The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01348
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: January 9, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01348
System ID: UF00028308:01348
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Hobby

Spotters


Loc0001
bird's-, 11 oF
LIF0,o2 sMi


i' 0 DIGT 326


Coming

To Town
The Gizmo Guys juggle
some fun, laughter.
LIFE, ID


Sunday, January 9, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com


er


;L2 m$1.00


Former captain files lawsuit vs. LCPD


Davis alleges racial
discrimination,
seeks $75,000.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@iakecityreporter. corn
Former Lake City Police
Department Capt Rudolph Davis
has filed a lawsuit against the
LCPD, seeking more than $75,000
in damages after allegedly being
subjected to racial discrimination


and retaliation by his superiors
at the department, where he
worked for more
than 19 years.
Davis' attor-
ney, Marie A.
Mattox, filed
a 13-page com-
plaint at the U.S.
District Court
Davis in Jacksonville
against the
LCPD on Dec. 21, alleging viola-
tion of federal law against employ-


"We're suing for monetary"damages..... we
would also like the court to order the Lake
City Police Department to cease and desist
its practices of discrimination."
Terri 'Shay' Alexander
Lawyer
ment discrimination, federal court because Davis went
Terri 'Shay' Alexander, one through the EEOC, the office
of- Davis' representatives at the that handles federal workplace
Alexander and Associates law discrimination cases, as opposed
firm, said the lawsuit was filed in to the Florida Commission on


Human Relations.
"We're filing under federal
law," Alexander said, noting that
the lawsuit is a civil case. "We're
suing for monetary damages as
well as injunctive relief. In addi-
tion to monetary damages, we
would also like the court to order
the Lake City Police Department
to cease and desist its practices of
discrimination."
In September 2010, Davis
LAWSUIT continued on 3A


NIAI RECORD LOWS Ichetucknee
tubing issue

gets murkier

'IBan proponents approval, submitted by Jim
wonder if county Stevenson, a former natu-
won e nouf. ralist with the Florida State
action is enough Park Service. There was
S not enough scientific doc-
By C.J. RISAK umentation included with
Icrisak@lakecityreporter.com the resolution for them to
approve it, they insisted.
The reluctance of the They did, however, agree
.. Columbia County Board of unanimously to send a letter
County Commissioners to to Florida's Department of
embrace a resolution to ban Environmental Protection
tihiie at the north end of to ask it to investigate and
the Ichetucknee River has intervene, if necessary.
left the issue as murky as "I was quite happy to
the water itself, according to go before the commission
those wanting it stopped. and I'm quite happy they're
The commission- sending a letter," Stevenson
S ers were direct in their
..--- {. ? -.. ....- response to the request for TUBING continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Wellborn resident Michelle Cowart (right) hugs herdaughter Sydney Morgan while visiting Wayside Park in White Springs on
Friday. 'This is the lowest I've seen the Suwannee River in a while,' Cowart said. 'It's looking bad. We need some more rain.'


Water management officials: Area

rivers encounter lowest flow rates


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
S uwannee
River Water
Management
District officials
continue to
express concerns about
low river flow rates and
lack of rainfall that have
area rivers near record
lows.
Megan Wetherington, a
senior professional engi-
neer with the Suwannee
River Water Management
District, said despite the
receiat rainfall earlier in
the week, officials haven't
seen any improvement in
river- conditions.
"Statistically we're still
in generally the lowest
five percent of observa-
tion.s of river flows for the
Santa Fe and Suwannee
riverss" she said.
Tdhe rivers are mea-
sured in terms of feet
above mean sea level as
well. as by flows, a volume
of water per unit of time
based on cubic feet per


S182 01 ) 82


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
More of the Suwannee River banks can be seen inside of the
Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park.


second as the flow rate.
'"The long term gauges
in the Suwannee and
Santa Fe rivers are in
the lowest five percent
of all observations going
back to the 1930's,"
Wetherington said.
"Ninety-five percent of the
time since the 1930's the
flows have been higher
than they are now."
She said the Suwannee


River at the White Springs
gauge, in particular, is
experiencing one of its
lowest flow rates since
record-keeping began.
'"The flow rate of the
Suwanflee River in White
Springs is in the first
percentile," Wetherington
said. "Ninety-nine per-
cent of the records since
1906 of that gauge, the
flow rate has been higher


Cs""


Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


* than we see now, based
on an eight-week average
stream flow. Looking at
the two-month average,
it's the lowest one percent
of readings."
In terms of river lev-
els, Wetherington said
the area is still close
to record lows on the
Upper Suwannee River,
but haven't reached
record lows stagewise
with the exception of the
Suwannee River in Fargo,
Ga.
'We haven't seen any
record low flows, but
we're pretty close on
the Upper Suwannee
River," Wetherington said.
The Upper Suwannee
River consists north-
ern Suwannee County,
Columbia County and
Hamilton County.
The Suwannee River
Water Management
District's Governing
Board recently enacted a
Phase 1 Water Shortage
Advisory, calling for vol-
SHORTAGE continued on 3A *


O pinion ................
Business ................
O bituaries ..............
A dvice ..................
Life ................ ....


Students offer

ideas through


Science Fair


Event to include
experiments from
private schools.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn
More than 200 area stu-
dents will display their per-
sonal scientific experiments
as they compete in the
annual Columbia County
Science Fair Tuesday.
All projects will be judged
from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at
Florida Gateway College's
Howard Conference Center.


Judging is a closed event
An awards ceremony for
the elementary students will
be held at 6 p.m. at the col-
lege's Levy Performing Arts
Center. Secondary students
will receive their awards at
10 a.m. Wednesday at the
Performing Arts Center.
Awards ceremonies are
open events.
Participants include
home-schooled students
and students from both
district schools and pri-
vate schools in Columbia
FAIR continued on 3A


Arizona Rep. Giffords

shot, at least 5 killed


Associated Press

TUCSON, Ariz. Rep.
Gabrielle Giffords of
Arizona was shot in the head
Saturday when an assailant
opened fire outside a gro-
cery store during a meet-
ing with constituents, kill-
ing at least five people and
wounding several others in
a rampage that rattled the
nation.'
Giffords was among at
least 10 people wounded,
and the hospital said her

TODAY IIN
LIFE
Enthusiasts ge
bird's-eye viev


outlook was "optimistic"
and that she was respond-
ing to commands from
doctors despite having
a bullet go through her
head.
The hospital said a 9-year-
old child was among the
dead, and a U.S. Marshal
said a federal judge was
also fatally shot in the
attack. Giffords spokes-
man C.J. Karamargin said
an unspecified number of
her staff members were
injured in the shooting.

4 COMING
TUESDAY
t We're covering the
v. Science Fair at FGC.


Rep(








LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 2011


Friday:
9-13-21-26 16


ezimat"i .

Friday:
2-10-18-21-36


Saturday:
Afternoon: 3-9-8


41

Saturday:
Afternoon: 5-0-9-3


FLORIDA


Wednesday:
11-16-19-21-37-45


Wednesday:
22-26-32-38-40


AROUND FLORIDA



Interior chief announcing new Everglades plan


FORT LA UDERDALE
interior Secretary
Ken Salazar is unveil-
ing plans for a new
Everglades headwa-
ters conservation
area and wildlife refuge at
an event in Florida.
Officials said the plan
announced Friday is aimed
at conserving ranches
and working land as well
as wildlife in the northern
parts of the Everglades.
Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill
Nelson was also scheduled
to attend the event.
Salazar recently
announced plans to replace
an additional 5.5 miles of
the cross-Florida Tamiami
Trail with bridges to
improve water flowing into
Everglades National Park.
Construction is progress-
ing on a one-mile bridge
span.
The proposals are among
many aimed at restor-
ing the health of the vast
Everglades wetlands.

Democrats pick
new chairman

ORLANDO Florida
Democrats -have a new
party chairman.
Former state Sen. Rod
Smith was elected Saturday
to lead the party after one
of its worst election years
ever.
Smith was an Alachua
County lawyer who rep-
resented the Gainesville
area until an unsuccessful
run for governor in 2006.
He will replace former
Congresswoman Karen
Thurman.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Interior Secretary Ken Salazar, left, talks to reporters as Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., looks on
during a news conference in Fort Lauderdale Friday. Salazar unveiled a wildlife refuge and
ranching conservation area would be carved out of 150,000 acres in the Everglades headwa-
ters north of Lake Okeechobee.


Before Saturday's elec-
tion, party leaders and strat-
egists reviewed an election
year that was just plain ugly
for Democrats.
Party executive direc-
tor Scott Arceneaux said
Republicans did an excel-
lent job of nationalizing
the election, so while
Democrats argued that
the GOP leaders control-
ling Florida government
"screwed up" the state, the
message was lost.
Democrats lost all five
statewide seats on the
ballot and lost ground in
the House, Senate and
Congress.


Agents raid cruise
ship for drugs
FORT LAUDERDALE
- Authorities said federal
agents raided a popular
music cruise ship for illegal
drugs and contraband while
docked at Port Everglades
in Fort Lauderdale.
U.S. Customs and Border
Protection spokeswoman
Migdalia Travis told the
South Florida Sun-Sentinel
that the Jan. 4 raid on the
Jam Fest cruise resulted
in 15 seizures& Among the
drugs collected were: mari-
juana, LSD, mushrooms,
hash oil, Ecstasy, prescrip-
tion drugs and drug para-


phernalia in mostly small
quantities.
The raid occurred right
before the MSC Poesia
set sail. MSC Cruises did
not release any immediate
comment.

Food writers,
critics gather

KEY WEST Leading
food writers and critics are
offering an exploration of
food in literature during
the 29th annual Key West
Literary Seminar.
The initial four-day
assembly is sold out with
375 attendees. It ends today.


A second session is still
open for registration. It's
scheduled to run Thursday
through next Sunday.
The seminar's theme is
"The Hungry Muse: An
Exploration of Food in
Literature" and features
more than 25 writers.
Readings, lectures and
panel discussions feature
presenters. Among those
include: memoirist and
former "Gourmet" editor-
in-chief Ruth Reichl, res-
taurant critic, columnist
and author Gael Greene,
American humorist and
author Calvin Trillin, as
well as Pulitzer Prize-win-
ning food critic Jonathan
Gold.

Ex-loan officer
gets 3 years

MIAMI A former
Miami loan officer has been
sentenced to three years in
federal prison for his role
in a $12 million bank fraud
scheme.
A federal judge on Friday
imposed the sentence on 29-
year-old former Wachovia
bank employee Richard
Garcia. Garcia was also
ordered to pay $10 million
in restitution and will spend
20 months in home confine-
ment after his release.
Prosecutors say Garcia
helped borrowers falsify
numerous documents -to
obtain commercial lines of
credit between 2005 and
2008.
The borrowers paid a fee
of 10 percent of the amount
of their fraudulent loans.
The case was part


of the federal govern-
ment's Financial Fraud
Enforcement Task Force.

Foreclosure
mediation expands

TALLAHASSEE Pre-
foreclosure, cases are being
added to am experimental
mortgage foreclosure
mediation program that
operates in six of Florida's
20 court circuits.
The Collins Center for
Public Policy, a Tallahassee
think tank, runs the pro-
gram and announced the
expansion Friday.
Governrnent-backed
mortgage giant Fannie Mae
has directed its loan ser-
vicers to participate in the
pre-foreclosure mediation.
Program director Ned
Pope called it a "game
changer" that will save
homeowners, lenders
and the courts time and
money.

Man dies after
car falls on him

JACKSONVILLE -
Police have not yet identi-
fied the man who died when
the car he was working
under in his Jacksonville
garage fell on top of him.
Authorities said the
man's wife. found him
Friday afternoon pinned
under his car. A neighbor
said she ran to help the
wife and called 911, but the
victim was not breathing.

* Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Clooney uses starpower in S. Sudan,


JUBA, Sudan
How do you get a long-
suffering but little-
known slice of Africa on
the White House agen-
da and onto American
TV screens? George Clooney knows
how.
Humble, self-effacing and dressed
for safari, the Hollywood star and
former Sexiest Man Alive was in the
scruffy, straw-hut capital of Southern
Sudan on Saturday to draw attention
to the region's weeklong indepen-
dence referendum.
The vote, which begins today, is
likely to create the world's newest
nation. Clooney is working to help
the region avoid a backslide toward
war.
In picking a cause and roughing
it in a developing country, Clooney
was hardly alone. Celebrities are
shining their star power on the poor,
the war-weary and the disaster-prone
more than ever.
"Our job is trying to keep this on
the front burner of the news," Clooney
told The Associated Press. "I'm the son
of a newsman. I understand how hard
it is to keep stories on the front of
news, and sometimes entertainment
and news can be meshed together if
you do it properly."
Clooney has had two meetings
with President Barack Obama on
Sudan and has persuaded reporters
from outlets like NBC, CNN and
Newsweek to focus on the country.
He says he doesn't know how much
his efforts help, but that every bit
counts.
"It's important as any other indi-
vidual in the country or in the world
to engage in life and in the world,"
he continued. "You know, a celebrity
is absolutely no different. I wasn't
a celebrity my whole life. I was an
individual citizen for most of it, an
unemployed citizen for a lot of it ....
I don't forfeit that just because I've
happened to get lucky in my career."
Whether it's Sean Penn in Haiti,
Ben Affleck in Congo, or Angelina
Jolie's work in more than a dozen
countries, stars are bringing atten-
tion to those in need. Bono, U2's


ASSOCIATED PRESS
US actor and activist George Clooney, during an interview in the southern
Sudanese capital of Juba on Saturday, discusses the upcoming independence
referendum. Clooney is trying to draw attention to the situation as the southern
Sudanese prepare to vote in what could determine whether the region secedes
from the north to form the world's newest country.


lead singer, has been nominated for
a Nobel Peace Prize for his aid work
in Africa.


History said the decision was
made after viewing the entire series,
which stars' Greg Kinnear and
Katie Holmes as President John F.


History network pulls Kennedy and his wife, Jackie.
plug on Kennedy project Reitman says script for


PASADENA, Calif. A controver-
sial miniseries on the Kennedy family
will not air on the History Channel
because the completed multimillion
dollar project does not fit the "History
brand," the network said.
The eight-part series drew
criticism during its production from
figures such as former Kennedy
administration aide Theodore
Sorensen, who attacked the scripts
as inaccurate. The role of producer
Joel Surnow, a political conservative,
also drew suspicion' from fans of the
Kennedy family.
"We have concluded this dramatic
interpretation is not a fit for the
History brand," the network said in
a statement late Friday. The deci-
sion was first reported Friday by the
Hollywood Reporter.


'Ghostbusters 3' ready
LOS ANGELES Power up that
Proton Pack: "Ghostbusters 3" is
closer to becoming a reality.
Ivan Reitman, who directed
and produced the first two.
"Ghostbusters" movies, says "a very
good script" for the third installment
in the comic ghost-hunting tale has
been sent to star Bill Murray.
Reitman said Friday that "nothing
you've read on the Internet is accu-
rate" and that Murray hasn't yet read
the "Ghostbusters 3" script.
But the filmmaker is confident
about its content, saying "it's good
enough to do, to take the risk of
doing again."

* Associated Press


* Football Hall-of-Famer Bart
Starr is 77.
* Sportscaster Dick Enberg
is 76.
* Actress K. Callan is 75.
* Folk singer Joan Baez is
70.
* Actress Susannah York is
70.
* Rock musician Jimmy


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation............... 755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)


Page (Led Zeppelin) is 67.
* Singer Crystal Gayle is 60.
* Actor J.K. Simmons is 56.
* Nobel Peace laureate
and human rights activist
Rigoberto Menchu is 52.
* Actress Joeiy Richardson
is 46.
* Rock singer Steve Harwell
(Smash Mouth) is 44.


Reporter

CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reoorter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5,445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................... $48.79
52 Weeks ................... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ................... $82.80
52 Weeks ..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture


"Seek good, not evil, that you
may live.Then the Lord God
Almighty will be with you, just
as you say he is. Hate evil, love
good; maintain justice in the
courts."
-Amos 5:14-15


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427










Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 2011


Man stabbed, robbed while walking on street


From staff reports


Two unidentified men
stabbed a Lake City man
and fled on foot after taking
a small amount of cash from
the victim Saturday after-
noon, according to Lake
City Police Department


reports.
Reports said Charles
Davis II, 38, was walk-
ing near Washington and
Alachua streets when two
unidentified black males
approached him. One of
the men stabbed him with
a sharp, object in the lower


left stomach area. After
Davis fell, the men kicked
him in the left side.
Davis said the men stole
$22 to $25 from him and
fled. Officers searched
the area but no contact
was made.
LCPD officers respond-


ed to the victim at Shands
Lake Shore Hospital at
2:08 p.m. The reports did
'not say the severity of the
man's injury.
The victim said one of
the suspects was wearing
black shorts and a red
shirt.


FAIR: Students to learn about scientific methods
Continued From Page 1A


County, said Missie
Minson, fair director. The
competitors had to partici-
pate in a school science
fair and place in that fair to
make it to the county level,
she said.
At the fair, students will
be interviewed by mul-.


tiple judges with ques-
tions about their projects,
Minson said.
"It's their time to put on
their show," she said.
Judges are from
district schools, the
Florida Department
of Transportation, the


Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission,
The Ichetucknee
Partnership and PCS
Phosphate. Minson said the
fair gives students a chance
to, share what they have
learned through their sci-
ence projects.


"It gives students a way
to show how they know the
scientific method, as well
as an opportunity to speak
publicly with an adult and
share their thoughts and
ideas," she said, "and basi-
cally understand the scien-
tific process."


SHORTAGE: Restrictive measures still months away


Continued From Page 1A
untary water restrictions.
However, despite the low rainfall
rates, implementing more restrictive
measures is a move that appears to
be months away, if necessary.
"We will assess conditions through
the winter and spring and if condi-
tions get extremely severe, then
consideration will be made towards
going to a Phase II Water Shortage
Advisory," she said. "There are no
immediate plans to go to a Phase II
advisory at this time."
Springs in the area are also
impacted by the lack of rain during
the past few months.
"Springs are driven by groundwa-
ter levels and we've seen through
December groundwater levels
continuing to drop throughout the
district," she said. "As groundwater
levels drop, spring flow decreases.
At these very low river levels, the
rivers are mostly sustained by spring
flow."
According to Suwannee River
Water Management District rainfall
statistics for December, area rivers
and waterways are a slightly lower
compared with November statistics.
The rain gauge in Lake City,
where rainfall statistics were first
recorded in 1893, the total rainfall
since October at that gauge was the
third-lowest since 1893.
"October, November and
December rainfall totals were the
third lowest since 1893, and the low-
est since 1935," Wetherington said.
The lowest recorded levels for the


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Laj.e City Reporter
The bottom of the White Sulphur Springs bathhouse in White Springs is barren
and dry, a change of pace from the usual flowing stream of water that spills out
into the Suwannee River.


October, November, and December
period .is 1908, followed by 1935 and
then 2010.
"We did better with rainfall in
December," Wetherington said.
"Generally, we got in the neighbor-
hood of 50 percent of what would be
average in December. Rainfall is still
below average ending in December."
Officials said little relief is in sight
and residents should expect a rela-
tively dry winter and spring.
"The long term forecast is for a


continued trend, but that doesn't
mean we can't get a lot of rain at
once," Wetherington said. "We'll
just have to wait to see what hap-
pens, but it seems to behave the way
weather patterns typically do during
La Nina years."
The Water Management District,
which is a taxing authority, governs
water quality issues in 15 counties.
The agency is in charge of water
quality, water supply, flood control
and natural (water) systems issues.


TUBING: Proponent says he had enough evidence


Continued From Page.

said Friday. "I had hope
for the resolution, but the:
have shown community'
concern, and that's a goo<
sign."
Although Stevenson ani
several supporters of th,
ban on tubing at the norti
end of the river were happ:
the commissioners would<
take some action, question:
remained whether it woulh
be enough.
Stevenson said he want
ed the ban to be function
by Memorial Day week
end, when tubing on thE
river begins to reach it:,
peak, a level it will continue
at through the summer
Realizing that timetable i:,
now far from certain.
Loye Barnard, a For
White resident who ha:,
"been here since 1964 an<
I've been an environment
talist ever since," was
supporter of the resolution
but was unable to attend<



Ix',


'I'


Thursday's meeting. The
outcome, she said, sur-
prised her.
"I didn't think this was
a controversial issue," she
said. "I think they may have
been caught off-guard."
Stevenson said the stud-
ies supporting his claims
of how tubing adversely
effects the shallow, narrow
waters at the river's north
end were plentiful.
"I thought I had provid-
ed enough," he said. "We
did get a letter of support,
that's all they can do. We'll
just have to continue to
get letters of support from
various people and organi-
zations."
Stevenson's resolution
* did not include the data
the commission requested
at Thursday's meeting.
"They said they don't know
enough, they need more
science," he said. "Now
often, when I've dealt with


legislators in the past,
when they didn't want to
handle an issue, they would
say they don't have enough
science.
"I am not saying that's
what the commission did.
But I thought what I gave
them was enough."
Stevenson was adamant
that a permanent ban on tub-
ing from the Ichetucknee's
north end was the only
way to restore the river's
clarity and vegetation. The


murkiness that Stevenson
.and many of his supporters
insist is due to tubing has
created an algae problem
as well.
"It's all the tubing," he
said.
A new governor and
cabinet taking over in
Tallahassee makes the
future of this movement
cloudy, Barnard admitted.
"Especially," she said,
"without the county mak-
ing a strong statement."


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since you completed your'
journey on this earth.
The Bible says that man
is a spirit and we surely
know this is true, be-
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on in each ol'f us. Thank


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LAWSUIT: $75K sought


Continued From Page 1

held a news conference
after receiving a notice
from the U.S. Equal
Employment Opportunity
Commission. The notice
gave Davis "the right to
institute a civil action"
against the LCPD.
Davis filed complaints
against former Police
Chief Steven Burch, as
well as retaliation and
discrimination com-
plaints against then-act-
ing police chief Bruce
Charles and current
Police Chief Argatha
Gilmore.
Davis, who joined the
LCPD as a police officer
in June 1990, was ter-
minated from the Lake
City Police Department
in 2009. His EEOC com-

accuses
LCPD
adminis-
S-. trators of
terminat-
ing him
without
Gilmore cause
after he filed discrimi-
nation charges against
Burch, Charles and
Gilmore.
Gilmore said she has
not received any recent
documentation regard-
ing Davis' lawsuit.
"We're going to just
do as we normally do
when -any lawsuit has
been served," she said.
"We'll look at it and we'll
move forward with the
advice of our counsel and
what's in the best inter-
est of our city and what's
in the best interest of the
citizens of Lake City."
Susan. Erdelyi, who
works with the law
firm Marks Gray of
Jacksonville, will be han-
dling the case for the city.
Erdelyi said her law firm
has represented the City
of Lake City for at least
20 years, as well as other
local governments.
A LinkedIn.com page
said Erdelyi has litigat-
ed claims for wrongful
termination, race and
gender discrimination
and sexual harassment,
among others.
Even though the City
of Lake City has its own
attorney, Erdelyi was
called in to work on the
case as an outside legal
counsel. She is a civil
rights and employment
attorney.
'The city's intention is
to vigorously defend the
lawsuit," she said.


Erdelyi said city offi-
cials have seen the com-
plaint, but they've not
been formally served
with the summons. She
said Davis has complaints
against several former
Lake City Police Chiefs
including Frank Owens,
David Allbritton, Burch,
Charles and Gilmore in
his personnel file. She
noted the only chief he
didn't file a complaint
against was interim chief
Gary Laxton.
"From time to time,
we get asked to look at
whether he was treat-
ed fairly," Erdelyi said.
"Davis has filed mul-
tiple EEOC complaints
and complaints with the
Florida Commission on
Human Relations. The
Department of Justice
looked at the matter after
the EEOC and they did
not make a judgment as
to whether Davis' charge
had merit."
Alexander, Davis'
lawyer, explained that
the lawsuit was filed
in excess of $75,000
because in order to file
a claim in federal court,
the plaintiff must meet
federal guidelines.
"One way is to say the
dispute involves a claim
of $75,000 or more,"
she said. "Another way
that the claim can stay
in federal court is to
file under federal stat-
utes. The federal stat-
ute that we filed under
is Title VII in section
1981 claims."
Davis' documents
said "he suffered men-
tal anguish, emotional
distress, expense, loss
of benefits, embarrass-
ment, humiliation, dam-
age to reputation, ill-
ness, lost wages, loss of
capacity for, the enjoy-
ment of life and other
tangible and intangible
damages."
Alexander said now
that the paperwork has
been filed, they'll have
to wait for the next step
in the proceedings.
"We will wait on a
response from the
opposing counsel and
more than likely we
anticipate a motion to
dismiss, which is a stan-
dard practice," she said.
"They have 20 days to
respond from the day
they receive the com-
plaint. Within the next
25 days, we should hear
. something from them."

