The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01342
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: January 2, 2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







SWEET SEND-OFF
With win over Penn State,
Meyer now 'at full peace.'
000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


TOO LATE

FOR TIDE
Alabama routs Michigan
State in Capital One Bowl.
Sports, IB



Sorter


Sunday, January 2, 2011 I


www.Iakecityreporter m


Vol. 136, No. 297 E $ 1.00


2010 election gives Florida many new faces


Political pundits
raise question:
Who's to blame?
By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
AP Political Writer
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida's representation in
government underwent a
huge change in 2010 and


voters can either blame
or thank former Sen. Mel
Martinez, depending on
how they feel about it.
Republican Martinez's
December 2008 announce-
ment that he would not
seek a second term created
a domino effect that led
to an election year unlike
Florida had seen in more
than a century.


"It was an unusual year and one we
might not ever see again."

Deborah Cox-Roush
Florida GOP vice chairwoman


If Martinez had just
stayed put, Gov. Charlie
Crist probably would have
run for re-election. Same


with Chief Financial Officer
Alex Sink and Attorney
General Bill McCollum.
Instead, Florida has a new


U.S. Senator, a new gover-
nor and three new Cabinet
members.
And it was a year when
tea party fervor over fed-
eral spending helped
Republicans take back four
U.S. House seats, includ-
ing two candidates consid-
ered safe when the election
cycle began.
"We could write a book,


couldn't we," said Deborah
Cox-Roush, the state GOP's
vice chairwoman. "It was
an unusual'year and one we
might not ever see again.
It's a second chance and
we have to work very hard
to make sure that we keep
the momentum going into
2012."
FACES continued on 3A


TUNED FOR SCOTT


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Columbia High School band director Ryan Schulz offers some advice to his band members after playing songs for friends
and family at Tiger Stadium in this Nov. 19 file photo. The CHS band willjoin Rick Scott's inauguration parade Tuesday as he
becomes the Sunshine State's 45th governor.


CHS band takes notes for inauguration


Columbia County
delegates to join
Governor's Ball.
By LEANNE TYO and
ANTONIA ROBINSON
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com,
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn
The Columbia
High School
marching band
will have a
first-time expe-
rience Tuesday it will
march in the parade held
for Governor-elect Rick
Scott's inauguration in
Tallahassee.
"Its a great honor," said
Ryan Schulz, band direc-
tor. "Me and the band are
very proud to represent
Columbia County in the
parade."
Approximately 80
marching band members
will travel to be a part
of the inaugural parade,
which begins at 2:15 p.m.
The CHS marching band
is in the middle of the
line-up, Schulz said, and
will play "Incantation," a


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
8 Fax: 752-9400


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The CHS drum line marches the field while performing
during a recent practice.

"This is the first time the Columbia
High School band, that I'm aware
of, has ever marched at a governor's
inauguration parade."
Tony Buzzella
Outgoing chairman
Columbia County Republican Executive Committee


Cirque du Soleil musical
number.
Schulz said he received
the invitation to par-


71
T-Storms
WEATHER, 2A


ticipate in mid-December,
one that was also extend-
ed to other high school
bands across the state.

Opinion
SBusiness
S Obituares


"There's a lot of high
school bands from
Florida, so I think they
were trying to get as
much representation from
each county," he said.
The Columbia County
Republican Executive
Committee donated $1,000
to pay for the band's
expenses in lieu of hosting
a float in the parade, said
Tony Buzzella, outgoing
chairman.
"We decide rather
than to do the float, let's
showcase the youth of
Columbia County," he
said. "What better way
to showcase the youth
than the Marching Tiger
Band?"
Several delegates from
Columbia County will
attend the parade and the
Governor's Ball.
The REC has great con-
fidence in Schulz, who is
a CHS graduate, Buzzella
said.
"He's one of our own,
born and raised, and

BAND continued on 3A


Advice
Puzzles


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida Gov. Charlie Crist (right) and Attorney General Bill
McCollum chat before a recent meeting of The Republican
Party of Florida in Orlando. Crist leaves office Tuesday.


State economy


ravages Crist's


political career


Outgoing leader
built popularity
much of his term.
By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
AP Political Writer
TALLAHASSEE -
Outgoing Florida Gov.
Charlie Crist will linger in
some short-term memories
for his failed
independent
Senate run ANP
and his par-
don of singer
JimMorrison.
People thinking longer term
will recall a governor who
persuaded Republicans and
Democrats to work togeth-
er but blundered away his
potential for success at the


.national level
Crist, who leaves office
Tuesday, enjoyed wide-
spread popularity for much
of his term. He built a repu-
tation as a national leader
on climate change issues
and had support from
Democratic, Republican
and independent voters.
Politically and on policy
issues, he was a winner
in his first
two years
IYSIS in office.
But then
a combina-
tion of a
bad economy and unchar-
acteristic political miscal-
culations set his political
career in reverse.
CRIST continued on 5A


Report: Python

that strangled

girl was hungry


Documents show
parents violated
wildlife rules.
Associated Press

OXFORD- Investigative
documents show that a
pet python that strangled
a Florida toddler had not
been fed in a month and had
escaped its tank 10 times
since its last meal, a news-
paper reported Saturday.
An Orlando Sentinel
review of investigative
documents showed that
the 8-foot-6-inch albino
Burmese python named(

TODAY
IN LIFE
t I. -. [ I
I -, it~ t l


Gypsy was kept in viola-
tion of wildlife rules, and
that the child's mother and
mother's boyfriend could
not afford to feed it.
The python escaped
its terrarium July 1, 2009,
and attacked 2-year-old
Shaianna Hare in her crib
in Oxford, about 60 miles
northwest of Orlando.
Jaren Hare, 21, and
her 33-year-old boyfriend,
Jason Darnell, face up to
15 years in prison if con-
victed of manslaughter or
third-degree murder. They
also are charged with child
PYTHON continued on 3A

COMING
TUESDAY
, 'I ,, '1111-ll: :l '- I
'_ [ l .m u [-, ] '- '_-I .


I ___


a 1Il


L


s M.









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011


c A .?F 4L ORIDA

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
7-8-9-28 8 7-12-24-31-35 Afternoon: 6-9-9 Afternoon: 0-5-8-8 17-25-28-45-47-48 3-16-18-20-37-30
Evening: 2-9-2 Evening: 4-3-5-2


AROUND FLORIDA


Florida woman among world's oldest dies at 112


MIAMI Onie Ponder,
Florida's oldest resident and one
of the oldest people in the world,
has died, her son said Saturday.
She was 112.
Ponder died Friday morn-
. ing at an Ocala hospice after a
brief bout with pneumonia, said
Carswell Ponder, 74, of Ocala.
According to the Los Angeles-
based Gerontology Research
Group, Onie Ponder had been
the oldest person in Florida and
one of the 25 oldest people in the
world. She was one of 1,000 sub-
jects in the New England Study
of Centenarians, conducted since
S1994 by Boston University's
College of Medicine.
"The good Lord had some-
Sthing to do with it. He treats
me pretty well," Ponder told the
Ocala Star-Banner at her birth-
day party in September.
"I never thought of age, even
when I was in my 60s and 70s,"
she told the newspaper.
Ponder had stayed active and
.healthy all her life, her son said.
She would tell stories about
;her childhood in Ocala, when
every family on her street put
up fences in their yards to keep
children out of the cows' way, he
said.
"All the things through his-
tory in the last century, she
remembered," her son said.
"Her mind was so sharp, she
could go way back to her early
childhood. She took it all in."
Ponder was born Sept. 3,
1898, in Ocala. She lived most
of her life in her hometown,
though she attended high school
in North Carolina and spent a
short time working as a book-
keeper in Boston.
She married bookkeeper
Lester William Ponder in 1928
in Ocala. He'died in 1958, and
Ponder lung outlived her seven
siblings, her son said.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New Year's in Key West attracts about 200 dachshunds
In this photo released by the Florida Keys News Bureau, dachshunds Winston (left) and Goodman, costumed as
vintage aviators, are pushed in the annual Key West Dachshund Walk Friday in Key West. The event attracted
about 200 of the pint-size canines.


The homemaker always
maintained a positive outlook
and a curiosity about the world,
Carswell Ponder said.
She was a devout Roman
Catholic and went to Mass every
Sunday. She took cruises and
traveled to Europe and Canada.
She liked to read and listened to
books on tape after her eyesight
deteriorated.
"She just tried to enjoy each
day as it came," her son said.
Ponder also is survived by
another son, 77-year-old Phil
Ponder of Nashville, Tenn.


State stops online
testing for permits
JACKSONVILLE Florida
teenagers won't be able to get
their learner's permits online
anymore.
Since 2004, the state had
allowed people to take the
learner's permit test online. The
permit is needed before getting
a driver's license.
The online program is being
canceled, effective Saturday. The
tests will now only be available
at a county tax collector or a


Department of Motor Vehicles
office.
The online test $20 to $30. In
2009, officials say the fees gener-
ated between $1.9 million and
$2.9 million in revenue.

Miami Beach offers
bike-sharing program
'MIAMI BEACH The city
of Miami Beach hopes a new
bicycle-sharing pf-tgram will
reduce traffic congestion on its
small island.


A private vendor is installing
a network of 100 self-service sta-
tions and 1,000 bicycles across
the 7-mile-long and 1-mnile-wide
city.
Starting in February, riders
can swipe a membership or
credit card at any DecoBike
station to check out a bike. The
bicycles can then be returned to
any other station.
City officials hope the bikes
will help break some residents'
and visitors' habit of driving just
a few blocks to a restaurant or
shop. The brightly colored bikes
have lights and built-in tracking
devices.
The program is modeled on
popular bike-sharing systems in
Paris, Barcelona and Montreal.
Minneapolis and Washington,
D.C., also have similar pro-
grams.

Father charged in
6-year-old's stabbing
TAMPA A Tampa father is
charged with attempted murder
after allegedly stabbing his 6-
year-old son more than 20 times.
According to the Hillsborough
County sheriff's office, 23-
year-old Xavier Thomas had
been watching New Year's Eve
fireworks with relatives late
Friday. When the fireworks were
over, Thomas took his son, also
named Xavier, to a play area in
the apartment.complex.
About a half hour later,
Thomas returned without the
boy. The sheriff's office said he
fled on foot when his relatives
asked about the boy.
The family called authorities.
Deputies said the blood-covered
child appeared from the play
area.as they arrived.
* Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Oprah comes out on her OWN


LOS ANGELES
0prah Winfrey wants
to better the world in
her own way, and that
absolutely, positively
excludes a political
career. The media powerhouse
who threw her clout behind Barack
Obama's presidential candidacy
says she will never seek office. As
she fervently asserts: "Arrgghhh!
The very idea of politics. No, no, no,
no, no, no, no, no."
But a new, basic cable channel
that bears her name and debuted
at noon EST Saturday to 85 million
homes across the land?
Politics is "having to live your life
at the whim of somebody's polls,"
Winfrey said in an interview from
her home near Santa Barbara. "I
just feel like there's so much more
ability for me, personally, to be able
to effect change and to be able to
influence through stories and ideas
than I could ever do with politics."
She hopes to see the Oprah
Winfrey Network OWN estab-
lish itself as a "force for good," a
platform that helps people "see the
best of themselves" on a broader
canvas than her daily Chicago-based
talk show.
With the Los Angeles-based
OWN, as well as orchestrating a
big finish in May for "The Oprah
Winfrey Show," the talk show host
said it's unlikely she'll have time for
the Chicago mayoral bid of Rahm
Emanuel, President Obama's for-
mer chief of staff. She and Emanuel
haven't seen each other in town.
"It seems that everybody else in
the world has run into Rahm except
me," said Winfrey. She offered
that she signed a petition to get
his name on the February ballot
when she was approached outside a
Chicago gym.
As for Obama, Winfrey remains a
steadfast booster.
"He's doing a great job, and I
don't use the term 'great' loosely,"
she said. '"The amount of pressure
and opinions coming at him from
every direction, to be steadfast and
solid in your own conviction about


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 5 photo, President Barack Obama introduces Oprah Winfrey,
recipient of the 2010 Kennedy Center Honors, during a reception in the East
Room of the White House in Washington. Winfrey said she hopes to see her
TV network, OWN, establish itself as a 'force for good.'


how you see this country and what
you believe is possible for the future
of this country. I think that takes a
lot of guts."
When Obama presumably seeks
a second term in 2012, "I would do
whatever they ask me to do. I'm
open," she said.
Winfrey, who caught flack from
some fans for endorsing Obama for
the Democratic nomination, said
she hasn't thought about how the
cable channel over which she pre-
sides as chairman might figure in
the national election.
"I'm really just trying to get on
the air," she said, lightly. "I'm trying
to think of the role OWN is going to
play on Jan. 2, and the 3rd and the
4th."
A pop culture force with a day-
time podium that at its peak attract-
ed more than 12 million viewers
(it's at nearly 7 million this season),
Winfrey has created careers and
successful TV shows ("Dr. Phil,"
"Dr. Oz"), energized the publishing


industry with her book club picks
and produced distinguished films
("Precious," "The Great Debaters"),
breaking ethnic stereotypes along
the way.
The 56-year-old Oprah is acutely
aware of what she might be losing
even as she stakes out new TV turf
to promote ideas and celebrities.
She was initially reluctant to sur-
render her daytime show, but "what
I realized is the 'Oprah' show has
had its time and its run and its abil-
ity to affect and influence, and that
now it's time for something else,"
she said.
On the cusp of her new
media adventure, a Harpo Inc.
joint venture with Discovery
Communications (which has a
reported $189 million commitment
to the channel), Winfrey said she
has shed any worries she had as
OWN experienced an uneven and
delayed gestation.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Country musician Harold
Bradley is 85.
* TV host Jack Hanna is 64.
* Actress Wendy Phillips is
59.,
* Retired MLB All-Star pitch-
er David Cone is 48.
* Actress Tia Carrere is 44.
* Actor Cuba Gooding, Jr.
is 43.


* Model Christy Turlington
is 42.
* Actor Dax Shepard is 36.
* Actress Paz Vega is 35.
* Country musician Chris
. Hartman is 33.
* Rock musician Jerry
DePizzo Jr. (O.A.R.) is 32.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Kelton Kessee (IMX) is 30.


Thought for Today


"You are not very good if you
are not better than your best
friends imagine you to be."

Johann Kaspar Lavater
Swiss theologian (1741-1801)



Lake City Reporter
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011


PYTHON: Snake found coiled around girl's head


Continued From Page 1A
abuse.
The python had slipped
out of its 150-gallon tank
with only a quilt as a lid
twice that day before attack-
ing Shaianna, investigators
said.
The emaciated snake
weighed less than 13
pounds, at least half what
healthy pythons that size
should weigh, Andrew
Wyatt, president of the
United States Association
of Reptile Keepers, told the
newspaper.
"You keep it hungry and
don't secure it, you're asking
for trouble," Wyatt said.
According to a death inves-
tigation by the Department


of Children and Families,
Jaren Hare's mother, Sheryl,
was concerned about her
daughter's ability to care for
the python and a smaller
snake.
Sheryl Hare told a DCF
investigator that a week
before the attack, she
offered to buy rats for the
snakes because the couple
had neither jobs nor money.
She said she also offered to
get sealed containers for
the snakes and to keep the
snakes at her home.
Both offers were reject-
ed, she told investigators.
According to reports
from the Sumter County
Sheriff's Office and DCF,


Shaianna and two older
children in the home regu-
larly handled the python
with adult supervision. The
couple told sheriff's detec-
tives that Gypsy was tame
and never coiled around
the children as they car-
ried it draped around their
necks.
Darnell recalled how the
python snatched a roadkill
squirrel from his hand about
a month before the attack.
"She was coming up due
(for a feeding)," Darnell
told sheriff's detectives.
"But I don't think hunger
would have been the motive.
... There's no way that she
could possibly in her mind


think that she could eat that
baby."
Darnell told detectives
that the snake was in its tank
when he went to bed around
11:30 p.m. An hour later,
while walking to the bath-
room, he found the python
in the hallway.
He said he stuffed the
snake in a mesh bag and put
it in its tank.
Darnell told investigators
that at 9:30 the next morn-
ing, he found the snake
coiled around Shaianna's
head, its fangs sunk into her
forehead.
Darnell stabbed the snake
when he found it wrapped
around the toddler.


Crist: Florida showed

spirit, resolve in 2010


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE-
Gov. Charlie Crist
said Florida residents
showed "tremendous
spirit and resolve" in a
challenging year.
In his New Year's
message, the outgoing
governor said he's grate-
ful for having had the
opportunity to serve the
state.
Crist said that when
faced with economic
strain and the oil spill
in the Gulf of Mexico,
Florida residents
responded with "cour-


age, talent and dedica-
tion."
He said that gives him
hope for Florida's future.
Crist also said he's
proud of his accomplish-
ments as governor,
including reducing the
crime rate and taking
steps to make govern-
iment'more transparent.
He said he's pray-
ing for success for
Republican Gov.-elect
Rick Scott, who takes
over next week.
Crist lost his indepen-
dent bid for an open U.S.
Senate seat.


FACES: Senate race had several twists due to backlash vs. Democratic Party


Continued From Page 1A
The year began with political
pundits assuming that McCollum
would be the Republican facing
Democrat Sink for governor.
Then Naples businessman Rick
Scott shook things up by invest-
ing tens of millions of his own
dollars to defeat McCollum in the
primary and later to beat Sink.
Despite repeatedly raised ques-
tions about massive Medicaid
fraud at the Columbia/HCA hos-
pital chain while Scott was CEO,
Scott was able to buy name rec-
ognition through television ads
that portrayed him as a political
outsider who would use his busi-
ness experience to turn around
the state's economy. His catch
phrase, "Let's get to work," was
heard over and over again.
The Senate race also had sev-
eral twists and turns. When the
year began, Crist was struggling
to maintain his lead over former
House Speaker Marco Rubio, a
tea party favorite who quickly
gained support by criticizing
President Barack Obama's spend-
ing policies and Crist's support
of Obama's $787 billion federal
stimulus package.
Rubio began raising more
money than Crist and the once-
obscure candidate was getting
national attention. When he
passed Crist in the polls, spec-
ulation began that Crist would
run as an independent candidate.


-



ASSOCIATED PRESS
Governor-elect Rick Scott speaks at the state Republican Party
quarterly meeting Saturday in Orlando. In his first state conference since
his Nov. 2 election, Scott urged GOP activists to keep their momentum
going for 2012, to defeat President Obama and U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson.
Listening at the head table are Dan Nordby, party general counsel, and
Republican Party of Florida Chairman John Thrasher.


Crist finally made that announce-
ment in late April, just before the
deadline to get on the ballot.
On the. Democratic side, U.S.
Rep. Kendrick Meek strug-
gled to gain attention, but still
remained the presumptive


nominee. That was until billion-.
aire Jeff Greene got in the race
on the final day to qualify and
began spending millions of dol-
lars on ads.
Greene took a lead in the race
and appeared heading toward


victory, but his campaign ended
up faltering in a circus-like
atmosphere with stories about
his ties to former boxer Mike
Tyson and troubled actress
Lindsay Lohan. Greene's efforts
to talk about policy were often
sidetracked with questions
about excessive partying on his
yacht and similar issues.
Meek won the nomination
by a landslide, 57.5 percent to
31 percent, but trailed badly
throughout the general election.
As Crist tried to pull votes away
from Meek, there was pressure
on Meek to drop out of the race
so the split Democratic vote
wouldn't help Rubio.
Meek stayed in, and Rubio
won by a wide margin, taking
about 49 percent of the vote
compared to Crist's 30 percent
and Meek's 20 percent.
Republicans were able to take
advantage of anti-Democratic
Party backlash and easily
swept all three Cabinet seats,
with Pam Bondi winning the
attorney general's race, Adam
Putnam winning the agriculture
commissioner position and Jeff
Atwater earning the chief finan-
cial officer seat.
In the House races,
Republican Dan Webster
knocked Democratic Rep. Alan
Grayson out of office after one
term. Republican Sandy Adams


did the same to Rep. Suzanne
Kosmas. Allen West, who was
trounced by Democratic Rep.
Ron Klein two years earlier,
used the tea party movement
to reverse those results, easily
beating Klein by nearly 9 per-
centage points.
In north Florida, Democratic
Rep. Allen Boyd lost by more
than 12 percentage points to
Steve Southerland, ending his
seven terms in office.
"Someone said to me the other
day Allen Boyd's never had a
close race and that's true. And
this one wasn't either. .Allen's
always won that seat handily,"
said Rod Smith, who was Sink's
running mate and who is likely
to become the state Democratic
Party chair next month.
He said voters frustrated with
the economy took their anger
out on the party in charge,
and while Republicans have
controlled Florida government
since 1999, Democrats at the
state level suffered because of
leadership in Washington.
'"This was certainly the tough-
est election that I can recall
in recent memory," Smith said.
"These things come in cycles. A
couple of years ago they were
saying the Republicans were
out of power for a generation
and they weren't even out of
power for two years."


