<%BANNER%>
The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/00996
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City, Fla
Creation Date: July 26, 2009
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33283560
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:00996
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text



























Community help alert


Time to buy?



Market, tax incentives turning some

renters into first-time homeowners


, JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
This photo shows a home on Southeast Evergreen Drive in the Forest Hills complex that is up for sale. A local market where
the median price of homes is falling and a government stimulus program are making home ownership attractive to many first-
time buyers - buyers that in many cases are finding it makes more sense to purchase, instead of rent, a home.


Median prices in
Lake City have
fallen 25 percent.
From staff, wire reports
f owning your own
home is the American
dream, that dream is
becoming a reality for
many former renters.
For Americans debat-
ing whether to buy or rent
their homes, the scales are
tipping toward ownership.
Because of the slide in
home prices, low interest
rates and tax incentives,
renters are realizing they
could handle a mortgage
for a just little more money.
An Associated Press
analysis of 45 metro areas
finds the gap between the
monthly mortgage pay-'
ment on a median-priced
home and the median rent
has shrunk from $777 a
month to just $221 in the
past three years.
It could mean a quicker
end to the housing-market
doldrums, as renters buy
up unsold homes languish-
ing on the market.
In once-inflated mar-
kets like Phoenix, Las
Vegas and inland swaths
of California and Florida,
where prices have tumbled
more than 40 percent,


sales are rising because
first-time home buyers are
snapping up bargain-priced
homes.
In Fort Myers-Cape
Coral, buyers faced with a
median home sale price of
$172,400 in June 2008 are
now looking at a median
price of $87,900. In Lake
City-Live Oak, median
home prices have fallen 25
percent, to $126,000 during
the same period.
First-time home buyers
are also getting help from a
federal tax credit that cov-


ers 10 percent of the home
price or up to $8,000 for
first-time buyers who earn
up to $75,000 a year, or
$150,000 for a couple. The
credit expires at the end of
November.
Cheap foreclosures in
some of those markets are
now drawing multiple bids.
As supply and demand
even out, home prices will
eventually begin to rise.,
But for now buyers are
having little trouble finding
bargains.
The study, conducted


for the AP by Marcus
& Millichap Real Estate
Investment Services, used
prices for the first three
months of this year.
It calculated mortgage
payments by assuming a
10 percent down payment,
a 30-year fixed loan at 5.15
percent, and taxes and
insurance that added up to
1.5 percent of the purchase
price. It assumed borrow-
ers used private mortgage
insurance.

.HOME continued on 3A


Gap on buying An Associated Press analysisof the top metro areas finds the gap.
t. between the monthly mortgage payment on a median-priced home
vs. renting shrinks and the median rent has shrunk from $777 a month to just $221.
Dollar amount by which median monthly mortgage payment
exceeds median monthly rent payment
.3] .,.:.:., $100 $500 $1,00 $1,500 $2,500
Poil,,, "F -1 -'-.-.
a/ .r / anc. k "\ r\/"-<:.-"-'UA Cleveland 'F>-\ , ,
S... . ..........r-..-.. -- ..... . . , ,, , - ..t . , * . ::,,-
- - - "- -.. ...... .. .
Sa .a.C L - 1 ...co. .r-L r. J G -i Y ;Manh' bl j ..

. L ' :, ' --l :- , -- o ...... .... -
C", ", r.a. e t o ri, ,,:,.:l a-c,. 6 ,,-,.:,,,',,,, I . -', *, � "- * C . . 7
Sv ' 't LOU .... S,-t . '

c ^ 0, |. T,.;,, I- i. {\ S <' *


1 . ..-,,.. DdIlas-Ft. . ' . ..


NOTE: Based on first-quarter 2009 \ Austine.,
median home prices, 90 percent
Loan-to-value, 5.15 percent interest ' , ",- ,:, �
rate, 0.52 percent private mortgage
insurance, 30-year loan term, 1.5
percent taxes and insurance.
'Median home price prepresnts the median price, of a condo/co-op
SOURCE: Marcus & Milllchap Real Estate Investment Services


St. f -i, L. . ,,,i , Palm.
1..: ,


AP


'One Stop Event' helps parents prepare early


'Back to school' gives
low-income families
more choices.

By BRANDON LOCKETT
blockett@lakecityreporter.com

With school starting just around
the corner, it's time to get back in
gear with new clothing and supplies.


For many families, that's an expense
that requires planning.
The Lake City Mall hosted "Back to
School One Stop Event" Saturday to
give parents a step ahead in preparing
their children for school. Several edu-
cational resource groups, including
the Suwannee Valley 4C's, Gateway
Learning Coalition and Southside
Recreation Department, provided
information on adolescent education,
organized sports, referrals services


and allowed parents to register their
children for Pre K .
Smokey the Bear was invited to join.
the event.
"No event is complete with-
out Smokey the Bear," said Janice
Dorminey, Lake City Mall operations
and marketing manager and coordi-
nator of the event.
"My thought is, it's a one-stop
SCHOOL continued on 3A


TONY BRITTILake City Reporter
Local youngster Rashaan (left) gets measured for shoes by
the director of the Christian Service Center, Shirley McManus,
-on Friday..The Christian Service Center will host its Fourth
Annual Sock Hop Aug. 1..

Sock Hop keeps

children in shoes


Event provides
footwear for four
years running.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
As the 2009 school year
gets closer to becoming a
reality, a local service orga-
nization has launched its
annual campaign to make
sure children go back to
school with comfortable
sneakers. �
The Fourth Annual


Christian Service Center
Sock Hop will take place
from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Aug.
1 at the Lake City Mall.
Live entertainment will be
featured at the mall from
11 a.m. - 3 p.m. with a Elvis
impersonator at noon on
the day of the event.
"We'll have entertainment
all day long," said Director
of the Christian Service
Center Shirley McManus.
"The children are being
measured this week and
EVENT continued on 3A


Day of rest greets

weary spacewalkers


All 13 astronauts
enjoy first day off
in 11 days.

By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL -
The astronauts in orbit, all
13 of them, enjoyed their
first day off in more than a
week Saturday after a series
of grueling spacewalks,
'Today we hope you can
enjoy some well-earned
time off," Mission Control
said in a morning message.
"At orbital rates, you can't
stop to ' smell the. roses,


but you can savor the view
from the best seats in the
house."'
The astronauts wrapped
up their fourth spacewalk
Friday, completing criti-
cal battery changes at the
international space sta-
tion. One more spacewalk
is planned for Monday to
perform additional station
work.
In a series of TV inter-
views, two-time spacewalk-
erChristopher Cassidy said,
he's learned to go slowly,
especially right after he goes
out the hatch. Cassidy's
REST continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake.City Reporter

Staying cool about fire safety
Columbia County firefighter Shawn Henderson gets hosed
down in order to beat the heat during a recent training ses-
sion at the Old Boy's Club off of Lake Jeffery Road. Students
had to endure searing heat ranging from 300 to 700 degrees.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


92 71
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


i-r


O pinion ................
Business ................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Crossword.
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Seniors and the new
minimum wage.


COMING
TUESDAY
Your calendar of
community events.


. I - -,. - ...-< - - , -. "-s: . - -.1."i3 . -I-.1 - .- " " ,


11,115


�- .� .� -�� I�~�


�-"'









Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424


.....S "i,,. . '.-$H3.. A,. >. 'f ._H

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: , Friday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
1-11-26-30 12 2-4-7-23-34 Afternoon: 5-0-3 Afternoon: 5-8-2-2 2-4-7-23-34 4-10-11-17-18-29 4-6-16-22-32-11
Evening: 2-6-1 Evening: 5-7-1-1


AROUND NATION



Portland's 'young creative' tough out tough times


By TIM FOUGHT
Associated Press
PORTLAND, Ore.
Ceramics artist
Heidi Sowa
had her eyes
set on Portland
for years. The
city was not too big, had a
cohesive arts community
and plenty of easygoing
and helpful people.
Within weeks of arriv-
ing, she landed a gig mak-
ing costumes for 8-inch
puppets in "Coraline,". a
3-D stop-motion animated
movie. Her job ended
last year, and the movie
opened in theaters earlier
this year.
Now, at 26, Sowa is liv-
ing on unemployment,
sleeping in a single room
apartment and eating
from a refrigerator in a
studio she shares with
other artists under a
bridge ramp in Portland's
industrial east riverbank.
And she's not planning
to go anywhere.
Like thousands of well-
educated young adults
who have flocked to
Portland, she is deter-
mined to weather a reces-
sion that is testing their
affection for the city.
The newcomers, called
the "young creative" by
local economists, have
helped give Portland the -
reputation over the past
two decades for being one
of the hippest cities in the
country. They have been
lured by the city's brew
pubs, bicycle and mass
transit culture, access to
mountains and seacoast,
and a tolerant, off-center


ASSOCIATED PRESS
High-tech entrepreneur Luke Sontag, of Vidoop, is shown in the company's office in downtown Portland, Ore. on June 5.
Sontag vows he'll stay in Portland despite a hard first year in town


way of life.
Now, they are trying
to hang on while hanging
out.
Sowa cites the city's
love affair with bicycles
and mass transit, its scale
and its mood for her deci-
sion to stay.
"It seems a small
enough but a big enough
place," she said. "It's
easy to meet people, and
the art community is
cohesive. People tend to


be pretty easygoing and
helpful, too. I haven't met
many abrasive people."
Sowa is keeping busy
with a whirl of projects
and prospects, ranging
from film pitches with a
"Coraline" colleague to
fashion corsets - she
helped a designer cre-
ate them in exchange for
learning the how-tos of a
trendy garment.
A Portland economist
who has studied the


"young creative" says
Sowa is typical.
"It's not as if it's
great somewhere else,"
said Joseph Cortright,
chairman of Gov. Ted
Kulongoski's council of
economic advisers and
author in' 2005 of a study
of young people and
American cities, "The
Young and Restless in a
Knowledge Economy."
Cortright said the
United States soon will


face a shortage of well-
educated workers. Baby
boomers are retiring, he
said, and the rising per-
centages of women and
college graduates in the
work force are leveling
off.
That, he said, will make
winners of cities such
as Portland that offer
creative, entrepreneurial
young people something
distinctive, whether it is
warm climate, cool cul-


ture, a combination of the
two or something else
entirely.
Charlotte, N.C., and
Austin, Texas, are oth-
ers that have Portland's
"stickiness," he said,
attracting outsize num-
bers of the 25- to 34-year-
old cohort and keeping
them.
High-tech entrepreneur
Luke Sontag vows he'll
stay in Portland despite a
hard first year in town.
In September, Sontag
led a crew of 34 high-tech
workers on a latter-day
"Oregon Trail" road trip,
moving from Tulsa, Okla.,
in a convoy of rental vans
and RVs, circling them
at night on the western
plains and building camp-
fires to illuminate perfor-
mances by the in-house
band.
Within weeks after
Vidoop Inc. arrived,
the financial companies
Sontag hoped to snag as .
customers were out of the
market for his Internet
security services. The lay-
offs started in November.
The company, he said,
was reincorporating, plan-
ning for new financing
and workers.
In the meantime, he's
plotting a company in
mobile marketing with
colleagues and living on
savings. "If all went to
hell with this, I would not
be moving," he said.."I
wouldn't give a flip if I had
to pick up trash."
Young creative turn
more often, though, to the
coffee shops for work and
their default job -
barista.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


'Dancing' duo prepares for Broadway


NEW YORK
ariha Smirnoff and
Maksim Chmerkovskiy
have no time to think
about their wedding.
They're too busy
burning up the dance floor.
The professional dancers best
known from ABC's "Dancing With
the Stars" are preparing for their
Broadway debuts in the ballroom
dance show "Burn The Floor."
It opens Aug. 2 at the Longacre
Theatre.
Smirnoff says she and her
husband-to-be, engaged since New
Year's Eve, are consumed by dance
steps and stage cues. Following their
three-week guest appearance; she
says, "we'll definitely start thinking
about the wedding."
Chmerkovskiy calls it "a
testament to the relationship" that
the passionate pair can rehearse so
closely and still stick together.

Furtado finds fresh
inspiration for 'Mi Plan'
MIAMI - Nelly Furtado admits
that writing her new, all-Spanish
album, "Mi Plan," wasn't in her plans
at all after finishing a hectic tour
to promote her last chart-topping
record.
"I was physically tired and I wasn't
feeling inspired. It was almost as if
I lost my pop inspiration to write
in English," Furtado said. "I just
needed a new outlet, and I found it
by writing in Spanish."
The 30-year-old singer told
The Associated Press at a Miami
recording studio that her fourth
full-length album, which is set for
release Sept. 15 on her own Nelstar
Music label, more intimately
explores the passion that fuels
relationships
"I think this album has some
of my first true love songs ever.
They're not complicated. They're not
over-intellectualized, and I found it
liberating to be able to sing in the
Latin language and to express myself
from my Latin soul," said Furtado,


. *ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dancers Karina Smirnoff (left), and Maksim Chmerkovskiy participate in a press ,
*preview of the new Broadway ballroom dance show 'Burn The Floor' at the
Longacre Theatre on Friday in New York.


the Canadian-born daughter of
Portuguese immigrants.
The Grammy-Award winner, who
vaulted up.the pop charts with such
indelible tracks as "I'm Like a Bird"
in 2000 and "Promiscuous" in 2006,
is set to deliver a new fleet of mostly
up-tempo, melodic tunes on "Mi
Plan."

Billy Joel, Elton John
Buffalo show postponed
BUFFALO, N.Y. - Billy Joel and
Elton John have postponed their
concert in Buffalo, N.Y., because
Joel isn't feeling well.
Concert promoters say Joel's
doctors advised him not to perform
Friday's sold-out show at HSBC
Arena after he came down with flu-
like symptoms.
A new date for the concert, a stop


on the pair's Face 2 Face tour, is
expected to be announced next week.

Bono, U2 rock Dublin as
world tour hits new high
DUBLIN - Bono and U2 rocked
more than 80,000 fans in Dublin as
the Irish supergroup's latest world
tour hit new emotional highs Friday
night on home soil.
A deafening roar welcomed the
Dubliners as they launched their
three-concert homestand at Croke
Park, Ireland's biggest stadium and
a cathedral to Irish nationalism. The
band's "360" tour - featuring its
underselling 12th studio album, "No
Line on the Horizon" - switches
from Europe to North America in
September.

* Associated Press


" Actress Marjorie Lord is 91.
* Movie director Blake
Edwards is 87.
* R&B singer-song-
writer Bobby Hebb is 71.
* Actress-singer Darlene
Love is 68.
m Rock star Mick Jagger is


Lake City
HOW TO REACH. US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ............... 755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Ha. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
t6 Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson ..... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland . .754-0417
(lstrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


66.
* Movie director Peter
Hyams is 66.
* Rock musician Roger
Taylor (Queen) is 60.
" Actor Kevin Spacey is 50.
* Actress Sandra Bullock is


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.,
To report a missed delivery, please call
(386) 754-0406. For all other circulation
issues, please call (386) 755-5445.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters..754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ............... . $26.32
24 Weeks... ........... . :..$48.79
52 Weeks ... .............. . $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks . . ............... $41.40
24 Weeks . ................ . $82,80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
.items. If you.have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Thought for Today

"Government is too big and
important to be left to the
politicians:'
- Chester Bowles
American diplomat (1901-1986)


Daily Scripture


"I will hasten and not delay to
obey your commands."
-Psalm 119:60


SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


2A


LAK CTYREORERSUN DAY REPORT








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


HOME: Falling prices attract renters


Continued From Page 1A

While the analysis found
the gap between what it
costs to own and rent is
shrinking, it's still too wide
for millions who live pay-
check to paycheck.
Renters with jobs in
the education, retail and
transportation industries
don't earn enough to rent
the average two-bedroom
apartment in many of these
major cities, let alone buy,
according to a recent study
of 200 metro areas by the
Center for Housing Policy.
Renters who want to
become homeowners also
face the obstacles of scrap-
ing together a down pay-
ment and qualifying for the
loan. And renters with a
record of paying bills late
will have a hard time getting
a low interest rate.
"The problem is, some
people are having a hard
'time getting financing,"
said Koby Adams, owner of
The Adams Agency in Lake


City.
But for those people who
can achieve a mortgage
loan, buying could be the
right thing to do, Adams
said.
"It wouldn't be a bad
move at all," he said. "You
can get more house for the
money."
Still, that money doesn't
always end with a mort-
gage payment.
Homeowners also have
to shoulder many costs
renters don't face - asso-
ciation fees, insurance,
some utilities. And there are
still cities, among them San
Francisco and Los Angeles,
where it's usually still more
affordable to rent - even
though home prices have
fallen more than 30 per-
cent.
Even in Columbia County,
the gap between renting and
buying is not as pronounced
as it is elsewhere.
"Rents are falling here,


too," said Jim Curry, a real
estate agent in Lake City
who handles both sales and
rentals.
"We've had to drop the
rents on some of our hous-
es to get people in them,"
he said.
Fear also keeps some
people in the rental market,
said Curry.
"Some buyers are afraid,"
he said. "They're afraid of
where the bottom is, of
spending too much money
or what's going to happen.
All the uncertainty is creat-
ing a lot of fear."
Nevertheless, Curry
agrees that homes in some
parts of the country are
more affordable than they've
been in decades and this is
enticing some buyers.
"Some people are think-
ing," Curry said, "these
houses are pretty good
deals; I need to figure out a
way to make it work, I can't
let this opportunity pass."


Flavor of Smokin' festival is fundraising
John Bennett (left),.41, of Hampton, S.C., and Gary Park, 41, of Green Cove Springs inspect
a' pan of St. Louis-style spare ribs. The two, who make up the Two Smokin' White Boys team,
believe that presentation, texture, taste and tenderness are essential in an award-winning
slab of ribs. The Smokin' On The Suwannee Barbecue Festival at the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park Friday and Saturday raised money for FFA.


SCHOOL: Begins at end of August


Continued From Page 1A

shop," she commented.
"This helps beat the school
rush."
Also at the event,
Columbia County Food
Services provided


EVENT
Continued From Page 1A

next week for school shoes.
We take those measure-
ments and their first names
and put them on a little
school (house) display."
The Christian Service
Center, 441 NW Washington
St., will be open from 10
a.m. - 4 p.m. for the children
to be measured for shoes.
People wanting to par-
ticipate in the program can
pick-up a discount coupon
at the Christian Service
Center booth in the mall,
pick a child's name off the
school house display and
go shopping for sneakers
or socks and return them
to the collection bin in the
center of the mall.
'Then we bring them all
back here and give them
out two weeks before school
starts," she said. "Every
year it's been close to 300
children that we've gotten
shoes for, but I don't know
what it will be this year."
The shoes collected as
part of the event will be for
pre-kindergarten to high
school-aged children.


REST
Continued From Page 1A

carbon dioxide levels were
high during both space-
walks, but not enough to
make him sick. He said he
felt fine the whole time.
His first spacewalk was
cut short because of the
problem.
. NASA officials attributed
the former Navy SEAL's
gung-ho approach to his
military training.
"Slow and steady wins the
race," Cassidy said, describ-
ing the lesson he's learned.
He promised to "go nice
and slow" during Monday's
spacewalk.





Unlimited Hours!
99P ONE
9 FULL YEAR!
offer ends 7/31/07

* No credit card required! * FREE Setup Software
* 10 E-maiAddresses .* SAVE more when you
* FREE Technical Support add Express!
Surf up to 6Xfaster!
Sign Up Onlinel www.LocalNet.com
752-0774
LocalNet 1-888-488-7265
I '1,flaHH:ffiHI.BBH. 4ffiii


information to help low-
income families with the
option to sign up their child
for subsidized meals.
"Generally, we'd wait


until the first day of school.
Last year, we started taking
applications a little early,"
said Anna Roberts, a, food
service technician.


SiZZling FREE Aerobics
Summer & Child Care!
Special! Ask about our Personal Training



$9 FITNESS CENTER
for 3 months Westfield Square
Regular Price $130 Lake City, FL
Ill- (386) 752-0749


Dr. Rios announces the sale of his
practice to Dr. Daina Greene, OB/GYN.
A graduate of the University of Florida,
Dr. Green will take over the office immediately.
"We would like to thank all of my patients
and the community of Lake City for your support.
We hope you give the same support to Dr. Greene
as she continues building her practice."
.,* - Dr. & Mrs. Rios



Dr. Rios will be taking a break for the next few weeks but plans to
return to the office working with Dr. Greene practicing Gyn. Marlene
' Summers, CNM will continue working with Dr. Greene.


MEET1 II


Main Library


Glynn Marsh Ahu-n sets her Lumane
Fogarty mystery novels in the cypress
swamps and sink holes of north Florida.


0~~4 ~


: 'jl PRESENTED BY FRIENDS OF THE11 LIBRARY .,

SUNRISE HOME COMPANIONS
IN HOME CARE
for your loved one

S,









TEMPORARY or LONG TERM COMPANIONSHIP
PRIVATE DUTY
We're here to help you enjoy living in your home with complete
assistance & safety as if we are your own family.
When a nursing home is
NOT the right answer for you.
SHIRLEY RESNICK, ADMINISTRATOR
-:UN 'ISE 386-963-5256
i~InME.r(rMfi,'EN N C lRrIr. License 299418


...We can see you today

or tomorrow..."
S--


W k. 1788 SWAN;. Barnett U'&'Ix'; Awy. 47Souh a z1 j-A.3.3' 1s
.. www.aspenlakecity.com


.


ENDOCRINOLOGY PATIENTS




sC ,is within


/ Reach!
North Central Florida's best endocrine clinic is just a short
drive away, with next day appointments now available.
Start healing today.
Specializing in...


Diabetes
Thyroid Disorders
Osteoporosis
Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome


Parathyroid Disorders
Pituitary Disorders
Adrenal Disorders
General Endocrinology


Accent and Dr. Catherine Edwards
Welcome Dr. SadafJeelani,
Board Certified in Endocrinology,. Diabetes and Metabolism



aCCent
ENDOCRINOLOGY

Next Day Appointments Available!

352-372-9414 * www.accentmd.com
4340 Newberry Road, Suite 301, Gainesville
(1-75 to Exit 387/Newberry Rd, Then 2 Miles East)


Page Editor: Torn Mayer, 754-0428


j"
-100441111?4 ��. .",
. t4.












OPINION


Sunday, July 26, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


OU
OPIN


R
IO0


Time to

own up

to actions

When does "boys
will be boys
stop qualifying
youthful indis-
cretion? How
about this for a litmus test:
When the felony charges roll
around.
The recent confession of
two teenagers to a number of
violent crimes including rob-
bery with a firearm, kidnapping
and grand theft is more than a
little disturbing. It's downright
frightening that two young men
would so casually disregard the
rules of society to commit vio-
lent acts that include removing
a store clerk from his place of
business in his own vehicle and
holding him hostage.
This from two youths not
yet old enough to vote - not
that.voting will be a near-term
thought if.a felony conviction is
on the horizon.
' The question is, have we
reached a point in society
where such behavior is toler-
ated? And a better question,
how did we get here?
There are easy targets on
which to lay blame: the failure
of proper parenting, the fail-
ure of our education system,
poverty, lack of community
resources, a dearth of mentors
or maybe, too much violent
television.
The truth is is that any or
none of these things may be
true, but in the end, the crimes
committed here in Columbia
County are emblematic. They
represent both a lack of per-
sonal accountability and an
apathetic American society that
too often looks the other way as
long as that accountability isn't
going down in our own neigh-
borhood.
At a time when youths have
access to a 9 mm handgun
they don't hesitate to wield, at
a crossroads where actions are
not subject to morality, we must
realize that the big question
isn't, how did we get here?
The vital quandary is, how
do we get back?
H I G H LI GH T S
IN HISTORY
Today is Sunday, July
26, the 207th day of 2009.
There are 158 days left in
the year. On this date in 1775,
Benjamin Franklin became
America's first Postmaster-
General.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is'pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
*BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


America's real power and strength


The real power and
strength of America
lies not in its over-
whelming military
power but in the
everyday small and kind deeds
of its people. They represent the
best of what is right about this
great country of ours."
Do these words sound to you
like they could be the words
of a fifth-generation American
making a patriotic speech, on
the Fourth of July?
Actually, they are the words
of a first-generation Chinese
man, Zehao Zhou, whose fam-
ily happened to get stranded in
White Springs during the great
snow and ice storm of 1989
and was befriended by White
Springs citizens Stephen and
Kathryn Williams.
The purity of the kindness of
the White Springs Williams fam-
ily - taking the Chinese family
into their home for the duration
of the storm - prompted that
profound observation by the
Zehao Zhou family in a letter
they later sent the Williams fam-
ily.
So, there we have the simple
truth. Our great country's.main
strength and power is in the
everyday acts of kindness by
ordinary people like us.

Mary's birthday
Mary Williams Barber will
be 101 years old tomorrow.
Mary was a well-known citizen
of both Ft. White and Lake
City in her youth, then' she
moved to High Springs and
married Talmadge Barber, the
police chief. Later they opened
Barber's Restaurant in High
Springs and built it into one of
the best-known restaurants in
North Florida.
Mary now lives with her
sister, Betty Jane Williams
Kinchen, in Gainesville. She is
still mentally sharp and enjoyed
a family-only birthday party
yesterday.
If you would like to wish
Mary a Happy Birthday, send a


LETTERS


TO


Vandalism threatens
sacred ground
To the Editor:
I am very hurt and angered
by what happened at Memorial
Cemetery. It is apparent that
whoever vandalized the grave
sites has never lost anyone
close to them. This is a sacred
place a place of respect. It
breaks my heart to know that


Morris Williams
Phone:(386) 755-8183
williamsh 2@firn.edu
372 W Duval St.
Lake City. FL 32055

card to Mary W. Barber, c/o
Betty Kinchen, 114 NE 11th
Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32605.

Sports flashbacks
* 1920: The CHS football
team lost 27-0 to the Cuban
Athletic Club in a game in
Havana and became the first
American team. to play a game
outside the United States.
* 1947: CHS won their only
state basketball championship
with a 37-26 win over Pompano
Beach High.
* 1967: CHS won the state
Class A football championship
by defeating host Auburndale
27-7 in the championship game.
. 1971-1994: LCCC softball
coach Jean Williams led the
Lady Timberwolves to 17 con-
secutive conference champion-
ships, eight state champion-
ships, and seven national cham-
pionships, and an overall record
of 874-274.
* 1990: The Florida Sports
Hall of Fame opened in Lake
City on December 1.
* 1994: Tiger Stadium
opened at CHS and the Tigers
defeated Suwannee 24-14 in the
stadium's first game.
* 1995: LCCC disbanded its
men's basketball program, one
of the most successful in the
state. Coach Joe Fields led the
Timberwolves for 22 seasons,
compiled a 512-190 record, won
a state title in 1970, and placed
third in the nation that same
year.

USA's 200th
In 1976, our town celebrated


THE EDITOR

there are people who would
destroy and vandalize some-
one's final resting place. It was
very hard for me to see the
picture in the paper with my'
family name on the headstone
and precious mementos from
another gravesite tossed around
like trash.
These items were placed on a
loved one's gravesite for a very
special reason to them. I am


our country's 200th birthday
with a full-scale community pro-
duction of the musical "1776,"
directed by Babs Lackey and
Lily Demas.
Only local cast members,
musicians and stagehands
were used. Frank Hubert,
Tommy Witt, Gordon Summers,
Martin Page, Richard Anders,
Noah Lindsay, Cindy Bowling,
Richard Hale and Mike Moses
headed up the large cast.
There was one non-human
member of the "cast" -- the St.
James Episcopal Church's 76-
year-old church bell was used to
replicate the Liberty Bell.

Who was Clickie?
In 1947 the Columbia School
of Forestry (informally "the
Forest Ranger School") opened
but had a problem attracting
students to the school.
One college story came
out later that Forestry School
superintendent Clarke "Click"
Mathewson talked a well-known
cartoonist into visiting the
school to help recruit students.
The man was so impressed
with the, school that he cre-
ated a cartoon character for
his comic strip and named him
"Ranger Clickie." Some said
that publicity did help get more
students to the school. I never
heard who that cartoonist was.
If you know, give me a call at
(386) 755-8183.

No August columns
I will be taking a break
from writing this column dur-
ing the month of August. So,'
the next column will be on
Sept. 6.

For sale
Clothes washer and drier for
sale cheap. Just joined a nudist
colony.

* Morris Williams is a local
historian and long-time Columbia
County resident.


sure that whoever they belong
to feels violated, hurt and angry,
just as I do. I pray that whoever
did these terrible things will
realize what they have done
because it does not matter what
I think or someone else thinks,
it is who will judge them in the
end.

CherylJoye Shiver
High Springs


ToddWilson
twilson@lakecityreportercom


'E-word'


loses its


coinage


Think the word "econ-
omy" is ruined for me.
It's been overused in the
past 18 months to the
point that when I hear it,
I get nauseous. It's a writer's
curse.
People talk incessantly about
"this economy" or the "state of
the economy" or the "current
economy." We've all been bom-
barded with the word in print
and on the airwaves. People
try to spin it into everyday
conversations like we've never
heard the concept that com-
merce as we once knew it has
- slowed. Experts and idiots roll
it out with identicalhconfidence.
It's mentioned'in nearly
,every national business story
we pick up from The Associated .
Press. It's discussed at high
decibels by literally every talk-
ing head on television and talk
radio.
Personally, it's to the point
that when I hear it, I shudder
at the lack of creativity from
the speaker. When I read
it, my eyes stumble on the
printed speed bump. Of course
the "economy" is the problem.
We get it. Now let's talk about
ideas that include a solid fix
without the concept of borrow-
ing money to get out of debt.
When "economy" is used in
dialogue, I fear it will always
strike me with unique pain,
a blinding stab similar to a
thumb squarely mashed with
a hammer or a blown knee.
It's a pain that comes frorr the
inside out.
In editorials, columns, story
editing and headlines, I've
tried to find ways to describe
financial situations without
using the word. It's tough.
A few dictionaries list one
definition of the word as
"thrifty management; frugality
in the expenditure or consump-
tion of money" or something
to the effect. What a laugher.
If our society was "thrifty" or
"frugal" with our wealth, the
word "economy" wouldn't be
growing hair on the buffet of
tired conversations. Through
overuse and vocal excitement,
"economy" has taken on new
definitions.
Proper synonyms may be
"thrifty" and "savings," but in
real-world vernacular, the big-
picture exchange of money,
at the front-pocket level or on
the national scale, whether at a
breakneck clip or a frugal drip,
is more accurate. Colloquial
exchanges that would be right-
. on might include "financial
situation" or "global financial
circumstances" or maybe
"Obamaconomy." OK, scratch
that last one.
Enough with the freshman
lecture. If you have a word or
phrase that fits better, e-mail
me with your suggestions and
rescue me from my torture.
We'll try to put it in play.
As for me, I'm done with the
"E-word."
Unless I'm quoting some-
one, I just can't, in good con-
scious, write it. You'll still read
it in this newspaper; others
on the copy desk have not yet
reached my level of rebellion.
My hope is that when we
work ourselves out of this
downturn, things will settle
down and we can put this word
on the shelf and talk and write


about other things.

* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


4A









Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


BRIEFS

Hemingway Days
honors author
KEY WEST - A Michigan
high school teacher has won
the literary centerpiece of Key
West's annual salute to Ernest
Hemingway.
Gregory Loselle earned the
contest's $1,000 first prize for
his short story, which was cho-
sen from 1,057 submissions
from American and interna-
tional writers.
The language arts and art
history instructors story is
about a priest who performs a
miracle causing him to ques-
tion his faith.
It particularly impressed
judges for its writer's unique
voice and ability to treat his
subject with balance and with-
out sentimentality, -said author
Lorian Hemingway, Ernest
Hemingway's granddaughter,
who directs the competition.
The Hemingway Days
festival, which ends Sunday,
honors Ernest Hemingways
literary legacy and Key West
lifestyle. Events.include a
look-alike contest and a fishing
tournament.

Man killed by
downed power line
HIALEAH - Authorities
say a man who was trying to
move a downed power line
off a Hialeah street died when
he was electrocuted.
Police say 21-year-old
Myles Davis was at work
Thursday when a passing
storm knocked the power line
down. Davis went outside
and tried to move the line
with his hands.
Police say the man's
hands were disintegrated by
the electricity. The amount of
power running through the
line was enough for a neigh-
borhood of 600 homes.

Lawyer denies
ethics accusation
TALLAHASSEE - The
lawyer for former Florida
House Speaker Ray Sansom
denied on Friday all ethics
accusations that a special
investigator has made .against
his client. '
Richard Coates also
requested that a special
House committee tasked with .
looking into the matter delay
taking action until Sansom's
criminal charges are resolved,
according to a letter sent
to panel chairman Rep. Bill
Galvano, R-Bradenton.

*Associated Press


0 N-

FREE RENT
Move in TODAY with

$299
Brand New Gated
Pool - Pet Friendly
200 Free Channels
Next to Lake City Middle School
754-1800



Lube, Oil, Filter
Change engine oil $ A 95I
Replace oil filter aUEH 195
Lube Chasis
(where applicable)
Inspect & Top off all fluids lt. had
Reset oil life monitor teiees upto5qls
Complete maintenance work sheet

A-.f'�Z-ZL


(386) 752-6933
4316 W US Hwy 90 � Lake City, FL 32055
%Saur,,dtavin rantno ontnr
Plumbing Tip No. 156:
No plumbing problem is more common or
frustrating than a clogged drain. Taking
some simple precautions will help you
avoid stop-Ups.
SDon't pour grease or wash coffee
grounds down the sink
Clean pop-up stoppers in the bathroom
sink and tub regularly.
* Every few months, remove the overflow
plate on a tub and pull up assembly to
reach the spring or rocker arm. Remove
accumulated hair and rinse thoroughly.



(386) 752-6306 CFc 14276413


Tornado destroys 7 homes in Port Orange


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ponce Inlet Fire Department Lt, Skip Tracy checks on the
occupant in a manufactured home in the Laurelwood Estates
subdivision in Port Orange after a tornado touched down
damaging homes and property on Friday.


Associated Press

PORT ORANGE - A
sudden tornado spawned
by fast-moving storms hit,
three Port Orange mobile
home communities Friday
evening, damaging 163
homes including seven con-
sidered a total loss, officials
said.
There was just one
minor injury from cut
class, the Port Orange Fire
Department reported. Eight
homes had major damage
and 26 had moderate dam-
age.
"I was taking my little
dog out when it hit," Sharon
Bigger told the Daytona
Beach News-Journal. "Then,
the roof was in the tree."
Mike Blancato was sit-
ting with his wife on their


irFMN.- "'i, 5 - I .,


porch when they saw debris
swirl past.
"It was like the movie
'Twister,"' Mike Blancato
said. "You couldn't tell what
direction it was coming from
or where it was headed."
A funnel cloud moved
onshore and touched down
briefly in Ormond Beach
and destroyed a catamaran,
the Volusia County Beach
Patrol reported.
"It was an intense little
system," Beach Patrol Capt.
Scott Petersohn said. "It just
came onto the beach and
trashed a little catamaran
and left."
The storm popped up
quickly to the north ear-
lier in the evening, the
National Weather Service


in Melbourne reported. It
was caused by a "sea-breeze
merger" when winds com-
ing off both coasts met and
caused the storm's rotation.
While bad weather hit the
entire area Friday, meteo-
rologists identified only
one true tornado, which hit
Port Orange around 6:30
p.m. The city is located just
south of Daytona Beach.
"It was one complex of
storm. cells that moved
from Flagler County down
through Dayton Beach
and down toward Cape
Canaveral," meteorolo-
gist Bob Wimmer, said,
"Fortunately, this just had
one instance where it
touched down and then
lifted back up."


If you are suffering from peripheral
neuropathy (painful burning feet and legs)
a new therapy may help you. Microvas
Therapy is non-invasive and pain free and
improves up to 85% of patients.
Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance plans accepted
, ,4 . 0oF. :Div,L ak - .. :,..





\Women'sn Health
wiiha Woman's Touch


IEW NUMBER


Coverall and Win...





$500

'I Source.

. Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com * C URRENTS ,,


1-25


"'ii"'Heads


15%

OFF
Any Service or BodyShop
Repair for active or inactive
militaryandseniorcitizens

jhrm ui.
1518 W H Iw9
(386) 52-505


Daily Quarter Games
Noon until 6:15pm


Curves Works. So you can get
more out of your summer.
At C-v1, our 30 minute fcu- t wofks -Y 1 major nl n sle
youp ,t p y u c l 5 bum up u t 5 e1 l s All with .1 41 rl' to














$1495

Most iiaikes illut o t I
to 4 quart- oil & lter
Bayr Auto
(C iirner of Baya ..A e. iiii .laiers ,tic.) )l86-;4126(


Please join the Columbia County Builder's Association
as they welcome special speaker, Dr. Jerry Osteryoung to their
General Council luncheon to be held on
Wednesday, August 5, 2009 at the Holiday Inn.

Dr. Osteryoung is an International and National speaker who
consults entrepreneurs throughout Florida and has published
books and articles on leadership and time management. Dr.
Osteryoung will present a special discussion on "How to be a
Great Manager and Get the Most Out of Your Stff'.

The public is welcome to attend. Tickets will be pre-sold,
$10 for (CCBA members and $15 for non-members. Tickets
include buffet luncheon. Doors open at 1:30 a.m., meeting
will begin at Noon.

Please call 386-754-5355 to purchase tickets or for
more information. Deadline for ticket purchase is
Saturday, August 1, 2009.


...Where the salt meets gour ife.
"" _ - " j rltch lingcdi lO e ifi, e ;t ''' i',1
Be, 111 )lo 1 p'1"
PANDORA"
.BracelesI ti An ECAST 101..
.16.& under 1 G lAi ,O
T-Shirts * Tanks * Caps * Decals
Knives * Ammo & Shooting Accessories
Fishing Poles * Live Bait & More


OB/GYN
Daina Greene, MD


SPECIALIZING IN-
* Non-Invasive -... i.:.'. .:; .:
Gynecological .-,
SAdolescent Gy-. I
* High and Low I : ..
* Conlihoceplion
* Delivering at Sl.-,.I '.-.I


New Patients Welcome.
Call today for a p.c. a.-nl appointment
386-755-0500


I L..


S NORTH FLORIDA
PHARMACY
347SWMain Blvd & Hwy90W
Lake City 758-6770
3718 Hwy 90W
Lake City-755-9300
7729 US Hwy 27
Ft. While -497-2580
101 SWHwy 27
Branford 935-6905


% s l� � I E ff.�WrLNW 4KN


gg-^r.- ..-..


i


LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


ama hawks health care overhaul, citing study


By TOM RAUM


\ASH IN (ITON -
-resident Harack Obama,
ciiingi a new White House
study sug-esting that small
businesses pay far more
per employee for health
insurance than big com-
panies, said Saturday the
disparity is "unsustainable
- it's unacceptable."
"And it's going to change
when I sign health insur-
ance reform into law," the
president said in his weekly
Internet and radio address.
A new study by the
White House Council of
Economic Advisers said
small businesses pay up to
18 percent more to provide
health insurance for their
employees. As a result,
fewer of them do so and the
number has been shrink-
ing further' in these hard
economic times.
It was released Saturday
as "part of the administra-
tion's aggressive campaign


-,-
*.-ip









ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this July 15 file photo, Sec. Chris Dodd, D-Conn. (left), watches as President Barack Obama speaks on health care reform
in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington with Rep. Carolyn McCarthy, D-NY (center) and Rep. George Miller, D,
Ca (right).


to build public and congres-
sional support for Obama's
health care efforts
Obama had called for
Congress to vote on health


legislation by the August
recess, but when it became
clear this week lawmakers
would miss that deadline,
he said he expects a bill by


year-end.
Separately, congres-
sional budget scorekeep-
ers say one highly touted
idea for saving money


from Medicare to finance
a health overhaul would
only yield modest savings.
In a setback for Obama,
the Congressional Budget


Office says that creating
a powerful commission to
recommend Medicare cuts
would produce only about
$2 billion in savings over
10 years. Cuts the commis-
sion agreed on would go
into effect unless Congress
overrides them.
On the issue regard-
ing small businesses, the
White House study said
only 49 percent of busi-
nesses with three to nine
workers and 78 percent of
companies with 10 to 24
workers offered any type
of health insurance to
their employees in 2008.
In contrast, 99 percent of
companies with more than
200 workers offered health
insurance.
Small companies pay
proportionately more than
big ones because they lack
bargaining power and face
higher administrative costs,
the study found. It said thaf
effectively levied a "heavy
tax" on small businesses
and their employees.


BRIEFS


Senators seem to
get no respect.
WASHINGTON - When
it comes to next year's pri-
maries; three senators prob-
ably are feeling a lot like
Rodney Dangerfield: They
can't get any respect.
As veteran, lawmakers,
Sens. Ailen Specter, D-Pa.,
and Jim Bunning, R-Ky.,
should be coasting; under
normal circumstances, to
the general election. Sen.
Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y.,
appointed in January as
Hillary Rodham Clinton's
successor, has the White
House's backing.
Yet each has party
challengers clamoring for a
primary fight in 2010. That's
unusual in the Senate,
where incumbents typically
sail smoothly into the
November vote. It's created
awkwardness and tension
for party leaders who like
to avoid contentious .and
expensive primary. contests.
Specter, a five-term
senator, cut his decades-
long ties with the Republican
Party in April and became
a Democrat in a state that
Barack Obama won handily
in the presidential election.
Bunning is a Hall of Fame
pitcher with two terms under
his belt. Gillibrand, 42, is the
Senate's youngest member.


Hard economic times,
however, are stirring dis-
content about politics as
. usual, which opens the
door for challengers, said
'Clay Richards, who recently
retired as a pollster at
Quinnipiac University.


claw to protect the jobs
these projects create in
their states and districts.
Others have serious
disagreements with the
Obama administration's
strategic choices.


U.S. takes firmer
Defense secretary i.S. with Ira i
elnil with Israel


scores big wins
WASHINGTON - Robert
Gates is on a roll. Question
is, how long will it last?
The politically savvy
defense secretary scored
big legislative wins when the
Senate voted convincingly
to end production of the
high-priced F-22 jet fighter
and killed an aircraft engine.
project that he says isn't
needed.
Gates, a Republican
holdover from the Bush
administration, is on a
campaign to change the
way the Peptagon does
business. In' his sights are
unnecessary or financially
troubled weapons that
siphon money away
from the troops and gear
required for irregular
wars now being fought in
Afghanistan and Iraq.
Yet getting Capitol Hill
to go along with further
deep cuts to big-ticket
programs remains a huge
challenge as lawmakers


OBITUARIES


Calivin Calloway
Mr. Calvin Lee Calloway, 54,
resident of Lake City, FL, passed
away'at his home, Friday July 24,.
2009. He was from Wauchula,
FL, where he attended school in,
the Hardee Public School System
and was a member of the Lake
Dale Baptist Church, but had,
lived here in Columbia County
for the past 40 years. He was the
Maintenance Director over the
shop at Terry Dicks Trucking
for 17 years, later he was a,
Mechanic Logistics Advisor for
G.T.C.F .Inc. in Lake City for
Tim Galloway. He was a loving \
.husband, father, &' grandfather
who enjoyed spending time with
his family,-trucking andjust being
at home. He is preceded in death
by his father, Billy Calloway and
his brother, George Calloway.
Mr. Calloway is survived
by his wife of 6 1/2 years,.
Bonnie Calloway of Lake City,
FL; sons. Calvin Lee (Erica)
Calloway Jr. of Anchorage, AK,
.Joseph Lee (Rhonda) Calloway
of Lake City, FL; daughters,
Windy (Tom) Rheaume of
Anchorage. AK, Jessica Lynn
(Bruce) Milton of Lake City,
FL; mother. JoAnn Calloway ;
brother, Jim D. Calloway both of
Lake City, FL, & family friend,
Jamic Ryals of Lake City, FL,
5 grandchildren and several
nieces & nephews also survive.
(iraveside services for Mr.
Callov;i, will be conducted
on TIlesday. July 28, 2009 at
1:30 P.M. in Iake Dale Baptist
(h'ic iI C cimetery, WauLchula, FL.
Visiliatioi iilh thle family will
he held on Monday, July 27,
2009 ;it the funeral 'home from
5 - 7 p.m. In lieu of flowers
th liFinily requests that dona-
Inlol I in C(' iin Call]oway's name
1e nimlde in Ih i Ameirican I leart


Association, 3324 W. University
Ave.#128 Gainesville, FL 32607.
Funeral Arrangements are under
the direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 South Highway
441, Lake City 386-752-
1954. Please sign the guest-
.book at gatewayforestlawn.com.

Obituaries 'are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


S a Heping dreams come true...
..:., ORTHODONTICs one smife ata time!


-- (L to R) Donna Chasteen - 13 yrs., Theresa Hacht - 13 yrs.,Dr. Celia Martin, DMD - 22 yrs.,
| I Lori Green Berry - 19 yrs., Lori Young - 6 yrs. (Not' pictured: Kristlna Carmlchael)

martin Orthodontics



Hwy 47 S.* Lake City, FL * 755- I 00 I

Hwy 47 S.� Lake City, FLo 7551- !001


WASHINGTON - The
Obama administration is
dispatching four of its most
senior foreign policy and
security figures to Israel
this coming week with the
same message on two open
questions causing friction
between the close allies:
Don't do it.
Taking, a firmer line
with Israel than the Bush


administration, President
Barack Obarria is urging
Israel to stop all settlement
construction in the West
Bank or risk closing off the
most promising avenues for
peace negotiations.

* Associated Press


".G*' .Gateway Forest
Lawn Funeral Home, Inc

Direct
Cremation


$895
. (Within 60 miles)
(386) 752-1954
Toll Frqe 1-800-432-1001
3596 SouLh Hwy 4 ! * I.ake Ctyv


ICS CEMATON




'UEALHM


now Advantage . P- U.�
ERA j- Rea myLjf , , MoO,--- .

NEW HOMEBUYER

INFORMATION SEMINAR
*$8,000 Federal Stimulus Check
* Determining how much home you can
qualify/afford and payment options.
* Help with credit issues and how to correct them.
STOP THROWING YOUR MONEY AWAY IN RENT!

SATURDAY,
AUGUST 1ST 10AM-2PM
ERA ADVANTAGE REALTY
.(NEXT. TO SEASON US.90.. ..
Can't make it...call for your personal consultation
ERAAdvantage Realty (386) 752-8224
Marie Holden, Apollo Mortgage (386) 292-9908


Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


BRIEFS


Protesters call for end to abuses


Zelaya prepares
trip to Honduras
OCOTAL, Nicaragua
- President Manuel
Zelaya made a second,
largely symbolic trip to
the Honduran border on
Saturday, despite foreign
leaders urging him not to
force a confrontation with
the government in power
since last month's coup.
Aide Allan Fajardo said a
visit was likely, and Zelaya's
white jeep set out north,'
toward the border. A pair of
pickup trucks with Zelaya's
Nicaraguan police escort
accompanied him.

Bicycle kingdom
is going electric
SHANGHAI - It's a simple
pleasure, but Xu Beilu savors
it daily: gliding past snarled
traffic on her motorized bicy-
cle, relaxed and sweat-free
alongside the pedal-pushing
masses.
China, the world's bicycle
kingdom - one for every
three inhabitants - is going
electric.
Workers weary of
crammed public transport or
pedaling long distances to
jobs are upgrading to battery-
powered bikes and scooters.
Even some who can afford
cars are ditching them for
electric two-wheelers to avoid
traffic jams and expensive
gasoline.

Journalists targets
in insurgency
ISLAMABAD - The
militants wore masks, carried
weapons and came by the
dozens. Still, they exhibited
q strange sense of courtesy:
They let the reporter's rela-
tives leave the house before
they bombed it.
Rehman Buneri, who
works for Khyber TV in
Karachi and contributes to
Voice of America's Deewa
Radio, was not home
when the 50 or so gunmen
showed up. Buneri told The
Associated Press the gunmen
said they'd been instructed by
a "high command" to destroy
the house because he had
spoken negatively of the
Taliban in a radio report.

Suicide attackers
strike Afghan city
KABUL - For the second
time in a week, Taliban fight-
ers armed with suicide vests
and automatic weapons
attacked a provincial capital
in eastern Afghanistan on
Saturday, triggering hours-
long gunbattles that left
seven militants dead, offi-
cials said.
The latest militant attack
came less than a month
before Afghanistan's Aug.
20 presidential election.
U.S. and NATO forces have
stepped up operations in
hopes of ensuring enough
security for a strong voter
turnout.
The assault in Khost
began when at least six
Taliban fighters carrying AK-
47s and rocket-propelled
grenades stormed the area
around the main police sta-
tion and a nearby govern-
ment-run bank. All were shot
and killed before they could
detonate their suicide vests,
the Interior Ministry said in a
statement.
A seventh attacker
detonated a car rigged with
explosives near a police
rapid reaction force, wound-
ing two policemen, the min-
istry said.
* Associated Press


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Protestors hold posters of those they claim have been
arrested and held in Iran for anti-government activities during
a demonstration in Brussels on Saturday.


III


By JILL LAWLESS
Associated Press

LONDON - Protesters
across the world on
Saturday called on Iran to
end its clampdown on oppo-
sition activists, demanding
the release of hundreds
rounded up during demon-
strations against the coun-
try's disputed election.
Groups including Human
Rights Watch and Amnesty
International are backing


Let's Build Something Together" Prices valid 7/26/09 - 8/2/09 unless otherwise noted.


EI 4�.1` IE IIt 1


Eu'm..


Applies to walk-behind mowers with yellow clearance
labels. Prices reflect discount. While supplies last.
Selection may vary by location. See store for details.


For


\ i'.-


Applies to patio furniture marked with yellow clearance labels.
Price reflects discount. While supplies last. Selection may vary
by store. See store for details.


Monthh 0 110029.4

pI3n( to* l dthe, pmclnaI'-
"fpaid iM fill Within 6 nMOuiths pr&hantM, eddpioas;,.


Applies to gas grills marked with yellow clearance labels.
Price reflects discount. While supplies last. Selection may
vary by store. See store for details.


Iv R AND


7 DAYS A WEEK.

NO REBATES.

NO MINIMUM
PURCHASES.
SIn-stock major appliances only.
US deliveries only. See sales
associate for details. Offer valid
now - 7/31/09.


6mm Harvest Oak 4
Laminate Flooring
*10-,ear varr3anly "Easy to install f165849


NeverKink Hose
'#6082;44541


2 $ was
now for $7-3 per case


Bottled Water
#46256;45072;57282,3,4,5
Brands may vary by market.


only
$350
per case


$1 19 was
Ss139 each
5/8" x 5-1/2" x 6' Dog-
Ear Treated Fence
Picket #202922


3s$4 now 3 each Colors may
for was 48. vary by market.
All 4" x 8"
Holland Pavers.


I __________________________ _____________________ I -


BUY THREE GEION,


50 LB. BAG
PLAY SAND
Item may vary by
market. Discount taken
at register. Offer valid
7/26/09 - 8/2/09.
See store for details.


1 i~'


now
$688 was
$6 8 *947 10. lbs.
Blug-B-Gon Granules
*10 Ilb. covers up to 10,000 sq. ft.
*Kills on contact -Up to 2-month
insect control *Kills above and
below surface insects #125810


i.el.lld


now
$397


was
,59 40 Ibs.'


Salt Pellets
#162417


a global day of action, with
protests planned in more
than 80 cities.
The protesters want
Iranian authoritiestorelease
what they say are hun-
dreds, or even thousands,
of people detained dur-
ing protests that followed
the presidential election
last month that returned
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to
power.
Police said about 600,
protesters joined a "noisy


but peaceful" demonstra-
tion, outside the Iranian
embassy in London, one
of a series of events in
cities across Europe. In
Brussels, Belgium, protest-
ers held placards carry-
ing images of the. detained
or dead, including Neda
Agha Soltan, the 27-year-
old whose death - beamed
around the world on the
Internet - became a rally-
ing cry for opponents of the
regime.


now

990
was $197


32 Oz. Glass Plus Glass
and Multi-Surface Cleaner
#206966
Gain 40-Count Fabric
Softener Sheets #198381
32 Oz. Glade Carpet and
Room Deodorizer #170044
Mr. Clean 40 Oz. Summer
Citrus Liquid Cleaner
#20952


now

$167

was $248


10 Oz. Oust Air Sanitizer
#196055,85;294827
32 Oz. Lysol Toilet Bowl
Cleaner #43967
Pledge Duster Plus
#39010
28 Count Windex Wipes
#197615


Details on our policies and services: Prices may vary after 8/2/09 if there are market variations. "Was" prices in this advertisement were in effect on 7/20/09 and may vary based on Lowe's Everyday Low Price policy. See store for
details regarding product warranties. We reserve the right to limit quantities. CREDIT FINANCING PROMOTION DETAILS: Applies to any single-receipt, in-store purchase of $299 or more made through 1/31/2010 on a Lowe's
Consumer Credit Card account. No monthly payments will be required and no finance charges will be assessed on this promotional purchase if you pay the following in full within 6 months: (1) the promotional purchase amount, and
(2) any related optional credit insurance/debt cancellation charges. If you do not, finance charges will be assessed on the promo balance from the date of the purchase and monthly payments will be required. Regular account terms
apply to non-promotional purchases. Standard APR is 22.99%. Delinuency APR is 26.99%. Minimum finance charge is $1.00. Existing cardholders should see their credit card agreement for their applicable terms. Offer is subject to
credit approval. Excludes Lowe's8 Business Credit Accounts, Lowe'sProect CardSM Accounts and Lowe's Visa� Accounts. While Lowe's strives to be accurate, unintentional errors may occur. We reserve the right to correct any error.
Prices and promotions apply to US locations only, and are available while supplies last. � 2009 by Lowe's�. All rights reserved. Lowe's and the gable design are registered trademarks of LFLLC. (6497)
001/6497/021


HURRY IN FOR



SPECIAL VALUES


Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424


111N,1111WL~lll!r










Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


THE WEATHER



, CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE
OFT - OFT - OFT-
S\\STORMS STORMS STORMS"

192 LOi ,t


NATIONAL FORECAST: A cold front will trigger showers and thunderstorms from the Mid-
Atlantic to the Tennessee Valley and the southern Plains today. An upper-level trough of low
pressure will generate showers and thunderstorms throughout the Great Lakes. Meanwhile, a
moist, unstable air mass will fuel thunderstorms in Florida and along the eastern Gulf Coast.


Tallahassee .
93/71.
Pensacola *,
88/74 Panama City
8 89/76


ValdMosta
93/70 , J
Lake City,
92/71
Gainesville �
,,92/72
Ocala *
'n) / 70


Tam
92/


City . Monday Tuesday
lacksonville Cape Canaveral 87/76/t 88/78/t


Daytona Beach
92j75
-*


Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


-92/72 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
92/75 '88/75 Miami
pa. * Naples
76 West Palm Beach Ocala
91/78 * Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers' 92/82 Pensacola
92/75 * Naples * Tallahassee
92/77 Miami ,Tampa
92/80 Valdosta
Key est * W. Palm Beach
91/82


gbT�-I,�,msrrnl-'r'~ \


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tqm.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


TEMPERATURES
I High Saturday i 90
Low Saturday 70
. Normal high 91
Normal low 71
Record high 98 In 1952
Record low 66 in 1907

PRECIPITATION
Saturday 0.74"
Month total 5.02"
Year total 29.16"
Normal month-to-date 4.92"
Normal year-to-date 28.95"


77, a I p 7w p .96a


6:46 a.m.
8:28 p.m.
6:46 a.m.
8:27 p.m.


11:43 a.m.
11:26 p.m,
12:45 p.m.


90/76/t
91/80/t
93/75/t
92/72/t
92/74/t
90/79/t
93/72/pc
91/79/t
92/75/t
91/72/t
92/75/t
91/76/t
90/73/pc
93/72/t
92/77/t
93/71/t
91/78/t


II


Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to. I.6


89/76/pc
89/81/pc
92/75/t
91/72/t
90/75/t
90/78/t
91/72/pc
90/81/t
92/77/t
92/73/t
91/76/ti
89/76/pc,
i , ; i'
91 ;2 p,.
91/i i7/
92/72/t:
89/80/ti


7l10iT


/ < Forecasts, data and
- graphics � 2009 Weather
' Central, Inc., Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubilsher.com


Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today


CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 79/62/0
Albuquerque 93/71/0
Anchorage 61/53/0
Atlanta 90/69/0
Baltimore 90/63/0
Billings 88/61/0
Birmingham 90/68/0
Bismarck 80/56/0
Boise 91/64/0
Boston 84/64/0
Buffalo 79/62/0
Charleston SC 92/77/0
Charleston WV 84/61/0
Charlotte 91/65/0
Cheyerine 75/59/0
Chicago 80/66/0
Cincinnati 79/65/.48
Cleveland 81/65/.05
Columbia SC 94/71/0
Dallas 100/76/0
Daytona Beach 90/71/0
Denver . 80/60/0


HI/Lo/W
82/66/i
93/69/pc
65/54/r
92/69/pc
89/69/t
90/59/t
91/69/t
91/60/pc
94/57/s
84/70/t
78/64/t
94/77/pc
83/64/t-
91/70/t
80/55/pc
81/63/pc
83/62/t
81/61/t
95/71/pc
95/76/pc
92/75/t
86/59/t


CITY
Des Molnes
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
85/63/0 82/64/pc Omah
81/66/.23 79/63/t Orland
98/75/0 101/77/s Philac
65/48/0 76/55/pe Phoer
, 92/67/0 '91/69/t Pittsb
85/63/.03 , 86/69/t Portla
85/77/0 89/77/s Portla
95/76/0 98/78/pc Ralelf
81/64/.65 81/64/t Rapid
93/66/0 90/69/t Reno,
93/71/0 90/73/t Richn
83/70/0 88/65/s Sacra
97/82/0 105/85/pc St. Lo
91/66/0 91/70/t Salt L
72/64/0 76/64/s San A
90/72/0 88/70/t San D
. 90/74/.48 92/80/t San F
74/63/.01 83/65/pc Seatti
91/70/0 91/72/t Spoki
92/75/0 91/75/t Tampa
83/66/0 85/7,1/t Tucsc
102/69/0 93/71/pc Wash


a
do
lelphia
lix
iurgh
nd ME
nd OR
gh
City
lond
mento
>uis
ake City
Antonio
liego
rancisco
le
ame
a
in
Ington


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
84/66/0 88/67/pc
93/72/0 92/75/t
87/64/0 88/73/t
103/89/0 109/88/pc
80/61/0 80/61/t
75/57/0 78/66/t
80/63/0 93/65/s
95/67/0 93/71/pc
85/55/0 90/61/pc
92/64/0 99/66/s
93/66/0 92/71/t
83/53/0 100/62/s
84/76/0 85/69/pc
88/69/.16 93/69/pc
99/74/0 i01/77/pc
74/69/0 78/68/s
66/54/0 69/53/s
'79/62/0 87/64/pc
83/61/0 89/66/pc
92/76/0 92/76/t
97/81/0 104/79/s
90/70/0 90/72/t


ThdavSatudav odavSatudav dany


I CITY
Acapulco
l Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beljing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


HI/Lo/Pcp.
90/81/0
68/59/0
na/75/0
52/41/0
, 86/68/0
, i6 52. 0
'55/39/rj0 ,
99/77/0'
77/55/0
93/72/0
72/61/.19
90/81/2.53
90/81/0'z


nvuay
HI/Lo/W
90/79/t
69/57/pc
95/74/s
50/36/s
84/66/pc
72/55/pc
-51/39/s
98/74/s
79/59/s
90/78/t
66/54/sh
P0/79/t
,92/80/t


CITY
La Paz
ULima
London
Madrid
MexiCo City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


HI/Lo/Pcp.
54/25/0
66/63/0
75/55/0
95/63/0
77/61/0
75/63/0
79/59/0
77/57/.30
90/79/0
96/na/0
66/55/0
93/86/.07
75/55/0


HI/Lo/W
52/28/pc
68/63/pc
68/53/sh
104/73/s
78/58/t
79/58/t
80/63/1
83/59/pc
90/79/t
97/82/pc
62/49/sh
89/78/t
78/64/pc


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
70/66/0
84/70/0
87/80/0
90/80/0
61/30/0
81/68/0
90/79/0
64/45/0
88/73/0
88/75/0
72/64/0.
73/61/.90
73/61/0


Hi/Lo/W
82/66/pc
87/68/s
90/79/pc
90/79/s
59/38/s
80/65/t
90/79/t
64/42/sh
90/71/s
86/75/t
78/58/t
76/58/pc
65/51/sh


KEY-TO CONDIONS: c=cloudy, drdrizzle, fsfair, fg-fog, h=hazy, i=ice, pc=partly cloudy, r=rain, s-sunny,
sh=showers, sn=snow, ts=thunderstorms, w=windy.


"I count on CAMPUS."


"CAMPUS was easy to work with and offered


helpful solutions for my business."

Brandy Heinlein, Owner
'* Tropical Smoothie Cafe


CITY


CAMPUS
U SA


www.campuscu.com

Call David Barber,

Commercial Loan Manager,

at 754-9088 ext. 10121


as low as ,.2 APR1 Fixed



Lock in a low FIXED RATE on

your owner-occupied business

property, equipment or vehicle

purchases ... even refinances!



