Group Title: Lake City reporter
Title: The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/00842
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Lake City reporter
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: January 28, 2009
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028308
Volume ID: VID00842
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ABZ6316
oclc - 33283560
alephbibnum - 000358016
lccn - sn 95047175
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







One Of The Best

000023 120209 ****3-DIGIT 32
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Le


City


Top Shelf
Fort White football
players named to
All-State roster.
Sports, I B






Reporter


Wednesday, January 28, 2009 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 135, No. 12 E 75 cents


Police officer shoots dog


LCPD sergeant tried
to avoid being bitten
by fighting canine.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City Police Department
officer shot a dog after the dog
tried to attack him as he and other
first responders attempted to
separate dogs who were fighting,
according to police reports.


School

board


approves
expansion

Projects at CHS
and Fort White to
total $2.5 million.
By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
The Columbia County
School Board approved
two new classroom expan-
sion projects Tuesday night,
that are set to begin: next
month.
The board awarded bids
for the eight-classroom
addition at Fort White
Elementary School and, a
classroom renovation proj-
ect at Columbia High School
Tuesday
night meet-
ing. The
FWES addi-
tion, was
awarded to
S Trenton-
Millikin based Gray
Construction, and the CHI
renovation was awarded to
Kelly Construction out of
SGainesville.
The i eight-classroom
addition at FWES will cost
the district approximately
$1.3 million, a little more
than $150,000 per class-
room. School superinten-
dent Mike Millikin said this
is noticeably lower than
the most recent, compara-
ble expansion at Westside
Elementary School when
the classrooms were built
for around $200,000.
"It's just a sign of the
downturn in the economy
and people wanting to
build," he said.
EXPANSION continued on 5A


The incident happened around
1:30 p.m. Tuesday at Martin Luther
King Jr. and Aberdeen streets.
Officers were dispatched to the
area because of calls to the police
department about dogs fighting.
Lake City Police Department offi-
cers Lt. Rudolph Davis, Cpl. David
Greear and Sgt. Keith Heston
responded to the call.
"When they arrived they found
three dogs attacking one dog,"
said Lake City Police Department
public information officer Lt. Joe


Moody. "Along with some assis-
tance from some of the neighbors,
they tried to pull the dogs off the
other dog."
Animal control officers arrived
at the scene and were able to help
the officers separate the dogs.
'When they were trying to get
control of the injured dog, which was
severely injured, one of the bulldogs
turned and attacked the officers
that were there," Moody said.
According to reports LCPD
officer Sgt. Keith Heston pulled


his .40-caliber service weapon
and fired a shot that killed the
menacing dog.
"No one was bitten," Moody said.
"Only one shot was fired, striking
the bulldog and killing it."
The dog, which attempted to
attack the first responders, did not
bite or scratch people at the scene,
so officials have not mandated'
precautionary rabies treatments.
Reports indicate animal control
personnel did ,not confiscate the
other dogs.'


In his own words


S .. JASON MATTHEW WALKERJL,3I.- 6 Rr..:.rl.
Bill Oberst Jr. entertains hundreds in his portrayal of Lewis Grizzard in 'Lewis Grizzard: In His Own Words' at the
Levy Performing Arts Center at Lake City Community College Tuesday night. 'The hardest thing about the Gulf
War was teaching Southerners to say Shi'ite,' he said. 'We'd been saying it the other way for so many years.'


Production brings to life
escapades and stories
of author Lewis Grizzard.,

By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@Iakecityreporter.com
ressed in a black sport
jacket and a red button-
up shirt, Lewis Grizzard
paced, the stage at Lake
City Connm unity'College
Tuesday night detailing his recent
escapades. I
"I ain't been all over the world, but
I've been some places," he said. "I was
in Olustee last night."
As Grizzard, Bill Oberst Jr. took
the stage in front of hundreds in
attendance Tuesday night and gave a
GRIZZARD continued on 6A


JASUN MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Oberst plays an older Grizzard in the second act who read from his
past columns and passages from his books. Grizzard intended to use
the scenes in his stage show before his death in 1994.


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Finally

Friday

kicks off
Year's first event
ties in with city's
150th anniversary.

By JEFF M. HARDISON
jhardison@lakecityreporter.com
The first Finally Friday
event of 2009 ties in with
the celebration of Lake
City's 150th anniversary and
with the Battle of Olustee
Festival and Re-enactment.
This event is free and open
to the public.
Roadhouse Live is the
band and it is scheduled
to start playing at 6 p.m. in
Olustee Park in downtown
Lake City. The movie -
"Shenandoah" with James
Stewart, Doug McClure
and Glenn Corbett begins
at 7:30 p.m.
FRIDAY continued on 5A


Roadwork in south of county to begin


Curb transition is
first part of project
with bridge on SR 47.
By JEFF M. HARDISON
jhardison@lakecityreporter.com
The sound of a power saw
cutting through asphalt and con-
crete Tuesday morning rever-
berated across the Santa Fe
River bridge on State Road 47
between Gilchrist and Columbia
County as a harbinger for work
scheduled to start next week.
Sylvester Holley and
Christopher Jones of Anderson


Columbia Co. were among the
crew that installed a curb transi-
tion on the Gilchrist County side
of the bridge.
This concrete structure,
said Florida Department of
Transportation Senior Inspector
Ronald Witt, deflects cars away
from the rail and back to the
road if they come in contact with
it The device improves safety on
the bridge.
Next week, according to DOT
spokeswoman Gina Busscher,
Anderson Columbia Co. is set to
start a 4.3-mile repaving project
going north from the bridge into
Columbia County on SR 47 to the


intersection of U.S. Highway 27
in downtown Fort White.
This job is scheduled to take
no more than 70 days, Busscher
said. The cost of the project is
$1.5 million, she said.
Another DOT project across
the Santa Fe River from Gilchrist
County goes into Suwannee
County. It is set to begin Feb. 2,
according to Busscher.
DOT will resurface nearly
three miles of U.S. Highway 129
in Suwannee County from the
Gilchrist County line at the Santa
Fe River bridge to the U.S. 27
ROADWORK continued on 5A


lJr~6mI
I~I


Sylvester Holley
uses a concrete
saw as Christopher
Jones (right) helps
Tuesday morning on
the Gilchrist County
side of the bridge
over the Santa
Fe River between
Columbia and
Gilchrist. Holley and
Jones are part of an
Anderson Columbia
Co. crew which
installed a concrete
curb transition
structure on


JEFF -. I the bridge.
JEFF M. HARDISONILake City Reporter


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


75 54
Chance of Showers
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion .
People ..........


Obituaries .
Advice & Comics
Puzzles .. .


6A
3B
. .... 4B


TODAY IN
SPORTS
Roddick bounces
defending champ.


COMING
THURSDAY
NASCAR revs -up
for Daytona 500.


