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The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01036
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City, Fla
Creation Date: September 11, 2009
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33283560
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01036
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Robbery
Investigators search
for information involving .J
Snni, ---- ****3-DIGIT 32
000022 120209 **HISTORY
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Lake


Friday, September I I, 2009


Li


www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 135, No. 205 0 75 cents


LCFD: Fire 'suspicious'


festivals and events


Today
* Sept. 11 remembered
in Olustee Park
The City of Lake City will
commemorate Sept. 11 with
a service at 10 a.m. today, in
Olustee Park. The featured
speaker will be Sheriff Mark
Hunter.

Saturday
* Audubon ALU-WALK
at Alligator Lake
The Four Rivers Audubon
ALLI-Walk is a bird, butterfly
and nature walk conducted
the first Saturday of every
month. The walk is from 8
a.m. to 11 a.m. and explores
the shores of Alligator Lake.
Enter Alligator Lake at the
County Park on Country
Club Road. Drive around
to parking area next to the
pole barn. Bring a hat, sun-
screen, water, binoculars and
a snack. Walk is free. Call
Jacqui Sulek (386) 497-4185
or Loye Barnard (386) 497-
3536.

* State park to host
reading event
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection will
celebrate State Park Literacy
Month from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, at O'Leno State
Park.

* Chapter AARP to
meet at LEC
Lake City Chapter AARP
will meet at 11 a.m. Saturday,
at the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center, 628 SE Allison Ct.
Local attorney Tom Brown will
be guest speaker, represent-
ing the Academy of Elderlaw
Issues Attorneys. Please
bring non-perishable food
items (cans and boxes) to be
given to the Christian Service
Center, also a covered dish
for lunch following the meet-
ing. Call Elsie at (386) 752-
3703 for more information.

* 9.12 Project to meet
in Olustee Park
The North Central Florida
9.12 Project will meet at noon
Saturday, at Olustee Park
downtown. There will be a
barbecue and a raffle. There
will also be a collection of
non-perishable food items to
be donated to a local charity.
Barbecue ticks are being sold
for $6 now and will be
$7.50 at the door. Call
(386)935-0821 or visit www.
northcentralflorida912project.
org for more information.
Story on 8A

* Gateway Girl Scouts
recruiting expo
There will be a Gateway,
Girl Scouts recruiting expo
open to girls of all ages to
learn what Girl Scouts do from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
at the Lake City Mall. Call
(386) 755-4848 or visit www.
shoplakecitymall.com for more
information.
* Adopt-A-Pet Day at
Lake City Mall
The Suwannee County
Animal Shelter will be host-
ing Adopt-A-Pet Day from 11
a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, at the
Lake City Mall. Dogs and cats
will be available for adoption.
Call (386) 755-4848 or visit
www.shoplakecitymall.com for
more information.


Flames cause an
estimated $60,000
in damages.

By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter. com

Firefighters responded
to a fire at Eastside Care
Assisted Living Facility late
Thursday afternoon, extin-
guishing flames that caused
more than an estimated
$60,000 in damages, accord-


ing to reports.
There were no injuries
reported in the incident.
Fire officials responded
to the scene at approxi-
mately 5:31 p.m. Thursday
to find heavy smoke billow-
ing from the north wing
of the facility, located on
Defender Avenue. Lake City
Fire Department Battalion
Chief Tim Westberry said
the main fire damage was
in the three northern-most
rooms at the facility, and


the fire originated in the
middle room of the three.
Westberry said firefighters
from both the Lake City and
Columbia County depart-
ments were able to knock
down the main flames in
under 20 minutes, and
checked for hot spots using
fans and thermal imaging
cameras.
There was fire damage
in the three main rooms,


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Reporter
Lake City Fire Battalion Chief Tim Westberry (right) douses
the flames at the Eastside Care Assisted Living Facility Friday
night, as Columbia County Fire Assistant Chief Jim Cason
(center) and firefighter Greg Sund inspect the building for


FIRE continued on 3A anymore hot spots.


We remember

Lake City residents reflect on their

experiences on Sept. 11, 2001


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Construction cranes work above the Freedom Tower at the World Trade Center, Tuesday, in New York.Today
marks the eighth anniversary of the attacks of September 11, 2001.


Nearly 3,000 people
died in attack
against U.S.
By TROY ROBERTS
and ANTONIA ROBINSON
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
Some people sat at home,
stunned by the events unfold-
ing on the television in front
of them. Others heard about it
second-hand, through a friend
or co-worker.
Some were washing dishes,
or getting their children on
the school bus. Others were at
school, sitting in class when the
attack occurred.
No matter where they were,
most people remember what


they were doing when the
events of Sept. 11, 2001, began
to unfold. Nearly 3,000 people
died in the event, marking the
deadliest attack ever on U.S.
soil. And even as construction
continues at the site of Ground
Zero, eight years has done little
to lessen those memories for
many local residents.
Lake City's Tyler Parsons
said he was getting ready for
work when he flipped on the
television by chance - he
rarely watched TV in the morn-
ing, he said. He was startled by
what he saw.
"I saw the towers burning
and what was happening hit
me like a load of bricks - we
were being attacked," he said
Wednesday. 'Those images
will forever be burned into my


memory. It is something I'll
never forgive, never forget.
Many innocent people died
that day, and we should always
remember them."
Sara South, who now lives in
Lake City, was sitting in a high
school business management
class in Saratoga Springs, NY,
when the attacks occurred. She
said her class witnessed on tele-
vision the second plane strike
the South Tower of the World
Trade Center.
"I didn't think it was real at
first," she said. "It felt so hor-
rific. It was heart-wrenching.
"It was my generation's Pearl
Harbor," South said.
She said the nation cannot
forget the tragic events of that
MEMORIES continued on 3A


New bill

may oppose

tag increase

Legislature voted to raise
fees to meet $6 billion
hole in state budget
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Constituents spoke and Florida House of
Representatives Dist 11 State Rep. Debbie
Boyd (D-NewBerry) said
she listened.
Boyd is primary spon-
sor of House Bill 99 that
seeks to eliminate vehicle
fee increases approved
during the 2009 legisla-
tive session.
Boyd TheFloridaLegislature
voted to raise vehicle
fees to meet a $6 billion hole in the state
budget. A Florida driver's license has
doubled to $48. Vehicle registration has
also significantly increased - a medium
sized car is now $57.65, compared to the
previous rate of $36.10.
The bill would revert vehicle registra-
tion, title fees and drivers license fees.
back to what they were' before the pas-
sage of Senate Bill 1778. Boyd opposed
the original hike.
"I opposed the bill during session that
increased taxes on motorists," she said. "I
thought it was the wrong direction."
Boyd said the increases are affecting
everyone .right now, especially people
that are struggling in their homes and
businesses.
"We need to do whatever we can to
keep money in their pockets," she said.
The government has to reprioritize its
spending whenever times are hard, not
shift the burden to the citizens, Boyd said.
However, the bill is just in its beginning
stages of reaching the House floor, she
said. There will be more than 2,000 bills
filed to be heard.
"We have a long way to go," she said.
If it is approved, the bill would go into
effect July 1.
Ultimately, signing the bill was a good
way to represent the voice of the people,
BILL continued on 3A


Event highlights spring's health _ ]


TIP discusses
Ichetucknee's
well-being.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE -
Community members
received an update on
the environmental and
economic well-being of
the Ichetucknee Springs
from The Ichetucknee
Partnership at its quarterly
meeting Thursday night.


"We wanted to take our
show on the road and get
all our partners to celebrate
where we've come so far,"
said Georgia Jones, chair-
woman of TIP.
More than 60 people
were in attendance at the
event Thursday night at
the Fort White Community
Center.
TIP is a coalition of
people, agencies and orga-
nizations that promotes
the. environmental and
economic well-being of
the Ichetucknee Springs


through local programs.
The partnership has
been in existence for little
more than a year, Jones
said.
Updates were given from
the Farm Best Management
Practices programs in
Columbia County, Florida-
friendly landscaping and
county extension programs,
Ichetucknee State Park and
TIP projects.
The BMP program is
incentive based and works
.MEETING continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Carolyn Saft, the University of Florida/IFAS Suwannee
County Extension Horticulture Agent, speaks with Executive
Director of Greater Lake City Regional Utility Authority Dave
Clanton at The Ichetucknee Partnership Thursday, at Fort
White.


1 84264 00020


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


-------------~A ~ -


8969
Isolated PM. Chance
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................ 4A '
Business ................ A
Obituaries .............. 6A
Puzzles ................. 2B
Advice & Comics ......... 3B " .


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Marijuana farming
rebounds.


COMING
SATURDAY
Faith & Values for
your weekend.









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


FLORIDA


Wednesday:
8-18-28-31-33-46


ca$ 3.. " 4

Thursday: Wednesday: Thursday:
Afternoon: 3-9-3 4-8-29-31-34 Afternoon: 1-3-4-8
Evening: 6-0-4 Evening: 1-9-0-0

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Wednesday:
4-16-18-51-53
Powerball: 23 X4


DeGeneres named 4th American Idol' judge


LOS ANGELES
llen DeGeneres is danc-
ing her way into the
fourth judge's seat on
"American Idol."
Fox announced
Wednesday the talk show host and
comedian, who admittedly has no
formal music experience, just a
passion for tunes, will join Simon
*Cowell, Randy Jackson and Kara
DioGuardi for the ninth season.
The announcement all but seals the
departure of Paula Abdul, the origi-
nal third judge who announced she
was quitting amid a contract dispute
in July.
Wednesday's announcement came
as a shock to many of the singing
competition's fans, who did not
expect the Emmy-winning talk show
. host to fill Abdul's spot. DeGeneres
Told her talk show audience in an
episode scheduled to air Thursday
that she had been "dying to tell-
everyone" and would not abandon
her chatfest Instead, she will have "a
- day job and a night job."


Ellen DeGeneres (right) and Portia de Rossi arrive at the Daytime Emmy Awards
on Sunday, Aug. 30, in Los Angeles.


Janet Jackson will pay tribute to
her late brother at the show.


Charlotte and runs the DCMA
Collective clothing line with his twin
brother, Benji.


I's a UUy UO r IRluu N e Ce
Trailer for Jackson film Richie and Joel Madden atale ole performs
"V .j ..~L. .. ufr Awn.,adi 1 ct nnost-surgerv rconcetrt


tLU UCeuu ait i i rv war u
NEW YORK - MTV says a trailer
for a Michael Jackson film built
around rehearsal footage left behind
after the King of Pop's death will
debut at Sunday's MTV Video Music
Awards.
"Michael Jackson: This Is It" will
be released for a limited two-week
theatrical engagement worldwide
on Oct. 28. Longtime Jackson col-
laborator Kenny Ortega is directing
the film, which offers a behind-the-
scenes glimpse of Jackson preparing
for a series of London shows he was
rehearsing when he died June 25.
The 2009 Video Music Awards
will be hosted by Russell Brand, with
performances by Beyonce, Jay-Z,
Lady Gaga, Green-Day, Pink, Taylor
Swift and Muse.


LOS ANGELES - Nicole Richie
and Joel Madden are setting their
sights on Sparrow - not in the
trees, but in the nursery.
The couple named their new-
born son Sparrow James Midnight
Madden.
Richie says on her Web site that
the 7 pound, 14 ounce baby boy was
born early Wednesday. Sparrow
is the second child for Richie and
Madden. Their daughter, Harlow,
will be 2 in January.
Richie, 27, became
a clothing and acces-
sories designer
after starring with
Paris Hilton on
"'TheSimple Life."
Madden,. 30, fronts
Richie the band Good


LOS ANGELES - Natalie Cole
has returned to the concert stage for
first time since a successful kidney
transplant.
The 59-year-old
singer performed
Wednesday night at
the Hollywood Bowl
in Los Angeles. Cole
had the surgery in
May..
Cole She received a
standing ovation from the crowd as
she walked onto the stage in a pur-
ple jewel-studded gown by designer
Lloyd Klein.
Cole sang songs from her latest
album, "Still Unforgettable," as well
as hits from her career.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


E Actress Betsy Drake is 86.
N Actor Earl Holliman is 81.
0 Movie director Brian.De
Palma is 69.
0 Actor Scott Patterson is 51.
N Rock musician Mick Talbot
(The Style Council) is 51.
* Actress Roxann Dawson
is 51.


M Actress Virginia Madsen
is 48.
* Musician-composer Moby
is 44.
a Singer Harry Connick Jr.
is 42.
M Rapper Ludacris is 32.
* Rock singer Ben Lee is 31
* Ed Reed is 31.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ....... .......755-5445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fa. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or'
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Edtor Tom Maer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Stricddand ..754-0417
(Istriddand @lakectyreporter.com)


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by,6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
am. on Sunday.
To report a missed delivery, please call
(386) 754-0406. For all other circulation
issues, please call (386) 755-5445.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 am. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10.30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice relatedcredits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters..754-0407
(rwater@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
l2Weeks................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................... $48.79
52 Weeks.................$83.46
Rates ixdde 7% ses ta
Mall rates
12 Weeks ................ $41.40
24 Weeks ................... $82.80
52 Weeks .................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Man demands
beer before arrest
BAYOU GEORGE -
'Authorities say they arrest-
ed George R. Linthicum
II, a convenience store
shoplifter, who demanded
to drink the 12-ounce beer
he'd stolen before being
arrested.
According to the Bay
County Sheriffs office,
Sthe man told the deputy
She had recently lost his
job of 13 years and wanted
to drink beer. The man
, became combative when
- the deputy wouldn't let
" him finish the beer.

Cops: Elderly man
: shoots daughter
PENSACOLA - The
SEscambia County Sheriff's
A offce is investigating a
;fatal shooting involving
Preston Lee Ezell, 86, suf-
fering from dementia, who
they say killed his daugh-
ter, Kurnetta.
Authorities say he shot
and killed his daughter in
Shis home early Saturday.
S: Ezell told deputies who
Responded to the scene
that he believed someone
had broken into his home
; and was arguing with who
She thought was his sister,
Swho had died years earlier.

SMonkeys, parrot
stolen from zoo
WEST PALM BEACH
- Four monkeys and a
parrot are missing from
Sthe Palm Beach Zoo.
S Spokesman Brian
: Crowley says someone
Used bolt cutters to get
Through a fence at'a side
Sgate and removed three
- Goeldi's monkeys, a squir-
Srel monkey and a green
Cheek Amazon parrot.
The discovery was made
SThursday morning.
Crowley is urging any-
Sone with information to
contact the police. He says
whoever did this is putting


CHANCE
OF T-
STORMS
188LO71


REIOA FOECS MP o Fidy Sptmer1


A full house
In this Aug. 27, photo, Ben and Karoline Byler try to get their
sextuplets Brady (from left), Ryan, Jackson, Mackenzie,
Charlie and Eli to stay still in Wesley Chapel. Now the fenced
back yard looks like a preschool, with big kid swings, ride-on
toys and stray sippy cups scattered across the lawn. Florida's
first surviving sextuplets have become toddlers.


the animals and them-.
selves at risk and hopes
the animals survive the
theft.

Man falsely files
$9M IRS claim
MIAMI - Marion T
Moore, 38, has pleaded
guilty to filing a $9 mil-
lion false claim with the
Internal Revenue Service.
The U.S. Attorney's
Office in Miami released
a statement saying that
Moore has several aliases.
His sentencing is sched-
uled for Nov. 18. He faces
a maximum penalty of up
to five years in prison.

Parents arrested
in child's death
WEST PALM BEACH
- A mother and father
have been arrested in the
death of their infant son in
West Palm Beach.
Police say Matthew
James, 25, and Jessica
Jozefyk, 22, were held
on homicide and neglect
charges in the death of
1-year-old Dayton James.
They were arrested
Thursday.


Authorities say the pair
argued at their home in
December and got into
a scuffle. They say the
woman was holding her
child when James swung
at her, striking the baby in
the head. The child died
the next day from blunt
force trauma. A judge on
Thursday set'the woman's
bail at $200,000.

Police: Father,
son killed man
MIAMI - Miami police
say a father and son killed
an intruder in their front
yard, but authorities have
not released a cause of
death.
Police spokesperson
Kenia Alfonso says the
father and son told officers
they heard a noise in their
yard Thursday morning.
When the father went
outside, he confronted the
intruder who had jumped
a six-foot iron fence. The
homeowner's son heard
the noises and went to
help his father, who was
struggling with the intrud-
er. A cause of death has
not been released.
* Associated Press


Tallahassee
89/71
SPlensacola ..
87/73 Paiama City
87/75


Valdosta
89/69 ' *jcksonile
Lake City ',86/71
89/69
SGainesvile . Daytona Beach
,88/69 88B675
Ocala *
,88/70
Orlando Cape Canaveral
S 88/75 85 74


Tampa *
89/75/


West Palm Be'ch
88/75 *,


\i: FL Lauderdale
FL Myeir, 87/76 0
89/74 *Naples 6
'89/75 Manmi
88/78
Key West. 8/78
88/80


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


89
68
88
69
96 in 1925
60 in 1963


0.00"
0.50"
38.15"
1.75"
38.51"


K i


7a Friday lp


- Eowasted tewpeabn


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torm.
Sunset torm.


7:13 a.m.
7:41 p.m.
7:14 a.m.
7:39 p.m.


MOON
Moonise today
Moonset today 2:04 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 12:18 a.m.
Moonset tom. 3:05 p.m.


