The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01343
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: January 4, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01343
System ID: UF00028308:01343
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Gators reign
Florida upends
Rhode Island.


2nd-half slip
Fast start can't carry Columbia
acoinst Hamilton.
000016 120511 ***3-DIGIT 326
LIe OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SP4A UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943





,ake Cii


Reynolds takes new job in southern part of state


IDA deputy director
takes over as CEO in
Florida's Heartland.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.comn
The Columbia County
Industrial DevelopmentAuthority
will soon be losing half of its
two-person staff to Florida's
Heartland Regional Economic
Development Initiative Inc., offi-
cials said Monday.
Gina Reynolds, IDA deputy


director, was 2-
selected and
unanimously -- t|y
approved by
FHREDI's
board of direc-
tors Dec. 29 as
the organiza- Reynolds
tion's new chief
executive officer. Reynolds will
begin working in the position
Feb. 1.
According to its website,
FHREDI assists businesses inter-
ested in expanding or locating to
south central Florida by providing


economic development coordina-
tion. The organization covers six
counties DeSoto, Highlands,
Hardee, Glades, Hendry and
Okeechobee and four cities -
Belle Glade, Pahokee, Immokalee
and South Bay.
Mandy Hines, FHREDI board
chairwoman, said Reynolds was
hired after an application and
selection process, multiple phone
interviews and a personal inter-
view. Reynolds was one of four
candidates chosen for the per-
sonal interview.
"Now we're just looking for-


ward to Gina coming on board
and we're excited about the
opportunities and think she'll be
a great fit," Hines said, "and we
can take the organization to the
next level and continue our good
work with good leadership."
Reynolds was hired after Lynn
Topel, FHREDI's current execu-
tive director, recently gave her
resignation.
FHREDI chose to hire Reynolds
for her economic development
experience in North Florida,
Hines said, and her involvement
with Enterprise Florida and the


Florida Chamber Foundation,
whose Board of Trustees
Reynolds sits on. She was also
hired because her experience
with state, local and regional lev-
els gives her "good insight" to
rural issues, Hines said.
"And the fact that she's very
keenly aware of the rural chal-
lenges in the rural areas of the
state," Hines said. "She has a
very positive outlook on making
a difference."
The new position provides
REYNOLDS continued on 3A


REVVIN' UP!


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Victoria Lee, a kindergartner teacher at Pinemount Elementary School, organizes magnets used in many of her activities.

School resumes and teachers, kids are ready


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. com

teachers spent
Monday on tasks
like ironing out
lesson plans and
readying their classrooms
to welcome students back
today from the two-week
holiday break.
"It's refreshing to come
back in and get back in the
groove of things before the
students come back," said
Victoria Lee, a kindergar-
ten teacher at Pinemount
Elementary School.
The teacher workday
allowed teachers espe-
cially secondary ones
whose dual enrollment
students begin new college
classes to prepare for the
beginning of a new semes-
ter and for the students'
return, said Mike Millikin,
superintendent of schools.
Mike McRae, Pinemount
Elementary's physical edu-
cation teacher, said he was
getting grades ready to
turn in and switching over
his class' units to "gear up"
for the second half of the
year.
Vickie Steward, Penny
Franey and Melissa


Anderson, third-grade
teachers at Westside
Elementary School, said
one task they used the
workday for was to collab-
orate on plans for giving
the Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test and equip-


ping their students for tak-
ing the exam.
Lee, McRae, Steward,
Franey and Anderson said
they are looking forward to
having the students back in
their classrooms.
"Their batteries are


charged, they're rested and
ready to go," Franey said.
"They're rested and
ready to learn some more,"
Lee said.
Millikin agreed.
SCHOOL continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Westside Elementary School third grade teachers Melissa Anderson (from left), Vickie
Steward and Penny Franey go over lesson plans Monday morning in preparation for the
return of students from Winter break.


Governor-elect

Scott begins

inaugural

celebration


But after the party
will come the
budget cuts.
By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
AP Political Writer
TALLAHASSEE In
many ways, Republican
Rick Scott's two-day inau-
gural celebration is a return
to tradition: lunches and
dinners, a prayer breakfast,
a parade, open house at the
governor's mansion and a
ball.
But once the parties and
pomp are over, expect his
traditional ways to end.
Scott, who spent tens of.
millions of dollars of his
own money to win a bit-
ter election, is a political
outsider who ran against
the so-called Tallahassee
insiders.
The former hospital com-
pany CEO believes there's
room to cut the budget in a
state where politicians say
they've cut just about all
they can. He also wants
to get rid of the corporate
income tax, which provides


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida governor-elect Rick
Scott (left) with his daughter
Allison Guimard as she is
overcome during the Florida
Governor's Inaugural Salute
to Women in Leadership
breakfast, at Florida State
University in Tallahassee,
Monday.
Florida with about $2 bil-
lion a year, just two years
after Gov. Charlie Crist and
the Legislature raised taxes
and fees by $2 billion to
INAUGURAL continued on 3A


Officials check

into 5 deaths

during holidays


All are listed as
'natural' deaths
by Sheriff's Office.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
The Columbia County
Sheriff's Office investi-
gated five deaths which
were considered "natural"
during the Christmas and
New Year holiday periods,
according to reports from
authorities.
"None of the deaths were
homicides and they were
considered natural," said
Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
public information officer,
noting the five death inves-
tigations is a fairly aver-


age number for the two-
week period. "The causes
of death are varied as each
case is different and based
on the person's medical his-
tory."
The Columbia Sheriff's
Office is responsible for
investigating any death in
the county when a medi-
cal doctor is unable to sign
a death certificate, which
would include homicides
and accidental deaths.
"The deceased may not
have had a primary care
physician that was familiar
with their medical history
and cannot sign the death
certificate," Seifert said.
"These cases are referred
to the Medical Examiner
DEATHS continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE'REPORTER:
Voice 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


67
Partly cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion
People
Obituaries
Ad.ice & Comircs
Puzzles ... .


TODAY IN
STATE
t Ii 1- I '- liilin


COMING
WEDNESDAY


Tuesday, January 4, 201 I


Sports, IB


orter


Vol. 136, No. 297 0 75 cents


0


A k - <.










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, JANUARY 4, 2011


Celebrity Birthdays


(ASH 3 Monday:
Afternoon: 6-0-8
Evening: 4-0-2


: 4: Monday:
SAfternoon: 5-8-8-6
Evening: 8-4-8-9


ezmatch.
Sunday:
10-14-26-30-34


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS




Chuck Berry returns home


ST LOUIS
huck Berry, who fell
ill with exhaustion and
was escorted from
stage during a Chicago
concert this weekend,
has returned home to suburban St.
Louis, a close friend of the rock-and-
roll legend said Monday.
The 84-year-old performer did
not require hospitalization and
Berry's friend, Joe Edwards, said he
appeared to have fully recovered.
"I think it was just exhaustion,"
Edwards said, noting that Berry
played two shows in New York
on New Year's Eve, then flew to
Chicago where he played at the
Congress Theater on Saturday night.
Berry's agent, Dick Alen, said in
an e-mail to The Associated Press that
the singer "feels tired but good."
Edwards said Berry returned to
his home in Wentzville, Missouri,
on Sunday afternoon, and that he is
feeling well enough to prepare for a
Jan. 19 concert at Blueberry Hill in
University City, Missouri.

David Arquette's rep
says actor is in rehab
NEW YORK David Arquette's
publicist said the actor has entered
rehab.
In an e-mail Monday to The
Associated Press, Cindy Guagenti says
she has "no further information at this
time."
Arquette and Courteney Cox
announced their separation in October
after 11 years of marriage. They have
a 6-year-old daughter, Coco.
The 39-year-old actor has appeared
in the "Scream" movies and co-starred
alongside Drew Barrymore in the
1999 romantic comedy "Never Been
Kissed."
The couple met on the set of the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
American guitarist, singer and songwriter Chuck Berry returned to the stage to
thank the.crowd and perform his famous "heel scoot" after he left to be examined
by ambulance medics at a show in Chicago Saturday.


film "Scream" in 1996 and married
three years later.

After release, more
uncertainty for Lohan
LOS ANGELES Lindsay Lohan
was scheduled to be released from
the Betty Ford rehab center in Palm
Springs sometime Monday, only to
face an uncertain career and looming
legal issues.
For months, the 24-year-old actress


has been haunted by her inability, or
unwillingness, to shake a 3 1/2 year-
old drunken driving case that resulted
in two rehab stints and two trips to jail
in 2010.
And now she also remains under
investigation for alleged misdemeanor
battery on a Betty Ford worker and
needs to satisfy a criminal judge that
she's been in compliance with her pro-
bation terms during her three-month
stint at the Ford center.

* Associated Press


* Actress Barbara Rush is
84.
* Football Hall-of-Fame
coach Don Shula is 81.
* Actress Dyan.Cannon is 74.
* Country singer Kathy
Forester (The Forester
Sisters) is 56.
* Actress Ann Magnuson is
55.
* Country singer Patty


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ............. ... 755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit'Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(cjrisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Petersori..754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Loveless is 54.
* Rock singer Michael Stipe
(R.E.M.) is 51.
* Actor Patrick Cassidy is
49.
* Singer-musician Cait
O'Riordan is 46.
* Actress Julia Ormond is
46.
* Tennis player Guy Forget
is 46.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.............. :... $26.32
24 Weeks.... .............. $48.79
52 Weeks ............... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks ................ $41.40
24 Weeks............ ......$82.80
52 Weeks. .. ............ .$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


A last generation
:cries over Cuba

MIAMI They hold
court in the back of the
-Versailles restaurant in
Miami's Little Havana, a
group of old Cuban men
whose raspy, impassioned
voices fill the room.
Presidents and political
candidates have passed
through, hoping to lure
the Cuban-American vote.
Journalists come with cam-
eras and microphones,
looking for an aging exile
to comment on the latest
news about the island's
communist government.
Legendary singers and art-
ists stop in for Cuban cof-
fee.
Miami is the de facto
capital of Cuban exiles, and
Versailles is their prime
meeting spot. The old men
Scall themselves La Pena
del Versailles. The Club of
Versailles.
Unlike the more tradi-
tional penas of Spain and
Latin America where artists
meet, these men are nei-
ther poets nor musicians.
They are retired realtors
and salesman, war veterans
and fumigators, who gather
each afternoon.
Cuba is always a topic of
discussion, but these days,
the talk veers elsewhere, as
well. They talk about taking
medicine and feeling old,
about families that put their
elderly in nursing homes,
about feeling disconnected
in an age of computers and
cell phones.
Their generation is
shrinking, and the Cuban-
American community is
changing. Younger gen-
erations and newer immi-
grants tend to be less
Republican. Many were
born in the United States
and have never been to
Cuba. Some don't even
speak Spanish.
The first arrivals left
Cuba thinking their sojourn
in Miami would be brief.


HI 67 LO


Pensacola
6! 4l5,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cuban exile Mike Baralt displays the paper he writes for. His
wife of 50 years died 12 years ago. After her death, friends
suggested he begin to write for a local small Spanish lan-
guage newspaper.


But years extended into
decades and now the likeli-
hood of a return seems a
near impossibility.
'There are weeks that
six, seven, eight people
leave us," said one of the
men, Juan Pena.
So they gather here,
among a final stronghold
of friends.

Officer's son
jailed after attack

SANFORD A police
officer's son has been
booked into the Seminole
County Jail, almost a month
after a video camera cap-
tured him sucker-punching
a homeless man.
Police said 21-year-old
Justin Collison turned
himself in to authorities
Monday morning. Collison,
son of Sanford Police Lt.
Chris Collison, faces an
aggravated battery charge
stemming from a Dec. 4
incident that a witness
caught on tape.
Acting Police Chief Jerry
Hargrett said last week
that officers made "blatant"
policy violations following
the attack, but added there
was no evidence Collison
received preferential treat-


ment.
Police said Collison
punched Sherman Ware,
who pitched forward, hit
his head on a light pole and
broke his nose.

Christmas trees
become zoo gifts

PANAMA CITY BEACH
- Some people in the
Florida Panhandle donated
their Christmas trees to a
zoo, instead of throwing
them out..
The trees were covered
with peanut butter, cereal
and Fruit Roll-Ups for the
animals at Zoo World in
Panama City Beach.
The animals also got
wrapped presents under
the trees. Zoo officials said
these gifts enrich the ani-
mals mentally and physi-
cally.
Zoo World's director of
education said lions and
tigers like to rub against
the trees to get the scent.
The zoo said they're
always looking for enrich-
ment items for the animals,
such as buckets, colognes,
cereal and Christmas
trees.


MOSTLY" PARTLY
SUNNY I CLOUDY,
,i s


HIG64 :L0 HI61 LO HI62LO HI 60 LO




Valdosta
Val9 dCity Wednesday Thursday
Le 9 lacksonville Cape Canaveral 2 .59 p. l J9 ;r
Tallahassee Lake City b t. Daytona Beach 71 53 6 c. p.:
... *. Ft. Lauderdale 7 6.4 p.: 7 p,:
SGainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers 76 ".> p,: ; 5:3 p.:
Panama City 70 J3 t 1 Gainesville 6 Jr : 7 r, r.
Ol 45 Olala Jacksonville t.4 45 r 60 3' r.
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West 6.1 p: ;
; a Lake City 643 j r,: 36! 3 :n A
Miami ,! 64 pr: ,77 5 p
Tampa Naples 6177 ,: .1 p,:
70 53 West Palm Beach Ocala ;71 5 p.: .Ip :.r,
j, 5 Orlando 7J 57 71 4. p:
FL Lauderdale Panama City . 45 r t.l 4- p.:
FL Myers 73 ,i Pensacola S 4': r 6. r 2 : 4
-7' Naples Tallahassee 5. J4 r 62 3 p. :
77. -' Miami Tampa 71 5 p: .0 p.: i
79 62 Valdosta '. 4( ri I.: 3I :r.
Key est W. Palm Beach 7; 6, p,: ; 3 p
7 3 1.


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TEMPERATURES
H'-r. Monr,,
L.:.. r,l,:-n,3 i,
r i, rrn n l I.....
r,:.-jr,3 rh ;


PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date






aTuesdayl








ForpcO td temperalire


E6.5


Sr 1'C:,
1'-. ,r, 1-2E.


