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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/00254
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 31, 2005
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:00254
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





WEATHER
Inside 2A

Hi: 73 V
Low: .4
Partly Cloudy


Saying

Farewell
PoDuhlr Lake Citv natrv
000016 032806 ****3-DIGIT
LIBRARY OF FL HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


32

, ..... - -.


Just Peachy


LSU, Miami
square off in
the Peach Bowl
Sports, IB


Lake


City


Reporter


Saturday,


December 31, 2005


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 131, No. 292 0 50 cents


JENNIFER CHASTEENILake City Reporter
A spike in gasoline prices in
Columbia County has
consumers fuming as the
Columbia County Second Local
Option Gas Tax ends at
midnight tonight. Prices ranged
locally .from $2.35 to $2.39 for
unleaded on Friday.


Gas


hike


angers


many

Prices creep up days
before repeal of
five-cent local tax.
By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
A spike in gasoline prices in
Columbia County on Friday
had consumers fuming even
though prices should decrease
when the Columbia County
Second Local Option Gas Tax
ends tonight at midnight.
Many expressed distrust
and disgust with gasoline
retailers as prices climbed
overnight Thursday and dur-
ing the day Friday at many
outlets in the county.
'This increase is ridicu-
lous," said Paul Gunn, of Lake
City. "I think many of the gas
stations are gouging the con-
sumer. Gas goes up a dime
then goes down a nickel -
: they're still making more
money than they were making
before. It's like they think
we're too stupid to realize
what is going on."
Prices rose nearly 13 cents
Friday, as many drivers
expected to see a decrease in
gasoline sales prices as the
gas tax comes to a close. The
tax, which was implemented
Jan. 1, 2001, added five cents
to every gallon of gasoline
sold in the county.
According to a survey by
the Energy Information
Administration, the average
national price for regular
unleaded gas is $2.20.
Reports from AAA indicate
the average national gas price
is $2.19.
The tax has generated near-
ly $10 million during its five
years. The money was collect-
ed to complete the Bascom
Norris connector project.
However, some in the coun-
ty feel it is unfair the prices
have gone up as the tax
expires instead of going down.
"It is almost worth it to drive
to Gainesville or Valdosta,
where gas is cheaper," said
Jack Bruce, who was filling up
at an S&S station on U.S. 90
GAS continued on 7A


L-. j.i -u- .'- -i-.Z - 'L -i' �"l"-t : . -. " -- - "C:," a-"Z g3 -:,:. -
CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
i d . j . " i Fax: 752-9400


SPolice seek robbery suspect


Surveillance camera
catches clear photo of
man accused of heist.
By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter. corn
A youthful-looking white man calm-
ly walked into a Bank of America
branch during one of the busiest
times of the day, strolled to a teller
window, robbed the facility and left
with an undisclosed amount of money
Friday.
At approximately 12:36 p.m. the
man, described as in his early-20s,


walked into the Bank of America
located at U.S. 41 and State Road 47.
He handed a note to a bank teller
informing her that he planned to rob
the bank, according to reports.
"During the robbery, the man
never showed or indicated that he had
a weapon of any kind," said Capt.
Gary Laxton, public information offi-
cer for the Lake City Police
Department.
An undisclosed amount of money
was taken and the suspect left on foot.
"He was last seen running on foot
south in the direction of U.S. 41 or
State Road 47," Laxton said. "We do
not have a possible vehicle


description."
During the robbery, a video tape
captured images of the suspect.
The man was described as young,
in his early 20s, about 5-feet-9, with
short hair and a round face. He was
last seen wearing a red and white
shirt.
The man was caught on video tape
using the bank's security cameras.
Police have released the images in
hopes of tracking down the suspect.
Police were still looking for the
man Friday afternoon. Those with any
information are urged to contact the
Lake City Police Department at
752-4344.


COURTESY PHOTOIBank otAmerica
A security camera image of a suspect
believed to have robbed the Bank of
America on U.S. 41 and SR-47 was
released by Lake City Police.


