The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01349
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: January 11, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01349
System ID: UF00028308:01349
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Title Battle
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for 000015 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
( LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Lake


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Tuesday, January I 201 I a


Wrestling

Invitational
Columbia fifth at Clay County meet.
Sports, I B




Reporter


ka. Vol. 136, No. 303 M 75 cents


LSHA seeks ways to keep clinic open


Alternatives to higher
primary visit costs
being considered.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
There might be a way to keep
the University of Florida West
Primary Care clinic open but
first it's going to require some
discussion between officials.
Lake Shore Hospital Authority


Board members heard a possible
solution to increasing primary
visit costs the authority pays
from $100 to $125 during a meet-
ing Monday night.
Dr. R. Whit Curry Jr., pro-
fessor and chairman of the
University of Florida Department
of Community Health and Family
Medicine, recently sent an e-
mail with the plan, said LSHA
Manager Jack Berry.
Curry wanted to get a feel from
the board in regard to pursuing


that option.
There would be no addition-
al funds up front, he said. The
money from the fee would come
spfrom the 1.5
2 mills already lev-
ied for indigent
care.
Previously,
the Department
of Community
Health and
Berry Family Medicine
officials were seeking $244,000


from the Hospital Authority
Budget for clinic funding. The
board did not approve the fund-
ing at a Nov. 8 meeting.
The Department of Community
Health and Family Medicine has
expressed an interest in staying in
Lake City, Berry said. The Lake
Shore Hospital Authority Board
has funding budgeted through
June 2011 for the clinic.
"Unless we do the $125, it won't
stay open," he said.
Board member Marc Vann said


he would like Berry and Lake
Shore Hospital Administrator
Rhonda Sherrod to look at the
plan, which would cut into hospi-
tal authority funds.
"I have no problem with it," he
said. "It's easy for me to spend
y'alls money."
A recommendation will be
brought to the board at its next
meeting.
Also during the meeting, the
LSHA continued on 3A


IDEAS ON DISPLAY


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Middle School eighth-grader Savannah Thomas, 13, searches for a spot Monday to set up her project for the
Columbia County Science Fair at Florida Gateway College's Howard Conference Center. The event, scheduled for today, will
feature projects from more than 200 elementary, middle and high school students.


More than 200 student projects

battle for honors at Science Fair


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn
Winning."
That's
what
Victoria
Whilden,
10, a fifth-grader at Melrose
Park Elementary, said
she was looking forward
to most as she set up her
project Monday for. the
Columbia County Science
Fair.
The annual fair's judging
- a closed event will
be held today from 9 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. at Florida
Gateway College's Howard
Conference Center.
District teachers, parents
and students trickled in
and out of the college's
conference center during
the fair's setup Tuesday to
deliver more than 200 tri-
fold boards representing
the competing student proj-
ects and experiments.
The fair will feature
around 125 elementary
school projects, 100 middle
school projects and 20 high


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
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THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


W ICH BRAND POP

TIlE MOST KERNEl


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Niblack Elementary School first-grade teacher Judy Warren
passes by project boards while setting up for the science fair.


school projects.
Missie Minson, fair
director, said she and the
fair organizers employ a
sticker system to organize
the projects and the judg-
ing.
The setup is also a time
to smooth out any prob-
lems, she said.
"We iron out any errors
that we may have," she
said.
Setup the night before
the fair is a finalization of


59
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


months of preparation.
Minson said the
Curriculum Improvement
Team for science has been
meeting once a month
since September, discuss-
ing the fair at each meet-
ing.
"When it's (the fair's)
over, we start planning for
the next year," Minson
said.
As Savannah Thomas,
13, a Lake City Middle
School eighth-grader,


c, vI ,


searched for the correct
spot to place her project,
she said she was glad to
compete in the fair again.
"I feel honored," she
said. "I'm excited and kind
of nervous, too." Thomas
said she took first place in
the fair's environmental
category the previous year
and hopes to win again.
Brannon Bolkosky, 10,
a Pinemount Elementary
fifth-grader competing
for the third time, said he
was also vying for the top
award.
"I haven't really won any
year, so I'm just trying to
get first place," he said.
The fair's awards cer-
emonies are open to the
public and will be held
at the college's Levy
Performing Arts Center.
The elementary students'
ceremony will be held at
6 p.m. and the secondary
students' ceremony will be
held at 10 a.m. Wednesday.
The winners will
advance to the Suwannee
Valley Regional Science
Fair on Feb. 15 at FGC.


Opinion .....
Obituaries .
Advice & Co.mic..
Puzzles .
Schools .


PATRICK SCOTTISpecial to the Lake City Reporter
Crash kills one, injures two
A rollover crash killed one person and injured two
others Monday on Southwest Old Wire Road near Fort White,
witnesses said. The pick-up truck rolled over several times for
unknown reasons while traveling south of Scout Glenn. The
Florida Highway Patrol, the Columbia County Sheriffs Office,
Columbia County Fire and EMS responded to the scene.


Chamber takes

a swing at golf

to raise funds


Annual cocktails,
dinner to recap
2010 highlights.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
The Lake City-Columbia,
County Chamber of
Commerce is adding a new
spin to its annual dinner
and bringing back an old
event with its inaugural golf
tournament.
The golf tournament is
at 1 p.m. Jan. 28 at the
Country Club of Lake City
and the title sponsor is Gulf
Coast Financial. Lunch is
before the tournament at
12 p.m.


The annual dinner begins
with cocktails at 6 p.m. Jan.
29 at the Country Club
of Lake City, and the title
sponsor is Rountree-Moore
Automotive Group.
The chamber hosted an
annual "play day," which
included a golf tournament,
in the past, said Dennille
Folsom, director. The event
was phased out in the '70s.
Instead of just hosting an
annual meeting, the cham-
ber wanted to have a cel-
ebration of its businesses,
she said.
Sponsors are need-
ed for both events.
Packages include: Table
CHAMBER continued on 3A


Parade organizer says

MLK's 'dream' served

as Obama inspiration


200 city residents
expected to join
Jan. 16 tribute.
From staff reports

More than 200 people
are expected to pay hom-
age to the legacy of Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr. for
his birthday, according to
NAACP officials.
The 26th annual Martin
Luther King Jr. Observance

DAILY
71. BRIEFING


Survivor winner
tights for survival.


Program is 4 p.m. Jan. 16
at Mount Pisgah A.M.E.
Church.
The program is hosted
by the Columbia County
Branch NAACP and hon-
ors king, a slain-civil rights
leader.
"Our NAACP Branch
and the nation honor the
Rev. Martin Luther King
Jr., whose life helped pave
the way for the inaugura-
MLK continued on 3A


COMING
WEDNESDAY
School board
meeting coverage.











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2011 Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


A SH3 Monday:
Afternoon: 5-4-7
Evening: 0-6-3


v' 4) Monday:
Afternoon: 9-1-2-8
Evening: 1-1-6-7


.ew atci.
- c::, Sunday:
12-13-18-32-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Judge: 'Survivor' winner broke terms


PROVIDENCE, R.I.
Reality TV star Richard
Hatch violated the
terms of his supervised
release by failing to'
refile his tax returns, a
judge ruled Monday, but he said he
hadn't decided whether to put the
"Survivor" winner back behind bars.
He delayed sentencing until he could
receive additional arguments.
Hatch, who was convicted in 2006
of failing to pay taxes on the $1 mil-
lion prize he won on the debut season
of the CBS reality series, spent more
than three years in federal prison and
was then placed on three years of
supervised release. He was released in
2009 and has been living in Newport.
Federal authorities accuse him of
violating the conditions of his release
by failing to file amended tax returns
for the years 2000 and 2001, as
required by a judge at the time of his
sentencing.
U.S. District Judge William Smith
said he could put Hatch back behind
bars for the remaining two years of
his supervised release if he finds that
Hatch willfully violated the terms of
his freedom, as prosecutors allege.
The judge ordered prosecutors and
Hatch's lawyer to file new paperwork
and said Hatch would be sentenced
later.
The Internal Revenue Service says
that as of last February, Hatch owed
about $1.7 million in taxes for 2000
and 2001 including interest and
penalties. But Hatch has appealed that
finding to the U.S. Tax Court, and his
amended tax returns cannot be filed
until after his appeal is concluded,
argued Hatch's federal public defend-
er, Mary McElroy.
"He has the right to go through that
process. He's been cooperating with
that process," she said.
But Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrew
Reich argued that Hatch had an oppor-
tunity to refile his tax returns before


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Reality TV star Richard Hatch (center) departs federal court in Providence, R.I.,
Monday. In 2009, Hatch began a three-year period of supervised release under
the condition that he refile and pay his taxes on the 'Survivor' winnings and other
income. The court found Monday that he violated the terms of his supervised
released.


he appealed to the U.S. Tax Court, and
that his failure to do so was part of his
overall resistance to complying with
the law.

'Band of Brothers'
inspiration Winters dies
PHILADELPHIA Even as
Parkinson's disease began taking
its toll on Dick Winters, who led his
"Band of Brothers" through some
of World War H's fiercest European
battles, the unassuming hero refused,
as always, to let his men down.
Friends accompanied him to public
events, subtly clearing a path through
the adoring crowds for the living leg-
end, whose Easy Company's achieve-
ments were documented by a book
and HBO miniseries. His gait had
grown unsteady, and he did not want
to be seen stumbling.
Winters "didn't want the members
of Easy Company to know," William


Jackson said Monday of his longtime
friend, who died last week- at age 92.

ABC: Marvel characters
to be on small screen
PASADENA, Calif. ABC's
entertainment chief said he would
love to have Marvel characters on
the network, with Incredible Hulk
and Jessica Jones among the front-
runners.
ABC executive Paul Lee said
Monday that he's "thrilled" to have
Marvel Entertainment in the family,
a reference to The Walt Disney Co.'s
acquisition of the comic book giant.
The 2009 deal gave Disney owner-
ship of a bevy of Marvel characters.
He noted that movie writer-direc-
tor Guillermo del Toro of "Hellboy"
fame is working on the Incredible
Hulk pilot.

E Associated Press


* Producer Grant Tinker is
86.
* Actor Rod Taylor is 81.
* Composer Mary Rodgers
is 80.
* Actor Mitchell Ryan is 77.
* Actor Felix Silla is 74.
* Rock musician Clarence
Clemons is 69.
* Movie director Joel Zwick
is 69.

Daily Scripture


* Country singer Naomi
Judd is 65.
* World Golf Hall of Famer
Ben Crenshaw is 59.
* Singer Robert Earl Keen
is 55.
* Musician Vicki Peterson
(The Bangles) is 53.
* Contemporary Christian
musician Jim Bryson
(MercyMe) is 43.


"But just as he who called you
is holy, so be holy in all you
do; for it is written: 'Be holy,
because I am holy.'"


- I Peter 1:15-16


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak. .754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
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Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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In Columbia County, customers should
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Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
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Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks .................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Castro's nemesis
goes on trial

DORAL- Fidel Castro's
nemesis has filled the
walls of his Miami-area
condo with his canvases:
Revolutionaries on horse-
back charging Spanish
soldiers; dark waves crash-
ing against the shore; the
sun setting on a peaceful
farmer.
.For some Cuban exiles,
avowed militant Luis
Posada Carriles is like the
horsemen, a patriot who
has long battled a fearsome
oppressor. To his foes,
Posada is like the waves,
a dangerous force respon-
sible for Havana hotel
bombings, assassination
attempts on Castro and one
of the deadliest pre-9/11
airliner explosions.
To others, the 82-year-
old is simply the farmer,
a harmless relic living out
his twilight.
Lawyers began picking
jurors Monday in El Paso,
Texas, to hear Posada's
trial on federal charges
connected to the decade-
old bombings that killed an
Italian tourist.
The case has been more
than four years in the mak-
ing, and Posada has spent
much of that time painting
his thoughts and memo-
ries. His art says much
about the cagey former
CIA asset, who remains a
lightning rod in much of
Latin America.
Posada painted several
versions of the turbulent
waters following his arrest
in 2005 on charges of lying
about how he arrived in the
U.S., and about whether he
tried to cover up -involve-
ment in the 1997 hotel
bombings so he could
obtain U.S. citizenship.
The Texas case likely
marks the last opportunity,
albeit indirectly, for Posada
to be tried in the bombings
or any other terror crime.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
As he prepares for trial Monday in El Paso, Texas, on federal
charges connected to the decade-old bombings that killed an
Italian tourist, Luis Posada Carriles' art says much about the
cagey former CIA asset who remains a lightning rod in much
of Latin America.


Officials: Man
tossed drug bag

GAINESVILLE A
north Florida man was
arrested after authorities
said he tossed a bag with
his identification and illegal
drugs out a car window.
Gainesville Police said
33-year-old Tarvares Lamar
Dorwell threw the bag dur-
ing a chase with them on
Sunday.
Officers said they tried
to pull him over for driv-
ing with a missing tag light
and obstructed windshield
view. A chase then ensued
and during the pursuit,
officers allegedly observed
Dorwell toss a duffel bag
out the window. Inside they
said they found Dorwell's
wallet and ID, 40 grams of
marijuana, ecstasy pills, a
scale and cash.
He was arrested hiding
in a bathroom. He faces
several drug-related charg-
es and has a $23,000 bond.

Police: Woman
stabs attacker

TITUSVILLE An
Titusville woman is in the
hospital recovering from a
stab wound and head inju-


ries after police said she
went to a woman's house
and attacked her.
Police said the 35-year-
old woman arrived at the
house Monday, knocked on
the door and then attacked
the woman who opened the
door for her.
Police said the resident
defended herself with a
knife and wasn't injured.
Paramedics arrived and
transported the injured
woman, and a man with
stab wounds, to a hospital.
It wasn't known what his
connection was to the inci-
dent.
Police said both were
listed in stable condition.
Charges have not been
filed.

Man struck, killed
by freight train

WEST PALM BEACH,
- A 52-year-old. man was
stuck and killed by a south-
bound freight train in Palm
Beach County.
Authorities say the acci-
dent happened about 2:25
a.m. Monday as the Florida
East Coast train passed
through the Flamingo Park
area of West Palm Beach.


THE WEATHER


PARTLY MOSTLY PARTLY
CLOUDY SUNNY, CLOUDY ,


S HI 59L0 'O H152L0 HI51LO ,'


Pensacola *
54 ,'30 Panama City 633
56, 31


Tam
70



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...


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


I-- .... ;11-ii


* JacKsonvlle
5I 33

Daytona Beach
74-7


Orlando Cape Canaver
77 1,1 72 46

West Palm Beach
7:9 5'i.
FtL Lauderdale
S 6S0 60 *
Naples *
7 7. 52 Miai


MOON
Moonrise today 11:22 a.m.
Moonset today
Moondse tom. 11:54 a.m.
Moonset tom. 12:35 a.m.