1 '0 U 0 -I


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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2009


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 9-4-4
Evening: 9-2-5


.Siay ) Tuesday:
Afternoon: 8-1-6-2
' Evening: 5-6-4-8


Celebrity Birthdays


1*0 4-10-20-29-34


POPLE uM THE NEMW


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* Actor Alan Alda is 73.
* Actress Susan Howard is 67.
* Actress-singerBarbi
Benton is 59.
* FrenchPresident Nicolas
Sarkozy is 54.
* Rocksinger Sam Phillips
is 47.
* Rockmusician Dan Spitz
(Anthrax) is 46.
* Countrymusician Greg
Cook (Ricochet) is 44.
* Gospelsinger Marvin Sapp
is 42.


* Singer SarahMcLachlan
is 41.
* ActressKathryn Morris
S("Cold Case") is 40.
* Rhythm-and-bluessinger
Anthony Hamilton is 38.
* Rockmusician Brandon
Bush (Train) is 36.
* SingerJoey Fatone, Jr. ('N
Sync) is 32.
* RapperRick Ross is 32.
* Singer NickCarter
(Backstreet Boys) is 29.
* Actor Elijah Wood is 28.


Thought for Today


"Since when do we have to
agree with people to defend
them from injustice?"

Lillian Hellman,
American author and playwright (1905-1984)


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS, .
If you nave a news tip. call any member
ol r-e rnew-. tah or 752-5295. ;
Editor Tom Mayer ......-.. 754-0428
('nmaer @lake.lvieponrercorr i
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(Isfickland@Jakecityreporter.com).


CORRECTION


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters. .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks...................$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks.............. $41.40
24 Weeks...... .........$82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


4


The Lake City Ieporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,, please.
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
iii.ttlis space. AMfthfinks'for reading.


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Page Editor: Jerry Spaeder, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2009


Change to downtown ordinance moves ahead


POLICE REPORTS


By JEFF M. HARDISON
jhardison@lakecityreporter.com

After months of Lake City Code
Enforcement Officer Sandra Caslow
and Downtown Redevelopment
Manager Jackie Kite working with
the Downtown Action Corp., a revised
ordinance is moving forward.
And after a two-month hiatus, the
Downtown Development Committee
met on Tuesday night with its new
chair Melinda Moses. The com-
mittee had nothing to add beyond
its previous agenda of moving for-
ward with revising the city ordinance
related to outdoor restaurant seating,
outside sales and displays, and issues
related to sign regulations.
The Florida Department of
Transportation, Caslow reported, has
provided a letter of endorsement for
the new ordinance. The next step in
the process is for it to be reviewed by
the City Planning and Zoning Board,
which will either recommend rejec-
tion or approval of the ordinance
amendments to City Council.
Tivo readings at City Council will
give those five leaders a chance to


reject or approve the revisions. The
amended ordinance may be effec-
tive in March or April if all goes
smoothly.
Outside restaurant seating, sand-
wich board signs and outdoor displays
are all covered extensively in the new
ordinance. Among the alterations, the
DAC decides quality and other fac-
tors for the outdoor seating. Another
revision calls for permit applications
to be completed for outdoor seating,
sandwich signs and banner signs.
In another matter that has taken
months, the Downtown Development
Committee endorsed buying signs to
replace those which designated the
historic district. '
However, rather than abiding by the
city ordinance that says, "Only coun-
cil members on each of the respective
committees shall be eligible to vote
on recommendations which may be
submitted to the City Council for
further action," the group allowed a
motion and a second by people other
than the two City Council members
present Moses and George Ward.
The non-council members' duties
do not include making motions, sec-


onds or voting on matters for recom-
mendation, according to the ordi-
nance creating advisory committees.
On a motion by Lester McKellum,
seconded by Jody DuPree, the 11
members present indicated by voice
or by not saying anything that they
endorse buying two signs from a par-
ticular vendor.
The Community Redevelopment
Agency, which is made up of the City
Council members, will decide wheth-
er to accept that recommendation.
The Downtown Development
Committee recommended spend-
ing $20,000 on two signs, one on
the north end of the historic down-
town area and one at the corner of
Olustee Park, where the old sign was
removed,
Kilgore's Repair Shop, 370 NW
Railroad St, was the winning bid-
der at $20,000, although Universal
Signs of Daytona Beach bid about
$19,988. McKellum said he endorses
buying locally. DuPree said the costs
from installation and other factors not
included in the Universal bid would
have made it cost more than the
Kilgore bid.


Student sewing program teaches basic techniques,


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Sewing is a life skill that
can be used for decades.
From quilting to making
fabric alterations to home
decor, various sewing skills
can be used for everything
from everyday activities to
artwork.
TheSouthsideRecreation
Complex has added a pro-
gram where its after-school
students are being taught,
how to sew as well as how
to use sewing machines.
"We're working on
teaching the children how
to quilt and basic sewing
techniques," said Lorraine
Miller, who volunteers and
teaches the children how to
use the sewing machines.
Ellie Baker and Carol
Altenbaugh assist Miller
with teaching sewing tech-
niques. "We've been work-
ing with the children since
September and they've
been very enthusiastic."
The students participat-
ing in the sewing program
range from kindergarten-
aged children to children
who are in middle school.
As part .of the program
the children are learning
to sew by hand as well as
sewing with the use of elec-
tric sewing machines. O.J.
Lake Security, First Federal
Bank and Lake City Glass
donated seven, new sewing





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S. .. .
TONY BRITTILake City Reporter
Lorraine Miller (from left)' helps Jolyn Falgout and Alicia Martin set up a sewing machine as
part of a Southside Recreation Center after-school project.


machines for the program.
The program has also ben-
efited from fabric and sew-
ing material donations.
"So far this program hasn't
cost us very much because'
we depend on the generosity
,of others," Miller said.
Miller said the program
is also having a positive
impact on the participants'
character.
"The girls seem real
enthusiastic and they're get-


ting energized," Miller said:
"The program is bringing
out some positive aspects in
their personalities. They're
learning to be patient and to
be cautious."
Gene Perry, owner of
AmyGene's Embroidery
Studio, also donated a sew-
ing machine for the project
and attended last week's
after-school session.
"I think it's important
for those of us in business


in the community to help
the community to support
the needs of young peo-
ple," he said. "It's really
encouraging to see the
enthusiasm of the children
in learning a new skill. This
is a lifetime skill."