0.00"
0.20"
0.20"
0.30"
0.30"


SUN
sunr.nS". i.o

Surinse tiom
Sur:E' (r.:.n',..


7.27 a.,.

.2- a rrn.
.-:J-l n- ,


MOON
Moonrise today 7:35 a.m.
Moonset today 6:14 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 8:17 a.m.
Moonset tom. 7:13 p.m.


Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.
4 12 19 26
New First Full Last


MOD i :.
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weather.com

Forecasts, data and graph-
i Ics 2011 Weather Central
LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com


7p la 6a
Wednesday 1989, up to a foot
of snow blanketed M
the mountains of
West Virginia. Mount
Washington, N.H.,
reported wind gusts
to 136 mph along
with a temperature i
of 30 below zero.


F'eIF B. e" ere ... rs ,


* Associated Press


Daily Scripture


"For the grace of God has
appeared that offers salvation
to all people. It teaches us to
say "No" to ungodliness and
worldly passions, and to live
self-controlled, upright and
godly lives in this present age."
-Titus 2:1I 12


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER



PARTLY CHANCE' :, ISOLATED,
CLOUDY OF: iOi. POWERSS
SHOWERS


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


... ~.:
.,..:
,.i








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, JANUARY 4, 2011


REYNOLDS: New post

Continued From Page 1A


another opportunity in a
career she enjoys, Reynolds
said, and she will continue
working with some state
partners she worked with
in North Florida. It will also
allow her to be near her fam-
ily, who lives in that region,
Reynolds said, a region she
is familiar with.
Reynolds noted she will
continue in her role sitting
on the Board of Trustees
for the Florida Chamber
Foundation, representing
economic development
and the state's three Rural
Area of Critical Economic
Concern sites.
"I'll continue to be a rural
advocate," she said. "I'll
continue to be the voice for
rural Florida."
The IDA's current transi-
tion in becoming a county
department was not a rea-


son for taking the new posi-
tion, Reynolds said.
Dale Williams, countyman-
ager, and Jim Poole, IDA exec-
utive director, said they are
unsure what the future holds
for the IDA's staffing.
"I really don't know
whether Jim wants to pro-
ceed with the status quo or
whether he wants to use
the opportunity to try and
reorganize the department,"
Williams said. "I really don't
know. My initial reaction is
that at the very least you've
got to have clerical support
But Jim may want to justify
something beyond that
"I'm really going to depend
greatly on him and well try
between the two of us to
prepare the proper justifica-
tion in which to put in front
of the county commission,"
Williams said.


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrested but not con-
victed. All people are inno-
cent unless proven guilty.

Saturday, Dec. 25
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
N Jesse Carl Beeman,
32, 153 NW Sugar Glen,
warrant Failure to appear
on original charge of driv-
ing while license suspend-
ed/revoked and tag not
assigned, failure to appear
on original charge of pos-
session of marijuana and
possession of drug para-
phernalia and grand theft.

Monday, Dec. 27
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Uriel Munoz, 33, 174


SW County Road 245A,
warrants: Violation of pro-
bation on original charge
of driving while license
suspended/revoked (habit-
ual), violation of probation
on original charge of felony
driving under the influence
and driving while license
suspended/revoked (habit-
ual).

Tuesday, Dec. 28
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
William Lee Burkett,
29, 170 NW Taylor Maggie
Place, warrant: Violation
of probation on original
charge of felony battery.
Luis Enrique Diaz,
42, 11205 NW 2nd Street,
Miami, warrant: Failure to
appear to pre-trial hearing
on original charge of pos-
session of more than 20
grams of marijuana.


INAUGURAL: Scott celebrates

Continued From Page 1A


help meet budget needs.
"You knew whatyou were
voting for, you knew what
I was going to do," Scott
said in a recent interview.
"I'm not going to surprise
anybody."
In a nutshell, he says he's
going to reduce the size of
government, force agencies
to cut costs, review every
state regulation and ques-
tion why it exists, speed
up the process and get rid
of uncertainty for project
approvals, and gradually
eliminate the corporate
income tax to entice more
businesses to Florida.
"Sometimes it takes
greater pain to get relief
from pain," said lobbyist
Ron Book. "We've got some
pain yet that we're all going
to suffer."
Book said Scott has cre-
ated thousands of jobs and
his business .experience
and a different approach
is needed to turn around
Florida's economy.
"We needed a different
style of leadership to get us
out of where we're at and
he's going to provide that,"
Book said. "He's obsessed
and laser-like focused on
how to get this deal done."
But that is the agenda for
after Tuesday's inaugura-
tion. On Monday, the focus
was more on celebrating
the victory and paying trib-
ute to others.
A morning breakfast
honored women in lead-
ership, including Jennifer
Carroll, who will be sworn
in Tuesday as Florida's
first black lieutenant gov-
ernor and the first woman
elected to the position, and
Republican Pam Bondi,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Governor-elect Rick Scott, right, and his wife Ann listen to music at a military appreciation
event Honoring Those Who Serve as part of the inaugural festivities in Tallahassee, Fla.,
Monday


who will become the first
woman to serve as Florida's
attorney general."
'This is the beginning,
we are going to turn the
state around, there is no
question," Scott said after
praising Carroll and Bondi.
"We're also going to make
this a place where it doesn't
matter whether you're male
or female, whether you are
black or white, whatever.
You have every opportu-
nity to do whatever you
want to do, whether it's be
governor, whether it's be
a successful business per-
son or a successful lawyer,
physician anything is
possible if we do the right
thing."
About 300 people attend-


ed a luncheon in honor of
Ann Scott.
DaughterAlisonGuimard
broke down while recalling
the times her mother chap-
eroned school field trips
and horseback rides and
took the girls to jazz classes
and clogging lessons.
"I can't think of a better
first lady for Florida," she
said.
Veterans were honored at
a two-hour afternoon concert
climaxed by Lee Greenwood
singing "God Bless the USA"
Scott and Carroll praised vet-
erans in front of about 1,500
people for their service. Scott
and Carroll served in the U.S.
Navy.
Carroll, a retired officer,
joked that she still out-


ranked Scott, "until tomor-
row."
After a Tuesday prayer
breakfast, the inaugura-
tion will begin at 11 a.m.
in front of the historic
Capitol. A "Let's Get to
Work" luncheon for busi-
ness leaders, a parade
and an open house at the
governor's mansion will
follow. The final event is a
$95 per ticket ball.
And though Scott criti-
cized the influence of spe-
cial interests during his
campaign, major Florida
companies are helping to
foot the bill of his inaugural
celebration.
In all, Scott's team raised
about $3 million in private
donations for the event.,


DEATHS: Investigation continues

Continued From Page 1A


even though no foul play
is present. The Medical
Examiner will determine
the cause of death and
sign the death certificate
so the family can make
funeral arrangements. In
most cases however, the
investigating deputy makes
contact with the person's
doctor and agrees to sign
the death certificate. Those
cases are not referred to
the Medical Examiner."
Seifert said the investiga-
tion length into a natural or
accidental death is typically


SCHOOL

Continued From Page

"Its great to get back to
business again and welcome
our children back," he said.
"We will begin refocusing
on the statewide testing
schedule that will begin in
February, as well as help-
ing our seniors in their
final push on making sure
they have enough credits
to graduate, passing test
scores on the FCAT and
any requirements needed to
graduate."


not lengthy.
He said in the instances
when a medical doctor will
sign the death certificate, the
family can make immediate
arrangements with a funeral
home for services. However,
if the case is referred to
the Medical Examiner, the
determination of death may
take a few days.
"The Columbia County
Sheriff's Office handles
these investigations with
the utmost compassion
and care," Seifert said. "We
understand the families


V


need to start the healing
process and our deputies
and detectives work hard to


ensure that a thorough and
timely investigation is con-
ducted."


Holiday Special!
Let us clean your carpet!

3 ROOMS & HALL 5 ROOMS & HALL
$79.00 $118.00
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All rooms 300sq max per room. LR, DR combo count as 2 rooms. Not valid with any other offer. Residential only. Offer expires 1/31/11


Tiffany Renee Murphy,
21, 33133 Odell Road, Dade
City, warrants: Violation
of probation on origi-
nal charge of grand theft
(two counts) and failure to
appear to pre-trial hearing
on original charge of deal-
ing in stolen property.
Jeffery Robert
Shagger, 21, 332 NE
Windall Lane, burglary of
a structure while armed,
grand theft, criminal mis-
chief and dealing in stolen
property.
Johnathan Nightingale
Tanner, 19, 8460 Old Port
Gibson Road, Edwards,
Miss., burglary of a struc-
ture while armed, grand
theft, criminal mischief and
dealing in stolen property.
Christopher Wayne
Thornton, 21, 465 SW
Randall Terrace, burglary
of structure while armed,
grand theft, criminal mis-
chief, warrants: Failure to
appear on original charge
of disorderly conduct, fail-
ure to appear on original
charge of driving while
license suspended/revoked
and dealing in stolen prop-
erty.
Billy Joe Tomlinson,
23, 253 NW Natasha Glen,
dealing in stolen property.


Robert Mark Turner,
29, 132 SW Summers Lane,
warrant Violation of proba-
tion on original charges of
burglary and assault while
armed, aggravated battery,
robbery and grand theft
auto.
Robert Scott Urban, 41,
319 SE Avalon Avenue, war-
rant Violation of probation
on original charge of traf-
ficking in Oxycodone.
Florida Department
Of Corrections
Kendrick Robihson, no
age given, 375 NW Bascom
Norris Drive, warrants:
Violation of probation on
original charges of burglary
and grand theft and viola-
tion of probation on original
charge of burglary.

Wednesday, Dec. 29
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Anthony Lewis Britt,
27, 193 SW Bramble Street,
possession of a controlled
substance.'
Michael Joseph
Culligan, 49, 2165 Adams
Drive, Atlanta, Ga., warrant
Violation of probation on
original charges of attempt-
ed possession of a short bar-
rel rifle and possession of a
firearm by a convicted felon.


NOTICE OF


COMMUNITY


DEVELOPMENT


BLOCK GRANT


HOUSING


REHABILITATION/


REPLACEMENT


ASSISTANCE AND


POTABLE WATER


CONNECTION


,ASSISTANCE

Columbia County has been awarded a Small Cities
Community Development Block Grant from the
Florida Department of Community Affairs for
Housing Rehabilitation.

What does the Small Cities Community Develop-
ment Block Grant offer?

Roof repairs, windows, structural repairs or
replacement houses and/or

Potable Water connection assistance in the El-
lisville Utility District.


Who qualifies?

Housing Rehabilitation and Replacement: Low-
and Moderate-Income Persons* Who Own Their
Homes and Reside in Unincorporated Columbia
County and

Potable Water Connection: Low- and Moder-
ate-Income Persons* who are in the Ellisville
Utility District.

Additional information concerning the
Community Development Block Grant Program
and application forms can be obtained from the
Office of the County Manager, located at 135 NE
Hernando Street, Lake City, Florida, telephone


number (386) 755-4100.


Please submit an


application by February 25, 2011.
* If the Number ofPeople
Living in Household is.. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
iotal Houeholdlncome
Cannot be More Than... 26,450 30,200 $34,000 $37,750 $40,800 543,800 S46,850 $49,850
*FY 2010 Income Limits
A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/FHANDICAPACCESS JURISDICTION.


Robert Woodard Edwar
Financial Advisor Edwardjones
MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING

148 North Marion Ave Downtown
Lake City, FL 32055-3915
Bus. 386-752-1215 TF Fax 800-217-2105 1
TE 888-752-1215
robert.woodard@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


r












OPINION


Tuesday, January 4, 201 I


OUR- -


OUR
OPINION


Education

divide

demands

reform

Bottom line, East
Asian kids are kick-
ing sand in U.S.
students' faces.
According to
PISA, Program for International
Student Assessment, results
recently released for 2009, the
U.S. ranks well behind more
than a dozen other industrial-
ized nations in reading, math
and science.
The data shows U.S. students
improved in science from 2006
scores, but still ranks 17th, up
from 21st.
Math and reading scores,
however, remained flat with
U.S. kids ranking 25th and 14th
respectively.
If you take the composite
scores of math, reading and
science for all 65 participat-
ing nations, the top 10 would
include eight Asian-Pacific
nations or provinces. The U.S.
would rank 26th overall.
The news, however, is not all
bad.
.Although the United States
fares relatively poorly consider-
ing the resources poured into
the national education system,
the test results do not tell the
entire tale.
Chinese educators, Shanghai
and Hong Kong specifically,
while trumpeting their triumph
in the PISA assessments, noted
that their educational system is
designed to produce students
who will.do well.in.tests of ..
memorization and regurgitation'
of facts.
SSeveral Chinese officials
bemoaned the relative lack
:of ability of their students to
creatively address issues or
problem solve or analyze vary-
ing texts or situations. U.S. stu-
dents increasingly are taught
exactly those skills at the cost
of rote memorization of facts.
The rise of Asian students,
including those from Korea,
Singapore and Japan, reflect
governmental policies and
investments in education that
prioritize education as a strat-
egy for economic development.
High quality education leads to

a Midland (Mich.) Daily News


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Allowing cell phones unlimited

access in all parts of our lives


ne of the things
that college teach-
ers do during the
apparently luxuri-
ous lull between
the end of the fall semester and
the beginning of the spring is to
think about what to do different-
ly when the new faces show up
in their classrooms in January.
And I've been thinking about
... cell phones. They're a much
bigger presence in the col-
lege classroom than one might
have imagined just a few years
ago. Left to their own devices,
students would use them in
classrooms just as they do else-
where, that is, incessantly.
A few college teachers, over-
whelmed by the inevitable,
allow their students to text
freely on their cell phones dur-
ing class. After all, according to
one survey, 10 percent of col-
lege-age students think it's okay
to text during sex; what chance
is there of curbing the urge to
connect during, say, a discus-
sion of Beowulf?
Still, I suspect that most col-
lege teachers resist, maintaining
that some social circumstances
church, funerals, sex acts,
college classrooms still call
for the kind of focused attention
that excludes outside connec-
tions, if only briefly.
This is a hard sell with mod-
ern students. Most of them
would be justifiably disconcert-
ed if their professor took a call
during class, but it's hard for
them to imagine disconnection
from their own electronic world
for as long as an hour. In fact,
many of them can't tolerate it,
at all. Even in classes like mine,
where we agree at the begin-
ning of the semester to forswear