Jan. Jan. Jan. Feb.
12 19 26 2
First Full Last New


7a lp 7p la 6a ', i-, -
STuesday Wednesday ','r,


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MOSTLY: s MOSTLY'
SUNNY, SUNNY i


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City Wednesday Thursday
Cape Canaveral 6r1 41 F. 1 J -' p:
Daytona Beach 6t4 39 6 u p.:
Ft. Lauderdale .2 J9' p,: ; 6 4, p.:
Fort Myers 4o 4i 6-' 39 ,,: A
Gainesville ." : 52 .:' p
Jacksonville '5 -' SO 9 p,: .
Key West 1: 5' p, 6" ".6 p,
al Lake City -'2 5. 29
Miami '49 p,: 61 '50 ,
Naples .7~ J0 p, 6." J 1 rp
Ocala : J 2 p:
Orlando 65 41I 6' J,'
Panama City 5.0 d -. 35 ".:
Pensacola 1. 'J ; 4J A 7 p.
Tallahassee J 25. : 4 c7 p -
mi Tampa .'? ; .7, :, p,
;., Valdosta -'. 4J p: ,
W. Palm Beach 6'4 J4 ,: -,1 46 p.:


MODEl E" ..:,.


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S Ics @2011 Weather Central
'LLC, Madison, Wi S s.





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Celebrity Birthdays


AROUND FLORIDA


* Valdosta
54 /30


Tallahassee Lake Ci
S 0 ,9 31
aineslise s


33
Ocala
,7 36


mpa *
47


FL Myer
76 51


Key West *
75,.66


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:28 a.m.
5:49 p.m.
7:28 a.m.
5:50 p.m.


68
44
66
42
85 in 1937
19 in 2010


0.19"
1.04"
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1.05"
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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


4


LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2011











- MLK: Inspired and led
-. Continued From Page 1A


tion of the nation's first
black U. S. President,
Barack Obama," said
Glynnell Presley, program
chairman and branch sec-
retary. "King's dream was
an inspiration to Obama,
who was six years old
when King was assassi-
nated in 1968."
The keynote speaker
for the event is the Rev. J.
T. "Billie" Simon, pastor of
Greater Popular Springs
Missionary Baptist
Church in Jasper.
King fought for peace
and goodwill for all man-


kind, according to offi-
cials. At the age of 35,
King was the youngest
man to have received the
Nobel Peace Prize.
"King led the country
through the wilderness,"
Presley said. "He did it
with words to the children
of slaves (and) children of
slave owners: words that
inspired not just blacks
but also whites, not just
Christians but Jews, not
just the Southerper but
the Northerner. He led
with words, but he also
led with deeds."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Congressional staff members walk off the steps of the Capitol in Washington on Monday after observing a moment of silence
for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) and other shooting victims. Giffords was shot Saturday in a Tucson shooting rampage that
left six people dead.


Arizona suspect could face


death in shooting rampage


By JACQUES BILLEAUD
Associated Press

PHOENIX-Jared Loughner, head
shaved, a cut on his right temple and
his hands cuffed, stared vacantly at a
packed courtroom Monday and sat
down. His attorney, who defended
"Unabomber" Ted Kaczynski, whis-
pered to him.
It was the nation's first look at the
22-year-old loner accused of trying to
assassinate Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.
The three-term Democrat lay about
100 miles away in a Tucson inten-
sive care unit, gravely wounded after
being shot through the head but able
to give a thumbs-up sign that doctors
found as a reason to hope.
Loughner seemed impassive and
at one point stood at a lectern in his
beige prison jumpsuit. A U.S. marshal
stood guard nearby.
The judge asked if he understood
that he could get life in prison or
the death penalty for killing federal
Judge John Roll, one of six who died
in the shooting rampage at Giffords'
outdoor meeting with constituents
Saturday in Tucson.
'Yes," he said. His newly appointed


lawyer, Judy Clarke, stood beside him
as the judge ordered Loughner held
without bail.
Throngs of reporters and television
news crews lined up outside the fed-
eral courthouse, where the hearing
was moved from Tucson. The entire
federal bench there recused itself
because Roll was the
chief judge.
President Barack
Obama will trav-
._'. el to Arizona on
Wednesday to attend
.a memorial service
for the victims.
Loughner Earlier in the day,
the nation observed a moment of
silence for the victims, from the
South Lawn of the White House
and the steps, of the U.S. Capitol
to legislatures beyond Arizona and
the planet itself. At the International
Space Station, Giffords' brother-in-
law, Scott, the commanding officer,
spoke over the radio as flight control-
lers in Houston fell silent.
"As I look out the window, I see
a very beautiful planet that seems
very inviting and peaceful," he said.
"Unfortunately, it is not.


"These days, we are constantly
reminded of the unspeakable acts of
violence and damage we can inflict
upon one another, not just with our
actions, but also with our irrespon-
sible words," he said.
'"We're better than this," he said.
"We must do better."
On a frigid, morning outside the
White House, Obama and first lady
Michelle Obama stood side by side,
each with their hands clasped, heads
bowed and eyes closed. On the steps
of the U.S. Capitol, congressional
staff and other employees did the
same.
At the Supreme Court, the jus-
tices paused for a moment of silence
between the two cases they were
hearing Monday morning.
The president called for the coun-
try to come together in prayer or
reflection for those killed and those
fighting to recover. -
"In the coming days, we're going to
have a lot of time to reflect," he said.
"Right now the main thing we're doing
is to offer our thoughts and prayers to
those who've been impacted, making
sure we're joining together and pull-
ing together as a country."


CHAMBER: Around 100 expected to join golf tourney


Continued From Page 1A
sponsor for $375, which
includes eight tickets or
one table at the annual din-
ner; golf tournament hole
sponsor for $125, which
includes one player in the
tournament and name and
logo recognition on the
program for the annual
dinner; bronze sponsor for
$250, which includes two
tickets to the dinner, one
player in the tournament
and name and logo recog-
nition; silver sponsor for
$500, which includes four
tickets to the dinner, two


players in the tournament
and name and logo recogni-
tion; gold sponsor for $750,
which includes six tickets
to the dinner, two players in
the tournament, hole spon-
sorship and name and logo
recognition; or platinum
sponsor for $1,000, which
includes one table at the
dinner, one foursome in the
tournament, hole sponsor-
ship and name and logo
recognition.
Around 100 participants
are expected in the shot-
gun-start golf tournament,


Folsom said. The annual
dinner will include a brief
meeting that will recap
the highlights of 2010,
recognize the outgoing
board members and give a
glimpse of what is planned
for this year.
"The meeting will only
be about 30 minutes, and
then there will be a dance
and silent auction," she said.
"The band will entertain and
provide a lot of good times."
Donations are also needed
for the silent auction.
"Nothing is too big or too


small," Folsom said.
The entry fee for the golf
tournament is $60 per golfer.
Tickets for the annual din-
ner are $50 per person. Call
the chamber for more infor-
mation at 386-752-3690.
Both events are the only
fundraisers for the chamber
and will offer an opportunity
for members to socialize and
network, Folsom said.
"It will just be a different
environment to celebrate
the business community
in Columbia County," she
said.


LSHA: Manager position discussed


Continued From Page 1A
board approved a recom-
mendation on how to pro-
ceed with the authority
manager position.
Marlin Feagle, board
attorney, and Richard
Powell, board accoun-
tant, will put together an
evaluation form to present
for board approval at its
February meeting.
The authority has never
had a manager before, and
information for the evalu-
ation will be pulled from
other examples, such as
the City of Lake City and
Columbia County, Feagle
said.
The board will then fill
out and return the form
by March to Feagle and
Powell, he said. The evalu-
ation will be discussed at
the March meeting
A decision about the
position and the contract
will be made at either the
regular March meeting or
a board workshop, tenta-
tively scheduled for 5:15


p.m. March 28, Feagle said.
By April, when the original
contract expires, the board
will have made a final deci-


sion.
The next hospital author-
ity meeting is 5:15 p.m.
Feb. 14.


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$5,000.00 REWARD


FOR THE
ARREST & CONVICTION
OF THE PERSONS RESPONSIBLE
FOR THE THEFT OF PROPERTY


BELONGING TO SUWANNEE VALLEY ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE








ALL INFORMATION MUST BE
REPORTED TO:
Deputy Jeff Cameron or Deputy Chris Fry
Suwannee County Sheriff's Department
At (386)362-2222


H Ai RR ESC UE
Has Hairewlooesocth






Appt. & Walk-Ins Welcome
:a5 3 H.e



Brngyor nwntd,'3.15'.. .
Gol, iler&


TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION













OPINION


Tirsdaiv lanuarv 1. 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com 4A


OU
OPIN


R
ION


Pilots N

Paws an

effort worth

making

need, those who
cannot help them-
selves, is a belief
as old as our coun-
try. Dozens of organizations
have been founded on that
essential principle.
So when examined with just
that basic tenet in mind, one
might not think the "Pilots
N Paws" program is all that
extraordinary. But look at it
closely, see the extent those
involved are willing to go to help
those in need, and one discov-
ers that this is taking that basic
belief to another level.
Quite an elevated level, at
that.
Pilots N Paws is actually
a website where people con-
cerned about the welfare of
animals can go to find, or give,
assistance. On Dec. 30, Jim
Carney a pilot who lives in
Tennessee transported 13
dogs on his own plane from a
shelter in Bristol, Va., which
was too overcrowded to house
them, and brought them to
Lake City.
The animals were cared for
and, once cleared for adoption,
were pictured on the website.
Even then, the organization's
efforts didn't end. Prospective
homeowners were screened
before an animal was relocated
with them.
The time and effort to do all
this is donated. That includes
flying dogs froni onbile part of the
country to another, something
Carney does quite often. In 2010,
he transported 215 dogs on his
plane.
He's not alone. There are sev-
eral others around the country
that have done the same during
Pilots N Paws' more than two
years of operation. And they do
it without compensation, paying
for the fuel themselves.
Why do those involved do it?
Because its necessary Without
help, these animals will be
euthanized.
These pets deserve a chance
at a normal life, and ift's gratify-
ing to see there are organiza-
tions willing to sacrifice to make
sure they get it


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman



LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Understand the Constitution


I salute the Republicans of
the 112th Congress for
their initiative to restore
the U.S. Constitution to its
legitimate place of promi-
nence in our public discourse.
Reading it aloud at
Congress's opening session
and requiring members to cite
constitutional authority when
introducing new legislation are
great ideas.
It will help highlight that the
real debate is about the underly-
ing defining principles of our
nation that the constitution
exists to protect.
Democrats mocking these
gestures show their disdain
for those underlying prin-
ciples. When Congressman
Henry Waxman (D-N.Y.) said,
"Whether it's constitutional or
not is going to be whether the
Supreme Court says it is," it's
like me saying that whether I
steal from my neighbor depends
on my calculation of whether I'll
get caught.
The constitution is our operat-
ing manual defining the func-
tions and bounds of our federal
government
It was meticulously designed
by our founders so that we
would have government consis-
tent with the values and prin-
ciples of our nation.
It's in those values and prin-
ciples where our "eternal truths"
lie. Not in the constitution con-
structed to secure them. If the
drafters didn't see it this way,
they wouldn't have provided pro-
visions to amend and change it
It's in our increasingly tenu-
ous sense of what the truths are
that precede the constitution,
or the questioning by some if
indeed there are any eternal
truths, where our problems lie.


Star Parker
porket@urbancure.org
The purpose of government,
stated in the Declaration of
Independence, is to "secure"
our "Rights", including those of
"Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of
Happiness."
But how can we understand
and use our constitution if we
can't agree on what "life" is or
what "liberty" is?
Consider one of the most
repugnant decisions to ever
emerge from the U.S. Supreme
Court the Dred Scott deci-
sion.
The decision relegated blacks
to subhuman status and pre-
cluded the possibility that they
could be considered US citizens
protected by the constitution.
The issue was not whether
the constitution was taken seri-
ously.
The issue was how prevailing
values dictated understanding
of who people and citizens are.
And so, per our Supreme Court
in 1857, a class of human beings
in our country was relegated to
chattel.
The Roe vs. Wade decision in
1973, which gave open license
to kill our unborn children,
stemmed not from indifference
to the constitution, but from
how we choose to relate to and
define what life is or the
extent to which we even care.
Recently a federal judge in
California overturned as uncon-


stitutional an initiative passed
by California voters to define
marriage as between a man and
a woman.
Lawyers who supported the
suit to overturn the initiative
included conservative and liber-
tarian lawyers who would claim
to support our constitution as
constructed by our founders.
What they don't support
is an understanding of the
definition of marriage being
between a man and a woman
as a pre-existing truth that the
state should be free to codify
in its constitution ..
Supposedly among the
truths that our constitution
secures is our right to our pri-
vate property.
But what can that possibly
mean if the federal government
can define what health insur-
ance is and force under law
every American citizen to buy
it?
It is a strange understanding
of "life" and "liberty" that will
allow this to occur.
If government can dictate to
this extent how I live and what
I do, I begin to feel like they
own me. I start feeling like
Dred Scott must have felt.
So, yes, let's put the spot-
light back on our constitution.
But let's not lose perspec-
tive that our understanding
and interpretation of it will be
just as good as our agreement
on and understanding and
appreciation of the underlying
values it's there to secure and
protect.

Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition on Urban
Renewal and Education (www.
urbancure.org) and author of three
books.