* Loans from $50,000 to $10 million

* Guaranteed lowest closing costs

* CAMPUS pays $1,000 toward
appraisal cost (if one is needed)3


Membership is open to everyone in Alachua, Clay, Columbia,
Lake, Marion and Sumter counties!'


oo*e
July Aug. Aug. Aug.
28 5 13 20
First Full Last New


---rY-- c- 7�1 - --- -.- __, _ --- -- -


3 7/39
aD tona Beach


I









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tki by4@lcikecityrepoIter com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, July 26, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

INDIANS FOOTBALL
Car wash set for
Aug. 11
The Fort White
football team will host
a fundraiser at Phish
Heads restaurant on
Main Blvd. from
6 p.m. - 9 p.m. on
August 11. Players
and coaches will serve
as waiters, as well as
bus and clean tables.
All tips go to the Fort
White Quarterback
Club to benefit the
football teams. For
more information please
contact Quarterback
Club President Scott
Gilmer at (386) 965-6938.
TIGER FOOTBALL
Quarterback Club
.meeting set on Monday
The Columbia High
Quarterback Club will
resume their regularly
scheduled meetings at
7 p.m. on Monday at
Jones fieldhouse at CHS.
Coach Craig Howard
will recap the team's
performance in the
National Select 7-on-7
tournament to kick off
the first meeting.
For more information
contact Mike Black at
(386) 334-4780.

Booster tickets
available
Columbia High
boosters may start
picking up their tickets at
McDuffie's from 8 a.m.
until 5 p.m. on Monday.
The package includes
varsity football tickets,
booster parking and
booster gifts.
GOLF TOURNAMENT
Tiger Football to host
4-man scramble'
The second annual
Columbia High
Tiger Football Golf
Tournament is slated to
take place at 8:30 a.m. on
August 29 with a shotgun
start.
' The tournament will
consist of a 4-man best
ball scramble play at Quail
Heights Country Club
with prizes including the
longest drive, straightest
drive, closest to the pin,
gross, net, and dead last
prizes. Door prizes will
also be given.
A Tigers Gold.
Sponsorship is available
for $400 and includes a
four player team with a
power ball package and
hole sign. Hole sponsors
are available for $50 and
individual players can
sign up for $75. Deadline
to sign up is August 21.
For more information
contact chstigerpride09@
hotmail.
YOUTH GOLF
Ste-Marie offers junior
clinics
Golf professional
Carl Ste-Marie has two
remaining Junior Golf
Clinics this summer
at Southern Oaks Golf
Club. Clinic times and
days are 8:30-11:15 a.m.,
Tuesday through Friday.
The dates offered are
July 28-31 and Aug. 11-14.
Beginner, intermediate
and advanced groups are
offered in each clinic.
Cost is $60 and includes
drinks and snacks.
Clinics are limited to the
first 24 paid golfers.
Registration and
information is available at
Southern Oaks, Brian's
Sports and Golf Etc. For
details, call Ste-Marie at
623-2833.


* From staff reports


Contador all but locks up Tour crown


Armstrong looks
to hang on to
third in France.
By JAMEY KEATEN
Associated Press
MONT VENTOUX,
France - Alberto
Contador all but sealed
his second Tour de France
title Saturday, keeping the
yellow jersey after a pun-
ishing mountain ride in
the next to last stage. And


almost certain to join him
on the podium is Lance
Armstrong.
Armstrong, a seven-
time champion in his first
Tour since 2005, held off
attacks from his closest
challengers in the dreaded
climb up Mont Ventoux
to hold third place. The
37-year-old Texan arrived
in a small group that
included Contador, his
Astana teammate, and sec-
ond-place Andy Schleck of
Luxembourg.


Armstrong, coming out
of 314 years of retirement,
wanted a higher finish in
cycling's showcase race
but he knew it wouldn't
be easy.
"Hey, I can't complain.
... Coming out here and
getting on the podium with
these young guys, it's not
so bad," he said.
The only thing keep-
ing Contador from adding
to his 2007 Tour title is a
ceremonial ride into Paris
on Sunday. The finale is


a flat stage that tradition-
ally doesn't feature break-
aways, meaning only an
accident can prevent the
Spaniard from going down
the Champs-Elysees as the
winner.
'This Tour has been very
difficult," he said. "Even if
it could have looked easy
from the spectators' point
of view, there have been
some moments when I
doubted about victory."
FRANCE continued on 3B


from


List


the
Campbell
witnesses perfect
game in Chicago.,
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comrn
Harvey
Campbell has
served as the
Executive
Director
for the Lake City/
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council for
more than 20 years, but
it was on a tourist trip to
Chicago's southside that
brought him a memory of
a lifetime.
Campbell had been
developing a bucket list of
things he wants to do in
his lifetime and attending
a Chicago White Sox game
was one of the things on
his list.
Of course, Campbell
also wants to see a shuttle
launch, skydive and do
many more daring things,'
so seeing a game in
Chicago seemed like a
pretty unremarkable thing
for his list. It didn't turn
out that way.
There had been 17
perfect games in baseball
before Mark Buehrle
recorded the 18th on
Thursday. Campbell just
happened to have perfect
timing for that perfect game.
"My son and I came up
here, because it was kind
of a bucket list thing,"
Campbell said. "We flew
up on Tuesday, and we
were delighted to see
the White Sox comeback
from trailing 3-1 to win on
Wednesday. We would have
just settled to see them win.
the series.


Bucket


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Harvey Campbell, the executive director of the Columbia County Tourist Development '
Council, speaks about his experience about being at the Chicago White Sox's perfect game
against the Tampa Bay Rays on Thursday..The Sox shut out the Rays 5-0. Displayed in front
of Campbell are newspapers from the Chicago Tribune, the Chicago Sun-Times and the ticket


stub from the game.
"By the sixth inning of
the game, people were
putting their hands up
in the crowd and telling
people to shhhh. Then
you have Dewayne Wise


come in to rob one from
Gabe Kapler over the
wall. Of course, the place
went crazy. The last play,
we we re just like, wow, to
see a no-hitter would have


Tigers fall to national champs


Columbia loses
to Hoover before
exiting tourney.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comrn
Columbia High faced
ups and downs in the
National Select 7-on-7
Championship in Hoover,
Ala., this week, but after
all was said and done, the
Tigers fell to the eventual
champions, Hoover High.
In the Tigers qualifier
to make it to the national
championship, they fell in
a controversial game to
North Gwinnett High out
of Georgia in the North
Gwinnett national select
qualifier semifinals.
As it turned out, the
Tigers were given a second
chance.


"It was such a
controversial game,"
Columbia head coach
Craig Howard said. "We
felt we won, but here we go
again in this tournament. It
was our biggest victory and
the kids, were excited to
come away with this
victory."
Columbia handed a
10 point loss to North
Gwinnett, 29-19.
The Tigers also defeated
the eventual runner-up in
Fairhope during the final
day of pool play.
"It shows that we've
made big strides from the
first season," Howard said.
"I hope the players
understand that and will
be prepared for the fall.
Hopefully this prepares
them -to beat Ed White,
Robert E. Lee, Suwannee
and the rest of our


opponents this fall.
That's the only thing that
matters."
The Tigers feel
better about the strides
made from the first season
and Howard believes
he now possesses the
ingredients for a successful
season.
"We have a whole
different feeling, about
our level of competition,"
Howard said. "Jamaal
Montague and Tiger Powell
were as good as anyone
there. Cameron Sweat just
continues to improve and
the whole receiving core
was playing outstanding.
We were able to get a lot of
reps for the young guys on
defense. As far as someone
standing out, I thought
Josh Faulkner stood out
TIGERS continued on 2B


been great, but we saw a
perfect game. We had tears
in our eyes.".
It was a perfect situation
CAMPBELL continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alberto Contador of Spain,
reacts as he crosses the .
finish during the 20th stage.
of the Tour de France cycling
race over 103.8 miles in
France on Saturday.


T.O.


mania

hits

Bills

Buffalo is first
NFL team to
open up camp.
ByJOHN WAWROW
Associated Press
PITTSFORD, N.Y. -
Coach Dick Jauron was
in the midst of discuss-
ing the electric quality
Terrell Owens' presence
brings to the Buffalo Bills
when, as if on cue, a roar
of cheers and shrieks
erupted from the other
side of the field.
I The cause of the com-
motion was Owens, of
course. To the delight of
the hundreds of fans who
had waited after practice,
the star receiver elected
to hold an impromptu
autograph session that
lasted nearly 25 minutes
and thoroughly, drowned.
out anything his coach
had to say about the Bills
opening training camp
Saturday morning.
Not that it mattered
to Jauron, who's quick-
ly grown accustomed
to being upstaged by
Owens after spending
most of his vacation this
past month fielding ques-
tions about T.O.
"It adds a lot of excite-
ment," Jauron said. -"I
don't know how (the
attention) can be bad."
It wasn't at all bad on
this muggy day in sub-
urban Rochester for the
Bills and their fans, who
got a firsthand taste of
TO.-mania. More than
5,000 fans combined to
attend the team's two

OWENS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Sliding soaked
Columbia Crushers Softball Camp coach Kyle Reed shows
campers the proper way to slide on Friday via the slip and slide.


ark


one













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
2 p.m.
ESPN - NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
Allstate 400, at Indianapolis
3 p.m.
' TOX - Formula One, Hungarian
Grand Prix, at Budapest, Hungary (same-
day tape)
5 p.m.
VERSUS - IRL. Edmonton Indy, at
Edmonton, Alberta


9 p.m.
ESPN2 - NHRA, Fram


Autolite


Nationals, final eliminations, at Sonoma,
Calif. (same-day tape)
12:30 a.m.
SPEED - GP2 Championship Series,
at Budapest, Hungary (delayed tape)
CYCLING
7:30 a.m.
VERSUS -Tour de France, final stage,
Montereau-Fault-Yonne to Paris
Noon
VERSUS -Tour de France, final stage,
Montereau-Fault-Yonne to Paris (same-
day tape)
2 p.m.
CBS - Tour de France, final stage, at
Paris (same-day tape)
8p.m.
VERSUS -Tour de France, final stage,
Montereau-Fault-Yonne to Paris (same-
day tape)


NBC
Boston


EXTREME SPORTS
4 p.m.
- Dew Tour, Skate Open, at

GOLF


9 a.m.
TGC - European PGA Tour, SAS
Masters, final round, at Malmo, Sweden,
I p.m.
ABC - The Senior British Open
Championship, final round, at Berkshire,
England
TGC - LPGA, Evian Masters, final
round, at Evian-les-Bains, France (same-
day tape)
3 p.m.
CBS - PGA Tour. Canadian Open,
final round, at Oakville, Ontario
7 p.m.
TGC - NationwideTour, Cox Classic,
final round, at Omaha, Neb. (same-day
tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
TBS - St. Louis at Philadelphia
2:10 p.m.
WGN - Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m.
ESPN - Chicago White Sox at
Detroit
MOTORSPORTS
3 p.m. SPEED- FIMWorld Superbike,
at Brno, Czech Republic (same-day tape)
5 p.m. .
SPEED - MotoGP 250, British Grand
Prix, at Derby, England (same-day tape)
6 p.m.
SPEED - MotoGP World
Championship, British Grand Prix, at
Derby, England (same-day tape)
SOCCER
5 p.m.
ESPN2 - World Football Challenge,
AC Milan vs. Inter Milan, at Foxborough,
Mass.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 - World Football Challenge,
Chelsea vs. Club America, at Arlington,


1
5
8
12 L
13
14 E
15

16

18
20
21
22 -
23 A
26 A


Texas
SWIMMING
Noon
NBC - World Championships, at
Rome
TENNIS
3 p.m.
ESPN2 - ATP, Indianapolis
Championships, championship match


CYCLING

Tour de France
Stage 20
1.Juan Manuel Garate, Spain, Rabobank, 4
hours, 39 minutes, 21 seconds.
2.Tony Martin, Germany, Team Columbia-
High Road, 3 seconds behind.
3. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Team Saxo
Bank, :38.
4. Alberto Contador, Spain, Astana, same
time.
5. Lance Armstrong, United States,
Astana, :41.
Overall
1. Alberto Contador, Spain, Astana,
81:46:17.
2. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Team
Saxo Bank, 4: 1.
3. Lance Armstrong, United States,
Astana, 5:24.
4. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Garmin-
Slipstream, 6:01.
S. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg, Team
Saxo Bank, 6:04.

BASEBALL

NL standings

East Division


Philadelphia
Atlanta
Florida
New York
Washington
Central Division

St. Louis
Chicago
Houston
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
West Division

Los Angeles
Colorado
San Francisco
Arizona
San Diego


Pct GB
.579 -
.515 6
.515 6
.463 II 1
.292 27h


Pct GB
.635 -
.542 9
.542 9
.423 20%'
.392 23'%


Thursday's Games
Chicago Cubs 5, Cincinnati 3
Philadelphia 14, St. Louis 6
Atlanta at Milwaukee (n)
N.Y. Mets at Houston (n)
San Diego at Washington (n)
Pittsburgh at Arizona (n)
San Francisco at Colorado (n)
Florida at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
San Diego (Gaudin 4-9) at Washington
(Lannan 7-7), 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis (Wellemeyer 7-8) at Philadelphia
(Blanton 6-4), 1:35 p.m.
Atlanta (D.Lowe 9-7) at Milwaukee
(Looper 9-4), 2:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Li.Hernandez 6-5) at Houston
(Moehler 7-5), 2:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Owings 6-10) at Chicago
Cubs (Harden 6-6), 2:20 p.m.
San Francisco (Sadowski 2-2) at Colorado
(Cook 9-3), 3:10 p.m. .


ACROSS 39 Strong soap
40 Dues payer,
Quilt stuffing briefly
Hideaway 41 R2D2's owner
Galaxy unit 43 Mel.Gibson
Lotion additive role (2 wds.)
Go - - diet 46 Patches a wall
Blah -48 Treated a
Monsieur, in ' sprain
Bonn 50 Debate side
Address parts 51 Shirt-pocket
(2 wds.) stain
Pigged out 52 Maritime rap-
Panache tor
Not neathh 53 Discreet sum-
- tai cocktail mons
Ache for 54 Six-pointers
Athena's 55 Not bogus


domain
29 Smidgens
30 - noire
31 PBS founder
33 Mr. in Bombay
34 Franklin's flier
35 Shout of
encouragement
36 Rib-eyes
38 Arrests, slangi-
ly


DOWN

1 Phooey!
2 Shake --
(hurry)
3 Bullring bull
4 Naughty kids
5 Earthmover,
for short
6 Camelot lady


Florida (Volstad 7-9) at L.A. Dodgers
(Schmidt 1-0), 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (V.Vasquez 1-4) at Arizona
(Scherzer 5-6), 4:10 p.m.

AL standings


East Division
W L
New York 59 38
Boston 56 39
Tampa Bay 54 44
Toronto 47 51
Baltimore 41 54
Central Division
W L
Detroit 52 44
Chicago - 50 48
Minnesota 48 50
Cleveland 40 58
Kansas City 37 58
West Division


Los Angeles
Texas
Seattle
Oakland


Pct GB
.542 -
.510 3
.490 5
.408 13
.389 14'

Pct GB
.604 -
.564 4
.526 7'
.427 17


Saturday's Games
Oakland 6, N.Y.Yankees 4
Tampa Bay 10,Toronto 9, 12 innings
Detroit 4, Chicago White Sox 3. 10 innings
Cleveland 10, Seattle 3
L.A.Angels I I, Minnesota 5
Baltimore at Boston (n)
Texas at Kansas City (n)
Today's Games
Oakland (Braden 7-8) at N.Y.Yankees
(Mitre 1-0), 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Niemann 9-4) atToronto
(Cecil 3-1), 1:07 p.m.
Baltimore (Da.Hernandez 2-2) at
Boston (Smoltz 1-3), 1:35 p.m.
Texas (Millwood 9-7) at Kansas City
(Ponson I-6), 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Swarzak 2-3) at L.A.
Angels (E.Santana 3-5), 3:35 p.m.
Cleveland (CI.Lee 6-9) at Seattle
(fakubauskas 5-6), 4:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Richard 3-3) at
Detroit (Porcello 9-6), 8:05 p.m.

NASCAR

Brickyard 400 in Indianapolis
Qualifying
I. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 182.054.
2. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
180.803.
3. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
180.567.
4. (21) Bill Elliott, Ford, ,180.357.
5. (00) David Reutimann,Toyota, 180.216.
6. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota, 180.112.
7. (14) Tony Stewart. Chevrolet, 179.964.
8. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 179.867.
9. (43) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 179.809.
10. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 179.773.
I I. (47) Marcos Ambrose,Toyota, 179.763.
12. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 179.712.
13. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet,
179.712.
14. (I 1) Denny Hamlin,Toyota, 179.684.
15. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 179.404.
16. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
179.354.
17. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet.
179.308.
18. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 179.126.
19. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 179.026.
20. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 178.923.
21. (12) David Stremme, Dodge,
t78.919.
22. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 178.699.
23. (55) Michael Waltrip,Toyota, 178.045.
24. (26) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 178.01.
25. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 177.989.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

TACO NYOYO IAGO0
ODOR AMID LAAW
WARD LANDFALL
SPEAKER RNES











AAUREVOI ETNA
DNALBA NARINA
AL R10TL
E S TEMP


P ELBAN IARC





SAL RESTE K


7 Be off one's
guard
8 Impassive
9 Dramatic intro
(hyph.)
10 Solemn assent


11 Matter, in law
17 Desist
19 Pentagon VIP:
22 Plant parasite
23 Gridiron meas.
24 Snakes lack
them
25 Not much (2
wds.)
26 Sprinkles
27 Rightmost col-
umn
28 Dissolve
30 Ten-speed
32 Capp and
Jolson
34 Arctic canoe
35 More tasty
37 Draw out
38 Sleeping place
40 Conceals
41 Med. staffers
42 Diner sign
43 Darn
44 Large lot
45 Warrior
princess
46 Maple syrup
base
47 Kindled a fire
49 PC key


� 2009 by NEA, Inc.


COURTESY PHOTO

Historical Fish

Lynn Richardson, (left) who landed a pin fish in Horsheshoe Beach that measured 83 inches
long, stands with Hope Reinke earlier this week.

. . , archable <. . . ... nkolayreopot -c
..J. Classifed Ads onl0 r .L.. Lake City


TIGERS

Continued From Page 1B


with a lot of big plays and
intensity."
Columbia returns home,
not as a champion, but as
an improved football team
that believes it has a
chance to win a
championship in the fall
when it really matters.
"Our most exciting game
was against Plant -High (in
pool play) where we lost
22-21," Howard said.
"It was an awesome game
and it proves that we can
play with the state champion
of Florida. You never want
to lose, but even in a loss
you can get something out
of it if you play hard."


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

PULIT I


NAUTER
/"" 17 17 <

NEW Jumbe Phlone App go to wwwbit ty/1 QkRq

HOYTER
U 0


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday Jumbles: VOCAL STOOP PATTER HUMBLE
I Answer: When the astronauts found the diner on the
moon, they said it lacked - "ATMOSPHERE"








SMILE


Because



THE DEALS ..


in Lake City Are So Good!

These local dealers and financial institutions

are teaming up for the


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles'" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


Earnhardt's Indv backup OWENS: Spectacle begins in Buffalo


By MICHAEL MAROT
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS - Dale
Earnhardt Jr. had no trou-
ble qualifying Saturday at
Indianapolis.
Finishing 400 miles in
Sunday's race may be a dif-
ferent matter.
Earnhardt fought off -a
stomach virus that sapped
his energy and forced
him to take intravenous
fluids this weekend to
qualify third at 180.567
mph.
But a carefully script-
ed backup plan fell
apart because of a rain
delay that lasted about four
hours.
Junior's team wanted
Hendrick Motorsports
developmental driver
Brad Keselowski to run
laps in the No. 88 car
later Saturday, just in case
Earfhardt needed a relief
driver Sunday. Instead, the
25-year-old Nationwide
Series regular had to get to
O'Reilly Raceway Park for
the start of his own race,
leaving Earnhardt likely on
his own. '
"I don't think Brad is
going to be able to come
out and run it today. So
we're not going to have
a backup plan, but that's


Continued From Page 11

Juan Manuel Garate of
Spain won the 20th stage,
a 104-mile course from
Montelimar that culminat-
ed with a very steep 13-mile
ascent to the moonscape-
like peak. Massive crowds
lined the winding road to
the bald-faced mountaintop,
possibly shielding the riders
from the swirling winds.
Garate entered the
stage more than 11/, hours
behind Contador. He fin-
ished in 4 hours, 39 min-
utes, 21 seconds, holding
off fellow breakaway rider
Tony Martin of Germany
by three seconds.
Schleck was third, 38 sec-
onds back, in the same time
as Contador. Armstrong
was fifth, 41 seconds behind
Garate, and Frank Schleck
was sixth, 43 seconds back.
Armstrong's task to finish
among the top three was to


all right. We'll see how it
goes," Earnhardt said. "It
was a 24-hour stomach bug
and I guess I lost a bunch
of fluids during that whole
deal. I feel real good right
now, I've just got to get a lot
more fluids back in me."
Earnhardt's biggest con-
cern: Dehydration.
He had a fever Thursday
night and was vomiting
Friday morning.
The illness limited
Junior to only 19 laps in
practice Friday, and the
fever returned Friday
night.
. By Saturday afternoon,
Earnhardt was feeling bet-
ter.
"I feel about 90 percent
today," he said. "It was
real frustrating yesterday
because we didn't come in
till Friday morning and I
felt so terrible before we
flew out."
The illness didn't hurt
Earnhardt's performance.
If Junior can build on
his qualifying performance
Sunday, he could end his
40-race winless drought,
which dates to June 2006 at
Michigan.
"I feel tons better," he
said Saturday.. "I used to
think a' sore throat was the
worst thing, but I'm not a
very big fan of stomach'


hold off two rivals: Bradley
Wiggins of Britain began the
stage 15 seconds behind the
Texan, and Frank Schleck
of Luxembourg trailed him
by 38.'
Armstrong said the start
of the ride to Mont Ventoux
was a "little aggressive," but
his assignment was clear.
"Following Wiggins and
following Frank Schleck,"
he said. "And I had the legs
for that."
Contador had a comfort-
able margin over Andy
Schleck, who led at least a
. half-dozen attacks on the
way up the peak.
"All Ihad to do was con-
trol Andy Schleck, and
that's what I did," Contador
said. "He attacked - it was
a good day for him. I was
able to rein him in."
Contador leads Andy
Schleck overall by 4:11, with


viruses now."

Wild Bill returns
Indy pole-winner Mark
Martin wasn't the only "old
guy" making .some noise
Saturday.
Former points champion
Bill Elliott qualified fourth,
not had for a 53-year-old
who didn't get much of a:
chance to practice on Friday
and instead had to rely on
information garnered from
tire testing at Indy earlier
this year to put together his
best run of the season.
"We felt like we had a
pretty good race car if we
just kept working at it,"
Elliott said.
"I'm just kind of dumb-
founded that we're at where
we're at today."
Indy will be Elliott's
seventh start of the sea-
son, and a little of the old
magic has returned in
recent weeks. He qualified
10th and finished 15th at
Charlotte in May and fol-
lowed with a 16th-place fin-
ish in Michigan. Two weeks
ago in Chicago, he made
the grid in eighth before
fading to 29th.
"We just keep getting
better, better and better,"
said Elliott, who won at the
Brickyard in 2002.


Armstrong 5:24 behind.
Wiggins is fourth, 6:01
back, and Frank Schleck
is fifth, 6:04 behind the
Spaniard.
"Today was a difficult
day," Contador said. "I had
to control Andy Schleck
and I managed to do it. He
attacked several times. He
was enjoying a good day,
too. But I was able to resist.
I knew that every minute
that went by was bring-
ing me closer to a Tour de
France victory."
Garate said he dreamed
of this stage victory last
night.
' "This is what I was miss-
ing - to claim a Tour stage
before retiring," he said on
Spanish TV. "Now, although
my retirement is not close,
I've made it home with the
stage. What more can you
ask for?"


plan falls through


Continued From Page 11

practice sessions, and
a majority of them were
clearly there to see Owens
make his public practice
debut in a Bills uniform
since signing with the team
in March, days after being
released by Dallas.
It proved to be a circus-
type atmosphere. There
were fans who had TO.'
painted on their chests
in Bills colors. Others
brought their popcorn and
spilled it on to the field.
Many brought boxes of
the limited edition TO's'
breakfast cereal that's
available in local grocery
stores. And there was cer-
tainly a large amount of
No. 81 jerseys that dotted
the stands.
Sound exciting?
"I'm used to it," Owens
said with a shrug.
"Everywhere that I've
been, it's always been that
type of reception."
But he did feel wel-
come?
"I know that the Buffalo
fans are very, very fanati-
cal," Owens said. "So, com-
ing out here, I expected
nothing less."
Owens got the royal treat-
ment, the type reserved for


the likes of past stars, such
as Jim Kelly, whenever he
makes his annual visit to,
camp. And it was a raucous
reception from a football-
mad fan base that has grown
discouraged by a team that
has gone nine straight sea-
sons without a playoff berth
- the longest 'drought in
franchise history.
Fans began chanting
'TO.! TO.!" the second
Owens was spotted emerg-
ing from the locker room to
take the field five minutes
before the start of practice.
They cheered Owens every
time he made a catch -
and even the time he didn't
after bobbling a ball out
of bounds. And the loudest
applause came when quar-
terback Trent Edwards hit
Owens for what would've
been a 60-yard touchdown
pass in the middle of the
afternoon session.
Owens returned the love
by flashing an occasional
smile as well as peace
signs toward the stands.
And he couldn't stop laugh-
ing when one fan, 32-year-
old Steven Lasek, held up
a box of T.O's' and began
yelling, "This cereal is deli-
cious."


CAMPBELL: Plans to play lotto next


Continued From Page li
for Campbell to enjoy, but
it almost didn't work out.
"My son had to con-
vince me to go," Campbell
said. "He was just retir-
ing from the Navy, and
it worked out with our
schedules. Sometimes you
just get lucky."
As a former sports
editor for the Lake City
Reporter, it's easy to
understand that Campbell
has witnessed some great
games, however, where
did this rank on his all-
time favorites?


"It was certainly in the
top 10," Campbell said.
"Some are more per-
sonal. I saw Columbia play
Pensacola in the playoffs
and lose 31-28 in what I
thought was one of the
greatest games of football
I had ever watched. We've
all seen great stuff on
television. This was just so
improbable that we would
choose to come."
If there's anything to be
learned from Campbell's
story is that if there's some-
thing you want to do, do it


"Ifs a lesson to be
learned," Campbell said.
"Sometimes it's important
to not putt stuff off. The
ticket stub and newspa-
pers will become framed
pieces in the Campbell
household."
With such an improb-
ably story, what's next for
Campbell on the bucket
list?
"Well, after I leave
here," Campbell said at
the Reporter on Friday, "I
guess I'm going to buy a
lottery ticket."


NOW OPEN!

at our new location O

SI------


Who in the community

is getting married,

having a baby

heading off to war?


When it happens to residents
of the community you'll read
about it in this newspaper.





We are you.

You'll be here.

We will, too.






Lake City Reporter


"Yeah," Owens said after-
ward with a smile. "He's
part of my P.R. team."
If that's the case, he had
plenty of publicists work-
ing for him.
Wearing an Owens' jer-
sey, Zachary Kiristis, 15,
arrived at camp more than
an hour before the first
practice to make sure he
had a place to stand as
close to the Bills' locker
room entrance as possible.
"I'm just dying to see
this guy," Kiristis said.
"This guy could be a game-
changer, and we really
need someone like that
to turn this team around
because we're terrible."
Kiristis even accepted
Owens' reputation for
being disruptive.
"I think we need a per-
sonality on this team," he
said. "We need someone to
bring cameras to Buffalo,
and he's going to do it. I
don't care if there's drama.
That's cool."
Owens' arrival has
already benefited the Bills,
who's season-ticket sales are
already over 50,000. Now
it's a question of whether he
can help spark what's been
a sputtering offense.


FRANCE: Tour headed into final day


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


a






4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


HOLIDAY INN

213 S.W. COMMERCE DRIVE


US 90 & 1-75
LAKE CITY FL. (850) 445-7764

INSTANT CASH FOR ACCUMULATIONS * COLLECTIONS * ESTATES


I I/A \/1 IA


J, SCHOOL RINGS
Vf JEWELRY
BROKEN JEWELRY
CHAINS, BRACELETS, CHAR
EARRINGS (SINGLE OR PAIl
rOLD WATCHES (POCKET OR W
DENTAL GOLD WEDDING BAI
FOREIGN GOLD COINS
-RANDS * PANDAS * PESOS *
LEAFS
US GOLD COINS
$50, $20, $10, $5, $3, $2.51


TYPE COINS V20 THRU BUST DOLLARS
SILVER COMMENTS * GOLD COMMENTS
ROLEX - CARTIER - PATEK PHILLIPE
PIAGET - BAUM MERCIER &
*HER FINE WRIST AND POCKET WATCHES
GOLD & SILVER EAGLES
i G.S.A. DOLLARS (CARSON CITY)
PCGS AND NGC CERTIFIED COINS
SELL AT THE TOP OF THE MARKET


S. COINS * K-RANDS
GOLD RINGS * EAGLES
IMS GOLD BRACELETS * MEX-PESOS
RS) GOLD CHAINS * CAN. M-LEAF
RIST), OLD CLASS RINGS - PANDAS
NDS GOLD BARS * INDUSTRIAL GOLD & PLATINUM
DENTAL GOLD * CRUCIBLES
MAPLE BRING IN ALL ITEMS FOR OUR BEST OFFER
l U.S. GOLD COINS *1 THRU $20 - $125 - *1,000 & UP
O, $1 GOLD COINS 1795-1833 - $5,000 - *40,000 & UP


STERLING
" ' -SILVER BARS .925
STERLING FLATWARE


-JD)UU,~~~ ~ R~ ?1LJ


,\ � ]K:�N m m R. I D) (CCT-"71(( ))'I U L,)).-.


', JR^3











Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayei)@lkecatyepoite;icom


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


Sunday, July 26, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


SSection C


ON BUSINESS _ Mi
..Minimum wage

increase helps

Jery.. working seniors
Jerry Osteryoung
(850) 644-3372
jostery@comcost.net By TONY BRITT gram designed to help
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com low income, older work-
n1 * ' ers enter the workforce,
olumbia County secure more challenging
S oighas an abun- position and move into
Sm dance of seniors career areas or supplement
p rl O em employed in the their incomes.'
Sm local workforce. Dineen said the increase
k From the school district in the minimum wage is a
w o 1 T to local business establish- benefit for program partici-
ments and restaurants, pants.
Without a compelling the senior local senior "Experience Works with
cause, our employees are population is represented low income seniors," she
just putting in time. Their in a variety of jobs in the said. '"They.all work for
minds might be engaged, but workforce. . minimum wage and any
their hearts are not. Many seniors earn mini- wniu a a y
- Lee J. Colan, mum wage pay, and those wage increase will help
"7 Moments that Define that do received a bump in them.
Excellent Leaders" salary Friday. During the country's
The minimum wage recent economic down-
roblem employ- increased 70 cents July 24 turn, the number of low
ees are an to $7.25 per hour. Although risk income, older people at
unavoidable part the 70 cents increase may increased by 140 percent
of the working seem a small amount, stud- since January, according
P world. We all ies have shown it has the to an Experience Works
have had to work for, work potential to have a consid- National client data survey.
with or supervise a difficult erable impact on the lives The Bureau of Labor
employee. Although in of working seniors, has reported that over the
many cases you inherit the Accordingto statistics past year, unemployment
problem worker, he or she AARP, 64 percent of older among people 55 and older
is still your responsibility, workers cite financial need has increased 115 percent,
It is so glib to say, "Let's as the reason they con- while among job seekers
just get rid of the problem tinue working. They need 75 and older, unemploy-
worker." This is an unrea- income to support their ment has increased by 100
sonable solution for many families, pay for health percent since June 2008.
reasons. care and maintain health "All of the funds that
I do not think that there insurance. come from Experience
is a clear definition of a Peggy Dineen is a Works that helps place
problem employee. What is public relations spe- older workers is federally
clear, however, is that these cialist for the Albers funded," Dineen said. "The
employees tend to affect Communication's Group minimum wage increase
the morale of the entire which has the Experience helps the workers. That's
organization and make Works Program as a cli- an extra $50 a month
your life very difficult. Too ent. The Experience - that's groceries for
PROBLEM continued on 2C Works Program is a pro- seniors."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Charlotte James, 65, a library assistant with Columbia County Public Library, shelves a book
as she recollects when she first started at the library 20 years ago. 'Six months after I started,
here they just started the minimum wage program.,I was a part-time shelver, and I loved
it,' James said. 'I say bully for (those seniors who have minimum wage jobs). Power to the
people. I just hope they don't lose the hours.'