OUT WITH THE OLD, IN WITH THE NEW




Party like it's 20.06


Entertainment
ideas available in
Columbia County.
By LINDSAY DOWNEY
Idowney@lakecityreporter. com
For many, this weekend is
a time to celebrate.
Some Lake City residents
likely will spend a relaxing
New Year's Eve at home,
watching Dick Clark's
Rockin' New Year's Eve 2006
countdown to the new year.
Others will ring in 2006 with
dinner and champagne down-
town, and football fans in the
area will be gearing up for
upcoming college bowl
games and NFL action.
Tucker's Fine Dining will
host its third annual New
Year's Eve Bash beginning at
8 p.m. today inside the
Blanche Hotel. Tickets are
$50 per person or $85 for a
couple. The event will feature
a full-course dinner, music
from Tony Buzzella and a
countdown to 2006.
"We will have champagne
at midnight and the ball will
drop on a large-screen TV,"
owner Brian Tucker said,
adding that he expects about
150 people at the celebration.
"We're the most fun you can
have in town without going to
jail. We're looking forward to
bringing in the new year and
the fun, the food and the
friendship."
Applebee's Neighborhood
Bar and Grill also will ring in
the new year with a count-
down to midnight. The


JENNIFER CHASTEENILake City Reporter
Amy Strickland serves Rae Windham at Phish Heads as customers enjoy football with their meals. Football fans will be able to
watch upcoming college bowl games and NFL action at various local establishments.


restaurant will stay open until
1 a.m. with happy hour spe-
cials from 3 p.m.- 7 p.m. and
again from 10 p.m. until close.
SApplebee's will televise
most college football bowl
games this weekend and
early next week on its four
TVs.
"This is our busiest week,"
manager Chuck Millsap said.
Beef O' Bradys will be open
until at least midnight New
Year's Eve if it has a large
crowd, owner Mike Nelson
said. The sports bar usually is
one of the most popular


places where sports fans con-
gregate and watch the games
on 21 TVs. This weekend
should be no exception.
"We've got all the bowl
games and we televise all
NFL games," owner Mike
Nelson said. "It's a football
atmosphere. Everybody's
coming here for all of them."
Beef 0' Bradys will have
specials during the games,
including pitchers of beer for
$5.99 and one pitcher and
25 wings for $17.99.
Phish Heads restaurant
also will have wing specials


with its happy hour from
4 p.m.-7 p.m. Owner Philip
Crenshaw expects big crowds
when the Gators play in the
Outback Bowl at 11 a.m.,
Monday, and again at 8 p.m.,
Tuesday, when the Seminoles
have their shot in the FedEx
Orange Bowl.
"Hopefully, we'll have a full-
house for the games,"
Crenshaw said, adding that
Phish Heads will show the
games on its big screen and
13 smaller TVs. "It gets pretty
jumping. We have a good time
with it."


Party safe
The Florida Highway
Patrol recommends the
use of a designated
drive if drinking this
holiday season,' '
Also, a Tow-to-Go
program will offer a free
tow for anyone who has
had too much to drink
and cannot drive home.
Call 1-800-AAA-Help to
use the service.


Churches see attendance boost after new year


Religious resolutions
popular for those
seeking life changes.
By LINDSAY DOWNEY
Idowney@lakecityreporter.com
The new year usually brings an
epiphany of religious resolutions as
more people vow to attend church in
2006.
Many people will sit in pews on
New Year's Day in an effort to enrich
their spiritual lives. Hugh Sherrill,
who has been in the ministry for
about 40 years, said churches often
see increased attendance at the new

INSIDE


Business
Classified . .


sA Obiu3res


Comics . .
Local & Nation . . . . . .


Opinion .. . .. ..
Puzzles
Faith & Values .


