.
The Tigers will try
to bounce back from a
rough week beginning at
7:30 p.m. on Tuesday at
Eastside High. Columbia
will host Newberry High at
6 p.m. Wednesday for
Senior Night.

Lady Tigers basketball
Columbia High picked up
a 42-36 victory on the road
against Middleburg High
on Thursday.
The Tigers led, 15-14,
at the half before outscor-
ing the Lady Broncos,
15-6, in the third quarter.
Middleburg rallied in the
fourth quarter, but it was
too late as Columbia hung
on for the victory.
Shaniqua Henry led the
Lady Tigers in scoring with


12 points in the contest.
Simone Williamson
and Briya McGuire each
scored eight points, Justice
Campbell and Marnae
Gaskins each had five points
and Katrina Goodbread
scored three points.

Lady Tigers weightlifting
Columbia High's Lady
Tigers weightlifting team
fell 56-34 at Gainesville
High on Thursday.
The defending state
champions, which are nota-
bly younger this season,
won three out of the 10
weight classes.
Winners for Columbia
were: Shicara Highland
(101), Alexis Brascome
(119) and Taylor Stamper
(199).
Columbia falls to 2-1,
while GHS improves to 5-0.


Defensive showcase


East beats West,
7-3, in 4th annual
All-Star Game.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Usually All-Star games
are set up to showcase the
offensive talent involved.
Spectators wouldn't know
it after watching the East
beat the West, 7-3, in the
Columbia Youth Football
Association/Dicks Sporting
Goods High School All-Star
Game at Memorial Stadium
in Lake City on Saturday.
Afumble midway through
the first quarter set the
West up on the East side of
the field on the West's only
scoring drive of the game.
Quarterback William
Wentworth hit Dantonio
Denson on a 31-yard fade
to the East 10-yard line, but
the West offense went back-
wards from there. Facing
a fourth-and-16, the West
sent Jamantye Thompson
in for a 33-yard field goal
and a 3-0 lead. It was the
only score of the first
half.
Dropped passes kept
the third quarter from
turning offensive, but the
East would start the game-
winning drive late in the
period.
East MVP, Kendrick
Sampson, would engineer
the scoring drive with 27


yards rushing and a touch-
down pass to Bryan Holmes.
Shayne Barber added the
extra point for the final 7-3
margin.
Lonnie Gosha, the East's
defensive MVP, liked the
the style of the game.
"The defense was out
there trying to stay hyped,"
he said. "We didn't let our-
selves be affected by the
trash talk and we knew that
the offense was going to
score if the defense kept
holding them."
Thompson was named
the West's offensive MVP,
while Marquise Hart took
defensive honors.


Photos by BRANDON FINLEYI
Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: MVP's (from
left) Jamantye Thompson,
Marquise Harts,
Kenderick Sampson and
Lonnie Gosha celebrate
after receiving offensive and
defensive awards for at the
Columbia Youth Football
Association/Dicks Sporting
Goods High School All-Star
Game at Memorial Stadium
Saturday.

LEFT: The East squads
Kendrick Sampson runs to
the outside during Saturday's
game.


Visiting Jernigan


Three schools at
Columbia High
on Friday.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comrn

Football coaches wasted
no time at the end of the
recruiting dead period to
visit Columbia High star
Timmy Jernigan.
Coaches from Alabama,
Florida and Florida State
started arriving at Columbia
high school as early as 7:30
a.m. on Friday according to
Tigers' head football coach
Craig Howard.
Alabama, Florida State
and LSU have long been
considered the favorites
for the defensive tackle,
but in the world of college
recruiting things change
daily. Florida is hoping it
can change Jernigan's mind
with a new coaching staff
headed by defensive guru


Will Muschamp.
Muschamp has put
together a staff that fea-
tures Bryant Young, a
former NFL Pro-Bowl
player at Jernigan's posi-
tion and Dan Quinn, a NFL
coach with multiple years
experience coaching the
defensive line. The staff
hopes that the coaching
experience at Jernigan's
position will sway the
Columbia star.
Howard noted that he
spoke with Muschamp ear-
lier in the week and the
Gators' head coach was
looking forward to meeting
the player face to face.
"The coaches are giving
Timmy enough informa-
tion to make his head spin,"
Howard said.
He wasn't just talking
about the Florida staff as mul-
tiple representatives were on
hand from each school.
Florida State brought
in Odell Haggins, which


Jernigan has a personal rela-
tionship with and defensive
coordinator Mark Stoops.
Howard wouldn't specu-
late to which schoolJernigan
was leaning towards after
the visit, but did mention
things are heating up for
the star recruits' services.
"It's getting crazy,"
Howard said. "It's coming
down to the wire and it
changes daily. Whatever
school he chooses will be
great academically. Every
recruit in America would
love to have his choices,
which speaks volumes of
him as a player."
Jernigan has taken three
of his five official visits avail-
able to high-school recruits.
He visited Michigan, USC
and LSU officially, but has
visited other campuses on
unofficial visits.
With two visits remain-
ing, Howard wasn't sure
where Jernigan would go
next.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High's Timmy Jernigan smiles from the sidelines
while competing in the U.S. Army All-American Game in San
Antonio, Texas on Jan. 9.










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports


ESPN -
at Las Vegas


Today
BOWLING
I p.m.
PBA, World Championship,


GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Joburg
Open, final round, at Johannesburg, South
Africa (same-day tape)
7 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Sony Open, final
round,.at Honolulu
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1:30 p.m.
CBS Purdue at WestVirginia
7:30 p.m.
FSN North Carolina at Georgia
Tech
10 p.m.
FSN -Washington at California
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN Denver at San Antonio
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
FOX NFC Divisional Playoffs, team
TBD at Chicago
4:30 p.m.
CBS AFC Divisional Playoffs, team
TBD at New England
TENNIS
6:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, early
round, at Melbourne, Australia
3 a.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, early
round, at Melbourne, Australia
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
2 p.m.
ESPN2 UCF at SMU
3 p.m.
FSN Kansas at Nebraska
4 p.m.


ESPN2 Illinois at Penn St.
5 p.m.
FSN Arizona at Arizona St.

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday
Pittsburgh 31 I, Baltimore 24
Green Bay at Atlanta (n)
Today
Seattle at Chicago, I p.m. (FOX)
N.Y. Jets at New England, 4:30 p.m.
(CBS)
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan.23
NFC, 3 p.m. (FOX)
AFC, 6:30 p.m. (CBS)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 6
At Arlington,Texas
AFC champion vs. NFC champion,
6:30 p.m. (FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 30
At Honolulu
AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (FOX)

College all-star games
Saturday, Jan.22
At Orlando
East-West Shrine Classic, 4 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 29
At Mobile, Ala.
Senior Bowl, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Saturday, Feb. 5
At San Antonio
Texas vs. The Nation All-Star
Challenge, 2 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule


Today's Games
L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Denver at San Antonio, 9 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 8 Purdue at West Virginia,
4:30 p.m.
No. 9 Notre Dame vs. St. John's at
Madison Square Garden, Noon
No. 17 Washington at California,
10 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Today's Games
Ottawa at Washington, 3 p.m.
Vancouver at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Anaheim, 8 p.m.

BASEBALL

MLB calendar
Tuesday Exchange of salary
arbitration figures.
Feb. 1-21 Salary arbitration
hearings.
Feb. 14 Voluntary reporting date
for pitchers, catchers and injured players.
Feb. 19 Voluntary reporting date
for other players.
March 2 Mandatory reporting
date.
March 31 Opening day, active
rosters reduced to 25 players.
July 12 -All-Star game, Phoenix.
July 24 Hall of Fame induction,
Cooperstown, N.Y.
Sept. 30 or Oct. I Playoffs begin.
Oct. 19-World Series begins.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Southern Mississippi guard D.J. Newell (top) goes for a layup in front of Central Florida guard
Marcus Jordan (5) during first-half action in Hattiesburg, Miss., Saturday.


Associated Press -

HATTIESBURG, Miss.
- R.L. Horton scored 18
points, D.J. Newbill added,
17 and Southern Mississippi
beat No. 23 Central Florida
86-69 on Saturday.
Gary Flowers and
Maurice Bolden each had
16 points for the Golden
Eagles (14-3,3-1 Conference
USA), who used a 21-2 run
midway through the sec-
ond half to turn a four-point
deficit into a 68-53 lead.
Horton was terrific dur-
ing the decisive stretch, hit-
ting a 3-pointer, completing
a conventional three-point
play and throwing a perfect
alley-oop pass for a thun-
derous dunk by Flowers.
UCF (14-2, 1-2) has lost
two in a row after start-
ing the season on a school-
record 14-game winning
streak. The Knights, who
earned the first national
ranking in program history
on Dec. 20, will likely fall



Florida


hires


Young

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE -
New Florida coach Will
Muschamp has completed
his staff by hiring former
San Francisco 49ers stand-
out Bryant Young as defen-
sive line coach.
Young was a four-time
Pro Bowl selection dur-
ing his 14 years with San
Francisco. He will assist
defensive coordinator Dan
Quinn, who coached Young
for four seasons (2001-04)
in San Fran'cisco.


out of the polls.
Marcus Jordan, the son of
NBA great Michael Jordan,
scored 15 first-half points
and finished with a team-
high 20 for UCE He went 7
of 17 from the field, but only
2 of 8 in the second half.
The win is one of the
biggest for Southern Miss
' coach Larry Eustachy dur-
ing his seven-year tenure.
The Golden Eagles hadn't
beaten a ranked team since
2004 and hadn't done so at
Reed Green Coliseum since
1986.
After the game, several
USM players jumped into
the stands and celebrated
with the student section.
Though Southern Miss
had balanced scoring,
Horton stuck out with his
overall game. He shot 6 of
11 from the floor, includ-
ing 2 of 4 from 3-point
range. He also made four
of five free throws and
had six rebounds and five
assists.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. z
REFIA I


2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.




-II
CROWE





CISTEB


South Carolina 72,
Florida 69

GAINESVILLE After a
miserable night at Alabama,
Bruce Ellington and his
South Carolina teammates
took extra shots in practice
all week.
It clearly paid off at
Florida.
Ellington scored 23
points, including the final
six for South Carolina, and
the Gamecocks beat the
Gators 72-69 on Saturday.
"We just stayed in the
gym and shot after
practice, before practice,"
Ellington said. "That's what
we do. We came in (here)
and knocked down some
big shots." '
Ellington got pretty
much any shot he wanted
against Florida's guards.
His biggest ones came late,
when he made a driving
layup and four free throws
to close it out in the final
seconds.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer: TII I I
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: WEIGH TITLE MOHAIR POWDER
Answer: When the class did the puzzle, the teacher
had a WORD WITH THEM


S rrtiLAI rriT M


COURTESY PHOTO

Disney
Marathon
finisher
Michelle Wilson, 44, of Lake
City, ran the Walt Disney
World Marathon last Sunday
in Lake Buena Vista. Wilson
finished the 26.2-mile race
through all four of the Disney
parks with a time of 6:36. The
event was her first attempt at
running a full marathon.


Florida State beats



N.C. State, 84-71


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Bernard James hit all eight
of his field goal attempts
to score a career-high 16
points Saturday as Florida
State captured an 84-71 win
over North Carolina State.
The Seminoles (13-5, 3-1
Atlantic Coast Conference)
led 28-19 at the half and
never looked'back as they
followed up Wednesday's
66-61 win over top-ranked
Duke with no sign of a let-
down.
Florida State shot 54.5
percent (30 of 55) from
the floor and all five start-
ers scored in double fig-
ures. Michael Snaer added
13 points and Terrance
Shannon 12 along with a
career-best nine rebounds
for the Seminoles, Who led
by as many as 22 in the
second half.
Tracy Smith scored 19
points and Ryan Harrow 17
for North Carolina State.


ACROSS

1 Diamond -
4 What divas do
8 Lubber's aye
11 Back when
12 Bach opus
13 Heating fuel
14 Pizza topping
16 Lion's quarry
17 Woolgatherer
18 Downhill racer
20 Stray dog
21 Sci-fi Doctor
22 More scarce
25 Florida crop
29 Bullring cheers
30 Ms. Hagen of
films
31 Make--
double
32 Hero sandwich
33 Bottle edge
34 River in
England
35 Warrior women
38. Change
39 Toothpuller's
org


ASSOCIATED PRESS
North Carolina State's C.J. Leslie slams home two points
over the defense of Florida State's Jon Kreft during the first
half Saturday, Jan. 15 in Tallahassee.


40 Corp. VIP
41 Welsh dog
44 Dawdled
48 "The Daba
Honeymoon"
49 School for
dogs
51 Kipling classic
52 Treatment
53 "Murder, -
Wrote"
54 Mind reader's
gift
55 Benefit
56 Mr. Cruise

DOWN

1 "Dragnet" org.
2 Disney exec
Bob
3 Canter
4 More certain
5 Borodin prince
6 Wimple sporter
7 Teahouse
hostess
8 Berra
of baseball


Answer to Previous Puzzle

FANG OAR AMFM
AREA AWE RARE
CLOT FALLFLAT
TONER KIT AYE
DEPENDS
FUR PANE YELP
EL DED UNDU E
ANGEL STEINS
TASK CHIT TAO
EPAULET
MPG ORD RIFLE
GOLDDUST PLAA
MOUE SOU PERE
THEN ONT YAKS


One, in Munich
Disparaging
remark
Thigh bone
Strides
"- Tiki"


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com

1 112 I I 1 1 3


21 Outer garment
22 Santa -,
Calif.
23 Pickling
ingredient
24 McEntire
of music
25 Elevator name
26 Donate
27 007's
alma mater
28 Pluck
30 Arm bone
34 Love in a gon-
dola
36 Zig's opposite
37 Disgusting
38 Nest on a
crag
40 Sponge
41 Birthday treat
42 Ginza
purchases
43 Boat runway
44 Salad bowl
wood
45 Prof.
46 Resound
47 Regard as
50 Youth org.


1-17 @2011 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420












Steelers rally, beat Ravens, 31-24, in playoffs


By ALAN ROBINSON
Associated Press
PITTSBURGH Ben
Roethlisberger hit rookie
Antonio Brown on a 58-yard
pass play on third-and-19,
and Rashard Mendenhall
scored from the 2 with
1:33 remaining to give
the Pittsburgh Steelers a
31-24 comeback victory
over the Baltimore Ravens
in an AFC divisional playoff
game Saturday.
The Steelers, 9-0 against
division teams in the play-
offs, advance to their fifth
AFC championship game
in 10 seasons next Sunday
- at New England if the
Patriots beat the Jets on
Sunday, in Pittsburgh if the
Jets win. They will be play
to reach the Super Bowl for
third time in six seasons.
The Steelers (13-4) were
trailing 21-7 at halftime
after turnovers created two
Ravens touchdowns. But
they came back With the
help of three Baltimore turn-
overs in the third" quarter.
It was so bad, the Ravens'
minus-4 yards in offense
wasn't the worst of it.
Baltimore was outgained
263-126 as Joe Flacco was
16 of 30 for 125 yards as the
Ravens became the eighth
team in NFL playoff history
to fail to gain at least 100
yards in the first three quar-
ters. All eight teams lost.
The Ravens' last chance
to beat the Steelers they
haven't in three postseason
tries ended when T.J.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Hines Ward (86) celebrates .with teammates after scoring a touchdown against the Baltimore
Ravens during the second half of an NFL divisional football game in Pittsburgh, Saturday. The Steelers own 31-24.


Houshmandzadeh dropped
Flacco's fourth down pass
at the Steelers' 38 with 1:03
remaining.
Failing to protect the ball
cost the Ravens even


after they scored two touch-
downs in less than 30 sec-
onds in the first half.
With Baltimore up 21-7,
Ryan Clark forced a rare
fumble by Ray Rice on a


screen pass, and LaMarr
Woodley recovered at the
23. The play re-energized
the crowd of 64,879 that had
grown silent as Baltimore
opened its two-TD lead.