Arrest Log
The following information
was provided by local law
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted.
All people are presumed
innocent until proven guilty.
Thursday, Jan. 15
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
George Lake, 60, 914
NE Aberdeen St., warrant:
Violation of probation
on original charges of
possession of a controlled
substance and possession of
drug paraphernalia.
Wesley Douglas
Lane, 28, 2652 Malabo
Circle, Orange Park,
warrant; Burglary of an
occupied structure, uttering,
unauthorized use of a credit
card and false verification of
ownership of pawned items
(three counts).
Glennell Witcher, 49,
290 Voss Road, possession
of cocaine and possession of
drug paraphernalia.
James Earnest Coker,'
38, no address given,
possession of cocaine,
tampering with evidence and
resisting an officer without
violence.
Selina Marie Green,
39, 2551 U.S. Highway 441,
possession of a controlled
substance and tampering
with evidence.
Lake City
Police Department
Sidney Lamar Gibson,
31, 231 NW Joland Way,
battery on a law enforcement.
officer, resisting arrest with
violence and resisting arrest
without violence.
Friday, Jan. 16
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
William Dale Griffin,
no age provided, 143 SE


Lawrence Court, warrant:
Third-degree grand theft.
Gary Lee King, 51,
17700 U.S. Highway 441,
White Springs, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of lewd or
lascivious molestation.
Scotty Michael Hudgins,
21, 407 SE Monroe St.,
warrant: Sale in lieu of
methadone.
Richard Dalton Griffis,
19, 495 SW Lynwood
Ave., warrant: Violation of
probation on original charge
of possession of a controlled
substance.
Jermaine Lasaune
Fulton, 35, 612 SE Congress
St., possession of cocaine.
William Arthur Wiker,
26, 341 SW Durant St.,
Fort White, warrant: Fleeing
police officer in high speed
pursuit, felony driving while
license suspended/revoked
and warrant: Violation of
probation on original charge
of felony driving while license
suspended/revoked.
Saturday, Jan. 17
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Calvin Dewayne
Griffin, 40, 5337 NE 24th
Place, Gainesville, warrant:
Kidnapping adult for ransom,
battery, contempt of court,
burglary of a structure (two
counts) and obstructing
justice.
Tuesday, Jan. 20
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Ronald Aaron Geiger,'
30, 1659 NW Oakland St.,.
warrant: Criminal mischief..
Arin John Amat, 23,
6519 W. Newberry Road,
Gainesville, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of conspiracy
to commit armed robbery. I
From staff reports


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Aaiabefrm Commercia News Providers"


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3 UF PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIANS.
2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS.

I MORE REASON TO LOVE LAKE CITY.


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[,Presbyterian Church
W 'Baya Dr. Lake City. Florida
0670 fpclc@bellsouth.net
6iw". ^greslakecity.org


WORSHIP
Contemporary Worship
Traditional Worship
Sunday School


9:OOAM
11:00AM
10:OOAM


Lake City West
221 SW Stonegate Terrace
386.758.1709


Lake City SW
1283 SW State Rd 47. Suite 101
386.752.0579




UNIVERSITY OF

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sw PRIMARY CARE
Shands.org/lakeshore


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Page Editor: Jerry Spaeder, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


ReaUng, aLe, (reAi4Uf'Bady, Sma, Rea4t Cl 114-1 p i,4 "it.


LOCAL & NATION WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2009














OPINION


Wednesday, January 28, 2009


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Students

can shine

with FCAT

For thousands of
Columbia County
students, the Florida
Comprehensive
Assessment Test
is a little more than two
weeks away. And although
the writing exam is important
to all students, it has special
significance to 10th graders
- passing the test is required
for graduation.
Still, passing the Grade 10
FCAT is hardly one strike
and you're out. Even though
new changes eliminate this
summer's retake of the exam,
students will have four other
opportunities to make the
grade during the year.
We understand that not all
students are good test-takers.
Not all students will come
prepared the first time around.
.And additional changes mean
that the test is now essay only.
But with multiple chances
to score a satisfactory grade
- on the mandatory test, there
is certainly enough time to
placate opening day jitters,
crack open the books and
practice writing skills.
We wish all of students
in grades four, eight and 10
success on these milestone
tests. Feb. 10 is your
opportunity to shpwcase what'
you've learned.

HIGHLIGHTS
SI N HI S TO RY
Today is Wednesday, Jan. 28, the
28th day of 2009. There are 337
days left in the year.
In 1969,. a major oil spill off Santa
Barbara, Calif., occurred as a Union
Oil well blew out, sending oil and
natural gas into the Santa Barbara
Channel.
i In 1973, a cease-fire officially
went into effect in the Vietnam War.
In 1978, fire swept through the
historic downtown Coates House
hotel in Kansas City, Mo., killing
20 people.
In 1986, the space shuttle
Challenger exploded 73 seconds
after liftoff from Cape Canaveral,
killing all seven of its crew members:
flight commander Francis R. "Dick"
Scobee; pilot Michael Smith; Ronald
McNair; Ellison Onizuka; Judith
Resnik; Gregory Jarvis; and
schoolteacher Christa McAuliffe.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that o
the Lake City Reporter.


- BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


4A


Tom Mayer
tmayer@lakecityreportercom

Sunshine

doll fails

to inspire

Much news of
the weird
coming put of
Jacksonville
this week. And
it's not all fun and games.


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Make a play-date


But some of it is all fun and
Lf f ~games.
About once a week in my
house our family gets together
for game night. Ahd I mean
night: Monopoly can go on for
hours, and we've been known
to play a dozen rounds of
Yahtzee without a break.
But for simple socialization,
bonding and impromptu
learning experiences, nothing
-beats a good game of Twister
or Life. In our high-tech world,
it's a great way to spend some
'- low-tech time together.
It's little surprise, then, given
the worries we have today over
the economy, jobs, housing,
-* fuel costs and the degradation
of morals in general that more
people are again turning to
such old-fashioned fun. In
Jacksonville, they're paying for
the opportunity.
Call it innocence found, but
- PlayDate, is booming. Young
professionals, 30- and 40-
somethings, gather monthly
S in an upscale downtown hotel
to play games. Dancing and
S networking are options, but
favorite activities are Connect
Four, Scrabble, Jenga and
S Pictionary. For those up to .a
.challenge there's Operation,
Hungry Hippos, chess and
S checkers.
The last event, according to
The Associated Press, attracted
about 500 people willing to
part with $10 to revisit their
childhood. For a few hours you
S. get to be a kid again.
SI knew my family was on
to something the last time we
._ went looking for Trouble.


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All dolled up
Speaking of looking for
trouble, there's no way to
spin this next story to make it
palatable.
Call it innocence lost, but a
Jacksonville company, Showbiz
Promotions, is marketing a
Caylee Sunshine doll. The
blond-haired doll is, according
to the company, a tribute
to Caylee Anthony the
slain Florida toddler whose
mother is now sitting in prison
charged with murder.
For $29.99, you can own
the "inspirational Caylee doll,"
reports The Associated Press,
with some of the profit going
to an as-yet undesignated
charity.
The doll, according to
the company's Web site,
www.cayleedoll.com, is a
"remembrance of how we can
embrace a child that did not
get a chance to sing their song
in life." The doll sings lyrics to,
"You Are My Sunshine."
Despite the company's
pledge to fund-raise and the
reminder that, "every child is a
living doll, a precious gift from
above," maybe common sense
does prevail in the end.
Although the doll was
supposed to go on sale this
week, Showbiz Promotions
offered this release on its
Web site: after measuring the
"reaction to our fund raising
efforts ... we feel that it is best
to suspend the launch of The
Sunshine Caylee Doll."
But then again, maybe
there's more than common
sense behind this decision
there certainly wouldn't be
anything weird about that.
Tom Mayer is editor of the
Lake City Reporter.


