The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01344
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: January 5, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01344
System ID: UF00028308:01344
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Lady Tigers

Start Right
C '- --. I .- ;l+e- n- r"lntv A
000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943



LaaKe e i


Tennis

Rivalry
Federer, Nadal to play
in Doha.
Sports, IB


reporter


Wednesday, January 5, 2011 I


Vol. 136, No. 298 0 75 cents


County to tackle Ichetucknee tubing issue


Damage to river's
northern part
needs attention.
By C.J. RISAK
crisak@lakecityreporter. com
In 1970, ground for a state
park was purchased and
the park was established
along the Ichetucknee
River, a spring-fed stream,
in Columbia County that
has been appreciated by
park visitors for decades.
One of the attractions
provided by the river has
been tubing, a recreation


"This will not restrict nor diminish
the use of the park. All we're doing
is (trying to) remove them from
the top of the park."

Jim Stevenson
Former coordinator
Ichetucknee Spring Working Group


many have tried. It's sim-
ple enough: Sit down in an
inflated inner tube and let
the current carry you, all
the way to the river's south
end. Many would take the
shorter route from the
middle of the river, others


would want to travel from
the north end to the south.
That longer route caused
a problem.
The shallow, frag-
ile bottom of the upper
Ichetucknee soon began to
show the damage caused


by overuse. Park officials
began to notice changes in
the river vegetation after
just two years; steps to
limit the number of tubers
on the upper Ichetucknee
were proposed in 1974, and
the first limitation (3,000 a
day from the north end of
the river) was adopted in
1978.
Adjustments continued
through 1989. But since
then, nothing's been done,
and the river has begun to
show the strain.
Jim Stevenson, a former
TUBING continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
The shallow water at the north end of the Ichetucknee River
may look like great fun for people who like tubing, but it has
wreaked havoc on the river's ecosystem.


Scott vows to aim for lower taxes,

smaller government, more jobs


By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
AP .,.: W ter -,

TALLAHASSEE


a mission" after being sworn in
Florida's 45th governor, and he
swiftly on an agenda of lower ti
ernment and less regulation.
Scott told the crowd gathered outside the
historic Capitol that he understands the hard-
ship of unemployment because his father was
often laid off and his mother had to take on
ironing work to put food on the table.
"I have a
clear mem-
ory of their
fear and
uncertainty
as they
struggled to
provide for
five kids,"
the 58-year-
old million-
aire said.
"So, for me,
job creation
is a mission. ASE
My personal After taking the oath of office, Gov
memories speaks during inauguration cererr
fortify my Tallahassee on Tuesday.
commit-
ment to this


mission. There are millions of families across
Florida whose future depends on the steps we
take to create jobs."
The former hospital company CEO said


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thousands gather to watch Rick Scott take his -
oath of office Tuesday outside the Old Capitol
in Tallahassee.




I'r '


'job creation is
n Tuesday as
e vowed to move
axes, smaller gov-


so
i.
1Io0I


there are three
forces that reduce
the chances for busi-
nesses to succeed: taxa-
tion, regulation and litiga-
tion.
'Together those
three form The Axis
of Unemployment. Left
unchecked, they choke oft produc-
tive activity," Scott said. "The state
of Florida raises enough current
revenues to meet its needs. It has to
focus on spending those revenue;
smarter, setting better priorities and
demanding more accountability.
We'll also re-examine every regu-
lation to make sure its benefits
outweigh its costs."
CIATED PRESS The new governor said his
Rick Scott first act will be to create a state
nies in office to review all proposed
and existing regulations to
determine their impact on
job creation.
Scott occasionally struggled
reading from a teleprompter, but he


SCOT continued on 3A


Lake City

residents

see event

at Capitol

County officials
also witness Scott's
inauguration.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Her first gubernatorial
inauguration ceremony was
an "impressive" experience
for Gayle Cannon, Columbia
Federation of Republican
Women president.
"The whole ceremony
was absolutely gorgeous,"
she said. "It wasn't a lot of
pomp and circumstance.
Everything just flowed
nicely."
Cannon and several other
Columbia County residents
attended inauguration fes-
tivities for Gov. Rick Scott
Tuesday in Tallahassee.
She and a state commit-
tee woman from Gilchrist
County left Sunday for all
the events.
"We didn't want to miss
anything," Cannon said.
They first attended a
salute to women breakfast
on Monday, then a prayer
breakfast preceding the
inauguration Tuesday. The
inauguration included a 21-
gun salute with four F-15
fighter jets flying above the
crowd.
Scott came across as a
very sincere and humble
man at the inauguration,
RESIDENTS continued on 3A


Students, teachers to pay

FW educator final respects


Wayne Hancock Jr.
served as teacher
for 11 years.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High School will
serve as a chapel this after-
noon as the school's faculty,
school district and commu-
nity honors a local educator
who recently died.
Funeral services for


Wayne H. Hancock Jr,, will
take place 2 p.m. in the Fort
White High School gymna-
sium. Hancock, 59, of Lake
City, died Friday, Dec. 31 at
his residence.
Hancock was working
on the Fort White High
School faculty as a science
teacher during the current
school year.
Fort White High School
principal Keith Hatcher
said it was a blow to the
school's staff to learn of
Hancock's death.


"It's pretty significant,"
Hatcher said. "He had been
down here for 11 years and
was here when the school
opened. He was an integral
part of our staff. He had a
fantastic sense of humor
and the kids loved him."
The Fort White High
School campus will dismiss
students at 12:30 p.m. for
Hancock's funeral servic-
es.
"Fort White has its own
EDUCATOR continued on 3A


COURTESY PHOTO
The Fort White High School
campus will dismiss students
at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday
for Wayne Hancock's funeral
services.


Authorities find

burglary suspect

hiding in closet


LC man allegedly
placed woman
in a headlock

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City man faces
multiple charges for alleg-
edly burglarizing a home,
kicking its door in and phys-


ically accosting a victim
before fleeing the scene.
-- Thesuspect
was found a
short time
later hiding
in the clos-
et of anoth-
er home,
authorities
Revels said.
BURGLARY continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


59
T-Storms
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................ 4A
Obituaries .............. 3A
Advice & Comics......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B
Around Florida........... 2A


I.


TODAY IN
NATION
Pelosi says
'no regrets.'


COMING
THURSDAY
Commission to
discuss IDA plan.


~T~~CE


~c~

s; ~i










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2011.


r:A 4)


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 7-0-0
Evening: 3-9-2


STuesday:
Afternoon: 5-9-0-6
Evening: 1-5-0-7


,enatch..
Monday:
2-15-20-24-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Stan Lee gets Hollywood star


LOS ANGELES

on Hollywood Boulevard.
Comic book legend
Stan Lee, creator or co-
creator of such Marvel
Comics characters as Spider-Man,
the Incredible Hulk, X-Men, The
Fantastic Four and Iron Man, has
now been enshrined in concrete.
The 88-year-old Lee unveiled
his Walk of Fame sidewalk star on
Tuesday in front of the Live Nation
Building on Hollywood Boulevard.
It's the 2,428th star dedicated on the
famous avenue of dreams.
Lee is founder, chairman and
chief creative officer of POW!
Entertainment.
More than 2 million of Lee's comic
books have been published in 75
nations and in 25 languages. His
characters have been featured in 24
animated television series and sev-
eral live-action movies.

Glenn Close calls image
in Navy video 'insulting'
RICHMOND, Va Actress Glenn
Close is speaking out about appearing
briefly in one of the raunchy comedy
videos made by a senior officer on a
nuclear-powered aircraft carrier a few
years ago.
The award-winning actress said she
appeared in a video clip after a "seem-
ingly innocent request" made during a
visit to the USS Enterprise more than
four years ago.
In a statement issued Tuesday,
Close called the use of her image
deeply offensive and insulting.
The Navy permanently removed
Capt. Owen Honors from command
of the carrier Tuesday for the videos
that included anti-gay slurs and sexual
innuendo.
In 1995, Close appeared in a TV


I AAV .-i 4 l ', 1
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Comic book creator Stan Lee signs a fan's 'Iron Man 2' helmet after he received a
star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Los Angeles Tuesday.


movie, "Serving in Silence," a true
story about Army officer Margarethe
Cammermeyer, who was discharged
for admitting she was a lesbian.

Choreographer: Jackson
was sick before death
LOS ANGELES A choreog-
rapher, who worked with Michael
Jackson on his ill-fated concert tour,
told a judge Tuesday he clashed with
Jackson's doctor and others over the
superstar's health six days before he
died.
Choreographer Kenny Ortega
testified that he was summoned to
Jackson's home a day after letting
the superstar skip rehearsal because
he seemed sick and out of shape.
Dr. Conrad Murray and others
suggested Jackson should not have
been sent home because he was
physically and emotionally fine,


Ortega testified, adding he was told
not to try to be Jackson's doctor or
psychiatrist.
The testimony came during a
preliminary hearing to determine if
Murray, the singer's personal phy-
sician, will be tried on a charge of
involuntary manslaughter.
Authorities contend Murray gave
Jackson a lethal dose of the powerful
anesthetic propofol and other seda-
tives in the bedroom of his rented
mansion before he died on June 25,
2009.
Deputy District Attorney David
Walgren said in his opening state-
ment that Jackson was already dead
when Murray summoned help and
tried to conceal his administering of
propofol to the pop star.
Later in the hearing, Ortega testi-
fied that Jackson had gone home
early from rehearsals on June 19.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Former Vice President
Walter F Mondale is 83.
* Actor Robert Duvall is 80.
* Pro Football Hall of Fame
coach Chuck Noll is 79.
* King Juan Carlos of Spain
is 73.
* Talk show host Charlie
Rose is 69.
0 Actress-director Diane
Keaton is 65.


* Rhythm-and-blues musi-
cian George "Funky" Brown
(Kool and the Gang) is 62.
* Rock musician Chris Stein
(Blondie) is 61.
* Former CIA Director
George Tenet is 58.
* Actress Pamela Sue Martin.
is 58.
* Actor Clancy Brown is 52.
* Singer Iris Dement is 50.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ............. 752-9400
Circulation .............. 755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709;
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak. .754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(cjrisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson..754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
SPlease call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
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Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks ............. $41.40
24 Weeks. .............$82.80
52 Weeks' ................ $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Feud puts leader's
burial in limbo

CARACAS, Venezuela -
A bitter dispute between rel-
atives of former Venezuelan
President Carlos Andres
Perez has derailed a plan to
send his body from Miami
to Venezuela, leaving the
former leader's burial in
limbo.
Perez's family in Caracas
said in a statement Monday
that the plan to fly the body
to the capital was canceled
because Perez's longtime
companion and daughters
in the United States said
through their lawyers that
they had never agreed to
transferring his remains
to Venezuela. That deci-
sion broke with an appar-
ent agreement reached
between relatives in the
U.S. and Venezuela last
week for the body to be
buried in Caracas.
"This is in the hands of
our lawyers now," Perez's
daughter Maria Francia
Perez Matos told The
Associated Press by tele-
phone from Miami on
Tuesday. She said her fam-
ily will comment further on
the matter at the appropri-
ate time.
A planned burial was
halted in Miami last week
after the former president's
estranged wife in Caracas,
Blanca Rodriguez de Perez,
persuaded a court in Miami
to issue an order stopping
it. Relatives on both sides
said then that they would
resolve the issue and agree
on when the body would be
sent to Venezuela.
Perez died on Dec. 25
at age 88 in Miami, where
he had lived for much of
the past decade with his
longtime companion and
former secretary Cecilia
Matos, with whom he had
two daughters. Perez's fam-
ily in the U.S. had main-
tained before last week's
funeral that he had wanted
to be buried in Venezuela


ASSOCIATED
Cecilia Victoria Perez (left) and Maria Francia Perez (fou
from left), daughters of former Venezuelan president Car
Andres Perez, stand with Cecilia Matos (third from left),
Perez' longtime mistress and secretary, as they arrive fo
funeral mass for Perez at the St. Thomas the Apostle Ch
in Miami.


only when President Hugo
Chavez is no longer in
power.
Rodriguez, who lives in
Venezuela, has maintained
she has the right to decide
what happened-to Perez's
body because, while the
two were separated, they
never legally divorced.
One of his daughters in
Caracas, Carolina Perez,
told the Venezuelan televi-
sion channel Globovision
on Monday night that her
family is confused by the
decision of Perez's rela-
tives in the U.S., and called
it a painful situation for the
family.
"What we want is for
our father to come here to
Venezuela ... for his soul to
rest in peace here, in the
country in which he fought
all his life," she said.