Mendenhall ran
for 14 yards before
Roethlisberger's 9-yard
scoring pass to Heath
Miller, who missed two
games after sustaining


a concussion on a hit by
Jameel McClain during
the Steelers' 13-10 win in
Baltimore last month.
Later in the quarter,
Flacco overthrew tight
end Todd Heap, and Clark
returned the interception
17 yards to the 25. Three
plays later, Roethlisberger
found ol' reliable Hines
Ward, absent in the offense
most of the day, for an 8-
yard touchdown pass and it
was tied at 21.
Along the sideline, the
Ravens had the look of a
team that couldn't believe
it had squandered the lead
- and couldn't figure out
how to get it back. They
never did.
Roethlisberger went 19
of 32 for. 226 yards as he
beat the Ravens for the sev-
enth successive time in a
rivalry in which both teams
had won twice by 3-point
margins during the last
two seasons. The asterisk:
Roethlisberger didn't play
in either Steelers loss.
Baltimore turned it over
for the third time in nine
minutes as center Matt Birk
snapped the ball .early to
Flacco, who never got his
hands on it, and Pro Bowl
defensive end Brett Keisel
recovered at the 23.
The drive stalled, but
Shaun Suisham, who had
missed earlier, converted
a 35-yard field goal with
12:15 remaining to give
Pittsburgh its first lead
since its opening drive at
24-21.


Rodgers stars

in Green Bay's


Al 48-21 rout


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Green Bay Packers wide receiver Jordy Nelson (87) scores a touchdown on a 6-yard pass as he is hit by Atlanta Falcons
cornerback Dunta Robinson (23) during the first half of an NFL divisional playoff game on Saturday in Atlanta.


By PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press
ATLANTA Brett who?
Aaron Rodgers has turned
these NFL playoffs into his
own showcase.
Carving up the NFC's
top-seeded team, Rodgers
threw three touchdown
passes, ran for another
score and led the Green
Bay Packers to their second
straightpostseason road vic-
tory with -a stunning 48-21
rout of the Atlanta Falcons
on Saturday night.
The Packers (12-6) will
have to win one more on


the road to complete their
improbable run from sixth
seed to the Super Bowl, but
nothing looks out of the
question the way Rodgers
is playing. He'll lead Green
Bay into the NFC champion-
ship game at either Chicago
or Seattle next weekend.
Rodgers completed 31 of
36 passes for 366 yards,
more than Brett Favre
- the guy he replaced in
Green Bay ever threw
for in a playoff game. Green
Bay scored 35 consecutive
points, including Tramon
Williams' 70-yard intercep-
tion return.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


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I-


WE HAVE UNCOVERED SOME
OF THE RAREST NOTES IN
UNITED STATES HISTORY!

BRING IN YOUR OLD BANK
NOTES TO FIND OUT IF YOU
HAVE A HIDDEN GEM!


.OhI ianey
Go(^ & Silver efiniery

Open to publtt:to sell their
g901, silver nd .their
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January 17tt 24it ,'

Fa 638 SW Corporate Drive
(1-76 Exit 4W.on Hwy 52,
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Monday-Friday3 'am-4pm
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*r _-
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[ILVEL

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UN-A&'


SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011


!Al


1,









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
cnsak@lakecatyreporter.com


BUSINESS


Sunday, January 16, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Program shifts gear to prepare CDL students


By A.C. GONZALEZ
agonzalez@lakecityreporter. corn

Florida Gateway
College has
launched a pro-
gram to help
drive students
closer to their future. It's a
short acronym: CDL.
Elaine Puri, director
of the Global Logistics
Banner Center at FGC, said
the Commercial Driver's
License program has
returned, offering more
education at a more afford-
able price.
"Now that the college
offers it independently,
there are more advantages,"
said Puri. "The course has
been advanced from 160
hours to a 320-hour course
and costs only a little more
than $3,000."
The CDL program was
discontinued prior to this
semester, said Puri, because
the college wanted to make
the program independent of
co-sponsorship with another
company.
Puri said that before
becoming independent, the
program cost more than
$5,000 and only offered a
160-hour course.
Instructor Shep
Shepherd said the new
320-hour course will chal-
lenge students with three
weeks of in-class studies
and five weeks of actual
driving practice. He said
this will dedicate 160 credit
hours specifically to the
driving portion, matching
the previously co-dependent
program's total.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Marcus Thomas, 24, (left) watches Michael Smith, 23, while he drives in snowy and icy conditions on a driving simulator
during the Commercial Driver's License class at the Florida Gateway College.


"The more experience
they get through driving,
better prepares them for
business," Puri said, refer-
ring to the students. "So
having a longer course to
offer, for less money, is
great"
This is the first time the
college has offered the CDL
program as a notjfor-profit
course. Because of that
status, the CDL program
became eligible for grants
and certain funding.
Puri said the funding
came from the Department
of Labor from a community-


based jobs training grant
The grant provided two new.
tractor trailers and a mobile
unit for the simulator at the
banner center.
The simulator is a com-
puterized training program
built to emulate the inside
cab of a real tractor trailer.
It has three screens that
simultaneously show the
driver's virtual surround-
ings, which a separate
computer has generated
to teach the driver how to
drive in several different
environments and situa-
tions.


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2806 West US Highway 90, Suite 101
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The chair that the driver
sits on shakes and moves in
a manner ahnost identical
to how a real truck would .
move in a similar situation,
making the simulator a
heavily utilized tool in the
CDL program.
"The simulator gets (stu-
dents) more prepared for
what is happening on the
road and the books teach
them regulations," said
Puri.
The program is now


being offered to a total of
eight students per course.
There are four students
enrolled in the program
since it's re-introduction,
with a new class being
given every 8 weeks, said
Shepherd.
"We are teaching the stu-
dent to become an appren-
tice," he said. "When they
complete the course, they
go to the state board and
are tested to get their CDL.
It's a skills test"


The CDL program is
a career-training course
offered to the students,
preparing them to operate
in the industry immediately
following schooling and the
CDL license test Therefore,
a College Placement Test
is not a prerequisite for the
course. Instead, those inter-
ested are required to take a
TABE test. However, there
are also disqualifications,
and other prerequisites to
the course.
Prospective students
must have a clean driv-
ing record, including no
felonies or DUIs, for seven
consecutive years prior to
enrolling. A Department of
Education physical must be
passed, to clear the student
for the task. The interested
person must also pass a
drug screening, be 18 years
or older, and have a valid
Florida Driver's License.
Shepherd said the stu-
dent can be 18 and still take
the course. Students have
to be 21 years or older to be
able to take any loads out-of-
state. Anyone between 18
and 21 is limited to deliver-
ies in the state where he or
she took the test.
"Being in transportation
myself, I know the sky is
the limit when you get in
a truck," Shepherd said.
'"You don't have to be a
driver. You can get into
dispatching, management,
training and so forth. So
there's plenty of opportunity
to those who get into the
industry."


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SUN$LJATh
~ t(t t I Nt~









Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011


Should You
Rent or Buy?
Q Should I rent, and not buy, a
house, if I plan to move within
a few years? P'G., Pueblo, Colo.
A In general, yes. If you buy
a house and then sell it soon,
you may not recoup the buying and
selling costs, which can total more
than 6 percent of a home's value.
In the first years of a traditional
mortgage, your payments go mainly'
toward interest, not toward paying *
off the principal. After living in the
house for only a few years, you'll
still owe the majority of the loan.:
(Plus, you'll have paid for repairs,
property taxes, etc.)
Renting is always worth
considering. It's true that mortgage,
interest is tax-deductible, but if
- you're renting a place for consider-.
ably less than you'd have to cough
up in mortgage payments, you
might invest the difference and
build a little nest egg. If you
expect prices to fall or stagnate
in the coming years, renting would
be especially prudent.
Learn more in our Home & Real
Estate nook at w tv.fool.com/hom-to-
invest And access a rent-or-bu., calcu-
lator at http://realestale.yahoo.com/
calculators

Q If I sell stock for a los tn
my [RA account, can I deduct
the loss on m. ta\ return B Y',
Lawreiit KIM
A Sorr You typically deposit
pre-ta. monet into a tradi-
tiona: IRA. Eventually, you'll be
taxed on your ennre withdrav.als
from it. regardless of any gains or
losses (Of course. if you make
non-deductible contributions to
your traditional IRA. they don't t be
taxed ~hen \ou take them in the
form of distributions I
With Roth LRAs. you Imest
post-:a\ money, and etenrually
withdraw it all tax-free But \ou
don't clan losses Ior pa\ taxes on
gains in the interim.

"Gbta qWu.'i, tot tih Fooi'l Send a( in
=--see e r' i.:) ('.)


The Motley Fool-

T" To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


IPOs, Explained
As we emerge from our recession,
IPOs (initial public offerings) are
coming back into fashion. IPOs we
might see in 2011 include Skype,
Hulu.com, HCA, Kinder Morgan,
Harrah's Entertainment, Groupon,
Fisker Automotive, Toys R
Us, Nielsen Holdings NV, -<
and possibly even Facebook. .,
Before you, get excited about
IPOs, understand them better.
When a company needs money,
it can borrow from a bank or
wealthy investor, or it can issue
bonds. Another option is to sell
off a chunk of itself to the public,
via an IPO.
Investors often work themselves
into a frenzy when a highly
regarded company first issues
shares of itself on the stock market.
This causes the new stock's price to
skyrocket, further fueling the pub-
lic's interest in IPOs.
Individual investors like us usu-
ally can't buy shares of hot IPOs at
their initial prices For ,taners. not
all brokerages are allocated shares.
The big clients of the underwriting


mi
fre
tha
men
comp
lion visit
online evE
. ,l. ,1 il. i1H <
,,l I t ha tl '


investment banks such as pen-
sion funds, mutual funds, other cor-
porations and high-net-worth indi-
viduals generally get first dibs.
(If a broker offers you IPO shares
and you're not a major client, the
big players must not have much
interest in them, and perhaps you
shouldn't, either.)
There are many reasons to avoid
IPOs: They tend to be much more
volatile than other stocks. Most are
tied to young companies with
.unproven operating histories, so it's
best to let a firm get a few public
quarters under its belt before invest-,
ing. Also, IPOs often underperform.
Though many IPOs do surge in
value in their first days, others don't.
High-fliers often descend, permit-
ting us to buy at better prices during
a pullback. Shares of Visa, an estab-
lished company, debuted at $44 in
2008, flirted with $70 on their first
day, but then closed near $56. A few
months later, they were below $42.
They're now near $70. You usually
needn't get in at the start.
There are many promising com-
panies out there with established
public track records. Think twice
before scrambling to get a piece of
an iffy IPO.


i iiit I ,- t i

Liquid Gold-
Not Quite
When I was a young man, in the
early 1950s, I scrounged up $300
and bought 100 shares of the Frank
Fehr Brewing Co., which was
releasing a new beer called
Fehr's Liquid Gold. All my (._-
friends were interested in it '"
because it was supposed to
leave no beer breath. (We were all
cursed with mothers who could
smell beer on our breath before we
reached the front porch.)
Unfortunately, it failed the mother
test. Bankruptcy followed, and I lost
my$S300. James S., online
The Fool Responds: The beer
apparently sold well at first, but it
ate into sales of the company's other
beers. The lesson here is that it's not
enough for a company to have an
exciting product. It needs to work
well and be successfully marketed to
and embraced by consumers. Even
then, if a company has unmanage-
able debt or is burning through cash
too quickly, it can stumble or fail.
Sometimes competitors are able


..... ........................ to copy a company s proucoo. r.sTa cts
....**m 'y......... 'Examine any potential investment there to tap. One also has consider
Name That Company lots of angles, and ask your- that Howard Stem's new five-year
A self what could go wrong u deal includes mobile streaming. Sirius
self what could go wrong. has rolled out smartphone apps,
I was founded in 1984 by a : Do you have an embarrassing hasre s out sm apps,
University of Texas student sell- lesson learnedthe hard way? streaming doesn't take off for Sirius
r om Boil it down to 100 words (or XM except perhaps the stiff price.
ing homemade computers from less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Sirius XM has cleaned up nicely,
.' his dorm room. Today I ship more Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? and now-like soon-to-be sub-
than 110,000 computer systems Submit to Myv Smartest Investment. Ifwe scribers on BMW motorbikes -
each day, to 180 countries. I'm the : print yours, you'll win a Fools cap! it's an easy rider.
top provider of PCs to large global LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
businesses, serving 98 percent of I was born when a fellow bought the assets of a bankrupt pretzel company
fortune 500 corporations, and I serve 10 in 1971. Based in New Jersey, I'm a tasty treat giant today. Brands under my
million smaller businesses as well. I offer umbrella include SUPERPRETZEL pretzels; ICEE, Slush Puppie and Arctic
Blast frozen beverages; LUIGI'S Real Italian Ice; Shape Ups and Whole Fruit
?e recycling and have recycled more frozen novelties; Readi-Bake; Tio Pepe's Churros; and the Funnel Cake Fac-
n 275 million pounds of computer equip- tory, among many others. You'll find my offerings in supermarkets, stadi-
it. (Forbes named me a top- green ums, malls, convenience stores, movie theaters and cafeterias. My stock has
grown by more than 10 percent annually, on average, over the past 20 years.
any.) My website gets more than 4 mil- Who am I? (Answer: J&J Snack Foods)
its daily, resulting in an order placed I F
er two seconds. Who am I? Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
?ry two seconds. Who am I? Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries
,. Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
, a into a ddawinr for a iftvize!? : ... Motley Fool. Sony; we can't provide individual financial advice.


' 2011 Tiii Mi. : IiooLIDis BY UNIVERSAL UICLIk (' RFIIASi I13/L2011)


Fed: US economy ends 2010 on strong note


By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON The U.S.
economy ended last year on an
encouraging note, with all parts
of the country showing improve-
ments. Factories produced more,
shoppers spent more and compa-
nies hired more pointing to a
stronger economy in 2011.
That's the picture that emerged
from the Federal Reserve's
survey of economic conditions
released this week.
Still, risks loom. Declining
home prices and millions of fore-
closures are depressing housing
markets around the country, the
survey said.
Companies are also paying
more for materials including oil,
food products, steel, textiles and
chemicals, the survey noted.
However, competitive pressures
prevented them from passing
those increased costs on to cus-
tomers in the form of higher
prices.
And even though employers
are slowly hiring more, workers
lack bargaining power to win big-
ger paychecks because of high
unemployment, which is now at
9.4 percent.
Prices increases remain tame.
The Fed will monitor inflation
as it reviews its $600 billion
Treasury bond-buying program,
which is intended to boost the
economy by lowering interest
rates, encouraging spending and,
lifting stock prices.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cowboy Maloney's Electric City employees Mike Richardson (left) and Willie Howard push out an electric range
for delivery in Jackson, Miss. in this Dec. 24 photograph. The U.S. economy ended last year on an encouraging
note, with all parts of the country showing improvements. Factories produced more, shoppers spent more and
companies hired more. All those signs point to a stronger economy in 2011.


Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke
says he is optimistic that the
economy will strengthen this
year. But he warned last week
that it will take up to five years for
unemployment to drop to a his-
torically normal level of around
6 percent.
The bond-buying program will
come under scrutiny at the Fed's
first meeting of 2011 on Jan. 25-


26. Four regional Fed presidents
become voting members of the
Fed's policymaking group at
that meeting. Two of them -
Richard Fisher, president of the
Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas,
and Charles Plosser, president
of the Federal Reserve Bank of
Philadelphia have voiced con-
cerns that the bond-buying pro-
gram could spur inflation.