year because people often are
looking to "turn a new leaf."
Sherrill said many people will
focus on per-
sonal resolu- "We've h
tions this year, coming ir
but if they turn
to God for help, saying the)
they will be back. Some
more likely to people
reach their p
goals. been away f
"I think the
majority of peo- - Brend
ple are going to Epiphany Catholic
focus on
material things, health things - like
stop smoking and lose weight - but


they don't realize the Lord is where
they'll find those things," Sherrill


said. "We should
iad several
this week
y're coming
of them are
who have
or a while ..."
a Cantella,
Church bookkeeper


always set goals
and resolutions
that are attain-
able. Through
God all things
are possible,
but not all
things are
given."
Epiphany
Catholic
Church ,
3600 S. Marion
Ave., typically


sees its congregation increase in
January, bookkeeper Brenda


Cantella said.
"We've had several (new mem-
bers) coming in this week saying
they're coming back." Cantella said.
"Some of them are people wIho have
been away for awhile and now are
wanting to come back."
Epiphany Catholic Church will
host services at 5 p.m. today and at
8:15 a.m. and 5 p.m. Sunday.
Hopeful Baptist Church, 204 Rt. 4
Walter Road, will host church services
at 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Sunday.
"Sunday night we're having a spe-
cial New Year's Day celebration,"
Pastor Dr. Rodney Baker said.
CHURCH continued on 7A


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
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COMING
SUNDAY
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Page Editor: S. Michael Manley, 754-0429


LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2005


(9ISH
Friday:
5-9-9


Thursday:
5-19-21-22-36


"A

Friday:
0-0-9-1


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Anatomy' star to have hands full


LOS ANGELES - Izzie's going to
have her hands full when "Grey's
Anatomy" returns from its holiday
break next month.
'There will be a love triangle for my
character," Katherine Heigl, who plays
Dr. Isobel "Izzie" Stevens on the hit
ABC show, told reporters recently,
according to AP Radio.
The 27-year-old actress also hinted
about upcoming developments:
'There's like some kind of prom
episode or something, I don't know


'Companion' won't
be leaving home
MINNEAPOLIS -
Garrison Keillor's "A Prairie
Home Companion" won't be
permanently leaving its
St. Paul home after all.
The humorist said he
expects to do about a dozen
shows during the 2006-07
season from the Fitzgerald
Theater, the longtime base of
the public radio program.
The rest of the season's
shows will air from the road,
including a return to the
Minnesota State Fair, he
said.


what that is. Somebody leaves the
program."
But, she added: "I don't know what
happens with Meredith and Dr.
McDreamy. Nobody will tell us yet
what's going on there."
Ellen Pompeo stars as Dr. Meredith
Grey, a first-year intern, and Patrick
Dempsey plays neurosurgeon Derek
Shepherd, nicknamed Dr. McDreamy.
Meredith was getting cozy with Derek
- until his sexy wife showed up in
Seattle.


Keillor said last month the
show was looking for a new
home.
But in the end, he said, it
was an impulsive decision to
stay at the Fitzgerald, based
partly on people he met at
coffee shops or parties.
"They said it would be
terrible if the show were not
in St. Paul," Keillor told The
Associated Press on
Thursday. "I listen to people
who tug at my sleeve."

Pair arrested
in video theft
NEW YORK - Two men


Celebrity Birthdays


* Folk and blues singer
Odetta is 75.
* Actor Sir Anthony Hopkins
is 68.
* Actor Tim Considine ("My
Three Sons") is 65.
* Actress Sarah Miles is 64.
* Rock musician Andy
Summers is 63.
* Actor Ben Kingsley is 62.
* Rock musician Peter
Quaife (The Kinks) is 62.
* Producer-director Taylor
Hackford is 61.
* Fashion designer Diane


Von Furstenberg is 59.
* Actor Tim Matheson is 58.
* Pop singer Burton
Cummings (The Guess Who)
is 58.
M Singer Donna Summer is
57.
* Actor Joe Dallesandro is
57.
* Rock musician Tom
Hamilton (Aerosmith) is 54.
* Actor James Remar is 52.
* Actress Bebe Neuwirth is
47.
* Actor Val Kilmer is 46.


Katherine Heigl


have been arrested for
trying to sell Marc Anthony,
and Jennifer Lopez's stolen
wedding video back to the
couple for $1 million,
authorities said.
The men tried to ransom
the video after first shopping
it around unsuccessfully to
media outlets including
People, Us Weekly and
"Access Hollywood,"
according to a criminal
complaint filed against them.
Tito Moses, 31, and
Steven Wortman, 49, were
arraigned late Wednesday in
Manhattan Criminal Court
on charges of conspiracy,
attempted grand larceny and


possession of stolen
property.
A copy of the celebrity
couple's wedding video was
in a laptop computer that
was in Anthony's car when it
was stolen in Linden, NJ.,
last October. The car was
later recovered, but the
laptop was gone.
According to the
complaint, once they failed
to sell the video to the
media, Moses and Wortman
called Marc Anthony
Productions and tried to sell
it back to the salsa star.
* Associated Press


Thought for Today


"No one ever regarded the first of
January with indifference. It is the
nativity of our common Adam."