Sept. Sept. Sept. Oct.
11 18 26 4
Last New First Full


unI LIi1 U II I
1976, up to five
inches of rain
brought walls of
water and millions
of tons of debris
into Bullhead City,
Ariz. via washes
from elevations
above 3000 feet.
Flooding caused
more than three mil-
lion dollars damage.


7p aturday I


"Feelaes 1 teii rata r


city
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesvllle
Jacksonville
Key West
Lake City
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Tallahassee
Tampa


Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


0mm

lOmtstobun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
toQ


Saturday
87/74/t
88/74/t
90/76/t
89/75/t
90/71/t
88/72/t
87/76/t
90/70/i
91/77/t
90/76/t
90/72/t
91/74/t
85/75/t
86/75/t
87/72/t
89/75/t
87/70/t
90/75/t


Sunday
86/75/t
88/75/t
89/76/pc
91/76/t
88/71/t
86/72/t
88/78/t
88/70/t
, 90/76/t
90/77/pc
88/72/t
91/76/t
85/75/t
87/76/t
85/72/t
89/77/t
89/70/t
89/74/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com
I a


Forecasts, data and
-.--d graphics @ 2009 Weather
' l Central, Inc., Madison, Wls.
www.weatherpublisher.com


Get Connected


Daily Scripture
"Even to your old age and gray
hairs I am he, I am he who will
sustain you. I have made you and
I will carry you; I will sustain you
and I will rescue you."
- Isaiah 46:4

Thought for Today

"I have seen gross intolerance
shown in support of tolerance."
- Samuel Taylor Coleridge,
English poet and .author (1772-1834)


onow 06wo


Page Editor:-Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


FRIJliAY


I


LAKE CITY ALMANAC


I


141&- -% lkmus go&* Llm'obmigh . I







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


County adopts proposed budget

during first public hearing


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
Columbia County offi-
cials took steps to approve
the county's 2009-2010 fis-
cal budget by holding three
public hearings and approv-
ing the proposed budgets.
During the county's first
budget hearing Thursday
night at the School Board
Administrative Complex
auditorium, county offi-
cials adopted the general
fund budget, the Industrial
Development Authority
budget and budgets from
12 other county funds.
The county's proposed
general fund budget for
2009-2010 is $37,134,787,
which is 6.5 percent lower
than the rollback rate,
and the proposed millage
rate is 7.891 mills. There
is no increase in taxes for
the general fund budget.
County officials unanimous-
ly adopted the general fund
budget following the public
hearing, where Stew Lilker
was the only citizen to make
comments on the proposed
general fund budget. Lilker
questioned attendance at
the meeting, asked that
county employees get
three percent pay increase
and also asked questions
about attorney fees and
the vacant assistant landfill
director position.
Columbia County man-



OLE TIME

"Home co

Cafer

Yl


SR
me -


ager Dale Williams said
officials didn't make any
adjustments to the budget
during the meeting, but
noted that could happen at
a later date.
"The board did not take
any actions that would
amend any line items as
proposed," he said. "There
will be some discussions
on the Sept. 17 (Columbia
County commission agen-
da) that could impact the
budget. As it was tonight,
no changes were made in
the budget so it will go
to the second hearing on
Sept. 24."
Eleven positions were
eliminated in the budget,
including five library posi-
tions, four building and
zoning positions and two
"leased" positions.
Williams said reducing
positions has not been a
common practice in balanc-
ing past budgets.
"This is the first budget
that I've ever prepared
where there is a reduction
in the number of positions
in 26 years," he said. "This
is the first time in 26 years
the county commission did
not even take the rollback
rate in terms of millage.
They took a rate less than
that, so they are actually
starting next year with less
property tax revenue than
they had this year. They
did that because of the


IS COUNTRY

okin' the way Mama

ring Avail

ear Round


/ Gift C

"f isiik


economy.
County officials then
reviewed the Industrial
Development Authority's
budget, which is pro-
posed at $554,709 for the
2009-2010 fiscal budget.
Its tentative village rate is
.124 mills.
Officials unanimously
adopted the IDA budget
and its village rate, follow-
ing a public hearing where
Lilker was the only person
to comment on the budget.
The final public hearing
was for the county's other
.budgets for funds not levy-
ing ad valorem tax, which
included: Transportation
fund ($9.5 million), Road
improvement debt service
fund ($960,000), Municipal
Services Special District
fund ($13.4 million), court
service fund ($699,000),
special law enforcement
fund ($65,500), tour-
ist development tax fund
($887,790), landfill enter-
prise fund ($4.3 million),
library enhancement fund
($2.1 million), local housing
assistance fund ($551,000),
economic development
fund ($2.6 million), con-
nector road project fund
($8.3 million) and road
improvement fund ($7.2
million).
County officials also
unanimously adopted the
proposed budgets for the
non ad valorem funds.


BUFFET

does it"

able

I


birds


Bible




870


FIRE: Under investigation


Continued From Page 1A
Westberry said, and smoke
damage throughout the
north wing and into the
main building, which hous-
es the kitchen and cafe-
tefia areas. He estimated
the damage to be around
$60, u000.
"The building has a cornm-


mon attic over the whole
wing, so the guys did an
excellent job of stopping
the fire before it could go
any further," he said.
Westberry said the cause
of the fire is under investi-
gation, but has been labeled
"suspicious."


BILL
Continued From Page 1A
Boyd said.
"I felt like I voted the way
I needed to represent the
constituents when legisla-
ture was in session," she
said.
"Now I'm supporting the
repeal of the increases.'


MEMORIES: OfLake CityduringSept. 11


Continued From Page 1A

day.
"When we forget, history
repeats itself," she said.
Mary Lee, of Lake City,
was at home that morning.
She said her phone rang
and her mother was on the
other end, telling her about
what had happened.
"I immediately went to


the TV," she said, noting
she felt desperate as she
watched the event unfold.
"I knew my world was
changing, and didn't know
what the repercussions of
that would be."
Linda Howard, who is
from Lake City but worked
in Gainesville, said the


attacks made her "angry,
upset and sick to her
stomach." But she said she
was proud of how officials
and emergency personnel
responded to the occasion.
"Everybody stepped.
up and showed the true-
American spirit," Howard
said.


MEETING: Discussed Ichetucknee
Continued From Page 1A


with local agriculture pro-
ducers, said Hugh Thomas,
Santa Fe River Partnership
coordinator.
There are 16 new farm-
ers in the program, which
added approximately
18,000 acres.


. Mike Tice, a Columbia
County farmer, is a part of
the program. The program
has helped him better
enhance his production,
he said.
Ide now uses GPS tech-
nology to reduce overlap-


ping chemical spraying
and laptops for data keep-
ing.
"It's going to take all of
us to get where we need to
be," Tice said.
"I'm glad to be a part
of it."


I AKE CITY
COMMUNITY COLLEGE


2009-2010
Lyceum Series
For ticket information call
(386) 754-4340


presents




satin awing
September 15- 7:30 p.m.
Levy Performing
Arts Center
..., . 7Ticklets.,wvite y&2,aleq~Qctober 12
at the PAC Box Office 9 a.m.-4p.m.
Cash, check, debit, & credit cards
(MasterCard & Vsa)


If you have a disability and need assistance, please contact (386) 754-434Q
"Enhance Education and the Arts by supporting LCCC's Foundation"



OPEN IN OUR

SNEW LOCATION!


~1�


Peoples State Bank makes it easyforteachers to earn more by offering an
exclusive savings account with a special 5.51% APY*for classroom teachers
only".. It's Peoples' way to help ourteachers turn their pennies into dollars!
To take advantage of this special opportunityjustfor teachers, visit any Peoples
State Bank location and establish your account with a minimum opening deposit
of $40. Then simplyarrange to have $40 or more electronicallytransferred each
semi-monthly pay period to yourTeacherls Savings Account. You may do this
through payroll deduction, automatic transferfrom another account at Peoples
or electronic debitfrom an account atany other bank, savings and loan or credit
union+. Then all you have to do is sit back and watch your money grow:
Now that's banking!
350 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025 E O P
3882 W. US Hwy 90, Lake City, FL 32055 P L
Telephone 386.754.0002
www.psb.biz Member FDIC _ STATE BANK
':Aitnualrcentage Yild (APY)lseffectiveasof July22.2009. Mnimumbalanceto earnmta tc A'i'$001. Feen.lYrmaymeuccciernyij3. KateI�' 45% l;n5dintlelrt.l
calculated uing thcDailyBatanc Method,omipounded monthly and credited toyouraccount.quartry. Rite are subjectto clhnye.pleae colt.act u5for curl I rlte.
There Is nomonthly maintenance fee for thi account Witdrwal orotrditn xc of 1 per month wll be a6esed an c e wt.ldrawal fee of ' 5 00.
4:Account whichdlscortinueem l-montyericct rnl 0dep tsIn mount 40 ormorewill nolorererble eligible fortlhIproduct, .,tu will L ,rei-cl.0i
to the Regular avinaccount product. The Regular Sv ngAnnual Frcentage Yieldof 0.257.al applyon aIccountswithlinance oft 5.000.00 ornwmr
"Fs-k through 12th gradeCoun Co unty SchoolDtrict Employees.


FREE
S GLASSES
SBuy 1 complete pair of glasses at regular
price and receive a FREE pair of glasses.
. Includes frames and single vision lenses. Offer only good for Lake
City store. Some restrictions apply. Coupon required. Not valid with
any other offers. Expires September 30, 2009.


Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424


- I













OPINION


Friday, September I I, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


IOUR


OUR
OPINION


Sept. 11

united

Americans

So where does the
American spirit find
itself on this eighth
anniversary of the
Sept. 11 terrorist
attacks? Where is our patrio-
tism?
In the waning days following
the shock of Sept. 11, as a coun-
try,, we were the most united
we've been since World War II.
Patriotism was at the forefront
of everything we did and every-
where we looked.
Visually, we were enveloped
by re'd, white and blue bunting
and American flags flying from
nearly every front porch and
vehicle in sight in any direction.
We were united and we were
unbeatable.
Sadly, some need reminding
that today is a significant, his-
torical date in American history.
Many already have forgotten.
Today our. country stands
divided in many areas.
Bickering about issues ranging
from war to economic woes to
healthcare reform echoes at an
all-time high. Government dis-
trust is off the charts.
Patriotism takes many appear-
ances, and regardless of mood,
we need to remember to display
and support the colors of free-
dom. No matter how deeply
we've stumbled as a country,
we're still the strongest on the
planet. We need to renew our
American pride and realize that
united, we can work our way
back to prosperity, security and
increased freedom.
We'canotToFrgetSept Ii? .
We mustcontinue to-buildon ...
the memory of that tragic day,
ensuring that the security of
our country never be taken for
granted.
We must learn from the les-
sons of the past, from the sac-
rifices of those lost on Sept. 11,
and be resolved not to allow the
horror of that day to occur ever
again in our country.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Friday, Sept.
11, the 254th day of 2009.
There are 111 days left in
the year. This is Patriot
Day.
In 2001, America saw its
worst day of terrorism.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Comrbiunity Newspapers Inc.
We:believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.:
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
lengthtand libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


5 things to fix health care


resident Obama
went to the well of
the House and the
House welled up with
discord.
Although his insistence on
the moral imperative and eco-
nomic necessity of overhauling
the health care system was
well received by Democrats,
Republicans remain skeptical.
(Most notably the boorish Joe
Wilson of South Carolina who
shouted that the president was
lying about not subsidizing
health care for illegal immi-
grants although he later apolo-
gized.)
Fact checkers say the presi-
dent was correct about that
point and about not setting up
"death panels" to kill seniors as
a way of cutting costs.
But the nation is now so
polarized, too many people
Believe what they want to
believe, no matter what the facts
are, while demagogues hog the
airwaves.
If the president wants to
succeed in changing the way
health care is handled in this
country, Obama must do five
things:
1. Convince Americans that
the status quo is a prescrip-
tion for disaster. He has to
explain more clearly that small
and large businesses are less
competitive because they are
hamstrung by ever-soaring
health care costs for employees
that businesses in other coun-
tries don't pay. U.S. jobs are not
being created in part because of
health care costs.. If the status
- quo prevails, in a very few years
health care will cost the govern-
ment more than anything else,
including defense.
2. Persuade Americans that


LETTERS TO


Affordable health
insurance necessary
To the Editor:
Concerning the letter "Health
care no government business"
(Sept. 3), the title is certainly
accurate. MedicineNet.com
defines socialized medicine
as, "A system of health care in
which all health personnel and
health facilities, including doc-
tors and hospitals, work for the
government and draw salaries
from the government."
Nothing like that has been pro-
posed in the current legislative
debate. Health insurance would
still be sold by private companies
offering their own programs and
rates. Care would still be pro-
vided by private doctors and facili-
ties. If a "public option" funded by
premiums was to pass, it would
be one more choice available
among hundreds of existing free
market policies.
Medicare, Medicaid, and VA
patients can also choose to use
private insurance, if they do not
have a pre-existing condition
and can afford the premiums.
The government pays the bills
submitted by private doctors and


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@ntionolpress.com
although' most have insurance
and are not in crisis, the risk
of bankruptcy or financial ruin
is just around the corner. Jobs
disappear overnight. Millions
are passing on care they should
get because it costs too much.
Still others find that when they
change jobs, they can't get
insurance because of !re-exist-
ing conditions. Some find their
insurance cancelled when they
get sick. Obama needs to tell
more stories such as the woman
whose insurance was cancelled
when she got breast cancer
because she hadn't mentioned
she had once had acne and the
man who died because he didn't
get treatment when the insur-
ance company said he didn't dis-
close gallstones he didn't even
know he had.
3. Storm the country
explaining that even though
many, especially the yohng,
don't have insurance because
they don't think they need '
it, this drives up the cost for
everyone. Who pays for the
uninsured motorcyclist who
ends up a paraplegic? We all do.
Who pays for the uninsured 20-
something who needs expensive
care for mental illness? We all
do. Nobody plans on getting
cancer or being in a serious
auto accident. Everyone needs
affordable insurance.
4. Convince people that this

THE EDITOR

facilities for health care received
by senior and extremely low-
income participants in these
programs. However, we decide
when to go to the doctor and
what kind of care we want. But
the costs are escalating.
A local doctor billed our insur-
ance $800 for one visit for an ear
ache. A local hospital charged
over $30,000 for my husband's
out-patient procedure. Our pri-
vate insurance premium reached
over $900 a month. One of our
prescriptions sells for $4,500
a month. How many families
can afford charges like these? I
believe that over time preventive
care will reduce the need for
expensive treatments and admin-
istrative costs can be reduced.
We aren't asking for a free
ride. We pay our premiums,
deductibles, and co-pays. We
would like to see affordable
health insurance made available
to all citizens without regard
to pre-existing conditions. The
proposals being debated do
not dictate what insurance or
health care providers we have.
We still get to choose. It is sad
to see people's emotions being
manipulated with inflammatory


is the make-or-break moment.
We've been studying the prob-
lem, he noted, since 1943 when
a reform plan was first offered
in Congress. If nothing is done
this autumn, nothing will be
done next year because it's a
mid-term election year and leg-
islators running for office don't
take big risks.
5. Obama must play for
keeps. This is his legacy; if he
fails, history will judge him a
failure. He has to twist arms,
curry favor and become a pow-
erful persuader instead of a
calm observer on the sidelines.
He wasted too much time this
summer hoping Republicans
would hop on board. He has to
be more definitive about costs,
tort reform and how he'll keep
his promise that health care,
overhaul will not add "one dime
to the deficit."
Just as he had the fire in the
belly to win the election, Obama
must rekindle that fire and go
into full campaign mode to win
over a skeptical public. He has
to convince them that this is
the right course for the nation
on grounds doing nothing will
mean permanent economic
decline.
Obama let others define the
battle. He has just a few short
months to lead the charge to
passage of a bill. His enemies,
gleeful about blocking him, are
many and massed.
Obama made one point that
united both sides of the aisle.
When he said many details
remain to be worked out,
everyone laughed.
M Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White. House and national
politics since 1986.


political statements that are not
supported by the facts.
We are considered a Christian
nation. I like to think that God
doesn't want us to turn away the
sick and the poor.
Jan Rupert
Fort White
Thank you to Friends
of the Library
To the Editor:
It seems appropriate after the
beginning of our school year to
pause and thank the Friends of
the Library for their thoughtful-
ness in hosting a teacher appre-
ciation reception at the down-
town branch on August 31st.
The room was filled with
teachers, volunteers and library
patrons enjoying each others'
company, sharing good food, and
exchanging gift bags and door
prizes. Small acts of kindness
and appreciation mean so much
to our dedicated teachers. I
thank them for their service and
everyone involved with making
sure this wonderful community
event was so successful.
Michael E Millikin
School Superintendent


Deroy Murdock
deroy, murdock@gmail.com


Health

reform

just one

more flop


reform debate
roars on, Uncle
Sam resembles a
Restless college
senior who is flunking econom-
ics, finance, and management.
Despite a report card full of-
Fs, he suddenly announces: "I
want to go to medical school!"
Similarly,. President
Barack Obama stood before
a joint session of Congress
Wednesday night and re-
embraced a government option
for health insurance. As he
explained, "sometimes govern-
ment has to step in to help
deliver" on the promise that
"hard work and responsibility
should be rewarded by some
measure of security and fair
play."
Alas, too often when
Washington steps in, failing
grades follow:
* Medicare, the Great
Society's shining jewel, is a
battered gem. Its hospitals pro-
gram already.bleeds ruby-red
ink. "Medicare Part A again
will spend more in benefits
than it receives th revenues"
this fiscal year, observes
Heritage Foundation analyst
Bob Moffitt. Its trust fund
is an accounting fiction, but
even that fantasy disappears in
eight years, with depletion in
2017. Even worse, Heritage's
Brian Riedl calculates, between
2009 and 2083, Medicare's
budget will zoom from 3.1 per-
cent to 14.8 percent of Gross
Domestic Product. Its unfund-
ed liabilities (promises backed
by campaign balloons instead
of cash) equal $36.3 trillion.
* Social Security, the New
Deal's cornerstone, is as cut-
ting edge as a 78 RPM record.
In 2016, barely six years away,
it will begin paying more in
pension checks than it collects
in payroll taxes. Congress
then will be unable to use
Social Security's surplus like a
ShamWow to absorb red ink.
Social Security's unfunded obli-
gations equal $17.5 trillion -
again not financed by anything
but congressional speeches.
* Fannie Mae and Freddie
Mac: These two government
options in the home mortgage
arena are widely considered
the twin jet engines that flew
the economy into a hillside.
These were supposed to be
money making, quasi-private
companies, with no fed-
eral involvement beyond an
implicit guarantee that govern-
ment would cover its losses.
Emboldened by this cozy
federal safety net, these enter-
prises embarked upon financial
acrobatics they otherwise
might have avoided..
* The Hope for
Homeowners program began
last October 1. Congress gave
it a hefty $300 billion to help
some 400,000 homeowners
avoid foreclosure. According
to an August 10 Newsday edito-
rial, "It has produced exactly
one refinanced loan." One
down, 399,999 to go.
Rather than inaugurate a
frivolous, bottomless govern-
ment option for healthcare,
Washington should launch
a "private option" for nearly
every federal activity outside
the Pentagon.
* New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


4A










LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


BRIEFS


GM to allow
customers returns
DETROIT - General
Motors Co. says it will allow
new car buyers to return their
vehicles within 2 months of
purchasing them for a full
refund if they're not satisfied.
The program is part of a
sweeping, new marketing
campaign, called "May the
Best Car Win."
The automaker says it will
help prove that its vehicles
are competitive when it
comes to quality and perfor-
mance.
GM will allow customers
who purchase a new vehicle
between Sept. 14 and
Nov. 30 to return it for a
refund within 31 to 60 days
from the date of purchase.
The offer applies to
brands such as Chevrolet,
GMAC, Buick and Cadillac.
Pontiacs are not eligible for
the program as the company
is phasing out the brand.
Leased vehicles are also
ineligible.