BAND: Experience to offer 'exposure'


Continued From Page 1A

has come back to be our
band director," he said.
"He's every bit a part of
Columbia County since he
was raised here and went
to Columbia High School."
Buzzella said he doesn't
recall a governor's parade
being hosted in recent
history.
"We're excited," he said.
"This is the first time the
Columbia High School
band, that I'm aware of,
has ever marched at a
governor's inauguration
parade. That's history
being made. I think the
Marching Tiger Band will
represent us well."
Some might perceive
having the parade along
with other inauguration
festivities as inappropriate
during the tough economic
times, Buzzella said. He


expressed to the parade
committee his concerns
about the costs.
From what he under-
stands, the Scott team
along with private individu-
als are picking up most of
the tab for the events, he
said. It's less than half the
dollars than what Charlie
Crist spent during his inau-
guration, he said.
"There is little or no
taxpayers' dollars being
used," Buzzella said. "I'm
happy to know the gover-
nor is starting out on the
fiscally responsible foot.
Let's hope he stays that
way."
Practice to prepare for
the parade performance
will be held Monday.
"We're going to work
pretty hard on Monday
and hope everything goes


well," Schulz said.
The students are excited
about the chance to march
in the inaugural parade,
Schulz said, and the expe-
rience will give them state
exposure.
"I think it's good for the
band," he said. "We're get-
ting out there among the
state and not just the coun-
ty, but the state. It feels
really good that we have
this opportunity and we're
just honored to do this."


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OPINION


Sunday, January 2, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Voters made

both parties

amenable to

compromise


t's been widely acknowl-
edged lately that
President Obama is hav-
ing his finest hour during
the current lame-duck
session of Congress.
But it must not be marginal-
ized that Obama's huge accom-
plishments came as a result of a
Democratic-controlled Congress
that has been one of the most
productive in history.
For that, House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi and Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid, who
have both been severely battered
and ridiculed, can hold their
heads high.
Prior to the current session,
which began after Democrats
were walloped in the November
election, sweeping legislation
adopted earlier this year included
a mammothhealth care reform
law, as well as major Wall Street
and banking reforms.
But its been within the past
10 days that heads have spun as
lawmakers adopted such monu-
mental laws as those in a com-
promise tax deal, and repealed
the military's "Don't ask don't
tell" policy that applied to gay
service people.
The Senate also passed
Obama's New Start nuclear
treaty with Russia. And suddenly,
too, the 9/11 rescue workers
bill was resurrected by New
York Sens. Chuck Schumer and
Kirsten Gillibrand to win Senate
passage.
What's behind the flurry
just days before Christmas? It's
hard to say, but one thing is
clear: The election removed a
lot of the timidity about tackling
hot-potato issues. And unhappy
voters made both parties more
open to compromise, which led
to passage of the $858 billion
tax package. It also didn't hurt
that Republicans won handily in
November, which heightened
Democrats' sensitivity to possible
gridlock in two weeks when the
GOP takes over the House.
With Republicans taking back
conti-ol of the state Senate, New
Yorkers can only hope that the
2011 Legislature will be half as
prolific.
E Rochester (N.Y.) Democrat


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
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Columbia and surrounding counties by
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LETT
POLIO


ERS
CY


Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
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and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


My Silent Night parking ticket


whenever I hear
the Christmas
carol Silent
Night, Holy
Night, I think of
Oberndorf, Austria. Here's why:
I was visiting friends in
Oberndorf in 1965, and we had
agreed to meet at a downtown
restaurant on Christmas Eve for
supper.
The town was bustling with
people and lots of Christmas
activities, and I had trouble
finding a parking place. Finally
I found a place to park in a near-
by church parking lot but did
not see the No Parking sign.
After supper I walked back
to my car and found a parking
ticket and a short note under
my windshield wiper. The park-
ing ticket said I had been fined
five marks (about $2.50) for
illegal parking. The note, writ-
ten by the church minister, told
me that the church parking lot
was not a public parking lot and
to please not park there again.
Looking around, I saw the 'no
parking' sign and knew I had
been wrong to park there.
The next morning I drove to
the police station and paid my
fine, then drove to the church to
apologize for my mistake.
At the church I met a person-
able young minister who spoke
good English and he accepted
my apology. Then he told me
about his church's history,
which included the history of
the carol "Silent Night, Holy
Night."
He said "Silent Night, Holy
Night" (German: Stille.Nacht,
Heilige Nacht), one of the most
popular Christmas carols any-
where, was first performed in
the Nikolaus-Kirche (Church of
Saint Nicholas) in Oberndorf on
Dec. 24, 1818.
In the early 1900s that
church was demolished due
to flood damage. A small cha-
pel, called the Stille-Nacht
Gedachtniskapelle (Silent Night


----- -


Morris Williams
Phone:(386) 755-8183
williams_h2@firn.edu
372 W Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055

Memorial Chapel) was built to
memorialize the demolished
church. The chapel parking
lot is where I got the parking
ticket.
So, Oberndorf, Austria,
was the town where "Silent
Night" was first performed, a
Christmas carol so powerful
that it was eventually translated
into more that 40 languages and
recorded by over 300 artists.
An incredible story reported-
ly took place during World War
I during the 1914 Christmas
truce. Warring French, English,
and German troops observed
Christmas night by singing
"Silent Night" simultaneously,
each in their own language
because it was the only carol
that soldiers on both sides of
the front line knew.
SSo, my visit to the Memorial
Chapel to apologize for my ille-
gal parking led to a wonderful
history lesson about one of the
world's best known carols and,
naturally, that is why I think of
Oberndorf, Austria, every time I
hear the song "Silent Night."

Niblack yearbooks
Our School Museum has
about 20 Niblack Middle School
1997 yearbooks in excellent
condition to give away. These
students would have graduated
in 2003.
L.C. Bradley was principal.
Student council officers were
Tyler Sapp, president; Brittany


Waters, vice president; Charyll
Bradley, secretary and trea-
surer. Carole Robertson was
the sponsor. Band director was
Steve Hentzelman.
We are hoping that a class or
faculty member will accept and
store these yearbooks and give
them away at a future reunion.
Call me at 386-755-8183.

City praise
A few weeks ago I had a
knotty problem involving city
utilities. The problem required
several phone calls back and
forth to the city before the prob-
lem was finally resolved.
Everyone at the city did their
best to help me. Everybody
returned every phone call exact-
ly when they said they would
and came for an on-site inspec-
tion when they said they would.
Thanks to all who helped,
especially to Nick Harwell and
Bev Harry. A happy new year to
you all!

Christmas humor.
There's nothing like
Christmas to put a little
BOUNCE in your checks.
In December, it's Santa
and Ho Ho Ho. In January it's
bills and Owe Owe Owe.
A man goes through 3
stages. He believes in Santa, he
doesn't believe in Santa, he IS
Santa.

Taking a break
This will be my last column
for a while. Thanks to those of
you who have been regular or
occasional readers, and to all
at The Lake City Reporter who
have been so helpful at every
turn.
I'll see you around town.

* Morris Williams is a local
historian and long-time Columbia
County resident.


He's older, he's even
tougher but
after almost half a
century in public
life, the verdict on
Arlen Specter remains some-
what elusive.
After 30 years, Specter is
Pennsylvania's longest-serv-
ing U.S. Senator, and probably
its most idiosyncratic. His five
terms have included dizzying
ideological twists, major accom-
plishments and opportunistic
betrayals, clout that brought
billions of federal dollars to the
commonwealth and a legend-
ary commitment to constituent
service. Not to mention a quirki-
ness that suggested indepen-
dence but sometimes veered
into the ridiculous as when
Specter avoided voting aye or


nay on the Clinton impeachment
but instead invoked Scottish
law to pronounce the case "not
proven."
Specter's legacy is difficult
to assess in a short space, but
as he leaves the Senate, invol-
untarily, here are some random
"snapshots":
Here's Specter shaking
hands with residents of a county
where the deer outnumber the
people. He visited every one
of the state's 67 counties every
year, earning a remarkable
amount of loyalty from constitu-
ents who might not have had a
lot in common with this Jewish
Kansas native from big bad
Philadelphia ... until it didn't.
There's Specter announc-
ing a multimillion dollar federal
grant for Pennsylvania, maybe


for medical research. Specter's
political leverage meant the
.state got its share of money
from D.C. maybe more than
its share regardless of who
occupied the White House.
And, finally, here's the
image of Specter's final speech
as a senator last week true to
form, he didn't call it a speech
but a "closing argument."
Specter went down swinging,
with a scathing attack on his for-
mer party's "cannibalism" and a
call for reform of the rules of a
Senate that has become increas-
ingly dysfunctional.
Arlen Specter's long career
includes evidence of brilliance
and effectiveness, opportunism
and cynicism as well as hard
work and personal courage.
a Philadelphia Daily News


- -~
Star Parker.
parker@urboncure.org


New black

church, but

same old

mistakes


the Conference
of National Black
Churches, held its
first annual meeting
a few weeks ago in Washington,
D.C.
The organization's stated goal
is "to improve the quality of life
for African Americans."
But looking over the group's
website, it's not the goal but
how they claim they will
achieve it that appears dubious.
The group is an umbrella
organization which claims to
provide a "single voice" unify-
ing nine of the largest Black
denominations which they
say constitute 30 million indi-
viduals and more than 50,000
congregations.
"CNBC will fill the void for
a unified voice of faith which
will be translated into advocacy
efforts in the area of Education,
Health, Public Policy/Social
Justice, and Economic
Empowerment."
The Rev. W. Franklyn
Richardson, chairman of the
board of the conference, cor-
rectly observes that the black
population still has dispropor-
tionate social problems and
lags economically. He states his
concern that the general public
thinks "everything is fine" now
with blacks because we have a
black president.
What's hard to discern is
where Richardson is proposing
any new course of action that is
not simply a rehash of the same
kinds of unproductive initiatives
that have always defined the
black left.
Plans for "economic empow-
erment", for example, which the
website describes as the orga-
nization's "centerpiece," has the
usual language of proposing col-
lective action to pressure cor-
porations to develop practices
and policies that "favor justice,
equality, and environmental
responsibility."
Isn't this exactly what Jesse
Jackson did for years?
Is it really the absence of
social action or a "unified voice"
in the black community that
accounts for a black poverty
rate little different now from
where it was 40 years ago?
On the contrary, it seems to
me that the problem is not a
dearth of organizations or social
initiatives, but the mysterious
allergy in black America to
the words that defined what
the civil rights movement was
allegedly about individual
freedom.
One can only hope that at
some point black clergy will
grasp that freedom means a
culture of responsibility, not a
culture of entitlement. And that
individuals cannot be empowered
by others or by forced transfer
of what belongs to others. It can
only come by individuals taking
responsibility for their own lives.
Today our whole nation is
debilitated by the culture of
entitlement and dependence that
has caused horrible problems
over the last half century in black
communities.
Let's pray that 2011 will be a
year of recovery for Americans
of all colors. And that there will
be a renewed appreciation that
American prosperity comes from
American freedom and that this
freedom is rooted in free and per-
sonally responsible citizens.
* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition on Urban
Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author
of three books.


4A


OTHER OPINION


Arlen Specter: Darlin' or snarlin'?


- I I --I










LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011


McCollum's career appears to be ending


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE
although Republican
Bill McCollum fell
short in his attempts
to be a U.S.' sena-
tor or a governor,
he tangled with Democratic
presidents during a long career
as a congressman and during a
single term as Florida's attorney
general.
Aside from wanting to have
won a couple more elections,
McCollum said there's little he'd
have done differently before
leaving the attorney general's
office Tuesday.
He doesn't second-guess the
decision that led to his failed bid
in an acrimonious governor's
race, where he was defeated
by Gov.-elect Rick Scott in the
Republican primary.
'The opportunity as governor
to do more is there," McCollum
said during a midweek breakfast
interview. "There's just a lot of
good things you can do as gov-
ernor. I have the background, I
thought I could do it."
But that stinging defeat about
four months ago didn't dimin-
ish McCollum's pride in the
accomplishments of the attorney
general's office under his leader-
ship the past four years.
"We've had more impact on
people's lives," he said about the
priorities of his agency. "We've
saved people's lives."
McCollum points to his expan-
sion of cybercrime units to crack
down on child pornography, in
part by educating middle school
children.
He also has beefed up enforce-
ment to reduce the growing
number of youth gangs.
When Gov. Charlie Crist
decided one term was enough
for him, McCollum seemed to be
a shoo-in for the GOP guberna-
torial nomination because party
insiders discouraged others from
getting into the 2010 contest.
Scott, a millionaire health


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Attorney General Bill McCollum makes a point about the pardoning process while considering the case of the
late rock star Jim Morrison on Dec. 9 in Tallahassee:


"I want to make it clear that I have no particular
sour grapes against Mr. Scott."

Bill McCollum
Attorney General


care executive from Naples, had
other ideas and a fortune to,.
spend against McCollum, who
had the backing of virtually
every significant Republican in
Florida including former Gov.
Jeb Bush.
However, Scott's millions
prevailed in the primary and in
his general election defeat of
Democrat Alex Sink.
It took McCollum awhile to
come to terms with that bitter
outcome and some of the criti-
cism from Scott's nearly non-
stop television advertising blitz


that portrayed the attorney
general as an insider and part
of the problem with govern-
ment.
"I want to make it clear that I
have no particular sour grapes
against Mr. Scott," the 66-year-
old McCollum said this week.
"I want to see him succeed."
The past decade was a
turbulent one politically for
McCollum.
In 2006, he won a statewide
bid for the only time in four
tries when he defeated former
state Sen. Skip Campbell of


Fort Lauderdale for attorney
general.
In that role, McCollum
tangled with his second
Democratic president, chal-
lenging Barack Obama's health
care overhaul in federal court.
Several other states soon fol-
lowed and joined Florida as
plaintiffs.
McCollum contends the plan
is unconstitutional because it
requires people to carry health
insurance.
"It's the most defining issue
of my lifetime," McCollum said.


"It's a huge issue of state sover-
eignty, where is the line?"
McCollum was a key player
as a congressman in the
impeachment of President Bill
Clinton on perjury charges in
the Monica Lewinsky affair,
and he still believes Clinton
should have been removed
from office for lying about his
sexual relationship with the for-
mer White House intern.
"No question about it," said
McCollum, who spent 20 years
in the U.S. House. "It was
unfortunate."
Clinton had denied under
oath that he'd had sexual rela-
tions with Lewinsky, although
it was later discovered the two
had oral sex. Ctinton, however,
was later acquitted at trial in
the U.S. Senate.
McCollum left Congress in
2000 to run for the U.S. Senate
seat vacated by Republican
Connie Mack III but was
defeated by another former
central Florida congressman,
Democrat Bill Nelson.
McCollum tried again for the
Senate in 2004, but lost in the
GOP primary to Mel Martinez,
who then captured the seat
for Republicans in the general
election that was previously
held by retiring U.S. Sen. Bob
Graham, a Democrat.
Given those losses and the
fact McCollum is now 66, it
would seem his political career
would be over.
"I've learned a long time
ago to never say never," said
McCollum, who resurrected
his political career in 2006 after
spending six years in the pri-
vate sector following his Senate
race losses.
And while he wasn't sure
about his future plans,
McCollum asked for one favor
as the interview concluded.
"You've got to mention my
wife," he said.in reference to
his bride, Ingrid, of nearly 40
years. "I couldn't have done
any of this without her."


CRIST: Miscalculated move to embrace Obama upset many Republicans
Continued From Page 1A


The guy who was
mentioned as a potential
2008 running mate for
Republican John McCain
and a possible future pres-
idential candidate is now
looking for a job outside of
politics.
"People found out about
his political philosophy....
His compass didn't point
north, it didn't point south,
it didn't point east'and it
didn't point west. It pointed
any way the wind was blow-
ing for him," said state Sen.
John Thrasher, who chairs
the state GOP. "You can
be a populist for so long
before it catches up to you
and that's exactly what hap-
pened to him."
Crist easily won office
in 2006 and immedi-
ately sought to win
over Democrats and
Republicans.
While times were good,
the parties came together.
They passed legislation
aimed at lowering the cost
of property insurance and
property taxes, ensuring
voting machines had paper
trails and Crist's first prior-
ity: putting violent offend-
ers who violate probation
back in prison.
'There was a great sense
of cooperation, Republicans
and Democrats really
working together very,
very well," Crist said.
"Unfortunately, this past
year that wasn't the case."
Crist held summits on cli-
mate change and appeared
with singer Sheryl Crow to
bring awareness to clean
energy.
He remained in the
national limelight when
Florida moved up its 2008
presidential primary date
and major GOP candidates
began knocking on Crist's
door looking for help.
Crist endorsed McCain
and helped push the
Arizona senator to victo-
ry in Florida, a win that
helped him cruise to the
nomination. Crist began
campaigning with McCain
and appearing on national


television to promote him,
leading to speculation that
Crist would be McCain's
running mate.
But McCain went with
another fresh-faced gover-
nor, Alaska's Sarah Palin,
and soon after McCain's
loss, Crist's luck began to
change.
He upset many
Republicans when he joined
newly elected President
Barack Obama on stage to
rally support for a $787 bil-
lion stimulus package that
most in the GOP opposed.
Crist's embrace of
Obama, an enduring image
from that southwest Florida
event, was used against
Crist repeatedly when he
decided to run for Florida's
open Senate seat this year.
He miscalculated by
assuming it would be an
easy walk to the Republican
nomination.
Crist supporters failed
to force former House
Speaker Marco Rubio out
of the race.
As the economy grew
worse, Rubio repeatedly
criticized Obama's spend-
ing policies and linked
Crist to them.
"You had a governor
that has had a very diffi-
cult economic time to deal
with and has shown noth-
ing to really counter the
bad economy except plati-
tftdes 'I love Florida,
isn't she great?'" said David
Johnson, a Tallahassee-
based Republican strate-
gist. "The clock ran out
on his good time because
he was governor during a
very bad time."
And what made Crist
successful before, his per-
sonality and his ability to
engage voters, no longer
worked.
"We need more than
a nice guy. No one can
take that away from him,
he is a very nice guy, but
being governor during
tough times requires more
and he doesn't have it,"
Johnson said.
Crist was also hurt


among Republicans when
he continued defending his
hand-picked GOP chair-
man, Jim Greer, despite a
growing cry for his oust-
er because of outrageous
spending. After Greer was
removed from office he
was accused of funneling
party money to himself
through a corporation he
set up and was charged
with grand theft.
With his numbers plum-
meting in the Republican
Senate primary, Crist chose
to bolt the GOP and run as
an independent. He began
reaching out to unions and
other groups that tradition-
ally back Democrats.
He vetoed Republican pri-
orities, like bills that would
have required women to
get an ultrasound before
having an abortion and
another that would have


stripped teachers of tenure
and based merit raises on
test scores.
He succeeded in pull-
ing away Democratic votes
from Rep. Kendrick Meek
in the three-way Senate
race, but Rubio won the
general election. Crist will
leave the governor's office
when Republican Rick
Scott is sworn in.
Still, Crist said he had
no regrets about his deci-
sion, saying he no longer
-felt comfortable in the
Republican Party.
"I just didn't feel that
was a place I wanted to
be anymore, it couldn't
be not being honest
with myself, about how I
felt about treating others,
doing unto others. There
was a harshness to it that
I'm not compatible with,"
Crist said.


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And for the critics who
called him a say-anything-
to-get-a-vote candidate,
Crist said he's always just
been himself.
"I really didn't change.
I've always been pretty


broad and trying to always
be understanding of other
points of view and not try
to be judgmental of differ-
ent points of view. It just
became formalized when I
went independent"


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter. com.


Wednesday
Friendship luncheon
The January Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomers is Wednesday
at the Telford Hotel, 16521
River St. in White Springs.
For those wanting to car
pool, please meet at the
park and ride lot next to
Arby's on Rte. 90 at 10:30
a.m. All members, guests
and friends are welcome.
Call 438-8100 or 754-7227.

Builder's Association
meeting
The Columbia County
Builder's Association is
meeting Wednesday at
the Holiday Inn. Buffet
opens at 11:30 a.m. and
meeting starts at noon.
The speaker is from the
Metro Crime Prevention
of Florida. Tickets may
be purchased at the door.
Members are $10 and
non-members are $15.
Call 386-867-1998 with any
questions. If you are inter-
ested in becoming a mem-
ber of Columbia County
Builder's Association con-
tact Kathryn Peterson at
754-0417 or Lynda Yeany
at 867-1998.

Wednesday,
Jan. 12
Lake City Newcomers
Regular Meeting
The regular monthly
meeting of the Lake City
r"-..comers is 11 a.m. Jan.
Guangdong Chinese
Restaurant. Luncheon
cost is $10. All members,
guests and friends along
with any newcomers to the
area are welcome. Lake
City Police Chief Argatha
Gilmore is the speaker.
Call 752-4552 or 755-4051.