- Charles Lamb,
English essayist and author (1775-1834)


MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR


Bonita Crews, 55
McClenny, Housewife and
homemaker

* Family: My husband
and I.

* Hobbies: Sewing

* Favorite pastimes:
Shopping

* What would you most
like to see improved in
your town?: "The traffic is
terrible."

* Who is your hero or
inspiration, and why?: "I
would have to say that I
really looked up to Princess
Diana, because she was the
perfect woman with great
beauty and charisma."


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ......... (386) 752-1293
Fax number .. ... .....752-9400
Circulation ..................755-5445
Online ...... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through-Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,'
Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fla. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard ... .754-0418
(mleonard@ lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson ..........754-0428
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Sales .....................752-1293
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)


Bonita Crews


Meet Your Neighbor is a daily
feature of the Lake City
Reporter. We interview people
in the community in order to get
to know our neighbors better.


Reporter

To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.

Controller Sue Brannon .......754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next
day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters ... .754-0407
watersr@ lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
13 Weeks .................... $23.54
26 W eeks .....................$42.80
52 Weeks ..... ............... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
13 Weeks .................... $44.85
26 Weeks ..................... $89.70
52 Weeks .................... $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items:
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Bush: Teachers
craft curriculum
TALLAHASSEE - As the
state begins to update it's
science standards for students,
Gov. Jeb Bush said Friday that
educators - not politicians -
should decide how they're
crafted and whether
"intelligent design" should be
a part of it
Despite his belief that God
created earth and all life on it,
the Roman Catholic governor
said he will leave science cur-
riculum to education experts.
'The standards should be
created by educators, not
politicians," Bush said. "Its not
my job."
Bush added that evolution
should "absolutely" be part of
science teachings, but he said
there are gaps in the theory
and he personally would want
science teachers to allow
discussions about creationism.
"What I would hope would
happen is that science
teachers would not feel
compelled to exclude opening
children's minds up to the fact
that other people - a lot of
people - have different views
about the creation of life. I
think that would be a healthy
thing to have children
understand, that it's not
either/or, that it's not one way
,or the highway," Bush said.
The Department of
Education plans to revise
Florida's science standards,
which haven't been updated in
nearly a decade, Bush said.
The revision isn't expected to
start before 2007. Bush, who
can't seek re-electiori because
of term limits, will leave office
in January 2007.

Dozens of Cubans
land on beaches
MIAMI BEACH - Dozens
of Cuban refugees, including
at least nine children, came
ashore Friday throughout
Southern Florida, officials
said.
Authorities reported at
least five groups of Cubans


landed at different points
along the coast. In Miami
Beach, 28 people came
ashore, said Miami Beach
police Officer Arley Flaherty.
The refugees were taken to
immigration offices where
their cases will be processed,
Flaherty said.
The group that landed at
Miami Beach said they left
Cuba Wednesday night and
that a good Samaritan picked
them up at sea after their
makeshift boat ran into
trouble, Flaherty said.
Under the so-called
wet-foot, dry-foot policy,
Cubans who reach U.S. soil
are usually allowed to stay,
while most picked up at sea
are sent home.