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmr.edu
our cell phones for two short
class periods per week, texting
is irresistible.
My college-age nieces assure
me that a good texter can rest
her hand inconspicuously within
her purse and send one-handed
texts to any number of friends
without betraying the slight-
est sign of diverted attention.
Most classroom texters aren't
that adept, however, and texting
is "often obvious. In fact, it's
so habitual and commonplace
among students that many
neglect to conceal it, at all.
Stop me if I overstate this,
but the struggle to achieve and
maintain students' attention to
ideas that will never be as inter-
esting, immediate, and seeming-
ly relevant as those that emerge
from an electronic device no
bigger than their palms, has
reached a crisis.
As an old-fashioned liberal,
naturally I turn to Washington
for help. None is forthcom-
ing. In fact, the new House
of Representatives, which
convenes this month, recently
made rule changes that per-
mit previously forbidden cell
phones and personal computers
on the House floor. If the repre-
sentatives that we elect to deal
with the weightiest matters of
governance are able to consult
their iPods and BlackBerrys in


the midst of their deliberations,
who am I to bar their use in my
humble classroom?
Still, I think I'll try, at least
for another semester or two.
Despite the systematic short-
ening'of our national attention
span, both individual and collec-
tive, colleges, conservative by
nature, continue to ask students
to do things reading and writ-
ing, for example that call for
focused attention and concentra-
tion.
Not everyone agrees with
me on this, but distraction is
the mortal enemy of the kind
of extended linear thinking
that underpins good reading
and writing. Modern students
are as smart as ever, but
many of them aren't great
readers and writers, partly
because they haven't prac-
ticed these skills very much.
Furthermore, they have an
abundance of other ways
of getting information and
expressing themselves that
have nothing to do with tradi-
tional linear text.
Finally, our culture is no
longer organized along lines
that encourage undistracted
focus on a single idea for a
prolonged period of time, for
more than, say, the length of
a commercial. Perhaps a col-
lege classroom could be one of
those rare venues where, freed
from the myth of multi-tasking,
students experience an uncom-
mon encounter with depth and
extended time that is nearly
unheard of in everything else
they do. It couldn't hurt to try
it.
a John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.


FCC should stay away from the Web


without autho-
rization from
Congress,
and in defi-
ance of a fed-
eral court ruling, the Federal
Communication Commission
this month has seized control
of the Internet and has started
the process of regulating it. The
process could distort the evolu-
tion of the Internet and slow
investment in it. The agency
should be told to back off.
The FCC move occurred as
the result of a.straight party line
3-2 vote, with the Democratic
majority deciding to intrude
government regulation on the
Web. The decision allows the
FCC to impose a so-called "net
neutrality" regime on the Web,
which means Internet provid-
ers would not be able to block
access to legal websites.
The regime isn't needed.
Providers weren't doing that
anyway. The FCC also gave
itself the power to determine
if a network is "unreasonably
discriminating" against a con-


tent provider in determining
how quickly to allow content to
appear on consumers' computer
screens.
In other words, the FCC
has given itself the authority to
involve itself in the business deci-
sions of Web access providers.
It has done so even though,
this spring, a federal court ruled
that the FCC has no express
statutory authority to govern
the Internet at all. Congress
briefly took a pass at creating its
own Internet rules this year and
gave up the idea. In fact, a num-
ber of members of Congress,
including many Democrats, told
the FCC to back away from its
proposed regulations.
With good reason. For most
of the past two decades, the
Internet has grown and evolved
on its own quite well. There is
now a host of new uses for the
Web, including entertainment
content, and a host of new ways
to receive Internet content,
including cell phones.
The Web also has been
turned into a telephone net-


work.
None of this was foreseen in
the early days of the Internet.
And new uses will likely be
devised that no one now envi-
sions.
But how much less quickly
and smoothly will these adapta-
tions occur under a new govern-
ment regulatory regime?
Prior to the vote, Republican
FCC Commissioner Robert
M. McDowell, who opposed it,
wrote in a Wall Street Journal
column, "Analysts and broad-
band companies of all sizes have
told the FCC that new rules
are likely to have the perverse
effect of inhibiting capital invest-
ment, deterring innovation,
raising operating costs, and
ultimately increasing consumer
prices."
But the Internet is too inte-
gral a part of the economy and
too valuable to let overreaching
federal bureaucrats gum it up.
The new Congress should
definitively tell the FCC to take
its hands off the Web.
* Detroit News


4A


Dan K.Thomasson


One factor

controls

college

bowls:

Money

A midst all the hurrah
of the college bowl
season topped so far
by Texas Christian
University's
exhilarating victory over the
behemoths from Wisconsin in
the venerable old Rose Bowl,
nothing is more important to
remember than the underlying
reason behind these events that
are supposed to highlight the
nation's best "student" athletes
money.
The bottom line is really all
that counts here in an improb-
able, dishonest exercise in
anti-competitive commercialism
called the Bowl Championship
Series, foisted off on Americans
as the true determiner of
America's number one football
team. Ka-ching! Ka-ching! Well,
TCU not a part of the cabal
that controls this infamous busi-
ness fought its way through
to finally dispel that notion drag-
ging with it the Boise States and
Utahs that have been so absurd-
ly denied the same opportunity
over the years.
Whatever the BCS claims, it,
never will be the same again.
That, of course, presumes that
it ever was what it claimed.
Perhaps the TCU fete will strike.
a blow for those who would set
aside this monstrosity and install
the only real way to decide
who should sit atop the football
mountain, a national playoff
just like other sports. But one *
shouldn't be too hopeful consid-
ering the millions upon millions
of dollars members of these priv-
ileged conferences, the bowls,
sponsors and television share.
Before this happens, the
sanctimonious nincompoops of
the National Collegiate Athletic
Association whose claims of
sports purity are only exceeded
by their greed have a lot to
straighten out Maybe a start-
ing point would be to examine.
how the smaller schools in their
respective divisions I, I-AA,
II, and III successfully manL :
age to maintain some integrity
that the high profile Division
I schools can't seem to attain.
These other institutions have
been running national football
playoffs without much scandal
for quite a while, centering as
they do more on school pride
than on how much is to be
made.
That, of course, is probably
an unrealistic suggestion in the
high powered professionalism,
both in college and afterwards,
of the game that has displaced
baseball as the national pastime
despite the growing evidence
that those who play it over a sus-
tained period face the chance of
irreparable, life shortening inju-
ries. Let's face it: A good football
program at the top level pays for
a lot of other, low revenue sports:
for both men and women. It also
brings an important visibility to
the institution. Someone once
said recently that the game is
the "front porch" of the school.
You don't think so? Look at
Notre Dame, a great university
built on the foundation of foot-
ball.
Of course the epitome of
NCAA greed is its decision to
allow five Ohio State players,
including the star quarterback,
guilty of rules infractions, to play
in the Sugar Bowl with their sus-
pension put off until next year.
That about says it all, doesn't it?

Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


"0










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY JANUARY 4, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today

MLK Parade
Participants are needed
for the Northeast Florida
Leadership Council
Annual Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Parade which will
be at 10 a.m. Jan. 17 begin-
ning at DOT Call Ron 623-
0468, Gwen 623-3779, or
Audre 344-9915.

Olustee Festival
Pageant
Contestants are being
sought for the 2011
Olustee Festival Pageant.
The pageant is Feb. 5
and open to girls ages 13
mo-20 years who reside
or attend school in Baker,
Columbia, Hamilton,
Union or Suwannee
Counties. Applications are
available at the Columbia
County Library, Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce, Emily Taber
Library, Suwannee
Regional Library, Hamilton


County Library, Union
County Public Library
or by contacting Elaine
Owens at 386-965-2787.
Deadline for entries is Jan.
25.

Master Gardener
program
A new University of
Florida Master Gardener
class is forming.
Applications will be accept-
ed through Jan. 15. To
learn more about becom-
ing a Master Gardener,
contact the Columbia
County Extension Office
at 752-5384 or stop by for
the application. Training
will take place every
Wednesday Feb. 9 April
20.

Scholars program
The deadline to sub-
mit report cards for the
.Presley Excel and Scholars
Program is Jan. 19. The
program honors students
in kindergarten through


12th grade whose second
nine weeks report card
has no grade less than a
B or S. Send a copy of the
report card and a contact
telephone number to: Mrs.
Bernice D. Presley, PO.
Box 402, Lake City, FL
32055, fax 719-4389 or e-
mail berniceEXCEL@aol.
com. Call 752-4074. The
theme is "Knowledge Is
Contagious." Qualifying
students are asked to
bring a book to exchange
or give away.

Wednesday

Friendship luncheon
The January Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomers is Wednesday
at the Telford Hotel, 16521
River St. in White Springs.
For those wanting to car
pool, please meet at the
park and ride lot next to
Arby's on Rte. 90 at 10:30
a.m. All members, guests
and friends are welcome.
Call 438-8100 or 754-7227.


Builder's Association
meeting
The Columbia County
Builder's Association is
meeting Wednesday at
the Holiday Inn. Buffet
opens at 11:30 a.m. and
meeting starts at noon.
The speaker is from the
Metro Crime Prevention
of Florida. Tickets may
be purchased at the door.
Members are $10 and
non-members are $15.
Call 386-867-1998 with any
questions. If you are inter-
ested in becoming a mem-
ber of Columbia County
Builder's Association con-
tact Kathryn Peterson at
754-0417 or Lynda Yeany
at 867-1998.

Saturday

ALU Walk
Four Rivers Audubon
hosts a monthly ALLI-
Walk: Bird /Butterfly /
Nature's Garden outing
8 to 11 a.m. at Alligator


Lake. Jerry Krummrich,
biologist, Virlyn Willis,
avid birder, and others will
share their knowledge.
Bring a hat, sunscreen,
water, binoculars and a
snack. No fee is charged.
All levels of participation
and knowledge are wel-
come. Enter Alligator Lake
at the County Park on
Country Club Road (east
side of lake). Drive in and
around to the parking area
in front of the lake. Call
Loye Barnard at 497-3536
for more information.

Monday

Support group meeting
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of Lake
City is meeting 5:30 to
6:30 p.m. Monday at
Baya Pharmacy East,
780 SE Baya Drive. The
guest speaker is Dr. Paul
Schilling, Community
Cancer Center, addressing
the question "I've finished
my cancer treatments...


now what?" Call 386-752-
4198 or 386755-0522.

Wednesday, Jan.
12

Lake City Newcomers
Regular Meeting
The regular monthly
meeting of the Lake City
Newcomers is 11 a.m. Jan.
12 at Guangdong Chinese
Restaurant. Luncheon
cost is $10. All members,
guests and friends along
with any newcomers to the
area are welcome. Lake
City Police Chief Argatha
Gilmore is the speaker.
Call 752-4552 or 7554051.


Thursday, Jan. 13

Medicaid workshop
A free Medicaid work-
shop is 10 a.m. Jan. 13 in
the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center. To attend, please
call Shana Miller at 386-
755-1977.


OBITUARIES


Myra Cumi Albritton
Mrs. Myra Cumi Albritton,
age 76 of High Springs, Flor-
ida died Saturday, January 1,
2011 at North Florida Regional
Medical Center. Mrs. Albrit-
ton was born September 25,
1934 to Troy M. and Mallie
Pitts Williams in Beaufort, S.C.
She was a member of the First
Baptist Church of High Springs.
Preceded in death by her son
David Melton. She is survived
by her husband, Tom E. "Red"
Albritton of High Springs, Flor-
ida. One son, Luther Melton
of High Springs, Florida; two-
daughters, Tina Arau of High
Springs, Florida, Rebecca 01-
heiser of Dickson, N.D. One
sister, Virginia Douglas of Lulu,
Florida. Eight Grandchildren
and ten Great Grandchildren.
Funeral services will .be held
Thursday, January 4, 2011 at
11:00AM, First Baptist Church
High Springs, 20112 U.S. Hwy
441 with Dr, Eddie Gandy of-
ficiating. Burial will follow in
High Springs Cemetery. Flow-
ers are welcomed but those
who wish to make donations
to American Cancer Society.
Arrangements are under the
care of EVANS-CARTER
FUNERALHOME,220N.Main
Street, High Springs, Florida.