Thursday, Jan 13
Medicaid workshop
A free Medicaid work-
shop is 10 a.m. Jan. 13 in
the Lifestyle Enrichment


A.C. GONZALEZ/Lake City Reporter

Columbia residents try to beat deadline to pay property taxes
Columbia County residents line up at the tax collector's office for their last chance to get a higher discount on property taxes.
Officials said more than $36 million have been collected during November and December.


Center. Teresa Byrd
Morgan of Morgan Law
Center for Estate &
Legacy Planning will expel
the myths and expand
the opportunities with
Medicaid Planning. The
LEC is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court. To attend,
please call Shana Miller at
386755-1977.

Monday, Jan. 17
MLK Parade
The Northeast Florida
Leadership Council is host-
ing its Annual Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. Parade at
10 a.m. Jan. 17 beginning
at DOT All participants are
asked to call Ron 623-0468,
Gwen 623-3779 or Audre
344-9915.

Friday, Jan. 21
Antique Show and Sale
Pilot Club of


Jacksonville is hosting
its 62nd annual Charities
Antique Show and Sale
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Jan. 21, 22, and from
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan.
23. The event takes
place at the Jacksonville
Fairgrounds Expo Center
in Jacksonville. Admission
is 10 dollars per person,
and parking is free. Call
386-752-6575.

EVERY MONDAY
Squadron meeting
Suwannee Valley
Composite Squadron -
Civil Air Patrol. Meets 6:30
to 9 p.m. Monday. For
more information, please
call Maj. Grant Meadows,
(386) 365-1341.

EVERY FOURTH
MONDAY
Bridge Club meeting


The Social Duplicate
Bridge Club meets from
1 to 5 p.m. every fourth
Monday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, 628
SE Allison Ct Call 755-
0235.

EVERY FIRST,
THIRD MONDAY
Weight loss support
group meets
The Thinner Me Weight
Loss Surgery Support
Group holds meetings at 7
p.m. on the first and third
Monday of every month in
the Classrooms at Lake City
Medical Center. Meetings
are for people that have
had weight loss surgery,
contemplating surgery or
just trying to lose weight on
their own. E-mail thethin-
nerme@gmail.com or call
(386) 288-9153 and leave a
message.


EVERY THIRD
MONDAY
MS support group to
meet
An MS support group
meets every third Monday
of the month, at the Lake
City Columbia County
Historical Museum, 157
SE Hernando Ave. Call
Karen Cross at (386) 755-
2950 or Jane Joubert at
(386) 755-5099 for more
information.

EVERY TUESDAY
Geri Actors
The Geri Actors at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center are looking for
members. Meetings are
12:45-2 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Anyone retired
and interested in becoming
an actor or actress is invit-
ed. Call Frank at 752-8861.


Domestic violence
support group to meet
A support group for
survivors of domestic vio-
lence meets at 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday. Child care is pro-
vided. Call Another Way at
(386) 719-2700.

UF Master Gardeners
are available
The University of
Florida Master Gardeners
are at the Columbia
County Extension Office
from 9 a.m. to noon
Tuesday. They answer
gardening questions and
conduct soil pH tests
free of charge. Call (386)
752-5384, or stop at the
UF/IFAS Extension Office
at the Columbia County
fairgrounds for more infor-
mation.

Lake City Uons to meet
The Lake City Lions
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, at
the Guangdong restaurant,
inthe Lake City Mall. Call
Truett George at (386)
497-2050 or Marshall
Barnard at (386) 497-3536
for more information.

Square Dancing
The Dixie Dancers
weekly dance is held at
6:30 p.m. every Tuesday
at Teen Town Community
Center. The group does
square and round dancing.
Couples 12 and older are
welcome. Call (386)497-
2834.

Domestic violence
support group to meet
A support group for
survivors of domestic
violence meets at 5:30
p.m. every Tuesday. The
location is for them alone.
Child care is provided.
Call Another Way at (386)
719-2700 for more infor-
mation.


OBITUARIES


Dorothy Lucille Crews
Henley
Mrs. Dorothy Lucille Crews
Henley, 82, resident of Lake
City, Fl, died at Suwannee Val-
ley Care Center in Lake City
Wednesday, December 29,
2010 after an extended illness.
She was a native of Columbia
County, Fl, daughter of the late
T.D. and Thelica Mae Hancock
Crews and had made her home
back in Columbia County since
1974. She resided in Jackson-
ville, Fl for many years before
returning to Lake City where
she retired from The Columbia
County School System after ten
years of service. She was devot-
ed to her family, enjoyed garden-
ing and was a member of East-
side Baptist Church in Lake City.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Elmer Henley Sr.
one son, Elmer Henley, Jr. and
one grandson, Scott Henley.
Survivors: One grandson, Jason
A. Henley (Sarah), Lake City,
Fl.; Two sisters: Ella Richards,
Lake City, Fl and Maxine Kirk-
land, Jacksonville, Fl.; One
sister in law: Adrena Crews,
Lake City, Fl.; Three great
grandchildren: Devlin Hen-
ley, Jessica Henley, and Quinn
Henley, all of Lake City, Fl.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 2 P.M. Wednesday,
Jan. 5, 2011 at GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
-HOME, (386-752-1954) 3596
South U.S. Highway 441, Lake
City, Fl with Rev. Brandon Witt
and Rev. Hugh Dampier offici-
ating. Interment will follow in
Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, me-
morials may be made to Haven
Hospice, 6037 West US High-
way 90, Lake City, FI 32055.
Visitation with the family will be
Tuesday, January 4, 2011, from
5 P.M. to 7 P.M. at the funeral
home. Please sign the guest book
at www.gatewayforestlawn.com.
Deborah E. Sheppard
Ms. Deborah E. Shep'- 57,
died early Thursday morn-
ing following a brief illness.
She was the daughter of the late
Harold Ray and Retha Bradley
Foster Sr. and the widow of the


late David Sheppard, Jr. she is
preceded in death by one brother
Harold Foster. she had lived
in Lake City, FL. for the past
twelve years after moving there
from Wellborn, FL. she enjoyed
watching the Florida Gators and
the Jacksonville Jaguars football,
enjoyed cleaning her house, and
her beloved dog Mojo. reading
the Bible. Her family was her
life she was her children's hero.
She is survived by one son
Charles Leach, Jr. (Karrie) Gra-
ham, FL.; two daughters Kim-
berley Walker, Live Oak, FL.;
and Jennifer Peeler (Bubba),
Live Oak, FL.; two brothers
Stephen Foster, Longview, WA.,
Eddie Bailey( Michelle),Oxford,
AL. One sister, Kathleen
Foster, Longview, WA.
A special friend, Mike McK-
illen. Nine grandchildren also
survive. Funeral service will
be conducted Tuesday Janu-
ary 4, 2011 at White Springs
Holiness Church with Broth-
er Dale Croft officiating.
Visitation with the family will
be held on Tuesday, January 4,
2011 at the church one hour prior
to service time. Funeral Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERALHOME, 3596 South
Highway 441, Lake City 386-
752-1954. Please sign the guest-
book atyne .. Hancock, Jr'.'.,.

Wayne H. Hancock, Jr.,
Mr. Wayne H. Hancock, Jr., 59, of
Lake City died Friday, December
31, 2010 at his residence. A na-
tive of Plant City Florida, Wayne
had been a resident of Lake City
for the past thirty years. Wayne
was a teacher at Ft. White High
School for the past ten years and
had taught at Columbia High
School for fourteen years prior
to that. He enjoyed running in
races, boating, fishing, and
trips to the.Caribbean. Wayne
was a member of Celebration
Baptist Church in Macclenny,
and had also Pastored many
Churches for over twenty five
years. C Il) n said that their life
was a GREAT ADVENTURE.
Wayne is survived by his wife,
Carolyn Corbin Hancock of
Lake City; daughter, April (Joe)
Levy of Anacortes, WA; grand-


children, Audrey and Jack Levy
of Anacortes, WA, and Miranda
Anderson of Satellite Beach, FL;
his parents, Wayne and Joyce
Hancock, Sr. of Ft. White; sis-
ter, Brenda (Steve) Chapin of
Crystal River, FL; brothers,
David (Kathy) Hancock and
John (Melinda) Hancock, both
of Ft. White, FL; stepsons, Ron
Anderson of O'Brien, FL and
Ryan Anderson of Jax., FL;
special nephew and niece who
spent many weeks with them
throughout the year, Dalton and
Capri Grisham of Lakeland,
FL; special friends, Elmer and
Nancy Crews of Macclenny.
Funeral services for Mr. Ilan-
cock will be conducted on
Wednesday, January 5, 2011 at
2:00 P.M. at the Ft. White High
School Gymnasium with Pastor
Elmer Crews officiating. Inter-
ment will follow at Forest Lawn
Memorial Gardens Cemetery in
Lake City. Visitation with the
family will be held from 6:00-
8:00 Tuesday evening at the fu-


neral home. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to Cel-
ebration Baptist Church, 6121
Copper Ridge Circle, Mac-
clenny, FL, 32063. Please sign
the guest book at www.gate-
wayforestlawn.com. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S.
HWY 441 South, Lake City.
Lillian Hess
Lillian Hess, 84, laced up her
hiking boots for the last time
and went to be with her be-
loved husband Harry and her
Lord on Thursday December
30, 2010. She was dearly loved
by her children, grandchildren,
great grandchildren, and great
grandchild she will be missed
by friends, and family every-
where. Contact Gateway-For-
est Lawn Funeral Home for
arrangements and funeral time.
Funeral Arrangements are under
the direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 South High-


way 441, Lake City 386-752-
1954. Please sign the guest-
book at gatewayforestlawn.com.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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I


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011


Medicare payment won't cover costs


By RICARDO A. ZALDIVAR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON

Medicare taxes
all those years
and want your
money's worth:
full benefits after you
retire.
Nearly three out of five
people say in a recent
Associated Press-GfK poll
that they paid into the sys-
tem so they deserve their
full benefits no cuts.
But a newly updated
financial analysis shows
that what people paid into
the system doesn't come
close to covering the full
value of the medical care
they can expect to receive
as retirees.
Consider an average-
wage, two-earner couple
together earning $89,000
a year. Upon retiring in
2011, they would have
paid $114,000 in Medicare
payroll taxes during their
careers.
But they can expect to
receive medical services
- from prescriptions to
hospital care worth
$355,000, or about three
times what they put in.
The estimates by econo-
mists Eugene Steuerle and
Stephanie Rennane of the
Urban Institute think tank
illustrate the huge discon-
nect between widely-held
perceptions and the num-
bers behind Medicare's
shaky financing. Although
Americans are worried
about Medicare's long-
term solvency, few realize
the size of the gap.
"The fact that you put
money into the system
doesn't mean it's there
waiting for you to collect,"


I'-.

U ~.'* -


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 28 file photo, President Barack Obama waves from the first fairway at Mid-Pacific County Club with friend Mike
Ramos during his holiday vacation in Kaneohe, Hawaii. A newly updated financial analysis shows that although baby boomers,
including Obama, are worried about Medicare's long-term solvency, few realize the size of the gap between Medicare taxes
and the medical services they would get.


said Steuerle.
By comparison, Social
Security taxes and expect-
ed benefits come closer to
balancing out
The same hypothetical
couple retiring in 2011
will have paid $614,000
in Social Security taxes,
and can expect to collect
$555,000 in benefits. They
will have paid about 10
percent more into the sys-
tem than they're likely to
get back.
Updated periodically, the
Urban Institute estimates


are part of an effort that
Steuerle and others began
several years ago to try to
illustrate the complicated
finances of Medicare and
Social Security in a format
the average taxpayer could.
grasp. The Washington-
based institute is a public
policy center that focuses
heavily on budget and eco-
nomic issues. Its analysis is
accepted among other pol-
icy experts in Washington,
including economists in
government
Many workers may


believe their Medicare pay-
roll taxes are going for their
own insurance after they
retiree, but the money is
actually used to pay the bills
of seniors currently on the
program.
That mistaken impres-
sion complicates the job for
policymakers trying to build
political support in coming
months for dealing with
deficits that could drag the
economy back down.
Health care costs are a
major and unpredictable
part of the government's


budget problems, and
Medicare is in the middle.
Recent debt reduction pro-
posals have called for big
changes to Medicare, mak-
ing the belt-tightening in
President Barack Obama's
health care law seem mod-
est. Some plans call for
phasing out the program,
replacing it with a fixed
payment to help future
retirees buy a private plan
of their choice.
Peel back the layers,
and there are several rea-
sons why Medicare ben-


efits and taxes are so out
.of line. First, the rapid rise
in health care costs.
A single woman who
retired in 1980, after
earning average wages
throughout her career,
could expect to receive
medical care worth about
$74,800 over the rest of
her lifetime. A comparable
woman retiring.in 2010
can expect services worth
$181,000. Those numbers
are in 2010 dollars, adjust-
ed for inflation so they can
be compared directly.
Another reason is that
payroll taxes cover most,
but not all, of Medicare's
costs. They are earmarked
for the giant trust fund that
pays for inpatient care.
Outpatient doctor visits
and prescription drugs
are paid for with a mix of
premiums collected from
beneficiaries and money
from the government's gen-
eral fund. Seniors pay only
one-fourth of the costs of
those benefits through their
premiums.
The system has worked
for 45 years, with occa-
sional fine tuning. But
the retirement of the
baby boomers, the first of
whom become eligible for
Medicare in 2011, threat-,
ens to push it over the
edge.
Medicare covers 46 mil-
lions seniors and disabled
people now. When the last
of the boomers reaches
age 65 in about 20 years,
Medicare will be cover-
ing more than 80 million
people. At the same time,
the ratio of workers pay-
ing taxes to support the
program will have plunged
from 3.5 for each person
receiving benefits cur-
rently, to 2.3.


US Coast Guard
saves 20 sailors

HONOLULU The
'U.S. Coast Guard said dis-
tress signals received at
its Honolulu center led to
the rescue of 20 sailors on
life rafts near the Marshall
Islands.
The area is about 2,500
miles from Honolulu.
An aircraft spotted the
rafts Friday morning and
several vessels were sent to
the area. A fishing boat res-
cued all 20 sailors around
6 p.m.
The Coast Guard said-
the sailors were on board
a ship hauling construction
materials that sank in bad
weather. Their conditions
were not known.
Coast Guard officials
said the rescue was made
possible thanks to the use
of portable radio beacons
designed for emergencies.

Capitol evacuated
after pilot error

,WASHINGTON A
passenger plane briefly lost
radio contact with air traffic
controllers when the pilot
turned to the wrong fre-
quency as he approached
.Washington, leading to the
scrambling of fighter jets
and the evacuation of the
U.S. Capitol, federal offi-
cials said Saturday.
Federal Aviation
Administration spokesman
,Jim Peters said the agency
is reviewing the "pilot read-
*back error." The loss of
radio contact as the plane
approached the nation's
capital also led officials
to evacuate all House and
Senate office buildings.
Piedmont Airlines flight
4352 from Hilton Head,
,S.C., was on course for
:Ronald Reagan Washington
SNationalAirportwhen it lost
radio contact with air traf-
fic controllers at a regional
radar facility in Virginia
for about 15 minutes, FAA
officials said. The facility
is responsible for handling
'the plane almost until the
landing, when Reagan
:National takes over.


F-16 fighter jets were
scrambled from Andrews
Air Force Base, but the
airliner was able to re-
establish radio contact
and it landed at Reagan
National, said Stacey Knott,
a spokeswoman for the
North American Aerospace
Defense Command. It was
unclear how contact was re-
established. The FAA and
U.S. Secret Service inter-
viewed the pilot when the
plane was on the ground.

Bail set at $13M
for two suspects

DALLAS Police said
two men accused of trying
to rob a suburban Houston
'bank and taking several
people hostage face mul-
tiple charges and are jailed
with bail set at $13 million
each.
Pearland Police Lt.
Onesmio Lopez said
Saturday that 39-year-old
Samuel Bonner and 29-year-
old Raymond Johnson have
each been charged with 13
counts of aggravated rob-
bery one count for each
hostage taken as well as
for the robbery of the Chase
Bank branch in Pearland.
They were being held in the
Brazoria County Jail.

17 hurt as rave
draws thousands

LOS ANGELES -
Authorities say 17 people
were hospitalized after a
New Year's Eve rave at the
Los Angeles Sports Arena
that drew thousands of par-
tyers and a heavy police
presence.
Fire Department spokes-
man Brian Humphrey says
an additional 62 people
were treated on site for a
variety of minor injuries
and illnesses.
Several people were
arrested on suspicion of
drug possession.
The Los Angeles Times
reports more than 26,000
people turned out for the
annual electronic music fes-
tival.

* Associated Press


Deputy, suspect killed



in trailer park standoff


By ANDREW W. HUGGINS
Associated Press

ENON, Ohio A sher-
iff's deputy investigating
a report of gunfire at a
trailer park was shot dead
Saturday, and the shoot-
ing suspect was killed after
a gun battle with police,
authorities said. A police
officer was wounded.
The slain deputy was
married and was the moth-
er of two children, Clark
County Sheriff Gene Kelly
said. He didn't release the
names of the deputy or
the suspect killed in the
standoff in Enon Beach,
about 50 miles west of
Columbus.
The deputy was shot as
she tried to photograph
a footprint in the mobile-
home park, which sits near
a highway, Kelly said.
"Our deputy never had
the opportunity to return
fire or take cover," he said
at a press conference.
Police officers were try-
ing to retrieve the depu-
ty's body when the sus-
pect fired on them from
inside a trailer, and a
German Township officer
was wounded in a large
exchange of gunfire, Kelly


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A Clark County deputy (left) and German Township
Patrolman Jeremy Blum open fire on a trailer Saturday at


Enon Beach near Enon, Ohio.

said. There were "many,
many, many" shots fired
by the suspect and police,
he said.
Enon Beach resident
Angelina Inman said she
looked out of her trailer
to see the deputy lying on
the ground. She watched
as another officer tried to
reach her body.
"He was itching to get
her," Inman said. "He kept
radioing in, can he please
get her, and he was told no
because it wasn't secure.
You could see that male


sheriff crying he want-
ed to get her, he wanted to
get her bad."
It appears that it was
gunfire from Clark County
deputies that killed the
suspect, said Kelly, who
has been sheriff for 24
years. He said he had
hired the slain deputy and
had known her since the
police academy. He called
her "just a good person, an
outstanding deputy," and
said she was the first offi-
cer he's lost.
"This," Kelly said, "is the


worst day of my entire law
enforcement career."
Enon Beach sits near
Interstate 70 and acts as a
seasonal campground with
some summer-only resi-
dents and others who live
there year-round. A por-
tion of the highway was
closed twice for a total of
about an hour because the
trailer park is so close to
the roadway, Ohio State
Highway Patrol Lt. Gary
Lewis said.
A girl who lives in the
trailer park said she knew
the shooting suspect and
he had a temper.
"He was a quiet person,
but if you made him mad
- he wasn't very pleas-
ant," 15-year-old Chelsea
Bagley said.
Her mother's boyfriend,
John Burkhardt, said he
heard the shots fired in the
neighborhood. Police then
arrived, Burkhardt said,
and for several minutes
authorities asked the sus-
pect over a loud speaker to
come out and surrender.
'"They give him 25 chanc-
es to walk out of there,"
Burkhardt said. "They
were begging him to come
out, but he wouldn't come
out."


BRIEFS


NOTICE OFMEETING CANCELLATION

FOR THE JANUARY 3, 2011 CITY COUNCIL MEETING.


THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
WILL NOT MEET ON MONDAY, JANUARY 3, 2011 AT 7:00 P.M.
THE NEXT MEETING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY,
JANUARY 18, 2011 AT 7:00 PM IN THE CITY COUNCIL
CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY
HALL, 205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA.


AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


I
I<


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424











Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011


THE WEATHER


MOSTLY
SUNNY


MOSTLY CHANCE
SUNNY 4USHOWERS


NATIONAL FORECAST: Rain and thunderstorms will affect much of California today as a
storm meanders offshore. Snow will be likely in the Sierra, where it could be locally heavy.
A weak clipper system will produce snow across Montana, and North Dakota, as well.
Meanwhile, rain and thunderstorms will diminish over the East as a front crosses the coast.


ISOLATED
SHOWERS


HI 64 LO


HI 68 LO


HI 68 LO


HI 65 LO


.4, {5b[ij~.r


Tallahassee *
cH '..


