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 Section A: Main: Opinion
 Section A: Main: Local & Busin...
 Section A: Main: Local
 Section A: Main: Local & Natio...
 Section A: Main: Local & State
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The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/00296
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: February 18, 2006
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:00296
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Daily Briefing
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Local & State
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Opinion
        page A 4
    Section A: Main: Local & Business
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: Local
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: Local & Nation
        page A 7
    Section A: Main: Local & State
        page A 8
    Section A: Main: Faith & Values
        page A 9
    Section A: Main: Local & State
        page A 10
    Section B: Regional News
        page B 1
    Section B: Regional News: Sports
        page B 2
        page B 3
    Section B: Regional News: Advice & Comics
        page B 4
    Section B: Regional News: Classified
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text





WEATHER


Inside 2A

Hi: 75 '
Low: 49
Chance of 5


A Field of
Their Own
I I I


-
000021 032806 ****3-DIGIT 32
LIBRARY OF FL HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


Lake


Saturday, February 18, 2006


City


All Things
Olustee
Vendors, re-enactors
and history galore!
Inside, 3A, 6A





Reporter


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 132, No. 27 0 50 cents


LUSTEE BAT T L E

FESTIVAL 2006


Fallen soldiers remembered at Oaklawn


155 Confederate
soldiers honored
during memorial.
By LINDSAY DOWNEY
Idowney@lakecityreporter. corn
Lake City honored sol-
diers who died in the Battle
of Olustee Friday morning at
Oaklawn Cemetery, NW
Matthew Street, during the
26th annual Civil War
Memorial Service.
Columbia County resi-
dents and visitors, including
Robert E. Lee and Abraham
Lincoln impersonators, sat in


chairs in front of several
rows of small, unmarked
graves that each were
adorned with miniature
Confederate flags for the
occasion. Women wearing
black Civil War-era mourn-
ing dresses and bonnets and
men in full battle uniform
stood in the cemetery, bow-
ing their heads in remem-
brance of the fallen heroes.
An inscription on a stone
near one entrance of the
burial ground says
155 Confederate soldiers
who were killed in the Battle
of Olustee or who died in'
Confederate hospitals after


the battle are buried in the
cemetery.
"We stand here on this
hallowed ground, on, the
manicured, green carpet of
heroic remembrance, and
we honor those who paid the
ultimate price at the Battle of
Olustee," said Lake, City
Reporter Editor Todd
Wilson, keynote speaker for,
the event. "We pay tribute
each year to these 155 brave
Confederate soldiers who
saw their young lives cut
short in agony, their hopes
and dreams left unfulfilled."
OAKLAWN continued on 7A


JENNIFER CHASTEENIL.i3 Lt,I P&p*'rl'i
Elwood Lodge (left), Laura Null, Ann Brown, and Craig Wolford
lay the memorial wreath during the Oaklawn Memorial Service
Friday morning.


Re-enactment
brings to life
medical drama.
By LINDSAY DOWNEY
Idowney@lakecityreporter. com
Groups of people walked
out of the Lake City-
Columbia County Historical
Museum' in tears Friday
night. From 6-9 p.m., the
museum hosted its
candlelight walk-through
"Angels of Mercy," during
which re-enactors portrayed
doctors, nurses and civilians
caring for wounded soldiers
in 1864 after the Battle of
Olustee.
As the. sun set, groups of
about 10 people walked into
the dim, candlelit home to
witness a surgery in
progress. With, blood splat-
tered on her white apron,
re-enactor Carole Hollamby
dug her fingers into a man-
made chest wound on a
soldier who laid on the oper-
ating table. Hollamby was.
portraying Esther Hill Hawk,
a surgeon who operated on
troops in Lake City.
In the room next to
Hollamby, bodies laid scat-
tered on the floor. A woman
sang softly to a dead elderly
soldier while another woman


OLUSTEE
Battle Festival


SKIRMISH!
* Re-enactors do
battle on the shores
of Lake DeSoto. 6A


JENNIFER CHASTEENIL.S .i' ; peil'ler
Cheryl Libbert (right) of Lake City comforts'Carol Jones from St. Petersburg as they portray
characters in the 'Angels of Mercy,' the candlelight drama, at the Lake City/Columbia County
History Museum Friday evening.,


consoled her ci'ying friend.
As the crowd made their way
into another, room, they
heard a young woman read-
ing a letter to a wounded
soldier. Confused, the
soldier suddenly crie-d out
for his mother before taking


his last breath. "
Lake City resident June
Murray, 71, dabbed her eyes
with a tissue as she walked
down the stairs into. the
backyard. There, a soldier
who had a large, bloody gash
on his left cheek, told a


gravedigger no one cared
about the dead "Yankee"-
soldiers who laid wrapped in
sheets on the ground. The
gravedigger pushed his
shovel into the dirt as. the
ANGELS continued on 7A


LIFE AT CAMP
* A look at what life
was like behind Union
lines at Olustee. 3A
* Students
see history up
close on
special
field trip.
6A ;


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OLUSTEE 2006 Magnets offer healing hope


UPCOMING EVENTS
TODAY
* Blue-Grey One-Mile Fun Run around Lake DeSoto.
9 a.m.
* Presentation of Colors, Oluscee Battlefield, 9 a.m.
E Vendor booths open, Downtown Lake City, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
E Park opens to the public,
Olustee Battlefield, 9 a.m.-6:15 p.m.
0 Annual Parade, Downtown,
10:30 a.m.
* Medical Demonstration,
Olustee Battlefield, I p.m.
* Period Music Contest,
Olustee Battlefield,
2:30 p.m.
0 Mini Battle, Olustee --
Battlefield, 3:30 p.m.
0 Blue-Grey Square Dance,
American Legion Hall,
7:45 p.m.


Vendor markets
his wares in heart
of downtown.
By LINDSAY DOWNEY
id,.-, n i. .. -1 iit epor ter. c.:,, i
Magnets were the only
thing that got rid of Walt
Treulieb's 'migraines. Today,
others who suffer from
migraines and.other forms of
pain can buy the Treuliebs'
magnetic jewelry at the
Olustee Battle Festival in
downtown Lake City.
Treulieb said he suffered
from migraines for 40 years,
after he was in a car accident
as a child.
"He was taking drugs -
pain killers," his wife,
Arleen, said. "Nothing
helped."
TheTreuliebs are selling
colorful, magnetic anklets,


bracelets, necklaces, pet
collars and Band-Aids, w which
start at $10, at their craft tent
on NW Marion Avenue. The
Fort White couple said
people in the medical indus-
try are the main customers
for their business. The
MNagnetic Solution.
"Magnets date back to
4,000 years as being used for,
pain relief," Walt Treulieb
said. "It's becoming more
popular in this country."
The magnetic jewelry
may help relieve pain for
70-80 percent of people who
wear it, Walt Treulieb said.
The magnets increase
circulation, which helps
release endorphins that may
ease pain. The Magnetic
Solution sells a selection of
"high powered" magnetic
jewelry for severe cases, but
VENDOR continued on 7A


LINDSAY DOWNEYILj3e ?City Repole'
Fort White resident Walt
Treulieb sells his magnetic
jewelry at the Olustee Battle
Festival Friday in downtown
Lake City. Treulieb said
wearing a magnetic necklace
helped rid him of migraines.


2 0 A4 WiNTER n'b.MES

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I CALLUS: INSIDE
(386)752-1293 INSIDE
SUBSCRIBETO Business . ...... 5A Local & State ............ 3A
THE REPORTER: Classified ............... 5B Obituaries .............6A
Voice: 755-5445 Comics ......... . 4B Opinion...... ......4A
1 8.2,6. to 0 1 Fax: 752-9400 Communit/ Calendar .... 5A Puzzles 6B


TODAY IN COMING
FAITH & VALUES SUNDAY
Churches step up to rebuild More Olurtee
Gulf Coast region 9A Festival co.erage


The horrors of war


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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2006


Thursday:
1-10-16-24-28


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Ihene" s mArtwn Srt ewMIW


"Copyrighted MaterialI

.,, ,. = Syndicated Content

wAvailable from Commercial News Providers"






* ~


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Jack Palance is 85.
* Former Cosmopolitan
editor Helen Gurley Brown is
84.
* Actor George Kennedy is
81.
* Senate Armed Services
Committee Chairman John
Warner, R-Va., is 79.
* Author Toni Morrison is 75.
* Movie director Milos
Forman is 74.
' Singer Yoko Ono is 73.
* Singer/songwriter Bobby'
Hart is 67.


Singer Irma Thomas is 65.
Singer Herman Santiago
(Frankie Lymon and the
Teenagers) is 65.
Singer Dennis DeYoung is
59.
M Actress Sinead Cusack is
58.
Producer-director-writer
John Hughes is 56.
Actress Cybill Shepherd is
56.
Singer Juice Newton is 54.
Singer Randy Crawford is
54.


- b a


Thought for Today


"What is man but his passion?"

Robert Penn Warren,
American author, poet and critic (1905-1989).


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MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR


Friday:
4-0-2


Lake City
HOW TO REAUHUS
Main number .......... (386) 752-1293
Fax number ................752-9400 .
Circulation .................755-5445
Online ...... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fla. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard .... .754-0418
(mleonard@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson ..........754-0428
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
ADvia-s-auIG
Sales .....................752-1293
(ads @lakecityreporter.com)


CORRECTION


Friday:
3-2-4-8


Reporter
CLASS M'lED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.

Controller Sue Brannon .......754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)

Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next
day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters ... .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
13 Weeks ................... ; $23.54
26 Weeks ..................... $42.80
52 Weeks .................... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
13 Weeks .................... $44.85
26 Weeks ................... $89.70
52 Weeks ...................$179.40


In an article published on Feb. 4, the writer of the Absalom Coon
article did not have the exact date of marriage for T. S. Graham
.and Frances Melissa Koon; however, Edwin Graham graciously
provided the correct information. T. S. Graham and Frances
Melissa Koon were married on Sept. 24, 1882, in Bradford County.







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Union Private John
Porter (portrayed by
James D. Starling)
Lake City, Union Soldier
Family: Mother, father
(deceased), and brother
(fighting for the South).

Hobbies: Drawing,
sketching, and keeping a
journal.

Favorite pastimes:
Horseback riding and
hunting.

What is the legacy of
the Battle of Olustee?:
"What sticks in my mind are
the war torn families. I was
born in Georgia, but I
decided to join the Union
and my brother joined the


Confederacy it's a big
conflict in our family."

N Who is your hero or
inspiration, and why?: "My
dear mother is my
inspiration. She is the
support bar for our family."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2006


Washing cloths during the


Cival War was a hard process


By LINDA YOUNG
lyoung@iakecityreporter.corn
During the Civil War, enlist-
ed men ate free but paid to
have their clothes washed and
ironed on suds row.
Women were allowed in
camp because they did laun-
dry, but were not allowed in
the section where soldiers
stayed, and soldiers were only
allowed on suds row to have
laundry done with the
exception of the laundress'
husband, said re-enactor Gail
Marsden of Bradenton.
'The men would come over
and say I want you to wash
this," Marsden said.
A private only earned $12 a
month in the Federal Army
and might pay 5 cents to have
a pair of socks washed, and
shirts cost more to wash and
iron. A laundress kept that
money and was also paid $12 a
month, plus medical care and


rations, she said.
A laundress had to be
married and was generally
married to a soldier. If she
was widowed, she was
expected to remarry within
six weeks, because a single
woman with so many soldiers
in camp would be a
distraction, Marsden said.
"It's just better to have a
married couple," Marsden
said.
Marsden is a re-enactor in
the Federal Camp at the
Battle of Olustee this week-
end. On Friday, students from
around the state arrived in
school buses to enjoy the
event.
'There's some stains that
won't come out. You have to
put up with stubborn stains,"
said Marsden, to a group of
fourth-grade students from
Trinity Christian Academy in
Jacksonville.


They watched as Marsden
used a scrub board and lye
soap to wash a white shirt in a
tin wash tub.
"They would make this
soap out of the ashes from the
fire, that's the lye part, then
mix it with animal fat,"
Marsden said.
Then she began to put the
shirt through a wooden man-
gle attached to the edge of
the tub to wring water from
the shirt.
'This will take the water out
like the spin cycle of your
washing machine," Marsden
said.
The father of one of the
children recalled that his
grandmother had an identical
wringer, washboard and tub.
"When I was real young, I
remember her using it," said
James Bonaparte of
Jacksonville.
His daughter, Emon


Bonaparte, had never seen
laundry done by hand before.
"I think it's cool that you
can do it yourself," Emon
Bonaparte said.
'This wouldn't be so cool if
you had to do this all the time.
It would get less and less
cool," James Bonaparte said
to his daughter, and laughed.
Doing the laundry was
demanding work. Marsden
had a large wooden tub that
she could not use *because it
takes "lots of water and five to
seven days to swell up" or else
it is not watertight and leaks,
she said.
The laundress had to make
sure that equipment was
ready to use as they moved
from camp to camp, she said.
"Then we would iron
things. I keep a clean frying
pan over on the campfire and
heat irons in it," Marsden
said.


Florida History Channel films

personalities of Olustee Re-enactment
By TONY BRITT re-enactment by himself last determined yet. is accepted, most likely it will
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com year, and this year he and "Like any documentary, we air. on Florida Public


OLUSTEE The 142nd
Anniversary Re-enactment of
the Battle of Olustee and the
personalities who make it
possible could be televised as
part of a documentary by the
Florida Travel Channel.
The Florida Travel
Channel, an Orlando-based
company, has several camera
crews at the Olustee
Battlefield Historic. State park
conducting interviews and
filming pre-re-enactment
footage for the film.
Richard Pabis, Florida
TrT li Ch nn l direAtor


members of his film crew
decided to make a-
documentary about the
people who participate in the
- re-enactment.
"We'll be here filming for
three days," he said. "My last
year's experience was great. I
was surprised how many
people actually participate in
this. It's kind of a hidden
treasure of Florida. Nobody in
Orlando knew something like
this actually existed. It was
very interesting coming
here."
T-He Said thea focns nof the


don't really know yet which
direction we'll go we'll
see," he said. "Obviously, it's a
lot of people, a lot of energy
and we really don't know in
which direction that energy
will go, so that's the mystery.
Three days from now we'll
have a better picture of it."
The date when the film will
be shown has not been
confirmed and Pabis said the
.film and interviews the crews
have been shooting 'will be
used for a pilot.
"Initially, it's a pilot and we
don't nlan to rndo much xwith it


Broadcasting Service and
other programs related to it.
It's designed to be played on
the History Channel or PBS
stations."
Pabis, who admitted he and
his crew were not focusing on
being .historically correct,
said they've. decided to film
two, 30-minute versions of the
documentary, a Blue (Union)
and a Grey (Confederate)
version.
'"Then we'll let the viewers
decide which direction they
want to go from on the two
e isodes that are 30 minutes,


l. vel UV ,11allll 4..LJL U e L, K U I, A .1 U OUL J IV L .Ul.lV OUH VIJ L. .llV Ull L. I Wlr..ULJ. IU uAJ J.LJ. "LJ. LU A .U 1 .U JIIUoI,.IL.a t,,t JU U rL. tJ.4.L e V J.J.J. A. 11 ,,AUM
said he went to the battle documentary hasn't been this year," he said. "If the pilot long," he said.


Old tires get a second chance as works of art


By TROY ROBERTS
trotvorr s wr,:l. l '"'.l er.co,:m
When tires become old,
many people across the world
get rid of them by throwing
' them into a junk 'pile.
However, Joe Hall isn't one of
those people.
Hall's recycled tire art
caused a lot of talk lastyear at
the Olustee Festival in
downtown Lake City. This
year, Hall said he has heard
more of the same.
"I -get a lot of people


coming by that just stop and
look at the tire art," Hall said.
"I get a lot of compliments
about the recycling of the
tires."
Hall's tire art ranges from
horse, bull and dragon tire
swings to parrot and rooster.
flower planters.
"This is definitely a lot of
,work, but it's something I
enjoy," Hall said. "You are,
taking something most
people normally throw away
and making something for
people to use.".


Hall's newest creation, the
Redneck Hammock, has sold
very well at the Olustee
Festival this year.
Hall has been making tire
art for about 10 years.
"A friend of mine was doing
horse swings and he showed
me how to do it," Hall said.
"So I got into that. Over the
years, when I've seen other
people doing certain designs,
I've learned how to do that as
well and added those to the
things I sell."
This is Hall's third time at


POLICE REPORTS


Arrest Log
The following information
was provided by local law'
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted. All
people are presumed innocent
unless proven guilty.

Sunday, Feb. 12
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Jonathon Leigh Crary,
23, 517 6th Avenue, Wellborn,
driving with a suspended'or
revoked license (habitual traffic
offender).
Monday, Feb, 13
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Cepeda Young, 37, 1003
Texas St. NW; warrant:
violation of probation on
charges of sale of cocaine and
possession of cocaine with
intent,to deliver.
Demetrius Anderson, 26,


996 NE Dyson Terrace,
warrant: violation of probation
on charges of robbery with a
deadly weapon, burglary while
armed and robbery while
armed. ,
Wednesday, Feb. 15
Lake City'
Police Department
Elbert Gillins, 42, 742
Alma St., aggravated battery.
Thursday, Feb. 16
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Lawrence B. Johns IV,
32, 174 Old Country Club
Road, burglary, grand theft,
criminal trespass, violation of
probation on charges of battery
and warrant: non-support.
Victor Keith Hicks, 23,
195 Rachel Way, warrant:
violation of probation on
charges of obtaining a
controlled substance by fraud.
Christopher Jerome
Brinson, 19, 351 SW Boyle
Loop, Fort White, domestic
battery, criminal mischief and


Baby Contest & .
Beauty/Model Search
F America's Cover Miss
& Cover Boy, USA
Age Divisions
Girls: Birth- limo. 1223mo. 2-3yr. 4-6fr, 7 9yr.
10.12y1. 13 15yr. 16-25yr. Boys: birth-23mo & 2-3yr. ,
Don't Miss Outl Call today to
quality to win a $10,000 bond!
Qualify to win $10,000.00
Entry forms available at Mail Office
Choose the location nearest you
March 12 Lake City Mall 1:30 p.m.
'For information or a brochure, call or visit our website at:
www.floridacovermiss.com Email: covermiss@aol.com
(850) 476-3270 or (850) 206-4569


aggravated assault.
Roberto Perez, 37, 306
Green St., Live Oak, providing
a false name to a law
enforcement officer.

Fire EMS Calls
Thursday, Feb. 16
5:09 p.m., brush fire, 1-75
northbound at the Ellisville
county line, one primary and
three volunteer units
responded.
5:30 p.m., rescue assist,
361 Colvin St., two volunteer
units responded.
8:11 p.m., rescue assist,
Bounty Road, one volunteer
unit responded.
9:06 p.m., structure fire,
U.S. 90 East near CR-100, four
primary units responded.
9:25 p.m., rescue assist,
U.S. 441 South, one volunteer
unit responded.
Friday, Feb. 17
12:32 a.m., rescue assist,


Olustee.
"Last year, we had a-good
crowd, but this is the largest,
Friday crowd I've seen," Hall
said. "It seems like the
consumers are buying well."
Hall said those in charge of
organizing the event were
easy to work with and is a
good event for vendors to
travel to.
"The show is economically
good for vendors," Hall said.
Hall will continue selling
his tire art through Saturday.



Congress Street, one primary
unit responded.
2:28 a.m., rescue assist,
CR-242, no response (one
volunteer unit called).
8:57 a.m., rescue assist,
Devin Street, one volunteer unit
responded.
9:38 a.m., wreck, 1-10
westbound mile marker 302,
one primary unit responded.
N 10:12 a.m., wreck, 1-75
southbound mile marker 435,
two primary units responded.
10:48 a.m., structure fire,
422 NE Lake Shore Terrace,
three primary units responded.
11:23 a.m., rescue assist,
610 SE Monroe St., one
primary unit responded.
12:36 p.m., rescue assist,
386 NE Jefferson St., two
primary units responded.
2:03 pam., wreck,
CR-100-A and Granger Road,
one primary unit responded.
* From staff reports.


Diogenes F Duarte, M.D. PA.
Board Certified in:
*Pulmonary

.4 (Breathing Problems)

*Sleep Medicine
Accepting Medicare, Medicaid and
most private insurance


334 SW Commerce Drive, Suite 1 Lake City, FI.
386-754-1711


PMM -N > It
7JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Kathleen Cooper (left) and Carolyn Jaeger of Lake City admire the
stainless steel spinners during the Olustee Festival in downtown
Lake City Friday afternoon.


Wind Spinners became

a business for family


* By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
Numerous people stopped
and stared at the colorful
wind spinners Friday after-
noon at the Olustee Festival in
downtown Lake City.
Designs with dragons,
frogs, sports team's names
and other figures grace the
wind spinners being sold by
Steve and Denise Ullman.
"We started making them
about three years ago," Steve
Ullman said. "We had seen
someone else doing the
designs and we thought it
would be an interesting
profession to get into.".
The business started off as
a side-job for the Ullmans, as
their main job in their home
state of Wisconsin is
designing cow barns and
decks.
'We would run our laser
about once a week for the
barns and decks, so wde would
begin cutting the 'wind spin-
ners on our off days," Steve
Ullman said. "Now we cut
them every day of the week."