-^- SA


11 The family of

.William (Ed) Ritch
would like to thank everyone for the
I, prayers, cards, gifts, food &'flowers.
Everyone that had a part in our lost one.
Your kindness and sympathy are more ,
deeply appreciated than any words of
thanks can every express. God bless
everyone. He will bless the family also.
) Love from: Jane, Elaine, Wanda, V
Rusty & Richard


-w


you lor being a great mother, wife and friend. We
will continue to celebrate your life and love you
for the gift that keeps giving our memories. We
miss EVERYTHING about you (especially red vel-
vet cakes) and are reminded of you constantly.
We love you and miss you dearly.
The Mayo & Smith Family, Albert (Husband) 2
Annie Mac Smith (Mother) ,
Children: Felicia (Forrest), Antoinette (Walter),
Eric (Tr'acy) and Alonzo
Grandchlldren: Wesley, Kendall, Corl and Eryn
Family Pets: Bonzy and Mieke


Attention:


Southeastern Rehabilitation

Medicine Patients


Southeastern Rehabilitation Medicine
will be closing its Lake City location
effective January 29, 2011.


Patient medical records will be
maintained at our Gainesville office
located at:


4343 Newberry Road, Suite 14
Gainesville, FL 32067
(352) 373-4321


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


mith


#


A"


n m- --ii


,j I I












OPINION


Sunday, January 9, 201 I


OTHER
OPINION



Retain

road test

for senior

drivers

Requiring road tests
for drivers over
age 75 is no more
discriminatory than
requiring young
people to be at least 16 to get a
license.
Both age restrictions are a
recognition of physical realities.
Young people tend to lack the
necessary judgment to operate a
motor vehicle safely. Older peo-
ple are much more likely to suf-
fer from deteriorating eyesight,
cognitive decline, physical limita-
tions or risks created by medica-
tions. That increased likelihood
justifies retaining the law.
Age alone, of course, does not
of itself reflect on one's ability to
drive safely. In fact, older drivers
self-limit their driving and drive
about 82 percent fewer miles
than younger drivers, accord-
ing to a Rand Institute for Civil
Justice study. And elderly drivers
show increasing-caution with
age, the likely reason why acci-
dent risk actually falls for drivers
between ages 55 and 70. After
85, however, that risk begins to
climb.
Though driver age becomes
the focus of reports when acci-
dents involve both young and
old drivers, the facts don't justify
stricter requirements than cur-
rently exist
For senior citizens, losing
one's license means a loss of
independence and possible
institutionalization, which is why
senior citizens tend to self-limit
their driving to minimize risk
and preserve their license. Some
seniors, however, are unwill-
ing or unable to recognize that
it's time to hang up the keys.
Testing at age 75, in conjunction
with reporting by medical pro-
viders, law enforcement officers,
family members or concerned
citizens when a driver of any
age is a hazard, protects public
safety.
The time could come when acci-
dent rates justify changes, includ-
ing graduated licenses for both
young and old drivers that include
measures like limiting night driv-
ing. But so far, they don't
* Concord (N.H.) Monitor

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman



LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Couric's bird-brained comment


Amid late 2010's
snowstorms and
champagne toasts,
most folks likely
missed a truly stun-
ning comment by a high-profile
U.S. journalist. Katie Couric's
words epitomize the ignorance
and politically correct blind-
ness that befall too many of
America's media elite.
In a CBSNews.com year-in-
review discussion, the Evening
News anchor lamented that
"the bigotry expressed against
Muslims in this country has
been one of the most disturbing
stories to surface this year." She
complained about "this seething
hatred many people feel for all
Muslims..."
Couric added: "Maybe we
need a Muslim version of
The Cosby Show'...I know
that sounds crazy. But The
Cosby Show' did so much to
change attitudes about African-
Americans in this country, and
I think sometimes people are
afraid of what they don't under-
stand..."
With apologies to chickens,
ostriches, and other feathered
creatures, Couric's comments
are multifariously bird brained.
Does Couric truly believe that
Americans were so prejudiced,
and yet superficially so, that Bill
Cosby's program substituted
decades of bias-with an era of
ethnic enlightenment?
The enormous audience of
"The Cosby Show" would have
been far smaller from 1984-92
absent the grueling and often
deadly civil-rights work of
such heroes as Rosa Parks; the
Congress of Racial Equality'
murdered Freedom Riders,
Andrew Goodman, Michael
Schwerner, and James Chaney;
and of course the late Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Couric's comments seem
blissfully detached from the


LETTER


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.com
clear and present danger posed
by Muslim zealots.
"A Bill Cosby show for
Muslims?" asks' House
Homeland Security Committee
Chairman Peter King, R -
N.Y.. 'That wouldn't allay the
concerns of liberals such as
Attorney General Eric Holder
who says he stays 'awake at
night' because so many young
Muslim-American men are
becoming so radicalized that
they are taking up arms against
our country."
Yes, Katie, it would be lovely
if a Muslim "Cosby Show" (per-
haps titled "al-Qasbi") were an
ecumenical love bomb. Alas, it
probably would enrage the very
bombers who should tune in.
The Investigative Project
on Terrorism reports that at
least 21 militant Muslims were
convicted on or pleaded guilty
to federal terrorism charges
in 2010 alone. While most
American Muslims peace-
fully practice their faith, Islamic
extremists in their midst
thirst to spill blood, usually on
American soil:
Last February 22 and April
23, respectively, Najibullah Zazi
and Zarein Ahmedzay pleaded
guilty to supporting a foiled
September 2009 al-Qaeda plot to
bomb New York City subways.
May 26: Hosam Maher
Husein Smadi pleaded guilty to
attempting to bomb Dallas' 60-
story Fountain Place tower.
June 21: Faisal Shahzad
pleaded guilty to parking a
thankfully dysfunctional car
bomb outside "The'Lion King"


in Times Square on May 1.
August 2: Russell Defreitas,
AKA Mohammed, and Abdul
Kadir were convicted of conspir-
ing to detonate jet-fuel tanks
and pipelines at New York's JFK
Airport to incinerate property
and passengers.
September 23: Aafia
Siddiqui was convicted of
attempted murder and assault
against American personnel in
Afghanistan. She was arrested
with a 2-pound jar of sodium
cyanide and a computer thumb
drive bearing, among other
things, descriptions of New
York City landmarks.
October 18: James Cromite,
AKA Abdul Rahman, converted
to Islam in prison. He and three
others were convicted of con-
spiring to blast a Bronx syna-
gogue and use Stinger missiles
to demolish military planes at
New York's Stewart Air Base.
, Shallower than Saran Wrap,
Couric uttered not a word about
this. She sees the real threat
as average Americans with a
"deep-seated hatred" of "all
Muslims." Yet, these suppos-
edly bigoted monsters some-
how denounced the proposed
Ground Zero mosque loudly, yet
peacefully.
Indeed, New York state's lat-
est data show that among 683-
reported hate crimes in 2009
(before the mosque fracas), 11
(1.6 percent) targeted Muslims,
while 251 (36.7 percent) focused
on Jews. In Los Angeles, Jews
endured 88 percent of hate
incidents; Muslims 3 percent.
Perhaps NBC should air "The
Cosbowitz Show."
None of this appears to occu-
py Katie Couric's head. But then
again, what does?
New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


TO THE EDITOR


We need to generate
other sources of fuel
We are all complaining about
the price fuel, which drives up
the price of everything we pur-
chase, including food, clothing,
medications.
My question then is: Do we
drill for oil here in the U.S. or


purchase from other countries?
My personal answer is to
purchase oil until other sources
of fuel and power can be gener-
ated in America.
My reasoning is that China,
India and other developing
nations need the oil and its
byproducts.
Remember, oil is a limited
resource. Therefore, if we have


oil resources in 50 to 100 years,
we can, 1) set the price, and 2)
possibly be the only ones able
to make the pharmaceuticals
that come from oil as well as
other products.
We need to look ahead, so
let's plan for the future to help
our children and grandchildren.
Irv Crowetz
Lake City


OU
OPIN


4A


R
ION


CHS band

showcased

talents of

local youths

In these difficult economic
times, it's important to
remember one cannot do
it alone. Everyone needs
help.
The multitude of agencies
within Columbia County that
helped provide for the needy
throughout the holidays provid-
ed ample proof. With that atti-
tude so prevalent in this area, it
was therefore no real surprise
to learn that some sacrificed
so others could benefit when it
came to the governor's inaugu-
ral celebration.
It had started as a rare oppor-
tunity. Columbia High School's ,
marching band, under the direc-
tion of Ryan Schulz, has been
in the middle of a dream year.
The band's performance last fall
propelled it to the Florida State
Marching Band Class 3A state
semifinals, one of ofily 25 to
make it that far.
After that came the invitation
in December to the governor's
parade, which was last Tuesday.
Since it had been more than a
half-century since a band from
Lake City had been so honored,
this was not to be ignored.
Sending 80 band members by
bus to Tallahassee is no slight
expense, and the CHS band
has been doing plenty of travel-
ing this year. But the residents
of Columbia County quickly
found a remedy to any financial
troubles.
It seems the Columbia
County Republican Executive
Committee had planned to send
a float to the inaugural parade.
When the CHS band was invit-
ed, an adjustment was quickly
made.
The float was cancelled. The
$1,000 meant for the float was
according to Tony Buzzella,
-the outgoing chairman of the
local Republican Executive
Committee donated to the
band for expenses.
Buzzella called it a way
to "showcase the youth of
Columbia County."
It's apparent this act did more
than that. It emphasized what
others throughout the county
have shown during the state's
difficult times, that they are will-
ing to sacrifice to help others
realize a dream.
The hard work put in by the
Tigers' marching band earned
it the attention it's received. To
deny this young, talented group
an opportunity like this would
have been tragic.
Fortunately, thanks at least
in part to the willingness of the
local committee to support the
* CHS band, that didn't happen.
And hopefully, an important
lesson was learned by the mem-
bers of the band, something
they can pass on later in their
lives.
Hard work and achievement
can, and should, be recognized.
All that's required is a little help
when needed.


HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Jan. 9, the
ninth day of 2011. There are 356
days left in the year.
On Jan. 9, 1861, Mississippi
became the second state to
secede from the Union, the
same day that the Star of the
West, a merchant vessel bring-
ing reinforcements and sup-
plies to Federal troops at Fort
Sumter, S.C., retreated because
o( artillery fire in Charleston
Harbor.
In 1788, Connecticut
became the fifth state to ratify
the U.S. Constitution.
In 1793, Frenchman Jean
Pierre Blanchard, using a
hot-air balloon, flew between


Philadelphia and Woodbury,
N.J.









Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today
MLK Parade
Participants are needed
for the Northeast Florida
Leadership Council
Annual Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Parade 10 a.m.
Jan. 17 beginning at DOT.
Call Ron 867-0468, Gwen
623-3779, or Audre 344-
9915.

Master Gardener
program
A new University of
Florida Master Gardener
class is forming.
Applications will be accept-
ed through Jan. 15. To
learn more about becoming
a Master Gardener, con-
tact the Columbia County
Extension Office at 752-
5384 or stop by for the appli-
cation. Training will take
place every Wednesday
Feb. 9 April 20.

Festival Pageant
Contestants are being
sought for the 2011
Olustee Festival Pageant.
The pageant is Feb. 5
and open to girls ages 13
months 20 years who
reside or attend school
in Baker, Columbia,
Hamilton, Union or
Suwannee Counties.
Applications are available
at the Columbia County
Library, Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce,
Emily Taber Library,
Suwannee Regional
Library, Hamilton County


Library, Union County
Public Library or by con-
tacting Elaine Owens at
386-965-2787. Deadline for
entries is Jan. 25.

Scholars program
The deadline to sub-
mit report cards for
the Presley Excel and
Scholars Program is Jan.
19. The program honors
students in kindergar-
ten through 12th grade
whose second nine weeks
report card has no grade
less than a B or S. Send
a copy of the report
card and a contact tele-
phone number to: Mrs.
Bernice D. Presley, P.O.
Box 402, Lake City, FL
32055, fax 719-4389 or e-
mail berniceEXCEL@aol.
com. Call 752-4074. The
theme is "Knowledge Is
Contagious." Qualifying
students are asked to
bring a book to exchange
or give away.

Monday
Blood drive
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is coming to
Florida Gateway College
9 a.m. 4 p.m. Monday.
Each donor receives a free
backpack and a chance to
win an Apple iPad.

Support group meeting
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of Lake
City is meeting 5:30


to 6:30 p.m.Monday at
Baya Pharmacy East,
780 SE Baya Drive. The
guest speaker is Dr. Paul
Schilling, Community
Cancer Center, addressing
the question "I've finished
my cancer treatments...
now what?" Call 386-752-
4198 or 386-755-0522.

Tuesday

Blood drive
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is coming to
Florida Gateway College
9 a.m. 4 p.m. Tuesday.
Each donor receives a free
backpack and a chance to
win an Apple iPad.


wVdnesday
Newcomers meeting
The regular monthly
meeting of the Lake City
Newcomers is 11 a.m.
Wednesday at Guangdong
Chinese Restaurant.
Luncheon cost is $10.
All members, guests and
friends along with any
newcomers to the area are
welcome. Lake City Police
Chief Argatha Gilmore is
the speaker. Call 752-4552
or 755-4051.

Thursday
Garden Club
The Lake City Garden
Club will hold its monthly
meeting at 10 a.m.
Thursday. The program
will be "Perfect Organic


Fertilizer" by Jane
Maxwell. Visitors are wel-
come.
DAR meeting

The Edward Rutledge
Daughters of the American
Revolution is meeting
10:30 a.m. Thursday at
Guangdong Restaurant.
Florida State Regent
Barbara Makant is the
speaker and will share
information about her
favorite project "Paws for
Patriots. "Bling" items
will be sold to benefit the
project. Other surprises
will also take place during
the meeting. Prospective
members and guests are
welcome. Call 386-755-
5579.

Medicaid workshop

A free Medicaid
workshop is 10 a.m.
Thursday ,in the Lifestyle
Enrichment Center. To
attend, please call Shana
Miller at 386-755-1977.

RMS Awards Program
Richardson Middle
School EXCEL Science
Club Student Dignitary
Awards Program is 9 a.m.
Thursday in the audito-
rium. The program hon-
ors outstanding scientist
in grades sixth through
eighth. Chief Argatha
Gilmore of the Lake City
Police Department is the
speaker.


OBITUARIES


Alan N. Lobeck
Alan N. Lobeck, 91, loving hus-
band, father, grandfather and
friend, passed away Friday, Dec.
31, 2010 in
Lake City, Fla. "
Alan served
5 years in the
NavyAirCorp.
during WWII.
He married
Phyllis Jeanne
Eberle Sept.
7, 1946. Alan
was a pilot fori
Pan Am for 35 yr
years, retiring
in 1979 as Capt.
Alan joined the
Boy Scouts at
the age of 12 and
was actively in-
volved in Scout-
ing for 80 years.
In his early adult
years, he was active with Troop
23 in Miami. After moving to
Lake City, Fla., he continued his
involvement in Scouting with
Troop 85. Summers in N.C. led
to involvement with the Daniel
Boone Council. As ayoungscout,


he earned Eagle Scout, Air Scout
Ace and Sea Scout Quartermas-
ter. He was a Vigil member of the
Order of the Arrow and recipient
of numerous BSA Adult Leader-
ship awards including the Silver
Beaver Award. Alan was re-
cently featured on ABC News as
Person of the Week, http://www.
wlos. com/shared/newsroom/
features/potw/videos/wlos vid
71.shtml?sms ss=email&at_
xt=4d24af331223a33a%2CO
He is survived by his son, Rick
Lobeck, daughter and son-in-
law, Sally and Doug Moore,
grandchildren, Matthew and Em-
ily Lobeck and Rachael Lobeck.
Alan was preceded in death
by his wife, Phyllis and
his sons, Paul and Keith.
A memorial service will be held
Jan. 22 from 1pm to 3pm at
the First Presbyterian Church
Fellowship Hall, 697 SW
Baya Dr., Lake City. In lieu
of flowers, please send dona-
tions to: Troop 85 BSA, PO
Box 469, Lake City, FL 32056.
Mrs. Ardeth Garau Parmer
Mrs. Ardeth Garau Parmer, 82, of


',- .*..


Lake City passed away Satur-
day, January 8, 2011 following
an extended illness. Mrs. Par-
mer was born in Fort Wayne,
Indiana, but had lived in the
Lake City area since 1996 after
moving here from Little Torch
Key, Florida. Mrs. Parmer was
a veteran of the United States
Navy, and she will always be
remembered as a loving wife,
mother, grandmother, and sis-
ter. Mrs. Parmer attended the
Church of Jesus Christ of Lat-
ter Day Saints Second Ward in
Gainesville. Mrs. Parmer was
preceded in death by her hus-
band Frank W. Parmer, Jr. and
a son J. Tyrone "Ty" Parmer.
Mrs. Parmer is survived by
her daughter Millie Crawford
of Gainesville, a son Frank
Parmer, III (Dimars) of Lake
City, two brothers John Garau
(Delores) of Martinsville, In-
diana and David Garau (Kar-
en) of Rushville, Indiana, five
grandchildren Vicky Crawford,
Summer Parmer, Keith Par-
mer, David Barry, and Chris
Workman, and one great-
grandchild Colt Workman.
Numerous other family mem-


bers and friends also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Par-
mer will be conducted 10:00
AM Tuesday, January 11, 2011
at the Dees-Parrish Family Fu-
neral Home Chapel in Lake
City with Elder Robert Hilter
Presiding. Interment will fol-
low with Military Honors at the
Screven Cemetery in Screven,
Georgia at 3:00 PM. The fam-
ily will receive friends at the
funeral home Monday evening
from 5:00 7:00 PM. In lieu
of flowers the family .requests
memorial donations be made
to Haven Hospice of the Su-
wannee Valley, 6037 US Hwy
90 West, Lake City, FL 32025.
Arrangements are under the
direction of the DEES-PAR-
RISH FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025 752-
1234 please sign our on-line
family guestbook at www.par-
rishfamilyfuneralhome. corn
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Ste www.lakecilyrepofer.com



Ail mmmIIS


Friday
Masonic Banquet
The Gold Standard
Lodge #167 celebrates
their annual Masonic
banquet beginning at 6
p.m. Friday and will take
place at the Winfield
Community Center. For
more information call
Brother Carlos Brown at
386-288-6235.


Saturday
MLK Youth Extravaganza
The PresleyLane
Community Youth Group
Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr.,, Youth Extravaganza
is 3 p.m. Saturday
at Olivet Missionary
Baptist Church, Davis
Street.

Gardening series
The Library
Educational Gardening
Series presented by UF
Master Gardeners is
2 p.m. Saturday at the
Columbia County Public
Library. This series of
workshops is held on the
third Saturday of each
month.


Sunday, Jan. 16
MLK Observance
The 26th annual
Martin Luther King Jr.
Observance Program is
4 p.m. Jan. 16 at Mount
Pisgah A.M.E. Church.
The program is hosted
by the Columbia County
Branch NAACP and
honors king, a slain-
civil rights leader. The
keynote speaker for
the event is the Rev. J.
T. "Billie" Simon. The
church is located at 924
NE Washington St.


Monday, Jan. 17
MLK Parade
The Northeast Florida
Leadership Council is
hosting its Annual Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Parade 10 a.m. Jan. 17
beginning at DOT.


Friday, Jan. 21
Antique Show and Sale-
Pilot Club of
Jacksonville is hosting
its 62nd annual Charities
Antique Show and Sale
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan;
21 and 22, and from 11
a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 23. The
event takes place at the
Jacksonville Fairgrounds
Expo Center located at
510 Fairgrounds Place in
Jacksonville. Admission is
$10 per person, and park-
ing is free. For advance
tickets, call 386-7526575.


Monday, Jan. 24
Academic Recognition
Presley EXCEL and
Scholars Program
Academic Recognition
Program is 6:30 p.m.
Jan. 24 in the Richardson
Middle School
Auditorium. The program
is for students in kin-
dergarten through 12th
grade whose second nine-
week report card has no
grade less than a B or
S. The. speaker for the
occasion is the Honorable
Circuit Judge Leandra G.
Johnson.


Every Day
Mall Walkers
Rain or shine, the Lake
City Mall is open at 7
a.m. Monday. Saturday
and 10 a.m. Sunday for
those who want to walk
for exercise.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 2011


TH WEATHER


-~ .tSJ0'.4 ^ A4. ^ a- -
PARTLY MOSTLY PARTLY MOSTLY 2
CLOUDY CLOUDY, CLOUDY: SUNNY
H 5.4 RAIN. 6LI' L

HI' 5410- L H165 HI H0LO 56L
A:" ":. j n e~ 0


73/3 /pc
60/38/pc
72/63/pc
60/35/pc
80/64/pc
77/57/pc
66/40/pc
72/50/s
55/38/pc
45/32/pc
57/31/pc
70/51/pc
56/34/pc
79/60/pc


NATIONAL FORECAST: Blustery conditions can be expected in the Northeast today, with
scattered snow showers in the interior and near the Great Lakes. Meanwhile, a low pressure
system moving over the Gulf Coast will be responsible for wet weather in that region. Heavy
rain and a few thunderstorms are anticipated near the coast with a wintry mix of snow and
freezing rain on the north side of this system.


14
*1
Ii
I-,
~ HI


ldosa City Monday Tuesday
S503 Jacksonville Cape Canaveral 3. 63 r, 2 5-' p3.-
Tallahassee Lae City 52/43 Daytona Beach 74/59/sh 72/46/s
50/40 54/42 Ft. Lauderdale 77/66/pc 80/63/pc
Pensacola Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers 76/61/c 77/55/pc
4 ns,071AA 4/l..7/4 6053-


46/44 ranama uty
52/46


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


66
49
66
42
84 in 1947
21 in 1970


0.00"
0.85"
0.85"
0.83"
0.83"


Galnesville
Ocala Jacksonville
60/47 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
63/52 63/57 Mai ami
Tampa Naples
63/52 West Palm Beach Ocala
69/63 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 72/66 0 Pensacola
71/56 Naples Tallahassee
72/58 Miami Tampa
73/65 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
72/65


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.



Jan. Jan.
12 19
First Full


7:28 a.m.
5:48 p.m.
7:28 a.m.
5:48 p.m.


10:24 a.m.
10:49 p.m.
10:53 a.m.
11:42 p.m.


Jan. Feb.
26 2
Last New


4
MODEMIE
45n ni*Esib blunm
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
., s,1ale rr':.m, 0
r': 10+ -.


69/b4/s6
65/52/r
74/66/pc
65/47/r
79/66/pc
75/63/pc
71/57/sh
74/58/sh
60/44/t
51/38/sh
60/41/t
71/59/sh
57/43/r
77/64/pc


NAn exclusive
service
brought to.
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather com


MOSTLY ;
SUNNY' I r

36/28 l' "jf-5,O_ Fal
55L0_ LO / Jf ',
.:^ ;. .. f...l._^e 13/-5 I ,r.1 3 1 5


.Ol Gt F :.,rI
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Front


High: 81, Harlingen, Texas Low: -200, Crane Lake, Minn.