SValdosta
65 37
Lake City
7;1 JI


Gainesville.
Panama City 75/5
63/36 Ocala
77/0.5


Tan
76/


*J


acksonville
74 34

Da)tona Beach
73/56

*


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


SI/oJ Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lke Cty
80/58 76/59 Mia iy
Miami
pa Naples
/59 West Palm Beach Ocala
78/61 Orlando
g Ft. Laudetdale Panama City
Ft Myers s, r. Pensacola
791, 5 e Naples Tallahassee
78/58 Miami Tampa
80/63 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
77/64
'24, a^ ^^ ^^ -. -^^ ia~t s O4t -s^iii~g


Monday
r, i *;, p. p,

, r.'f. [,
77/58/pc
66/39/pc
62/41/s
73/63/s
64/37/pc
78/64/pc
77/59/pc
69/43/pc
74/54/pc
59/43/s
57/40/s
62/37/s
71/56/pc
61/39/s
77/61/pc


Tuesday


:- F p,
77/59/pc
69/46/pc
67/47/s
70/62/s
68/43/pc
78/65/pc
76/59/pc
71/49/pc
78/57/pc
63/50/pc
60/47/pc
65/47/pcl
73/58/pc
63/48/pc
78/62/pc


P B D.llngs
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YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today


High: 800, Naples, Fla. Low: -310, Big Piney, Wyo.


Saturday Today


a ,'~, T ri.


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high


SRecord low

PRECIPITA
SSaturday
Month total
Yrt tn* tl


79
49
66
43
84 in 1975
18 in 1918


TION


ormal ottoata
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


0.00"
0.00"
0.00"
0.10"
0.10"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torm.
Moonset torm.


7:27 a.m.
5:42 p.m.
7:27 a.m.
5:43 p.m.


5:55 a.m.
4:16 p.m.
6:48 a.m.
5:15 p.m.


5
MODEOAM.
i "mitest b un




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weather comr


Jan. Jan.
12 19
First Full


SIp la 6a
Monday ,,. ,'
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Forecasts, data and graph
ics 2011 Weather Cent
SLLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.cor








Get Connected





'1 --HfM^^-
igaaag *" ^


i Fidrecasr t erAture eels fhte 'eiZtpenature ''
a i. .am s. .7. ..- r.-. -- a


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchbrage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
h- Daytona Beach
ral Denver


i H
4. 4
m
CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beljing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
,Jronrg. Kong
S .ltgston
is ; i., >a'8 ~r .


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
48/36/0
25/8/0.
35/28/0
62/56/.90
59/29/0
10/-1/0
64/52/2.04
5/-1/0
22/9/0
56/35/0
55/47/.50
73/52/0
63/47/.57
60/39/.02
13/2/0
41/19/0
58/45/.40
58/43/.39
70/48/0
45/30/0
76/52/0
18/2/0



Saturday
Hi Lo Pcp.
';. .l II
i. I I1
51/37/0
70/64/0
30/10/0
37/34/0
86/70/0
64/55/0
37/34/0
79/64/0
28/16/.06
64/55/0
81/72/0


HI/Lo/W
40/22/c
38/13/pc
34/27/rs
53/30/pc
49/27/pc
26/11/sn
48/26/s
18/8/c
29/17/pc
48/25/sh
28/19/sn
70/41/t
38/23/sf
58/28/c
31/14/sn
24/18/pc
31/20/s
28/20/sf
64/34/sh
50/33/s
73/56/t
38/10/s



Today
HI Lo W
II ...
60/50/r
74/66/s
33/17/c
32/21/pc
87/70/s
69/53/s
35/21/pc
82/60/pc
13/-2/pc
65/56/pc
81/71/s


CITY
Des Molnes
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
18/8/0
53/42/.46
37/25/0
15/-5/0
55/37/0
54/32/0
80/70/0
64/53/0
55/31/.75
71/50/.22
75/46/0
27/11/0
37/27/0
50/39/0
59/44/0
55/39/.31
78/66/0
9/1/0
70/62/.33
73/57/.18
52/40/0
36/15/0


Hi/Lo/W
26/17/pc
28/19/pc
48/25/s
21/-3/pc
54/26/c
46/21/c
81/69/s
60/40/s
,29/20/s
53/27/s
74/44/t
39/22/s
43/30/c
46/25/s
58/46/sh
45/26/s
80/63/pc
10/5/pc
58/30/pc
56/37/s
45/29/pc
44/24/s


.. . 4.
Saturday Today
CITY Hi Lo Pcp. Hi Lo W
La Paz 'i! .1I'. 1 Il r
Um a J : r "
London 45/41/.01 37/26/s
Madrid 55/37/0 53/33/s
Mexico City 72/45/0 72/41/pc
Montreal 45/36/.11 36/16/c
Moscow 21/16/.07 30/12/sn
Nairobi 79/57/0 80/58/s
Nassau 79/68/0 75/62/pc
New Delhi 46/46/0 63/44/s
Oslo 36/30/0 30/12/pc
Panama 97/73/0 85/73/t
Paris 36/30/0 37/26/pc


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid,City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
19/6/0
77/53/0
52/30/0,
47/30/0
56/49/.76
50/31/0
35/29/.01
63/39/0
14/-1/0
29/21/.07
61/37/0
46/41/.22
40/24/0
18/5/0
62/47/0
59/47/0
52/47/.08
39/26/0
14/-3/0
78/61/0
44/21/0
58/34/0


Hi/Lo/W
23/13/pc
80/58/pc
46/28/c
56/38/s
34/21/sf
45/31/sh
36/26/s
56/28/sh
29/10/pc
35/20/sn
54/27/sh
49/38/sh
37/23/s
28/13/c
61/35/s
60/48/sh
53/44/t
39/32/s
19/2/pc
76/59/pc
56/31/s
50/29/pc


Saturday Today ,
CITY Hi Lo Pcp. Hi Lo W
Rio ', I ., 0 4 J .
Rome' '4 4 .:
St. Thomas VI 79/69/.03 78/70/sh
San Juan PR 81/73/.01 79/72/sh
Santiago 84/55/0 80/54/sh
Seoul 23/5/0 30/14/s
Singapore 88/77/0 86/75/t
Sydney 91/70/0 80/66/pc
Tel Aviv 63/57/.01 68/50/s
Tokyo 50/36/0 51/36/s
Toronto 54/43/.29 23/19/pc
Vienna 37/23/0 32/22/pc
Warsaw 36/30/0 28/19/sf


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr=drizzle, f-fair, fg=fog, h=hazy, i=ice, pc=partly cloudy, r=rain, s=sunny,
sh=showers, sn=snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


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Pensacola
61/33


Saturday Today


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Sunday. january 2. 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

ALL-STAR FOOTBALL
Senior all-star
game Jan. 15
The fourth annual
Columbia Youth Football
Association/Dicks
Sporting Goods High
School All-Star Football
Game is 4 p.m. Jan. 15
at Memorial Stadium
in Lake City. The game
will feature graduating
seniors from Columbia,
Fort White, Baker
County, Bell, Bradford,
Branford, Chiefland,
Dixie County, Hamilton
County, Lafayette,
Madison County,
Taylor County, Trenton,
Suwannee and Union
County high schools.
For details, call
chairman William
Murphy at 288-4779.

CHS SOCCER
Fundraiser set
for Saturday
Columbia High's
junior varsity soccer
teams have a breakfast
fundraiser planned for
7:30-10:30 a.m. Saturday
at Kazbor's Grille in Lake
City. Tickets are $6 at the
door or in advance.
For details, call
365-1877.

CHS SOFTBALL
Tryouts planned
for Jan. 10
Columbia High
softball tryouts are
3:30 p.m. Jan. 10 at the
CHS field. Players will
need a current physical,
and drug testing and
parent consent forms.
For details, call Jimmy
Williams at 303-1192.

From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Columbia High
basketball vs. Hamilton
County High, girls-
4:30 p.m. (JV-3); boys-
7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Tuesday
Fort White High
girls soccer vs. Oak Hall
,School, 6 p.m.
Columbia High boys
soccer at Gainesville
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High boys
soccer at Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High girls
soccer at Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Ed White
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Thursday
Fort White High girls
soccer vs. Lafayette High,
7 p.m.. (JV-5)
Fort White High boys
soccer at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Middleburg
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Friday
Columbia High
wrestling at Clay Rotary
Tournament, TBA
Fort White High girls
basketball at Trenton
High, 6 p.m. (JV-4:30)
Columbia High girls
soccer at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High
girls soccer at Madison
County High, 7 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Columbia
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High girls
basketball at Fleming
Island High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Trenton


High, 7:30 p.m.


A lot, but too


late for Tide


Alabama routs
Michigan State in
Capital One Bowl.
By ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press
ORLANDO The team
picked to repeat as national
champions gave a glimpse
of everything it could've
been and more.
Too bad for Alabama it
came too late.


Mark Ingram ran for two
scores to break the school
record for career touch-
downs, and 15th-ranked
Crimson Tide rolled past
No. 7 Michigan State 49-7
on Saturday in the most
lopsided Capital One Bowl
in the game's history.
"We just showed what
we're capable of doing when
we play our best football,"
Ingram said. "It just shows
TIDE continued on 2B


Sweet


With win over
Penn State, Meyer
now'at full peace.'
By FRED GOODALL
Associated Press
TAMPA Florida coach
Urban Meyer closed out a
highly successful six-year
run that included a pair of
national championships by
leading the Gators back
from a second-half deficit to
beat Joe Paterno's Nittany
Lions 37-24 in the Outback
Bowl on Saturday.
"I'm at full peace because I
saw a bunch of smiles in that
locker room," said Meyer,
who announced his resig-
nation last month. "Locker
rooms really aren't very
much fun when there's ...
a pain in your stomach and
your chest and everything
else. There was a lot of fun
in there. A lot of fun."
Omarius Hines and Mike
Gillislee ran for touchdowns,
Chas Henry kicked three
second-half field goals, and
Ahmad Black sealed the win
with an 80-yard interception
return TD to help Florida
(8-5) send Meyer out with a
smile of his own..
Meyer said he was step-
ping away from coaching
because of health con-
cerns and to spend more
time with his family. As for
Paterno, he and his wife
and Penn State officials
- spent the week leading
up to the game repeatedly
shooting down rumors that
the Outback Bowl could be
his last.
"He said, 'I love you kid,'"
Meyer said about his quick
postgame meeting on the
field with Paterno. "He's the
only one who calls me kid.
And I love him too."
All week long, Meyer
paid tribute to Paterno, the
all-time bowl wins leader
with 24.
FLORIDA continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mississippi State quarterback Chris Relf (36) looks for
running room during the Gator Bowl game against Michigan
in Jacksonville on Saturday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alabama running back Mark Ingram (left) scores a one-yard touchdown over Michigan State's
Marcus Hyde during the Capital One Bowl in Orlando on Saturday.


send-off


p.4


A
- -


ASSOCIATED PRESS


TOP: Florida wide receiver
Omarius Hines (82) leaps
over Penn State safety
Malcolm Willis (10) while
scoring a touchdown in the
Outback Bowl in Tampa on
Saturday.

LEFT: Florida head coach
Urban Meyer hugs wife
Shelley after Florida defeated
Penn State in the Outback
Bowl.


ASSOCIATED PRESS


TCU.


proves


mettle

Homed Frogs
make non-BCS
noise, 21-19.
By GREG BEACHAM
Associated Press
PASADENA, Calif.
- Andy Dalton threw a
touchdown pass and ran
for a score, linebacker
Tank Carder swatted
down a 2-point conver-
sion pass attempt with 2
minutes to play, and No. 3
TCU completed a perfect
season with its first Rose
Bowl victory, 21-19 over
fourth-ranked Wisconsin
on Saturday.
BartJohnson caught an
early TD pass and recov-
ered a late onside kick
for the Mountain West
champion Horned Frogs
(13-0), who followed up
their second straight
unbeaten regular season
by busting the BCS in
dramatic fashion. "
Dalton passed for 219
yards for TCU, which
won't win the national
title that will go to
either Auburn or Oregon.
They meet in the BCS
championship game in
nine days.
These ferocious Frogs
still proved they can play
with anybody on college
football's biggest stages.
"I've been saying for a
while that parity in col-
lege football is here," TCU
coach Gary Patterson
said. "I got texts from
everybody across the
nation, from Boise State
and schools all over. ...
Today we played for us,
and for all the schools
that wanted a chance."
Montee Ball rushed
for 132 yards and a late
score for the Big Ten
co-champion Badgers
ROSE continued on 3B


New 'Dogs let out


Mississippi State
extends promise
with bowl victory.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE -
Mississippi State displayed
a program and a coach on
the rise with an overwhelm-
ing performance in the
Gator Bowl.
For Michigan, it could
have been the final blow for
its beleaguered coach.
Chris Relf accounted
for four touchdowns, Vick
Ballard ran for three scores


and coach Dan Mullen's
21st-ranked Bulldogs rout-
ed Rich Rodriguez and
the Wolverines, 52-14, on
Saturday.
The 38-point drub-
bing was the worst bowl
loss in Michigan's storied
history and might have
sealed Rodriguez's future.
His three-year tenure has
been tainted by consecu-
tive losing seasons, NCAA
sanctions and late-season
slides.
Rodriguez said all the
speculation about his job
was "the elephant in the
room" during meetings and
practices, but insisted his


team never "cheated the
University of Michigan a
day of work."
The Wolverines (7-6)
were out of this one early,
done in again by a defense
that made a middle-of-
the-pack Southeastern
Conference offense look
like a juggernaut.
Relf and Ballard posed
problems all day. Relf com-
pleted 18 of 23 passes for
281 yards and three touch-
downs, and added 30 yards
and a score on the ground.
Ballard ran for 76 yards.
The Bulldogs (9-4) finished
GATOR continued on 2B


II I
- I-


* .


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
I p.m.
FSN Gonzaga at Wake Forest
5:30 p.m.
FSN LSU atVirginia
7:30 p.m.
FSN Miami at Duke
10 p.m.
FSN -Arizona at Oregon St.
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
CBS Doubleheader game
FOX Ddoubleheader game
8:15 p.m.
NBC St. Louis at Seattle
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m.
FSN Stanford at California

Monday
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:37 p.m.
ESPN.- Orange Bowl. Stanford vs.
Virginia Tech, at Miami
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL .
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Georgetown at St.John's
NHL HOCKEY
9 p.m.
VERSUS Chicago at Los Angeles

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


y-New England-
x-N.Y. Jets
Miami
Buffalo

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston


x-Pittsburgh
x-Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati


East
W L
13 2
10 5
'78
4 11
South
W L
9 6
8 7
6 9
5 10
North
W L
11 .4
11 4
5 10
4 11
West


T Pct PF PA
0.867480 306
0.667 329 297
0.467 266 295
0.267 276 387

TPct PF PA
0.600412 368
0.533 336 385
0.400 336 316
0.333 356 410

TPct PF PA
0.733 334 223
0.733 344 263
0.333 262 291
0.267315 382


W L TPct PF PA
y-Kansas City 10 5 0.667356 295
San Diego 8 7 0.533 408 294
Oakland 7 8 0.467379 361
Denver 4 11 0.267316438
NATIONAL CONFERENCE


y-Philadelphia
N.Y. Giants
Washington
Dallas

x-Atlanta
x-New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina


y-Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit

St. Louis
Seattle
San Francisco


East
W L
10 5
9 6
6 9
5 10
South
W L
12 3
II 4
9 6
2 13
North
W L
II 4
9 6
6 9
5 10
West
W L
7 8
6 9
5 10


TPct PF PA
0.667426 363
0.600 377 333
0.400 288 360
0.333 380 423

TPct PF PA
0.800 383 278
0.733 371 284
0.600318 305
0.133 186 377

T Pct PF PA
0.733331 276
0.600 378 237
0.400 268 328
0.333 342 356

TPct PF PA
0.467283 312
0.400 294 401
0.333 267 339


Arizona 5 10 0.333282 396
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Today's Games
Oakland at Kansas City, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at New Orleans, I p.m.
Miami at New England, I p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, I p.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, I p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, I p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
San Diego at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Chicago at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants atWashington, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Tennessee at Indianapolis, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at Seattle, 8:20 p.m.

NFL playoff scenarios

AFC
PITTSBURGH
Clinches AFC North and a first-
round bye with:
I) Win OR
2) Tie and Baltimore loss or tie OR
3) Baltimore loss
BALTIMORE
Clinches AFC North and a first-
round bye with:
Il)Win and Pittsburgh loss or tie OR
2) Tie and Pittsburgh loss
INDIANAPOLIS
Clinches AFC South with:
I) Win or tie OR
2) Jacksonvile loss or tie
JACKSONVILLE
Clinches AFC South with:
I)Win and Indianapolis loss

NFC
ATLANTA
Clinches NFC South and a first-
round bye with:
I)Win or tie OR
2) New Orleans loss or tie
Clinches homefield advantage with:
I)Win or tie OR
2) New Orleans loss or tie and
Chicago loss or tie
CHICAGO
Clinched the NFC North and a
first-round bye and clinches homefield
advantage with:
I) Win and Atlanta loss and New
Orleans loss or tie
NEW ORLEANS
Clinches the NFC South and
homefield advantage with:
I) Win and Atlanta loss
GREEN BAY
Clinches a playoff spot with:
I)Win OR
2) Tie and N.Y. Giants loss or tie and
Tampa Bay loss or tie OR
3)..N.Y. Giants loss and Tampa Bay
loss
NEWYORK GIANTS
Clinch a playoff spot with:
I)Win and Green Bay loss or tie OR
3) Tie and Green Bay loss and Tampa
Bay loss or tie
TAMPA BAY
Clinches a playoff spot with:
3) Win and N.Y. Giants loss or tie and
Green Bay loss or tie OR
4) Tie and N.Y. Giants loss and Green
Bay loss
ST. LOUIS
Clinches NFC West with:
I)Win or tie
SEATTLE
Clinches NFC West with:
l)Win

College bowl games

Friday
Meineke Bowl
South Florida 31, Clemson 26
Sun Bowl
Notre Dame 33, Miami 17


Liberty Bowl
UCF 10, Georgia 6
Chick-fil-A Bowl
Florida St. 26, South Carolina 17
Saturday
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Texas Tech 45, Northwestern 38
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Alabama 49, Michigan State 7
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Florida 37, Penn State 24
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Mississippi State 52, Michigan 14
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
TCU 21,Wisconsin 19
Fiesta Bowl
At GlendaleAriz.
Connecticut vs. Oklahoma (n)
Monday
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Stanford (11-1) vs.Virginia Tech (I 1,2),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Tuesday
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Ohio State ( I1-) vs.Arkansas (10-2),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
: Thursday
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle
Tennessee (6-6), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2),
8 p.m. (FOX)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Indiana at NewYork, I p.m.
Atlanta at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Dallas at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Houston at Portland, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 9 p.m.
Detroit at Utah, 9 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule
S Today's Games
No. I Duke vs. Miami, 7:45 p.m.
No. 3 Kansas vs. Miaii (Ohio), 6 p.m.
No. 8Villanova vs. Rutgers, I p.m.
No. 21 Memphis vs.Tenn. State, 3 p.m.
No. 23 Illinois vs.Wisconsin, 6 p.m.
No. 24 Vanderbilt vs. Davidson, 5 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Today's Games
Atlanta at Montreal, I p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Florida, 5 p.m.
Philadelphia at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Dallas at St. Louis, 6 p.m.
Columbus at Nashville, 6 p.m.
Phoenix at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Vancouver at Colorado, 8 p.m.
Chicago atAnaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Boston atToronto, 7 p.m.
Florida at Carolina, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


FLORIDA: Meyer 5-1 in bowl games


Continued From Page 1B

Paterno expects to be
back for a 46th season
with Penn State (7-6). At
one point, he called the
speculation about his future
- including reports that
he might be in poor health
and had been hospitalized
- "ridiculous."' He reiter-
ated Friday that he has no
plans to retire.
Paterno hoped the
Nittany Lions' record 37th
bowl trip under him would
set a nice tone for next sea-
son. The six losses are the
most Penn State's had since
going 4-7 in 2004, and the
legendary coach is confi-



GATOR

Continued From Page 1B

with 485 yards, had five
fourth-down conversions
and capped a surprising sea-
son with a dominant win.
"We went from average
to good and now we want
the ability to go from good
to great," said Mullen, the
second-year coach who
went 5-7 in his first year in
Starkville, Miss. "Hopefully
that (win) catapults us
into the step from good to
great:"
Denard Robinson, the Big
Ten's offensive player of the
year, played every snap for
Michigan and was dynamic
as usual. He threw for 256
yards and two touchdowns,
and ran for 58 yards. But he
got little help.


dent the team is headed in
the right direction.
Meyer initially resigned
in December 2009 only to
change his mind the follow-
ing day, returning for what
turned out to be a disap-
pointing year.
He sent shockwaves
through college football
again on Dec. 8 when
stepped down again. There
have been indications that
he could be headed for a
broadcasting job.
The Gators already
have hired former Texas
head coach-in-waiting Will
Muschamp as Meyer's



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

SWENIT


TRUXAS




SNAFET



Ans: HIS

I Jumbles: LITHE


replacement.
He'll inherit a talented
team that on Saturday con-
tinued to make the type of
mistakes that contributed
to their worst record in six
seasons under Meyer.
Meyer improved to 5-1 in
bowl games with Florida,
and he avoided finishing
with a two-game slide.
'Will Muschamp's get-
ting a football team that's
going to have some bright
eyes and ready to get to
work and go get a little
better next year, get back
to where we need to be,"
Meyer said.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


US

S4
THE HUNTER
HIREP THE
TAXIPE-MIST
BECAUSE HE ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)
SNARL OPAQUE TROPHY


Oaturuays I Answer: What the co-owners of the fishing boat
shared A "PARTNER-SHIP"


Back to business for



Columbia, Fort White


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com

The rest period is over
for athletes at Columbia
High and Fort White High.
Some teams took the
Christmas break off from
competition and some
played in holiday tourna-
ments.
The countdown to dis-
trict tournaments for winter
sports begins this week.
Columbia's basketball
teams start the sports
return with a quadruple-
header at home against
Hamilton County High on
Monday.
The Lady Tigers play
at 4:30 p.m., preceded by
the junior varsity game
at 3 p.m. The boys play
at the regular times of
7:30 p.m. varsity and 6 p.m.
JV, in a game moved from
Thursday.
Columbia's boys com-
peted in tournaments at
Madison County High and
Santa Fe High during the
break. The Tigers (4-7, 1-1


District 4-5A) lost at Bishop
Kenny High in the final
school game on Dec. 11.
In the Madison tourna-
ment, Columbia lost to
Seminole High and the
host school, then bounced
back to beat Jefferson
County High. At Santa Fe,
the Tigers beat St. Johns
Lutheran School before
falling to Lake Weir High.
Columbia begins a string
of six district games when
Ed White High visits on
Tuesday.
Columbia's boys soccer
team won the three games
in its Christmas tournament
to improve to 11-4-1. The
Tigers are 2-2-1 in district
play and travel to Citizen's
Field to take on Gainesville
High in a district match at
7 p.m. Tuesday.
The LadyTigers splitfour
games in the (Buchholz)
Bobcat Invitational last
week. Columbia (8-10-2)
beat John Paul II Catholic
andNewberryhighschools,
and lost to Eastside High
and the host school.