OTHER OPINION


More troops headed to Afganistan


n something of a surprise
move, the Pentagon
is sending an addi-
tional 1,400 Marines to
Afghanistan, bringing
the total U.S. personnel there
to about 97,000. In addition,
U.S. commanders are said to be
changing the mix of forces in
favor of more combat units and
fewer logistical units.
The reinforcements should
arrive mid-month, six months
before the White House dead-
line to begin withdrawing U.S.
troops. The White House is des-
perate to show progress in what
has become President Barack
Obama's war.
The president made it his
own when, in December 2009,
he approved a surge of 30,000
more troops and later installed
a new overall U.S. commander.
At the time, the president OK'd
adding another 3,000 if the
situation required, and the addi-


tional Marines would seem to fit
within those guidelines.
The Marines will be stationed
around the key southern city of
Kandahar, the one-time Taliban
stronghold that U.S.-led forces
have steadily cleared. The aim
appears twofold: To consolidate
gains in advance of Afghan
security forces taking over;
and to have troops in place in
advance of an expected spring
Taliban offensive.
June is shaping up as a
critical month. By then, com-
manders should know whether
Taliban forces were significantly
crippled by the hammering
they took last year, or whether
they were able to substantially
replenish their ranks over the
winter in Pakistan.
If the Taliban have substan-
tially regrouped, the president
faces a real dilemma. The
Pentagon is heavily invested
in the new strategy. Liberal


Democrats just want us to get
out and go home. The adminis-
tration is divided over its strate-
gy. Republican support is uncer-
tain if there is no demonstrable
progress. And even the most
optimistic don't see the Afghan
army ready to be responsible
for the war until 2014.
Meanwhile, the cost of the
Afghan war is mounting rapidly.
The U.S. and NATO will spend
$11.6 billion this year to build
up Afghan security forces. The
Washington Post calculates that
spending for 2010 and 2011 will
be nearly $20 billion, as much
as the previous seven years
combined.
In this new age of austerity -
assuming it lasts Congress
may decide that even if the
war is worth fighting, we can't
afford it. Certainly few lawmak-
ers would have the fortitude to
raise taxes to pay for it.
N Scripps Howard News Service


Dale McFeatters
mcfeottersd@shns.com


Daley was

a political

Clinton

veteran


Constitution that
the House insisted
on reading aloud
last week is there
mention of the White House
chief of staff, yet over the years
it has evolved into one of the
most powerful and influential
jobs in Washington, at times
second only to the presidency
itself.
As the name suggests, how-
ever, it is in the end a staff
job and its considerable clout
derives solely from the occu-
pant's proximity and relation to
the president.
Barack Obama's chief of staff
as he took office two years ago
was Rahm Emanuel, a former
congressman of notably abra-
sive style, who proved adept at
keeping the unruly Democrats
in line behind the president's
agenda.
Emanuel then left to run
for mayor of Chicago and was
replaced on an interim basis
by Peter Rouse, a Washington
insider so inside as to be
unknown even to many capital
veterans.
In their search for a succes-
sor, Obama and, his advisers
were looking for someone who
could accomplish two missions:
Restore Obama to his early-
2009 luster and re-elect him
president. And, of course, as
they say, make the trains run
on time.
The White House seems to
have found its man William
Daley, member of a legendary
Chicago political family, a for-
mer Cabinet secretary under
Bill Clinton and an operative
with national political expertise
as chairman of Al Gore's 2000
presidential campaign.
Most importantly in the cur-
rent climate, as a former senior
executive of JPMorgan Chase,
he has close ties to Wall Street
and the business community,
where Obama badly needs to
begin building bridges.
Daley's appointment imme-
diately rebuts the criticism
of Republicans, and a few
Democrats, that Obama's staff
is too heavily weighted toward
academics or, as Senate GOP
leader Mitch McConnell put it,
that nobody in the White House
has run so much as a lemonade
stand.
Daley also represents a
gathering around Obama of sea-
soned hands from the Clinton
administration as White
House budget director, CIA
director, chief economic adviser,
secretary of state and now, of
course, Daley as Obana's chief
of staff. In the Clinton years,
they weathered political set-
backs that make the Democrats'
loss of the House look like a
speed bump.
In his first go-round, in 1997,
Daley had a rough introduction
to Washington. When then-
President Clinton was introduc-
ing Daley as his new secretary
of commerce, Daley fainted and
plunged headfirst off the stage.
He's already off to a much bet-
ter start.
Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.

HIGHLIGHT
IN HISTORY
Today is Tuesday, Jan. 11, the
llth day of 2011.
In 1935, aviator Amelia
Earhart began an 18-hour trip
from Honolulu to Oakland, Calif.,


that made her the first woman
to fly solo across the Pacific
Ocean.











Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2011


Rhee takes reform nationwide


CHRISTINE ARMARIO
Associated Press

MIAMI Looking back, M4ichelle
Rhee says there are a few things
she didn't do successfully during
her three years as chancellor of the
District of Columbia public schools.
One: She failed to engage and
mobilize parents, residents and com-
munity leaders who supported her
ambitious education reform agenda,
but were never vocal about it.
"The people who were vocal were
the people who were opposing,"
Rhee said in an interview with The
Associated Press, three months after
announcing her resignation.
The opposition was, in fact, quite
loud: Teacher unions and even groups
of'parents balked at her ideas to close
schools, fire teachers, and get rid of
tenure.
District of Columbia Mayor Adrian
Fenty, who had selected Rhee for the
position and supported her reforms,
lost re-election.
Rhee, who has been featured on
the covers of magazines, on Oprah,
who famously called her a 'warrior
woman,' and in David Guggenheim's
recent documentary, "Waiting for
'Superman,"' resigned shortly there-
after.
Now Rhee is continuing her fight
to improve the nation's classrooms
through a new organization, Students
First. This time, she's hoping to bet-
ter tap into discontent with the state
of public schools across the country.
Thus far, she's raised $1.4 million
and attracted 140,000 members, she
said. The goal: Raise $1 billion in a
year and organize 1 million mem-
bers.
On Monday, she'll announce the
group's agenda, focusing on three
areas: the teaching profession,
empowering families with informa-
tion and choices; and developing
more accountability.
Many of the ideas are similar to
those she pushed as chancellor,
though the agenda also adopts prac-
tices that have been put in place else-
where, including parent participation
in restructuring schools.
But will this reformer be able to
drum up support nationwide?
She'll need to take a different
approach, said Emily Cohen, district
policy director at the National Council
on Teacher Quality, a Washington,
D.C.-based nonprofit.
"Working from the outside in an
advocacy organization, a reform orga-
nization, is very different from lead-
ing a school district from the inside,"'
Cohen said.
Arguably the nation's most outspo-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Michelle Rhee (left), former D.C. public schools chief, and Gov. Rick Scott prepare
to tour a South Florida charter school in in Opalocka Thursday. Rhee was on
Scott's education transition team, and the new governor said she would continue to
serve Florida as an informal education adviser.


ken advocate on reform, Rhee, the
daughter of immigrants from South
Korea, took on one of the nation's
most troubled school districts with-
out ever having led a school. She had
worked as a teacher at a distressed
Baltimore district, and created the
New Teacher Project, which works to
bring strong teachers to the weakest
schools.
She closed schools that were under-
enrolled, fired teachers and princi-
pals deemed ineffective, and reached
what's been described as a landmark
contract with teachers, offering steep
financial rewards for those who boost
students scores.
"She really shook up this city,"
Cohen said. "People are much more
aware of the problems in education
because of her."
The changes have been widely
praised in education circles, but crit-
ics say she didn't work hard enough
to collaborate with teachers.
"You either liked her or you hated
her," said Jackie Alvarado, co-presi-
dent of the parent teacher organiza-
tion at the Oyster-Adams Bilingual
School, where Rhee enrolled her own


daughters. '"There was no middle
ground."
"I definitely think we did not do
as good a job communicating as we
could have," Rhee acknowledges.
Rhee wants her organization to
support states and school districts
adopting policies that enhance the
teaching profession. Rhee argues
that 50 percent of a teacher's evalu-
ation should be based on measurable
student achievement growth. She
said a teacher's contribution to the
community should also be taken into
account.
Her group will support. rewarding
effective teachers with higher pay
and eliminating tenure, the lifetime
job protections that critics say pro-
tect mediocre and even incompetent
teachers. It also supports allowing
the number of good charter schools
to expand, while closing those that
don't work.
In the area of accountability, Rhee
says the organization will push for
promoting board and education struc-
tures that put students first includ-
ing considering mayoral control, as
was done in D.C.


Lakeland teen
shoots teen

LAKELAND One teen
was shot and another was
injured in a scuffle with a
15-year-old who was arrest-
ed after a fight broke out at
an apartment complex.
Police were question-
ing the 15-year-old Sunday
night. He faces a number
of felony charges, includ-
ing carrying a concealed
firearm, tampering with
evidence and two counts of
aggravated battery with a
deadly weapon
Authorities said the teen
shot 15-year-old Kevonte
Isaac in the leg. Another
teen, 16-year-old Iquan
Isaac, was injured in a scuf-
fle over the gun.
It was not clear why the
teens were fighting. But
police said there was a dis-
turbance in the same area
on Saturday night, which
may have triggered the
fight.

Court let $5M
award stand

WASHINGTON The
Supreme Court will not
overturn a Florida sur-
geon's $5 million slander
award after a hospital exec-
utive said he would not
send his dog to the doctor
for surgery.
The high court on
Monday refused to hear
an appeal from Lawnwood
Medical Center, Inc. It
argued that the award given
to Dr. Samuel Sadow was
excessive.
Sadow and the hospital
had been fighting in court
because the doctor was
denied privileges to do sur-
gery in Lawnwood's open-
heart institute. A Lawnwood
official then told another
doctor about Sadow: "I
would not send my dog to
him for surgery."
Sadow sued for slander,
and a jury awarded him $5
million in punitive damag-
es. A Florida appeals court
upheld the award.
The case is Lawnwood v.
Sadow, 10-371.


AFL-CIO disputes 'myths'


about Florida pension funds


BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE The
AFL-CIO and two outside
experts Monday disputed
what they say are "myths"
that Florida's public
employee retirement plans
are underfunded and pro-
vide lavish benefits.
Also, during a news con-
ference they disagreed
with claims that public pen-
sion costs are too high and
eating up state -and local
budgets and that they hurt
local economies.
The pension plans have
drawn those kinds of criti-
cisms from Gov. Rick Scott,
lawmakers and a conserva-
tive think tank.
Florida AFL-CIO legis-
lative and political direc-
tor Rich Templin said the
union is troubled by such
comments although details
of proposed legislation are
hazy and nothing has yet
been filed.
"We can't find any veri-
fiable information to indi-
cate that those claims are
true, that those claims are
anything other than politi-
cal rhetoric and ideological
posturing," Templin said.
He said pension bene-
fits averaging $16,000 to
$23,000 a.year cannot be
considered extravagant.
Scott has called the $122
billion Florida Retirement
System "a ticking fiscal
time bomb" because he
doesn't think it can sus-
tain its current high rate
of return on investment.
He's also worried about its
unfunded liability.
As of last June 30, the


closing date for the plan's
last annual report, it had
$109 billion in assets and an
unfunded liability of about
$15 billion, or 12 percent.
That percentage is one of
the lowest of any public pen-
sion funds in the nation.
"You are one of the
shining stars of pension
systems throughout the
United States," said Ray
Edmonsdon, CEO of the
Florida Public Pension
Trustees Association, a non-
profit educational organiza-
tion for local plans.
The state plan, which isn't
a member of Edmonsdon's
organization, covers state
and some local employees
including teachers. Florida
also has 488 local govern-
ment pension funds.
Unfunded liability is the
difference between a plan's
assets and liabilities assum-
ing it had to pay out benefits
all at once.
'To say that a pension
fund that has an unfunded
liability is underfunded is
not true," said Chad Little, a
partner in Freiman and Little
Actuaries of Merritt Island,
which specialized in public
pension plans. "Unfunded
and underfunded are not the


same thing."
In response, the James
Madison Institute, a
Tallahassee think tank,
issued a news release
acknowledging underfund-
ed public pensions have not
yet reached a crisis in most
Florida municipalities but
saying that possibility should
be addressed now to prevent
future problems.
"Underfunded public
pension liabilities are eco-
nomic sinkholes waiting to
collapse," said the institute's
president, J. Robert McClure
Ill.
Florida is one of very few
states that don't require state
employees to pay into its
pension fund. Scott has pro-
posed compelling them to
contribute although they've
gone five years without an
across-the-board pay raise.
Little acknowledged that
would save taxpayers money
but said it also would reduce
the plan's financial health.
That's because employee
contributions must' be
returned if a worker leaves
the system before being
vested or dies early. The
state's contributions stay in
the fund under all circum-
stances.


Scott also wants new hires
to be placed in a defined
contribution plan similar to
a 401K That would allow
employees to take their
individual plans with them
if they move to a new job
not covered by the state sys-
tem. They'd also be respon-
sible for managing their own
investments and would not
be guaranteed lifetime pay-
ments that they get under
the present defined benefits
plan.
Edmonsdon, a retired
Fort Lauderdale police
officer, said switching to
defined contributions could
cost taxpayers more because
retirees who exhaust their
pension benefits would qual-
ify for welfare at taxpayer
expense.
The investment track
record for such plans also
has been poor compared
to defined benefit systems,
which are more diversified
and run by professional
money managers, he said.


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Man Goes "TOAD-AL" at High School Reunion
BEXAR COUNTY After using Thera-( iesic' on aching joints,
Ibm W. attended last Friday's reunion where, according to 5 amused and
concerned classmates, he went I OAD-AL. I e squatted, extended both
annrms to the ground, arched his back and did his best to hop numerous times
while croaking.
When asked to explain his behavior, he painlessly replied,
"None of your dang business!"

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Doctor surrenders
medical license

FAIRFIELD, Iowa A
doctor has surrendered his
medical license to settle
a case against him by the
Iowa Board of Medicine.
The Hawk Eye of
Burlington said 55-year-old
Robert David pleaded guilty.
last February in Florida to
three counts connected to.
a Medicaid fraud. He was'
first arrested in September,
2004.
David was given four
years of probation and was
ordered to pay $100,000
in restitution and nearly
$45,100 in court costs.
He had practiced medi-
cine in the southeast Iowa
city of Fairfield.
In June 2006, Iowa-
filed disciplinary charges
against David, saying that
he engaged in a pattern of
unprofessional or unethical
conduct and had violated
laws relating to the practice
of medicine.
David settled with Iowa
on Dec. 31.

Synovus announces
plans for layoffs

COLUMBUS, Ga. -
Synovus Financial Corp.
said it will eliminate 850
jobs this year, 470 of them
in the next 30 days.
The company said the lay-
offs are designed to stream-
line operations, boost pro-
ductivity, reduce expenses
and increase revenue.
Kessel D. Stelling, the
company's president and
CEO, said Synovus hopes
to generate about $100 mil-
lion in annual expense sav-
ings by the end of 2012,
with about $75 million to be
realized in 2011.
Synovus is a financial
services company with
$30 billion in assets based
in Columbus. Synovus.
provides commercial and
retail banking, investment
and mortgage services
to customers in Georgia,
Alabama, South Carolina,
Florida and Tennessee.


LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Blood drive
The LifeSouth Bloodmobile
is coming to Florida Gateway
College 9 a.m. 4 p.m. today.
Each donor receives a free
backpack and a chance to win an
Apple iPad.

Painting exhibit
The Art League of North
Florida is sponsoring an
exhibit of paintings by mem-
oer Kathleen Giddens from
now until Feb. 4 at the Levy
Performing Arts Center. Levy
Center hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday.

MLK Parade
Participants are needed
for the Northeast Florida
Leadership Council Annual Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr. Parade 10
a.m. Jan. 17 beginning at DOT.
Call Ron 867-0468, Gwen 623-
3779, or Audre 344-9915.

Wednesday
Newcomers Meeting


The regular monthly meeting
of the Lake City Newcomers
is 11 a.m. Wednesday at
Guangdong Chinese Restaurant.
Luncheon cost is $10. All mem-
bers, guests and friends along
with any newcomers to the area
are welcome. Lake City Police
Chief Argatha Gilmore is the
speaker. Call 752-4552 or 755-
4051.