Saturday Today


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


HI/Lo/Pcp.
27/21/.07
47/23/0
17/10/0
47/33/0
33/27/.01
40/32/.01
47/33/0
12/7/0
34/23/0
34/27/.08
24/16/.01
54/39/0
25/19/.16
44/27/0
44/20/0
23/9/0
23/15/0
20/15/.04
50/37/0
53/35/0
71/50/0
49/19/0


HI/Lo/W
31/17/c
46/26/pc
33/18/pc
37/28/pc
31/19/s
13/-5/sn
34/29/i
9/-3/sn
32/14/c
34/22/c
26/16/sn
44/32/s
27/16/pc
38/26/s
22/3/sn
27/20/s
28/16/s
23/14/sn
.40/28/s
36/26/sn
60/53/pc
26/7/sn


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


HI/Lo/Pcp.
19/9/0
24/8/0
59/32/0
17/7/0
38/25/0
30/27/0
76/61/0
65/42/0
19/9/.01
50/28/0
61/45/0
23/14/0
55/36/0
48/34/0
58/50/0
41/33/0
76/56/0
12/2/0
58/38/0
61/49/0
31/23/0
46/25/0


Saturday Today
Hi/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
20/15/0 22/15/sn
71/48/0 63/52/pc
30/23/.09 32/19/s
58/40/0 64/42/s
20/15/.03 25/14/c
33/18/0 35/18/c
40/28/0 39/29/rs
44/27/0 37/25/s
27/18/.05 18/3/sn
39/20/0 34/14/pc
38/24/0 37/22/s
39/37/0 48/32/pc
26/14/0 27/20/pc
25/19/0 28/8/sn
63/45/0 50/35/r
58/50/0 55/47/c
48/43/0 53/40/pc
38/35/0 36/28/sn
31/22/0 24/6/sn
70/58/0 63/52/s
58/34/0 63/36/s
35/30/.02 33/21/s


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
82/73/0
52/41/.20
55/32/0
73/63/0
30/18/0
45/39/0
88/66/0
64/52/0
61/46/0
77/52/0
30/21/0
61/50/0
81/72/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
86/68/pc
41/32/pc
60/42/s
72/64/pc
28/8/s
46/30/sh
81/62/s
67/55/s
50/39/sh
80/59/pc
31/26/sf
62/53/pc
82/74/pc


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
57/39/0
75/66/0
50/36/.17
55/46/.37
77/46/0
27/16/.03
25/16/0
82/59/0
77/64/0
45/45/04
21/3/.12
81/75/0
55/48/.02


Today
HI/Lo/W
57/42/sh
74/67/pc
42/35/s
50/39/pc
74/41/pc
23/19/sf
32/24/sn
82/62/c
76/65/pc
59/43/s
33/22/sf
86/73/t
44/32/c


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas V
San Juan. PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


9 Satrday odayP


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
93/75/0
61/48/0
I 82/75/0
89/73/0
86/57/0
36/7/0
86/75/.01
81/70/0
61/52/.19
50/36/0
23/18/60.00
37/28/0
41/36/.04


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s=sunny,
Jri-;hiucr., ;,-:'..i l:- ,J,:,-l:,,,' =-.,]


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4*r ( Ieprv Ia*IemI a S I*psi e uie. e Iin l s I]ad *. Iw iv0 i $5nwmeIIhrsi e 0

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Saturday Today


HI/Lo/W
21/17/c
25/12/s
58/33/s
3/-14/pc
36/24/s
33/17/c
77/70/pc
44/36/r
27/17/pc
34/27/i
52/43/pc
30/21/c
55/36/pc
34/27/sn
55/46/pc
33/27/sn
73/65/s
13/7/pc
40/39/sh
49/38/r
35/23/pc
35/25/sn


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


.f Forecasts, data and graph-'
S Ics 2011 Weather Central
' LLC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


CITYY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
BeiJing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Today I
HI/Lo/W
94/75/t
60/48/pc
80/72/pc
83/74/pc
86/58/s
21/10/s
84/74/t
76/70/sh
62/50/pc
53/33/s
23/10/s
38/30/pc
37/30/pc


MMK


aiFt e r. c r) m


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


I










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, January 9, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS FOOTBALL
Moe's Night
set for Monday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club has a
Moe's Night fundraiser
from 6-8 p.m. Monday at
Moe's Southwest Grill.
For details, call Blake
Lunde at 754-5810.

CHS SOFTBALL
Tryouts planned
Monday at CHS
Columbia High softball
tryouts are 3:30 p.m.
Monday at the CHS field.
For details, call Jimmy
Williams at 303-1192.

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Tuesday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday
in the teacher's lounge.
For details, call
Lori Pitts at 867-2117.

N From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Fort White High boys
soccer at Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High boys
'soccer at Fleming Island
High, 7:20 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Tuesday
Columbia High girls
soccer at Buchholz High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High boys
soccer at Taylor County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball at Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Wolfson
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Buchholz
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Williston
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Wednesday
Fort White girls
weightlifting at Trenton
High, 4 p.m.
Columbia High
wrestling vs. Forrest High,
TBA
Thursday
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Chiles High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
soccer at Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High boys.
soccer vs. Chiles High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)'
Columbia High girls
basketball at Middleburg
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High
boys basketball vs. Union
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Friday
Columbia High
wrestling at Suwannee
tournament, TBA
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Newberry
High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer at P.K. Yonge
School, 6 p.m.
Fort White High
girls soccer vs. Hamilton
County High, 7 p.m.
(JV-5)
Columbia High boys
soccer at Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High boys.
basketball at Fleming
Island High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling at Suwannee
tournament, TBA


Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Wolfson
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)


Early exit


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees walks off the field after the 41-36 loss to the
Seattle Seahawks in an NFL NFC wild card playoff football game, Saturday in Seattle.


Dominant






defense


U.S. Army All-American East players, which include Columbia High's Timmy Jernigan,
celebrate their win in the U.S. Army All-American Bowl football game, Saturday in San
Antonio. East won 13-10.

Jernigan, East win U.S.

Army All-American Game


Associated Press

SAN ANTONIO -James
Wilder Jr. scored on a
3-yard run with 4:14 left to
give the East a 13-10 victory
over the West in the U.S.
Army All-American Bowl
high. school all-star game


Saturday.
A crowd of 37,893, a
record for the All-American
Bowl, attended the game at
the Alamodome.
Timmy Jernigan, a
Columbia High defensive
tackle, was on a defense that
recorded 13 sacks against


the West squad. Jernigan
had two.
The East overcame a
10-0 deficit in the fourth
quarter.
Wilder rushed for
39 yards, with 26 coming on
four carries on the winning
drive.


Florida beats Ole Miss,

77-71, in SEC opener
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Erving
Walker scored 20 points,
Kenny Boynton hit three
huge shots down the stretch
and Florida beat Mississippi
77-71 Saturday night in the ,.
Southeastern Conference -
opener for both teams.
Chandler Parsons added
17 points for the Gators, who
won their fourth straight.
Vernon Macklin chipped .
in 16 points. But Walker
and Boynton carried Florida -
(12-3) in crunch time. ASSOCIATED PRESS
Walker hit a teardrop in Florida coach Billy Donovan (second from right) talks with his
the lane, two free throws team during a timeout against Rhode Island at the Stephen
and a layup after a steal that C. O'Connell Center on Monday. Florida beat Mississippi,
put Florida ahead 67-63. 77-71 on Saturday.


Seattle stuns New
Orleans 41-36 in
NFC playoffs.
By TIM BOOTH
Associated Press
SEATTLE Jokes, light-
weights, laughingstocks.
Not these Seattle
Seahawks. They just sent
the defending Super Bowl
champions packing.
Matt Hasselbeck threw
four touchdown passes and
Marshawn Lynch scored
on an electrifying 67-yard
run with 3:22 left and the
Seahawks pulled one of the
biggest upsets in playoff his-
tory with a 41-36 win over


FROM THE SIDELINE







Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityrepo'rter.com

Impact

extends

beyond

field
Sure, Timmy
Jernigan might
record some
unbelievable
stats on the
football field, but he
means much more than
that to Columbia High
football and this city.'
Jernigan became the
first Tiger to compete in
the U.S. Army
All-American Bowl on
Saturday when the former
Columbia defensive
tackle started for the East
squad in a 13-10 win over
the West. He recorded
two sacks in the game
including a key sack late
to help seal the deal for
the East.
He knows that its not
just about making plays on
the football field, however.
Jernigan carries a torch
for Lake City. It's one that
he's continued to carry
with poise.,
Jernigan says all the
right things. He's handled
the recruiting process
with more dignity that
most, even choosing to
hold off his commitment
on national television so
that he could share it with
his friends and family in
Lake City. Most of all,
Jernigan remembers to
stay humble.
He knows what he
means to this county and
he's thankful to those that
have helped him along
the way. Speaking to him
after Saturday's win in San
Antonio, there was only
one thing he wanted to
make sure was recorded
in today's Lake City
Reporter.
"I just want to thank all
of the people that have
supported me along the
way," Jernigan said. "I
want to thank the ones
who watched, the ones
who came and the ones
who couldn't come but
wanted to."
He also gave thanks to
God for helping him get
through a performance
that almost wasn't.
Leading up to
Saturday's game, Jernigan


the New Orleans Saints.
The Seahawks (8-9) held
a 34-20 early in the fourth
quarter before Drew Brees
looked ready to lead the
Saints (11-6) on one of their
patented comebacks. But
Lynch broke about a half-
dozen tackles for his TD
and a few anxious minutes
later, the party was on at
the NFL's loudest stadium.
Seattle, the first division
winner with a losing record,
will play next weekend,
either at top-seeded Atlanta
or No. 2 Chicago.
"We kind of expected to
win," first-year Seahawks
coach Pete Carroll said. "I
PLAYOFFS continued on 3B


hadn't
practiced
much
since
Monday.
After
being
named Jernigan
the most
dominant player in
Monday's practice,
Jernigan fought off a bad
case of back spasms. It
kept him from practicing
throughout the week, but
there wasn't anything that
was going to keep him
from playing in front of a
national audience.
Jernigan had nothing
to gain from an individual
basis. Whether he played
. "well or not, Jernigan will
be able to sign with any
college he chooses. He
played for everyone back
home. He did it all while
dealing with pain.
"My back was killing
me all week," he said. "It
felt better this morning,
but it took a lot of prayer,
determination and
hooking up to a muscle
stimulator right before
walking out to play."
Jernigan drew double
teams throughout much
of the contest and his
impact wasn't showing up
through statistics through
the first half. Instead of
losing hope, he remained
focused to put Lake City
on the map as he had
promised.
"I got off to a slow start,
but I told myself just get
that first tackle," he said.
"By the fourth quarter
I could see the linemen
breathing hard and my
adrenaline was enough to
drive me."
When he came through
with his first full sack
late in the game, it was a
moment of euphoria.
"I felt like I was back in
the Jungle," he said.
Jernigan knows that
he's been a source of
inspiration for those that
still have time to put on
the pads at Columbia.
He knows he'll be even
more of an inspiration for
the future generations of
Tigers.
'"That's what drove
me," Jernigan said. "Even
though my back was
hurting, I just continued
to pray, pray, pray. After
the first series, my
back was hurting, but I
wouldn't let myself give
up. I just thought of all
those watching."
The athletes were
bigger, stronger and faster
than most of the those he
went against at CHS.
It was the first time
that Lake City was able
to witness him against
college-worthy athletes. It
certainly won't be the last.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN Fight Hunger Bowl, Nevada
vs. Boston College, at San Francisco
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Africa
Open, final round, at East London, South
Africa (same-day tape)
6 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Tournament of
Champions, final round, at Maui, Hawaii
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
4:30 p.m.
CBS Kansas at Michigan
8 p.m.
FSN Maryland at Duke
10:30 p.m.
FSN UCLA at Southern Cal
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Playoffs,AFCWild Card Game,
Baltimore at Kansas City
4:30 p.m.
FOX Playoffs, NFC Wild Card
Game, Green Bay at Philadelphia
RODEO
2:30 p.m.
NBC PBR, Madison Square Garden
Invitational, at New York
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Dayton at Xavier
3:30 p.m.
FSN Oklahoma St. at Kansas St.
5 p.m.
ESPN2- Tulane at UAB
SOCCER
12:55 p.m.
ESPN2 Spanish Primera Division,
Real Madrid vs.Villarreal, at Madrid, Spain.
Monday
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:37 p.m.
ESPN BCS National Championship,
Auburn vs. Oregon, at Glendale,Ariz.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.


ESPN2 Notre Dame at Marquette
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Boston at Pittsburgh

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs
WILD CARD
Saturday
Seattle 41, New Orleans 36
N.Y.Jets at Indianapolis (n)
Today
Baltimore at Kansas City, I p.m.
(CBS)
Green Bay at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m.
(FOX)
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. IS
Indianapolis, Kansas City or Baltimore
at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m. (CBS)
Green Bay, New Orleans or Seattle at
Atlanta, 8 p.m. (FOX)
Sunday, Jan. 16
Philadelphia, New Orleans or Seattle
at Chicago, I p.m. (FOX)
N.Y Jets, Kansas City or Baltimore at
New England, 4:30 p.m. (CBS)
Conference Championships
Sunday,.Jan.23
NFC, 3 p.m. (FOX)
AFC, 6:30 p.m. (CBS)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 6
At Arlington,Texas
AFC champion vs. NFC champion,
6:30 p.m. (FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 30
At Honolulu
AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (FOX)

College bowl games
Friday
Cotton Bowl
LSU 41,Texas A&M 24
Saturday
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Pittsburgh vs. Kentucky
Today


Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Boston College (7-5) vs. Nevada
(12-1), 9 p.m.(ESPN)
Monday
BCS National Championship
At Glendale,Ariz.
Auburn (13-0) vs. Oregon (12-0),
8:30 p.m.(ESPN)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
Sacramento atToronto, I p.m.
Golden State at L.A. Clippers,
3:30 p.m.
Minnesota at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Miami at Portland, 9 p.m.
New Orleans at Denver, 9 p.m.
New York at LA. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Memphis at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Houston at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. I Duke vs. Maryland, 8 p.m.
No. 2 Ohio State vs. Minnesota,
2 p.m.
No. 3 Kansas at Michigan, 4:30 p.m.
I No. 7 Villanova vs. No. 24 Cincinnati,
Noon
No. I I Purdue vs. Iowa, Noon

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Today's Games
Atlanta at Carolina, 1:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at New Jersey, 5 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Chicago, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Boston at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at St. Louis, 9 p.m.
Detroit at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.
Toronto at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


Houston hands UCF


first loss of season

Associated Press

HOUSTON Kirk Van
Slyke scored 15 of his 17
points in the first half as
Houston built a big early
lead and held off No. 19
Central Florida 76-71 on
Saturday, handing the..
Knights their first loss of
the season..
Zamal Nixon also had 17
points for Houston (9-6, 1-1
Conference USA). Maurice
McNeil scored 15 and ,
Alandise Harris added 14.
Keith Clanton and Tom '
Herzog each scored 13 points
for UCF (14-1, 1-1). Leading
scorer Marcus Jordan, son of
former NBA great Michael
Jordan, was held to 10.
Strong shooting and pres-
sure defense gave Houston
control from the start as
Van Slyke led the Cougars
to a 22-8 lead.
On the other end, Jordan,
averaging 16.7 points per
game, missed his first
five field goal attempts, "
and frustration mount-
ed. Jordan tangled for a
loose ball with Houston's
Darian Thibodeaux mid- .
way through the first half
and both players had to be ..........
restrained. ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the first half the Central Florida guard Marcus Jordan (5) drives to the basket
Knights shot only 5 of 22 between Houston's Kirk Van Slyke (32) and Zamal Nixon
from the field, including 1 (2) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game
of 6 from beyond the 3-point Saturday in Houston.
arc.



Clemson beats Miami


79-72 behind Grant's 18


By PETE IACOBELLI
Associated Press

CLEMSON, S.C. (AP)
- Jerai Grant had 18 points
and Demontez Stitt 17 as
Clemson won its seventh
straight game and gave
coach Brad Brownell his
first ACC victory, 79-72 over
Miami on Saturday night.
Grant added 11 rebounds
for his third double-double
this season and Stitt had 11
of his points in the second
half, including five in a 12-0
run to start the half, for the
Tigers (12-4, 1-1 Atlantic
Coast Conference).
Miami (11-5, 0-2) got
within 74-71 on Durand
Scott's banker with 1:16 left,
but Andre Young followed


with a high, floating basket
as the shot clock ran out to
extend the Tigers' lead.
Scott finished with a
game-high 24 points.
It was Clemson's fourth
consecutive win over the
Hurricanes.
The Tigers led by as many
as 13 points in the second
half before the Hurricanes
tightened things up.
Malcolm Grant's 3-point-
er drew Miami to 57-55 with
8 minutes left before Stitt
and Milton Jennings hit a
pair of long-range shots to
increase Clemson's lead.
Scott powered the
Hurricanes' final charge
with a running banker to
bring his team within 3.
Clemson used up most


of the shot clock before
starting a play. Stitt's drive
was cut off and he shov-
eled the ball to Young, who
had to dribble to keep his
balance and was swarmed
by defenders. But Young,
at 5 foot 11, backed up and
floated a high arching des-
peration shot that went in
as the buzzer sounded.
Miami could get no closer.
Both teams had lost their
ACC openers and were
eager to pick up a league
win.
The Tigers fell at Florida
State 75-69 to start the ACC
on Dec. 12, the last of a
three-game losing streak
that looked like it might
take the air out of Brownell's
team.


Allen leads Virginia


Tech past Florida State


Associated Press

BLACKSBURG, Va. -
Jeff Allen estimated that
he was playing at about
75 percent because of an
injured groin. 'I
But one might have a
hard time convincing the
Florida State Seminoles of
that.
Allen scored 18 of his
season-high 24 points
in the second half to lift
Virginia Tech past Florida
State 71-59 on Saturday.
The Hokies (10-
4, 1-1 Atlantic Coast
Conference), who won
their sixth straight game,
broke open a close contest
with a 12-0 run to end the
first half and took a 29-'
19 lead at halftime. They
never trailed again.
Allen, who also had
11 rebounds for his sev-
enth double-double of the
season, connected on 7
of 12 from the floor and
10 of 12 from the free-
throw line. The scoring
outburst marked his best
game since a 25-point per-
formance in the Hokies'
double-overtime loss to
Maryland last February.
"I was just going out
there and playing hard,"
Allen said. "I tried to play
through the groin inju-
ry. I just blocked it out
because we needed this
victory."
"He really took us to the
woodshed," Florida State
coach Leonard Hamilton


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State's Okaro White (10) rebounds the ball in front of
Virginia Tech's Terrell Bell (1) during the first half Saturday in
Blacksburg.


said of Allen. "We had very
little answer for him. We've
normally been able to keep
him in check. But today, he
played with a tremendous
amount of maturity and
executed well. He was very
patient in his game and that
was one reason why they
kept us at bay."
Florida State (11-5, 1-1),


which saw its three-game
winning streak against
the Hokies snapped, cut
Virginia Tech's lead to
46-42 with 7:32 remain-
ing on a 3-pointer by Luke
Loucks, but the Hokies
scored the next eight
points. The Seminoles got
no closer than eight points
the rest of the gafne.


'Noles extends Fisher's


contract to 2015 season


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE': -
Florida State has extended
Jimbo Fisher's contract for
one year, taking the head
football coach through the
2015 season.
Fisher said in a state-
ment: "Everything is
in place here at Florida
State to be very success-


ACROSS

ET vehicle
Chitchats
Jaunty lid
Telephoned
Fridge stick
Deli bread
Lo-cal '
Forks and
knives
Warehoused
Wordy
Webster
Bikini half
Team cheer
Agra's land
Kept in shape
Do perfectly
Belafonte's
holler
Kids' cereal
Radio's PBS
Major- -
Colonial dance
Verse
Catalogs
Low-lying
island


ful and I really appreci-
ate FSU's commitment to
excellence:"' "'" '..-. !
Fisher will make $2.75
million a year for five years.
The additional compensa-
tion in his extended con-
tract will come from Florida
State's contracts with IMG
and Nike.
Florida State athletic
director Randy Spetman


41 Paid work
42 Baby soother
45 Tooth coating
49 Fitting
53 Many Trevi
coins
54 Opposite
of post-
55 Fruit-cup
chunk
56 Early 007
movie (2 wds.)
57 Antonio
Spurs
58 Track
postings
59 Craving

DOWN

1 WWW address-
es
2 accompli
3 Glom -
4 Dutch cheese
5 Neighbor of
CTRL
6 Winged insect
7 Heir, often


announced the deal
Saturday, saying he wanted
to continue the "enthusi-
asm and momentum" with-
in the program.
The Seminoles finished
the season 10-4 in Fisher's
first year taking over for
Bobby Bowden. They beat
South Carolina in the Chick-
fil-A bowl after an appear-
ance in the ACC title game.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

MEN DE B DAHL




AGA SEA E I
V N EG UT PLEID

BS LWOO


AHA EDIT ERRS
LU GS ETE COO
MOANED X RAY S

JADE LLAMA
H 1 FI FOOTNOTE
TVAN ERAS WOE
MERE WOK NPR


8 Small
combo
9 Jean Auel hero-
ine
10 Chicken wire
12 Small pet


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


17 Unforeseen
problem
19 Baseball stat.
22 Cellist Ma
(hyph.)
23 It's easily
deflated
24 Quaint hotel
25 Drowses off
26 Gossip
27 Dr.'s magazine
28 Really skimps
29 Lose some
31 Half-asleep
33 Big tees
35 Court
evidence,
maybe
36 Bawdy
38 Bank abbr.
39 Cohort of
Boris and Bela
41 Catcalls
42 Sugar amts.
43 Faint glow
44 Mortgage, e.g.
46 Muddy
47 Seacoast
eagle
48 Ponce de -
50 GI address
51 Converted
sofa
52 Highland
youth


2011 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 2011


PLAYOFFS: Saints fall in first-round upset
Continued From Page 1B .


know that sounds crazy, but we
did expect to win. The fact that
it happened, it's just kind of like,
we want to take it in stride and go
to the next one. I know it sounds
crazy, but that's the way the mind-
set of this team was."
Hasselbeck, cleared to play just
two days ago because of a hip
injury, threw for 272 yards and
his four TD passes set a playoff
career high. The veteran quarter-
back threw two TD passes to tight
end John Carlson in the first half
and started the second half with a
38-yard strike to Mike Williams to
give Seattle a 31-20 lead.
The game wasn't clinched,
though, until Lynch provided
a run that'll be replayed in the
Pacific Northwest for years. He
took a second-down carry with
less than four minutes to go and
then the highlights began. He
broke six tackles on his 67-yard
run, tossing in a massive stiff arm
that sent cornerback Tracy Porter
to the turf and completed the lon-
gest scoring run of his career.
The win was the first in the
playoffs for a team with a losing
record.
"We respect the heck out of the
Saints, but I think we felt some-
thing special all week and today,
and we'll seet' Hasselbeck said.
"It's a good start for us."
Lynch finished with 131 yards
on 19 carries, the first Seattle
back to top 100 yards all season.
Hasselbeck, Lynch and a strong
performance by Seattle's offense


extended the Saints franchise mis-
ery to 0-4 in road playoff games.
The Saints were considered the
second-best team in the division
behind the NFC South-winning
Falcons. Even though they lost
to Tampa Bay in the season finale
a week ago and were without
running backs Pierre Thomas
and Chris Ivory, safety Malcolm
Jenkins and linebacker Danny
Clark, the Saints were favored by
10 points to advance.
* Now they go home.
Brees, who completed a playoff-
record 39 passes in 60 attempts
for 404 yards and two TDs, still
couldn't match Hasselbeck and
the Seahawks offense. Brees led
one final drive, hitting Devery
Henderson on a 6-yard touchdown
with 1:30 left to get within 41-36.
But DeShawn Wynn was
stopped on the 2-point conversion,
Garrett Hartley's onside kick was
recovered by Carlson. and the
Seahawks were home free.
Reggie Bush finished with five
carries for 12 yards, caught five
passes and did not play in the
fourth quarter, jogging back to
the locker room early in the quar-
ter and never returning.
Julius Jones, cut by Seattle ear-
lier in the season, ran for two
short touchdowns and finished
with 120 all-purpose yards.
In the second half, Brees all but
abandoned the run, throwing on
33 of the Saints' 41 plays, as he
tried to rally the Saints from a two-
touchdown deficit.


Brees pulled the Saints within
34-27 on Jones' 4-yard touchdown
run with 13:11 left, a drive helped
along by a personal foul penalty
by Seattle defensive end Chris
Clemons.
Seattle then threw on three
straight plays, all incomplete and
used just 16 seconds.
Brees and the Saints took over
at their 44 and drove to the Seattle
4 before Henderson was stopped
short on a third-and-3 pass.
The Saints settled f6r Hartley's
21-yard field goal with 9:13 left
and trailed 34-30.
Seattle got a first down on its
next drive when Hasselbeck hit
Brandon Stokley for 12 yards,
but Hasselbeck was sacked by
Scott Shanle on second down and
Seattle was forced to punt with
under six minutes remaining. The
52-yard punt by Jon Ryan, plus
a penalty on the return, backed
the Saints to their own 6 with 5:36
left.
Brees couldn't convert on third-
and-8 at his 19 and the Saints
punted with 4:29 left and just one
timeout. Lynch's run then gave
Seattle an 11-point lead.
At the end of the game, Carroll
gathered his team at midfield
after Hasselbeck took one final
knee, jumping up and down on the
Seahawks logo with most of his
team jumping in unison.
Hasselbeck left the field to a
rousing ovation and his young-
est son propped up on his
shoulders.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New York Jets running back LaDainian Tomlinson (21) goes in for a
1-yard touchdown run while being tacked by Indianapolis Colts
linebacker Kavell Conner (53) and cornerback Cornelius Brown (39)
during the third quarter of awild card game in Indianapolis, Saturday.


Last-second win


By MICHAEL MAROT
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Nick Folk
kicked a 32-yard field goal as
time expired Saturday night, giv-
ing the New York Jets a 17-16
first-round playoff victory over
the Indianapolis Colts.
New York (12-5) now heads to
New England for a third meet-
ing next Sunday.


The Colts (11-6), AFC cham-
pions last year over the Jets,
thought they had won it when
Adam Vinatieri made a 50-yard
field goal with 53 seconds left,
his longest kick since 2008.
But the Jets got a 47-yard
kickoff return from Antonio
Cromartie and Mark Sanchez
set up the field goal with an 18-
yard pass to Braylon Edwards at
the Colts 14.


ALL-STAR FOOTBALL
Senior game
set for Saturday
The fourth annual
Columbia Youth Football
Association/Dicks
Sporting Goods High
School All-Star Football
Game is 4 p.m. Saturday
at Memorial Stadium
in-Lake City. The game
will feature graduating
seniors from Columbia,
Fort White, Baker
County, Bell, Bradford,
Branford, Chiefland, Dixie
County, Hamilton County,
Lafayette, Madison County,
Taylor County, Trenton,
Suwannee and Union
County high schools.
For details, call
chairman William Murphy
at 288-4779.

