The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01352
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: January 14, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01352
System ID: UF00028308:01352
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Tigers Fall
Chiles beats CHS soccer

000015 120511 ****3-DIGIT 3
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


U',


L

26 C-..



tyA.Re
1-ryB^ Re



_i...


Sw.,l'akecityr porter.com


Champions
.CMS wins Star Conference title.
Sports, I B






porter


Vol. 136, No. 306 E 75 cents


County letter to DEP drafted


Commissioners ask
state agency to look
into tubing issue.
By C.J. RISAK
crisak@lakecityreporter. corn
An initial step aimed at putting
the north end of the Ichetucknee
River on a course towards recov-
ery has been taken.
The Columbia County
Commissioners have put togeth-
er a draft of a letter meant for
Donald Forgione, the director
of the Florida Department of


"As the regulatory agency for the park,
Columbia County is concerned that the
Department of Environmental Protection
has not taken an action regarding the
restriction of tubing if such science exists."

Draft of letter prepared by County Commissioners


Environmental Protection. In it,
the commission asks the DEP to
"review the existing science and
act accordingly" in examining
any harm done by tubing in the
shallow, narrow waters at the


north end of the river.
At the county commissioners'
meeting Jan. 6, Jim Stevenson, a
former chief naturalist with the
Florida State Parks Department,
presented a resolution aimed at


stopping tubing from the north
end of the river.
An annual delight for many
familiar with the Itchetucknee, in
recent years problems believed
to be caused by the tubing pub-
lic walking on the bottom of the
river has stirred up a contro-
versy. A group led by Stevenson
is convinced algae and turbid-
ity have damaged the growth of
vegetation in the river, and it has
not been able to recover during
the offseason.
Since it's a state park, the
TUBING continued on 3A


TIP must take
new approach
in next 3 years

By C.J. RISAK
crisak@lakecityreporter. corn
When The Ichetucknee
Partnership was first formed
in 2008, it had a goal to
bring people from all areas
who could help in the riv-
er's preservation and resto-
ration -- and the means to
address it, at least in part.
Approximately $70,000 in
funding was available, which
TIP used for research and
TIP continued on 3A


SKUNKIE CLASH


JASON MAT IHEW WALKERlI.1,, '=:., a .,.:,
Columbia County resident Linda Cason addresses a panel of county officials Thursday while complaining about the noise
and smell allegedly coming from the Skunkie Acres compound.

Residents complain about stench

from White Springs animal shelter


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia
County
residents
gathered on
Thursday to
publicly complain of the
smell, barking dogs, loose
animals and loud music in
their White Springs neigh-
borhoods that they attri-
bute to Skunkie Acres.
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners orga-
nized a meeting at the
Springville Community
Center, allowing residents
to express their concerns.
Located at 608 NW
Sophie Drive in White
Springs, Skunkie Acres
is a family-operated, non-
profit organization with
riding stables, an exotic
animal zoo and a skunk
and exotic animal rescue.
The organization is owned


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Skunkie Acres owners Barbara and Bernard Haake defend
their organization against allegations made by neighbors,
including complaints ranging from foul smells and loud music
to barking dogs and rampant animals.


by Barbara Haake and her
daughter, Megan.
In attendance at the
meeting were Pam
Taylor, Lake City Humane
Society and Animal
Control program director;
Lisa Roberts, assistant
county manager; Sallie


Ford, Columbia County
Environmental Health
director; Commissioner
Ron Williams; Brian
Kepner, county planner;
Staff Lt. Ken Holmes
of the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission; Columbia


County Sheriff Mark
Hunter and more than 50
residents.
Williams said after the
county received a num-
ber of complaints about
Skunkie Acres, the meet-
ing was organized.
Hunter said the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office had received
almost 80 calls and had
15 incident reports filed
concerning Skunkie Acres
since 2007.
Maryann Moates of
White Springs said the
noises of loud music and
barking dogs were her
biggest concerns.
"We're the residents,"
she said. "We're the ones
that live there. We have to
see it, smell it and hear it
and I'm tired of it."
Linda Cason of White
Springs also said the
noises and smell were
SKUNKIE continued on 3A


DAR regent


sets focus on


guide dogs


Paws for Patriots
helps US soldiers
who've lost sight.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
artiinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
It was a doggy day for the
Edward Rutledge Chapter
Daughters of the American
Revolution.
Florida State Regent
Barbara Makant spoke
about her favorite project,
Paws for Patriots, dur-
ing the chapter's meeting
Thursday at Guangdong
Restaurant.
Paws for Phtriots is a pro-
gram through Southeastern
Guide Dogs to provide
guide dogs to service men


and women who lost their
eyesight due to combat
injuries.
Each state regent has
to decide on a worthwhile
cause to push during a
term, she said.
Paws for Patriots seemed
tobetherightcausq, Makant
said. She is a retired Air
Force officer and suffered'
the lost of visual fields due
to glaucoma.
"It was just a perfect proj-
ect for me," she said.
One of the first Paws
for Patriots recipients
was Marine Cpl. Michael
Jernigan, Makant said.
A roadside bomb in Iraq
severely injured Jernigan
DAR continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Betsy Burch (right), regent of the Edward Rutledge Chapter
Daughters of the American Revolution, pins a corsage decorated
with doggy treats to Florida State Regent Barbara Makant.


Greenthumb? Try

training class for

master gardeners


Program covers
basic botany, soil,
plant nutrition.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Residents with a love for
gardening and sharing their
knowledge are encouraged
to become a master gar-
dener.
The deadline to submit


applications for the next
Columbia County master
gardener training class is
Saturday.
Master gardeners are
University of Florida volun-
teers with special training
in horticulture who help
the community with that
knowledge, said Nichelle
Demorest, Columbia
County UF/IFAS extension
GARDENERS continued on 3A


1 84264 1I


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


Sunny
Sunny


WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................ 4A
O bituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics ......... 4B
Puzzles ......... ...... 2B
Around Florida........... 2A


TODAY IN
l ... NATION
' 'Hundreds mourn
Tucson victim.


COMING
SATURDAY
Learn how to save
lives through CPR.


aile


Friday, January 14,201 I


,\


-fl










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 2011


Faya


Thursday:
Afternoon: 9-2-3
Evening: 0-1-9


Thursday:
Afternoon: 8-8-6-8
Evening: 1-9-8-6


eznatdz.
%-:. Wednesday:
3-20-21-27-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Lady Gaga, Eminem, Perry to perform


NEW YORK
Lady Gaga, Eminem and
Katy Perry are set to per-
form at the 53rd annual
Grammy Awards.
The Recording Academy
announced Thursday that the nomi-
nees will hit the stage at the awards
show. It airs live on Feb. 13. Arcade
Fire, Cee Lo Green and Miranda
Lambert will also perform.
Eminem leads this year with 10
nominations. He's won 11 Grammy
awards throughout his career. Lady
Gaga is up for six awards, while Green
and Perry are up for four. Arcade Fire
and Lambert each have three nomina-
tions.
Other top nominees include Bruno
Mars with seven and Lady Antebellum
and Jay-Z, who each have six.

Gibson's next film to
debut at Texas festival
LOS ANGELES Mel Gibson's
return to the big screen will begin
in March at the S6uth by Southwest
festival.
Organizers of the Austin, Texas,
multimedia entertainment festival
announced Thursday that "The
Beaver" will be one of five films '
that will have their international
premieres at the event, commonly
known as SXSW.
Jodie Foster directed and co-stars
in "The Beaver," which features
Gibson as a troubled family man
trying to cope with help from an
unusual friend a beaver puppet he
wears on his hand.
The film will be shown week
before a limited public release on
March 23, with an expansion to
more theaters planned on April 8.
Its release had been delayed as
Gibson dealt with bad publicity from
a public breakup with his ex-girl-
friend Oksana Grigorieva.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 20, 2010 file photo, singer Lady Gaga performs in concert at Radio City
Music Hall in New York.


Paris Hilton to star in
Oxygen reality TV show
PASADENA, Calif. Paris
Hilton's life will be on display in a
new Oxygen TV reality TV series.
The cable channel said Thursday
that "The Wodld According to Paris"
will debut this spring.
An Oxygen executive described
the series as "for real," detailing the


"highs" of the socialite turning 30
and her -relationships.
Programming executive Amy
Introcaso-Davis said it will also focus
on the "lows" of her forced commu-
nity service.
Last September, Hilton pleaded
guilty to two misdemeanor charges,
ding drug possession, stem-
ming from an August, 2010 arrest.

* Associated Press


* CBS commentator Andy
Rooney is 92.
* Blues singer Clarence
Carter is 75.
* Country singer Billie Jo
Spears is 74.
U. Former NAACP Chairman
Julian Bond is 71.
* Actress Faye Dunaway is
70.
* Actor Carl Weathers is 63.


Lake Cit3
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440..


* Singer-producer T-Bone
Burnett is 63.
* Movie writer-director
Lawrence Kasdan is 62.
* Pulitzer Prize-winning col-
umnist Maureen Dowd is 59.
* Movie writer-director
Steven Soderbergh is 48.
* Actor Mark Addy is 47.
* Actress Emily Watson is


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon..; .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter,com)


CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................... $48.79
52 Weeks.................. $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ..... . ......... $82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Teen, 83 animals
taken from home
DELTONA- A fifth
grade teacher and her
husband face hoarding and
child abuse charges after
authorities found 71 cats
and 12 dogs inside their
filthy home.
Volusia County Sheriffs
deputies arrested 46-year-
old Robyn Harms and
50-year-old Keith Harms
Wednesday. The couple's
16-yeat-old daughter was
turned over to the Florida
Department of Children
and Families.
Deputies had to wear
masks and protective
clothing to rescue the ani-
mals. Sheriff's spokesman
Gary Davidsbn said the
stench of animal waste was
so powerful it was difficult
to breathe.
The animals were taken
to the Halifax Humane
Society in Daytona Beach.
Authorities said Robyn
Harms is a teacher at Blue
Lake Elementary School in
DeLand.

Elderly man killed
in Weston fire
WESTON Fire offi-
cials said an 81-year-old
Weston man has been
killed in a house fire.
Broward Sheriff Fire
Rescue spokesman Mike
Jachles said Jerome
Taylor was confined to
a wheelchair and unable
to get out of his house
when the fire broke out
Wednesday night.
The man's wife, 79-
year-old Mattie Taylor,
got out of the house but
said she couldn't reach
her husband.
Neighbors who heard
the fire alarm going off
in the home called 911.
Jachles said Taylor was
already dead by the time
rescue crews reached
him.
The cause of the fire


I, 4


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Lake City Reporter gets award
Lake City Reporter Publisher Todd Wilson (right) was award-
ed outstanding media coverage by the Edward Rutledge
Daughters of the American Revolution Chapter Thursday.
Pictured is Samma Campbell (left), publicity chairperson,
Betsy Burch, regent, and Wilson.


has not yet been deter-
mined.
The Broward Sheriff
Fire Marshal's Bureau
and the State Fire
Marshal's Office are
investigating.

3 face cemetery
theft charges
JACKSONVILLE
Three people face mul-
tiple charges for stealing
hundreds of memorial
vases from cemeteries in'
Jacksonville and Orange
Park over the past month.
Authorities said the vases
were sold at scrap yards
across Jacksonville for
quick cash.
Police said Wednesday
the charges against
24-year-old Nicholas J.
Dennison, 22-year-old
Nicolas J. Withey and
24-year-old Jessica Ann
Arnold include felony
grand theft, dealing in
stolen property and defac-
ing a grave site.
The thefts occurred
at Jacksonville Memory
Gardens in Orange Park
and Riverside Memorial
Park, Gethsemane
Memorial Gardens at
Trinity Baptist Church


and Evergreen Cemetery
in Jacksonville.

Teacher finalist
for national honor
VERO BEACH A
Florida teacher has been
named one of four final-
ists in a national teaching
competition.
Cheryl Conley, a fourth
grade teacher at Osceola
Magnet Elementary
School in Vero Beach,
has been selected as a
finalist to become the
2011. National Teacher of
the Year.
The Council of Chief
State School Officers
announced the finalists
Wednesday. The three
other teachers in run-
ning for the title are from
Illinois, Maryland and
Montana.
Conley has been teach-
ing for 11 years and is
Florida's 2011 Teacher of
the Year.
Florida Education
Commissioner Eric Smith
called Conley an innova-
tive leader who works
tirelessly to help her stu-
dents find success.


THE WEATHER



SUNNY MOSTLY PARTLY CHANCE CHANCE
2 ; SUNNY CLOUDY OF RAIN OF RAIN


HI H56LO HI 62 LO- HI 64 LO I 69. LO j I 76 LO 49


t


Tallahassee *
j
Pensacola 0
SI 21 PanamaCity
; 52 1ii
Il;
l"


'J"s


* Valdosta
53,'24
Lake City,
56 26"


SJacI
6


Gainesville Da
5t7 2S
Ocala *
5'3 30
Oran
63 4
Tampa *
63 45


*
FL Myers
69 49 *


City
sonville Cape Canaveral
4 29 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
ytona Beach Fort Myers
596 3 Gainesvllle
0 Jacksonville
do Cape Canaveral Key West
42 63 43 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
0 5s4 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
71 59' Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
,u, cd Miami Tampa


KeWest ) 58 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


50
26
66
42
86 in 1932
14 in 1981


0.00"
1.04"
1.04"
1.38"
1.38"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


0
Jan.
19
Full


JC
L


.... ...
7 a lp 7p Ja 6a
.r. Fdday Saturday

,,t-"t- 1 d





" -." -:-- Forecasted teiperature Feels ie" tiempebu
--;;i~.~n. _* -is'-SKi,a.fl .t.-a'^j


7:28 a.m.
5:52 p.m.
7:28 a.m.
5:53 p.m.


1:09 p.m.
2:27 a.m.
1:55 p.m.
3:25 a.m.


an. Feb. Feb.
26 2 11
ast New First



On this date in
1992, a very strong
storm system
moved from the
Tennessee Valley to
northern New York.
Blizzard conditions
covered Ohio and
eastern Michigan,
while severe weath-
er stretched over
Pennsylvania, New
Jersey, and south-
eastern New York.


4
MODWE*
45 nuitesto b
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Saturday
66 4 7 pr
65 42 .
74 59 p."
73 50 ,:
.4 .30
62 32 i
69 62
c"' 28 i
75 59 ,:

6,k 45 Pc
58 3I S
58 3x
60 26 4l
6: JS p.:
5, 30
72 55 pr


7ON U 1


Sunday
67 49. pc
64 45 pc
74 63 p:
74 55 PC:
6-4 410 pC
$1 40 pr.
70 63 p:
64 38 p.,
75 63 oc
73 55 PC:
65 42C p:
70 47 p.
60 43
59 44 PC
60 33 i
68 53 p,:
PU i.
60l


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


/ ,. Forecasts, data and graph-
%" Ics 2011 Weather Central
S. LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com






Get Connected
2 117^^^^


U Associated Press


CH 3.


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture


"We are therefore Christ's
ambassadors, as though God
were making his appeal through
us.We implore you on Christ's
behalf: Be reconciled to God."


2 Corinthians 5:19-20


AROUND FLORIDA


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













. -^ t SKUNKIE: Residents talk about smell
S ,- -- '- Continued From Page 1A


TODD WILSONILake City Reporter

Rotary Club collects more than $11,000
Lake City Rotary Club members collected $11,916 in donations during the annual Salvation Army
Bell Ringing campaign between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Rotary members were stationed
in front of Wal-Mart to collect the donations and the club won the annual competition with Altrusa
International of Lake City and raised the most money between the two clubs. Lake City Rotary
Club President Carlton Jones, (left) Salvation Army representative Ken Watson, and Rotarians
Donald Hall, Chase Moses and Brett Crews presented the check Thursday.