Fisher and Plosser have reputa-
tions for being "inflation hawks,"
meaning they are more con-
cerned about the prospects of ris-
ing inflation than they are about
ratcheting down high unemploy-
ment. Both men are likely to
put pressure on Bernanke to
scale back the $600 billion pro-
gram, especially later this year
if the economy continues to gain


momentum as expected.
In a speech Wednesday, Fisher
said the Fed has done enough to
aid the economy. "I think we have
reached our limit," he said.
The Fed indicated there would
be a high threshold for chang-
ing the program, according to
minutes from its Dec. 14 meet-
ing. Bernanke offered no signals
that any changes would be forth-
coming when he testified before
Congress, last Friday.
"While the (Fed survey) was
somewhat upbeat, it is clear
that the economy is still a long
way from the threshold which
would induce any change in
the Fed's extremely accommo-
dative policy orientation," Brian
Bethune, economist at IHS
Global Insight, said referring to
the central bank's bond-buying,
program.
The Fed survey also said:
Hiring was firming and busi-
nesses in most regions planned
to increase hiring at the same or
faster pace this year.
Retailers across all regions
experienced better-than-expect-
ed sales after a strong holiday
shopping season.
Factories across the coun-
try boosted production, with
demand growing for cars and
high-tech equipment.
Businesses said they no
longer fear there will be a dou-
ble-dip recession. Many had
expressed concerns of a second
downturn when surveyed over
the summer.


Feds begin $1.5B loan effort to aid small business


By DAVID RUNK
Associated Press

DETROIT Michigan
and North Carolina are the
first states to get a share of
funding from a new $1.5 bil-
lion federal program aimed
at helping creditworthy
small businesses and manu-
facturers get loans they need
to expand as banks tighten
up lending standards, offi-


cials announced Friday.
State Small Business
Credit Initiative funds are
expected to be used by
states to help businesses
secure 10 times as much
in loans from private lend-
ers, meaning the program
could encourage $15 billion
in loans nationwide, the
Treasury Department said.
Michigan will get $79.1 mil-
lion and North Carolina will


get $46.1 million.
"When small businesses
can't access credit, they
cannot create jobs," U.S.
Treasurer Rosie Rios said
in announcing the funding
at a Detroit metal stamping
facility.
Funding. for other states
is expected to be announced
later. The goal is to encour-
age job growth.
The federal program


is partly modeled on a
Michigan program that
used $20 million to help
secure $191 million in
loans for businesses. Rios
was joined by Republican
Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder,
U.S. Sen. Debbie Stabenow
(D-Mich.), and U.S. Rep.
Gary Peters (D-Mich.) for
the announcement at United
Metal Products, which ear-
lier got a loan with help from


the state program.
"This is a great example
of the entrepreneurial effort
we have going here in the
state, the dynamic attitude
that we're taking," said
Snyder, who took office this
month.
Michigan has lost jobs
every year for the past
decade, and was the only
state to lose population
during that period. It's had


one of the nation's highest
unemployment rates at 12.4
percent in November. That
month, North Carolina's
unemployment rate rose to
9.7 percent as the state led
the country in the number
of jobs lost.
The loan program is
part of the Small Business
Jobs Act that was signed in
September by President
Barack Obama.


IiktheiFool


What Is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
Remember Shakespeare?
Remember "As You Like It"?
In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only
people who could get away with telling the
truth to the King or Queen.
The Motley Fool tells the truth about invest-
ing, and hopes you 'll laugh all
the way to the bank.
........................... . ..... .... ... ... ........t..th..............


Sirius XM Is
an Easy Rider
Petite cars? Two wheels? If you're
rolling down the street, you're in
Sirius XM Radio's (Nasdaq: SIRI)
crosshairs.
The satellite radio giant has struck
deals with MINI USA and BMW
Motorcycles to offer its satellite
receivers as standard equipment
beginning with 2011 vehicles. The
radios will come with a free year of
Sirius Everything. If past patterns
hold up, roughly half of those instal-
lations will convert into self-paying
customers after the trial is up.
Sirius XM has grown its sub-
scriber base in each of the past five
quarters, topping the 20-million
mark recently. When the bottom fell
out of the new-car market, Sirius
XM felt the pain alongside automak-
ers. Now that car sales have picked
up, there's little reason to expect sub-
scriber accounts to decline the way
they did during the first half of 2009.
Are we closing in on market satura-
tion? No. Paying for radio may never
be appealing outside of active drivers,
but there's still a big enough market















Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights'

NYSE Amex Nasdaq
8,174.12 +193.80 2,185.52 +34.94 2,755.30 +52.13


Gainers (2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
EvergE rs 2.03 +.68 +50.0
CaptlTr 2.23 +.72 +47.6
ZaleCp 5.35 +1.32 +32.8
FstBcPRrs 7.10 +1.69 +31.2
Nautilus h 2.81 +.65 +30,1
ReddyIce 3.58 +.76 +27.0
GCSaba 18.25 +3.85 +26.7
CallonP h 7.60 +1.51 +24.8
Resolute wt 4.50 +.89 +24.7
ExamWk n 22.00 +4.31 +24.4

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GNIron 98.25-34.97 -26.2
CSVS2xVxS45.30-13.93 -23.5
Gerova un 5.37 -1.53 -22.2
LeapFrog 4.28 -1.14 -21.0
DrxSOXBr 11.74 -2.37 -16.8
Talbots 6.24 -1.26 -16.8
Molycorp n 46.13 -8.27 -15.2
C-TrCVOL 53.55 -9.31 -14.8
Supvalu 7.39 -1.27 -14.7
Lentuo n 5.68 -.83 -12.8

MOst Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citigrp 28201536 5.13 +.19
BkofAm 10204905 15.25 +1.00
S&P500ETF5046128129.30+2.16
SPDR Fncl3601650 16.72 +.51
FordM 3235901 18.65 +.38
SprintNex 2945498 4.45 -.23
Alcoa 2800817 15.97 -.45
iShEMkts 2666340 47.93 +.68
GenElec 2552778 18.82 +.39
Pfizer 2452606 18.34 ...

Diar
Advanced 2,135
Declined 1,020
New Highs 522
New Lows 175
TVoum 29.,7, 13,199
i.', r : ." : 44
Volume 21,671,903,299


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Wstmlndpf 53.01+19.01 +55.9
Barnwell 7.25 +2.51 +53.0
PacOffPT 3.00 +.87 +40.8
iBio 4.91 +1.11 +29.2
TriangPet 7.92 +1.55 +24.3
SinoHub 2.95 +.50 +20.4
PernixTh 7.57 +1.27 +20.2
MexcoEn 8.36 +1.37 +19.6
NAPallg 7.43 +1.18 +18.9
NDynMng 16.83 +2.56 +17.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Gainsco 5.60 -3.19 -36.3
Inuvors 4.11 -.96 -18.9
GoldenMin 21.25 -4.21 -16.5
YM Biog 2.28 -.38 -14.3
AvalRare n 5.70 -.83 -12.7
CagleA 7.39 -.89 -10.7
AlmadnM g 3.91 -.42 -9.7
ChiBotanP 2.14 -.23 -9.7
ChinaShen 8.14 -.83 -9.3
EVNJMu 11.67 -1.19 -9.3

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
NthgtM g 287768 2.78 -.17
NA Pall g 285329 7.43+1.18
Taseko 278110 5.87 +.80
NovaGid g 274296 13.63 +.47
RareEleg 238243 13.40-1.30
ChinaShen 209829 8.14 -.83
VantageDri 162307 2.09
GoldStr g 152549 3.86 -.16
CheniereEnl45405 7.48 +.28
AvalRare n 143594 5.70 -.83

Diary
Advanced 268
Declined 261
New Highs 47
New Lows 70
Total issues 548
Unchanged 19
Volume 886,860,989


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Cha %Cha Last


AES Corp ..
AFLAC 1.20
AK Steel .20
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72
AbtLab 1.76
Accenture .90
AMD
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12
Aldlrish
Allstate .80
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52
AmBev s .99
AmAssets n...
AmAxle
AEagleOut .44
AEP 1.84
AmExp .72
AmlntlGrp ...
Anadarko .36
Annaly 2.65
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .40
ArchDan .60
ATMOS 1.36
Avon .88'
BB&TCp .60
BakrHu .60
BcBiIVArg .55
BcoBrades .82
BcoSantand .78
BcoSBrasil .45
BkofAm .04
Bklrelnd 1.04
BkNYMel .36
Barclay .28
Bar iPVixsrs...
BarrickG .48
Baxter 1.24
BerkH Bs ..
BestBuy .60
Blackstone .40
BlockHR .60
Boeing 1.68
Borders ..
BorgWarn ...
BostonSci
BoydGm
BrMySq 1.32
CB REllis
CBS B .20
CMS Eng .84
CSX 1.04
CVS Care .50
CdnNRs gs .30
CapOne .20
CapitlSrce .04'
CardnlHIth .78
Carnival .40
Caterpillar 1.76
Cemex .43
CntryLink 2.90
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.88
Chicos .16
Chimera .69
Citigrp ..
CliffsNRs .56
Coach .60
CocaCE .48
CocaCI 1.76
Coeur
Comerica .40
ConAgra .92
ConocPhil 2.20
ConsolEngy.40
ConEd 2.38


17 ... +6.7
12 +1.82 +2.2
41 -.51 -9.3
... -.22 +10.8
8 -.42 -3.2
12 -1.04 -2.1
19 +1.46 +3.1
5 -.63 +,2
... +.34 +12.2
69 -.45 +3.8
... +.05 -3.5
14 -.58 -3.7
69 -6.21 -1.6
13 -.23 -1.9
... -2.12 -9.5
... ... +.3
13 +2.04 +24.7
17 -.42 -4.0
13 -.55 -1.5
15 +1.89 +7.8
... -7.18 -6.3
45 +4.81 +4.4
13 -.03 -.9
11 +1.26 -4.9
45 ,-.60 '-2:9
12 +1.56 +11.4
15 +1.40 +6.2
19 -.67 -.5
24 +1.45 +5.7
40 +2.98 +4.2
... +2.10 +10.7
... +.58 -.4
... +1.72 +7.8
... +.46 -1.5
22 +1.00 +14.3
... +.08 -7.2
16 +1.61 +7.2
.. +2.51 +19.7
.. -4.48 -16.1
17 -2.02 -11.5
13 +.90 -.6
17 +1.91 +1.9
11 +.25 +3.9
... +1.05 +12.8
9 +.03 +7.6
15 +.69 +7.4
... +.14 +17.8
27 +.44 -2.7
+.25 -.5
62 -.08 +11.7
13 +.04 -2.4
35 +1.27 +7.3
32 +.69 +4.7
16 +.09 +2.2
19 +1.42 +7.1
14 +.03 +.9
... +.91 -5.6
9 +2.97 +13.7
... +.23 +9.7
15 +1.79 +6.0
19 +.71 +3.8
31 +.28 +.4
... -.25 -1.9
12 -.54 -4.1
19 +.71 +6.8
11 +1.64 +1.7
17 -.22 -10.1
6 -.02 +.5
... +.19 +8.5
15 +7.51 +13.9
22 +1.55 -1.7
15 +1.61 +1.8
19 +.21 -4.0
... +.62 -9.0
... +1.24
16 +.50 +2.3
11 +.61 -.6
25 +.84 +6.2
15 +.29 +.5


Name Div
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
Covidien .80
DCT Indl .28
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.24
DanaHldg ..
DeanFds
Deere 1.40
DelMnte .36
DeltaAir
DenburyR ..
DiaOffs .50
DrSCBear rs...
DirFnBear ...
DrxFBulls ...
DirxSCBull .11
DirxLCBear ...
Discover .08
Disney .40
DomnRescs 1.83
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
ECDangon .
EMCCp ...
ElPasoCp .04
EldorGld g .10
EmersonEl 1.38
EnCana g .80
EvergE rs ...
ExcoRes .16
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.76
FstHorizon .72
FirstEngy 2.20
FlagstB rs ...
FordM
FMCG 2.00
FrontierCm .75
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .40
GenGrPrn ...
GenMillss 1.12
GenMot n ...
GenOn En ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .32
GoldFLtd .16
Goldcrp g .36
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .20
HItMgmt
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess -.40
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .95
HonwillntI 1.33
HostHotls .04
Huntsmn .40
ICICI Bk ,.53
iShGold s ...
iSAstla .82
iShBraz 2.53
iSh HK .45
iShJapn .14
iSTaiwn .29
iShSilver
iShChina25 .63
iShEMkts .64
iShB20 T 3.86
iS Eafe 1.42
iSR1KG .73
iShR2K .89
iShREst 1.97
ITT Corp 1.00


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GeneficTh 3.15 +1.67 +112.5
Golfsmith 4.33 +1.88 +76.7
Intelliph h 4.96 +2.04 +69.9
IndBkMIrs 3.80 +1.33 +53.8
Cuds 3.24 +1.09 +50.7
DotHillh 2.79 +.90 +47.6
PluristemT 2.72 +.86 +46.2
Rdiff.cm 8.12 +2.55 +45.8
MarketLdr 2.62 +.82 +45.6
Biodel 2.75 +.85 +44.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Celgenert 2.98 -1.86 -38.4
SemiLeds n 17.72-10.17 -36.5
Coinstar 41.50-16,08 -27.9
ChiValve 6.87 -2.46 -26.4
ChiCeraun 12.00 -4.00 -25.0
CleanTech 5.54 -1.71 -23.6
GraniteCty 3.81 -.98 -20.5
Telestone 8.24 -2.09 -20.2
TuesMrnm 4.27 -1.08 -20.2
NovllWrls 7.81 -1.90 -19.6

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Intel 4136187 21.08 +.42
Nvidia 3007883 23.59 +3.72
Microsoft 2728991 28.30 -.30
MicronT 2631462 9.71 +1.07
PwShs QQQ248676757.00 +1.13
SiriusXM 2124142 1.56 -.05
Cisco 1863868 21.21 +,24
Oracle 1708484 31.25 +.26
Level3h 1221575 1.27 +.16
HuntBnk 1154371 7.25 +.16

Diary
Advanced 1,935
Declined 863
New Highs 494
New Lows 28
Total issues 2,853
Unchanged 55
Volume 9,601,016,638





Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
3.0 1 +.04 +4.6 32.05
1.0 10 +.35 +2.5 19.81
1.7 ... +1.23 +3.9 47.43'
5.0 ... +.36 +5.6 5.61
1.1 18 +.48 +13.2 13.50
4.8 14 +.51 +3.4 46.85
... ... +.90 +8.8 18.72
10 +.05 +12.4 9.94
1.6 21 +5.18 +7.8 89.52
1.9 15 +.04 +.7 18.94
... 27 -.25 +1.2 12.75
.. 26 +.45 +.4 19.16
.7 11 +4.33 +12.0 74.90
... ... -1.10 -8.8 14.24
... ... -.74 -12.6 8.26
... ... +2.46 +13.0 31.46
.1 ... +5.35 +8.5 78.60
... ... -.44 -8.0 8.07
.4 17 +1.48 +10.0 20.38
1.0 19 -.16 +4.7 39.29
4.3 14 -.25 +.6 42.98
1.7 24 +1.00 +5.2 35.93
5.5 12 +.13 +.6 17.92
+6.15 +25.1 33.86
... 31 +1.07 +7.2 24.54
.3 11 +.48 +2.8 14.14
... 45 -.06 -7.8 17.12
2.4 22 +1.33 +1.7 58.16
2.5 17 +2.81 +8.2 31.51
... ... +.68 +211.5 2.03
.8 10 +.54 +.5 19.52
4.9 14 +.29 +3.0 42.87
2.3 14 +2.25 +6.5 77.84
... ... +.54 +6.4 12.53
5.7 14 +.35 +4.3 38.60
... ... -.06 +2.5 1.67.
... 9 +.38 +11.1 18.65
1.7 15 +1.38 -1.4 118.35
8.0 16 -.20 -3.5 9.39
... 9 -.40 -11.0 20.37
1.1 6 -.21 -1.4 14.88
2.0. 11 -.10 -7.4 20.41
... ... +.08 -2.5 15.10
3.1 15 +,18 +.6 35.80
... ... -.78 +3.6 38.20
... ... +.22 +9.7 4.18
... 22 +.19 +8.9 14.31
2.2 ... +.16 +4.5 14.62
1.0 3 -.36 -8.1 16.67
.9 ... -2.28 -11.7 40.59
.8 10 +4.31 +4.1 175.00
... 43 -.77 +2.4 12.13
.9 25 +1.54 -2.1 39.99
.7 10 +.72 +7.5 28.48
... 15 -.19 +.3 9.57
96 -.44 -14.9 9.58
... 41 -.43 -3.7 13.96
.5 11 +2.96 +7.3 82.13
.7 12 +1.16 +9.9 46.25
2.6 19 +1.51 +2.4 35.89
2.4 21 +.72 +3.5 55.02
.2 ... +.25 +3.5 18.49
2.2 24 +1.76 +14.9 17.94
1.2 ... -.69 -10.9 45.10
-.09 -4.3 13.30
3.3 ... +.47 -2.2 24.89
3.3 ... +1.32 ... 77.40
2.3 ... +.13 +5.3 19.93
1.3 ... +.16 +2.2 11.15
... ... +.63 '+.6 15,71
-.36 -8.1 27.74
1.4 ... +.90 +3.4 44.55
1.3 ... +.68 +.6 47.93
4.2 ... -.52 -2.4 91.84
2.4 ... +2.08 +2.1 59.45
1.2 ... +1.13 +2.9 58.94
1.1 ... +2.02 +2.9 80.54
3.5 ... +.67 +.8 56.40
1.7 15 +6.68 +13.8 59.30