Maronda Homes


, 1/AT 1imberlands
e1/2 Acre Wooded Homesite Included
d;fi- 1C�",4 KFW


STew' times from
$139,990
Price Includes:
Half Acre Homesite
Landscape and Sod
City Water
Complete Alarm System
Maple Cabinets
Knock-Down Ceilings


Rear Patio and much, much more...
* This offer is ONLY available on Maronda Homes financed through MFC
Mortgage, Inc of Florida in Timnberands.
Prices an availability subject to change without notice. See Sales Consultant
for details.


386-752-0404


OB4649


www.Maronda.com


RFRNITURE SHOWPLACE
, " . ... . is b" irs


"COMPREHENSIVE CANCER T TREATMENT ,
DELIVERED' ' //' PERSONALIZED CARE


SERVICES INCLUDE:

1I MAGE GUIDED RADIATION
TR E.AFTMENT
� INTENSITY MODULATED RADIATION
TH ERPY (IMRT).
SON. SIT EPET/CT SCANNING
. MAMMOSITE THERAPY FOR BREAST
CNAN'.ER


' i...


Monday: 1pm-7pm
Tuesday: 10am-7pm
Wednesday: 10am-7pmi
Thursday: Closed
Friday: Closed
Saturday: 10am-7pm
Sunday-: lam-5pm


I I--I


- --


one
















Capital Ideas

What's a company's "capital
allocation"? - S.L., Honolulu
A t's how the company spends
its money. A firm can typically
do one or more of the following
things with its greenbacks: buy back
some of its shares on the open mar-
ket, pay a dividend to shareholders,
pay off debt, buy another company,
invest the money, or reinvest it in
the finrm's core business (perhaps
building a new factory or hiring
ignore employees). Companies
should spend effectively, though -
buying back overpriced shares or
paying too much for an acquisition,
for example, is wasteful.


Q How does online stock trading
work, and is it safe? - JS.,
Baton Rouge, La.
A Many investors prefer online
trading to alternatives. It's gen-
erally inexpensive, with some com-
mission rates below $8 per trade.
Also, you can examine orders care-
fully before placing them, and you
can review your portfolio at any time.
To trade online, all you need is
a computer and Internet access (and
some money to invest, of course).
To get started, visit the Web site of
the brokerage you're interested in
There, you'll probably be able to
doivnload or print forms with /
which to open an account, or
you'll find a phone number to call
for help and information. Once you
mail in the paperwork with a check.
you'll receive an account number
and password. Use those to log in at
the Web site. From there you can
check the status of your account or
place an order.
All reputable online brokerages
have security measures in place.
Before opening an account, read up
on thermatthe Web site or call and,
ask about them.
Learn more about online broker-
ages at www.broker.fool.com and
www.smartmoney.com/investing/
stocks/SmartMoney-2009-Broker-
Survey. ,


Got a questionfor the Fool? Send it in
-see Write to Us


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009






The Motley Fool0


To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


Want to Retire Soon?
For some investors, the market's
plunge over the last year has actu-
ally been good news. Those in
their-40s and early 50s have time
to recover from their losses -
and many young investors had
little to lose, so they're happy to
see their favorite stocks at more
affordable prices.
Fortunately, if you're
within 10 years of retire- W III
ment, it's not too late to try
to repair your portfolio -
and prepare yourself for the end of
your peak earning yeats. Below are
some suggestions.
As you approach the end of your
career, you have to face one stark
reality: You've already earned more
money than you're going to make
over the rest of your life. As impor-
tant as your investments have been
throughout your career, they take on
added importance as you realize
that what you own is all you'll have
to support you during retirement.
That's one reason why those
within 10 years of retirement


should consider cutting back on
stocks and adding bonds. They
may also consider building their
own pensions with annuities from
insurance companies.
Still, don't completely ditch seem-
ingly riskier investments. Small-cap
stocks could well lead the economy
out of recession. International
stocks provide exposure to
economies that may well do better
than our own in future years. In
many ways, it's riskier not having a
wide range of investments than it is
to focus on well-known blue-chips,
which carry risks of their own.
Even once you optimize your
investments, nothing's better for
your investments, than to save more.
The IRS lets anyone 50 or over save
more money in 401(k) plans and
IRAs, and it's worth it to take the
IRS up on its offer.
But don't let those higher limits
stop you from saving more outside
tax-favored accounts if you can:
Unless you plan on working your
whole life, those high salaries won't
last forever. Make the best use of
them before they disappear, and
you'll put yourself in the best shape
you can for retirement.


Lost on a Casino
My dumbest investment was
investing $5,000 in an upstart
Internet casino business. Turns out,
it was a scam. Its ad was posted in
a major financial publication, and
I thought that it was a trusted site
that would do some review of the
companies allowed to solicit in
its magazine. Major learning
experience. - WW, online
The Fool Responds: For starters,
. know that if a company has to buy
print ads urging people to invest in
it, it's probably not any kind of bar-
gain. Avon' Products and Comcast
are considered by some to
be solid bargains now, but l
you don't see them buying
ads for their stock. Instead,
they let analysts and others with
opinions point out their value. Next,
never assume that just because
something is advertised in a rep-
utable place, it's a reputable product.
When you look for investments,
look for track records of rising sales
and earnings, along with competi-
tive advantages, respectable profit
margins, promising growth
prospects, and managements that
inspire your trust. And if that sounds
too daunting, consider a simple
S&P 500 index fund, instead.
\ Do you have an embarrassing
lesson learned the hard way?
Boil it down to 100 words (or
less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My
Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked?
Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we
print yours, you'll win a Fool's cap!


Name That Company *

Born in 1979 in Arkansas,
I'm one of the nation's top
retailers and distributors of auto-
* . motive replacement parts and
( . accessories. I sport roughly
4,200 stores, some of which pro- "
. vide commercial credit, and deliver :


parts and other products to local,


regional and national repair garages,
dealers and service stations. I sell
Duralast, Duralast Gold and Valucraft
brands, and ALLDATA diagnostic and
repair software. I recycle more than 15,700
tons of cardboard annually. My stock has
soared in value fivefold over the past decade,
and my workers are trained to "GOTTChA" -
go out to the customer's automobile. Who am I?,
Knkw ieth aniit-r' Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and
1i. ' 11 en'/ re tu nm, a drawing for a nifty prize!


0 2009 THlE MOTLEY FooiDi BYUNolVEoRSA*L PiREOSSISYONDIECATE RELEASE 7/23/2 WJ9)


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428

What Is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
Remember Shakespeare?
Remember "As You Like It"?
In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only
people who could get away with telling the
truth to the King or Queen.
The Motley Fool tells the truth about invest-
ing, and hopes you'll laugh all
............. the way to the bank
.. .... ... .. ..... .. .. .... .. .. ..... ... ... .


Shrinking Inventories
As shoppers rein in their spend-
ing, many retailers are rethinking
their overstuffed inventories. But
stores' efforts to Whittle down their
bloated roster of products could
ultimately do more harm than good.
According to The Wall Street
Journal, retailers such as Wal-Mart,
Kroger and Walgreens are paring back
their product selection to cut inventory
costs. Many stores currently offer an
absurd range of choices; the Journal
.cited stores reducing superglue
options from 25 to 11, and tape mea-
sures from 24 to four varieties.
Still, shareholders in conventional
retailers probably won't
approve if stores cut too , :
deep, as too few choices i-1
could alienate consumers. .
Pruning too aggressively could also
pinch suppliers, who may already -
fear that smaller inventories will shut
them out of huge retailers.
Internet rivals pose yet another
danger for stores slashing their
selection. Online, the amazing
range of offerings from companies
such as Netflix and Amazon.com
may be one of their greatest com-
petittie advantages, with a selection
that often trounces that of their
bricks-and-mortar rivals.
Offlinie retailers face a difficult
balancing act, trying to trade cost
savings against customer satisfac-
tion. And beneath their tightrope,
hungry online retailers wait, salivat-
ing at the thought that they can pro-
vide more of the items increasingly
missing from skimpier shelves.


LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
Tracing my history back to Minnesota in 1870, today I'm one of the largest
American supermarket companies, with annual sales topping $40 billion. My
regional brands include Acme, Albertsons, Bristol Farms, Cub Foods, Farm
Fresh, Hornbacher's, Jewel-Osco, Shaw's/Star-Market, Shop'n Save and
Sunflower Market. My in-store house brands include Culinary Circle, Wild
Harvest and homelife. I run some 2,400 stores and 900-in-store pharmacies
and employ more than 180,000 people. I've paid a dividend for more than
70 years. My mission is to serve my customers "better than anyone else
could serve them." Who am I? (Answer: SUPERVALU)


Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries
to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
Motley Fool. Sorry, we can providee individual financial advice.


0 .0,0 0 se *a *** * 00 S* 'S. 00*,000


PROBLEMS: with workers are fixable Volunteers help spruce Center


Continued From Page 1

often, the implicit assump-
tion is that a replacement
worker must be better;
however, this is frequently
not the case.
How would a manager
make a decision on a piece
of equipment that was
causing a maintenance
headache? Well before it
was replaced, I guarantee
you that a thorough analy-
sis of the problem would
be conducted, and pos-
sible alternatives for fixing
the problems) would be
evaluated. It is just good
business to make sure that
the problem cannot be cor-
rected before a new asset
is purchased. Yet, this
same type of. analysis is not
done on employees who
are having difficulties.
So many times I see
employers letting staff go
simply because they did
not give the manager what
they wanted. However,
when I go back to the
staff member and 'ask if
they understood what
was expected of them, the
majority says, "No." In
these instances, manage-
ment never attempted to
work with them to see if it
was possible to overcome
the problem..
I think so many times
the cost of replacing a
worker is either unrealized
or is perceived as small
and inconsequential. There
is no question in my mind
that if you fully account for
all of the time involved in
hiring a replacement (i.e.:
time spent advertising


to find anew employee,
interviewing candidates
and training a new hire)
and numerous other indi-
rect expenses, the cost
of replacing a worker
amounts to at least 100 per-
cent of the annual salary.
If the cost to replace a
worker is so high, why
do so many firms keep
on doing this over and
over? I think the answer is
that many'managers lack
the skill set to deal with
problematic employees or
behaviors. For example,
if you have a worker that
has been coming in late
to work, and you are dis-
appointed because you
believe you have made the
company policy clear to
everyone, maybe the issue
is that you are not con-
necting with the employee,
being clear about the
'expectations or there is
something going on in
their personal life that is
influencing their behavior.
Changing behavior is
especially difficult if it has
been tolerated for a period
of time. However, working
to overcome an employee's
problem rather than seek-
ing to hire a new worker
will often pay off in the
long run.
In looking to overcome
behavioral issues, consider
the root cause of the prob-
lem. For example, is there
something in the company
culture that is contributing
to the problem behavior?
In the case of the late
employee, maybe you


are being inconsistefit
about enforcing company
policies.,Ate some people
allowed t6 come in late due
to personal circumstances
that are not explained
to,the other employees?
Are you holding people
accountable, or do you let
things slide?
Once you have deter-
mined the reason behind
the behavior, there are
many things that you can
do to turn the situation
.around. Firstly, provide
specific guidelines and
processes to, help clarify
expectations. Secondly,
ensure open communica-
tion with managers and
employees to help resolve
minor issues before they
become serious problems.
A third possibility is the
use of incentives, rewards
and recognition as ways of
reinforcing the change you
are looking for. I have seen
some managers simply
start acknowledging posi-
tive changes in behaviors,
and that has been the key
to effecting the change.
For example, with the
habitually late worker,
offer a kind word about the
improvement the employee
is showing by successfully
arriving on time three days
out of five.
An employee's problem-
atic behavior should not
necessarily mean termina-
tion. Rather, it should be
thought of as an opportu-
nity to turn this employee
into a great employee.
You can do this!


From, staff reports

Fairfield Inn and Suites
employees recently con-
ducted a beautification proj-'
ect at the Columbia County
Senior Citizens'. LifeStyle
Enrichment Center.
The project was coordi-
nated through United Way
of Suwannee Valley.


The Columbia County
Senior Citizens' LifeStyle
Enrichment Center was
completed with a federal
grant and community
support; but work on the
grounds continues as com-
munity groups volunteer.
"Our center has been"
most fortunate to benefit
from beautification projects


conducted by local service
groups, and employee. vol-
unteer groups," said Debby
Freeman, .executive direc-
tor of Columbia County
Senior Services. "Without
the efforts of these groups,
the grounds of the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center would
not have been landscaped
as they are."


Canada enters NYC doughnut wars


By SUZANNE MA
Associated Press
NEW YORK - There's
a new doughnut in town
with a Canadian flavor, and
it's saving Zachary Abella
from making a two-hour
commute.
For- a sip of hot chocolate
and his preferred pastry fix,
the 32-year-old Manhattan,
lawyer has driven 100
miles to Meriden, Conn.,
to what was.then the clos-
est Tim Hortons, a beloved
Canadian chain that sells
coffee and baked goods;
Abella, a Toronto native,
now has an easier time sat-
isfying his cravings. Earlier
this month, Tim Hortons
opened its first New York
City locations,. replac-
ing 11 Dunkin' Donuts in
Manhattan and Brooklyn.
The transformation
brings new blood to the
doughnut war in America's
most competitive market.
Employees from both com-
panies took to the streets
this week, handing out cou-
pons while mascots roamed


major transportation hubs.
It also rekindled memo-
ries of a decade-old fight
between Dunkin' Donuts
and the Riese Organization,
a franchisee that owned the
Dunkin' Donuts stores and
now owns the Tim Hortons
locations.
In 1999, Dunkin' Donuts
tried to end its relationship
with Riese, alleging that the
franchisee didn't do enough
to keep stores clean. The
New York 'Post had pub-
lished a photograph of a
mouse eating a doughnut
in the window of a Riese-
owned outlet After years
of.lawsuits, both companies
ended their contract this
month.
It was the perfect oppor-
tunity for Tim Hortons to
step in, said Don Schroeder,
president and CEO of Tim
Hortons Inc.
"The key is the high vol-
ume of traffic and an estab-
lished clientele," Schroeder
said. "People are creatures
of habit."
Neither company would
disclose sales figures since


the Canadian. chain entered
New York; most of the
new stores are in midtown
Manhattan, including near
Grand Central Terminal
and Penn Station.
Worldwide, Dunkin'
Donuts has nearly 15,000.
stores that drew in $6.9 bil-
lion in sales in 2008. In con-
trast, Tim Hortons has about
3,500 stores that made $1.9
billion last year; the com-
panies did not immediately
respond to requests Friday
for U.S. sales figures.
Dunkin' Donuts plans to
open more stores elsewhere
in the city in addition to the
415 located within 10 miles
of Times Square. "What we
offer matches perfectly with
what consumers are seek-
ing in these tough times,"
spokeswoman Michelle
King said.
Tim Hortons made its
U.S. debut in 1984, open-
ing a store in Tonawanda,
N.Y. It operates more than
500 stores in 11 states. In
Canada, Timmies is the
underage pub for teens on
Friday nights.


I Ask th


TM a 517 M-















Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights_

A NYSE A Amex A Nasdaq
6,337.46 +299.35 1,672.87 +48.32 1,965.96 +79.35


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
MediaGen 4.15 +2.22 +115.0 AMCON 59.50+18.54 +45.3 HumGen 14.64+11.32 +341.0
JoumalCm 2.14 +1.05 +96.3 WhiteRiv 13.25 +2,35 +21.6 Somaxon 2.92 +1.78 +156.1
MirantwA 2.29 +.79 +52.7 DeltaAprI 8.50 +1.50 +21.4 CerusCp 2.05 +1.01 +97.2
HorizLns 5.35 +1.82 +51.6 UnivTravn 11.14 +1.90 +20.6 Medarex 15.90 +7.81 +96.5
GATX pf 135.35+44.92 +49.7 InvCapHId 2.83 +.48 +20.4 NN Inc 2.70 +1.09 +67.7
ArvMerit 5.20 +1.64 +46.1 Lannett 9.50 +1.52 +19.0 Cardica h 2.15 +.83 +62.9
BrkfidH 5.49 +1.63 +42.2 ChinaGmn 9.50 +1.46 +18.2 BkVA 5.99 +2.28 +61.5
TrueBlue 12.89 +3.81 +42.0 Wilber 11.48 +1.74 +17.9 Biocryst 9.49 +3.54 +59.6
DanaHIdh 2.98 +.86 +40.6 Protalix 6.34 +.95 +17.6 HutchT 3.41 +1.20 +54.3
Reddylceh 2.25 +.65 +40.6 PacBkrMg 6.00 +.85 +16.5 Tongxinwt 2.43 +.83 +51.7


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Citigrp pfP 11.77 -7.51 -39.0
CitigppfM 12.68 -6.56 -34.1
FtTrStrHi 2.73 -.80 -22.7
DirREBear 48.86-14.04 -22.3
Lexmark 15.25 -3.36 -18.1
DirxEnBear 17.71 -3.57 -16.8
DirxEMBearlO.05 -1.95 -16.3
DirxSCBear17.29 -3.35 -16.2
DirMCB3x rs46.22 -8.87 -16.1
AllegTch 28.20 -5.14 -15.4

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citigrp 14142127 2.73 -.29
BkofAm 13375587 12.51 -.38
SPDR 8879808 97.86 +3.73
FordM 5435767 6.78 +.64
SPDR Fnc5166841 12.42 +.28
WellsFargo4565164 23.47-1.53
GenElec 4335423 12.03 +.38
iShEMkts 3212610 35.40+1.83
Pfizer 3034443 16.48 +1.52
RegionsFn2288683 3.69 -.36

Diary
Advanced 2,702
Declined 488
Ntew Highs 172
lew Lows 11
fotal issues 3,228
Jnchanged 38
Volume 25,091,438,741


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
HillmCTpf 21.25 -3.40 -13.8
ManSang 2.06 -.33 -13.8
EngySvcs 2.99 -.45 -13.1
PSBMetDS 32.37 -4.34 -11.8
HealthFitn 6.60 -.75 -10.2
PSCrudeDS81.06 -7.81 -8.8
Velocity rs 3.95 -.36 -8.4
Aerosonic 4.54 -.41 -8.3
PacOffPT 3.80 -.28 -6.9
PionDrill 4.42 -.33 -6.9

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Hemisphrx1084011 2.36 +.25
PSCrudeDL458199 4.57 +.59
EldorGldg 128213 9.27 +.06
GoldStr g 103343 2.24 +.03
NthgtMg 84171 2.38 +.08
NovaGldg 79636 4.18 +.12
Taseko 76454 1.89 +.16
US Gold 65825 3.00 +.26
GranTrra g 64512 3.82 +.08
NwGoldg 52433 2.85 +.11

Diary
Advanced 442
Declined 196
New Highs 28
New Lows 6
Total issues 680
Unchanged 42
Volume 502,482,047


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ReprosTh 2.55 -2.02 '-44.2
HMN Fn 3.70 -1.90 -33.9
StrlFWA 2.29 -1.03 -31.0
Quigley 2.25 -.80 -26.2
RigelPh 10.43 -3.51 -25.2
CapCrs pfD 7.00 -2.35 -25.1
MdwstB pf 3.00 -.95 -24.1
CeleraGrp 5.98 -1.73 -22.4
VIST Fncl 5.95 -1.55 -20.7
PoputrpfB 7.00 -1.80 -20.5

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ589682839.05+1.49
Microsoft 4801041 23.45 -.84
Intel 4524136 19.36 +.57
Cisco 3060657 21.88 +1.37
ETrade 2809426 1.42 +.19
HumGen 2620718 14.64+11.32
Yahoo 1697888 17.48 +.64
FifthThird 1672110 8.49 +1.48
Dell Inc 1487055 13.50 +.83
Oracle 1479877 22.33 +.59


Diary
Advanced 2,141
Declined 741
New Highs 201
New Lows 42
Total issues 2,951
Unchanged 69
Volume 12,013,126,998


STOqKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
Wkly Wkly YTD Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg
AT&TInc NY 1.64 25.45 +1.47 +6.1 -10.7 Intel Nasd .56 19.36 +.57 +3.0 +32.1
AMD NY ... 3.77 -.23 -5.8 +74.5 JPMorgCh NY .20 37.92 +1.03 +2.8 +21.7
AutoZone NY ... 157.24 +.26 +0.2 +12.7 LVSands NY ... 10.88 +2.29 +26.7 +83.5
BkofAm NY .04 12.51 -.38 -2.9 -11.2 Lowes NY .36 22.00 +1.58 +7.7 +2.2
BobEvn Nasd ,64 29.34 -.16 -0.5 +43.6 McDnlds NY 2.00 56.08 -1.76 -3.0 -9.8
CIT Gp NY . .75 +.05 +7.1 -83.5 Microsoft Nasd .52 23.45 -.84 -3.5 +20.6
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 16.97 +1.90 +12.6 +51.7 NYTimes NY ... 6.66 +1.12 +20.2 -9.1
CSX NY .88 40.72 +2.85 +7.5 +25.4 NobltyH Nasd .25 9.20 ... ... +16.3
ChampEh NY .33 +.03 +10.0 -41.1 NokiaCp NY .52 13.20 -.19 -1.4 -15.4
Chevron NY 2.60 68.43 +3.31 +5.1 -7.5 OcciPet NY 1.32 72.43 +4.68 46.9 +20.7
Cisco Nasd ... 21.88 +1.37 +6.7 +34.2 Penney NY .80 29.45 +.75 +2.6 +49.5
Citigrp NY ... 2.73 -.29 -9.6 -59.3 PepsiCo NY 1.80 56.41 -.25 -0.4 +3.0
Ciligrpwi NY 2.59 ... +2.4 Pfizer NY .64 16.48 +1.52 +10.2 -6.9
CocaCI NY 1.64 49.36 -.96 -1.9 +9.0 Potash NY .40 96.01 +4.72 +5.2 +31.1
ColBgp NY. .72 +.13 +22.0 -65.2 PwShsQQQNasd .16 39.05 +1.49 +4.0 +31.3
Delhaize NY 2.01 74.30 +1.12 +1.5 +18.0 PrUShS&PNY 15.64 48.06 -4.19 -8.0 -32.3
DirFBearrsNY ... 38.71 -3.59 -8.5 -89.2 ProUltFin NY .12 4.25 +.23 +5.7 -29.5
DirFBull rs NY ... 51.49 +3.96 +8.3 -59.6. RegionsFn NY .04 3.69 -.36 -8.9 -53.6
ETrade Nasd ... 1.42 +.19 +15.4 +23.5 Ryder NY 1.00 32.25 +5.14 +19.0 -16.8
EMCCp NY ... 14.95 +1.03 +7.4 +42.8 SearsHIdgsNasd .. 67.25 +4.53 +7,2 +73.0
FPL Grp NY 1.89 60.05 +3.23 +5.7 +19.3 SiriusXM h Nasd .. 41 +.02 +5.1+244.2
FamilyDIr NY .54 31.11 +.38 +1.2 +19.3 SouthnCo NY 1.75 32.63 +1.15 +3.7 -11.8
FordM NY 6.78 +.64 +10.4+196.f SPDR NY 2.60 97.86 +3.73 +4.0 +8.4
GenElec NY .40 12.03 +38 +3.3 -25.7 SPDR FnclNY .33 12.42 +.28 +2.3 -.8
HomeDp NY .90 25.32 +.65 +2.6 +10.0 TimeWrnrsNY .75 27.58 +1.43 +3.5 +23.6
HumGen Nasd ... 14.64+11.32+341.0+590.6 WalMart NY 1.09 48.94 +.45 +0.9 -12.7
iShEMkts NY .60 35.40 +1.83 +5.5 +41.8 WellsFargoNY .20 23.47 -1.53 -6.1 -20.4
iShR2K NY .83 54.81 +2.91 +5.6 +11.3 Yahoo Nasd ... 17.48 +.64 +3.8 +43.3

Stock Footnotes: g Dividends and earnings In Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to Puy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wi =
When Issued, wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets, d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available. p = previous day's
net asset value, s= fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gainers and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed In tables at left. Moat Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares., Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last PvsWeek


Prime Rate


� I l.M 0- . Lrn tHt


3.25 3.25


Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.19 0.17
6-month 0.27 0.27
5-year 2.54 2.51
10-year 3.67 3.65
30-year 4.56 4.53


Currencies
Last


Pvs Day


Australia 1.2245 1.2242
Britain 1.6432 1.6520
Canada 1.0839 1.0857
Euro .7034 .7041
Japan 94.73 95.13
Mexico 13.2305 13.1975
Switzerlnd 1.0701 1.0719
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 9,093.24
1-week change: 349.30 (4.0%)
10,000


9,000 ,


6,000 j


104.21 67.79


MON TUES


-34.68 188.03 23.95


WED THUR FRI


F M A ' M J J


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ABB Ltd .44 2.5
AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.12 3.1
AK Steel .20 1.1
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.64 6.4
AU Optron .82 7.3
AbtLab 1.60 3.6
AMD
Aetna .04 .2
AirTran
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 1.1
AllegTch .72 2.6
Allstate .80 3.0
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.28 7.4
AmbacF
AMovilL .45 1.0
AmAxle
AEagleOut .40 2.7
AEP 1.64 5.3
AmExp .72 2.4
AlntlGprs ...
Ameriprise .68 2.6
Anadarko .36 .7
AnalogDev .80 2.9
Annaty 2.15 13.1
Anworth 1.28 17.5
ArcelorMit .75 2.0
ArchCoal .36 2.0
ArchDan .56 1.8
ATMOS 1:32 4.9
Avon .84 2.8
BB&TCp .60 2.9
BHP BillLt 1.64 2.7
BJSvcs , .20 1.3
BakrHu .60 1.4
BcoBrades .42 2.6
BcoSantandl.03 7.5
BkofAm .04 .3
BkNYMel .36 1.3
BarrickG .40 1.1
BestBuy .56 1.5
Boeing 1.68 4.0
BostonSci ..
BrMySq 1.24 5.8
CB REIis ...
CBS B .20 2.6
CIGNA .04 .2
CITGp
CSX .88 2.2
CVS Care .31 .9
Calpine
ameron ...
apOne .20 .7
Carnival
Caterpillar 1.68 4.0
Cemex .40
CenterPnt .76 6.4
ChesEng .30 1.4
Chevron 2.60 3.8
Chicos
Chimera .34 9.2
Chubb 1.40 3.1
Citigrp
Ctrigrp wi
CliffsNRs .16 .6
Coach .,30 1.0
CocaCE .28 1.5
CocaCl 1.64 3.3
Comerica .20 .9
ConAgra .76 3.9
ConocPhil 1.88 4.2
Conseco ...
ConsolEngy .40 1..2
ConEd 2.36 6.0
ConstellEn .96 3.3
CtlAir B


... +1.75 +17.5
7 +1.13 +58.5
13 +4.37 -21.7
... -1.04 +103.3
+.32 -56.3
13 +1.47 -10.7
. -.48 +46.4
14 +.54 -15.7
... -.23 +74.5
9 +.06 -7.2
..., +43 +48.9
+.03 +18.1
... +.80 -2.1
7 -5.14, +10.5
... +2.16 -19.4
14 +5.58 +111.2
10 ... +15.1
+.08 -27.7
... +2.94 +40.4
... -.15 -58.1
20 +.75 +59.0
11 +1.14 -7.0
17 +1.48 +59.1
...-1.06 -60.3
... +1.14 +10.3
9 +3.14 +27.6
22 +1.76 +43.9
22 +.44 +3.5
9 +.10 +13.5,
6 +2.35 +52.1
9 +1.69 +11.4
10 +1.76 +5.4
12 +1.20 +13.9
16 +1.74 +23.3
11 +.08. -23.5
... +4.39 +43.4
14 +.77 +30.3
9 +2.91 +29.3
... +1.00 +61.1
... +1.06 +45.4
34 -.38 -11.2
38 -2.65 -5.6
54 +.90 -3.9
15 +.37 +30.7
14 +1.01 -.7
... +.53 +36.6
8 +1.40 -8.0
62 +.56 +128.2
... +1.08 -4.4
17 +1.33 +55.5
... +.05 -83.5
14 +2.85 +25.4
16 +1.72 +19.6
25 +1.62 +79.9
13 +2.68 +55.4
... +3.57 -5.7
10 +2.16 +17.2
15 +8.01 -6.0
... +.92 +11.5
11 +.68 -5.9
... +1.17 +31.7
7 +3.31 -7.5
.. +1.27 +159.8
... +.02 +7.5
10 +4.73 -11.0
... -.29 -59.3
+2.4
6 +2.78 +7.5
14 +2.68 +41.1
... +.77 +50.6
18 -.96 +9.0
... +.17 +12.4
9 +.76 +19.2
... +2.57 -13.2
... +.02 -62.4
11 +1.05 +21.4
.10 +1.62 +.2
... +1.86 +17.6
... +.33 -44.2


Name Div
Coming .20
CypSemis ..
DJIA Diam 2.74
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.12
Deere 1.12
DeltaAir
DevelDiv .08
DevonE .64
DirFBearrs ...
DirFBull rs ...
DirxSCBear..
DirxSCBull .09
DirxLCBear ..
DirxLCBull .26
DirxEnBear ...
DirxEnBull .13
Discover .08
Disney .35
DomRescs 1.75
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .96
DukeRfty .68
Dynegy
EMCCp
Eaton 2.00
ElPasoCp .20
Elan
EmersonEl 1.32
EqtyRsd 1.93
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.68
FPL Grp 1.89
FannieMae h...
FstHorizon .80
FirstEngy 2.20
FordM
ForestOil
FdtnCoal .20
FMCG
GameStop ..
Gannett .16
Gap .34
Genworth ...
Gerdau .32
GoldFLtd .20
Goldcrpg .18
GbldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
GitAtlPac ...
GuamtyFif ...
Hallibrtn .36
HarleyD .40
Harman- ...
HartfdFn .20
HealthNet ...
HeclaM
Hess .40
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .90
Honwillntl 1.21
HostHotls
iSAsIla .94
iShBraz 2.03
iSh HK .54
iShJapn .12
iShMex .61
iSTaiwn .60
iShSilver
iShChina25 .53
iSSP500 2.38
iShEMkts .60
iSEafe 1.49
iSR1KG .65
iShR2K .83
iShREst 2.73
iShFnSc 1.60
ITW 1.24
IngerRd .72