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Page Editor: Jerry Spaeder, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER. LOCAL & BUSINESS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2009 5A



(OMIw akma A"( hrWp he aenoV ny FRIDAY: In Olustee Park
Continued From Page 1A


People are encouraged to
bring lawn chairs, blankets
and coolers with their own
food and drink.
There will be hot dogs,


soda, popcorn and either
coffee or hot chocolate
for sale. The event is spon-
sored by the Downtown
Action Corp.


~- .
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www.lakecityreporter.com


-Jack Burke's

"lee Surgeon, Inc.


Land Clearing ~ Lawn Service


386-961-9151


386-473-0495


Licensed.


Insured


SCopyrighted Material
,6 py Ign 9 it


5Syndicated Contentb
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Assisted Living & Adult Day Care
"Where Care Runs Deep"


Available from Commercial News Providers"


* Nursing Supervision
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* Creative Daily Activities


507 NW Hall of Fame Drive
Lake City, Florida
386 / 755.6560
A no-o-proflit nnsOian Crgama
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EXPANSION: Set to begin


Continued From Page 1A
The nearly $1.2 trillion
expansion at CHS will see
the conversion, of the old
cafeteria, agriculture shop,
old. teacher's lounge', and'
senior picnic area into
classrooms, as well as a
remodeling of the guid-
ance office. The renovation'
project will net the school
12 new classrooms.
'This will allow us to
eliminate most of the por-.
tables, which are well past
their useful time, and have
all of the students in the


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main building," said CHS
PrincipalTerryHuddleston.
He noted that it also will
allow officials to redesign
the ninth grade wing to
help them better transition
into the high school envi-
ronment:
Both projects will begin
next .month. Millilin said
the district is using con-
struction money for these
projects not many from
the general fund and is
money which must be spent
during this school year.


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ROADWORD: Projects set


Continued From Page 1I
intersection as well.
Anderson Columbia Co. of
Lake City has been hired by
the DOT to do the work at
a cost of $578,000. It should
be complete in 30 days, bar-
ring any weather delays
such as rain or extremely


cold temperatures.
Daytime lane closures
with flaggers directing traf-
fic will be required at both
sites, but will not be sched-
uled between 6:30 and
8:30 a.m. to accommodate
morning traffic.


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3.4 10 18.95 +.45 -7.2
6.1 13 10.82 +.08 -3.3
3.0 9 .29.66 +1.27 -8.7
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3.6 6 72.09 +.80 -2.5
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1.1 ... 3.55 +.22 -47.1
3.5 17 43.33 +.30 -4.3
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4.0 .:. 13.89 +.73 +14.7
3.5 ... 65.79 +1.24 +4.4
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3.5 12 50.78 +1.84 +.9
1.9 16 27.70 +.42 +6.3
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9.5 8 13.06' +.64 -19.4
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3.8 ... 22.88 +.40 -8.4
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Microsoft Nasd .52
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PepsiCo NY 1.70
Pfizer NY 1.28
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SPDR Amex 2.72
SFDR Fncl NY .58
TimeWam NY .25
WalMadr NY '.95
WellsFargo NY 1.36


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F-l"'n Av I. i A











Page Editor: Jerry Spaeder, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2009


Robert Harvey Haven
Robert Harvey Haven, age 86, of
Lake City, FL passed during the
night of January 6, 2009 at the
Haven Hospice
Care Center after
a long heroic
fight with the
rare disease, "
Progressive
Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). Born
in Hamilton Twp., NJ, he was
the only child of Harvey Lee
Haven and Johanna Pauline
Hansen, both from the Trenton,
NJ area. After graduation
from Hamilton High School,
he enlisted in the Army during-
World War II, served four years
including a year on Okinawa and
was discharged with the rank
of Tech/Sgt, 71st Heavy Mortar
Btn. The G.I. Bill provided the
opportunity for extensive training
in photography at the Yale School
of Photography, Hartford, CN
which he used with a business
partner John J. Mayer II to
establish Trenton Photographers,
a studio currently managed by
John J. Mayer III. To become
more proficient in his field, he
studibd atthe Winona Professional
School of Photography, Warsaw,
IN, a school managed by the
Professional Photographers of
America, Inc. and from which
he later received a Master of
Photography degree. He earned a
diploma in business management
from LaSalle Extension
UJniversity, Chicago, IL. He
served two terms as president of
the Professional Photographers
of NJ and six years as portrait
board member pf the Professional
Photographers of America. He
had the rare privilege -of being
elected honorary member of the
prestigious Royal Photographic
Society of Great Britain and
selected by Kodak to receive
the title Mr. Professional
Photographer of NJ. In
addition to receiving awards
for his prints, he started a local
photographers association and
lobbied successfully for special
legislation related to this field.
He retired at age 50 to travel
and photograph and later sell his
cibachrome prints to galleries.
He- moved to Lake City. from
Alexandria, VA in 1981. His
legacy is perpetuated in the
Robert H. Haven Dark Room
at the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center where free classes are
taught on the second Tuesday of
every month from 3:00 to 5:00
PM.. The room was purchased'
by his wife Dr. Betty Haven but
furnished by friends with the
hope that others "a also enjoy
the an ofphotogrjph. Instructors
have been local professionals
in the field. Survivors include
his wife, cousins George .and


OBITUARIES

Peggy Banker and Mary Stone
of Trenton, Dick and Jane Vero
of Moultrie, GA, and several
second cousins. Burial will
be on Monday February 9 in
the Florida National Cemetery,
Bushnell, FL located 123 miles
from Lake City off 1.75 at Exit
23. A military funeral will
be provided by the American
Legion, Dade City. Relatives
and friends are invited to attend
a beautiful tribute to men and
women who served our country.
Donations can be made to the
Lake City Animal Shelter (1392
NW Shelter Glen, Lake City,
FL 32055) and Haven Hospice
(6037 W Hwy 90, Lake City, FL
32055). For further information,
call (386) 755-4284 or email:
havenassociates@j uno.com.

Marilyn B.Willis-Hicks
Marilyn B.Willis-Hicks, was born
February 4, 1925 in Lake City,
Florida, to D.H. "Buck" and Eva
Bevan. She graduated Columbia
High School in 1942 and attended
Jones Business College in
Jacksonville. She retired in 1990
from the University of North
Florida, after becoming active
in volunteer work with the
Mental 'Health Association,
as a Memorial Hospital Pink
Lady, on committees for Super
Seniors and was a member of
Arlington United Methodist
Church and the Friendship
Sunday School Class. She
was a founding member of
the first Jacksonville chapter
of the Red Hat Society. She
leaves her loving husband,
T. Louie Hicks, three sons,
Clyde "Butch" Willis, Dr.
David "Randy" Willis, with
daughter-in-law Michelle and
DanL. Willis. Stepson Tommy
Hicks, stepdaughter Cindy
Simmons, six grandchildren,
Katie, Abbey, David, Nathan,
Paul and Teddy and two
step-grandchildren, Jessica
and Brittany. She leaves her
sister, Bettye B. Strickland of
Winter Park and many nieces
and nephews. In lieu of flowers
donations, may be made to
Northeast Florida Community
Hospice, 4266 Sunbeam Road,
Jacksonville, FL 32257 or
Arlington United Methodist
Church, 1400 University Blvd.
North, Jacksonville, FL 32211
or the charity of your choice.
Funeral services for Mrs. Hicks
will be conducted Thursday,
January. 29, 2009 at 11:00 A.M.
at Arlington United Methodist
Church, 1400 University Blvd.
North, Jacksonville, FL 32211.
. Visitation will be held-one hour
prior to services. Graveside
services will be held on Friday
at 11:00 A.M. at Forest Lawn
Memorial Gardens Cemetery


GRIZZARD: Character brought to life


in Lake City. Arrangements
are under the direction of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S.
HWY 441, Lake City. (386) 752-
1954. Please sign the guest book
at www.gatewayforestlawn.com.