FAA orders
seaplanes checks
MIAMI - The Federal
Aviation Administration
grounded Friday all
seaplanes similar to the one
involved in last week's fatal
crash off Miami Beach until
they are inspected.
The G-73 Turbine Mallard
plummeted into the ocean
Dec. 19 when its right wing
separated from the fuselage
minutes after taking off for
the Bahamas, killing all 20 on
board.
An initial investigation by
the National Transportation
Safety Board found fatigue
cracks along the Chalk's
Ocean Airways plane's right
wing. The NTSB is unlikely
to issue its final report for
months.
About 25. other Grumman
G-73 seaplanes are in
operation, FAA officials have
said. Chalk's was the only
one to operate the 1940s-era
aircraft commercially and had
voluntarily grounded its other
four planes.
Last week, the FAA sent
out a bulletin alerting
operators and owners that it
would likely issue the
inspection order, which
covers the Frakes Aviation
Gulfstream American G-73
model, originally


manufactured by Grumman,
as well as other G-73 models
with converted turbine
engines.
"We have evaluated all
pertinent information and
identified an unsafe condition
that is likely to exist or
develop on other airplanes of
this same type of design,"
Friday's order states.
The FAA mandated
detailed visual inspections of
the wings, including removal
of wing sealant, to detect
possible cracking or
corrosion, and removal of any
repairs to allow for inspection
of the original wing structure.
It ordered the repair of any
cracks or corrosion found.

Man arrested for
photos released
LAKELAND - An appeals
court has ordered the release
of an alleged Internet
pornographer who was
arrested after he posted
grisly photos U.S. soldiers
took in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The 2nd District Court of
Appeal did not state in its
brief or4er Thursday why
Chris Wilson should be
released, but said a written
opinion would follow. He left
jail a few hours later.
Wilson, 28, was arrested on
obscenity charges in October
for operating a Web site which
sparked national attention for
giving soldiers free access to
pornography in exchange for
posting pictures from the Iraq
and Afghanistan wars.
His attorney has suggested
the government arrested
Wilson for posting naked'
photos as a way to stop him
for posting the war photos,
saying that few alleged Web
pornographers are charged
with obscenity.
Polk County prosecutors
requested in November that
Wilson's $151,000 bail be
revoked because his Web site
continued to operate.
* Associated Press


(BBI,


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_____________________________________,I,.,,--... *,....


TEMPERATURES
SHigh Friday
, L ovFricia,
r: normal nign
lJorrmal lowv
Record high
Rec. rd IcO,

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Mortin total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year to date


SUN
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"Saturday Sunday








- Fnrcasted tempeature "Feei like" temperature


- -"


I


City
Cape C
Daytona
Ft. Laud
Fort My
Gainesv
Jackson
Key We
Lake Ci
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Orlando
Panama
Pensac
Tallaha
Tampa
Valdost
W. Palr


PARTLY: MOSTLY
OUDY i SUNNY


LO - HI 70 L05





Sunday Monday
anaveral I d. : 74 62 p.:
a Beach 7S 60 p,: 17 61 p.:
derdale 80, 69, p: 81, 6S, pc
yers 80/63/pc 80/64/pc
rille 73/55/pc 73/57/pc
nville 70/54/pc 73/56/r
ast 79/70/pc 79/70/pc
ity 71/54/pc 73/55/c
81/69/pc 82/69/pc
81/65/pc 82/64/pc
76/57/pc 76/57/pc
i 79/60/pc 78/61/pc
a City 70/63/ts 73/57/pc
ola 72/64/pc 76/56/c
ssee 73/58/ts 74/54/pc
78/63/pc 76/63/r
ta 71/56/pc 73/53/ts
n Beach 80/65/pc 82/65/pc


.1 ,


77m LOIV
452 a, m iusrto m aii


-;:12 a ~ .
k3 I.
3 1''
'Dienr.'


in. Jan.
22 29
ist New


On this date in
1830, a very heavy
snowstorm ushered
in the "winter of the
deep snow". The
storm produced 30
inches of snow at
Peoria, III. and 36
inches at Kansas
City, Mo.


An exclusive
service
:, to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


Sweather.com


, Forecasts, data and graphics
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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2005


Corner Kitchen says goodbye


Norma Jean Hancock, past owner of the Corner Kitchen restaurant, says goodbye to longtime regular
customer Baliff Tommy Richardson on the last day the business was open Friday.