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


6 +.37 +78.4
.. +.47+139.1
+3.51 +3.9
... +1.23 +57.4
9 +2.09 -2.7
11 +3.98 +10.5
... +.12 -45.9
. +1.35 +16.4
.. +2.78 -11.0
... -3.59 -89.2
... +3.96 -59.6
... -3.35 -63.9
... +4.89 +.1
... -4.05 -51.7
... +4.78 +11.9
... -3.57 -52.6
... +5.33 -11.0
6 +1.14 +26.5
14 +2.07 +17.1
12 +1.72 -3.5
... +3.20 +33.8
16 +.66 +2.5
17 +.78 -18.8
... +.02 +.5
28 +1.03 +42.8
19 +6.25 +3.0
+.72 +29.4
+.27 +27.3
13 +2.83 -+.5
17 +1.20 -28.8
13 +3.02 -2.1
10 +3.77 -9.4
14 +3.23 +19.3
... -.01 -25.0
-.21 +15.4
11 +2.17 -11.9
... +.64+196.1
... +3.15 +4.7
... +6.14+158.5
... +4.32 +144.8
10 +2.19 +11.5
3 +1.02 -27.5
12 -.23 +19.0
... +.65 +143.5
... +.94 +76.7
27 +.20 +19.6
20 +1.53 +21.8
33 +7.88 +95.2
-... +1.55+142.4
... +1.18 -12.1
... -.08 -94.3
19 +2.10 +29.2
13 +2.82 +28.1
...-1.51 +41.5
... +3.16 -8.5
8 +.17 +25.3
... +.18 4-11.8
11 +3.35
13 +1.74 +15.0
18 +.65 +10.0
10 +1.56 +3.5
.. +.57 +13.6
... +.70 +28.3
... +3.02 +63.1
... +.86 +45.6
... +.40 +.9
... +1.80 +24.7
... +.22 +47.6
... +.49 +22.0
... +2.92 +45.3
... +3.91 +8.9
.. +1.83 +41.8
.. +2.44 +9.8
... +1.55 +17.8
... +2.91 +11.3
... +2.45 -7.1
... +1.33 -1.5
24 +2.19 +16.8
... +5.79 +58.4


New York Stock Exchange


AREA MORTGAGE RATES


Institution Phone 30 fixed 15 fixed 5/1 ARM FHA / N
institution one rate I pts rate I pts rate / pts VA NN
N


O


PG
P

P.
Pa



AmCap Funding Corpg (800) 289-6516 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote Pl
Absolute c Mortgage Co. (888) 90-HOMES 6.38 / 0.00 5.88 / 0.11 6.13/0.00 No Quote P

Pl
Pf
AmCap Funding Corp. (800)1289-6516 No Quote No Quote NoQuonte NoQuoilc p


Capital Financial Mtg. Corp. (888) 328-9328 6.50/0.00 6.00 / 0.0 No Quote No Quote Ph


Earth Mortgage


(877) 327-8450 No Quote


No Quote


No Quote


No Quote


Pr
Pi


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


okiaCp .52 3.9
ordstrm .64 2.4
orflkSo 1.36 3.0
ucor 1.40 3.1
cciPet 1.32 1.8
fficeDpt ...
ilSvHT 1.52 1.0
G&ECp 1.68 4.2
NC .40 1.2
activ ...
atriotC s
eabdyE .24 .7
enney .80 2.7
epsiCo 1.80 3.2
etroC g .80 ...
etrbrsA .95 2.8
etrobras 1.30 3.1
izer .64 3.9
hilipMor 2.16 4.6
ainsEx
lotash .40 .4
rinFncl .45 2.0
roShtS&P11.98 ..
rUShS&P15.64 8.7


ProUltDow .59
PrUIShDowt9 9
Ist Metopolitan Moitgage (800) 548-5988 5.99/ 2.00 5.38 / 2.00 5.50 0.)00 No Quotec ProUIlQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ9.80
ProUltSP .33
Heidelberg Capital Corp. (800) 968-2240 6.13/1.00 5.75 / 1.00 5.50 / 1.00 NoQuote PrUSh20 .17
ProUShtRE5.08
ProUShOG8.10
Nationwide Mtg. Lending Grp. (866) 548-6535 6.25/0.00 5.881/0.00 5.50 / 0.00 No Quote ProUShtFn .18
* ProUShtBM26.8
ProUltRE .39
ProUItO&G .17
Webb Mortgage Direct (800) 952-8706 6.38 /0.00 5.88 / 0.00 6.13 / 0.00 No Quote ProUlFin .12
ProUBasM .34


Rates provided by Shoprate.com. Rates are valid as of August 12, 2008. Rates are inclusive of all
fees and are subject to change without notice. Call lender directly for APR's. Lenders wishing to
participate in this service, please call 877-429-0940. For additional information on mortgages, go to:
www.shoprate.com/lakecity.aspx


Name Div YId


IBM 2.20
IntlGame .24
IntPap .10
Interpublic ...
Invesco .41
ItauUniMult .37
JPMorgCh � .20
JanusCap .04
JohnJn 1.96
JohnsnCl ,.52
KB Home .25
Keycorp .04
Kimco .24
KingPhrm ...
Kinross g .08
Kohls
Kraft 1.16
LDK Solar ...
LSI Corp ...
LVSands ...
LeggMason .12
LennarA .16
Lexmark ' ...
UllyEli 1.96
Umited .60
LUncNat .04
MEMC
MFA FncI 1.00
MGMMir
Macys ' .20
Manitowoc .08
Manpwl .74


Wky YTD Wkly
PE Cha %Chg Last


13 +2.22 +39.8
26 +2.06 +66.0
44 +2.47 +58.6
13 +.86 +59.1
22 +1.54 +34.1
... +1.65 +54.8
44 +1.03 +21.7
39 +.95 +61.6
14 +2.28 +2.8
... +3.43 +37.4
... +1.95 +19.0
.. +.15 -38.3
11 +.94 -49.9
... +.29 -11.6
... +.36 +10.3
17 +2.84 +35.6
14 +.69 +4.7
... +2.59 -10.0
... -.09 +57.1
... +2.29 +83.5
... +2.92 +23.8
... +1.41 +28.1
9 -3.36 -43.3
... +1.15 -13.9
34 +.92 +25.4
... +2.45 -1.2
16 -.04 +31.1
8 +.17 +20.5
... +1.39 -43.8
9 +1.66 +31.1
9 +1.50 -24.6
66 +6.28 +44.2


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div" Yld PE Cha %Chg Last


MarathonO .96
MktVGold
MarintA .35
MarshM .80
Marshals .04
Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
Mattel .75
McClatch h ...
Mechel
Medtmic .82
MetLife, .74
MetroPCS ...
MicronT
Monsanto 1.06
Moodys .40
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
Motorola
NCR Corp ...
NRG Egy ...
Nabors
NatGrid 2.69
NOilVarco ...
NatSemi .32
NYCmtyB 1.00
NewellRub .20
NewmtM .40
Nexen g .20
NiSource .92
NikeB 1.00
NobleCorp .16


7 +1.89 +17.5
... +1.26 +17.8
53 +1.26 +9.2
33 +.10 -19.2
... +.18 -64.7
... +1.37 -.7
29 +2.79 +72.2
17 +.27 +10.6
... +.73 +46.3
4 +.75+156.3
17 +.38 +11.6
13 +3.24 -3.4
30 +.16 -13.3
. +.52 +137.5
21 +8.75 +19.6
15 -3.10 +29.1
... +.26 +76.1
12 +3.89 +54.5
... +.28 +48.5
15 +1.11 -6.6
5 +2.52 +15.3
11 +.33 +42.7
... +1.24 -7.2
8 +3.44 +53.8
51 +1.03 +46.4
43 +.30 -5.8
8 +.80 +25.1
32 +.62 +2,6
... +1.10 +18.4
24 +1.02 +21.2
17 -.27 +2.3
6 +2.76 +54.0


1.8
8 .8

1.1
1.1

3.8
3.1
12.5

11.6
9.7
.6
2.8
1.6


ProUSR2K25.38 1.0
ProUltR2K .09 .4
ProUltCrude...
ProgsvCp ...
ProLogis .60 6.6
Prudent] .58 1.4
PullteH ......
QwestCm .32 8.0
RRI Engy ...
RadioShk .25 1.6
Raytheon 1.24 2.7
RedHat
RegionsFn .04 1.1
RiteAid ... ...
Rowan
RylCarb ...
SLM Cp
SpdrGold ..
SpdrHome .49 3.6
SpdrKbwBk .81 4.4
Spd[Kbw RB1.22 6.5
SpdrRetl .43 1.4
SpdrMetM .55 1.4
Safeway .40 2.1
StJude
SandRdge .,
SaraLee .44 4.1
Satyam .15 2.9
SchergPI .26 1.0
Schlmbrg .84 1.5
SemiHTr .39 1.6
SiderNac 1.13 4.6
SilvWhtng ...
SimonProp .48. .9
Smithlnll .48 1.8
SouthnCo 1.75 5.4
SthnCopper .60 2.3
SwstAirl .02 .3
SprintNex
SPDR 2.60 2.7


... -.19 -15.4
17 +4.64+100.2
11 +3.45 -4.7
28 +.23 -3.0
16 +4.68 +20.7
... +.49 +67.4
... +6.62 +45.9
11 +1.85 +2.2
31 -3.51 -30.3
11 +3.13 +3.1
4 +1.67 +39.7
10 +1.03 +50.3
14 +.75 +49.5
18 -.25 +3.0
... +3.15 +91.5
... +1.53 +67.7
.. +2.44 +73.4
13 +1.52 -6.9
15 +3.30 +8.7
... +5.32 +38.3
12 +4.72 +31.1
11 +3.10 +1.4
... -2.61 -14.9
... -4.19 -32.3
... +2.49 +3.9
... -3.52 -23.7
.. +3.91 +65.0
... -2.75 -52.9
... +2.35 +12.6
.. -.37 +41.0
..-1.66 -72.5
..-2.91 -67.5
...-2.11 -35.1
.-2.47 -64.0
... -2.47 -61.9
+.56 -37.3
. +3.21 +3.3
+.23 -29.5
... +2.70 +50.6
... -4.36 -43.5.
... +2.27 +11.4
...'+1.25 -12.9
... +.81 +5.7
... +1.40 -35.0
... +3.80 +41.5
... +.61 -10.8
9 ... +9.6
... +.42 -5.7
10 +1.88 +34.5
10 +.45 -11.1
58 +2.40 +74.0
... -.36 -53.6
... +.07+332.3
5 +2.22 +34.2
8 +2.94 +20.9
... -.52 +3.1
+1.48 +8.0
+1.10 +13.2
+.10 -15.9
+.73 -35.4
�. +1.60 +49.2
... +1.61 +43.2
9 -1.06 -21.6
32 -.63 +16.3
'.. -.03 +56.9
... +.39 +10.9
... +.74 -43.3
19 +1.70 +58.4
14 +1.33 +35.5
... +1.13 +40.8
... +2.17 +93.1
... +.75 +42.2
28 +3.71 +1.0
8 +.80 +13.4
17 +1.15 -11.8
24 +2.73 +59.5
... +.43 -13.6
-.07 +147.0
.. +3.73 +8.4


Wly YTD WiMy
Name Div YId PE Cha %Cha Last


SP Mid . 1.72
SP Malls .76
SP HIthC .58
SP CnSt .69
SP Consum .30
SP Engy .70
SPDR Fncl .33
SP Inds .70
SPTech .31
SP Util .90
StarwdHtl .90
StateStr .04
Sterlite
Suncorgs .20
Suntech
SunTrst .04
Synovus .04
Sysco - .96
TJX .48
TaiwSemi .46
TalismE gs .23
Target .68
TeckRes g ...
Templelnld .40
TenetHith ..
Teradyn
Terex .
Tesoro ' .40
Texlnst .44
Textron .08
ThermoFis ...
3M Co 2.04
TimeWm rs .75
TitdanMet ...
Transocn
Travelers 1.20
TycoElec .64
Tyson .16
UDR .72
US Airwy ...
UnionPac 1,08
Unisys h .
UtdMicro .12
UPSB 1.80
US Bancrp .20
USNGsFd ...
US OilFd ..
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .03
Vale SA .54
Vale SA pf .54
ValeroE ,60
VangEmg 1.18
VerizonCm 1.84
VimpelCm ..
Visa .42
Vodafone 1.14
Vomado 1.52
Waigrn .55
Weathflntl ...
WellPoint ...
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby'.06
WDigital ...
WstnUnion .04
WmsCos .44
Wyeth 1.20
Wyndham .16
XL Cap .40
XTO Engy .50
Xerox .17
Yamana g ,04
YingliGm ...
YumBmds .76


... +6.11 +16.3 113.01
...+2.14 +26.4 28.75
... +1.37 +5.1 27.90.
... +.60 +2.8 24.53
... +1.22 +15.9 24.99
... +2.74 +7.2 51.19
... +.28 -.8 12.42
... +1.03 ... 23.41
... +.65 +27.5 19.65 -
... +1.54 +1.8 29.56'
18 +2.27. +28.0 22.92
13 +.72 +24.2 48.83
... +1.63+141.1 13.31
... +2.48 +68.6 32.88
... +4.54 +75.1 20.49
... +.81 -42.3 17.05
... +.04 -65.3 2.88
13 +.13 +.4 23.04'
17 +.68 +74.4 35.88
... +.36 +30.9 10.29-
+,90 +60.4 16.02
15 +3.15 +23.7 42.71
... +3.43 +397.8 24.49
17 +1.38 +220.6 15.39
7 +.24 +202.6 3.48
... 35 +88.4 7.95
.. +1.16 -18.3 14.15
4 +1.27 -.3 13.13
31 +1.08 +55.2 24.09
8 +1,12 -18.5 11.31
22 +3.51 +30.3 44.39
17 +6.50 +20.6 69.42 ,
... +1.43 +23.6 27.58
11 +.06 -5.2 8.35'
7 +7.63 +73.5 81.97.
10 +2.80 -4.4 43.22
... +1.73 +26.5 20.50'
... -.80 +35.2 11.84.
.. 60 -26.9 10.08
+.75 -63.9 2.79
13 +1.16 +21.3 57.99
... +.16 +98.8 1.69'
... +.17 +58.2 3.10
25 +1.23 -3.2 53.40
24 +1.81 -21.0 19.77
... +.17 -42.5 13.33
... +1.98 +9.4 36.22
3 +3.30 +9.5 40.72 -
9 +2.23 +2.7 27.32'
.� +1.42 +60.2 19.40 -
... +1.39 +58.8 16.91
... +.89 -15.4 18.31 -
... +1.72 +47.9 34.86
14 +1.91 -7.1 31.50
... +1.26 +83.8 13.16
44 +3.19 +28.3 67.29.
... +1.32 -2.5 19.93
... +6.74 -16.3 50.53
14 +.60 +23.3 30.42,
14 -.71 +77.6 19.22.
11 +2.55 +24.7 52.54
30 -1.53 -20.4 23.47
... +.01 -10.5 4.42
14 +1.16 +165.5 30.40
14 +.46 +28.7 18.46
9 +.84 +14.1 16.52
14 +1.37 +26.2 47.34
+1'.01 +93.9 12.70
+1.17+267.8 13.61
12 +1.62 +15.1 40.61
16 +1.20 -.9 7.90
15 +.02 +22.4 9.45
... +3.37 +147.5 15.10
17 +.29 +7.6 33.90


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
ActivsBIzs ... ... ... -.16 +33.6 11.54
AdobeSy ... ... 24 +1.61 +53.3 32.63
Affymetrix ... ...... +2.69 +165.6 7.94
AkamaiT ... ... 27 +1.49 +40.0 21.13
AlteraCp If .20 1.0 21 +1.70 +14.4 19.11
Amazon .... ... 57 +.64 +68.7 86.49
Amgen ... 16 +2.13 +5.5 60.92
AmkorTIf ... ... ... +.17+169.3 5.87
Antigncs ... ... ... +.67 +372.9 2.27
Apple Inc ... 28 +8.24 +87.4 159.99
ApidMati .24 1.8 ... +.52 +30.2 13.19
AsscdBanc .20 2.1 19 -.75 -53.7 9.70
Atheros ... ... ... +2.53 +70.2 24.35
Autodesk ... ... 44 +3.53 +13.5 22.30
AutoData 1.32 3.6 16 +1.62 -6.1 36.93
Baidu Inc ... ... ...+36.50 +174.3 358.10
BedBath ... ... 21 +2.10 +36.7 34.75
Biocryst ... ... +3.54 +592.7 9.49
Biogenldc ... ...18 +2.91 +2.8 48.98
Broadcom ... ... ...-.27 +60.3 27.20
BrcdeCm ... .....+.27+205.7 8.65
Bucyrus .10 .3 9 +2.42 +69.4 31.37
CAInc .16 .8 16 +2.61 +11.4 20.64
CDCCpA ... ...... +1.03+177.4 3.19
Celgene ... ... 76 +7.81 -1.2 54.64
CeliTher rsh... ... ... +.09+950.0 1.47
CentAl ... ... ... +1.18 -27.0 7.30
Cheesecake... ... 24 +.76 +81.2 18.30
CienaCorp ... ... ...+1.42 +70.7 11.44
Cisco ... ... 18 +1.37 +34.2 21.88
CtrixSys ... ... 41 +.54 +50.7 35.53
Clearwire ... ... ... +1.49 +60.4 7.91
CognizTech ... ... 20 +1.34 +68.1 30.36
Comcast .27 1.9 16 +.35 -14.1 14.50
Comocspcl .27 2.0 15 +.03 -15.6 13.63
Compuwre ... ... 12 +.24 +9.9 7.42
Costco .72 1.5 19 +1.65 -6.4 49.13
CvIRx ... ... ... +.11 +303.3 1.21


Name
Dell Inc
DItaPtr
DirecTV
DiscvLabs
DishNetwk
DryShips
ETrade
eBay
EstWstBcp
ElectArts
EngyConv
EricsnTel
EvrgrSIr
Expedia
ExpScripts
F5 Netwks
FLR Sys
FifthThird
FstSolar
Flextrn
GenBlotc h
Gentex
Genzyme
GileadSci
Google
HercOffsh
HudsCity
HumGen
HuntJB
Incyte
InfosysT
IntgDv
Intel
Intersil
Intuit 4
JA Solar
JetBlue
JovGIbl


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg. Last Name


13 +.83 +31.8
... -.03 -62.4
20 +.92 +11.7
... +.24 -40.6
8 +.69 +51.8
.. +.41 -41.6
... +.19 .+23.5
16 +2.69 +52.1
... -.11 -56.9
.. +.23 +31.9
17 +2.24 -39.6
... -.39 +23.6
.. +.28 -26.6
... +1.80 +123.9
22 +4.51 +28.3
36 +1.77 +64.0
15 -1.14 -28.2
.... +1.48 +2.8
30+24.88 +22.8
... +.62+115.6
... +.08+111.0
69 +2.50 +64.2
31 -1.02 -20.5
21 +.60 -5.3
31+16.47 +45.2
... +.50 -8.2
13 -.62 -14.5
...+11.32+590.6
22 +1.61 +9.3
... +1.82 +49.3
19 +3.66 +72.6
... +.12 +18.4
45 +.57 +32.1
... -.19 +49:1
21 +1.28 +22.9
+.84 +21.7
... +.42 -29.2
9 +2.62 +68.4


Wkly: YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


JnprNtwk
KLA Tnc .60
LaJollPhm ...
Level3 ...
LibGlobA ...
LibtyMIntA ...
UbMEntA ...
UfeTech ..
LinearTch .88
MarvelIT ...
Maximflgn .80
Medarex
MesaAirh ,.
Microchp 1.36
Microsoft .52
Nil Hldg ...
NetApp
NewsCpA .12
NewsCpB .12
Novavax
Novell
Novlus
Nvidia
OceanFrt ..
OnSmcnd
Oracle .20
Orexigen ...
PDL Bio 1.00
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .36
Palm Inc
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .61
PharmPdt .60
Popular ...
PwShs QQQ .16
Qlo ic ...


50 +1.67 +53.4
... +1.88 +44.8
... +.10 -55.0
... +.11 +142.9
... +2.38 +27.3
... +.26 +98.7
... +1.10 +57.3
.. +3.26 +86.2
19 +1.91 +21.7
62 +.41 +103.6
43 +.30 +54.8
... +7.81 +184.9
+.03 -43.4
20 +1.33 +38.4
15 -.84 +20.6
12 +1.79 +23.3
88 +1.47 +64.6
+.65 +8.8
... +.74 +20.6
+.48 +85.2
. +.37 '+23.9
. +.37 +62.2
. +.89 +60.6
1 -.01 -54.5
... +.03 +124.4
20 +.59 +25.9
... +2.82 +52.5
7 +.49 +35.6
24 +.44 +82.9
17 +2.64 +20.9
... -.91 +371.3
8 +.59 +29.2
18 +.84 -.3
39 +.44 -11.7
13 -1.54 -31.3
... +.15 -75.2
... +1.49 +31.3
18 -.44 -.4


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
Qualcom .68 1.4 48, -.05 +32.2 47.35
RF MIcD ... ... ... +1.10 +539.7 4.99
RschMotn ... ... 21 +3.96 +88.2 76.39
Riverbed ... ... ... -2.78 +86.8 21.28
SanDisk ... ... ... -.94 +78.0 17.09
Sanmina ... ...... ..+.11 +21.3 .57
Schwab .24 1.4 18 -,48 +2.7 16.60
SeagateT ... ... ... +.38+160.3 11.53
Sepracor ... 3 -.41 +45.5 15.98
Sequenom ... ... ... +1.38 -71.9 5.58
SiriusXM h +.. ... ... .02+244.2 .41
SkywksSol ... ... 22 +.74+117.9 12.07
Somaxon ... ... ... +1.78 +111.6 2.92
SouthFncl .04 3.4 ... -.03 -72.9 1.17
Staples .33 1.5 21 +1.07 +20.2 21.54
Starbucks ... ... 52 +2.78 +82.0 17.22
StIDynam .30 1.8 48 +.15 +46.5 16.38
SunMicro ... ... ... 4 +.05+141.4 9.22
SunPowerA. ... 40 +8.75 -13.4 32.04
Symantec ... ... ... +.96 +28.5 17.37
TDAmeritr ... ... 16 +.72 +29.1 18.40
Tellabs ... ... ... +.40 +40.0 5.77
TevaPhrm .53 1.1 48 +.98 +18.3 50.35
3Com ... ... 13 -.36 +60,5 3.66
TibcoSIt .... ... 26 +.64 +63.6 8.49
TriQuint ... ... ... +.64 +102.6 6.97
UAL ... ... ... +.40 -65.6 3.79
UCBHi f ... .... .. +.11 -85.0 1,03
UrbanOut ... ... 20 +.94 +50.0 22.47
Verisign ... ... ... +.38 +6.1 20.24
WholeFd ... ... 34 +1.86 +151.4 23.73
Wynn ... ... 27+11.12 +11.9 47,29
Xilinx .56 2.6 18 +1.21 +20.5 21.47
YRC Wwde ... ... ..+.26 -44.3 1.60
Yahoo ... . +.64 +43.3 17.48
ZionBcp .04 .4 .,. -.36 -54.3 11.20


Name


Div YId PE


AbdAsPac .42
Adventrx
AldNevG
AmApparel ..,
AmO&G
AntaresP
ApolloG g ...
Aurizon g ...
BMB Munai ...
BPZ Res ...
BarcUBS36 ..
BarcGSOil ...
BrclndiaTR ...
BootsCoots ...
CanoPet
CapAcquis ...
CeISci
CFCdag .01
CheniereE 1.70
ChinaGrn n ..
CortexPh
DenisnM g ..
DuneEngy ...
EV LtdDur 1.30
EldorGldg .g
Elixiriam
EndvSilv g ...
EnlerAcq
FrkStPrp .76
GabGIdNR 1.68
GascoEngy ...
GastarE g ...
GenMoly
GoldSlrg .,
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasG g ...
HealthFit n ...
Hemisphrx ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
Cha %Chg Last


+.25 +35.6
+.02 +84.0
+.21 +65,4
+.50 +96.0
+4.15 +46.3
+.12+137.8
... +87.0
+.28 +18.2
+.02 -36.5
+.28 +1.9
+.95 +6.1
+1.36 ,+2.6
+2.86 +67.3
.. +14.5
+.05 +65.9
+.11 +7.9
+.05 +50.5
+.25 +6.3
+.60 +132.6
+1.46 +187.9
+.05 -53.8
+.06 +50.8
-.00 -35.0
+.48 +38.5
+.06 +16.6
+.00 +23.1
... +86.3
+.05 +7,4
+.59 -5.4
+.76 +8.1
+.02 -38.5
-.00 +91.3
+.36 +127.1
+.03 +124.0
+.08 +36.4
-.01 +8.6
-.75 +202.8


.. .. +.25 +555.6


SWkly YTD Widy
Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


Hyperdyn ...
IA Global
ImpOil gs .40
IntlRylty g .04
JavelinPh ...
KodiakOg ...
LibertyAcq ...
Metalico ...
Minefndg ...
Nevsun g ..
NDragon ...
NwGold g ...
NA Pall g ...
NthgtM g ...
NovaGldg ...
Oilsands g ...
On2 Tech ...
ParaG&S ...
PionDrill
PSCrudeDS...
PSCrudeDL...
ProceraNt ...
Protalix
RaeSyst
Rentech
Rubicon g ...
SilvrcpM gn .08
Sinovac
SulphCo
Taseko
TrianAcq ...
Triplcr wt .,
US Geoth ...
US Gold ..
Uluru
UnivTrav n ..
UraniumEn...


... ... +10 +20.0
... -.00 -32.7
... +1.39 +19.5
1.1 ... +.44+169.9
... ... +.29 .+46.4
... -.03+219.4
... ... +.02 +11.2
.. +.14 +178.1
...... +.60 +65.6
... +.02 +140.3
... ... +.02 -44.2
... ... +.11 +99.3
. ... +01 +41.0
... 60 +.08 +186.7
... +.12+184.4
... -.06 +23.3
... ... ...+100.0
... 5 -.09+193.5
...... -.33 -20.6
... ...-7.81 -44.5
... ... +.59 +79.2
... ... +.22 -13.2'
...... +.95+244.6
...... +.32 +225.9
... ,.. +.04 -26.5
... ... +.07 +156.9
... ... +.41 +21.6
... 22 +.40+212.3
... ... +.20 +12.8
... ... +.16+231.6
... ... +.11 +9.4
... ... -.07 +30.0
... -.02 .+73.5
... ... +.26 +229.7
. +.02 -57.1
... 9 +1.90 +52.6
... ... -.17+783.9


.54
.03
40.30
3.67.
1,83
.99
9.22
4.31
8.53
1.73
.14
2.85
2.58
2.38
4.18
.90'
.40
1.35
4.42
81.06
4.57.
.79
6.34
1.76
.50
2.98
3.60
4.31
1.06
1.89
9.75
.13
1.44
3.00
.12
11.14
2.74


-__ - Weekly Dow Jones


MUTUAL FUNDS
roii Assei Toutl Reltrn/Rank PeI Mininit
NJ.Tne Obl iSMMins NAv 4-wk 12-.mo 5-ye3r Load Invt
f irt.. T.IH, ii i l 1'. 'i hi ' .1 i Ii A .. , iA IlL '.i: 0)0 i)i)

r f 11 ,1 ' u-,i IH ' 1.1 u4- : I - I, :. 4 .ll -.
.T,, ,.,,, F,,,,, ,1 .. ,r, " 0 .'i l -1 ':' 4 .,A 11 .7' - S(


a -,,,,,, ,,fa, i.ii,. .,, ,IT, TI.1.6 1 5 I ,. I I. , . -r iD 1.i : B 5 S 25i.
Vanguard 5001nv LB 40,460 90.36 +8.9 -19.6/C , -0.1/C NL. 3,000
Vanguard Instldx LB 35,143 89.78 +8.9 -19.5/C 0.0/C NL 5,000,000
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 34,920 21.83 +8.0 -19.9/C -0.5/C 5.75 250
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 34,013 33.88 +9.0 -17.3/A . +8.4/A 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 33,500 83.23 +10.3 -23.7/E -0.5/C NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 27,905 27.60 +10.8 -23,1/C +6.8/A NL 2,500
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 27,386 22.26 +8.9 -17.0/A +5.8/A 5.75 250.
Fidelity Divrlntl d FG 27,105 24.79 +8.2 -26.5/D +4.7/C NL 2,500
American Funds BalA m MA 26,528 14.74 +6.1 -10.8/C +1.5/C 5.75 250
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 25,807 .28.76 +8.6 -20.4/D +4.0/A 5.75 250
American Funds BondA x Cl 25,728 11.32 +2.0 -2.2/E +2.1/D 3.75 250
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl 25,632 10.54 +1.8 +10.5/A +6.1/A NL 5,000,000
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 24,447 1.88 +5.8 -12.0/E +2.9/B 4.25 1,000
Vanguard Welltn MA 24,182 26.31 +6.0 -8.0/A +4.7/A NL 10,000
Fidelity GrowCo LG 23,956 59.32 +9.9 -20.7/D +4.8/A NL 2,500
Vanguard 500Adml LB 23,394 90.37 +8.9 -19.5/C 0.0/C NL 100,000
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 21,188 24,06 +9.4 -19.3/C +0.8/B NL 100,000
Fidelity LowPriStk d MB 20,269 27.74 +9.6 -14.7/A +3.9/A NL 2,500
Vanguard InslPlus LB 20,219 89.78 +8.9 -19.5/C 0.0/C NL 200,000,000
CA -Conservave Allocaion, Cl -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Bend, FG -Foreign targeGrowth, FV -Foreign
Large Value, IH -World Allocaton, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Modere Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV
Mid-Cap Value, SH -Speoalty-heath, WS -Wodd Stock, Total Retumn: Chng in V with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs.
others with same objective: A is in lop 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init nvt Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Momingstar.


JI 1 F


-JII


y


nuocsIIJ mate


U.ou U.0U


il-I


INZI


I.,












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JU Ly 26, 2009


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Emss
UM1a l


One Item per ad ai s
14 lines* 6 days additional







ncludes a adItio ne $1.15 p
Rate applies to private individuals selling
p er.son me rhamnisetontallg S500or Is...
This is a non-refundable rate. g





I A ineo te a W Each additional

4 lines t * 6 ays line $1. 15



Rate applies to private Individuals selling
peRonal merchant Ise totalling v 1,000 or less.
Each item must include a price.







One itm per ad so ns s





Eanca tegoies win de qe prcep
etO i is locpratefindivi rates 1
4 lines 6 days Each additional

Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,000or less.
Each item must include a price. s
This is a non-refundable rate.