Chrysler ends
business alliance
DETROIT - Chrysler
Group LLC says it ended
an engine building alliance
with Mitsubishi Motors Corp.
and Hyundai Motor Co. and
is in talks to replace it with
Fiat Group SpA, bringing the
Italian automaker's technol-
ogy to engine manufacturing
in the U.S.
Fiat has 20 percent owner-
ship stake in Chrysler.
The Global Engine
Manufacturing Alliance
between Mitsubishi, Hyundai
and Chrysler was disbanded
last month, with Mitsubishi
and Hyundai selling their
stakes to Auburn Hills, Mich.-
based Chrysler for an undis-
closed amount.

Google willing to
share books
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif.
- Google will let other online
companies sell its digital cop-
ies of out-of-print books if a
class-action settlement with
U.S. authors and publishers
wins court approval.
The company announced
that concession Thursday
after mounting opposition
to Google's 10-month-old
settlement. Among other
things, opponents of the deal
argue it would give Google a
digital monopoly on millions
of books that are no longer
being published.


* Associated Press
Irrir- -Ir lr


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kentucky State Police find a small plot of marijuana hidden among other vegetation on an
Appalachian hillside July 22, near Barbourville, Ky. The demand for domestically grown
marijuana is at a record high, in part because stricter border control has made it more difficult
to import marijuana from Mexico.


Marijuana farming rebounds

in economic hard times


By ROGER ALFORD
Associated Press

BARBOURVILLE,
Ky. - Machete-wielding
police officers have hacked
their way through billions
of dollars worth of mari-
juana in the country's top
pot-growing states to stave
off a bumper crop sprout-
ing in the tough economy.
The amount only got
bigger Thursday when
helicopter spotters in
Tennessee discovered a
pot field near the Kentucky
border with hundreds of
thousands of plants.
The number of plants
seized has jumped this year
in California, the nation's
top marijuana-growing
state, while seizures con-
tinue to rise in Washington
after nearly doubling the


previous year. Growers in
a three-state region of cen-
tral Appalachia also appear
to have reversed a decline
in pot cultivation over the
last two years.
Officers in those areas,
the nation's biggest hot-
beds for marijuana produc-
tion, have chopped down
plants with a combined
street value of around
$12 billion in the first eight
months of this year. While
national numbers aren't
yet available this year, offi-
cers around the country
increased their haul from
7 million plants in 2007 to
8 million in 2008.
"A lot of that, we theo-
*rize, is the economy," said
Ed Shemelya, head of
marijuana eradication for
the Office of Drug Control
Policy's Appalachian


High Intensity Drug
Trafficking Area. "Places
in east Tennessee, east-
ern Kentucky and West
Virginia are probably feel-
ing the recession a lot
more severely than the
rest of the country and
have probably been in that
condition a lot longer than
the rest of the country."
Growers in Appalachia
are often hard-luck entre-
preneurs supplementing
their income by growing
marijuana, authorities
say. Troopers thrashing
through the thick moun-
tain brush there typically
find plots that could eas-
ily be tended by a single
grower, while officers in
the two western states
have focused on larger
fields run by Mexican car-
tels with immigrant labor.


Outdoor Power Equipment

Bennett's TrueValue Hardware
5 South Main Street, High Springs -
- 386-454-1717-- J/WV


LOCAL STOCKS


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
YTD YTD
Name Ex Dlv YId PE Last Chg%Chg Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg
AT&TInc NY 1.64 6.2 13 26.56 +.62 -6.8 iShEMkts NY .60 1.6 ... 37.84 +.49 +51.5
AutoZone NY ...... 13 149.40 +.08 +7.1 Intel Nasd .56 2.8 46 19.76 -.17 +34.8
BkolAm NY .04 .2 47 17.22 +.18 +22.3 LVSands NY ........ 16.24 -.60+173.9
BobEvn Nasd .64 2.3 ... 27.64 +.63 +35.3 Lowes NY .36 1.6 16 21.86 +.14 +1.6
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 4.1 24 15,95 -.05 +42.6 MGMMi NY ......... 11.24 +1.15 -18.3
CSX NY .88 1.8 16 48.17 +1.24 +48.4 McDnlds NY 2.00 3,6 15 54.85 -.24 -11.8
ChampEh NY ... ...... .47 ... -16.1 NYTimes NY ......... 7.72 +.35 +5.3
Chevron NY 2.72 3.8 9 71.45 +1.12 -3.4 NobltyH Nasd .25 2.5 ... 10.00 ... +26.4
Cisco Nasd ...... 22 23.01 +.78 +41.2 OcciPel NY 1.32 1.7 17 76.78 +.93 +28.0
Ciigrp NY ......... 4.75 +.09 -29.2 Penney NY .80 2.5 19 31.45 +.09 +59.6
CocaCI NY 1.64 3.2 19 50.58 -.05 +11.7 PepsiCo NY 1.80 3.1 18 57.86 -.18 +5.6
ColBgp NY ......... .41 ... -80.0 Potash NY .40 .4 11. 90.30 -.74 +23.3
Delhaize NY 2.01 2.9 ... 69.80 -.21 +10.8 PwShsQOONasd .16 .4 ... 41.48 +.39 +39.5
DirFBearrs NY ......... 22.82 -.58 -93.6 Ryder NY 1.00 2.4 21 42.06 +1.55 +8.5
ETrade Nasd ......... 1.71 +.05 +48.7. SearsHldgs Nasd ......... 63.84 -.89 64.2
FPLGrp NY 1.89 3.5 11 54.12 +.06 +7.5 SouthnCo NY 1.75 5.6 16 31.21 +.06 -15.6
FamilyDIr NY .54 1.9 14 27.82 -.05 +6.7 SprintNex NY ......... 3.78 +.10+106.6
FannieMae NY ......... 1.68 +.02+121.1 SPDR NY 2.60 2.5 ... 104.79 +1.06 +16.1
FordM NY ......... 7.44 +.05+224.9 SPDRFnd NY .33 2.3 ... 14.62 +.12 +16.8
GenElec NY .40 2.7 11 14.80 -.07 -8.6 TimeWmrs NY .75 2.5 ... 29.51 +1.04 +32.3
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Report: Agency waives

rules for shipping

hazardous materials


By JOAN LOWY
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Members of Congress
Thursday demanded a
shake up at the agency that
regulates the transport of
hazardous materials, say-
ing officials for years have
quietly waived safety rules
because of a cozy relation-
ship with industry.
The Pipeline and
Hazardous Materials Safety
Administration - which
regulates more than
1 million daily shipments
of potentially dangerous
cargo by land, sea and air
- has routinely granted
or renewed waivers of
rules without attempting
to find out whether ship-
pers had been involved in
accidents or were cited


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for *violations, according
to investigations by the
House Transportation and
Infrastructure Committee
and the Transportation
Department's inspector
general.
The agency's "culture
appears plagued by a belief
that it should make things
as easy as possible for the
industry that it should be
regulating," Rep. James
Oberstar, D-Minn., the
committee's chairman, said
at a hearing.
"It's clear this agency's
relationship with the indus-
try it regulates needs to
be completely overhauled.
Its current state is unac-
ceptable to say the least,"
Oberstar said.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


BRIEFS


Swiss to keep
stolen painting
GENEVA - Swiss law
bars a museum from surren-
dering a 19th-century painting
that it was given after it had
been stolen from a Jewish
family in Paris by the pro-
Nazi Vichy French regime
during World War II, authori-
ties said Thursday.
More than 40 years after
the war, a subsequent owner
of "The Valley of the Stour"
by British painter John
Constable gave it to the city
of La Chaux-de Fonds in
her will, on condition that
the work remain in the local
museum, said Remy Gogniat,
a city spokesman.
When a relative of the
original owner claimed the
painting in 2006, the city near
Switzerland's western bor-
der with France sought two
expert legal opinions in the
case.

Iraqi shoe thrower
to promote causes
BAGHDAD - The Iraqi
television reporter who threw
his shoes at former President
George W. Bush in one of the
more bizarre episodes of the
Iraq war might use his new
iconic status in Iraq to pro-
mote humanitarian causes,
his family said.
The reporter, Muntadhar
al-Zeidi, is to be released
Monday after nine months in
prison. He will be greeted by
a nation where many feel his
act of protest encapsulated
their own bitterness over the
war and U.S. occupation.

Child death rate
continues decline
UNITED NATIONS - It
is unacceptable that 8.8 mil-
lion children die every year
before their fifth birthday
- 40 percent of them in
India, Nigeria and Congo, the
U.N. children's agency said
Thursday.
New data released by
UNICEF and published online
in The Lancet, a British medi-
cal journal, shows ' continu-
ing decline in the death rate
for youngsters under the age
of 5, a trend that has cohtin-
ued for the last two decades.
Progress has been seen
in every part of the world,
* Associated Press


Effects of Arctic


warming seen


as widespread


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. takes part in a news conference on Capitol Hill
Thursday, in Washington.


Dems say health care


bill to pass this year


By DAVID ESPO
AP Special Correspondent

WASHINGTON -
Democratic congressional
leaders predicted passage
of health care legislation
within a few months despite
undimmed Republican
opposition, claiming
momentum Thursday from
President Barack Obama's
speech and renewed com-
mitment from lawmak-
ers fresh from a month
of meetings with constitu-
.ents.
Increasingly, events
in the Senate Finance
Committee appeared pivot-
al, precursor to likely votes
in both the House and the
Senate by early October.
"I'm confident the presi-


dent will sign a bill this
year," said House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi of California.
While effusively praising
Obama's speech from the
night before, Pelosi and
Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid of Nevada sig-
naled separately the presi-
dent may not prevail in
his call for legislation that
allows the fedeFal govern-
ment to sell insurance in
competition with private
industry.
Reid said that while he
favors a strong "public
option," he could be sat-
isfied with establishment
of nonprofit cooperatives,
along the lines expected to
be included in the bill tak-
ing shape in the Finance
Committee.


Pelosi, who has long
favored a measure that
allows the government to
sell insurance, passed up a
chance to say it was a non-
negotiable demand.
As long as legislation
makes quality health care
more accessible and afford-
able, "we will go forward
with that bill," she said.
Democrats are divided
over the public option
in both houses, liber-
als strongly in favor and
many moderates against
it. Critically, though, it
appears that any chance for
Republican support. would
evaporate if legislation
permits immediate, direct
competition between the
government and insurance
industry.


By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID
Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Arctic
warming is affecting plants,
birds, animals and insects
as ice melts and the grow-
ing season changes, scien-
tists report in a new review
of the many impacts climate
change is having on the far
north. As the global climate
changes, the Arctic Circle
has been warming faster
than other regions and sci-
entists have documented a
series of affects on wildlife
in the region.
Indeed, just last week
researchers reported that
the Arctic is warmer than
it's been in 2,000 years, even
though it should be cool-
ing because of changes in
the Earth's orbit that cause
the region to get less direct
sunlight. "The Arctic as we
know it may soon be a thing
of the past," Eric Post, an
associate professor of
biology at Penn State
University, said in a state-
ment.
Post led a research team
that studied the Arctic dur-
ing the International Polar
Year, which ended in 2008.
Their findings are report-
ed in Friday's edition of the
journal Science.
Snow cover has declined
steadily in recent years
and in the last two to three
decades the minimum sea ice
coverage declined sharply, a
change that affect animals
like polar bears that depend
on the ice for habitat and
hunting.


"Species on land and at
sea are suffering adverse
consequences of human
behavior at latitudes
thousands of miles away,"
Post said. "It seems no mat-
ter where you look - on the
ground, in the air, or in the
water - we're seeing signs
of rapid change."
In addition, he added,
the Arctic is very complex
and "not all populations
within a given species
respond similarly to warm-
ing because physical and
landscape features that
interact with climate can
vary tremendously from
site to site."
For example, migra-
tory caribou in Greenland
and elsewhere are declin-
ing, the researchers said,
since the animals have not
been able to adjust their
calving season to keep it
synchronized with changes
in plant growth.
As a result, the time
when the females need
the most food no longer
matches the time when the
most food is available, and
fewer calves survive. In
addition, warmer weather
can produce more insects
and parasites to prey on
the caribou.
On the other hand, wild
reindeer on the Norwegian
islands of Svalbard appear
to have benefited from
the earlier seasonal loss
of snow cover. These ani-
mals don't migrate and the
longer growing season and
less snow cover means
more food for them.


221 missing after Sierra Leone boat capsizes


By CLARENCE ROY-
MACAULAY
Associated Press

S' FREETOWN, Sierra
Leone - More than
200 people, including many
schoolchildren returning
from holidays, remained
missing Thursday, a day


after a wooden boat cap-
sized at sea and left at least
eight dead, police said.
Some 39 passengers
have been rescued so far
off the coast of the West
African nation, police offi-
cial Ibrahim Samura said.
At least 221 people remain
missing and some of the


passengers also were trav-
eling with young children,
Samura said.
"Most of the passengers
were school-going children
returning from holidays,"
Samura said. The boat was
traveling from the village
of Shenge to Tombo, near
Freetown, when the acci-


dent occurred Wednesday.
"On the day of the acci-
dent the sea was:rough and
it was ,nAdy," S&nidra-said,
adding, that:.the boat alos
may have capsized because
of overloading. In addition
to the at least 268 people'
aboard, the Teh Teh also
was carrying other goods.


The boat has been found
afloat, Samura said, and
search and rescue opera-
Stions weeke continuing in the
area,.
Sierra Leone is in the
middle of its rainy season,
with persistent and heavy
storms affecting both land
and sea.