CHS BASEBALL
Alumni game
planned Jan. 29
Columbia High baseball
will hold its annual alumni
game on Jan. 29 at the CHS
field. Registration begins at
10:30 a.m. There will be a
home run derby at
11:30 a.m., with the alumni
game at 1 p.m. and the
Purple and Gold game at
3 p.m.
For details, call J.T.
Clark at 365-1754 or Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810.

ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays. Cost
is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
623-4817 or Mario Coppock
at 754-7095.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Interest sought
for 10-under girls
Athletes interested in
playing 10-under girls
softball year-round are
being sought.
For details, call Butch
Lee at 965-6002 or Tim
Blackwell at 623-1826.

YOUTH BASKETBALL
Sign-up ongoing
at Boys Club
Registration for the Boys
Club of Columbia County's
2011 basketball program
is open through Jan. 15.
Girls and boys ages 6-14
are eligible. Practices are


BRIEFS

twice weekly and games
are played on Saturday.
Cost is $40.
For details, call 752-4184
or visit the club on
Jones Way.

YOUTH GOLF
Junior tour in
Springfield, La.
The Arrowhead Junior
Golf Tour Carter Plantation
Junior Classic is
Jan 15-16 in Springfield, La.
The 36-hole tournament
for ages 12-18 is ranked by
the National Junior Golf
Scoreboard. Discounted
accommodations are
available at the Carter


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NICCY I


Plantation Villas. Call (225)
294-7555 for reservations.
Registration deadline is
today. To enter, call (318)
402-2446 or enter online at
www.arrowheadjgt.com.

FLAG FOOTBALL
Registration for
co-ed football
Christ Central Sports is
offering co-ed flag football
for ages 5-12. Cost is $40
and registration continues
through Jan. 15.
For details, call Ronny
at 365-2128 or the church
office at 755-2525.

M From staff reports


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


L -LI ir THE ARCeTIC
SEXPLOR-IE 5AIP HIS
SHEAP &EARH
ORPAND WA A ---
' ow arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
A:
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: UNWED RIVET HELIUM PURITY
I Answer: What her friend did to shorten the long
story INTERRUPTED


I I
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W R C J L V E L A K P S Z L J H A G Y 0
I A M E X I C A N W E D D I N G W M P P M I
R X Y T E X I Y U N K H N O C A S Z J R
M Q Q Y Y A Y F P J C S L J A X V R W E
I E Z K Z D K 0 J B J D E P I K G P X R H
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N O W Z O T A T O P F S P L I T P E A M
Find all 18 of the 'Soup' related words hidden in the word search above. Words can I
be found in the banners on the ads shown here. Complete the puzzle and return it to the
Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City, FL by Monday 5:00pm, for your chance to win

A N ONAL ENTRY FORM
I I
I ...Name: __
SPhone Number: b _
.Address:I
Subscriber: E Yes 0 NoI
Sl Deadline is Monday, January 10, 2011 at 5:00 p.m.

Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magazine


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BCS CHAMPIONSHIP SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 2011


Auburn's past full of near-misses


By JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.
- One lonely national title.
That's all Auburn has, a
good dozen fewer than
hated rival Alabama claims
a few hours away, to the
Tigers' enduring chagrin.
That hardly tells the
whole story, though. The
top-ranked Tigers, who
were crowned in 1957, have
been waiting ever since
for the win-and-you're-in
shot at national champi-
onship glory that comes
Monday night against No.
2 Oregon.
They've come close sev-
eral tantalizing times. And
these Auburn players carry
a little extra burden from
their predecessors as a
result.
"I tell them all the time
so many other players are
living through them," said
Travis Williams, a lineback-
er for the 2004 team that
went 13-0 and finished No.
2. "And the good thing is
they take it on their shoul-
ders and they really want to
do it for the guys that came
before them."
In the modern era, those
guys come from that 2004
team and- the 1983 group
that was leapfrogged when
No. 5 Miami catapulted to
the top after Auburn was
the only team ahead of
the Hurricanes to win its
bowl game. Even Terry
Bowden's 1993 group can
nurse some claim after
going 11-0 while on NCAA
probation and ineligible for
the postseason.
"I think there are Auburn
people who feel snakebit,
but if you feel snakebit,
you're looking for excus-
es," former Auburn athletic
director David Housel said.
"The only thing you can
worry about is what you
can influence, and there's
certain factors you can't
influence. I wouldn't say
snakebit, I would say unfor-
tunate would be a better
term."
Auburn only claims titles
bestowed by the wire ser-
vices, and now the BCS,
which leaves the 1957
team selected No. 1 by The
Associated- Press and oth-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 13, 2004 file photo, Auburn players (from left) Jay Ratliff (83), Tommy Jackson (58) Anthony Mix (9) and Mayo
Sowell (57) celebrate with the fans after defeating Georgia 24-6, in Auburn, Ala. The 2004 Auburn team went unbeaten in
the brutal SEC and didn't get a national title shot. The Tigers have only one national title in 1957 but there have been a
handful of close calls. Top-ranked Auburn is scheduled to play Oregon for the national championship on Monday.


ers standing alone. Some
groups of varying legiti-
macy have crowned eight
Tigers teams.
The most recent, and
now most famous, near-
miss came six years ago.
Tommy Tuberville's loaded
Tigers went 13-0 but were
relegated to the Sugar Bowl
while Southern California
routed Oklahoma 55-19 for
the BCS title since vacated
due to NCAA violations.
A 16-13 win over Virginia
Tech merely let Auburn
keep its argument going in
perpetuity.
"I remember it just like
it was yesterday," recalls
Williams, now a graduate
assistant for his alma mater.
"We were glued to the TV
every week to see if we
were going to be 1 or 2 and
have a chance to fight for it.
It was disappointing but at
the end of the day we won
every game that was on
our schedule. We knew we


were probably one of the
best teams that ever came
through Auburn, if not the
best. That year we would
have given USC a run for
their money."
Four players from that
team were first-round
picks in the following NFL
draft cornerback Carlos
Rogers, quarterback Jason
Campbell and running
backs Carnell Williams and
Ronnie Brown. Run for their
money? Heck, Williams still
feels confident in the out-
come of an Auburn-USC
matchup, though he'll never
get to prove it.
"We'd have won," he
insists. "I tell everybody
we had a mini-NFL team,
and it was almost scary.
We went into every game
expecting to win. It wasn't
hoping. It wasn't waiting
on another player to do it.
Any player could have done
it, from our running backs
to our quarterbacks to our


receivers and then the No.
1 defense. We expected to
win every game."
The Tigers did beat three
Top 10 teams but strug-
gled to put away unranked
Alabama at the end, which
certainly didn't help with
three teams sporting such
strong claims of worthi-
ness.
E 1983. The third-ranked
Tigers managed to edge No.
8 Michigan 9-7 in the Sugar
Bowl, while Miami beat
top-ranked Nebraska 31-30
in the Orange Bowl, No.
2 Texas lost in the Cotton
Bowl and No. 4 Illinois fell
in the Rose.
H o w a r d
Schnellenberger's
Hurricanes vaulted to the
top with a team led by
quarterback Bernie Kosar.
Nebraska finished No. 2,
while Auburn stayed put.
The New York Times was
among 15 groups crowning
that Auburn team, which


included a sophomore
running back named Bo
Jackson and eight first-
team All-Southeastern
Conference picks.
"You could have said that
team was named national
champion," Housel said. "I
think Miami did a heck of a
job promoting the fact that
if you beat No. 1, you ought
to be No. 1. They had a hell
of a game ... Nebraska went
for two and didn't make it,
and Miami beat No. 1 so
they go to No.1. If you're
from Auburn, you'd argue
that. And if we'd been more
impressive in our win over
Michigan, we might have
been No. 1, but it just didn't
happen.
"Based on strength of
schedule and performance
throughout the year, that
1983 team deserved to be
national champion."
The Tigers did beat four
teams ranked in the top 8
in their final five games, but


lost to then-No. 3 Texas in
Game 2 to finish 11-1.
N 1993. Bowden's first
Auburn team opened the
season unranked and large-
ly unnoticed after the pro-
gram was slammed with
NCAA sanctions for viola-
tions during Pat-Dye's ten-
ure. The Tigers won four
games by four points or less
and finished, appropriately,
fourth in the rankings.
A handful of mostly
obscure organizations gave
the title to Auburn, which
was coming off two five-win
seasons.
1958. The Tigers fol-
lowed up their national
championship season by
going 9-0-1 with only a 7-all
tie with Georgia Tech in
Game 3 marring a perfect
record.
Coach Shug Jordan's
team allowed only 62 points
and also finished at No. 4.
"I think '58 was probably
a better football team than
'57," said Kenny Howard,
the Tigers' trainer from
1949-75 and a close friend
of the late Jordan. "I think
"we probably had better per-
sonnel then."
Then again, the Tigers
probably didn't figure it
would be another half-cen-
tury before the opportunity
arose again to win a title on
the field.
"It's amazing that where
football means so much to a
state and a university ... that
you come up and don't have
the opportunity to be No. 1
again," Howard said.
There were also the
unbeaten teams in 1913 and
1914, the latter of which
outscored opponents 193-0.
Meanwhile, the rival
Tide captured its seventh
AP national title and eighth
of the poll era last season.
Left tackle Lee Ziemba
said the message from for-
mer Auburn players want-
ing to close the gap a bit is
loud and clear.
"I've heard from a lot of
them, and a lot of them said
the same thing: Take advan-
tage of the opportunity,"
Ziemba said. "This chance
doesn't come around for
very many people very
often."
Auburn fans know that
well.


Rapid rises put Chizik,



Kelly in championship


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.
- Gene Chizik won five
games in two seasons at
Iowa State before becom-
ing Auburn's head coach
in'2009.
Oregon's Chip Kelly can
top that. He had never even
been more than an offen-
sive coordinator and
had only been working in
major college football for
two seasons when he
was promoted to top Duck,
also in 2009.
Now Chizik and Kelly
each are a win away from
a national championship,
with only the other in the
way. Whichever coach
leads his team to victory
in the BCS title game on
Monday night will join an
elite club.
Only eight active FBS
coaches have won national
championships. The group
includes Alabama's Nick
Saban, LSU's Les Miles,
Texas' Mack Brown,
Ohio State's Jim Tressel,
Oklahoma's Bob Stoops,
South Carolina's Steve
Spurrier, Penn State Hall
of Famer Joe Paterno and
Florida Atlantic's Howard
Schnellenberger.
Compared to those guys,
Chizik and Kelly are practi-
cally unknowns to the casu-
al sports fan.
The 49-year-old Chizik's
return to Auburn, where he
had been defensive coordi-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Auburn head coach Gene Chizik applauds his players
during NCAA college football practice, Thursday in
Scottsdale, Ariz. Auburn is scheduled to play Oregon.in the
BCS Championship on Monday in Glendale, Ariz.


nator for the undefeated
2004 Tigers, was not at
first triumphant.
He had spent 19 years as
an assistant, the final two at
Texas where he helped the
Longhorns win a national
championship in 2005 and
became rising star within
college coaching.
Iowa State, a program
with little history of suc-
cess, gave Chizik his first
head coaching job in 2007.
He won three games that
season and two the next,
and it seemed as if his star
had dimmed.
"Iowa State was a rebuild-
ing situation for myself and
our assistants," he said.
"I had a great two years
there, learned a lot, did a
lot, made a lot of strides.


"Obviously, along the
way we would have liked to
have had more wins."
When he was hired to
replace his former Auburn
boss, Tommy Tuberville,
who was ousted with a
85-40 record, many Tigers
fans and alum were out-
raged. A YouTube video of
athletic'director Jay Jacobs
being heckled by 'an upset
fan exemplified the anger.
To compete against Saban,
Auburn had hired a coach
that was 5-19 at Iowa State.
Of course, not all the
Auburn fans wanted to run
Chizik off before he even
moved into his office.
"When I came to Auburn,
I got off the plane, there
was about 800 people wait-
ing for me and it was an


awesome reception, and
it has never changed,"
said Chizik, a native of
Clearwater, Fla. "There's
always going to be a few
people that disagree with
anybody's hire."
Knowing you're only as
good as the people around
you, Chizik assembled a
strong staff, led by offen-
sive coordinator Gus
Malzahn and assistant
head .coach and lockdown
recruiter Trooper Taylor.
It was Malzahn and
Taylor who Chizik cred-
its with helping Auburn
land Heisman Trophy
winner Cam Newton out
of junior college. With
Newton leading the way,
Auburn went from 8-5 last
season to 13-0 and in posi-
tion to win the school's first
national title since 1957 this
season.
"He can look at a team
- and I don't know how
he does it, I'm trying to
figure it out because I want
that ability but he can
look at a team and he can
say, This is what this team
needs,"' Taylor said about
Chizik. "He came in before
the season started and said,
This year we're going from
good to great."'
It's the Southeastern
Conference, so there will
always be skeptics, but it's
safe to say many of the
doubters have changed
their tune about Chizik.
Kelly's arrival at Oregon
was not nearly as volatile.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oregon head coach Chip Kelly (left) high fives linebacker
Josh Kaddu during practice before playing the Auburn Tigers
in the BCS Championship game on Saturday in Scottsdale,
Ariz. The BCS Championship game will be played on
Monday.

Oregon QB Hawkins' role

is to portray Cam Newton
Associated Press they're about to see."


SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.
- Daryle Hawkins doesn't
look a thing like Cam
Newton.
Oregon's redshirt fresh-
man quarterback from
Omaha, Neb., is about 6-
foot-4 and 192 pounds. Or
about two inches shorter
and 60 pounds lighter than
Auburn's quarterback.
But Hawkins is doing
his best to impersonate the
Heisman Trophy winner on
the practice field as the sec-
ond-ranked Ducks prepare
for the BCS national title
game Monday against No.
1 Auburn.
That includes dressing
like Newton. Hawkins said
he's sort of like an actor try-
ing to get into character.
"I wear the half sleeves,
the sweat bands and such,"
he said. "I'm trying to give
the defense a real good look
to prepare them for what


Holding the trophy
During media day at.the
Camelback Inn, the national
championship trophy sat on
display at the front of the
ballroom.
Auburn linebacker Josh
Bynes was so focused he
didn't even notice.
"No, where is it?" Bynes
said when asked if he had
seen it. "Can I go touch it?
Dang. That's kind of crazy.
That's something I see in
commercials, not something
I thought I'd see in real life,
a couple steps away."
And, to think, he could be
holding it Monday night if
the Tigers win.
"That would be a bless-
ing," he said. "The ultimate
goal is to hold that crys-
tal ball and place them lips
on it, knowing we won it.
That's what's going to mat-
ter the most."


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
cnsak@lakecityreportercom


BUSINESS


Sunday, January 9, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


First Federal banks on students' job skills


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The First Federal Tiger
Bank at Columbia
High School has been
providing students
with job skills and
experience to prepare for future
careers.
"I have learned so much," said
Lauren Cunningham, 17, a CHS
senior and a Tiger Bank student
manager.
Since the school's branch
opened its doors in August 2008,
about 40 students have worked
in the branch as either tellers or
student managers, said Crista
Thomas, First Federal Financial
Center manager.
The branch is open to serve
CHS students, staff and teach-
ers.
"Ifs an actual, fully-functioning
First Federal branch," said Terry
Huddleston, CHS principal. "The
only thing that you can't do is
here we don't loan money. Any
other transaction can be handled
right here just like any other
bank."
Student managers who work
in the bank are a part of the
school's Finance Academy,
but are also employees of
First Federal Bank of Florida,
Huddleston said.
Tina Williams, First Federal
teller operations manager, and
Thomas said students begin
working in the Tiger Bank as
ninth- and 10th-graders and can
earn student manager status
after they have built the neces-
sary skills, undergone the appro-
priate orientation and training
and turn 16 years old.
Keith Leibfried, First Federal
president, noted that confiden-
tiality is a key training point the


cr%~


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The First Federal Tiger Bank at Columbia High School gives students a chance to work closely in the banking
field, which can lead to career goal opportunities. Pictured are teller operations coordinator Darian Ste. Marie,
16, (from left) new accounts manager Brian Hogue-Pua, 16, human resources manager Holly Wheeler, 16, and
branch manager Lauren Cunningham, 17.


students learn.
Tiger Bank student manag-
ers work as paid student interns
outside of school at the various
First Federal Bank branches in
Lake City, Williams said. Their
shifts include working in the
lobby, the drive-through or at
the new accounts and customer
service desk.
After First Federal trains the
student managers, those stu-
dent managers train the tellers
under them at the Tiger Bank,
Williams said.
"One thing I think we do is


we try to train these interns
to understand various banking
products so that they, in turn,
can communicate back to their
peers," Leibfried said. "Younger
people really don't understand a
lot about banking and this whole
effort is to enrich and educate
them about banking and, hope-
fully, they're passing that back to
their peers."
Working at the First Federal
branches also allows students to
earn elective-work experience
credit, Huddleston said.
Other CHS academies, like its


Logistics Academy, utilize the
Tiger Bank to make deposits,
Huddleston said, which allows
students working in the branch
to build banking relationships
with the school-based enter-
prises.
"It's as close to a real-life expe-
rience as we can make in a high
school setting," he said.
Students learn soft skills
- such as greeting the public,
appropriate dress, punctuality
customer service and problem-
solving for customers from
their Tiger Bank experience that


businesses seek when hiring,
Huddleston said.
"All of these soft skills are
so important to everybody and
these students definitely have
that when they walk out of
.here," he said.
Cunningham said she has
learned those skills from work-
ing at the bank.
"It's a great opportunity to
see my skills of how to handle
people," she said.
Brian Hogue-Pua, 16, a CHS
junior and Tiger Bank student
co-manager, said working at the
bank has provided experience
for a future career.
"It gives you the experience
because if you were to continue
in a business career, banking
would be a good start," he said.
Thomas and Williams said the
experience allows students to
learn how to use money wisely
and manage an account, while
Huddleston said it can ready
them for a job in finance or any
field.
First Federal has hired two of
its Tiger Bank student managers
after they graduated from high
school, Williams, Thomas and
Leibfried said.
"I think it gives us an oppor-
tunity to give back to the com-
munity," Leibfried said. '"We're a
community bank and it's impor-
tant for us to give back to the
community.
'"We feel like through this
effort, we are helping the stu-
dents not only learn about jobs
and responsibility, but also learn-
ing about bank products," he
said. "At the same time, we're
getting exposed to some stu-
dents who are coming back and
working for us. It initiates, devel-
ops and fosters relationships that
are a benefit for all concerned."


103K new jobs in December

point to slow, steady growth


By CHRISTOPHER RUGABER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
nation's economy added
103,000 jobs in December
and the unemployment rate
dropped to 9.4 percent last
month, its lowest level in 19
months.
But the job growth
fell short of expectations
based on a strengthening
economy. And the drop in
unemployment was partly
because people stopped
looking for work.
Private employers added
a net total of 113,000 jobs
last month and the gov-
ernment shed 10,000 jobs,
the Labor Department said
Friday.
"It's a bit of a mixed bag,"
said Ryan Sweet, an econo-
mist at Moody's Analytics.
Many analysts hoped to see
larger job gains, and the
drop in the unemployment
rate is unlikely to be sus-
tained, he said.
"The labor market ended
last year with a bit of a
thud," he said. "But I think
things will get much better
this year."
The economy has shown
signs of steady improve-
ment in recent weeks, lead-
ing many economists to
expect more job creation.
The Labor Department
said Thursday that fewer
people applied for unem-
ployment benefits over the
month than in any four-
week period in more than
two years.
An increase in consumer
spending made this past
holiday season the best in
four years.
There were positive
signs in the December jobs
report. Government revi-
sions showed more people
were hired in previous
months than the govern-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke prepares to testify
before the Senate Budget Committee Friday at Capitol Hill
in Washington. The nation's economy added 103,000 jobs in
December and the unemployment rate dropped to 9.4 per-
cent last m6nth, its lowest level in 19 months.


ment first estimated. The
economy added 210,000
jobs in October, above the
previous figure of 172,000.
November's total was
revised to 71,000, up from
39,000.
President Barack Obama
said the new jobs report
shows the economy is mov-
ing in the right direction.
But he acknowledged that
hiring and growth must
still accelerate.
Over the past three
months, the economy
has added an average of
128,000 jobs. That's just
enough to keep up with the
population growth. Nearly
double is generally needed
to significantly reduce the
unemployment rate.
But other factors can
affect the unemployment
rate, at least temporarily.
One key reason for the drop
was that the government
no longer counts people
as unemployed when they
stop looking for work.
Fewer people said they


were out of work last month.
The number of unemployed
fell by more than 500,000 to
just under 14.5 million, the
lowest since April 2009.
Still, the unemployment
rate has topped 9 percent
for 20 months, the longest
such streak on record. And
even with last year's job
gains, the unemployment
rate fell only from 9.7 per-
cent to 9.4 percent.
Stocks edged lower after
the disappointing report
was released The Dow
Jones industrial average
fell more than 44 points in
midday trading.
Through all of 2010,
the nation added 1.1 mil-
lion jobs, or an average of
94,000 jobs a month.
Economists expect hir-
ing will ramp up this year,
with some predicting dou-
ble last year's total of jobs
or more.
A tax cut package that
goes into effect this month
should boost consumer and
business spending.


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Many people don't realize it, but
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taxpayers who take advantage of
loopholes, many of which no longer
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it's riot indexed for inflation,
it's hitting more and more
middle-income taxpayers.
It's not pretty, either. Your calcula-
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expect a refund of $1,500, but when
the AMT rears its ugly head, you
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a large sum of state and local
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a large amount of miscellaneous
itemized deductions;


a large amount of deductible
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certain incentive stock options;
large capital gains.
If you have one or more of these
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have the unpleasant obligation of
paying the AMT. You may want to
consult a tax professional for advice,
because there are some ways you
may be able to reduce the hit, such
as by accelerating some income and
deferring some deductions.
With any luck, the AMT will be
either eliminated or overhauled in
the near future. But for many years
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"patches," temporarily increasing
the exemption amounts for the AMT
and thereby aiming to keep it from
affecting even more Americans. In
December, Congress issued patches
for tax years 2011 and 2012.
Nina Olson, our national taxpayer
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She has said that"... if I were given
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I've got more than 16,000 service stations, and I sell about 3.6 million
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- 2011 Tii Min Foo iDisi. m UNI RS~4 U IitK (KO RRH[I ASI 1/6/2011)


Court rules against banks


in pivotal mortgage case


By DENISE LAVOIE
Associated Press

BOSTON The high-
est court in Massachusetts
ruled against U.S. Bancorp
and Wells Fargo & Co.
Friday in a widely watched
mortgage foreclosure case
that could have serious
implications for the nation's
largest banks.
The Supreme Judicial
Court affirmed a lower
court judge's ruling invali-
dating two mortgage fore-
closure sales because the
banks did not prove that
they actually owned the
mortgages at the time of
foreclosure.
Last fall, the banking,
industry's foreclosure
machine came under
intense scrutiny with the
revelations that low-level
employees called "robo
signers" powered through
hundreds of foreclosure
affidavits a day without ver-
ifying a single sentence.
At the time, analysts
warned that the banks'
allegedly fraudulent docu-
ment procedures could
imperil their ability to
prove that they owned the
mortgages.
The Supreme Judicial
Court.found that the banks,
who were not the original
mortgagees, did not make
a required showing that
they held the mortgages at
the time of foreclosure.
As a result, the court
found, the banks did not
demonstrate that the fore-
closure sales were valid to
convey title to the proper-
ties.
"We agree with the judge
that the plaintiffs did not
demonstrate that they were
the holders of the ... mort-
gages at the time that they
foreclosed these proper-
ties, and therefore failed
to demonstrate that they


"For homeowners and foreclosures
in general, it means that any
mortgage foreclosure which was
initiated by a securitized trust at a
time when the trust had not obtained
a mortgage assignment which gave it
the lawful right to do so is void."

Paul Collier III
Attorney


acquired fee simple title to
these properties by pur-
chasing them at the fore-
closure sale," Justice Ralph
Gants wrote for the court in
the unanimous 6-0 ruling.
Attorney Paul Collier III,
who .represents Antonio
Ibanez, one of the hom-
eowners in the case, said
the ruling affects thou-
sands of mortgages in
Massachusetts and could
have a far-reaching impact
on the nation's banking
industry.
"For homeowners and
foreclosures in general, it
means that any mortgage
foreclosure which was initi-
ated by a securitized trust
at a time when the trust had
not obtained a mortgage
assignment which gave it
the lawful right to do so is
void. Those homeowners,
like Mr. Ibanez, still own
the property," Collier said.
The banks argued that
securitization documents
they submitted were suf-
ficient to prove they owned
the mortgages before the
publication of the notices
of sale and the foreclosure
sales.
The banks asked the
court to apply its ruling
only to future transactions,
but the court rejected that.
The court said it had not
made a significant change
in common law and scolded
the banks for not following
those mandates.