One item per ad t. M v t
4 lines * 6 days E add ition al


























Monday through1m Fria fro 1 d 8:0

AEro r- pole ae p re ad youradt
SRate applies to private individuals selling




personal merchandisetotalling , or less.










n Each te f must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.














LEna2s D al 1tet



S Onc item per a ormal ad r ti

4 lines o dayS mnt. ac tion
Rate to private individal s seling55
ronal merchandise totalling p6,0y t or




















d coach tem must include e a price.



o terhis is a non- unable rat
nclues2day s ,th rogh 1a o, :00j m
clasimited to service type advertis-e
ing only.
4 lines, one months ....a90.20
$10.80 each additional line











ad for each Wednesday i insertion.


















frtha Ourtion of the socatedvetie0am
You can call us at 755-5440, al or a
Monday through Friday from 8:00







a.m. to er 5:00 p .m.





Some people p refer to place their,
ad categories wll reae re prepay-


East Duval Stresaet. ability;
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.








Ad is toAppear Call by: Fax/Emailby:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00 a.m. Ma n., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday We., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Thurs.,9:00a.m .
Saturday Fri., 10:00 a.. Fri, 9:00 a.m.
Sunday ri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.

rBilling Inquiries- Ca ll 755-544o0.

edit limits, ourc ifor b tene





Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher whor
reserves the fright to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under








omission of advertisements ordered


Advertising language must comply

regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.


In Print

and Online
www.liakccitvce portcr.eoin


Take ADvantage of dte
Reporter Classifieds!

755.5440


SADvantage


Legal

STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRON-
MENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF PROPOSED AGENCY
ACTION
Permit Number: FLA 113956
Columbia County
City of Lake City
527 SW St. Margarets Street
Lake City, Florida 32025.
The Department of Environmental
Protection gives Notice of Its Intent
to Approve the Pretreatment Pro-
gram Modification of the City of
Lake City, Florida for Permit Num-
ber FLA113956. The Pretreatment
Program Modification consists of re-
visions to the City's local discharge
limitations and sewer use ordinance.
The Department file on this matter is
available for public inspection during
normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday,
except legal holidays, at Domestic
Wastewater Section, at 2600 Blair
Stone Road, Mail Station 3540, Tal-
lahassee, Florida 32399-2400, (850)
245-8605.
The Department will approve the
pretreatment program modification
submission unless a timely petition
for an adminsitrative hearing is filed
under sections 120.569 and 120.57
of the Florida Statutes before the
deadline for filing a petition. The
procedures for petitioning for a hear-
ing are set forth below.
A person whose substantial interests
are affected by the Department's pro-
posed decision may petition for an
administrative proceeding (hearing)
under sections 120.569 and 120.57
of the Florida Statutes. The petition
must contain the information set
forth below and must be filed (re-
ceived by the clerk) in the Office of
General Counsel of the Department
at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard,
Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-3000.
Petitions by the applicant or any of
the parties listed below must be filed
within twenty-one days of receipt of
this written notice. Petitions filed by
any persons other than those entitled
to written notice under section
120.60(3) of the Florida Statutes
must be filed within twenty-one days
of publication of the notice or within
twenty-one days of receipt of the
written notice, whichever occurs
first.
Under section 120.60(3) of the Flori-
da Statutes, however, any person
who has asked the Department for
notice of agency action may file a
petition within twenty-one days of
receipt of such notice, regardless of
the date of publication.
The petitioner shall mail a copy of
the petition to the applicant at the ad-
dress indicated above at the time of
filing. The failure of any person to
file a petition or request for enlarge-
ment of time within the appropriate
time period shall constitute a waiver
of that person's right to request an
administrative determination (hear-
ing) under section 120.569 and
120.57 of the Florida Statutes. Any
subsequent intervention (in a pro-
ceeding initiated by another party)
will be only at the discretion of the
presiding officer upon the filing of a
motion in compliance with rule 28-
106.205 of the Florida Administra-
tive Code.
A petition that disputes the material
facts on which the Department's ac-
tion is based must contain the fol-
lowing information:
(a) The name, address, and telephone
number of each petitioner; the name,
address, and telephone number of the
petitioner's representative, if any; the
Department case identification num-
ber and the county in which the sub-
ject matter or activity is located;
(b) A statement of how and when
each petitioner received notice of the
Department action;
(c) A statement of how each petition-
er's substantial interests are affected
by the Department action;
(d) A statement of all disputed issues
of material fact. If there are none, the
petition must so indicate;
(e) A concise statement of the ulti-
mate facts alleged; including the spe-
cific facts the petitioner contends


Computer Services

SDonna's Computer Service.
We Will Find A Solution!
Call Donna at: 386-559-7311
www.donnascomputerservice.com

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 lv msg.


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
*****A*A**************+**^***


Legal

warrant reversal or modification of
the Department's proposed action;
(f) A statement of the specific rules
or statues the petitioner contends re-
quire reversal or modification of the
Department's proposed action, in-
cluding an explanation of how the al-
leged facts relate to the specific rules
or statues; and
(g) A statement of the relief sought
by the petitioner, stating precisely
the action that the petitioner wants
the Depprtment to take.
A petition that does not dispute the
material facts on which the Depart-
ment's action is based shall state that
no such facts are in dispute and oth-
erwise shall contain the same infor-
mation as set forth above, as required
by rule 28-106.301.
Because the administrative hearing
process is designed to formulate final
agency action, the filing of a petition
means that the Department's final ac-
tion may be different from the posi-
tion taken by it in this notice. Per-
sons whose substantial interest will
be affected by any such final deci-
sion of the Department have the right
to petition to become a party to the
proceeding, in accordance with the
requirements set forth above.
Mediation is not available in this
proceeding.

04533369
July 26, 2009


020 Lost & Found

FOUND DOG
Near Emerald Lakes / Fairfield
area. Please call to identify.
386-719-9702.

Found: Redish Brown dachshund.
No collar, chip, or tatoo. Great
temper. Near 110/75 split. Call
904-612-9598 w/name to identify.
LOST DACHSHUND. black &
brown female. red color.
Lost in Forrest Hills sub. near VA.
Reward. 386-854-5363.
LOST: White Gold hoop earring
w/diamonds. Reward $100.00.
Missing on the 15th of July.
(386)867-0863
Notebook called "Good Seeds
Book 2" & 2 Charts in folder..
Adam to Noah to Abraham. Last
seen First Assembly of God.
Reward 386-752-4478

Set of keys found on
S.E. Saint Johns St. -
Call to identify:
386-719-5494


060 Services

ASSISTED LIVING in our home
on our ranch. Peace & quiet, �
country cooking. Hospice patients
Weclome. 386-755-8722

to 0Job
10 Opportunities

04533349
CCSS, Inc. is seeking a detail
oriented, self-directed person to
assess senior adults. Graduation
from an accredited 4 yr college
or university preferred. Appro-
priate exp. may qualify for part
or all of the ED requirements.
Travel within Col. County req'd.
Criminal background & drug
testing required. DFWP. Fax
' resumes (386)752-8256. EOE

04533396
LICENSED PRACTICAL
NURSE
The Columbia County Health
Department is seeking a
Licensed Practical Nurse, PSN
#64080175. This is a clinical /
nursing position to work in
Family Planning, Primary Care,
Maternity and Ryan White
clini s. Knowledge of required
-childhood immunizations and
administration would be a plus
as well as computer skills.
Applicants must have a current
LPN license in the State of
Florida. Must be fingerprinted.
May be required to work during
or beyond normal work hours or
days in the event of an
emergency. Salary range is
$23,645.18-$61,448.66
(positions are usually filled at
the minimum of the salary
range). Applications will be
accepted online at https://peo-
plefirst.myflorida.com/ Stale of
Florida applications may be
mailed to State of Florida,
People First, Staffing
Administration, PO Box 44058,
Jacksonville, FI 32231 or faxed
to (904)636-2627, by 8/3/09.
EEO/AA/VP Employer.

04533475
100 WORKERS.
Assemble crafts, wood items,
sewing. Materials provided. To
$480+wk. Free information
24hr. 801-428-4893


00 Job
100 Opportunities

Administrative Assistant. PT,
min wage to start. Lt computer
skills, must have transportation.
Only serious inquires.
Fax resume to (386)752-9671

Customer Service Rep needed
Must have excellent customer
service skills, typing and computer
skills Apply at 3076 95th Drive,
Live Oak

A Terrific Opportunity
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company
$100,000+ Earning Potential,
Benefits, Pension, 401K & BCBS
Insurance for those who qualify!
Call 1-800-257-5500

DUMP TRUCK Driver
w/Asphalt experience.
386-497-3131


Gilman Building Products
Company is accepting applications
for Security Guard at the Sawmill
located in Lake Butler. A high
school diploma or equivalent is
required. Computer knowledge is
required. We have competitive
rates & 401K, dental & health
insurance, paid vacation &
holidays & promotional
opportunities. This position is
night shift and every weekend.
Interested applicants should apply
in person form 8:00 AM until
3:30PM at the front office.

LOOKING FOR exp carpet sales
person. Apply.in person at 1512 S.
Ohio Ave. Live Oak or call Brad
or Martha 386- 362-7066

Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.

Production Supervisor
Benefits-40 IK-Profit Sharing
Apply in person
Idaho Timber of Florida
1786 SE State Road 100
Lake City, FL

120 Medical
120 Employment

04533153
We are growing again!!


I 1i lspcIc


Join our family of
caring professionals
in our Branford Office
Regional Manager
FT

Social Worker
FT

CNA/HHA
FT

PRN Staff
RN
LPN
CNA/HHA

Job descriptions as well and
a downloadable application
can be found at:
www.hospiceofthenaturecoast.orE
email:
hr@hospiceofcitruscounty.org
Hospice of the Nature Coast
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FL 34464
Fax: 352-527-9366
DFWP/EOE

04533478
Baya Pointe Nursing & Rehab
Center has the
following open positions.
* Risk Manager, Licensed RN
preferred
* RN, 7-3 shift full time.
Please apply to
administrator@bayapointe.com
or fax resume to 386-752-7337.


120 aMedical
120 Employment

F/T Transcriptionist needed for
busy medical practice. M - F.
Typing experience is a must. Send
reply to Box 04075, C/O The Lake
City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056



140 Work Wanted

Getting out of the military,
need job. My email is
dave street 198l@yahoo.com


HOME CLEANING.
Done your way.'
Call Ethel
386-303-1496.


160 Investments

04533410
Duplex - Investor Opportunity
Fully Occupied -
income producing
3/2 1200 sqft-each unit w/garage
$135,000
Call for Apt.
386-755-0037 or 904-349-1302
info@markbusher.com

s MARK Bus- IER




SSchools &
Education

04533007
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant, $409
next class-8/03/09
* Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-8/15/09
* Pharm Tech national
certification
$900 next class-9/15/09.
* Continuing education

Fees incl. books,
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

BOSTON TERRIER born 6/04.
CKC Smaller size. $400.
Call for details.
386-963-1211

CKC YORKIES. 9 weeks old.
2 small ,males $650 ea. 1 large.
female $500. Looking for good
homes. Call after 5pm. 984-7740.

MINIATURE PINSCHER
, Stud Services.
Call 386-758-2374


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


3 0 Livestock &
33 Supplies

10 yr. old Palomino Quarterhorse
Mare. UTD on all shots & coggins.
Great kids.horse, no bad habits.
$1,500 352-870-3339

HAY For Sale. Round bales.
Bahia. Fertilized, no weeds, barn
kept. $30 & $35. roll
386-209-0399


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.

IU - n Pr*




2001 VW Beetle Onine
Diesel, auto., under 64K
mi. Great MPG. 6 disc
changer, 2 new tires
& battery.
$6,500 Cash Low Price!

386-752-7177


08 Civic EXL Nav
06 Jaguar Xtype
08 Maxima SE
08 Azera Limited


$18,990
$18,990


I- redt Uion Wecom

SOUTHESTAR



39l an ansilF
31 E 9hse


New Home Sales


Consultant Wanted

Excellent Commission Based

Pay and Benefits

Fax Resume to 509-756-2869

or email mh newhomeiobs@vahoo.com


B Maronda Homes
|ft!^j -~ia| /4^^5*�^<�%>�iow!

DOMESTIC
06 Dodge Stratus
06 PT Cruiser Cony
05 Grand Prix V6
07 Chevy Cobalt
08 Cobalt LT
08 PT Cruiser
06 Malibu Maxx LT
03 Towncar Exect
08 Grand Prix V6
07 PT Cruiser Tour
04 Mustang GT
06 Ford 500 LTD
08 Chevy Impala
08 Pontiac G6
08 PT Cruiser Tour
07 Pontiac G6 S/R
08 Dodge Caliber
07 Cobalt LT
07 Ford Mustang
08 Malibu Classic
08 Chevy HHR
07 Grand Prix GT
07 Mustang Leather
08 Avenger Leather
08 PT Cruiser LTD
08 Sebring Cony
08 Gr Marquis LS
08 Saturn Aura SIR
08 Dodge Magnum
07 Dodge Magnum
07 Mustang Cony
08 Chrysler 300
08 Dodge Charger
06 Towncar Sig
08 Malibu LT
09 Ford Mustang
07 Monte Carlo SS
08 Pontiac G6 GXP
08 Sebring Conv LTD
09 Fusion SEL
08 Chrysler 300Tour
07 Cadillac DTS
08 Pontiac G6 Cony
06 Cadillac STS
07 Charger SRT8
TRUCKS
05 GMC 1500 V8
03 Dodge Ram Hemi
08 Raider Xcab
03 GMC Crew 4x4
04 2500 Crew 4x4
07 Dodge 1500 Quad
06 Colorado Crew Z71
08 Frontier Crew V6
08 F150 Xcab V8
08 Tundra Crew
08 Chevy 1500 Crew
08 Ford F150 Crew
07 Ram Quad 4x4
04 F250 Crew 4x4
07 F150 Crew FX4
08 Tundra Crew XSP
SPORTS UTILITY
06 Pontiac Torrent
06 Wrangler Sport
Right Hand Drive
07 Jeep Liberty
05 Jeep Wrangler
07 Compass 4x4
08 Mazda Tribute
07 Pacifica Touriog
07 Ford Escape
06 Pacifica Leather
05 Explorer Sp Trac
07 Durango Leather
08 Jeep Commander
08 Trailblazer
08 GMC Envoy
09 Dodge Journey
07 Highlander
09 Journey SXT
07 Santa Fe V6
08 Pathfinder
09 Pontiac Torrent
08 Toyota Rav4
08 Nissan Xterra
08 Mazda CX7
08 Dodge Durango
06 Commander LTD
08 Honda Element
04 Infiniti QX56
08 Explorer Bauer
07 Saturn Outlook
08 Highlander V6
07 Cadillac SRX
08 Saturn Oulook
07 Veracruz LTD
08 Suburban Lthr
08 Cadillac SRX
07 Expedition LTD
08 Infiniti EX35
08 Infinlti FX35
08 Acura RDX Nay
08 BMW X3
08 Porsche Cayenne
VANS
06 Gr Caravan Cargo
06 Kia Sedona LX
06 Town Country
07 Grand Caravan
07 Hyun Entourage
08 Uplander LS
08 Ford E150 Cargo
07 Town Country
08 Grand Caravan
08 Kia Sedona
07 Ford E250 Cargo
08 Chevy Cargo
08 Ford 8 Pass
06 Ford 15 Pass
07 Sienna LE
08 Ford 12 Pass
08 Chevy 12 Pass
08 Chevy 15 Pass
07 Odyssey EXL
07 Dodge Sprinter
IMPORTS
07 Hyundai Accent
05 Civic Coupe
06 Scion XA
06 Mazda 6i
08 Nissan Sentra
07 Kia Spectra
08 Mits Gatant
08 Toyota Yaris
07 Mazda 5 SIR
08 Hyundai Accent
08 Hyundai Elantra
08 Sonata SIR
03 Mini Cooper
05 Infiniti G35
07 VW Rabbit
06 Scion XB
08 Toyota Corolla
04 Mini Cooper
08 Nissan AltrIma
05 Accord Hybrid
06 Civic Hybrid
07 Scion TC
08 Scion XB
07 Jetta Wolfsburg
06 Acura RSX
08 Altlma Leather
09 Corolla LE
07 Maxima SE
08 Forrester 2.5X
07 Honda Civic Hybrid
08 Honda Accord
09 Camry LE


$7,990
$8,990
$8,990
$8,990
$9,990
$9,990
$9,990
$10,990
$10,990
$9,990
$10,990
$10,990
$11,490
$11,990
$11,990
$11,990
$11,990
$11,990
$11,990
$11,990
$12,490
$12,990
$12,990
$13,990
$13,990
$13,990
$13,990
$13,990
$13,990
$13,990
$13,990
$14,990
$14,990
$14,990
$15,890
$15,990
$16,990
$16,990
$16,990
$16,990
$17,990
$18,990
$19,990
$20,990
$28,990


$7,990
$8,990
$11,990
$14,990
$15,990
$15,990
$16,990
$16,990
$16,990
$18,990
$18,990
$19,990
$19,990
$20,990
$22,990
$27,990

$11,990

$11,990
$12,990
$12,990
$12,990
$13,990
$13,990
$13,990
$14,990
$14,990
$14,990
$15,990
$15,990.
$15,990
$15,990
$16,890
$16,990
$16,990
$16,990
$16,990
$16,990
$16,990
$16,990
$16,990
$17,990
$17,990
$18,990
$19,990
$19,990
$19,990
$21,990
$21,990
$22,990
$23,990
$23,990
$27,990
$28,990
$28,990
$29,990
$35,990
$48,990

$9,990
$10,990
$10,990
$10,990
$11,990
$11,990
$12,990
$12,990
$13,250
$13,990
$14,990
$14,990
$14,990
$15,990
$15,990
$17,990
$17,990
$19,990
$22,990
$29,990

$8,990
$9,990
$10,990
$10,990
$11,750
$11,990
$11,990
$11,990
$12,990
$12,990
$12,990
$12,990
$12,990
$12,990
$12,990
$12,990
$13,990
$13,990
$14,990
$14,990
$14,990
$14,990
$15,990
$15,990
$15,990
.$15,990
$15,590
$16,990
$18,990
$16,990
$17,990
$17,990
$17,990
$17,990












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China. Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
NICE WHIRLPOOL Clothes
Dryer. Guaranteed to work.
Looks great. White. $125 obo.
386-754-9295 or 984-0387

408 Furniture
CHERRY COFFEE TABLE and
2 END TABLES.
$75.00
386-288-7067 OR 719-5658
RECLINING COUCH &
love seat. $300.
S386-288-7067 or
719-5658

418 Toys
Train table
$75.00
386-854-0749


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat & Sun. 8-4. Legos, K-nex,
toys, paintball gun, games &
collectibles. Computer w/XP, 17'
LCD monitor, speakers. PC desk
/chair. PC games, software. 3 room
tent, holiday, fog mach. & house-
hold. Country Village,road beside
Bingo Station off 47, to Ace Ln.

440 Miscellaneous
18X48 EASY
set pool.
$150.
386-344-0208
3" Binder. Beautiful Parrot
pictured. 3 rings. 25 for $65.
Never used. Retails $6-$10 ea.386-
758-1358 or 7pm-10pm 752-3491
5'X10' UTILITY trailer
with wood floor and
side rails. $250.00
386-288-7067 or 719-5658
Craftsman Tractor Mower 1.5 yr
old. Very good shape. $450. Also,
Kenmore Refrigerator'$275. good
shape. 386-697-9343 or 438-8190
MOBILE HOME ALUMINUM
FRONT DOOR. NOT PRE-
HUNG. ONLY $50. 386-7.58-1358
xr7.!Onpm"n V-?I301


440 Miscellaneous
WHIRLPOOL 220
AC unit.
$200.
386-344-0208

450 Good Things
450 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
386-752-3434

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
14 wide. 2/1, 2/2.
Quiet, clean country park.
Electric. H/AC. No pets.
$400-$500. + Dep. 386-758-2280.
2 & 3 br Mobile Homes for Rent.
$450-$650. monthly.
Call for move in special.
(386)752-6422
2/2 M H's Nice park setting, Very
clean, well maintained 1 mi. east
of downtown. Move In Specials
386-623-7547 or 386-984-8448
2br MH's & 3br houses in 5 pt.
area. Also, 16X80 off Old Country
club Rd. 1st & dep. All electric
No Pets! 386-961-1482
2br/ba MH w/patio & utility shed.
Lawn maint. incl. Country setting.
Safe, quiet, clean park. Discounts
offered. 386-755-4965/752-0981
3br/1.5 ba MH.
on Ridgewood
$550 mo. 1st, & sec.
386-752-5911 or 466-2266
3BR/2BA Double wide.
$750 a month. 1st, last & security.
Please call 386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243.
3BR/2BA DW
$550.00 mo + deposit
Northside.
386-965-6250
3BR/2BA ON 1/2 fenced acre.
Pets allowed. $650. mo
1st & last.
386-697-6621
CLEAN, QUIET AND SAFE
M.H. & Apt. Some utilities
furnished. Monthly or Weekly.
Call 386-755-2741
FREE ELECTRIC! And all
utilities. 2br/lba, south of Lake
City.$400 security, $570.mo
386-590-0642 or 867-1833
Large partially furnished 1/Iba
Private on 8.5 ac w/ a large pond.
$450.00 1st, last plus deposit, no
pets. Live Oak 386-208-1060
Late Model Mobile Homes in
Park. 2br/lba from $450 &
3br/2ba from $550 Includes .water
& sewer. No Pets! 386-961-0017
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs. 2 and
3 bedrooms. Contact
386-867-2337 or 397-1522
Move in Special. Centrally
located MHP. Quiet family
community. 1st month moves you
in. 2br -$485. 3br.- $575. $50 app
fee Ref', req'd 305-oR4-'1


Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

Reduced Rent!!!, $400.00 Moves
you in! Includes , water,
& Mowing. 2 & 3 br available.
386-755-5488


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

04532633
Got Animals? Need Room?
4br/3ba on 10.3 acres., 2006
32X76 Manufactured home
White Springs area.
$169,995.00

PRESTIGE
HOME CENTERS

3973 Hwy 90 West, Lake
City, Fl. 386-752-7751
or 1-800-355-9385

04532634
REAL Western Red Cedar
Logged Homes Direct from
our Factory!
NO MIDDLE MAN!
100 Plans to choose From!

PRESTIGE
HOME CENTERS
3973 Hwy 90 West, Lake
City, Florida. 386-752-7751
or 1-800-355-9385

04532635
Only $500-$1000 Down,
With Your Land!
PRESTIGE
HOME CENTERS
3973 Hwy 90 West, Lake
City, FL 386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

04533245 STOP
Read no further. Save 12% on
all Jacobson ordered homes until
Nov. 1st. Call Eric for Details
386-719-5560
BRAND NEW 28'X60' DW.
1500 sq ft. CH/A, skirting,
set-up, Del. & steps.
All this for only $50,439.
Call Eric for details 386-719-5560

BRAND NEW 3/2
28'X 40' for only $25,900.
Call Eric @ 386-719-5560

BRAND NEW. 32' X80' DW
2300 SQFT. CH/A, Skirting, steps,
set-up - Del., All for only $77,304.
Call Eric @ 386-719-5560
HURRY!!!
O nlv 1 loft at this nrice 32 X80


SUnfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423
$99 MOVES YOU IN!
1, 2 & 3 BR's Windsong Apts
$$$Reduced Rent$$$
The Community that Cares!
386-758-8455

*$299 Moves
You In!!!


FREE RENT
MOVE IN TODAY

BRAND NEW
GATED
POOL**PETS OK
Students Special
200 FREE
CHANNELS
Next to Middle School
2 br - 386-754-1800
1br - 386-758-8029
Windsor Arms
www.windsorarmsapts.com
www.aptsinlakecity.com
*certain restrictions apply
04532819
Peavy Properties
386-288-3128

Sugarmill Apts
Lake City, FL. 2Br/2Ba.
Rent $725 ~ Deposit $500
537 Waldron Terrace
Lake City, FL 3Br/lBa House,
Rent $800 ~ Deposit $500
Ask about our Move in Specials
Pets are Welcome

04533337
Cute 2BR/2BA brick duplex
unit for rent. Well kept.
Convenient location at 198 SW
Cannon Creek Dr., close to S.R.
47 and 1-75. $800/month plus
deposit. Available August 1st.
Call Maston Crapps at Daniel
Crapps Agency, Inc. (Realtor)
386-365-1444.

1BR Apartment $500. mo
2BR Apartment $600mo.
plus Sec. Downtown Location,
Clean. NO PETS. 386-755-3456
2BR/1.5 BA. Townhouse Apt.
$500.00. mo. + security
996 SE Putnam
386-344-2472


Classified Department: 755-5440


4/2 DW, CH/A, skirting, steps, 2Br/1.5Ba Duplex DAniel Crapps Agency, Realtor
set-up/Del. for only! $80,539! CH/A, W/D hook up. Convenient
Call Eric @ 386-719-5560 locatiori.'$650. plus security 04533485
386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Very nice home in Woodcrest
FSBO 4br/2ba Manufactured 2br/lba Duplex S/D, 3br/2ba. 2 car garage.
home. Partly furnished, carport, completely remodeled Screened porch. Rent
workshop. Close to town. Priced $575 monthly $500 deposit.. $1.000. mo w/$1,075.00 dep.
reasonable. Call 386-438-8445 386-497-1514. . 386-984-6447


r


71 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
in Gatorwood
Rent $700. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
High Springs, downtown 1
BR/IBa central H/A, quiet
$530/mo laundry available 30 B
NE 2 Ave 352-395-7441
Large Deluxe Apts, 2 BR/2 BA,
'W of 1-75a, Garage, W/D hook-up,
from $725 + SD. (386) 965-0276,
466-7392, or 965-5560
Studios & 1Br's from $135 week.
Utilities & cable included. Fur-
nished or unfurnished. 386-752-
2741 or 352-538-0292/514-2950
SUMMERS HERE.We're giving
one month free with new 1 year
lease. From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
X-tra Lg. 2/1 Duplex
w/ Garage, off Country Club.
Immaculate Cond. W/D hook ups.
$650/Mo.+1 Yr. Lease.
386-397-2108 or 352-514-2332

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
EFFICIENCY APT. All utilities
included. In town, clean, quiet.
Great location $475mo. plus
$150 deposit. 386-397-3568
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $145. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
70v Home For Rent
$199. MOVES YOU IN
I br house $450 mo. 2br/2ba
Mobile Home $495. mo.
Includes water. 386-755-2423
$450. mo 2br/lba in Lake City.
CH/A, Lg spacious living room.
Back porch. 866-608-8911
$99 Deposit special.
04533303
BRICK 3BR/2BA
Chain link fence, unfurnished.
' Off Branford Hwy.
$900 mo. 1st &-last month.
Call 386-466-2254

04533339
Nice 4BR/2BA Brick, 2,916 SF
home for rent. Convenient
location at 392 SW Baya Dr.
Must See! $1,250/month plus
deposit. Call Maston Crapps at
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
(Realtor) 386-369-1444

04533386
3br/2ba excellent condition,
in city limits. $1000. per month.
386-623-6612


- i


1 & 2 Bedroom Aparent es

Furnished Apartments Available


*Washer/Dryer Hook-Ups * Pool

Located next to Lake City Middle School









APARTMENT HOMES


754-1800

www.windsorarmsapts.com


Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

0453311 I
Callaway
340 SW Wilshire Dr. - 4/2, 1,725
sq ft, wood floors in kitchen,
newer paint throughout,
1/2-acre lot, only $1,195/mo!

Countryside Estates
309 SE Gregory Glen - 3/2,
1,500 sq ft, 1/2-acre lot,
2-car garage, only $925/mo!

Grandview Village
1175 SW Shenandoah Glen -
4/2, 1,450 sq ft, eat-in kitchen, 2-
car garage, only $995/mi!

H MARK BUSH ER


386-755-0037 or 904-891-3472
Email: info()markbusher.com

04533488
FOR RENT 3br/2ba in Lake
City Country Club on lake &
Golf Course. Fenced back yard,
2 car garage. $1,200. mo.
$1,000. dep. Call 386-466-2254

lbr cottage private fenced yard
.All utilities Incl.
Close to VA. Pets OK.
(615)943-2825
2BR/2BA BRICK home
�w/garage. Forest Country S/D.
1 Year lease req'd. No pets.
$1,100 mo. 386-752-6082
A 4BR 3BA HUD Home!
ONLY $217/mo!!
5%dn 15yrs @ 8%apr for listings
800-366-9783 ext 7782
Apt. & MH for rent. Shady areas
in FT. White. 1st & dep. Apt.
2b/lba $575. & MH 3b/2ba $675.
NO PETS! 386-497-1116.
Beautiful newer brick home on 5
acres. Outbuildings. 1262 SW
Wendy Terrace. $1250 + sec.dep.
386.344.3715 or 965.0276. *
lBr/1-1/2Ba Cabin. Quiet setting
on wooded acreage near Itchetuck-
nee River. Well Kept. Non Smok-
ing environment. $500 mo. 1st
plus Dep. Call 386-590-4050
Clean, quiet, charming,
close in. 3/2 CH/A.
Call for details
386-755-0819
CUSTOM 4BR/3.5BA
on 5+ acres. $2,500 mo + security
& dep. Possible purchase option.
386-365-4307

Large 3 BR 2 BA downtown Lake
City, fenced yard, A/C, enclosed .
pool, no pets: $800/mo + $800 sec
deposit. 386-623-2642
TOTALLY UPDATED home for
rent 4BR/3BA, 2 story,
over 3,300 s.f., 4 acres, park-like
setting. Close to 1-75. 10 minutes
to Lake City or 35 to Gainesville.
$1,650/mo.. or purchase.
Call Sandy Kishton. Daniel
Cranes Aencv 386-344-0433.