Columbia also plays on
the road at Gainesville High
at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Columbia's wrestling
team will compete in the
Clay Rotary Tournament
on Friday and Saturday.
Fort White's girls soccer
team wrapped up District
5-3A play with a 2-1 loss
at Newberry High on
Dec. 17. The Lady'Indians
(3-7-3, 2-5-1) host Oak Hall
School at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Fort White's boys (3-9-0,
2-3-0) play Lafayette High
at 7 p.m. Tuesday in Mayo.
The Indians play at Santa
Fe on Thursday and host
Columbia on Friday.
The Lady Indians basket-
ball team lost to St. Francis
Catholic High, 50-37, at
home on Tuesday. Fort
White plays at Trenton
High at 6 p.m. Friday.
Fort White boys (1-7,
0-4) play the 7:30 p.m. game
Tuesday in Trenton.
Fort White's girls weight-
lifting team hosts defending
state champion Columbia
at 4 p.m. Thursday.


TIDE: Scored on first 5 possessions


Continued From Page 11

how fragile a season is."
The pieces came togeth-
er better than they had all
season in this one.
The 2009 Heisman
Trophy winner had 59
yards rushing on 12 car-
ries 'and a 30-yard recep-
tion. Ingram also moved
past Shaun Alexander's
mark (41) with 42 career
touchdowns.
Greg McElroy threw for
220 yards and one touch-
down and the game got
so out of hand that the
Crimson Tide (10-3) pulled
most of their starters early
in the third quarter.
The margin of victory
topped East Texas State's
33-0 victory over Tennessee
Tech in the 1953 game, then
known as the Tangerine
Bowl.
"We were out-coached,
we were out-played and
we were out-physicaled
and that's just the way it


1

5,
8
12

13C
141
15
16
18'
20
21
22


is," said Michigan State
coach Mark Dantonio, who
worked under Alabama
coach Nick Saban when he
was at the helm for the
Spartans. "Sometimes, you
get an avalanche come on
you and that's just what
happened."
The Crimson Tide found
the end zone on their first
five possessions, held the
Spartans (11-2) to 171 total
yards and sacked Kirk
Cousins four times in their
most dominant perfor-
mance all season.
Cousins had 120 yards
passing, one interception
and was under pressure all
game. Edwin Baker was
held to 14 yards rushing
for a Spartans team that felt
snubbed by the BCS after
sharing the Big Ten title.
Instead, they were bullied
and bruised by a team that
knows the big stage well.
Asked what hit gave him


ACROSS 39 Electrical unit,
once
Mutual-fund 40 Montgomery of
charge jazz
Alt. 41 Incline
Plant parasite 44 Cute
Bancroft 47 Dampness
of films 49 Feudal estate
Call in sick 51 Microbiology
Time to beware gel
Israel's Golda 52 -ammoniac
Front teeth 53 Arm bone
Trousers 54 "The Jackal"
Kukla's friend star
Chit 55 Not forward
Ms. Haqeri of 56 For fear that


films
23 Napkin
26 Approved
29 Galley slaves'
need
30 Zoo denizens
31 Autumn mo,
33 SFO info
34 Sums for CPAs
35 Trace
mineral
36 Pigeons
38 Fragrant wood


DOWN

1 Go on the -
2 Wallet stuffers
3 Indigo shrub
4 Jumps the
tracks
5 17-syllable
poem
6 Cotton seeders
7 What RNs dis-
pense


a headache and sent him to
the sidelines for good in the
fourth, Cousins replied: "It
was an accumulation of hits
I took during the game."
A season that began
with the No. 1 ranking and
dreams of second straight
title for Alabama never
lived up to those standard.
Losses to rivals Auburn,
LSUand South Carolinapre-
vented the Tide from even
making the Southeastern
Conference title game.
The team everybody
expected to see showed up
in the finale.
Alabama pushed and
pounded the Spartans at
the line of scrimmage in
what was utter domination
in every phase. Perhaps
nobody was more physical
than Ingram, who rooted
for Michigan State where
his father, Mark, was a star
receiver while growing
up in Flint, Mich.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

PANIG HOR S ERG
DOL AORC0 A IMA



E "A CI IHI
ARMADA AORTA






NAM ACE AGED
TIN TRAP LORD
IDEA ISIS PET


GEE AUDI
ALBUM SPLINT
FALSETTO L-OCI
RIO RAHS EDAM
OR B YOYO DENS


8 Lose
9 Matinee -
10 Garr or Hatcher
11 To be, to Brutus
17 Smidgens
19 Flirtatious


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


22 Luau guitars,
briefly
23 Mother
rabbit
24 Feedbag con-
tents
25 Mideast nation
26 Chooses
27 Novelist
Bagnold
28 Lisbon lady
30 Pulpit
32 Rec-room gear
34 Oohed and -
35 Lively
37 Officiate
38 High note
40 With dry
humor
41 Chase flies
42 Winter
Olympics
event
43 Khayyam
44 Egyptian god
45 Piece of
linoleum
46 Longings
48 NASA destina-
tion
50 Corpulent


2011 by UFS, Inc.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ohio State coach Jim Tressel (right) shakes hands with patient Walter Cox at West Jefferson
Medical Center in Marrero, La., as part of events on Friday for the upcoming Sugar Bowl.


Buckeyes' bowl losses


to SEC wearing thin


By BRETT MARTEL
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Even
after Ohio State corner-
back Chimdi Chekwa was
told about the Buckeyes'
bowl futility against teams
from the Southeastern
Conference, he had a hard
time believing it.
"I think Ohio State has
beaten the SEC in bowl
games, if I'm not mistak-
en," Chekwa said Friday,
an incredulous look on
his face. "It can't be in
all bowls. ... I'll go on the
computer and look that up,
but there's been a lot of
bowl games and I feel like
they won a couple of bowl
games against SEC teams,
or maybe they beat an SEC
team in a regular game."
Well, the last part's
true. The Buckeyes have
beaten SEC teams during
the regular season, most
recently LSU in 1988. In
bowl games, however, Ohio
State is 0-9 against teams
from the conference that
has produced the past four
national champions.
The streak includes loss-
es to Florida and LSU in
the BCS title games for the
2006 and 2007 seasons, and
the longer it goes, the more
the Buckeyes have to hear
about it when they wind up
meeting another SEC team
in the postseason. This time


it's Arkansas in the Sugar
Bowl on Tuesday night.
"I know personally I have
lost three in a row against
the SEC," Ohio State coach
Jim Tressel said. "I'm not
tired of hearing about it.
It's a reminder to me of just
how good the SEC is in foot-
ball. We are playing another
great one in Arkansas."
For their part, Arkansas
players and coaches are try-
ing not to make too much
of the streak. None of them
want to get caught talking
about any kind of talent gap
between the SEC and the
Big Ten. That might be the
motivation the Buckeyes
need to avoid having to
hear about being 0-10 the
next time they meet an SEC
team in a bowl game.
"It's nothing I take seri-
ously because every team's
different every year,"
Arkansas quarterback Ryan
Mallett said. "I don't know
what happened. I don't
know how to explain it."
Mallet only knows he
doesn't want this Arkansas
team, the first from the
school to go to a BCS bowl,
to also be the first from the
conference to lose to Ohio
State in the postseason.
"Definitely I don't
want to help them end
that streak," said Mallett,
a Michigan transfer who
also acknowledged a bit of
residual animosity toward


the Wolverines' archrivals.
The first time Ohicq
State met an SEC team in
the postseason was when
Woody Hayes' Buckeyes
met Paul "Bear" Bryant's
Alabama Crimson Tide in
the 1977 Sugar Bowl. Bama
bashed the Buckeyes 35-6.
Next in the streak came
losses to Auburn in the
1989 Hall of Fame Bowl,
and three Florida Citrus
Bowl losses to Georgia in
1992, Alabama in 1994, and
Tennessee in 1995. Then
there were back-to-back
Outback Bowl defeats to
South Carolina in 2000 and
2001, followed by the two
BCS title game losses.
As the losses mounted,
college football analysts
began espousing the theory
that team speed in the SEC,
particularly on defense, is
superior to that in the Big
Ten.
Ohio State players say
they don't see the streak as
any kind of weight on their
backs. If anything, they'd
like to meet SEC teams in
bowls every year until they
start beating them.
"It's kind of a motivational
thing," Buckeyes linebacker
Ross Homan said. "We kind
of look at it as: This is the
present, the here and now.
That was in the past. We
can only control what we
do in this game on Tuesday
night."


Orange Bowl a matchup


of turnaround teams


By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press

.MIAMI Stanford's football program
was in a slump in 2006 when Thomas
Keiser, a widely recruited prep defensive
lineman from Pennsylvania, accepted a
scholarship offer to play for the Cardinal.
"I committed very early I believe it
was June before my senior year," Keiser
says. "My dad actually made me commit,
and I was kind of mad at him."
Keiser had reason to second-guess his
father when Stanford subsequently stag-
gered through a 1-11 season in 2006.
Then came the rebound. The Cardinal
hired Jim Harbaugh as coach, and four
years later they're 11-1, ranked No. 5 and
preparing to play No. 12 Virginia Tech
(11-2) in the Orange Bowl on Monday.
Harbaugh says he envisioned such
success.
"Not only did I envision it, I promised it
to my team," he says. "I remember telling
the guys that the first time I ever had them
together. They're the ones who delivered
on it and made me look good."
The Hokies are in Miami thanks to
a turnaround of their own. Ranked No.
10 and touted as national championship
contenders at the start, of the season, they
opened with a loss at Boise State and a
shocking defeat at home against lower-tier
James Madison, all in a span of five days.
"The way we started off the season was
awful," quarterback Tyrod Taylor says.
"Sorry to say it like that. It just didn't go
as planned."
Taylor and his teammates regrouped
and swept the next 11 games, including all
eight in the Atlantic Coast Conference to
win the title for the fourth time since join-
ing the league in 2004.


Potts' four touchdown


passes paces Texas Tech


By JAIME ARON
Associated Press

DALLAS Taylor Potts
threw four touchdown
passes and scored another
on a trick play, and Eric
Stephens ran 86 yards for
a TD to carry Texas Tech
to a 45-38 victory over
Northwestern in the inau-
gural TicketCity Bowl.
The Red Raiders (8-5)
led by 22 points early in
the second half, then had
to sweat it out.
The Wildcats (7-6) got
within a touchdown twice
in the fourth quarter, with
freshmen quarterbacks
Evan Watkins and Kain
Colter combining to lead
three straight touchdown
drives and Jordan Maybin
returning an interception
39 yards for a score with
5:37 left.
The game wasn't decid-
ed until the final play, a
heave by Watkins that was
intercepted.
Northwestern remains
winless in a bowl since
1949. The Wildcats have
lost eight in a row.
The game was played
at the Cotton Bowl, site of
more bowl games than any
stadium but the Rose Bowl
in Pasadena, Calif.
It turned out to be quite a
contest 927yards of total
offense and an inspired
comeback by the Wildcats.
There were all sorts of
oddities and game-chang-
ing plays, from a flubbed
hold on an extra-point kick
to Tech coach Tommy
Tuberville trying an onside
kick while leading 38-17
late in the third quarter.


'I
j-i.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Texas Tech receiver Tramain Swindall (11) celebrates after
scoring a touchdown against Northwestern in the TicketCity
Bowl in Dallas on Saturday.


Soon, Northwestern was
within 38-31.
Potts held them off,
though, going 43 of 56 for
369 yards.
Stephens ran 14 times
for 128 yards.
His big play was the sec-


ond-longest in a bowl game
at this stadium, topped
only by tae 95-yarder in the
1954 Cotton Bowl that was
awarded vvaen Alabama's
Tommy Lewis came off
the bench to tackle Rice's
Dickie Maegle.


ROSE: QB Dalton offensive MVP


Continued From Page 11
(11-2), whose loss capped a
nightmare New Year's Day
for their conference. The
Big Ten went 0-5 in bowl
games Saturday.
The Badgers fell just
short of a late rally when
Carder made a defensive
play that will live forever in
TCU lore.
TCU lost last year's
Fiesta Bowl to Boise State,
but that's still the only loss
of the past two seasons
for Patterson's remarkable
Fort Worth power. TCU
is the first school from a


non-automatic qualify-
ing conference to play in
the Rose Bowl since the
advent of the BCS, but the
Frogs were right at home
in Pasadena.
Luke Shivers' 1-yard TD
run put TCU ahead 21-13
early in the third quarter,
but neither team scored
again until Wisconsin
mounted a 77-yard -drive
in the waning minutes.
Montee Ball rushed for a
4-yard score with 2 min-
utes to play; but Carder
made a perfectly timed


leap at the line to bat down
Scott Tolzien's throw to the
end zone. The intended
receiver was open in the
end zone.
Johnson easily grabbed
Wisconsin's onside kick
and TCU rushed for a fina:
first down to kill the clock
Dalton went 15 for 23 and
rushed for a first-quarter
score, winning the game's
offensive MVP award. But
the defense deserved the
credit for hariging'on when
TCU couldn't score in the
game's final 26 minutes.


m
Ur
YOUR F4JLEXP[AN
[*EMMBR


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck throws
during practice for the Orange Bowl at Barry
University in Miami Shores on Wednesday.

Tech's poor start was a shocker, and not
just because of the loss to a lower-division
team. The Hokies hadn't been 0-2 since
1995, and their streak of six consecu-
tive seasons with at least 10 wins was in
jeopardy.
Handling the situation required creativi-
ty, offensive coordinator Bryan Stinespring
says.
"There's not a manual that says, 'Step
one, in case of crisis ... "' he says. "It's not
like you get on the plane and all of a sud-
den an oxygen mask comes down and you
have a step-by-step process."
A meeting of the seniors the day after
the James Madison loss prevented panic.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


i











Classified Department: 755-5440


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NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
The School District of Columbia
County, Florida announces they will
hold a workshop, to which all per-
sons are invited to attend as follows:
DATE: Thursday, January 13, 2011
TIME: 4:00 p.m.
PLACE: Columbia County School
District
Administrative Complex Room
227 (Second Floor)
372 West Duval Street
Lake City, FL 32055
PURPOSE: Workshop to discuss in-
surance issues.
No action will be taken at this meet-
ing. '
Pursuant to the provisions of the
American with Disabilities Act, any
person requiring special accommo-
dations to participate in.the above
workshop is asked to advise the
School Board at least 48 hours be-
fore the workshop by contacting
Mrs. Lynda Croft at (386) 755-8003.
School Board of Columbia County,
Florida
By: Michael F. Millikin
Superintendent of Schools
04542678
January 2, 2011
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF FLORIDA GATE-
WAY COLLEGE WILL RECEIVE
BIDS FOR THE FOLLOWING:
EG.C. BID NO. 11-1-02
L&MC AUDIO VISUAL PROJECT
HARVARD JOLLY, INC. PROJ-
ECT NO. 08085.00
PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
Florida Gateway College has award-
ed a bid to Marcobay Construction,
Inc. to construct a new 38,000 square
foot Library and Media Center on the
main campus of the College. That
construction of that facility is ap-
proximately 50% complete.
The Florida Gateway College Audio
Visual Department currently pro-
vides live and pre-programmed ana-
log content to the local Comcast Ca-
ble system for play-out to the com-
munity. The feed to the cable head-
end is accomplished via fiber. In ad-
dition, Florida Gateway College
streams audio to the local radio sta-
tions as well as programming to
WCJB Channel 20 in Gainesville,
FL. Operationally, the workflow and
play-out process is mostly automated
with manual override capability. Ex-
isting production and broadcast sys-
tems consist predominantly of analog
video and audio technology.
Florida Gateway College will contin-
ue to support Comcast Cable from
the new facility. The infrastructure
will be digital. As a result, Comcast
will need to upgrade the current Flor-
ida Gateway College fiber transmis-
sion system to accept a 270 MB/sec
Standard Definition (SD) digital sig-
nal.
The new broadcast system will sup-
port either a High Definition (HD) or
Standard Definition (SD) broadcast
stream. Initially, Florida Gateway
College will operate as an SD plant
with discreet audio processing. The
final system design will have a sim-
ple upgrade path to support HD in
the future.
A file-based production and playout
system workflow will be adopted in
the new facility. Content streaming
to the internet and throughout the
Florida Gateway College campus
will be included as part of the new
system design. Broadcast depart-
ment wants to increase its support of
the college by expanding classroom
learning and special event production
projects. The new workflow will
support this goal.
There are three primary areas identi-
fied to support broadcast operations.
They include a production control
area, a studio, and the Master Con-
trol/Network Operations Center
(MCR/NOC). In addition, a digital
signage system will be designed and
installed in the new facility. This
system will be used to communicate
with faculty and students throughout
the building.
ELIGIBLE BIDDERS:
In .order to be eligible to be awarded
this project a Bidder must have dem-
onstrated expertise and experience
that is relevant to this project. Such
expertise and experience will be evi-
denced by the successful completion
of five (5) projects within the past
five (5) years similar in scope;
knowledge and experience in the
Broadcast and Audio Visual indus-
try; an understanding of latest tech-
nologies, products and services is es-
sential and required. Bidder must
possess a valid Low Voltage Li-
cense, an InfoComm sanctioned
Emerald Level or higher (CAVSP)
certification rating. Additionally, a
minimum of 50% of Bidder's em-
ployees shall be InfoComm Interna-
tional CTS certified or above. Bidder
must be licensed to do business in
the State of Florida.
TIME AND DATE FOR RECEIV-
ING BIDS:
2:00 P.M. E.S.T. TUESDAY JANU-


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


Legal

ARY 18, 2011
PLACE FOR RECEIVING BIDS:
Bids may be mailed as follows:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Hand delivered bids are to be pre-
sented to:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
198 S.E. StaffWay
Administration Building 001, Room
138
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
All bids must arrive and be date/time
stamped by a Purchasing Department
representative prior to the specified
bid opening date/time. The College
will not be responsible for Postal or
other delivery service delays that
cause a bid to arrive at Room 138,
Building 001 after the designated bid
opening date/time. Bids that are
mailed must be clearly marked on
the outside of the envelope.
FGC BID # 11-1-02,
L&MC AUDIO VISUAL PROJECT
HARVARD JOLLY, INC. PROJ-
ECT NO. 08085.00
JANUARY 18, 2011
PRE-BID CONFERENCE:
There will be a MANDATORY pre-
bid meeting beginning at 1:30 PM
EST THURSDAY, JANUARY 06,
2011 in the Board Room located in
the Administration Building (001) on
the main campus of Florida Gateway
College.
BID DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE
FROM:
Phil Trezza
Harvard Jolly Architects
5201 W. Kennedy Blvd
Tampa, Florida 33704
Telephone (727) 896-4611
E-Mail:
P.Trezza@harvardjolly.com
RIGHT TO WAIVE IRREGULARI-
TIES AND TECHNICALITIES:
Florida Gateway College reserves
the right to waive minor irregulari-
ties and/or technicalities associated
with this solicitation. The Director of
Purchasing of Florida Gateway Col-
lege shall be the final authority re-
garding waivers of irregularities and
technicalities.
FOR FLORIDA GATEWAY COL-
LEGE
Bill Brown, Director of Purchasing
04542720'
December 19, 26, 2010
January 02, 2011



010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

05524732
Reward Two Lost Jack Russell
Terriers,female w/blind eye,
male neutered,
missing since 12/21
386-497-4325 or 365-3970

FOUND 12/25: Boxer mix dog.
Approx. 1 yr. old. Very friendly &
taken care of. Found in Hidden
acres off 245. 386-754-1407

100 Job
1 v Opportunities

04542744
Carpenters/Cabinetmakers
We need your job skills. Wages
negotiable based on skills and
experience of one year or more.
Stable work history. Benefits
include: paid holidays, paid
vacations, family health insur-
ance, and a 401-K plan. Some
hand tools required. Please
apply in person at Hinter Marine
on Hwy 441 in Alachua, Fl.