DAR: Paws for Patriots gets backing


Continued From Page 1A
causing him to lose among
other things both his eyes.
Jernigan was later
matched up with Brittani.
"Brittani is a beautiful
dog," she said.
Another "Paws for
Patriots" recipient was
Army Lt. Col. Kathy
Champion, Makant said.
She served three tours in
Iraq and was the survivor
of several bombings, but


was diagnosed with Devic's
disease which eats away at
the optic nerves and spinal
cord, she said.
On a trip to Venice Beach
friends first stopped by
Southeastern. Champion
always called her two chil-
dren angels. As a coinci-
dence she was matched up
with a guide dog named
Angel.
Makant said her initial


goal was to raise $60,000
for Southeastern, which is
the cost.of underwriting
a guide dog from incep-
tion to matching it with a
person.
At the DAR state confer-
ence last spring a check
for $30,000 was donated
to Southeastern, she said.
The check at this year's
conference will have "far
more than that amount."


TIP: Partnership faces lack of funds


Continued From Page 1A

assessment projects.
Times have changed.
TIP's original three-year
Action Plan and Budget is
drawing to a conclusion and,
as chairman Joel Foreman
told partnership members,
the organization needs to
change with them.
"The problem now is,"
Foreman said, "we don't
have that funding, If we're
going -to continue doing
what we were doing,
well, we can't, we can't do
research because we don't
have the funding. ,
"We have to refine our
focus. We have to evolve
and focus on what we do
best."
Or, as TIP coordina-
tor Cindy Johnson said
in rephrasing something
Foreman said earlier,
"You have to play to your
strengths."
A strategic planning
session among TIP' board
members to put together
a new three-year plan will
be scheduled. What will
emerge from that discus-
sion Foreman could only
estimate, but he thought
TIP should now concen-
trate on education and out-
reach, two aims already on
the group's agenda that can


be expanded.
Reaching out to the
public was the reason
TIP sponsored awards
at the Columbia County
Science Fair, something
the board will consider
doing on an annual basis.
Another idea endorsed by
Foreman was Bellamy, a
mascot in the guise of a
beaver (Ichetucknee, as
John Wheeler said, is an
American Indian word
meaning "Beaver Pond").
"Bellamy will probably
cost us between $6,000 and
$7,000 if we do it right, but
we'll get great use out of
him," Foreman said. That
would include everything
from school visits to appear-
ances at special functions,
delivering the same mes-
sage each time: Take care
of the Ichetucknee.
Spreading knowledge
of the problems facing the
Ichetucknee River is essen-
tial, according to Terry
Hansen, who works with
the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection.
In his address to TIP, he
explained nitrate levels
- which affect vegetation
growth in rivers are at
.79 in the Inchetucknee;
the normal rate is .35.


That nitrate level was
found last year, placing
the Ichetucknee on the
impaired list.
Hansen said the prob-
lem is a complex one, with
similar issues affecting the
Suwannee and the Santa
Fe, since the rivers flow
into each other.
"You can't deal with one
without dealing with the
other," Hansen said. "They
all feed together. -
'We're not going to get
(a solution) in five years.
We're going to have to take
baby steps."
Many steps have been
taken in what Hansen called
Phase 1, including helping
through capital projects,
government ordinances
and educational efforts.
"Phase 1 was pretty much
voluntary," he said. "If we
have to go to Phase 2, we'll
have to be more restrictive.
We'll come around and say
you have to do this.
"And that's not fun for
anyone."
A reduction in nitrate lev-
els would prevent that from
happening, Hansen said.
He added that the atten-
tion given the river through
organizations like TIP can
only be a benefit.


TUBING: Traffic reduction considered
Continued From Page 1A


county commissioners
could do nothing more than
approve the resolution. But
as explained by county
manager Dale Williams, the
resolution did not include
the scientific documenta-
tion necessary.
The commissioners
therefore would not sign
off on the resolution, but
they did say they would
draft a letter to the DEE
That letter was present-
ed by Murphy at The
Ichetucknee Partnership
meeting Thursday.
In the draft of the let-
ter, which still needed to
be signed by Jody DuPree,
chairman of the Board of
County Commissio.ners, it
said: "According to testimo-
ny presented to the Board
of County Commissioners,
a significant amount
of science exists to sup-
port closure of the upper
Ichetucknee to tubing."
It later said, "As the regu-
latory agency for the park,


Columbia County is con-
cerned that the Department
ofEnvironmentalProtection
has not taken an action
regarding the restriction
of tubing if such science
exists."
Included as part of the
letter were considerations
regarding people tubing on
the river the total num-
ber allowed per day would
not be affected, just where
they started from traf-
fic reduction, and those
interested in canoeing and
kayaking (they would not
be affected).
"I don't mind telling you,
I'll support it," said Joel
Foreman, TIP chairman.
"It's not taking tubing away
from the park, but relocat-
ing it."
Stevenson had hoped to
get the issue to the DEP
quickly enough so that
the department could act
before the start of the heavy
tubing season, traditionally
Memorial Day weekend.


Murphy thought that might
be accomplished.
"(The letter) hasn't
gone out yet, it's subject
to review by the chairman
and he has to sign it," he
said. He did believe the
letter would go out quick-
ly and that the DEP "will
act on it. They have rules
they have to adhere to, and
I doubt they can change
those rules overnight.
"There's a process
involved."
As Stevenson said the
day prior to the TIP meet-
ing, "We're hoping the DEP
acts on it. It's in their hands
now."



Ad. Tix on Safe THE RITE
Adv. Tix on Sale NO STRINGS ATTACHED
THE GREEN HORNET IN REAL 3D- EVENT
PRICING (PC-13) (100) 400 700 950
THE DILEMMA (PG-13) (140) 440 740 1015
COUNTRY STRONG (PG-13) (130) 430 730 1010
TRUE GRIT (PG-13) (120) 420 720 1005
LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) (150) 450 750 1020
TRON: LEGACY IN REALD 3D EVENT
PRICING (PG),* (110) 4107101000
.0 ma= .H 0 ,,"mimrm


unbearable.
"The smell is outra-
geous," she said. "It's
so bad that you would
vomit"
Residents complained
of the amount of animals
on the property, which
number almost 150, and
the animals getting loose
onto their properties, an
issue raising safety and
health concerns.
Stephen Dykes of
White Springs said urine
and feces from Skunkie
Acres drain onto his prop-
erty when it rains, which
can contaminate a water
system.
'There's a business that
doesn't belong in a resi-
dential area," Cason said.
Other residents dis-
agreed.
"There is no harm
being done," said Carin
Copeland of White
Springs, who adopted ani-
mals from Skunkie Acres
in the past.
'"These are good people
doing good deeds," she
said.


"I support all the
work they do," said Gayl
Coppeta of McAlpin, who
also said she smelled no
offensive odor.
"We're out there doing
the best we can taking
care of animals because
that's what we love to do,"
said Wilhelm Haake .of
' White Springs. He also
noted that the organiza-
tion brings people and
business into the White
Springs area.
Bernard Haake,
Barbara Haake's husband
who helps run Skunkie
Acres, said despite all the
complaints and inspec-
tions, there have been no
violations.
'They have found
nothing wrong with
Skunkie Acres," he said.
"Nothing."
Barbara Haake
addressed all of the
public's spoken concerns
and said the dogs do not
bark constantly and the
animals do not run loose.
Bernard Haake said the
complaints were based on


personal matters.
Williams charged the
agencies present with
appropriately dealing with
the complaints.
"If anything falls on you
guys, I want it investigat-
ed to the utmost," he said.
Taylor said any affi-
davit filled out with her
organization would be
investigated. Ford said
she would deal with the
complaints individu-
ally and took resident
phone numbers to do so.
Williams asked Holmes
to provide him with
paperwork stating that
Skunkie Acres meets all
necessary FWC criteria.
"We've got to find
some way to work this
out so everyone can get
along in the neighbor-
hood," Hunter said.
Williams said after all
investigations, a recom-
mendation regarding
Skunkie Acres would be
made to the county com-
mission.
"We're going to get to
the bottom of it," he said.


--4~

JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Barbara Ratliff (left) and Dorris Johnson spruce up the garden where rosemary, oregano,
thyme and chive plants are growing. Both are members of the Columbia County Master
Gardener Program, which offers support to local residents seeking advice on anything dealing
with gardening activities.

GARDENERS: Application deadline set


Continued From Page 1U
agent.
Columbia County's pro-
gram began in the spring
of 2001 and is housed at
the UF/IFAS Extension
Office at the fairgrounds,
Demorest said. There
are 42 active members in
Columbia County's pro-
gram.
Everything the volun-
teers are taught in the
training class is based on
research information gen-
erated from UF and other
land grant universities.
"We base everything on
what does well in Columbia
County," Demorest said.
'This is for Columbia
County residents."
The class offers about
70 hours of training taught
by Demorest and guest
speakers. Field trips and


hands-on-learning are
also incorporated into the
class.
Class topics include
basic botany, entomology
and soil and plant nutri-
tion.
"It covers so many top-
ics," she said. "Nobody's
going to be an expert, but
they'll know where to find
the information."
A take-home test is pre-
sented at the end of class.
"People are able to
research the information
if they need it," Demorest
said. "It's not like they have
to know everything off the
top of their head, but they
probably will know quite
a bit."
Once training is com-
plete there will be other
educational opportunities


throughout the year for
master gardeners, she
said.
The cost for the training
course is $95 per person,
which includes materi-
als and the registration.
Training will take place
every Wednesday Feb.
9 to April 20. Times will
vary.
Contact the Columbia
County Extension Office
at 752-5384 or stop by for
the application.
"(Master Gardeners) do
a lot for -the community,"
Demorest said. "In the
clinic where they work,
people will call or come in
with gardening questions.
Anything that has to do
with horticulture, they'll
work on it until they figure
it out."


MATTRESS OUTLET

o l I I


Q
S
3
4


I


ALL THE BEST BRANDS
@ THE BEST PRICES
EVERYDAY!


TWIN j FULL
$2500 $5000

OFF OFF
Premium Set i Premium Set
mmmm n m mm l mmmmm mem l
QUEEN m KING I

$7500 $1 bO(oo
SOFF OFF
I Premium Set : Premium Set


Mon.-Fri. I0AM-6PM Sat. I0AM-5PM
Same Day Delivery Available n.MII

'BEDS T^f BED ^^BEDS,^-

^^^^^^1472 Hwy 90 West^^^^^


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













OPINION


Friday, January 14, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Smile,


don't fear


fluoride

rom time to time,
people have mount-
ed campaigns to
add fluoridation
to the cities' water
supply. A few years ago, the
fight became so fierce it ended
in public referenda. The vot-
ers said no, a decision that, in
some quarters, labeled us as
unenlightened, if not primitive.
Now comes the federal gov-
ernment with a warning and
a directive. Cut the amount
of fluoride in water supplies.
Although it has kept its prom-
ise of fighting cavities and
tooth decay, fluoride also is
causing problems.
The federal change in rec-
ommended fluoride levels is
the first in 50 years.
About 2 out of 5 adolescents
have tooth streaking or spotti-
ness because of too much fluo-
ride, a government study found
recently, according to a wire
report. In some extreme cases,
teeth can even be pitted by the
mineral though many cases
are so mild only dentists notice
it The problem is generally
considered cosmetic.
Health officials note most
communities have fluoride in
their water supplies, and tooth-
paste has it too. Some are even
given fluoride supplements.
The cosmetic problem is not
the only hazard, though. A 5-
year-old report said people, who
consume excessive fluoride
can end up with crippling bone
abnormalities and brittleness.
Even the American Dental
Association, one of fluoride's
staunchest advocates, is on
board with lowering fluoride
levels. Yet officials are quick
to point out that anti-fluorida-
tion groups should not view a
reduction in levels as a clear-
cut victory to rid waterworks
of fluoride. The mineral has
proven its effectiveness against
tooth decay.
Perhaps proponents will
stop smiling condescendingly,
through their speckled teeth,
at those who have weighed
both the risks and benefits
of adding fluoride to potable
water.
Texarkana (Ark.) Gazette

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman



LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced..Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at.
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Water rises higher Down Under


The great snows that
have visited much of
the United States this
winter have had their
polar opposite in
flooding rains in the Australian
summer. Over Christmas and
New Year, I made a visit Down
Under and return with this sod-
den report.
The rain in northern Australia
is attributed to the cooling of
the tropical Pacific as part of
La Nina, which I believe in
Australian means Rain Bloke,
although I could be wrong.
La Nina is also affecting U.S.
weather in its own way and
it's tempting to think that it is
another sign of the world's cli-
nmate being screwed up, which .
I 4.m inclined to believe. But
alas, the temptation for sweep-
ing generalizations must be
resisted.
As bad as the Australian
flooding is, it has happened
before and will happen again.
Australia's most beloved poem,
written in 1904 by Dorothea
Mackellar, famously says: "I
love a sun burnt country/A land
of sweeping plains/Of ragged
mountain ranges/Of droughts
and flooding rains." Note how '
the last two go together like a
horse and cart.
The joke is that Australian
newspapers have a standing
headline waiting to be inserted
when conditions demand:
"Flood Ends Drought" In fact,
the country was in the grip of a
terrible drought when I last vis-
ited in 2006.
I grew up in Brisbane,
the capital of the state of
Queensland now the hard-
hitest by the flooding. I cut
my journalistic teeth writing
accounts of plucky residents of
inland towns marooned in a sea
of floodwater, down to their last
supplies of food and asking for
more beer to be flown in.