Thursday
FGC family event
The Gizmo Guys comic
jugglers, are performing 7
p.m. Thursday at the Levy
Performing Arts Center. Ticket
prices are $15 adults, $14 seniors
age 55 and over and $13 for
students. To purchase tickets or
for further information call 386-
754-4340.

Garden Club meeting
The Lake City Garden Club is
meeting 10 a.m. Thursday. The
program is "Perfect Organic
Fertilizer" by Jane Maxwell.
Visitors are welcome.

DAR meeting


The Edward Rutledge
Daughters of the American
Revolution is meeting at 10:30
a.m. Thursday at Guangdong
Restaurant. Florida State Regent
Barbara Makant is the speaker
and will share information about
her favorite project "Paws for
Patriots. "Bling" items will be
sold to benefit the project. Other
surprises will also take place
during the meeting. Prospective
members and guests are wel-
come. Call 386-755-5579.

Medicaid workshop
A free Medicaid workshop
is at 10 a.m. Thursday in the
Lifestyle Enrichment Center.
Teresa Byrd Morgan of Morgan
Law Center for Estate & Legacy
Planning will expel the myths
and expand the opportunities
with Medicaid Planning. The
LEC is located at 628 S.E. Allison
Court. To attend, please call
Shana Miller at 386-755-1977.

Science Club awards
Richardson Middle School
EXCEL Science Club Student
Dignitary Awards Program is 9
a.m. Thursday in the auditorium.


The program honors outstand-
ing scientist in grades sixth
through eighth. Chief Argatha
Gilmore of the Lake City Police
Department is the speaker.

Landlord Meeting
A meeting will be held at 6
p.m. on Thursday, in the Lake
Shore Hospital Conference room
for landlord's. For more informa-
tion, contact Arline Craft at 386-
755-0110.

First of year meeting
North Central Florida 9-12
project holds first meeting of.
2011 at 7 p.m. on Thursday in
the Taylor building located at
128 SW Birley. Guest speaker
Paul Henry speaks about repeal-
ing the Florida REAL ID law, and
other important topics. For more
information, call John at 386-935-
1705, or visit www.northcentral-
florida912project. org.

Friday
Masonic Banquet
Members of the Gold
Standard Lodge #167 celebrate


their annual Masonic banquet
beginning at 6 p.m. Friday.
The event will take place at the
Winfield Community Center. For
more information, call Brother
Carlos Brown at 386-288-6235.

Saturday
4-H Love A Horse Project
The 4-H Horse Project Club
is meeting 2 p.m. Saturday at
the Columbia County Extension
office. Students who are more
than 9 years old and interested
in learning about, horses are
welcome to attend. There is no
horse required to participate.
The first several meetings will
concentrate on learning about
horses; care, feeding, equip-
ment and safety. Call 4-H vol-
unteer leader Jennifer Powers
at 386-853-0608 or the County
Extension Office at 386-758-1168.

MLK Youth Extravaganza
The PresleyLane Community
Youth Group Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr., Youth Extravaganza
is 3 p.m. Saturday at Olivet
Missionary Baptist Church,
Davis Street.


Anne Daniel Miller
Anne Daniel Miller, age 63, of
Alpharetta, Georgia went to her
eternal home in heaven early
Friday, January 7, 2011. Mrs.
Miller was born on November
29, 1947 in Durham, N.C. to Ed-
ward and Virginia Daniel. Anne
grew up in White Springs, FL.
where her family has resided
since the 1800's. She attended
White Springs United Methodist
md graduated from White
High School. Anne was
preceded in death by her parents,
the late Edward and Virginia
Daniel and her granddaugh-
ter, Sarah Elizabeth Strickland.
She devoted her life to her fami-
ly and raised them to know Jesus
as their personal savior, to love
Him and others around them.
Her gift of humor, and infec-
tious laughter warmed the hearts
of all who met her. She will be
treasured forever. by her ,fam-
ily as a beloved wife and friend
and the best Mama and Mimi
God could have ever given.
She is survived by her husband,
Tom Miller; two daughters, Vir-
ginia "Ginny" Dodd and her
husband Larry of Raleigh, N.C.
and Megan Strickland and her
husband Shannon of Memphis,
TN; seven grandchildren, Anne
Cayton Dodd, Virginia "Ginna"
Dodd, Sam Dodd, Luke Dodd,
Mary Daniel Dodd, Charlie
Strickland and Emily Strickland.
Funeral services will be held
at 11:00 a.m. Tuesday, Janu-
ary 11, 2011 at the White
Springs United Methodist
Church in White Springs, FL.
The family will receive
friends at the church Tues-
day 'beginning at 10:00 a.m.
Interment will follow at River-
side Cemetery in White Springs.
In lieu of flowers, contribu-
tions may be made to the
White Springs United Meth-
odist Church, P.O. Box 204,
White Springs, FL. 32096.
HARRY T. REID FUNER-
AL HOME, Jasper, FL. is
in charge of arrangements.

Ardeth Garau Parmer
Mrs. Ardeth Garau Parmer, 82,
of Lake City passed away Satur-
day, January 8, 2011 following
an extended
illness. Mrs. I _.
Parmer was
born in Fort
Wayne, Indi- i
ana, but had
lived in the
Lake City area
since 1996 af-
ter moving here
from Little Torch
Key, Florida.
Mrs. Parmer was
a veteran of the
United States Navy, and she will
always be remembered as a lov-
ing wife, mother, grandmother,
and sister. Mrs. Parmer attended
the Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints Second Ward
in Gainesville. Mrs. Parmer was
preceded in death by her hus-
band Frank W. Parmer, Jr. and
a son J. Tyrone "Ty" Parmer.
Mrs. Parmer is survived by her
daughter Millie Crawford of
Gainesville, a son Frank Par-
mer, Ill (Dimars) of Lake City,
two brothers John Garau (Delo-
res) of Martinsville, Indiana and
David Garau (Karen) of Rush-
ville, Indiana, five grandchildren
Vicky Crawford, Summer Par-
mer, Keith Parmer, David Barry,
and Chris Workman, and one
great-grandchild Colt Workman.
Numerous' other family mem-
,rs rnld friends also 'e.
Funeral services for Mi.,. 'ar-
mer will be conducted 10:00
AM Tuesday, January 11, 2011
at the Dees-Parrish Family Fu-
neral IHome Chapel in Lake City


with Elder Robert Hilter Presid-
ing. Interment will follow with
Military Honors at the Screven
Cemetery in Screven, Georgia
at 3:00 PM.. The family will
receive friends at the funeral
home Monday evening from
5:00 7:00 PM. In lieu of flow-
ers the family requests memo-
rial donations be made to Haven
Hospice of the Suwannee Valley,
6037 US Hwy 90 West, Lake
City, FL 32025.Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
www.parrishfamiljfiineralhome.conm

Wendy Gale Perry
Mrs. Wendy Gale Perry,.55, of
Lake City, passed away late Fri-
day evening, January 7, 2011 in
the Tallahassee Memorial Hos-
pital following a brief illness.
A native of Anderson, South
Carolina, Mrs. Perry had been a
resident of Lake City for the past
twenty-six years having moved
here from Hollywood, Florida.


Mrs. Perry had worked for sev-
eral years as a cosmetologist.
She then graduated with an A.S.
Degree in Computer Science
from Lake City Community Col-
lege and worked as a computer
programmer until she entered the
real estate field. She was current-
ly employed as an agent with the
Darby-Rogers Century 21 Agen-
cy and had been employed for
five years as a real estate agent
in Lake City. In her spare time
Mrs. Perry enjoyed bowling,
fishing, playing cards, especially
Texas Hold'em Poker. Her com-
petitive spirit was matched by
her ability to excel in all things.
She was. preceded in death by
her father, Joseph Tagmeyer.
Mrs. Perry is survived by her
son, Donnie Ray Perry Jr.
(Christina Prince) of Lake City;
her. grand-daughter, Angelina
Perry of Lake City: her mother,
Mildred Tagmeyer of Boynton
Beach, Florida; two sisters, Pat
Cook of Boynton Beach, Florida
and Omega Zachman of Ft My-
ers, Florida; two brothers, Joe
Tagmeyer of Boynton Beach,
Florida and Ron Tagmeyer of
Davie, Florida. She was ex-
pecting the arrival of her sec-


Camp Lejeune Water Contamination
Informational Meeting
An informational T. -T.n ,e ,:-r,' the CAMP LEJEUNE WATER
CONTAMINATION effects will be held
When: Saturday, January 15, 2011
Time: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Where: Tampa Marriott Westshore
1001 N. Westshore Blvd.
e,. ..'- r, ] '_.. ~,,,j iii, ii, .. I m.1iiii. r,,, .r,..[.l.,-_ ., dsposed of chem ical
,j .jrE i i = i r, ,,nj :.l-. I.,'. .: i L I.-i.-i ,;- l- tia l u na i -n contam inated the
.lriir.i n i, r r '.in. :rrp L -eleuri !.'1iil r ,* I ,:iii, in, IC. Military
S r ,.,nr, l l l r I r,, s ri .i i -u i ,. -r,.1 '. :.rl ing in the vicinity of
ire r,.-: r .e .,- n p.:.; ar,. j m .inl .-r ',.- erous health effects
': fi_ i ,J L,' I ...:-rl w ,i al it ..' aT-f Trie:, ..,- l.:u ,le:
Cancers
Reproduclive disorders
Binth defects
i :.,j r, 1-.-. ,ijr i,, i i, ii, I- -. ,, ..ii, i : 1 ...-i ...r. n, as been affected
e- .L.: ur- r : I i, .. e r -i L'-i u e1 ,-*i' a -i ,r,.'ited to attend this
h ,,, -.- r~. :.,n ,r .n al 31 ,-Tu r-, "
-,.r ,n t:,r- .." l:i T ,,ri .:.r I :, u : e- : : hl'l n ;n contact:
.Jerr, Erinnq,,ar E, .el -r hm .j.:r ||llp:,r.com
,:.i i : [ ,l :,u r ti : e[- 1 ,il ,* i II-,^ T -. ,_. ..11


ond grand-daughter in March.
Memorial services for Mrs.
Perry will be conducted at 5:00
P.M. on Thursday, January 13,
2011 in the Chapel of the Dees-
Parrish Family Funeral Home
with Father Robert Trujillo of-
ficiating. The family will re-
ceive friends for one hour prior
to the service. In lieu of flowers,
please send donations to help
the family with the funeral ex-
penses to either Peoples State
Bank location (386-754-0002,
please refer to account #7112).
Arrangements are under the
direction of the DEES-PAR-
RISH FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 South Marion
Ave., Lake City, FL 32025
(386-752-1234) Please sign
the on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilfnimeralhome. com
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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OBITUARIES


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


'


COMPLETE HOME FURNISHINGS









LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2011


BulletinBoard

NE SABOTORS CHOS


CAMPUS

NEWS

Columbia City
Elementary
Spelling bee
Columbia City
Elementary held its fifth-
grade Spelling Bee in
December.
All students competed
first in their classrooms
with the top two advancing
to the grade level spelling
bee.
The contestants were:
Chase Layton, Sasha
Ellis, Jon Ellis, Austin
Nash, Dezmund Cothran,
Destiny May, Matthew
Hunter, Emily Harrington,
Stormi Smith and Ashlyn
Busscher.
The winner was Matthew
Hunter and the runner up
was Stormi Smith. Matthew
will compete in the District
level spelling bee on
January 20.

Science Fair winners
The kindergarten win-
ner was Megan Merritt, 1st
place. First-grade winners
were Anelise Bullard, 1st
place; Logan French, 2nd
place; and Logan Radar,
3rd place.
Second-grade winners
were Carol Dougherty,
1st place; Chandler
Frisina, 2nd place; and
Isaac Cabrall, 3rd place.
Honorable mentions went
to Gabrielle Griffis, Chance
Kurrasch and Marie
Henderson.
Third-grade winners
were Trace Umstead,
1st place; Grace Boswell,
2nd place; and Wittleigh
Summerlin, 3rd place."
Honorable mentions went
to Julie Boozer and Jakob
Jones.
Fourth-grade winners
were Hunter Shoup, 1st
place; Lance Nabinger, 2nd
place; and Cecily Griffis,
3rd place.
Fifth-grade winners were
Jasmine Cook, 1st place;
Caitlyn Frisina, 2nd place;
and Melissa Rhoades, 3rd
place. Honorable mentions
went to Madison Wolf and
Micah Krieghauser.
The winner of the class
project was Mrs. Jewett's
pre-kindergarten class, 1st
place.

Outstanding adults
Recognized as outstand-
ing adults at Columbia
City Elementary: Mrs.
Malinda Cembruch, a sec-
ond-grade teacher named
Teacher of the Year; Mrs.
Wendy McIntosh, a para-
professional for first-grade,
named Florida School-
Related Employee of the
Year; Mrs. Laura Merritt,
named Adult Volunteer
of the Year; and Mrs.
Adrienne Daniel, named
Senior Volunteer of the
Year.

Cup-Stacking
Competition
Columbia County
Schools recently held a
Cup-Stacking Competition
among seven elemen-
tary schools. Columbia
City Elementary team
members were: Austin
Jenkins, Jessica Jewett,
Jacob Wentworth, Shaylen
Raulerson, Krista Vargo,
Estefenia Gray, Landon
Smith, Dakota Lugenbeel,
Ryan English, Bruce Pope,
Callahan Register, Jacob
Zecher, Jacob Boone,
Hunter Shoup, Breanna
Christman, Brianna
Neitzke and Wittleigh
Summerlin.
The CCE team placed
third overall.


Austin Jenkins placed
second and Jacob
Wentworth placed fifth
overall in the individual
competition.


4
:._*i
r..


I


COURTESY PHOTO


Slime hits teacher of discipline at Five Points
Victoria Thomas, a third-grade student at Five Points Elementary, pours a cup of slime
on Roger Little, discipline and academic resource teacher, on Dec. 17 at Five Points
Elementary. Students who raised five dollars or more for the school's Jump Rope For
Heart campaign had the chance to 'slime' Little or two other faculty members.


STUDENT PROFILE


Name: Briana E White
Age: 11
Parents: Billy and
Sharon White
School and grade:
Joy Explosion Christian
Academy, seventh grade
Achievements: A/B
Honor Roll, "A" Privilege
and Scripture Memory
What clubs or
organizations do you
belong to? 100's Club,
GFC Youth Group, Youth
Praise Team and Drama
Team


What do you like best
about school? Math and


science
What
would
you like
to do
when
y o u
corm -


White p I e t e
vvnite plete
your education? I would
like to act and become a
fashion designer.
Teacher's comments:
Briana is a hard worker


nes


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Your Name:
Phone:
Address:
City/State/Zip:
Mail to: Lake City Reporter, Classified Department
PO Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056 ~ 755-5440


ALL ADi MLUS' HE PA.ID.AT
TH TI M E OF PLACE fMNF N T.
DEADLINE IS FEB. 8,2011.