Elizabeth L. "Betty" Novak
Elizabeth L. "Betty" Novak,
72, of Lake City died Saturday
morning, January 24, 2009 at
Still Waters Assisted Living
Facility. She was born in the
Bronx, New York, the daughter
of the late Joseph C. and Elsie L.
Novak. She moved to Lake City
from the Bronx in 1993 after
retiring as a Senior Accountant
with CBS Broadcasting for 35
ears. Ms. Novak enjoyed sewing,
her pets and devoting time to
her friends. She was a faithful
servant of this community who
sewed stuffed animals to be
given out with the Christmas
Dream Machine, a member of the.
Lake City Newcomers Club, past
Treasurer for Eastside Village
Homeowners Assoc., volunteer
for AARP seniors tax service
and a generous supporter of the
Humane Society. Ms. Novak
is survived by her devoted and
longtime friend, Gayle Hahn,
friends, Rita Lattin, Eddie &
Gary Klatt, Joan Wilson, Beth,
John & Jennifer Warren, Judee
Swilhart, Marie Drossos, Betty
Cea and a host of other friends
who will miss her deeply. In
lieu of flowers, contributions can
be made to Suwannee Valley
Care Center (Haven Hospice),
6037 Highway 90 West, Lake
City, FL 32055 or Still Waters
Assisted Living Facility, 507
NW Hall of Fame Dr., Lake
City, FL 32055. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South
Hwy 441, Lake City. 386-752-
1954. Please sign the guestbook
at www.gatewayforestlawn.com

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.

,J. Gatew4, restt

Lawn Funeral e* a

Direct

Cremat 6n



(B6) 7524954-
.-T6l]Fri 1-800-432-1001
3596 South6'tWy.41 Lake City


Continued From Page 1A
performance to remember.
"Lewis Grizzard: In His
Own Words" was part of
the 2008-2009 Lyceum
Series at LCCC.
Oberst's performance
was divided into two acts
- the first was a routine
Grizzard often performed
in his popular stage show,
while the second, shorter*
act was one that Grizzard
had intended on taking on
the road before his death
in 1994.
The first act was
intended to make the
audience laugh using
many of Grizzard's jokes.
He talked about his trip
to Russia and it's lack
of toilet paper and
how after several heart
surgeries, doctors inserted
a pig valve into his heart.
"People tell me I'm part
pig now," he said. "And I
tell say 'yeah, every time I
drive past a barbecue joint
my eyes tear up.'"
He discussed the South
and how it's changed
'"We got more Yankees
down here than when
Truman came through"
and also offered his
thoughts on people from
the North.
"Yankees ain't too sure
how smart us Southerners
are," he said, adding later
that he was sure "there
ain't no Southerner who
has ever paid to go inside
a reptile farm."
But of course,
Southerners, have
problems too, he said.
'The hardest thing
about the Gulf War was
teaching Southerners to


Share
your photos





www.lakecityreporter.com


In Tuesday's
second act
at Lake City
Community
College,
Oberst, acting
as Grizzard,
spoke about
God and the
relationship
he had with
his father.


say Shi'ite," he said. "We'd
been saying it the other
way for'so many years."
The second act offered
a look at an older, more
weary Grizzard, who read
from his past columns and
entries from his published
books. He spoke about his
father and their strained
relationship before his
father's death. He also


spoke about God and even
led the audience in singing
a few hymns.
But even in his older
age, the humor was never
lost on Grizzard.
"I haven't been the best
person," he said, "but I
still haven't broken all 10
commandments. I ain't
ever made no graven
image."


What does the

Bible say about...


l The Times in

Which We Live?
Jesus' Return?
and the

End .of the World?
On Wednesday, Feb. 4 Rev. Cheryle Pingel, Ed.S, M. Div.
will begin an extended Study of Bible prophecy at Falling (reek Chapel.
This study will continue each Wednesday evening at 7pm, ultimately covering
prophecies from the entire scripture, including Revelation. In order to register,
please e-mail Rev. Pingel at Marche@nefcom.net or call 755-0580 after 6pm.


* ta.gLow dm

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US 90 West (next to 84 Lumber) Lake City* 386-752-9303









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Wednesday, January 28, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE






Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@akecityreporter.com

New

batch


of

'Noles
or the past few
seasons the
Florida State
Seminoles
have been all
about improving for the
next season.
When the.2009 season
kicks off, the Seminoles
might be past that
transition period.
After consecutive 7-6
seasons, Florida State
reached nine wins for the
First time since 2004.
While the core group
of starters return for the
Seminoles, they do lose a
couple of key players in
Antone Smith, Greg Carr,
Everette Brown, Derek
Nicholson, Neefy Moffett
and Tony Carter.
Despite the losses,
i the Seminoles should
continue on an
upward swing in, 209 2 "6 "
as they return their
entire offensive line,
quarterback Christian
Ponder, running back
Jermaine Thomas, and a
young receiving core.
The offensive line has
been much of the reason
that the Seminoles have
struggled in the past
Sfew seasons, butthat
could be a strength next
season.
Incoming freshmen
have the biggest chance
to make an immediate
impact on the defensive
side of the ball where
the Seminoles have their
biggest losses.
Brandon Jenkins has
already signed a letter
of intent, which gives
him an upper hand in
competing for early
playing time. He's a
defensive end who's
quick off of the edge, but
he'll need to put on some
weight before he can
compete in the. ACC.
The player with the
biggest chance of making
it on Saturdays will be
Jacobbi McDaniel.
McDaniel is the -
prototype defensive
tackle with a mean ,
streak. After watching
him at Madison it's
easy to see why scouts
are drooling over this .
prospect.
McDaniel may be
slightly undersized at only
267, but expect him to
add weight to his stocky
Frame. He's a run-stopper,
and the Seminoles could
use some help through
the middle of their
defense as shown by their
inability to stop the run.
S Demonte McAllister is
a lot like Jenkins in that
he has speed off the end.
He's got the size to come
Sin and compete right '
S away at 263, and there's
a good chance he'll get a
shot at it if he competes
well over the summer.
Check back Saturday
Sfor a look at the offensive
S recruits.
Brandon Finley covers


sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


All-State


JASON MATTHEW WALKER L b '.:r ,r p.O"le


Fort White High's Jordan Dewhirst (16) drives for extra yardage in a 27-24 w h
against rival Santa Fe High in the regular Season finale. ,