Cow attacks on
New Years Day

FORT PIERCE A
woman rammed her truck
into a cow that attacked her
husband as he repaired a
fence New Year's Day in St.
Lucie County.
Authorities said Tuesday
that 70-year-old Oscar
Wilcox apparently shot the


cow but dropped his weap-
on during the attack.
His wife heard his
screams, drove to the area
and hit the cow several
times with the truck. Then,
she picked up the pistol
loaded with "ratshot" and
shot the cow a couple of
times in the face.

Burglar jumps
through window

SUMMERFIELD A
would-be burglar on a drug
binge died after jumping
through the front window
after a pit bull inside the
home chased him.
Police said 41-year-old
Laird Butler entered his
neighbor's mobile home
Sunday afternoon. He suf-
fered severe cuts and blood
loss and died on the way to
the hospital.
Officials arriving at the
scene initially thought they
were dealing with a stab-
bing victim. They followed
a blood trail back to the
mobile home and found the
shattered front window.
The homeowner told
police she recognized him
from the neighborhood.


THE WEATHER
L ""..', ,4,, '" '.:" .'.Y .i ;,,':

I. HUNDER- MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY
STORMS SUNNY : SUNNY: SUNNY CLOUDY


SI59LOH HI61LO HI 60 LO HI57 LO HI 60 L 9
A


Valdosta
S53alsa City Thursday Friday
S5 3 Jacksonville Cape Canaveral 11 46 p: 65 47 p,
J .Tallahassee akeCity 7Daytona Beach 6 4 65 41
SPRESS CaineVi Dayta Bh Ft. Lauderdale 80 5., ir 7 54
SPRES Pensacola Gainesville aytona Beach Fort Myers 73 50 r, 70D 48 pc
irth sacla PanamaCRY 62o658
rt 56 46 Panama City c -6 Galnesville 63 36 p,: 6 33 p,
los 53 46 Ocala Jacksonville 60 3 P 61 3.3 p:

1 Orando Ce Key West 72 3 I 66 58
ra 3 Cape Canaveral ake City 61 34 p-. 6 .32 p.
lurch Tap*Miami 61 54 r ; 54
Tampa Naples 74 53 r, 65 52
;171-60 WdPI -


West rdPlm eaFi ucala
7 6.3 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
FL Mers ;-I S. Pensacola
7 62 Naples e Tallahassee
7 .6 Miami Tampa
e9 66 Valdosta
ey West W. Palm Beach
'4 t


.A.....A


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday.
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date






7a Ip
SWednesday








Forecasted Imperatur


* Associated Press


69
36
66
42
82 in 1974
23 in 1928


0.00"
0.20"
0.20"
0.40"
0.40"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


Jan. Jan.
12 19
First Full


7:28 a.m.
5:44 p.m.
7:28 a.m.
5:45 p.m.


6C.9 J3 p.
5-7 37 -
59 3? -.
57 32;
6_ 49 p,:
56 31 p.:
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8:17 a.m. ;' raa.ton nr,
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Jan. Feb. Foreca
26 2 Ics
Last New LLC,
www.v


63 3J ,
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5 33 pr:
5S 35 s
59 29 pc
65 49 p.:
5.7 9 p,:
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;,ASil pC


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
i: Weather
Channel.



weather.com


ists, data and graph-
2011 Weather Central
ladlson, Wis.
weatherpubllsher.com


7p a 'a i i-, ir a-e ,n
Thursday P nl- z, 1 1
winter storm spread
heavy snow from
the southwest- Oi I CII Iod
ern U.S. into the
S-Rockies. In Utah,
.".... A.,. the Alta ski resort
reported a storm
total of 42 inches
of snow. Winds
gusted to 64 mph at
eshe"tm era Albuquerque, New il_ V1,
e 'Feoelsik'e" mine Mexico.


CAH 3.


Thought for Today



"He has shown you, O mortal,
what is good.And what does
the Lord require of you? To act
justly and to love mercy and to
walk humbly with your God."


Micah 6:8


AROUND FLORIDA


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


r- .- . ~t ..- ;. ~r -..::~;r...~.i- ;.r~~.~hi*~,-*~r~riii~;i~PI~











Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2011


TUBING:
From Page 1A
chief naturalist for
the Florida State Park
Services and also a for-
mer coordinator for the
Ichetucknee Spring
Working Group, hopes to
get things moving toward
solving this problem. On
Thursday, Stevenson will
present to the Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners a resolu-
tion to "discontinue tubing
on the upper Ichetucknee
River before Memorial
Day, 2011."
"I've been involved
with this for 40 years,"
Stevenson said. "Each
step we took was good
but we stopped 21 years
ago. It's time to get start-
ed again."
The Ichetucknee is
currently limited to 750
tubers per day at the
north end and 2,250 at
the middle. Several busi-
nesses rely on tubing, but
Stevenson assured that
the total number of those
tubing on the river would
not be altered.
'This will not restrict
nor diminish the use of
the park," he said. "All
we're doing is (trying to)
remove them from the
top of the park. There will
still be 3,000 tubers a day,
but from the middle of the
river.".
The turbulence caused
by tubers at the top of
the river, which is shal-
lower, has left the water
cloudy. That lack of water
clarity has prevented sun-
light from penetrating,
which has diminished
the growth of vegetation.
Blue-green algae has also
proved to be a problem.
The discontinuation
of tubing is expected to
reverse those effects.
Asked how long tub-
ing would be banned from
the upper Ichetucknee,
Stevenson said, "It needs
to be permanent. It's
being damaged year after
year. The Florida Parks
Service needs to initiate
this policy. (With the res-
olution) we're just trying
to show support for it"
Although the river's
ecology is one reason for
the ban, other issues exist,
according to Stevenson.
Tubers have caused con-
gestion at the top of the
river, with some traffic
problems. A pair of vehi-
cles is needed to trans-
port tubers from where
they start to where they
finish, and then' back to
where they started.
The upper Ichetucknee
would remain open
to those who canoe or
kayak.
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners will meet
at 7 p.m. Thursday at the
Columbia County School
Board Administrative
Complex Auditorium,
372 W. Duval St., in Lake
City.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican Rick Scott (left) takes the oath of office as Florida's 45th governor. He was
accompanied by his wife, Ann, during inauguration ceremonies in Tallahassee on Tuesday.


SCOTT: Wants to protect businesses


Continued From Page 1A
turned slip-ups into jokes,
such as when he was
talking about his plan to
review every state agency
from top to bottom..
'We'll get rid of the
agencies," Scott declared,
before pausing with a
laugh and correcting that
he meant to say he would
get rid of programs that
don't work. "That will be in
the paper. That wasn't part
of the script."
Scott seemed relaxed
before and after the
speech and he smiled
broadly while he and his
wife, Ann, greeted elected
officials and dignitaries.
Once he completed his
oath, cannons fired blanks
into the air and military
jets flew overhead.
Unknown to many
Floridians, when he
entered the governor's


race last spring, Scott
at the time frustrated'
many in the Republican
establishment who
were coalescing around
Attorney General Bill
McCollum. Scott over-
came negative attacks that
focused on his former role
as CEO of Columbia/HCA;
he was ousted after a
Medicare fraud investiga-
tion led to the company
paying a $1.7 billion settle-
ment.
Never having run for
office, Scott capitalized
on his outsider status. His
promise of jobs appealed
to angry voters frustrated
with the economy and poli-
tics, as usual.
He said he wanted to
make the state more attrac-
tive by gradually phasing
out the corporate income
tax, which provides Florida


with about $2 billion a year.
He also said he wanted to
further protect businesses
from lawsuits and said he
would look at every govern-
ment agency cost and ask if
the state is getting a return
on the investment
Scott replaces Gov.
Charlie Crist, who didn't
seek a second term to
mount an ultimately unsuc-
cessful bid for the U.S.
Senate. Backers say Scott
will bring a new approach to
the governor's post
'There will be a differ-
ence in what you had and
what you've got He is not
a cheerleading kind of guy.
Charlie had a different
style as governor," lobbyist
Ron Book said. "He was an
eternal optimist. This guy
is more of a realist to what
he's facing ... He's going to
move things."


RESIDENTS: Glad to see historic event
Continued From Page 1A


she said.
"He's determined to
make Florida work,"
Cannon said. "His whole
campaign was the road to
prosperity, and that's what
he totally intends to do."
This was also the first
gubernatorial inaugura-
tion for newly-elected State
Rep. Elizabeth Porter (R-
Columbia).
"It couldn't have been bet-
ter," she said. "The weather
was beautiful, and it was a
really large crowd."
Following the inau-
guration was the parade,
which featured several
great bands, especially
the Columbia High School
Marching Tigers, Porter
said.
"I was really glad to see
our kids and their hard
work," she said. "They were


OBITUARIES


Arthur E. Emery
Mr. Arthur E. Emery, 84, of Lake
City, passed away peacefully
on Monday, January 3. 2011 in
The Health Care
Center of Lake ":
City following
an extended ill- ,
ness. A native
of New Port, Maine, Mr. Emery
had been a resident of Lake City
for the past fifteen years having
moved here from Meredith, New
Hampshire following about five
years of "snowbirding" here in
Lake City. Mr. Emery was a vet-
eran of the United States Navy
having served in W.W. II. He had
worked for many years prior to
retiring in the Canadian shipping
division of a pressure relief valve
plant. Together with his wife of
thirty-nine years, Nancy Cook-
man Emery, Mr. Emery very
much enjoyed camping and trav-
eling. They had traveled to all of
the Scandanavian Countries. He
also was an active member of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter
Day Saints Cannon Creek Ward
until his ill health. He had worked
in the Orlando Temple for several
years. He is survived by his wife,
Nancy Emery and together their
nine children. The family will
recieve friends from 4:00-7:00
Friday evening at the funeral
home. Final services and burial


will be held in the Spring in the
Oakland Cemetery in Meredith,
New Hampshire. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 752-1234 Please sign
the online family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.





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absolutely fantastic."
Porter's favorite part
of the parade, aside from
CHS, was the elephants.
"That's not something
you see everyday," she
said. "They were adorable
nonetheless."
Porter said she.is anx-
ious to wait and see what
Scott brings to the table
and has to offer.
"I have great hopes it will
all be good for the state and
economy," she said.
The day marked the
second gubernatorial inau-
guration Florida Gateway
College President Chuck
Hall and his wife, Robin,
have attended. They were
at the inauguration for for-
mer Gov. Jeb Bush.
'"The college had a great
relationship with governors
in the past and hope to have



N l


the same relationship with
Gov. Scott," he said.
Producing not just any
type of graduates, but the
best ones possible, was
a point Scott made, Hall
said. The state is going to
be a place where people
will want to come to work
and live.
"He had a very strong
speech," he said. "He set
up standards and expects
people to stand by them."
The Halls, as well as
Porter and Cannon,
attended the inaugural
ball as an end to the day's
festivities.
"We certainly like to
support him and do want
him to be successful," he
said. "If he's successful,
the things we're doing will
be successful, too. It's a
real partnership."



SWaWcikKilyreporter aor
lo, Im ama
111"'Y-. ^OOTP


OB/ YN

DANNA GREENE MD


I
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH









*" .