Lake City Reporter
lakecilytepo eicom(m U.I'I NT. .,,,.....,-


who strives to do her best.
She is a self-motivated stu-
dent who enjoys reaching
goals that require a bit
more effort.
Principal's com-
ments: I appreciate hav-
ing Briana as a student
here at Joy Explosion
Christian Academy. She
is always willing to lend
a hand and help where
needed.
Student's comments
concerning honor:
I think it's pretty cool.

SPut a little I
Lake Cit) Re
You loe b, 'Tr,


our


Fort White students

educate community

on juvenile diabetes


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Juvenile diabetes
wasn't something
Taylor Morgan of
Fort White was too
familiar with before
researching about it
for a community aware-
ness project.
"You may see someone
walking on the street and
never know they have it,"
he said.
Morgan along with
Kayla Williams, Kien Cade
and Abbie Williams all
Fort White High School
students are present-
ing the project during
the Health Occupations
Students of America
Region 2 Competition
Saturday in Gainesville.
There are 50 different
competitive events for
students to participate in .
during a competition, said
Lloyd DeVault, state advi-
sor. The community aware-
ness project focuses on
issues that may be of local
interest.
The students focused on
juvenile diabetes, or Type,
1, for their community
awareness project, said
Kayla Williams. The group
talked to several people
who either had juvenile
diabetes or a relative with
the disorder for research.


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"We have people in the
community who have it
and not a lot of people
know about (juvenile dia-
betes)," she said.
The group participated
in several events to edu-
cate the community about
juvenile diabetes, such
as hosting a booth at the
Columbia County Fair in
November and a bowl-a-
thon to raise money for the
Juvenile Diabetes Research
Foundation, Cade said.
Their presentation for
judges at the competition
will include a portfolio
documenting the project
and activities and a power
point presentation.
Projects are judged based
on the oral presentation,
portfolio, understanding of
the issue and more, DeVault
said.
"The big area is the impact
on the community," he said.
The top three teams in
each event will advance to the
state competition and, from
there, to Nationals, DeVault
said.
The group worked hard
to provide community aware-
ness on juvenile diabetes,
Abbie Williams said.
"Working on the project
was a great experience for all
of us to go out and tell people
and make them more aware
of juvenile diabetes," she
said.


e's Day nilh the
cial day for those
HIe'll include it on
ary 13Jh.


Robert Woodard Edward Jones
Financial Advisor KING S OF

148 North Marion Ave Downtown
Lake City, FL 32055-3915
Bus. 386-752-1215 TF Fax 800-217-2105 -
TE 888-752-1215
robert.woodard@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com


Roses are red, violets are blue, send Love Lines
to show them thatyOur love is true.
The Lake City Reporter
C I Presents: (


k


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


'N.!
,: ,: :


|ilk ;&-


, ,' b- ,


X ,O


(i P, -







8A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2011





U.S. GOVERNMENT


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@akecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





S PORTS


Tuesday, January I 1, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting today
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. today in
the high school teacher's
lounge. On the agenda
are end-of-the-year
issues, a date for the
organizational meeting,
election of officers and
football banquet plans.
For details, call
Lori Pitts at 867-2117.

ALL-STAR FOOTBALL
Senior game
set for Saturday
The CYFA/Dicks
Sporting Goods High
School All-Star Football
Game is 4 p.m. Saturday
at Memorial Stadium.
The game will feature
graduating seniors from
Columbia, Fort White,
Baker County, Bell,
Bradford, Branford,
Chiefland, Dixie County,
Hamilton County,
Lafayette, Madison
County, Taylor County,
Trenton, Suwannee and
Union County schools.
For details, call
chairman William
Murphy at 288-4779.

From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High girls
soccer at Buchholz High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High boys
soccer at Taylor County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball at Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Wolfson
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Buchholz
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Williston
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Wednesday
Fort White girls
weightlifting at Trenton
High, 4 p.m.
Columbia High
wrestling vs. Forrest High,
canceled
Thursday
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Chiles High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
soccer at Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Chiles High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball at Middleburg
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High
boys basketball vs. Union
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Friday
Columbia High
wrestling at Suwannee
tournament, TBA
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Newberry
High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer at P.K. Yonge
School, 6 p.m.
Fort White High
girls soccer vs. Hamilton
County High, 7 p.m.
(JV-5)
Columbia High boys
soccer at Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Fleming
Island High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling at Suwannee
tournament, TBA
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Wolfson


1U


urn


ace


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Auburn's Cam Newton (left) carries the ball as Oregon's Kenny Rowe (58) defends during the BCS National Championship
football game in Glendale, Ariz., on Monday.


Late drive carries Tigers to title


By EDDIE PELLS
Associated Press
GLENDALE, Ariz. -Wes
Byrum kicked a 19-yard
field goal as time expired
and No.- 1 Auburn beat
No. 2 Oregon 22-19 to win
the BCS national champion-
ship Monday night at the
site of the Fiesta Bowl in
Glendale, Ariz.
Oregon had tied it at 19
with 2:33 left when Darron
Thomas connected with Jeff
Maehl on a tying 2-point
conversion after LaMichael
James scored on a shovel
pass.
Heisman Trophy winner
Cam Newton and Auburn
came right back with a


Columbia

wrestlers

fifth at

Clay meet
From staff reports

Columbia High's wres-
tling team placed fifth in
the Clay (County) Rotary
Invitational on Jan. 7-8.
The host Blue Devils of
Clay High won the tourna-
ment, followed by Ridgeview
High, Flagler Palm Coast
High, Wakulla High and
Columbia.
Columbia's Cole
Schreiber won the indi-
vidual championship in the
103-pound weight class.
Schreiber posted a perfect
mark, with all four wins by
pinfall.
Isaac Henderson (152-
pound class),Joe Fields (171
pounds) and Monterance
Allen (189 pounds) all went
4-1 and won third place.
Michael Roberts (140
pounds), Daniel Graham
(145 pounds) and Daniel
Devers (160 pounds) each
went 2-2 for the tournament.
Jacob Dicks (112 pounds)
was 1-2 and Bryan Piercy
(215 pounds) was 0-2.
The CHS match on Wed-
nesday has been canceled.


73-yard drive, with fresh-
man Michael Dyer
making the key plays. First
he rolled over an Oregon
tackier and, with most of
the players thinking the
playwas over around mid-
field, scooted another 30
yards to the 23.
A play later, Dyer went
through the middle for 16
to the 1.
After Newton was pushed
back a yard, Byrum came
on with 2 seconds left
to kick the winner and give
Auburn its first national
championship since 1957
and the Southeastern
Conference's fifth in a row.
Newton's passing and a
goal line stand helped No_


1 Auburn build a 19-11 lead
over No. 2 Oregon after
three quarters of the BCS
national championship
game.
The Heisman Trophy win-
ner threw two touchdown
passes in the second quar-
ter and Nick Fairley and
the Auburn defense made
the biggest play in the third
quarter at the University of
Phoenix Stadium.
Auburn led 16-11 at half-
time as the Tigers rolled
up 258 yards in the second
quarter and picked up right
where they left off at the
start of the third.
The Tigers drove into the
red zone, but stalled and
settled for Wes Bvrum's


28-yard field goal to make
it 19-11.
Oregon had its best
chance to score on its sec-
ond possession of the third
quarter, using a faked punt
in its own territory to keep
the ball and a 43-yard pass
from Darron Thomas to
Lavasier Tuinei, who made
a juggling catch, to get
down to the Auburn 3.
The first Oregon run
went backwards, but the
next two left Oregon at the
1 facing fourth down..
Thomas handed to
Kenjon Barner, but he
didn't get close to the goal
line, with throng of Auburn
defenders stacking him up
for no rain


S / '


- dA *


COURTESY PHOTO


TOP: Columbia wrestlers
who won medals in the
Clay Rotary Invitational are
Joe Fields (from left), Cole
Schreiber, Isaac Henderson,
Monterance Allen.


LEFT: Monterance Allen
wrestles against an opponent
from Flagler Palm Coast High
in the weekend tournament
hosted by Clay High.


Cecil

Newton

is right

By TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press
GLENDALE, Ariz.
Cam Newton
would likely
have won the
Heisman by
a record
margin had 105 of the
886 voters not left him
off their ballots because
they thought his father
might have made a few.
bucks off his son.
He walked away with
the trophy last month
in New York anyway,
though Cecil Newton.
couldn't share the proud
moment because the
moral guardians of
college football were
aghast at the notion
he might have wanted
$180,000 for a season's
worth of work by his son.
Here's hoping Cecil
Newton got his money.
It's only right; everyone
else gets theirs.
The sham that is
big-time college athletics
was on full display this
week in the Arizona
desert.
The Ducks against
the Tigers. Nike versus
Under Armour. The new
granddaddy of them all.
The last time both
teams played there were
Thanksgiving leftovers in
the refrigerator. Now, the
Tigers have been playing
and practicing for more
than five months and
most everybody outside
of Alabama and Oregon
never wants to see
another bowl game.
The new schedule may
not be traditional, but
there's little argument
that it's profitable. Each
team will get some $21
million to share with its
conference foes, ESPN
will cash in on extra
timeouts it inserts into
each half, and the two
millionaire coaches and
their well-paid staffs will
get even richer.
And the players who
got them here? The
NCAA is graciously
allowing them up to $500
in gifts, enough for an
X-Box or maybe a new
recliner for the dorm
room back home.
And you were
wondering why Cecil
Newton wanted his
money up front?
The hypocrisy that
is college football is no
secret, of course. The
NCAA long has been
pretending it oversees
a purely amateur sport
and the big time schools
are more than happy to
collect millions and go
along with the charade.
The industry is so
important and the stakes
are so huge that Cam
Newton plays in the BCS
title game even though
the NCAA came to the
conclusion Cecil Newton
was indeed shopping his
son to the highest bidder.
So what's in it for the
players? Not much other
than a chance to earn
a piece of parchment,
except for the rare few
who make it to the NFL.
The better payoff
would be in something
that actually pays off-
like cash. There seems
to be plenty of it being
made off their sweat and
talent.
Pay players a monthly
stipend and let them


1, ..61.. 1. 611, 1 1 11- ni i's. .... .. .11, I'll" I )YI ulu lul ll%? 6-11-


____j


COURTESY PHOTO


NEWTON continued on 2B


High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN -Wisconsin at Michigan St.
ESPN2 -Texas at Texas Tech
9 p.m.
ESPN Florida at Tennessee .
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Philadelphia at Buffalo

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

WILD CARD
Saturday
Seattle 41, New Orleans 36
N.Y.Jets 17, Indianapolis 16
Today
Baltimore 30, Kansas City 7
Green Bay 21, Philadelphia 16
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 15
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m.
(CBS)
Green Bay at Atlanta, 8 p.m. (FOX)
Sunday, Jan. 16
Seattle at Chicago, I p.m. (FOX)
N.Y. Jets at New England, 4:30'p.m.
(CBS)
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 23
NFC, 3 p.m. (FOX)
AFC, 6:30 p.m. (CBS)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 6
At Arlington,Texas
AFC champion vs. NFC champion,
6:30 p.m. (FOX)

Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan.30
At Honolulu
AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (FOX)

Super Bowl odds


New England
Atlanta
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Green Bay
Baltimore
N.Y. Jets
Seattle


(Sunday)
Current Opening


College bowl games

Sugar Bowl
Ohio State 31,Arkansas 26
GoDaddy.com Bowl
Miami (Ohio) 35, Mid.Tennessee 21
Cotton Bowl
LSU 41,TexasA&M 24
Saturday
BBVA Compass,Bowl
Pittsburgh 27, Kentucky 10
Sunday
Fight Hunger Bowl
Nevada 20, Boston College 13
Monday
BCS National Championship
Auburn vs. Oregon (n)

Saturday, Jan. 22
At Orlando
East-West Shrine Classic, 4 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 29
At MobileAla.
Senior Bowl, 4 p.m. (NFLN)


Florida's

Jenkins

returning

By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Florida
cornerback Janoris Jenkins
pretty much shut down the
Southeastern Conference's
best receivers in 2010.
He'll try to do it again
next season.
Jenkins announced
Monday that he has decid-
ed to return for his senior
season, a huge boost for the
Gators and new coach Will
Muschamp.
"I spent some time
with my family and coach
Muschamp and came to the
conclusion it was in my best
interest to return to school,"
Jenkins said in a statement.
"Coach Muschamp was
very supportive throughout
the whole process, regard-
less of my decision, but
he wanted to make sure I
had all of the facts. I'm
looking forward to working
towards my degree, com-
pleting my rehab and get-
ting back on the field with
my teammates."
Jenkins, a three-year
starter projected to be a
first-round draft pick, has
eight career interceptions.
He had three this season,
and was first-team All-SEC.
He was at his best against
Georgia's A.J. Green,
Alabama's Julio Jones and
South Carolina's Alshon
Jeffery. They averaged 38
yards receiving against
Jenkins and had one touch-
down between them.


Saturday, Feb. 5
At San Antonio
Texas vs. The Nation
Challenge, 2 p.m.