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Syndica(ed Conleni


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JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Chandler Parsons '(25) gets defensive as Arkansas' Courtney
Fortson (4) pushes toward the basket in a game last week in Gainesville.


ndians


Dewhirst leads Fort
White with first team
All-State selection.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
9-1 season is sure
to bring some
attention to a ,
program. The Fort
White High Indians
got plenty of attention when
the Class 2A All-State teams
were released on Tuesday.
Five players from the Indians
were selected as members of the
2A All-State team led by wide
receiver/defensive back Jordan
Dewhirst.
Dewhirst was selected as
a first team member of the
defensive backfield after his
senior season in which he
accumulated 45 total tackles
including 27 solo tackles.
"Jordan was a complete
surprise for us defensively,"
coaqh Demetric Jackson said.
'We weren't going to use
him as much on defense, but
he started making plays. He
definitely deserves the honor,
and put in the hard work.
He didn't get to do as much
offensively, but when we needed.
plays on defense, he came
through for us."
-Dehwirst's biggest compliment
to the Indians' defense was
his ability to create turnovers.
The defensive back had three
interceptions and three fumble
' recoveries in 10 regular -season
games for Fort Whiite in 2008.


R. Blake X. Blake


Gilmer Johnson


Dewhirst also ranked second
on the team in receiving, andI
led the Indians with three
touchdowns.
At wide receiver Dewhirst
recorded 41 catches for 574
,yards.
Joining Dewhirst on the
All-State team as second team
members were Xavier Blake and
Joseph Johnson on offense.
Alex Gilmer was given
honorable'mention on offense
and Roy Blake was given
honorable mention on defense.
Blake'became the offensive
leader for the Indians this season
while rushing for 1,444 yards on
250 carries.
He also was responsible for
game-winning runs against
Middleburg and Santa Fe high
schools.
Blake's biggest stat was
the number of times he
INDIANS (onliiwt don 4B


Tigers beaten by
Gainesville 77-53 in
District 4-5A game.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Gainesville High's basketball
team is No. 4 in the state. The top
three must be something else.
The Hurricanes hammered
Columbia High, 77-53, in Lake
City on Tuesday in a District
4-5A game.
"There is a reason they are No.
4 in the state," CHS head coacb
Trey Hosford said.
"You can't make a lot of mis-
takes against them and expect to
win. They expose any weakness
you have." "
Following a second 3-pointer
by Ricky Jernigan, Columbia was
within two, 18-16, late in the first
quarter.
The Hurricanes closed the
period on a 10-0 run.
Gainesville continued the spurt
with the first seven points of the
second quarter.
Columbia played almost even
with the Hurricanes the rest of
the way.
"We can find some positives
even in this defeat," Hosford said.
'Two things stood out in the first
half second-chance points and
transition baskets. We gave up
numerous transition baskets and
they hit three 3-pointers off offen-
sive rebounds.
"When we got back on defense
and made them work we did bet-
ter. We have to point to the second
and third quarters and try to make
that a four-quarter effort."
Dont'ae Davis led the Tigers
with 15 points, including a pair of
treys.
Julio Viens scored 11 points and
Jernigan added another 3 for nine
points.
Tiger Powell, Jerry Thomas
and Dexter Dye each scored four
points. Dakota Smith and Jordan


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Dont'ae Davis (25)
goes up for a shot as Forest High
.players Matt Morris (24) and Hunter
Williams (1) defend during the game
in Lake City on Dec. 11.
Kirby both scored three.
Gainesville (18-3, 10-0) got
3-pointers from five different play-
ers and totaled nine for the night
The Hurricanes had two more 6-0
runs during the game.
Anthony Nwadigo led the 'Canes
with 23 points and Florida Atlantic
signee Greg Gantt scored 19.
Frank Gainey scored eight points
in the fourth quarter. Matt Huber
hit two treys.
Columbia (9-13, 5-7) plays
Suwannee High at 7:30 p.m.,
Saturday, in Live Oak.
Columbia wraps up the regu-
lar season next week with home
games against Santa Fe High on
Feb. 3 and Hamilton County High
on Feb. 5.
The Tigers will host the district
tournament, beginning Feb. 10.


Hurricanes


hammer CHS










Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2009


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Duke at Wake Forest
7;30 p.m.
ESPN2 Kansas at Nebraska
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN Golden State at Dallas
TENNIS
9:30. p.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, women's
semifinals, at Melbourne,Australia
3:30 a:m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, men's
semifinal, at Melbourne,Australia

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs
Wild Card
Arizona 30,Atianta 24
San Diego 23, Indianapolis 17, OT
Baltimore 27, Miami 9
Philadelphia 26, Minnesota 14
Divisional Playoffs
Baltimore 13,Tennessee 10
Arizona 33, Carolina 13
Philadelphia 23, N.Y. Giants I I
Pittsburgh 35, San Diego 24
Conference Championships
Arizona 32, Philadelphia 25
Pittsburgh 23, Baltimore 14

Super Bowl
Sunday
At Tampa
Arizona vs. Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. (NBC)

f Pro Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 8
At Honolulu
AFC vs.NFC,4:30 p.m. (NBC)

College all-star games
Saturday
Texas vs.The Nation All-Star
Challenge
At El Paso,Texas
Texas vs. Nation, I p.m

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Monday's Games
Phoenix 103,Washington 87
Miami 95,Atlanta 79
NewYork 104, Houston 98
Minnesota 90, Milwaukee 83
Oklahoma City 94, New Jersey 85
New Orleans 101, Philadelphia 86
Portland 113, L.A. Clippers 88
Tuesday's;Games
Indianaat Orlando (n). '

Denver at. Memphis (n), ..
S3n Arton.o at Utah (r.) '
Charlotte at L.A. Lakers (n)
Today's Games
Milwaukee at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Toronto at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Denver at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Houston, .8:30 p.m.
Golden State at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at Portland, 10 p.m.
Chicago at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games'
Cleveland at Orlando, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule ,

Today's Games
No. I Duke at No. 6 Wake Forest,
7 p.m. _,
No. 2 Connecticut at DePaul, 9 p.m.
No.3 Pittsburgh vs. No. 21Villanova at
Wachovia Spectrum, 7 p.m.
No. 5 North.Carolina at Florida
State, 9 p.m.
No. 7 Louisville vs. South Florida,
7 p.m.
No. 10 Xavier'vs. Charlotte, 7:30,p.m.
No. IS Syracuse at Providence, 7 p.m.
N6.' 18 Memphis at East Carolina,
7 p.m.
No. 25 Georgetown at Cincinhati,
7:30 p.m. '
Thursday's Games .
No. 9 Michigan State at Iowa,
7:05 p.m.
No. 12 Clemson at Virginia Tech,
7 p.m. ,, ,
No. 14 Arizona State vs.,Washington
State, 9 p.m. .
No: 17 UCLA vs. California, 10:30 p.m.
No. 19 Illinois at Minnesota, 9 p.m.
No. 20 Gonzaga vs. No. 22 Saint
-' Mary's, Calif., II p.m.
No. 23 Washington at Arizor
8:30 p.m.