*Meet with a provider the day you come in
-Same day/next day OB appts.
*Dr. Greene is chief medical officer at Pregnancy
Care Center
*Free pregnancy tests
Call for appt. Mon.-Thurs. 8am-5:30pm
755-0500 449 SE Baya Dr. Lake City
Accepts All Insurance


EDUCATOR: Goodbyes


Continued From Page L

transportation route sys-
tem so we are altering the
schedule to accommodate
the families, students and
teachers that would like to
attend at his school," said
Columbia Schools' super-
intendent Mike Millikin.
"The elementary sched-
ule is not affected so the
busses can make the
middle and high school
routes and be back in time
for the elementary sched-
ule at its normal time. It
doesn't affect any Lake
City schools at all."
Hancock worked at
Columbia High School
(North Campus) from
1994-2000; and during
the 2000-01 school year
he transferred to the Fort
White High School.
Millikin said Hancock
taught at Columbia High
School and when the staffs
and student bodies were
split in 2000, Hancock
went on to become one of
the initial staff members
of the new Fort White
High School. He was
nominated in 2009 as the
Fort White High School
Teacher of the Year.
School officials and the
family agreed to hold funer-
al services in the school
gymnasium as a special
way to honor Hancock.
"We expect there to
be a relatively good-sized
crowd," Hatcher said. "He


was well thought of by his
peers and his students."
Hatcher said there were
grief counselors at the
school to help people cope
with Hancock's death.
'We notified faculty and
staff over
~the week-
end and
Sa notified
S "- students
I Monday
and again
Tuesday
Millikin morning
and had
grief counselors on cam-
pus Tuesday," he said.
Hatcher also noted the
impact the news about
Hancock's death had on
the students.
'They were obviously
moved by the news," he
said. "A lot of them already
knew."
He said some of
Hancock's students wrote
and some did artwork
to handle their grief on
Tuesday.
Grief counselors will
also be on campus today
Wednesday for students
who attended Hancock's
classes and will be on call
after the funeral services in
,case they are needed.
"Much of it (grief cour-
seling) is being handled by
our own guidance counsel-
ors who are doing a great
job," Hatcher said.


BURGLARY: Captured


Continued From Page 1
Gary Lamar Revels,
43, of 199 NW McCall
Terrace, was charged
with burglary of an occu-
pied dwelling, criminal
mischief and resisting
arrest without violence
stemming from the inci-
dent.
He is being held in
the Columbia County
Detention Facility with-
out bond.
According to Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
reports, around 1 a.m.
Monday Revels knocked
on the door of the victim's
house and requested to


speak with a female that
lived at the residence.
The victim reportedly
told Revels that she was
sleeping and then closed
the door. Revels then
kicked-in the front door
to the home and placed
the victim in a headlock.
The victim was able to
break free from Revels,
who reportedly fled from
. the home..
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office deputies
responded to the scene
and found Revels hiding
in the closet of another
home.


41
Camp Lejeune Water Contamination
Informational Meeting
An informational T-eelrg ,l -irlrj the CAMP LEJEUNE WATER
CONTAMINATION effects will be held
Whert: Saturday, January 15, 2011
Time: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Where: Tampa Marriott Westshore
1001 N. Westshore Blvd.
Between 1957 and 2000, the US Military improperly disposed of chemical
degreasers and other toxic substances :r,i t 1 uiiI lei., .,-,Irarimn.je the
drinking water at the Camp Lejeune Military facility in NC. liarr
personnel, their families, and individuals living or working in the vicinity of
the base have been exposed and may suffer from serious health effects
caused by the contaminated water. These risks include:
Cancers
Reproductive disorders
Birth defects
If you believe your health or the health of a loved one has been affected
by exposure to the water at Camp Lqjeune, you are invited to attend this
free informational seminar.
Fur m eirr ir .:,rri.i iinr, .:,r i i 'i ",. .1 r_ r .,. d ,._r, i _, n ri jct:
J-rr', Er,-nirrq,:r j i ji _-r, _- nr,L .er', r ll X ::,T
.1 i ': .u r ,. b t .,ii .1 .'. ,*_._', rl .,_':'"r.


I LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













OPINION


WednesdayJanuary 5, 20 II


OTH E


OTHER
OPINION


Fed's cap

on debit

card fees

no bargain

t would be amusing to
watch individuals, insti-
tutions or government
agencies try to "get
around" the laws of eco-
nomics if ignoring economic
principles did not cause so
much trouble.
Prodded by Congress, the
Federal Reserve has proposed
a cap on the fees that banks
charge to businesses for debit
card transactions. The Fed says
its proposed limit of 12 cents
per transaction about a 73
percent cut from the current
average fee is "enough" for
banks to charge.
S You might think, well, what's
Wrong with a 12-cent cap on
debit card transactions? Won't
that mean lower costs for con-
sumers and the businesses
where they use their debit
cards?
S The answer is "yes" and
"no."
The cap would reduce debit
card transaction costs. But lim-
iting those costs doesn't reduce
the banks' need to "pay their
bills." So they have to make up
that lost revenue somewhere
else.
Where? Well, here is how
The Associated Press described
it The proposed fee cap has
"started a death watch for debit
card rewards (programs) and
renewed predictions that free
checking is done for."
So, the AP noted, the cap
could "leave consumers to
bear the brunt of the new law
through higher costs for bank-
ing and reduced rewards pro-
grams."
We may feel good about
"price controls" on debit card
transactions. But suddenly, if
your free checking is at stake
or you are facing other higher
banking costs, it's not such a
good deal, is it?
This proposal won't really
"control" costs. It will just shift
costs from one group of con-
sumers to another.
That's no bargain.
Chattanooga (Tenn) Free Press


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
,erification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


T e were troubled
M I by a recent
report from the
W state comptrol-
V ler's office that
pointed to possible waste of
federal stimulus funds to help
low-income residents properly
weatherize their homes.
That concern was some-
what tempered by the
response from those han-
dling the program that prob-
lems cited in the report had
already been addressed, and
we hope the two sides will
hash out any differences or
misunderstandings as a final
audit of program spending
approaches in March.
The Weatherization
Assistance for Low-Income
Persons program allowed
homeowners to make weather
improvements such as install-
ing insulation or replacing
windows and doors.
On its face, the program is
a proactive approach to home


www.lakecityreporter.com


END OF LIFE COUNSELING



Restore Marine Corps memorial


he iconic Marine
Corps War Memorial
better known as
the Iwo Jima monu-
ment has lost its
bronze luster, and cracks and
gaps are causing water damage.
Polished granite panels on
the 56-year-old memorial site
have loosened and flipped, and
subsidence is causing puddles.
James Donovan, executive
director of the Marine Corps
War Memorial Foundation, is
leading the charge to spruce
up the hallowed memorial
situated across the Potomac
River from Washington in
Arlington, Va.
Though it depicts a
U.S. flag raising at Mount
Suribachi in the Western
Pacific during World War II,
it stands as the memorial
to all Marines past, pres-
ent and future who die in
battle. It was dedicated Nov.
11, 1954.
Donovan, a former Marine
who participated in ceremo-
nies in front of the memorial
from 1964 to 1968, hopes to
spur a rehabilitation opera-
tion that will, among other
fixes, bring a museum-grade
cleansing to the bronze
statue, which was originally a
Marine Corps green but now
is a dirty bronze. It last was
cleaned in 1984.
He is now working with
the National Park Service,
which is officially in charge
of the memorial's administra-
tion, to make plans for the
restoration, according to the
service's Marine Corps News.


Lisa Hoffman
lisahoffman@shns.com


mmm


This year carries extra sig-
nificance for America's 12,000
submariners who no longer
will be allowed to smoke
undersea.
That is no small matter to
the denizens of the nation's 71
subs, where surveys showed
as many as 40 percent of the
sailors were smokers when,
the Navy announced the new
policy in April. Smoking and
coffee long have been part
of the storied culture of the
"silent service."
That decision came in the
wake of a 2009 study that
showed second-hand smoke
was harmful to the health of
those jammed 100-strong into
windowless metal tubes that
stay submerged for months.
Since the policy was
announced, the Navy set in
motion a full-bore stop-smok-
ing effort complete with coun-
seling, classes, and nicotine
patches and gum.
Sailors are denied Zyban
and other prescription medi-
cines that can help smokers
stop because their use of "psy-
chotropic" drugs is banned.
About 50 percent of the


boats had set and met a non-
smoking deadline earlier than
the midnight, Jan. 31st date set
by the Navy, the service said.
Smoking will still be allowed
pier side and on liberty, and
while the Navy discourages
the use of smokeless tobacco,
it is not banned.


Along with IEDs and suicide
bombers, U.S. operations in
Afghanistan face an ongo-
ing threat from a little known
source: birds.
The main U.S. base in....
Afghanistan Bagram Airfield
- apparently sits dead center
in the path of assorted migra-
tory birds, and also is home ter-
ritory for other flocking species.
At one point, more than 2,000
black kites were massing every
day at dusk at on% end of a
runway. In 2007, one of those
birds of prey intersected with
an F-15E Strike Eagle warplane,
causing more than $1 million in
damage to one of the aircraft's
engine, not to mention an ugly
end for the kite.
To avoid such costly "bird
strikes," the Air Force has
cleared brush, recruited local
Afghan falconers to hunt the
offending birds and, in April,
shipped in a $300,000 bird-
detection radar system.
Now, the U.S. Department of
Agriculture has announced that
it will deploy six of its wildlife
biologists for four-month tours
next year to lend their profes-
sional expertise to the effort.

Scripps Howard News Service


energy efficiency that has
short- and long-term benefits
to homeowners and taxpayers.
But Comptroller Justin
Wilson said in a report to the
state Department of Human
Services that his inspectors
found shoddy, inappropriate
or unfinished work in nearly
half of the homes it checked
in a review of spending by
the $106 million program.
Auditors also found paper-
work problems, such as miss-
ing proof-of-income state-
ments and work verification
forms, in a little more than
half of the files it reviewed.
Wilson's office sees such evi-
dence as signs of waste, and
we agree.
The comptroller's review
was done between August
2009 and June 2010 and con-
sisted of an audit of more
than 400 files randomly
selected and onsite inspec-
tions of about 80 homes
around the state. The comp-


troller found deficiencies in
233 files and problems with
the work in 38 homes. Such
numbers are obviously red
flags that should be scruti-
nized.
To its credit, the DHS gave
a strong response to Wilson's
report, noting that DHS rules
require the 18 agencies that
administer the program to
audit each house after work
is done, and the depart-
ment also conducts random
reviews of work and investi-
gates complaints.
Contracts for weather-
ization jobs also let DHS
recover payments made for
work that is substandard,
incomplete or does not fit the
program's criteria.
If so, we trust the upcom-
ing audit will allow the pro-
gram to weather this recent
scrutiny or lead to it being
shuttered.
The Daily News Journal (Tenn.)