Charles L. DePratter
Mr. Charles L. DePratter, 56, of
Gainesville, Florida, passed
away on January 1, 2011 in the
Haven Hospice of the Suwan-
nee Valley while surrounded
by his family. The son of the
late Charles M. DePratter III
and Billye Sharpless DePratter,
Charles was severely handi-
capped since birth and had been
a resident of the Tacachale Cen-
ter in Gainesville, Florida for the
past fifty-four years. He was a
member of the Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter Day Saints Deep
Creek Ward. Charles was pre-
ceded in death by his father, his
paternal grandparents, Charles
M. & Willard H. DePratter and
his maternal grandparents, Hu-
bert G. & Fanny K. Sharpless.
He is survived by his mother,
Billye DePratter of Lake City;
his brothers, Randy DePratter
of Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida;
Rusty DePratter (Cori); Rocky
DePratter (Angle); Reed DePrat-
ter (Kathy) and Ray DePratter
(Stacey) all of Lake City; his
aunts, June Brannon (Lavern) of
Lake City; Joan Strickland, Dia-
mond Head, Mississippi and Ann
Katona of Las Vegas, Nevada; a
cousin, Jimmy DePratter of Lake
City; his four nephews, Ethan
DePratter (Candace) of Blount-


stown, Florida; Cory DePratter
(Angie)- of Lake City; Landon
DePratter ofAtlanta, Georgia and
Keahi DePratter of Ewa Beach,
Hawaii; and his three nieces,
Katelyn DePratter of Lake City;
Kanoe DePratter of Ewa Beach,
Hawaii and Jordan DePratter of
Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. He
will be missed by other family
members and friends including
his longtime friend and caregiv-
er, Barbara Dupree of Gaines-
ville and all of his other friends
and caregivers at Tacachale.
Funeral services for Mr. DePrat-
ter will be conducted at 4:00
P.M. on Wednesday, January
5, 2011 in the Church of Je-
sus Christ of Latter Day Saints
Deep Creek Ward (located on
Old Country Club Road) with
Bishop John Luthi presiding.
Interment will following the Oak
Grove Cemetery in Providence,
Florida. The family will receive
friends from 5-7:00 Tuesday
evening at the funeral home. Ar-
rangements are under the direc-
tion of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City,
FL 32025 752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
w w w. p a r r ishfami -
lyfuneralhome. comr

William Earl Hawkins
William Earl "Bill" Hawkins
Was called home to God on
January 2nd after a long battle
with Cancer and
Alzheimer's.
Bill was born
to Benjamin
and Beatrice
Hawkins on April 26, 1926, in
Prince Georges County Mary-
land. Bill and his mother owned
and operatedriding stables. His
horse, Tex, was a special love
of his. He joined the Marines
at age 17 and had the opportu-
nity to work with horses while
serving his country. Bill was
extremely proud of being a Ma-
rine, so much so that he would
tear up when he saw the com-
mercial, "The few, The proud,
The Marines." After the Marine
Corps Bill worked at Sears, as
a supervisor over the major ap-
pliance repair department for
eleven years. He then gambled
as an entrepreneur, by buying a
small business in Miami where
he met his wife of 43 years, San-
dy. Shortly after their daughter,
Kellie, was born they sold the
business and moved to the Keys.
He worked for the Ocean Reef
Club in North Key Largo which
allowed him to spend many
hours doing what he loved, fish-
ing the pristine waters of the
Keys. After retiring they moved


to Live Oak where he spent the
remainder of his life. Bill was a
humble and reserved man with a
quiet charm and a great sense of
humor. Throughout his lengthy
battle, with Cancer and Al-
zheimer's, he never complained
and always tried to comply with
the sometimes difficult care be-
ing given to him. His daughter,
Kellie, could always put a smile
on his face and he seemed to
never forget who she was or the
special bond between them. He
will be greatly missed by his lov-
ing wife, Sandy, Daughter Kellie
Shirah (B.J.), daughters Jeanne
Booher and Judy White and son,
Billy Hawkins Jr, granddaughter
Kelsey Shirah, grandson Justin
Shirah, and many friends. He
was predeceased by his father
Benjamin at age 43, mother
Beatrice at age 89, and his sis-
ter Bertha Rhinehardt. Crema-
tion is to be handled by Daniels
Funeral Home. His ashes are to
be spread over his favorite fish-
ing spot. A memorial service is
being planned for a future date.
DANIELS FUNERAL
HOMES & CREMATORY,
INC., of Live Oak and Branford,
FL in charge of arrangements.

Phyllis F. Register
Mrs. Phyllis F. Register, 71,
resident of Lake City, Fl, passed
from this life at Suwannee Val-
ley Care Center of Lake City,
Sunday, Janu-


She was the



a native of Mt. Sterling, Ken-
tucky but had made her home
in Lake City most of her life
where she was a longtime mem-
ber of Parkview Baptist Church.
She enjoyed her church, fish-
ing, traveling, quilting (she
gave many of them to charity)
and was devoted to her family.


She was preceded in death
by her sister, Juanita VanPelt,
and brother, Mack Morris.
Survivors include her husband
of fifty-three years W.C. Regis-
ter, Lake City. Three sons, Larry
Register, Lake City, Troy Reg-
ister (Gigi) Lake City, and Ray
Register (RaLinda), Rock Hill,
SC; Two sisters, Helen Byrd,
O'Brien, FL and Arlene Wilks
(Jerry), Trenton, FL: Seven
Grandchildren, Shelby, Tyler,
Hayden, Witt, Haley, Callahan,
and Hannah Register also survive.
In lieu of flowers, memorials
may be made in Mrs. Register's
honor to the Parkview Baptist
Church, Building Fund, 268
NW Lake Jeffery Road, Lake
City, Fl. 32055 or the Suwan-
nee Valley Care Center (Ha-
ven Hospice), 6037 US 90
West, Lake City, Fl. 32055.
Visitation will be from 5:00 p.m.
until 7:00 p.m., Tuesday, Janu-
ary 4, 2011 at Parkview Baptist
Church, 268 NW Lake Jeffery
Road, Lake City, FL. Funeral
services will be conducted at
11 A.M. on Wednesday, Janu-
ary 5, 2011 at Parkview Baptist
Church with Rev. Mike Tatum
and Rev. Keith Norris officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in
Memorial Cemetery, Lake City,
FL. GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 S. U.S. Highway 441,
Lake City, FL (386-752-1954)
in charge of arrangements.
Please sigh the, guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com.

Eric Shane Snyder
Eric Shane Snyder passed away
tragically at the tender age of 19
due to a house fire on Friday,
December 24,
2010. Eric was
born in WPB,
FL and moved
to Lake City,
FL after his
birth. He was
a loving and
devoted son,
brother, grandson, nephew,


II


cousin and friend. Eric was pre-
ceded in death by his maternal
grandfather Frank Stamper, Sr.
and his paternal grandparents
Robert and Francis Snyder.
Eric is survived by his maternal
great grandmother, Pearl Stamp-
er; his maternal grandmother,
Retha Piper; his mom, Shawn
Wheeler; his father, Scott Snyder
of WPB; sister, Sarah Wheeler;
nephew, Wes Johnson and girl-
friend, Amy Latinka as well as
many aunts, uncles, cousins and
many, many lifelong friends.
A special thank you to his best
friend, his "Bro," Teak who'did
his best that tragic night to save


Eric's life. Also, wewould like to
thank our wonderful neighbors/
friends Derek & Amber Shiver.
A funeral service for Eric will
be conducted at 3pm on Thurs-
day, January 6, 2011 at Christ
Central Ministries, by Pastor
Lonnie Johns. All friends and
family are welcome to attend.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427









LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE TUESDAY, JANUARY 4. 2011


King Arthur


reigns at


Hoggetowne


Medieval Faire


From staff reports
For two week-
ends each
year, the clear
blast of trum-
pets mingles
with the laughter of
children as the kingdom
of Hoggetowne opens
its gates. Performers
in period garb sing and
dance in the streets, while
knights joust on horseback
and magicians captivate
the crowds. Tucked away
in the enchanted forest
of the Alachua County
Fairgrounds in Gainesville,
this medieval marketplace
will come to life on Jan. 29-
30 and Feb. 4-6.
Hoggetowne is home
to more than 160 talented
artisans from across the
country who journey
to the Faire to sell and
demonstrate their wares,
offering medieval crafts
such as weaving, black-
smithing, leatherworking,
wood carving and glass
blowing. Fairgoers can
browse through a selec-
tion of delicate medieval
jewelry or glimpse into
their future with a mysti-
cal fortune teller.
"Visitors should arrive
early to take full advan-
tage of the e. Citing medi-
eval magic," said Linda
Piper, faire coordinator.
"Each morning all the
entertainers greet the
Hoggetowne guests as
the city gates open to this
enchanted kingdom."
The sound of applause
echoes from the Faire's
eight stages, where the
forgotten skills of full-
flight falconry,.gripping
aerial acrobatics and
old-world magic come to
life. Jugglers, knife throw-
ers and gypsy dancers
add to the excitement


Police:

Driver

who fled

fatal crash

arrested

MIAMI A van driv-
er who a witness said had
limped away from a crash
that killed three people has
been arrested, police said
Monday.
Cedric Levon Williams,
48, of Miami, crashed his
blue van into a Honda
Civic early Sunday as the
van raced through the city,
Miami police said. Shortly
before the crash, authorities
had issued an alert about
the van, saying it had been
seen speeding erratically.
Williams was held on
$36,000 bond on charges of
leaving the scene of a fatal
crash.
Williams' van ran a red
light and T-boned the Civic,
according to an arrest
report.
The car's driver, Robert
Wissler, 25, of Sunny Isles
Beach, died at the scene.
Also killed were two back-
seat passengers, 20-year-
old Lindsey Ellen Ennis of
Duluth, Ga., and 19-year-
old Kayla Elizabeth Bain of
Tutnam Station, N.Y.
A male passenger in the
front seat, 69-year-old Robert
Judd of North Miami Beach,
was injured and remained
hospitalized Monday, author-
ities said.
A security guard told inves-
tigators Williams limped
away from the crash, accord-
ing to the arrest report.
"It happened so fast,"
Williams told his mother
when officers arrested him
at his home Sunday after-


noon after an hourslong
standoff, police said.


as they fill the streets of
Hoggetowne.
"Visitors should plan
to spend the entire day
enjoying Hoggetowne's
enticing blend of artwork,
period music and medi-
eval traditions," Piper
said. "People wait all year
for this highly anticipated
event."
One of the Faire's most
popular attractions is the
joust, where knights in
full body armor battle
on horseback. Children
can meet the knights
and their magnificent
steeds, or they can watch
the Living Chess Match,
where the wizard Merlin
will battle Morgause, the
overbearing head mis-
tress of Orkney, to decide
who wins the Sword of
Power.
Visitors can also
engage in traditional
medieval games of chance
and skill. They can shoot
arrows or hurl battle
axes at targets, or they
can navigate their way
through a winding maze.
Thrilling human-powered
push rides, as well as
camel and elephant rides,
attract eager children and
adventurous adults.
Children can also enjoy
the Faire's School Day on
Friday, Feb. 4, in which
thousands of students
from Florida journey to
Hoggetowne for a day
of face painting, hair
braiding and medieval
crafts. General admission
is half-price, and larger
discounts are available to
school groups that regis-
ter in advance.
"It's so great to be
able to provide this edu-
cational opportunity to
children who are learning
about medieval times in


Some of the
sights to be
seen at the
Hoggetowne
Medieval Faire
in Jacksonville
include knights
jousting (left)
and magicians
swallowing fire
(below).


- K
'. .' .






ANA W,-


their schools," Piper said.
"This is a chance for stu-
dents to see the Middle
Ages come to life."
After roaming the
streets of Hoggetowne
and working up an appe-
tite, both adults and
children can enjoy a feast
fit for a king at the food
court. The tempting aro-
mas of freshly baked pas-
tries, blooming onions,
sweet potato fries, giant
turkey legs and succu-
lent ribs attract scores of
lords and ladies.
Produced by the City of
Gainesville Department
of Parks, Recreation
and Cultural Affairs, the
Hoggetowne Medieval
Faire draws more than
50,000 guests each
year. On Saturdays and
Sunday, the Faire is
open from 10 a.m. to 6
p.m. and costs $14 for
adults and $7 for children
ages 5 tol7. The Faire is
free for children under 5.
School Day, Friday, Feb.
4, is open from 9:30 a.m.
to 3 p.m., and admission
is half-price. Pets are not
permitted. The Alachua
County Fairgrounds is
located east of Gainesville
at 2900 NE 39th Ave.
adjacent to Gainesville
Regional Airport. For
more information, visit
www.gvlculturalaffairs. org
or call 352-334-ARTS.


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
rkirb, Ciakecaiyreportercom


SPORTS


Tuesday. lanuary 4. 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
FORT" V'': FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Jan. 11
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday
in the high school
teacher's lounge. On the
agenda are discussing
end-of-the-year issues,
setting dates for the
annual organizational
meeting, election of
officers and final plans
for the football banquet
(Jan. 22). All members
and those interested in
becoming members are
encouraged to attend.
For details, call club
president Ldri Pitts at
867-2117.
FLAG T' ;t,.i '
Registration for
co-ed teams
Christ Central Sports
is offering co-ed flag
football for ages 5-12.
Cost is $40 and
registration continues
through Jan. 15.
For details, call Ronny
at 365-2128 or the church
office at 755-2525.
CHS SOCCER
Fundraiser set
for Saturday
Columbia High's
junior varsity soccer
teams have a breakfast
fundraiser planned for
7:30-10:30 a.m. Saturday
at Kazbor's Grille in
Lake City.
Tickets are $6 at the
door, or may be
purchased in advance
from players.
For details, call
365-1877.
From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Fort White High
girls soccer vs. Oak Hall
School, 6 p.m.
Columbia High boys
soccer at Gainesville
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High boys
soccer at Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High girls
soccer at Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Ed White
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Thursday
Fort White High boys
weightlifting vs. Columbia
High, 4 p.m.
Fort White High girls
soccer vs. Lafayette High,
'7 p.m. (JV-5)
M Fort White High boys
soccer at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Middleburg
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Friday
Columbia. High
wrestling at Clay Rotary
Tournament, TBA
Fort White High girls
basketball at Trenton
High, 6 p.m. (JV-4:30)
Columbia High girls
soccer at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High
girls soccer at Madison
County High, 7 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Columbia
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High girls
basketball at Fleming
Island High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Trenton
High, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling at Clay Rotary


Tournament, TBA


'Only the beginning'


Fisher wants to
keep momentum
going for FSU.
By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -Jimbo
Fisher isn't looking back on
his impressive first season
at Florida State.
He was instead closeted
in his office Monday pre-
paring for a strong close on
a new recruiting class that
is shaping up to be bounti-
ful for the Seminoles.
"Having momentum like
this going into the offseason
is really important," Fisher
said during the weekend.
The coach's first-year suc-.
cess combined with chang-
es at Florida and Miami
give him an additional boost
in the recruiting.wars.
"I think we are getting
the guys we're going after,"


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State head coach Jimbo Fisher reacts to a penalty in
the Chick-fil-A Bowl in Atlanta on Friday.

said Fisher, who can't talk our recruiting class."
about individual athletes One of the nation's most
until next month's signing
day. "I'm very excited about FSU continued on 2B


Trojan


CHS caught by
Hamilton County;
defeated 75-63.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High's basket-
ball team bounded out of
the gate against Hamilton
County High, but gave it
all back at the end of the
third quarter. The visiting
Trojans won 75-63.
The Tigers led by 11
points late in both the first
and second quarters. The
score at the end of the first
quarter was 20-12. Columbia
overcame an 11-2 run late in
the second quarter to hold
on to a 37-32 halftime. lead.
The teams duked it out
in the third quarter and
the Trojans pulled within
two points with 2%1 minutes
left. The Tigers pushed it
back to four points, then
Hamilton County scored
the final 10 points to take a
54-48 lead.
Columbia got within two
points a couple of times
in the fourth quarter, but
could never get the lead.
The Trojans drained six
straight foul shots down the
stretch.
Morris Marshall led the
Tigers with 24 points and
Nigel Atkinson also hit dou-
ble figures with 12.
Kenneth Coffee poured
in 31 points for the Trojans
(10-4). Antefernce Smith
scored 21.
Columbia (4-8) hosts Ed
White High at 7:30 p.m.
today.