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com
This time my wife and I flew
down to visit our daughter
Allison and her husband Critter
(Christopher in more formal
circles, which as an avid surfer
he tries hard to avoid). They are
on a working vacation, which
so far has been more vacation
than working, and so were able
to pause from the job of hav-
ing a good time for the family -
reunion.
Our fun and adventures were
not spoiled because it rained
some, then rained some more,
and then some more after that.
Why, I went surfing in the rain.
When you are going to get wet
anyway, why not? But some-
times the sun would come out
and frazzle the recently water-
logged with its fierce rays. And
while we saw swollen rivers, we
avoided the worst of it.
The rain, however, did create
Pittsburgh-sized potholes, which
surprised and impressed me.
As you know, Pittsburgh has
long been prized by connois-
seurs of holes in the road, and
the news that somewhere else
might have more cavernous
cavities will unnerve the shovel
tossers at the Pennsylvania
Department of Transportation.
I am thinking that an America's
Cup of Potholes might have to
be arranged, so PennDOT can
prove we are still No. 1.
Since I left, the flooding
has become worse, with the
Brisbane River threatening to
break its banks and inundate
the city. My relatives appear safe


but I have concern for the resi-
dents of my old hometown, who
in the country of "no worries"
now have some real worries.
I have concern but not
despair. My hope is that the
Aussies are a resilient people.
They live in a country full of
potential dangers bush fires,
big sharks, poisonous snakes
and spiders that will bite you on
the butt if you bend down to go
to the loo in the bush (and you
know that no one is going to
suck that toxin out!).
What's a flood in the general
tide of possible calamities? A
challenge to be faced with cour-
age and a joke, an excuse to
make a cup of tea or perhaps
have a cold one if the time is
"beer o'clock."
For once I timed my exit
to perfection. Luckily for me,
the worst dark clouds were
the ones familiar to anyone
who goes home after a long
absence. Memory has its
sacred, unchanging landmarks,
but when we are away time and
progress change our landmarks
nevertheless. To go back is to
search for what was and find out
what is.
I grew up in Eagle Junction,
a Brisbane neighborhood as
unfancy as it sounds. (It has a
railway junction but no eagles.)
One morning, we went down to
see the site of my family home
on Lewis Street. I knew that the
old house had been knocked
down years ago but I wasn't
expecting a huge industrial site
at the end of the street.
Crikey! It is apparently the
place where a cross-city tun-
nel is being sunk to provide a
detour to the airport.
Maybe the Rain Bloke will do
us all a favor and fill that pothole
with water.
* Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


OTHER OPINION


It's time to
W ith the Senate's
vote Tuesday
to abolish the
death pen-
alty in Illinois,
the General Assembly has
addressed one of the most dif-
ficult and emotional legislative
issues in recent memory.
Now it is up to Gov. Pat Quinn
to complete the job by signing
into law the repeal of capital pun-
ishment in Illinois.
Between last Thursday's
vote by the Illinois House and
Tuesday's Senate vote, we heard
hours of compelling testimony
by lawmakers on both sides of
this issue. In a body that of late
has been defined by partisan divi-
sion on fiscal issues, the General
Assembly set aside party labels
as it focused on a topic with life-
or-death consequences.
"This issue has taken me to a
place in my mind and my heart
that I didn't think I could go to,"


repeal death penalty
said Sen. Jeff Schoenberg (D- authority to oversee capital pun-
Evanston) who said he had been ishment, a defendant's likelihood
a supporter of capital punishment of receiving the death penalty var-
from 1993 until recently. "The ies greatly from county to county.
death penalty in Illinois is not And since juries ultimately must
marginally flawed. It is irretriev- choose whether to impose a
ably broken." death sentence, the luck of jury
We have long agreed. With selection can determine whether
death row exonerations in Illinois a defendant gets a life sentence
now numbering 20, the state had or death.
proved repeatedly that it was With a decade behind us and
prone to mistakes with potentially no progress on these issues, it's
fatal consequences. time for Illinois to accept the
Capital punishment proponents truth.
had noted that many reforms We heard arguments in the
have been put in place since Gov. last week that claimed families of
George Ryan established a mora- victims could only attain "closure"
torium on executions 11 years through capital punishment. But
ago. Yet no reform can guarantee what "closure" can there be when
that the state which is to say, all death sentences are put in a
we, the citizens of Illinois will state of permanent limbo?
not mistakenly kill an innocent Sign this bill, governor, and
person. And even after all these end the myth of Illinois ever
years for reform, application of arriving at a perfect system that
the death penalty throughout executes only the guilty.
the state remains remarkably
inconsistent With no central state M The State Journal-Register


Jose De La Isla
joseisla3@yohoo.com


Science -


provides


few clues

In the still-churning wake,
of the Tucson slaughter,
it is easy to come to a
mistaken conclusion.
That the target
was a beloved member of
the United States House of
Representatives,, 40-year-old
Democrat Gabrielle Giffords,
makes the story an instant
headline. She was severely
wounded with a bullet to
the brain. The extent of the
wound's physical and mental
damage will come slowly to
a concerned nation in install-
ments.
Six people were killed.
Among them were a U.S.
District Judge, John Roll;
nine-year-old Christina Green,
Giffords's 30-year-old aide Gabe
Zimmerman, and three victims
in their seventies, Dorothy
Morris, Dorwin Stoddard, and
Phyllis Schneck. Nineteen oth-"
ers were wounded.
Add them up and you have
news stories and analyses for
weeks, and books telling us
what it all means for years to
come.
Arizona Republic columnist ,-,
E. J. Montini was an early one
asking why? He shared Arizona'
. congressman Raul Grijalva.
immediate reaction: "We need",
to set the example ... (and) dig-,'
agree in a way that is not mean,
spirited, hateful and so full of .,"
anger that people feel they have
some sort of permission to treat
their elected officials as fodder?'
When Timothy McVeigh
blew up the Murrah Federal
Building in Oklahoma City in
1995, killing 149 adults and 19'
children under the age of six,
are we all responsible, even
though the social environment
was toxic?
Is it our responsibility to
direct our behavior to sober,
clear, insightful thinking and
acting to protect our private,
public and civic lives from kill-','
ers?
The alleged shooter, Jared
Lee Loughner, might have told:'
us himself, in a disjointed way',
what this is all about.
The United Press
International's analysis of
Loughner's YouTube posting
three weeks ago reported he
said, "If you call me a terrorist;'.
then the argument to call me a'.
terrorist is ad hominem."
"Ad hominem" is Latin for '
an argument directed against a.,
person rather than the person's
arguments. It means "to the ",
man." It also means "appealing':
to prejudice or passions; illogi-.
cal." Taken literally, the Tucson
shooting was an irrational ter-
rorist attack against the public
and those representing it as we.
know it.
The same week of the shoot-'
ing spree, Dr. Douglas Fields in
The Huffington Post wrote how '
toxic environments can form in
a "disrespectful, stressful social
environment" that acts "as a
neurotoxin for the brain and
psyche, and the scars are per-
manent." It's a warning that all
that talk about putting political
adversaries in the "cross-hairs"
and second-amendment retribu-
tion and sporting weapons at
political events is not simply
blather and bluster but brain-
washing with a poison gas made
of words and tauntings that pol-
lute the social environment.
We have seen this in hate
crimes. Now we see it as
democratocide.
Jose de la Isla, author of "The
Rise of Hispanic Political Power"
writes a weekly commentary for
Hispanic Link News Service.


4A











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter. corn.


Today

Masonic Banquet
The Gold Standard Lodge
#167'celebrates their annual
Masonic banquet beginning at
6 p.m. today and will take place
at the Winfield Community
Center. For more information
call Brother Carlos Brown at
386-288-6235.

Saturday

Love A Horse Project Club
The 4-H Horse Project Club
is meeting 2 p.m. Saturday
at the Columbia County
Extension office. Students 9
years old and older who are
interested in learning about
horses are welcome to attend.
There is no horse required to
participate. The first several
meetings will concentrate on
learning about horses; care,
feeding, equipment and safety.
Call 4-H volunteer leader
Jennifer Powers at 386-853-0608
or the County Extension Office
at 386-758-1168.

MLK Youth Extravaganza
The PresleyLane Community
Youth Group Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr., Youth Extravaganza
is 3 p.m. Saturday at Olivet
Missionary Baptist Church,
Davis Street.

Gardening series
The Library Educational
Gardening Series presented
by UF Master Gardeners is 2
p.m. Saturday at the Columbia
County Public Library. This
series of workshops is held


COURTESY PHOTO,

Students to present juvenile diabetes awareness project
Fort White High School students will be presenting a juvenile diabetes community awareness project during the
Health Occupations Students of America Region 2 Competition Saturday in Gainesville. Pictured are Kayla Williams
(front row, from left), James Fussell and Abbie Williams; Kien Cade (back row, from left) and Taylor Morgan.


on the third Saturday of each
month.

Chili Cook-off
The second annual Branford
Chili Cook-off is noon to 5
p.m. Saturday at Hatch park in
Branford. The event includes
games, live entertainment, door
prizes and a silent auction. The
$5 dollar admission fee includes
chili and soft drinks Chili cook-


off winners will receive cash
prizes. Applications are available
at www.hospiceofthenaturecoast.
org or call 386-935.4520 for more
information.

Master Gardener program
A new University of Florida
Master Gardener class is form-
ing. Applications will be accept-
ed through Saturday. To learn
more about becoming a Master




OBITUARIES


Gardener, contact the Columbia
County Extension Office at 752-
5384 or stop by for the applica-
tion. Training will take place
every Wednesday, Feb. 9 to
April 20.

Sunday

Blood drive
The LifeSouth Bloodmobile is
coming to Ole Times Country


Buffet 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.
Each donor receives a free back-
pack, 10 percent off the buffet
and a chance to win an Apple
iPad.

MLIK Observance Program
The 26th annual Martin
Luther King Jr. Observance
Program is 4 p.m. Sunday at
Mount Pisgah A.M.E: Church.
The program is hosted by
the Columbia County Branch
NAACP and honors king,
a slain-civil rights leader.
The keynote speaker for the
event is the Rev. J. T. "Billie"
Simon, pastor of Greater
Popular Springs Missionary
Baptist Church in Jasper. The
church is located at 924 NE
Washington St.

Monday

MLK Parade
The Northeast Florida
Leadership Council is hosting
its Annual Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr. Parade 10 a.m. Monday
beginning at DOT. The parade
will end at the field next to
Memorial Stadium. The Theme
this year is: "Celebrating the
Legacy of a King." The Grand
Parade Marshals are Mr. Walter
"Polk" Jones and Mrs. Joyce
Tunsil.

MLK service
A Church Commemoration
service honoring Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. is 11:30
a.m. Monday. The Speaker
for the occasion is the Rev.
Wyndell Wallace, pastor of
Fellowship MBC. Guest Choir is
Compassion Love Center.


Gerene Alice Bushor
Gerene Alice Bushor, 73, passed
away on Monday, January 10,
2011, due to complications asso-
ciated with cancer. Born on June
7th, 1937. in Menominee, Michi-
gan to George and Alice Gaugh,
and one of six children, Gerene
relocated to Central Florida in
1958 and then again to Lake
City in 1998. She is survived by
her husband of 38 years, Jack L.
Bushor, sons; Jeffery A. Ewaldt
and Jon N. Bushor, as well as
her grandsons Larry F. Ewaldt
and Nikolas R. Ewaldt. Preced-
ed in death by her first husband
Lawrence F. Ewaldt, Gerene
lead a full and beautiful life.
Throughout her time on earth,
she held many titles. In 1962,
she was appointed by the Gov-
ernor as Justice of the Peace for
District 6 in Seminole County,
Florida, where she served hon-
orably in office until 1973. That
same year she ventured into her
role as Co-Owner/Co-founder of
Bushor Plumbing in Longwood,
Florida, where she remained un-
til 1998. Upon their retirement in
1998 she and her husband Jack
relocated to Lake City, where she
remained active within the com-
munity by helping others in any
way the she could be of service.
As a member of Our Redeemer
Lutheran Church, she spread
joy through her numerous baked
goods and acts of kindness. Her
participation as head of the Fel-
lowship at church, allowed her
to reach many people in a mul-
titude of ways. Gerene enjoyed
creating, baking and sharing her
various delectable edibles with
as mnany people as she could. Of
all of her titles and accomplish-
ments she valued none more
than that of lovingly dedicated
and caring wife, mother, grand-
mother and friend. She will truly
be missed by her family and
friends, as well as all that she
had opportunity to touch with
her generous acts of kindness.
Gerene will be laid to rest at
the Veterans Memorial Cem-
etery in Jacksonville, Flor-
ida.' Funeral service dates
are yet to be determined.
"You will be forever missed and
infinitelylovedbyallofusMOM!"

J.M. "Murph" Everett
Mr. J.M. "Murph" Everett, 80, of
Trenton, Florida died unexpect-
edly on Monday, January 10,
2011 intheNorth
Florida Regional
Medical Center -
in Gainesville. A '; :
native of Wilcox,
Florida Mr. Everett had been a
very active resident of Trenton
and its surrounding communities
for most of his life. After gradu-
ating from Trenton High School
in 1949 Mr. Everett joined the
U.S. Army and served in the Ko-
rean Conflict earning the Army
Occupational Medal for Japan
and the Korean Service Medal
with four Bronze Stars. He mar-
ried the love of his life, Mildred


Parrish on June 28, 1953 in the
Bethel Baptist Church where his
grandparents were charter mem-
bers and where he and his' family
are still very active members. Mr.
Everett graduated from the Uni-
versity of Florida in 1965 with
his Bachelor of Science degree
in Agriculture and in 1986 he
received his Master of Science
in Supervision & Administration
from Nova University. He taught
agriculture in Lafayette and Gil-
christ county schools from 1956-
1992 and served on the Gilchrist
County School Board from 1996-
2004. Mr. Everett had a heart for
serving the citizens of his county
and served on many boards and
foundations. He was currently
chairman of the Bethel and Jen-
nings Lake Cemetery commit-
tees and was a deacon, Sunday
School Director, Church Histo-
rian and Sunday School Teacher
at Bethel Baptist Church. Mr.
Everett was preceded in death
by his parents, Paul Lee Ever-
ett and Minnie Johns Everett
Polk, a son, Alan Scott Everett
and his step-father, Aaron Polk.
Mr. Everett is survived by his
wife of fifty seven years, Mil-
dred "Midge" Parrish Everett of
Trenton; a son, Kevin Murphy
Everett (Donna) Bell, Florida;
one grandson, Ryan Lee Everett
(Katlyn) of Tallahassee, Florida.
A multitude of relatives, adopted
relatives and friends also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Everett
will be conducted at 2:00 P.M.
on Saturday, January 15, 2011 in
the Bethel Baptist Church with
burial following in the Bethel
Baptist Church Cemetery. The
family will receive friends from
6:00-8:00 Friday evening in the
Bethel Baptist Church. Expres-
sion of sympathy may include
flowers or a memorial contribu-
tion to the J.M. Everett Scholar-
ship at Trenton FFA c/o Steve
Broker, 1013 N. Main, Tren-
ton, FL 32693. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 South
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 386-752-1234 Please sign
the online family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Dennis E. "D.J." Fleming,
Jr.

Due to the inclement weather
across the nation family members
are unable to be here. Therefore
Services will be canceled and
rescheduled in the near future.