4A'


Dale McFeatters
mcfeottersd@shns.com


Just enjoy

the votes

and then

move on


plan to celebrate
their new majority
status with a vic-
tory lap of largely
symbolic gestures.
On Thursday, they plan to
blow part of a workday by hav-
ing the U.S. Constitution read
aloud. It will be instructive
to see how many members
remain on the floor for the
entire reading of a document
they are expected to know
intimately in any case and how
many of those who do stay will
be bowed prayerfully over their
Blackberrys.
The House also plans to cut
its budget by 5 percent, also a
symbolic gesture since it will
only generate $25 million to $30'
million in savings in a deficit of
$1.3 trillion.
Rep. Fred Upton of
Michigan, the new chair-
man of the House Energy
and Commerce Committee,
promises a vote to repeal the
Democrats' prize health-care
reform, right before President
Barack Obama's State of the
Union speech on Jan. 27.
Even though Upton con-
fidently says he may get a
two-thirds majority in favor
of repeal, the number will be
impressive but meaningless as
long as Obama is in the White
House and the Democrats have
a majority in the Senate.
Those votes will provide an
opportunity for the 61 newly
minted House GOP lawmakers
to grandstand and delight their
anti-Washington, anti-spending
supporters, but the problem
with victory laps is that they go
in a circle.
Awaiting them when the cele-
bration is over is the unfinished
business of the last Congress,
including 12 overdue spending
bills. If they don't like Obama's
budget, and they surely won't,
they have to draw up and enact
one of their own. And they
have to get started on 12 new
spending bills for the fiscal year
beginning Oct. 1.
Matters will get deadly seri-
ous in March or thereafter
when Congress must raise the
ceiling, currently $14.3 trillion,
on how much the government
may borrow.
Many of the members, new
and old, are talking about
using the threat of inaction to
force spending reductions. The
problem with this is the risk of
inadvertently putting the U.S.
government in default.
Outspoken new GOP Rep.
Mike Kelly says it would be
"absolutely irresponsible" to
raise the debt limit.
Kelly was undoubtedly a very
fine auto dealer back in Butler,
Pa., but Obama's chief econom-
ics adviser, Austan Goolsbee,
is much closer to the mark. He
says, "The impact on the econo-.
my would be catastrophic."
There is a sort of precedent
for this kind of highhanded dis-
dain for responsibility.
In the fall of 2008, House
members, using similarly tough
talk, voted to kill a $700 billion
bailout of the financial system.
The Dow Jones index promptly
took a record one-day swan
dive of 778 points, and foreign
financial markets also fell dra-
matically.
The House scurried back
to Washington and sheepishly
reversed the vote.
Dale McFeatters is editorial


writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


OTHER. OPINION

Possible waste of fed stimulus funds






5A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2011


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Navy commander


loses carrier job



over lewd videos


6A LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE & NATION


By STEVE SZKOTAK
Associated Press

NORFOLK, Va. The
Navy permanently removed
a senior officer from com-
mand of an aircraft car-
rier Tuesday because of
raunchy comedy videos he
made and showed to the
crew several years ago.
The videos, which
included anti-gay slurs and
sexual innuendo, showed
extremely poor judgment
by Capt. Owen Honors,
said the commander of U.S.
Fleet Forces, Adm. John C.
Harvey Jr.
"While Capt. Honors' per-
formance as commanding
officer of USS Enterprise
has been without incident,


his profound lack of good
judgment and professional-
ism while previously serv-
ing as executive officer on
Enterprise
calls into
question
his char-
acter and
completely
under-
mines his
Honors credibility
to continue
to serve effectively in com-
mand," Harvey said in a
statement read'to report-
ers in Norfolk on Tuesday
afternoon.
Harvey did not take
questions, including why
Honors is just now being
relieved of command when


the videos were made sev-
eral years ago. They sur-
faced when the Virginian-
Pilot reported on them.
Honors has been reas-
signed to an administrative
role. Harvey said the Navy
continues to investigate the
case of the videos from 2006
and 2007 and will look into
what other officers aboard
the USS Enterprise knew
about them.
The videos feature Honors
using gay slurs, pantomim-
ing masturbation and staging
suggestive shower scenes.
They were played on the
shipwide television system
during weekly movie night
when Honors was executive
officer, or second in com-
mand, of the Enterprise.


Staff report

JACKSONVILLE-Swan
Lake, one of the greatest
classical ballet: of all time,
is based on a German fairy
tale and follows the heroic
young Prince Sedgfried as
he labors to free the deli-
cately beautiful swan maid-
en, Odette, from an evil
sorcerer's spell.
SThe enchanting tale
comes to life by the bril-
liant dancers of the State
Ballet Theater of Russia,
coming to the Times Union
Center's Moran Theater
for one show at 8 p.m.
Saturday.
The State Ballet Theater
of Russia, which is the tour-
ing name of The Voronezh
State Theatre of Opera and
Ballet, was established in.
1961.
The director is Honored
Artist of Russia, Igor
Nepomnyashchy.
The Artistic Director of
the ballet since the early
1990s is People's Artist of
Russia, Nabilya Valitova.
The repertoire of the
theatre includes work by
both classical and mod-
ern Russian composers
including: Swan Lake, The
SleepingBeauty, Cinderella,
The Nutcracker, Giselle,
Don Quixote, Le Sylphide,
Scheherazade, Gavalry
Halt, The Stone Flower,
1001 Nights, Carmen-suite,
Cipollino, Doctor Aubolit,
Francesca di Rimini andThe
Fountain of Bakhchisarai.
The State Ballet Theatre
of Russia has toured with
productions of traditional
Russian classics through-
out France, (performing
Sleeping Beauty in 38 cit-


' :- ,,


Jwe


Dr. Guy S. Strauss, D.O.,FA
Board Certified Internal Medi
Board Certified Critical Ca
Allison B. Baris, A.R.N


The Russian National Ballet is performing Swan Lake in
one show Saturday night at the Times-Union Center in
Jacksonville.


ies), Germany, Holland and
Czech Republic, as well as
in India and throughout
Africa .with engagements
in Tunisia, Zimbabwe, and
Ethiopia.
Among the company's
54 dancers are many dis-
tinguished Russian artists
and winners of many inter-
national ballet competi-
tions including: Tatyana
Frolova People's
Artist of Russia, Mikhail
Negrobov, Vladislav
Ivanov, Piotr Popov -
Honored Artists of Russia;
Denis Kaganer; Dina


Bolotova, Julia Korneva,
Svetlana Noskova; Anna
Belyustova, Alexandra
Alimova, Julia Plonish,
Alexander Ivliev and
Marina Leonkina -
Laureate of international
competitions in Moscow,
Paris, Varna.These leading
dancers have represented
the art of Russian Ballet
in the USA, Germany,
Hungary, Spain, Italy,
France, Poland, Austria,
Czech Republic, Slovakia,
Vietnam, India, Cyprus,
Malta, Japan, and several
countries in Africa.


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Outgoing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif. (left) and outgoing House Majority Leader
Steny Hoyer of Md., take part in a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington on Tuesday.


Pelosi says 'no regrets'


on last day as speaker


By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Democrat Nancy Pelosi
said she had no regrets
on her last day as House
speaker Tuesday, a reign
that lasted four years and is
ending after the November
elections.
Pelosi said Tuesday she
looks forward to leading a
loyal but tenacious opposi-
tion in the House. She start-
ed by calling Republicans
hypocrites for trying to
repeal President Barack
,Obama's health care over-
haul, saying it would add to
the federal budget deficit
Republicans won the
House. majority in the
November elections and
John Boehner of Ohio will
be sworn in as the new
speaker on Wednesday.


Pelosi the first female
speaker will be demoted
to minority leader.
"I don't really look back,
I look forward, and we look
forward to, as I said before,
Being a willing partner
and solving the problems
of the American people,"
Pelosi said at a news con-
ference with other House
Democrats. "When our
Republican colleagues have
positive solutions, again,
they will have a willing part-
ner in solving the problems
of the American people."
Pelosi said House
Democrats will focus on
creating jobs, improving
the economy and shrinking
the federal budget deficit.
The deficit hit $1.3 trillion in
the budget year thatended
in September a year
in which Democrats con-
trolled Congress and the


White House.
With unemployment
stuck above 9 percent, Pelosi
was asked whether she
regretted not doing more
to improve the nation's still-
struggling economy while
she was speaker. Pelosi said
the nation's economy was
in a "near-depression" two
years ago, when Obama
first took office.
Since then, she said, the
House passed numerous
bills designed to create
jobs that were ultimately
blocked in the Senate, usu-
ally because the two cham-
bers couldn't agree on how
to pay for them.
"We have no regrets,"
Pelosi said. 'This adminis-
tration and this Congress
inherited a near-depres-
sion. And so the initiatives
that we took were positive
Sfor the American people."


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DOB: 6/15/83
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Wanted For: VOP Dealing in
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State Ballet Theater


of Russia to perform


'Swan Lake' Saturday


3


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2011


Ra.











Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkrby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter






SPORTS


Wednesday, January 5, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASEBALL
Fort White
meeting Friday
Fort White Youth
Baseball's annual
meeting is 6:30 p.m.
Friday in the portable
building at the back of
South Columbia Sports
Complex.
For details, call
Tammy Sharpe at
867-3825.

CHS SOCCER
Fundraiser set
for Saturday
Columbia High's
junior varsity soccer
teams have a breakfast
fundraiser planned for
7:30-10:30 a.m. Saturday
at Kazbor's Grille in Lake
City. Tickets are $6
at the door, or may be
purchased in advance.
For details, call
365-1877.

CHS FOOTBALL
Moe's Night
set for Monday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club has a
Moe's Night
fundraiser planned for
6-8 p.m. Monday at
Moe's Southwest Grill in
Lake City. The club will
meet at 6 p.m. Jan. 20 in
the Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call Blake
Lunde at 754-5810.

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back.Club
meeting Tuesday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday
in the high school
teacher's lounge. On the
agenda are discussing
end-of-the-year issues,
setting dates for the
annual organizational
meeting, election of
officers and final plans
for the football banquet
(Jan. 22).
For details, call club
president Lori Pitts at
867-2117.

CHS SOFTBALL
Tryouts planned
Monday at field
Columbia High softball
tryouts are 3:30 p.m.
Monday at the CHS
field. Players will need
a current physical, and
random drug testing and
parent consent forms.
For details, call Jimmy
Williams at 303-1192.

FLAG FOOTBALL
Registration for
co-ed football
Christ Central Sports
is offering co-ed flag
football for ages 5-12.
Cost is $40; registration
runs through Jan. 15.
For details, call Ronny
at 365-2128.

From staff reports

GAMES

Thursday
Fort White High girls
weightlifting vs. Columbia
High, 4 p.m.
Fort White High girls
soccer vs. Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Buchholz
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High boys
soccer at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Middleburg


High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)


Lady Tigers start right


Columbia's girls
beat Hamilton
County, 38-22.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

The early season was
a struggle for Columbia
High's girls basketball.
The Lady Tigers stum-
bled out of the gate, losing
their first seven games, a
couple by enormous mar-
gins. Columbia has now won .. G
three of four games, includ-
irig a 38-22 victory over
visiting Hamilton:County
High on Monday to open
the new year.
Columbia built an early Ar"
lead and held off all that I
Hamilton threw at them..
Marnae Gaskins led the
Lady Tigers with 11 points.
Mariah Harrington
and Simone Williamson
each scored eight points.
Shaniqua Henry scored six
points, with three points
from Briya McGuire and two
points from Ariel Dorsey.
Columbia travels to
Fleming Island High at
7:30 p.m. Friday to try and
notch a win in the nine-team
District 4-5A. Wolfson High
(Jan. 11) and Middleburg -4
High (Jan. 13) remain on
the district schedule for
Columbia to improve its
tournament seeding.
The Lady Tigers host
Suwannee High on Jan. 19
and Union County High for
Senior Night on Ja. .
A rematch in JaR sper: ... JASON MATTHEW ALKERIL '.,t) ep? er
wraps up the regular season Columbia High's Mariah Harrington (33) sea sthe court for an open teammate
on Jan. 22. during the Lady Tigers' 38-22 home win against Hamilton County High on Tuesday.


Michigan,

Rodriguez

on hold

Athletic director,
coach to continue
meeting today.