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg
AT&TInc NY 1.72 28.43 -.42 -1.5 -3.2
AMD NY ... 8,20 -.63 -7.1 +.2
Alcoa NY .12 15.97 -.45-2.7 +3.8
AutoZone NY ... 252.62 +1.95 +0.8 -7.3
BkofAm NY .04 15.25 +1.00 +7.0 +14.3
BobEvans Nasd .80 33.04 +.37 +1.1 +.2
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 14,95 +.27 +1.8 +.9
CSX NY 1.04 69.21 +1.42 +2.1 +7.1
Chevron NY 2.88 92.83 +1.64 +1.8 +1.7
Cisco Nasd ... 21.21 +.24 +1.1 +4.8
Cibgrp NY ... 5.13 +.19 +3.8 +8.5
CocaCI NY 1.76 63.13 +.21 +0.3 -4.0
Delhaize NY 2.02 75.44 +3.54 +5.1 +2.3
DirFnBear NY ... 8.26 -.74 -8.2 -12.6
DrxFBull s NY ... 31.46 +2.46 +8.5 +13.0
EMCCp NY ... 24.54 +1.07 +4.6 +7.2
FamilyDIr NY .62 43.22 -.68 -1.5 -13.1
FordM NY ... 18.65 +.38 +2.1 +11.1
GenElec NY .56 18.82 +.39 +2.1 +2.9
HomeDp NY .95 35.89 +1.51 +4.4 +2.4
iShJapn NY .14 11.15 +.16 +1.5 +2.2
iShSilver NY ... 27.74 -.36 -1.3 -8.1
iShEMkts NY .64 47.93 +.68 +1.4 +.6
iShR2K NY .89 80.54 +2.02 +2.6 +2.9
Intel Nasd .72 21.08 +.42 +2.0 +.2
JPMorgCh NY .20 44.91 +1.27 +2.9 +5.9
LVSands NY ... 48.07 -1.82 -3.6 +4.6
Level3h Nasd ... 1.27 +.16 +14.4 +29.6


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg %Chg


+4.7 -.3
+2.5 +12.9
-0.4 -3.5
-8.4 -5.0
+12.3 +21.1
-1.0 +1.4
+1.2 +4.4
+3.7 +4.2
-4.6 -.6
+18.7 +53.2
+1.2 -.8
+0.9 -.2
-1.0 -5.9
+0.6 +2.2
... +4.7
+3.0 +11.0
+2.0 +4.7
-0.9 -2.3
+1.7 +2.8
+4.3 -.7
-3.1 -4.3
+1.1 +.7
-4.9 +5.2
+3.1 +4.8
-0.5 +3.0
-1.3 -.9
+1.3 +1.6
+4.0 +5.7


Lowes NY .44
MGM Rsts NY
McDnlds NY 2.44
Merck NY 1.52
MicronT Nasd ...
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd ...
Nvidia Nasd ...
OcciPet NY 1.52
Oracle Nasd .20
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .80
Potash NY .40
PwShs QQQNasd .33
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2,37
SearsHldgsNasd
SiriusXM Nasd ...
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SpiintNex NY
SPDRFndclNY .16
TimeWam NY .85
VerizonCmNY 1.95
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20


Stock Footnotes: g= Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New In past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred, rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy securitV at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un Units. vj ='In b,,-,,,.y, y .r .-;rh[|:, ,is. = eVr,,n .1,ur,ut~ued =
When issued. wtl= Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b= Fee covering market costs 1.1 h:T. .in,] a 'ri = a D.n.j :al- r,,,i -.,,'
redemption fee. nt load (sales charges). m= Multiple I.- ,:r.,g r j -;.].r. i.- p .,.ua
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = l-,: p t, 11,nu.u,, jn ,tjrir,.] ir, ,x,. Gainers ind
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at ler Most Aclnies IT,,i:i- .i:..all i: I :r ui v1jl.jle
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sale. riu,.: ur u,.:.n:,:, Ci


|STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Name Div YId


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


IngerRd
IBM ;
Intl Coal
IntlGame
IntPap
Interpublic
Invesco
ItauUnibH
JPMorgCh
Jabil
JanusCap
JohnJn ;
JohnsnCtl
JnprNtwk
KB Home
Keycorp
Kimco
Kinross g
Kohls
Kraft
LDK Solar
LSI Corp
LVSands
LennarA
LillyEli
Limited
LincNat
LizClaib
LloydBkg
LyonBas A
MBIA
MEMC


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg


ASML HId .27
AVI Bio
Aastrom rs...
AcadiaPhh ...
ActivsBliz .15
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT
AllscriptH ...
AlteraCp If .24
Amarin
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
ApolloGrp ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMall .28
ArenaPhm ...
ArmHId .12
ArubaNet ...
Atheros
Atmel
Autodesk ...
Baidu s
BeaconPw ...
Biodel
Broadcom .32
BrcdeCm ...
CapFdFrs ...
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
ChkPoint ...
ChinaMda ...
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco
CitzRepBh ...


... +4.52
... +.06
... +.48
... +.48
16 -.34
23 +1.75
62 +3.06
63 +.25
19 +3.13
.. +.27
76 +3.26
4 -.47
4 +.55
12 -.48
11 +4.33
23+12.36
22 +1.36
... -.08
... +3.79
... +2.36
34 -.06
54 +.42
49 +.68
93 +.78
... +.05
... +.85
29 +2.45
23 +.27
29 +.03
... +.01
29 -1.71
... -.02
23 +.41
6 +2.15
... +1.51
16 +1,30
15 +,24
... -.08


Wkly
Last Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Clearwire ...
Coinstar
Comcast .38
Comc spcl .38
Conexant ...
ConvOrg h ...
Copart
CorinthC
Cree Inc
Ctrip.coms ...
CypSemi ...
Dell Inc
DeltaPtr h ...
Dndreon
DirecTVA ...
DiscCm A ...
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips ...
ETrade rs ...
eBay
ElectArts ...
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .28
Expedia .28
FifthThird .04
Finisar
Flextm ..
FuelCell ...
GT Solar ...
Genzyme ...
GileadSci ...
Hasbro 1.00
HercOffsh ...
HudsCity .60
HumGen
Intel .72
Intuit
JA Solar


... +.08
30-16.08
18 +.02
17 -.07
6 +.23
... +.02
21 +.18
3 -.22
36 -2.87
46 -2.36
44 +2.05
13 +.07
... +.04
... -1.04
25 +.65
28 -1.76
12
26 +.01
... +.36
15 +1.49
... -.10
60 -.12
... +.52
17 +1.68
... +.28
36 +2.96
17 +.28
... -.09
12 +.25
... +.79
11 +.72
16 -1.58
... +.11
12 +.04
... +1.52
10 +.42
27 -1.41
7 +.05


Name Div YId
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
KLATnc 1.00 2.4
Kulicke
LamResrch ...
Level3 h ..
LexiPhrm
LibtyMlntA ...
lululemng ...
MIPS Tech ...
MannKd
MarvellT
Mattel .83 3.5
Maximlntg .84 3.2
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .64 2.3
NGAS Rs h ...
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15 1.1
Novell
Novlus
Nvidia
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .20 .6
PDL Bio 1.00 18.2
PMC Sra ...
PacEth h ...
PattUTI .20 1.0
PeopUtdF .62 4.3
PlugPwrh ...
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ.33 .6
Powrwav
QiaoXing
Qloqic


28 +.22 -.6 46.82
14 +2.07 +2.2 150.00
90 +.43 +16.6 9.02
25 +.38 +6.3 18.80
57 +.68 +5.2 28.67
35 -.01 +4.5 11.10
28 +.67 +3.9 25.00
... +.71 -.4 23.81
13 +1.27 +5.9 44.91
19 +.27 +6.2 21.34
19 +.52 +4.8 13.59
13 -.05 +1.1 62.55
18 +.09 +5.9 40.45
46 +1.14 +4.9 38.73
.. +.46 +16.5 15.71
... +.04 .-.9 8.77
62 +.01 +.2 18.08
25 -.72 -11.4 16.80
15 -.39 -5.2 51,51
12 +.15 -.5 31.34
12 +1.67 +19.6 12.10
35 +.17 +3.8 6.22
... -1.82 +4.6 48.07
40 +1.22 +10.0 20.63
8 +:01 -.4 34.91
16 +.43 -5.3 29.11
13 +.02 +5.2 29.27
... -.65 -25.1 5.36
... +.32 +7.8 4.43
... +1.99 +6.4 36.61
... +.62 +9.1 13.08
... +.76 +7.5 12.11




Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
... +1.53 +22.7 17.77
22 -.28 +2.9 6.80
31 +4.42 +9.0 42.11
5 +1.13 +36.0 9.79
13 +5.49 +1.8 52.69
.. .16 +29.6 1.27
+.12 +47.2 2.12
15 +.30 +2.3 16.14
54 +4.81 +5.0 71.81
40 +.31 +13.7 17.25
... +1.44 +19.6 9.64
24 +1.83 +17.9 21.87
13 -.23 -5.8 23.95
39 +2.00 +10.0 25.99
... +.54 +18.6 7.55
5 +1.07 +21.1 9.71
7 -.30 +1.4 28.30
... +.07 +10.7 .62
40 +2.28 +8.2 59.48
71+12.18 +9.0 191.48
13 -.51 -2.7 14.17
6 -.01 +.3 5.94
16 +5.98 +14.0 36.85
66 +3.72 +53.2 23.59
17 +.86 +17.8 11.64
23 +.26 -.2 31.25
6 -.69 -12.0 5.48
25 +.27 +6.4 9.14
... ... +19.1 .86
71 +.52 -4.8 20.51
48 +.18 +2.9 14.42
... +.29 +94.1 .72
... +.11 +5.1 3.30
16 +.23 +5.0 10.71
.. +1.13 +4.7 57.00
... +.57 +51.6 3.85
... -.28 -4.2 2.71
26 +1.09 +5.9 18.03


Name Div
MGIC
MGM Rsts...
Macys .20
Manpwl .74
MarathonO 1.00
MktVGold .40
MktVRus .18
Marshlls .04
Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
Mechel
Medtrnic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
MitsuUFJ ..
MobileTel s ...
Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12
MonstrWw ...
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
MotrlaSoln ...
MotrlaMo n ..
NCR Corp ...
NRG Egy ..
NV Energy .48
Nabors
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 7.04
NOilVarco .44
NatSemi .40





Name Div
Qualcom .76
RF MicD ...
RschMotn ...
Riverbed s ...
Rovi Corp ...
STEC
SanDisk
SeagateT ...
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
Solarfun
Sonus
Staples .36
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .30
SunesisP h ...
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .20
Telestone ...
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .75
Thoratec ...
TibcoSft
TriQuint
UranmRs ..
Verisign 3.00
VirgnMdah .16
Vodafone 1.33
WaveSys ..
Windstrm 1.00
XOMA rs
Xilinx .64
Yahoo
Zalicus
ZionBco .04


Wkly YTD
YId PE Chg %Chg
... ... +.02 +13.2
... ... +.41 +12.9
.9 15 -.23 -8.8
1.1 44 +2.25 +6.7
2.3 14 +3.96 +15.0
.7 ... -1.86 -10.7
.5 ... +1.84 +5.2
.6 ... +.17 +4.6
2.1 ... +.23 +10.6
.4 ... -.73 +3.2
... ... +.44 +12.1
2.4 12 +.79 +.3
4.4 17 -3.12 -5.0
1.6 13 +.55 +4.9
... 22 +.11 +3.4
... ... +.24 +2.6
... 35 +.32 -1.1
... ... -8.27 -7.6
1.5 .33 +2.54 +6.7
... ... -1.76 -1.4
.7 11 +.78 +6.5
.2 19 +6.68 +8.7
-.62 +.6
+.71 +16.0
... 12 +.24 +9.5
.. 10 +.61 +3.6
3.4 15 -.10 +1.6
... ... -.24 -4.0
... ... +.20 +5.4
6.5 ... -2.77 -3.8
.6 18 +4.27 +3.1
2.7 12 +.82 +7.3


Wkly YTD Wkly I
PE Chg %Chg Last I Name


NYCmtyB 1.00 5.4 14 +.06
NewellRub .20 1.1 13 -.31
NewmtM .60 1.1 14 -1.17
Nexen g .20 ... ... +2.19
NextEraEn 2.00 3.7 14 +1.93
NiSource .92 5.0 15 +.36
NobleCorp .90 2.4' 9 +1.33
NokiaCp .56 5.1 ... +.48
NorflkSo 1.44 2.2 17 +.36
Nucor 1.45 3.3 69 +.21
OcciPet 1.52 1.6 18 +1.13
OfficeDpt ... ... ... -.23
OilSvHT 2.40 1.1 ... +7.34
Omnicom .80 1.8 17 -2.17
PG&E Cp 1.82 3.8 14 +.31
PMI Grp ... ... ... +.29
PNC .40 .6 10 +2.38
PPLCorp 1.40 5.5 14 -.74
PatriotCoal ... ... ... +1.33
PeabdyE .34 .5 25 -.06
Penney .80 2.6 23 -.32
PepsiCo 1.92 2.9 17 +.39
Petrohawk ... ... 25 +.72
PetrbrsA 1.20 3,6 ...+1.00
Petrobras 1.20' 3.2 ... +1.20
Pfiz'er .80 4.4 10
PhilipMor 2.56 4.5-15 +.25
PlaybyB ... ... ... +.90
Potash .40 .2 33 +4.98
PwshDB ... ... ... +.90
PS USDBull... ... ... -.59
PrUShS&P ... ... ... -.79
ProUltQQQ ... ...... +3.48
PrUShQQQO... ...... -.43
ProUltSP .43 .8 .. +1.64
ProUShL20 ... ... ... +.36
ProUSR2K ... ... ... -.61
ProUSSP500... ... ... -.96
ProUltCrude... ... ... +.78
ProUSSIv rs... ... ... +.22
ProgrssEn 2.48 5.5 14 +.01
ProgsvCp 1.16 .8 12 -.27
ProLogis .45 3.1 ... +.32
Prudentl 1.15 1.9 10 +1.50
PulteGrp ... ... ... +.08
QntmDSS ... ... ... -.50
QweslCm .32 4.4 52 -.11
RAITFin .03 1.0 3 +.41
RadianGrp .01 .1 ... +.61
RadioShk .25 1.4 10 -1.11
Raytheon 1.50 3.0 9 +.41
RegionsFn .04 .5 ... +,45
ReneSola ... ... ... +.61
RiteAidh ... .... ... +.07
SAP AG .67 1.3 +4.25
SLM Cp ... ... 8 +.75
SpdrDJIA 2.77 2.4 ... +1.12
SpdrGold ... ... ... -.89
SP Mid 1.51 .9 ... +3.75
S&P500ETF2.37 1.8 ... +2.16
SpdrHome .33 1.8 ... +.60
SpdrKbwpk .13 .5 ... +.91
SpdrKbw RB .35 1.3 .. +1.42
SpdrRetl .49 1.0 ... +.09
SpdrMetM .38 .6 ... -.29
Safeway .48 2.3 -.09
StJude 15 +.92
SandRdge ... ... 7 +.05
SaraLee .46 2.5 24 +.92
Schlmbrg .84 1.0 27 +5.35
Schwab .24 1.3 45 +.94
SemiHTr .56 1.6 ... +1.59
SiderNac s .58 3.2 +.51
SilvWhtn g ... ... 50 -1.81
SilvrcpM g .08 ... ... -1.27
SouthnCo 1.82 4.7 15 +.42
SwstAirl .02 .2 24 -.05
SwstnEngy ... ... 23 +1.23
SpectraEn 1.04 4.2 17 +.05