Lular Mae Cruwsaw
Johnson
Mrs. Lular Mae Cruwsaw John-
son, age 86,resident of Welborn,
Florida, departed this life Wends-
day, January 5,
2011at her res-
ident following
an extended
illness. She
was the daugh-
ter of An-
nie and John


Cruwsaw Sr. Born in Suwan-
nee County she was a life long
resident of Wellborn, Florida.
She leaves to cherish her mem-
ory; Four Daughters: Rosetta
(Winston) Jones of Lake City,
Florida, Nancy J. (Jeffrey)
Beckles of Wellborn, Florida,
Miss. Ronnie L. Jones of Well-
born, Florida, Ymekico Gibson,
Anthony Gibson of Lake City,
Florida, and Alkesha Watkins of
Lake City, Florida; Three Sons:
James N. Fulcher (Bernice) of
Wellborn, Florida, James C.
Johnson (Darlene) of Wellborn,
Florida, Frankie L. Johson (An-
nie Laura) of Wellborn, Florida;
Three Brother: John Cruwsaw
Jr. (Lucillie) of Wellborn, Flori-
da, Henry Crusaw of Wellborn,
Florida, O.C. Crusaw (Argie) of
Wellborn, Florida; Two Brothers
who preceded her in death: Walter
Crusaw (Ruth Ann) of Winfield,
Florida, Julius Crusaw (Shirlene)
both preceded her in death; One
Sister who preceded her in death
Minnie Jones of Lake City,
Florida; Sisters Ann'Bell Lewis
of Sebring, Elmira Gray, Eliza-
beth Jackson of Lake City, Flor-
ida, Bertha Wright of Wellborn,
Florida. Dester Gaddis (James)
of Lake City, Florida; Twenty-
two Grand Children, twenty-six
Great Grands, three Great Great
Grands and a host of nieces,
nephews, and sorrowing friends.
Graveside services for Mrs. Lu-
lar Mae Crusaw Johnson, will
be 2:00 pm Saturday, January
15, 2011at the Crusaw Family
Cemetery in Wellborn, Florida
with Rev. Wright, Officiating.
The family will receive friends
Friday, January 14, 2011 at
the Cooper Funeral Home
Chapel from 12:00- 8:00pm.
Arrangements Entrusted to:
COOPER FUNERAL
HOME 251 N.E. Washing-
ton Street Lake City, 32055
Willis 0. Cooper L.F.D

Alyssa Catherine Metten
Alyssa Catherine Metten, six
month old daughter of Lisa Wil-
lis died unexpectedly on Monday,
January 10, 2011 in the Shands
at the University of Florida E.R..
A resident of Gainesville Alyssa
was preceded in death by her fa-
ther, Jason Kenneth Metten and
her grandmother, Mary Catherine
Willis. She was the light of her
mother's life. Alyssa is survived
by her mother, her grandfather,


Leonard Willis (Sandra) and her
aunt, Jessica Willis all of Lake
City. Private family interment
services were held in Memorial
Cemetery. Arrangements are un-
der the direction of the DEES-
PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 South
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 386-752-1234 Please sign
the online family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Robert G. Morris
Mr. Robert G. Morris, 67, a life-'
long resident of Lake City died
late Wednesday evening January
12, 2011 following an extended
illness. The son ofthe late Charles
Haskell & Mae Willie Robinson
Morris, Mr. Morris had worked
as an insurance agent, man-
aged a full service gas station
in Gainesville for several years
and worked in corrections in the
Juvenile Detention service prior
to his ill health. In his spare time
he enjoyed working and talking
on CB radios and was a very
talented guitar player. Mr. Mor-
ris was of the Pentecostal faith.
He was preceded in death by a,
son, Charles "Charlie" Morris.
Mr. Morris is survived by his
wife often years, Christine Moon
Morris; a son, Rob Morris (Kim);
two brothers, James Morris and
Edwin Morris and a sister, Mary
Ann Kirby all of Lake City; and
his grandchildren, Racquel, Lo-
gan, Jordan and Dalton Morris.
Graveside funeral services for
Mr. Morris will be conducted
at 2:00 P.M.(TODAY) Friday,
January 14, 2011 in the Mt. Ta-
bor Cemetery with Rev. Stan
Ellis and Rev. Cagney Tanner
officiating. Interment will fol-
low. Arrangements are under
the direction of the DEES-
PARRISH FAMILY FUNER-
AL HOME, 458 South Marion
Ave., Lake City, FL 32025
386-752-1234 Please sign
the online family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Mary Ann Pattillo
Mrs. Mary Ann Pattillo, 78,
of Lake City, passed away on
Wednesday, January 12, 2011
in the North Florida Regional
Medical Center following an ex-
tended illness. A native of Pom-
pano Beach, Florida, Mrs. Pat-


tillo had been a resident of Lake
City since 1982 having moved
here from Pompano Beach. Mrs.
Pattillo was a retired secretary
having worked with the State of
Florida for many years. Mrs. Pat-
tillo was a member of the D.A.R.
as she was a direct descendent of
Col. Robinson who fought in the
Revolutionary War. She was also
a member of the United Daugh-
ters of the Confederacy as her
great-great grandfather was a
Private who fought in the Battle
of Olustee. In her spare time she
enjoyed reading and playing ten-
nis. Mrs. Pattillo was a member
of the Hopeful Baptist Church.
She is survived by her daugh-
ter, Patricia "Tish" Pattillo of
Lake City; her sons, Stephen
Pattillo of Auburn, Alabama
and David Pattillo (Debbie)
of Fayettville, North Carolina.
Her two grandchildren, Chase
and Bailey Pattillo also survive.
Graveside funeral services for
Mrs. Pattillo will be conducted
at 10:00 A.M. on Monday, Janu-
ary 17, 2011 in the Forest Lawn
Memorial Gardens. Interment
will follow. In honoring Mrs.
Pattillos' wished there will be
no visitation. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 South
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 386-752-1234 Please sign
the online family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn


Barbara Lee Williams
Barbara Lee Williams 95, of
Lake Butlei, passed away peace-
fully at the North Florida Re-
gional Rehab and Specialty
Center in Gainesville. She was
the daughter of the late Wal-
lace Lee and Florence Shirley.
She was a clerk at Both Phar-
macys in Lake Butler for sev-
eral years. Maines Pharmacy
and Lake Butler Pharmacy.
She was preceded in death by
her loving husband Ivan Wil-
liams and her son Joe Williams.
She is survived by two daugh-
ters: Joyce Kite (Fred) of Mid-
dleburg; and Vicki Blom (Denis)
of Lake Butler. Two sons: Wayne
Williams (Latrelle) of Lake But-
ler and Ken Williams (Rene) of
Decatur, Alabama. Her Brother:
Hugh Lee of Ocala and sister:
Jetta Bova of Tampa. Four-
teen Grandchildren and twenty
eight Great Grandchildren.
Funeral services 'will be held
Sunday at 2:00 P.M. in the Ad-
vent Christian Church in Lulu
at 2: 00 P.M. with Rev. Butch
Nelson officiating. Family will
receive friends at the funeral
home Saturday evening from
6 to 8 P.M. Burial will fol-
low in New Zion Cemetery
under the care of ARCHER
FUNERAL HOME
of Lake Butler.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER


NATION


FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


BRIEFS .: i K -


Navy carrier chief
promises karaoke
NORFOLK, Va. The
new commander of
the USS Enterprise on
Thursday promised kara-
oke and video games to
boost crew morale instead
of the raunchy videos that
cost one officer his com-
mand and forced another
to delay his retirement.
Capt. Owen Honors, 49,
lost his command of the
Enterprise as the Navy
launched an investigation
into the videos broadcast
in 2006 and 2007, which
included gay slurs, sail-
ors in suggestive shower
scenes and simulated mas-
turbation.
On Thursday, officials
deferred Rear Adm.
Lawrence Rice's planned
Feb. 1 retirement until
that probe was complete,
said Rear Adm. Dennis
Moynihan, a Navy spokes-
man. Rice had commanded
Honors for part of his duty
on the ship.
Capt. Dee L. Mewbourne
took over the storied nucle-
ar-powered aircraft carrier
the oldest in the nation's
fleet of 11 less than two
weeks after Honors was
relieved of his command
for a "profound lack of
good judgment and profes-
sionalism."

1.2M homes may
get repossessed
NEW YORK-The
bleakest year in the fore-
closure crisis has only just
begun.
Lenders are poised to
take back more homes this
year than any other since
the U.S. housing meltdown
began in 2006. About 5
million borrowers are at
least two months behind
on their mortgages and
industry experts say more
people will miss payments
because of job losses and
also loans that exceed the
value of the homes they are
living in.
"2011 is going to be the
peak," said Rick Sharga,
a senior vice president
at foreclosure tracker
RealtyTrac Inc. The firm
predicts 1.2 million homes
will be repossessed this
year.
The blistering pace of
foreclosures this year will
top 2010, when a record 1
million homes were lost,
RealtyTrac said Thursday.
One in every 45 U.S. house-
holds received a foreclosure
filing last year, a record 2.9
million of them. Thafs up
1.67 percent from 2009.

WikiLeaks gives
$15K in legal aid
HAGERSTOWN, Md.
- Supporters of the Army
private suspected in one
of the biggest security
breaches in U.S. history
said WikiLeaks has fulfilled
its pledge to aid in his
defense by contributing
$15,100.
The Bradley Manning
Support Network
announced the gift
Thursday. Jeff Paterson
of the affiliated group
Courage to Resist in
Oakland, Calif., said
the contribution brings
the total raised for Pfc.
Manning's defense to
more than $100,000 but is
still short of the $115,000
needed.

FDA limits Vicodin
main ingredient
WASHINGTON -
Federal health regulators
are limiting a key ingre-
dient found in Vicodin,
Percocet and other pre-
scription painkillers that
have been linked to thou-
sands of cases of liver dam-


age each year.
The Food and Drug
Administration said
Thursday it will cap the
amount of acetaminophen
in the drugs at 325 milli-
grams per capsule. Current
products on the market
contain doses of up to 700
milligrams.
M Associated Press


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pall bearers bring the casket to the front of the church during the funeral of 9-year-old Christina Taylor Green Thursday in Tucson, Ariz. Green was the
youngest victim of Saturday's shooting in Tucson.


Hundreds mourn youngest Tucson victim


By GILLIAN FLACCUS
Associated Press

TUCSON, Ariz. The
family of the youngest
victim of the mass shoot-
ing in Arizona held hands
and paused in a moment
of silence Thursday under
the large American flag
recovered from Ground
Zero after the 9/11 attacks,
and later escorted the 9-
year-old's small brown cas-
ket into the church as little
girls about her age cried.
Several hundred other
mourners, many in white
T-shirts, lined a road near
the church to show sup-
port.
Christina Taylor Green
was born on Sept. 11, 2001,
and featured in a book
called "Faces of Hope" that
chronicled one baby from
each state born on the
day terrorists killed nearly
3,000 people. Christina's
funeral is the first for the
six victims killed when
police said a gunman
opened fired on a crowd at
an event for Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords, critically injuring
the congresswoman and
wounding 13 others.
The third-grader had
an interest in politics and
had recently been elected
to her student council.
She was the only girl on
her Canyon del Oro Little
League baseball team and
played second base, and
had told her father she
wanted to become the first
woman to play in the major
leagues.
The game was in her
blood. Her dad is. a scout
for the Los Angeles
Dodgers and her grand-
father, former big league
pitcher Dallas Green, man-
aged the 1980 world cham-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
People line the street as a hearse leaves the St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church after the
funeral of 9-year-old Christina Taylor Green Thursday in Tucson, Ariz.


pion Philadelphia Phillies.
"She had the time to root
for the Dodgers and the
Phillies," Bishop Gerald
Kicanas said. ... a little
girl with the wisdom of a
wise woman. She wanted
to make a difference in her
life. She wanted to make
her mark."
Christina's father John
Green spoke to the tear-
ful crowd, including his
11-year-old son Dallas who
wiped tears away with the
sleeve of his suit "Christina
Taylor Green," he began, "I
can't tell you how much we
all miss you."
"I think you have affected
the whole country," he said,
according to the Arizona
Daily Star.
Generally, reporters were
not allowed inside, but The
Associated Press talked to
several people who attended.


USPS: Mail rates

going up, but not

for most letters


By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Postal rates will go up in
April, but the cost of send-
ing the basic letter will
remain the same.
The Postal Service
said Thursday that most
rates will increase April
17 under a formula that
allows the agency to raise
prices within the rate of
inflation.
The post office said the
44-cent price of a first-class
stamp won't change, but
heavier letters will cost
more. The basic rate is for
the first ounce, and the
price for each extra ounce
will rise from 17 cents to
20 cents.
"While changing prices
is always a difficult deci-
sion, we have made every
effort to keep the impact
minimal for consumers
and customers doing
business with us at retail
lobbies," Postmaster
General Patrick R.
Donahoe said in a state-
ment.
The post office can
raise rates as long as it
doesn't exceed inflation,
which would permit an
increase of 1.7 percent
averaged over all mail.
The Postal Service


lost $8.5 billion last year
despite cuts of more than
100,000 jobs and other
reductions in recent
years.
The agency has lost
considerable business to
the Internet. Last summer
the post office sought an
increase that would have
exceeded inflation, citing
the unusual business con-
ditions of the recession.
That was rejected by
the independent Postal
Regulatory Commission.
The post office has
appealed. In the mean-
time it is moving to
increase rates within the
legal limit because of the
urgency of its financial
condition.
Its filing with the Postal
Regulatory Commission
also said the agency
expects to raise rates
annually in mid-April.



a minute '

Our customers receive
a Complimentary
copy of the
Lake City Reporter
whenn they drop off&


They said her father talk-
ed about the places the fam-
ily had lived and traveled,
and that he would always
cherish coming home after
long business trips.
Billy Joel's "Lullaby,"
which begins "Goodnight,
my angel, time to close your
eyes," was performed at the
end.
During President Barack
Obama's speech at a memo-
rial Wednesday night,
he spoke at length about
Christina and reminded the
audience that the third-grad-
er's neighbor had brought
her to meet Giffords
because of her budding
interest in democracy.
"She saw all this
through the eyes of a child,
undimmed by the cynicism
or vitriol that we adults all
too often just take for grant-
ed," he said. "I want to live


up to her expectations. I
want our democracy to be
as good as Christina imag-
ined it I want America to
be as good as she imagined
it"
The girl had told her par-
ents she wanted to attend
Penn State and have a
career that involved helping
those less fortunate.
Before her funeral, cars
were parked on both sides
of the road, and traffic was
backed up. Members of
motorcycle groups from
Arizona and California
parked their bikes in a
group. Several hundred
people, many dressed in
white T-shirts, stood silent-
ly along a road near the
church. About 20 people
were dressed as angels.
They organized over the
Internet and by word of
mouth, saying they wanted


to be there in case members
of a Kansas church showed
up to protest The Westboro
Baptist Church threatened
to picket the funerals for
Christina and other victims,
but they backed off, in part
because a nationally syndi-
cated radio show agreed to
host some of their mem-
bers.
The church is known for
protesting at the funerals
of slain servicemen and
blaming their deaths on -
the country's tolerance of
homosexuality.
As the city mourned ,
the little girl, more details I
and documents surfaced 1
about the suspect, Jared
Loughner. For four years,
he was an unremarkable
college student, commuting
to classes near his home
where he studied yoga and
algebra, business manage-
ment and poetry.
But last year, his class-
room conduct began to
change. In February,
Loughner stunned a teacher
by talking. about blowing up
babies, a bizarre outburst
that marked the start of a
rapid unraveling for the 22-
year-old.
After his first flare-up,
campus police decided not
to intervene.
"I suggested they keep
an eye on him," an officer
'wrote.
Loughner's on-campigs
behavior grew increa-
ingly erratic, menacing,
even delusional. Fifty-one
pages of police reports
released Wednesday pro-
vided a chilling portrait
of Loughner's last school
year, which ended in
September when he was
judged mentally unhinged
and suspended by Pima
Community College.


Put a little lose in someone's heart this Valentine's Da) nith the
Lake Cinr Reporter's 'Love Lines.' Make it a special da; for those
.ou love b.s writing a message to .our sneetheart. 4e'll include it on
our IMentine Lowe Line' page on February 13th.