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The process of making the
wind spinners involves draw-
ings by hand, computer pro-
grams, sanding and painting
with a transparent finish.
"All of our wind spinners
are made from stainless steel,
so they're guaranteed to
never rust," Steve Ullman
said.
The Ullmans spend half of
the year traveling through the
northern states, selling wind
spinners at fairs and events.
During the winter months,
however, the Ullmans travel
south.
While they stay in the south
for parts of the year, they have
never been to the Olustee
Festival before this year.
'This is our first time at
Olustee," Steve Ullman said.
"We. did an'event in Starke last
year, but this is our first time
here. Business has been real-
ly good (Friday). The traffic
has been really good."
The Uillmans will continue
to sell their wind spinners
today during the downtown
festival. -





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Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


1
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OPINION


Saturday, February 18, 2006


www.lakecityreporter.com


EDITORIAL


Teacher is

'old-school

educator'

R ebecca Brown represents the
best of public education. For
20 years, she has served as
an educator and currently is a
kindergarten teacher at
Columbia City Elementary.
Besides her classroom job, she also
volunteers as a tutor for students in
grades first through third after school.
Brown is an old-school educator -
'a classroom teacher willing to do
whatever it takes to help her students,
even if it means staying after class to
work with children. She is an example
who is looked up to by educators
throughout the district and the area.
We need teachers like Rebecca
Brown to solidify the foundation of
public education in our state. As a
kindergarten teacher, she serve as the
launching pad for educational success.
She has the first opportunity to shape
the educational future of our children.
She will represent us well during the
next year as the 2007 Columbia County
Schools Teacher of the Year and we
congratulate her on the honor.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Saturday, Feb. 18, the 49th
day of 2006. There are 316 days left in
the year.
E On Feb. 18, 1885, Mark Twain's
"Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" was
published in the United States for the first
time.
In 1546, Martin Luther, leader of the
Protestant Reformation in Germany, died.
In 1564, artist Michelangelo died in
Rome.:
In 1861, Jefferson Davis was sworn in
as president of the Confederate States of
America in Montgomery, Ala.
In 1930, the ninth planet of our solar
system, Pluto, was discovered.
In 1960, the Eighth Winter Olympic
Games were formally opened in Squaw
Valley, Calif., by Vice President Nixon.
*In 1970, the "Chicago 7" defendants
were found innocent of conspiring to incite
riots at the 1968 Democratic national
convention.
HIn 1972, the California Supreme Court.
struck down the state's death penalty.
EIn 1977, the space shuttle Enterprise,
sitting atop a Boeing 747, went on its
maiden "flight" above the Mojave Desert.
*In 1988, Anthony M. Kennedy was
sworh'in as the 104th justice of the
U.S. Supreme Court.
Five years ago: Auto racing star Dale
Earnhardt Sr. died from injuries suffered in
a crash at the Daytona 500; he was 49.
Death also claimed baseball Hall of Famer
Eddie Mathews at age 69.

Lake City Reporter
serving Columbia County since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is published with
pride for residents of Columbia and
surrounding counties by Community,
Newspaper Inc. of Athens, Ga.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities "Newspapers get
things done!"
Our primary goal is to publish
distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work.
Michael Leonard, publisher
Todd Wilson, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

OUR POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be typed or
neatly written and double spaced. Letters
should not exceed 400 words and will be edited
for length and libel. Letters must be signed and
include the writer's name, address-and
telephone number for verification. Writers can
have two letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of the


writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City
Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St.
downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com


___ '.4 G *
INN'. a __t 4


"Copyrighted Material

b | ISyndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


COMMENTARY


The sacrifice God seeks


For centuries under
the Law of Moses,
worshippers had
sought to please God
with sacrifices and
burnt offerings. Though these
things were commanded by
God, they just didn't work out
Isaiah the prophet wrote, 'To
what purpose is the multitude
of your sacrifices unto me,"
says the Lord ... When you
come to appear before me, who
has required this from your
hand to trample my courts?
Your new moons and your
appointed feasts my soul hates;
they are a trouble to me, I am
weary of bearing them" (Isaiah
1:11-14).
Repeated trips to the altar
with animal carcasses didn't
have the desired effect The
people kept coming but the
prophets kept telling people
that God (Yahweh) hated their
offerings.
The Lord himself had
commanded those offerings.
Why did he no longer want
them?
They may have missed the
scripture that says, "And now,
Israel, what does the Lord your
God require of you, but to fear
the Lord God, to walk in all his
ways, and to love him, and to
serve the Lord thy God with all
thy heart and all thy soul"
(Deuteronomy 10:12).
Lives had not been
transformed. Redemptive
communities had not been
created. Outsiders mocked
them and refused to be a part
of Israel. All this was the
opposite of what Abraham had
done, for the scriptures said,
"And Abraham believed in the
Lord and it was counted (credit-
ed) to him for righteousness"
(Genesis 15:6). God made
Israel (Jacob and his sons) a
light to the nations and his own
chosen people. They were
destined by God to become the
beating heart of an entire world
living to the glory of God.
Israel had missed the key
truth that Yahweh had always
wanted their hearts and not
their cate, their bodies and not
their burnt offerings. According


-.
i



Jack Exum
Phone: (386) 755-9525
jhexum@netzero.net
to the writings of Hebrews "But
in those sacrifices there is a
reminder of sins every year.
For it is not possible that the
blood of bulls and goats could
take away sins (Hebrews
10:34).
Paul refers to this in Romans
12:1-3: "I beseech you therefore
brethren, by the mercies of
God, that you present your
bodies a living sacrifice, holy,
acceptable to God, which is
your reasonable service
(spiritual worship). And do not
be conformed to this world, but
be transformed by the
renewing of your mind, that.
you may prove what is that
good and acceptable and
perfect will of God."
Jesus Christ was called to be
our Great High Priest. "For if
the blood of bulls and the ashes
of a heifer, sprinkling the
unclean, sanctifies for the
purifying of the flesh, how
much more shall the blood of
Christ, who through the eternal
Spirit offered himself without
spot to God, cleanse your
conscience from dead works to
serve the living God" (Hebrews
9:13-14).
Jesus paid the debt he did not
owe for a price we could not
pay. Paul writes in summation,
"For all have sinned and fall
short of the glory of God. Being
justified freely by his grace
through the redemption that is
in Christ Jesus, whom God has
set forth as a propitiation (atone-
ment) by his blood, through
faith, to demonstrate his. right-
eousness ... for by one man's
disobedience many were made
sinners, so also by one man's
obedience many will be made
righteous ... So that as sin
reigned in death, even so grace
might reign through


righteousness to eternal life
through Jesus Christ our Lord"
(Romans 3:23-25; 5:19-21).
It was a cold day in the early
1900s. The one-room school
house took all who desired to
learn through the ninth grade.
The new schoolmaster was a
scrawny sort and the older kids
delighted in tormenting the
teacher to distraction.
The new schoolniaster
approached his first term in a
unique way. "I want the
students to make the rules."
This strange beginning
appealed to the group and they
began to shout out the rules to
govern the student body. "Ain't
gonna be no cheating" one
shouted. Another voiced, "Ain't
gonna be no stealing," and one
by one the rules were written
on the faded blackboard. Each
law had a penalty to be imposed
without exception.
One day, Big Mike missed
his lunch. The law clearly
stated that the guilty party
would get 10 lashes from the
hated bull whip. Surface
information convicted a
youngster of eight as guilty.
The boy was pitiful.
He explained that he hadn't
eaten in two days, but the law
said "10 lashes without excep-
tion."
The boy's tattered overcoat
was removed and a thin shirt
revealed an emaciated body.
The teacher took the whip but
had no heart to whip the boy.
The law demanded and the
integrity of the system was at
stake.
As she faced the shivering
lad and drew back the whip, a
strong voice called out, "Wait a
minute teacher. I'll take that
whipping for that kid." Big
Mike took the beating and the
law was satisfied.
Isaiah said, "Yet it pleased the
Lord to bruise him ... when he
made his soul an offering for
sin ... He saw the travail of his
soul and he was satisfied.
Ah Grace, a marvelous word.
* Jack Exum is a minister and
motivational speaker. He is an
Amy-Award winning religious
writer and resides in Lake City.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & BUSINESS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2006


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Today

Great Backyard
Bird Count today
Calling all birders! It's time
again for the ninth annual
Great Backyard Bird Count,
sponsored by the Audubon
Society and Cornell Ornithology
Lab. All bird count data will be
collected and submitted to the
national database for research
to study bird populations and
migration patterns.
This year's public bird count
will be co-hosted by Natural
Encounters Environmental
Education Programs and the
Friends of the Suwannee River
State Park, and will be held at
the Suwannee River State Park
from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. today.
For more information,
contact Nancy Birmingham-
Hague at
naturalencounters @alltel.het or
call 364-4373.

Poker Run to benefit
family of crash victims
A Poker Run to benefit Diana
and Ricky Murphy, victims of
the school bus crash in Union
County, has been scheduled for
Saturday.
The event, sponsored by
VFW Post 10082 in Lake
Butler, begins with sign-in at
10 a.m. The first bike goes out
at 11 a.m.
The cost is $15 per poker
hand,: which includes a meal of
chicken and rice. Extra meals
will be available for sale for
$5 each.
The proceeds will go to help
the Murphy family with their
expenses. For more
information, contact Harold
Pittman at (386) 496-1140 or.
Annie Pittman at
(352) 258-9578.

Civil War Living
History Day is today
A Civil War Living History
Day is set for 10 a.m.-5 p.m.,
today on the grounds of the
Lake City/Columbia County
Historical Museum, 157 SE
Hernando Ave., Lake City. The
display will allow visitors to see
what life was like for women
and children in the
Confederacy, There will be
examples of hands-on period
activities and demonstrations
of Civil-War-era medicine. The
event is free.

Basket workshop
coming today
Learn how to make a
Shaker-style potbellied cathead
basket in a one-day workshop
today at Stephen Foster Folk


Culture Center State Park.
The basket is made'with
bottom corners that resemble a
cat's ears and has a potbelly
shape. Basket maker Katie
Avram of Sassykat Baskets in
Ft. McCoy will teach the class
from 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. at Craft
Square.
The fee of $36 includes all
materials, instruction, and
admission to the park.
All tools necessary for the
class will be provided by the
instructor. No prior basket
making experience is needed.
To register, call 397-1920, or
visit the Web site at
www.stephenfostercso. org.

Sunday

Dance lessons offered
at O'Leno on Sunday
Ever want to learn Old
Fashioned Circle, Square or
Contra dancing? ,
Come out and kick up your
heals and dance to the sounds
of the "Flying Turtles String
Band."
The dance will take place
'from 4-7 p.m., Sunday, in the
historic log cabin recreation hall
along the banks of the Sante
Fe River in beautiful O'Leno
State Park. Beginners
instructions starting at 3:30
p.m. The cost of park admis-
sion is $4 per car plus $5 per
adult and $3 per child for dance
entrance. :
For more information, call
(352) 472-7632 or
(386) 454-1853.

College Goal Sunday
set for this weekend
Lake City Community
College will host College Goal[
Sunday from 2-5 p.m., Sunday,
in the Allied Health Building
Auditorium.
What is College Goal
Sunday? It is a statewide
initiative that gives free
information and assistance to
students and families applying
for college financial aid. In one
afternoon, students can get
free help with starting their
application for financial aid.
College Goal Sunday targets
low-income, first generation
minority students who need
financial aid to attend college
and who need help applying for
that aid.
-This is Florida's first year
participating in this national
initiative. Dixie County students
are the targeted group for this
first application process,
however, any community
students and parents who wish
to attend are welcome. There
will be 22 other sites
throughout the State of Florida


that will be providing this
assistance to needy students.
If you would like to know
more about this event, contact
Debberin Tunsil, director of
financial aid at 754-4283.


Tuesday

SCORE to host
managing workshop
SCORE of'Suwannee Valley
is sponsoring a workshop
entitled "Hiring the Best -
Managing the Rest," from
11 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Tuesday, at
the new Holiday Inn, 213 SW
Commerce Drive, Lake City.
Local speakers will cover
topics including job applications
and interviewing, reference and
background checks, employee
retention, performance reviews
and termination procedures.
The cost is $25 including
lunch and materials. Call
SCORE at 755-9026, extension
3214, or John Pierce at
344-2472, for tickets. Space is
limited.

Audit Board scheduled
to meet Tuesday
The Finance/Audit Board of
the Lake City Community
College Foundation will meet at
noon, Tuesday, in'the Lake City
Community College Foundation
Board Room, downtown Lake
City. For more information,
contact Mike Lee, executive
director of the LCCC foundation'
at 754-4392 or 754-4433.

NARFE to host
monthly meeting
The National Active and
Retired Federal Employees
Association, Chapter 1548, will
host its monthly meeting at
11:30 a.m., Tuesday, at Quail
Heights Country Club in Lake
City.


Guest speaker Dorothy
Spradley, Volunteer Program
Director for the Columbia
County School System, will
discuss the school volunteer
program. For more information,
contact Jim Purvis at 752-8570
or purvislkcty@aol.com or
Ralph Hurst at 752-6593 or
hurst714@alltel.net.

Seniors invited to
tryout for Follies
Vocalists, dancers and
comedians who are 50 years
old or older are invited to
audition at 7 p.m., on Tuesday
or Thursday, for the upcoming
Swinging Seniors Benefit
Follies, set for April 11, at the
Alfonso Levy Performing Arts
Center. The auditions will be at
the Lake City Community
College Music Building.
For more information, call
752-7729.


Coming Up

Lake City Home and Patio
show coming soon
The Lake City Home and
Patio Show is set for March
4-5, at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds.
The show is organized by
the Rotary Club of Lake
City-Downtown and sponsored
by the Lake City Reporter.-
Downtown Rotary organizes
the event as its largest
fund-raiser of the year and it
returns the proceeds to the "
community through various
projects.
For more information on the
Lake City Home and Patio
Show, call Debbie Myles at
752-6575.

* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Todd
Wilson at 754-0428 or by e-mail
at twilson @lakecityreporter.com.


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MARKET REPORT


Feb.17,2006

Dow Jones

industrials

-5.36

11,115.32
Pct. change
from previous: -0.05


11,250
11,000

10,750
10,500
10,250
10.000


NOV DEC JAN FEB'
High Low Record high: 11,722.98
11,131.95 11,077.70 Jan. 14, 2000


STOCK MARKET INDEXES
52-Week YTD 12-mo
High .Low Name Last Chg %Chg %Chg %Chg
11,120.76 10,000.46 Dow Industrials 11,115.32 -5.36 -.05 +3.71 +3.06
4,447.32 3,348.36 Dow Transportation 4,404.34 -10.27 -.23 +4.96 +21.67
438.74 342.48 Dow Utilities 409.66 +3.30 +.81 +1.12 +16.26
8,130.19 6,902.51 NYSE Composite 8,092.42 +5.68 +.07 +4.37 +11.05
1,864.31 1,415.75 Amex Market Value 1,820.63 +10.57 +.58 +3.50 +21.25
2,332.92 1,889.83 Nasdaq Composite 2,282.36 -12.27 -.53 +3.49 +10.87
1,294.90 1,136.15 S&P500 1,287.24 -2.14 -.17 +3.12 +7.13
784.48 623.57 S&P MidCap 774.61 -.12 -.02 +4.95 +17.13
736.45 570.03 Russell 2000 730.94 -.98 -.13 +8.57 +16.00
13,016.59 11,195.22 Wilshire5000 12,971.57 -16.02 -.12 +3.63 +9.54

STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

A NYSE A AMEX 3 NASDAQ
8,092.42 +5.68 1,820.63 +10.57 2,282.36 -12.27


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
INCOwt 24.48 +2.59 +11.8
KeySpan 40.41 +4.23 +11.7
TorchEn 7.91 +.63 +8.7
Natl RV/h 6.50 +.49 .+8.1
GpoASur 31.'62 +2.22 +7.6
Mirant wtB 12.25 +.84 +7.4
Heico A 24.63 +1.68 +7.3
Innospec 21.24 +1.33 +6.7
MirantwtA 11.25 +.70 +6.6
WtWatch 52.79 +3.13 *+6.3

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
PXRE Grp 4.05 -7.84 -65.9
PremGlbSv 7.98 -1.01 -11.2
Ryerson 28.27 -3.23 -10.3
Smucker 38.25 -4.18 -9.9
RadioShk 19.08 -1.67 -8.0
ConstellA s 25.34 -2.04 -7.5
Guess 37.35 -2.80 -7.0
Constll pfA 37.77 -2.64 -6.5
BeckCoul 56.53. -3.63 -6.0
OrmatTc 35.70 -2.28 -6 0
MOST ACTIVE (51 oil MOuE)
Name Vol1001 Last Chg
Trr,.Vl i-, 1 ':1 71 17 7 I'
F .-FF G. w ot s 1c
El,,: 'p ai r. I? 1 A ', '
GerEl,: .'iS 1.? 3 32 I 6
Ues.I',.mnri "4i') 1 o.6.7 +3
AMD 207924 40.33. -141
Motorola 197159 21,49 71
ExxonMbl 188715 60.55 *

DIARY
A.e,:h,- ed I 71
I'Jr," r, ,,l 113
TC',I j .u e 'j 1.458
l-Aw L.2. 17
v,,lunie ;2 12/ 1:,.'3


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Flotekn 26.26 +2.76 +11.7
ApexSilv 18.28 +1.88 +11.5
Metretekn 11.90 +1.15 +10.7
Tarpon 2.57 +.21 +8.9
Isolagen 2.52 +.20 +8.6
SeabGldg 7.88 +.59 +8.1
,:,, : 4.67 +.34 +7.9
b6-ilTer, 12.68' +.86 +7.3
Dyadic n 2.78 +.19 +7.3
YM Bio g 4.97 +.34 +7.3

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
QComm 2.75 -.26 -8.7
ASpectRit 16.50 -1.50 -8.3
MS XM06n 13.90 -1.10 -7.3
Tgt S06n 8.85 -.65 -6.8
FlexSolu 2.66 -.19 -6.7
LeNik07wt 27.12 -1.75 -6.1
MidwstAir 4.98 -.30 -5.7
ValpeyFsh 3.21 -.19, -5.6
Rentech 4.31 -.23 =-5.1
Con.ri:.lrr 2.10 -.1.1 -5.0

MOST ACTIVE 1$1 OR MORE)
Name Voll001 Lasi Chg
cF C, :74157 12,81 j5
,P Er.y 123i55. 53'i1 t 3.
.:,rFi-. '0 / W ;'17 ;'12 7 .5 /i
'.eirTHTr 11 09i3 -' .8' 81
,3,,ilHT 103.l.IC" 136 5l 25
SPFrn,:I 7680. 324 13
.r, EAFE6A315 61 .3 18
B6maG341d 185c1 .4.03 +.07.
GryW.Il. 548881 7.20 -.14
iP util 3:9"5 32.30' -+.29

DIARY
Advar:.,l .537
1 n: / r., 3 6
ULIrnj 3r.. e 94
T..151,: ..ue. 1.021
I/9W H.h:. 52
if, Lo'.7 55
V.rjlurT, 248,733,140


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) ''
Name Last Chg %Chg
Spherix 2.88 +.68 +31.0 /
Margo s 8.88 +1.68 +23.3
Sapient 7.65 +1.18 +18.2
InetCmce 3.82 +.54 +16.4
DynacqHItn 3.44 +.44. +14.7
VASftwr 2.96 +.36 +13.8
CntlVyCms 17.00 +2;00 +13.3
pSivida 5.44 +.64 +13.3
Sentigen 5.23 +.61 +13.2
DitechCo 10.61 +1.16 +12.3

LOSERS ($2OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Air.Cu r 8 04 i -22 -1
,'I,,lrg .3 '4. -I /2 -I I 2
FrozenFd 11.91 -2.09 -14.9
CitzFnCp 5.55 -.95 -14.6
Ad,.qllr.il 9.20 -1 21 -11.6
Tal A T.er 8.85 --" 6 -10.7
Aware. 5.43 -.63 -10.4
ICOP Dgwt .2.15 -.25 -10:4
Intuit 49.25 -5.55 -10.1
XMSat 21.57' -2.41 -10.1
MOST ACTIVE (S1 OR MORE)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
iriu;,S 1226177 5.26 -.39
irae 1162565 20.61 -.74
riH./'FITr:C.'9770 41..21 -.33
JD':, r,,lh- 135-8 ,3.06 +.11
ODlrnc .,680132 30.38 -1.58 '
-'.ij'Ml.cro 48699'1 43 0 -07.
AplmM/il 416f.8"31 ;72- -2 4
Micrco/n 4(10093 226:' -7 1 1
, ; i658068 '8 ,.
CO3,i. 353603 1240 -4 .14

DIARY,
Advanced 1,397
D", red ., 1,628 :
10./3/65 3.l 153
New;Highs 181
New'Lows 13
Volume ')43 6 '65379


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


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NY Times NY 66
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n/u h n. r 'N 149
5P!A Amei. 14
SunMicro Nasd ...
TimeWam NY .20
Wa/Marn *NY .60