-.8 18.69
-2.3 17.76
-9.3 55.72
+6.0 24.28
+4.2 54.15
+5.4 18.57
+6.5 38.09
+6.5 10.99
+4.1 65.40
+.9 44.20
-.8 97.32
+6.7 5.76
+4.3 146.59
-2.1 44.83
-1.1 47.33
+22.1 4.03
+5.8 64.22
-2.5 25.65
+26.6 24.52
-3.1 62.01
-5.9 30.40
+2.2 66.78
+9.3 19.94
-2.3 33.40
-1.1 37.42
+4.7 18.34
-3.2 56.67
+16.9 6.10
+11.0 171.90
+1.7 28.02
+.3 22.77
-5.4 22.47
+9.5 89.13
-8.9 10.60
+5.5 50.68
+4.5 38.70
-5.9 11.82
-8.1 17.84
+.7 12.58
+16.4 11.43
+2.9 44.73
-2.0 19.47
+1.7 14.68
+5.1 61.70
+15.6 8.69
+2.2 3.80
-4.3 7.28
+37.0 3.00
+18.7 9.58
-6.7 17.25
+9.4 50.26
+6.7 7.47
+18.1 10.32
+17.8 1.04
+5.9 53.60
+13.4 14.28
+1.8 117.69
-4.3 132.69
+2.6 169.01
+2.8 129.30
+5.6 18.37
+4.7 27.14
+2.8 27.19
-2.8 47.02
-.3 68.58
-6.4 21.04
-3.0 41.47
+7.4 7.86
+4,8 18.35
+4.1 86.91
+10.1 18.83
+5.8 34.41
+8.0 18.01
-18.8 31.70
-19.2 10.37
+.7 38.50
+2.0 13.24
+5.2 39.38
+.1 25.01


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div Yld PE Chg %Chg. Last


SprintNex ...
SP Matls 1.17
SP HIthC .57
SP CnSt .78
SP Consum .49
SP Engy .99
SPDR FncI .16
SP Inds .60
SPTech .32
SP Util 1.27
StateStr .04
StillwtrM ...
Suncor gs .40
Suntech ...
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TaiwSemi .47
Talbots
'"alismE g .25
Target 1.00
Taubmn 1.75
TeckRes g .60
Tenaris .68
TenetHIth ..
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texlnst .52
TimeWam .85
TitanMet ...
TollBros
Total SA 3.13
Transocn ...
Travelers 1.44
TrinaSols ...
Tycolntl .86
Tyson .16
UBS AG ...
US Airwy ...
UnionPac 1.52
UtdOontl ..
UtdMicro .08
US Bancrp .20
USNGsFd..
US OilFd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .50
Vale SA .76
Vale SA pf .76
ValeantPh .38
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VangEurPc .90
VerizonCm 1.95
ViacomB .60
Visa .60
Vonage
Walgm .70
WeathfIntI ...
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .08
WDigital ..
WstnUnion .28
Weyerh .60
WmsCos .50
WmsSon .60
WT India .15
XL Grp .40
Xerox .17
Yamana g .12
YingliGrn ..
YumBmds 1.00
ZaIeCp


... -.23
... +.49
... +.11
... +.30
+.22
... +2.37
.. +.51
+.65
+.42
... +.16
j... J.37
78 +1.75
... +1.47
+.66
+.12
-1.27
... +.22
16 +.09
... +.61
14 -1.26
... +.54
14 +.02
... -.12
+.48
-.70
4 +.17
10 +1.00
24 -.50
14 +.82
15 -.17
52 +.86

... +3.57
10 +3;97
8 +1.30
9 +.93
20 +2.11
8 +.08
... +1.19
7 -.61
20 +3.48
... -.07
+.09
18 +1.28
+.07
... +1.25
... -1.47
10 +2.32
.. +1.36
+.97
23 -.61
... +1.16
+.71
... +1.25
... -.47
14 +1.27
18 -1.84
19 +.41
18 +1.36
... +1.56
13 +1.25
41 -.07
6 +.41
15 +.07
... +1.06
37 +1.54
20 -1.58
... -.88
23 +1.45
16 +.32
27 -.34
13 +.13
21 -1.43
... +1.32


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
1.5 27 +.31 +5.2 52.04
...20 +.42 +12.7 8.28
... 11 +3.09 +11.4 64.77
... ... +1.09 +12.1 39.44
... 51 +5.80 +10.6 68.58
.. 31 +3.14 +26.5 22.32
... 11 +.40 +5.8 52.77
... 5 -.21 -5.1 14.26
... 12+12.24 +28.1 88.17
... 78 -.05 -4.3 1.56
43 +2.27 +13.6 32.51
... 22 +.43 +9.1 8.91
... ... +.34 +18.4 3.16
1.5 20 -.06 +2.7 23.39
1.6 26 -.08 +1.8 32.70
1.6 25 -.53 -.3 18.24
... ... +.01 -7.7 .48
... 18 -.03 +4.7 17.52
1.0 21 +1.00 +8.7 20.65
... 5 -2.09 -22.4 8.24
1.1 12 +.18 +6.3 7.21
1.4 16 +.25 +4.1 54.26
... 31 -2.38 -2.9 27.50
... 46 +1.54 +6.6 21.02
... 14 +.85 +22.4 14.31
... +.17 -8.8 3.10
... 6 -.19 +1.5 33.15
.6 ... -.77 -7.5 25.20
4.8 ... -.02 +4.0 27.51
... +.58 +16.5 4.59
7.6 20 -.42 -6.1 13.09
-.04 +12.9 5.79
2.0 15 +1.72 +9.4 31.69
... 22 -.09 +1.1 16.81
... 7 ... +36.1 2.15
.2 ... +.02 +1.5 24.59


Name


Div YId PE


Wkly YTD
Chg %Cha


AbdAsPac .42
Advntrx rs ...
AlIdNevG ...
AlmadnMg ...
AmApparel ...
ArcadiaRs ...
AvalRare n ..
Bdgus grs ..
CAMAC En ...
CanoPet ..
CelSci
CFCda g .01
CheniereEn ...
ChiGengM ...
ChinNEPet ...
ChinaShen ...
ClaudeR g ...
Crossh g rs ..
DejourE g ...
DenisnM g ...
EndvSilv g ..
Fronteer g ...
GascoEngy ...
Gastar grs ...
GenMoly ...
GoldStrg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasG g ...
Hyperdyn ...
IndiaGC ...
InovioPhm ...
KodiakO g ...
LongweiPI ...
MadCatzg ...
MdwGoldg ...
MincoG g ...
Minefnd g ..
Nevsun q ...


Wkly
Last Name
6.63 NDragon
2.51 NwGold g
24.45 NA Pall g
3.91 NDynMn g
1.50 NthnO&G
.34 NthgtM g
5.70 NovaGid g
1.76 Oilsands g
1.92 ParaG&S
.38 PhrmAth
.82 PionDrill
19.13 PlatGpMet
7.48 PudaCoal
3.41 RadientPh
5.90 RareEle g
8.14 Rentech
2.20 RexahnPh
.34 Rubicon g
S SamsO&G
3.33
6.16 Senesco
10.10 SulphCo
.47 Talbots wt
4.74 Taseko
6.09 Tengsco
3.86 TmsatlPet
8.47 TriValley
2.50 US Geoth
7.04 Uluru
.72 Ur-Energy
1.52 Uranerz
6.28 UraniumEn
2.74 VantageDrl
1.15 VimetX
.90 VistaGold
2,16 WizzardSft
9.96 YM Bio g
6.37 ZBB Enqy


Wkly. YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... +.01 +31.1 .06
... ... -.29 -11.6 8.63
... ...+1.18 +7.1 7.43
... ... +2.56 +17.8 16.83
... ... ... +1.21 +2.8 27.98
... 23 -.17 -13.1 2.78
... ... +.47 -4.5 13.63
... ... +.06 +28.1 .54
... -.10 -9.3 3.62
... ... -.07 -17.5 3.49
... ... +.06 -3.0 8.55
+.06 -9.4 2.41
... 12 +.15 -3.2 13.79
+.08 -12.9 .88
-1.30 -16.6 13.40
... .. +.12 +13.1 1.38
-.09 +8.0 1.21
... ... +.54 -.5 5.68
... ... +.51 +47.7 1.95
... ... -.03 +12.3 .31
... ... +.01 +29.4 .22
... ... -.43 -51.9 .63
... ... +.80 +11.8 5.87
... ... +.12 +13.8 .72
... ... +.11 +.6 3.35
... ... ... -.02 -22.8 .44
... ... +.10 +8.4 1.27
... ... -.00 -12.7 .10
... ... +.35 -1.0 2.96
... ... +.60 +8.8 4.34
... ... +.07 -10.8 5.39
... ... ... +3.0 2.09
.50 ... 11 -.19 -.3 14.81
... ... -.19 +17.2 2.80
... ... +.08 +46.0 .37
... ... -.38 -2.1 2.28
... ... -.22 +25.9 1.36


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.14 0.14
6-month 0.17 0.17
5-year 1.92 1.95
10-year 3.33 3.32
30-year 4.53 4.49


Currencies
Last Pvs Day

blJ lrl~llln I O IU" I 1__ 1 li
t .'. 1i 2 1 1),)- 3

J :~ll62 3? 83 x
Mexico 12.0900 12.0865
Switzerind .9650 .9634
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


New York Stock Exchange


---. ,:



Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones Industrials -37.31 34.43 83.56 -23.54 55.48
Close: 11,787.38 0 ", 01 W T *_
1-week change: 112.62 (1.0%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
1 2 ,0 0 0 ........... ......... .......... .. ... ..... .... .................................... .... ....... ........... ......


11,000 ... - ................................
9 5000" ..... .... ......... .... ....- .. ..... ........ ....... . ............... ... .....
11,000




10'0 00 1 _ _'i__---_............ -J -1 1 ................

9,500 j A S- 0 N D



MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct MinInnt
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRetls Cl 138,794 10.87 +1.6 +7.8/B +7.9/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 66,101 31.16 +3.5 +11.8/E +2.2/C 5.75 250
Fidelity Contra LG 61,430 69.46 +3.0 +18.1/B +4.5/A NL 2,500
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 58,576 50.15 +0.2 +7.2/D +4.0/C 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStldx LB 56,062 32.50 +4.5 +16.9/A +2.8/B NL 3,000
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS 55,060 36.32 +2.0 +6.5/E +4.3/B 5.75 250
Vanguard Instldxl LB 54,685 118.35 +4.3 +14.9/B +2.3/B NL 5,000,000
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 52,074 16.73 +0.7 +11.1/C +4.1/B 5.75 250.
Vanguard 500Adml LB 51,437 119.19 +4.3 +14.9/B +2.2/B NL 10,000
A ",,,c, r,rl:Fund: ir,nC,Ar.A ,T. LB 48,788 28.74 +3.1 +10.0/E +2.3/8 5.75 .250
',',,.ujr.l Tc.;]A,]i,|, LB 47,190 32.50 +4.5 +17.0/A +2.9/B NL 10,000
var.iu..r, T.:,l rl ,t FB 45,190 16.02 +2.9 +8.4/C +3.8/B NL 3,000
[;,,e (,.. Irtli t FV 43,406 36.48 +2.8 +11.7/A +4.5/A NL 2,500
D C:..,. o.., ilo.,:e LV 43,037 111.67 +4.6 +12.8/C 0.0/D NL 2,500
Artr,.:,rn ,,, jr,l.EurFa.:GrA in, FB 39,209 41.92 +1.8 +7.3/C +4.9/A 5.75 250
Aer,-.:,,r, Furd VWAMuirA rn LV 38,821 27.66 +2.6 +12.1/C +1.8/B 5.75 250
Frar ie.p-Frxir, in,:,T, eA ,T, CA 34,273 2.21 +2.9 +12.2/A +5.8/A 4.25 1,000
PIM,":.' T.iAt.iTr,lm t. Cl 33,684 10.87 +1.6 +7.5/B +7.7/A NL 1,000,000
'.,.iii)u.alr, i.iPlu LB 33,642 118.35 +4.3 +14.9/B +2.3,3 NL 200,000,000
,r,,, r,: Fur.li NeePerir.4 m WS 33,224 28.96 +1.9 +10.8/C +5.3/A 5.75 250
A,T,n.," r,F ur,d, Fr,ir,nA T, LB 33,088 37.50 +3.5 +12.8/D +4.1/A 5.75 250
V' j, ui..],00ir.v LB 31,904 119.18 +4.3 +14.7/B +2.1/C NL 3,000
A,'nr,,, r i.urnd.BalA n MA 31,408 18.29 +3.4 +12.4/B +3.9/B 5.75 250
F,,-iry ,Gr,:,e.-O LG 28,621 87.45 +6.0 +24.0/A +5.6/A NL 2,500
vi,auid T.,:I dA.irr,l Cl 27,199 10.59 +0.9 +5.6/D +5.7/B NL 10,000
Vi..uald iidWelllr.imrr MA' 27,179 54.74 +3.2 +10.4/D +5.7/A NL 50000
Fidelity LowPdStk d MB 27,094 39.20 +3.7 +18.8/D +5.0/B NL 2,500
CA -ConservativeAllocation, Cl -ntermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Bend, FG -Fornr LargeGrowth, FV -Fogn
Large Value, IH -World Alkocaon, LB .-Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV-
Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specialty-heath, WS -World Stock, Total Retum: Chng In NAV with dividends lanvested. Rank: How fund performed vs.
others with same objective: Ais in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Inilnyt: Minimum $ needed to invest In fund. Source: Momingstar.


jl












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


010 Announcements

PLAY TO IM


060
$ 01
One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days line S oa
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
S Each Item must include a price


Services

Cabinets For Less
Free Estimates
www.tlcw.us
386-288-2836


o 100 Job
Opportunities

6 Temporary Farm Workers need-
eOne Item per add. Employer: Orville Hail, Jr.
4 lines 6 ays Tobacco, Straw/Hay, & Row
Rpaeappiesi rondpisavtaiduasi Crop, Row Cop Produce,
p This inanson an1 s Greenhouse/Nursery & Alternative
P - i~


One Item per ad 2|
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $200 or less.
This is a non-refundable rate.




4 nes e 6 days. c tonall
Rate applies to private individuals selling
persona merchandise tontallig $4,00 or less.