OBITUARIES


Lois H. Armitage
Mrs. Lois H. Armitage, 95, of
Lake City, died late Wednesday
evening, September 9, 2009 inthe
Shands at Lake Shore Hospital
following a brief illness. A
native of Omaha, Nebraska, Mrs.
Armitage had been a resident of
Lake City, for the past nine years
having moved here from.Orlando.
Mrs. Armitage was an award
winning actress and had been
associated with the play houses
Sand theatres in both Jacksonville
and Orlando, Florida. She was
an extremely talented artist who
excelled in both painting and
sculpting. In her spare time Mrs.
Armitage enjoyed reading and
working cross word puzzles. She
was a very avid supporter of
the Humane Society and was
actually able to reside by herself
until her recent ill health. Mrs.
Armitage was preceded in death
by her beloved husband, James
Armitage, a daughter, Diane
Koslik and two grandchildren.
Mrs. Armitage is survived by her
children, David Geary (Colleen)
a retired systems analyst who
resides in Moraga, California;
Susan G. Williams (David) a
veterinarian with Lake City
Animal Hospital here in Lake
City and Patricia Geary (Jack
Lopez) a writer who resides in
Redlands, California. Eleven
grandchildren survive, including,
Troy Williams, Austin Williams
and Jessica Williams Little who
are all Lake City residents.
Numerous great-grandchildren
other family' members and
friends and her beloved pets,
Lucy and Ben also survive.
Cremation arrangements are
' under the direction off he DEES-
PARRISHFAMILYFUNERAL
HOME, 458 S. Marion Aye.,


Lake City, FL 32025. (752-1234
or 752-2211) Please sign the on-
line family guestbook at www.
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. com


Totsie Copeland
Mother Totsie "Momma Tot"
Copeland, daughter of the late
Henry and Pearl Paige, Sr. was
bornMarch 11,1947 inSanderson,


schools of



married the only love of her
life, the late Nathaniel "Sonny"
Copeland. Mother Copeland fully
and faithfully accepted Christ
under the Pastorate, of Bishop
Ernest Folston, Jr. She was a
member of. Kingdom Christian
Fellowship International Church,
Sanderson, Florida where she
served faithfully in various
capacities, including Mother of
the Church. "Momma Tot" as
she was affectionately known
was full of wisdom. She was
the perfect example of what a
wife, mother, sister and friend
should be. Saturday September
5, 2009, Mother Totsie slept
quietly away. She leaves to
cherish precious memories:
Six devoted daughters, Wendy
(Jessie) Simmons, Laverna
(Carey) Dolison, both of
Sanderson, FL., Natalie (Julian)
Lee, Macclenny, FL., Sunny
Copeland, Jacksonville, FL.,
Ashley and Naudia Copeland,
Sanderson, FL.; devoted sons,
Elder Leonard (JoAnn) Lewis
and Pastor Wyndell (Almeda)


Wallace; godson, Shaquille
Tisdale; mother-in-law, Florine
Copeland; seven brothers, Wilbur
Stewart, Macclenny, FL., Henry
(Mary) Paige, Jr., Sanderson,
FL., Morris (Ola) Paige,
Raiford, FL., Bishop Vernon
(Wanda) Paige, Sanderson,
EL., Roosevelt (Arnita) Paige,
Lake City, FL., Charles (Linda)
Jefferson, E.J. (Bobbie Lee)
Paige, both of Sanderson, FL.;
five sisters, Rita (Willie) Givens,
Mattie Givens, Ernestine (Collis)
Givens, Mary Alice Jefferson,
all of Sanderson, FL., Flossie
(Hardrick) McGuire, Lake City,
FL.; brothers-in-law, Donnell
(Loretta) Copeland, Ernest (Tina)
Copeland; sisters-in-law, Anabell
Hathcock, Frances Reynolds;
uncles, Jacob Caine, Henry Lee
McDonald; aunts, Mother Hilda
McCray, Dot McDonald; 10
grandchildren; a host of loving
nieces, nephews, other relatives
and friends. Funeral services
for Mother Copeland will be
Saturday, September 12, 2009 at
2:00 P.M. at Christian Fellowship
Temple. 251 W. Ohio Avenue.
Macclenny, Florida. The family
will receive friends Friday,
September 11, 2009 from 6:00
- 8:00 P.M. at the Funeral Home.
Arrangements are entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street. Lake
City, Florida. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, .L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"


Cleveland Dix
Graveside Services for Mr.
Cleveland Dix, will be held
1:00 p.m., Sunday, September
13, 2009 at Mt. Tabor Cemetery
Lake City, I I
Florida with
Elder George
M. Dix,
officiating. Mr.
Dix 89, died
September .
5, 2009 at
Lakeside
Health Center. He was born in
Lake City, Florida, relocated
to West Palm Beach where
he resided over fifty years.
Survivors include: his dedicated
and beloved Mrs. Corene Dix,
one daughter; Freddie Nell
Green, Vero Beach, Florida;
two granddaughters: Cassandra
Green-Robinson, Tampa, Florida
and Kamala Goslton (Curtis),
one grandson: Lovett Cummings
(Aprielle) both of West Palm
Beach, Florida. Four great
grands and a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins and sorrowing
friends. The family will receive
guest and public viewing will
be Sunday, September 13, 2009
from 1:00 to 2:00 pm at Mt.
Tabor Cemetery. Arrangements
entrusted to: Stevens Brother
Funeral Home, 1803 North
Tamarind Avenue, West
Palm Beach, Florida 33407
and COMBS FUNERAL
HOME - 400 E. Washington
Street - Lake City, Florida


Alligator Community Theater
is Casting Actors for
Sesquicentennial Commemoration

The historical play for Lake City's Sesquicentennial will need

Six teenagers - three female, three male
Twelve adults - four female, eight male
Stage, prop, costume and make-up hands
Set artists and builders

Auditions will be held Monday and Tuesday, September
14th and 15th in the Fellowship Hall of First Presbyterian
Church starting at 6:00 p.m. Anyone interested in
performing or assisting in this production is encouraged
to attend the auditions. The church is located at 697 SW
Baya Drive.


Eleanor B. Eckert
Mrs. Eleanor B. Eckert, 102,
of Lake City. went to her
Heavenly Father on Wednesday,
September 09. 2009 at the Haven
Hospice in Lake City. A native of
Alexandria, VA, Mrs. Eckert was
the daughter of the late Rufus
and Ethel Peyton Mitchell, and
had lived in Rockville, MD and
Washington DC before moving
to Lake City in 1989. She was
a retired waitress, and was a
member of Hopeful Baptist
Church where she was a member
of the Dorcas Sunday School
Class, and was involved in many
church activities. She enjoyed
singing, crafts, and reading the
Bible, and was the mother of
seven children. Mrs. Eckert
was preceded in death by her
husband, Howard Eckert in 1987,
and four children, Robert S.
Kidd, Joseph B. Kidd, Raymond
L. Kidd, and Doris Mancuso.
Mrs. Eckert is survived by
three daughters, Catherine
Dicks of Lake City, Betty Jean
Spreitzer (Richard) of Memphis,


TN, and Joyce Hackman of
Lake City; two sisters, Helen
Laughlin of Bellview, NE and
Caroline Raugh of Stuart, FL;
nineteen grandchildren, thirty-
eight great grandchildren, and
fifteen great-great grandchildren
also survive. Funeral services
for Mrs. Eckert will be held at
Hopeful Baptist Church at 11:00
A.M., Saturday, September 12,
2009 with Dr. Rodney Baker
officiating. Interment will
follow at the Bethlehem Baptist
Church Cemetery (on S.R.
100). Visitation with the family
will be held from 5:00-7:00
P.M. on Friday, September 11�
2009. Arrangements are under
the direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 S. HWY 441,
Lake City. (386) 752-1954.
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424






LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009 7A


"Don't Put Me In A

Nursing Home!"

Having worked hard all her life, I was happy to see that Mom was finally enjoying some time with friends.
But, I could also see that keeping up with the household chores had become too much for her. Every so often,
I was reminded of a promise Mom had asked me to make years earlier-not to put her in a nursing home just
because she might be slowing down. Thanks to a recommendation by her doctor, we found the perfect solution--
WillowBrook Assisted Living.

Assisted Living IS NOT a Nursing Home

Before our first visit to WillowBrook, I really hadn't realized the difference between nursing homes and
assisted living facilities. Quite simply, living at WillowBrook takes away all the drudgeries of life while
enhancing the best parts. Soon, we both came to realize why the residents at WillowBrook say "Life Is Good Here."
Things such as lawn maintenance, household repairs, housekeeping and laundry have been replaced with big screen
TV, bridge, bingo and lots of visiting with friends-both new and old.

Warning: My Mother Is A "Finicky" Eater

I still remember sitting down with Mike Roper and Debbie Brannon on the day of our initial tour. (They're
WillowBrook's Managing Partner and Administrator.) I kept stressing that Mom had long been accustomed to her
own southern-style cooking, and that she wasn't exactly easy to please. That's when
Mike and Debbie invited us for dinner at WillowBrook. All I can say is that Mom's
been a resident at WillowBrook for some time now, and she still raves about the
Food, although she's careful to never admit that it's "better" than her own cooking.
Often, when Mom and I want to have lunch or dinner together, we choose to dine
at WillowBrook. Honestly, there aren't many restaurants with food that compares. (We both highly recommend
the Hush Puppies and Pecan Pie, by the way.)

My Mother Is Safe, Well Cared For and Happy at WillowBrook

I'm happy to tell friends and family that, thanks to WillowBrook, . : * ..
Mom is eating fabulously well while enjoying her golden years among ' "ji
some truly wonderful folks. She's kept busy with a host of fun activities "'ji sfni d ' . '
each and every day. She even still gets her hair done weekly right there .
in WillowBrook's own salon. Her beautifully appointed apartment b. ..:. -UESTROOM
overlooks a'gazebo and pond, filled with turtles and swans..; .

And She's NOT in a Nursing Home, i .. ;
AL9909
She's at WillowBrook Assisted Living. Yes, life is good there.





SCall For A Complimentary Tour
, 1580 S. Marion Avenue * Lake City

Assisted Living .


www.LifelsGood Here.com


MomMae' MeProis








LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Reporter
A Sonic employee watches Lake City Police officers Michael Del Castillo (center) and Staci
Brownfield dust for fingerprints after the restaurant was robbed late Wednesday Night.


Sonic restaurant robbed

by two masked men


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.corn
SThe Sonic Drive-in restai-
rant was robbed Wednesday
night when the store's man-
ager was knocked uncon-
scious and two unidentified
men robbed and escaped
with an undisclosed amount
of cash from the restaurant.
The Lake City Police
Department is investigating
the case as a strong-armed
robbery.
According to Lake City
Police Department public
information officer Capt.
Rudolph Davis, though no
weapon was seen during the


-incident, it is being investi-
gated as a strong armed rob-
bery because of the manner
in which it occurred.
.The robbery took place
at approximately 11:40 p.m.
at the restaurant, located at
,2395 SW. Main Boulevard,
when the suspects, dressed
Sin, black and wearing ski-
masks,'alked into the store
as it was closing.
'They hit the manager
in the head and he was
knocked unconscious,"
Davis said. "He received
medical attention and he's
fine, but we don't know what
they hit him with. There
were no guns or weapons


shown, they just walked up
and told him to give them
the money. They made
the manager give him the
money bag."
The two suspects have
been described as tall, black
men, wearing long sleeve
black shirts, black pants
and ski masks.
Police said the men fled
the scene on foot after the
robbery, but K-9 units were
unable to track the sus-
pects.
Anyone with any addi-
tional information about
the robbery is asked to call
LCPD detective Paul Kash
at 752-4344.


9.12 project to meet at Olustee Park
From staff reports n c r i as nl f S n


The North Central
Florida 9.12 Project is host-
ing its first barbecue and cel-
ebration at noon Saturday.
The event will be in the
Olustee Park in downtown
Lake City.


J llUv � CL LL HI I iUll Z Mi A
encouraged to bring chairs
and blankets.
The March on
Washington, hosted by
Glenn Beck, will possibly
be broadcast.
Pork sandwiches and
barbecue chicken plates


the event or $6 for advance
tickets.
Contact Judy Thacker at
k ,i, .eal',n , /m li.htnwil comn
for ticket information.
Also, everyone is asked -
to bring a canned item to
donate to a food drive.


.- 2009 deep mangledr 2009 Rawm 0a0 m0m9RUNlow
9J28 9DT58





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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirbye@lakecityreporte.com


SPORTS


Friday, September I I, 2009


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS


Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom

Football

family

We have
been
keeping
in touch
with
Draymenski Wilson, the
former Columbia High
player who starts at
Florida A&M.
Clayrinski Wilson,
Dray's older brother,
recently checked in from
Homestead. Clayrinski
was a varsity linebacker
for the Tigers in 1989-90.
Clayrinski wrote to tell
of a senior at Princeton
Christian School, an ath-
lete with the potential to
earn six letters this year.
Clayon Wilson is a
middle blocker on the
Panthers volleyball team,
where she serves as
team captain. Clayon
plays softball, basketball,
track and plans to add
soccer this year.
Oh yeah, the sixth
sport - football, which
Princeton Christian
added this year.
Clayrinski's
daughter is 5-8 with a
28-inch vertical leap
and she leg presses 640
pounds.
There are others in the
Wilson wing of Panthers
football.
Sons Demetri, 15, and
Brandon and Eldrick,
both 14, all start on the
varsity football team.
Demetri, a sophomore,
bench presses 320
S pounds, while
freshmen Brandon is 6-1,
200 pounds, and Eldrick
is 5-10, 185 pounds.
I put a big
typo-hurting on Albert
Coker in the Aug. 21 list
of local football players
in the college ranks.
Coker caught 30 passes
'last year at Truman State
for 489 yards, 300 yards
more than I gave him in
the article.
After two games this
year, Coker is fourth on
Truman State (1-1) in
all-purpose yards.

LaGarrette Blount, the
Oregon running back
who was suspended for
the season, played for
Taylor County against
Fort White in one of its
classic games.
In 2003, the Indians
and Bulldogs played to
begin the season.
Blount carried the ball
30 times for 298 yards
and had touchdown runs
of 83, 10, 2 and 1 yards.
Fort White had an
answer in running back
Darius Wright. Wright
rushed for 238 yards on
28 carries and scored on
runs of 7 and 4 yards.
Trailing 34-28 at the
end of the third
quarter, the Indians got
two touchdown runs
from Donald Lewis in the
fourth quarter to pull out
a 41-34 win.
Blount fumbled on the
Fort White 2 with less
than a minute left in the
game. It was the only
win of the season for the
Indians.


* Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


Open house:



CHS, Fort White ready for home openers


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
The key that opens the door to
a victory for any football team is
offensive balance.
Columbia (0-0-1) employed that
strategy against Charlton County
(Ga.) last week on it's way to a
48-48 tie. The Tigers hope to use
the same strategy this week and
pick up their first win against
Gainesville High (1-0).
Against the Indians, the Tigers
split their balance between halves
going pass happy in the first half
and unleashing Tiger Powell in
the second half.


"We want balance when it's
all said and done," coach Craig
Howard said. "We want to distrib-
ute the ball to different people
with the balance. It's harder to
defend when we distribute it to
different people. If you distrib-
ute it all to one guy, it's easy to
defend. When you do things dif-
ferently, it's harder to take away."
Coming off of 253 yards in the
first regular season football game,
the Tigers may try to get Powell
involved earlier.
" We want to be able to run
more each week," Howard said.
TIGERS continued on 4B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Brach Bessant (22) brings Fort White High's Montre Cray
(10) down in the kickoff classic on Aug. 28 in Lake City.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Soron Williams (21) is dragged down by a Madison
County defender on Aug. 24 in Madison.


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE - Fort White
High opens its home football slate
with a team that has become a
regular on the schedule.
The Indians host Newberry
High at 7:30 p.m. today.
Fort White dropped the season-
opener, 42-26, at Madison County
High last week. Newberry beat up
on visiting Santa Fe High, 41-14.


"We don't have many easy
games," Fort White head coach
Demetric Jackson said. 'They
are just as tough and physical as
Madison."
Fort White and Newberry are
now in Class 2B after realignment,
and both are coming off playoff
seasons. The teams have met
annually since 2003.
Fort White was runner-up last
INDIANS continued on 4B


Wolves knock off Indians


Richardson beats
FortWhite 8-0 in
opener for both.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Richardson Middle
School scored a late touch-
down to hold off visiting
Fort White Middle School,
8-0, in the first game of the
season for both teams.
Punting problems and
the Wolves defense kept the
Indians pinned in their ter-
ritory much of the last half.
Fort White's defense held
firm until Richardson set up
on the Indians 22-yard line.
The Wolves turned to Davin
Pierce and handed him the
ball four times for all the
yardage. The touchdown
came from four. yards out
with 3:50 left in the game.


Alex Weber ran in the two-
point conversion.
"Both defenses were
good," Wolves head coach
Wade Burlingame said.
"You have to give credit
to our defensive coaches.
We've got some work to do
on offense. We had a lot of
jitters and I'm glad to get
this one under our belts."
Maurice Nelson stopped
the Wolves opening drive
of the second half with an
interception. He returned
it 23 yards to midfield. Fort
White made one first down,
but the Richardson defense
and cramps kept the Indians
at bay.
"I was real proud of our
kids," Indians head coach
Mike Hunter said. "I felt
we were just not quite
ready. We didn't have as
much practice time and our
conditioning hurt us."


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Richardson Middle School cheerleaders for 2009-10 are (front row, from left) captain
Katie Hall and captain Kayla Carman. Second row (from left) are Antyria Caldwell, co-captain
Lacey King, Lorrae Blalock, Courtney Parker, Shelby Overstreet, Fallon Sterling,
Brianna Pope, Cheyenne Willems and co-captain Emily Larson. Back row (from left) are
assistant coach Caleb Charles, Danielle Turner, Ranicka Givens, Kaitlin Fowler,
Krischara Anderson-Caldwell, Bethany Larson, Kaitlyn Brink, Nikole Bryant, Kelsie Burnsed
and head coach Shannon Hall.