By LARRY LAGE
Associated Press

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -
Michigan and Rich Rodriguez
will meet again today to discuss
the embattled football coach's
future, The Associated Press has
learned.
A person familiar with the situ-
ation told the AP that Michigan
athletic director Dave Brandon
has not decided whether to fire
Rodriguez, who's 15-22 with
college football's winningest
program.
The person spoke on condition
of anonymity because the details
of the evaluation were supposed
to remain confidential.
Defensive back James Rogers
said a Tuesday players meet-
ing was postponed until today;
Rodriguez traditionally holds the
meeting the night before classes
resume each semester.
Michigan officials declined
comment amid reports that
Rodriguez had already been fired.
"The definitive voice on. this
matter is Dave Brandon, and
he has not and will not speak
publicly until a final decision has
been made," associate athletic
director Dave Ablauf said in a
statement.
Rodriguez's wife, Rita, left
Schembechler Hall shortly before
5. m..nm. and told reporters, she
had been told nothing about her
MICHIGAN continued on 2B


*&I" -. - .I







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ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo issued by ATP, Rafael Nadal of Spain (left) and Roger Federer of Switzerland play tennis on a specially designed aquatic tennis court, set up
Sunday in the Gulf Sea with the Doha, Qatar, city panorama in the background to promote this week's Qatar ATP Open tennis tournament.
.Mceis













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....r.._...: -,es-rv---_-- -s y a .
DP- ... 7


Both Federer and
Nadal competing
in Doha this week

By MIN LEE
Associated Press

HONG KONG John
McEnroe says he expects
the rivalry between Roger
Federer and Rafael Nadal
to last at least a few more
years before a new face
breaks through the top
ranks of men's tennis.
The two players have
swept nearly all the Grand
Slams and controlled the
top two spots in the rank-
ings in recent years.
Both players have won
all four majors, with Nadal
completing his trophy col-
lection by winning the U.S.
Open for the first time in
September his third


consecutive Grand Slam
title after wins at the French
Open and Wimbledon.
"There's no reason to
believe ... that these guys
aren't going to be around
for the next couple of
years," retired American
tennis great McEnroe said
Tuesday on the sideline of
an exhibition tournament in
Hong Kong.
While Nadal dominated
last season to seize the
No. 1 ranking from his
29-year-old Swiss rival,
McEnroe said Federer was
still enthusiastic about the
game and finished the sea-
son on a high note. The
16-time Grand Slam champi-
on beat Nadal five years
his junior to clinch the
season-ending ATP World
Tour Finals in London.
"He still seems to love to
play. He's finished the year


very strong," said McEnroe,
a seven-time Grand Slam
champion.
"We have an incredible
rivalry that hopefully will
last another couple of years,
a year or two more, and we
can take advantage of that,"
he said.
McEnroe said world
No. 3 Novak Djokovic and
No. 4 Andy Murray still
need to improve to break
the Federer-Nadal strangle-
hold.
"They're going to have to
add elements to their games
... and to work harder than
ever to try to allow them-
selves to compete against
two of the most if not
the most talented play-
ers that ever played tennis,"
McEnroe said.
As they step up their
preparations for the first
major of the year, the


Australian Open, Federer
and Nadal faced off in the
final of the Abu Dhabi men's
exhibition tournament last
week, where the Spaniard
prevailed in two tight sets
that had to be decided in
tiebreakers.
Both are competing in
the ATP tournament in
Doha this week.
The European domina-
tion at the top has translated
into an extended drought
for the American men.
While the U.S. boasted
major champions like Pete
Sampras, Andre Agassi, Jim
Courier and Michael Chang
in the 1990s, the Americans
have faded in the new
millennium.
The last American man to
win a Grand Slam was Andy
Roddick, who claimed the
2003 U.S. Open. Roddick is
currently the only American


in the top 10 at No. 8. There
are three others in the top
20: Mardy Fish at No. 16,
Sam Querrey at No. 18 and
John Isner at No. 19.
Roddick, 28, and Fish, 29,
however, are reaching the
end of their careers.
McEnroe said Roddick
may have a few good years
left in him, but he wasn't
bullish about the major
prospects of the younger
Americans.
"At the moment, I see
Isner and Querrey as excel-
lent players bordering on
great players, but I don't
see them breaking and win-
ning majors," he said.
As for another much-
touted junior, Ryan
Harrison, McEnroe said he
still reserves judgment. The
18-year-old is just starting
his senior career and is
currently ranked No. 173.


II r


I











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 UAB at Duke
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Memphis at Tennessee
NBA BASKETBALL
10:30 p.m.
ESPN L.A. Lakers at Phoenix
PREP FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN All-America Game, Red vs.
White, at St. Petersburg
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Manchester
City at Arsenal

FOOTBALL

NFL final standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East


y-New England
x-N.Y.Jets
Miami
Buffalo

y-Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Houston
Tennessee

y-Pittsburgh
x-Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati

y-Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland
Denver


W L TPct PF PA
14 2 0.875518 313
11 5 0.688 367 304
7 9 0.438273 333
4 12 0.250283 425
South
W L TPct PF PA
10 6 0.625435 388
8 8 0.500353 419
6 10 0.375390 427
6 10 0.375356 339
North
W L TPct PF PA
12 4 0.750375 232
12 4 0.750357 270
5 II 0.313271 332
4 12 0.250322 395
West
W L TPct PF PA
10 6 0.625366 326
9 7 0.563441 322
8 8 0.500410 371
4 12 0.250344471


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
y-Philadelphia 10 6 0.625439 377
N.Y. Giants 10 6 0.625 394 347
Dallas 6 10 0.375 394 436
Washington 6 10 0.375 302 377
South


y-Atlanta
x-New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina

y-Chicago
x-Green Bay
Detroit
Minnesota

y-Seattle
St. Louis


W L TPct PF PA
13 3 0.813414 288
II 5 0.688384 307
10 6 0.625341 318
2 14 0.125 196 408
North
W L TPct PF PA
II 5 0.688 334 286
10 6 0.625388 240
6 10 0.375362 369
6 10 0.375281 348
West
W L TPct PF PA
7 9 0.438310 407
7 9 0.438 289 328


San Francisco 6 10 0.375 305 346
Arizona 5 11 0.313289434
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division

NFL playoffs


New
(NBC)


WILD CARD
Saturday
Orleans at Seattle. 4:30 p.m.


N.Y.Jets at Indianapolis, 8 p.m. (NBC)
Sunday
Baltimore at Kansas City, I p.m.
(CBS)
Green Bay at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m.
(FOX)
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday,Jan. 15
Indianapolis, Kansas City or Baltimore
at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m. (CBS)
Green Bay, New Orleans or Seattle at
Atlanta, 8 p.m. (FOX)
Sunday, Jan. 16
Philadelphia, New Orleans or Seattle
at Chicago, I p.m. (FOX)
N.Y. Jets, Kansas City or Baltimore at
New England, 4:30 p.m. (CBS)
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 23
NFC, 3 p.m. (FOX)
AFC, 6:30 p.m. (CBS)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 6
At Arlington,Texas
AFC champion vs. NFC champion,
6:30 p.m. (FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan.30
At Honolulu
AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (FOX)

College bowl games
Monday
Orange Bowl
Stanford 40, VirginiaTech 12
Tuesday
Sugar Bowl
Ohio State vs.Arkansas (n)
Thursday
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle
Tennessee (6-6), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington,Texas
Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2),
8 p.m. (FOX)
Saturday
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham,Ala.
Pittsburgh (7-5) vs. Kentucky (6-6),
Noon (ESPN)
Sunday
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Boston College (7-5) vs. Nevada
(12-1),9 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 10
BCS National Championship
At GlendaleAriz.
Auburn (13-0) vs. Oregon (12-0),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)


BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
Toronto at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Chicago at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
San Antonio at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Golden State at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Denver at Sacramento, 10:30 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week
PGATOUR
Tournament of Champions
Site: Kapalua, Hawaii.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Kapalua ResortThe Plantation
Course (7,41 I yards, par 73).
Purse: $5.6 million. Winner's share:
$1.12 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
5:30-10 p.m., 10:30 p.m.-3 a.m.; Friday-
Saturday, 1-5 p.m., 5:30-10 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.-3 a.m.; Sunday, 1-5:30 p.m.,
6-10 p.m., II p.m.-3 a.m.).
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
PGA EUROPEAN TOUR/
SUNSHINE TOUR
Africa Open
Site: East London, South Africa.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: East London Golf Club (6,770
yards, par 73).
Purse: $1.3 million. Winner's share:
$215,340.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Sunday, 9 a.m.- I p.m.).
,Online: http://www.europeontour.com
Sunshine Tour site: http://www.sun
shinetour.com

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Today's Games
Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Calgary atVancouver, 10 p.m.
Nashville at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Minnesota at Bdston, 7 p.m.
St Louis at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Colorado, 9 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Nashville at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Buffalo at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


On the Fringe: Kim wants


to be about golf, not gossip


By DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
KAPALUA, Hawaii
nthony Kim
wants 2011 to
be a season
that changes
his career.
He hopes it might be
enough to change his
reputations too.
One of the most dynamic
young talents in golf?
That's what people were
saying two years ago,
when Kim blew away the
field with a record score
at Quail Hollow, then shot
65 in the final round at
Congressional to win the
'AT&T National.
It made him the
youngest American since
Tiger Woods to win twice
in one year.
If that wasn't enough, he
brought energy and
attitude to the Ryder Cup
and was the catalyst of a
rare U.S. victory.



MICHIGAN
Continued From Page 1B
husband's job.
If he is fired, Michigan
would owe him $2.5 million
to buy out the final three
years of his contract.
Potential candidates
include San Diego State
coach Brady Hoke.
Michigan won its first five
games, but lost six of the
last eight. The season was
also marred by NCAA viola-
tions tied to practices and
workouts that led to three
years of probation.
Quarterback Denard
Robinson, the Big Ten offen-
sive player of the year, has
spoke highly of Rodriguez.
"That's my coach,"
Robinson said. 'That's who
recruited me."


That now seems like a
long time ago.
It's not that the
25-year-old Californian has
disappeared. He is still
among the elite at No. 31 in
the world, having reached
as high as No. 6 toward the
end of 2008. And only PGA
Tour winners enjoy the
oceanfront room that Kim
has at Kapalua, where the
Tournament of Champions
kicks off Thursday.
But he has a bitter taste
about how last year ended:
He won the Houston
Open in a playoff, then
closed with a 65 at Augusta
National to finish third.
Thumb surgery a month
later kept him out of golf
for three months, and he
failed to make the Ryder
Cup team when he couldn't
make a cut upon his
return.
Kim still managed to
make news, or at least
gossip columns.
He has a zest for living,
which first came to life



Unscramble these four.Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words
GERME I


QUIDIL _



TRARAT
I 1>
^_ / /s __ __


with tales from his Ryder
Cup celebration at Valhalla
and carried on through
Twitter and blog reports
from a night in the Las
Vegas casinos in October.
Is he closer to being like
Tiger Woods or John Daly?
'That's a hell of a
question," Kim said,
smiling at first before
pausing to contemplate.
After the headlines
he made in Las Vegas in
October, Daly was the only
tour player who reached
out to him in a text.
"Both have majors," Kim
said. "I think I'm closer to
Tiger because I love
putting in the time. Now,
I've gotten away from this.
But I definitely feel like I'm
closer as far as the values
of the Asian culture and
putting in time, not
worrying about tough
times. In a lot of ways, I
think people see me as a
guy who likes to have fun,
and that's it. But I care
About a lot of things."
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


HOW HE FEL-T
WHEN HE UNPLUGGED
THE 5INK.