One mitem per ad p s
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Sonal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less.
Each m. em must In5:o a pripe.m







3 days 71
includes 2 signs ,,i,,a l, n e i


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....$92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon.;,9:100a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mn., 9:00 am.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 am.
Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m. Thurs, 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00a.m. Fri.,9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 am. Fri.,9:001am.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first Incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.
Sr- ,Idand Online
tw 1 w. likci ty report r.coni


WorK. E employment Dates:L
03/15/11 01/15/12. Wage of
$9.71/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference Job Order
#KY0419186

04542849
Wanna Go West? Let's Go!
CDL A Operators Wanted for
Lease with a Lease Purchase
Plan, Spouse and Pet Rider
Policy, Health and Life
Insurance Available. 12-15 day
trips, No New England States,
You get 100% fuel surcharge,
0/0's and PTDI
Certified Students Welcome
CALL TODAY TO JOIN US
AND START
THE NEW YEAR
OFF RIGHT!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

04543009
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
Night Audit position
Part/full time. MUST be a people
person with great customer service
skills, strong work ethic, good
communication, computer skills,
and willingness to learn. MUST be
a team player and be able to work
a flexible schedule including
weekends and holidays.
Only those seeking long term
employment need apply in person
at Comfort Suites located 3690 W
US Hwy 90, Lake City. Please do
not call regarding application.

04543038
LOSS MITIGATION SPE-
CIALIST/FULL TIME
DUTIES AND
RESPONSIBILITIES:
Work with collection staff on
loss mitigation options to
avoid foreclosure, evaluate
borrowers financial situation to
review workout options; loan
modification, assumptions, short
sale, deed in lieu; work with
investors to ensure loss
mitigation efforts comply with
investor, insurer and company
guidelines as well as with
applicable laws and regulations.
Responsible for reporting loan
account status to investors on an
ongoing basis as well as
maintaining and updating
agency requirements for default
reporting & claims submission.
JOB REQUIREMENTS:
Must have experience in FHA
guidelines, reviewing
financial statements, tax
returns, and understand real
estate laws. Ability to work
independently as well as part of
a team. Ability to learn rules,
regulations, laws and methods
of collection. Strong negotiation
skills. Excellent organizational
skills. Self motivated and
results oriented. Bilingual
candidates encouraged to apply.
Full benefits package.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal Branch
and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029,
Lake City, FL 32056 or email
Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks / Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


4 ems days nach1hdditional
Rate applies to private Individuals IlIng
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.
Eahitem ut nlude a prce.


Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference Job Order
#KY0417453.


100 Job
Opportunities

05524764
Suwannee Homecare is seeking
LPN's for an elderly Gainesville
couple for 7am-7pm Days and
weekends will vary This is a
great position to supplement
income Please call Wendy
386-755-1544
Serious inquires only

05524886
OFFICE MANAGER
Mini-Storage and Record
Storage of Lake City seeks
energetic and creative individual
with proven customer service
skills and sales skills,
excellent computer skills.
Monday thru Friday and some
Saturday required. Salary
Range $32,500 to $45, 000.
Email resume to:
stephen@lakecitystorage.com or
drop off resume at main office
on: 442 SW Saint Margarets
Street, Lake City, FL 32025

Experienced Legal
Secretary/Paralegal
5 yrs exp, including
civil litigation, email resume and
salary requirements to:
sportsroof@yahoo.com

Experienced Stylist
needed, apply at
Southern Exposure Salon
386-752-4614
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.
12 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Employer: Mahan Farms
- Paris, KY. Tobacco, Straw/Hay,
Row Crop, Vegetable, & Sod
Production & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 03/01/11 -
12/31/11. Wage of $9.71/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference Job
Order #KY0417455.
20 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Employer: Mark
Cunningham Elkton, KY. To-
bacco, Straw/Hay, & Row Crop
Production, & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 03/01/11 -
12/31/11. Wage of $9.71/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence reim-
bursed when 50% of contract is
met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference Job
Order #KY0416445.
New Generation Christian School
is hiring an elementary teacher.
Minimum of bachelors degree in
education, psychology or other
related field is required.
Please fax application to:
(386) 758-5597 or e-mail to
pgorman@newgenerationschool.org
Receptionist needed for ASC,
knowledge of insurance a plus.
Please send resume to:
admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net
or fax to 386-755-2169
Residential Carpenters needed.
Must have tools and transporta-
tion. Call 386-623-7063 or
386-496-3873 for information.
TEACHER/PTA/PCA,
(Brain damage therapies preferred)
FDLE check, some driving,
cooking, cleaning and personal
care, lift 100 lbs is required
3-4 days a week, Email
resume' and reference to
PCAposition@yahoo.com
5 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Todd Clark
Farms, Inc. Tobacco, Straw/Hay,
S & Row Crop, Poultry &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 03/01/11 12/31/11. Wage
of $9.7 1/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Center
in your area and reference Job
Order #KY0417494.
Two Hair Stylist needed,
with clientele for Branford salon,
please call Maggie,
386-935-4059
Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630
8 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: William &
Lynn Gamett Farms. Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, & Row Crop
Production & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 03/01/11 -
12/15/11. Wage of $9.71/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.


Apply Online or In Personl


SITEL


110 Sales
110 SEmployment

05524825
Lake City, FL based business
looking for qualified sales
professional. Performance based
pay estimated $45K+ per year.
Advertising Sales experience
preferred. Send resume to
info@lakecityfl.info or
PO Box 1208, Lake City, FL


1 an Medical
120 Employment

05524758
RN NEEDED
7:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m.
The Health Center of Lake City
has an opening for an RN with
good assessment skills
Excellent Salary
EOE/ADA/Drug
Free Workplace
Apply in person or
send resume to:
The Health Center
of Lake City
560 S.W. McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025

05524896



MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
RN's
PRN/1 yr experience
CNA
F/T & PRN
ARNP Outpatient Svcs
Starke/Tri County

Recovery Specialist
Prevention Specialist
Starke/Lake City

Bachelors Therapist
Support
Masters Therapists
Adult Substance Abuse
(Licensed)
Emergency Screener
Lake City

Adult Case Manager
Live Oak

Psychiatrist
Outpatient clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City

Custodial
Lake City
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
www.mbhci.org
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP

Busy outpatient surgery center has
immediate opening for part time
Registered Nurses.
Please email resume to
administration@lcsurgerycenter.com
or fax to 386-487-3935.

Homecare LPN's &
Homecare CNA's needed for cli-
ent in Lake City, call
Maxim Healthcare Services
352-291-4888

Physician's Assistant or Nurse
Practitioner needed for new Ur-
gent Care Center in Alachua area,
ER or Urgent Care experience a
plus, but riot required. Contact
Paul @ 352-258-4452

4 Schools &
240 Education

04542861
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/17/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

AKC GERMAN SHEPPARD
puppy. Born 12/13.
Parents on site. $400.
386-496-3654 or 352-745-1452


CE?


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


310 Pets & Supplies
Albino Cockatiel w/cage
and supplies $75
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
Thank you fo rthe inquires.
We have already found a
home for the blonde lab
mix female.


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid-2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. ob6. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques
CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621


402 Appliances
GE Electric Stove,
White, works great,
$160 386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331 eves after 6pmr
GE Gas Cook Top,
Black, still in box $650 new,
will accept $225
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
Matching Whirlpool
Washer/Dryer Set,
White $245
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331


407 Computers
DELL COMPUTER
$80. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture
ASHLEY DINING ROOM
TABLE w/6 chairs and leaf.
$150.00 Great Deal!!!
386-344-5706

Comfortable, used Love Seat,
Beige cloth, $20,
1st come 1st served!
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous
Gas Heater, (four grate)
Dearborn type, $50
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387 "

PIGLETS
Black & White
$50 each
386-965-2215 '
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
719-4802
REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
WWW.Iakecityreporter.com


Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: h iimnni,,iolc edu
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SITil


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2 br/2 full bath SWMH
ready to rent Ft White
$600.mo
386-497-1464 or 365-1705
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
Clean, quiet 3/2 ($625 mo) &
.2/1 ($450 mo.) both in Branford
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114






Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003 "
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Nice 4br/2.5 ba, 3 ac. Fenced
/Cross Fenced, paved rd., huge
deck, private. McAlpin area. $900
dep. & $950. mo. 386-867-1833

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

05524744
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers Save
up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832


Unfurnished Apt.
7 0v For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

05524833
Get up to $2011 in 2011!
Call for Details
Windsong Apts
386-758-8455
2br/lba house. In town
Close to shopping.
$500. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $500. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Large 2br/2ba Duplex.in
nice area with W/D hookup.
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country aci;e 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

FLORIDA
GATEWAY
"- COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
HEATING VENTILATION AND AIR
CONDITIONING (HVAC)
224 DUTY DAYS
GRANT FUNDED
To teach at Columbia Correctional
Institution. Responsible for the
development and.implementation of
the HVAC curriculum based on the
provided course objectives. The
instructor is required to use any tools,
equipment, or textbooks provided for
the program Prepare all class
materials, syllabi exams, etc.
Prepare students for employment in
the HVAC industry. Maintain all
course records (attendance and
grades) to meet audit requirements.
Requires four years experience in the
HVAC industry. Must become
NCEER Certified HVAC Instructor
and receive a Proctors License to
give the EPA exam. Must have prior
teaching experience and be
comfortable working in a
government-regulated environment.
Knowledge of basic teaching
concepts and proficient in
troubleshooting, installing and
repairing HVAC equipment required.
Desirable Qualifications A.S Degree
in Industrial Maintenance or related
work area preferred with teaching
experience. Salary: Based on degree
and experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 2/11/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.ffgcedu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place


I'",


TM,!


AR










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011


7 Furnished Apts.
20 For Rent
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

M0443053
403 Baya Ave...First month's
rent discounted 50%! 3/2
remodeled home on Baya Ave.
1440 sf. with side deck. Pets
considered. $790./mo +
$790./ security
642 SW Chris Terrace...
Located in a nice wooded
subdivision, beautiful 3/2
upscale rental close to Lake City
but far enough out to enjoy your
privacy. $1150./mo plus
$1150. secuirty
315 Piedmont Live Oak...older
4/2 home in downtown Live
Oak. Kitchen remodeled.
$850./mo plus $825. security
881 SW Sunview...Gorgeous
4/2 country home between Lake
City and Ft. White just off SR
47. Mobile home situated on 5
acre comer lot. $900./ mo. plus
$900. security
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co. @
386-365-5884
http://springsrus.com/
Learn about Lake City!

05524832
New Years Dream "Surprise"
Why Rent? Lease to own.
New model home 2 miles S off
47. 3000 sq ft, 4/3, 5% int, is
tax deduc, consider trade-in
386-752-1364

1/1 small home for rent,
near Pinemount Rd.
386-755-8918
call anytime
2 br/lba w/Laundry room
w/yard, near airport, $500. mo;
1st, last & $300 sec.
386-752-0335 M-F 8-4
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1000 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport, $825 mo, 1st,
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Three Rivers Estates, 2/1, CH/A,
2010 W2 and ref's from current
landlord required, $700 month, &
$700 sec dep, 386-497-4699


TOWNHOUSE 2br plus bonus
room. w/1.5 bath. Quail Heights
CC. $750. mo plus $250 damage
dep. 386-752-8553

750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd, owner fin, no
down pym't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.
This nice 4.5 acre parcel has.
septic, power & well, older MH
$39.900 MLS 76182
Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty

810 Home for Sale
$569 mo 3Bd/2Ba Modular
1/2 acre Deck, energy efficient,
appliances, drive, w/$12K down
($640 mo w/ $6K down).
Avail in March
Owner finance or rent to own???
Call (386) 758-9824 hurry
2br/2ba Eastside Village.
Unique floor plan. Lg utility/
work room. Screened front porch.
$55,000 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
3/1 on 4.43 acres, metal roof,
pond on property,
Lease option available
$129,888 Results Realty,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
3br/2ba 80'X125' lot. 1,200 sqft.
Kitchen & bath remodeled, metal
roof, Ig fenced back yard. Close to
amenities. $79,900 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Brick home w/1,934 sqft
in Piccadilly Park. 1/2 acre. Lg
playroom, fenced yard. Reduced to
$139,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
3br/2ba Custom home. on 5 ac.
where deer & turkey roam.
Lg barn w/enclosed workshop.
$219,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
4/2 in Sub-div, open floor
plan,florida room, porch, fenced,
$150,000 call Missy Zecher
@Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
4/2 on 4 acres, open floor plan, 2
living rms, rec room w/wet bar
$89,900 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
4/3 farm house on 3.95 acres
w/private pond, surrounded by
oaks $689,000 Charlie Sparks,
Westfield Realty MLS#76149
386-755-0808
4br/2ba, 5 ac., 2069 sqft. Ig family
& florida rm, den. Covered patio,
workshop. $229,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba, remodeled, views of the
lake. Formal ILR, dining room &
family room. Many upgrades.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
67.5 acre farm, fenced, workshop,
pole barn and two ponds, MH
(1984 sq ft) $299,000
call Patti Taylor at
Access Realty 386-623-6896


Affordable, clean home in sub-div,
Freshly painted interior,
This is a must see!
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
BRAND new home, Irg master
suite, 2 miles from US 90,
$179,900 MLS #76449
Carrie CasonWestfield Realty
386-623-2806
Brick home on 5 acres,
country feel close to town!
Must See! Results Realty
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
Clean, cozy, well maintained 3/2
on 1.05 acres, lots of shade trees,
built in 2007, $135,900
Call Patty Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896


Classified Department: 755-5440


WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
8 Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190
Commercial property situated
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya Ave 3.27 acres,
$398,888 Results Realty
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271


1


DAY
FORONL


l $4


ADVERTISE IT HERE!.

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


For ore etals Cll Mry r Brdge

at 386-755-544


810 Home for Sale
Country Club. 4br/4ba. New roof,
AC, windows. Pool, hot tub,
& greenhouse. $229,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Custom Brick, 5+ ac. 5br/4ba.
4412 sqft. 3 car garage, pool, hot
tub, 3 fireplaces, more. $569,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lori Giebeig Simpson 365-5678
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home
w/oversized garage.
Eastside Village Realty, Inc
386-752-5290
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home
2br/2ba, 1 car garage,.
Eastside Village Realty $83,000
386-752-5290
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home lots of
amenities; clubhouse, pool, spa.
Eastside Village Realty
$89,500 386-752-5290
Excellent area. 3br/2ba home.
1620 sqft. w/covered patio. Lg
front porch & 1 car carport
Lori Giebeig. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances, close to
schools, $65K 478-391-1592
Large 3/2 brick home w/basement.
2 living areas, porch on 2 lots
$129,900 MLS #74118
386-623-2806 Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty
Large entertaining home, w/pool,
gazebo, huge workshop,
$285,000 Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Large home w/acre of land, Irg
family & florida rooms,
covered porch,
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Move In Ready. 3br/2ba w/1,225
sqft. Comer lot, great S/D.
12x16 workshop w/elec.
Upgrades. $75,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
Nice 3/2 home on 4 acres
close to town $168,000,
Motivated seller MLS#73410
Carrie Cason Westfield Realty
386-623-2806
Nicely remodeled 3/2 on 2 acres,
partially fenced $115,888
Nancy Rogers @
Results Realty
386-867-1271
Open House Sat. 01/22. 10a-4p
215 NW Fairway Hills Glen. Fully
remodeled condo, Unit #9. Golf
Coarse view. Introductory price
$125,000. 386-397-3800/697-1334
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Woodcrest S/D Super location,
nice back yard. 3br/2ba home,
cov-
ered back poich. New AC in 2010
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
WOODGATE VILLAGE.
3br/2ba DWMH.
Close to new elementary
school. $27,000. 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc

820 Farms&
2( Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


83O0 Commercial
830 Property
Property (comer location), easy
access comer, close to downtown,
$94,000 Charlie Sparks
Westfield Realty
386-755-0808 MLS#74814


940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
2007 Nissan Titan Crew Cab
only 25,000 miles stock #F28
386-365-7431 Steve Bonesio
Rountree-Moore Ford
97 Chevy Z71 ExJended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802






950 Cars for Sale
2008 Cadillac DTS, only 15,000
miles, stock # 245108, pls ask for
Myron Wruble @ 386-755-0630
#292, Rountree-Moore Ford
2010 Grand Marquis, 3 to choose
from stock #F292 Myron Wrubel,
386-755-0630 #292
.Rountree-Moore Ford
2010 Hyundia Sonata GLS,
4dr, $12,999, warranty, auto, stock
#F307 Dwight Twiggs Rountree-
Moore Ford 386-755-0630 #219
Gas Saver, 07 Sporty Honda Fit,
stock #293G, 31 city 40 hwy,
Tommie Jefferson @ 386-209-
S8680 Rountree-Moore Ford

952 Vans & Sport
S Util. Vehicles
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Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, January 16, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Right time

to grow

seedlings

indoors

Growing your
own seedlings
for the spring
vegetable
garden can
be very rewarding. You
can get a head start on
the growing season and
find the cultivars that are
adapted best for Florida.
You will be able to grow
more plants from seed for
the same money as buying
transplants in cell packs or
pets.
Some vegetable plants
are just too difficult to
establish from transplants.
It is advisable to wait and
sow them directly into the
garden when the weather
is favorable. Some of these
plants include bush and
pole beans, lima bean,
melon, sweet corn, cucum-
ber, southern pea, squash
and turnip.
Our average frost-free
date is in mid-March. We
most likely will not have
frosts later, but there's no
guarantee.
Most vegetable trans-
plants are going to require
six to eight weeks to devel-
op before setting them out
in the garden.
If you do the math, you'll
see that now, mid-January,
is the right time to start
your seeds indoors.
If you are new at germi-
nating seeds indoors, con-
sider trying tomato, broc-
coli, cauliflower, eggplant
or peppers. These plants
are easy to grow if you give
them the proper condi-
tions, and they will more
likely survive being trans-
planted into the garden.
Start with seeds that
are adapted to Florida,
and those that have good
nematode and disease
resistance.
A list of good vegetable
varieties for our gardens
can be found at http.//edis.
ifas. ufl. edu/vh021.
Check the local garden
shops, farm supply stores,
seed catalogues, and on-
line seed companies for
seeds.
The materials you will
need to get started include
sterile seed-starter soil,
clean seed trays or cell
packs, water, and water sol-
uble houseplant fertilizer.
Other requirements for
growth are warmth, bright
light, and constant soil
moisture.
Containers such as cans
or yogurt cups with drain
holes can also be used for
direct seeding or for trans-
planting seedlings.
If you would like to try
staring seeds this year, the
Master Gardeners can pro-
vide you with instructions,
tips, and lots of encourage-
ment.
They can be reached on
Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday mornings at the UF
Extension Office, or call
them at 752-5384.