* ' .:i


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the 2009 Richardson Middle School football team are (front row, from left) Sayvon Miller, Rodney Williamson, Ronnie Williamson,
Andrew Howard, Deondre Mathews, Justin Winn, Zac Register, Xavier Rose, Marcus W~eston, Andre Williamson, Joseph Drawdy, Russell Baxter,
Antonio Phillips and Allen Whitehead. Second row (from left) are coach Jeremiah Hook, Zyeric Woods, Dillon Brown, Richard Williams, Zedrick Woods,
Jamarquis Langley, Robert Getzan, John Baker, Fred Smith, Cristopher Washington, Alexander Butler, Dylan Regar, Tre'Var Lee and coach John Brown, Third
row (from left) are coach Jason Floyd, Alexander Weber, Terrivio Williams, Akeem Jones, Demario Jackson, Austin Williams, Davin Pierce, Robert Dace,
Cole Carver, Isaiah Allen, Tyler Bethea, Gabe Allen and coach Dick McAdams. Back row (from left) are head coach Wade Burlingame, Ricky Mobley,
Deontae Crumitie, Thomas Yates, James Johnson, Michael Burlingame, Keith Harris, Zack Beverly, Quinton Drawdy, Tayvion Steward, Robert Radford,
Aaron Burkart and coach Kenneth Johnson. Artis Berry, James Williamson and Blake Dicks also are on the coaching staff and Denis Turner is manager.,











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
SPEED - Formula One, practice for
Italian Grand Prix, at Monza, Italy
10 a.m.
ESPN2 - NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, final practice for Virginia 529
College Savings 250, at Richmond,Va.
Noon
SPEED - NASCAR. Sprint Cup,
practice for Chevy Rock & Roll 400, at
Richmond,Va.
2 p.m.
ESPN2 - NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series:' final practice for
Chevy Rock & Roll 400. at Richmond,Va.
4 p.m.
ESPN2 - NASCAR: Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Virginia 529
College Savings 250, at Richmond.Va.
5:30 p.m.
ESPN2 - NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Chevy Rock & Roll 400, at
Richmond,Va.
, 7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 - NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, Virginia 529 College Savings 250,
at Richmond,Va.
BASKETBALL
6:30 p.m.
ESPN - Hall of Fame Enshrinement
Ceremony, at Springfield, Mass.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN - Colorado atToledo
CYCLING
Ia.m.
VERSUS - Tour of Missouri, fifth
stage, at Sedalia, Mo. (delayed tape)
GOLF
9 am.
TGC - European PGA Tour,
Mercedes-Benz Championship, second
round, at Cologne, Germany
12:30 p.m.
TGC - LPGA, NW Arkalsas
Championship, first round, at Rogers, Ark.
3 p.m.
TGC - PGA Tour, BMW
Championship, second round, at Lemont,
Ill.
6:30 p.m.
TGC - Nationwide Tour. Utah
Championship, second round, at Sandy,
Utah (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2:10 p.m.
WGN - Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs
10 p.m.
WGN - Chicago White Sox at LA.
Angels
TENNIS
12:30 p.m,
CBS - U.S. Open, men's doubles and
women's semifinals, at NewYork

BASEBALL

NL standings '

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 79 58 .577 -
Florida 74 65 .532 6
Atlanta 71 68 .511 9
NewYork 62 77 .446 18
Washington 47 92 .338 33
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 84 57 .596 -
Chicago 71 67 .514 I11'-
Houston 68 71 .489 15
Milwaukee' 66 73 .475, 17
Cincinnati 63 77 .450 20'A
Pittsburgh 54 84 .391 28/'
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 83 58 .589 -
Colorado 81 60 .574 2
San Francisco 76 64 .543 6'A
San Diego 63 78 .447 20
Arizona . 62 79 .440 21
Thursday
Colorado 5, Cincinnati I
Today's Games
Cincinnati (Lehr 4-1) at Chicago Cubs
(Harden 9-8), 2:20 p.m.
N.Y. Mts (Figueroa 2-4) at Philadelphia
(Hamels 8-9), 7:05 p.m.
Washington (J.Martin 3-4) at Florida
(Jo.Johnson 14-4), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 3-7) at Houston
(Norris 4-3), 8:05 p.m.
Atlanta (urrjens 10-10) at St. Louis


CHS CROSS COUNTRY

Booster meeting

planned Thursday
A Columbia High and
Eye of the Tiger
parent/booster meeting is
planned for 5:45 Thursday
at the CHS cafeteria.
For details, e-mail coach
April Morse at
morse_al@firn. edu.

YOUTH SOFTBALL

Fort White plans
fall girls league
The Fort White Girls
Softball Association will be
playing a fall league.
SFor details, call Rodney
Cole at (352) 225-1356, or
e-mail rodney@fwgsa.org.

OUTDOORS
Florida Trail
meets Monday
The Suwannee Chapter
of the Florida Trail
Association's monthly
meeting is 7-9 p.m.
Monday at the Suwannee


.(Pineiro 14-9), 8 15 p.m.
Milwaukee (Looper 11-6) at Arizona
(D.Davis 7-12). 9:40 p.m.
Colorado (De La Rosa 14-9) at San
Diego (Mulica 3-4), 10:05 p.m
L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 5-6) at San
Francisco (Cain 13-4), 10:15 p.m

AL standings


East Division
W L
NewYork 91 50.
Boston 81 58
Tampa Bay 72 68
Toronto .63 77
Baltimore 56 83
Central Division
W L
Detroit 75 64
Minnesota 70 70
Chicago 70 71
Cleveland 60 79
Kansas City 55 85
West Division
W L
Los Angeles 83 55
Texas 79 69
Seattle 72 68
Oakland 62 77
Thursday
Toronto 3, Minnesota 2
Kansas City 7, Detroit 4
Today's Games


Pct GB
.645 -
.583 9
.514 18'
.450 27',
.403 34


Baltimore (Tillman 1-3) at N.Y.Yankees
(Pettitte 13-6). 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Greinke 13-8) at
Cleveland (Masterson 4-7), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Tallet 6-9) at Detroit
(E.Jackson 12-6). 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay O.Shields 9-10) at Boston
(Lester 12-7), 7:10 p.m.
Seattle (Morrow 0-4). at Texas
(Millwood 10-9), 8:05 p.m.
Oakland (Mortensen 0-2) at Minnesota
(Blackburn 9-10), 8:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (G.Floyd 11-9) at
LA.Angels O.Saunders 12-7), 10:05 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL games

Thursday's Game
Tennessee at Pittsburgh (n)
Sunday's Games
Miami atAtlanta, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Houston, I p.m.
Detroit at New Orleans, I p.m.
Denver at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Kansas City at Baltimore, I p.m.
Dallas atTampa Bay, I p.m.
Minnesota at Cleveland, I p.m.
Philadelphia at Carolina, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, I p.m.
St. Louis at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Giants, 4:15 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
Chicago at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Buffalo at New England, 7 p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 10-15 p.m.

College games

Today
Colorado (0-1) at Toledo (0-1), 9 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Chevy Rock & Roll 400
Site: Richmond,Va.
Schedule:Today, practice (Speed, noon-
1:30 p.m.), practice (ESPN2, 2-3:30 p.m.),.
qualifying (ESPN2, 5:30-7 p.m.); Saturday,
race, 7:30 p.m. (ABC, 7-11:30 p.m.).
Track: Richmond International
Raceway (oval, 0.75 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 400 laps.
Next race: Sylvania 300, Sept. 20, New
Hampshire Motor Speedway, Loudon.
N.H.
On the Net: http://www.noscor.com
NATIONWIDE
Virginia 529 College Savings 250
Site: Richmond,Va.
Schedule: Today, practice (ESPN2,
10 a.m.-noon), qualifying (ESPN2,
4-5:30 p.m.), race, 8 p.m. (ESPN2,
7-10 p.m.).
Track: Richmond International
Raceway.
Race distance: 187.5 miles, 250 laps.
Next race: Dover 200, Sept. 26, Dover



BRIEFS

River Water Management
District Office. The
program is "Water Issues
in the Suwannee Valley
Region" by David Sill,
Executive Director for the
Suwannee River Water



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I HECKE


GILOOG
-TT I I
NEW Jumble IPione App go to:wwwbit.y/150kRq

THYFOR

7~ 1 /


International Speedway, Dover, Del.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Copart 200
Site: Madison, Ill.
Schedule: Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed. I I a.m.-12:30 p.m.); race. 1:30 p.m.
(Speed. 2-5 p.m).
Track: Gateway International Raceway
(oval, 1.25 miles).
Race distance: 200 miles, 160 laps.
Next race: Heluva Good! 200, Sept.
19. New Hampshire Motor Speedway,
Loudon, N.H.
FORMULA ONE
Italian Grand Prix
Site: Monza, Italy.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
8-9:30 a.m.); Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30-10 a.m., 4:30-7 p.m.).
Track:Autodromo Nazionale di Monza
(road course, 3.6 miles).
Race distance: 190.8 miles, 53 laps.
Next race: Singapore Grand Prix, Sept.
27, Marina Bay, Singapore.
On the Net: http://www.formulal.com

TENNIS

U.S. Open

Wednesday
Singles
Men
Quarterfinals
Novak Djokovic (4), Serbia, def.
Fernando Verdasco (10), Spain, 7-6 (2),
1-6,7-5,6-2.
Roger Federer (I), Switzerland, def.
Robin Soderling (12), Sweden, 6-0, 6-3,
6-7 (6), 7-6 (6).
Women
Quarterfinals
Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, def.
Kateryna Bondarenko. Ukraine, 7-5, 6-4.
Caroline Wozniacki (9), Denmark, def.
Melanie Oudin, United States, 6-2, 6-2.
Doubles
Men
Semifinals
Lukas Dlouhy, Czech Republic, and
Leader Paes (4), India, def. Bob and Mike
Bryan (I), United States, 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (6).
Mahesh Bhupathi. India, and Mark
Knowles (3), Bahamas, def. Max Mirnyi,
Belarus, and Andy Ram (5), Israel, 6-4,
6-2.

GOLF

Golf week

U.S. GOLF ASSOCIATION
ROYAL AND ANCIENT GOLF
CLUB OF ST.ANDREWS
Walker Cup
Site:Ardmore, Pa.
Schedule: Saturday-Sunday.
Course: Merion Golf Club, East
Course (6,846 yards, par 70).
Television: Golf Channel (Saturday,
4-6 p.m.; Sunday, midnight-2 a.m., 4-6 p.m.,
Monday, midnight-2 a n.).
Format: Team match play. Saturday.
four morning alternate-shot matches and
eight afternoon singles matches; Sunday.
four morning alternate-shot matches and
10 afternoon singles matches.
United States: Bud Cauley, Jacksonville;
Rickie Fowler. Murrieta, Calif.; Brendan
Gielow. Muskegon, Mich.; Brian Harman,
Savannah, Ga.; Morgan Hoffmann, Saddle
Brook, N.J.; Adam Mitchell, Chattanooga,
Tenn.; Nathan Smith, Pittsburgh; Cameron
Tringale, Laguna Niguel, Calif.; Peter
Uihleln. Orlando; Drew Weaver, High
Point. N.C. Captain: George Maricci Jr.,
Villanova, Pa.
Britain and Ireland: Wallace Booth,
Scotland; Gavin Dear, Scotland; Niall
Kearney, Ireland; Tommy Fleetwood,
England; Luke Goddard, England; Matt
Haines, England; Eamonn Hodgson,
England; Sam Hutsby, England; Chris
Paisley, England; Dale Whitnell, England.
Captain: Colin Dalglelsh, Scotland.
On the Net http://www.wolkercup.org
OTHER TOURNAMENTS
Men
U.S. GOLF ASSOCIATION: USGA
Senior Amateur, Saturday-Thursday,
Beverly Country Club, Chicago. On the
Net: http://www.senioram.org
Women
U.S. GOLF ASSOCIATION: USGA
Senior Women's Amateur, Saturday-
Thursday, The Homestead, Cascades
Course, Hot Springs, Va. On the Net:
http://www.seniorwom.org


Management District.
For details, call Sylvia
Dunnam at (386) 362-3256,
or visit
dunnams@windstream. net.

N From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print answer here: [I II I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: ENACT LOGIC UNWISE VARIED
Answer: Why the banker didn't have many friends -
HE WAS A "LOANER"


Rebuilding year: Jaguars


seeking quick turnaround


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE -
When the Jacksonville
Jaguars started grow-
ing beards before train-
ing camp, running back
Maurice Jones-Drew
called it a "movement."
It turned out to be a
youth movement.
After parting ways with
more than a dozen vet-
erans in the offseason,
the Jaguars continued
the trend while shaping
their roster for the season
opener. Cornerback Brian
Williams, right tackle Tony
Pashos and quarterback
Todd Bouman were cut.
Even veteran long snapper
Joe Zelenka, who had been
with the team longer than
any other player or coach,
was shown the door.
Now, the Jaguars have
four rookies projected to
start at Indianapolis on
Sunday and several other
young guys playing promi-
nent roles. But they refuse
to call this a rebuilding year.
They prefer to think of it as
a much-needed facelift.
The Jaguars have
declared last year's 5-11
record an aberration and
say they haye the right mix
of veteran leadership and
youthful energy to turn
things around in a hurry.
"Anything is possible in
the NFL," linebacker Justin
Durant said. 'Teams have
proven each and every year
that you can have a terrible
season and turn around
and have a great season.
We want to be one 6f those
teams that does that."
Coach Jack Del Rio has
placed the onus on his
veterans, guys like Jones-
Drew, Durant, quarterback
David Garrard, tight end
Marcedes Lewis, defensive
tackle John Henderson
and cornerback Rashean
Mathis, to get the franchise
back to the playoffs for just
the third time in the last 10
years.
But there's little doubt
his youngsters, especially
those rookies, will be key
factors.
"We've taken a very
aggressive approach at it,"


1

5
8
12

13J
t
14

15
16
17 1
18
20
t
22

23
24

27
30 \
31

32
h


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 14, 2007 file photo, Jacksonville Jaguars coach
Jack Del Rio (left) congratulates defensive lineman John
Henderson following a defensive stand against the Houston
Texans in Jacksonville.


Del Rio said. "If you look at
the amount of turnover that
we've had, it's unusually
large. That amount of turn-
over is rare. We certainly
can't continue to do that
and have much success,
but we felt that the steps
that were taken were in the
best interest of the team
and part of that was moving
on with some players, part
of that was purging some
guys that just didn't fit what
we were looking for going
forward."
Last year was such a
debacle that the Jaguars
felt the only thing to do was
make a major overhaul.
Backup left . tackle
Richard Collier was shot
and paralyzed just days
before the opener. Two
starting offensive linemen
were lost for the year in the
first game, a huge blow for
a team built to run the ball.
Things got worse, too.
The team's two big-
money free agent signing
backfired, as Jacksonville
got little in return for the
more than $20 million they
guaranteed receiver Jerry
Porter and cornerback
Drayton Florence. Receiver
Matt Jones' felony drug
charge lingered through-


ACROSS 34 Rare
mineral
Made 35 Give notice
a tapestry 36 Courtroom
Cradle bargain
Fillet a fish 37 Newspaper fea-
Quite ture
similar 39 Likes and dis-
Jackie's likes
ycoon 40 Oola's guy
Adams or ' 41 Cinnamon -
McClurg 42 Tie-dye cousin
Remnant 44 Open
College degs. 47 Huge
Tiny room 48 Passports, etc.
Stirring 50 Hertz rival
Come 52 In addition
o an end 53 Bolt holder
Matter, 54 Superman alias
n law 55 Earns
Meadow grazer as profit
Down 56 Distress signal
at the heels . 57 Joule
Go over aaain fractions


Wheel rod
Baby chick
sound
Sense of
humor


DOWN


1 Big bankroll
2 Creole veggie


out the season and the
chemistry between Del Rio
and star running back Fred
Taylor was questioned.
'We have the understand-
ing that we're not going to
go anywhere unless we buy
in," Lewis said. "I feel like
last year we didn't have the
100-percent buy in. This
year, I think the leadership
is there and guys under-
stand the kind of attitude
we're going to have to have
if we want to get to the
championship and win the
championship."
Team owner Wayne
Weaver had something to
do with the changes
He asked personnel chief
James "Shack" Harris to
resign, promoted longtime
scout Gene Smith to gener-
al manager and then start-
ed clearing house. Weaver
and Smith got rid of sev-
eral aging veterans and just
about everyone with ques-
tionable character.
Captains, coaches - no
one was immune.
Taylor, defensive captain
Mike Peterson and defen-
sive end Paul Spicer were
let go. So were Porter,
Jones, Florence, Reggie
Williams, Khalif Barnes
and Gerald Sensabaugh.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

PIEIGIS E IGH T
JETLAG ON TOUR
ETI LR I



AEA YE F PL
Z IEIRIOESIEN


OMELIEi T GE
ILA S EN
S.I iT UA ID TDS


EIPA J AG OLLA
SONATA EDGIER
T EN.DER NE- U RION
AMAZE BE E S


Panorama
Fencer's cry
(2 wds.)
Neonates
Big Band -
Tactful


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com . - '


8 Changed into
9 Byron's works
10 Shade
of green
11 Lamprey
19 Low island
21 Dodge City
marshal
24 Slump
25 Co. honcho
26 Red Muppet
27 Harness piece
28 Hole punchers
29 Lose some
31 Fall
veggies
33 - kwon do
35 Je ne sais -
36 Flapjack
38 Jackpot
games
39 Winery cask
41 Roman sculp-
tures
42 Hayfield sight
43 Type of prof
45 Say it's so
46 Sonar's sound
47 Moving truck
49 Batman and
Robin
51 Ave. crossers


9-11 � 2009 by NEA, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420












Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


GARFIELD


B.C.