All-Star


BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Monday's Games
Charlotte 96, Memphis 82
Houston 108, Boston 102
Chicago 95, Detroit 82
Today's Games
Milwaukee at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Washington, 7 p.m.
San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Denver, 9 p.m.
New York at Portland, 10 p.m.
Cleveland at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Chicago at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Orlando at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
New York at Utah, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Miami at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

APTop 25

The top 25 teams in The Associated
Press' college basketball poll, with first-
place votes in parentheses, records
through Jan. 9, total points and last week's


ranking:

I. Duke (65)
2. Ohio St-
3. Kansas
4.Syracuse
5. Pittsburgh
6. San Diego St.
7.Villanova
8.Purdue
9. Notre Dame
10. Connecticut
11I. BYU
12.Texas
13. Kentucky
14.Texas A&M
15. Missouri
16. Illinois
17.Washington
18. Louisville'
19.Temple
20.Wisconsin
21. Kansas St.
22. Georgetown
23. UCF
24. Georgia
25. Cincinnati


Record
15-0
16-0
15-0
16-0
15-1
17-0
14-1
15-1
14-2
12-2
16-1
12-3
12-3
14-1
14-2
13-3
12-3
13-2
11-3
12-3
12-4
12-4
14-1
12-2
15-1


Others receiving votes: Minnesota
123, Michigan St. 118, Baylor II I, Florida
110, UNLV 74, Vanderbilt 74, Oklahoma
St. 71, Memphis 49, Saint Mary's, Calif.
49, North Carolina 31, Gonzaga 29, West
Virginia 15, Arizona 6, Old Dominion 4,
St. John's 4, Tennessee 4, Utah St. 4,
Missouri St. 2, Virginia Tech 2, Wichita St.
2, Coastal Carolina I, Richmond I.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 10 Connecticut vs. Rutgers at
the XL Center, Hartford, No. 10 Conn.,
7 p.m.
No. II BYU at Utah, 8:30 p.m.
No. 12 Texas at Texas Tech, 7 p.m.
No. 13 Kentucky vs.Auburn, 7 p.m.
No. 16 Illinois at Penn St, 9 p.m.
No. 20 Wisconsin at Michigan State',


7 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
No. I Duke at Florida St., 9 p.m.
No. 2 Ohio State at Michigan,
6:30 p.m.
No. 3 Kansas at Iowa State, 9 p.m.
No. 4 Syracuse vs. St.John's at Madison
Square Garden, 7 p.m.
No.5 Pittsburgh at No.22 Georgetown,
7 p.m.
No. 6 San Diego State vs. UNLV,
10 p.m.
No. 14Texas A&M vs. Oklahoma State,
8 p.m.
No. 15 Missouri vs. Nebraska, 7 p.m.
No. 18 Louisville at No. 7 Villanova,
7 p.m.
No. 19 Temple vs. St. Bonaventure,
7:30 p.m.
No. 21 Kansas State vs. Colorado,
9 p.m.
No. 24 Georgia at Vanderbilt, 8 p.m.
No. 25 Cincinnati vs. South
Florida, 7 p.m.
Thursday's Games
No. 8 Purdue at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
No. 17 Washington at Stanford,
10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. I Duke vs.Virginia, 2 p.m.
No. 2 Ohio State vs. Penn State,
5:30 p.m.
No. 3 Kansas vs. Nebraska, 2 p.m.
No. 4 Syracuse vs. No. 25 Cincinnati,
Noon
No. 5 Pittsburgh vs. Seton Hall, 7 p.m.
No. 6 San Diego State at New Mexico,
6 p.m.
No. 7 Villanova vs. Maryland, I p.m.
No. 10 Connecticut at DePaul, 2 p.m.
No. 12 Texas vs. Oklahoma, 4 p.m.
No. 13 Kentucky vs. LSU, 4 p.m.
No. 14TexasA&M vs. No. 15 Missouri,
I p.m.
No. 16 Illinois at No. 20 Wisconsin,
3 p.m.
No. 18 Louisville vs. Marquette,
II a.m.
No. 19 Temple at Duquesne, Noon
No. 21 Kansas State vs. Texas Tech,
1:30 p.m.
No. 22 Georgetown at Rutgers,
Noon
No. 23 UCF at Southern
Mississippi, 5 p.m.
No. 24 Georgia at Mississippi, 5 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 8 Purdue at West Virginia,
4:30 p.m.
No. 9 Notre Dame vs. St. John's at
Madison Square Garden, Noon
No. 17 Washington at California,
10 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Monday's Games
Boston 4, Pittsburgh 2
Phoenix at St. Louis (n)
Detroit at Colorado (n)
Toronto at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
Ottawa at Boston, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at'N.Y. Islanders: 7'p:m.
Montreal at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Pittsburghat Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Washington atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
St. Louis atAnaheim, 10 p.m.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


WHAT MOM TAUGHT
HER C-HILPREN WHILE
GROCERY SHOPPING.,
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CYNIC LIMBO TEAPOT PARDON
I Answer: The arctic explorer said his head gear was
a POLAR ICE CAP


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

District tournaments
for winter sports are fast
approaching for Fort White
High and Columbia High.
Fort White competes
in District 5-3A, 'while
Columbia is in District 4-5A
for team sports other than
football.
Fort White's district
includes Suwannee,
Santa Fe, Newberry and
Williston (no boys soccer)
high schools.
Columbia is in a dis-
trict along with Ed White,
Middleburg, Ridgeview,
Wolfson, Lee, Gainesville,
Buchholz and Fleming
Island high schools.
Girls soccer kicks off the
eight-week slate of district
tournaments, with games
as early as Saturday in
Columbia's district.
District5-3Aplaybeginsat
7 p.m. Jan. 18 at Suwannee.
The final is 7 p.m. Jan. 21.
Fort White finished 2-5-1 in
district play.
With the nine-team
District 4-5A, a play-
in game is required and
will be at noon Saturday
at Ridgeview. The final is
7 p.m. Jan. 21. Columbia's
district record is 2-5-1.
Boys soccer follows the
next week and Newberry
is the host school for
5-3A. The opening round
of district games begins at
5 p.m. Jan. 25. The final is
7 p.m. Jan. 28. Fort White
is 2-4 in district.
Ridgeview will host the
4-5A boys soccer. The tour-
nament begins at 1 p.m.
Jan. 22. The final is 7 p.m.
Jan. 28. Columbia is 3-4-1
after a 3-0 loss at Fleming
Island on Monday.
Newberry is the host for
5-3A girls basketball. The


Continued From Page 1B
earn even more by
reaching certain goals, just
like their coaches do.
Give everybody on
the team, say, $25,000
t


1 I

4
7 F
11 (
12 c
14 F
r
15 (
17 -
18 1
(
19 c

21 A
22 S


-- -.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Shaniqua Henry (3) drives around a
Hamilton County High defender in a game on Jan. 3.


first round is 6 p.m. Feb.
1, with the final at 7 p.m.
Feb. 5. Fort White was
0-3 in three district games.
The Lady Indians lost
56-43 at Trenton High on
Friday.
Columbia's tournament
will be at Buchholz, begin-
ning with a game at 3 p.m.
Jan. 29. The final is 7 p.m.
Feb. 5.
The Lady Tigers are 0-6
in district play following a
77-24 loss at Fleming Island
on Friday.
Newberry also will host
the 5-3A boys. The opening
game is 6 p.m. Feb. 8 and
the final is 7 p.m. Feb. 12.,
Fort White is 0-5 in district


play to date.
Columbia's tournament
will be at Wolfson, begin-
ning at 7 p.m. Feb. 7. The
final is 7. p.m. Feb. 12.
Columbia is 2-2 so far in
district play.
Both Fort White and
Columbia are in District 4
for girls weightlifting. The
district qualifying tourna-
ment is at Belleview High
on Jan. 29.
In wrestling, Columbia
is in District 2-2A and will
host the district tourna-
ment on Feb. 5.
Fort White is in District
2-1A and will travel to
Suwannee for the district
tournament on Feb. 4.


for being in the BCS title
game.
Make Cecil Newton look
like a man ahead of his
time.


ACROSS 38 Water-based
paint
Had some 39 Small fry
unch 40 Perfume label
/accine amts. word
follow a trail 41 Take in
Our sun 44 Energetic per-
Seniors' org. son
Hungry for 48 Have as a defi-
more nition
Grandeur 49 Mathematical
- noire operation
1960s garment 51 Sturdy lock
hyph.) 52 Put on weight
Greeting the 53 Resin
lay 54 Litigated
acquired 55 Request charity
o far 56 Sault Marie


23 "Iliad"
beauty
26 Rented
29 Fired, slangily
30 Company
31 VII doubled
33 Barely visible
34 Oceans
35 Fast talk
36 Volcano's
mouth


DOWN

D.A. backup
Pith helmet
Fashion maga-
zine
Ravine
Youngest son
Old B'way post-
ing


Tim Dahlberg is a
national sports columnist
for The Associated Press.
Write to him at
tdahlberg@ap. org.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

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AG OL EORY E
SUT E UT ENISI LIS
B Y E S



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R A YEB






T A Y E iX
S U ITA E INR E
P R OE RE 0
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Sisters' clothes
Currier's partner
Write a bad
check
Blissful spot
Earnest requests


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16 Crept
20 Squeeze
oranges
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notably
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nightspot
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"lunchbox"
32 Hassle
34 Galaxy unit
35 Excursion
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Cantor
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Vanderbilt
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draw
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par
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defense
47 Not even twice
50 Tiny bit


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FISH BUSTERS' BULLETIN



i :Bass tournament



-future under study


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Green Bay Packers cornerback Tramon Williams (38) intercepts a pass in the end zone
intended for Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver Riley Cooper (14) during the closing seconds
of the NFC wild card football game in Philadelphia on Sunday.


Rodgers, Stark lead


Packers over Eagles


By ROB MAADDI
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA -
Aaron Rodgers watched
helplessly from the sideline,
hoping the defense could
get a big stop to preserve
his biggest win.
When Tramon Williams
intercepted Michael Vick's
pass in the end zone,
Rodgers threw his hands up
and pumped his fist. It was
a low-key celebration by
Brett Favre standards, but
perhaps one that was fitting
- Rodgers has finally shed
the ghost of Favre.
He's building his own
legacy with the Green Bay
Packers, and now has his
first playoff victory.
Rodgers threw three
touchdown passes while
seldom-used rookie James
Starks ran for 123 yards in
a 21-16 wild-card win over
the Philadelphia Eagles on
Sunday.
"Well, in all my time being
a football fan, I have never


seen one player win a game
all by himself," Rodgers
said afterward. "It's a good
team win for us and I will
let you guys write what you
want on that."
Rodgers was merely a
spectator while Vick nearly
led the Eagles back. But
Williams picked his throw
intended for Riley Cooper
with 33 seconds left to end
it, sending the sixth-seeded
Packers (11-6) to Atlanta
(13-3) for a divisional play-
off game Saturday night.
Favre may have run
on the field and carried
Williams off on his shoul-
der after that play, a big
grin on his face. Rodgers is
a little more subdued than
No. 4, though. He grabbed
his helmet and went out
to kneel down for the final
play.
"It is a tough position as
a quarterback to be on the
sidelines and not be able
to have an impact on that
play," Rodgers said, "just
hoping that the defense


comes up with a stop."
Rodgers has shown
patience before. He waited
three years to become Green
Bay's starter and took over
after Favre's messy depar-
ture before the 2008 season.
He long ago made Packers
fans forget about Favre,
and now has punctuated his
impressive resume with his
first playoff win.
"Milestone? That's what
you' talk about. We don't
look at it that way," Packers
coach Mike McCarthy said.
"Aaron's got a lot of football
left in front of him. He's
going to be playing for a
long time, and I think those
conversations should be
talked about at the end in
my opinion."
Clay Matthews, Charles
Woodson and Co. contained
Vick for the most part. He
threw for 292 yards and ran
for 33 in his first playoff
start since losing the 2005
NFC championship game
on the same field as a mem-
ber of the Atlanta Falcons.


Baltimore batters KC


By DOUG TUCKER
Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -
Maybe the great Baltimore
defense isn't aging as quick-
ly as some people thought.
The battle-tested Ravens
humbled a youthful Kansas
City offense in a smothering
second half Sunday, hold-
ing the Chiefs to 25 yards
over the final two quarters
en route to a 30-7 victory.
Now it's back to Pittsburgh
on Saturday in the second
round of the AFC playoffs,
a showdown between bit-
ter division rivals who split
their season series.
And yes, said Pro Bowl
linebacker Terrell Suggs,
this one is personal but
not just between the teams.
"It's personal between the
two cities, Baltimore and
Pittsburgh," said Suggs. "It
shouldn't surprise you that
these two teams are in the
fight and at each other's
throats."
The Ravens (13-4)
stopped what Kansas City
does best. The No. 1 rush-
ing offense in the NFL was
held to 108 yards on the
ground. Cassel was sacked
three times. The Ravens
forced five turnovers. And
Pro Bowl wide receiver
Dwayne Bowe, who led the
league with a team-record
15 receiving touchdowns,
did not catch a pass.
He was so blanketed by
the Ravens defense, he was
never even thrown to.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Matt Cassel is sacked by
Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis during the fourth
quarter of the AFC wild card football game Sunday in
Kansas City, Mo.


"It was a tough one,"
Chiefs coach Todd Haley
said. "I thought we got
great experience for a lot
of young guys that hadn't
been part of this."
The defensive onslaught
began in the third quarter,
when Jamaal Charles lost 5
yards on fourth-and-inches.
From then on, the Chiefs
were helpless to move the
ball or stop the Ravens.
The Chiefs (10-7), who
had made a six-game
improvement to win their
first AFC West title in seven
years, now go into the
NFL record book as the


only franchise with seven
straight playoff losses.
Joe Flacco threw two
touchdown passes for the
Ravens. But it was the vaunt-
ed Baltimore defense that
sent about 70,000 shivering
fans home with one more
playoff loss, a streak that
stretches back 17 years.
'To set records is one
thing," said Lewis. "To
come out and play the way
we've played in the third
quarter all year and the last
two weeks, just giving up
seven points to opponents,
that's championship-caliber
football."


By BOB WATTENDORF

In surveying anglers about a
proposed Long-term Black Bass
Management Plan, the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission's Division of
Freshwater Fisheries Management
learned that people have opposing views
about fishing tournaments.
Ray Scott, founder of the Bass Anglers
Sportsman Society, brought a network of
large, competitive bass tournaments to
reality and attracted millions of anglers
to the sport, enhancing their
understanding and enjoyment of what
has become America's most-sought
recreational fish. Along the way,
tournament groups helped promote
catch-and-release fishing and educated
the public about conservation issues.
However, many anglers feel
tournaments exploit the resource and
cause congestion at ramps. They are
also concerned with bass that die after
release and, especially, the impact of
interfering with bedding bass.
One angler said tournaments
shouldn't be continued if they don't
overwhelmingly benefit the state.
Someone else held the opposite view:
that high-profile tournaments draw
worldwide attention to Florida's
fisheries, boost local economies, and
provide great public relations to the bass
fishing Florida offers.
A third survey participant said that
during and after weigh-ins, bass are kept
out of the water far too long. "Go to a
tournament site the next morning and
look at all the dead bass floating in the
water," the participant said.
FWC staff, in drafting the Black Bass
Management Plan, is considering
another aspect of holding tournaments:
the pros and cons of allowing bass
tournaments to be temporarily exempt
from size limits. A summary of those
discussion points are provided below.

Continue tournament permitting
Competitive bass tournament angling
is very popular in Florida and has
profound economic impacts locally
and statewide. For example, the 2005
BassMaster Classic on the Kissimmee
Chain of Lakes generated an estimated
$25 million for the community during the
three-day event. Some premier
largemouth bass fisheries in Florida
(e.g., Istokpoga, Orange, Walk-in-Water)
have protective slot limits (15-24 inches)
that would restrict tournament anglers
from maximizing their daily weight.
Because most tournaments, including
small clubs, penalize anglers for dead
fish, tournament anglers try to take very
good care of their fish. Therefore, the
FWC provides exemptions to size
restrictions (but not bag limits) to allow
tournament anglers to temporarily
possess these fish. Permitted
tournament anglers must follow strict
permit requirements, including releasing


all fish after weigh-in and any dead fish
must be donated to charity or research.
Tournament angling depends on
temporary exemptions to be competitive.
So, for economic and social reasons,
exemptions should be continued, since
they don't hurt the resource, compared
with allowing these same anglers to
harvest their catch.