Weis confirmed
for Gators; Quinn,
Verducci added.
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE -
Florida's coaching staff is
nearly complete.
The Gators confirmed
Monday that former Notre
Dame coach Charlie Weis
will be Will Muschamp's
offensive coordinator and
quarterbacks coach.
Muschamp also hired
Seattle Seahawks defensive
line coach Dan Quinn as
defensive coordinator and
line coach. Quinn spent
the past 10 years in the
NFL and has seven years
of college experience.
Frank Verducci was
added as offensive line
coach and running game
coordinator. Verducci
coached at Notre Dame


trouble


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Morris Marshall (22) dribbles past a Hamilton County High defender as he
heads down the court in a game Monday night in Lake City.


in 2009 after eight seasons
with four NFL teams.
George Wynn will be
director of football opera-
tions. He spent the past six
seasons at assistant ath-
letic director for football
operations at Texas.
Weis and Quinn will
remain with their NFL
teams through the post-
season.
Muschamp has eight
assistants now, leaving one
spot to fill.
It's unclear what direc-
tion Muschamp will go
with the final hire.
Muschamp said during
his introductory news con-
ference that he wanted to
install a prostyle offense
and a multiple-scheme
defense. He called Weis "a
perfect fit."
"He has both college
and pro experience and
GATORS continued on 2B


Florida

beats

Rhode

Island
Gators close
non-conference
slate with win.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE -
Chandler Parsons broke
out of a scoring slump
with 18 points, Erving
Walker added 14 and
Florida beat Rhode Island
84-59 Monday night
The Gators (11-3)
capped their non-con-
ference schedule with a
third straight win, includ-
ing consecutive games
against Atlantic-10 teams.
Florida won at Xavier on
Friday.
Kenny Boynton and
Alex Tyus chipped in 10
points apiece for Florida,
which used a 22-2 run
in the first half to turn
a close game into a lop-
sided affair.
The Gators opened up
a 21-point advantage with
4:18 remaining before
the break. Rhode Island
(9-5) sliced into the lead
on Will Martell's back-to-
back buckets and Delroy
James' 3-pointer. But
Parsons answered with a
3 on the other end, then
really helped the Gators
pull away in the second
half.
James led the Rams
with 23 points. Martell
added 13 points and seven
rebounds.


Rangers beef up

starting pitching


Former CyYoung
winner Brandon
Webb signed.
By STEPHEN HAWKINS
Associated Press
ARLINGTON, Texas
- The Rangers will have
a former Cy Young Award
winner wearing No. 33 after
all next season Brandon
Webb instead of Cliff Lee.
Three weeks after los-
ing Lee in free agency, the
AL champions on Monday
finalized a $3 million, one-
year deal with the 2006


NL Cy Young winner, who
hasn't pitched since the
2009 season opener after
shoulder surgery. Texas
also completed a $3.9 mil-
lion, one-year contract with
41-year-old reliever Arthur
Rhodes.
Webb, whose last major
league game was the 2009
opener for Arizona, can
earn $5 million in bonuses.
Rhodes, coming off one
of his best seasons in a
20-year major league career,
has a deal that includes a
$4 million club option for
2012 that could become
guaranteed.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Texas Rangers manager Ron Washington (left) and general managers Jon Daniels (right)
greet newly signed pitcher Brandon Webb after presenting him with a hat and jersey at a
press conference at the Rangers Ballpark in Arlington Monday.


Strong staffing


Ill I













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 4. 2011 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCOREBOARD


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ESPN Sugar Bowl, Ohio St. vs.
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FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


y-New England
x-N.Y jets
Miami
Buffalo


y-lndianapolis
Jacksonville
Houston
Tennessee

y-Pittsburgh
x-Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati


East
W L TPct PF PA
14 2 0.875518 313
I I 5 0.688 367 304
7 9 0.438273 333
S4 12 0.250283 425
South
W L TPct PF PA
10 6 0.625435 388
8 8 0.500353 419
6 10 0.375390427
6 10 0.375356 339
North
W L TPct PF PA
12 4 0.750375 232
12 4 0.750357 270
5 II 0.313271 332
.4 12 0.250322 395


West
W L TPct PF PA
y-Kansas City 10 6 0.625366 326
San Diego 9 7 0.563441 322
Oakland 8 8 0.500410 371
Denver 4 12 0.250344 471
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
y-Philadelphia 10 6 0.625 439 377
N.Y. Giants 10 6 0.625394 347
Dallas 6 10 0.375 394 436
Washington 6 10 0.375 302 377
South


W L
y-Atlanta 13 3
x-New Orleans I I 5
Tampa Bay 10 6
Carolina 2 14
North
W L
y-Chicago II 5
x-Green Bay 10 6
Detroit 6 10
Minnesota 6 10
West
W L
y-Seattle 7 9
St. Louis 7 9
San Francisco 6 10
Arizona 5 11
x-clinched playoff spot
:x-glLnched division
; uSundav's Ga


TPct PF PA
0.813414 288
0.688 384 307
0.625341 318
0.125 196 408

tiPct PF PA
0.688 334 286
0.625 388 240
0.375 362 369
0.375281 348

TPct PF PA
0.438310 407
0.438 289 328
0.375 305 346
0.313 289 434


ames ,


Oakland 3 1, Kansas City 10
Tampa Bay 23, New Orleans 13
New England 38, Miami 7
Detroit 20, Minnesota 13
Atlanta 3I, Carolina 10
Pittsburgh 41, Cleveland 9
N.Y.Jets 38, Buffalo 7
Baltimore 13, Cincinnati 7
San Francisco 38,Arizona 7
San Diego 33, Denver 28
Green Bay 10, Chicago 3
Houston 34, Jacksonville 17
N.Y. Giants 17,Washington 14
Dallas 14, Philadelphia 13
Indianapolis 23,Tennessee 20


Seattle I 6, St. Louis 6
End of Regular Season

NFL playoffs
Wild Card
Saturday
New Orleans at Seattle, 4:30 p.m.
(NBC)
N.Y Jets at Indianapolis, 8 p.m. (NBC)
Sunday,Jan. 9
Baltimore at Kansas City, I p.m.
(CBS)
Green Bay at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m.
(FOX)
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 15
Indianapolis, Kansas City or Baltimore
at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m. (CBS)
Green Bay, New Orleans or Seattle at
Atlanta, 8 p.m. (FOX)
Sunday, Jan. 16
Philadelphia, New Orleans or Seattle
at Chicago, I p.m. (FOX)
N.Y. Jets, Kansas City or Baltimore at
New England, 4:30 p.m. (CBS)
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 23
NFC, 3 p.m. (FOX)
AFC, 6:30 p.m. (CBS)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 6
At Arlington,Texas
AFC champion vs. NFC champion,
6:30 p.m. (FOX)

Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 30
At Honolulu
AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (FOX)

College bowl games

TicketCity Bowl
Texas Tech 45, Northwestern 38
Capital One Bowl
Alabama 49, Michigan State 7
Outback Bowl
Florida 37, Penn State 24
Gator Bowl
Mississippi State 52, Michigan 14
Rose Bowl
TCU 21,Wisconsin 19
Fiesta Bowl
Oklahoma 48, Connecticut 20
Monday
Orange Bowl
Stanford vs.Virginia Tech (n)
Today
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Ohio State ( I1-) vs.Arkansas (10-2),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Thursday
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle
Tennessee (6-6), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington,Texas.
Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2),
8 p.m. (FOX)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Monday's Games
Miami 96, Charlotte 82
Orlando 110, Golden State 90
Boston 96, Minnesota 93
New Orleans 84, Philadelphia 77
Houston at Denver (n)
Detroit at Utah (n)
Today's Games
Milwaukee at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Chicago, 8 p.m.


Oklahoma City at Memphis. 8 p.m.
Portland at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Detroit at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Toronto at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Chicago at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia. 7 p.m.
San Antonio at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Golden State at New Orleans. 8 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25

The top 25 teams in The Associated
Press' college basketball poll, with first-
place votes in parentheses, records
through Jan. 2, total points and last week's
ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
I.Duke (65) 13-0 1,625 I
2. Ohio St. 14-0 1,551 2
3. Kansas 13-0 1,491 3
4. Syracuse 15-0 1,437 5
5. Pittsburgh 13-1 1,358 6
6.San DiegoSt. 15-0 1,198 7
7.Villanova 12-1 1,187 8
8. Connecticut 11-1 1,168 4
9. Missouri 13-1 1,116 10
10. Kentucky 11-2 1,052 II
II.Purdue 13-1 930 12
12.Texas 11-2 902 13
13. Georgetown 12-2 834 9
14. Notre Dame 12-2 688 15
15.BYU 14-1 648 16
16.Texas A&M 12-1 569 18
17. Kansas St. .11-3 523 17
18. Michigan St. 9-4 504 20
19.UCF 13-0 490 19
20. Illinois 12-3 328 23
21. Memphis 11-2 313 21
22.Vanderbilt 11-2 238 24
23.Washington 10-3 173 -
24. Cincinnati 14-0 159 -
25. UNLV 12-2 136 -
Others receiving votes: Louisville 124,
Minnesota 96, Temple 74, Wisconsin 55,
Baylor 50, Florida 35, Butler 25,Wichita
St. 17, North Carolina. 9, Saint Mary's,
Calif. 8, Gonzaga 7, Arizona 2, Cleveland
St. 2, Florida St. 2, Georgia 1.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 2 Ohio State at Iowa, 9:05 p.m.
No. 5 Pittsburgh at Providence, 7 p.m.
No. 8 Connecticut at No. 14 Notre
Dame, 7 p.m.
No. 12 Texas vs.Arkansas, 9 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Monday's Games
Boston 2,Toronto I
Florida 4, Carolina 3, OT
N.Y. Islanders at Calgary (n)
Chicago at Los Angeles (n)
Vancouver at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
Minnesota at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Detroit at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Columbus at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Florida, 7:30 p.m. .
Dallas at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Calgary atVancouver, 10 p.m.
Nashville atAnaheim, 10 p.m.


GATORS: Weis will guide pro offense


Continued From Page 1B

has been a play caller in
the NFL," Muschamp
said in a statement. "He
has four Super Bowl rings
and his accomplishments
and his ability to develop
quarterbacks speak for


themselves."
Muschamp and Quinn
worked on the same staff
with the Miami Dolphins.
Muschamp said Quinn "is
one of the best I've been
around in terms of teaching


fundamentals."
"He understands how
defenses will need to be
multiple and how to put
players in a position to be
successful," Muschamp
said.


COURTESY PHOTO
Pinemount and Summers elementary schools shared first place in the 5th Annual Columbia
County Schools Cup Stacking Competition at Richardson Community Center on Dec. 16.


Pinemount, Summers tie for


Cup Stacking championship


From staff reports

The 5th Annual
Columbia County Schools
Cup Stacking Competition
was Dec. 16 at Richardson
Community Center.
For the first time since
the competition began
there was a two-way tie for
first place, with Pinemount
Elementary and Summers
Elementary sharing the
honor.


Team scores were based
on combined times in the
3-3-3 Relay, 3-6-3 Relay, 6-6
Relay, 1-10-1 Relay and the
Cycle.
Pinemount swept the
individual winners, who
were Savannah Amparo in
Cycle (11.33 sec), and Alex
Guerney (4.28 sec) and
Kailey Kiss (3.44 sec) in
3-6-3. Guerney and Kiss set
individual time records.
More than 110 students


from seven elementary
schools participated in
the event, which was co-
sponsored by the Board of
County Commissioners,
Columbia County
Recreation Department
and Lake City Recreation
Department.
Participating schools
were Columbia City,
Eastside, Five Points,
Niblack, Pinemount,
Summers and Westside.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High wrestlers who placed in the Valdosta Wildcat Invitational on Dec. 30-31 are
(front row, from left) Cole Schreiber, Isaac Henderson, Michael Roberts and Monterance
Allen. Back row (from left) are coach Andrew Porter, Joe Fields and Daniel Graham.


Columbia wrestling team


places sixth at Valdosta


From staff reports

Columbia High's wres-
tling team competed in
the Valdosta Wildcat
Invitational on Dec. 30-31.
Columbia placed sixth
in the tournament won by
Clay High.
Valdosta placed second
and Lowndes County High.
was third.


Isaac Henderson went
3-0 and won first place in
the 152-pound weight class
for the Tigers.
Cole Schreiber (2-1 at 103
pounds) and Monterance
Allen (2-1 at 189 pounds)
placed second.
Michael Roberts (3-3 at
140 pounds) and Joe Fields
(3-3 at 171 pounds) placed
sixth.


Edriech Rosa (1-2 at 112
pounds) and Vinny Corrao
(0-2 at 160 pounds) also
competed for the Tigers.
Jacob Dicks won first
place in the junior varsity
103-pound weight class
with a record qf 3-0.
Columbia is sched-
uled for the Clay Rotary
Tournament on Friday and
Saturday.