04542804
Auditor
Camp Weed and the Cerveny
Conference Center located in
Live Oak, Florida is seeking an
Accounting Auditor. The facility
offers 53 guestrooms, 8 cabins
and a full conference center.
Candidate must have prior
accounting experience in similar
facility. Key responsibilities will
include accounts receivable/
payable oversight/management,
cash management, inventory
control, credit card reconcilia-
tion, profit and loss statement
inputting, etc. Must have
excellent verbal and written
communication skills. Competi-
tive salary and benefits. Email
resume to joe@campweed.org.

04542849
Wanna Go West? Let's Go!
CDL A Operators Wanted for
Lease with a Lease Purchase
Plan, Spouse and Pet Rider
Policy, Health and Life
Insurance Available. 12-15 day
trips, No New England States,
You get 100% fuel surcharge,
O/O's and PTDI
Certified Students Welcome
CALL TODAY TO JOIN US
AND START
THE NEW YEAR
OFF RIGHT !
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company


Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.


100 Job
SOpportunities

04542851



Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches, Inc.
Accounts Payable Coordinator
This position is responsible for
the timely and accurate
processing of account payable
transactions, with additional
responsibilities related to fixed
asset management.
High school diploma or GED
with two years accounting
experience. Associate Degree in
accounting or business is
preferred. College accounting,
courses may be substituted for
experience. High level of PC
software knowledge required.
$10.00 PER HOUR
EXCELLENT BENEFITS
SEND/FAX APPLICATION
Ed Leon
Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranch
PO Box 2000
Boys Ranch, FL 32064
Fax: (386) 842-2429
EOE/DFWP

04542867
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
Night Audit position
Part/full time. MUST be a people
person with great customer service
skills, strong work ethic, good
communication, computer skills,
and willingness to learn. MUST be
a team player and be able to work
a flexible schedule including
weekends and holidays.
Only those seeking long term
employment apply in person at
Comfort Suites located 3690 W
US Hwy 90, Lake City. Please do
not call regarding application.

04542883
Member Service Specialist
Florida' Credit Union seeks an
energetic, creative individual to
help us meet our goals. Full time
Member Service Representative
Position available at our Lake
City branch. Monday Friday
and some Saturdays required.
If you have proven customer
service and sales skills we
would like to hear from you.
Prior financial experience is a
plus. Pay commensurate with
experience. Benefits include
vacation, 401k, health/life
insurance etc. Stop by our
branch at 583 West Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to with salary
requirements to: Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/MSS, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

05524755
OPS Gift Shop Attendant
Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park
White Springs, Florida

$7.50/hr Approx.
28 hours per week

Operate cash register, answer
visitor inquiries in a courteous
and tactful manner in person and
over the phone, sells and stocks
merchandise, provides cleaning
and maintenance of the Gift
Shop. Outstanding customer
service is a must as well as
knowledge of basic arithmetic,
computers and sales. Must be
able to work rotating shifts
including weekends, some
nights and holidays.

Mail or Fax. State of Florida
Employment Application by
Friday January 14th to:
Attn: Ben Faure, Park Manager
Stephen Foster State Park
P.O. Box G
White Springs, FL 32096
Fax (386) 397-4262

Applications are
available online at
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com
Resumes are not accepted unless
accompanied with a State of
Florida Employment
Application

DEP only hires US Citizens or
authorized aliens and is an EEO
/ ADA / VP employer Section
110.128, FS. prohibits the
employment of any male
required to register with
Selective Service System under
the US Military Selective
*Service Act.

0)5524757
Positions available for qualified
Tax Preparer and
Receptionist.
Apply in person only at
The Tax Station
1010 SW Main Blvd.,,Lake City

Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.
Customer Service Experience
and Golf Knowledge a must.
Drug free workplace.
Apply in person @ Quail
Heights Country Club.
Fabulous Coach Lines, Branford


Now Hiring
ACCOUNTANT
Experience & Education Preferred
e Application at http://www.fabu-
louscoach.com/career-application/


100 Job
0 Opportunities

Experienced IT Tech/
Network Admin
Qualifications: 2+ years
experience with: win XP pro, win
7 pro, server 2003, 2008. Must
have worked within and be
familiar with active directory.
Must be capable of lifting/moving
workstations. Microsoft
certifications a plus. Clean drivers
license required. Please submit
resume to.hr@chclabs.com or
fax to 386-758-1791

Experienced Stylist
needed, apply at
Southern Exposure Salon
386-752-4614
I need a BABYSITTER
locally. Must be able to work
flexible hours. License Preferred.
(229)300-0580 for info.
Local medical office
seeking a cleaning person
5 days a week. Pltase fax resume
to 386-719-9662
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com

120 Medical
120 Employment

04542857-
Doctor's office is looking for a
full time Office Assistant/Front
Desk Clerk. Please fax resume
to 386-755-1744 or call
386-755-1703 ask for Margaret

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05524749




MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
RN's & LPN's
PRN/1 yr experience
CNA
F/T & PRN

ARNP Outpatient Svcs
Starke/Tri County

Recovery Specialist
Recovery Center

Prevention Specialist
Trenton/Starke

Masters Therapists
Adult Substance Abuse
(Licensed)
Emergency Screener
Live Oak/Lake City

Adult Case Manager
Live Oak/Gainesville

Psychiatrist
Outpatient Clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City

Custodial/Maintenance
Lake City

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
www.mbhci.org
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP

Wanted Receptionist,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025

240 Schools &
240 Education

04542415
OBTAIN YOUR
COMMERCIAL DRIVERS
LICENSE, CLASSES
FORMING NOW AT
FLORIDA GATEWAY
COLLEGE, CLASSROOM
TRAINING, STATE-OF THE
ART SIMULFAOR, BEHIND
THE WHEEL DRIVING
FINANCING AVAILABLE
FOR QUALIFIED
APPLICANTS
CALL 386-754-4405

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


240 Schools &
240 Education,

0-1542861
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/17/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

POMERANIAN
10 weeks old.
$250. Paper trained.
386-438-3885

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
330 Supplies

Pigs for sale
9 weeks old
$50 each
386-965-2215


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

Kenmore Washer & Dryer Set
front load, side by side or stacka-
ble, HE model, good cond, $300
386-755-2548 or 867-0546


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.'

Scrap Lead Acid Batteries. Pay-
ing $8.00ca & up. (Excludes lawn
mower batteries.) Minimum pick-
up 20 batteries. Art 352-262-6202
EPA# FLR000134601
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



520 Boats for Sale

Bass Tender Boat
10'2",
$500 Call for details
386-965-2215

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2/2 S/W beautiful, clean freshly
painted, near college. l acre,
big front porch $650 mo, avail 1/1
386-697-1013 or 386-697-1900

2/2. S/W, 1 acre secluded lot
Bascom Norris Bypass, $500 dep,
$500 mo, possible owner finance
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
3/2 DW, secluded, Columbia City
Area, covered back deck, No Inside
pets, $750 mo, plus sec dep
386-752-1941/386-965-0932
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. Ref's. No Pets. Non smoking
environment 386-755-3288
DWMH, $850 mo plus $300 sec.
Spacious 4/2, on 5 ac, south of LC,
clean, quiet, great area, shed, 3
386-462-1138, No Cats/Pitbulls


ARE YOU. OUR MISSING PIECE?


C, CourlrubIr
IL ork
UntIisuCi


.' Opllpm uniies




Apply Online or In Person!


SiTEL


Sour skills
It i .i iltitl fl


Recognition


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


lith'iiir

IBUYI


FIND 1


,111,U __









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011


630 Mobile Homes
0 for Rent
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482





Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
4 Mobile Homes
Sfor Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524590
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers
Save up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832

05524637
Gainesville-Jacobsen-Savings
Factory direct Jaconsen outlet
now open to the public 3/2 start-
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilehomesales.co
m for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!

05524638
North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gainesville and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty, 2x6 wall, and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

05524639
Why drive to Gainesville?
This is Why! New 28x60
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni-
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy,
I pay for your gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent,
05524443
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/1BA with carport,
Privacy Garden and
Utility Room Near VA.
No Pets. 386-438-8052
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698 or 386-292-4937
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail C11 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181
720Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
NO Lease/Deposits, ROOMS only
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169,2 ppl $179 + tax
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,


cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
730 Unfurnished
73U Home For Rent
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3/2 W/D hook up, appliances
included, $200 sec dep,
$650 month. Madison Street
"386-365-2515
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276


70n Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
Lg 4 br 2 ba home on Old Country
Club Rd, Living Rm, Family Rm,
Recreation Rm, fenced yard; no
pets; $800/month; 386-623-2642

740 Furnished
4 Homes for Rent
3/2, 2000 Sq Ft Home,
completely furished,$900 month,
,located behind high school,
386-758-9668

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9717,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances,Schools
blks away, $65K 478-39.1-1592

820 Farms&
O Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
1998 F-150 Ford
Pick Up
Nice truck for $3,900 CASH
386-752-1677


UOM,.NGUY


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445


M--WR-l--im


Contact us

at the paper.


CLASSIFIED ADS
386-755-5440

SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445

ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293

ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO
ads@lakecityreporter.com

Mon.-Fi.: 8 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.
THIS REPORTER WORKS FOR YOU!
I "rLa ityeprtLrU


80 East Duval St
Lake City, FLorida 32055


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


2009 Harley Davidson
XR1200R Mirage
Orange and black. One
owner, garage kept. Like
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Story ideas?

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Assistant editor
754-0427
crisak@lakeotyreportercom


Lake City Reporter






BUSINESS


Sunday, January 2, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


CHAMBER BUSINESS







Dennille Folsom
dennille@olkecitychamber:com


Chamber

prepares

for golf

tourney


Happy New
Year! I am
pleased to
report that
your Chamber
had an outstanding 2010
with many new programs
and events.
I am even more pleased
to report now that the foun-
dation has been laid, we
are working to make 2011
even better.
We have a new execu-
tive committee as well as
four new board members.
Please welcome the new
executive board: Bill Haley,
president; Todd Wilson,
president-elect; and Joel
Foreman, treasurer; as
well as our four new board
members: Josh Crapps,
John Kuykendall, Polly
Tyler and Matt Vann.
I, along with the 2011
board of directors, am look-
ing forward to working
hard for our members and
our community.
To kick off 2011, please
join the Lake City -
Columbia County Chamber
of Commerce for our first
Chamber Ball Dinner and
Golf Tournament.
This exclusive event is
offered to chamber mem-
bers and their guests. Help
us renew a Lake City tradi-
tion of business men and
women networking and
socializing in a fun environ-
ment.
The golf tournament,
sponsored by GulfCoast
Financial, will be held on
Jan. 28 at the Country Club
of Lake City.
Lunch will be served
at noon and the "Shotgun
Start" is scheduled for 1:00
p.m.
The weekend contin-
ues on Saturday, Jan. 29
with our Annual Dinner
and Dance sponsored
by Rountree-Moore
Automotive Group.
The evening will kick
off at 6 p.m. with cocktails,
6:30 p.m. for the dinner and
meeting and the live band.
Silent auction will begin at
7 p.m.
Entry fee in the golf
tournament is $60 and tick-
ets to the dinner are $50.
We have many sponsor-
ship packages available and
encourage all our members
to take a part in this week-
end of fun and fellowship.
We are also looking for
silent auction donation
items. If you are interested
in a sponsorship package,
the deadline is Jan. 17 and
the RSVP deadline for the
tournament and the dinner
is Jan. 21. Don't miss your
chance to attend!
Take advantage of
the newest benefit the
Chamber is offering: Leads
Club. Leads Club is a sub
group of chamber mem-
bers who get together and
exchange leads with one
another. The first Leads
Club has met four times
and has already generated
over 50 leads passed for its
members.
We are hoping to start


CHAMBER continued on 2C


Gas prices zooming: $4 per gallon possible


By A.C. GONZALEZ
agonzalez@lakecityreporter. com
Gas prices are
expected
to continue
climbing this
year, with a
possibility of seeing $4
per gallon during the sec-
ond quarter, said Jessica
Brady, spokesperson for
AAA Auto Club South.
Prices have crept up
this winter season, averag-
ing at $3.10 per gallon for
regular unleaded fuels in
the city limits. Brady said
that the past year has not
been typical in the way
gas prices have raised and
declined. "Usually we see
gas prices peak mid-sum-
mer and. July," said Brady.
"Instead, we saw them
reach highs in April and
May, and remain relatively
stable during the summer
months."
The beginning of the
new year will show little
change, however the cost
per gallon is forecast to
average around $3.25 dur-
ing the first quarter of the
year, said Brady.
Brady said that many
factors affect the constant-
ly swaying prices of fuel
in the country, not least of
which is the economy in
general. "A weak U.S. dol-
lar will ultimately increase
the price per barrel," said
Brady. With a struggling
economy and a decrease
in value of U.S. currency,
the barrels become more
expensive to purchase,
making the price at the
pump bear the reflection
of this economy.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Charles Hart, of Newcomberland, Pa., fills up his Mercury Grand Marquis at a local Exxon gas station in Lake City. Gas
prices ranged at the station from $3.15 a gallon for regular to $3.37 a gallon for supreme.


"If 2011 takes the path
of a typical year," said
Brady, "we will see prices
drop off during the begin-
ning of the year, and rise
in the second quarter,
while peaking during the
summer months. Though
prices are high, I don't
think we will see $5 gas
prices in this year, so con-
sumers have no need to
panic at the moment."
Billy Johnson, sales
manager at the Sunbelt


dealership in Lake City,
said he remains optimistic
through the struggling
economy and the high gas
prices.
"This is truck country,"
said Johnson, "and these
people that rely on a good
truck for their livelihood
will be aggravated, but I
believe sales will continue,
even for those big trucks."
Though prices have
steadily increased in the
past year, Johnson said


sales have been very well
through the year, and that
the people of Lake City
have always found a way
to budget within their
means to still afford what
is necessary.
"I am optimistic as to
what the outcome will be,
we just have to tighten our
belts in other areas to see
our way out of this mess,"
she said.
A familiar name in
the area, Lester Scaff,


president and owner of
Scaff's Incorporated, owns
47 S&S gas stations and
food marts throughout
the North Florida area.
Scaff said he has person-
ally felt the consequences
of a steadily increasing
fuel bill, but knows that
the consumers are ulti-
mately the ones who suf-
fer through the sluggish
economy. Prices at S&S

GASOUNE continued on 2C


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BEAUTIFUL well-kept 3BR/2BA home
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0 Ig screened lanai & gorgeous fenced back .
yard; large master suite, custom kitchen
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.'- ,'


I

?;.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Feb. 17, 2009 file photo, an engine technician
works on a vessel engine at the Caterpillar company in
Friedrichsort near Kiel, northern Germany. More than half
of the 15,000 people that Caterpillar has hired this year
were outside the U.S.


U.S. companies

hiring workers,


mostly overseas


By PALLAVI GOGOI
AP Business Writer

Corporate profits are
up. Stock prices are up. So
why isn't anyone hiring?
Actually, manyAmerican
companies are just
maybe not in your town.
They're hiring overseas,
where sales are surging
and the pipeline of orders
is fat.
More than half of
the 15,000 people that
Caterpillar Inc. has hired
this year were outside the
U.S. UPS is also hiring at
a faster clip overseas. For
both companies, sales in
international markets are
growing at least twice as
fast as domestically.
The trend helps explain
why unemployment
remains high in the United
States, edging up to 9.8
percent last month, even
though companies are


performing well: All but
4 percent of the top 500
U.S. corporations reported
profits this year, and the
stock market is close to
its highest point since the
2008 financial meltdown.
But the. jobs are
going elsewhere. The
Economic Policy Institute,
a Washington think tank,
says American companies
have created 1.4 million
jobs overseas this year,
compared with less than
1 million in the U.S. The
additional 1.4 million jobs
would have lowered the
U.S. unemployment rate
to 8.9 percent, says Robert
Scott,..the institute's senior
international economist.
"There's a huge differ-
ence between what is good
for American companies
versus what is good for
the American economy,"
HIRING continued on 2C


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* LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011


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HIRING: Job openings, economic growth happening in Asia

Continued from Page 1C


says Scott.
American jobs have been mov-
ing overseas for more than two
decades. In recent years, though,
those jobs have become more
sophisticated think semicon-
ductors and software, not toys and
clothes.
And now many of the products
being made overseas aren't com-
ing back to the United States.
Demand has grown dramatically
this year in emerging markets like
India, China and Brazil.
Meanwhile, consumer demand
in the U.S. has been subdued.
Despite a strong holiday shopping
season, Americans are still spend-
ing 18 percent less than before the
recession on furniture, and 10 per-
cent less on electronics, according
to MasterCard's SpendingPulse.
"Companies will go where there
are fast-growing markets and big
profits," says Jeffrey Sachs, glo-
balization expert and economist
at Columbia University. "What's
changed is that companies today
are getting top talent in emerging
economies, and the U.S. has to
really watch out."
With the future looking bright-
er overseas, companies are build-
ing there, too. Caterpillar, maker
of the signature yellow bulldozers
and tractors, has invested in three
new plants in China in just the last
two months to design and manu-
facture equipment The decision is
based on demand: Asia-Pacific sales
soared 38 percent in the first nine
months of the year, compared with
16 percent in the U.S. Caterpillar
stock is up 64 percent this year.


"What's changed is that companies today are
getting top talent in emerging economies,
and the U.S. has to really watch out."

Jeffrey Sachs
Globalization expert and economist
Columbia University


'There is a shift in economic
power that's going on and will
continue. China just became the
world's second-largest economy,"
says David Wyss, chief economist at
Standard & Poor's, who notes that
half of the revenue for companies
in the S&P 500 in the last couple
of years has come from outside the
U.S.
Take the example of DuPont,
which wowed 'the world in 1938
with nylon stockings. Known as one,
of the most innovative American
companies of the 20th century,
DuPont now sells less than a third
of its products in the U.S. In the first
nine months of this year, sales to the
Asia-Pacific region grew 50 percent,
triple the U.S. rate. Its stock is up 48
percent this year.
DuPont's work force reflects the
shift in its growth: In a presentation
on emerging markets, the company
said its number of employees in the
U.S. shrank by 9 percent between
January 2005 and October 2009.
In the same period, its work force
grew'54 percent in the Asia-Pacific
countries.
"We are a global player out to
succeed in any geography where
we participate in," says Thomas M.
Connelly, chief innovation officer at
DuPont. "We want our resources


close to where our customers are,
to tailor products to their needs."
While most of DuPont's research
labs are still stateside, Connelly says
he's impressed with the company's
overseas talent The company
opened a large research facility in
Hyderabad, India, in 2008.
A key factor behind this runaway
international growth is the rise of
"the middle class in these emerg-
ing countries. By 2015, for the first
time, the number of consumers in
Asia's middle class will equal those
in Europe and North America com-
bined.
"All of the growth over the next
10 years is happening in Asia," says
Homi Kharas, a senior fellow at the
Brookings Institution and formerly
the World Bank's chief economist
for East Asia and the Pacific.
Coca-Cola CEO Muhtar Kent
often points out that a billion
consumers will enter the middle
class during the coming decade,
mostly in Africa, China and India.
He is aggressively targeting those
markets. Of Coke's 93,000 global
employees, less than 13 percent
were in the U.S. in 2009, down from
19 percent five years ago.
The company would not say how
many new U.S. hires it has made in
2010. But its latest new investments


are overseas, including $240 million
for three bottling plants in Inner
Mongolia as part of a three-year,
$2 billion investment in China. The
three plants will create 2,000 new
jobs in the area.
In September, Coca-Cola pledged
$1 billion to the Philippines over
five years.
The strategy isn't restricted to
just the largest American companies.
Entrepreneurs, whether in technol-
ogy, retail or in manufacturing, today
hire globally from the start
Consider Vastcom, which powers
the search engines of sites like Yahoo
Travel and Aol Autos. The company
was founded in 2005 with employees
based in San Francisco and Serbia.
Harvard Business School Dean
Nitin Nohria worries that the trend
could be dangerous. In an article in
the November issue of the Harvard
Business Review, he says that if U.S.
businesses keep prospering while
,Americans are struggling, business
leaders will lose legitimacy in society.
He exhorted business leaders to find
a way to link growth with job creation
at home.
Other economists, like Columbia
University's Sachs, say multina-
tional corporations have no choice,
especially now that the quality of
the global work force has improved.
Sachs points out that the U.S. is
falling in most global rankings for
higher education while others are
rising.
"We are not fulfilling the educa-
tional needs of our young people,"
says Sachs. "In a globalized world,
there are serious consequences
to that."