Discontinue tournament permitting
Many anglers think it is unjust for
tournament participants to get even a
temporary exemption from designated
size limits. Har-vest restrictions are set
to manage a fishery based on a stated
objective.
Research from 'he University of
Florida and elsewhere has shown that
tournament-associated mortality could
harm a fishery and prevent managers
from meeting objectives. Tournament
associated mortality has been found to
average 26-28 percent, and modeling
effects of this mortality show that, under
certain circumstances, it could affect the
sizes of fish available for anglers. Thvs,
all anglers should follow size restrictions
to ensure objectives are met.
Given that both sides have valid points,
the FWC continues to review the impact
of tournaments. It studied them in the
1980s and again in the '90s and found no
significant impacts. An FWC subteam is
looking at the tournament issue again, as
is its technical assistance group of
stakeholders representing various
groups that use these fisheries or are
affected by management decisions.
The FWC's No. 1 objective is to
ensure sustainable bass populations.
Tournaments won't affect that, but they
could alter the quality of a I2al fishery.
Moreover, this is a resource-allocation
issue, so sharing of public resources
in an equitable manner and economic
and social considerations need to be
weighed.
An FWC team is endeavoring to think
outside the box and consider testing
alternative solutions, at least for smaller
qualifying tournaments, such as digital
tournaments. As an example, with
smart-phone technology, fish can be
photographed on official rulers,
date-stamped and the location plotted
with GPS accuracy, enabling the angler
to release the catch immediately.
On a preliminary basis, the team
identified five main issues that could be
addressed through FWC efforts:
Tournament mortality;
Issues with moving fish from one
water body to another for weigh-in;
Crowding/pressure (at access
points and on the lake);
Data collected from tournaments;
Education.
Recommendations have not been
finalized, and people can still contribute
by completing a brief survey about
tournament bass fishing at
www.surveymonkey. com/s/
BBMPtournaments.


Antler scoring in Lake City


Commission reports

Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
officers will score deer
antlers Jan. 29 and Feb. 5
in Lake City.
The Jan. 29 event for
scoring will begin at 9 a.m.
at Scott's Gunsmithing and
Sales at 4201 U.S. Highway
441 south.
The Feb. 5 event is
combined with the FWC
Family Fun Day at the
Deep Creek Community
Center. People should
bring their bucks to
Milton's Country Store at


12049 U.S. Highway 441
north for scoring from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
There will be live music,
food and vendors, as well as
biologists and law enforce-
ment officers with infor-
mation about wildlife. K-9
demonstrations will also be
available.
The deer being scored
must have been taken
in Florida by fair-chase
methods. Qualifying ant-
lers will be recorded in
the Florida Buck Registry;
owners will receive a cer-
tificate suitable for framing
and a patch.


The' FWC established
the Florida Buck Registry
in 1982 to provide hunters
with a record of the num-
ber and quality of white-
tailed deer taken in Florida
and to give recognition to
Florida hunters.
The minimum qualifying
antler score is 100 Boone
and Crockett inches for
typical antlers and 125 for
non-typical antlers.
For details, call Scott's
Gunsmithing and Sales
at 752-9898 or Milton's
Country Store at 755-
6975. For the Florida Buck
Registry, go to MyFWC.


Large harvest of Bluegrass bears


Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn.-
Hunters bagged more
than 300 black bears in
Tennessee during the 2010
hunt.
The Tennessee Wildlife
Resources Agency reports


301 bears were taken -
the sixth consecutive year
during which at least 300
were harvested.
However, the number
was about half that of the
record 2009 hunt in which
566 bears were taken.
TWRA said an excep-


tional year for nuts and
berries had bears scat-
tered throughout their
range and limited how far
they roamed.
The county where the
most bears were bagged
was Monroe, with 51 killed,
followed by Polk with 49.


' ,,rcha e I "
...j j. y 1^. ;.


www.lakecityreporter.com
Lake City
-. Reporter


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421








ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2011


DILBERT
IF =If


BLONDE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


ZITS


GARFIELD


sul C>OZP.R


02011 John L HartFLP


d I


AAATAP^ WITH A
T9A.QUlUIttZEF LUJN .


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Forgiving those who've hurt

us is gift we give ourselves


DEAR ABBY: 'The One
Left Behind in Oregon"
(Nov. 16) was disowned by
her parents and brother after
leaving her abusive husband.
She asked how to forgive her
father now that he is dying.
You told her she didn't have
to because he did not ask
for forgiveness. I disagree.
If she doesn't do it, SHE will
be the one to suffer.
As a recovery counselor,
I work with people to help
them forgive those who had
hurt them whether or not
the offenders deserved to be
forgiven. Why? Because re-
sentment hurts the resenter
far more than it hurts the of-
fender. Grudges are cancers
in our souls. Forgiveness
isn't a gift we give to others,
but a gift we give ourselves.
It is especially important
for "Left Behind" to see her
father now as a way to pre-
vent any regrets she may
have in the future. If he's
still hostile on his deathbed,
that's an issue HE'LL carry
to the grave. KATHER-
INE IN CHILLICOTHE,
OHIO
DEAR KATHERINE:
Many readers echoed your
sentiments and offered a dif-
ferent perspective for "Left
Behind" to consider. Read
on:
DEAR ABBY: I had an
alcoholic father who beat us,
then left us never to return.
I was angry for years until


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
I realized I was hurting no
one but myself. He never
asked, but I forgave him so I
wouldn't carry anger around
for the rest of my life. I wrote
him a letter and told him I
forgave him for all the beat-
ings and drunken rages. He
never responded, but I felt a
burden lifted off my shoul-
ders.
"Left Behind" might con-
sider writing her father a
letter saying how hurt she
has been, but letting him
know she has forgiven him.
She might be surprised and
get a response back, but if
she doesn't, at least she'll be
rid of that burden. FOR-
GAVE HIM IN DAPHNE,
ALA.
DEAR ABBY: My family
members also sided with my
abusive ex-spouse. At first it
hurt, but over time I came
to realize that not forgiving
them was hurting me more
than them. I'm not saying I
have the same relationship
with my family now, but in
order to truly move on with
my life I had to clear my
heart and mind. Forgiveness


is not only for the offenders
as much as it is for the of-
fended. Forgive your father
even if he doesn't ask for it,
and see him before it's too
late. If he sends you away,
at least you tried. HAVE
ALSO BEEN THERE
DEAR ABBY: To for-
give someone is a decision
to let go of the hatred, hurt
and resentment even when
the other person doesn't de-
serve it or ask for it. When
we can do this, the terrible
deed loses its hold on our
lives. Forgiveness is an act
of strength, not weakness. It
is healthy for us. A.Q. IN
MOBILE, ALA.
DEAR ABBY: I was in
a similar position as "Left
Behind" with my mother
many years ago. Although I
couldn't bear to talk to her
face-to-face, I wrote a letter
saying a few positive things
about our relationship. She
never spoke of it to me, but
I learned later from another
relative that she read it over
and over and that it was in
her hands when she died.
Knowing that I made the
best effort I could to say
goodbye in a compassionate
and loving way has lasted
far longer than the hurt and
anger. ANNA IN CORT-
LAND, ILL. -
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Broaden your
vision and it will be easier
to see past the obstacles
that stand between you and
what you want. Figure out
your costs before you make
a decision regarding a high-
ticket purchase. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Taking on too
many obligations or trying
to please too many people
will not allow you to do
what needs to be done. You
will come up against road-
blocks but, if you have done
your research, you'll find al-
ternatives. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Look before you
leap, especially when mon-
ey is involved. Protect what
you have but don't be afraid
to buy into a sure thing.
You can improve your re-
lationships if you enhance
your knowledge and meet
people from different walks
of life. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You can advance
as long as you are consis-
tent. Being calm and sure-
footed in your approach to
whatever you do will put
you in the spotlight and
bring you responsibilities
that will buy you the free-
dom you need to excel. **
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Your bold approach


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

to life, love and happiness
will be inspiring to others.
Make personal changes
or connect with a person
or group that can help you
reach your goals. You have
everything to gain by tak-
ing action and sharing your
views. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22): Take a stab at
something you've never
done before. You will find it
stimulating and ego-boost-
ing. Your abilities will not
go unnoticed and an offer
or proposal is likely to fit
into some underlying plans.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You'll have to divide
your time and attention
carefully. Someone in your
personal life will challenge
you and you will meet with
competition in your profes-
sional life. Don't let a bur-
den that doesn't belong to
you cause you to miss an
opportunity. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Take on a chal-
lenge and you will find your
niche. Your skills are far
greater than you give your-
self credit for and, if you im-
plement them into what you
offer others professionally,
you will advance. ***


SAGrITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Move ahead
with caution. Take care of
small but important details.
There is much to be grate-
ful for and to accomplish if
you work diligently to make
your world a better place for
you and your loved ones.
Focus on home and family.
******
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Emotions
will stand in the way of
good judgment. Ask a trust-
ed friend to help you if you
don't feel you can make a
suitable choice. Problems
with authority or while
traveling can be expected.
Don't take a chance; rely on
experience. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Love is in the
stars and with a couple of
suggestions you will find
that you have more in com-
mon with someone you care
for than you realized. Work-
ing as a couple will help you
achieve a stable lifestyle and
a secure future. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Stick to your
word. If you start to change
your mind, you will add to.
the confusion and cause
others to see you as unsta-
ble. Consistency will count.
Overdoing it will lead to
loss. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: E equals C
"GNS MOAMHXSOHWPCS TMIHG
HGSX GD USGGMOU GNS GNMOUH
LDR FWOG DRG DT CMTS MH GNMH:
ASEMAS FNWG LDR FWOG." PSO
H G S M O
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I don't judge others. I say if you feel good with what
you're doing, let your freak flag fly." Sarah Jessica Parker
(c) 201 1 by NEA, Inc. 1-11


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


B.C.


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


4B LAKE CITY REPORTER


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In Print and Online
WwmV t ,A.;l -..'1i 1 r,:i ,i J,:r.<. ,iill


I


020 Lost & Found

05524732
Reward Two Lost Jack Russell
Terriers,female w/blind eye,
male neutered,
missing since 12/21
386-497-4325 or 365-3970

FREE: Boxer mix dog.
Appiox. 1 yr. old. Great
companion. Very friendly &
playful. 386-754-1407

ioo Job
Opportunities
04542883
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

05524764
Suwannee Homecare is seeking
LPN's for an elderly Gainesville
couple for 7am-7pm Days and
weekends will vary This is a
great position to supplement
income Please call Wendy
386-755-1544
Serious inquires only .







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks / Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that on
1/28/2011 at 9:00 am the following
vehicles) will be sold at public auc-
tion for monies owed on vehicle re-
pairs and for storage costs pursuant
to Florida Statutes, Section 713.585.
The lienor s name, address and tele-
phone number and auction location
are: ELITE CARS, PARTS AND
REPAIRS 3720 SW SISTERS
WELCOME ROAD, LAKE CITY,
FL 32024, 386-628-9245. Please
note, parties claiming interest have a
right to a hearing prior to the date of
sale with the Clerk of the Court as
reflected in the notice. The owner
has the right to recover possession of
the vehicle without judicial proceed-
ings as pursuant to Florida Statute
Section 559.917. Any proceeds re-
covered from the sale of the vehicle
over the amount of the lien will be
deposited with the Clerk of the Court
for disposition upon court order.
1GCEK14X78Z110354 2008
CHEVROLET
3C8FY68B73T509973 2003
CHRYSLER
05524822
January 11,2011
PUBLIC AUCTION
Type of Ad Legal
1994 CHEV
VIN# 1Gl1JC5442R7144832
1991 NISSAN
VIN# JN1CZ24H2MX505424
To be held 01/30/2011, 8:00am at
Bryant's Tire and Towing
1165 East Duval St. Lake City FL
32055
04542990
January 11, 2011
PUBLIC AUCTION
Type of Ad Legal
1995 LINC
VIN# 1LNLM81W8SY709794
To be held 01/25/2011, 8:00am at
Bryant's Tire and Towing
1165 East Duval St. Lake City FL
32055


Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.

Experienced IT Tech/
Network Admin
Qualifications: 2+ years
experience with: win XP pro, win
7 pro, server 2003, 2008. Must
have worked within and be
familiar with active directory.
Must be capable of lifting/moving
workstations. Microsoft
certifications a plus. Clean drivers
license required. Please submit
resume to hr@chclabs.com or
fax to 386-758-1791


Experienced Stylist
needed, apply at
Southern Exposure Salon
386-752-4614


Sewing Machine Operator. Good
wages for experience. 2nd person
needed for misc. duties.
Call Hafner's 386-755-6481

Two Hair Stylist needed,
with clientele for Branford salon,
please call Maggie,
386-935-4059
Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

110 Sales
1 Employment

05524825
Lake City, FL based business
looking for qualified sales
professional. Performance based
pay estimated $45K+ per year.
Advertising Sales experience
preferred. Send resume to
info@lakecityfl.info or
PO Box 1208, Lake City, FL


120 Medical
1 Employment

I05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328


100 Job
Opportunities

04542968




FLORIDA SHERIFFS BOYS
RANCH
UNIT SECRETARY
High school diploma with a
minimum of one year of
experience in a responsible
clerical or secretarial position
required. Vocational training in
secretarial/office systems is
preferred. Competitive salary
with excellent benefits.
THERAPIST
The Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch is currently recruiting for
a youth Therapist. Position re-
quires a Master's Degree in
counseling, social work, psy-
chology or related human serv-
ices field with a preference of 2
years clinical experience in pro-
viding services to youth with
emotional disturbances. Li-
censed supervision available.
COTTAGE PARENTS
(3 couples)
Couples needed to provide
direct care and development to
10 boys, ages 8-18. Specific
professional skill based training
& support provided. Our model
helps children develop social,
academic, and independent
living skills. Salary $47,000 per
couple with housing, utilities,
board, and benefits provided.
YOUTH CARE ASSISTANT
Responsibilities involve
working as part of a team in the
direct care and development of
youth between the ages of 8 and
18. Specific skill-based
training provided. High school
diploma required.
For more information on these
challenging opportunities
contact Linda Mather at
(386) 842-5555. Fax resume to
386/842-1029. Employment
application available at
www.youthranches.org
EOE/DRUG FREE
WORKPLACE

05524782






Now accepting resumes for all
positions. Please bring your
resume and visit us from
9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Thursday, January 13th
Sonny's BBQ
3177 W Highway 90
Lake City

05524793
NEED IMMEDIATELY
EXPERIENCED TAX
PREPARER
Tax office needs experienced
tax preparer. Must have mini-
mum 2 years experience. Apply
at: 4158 West US Highway 90,
Lake City, FL 32055


POMERANIAN
10 weeks old.
$250. Paper trained.
386-438-3885
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-.
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractbr. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 mot6r. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances
GE Electric Stove,
White, works great,
$160 386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331 eves after 6pm
GE Gas Cook Top,
Black, still in box $650 new,
will accept $225
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
Matching Whirlpool
Washer/Dryer Set,
White $245
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture

ASHLEY DINING ROOM
TABLE w/6 chairs and leaf.
$150.00 Great Deal!!!
386-344-5706


12 ^f Medical
120 Employment

Busy outpatient surgery center has
immediate opening for part time
Registered Nurses.
Please email resume to
administration@lcsurgerycenter.com
or fax to 386-487-3935.
Family Life Care is searching
for good reliable workers
PRN- RN'S and LPN'S as well
as C.N.A's, application found on
our web-site or send resume to:
386-364-5648 HHA#299992645
Giebeig Family Medicine
Hiring for two full-time positions
Front Office Receptionist and
Nursing, experience preferred.
Fax resume to 719-9494.
Physician's Assistant needed for
new Urgent Care Center in Gaines-
ville area, ER or Urgent Care ex-
perience a plus, but not required.
Contact Paul @ 352-258-4452
Wanted Receptionist,
experienced. Send resume to'
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


130 Part Time

05524792
NEED IMMEDIATELY
TEMPORARY PART-TIME
OFFICE HELP
Tax office needs a mature,
dependable person to work part-
time during tax season must be
able to work evening's and Sat-
urday's. Candidate must be
dependable, have ability to
multi-task, and be computer
literate. Must also have know
ledge of general office duties as
well as excellent telephone
etiquette and people skills.,
Salary based on skills and
experience. 'Fax resume to
386-755-7331.