Roses ate red, violets are blue, send Love Lines
to show them that your love is true.
The Lake City Reporter
(-, ) Presents:


ve


nes


Love Line Rates are. as follows:
35 WORDS or less for 112.00 Each additional word 150
Add a photo for 13.00


l
.1Jalahhi,
WFThiI' ^ ,,,r h .t me I Ii


hlaria


Print your message here:


Your Name:
Phone:
Address:
City/State/Zip:
Mail to: Lake City Reporter, Classified Department
PO Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056 ~ 755-5440
t \LL L 1WMIJ.iT BE 1'\II)AI
S THE TIIE (F I'PL -( E1MEN T.
min k. 'ga)E E\DLINE IS FLB.. %21111


A


Lake City Reporter
i .k-,:,t, epr t. m. . ., N T' -...,p,,-.,











Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421 -
tkirby@iokeatyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Friday, January 14, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS







Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirby@iokecnyreportercom


Allen to

address

all-stars

Highlight of
senior all-star
week is the
Friday night
anquet.
Not only does it
signal an end to practice,
but players from both
teams come together
to swap stories over a
good meal. It provides an
opportunity for players
and coaches of area high
schools to meet
The banquet is a
prelude to Saturday's
Columbia Youth Football
Association/Dicks
Sporting Goods High
School All-Star Game
at Memorial Stadium.
Kickoff is 4 p.m.
Tonight's banquet is at
Richardson Community
Center and the
committee had to settle
for a history teacher as
the guest speaker.
But wait
This history teacher is
Brian Allen, who starred
at Florida State and
played several seasons in
the NFL. Allen teaches at
Lake Howell High, where
he is defensive
coordinator and
linebacker coach, and a
head coach for track.
Allen graduated from
Columbia High in 1996.
In his senior season
the linebacker led the
Tigers with 159 tackles,
41 more than the next
player. Allen intercepted
four passes and returned
three for touchdowns,
including a 70-yarder
against Valdosta High.
He was second-team
all-state.
Counting his redshirt
season, Florida State
appeared in three Sugar
Bowls, an Orange Bowl
and a Fiesta Bowl
during his playing days.
The Seminoles were
national champions in
1999. Allen was second
team all-ACC his junior
and senior seasons.
Allen was drafted in
the third round by the
St. Louis Rams before
their Super Bowl season
of 2001. He broke bones
a couple of times and
spent most of the year on
the inactive list.
Allen was placed in
the expansion draft and
taken by Houston. A torn
calf muscle led to his
release by the Texans
and he was signed by
Carolina in 2002. The
Panthers went to the
Super Bowl the next
season.
"I was a backup, but
got to start a good bit
and played a lot," Allen
said Thursday morning.
"I was one of the
special-team captains."
Allen became a free
agent after 2004 and
signed with Washington,
but a knee injury led
to his retirement. He
returned to live in
Orlando where he had
built a home.
"It was a lot of fun
and a good experience,"


ALLEN continued on 2B


Lady Tigers fall


to Chiles on


Senior Night


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Michaela Burton advances the ball against Buchholz High in a game played
earlier this year.


CHS loses 7-0
game against
Timberwolves.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Eight seniors were hon-
ored for Columbia High
soccer before Thursday's
7-0 loss against Chiles High.
Despite injuries this sea-
son, coach Ashley Brown is
proud of the way the team
has held together.
"Physically it's been a
tough year, because we have
lost so many starters due to
injury," she said. "I'm proud
of the team for the way


they've stayed motivated
despite the setbacks. The
seniors have displayed a lot
of leadership."
Captains Haley Dicks,
Brittany Strickland and
Leslie Wood were honored
along with Haley Hyde,
Britni Machleit, Vanessa
Paul, Trisha Ruthorford
and Amber Simms.
Columbia finished the
regular season at 8-11-2 fol-
lowing the loss, but will con-
tinue play in the district tour-
nament starting Monday.
The Lady Tigers come
in as the No. 7 seed and
will play against No. 2
Fleming Island at 2 p.m. in
Middleburg.


Lake City makes its point


LCMS basketball
team wins Star
Conference title.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. corn
Based on their previous
meetings this season, Lake
City Middle School's 24-22
home win over Madison
County Central School in
Thursday's Star Conference
championship game was a
blowout.
The teams had hooked
up twice already with Lake
City winning both games
by one point, 41-40.
This time the Falcons
had to overcome an 18-14
deficit entering the fourth
quarter.
The deciding play came
from Lonnie Underwood,
who got good position for a
rebound on a 3-point shot.
Underwood snagged the
ball and put it right in for
the two-point margin with
just under a minute to play.
Lake City kept the defen-
sive pressure on and made
the lead stand up.
Roger Cray got the
Falcons within one with a
three-point play off a steal
with 4:16 left in the game.
Madison's Ahkevious


S' ;'/
if l ^ i f**: ^ ?


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Middle School's boys basketball team celebrates winning the Star Conference championship on Thursday.


Williams pushed the lead
back to three points with a
driving basket, then Jordan
Coppock nailed a trey to tie
the game at 20,all with 3:15
to play.
Alex Brown hit two free
throws for the Broncos and
Cray countered with anoth-
er steal and basket to set up
the final action.
"We went to the press and


that changed the game,"
coach Mardell Jackson said.
'We,have been working on
it all year and it finally came
through."
Lake City led 6-2 at the
end of the first quarter, and
the game was tied 10-10 at
the half. Madison County
doubled up the Falcons in
the third quarter.
Cray led the Falcons with


seven points. Underwood
finished with six points
and Coppock scored five.
Kelvin Jonas had a basket
and added two free throws.
Darrell Jones was two-for-
two from the stripe.
Williams paced the
Broncos (12-4) with nine
points. Jaylon Hazzard
scored five points, Edric
Bright scored four points


and Javon Redding joined
Brown with two points.
'"This was the third time
around and all three games
were close," Falcons head
coach Casharo Thomas
said. "It was a tough game.
They have worked hard and
they deserve it."
Lake City (13-0) has a
final home game against
Fort White on Thursday.


It won't be cold

in Foxborough,

Pittsburgh


Rivalries heated
for this weekend's
playoff games.
By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press
Forget the cold. It's going
to be smoking' hot in the
AFC playoffs this weekend.
No one is trying to shove
aside the action in the NFC,
but the verbal activity head-
ing into Ravens-Steelers on
Saturday and Jets-Patriots
on Sunday has reached
seismic levels.
Jets cornerback Antonio
Cromartie disrespects
Tom Brady, then dares the
Patriots' star quarterback
to make him a target in the
divisional round game at
Foxborough, Mass.
Ravens linebacker Terrell
Suggs dons an insulting T-
shirt, then calls Saturday's


matchup at Heinz Field
"World War III."
As if these opponents
aren't heated enough
rivals in their respective
divisions.
There's nothing quite
so tangy in the NFC,
where both games also
. are rematches. Neither
the Packers at Falcons
match Saturday night nor
the Seahawks at Bears on
Sunday has been accompa-
nied by so much trash talk
or accusatory tones.
Not that you expect
everyone to get along as
they pursue a spot in the
conference title games.
"You shouldn't like who
you are going up against
right now," said Jets coach
Rex Ryan, hardly a wall-
flower. "This is the playoffs.
I can tell you our whole


NFL continued on 3t Sunday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (12) throws a pass to tight end Alge Crumpler
(82) during practice at the team's training facility in Foxborough, Mass. Thursday. The Patriots
are scheduled to host the New York Jets in an AFC Divisional playoff NFL football game on


..m ......












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 2011 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports


ESPN2 -
at Las Vegas


Today
BOWLING
5 p.m.
- PBA, World Championship,


BOXING
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Middleweights, Peter
Manfredo (36-6-0) vs. Daniel Edouard
(23-3-2), at Key West
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Joburg
Open, second round, at Johannesburg,'
South Africa (same-day tape)
7 p.m.
TGC -PGATour, Sony Open, second
round, at Honolulu
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Dallas at San Antonio
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Portland at Phoenix
PREP BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 St. Patrick (NJ.) at Winter
Park

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

WILD CARD
Seattle 41, New Orleans 36
N.Y.Jets 17, Indianapolis 16
Baltimore 30, Kansas City 7
Green Bay 21, Philadelphia 16
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m.
(CBS)
Green Bay at Atlanta, 8 p.m. (FOX)
Sunday
Seattle at Chicago, I p.m. (FOX)
N.Y. Jets at New England, 4:30 p.m.
(CBS)
Conference Championships,
Sunday, Jan.23
NFC, 3 p.m. (FOX)
-AFC, 6:30 p.m. (CBS)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 6
AtArlington,Texas
AFC champion vs. NFC champion,
6:30 p.m. (FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 30
At Honolulu
AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (FOX)

College all-star games
Saturday, Jan. 22
At Orlando
East-West Shrine Classic, 4 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 29
A... Aj obiAla.. ... ..
'Senior Bowl, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Saturday, Feb. 5
At San Antonio
Texas vs. The Nation All-Star
Challenge, 2 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Chicago at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Utah, 9 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Golden State,
10:30 p.m.
New Jersey at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Portland at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Houston at Atlanta, 7 p.m.


New Orleans at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Toronto atWashington, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Orlando at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Denver, 9 p.m.
New Jersey at Portland, 10 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule
Saturday's Games
No. I Duke vs.Virginia, 2 p.m.
No. 2 Ohio State vs. Penn State,
5:30 p.m.
No. 3 Kansas vs. Nebraska, 2 p.m.
No. 4 Syracuse vs. No. 25 Cincinnati,
Noon
No. 5 Pittsburgh vs. Seton Hall, 7 p.m.
No. 6 San Diego State at New Mexico,
6 p.m.
No. 7Villanova vs. Maryland, I p.m.
No. 10 Connecticut at DePaul, 2 p.m.
No. 12 Texas vs. Oklahoma, 4 p.m.
No. 13 Kentucky vs. LSU, 4 p.m.
No. 14Texas A&M vs. No. 15 Missouri,
I p.m.
No. 16 Illinois at No. 20 Wisconsin,
3 p.m.
No. 18 Louisville vs. Marquette,
II a.m.
No. 19 Temple at Duquesne, Noon
No. 21 Kansas State vs. Texas Tech,
1:30 p.m.
No. 22 Georgetown at Rutgers,
Noon
No. 23 UCF at Southern
Mississippi, 5 p.m.
No. 24 Georgia at Mississippi, 5 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 8 Purdue at West Virginia,
4:30 p.m.
No. 9 Notre Dame vs. St. John's at
Madison Square Garden, Noon
No. 17 Washington at California,
10p.m.

TENNIS

Australian Open seeds

At Melbourne Park
Melbourne,Australia
(Monday through Jan. 30)
Men
1. Rafael Nadal, Spain
2. Roger Federer, Switzerland
3. Novak Djokovic, Serbia
4. Robin Soderling, Sweden
5.Andy Murray, Britain
6.Thomas Berdych, Czech Republic
7. David Ferrer, Spain
8.Andy Roddick, United States
9. FernandoVerdasco, Spain
10. Mikhail Youzhny, Russia
II .Jurgen MelzerAustria
12. Gael Monfils, France
13.Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, France
14. Nicolas Almagro, Spain
15. Marin Cilic, Croatia
16. Mardy Fish, United States
17. Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia
18. Sam Querrey, United States
19. Stanislas Wawrinka, Switzerland
20.John Isner, United States
21. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyrus
22. Michael Llodra, France
23. Nikolay Davydenko, Russia
24. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia
25.Albert Montanes, Spain
26.Juan Monaco,Argentina
27. David Nalbandian,Argentina
28. Richard Gasquet, France
29.ViktorTroicki, Serbia
30.Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil
3 I. Feliciano Lopez, Spain
32. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain
Women
I. Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark
2.Vera Zvonareva, Russia
3. Kim Clijsters, Belgium
4.Venus Williams, United States
5. Sam Stosur,Australia
6. Francesca Schiavone, Italy
7.Jelena Jankovic, Serbia
8.Victoria Azarenka, Belarus ,
9. Li Na, China
10. Shahar Peer, Israel
I I.Justine Henin, Belgium
12.Agnieszka Radwanska, Poland


13. Nadia Petrova, Russia
14. Maria Sharapova, Russia
15. Marion Bartoli, France
16.Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia
17.Aravane Rezai, France
18. Maria Kirilenko, Russia
19.Ana Ivanovic, Serbia
20. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia
21 .YaninaWickmayer, Belgium
22. Flavia Pennetta, Italy
23. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia
24.Alisa Kleybanova, Russia
25. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic
26. Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez.
Spain
27.Alexandra Dulgheru, Romania
28. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia
29. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia
30.Andrea Petkovic, Germany
31. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic
32.Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Today's Games
Vancouver at Washington, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh at Boston, I p.m.
Calgary atToronto, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at NXY. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Florida, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
St. Louis at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

BASEBALL

MLB calendar

Tuesday Exchange of salary
arbitration figures.
Feb. 1-21 Salary arbitration
hearings.
Feb. 14 Voluntary reporting date
for pitchers, catchers and injured players.
Feb. 19 Voluntary reporting date
for other players.
March 2 Mandatory reporting
date.
March 2-11 Teams may renew
contracts of unsigned players.
March 15 Last day to place a
player on unconditional release waivers
and pay 30 days termination pay instead
of 45 days.
March 29 Last day to request
unconditional release waivers on a player
without having to pay his full 2011 I salary.
March 31 Opening day, active
rosters reduced to 25 players.

Career saves leaders
Career save leaders since 1969, when
saves became an official major league
statistic (x-active):
I.Trevor Hoffman 601
2. x-Mariano Rivera 559
3. Lee Smith 478
4. John Franco 424
5. x-Billy Wagner 422
6. Dennis Eckersley 390
7.Jeff Reardon 367
8. x-Troy Percival. 358
9. Randy Myers 347
I 0.Rollie Fingers 341
I .John Wetteland 330
12. Roberto Hernandez 326
13.Jose Mesa 321
14.Todd Jones 319
15. Rick Aguilera 318
16.Robb Nen 314
17.Tom Henke 311
18. Rich Gossage 310
19.Jeff Montgomery. 304'
20. Doug Jones 303
21. Bruce Sutter 300


BRIEFS


CHS TENNIS
Tryouts Tuesday
for girls, boys
Columbia High
tennis tryouts for girls
and boys begins at
3:30 p.m. Tuesday at the
CHS courts. Students
interested in trying out
must have a completed
physical form, which is
available at the school.
For details, call coach
Tabatha McMahon (girls)
at 755-8103 or coach Russ
Waters (boys) at
(386) 697-4114.

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Publix fundraiser
today, Saturday
The Fort White High
Dugout Club has a
fundraiser planned at
Publix in Lake City from
4-8 p.m. today and 8 a.m. to
4 p.m. Saturday.
For details, call Jeanne
R Howell at 288-5537.

YOUTH BASKETBALL
Sign-up deadline
at Boys Club
Registration for the Boys
Club of Columbia County's
2011 basketball program
is open through Saturday.
Girls and boys ages 6-14


are eligible. Games are
played on Saturday. Cost
is $40.
For details, call 752-4184.

FLAG FOOTBALL
Registration
for co-ed teams
Christ Central Sports is
offering co-ed flag football
for ages 5-12. Cost is $40.
Registration ends Saturday.
For details, call Ronny at



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square, '
to form four ordinary words.
GEALL I


365-2128.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Interest sought
for 10-under girls
Athletes interested in
playing 10-under girls
softball year-round are
being sought.
For details, call Butch
Lee at 965-6002.