By LINDSAY DOWNEY
Idowney@lakecityreporter.com

Jeane Nessmith will miss
the macaroni and cheese, the
chocolate pie and the lifelong
friends she made eating lunch
in the Corner Kitchen restau-
rant almost every day for
more than five years.
The 41-year-old Lake City
eatery, located at 18 N.
Marion Ave., closed its doors
at 2 p.m. Friday. Owner
Deborah Blakely said she is
closing the restaurant
because of health problems in
her family and because she
"felt it was time."
'This is an era that's end-
ing. Where are we going to
eat lunch now?" Nessmith
asked just before she cried
and hugged the staff goodbye.
Thomas Bulthuis, 64, also
felt a sense of loss as he
sipped on iced tea inside the
green-and-white restaurant he
has been frequenting for
about two years.
"I guess I'll starve to death
now," Bulthuis said, adding
that the restaurant's Italian
beef casserole is his favorite
item on the menu.
Blakely, 52, has been work-
ing at the Corner Kitchen
since she was 13 years old.
Blakely's mother and
grandmother opened the


restaurant in 19.64. Blakely
became owner in 1997.
"I still use my
grandmother's recipes," she
said.
Corner Kitchen is
renowned in Columbia
County for its country cook-
ing and down-home atmos-
phere. One repair man told
Blakely people in Tampa told
him about the legendary Lake
City establishment.
"They're one of the few
places that still serves collard
greens and black-eyed peas
and cornbread," Sixty-five-
year-old patron Stephen
Knight said after he snapped a
photo of the outside of the
restaurant.
Knight, who is a retired
environmental health director,
said many business people
often ate at the Corner
Kitchen. Knight used to walk
from the courthouse to the
restaurant on his lunch
breaks.
"If I want to see somebody,
I come down here," Knight
said. "You always find
different lawyers over here."
Nessmith said people in the
area often recognized her as
the woman who sat every day
at the first table on the right in
the second dining room -
also known as the Corner
Kitchen's "prayer table"


because patrons often sat
there to talk and share their
problems.
"When you come in. here,
you have come home,"
Nessmith said. "It's a place of
real comfort."
Just after the restaurant
closed Friday, the Corner
Kitchen's five staff members
and a few lingering patrons
took photos in front of the
restaurant and behind a cake
with white icing that sat on the
dining room counter. After
tearful goodbyes, a few staff
members walked out of the
door, including cook Christine
Baker, who worked at the
restaurant for 33 years.
"She's the greatest grill
cook I've ever met," Blakely
said fondly.
Blakely said she always will
remember the customers who
have eaten at the restaurant
for most of their lives.
"I've probably seen three
generations of kids grow up
here," Blakely said. "Just see-
ing them come in as adults -
it's just been unreal."
Blakely said there is inter-
est in buying the restaurant
and it could reopen in the
future with many of the same
employees and the same
country cooking.
"I. could still visit," Blakely
said with a smile.


Columbia County woman


charged with animal cruelty


By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com

A Columbia County woman was arrest-
ed Thursday and charged with animal
cruelty after reportedly selling an
extremely abused horse in September.
Jeanette Martinez, 31, of Downy Street
near Fort White, was arrested and
charged with cruelty to animals. She was
booked into the Columbia County Jail
and released on $1,000 bond Thursday.
Animal cruelty is a third-degree felony.
Those convicted of the charge could face
up to five years in jail and a $10,000 fine.
Veterinarian reports showed the less
than 2-year-old horse was extremely
weak and was suffering from


malnutrition.
The horse's coat,
mane and tail were mat-
ted and ragged, said
Columbia County
Sheriff Bill Gootee. The
horse's hooves had not
been trimmed in some
time and were cracked' Martinez
In addition, the horse suffered from an
abnormal heart beat and there was no
record of regular medical care
"This case has been ongoing since
September, when Ms. Martinez sold the
horse in such bad shape," Gootee said.
"As an agency, we are learning how to
better understand and investigate reports
of animal cruelty and neglect cases. This


is one of the first, but expect to see
more."
Gootee and four sheriff's deputies
went to St. Petersburg last month for a
training seminar on investigation animal
cruelty and neglect cases.
The horse's new owner has named the
animal Spirit and had reported the animal
is improving daily.
'We have a wonderful organization
here - Neighbors Equine Assistance
Team - and they are more than willing
to help people understand the needs of
their horse," Gootee said. "It's OK if you
realize you need help and get it - but it
becomes criminal when you need help
understanding your horse and you don't
get it and the horse suffers."