GASOLINE

From Page 1C


gas stations vary with local
competition and forecasted
prices for fuel in the area.
However, Scaff said the
thing that remains constant
in all stores is that the
price in general is entirely
too high.
"When gas prices go
up, it takes more of the
customer's money and they
buy less gallons to make
up for needing to spend
money elsewhere," said
Scaff.
Prices remained steady
through the first nine
months of 2010, said Scaff,
but the last three months
have seen numbers moving
up steadily.
'These prices affect
me the same as every
American in this country.
There are bad times and
good times, and that's the
way business is," Scaff
said.
Like Johnson, Scaff said
he believes the people
of Lake City will make it
through as they always
have. "The people of this
city, and the American peo-
ple, have a way of respond-
ing to gas prices, and they
will find a way of using less
to make it through," Scaff
said. "We all have to be
more conscious of what we
spend, and during these
times we cannot waste any
trips."


CHAMBER: Local golf tournament, Chamber Ball and dinner scheduled

Continued from Page 1C


the second and third
clubs in late January and
February. If you would
like to sit in on a meeting
of the Leads Club and
see what it is all about,
please join us at 8 a.m. on


Tuesday at the Holiday
Inn and Suites. This week
marks my first anniver-
sary as your Chamber
director. I have had an
amazing year and am
thankful to everyone who


has given me guidance,
support and encourage-
ment. I would like to thank
the 2010 board of direc-
tors, specifically Jenny
Drawdy, 2010 president,
for spending many hours


of their personal time to
help me learn and grow
into my position. I would
also like to recognize the
retiring board members,
Charlene Brown, Lee Ann
Hires and Brad Wheeler,


for all of their dedication
to the Chamber and their
community.
Wishing a prosperous
2011 for you, your busi-
ness, your Chamber and
our community.


* Dennille Folsom is the
executive director of the
Lake City/Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce.
She can be reached at
386-752-3690 or e-mal
dennille @lakecitychamber.
com


What Is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
Remember Shakespeare?
Remember "As You Like It"?
In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only
people who could get away with telling the
truth to the King or Queen.
The Motley Fool tells the truth about invest-
ing, and hopes you 7! laugh all
the way to the bank



A Promising Steel Stock
As the global economy begins to
recover, it pays to keep a close eye
on which countries are showing
stronger GDP growth than the
norm such as Mexico.
Here's a company that can berie-
fit domestically from Mexico's
growth but also sells its products
internationally: Grupo Simec
(AMEX: SIM); a producer of
special bar quality (SBQ) steel
for non-residential construction
and the automotive industry.
Mexico's automotive industry
is poised to outpace'growth in the
U.S. thanks to lower labor costs.
For U.S. manufacturers looking to
tap Mexico more, to reduce over-
head costs, Grupo Simec offers
axles, hubs and crankshafts. Rising
steel prices have brought higher
revenues and a healthier profit for
the company this year.
Recently trading below book value,
Grupo Simec has more than $200
million in net cash, and has surpassed
Wall Street's earnings-per-share
expectations twice this year.
It also maintains the strongest free
cash-flow margin of any of its major
steel competitors. Keeping costs
under control has allowed Grupo
Simec to be more nimble than larger
competitors, Over the past few years,
it has grown through the acquisition
of steel mills in the U.S. and Mexico.
Grupo Simec appears in good
shape to benefit from any uptick
in global steel demand, but only
time will tell if it can translate its
momentum into creating value
for shareholders.


... . .....


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER HOME SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011


Drink in the Facts


FAMILY FEATURES


\ water is anl essential element for the
V human body, and we need it to stay
hydrated and healthy.
But where should we get our water from
the tap or a bottle? Many people drink both,
depending on taste and accessibility. To help
you make an informed decision, here is some
new information about the different refresh-
ment choices you can make.

Environmental Impact
Perhaps the biggest debate is around the
environmental impact of bottled water. A first-
of-its-kind life cycle study recently commis-
sioned by Nestle Waters North America exam-
ines the environmental impact of tap water,
filtered tap water, bottled water and other
packaged beverages. Here are a few findings:

Water in all its forms is the best
beverage option for the environment.

Among packaged beverages evaluated in
the study, bottled water has the lightest
environmental impact. So, people can
lighten their own environmental impact
simply by drinking bottled water instead
of packaged soda or sports drinks.'

Just by recycling the water bottle, the
environmental impact is reduced by
25 percent.

Bottled water companies are working to
reduce their environmental impact. For example,
over the past 15 years Nestl6 Waters North
America has reduced the amount of plastic in its
bottles by 60 percent, making its Eco-Shape'
bottle among the lightest half-liter bottles across
the packaged beverage industry.


Climate change impact of non-alcoholic
beverage consumption
Bottled Water, 0.070/
.


Tap Water
Illllt red,
unliller-l., 0.05%


Tea
(hot,
iced),
0.08%








Coffee I:1 "..


.Juice,
0.09%



Ii



Soda,
0.17%



I CA nrnh


*Others
(sports drinks,
vitamin-fortified waters, etc.), 0.07%
Non-alcoholic beverages make up 0.92 percent of the average
consumer's total carbon footprint. This chart shows the per-
cent of total lifestyle impact these beverages have.

Why is bottled water better for the environment than other packaged drinks?
Bottled water has no "grown" ingredients like sugar, which eliminates the
environmental impact of additional water, pesticides and energy usage
associated with harvesting those ingredients. Soda has nearly twice the
environmental impact as bottled water, largely because of its ingredients,
the heavier bottles required for carbonation, and the amount of water used
during production.
The good news is that more and more people are drinking water from
the tap and from a bottle: Studies show if bottled water is not available,
two-thirds of people will choose other packaged drinks that produce more
carbon emissions and, typically, are more calorie-intensive.


How can you
be sure your
water is safe?

* Learn the facts. Tap and
bottled water are regulated by
the government with public
health and safety in mind. By
law, FDA standards for bottled
water must be as stringent as
EPA standards for public water
supplies. And in some cases,
FDA bottled water standards
are more stringent than the
EPA's, such as for coliform
bacteria, fluoride and lead.

* Read your municipal water
quality report. Municipal
water suppliers are required
to produce quality reports each
year. Contact your local water
supplier to find out how to
access these reports. Or, visit
www.epa.gov/safewater.

* Find out the source and con-
tents of your bottled water.
Some bottled water brands
provide information on how
to access source and quality
information, so you know
exactly where your water
comes from and what's in it.


Photo courtesy of Getty Images

"Our customers want to know
what they're buying and
consuming," says Nick Dege,
director of quality assurance at
Nestl Waters North America.
"We make it easy by publish-
ing quality reports from
independent testing results, ,
which our customers can access
through our website and via a
toll-free phone number, both of
which can be found on the label
of every bottle."


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


1.1al 0 15 ".


*i-
!:i








LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011


Auto industry recalled 20 million vehicles in 2010


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this July 6, 2010, file photo, visitors look at Toyota Prius hybrid vehicles
on display at Toyota Motor Corp.'s showroom in Tokyo. Toyota Motor
Corp. recalled about 7.1 million vehicles in 201.0.


By KEN THOMAS
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -Automakers
recalled about 20 million vehicles
in 2010, led by high-profile recalls
by Toyota that prompted new
scrutiny of the auto industry's
safety record.
The number of recalls this year
was the largest in the United
States since 2004, according to
an analysis of federal data by The
Associated Press. The auto indus-
try set a record with 30.8 million
recalled vehicles that year.
Toyota Motor Corp. recalled
about 7.1 million vehicles in 2010
to fix faulty gas pedals, floor.
mats that could trap accelera-
tors, defective braking and stall-
ing engines.
The safety woes by the world's
No. 1 automaker brought more
attention to auto safety from
government regulators and the
public, which filed more than
64,000 complaints with the
National Highway Traffic Safety.
Administration, nearly double the
number in a typical year.
Safety recalls can cost car com-


panies tens of millions of dol-
lars or more and have become
more common since 2000, when
Congress passed legislation to
spot safety defects more quickly
in the aftermath of the massive
Firestone tire recalls.
In 2010, lawmakers held several
hearings on the Toyota recalls but
sweeping legislation to increase
penalties against car companies,
require automakers to meet new
safety standards and empower
the government to demand a
recall stalled in Congress.
Toyota was fined $48.8 million
by the government for its han-
dling of three recalls dating back
to 2004.
Toyota has vowed to take a
more proactive approach to safe-
ty, creating engineering teams
that can quickly examine cars
that are the subject of consumer
complaints while giving its U.S.
offices a more direct role in safe-
ty related decisions.
Among other automakers,
General Motors Co. recalled
about 4 million vehicles in 2010
while Japanese rivals Honda and
Nissan both recalled more than 2


million cars and trucks. Chrysler
recalled about 1.5 million vehi-
cles and Ford called back more
than 500,000 vehicles.
The recall data was prelimi-
nary and the government was
expected to release final num-
bers next year.
"More and more recalls are
being voluntarily initiated by
automakers and we think that's
a good sign," Transportation
Department spokeswoman Olivia
Alair said Wednesday. "Safety
is NHTSA's first priority and
improved cooperation from auto-
makers will help resolve safety
issues more quickly and compre-
hensively."
Wade Newton, a spokesman
for the Alliance of Automobile
Manufacturers, which represents
a dozen car companies, includ-
ing GM, Toyota and Ford, said
automakers "are doing a better
job of identifying and pinpointing
safety-related issues and taking
faster action."
He said safety advances in new
vehicles helped traffic deaths
decline last year to its lowest lev-
els since 1950.


Professors build

website for rich

to return tax cuts


By JOHN CHRISTOFFERSEN
Associated Press
NEW HAVEN, Conn: -
Upset the federal govern-
ment recently extended tax
cuts for the rich, three pro-
fessors at Yale and Cornell
universities have created
a website that encourages
wealthy Americans to give
their tax savings to chari-
ties and send a political
message in the process.
The professors started
giveitbackforjobs.org to allow
Americans "who have the
means" to calculate what
their tax cut would be and
donate that amount to a
charity.
"Extending the tax cuts
for the very wealthiest
Americans is frankly uncon-
scionable," Yale Law School
professor Daniel Markovits
said Wednesday. With the
website's help, "donors can
pledge their money to sup-
port the kinds of programs
that will help families, cre-
ate jobs, and set the coun-
try moving toward a just
prosperity," the professors
said in announcing the ini-
tiative.
Markovits, Yale politi-
cal scientist Jacob Hacker,
and Cornell law professor
Robert Hockett started the
campaign. Hacker is co-
author of "Winner Take All
Politics: How Washington
Made the Rich Richer -
and Turned Its Back on the
Middle Class."
The three recommend
giving to groups such as


Habitat for Humanity,
Children's Aid Society and
Salvation. Army that they
say promote fairness, eco-
nomic growth and a strong
middle class. They say the
contributions could repli-
cate good government pol-
icy and, in effect, draft the
government as a funding
partner when the donation
is tax deductible.
"The collective giving
together becomes almost
a kind of shadow fiscal poli-
cy," Markovits said.
Congress approved the
tax package and President
Barack' Obama signed
it into;law this month. It
retains "Bush-era tax rates
for all taxpayers, includ-
ing the wealthiest, a provi-
sion Obama and congres-
sional liberals opposed.
Proponents of the tax cuts
argued that raising taxes
in a fragile economy would
hurt small businesses and
job growth.
The professors said other
features of the tax package,
including a payroll tax cut
and an extension of unem-
ployment benefits, are
acceptable but the overall
package does not go far
enough to help the middle
class and doesn't expect
enough of those who can
afford to give the most.
Markovits said an ear-
lier effort that encouraged
taxpayers to donate their
tax cuts to help in the after-
math of Hurricane Katrina
resulted in about $250,000
in pledges.


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meet thousands of potential clients!


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FREE TO THE PUBLIC


Where local people can connect with

local businesses to improve their homes.


California woman

arrested in insider

trading scheme


LARRY NEUMEISTER
Associated Press
NEW YORK A
California woman was
arrested on securities fraud
charges in an ongoing feder-
al crackdown on people who
illegally feed inside infor-
mation about publicly held
companies and pass it off as
research, federal authorities
announced Wednesday.
Winifred Jiau, 43, was
arrested Tuesday at her
Fremont, Calif., home and
was held for a Wednesday
appearance in federal court
in San Francisco, accord-
ing to a release from U.S.
Attorney Preet Bharara in
Manhattan. It was not imme-
diately clear who would rep-
resent her in court.
Jiau was charged with
securities fraud and con-
spiracy to commit securi-
ties fraud for accepting
more than $200,000 over


a two-year period from an
expert networking firm that
promises to provide "institu-
tional money managers and
analysts with market intel-
ligence" through a "Global
Advisory Team of Experts,"
Bharara said.
According to prosecu-
tors, Jiau provided detailed
financial earnings informa-
tion about multiple publicly
traded companies, including
Marvell Technology Group
Ltd. and Nvidia Corp.
He said she told two port-
folio managers at separate
hedge funds in May 2008
about Marvell's quarterly
revenues, gross margins and
earnings and did so again
three months later, prior to
the earnings statements.
The latest arrest is part of
a widening probe targeting
those in the financial services
industry who glean secrets
from public companies and
share them as research.


Columbia County Fairgrounds


2 BIG DAYS!
Saturday, March 5th Sunday, March 6th


9 a.m. 5 p.m.


10 a.m. 4 p.m.


Co-Sponsored by:
L e N EWSOTAIK WS' M ? J d
Lake City Reporter N BwsTTA leo "
lakecityreporter.com CURRFNTS magazine .. 9 4 .
inni i .rotarvcluboflakecity -doiin ton n.com


SUNSTATE
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


?I Za]












Story ideas?


Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
crisak@lakeatyreporter:com

Sunday, January 2, 201 I


Lake City Reporter






LIFE


www.lakecityreporter.com


GARDEN TALK
embdica -&. \ I I


Nichelle Demorest



Problems

revealed

in winter

landscapes


fall, we start to
notice things
we hadn't seen
before. I'm
referring to those strange
living things attached
or hanging from the
branches of our shrubs
and trees.
During the fall and
winter, I get a lot of ques-
tions about the grayish
lichens that grow on the
stems of many plants
such as crape myrtle.
They may be ugly and
look like they are hurting
the plant, but there is no
evidence that they are
harmful.
During the winter
they are more apparent
because the leaves which
hid them have fallen.
Lichens are most abun-
dant on plants that are
already in poor health for
other reasons.
Lichens have more
sunlight on inner branch-
es if an unhealthy plant
is skimpy. Giving a plant
the proper growing con-
ditions such as water,
good drainage, and prop-
er fertilizer will help keep
it full and healthy.
Lichens are actually
a fungus and an algae
growing together and
keeping each other alive.
Because lichens are
not considered to be
harmful, UF has no rec-
ommendations for chemi-
cal sprays.
If they really bug you,
you can always hand pick
them.
For information on
lichens, scales and other
pests, visit the UF/IFAS
website http://solutions-
foryourlife.com or call
the Master Gardener
Plant Clinic on Tuesday,
Thursday, or Friday
mornings at 752-5384.
Don't miss our monthly
gardening talks at the
public library in down-
town Lake City on every
third Saturday at 2pm.
Beginning on Jan. 20,
we will also be holding
these workshops at the
new library in Fort White
from 5:45 to 7:00 p.m.
on the third Thursday of
each month.
We discuss a variety
of seasonal topics, and
answer questions to help
you solve gardening
problems.
If you enjoy growing
plants, learning about the
environment, and sharing
knowledge with others,
consider volunteering as
a UF Master Gardener.
Applications may
be picked up at the
Extension Office and the
deadline is January 10th.
Call or e-mail me for
more information about
working with our won-
derful group of UF volun-
teers.

* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


*.


r


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
ceriL'i-' -.5. '" ecityreporter.com
Keeping New Year's
resolutions hasn't
been easy for Dan
Gherna of Lake City.
None have lasted lon-
utr thal i a 1day.
"I\- In -r .r kept one really," he
.aid "I've had a few I thought I
v.. -,_id i.I:. like lose weight or quit
blad habit-. "
An.-r the New Year celebrations
tad:l. manly people struggle to keep
their ri-.s,,lul ions.
In lthri [pait, Stephanie Tyson of
LIkl- < ilx made resolutions each
yVetr.
"I thinkii almost everybody I
lkni,. imak:s resolutions," she said.
Insti,'ad it making them now,
Tyson1 just keeps in mind things
slh wants to work on for the year.
"[' I [-ever make it to begin with,
I can't bl)real it," she said.
B,:- t*-.la,.-r of Lake City tries
'-~ri .hard t, keep her resolutions
i-n.ilh \> ajr
"I ala ay) have more than one,"
shli -ail "Some are more difficult
Ithan 41hi r1 ",
Coleir -;iaid she tries to stage her
rI.'sll.hins where something huge
cain b,) ;n going project. One


'-l


r-


of her resolutions for the year is
to maintain a certain grade-point
average while in law school.
"It's an ongoing, active resolu-
tion," she said.
Several reasons can contribute
to why people don't keep their
New Year's resolutions.
Most resolutions aren't realistic
and maybe too vague when set,
Tyson said.
"You can say, 'I want to lose
weight,' but how are you going to
do it?" she said. "How much do
you want to lose?"
Setting a resolution of losing 50
pounds by February, for example,
is a little unrealistic, Tyson said.
"Maybe (people) aren't clear
enough or specific in what they
want to do," she said.
Resources might not be avail-
able for a person to maintain a
resolution, Coker said.
"Some of the things they resolve
to do might be out of their control
and they don't have the support,"
she said.
New Year's Day is also not an
ideal time to make life changes,
Gherna said.
"I think if a person resolves to
change something, the Christmas
RESOLUTIONS continued on 2D


Section D


A













FGC students get chance to howl in the New Year


By Troy Appling

L ast month during
Final Exam week,
I was sitting in the
corner of the college's
Lobo Cafe waiting for
some colleagues to join me for
lunch. As I sat there, I noticed
several groups of students doing
some last-minute studying at the
adjacent tables. One table was
quizzing each other about vari-
ous nerves and their functions in
the human body, another group
was tossing around calculus
equations and numbers, and a
third group was carrying on a
spirited conversation in Spanish,
correcting each other's pronun-
ciation along the way.
Something that struck me
about this experience was each
group's sense of determina-
tion and dedication. I know the
sense of panic that sometimes
descends on undergraduates at
the end of every semester (it
hasn't been that long since I've
taken final exams myself, thank


you). Yet this was different;
these students appeared to rel-
ish the challenge that the mate-
rial presented, and each person
seemed genuinely interested in
helping the other members bet-
ter learn the concepts at hand.
This was an example of what
for me is the highest goal of
education, for both students and
professors: to engage challeng-
ing new ideas, absorb them, and
then help others to master them
as well. One of my personal chal-
lenges each semester in ENC
1101 (Freshman Composition)
is to teach students, even ones
who tell me that the only writing
they ever want to do is to sign
their name to their paychecks,
the skills they will need in, order
to share their passion and knowl-
edge with others. Whether the
topic is literature or lug nuts,
poetry or the Pythagorean
Theorem, effective communica-
tion allows the reader to connect
with the author's expertise and
energy.
In addition to my passion for


Freshman Composition, my posi-
tion at the College has afforded
me a new challenge, one for
which I could use your help.
In the Spring semester (which
starts this Thursday), I have the
privilege of teaching CRW 2200,
the Magazine Writing course.
This primarily online class will
focus on a single endeavor: cre-
ating Howl!, the student literary
magazine. Although it has been
on hiatus for a few years, the
magazine has been a great suc-
cess in the past, winning numer-
ous awards in state-level com-
petitions, including Best Poem,
Best Fiction, and Best Contents.
This regional recognition
showcases our student body's
immense talent in essays, fiction,
poetry, drama, and artwork of
all kinds. It's time to revive this
forum to illustrate our students'
talent. As one of the newest
faculty members, I am looking
for interested students to help
make this happen, and this is
where you come in. If you want
an elective to build into your


schedule and you like writing,
graphic design, or web design
(or you know someone else who
does), please let me know. If you
are not yet a student but want
to be, and feel like this course is
for you, let me know that as well
and I will put you in touch with
the right people.
Even if the course does not fit
your calendar, I still need your
input. A literary magazine does
not amount to much, unless
there is something literary to
put in it.
We will publish calls and
guidelines for submissions
later this month, so be thinking
about what you might like to
contribute. I've looked at past
issues of the magazine, and the
variety of entries is astounding
- the contents of the magazine
are almost as diverse as the
student body itself. Don't worry
that your work is not "literary"
enough. Almost anything can be
the subject; while my disserta-
tion, for example, is on religious
imagery in modern American .


drama, my first published essay
was a reflection about blank
notebooks and journals. As long
as you are passionate about it,
you can write/draw/compose it
(and then submit it to us).
This brings me back to where
I started the College's Lobo
Caf6. Those math, science, and
language students were passion-
ate about passing their exams.
More importantly, though, I
saw in them a passion for their
subject matter. It wasn't simply a
case of "I have to cram this into
my brain so I can make an A."
It was "I need to get this right
so that I can be a better" (insert
career here).
I hope that 2011 brings you a
similar drive and passion for new
challenges. And if some of those
happen to be literary, send them
my way!