College scores

Monday
EAST
Manhattan 65, Fairfield 60
Niagara 75, Canisius 69
Siena 69, Iona 68
SOUTH
Alabama A&M' 60, Southern U. 57
Alcorn St. 79,Alabama St. 74
Belmont 86, Mercer 82, OT
Bethune-Cookman 58, Md.-Easte
Shore 55
Coppin St. 77, Howard 69
Delaware St. 64, Florida A&M 58
ETSU 82, S.C.-Upstate 72
Furman 59. UNC Greensboro 54
Hampton 62, Morgan St. 57


Lipscomb 90, Kennesaw St. 78
MVSU 81, Texas Southern 68
Norfolk St. 69,Winston-Salem 51
S. Carolina St. 71, N. Carolina A&T
The Citadel 70, Samford 45
Wofford 74, Elon 71, OT
MIDWEST
Akron 67,Youngstown St. 53.
Detroit 68, Chicago St. 67
Marquette 71, Notre Dame 64
SOUTHWEST
Ark.-Pine Bluff 67, Prairie View 62
Oklahoma 89, Oklahoma St. 81


FAR WEST
Oregon St. 65, CS Bakersfield 59

TENNIS

Australian Open

At Melbourne Park
Melbourne,Australia
Tuesday
Singles
Men
Quarterfinals
Andy Roddick (7), United States, def.
Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, 6-7 (3), 6-4,
6-2, 2-1, retired.
Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def.
Juan Martin del Potro (8), Argentina, 6-3,
6-0,6-0.
Women
Quarterfinals
Vera Zvonareva (7), Russia, def. Marion
Bartoli (16), France, 6-3, 6-0.
Dinara Safina (3), Russia, def. Jelena
Dokic,Australia, 6-4 4-6, 6-4.
Doubles -
Men
Quarterfinals
Lukasz Kubot, Poland, and Oliver
Marach, Austria, def. Mariusz Fyrstenberg
and Martin Matkowski (6), Poland, 6-2,
6-2.
Mahesh Bhupathi, India, and Mark
Knowles (3), Bahamas, def. Feliciano
Lopez and Fernando Verdasco, Spain, 6-I,
2-6,6-4.
Women
Quarterfinals
Casey Dellacqua, Australia, and
Francesca Schiavone (12), Italy, def.Anna-
Lena Groenefeld, Germany, and Patty
Schnyder, Switzerland, 0-6, 7-5, 6- I.
Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, and
Ai Sugiyama (9), Japan, def. Cara Black,
Zimbabwe, and Liezel Huber (1), United
States, 6-7 (0), 6-3, 7-6 (10).
Nathalie Dechy, France, and Mara
.Santangelo, Italy, def. Nuria Llagostera
Vives and Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez
(I I), Spain, 3-6,7-6 (7), 7-6 (6).
Serena andVenus Williams (10), United
States, def. Hsieh Su-wei Hsieh, Taiwan,
and Peng Shual (16), China, 6-2,4-6,16-3.

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
FBR Open
Site: Scottsdale,Ariz.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: TPC Scottsdale (7,216 yards,
par 71).
Purse: $6 million. Winner's share:
$1.08 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
4-7:36 p.m., 8-11:30, p.m.; Friday, 12:30-
4 a.m., 4-7:30 p.m., 8-11:30 p.m.; Saturday,
midnight-3:30 a.m., 1-2:30 p.m., 9:30-
11:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1-2:30 p.m., 9:30-
11:30 p.m.) .'and CBS (Saturday-Sunday,
3-6 p.m.).
last year-. JB.BHolmes won the event
for the second time in three years, beating.
Phil Mickelson with a birdie on the first
playoff hole. Holmes birdied the final hole
of regulation to force the playoff.
Last week: Pat Perez won the Bob
Hope Classic for his first PGA Tour
title, taking advantage of Steve Stricker's
collapse and holding off John Merrick by
three strokes. Perez finished at 33-under,
327. Striker, 33 under entering the final
day after rounds of 61 and 62, had a 77
in the windy finale to tie for third at 28
under.
I Notes: Mickelson is making his
first start of the year. He won in 2005,
shooting a 60 in the second round
en route to a five-stroke victory. The
former Arizona State star also won in
1996 .r. .Geoff Ogilivy, the .Mercedes
Championships winner, also is playing
along with Holmes, Perez, Stricker, Sony
Open champion Zach Johnson, three-time
winner Mark Calcavecchia,2007 champion
Aaron Baddeley, Camilo Villegas, Anthony.
Kim andiKenny Perry.... Calcavecchia won
in 1989, 1992 and 2001, shooting 65-60-
64-67 in 2001 for a 28-under 256 total
at the time a PGATour record....The
Buick Invitational is next week at Torrey
Pines;followed by the AT&T Pebble Beach
National Pro-Am.
On the Net: http://www.pgatour.com
PGA EUROPEAN TOUR
Dubai Desert Classic
Site: Dubai, United Arab .Emirates.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course Emirates Golf Club, Majils
Course (7,30 I yards, par 72).
Purse: ,$2.5 million. Winner's share:
$416,660.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Saturday,
8:30 a:m.-12:30 p.m., 6:30-8:30 p.m.;
Sunday, midnight-3 a.m., 8:30 a.m.-
12:30 p.m., 7-9:30 p.m.; Monday, midnight-
4 a.m.).
Last year:TigerWoods holed a 25-foot
putt on the final hole .for a one-stroke


behind leader Ernie Els entering the final
round, Woods birdied the final two holes
and five of the last seven for a 65.
Last week: Spain's Alvaro Quiros won
the Qatar Masters for his third European
tour victory, beating Louis Oosthuizen
and Henrik Stenson by three strokes.
Quiros jumped from 74th to 28th in
the world ranking to virtually wrap up a
Masters spot.
.Notes: Woods, also the 2006 winner,
is sidelined following knee surgery. ..
Erik Compton, the American who had a
second heart transplant last year, received
a sponsor exemption. ... Els, the 1994,
2002. and 2005 champion, also is in the
field along with Quiroi, 2007 winner
Stenson, second-ranked Sergio Garcia,
Colin Montgomerie, Lee Westwood, Jose
Maria Olazabal, Abu Dhabi winner Paul
Casey, Justin Rose, Robert Karlsson, David
Howell and Mark O'Meara, the 2004 win-
ner at age 47. ... The tour will return to
Dubai in November for the Dubai World
Championship, the new $10 million
season finale.
On the Net: http://www.dubaidesert
classic.com
PGA European Tour site: http://www.
europeantour.com
CHAMPIONS TOUlt
Next event:Allianz Championship, Feb.
13-15,The Old Course at Broken Sound,.
Boca Raton
Last week: Bernhard Langer
won the Champions Tour's season-
opening Mitsubishi Electric Championship
in Hawaii, beating Andy Bean by a stroke.
The German star has five victories in 26
starts on the 50-and-over tour.
LPGATOUR
Next event SBS Open, Feb. 12-14,
Turtle Bay Resort, Palmer Course,
Kahuku, I-Hawaii.
Last week: Catriona Matthew, the
39-year-old Scot expecting her second
child in May, won the 15-player, 36-hole
HSBC LPGA Brazil Cup exhibition event,
shooting two 3-under 69s for 'a five-
stroke victory over Kristy McPherson.
On the Net: http://www.lpgq.com