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20 66.27 -.37 -6
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16 28.19 +.08 +6.6
17 25.61 2 S -5
90.04 +i1 36 .12
1 57 24 -61 +2.9
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12 43.26 -41. +5,5
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MONEY RATES CURRENCIES
Last Pvs Week Last Pvs Day
Prrne R~. e 7 50 750 Aural.a I 3541 I 3548
,.:.:.uri Rlae 5.0 550 Bri n 1.7.105 1 7393
Fede,3l Fundr Hale 1 50 I 4 50 Canara3 I 1515 I 1573
T''"'iur,.: Euro. 8382 84108
?-morr. l,34 443 J3:, 11816 117 .
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c,' 4 Sw,[;rlr,,1 13102 13105
l'-ye3r 4 51 4 5C. rl-:r, .:,, .-: .. i. ,,1 : l i r,


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank PctMnIn Int
Name Obj ISMIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
AiT,-,:,rFuni'Fi i,, A CGwlr,A .p ?' 118 31 6'i9 0 i I 1 l8(B +2. 71A 5 75 250
V.n,3urr.1 lo. Fil5 00 7P 70 .15 118801 22 .9 I/A t69/A IL 3000 i
Amen.inr, FunrdA ICAAp LV f E.8 32.46 +1.9 +10.8/B +25.4/B 5.75 250
Fi I,r lirV-.l C':i ri 64 9 1 65.42 +0.5 +18.5/B +47.4/A. NL 2,500
Air,.ar.,Mn F.,,,d. m W.:r,r 1r LV 638i.1 :2.00"' +2.8 -781C +26.2/L, '; 250 '
PllL/ lr. iIPirA:. TotIl 168 i7 1 lJ4 -0.6 '*2/A +363/A IlL ..3' /39
D.-.l~,j:i,. VTS ,5 .'V 5v 5'"3 1- 2 78 +1.8 +14.2/A +70.0/A NL 2~.5 30
Fideii Irreil Margel1n LLC LSi ..140 19.33 +0.8 +9.8/B +0.7/C NL 2;500
Amrr,.:.,r, Furnd A r,,,:,A p MP 49 883 18.70 .+2.3 +6.9/C +50.2/A 5.75 250
Arrirn, ar, Fur.): A EupacAp IL 48 'j2 4.76 +1.9 +24.9/A +64:1/B 5.75 250
rrmenr:n Fund., A Ca.816Ap MP 4 .4r'1) 54.64 +1.8 +8.3/B ',62/A 575 5
Amerr,anr, Fur,. :A C,apWYVAp GL 45 54 37.94 +2.2 +17.8/B *i70 5IA 575 250
Vangua3.Ilr oFlFd In. il.. 5P 40 358 117.87 +2.2 +9.2/A +7:6/A. Il 5,000,000
Van,)j11r.l Arnmiral 5jOAdi l SP 3910:40 118.81 +2.2 +9.2/A +7.3/A NL 100,000
Amerin.:r. Furmn.i.A n PrAp GL 38 761 29.62 +1.2 .1611/C +38.2/B 5.75 250
F,.lrlry Ir'rv L.:.P r MV 38 3;.5 4129 +2.8 .15 UC +117.6/A IL L 2 5001
F,.lI I rn..i D Uvinil IL 3.761 34.01 +1 4 +21.2/8 .71 2/A IL 2500
Amii.,:3n FurN.IA 8.,l 61L 33'451 18.10 .1 +5.5/D .394/1A '5.5 250
Fdeir, Iive:I r1ins LIC 3: 4'3 i5.17 +1.1 +6.1/E +5.3/B NL 2,560
variju.afd Id. F os .:.lSI *C 31 329 31.16 +2.2 +11.1/C +15.6/C NL 3,000
vanuaril Fos, WlilI LV 2977,: 32.32 +1.9 +9.6/B +35.3/A NL' 3,000
F,jelnly inre: GoUC.:. 2 2 2257 66.23 '+1.4 +21.7/A +4.1/8B NL 2,500
Varguai.l Fd'., Welli BL 27 127 31.19 +1.4 +9.3/A +40.0/A NL 3,000
A,,arican Funds A FdlrvA p. LV 6, 141 37.10 +1.6 +17.5/A +32.1/A 75 5 250
F.delty inv,-l E.l in.: El 26036 54.84 +2.6 +10.1/B +24.6/C INL 2,500
Do0ge.iCo. Bao,,,i-e S BL 24 272 83.66 +1.2 +9.6/A +60.5/A NL 2,500
Fo2,MTy lr, vl Puri,m BL 2: 931 19.23 +1.6 +7.3/C +29.7/A NL 2,500
FrariTernpFrn+ A in.:omAp MP 2)(040 2.47 +2.1 +5.6/0 +52.9/A 4.25 1,000
FrankiTerrp Terrp A GrlhA p GL 22 C 5A 23.83 +2.1 +11.5/D +58.4/A 5.75 1,000
V.3rn.jua.d 11. Fd Tor6rd 16 8 2 1s, 13.01 -0.4 +1.8/B +28.3/C NL 3000
Fi deTly li've'. BlueCr.Gr LC 21985 43.84 +0.8 +7.6/D -9.5/E NL 2.500
Vanrrjua.d F.Js Pnrr.p i C' 21 982 68.59 +2.3 +15.9/A +25.2/B NL 25,000
Var.gquadAdmirl T1iSAamT, C 212032 .1.16 +2.2 +11.2/C +16.0/C NL 100,000
F,.dlty sipaanrr. Eq.1.lln SP 0447 45.65 +2.2 +9.1/A +6.9/A NL 100,000
I)3vi Fund.: A (J iVe. A LC 2/ I I7. 34.32 +0.6 +10.9/B +25.7/A 4.75 1,000
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PlMCO Adrminr PMi TolIlAd, IB 18 7/l 1'.47 -0.6 +2.6/A +34.6/A NL 5,000,000
Pr..,, Fund E.inr, El 18 29J 26.95 +3.0 +8.4/C +36.9/B NL 2,500 .o,
Fdeliry Ira1l 6alar,c BL 18 265 19.40 +0.9 +13.5/A +49.6/A NL 2,500 ,
Amer,r, nFuxir, A BrondAp AB 17 8 13.21 -0.3 +1.9/B +34.5/B 3.75 250
Vi.)gu,.ar,l il FaiJr lJ.FI P 17 46 117.88 +2.2 +9.2/A .L+7.7/A NL200,000,000 1
vanr,ar.7~1FaF l Hli,Cre HB ; /138 142.68 +1.1 +18.9/B +46.1/B NL 25000
F.diary inve:i DuvGin L: .1654 2'9.65 +2.5 +8.1/C +7.1/B NL 2.500
BL Bil',.. Ei El -Eu., i...: M Enr,@.n.i 1 3/ L L-Global Stock, GM -Gen. Muni, IB :Intermd. Bond, IL -
1r. Ie,....r.l / IS" LI *L a.1--" ap C...:' LC 13rge.jcap Growth, LV -Large-Cap Val., MP-Stock/Bond Blend, MT
*l.l...a,3,= -B .*r..-,n. T B..r..s P1 P -/., 5,, SS -Single-Stale Muni, XC -Multi-Cap Core, XG -Multi-Cap
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-.r.r; r. ar A., in -,r. .'.. E ,n'E.:.nom 20%.*Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest In fund.
NA 14, i a 5.1 IJE = 11Caa .i, qu.i:i,r. r1i = Fur..irn:.1 in existence. Source: Upper, Inc.

Stock Footnotes: q Di.dernd and ear ln,-: r,n Canadian d,Illari r,. D. oe.. r 1me.l tcorrl'nud-liu.lng standards
If = Lile ll,r.j wair EC r, J Fw in p3i 52 we '-a pi = Pr/ereil a rs = Slrci raE urdilqor. a r sar6 e bl ,'pi ollt lI el 1 5asi
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Mutual Fund Footnoles: u E '.hla dvidrand INL No up-laor.1a lei cha:ge p Fund asietO used 10 py dir lr.tri.,n ist3 0
i = Rlemptin.,n fee cr c.oriOg rl delaereda ales koal may apprv I = Both p armed r
Galners ana Losers must be w*.it. atl .2 Io be Is e is tables i left Most Actives mu. t wonnrm at lea a$1 Volume n
nundiadj 1of mknes Source: The A-5ocialed Pres adler f.guies are unIoffiwial


YTD
YId PE Last Cha'gChag


/JI-I -Y vi -T


- -


Page Editor: Randy Roughton, 754-0429


^X.lJ /V\









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2006


Students observe Civil War era


activities prior to re-enactment


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
OLUSTEE Most school
children rarely get the oppor-
tunity to talk to Civil War era
impersonators or see how
soldiers lived during the
days leading up to the Battle
of Olustee.
That changed Friday as a
result of the 30th Annual
Re-enactment of the Battle
of Olustee. More than
14 school buses carrying
several hundred students
from Jacksonville and other
school districts were at the
Historic Olustee Battlefield
State Park Friday, taking in
some of the knowledge, first-
hand from re-enactors and
living historians who were at
the park for the annual
re-enactment.
Jennifer Brown, a fourth-
grade teacher at Trinity
Christian Academy in
Jacksonville, was one of
many chaperones walking on
the park's grounds learning
history from re-enactors.
"We saw some unique
campsites and how people
lived during those times,"
Brown said. "The students
saw a washer-woman washing
clothes, a man playing a fife,
and they learned about the
different flags and the


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Dr. Bruce Armstrong, West Meadows Baptist Academy principal
(far left), looks at an Olustee Battlefield exhibit with one of the
school's students Friday at the historic park.


weapons, cannons and things
like that the kids loved it."
Trinity Christian Academy
had 96 elementary school-
aged children, who were
accompanied by chaperones,
. at the Olustee Battlefield
Historic Park for Friday's
activities as part of the
school's first visit to the
historic battlefield.
'This was a great experi-
ence, because it opened the
kids' eyes so they could see


what it was like they had
no idea," Brown said. "You
can learn a lot of things from
history like why things hap-
pened the way they did and
how people lived back then. I
think it's important that we
know our roots; where we
come from and what kinds of
things happened in American
history to give us a sense of
citizenship and pride in our
country."
Several other school


GLAUCOMA TREATMENT
MACULAR DEGENERATION
EYE EXAMS


groups who had been at the
park since early morning
were leaving just after lunch,
but students from West
Meadows Baptist Academy
were still touring the area.
Dr. Bruce Armstrong, West
Meadows Baptist Academy
principal, said this year's trip
to the battlefield and park
marked the second time stu-
dents from the Jacksonville
school visited the park.
The 45 students from the
school were, easily identified
as they wore light blue shirts
and could be seen through-
out the park visiting the
various tents and exhibits.
"The students like coming
out here," Armstrong said.
"They enjoy seeing the
exhibits and it helps them
relate to history."
Armstrong said he
believes it's important for the
students to have an opportu-
nity to see what life looked
like in the late 1800s.
"I think it (visiting the
park) gives them an appreci-
ation for their heritage and
also for historical things," he
said. "They've learned a lot
interviewing and talking with
the surgeons and about dif-
ferent things that were
around during that time.
We've enjoyed it."


Re-enactors simulate everyday life


during the time of the Cival War


By LINDA YOUNG
lyoung@lakecityreporter.com
Smoke from a campfire'
drifts through the woods. '
It mingles in the air with
sounds the thud of an ax as
it splits a pine log, the whistle'
of a train as the engine chugs
to a stop nearby, the ring of a
blacksmith's hammer as it
'stfikes','piece of'iron'.
The white canvas tent tops
visible between tree trunks
include some in a cluster
called "Civilians on the
Homefront."
"We're the village of
'Olustee a few days before the'
'battle, so nobody knows
what's coming. We're just
going about our daily lives,".
said Shorty Robbins, civilian
re-enactor and member of
Golden Teacup of
Switzerland.
Florida was the breadbas-
ket of the Confederacy. The
Union Army descended on
Olustee to try to cut off food
;and medical supplies. Many
'wounded were .cared for in
homes in Olustee, Robbins
said.
She used an 1860 portable


Singer sewing machine to
make a striped dress for her
2-year-old granddaughter,
Aurora Robbins, to wear to a
tea today.
'We're not able to bring our
houses out here. So, our tents
are representative of our
homes," said civilian
re-enactor Sarah Spivey of
Yulee.
Spivey was sewing by hand
and had materials to write let-
ters to soldiers, along with
paper, pencils and stamps to
send them in care packages.
With oranges in season, she
had a large basket full to hand
out to troops that walked by. '
Under open tents, carefully
arranged rocking chairs,
trunks and tables with
kerosene lamps represent
parlors. Visible through
half-closed tent flaps, colorful
quilts cover low beds.
"We're portraying the fami-
lies that would have stayed
home," said Terri Blocker, a
civilian re-enactor from Lake
City.
Some women spin, knit,.
crochet or sew.
"They would try to send
comforts from home," which


included socks, mittens,
scarves, clothes, quilts,
blankets and home canned
goods, Blocker said.
Comforts included some-
thing called "lint" used for
packing wounds in hospitals.
It was made by pulling the
threads out of woven cotton.
"This is something the
children could really help
with. The South made tons of
it -(lint) to send to the.
hospitals; the North had
factories," Blocker said.
* But children still played in
1864 and had treats.
Toys were often made of
wood. Acrobat, a simple toy
with a character that spun
around, and Table-Top-Nine-
Pins, a game similar to bowl-
ing that was played on top of a
dining table, were popular.
Dining areas, contain plates
of sugar cookies, snickerdoo-
dles and war cake. Water is in
glass jugs with lemon slices
floating on top, or in wooden
barrels with lids or a towel on
top to keep dirt out.
Baskets of apples, potatoes
and freshly washed green
beans stand in kitchens, along
with jars of dried corn and


candied orange peel. There
are small butter churns, wood
bowls for washing butter,
wood dish racks and metal or
crockery bowls for sinks.
In her kitchen, re-enactor
Becke Johnson with North
Florida Civilian Society in
Lake City tried her hand at a
period recipe for pickled
limes. Picklinv food with a salt
Ir ~-in-rgar brine "--was the
common w ay" tu pr>ser ve
foods in an era before
refrigeration, she said.
Holding a large jar she had
just filled with limes, garlic,
pimento and pickling brine,
Johnson said that pickles and
preserves were among foods
"that could keep and would
keep when they sent them to
the troops."
Among visitors to the civil-
ian re-enactors camp was
Melody Downey, with a
school group from Grace
Lutheran Church in
Jacksonville.
"It really puts a perspective
on how far we've come in life.
... They have to make their
own clothes.. They have to
cook over an open fire on
demand," Downey said.


OBITUARIES


Mrs. Delma L. Vining
Mrs. Delma L. Vining, 88 of Gain-
esville died Thursday afternoon,
February 16, 2006 at her home. She
was born in White Springs, FL and
had lived in Lake City since 1941
prior to moving to Gainesville four
years ago. She is the daughter of
the late Eli B. and Jane Thomas
Box. Mrs. Vining attended and was
a graduate of White Springs High
'School, she loved arts and crafts,
:" sewing and was devoted to her fain-
!ily, she was a member of Siloam
United Methodist Church in Lake
City, and is preceded in death by her
husband, Fred N. Vining.;
Mrs. Vining is survived by her son,
;Fred Vining, Jr., Lake City, four
daughters, Shirlene Fletcher
(Charles), Gainesville, Virginia
Miles (Milo) and Pat Hudson
(Mike), all of Lake City and Freda
Flamm (Edward), Mt. Washington,
KY, one sister, Elizabeth Norris,
Live Oak. Nine grandchildren,
Vicki, Brian, Troy, Miriam, Amy,
Lisa, Justin, Christa and Staci and
thirteen great-grandchildren also
survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Vining
will be conducted, Saturday; Febru-
ary 18, 2006 at 3:00 P.M. at Gate-
:way Forest Lawn Funeral Home


Chapel with Reverend Herbert Box
of Douglas, GA officiating. Inter-
ment will follow at Forest Lawn
Memorial Gardens Cemetery. Visi-
tation with the family will be one
hour prior to service. Arrangements
are under the direction of GATE-
WAY-FOREST 'LAWN FUNER-
AL HOME, 3596 S. HWY .441,
Lake City. (386) 752-1954. Please
sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com.

Mr. James Delano Works
Mr. James Delano Works, 69 of
Lake City, died Thursday afternoon,
February 16, 2006 at the Lake City
Medical Center. He was born in.
Harlan, KY and moved to Lake City
in 1971 from Shelbyville, IN. Mr.
Works retired from Occidental
"OXY Chem" in White Springs in
1992 after 20 years of service.. He
enjoyed fishing, cooking out for his
family and friends and spending
time with his pets.
Mr. Works is survived by his wife
of 49 years, Felicia Works, Lake
City, three sons, Roy Works, Tam-
pa, Jeff Works (Tammy), Ft.
White, and Jimmy Works, Jr.; Lake
.City, three daughters, Janet Tidwell


rDirect Cremation

$595* Complete
*(Basic services of funeral director and staff, removal from place of death o fiineral home
within 50 miles, refrigeration, cremation fee and cardboard alternative container.)

GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME
Ted L. Guerry Sr., L.F.D. & Brad Wheeler, L.FD., Owners
3596 South Hwy 441 Lake City, Florida 32025
K (386)752-1954 y


(Jimmy), Panama City Beach,
Tammy McCall (Rick), Panama
City, and Melissa Stallings (Bob-
by), Tallassee, TN. Seventeen
grandchildren and thirteen great-
grandchildren also survive.
The family will have a memorial
service at a later date. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWNi


FUNERAL HOME, INC. 3596 S.
Highway 441, Lake City, Florida.
Please sign. the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com.

Obituaries are paid advertisements.
For details, call the Lake City
Reporter's classified department at
752-1293


DIABETIC EXAMS
NEURO-OPHTHALMOLOGY
CHILDREN AND ADULTS


We accept Medicare, Medicaid, Blue
Cross Blue Shield and many more.
Eduardo M. Bedoya, M.D.
Board Certified
American Board of Ophthalmology

EYE CENTER OF NORTH FLORIDA
917 W. Duval Street, Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 755-7595


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter

Marching soldiers
Re-enactors of the 146th Pennsylvania Bucktails march around
Lake DeSoto as part of Monitor and the Merimac battle Friday
afternoon.



Want to swim with

manatees? You can


By LINDSAY DOWNEY
ldowney@lakecityreporter. comn
People attending the
Olustee Battle Festival today
can book a tour to swim with
the manatees in Homosassa
Springs.
Mike Sutton has been
promoting his manatee
excursions for five years at
the festival. From Jan. 1-
April 1, Sutton takes small
groups of twto six people at
a time to swim with the crea-
tures at $35 per person. After
April, the manatees swim
back to sea, Sutton said.
"Citrus County is the only
county in the United States
where you're allowed to do
this," Sutton said. "You get in
the water and you actually
can play with them."
People attending "Captain
Mike's APS Tours" can stay
in the water for as long as
they want, unlike some
dolphin tours where patrons
may be rushed, Sutton said.
:People lay on a surface in a
wet suit and let the manatees
come to them. Sutton
teaches people how to


interact with the manatees in
their ,natural habitat while
respecting their space.
"You only use one hand to
touch them," he said.
Sutton said calfs like to
interact with people, but
older manatees sometimes
don't. One adult manatee in
the springs, however, didn't
mind the attention.
"She was so big she'd let
the kids climb on top,of her,"
Sutton said.
Sutton nicknamed one of
his favorite manatees
"Wrinkles."
"He was a calf who just
loved people," Sutton said.
"He wouldn't leave people
alone."
In addition to promoting
his manatee tours, Sutton is
selling a wooden ship, wood-
en motorcycles and hanging
metal. "spinners," which
were made by his friends.
The spinners turn in the
breeze and come in an array
of colors, such as a green
spinner with 'a palm tree
cutout and a fuchsia
flamingo spinner.


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General 'Eye Care & Su'rgery





.- .,


...because there is so much to see

SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGERY


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2006


I:li


olerat ions on


(ISS Kennudy suspended


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


* -


m a mmdh 4w


VENDOR: Magnets heal?


Continued From Page 1A
Walt Treulieb said the
regular strength works for
most people.
"The major thing is it's safe
- there are no side effects,"
Walt Treulieb said.
The jewelry is made from
hematite, the mineral form of
Iron oxide, which is then
magnetized. Walt Treulieb
said the magnetic collars are


popular for pets.
'The dogs get arthritis a
lot," Walt Treulieb said. "It
seems to work very well for
that."
Arleen Treulieb wears a
black magnetic bracelet
around her wrist.
"It has literally gotten rid of
my carpal tunnel," she said.
"I'm amazed."


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"






*


OAKLAWN: Memorial
Continued From Page 1A


The ceremony also recog-
nized Columbia County
residents who came to the aid
of soldiers wounded in the
battle.
'"This year, we also remem-
ber: the sacrifices of the
"Angels of Mercy," the
residents who, much like the
soldiers in uniform, gave of
themselves under dire
circumstances and answered
the call to give comfort and
aid to wounded and dying
soldiers who were returned
to Lake City for treatment,"
Wilson said.
The Sons of Confederate
Veterans hosted a second
memorial service that
immediately followed the first
ceremony. During that


ceremony, officials read the
names of Confederate
soldiers killed in the Battle of
Olustee.
Eric and Traci Hillhouse,
of Fort White, brought their
6-year-old daughter, Selena,
to the memorial service. The
entire family dressed in Civil
War-era clothing.
"It's beautiful. We attend
every year," Traci Hillhouse
said of the ceremony. "It's an
honor to remember them."
Eric Hillhouse said his
great great grandfather
fought at Olustee and he
enjoys paying tribute to his
ancestor.
"He served the cause he
believed in at the time," Eric
Hillhouse said.


dh-i


~
- e -~


ANGELS: Mission of mercy


Continued From Page 1A
spirit of the dead soldier
appeared.
"You can't bury me," the
spirit said watching over his
dead body. "Who's going to
tend the farm? How's my
family going to find me?"
, Finally, another spirit led
him to "the light," where he
reunited with his mother in
heaven.
As Murray exited the tour,
she said the burial scene was


very sad.
"It's very moving," she said
of the drama. "It's very
realistic."
People can return to the
museum today for its living
history presentation from
10 a.m.-5 p.m. The re-enac-
tors will answer questions
about the "Angels of Mercy"
drama and there will be
medical re-enactments and
activities for children.