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print answer here: L I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: ENVOY HOIST BAZAAR MISFIT
SAnswer: What she experienced on her date with the
eye doctor "I" STRAIN


GOLF REPORTS



Lucky blitz number is 7


Seven was the operative
number in blitz play this
week.
Chad Hunter set the
standard with a +7 in the
Wednesday game for a
six-stroke win over Bob
Randall.
In Saturday action, Steve
Patterson posted the sec-
ond winning +7 for a con-
vincing eight-shot win over
Randy Van Vleck.
Both skins games pro-
duced a lot of winners,
reducing the payoffs to a
mediocre level.
Ten players shared the
small payout on Wednesday,
led by Hunter with three.
Scott Kishton was the other
multiple winner with two.
Mike McCranie, Buddy
Slay, Charlie Timmons,
Travis Timmons and
Randall each had one.
Eight players shared
in the Saturday skins pot
led by Dennis Crawford
with three. Van Vleck and


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

Patterson had two each,
leaving one for Kishton.
Match 1 of Good Old
Boys play was a high-
scoring contest Mark Risk,
Bobby Simmons and Tom
Hosford pulled out the win
with 9 points over Monty
Montgomery, Merle
Hibbard and Tom Elmore,
who scored 7 points, and
the third place team of Ed
Snow, Jim Bell and Howard
Whitaker with 6.
Match 2 was headed
for a scorecard decision
until Mack Reeder, Mike
Spencer, Carl Wilson and
Dan Stephens managed
a late point to edge Stan
Woolbert, Jim Stevens,
Joe Persons and Don
Christensen, 3-2.
Risk, with a sub-par
round of 34-36-70 was


back in the 18 hole med-
alist position with a two-
stroke win over Woolbert
at 37-35-72. Snow (75) and
Montgomery (79) rounded
out the best score.
Christensen took front
nine honors with a 36 to
Bell's 39. Hibbard took his
second straight back nine
win with a 37. -
The LGA finally found
good weather to stage its
best-ball Christmas event.
The format had a twist,
requiring each team to use
a designated "Christmas
Ball" for its score on two
designated holes.
Caroline Stevens, Ann
Bormilini and Sally Rivers
had the merriest day
with a team score of 60
and a five-shot win over
Natalie Bryant and Roberta
Whitaker.
The Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce
scramble is Jan. 28 with a
1 p.m. shotgun start.


Augusta National to be


part ofWoods' video game


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

KAPALUA, Hawaii -
The Masters is about to
let anyone play Augusta
National at least in a
video game.
In another step toward
reaching a younger audi-
ence, the Masters will be
featured in EA Sports'
next edition of the popular
'Tiger Woods PGA Tour
12" golf game franchise.
The game is go on sale
March 29, a week before
the Masters, and will be
available on Wii, Xbox
360 and PlayStation con-
soles. It will be the first
time Augusta National
has allowed its fabled golf
course to be used for a
video game.
"This is great for the
sport and will connect anew
audience with the Masters,
a tournament I've been for-


ACROSS

1 Mailbox
device
6 Hams it up
12 More
curious
14 Jujitsu cousin
15 Phonograph
need
16 Coax
17 Volcanic dust
18 PBS "Science
Guy"
19 Mae West role
21 31-day mo.
23 Furrow
26 Not prepaid
27 Deli units
28 Transplant
30 Dazzle
31 Sun Devils
sch.
32 In a weird.way
33 Comes closer
35 Campers, for
short
37 High mountain
38 Sen. Kefauver


tunate to experience since
1995," said Woods, a four-
time Masters champion.
"Continually growing the
visibility of golf is impor-
tant to attracting newcom-
ers to the sport, and I
agree that showcasing the
Masters Tournament in the
game will bring an entire-
ly new dimension to that
approach."
The move is part of a
broader effort by the club
to increase interest in golf
around the world, especially
among youth. As club chair-
man, Billy Payne started a
program in which juniors
can attend the Masters for
free with an adult who has
a season badge.
Payne also' announced
Tuesday the "Masters
Tournament Foundation,"
a charity arm that will allow
Augusta National to invest
in developmental programs
around the world. Payne


39 Cry of disgust
40 Unisex wear
41 Mr. Danson
42 Viper
43 Part of B&B
44 Winter malady
46 the wall
48 Place for shad-
ow
51 Have rapport
55 Deli purchase
56 Some flights
57 Tap
58 Posh hotel lob-
bies

DOWN

1 News
channel
2 Weed whacker
3 Put into action
4 Kind of pool
5 Morays
6 Just scraping
by
7 A throng
8 Sent for
9 Frat letter


said all proceeds from the
EA Sports game would go
into the new foundation.
"Our desire to help grow
the game of golf through-
out the world is sincere,
and it is that commitment
that first led us to EA
Sports more than three
years ago," Payne said in
a statement. "EA Sports,
Tiger Woods and the PGA
Tour have developed an
extremely successful
franchise that responds to
one of the popular enter-
tainment choices of kids
today. We hope our inclu-
sion will foster an apprecia-
tion for the history and tra-
ditions of the Masters and
inspire the next generation
of golfers."
Payne first raised the
idea of the Masters being
part of video games two
years ago while expanding
the multimedia aspect of
the tournament's website.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

PGA SHEA EONS
ART TAGS SNAG
TEA URGE STET
ERE AP E MAH
HEE IS ANYAI
FI ON DR E
UNTI FROUEESRIO
HNJ YIA




UE TIOIUREK TE


EIRIR ADIS T AE


List shortener
Date regularly
Restored build-
ings
Bottommost
Have thoughts


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


22 Seizes the
throne
24 Latest news
25 Pealed
26 Blackberry
stem
27 Laird's daugh-
ter
28 Hashanah
29 Hunt and peck
34 Danger signal
(2 wds.)
36 Mist and
smoke
42 Ledger check
43 Musical key (2
wds.)
45 VIP transport
47 Goat cheese
48 Winding curve
49 Shrill bark
50 Yale athlete
52 Melody
53 Prefix for pod
54 NASA coun-
terpart


SCOREBOARD


~~


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER


FOOTBALL


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2011


Del Rio gets


reprieve, but


* y, must improve


ASSOCIATED PRESS


Stanford players celebrate after their 40-12 victory over Virginia Tech in the Orange Bowl in Miami on Monday.


Celebration amid uncertainty


By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press

MIAMI-As the Stanford
Cardinal accepted their
Orange Bowl trophy, fans
chanted "One more year!"
They're hoping to keep the
coach and quarterback who
helped the school to its first
bowl win in 14 years.
Andrew Luck threw for
287 yards and four touch-
downs Monday night to
lead fifth-ranked Stanford
past No. 12 Virginia Tech,
40-12. The blowout was the
latest success for a school
that went 1-11 just four
years ago before hiring Jim
Harbaugh as coach.
Afterward, Luck and
Harbaugh deflected ques-
tions about whether the
game might have been their
last at Stanford. Harbaugh'
is expected to be courted
by NFL teams and perhaps


alma mater Michigan, and
Luck is projected as the
likely first pick in the draft if
he turns pro this year.
"There are a lot of worse
decisions you might have
to make in life," Luck said.
"I don't want to make an
impulsive decision. I'll
enjoy this as long as I can.
I know the deadline is com-
ing up. I'll sit down with my
parents, weigh the pros and
cons and go from there."
The sophomore turned
in a performance reminis-
cent of two sideline specta-
tors, former Stanford quar-
terbacks John Elway and
Jim Plunkett. Elway, who
is expected to become the
Denver Broncos' chief foot-
ball executive this week,
served as honorary captain.
"As :.an. alum, it's the
greatest to be able to
come down here and watch
a great football team,"


Elway said. "They're well-
coached, they played great.
Some great players. A big
thrill." .
The Cardinal (12-1) likely
will end the season ranked
in the top 5 for the first time
since the unbeaten 1940
team finished No. 2.
"They've bounced back
from some terrible years
and put Stanford back on the
football map," Plunkett said.
"I'm very proud of them."
Virginia Tech (11-3), play-
ing in a bowl game for the
18th consecutive year, fell
to 1-27 against top-5 teams.
They were outscored 27-0
by the Cardinal in the sec-
ond half.
"They're really good,
and we helped them be
good," Hokies coach Frank
Beamer said. "There were a
couple of long plays against
our defense, and then the
game got away from us.


The thing kind of snow-
balled."
Tight end Coby Fleener
caught scoring passes of 41,
58 and 38 yards from Luck,
all in the final 21 minutes.
Zach Ertz had a 25-yard TD
reception, Jeremy Stewart
scored on a 60-yard run
and Stepfan Taylor added
a 56-yard run. Fullback-
linebacker Owen Marecic
scored on a 1-yard run and
had a sack.
Luck went 18 for 23 and
was chosen the game's
most valuable player.
"Andrew Luck is the
straw that stirs the drink
around here," Harbaugh
said.
Fleener had six catch-
es for 173 yards for the
Cardinal, who outgained
Tech 534-288.
The Hokies'Tyrod Taylor
passed for 222 yards, but
had 70 yards in losses.


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE -
Jacksonville Jaguars coach
Jack Del Rio's job is safe
for another year. His role
as defensive play caller is
over, though.
Team owner Wayne
Weaver talked with about
10 players Monday, then
had a lengthy meeting with
Del Rio. Del Rio explained
what went wrong this
season and outlined a
plan to fix things. Weaver
responded by asking Del
Rio to give up control of
the defense.
Weaver also made it
clear Del Rio needs to
make the postseason in
2011 to keep his job.
"If we're not in the
playoffs, it's pretty appar-
ent we'll have a different
coach," Weaver said.
Tight end Marcedes
Lewis said players embrace
Weaver's challenge.
"Pressure either makes
pipes burst or makes dia-


monds," Lewis said. "We're
going to make diamonds.
We're heading in the
right direction. We almost
made the playoffs this
year. We know how close
we are. We know we can
get it done."
Weaver declined to
renew contracts for Del
Rio's assistant coaches.
Only Philadelphia's
Andy Reid, Tennessee's
Jeff Fisher and New
England's Bill Belichick
have been with their NFL
teams longer than Del Rio.
All of them have made
the Super Bowl. Del Rio,
meanwhile, has two post-
season appearances and
one playoff victory.
That looked like it might
change this season, but
the Jaguars (8-8) ended
with a three-game losing
streak and blew a chance
to clinch the AFC South.
Jacksonville ended last
year on a four-game slide,
and the team is 4-11 in
December and January
the last three years.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jacksonville coach Jack Del Rio stands on the sidelines
during a game in Houston on Sunday.


Nobody picks on Brady


By HOWARD ULMAN
Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
- Tom Brady heaved the
ball toward the end zone,
a long pass to try to avoid
overtime.
The throw on the last
play of the fourth quarter
was picked off by Baltimore
safety Ken Hamlin on a mild
mid-October afternoon.
Yes, New England's pin-
point passer actually threw
an interception.
He hasn't thrown one
since.
Eleven games, 335 con-
secutive passes. Just four
interceptions all season.
"It blows my mind a
little bit," Miami coach
Tony Sparano said before
his Dolphins kept Brady's
streak alive in the Patriots'
38-7 win on Sunday.
Through five games,
Brady was accurate, but
not perfect. He threw two
interceptions in the second
game on deep passes to
Randy Moss in a 28-14 loss
to the New York Jets. He
threw two more in the fifth,
a 23-20 overtime win over
the Ravens.
And that's it.
Eight other quarterbacks
have, thrown four intercep-
tions this season in a sin-
gle game. Peyton Manning
did it twice in consecutive
games, losses at home to
San Diego and Dallas. And
four of those there's
that number again were
returned for touchdowns.
It has taken some luck.
In a 36-7 win at the Chicago
Bears, at least two passes
were nearly intercepted
after being tipped.
"I've been very fortu-
nate over the course of this
season that the (opposing)
defense has dropped the
ball. They could catch it, you
know?" Brady said, starting
to smile. "But (then) they'd


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (12) passes as
he is pressured by Miami Dolphins linebacker Cameron Wake
during a game in Foxborough, Mass., on Sunday.


be playing offense."
The only defenders who
have hung on to his passes
are Antonio Cromartie and
Brodney Pool of the Jets
and Chris Carr and Hamlin
of the Ravens.
With home-field advan-
tage throughout the AFC
playoffs, the Patriots
(14-2) have this weekend
off and will play the Ravens
or the Jets the only two
teams that have intercepted
Brady or the Kansas City
Chiefs on Jan. 16 in the
divisional round.
Brady has never thrown
more than 14 interceptions
in his nine seasons as a
healthy starter. Brett Favre
has done that in 14 of his 19
full seasons.
Interception No. 1 came
on an 81-degree day at New
Meadowlands .Stadium on
Sept. 19.
On a third-and-13 play at
the Jets 47 with 9:52 left
in the third quarter, he
took a snap in the shotgun
formation and threw deep
to Moss on the right side.