* Troy Appling is an associate
professor of English at the Florida
Gateway College. He can be
reached at 386-754-4369 or e-mail
troy.appling@fgc.edu.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Bruce Kiesslang, a physician from Anchorage, Alaska, does push-ups with kettle balls while
working out at Anytime Fitness in Lake City. 'My resolution is to keep the resolutions I made,
a decade ago,' Kiesslang, who exercises one and a half hours a day for five days a week,
said. 'Fitness is the best way to not need the medical system. I like to drive my body like a
Ferrari, but like any 63-year-old Ferrari, I can't deter maintenance.'


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Darlene Holm of Wellborn shops for fresh vegetables at the Publix Supermarket in Lake City.
'I would like to eat more raw vegetable and less cooked food,' Holm said. 'My son tells me I
could be healthier if I eat raw food. He's a "raw foodist".'


RESOLUTIONS: Set easy, small goals


Butler -
O'Rourke
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur
C. Butler, Jr. of Lake City
announce the engage-
ment and approaching
marriage of their daugh-
ter, Sarah Ann Butler of
Lake City, to Michael
Shawn O'Rourke of
Clearwater. He is the
son of Mr. and Mrs.
Patrick Mark O'Rourke of
Clearwater.
The bride-elect is
a 2005 graduate of
Columbia High School.
and a 2007 graduate of
Florida State University.
The groom is a 2001
graduate of Clearwater
High School and a 2007
graduate of St. Petersburg
College.
Both are 2011 doctor of
Pharmacy candidates at


COURTESY PHOTO
Sarah Ann Butler and
Michael Shawn O'Rourke.

the University of Florida
College of Pharmacy.
A February wedding is.
planned.


BIRTH

Mason Mann
Bedenbaugh
Kevin and Amy
Bedenbaugh Jr. of Lake
City announce the birth
of their son, Mason
Mann Bedenbaugh,
born Oct. 18 at Shands
Lake Shore.
He weighed 8 pounds,
11 ounces and measured
21 inches.
He joins Kailey
SElizabeth, 5, and Chase
Lyttleton, 3.
Grandparents are
Stephen and Mary
Parsons, Kevin and
Marla Bedenbaugh Sr.,
and Tony and Marcy
Robinson.
Great-grandparents
are Helen and the late
Peter Mann Dukes,
Arthur and Janie
Bedenbaugh and the
late Lillian Bennett.


Canipe Sutton
Norman and Peggy
Canipe of Lake City ,
announce the engage-
ment and approaching )'-
marriage of their daugh-
ter, Stephanie Michelle
Canipe of Lake City, to
Stefan Christopher Sutton


of Lake City. He is the
son of Robert Sutton and
Kimberly Butler of Lake
City.
The bride-elect is
a 2004 graduate of
Columbia High School.
She is currently serving
in the United States Navy
Reserve and works at


COURTESY PHOTO
Stephanie Michelle Canipe and Stefan Christopher Sutton.
Verizon Wireless in Lake -visor for United Parcel
City. The future groom Service. The wedding is
is a 2004 graduate from planned for 2 p.m. May, 7.
Columbia High School. A location for the wedding
He is currently working and reception will come at
as a night shift sort super- a later time.


Continued From Page ID

and New Year holiday is
probably not the best
time of the year to do
that," he said. "There is
so much activity going
on during the holidays
that you're not able to
focus on the resolu-
tion."
Setting easy, small
goals can help a person
actually keep their reso-
lutions, Tyson said.
"Unfortunately it's
when you have these
really large, lofty ones
something happens, and
you realize you're not
going to make your goal
in time or the way you
want," she said. "And
then you just stop."
Different milestones
can be set for each reso-
lution, Coker said.
If needed, a resolu-
tion can even carry over
into the following year.
"I can measure it
throughout the year
instead of waiting until
the end of the year to
realize I didn't make
it," she said.
Making a resolution
fun can also help a per-


son keep it.
"Incorporate it with
fun," Coker said.


"Reward yourself
when you reach a
milestone."


Don'r
(Miss The '
Deddline!



Call
r.l r, i ,r 1 r, lge
TODAY i: piac-.
: urp-i,:,e adl tor
7-5,l 0ri e :-,i I I
755-5440 ,


755-54
B i ,'-.n _.,1


I-zv^


(^^'erv


141
I' ..n pri ni


110


Deddll ethe Lake ity Report-r.


ENGAGEMENTS


--


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


C`----C`~c~c~-r~-IsC~j









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011


DEAR ABBY



Two of man's friends don't


pass muster with new wife


DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band "Larry" and I have been
married three months. I adore
him, his family and most of his
friends. Two of them, howev-
er, I can barely tolerate. They
show up at our house unan-
nounced and stay for hours.
Larry is too nice to say
anything to them about these
drop-in visits. They also make
disparaging comments about
their wives, complaining con-
stantly about their "nagging"
and their "faults." One of them
has repeatedly cheated on his
wife.
I don't want my husband
around these men who obvi-
ously don't like their wives.
I'm afraid what they say will
"rub off' on him. I have ex-
plained the reasons I dislike
his friends, but he says I have
nothing to worry about. That
doesn't change the way I feel.
What can I do? WORRIED
WIFE IN ARKANSAS
DEAR WORRIED WIFE:
Have a little patience and stop
telling your husband you think
his friends are a threat to your
marriage. Instead, schedule
as much social time as you
can with other couples who
have healthy relationships. It
shouldn't take long for your
husband to realize what. sad
sacks those two are.
Not all friendships last for-
ever. Sometimes people out-
grow them, and that's what
I'm hoping your husband will


F ,


Abigail Van Buren
wwwdeorabby.com

realize without you acting like
his "keeper."
DEAR ABBY: I am a long-
time member of the U.S. Air
Force who has three college-
age sons and a 13-year-old
daughter, "Carly." Their moth-
er and I divorced eight years
ago. I've done everything I can
to stay a part of all their lives.
My sons and I get out for an
occasional round of golf or
watch the game over dinner,
but Carly and I have reached a
disconnect. We were close un-
til early last summer swim-
ming, shopping, vacationing or
just hanging out at my house.
She and my wife have a good
relationship. But something
has changed.
Now, when we make plans
for a movie or dinner or what-
ever, Carly makes an excuse
at the last minute to break it. I
asked her what's going on, but
she won't tell me. My wife says
it's just her age, but I don't
understand why I am the one
who gets cut out of her life.
Carly's mother and I don't
have the best relationship, and
she's not interested in discuss-
ing these matters, but she
says Carly is "just being Car-
ly"' Abby, am I worried about


nothing? Is my wife right or
could there be another issue?
- STILL A DAD IN THE
U.SA.F.
DEAR STILL A DAD:
Stop panicking and listen to
the women. Your little girl may
have been Daddy's, girl until
last summer but she's a
teenager now. It's normal for
teens to disengage from their
parents and develop interests
of their own, so relax and don't
push. Let Carly know you're
there for her and eventually
she'll start coming around
again. What you have de-
scribed is not unusual for girls
her age.
DEAR ABBY: Do you
think it's appropriate to ask
for credit on articles I write
for our company newsletter? I
don't think it's fair to write an
article for the HR department
and not receive credit for it.
It's MY creation and I'd like to
be recognized. Is this selfish,
or is it a reasonable request?
- UNACKNOWLEDGED
IN MADISON, OHIO
DEAR UNACKNOWL-
EDGED: It's reasonable as
long as other contributors also
receive credit for their articles.
In some but not all compa-
nies, that's the case. You are
certainly within your rights to
make your preference known
to whoever is publishing your
newsletter. No one may have
asked before.

E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Jump into the new year
feet first. Throw all your
cards on the table. A move
or trip will pay off and lead to
an interesting new beginning.
Don't let the red tape you face
discourage you from moving
forward. *****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Stop laboring over re-
sponsibilities that don't be-
long to you. Take care of your
own well-being. A personal
or business partnership will
help eliminate your stress and
teach you how to care, share
and work as a team player.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): If picking up additional
information will help you ex-
pand, now is the time to sign
up for whatever course or
apprenticeship might be re-
quired. Don't rely on a part-
nership for the wrong reason.
Make sure all can live up to
the promises made. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Make changes that will
brighten your world. Take
your future into your own
hands. Look at the possibili-
ties and do your research care-
fully. Don't give up one thing


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last
until you have something to
put in its place. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Invest in your future. Don't
waste time traveling when
you can take care of most
matters via email or phone.
You may be faced with added
responsibility or low vitality
but don't let that stand in your
way. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Make whatever adjust-
ments are needed to set up
shop and make extra cash. Al-
tering your surroundings by
making it more user friendly
and techno savvy will be a
saving grace. In time, your
insight will be recognized by
someone who didn't share
your vision. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't try to fix what
doesn't need fixing. Leave
well enough alone and focus
more on how you can improve
your skills, your health and
your well-being. Problems at
home due to minor mishaps
can be avoided. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: L equals M
"PVK TAKUP PVGMT UWZNP TKPPGMT
ZYEKA GO PVUP BZN EZM'P YZOK
UYY PVK ZPVKA UTKO BZN'RK
WKKM." LUEKYKGMK Y'KMTYK
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I'm always interested in looking forward toward the
future. Carving out new ways of looking at things." Herbie Hancock
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 1-3


21): Gravitate toward people
you find inspiring. Working
alongside someone will give
you a better sense of your
own talent, skills, knowledge
and experience. Produce and
present without hesitation.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You've been
through plenty of ups and
downs and are an old pro
when it comes to sizing up a
situation and making it work
to your advantage. Your intu-
ition regarding your personal
life is accurate, so don't hesi-
tate to take action. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't hold back
when you know you are right.
Standing up for your princi-
ples will make people listen.
Love is in the stars and reveal-
ing your intentions for the up-
coming year will enhance the
relationship you care about
most. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
SFeb. 18): Whether you al-
ready have a job or you are
looking, it is time to make an
upward move financially by
putting your skills to work for
you. A service you have to of-
fer will be in demand and, if
you present and promote it
properly, you will be victori-
ous. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
'20): Emotions will hinder
your ability to get things
done. Don't let anyone back
you into a corner or play mind
games with you. An offer you
make to someone you fancy
can help to enhance your life-
style financially and person-
ally. **


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


HEY, MISTER! By Darin McDaniel / Edited by Will Shortz 1 12 13 14 5 16 f7 |8 19 = 10 11 112 113 14 15 116 117 f18


Across
1 Shine
6 Intensifies, with
"up"
10 High-school
class
14 On the 73-
Across, e.g.
19 Elan
20 Lampblack
21 Come to
22 Shifty ones?
23 Loving comment
from an
astronaut's wife?
26 Place from which
to watch a
Hawaiian sunset
27 Low tip
28 Not well
29 Throws (off)
30 Close
31 Big brass
34 Plumber's fitting
35 News offices
37 The Dark Knight
rooms with
Quasimodo?
41 Chili powder
ingredient
44 "He wore a
diamond" in
"Copacabana"
45 Ryan's "Love
Story" co-star
46 Origin
47 Hotel's ask-your-
greeter-anything
approach?
53 Popular portal
54 Swift

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


55 Modern
pentathlon event
56 Difference in
days between the
lunar and solar
year
61 "All clear"
64 Honoree's spot
65 Singer Carey
66 "South Park"
character leading
a walk around a
paddock?
71 Patronized a
restaurant
72 One ___ (ball
game)
73 W.W. II. carrier
praised by
Churchill for its
ability to "sting
twice"
74 Vaults
75 Aspersion
76 Brazilian name
for six popes
79 Speak lovingly
80 What Dustin
Hoffman gets to
do often, thanks
to royalties?
85 Advantages
89 Scoundrel
90 Steve McQueen's
first major
movie, with
"The"
91 Sled dog
92 Actor Hugh
involved in
every swap shop
deal?
98 W.W. I hero
played by Gary
Cooper
99 Pre-1868 Tokyo


100 "Don't strain"
101 Song on an
album
104 Gillis of
1960s TV
105 Colloquialism
107 Bar activity
110 Like some gases
111 Actor John
playing Wayne
Knight's role on
"Seinfeld"?
114 Inhabitant of
the Pribilof
Islands
115 Razor brand
116 Quotable Hall-
of-Famer,
informally
117 Excoriate
118 "Viva !"
119 Pastoral sounds
120 Sign
121 Dummkopfs

Down
1 Modern party
summons
2 Element in strobe
lights
3 Confession of
faith
4 Square
5 Mother of Helen
6 Retreat
7 ___ Eisley, "Star
Wars" cantina
town
8 Dad
9 Attempt
10 Winter Olympics
powerhouse


11 Whence the
phrase "Murder
most foul"
J2 So-so
13 Pound
14 Harshly bright
15 Prickly plants
16 Onetime home
for Georgia
O'Keeffe
17 Expunction
18 Sinatra's "Softly,
Leave You"
24 Hand, in slang
25 Charged particle
29 Third-degree, in
math
32 Vermont city
33 Cartoon genre
35 Contradict
36 Old-time
cartoonist Hoff
37 Hopper
38 Plus
39 Vamoose
40 Most fit
41 Funny
42 Like Rochester,
N.Y.
43 Literally, "guilty
mind"
48 Run the
mouth
49 Author Robert
Butler
50 Nectar flavor
51 1960s TV boy
52 Chorus of
approvals
57 Projecting front
58 The Red Baron
and others
59 Clerical robe
60 Stir
62 "Uncle!"
63 Something that's
not optional
64 E-mail address
component


65 Quark/antiquark
particle
67 Slow dance with
quick turns
68 S. American land
69 Act css Diane of
"Numb3rs"
70 Bowl
75 Shut out
76 Tiresomely
disagreeable sort
,77 Make of


78 Planetary shadow
81 Without
(nonchalantly)
82 Flowering
83 "El __ vive!"
(revolutionary
catchphrase)
84 Czech martyr Jan
85 Comfy bedwear
86 Ann or Andy
87 When Canada
celebrates
Thanksgiving


88 Azure
93 Half
94 Topper for 01'
Blue Eyes
95 Nike competitor
96 Welcomes
warmly
97 Actress Cannon
101 Results of some
accidents
102 Decree
103 Backpackers'
gear


105 Wee bit
106 Spread for
lunch, maybe
108 First name in
country
109 Woodworking
tools
110 Dundee dissent
111 Yak
112 Passeport info
113 Dating service
datum


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
ONTAPE, DAHL ADZE THINLY
BOUTON AVNIA SIAM A ENEID
STRIPE MANY SAGO CROWNS
AFTERAR t D IE ON DARKHOgRNSE
HOW IYOM TURNED ASG I PDAW
ON AME APO SGT US ICDmA G E


EN EIA G 0 ID ETA A L
VEE R 0--RS DTCE S|TLIS
INUTE R T 0R MIEIA KNA SSK IS
TR S AATT HE SCORE I lI
AMERE Ll RA p L OY JESS
AMATEURASTRONOMER

AIR NN EDY SWANNS

LASA ES TOTEIM XRAYSPEX

AGA RL U AR I PSNAME
CASTING GOEsmDER SHADOW
OPHELIA INBUI LT T EELINE
PEEWEES COWPOKE ONESTAR


L 6 9 L 8 E 9 V Z


L9 9 6 6L L 9 8,


8 Z L 9 9 l 6 L I


S9 V L 9 L 8 6,


6 8 9 V L 9 ESL


L L 8 6 ZS 9 91

9LEI86 8 6 9



S L 6 9 V L 8 Z 9


91 8 Z 9 6 L L


1 9 4 5


4 9 1 3


59 8 1


6 2 7


3 2 6.


8 7 5


1 6 7


7 936


2 8 5 9


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415








LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011


Winged and Warbling







Backya rd





FAMILY FEATURES
Most people could recognize a
Robin or a Cardinal if they saw
one but what about a Northern
Flicker or a Lazuli Bunting?
Even with several hundreds of bird species
in North America year-round, many backyard
birders are unfamiliar with some of the birds
specific to their region. If you'd like to meet
some unique feathered friends, follow these
simple tips on how to attract them to your
own backyard.

Create a Friendly Habitat
Birds have simple needs: food, water, shelter
and places to raise young. By establishing these ..
elements in your outdoor living space, you can
make beautiful birds in your region feel right at
home. In addition, incorporating these basic I
elements can help certify your backyard as a
wildlife habitat by the National Wildlife
Federation.
Water Birds need a dependable supply
of fresh, clean water for drinking and
bathing. Placing a birdbath, especially *'
one with a trickle or fountain, makes
ybur garden a very desirable spot. John
Robinson, Scotts chief ornithologist,
recommend -sing a low, shallow'
birdbath, where birds normally find
water. "Birds will naturally be attracted
to water source s found at the ground
level even more than those placed on
pedestals. This is especially true if the
source is in the shade to keep the water
cooler," he says. Also, if you have a pond
or stream, remember to add some flat rocks
where birds can perch while drinking
or bathing.


Shelter Birds seek shelter at different
heights. Make your garden more hospitable.
by growing vines, shrubs and trees. Ever-
greens provide excellent winter shelter, as
well as protection from cats and other preda-
tors. Cavities in a dead or dying tree make
great nesting spots. If there's one in your
yard, let it stand unless safety is a concern.
Nesting Many bird species will .use the same
plants that provide shelter as nesting spots.
You can put up nesting boxes that will be
used by species such as bluebirds, chickadees,
wrens, woodpeckers and even owls.

Feed Wild Birds


Pyrrhuloxia -
The Pyrrhuloxia is a
songbird that lives in
the open desert scrub
of southwestern United
States. Being a thick-
billed, reddish bird with
a crest, it marginally
resembles its close
relative, the Northern
Cardinal.


Wild birds spend most of their time foraging for food such as insects, fruits, nectar
and seeds. Many birds may require up to 10,000 calories a day and enjoy sampling
a wide variety of foods. Therefore, providing numerous feeding options is the best
way td keep them returning to your backyard habitat.
Growing a variety of plants that bloom and produce fruit, seeds or nuts at differ-
ent times throughout the year attracts even more birds to your backyard. Many
perennials, grasses, vines, shrubs and trees also are food sources. Naturally, native
birds thrive on native plants, so selecting regional beauties that produce seeds,
berries, or nectar increases food sources as well as shelter and nesting materials.
Check with a local nursery to get advice on what plants are native to your area.
To supplement their diet, fill feeders with high quality wild bird food. Not all
birds enjoy the same seeds. Birds found in oie area of the country may be different
from birds in other regions. A great way to ensure the birds in your area are receiv-
ing the nutrition needed is to look for region-specific wild bird food, like Scotts
Songbird Selections Regional Bird Blends.
To learn more about bringing unique birds to your backyard, sign up for the
Backyard Birding e-newsletter at www.scottswildbirdfood.com.



Birds in Your Region
Here are just a few of the unique'regional birds.


Western
Bird Blend


Midwestern
Bird Blend


Southwestern
Bird Blend


Northeastern
Bird Blend


Southeastern
Bird Blend


Northeast: Purple Finch, Tufted Titmouse
Southeast: Red-bellied Woodpecker, Carolina Chickadee
Midwestern: Northern Flicker, Red-breasted Nuthatch
Southwestern: Pyrrhuloxia, Lazuli Bunting
Western: Spotted Towhee, Mountain Chickadee


Learn more about the
birds where you live

. Identify birds with the National
Wildlife Federation "Field Guide to
Birds of North America." Find it at
www.shopnwf.org.
* Find state and regional backyard bird
guides at www.songbirdgarden.com.
* Learn how to participate in the
Great Backyard Bird Count at
www.birdsource.org.
* Learn more about participating in a
Christmas Bird Count by contacting
your local Audubon Society Chapter:
www.audubon.org/bird/cbc/.
* Check with your local cooperative
extension office to learn more about
native plants and creating a backyard
habitat for the birds in your region.
* Have your garden certified as a wild-
life habitat by visiting the National
Wildlife Federation website at
www.nwf.org.
* Find out which species are visiting
your feeders with the Bird Identifier
at ww', ,.-.:. i,~ l ldl.I.. d ,ll


Purple Finch -
The Purple Finch i,
a migratory bird ihait
would be a colorful
addition to any garden.
It winters along tilh
Pacific Coast and
from central Te\.,i
to northern Florida..


.' j


* N.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


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