DEAR ABBY


Woman chooses cruel answer

to question of unwanted cat


DEAR ABBY: My broth-
er-in-law, "Ray," and his wife
moved in with my husband's
parents for a few months
until they could get back
on their feet. They have two
small boys and a cat, "Pre-
cious," they have had since
they were first married.
They looked for an apart-
ment to rent, but could not
find one that would allow
pets. My mother-in-law, "Lo-
retta," was anxious for them
to move out, so she told
them to take the apartment
and she'd keep the cat at her
home.
Shortly after, Loretta
asked my husband to se-
cretly get rid of it. (Her hus-
band had refused.)' When
my husband said he couldn't
do it, she took matters into
her own hands, drove Pre-
cious 10 miles away from
her house and dumped her
on the side of the road.
Ray and the kids went to
her home every day to set out
milk and look for their kitty.
They also checked with the
local animal shelter. About
10 days later, they found Pre-
cious at the shelter. They
had to pay to re-adopt her
- money they didn't have
to spare. Not knowing what
I know, they then returned
their cat to Loretta!
Should I tell Ray the truth
so they can rescue their cat,
or keep mum so as not to
make my mother-in-law an-
gry by revealing the awful


Abigail Van Buren
wwwdearabby.com
thing she did? - ON THE
FENCE IN NEVADA
DEAR ON THE FENCE:
What your mother-in-law did
was unconscionable. I don't
know how many of Precious'
nine lives were used up af-
ter she was abandoned, but
house pets usually die from
starvation, exposure, attacks
by predators or encounters
with vehicles after being
dumped as she was.
If you can't bring yourself
to tell your brother-in-law
what happened to his furry
family member, clip this and
mail it to him with a note ex-
plaining that it contains an
important message. After all,
someone must speak for the
voiceless.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band and I moved into a new
home a few months ago. On
our first night in our new
residence, an emotionally
disturbed relative came over
and caused a scene which
resulted in the police being
called to have the person re-
moved from our home. Since
then, we have been shunned
* by our neighbors.


I was hoping for a friendly
welcome, but I haven't got-
ten so much as a "hello," let
alone a plate of cookies.
How should we handle
this? I realize that because
of the police incident, the
neighbors may think we have
domestic issues - or worse. I
don't know how to improve
the bad impression that was
created - especially since
it was not our fault. Please
help. - WAITING FOR
THE WELCOME WAGON
IN INDIANAPOLIS
DEAR WAITING: If you
see a neighbor, smile, say
hello and introduce your-
self. As to "waiting for the
welcome wagon," in many
areas the custom of wel-
coming newcomers into the
neighborhood has died out.
So why not take the initia-
tive, bake a couple of batch-
es of cookies or buy some
candy for the neighbors on
either side of you and im-
mediately across the street.
Write a short note to be in-
cluded with each, saying,
"We apologize for not doing
this sooner, but my husband
and I were embarrassed by
what happened the night we
moved in. A relative caused
the disturbance. We are very
sorry you were inconve-
nienced. Sincerely, _"

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Getting angry
won't solve anything. Don't
give in to pressure at home
when a little outside infor-
mation will help you fight
back and win. Someone you
love and respect will have
some valuable ideas that
can help you raise interest
in what you are pursuing.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Someone playing
emotional games with you is
likely to tempt you. Say no
to any added responsibili-
ties. It's important to protect
your home and family from
anyone trying to mislead
or take advantage of you.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Stick to the people,
projects and pastimes that
will help you get ahead. As
soon as you get involved
with negative people or
.those wanting to change
the way you are, you will be
fighting to hold on instead
of getting on with your life.
The choice is yours. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): It's about time
you made some changes
at home and with regard
to your relationships with
family. Talk with everyone
about your dreams, hopes
and wishes for the future.
You'll be surprised how
many will stand beside you.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word


LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You can make head-
way if you get involved in
something you feel strongly
about. The people you meet
and the talks you have will
lead to an interesting pro-
posal and partnership. It's
time to take charge and be
a leader. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Watch your back.
Someone you think you can
trust may be jealous or after
the same position you are.
Don't share your secrets or.
your plans. Instead, do your
best and present yourself
professionally. -**
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): If you procrastinate,
you'll only have yourself to
blame. You can expect to
face opposition but move
swiftly before you lose
what's being made available
to you. A short trip will pay
off and give you a different
outlook. *****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Find an inner
circle of people in your in-
dustry, your history or your
favorite pastimes and you
can incorporate what you
love into what you do for a
living. With a unique spin,
you can turn your projects
into something tangible.


*****
SAGIITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Your emo-
tions will get in the way,
leading you into dangerous,
personal territory that has
added responsibilities. Prop-
erty, investments or buying
and selling possessions you
no longer use will help you
financially. *-**
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Everything
will be dependent on how
you conduct yourself re-
garding a pending financial
or legal problem. Make
concessions that allow the
people you are dealing with
to feel you are giving them
something in return. A pas-
sionate encounter will bring
about a worthwhile change.
***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Put your heart
and soul into making things
better at home. If you take a
chance or make a move, you
will end up with more cash
for the things you enjoy do-
ing. Love is on the rise. **A

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): There will be
plans going on behind your
back. Rely on someone you
have been there for in the
past to weed out information
and fill in the blanks. You
cannot make a decision that
will affect your home, family
and your next move without


FRANK & ERNEST


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: S equals J
"UOJ VNGYJ XDJ TJYJ N, UOM BLO
UOJP RWJJK DT XBRU: UOJDN
EMBNGLJ TJNYJR G UOMBRGTX
WDYDTL ZJ T." - ZDTMU S. R GYGLJ
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Real peace comes from enlightenment and
educating people to behave more in a divine manner." - Carlos Santana

(c) 2009 by NEA, Inc. 9-11


FOR BETTER OR WORSE CLASSIC PEANUTS
I KNOW IT�s -ELFISH, I DON'T LE TFF- E CFLL MfI NFtRktJ- BUT OINK RT MV:- - MYCBOEIN65A READING IN CHILDREN 15
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Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009









Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


_ Keeping Hernandez healthy


a priority for top-ranked UF


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Kaycee Baker looks to return a shot against
Columbia High on Aug. 27 in Fort White.

Indians win 'Devil' of a game


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE - In their
first district matchup of
the season, the Fort White
High Lady Indians battled
back twice to pick up a
26-24, 25-22, 25-19, 25-16
and 15-4 in the tiebreaker.
Fort White's most impres-
sive win came in the fourth
game as Kaycee Baker
pulled off 10 straight ser-
vice points to take a 21-11
lead. From there, the Lady
Indians didn't look back.
Baker led the Lady
Indians with 31 service
points, six aces, five kills
and 10 digs.
Brigitte Lapuma had 16
kills and three digs. Colee
Rendeck had 16 service
points and seven digs. Holly
Polhill had 10 kills and nine
digs.
"Kaycee played awe-
some tonight," coach Doug
Wohlstein said. "Sara Resta
was sick and out of school
four days and Holly, Kaycee
and Bridgitte stepped up
tonight. I was talking to


them about how they've
shown it in practice, but we
needed to see it in a game.
We saw that tonight. There
was a lot of enthusiasm,
which allowed us to come
back and finish strong."
Fort White is 2-1 and
travels to Newberry High
at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday.

Lady Tigers golf
Columbia High teed off
Their 2009 season at Quail
Heights with a tri-match
against Chiles and Leon
high schools. The Lady
Tigers split the match with
a 189, beating Leon, which
shot a 200, but falling to the
winner Chiles, which shot
182.
The Lady Tigers were led
by Brittany Boris with a 42.
Katie Sweat and Darian
Ste-Marie both broke
50 shooting 45 and 47
respectively. Ashley Mixon
rounded out the top four
scores with a 55.
The Lady Tigers travel
to play Buchholz High at
4 p.m. on Tuesday.


TIGERS: Host Gainesville


Continued From Page 1B

"We definitely want to have
that running threat on
offense."
The way that Tigers try
to execute their run may
involve different players
like Bernard McNeil and
using the passing game to
set up bigger runs.
That's kind of what we
do," Howard said. "We want
to go fast tempo, primarily
with Tiger and McNeil. We
also have Quartez Pate, who
didn't play last week. It's a
tough plan to defend once
you have to worry about all
of their guys. McNeil had
several big runs (against
Charlton County). Involving.
all of those guys would be
a winning formula, but we
also have a passing game
that's working well. Jamaal
Montague is playing as
good as anyone. Cameron
Sweat was on pace to throw
for 400 yards before we


started relying on the run
during the second half."
Of course, the Tigers will
have their own set of skill
position players to defend.
Columbia's strategy will be
to force turnovers to set up
the offense in good scoring
situations.
"They have great skill
positions themselves,"
Howard said. "Our goal is
to force more turnovers,
so that good things hap-
pen. Against Charlton we
forced one turnover and we
scored. We're still building
the defense, but when the
game was on the line, they
came through. We're hop-
ing to get Todd Steward
back. He's as good of a high
school tackler as there is.
He's a lot like the linebacker
that they have committed to
play for Miami. It's hard to
tell one from the other (as
far as the way they play)."


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE - Forgive Florida
tight end Aaron Hernandez if he
gets a little winded in practice and
games.
After all, he's the only one at his
position.
It's a big concern for the top-ranked
Gators (1-0), who host Troy (0-1) on
Saturday. Although coaches expect
Hernandez to play a significant role
this season - he caught four passes
for 79 yards and a touchdown in the
opener - they also are trying to find
the right balance between having
him on the field, preventing fatigue
and keeping him healthy.
"We have to be smart," tight ends
coach Brian White said. "He can't
take every rep in practice. There's
only one Superman on this team, and
it's not him."
Hernandez, a 6-foot-2, 250-pound
junior from Bristol, Conn., caught
34 passes for 381. yards and five
touchdowns last season. He was Tim
Tebow's third option behind Percy


Harvin and Louis Murphy, and was
equally involved in the running game
and in goal-line situations.
The Gators need him to do even
more this season, especially since he
doesn't have a backup.
"It's terrible. You hate to do that,"
coach Urban Meyer said. "First of
all, he's a really, really good player ...
The negative is you put all your eggs
in that basket. If something happens *
and he has to miss a series, then
you're out of that series altogether.
So we're very cautious, but we also
game plan around that."
Meyer thought he had some
options. With tight ends Cornelius
Ingram and Tate Casey graduating,
Desmond Parks enrolled in January
and was supposed to play behind
Hernandez this fall. But he dislo-
cated a knee cap during spring drills
and probably won't be ready until
the spring. And walk-on tight end
Christopher Coleman is sidelined
with a leg injury.
That leaves Hernandez alone at
the position.
"There's not a tight end walking


around here that we can move into
that spot," Meyer said. "I've looked
through the roster a few times."
So Meyer is stuck experimenting.
He played seldom-used fullbacks
T.J. Pridemore and Rich Burgess, as
well as defensive endJustinTrattou, in
goal-line situations during Saturday's
62-3 win over Charleston Southern.
He also is considering having athletic
offensive tackle Matt Patchan work
at tight end in some situations.
He even pulled Hernandez from spe-
cial teams duty to limit his workload.
"Every player wants to play every
down," Hernandez said. "Every once
in a while; you get too tired and need
a break. But every player wants to be
in there every down because that's a
chance to make a play."
Hernandez says he gets annoyed
at times by not having anyone to
share repetitions in practice. But
he also realizes it helps him run
more precise routes, improve his
blocking technique and get him in
better shape to handle the no-hud-
dle offense Florida is debuting this
season.


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INDIANS: Play at 7:30 p.m.
Continued From Page 1B

year in District 2-2A. It was the second playoff appear-
ance in Jackson's two years as coach. The Indians, who
are entering their 10th season, also made the playoffs in
2002.
Newberry was the 4-2B runner-up last year and won a
playoff game over Trinity Christian Academy before los-
ing to Trinity Catholic High.
The Panthers had made 14 trips to the playoffs before
experiencing a drop-off. Coach Tommy Keeler resurrect-
ed the program and has three consecutive playoff trips.
The Panthers were state runners-up in 2007.
'They are well-coached and disciplined," Jackson said.
Newberry has a pair of 100-yard runners last week and
totaled 482 yards on the ground.
The Indians got 166 yards passing from quarterback
Alex Gilmer last week. He threw two touchdown passes to
Alexis Blake. Montre Cray had 29 of Fort White's 59 rush-
ing yards and scored a touchdown. Zach Lewis returned a
fumble for a touchdown.
Tickets for the game are $6 at the gate. Pre-sale tickets
for $5 will be offered today at the school. Elementary
tickets for third- through fifth-graders are $3, and second-
grade students and younger are free.
Athletic Director John Wilson said there will be three
parking areas offered with a $2 fee. These are the base-
ball parking area for visitors, the lot behind the gym and
down the bus lanes. Free parking is offered in front of the
school.


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LADY LAKE 870 N. Hwy. 27/441, Ste. G. 352-350-2861
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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED F hILAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


HE WORKS HARD TO KEEP

YOUR FAMILY AT PLAY.


Bryan R. Prine. MD
,,. r. ... I I ,

386.755.4007
'1,I ,,I ,, , 1 , ' ,',,i ,


~' N Icd' '


& ST R I P E S


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High quarterback Cameron Sweat (7) drops back for a pass and gets a block from
his lineman Jordan Morris (72) during the kickoff classic on Aug. 28 in Lake City.


Tigers return home for test


olumbia High
(0-0-1) will
attempt to pick
up its first ,
victory of the
year as the team returns to
Tiger Stadium on Friday
against the Gainesville
High Hurricanes (1-0).
The Hurricanes are
coming off of a win
against the 2B state
runner-up Ocala Trinity
Catholic High on Friday,
35-17.
Gainesville has a


three-headed attack led by
quarterback Ryan McGriff
and running backs Corey
Hodges and Anquan
Gainey. The trio accounted
for all five touchdowns
against the Saints.
Columbia also is coming
off an explosive offensive
game, as it scored 48 points
on perennial state
championship contender
Charlton County (Ga.) in a
tie game on Friday.
The Tigers look to get
running back Tiger Powell


involved early and often in
the contest, as he rushed
for 253 yards against the
Indians.
Columbia's passing
game will also be a threat
lead by the combination of
Cameron Sweat and Jamaal
Montague. The duo hooked
up on two touchdowns
against the Indians and will
look to test the Hurricanes'
defense.
Trinity's quarterback
was 16-of-28 for 162 yards
against Gainesville.


tiger


of the week


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's JuStin Kennedy (64) attempts to tackle Fort White High's Montre Cray (10)
during the Aug. 28 kickoff classic in Lake City.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Tiger Powell (6) dives forward for extra yardage in the kickoff classic on
Aug. 28 in Lake City.


2009 Tiger Football Schedule


Wk 9 Wolfson (A) 7 p.m.

Wk 10 Suwannee (A) 7:30 p.m.
Open date is Oct. 16


7 p.m.

7:30 p.m.

7:30 p.m.


i ----------------
T II
I diI








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-- Buy a Whopper
prhs Value Meal

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HAVE IT YOUR WAY�
4560 W US 90 25 S. 1st St.
Lake City Lake City


CHS


STAR


Charlton Co. 48, Columbia 48

Wk 2 Gainesville (H) 7:30 p.m.

Wk 3 Buchholz (A) 7:30 p.m.

Wk 4 Robt. E. Lee (H) 7:30 p.m.

Wk 5 Madison Co. (H) 7:30 p.m.


Wk 6 Ridgeview (A)

Wk 7 Godby (H)

Wk 8 Ed White (H)


LAKE CITY REPORTER C LASSIFIEDs Ee3S 1- 111,AY, SEPTEMBER 111, 2009


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009

Lake City Reporter





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Take ADvantage of the
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Legal


Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT ON COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY, PROBATE DIVISION
FLORIDA File No. 09-188-CP
CIVIL ACTION Division Probate
CASE NO. 05-270-CA IN RE: ESTATE OF
DIVISION WALTER C. KEATON, JR.
LASALLE BANK NATIONAL AS- Deceased.
SOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR NOTICE TO CREDITORS
SECURITIZED ASSET INVEST- The administration of the estate of
MENT LOAN TRUST MORT- Walter C. Keaton, Jr., deceased,
GAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIF- whose date of death was July 25,
ICATES SERIES 2004-4, 2009, is pending in the Circuit Court
Plaintiff, . for Columbij C(ounl,. Florid.. Pro-
Svs ' bate Divisio:n. lhe .nildres , of which
' ANGELACOLE, el al. is 173 NE -lerniado A-\enue Lake
Deteddanlia) City, Florida, 32055 The nime, .ani
NOTIC 'OF RESCHEDULING 'addresses of the personral'repre'enta.i
'.FORECLOSURE SALE tive and the personal repretenr e',-.
SNOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur- attorney are.set fonh below.
,'u suant to an Order R.eheduling All creditors of the decedent and oth-
Foreclo.ure dated Augutl 24, 2009 er persons having claims or'jemands
and entered in Case NO. 05-270 CA a.itur l deedentm' ed.ie on hnhom a
of the Circuit Courtof the THIRD cop, of ihil noitce Iefluired to be
Judicial Circuiitjn and for COLUM- .er.ed muit filtlih.f.'laims '.ith
BIA' C6faty,' Florida wherein LA ihis courn \WIT T LATER OF
SALtE BANK NATIONAL ASSO-. '%3 MONTHS A .TIME OF
CATION. AS TRUSTEE FOR SE ' THE FIRST UB'iAT ON OF
",CURITIZED 'ASSBT INVEST- THIS NOTICE DAYS AF-
V"MENT LOAN TRUST MORT- TER THE DATE ,fERVICE OF
GAGE PASS-THOUGH CERTIFI- A COPY, OP,J;TH ~ QTICE ON
, ATES SERIES 2004-4, is the THEM p, '*
Plaiqdff and ANGELA COLE; All other credniors phe decedent
:',DUANE COLE; ROBERT P. and other peons h ig claim- or
:'BENTLEY;' E. NAOMI BENTLEY; demands against d.eedent's estate
RICHARD BICKNELL; CAPITAL must file their claims with' this court
ONE BANK;. are the Defendants, I WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
will sell to the highest,a d, best bid- DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
derfor cash' at T'ON'T,STEPS OF'..TION,OP'THIS NOTICE.'
THE COLUMBIA "COUNTY ALL CI,, MSl OT FILED WITH-
COURTHQUSBi at .lth AM, on IN ".*'T TIME PERIODS SET
the 23rd dayt, tptember, 2009,, the FORTH. IN SECTION 733.702 OF
,,. a Iepro t, as ~srip,TH FlpRIDA PROBATE CODE
dl iatgi .: ;n 'WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
: LO 3, BLOCK A, OF SOUTH- NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
.,WOOD MEADOWS, UNIT. II, A PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
'SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
THE PLAT THEREOF. AS RE- YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
PAGE 84, OF THE PUBLIC RE- IS BARRED.
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN- The date of first publication of this
TY, FLORIDA. notice is September 4, 2009.
A/K/A Route 9, Box 785-32, Lake Attorney for Personal Representa-
City, FL 32024 tive:
Any person claiming an interest in by:/s/ Tom W. Brown .


pian, il.una jau, ,t. M i ,tpIt*s
ber k8.)'774-8124; 1-800-Ar1i
(TDmror $r(-8 0 5-87 3
.J Florida RelUI S lateral
seven (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing. .."