Cromartie picked it off and
the Jets capitalized with a
36-yard field goal by Nick
Folk that cut the Patriots'
lead to 14-13.
Interception No. 2 came
soon after, on the first play
of the fourth quarter.
With a second-and-3 at
the Patriots 38, Brady threw
deep to the right again.
Moss tipped the ball twice
before Pool caught it.
Moss was traded to the
Minnesota Vikings after the
fourth game. Since then,
the Patriots have concen-
trated on shorter passes.
"Of course, when you're
throwing to a Hall of Famer,
you feel obligated to get him
the ball a certain amount of
times. You feel pressure,"
said former Patriots safety
Rodney Harrison, now an
analyst on NBC's Football
Night in America.
Brady's run of 335 straight
passes without an intercep-
tion is an NFL record. Only
.81 of his 492 passes have
been picked off, third best
in NFL history.


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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2011 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Girl with abusive home life

should try to help herself


DEAR ABBY: I'm dating a
15-year-old girl who was seri-
ously physically abused in the
past. She and her mom had
to move away for a while, but
have now been told by Depart-
ment of Children and Family
Services that it's safe for them
to move back with her father,
who abused her.
After seeing what goes on
in this house and hearing her
describe how they treat her,
I think the physical abuse
has changed to mental and
emotional abuse. I'm not sure
what to do because I'm 18
and it's "illegal" that we are
dating. It scares me that they
can use anything against me.
- WHAT TO DO?
DEAR WHAT TO DO?:
You are not in a position to do
anything yourself. If you try
to get help for your girlfriend,
her parents could create prob-
lems for you that would last a
lifetime. However, that doesn't
mean you shouldn't encour-
age the girl to help herself by
talking to a counselor, a trust-
ed teacher or a clergyperson
about the difficulties she's
experiencing at home. If she
does, they are mandated by
law to report abuse. And this
is a family that's already been
in the system.
DEAR ABBY: I have been
unable to ask "Mary" out
- or at least see if she's into
me because we both work
at the same place. I am not the
type to be shy with my feel-
ings, but with her it's differ-
ent. When I see her, I forget


Abigail Van Buren
ww.deorabby.com
everything else. It's as if my
whole world stops when I see
her smile. She's amazing!
I want to ask her out, but
I'm unsure how to, consider-
ing that I am a woman. She
does not know how I feel
about her. What should I do?
- HAS IT BAD IN ARI-
ZONA
DEAR HAS IT BAD: First,
see if there are regulations in
your employee handbook that
discourage employees from
dating. If there aren't, go slow
and let Mary get to know you
as a friend before trying to
start a romantic relationship.
And before declaring your
feelings, be sure that a lesbian
relationship is one that your
co-worker would welcome.
DEAR ABBY: My boy-
friend of three years, "Sam,"
came home from basic train-
ing in the Army and told
me he wanted to go active.
(He was part of the National
Guard.) He has asked me to
go with him and I agreed, but
in order to do that we have to
be married.
I love Sam very much and
we have talked about marriage
before, but not elopement. He


hasn't really "proposed" be-
cause he doesn't have a ring.
We will be married, but with-
out a real wedding yet.
I have no problem with
this. It's a bit unconventional,
but I love Sam and want to go
with him. It will be an oppor-
tunity to travel, and'I could
finish my degree online.
The problem is, how would
I define us as a couple? When
we move onto the base, I'm
worried people will see my
ringless finger and ask ques-
tions. What should I tell them?
And when we do have the ac-
tual wedding, what will that
be called? DONT WANT
TO BE EMBARRASSED IN
CALIFORNIA
DEAR DON'T WANT TO
BE EMBARRASSED: Not
all married women wear wed-
ding rings, although most do.
If you are afraid there will be
questions if you're riot wearing
one, you and Sam might con-
sider getting a used gold band
to wear until he can buy you
something else. If that doesn't
appeal to you, then you'll just
have to tell people that you
are married and you have the
license to prove it. (I doubt it
will come to that.) And when
you and Sam are finally able
to have the wedding.of your
dreams, call it a renewal of
your marriage vows because
that will be accurate.

N Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Sharing respon-
sibilities will make the dif-
ference. Someone may try
to stand in your way. If you
have looked at every angle
and have a response for ev-
ery negative, you will get
favorable results. ****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Your emotions
will hold you back. Put your
differences aside and strive
for perfection in all that you
do and you cannot lose. A
change in the way you do
things will result, once you
realize the cost involved
and who is being greedy.
**
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Positive action
and information will bring
you good results, even if
someone is trying to sabo-
tage what you are trying to
accomplish. Your determi-
nation, creativity and origi-
nality will separate you from
everyone else. -*****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Try your hand
at something new and you
will find a way to earn extra
income. Love and romance
are on the rise but honesty
will play an important role.
Don't promise anything
you don't intend to honor.

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Socializing will lead to


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

personal and professional
opportunities. Y6ur ability
to adapt to whatever you
are faced with will impress
someone in a key position.
A tradeshow, conference
or geographical region that
caters to your talents is a
must. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't let work bog
you down when you should
be focusing on your hob-
bies, friends, family or your
lover. Nurture what's im-
portant to you. Changes to
your home life will lead to a
brighter and more inviting
future. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Accept the inevitable
but monitor every step of
the way. Hold on to as much
control as you can in order
to look out for your own in-
terests. Keeping the peace
is one of your finer qualities
and will come in extremely
handy right now. *****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Getting together
with peers will lead to de-
cisions that can help you
move forward with your
plans. Your ideas and the
way you express what you
want to do will lead to fur-
thering your interests.
Travel for business will pay


off. ****-
SAGFITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Itwillbe easy
to send the wrong message
if you say something out of
turn or reveal information
that should be kept secret.
Changes at home will be a
direct result of something
you say to someone you
depend on for comfort or
money. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You've got
everything going for you,
so take advantage of your
good fortune. Talk to people
who can contribute to your
goals and make changes
that will give you greater
freedom to excel. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't fall for
someone's poor-me attitude
or idle threats. Stop making
excuses for being different
or taking a path that others
might not consider. Once
you establish what you can
do and how you can accom-
plish your goals, you will
excel. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Interaction
will lead to someone you
want to either work with or
at least get to know better.
Your creativity is high and
your ability to get others to
look at what you are trying
to accomplish will pay off.
****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: U equals X
"RCBDB ZL HFDB NDBSZR KMS
LKRZLTKNRZFM ZM WBZMO K TZDLR-
DKRB RDPNY SDZABD RCKM K
RBMRC-DKRB BUBNPRZAB." W. N.
T F D W B L
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Writers are exorcists of their own demons." Mario
Vargas Llosa "How can you write if you can't cry?" Ring Lardner
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 1-5


CLASSIC PEANUTS














olumbia

Your marketplace source for Lake City


and


Columbia County.
-' '


Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2011 iC



Shirley's: Good food and conversation


customers can
find a place
"where friends
meet to eat"
at Shirley's
Restaurant.
"Here everybody knows
everybody," said Trammel
Wasden, owner. "It's a
neighborhood restaurant."
He and his wife, Dawn,
will have owned the res-
taurant for six years in
May. Trammel Wasden
was already a big fan of
Shirley's before buying it.
"I enjoyed coming in
here," he said. "I liked the
home cooking and the
atmosphere."
. The restaurant was
named after the original
owner, Shirley. The busi-
ness retained the name
even with a new owner.
"The name was too well
known in Lake City," Dawn
Wasden explained.
Home cooking is the
specialty at Shirley's
Restaurant. There are daily
breakfast and lunch spe-
cials available.
The restaurant boasts
the best burger in town,
Trammel Wasden said. The
burgers are made from
fresh, not frozen, meat, and
are cooked open face. The
vegetables are also fresh
and purchased locally.
"Not many restaurants
serve fresh," he said. "Most
are out of the box. That's
why I like our burgers."
Shirley's is also known
for it's homestyle break-
fast, Dawn Wasden said.
Biscuits and gravy and the
cornbeef hash are popular
menu items.


Each meal includes an
ample amount of food,
Trammel Wasden said.
Entrees come with two
sides and a biscuit or corn-
bread.
Reasonable prices accom-
pany the large portion size,
Dawn Wasden said.
A lot of remodeling was
done on the restaurant after
he purchased it, Trammel
Wasden said. Remodeling
helped the business grow
about 20 to 25 percent.
"We strive to make the
business better," he said.
Antique license plates
from different states and
years adorn the walls -at
Shirley's, along with other
collectible items.
"Itfs a great conversation
piece for customers," Dawn
Wasden said.
The oldest plate dates to
1913, and customers real-
ly enjoy them, Trammel
Wasden said. He has close
to 200 antique license
plates.'
The couple appreciate
each of their customers.
Because without them,
there would be no busi-
ness, he said.
About 25 customers
come into the restaurant
daily, some for both break-
fast and lunch.
"I like owning Shirley's
a lot because of the people
I meet," Trammel Wasden
said. "We have some of the
finest people in Lake City
come in here."
The employees are also an
important part of the restau-
rant, Dawn Wasden said.
There are seven full-time


Trammel Wasden and his wife Dawn, are seen in a booth at Shirley's Restaurant,
has owned the local eatery for more than five years.


employees and three part-
time.
"They're what make the
restaurant," she said.
Great employees, good
home cooking and faith-
ful customers contribute to
the restaurant's success.
"The employees and cus-
tomers are who make the


restaurant go," Trammel
Wasden said. "It wasn't
me."
Advertising in the Lake
City Reporter brings a lot
of new people to the res-
taurant.
"There are people that
have been here several
years and don't know


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
located at 746 East Duval Street. Trammel


about Shirley's," he said.
"It's good to let them
know."
Shirley's Restaurant
is open 6 a.m. 2 p.m.
Monday Friday, 7 a.m.
- 12 p.m. Saturday and 8
a.m. 2 p.m. Sunday. It is
located at 746 E. Duval St.
The number is 386-755-


9130.
People are invited to
the restaurant for good
food, good service and the
opportunity to socialize.
"It's like a big fellow-
ship," Trammel Wasden
said. "People do come
here to see their neigh-
bors."


the Deals


OF THE WEEK


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S- ., Lake City 52"59


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I Examtil andtit

First-time
S patient


Rotate &
Balance
Tires
Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
Not valid with any other offer
expires 1/31/1


Necessary X-ra\ s


Reg. $l3r SA~ INGS OF S107 .I'
Expire Januan 31, 2011
t.Ta~~u- -- -- -- ------- -
www.aspenlakecity.com




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: NO WAIT
QUALITY SERVICE

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Free Aerobics & Child Care

Westfield Square LAKE. C "T
386-752-07490
"Lake City's Best Sinde 1~O :'i


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..O.. V.E.RS-TO -C K-
UROTOP SUPREME SUPER BUYS
'' I B S PLUS EXTRA
ROLLBACK SAVINGS! ROLLBACK COMFORT POSTUIRE
OVERSTOCK! PRICE REUCTIONS FIRM COMFORT
TWIN SET 99 s254 TWIN SET $197
FULL SET "899 354 FULL SET 247
Serta QUENSET S799 $39N
KIN6SET g9 s39 QUEEN SET 257
-^ KING SET $397 47
G3DDB D oo (G 0 D G 1678 US Hwy 90 W
SLake City, FL
,awl gPH: 754-4654


Most cars & trucks
expires 1/31/11


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Classified Department: 755-5440


BU-I


Maiiiiii

FI N DITIH UI- ^


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


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Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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One item per ad
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FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
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reserves the right to edit, reject,
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Advertising language must comply
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In Print and Online
w ,ww :a'.;'.. C ,, c (tC.'i .