N From staff reports
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


" ALTHOUGH THE
BACHELOR OWNEP
A LARGE FARM, THE
IRLS AI HE WA5 ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: { I I I "
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: ARDOR PIANO SCROLL JAGGED
Answer: What it can take to put up with bad
manners GOOD ONES


LT pleads guilty to



two misdemeanors


By JIM FITZGERALD
Associated Press

NEW CITY, N.Y. -
Former NFL star Lawrence
Taylor pleaded guilty
Thursday to sexual mis-
conduct and patronizing a
prostitute, misdemeanor
charges that carry no jail
time but require him to
register as a sex offender.
The 51-year-old ex-line-
backer, who led the New
York Giants to Super Bowl
titles in 1987 and 1991, will
serve six years probation.
"She told me she was
19," Taylor, standing with
his hands clasped behind
him, said in court as he
admitted having sex with a
prostitute who turned out
to be a 16-year-old Bronx
runaway.
Taylor said he now
knows the girl was legally
incapable of consent
Harry Carson, his for-


mer teammate and fellow
Hail of Famer, was in the
courtroom and gave Taylor
a supportive handshake
when he arrived.
Pros-
ecutor
Patricia
Gunning
said the
plea
deal was
accept-
Taylor able e
in part
because Taylor had assist-
ed in investigations into
human trafficking since he
was charged. Another pros-
ecutor, Arthur Ferraro, said
outside court that Taylor
"was of assistance in the
field of human trafficking
in several jurisdictions and
with federal authorities."
Taylor was arrested in
May at a suburban hotel.
He previously had
pleaded not guilty to third-


degree rape, patronizing
a prostitute, sexual abuse
and endangering a child.
He had been resisting a
plea deal for months.
Prosecutors said in
December he had been
offered a six-month jail
term and 10 years' proba-
tion in exchange for plead-
ing guilty to a felony. Taylor
would have had to register
as a sex offender. Defense
attorney Arthur Aidala had
called that offer unaccept-
able but said he would lis-
ten to any other offers.
Two other members of
the Giants' 1991 Super Bowl
team are behind bars. Mark
Ingram Sr., a star receiver,
is spending nearly 10 years
in federal prison for money
laundering, bank fraud and
bail jumping. Kick returned
Dave Meggett was sen-
tenced last year to 30 years
for criminal sexual conduct
and burglary.


Allen said. "I played with a Christi
couple of hall-of-famers." signed
Allen spent one year at was th.
Lyman High before No. 7 t
moving to Lake Howell Pondei
for the past three years. Allel
As one with an interest in Jessica
history, Allen knew about children
CHS and Lake Howell Allen,
splitting playoff games in Summ
1989-90. Trinity
Lake Howell is His
struggling with the an Infc
challenge of a large with th
population area and has School
won only a handful of friendly
games in three seasons. the re(
"We are building the school
program back up, but we Mrs. P
have five schools in a HRS a
six-mile radius," Allen said. His
"It is hard to have a was a.t
nucleus of players who hunter
grew up in middle school. before
We put a bunch of time in accide
with our No. 1 cornerback him fr,
and he transferred out He ha,
of the blue. It broke my pheasa
heart." still ha
Allen did coach and th
"five-star" linebacker Alle

ACROSS 35 Mr. Lugosi


1 Lot of bills
4 Cat's plaint
8 Museum con-
tents
11 Kappa
preceder
12 Yen
13 Dit opposite
14 Castle, .
in chess
15 Information
source
17 Oblong
nuts
19 Like bad gravy
20 Kind
of poodle
21 Married
22 Heavy horns
25 Forgive
28 Baton Rouge
campus
29 Sledding spot
31 be sur-
prised!
33 Biology
topic


37 Apple goody
38 Played hockey
40 Wasps' homes
42 Nth degree,
slangily
43 Zero, in sports
44 Archipelago
dots
47 Opinions
51 Car parts
53 Superman's
mom
54 Dog days mo.
55 Radiate
56 Aloud
57 Fabric meas.
58 Chop -
59 Libn's prey

DOWN

1 Winter wear
2 Molecule com-
ponent
, 3 Sioux
territory
4 Loose blouse
5 Depot info


ian Jones, who
with FSU. Jones
e defensive
his year to Christian
r's offensive No. 7.
n is married to
a. He has two
en daughter KB
a fourth-grader at
ers Elementary and
SAllen, 2.
mom, Ann Allen,
>rmation Specialist
ie Columbia County
I Board, is the
y face you see at
ception desk at the
board complex.
llen retired from
after 35 years.
dad, Leronia Allen,
top-class coon
rand dog breeder
suffering an
nt that paralyzed
om the chest down.
s a quail and
ant farm, and will
irvest a deer now
en.
n gravitated to


teaching history after a
degree in social science.
He has become a buff.
"As you get older, you
get more involved in
history," Allen said. "I
guess it comes with
growing up. I used to
watch only "Sports
Center," now I pop on
CNN to see what is on the
news. I try to motivate the
kids. I go into class with
the same energy and
passion I played with."
Allen said legendary
UCLA basketball coach
John Wooden is one of his
most inspirational coaches.
"I am inspired by
people who are extremely
successful," Allen said.
"He has the "Pyramid of
Success" and I will use
that in my speech. I will
let them hear what he said
and give my experience
with it"

* Tim Kirby is sports editor
Sof the Lake City Reporter.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

CLN K BASK
DERAIL FOILED
SIESTA UNDONE
ATOLLS GOB
KALE ALAS
MIL NOB ITEM
SNGE FOG OMEN
AGAR ERA PILE
SEAL EPA REV
TERR EASE
TVA MUSING
IN JAS MEEK ER
TENA NST PINATA
DO0G S DAC


6 World Series
mo.
7 Moby Dick's
pursuer
8 A Ponderosa
son


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossw6rd Puzzles" books
ai QuillDriverBooks.com


9 Coarse file
10 Not we
11 401(k) cousin
16 Pal
18 Grab a snack
21 Mural's locale
22 Best
medicine
23 Purposes
24 Kind of mail
25 Entreated
earnestly
26 Fumbler's
word
27 Soir follower
30 Mountain goat
32 Plaines, IIIl.
34 Weaker, as an
excuse
36 Indigo dye
39 Flavors
41 Novel
closer
43 Piquant
44 "- -, old
chap"
45 Cuff link
46 Hangs back
47 Party cheese
48 Deserve
49 Herr's spouse
50 Mr. Mineo
52 Ostrich
relative


@ 2011 by UFS, Inc.


ALLEN: Inspired by John Wooden

Continued From Page 1B


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


QULLAS



INKANP
7, T ,^
' __ _ __ '
















FSU, Duke move on after upset win


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Top-
ranked Duke hadn't lost in
25 games, the second-lon-
gest run in school history.
Florida State had lost twice
in little more than a week.
None of that mattered
much Wednesday night.
Derwin Kitchen scored 17
of his 22 points in the second
half, Chris Singleton added
18 points and the Seminoles
pulled of their latest upset
of the Blue Devils, 66-61.
It was the third time since
2002 that Florida State beat
a top-ranked Duke team at
home.
"We have not been in a
game like that (this sea-
son). They knocked us
back," said Duke coach
Mike Krzyzewski, whose
team hadn't lost since a
79-72 setback last March at
Maryland. "You just learn
from the experience. We
have a long way to go."
While the Blue Devils
were putting together
their winning streak,
which included another
ACC title and their fourth
national championship, the
Seminoles were trying to
find an identity.
They lost competitive
back-to-back games earlier
this season to Florida and
Ohio State, then seemed to
get things going in the right


direction, before dropping
three of their last four to
Butler, Auburn and Virginia
Tech.
But there's just some-
thing about the Seminoles
when they play top-ranked
teams.
This was the fourth time
they've knocked off No. 1,
including in 2002 and 2006
against Duke. Florida State
fans rushed the floor follow-
ing the final buzzer, making
for a garnet-and-gold mob
scene at center court, and
one was still climbing on
the rim 15 minutes after the
game ended.
"We've had some kinks
and some problems ear-
lier in the season," center
Bernard James said. 'We've
figured some stuff out in
the last couple practices
we had, creating for each
other."
The Seminoles were up
28-24 at halftime and by
as many as 11 early in the
second half, but the game
was tight to the finish.
Florida State needed five
free throws in the final 33
seconds.
Kyle Singler scored 20
points and Nolan Smith had
19 for the Blue Devils, who
missed their first 10 3-point
attempts and shot 31.1 per-
cent overall.
'Tonight wasn't about
us being bad," Krzyzewski
said. "They were really


good."
Every time Duke got
close, Kitchen had an
answer. The 6-foot-4 senior
guard had a team-high
10 rebounds to go with
his 22 points, his second
double-double of the sea-
son.
"I just took what they
gave me and tried to be
as aggressive as possible,"
he said. "When I'm more
aggressive we're a better
team than when I'm just sit-
ting back passing the ball."
"He went into beast
mode," James said.
Singleton's two free
throws with 33 seconds left
gave the Seminoles a 63-58
lead, but Smith's 3-pointer
chopped the Duke deficit
to two with 26.9 seconds
remaining.
That was as close as the
Blue Devils got. Michael
Snaer hit a pair of free
throws and Okaro White
added another to seal it
after Duke misfired at the
other end.
"We came together
tonight," Singleton said. "If
we can beat them we can
beat anybody."
Duke came into the
game averaging nearly 88
points, having outscored its
opponents by just under 25
per game this season. That
included ipmressive wins
over then-No. 4 Kansas
State, then-No. 6 Michigan


State and an 82-70 rout of
Butler in a rematch of the
national title game.
"Our guys stuck with our
game plan," Florida State
coach Leonard Hamilton
said. "They maintained their
poise. We hit the big free
throws down the stretch. I
hope they understand now
exactly the way they have
to play in order to be suc-
cessful."
Smith's 3 with 2:26 left
pulled Duke to 59-58, but
Kitchen countered with
a baseline pull-up to give
Florida State a 61-58 edge
with 2:01 to go.
Singler missed a 3-point-
er with a minute remain-
ing that would've tied the
score.
Singler didn't get his first
field goal until the opening
minute of the second half
on a goaltending call on
Singleton, but then heated
up quickly, hitting five of
his next six from 3-point
distance to help wipe out
Florida State's 40-29 cush-
ion early in the second
half.
Duke caught up with a
13-2 run and tied it at 42 on
Andre Dawkins' three free
throws after being fouled
by Singleton on a 3-pointer.
Kitchen answered again,
this time with a 3-pointer
from 'the top of the circle,
and Duke could never get
the lead.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State's Michael Snaer shoots as Duke's Mason
Plumlee defends in the Seminoles' 66-61 upset win against
Duke on Wednesday in Tallahassee.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Aug. 5 file photo, St. Louis Rams offensive coordinator Pat Shurmur jogs with
members of the Rams during training camp at the team's training facility in St. Louis. The
Cleveland Browns named Shurmur its fifth coach since 1999.


Browns' hire Shurmur


By TOM WITHERS
Associated Press

CLEVELAND Pat
Shurmur quickly turned
rookie quarterback Sam
Bradford into a rising NFL
star. Shurmur's next proj-
ect will be tougher.
The Cleveland Browns
are no easy fix.
Shurmur, St. Louis'
offensive coordinator
the past two years, was
hired by the Browns on
Thursday, ending a search
for their fifth coach since
1999 that began when team
president Mike Holmgren
fired Eric Mangini on Jan.
3 after his second straight
11-loss season.
Shurmur isn't a big-
name hire, and his addition
won't trigger a celebration
by Browns fans or a rush
of season-ticket requests.
But to Holmgren, the 45-
year-old's last name means
success.
Shurmur's late uncle,
Fritz, was Holmgren's
defensive coordinator
in Green Bay when the
Packers won the Super
Bowl in 1996. And in hir-
ing a candidate with no
head coaching experience,
Holmgren is following the
same path he took in get-
ting to the top of his pro-
fession.
Like Shurmur, Holmgren
was a quarterbacks coach
and an offensive coordi-
nator before getting the
Packers' job in 1992. When
Shurmur, who was the
first of three known can-


didates to be interviewed,
sat across the desk from
Holmgren, Cleveland's
top football executive may
have seen a younger ver-
sion of himself.
"Pat is a bright, young
man who grew up in
football and around the
coaching profession,"
Holmgren said. "I came
away from our interview
very impressed with him
as a person, his extensive
knowledge of the game
and his track record of suc-
cess as an assistant coach
in this league.
"Most importantly, I feel
as though he possesses the
necessary qualities' which
make him the right man to
lead our football team."
The Browns have a been
a mess for far too long.
In a league where quick
turnarounds are common,
they've been an exception
to the rule. Cleveland has
made the AFC playoffs just
once and had nine double-
digit loss seasons in 13
years. Chris Palmer, Butch
Davis, Romeo Crennel
and Mangini each failed
in trying to build a consis-
tent winner in Cleveland's
expansion era.
The Browns will intro-
duce him as their 13th full-
time coach Friday in a news
conference at their Berea,
Ohio, headquarters.
Shurmur's development
of Bradford, last year's No.
1 overall draft pick, was
one of the main reasons
the Browns nabbed him.
They're hoping he can have


similar success with Colt
McCoy, who showed poise
and promise after being
thrown into a starting role
because of injuries.
Under Shurmur,
Bradford lived up to his
hype and set rookie league
records for completions
and attempts. He also led
St. Louis to a 7-9 record
- the Rams were 1-15 a
year earlier while throw-
ing for 3,512 yards, sec-
ond-most ever for a rookie
behind Peyton Manning's
3,739 in 1998.

Broncos name Fox head
coach
ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
- The Denver Broncos
hired former Carolina
Panthers coach John Fox
on Thursday to resurrect a
downtrodden team.
Fox's contract wasn't
renewed by the Panthers
following an NFL-worst
2-14 season.
Fox replaces Josh
McDaniels, who was fired
Dec. 6 amid the Broncos'
worst slide in four decades
and the embarrassing
Spygate II videotaping
scandal.
The 55-year-old Fox
went 78-74 including play-
offs in nine seasons at
Carolina. The Panthers
were coming off a 1-15 sea-
son when he took over in
2002 and led them to a
7-9 mark in his first year
before guiding them to the
Super Bowl in his second
season.


NFL: Rivalries highlight matchups


Continued From Page 11

team respects Brady and
the Patriots. But hey, we
don't like any of them
right now. You shouldn't.
(Former Jets running back)
Danny Woodhead is a great
kid, but I can't stand Danny
Woodhead right now.
"I think that's just part of
it, and trust me, the feeling
is mutual."
That right, Terrell?
"We're looking forward
to walking into Heinz Field
with a certain swagger,"
Suggs said.
Presumably, he won't be
wearing the T-shirt that dis-
plays "HEY PITTSBURGH"
and a purple Raven and a
hand with the middle finger
extended.
"There isn't any mes-
sage," he insisted. '"This is
just, like I always say, I put
on for my city. They rep
their city, and I'm repping
mine. So, here we go."
Loudly.
Saturday

Ravens (13-4) at
Steelers (12-4)
Each side won a superb
defensive game on the
other's field, which should
give Baltimore some con-
fidence. But the Ravens
never have won a playoff
game in Pittsburgh.
Plus, Steelers quarter-
back Ben Roethlisberger
was serving the last game
of his four-game suspen-
sion when the Ravens won
on Oct. 3.
The game-breakers
in this one are guys like
Suggs, Ed Reed and Ray
Lewis for Baltimore, Troy
Polamalu, James Harrison
and LaMarr Woodley for
Pittsburgh. Defenders all.
"You can talk about the
offense, but these are
the two best defenses,"
Roethlisberger said. "They
are great defenses with a
lot of exotic-type blitzes and
exotic looks. Both groups
are veteran, so it's all about
the offense that makes the
fewest amount of mistakes.
So, I think that's why it's
always close. You never
want to make a mistake,
especially in the playoffs,
because everything gets a
little tighter. A defense like
that, you're under a micro-
scope even more."