240 Schools &
24v Education

04542861
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/17/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
Chocolate Lab
$50
AKC
SOLD
Free to good home, blonde lab mix
female, has all shots, very loving,
please call 352-473-2262 or
386-288-7664

Pair of Sugar Gliders
with cage and food. Retails at
$149. ea. Asking $100. for both.
386-288-9707


408 Furniture

Comfortable, used Love Seat,
Beige cloth, $20,
1st come 1st served!
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

Bass Tender Boat
10'2",
$500 Call for details
386-965-2215

Beautiful Brunswick
Pool Table. Claw feet,
leather pockets. Like new.
$1,200. 386-365-0697
PIGLETS
Black & White
$50 each
386-965-2215

Tow Behind Grill/Smoker. Com-
mercial built, nice shape. $1250.
obo. 386-249-3104 or 719-4802
Great for your New Years Bash!!!

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422

Clean, quiet 3/2 ($625 mo) &
2/1 ($450 mo.) both in Branford
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114

Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482






Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003

Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547

Very Nice 4br/2.5 ba, 3 ac. Fenced
/Cross Fenced, paved rd., huge
deck, private. McAlpin area. $900
dep. & $950. mo:.386-867-1833

640 iMobile Homes
640 for Sale

$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524637
Gainesville-Jacobsen-Savings
Factory direct Jaconsen outlet
now open to the public 3/2 start-,
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilehomesales.co
m for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!

05524638
North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gainesville and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty, 2x6 wall, and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

05524639
Why drive to Gainesville?
This is Why! New 28x60
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni-
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy,
I pay for your gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568


LAKE CITY
USED FURNITURE
'We specialize in moakng beds .
Alo hond.T.,,e Co"-,ee Table: "i'"
Er,.J rTable: r '..and, d ,


Plus, our everyday great deals "'0 a...
" on quality used furniture! A -
728DUALSR AKE.CITY,1FLa. 2055
^^^^^^B^ Next to Shi^rleyi's Res'taurant ^^^^^^
(386)2,43-027 TOR~fl~E^ -(8)67113 CkELL


/640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

05524744
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers Save
up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832


7 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
)5524443
54 $Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2br/lba house. In town
Close to shopping.
$500. mo plus deposit
386-344-2972
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or .
386-623-1698 or 386-292-4937
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514.2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Quail Heights 2br/lba duplex.
Secluded, private, safe. W/D
hookup. $700. mo. $500 security.
386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

SFurnished Apts.
720 For Rent A

NO Lease/Deposits, ROOMS only
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169,2 ppl $179 + tax
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month.
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73O Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423

3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1000 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 Brick home w/great rm, approx
2500 sq ft, bonus rm 300 sq ft,
upgrades thru-out, on 1+1/2
acres,fenced back yard, detached
Irg storage area, 2 car garage,
Exec level home, $1500 month,
1st, last and sec req'd upfront, will
lease with option 386-527-0895
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
3br/2ba Brick. Double Carport
Carpet & tile. CH/A.On small lake
2000 sqft. $950. mo + sec. 386-
752-0118, 623-1698 or 292-4937
Cozy Cottage lbr/lbq S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760"SqFt. carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances.
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Three Rivers Estates. 2/1, CH/A,
2010 W2 and ref's from current
landlord required, $700 month, &
$700 sec dep, 386-497-4699
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus bonus
room. w/1.5 bath. Quail Heights
CC. $750. mo plus $250 damage
dep. 386-752-8553


/ 1


I


BUT IT^



[Ennnu:4^:


iiFrINPIT_









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2011


750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

770 Condos For Rent
Prime location 2br/lba.
Residential or commercial. Comer
of Baya & McFarlane. $600. mo.
$500 security. 386-752-9144 or
386-755-2235

805 Lots for Sale
1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd, owner fin, no
down pym't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.
This nice 4.5 acre parcel has
septic, power & well, older MH
$39.900 MLS 76182
Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty

810 Home for Sale
2br/2ba Eastside Village.
Unique floor plan. Lg utility/
work room. Screened
front porch. $55,000
DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110
3/1 on 4.43 acres, metal roof,
pond on property,
Lease option available
$129,888 Results Realty,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
3br/2ba 80'X125' lot. 1,200 sqft.
Kitchen & bath remodeled,
metal roof, lg fenced back yard.
Close to amenities. $79,900
DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110
3br/2ba Brick home w/1,934 sqft
in Piccadilly Park. 1/2 acre.
Lk playroom, fenced yard.
Reduced to $139,000.
DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110
3br/2ba Custom home. on 5 ac.
where deer & turkey roam.
Lg barn w/enclosed
workshop. $219,000.
DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110
4/2 in Sub-div, open floor
plan,florida room, porch, fenced,
$150,000 call Missy Zecher
@Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
4/2 on 4 acres, open floor plan, 2
living rms, rec room w/wet bar
$89,900 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
4/3 farm house on 3.95 acres
w/private pond, surrounded by
oaks $689,000 Charlie Sparks,
Westfield Realty MLS#76149
386-755-0808
4br/2ba, 5 ac., 2069 sqft. Ig family
& florida rm, den. Covered patio,
workshop. $229,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba, remodeled, views of the
lake. Formal LR, dining room &
family room. Many upgrades.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
67.5 acre farm, fenced, workshop,
pole barn and two ponds, MH
(1984 sq ft) $299,000
call Patti Taylor at
Access Realty 386-623-6896


810 Home for Sale
Affordable, clean home in sub-div,
Freshly painted interior,
This is a must see!
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
BRAND new home, Irg master
suite, 2 miles from US 90,
$179,900 MLS #76449
Carrie CasonWestfield Realty
386-623-2806
Brick home on 5 acres,
country feel close to town!
Must See! Results Realty
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
Clean, cozy, well maintained 3/2
on 1.05 acres, lots of shade trees,
built in 2007, $135,900
Call Patty Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Country Club. 4br/4ba. New roof,
AC, windows. Pool, hot tub,
& greenhouse. $229,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Custom Brick, 5+ ac. 5br/4ba.
4412 sqft. 3 car garage, pool, hot
tub, 3 fireplaces, more. $569,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lori Giebeig Simpson 365-5678
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home
w/oversized garage.
Eastside Village Realty, Inc
386-752-5290
Eastside Village Retirement
A'55+ Spacious home
2br/2ba, 1 car garage,.'
Eastside Village Realty $83,000
386-752-5290
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home lots of
amenities; clubhouse, pool, spa.
Eastside Village Realty
$89,500 386-752-5290
Excellent area. 3br/2ba home.
1620 sqft. w/covered patio. Lg
front porch & 1 car carport
Lori Giebeig. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances, close to
schools, $65K 478-391-1592
Large 3/2 brick home w/basement.
2 living areas, porch on 2 lots
$129,900 MLS #74118
386-623-2806 Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty
Large entertaining home, w/pool,
gazebo, huge workshop,
$285,000 Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Large home w/acre of land, Irg
family & florida rooms,
covered porch,
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Move In Ready. 3br/2ba w/1,225
sqft. Comer lot, great S/D.
12x16 workshop w/elec.
Upgrades. $75,000.
DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110
Nice 3/2 home on 4 acres
close to town $168,000,
Motivated seller MLS#73410
Carrie Cason Westfield Realty
386-623-2806
Nicely remodeled 3/2 on 2 acres,
partially fenced $115,888
Nancy Rogers @
Results Realty
386-867-1271
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Woodcrest S/D Super location,
nice back yard. 3br/2ba home,
cov-
ered back porch. New AC in 2010
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
WOODGATE VILLAGE.
3br/2ba DWMH.
Close to new elementary
school. $27,000.
DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110

820 Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


820 Farms &
SAcreage
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

Q830 Commercial
Property
2 Acre commercial lot w/1400 sq
ft building. Lease option or Owner
Financing 251 NW Hall of
Fame Dr. 386-867-1190
Commercial property situated
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya Ave 3.27 acres,
$398,888 Results Realty
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
Property (comer location), easy
access comer, close to downtown,
$94,000 Charlie Sparks
Westfield Realty
386-755-0808 MLS#74814

930 Motorcycles
2003 Honda Shadow Ridge 750cc
bike mustang seat, sissy bar,
Cobra pipes & floorboards, custom
tangerine paint 12k mi. runs &
looks great. $4100obo
will entertain reasonable offers
386-965-0676 Iv mess or text.
2008 Johnny Pag PINK custom
chopper 200 mi. Real head turner
excel cond ,pink w/white/silver
outlined flames $4500obo will
entertain reasonable offers
386-965-0676 Iv mess or text.

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
2007 Nissan Titan Crew Cab
only 25,000 miles stock #F28
386-365-7431 Steve Bonesio
'Rountree-Moore Ford
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802






950 Cars for Sale
1970 Monte Carlo (1st yr). Body
restored, painted, New engine, less
than 10,000 mi. Must see. $9,000.
386-365-0697
2003 Cadillac, Sedan Deville,
Pearl White,excellent condition,
84 K Miles, $6,000
386-527-0895
2008 Cadillac DTS, only 15,000
miles, stock # 245108, pls ask for
Myron Wruble @ 386-755-0630
#292, Rountree-Moore Ford
2010 Grand Marquis, 3 to choose
from stock #F292 Myron Wrubel,
386-755-0630 #292
Rountree-Moore Ford
2010 Hyundia Sonata GLS,
4dr, $12,999, warranty, auto, stock
#F307 Dwight Twiggs Rountree-
Moore Ford 386-755-0630 #219
Gas Saver, 07 Sporty Honda Fit,
stock #293G, 31 city 40 hwy,
Tommie Jefferson @ 386-209-
8680 Rountree-Moore Ford


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ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER
Only

$1750

4 LINES 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS I

(386) 755-5440


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


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Lake City

Reporter's
popular weekly

word search is
a great way to
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Adoption


Are you pregnant? A childless, successful, single
woman seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON mom
w/flexible work schedule. Financially secure. El-
len. (888)868-8778. ellen@eeadoption.com FL.
Bar#0150789

Announcements

Advertise in Over 100 Papers throughout Florida.
Advertising Networks of Florida, Put us to work for
You! (866)742-1373 www.florida-classifieds.com.

DIVORCE with or without Children $125.00.
With FREE name change documents and marital
settlement agreement. Fast and easy. Call us 24hrs./
7days: (888)789-0198; www.CourtDivorceService.
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Business Opportunities


DO YOU EARN $800.00 IN A DAY? Your Own
Local Candy Route 25 Machines and Candy All for
$9995.00 All Major Credit Cards Accepted (877)915-
8222 AINB02653


Financial


CASH NOW! Cash for your structured settle-
ment or annuity payments. Call J.G. Wentworth.
1-866-SETTLEMENT (1-866-738-8536). Rated A+
by the Better Business Bureau.

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$ As
seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need
$500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY
NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-
8321 www.lawcapital.com

$500 CASH LOAN, No Credit Check, 6 Months
Repay, Payments $55 Biweekly. Active checking ac-
count and $1,000/month min income required. Call
24 hrs (760)569-6474


Reefer Company $1,000.00 SIGN ON BONUS!
Home weekly. Call (800)237-8288 or visit www.
suncocarriers.com

Colonial Life is expanding and looking to fill 2
positions by January 17- an account manager and
sales manager. Submit resume to Meredith.Brew-
er@coloniallife.com or call (904)424-5697

17 DRIVERS NEEDED! Top 5% Pay! Excellent
Benefits New Trucks Ordered! Need CDL-A & 3
mos recent OTR. (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.
com

Drivers FOOD TANKER DRIVERS NEEDED
OTR positions available NOW! CDL-A w/ Tanker
REQ'D. Outstanding pay & Benefits! Call a recruiter
TODAY! (877)882-6537 www.oakleytransport.com

Driver- Drive KNIGHT in 2011! Daily or Weekly
Pay, Top Equipment, 27 Service Centers, Van and
Refrigerated. CDL-A with 3 mos OTR experience.
(800)414-9569. www.driveknight.com

Land For Sale

NC MOUNTAINS CLOSEOUT SALE! Cabin
Shell, 2+ acres with great view, very private, big
trees, waterfalls & large public lake nearby, $99,500
Bank financing (866)275-0442

Miscellaneous

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if qualified Housing available.
CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-
3769.

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Jus-
tice. Job placement assistance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call
(877)206-5165, www.Centura.us.com


Schools & Education


Health


Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week ac-
celerated program. Hands on environment. Nation-
wide certifications and Local Job Placement Assis-
tance! (877)994-9904



ANF
ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA


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( Week of January 10, 2011 J


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Help Wanted


Between High School and College? Over 18? Drop
that entry level position. Earn what you're worth!!!.
Travel w/Successful Young Business Group.
Paid Training. Transportation, Lodging Provided.
(877)646-5050.

Regional Opportunity 100% Owner Operator


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