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Sweet on Olustee
Publix store manager Larry Rossignol (left), 'Miss Wezzie' Huelskamp, George Hudson Jr. of
Rountree Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury, bakery manager Chris Green, and bakery assistant Melissa
Stewart decorate the Battle of Olustee Festival opening ceremonies cake Friday morning.


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No-mb -f


- WAS -
40 ~ -


S. o411.

4b- go.


__ _- ~mrn


Here's My Card


-... ...
--, *":^ *,-


Lake City Reporter


Canoe/Kayak


* OLD TOWN CANOES SALES
* CANOEING HIKING





AMERICAN CANOE ADVENTURES
10610 BRIDGE ST. WHITE SPRINGS, FLORIDA 32096
(386) 397-1309
www.acal.com

Chiropractor


Lake City Chiropractic & Massage
Bring In This Ad
and receive a 15 minute
FREE CHAIR MASSAGE
B ^Exp. 4i'1,06
S. 512W.Duval St.
752-3877
Our goal is to provide Office Hours: 8am-6pm -
superior care to new and e. Op ,ion.
existing patients." BC/BS, Health Opilons, AvMed
Medicare, Medicaid and most others I


Collectibles


r -- -- -- -- ----- ---- -- ------------------ ---------------


Cards & Collectables IIAllstate.
You're in good hands.
Game Used Memorabilia Cards
Autographed Cards Autographed Mini Helmets
I Bring ins s in for I
20% Off All NASCAR Diecast
Now offering ebay listing service
.Ctjbcollect@earthlink.net I
"Collecting, Gifts, Just for Fun Something for Everyone"
L_, -- --- ------------ -


Computer


COMPUTER SALES and SERVICE,
New and used computers


Virus and
Spyware
Cleaning
Friendly, discreet
and affordable


Many parts and accessories in stock.
On Site network installations
Located 3 blocks east of
the courthouse on Hwy 90

HANKINS
758-6051


Mortgage


SFirst Atlantic Mortgage ;
of Lake City, Inc.
First Time Buyers Equity lines of Credit
Program Lard aLoarns
Second Mortgages Primary or Second
Retirance Homes
Debi C'nsonlidallon Lot Loans
" Frank McElhaney 888 SW Sisters Welcome Rd.
S Licensed Mortgage Broker Cell: 386.984.5217"
w, "The Know How People!" f ranaamlocbelsouto.net


Insurance


Mary T. Slay
Exclusive Agent

Allstate Insurance
Company
Life, Annuities, Mutual Funds
Auto, Home
757 W. Duval Street
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 755-6801
Toll Free (888) 755-6803


Moving

"We take your move as
I serious as you do."
I~ Mike Oosterhoudt
pOwner


Office: 386-754-2820
Cell: 386-623-1651 Fax: 386-752-2125

1780 East Duval St., Lake Ciy FL, 32055
miko70@msn.com Fla. Movers Reg. #1M585


Page Editor: Joseph DeAngelis, 754-0424









Page Editor: Joseph DeAngelis, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2006


I IkLf-ilih CHURCH OFi( HRMI NEMr-a I ITF I FNJTT-OER 0lUTFAH


In Order to Form a

More Perfect Union...

Each Februart as
we remember the great
leaders in our histori.L
these words from the --- --------
Constitution come to
mind... in order to t
form a more perfect
J. "
union" through freedom
from oppression. '
George Washington
recognized our need for /
freedom from British
txrann. .A century later,
Abraham Lincoln saw
the need for freedom W..
from slateri and the V
need for equality within
our own nation. In
God's word we read,
"There is neither lew nor
Greek, slave nor free,
male nor female, for you
are all one..." (Galatians 3:28).
Throughout historic our leaders have understood the need for equality
and civil rights and the role we as a nation play in forming a better world
l_ through upholding freedom.
I- FAs you celebrate "Presidents' Day", exercise sour freedom of
religion and worship in your chosen house of worship. While
US N'- you'ree there, prai for our leaders and for "'a more perfect union."


MONDAY TUESDAY
Psalm Psalm
36 62


I'EDNESDAY
Psalim
63


THURSDAY Y
Psalm
91


FRIDAY
Psalm
107


SATURDAY
Psalmh
138


Scrprure. --~S *:-,re t, T- Am mrcar, Baie S.:-,ceii
Cop:,yrjr.i 2O ..oiKel rzr-V larn, ri...-p.1iper '-riie. P Ci Bc-x8,187. Ch-arltre iiie. VA 22906,P ww,, kvne*s,-:,rr,


1-IH 'ill .-[.
I:'H,:.,Ie.3]', .-,: :.._ .
L r J F.I: -I I'Ob I. 4I
O'NEAL
ROOFING COMPANY
ROOFING INSULATION


I V M DENTiST
255 SW Main Blid.
Lake City
752-2480

Ronsonet
Buick-GNIC Truck Inc.
490 E. Dural St. (IU.S. 90 Easl)
Lake Cits. FL 32055
1-386-752-2180

Ironwood Homes
of Lake City
God Ble.-in. i N;i r ear'3r
A speciaI trirlar.; to all our cu lomer ; ol 2004
From Larry Martiri ,- 1g c q ,i :1 arav M.ffm
TIr. Whr.ail arid a riaBl1 Iegi-rir
Pnor.c:386-75J4-.844 FAX 386-751.01911
-4109 liUS 90W Laie FCi FL 2055S



Supercenter
'LIPI PRICES El FTRY D-"
US 90 WEST 755-6304


GIW, HIlunte; Inc.
cn.., Chevron Oil
N Jobber


': 178US9 Ws 75- 59


I


C,_, iq'ihloI h; ," I
ACCURATE GAR CARE
Car Wash
4114 \\ LIS H', ,,L. Lak C i,I FL
386-755-1125


FOOD STORES
hus 'Fij..0. w
10 36 L l .4v A t.,L A nhr FI..
i 3?nhi'"5211116'
Freih ejl, Fr-h Pr..duc!
i ,a + ,,,, ,... +,.. ,.,, .t, ,. .. ; ..t. +

LAKE CITY
CHRISTIAN SrUPPLY
216',I St\&ain Bliii.
L i6L rFL 3'21:24
Phr.nE- 386 1 5'-5"'5 Fa 1.38w '5- 5"'-3
Moni'-rin. l- s 1.1i5
Emall- chrliqbilvf.aul.i.c
COLUMBIA
(.4..-A ,4t _READY MIX
O CONCRETE, INC.
COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL RESIDENTIAL
LAKE CITY 386-755-2458
LIVE OAK: 386-362-4422
wwvv crmeon:rnrei coLni
-- "" '-I,, II I -i
,..k,. '. : ,....... -.. ... ..
.41'si'Inl ,TIIe"m. Iee. i -,, .. ....- ..-- ,,
.O oueT n s. n ,,,,.t,, 1,
Get In Gear For Bumi (amp Stua Lv
April 5"
0 \%cek (our.t-
386-755-4800 Loc led in Lcwrnilow, Lake CiTy

JORDAN'S CONCRETE
Footers House Floors Driveways
Shops Parios Sidewalks Additions
QL I ii I 'WORK AT A FAUR PUt'LL"
386-755-4919 S' )S
Licensed & Insured.- FREE ESTIMATES


"i(H S RINGC ,AN, LI- N FELLOWSHIP
: 4 I I *.'' '* i J \\ Fir't si reet
IStveih DaL, Adierinst C hurchi
Scund i' 1(1 ij0) N
hup i uvi'anrarngb.-tellowvhrp Arp
r v Claucda kahlis

BERLA BAPTfI CHURCH
SR-17 S *7559Lii0i
Sunday' Schoo)l 9 3M1A
SundaWi,,'hip (1:45, M&TPPM
W.ednr,',, E'. Sti 7P M,
F -, i, ir Lo r r f ,- a l

FELI.OWSHiP BAPTIST CHURCH
C242 West or C252 Wes[
sunday Schol 1lAM
Sumi. Worbhip. 1 I- ., 6 [I'M
rWed tl Servi.e 7, P
lRe lin Harison, Paistr i


FIRST BAPTIST ( CHURCH
"'lie Place for New Beginnings!"
['-or: Toy Vu..rnum
SUNDAY


Bible Study
iilinuigqa n.,s, ip
Sunday Ev-rling Worship
WEDNESDAY
Fami tly Supper
Student MinistLiv
Praver & BEile Stlud,
SIi ldreni's '. inist,3


9.15 4N!I
i0:31 ,.1.,
6.00 PMNi
5 30 FM
b:0ti PM
6 15 PM
6 15 PM


2 .i, s La- v ,of US 441 on Hvy.90
in lnDotwntLt- Lak.er,- *. -75 4 I. .752- 4.
Grafdve Covenant Bapdvti Church
4471 US Hy i90 West
il mile ivesi olt 1-75
Sunday Servicesv


Suday, Snol q
Worihip Ill
A\i.anri -
Bible Siud\
Wedns-da Pa yer 6
SPasroi usell Ta3l ir
ihuri Phune..752-14,7


11), IAM
I IIANM
DOWP~
IlliPNI
MF'I'ih


OLIVE II MSSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 sNF 1r60S Stlee
R,:ndd V. Wliei, Pastor
Sunday Schrol 94 4,df1
Sunday Morning Wnorslup II 00ANI
\Wed Mid-Week Vl'ordilp 6 00PII
'in Gid' Wrird, WViI ... Way
PRknRVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
'1 ii W Lake ItfTey Hd 752-11-1i
1Lt5e (, Florida 32i"55
Sunday Senices
Earl) Worship 8 30NlAI
Bible trud' 9:jq AM
klormnig\Voiship 11 0 u IA
Evening Wr, ship 600 PM
Wed. Eve S:Leduile
Family Supper Reseruationi 5PM
Youth Worsltip 5:30 PM
Prayer Meeting 6 PM
P-s-toi: iseph l IButler

CELEBRATION COMMNIM NITY CHURCH
Hwy 4' between FI, White & Columbia City
SLda) Sermi-:es
Bible Srudy 9AM
Worship 10t 151I
Wednesday Evening Sihedule
AWANIt,\ :UPM
Pra.ei -.d Bible Siudy 7 PM
Pastor Dick ShoTr* 754-.144


HOPEFUL BAPTIST CHURCH
"T he Caring Plcxe
415S to -HS, left on CiR 22
1o CR 245 1Price Creeki,
right nPn Lt Creek2 mnude, 752-41
Worship Service 8 31i & II ANI
Children's Churdh 8-30i & I I N!
Sunday School 945 _t
E v rang Wut-hip 7-PMl
Wveldnesday schedule
Family Supper 6, PI
'SLith Service 6:45 PMI
tChildreris Ch:oir 615 PM
Bible Srud, t., 4iS PS.I
Nurer-y Pr',.idEd
SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Servic:e, 1U 310 AM
Pastor Elder Herman Gritmi
752-,4198M
SOUIHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
600 E Baya Avenrue
Bible Stujdy 9:15 AMI
sun. Mor. I worship ]3flAM
Sunday, Eve -6t1PM
Wed Prayei Meeuing 6-Il, PM
NURSERI RM utED

ITABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
SuIndependent Bapristl
144 SE Moncnose At.e ?2--427
Sunday School 10 AT
Sun Muitm. W h)llLp 11 AM
Sunday Eve. PM
Wed Prayer NMeeting 7 m 30 PM
P3s[or: Mike Norman



EPIPHANY CATHOUC CHURCH
3.10 S Manion st -7512-4470
SaiurdayVigi NMass ... 5 PM
Sunday Mass i 15 AM, I10 30 AM,
500 PM ISpanishlEniigshl
Sacramrent o' Penantce Satuiday
,2 hr betorji 7PM MNass.
and 12 hr belme .31 0 At
Mass oan Sunday


LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hw, 247 .S 755.9431 ,


sunday School
Sun liotn. Worship
Wed Prayer Meeung


'9:30 AMN
II): 11 AM
7 PM


FIRST AD\TNT CHRISTIAN CHURCH
tciated at Hwyu47 Soth
McFarian.e Ae.,' 752-.39011
Sunday School (alld ages 10.00 AM
Wo-rshitp 11:00.U'ANI
Pastor Rev 1 arn, L 'eaton



CENTRAL CHURCHOF CHRIST
"Where Christians Meet"'
6130SUS441
755.j 320
SLin..AM Bible Classes 9301M
Sun. AM A.ssemnibly 10:30AMi
Sun PkM Assembly 6.00PM
Wed PM Bible Ciasses 7:0PM
MLnrm.tir Denis Weston
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF CHRIST
3614 H-wy 47 South 752-6010
Sur,. Bible Study 9 AM
Sun. Mor. worship 10 AM
Sun. Evening Worship 6 PM
Wed. Bible Study 7-00 PNi
MNJister Ryan Tuten


f ai ia J', ,U,-1,0 flb
[ hJ \e e InIble: hlndd' \\q',J


ii Ill
lilipSl
ill


LAKE CITY CHURCH O(F GOD
11i7 Ermine. St., 752-59l65
Sunday School 9.45 AM1
Sun. Wor;hip 10:30AM h ul-'1"
Wed. Fanmiy Night : PM%
Wed. YoVtih erie 7 I'eM
Ikieltir:iCHnull I ei
ANGEL (CIf CH OF 1,00GD
:'42 ari.head ,i *,d : 1-4
Surnda, .' h -34 .'
wtind r- r I 'J, 1 ,:, 6 '.tI
w d ipiriral fl'imiri7nt .PM
Shil I.. ',, ih iChurch
0.j nrd 21,C Llub,
Bibl,- Nrd
["i',t r h R, alhaJ

_T lIES EPISCOPU L CHURCH
C ,nor, Mc[. rIan: i. Baci mNorn -4
',t ,sW rlahlre
Laol ir -L 1202-5-i a-.75-'2218
r, .flnl -d nn ':,.-'Jd n1 i ri. i
Hul ., Eucharist Vtd S ..'uPNI
Holy Euhi uIriie IrIHAd S&un 10 PM
';-ga I ,l ,-IM'n '. PlM Wed 8-l .U l
Suppl' i irtI. Ithe R ,i-v. i [ Wl.- .\ariern
Uric,, ii lie k Ihrr"in e.I Iii-h1Rinrt
['ecoij ul MNusc Di Aifrmn, L e,

BETHELEHEM LI IHERAN
II imrules s.luth o1L Hi)I 41
Sund ', .khool iM 0JuAil
'SLIi morr inp ,i..,ultip II .jk\I
acito IJbllA Bud.
OURREDEEMIER LU riERAN CHURCH
LCMS
112 mile S c 7' i.-n s-; 47
r5.4:"qq
Sund Sernce. : ,1MI
It-Jr'ery ['Povinidedi
Chliri iJai iEduc.iinr H[oIur
Fr a3ll age1 at 1-4' 5,t1A
"'tartr. Rev Bruce A lirc

SPIRIT OF CHRIST [LU-ITfER.lN
Hft 9 i 1.5 mde,, Wet all-71- 75-.52 3807
Surd.;r ii', hup luf.uiNl
Fian ul,, Nigli lunibly
Al far Detalls, Handu:ap Acce'--be-
Piasor antams Bexaire
I .
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Sen ice;
Sutinda- S-.hool '4:45,AM
Sunday, \Voship-i [l''AM, 6: ,IPl
W.dne'ddN 6 110PM
Adult. Yuuth MntLrY, Children's Minictry
jdatei.-T-Care jin.s.Uy
iutr ,er Prviid-ed
i orner r o SW S 17 and Aalea Place
Formerly i-rury Church of the rNaarene


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
973 S. laririn Ave
Sunday shonl q ii .M
Sunday Mo ii rdng Worship
Contemporary Service : .9:0 ( .-
Tradlional Service 110t11 AM
Programi opportunities available
in ad arei ,for A] ages
For a 'rnplere ,i;chedidt-
,orita(I church iflc I t 7458
Pastor FAEid Paul
PLEASANT GROVE UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
1 mile S.of1-7-orn SR 47*752-3316,
Sund.r Morning Worship 11t I01
Nursery' Pua,.rded
Paitor Da,.td Kirk

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
ww.w wte ,lesqllemanl Ol
(Adjacent to Summers Schoulh
Sunday School 9 45 MI
Sunday IWrship 8.lrlAl4 & i.W10,401A
Youth MeeUng 5 Phi
Praise &W obrship P PM
NURSER) PRQ0 7DE1)
Panior: Louie Mlabrey

WATERTOWN CONGREGCATIONAM.
METHODIST CHURCH
LI S 9iu F rum cn Cortez me;.1 to Quaityh
[rind I garm on Weljn .iwa
Sunday Sihool 9:45 AN!
Sun Worship IA/M ,., 6 PM
W ined ergli rten e PM
Pastor R and e Ogburn

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
li23W.' Ba,, Ave *752-.jlati
Ealy Contemporary SN Wie. 9.01 AN!
Surd:a), school 9:5n.*is-
Ttadinonal Serv-ice 10Pli A'-
South Progr~am on W~ed
Krndergarren rbru Sr. High.
NURSEFRY' PRO WDED
Pntor: Di Ri:)i A Miartin-
Associate Pastor- Rev lanke C Kirk
M.lnister of M',usic BiDl Poplin

FOIST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
[Nr Vuinao Woav& NE Washingtor, St
Sunday School 10.00 AM
Morning Worship 11 0O AM
Evangeisric Serviqce 6 10 PM


Youth SermcEs Wedne day 7-00PM
Mid-*.ee. Ser'ice- Wednesday 7 00 PM
For infc ral 75- 1"8,A Evermone Wekomr
Pastor- Rev. Stan Ellis
DESTINY MINISTRIES OF LAKE CITY
412 Md essouth of 90 on 441
Morning Worship 10..30A.-1
Children's Church 1030AM
Pastor: Rev Tim Cheslie


LAI II% U Lrili


ETERNAL ROCK MINISTRIES
315 NW Brown Rd.
Pastor David B. Sands 752-6328
Sunday S hool 9:45AM
Morning Service 10:45AM
Evening service 6:30PMN
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 7PM
FAItING CREEk CHAPEL
filling Creek Road 755-0501
Fu-t a.d I lurd sunday, 9.1 AM.
Second and Fniurth Sunrdays 3:110 PM.
Paet:r. Rt. kCheryl t Pingel
KOL FHA MASHLACR
Messianic Israel Congregation
Pinemount IV tc Eurlev then left
,55-7922 or 755-1868 for irdo.
Saturday Sabbath Torah Sc, 3PMI
Tuesday Scnpture Study 7PM
lit %, 3rd hliu,. ea mnionth
Dance a i Worship Class 7PMI
Tea hing the Hebrew Bouts of the
Chrivsuan Paith.
Crr learn nith us'


To List



Your



Church



on the



Church



Directory


Call





752-1293!


PIbVt~'t
IV7a2L


Toa Cuc ir-Ca -440
J* I


Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc
..c.rrieiii.e ralve ririrfii
ihi.h r i.e in ,,ur ,,:,rrirmunir,,
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayeleclric.com

/lill1F1 W Hwy 90
KFC r752-1123
Stop in After Church and See
Our Newly Remodeled Store
and Try Our Delicious Bufiel.


MINisTRIs, INC.
iH 1 47 N.OiJih 7% -71S 7
I'd,.RU -hL -',elI .I alne M,:Daoiel
Schrduln al \'rx%-m ce
irnda 5.ho' l P-45 .AN1
,\3 hip Sf' .L'.kN10.t
\ .'-d Semrvir 7 (i0 PNI
For Ou reach \.I riLries
(-all 75b-. 13
5
1, [0 1 t] 0 zI I : /[ : i

CHRISI CENIlAL MINISTRIES
i eaderthip Ser. ices ,i41Sad
Sund a', .P\I, nt ii lAN
\Wvdnesda Fible 'udy, 7 01PM
[i. il Rd hinm H%-y 9) take
Slr-tiik'V.-li:,:,h,- Rd. gOi S inale., s OtLh,
,him,:) r~n I,-lu 759-..7'.r
..ui-J .ni j .
Arr, Pator, LOnnie lhrihns
,4'k,(CJI]IeP3'101 ot t. l.johric
SAChurch i,:n Ihe love'

CHRISiLAN HERI[,GE CHURCH
Courier sR S 47 &hiadclri Ccle
S ,, :.a ,rlI bra i ron 10:3i t AM'.
PRs[or I-ddte Tai],. 7'J-9' 119
.-io ,,pial itor iti Huririung."