E D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


If


04.4 P






JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the First Presbyterian Church share a joke while compiling food for the church's Backpack Project, a program that gives school children non-
perishable food for the weekend. Pictured are local missions elder Beverly Schulz (from left), Terri Millikin and youth director Kristy Ray. 'We wanted to
feed people,' said Schulz, the program's coordinator. 'I feel like it's something that everyone in the church can take a part in.'





Backpack Ministry



Mission project delivers tasty food for Melrose students


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. comr
Attending a Purpose
Driven Church
Conference last
spring left members
of First Presbyterian
Church of Lake City with a new
ministry idea the Backpack
Ministry.
"We heard about mission proj-
ects other churches were doing
and someone mentioned the
Backpack Ministry," said Beverly
Schulz, local missions elder. "I
felt like we could do that project
here."
First Presbyterian kicked off
the project in September for
the 2010 school year at Melrose
Park Elementary School, Schulz
said. It provides 15 students at
Melrose Park Elementary School
with enough food to eat on week-
ends.
Schulz already knew Melrose
Park Elementary School Principal
Joe Adkins, who agreed to have
the school participate in the pro-
gram. School guidance counselor
Robby Demmons helped identify
students to receive backpacks.
Selected students receive free
or reduced breakfast and lunch at
the school, she said. But on the
weekends they might be left with


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Beverly Schulz inventories the different foods stocked in the church's pan-
try, which was donated by dozens of congregation members. The program
gives food consisting of two breakfast and lunch items, a snack and a
drink to Melrose Park Elementary students.


little or no food.
Each week the church provides
backpacks filled with enough
food for at least four meals and a
snack, she said. Students pick up
the backpacks on a Friday.
"Then on Monday they return
their empty backpacks and we fill
them again," Schulz said.
Items in the backpack include
individually wrapped and single-
serve packages of instant oat-
meal, crackers, canned meats


and more, she said. The items
are donated by members of the
church's congregation.
"Members have been more
than generous with their dona-
tions," she said.
One of the church's mem-
bers, Lisa Smith, is a teacher at
Melrose Park and serves as a liai-
son for the program. Smith deliv-
ers the backpacks each week.
The students impacted .by the
project are so appreciative and


grateful, Schulz said. One student
was excited about the candy
canes she received in the back-
packs during the holidays.
"She told me she gave one to
her friends since she got two,"
she said.
Columbia County has so many
caring people willing to help oth-
ers in need, said Mike Millikin,
superintendent of schools.
"This is an excellent example
of a church adopting a school
and providing what the students
need," he said. "It's a wonderful
thing."
Schulz said she would like to
see more churches or organi-
zations in the area take on a
similar project to benefit other
schools in the district. The need
is greater than just one church.
Now more than ever, fami-
lies need assistance with the
current economy, Schulz said.
Money parents would have
spent on food can possibly go
to another need just by simply
providing the backpacks.
Participating in the ministry
helps meet the physical needs,
in addition to spiritual ones, of
others, she said. Churches are
called to reach out to those in
need.
"We're showing God's love,"
she said.


Levi's makes 'waterless' denim


By SAMANTHA CRITCHELL

.ViEll 1OR
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You don't take a trip ... a trip takes you


Rule No. 1 for
traveling: Just
do it! Even
from Lake City,
there are many
short day trips that are
available the Stephen
Foster State Park in
White Springs, the Gulf of
Mexico, the Atlantic Ocean
or the many Orlando
attractions.
And, if you get the
chance, try traveling
to another country to
see more of our world
- Canada and Mexico
would be easy choices.
Most of these travel tips
are for folks who are
going on extended trips.
Rule No. 2 for travel-
ing: Pack light.
I'm the most notori-
ous for overpacking and
I literally pay for it-
with the airlines putting
on extra charges for lug-
gage these days.
During the year I
spent in Finland, I trav-
eled to many other
European countries by
bus, by train, and by
ship. I saw an Australian
couple getting off a


cruise ferry in Sweden
and they had only one
medium-sized suitcase
on wheels for each
of them during their
month-long European
tour.
I once knew a woman
who really traveled light
- she took only three
pairs of underwear: one
to wear, one to wash,-
and one to dry. I sug-
gest carrying only four
pairs of shoes on your
long trips: tennis shoes
for lots of walking,
dress flats, low-heeled
dress shoes and sandals
or flip flops as house-
shoes. And never buy
new shoes before you
go break them in for
several months (and if
you do get blisters, buy
mole skin at a phar-
macy).
Be careful. I have
been pickpocketed sev-
eral times. Once was
when I had just left a
money exchange coun-
ter in Paris. Of course, I
was a target the thief
just saw me receive
money and saw where I


rqI~


Dr. Sheri Carder
sheri. carder@fgc.edu
put it. My backpack was
pick-pocketed while I
was doing research in a
library in England and I
left it on the table while
I went to get books.
With the terrorist
fears today, never leave
your luggage unat-
tended and never agree
to hold anything for any-
one else.
Make a copy of your
credit cards, pass-
port, birth certificate,
insurance cards, and
prescriptions. Keep a
copy in your wallet and
another in your luggage
or carry-on.
Check your health
insurance to see if it
covers you while trav-
eling. Check your car
insurance to see if


you're covered when
renting a car.
Pre-pay all your bills
that may come due
while you're away.
Stop the newspapers
and mail if you're away
for more than a few
days.
Turn off your tele-
phone answering
machine. Have someone
mow your yard if you're
away for more than a
week. And for good-
ness sakes, dQn't post
on Facebook that you're
away on a trip.
Leave your expensive
jewelry and important
papers in a safe deposit
box.
Leave a copy of your
itinerary with your fam-
ily. Adjust your thermo-
stat and hot water heat-
er while you're away
(but don't turn them
all the way off). Turn
off your water supply
at the washing machine
and dishwasher. Put
your lights on a timer.
Unplug all computers
and electronics.
If you don't have lug-


gage on wheels, ask for
it on your next birthday.
There is no substitute.
Forget black luggage
because everyone's
looks alike. If you do
have black luggage, put
a colored ribbon on your
handle.
If you fly, your
luggage will eventu-
ally be ruined from
the machine handling.
So buy the best you
can and buy the most
lightweight you can.
With limits on luggage
weight, don't buy a.17-
lb. suitcase if you can
only pack a total of 50
lbs.
Always pack an empty,
collapsible suitcase so
that you can bring home
all the souvenirs you
buy.
Take only a few coor-
dinating pieces of cloth-
ing. Change their look
with scarves, different
tops or accessories.
Roll your clothes. They
will wrinkle less and
take up less room.
And, because you're
going to build great


memories, take a cam-
era.
It's better to choose
a lightweight point-and-
shoot digital camera
that uses regular AA or
AAA batteries. You can't
always get to an electri-
cal outlet to recharge.
Lastly, edit and print
your photos, label them
on the back, and put
them in a photo.album
as soon as you get home
... before you forget.
Digital memory sticks
get lost and computer
hard drives can crash,
so don't rely on keeping
them digitally.
Go. Be open to adven-
ture. See new places.
Get out of your ruts.
Adapt to other cultures.
And, as author John
Steinbeck advises, let
the trip take you.
The world is a book,
and those who do not
travel, read only a page.

* Dr. Sheri Carder is profes-
sor of marketing and man-
agement at Florida Gateway
College. She can be reached
at 386-754-4407.


Jones
Lavater "Pat" and Elton
Jones of Lake City are cel-
ebrating their 71st wedding
anniversary.
They were married Dec.
20, 1939 in the Hatchbend
community in Lafayette
County.
She is the former Lavater
"Pat" Grambling.
Their sons are Carlos
Jones,JeraldJones and Gene.
Jones al of Jacksonville.
They have seven married
grandchildren and six great-
grandchildren.


COURTESY PHOTO
Lavater and Elton Jones.


BIRTH

Darrell Jenkins

Sean and Kathy Jenkins
of Lake City announce the
birth of their son, Darrell
Parker Jenkins, born Nov.
16 in North Florida Regional
in Gainesville. He weighed
10 pounds and measured
21 inches. He joins a
brother, Trace Jenkins, 12.
Grandparents are Ernest
and Tracy Ogden of Lake
City and Bill and Renee
Jenkins of Lake Alfred.
Great-grandparents are
Emily and the late Charles
Ogden of Lake City.


ENGAGEMENT


Evans Fentress

Lametria "Mickey"
Evans and James Stephen
Fentress, both of Lake City,
announce their engage-
ment and upcoming mar-,
riage.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Harry and
Thelma Evans and the late
Ellen Evans. She is a devot-
ed caregiver for people with
developmental disabilities.
The future groom is the
son of the late James III and
Lorraine Hines Fentress.
He is a retired aerospace
industrial engineer.
An April 29 wedding is
planned.


Lametria Evans and James Stephen Fentress.


ENGAGEMENT


Theresa Lynn Lastinger and Robert Westberry.


Lastinger-
Westberry

James Lastinger and
Joyce Hall of Lake City
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Theresa
Lynn Lastinger of Lake
City, to Robert Westberry
III of Lake City.
He is the son of Robert
,and Sonya Westberry of
Lake City.
The bride-elect is a 2005
graduate of Columbia
High School. She is the
sales and catering direc-
tor at Holiday Inn Lake
City and an active volun-


COURTESY PHOTO


In Russia, New Year's


celebrations last 10 days


By DAVID NOWAK
Associated Press

ZHELEZNO-
DOROZHNY, Russia -
While the rest of the world
has been back at work for
days, the New Year's holi-
days are barely half over
in Russia.
Since 2004, Russians
have been partying
through the first 10 days
of January, after May holi-
days were moved to win-
ter to give people some
respite during their seem-
ingly interminable deep
freeze.
While few complain
about the extra days off,
some economists wonder
whether the country can
really afford such a long
break, especially as ripples
from the global financial
meltdown are' still being
felt.
Yet at an outdoor ice rink
near Zheleznodorozhny,
a town of 100,000 about
20 miles east of Moscow,
macroeconomics was the
furthest thing from any-
one's mind.
"Who cares about the
economy? Justlook around
you," said retired mechan-
ic Valery Rannykh, 70.


teer with the Pregnancy
Care Center and other
local organizations.
The future groom
is a 2007 graduate of
Columbia High School.
He is currently employed
with the Department of
Corrections at Baker
Correctional Institute.
The wedding is
planned for 4:45 p.m.
Feb. 12 in the Mandi
Chapel of Camp Weed
in Live Oak. A reception
will follow at the Juhan
Dining Hall in Camp
Weed.
All family and friends
are invited to the wed-
ding.


The scene was intoxi-
catingly tranquil: moth-
ers helping toddlers into
skates for the first time;
father-vs.-son hockey
games; brothers whizzing
up and down playing tag.
Among. the freeflowing
mayhem, Rannykh's 6-
year-old'grandson, Dima,
skidded around the rink.
"Look out there. He is
growing up. People are
living their lives. Isn't it
a pretty picture? This is
what the holiday means
to us economics be
damned," Rannykh said.
, Nearby, businessman
Sergei Kotelnikov, 42, was
beaming even though the
restaurant he co-owns was
closed.
"They can't take this
away from us. It is a holi-
day we earn," he said.
While many stores and
restaurants do stay open,
government offices, busi-
nesses, banks and factories
are shuttered. The stock
markets are closed and no
newspapers are printed.
Traffic flows smoothly
on Moscow's chronically
jammed roads.
New Year's has been
the biggest holiday of the
year in Russia since Soviet


times, when celebrating
Christmas was banned or
discouraged under com-
munist rule. Christmas
returned to favor with the
1991 collapse of the Soviet
Union.













China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Sarah Butler
Michael O'Rourke
February 26, 2011


Tiffany Torrans

Kyle Malone
March 19, 2011
i-*

Shannon McRae

Michael Bishop
March 19, 2011


Dianna Roberts

Jay Swisher
March 26, 2011


Dorrie Sloan.
James Albritton, Jr.
April 2, 2011


Joanna Watson
Dustin King
April 15, 2011


Christine Moses
David Moor
May 21, 2011
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding or
shower gift. We update their
list as gifts are purchased,
and gift wrap.

WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
S156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


--------'


ANNIVERSARY


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Family finds relief by putting


intolerable mother in a home


DEAR ABBY: My 92-year-
old mother is the most hateful
woman you have ever met. My
husband and I took her into our
home because she could no lon-
ger care for herself. She imme-
diately took over everything,
telling us what to do, being de-
manding and complaining that
nothing was ever right.
She tried to discipline my
well-behaved kids, ages 15 and
21. She attempted to treat them
the way she treated us, using
foul language, hitting and ver-
bally abusing. My husband and
kids have called me at work
saying I need to get home im-
mediately because Mother was
out of control.
We told her we'd cook her
meals because she could no
longer use the oven. We mod-
eled appropriate examples of in-
teracting with the kids, but she
just didn't get it. We finally had
to put her in a nursing home.
Now we are wracked with
guilt Did I do the right thing?
My siblings didn't want her
because of her long history of
abuse. I'm in no hurry to visit
her at the home, either. Why
couldn't she be the kindly
grandma and parent that many
children have? GUILT-
RIDDEN IN TUSTIN, CA-
LIF.
DEAR GUILT-RIDDEN:
Probably. because she was
modeling behavior she learned
from her own mother and pos-
sibly because she is demented.
Frankly, it was unrealistic to
expect that she would suddenly
change from the person she has
A


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com

been for the past 92 years into a
Disney character and I don't
mean Cruella De Vil.
Did you do the right thing?
All things considered, yes. How-
ever, you should not abandon
your mother. As a loving daugh-
ter which you have tried to
be.- I'm advising you to try
a little harder. Visit her. Bring
her something to distract her.
If she's able to be moved, take
her out for a meal. When she's
gone, you, unlike your siblings,
will have nothing to regret.
DEAR ABBY: My son
"Rob" and his fiancee invited
me to join them at a dinner his
father and stepmother, "Jane,"
are hosting. Rob's grandmoth-
er, brother and sister-in-law
will be there, as well as Jane's
two sons. I love them all and
thought they loved me.
Apparently, Jane doesn't
want me to attend! No rea-
son was given. I was shocked.
Jane and my ex were always
welcomed in my home and
life. I wished them well when
they married after dating for
20 years. Jane's children have
spent the night in my home. I
took care of them for several
days after a hurricane. I even


flew her youngest son'to join
Rob and me at a theme park.
Now when I look back, I realize
Jane never reciprocated.
Rob and I are heartbroken.
He wants nothing to do with
Jane and doesn't want her at
his wedding. He's furious with
his dad for letting Jane make
the rules. Rob doesn't want
to attend their dinner. Abby,
I am sick that I have appar-
ently caused a rift in the family.
Please tell me how to deal with
this. STUPEFIED IN THE
SOUTH
DEAR STUPEFIED: Take
the high road and encourage
Rob to attend the dinner. This is
Jane's party, and as the hostess
it was her privilege to invite you
- or not. Rob should not have
assumed that he could dictate
her guest list.
While you have done every-
thing you can to be a friend to
Jane and have one large, happy
extended family, she may feel
competitive toward you. Or
she may regard you as a chap-
ter in her husband's life that
she would prefer to be closed.
Regard it as a reflection on her
and her own insecurities. Be
smart, take your cue from this
and step back.
As to Jane attending Rob's
wedding if he wants his dad
there, he may have to accept
her presence. But that decision
is Rob's to make. Do not allow
yourself to be dragged into it.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Give yourself more
time to rethink your strategy
before you share it with oth-
ers. Focus on being the best
that you can be physically,
emotionally, mentally and fi-
nancially. Accept the help of-
fered by someone you. love.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Plan a vacation
or take a mini holiday to be
with someone you miss or go
with someone you love. You
will gain experience from the
people with whom you inter-
act. Emotional stability will
be yours. -***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Spend your time with
someone you know well and
trust, someone you can relax
with and enjoy simple plea-
sures. Put your energy into
love and laughter. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't waste too much
time fretting over money or
worrying about possessions
or investments. Working on
what you have to offer is a far
better way to spend your day.
An older individual will put
things in perspective. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Do whatever it takes to make
improvements. Whether you
focus on changing your im-
age, updating your look or
taking a course that helps
you learn something you can
offer others doesn't matter.
Spend the day working to-
ward-a better you. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't let your emotions
ruin a perfectly good time
with family or friends. Now
is not the time to criticize or
complain. Instead, enjoy the
people who love you and be
thankful for what you have.
Don't overspend. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You can inch your way
into something quite en-
joyable by taking part in a
project, htbby or class that
offers something out of the
ordinary. What you learn
now will help you out in the
future when dealing with oth-
ers. Distance yourself from
the negative. **-***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): There is plenty


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: H equals C
"Y J YG FC F X G Y B KWZ K KSLSIISB
KWY BSIAT BSNAT ES KS OFYHYD, F
BSNAT D K FAA OAZ GK L M Z OO A Y
K I Y Y LZ I K F G A N KWY I X FG E P I.
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I have been a gigantic Rolling Stones fan since
approximately the Spanish-American War.' Dave Barry
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 1-17


of change heading your way
and you don't want to miss
it by being reclusive. Inter-
acting with others will open
your mind and your heart
, to a new and better lifestyle.
Stop spinning your wheels
alone when someone else
can help you move forward.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Accept the in-
evitable and get on with your
life. Nothing stays the same
forever, so reinvent who you
are or what you are going to
do. You have plenty of tal-
ent and should be relying on
what you have to offer. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Avoid anyone try-
ing to limit you. You should
be looking at positive chang-
es for your home, lifestyle or
relationships. Keep things
simple and you will find a
path that saves you financial-
ly, emotionally and mentally.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't donate to a
cause you know little about.
Getting involved .in secrets
or someone else's business
will leave you in a vulnerable
position. Love is in the stars
and romance should be high
on your list. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Your input to any orga-
nization or cause you believe
in will be appreciated and
will enhance your reputa-
tion. Don't let someone you
love take advantage of you
or make you feel guilty about
what you do for others. ** -


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


THE LONG AND SHORT OF IT By Patrick Berry / Edited by Will Shortz 1 2 13 4 5 6 7 8 m 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18


Across
1 Thanksgiving
staple
4 "Big ___," 1995
Notorious B.I.G.
hit .
9 Some special deals
16 Entanglement
19 Beer buyers'
needs
20 Low profile
maintainer
21 Purifies
22 Exclusively
23 Manic desire to
make sweaters
when the
weekend starts?
26 Certain corp.
takeover
27 Musical
virtuosity
28 Uncharitable
29 One side of a
shutout
30 Put away '
31 "I shouldn't have
done that"
32 Contents .of the
Visine Gazette?
37 Empty words
38 Spot for a stream
39 Half brother of
Athena
40 Naval need of old
41 Like the
narrowest of
wins
43 Mends
45 Hardly surprising
48 Parts of many
cheerleading
uniforms?
50 Where brown and
white meet
51 Music category
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


52 Bit of chicken
feed
53 Plumbing, e.g.
55 Sticky sticks
.56 Disastrous
59 Chock-a-block
61 Author in the
1950s "angry
young men"
movement
62 "True Blood"
network
63 Addison's
to Creation"
64 Cleanup crew's
goal?
67 Badge material
.68 Caterer's vessel "
69 Part of a code
70 Photography
problem
71 "Ghosts of the
___" (James
Cameron
documentary
about the
Titanic)
73 Whither Cain
fled
74 Furnishes
76 Musician Brian
77 Rosada
(Argentine
presidential
manor)
79 Dandy things?
81 Punchophobic?
86 Layers
87 Asks for help, in
a way
88 Getting help, in a
way
90 London's Old

91 Unwelcome
stocking stuffer
92 Like some
highlighter
colors
93 2006 Verizon.
acquisition


94 Company whose
motto is "Our
pilots are
moderately
intelligent"?
100 Black
101 Repetition
102 "Giant" in
"Honey, I
Shrunk the Kids"
103 Layer
104 All-too-public
tiff
105 Org. that
supports water
fluoridation
106 "That thar was
an appropriate
thing to say!"?
111 Many a hand
sanitizer
112 Undeniable
success
113 Major-league
manager Joe
114 Urban rollers
115 Message in a
bottle
116 Bringing forth
young, as sheep
117 Springe
118 Batiking need

Down
1 Sinatra portrayer
on "S.N.L."
2 Residents of
Canyon County
3 Legal impediment
4 Three, four and
five, usually
5 Outdated
6 ___ mater (cranial
membrane)
7 Checks, e.g.
8 Not straight
9 Singer Lopez
10 Like some snow
11 Vacationing"


12 Voldemort's
portrayer in the
Harry Potter
films
13 Begrudges
14 Reacts to a shock
15 Div. of a former
union
16 Cronkite when at
the top of the
ratings?
17 The radius
extends from it
18 Explodes
24 Boom markets
25 "On second
thought, forget
it"
30 Tie-up
32 Root of
diplomacy
33 Musical featuring
"The Way He
Makes Me Feel"
34 Like.crab apples
35 John Steinbeck's
middle name
36 Top-grossing
concert act of
1989, '94 and
'05, with "the"
38 "The Government
Inspector"
playwright
42 Home of Galileo
Galilei Airport
43 ___ box
(computer screen
pop-up)
44 Big guns
45 Most hopeless
moment
46 Jackal-headed
god
47 Nonstarters?
49 Reagan-era
surgeon general
50 Unexciting
54 Insurance quote
56 Water sources
57 Dexterous


58 Easily damaged
major organs?
59 Tore
60 "___ Story,"
1989 best seller
64 Ethan Frome's
sickly wife
65 Wayhouses
66 Half-human
counselor on
"Star Trek:
T.N.G."
69 Program problem
71 Drained of blood
72 Help (out)


75 ___ Hughes,
2002 Olympic
skating gold
medalist
77 Brooklyn's ___
Island
78" Hair" hairstyles
80 Baseball Hall-of-
Famer with the
autobiography
"Maybe I'll
Pitch Forever"
82 1940s White
House dog
83 Political caller's
request


84 Covered with
trees
85 "For another
thing ..."
87 They deliver
89 Savoir-faire
91 Industry built
around shooting
stars?
94 Talks big
95 Barrel racing
venue
96 Chevy S.U.V.
97 Winter
windshield
problem


98 Cheap booze
99 Light figures?
100 Sphere or
system starter
104 "Little _
Pea" (1936
cartoon)
106 Your alternative
107 Mumbai Mr.
108 Beer and
skittles
109 Big D.C. lobby
110 Dog's sound


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
YESM PLE A SITIOR KN STIOICK
AIL T'ONH I N DNYAIL E UNRIEIP L
M0O0OT OLAV SMEAR TAPED
0A R E P M E I N S A AR GR A
AR SE B CK INTHEN0

I A L I A N El SI R

EAI NI H ICA GIK ET
SK 0 IC MSGR

E P OENA|T ME NI c 0
D ACI I I EN IT i R





ABIE KISAI RNA SENILE
L 0
DEATR EHWNMINY A B E T



CS I N G I J 0 E E A C H I L S E
DI NARN IL 0 NI ANA TMO N E E T
EN G LE NN tE S T sND E P|TNG R E S


__17 3 1


9 5 2 4


5 2 3 67


1 9 2


6 4


56 89


1 4 8 7


9 4 18


31 3


81LL 819196


Z S9' 9 L 6 8 I S L


L L16 8 919 'VI


V 8 9 6 LL 6 9 Z


9 ZC 17 9 6 8 LL


L 9 8 6 L v 6z91


C i V98LL1699

6L6L 9C L
96L9OL81


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415









4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011


Latest toolbox must-have? A smart phone


By MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON
For The Associated Press


and design enthusi-
asts can add a ver-
satile tool to their
toolbox: a phone.
Software programs available
for cell phones can help hom-
eowners with everything from
selecting paint colors to finding
artwork to determining their
favorite decorating style.
Mark English, a San Francisco
architect, uses an application
on his cell phone to help clients
visualize projects and plans.
English creates "idea books," or
files of images, for his clients to
review with Houzz, a free phone
app that contains more than
70,000 photos of rooms, homes
and landscape projects. Having
the images to refer to helps cli-
ents articulate more clearly their
likes and dislikes, he said.
"We can develop a language .
where we all know what these
adjectives mean," he said. "We
get to that .point where we know
what the goal is much more '
quickly."
Many apps are meant to pro-
vide inspiration for people look-
ing to redecorate. The Dream
Home app allows users to search
thousands of photos sorted by
style, room and color. The app,
which ranges in price from $1.99
to $4.99, is like having thousands
of design magazines at your
fingertips, said Peter Melnikov,
vice president of Apalon, the
company that created it.
Apps mean users can carry
their inspirations and ideas
wherever they go, said Bridget
Sandquist, editorial director for
holidays and entertaining at
BHG.com, Better Homes and
Garden's website. The magazine
released an app, which cost
$3.99, over the holidays that
offered tips on entertaining and
hosting parties.
Readers could consult their
phones in the kitchen for recipes
and in the store when shopping,
she said.
Decorating a room and
looking for just the right col-
ors? Sherwin-Williams' free


ASOuuIAIu t-KRS
This screenshot courtesy of Houzz shows the Houzz app. Software programs available for cell phones can help homeowners with everything from
selecting paint colors to finding artwork to determining their favorite decorating style. The free Houzz phone app contains more than 70,000 photos of
rooms, homes and landscape projects.


ColorSnap application lets you
take a photo of an item and
then find the name of the paint
hue that is closest to it. You can
fine-tune the color by making it
brighter or lighter, and also find
complementary colors.
Homeowners with freshly
painted walls can determine
what to hang on them with an
app from Art.com. The free pro-
gram lets users upload photos of
the wall and digitally fill it with
various pieces of artwork. The
resulting images can be sent to
friends and family to get their
opinions, too.
Once the perfect piece of art
is located, a level app can help
you hang it straight. Stanley


"We can develop a language where we all
know what these adjectives mean.We get
to that point where we know what the goal
is much more quickly."

Mark English
San Francisco-based architect


Bostitch offers a free app that
turns iPhones into picture level-
ers.
The Good Housekeeping
app offers advice on a variety
of issues ranging from "how
to remove mustard stains" to
"inspiration for a bathroom
renovation," said Sara Lyle, the
magazine's lifestyle director.


Good Housekeeping launched
its free app last year with the
intention of putting lots of advice
and articles in readers' hands at
once, she said.
The app includes step-by-step
instructions for many home
improvement and craft projects.
The portability of an app
means do-it-yourselfers can take


their phone with them to the
store when shopping for materi-
als for a project, Lyle said.
After lookingothrough pho-
tos on the Houzz app, Sharon
Glazer of Baltimore decided her
style lies somewhere between
contemporary and modern, with
a touch of Mediterranean flair.
Glazer, who is house hunting,
uses the app to organize her
ideas for decorating her next
home. She has even created files
to share with a designer once
she buys a house.
"We're trying to design out
what we're going to do and how
the rooms will look and flow
before we physically move,"
she said.


Cougar-cub pairs


not always ideal


for the long haul


By LEANNE ITALIE
Associated Press
Kimberlee
Turner
enjoyed the
cougar life
after a brief
teen marriage to her high
school sweetheart ended
in divorce.
She started off dat-
ing guys a few years her
junior, then graduated to
age spreads of a decade or
more.
"I was terrified of men
my age, or older than
myself. Really, really afraid,"
said Turner, a 46-year-old
bookkeeper from San Luis
Obispo, Calif. 'They wanted
to marry me and put me in
a house and keep me there.
They seemed incredibly
boring."
As the years rolled on,
though, her dates were
closer in age to her 25-year-
old daughter. Some of her
paramours joked that if her
offspring was just a little
bit older, '"I'd be dating her
instead.'"
So after years of play-
ing "Jane to their Tarzan,"
Turner is happily an ex-cou-
gar, living with a man four
years older in a relationship
five years strong and getting
stronger.
Much is made of age as
a meaningless number in
relationships as the cougar
craze has become cultural
wallpaper akin to older men-
younger women couplings.
But does age, in fact, some-
times matter and perhaps
more for women than for the
Hugh Hefners of the world?
The impact broad age
spreads have in how well
cougar-cub marriages fare


decades down the line has
been little studied. What
happens when a man, say
10 years younger or more,
decides he wants a biological
child? What about a financial-
ly independent career woman
who's ready to retire and hit
the road on permanent vaca-
tion while her youriger hubby
has years left on the job?
David Arquette, 39, said
46-year-old Courteney Cox
tired of being his "mother," so
they separated in October, 11
years and one child into their
marriage. Cher and Madonna
both married and are
divorced from younger men,
with no indication whether
age was a factor.
In a 2004 study of divorce
at midlife and beyond, the
AARP noted a likely uptick
in decouplings among older
people overall as life expec-
tancies increase and the less
traditional baby boom genera-
tion ages. In real numbers,
women married to younger
men were a thin demograph-
ic slice, less than 15 percent
For Deborah Becker,
41, in Eau Claire, Wis., it's
not about babies.but about
maturity and responsibility,
both common complaints
from women married to
men of all ages.
Becker's husband is 10
years younger. They tied
the knot three years ago
after three years of dating.
"I love the guy. I do. I
love it, but I don't know
how to bridge that gen-
eration gap without poten-
tially getting a third party
involved to help us learn
how to better communi-
cate," she said. "I saw the
Courteney Cox thing and
I was, like, I know where
she's coming from."


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424




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