Continued From Page 1B

highly prized recruits,
Plant High School's James
Wilder Jr., is among many
who have publicly commit-
ted to Florida State.
Florida State grabbed
instate bragging rights with
routs of rivals Florida and
Miami, outscoring the two
by a combined 76-24. And
the Seminoles captured
the Atlantic Division of the
Atlantic Coast Conference
in Fisher's first go-around
after taking over for the
iconic Bobby Bowden a
year ago.
The 23rd-ranked
Seminoles capped a 10-4
season in Fisher's inau-
gural campaign as a head
coach with an impressive
Chick-fil-A Bowl win over
Southeastern Conference
runnerup South Carolina.
'This is only the begin-
ning," a jubilant Fisher

ACROSS 37 Doc
38 Writ
1 Links org. 39 Finis
4 Former New 40 Rule


York stadium
8 Untold cen-
turies
12 Craft's kin
13 Labels
14 Minor setback
15 Popular bever-
age
16 Strongly
advise
17 Proofer's word
18 Mariachi wear
20 Memsahib's
nanny
22 About 2.2 Ibs.
23 Did batik
25 Fern foliage
29 CD--
31 Big coconut
exporter
34 Enemy
35 Mark's succes-
sor
36 Roller coaster
cry


promised Florida State fans
after the 26-17 bowl win.
A missed field goal
and fumble in last-minute
losses to North Carolina
State and North Carolina
kept the Seminoles from a
12-2 record. They couldn't,
however, keep up with
Oklahoma or Virginia
Tech.
Florida State's defeats
came at a pace of one per
month.
Junior linebacker Nigel
Bradham, who says he
didn't have a good enough
season personally to leave
for the NFL, takes it a bit
further.
"We can play with any-
body," the 240-pound
Bradham said. "We're
going to be ready to come
back to compete for the
national championship."
Quarterback Christian


trine
er Seton
sh a "j"
es of con-


duct
12 Scheme
14 Ms. McEntire
17 Coats cup-
cakes
19 Use a coupon
51 Least of the lit-
ter
53 Cad
55 Depot (abbr.)
56 Chocolate
cookie
57 Long hike
58 Draw to a close
59 Earl Biggers
60 Says further
31 kwon do

DOWN

1 Dabs on
2 Kind of olive
3 Video-game
pioneer
4 Daze


Ponder, center Ryan
McMahonandAll-American
guard Rodney Hudson, a
Outland Trophy finalist,
are the most notable losses
on offense while a vastly
improved defense returns
virtually intact
New defensive coordi-
nator Mark Stoops went
with a freshman and two
sophomores in a second-
ary that developed into a
terrific unit and the line
was sparked by sophomore
end Brandon Jenkins, who
finished with 13.5 .,sacks
and 21.5 tackles for loss,
both good for the third best
in each category in school
history.
The Seminoles achieved
10 victories for the first
time since 2003.
EJ Manuel effectively
gives Fisher a veteran
quarterback returning.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

LOAD HGT1 M I TIE
ANNE A I ID EIS
MIE R INCISORS
SLAC KS OLLIE
bIOiU UTA
DIOl OKA YIED
OIAIRS AP EIS NIO V
ETAA MTSZI I INIC
slQMUoA-EIDIAIR


E T
H U MI BDITY F F
AGAR SAL UL A
G RE RE S|HY LESrST


Jackrabbit
Omelet
ingredient
Between ports
Dreaded assign-
ment


9 Busy-busy (3
wds.)
10 Dundee
refusal
11 Top NCO
19 Michael Caine
role
21 Rx givers
24 Fishing boat
26 Never heard

27 Raid the fridge
28 Half, in com-
bos
30 Extinct kiwi
relative
31 ATV feature
32 Flapjack chain
33 Travel choice
35 Mitigated
40 Vane dir.
41 Brooks
43 Cue user
45 Attacked on
all sides
46 Insurance
giant
48 Mex. miss
49 Regretted
50 Fabricated
51 Towel's place
52 Suffix for
press
54 California fort


1-4 @ 2011 by UFS, Inc.


FSU: Defense should be improved


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 4. 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


-------------














Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL TUESDAY. JANUARY 4, 2011


NFL playoff field set


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

Seattle, Indianapolis,
Atlanta and Pittsburgh
clinched division titles
Sunday, while Green Bay
grabbed the final wild-card
berth.
The Seahawks, at 7-9,
became the first division
winner with a losing record
in NFL history when they
defeated St. Louis 16-6 for
the NFC West title.
"We didn't get here the
way we all dreamed of
getting here, but we got
here," first-year coach Pete
Carroll said. "When it came
down to it, the guys played
a great football game
tonight."
The Packers beat archri-
val Chicago 10-3 to secure
the NFC's sixth seed;
defending league champion
New Orleans has the con-
ference's other wild card.
A last-second 43-yard
field goal by Adam Vinatieri
lifted the AFC South cham-
pion Colts past Tennessee,
23-20.
It's the ninth straight
year the Colts have reached
the postseason, tying the
NFL record Dallas set from
1975-83.
"I think it shows the
resolve of this team and
our fight," Colts defensive
end Dwight Freeney said.
"It doesn't matter if we're
6-6 and we have to win our
last four, we have to do it."
So Indianapolis (10-6)
hosts the New York Jets
(11-5) in a rematch of last
January's AFC champion-
ship game on Saturday
night. Before that, the
Saints (12-4) are at Seattle.
On Sunday, NFC East
champion Philadelphia
(10-6) hosts Green Bay


alc- AJ.

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Seattle Seahawks' Will Herring (54) celebrates, with Aaron Curry (right), after intercepting a
pass in a 16-6 victory over the St. Louis Rams to secure the final NFL playoff spot.


(10-6) after AFC West win-
ner Kansas City (10-6) is
at home against Baltimore
(12-4).
Atlanta (13-3) won the
NFC South with a 31-10 rout
of Carolina. The Falcons
get home-field advantage
throughout the playoffs
and a bye next week. They
open their postseason the
weekend of Jan. 15-16 in
the Georgia Dome.
"It's very important,"
top receiver Roddy White
said. 'We rarely lose in this
building. We find a way to
win here."
The Steelers (12-4) took
the AFC North with a
41-9 romp at Cleveland.
They edged Baltimore
in the division, making


the Ravens a wild card.
Pittsburgh is the No. 2
seed behind New England
in the AFC and will have a
bye next weekend.
"We love to win the divi-
sion," Ben Roethlisberger
said. "This is a hard divi-
sion. We hope this is just
the beginning."
New England already
owned the top seed in the
AFC and beat Miami 38-7
to finish 14-2, the league's
best record. The Patriots
won their last eight games.
"The greatest advantage
we have is we don't have
to play next week and we
play at home the following
week," Tom Brady said,
"so that's really what we've
earned to this point. I don't


think we've earned any-
thing more than that."
When Kansas City was
ripped by Oakland 31-10, it
gave the Colts the chance
to become the No. 3 seed.
Baltimore defeated
Cincinnati 13-7 to finish
its season, while the Jets
routed Buffalo 38-7.
Also in the playoffs from
the NFC is Chicago (11-5),
which owns the North title
and the conference's other
bye. Green Bay finished
second in the division and
got the final wild card on
tiebreakers over Tampa
Bay and the New York
Giants, a pair of 10-6 teams
that didn't qualify. The last
time that happened in the
NFC was 1991.


Finally, end of the line for Favre


By JON KRAWCZYNSKI and
NOAH TRISTER
Associated Press

Brett Favre was the
NFL's ultimate iron man
for 19 years, inspiring
coaches and teammates
with extraordinary tough-
ness and thrilling fans with
a daredevil's verve and a
showman's sense of the
moment
The once-irrepressible
Favre never looked older
or more fragile than in
year No. 20. The magic of
last season, and most of
his brilliant career, never
seemed farther away.
It had to end some time.
And Favre says that time
is now.
The 41-year-old quarter-
back sat out Minnesota's
season-ending loss to the
Lions on Sunday because
of a concussion, and it
appears his career ended
not on the field trying to
rally the Vikings to another
victory, but on the side-
line as a third-string rook-
ie floundered in Favre's
place.
No one not even Brett
Favre can play forever.
"I know it's time, and
that's OK It is," Favre said
after the 20-13 loss. "Again,


...... . .. ...






ASSOCIATED PRESS
Minnesota Vikings quarterback Brett Favre speaks to the
media after the season finale in Detroit on Sunday.


I hold no regrets, and I
can't think of too many
players offhand that can
walk away and say that.
Individually and from a
team standpoint, it was way
more than I ever dreamed
of."
He also retired in 2008
with the Packers and 2009


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with the Jets, only to return
both times when the foot-
ball bug bit him in the sum-


mer. He knows that there
will be doubters again.
"I don't know for me if
it's ever easy," Favre said.
"I'm sure throughout this
year, the comment has
been made that, 'We'll
wait and see in August or
September' and that's fine.
It's time. I'm OK with it."
If this indeed is the end
- for real, this time for
Favre, one of the most
colorful and celebrated
careers in NFL history con-
cluded with a season filled
with interceptions, injuries
and insults.
He threw 19 intercep-
tions and his 69.9 quarter-
back rating is the lowest
of his career. The Vikings
sunk to the bottom of the
NFC North after starting
the season with Super Bowl
aspirations.
His cherished streak of
297 straight starts ended
three weeks ago, with a
sprained throwing shoulder
making it impossible for
Favre to let those famously
zip-filled passes rip.


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Super Bowl odds

(as of Monday morning)
Team Current Opening
New England 8-5 10-1
Atlanta 9-2 30-1
Pittsburgh 6-1 12-1
Chicago 8-1 35-1


NFC leaders


Final
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds


Rodgers, GBY 475
Vick. PHL 372
Freeman, TAM 474
M. Ryan,ATL 571
Brees, NOR 658
Kitna, DAL 318
Cutler, CHI 432
E. Manning, NYG539
Ale. Smith, SNF 342
Sh. Hill, DET 416


312 3922
233 3018
291 3451
357 3705
448 4620
209 2365
261 3274
339 4002
204 2370
257 2686


Rushers
Att Yds
M.Turner.ATL 334 1371
A. Peterson, MIN283 1298
S.Jackson,STL 330 1241
Bradshaw, NYG 276 1235
L. McCoy, PHL 207 1080
Forte, CHI 237 1069
Blount,TAM 201 1007
Gore, SNF 203 853
Jacobs, NYG 147 823
F.Jones, DAL 185 800
Receivers
No Yds
R.White,ATL 115 1389
Witten, DAL 94 1002
S.Moss,WAS 93 1115
Fitzgerald,ARI 90 1137
Amendola, STL 85 689
Colston,NOR 84 1023
H.Nicks, NYG 79 1052
L. McCoy, PHL 78 592
Ca.Johnson, DET77 1120
CooleyWAS 77 849
Punters


McBriar, DAL 6.
A.Lee,SNF 9
Morstead, NOR 57
'Donn.Jones, STL 9A
Dodge, NYG 7:
N. Harris, DET 91
Masthay, GBY 7
Rocca, PHL 7:
Be. Graham, ARI 9-

AFC leaders


Final
Quarterbacks
Att Corn Yds
Brady, NWE 492 324 3900
P. Rivers, SND 541 357 4710
Roethlisberger, PIT389240 3200
Flacco, BAL 489 306 3622
Cassel, KAN 450 262 3116
Schaub, HOU 574 365 4370
P. Manning, IND 679 450 4700
GarrardJAC 366 236 2734
Orton, DEN 498 293 3653
J. Campbell, OAK329 194 2387
Rushers
Att Yds Avg
A. Foster, HOU 327 1616 4.94
Charles, KAN 230 1467 6.38
Chr.Johnson,TEN3161364 4.32
Jones-Drew,JAC299 1324 4:43
Mendenhall, PIT 324 1273 3.93
R. Rice, BAL 307 1220 3.97
Hillis, CLE 270 1177 4.36
D. McFadden, OAK223 157 5.19
Benson,CIN 321 1111 3.46
Green-Ellis, NWE2291008 4.40
Receivers.
No Yds Avg
Wayne, IND III 1355 12.2
And.Johnson, HOU861216 14.1
B. Marshall, MIA 86 1014 11.8
Welker, NWE 86 848 9.9
Ste.Johnson, BUF82 1073 13.1


Bess, MIA 79 820 I(
B. Lloyd, DEN 77 1448 It
Bowe, KAN 72 1162 1I
T. Owens, CIN 72 983 1I
B.Watson, CLE 68 763 I1
Punters
No Yds
Lechler, OAK 77 3618
Scifres, SND 52 2430
B. Fields, MIA 73 3369
Sepulveda, PIT 56 2550
B. Colquitt, DEN 86 3835
D. Colquitt, KAN 88 3908
Hodges, CLE 78 3424
PodleshJAC 57 2496
KochBAL 81 3530


Baltimore
Green Bay
New Orleans
Philadelphia
Indianapolis
N.Y.Jets
Kansas City
Seattle


20-1
15-1
10-1
20-1
7-1
25-1
150-1
55-1


J. Baker, CAR 95 4097 6043.1
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LGTD
D. Hester, CHI 33 564 17.1 89t 3
GinnJr.,SNF 24 321 13.4 78t I
Logan, DET 30 362 12.1 71 0
De.JacksonPHL20 231 11.6 65t I
Banks,WAS 38 431 11.3 53 0
L.Washington, SEA22 249 11.3 84 0
Amendola,STL 40 452 11.3 42 0
Munnerlyn, CAR 30 327 10.9 37 0
Camarillo, MIN 39 359 9.2 52 0
Tra.Williams, GBY41 326 8.0 52 0
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LGTD
Weems,ATL 40 1100 27.5102t I
Step.-Howling,AR157 1548 27.2102t 2
Logan, DET 54 1448 26.8105t I
Spurlock,TAM 44 1129 25.7 89t I
L.Washington, SEA571461 25.610lt 3
Banks,WAS 46 1155 25.1 96t I
D. Manning, CHI 33 816 24.7 62 0
Roby, NOR 33 785 23.8 39 0
Harvin, MIN 40 933 23.3 95t I
Amendola, STL 50 1142 22.8 84 0
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec RetPts
A. Peterson, MIN 13 12 I 078
Ca. Johnson, DET 12 0 12 074
G.Jennings, GBY 12 0 12 072
M.Turner.ATL 12 12 0 072
H. Nicks, NYG II 0 II 0 66
Mi.Williams,TAM II 0 II 0 66
R.White,ATL 10 0 10 064
Maclin, PHL 10 0 10 060
Forte, CHI 9 6 3 0 56
SWitten,DAL 9 0 9 056
Kicking


LG Avg Akers, PHL
65 47.9 M. Bryant,.ATL
64 46.2 Jo. Brown, STL
64 45.6 Buehler, DAL
63 45.5 Crosby, GBY
6944.8 Gould, CHI
6644.6 FeelyARI
62 43.9 Mare, SEA
63 43.8 Barth,TAM
6543.4 Gano,WAS