Record-tying tropical storm forms in Atlantic


By ADRIAN SAINZ
Associated Press Writer

Tropical.Storm Zeta tied a record for
the latest developing named storm
when it formed Friday in the open
ocean, another surprising turn in an
already-infamous 2005 Atlantic hurri-
cane season.
Although the National Hurricane
Center said Zeta wasn't forecast to
become a hurricane or threaten land,
Zeta's development was significant
because it came a month after the offi-
cial Nov. 30 end to the busy season.
The six-month season featured a
record 14 hurricanes, including
Hurricane Katrina, which devastated
Louisiana and Mississippi in August in
the most costly disaster in U.S. history.
Forecasters exhausted their list of
21 proper names and began using the
Greek alphabet to name storms for the


Arrest Log
The following information was
provided by local law
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted. All
people are presumed innocent
unless proven guilty.
Thursday, Dec. 29
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Stephen Duane Rapp, 36,
14017 NW 214th Terrace, High
Springs, warrant: violation of
probation on charges of
stalking.

Fire EMS Calls
Thursday, Dec. 29
* 7:10 p.m., wreck, 1-10 mile
marker 308, one primary and
one volunteer unit responded.
* 7:54 p.m., wreck, U.S..441
North, one primary and one
volunteer unit responded.
* 8:54 p.m., rescue assist,
Memorial Drive, one volunteer
unit responded.
* 9:56 p.m., rescue assist,
June Road, one volunteer unit


first time.
The 27th named storm of the season,
Zeta was located about 1,065 miles
southwest of the Azores, the National
Hurricane Center reported at 4 p.m.
EST Friday. Zeta had maximum sus-
tained winds near 50 mph and was mov-
ing toward the northwest near 7 mph.
Zeta tied one other storm for the lat-
est developing named system since
record keeping began in 1851, said
Greg Romano, a National Weather
Service spokesman. Tropical Storm
Alice developed Dec. 30, 1954, and later
became a hurricane before dissipating
Jan. 5. (It was actually the second storm
named Alice to develop in 1954; the first
one hit Mexico in June.) Tropical
storms develop when their winds
exceed 39 mph, and hurricanes form
when their winds exceed 74 mph.
Romano said Zeta just made the cut
to be counted for the 2005 season

POLICE REPORTS


responded.
Friday, Dec. 30
* 12:21 a.m., rescue assist,
Windsong Apartments, one
primary unit responded.
* 5:54 a.m., rescue assist,
Pearl Drive, one primary unit
responded.
* 9:20 a.m., rescue assist,
Trotters Glen, one volunteer
unit responded.
* 9:27 a.m., wreck, Jim Witt
Road, one primary and two vol-
unteer units responded.,
* 10:05 a.m., rescue assist,
Spoonville Road, one volunteer
unit responded.
* 11:14 a.m., rescue assist,


because storms developing after
December apply to the following sea-
son.
"Had this storm developed in
January, it would be called Alberto, not
Zeta," Romano said.
Earlier this month, Hurricane
Epsilon became only the fifth hurricane
to form in December in 154 years of
record keeping - though Romano said
some storms could have fallen through
the cracks before technology such as
satellites was available to help find and
track tropical systems.
Meteorologist Martin Nelson said the
hurricane center had been monitoring
the low-pressure system and believed it
could form into a tropical storm.
But because many hurricane center
staffers were taking time off near the
end of the year, forecasters were forced
to scramble as the storm quickly
strengthened Friday morning.


Lake City Community College,
one primary unit responded.
* 11:45 a.m., rescue assist,.
U.S. 441 North, north of
Mershon Road, one volunteer
unit responded.
* 12:07 p.m., wreck, Marion
Avenue and Ivan Street, one
primary unit responded.
* 12:21 p.m., rescue assist,
Goose Nest Restaurant, one
volunteer unit responded.
* 12:23 p.m., wreck,
Hwy. 247, one primary and one
volunteer unit responded.
N 1:03 p.m., yard fire,
CR-242, one primary and two
volunteer units responded.