Packers (11-6) at
Falcons (13-3)
Green Bay is on a roll,
winning its last three games
when one loss would have


ended its season. The
21-16 victory at Philadelphia
was Aaron Rodgers' first in
the postseason as Packers
quarterback, and he per-
formed superbly in a 20-17
loss at the Georgia Dome
on Nov. 28
, He. also. lost ,a> fumble
'near the Atlanta goal line
in that game, something he
seems to remember more
than going 26 of 35 for 344
yards with one TD and no
interceptions.
The Falcons were 7-1 at
home, where they haven't
had a playoff game' since
the 2004 season, when they
routed the Rams 47-17 in
the divisional round. They'll
face an offense that sudden-
ly became versatile when
rookie James Starks rushed
for 123 yards in Philly.
Atlanta already has that
offensive variety with Matt
Ryan throwing to Roddy
White and Tony Gonzalez,
and Michael Turner run-
ning the ball.
'"That's the thing I think
will make them even
more dangerous," Falcons
coach Mike Smith said of
the sixth-seeded Packers.
"With the way they're run-
ning the football, they have
a chance to be even more
multidimensional. They ran
the ball probably as effec-
tively as they've run it all
season."
Sunday

Seahawks (8-9) at
Bears (11-5)
How can a losing team
get within a step of the
conference championship
game? Well, win a weak divi-
sion (the NFC West, which
Seattle took at 7-9, the first
under.-500 division win-
ner). Then play an inspired
game featuring loads of
big plays against an under-
manned opponent albeit
the defending Super Bowl
champs.
Now, the Seahawks go
back to Chicago, where
they won 23-20 in October,
their best game of the regu-
lar season, and if they do
it again, the NFL has a 9-9
club one win away from the
big game.
Seattle is brimming with
confidence after outscoring
New Orleans. Chicago is
healthier than the Saints,
has a much better defense,
and has improved signifi-
cantly since falling to the
Seahawks, particularly the
running game with Matt
Forte.


Forte ran for 717 yards
over the final nine games,
averaging 4.9 yards per
carry. He expects to carry
a big load Sunday.
"I don't think we have
a choice," Forte said. "We
can't go out and do what
we did last time and throw
the ball 40 or 50 times and
run the ball 10 times. We
have to have a balanced
offense."

Jets (12-5) at
Patriots (14-2)
The AFC foes split two
games, with the Jets con-
trolling the second half of a
28-14 home victory in Week
2, then the Patriots domi-
nating from the outset of a
45-3 Monday night romp on
Dec. 6. New England won
eight straight to close out
the season, and Brady has
won an NFL-record 28 con-
secutive home starts.
He also is 8-1 in home
playoff games, but the
defeat came last year
against Baltimore in the
wild-card round.
Brady noted he's been
called worse than what
Cromartie sent his way,
and Brady's history is to
send lots of passes com-
pleted passes, several for
touchdowns the way of
anyone who insults him
or his team. Remember
Pittsburgh's Anthony Smith
calling out the Patriots three
years ago, then getting vic-
timized time and again by
Brady?
"(Coach Bill) Belichick
has called me that, our
offensive coordinator has
called me that," Brady
said. "I know that they (the
coaches) like me, so maybe
he (Cromartie) really likes
me, because there are peo-
ple who have called me that
a few times."
Big talk aside, the Jets
must find a pass rush and
need to hold the ball on
offense to have any chance
of a fourth road playoff win
in five tries under Ryan.
And they need a fast start.
"It was the perfect
sto-m," Jets second-year
QB Mark Sanchez said of
the lopsided loss at Gillette
Stadium. "We played very
poorly. We started off slow.
They started off fast. They
kept rolling (and) we didn't
bounce back. When you get
down like that, then you
start forcing balls over the
middle, you start throwing
interceptions and you just
end up buried."


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 2011


DILBERT


BLONDIE
LOOK, HONEY! I GOT OH,
ONE OF THOSE COOL LET'S
>ONLINE SEE
E-CARDS!



0 '




BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


MAN! I MISS BUT ISN'T IT NICE
ONE DAY AT TO KNOW YOU WERE
LOU'S DINER MISSED, DEAR?
AND E
GOES TO




* ul BB^^


B.C.


2011Johnt..HatP OM


201 Jhn Hat FLP' '" ** .p -l.|


WHEN YOUR. PARROT
FLIES The- CooP.


FRANK & ERNEST

IF JOHNNY HAS 5IX MOLD IT/! YOU lAID THI$
APPLfS AND MARY v/iA AN ARITHMfTIC
^/ HA$ /^QUIZ, NOT A
FOUg... ,QUIZ ON



-J-NATIONLAv I-I


DEAR ABBY


Naughty past posted online

jeopardizes student's future


DEAR ABBY: A for-
mer student asked me to
write a character reference
to help her land a teach-
ing job abroad. I agreed,
since I thought highly of
her potential as a teacher
and scholar, and her level
of character. However, af-
ter she was placed in the
classroom, the ministry
of education of the nation
where she was to teach
discovered some inappro-
priate posting on her social
networking site.
Because I had writ-
ten the recommendation,
they contacted me asking
if they had a problem and
provided me with copies of
what they had found. Her
posting detailed a history
of forging fake IDs to buy
alcohol while underage, nu-
merous episodes of binge
drinking in high school and
college, her marijuana use
and several exhibitionistic
stunts and sexual activi-
ties that I won't mention.
I was shocked. None of
this matched the person I
thought I knew.
When I tried to contact
her to let her know she had
been discovered, she re-
buffed my inquiries and cut
off all contact! Her parents'
response was denial and to
"kill the messenger." I have
been left with the problem
of how to respond to the
ministry's questions.
Ordinarily I would not


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
want my signature associ-
ated with someone with
those behaviors and at-
titudes, but this young
woman is in legal jeopardy
abroad. I still don't know if
what she wrote is true, but
I find it highly problematic
that she would portray her-
self as she did.
This situation has so
shaken my trust in the
character and judgment of
the 20-something crowd
that I'm now reluctant to
write recommendations for
any of my students. What
do you think I should have
done? I'm concerned that
too many of these young
people, however intelli-
gent, lack integrity, charac-
ter, judgment and common
sense. HEARTBRO-
KEN TEACHER, OAK-
LAND, CALIF.
DEAR HEARTBRO-
KEN: You responded ap-
propriately by trying to
contact your former stu-
dent and her parents. If the
information on that social
networking site is an accu-
rate reflection of her behav-
ior, she could get herself in


real trouble if the country
she's in is one with conser-
vative social views.
It is intelligent of you to
think twice about giving
references to students i.
the future. It's important
that you be careful because
there could be liability for
you if you knew anything
about her antics when you
wrote her recommenda-
tion. If you are wonder-
ing how to respond to thte
ministry of education, what
you need to convey is that
you had no knowledge of
any social networking sites
or postings related to her,
and that you. were basing
your recommendations on
your personal interactions
with her.
Let this be a lesson to all
young people who are us-
ing social networking sites.
Employers are doing back-
ground checks and you will
be discovered. Any past
communications you have
on the Internet are thee
to stay.
This has been a hot top-
ic in the media. But I'm in-
terested to know what you,
my readers, both young
and old, think about this.
You teach me more than I
teach you, and this subject
is one of great importance.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): It's catch-up
time, so focus and con-
centrate. Don't fret over
what someone else does or
says. Love and money ap-
pear to cross paths. Before
you spend trying to please
someone, see if there is
room in your budget ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Don't worry
about showing your emo-
tions; it will help you relate
better to your peers and
your family. Expressing
what you want is the fastest
way to achieve your goals.
Expect greater understand-
ing and plenty of sugges-
tions. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Discuss money
investment with a financial
expert and you can stabilize
your situation. A partner-
ship is apparent but, before
you move ahead, check the
individual's credentials.
Moderation will be the key
to your success. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You may be
tempted to follow instead of
lead. Before you make an
impulsive move, consider
what you stand to lose or
gain. You may want to slow
down. Your intuition won't
fail you but greed will.

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Stabilize your cur-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

rent career situation by
doing more. Ifs all about
work ethics and how you
see yourself fitting into the
changing economy and
business structure. Love is
on the rise. Future promis-
es will be reciprocated. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Travel, socialize and
network. Now is not the
time to invest more in your
surroundings or to make an
impulsive move. Enjoy the
people you care about and
you will realize what you
want to do regarding your
present location. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't question or op-
pose the people you interact
with or you will face nega-
tivity and disappointment.
Observe and focus more
on the creative endeavors
you enjoy. Don't overspend
trying to make yourself or
someone else feel better.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Taking time to
create something new or to
get involved in a group that
you relate to will lead to an
exciting new enterprise. A
trip geared toward some-
thing you love doing and
spending time with people
you enjoy will show you the
way to a brighter future.

SAGrITARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Don't fool
yourself into thinking that
you've gotten away with
something. If you haven t
abided by the rules, you
can expect someone to
point the finger at you.
Don't mess with authority,
especially in your persom.n
life. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Spend more
time working with family
or on your residence. Th:;
is a good time to look into
personal investments oi
to throw a party at your
place. Your enthusiasm and
warmth will lead to some
excellent opportunities.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Stick close io
home and figure out a way
to make things better. Put
your personal papers in
order and set a budget for
the year. Someone fro,
your past will be able 1L
help you. An honest effort
to make your life better wifl
pay off. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You can make
more money and get in-
volved in better projects if
you are prepared. Changes.
at home will be conducive
to a better lifestyle and w l
also show off your skill..
You will be awarded favy-",
and given opportunities .
excel. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: T equals M
"G ON NJ C Y VW W X- HW C X GRA
DNL H Y W C R X HWCX 'ZCH C R X
VWCDW' GR OZWROM TGRLOWY. GO


GRSNKSWY HLYYGC."


ZNNXM


C K K W R
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Authors are sometimes like tomcats: They distrust all
the other toms but they're kind to kittens." Malcolm Cowley
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 1-14


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


issued you.! Todayl was lik a b
without a iburger, fries without
Stchakp...chill without hot saLuce


AN' IT WORKED !! THIS MORNING'
I ETCHED A PICTURE OF A MOUSE !!
_-- GROAN...THAT
(J_ / OKE IS EVEN
1 OLDER
l - ~YOU!!


............ .......... '. I


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


* ADvantage


One item per ad il |
4 lins 6 dy Eay h additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling S100 or less.






4 lines 5* 6 days
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandisetotalling 500 or less.
S Each item must include a price.




Lines 6 days Each additional







ad eah Wd ne s ayS1 i srt
Rate applies to private individuals sellng
personal merchandise totalling 1,000 or less.
S Eac ir' em i mus,-.-,.t include a price., j
Sn -refundable rate.










SOne telem p rer a t plaet
4 lines 6 days 4dt"onal'
S Rate applies to private individuals selling
persona andise totalling $ 00 or less
ct e rThis Is non-refundablre rate. a




eOn t O er oa is l a
4 ines 6 days Each additional






i one alm pEr a
4 lines 6 dhays92.0









4alinOS S 1 50

pneirles 2 signs etota l 2r less



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.I

$10.80 each additional line


r Un

You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or e-mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified

EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.comr





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mns .,e9:00a.m
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs.,10:00 a.m. Thurs., 9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fn., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fi., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change wilho notice




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard


abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In 0.co
wwM .' -o


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.:2007-488CA
DIVISION:
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHARLES FENWICK, et al
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated December 31,
2010 and entered in Case NO. 2007-
488CA of the Circuit Court of the
THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for
COLUMBIA County, Florida where-
in WELLS FARGO BANK,N.A., is
the Plaintiff and CHARLES F. FEN-
WICK; CONTANCE M. FEN-
WICK; TENANT #1 N/K/A CAR-
RIE FENWICK are the Defendants,
The Clerk of the Court will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
at FRONT STEPS OF THE CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 9th day
of FEBRUARY, 2011, the following
described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment:
LOT 22, FIVE POINTS ACRES,
ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 22, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH: A 1997 28 X
70 FLEE DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE
HOME, I.D. NO.
GAFLV35A127421HH21 AND I.D.
NO. GAFLV35B 12742HH21.
A/K/A 209 NE DIANA TERRACE,
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on January 5, 2011.
P DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
.ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper,
Court Administration at 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake
City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at
least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F07048939- NMNC-SPECFHLMC
05524828
January, 14,21, 2011
PUBLIC AUCTION to be held
February 19, 2011 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto, 2492 SE
Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
Vin #1HGEM1154YL045254
2000 Honda
05524830
January 14, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Probate Division
File No. 10-105-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EVELYN MARIE JUSTICE,
a/k/a EVELYN C. JUSTICE,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Or-
der of Summary Administration has
been entered in the estate of EVE-
LYN MARIE JUSTICE a/k/a EVE-
LYN C. JUSTICE, deceased, File
No. 10-105-CP, by the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 173 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, FL 32055; that the total cash
value of the estate is -0.- and that the
names and addresses of those to
whom it has been assigned by such
order are:
NAME:Lisa J. Youngblood
ADDRESS:13116 NW CR 231,
Gainesville, FL 32609
NAME: John M. Justice
ADDRESS: 10351 Killamey Lane,
Crystal River, FL

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, on
whom a copy of this notice is served
within three months after the date of
the first publication of this notice
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE


I- I bah


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance


Legal

(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the dece-
dent must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is January 14, 2011
Attorney for person giving notice:
/s/ Terry McDavid
TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone: (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No 052454
Person giving notice:
/s/ Lisa A. Youngblood
13116 NW CR 231
Gainesville, FL 32609

05524868
January 14, 21, 2011

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING A SPECIAL EX-
CEPTION AS PROVIDED FOR IN
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY LAND
DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS
BY THE BOARD OF ADJUST-
MENT OF COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that, pursuant to the Colum-
bia County Land Development Reg-
ulations as amended, hereinafter re-
ferred to as the Land Development
Regulations, comments, objections
and recommendations concerning the
special exception as described be-
low, will be heard by the Board of
Adjustment of Columbia County,
Florida, at a public hearing on Janu-
ary 27, 2011 at 7:00 p.m., or as soon
thereafter as the matter can be heard,
in the School Board Administrative
Complex, located at 372 West Duval
Street, Lake City, Florida.
SE 0510, a petition by Bobby D.
Baird, to request a special exception
be granted as provided for in Section
4.5.7 of the Land Development Reg-
ulations to allow for a vehicle repair
and contractor yard as a use similar
to an automotive repair and repair of
agricultural equipment (not to exceed
two thousand five hundred (2,500)
square feet), a building contractor
and yard, and other uses which are
compatible with the uses of this dis-
trict within an AGRICULTURE (A-
3) zoning district in ,accordance with
a site plan submitted as part of a peti-
tion dated December 20, 2010, to be
located on property described, as fol-.
lows:
A parcel of land lying within Sec-
tions 16, Township 5 South, Range
17 East, Columbia County, Florida.
Being more particularly described, as
follows: Commence. at the North-
west comer of the Southwest 1/4 of
the Northwest 1/4 of said Section 16;
thence South 89052'51" East, along
the North line of said Southwest 1/4
of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 16 a
distance of 21.96 feet to East right-
of-way line of Southwest Mixon
Road also being the Point of Begin-
ning; thence continue South
89052'51" East, along the North line
of the Southwest 1/4 of the North-
west 1/4 of said Section 16 a dis-
tance of 630.71 feet to the West
right-of-way line of Interstate 75
(State Road 93); thence South
1704719 East, along the West right
of-way line of said Interstate 75
(State Road 93) 353.12 feet; thence
North 89052'51" West 744.81 feet to
said East right-of-way line of 'South-
west Mixon Road; thence North,
along the East right-of-way line of
said Southwest Mixon Road 336.07
feet more or less to the Point of Be-
ginning.
Containing 5.03 acres, more or less.
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future dates. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
ceming the matter will be published.
At the aforementioned public hear-
ing, all interested parties may appear
to be heard with respect to the spe-
cial exception.
Copies of the special exception are
available for public inspection at the
Office of the County Planner, Coun-
ty Administrative Offices, 135
Northeast Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, during regular business
hours
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ing, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation or an
interpreter to participate in the pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa K. B.
Roberts, at least seven (7) days prior
to the date of the hearing. Ms. Rob-
erts may be contacted by telephone
at (386)758-1005 or by Telecommu-
nication Device for Deaf at
(386)758-2139.
04543012
January 14, 2011


010 Announcements


060 Services


Cabinets For Less
Free Estimates
www.tlcw.us
386-288-2836


100 J01
100 'Opportunities

04542883
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

04543009
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
Night Audit position
Part/full time. MUST be a people
person with great customer service
skills, strong work ethic, good
communication, computer skills,
and willingness to learn. MUST be
a team player and be able to work
a flexible schedule including
weekends and holidays.
Only those seeking long term
employment need apply in person
at Comfort Suites located 3690 W
US Hwy 90, Lake City. Please do
not call regarding application.