0453425:'
September, 11,2009 ,;
Registraodton of Fcttious NNames ,
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of Lake City
Used Furniture at 368 SW Sisters
Welcome Rd., Lake City, FL. 32055

Contact Phone Number: 386-867-
4242 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as'follows:
Name: TRAMMEL WASDEN
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/Trammel Wasden
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 9 day of September, A.D. 2009.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
04534463
September 11, 2009

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

Custom Hay service. Rolled Hay
for sale. between $15-$30 ea.
Fencing work, bush hogging, site
prep, dump truck work'& more.
Call Chris 386-755-1432/867-6005
DIVORCE -ANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
********* ********* ********

NEED HOUSEKEEPER?
Call Ethel
386-303-1496.
Cleaning Done Your Way!
Taurus Enterprise is open for
business. Computer/Quick
Books/Accounting. Please call
386-961-9923 or teinc66(i@aol.com
Very reasonable Fees.

Land Services

Lot Clearing Special.'Bush Hog 5
ac $199. New driveways, gravel or
concrete. Also repairs, site storage
bldg, all sizes. State Lic. Contrac-
tor. 386-497-3219. Free Estimates.


ALL HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES,
LE-I IES, DEVISEES, PERSON-
2 AJ. REPRESENTATIVES, CRED-
rrORS AND ANY OTHER PER-
SON CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
-UNDER OR AGAINST WILMA L.
COURTNEY A/K/A WILMA
COURTNEY, DECEASED, ET AL
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
To the following Defendant(s):
ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFI-
CIARIES, LEGATEES, DEVISEES,
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES,
CREDITORS AND ANY OTHER
PERSON CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST WILMA L. COURTNEY
AKA WILMA PARSONS COURT-
NEY AKA WILMA COURTNEY,
DECEASED
LAST KNOWN RESIDENCE
299 SOUTHEAST MAID MARION
LANE
HIGH SPRINGS, FL 32643
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion for Foreclosure of Mortgage on
the following described real proper-
ty:
LOT 11, SHERWOOD FOREST
UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 13 AND
13A, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA
1981 MANAC MOBILE HOME
VIN# 061112S6255- TITLE#
19581718
a/k/a 299 SOUTHEAST MARION
LANE, HIGH SPRINGS, FLORIDA
32643
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
Moskowitz, Mandell, Salim & Simo-
witz, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 800 Corporate
Drive, Suite 500, Fort Lauderdale,
FLORIDA 33334 on or before Sep-
tember 21, 2009, a date' which is
within thirty (30) diys .'atr publica-
tion of this: Notice in the LAKE
CITY REPORTER and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's ait
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be enteredd
against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint.
This notice is ro, idcfl priu.int to1
AdministratiVe Order ~ .05 . '
In accordance -. th bli~ mnierican
with Disabilities \cti If ,,'o are per-
son with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding , you are enti-
tled, at no cost to you, to provisions
of certain assistance. Please contact
the Court Administrator at 145 N.
Hemando Street, Rm. 113, Lake
City, Fl 32055, Phone No. (386)758-
2163 within 2 working days of your
receipt of this notice or pleading; if
you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-
995-8770 (V) (via Florida Relay
Services).
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 21 day of August,
2009
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

04534119
September 4, 11, 2009


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 2099-CA-00216
OLD WIRE FARMS, INC., a Flori-
da corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CARLOS M. HERNANDEZ, a sin-
gle person and MARIELA MARTI-
NEZ, a single person,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that 1,
P. DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the
Circuit Court of the Third Judicial
Circuit, in and for COLUMBIA
County, Florida, pursuant to the
Summary Final Judgment In Fore-
closure entered in the above styled
cause, will sell at public sale the fol-
lowing described property situate in
COLUMBIA County, Florida, to
wit:
LOT 1, BLOCK D, OLD WIRE
FARMS, according to the Plat there-
of recorded in Plat Book 6, pages 22-
22A, public records of Columbia
County, Florida.
Said sale shall be made to the highest
and best bidder for cash pursuant to .
the Final Judgment entered in' the,.
above styled cause and, will be held
at the front door' of the :Columbia
County" Courthouse ihn LikeQ City,'
Florida, on the 30 day of September,
2009, commencing. at 'th .hour of,
11:00A.M.
All interested parties shall be gov-.
erned accordingly by this Notice '*
DATED this 26 day ot August. 2009'
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Court . -:
By:/s/. Scippio . '.,.
Deputy Clerk 'r "
04534287 .
September 4, 1 h2009


Legal

Public Auction to be held October 3,
2009 AT 8AM at Ozzie's Towing &
Auto, 2492 SE Baya Ave. Lake City
FL, 32025.
(386)755-0608
Following Vin Numbers:
1991 GMC
Vin# 1GKCT18Z1M8529739
04534453
September 11,2009


020 Lost & Found

LOST DACHSHUND mix
Birley Rd. Area.
Missing around Sept. 7.
386-755-5723 or 288-7023


100 Job
10 Opportunities

(M5336S5
Wanted Career
Motivated Students!.
If you are seeking a new career
Sin a high:dematid field, then get'
Your Degree or Certificate in
'Logistics & Supply Chain
Management! ,
Instant scholarships available
for qualified students. Classes: .
start 9/2'109, call Lake City
Community College,
. : (386) 754-4492.

04534156
GOOD OPPORTUNITY!
NOW HIRING A Stylist
Southern Exposure '
386-752-4614


�_"'__"____ ,___'____ ~04534351
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD:. Customer Service
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR . .Repnu resell "tiv
COLUMBIA COUNTY; FLORIDA. ff' i ce ,
CASE NO. 09-505CA. Busy office:peeilelfu
BAL INV TMENT C - 0 ,' '. "' ii m vator for a fastpaced call
BKL INVEWTMENT.CO ,' Ces er. gteat cier service
A Flonda corporanon, ,... ' - . Ceigeat c service
Plainuff, . . . " sklls; :.acenl experience a
S.. plus.'Hu- -Mon. - Fri.
SONIA B. MITCHELL , . citi ' aiicheck required.
Defendant. . ." - ', " .Bililgual a plus. Send resume
', torJ6ey Kitaif; P.O. Box 3116
NOTICEOF Al TON Lake City, Fl. 32056.
TO: SONIA E M HEL.
LAST KNOWNi DRESS: 3437
Post Offire px552419 : ' PRO CT COORDINATOR
Opa Locka. FfIrida 33055 , OOR INA
LAST KNOWN.ADDR9SS: , ' Lake City
Post Office Bo 2419 ' ' Assist management with admin-
Carol City, lo' 5 . ' ; istrative eds and supervision
YOU ARE W B thai al on for dayoib-day operations of
to foreclose *6ort a0e'oiqi tlefol- roj'et.'Key roles;
lowing dscrited 'property .;on Co-
luhmbi4Vtnty.
Lbt . rawford
sion',us recording Plat $
64-65 of the public reco n-
lumbia County, Florida. ,, " fidentii';...
has been filed against you ani you .I A E ND ACCOUNT-
are required to serve a copy of your N siswth accounts paya-
written defenses, if any, to it on Ed- le,pprdcess expense reports,
die M. Anderson, Plaintiff's attor- monthly journal entries and
ney, whose address is Post Office mnnth end cose process, finan-
Box 1179, Lake City, Florida 32056- ont-atend close pcessnan-
1179, no later than thirty. (30) days :al statement review and sc-
after the first publication of this no- counts receivable invoice prepa-
tice, and file the original with the ration with supporting docu-
Clerk of this Court either before mentation;
service on Plaintiff's attorney or im- PERFORMANCE MANAGE-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a de- MENT-compile and analyze da-
fault will be entered against you for ta to assist in the preparation of
the relief demanded in the complaint. reports;
If you are the are the owner of real BUSIN S S-w
estate that is being foreclosed, there USINESS SERVICES-work
may be money owed to you after the ith Employer Services unit to
sale. You may contact the Clerk of increase community awareness
Court, Columbia County, 173 NE of services offered and to in-
Hemando Avenue, Lake City, Flori- rease number of job openings
da 32055, phone number (386)758- osted and maintained. REQ:
1031, for information on what you degree in Bus Mgt/Finance, 5-7
need to do to get the funds. You do years supervisory exp, ability to
not need to hire an attorney or other and work well with
representative to get this money. otivate and work well with
DATED ON August 25, 2009. people, excellent communica-
P. DEWITT CASON tion/organizational skills, must
Clerk of the Court be able to maximize human/oth-
By:/s/ B. Scippio er resources to accomplish per-
As Deputy Clerk formance outcomes.
Apply online:
0453485http://www.rescare.com/careers.
September 4, 11, 2009 =fm


NOTICE OF ENACTMENT OF AN
ORDINANCE BY THE TOWN
COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF
WHITE SPRINGS, FLORIDA.
NOTICE IS HEREBY given that a
proposed Ordinance which title here-
inafter appears will be considered for
enactment on the second and final
reading by the Town Council of The
Town of White Springs, Fl., Tues-
day, September 22, 2009 6:30 p.m.
or as soon thereafter as, the matter
can be heard. A Public Hearing will
begin at 6:30 p.m. inithe Communin
Center 12760 Roberts St.,' Whlut:
Springs, Fl. Copy of said Ordihance
may be inspected by any member of
the public at the Office of The Clerk
, Town Hall, on the date, time and
place first above mentioned. All in-
terested persons may appear and be
heard with respect to the proposed
ordinance."All persons' are advised
that, if they decide to appeal any de-
cision made at this public hearing
hey will need a record of the pro-
ceedings and, for such purpose, they
may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of theproceedings is made,
which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal
is to be based.
Ordinance of the Town of White
Springs, Florida, relating to its gen-
eral government budget for the fiscal
year beginning October 1, 2009 and
ending September 30, 2010 and
adopting the budget; and providing
an immediate effective date.
04534347
September 11, 2009
&
PUBLIC AUCTION
1984 OLDS
VIN# 1G3AY69Y9EM795283
1989 CHEV
VIN# 1GCDM15Z3KB225037
To be held 09/30/09, 8:00 am at Bry-
ant's Tire and Towing 1165 East
Duval St. Lake City, FL 32055
04534456
September 11, 2009.


Bartender needed. Must
have experience & be reliable, &
have your own transportation and
your own phone. 386-752-2412

FT, Staff Assistant. AA Degree/or
2 yr experience, Detailed Oriented,
self-motivated, proficient on
Microsoft office, Publisher and
Power Point, excellent office and
communication skills and team
player. APPLY IN PERSON.
CARC, 512'SW Sisters Welcome
Road. Closing date September 18.

Jewelry Trade: Retired jeweler,
gemologist, craift r benchworker,
retail jewelry all OK.
Part Time: $150 per each 2-3 hour
event. Essential qualities:
Integrity, Dependability,
Professional Appearance.
Call Terry 770-682-5855

Local Law Firm needs experienced
Legal Secretary. Immediate
employment. Send resume to
Office Manager, Post Office
Box 1029, Lake City, FL 32056


o00 Job
1 Opportunities
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.


Wanted Part Time Insurance sales
person with customer service
skillU. Florida 440 or 220 License
preferred. Team player, salary
negotiable. Email resume to
smcknight8 c1cox.net.

120 Medical
12 Employment

U4534393
LPN NEEDED
Looking for a change from hospi-
tal hours and shifts? Tired of
working in an office/nursing
home?
Our growing outpatient dialysis
clinic needs you! No Experience
Necessary. We will train!
F/T with excellent benefits and
great hours. No Sundays!
Apply in person:
.FMC Live Oak -'
10543 Suwannee Plaza Blvd-:,
,Live Ok,,F1 32060;. ,
(Beside Subway.at Waliait.
Plaza)' , .
. * '386-3 64.-604-' ' *
*O. .-


0453448,t
.'Actiifites Director Needed
* .Skilledurig I facility. '
. . Certification Required.
Experience Preferred.
Full Timewith Benefits. "'
Fax Resume To:
Suwannee Ii-ealth & Rehab.
1620 East Helvenson Street
Live Oak;.FL 32064
386-362-7860'
EOE/V/I/M/F

2 positions: Medical & Optical .
A.-sisants needed at busy practie
in Lake City. Full time. Pleas
mail resume to: 763 SW Main
Blvd Lake City, S 32025 or
fax to: 386-755-'1858r
Medical assistant/secretary '
needed inLake;City/Gainesrille
medical offices; Experience in
medical office preferred. Please
fax CV (resume) to 386-719-9662.
RUN'S NEEDED
M N charge Nurses4on. - Fri.
RN:Every other weekend; if,.
. intetestd Applyin..person at
Macclerny .Nursihg &.Rehab
755 South 5th Street inust pass
background and be a team player.
Wanted experienced Medical
Biller foi bus�ifamil'y prifice.
Certification a pls. Must be self
starter, knowledgeable tenacious,
and adaptable to change. Fax
resume to 935-1667 or mail to
Three Rivers Medical 208 NW, Su-
wannee Ave. Branford. Fl 32008.

240 Schools &
Education

04534294
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant, $409
next class-9/14/09
* Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-9/19/09
* Pharm Tech national
certification
$900 next class-9/15/09.
* Continuing education

Fees incl. books,
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being, sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and'are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
lifemiust be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
330 Supplies
. REGISTERED BRANGUS
Bulls. 1-3 yrs. old. Gentle
disposition. Certified herd. $1000-
$1800. 352-215-1018


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED p
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


New Home Sales


Consultant Wanted

Excellent Commission Based

Pay and Benefits

Fax Resume to 509-756-2869

or email mh newhomeiobs@vahoo.com

Maronda Homes
|R hc ^�/S . � w s/wl, Aiastafe i A'.*Pla e


* ADvantage


.i







Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


- r i- , I 73 Bedroom Kitchen -Whirlpool appliances, 18 cubic ft
... - '-;3:2 Bath refrigerator, 30" free standing range, Marble
.. windows seals throughout, porcelain lavatories,
, U * N LY wired & braced for ceiling fans
......... PRESTIGE


9 HOME CENTERS
Price Includes A/C, Monday-Friday 8:30am-6pm * Saturday 8:30am-5pm * Sunday 12pm-5pm
.- setup, skirting and steps 3973 HWY 90 WEST * LAKE CITY 386-752-7751 or 1-800-355-9385


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Montre Cray (10) dives for extra yards against Madison County on Friday.


Challenges keep coming


County
High
showed a
bit of the
pass, but when things got
tight the Cowboys reverted
to their running game.
They did not attempt a
pass in the fourth quarter
and rushed for almost 300
yards.
Newberry High, which
Fort White High faces
in Friday's home opener,
rolled up 300 yards on the
ground in the second half.


For the game, the Panthers
had 47 carries for 482
yards.
Newberry was 9-3 last
year and made the playoffs
as the runner-up in District
4-2B. One of the
regular-season losses was
to Fort White, 15-9. It was
the Indians' second win
over the Panthers in a
series that began in 2003,
and the first victory in
Newberry.
Alexis Blake was
back on the field against
Madison County and


produced on offense,
defense and special teams.
Blake caught eight passes
for 124 yards and he and
quarterback Alex Gilmer
hooked up for touchdown
passes of 32 and 16 yards.
Blake also had an
interception on defense
and averaged 30 yards on
four kickoff returns.
Montre Cray had a
rushing touchdown and
Zach Lewis scored on a
45-yard fumble return.
Joseph Johnson kicked two
extra points.


ind" n


of the week


Photos by JASON
MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Reporter

TOP: Fort White High's
Alexis Blake (1) makes
the tackle on Madison
County High running back
Mar'Terrius McDaniel in the
game on Friday.

LEFT: Fort White High
quarterback Alex Gilmer (12)
fires a pass, as Montre Cray
(10) sets to block Madison
County High's Coydrick
Williams in the game on
Friday.


2009 Indian Football Schedule


Wk 9 Bradford (A) 7:30 p.m.
Wk 10 Santa Fe (H) 7:30 p.m.