TD Int
36 4
30 13
17 5
25 10
27 7
24 12
33 17
23 15
20 9
13 8

LGTD
74t 16
80 5
76t It
37 5
50t 13
50 5
48 II
57t 7
26 7
33t 13

LGTD
50 6
60 8
46 3
35 7
45 10
29 5
71 II
75t 15
78t 9
44 3

.G Avg
68 47.0
67 46.7
69 46.2
62 45.5
63 44.6
72 44.4
59 43.9
63 43.8
6043.6


PAT
47-47
44-44
26-27
42-44
46-46
35-35
29-29
31-31
36-36
28-28


Mesko, NWE 58 2505
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
Edelman, NWE 21 321 15.3
Mariani,TEN 27 329 12.2
E. Royal, DEN 25 298 11.9
Bess, MIA ?5 284 11.4
Lebnhard, NYJ 21 238 11.3
Mi.Thomas,JAC 34 358 10.5
L.Webb, BAL 21 199 9.5
Cribbs, CLE 20 168 8.4
Arenas, KAN 39 322 8.3
Cosby, CIN 30 225 7.5
Kickoff Returners-


No Yds
D.Reed,BAL 21 616
Bra. Smith, NYJ 50 1432
Br.Tate, NWE 41 1057
Marianrii,TEN 60 1530
Decker, DEN 22 556
E. Sanders, PIT 25 628
Karim,JAC 50 1248
Sproles, SND 51 1257
Carroll, MIA 27 655
J. Ford, OAK 53 1280
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush
A. Foster, HOU 18 16
Bowe, KAN 15 0
Green-Ellis, NWE13 13
Hillis, CLE 13 11
Mendenhall, PIT 13 13
Chr.Johnson,TEN12 II
Tolbert, SND II II
B. Lloyd, DEN II 0
Gates, SND 10 0
R. G'kowski, NWEIO 0
Kicking
PAT
Janikowski, OAK 43-43 33
Vinatieri, IND 51-51 2(
Folk, NYJ 37-37 3(
Rackers, HOU 43-43 2;
Cundiff, BAL 39-39 2<
D. Carpenter, MIA 25-25 3(
Bironas,TEN 38-38 2-
Kaeding, SND 40-40 2;
Scobee,JAC 41-41 22
Succop, KAN 42-42 2(


LG Pts
50143
51 128
53125
53114
56112
54110
55107
51 106
53105
49100
6543.2

LGTD
94t I
87t I
33 0
47 0
32 0
78t I
35 0
17 0
36 0
20 0


Avg LGTD
29.3 103t I
28.6 97t 2
25.8 103t 2
25.5 98t I
25.3 51 0
25.1 48 0
25.0 65 0
24.6 45 0
24.3 46 0
24.2101It 3


RetPts
0108
090
0 78
0 78
0 78
0 72
0 68
0 66
0 60
0 60

LG Pts
59142
48129
56127
57124
49117
60115
55110
50109
59107
53102


T THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, :
one letter to each square, l ...jet pilot. got my
to form four ordinary words. \degree with honors..
run tenmiles
VONEY I aday... i


RAZABA




SITMIF




Print answer here: I


Yesterday's Jumbles: TWINE
Answer: The hu
he K


I EXPERIENCE ON
HER PATE WITH
THE EYE DOCTOR.

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.



(Answers tomorrow)
S FLUKE SURTAX FASTEN
nter hired the taxidermist because
;NEW HIS "STUFF"


Man Goes "TOAD-AL" at High School Reunion

BEXAR COUNTY- After using Thera-Gesic' on aching joints,
Tom W. attended last Friday's reunion where, according to 5 amused and
concerned classmates, he went TOAD-AL. He squatted, extended both
amis to the ground, arched his back and did his best to hop numerous times
while croaking.
When asked to explain his behavior, he painlessly replied.


"None ofyour dang busing


SAVE, LIVE,
BUY THERA-GESIC'.


I


LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL TUESDAY. JANUARY 4, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


4


I
8
7
L


j0an turns 58. .

ove, 7p- W











Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE &


DILBERT

EXCUSE ME, BUT I
CAN'T CONCENTRATE
WHEN SOMEONE
REMINDS ME OF A
CREATURE.


BABY BLUES


BLONDE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


1'


GARFIELD


FRANK & ERNEST


COMICS TUESDAY, JANUARY 4. 2011 4B


DEAR ABBY


In-law's bad attitude tests

limits of woman's tolerance


GIVE ME A HEADS UP
5 IF YOU SEE A WALKING
STICK COMING MY WAY.
/


j L,


DEAR ABBY: How does
one live peacefully and get
along with one's in-laws? I
understand that everyone has
different ideas, morals, etc.,
and I feel we should all try to
respect one another's differ-
ences. However, my in-laws
make it extremely difficult to
spend time with them.
How does one eat at the
same table with people who
eat with their faces an inch
from their plates and chew
with their mouths open? How
does one tolerate their com-
plaining about everything and
everyone? How does one co-
exist with people who think
they're perfect and the rest of
the world is flawed?
I thought about giving
them an etiquette book as a
gift, but my spouse told me
not to waste the money. -
BITING MY TONGUE IN
ST. PAUL, MINN.
DEAR BITING: An eti-
quette book would help only
people who recognize they
needed to consult one. The
way to deal with your in-laws
is, first, to remember they
did one thing right: They pro-
duced your husband.
Because their table man-
ners offend you, visit with
them after mealtime whenev-
er possible. If you can't avoid
it, keep your eyes on your
own plate. When they com-
plain, respond with something
positive or tactfully redirect
the conversation to another
subject. When they present
themselves as perfect, never


one can get. Bobby isn't going
anywhere, and the sooner you .
accept that fact the sooner
you can find an eligible man
to spend your life with. This.
may seem hard to accept, but*'
if you don't believe me, just
give your "true love" an ulti-
matum.
DEAR ABBY: Does a
woman consider a man's in-'
vitation to lunch as the next{
thing to his asking her to;
sleep with him? And what do
others think about this invita-
tion if the female mentions it
to her husband or friends?
One etiquette book said,
in effect, "If the lunch is not
about business, it's about
sex." Pretty severe, I think.
I asked a female co-worker
to lunch for purely social rea-
sons, but I have gotten reac-
tions of derision from others
about it. Can't a man ask a
female t9 lunch without some
sort of negative social reac-
tion? LETS DO LUNCH,
MISSOULA, MONT.
DEAR LETS DO
LUNCH: In my book he can.
And many do. To ask someone
to lunch in the bright sunlight
of high noon in a casual res-
taurant is hardly what I'd call
a proposition. And I've never
seen an etiquette book that.
implied that it is. It appears
the "others" you have been
telling have dirty minds and'
enjoy razzing you.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): You may offend
someone and jeopardize
your position, personally
or professionally. Reevalu-
ate your partnerships and
make sure they are ben-
eficial to both you and the
people you are involved
with. Weigh all the pros and
cons. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Add a little ex-
citement to your life. Don't
limit the possibilities when
you have so much to look
forward to and to offer.
This is just the beginning
of an adventurous year.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): You will learn
from your experience and
be able to help someone
because of the knowledge
you acquire. Don't limit
what you can do because
you feel you do not have
the resources. Your imagi-
nation and. creativity will
lead to the best answer to
any problem. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Don't accept
change if you aren't ready
for it. Partnerships may
force you to take on addi-
tional responsibilities that
you are not ready for. Your
interests may be changing,
so rethink your current sit-
uation and future direction.
LEO (Juy 23-Aug.
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): You may think you
know what you want but
someone else's, influence
may determine what or
who you end up with. Don't
let your generosity coupled
with your love for someone
cost you when you should
be fiscally careful. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): All work and no play
will lead to a lack of har-
mony between you and
your peers. You will be able
to make some interesting
economic changes regard-
ing your residence. Invite
friends and peers to help
you out and you will build
a closer bond with them.
******
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Look out for yourself
and take care of your needs.
It's up to you to set limits on
what you will and will not
do. Don't let anyone quilt
you into something that you
don't feel right about. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Call the shots,
make the suggestions and,
most of all, follow your
heart and take action when
required. Love is mounting
and planning something
special for the person you
care about most will pay
off. If you are single, take
part in something you find


stimulating. ****
SAGITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Don't jump
to conclusions or make fast
decisions, especially if it
will affect your personal or
professional status. Sit back
and observe. There is too
much to lose if you let your
ego get in the way, causing
a mistake you will live to re-
gret. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Whether you
are running your own busi-
ness, working for someone
else or looking for employ-
ment, the stars are in your
favor and can help you ad-
vance, no matter what level
you are striving to achieve.
Don't let anyone discour-
age you; confidence will
help you get ahead. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Problems with|
institutions, emotional well-
being, health, finances or'
legal matters will all require
proper attention. Your ideas
are good and can be imple-
mented. Avoid negativity.
Don't let a passionate ges-
ture lead you astray. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You will re-
ceive the help required if
you ask. Helping others
will bring you rewards in
return. This is a great time
for give and take, shar-
ing and exchanging ideas.
Show your skills and talent.
****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: Z equals X
"VJNAXJR CJX XZHJB NRAR HE


ALX N J HVD U X P H D R "


P C J N H


MCJSCR I IHRC "LHV BCD OHT
VJ NAX NE OHT BCD'A B JO?"
J N D S ICJ U D X J
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The great thing about getting older is that you don't
lose all the other ages you've been." Madeleine L'Engle
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 1-4


FOR BETTER ORWORSE CLASSIC PEANUTS


YOU'VE GOT SOME SORT
OF BILBO BAGGINS VIBE
GOING ON HERE AND IT'S
THROWING ME OFF
MY GAME.


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
disagree and see them as
infrequently as possible.
DEAR ABBY: My boy-
friend of two years, "Bobby,"
is still technically married to
- and living with his wife
and child. He says he "has"
to stay there because his son
has learning difficulties and-
needs his support.
Bobby wants to wait until
his son is older and more sta-
ble. His wife is a shrew who
is just there as a roommate.
She knowsall about our affair,
but she wants to stay married.
She says she still loves Bobby
even though he no longer
loves her.
This triangle is stressful
for me and Bobby. Don't you
think his wife should wake up
and smell the coffee? Bobby
and I want to get on with our
life together without all of this
baggage constantly interfer-
ing with your plans. What
should we do? HIS TRUE
LOVE
DEAR TRUE LOVE: The
person who should be smell-
ing the coffee isn't Bobby's
wife it's you. You have in-
vested two years of your life
in a man who is as married as












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In Print and Online
www.Ilakecityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 12-2010-CP-277
Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF FRANCIS E.
NAKPODIA
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Francis E. Nakpodia, deceased,
whose date of death was April 15,
2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida Pro-
bate Division, the mailing address of
which is PO Box 2069, Lake City,
Florida 32056-2069. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decendant
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CADE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is December 28, 2010.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By:/s/ Kimberly A. Gossett
Attorney for Carolyn D. Nakpodia
Florida Bar Number: 123536
2902 Isabella Boulevard, Suite 30
Jacksonville Beach, FL 32250
Telephone: (904)372-0185
Fax: (904)212-0877
E-Mail:
kgossett@beacheselderlaw.com
Personal Representative:
By:/s/ Carolyn D. Nakpodia
392 NW Scenic Lake Drive
Lake City, Florida 32055

04542807
December 28, 2010
January 4, 2011
PUBLIC AUCTION to be held
February 12, 2010 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto, 2492 SE
Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
Vin #1N4DL01D31C206736
O1Nissan
Vin #1N6SD11SOPC447677
93 Nissan
Vin #1GCCT14R8H2264747
87 Chevy
Vin #1FTCR10U7VUC14141
97 Ford
05524747
January 4, 2011
Notice OfAbandoment
Apple Valley Storage
Located at 128 SW Birley Ave Lake
City,FL 32024
The Following unit will be auctioned
off on 1/11/11 at 10AM
Unit B7 10x15 Tommy Biggs
Owner of personal property has right
to redeem up to last minute and AVS
reserves right to bid
Contact Apple Valley Storage @
386-752-4633

04542815
December 28, 2010
January 4, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE INTEREST OF:
CASE NO.: 2009-89-DP
S. J. Y. M.
DOB: 10/29/2009
MINOR CHILD.
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-
VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO: Syeisha Teresa Kilby
Address Unknown
WHEREAS, a Petition for Termina-
tion of Parental Rights under oath
has been filed in this court regarding
the above-referenced childrenn, a
copy of which is on file with the
clerk of court,
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMAND-
ED TO APPEAR before the Honora-
ble E. Vernon
Douglas, Circuit Judge, at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Florida, on JANUARY 19,
2011, at 10:20 A.M., for a Termina-








Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance


Legal

tion of Parental Rights Advisory
Hearing.
YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI-
FIED.
*****FAILURE TO PERSONAL-
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN)
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE
COURT*********
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on
this 10th day of December 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: Clerk
Tracy L. Sorcek, Esq.
Florida Bar No.46860
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437

Special Accommodations. In ac-
cordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, if you are a person
with a disability who needs any ac-
commodation in order to participate
in this proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact
Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-
tion, 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at
least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than seven (7)
days. If you are hearing impaired or
voice impaired, call 711.