Legal

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
INVITATION TO BID
ROADSIDE MOWING AND LIT-
TER REMOVAL
BID NO. 2011-A
This is to advise that Columbia
County is accepting bids to provide
roadside mowing and litter removal
services. Bids will be accepted
through 2:00 PM on January 26,
2011. Information and instructions
may be obtained by contacting the
office of the Board of County Com-
missioners, Colurmbia County, 135
NE Hemando Ave. Suite 203, Lake
City, Florida or P. 0. Box 1529,
Lake City, Florida 32056-1529 or by
calling (386)719-2028.
Bid packages may also be download-
ed from the County's website:
http://www.columbiacountyfla.com/
PurchasingBids.asp
All bidders must attend a pre bid
meeting to be held at the Commis-
sioners office located at 135 NE Her-
nando Avenue Room 203, Lake City,
FL on January 19, 2011 at 2:00 P.M.
Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners
Jody DuPree, Chairman

04542888
January 5, 12, 2011
REQt EST FOR PROPOSALS
2011-C
ENGINEERING, DESIGN, PER-
MITTING,
CONSTRUCTION PHASE SERV-
ICES AND OTHER RELATED.
SERVICES
FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGE-
MENT
Please bed advised that Columbia
County desires to accept proposals
on the above mentioned project.
Proposals will be accepted through
2:00 P.M. on January 26, 2011.
Proposal requirements may be ob-
tained by contacting the office of the
Board of County Commissioners,
Columbia County, 135 NE Hernando
Avenue, Post Office Box 1529, Lake
City, Florida 32056-1529 or by call-
ing (386)719-2028. Columbia Coun-
ty reserves the right to reject any
and/or all proposals and to accept the
proposal in the County's best inter-
est.
Dated this 5th day of January 2011.
Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners
Jody DuPree, Chairman
04542890
January 5, 12, 2011

020 Lost & Found

05524732
Reward Two Lost Jack Russell
Terriers,female w/blind eye,
male neutered, ,
missing since 12/21
386-497-4325 or 365-3970

FREE: Boxer mix dog.
Approx. 1 yr. old. Great
companion. Very friendly &
playful. 386-754-1407

io Job
Opportunities

04542744
Carpenters/Cabinetmakers
We need your job skills. Wages
negotiable based on skills and
experience of one year or more.
Stable work history. Benefits
include: paid holidays, paid
vacations, family health insur-
ance, and a 401-K plan. Some
hand tools required. Please
apply in person at Hinter Marine
on Hwy 441 in Alachua, Fl.

04542867
FANTASTIC'
OPPORTUNITY
Night Audit position
Part/full time. MUST be a people
person with great customer service
skills, strong work ethic, good
communication, computer skills,
and willingness to learn. MUST be
a team player and be able to work
a flexible schedule including
weekends and holidays.
Only those seeking long term
employment apply in person at
Comfort Suites located 3690 W
US Hwy 90, Lake City. Please do
not call regarding application.

Experienced IT Tech/
Network Admin
Qualifications: 2+ years
experience with: win XP pro, win
7 pro, server 2003, 2008. Must
have worked within and be
familiar with active directory.
Must be capable of lifting/moving
workstations. Microsoft
certifications a plus. Clean drivers
license required. Please submit
resume to hr@chclabs.com or
fax to 386-758-1791







Home Improvements

Carpentry; remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


ioo J0ob
Opportunities

04542883
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fi
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

04542905





Lake City's only full service hotel
is seeking the following:

* Caf6 Manager
* Front Desk Agent P/T
* Room Attendant P/T
Experience required. Apply
in person. Mon-Fri 12-5pm
213 SW Commerce Dr.
or email resume to:
gm@hilakecityfl.com
EOE/DFWP.

04542906
Office Administrator for
local law firm.
Apply in person if you have
experience in office administra-
tion as well as legal experience.
Those with experience
need only apply.
Must have experience in
management, payroll and
bookkeeping And be available
to start immediately.
Salary will be commensurate
with experience.
Apply in person at
116 NW Columbia Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055.

05524757
Positions available for qualified
Tax Preparer and
Receptionist.
Apply in person only at
The Tax Station
1010 SW Main Blvd., Lake City

05524758
RN NEEDED
7:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m.
The Health Center of Lake City
has an opening for an RN with
good assessment skills
Excellent Salary
EOE/ADA/Drug
Free Workplace
Apply in person or
send resume to:
The Health Center
of Lake City
560 S.W. McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025 '

05524764
Suwannee Homecare is seeking
LPN's for an elderly Gainesville
couple for 7am-7pm Days and
weekends will vary This is a
great position t6 supplement
income Please call Wendy
386-755-1544
Serious inquires only


Business in Lake City is seeking a
full time qualified individual to
assist in out Acct. Dept. Candidate
should possess A/P, A/R, General
ledger and bookkeeping skills. 2+
yrs. exp. in accounting environ-
ment. Attention to detail and
ability to multi task. Fax resume:
w/salary requirements to:
386-487-0021 DFWP/ EOE
Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.

Experienced Stylist
needed, apply at
Southern Exposure Salon
386-752-4614
Fabulous Coach Lines, Branford
Now Hiring
ACCOUNTANT
Experience & Education Preferred
e Application at http://www.fabu-
louscoach.com/career-application/


100 Job
100 Opportunities
Local medical office
seeking a cleaning person
5 days a week. Please fax resume
to 386-719-9662
Part/Time Sales Clerk. $7.25 per
hour. Must be energentic, reliable,
ability to multi task & able to lift
501bs. Fax resume: 386-742-1293
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com

12 Medical
120 Employment

04542857
Doctor's office is looking for a
full time Office Assistant/Front
Desk Clerk. Please fax resume
to 386-755-1744 or call
386-755-1703 ask for Margaret

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Giebeig Family Medicine
Hiring for two full-time positions
Front Office Receptionist and
Nursing, experience preferred.
Fax resume to 719-9494.
Wanted Receptionist,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025

240 Schools &
Education

04542861
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/17/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
Pair of Sugar Gliders
with cage and food. Retails at
$149. ea. Asking $100. for both.
386-288-9707
POMERANIAN
10 weeks old.
$250. Paper trained.
386-438-3885


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies
Pigs for sale
9 weeks old
$50 each
386-965-2215


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances
Kenmore Washer & Dryer Set
front load, side by side or stacka-
ble, HE model, good cond, $300
386-755-2548 or 867-0546


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?


Catufuortabl :
warA




S Car r
Opparianits




Apply Online or In Person


SFTEL


SN. Sour skills
Sand
positive arilude
^(- .


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker. Com-
mercial built, nice shape. $1250.
obo. 386-249-3104 or 719-4802
Great for your New Years Bash!!!


520 Boats for Sale
Bass Tender Boat
10'2",
$500 Call for details
386-965-2215

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2/2 S/W beautiful, clean freshly
painted, near college, 1 acre,
big front porch $650 mo, avail 1/1
386-697-1013 or 386-697-1900
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. Ref's. No Pets. Non smoking
environment 386-755-3288
DWMH, $850 mo plus $300 sec.
Spacious 4/2, on 5 ac, south of LC,
clean, quiet, great area, shed, 3
386-462-1138, No Cats/Pitbulls


Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114


Nice 2br/2ba furnished MH on
Hwy 241, Providence. Front porch
Ref req'd. No inside pets. 1st &
sec. 386-752-461'8 or 623'-0925.
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale


$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524637
Gainesville-Jacobsen-Savings
Factory direct Jaconsen outlet
now open to the public 3/2 start-
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilehomesales.co
m for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!

05524638
North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gainesville and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty, 2x6 wall, and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

05524639
Why drive to Gainesville?
This is Why! New 28x60
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni-
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy,
I pay for your gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568

05524743
Palm Harbor Homes
Short Sales/Repo's/Used Homes
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
Won't Last!! $3,500 40k
John 800-622-2832 Ext. 210

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
05524443
2 $Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455

2BR/1BA with carport,
Privacy Garden and
Utility Room Near VA.
No Pets. 386-438-8052


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Move In Special.2/1 w/garage
on the east side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181


720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent


NO Lease/Deposits, ROOMS only
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169,2 ppl $179 + tax
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

n730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent


2bedroom/lbath in town
No Pets!
$550. mo. plus deposit
386-758-0057
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nicejn town.
$i ?5 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3/2 Brick home w/great rm, approx
2500 sq ft, bonus rm 300 sq ft,
upgrades thru-out, on 1+1/2
acres,fenced back yard, detached
lrg storage area, 2 car garage,
Exec level home, $1500 month,
1st, last and sec req'd upfront, will
lease with option 386-527-0895
3/2 W/D hook up, appliances
included, $200 sec dep,
$600 month. Madison Street
386-365-2515
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
Lg 4 br 2 ba home on Old Country
Club Rd, Living Rm, Family Rm,
Recreation Rm, fenced yard; no
pets; $800/month; 386-623-2642

740 Furnished
74 Homes for Rent

3/2, 2000 Sq Ft Home,
completely furnished,$900 month,
located behind high school,
386-758-9668

750 Business &
Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
Please call 512-663-0065


FREE
NEWSPAPER









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Classified Department: 755-5440

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances,Schools
blks away, $65K 478-391-1592

820 Farms &
Acreage


4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
1998 F-150 Ford
Pick Up
Nice truck for $3,900 CASH
386-752-1677
2007 Nissan Frontier SE,
21K miles, excellent condition,
V6, Auto, $15,000
386-961-8680
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802

950 Cars for Sale
2003 tadillac, Sedan Deville,
Pearl White,excellent condition,
84 k Miles, $6,000
386-527-0895


LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIFIED


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2011


PT!I77 0OE~I
h Phare ~lN

ONIN A


^1ME=


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.



In Print
1998 Ford F150 I P nt
Pickup & Online
Nice. One Low
$3,900 cash O r o !
Call Price!
386-752-1677






ADVERTISE YOUR

Job Opportunities in the

Lake City Reporter

Classifieds.

Enhance Your Ad with

Your Individual Logo

For just pennies a day.

Call today,

755-5440.


It's quick and easy.



1.) Go to www.lakecityreporter.com

2.) Click the"Share Photos" icon




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Share Photos
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3.) Click:


Submit Events
to be posted on
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calercar


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Submit Photo i
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4.) Attach your photo (Choose File)

5.) Select the best album for your photo

6.) Complete the form and'Submit

Albums will change during the year.
Most photos will remain online for at least one month.


Photo Gallery > Submit a Photo
Plase L I : ; pho to t our .-- ;,-: ," ':; : -.;:: must be approved by : t : o : appear ro th
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The title is the name of your photo.







The caption is the description of your photo
The caption is the description of your photo


that will be seen by viewers.
---------------.-- ------ .__ ____A._.___..


SLubrlit


S Photo Gallery Home



Sendin your favorite photos

and share them with everyone!


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2011


Get Connected


www.lakecltyreporter.com


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Classified Department: 755-5440


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Contact us

at the paper.




CLASSIFIED ADS
386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445

ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293

ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO
ads@lakecityreporter.com
Mon.-Fri.: 8 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.
THIS REPORTER WORKS FOR YOU!
Laike l y Rpote


180 East Duval St.
Lake City, FLorida 32055


C^R PRSENTFD BY
ROTARY CUB OF LAKE CITY
':,. DowNTOWN
Call now to take advantage of this once-a-year
opportunity to showcase your business and
meet thousands of potential clients!
Call Sue TODAY to reserve
your booth (386) 935-3496

FREE TO THE PUBLIC
Where local people can connect with
A
local businesses to improve their homes.
m 8th Annual


Columbia County Fairgrounds
2 BIG DAYS!
Saturday, March 5th Sunday, March 6th
9 a.m. 5 p.m. 10 a.m. 4 p.m.
Co-Sponsored by:
NEWSOtALK M P
Lake City Reporter Ma re n SUN
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magazine 3 RAL C9
wwww.rotarycluboflakecity-downtown.com


4".
. _. -
, -_':


8th Annual
NORTH HOME
ORIDAO SHOW
&PATIO SHOW


STATE
mE ITUNION


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