"The legal principles and
requirements we set forth
are well established in our
case law and our statutes.
All that has changed in the
plaintiffs' apparent failure
to abide by those princi-
ples and requirements in
the rush to sell mortgage-
backed securities," Gants
wrote for the court.
In a concurring opinion,
Justice Robert Cordy used
even stronger language,
citing what he called the
"utter carelessness" with
which the banks document-
ed the titles to their assets.
"There is no dispute
that the mortgagors of the
properties in question had
defaulted on their obliga-
tions, and that the mort-
gaged propeflties were sub-
ject to foreclosure.
Before commencing
such an action, however,
the holder of an assigned
mortgage needs to take
care to ensure that his legal
paperwork is in order,"
Cordy wrote.
Massachusetts Secretary
of State William Galvin said
he agrees with the ruling,
which he said demonstrates
the need for judicial review
of foreclosures in the state
to give homeowners more
protections.
It's up to lawmakers to
take action to remove the
uncertainty over mortgag-
es raised by the decision,
he said.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Specialist Michael Pistillo (left) and traders work on the floor of the New York Stock
Exchange on Tuesday. Braving high unemployment and unsustainable levels of debt and
budget deficits in Europe and the U.S., the world economy is expected to slow in 2011 with
economists cutting their forecasts for growth in developed countries.



JPMorgan, banks



lead stocks lower


By CHIP CUTTER
Associated Press

NEW YORK A rela-
tively weak report on jobs
dragged stocks lower
Friday. Banks took a hit
after a Massachusetts
court upheld a ruling
against U.S. Bancorp and
Wells Fargo & Co. in a
closely watched foreclo-
sure case.
The Labor Department
said 103,000 jobs were cre-
ated last month, less than
analysts expected. Job
growth has remained slug-
gish in the U.S. since the
recession ended in June
2009.
A separate survey from
the Labor Department
found that the unemploy-
ment rate fell to 9.4 per-


cent last month. ThAt's
a decrease from 9.8 per-
cent in November and the
lowest rate in 19 months.
The lower rate means
that many people found
jobs but 'also that others
stopped looking.
"On balance, this
was a pretty disappoint-
ing report," said Hugh
Johnson, chairman and
chief investment officer
of Johnson Advisors. It
"suggests we have a long
way to go to recover the
8.4 million jobs that we
lost during the crisis."
JPMorgan Chase &
Co. and Bank of America
Corp. were the biggest
losers among the 30
stocks that make up the
Dow Jones industrial
average. Banks fell as


investors worried that
the foreclosure ruling in
Massachusetts could set a
precedent for other cases
against lenders. Bank
of America, the largest
holder of mortgages in
the U.S., fell 3 percent
to $14.07. JPMorgan also
lost 3 percent to $43.02.
The highest court in
Massachusetts found that
U.S. Bancorp and Wells
Fargo failed to prove that
they owned the mortgag-
es in two cases where
homeowners were in fore-
closure. Lenders have
been under scrutiny from
law enforcement officials
since last fall over accusa-
tions that they bungled
foreclosure proceedings
and had shoddy record-
keeping practices.


WlpxlIT


What Is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
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...................... Y.. e.... ...... ... .....................
,h o yi 80ol;T ak

Navistar Blows a Tire
Navistar (NYSE: NAV), the truck-
and diesel-engine-maker formerly
known as International Harvester,
recently reported earnings that were
10 percent below expectations.
Fourth-quarter earnings dropped 55
percent over last year's fourth quarter.
Full-year profits dropped 32 percent,
with revenue growth anemic at just 5
percent for the year. Yet not all is lost.
Check out a key reason for the
earnings drop: Navistar inked
a new four-year contract with
the UAW. That cost it $0.14
per share in fourth-quarter
profit, but secures the company
against similar labor-cost surprises
for the next four years, and gives
the company a contented workforce
as it moves into 2011.
Better still, Navistar may well
blow all these numbers away next
year. CEO Daniel Ustian says that
"the North American truck market
has been depressed for three years."
But Ustian expects to generate
"solid returns to our bottom line in
2012 and 2013." Why? Because
North American trucking is about to
take its foot off the brake, as ancient
trucking fleets turn over, and truck-
ing companies make good on their
promises to buy newer, more fuel-
efficient, less accident-prone rigs.
Analysts expect this trucking
renaissance to keep Navistar's profits
growing at an annualized 9.3 percent
pace over the next five years'. With
Navistar stock currently selling for
less than five times its free cash
flow, its shares are looking attractive.


Page Editor: Roni Toldans, 754-0424














Page Editor: Roni Toldans, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW



The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights

A NYSE Amex A Nasdaq

7,980.32 +16.30 2,150.58 -57.81 2,703.17 +50.30


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
CaptlTrpf 2.56 +1.20 +88.2 Bamwell 4.74 +1.12 +31.1 GranCtyrs 4.79 +2.39 +99.6
CapTrl2pf 2.61 +1.10 +72.8 CheniereEn 7.20 +1.68 +30.4 IndBkMIrs 2.47 +1.17 +90.0
Raythnwt 12.42 +3.70 +42.4 Hyperdyn 6.36 +1.40 +28.2 VillBk&Tr 2.50 +1.01 +67.8
DaqoNEn n 13.25 +3.09 +30.4 VistaGold 2.99 +.60 +25.1 OpexaTher 2.36 +.89 +60.5
QiaoXMob 5.28 +1.22 +30.0 ChiBotanP 2.37 +.40 +20.3 AnacorPhn 8.17 +2.80 +52.1
ValeantPh 35.64 +7.35 +26.0 iBio 3.80 +.64 +20.3 YadkinVFn 2.64 +.83 +45.9
Vonage 2.78 +.54 +24.1 eMagin 7.03 +1.03 +17.2 Carver8cp 2.78 +.87 +45.5
SundseSen 6.62 +1.17 +21.5 GIblScape 2.32 +.34 +17.2 TranSI 2.92 +.84 +40.4
Nautilush 2.16 +.38 +21.3 LGLGrp 21.09 +3.10 +17.2 LexiPhrm 2.00 +.56 +38.9
Gramrcy 2.80 +.49 +21.2 WellsGard 2.55 +.33 +14.9 HaupgDig 3.09 +.85 +38.0


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Goldcpwt 2.55 -1.24 -32.7
FstBcPR rs 5.41 -1.49 -21.6
AmrRlty 6.24 -1.71 -21.5
ChinaGreen 7.33 -1.67 -18.6
LizClaib 6.01 -1.15 -16.1
KVPhmA 2.15 -.40 -15.7
DirDGIdBIIl 33.38 -5.82 -14.8
AmbwEdn 11.91 -2.01 -14.4
SilvWhtn g 33.51 -5.53 -14.2
ChiXFash n 7.90 -1.26 -13.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
Citgrp 31971582 4.94 +.21
BkofAm 14061002 14.25 +.91
S&P500ETF5998227127.14+1.39
FordM 4811467 18.27+1.48
SPDR Fncl4784447 16.22 +.26
SprintNex 3967106 4.68 +.45
Pfizer 3851917 18.34 +.83
GenElec 2787888 18.43 +.14
Alcoa 2345679 16.42+1.03
JPMorgCh2332742 43.64+1.27

Diary
Advanced 1,677
Declined 1,476
New Highs 553
New Lows 24
Total issues 3,197
Unchanged 44
Volume 24,298,062,459


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
PacOffPT 2.13 -2.04 -48.9
ChiGengM 3.46 -1.69 -32.8
Crosshg rs 2.00 -.52 -20.6
EstnLtCap 4.11 -.95 -18.8
PhrmAth 3,56 -.67 -t5.8
MincoG g 2.31 -.42 -15.4
AlexcoRg 6.98 -1.21 -14.8
HKN 3.00 -.50 -14.3
GrtBasGg 2.56 -.40 -13.4.
DenisnMg 2.98 -.44 -12.9

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
RareEleg 569307 14.70-1.36
ChinaShen 548478 8.97 +.57
AvalRare n 476615 6.53 +.29
NovaGldg 328467 13.16-1.11
ChiGengM 255933 3.46-1.69
NthgtM g 255228 2.95 -.25
CheniereEn238196 7.20+1.68
KodiakOg 232366 6.09 -.51
VantageDrd 215442 2.09 +.06
NAPallg 211774 6.25 -.69

Diary
Advanced 253
Declined 279
New Highs 58
New Lows 10
Total issues 550
Unchanged 18
Volume 1,031,424,189


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
InspPhar 3.84 -4.56 -54.3
TastyBak 4.10-2.25 -35.4
Mattson 2.38 -.62 -20.7
WSI Inds 4.93 -1.24 -20.1
Local.com 5.19 -1.30 -20.0
EDAPTMS 4.63 -1.01 -17.9
KingldJrs 3.44 -.64 -15.7
Aetrium 2.00 -.35 -14.9
Wowjntun 3.80 -.65 -14.6
CrownCfts 4.41 -.74 -14.4

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Intel 3798957 20.66 -.37
Microsoft 3240595 28.60 +.69
Cisco 2993458 20.97 +.74
SidiusXM 2950976 1.61 -.02
PwShs QQQ286064755.87+1.41
Nvidia 2188683 19.87+4.47
MicronT 1759583 8.65 +.63
HuntBnk 1363491 7.09 +.22
Oracle 1284665 31.03 -.27
DryShips 1258072 5.40 -.09


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg
AT&T Inc NY 1.72 28.85 -.10 -0.3 -1.8
Alcoa NY .12 16.42 +1.03 +6.7 +6.7
Annaly NY 2.65 17.78 -.14 -0.8 -.8
AutoZone NY ... 250.67-21.92 -8.0 -8.0
BkofAm NY .04 14.25 +.91 +6.8 +6.8
BobEvans Nasd .80 32.67 -.29 -0.9 -.9
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 14.68 -.13 -0.9 -.9
CSX NY 1.04 67.79 +3.18 +4.9 +4.9
Chevron NY 2.88 91.19 -.06 -0.1 -.1
Cisco Nasd ... 20.97 +.74 +3.7 +3.7
Citigrp NY 4.94 +.21 +4.4 +4.4
CocaCI NY 1.76 62.92 -2.85-4.3 -4.3
Delhaize NY 2.02 71.80 -1.91 -2.6 -2.6
DirFnBear NY ... 9.00 -.46 -4.8 -4.8
DrFBull sNY ... 29.00 +1.16 +4.2 +4.2
DryShips Nasd ... 5.40 -.09 -1.6 -1.6
FamilyDIr NY .62 43.90 -5.81 -11.7 -11.7
FordM NY ... 18.27 +1.48 +8.8 +8.8
GenElec NY .56 18.43 +.14 +0.8 +.8
GenMotn NY ... 38.98 +2.12 +5.8 +5.8
HomeDp NY .95 34.38 -.68 -1.9 -1.9
HuntBnk Nasd .04 7.09 +.22 +3.2 +3.2
iShSilver NY ... 28.10 -2.08 -6.9 -6.9
iShEMkts NY .64 47.25 -.39 -0.8 -.8
iShR2K NY .89 78.52 +.28 +0.4 +.4
Intel Nasd .72 20.66 -.37 -1.8 -1.8
JPMorgChNY .20 43.64 +1.27 +3.0 +2.9
LVSands NY .. 49.89 +3.94 +8.6 +8.6


Name Ex Div
Lowes NY .44
MGM Rsts NY
McDnlds NY 2.44
MicronT Nasd ...
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY ..
NextEraEn NY 2.00
NobltyH Nasd ...
Nvidia Nasd ...
OcciPet NY 1.52
Oracle Nasd .20
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .80
Potash NY .40
PwShs QQQNasd .33
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNI 2.37
SearsHldgsNasd
SiriusXM Nasd
SoulhnCo NY 1.82
SprntNex NY
SPDR FnclNY 16
TimeWamr NY .85
US NGsFd NY
VedzonCmNY 1.95
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20


Last


Wkty Wkly YTD
Cha %Chq %Chg


23.99 -1.09 -4.3 -4.3
16.35 +1.50 +10.1 +10.1
74.37 -2.39 -3.1 -3.1
8.65 +.63 +7.8 +7.8
28.60 +.69 +2.5 +2.5
10.11 +.31 +3.2 +3.2
52.22 +.23 +0.4 +.4
8.45 +.34 +4.2 +4.2
19.87 +4.47 +29.0 +29.0
96.19 -1.91 -1.9 -1.9
31.03 -.27 -0.9 -.9
30.72 -1.39 -4.3 -4.9
66.39 +1.06 +1.6 +1.6
18.34 +.83 +4.7 +4.7
166.92 +12.09 +7.8 +7.8
55.87 +1.41 +2.6 +2.6
51.91 -.73 -1.4 -1.4
127.14 +1.39 +1.1 +1.1
70.18 -3.57 -4.8 -4.8
1,61 -.02 -1.2 -1.2
38.08 -.15 -0.4 -.4
4.68 +.45 +10.6 +10,6
16.22 +.26 +1.7 +1.7
33.30 +1.13 +3.5 +3.5
6.03 +.04 +0.6 +.6
35.93 +.64 +1.8 +.4
54.08 +.15 +0.3 +.3
31.50 +.51 +1.6 +1.6


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings In Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New In past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
ol at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wi =
When Issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs Is paid from fund assets., =- D.t,..; a-. i.- r.,~h, .i [
redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA= nsi. ,mldtt,. wp plPeu.3 dJa -
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gainers and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week


Prime Rate


3.25 3.25


Diar Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
ary DiFederal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Advanced 1,632 Treasuries
Declined 1,168 3-month 0.14 0.12
New Highs 490
New Lows 20 6-month 0.17 0.18
Tolal issues 2,856 5-year 1.95 2.01
Unchanged 56 10-year 13.32 3.30
Volume 10,069,417,777 30-year 4.49 4.45


Dow Jones Industrials
Close: 11,674.76
1-week change: 97.25 (0.8%)
12,000 ....... . ...... . ......


93.24 20.43 31.71 -25.58 -22.55


MON TUES WED THUR FRI


1 1 5 0 0 .


11,000

10,500 *

10,000

9,500


J A S 6 N 0 2


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Mn InIt
Name Obj ($MIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRetis Cl 138,794 10.85 +0.2 +8.1/B +7.9/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 66,101 30.65 +3.0 +10.7/E +1.9/C 5.75 250
Fidelity Contra LG 61,430 68.27 +1.4 +16.3/B +4.3/A NL 2,500
Amedrican Funds CapincBuA m IH 58,576 49.63 +0.2 +7.0/D +3.8/C 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStldx LB 56,062 31.91 +4.0 +15.4/A +2.5/B NL 3,000
Amedrican Funds CpWIdGrlA m WS 55,060 35.49 +1.1 +5.2/E +3.8/B 5.75 250
Vanguard InstIdxl LB 54,685 116.34 +4.1 +13.6/B +1.9/B NL 5,000,000
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 52,074 16.58 +0.7 +10.8/C +4.0/B 5.75, 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 51,437 117.17 +4.1 +13.6/B +1.9/B NL 10,000
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 48,788 28.30 +3.1 +9.2/E +2.0/B 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 47,190 31.92 +4.0 +15.6/A +2.6/B NL 10,000
Vanguard Totlntl d FB 45,190 15.58 +1.7 +6.9/C +3.1/B NL 3,000
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 43,406 35.32 +0.9 +9.4/A +3.8/A NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 43,037 109.50 +5.2 +11.9/B -0.2/D NL 2,500
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 39,209 41.04 +0.9 +6.6/C +4.4/A 5.75 250
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 38,821 27.43 +3.4 +12.3/B +1.7/B 5.75 250
fri.Te,,mp-Fai,'H,,Iro',,T, A ,0, :A j- i 2 I' .) A .lil iA .'.6/A 4.25 1,000
P'f.Mc T.:.R,f+TA.T CIl I,84 a, 8I5 ). W. .?B .7 7/A NL 1,000,000
v .fqu,,rir,:ii'Plu L B 3 i.4 ir' :u -4 I ,1 -B .21 )/B NL 200,000,000
Arr,.:,ir, Fjur, Ne.rwferqpA T, W'i .1 'A > 2 IA II 8 7 10. 0/A 5.75 250
,T,.,,.:ar, Fun.j.: Fr.i.Iv m Lb Vi)A88 '., .' I 'c, 0 13/A 5.75 250
v'n.j,, ird 1,01rL& 18 : 04l 11" 16 .-I 1 1 34B I 81C NL 3,000
Amr,n.r,..jr, F.rrT.. ,lA n.T MA j3 408 1', (: 19 1 I 'B 6/B 5.75 250
Fidel ,GAeCi. I WC .I2I 8 .'4 :+" a *.,A2/A NL 2,500
var.runr.1 T:.iei.)i,.Ti CI 2' I' ,I -0 I t. D 5 8/B NL 10,000
V :.,.j.iar, Wellrr.,lm r r, 4 54 :,)4 .. +9 A i L .5 4/A NL 5n,000
F,',ia L..FPr.Sl, 1 I.1 2" ,i2 .4 9 4. .28 I. 'li -, 8/B NL 2,500
." ..,, .' i,., 4 i ,.' ,-,, I, ,-r.-i, ....i i : ,'...| *] 0* e,..... . j + .' ... +....'gnLargerowtth,FV -Foreign
.ii.' .1... in 4 ,i.i ...- L5 ... t-"] IL I..l... ..*- L. *Li> -0 M" Cr-i- i:.*2j nMB-M4. C apBlend,MV-
M .: ...... ._ :1i. .. i .,. A r. .,,. j... ,. nr.,. .]r. ,rAi.... 1 .3Rank How fund performed vs.
others with same objedive: A s in top 20%, E in bottom 20%.Min Init lint: Minimum $ needed to Invest inund. Source: Momolgso


New York Stock Exchange


Name Div Yld
AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20 2.1
AK Steel .20 1.3
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72 6.0
AbtLab 1.76 3.6
AberFitc .70 1.3
AMD ...
Aeropostl s ...
Aetna .04 .1
Agilent
Agnico g .64 .9
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 .7
Aldlrish
Allstate .80 2.6
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52 6.2
AEagleOut .44 3.0
AEP 1.84 5.1
AmExp .72 1.6
AmlntlGrp ...
Anadarko .36 .5
AnalogDev .88 2.3
AnnTaylr
Annaly 2.65 14.9
Aon Corp .60 1.4
ArcelorMit .75 2.1
ArchCoal .40 1.2
ArchDan .60 1.9
ATMOS 1.36 4.3
Avon .88 3.0
BB&TCp .60 2.3
BakrHu .60 1.1
BcBilVArg .55 6.0
BcoBrades .82 4.2
BcoSantand .78 7.9
BcoSBrasil .45 3.5
BkofAm .04 .3
Bklrelnd 1.04 ...
BkNYMel .36 1.2
Bar iPVix rs ...
BarrickG .48 1.0
Baxter 1.24 2.5
BerkHBs ... ...
BestBuy .60 1.7
Blackstone .40 2.7
BlockHR .60 4.7
Boeing 1.68 2.4
Borders
BostonSci ...
BoydGm ...
BrMySq 1.32 5.1
CB REIlis ...
CBS B .20 1.0
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Citigrp
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CocaCE .48 2.0
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ColgPal 2.12 2.7
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Wkly YTD Wkly I
PE Ch %Chg Last Name


17 +.81
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Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cho %Chg Last


ConAgra .92
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ConEd 2.38
ConstellA ...
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
Covidien .80
DCT Indl .28
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.24
DanaHIdg ...
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.40
DelMnte .36
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DiaOffs .50
DrSCBear rs...
DirFnBear ...
DrxFBulls ...
DirxSCBull .11
DirxLCBear ...
Discover .08
Disney .40
DomRescs 1.83
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
EMC Cp ...
ElPasoCp .04
Elan
EldorGid g .05
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FordM
ForestLab ...
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GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .40
GenGrPrn...
GenMills s 1.12
GenMot n ...
GenOn En ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .32
GoldFLtd .16
Goldcrp g .38
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HeclaM
Hertz
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Name
iShEMkts
iShB20 T
iS Eafe
iSR1KV
iSR1KG
iShR2K
iShREst
IngerRd
IBM
Intl Coal
IntlGame
IntPap
Interpublic
Invesco
ltauUnibH
JCrew
JPMorgCh
Jabil
JanusCap
JohnJn
JohnsnCtl
JnprNtwk
KB Home
Keycorp
Kimco
KingPhrm
Kinross g
Kohls
Kraft
LDK Solar
LSI Corp
LVSands


Wkly YTD 'Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
.64 1.4 ... -.39 -.8 47.25
3.86 4.2 ... -1.77 -1.9 92.35
1.42 2.5 ... -.85 -1.5 57.37
1.29 2.0 ... +.70 +1.1 65.57
.73 1.3 ,.. +.55 +1.0 57.81
.89 1.1 ... +.28 +.4 78.52
1.97 3.5 ... -.23 -.4 55.73
.28 .6 27 -.49 -1.0 46.60
2.60 1.8 13 +1.17 +.8 147.93
86 +.85 +11.0 8.59
.24 1.3 25 +.73 +4.1 18.42
.50 1.8 56 +.75 +2.8 27.99
... 35 +.49 +4.6 11.11
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... 18 +1.08 +2.5 44.22
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.04 .3 18 +.10 +.8 13.07
2.16 3.5 13 +.75 +1.2 62.60
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... 44 +.67 +1,8 37.59
.25 1.6 85 +1.76 +13.0 15.25
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.72 4.0 62 +.03 +.2 18.07
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... 15 -2.44 -4.5 51.90
1.16 3.7 12 -.32 -1.0 31.19
... 10 +.31 +3.1 10.43
... 34 +.06 +1.0 6.05
... ... ... +3.94 +8.6 49.89


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cha %Chg Last


LennarA .16
L.llyEli 1.96
Limited .60
UncNat .20
LizClaib
LyonBas A
MBIA
MEMC
MFA Fncl .94
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .20
Manpwl .74
MarathonO 1.00
MktVGold .40
MktVJrGId 2.93
MarshM .84
Marshlls .04
Masco .30
MasseyEn ,24
McAfee
Mechel
Medtmic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
Molycorp n ..
Monsanto 1.12
MonstrWw ..
Moodys .46
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20


Name DIv YId PE


MotriaSoln ...
MotriaMon ...
NCR Corp ...
,labors
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 7.04
NOilVarco .44
NatSemi .40
NY CmtyB 1.00
NewmtM .60
NextEraEn 2.00
NiSource .92
NobleCorp .90
NokiaCp .56
NorflkSo 1.44
Novartis 1.99
Nucor 1.45
OcciPet 1.52
OfficeDpt
OilSvHT 2.40
PG&E Cp 1.82
PMI Grp
PNC .40
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.92
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.20
Petrobras 1.20
Pfizer .80
PhilipMor 2.56
Potash .40
PS USDBull...
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ...
ProUltSP .43
VroUShL20 ...
ProUShtFn ...
ProUSR2K ...
ProUSSP500...
ProUltCrude...
ProUSSIv rs...
ProgrssEn 2.48
ProgsvCp 1.16
ProLogis .45
Prudenll 1.15
PSEG 1.37
PulteGrp ...
QntmDSS ...
QwestCm .32
RAIT Fin
RadianGrp .01
Raytheon 1.50
RegionsFn .04
ReneSola .
RiteAidh
SLMCp
SpdrDJIA 2.77
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S&P500ETF2.37
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SpdrKbwBk .13
SpdrLehHY4.68
SpdrKbw RB .35
SpdrRetl .49
SpdrMetM .38
Safeway- .48
StJude
Saks
SandRdge ..
SaraLee .46
Schlmbrg .84
Schwab .24
SemiHTr .56
SiderNacs ,.58
SilvWhtng ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last


... +.85 +2.2
...+3.96 +13.6
12 +1.22 +7.9
... -.70 -3.0
... -.11 -6.5
... +1.08 +2.4
17 -2.21 -3.3
11 +.19 +1.4
14 -.22 -1.2
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13 +.23 +.4
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8 +.99 +2.8
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17 +2.22 +3.5
13 -1.90 -3.2
69 +.17 +.4
18 -1.91 -1.9
.. +.59 +10.9
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14 -.82 -1.7
... +.44 +13.3
10 +1.22 +2.0
..: +3.82 +19.7
25 -1.91 -3.0
23 -1,39 -4.9
17 +1.06 +1.6
24 +.97 +5.3
... -1.7T -5.2
.. -1.62 -4.3
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15 -2.11 -3.6
32+12.09 +7.8
... +,65 +2.9
... -,50 -2.1
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... +.99 +2.1
... +1.30 +3.5
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-.13 -1.0
... -.61 -3.1
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14 +1.86 +2.9
12 -.13 -.7
... -.08 -.6
9 +1.49 +2.5
10 -.22 -.7
...+1.09 +14.5
... +.58 +15.6
53 -.22 -2.9
2 +.40 +18.3
... +.90 +11.2
9 +3.89 +8.5
.. +.02 +.3
... '+.97 +11.1
+.09 +9.9
8 +.94 +7.5
... +.94 +.8
... -5.14 -3.7
... +.58 +.4
... +1.39 +1.1
... +.38 +2.2
... +.32 +1.2
... +.29 +.7
-.68 -2.6
... -1.43 -2.9
... +.09 +.1
...-1.36 -6.0
15 -2.20 -5.1
... +.82 +7.7
7 +.49 +6.7
23 -.08 -.5
25 -1.94 -2.3
43 +.78 +4.6
... +.29 +.9
... +.83 +5.0
52 -5.53 -14.2