OLE TIMES COUNTRY BUFFET
S Locat'dn in he LaA CityI Mall
, / Catering Available
Year Round
Gift Cards Available
752-1070


'I-


Hwy 90
Lake City
755-3444


GOING-ON

NOW!
2009 Dodge
Ram 1500
SLT, Crew Cab
$299mo*


I ,ur cd o.r 72 inrlA,
)7


SHONEYS
Limited Time Offer.
Our Famous Express Breakfast
& Lunch Buffet is noi onl '5.99
Mlonday-Sunday


iwww.shoneys.com (386) 752-7232 ap 1-75 - Hwy 90
www.shoneys.com (386) 752-7232 * 1-75 - Hwy 90


Madison Co. 42, Fort White 26
Wk 2 Newberry (H) 7:30 p.m.
Wk 3 Suwannee (A) 7:30 p.m.
Wk 4 Union Co (H) 7:30 p.m.
Wk 5 N.F. Christian (A) 7:30 p.m.
Wk 6 Florida High (H) 7:30 p.m.
Wk 7 East Gadsden (A) 7:30 p.m.
Wk 8 Taylor Co. (H) 7:30 p.m.




.p


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


Classified Department: 755-5440


402 Appliances
HEAVY DUTY good used
washer &Dryer. works and looks
great. $200. obo Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.
NICE GE Dishwasher. Quiet
power pot scrubber. Heat boost,
energy saver. $125. OBO.
386-754-9295 or 984-0387
WHITE ELECTRIC stove. GE
works well & looks good.
$125.00 OBO Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.

403 Auctions
' PUBLIC AUCTION
Fri. 09/11 @ 6:30 PM. Mason City
Community Center. Details @
auctionzip.com. Perry Auction
Service AB2667 AU3785
Sat. Sept 12, at 6:30pm. Huge
Public Auction 250 SW 9th Ave,
Lake Butler. The estate of Diane
Cooper. Other items including
1965 Chevy pickup; guns, tools,
shop smith, furniture, housewares
& iriore. Steve Wilson-AB809'
/AU1159. Fdr reserved seating.
: 352-316-0806/ 352-317-0072.
Loqk for s.igrisjust off 121. Good
*concessions. 10% Buyers premn.
Cash, Visa;,Discover, Master Card

.404 Baby Items
,Toddler Bed- Thomas the Tank
Engine, Good Condition, Ihcludes
Mattress. $100. Call (386) 935-,
6818 or (386) 590-4318.

420 Wanted to Buy


K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

430 Garage Sales
3 Family. Fri. & Sat. 8 - ? 297 SE
Eloise Ave.. Off Baya. Look for
signs. Tools, arts & crafts,
baby items, much more.
CONVERTED PACK RATS .
downsizing. Unusual collectibles.
Westwood Acres/Pinemount Rd.
Look for signs. 8-1. 386-752-0347
Everything from soup to nuts.
386-755-2517. 454 NW Harris
Lake Dr. Country Club of Lake
City area. Sat. Sept. 12th. 8-until.
Forest Country (Branford Hwy)
Fri Sept 11 & Sat 12th * 8am -
Ipm Collectibles, furniture,
household, Christmas items, Misc
FRI - Sun. 8-? 1414 NW Moore
Rd. off Hwy 41N. New
washer/dryer, new bedroom suite.
sleeper sofa, recliners, much more.
Moving/garage, 9/11,12/09 &13th
after 2 pm. Fum, tools, yard chairs,
to much more to list. 8-5. 124 SW
Barber Glen, Ft White, 454-9817
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Body by Jake. Ab Rocker.
5 minute Ab machine. Instructions,
videos included. $25.00. Leave
message at 386-752-4093
CAREGIVER NEEDED for
handicap female, in my home
Part time
386-755-1730
DISPOSABLE BRIEFS. Large
size, 36 pack. 5 bundles.
Only $100 OBO.
Call 386-7581358.
GUNSHOW: 09/12 & 09/13 @
The Columbia County
Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City.
Sat 9am - 4pm, Sun 9am-3pm.
Info: 904-461-0273
LOMAN'S 2000 vent fan for attic.
Good for 2000 sqft. New in box.
$100.00 Call today 386-758-1358.
7pm-10pm- 752-3491


630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
14X70 3BR/1BA
Falling Creek Rd. $650. moe
plus deposit.
386-623-2203
1BR FURNISHED
All utilities included plus satellite.
$155 week, $155 Deposit
Call 386-758-9455
2 & 3 br Mobile Homes for Rent.
$450-$650. monthly.
Call for move in special.
(386)752-6422
2br/lba MH. Exc Cond. $475/Mo.
+ $475. sec. dep. Also. new MH
3br/2ba. 73X14ft. $695.mo + 1st
& last mo rent & sec.
Call: 954-258-8841
3BR/1.5 BA
Unfurnished Mobile Home.
No animals. Call 386-755-0142
For more details.
3br/2ba nice doublewide w/fire-
place. 10 ac. on Sante Fe River. 30
mmin. from Lake City. $725. mo +
last & sec. 386-365-3865


Largeclean 3br/2ba all electric in
, 5 pt. area. Also, 3br/2ba DW off
Triple Run. Ist & dep.
No Pets! 386-961-1482
Late Model Mobile Homes .Quiet
area. 2br/lba from $400 & 3br/2ba
from $500 Includes water &
sewer. No Pets! 386-961-0017
LOOK! What a deal 1 & 2br in
town. No pets! Close to Drug
.Stor6/shopping. Starting at
$375.mo 90W.386-397-0807,
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, 2 and
. 3 bedrooms. Contact
386-867-2337 or 397-1522
PARTLY FURNISHED
Clean 2br, large lot with trees on
Turner Rd. 386-752-6269
leave message if no answer.
SMALL Single Wide Mobile
Home. Studio type.
. For rent
719-7017 after 8pm

�A Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

04534025
New Double Wides starting at
$39,995. Inc., delivery, set-up.
heat& Air, code steps &
skirting. Call Jeff for appt.
386-752-7751

PRESTIGE
HOME CENTERS


04534926
Your'home built Your Way
No Excuses Call Pete!
386-752-7751
PRESTIGE
HOME CENTERS
3973 Hwy 90 West, Lake
City, FL
1-800-355-9385

04534027
-Log Cabin Elegancy at a
Reasonable price
Call Pete 386-752-7751

PRESTIGE
HOME CENTERS


3973 Hwy 90 West, Lake
City, Florida. 386-752-7751
or 1-800-355-9385

2004 PALM Harbor
(never owned)
32X66, Many upgrades and
features Delivered, set up.
and A/C incl.
REDUCED PRICE!!!! $447mo
owner finance 1st time homebuyer
Mary Hamilton 386-963-4000
BRAND NEW
2010 - 3/2 only 2 left @ this price.
$23,900 or payments of $274. mo.
Call Eric @ 386-719-5560
DW 3/2 1456 sq ft. 55+ park fam.
room, 20x10 encl porch 12x12
deck, car port,12x12 workshop
exc. cond. $47,500. 386-269-4657


640 2Mobile Homes
40 for Sale
FOR SALE
5br/3 full ba. 2300 sq ft. Your land
or mine. Payment of $569.mo.
Call Eric @ 386-719-5560.
SWMH for sale 2br/2ba. on
rented lot. Needs work.
90% owner financing. $9,900
FIRM. 386-755-2423
WOW!
4BR/2BA on land. $500 down
and payments at $689. mo.
Call Eric e@ 386-719-5560

650 Mobile Home
& Land

0-54153415.1
LIKE NEW! 3br/2ba. Many
upgrades: including stainless
appliances Very spacious nice
rooms, less than 1 mile from
boat landing on the Suwannee.
Must See! $119,900.
Call Carrie Cason, Agent
Westfield Realty Group.
386-755-0808 or 623-2806

FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3br/2ba MH. Quiet park. Small
pets ok. $500. move in. $575. mo.
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
NEW 3bed/2bath ModOlar
(never lived in) 1/2 acre upscale.
Appl. and furniture decks,
concrete foundation, driveway,
new well,' septic and a/c.
REDUCED PRICE $649 mo.
owner finance 1st time homebuyer
Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent


$299 Moves

You In!!!


FREE RENT

BRAND NEW
GATED
POOL**PETS OK
Student/Law
Enforcement Specials
200 FREE
CHANNELS
Next to Middle School
2 br - 386-754-1800
lbr - 386-758-8029
Windsor Arms.
www.windsorarmsopts.com
www.aptsinlakecity.com
*certain restrictions apply
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423
$99 MOVES YOU IN!
1, 2 & 3 BR's Windsong Apts
$$$Reduced Rent$$$
The Community that Cares!
386-758-8455
(M514145
Sugarmill Apts
Lake City, FL
386-288-3128
� 2Br/2Ba.
Rent $725 - Deposit $500
/ 3Br/2Ba
Rent $795. ~ Deposit $500
Pets are Welcome

1 Month FREE 2br/l.5ba
Duplex CH/A, W/D hook up.
Convenient location. $650.mo +
sec. 386-758-9351/352-208-2421
1700 sf SECOND STORY 2/2,
nice private country 8 mi to VA
off Lk Jeffrey Hwy. $700 mo,
$1100 needed, no dogs
386.961.9181
2 BR/1 BA with garage.
on West side of Town
1st, last &security.755-6867

2BR/1.5 BA.
$500. mo
includes water.
386-697-1623


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
EFFICIENCY ROOM FOR
RENT. All utilities & cable.
$400. mo. $200 dep.
386-397-5277
High Springs, downtown
IBR/lBa central H/A, quiet
$530/mo laundry available 30 B
NE 2 Ave 352-395-7441
Large Deluxe Apts, 2 BR/2 BA,
W of 1-75, Garage. W/D hook-up,
from $650 + SD.
No longer available.
Room in beautiful lake-view
home. Screened-pool, modern kit,
washer/dryer, private bath. $600
mo incl water, cable, Internet, ele.
$300 dep. Derek 386-344-3261
www.biefloridahome.com
Rooms for Rent. Hlillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Spacious, X-clean. 2/1 Duplex
w/ Garage, W/D hook ups & dish-
washer. Off Country Club Rd.
$650/Mo.+1 Yr. Lease.
386-397-2108 or 352-514-2332
Studios & IBr's from $125 week.
Utilities & cable incl. Full size
kitchen, fridge & range. 386-752-
2741 or 352-538-0292/514-2950
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
W of 1-75, spacious new
2BR/2BA townhome,
$650 and up, plus SD,
(386)344-3715 or (386)466-7392.

720 Furnished Apts.
20 For Rent
EFFICIENCY APARTMENT
Cable & all utilities included.
$540. mo. & $150. Sec Dep.
386-697-9950
Neat as a Whistle lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady. Close to town. 41S.
$135wk. 386-755-0110

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent


04534363
STOP RENTING! OWN
YOUR OWN
grand new 3/2 home under
$799/mo. $8000 first time
homebuyers credit.
Hurry! This program
ends Nov30!
Call Rqb 758-1880,
Burbach Realty
S2BR/15BA, w/bonus room
Unfurnished in .Quail Heights
Country Club. $750.mo, 1st, last &
$250 security dep. .386-752-8553
3 RIVERS estatp home. 3 br/2 ba
concrete block 1 'ac across Itch. R.
Ig 12 x 20 kit./din, w/ wood cab.
32 X 30 bam-h2o + elec. $1000.
mo. 1st, last + sec.386-961-5078
3BR/1.5 BA.-.
276 Hilton Ave. CH/A.
$750. mo,+ $700. dep. (pet.fee)
386-365-8543
3BR/IBA HOUSE. Newly
remodeled. New AC, carpet, paint,'
windows. $570 mo. + $600 sec.
dep. w/6 mo lease. 386-697-9950


A4BR 2BA HUD Home!
ONLY $215/mo!!
5%dn 15yrs @ 8%apr for listings
800-366-9783 ext 7782
BANK FORECLOSURE!
6 Br 3ba! Only $29,900!
Must See, for listings
1-800-366-9783 ext 7921
Beautiful newer brick home on 5
acres. Outbuildings. 1262 SW
Wendy Terrace. $1250 + sec.dep.
(386)344-3715 or 961-9490
BRANFORD 4BR/2BA.
148 NE Hillcrest Cr. CH/A.
$900 mo. plus $850 deposit.'
386-365-8543
COUNTRY LIVING close to
town. 3br/2ba, 2 car garage
modular. 1st and last mo rent +
deposit $900. mo. 386-758-3610
CUSTOM 4BR/3.5BA
on 5+ acres. $2,500 mo + security
& dep. Possible purchase option.
386-365-4307


730f Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
Forest Country S/D 2br/2ba
Brick, w/2 car garage. Lawn
service incl. Great school district.
Screened in patio. 1 Yr lease req'd.
No pets. $1,100 mo. 386-752-6082
TOTALLY UPDATED home for
rent 4BR/3BA, 2 story,
over 3,300 s.f., 4 acres, park-like
setting. Close to 1-75. 10 minutes
to Lake City or 35 to Gainesville.
$1,650/mo., or purchase.
Call Sandy Kishton, Daniel
Crapps Agency 386-344-0433.

740 Furnished
Homes for Rent
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Has washer
& dryer. Pets OK. (386)758-2408

75T Business &
5/ Office Rentals
04534326
Brand New Comm Space
Retail/Office/Warehouse
Private Bathroom
Midtown $650/mo Call Rob
Burbach Realty 386-758-1880


MUST LEASE!
Long Term leasing or short term
rental available. Best use is office
Space, can be retail. Location East
Baya Ave. Call for special pricing.
Weekdays 904-579-6645 or
386-497-4762 Weekends
Office for Rent across from
Court House. Great for
Lawyer, CPA or other
professional. 386-755-3456
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
'$700/mo. plus tax..
Call Bob 386-752-9086
Office Space. 152 N. Marion Ave.
1500 sq ft includes 4 offices.,
storage space & kitchen area
$650 mo. 386-867-4995
Retail Space
Heavy traffic area
800 Sf. & 1600 Sqft.
Call for quotes 1-800-342-0135

790 Vacation Rentals

For Rent: Cabin in the Woods, 2
bedroom, 2 bath, cabin sitting on 1
acrea snuggled up against Osceola
National Forest. Rents by day,
week or month. www.sharonsca-
bin.com or call 1-800-750-4712
OCEAN FRONT Cresent Beach.
1 bedroom. Sleeps 4. Heated
pool.$650.00 weekly. Monthly
avail. 904-483-7617.
Scallops Special Horseshoe
Beach Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg
waterfront porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-.986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale

1 AC.-3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$256/mo. $24,900. 352-215-1018


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-


820 Farms &
SAcreage


10 ac for sale in Columbia County
by owner. Off CR 131. South of
Lake City. $35,000 cash. Will
finance for $50K. (352)498-3035
4-1/2 AC: Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks! Great area!
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$74,900. $657mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
Owner Financed
Half-acre to 10 acre lots
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

930 Motorcycles
1995 HARLEY Davidson
Sportster 883
$3,200.
386-623-4669
2007 YAMAHA RAPTOR
$5000.00
386-754-5564

APCNF at Baya Auto.
Now offering used 4-wheelers of
all sizes at recession prices.
Hunter specials for all ages.
As low as $850. 386-752-2371
Open 6 days a week.
Financing Available WAC.


940 Trucks
1995 CHEVY S-10
pickup $2,500
386-719-7333
386-365-4501

950 Cars for Sale
1991 BUICK Century. 4 door,
white, 58K original miles, one
owner, most options. V-6. 28MPG
$2,500. (352)339-5158

1994 OLDS Royal 88.
Runs good. $1900.00.
386-697-1194 or 386-752-5878.
2000 TOYOTA SiennaVan, 5 Dr.,
V6, Silver XLE, good condition,
many extras, 169,600 miles asking
$4,995. Call 755-3757.
Acura Integra 98 $500!
Police Impounds/Repos!
for listings
800-366-9813 ext A834

952 Vans & Sport
952Util. Vehicles

2001 TOYOTA Landcruiser
All options. 129k miles
Very good condition. $12,800
386-752-0989/904-759-9359


CLASSIFIED LINE AD
Merchandise for Sale
1 personal merchandise item, priced at $100 or less * Free ads not applicable for
pets for sale * 1 item per coupon * 2 coupons per family per week * 4 lines - 6 days
Coupon MUST be filled out and include price. No Phones Calls.
Coupon must be mailed or dropped off
Lake City Reporter P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056 or 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055
Newspaper reserves the right to edit copy and set dates to run (Ads will run at the discretion of the Lake City Reporter).

Name:

Address:

Phone:

Ad:


04534382
FOR LEASE
Office/Warehouse
Great Location near 1-75
$750/mo, 1247sf,
10' roll up door, office built out,
private restrooms.
Call Scott Stewart
386-755-0757
Westfield Realty Group


805 Lots for Sale
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
045344(MX
LEASE W/OPTION TO BUY
4br/2.5ba, 2 car garage. 2747 sq
ft. 2 story home. $1,500. per mo
Susan 386-623-6612, Realtor
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
2.5 yr old 3 BR/2BA, Cypress
Landing, 2 car garage, roughly
1,400 sqft., patio, 1g. living & kit.
area. 386-438-4822/386-697-4336
6- 2/1 Houses, Lake City all for
$115,000 NE Congress, Fairview.
Owner Financing Avail. 503-932-
8677 sunlizard2(@yahoo.com
Below Appraisal Owner motivated
2br/2ba on 10 ac. w/garage, 2 out
buildings. $159,900 Will consider
reasonable offer 386-935-4205
New 3/2 Brick/HB on 1/2 Ac
w/neany upgrades Lake Jeffery
Area Up to 100% financing
available. Additional Properties
avail for new construction
386-752-5035 X2910
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.







Classified Department: 755-5440 LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009 5C













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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


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