MEADE MINISTRIES
DI -Itivy 47. toi Columba C it ,.
aune mle Et ,onr Cr 14fi
Mmdi'. tI iAN and 7PNi
I-liiir.nday gPk[
Nr olNurser ha, lable
sp, i lI,.i d or,_ hip
Healing and DeliJ.etance


TIREMART OF LAKE CITY
Tires tfdo r every neer.
US 90 Wei. across' frorn Wa -Man
752-0054


Morrell's
YotLIr Comnplcie decorating and
honme rurnirhirngi\ \t ie
,. I.ci-, l, l in .i, L iv= ih.,n.I f',.',,--vi'i,,i. ,.1 I
I '1 .
nY n .- ... ,








~NDERSON (fOLLU1NBIA (0., INC.
.SPILtJ PMING
(OMIERCL .[LNDLISTRAL
iir Pr r uI r Ri. -. Budi.'.i I' ', [.-L.
cI.uay ['& Draariagc
752-7585
2 NW Guerdon St Lake Citv

HARRY'S
""' Heo.ling Air Crndilr.ing Ir
m i r r, A 6, o Fr e g -Je .
Mi A.:.ieP,-ien

pun. 752-2308 4N%


Freedom Homes
Committed to Serving
Your needs
386-752-5355
www.freedomhomeslnc.com
World
THE MOVE Wide!
CONNECTION
L,:,,:l M1,:vini O S Ira,.e LongO D4I rnce
Pr:,esiran.l & Courlecu' Padrin l& Cu ang
200 N. Chestnut St. Lake City. PL 32055
13861 755-5595 (8001 755-5595

To Advertise
in this
Church Directory
Call 755-5440

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your La,,n & Garden Headquarrers
MOWERS 'CHAINS-A\WS' TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 %ES-T LAKE CITI. FL.
386-752-8098

lake city roup Rate4 Avaulable
SWih Advanced
-. Pewerva.iicln
Phone 755-2206
BRIAN MEEK
Owner/Manager *0:



i, i U ivh tliv I e ,.

386-754-5422
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FAITH


18,2006


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS


Former minister
returns to work


On (;ulf oast, faith-bawd groups


pick up the government's slack

o w. 0fo m


COURTESY PHOTO
Michael D. Stone
Central Church of Christ
on Highway 41 South in
Lake City has named
Michael D. Stone as
"Minister for Church
Growth." The minister
began his new work on
Feb. 12. Mr. Stone
previously served the
church in planning and
implementing church
growth strategies. Denis
Westin serves the church
as pulpit minister.
The new minister brings
years of experience into
this new work. He is
considered by some to be
an authority in church
growth issues. He is a
native of Okla., but has
lived in Florida for many
years. He and his wife Ann
reside in Baker County. His
formal education includes
graduation from Shawnee
High School in Shawnee,
Oklahoma. He has two
degrees from
Freed-Hardman University
in Tennessee, a master's
degree from Troy State
University, in Alabama,, and
a doctorate from Southres;.t
Seminary.
Mr. Stone states, "It is
'good to be back working
again in Lake City and to be
associated with the fine
people of this area. We
invite you to make Central
Church of Christ your.
.church home." ,

Church petitions
against sexual law
SAN FRANCISCO At
least 21 out of 173 regional
bodies in the Presbyterian'
Church (USA) have
petitioned a June legislative
assembly to repeal a
church law that bars clergy
and lay officeholders living
in relationships outside
heterosexual marriage.
The tally was reported by
the San Francisco-based
Covenant Network of
Presbyterians, which has
long advocated repealing
the law. Wednesday was the
deadline for such
legislation.
The bills ignore a special*
task force's plea against
making changes this year
to help keep the church
unified in the face of
divisions over the role of
gays in the denomination.

Bill would ban
'intelligent design'
MADISON, Wis. Two
Democratic lawmakers,
introduced a bill to ban
public schools from ':
teaching "intelligent
design" as science, saving
"pseudo-science" should
have no place in the
classroom. ,
The proposal is the first
of its kind in the country,
the National Conference of
State Legislatures said.
The measure would
require science
curriculums to describe
only natural processes and
follow definitionral judge in
Pennsylvania outlawed a
school district's policy of
reading a statement to
classes citing intelligent
design options.
* From staff and wire reports.


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The Beginning of Human Life


S science tells us that
within the first
thirty seconds of the
male sperm
impregnating the
female ovum, twenty-three of
the fathers forty-six
chromosomes and
twenty-three of the mothers
forty-six chromosomes
combine to form a new'
individual. At this instant the
genetic code determining a
host of innate traits such as
eye and hair color, gender,
foot size, height, etc., are set.
The zygote (the fertilized
female ovum) now travels
through the fallopian tube to
the uterus and attaches itself
to the inside. Nourished by'
the mother, the embryo
begins to grow. Early on the
embryo resembles little more
than a lump of tissue, but it is
living tissue. If it is left
.unhindered, it will grow into
a baby.


CHRISTIAN CONCEPTS


Gary B. King
gbktdwh@yohoo.com
I mention all of this
because the State of Indiana
is considering passage of a
law requiring women who
are seeking an abortion be
told that life begins at
conception. Indiana state
representative John Ulmer
voted against the proposed
bill. He stated, 'To put our
religion or faithful beliefs
into a statute that's going to
be law, .without being able to
back it up scientifically, I
have real hard questions
about doing that."


"For Thou didst form my inward parts;
Thou didst weave me in my mothers
womb."
Psalm 139:13
(NASB)


I guess Ulmer slept
through his high school
biology class. Spermatozoa
are alive. In fact, one form of
birth control is the use of a
spermicide. There is no need
to make a chemical to kill
them unless they are alive.
Ova are alive. When they are
joined together the resulting
zygote is alive. This is not a
matter of religious belief; it is
scientific fact.
I read about spermotozoa,,
ova and zygotes in science
textbooks. These terms do
not exist in the Bible. I can
assure my readers that
human reproduction as


taught in a biology textbook
was not predicated on
scriptural doctrine. And I feel
confident in saying that
representative Ulmer never
read in a biology textbook
that a dead sperm
impregnated .a dead ovum
and produced a living baby.
Since Ulmer is having a
' problem differintiating
between scientific fact and
religious belief, I will clarify
another point of confusion.
Scientific observations of
human conception are
nothing more than an
observation of life's
existence and the process by


which it continues to exist.
Science does not have the
first clue about how life
began. '
-Life began so far in the
distant past that it was
unobserved and ergo. wholly
outside the scope of scientific
scrutiny. The whole scientific
community is not in
possession of a single
scientific fact about the origin
of life. Scientists may hazard
a guess, but it is an
uneducated guess.
Science does not know
how lifebegan. Science can
observe that life exists and
the process by which it
continues to exist Science
also knows how to end life.
Those are the facts.
What you do with the facts
will be determined by what
you believe.
* Gary B. King is a Christian
writer and speaker who lives in
Lake City.


CHURCH NOTES


Gospel Sing
planned for today
Divonia Baptist Church will
have a Gospel Sing starting at
6:30 p.m. tonight. The group.
Delivered will perform. There
will be refreshments after the
sing. The church is located on
Highway 129 South between
Jasper and Live Oak.

Eight-week spiritual
survival course
Celebration Community
Church will start a 50-day
spiritual adventure call, "More
Than Survivors: What it Takes
to Thrive Spiritually." The
program will take place from
Sunday through April 9. The
program consists of weekly
sermons each with its own
theme. If you are interested and


want to know more about this
spiritual adventure, call
754-1144. The church's weekly
service starts at 10:15 a.m. on
Sunday.

Dual Day
planned for Sunday
Union A.M.E. Church will be
hosting its Annual Dual Day
program Sunday. The women
will be in charge of the 11 a.m.
service. The speaker for the
hour will be Revrond Patricia
McGeathey, members of
St. Stephens A.M.E. Church,
Jacksonville and Union A.M.E.
Church Mass Choir will render
the music.
At 3 p.m., the men are in
charge of the service, with the
Rev. Calvin McFadden as the
speaker for the hour. He is also
the pastor of Community of
Faith Church, Tallahassee.


Beth Taylor to
speak Monday
The Lake CityWomen's
Aglow Community Lighthouse
will meet at 7 p.m., Monday, at
Christian Heritage Church
located at 159 SW Hudson
Lane. Sign in will be at
6:45 p.m. and the meeting will
begin at 7 p.m. The speaker for
the evening will be Beth Taylor.
For more information, call
719-8941.

Youth Rally planned
for Feb. 25
Pine Grove Baptist Church
will have a Raise the Roof
Youth Rally from 5:30-9 p.m.
Feb. 25. There will be music,
free pizza and drinks, games
and give-aways as well as a
guest speaker and a


performance by "Heaven's
Grace." The church is located
at 1989 North U.S. 441.


New Beginning Church will
celebrate its ninth year with
homecoming with John Lhnier
at 10 a.m. Sunday with dinner
following morning services.
Revival with John Lanier will
begin at 6 p.m. Sunday and at.
7 p.m. through Wednesday. The
church is located on 242 East
of Branford Highway. For more
information, call 758-7802.

Homecoming
services planned
Huntsville Baptist Church is
celebrating their 27th
homecoming. Dr. Fred Williams


from Dothan, Ala., will be
bringing the message starting
at 10:45 a.m. Sunday and
Thursdavu The church is Incat.ed


gospel Smng
planned for Feb. 25
. Watertown Congregational
Methodist Church will have a
Gospel Sing at 7 p.m., Feb. 25,
featuring Stephen Jones.

Sunday service
planned for today
Destiny Ministries of Lake
City Pentecostal Faith would
like to invite you to their Sunday
service at 10:30 a.m., with the
Rev. Tim Cheshire.


Saturday, February


9A


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Homecoming revival at 5720 NW Lake Jeffery Road.
planned for Sunday


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2006


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Page Editor: Joseph DeAngelis, 754-0424


Lai


'








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakeatyreportercom
Saturday, February 18, 2006


SPORTS


www.Iakecityreporter.com


m* 4-., a ,0.44 : -


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16 vie for


I all of I[ame


,COREYDAVISIL "-w ':- '-,p,;I,-
Senior shortstop Amanda Edenfield cuts the ribbon signifying the grand opening of Dreamcatcher Field
'prior to Fort White's home game against Lafayette Friday night. .


Indians win wild one


Kali Hunter's
two triples power
Fort White to victory.
By COREY DAVIS
cdavis@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE -After
struggling at the plate against
Dixie County the other night
junior first baseman Kali
Hunter did 'what any other
teenager girl would do -go
shopping for a new bat of
course.
Since then, Hunter has been
on fire with eight RBI's in her
last two games, including six in
the Indians 15-14 win over
visiting Lafayette last night.
A night after hitting a two
run home run,. Hunter followed
that up with two three-run
triples last night.
"I've been doing pretty good,
I've been hitting the right pitch-
es, it helps to have the team
behind me," Hunter said. "I
bought a new bat the other
night and I don't know things


have been going well ever
since."
Fort White head coach
Frank Howell needed Hunter's
bat and many. others as the
Indians found themselves trail-
ing twice, 4-0 and 7-4, before
rallying for the win.
Down 7-6, an eight-run fifth
inning helped the Indians take
the lead for good as all but one
hitter in the lineup scored on
three hits, one walk and tivo hit
batters.'
Amanda Edenfield singled,
Laicey Geiger walked with the
bases loaded for a RBI and
Ashley Bishop was hit by a
pitch to start the inning.
Ahead 14-7, Howell had to
feel comfortable at least for one
inning, but Lafayette wouldn't
go away scoring four in the
top of the sixth to cut the lead
to 14-11.
"I was thinking, 'Which team
is coming up.every inning?' We
made little mental mistakes not
physical ones," Howell said,
"Making mental mistakes has
cost us big this year. If we don't


make so many mental mis-
takes, we are 5-0. Our offense
is good enough to carry us if
we make mistakes."
Lafayette made it even more
interesting in the top of the sev-
enth, scoring three runs with
less than two .outs before
Danielle Thomas' pop up to
third was pulled down by
Jordan Spires, leaving the tying
run on third \ith two outs.
Hunter went 2-for-4 with six
RBI's, Alexi Hodson 2-for-4
with one RBI and Amanda
Edenfield 2-for4 to lead the
Indians.
"Kali is a great hitter, both
triples were up the middle.
She's been pulling the ball
often. We've been working with
her to hit up the middle. She's
been one of our most consis-
tent hitters."
Fort White defeated host
Branford 13-8 on Thursday
night behind the hitting of Julie
Cole and Jessica Gayheart.
Both were 2-for-3 on the night
as Cole scored four runs and
had three stolen bases.


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Section B


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2006


TELEVISION


TV Sports

Today
AUTO RACING
10:30 a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nextel Cup, "Happy
Hour Series'," final practice for Daytona 500,
at Daytona Beach
I p.m.
TNT NASCAR, Busch Series, Hershey's
Kissables 300, at Daytona Beach
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Malaysian
Open, third round, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
(same-day tape)
II a.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour and PGA Tour
Australasia, Jacob's Creek Open
Championship, third round, at Findon,
Australia (same-day tape)
1:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour,The ACE Group
Classic, second round, at Naples
3 p.m.
ABC PGA Tour, Nissan Open, third
round, at Pacific Palisades, Calif.
6:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, SBS Open, final round, at
Kahuku, Hawaii
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN2 Bucknell at N. Iowa
I p.m.
ABC Regional coverage, N.C. State at
Virginia Tech or Iowa St. at Oklahoma
1:30 p.m.
CBS Kentucky at South Carolina
2 p.m.
ESPN Charlotte at Fordham
ESPN2 Missouri St. atWis.-Milwaukee
3:30 p.m,
ESPN CLASSIC Mississippi at
Mississippi St.-
3:45 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage, Missouri at
Kansas or Connecticut atWestVirginia
4 p.m.'
ESPN Michigan at Michigan St.
ESPN2 Marist at Old Dominion
6 p.m.
ESPN2 Louisiana Tech at S. Illinois
8 p.m.
ESPN2 George Mason atWichita St.
FSN Arizona St. at California
9 p.m.
ESPN Louisville at Syracuse
Midnight
ESPN Fresno St. at Creighton
NBA
8:30 p.m.
TNT Exhibition, Shooting Stars, skills
challenge, three-point shootout, slam dunk
competition, at Houston
OLYMPICS
5 a.m.
CNBC Men's hockey: Russia vs.
Kazakhstan, Italy vs. Germany, Canada vs.
Switzerland, and Sweden vs. Latvia, at Turin, Italy
8 a.m.
USA Men's curling: U.S. vs. Germany, at
Turin, Italy ,
Noon
NBC SAME-DAY TAPE: cross country:
women's relay gold medal final; biathlon: men's
pursuit gold medal final; LIVE: men's hockey:
U.S. vs. Slovakia; SAME-DAY TAPE: short track
speed skating: women's 1500m semifinals, at
Turin, Italy '
3 p.m.
CNBC Men's hockey: Czech Republic
. vs. Finland, at Turin, Italy
5 p.m.
MSNBC Women's curling. U.S. vs. Italy,
atTurin, Italy (same-day tape)
8 p.m.
NBC -Alpine skiing: men's super-G gold
medal final; short track speed skating: men's
I 000m gold medal final; women's 1500m gold
medal final; speed skating: men's 1000m gold
medal final; ski jumping: K125-large hill iridivid-
ual gold medal final; bobsled: two-man compe-
tition, at Turin, Italy (same-day tape)
Midnight
NBC Biathlon: women's' pursuit gold
medal final; Medals Plaza: award ceremonies, at
Turin, Italy (same-day tape)
I a.m.
NBC Primetime replay, at Turin, Italy,
(delayed tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2 p.m.
FSN Kansas at Iowa St.
4 p.m.
FSN Southern Cal at UCLA
6 p.m.
FSN California at Arizona St. .

BASKETBALL

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New Jerse9 28 23 .549 -
Philadelphia 25 27 .481 3i/
Boston 20 32 .385 8/A
Toronto 20 33 .377 9
NewYork 15 37 .288 13%
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 33 20 .623. -
Washington 26 25 .510 6
Orlando 19 32 .373 13
Atlanta'':: 16 34 .320 5'15".
Charlotte 14 40 .259 19ui
Central Division ,
W L Pct GB
Detroit 42 9 .824 -
Cleveland 31 21 .596 II A
Indiana 26 23 .531' 15
Milwaukee 27 25 .519 15'A
Chicago 23 29 .442 19'/
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
"W L Pct GB
Dallas 41 II .788 -
San Antonio 40 12 .769 I
Memphis 29 23 .558 12
New Orleans 29 23 .558 12
Houston 22 31 .415 19'/
Northwest Division


W L Pct GB
Denver 28 26 .51 -
Utah 25 27 .481 2
Minnesota 23 29 .442 4
Seattle 20 33 .377 7'/
Portland 18 33 .353 8'
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
Phoenix 35 17 .673 -
L.A. Clippers 30 21, .588 4'
L.A. Lakers 26 26 .500 9
Golden State 24 28 .462 II
. Sacramento 24 29 .453 1I'1


Thursday's Games
Chicago 117, Philadelphia 84
Phoenix 109, Houston 75
Friday's Games
No games scheduled
Today's Games
No games scheduled
Sunday's Game
All-Star Game, at Houston
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
Orlando at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Memphis, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Seattle at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Boston at Utah, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at Denver, 9 p.m.
Golden State at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Portland at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.

College scores

Thursday
EAST
Boston College 65, Miami 54
Cent. Connecticut St. 74,Wagner 55
Fairleigh Dickinson 85, Sacred Heart 76
Long Island U. 74, Robert Morris 69
St. Francis, NY 69,.St. Francis, Pa. 46
SOUTH
Coll. of Charleston 72,The Citadel 52
E. Kentucky 72,Jacksonville St. 71
Florida Atlantic 93, ETSU 87
Gardner-Webb 74, Belmont 66
IUPUI 65, Centenary 49
Lipscomb 82, Campbell 70
Louisiana-Lafayette 76, New Orleans 69
Murray St. 77,Tennessee St. 52
Norfolk St. 52, Hampton 51I
Northwestern St. 79, Nicholls St. 70
SE Louisiana 42, Louisiana-Monroe 40
Samford 76, Morehead St. 52
South Alabama 66,Troy 52
Tennessee Tech 74,Tenn.-Martin 72
MIDWEST
Butler 62, Loyola of Chicago 50
Marquette 57, Georgetown SI
S. Utah 89,W. Illinois 82
Valparaiso 70, Chicago St. 64
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas St. 75, Middle Tennessee 74
Oral Roberts 86, UMKC 79
Texas-San Antonio 74,Texas-Arlington 71
W. Kentucky 74,Ark.-Little Rock 73
_.% FAR WEST
California 75,Arizona 66
N.Arizona 82, Montana St. 73
Oregon St. 71,Washington St. 62
Portland St. 80, Idaho St. 73
San Diego St.81,UNLV 70
Stanford 82,Arizona St. 69
Washington 75, Oregon 72

Top 25 games

Today's Games
No. I Connecticut at No. I I WestVirginia,
3:45 p.m.
No. 3 Memphis at Tulane, 8 p.m.
No. 5 Gonzaga at Loyola Marymount,
6 p.m., ;-., ...........
No. 7 George Washington at Richmond,
7 p.m.
No. 8 Tennessee at Alabama, 4 p.m.
No. 9 Pittsburgh at Marquette, 9 p.m.
No. 10 Florida at Arkansas, 2 p.m.
No. 12 Ohio State vs. Northwestern,
Noon
No. 16 Michigan State vs. Michigan, 4 p.m.
No. 18 Iowa at Minnesota, 4:30 p.m.
No. 19 Oklahoma vs. Iowa State, I p.m.
No. 20 Washington at Oregon State,
10 p.m.
No. 21 N.C. State atVirginiaTech, I p.m.
No. 22 Kansas vs. Missouri, 3:45 p.m.
No. 24 Bucknell at Northern Iowa, Noon
No. 25 LSU atAuburn, 6 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 2 Duke vs. Miami, 5:30 p.m.
No. 4 Villanova vs. No. 17 Georgetown,:
Noon
No. 6 Texas at Oklahoma State, 1:30 p.m.
No. 14 Illinois vs. Indiana, 3:30 p.m.
No. 15 UCLA at Southern California,
8 p.m.
No. 23 North Carolina at Wake Forest,
1:30 p.m.

BASEBALL

College scores

Thursday
Brewton Parker 15, Faulkner 4
Liberty 4, Longwood 3

AUTO RACING

Daytona 500 lineup

At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach
Sunday race
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (31) Jeff Burton,, Chevrolet,' 189.151
mph.
2. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 188.877.
3. (38) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 188.810.
4. (5) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, 187.570.
5. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 186.614.
6. (26) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 187.743.
7. (8) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
185.124.
8 i43i Bobby Lsbo,-te. Dodge, 187 935
9 q468) jimmie Johnr.;on Che/rolet. no
speed.
10. (6) Mark Martin, Ford, 186.436.
11.(17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, no speed.
.12. (45) Kyle Petty, Dodge, 184.794.
13. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 187.539.
14. (42) Casey Mears, Dodge, 186.127.
15. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 187.196.
16. (16) Greg Biffle,. Ford, 186.672.
17. (II) Denny Hamlin, Chevrolet,
187.488.
S18. (12) Ryan Newman, Dodge, 185.774.
19.(I) Martin TruexJr., Chevrolet, 185.242.