Name Div
SouthnCo 1.82
SwstAid .02
SwstnEngy ...
SprintNex ...
SP Matls 1.17
SP HIthC .57
SP CnSt .78
SP Consum .49
SP Engy .99
SPDR Fncl .16
SP Inds .60
SPTech .32
SP Util 1.27
StateStr .04
StillwtrM ...
Suncorgs .40
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TCF Fncl .20
TJX .60
TaiwSemi .47
Talbots
Target 1.00
TeckRes g .60
TenetHIth ...
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texlnst .52
ThomCrkg ...
3M Co 2.10
TimeWam .85
TitanMet ...
TollBros ...
Total SA 3.13
Transocn ...
Travelers 1.44
Tycolnti .86
Tyson .16
UBS AG ...
USAirwy ...
USEC
UtdContl ...
UPS B 1.88
US Bancrp .20
USNGsFd...
US OiFd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .50
ValeSA .76
ValeSApf .76,
VateantPh .38
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VerizonCm1.95
ViacomB .60
Visa .60
Vishayint ...
Vonage
Walgm .70
Weathflntl ...
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .08
WDigital ..
WstnUnion .28
Weyerh .60
WmsCos .50
WT India .15
XL Grp .40
Xerox .17
Yamana g .12
Youku n
YumBmds 1.00


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
4.8 15 -.15 -.4 38.08
..2 24 +.31 +2.4 13.29
.. 22 +.72 +1.9 38.15
... ... +.45 +10.6 4.68
3.1 ... -.10 -.2 38.32
1.8 ... +.57 +1.8 32.07
2.7 ... -.28 -.9 29.03
1.3 ... +.29 +.8 37.70
1.4 ... +.03 ... 68.28
1.0 ... +.26 +1.7 16.22
1.7 ... +.39 +1.1 35.26
1.2 ... +A6 +2.2 25.75
4.0 ... +.24 +.8 31.58
.1 ... +.28 +.6 46.62
... 71 -1.40 -6.6 19.95
... ... -.99 -2.6 37.30
.1 ... -.71 -2.4 28.80
4.0 ... -.97 -10.1 8.66
1.6 ... -.09 -3.4 2.55
3.4 16 +1.22 +3.3 30.36
1.3 15 +.31 +2.1 15.12
1.3 13 +1.26 +2.8 45.65
3.6 ... +.53 +4.2 13.07
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1.8 14 -5.08 -8.4 55.05
... ... +.59 +1.0 62.42
... 4 +.20 +3.0 6.89
... 9 -.34 -2.4 13.70
... 24 +.81 +4.4 19.35
1.6 14 +.72 +2.2 33.22
... 33 -.22 -1.5 14.50
2.4 15 -.07 -.1 86.23
2.6 15 +1.13 +3.5 33.30
... 50 +.26 +1.5 17.44
... ... +1.90 +10.0 20.90
5.8 ... +.06 +.1 53.54
... .10 +5.53 +8.0 75.04
2.7 8 -2.38 -4.3 53.33
2.0 19 +1.69 +4.1 43.13
.9 8 -.29 -1.7 16.93
... ... -.04 -.2 16.43
... 7 +1.39 +13.9 11.40
.. 19 +.16 +2.7 6.18
... ... +2.13 +8.9 25.95
2.6 22 -.43 -.6 72.15
.8 17 -.88 -3.3 26.09
... ... +.04 +.6 6.03
... ... -1.33 -3.4 37.67
.4 ... -2.28 -3.9 56.14
1.3 10 +2.34 +6.5 38.45
2.2 ... +.41 +1.2 34.98
2.5 .. +.44 +1.5 30.66
1.1 23 +7.35 ,+26.0 35.64
.8 ... +.71 +3.1 23.83
1.7 ... -.40 -.8 47.75
5.4 +.64 +.4 35.93
1.5 14 +.91 +2.3 40.52
.8 18 +2.58 +3.7 72.96
... 12 +.84 +5.7 15.52
... 16 +.54 +24.1 2.78
1.7 18 +1.12 +2.9 40.08
... -.43 -1.9 22.37
.6 12 +.51 +1.6 31.50
1.8 41 -.06 -1.3 4.56
... 6 -.87 -2.6 33.03
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2.9 .., +1.64 +8.7 20.57
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.6 ... -1.35 -5.1 25.04
1.8 21 +.30 +1.4 22.12
1.5 16 -.22 -1.9 11.30
1.0 28 -.94 -7.3 11.86
... ... +3.89 +11.1 38.90
2.0 21 +.47 +1.0 49.52


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ASML Hid .27
ATPO&G ..
ActivsBliz .15
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT
AllscriptH ...
AlteraCp If .24
Amarin
Amazon
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
Angiotc gh ...
ApolloGrp ...
Apple Inc ...
ApidMatI .28
ArenaPhm ...
ArmHId .12
ArubaNet ...
Atheros
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.44
AvisBudg ...
Baidu s
BedBath
Broadcom .32
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .16
CapFdF rs ...
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
ChkPoint ...
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco
CitzRepBh ...
CitrixSvs


... -2.03
... -.42
16 -.34
22 +1.26
58 +1.64
62 +1.30
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92+10.42
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22 +.42
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29 -.19
... +.21
30 +.02
... +.04
23 -.47
... +2.77
15 +1.65
15 +.74
... +.18
48 +.01


-5.3 36.31
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-2,7 12.10
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... 59.16
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-1.0 45.79
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+3.7 20.97
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... 68.42


Name DIv
Cleerwire ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .38
Come spcl .38
Compuwre ..
CorinthC ..
Costco .82
Crocs
Ctrip.coms ...
CypSemi
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTV A ...
DishNetwk...
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips ...
ETrade rs ....
eBay
ElectArts ...
EntropCom ..
EricsnTel .28
Expedia .28
ExpScrips ...
FifthThird .04
Finisar
Flextm
FosterWhl ...
FuelCell ...
GT Solar ...
GileadSci ...
GreenMtC s...
HaupgDig ...
HercOffsh ...
Hologic
HudsCity .60
Incyte
InspPhar ...
Intel .72


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... +.46 +8.9 5.61
... 34 +1.80 +2.5 75.09
1.7 18 +.83 +3.8 22.70
1.8 17 +.70 +3.4 21.41
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1.2 24 -1.56 -2.2 70.65
... 25 -.51, -3.0 16.61
... ... +4.00 +9.9 44.45
... 40 +.71 +3.8 19.29
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... ... +3.28 +9.4 38.20
... 25 +1.93 +4.8 41.86
... 10 +1.48 +7.5 21.14
5.9 12 +.16 +.9 17.63
... 26 -.09 -1.6 5.40
... ... +.34 +2.1 16.34
.. 14 -.14 -.5 27.70
... ... -.33 -2.0 16.05
.. 61 +1.30 +10.8. 13.38
2.5 ... -.47 -4.1 11.06
1.1 16 +.53 +2.1 25.62
... 29 +2.20 +4.1 56.25
.3 ... -.01 ... 14.68
... 33 +1.97 +6.6 31.66
... 16 +.26 +3.3 8.11
... 18 +.36 +1.0 34.88
... ... -.23 -10.0 2.08
... 12 +1.38 +15.1 10.50
... 11 +1.26 +3.5 37.50
... 76 +3.06 +9.3 35.92
... ... +.85 +38.0 3.09
... ... -.17 -4.9 3.31
... ... -.03 -.2 18.79
4.6 12 +.41 +3.2 13.15
... ... -.21 -1.3 16.35
... ... -4.56 -54.3 3.84
3,5 11 -.37 -1.8 20.66


Name Div
Intersil .48
Intuit .1.
IvanhoeEn ...
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ..
JetBlue
Kulicke
LamResrch ...
Level3h ...
LexiPhrm ..
UnearTch .92
Local.com ..
Logitech
MIPS Tech..
MannKd
MarvellT ...
Mattel .83
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .64
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15
Novell
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia
OmniVisn
OnSmcnd
Oracle .20
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .48
PacEthh ...
PattUTI. .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .62
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ .33


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
3.3 ... -.63 -4.1 14.64
27 -.91 -1.8 48.39
... ... +.41 +15.1 3.13
... 7 +.20 +2.9 7.12
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... 23 +.47 +7.1 7.08
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... ... +.56 +38.9 2.00
2.7 18 +.02 +.1 34.61
... 19 -1.30 -20.0 5.19
... 23 -.38 -2.0 18.17
... 39 +1.77 +11.7 16.94
... ... +.14 +1.7 8.20
... 22 +1.49 +8.0 20.04
3.4 13 -1.25 -4.9 24.18
... ... +.65 +10.2 7.01
... 5 +.63 +7.8 8.65
2.2 7 +.69 +2.5 28.60
... 38 +2.24 +4.1 57.20
... 67 +3.60 +2.0 179.30
1.0 14 +.12 +.8 14.68
... 6 +.03 +.5 5.95
... ... +1.17 +6.4 19.35
55 +4.47 +29.0 19.87
28 -2,40 -8.1 27.21
16 +.90 +9.1 10.78
.6 23 -.27 -.9 31.03
... 24 +.28 +3.3 8.87
.8 62 -.61 -1.1 56.73
... ... +.14 +19,1 .86
1.0 69 -1.56 -7.2 19.99
3.9 23 +.96 +3.1 31.87
4.4 47 +.23 +1.6 14.24
... ... +.05 +1.6 3.19
16 +.28 +2.7 10.48
.6 ... +1.41 +2.6 55.87


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Powrwvav ...
QiaoXing
Qualcom .76 1.5
RF MicD ... ...
RschMotn ...
Riverbed s ...
Rovi Corp ...
STEC
SanDisk
Satcon h
SeagateT ...
Sequenom ...
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ... ...
Staples .36 1.5
Starbucks .52 1.6
StlDynam .30 1.6
StemCells ...
SunesisPh ...
Symantec ... ...
TD Ameritr .20 1.0
Tellabs .08 1.1
TevaPhrm .75 1.4
TiVo Inc ...
TriQuint
UranmRs ...
UrbanOut ...
VirgnMdah .16 .6
Vodafone 1.33 4.8
Windstrm 1.00 7.4
Wynn 1.00 .8
XOMA rs
Xilinx .64 2.1
Yahoo
Zalicus
ZionBcp .04 .2


... +.74
... +.16
26 +2.24
19 +.51
11 +3.55
... +3.18
47 +.77
27 +1.53
11 +2.51
... +.32
5 -.57
... -.33
81 -.02
40 +1.61
20 +.67
26 +.65
26 +.47
... -.11
.. -.06
18 +.81
20 +.66
12 +.25
16 +1.88
... +1.35
13 +1.77
... -47
22 +.20
... -1.27
... +1.09
21 -.43
...+14.89
... +.70
14 +.99
22 +,27
7 +.57
... +.34


+29.1 3.28
+5.7 2.99
+4.5 51.73
+7.0 7,86
+6.1 61.68
+9.0 38.35
+1.2 62.78
+8.7 19.18
+5.0 52.37
+7.1 4.82
-3.8 14.47
-4.1 7.70
-1.2 1.61
+5.6 30.24
+2.9 23.44
+2.0 32.78
+2.6 18.77
-9.7 .98
-10.6 .47
+4.8 17.55
+3.5 19.65
+3.7 7.03
+3.6 54.01
+15.6 9.98
+15.1 13.46
-13.8 2.93
+.6 36.01
-4.7 25.97
+4.1 27.53
-3.1 13.51
+14.3 118.73
+13.6 5.83
+3.4 29.97
+1.6 16.90
+36.1 2.15
+1.4 24.57


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
AbdAsPac .42 6.3 ... -.11 -1.6 6.64
AdeonaPh ........ +.33 +26.4 1.58
Advntrx rs ...... ... -.08 -3.1 2.53
AlexcoRg ... ... ... -1.21 -14.8 6.98
AldNevG ... ... 49 -1.88 -7.1 24.43
AlmadnM g ...... ... -.40 -8.5 4.33
'ArcadiaRs ... ... ... +.03 +11.3 .34
Aurizon g ... ... ... -.52 -7.1 6.80
AvalRaren ......... +.29 +4.6 6.53
BarcUBS368 ...... ... -1.31 -2.7 47.81.
BarcGSOil ...... ... -.84 -3.3 24.77
Brigus grs .. ... ... -.30 -14.3 1.80
CAMACEn ..... ... -.25 -12.6 1.74
Carderog ... ... ... -.35 -15.2 1.95
CardiumTh ...... ... +.04 +9.4 .43
CelSci 16 -.01 -.7 .82
CFCdag .01 .1 ... -1.62 -7.8 19.11
CheniereEn ...... ... 1.68 +30.4 7.20
ChiArmM ... ... 18 +.06 +1.6 3.94
ChiGengM. ... 27 -1.69 -32.8 3.46
ChinaShen ... 26 +.57 +6.8 8.97
ClaudeR g .... ... -.23 -10.5 1.96
Crossh g rs ...... ... -.52 -20.6 2.00
DejourEg ...... ... +.01 +4.7 .34
DenisnMg ...... ... -.44 -12.9 2.98
EndvSilv g ...... ... -.80 -10.9 6.54
Fronteerg .... ... -1.43 -12.2 10.30
GascoEngy ........ +.10 +28.6 .45
GenMoly ... ... ... -.40 -6.2 6.08
GoldStrg ... ... 40 -.57 -12.4 4.02
GranTrra g ... ... ... +.04 +.5 8.09
GrMBasGg ... ... ... -.40 -13.4 2.56
Hemisphrx ........ +.02 +3.8 .51
Hyperdyn ... .. ... +1.40 +28.2 6.36
InovioPhm ...... ... +.15 +13.0 1.30
KodiakO g ... ... -.51 -7.7 6.09
MadCatzg ... 10 +.13 +12.7 1.15
Metalico ... ... 28 -.28 -4.8 5.60


Name Div
Metalline
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Minefnd g
NIVS IntT
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NA Pall g
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VimetX .50
VistaGold ..
YM Bio ..


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YId PE Cha %Chg Last


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Weekly Dow Jones


Currencies
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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 2011


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


personal merchande totalling $100 or less.
Thls isa non-refundable rate.





|4lianes p 6 days l anddditional
Rate applies to pvate Individuals selling
personal merclhandise totalling ,500 or less. j
Each Item must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate




One item per ad 6 |
4 lines 6 days Each additional
lne $1.15
Rate applies to private IndivIduds selling
personal menchain m rdise tota $D 00 a or less.
Each Item mInst include a price.
This Isa -refundable rate.



One Item per ad jl 6X
4 lines 6 daysEach additional
Rate applies to private individual selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less.
Sach i Item must Include a price.
This iS a norefundablerate.




One item per ad $ 3l
4 lines 6 das Each additional
line $1.55
Rate applies to private individuals selling
Each item must Include price.i
This Is a non-refundable rate.




|One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days Each additional
e oi.ie t r....v ,.a ., s ...,








4 lines$ 1750
3 days
Ichigde 2 Silgn Dactladditionalline'l65



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....'92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each.Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com

Deadine


Ad isto Appear,
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday


Call by:
Mon., 10:00a.m.
Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Wed., 10:00a.m.
Thus., 10:00 a.m.
FN., 10:00a.m.
Fdi, 10:00 am.


Fax/Email by:
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wed., 9:00a.m.,
Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Fd., 9:00a.m.
Fr., 9:00 a.m.


These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings.. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.itkeeitiyreportcr.conl


Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA The
School District of Columbia County,
Florida announces they will hold a
workshop, to which all persons are
invited to attend as follows:
DATE: Tuesday, January 25, 2011
TIME: 6:30 p.m.
PLACE: Columbia County School
District Administrative Complex Au-
ditorium
372 West Duval Street
Lake City, FL 32055
PURPOSE: Workshop to discuss
District Accreditation.
No action will be taken at this meet-
ing.
Pursuant to the provisions of the
American with Disabilities Act, any
person requiring special accommo-
dations to participate in the above
workshop is asked to advise the
School Board at least 48 hours be-
fore the workshop by contacting
Mrs. Lynda Croft at (386) 755-8003.
School Board of Columbia County,
Florida
By: Michael F. Millikin
Superintendent of Schools
04542916
January 9, 2011
PUBLIC NOTICE
ON INVITATION TO BID
ITB-014-2011
Sealed bids will be accepted by the
City of Lake City, Florida, 205 N.
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida
*32055 until February 1, 2011 at
11:00 A.M. at which time all bids
will be opened and read aloud in the
City Council Chambers located on
the 2nd Floor of City Hall, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida.
AVIATION FUELS ANNUAL
CONTRACT
Bid specifications may be viewed on
the City website
http://www.lcfla.com/purchasing.ht
m, by contacting
purchasing@lcfla.com, or by phone
(386) 719-5818 or (386) 719-5816.

04542946
January 9, 2011
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
(RFP)
FLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE
IS SEEKING SEALED PROPOS-
ALS FOR THE FOLLOWING:
FGC RFP #11-2-01
CONSULTING SERVICES FOR
EMPLOY FLORIDA BANNER
CENTER FOR WATER RESOUR-
CES
Florida Gateway College
Lake City, Florida
Intent of the Proposal:
Workforce Florida, Inc. (WFI) has
awarded the Employ Florida Banner
Center for Water Resources (Banner
Center) to Florida Gateway College
(College). The purpose of the Banner
Center is to promote and develop
training and -career awareness pro-
grams designed to provide a world
class workforce for the Florida water
industry.
This RFP is seeking proposals from
qualified consultants to assist the
Banner Water Resource Center in
meeting deliverables set forth in an
agreement between WFI and the
Banner Center. The proposal will be
expected to produce planning docu-'
ments keyed to certain deliverables
in the contract between the College
and WFI including Marketing and
Outreach Plan, Career Awareness
Campaign, and Sustainability Plan.
Date & Time for Receiving Propos-
als: -
2:00 P.M. Local Time, TUESDAY,
JANUARY 25, 2011
Place for Receiving Proposals:
Sealed Proposals may be mailed as
follows:
Purchasing Department
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025
Hand Delivered Proposals Are to be
Presented to:
Purchasing Department
Florida Gateway College
198 S.E. Staff Way
Administration Building 001, Room
138
Lake City, Florida 32025
All Proposals must arrive and be
date/time stamped by a Purchasing
Department representative prior to
the specified opening date/time. The
College will not be responsible for
Postal or other delivery service de-
lays that cause a Proposal to arrive at
Room 138, Building 001 after the
designated opening date/time. Pro-
posals that are mailed must be clear-
ly marked on the outside of the enve-
lope as follows:
NAME OF THE PROPOSER
ADDRESS OF THE PROPOSER
RFP# 11-2-01, CONSULTING
SERVICES FOR EMPLOY FLORI-
DA BANNER CENTER FOR WA-
TER RESOURCES, JANUARY 25,
2011.
Qualified Consultants:
Consultants who wish to respond to
this RFP should have demonstrated
success in developing proposals for
Workforce Florida, Inc., the Agency
for Workforce Innovation, or any of


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks / Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


Legal

the Banner Centers in Florida. The
Consultant will have a proven record
of assisting Banner Centers in the de-
velopment of industry advisory
groups and the coordination of the
activities of those groups. Addition-
ally the Consultant will be expected
to have expertise in the areas of de-
veloping and executing marketing or
career awareness campaigns for in-
dustry workforce training. Further,
the Consultant should have demon-
strated experience in the implemen-
tation of business plans designed to
insure the sustainability of work-
force/economic development proj-
ects including the development of
partnerships and customers regional-
ly, nationally, and globally.
Date, Time and Place for Pre-Pro-
posal Conference:
All vendors who are qualified and in-
terested in submitting a sealed pro-
posal for consulting services to the
Banner Center are invited to attend a
PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE
at the College, to be held at 2:00
P.M. local time on THURSDAY,
JANUARY 13, 2011. The Confer-
ence will be held in the Administra-
tive Conference Room in the Admin-
istrative Building 001, on the Col-
lege's main campus.
Proposal Documents Available
From:
Bill Brown, Director of Purchasing
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025
Phone: (386) 754-4360
Fax: (386) 754-4860
Email: bil.brown@fgc.edu
Right to Waive Irregularities and
Technicalities:
Florida Gateway College reserves
the right to waive minor irregulari-
ties and/or technicalities associated
with this solicitation. The Director
of Purchasing of Florida Gateway
College shall be the final authority
regarding waivers of irregularities
and technicalities.
FOR FLORIDA GATEWAY COL-
LEGE
Bill Brown, Director of Purchasing
04542891
January 4, 8, 9, 2011


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

05524732
Reward Two Lost Jack Russell
Terriers,female w/blind eye,
male neutered,
missing since 12/21
386-497-4325 or 365-3970
FREE: Boxer mix dog.
Approx. 1 yr. old. Great
companion. Very friendly &
playful. 386-754-1407

100 Job
Opportunities

04542849
Wanna Go West? Let's Go!
CDL A Operators Wanted for
Lease with a Lease Purchase
Plan, Spouse and Pet Rider
Policy, Health and Life
Insurance Available. 12-15 day
trips, No New England States,
You get 100% fuel surcharge,
0/0's and PTDI
Certified Students Welcome
CALL TODAY TO JOIN US
AND START
THE NEW YEAR
OFF RIGHT!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

05524782






Now accepting resumes for all
positions. Please bring your
resume and visit us from
9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Thursday, January 13th
Sonny's BBQ
3177 W Highway 90
Lake City


FLORIDA
GATEWAY
r COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
MATHEMATICS
164 Duty Days Tenured Track
to Commence Fall 2011
Teach college-level and preparatory
mathematics courses; work with
colleagues for the advancement of
departmental goals. Requires
Master's degree in appropriate area
related to mathematics; or Master's
degree with minimum of 18 graduate
credit hours in course work centered
on mathematics.
Salary Based on degree and
experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 2/7/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at' www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007


Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: hunanr@fqc. edu

VI'"ADA.A/Afi 0'oilgm I ducjm ani-
______ P [:r llloynit iil ______


100 Job
Opportunities

04542883
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace
M54--------------
04542905


S .

Lake City's only full service hotel
is seeking the following:
S Cafe Manager
Front Desk Agent P/T
Room Attendant P/T
Experience required. Apply
in person. Mon-Fri 12-5pmr
213 SW Commerce Dr.
or email resume tQ:
gm@hilakecityfl.com .
EOE/DFWP.

04542906
Office Administrator for
local law firm.
Apply in person if you have
experience in office administra-
tion as well as legal experience.
Those with experience
need only apply.
Must have experience in
management, payroll and
bookkeeping And be available
to start immediately.
Salary will be commensurate
with experience.
Apply in person at
116 NW Columbia Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055.

04542968




FLORIDA SHERIFFS BOYS
RANCH
UNIT SECRETARY
High school diploma with a
minimum of one year of
experience in a responsible
clerical or secretarial position
required. Vocational training in
secretarial/office systems is
preferred. Competitive salary
with excellent benefits.
THERAPIST
The Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch is currently recruiting for
a youth Therapist. Position re-
quires a Master's Degree in
counseling, social work, psy-
chology or related human serv-
ices field with a preference of 2
years clinical experience in pro-
viding services to youth with
emotional disturbances. Li-
censed supervision available.
COTTAGE PARENTS
(3 couples)
Couples needed to provide
direct care and development to
10 boys, ages 8-18. Specific
professional skill based training,
& support provided. Our model
helps children develop social,
academic, and independent
living skills. Salary $47,000 per
couple with housing, utilities,
board, and benefits provided.
YOUTH CARE ASSISTANT
Responsibilities involve
working as part of a team in the
direct care and development of
youth between the ages of 8 and
18. Specific skill-based
training provided. High school
diploma required.
For more information on these
challenging opportunities
contact Linda Mather at
(386) 842-5555. Fax resume to
386/842-1029. Employment
application available at
www.youthranches.org
EOE/DRUG FREE
WORKPLACE

05524758
RN NEEDED
7:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m.
The Health Center of Lake City
has an opening for an RN with
good assessment skills
Excellent Salary
EOE/ADA/Drug
Free Workplace
Apply in person or
send resume to:
The Health Center
of Lake City
560 S.W. McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life


Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.