Classified Department: 755-5440


CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


750 Business &
SOffice Rentals

Office/Warehouse
Space for Rent
1000 Sqfl. at $425/Mo. Located
behind Hwy Patrol, on
Arlington Blvd. going toward
middle school. 386-752-6806

3200 sq. ft. warehouse/metal bldg.
for rent. Iwy frontage & loading
base. $1650.00 monthly. 386-867-
1212 cell or 755-2556 office.
MUST LEASE!
Long Term leasing or short term
rental available. Best use is office
Space, can be retail. Location East
Baya Ave. Call for special pricing.
Weekdays 904-579-6645 or
386-497-4762 Weekends
MUST LEASE!
Long Term leasing or short term
rental available. Best use is office
Space, can be retail. Location East
Baya Ave. Call for special pricing.
Weekdays 904-579-6645 or
386-497-4762 Weekends
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$700/mo. plus tax.
Call Bob 386-752-9086
Retail Space
Heavy traffic area
800 Sf. & 1600 Sqft.
Call for quotes 1-800-342-0135

790 Vacation Rentals
Scallops Special Horseshoe
Beach Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg
waterfront porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$307/mo. $29.900. 352-215-1018
FOR SALE 1 acre land w/old
house selling "AS IS" on comer of
Lapaz and 242. Taking Bids.
For more info call (423)360-3396
Owner Financing Ft. White 5ac.
$79,995, $995 dn. $574.17 mo.
Paved Rd. Wooded, Homes only
vargasrealty.com (305)292-0550


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
1 18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
.newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-


805 Lots for Sale
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
504331. IS
3Br/2Ba with Appliances built
on your lot. $59,900. Visit:
www.dugardconstruction.com
or call 904-259-5008


I


810 Home for Sale


REDUCED-PERFECT HOME
$121,900
1002 SW Yorktown Glen
4BR1 / 2 BA
Call for Apt.
386-755-0037 or 904-349-1302
inlo@markbusher.com

MARK MUSI-s ER



2.5 yr old 3 BR/2BA, Cypress
Landing, 2 car garage, roughly
1,400 sqft., patio, 1g. living & kit.
area: 386-438-4822/386-697-4336
3/2 Block on Saturn Ln. , 5 ac,
new paint in & out, extra P/P, sep-
tic & well. I mi. north of the new
Food Lion. 877-231-0080 or 386-
754-0800/386-755-7773 $122,000
3br/2ba 2 story brick, in ground
pool. 4.6 ac. Very Ig workshop.
Old Wire Rd. $150,000 obo. Own-
er Financing w/$25,000 down. .
386-365-4353 or 850-663-2192
OWNER WILL FINANCE
2br/lba, home w/office & Florida
room on corner lot. $59,500
566 SE Monroe St. 386-867-0048
QUICK SALE!
1628 sq. ft. with efficiency apt..
559 Gwen Lake, totally remod-
eled, Must see. 813-541-3935.


ACCREDITED REAL
ESTATE SERVICES, LLC.
LAKE CITY
' 3BR/1BA- 1038 SF
$575.00
' 4BR/2BA - 1539 SF
$1050.00
- 4BR/2BA- 1568 SF
$995.00
- 2BR/1.5BA- 975 SF.
$695.00
LIVE OAK
'I 1BR/1BA - 500SF
$395.00
ALL UTILITIES ARE $75 PER
MONTH EXTRA
WHITE SPRINGS
'k 3BR/2BA - 1987 SF
$950,00
MADISON
'k 2BR/1BA
JUST REMODELED
$495.00 (2 available)
' 3BR/1.5 BA
REMODELED
$595.00

Call Mitchell Lee
386-867-1155
Accredited Real
Estate Services
369 W. Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055
Accredited Real Estate Services
is a

EOUAL HOUSING
LENDER REALTOR'
Service Real Estate
Of-
fice.
We do .
Rent-
als --
Property, Management --
Property Sales


tare wmcn is vtlation oI mie Only $701./mo 352-215-1018.
BRICK HOME. 4br.2ba. nice www.Laind-Owner-F:. ,. c .......
- i family neighborhood ."hear Gwen
n IEn . l. l . Lake. Fenced yard, outdoor 4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
storage. Excellent condition. Gorgeous Oaks! Great area!
i n M an I L e Move in ready. $129,000. Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
Owner/Realtor. 386-965-0763 $74,900. $657mo 352-215-1018.
WWWikeCityrleporter.com www.Land-Owner-Financing.com

IrT'J - , ,


LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIFIED ADS
386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293


ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO
ads@lakecityreporter.com

Mon.-Fri.. 8 a.m.- 5:00 p.m..

THIS REPORTER WORKS FOR YOU!



180 East Duval St
Lake City, FLorida 32055


It's quick and easy.


820 Farnms &
2h Acreage
MUST SIELL! 5 acres Located
near ltchetucknee North entrance
$35.000 FIRM.
(772)519-1342
Owner Financed
Half-acre to 10 acre lots
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

920 Auto Parts
& Supplies
3 NICE truck tires, good tread
LT235 X 85 X 16 4 ply
general grabber $110.obo
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

950 Cars for Sale
2001 VW Beetle. Diesel, auto.
Under 64K mi. Great MPG. 6 disc
changer. 2 new tires & battery.
$6,500 cash. 386-752-7177.
92 CUTLASS Ciera Olds.
4dr. Runs good.
$1000.obo.
386-590-1883
* Easy Auto Loans
Bad Credit OK- 99% approval
$500.00 down. Call Ken
352-486-1331 or 352-949-9098
Honda 97 Civic $400!
Police Impounds from $500!
for listings
800-366-9813 ext A760



Contact us

at the paper.


Share Photos
Of ,.:L' fa fil'1,,
friends and
community


3.) Click:


Submit Events
to be posted on
our online
calendar


Comment and
conrwect with
'other local
online users on
our guest book


Submit Photos


4.) Attach your photo (Choose File)

5.) Select the best album for your photo

6.) Complete the form and Submit
Albums will change during the year.
Most photos will remain online for at least one month.

Pholo Gallery > Sunmit a Photo
,subm inl yot r photo m ur oE ;,nt.o p al p y Al p'se i t eappovfe Ry o, t Web siaft ' hicforo ',y wa twair o:-
Shumltotapholo thisGaIn tO 'igCurraing "' e yoay o accept mages -i te Je,, fcrma, thmik ycuai
Cioose ile no file selected
PotPhtots Bilds _
Name: .

Email:
T0 The title is the name of your photo.

Phtographo,

CaotlIon
The caption is the description of your photo
that will be seen by viewers.


iPhoto Gallery Home


Send in your favorite photos

and share them with everyone!


Sunbelt Chysler, Dodge, Jeep has been
given special permission to accept
trade-ins that may otherwise not
qualify for the government's

Car Allowance Rebate System.

So even if other dealerships have

told you 'NO' Sunbelt Chrysler,

Dodge, Jeep says I
'Other Dealership SUNBELT CDJ

Is your clukeC E No
more then 25 Y
years old?
Does your cIUlIer NO
have a combined Y MES
fuel economy of -
19mpg or more?
Has your clunker NO
been uninsured
and withloul a lag YES
during the past 12
months?
Was your clunker's NO
tiule in someone YES
else's name during
the past 12 months?


201 /MO. I241 /Mo. I305/Mo.


. I'r,







Chrysler * Dodge * Jeep


HWY 90 W * Lake City, FL

(386) 755-3444

wwww.Sunbeltchrysler.com
'Payments based on $9 000 down colhbinec CARS funds and
trade equity financed for 72 monins at 8%APR WA C


Ready to move in - New 3/2 Brick
home Lake Jeffery Area 2200 total
sq ft. Come see this house or
have one built to your specs
386-752-5035 x2810
7 days 7-7 AA Bar Sales, Inc.
REDUCED! Owner Motivated
2br/2ba on 10 ac. w/garage; 2 out
buildings. $169,900 Will consider
any reasonable offer 386-935-4205
Time to use your noggin or some
asset to buy new spec. home, on 1
acre, in exclusive s/d. On 47; 3 or
4br/3ba,, 2:500 sq. ft. cond.,
3,500 sq. ft. floor. Red $379 K. to
$299 K; Qwner finan. land trade,
and/or $8.000. Stimulus Possible!
Be Smart! 386-752-1364.

820 Farms &
Acreage
04533338
5 AC on Branford Hwy
(S.R. 247). Great location, close
to Lake City. Cleared, with well
and power. Won't last long at
only $59,900. Call Maston
Crapps at Daniel Crapps
Agency, Inc. (Realtor)
386-365-1444.

4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well. Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $79,900.


1.) Go to www.lakecityreporter.com

2.) Click the "Share Photos" icon






,, .,'
li0w . _, ,,a E a i - .. '" '












Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmnoyet@olkecidyeporter.com


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, July 26, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


GARDEN TALK







Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Sustainable,

beautiful

and Florida

friendly

Florida-Friendly
Landscaping
is a University
of Florida
Extension pro-
gram. The mission of the
program is to "educate
Floridians about science-
based, environmentally
friendly landscaping prac-
tices." Floridians are
encouraged to conserve
and protect our water
resources by using the
FFL principles in their own
landscapes.
There are a couple of
main concepts in the mis-
sion statement that are
especially important to me
and the messages that I
pass on to all of my clients
in the county. The informa-
tion to which people have
access through UF/IFAS
Extension is based on sci-
ence and research, and that
means it is the most reli-
able working knowledge
that we presently have.
The best practices taught
by UF Extension Faculty
in every county help all of
us protect Florida's surface
and ground water.
There are nine prin-
ciples of Florida-Friendly
Landscaping that help us
manage our lawns and
gardens so that they are
beautiful, healthy, and have
little negative impact on the
greater environment. Read
more about these prin-
ciples and how they canl
help you become a more
efficient gardener by going
to http://fyn.ifas.ufl. edu
These nine FFL prin-
ciples are:
1. right plant, right place
2. water efficiently
3. fertilize appropriately
4. mulch
5. attract wildlife
6. manage yard pests
Responsibly
7. recycle
8. reduce storm water
runoff
9. protect the waterfront
I would like to expand a
little on the first principle,
"Right Plant, Right Place."
Have you ever purchased
that beautiful plant at the
garden center and then,
after planting it, it starts
looking sick? It just keeps
'getting worse every day
so you give it more water,
more fertilizer, more water,
more fertilizer. ... Unless
you figure out that the site
conditions are wrong for
your beautiful little plant, it
dies and you blame it on a
black thumb.
My favorite part of land-
scaping is choosing the
plants I am going to enjoy
every day. (No, not digging
the holes!) Our climate in
North Florida supports so
many different and exciting
plant varieties. But to be
successful, we need to first
match plants to the site .
where they will be planted.
Sun/shade and dry/moist
are major considerations.
But also consider what
the needs are of the other
plants growing in the same
area. If you plant a drought
tolerant plant beside a plant
that requires regular sup-
plementary watering, what
are the consequences? If a
native plant that requires


SUSTAIN continued on D6


N. Florida man trades chips with celebs in World Series of Poker


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Some people
dream of throw-
ing a touchdown
pass in a Super
Bowl. Others
would like to hit a home
run during Game Seven
of the World Series. Then
there's Brad Patterson.
His dream? Sitting at
the final table of the World
Series of Poker against the
game's greats.
Patterson recently had
the experience of playing
out that dream by travel-
ing from North Florida
to compete in the 2009
World Series of Poker in
Las Vegas, as featured on
ESPN.
The July 4 holiday tour-
nament, which hosted
6,494 of the top poker
players in the world for a
multi-million dollar payoff,
marked Patterson's first
trip to Vegas. Fromthe .
start, Patterson knew the,
trip was going to be some-
thing special.
"When I initially got
there, they were having
a charity tournament,"
Patterson said. "I saw Matt
Damon and I believe (Ben)
Affleck was there as well,
among other guys."
Vegas was already
showing its colors, and
the Main Event was yet to
take place. He knew this
wasn't anything like home
in Florida.


S . .BRANDON FINLEYILake O.i Reportlr
Brad Patterson competed in the 2009 World Seriesof Poker's Main Event as featured on ESPN in Las Vegas during the week


of July 4.,

* Patterson spent the first
day touring the city, but he
knew a grind was coming.
Some people may see
poker as a leisure activity,
but for professionals , it is
grueling eight-phis hour
days, Patterson said.
The first round of the
tournament was so full
that Day: One had to be


split into four different
.groups.
"I played on Day 1B,"
Patterson said. "We started
about noon that day and
played until after 10:30
p.m. that night. We were
able to take a break every
two hours for about twenty
minutes."
Patterson's tournament


nearly ended early as he,
found himself in a rough
situation on the first day.
"I actually about went
out pretty early," Patterson
said. But a lucky ace later
gave Patterson a big chip
stack heading into Day
Two.
It took four days to fin-
ish Day One of the tourna-


ment, but when Day'Two
began, Patterson was sit-
ting in good shape ahead
of most players in chips.
But Patterson caught
a bad break on Day Two,
which crippled his chip
stack.

POKER continued on D6


28 finalists named in '7 Wonders of Nature' poll


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Matterhorn mountain, one of the finalists, is seen on a screen, as Swiss Bernard Weber,
founder and president of the "New 7 wonder" campaign, announces the 28 finalists of the
New 7 Wonders of Nature global campaign in Zurich, Switzerland on Tuesday.


By ELIANE ENGELER.
Associated Press
GENEVA - The Grand
Canyon, the Matterhorn
and the Great Barrier
Reef are competing with
25 other spectacular
natural landmarks in the
final phase of the global
poll to choose the "New 7
Wonders of Nature."
The Amazon rainforest,
the Dead Sea, Mount
Kilimanjaro in Africa and
Ecuador's. Galapagos
islands are also among
the finalists, according
to the organization New
7 Wonders led by Swiss
adventurer Bernard
Weber.
People can vote by


Internet or phone. The
winners will be announced
in 2d11 and share in the
glory already enjoyed
by the seven man-made
wonders chosen two years
ago.
Over 1 billion people
are expected to join in
the voting, Weber said
Tuesday.
"This campaign
should contribute to the
appreciation - to the
knowledge - of our
environment and not just
the one in our country but
worldwide," he told The .
Associated Press. "If we or
our children want to save
anything, we should first

WONDERS continued on D6


ID


�� � "�









LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


Librarian: The perfect


career choice for me


A s a child, I
always took
the library
for granted.
I spent many
hours reading books and
attending the summer
programs at the public
library in Live Oak, never
having any idea that I
would one day make my
career as a librarian. As the
new research coordinator
at Lake City Community
College's library, I am
confident in my decision to
pursue this career, although
it was not always an obvious
choice.
I graduated from
Suwannee High School in
2000 without any specific
plans. I knew I wanted to
go to college and I toyed
with the ideas of several
careers, including teaching
or nutrition. I attended
North Florida Community
College to get my associate
in arts degree. This gave
me time to decide on my
next step. A community
college is a great way to
acclimate to college life
because there are many
options available in the
technical, occupational and
arts areas of study without
the larger financial and
geographic commitment of
a larger university. While at
NFCC, I met an employee
in the library who was
working on her master's
in library and information
science (MLIS). After
learning about the program,
I became fascinated with
it It never occurred to me
that there could be a career
in libraries despite the fact
that I had spent so much
time in them.
After graduating from
NFCC, I transferred to
FSU. I chose to focus on
history for my bachelor of,
arts degree because history.


Christine Boatwright
has always been interesting
to me even though I .
decided that I was not
going to teach. Like anyone,
I was uncertain that I was
making the right decisions.
I kept going and graduated
in 2005. By this time, I was
ready for a break from
school and decided to
take A year off to work in
a library. I wanted to make
sure I was ready to invest
so much time and effort
into a career in libraries.
I began working in the
Suwannee River Regional
Library system in June
2005 as a library aide and
loved it Libraries are all
about public service and
being flexible is a must
Despite the stereotypes,
I found that it was never
boring and rarely quiet in
a public library and I never
wore a bun and shushed
people. Libraries require
patience, tolerance and a
little creativity..
After working at the
library in Live Oak for a .
year, I began work on my
master's degree. One of
the best things about FSU's
College of Information is
the availability of an online
curriculum. I received my
master's degree online
while working full time in
Live Oak. This option is
becoming more popular
with many programs
because our lives are so
busy with work, family
and everything else and
most people can't afford


to quit work for school. I
graduated December 2008
with my MLIS and I've
learned that anything is
possible with hard work
and determination.
I've worked with Lake
City Community College
since May 2009 and enjoy
working for the library. Ifs
a great atmosphere and I
was pleased to learn that
the library staff here is just
as concerned with serving
the community as they ,
are students. There is so
much available to everyone
including art, music, DVDs,
audiobooks, fiction and of
course a large collection
of nonfiction academic
books ranging from nursing
to cooking to financial
planning. We also have
wireless Internet and public
access computers available.
For those interested in
genealogy we have the Lake
City Reporter on microfilm
dating back to 1901.
One of the most exciting
aspects of my new job
is that the college will
soon begin building a
neW 35,000-square-foot
library and media center,
three times the size of the
current building. The new
library will allow for more
comfortable seating and
study areas as well as more
computers'.
Though I've only worked
with LCCC a couple of
months, I appreciate the
changes taking place and
am glad to have come as far
as I have. While I can't say
that being a librarian is the
ideal'career for everyone, I
have to say that it is perfect
for me and I'm pleased with
my position as LCCC's new
research librarian.

m Christine Boatright is coor-
dinator of library research at
Lake City Community College.


Young girl wins country showdown


From staff reports

LIVE OAK - Emily .
Brook is the 2009 Colgate
County Showdown North
Florida finalist. '
"I just love perform-
ing," Emily said later


after she learned she will
be representing North
"Florida in the state finals
Oct. 25 in Pensacola..
Colby Craig of Lake
City was named first
runner-up in the North
Florida competition.


The event was spon-
sored by WQHL 98.1-
and the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park.
Kevin Thomas, WQHL
radio personality, was the
emcee for the exciting
event. '


BIRTH.


HAYDEN CLAYTON
JONES
Kyle and Della Jones
announce the birth of
their son Hayden Clayton
Jones June 18, 2009, in East
Cooper Regional Medical'


Center, Mount Pleasrnt,
S.C .
He weighed 7. pounds,
1 ounce and measured 19
inches.
Grandparents are Gene
and Beth Bullard, Buddy
and Cindy Clayton and


Eric Jones
Great Grandparents are
James and Thelma Bray,
'Talmadge and Gladys
Bullard, James and Marie-
Clayton, Jim ,and Sandra
Lastinger'and Catherine
Pender.


WEDDING


. Aso


LAND-DACONCEICAO
Laura Keating Land and Danie
DaConceicao of Tampa were uni
marriage on Feb. 21, 2009, on th
at Carlouzl Yacht Club in Clearw
bride is the daughter of Judge H
Jr. and Mrs. Nell K J. Land, of M
groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs
Daconceicao of Palm Coast. The


was giver in marriage by her family. Rev.
Canon Gary Marshall of Orlando offici-
ated the ceremony. Garrison Groughton
Land of Lake City escorted the mother
of the bride. The bride's best man was
H. Broughton Land and Meredith H.
Broughton Land of Tampa was the
maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Emily
Combs of Jacksonville, Heather Lohbeck
of Jacksonville and Melinda Monaco of
Tampa. Groomsmen were Manny Banco
of Kenilworth, N.J., Kristopher Jackson of
Courtesy Photo Tampa, Manny Goncalves of Kenilworth,
NJ. Matron of the groom was Rosa Branco
of Kenilworth, N.J. Jackie H. Ross was the
wedding director. The musician was the
el Alafia Music Group. The reception was
ted in held at Carlouel Yacht Club. The bride
e beach is a graduate of Florida State University
water . The and currently is a proposal manager at
arlow H., Doosan Hydrotechnology, Inc. The groom
[ayo. The. a graduate of the University of Tampa
. George and currently is director of operations for
bride . Outcomes, Inc.


ENGAGEMENTS

CHRISTIE-OGBURN
Woody and Connie Christie of Lake City .
announce the engagement and approach- 7 i
ing marriage of their daughter, Deborah .- ,
Ann Christie of Lake City to Bailey Edward'
Ogburn of White Springs, the son of Joseph \
and Tammy Ogburn of White Springs. The -
wedding is planned for 3:30 p.m. on Aug.
15, at Stephen Foster State Park in White
Springs. A reception will follow at PCS
Conference Center in White Springs. Courtesy Photo


KING-MCCALLISTER
Carl and Debra King of Ft White
announce the engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daughter, Casie
Marie King of Fort White to Matthew.
Jackson McCallister of Live Oak, son of
Donny and Kathy McCallister of Live Oak.
The wedding is planned for Saturday,
Aug. 1, 2009, at Mandi's.Chapel at Camp
Weed in Live Oak.
A reception will follow at the Varn CourtesyPhoto
Dining Hall at Camp Weed. Courtesy Photo
The bride-elect is a 2000 graduate of leadership program.
Columbia High School, a 2002 graduate The groom is a 1994 graduate of
of Lake City Community College and a Suwannee High School and a 2008 gradu-
2004 graduate of Thomas University. She ate of Sante Fe Community College. The
is currently employed as a physical educa- future groom is employed by Shands at the
tion teacher at Coluimbia High School and University of Florida as an RN in the neu-
coaches their varsity team and club vol- rological intensive care unit He plans to
leyball. The bride-elect is also employed as begin the RN-RS program at the University
a personal trainer and is a graduate of the of South Florida Sphool of Nursing in Aug.
American College of Education education 2009.


MURRILL -
ANDERSON
Jesse L. and C)
D. Muri-ill of Lak


announce the engagement
and approaching mar-
riage of their daughter,
Sarah Elizabeth Murrill of
Orem, Utah, to Kyle Dane
. Anderson of Provo, Utah,
son of John and Dana
Anderson of Hemet, Calif.
The wedding is planned '
for 10 a.m. on Aug. 15 at
� San Diego LDS Temple, San
Courtesy Photo Diego, Calif.
The reception will fol-
low at the home of Bill
and Delores Stromblad of
Hemet, Calif
Sarah is currently attend-
ythia ing Utah Valley University
e City. . and will graduate with a


bachelors degree in psy-
chology in 2011.
Kyle is currently attend-
ing Bringham Young
University and will graduate
with a master's degree in
psychology in 2011.
The couple will reside
in Provo, Utah to continue *
their education.


Courtesy Photo


Airman graduates

basic military academy


From staff reports

Air National Guard
Airman Steven E.
Beckman graduated from
basic military training at
Lackland Air Force Base,
San Antonio, Texas.
Beckman completed an
intensive, eight-week pro-
gram that included training
in military discipline and
studies, Air Force core val-
ues, physical fitness, and
basic warfare principles
and skills.


Airmen who complete
basic training earn four
credits toward an associate
in applied science degree
through the Community
College of the Air Force.
Beckman is the son of
Cheryl Beckman of S.W.
Summerhill Glen, Lake
City.
Beckman graduated in
2007 from Fort White High
School and received an
associate degree in 2008
from Lake City Community
College.


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Jessica Bell
Stephen Douglas
July 25, 2009
Casie King
Matthew McCallister
August 1, 2009
Amber Fike
Steven Khachigan
August 15,i 2009
Britnee Skinner
Dustin Bell
September 26, 2009
Amy Hizer
Richard Francis
November 7, 2009
Catherine Vann
Taylor Williamson
November 21, 2009

We know exactly what
they want in a wedding
or shower gift, We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.

WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
Historic Downtown
156 N. Marion Ave.
752-5470


Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424


i 4


i














SPOTLIGHT


Sunday, July 26, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


Annual Fine Art
Exhibition
From staff reports
LIVE OAK -The 13th
Annual Fine Art Exhibition will
be presented by the Live Oak
Artist Guild, from Sept. 14 to
Sept. 25, at the Suwannee
River Regional Library in Live
Oak.
A call for entries has gone
to local artists to enter their
recent works. Entry forms
are available at the Live
Oak Artist Guild, The Frame
Shop, The Rainbow's End
Art Supply, Thunder Alley
or LOAG.org. Categories
for entries include painting,
drawing, photography and
sculpture. The deadline to
enter is Aug. 28.
Please call the Live Oak
Artist Guild Gallery at 364-
5099 or go to LOAG.org.



'G-Force'

to make

guinea pigs

popular

By SUE MANNING
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES -The
Disney movie "G-Force"
shows a squad of specially
trained, computer-gener-
ated guinea pig spies com-
ing to the world's rescue.
After the movie comes out,
though, animal activists say
it will be real life guinea
pigs who need rescuing.
Some guinea pig res-
cue groups have already
posted pleas to those who
might rush out to buy the
furry little rodents. "I can
tell you, every single res-
cue in the United States
and abroad took a look
at that movie trailer and
said, 'Oh God, here we
go,"' said Whitney Potsus,
vice president of The
Critter Connection, Inc., in
Durham, Conn.
The Orange County
Cavy (aka guinea pig)
Haven in Costa Mesa has
already posted urgent
Internet pleas to parents
asking them to say no
when their children beg for
guinea pigs, because the
animals are too fragile for
young children.



Winehouse

in court

By MICHAEL BUSHNELL
.Associated Press
LONDON - A pros-
ecutor told a London
court Thursday that Amy
Winehouse punched a fan
with deliberate and unjus-
tifiable vio-
lence after
the woman




Winehouse singer
denied
assault, saying she was
simply trying to get away
from an intimidating fan.

accused of attacking anoth-
er guest at a charity ball
last September. Dancer
Sherene Flash alleges
she was hit in the eye by
the 25-year-old "Back to
Black" singer after asking
to take her picture follow-
ing the event in London's
Berkeley Square.
Prosecutor Lyall
Thompson said
Winehouse appeared to
be under the influence of
alcohol or "some other
substance" when she hit
Flash.
Thompson said


Winehouse initially agreed
to have her picture taken
by Flash, but may have
been angered when a
drunken friend of Flash
tried to get into the photo.


I'-e



ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this film publicity image released by Warner Bros., Isabelle Fuhrman is shown in a scene from, 'Orphan.'



Scares, dark laughs in 'Orphan'


By CHRISTY LEMIRE
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Esther is
unfailingly polite, a sensitive
painter and pianist, a vision of
traditional feminine charm in
her prim dresses and bows. But
this 9-year-old also has a way
with a hammer and a handgun
and knows a thing or two about
arson and destruction of evi-
dence.
Yes, she's complicated,
the little girl at the center of
"Orphan," a descendant from a
long line of cinematic evil chil-
dren. Still, despite similarities
to predecessors like "The Bad
Seed" and "The Omen;" this
well-crafted flick has frights all
its own.
Director Jaume Collet-Serra,
working from a devilishly clever
script by David Leslie Johnson,
maintains steady suspense
while mercifully mixing in some
moments of dark humor. He's
got a strong cast to work with in
Vera Farmiga, Peter Sarsgaard
and CCH Pounder (Claudette
from "The Shield"), but in
young Isabelle Fuhrmnan, he has
a formidable force. Fuhrman,
who was just 11 when she shot
"Orphan," can command the
screen with just a sunny smile


or a menacing glare. She's
called upon to do some gnarly
stuff here and more than rises
,to the challenge.
Sure, sometimes Esther
seems like an impossibly
unstoppable killing machine
like a Soviet-era spy in a pint-
size body but seeing how far
"Orphan" will go is part of the
fun.
Farmiga and Sarsgaard star
as Kate and John, a wealthy
Connecticut couple reeling from
the stillbirth of their third child.
Wanting to give all that love
to a child who needs it, they
decide to adopt the Russian-
born Esther, who's obviously
more than a little different from
the other girls at the orphan-
age. (Pounder plays the nun
who arranges the adoption.)
Still, that's much of the allure in
their eyes, that she is her. own
person.
When the couple brings her
home, their son, Danny (Jimmy
Bennett), immediately feels
threatened by her. (He has no
idea how right he is.) But their
other daughter, Max, takes to
her and in no time looks up to
her as a big sister. The char-
acter is hearing-impaired, as is
the actress playing her, Aryana
Engineer, who expresses so


much emotion by just widening
her eyes or scrunching down to
hide amid her stuffed animals.
She's adorable but she's also
crucial to showing us just how
rotten Esther truly is.
Soon, accidents start occur-
ring, flare-ups at school and
on the playground, and Esther
always happens to be around.
Kate grows suspicious but John
frustratingly fails to believe her,
the product of lingering mis-
trust because of her previous
alcoholism and irresponsibility.
You want to grab him by the
shoulders and shake him, he's .
so blind to Esther's wicked
ways, even as the damage wors-
ens.
- Then again, Esther's so
'sweetly manipulative; she's
hard to resist; in some of the
ridiculous moments she shares
with John, you don't know
whether to laugh with "Orphan"
or at it.
Farmiga runs and screams
and flails a lot, "Orphan" is
reminiscent of 2007's evil-child
thriller "Joshua," in which she
also starred as a besieged mom
but she also brings believability
to Kate's inner demons, which
are so relevant to the way she
responds to the increasingly
dangerous Esther.


ON TELEVISION


Fans support'Idol's' Paula Abdul


By ERIN CARLSON
Associated Press

NEW YORK- The clock
is winding down to the judges'
round of "American Idol" audi-
tions - next month, the gates
will be opened for a new batch of
hopefuls. They'd do well to come
prepared: Paula Abdul might
not be around to dole out much-
needed hugs and kind words of
encouragement ,
The kooky, feel-good judge,
vyhose sweetness tempers the
tart-tongued Simon Cowell, is
reportedly unhappy about her
status on the top-rated talent
competition - and she wants her
frustration known. Abdul's man-
ager, David Sonenberg, dropped
an "Idol" bombshell last Friday
when he told The Los Angeles
Times' Web site that the longtime
judge may not be returning to the
upcoming ninth season.
The reason? According to
Sonenberg, she had not yet
received a proposal for a new
contract
"I find it under 'these circum-
stances particularly unusual; I
think unnecessarily hurtful," said
Sonenberg, who noted Abdul was
"not a happy camper" as a result
of stalled contract negotiations.
Abdul seems to be healing
her wounds on Twitter. After
Sonenberg's public statements, a
campaign of support sprung up
on the micro-blogging site, where
"KeepPaula" became a hot trend-
ing tropic. Among those joining
the effort were former "Idol"
contestants Anoop Desai, Danny
Gokey and Syesha Mercado.
Mercado, a finalist on season
seven, tweeted: "No Paula No
American Idol."
Abdul, who has over 725,000
followers on the site, responded
to her fans, gushing, "I'm actu-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 5 file photo, "American Idol" judge Paula Abdul arrives at
the American Idol Top 13 Party in Los Angeles.


ally moved 2 tears upon reading
the enormous amount of tweets
showing me your kindness, love,
& undying support."
Meanwhile, host Ryan Seacrest
,is making bank. The media
mogul signed a lucrative deal that
keeps him hosting "Idol" through
2012 as well as participating in
new projects. The announce-
ment, made last week, specified
no dollar figure, although The
Hollywood Reporter pegged the
deal at $45 million.
The other "Idol" judges
are Simon Cowell, Randy
Jackson and newcomer Kara
DioGuardi. Representatives for


Fox and the show's produc-
ers - 19 Entertainment and
FremantleMedia - declined to
comment on Abdul's situation.
Abdul's publicist, Jeff Ballard,
directed The Associated Press to
Sonenberg, who did not respond
to requests for comment.
"The perturbing thing of
this Paula Abdul news, of her
not coming back, is the sort of
implication that if Paula doesn't
come back, does this mean that
they're now relying on Kara to fill
that third seat?" mused Michael
Slezak, who blogs about "Idol"
for Entertainment Weekly maga-
zine's Web site.