04542675
December 14, 21, 28, 2010
January 4, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 09-380-CA
Division: Civil
ALEX HOWARD SEVENS, JR.
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBERT K. BROWN and CAROL
C. BROWN
Defendants/Third-Party Plaintiffs
vs.
CHAD HOWARD STEVENS,
CHRIS BROWN COLEMAN, and
CSCC MARINE INC., a Florida
Corp. Third-Party Defendants
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
The undersigned Clerk of the Circuit
Court for Columbia County, gives
notice that he will sell the following
property to the highest bidder for
cash, or as provided in the Amended
Final Judgment of Foreclosure as to
Chris Brown Coleman Only .dated
December 7, 2010, pursuant to
Chapter 45 Florida Statutes:
The description of the property to be
sold is:
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST
Section 5: S 1/2 of NW 1/4 of SW
1/4 lyingWest of State Road 47 and
North of Tracy Place Street, except
0.30 acres in Northeast comer as
"Parcel A" and except: Begin at the
West right-of-way of State Road 47
and North right-of-way of MArk
Place Street and run approximately
390 feet along West-right-way of
State Road 47; West 212.46 feet;
North 35.1.59 feet to the South right-
of-way of Mark Place; and East 360
feet to point of beginning "Parcel B".
Parcel No. 07679-000
Section 6: S 1/2 of SE 1/4 except the
North 1281.13 feet and also except
all lying West of McFarlane Avenue
"Parcel A" and a parcel of land ap-
proximately 2.34 acres being in the
Southeast comer of SE 1/4 lying East
of McFarlane and West of State
Road 47 and South of First Advent
Christian Church "Parcel B" and ex-
cept a parcel of land approximately
100 feet by 260 feet lying adjacent to
McFarlane and South of Tracy Place
Road and North of Mark Place Road
in the SE 1/4 of "Parcel C".
Parcel No. 08045-000
Section 6: The East 220 feet of S 1/2
of NE 1/4 of SW 1/4 and East 220
feet of SE 1/4 of SW 1/4 except the
North 1281.13 feet.
Parcel No. 08044-000
Section 7: Begin at the Northwest
comer of NE 1/4 of NE 1/4 and run
South 503 feet; East 959 feet to State
Road 47; Northeast along State Road
47, 525 feet to the section line; West
to the point of beginning. Except
0.52 acres and except 0.50 acres for
road and also except 0.32 acres and
except 0.32 acres and except 0.64
acres..
Parcel No. 08099-000
Section 7: North 615.97 feet of NW
1/4 of NE 1/4 and except a lot 280
feet North and South by 155.50 feet
East and West.
Parcel No. 08153-000
Section 7: begin at Northeast comer
of NW 1/4 of NE 1/4 and run West
276.80 feet; South 30 feet to South
right-of-way line of Brown Land and
point of beginning; run South 280
feet; West 155.50 feet; North 280
feet; East 155.50 feet to the point of
beginning.
Parcel No. 08158-001
The time and place of the foreclosure
sale is the front door of the Columbia
County Courthouse, 173 NE Heman-
do Avenue, Lake City, Florida, on
the 12th' day of January, 2011, at
11:00 a.m., or as soon as possible.
The foreclosure sale by the Clerk of
the Court will be pursuant to the
Amended Final Judgment of Fore-
closure as to Chris Brown Coleman
only in the above captioned action.
The name of the Clerk making the
sale appears below.
WITNESS my hand and seal this 17
day of December, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE COURT


BY:/S/B. SCIPPIO
DEPUTY CLERK

04542763
December 28, 2010
January 4, 2011


Legal


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
(RFP)
FLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE
IS SEEKING SEALED PROPOS-
ALS FOR THE FOLLOWING:
FGC RFP#11-2-01
CONSULTING SERVICES FOR
EMPLOY FLORIDA BANNER
CENTER FOR WATER RESOUR-
CES
Florida Gateway College
Lake City, Florida
Intent of the Proposal:
Workforce Florida, Inc. (WFI) has
awarded the Employ Florida Banner
Center for Water Resources (Banner
Center) to Florida Gateway College
(College). The purpose of the Banner
Center is to promote and develop
training and career awareness pro-
grams designed to provide a world
class workforce for the Florida water
industry.
This RFP is seeking proposals from
qualified consultants to assist the
Banner Water Resource Center in
meeting deliverables set forth in an
agreement between WFI and the
Banner Center. The proposal will be
expected to produce planning docu-
ments keyed to certain deliverables
in the contract between the College
and WFI including Marketing and
Outreach Plan, Career Awareness
Campaign, and Sustainability Plan.
Date & Time for Receiving Propos-
als:
2:00 P.M. Local Time, TUESDAY,
JANUARY 25, 2011 '
Place for Receiving Proposals:
Sealed Proposals may be mailed as
follows:
Purchasing Department
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025
Hand Delivered Proposals Are to be
Presented to:
Purchasing Department
Florida Gateway College
198 S.E. Staff Way
Administration Building 001, Room
138
Lake City, Florida 32025
All Proposals must arrive and be
date/time stamped by a Purchasing
Department representative prior to
the specified opening date/time. The
College will not be responsible for
Postal or other delivery service de-
lays that cause a Proposal to arrive at
Room 138, Building 001 after the
designated, opening date/time. Pro-
posals that are mailed must be clear-
ly marked on the outside of the enve-
lope as follows:
NAME OF THE PROPOSER
ADDRESS OF THE PROPOSER
RFP# 11-2-01, CONSULTING
SERVICES FOR EMPLOY FLORI-
DA BANNER CENTER FOR WA-
TER RESOURCES, JANUARY 25,
2011.
Qualified Consultants:
Consultants who wish to respond to
this RFP should have demonstrated
success in developing proposals for
Workforce Florida, Inc., the Agency
for Workforce Innovation, or any of
the Banner Centers in Florida. The
Consultant will have a proven record
of assisting Banner Centers in the de-
velopment of industry advisory
groups and the coordination of the
activities of those groups. Addition-
ally the Consultant will be expected
to have expertise in the areas of de-
veloping and executing marketing or
career awareness campaigns for in-
dustry workforce training. Further,
the Consultant should have demon-
strated experience in the implemen-
tation of business plans designed to
insure the sustainability of work-
force/economic development proj-
ects including the development of
partnerships and customers regional-
ly, nationally, and globally.
Date, Time and Place for Pre-Pro-
posal Conference:
All vendors who are qualified and in-
terested in submitting a sealed pro-
posal for consulting services to the
Banner Center are invited to attend a
PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE
at the College, to be held at 2:00
P.M. local time on THURSDAY,
JANUARY 13, 2011. The Confer-
ence will be held in the Administra-
tive Conference Room in the Admin-
istrative Building 001, on the Col-
lege's main campus.
Proposal Documents Available
From:
Bill Brown, Director of Purchasing
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025
Phone: (386) 754-4360
Fax: (386) 754-4860
Email: bill.brown@fgc.edu
Right to Waive Irregularities and
Technicalities:
Florida Gateway College reserves
the right to waive minor irregulari-
ties and/or technicalities associated
with this solicitation. The Director
of Purchasing of Florida Gateway
College shall be the final authority
regarding waivers of irregularities
and technicalities.
FOR FLORIDA GATEWAY COL-
LEGE
Bill Brown, Director of Purchasing

04542891
January 4, 8, 9, 2011


010 Announcements










020 Lost & Found

05524732
Reward Two Lost Jack Russell
Terriers,female w/blind eye,
male neutered,
missing since 12/21
386-497-4325 or 365-3970

FREE: Boxer mix dog.
Approx. 1 yr. old. Great
companion. Very friendly &
playful. 386-754-1407


100 Job
1 0 Opportunities

04542744
Carpenters/Cabinetmakers
We need your job skills. Wages
negotiable based on skills and
experience of one year or more.
Stable work history. Benefits
include: paid holidays, paid
vacations, family health insur-
ance, and a 401-K plan. Some
hand tools required. Please
apply in person at Hinter Marine
on Hwy 441 in Alachua, Fl.

04542867
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
Night Audit position
Part/full time. MUST be a people
person with great customer service
skills, strong work ethic, good
communication, computer skills,
and willingness to learn. MUST be
a team player and be able to work
a flexible schedule including
weekends and holidays.
Only those seeking long term
employment apply in person at
Comfort Suites located 3690 W
US Hwy 90, Lake City. Please do
not call regarding application.

04542883
Member Service Specialist
Florida Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

05524757
Positions available for qualified
Tax Preparer and
Receptionist.
Apply in person only at
The Tax Station
1010 SW Main Blvd., Lake City

05524758
RN NEEDED 7
7:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m.
The Health Center of Lake City
has an opening for an RN with
good assessment skills
Excellent Salary
EOE/ADA/Drug
Free Workplace
Apply in person or
send resume to:
The Health Center
of Lake City
560 S.W. McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025

Business in Lake City is seeking a
full time qualified individual to
assist in out Acct. Dept. Candidate
should possess A/P, A/R, General
ledger and bookkeeping skills. 2+
yrs. exp. in accounting environ-
ment. Attention to detail and
ability to multi task. Fax resume:
w/salary requirements to:
386-487-0021 DFWP/ EOE
Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.
Customer Service Experience
and Golf Knowledge a must.
Drug free workplace.
Apply in person @ Quail
Heights Country Club.
Experienced IT Tech/
Network Admin
Qualifications: 2+ years
experience with: win XP pro, win
7 pro, server 2003, 2008. Must
have worked within and be
familiar with active directory.
Must be capable of lifting/moving
workstations. Microsoft
certifications a plus. Clean drivers
license required. Please submit
resume to hr@chclabs.com or
fax to 386-758-1791
Experienced Stylist
needed, apply at
Southern Exposure Salon
386-752-4614
Fabulous Coach Lines, Branford
Now Hiring
ACCOUNTANT
Experience & Education Preferred
e Application at http://www.fabu-
louscoach.com/career-application/
Local medical office
seeking a cleaning person
5 days a week. Please fax resume
to 386-719-9662
Part/Time Sales Clerk. $7.25 per
hour. Must be energentic, reliable,
ability to multi task & able to lift
501bs. Fax resume: 386-742-1293
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com

120 Medical
v120 Employment

Wanted Receptionist,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


04542857
Doctor's office is looking for a
full time Office Assistant/Front
Desk Clerk. Please fax resume
to 386-755-1744 or call
386-755-1703 ask for Margaret


120 ^Medical
120 dEmployment

04542SIO
Advent Christian Village
Current JOBS Line
Advertisement
call 658-5627 or visit
www.acvillage.net
24 hrs/day, 7 days/week
Find a Job/Become Part
of a Community

LPN/RN Supervisor
Night Shift, long-term care
setting: unrestricted Florida
license & knowledge of LTC
regs & management skills
required, prior supervisory
experience preferred: prior
experience in long-term care
setting a plus.
LPN/RN Direct Care
Unrestricted Florida license &
knowledge of LTC regs
required, prior experience in
long-term care setting a plus.
Assistant Postal Clerk
PT, high school diploma or
equivalent preferred. Simple
math skills, strong customer
service skills, & attention to
detail required. Must work
some Saturdays.
Desk Clerk/Guest
Registration
PT, high school diploma or
equivalent preferred. Good
working knowledge of MS
Office/spreadsheet software,
strong customer service, basic
math, & good communication
skills required. Hours vary &
include some weekends.
Excellent benefits
competitive pay. Apply in
person at Personnel Office
Monday through Friday from
9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax
resume/ credentials to
(386)658-5160. EOE/
Drug-Free Workplace /Criminal
background checks required.

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

240 Schools &
0 Education

04542861
Interested.in ~ Medlicl ,i .u: r
Express Training .!..r
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/17/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

POMERANIAN
10 weeks old.
$250. Paper trained.
386-438-3885

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
,parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


330 Livestock &
3 Supplies

Pigs for sale
9 weeks old
$50 each
386-965-2215


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front fires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver. Glassware.
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

Kenmore Washer & Dryer Set
front load, side by side or stacka-
ble. HE model, good cond. $300
386-755-2548 or 867-0546


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Scrap Lead Acid Batteries. Pay-
ing $8.00ea & up. (Excludes lawn
mower batteries.) Minimum pick-
up 20 batteries. Art 352-262-6202


EPA# FLR000 134601
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks. Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


I


BUY I



SELLhT


lFINDi1l











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JANUARY 4, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


430 Garage Sales







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker. Com-
mercial built, nice shape. $1250.
obo. 386-249-3104 or 719-4802
Great for your New Years Bash!!!

520 Boats for Sale
Bass Tender Boat
10'2",
$500 Call for details
386-965-2215

63 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2/2 S/W beautiful, clean freshly
painted, near college,l acre,
big front porch $650 mo, avail 1/1
386-697-1013 or 386-697-1900
2/2, S/W, 1 acre secluded lot
Bascom Norris Bypass, $500 dep,
$500 mo, possible owner finance
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
3/2 DW, secluded, Columbia City
area, covered back deck, No Inside
pets, $750 mo, plus sec dep
386-752-1941/ 386-965-0932
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. Ref's. No Pets. Non smoking
environment 386-755-3288
DWMH, $850 mo plus $300 sec.
Spacious 4/2, on 5 ac, south of LC,
clean, quiet, great area, shed, 3
386-462-1138, No Cats/Pitbulls
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice 2br/2ba furnished MH on
Hwy 241, Providence. Front porch
Ref req'd. No inside pets. 1st &
sec. 386-752-4618 or 623-0925.
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961,1482






Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

f640 Mobile Homes
0 for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524637
Gainesville-Jacobsen-Savings
Factory direct Jaconsen outlet
now open to the public 3/2 start-
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilehomesales.co
m for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!

05524638
North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gainesville and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty, 2x6 wall, and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

05524639
Why drive to Gainesville?
This is Why! New 28x60
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni-
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy,
I pay for your gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568

05524743
Palm Harbor Homes
Short Sales/Repo's/Used Homes
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
Won't Last!! $3,500 40k
John 800-622-2832 Ext. 210


710 Unfurnished Apt.
i For Rent

$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2BR/1IBA with carport,


Privacy Garden and
Utility Room Near VA.
No Pets. 386-438-8052
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698 or 386-292-4937
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
Move In Special.2/1 w/garage
on the east side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
For Rent
NO Lease/Deposits, ROOMS only
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge,' phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169,2 ppl $179 + tax
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3/2 W/D hook up, appliances
included, $200 sec dep,
$600 month. Madison Street
386-365-2515
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
Lg 4 br 2 ba home on Old Country
Club Rd, Living Rm, Family Rm,
Recreation Rm, fenced yard; no
pets; $800/month; 386-623-2642

740 Furnished
4 Homes for Rent

3/2,2000 Sq Ft Home,
completely fumished,$900 month,
located behind high school,
386-758-9668

750 Business &
75v Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliancesSchools
blks away, $65K 478-391-1'592

820 Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo


386-965-2215
1998 F-150 Ford
Pick Up
Nice truck for $3,900 CASH
386-752-1677
2007 Nissan Frontier SE,
21K miles, excellent condition,
V6, Auto, $15,000
386-961-8680
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802


COME O GUYS


Tell'em L.C. Reporter sent ya.


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Sign up today fto Easy, "' and receive
one month FREE added to your subscription.

S6 w detdu/ 386.755.5445


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.




Eg "' T" P_- n nt
1998 Ford F150 P
Pickup & Online

ice One Low
$3,900 cash Price!
Call
386-752-1677


For More Details Call Mary or


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