20. (7) Robby Gordon, Chevrolet, 186.850.
21. (66) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, 186.990.
22. (41) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 186.289.
23.(21) Ken Schrader, Ford, 186.043.
24.(09) Mike Wallace, Dodge, 182.953.
25. (88) Dale Jarrett, Ford, 188.849.
26. (19) Jeremy Mayfield, Dodge, 186.908.
27. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 186.691.
28. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 187.406.
29. (49) Brent Sherman, Dodge, 182.142.
30. (55) Michael Waltrip, Dodge, 183.411.
31. (61) Kevin Lepage, Ford, 186.097.
32. (40) David Stremme, Dodge, 184.543.
33. (36) Bill Elliott, Chevrolet, 187.715.
34. (22) Dave Blaney, Dodge, 184.566.
35. (25) Brian Vickers, Chevrolet, 187.239.
36. (18) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 187.207.
37. (07) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 187.786.
38. (01) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet,
187.402.
39. (14) Sterling Marlin, Chevrolet,
187.274.
40. (32) Travis Kvapil, Chevrolet, 187.106.
41. (00) Hermie Sadler, Ford, 187.025.
42. (27) Kirk Shelmerdine, Chevrolet,
185.361.
43. (96) Terry Labonte, Chevrolet, past
champion.
Failed to Qualify
44. (10) Scott Riggs, Dodge, 180.890.
45. (78) Kenny Wallace, Chevrolet,
181.594.
46. (4) Scott Wimmer, Chevrolet, 184.854.
47. (23) Mike Skinner, Dodge, 182.771.
48. (74) Derrike Cope, Dodge, 183.333.
49. (52) Larry Gunselman, Dodge, 181.214.
50. (37) Chad Blount, Dodge, 181.906.
51. (50) Larry Foyt, Dodge, 185.128.
52. (59) Andy Belmont, Chevrolet, 179.960.
53. (64) Randy Lajoie, Chevrolet, 184.540.
54. (89) Morgan Shepherd, Dodge,
183.576.
55. (92) Chad Chaffin, Chevrolet, 181.763.
56. (80) Carl Long, Ford, 176.935.
57. (15) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 185.334.
58. (95) Stanton Barrett, Chevrolet,
185.322.

HOCKEY

NHL standings

EASTERN, CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W LOT Pts GF GA
N.Y. Rangers .35 15 8 78 189 142
Philadelphia 33 16 9 75 195 186
New Jersey 30 22 6 66. 170 166
N.Y. Islanders 25 27 4 54 165 200
Pittsburgh 14 34 II 39 165 235
Northeast Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Ottawa 37 14 5 79 223 137
Buffalo 36 15 5 77 186 158
Montreal 26 22 8 60 160 180
Torqnto 27 25 5 59 178 191
Boston 24 24 10 58 168 180
Southeast Division
W LOT Pts GF GA
Carolina 39 14 4 82 215 176
Tampa Bay 32 22 4 68 180 168
Atlanta 26 26 6 58 194 203
Florida 22 27 8 52 154 178
Washington 19 32 5 43 156 217
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central 'Division '
W L OT Pts GF GA
Detroit 39 13 5 83 208 142
Nashville 34 18 6 74 183 169
Columbus 23 33 2 48 147 209
Chicago 18 31 8 44 145 199
St. Lohis 16 31 9 41 153 210
Northwest Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Calgary 33 17 7 73 153 144
Vancouver 33 21 5 71 198 180
Colorado 32 21 6 70 213 187
Edmonton 30 20 8 68 193 186
Minnesota 29 25 5 63 176 153
Pacific Division
W LOT Pts GF GA
Dallas 38 '17 3 79 192 156
Los Angeles 32 23 5 69 203 200
Anaheim 27 19 II 65 168 159
San Jose 27 21 8 62 174 172.
Phoenix 27 28 4 58 171 192
Olympic break no games scheduled.
Games resume Tuesday, Feb. 28.

OLYMPICS

Daily schedule

Alpine Skiing
Men's Super G, 5 a.m.
Biathlon
Women's I 0km Pursuit, 6:30 a.m.
.Men's 12.5km Pursuit, 8:30 a.m.
Bobsleigh
Men's Two (run 1), 11:30 a.m.
Men'sTwo (run 2), 1:20 p.m.
Cross-Country Skiing
Women's 4x5km Relay, 3:45 a.m.
Curling
Men
Germany vs. United States, 8 a.m.
Canada vs. Italy, 8 a.m.
Switzerland vs. Britain, 8'a~m.
Finland vs. Norway, 8 a.m.
Women
Britain vs. Italy, 3 a.m.
Russia vs. Switzerland, 3 a.m.
Sweden vs. Denmark, 3 a.m.
Japan ys. Canada, 3 a.m.
Japan vs. Sweden, I p.m.
Britain vs. Norway, I p.m.
Italy vs. United States, I p.m.
Hockey
Men
Kazakhstan vs. Russia, 5:30 a.m.
Italy vs.. Germany, 7 a.m.
Canada vs. Switzerland, 9:30 a.m.
Sweden vs. Latvia, 11 a.m.
Slovakia vs. United States, 2 p.m.
Czech Republic vs. Finland, 3 p.m.
Short Track Speedskating
Women's 1500 final, 1:30 p.m.
Men's 1000 final
Ski Jumping
K 120 Hill final, Noon
Speedskating
Men's 1000, 1I a.m:


BOWLING


League reports

Results from Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
HIT & MISS
High scratch game: 1. Amber
Tompkins 215; 2. Carol Tonietto 212;
3. Linda Adams 186.
High scratch series: 1. Karen Gardner
522; 2. Amber Tompkins 521; 3. Elsie
Huddleston 501.
High handicap game: 1. Carol Tonietto
266; 2. Amber Tompkins 263; 3. (tie) Jean
Dukes, Linda Adams 230.
High handicap series: 1. Amber
Tompkins 665; 2. Carol Tonietto 652;
3. Elsie Huddleston 624.
High average: 1. Shannon Howard
162.08; 2. Karen Gardner 158.79.
(results from Feb. 14)
WEDNESDAY NITE MIXED
High scratch game: 1. Wendy Perry
222; 2. Liz King 206; 3. Maggie Battle
201. 1. Brian Meek 246; 2. Dan McNair
236; 3. Harry Smith 226.
High scratch series: 1. Wendy Perry
630; 2. Liz King 604; 3. Amber Tompkins
561. 1. Brian Meek 662; 2. Dan McNair
650; 3. Mike Lominack 635.
High handicap game: 1. Missy Fisher
278; 2. Tracy Hamrick 244; 3. Amber
Tompkins 243. 1. Zach Daughtry 281;
2. Harry Smith 271; 3. Brian Meek 246.
High handicap series: 1. Amber
Tompkins 693; 2. (tie) Missy Fisher, Liz
King 676; 4. Debra Hartman 673. 1. Zach
Daughtry 678; 2. Mike Lominack 677;
3. Harry Smith 671.
High average: 1. Wendy Perry 197.38;
2. Maggie Battle 167.3. 1. J.J. Hilbert
216.89; 2. Brian Meek 210.52.
(results from Feb. 8)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Abby's Crackers;
2. Graves Realty; 3. Jo's Crew.
High scratch game: 1. Bea Purdy 191;
2. Phyllis Benton 179; 3. Louise Atwood
169. 1. Ray Denton 227; 2. C.W. Reddick
213; 3. Dan Groh 210.
High scratch series: 1. Bea Purdy 525;
2. Joyce Hooper 463; 3. Louise Atwood
462. 1-. C.W. Reddick 589; 2. Earl
Hayward 567; 3. Jim Hawkins 526.
High handicap game: 1. Bea Purdy
224; 2. Myrl Schleisman 201; 3. Yvonne
Finley 198. 1. Ray Denton 255; 2. Dan
Groh 237; 3. Pete Bray 226.
High handicap series: 1. Bea Purdy
624; 2. Joyce Hooper 562; 3. Myrl


Schleisman 561. 1. Dan Groh 599;
2. Pete Bray 594; 3. (tie) Jim Hawkins,
C.W. Reddick 589.
High averages: 1. Phyllis Benton
164.44; 2. Susan Mears 156.39; 3. Louise
Atwood 154.4. 1. C.W. Reddick 191.96;
2. George Mulligan 190.38; 3. Earl
Hayward-174.65.
(results from Feb. 14)
QUEEN'S CLASSIC
High scratch game: 1. Jamie Rossin
191; 2. Ida Hollingsworth 182; 3. Tina
Church 180.
High scratch series: 1. Jamie Rossin
533; 2. Ida Hollingsworth 512; 3. Tina
Church 511,
High handicap game: 1. Lindsey
Stanfield 237; 2. Barbara Shrum 230;
3. Cindy Davis 223.
High handicap series: 1. Barbara
Shrum 646; 2. Linda Andrews 629;
3. Tootie Chesser 620.
(results from Feb. 8)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Bias Well Drilling
(13-3); 2. Ragtimes (12-4); 3. Travel
Country RV Center (11-5).
High scratch game: 1. Grant Spears
300; 2. Curtis Gutzmer 285; 3. Tanner
Wayne 260.
High scratch series: 1. Rodger
Ausgood 727; 2. Grant Spears 716;
3. George Rye 693.
High handicap game: 1. Grant Spears
314; 2. Curtis Gutzmer 301; 3. Tanner
Wayne 278.
High handicap series: 1. Grant Spears
758; 2. Rodger Ausgood 739; 3. Curtis
Gutzmer 732.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl 218.37;
2. Greg Moravec 208.68; 3. Rodger
Ausgood 207.7.
(results from Jan. 30)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Pin Poppers
(60-32); 2. Jo's Crew (58.5-33.5);
3. Pindusters (49.5-42.5).
High scratch game: 1. Louise Atwood
203; 2. Mary Lou Mears 190; 3. Yvonne
Finley 167. 1. Earl Hayward 201; 2. Tom
Evert 191; 3. Chuck Pressler 177.
High scratch series: 1. Phyllis Bentdn
548; 2., Betty Brown 530; 3." Betty
Carmichael 461. 1. Dan Ritter 581; 2. Art
Joubert 532; 3. George Mulligan 496. ,,
, High handicap game: 1. Vy Ritter 247;
2. Dolores Porter 246; 3. Susan Mears
235. 1. Clarence Clements .37; 2. Buck
Roberts 219; 3. Martin Griner 218.
High handicap series: 1. Bee Brickles


654; 2. Bea Purdy 651; 3. Darlene Morris
640. 1. Johnnie Croft Jr. 642; 2. Vernon
Black 641; 3. Sal Annello 618.
(results from Feb. 2)
THURSDAY NITE MIXED
Team- standings: 1. Outback
(58.5-41.5); 2. Taz (58-42); 3. Whats A
Strike (55.5-44.5).
High scratch game: 1. Sjaan Tensen
186; 2. Linda Andrews 177; 3. Bobbie
Watts 170. 1. Jim Howard 213; 2. C.W.
Reddick 205; 3. George Poultney 191.
High scratch series: 1. Sjaan Tensen
532; 2. Bobbie Watts 508; 3. Linda
Andrews 483. 1. C.W. Reddick 605;
2. Jim Howard 563; 3. Steve Merriman
555.
High handicap game: 1. Sjaan Tensen
237; 2. Pat Walsh 228; 3. Linda Andrews
226. 1. Jim Howard 255; 2. Michael Minks
222; 3. George Poultney 217.
High handicap series: 1. Sjaan Tensen
685; 2. (tie) Pat Walsh, Linda Andrews
630; 4. Kim Tice 613. 1. Jim Howard 689;
2. Michael Minks 646; 3. C.W. Reddick
629.
High average: 1. (tie) Phyllis Benton,
Bobbie Watts 168; 3, Cindy Norred 164.
1. C.W. Reddick 192; 2. Brett Reddick
179; 3. Steve Merriman 177.
(results from Feb. 9)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. Mudd Dawgs
(66-30); 2. Beaver Dump Truck Service
(63.5-32.5); 3. All In The Family (55-41).
High scratch game: 1. (tie) Autumn
Cohrs, Donna Duncan 192; 3. (tie) Tricia
Drawdy, Phyllis Benton, Norma Yeingst
176; 6. Bobbie Watts 172. 1. Jack Devries
275; 2. Leonard Randall 231; 3. Mark
Schneider 223.
High scratch series: 1. Autumn Cohrs
525; 2. Norma Yeingst 504; 3. Phyllis
Benton 499. 1. Leonard Randall 600;
2. Bill Duncan 581; 3. Jack Devries 567.
High handicap game: 1. .(tie) Donna
Duncan, Tricia Drawdy, Helen Suciu 227;
4. Autumn Cohrs 226; 5, (tie) Elaine Groh,
Sandy Welden 225. 1. Jack Devries 300;
2. Leonard Randall 259; 3. Dan Groh 252.
High handicap series: 1. Elaine Groh
664; 2. Helen Suciu 630; 3.. Autumn
Cohrs 627. 1. Leonard Randall 684;
2. Dan Groh 676; 3. Randy Wittlenger
648.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst 168;
2. Bobbie Watts 166; 3. Phyllis Benton
163. 1. Bill Duncan 194; 2. Robert Pond
192; 3. Carl McGhghy 187.
(results from Feb. 12)


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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2006


IAIC .BR 0 So Y S EEAR


GR WING UP A MERICAN


The Family




WVgon


First I hated it. Then I loved it
By Denise Mainquist
In 1970 I thought our family station wagon was a dream car. It
had five doors and was big enough for us three: kids to stretch
out without having to touch each other. Hidden fold-up seats
in the back were more fun than a clubhouse. My morn made cor-
duroy-covered cushions and hung curtains for the back windows
so we could ride in comfort. And it was really cool to tie all the
suitcases on top for long family vacations.
Nine years later that same station wagon become my teenaged
nightmare when my parents told me I'd be driving it to school.
There had to be-amistake! I wasn't meant to drive a station
wagon. I was more of a MG midget girl. That station wagon was
a big old boat. I'd never be able to park it in a normal spot. It had
ugly luggage racks on top and all those extra doors.
I begged and pleaded with my parents for a new car, a different
car, anything but the station wagon. Somehow they were able to
resist my persuasive requests. Then I tried threats. I wouldn't
learn to drive. They'd be my personal chauffeurs, hauling me to
ballgames and play practice for years. During these conversations


my parents just smiled and hummed happy little tunes as if they
couldn't even hear me. My conclusion was that, at the advanced
age of 35, they must be senile.
As a last resort, I tried to appeal to them on a human level, as
people who claimed to have once been "my age." I calmly
explained that I would become an outcast, shunned by all my
friends who would never ride with me because they would be
mortified to have anyone see themin a station wagon. I would
carry this stigma all my days-it would damage my popularity,
and I would never be elected homecoming queen or cheerleader.
My high school days would be ruined, and the psychological bur-
dens would haunt me for the rest of my mortal life.
And the next day I drove the station wagon to school.


My friends didn't shun me. In fact, they thought those nice
corduroy-covered cushions in the back looked nice and comfy.
As it turned out, I could easily fit 12 or more of my friends inside
for some serious main street cruising.
Surprisingly, I began to bond with this vehicle that provided so
many opportunities for excitement and then safely guided me
home every night. Still, I had no qualms about passing the station
wagon oh to my youngerbrother when I finally got my "new" car.

SAYING GOODBYE
One rainy afternoon several years later, my dad and I drove the
station wagon to the local salvage yard. The old girl was past her
twelfth birthday, and the odometer was ready to turn over for the
second time. My dad reasoned that, like a faithful family pet, she
had better go peacefully than linger on.
A man in a grease-spotted navy jumpsuit circled her once, then
twice, jotting notes onto a clipboard and kicking at the rusty
fender with his steel-toed boot. Dad and I paced nervously, wait-
ing for the final evaluation. After a few more minutes studying
the car and double-checking figures, he looked up. "Fifty dollars."
I suddenly felt faint. What did he mean? She still had plenty of
life in her. She'd be perfect for some kid who needed a safe,
dependable school car. That station wagon gave 12 years of faith-
ful service to our family. She had taken us on vacation, taught .
both my brother and me to drive, and even survived a time or two
in the ditch. Just the memories were worth more than 50 dollars.
My dad never looked up. He shook his head, slowly at first,
then deliberately. He walked to the driver's side and motioned for
me to get in. Dad turned the key, and the old car jumped to life
without a moment's hesitation. With the engine purring, we held
our chins high and took her back home.

Denise Main'quist writes from Lincoln, Nebraska.


N, INVENT-A-


CONTEST


Think of all the great sports that have been invented over the years: baseball, football, golf, tennis,
skiing, and so many' more.
Could this be the year that YOU invent a sport?
We're inviting our readers to create a sport-the simpler, the better. Send your original idea (with
sport name and rules i by March 1 to Invent a Sport, The Front Porch Syndicate, 1922 Howell Mill
Drive, Chattanooga, TN 37421 or email to submissions@porchsyndicate.com
Se We'll announce the $150 winner this spring. We'll also publish the rules
and invite families across America to get the kids together and try it out.
Who knows-your town could become the next,.Cooperstown!


m oMoments
J intime

THE HISTORY CHANNEL
ON FEB. 26, 1903, Alexander Winton, driving his
Winton Bullet, sets the first speed record ever achieved at
Daytona Beach, Fla. Built in 1902, the "Bullet Number.1"
drove a measured mile at more than 65 mph.
ON FEB. 24, 1938,
Variety reports that MGM has
cast Buddy Ebsen for the film
"The Wizard of Oz." However,
Ebsen dropped out after just
nine days of shooting when
he was poisoned by his make-
up, and Jack.Haley replaced
him as the Tin Man.

ON FEB. 23, 194 5s, during the battle for Iwo Jima,
U.S. Marines and a Navy corpsman raise the American flag
on Mount Suribachi, an event captured on film by AP pho-
tographer Joe Rosenthal. Three of the six men seen raising
the flag in the famous photo were killed before the battle for
Iwo Jima ended more than a month later.

O N .FE B. 2 2, 1 9 5 0 Walt Disney's animated feature
"Cinderella" opens. Based on a fairy tale by the Brothers
Grimm, "Cinderella" featured songs like'"A Dream Is a Wish
Your Heart Makes" and became one-of Disney's most beloved
films.

ON FEB. 21, 1 9 6 5, in New York City, Malcolm X, a
black nationalist and religious leader, is assassinated by rival
Black Muslims. Born Malcolm Little in Omaha, Neb., in
1925; he took the last name "X" to symbolize his stolen
African identity.