BOOKS
.*'no a : ; '.,: , '. ' ,

1. "Best Friends Forever" by Jennifer
Weiner (Atria)
2.."Eclipse" by Stephenie Meyer (Little,
Brown and Company)
3. "Breaking Dawn" by Stephenie Meyer
(Little, Brown for Young Readers)
4. "Swimsuit" by James Patterson,
Maxine Paetro (Little, Brown)
5. "Black Hills" by Nora Roberts (G.P.
Putnam's Sons) (F-H)
6. "Finger Lickin' Fifteen" by Janet
Evanovich (St. Martin's)
7. "L.A. Candy" by Lauren Conrad
(HarperCollins)
8. "The Help" by Kathryn Stockett
(Putnam/Amy Einhorn)
9. "Rain Gods" by James Lee Burke
(Simon & Schuster)
10. "The Doomsday Key: A Novel" by
James Rollins (William Morrow)
11. 'The Last Olympian" by Rick Riordan
(Disney Hyperion Books for Children)
. 12. "The Apostle: A Thriller" by Brad
Thor (Atria)
13. 'The Devil's Punchbowl" by Greg
lies (Scribner)
14. "Dead and Gone" by Charlaine
Harris (Ace)
15. "Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Last
Straw" by Jeff Kinney (Amulet)

NON-FICTION

1. "Unmasked: The Final Years of Michael
Jackson" by lan Halperin (Simon Spotlight
Entertainment),
2. "Outliers: The Story of Success" by
Malcolm Gladwell (Little, Brown)
3. "Liberty and Tyranny: A Conservative
Manifesto" by Mark R. Levin (Threshold
Editions)
4"Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man:
What Men Really Think About Love,
Relationships, Intimacy, and Commitment",
by SteVe Harvey (Amistad)
5. "StrengthsFinder 2.0: A New and
Upgraded Edition of the Online Test from
Gallup's Now, Discover Your Strengths" by
Tom Rath (Gallup Press)
6. "Catastrophe" by Dick Morris, Eileen
McGann (Harper)
7. 'The Last Lecture" by Randy Pausch
with Jeffrey Zaslow (Hyperion)
8. 'The Accidental Billionaires: The
Founding of Facebook A Tale of Sex,
Money, Genius and Betrayal" by Ben
Mezrich (Doubleday)
9. "End of Overeating: Taking Control of
the Insatiable American Appetite" by David
Kessler (Rodale Books)
10. "Master Your Metabolism: The 3
Diet Secrets to Naturally Balancing Your
Hormones for a Hot and Healthy Body!"
by Jillian Michaels and Mariska van Aalst
(Crown)
11. "Horse Soldiers: The Extraordinary
Story of a Band of US Soldiers Who Rode
to Victory in Afghanistan" by Doug Stanton
(Scribner)
12. 'The Secret" by Rhonda Byrne (Atria)
13. "Mommywood" by Tori Spelling
(Simon Spotlight Entertainment) .
14. "Bobby and Jackie: A Love Story" by
C. David Heyman (Atria)
15. "Got Fight?: The .50 Zen Principles of
Hand-to-Face Combat" by Forrest Griffin,
Erich Krauss (William Morrow)



MOVIES
1. "Harry Potter & the Half Blood Prince,"
Warner Bros., $77,835,727, 4,325 locations,
$17,997 average, $158,022,354, one week.
2. "Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs," Fox,
$17,561,406, 3,817 locations, $4,601
average, $151,865,987, three weeks.
3. 'Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen,"
Paramount, $13,691;487, 3,857 locations,,
$3,550 average, $363,808,123, four weeks.
4. "Bruno," Universal, $8,318,385, 2,759
locations, $3,015 average, $49,533,475, two
weeks.
5. 'The Proposal," Disney, $8,289,707, 3,043
locations, $2,724 average, $128,083,273,
five weeks.
6. 'The Hangover," Warner Bros.,
$8,177,272, 2,667 locations, $3,066
average, $235,744,423, seven weeks.
7. "Public Enemies," Universal, $7,748,325,
3,118 locations, $2,485 average, *
$79,639,205, three weeks.
8. "Up," Disney, $3,172,014, 1,706 locations,
$1,859 average, $279,583,282, eight weeks.
9. "My Sister's Keeper," Warner Bros.,
$2,828,367, 1,967 locations, $1,438
average, $41,507,695, four weeks.
10. "I Love You Beth Cooper," Fox,
$2,766,863, 1,872 locations, $1,478
average, $10,363,239, two weeks.
11. 'The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3," Sony/
Columbia, $889,259, 610 locations, $1,458
average, $62,900,310, six weeks.
12. "(500) Days of Summer," Fox
Searchlight, $834,501, 27 locations, $30,907
average, $834,501, one week.
13. "Night at the Museum: Battle of the
Smithsonian," Fox, $759,571, 515 locations,


$1,475 average, $171,820,365, nine weeks.
14. 'The Hurt Locker," Summit, $740,224, 94
locations, $7,875 average, $2,148,619, four
weeks.
15. "Star Trek," Paramount, $690,639,'505
locations, $1,368 average, $253,164,613, 11
weeks.


3D











Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community .
Calendar item, contact Brandon
Lockett at 754-0424 or by -
e-mail at blockett@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Friends to host author
at library
The Friends of the
Columbia County Library's
Meet the Author Program is
scheduled to feature Glynn
Marsh Alam at 2 p.m. today.
She is the author of the
"Luanne Fogarty".mystery
series. The Columbia
County Public Library
is celebrating its 50th
Anniversary with this series
of talks by Florida authors.

Tuesday
Possibilities self-help
group meets Tuesdays
'A selfshelp group
facilitated by Life Coach
Judee Holmberg will
explore options for what's
next. It is scheduled for
7:30 p.m. every Tuesday at
Fort White.Town Hall. There
is no charge. Call (386)
497-3223.

Kiwanis Club meets
Tuesday at Women's
Club
The Kiwanis Club of Lake
City meets at noon every
Tuesday at the Women's
Club, 257 SE Hernando
Ave. Call (386) 365-8747, or
call Dennis Smith at (386)
365-8747.

Lions Club meets
Tuesday at Guangdong
The Lake City Lions Club
meets at the Guangdong
Chinese Restaurant in the
Lake City Mall at 7 p.m.
every Tuesday. Call 752-
2612 or (386) 497-3536.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Putting some light on the situation
Gary Pinkham,'a traffic department Supervisor, is perched 55 feet in the air while replacing a 45-pound street lamp along U.S.
Highway 90 Thursday afternoon.


Call (386) 752-5001.


VFW Post 2206 hosts UF Garderners are
Bingo available


VFW Post 2206 hosts
Bingo 1-4 p.m. Tuesday,
at 134 Forest Lawn Way.


The University of Florida
Master Gardeners are
at the Columbia County


Extension Office from 9
a.m. to noon every Tuesday,
Thursday and Friday. They
answer gardening questions
and conduct soil pH tests
free of charge. Call (386)
752-5384, or stop at the
UF/IFAS Extension Office


at the Columbia County.
fairgrounds.

Preschool storytime is
slated
Preschool storytime is
available from 3:30 to 4:30


p.m. every Tuesday at First
Baptist Church of Lake
City, 182 NE Justice St. All
children aged 4 years and
younger are invited to join the
fun, which includes a story,
craft and snack. Call (386)
752-5422.


Wednesday
Rotary Club of Lake City
to meet

The Rotary Club of
Downtown Lake City
meets at 7:15 a.m. each
Wednesday in the Lifestyle
Enrichment Center, 628.SE
Allison Court. Call (386)
755-7969.

Moose Lodge Bingo is
open for everyone
Bingo games at the
Moose Lodge, 624 NE
Williams, are open to
everyone. Games are'at
3 p.m., 6:45 and 7 p.m.
on every Wednesday and
Friday. There is free ice
tea and .coffee. Food is
available for purchase. Call
(386) 755-3730.

Thursday
Rotary Club to meet
The Rotary Club of Lake
City meets every Thursday
at noon at the Elks' Club,
309 NE Hernando Ave.
Visiting members and
guests are welcome. Call
Steve Smith at (386) 758-
9990.
Wildflower Cafe hosts
Jam Session

All musicians are invited
to a free jam session at 6.30
p.m. every Thursday at the
Wild Flower Cafe, 326 N.
Marion Avenue. Call (386)
754-1150.
American Legion Post
57 hosts bingo

American Legion Post 57
and Auxiliary Unit 57. Bingo.
begins at 3 p.m. and 6:45
p.m. every Sunday, Monday
and Thursday. Call (386)
288-2755.


Focus from labels to essentials for urban youth


By SAMANTHA GROSS
Associated Press
NEW YORK-
Herman Joseph's eyes
light up when he lists
some of his favorite cloth-
ing lines: True Religion.
Rock & Republic. 7 For
All Mankind.
Once, he even paid
$300 for a pair of black
and silver Gucci dress
shoes.
"I used to like to be
fly," the 19-year-old said
of his pricey wardrobe.
"It gave me confidence in
myself."
But now, sitting in the
Manhattan youth cen-
ter where he's working
toward getting his GED,
Joseph is wearing no-
name jeans. He, like sev-
eral of the other young
people in his program,
lost his job. They've been
talking less about who's
wearing what, and wear-
ing less of what's in style.
For young people from
low-income backgrounds,
often faced with paying
their own way and help-
ing support their families,
interest in designer labels
is waning as the econom-
ic downturn strains wal-
lets and helps boost the
appeal of frugality.
Staffers at programs
serving low-income youth
in Los Angeles, Detroit,
Chicago and New York
notice a reduced focus on
top labels, whether due
to dwindling resources
or changing tastes. It's a
shift away from decades-
old stereotypes of poor
kids obsessed.with bling
and brand labels.
While people with
lower incomes have dis-
proportionately sought
out high-end brands for
at least the last 18 years,
they've recently been
turning away from them,
said Marshal Cohen,
chief retail industry ana-
lyst at market researcher


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A shopper walks past the window at an Old Navy store in San Francisco op Tuesday. Old Navy, owned by Gap Inc., saw June
safes at stores open at least a year were down 7 percent from a year earlier, compared with a 10 percent drop for all Gap
businesses, which include its more-expensive namesake stores, Banana Republic and other brands. Old Navy carries the
least expensive clothing among Gap Inc.. stores.


NPD Group.
Spending on designer
wear by families earn-
ing between $15,000 and
$25,000 a year fell by 29
percent in 2008 from the
year before, according to
NPD.
That's a significantly
larger decline than for
any other income group


tracked by NPD. Families
earning between $50,000
and $100,000 yearly, for
example, spent an esti-
mated 7 percent less on
designer apparel in 2008
compared with the previ-
ous year.
The change has served
some retailers well.
Joseph and several others


at The Door youth center
in Manhattan say they
have switched to shop-
ping at more affordable
chains like Old Navy.
Old Navy, owned
by Gap Inc., saw June
sales at stores open at
least a year were down
7 percent from a year
earlier, compared with


a 10 percent drop for all
Gap businesses, which
include its more-expen- �
sive namesake stores,
Banana Republic and
other brands. Old Navy
carries the least expen-
sive clothing among Gap
Inc. stores.
At Abercrombie &
Fitch, which has long


marketed'itself as an
exclusive youth brand,
same-store sales fell 32
percent in June com-
pared to last year while
at the less-expensive
Aeropostale, those sales
were up 12 percent com-
pared to the year before.
Twenty-year-old Daryl
Salter, who also is study-
ing at The Door to get
his GED, says his friends
are bragging less about
their wardrobes. Before,
there was a common
refrain: "Man, I paid $500
for these. How much are
those? What you got on?"'
Salter's priorities also
changed as the economy,
worsened. He lost his job
as a dock worker, and
rent on the apartment he
shares with his mother
and sister in Brooklyn
has gone up to $600, a
month. Their family's
fridge is usually empty,
their phone line was cut
off and a generous cousin
has stopped giving him
money.
Now he holds himself
back from adding to his
collection of fashionable
baseball hats and hip
jeans focusing instead on
how he can help his 18-
year-old sister come up
with the cash to start col-
lege in the fall. His own
plans for starting college
are on hold.
At The Door, "there
was a certain period
when certain types of
clothing labels were
clearly more important
than anything else," even
among some of the poor-
est members, says Greg
Morris, a program direc-
tor at the center.
Now Morris says he's
hearing the young people
say: "We have to focus
our money on what's
most important right
now whether that's tak-
ing care qf bills, or taking
care of our kids, or taking
care of the rent."


LAK CTYREORER LIFE SUDYJLY2,09


Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424









Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009 5D


DEAR ABBY


Husband's gift for grandson


fails his wife's fun test


DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band, "Hugh," is wonderful
in every way except one.
He is extremely controlling
when it comes to money,
particularly on what we
spend on gifts for my grown
children and our baby grand-
son.
Not only does Hugh set
the dollar limit for birthday
and Christmas gifts, but he
insists on deciding WHAT
we give them. An example:
My grandson's first birthday
is coming up. Hugh told me
we're buying the child a $100
savings bond and will con-
tinue to do it every year.
This is certainly not a
"fun" gift! I had planned on
spending between $100 and
$150 on toys and clothes for
him - tangible gifts for him
to open. I'm not arguing the
fact that Hugh's suggestion
is sensible and the boy may
appreciate it someday, but
it's just not exciting.
Hugh and I make $140,000
a year between us. I work
full time, so I think I should
be able to do what I want,
within reason. What do you
think? -- WHERE'S THE
FUN IN UPSTATE NEW
YORK
DEAR WHERE'S THE
FUN: For a child's first few
birthdays, most little ones
are far more interested in
getting their hands into the
cake and frosting than open-
ing "exciting" gifts. Until
your grandson is a little
older, a few small, inexpen-
sive toys in colorful paper he


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

can rip open should be suffi-
cient. While it may be galling
to be "told" by your husband
what you can or cannot give
to your offspring, in this
case, I think you should
listen to.your pennywise
husband.
DEAR ABBY: Please
print this "act of kindness"
letter so the person who
helped me can get the prop-
er thanks he deserves.
My boyfriend and I went
out to a movie. As we got out
of my car, I noticed that one
of my tires was almost flat.
He decided to go ahead and
buy the tickets while I drove
to a nearby gas station to put
air in the tire. By the time I
got back to the parking lot,
the tire was completely flat,
and it had begun to drizzle.
I called my boyfriend on
his cell, only to have him tell
me he had already bought
the tickets, and he knew
nothing about changing a
tite. He said he'd wait inside
the theater and for me to
"hurry up." I stood there in
shock.
I knew nothing about
hanging a tire, either. A man
jogging by with his family on
their way to dinner saw my
distress, and sent his family


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Do something
to make a difference to
a group or a cause you
believe in. Your support
will bring back all sorts of
favorable input, help and
good will. Deal with any
disagreement you have so
it doesn't linger on.
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Put time and
effort into developing
something that can help
you get ahead financially.
Someone you are close to
will add to your respon-
sibilities. You will have
to juggle your time care-
fully.
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): You'll have
excess energy coupled
with added discipline to
take care of any task or
responsibility that comes
your way. Your competitive
edge will put anyone trying
to outmaneuver you in his
or her place.
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You may be.try-
ing to do something that
is a hard sell but it's the
baby steps you take that
will lead people to follow,
support and help. You may
feel stretched or under


THE LAST WORD

Eugenia Word

pressure but stick to your
schedule and everything
will get done on time.
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You'll have to spread
yourself a little thinner in
order to take care of press-
ing matters concerning
children or elders. You'll
gain insight by listening
to complaints and utilizing
your experience to fix what
isn't running smoothly.
Don't give in to a bully.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Before doing some-
thing out of the ordinary
that might have financial
consequences, talk to
someone experienced in
such matters. You have
a great idea but may not
really know what to do
with it. Don't let flattery
cause you to make a costly
mistake.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Concentrate on getting
ahead professionally. Avoid
letting personal troubles
take over, standing in the
way of your progress. You
need to clear the way if


ahead to get a table and dry
off while he stopped to help
me.
By then it was pouring
rain, so my'thank you to him
was brief. He wouldn't accept
anything for helping me
and ran to join his family. I
never got his name and have
regretted it ever since.
When I entered the the-
ater my boyfriend chewed
me out for making him miss
the first part of the show! All
I could think of during the
movie was how lucky that
Good Samaritan's wife was
to have such a kind husband,
and how silly I was to still be
sitting there with my jerk of
a boyfriend.
The gentleman who
helped me that evening
changed more than my tire.
He changed my life because
he made me realize the kind
of people I want to surround
myself with - people with
the compassion to help a
stranger, even if it means
doing it in the pouring.
rain. -- THANKFUL IN
LINCOLN, ILL.
DEAR THANKFUL: I,
too, hope the kind-hearted
man who stopped to help
sees your letter because he
is both selfless and gener-
ous. And I'm pleased you
learned the important life
lesson his good deed taught
you. For your boyfriend to
have left you standing alone
in the rain while he waited
inside the theater was not
only selfish and inconsider-
ate, but also dangerous.


you want to make the most
of a good thing.
SCORPIO (Oct.
23-Nov. 21): Don't
make too many plans
or you will fall short of
your goals. Travel plans
may backfire if you let
someone else make your
arrangements. A couple *
of changes at home and
you will be in someone's
good graces.
SAGIITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Financial
planning will put you in a
better position to network
and offer proposals. A ser-.
vice that you can provide
can be adapted to these
economic times and still
make a profit. Travel plans
may be delayed.
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You may
have to appease someone
who has been patiently
waiting for you to take a
break. Please someone
you care about by making
special plans that will make
up for lost time. Share your
success.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Emotional upset
will plague you. Avoid
overreacting or getting
worked up over nothing.
Someone you thought
you knew well will let you
down. Additional respon-
sibilities can be expected.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Follow your
heart if you want to get
ahead. Nothing is too great *
to accomplish if you are
willing to put in the time
and effort. A love relation-
ship may take a drastic
turn. Before letting this
dilemma consume you,
make sure it's worth it.


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


YOU ARE THERE By Lynn Lempel / Edited by Will Shortz


Across
1 Where to spot a
king or queen
5 __'-approved
9 Ridicule
13 Part of a college
application
18 Socialite with a
self-named
perfume
20 Versatile body
builders
22 Two-door
23 Lord's home
24 Corrupt
financier's
command?
26 Grocery store
lineup
28 Trading post
buys
29 Frequent figure
in Renaissance
art
30 Mama Bear at the
stove?
32 Part of 5-Across:
Abbr.
33 U.R.L. start
37 Starfish feature
38 "Catch-22"
bomber pilot
39 Crowning point
42 View ruiner
44 Disputed-
47 Pets with
dewlaps
49 Like Larry King,
. repeatedly
'50 Coaches
51 Word with beauty
or pizza
52 Dumber than
dumb 53 Heat
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


54 Alpo or Purina
* One?
56 Sanctioning assn.
for pugilists
57 Like many a 21-
Down
58 Percussion
instrument in
Off Broadway's
"Stomp"
59 Topic in tr-
anscendentalism
60 Members of la
familiar
61 Familiar flight
pattern
62 Painter Andrea
_ Sarto
63 Critical
64 Toxic spray
65 Give ___. shot
66 Droopy
67 In high esteem
69 U.S.S. Enterprise
title: Abbr.
70 Certain power
71 Post-O.R.
location
72 Greeting from
Smokey the
Bear?
74 Happy shouts
77 Good points
79 Pair of opposite
electric charges
80 Best Actress
nominee for
"Indochine"
81 Singer John with
the album
"Bruised
Orange"
82 Bacchus, notably
83 Agitated
84 "The Bald
Soprano".
dramatist
86 Schnauzer sounds
87 Poet Hughes


88 Cursor
attachment?
89 Some food
additives
90 Integral subj.
92 Pumpkin
grower's cry of
surprise?
95 "No problem!"
97 Something made
in the still of the
night?
100 Above: Lat.
101 Scheduled
activity at a
Vegas chapel?
106 Like "Have a
nice day!"
108 Greek moralizer
109 What drives you
to get better?
110 Fills to the gills
111 Waxes
112 Exam with 125
questions: Abbr.
113 Bygone
. depilatory
114 Douglas:___ .
first president of
Ireland

Down
1 Unfavorable
2 Clears
3 Songbird at an eye
drops factory?
4 Popular brand of
bouillon
5 Kind of port for a
PC
6 Daze
7 ___ Walcott, 1992
Literature
* Nobelist
8 nitrite
9 Gets set
10 Unfavorable,
11 Indifferent
12 Hatches, say
13 Capital subj.


14 From Polynesia
and environs
15 Globe : Boston ::
: Baltimore
16 Inclined
17 Happy shout
19 Bohemian
21 Cool sort
25 Part of 85-Down
27 Searches high
and low
30 Curator's
selection
31 Some have a
silver lining
32 Mean
34 Sodom or
Gomorrah?
35 Snake with
"lightning bolts"
on its .back
36 Baseball's
Martinez and
others
39 Culture medium
40 Triumphant spicy
meal for the
Three Little
Pigs?
41 Affliction
43 Relatives of kites
45 Mavie star with
the most Oscar
nominations (15)
46 Starter, perhaps
47 "___ a Spell on
You" (classic
1956 Screamin'
Jay Hawkins
song)
48 King Minos'
daughter who
aided Theseus
52 Sch. or hosp..
54 Disagree strongly
55 Pioneer
automaker
58 Fried rice
ingredients
60 Some church
income


61 Christopher
Columbus, in the
Indies
62 TiVo's, e.g.
63 Big-enough catch
66 Clear
68 First
commercially
successful
computer
69 Sometime
70 Darling family
pet
72 Early Coloradans


73'Draft picks ,
74 "Quality Is Our
* Recipe"
franchise
75 Not as good as.
claimed
76 Worked on a
shift, maybe
78 Held for later
disbursement, as
funds
80 Ngo Dinh ___,
South Vietnam's
first president
82 Plan of action


85 School,inits. in
Harlem since
1907
87 From that point
on
91 Earthy mixtures
92 Radiation
reducer
93 Kishkes
94 Big name in
daytime TV
96 Liechtenstein's
locale
97 Very dry


98 Biggest export of
,99.-Down
99 See 98-Down
101 Witch
102 "Give ___ the
play": "Hamlet"
103 Show presenter,
for short
104 "More later," on
a sched.
105 Still
107 Legal
conclusion?


Sudoku Puzzle #1512-M

1 2 3

4 3. 5 6

7 4 8

9 5 1 8 2

7 3

6 2 9 7 5

2 6 4

6 7 1 8

5 . 3
---00--- M--


Medium


Answers to last week's Sunday Crossword.

LAMA VIRIGIO LIMO ASPCA
ELEC U L EIEIS ARA PH 11L
MIDDLEOFENOWHERE PEROT
ONICE VIbOLET ONLEAVE
NEA NNE MED ICALCENTER

PAALM WOE A LEN RAPS
SPIRITUALLEADER RAHAL
TE H E ID I AI C T L I IIK EL

BEG 0INN UICNGOFTIME
ALFA RESEND AFTON AMP
BEANBAG BASTE ESTEE



ENDOFDECEMBER SL PRE1 I M R E
LOWGEA R CARESS EARED
BILS BROADWAYCLOSING
1 TDE IBET ISSUE ACTE
SIEEDSB LI DIS NIEITITIY P E ARg


JZ 16 1'1 t i LISE; I 1

13[ ; -, 6 L V 8 9




9L 6 L Z, V 9 8 C

8 L 8 6 .9 9 . Z tp L
189L$6LL91

9L~i?8996P

6P9L6LEt9C~








YU-Z ts W U 01innos nyopns


CELEBRITY CIPHER

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: U equals V
"KV FVO TMVJ JSHR GF CHUVEPRZ
LH.ER VC RSZ YHGZ PW? RSZ
VLLMVEROMPRF RV LXHF." -
CVVRAHXX'W GPTZ WPMYXZRHEF

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Humor is reason gone mad." - Groucho Marx "I
wasn't kissing her, I was just whispering in her mouth." - Chico Marx


ma.m on,


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 26, 2009


Us Weekly editor steps down __ 1


By JOCELYN NOVECK
AP National Writer
NEW YORK - In six
years as editor in chief
of Us Weekly, Janice Min
often found herself zeal-
ously watching young
women in airport lounges.
She wanted to be sure they
were reading her maga-
zine cover to cover.
"I was amazed at how
often they were reading
every last word," Min
says with a satisfied smile.


The celebrity editor, who
announced this week she
was stepping down to
pursue other, unspecified
opportunities, presided
over a two-thirds increase
in circulation during her
tenure, in part by recogniz-
ing that young, affluent
women like herself wanted
to read edgier, newsier
celebrity journalism - lots
of it.
For that, Min was hand-
somely rewarded - close
to $2 million, according to


some accounts (She won't
comment). But this is a
tough time for print media,
and though Us Weekly is
doing well, there have
been reports that Min
decided to leave partly
because her boss, Jann
Wenner, was unwilling
to keep paying her at the
same level.
True or not, Min is
probably one of the last
magazine editors to be
paid so well, says industry
analyst Samir Husni.


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter

Taking Stock in Children receives check
The Take Stock in Children Program received a check for $200 from the Columbia County
School District Association. Take Stock in Children strives to improve the lives of deserving,
low-income and at-risk children in Columbia County. Pictured are (from left) Carolyn Jones,
Dorothy Spradley and Manti Polvere.


POKER: Player learns to stick to day job


Continued From Page 11

"I ran into a big hand,"
Patterson said.
Patterson fell victim los-
ing by one card to a poker
professional, which would
ultimately be his downfall.
"The funny thing is that
I had a chance to put the
same guy out of the tour-
nament about 20 minutes
earlier, but he folded,"
Patterson said.
Even without finishing in
the money, Patterson' will
remember the trip for the
experience.
"It was a good time,"
Patterson said. "I had the
opportunity to meet tons of
professionals and celebri-
ties. I saw Brad Garrett,


Jennifer Tilly, Jason
Alexander and a lot of
poker players."
One thing that Patterson
also learned is that he'll
stick with his day job.
"I told everyone two
- things that I learned,"
Patterson said. "One thing
is that I'll never move to
Vegas. The other is that I'll
never play poker as a pro-
fession. It's a grind. There's
always someone watching
you, and. they study your
every move. You have to
study them and try to emu-
late them. If you don't bring
your game up to their level,
they're going to eat you
alive.


"By the time I was done
I was exhausted. I tell
everyone that out of the
nine people sitting at the
table, there were prob-
ably five better than I was.
These guys have degrees
from Boston College, and
they spend all day playing
poker on a computer for a
living."
In the end, Patterson
was better than 75 percent
of the field - he finished
above more than 4,494
people. But in poker, there
is only one winner.
Winning would have
been nice, Patterson said,
but for him it was all about
the experience.


WONDERS: Promote cultural diversity


Continued From Page 1
appreciate it"
The finalists also
include Azerbaijan's Mud
Volcanoes, Lebanon's Jeita
Grotto, Ireland's Moher
Cliffs and Germany's Black
Forest
A panel of experts chose
the finalists among the
77 nominees that gained
the most votes in an early
round of polling. People had
suggested 261 landmarks in
countries all over the world.
The panel chaired by
Federico Mayor, former
chief of UNESCO, the U.N.
Educational, Scientific and
Cultural Organization,
picked the finalists
depending on geographical'
balance, diversity and the
importance to human life.
Weber said he was happy
the nominees included
places that lie in more than
one country, such as the
Dead Sea or the Amazon


rainforest, which makes
people work together
across borders.
High voter participation
has come from Asian
countries, including
Indonesia, India,
Bangladesh and Vietnam,
as well as from Latin
America, he said.
"U.S. voters' participation
is always quite high," he
added.
Africa, where most
people vote by mobile
phones, has had thq biggest
increase in votes over the
last few weeks, Weber said.
Weber declined to give
- any specific numbers
of votes so far. But the
organization plans to
release details about voter
profiles later. Registration
on the Web site aims to
prevent people from voting
twice.
Around 100 million


people voted in the
selection of-the seven
manmade wonders in
2007. The winners were
the Colosseum, Italy; the
Great Wall of China; the Taj
Mahal, India; Petra, Jordan;
Christ the Redeemer
Statue, Brazil; Machu
Picchu, Peru; and the
Pyramid at Chichen Itza,
Mexico.
Choosing world wonders
has been a continuing
fascination over the
centuries. UNESCO keeps
updating its list of World
Heritage Sites, which now
totals 890 places.
The New 7 Wonders
campaign aims to promote
cultural diversity by
supporting, preserving
and restoring monuments
and natural sites. It relies
on private donations and
revenue from broadcasting
rights.


SUSTAIN: By keeping your yard 'green'


Continued From Page 1D

no fertilization is growing
among plants that need
regular feeding, what has
been gained by using a
native plant? Think in
terms of grouping plants
with like requirements so
you don't end up wasting
your time, energy and
money on extra mainte-
nance.
The FDEP Springs
Initiative has a wonderful
companion website
http://www.floridayards.
org where you can
find lots of tips for
landscaping. The site
has an extensive Florida-


friendly Plant Database
to help you choose just
the Right Plant. The
Interactive Yard program
will help you transform
your yard into a beautiful
Florida-Friendly
Landscape.
The UF/IFAS
Master Gardeners are
available to answer
gardening questions
on Tuesday, Thursday,
and Friday mornings at
the Columbia County
Extension Office or
by phone at 752-5384.
Join us at 6 p.m. on
Thursdayto learn about


composting yard waste.
You will make a compost
bin to take home from
this workshop. The fee is
$15 and preregistration is
required.
We are also having
another 'Make and Take'
Rain Barrel workshop
at 6 p.m. on Aug. 6.
This workshop will be
held at the Fort White
Community Center. The
$35 fee covers materials
and a ready-to-use rain
barrel. Space is limited
to 20 participants so call
752-5384 to reserve you
barrel.


'I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
'I
I


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter

'Courageous efforts' awarded.
Lake City Police Department Cpl. Tim Murphy (from left) stands with Lake City major Stephen
Witt, officer Jason Golub, and city employees Joseph Raulerson II and Tony Bell. Murphy,
Golub, Raulerson and Bell were recognized during the July 20 city council meeting for their
"Courageous Efforts" when attempted to resuscitate a driver involved in ,a car accident at
Lake DeSoto earlier this month.


- -- - - �------- -- -----�----

Z H U J X V L N DX SC S M
I
G D Q S Z U Y F W RH OP X
I
R R G LW A S H X AT W TQ

H C Z L M L T K R T A J D E

W T T E' T D N SEN E A Al

G N S B X Z E E E A R L G L

Z S E A W C M V D S W 0 I I

Y E F S E P A L N E E J F G

S I E S X F N E I X T X T H

E K L X O S R E E D I V S T

L O U T Y R O F R H H P K S

A 0 Y Y S L 0 R A C W Y H P


S C

P N

S V

B I



Name:


R P S E E R T M L A P J

M A M Y F Y T Y S V N O

S M E R R Y W H B U P N

N W D K L A J Y Y U Q S

ENTRY FORM


Phone Number:
A flu


I Address:
I " " Community.
I Subscriber: -- Yes - No Sore"
* - Lake City Reporter I

Winning is easy! Find these 15 'Christmas in July' related words
hidden in the word search above. Words can be found in the banners on the ads listed below.
I Then bring this completed form into the Lake City Reporter Office, 180 E Duval St, Lake City, I
I FL 32055 by 5:00 p.m. Monday, July 27, 2009 for your chance to win. I
&---------- - - . . .u m .. ...1



2ORDiSEA in July

WORD SEARCH


Free Delivery I Mil Box Store
TLDA 754-1110 1468 SW Main Blvd
cTLER 755-2642 Ste. 105
" A:t;, -",I." .r l . . 386-758-8801


--I


Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424