04543038
LOSS MITIGATION SPE-
CIALIST/FULL TIME
DUTIES AND
RESPONSIBILITIES:
Work with collection staff on
loss mitigation options to
avoid foreclosure, evaluate
borrowers financial situation to
review workout options; loan
modification, assumptions, short
sale, deed in lieu; work with
investors to ensure loss
mitigation efforts comply with
investor, insurer and company
guidelines as well as with
applicable laws and regulations.
Responsible for reporting loan
account status to investors on an
ongoing basis as well as
maintaining and updating
agency requirements for default
reporting & claims submission.
JOB REQUIREMENTS:
Must have experience in FHA
guidelines, reviewing
financial statements, tax
returns, aqd understand real
estate laws. Ability to work
independently as well as part of
a team. Ability to learn rules,
regulations, laws and methods
of collection. Strong negotiation
skills. Excellent organizational.
skills. Self motivated and
results oriented. Bilingual
candidates encouraged to apply.
Full benefits package.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal Branch
and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029,
Lake City, FL 32056 or email
Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

05524764
Suwannee Homecare is seeking
LPN's for an elderly Gainesville
couple for 7am-7pm Days and
weekends will vary This is a
great position to supplement
income Please call Wendy
386-755-1544
Serious inquires only

20 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Employer: Caseland, Inc
Cynthiana, KY. Row Crop & ,
Produce Production,
Greenhouse/Nursery Production,
& Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 03/01/11 11/01/11. Wage
of $9.71/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Center
in your area and reference Job
Order #KY0416453.
3 Temp Nursery Workers needed
2/15/11 12/15/11. Workers will
cultivate, harvest, grade, store, &
ship container & field grown
horticultural products. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools,
supplies, equip provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon com-
pletion of 50% of contract or
earlier. $10.51/hr. Report or send
resume to nearest FL Agency of
Workforce Innovation office &
ref. job order # OH 520674.
Davis Tree Farm & Nursery -
Valley City, OH
Experienced Legal
Secretary/Paralegal
5 yrs exp, including
civil litigation, email resume and
salary requirements to:
sportsroof@yahoo.com
Experienced Stylist
needed, apply at
Southern Exposure Salon
386-752-4614


Receptionist needed for ASC,
knowledge of insurance a plus.
Please send resume to:
admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net
or fax to 386-755-2169


100 Job
100 Opportunities

New Generation Christian School
is hiring an elementary teacher:
Minimum of bachelors degree in
education, psychology or other
related field is required.
Please fax application to:
(386) 758-5597 or e-mail to
pgorman@newgenerationschool.org
5 Temp Farm Workers needed
2/14/11 11/30/11. Duties
include: planting, cultivating,
harvesting nursery stock including
container & field grown plants,
trees, & shrubs. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. All tools, supplies,
equip, provided at no cost.
Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract or
earlier. $9.11/hr Report or send
resume to the nearest FL Agency
of Workforce Innovation office &
ref. job order # AL 623159.
Oak Hill Tree Farm -
Grand Bay, AL
TEACHER/PTA/PCA,
(Brain damage therapies preferred)
FDLE check, some driving,
cooking, cleaning and personal
care, lift 100 lbs is required
3-4 days a week, Email
resume' and reference to
PCAposition@yahoo.com
Two Hair Stylist needed,
with clientele for Branford salon,
please call Maggie,
386-935-4059
Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

110n Sales
11 Employment

05524825
Lake City, FL based business
looking for qualified sales
professional. Performance based
pay estimated $45K+ per year.
Advertising Sales experience
preferred. Send resume to
info@lakecityfl.info or
PO Box 1208, Lake City, FL


1 0 Medical
120 Employment

05524758
RN NEEDED)
7:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m.
The Health Center df Lak6 City
has an opening for an RN with
good assessment skills
Excellent Salary
EOE/ADA/Drug
Free Workplace
Apply in person or
send resume to:
The Health Center
of Lake City
560 S.W. McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025

Busy outpatient surgery center has
immediate opening for part time
Registered Nurses.
Please email resume to
administration@lcsurgerycenter.com
or fax to 386-487-3935.
Giebeig Family Medicine
Hiring for two full-time positions
Front Office Receptionist and
Nursing, experience preferred.
Fax resume to 719-9494.
Physician's Assistant or Nurse
Practitioner needed for new Ur-
gent Care Center in Alachua area,
ER or Urgent Care experience a
plus, but not required. Contact
Paul @ 352-258-4452

240 Schools &
240 Education

04542861
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/17/10 -

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

AKC GERMAN SHEPPARD
puppy. Born 12/13.
Parents on site. $400.
386-496-3654 or 352-745-1452
Albino Cockatiel w/cage
and supplies $75
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
Thank you fo rthe inquires.
We have already found a
home for the blonde lab
mix female.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

GE Electric Stove,
White, works great,
$160 386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331 eves after 6pm

GE Gas Cook Top,
Black, still in box $650 new,
will accept $225
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
Matching Whirlpool
Washer/Dryer Set,
White $245 .
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

ASHLEY DINING ROOM
TABLE w/6 chairs and leaf.
$150.00 Great Deal!!!
386-344-5706

Comfortable, used Love Seat,
Beige cloth, $20,
1st come 1st served!
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

Moving Sale. Sat. 8-? Past High
school (252) to Old Country Club
Rd. Rt at light 1/2 mi to Oat P1.
New 2 story on left Look for signs.







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

Gas Heater, (four grate)
Dearborn type, $50
386-292-3927 or
386-984-0387

PIGLETS
Black & White
$50 each
386-965-2215
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
719-4802

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422

3/2 DWMH, back porch/carport,
nice area of Picadilly Park, $675
month, lst/last/$300 dep,
Call -386-752-6333
Clean, quiet 3/2 ($625 mo) &
"2/1 ($450 mo.) both in Branford
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482






Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Nice 4br/2.5 ba, 3 ac. Fenced
/Cross Fenced, paved rd., huge
deck, private. McAlpin area. $900
dep. & $950. mo. 386-867-1833

6 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824


05524744
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers Save
up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832


Pool Leaks / Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


Hll gym


I


N











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


710 f oUnfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent Ap

05i2472x
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

Get up to $2011 in 2011!
Call for Details
Windsong Apts
386-758-8455
2br/lba house. In town
Close to shopping.
$500. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
2BR/1BA with carport,
Privacy Garden and
Utility Room Near VA.
No Pets. 386-438-8052
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $500. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up' patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Large 2br/2ba Duplex.in
nice area with W/D hookup.
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
.2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

7 Unfurnished
70U Home For Rent

1/1 small home for rent,
near Pinemount Rd.
386-755-8918
call anytime
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1000 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport, $825 mo, 1st,
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt,'carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Prime location 2br/lba.
Residential or commercial. Comer
of Baya & McFarlane. $600. mo.
$500 security. 386-752-9144 or
386-755-2235
Three Rivers Estates, 2/1, CH/A,
2010 W2 and ref's from current
landlord required, $700 month, &
$700 sec dep, 386-497-4699
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus bonus
room. w/1.5 bath. Quail Heights
CC. $750. mo plus $250 damage
dep. 386-752-8553

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft -
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale
1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd, owner fin, no
down pym't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin: or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of


18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.
This nice 4.5 acre parcel has
septic, power & well, older MH
$39.900 MLS 76182
Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty


810 Home for Sale
2br/2ba Eastside Village.
Unique floor plan. Lg utility/
work room. Screened
front porch. $55,000
DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110
3/1 on 4.43 acres, metal roof,
pond on property,
Lease option available
$129,888 Results Realty,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
3br/2ba 80'X125' lot. 1,200 sqft.
Kitchen & bath remodeled,
metal roof, Ig fenced back yard.
Close to amenities. $79,900
DCA. Inc. 386-755-5110
3br/2ba Brick home w/1,934 sqft
in Piccadilly Park. 1/2 acre.
Lg playroom, fenced yard.
Reduced to $139,000.
DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110
3br/2ba Custom home. on 5 ac.
where deer & turkey roam.
Lg bam w/enclosed
workshop. $219,000.
DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110
4/2 in Sub-div, open floor
plan,florida room, porch, fenced,
$150,o00 call Missy Zecher
@Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
4/2 on 4 acres, open floor plan, 2
living rms, rec room w/wet bar
$89,900 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
4/3 farm house on 3.95 acres
w/private pond, surrounded by
oaks $689,000 Charlie Sparks,
Westfield Realty MLS#76149
386-755-0808
4br/2ba, 5 ac., 2069 sqft. Ig family
& florida rm, den. Covered patio,
workshop. $229,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba, remodeled, views of the
lake. Formal LR, dining room &
family room. Many upgrades.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
67.5 acre farm, fenced, workshop,
pole barn and two ponds, MH
(1984 sq ft) $299,000
call Patti Taylor at
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Affordable, clean home in sub-div,
Freshly painted interior,
This is a must see!
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473


BRAND new home, Irg master
suite, 2 miles from US 90,
$179,900 MLS #76449
Carrie CasonWestfield Realty
386-623-2806
Brick home on 5 acres,
country feel close to town!
Must See! Results Realty
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
Clean, cozy, well maintained 3/2
on 1.05 acres, lots of shade trees,
built in 2007, $135,900
Call Patty Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896


Country Club. 4br/4ba. New roof,
AC, windows. Pool, hot tub,
& greenhouse. $229,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Custom Brick, 5+ ac. 5br/4ba.
4412 sqft. 3 car garage, pool, hot
tub, 3 fireplaces, more. $569,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lori Giebeig Simpson 365-5678
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home
w/oversized garage.
Eastside Village Realty, Inc
386-752-5290
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home
2br/2ba, 1 car garage,.
Eastside Village Realty $83,000
386-752-5290
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home lots of
amenities; clubhouse, pool, spa.
Eastside Village Realty
$89,500 386-752-5290
Excellent area. 3br/2ba home.
1620 sqft. w/covered patio. Lg
front porch & 1 car carport
Lori Giebeig. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances, close to
schools, $65K 478-391-1592
Large 3/2 brick home w/basement.
2 living areas. porch on 2 lots
$129,900 MLS #74118
386-623-2806 Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty
Large entertaining home, w/pool,
gazebo, huge workshop,
$285,000 Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Large home w/acre of land, Irg
family & florida rooms,
covered porch,
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Move In Ready. 3br/2ba w/1,225
sqft. Comer lot, great S/D.
12x16 workshop w/elec.
Upgrades. $75,000.
.DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110
Nice 3/2 home on 4 acres
close to town $168,000,
Motivated seller MLS#73410
Carrie Cason Westfield Realty
386-623-2806
Nicely remodeled 3/2 on 2 acres,
partially fenced $115,888
Nancy Rogers @
Results Realty
386-867-1271
OPEN HOUSE Saturday 01/15
between 12 noon -4pm. 4br/2ba
MH on 4 acres in O'Brien.
$119,000. John Denyko, Access
Realty of N.FL.Inc. 386-344-5551
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$ 163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Woodcrest S/D Super location,
nice back yard. 3br/2ba home,
cov-
ered back porch. New AC in 2010
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
WOODGATE VILLAGE.
3br/2ba DWMH.
Close to new elementary
school. $27,000.
DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110


820 Farms &
SAcreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac..Ft. White. Well. Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

83O Commercial
Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190
Commercial property situated
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya Ave 3.27 acres,
$398,888 Results Realty
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
Property (comer location), easy
access corner, close to downtown,
$94,000 Charlie Sparks
Westfield Realty
386-755-0808 MLS#74814


940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
2007 Nissan Titan Crew Cab
only 25,000 miles stock #F28
386-365-7431 Steve Bonesio
Rountree-Moore Ford
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-31044 386-719-4802
C G





950 Cars for Sale
2008 Cadillac DTS, only 15,000
miles, stock # 245108, pls ask for
Myron Wruble @ 386-755-0630
#292, Rountree-Moore Ford


2010 Grand Marquis, 3 to choose
from stock #F292 Myron Wrubel,
386-755-0630 #292.
Rountree-Moore Ford
2010 Hyundia Sonata GLS,
4dr, $12,999, warranty, auto, stock
#F307 Dwight Twiggs Rountree-
Moore Ford 386-755-0630 #219
Gas Saver, 07 Sporty Honda Fit,
stock #293G, 31 city 40 hwy,
Tommie Jefferson @ 386-209-
8680 Rountree-Moore Ford

952 Vans & Sport
Util. Vehicles


2006 EF250 Ford Van, 3/4 ton,
metal work shelves/ladder rack
60K miles, exc cond, $10,500
386-623-9026


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online. -

4, -_




2008 Johnny Pag 2003 Honda Shadow 2007 Nissan 2006 EF250
Pink Custom Chopper Ridge 750cc Bike 21 Frontier SE Ford Van
200 mi., exc. cond., pink Mustang seat, sissy bar, 21,800 miles, excellent 3/4 ton, metal work
with white/silver outlined cobra pipes, 12k miles. condition, V-6, automatic shelves/ladder rack,
flames. $15,000 60K miles, exc. cond.
$4,500 obo.. $4,100 obo
Call Call Call $10,500

386s-965-0676t. 386-s965-0676t 386-961-8680 386-62-9026























It's quick and easy.



1.) Go to www.Iakecityreporter.com


2.) Click the "Share Photos" icon


f ri er; arnd






3.) Click:


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445



VWSWSM WUH


I r. atrn ,,,




L , ,


tol beposted r

ca11 e rcda i.


Comment ard
ccIV-ect vr'.th

clr.llre users on
our guest bccl


Submit Photo ,


4.) Attach your photo (Choose File)


5.) Select the best album for your photo


6.) Complete the form and Submit

Albums will change during the year.
Most photos will remain online for at least one month.


Photo Gallery > Submit a Photo
Please submit ""our pioao to obr orir, pl'",to ,lk'. Alt photos, must be approved by our Web staff befiom they will appear o th
Web sr.
Submit a photo to this Gallary (Currently we only accept images In the Jpog format, thank youth)
( Choose File no file selected

Pet Photos Birds
Name:


T'ite


Photographer:

Caption:





( Sb-m-- }


The title is the name of your photo.







The caption is the description of your photo

that will be seen by viewers.


q Photo Gallery Home



Send in your favorite photos


and share them with everyone!


Lae-iyRpre




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Powered by SobekCM