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Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754 0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2006


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Classified Department: 755-5440


i~jfi


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2006

Lake City Reporter





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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORI-
DA
CASE NO: 05-522-CA
JUDGE: E. V'ERNON LEOTL S 3
IN RE: FORFEIT LURE OF I. 1993
BUICK ROADMASTER,
VIN: 1G4BN5372PR400871; AND A
1979 BUICK LE SABRE,
VIN: 4P37Y9X139950
NOTICE OF COMPLAINT
TO: ANY AND ALL PERSONS WHO
CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE FOL-
LOWING PERSONAL PROPERTY:
A 1993 BUICK ROADMASTER,
VIN: 1G4BN5372PR400871; AND A
1979 BUICK LE SABRE,
VIN: 4P37Y9X139950
NOTICE is given pursuant to sections
932:703 and 932.704, Florida -Statutes
(2005) that the DEPARTMENT OF
HIGHWAY AND MOTOR VEHICLES
(Department), acting through its divi-
sion, the Florida Highway Patrol,, seized
the above-described personal property
on December 9, 2005, in Columbia
County, Florida, and is holding the per-
sonal property pending the outcome of
forfeiture .proceedings. All persons or
entities who have a legal interest in the
subject property may request a hearing
concerning the seized property by con-
tacting the undersigned. A complaint has
been' filed in the Circuit Court of the
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, in and for
Columbia County, Florida. On February,


Roofing & Gutters

SOUTHLAND REMODELING
Specializing.in Reroofs,
Roof Repair, Roof Cleaning.
Call 386-697-3134

Painting Service

04502022
Nicks Professional Painting &
Pressure Washing. Free
Estimates. Will.Meet or Beat all'
other Estimates. 386-344-4242

Painting & Handyman Service
Painting, Home Repair, Remodel,
Drywall Repair, & Pressure Wash
Call Mike Lainhart 386-454-7060,


Home Improvements

MITCHELL / HILGERSON LLC
Kitchen & Bath Remodeling.
Electrical repairs, Carpentry.
Paint & Trim Call 386-365-9909

The Carpenters Touch Inc
Home repairs & remodeling.
Licensed & insured. Free estimates
Call 386-365-3314/755-1462

Home Maintenance

Grey Wolf Enterprises
Custom Site Built Sheds, Decks
& Vinyl/Hardy Board Siding.
Home Maint. & Improvements
Call For Estimate 386-697-6765


Legal

6, 2006, the trial court entered an order
finding probable cause. If no claimants
appear within 20 days, the department
will be seeking a final order of forfei-
ture.
Dated:.February 13, 2006.
CHARLES J. CRIST, JR.
ATTORNEY GENERAL
ANTHONY ANDREWS
Assistant Attorney General
Office of the Attorney General
The Capitol, Suite PL-01
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-1050
Tel: (850) 414-3300
04502890
February 18, 25, 2006

010 Announcements.
CLASS OF 1986
Please Provide your e-mail,
street address, & phone number to
CHS1986@ffsb.com or
PO Box 2127 Lake City, FL 32056


020 Lost & Found

LOST AT MALL 2-11-06
BLACK/WHITE BOSTON
TERRIER. REWARD
752-0804 OR 365-0565


020 Lost & Found
LOST CALICO Cat Female, Long
Hair, White Flea Collar, Tan tail,
black marking over right eye.
$25.00 reward. 755-2269
LOST: MALE Long haired
White Cat. Large 14-15 Ibs.
Reward $100.00.
Call 386-758-7697

060 Services

24 Hour care at senior living home.
Private rooms & meals incl.
Couples & Alheizmers welcome.
Dr. trans. avail. 386-397-2920

MOBILE RV WASH &
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Free estimates, will come to you.
Call 386-365-3603 or 386-758-2971

10 A Job
100 Opportunities

A/C SERVICE
Tech, needed
Full time with benefits.
Please call 386-454-4767


Lawn & Landscape Service Land Services


Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, design. Com. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call 386-496-2820 Iv msg,
Kirkland's Lawn Care
If you need Bush Hog Work, Field
Mowing, Trimming or Hauling,
Please Call 904-259-3352
TIME TO MULCH
Make your flower beds look like
new. Delivered & spread or.just
delivery. 386-935-6595

Services

DUMP TRAILER drop off, Bob
Cat work, Const. cleanup, Lime
rock, Driveways cut, Concrete re-
moved, Free Est. Call 386-362-6293
Local-Elderly care in your home.
What ever your need, Cleaning,
Cooking, Bathing. Call Debra
904-259-7319 or 904-674-3442
-MADE .TUST-FOR-YOU
I'll Create One-of-A-Kind,
Personalized Gifts to Match your
Decor. Soni at Sunlite Studio,
386-497-3939, sunlite412@aol.com
WANTED TO BUY
Junk Cars & Trucks.
No Title Necessary.
Call 386-623-1943

Drywall Services

DRYWALL Hang, Finish;
Textures; Plaster & Stucco Repairs;
Interior & Exterior Painting.
386-752-2412


mL Bulldozer Work! Tractor
work, root raking, bush hogging,
seeding, sodding, disking, site prep
& landscape work. Custom Lawn
care. Irrigation Repair &
Installation. Free Estimate!
Call 755-3890 or (386) 623-3200
TRACTOR WORK:
Mowing, Harrowing, Seeding,
Leveling, Pine Tree Planting.
Call 386-752-7109

Tree Service

CHARTER OAK
TREE SERVICE
Tree Trinmming, Tree Removal,
Fully Insured!!
30 years experience
963-2140 or 365-0743

Hazardous TREE TRIMMING,
removal & stump grinding. Senior
discount. 15 years experience.
386-590-7798 or 386-963-3360

Carpet Cleaning

CARPET CLEANING WOW!
Only $18.50 per room, Also Tile &
Grout Cleaning. Call Authorized
Carpet Cleaning at 386-755-9200

Bankruptcy/Divorce

#1 IN BUSINESS SERVICES
Divorce, Bankruptcy, Resumes
RE Closings, Legal Forms
248 N Marion Av. 755-8717


100 OOpportunities

01556185


Want steady work w/stable
Company. Good equipment
w/ good wages & a full benefits
Pkg. Home daily, off weekends.
CDL-A req'd.
Call Columbia Grain
386-755-7700

,03527992
Lake City Reporter

is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier
from Columbia City to Fort White
area. Deliver the Reporter in the
early morning hours
Tuesday Sunday.
No delivery on Monday's.
Carrier must have dependable
transportation. Stop by the
Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!

04501598

Lake City Reporter


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING:
The Lake City Reporter has an,
opportunity for an enthusiastic
professional to join out
Advertising Team! You'll make
outbound sales calls and assist
customers. Previous sales
experience helpful. Strong
communication skills and the
ability to thrive in a fast paced
team environment a must. We'll
reward your efforts with
competitive compensation,
excellent benefits and outstanding
opportunities.
Apply to:
Lake City Reporter, Attn:
Advertising Director,
P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL
32056 or e-mail to
tpeavey@lakecityreporter.com


days



Uw..


too Job
SOpportunities
04501921
Drivers
.: : ":-'::. '*


!! $2,000 Sign On Bonus.!!
Limited Time'Only
STAY IN THE
"SWEET PART"
OF THE SOUTH
FL., GA., SC., NC., TN., AL.
Top pay-up to .40 cpm w/5 yrs
Guaranteed Hometime
Health & Disability Ins. Avail.
*Life & Dental Ins. Provided
*401K available
Safety Bonus
Call 800-874-4270 # 6
Highway 301 South, Starke, FL.
www.davis-express.com.

04502390

USI
HIRING NOW
Crew Leaders, Heavy Equip.
Operators, Pipe Layers, Concrete
Finishers, Laborers ($8/hr min.).
FT, Benefits, DFWP.
Underground Utility Const.
1360 NW 53 Ave G'ville
,352-377-1511

04502573
Customer Service/Sales
Representative needed. Must'
have good communication skills,
working knowledge of computer
entry and be able to work flexible
hours. Telemarketing and
sales experience a plus.
Competitive salary,.health
benefits and 401K avail. DFWP
Fax resume to:
Human Resources 386-758-4523

04502574
Dispatcher Positions Available
Large Mfg Co looking for
dispatchers. Telemarketing
experience a PLUS! We need
HIGHLY MOTIVATED people
that are looking for a challenge!
This is a fast paced environment
and will require long hours.
You must possess good
communication skills, have an
outgoing personality, be able to
cold-call truck lines, handle
multi-line phone system, have
computer (Windows 98+, Excel,
.and Word) and basic office
equipment experience.
Please fax resume to Dispatch at
38-758-4523. Benefit pkg avail.
DFW

04502632
*ASSISTANT MANAGER*
CASHIERS *
FRUIT BAGGERS *
Immediate openings for
High Springs fruit & gift store.
Please call Judy @ 352-266-3800

BLUE JEAN JOB
$ Money $
Seeking sharp go getters, Able to
TRAVEL USA. Demo chemical
products. Good people skills &
enjoy working in a Rock in Roll
evir. Call Kelly 1-800-201-3293.
9-6. Must start immed.


too Job
SOpportunities

04502679
MANAGERS NEEDED
P; FastTrackFood: ir .ceeking
ilt.1 mnoiivate e .pe.ctic.n....
and enthusiastic pr. leoi-riaLs for
the Lake City Jare. Con)i. itil e
Salary, Bonus, Benefit nd
opportunity to join a progressive
and fast growing company.
Fax resume to Fast Track Foods,
ATTN: Bertie at (352)333-1161
or Call Bertie at (352)494-7550.

04502781
:i EXPERIENCED
DRIVERS NEEDED it
CLS A VAN,
FLATBED & LOG
$1000 Sign on Bonus
Local Runs $550 $675
Home Nights
OTR $650 $1,000,
Home 1-2 Nights and almost
EVERY W/E
Health/Life Ins Avail, 401K,
Paid Vacation, Wkly
Performance Bonus
$500 Quarterly -
Safety/Perf Bonus
CALL PRITCHETT TRUCKING
INC., 800-808-3052

04502787
RETAIL MANAGEMENT
Join Aaron's Lake City.
Start a Career, not a job!
Manager Trainees, Paid Training,
bonus, benefits, NO Sundays!
Join our Team as we GROW!
Over 21, clean MVR, Drug Free
APPLY IN PERSON
2658 SW. Main Blvd., LC
franmaun@msn.com

04502804
EARTHWORKS OF
NORTHEAST FLORIDA, INC.
seeks a PROJECT
ESTIMATOR. We are a Site &
Underground Contractor working
for private developers.
This position will be responsible
for estimating, soliciting bids,
assembling pricing for proposals,
and preparing budgets &
schedules.
Compensation package is
competitive and is based on
experience in the industry.
Please fax resume to
904-653-2801 or e-mail to
EARTHWORKS( setel.net. Or
you may apply in person at:
11932 N. State Rd 121,
Macclenny, lorida 32063
904-653-2800 EOE/DFWP

04502815
Administrative Assistant
Comfortable, modem work
environment, great pay and
opportunity for advancement.
Must have fair typing skills and
be experienced with Windows
Programs (QB, Excel a plus!).
Looking for a hard-working
candidate who is comfortable
with customer communication
and follow-up, and enjoys
working with a variety of
business responsibilities.
E-mail resume to
jobs(5lakecityhome.com


, 91


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V v
A


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2006


too `ob
100 Opportunities

0-15t2824
Need eager, fast thinking
Secretary/Assistant with good
communication skills for a variety
of jobs from phone answering, to
helping manage projects.
Room for advancement.
Call Heather @ 386-487-1038, or
fax resume to 386-755-3233
Bi-lingual sp/English desired.

04502925
Administrative Secretary I
Part Time State position available
with the Courts of the
Third Judicial Circuit performing
and providing assistance
with a variety of secretarial,
administrative and clerical duties
for the Hearing Officer.
The Administrative Secretary
works independently and must
exercise discretion in dealing with
confidential and sensitive
information. Graduation from a
standard high school and four
years legal secretarial experience.
Must have knowledge of and
ability to use word processing
applications. Resumes must be
received in Court Administration
before March 6, 2006.
Submit resume w/State of Florida
application to: Human Resources
P.O. Box 1569
Lake City, FL 32056
ADA Compliant/EOE

04502927
LOG SCALER/ANALYST:
Log Scaler/Analyst position
available. Prefer 2-year degree
-with Forestry or Business
Management. We are an EECC,
Drug free workplace. 401K,
health/dental/life insurance, paid
holidays/vacations. Apply at
Gilman Building Products, 6640
CR 218, Maxville, FL or
fax resume to (904) 289-7736

05509462
Lake City Reporter

is currently looking for an
.independent newspaper carrier
from Lake Jeffery Rd to*
Wellborn. Delivering the Reporter
in the early morning hours
Tuesday Sunday.
No delivery on Monday's.
Carrier must have dependable
transportation. Stop by the
Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!

ACCOUNTING CLERK
Experience in G/L, A/R, A/P & P/R.
Salary open. Fax resume to
386-397-1130
American Canoe eAdventures
looking for Part Time & Full Time
workers, Apply at 10610 Bridge
St:-et. White Spring- 3b-397-1300
ulto Rod3 Tech & Painter
S-Must have Exp. & Tools.
Good Pay & Benefits. Mon-Fri.
Class "A" Collision in Branford
Call Ted or Teresa at 386-935-9334
AULITO TECH: \V ae in need of
an e\penenced -ASE,/GN Mecharue.
experienced in all phases of today's
( N I vehicles. Candidate should
have a clean driving record, own
to'ols. Training will be a must! No
eekeld. Fa,, resume to Scoggin .
in Chiefland '( 352-493.-427 'or
e-mail vernonl(a)bellsouth.net
Busy Insurance Agency
Looking for higld.\ motivated
ir, did idual. Licen-ed 4-40 CSR is
desired. Must ha'.e e\celleni
computer skills-& people skills. -
Benefits a\uaible.
Fax, email or drop off resume.
-, Fax#: 386-752-2102
Email v. iie.',i'bell'oth net
Addre:s-: 4S3 South Marion Ase.
Central Supply Clerk Full Time
i ith Benefits. Must hae High
School Diploma or equi. talent and
Computer skills preferred. Must be
able to life -40 Ib. Please 1.all
. Amelia Tompkins at'386-362-.A60
S' or apply in person, to:
Su% a nnee Health Care 1620 E.'
Hel ernsion St. Live Oak, FL 32064
EOE/D/V/M/F
Child Care worker for !Mon thru Fri'
6AM o 10 PPM, 41 I hour shifts. must
* ha' e clean background check. F/T
Sonhl need apple CD A.Applicants
preferred. Cail 752-4411 or
stop by 522 NW Turner Ave. &
pick up an application.
DINNER COOK Wanted
Gajines ile Sorority Appro\
Hours: 11 b.m to 6.i00C p m
Mon through Fri.' 3 Sat. per month
10-00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Immediate
Opening. Family Atmosphere
Experience Necessa.r. Salary
R jrge" $8.00 toi $10 1 per hour
plus health insurance.
Fax resume to 352-375-7937
DRIVER WANTED. Must have .
clean Class A CDL, must be able to
help load & unload flat bed trailers.
Call David 352-2S1-0235
DRIVERS NEEDED
Class A ODL
Dump trailer exp.
386-867-3432


: EXPERIENCE COOK Onli.
S Appl\ from 2-4 at
Beetf0' Brady's.
No Phore'Calls.
Experienced Framers Needed.
Reliable & Hardworking only.
Must have hand tools &
Transportation. Stejd) work.
Call 386-623-3307"
Experienced Tandem Dump Truck
Driver. Asphalt, Milling Exp.
Class B CDL & clean driving
record. PDOE. 386-590-0783
FLAT BED DRIVERS
Atlantic Truck Lines
$4,000.00 Sign on Bonus
Class A, in state & home every
night. $600-$750/wk. Yearly $1,000
safety bonus. 3 yrs. exp. Paid
vacation, health/dental. Call
1-800-577-4723 Monday-Friday


100 'Opportunities
Fuel & Lube Truck Driver Class
B w/Hazmat. Competitive
Wages and Benefits. Must have
Exp. EOE/DFWP 386-462-2047
FULL TIME accounting clerk
needed. Experienced in A/R, A/P,
& P/R. Mail resume to:
Accounting, PO Box 2794
Lake City, FL 32056
Green Acres Learning Center
has position open for a Teacher.,
CDA's preferred. Apply in person at
1126 SW Main Blvd. Lake City.
No Phone Calls
Green Acres Learning Center
has Part Time Positions. Good with
Children, Mature, Responsible,
must have Drivers License & Good
Computer Skills. Apply in person at
1126 SW Main Blvd. Lake City.
No Phone Calls
Handyman Wanted to remodel 4
Mobile Homes in Lake City area.
Must have tools, transportation &
references. Call Dave 352-281-0235
HELP WANTED: Experienced
diesel truck tech. Must-have own
tools and reliable transportation.
Willing to work over-time when
needed. Vacation and Health
Insurance available foi full-time
employee. Call 352-468-1644
HUNGRY HOWIES is hiring
delivery drivers. Must have car
w/insurance & 2 yrs. driving exp.
Flex schedule. F/T & P/T avail.
CASH PAID DAILY!
Earn $8. $15./ hour. Apply in
person at 857 SW Main Blvd
INSIDE SALES.
Knowledge of INDUSTRIAL
Supplies & computer helpful..
7am-6pm. Apply in person at
Quality Mill Services, U.S. 90 East,
Across from the airport, Lake City.
Drug Free.
JIFFY LUBE Seeking Friendly,
Smiling LUBE TECHNICIANS &
ASST. MANAGERS who like to
talk to-people. Flexible hours from
8-6. Will Train. Apply, at 1895 US
Hwy 90. EOE/DFW
LAUNDRY PERSON
Laundry Person needed at The
Health Center of Lake City, Inc.
Please apply in person at
560 SW McFarlane Avenue,
Lake City, FL 32025.
Contact: Sharon Tervola, ADM
Drug Free WorkPlace/EOE
LICENSED AESTHETICIAN
Experience. Independent or
Non-Independent Contractor.
Fax resume to 386-758-6923
or call 386-758-1965
LOCAL GRASSING
COMPANY,
is seeking Truck Drivers. Class A
CDL required. Pay rate based on
experience. Duties include hauling
I equipment. sod. and square hay
bales Mon -Fn ., some weekend
work required. Also seeking
General Laborers
(valid Drivers License desired).
Females encouraged to
apply. We are an Equal Opportunity
Emplo' er and a Drug Free
Work Place. Apply in person at the
comer of US 441 & Cason Rd.
Local Mortgage Company
Looking for dependable employee
for entry level office duties. Mon-
Fri. opportunities for ad% ancement.
killing to train the right individual.
Please fax resume with references to
866-399-0611
M&L Trucking needs a Truck
Dmrer for hauling logs a ith clean
CDL'-. MUST be willing to % ork''
Leo Brady at-386-961--1133,-
386-344-5035, after 7pm. 752-6259


100 Job
100 'Opportunities
MAINTENANCE ASSISTANT
needed. FT/Benefits/401K A/C
and heating repair exp. preferred. At
least 2 years experience in Building
Maintenance. Please apply in person
at Suwannee Health Care 1620 E.
Helvenston St. Live Oak, FL 32064
EOE/D/V/M/F
MECHANIC Gas/Diesel Trucks
and Heavy Equipment for Shop and
Field Work. Must have own Tools.
EOE/DFWP Call 386-462-2047
MECHANIC WANTED To work
on Older Diesel Trucks & Tractors.
Must have tools, & transportation.
Call Dave 352-281-0235
MOBILE HOME
Drywall Finishers. Tools &
Transportation a must.
Call 386-431-1044
MOTEL MANAGER
Manager Housekeeper needed for
1.7-suite motel in Steinhatchee,
Florida. $20,000.00 annual salary
plus free residence (Utilities not
included). References and retail
experience required. Must be
responsible, dependable and honest.
352 498-5678. 352 498-0306 (fax).
lpfow(B aol.com
NEEDED
Automotive Salesman.
Experience in Secondary financing.
Call 386-758-2202
Now Accepting Applications for:
Housekeeping. Apply in person
Mon-Fri, at QUALITY INN,
Lake City. DFWP
NOW HIRING!
Growing company looking for help
w/inside sales/customer service
Fax Resume to 813-333-2014
OTR DRIVERS NEEDED,
Heavy Haul,Class A CDL,
2 week turnaround,good pay,
Call Southern Specialized,LLC
386-752-9754
OWNER OPERATORS Needed-
Flatbed Freight, Class A CDL
Home every night & weekends
Drug Free workplace
Call 850-971-7216
PROGRAM DIRECTOR...
Immediate opening for a highly
motivated individual to direct a
professional driving program a a
community college. Must have
sales/marketing, admin/management
experience. Min. undergraduate
degree. Call 607-349-8234 or
386-754-4308 for more information.
PROMOTIONS SPECIALIST
Needed in Lake City area. Must
have a computer, email, & transpor-
tation for a PT or FT flexible job.
Call Bev at 904-669-5992
QUALIFIED INDIVIDUAL
needed with experience in account-
ing, bookkeeping and quick books.
Well established and growing
Contractor/Retailer Fax resume to
386-961-9267 or call 386-755-9629
READY MIX and Block Truck
Drivers Needed. Class B CDL is
required. Benefits, Drug Free Work
Place. Call 386-755-2458 for Lake
City or 362-4422 for Live Oak.
READY MIX Drivers Needed in
the Baldw in airea. Heavy truck
experience required. We will train
for ready mix truck. There is a $600
sign-on bonus. Call 904-449-6968.
EOE, Drug Free Workplace.
RE AL ESTATE
,GENTS NEEDED
Looking for a job
or a fresh start?
Call Shirley @
386-365-1979
RECEPTIONIST NEEDED for
Bus', office. Appl in person
between 2 4 pm. Must hal\e
resume. 1944.East Diival St.


WOW!

FLORIDA
S PEST V\
"CONTROL WO W!


Building Careers for 55 Years

Management/Sales
* Training/Career Development
*Great Starting Pay
* Full Benefit Package
* Drug Free Workplace
Apply in person at
536 SE Baya Dr., Lake City
or FAX Resume to: (386) 752-1703
or Email Resume to: HRdirector@flapest.com


J~J


100 Job
100 Opportunities
SALES PERSON
Motivated & Eager to earn a great
income. Gary Hamilton Homes
386-758-6755
Waste Management Inc.
Lake City/ Gainesville
Has an immediate opening for a
hard working, flexible individual to
fill the position of Driver/Laborer
for Lake City and Gainesville. This
position requires a minimum Class
B CDL with air brake endorsement.
Waste Management offers a full
benefits package including health
insurance and 401 K plan. If you
feel you meet the requirements,
please apply by phone
1-877-220-JOBS (5627) or online at
WWW.WMCAREERS.COM
EOE/ADA/DFWP
WELCOME CENTER Hiring.
Immed. help wanted, paid training,
benefit pkg, flex. hrs, hourly plus
comm. Apply at Welcome Center
inside BP Station, exit 427.
386-754-2500

11t Sales
Employment
AVON
Earn 50% Only $10 for KIT
Call: 1-800-275-9945
pin # 4206(IndSalesRep)'

120 Medical
2 Employment

04502788
A SPECIAL INVITATION
TO JOIN
SHANDS LAKE SHORE'S
PER DIEM POOL FOR
RN'S1
NEW RATES
THREE LEVELS
$26.00 $28.00 $31.00
for more information, please call
386-754-8140 and
ask for Bonnie Price, Recruiter or
Janice Jackson, HR Director
EOE, M/F/V/D
DRUG FREE WORK PLACE

04502907
MDS/PPS Coordinator
Must be RN with MDS..
experience preferred. Full Time
with Beneftis/401K. Please call
Brenda Lacy or Amelia Tompkins
at 386-362-7860 or apply in
person at Suwannee Health Care
Center 1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064.
EOE/D/V/M/F

BUSY OB/GYN Office needs a
Front Desk, Check Out Person.
Heavy Medical Manager
Experience Required.
Responsibilities include: Check
in/Out, Charge/Payment Posting,
Scheduling Appointments, Tests,
Surgeries. Fax resume to:
386-755-9217


Heallhcnre Ph3sical Therap3
looking for FT/PT, PRN. Plv, :icia!
Therapist, & PRN Occupational
Therapist. Fax resume to
386-754-9059 or Call
Ken Watson 3b6-754-3908 or
Cell .3'6-67-4n995'
All inquiries Confidential.