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
Detroit at Columbus (n)
Washinhgtn at Boston (n)
Carolina at N.Y. Rangers (n)
New Jersey at Ottawa (n)
Philadelphia at Florida (n)
Montreal at Tampa Bay (n)
Toronto at Minnesota (n)
Atlanta at Dallas (ni
Anaheim at Phoenix (n)
Buffalo at Edmonton (n)
San Jose at Colorado (n)
Today's 'Games
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Calgary, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Nashville atVancouver, 10:30 p;m.
Thursday's Games
New Jersey at Boston, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Atlanta,'7 p.m.
Montreal at Florida, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Ottawa at St. Louis, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Chicago at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.

HORSE RACING


Eclipse Awards

Horse of the Year Curlin
Two-Year-Old Male Midshipman
Two-Year-Old Female Stardom
, Bound
Three-Year-Old Male Big Brown
Three-Year-Old Female Proud
Spell
Older Male Curlin
Older Female Zenyatta
Male Sprinter Benny the Bull
Female Sprinter Indian Blessing
Male Turf Horse Conduit (IRE)
Female Turf Horse Forever
Together
Steeplechase Good Night Shirt
Owner Stronach Stables
Breeder Adena.Springs
Trainer Steve Asmussen
Jockey Garrett Gomez ,
Apprentice Jockey Pascacio Lopez

BOXING

Fight schedule

Friday
At Bell Centre, Montreal (ESPN2),
Herman Ngoudjo, Canada, vs.Juan Urango,
Miami, 12, for the vacant IBF light welter-
weight title; Antonin Decarie, Canada, vs.
Michael Clark, Columbus, Ohio, 12, for
.t,_VJ'MnKAA(- v~cfr~ t-it].J I


GOLF REPORTS



Kahlich/Williams team wins


27-hole triple format event


The MGA hosted a
27-hole event on Saturday,
using a different format for
each 9.
The Ponds competi-
tion was a scramble; the
Dunes play was best ball;
the Creeks was aggregate
.score.
Mike Kahlich and David
Williams were the winners,
followed by Buddy Slay
and Charlie Timmons in
second, and- Lynn ,Smith
and John Rajer in third.
Low Aggregate winner
was Kahlich and Williams.
Low Best Ball win-


QUAIL
HEIGHTS
Boots Farley

ners were Mal Henson
and Rocky Ryals, Charles
Gagliano and Steve Pellicer,
Slay and Timrnons, and
Gordon Fuller and Bob
Jaeger.
Low Scramble winners-
were Kahlich and Williams,
Steve Nail and Bill Ryan,
Smith, and Rajer, Gagliano
and Pellicer, and Fuller and
Jaeger.
Blitz winners were:


A Division John
Raulerson, first; Jeff
Mosely, second; David
Crawford, third;
B Division Mike
Harris and Lynn Smith,
tie for first; Tim Torlorice,
third.
Top of the Hill winners
were:
A Division Tim
Tortorice, first; Bill Levens,
second; Jerry Snowberger
and Dan Widdenberg, tie
for third;
B Division Jack
Tuggle, first; Bill Walls,
second; Joe, Herring, third.


Familiar faces back on top


:of field in Saturday Blitz


The' Saturday Blitz
played two flights using full
handicaps, each paying
for low gross and low net
scores.
Familiar faces returned
to the winners-circle, begin-
ning with Dermis Crawford
who took First Flight gross
honors with an even par 72.
Steve Thomas took the net,
win with 731 "
Second Flight winners
were Jim Carr, who posted
83 for low gross, and Ron
Bennett at 75 with a score-
card win over Eli Witt for
low net.
Winning skins were


YOUTH BASEBALL

Fort White sets
registration dates

Fort White Youth
Baseball Association has
registration set for noon to
4 p.m. Saturday, and
3-7 p.m. on Tuesday.
Sign-up is at the South
Columbia Sports Park
concession stand.
Birth certificates are
required for new players.


e~ar


SOUTHERN
OAKS'
Ed Goff

Crawford with two, and'
Trey Hodsford, Dennis-
Hendershott, Thomas and"
Bennett with one each.. .
The front nine was' little:
challenge to a number of
the Good Old Boys this
week, yielding a 35to Mark
Risk. 36 to Stan Woolbert
and 38 to. Carl Jones and
Bobby Simmons.
In Match 1 play, Mark
Risk, Jim Bellf and Carl'
Wilson doubled up on J.D.


For details, call Tammy
Sharpe at 867-3825 or
755-1519.


Lake City Babe_-
Ruth registration
Lake City/Columbia
County Youth Baseball
has spring sign-lip dates
planned at the Babe Ruth
Baseball fields.
Cost is $75.
Rookie (ages 7-8), Minor


Dedge, Howard Whitaker
and Carl Wilson, 8 skins to
4. Eli Witt, Tom Hosford
and Larry Ward posting 2
skins for third place.
Skins. were scarce in
Match 2, won by Merle
Hibbard, Jim Stevens,
Mike Spenser and Dan
Stephens, 4-3, over Bobby
Simmons, Jerry West, Nick
WhitehurstandJoePersons.
Monty Montgomery, Stan
Woolbert, Carl Jones and
Don Dockery were third
with two marks.
The Super Bowl Flag
tournament and party is
this weekend.


(ages 9-10) and Major
(ages 11-12) divisions are
offered.
Registration dates and
times are; 10 a.m. to 2.p.m.
SafurdayTand Feb: 7 anif-
Feb. 14, and 6-8 p.m. -or-'I
Monday and Feb. 9.

For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 3654810 or
Shawn Thomas at
867-4810.

* From staff reports


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INDIANS: Earn five All-State selections


Continued From Page 11
reached.the endzone
as he accumulated 23
touchdowns between
rushing and receiving.
"He was our work-
horse," Jackson said.
"He came through for
,us, although he didn't get'
as many touches as he
has in the past. We kind
of spread the ball out a
little more this season,
but he was still a guy
that we could depend
on."
Johnson was second
on the team with 58
points behind Blake's
134 points this season.
He converted on 34
PATs this season..
Gilmer came into
his own in his second
season as the Indian's
quarterback.
Gilmer threw for
1739 yards while
completing 113 of 224
passes. He threw 12


touchdowns and eight
interceptions during the
season with a long of 78
yards to Blake.
Roy Blake was the
defensive version of Xavier
Blake as he became the
leader for Fort White's


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running stopping attack.
Blake had 137 tackles
with 71 solo tackles during
the season.
Blake also had one
sack, one interception, and
three fumble recoveries'
during the year.


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