100 Job
Opportunities

05524764
Suwannee Homecare is seeking
LPN's for an elderly Gainesville
couple for 7am-7pm Days and
weekends will vary This is a
great position to supplement
income Please call Wendy
386-755-1544
Serious inquires only

05524793
NEED IMMEDIATELY
EXPERIENCED TAX
PREPARER
Tax office needs experienced
tax preparer. Must have mini-
mum 2 years experience. Apply
at: 4158 West US Highway 90,
Lake City, FL 32055.

05524813
WAREHOUSE
OPERATIONS
SUPERVISOR

The nations leading retail and
supply chain organization,
SUPERVALU, Inc. has an ex-
cellent career opportunity avail-
able for a Warehouse Operations
Supervisor to assist in ongoing
operations for a perishable
facility (35 degrees to -15 de-
grees) called SUPERVALU
LOGISTICS Florida located in
the Lake City area. This position
will be responsible for supervis-
ing and directing the warehouse
workforce and providing direc-
tion to the support staff. The op-
erational areas that will require
direction and leadership include
receiving, order selection, load-
ing, letdowns and sanitation.
Previous experience, in ware-
house logistics is required in-
cluding the following areas of
expertise:
4+ years of prior warehouse
logistics experience
Perishable warehouse experi-
ence preferred
Knowledge of a mechanized
warehouse operation is desired
Excellent human relations and
communications skills
Proven record of achieving
operational and personal objec-
tives
Ability to maintain a safe and
productive working environment
Bi-lingual in English-Spanish
is a plus
College preferred
Effective coaching, training
and counseling skills
Tcchnical/PC skills desired ,

Work schedules will be fluid as
typical with a warehouse. Posi-
tion requires availability which
includes weekends. In return for
the above qualifications and
skills we offer a competitive
compensation program includ-
ing medical, dental, life insur-
ance, Short Term Disability,
LTD, 401-K, vacation and holi-
days. If you feel that you meet
or exceed the above qualifica-
tions and are seeking a new op-
portunity with a solid, profitable
and progressive organization
please apply at Florida Crown,
1389 US Hwy. 90 West/ Suite
170B, Lake City, FL 32025

05524814
WAREHOUSE SHIPPING
OUTBOUND

SUPERVALU LOGISTICS
Florida is a perishable/frozen
food facility located in Lake
City. We are currently seeking a
qualified candidate for our ship-
ping outbound position (2nd
shift). This position will involve
repetitive lifting and the candi-
date should have the ability to
work overtime as required. This
position will receive progression
increases and wage differentials
for second shift. More detailed
information will be available at
time of interview. Previous
warehouse experience is a plus.
Material handling equipment ex-
perience preferred. We provide
an excellent compensation and
benefits program medical, den-
tal, life insurance, Short Term
Disability, 401(k), employee
stock purchase, vision, a drug
free workplace and great
opportunities for advancement.
Please apply at Florida Crown,
1989 Highway 90 West, Suite
170, Lake City, FL 32025.
Drug Free
EOE/M/F/D/V
Thank you for your interest"

Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.


AR


100 Job
Opportunities
Experienced IT Tech/
Network Admin
Qualifications: 2+ years
experience with: win XP pro, win
7 pro, server 2003, 2008. Must
have worked within and be
familiar with active directory.
Must be capable of lifting/moving
workstations. Microsoft
certifications a plus. Clean drivers
license required. Please submit
resume to hr@chclabs.com or
fax to 386-758-1791
Experienced Stylist
needed, apply at
Southern Exposure Salon
386-752-4614
Part/Time Sales Clerk. $7.25 per
hour. Must be energentic, reliable,
ability to multi task & able to lift
501bs. Fax resume: 386-742-1293
Sewing Machine Operator. Good
wages for experience. 2nd person
needed for misc. duties.
Call Hafner's 386-755-6481

120 Medical
SEmployment

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05524790




MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
RN's
PRN/1 yr experience
CNA
F/T & PRN

ARNP Outpatient Svcs
Starke/Tri County

Recovery Specialist
Prevention Specialist
Trenton/Starke/Lake City

Bachelor's Therapist
Support
Masters Therapists
Adult Substance Abuse
(Licensed)
Emergency Screener
Live Oak/Lake City

Adult Case Manager
Live Oak

Psychiatrist
Outpatient Clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City

Custodial
Lake City

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
www.mbhci.ore
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP

Family Life Care is searching
for good reliable workers
PRN- RN'S and LPN'S as well
as C.N.A's, application found on
our web-site or send resume to:
386-364-5648 HHA#299992645
Giebeig Family Medicine
Hiring for two full-time positions
Front Office Receptionist and'
Nursing, experience preferred.
Fax resume to 719-9494.
Physician's Assistant needed for
new Urgent Care Center in Gaines-
ville area, ER or Urgent Care ex-
perience a plus, but not required.
Contact Paul @ 352-258-4452
Wanted Receptionist,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


130 Part Time

05524792
NEED IMMEDIATELY
TEMPORARY PART-TIME
OFFICE HELP
Tax office needs a mature,
dependable person to work part-
time during tax season must be
able to work evening's'and Sat-
urday's. Candidate must be
dependable, have ability to
multi-task, and be computer
literate. Must also have know
ledge of general office duties as
well as excellent telephone
etiquette and people skills.
Salary based on skills and
experience. Fax resume to
386-755-7331.


E YOU OUR MISSING P
.

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SYour kl
-- positive att
Ser,
Opportunlri


Apply Online or In Persont


SiTEL


TIECE


ills

itude


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 2011


240 Schools &
240 Education

04542861
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/17/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainineservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
Chocolate Lab
$50
AKC
386-965-2215
Pair of Sugar Gliders
with cage and food. Retails at
$149. ea. Asking $100. for both.
386-288-9707
POMERANIAN
10 weeks old.
$250. Paper trained.
386-438-3885
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old And have a health
certificate from a licensed
, veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for iriformatiqn.


361 Farm Equipment 05524743 H
Palm Harbor Homes "
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good. Short Sales/Repo's/Used Homes
Solid 2WD. New front tires, 3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable. Won't Last!! $3,500 40k
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005 John 800-622-2832 Ext. 210


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

407 Computers
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
ASHLEY DINING ROOM
TABLE w/6 chairs and leaf.
$150.00 Great Deal!!!
386-344-5706

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER ,
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat Jan 8th & Sat Jan 15th,8a-3p
Lots of baby things and toys,
181 SE Ripley Place,
Mikesville, off 441, S of Ellisville

440 Miscellaneous
Bass Tender Boat
10'2",
$500 Call for details
386-965-2215
Beautiful Brunswick
Pool Table. Claw feet,
leather pockets. Like new.
$1,200. 386-365-0697
PIGLETS
Black & White
$50 each
386-965-2215
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker. Com-
mercial built, nice shape. $1250.
obo. 386-249-3104 or 719-4802
Great for your New Years Bash!!!

630 Mobile Homes
J30 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
Clean, quiet 3/2 ($625 mo) &
2/1 ($450 mo.) both in Branford
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice 2br/2ba furnished MH on
Hwy 241, Providence. Front porch
Ref req'd. No inside pets. 1st &
sec. 386-752-4618 or 623-0925.
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482






Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003


Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
05524443-
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2BR/1BA.with carport,
Privacy Garden and
Utility Room Near VA.
No Pets. 386-438-8052
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $500. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698 or 386-292-4937
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Quail Heights 2br/lba duplex.
Secluded, private, safe. W/D
hookup. $700. mo. $500 security.
386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961,9181

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
NO Lease/Deposits, ROOMS only
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169,2 ppl $179 + tax
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

70A Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1000 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 Brick home w/great rm, approx
2500 sq ft, bonus rm 300 sq ft,
upgrades thru-out, on 1+1/2
acres,fenced back yard, detached
Irg storage area, 2 car garage,
Exec level home, $1500 month,
1st, last an'd upfront, will
lease with option 386-527-0895
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
3br/2ba Brick. Double Carport
Carpet & tile. CH/A.On small lake
2000 sqft. $950. mo + sec. 386-
752-0118, 623-1698 or 292-4937


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Nice 4br/2.5 ba, 3 ac. Fenced
/Cross Fenced, paved rd., huge
deck, private. McAlpin area. $900
dep. & $950. mo. 386-867-1833

6 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524637
Gainesville-Jacobsen-Savings
Factory direct Jaconsen outlet
now open to the public 3/2 start-
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilehomesales.co
m for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!

05524638
North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gainesville and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty, 2x6 wall, and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

05524639
Why drive to Gainesville?
This is Why! New 28x60
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni-
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy,
I pay for your gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568


Country Club. 4br/4ba. New roof,
AC, windows. Pool, hot tub,
& greenhouse. $229,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Custom Brick, 5+ ac. 5br/4ba.
4412 sqft. 3 car garage, pool, hot
tub, 3 fireplaces, more. $569,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lori Giebeig Simpson 365-5678
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home
w/oversized garage.
Eastside Village Realty, Inc
386-752-5290
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home
2br/2ba, 1 car garage,.
Eastside Village Realty $83,000
386-752-5290


SA


73O Unfurnished
7I3 Home For Rent
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3br/2ba 1760 SqFt, carpet,
tile, enclosed porch, all appliances,
Ig garage, big kitchen. No pets.
386-269-0123
Three Rivers Estates, 2/1, CH/A,
2010 W2 and ref's from current
landlord required, $700 month, &
$700 sec dep, 386-497-4699
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus bonus
room. w/1.5 bath. Quail Heights
CC. $750. mo plus $250 damage
dep. 386-752-8553

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

770 Condos For Rent
Prime location 2br/lba.
Residential or commercial. Comer
of Baya & McFarlane. $600. mo.
$500 security. 386-752-9144 or
386-755-2235

805 Lots for Sale
1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd, owner fin, no
down pym't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2br/2ba Eastside Village.
Unique floor plan. Lg utility/
work room. Screened
front porch. $55,000
DCA, Inc. 386-755-51.10
3/1 on 4.43 acres, metal roof,
pond on property,
Lease option available
$129,888 Results Realty,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
3br/2ba 80'X125' lot. 1,200 sqft.
Kitchen & bath remodeled,
metal roof, Ig fenced back yard.
Close to amenities. $79,900
DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110
3br/2ba Brick home w/1,934 sqft
in Piccadilly Park. 1/2 acre.
Lg playroom, fenced yard.
Reduced to $139,000.
DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110
3br/2ba Custom home. on 5 ac.
where deer & turkey roam.
Lg barn w/enclosed
workshop. $219,000.
DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110
4/2 in Sub-div, open floor
plan,florida room, porch, fenced,
$150,000 call Missy Zecher
@Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
4/2 on 4 acres, open floor plan, 2
living rms, rec room w/wet bar
$89,900 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
4br/2ba, 5 ac., 2069 sqft. Ig family
& florida rm, den. Covered patio,
workshop. $229,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba, remodeled, views of the
lake. Formal LR, dining room &
family room. Many upgrades.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
67.5 acre farm, fenced, workshop,
pole barn and two ponds, MH
(1984 sq ft) $299,000
call Patti Taylor at
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Affordable, clean home in sub-div,
Freshly painted interior,
This is a must see!
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Brick home on 5 acres,
country feel close to town!
Must See! Results Realty
Brittany Stoeckert
386-397-3473
Clean, cozy, well maintained 3/2
on 1.05 acres, lots of shade trees,
built in 2007, $135,900
Call Patty Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896


2008 Johnny Pag
Pink Custom Chopper
200 mi., exc. cond., pink
with white/silver outlined
flames.
$4,500 obo
Call
386-965-0676
Leave message or may text.


2003 Honda Shadow
Ridge 750cc Bike
Mustang seat, sissy bar,
cobra pipes, 12k miles.
$4,100 obo
Call
386-965-0676
Leave message or may text.


2007 Nissan
Frontier SE
21,800 miles, excellent
condition, V-6, automatic.
$15,000
Call
386-961-8680


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 2011


810 Home for Sale
Eastside Village Retirement
A 55+ Spacious home lots of
amenities; clubhouse, pool, spa.
Eastside Village Realty
$89,500 386-752-5290
Excellent area. 3br/2ba home.
1620 sqft. w/covered patio. Lg
front porch & 1 car carport
Lori Giebeig. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, newedeck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances, close to
schools, $65K 478-391-1592
Large entertaining home, w/pool,
gazebo, huge workshop,
$285,000 Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Large home w/acre of land, Irg
family & florida rooms,
covered porch,
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Move In Ready. 3br/2ba w/1,225
sqft. Comer lot, great S/D.
12x16 workshop w/elec.
Upgrades. $75,000.
DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110
Nicely remodeled 3/2 on 2 acres,
partially fenced $115,888
Nancy Rogers @ '
Results Realty
386-867-1271
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Woodcrest S/D Super location,
nice back yard. 3br/2ba home,
cov-
ered back porch. New AC in 2010
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
WOODGATE VILLAGE.
3br/2ba DWMH.
Close to new elementary
school. $27,000.
DCA, Inc. 386-755-5110.
820 Farms &
820 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


820 Farms &
SAcreage
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties'
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
830 Commercial
Property
Commercial property situated
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya Ave 3.27 acres,
$398,888 Results Realty
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271

930 Motorcycles
2003 Honda Shadow Ridge 750cc
bike mustang seat, sissy bar,
Cobra pipes & floorboards, custom
tangerine paint 12k mi. runs &
looks great. $4100obo
will entertain reasonable offers
386-965-0676 Iv mess or text.
2008 Johnny Pag PINK-custom
chopper 200 mi. Real head turner
excel cond .pink w/white/silver
outlined flames $4500obo will
entertain reasonable offers
386-965-0676 Iv mess or text.

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
2007 Nissan Frontier SE,
21K miles, excellent condition,
V6, Auto. $15,000
386-961-8680
2007 Nissan Titan Crew Cab
only 25,000 miles stock #F28
386-365-7431 Steve Bonesio
Rountree-Moore Ford
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802

COM ONGY


950 Cars for Sale
1970 Monte Carlo (1st yr). Body
restored, painted, New engine, less
than 10,000 mi. Must see. $9,000.
386-365-0697
2003 Cadillac, Sedan Deville,
Pearl White,excellent condition.
84 K Miles, $6,000
386-527-0895
2008 Cadillac DTS, only 15,000
miles, stock # 245108, pls ask for
Myron Wruble @ 386-755-0630
#292, Rountree-Moore Ford
2010 Grand Marquis, 3 to choose
from stock #F292 Myron Wrubel,
386-755-0630 #292
Rountree-Moore Ford
2010 Hyundia Sonata GLS,
4dr, $12,999, warranty, auto, stock
#F307 Dwight Twiggs Rountree-
Moore Ford 386-755-0630 #219
Gas Saver, 07 Sporty Honda Fit,
stock #293G, 31 city 40 hwy,
Tommie Jefferson @ 386-209-
8680 Rountree-Moore Ford

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Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
cnsak@okecityreportertcom


Lake City Reporter






LIFE


Sunday, January 9, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Good tips

for the

January

gardener


else, gardeners
often take their
turn at being
procrastinators.
We have gotten lazy over
the past couple months.
Now we wait to go out and
work when there is less
wind, more sun, less rain,
more moisture, warmer
temperatures, and so on.
But the January garden
is beckoning, and there is
much to do.
The average daytime
temperature for Columbia
County in January is in the
mid-50s. What could pos-
sibly be better than work-
ing outside with the crisp,
clean air and the warm
winter sun on your face at
the same time?
If you have a cool sea-
son garden, there are a
few last-minute additions
you can make now. Some
cool season vegetables are
beets, broccoli, cabbage,
carrots, turnips, radishes
and mustard. On the aver-
age, our coldest tempera-
tures arrive during the last
week of January or the
first week in February. Be
prepared to cover your ten-
der plants with sheets and
blankets.
Crinum, agapanthus,
and gloriosa lily are bulbs
that can be planted now.
Choose a sunny, well
drained site and till the soil,
mixing in soil amendments.
Add several inches of
organic matter such as
peat, compost or well-rot-
'ted manure, and bulb fertil-
izer. A layer of mulch over
the bed will provide cold
weather protection.. Now
is the time to be planting
those deciduous fruit trees
that you've been thinking
about.
Planting trees now will
give the roots time to
develop before the dry,
spring months arrive.
Make certain your new
trees are watered well dur-
ing their first year, espe-
cially during dry spells.
Choose cultivars of
peaches, nectarines,
and plums that will
grow well in Florida.
The Oriental persimmon
is well-adapted to northern
Florida, as well as some
figs and hard pears.
The cultivars to look for
can be found at http://edis.
ifas. ufl. edu/mg211 or you
can contact the Master
Gardeners at 752-5384 on
Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday mornings.
While you are sharpen-
ing your tools and cleaning
out the shed or garage,
why not consider making a
donation of those nursery
pots or potting soils to the
Master Gardeners for their
annual plant sale? Pick up
service is available.

E D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jacqui Sulek, the Four Rivers Audubon Society president, scans the water with binoculars for any non-native birds while vice president Loye Barnard
identifies them in 'The Sibley Field Guide to Birds of Eastern North America,' known to many as the bird watcher's Bible.




Getting bird's-eye view



Counts from LC birders sent to National Audubon Society


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn
I Achallenge from his father sparked
Salife-long interest in bird watching

"I was 10-years-old. My father
old me if I could find 10 differ-
ent birds in our backyard he would get me a
'Golden Nature Guide' and pay for the book,
but if I couldn't, he would take it out of my
allowance," he said. "I found 13 different
birds in our backyard and have been a bird-
watcher ever since."
These days Krummrich goes out of his way
to find birds.
"It's something inside of my blood," he
said. "God gave me a bird brain."
There are more than 200 different species
of birds for watchers, or birders, to see in
Columbia County, said Virlyn Willis of Lake
City. The area offers the opportunity for bird-
ers of all levels.
"They say (birding) is the fastest grow-
ing hobby in the country," he said. "You can
always look for birds. I don't care what you're
doing."
Willis
has
been a
S.: birder for
40 years.
. Another
Sbobby led to
Willis becom-
ing a birder.
"I used to do
'an awful lot of
duck hunting and
tuMd; se-e other crit-
t Ners ly ing by," he said.
COuTA Vermillion T 11 you've got any curi-
FlA Vermillion osity at all you go see
Flycatcher.what it is out there."


Krummrich and Willis were count compil-
ers for the annual National Audubon Society
Christmas Bird Count during the recent holi-
day'season. Christmas bird counts were held
during Dec. 15 to
Jan. 5 across the
nation.
"They track
trends and give .
an indication
of what's going
on out there,"
Krummrich said.
There were
three counts in
the area: Hamilton
County, O'leno and
Lake City.
The compiled
information goes JA
to the Audubon Jacqui Sulek (from left), Vii
and Cornell and Russ Plummer use sp
University to variety of birds in Lake Del
determine where
birds are during
the Christmas season, Willis said.
A circular spot is picked during a count, he
said. Volunteers try to count every species
within the 15-mile diameter.
In Lake City, 116 different species were
observed during the count.
Krummrich has seen several interesting
birds in the area through the years, he said.
A masked duck was on Alligator Lake
about four years. Also a black-throated gray
warbler was in the area in October 2009.
"It came to my bird feeder for about 15
minutes," Krummrich said. "I never saw it
again. I was just blessed and tickled to see
it."
Each movement of birding is a challenge.
"The hope is that you'll find a different
one or strange one," Willis said. "After
you've done it for a long time, it's harder to


find new ones."
Birding can start for interested people at
any time, he said. It requires as much or as
little effort as a person wants.


ASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
rlyn Willis, Jerry Krummrich
otting scopes to look at a
Soto.


"If it turns into
work, I quit,"
Willis said. "I
enjoy it. It lets
you get out and
see interest-
ing birds. It's
an interesting
thing."
A good set
of binoculars
and field guide
come in handy to
become an avid
birder, Willis
said. Peterson's
Guide to eastern
birds and the
Sibley Guide to
birds are both
useful for identi-


fying species in the area.
Paying attention to every detail such
as location, size, markings help iden-
tify a bird, he said. Over time, birders can
identify species by hearing them.
"You learn that different birds do differ-
ent things," Willis said.
The monthly ALLI-Walk at Alligator
Lake features an opportunity to see a vari-
ety of birds and learn about them from
Krummrich and Willis and other experts.
All levels of participation and knowl-
edge can attend the excursion, and more
information is available by calling Loye
Barnard at (386) 497-3536.
"It's really a fantastic resource for
Columbia County," Willis said. "We have
people join us and go see what we can
see. It's just fun down there."


Gizmo Guys coming to FGC Thursday


From staff reports

Fun and laughter open the new
year at Lake City's Florida Gateway
College when The Gizmo Guys
Comic Jugglers perform at the
college's Levy Performing Arts
Center at 7 p.m. on Thursday. The
show is the fourth in the 2010-11
Lyceum Series programs present-
ed by the college.
The Gizmo Guys is the duo of
Allan Jacobs and Barrett Felker,
each an accomplished juggler in
his own right. Both men had 10
years of singular success before
teaming up to form an act.
The New York Times has
described the Gizmo Guys as
"master jugglers with ebullient
energy and exquisite skill" and
they showed "human virtuosity


with a touch of lunacy."
The Gizmo Guys is great fam-
ily entertainment, suitable for all
ages. Combining zippv
repartee, world
class juggling feats,
many of'which they 1
created, and affable a
personalities, Felker '
and Jacobs fashioned
an act which has ama.:-,'I
and amused audiences tur '
more than 20 years and mni. -
than 2,500 performanii,-
The Gizmo Guys has plN,-\l I
practically all of the Uniw-d
States and Canada and
has done shows in many
foreign countries, such
as Japan and Saudi
Arabia. The act fre-
quently appears on


television.
Jacobs learned to juggle in
college and after graduation co-
founded the group Slap
Happy, which
twice won the
best comedy of
the year award
S' by the Boston
Globe. When not
I. during with Slap Happy,
S .' l.bs taught juggling
:it Ringling Brothers and
[li rnum & Bailey's Clown
,,Cllege. Felker, a juggler
since age 15, started his
career with the Harlem
Globetrotters, doing
his act in between
the team's bas-
ketball playing.
After years with


the team, he settled in Europe,
doing a solo act then returned to
America, where he co-formed The
Dynamotion Jugglers.
Then in 1987 Felker and Jacobs
formed The Gizmo Guys and
have been working together ever
since.
Tickets are now available for
The Gizmo Guys, "a show for the
ages and for all ages." Prices are
$15 for adults, $14 for seniors (age
55 and older), and $13 for students
and Florida Gateway College staff.
For more information, call the
Levy Center box office at (386)
754-4340 or e-mail mark.kirby@
fgc.edu. Prior to the performance,
dinner will be served in the col-
lege's Lobo Cafe. Reservations are
required. For further details call
i.'.-., 845-0925 or (386) 438-511l













Update on the pediatric vaccine controversy


ost parents
are well
aware of
the recent
controversy
regarding vaccination in
children.
In 1998, provoking study
was released by Dr. Andrew
Wakefield and colleagues.
The Wakefield, et al. study,
entitled "Ileal-Lymphoid-
Nodular Hyperplasia,
Non-Specific Colitis, and
Pervasive Developmental
Disorder in Children,"
suggested an association
existed between the MMR
(measles, mumps, rubella)
vaccine and Autism.
Around the same time,
it was suggested that
Thimerosal, a preserva-
tive used in some vaccines,
may also be associated with
autism.
The negative attention
vaccination received in the
late nineties certainly had
an effect on the public. A
firestorm of anti-vaccina-
tion opinion was ignited
across the U.S.
An anti-vaccination
movement was born:
Complete with celebrity
spokespeople, websites,
books, and TV commer-


cials.
Perhaps the most well-
known spokesperson for
the anti-vaccine move-
ment is the actress Jenny
McCarthy.
McCarthy has authored
several books, made count-
less television appear-
ances, and has established
Generation Rescue, an
organization that promotes
anti-vaccination opinion.
Her organization, inci-
dentally, also claims that
autism is reversible, an
opinion unsupported by
research.
The result of the anti-
vaccination movement was
that more parents refused
to vaccinate their children,
or adopted delayed alter-
native schedules of vac-
cination.
Vaccine refusal and
delayed vaccination have
since resulted in several
outbreaks of vaccine-pre-
ventable diseases in the
United States.
Vaccine-preventable dis-
eases do still exist, and can
be fatal. Pertussis, once
virtually eradicated in the
U.S., began cropping up in
numerous communities.
Indeed, the Tri-County


S---

Megan F. Smith
megan.smith@fgc.edu
area has had several cases
of pertussis in recent
years. Measles outbreaks
have been reported in the
Midwest.
In Colorado, an out-
break of chickenpox was
reported from 1998-2008.
Finally, an outbreak of
H. influenzae disease
occurred in Minnesota
in 2008, leaving one child
dead.
In the midst of the anti-
vaccination movement
and resulting outbreaks,
research has continued on
the safety of vaccines.
So what do we know
now? In 2002, a study
of 537,303 children in
Denmark showed no asso-
ciation between MMR vac-
cine and autism.
In 2003, a study of
124,170 children in the
U.S. showed no associa-


tion between thimerosal
and autism.
Also in 2003, a study
of 467,450 children in
Denmark yielded the same
results.
In fact, no study
since the original 1998
Wakefield et al. research
has been able to prove
an association between
either the MMR vaccine
or Thimerosal and autism.
It is important to note, as
well, that Thimerosal was
removed from all vaccines
administered to children
(except multi-dose influ-
enza) in 2001. Despite its
removal, autism rates have
continued to climb.
These facts bring into
question the accuracy of
Wakefield and colleagues
research. You may be
wondering, is Wakefield's
research still considered
valid?
Can it be depended
upon to help me make
decisions regarding vac-
cinating my child? The
answer, according to the
British General Medical
Council, The Lancet (the
journal that originally
published the Wakefield
article), our own Vaccine


Court, and numerous
other scientific entities, is
a big resounding no.
Just this year, the
British General Medical
Council determined that
Dr. Andrew Wakefield
acted in breach of patient
trust, that he violated
research ethics, and acted
with "callous disregard"
for the pain and suffering
of his subjects.
' It was discovered
that the children in the
Wakefield study were
specifically selected by
the authors to participate,
instead of being randomly
chosen.
We must also note
that there were only 12
children involved in the
study, an extremely small
sample size. These 12
children were subjected
to painful diagnostic tests.
Additionally, the research
was funded by lawyers
bringing litigation against
vaccine manufacturers.
Also this year, The
Lancet officially retracted
the article it published
12 years ago. Claims that
Thimerosal and MMR
combine to cause autism
were discarded by our own


Vaccine Court in 2009.
The Vaccine Court has
also discarded claims that
Thimerosal alone can
cause autism. Perhaps
most convincing, however,
is the fact that 10 of the 13
authors of the Wakefield
study have retracted their
support.
Overwhelmingly, the
opinion that is championed
by real scientific research,
is that neither the MMR
vaccine nor Thimerosal
have anything to do with
the development of autism.
It is important for par-
ents to talk to their child's
health care provider about
vaccination.
Pediatricians, Pediatric
Nurse Practitioners,
Pediatric Physician
Assistants, and Pediatric
Nurses recommend vac-
cines because we care
about your child.
Ask us, and we will give
you our honest opinion.
Listen to what we say.
Protect your child from
vaccine-preventable diseas-
es and possible death.