120 ^ Medical
120 Employment

HHA
CNA'S needed in the Lake City
area. Weekdays and Weekends.
Please call 386-755-1544


LPN
Private Duty Shift in
Lake City area. Weekends.
Please call 386-755-1544


MEDICAL ASSISTANT
Exp. in fast paced Medical Office.
Must be dependable, efficient,
computer exp. Send CV to
Administrator, PO Box 489,
Lake City, Florida 32056
Medical Office Assistant
Experience in a MedicalOffice
with Billing and Word Processing
required. Fax resume to
386-758-5987
Optical Lab Technician
Experienced for Mon-Thur, 9-6,
$12-16 hr w/full benefits.
Must be dependable, accurate.
Send Resume to PO Box 489,
Lake City, FL 32056
Position Open Medical office
Receptionist/Clerk & Medical
Assistant with experience.
Call 386-755-1960 for interview
RN NEEDED, Part-Time,
Sllp-7a. Please apply at
The Health Center of Lake City,
560 SW McFarlane Avenue,
Lake City. Equal Opportunity *
Employer/ Drug Free Work
Place/Americans with
Disabilities Act.
THE HEALTH CENTER OF
LAKE CITY is looking for an
ASSISTANT BOOKKEEPER
Seeking a highly motivated person
for a fast paced office. Candidate
must be experienced with personnel,
payroll, accounts payable. and have
computer skills. Qualified
applicants submit resume to:
Bookkeeper, P.O. Box 869,
Lake Cit,,'FL 32025
EOE/ADA Drug Free Work Place
WANTED ARNP. for Lake City
Primary. Care Practice. New Grads
welcome. Please call 386-344-5226
from 8:30 am 8:00 p.m.

170 Business
Opportunities

04502965
A CASH COW!!!
90 VENDING MACHINE
UNITS/ YOU OK LOCATIONS
ENTIRE BUSINESS $10,970
HURRY! 800-836-3464 #B02428

240 Schools &
240 Education


\\.rii \ani t)h a CNA' Don't v'..ant to
Q o
wait? Express Training Sern ices of,
Gainesville is no.'. offenng our.
quality CNA exam Prep classes.
Day/Eve classes. Class for 1 week,
certification test the ne\i '..eek.
Class ize is lined Ne'..t class
3.1 0,,'06. Call 3x6-755-441 .


-l

310 Pets & Supplies

04502863
Two Black Labs. One Male
(Fixed) One Female. Last Home
did not work out. "MOVING"
Two years old. Very Loving and
fully trained. Need a Loving
home with someone who stays
home during day. Retired People
Great!! Fenced in yard.
Must find the perfect home.
Day/Nite 386-397-2683

AMERICAN BULL Dog & Red
Nose mix. Call to inquire
386-752-1773

COCKER SPANIEL
Puppy, CKC, Health Cert.
Buff & Black. $250.00
Call 386-935-4122 or 352-238-7006
Free To Good Home: Female
Chihuahua. 2 1/2 yrs old. Good with
Kids & other animals. Very
Lovable. 386-758-9225/ 867-2644
LAB MIX,
Has Shots.
Free To Good Home
Call 386-752-2401
RED NOSE Pit Bull.
Ready Now. $150.00
Call 386-867-0396

330 Livestock &
33 Supplies

04502678
YORKSHIRE HOG
MALE BREEDER
600 PLUS POUNDS (guessing)
Grain Fed
Interested in possible trading
options for a young male
Durac breeder.
Must be able to haul
(386) 697-4114 or'
(386) 833-0038,
Email:
irisn) busirie,.(dam) %\ a.com


402 Appliances
COIMMERCI -L GRADE
Ice-Maker Manitov.ioc GDI.Is02A -
self contained head & 500 Ib bn -
new compressor & water tray -
new water filter included.
Call 386-454-454-4433

KENMORE REFRIGERATOR
21 CF, Almond, TOp Freezer,
Ic Maker, E.C. $45.00 '
Bil 386-755-9156 -'


REFRIGERATOR
Good Condiimon
$4al I-0 -
Call 386-755-4835


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Classified Department: 755-5440


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2006


402 Appliances
WHIRL POOL Dishwasher,
Almond. $50.00
Call 386-754-1166



404 Baby Items
BABY CRIB
Light Wood, Great Condition.
$100.00 OBO
Call 386-466-1171

408 Furniture
BED- $130 Brand new Queen
orthopedic pillowtop mattress set.
Still in plastic! Can deliver.
(352) 376-1600
BEDROOM 7 pc. Complete
Louis Philippe Cherry set! Custom
built, dovetail double-glide drawers,
hidden storage w/felt lining. Brand
NEW still in boxes! Retail $5,200.
Sacrifice $1,400. 352-264-9799
CHERRY SLEIGH Bed- $395.
New, still in box! Solid wood, even
the side rails! Will sell w/ New
pillowtop mattress set for $550.
(352) 494-0333
END TABLE
With 2 draws,
Excellent Condition, $29.00.
Call 752-6405
NASA MEMORY FOAM BED-As
seen on TV/Mall. 20 yr warranty!
Never used, still wrapped in plastic!
Why pay $1800? I will sell for
$699. (352) 264-9799
NTIQUE ENGLISH walnut chest
of drawers. Very heavy and
needs a little glue. $100.00
755-4634 suzannerae@hotmail

416 Sporting Goods
POOL TABLE Gorgeous Brand
new 8' wood table. Leather pockets,
Italian 1" slate, carved legs. Still in
Crate! Cost $4,500. Sell $1,350.
Can Deliver. 352-494-0333

419 TV-Radio &
Recording
MOVING SALE: '35 inch TV,
RCA HDTV. Like New $500. OBO.
Seen at Windsong Apts Building 10
Apt. 305. 961-8633 between 8-4


420 Wanted to Buy
I


Cash for Estates,
Real Estate, Furniture
Old Tractors, Tools, & Vehicles.
Call 386-365,-3865


430 Garage Sales


ESTATE ,SALE: .Sat 2/18, Hwy 47
South, 2 miles past 1-75, 'Left on
Walter Ave, Follow signs. Lots of
housewares, women clothes & misc
Fri & Sat 8-? comer of cullen & 27
'in fort White.Robo laser level,
saddles, welder,oxy aet outfit,
airless paint sprayer,2xl0 & 2x12
lumber, 1/2" drill,masonary &.
electrical misc,knack tool box,barb
wire,chain binders,old records &
books', antique slipper chair,curio
cabinet, dining table & 6 chairs,old
Lane cedar chest,girl. clothe, shoe,
& bikes & more. Cjll 36-9%5--4.N'2t
for more info.
Garage Sale
Furniture, tools & misc. Sat & Sun
10am- 2pm. 305-619-226:2.
438 SW Elim Church Rd, FW
GARAGE SALE: Sat & Sun from
9 until 2. 141 NE Poppy Way, off of
US 90 East look for signs. Furn,
Household, Appl & Lots of Misc.
YARD SALE:. Branford Hwy to
Troy Rd follow signs. Fri & Sat 8-?
Vehicle, Furniture, exercise equip,
scooter, bikes, clothes & misc.


440 Miscellaneous
2 WOODEN Baby Gates
32x48, Like New
$20.00 will sell Separate
Call 386-754-1166

BRAND NEW Wheel Chair,
Walker, & Bath Chair for sale.
$300.00
Call 386-752-7112
FAN EXERCISE Bike.
Lifestyler 3500. $10.00.
Call 386-754-1166

For SALE or TRADE Revolving
Refrigerated Cake Display unit,
$800 and Rotisserie Hot Dog
Cooker, $350. Willing to Trade for
Slicer. Call 386-755-0400
HOT TUB $1,795. LOADED!'
Never used. Waterfall, therapy jets,.
LED lights, cupholders, 11Ov
energy efficient. With warranty.
Can deliver 352-376-1600
-1

460 Firewood
OAK FIREWOOD for SALE'
$45.00 a Truck Load! 386-752-1874

520 Boats for Sale

2005 20FT Tuscany Pontoon Boat,
50 hp, 4 stroke yamaha. Still under
warranty. -$13,500 OBO.
Call 386-752-4962

MINI STORAGE SPECIAL
Rent 2 months, get the 3rd month
free. Limited time offer and space.
Lake Jeffrey U-Store It
386-752-8977
Cell: 365-4091


520 Boats for Sale
AIRBOAT, FAST and Furious!
14" aluminum hull with trailer.
280 hp 6 cil Lycoming. Reduced
$6000.00 386-758-1250.

Mobile Home
Lots for Rent
Large Mobile Home Lot for lease
$250 mo, plus $250 security. 3 year
lease. Water, sewer, garbage includ-
ed. Shaded lots, Call 386-961-0017
630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
COMPLETELY RENOVATED
3BR/2BA, W/D. Private Road &
Yard. Close to town, all fenced in.
Water & garbage included. Front &
back porch, garage, pole barn
storage, pool w/bath house. Must
see, won't last long. Prefect for
Working Prof. $800 mo, w/lst &
last. Sec. $600. Call 386-754-6924
all calls will be returned.
LATE MODEL MOBILE HOMES
Starting $450 month, Beautiful
Pond setting, w/trees. CH/A, Cable
avail. No pets. Call 386-961-0017

640 Mobile Homes
0 for Sale
ABSOLUTELY "THE BEST"
Mobile Homes and Modulars
Move over Palm & Jake, the new
#1 home is here. Guaranteed
Gary Hamilton Homes 758-6755
BUY A MANUFACTURED
HOME WITH AS LITTLE AS
$500 DOWN.
CALL 386-752-7751
COMPLETELY RENOVATED
Inside-out 2BR/2BA Singlewide.
Fully Furnished, some new
appliances. Mobile Home Park
inside city limits. Low Lot Rent.
Ready to move in $15,000.00 Cash.
386-758-3506
MOBILE HOME MOVER
STATE CERTIFIED
Call 386-755-1783
FREE ESTIMATES
34 w/16 left, Used Doublewides
from Disney Area. Now in Lake
City. A/C, steps, cable ready w/TV,
telephone, furnished, pots & pans,
dishes, & silverware. Perfect for
Rental Properties or Starter Home.
Great Deals, While they Last!
386-752-5355
3BR/2BA, 01 DOUBLEWIDE ON
ABOUT 1/2 ACRE, IN
WOODGATE VILLAGE, LAKE
CITY, FL. CALL TIM FOR INFO.
386-344-5292


BUY, SELL, TRADE!
.We Have Land, Used Homes, We
* Take Trades. No Money Down
Programs. First Time Buyer
Programs. Call Tim 386-344-5292,
LEAVE MESSAGE!


CASH DEALS. WE LOVE EM!
We will give you the very best
pricing in'No.1l- h Florida onr New. or
Used Manufactured Homes!
386-752-5355
IF YOU OWN LAND OR HAVE A
LARGE DOWN PAYMENT. I
MAY BE WILLING TO OWNER
FINANCE A NEW
MANUFACTURED HOME FOR
YOU! CALL STEVE 386-365-8549
USE YOUR LAND IN LIEU OF A
DOWN PAYMENT TO BUY A
MANUFACTURED HOME.
1-800-355-9385
WE SELL MANUFACTURED
HOMES THAT LOOK LIKE LOG
CABINS, ALL SIZES.
3.86-752-7751

650 Mobile Home
650 &Land
1990 3BR/2BA DWMH on 1.24
acres in The Suwannee Valley.
Grandfather oaks, nice yard.
Great income producing
investment property.
Currently rented $59,900.
No Owner Financing
386-719-4802.
1997 DW MH on 1 acre. Like New
with front & back porches, a small
barn, & completely fenced. $76,000.
Call Cheryl 386-754-6957
3/2 DW A/C on 1.5 acre lot
Will sell or Lease
in Worthington Springs
Call 386-466-1104
LAKE CITY New
3BR/2BA DW on 1 acre comer lot.
Beautiful trees. $85,900.
Call 386-755-2065
MODEL HOME by Contractor
4BR/2BA with many upgrades on
1/2 acre in upscale subdivision
(close in). Hamilton Homes
386-758-6755
4 BEDROOM 2 bath
home on land. Must sell.
InBeautiful Deer Creek Only
& $774 per/mth
CALL 386-752-5355
LAND HOME PACKAGES,
NEW-AND USED,
WHILE THEY LAST!
CALL RON 386-397-4960


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
I & 2 Bedroom Apartments
All very nice.
Convenient location.
Call 386-755-2423
2BR/1.5BA LUXURY
Apartment with garage. 5 min. from
Timco & downtown.
386-755-4590 or 386-365-5150
TOWNHOUSE
2br/1.5ba. Lake City. Lawn,
garbage & water Inc. $575 mo.plus
$250 security deposit 386-208-2426

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
2BR/2BA DUPLEX Ready Now.
Quite Peaceful Surroundings.
20 mins from Lake City. No Pets.
$575 mo. Call 386-935-0268
73 Unfurnished
730 'Home For Rent
04502961
BRAND NEW 4BR homes for
rent in Grandview Estates,
1175 SW Shenandoah Glen,
2 car garage & well equipped
kitchen $1050/MO.
Ted Lancaster,
Mark Busher & Assoc.
904-317-4511 ext 18

3BR/2BA, 2 car garage. 1800 sq ft.
Fire place, wet bar area, 16x20 patio
on cul-de-sac in City Limits. Avail
2/15. $1,400 mo. 352-875-4427
FISHERMANS PARADISE
1BR/1BA Home in Wilson Springs.
$450 mo.
Call Sandra 386-365-1783
HOMES FROM $199/mo.
4% Down, 30 years at 5.5%
1-3br Foreclosures! For listings
1-800-749-8124 ext. F388
RENT TO OWN!
2/1 Block Home, Live in or Rental
628 NE Congress Ave. Serious
inquires only. (904)207-9550
750 Business &
Office Rentals
GREAT LOCATION
1235 SF Building
All Utilities Furnished
$975/month
A Bar Sales, Inc.
386-752-5035
7 Days 7 am-7 pm
Historic Henderson House
Office/Retail 3000 total sqft.
$1,875/mnthly. 207 S. Marion Ave.
386-867-0048 or 386-752-7951
New Office Space For lease
with Baya frontage
900 sqft $750 mth
Call 386-752-4072
SPACE AVAILABLE in Shopping
Center on East Baya Ave. Approx
2000 sq ft. Perfect for offices.
Call 386-566-8079 weekdays,
386-497-4762 weekends.
The Office Building is 3,437 square,
foot and has a reception room,
conference room, 12 offices,
2 storage rooms, a break room, and
4 restrooms. The office is located at
816 SW Main Boulevard and is
currently leased by the Odoni
Moses & Company. The office will
be available on March -1, 2006. *
Monthly rent is 3500.00 plus taxes.
Call 386-365-8181 or 386-623-3771
US 90 W in Westside Plaza
New Office Space 900 sq ft
Near Future Home Depot
Call Keith 867-3464

770 Condos For Rent
CONDO FOR RENT
3BR/2.5BA, 2 story, Available now.
$1200/mo. Call Sandy Kishton,
Daniel Crapps Agency
386-344-0433

805 Lots for Sale
FSBO: CLEAR Lot approx 3 1/4
acre. Close to shopping.
Homes only community.
City water avail. $45,000 each.
(772)201-7394 Ive msg

810 Home for Sale
$13,200! 3BR
FORECLOSURES! AVAIL.NOW!
FOR LISTINGS 800-749-8124
EXT. H411
FOR SALE hy Contractor:
3/2 all brick home with many
upgrades and city water on 1/2 acre
lot in upscale subdivision close to
town. Call Woodman Park Builders,
Inc. 386-755-2411 CB-C058182 '
FSBO: 3BR/2BA home.
Good condition. Jasper.
$82,500.
386-365-1130 or 386-963-3445
MODULAR HOME, 1508 Sqft.,
3BR/2BA. LIV/FRM, STUCCO
EXTERIOR, DRIVEWAY,
SODDED, SPRINKLER SYSTEM,
20% DOWN,
APPROX. $722.72NMTH.
CALL RON 386-397-4960


SA.r1yR1 i. Q OR


Classified Department: 755-5440


951 Recreational
Vehicles

1990 ALLEGRO Class A
Nice shape
12,500 OBO
Call Jim 352-572-4470


820 Farms &
820 Acreage
11.61 AC Rolling Land. US 41
Frontage. Part woods & pasture,
fenced/cross fenced. Comes with
1998 DW Call 386-303-1258 or
386-623-3388
200 ACRES in Columbia County,
FL., Paved & graded frontage. DW
MH. Pines, Hardwoods. Exc. Deer,
Turkey hunting. 8 miles East of
Lake City. $8,500 per acre.
386-752-1660 (Owner-Broker)
5-7 AC lots, Start @ $89K
Owner Fin. 386-754-7529
www.bullardpropertv.com
Chris Bullard Owner/Broker
BEAUTIFUL HOMESITE For
Sale on 1.3 acres corner lot off of
Anderws & Tevis. $43,500.
Call (334)285-6052
SUWANNEE COUNTY
320 acres, beautiful 9 years old
timer, w.CR on 3 sides for
$3,520,000. Call Crosby & Associ-
ates Inc. Broker (800)320-3477

940 Trucks
1999 FORD Ranger, Ext. Cab
4x4, XLT, Automatic, &4 cylinder.
Excellent Condition. $8,500 OBO.
Call 386-623-2582

950 Cars for Sale
*Hondas from $500*
Police Impounds!
For listings call
1-800-749-8116 ext A760
1997 FORD T-Bird V-8
59K miles, In better than Excellent
Condition. Only $5,590.
Christina 386-755-6500
2000 DODGE Stratus
White, PW/PL/Cruise.
Super nice car. $3,995 Cash.
Renee 386-755-6500
2002 CHRYSLER Sebring LXI
43K miles
$10,900, Excellent Condition
Call Jelani at 386-755-6500
2004 HONDA Accord, 2 Door,
EXL V6. Blue with Charcoal Int.
37K miles, Mint Condition. Must
See! $20,700. Jelani 386-755-6500
2004 PONTIAC Grand AM
Silver, 38K miles
$10,900
Call Jelani at 386-755-6500
2004 TOYOTA Solara, Red with
Leather interior. Only 16K miles.
A Steal at only $ 16,500.
Renee 386-755-6500
2005 DODGE Neon SXT
Blue, 27K miles
$10,900
Call Allen at 386-755-6500
2005 DODGE Stratus SXT
Gray, Loaded, 23K miles
$11,800
Call Christina at 386-755-6500
21105 FORD Tauru: SE
Buf,'unj' 22K r.' l
1"1.201i
Call Danielle at 386-755-6500
2006 FORD Taurus
White, 14K miles
$14,500
Call Renee at 386-755-6500
Two vehicles for sale, 99' Ford
Explorer Eddie Bauer $8500 and 02'
Toyota -Echo $6250. Both in good
condition, call 752-0068 for more
info ask for John.

951 Recreational
SVehicles
04502578
TRAVEL COUNTRY
RV CENTER
Pre-Owned Specials
MOTOR HOMES
00 DUTCHSTAR 38' DIESEL
05 PURSUIT 35' SLIDES
99 DIPLOMAT 36' NICE
00 SPORTSCOACH 38' SLIDE
05 CHEETAH 40' DIESEL
01 MONTANA 28' SLIDES
04 QUANTUM 28' SLIDES
05 CAMEO 34'" SLIDES
99 ALFA 38' SLIDES
And many, many more!!
Plus....over 10 million
In new inventory!!
1-888-222-7079 Lake City


200 PACE Arrow 35R
Great Shape!
Low Miles 62,900
Call Jim 352-572-4470


2006 28, TT with slide
frm 14,500
Call 386-758-8661


2 Vans & Sport
95 Util. Vehicles
04502490
FOR SALE -;- "
i BEST OFFER : -
1991 Isuzu Trooper. Four door,
6 cylinder, five speed with off
road tires. Vehicle has been
wrecked and needs a clutch.
Was driving back and fourth to
school before clutch went out.
Call 386-697-4114, 386-833-0038
or email
itismvbusiness(@mywav.com

1993 COM. Van
144K mi, good condition.
AC, TV, New Brakes. $3,500 OBO
Call 386-623-5585
1995 F350 White Ford
PassengerVan. with low miles, 500k
miles & tinted windows. In great
condition $7,000. 386-497-2667


Contact us




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Advertise It Here'

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your
vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $10 you can run your ad for an additional
10 days. A picture will run every day with a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring
your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private Party Only!

10 DYS FR ONY $3


1998 FORD
EXPLORER LIMITED
$6,000 OBO
Pearl White, 110K Miles, All Power, Moon
Roof, Leather. Digital Computer,
Worth 18000
Call
352-538-9948


1973 Dodge Charger
$ 2,000 firm
Professional rebuilt motor
and trans.,new paint and
white vinyl top, exc. shape,
was $13,000 1 yr. ago.
Call
386-755-7914


SPACE

AVAILABLE

NOW!


1996 JAYCO Super slide
RV Camper.
$10,500 OBO.
Call 386-755-3371






SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2006


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