H Megan F. Smith is an
associate professor of nurs-
ing at Florida Gateway
College.


Magazine names most innovative products of 2010


By LEANNE ITALIE
Associated Press

NEW YORK As Top 10
list season winds down and
awards season cranks up, Good
Housekeeping named some win-
ners of a different sort Tuesday.
A handful of gadgets, gizmos
and gear that saved us time and
made our lives easier in 2010
received VIPs, for "very innovative
products," after hands-on testing
by the white-coated folks at the
magazine's research institute.
The iPad topped the annual list
of 10, but the wildly popular tablet
was joined by a few less obvious
choices: Coleman's Instant Tent,
Dyson's bladeless fan, Method's
highly concentrated laundry deter-
gent and the Goody Spin Pin, an
inexpensive corkscrew bobby pin
to secure updos with ease.
The researchers and engineers
started with about 2,000 products
that hit the market last year, from
cell phones to anti-aging prepara-
tions. They actively tested about
60 for durability, performance and
safety, sometimes relying on non-
experts to weigh in on assembly
and ease of. use, said Rosemary
Ellis, the magazine's editor-in-
chief.
"We really look carefully at
everything that's coming down the
pike," she said. "How truly innova-
tive was it? Does it really solve a
problem that hasn't been solved


ASSOCIATED PRESS
These product images, courtesy of Good Housekeeping, shows (from left) the GE Profile Frontload Steam Washer with Overnight Ready Cycle,
Dyson's Air Multiplier bladeless fan, Sunbeam Convertible Iron with Steamer and the HTC Evo 4G from Sprint. Good Housekeeping named these prod-
ucts among its Top 10 List.


before? That could be a huge prob-
lem or a niggling, smaller problem.
They have to work as promised. We
put them through the wringer."
Some winners:
The Dyson Air Multiplier.
Chosen for its sleek, bladeless
design that makes it child and pet
friendly and easy to clean. "The
blades and front grille of a tradi-
tional fan are magnets for dust and
tough to access. Here, one wipe
and you're done," Carolyn Forte,
the Good Housekeeping Research
Institute's home care director, said
in a statement.
Mint The self-propelled hard-
floor 'bot is less than 10 inches


wide and will sweep or mop with
any dry or wet, disposable or reus-
able cloth. "Others don't do dry
and wet. They're bigger and can't
get into as many places," Ellis
said.
E* The GE Profile front-load
washer with an overnight ready
cycle. Throw in up to eight gar-
ments. They're washed and dried
in one place. You can delay the
start for wrinkle-free clothes in the
morning.
Method laundry detergent.
The formula is eight-times concen-
trated. A 50-load container is the
size of a small soda bottle. "Other
concentrates still come in huge


plastic bottles .that you have to lug
home and are hard to measure,"
Ellis said. "With this, four pumps
and you're done, and it's a green
cleaner that cleans well."
Goody Spin Pin. Ellis said she
rolled her eyes at the notion of
including the pin until she tried it
for herself. "I have very fine, very
straight hair. Nothing keeps it in
place." You twist it in for an invis-
ible look. They come two to a pack
for $6.
HTC Evo 4G. Spriht made it
the first U.S. smartphone to use a
4G network before the iPhone.
"It was a game-changer in terms of
speed," Ellis said.


Sunbeam Convertible Iron
and Steamer. It converts to a hand-
held steamer by turning a dial to
detach the iron plate.
Zoku Quick Pop Maker.
Freeze healthy pops in under 10
minutes.
Good Housekeeping asked read-
ers to help choose a product for
the magazine's Hall of Fame. They
did: Tupperware. "It kept food
fresher for longer for middle class
American women who were look-
ing to stretch their food dollars and
keep food in their refrigerators,"
Ellis said. "It was a great idea
that resonated, probably all over
the world."


Journals can add another


dimension to gardening


By DEAN FOSDICK
For the Associated Press

Gardeners seeking a dif-
ferent kind of growing expe-
rience with the start of the
new year might try keeping
a journal. It's a great way to
get a better picture of what's
happening in your yard.
'To effectively journal is
to learn the art of obser-
vation," said Elizabeth
Haegele, a horticulturist
who teaches nature journal-
ing at The Scott Arboretum
of Swarthmore College,
in Swarthmore, Pa. "It's a
tool for learning patience
and using time. You come
away with impressions you
wouldn't necessarily get if
you took up a camera."
Journals can be as var-
ied as the landscape. Some
hold personal observations.
Others detail plants and
insects. Many resemble a
ship's log, noting such things
as the dates of the last killing
frost or the seasonal return
of a favorite bird species.
"You don't have to live
on a farm or a cabin in the
woods. You can find nature
wherever you are," Haegele
said. 'Write about an eclipse.


"It's work but it's great fun. If you're
trying to learn plants, that's a good
way to go about it."

Elizabeth Haegele
Horticulturist


Colorful butterflies. There
are plenty of things you can
see just by looking out your
window."
Journal styles vary, but
often include:
The four-part Grinnell
system. That includes obser-
vations made while in the
field, more detailed accounts
written later, an index of
found species and then a
combination of all that mate-
rial, including plant and wild-
life samples. 'That makes for
a complex, complicated jour-
nal," Haegele said. "It's work
but it's great fun. If you're
trying to learn plants, that's
a good way to go about it."
Phenology, or study-
ing the life cycles of plants
and animals. "Some people
simply use a calendar to
describe what's going on
around them," Haegele said.
"It could be an entry about
when the creek freezes or
the flowers bloom. It can


show how things might be
evolving. It plays an impor-
tant part in the total pic-
ture."
Specific locations.
"When I was a kid, I blocked
off a 3-foot-by-3-foot sec-
tion and observed it over
time," she said. "It taught
me things about soil, leaf
composition and birds in
the area. It provided a full
natural history picture of my
neighborhood."
Chronology. "Include
something about your day,
your month. Add personal
accounts and anecdotes. Mix
words with pictures. Make it
a scrapbook for jogging your
memory," Haegele said.
The journal itself can
range from an inexpensive
D-ring binder to a notepad,
sketchbook or clothbound
book. Add pages with pock-
ets for storing seed packets,
garden plans, sales receipts
or dried flowers.


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 2011 3D


DEAR ABBY


Loneliness dampens holiday

cheer two years after divorce


DEAR ABBY: I divorced
two years ago, after 40 years of
marriage. The divorce papers
read "irreconcilable differenc-
es." I made up my mind that I
wouldn't badmouth my ex-wife,
would use her name when
speaking of her, and would re-
build my personal and social life
as quickly as possible.
Last year, I dated half a
dozen widows. Without fail,
during the course of the date,
these lovely ladies would raise
the subject of the death of their
husbands. These women were
beyond tears, but the pain in
their eyes was evident. I heard
stories about how they took
care of a beloved husband while
he was dying of cancer, or an
unexplained sudden death and
the anguish of trying-to wake
him from his eternal sleep.
Christmas has just passed
and it has been a long time since
I have felt so alone. I went to the
clubhouse in our community for
dinner, but all my friends were
either away for the holidays or
entertaining friends and family
and I couldn't intrude.
While I listened to these
widows, I have seen steely eyes
soften and even heard them
laugh. What an ego booster it
has been for me. What I need
now is some of my, own medi-
cine. I hope one day I'll find
someone who doesn't need a
handsome Jack, a good golfer
or a sugar daddy. Until then,
I'll just have to be a ... LONE-
SOME GEORGE
DEAR LONESOME
GEORGE: Because you're a
good listener, please listen to


%


Abigail Van Buren
wwwdeorobby.com

me. It's time to become more
involved in life. Enroll in adult
education classes, learn to
paint, take a writing class or an
acting class or get some com-
puter training.
Volunteer your services.
There are plenty of underprivi-
leged people, people with dis-
abilities and teens who could
* use a friend. Get involved in
your political party, your church
or a professional organization.
Take dancing lessons. Join a
gym or health club. Do some en-
tertaining and ask your friends
to bring a friend. And let your
friends know you're available.
You may not meet the perfect
somebody right away, but you'll
make new friends and one of
them may have a friend who's
perfect for you.
DEAR ABBY: My lifelong
friend from childhood wonders
why I am avoiding her. Now
that I am in my 80s, the unfair-
ness of a lie from our past is still
plaguing me.
Seventy-five years ago,
at. a Sunday school picnic, I
saw "Mary Ann's" mother
take something from another
woman's purse. As she looked
around, she caught my eye and
an ugly expression came over


her face. Days later, Mary Ann
told me people in our church
were being told that I was a
thief. Not having the maturity
to handle the enormous false-
hood, and knowing it wasn't
true, I chose to ignore it. But it
didn't go away. It followed me
all my life.
Some years later, another
friend advised me to talk to our
minister, who told me to pray
about it. My prayer was that he
would stand up in the pulpit and
declare my innocence, but it
never came about and I eventu-
ally left the church.
I learned later that Mary
Ann's mother had a habit of
stealing from homes where she
worked as a practical nurse.
Losing my reputation because
of this woman's weakness made
the lie all the more painful, and
I so want to be cleared at least
in my friend's eyes. But do I
want to hurt my friend in reveal-
ing her mother's responsibility
in switching the blame for HER
theft? Please help. IN LIN-
GERING PAIN, GRAHAM,
WASH.
DEAR IN PAIN: Write
Mary Ann a letter and tell her
exactly what you have told me.
I'm sure she knows her moth-
er's character very well, and it
will come as no shock to her.
Then the two of you should de-
cide together how her mother's
slander of you should be han-
dled. If she's your friend, she'll
help you.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Trust in love. Don't let
past experience shut you
down. You have to be in con-
trol of your own life before
you can possibly make your
relationship work. Personally
and professionally you need to
strive for equality. *****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): It's time to tie up loose
ends and to put old problems
to rest. Don't. let someone
disrupt your day by imposing
on you or trying to get some-
thing from you for nothing.
Make yourself heard by what
you do and you will succeed.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Minor mishaps or illness
will develop if you let yourself
get rundown because too
many people are expecting
too much from you. Take care
of yourself, first and foremost.
You can change the dynamics
of an important partnership.
**
CANCER (June 21-July
22): An older relative may
not be that easy to deal with,
especially if you aren't stern
about the way things are and
what has to transpire. Your
strength will help you get


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last
your point across. A change
heading your way will be ben-
eficial. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
A get-together with friends
or someone you love will en-
able you to make some deci-
sions regarding a vacation or
change that you want to make
within your relationship. A
commitment or vow can be
made. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't sit around home
or allow someone you are in-
volved with or live with to take
advantage of you or cause you
grief. Do something you en-
joy and with people who make
you feel competent and good
about yourself. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Being treated poorly
should make you realize that
you deserve better. Strive for
peace and contentment and
you will succeed. Let your
imagination take over and
lead you down a positive path.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Give in to your needs


CELEBRITY CIPHER .
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: G equals W
"X ENA'Z I MEUK NZ F KW J X J BT X Y
TNM YKKR UN NE GXZF GFBZ TNM'WK
ENXAU, RKZ TNMW YWKBP YRBU
YRT. J B W B F I K J J X OB VB WP KW
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "In art and dream may you proceed with abandon. In
life may you proceed with balance and stealth.' Patti Smith
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 1-10


and desires and reach for the
goals you have set for your-
self. It's never too late to fol-
low the path you were meant
to go down. Be courageous
and don't worry about what
others say or do. *****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Learn by your
mistakes so you don't have
to repeat something you've
already gone through in the
past. Love is in the stars and
can help you discover what
you should be doing to make
your future meaningful and
'bright. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You'll be able to mix
and match all sorts of ideas,
people and plans in order
to come up with something
spectacular and successful.
Recognize that you have to
reconnect with someone with
whom you had a falling out,
in order to pull everything to-
gether. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Figure out what
you need in order to rejuve-
nate and don't be afraid to ask
for help. It will be important in
order to stabilize your future
and your relationships with
others. Don't be reluctant to
insist on equality. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You are full of great
ideas and ready to imple-
ment changes. Get the go-
ahead from those affected
and everything will work out
surprisingly well. Think posi-
tively and present openly and
you will get the backing and
support you need. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


WORKS IN TRANSLATION By David Levinson Wilk / Edited by Will Shortz 1 2 3 4 *5 6 7 8 0 9 10 11 12 13 *14 15 16 17 18


Across
1 Polite, old-
fashioned assent
5 Court action
9 Baby bird?
14 Inventory
19 It's high in Peru
.20 Rear
21 Where Gerald
Ford went to law
sch.
22 E-mail button
23 Like some points
24 Royal Norwegian
Order of St. ___
25 Slur
26 Like boxers'
hands
27 1934 novel


31 Harold's car in
"Harold and
Maude"
32 Subj. of the 2005
book "Many
Unhappy
Returns"
33 Greeting in
Lisbon
34 shui
36 Creative sort
38 1968 hit song
'Ha3a".
43 NPR host Conan
and others
45 for owl
46 Pitcher of milk?
47 1985 hit song


55 Portland-to-
Spokane dir.
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


56 "Ben-___"
57 One of the Pac-
Man ghosts
58 Impassive
59 Cath. title
60 Reactions from
the hoity-toity
64 Electrophorus
electricus, for
one
66 Light on the top?
68 2003 film "Erase
una Vez"
76 Constellation
next to Ursa
Major and Ursa
Minor
77 Paisano
78 Film worker
79 Spanish liqueur
82 ___-Turkish War,
1911-12
85 Brilliant display
88 Sweet suffix?
89 Pep
90 1951 film "Une
Personne des
Etats-Unis"
95 Robin Hood
portrayer in
"Robin Hood:
Men in Tights"
97 Little pocket
98 Reveler's cry
99 1912 novella ;
"Morte"
105 "You're on!"
109 Irish Rose's guy
110 ___ pond ,
111 It contains
uracil
113 90% off?
114 1943 novel
"Whaddya Tink?
A Sapling Stays
a Sapling
Fuhevah?"
120 Hit CBS series
beginning in
2004


121 "The Story of
___" (1945 war
film)
122 All's partner
123 German
photographer
___ Bing
124 Bahraini buck
125 Actress Massey
126 Prefix with
sphere
127 Classic brand of
hair remover
128 2003 Economics
Nobelist Robert
129 Forest homes
130 Abbr. in many a
mail-order
address
131 Tests for coll.
seniors

Down
1 Bike brand
2 One forming a
secret union?
3 Visit during a trip
4 It's often visited
during a trip
5 Failure to
communicate?
6 Music on a -
carnival ride
7 As a friend: Fr.
8 Daily or weekly
9 Part of GPS: Abbr.
10 Novelist Hoag
11 Author
Steinhauer with
the 2009 best
seller "The
Tourist"
12 Use logic
13 "On the Road"
journalist
14 Mucha6ha: Abbr.
15 Like some
goodbyes
16 Puts under the
yoke
17 Purifying


18 English dramatist
Thomas
28 Immigrant from
Japan
29 Ultrasecret org.
30 .._-jongg
35 Feminist
G e rm na i n e
37 Pre-college yrs.
39 Cookout discard
40 Some Korean
exports
41 "And who ?"
42 "Yikes!"
44 D.C.'s Union
47 Tres
48 Senate Armed
Services
Committee
chairman after
Goldwater
49 Hockey's Lindros
50 Retail giant
whose logo has
blue letters in a
yellow oval
51 Dostoyevsky's
denial
52 Area crossed by
Marco Polo
53 Pottery need
54 Carol start
59 Year of the first
Spanish
settlement in
Cuba
61 A.T.F. agents,
e.g.
62 Some trim
63 Home of Galicia
65 Something that
may be glossed
Over
67 "Waking ___
Devine" (1998
comedy)
'69 Numerical prefix
70 Linguist
Chobmsky
71 Jacobs of fashion


72 "The Praise of
ChIimney-
Sweepers"
essayist
73 "Like ___ not ..
74 Mozart opera
tit:- opening
75 Rich rocks
79 Skin care brand
80 About 10% of
Africa
, 81 "Any day now"
83 ___-majest6


84 Setting for
Cervantes's "El
Gallardo
Espailol"
86 Turn-___
87 Kind of torch
90 Bat wood
91 Starting point, on
a French map
92 Eli
93 1990s Toyota
coupe


94 Comic who said
"A short
summary of
every Jewish
holiday: They
tried to kill us.
We won. Let's
eat"
96 Everlasting
100 "South Park"
sibling
101 Gourd
102 Manly
103 de coeur
104 The Supreme
Court, e.g.
106 Invoice issuer


107 Parisian palace
108 Dogmata
112 Drop off
115 "Reader, I
married him"
heroine
116 Iberian eyes
117 Custom
118 They may be
high or heavy
119F forces on
horses: Abbr.
120 Alphabet trio


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
E X CEL AMPI S SHIOIP AT SEA
VERVE SO 0 T W AK E GE A RS



END TUBA TEE B UREAUS
BA T ASINTHEIBEL FIR

OP EN DOORMAN POL L 1C
MSN MLEET E PEE i EPACST
I T SSAFA S A R I A H


C A R GT MBIE I H 0 R S E
A T E 0 UT A0 CTRA EUS AS
L E A P S L U R PAU|Lc 00O
= T I K E A R IN MIAINC H E C K
P|R S C R B OB HUBS K Y
J AC KMA N O FALL R|A|DESiBlBB
S G T Y 0 R K E D 0 E C UHT
D 0 B I E I D 1IO|M 0 KY AR A 0 K E
NOBL E GOODMAINASINIE W MAN
A L E-U AT R J O GOIE B L A S TLs
iEnL R__E Y_ EBNAAS S E S


58 3 7


3 2 8 11


7 4


5 3


9 1 4 2 3


8 9


5 6 9 2


4 9 6


6 1 9 5


Z6 L 9 v 9L816 L


6 L 9 L 9 1Z8C7V8


L 8 2 L 9 6 L


9 L 17 8 6 9 LZ


8L7 V 9 ZL6 L 9 6


9 9 6 L 8 V LZ 8

L L I; 6 9 lz 8 9


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415







LAKE CITY REPORTER


LIFE


SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


FAMILY FEATURES


SSL


MM


NG


SECRETS


bananas on the shelves after a man revealed the secret
of his weight-loss success on a leading social network.
Now a healthier version of his diet is catching on in
America, thanks to the fruit and nutrition experts at Dole.
The Go Bananas 2-A-Day Challenge was originally created
in 2009 by the Dole Nutrition Institute as a healthier sequel to
Japan's phenomenally popular Morning Banana Diet.
Dole's expanded version for 2011 is part of larger multimedia
initiative created by Dole Fresh Fruit for Americans looking
for a healthy way to kick off the New Year. The Go Bananas
Challenge substitutes well-balanced meals and nutritious recipes
instead of the "all-you-can-eat" approach popular in Japan.
Going beyond the original two-banana morning routine,
Dole nutritionists created a comprehensive two-week regiment
of lunches, dinners and snacks to help participants boost their
energy, increase their intake of fruits and vegetables, and
improve their overall health while they lose weight.
"We know that increasing consumption of fruits and vege-
tables in general, and bananas in particular, can help support
healthy, sustainable weight loss," said Nicholas Gillett, Ph.D.,
of the Dole Nutrition Institute. "What we did at Dole was
expand this simple principle into a well-balanced, two-week
plan that can serve as the basis for a long-term healthy lifestyle."
Go Bananas 2-A-Day Challenge participants begin each day
with two bananas and at least eight ounces of water, a combi-
nation that specifically aids in weight loss.
According to Gillett, banana fiber creates extra bulk in the
stomach, allowing participants to feel full longer and less


hungry overall. He says the fiber acts like an internal acceler-
ator that pulls some of the fat in the stomach through the diges-
tive system before it can be absorbed.
The Go Bananas Challenge follows the morning banana
routine with a medley of 14 lunch and dinner recipes that com-
bine lean chicken or fish with fresh Doles fruits and vegetables,
low-fat cheeses, wheat pasta, long-grain rice and salads.
While participants can choose among fresh fruit, vegetables
and nuts for their daily afternoon snack, sugar-based desserts
and alcohol are strictly off-limits. The plan also advocates that
followers drink water only with every meal, finish eating by
8 p.m. each day and go to bed by midnight.
"Of course, those taking the Go Bananas 2-A-Day Challenge
also benefit from the banana's status as a superfood. It doubles
as an excellent source of vitamin B6 and a good source of
potassium, fiber and vitamin C," added Gillett.
Special dishes included in the plan range from Curried
Spinach Soup and Warm Thai-style Scallop and Mango Salad
to Spinach and Chicken Stir Fry with Raspberries and Honey
Mustard-glazed Salmon with Fruit Salsa.
For more information on the Dole Banana Diet, or Dole
Bananas in general, including recipes, serving suggestions
and nutritional information, go to www.dole.com/bananas.
You can also follow Dole Bananas on Facebook at
www.facebook.com/DOLEbananas.
Two popular recipes, Caribbean Black Bean and Fruit
Salad and Pineapple Salsa Chicken, are featured in.the sample
meal plan. Remember that at least 8 ounces of water should
accompany each meal.


Sample of a Day's Menu


BREAKFAST MORNING SNACK


2 Dole Bananas
and 8 ounces
of water


5 slices Dole Pineapple
(3-1/2 inches in diameter
x 3/4 inches thick)


"V


LUNCH
Caribbean Black Bean and Fruit Salad
1 can (15 ounces) black beans, drained I large Dole Banana, sliced
2 tablespoons prepared salsa 1 Dole Orange, peeled and sliced
1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro Combine beans, salsa, cilantro, onion, orange
1 tablespoon finely chopped red onion peel, lime juice and cumin in large bowl. Spoon
1/2 teaspoon grated orange peel onto lettuce-lined platter. Sprinkle cheese on top
1 tablespoon lime juice of salad, if desired. Arrange.banana and orange
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin slices alongside of salad. Squeeze additional lime
1 ounce feta cheese, crumbled (optional) juice over bananas.


.:AFTERNOON
SNACK
1/4 cup almonds

DINNER
Pineapple Salsa Chicken
6 boneless, skinless chicken
breasts
2 cups chunked, fresh Dole
Tropical Gold Pineapple*
1/4 cup Dole Pineapple juice
1/2 cup finely chopped Dole
Red Bell Peppers
1/4 cup finely chopped Dole
Green Bell Pepper
1 tablespoon chopped Dole
Green Onion
2 teaspoons chopped fresh
cilantro or parsley
2 tablespoons chopped
jalapeiio chilies
Grill or broil chicken 5 to 10 min-
utes on each side or until chicken is
no longer pink in the center. Com-
bine pineapple chunks, juice, bell
pepper, onions, cilantro and chilies
in bowl. Serve salsa with grilled or
broiled chicken.
*May substitute I can (20 ounces)
Dole Pineapple, chunked, drained.


. ALL&,&AkmkAg ,; a., '.


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