* 2:47 p.m., wreck,
Hwy 100rA and Williams Road,
one primary;unit responded.
* Fr6m staff reports.


Pictured from left: Sharon Timmons, Head Nurse of Veterans
Affairs Medical Center Hospice/Palliative Care Unit; VA volunteer
Joseph Wilson; VA Associate Director Nancy Reissener; and VA
Physician of Hospice/Palliative Care Khalid Khan stand with a
poster created and donated by local artist Duffy Soto dedicated to
WWII veterans.

Lobbyist, prosecutors

are reportedly close to deal


By TONI LOCY
Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Federal
prosecutors and lawyers for
Republican lobbyist Jack
Abramoff are putting the fin-
ishing touches on a plea deal
that could be announced as
early as Tuesday, according to
people familiar with the
negotiations.
The plea agreement would
secure the lobbyist's testimo-
ny against several members of
Congress who received favors
from him or his clients.
Abramoff and a former part-
ner were indicted in Miami in
August on charges of conspir-
acy and fraud for allegedly
lying about their assets to help
secure financing to purchase a
fleet of gambling boats.
For the past two weeks,


pressure has been intensifying
on Abramoff to strike a deal
with prosecutors since his for-
mer business partner, Adam
Kidan, pleaded guilty to fraud
and conspiracy in connection
with the 2000 SunCruz deal.
Abramoff's cooperation
would be a boon to an ongoing
Justice Department investiga-
tion of congressional corrup-
tion, possibly helping prosecu-
tors build criminal cases
against up to 20 lawmakers
and their staff members.
Requesting anonymity
because of the sensitive nature
of the talks, people said the
lawyers spoke by phone with
U.S. District Judge Paul C.
Huck, giving him an update on
the plea negotiations. Huck
scheduled another status
conference for 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday.


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EYE CENTER OF NORTH FLORIDA
917 W. Duval Street, Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 755-7595


Page Editor: S. Michael Manley, 754-0429














OPINION


Saturday, December 31, 2005


www.lakecityreporter.com


EDITORIAL


There's still

some pain

at the pump

he clock is ticking on
Columbia County's Second
Local Option Gas Tax. The
five-cent addition to each
gallon of gas purchased in
Columbia County will cease to exist at
the stroke of midnight.
Celebrate. Kiss your loved ones.
Like it or not, the tax has served us
well, providing more than $10 million in
revenue to build and complete the
Bascom Norris Drive project. We've
paid our taxes and we've seen some
results with the final stage of the road
project hopefully seeing completion in
2006.
Now, it's time for the tax to sunset
and here is where consumers need to
watch closely. It seems, mysteriously,
that many gas stations in the county
jumped their prices by as much as
13 cents overnight Thursday and
during the day Friday.
Why? Could it be a plan to raise
prices by a dime or more, then reduce
the five cents at midnight? That would
be unfair.
We won't know the outcome of the
questionable gasoline pricing until
tomorrow, but if gouging is detected, it
should be reported.
It's a sorry business practice and it
can't be tolerated.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Dec. 31, the 365th
and final day of 2005.
* On Dec. 31, 1879, Thomas Edison
first publicly demonstrated his electric
incandescent light in New Jersey.
* In 1775, the British repulsed an attack
by Continental Army generals Richard
Montgomery and Benedict Arnold at
Quebec; Montgomery was killed.
* In 1862, President Lincoln signed an
act admitting West Virginia to the Union.
* In 1877, President and Mrs. Hayes
celebrated their silver anniversary (actually,
a day late) by re-enacting their wedding
ceremony in the White House,
* In 1905, 100 years ago, Broadway
composer Jule Styne was born in London.
* In 1946, President Truman officially
proclaimed the end of hostilities in World
War II.
* In 1961, the .Marshall Plan expired
after distributing more than $12 billion in
foreign aid.
* In 1974, private U.S. citizens were
allowed to buy and own gold for the first
time in more than 40 years.
* In 1985, singer Rick Nelson, 45, and
six other people were killed when fire
broke out aboard a DC-3 that was taking
the group to a New Year's Eve
performance in Dallas.

Lake City Reporter
serving Columbia County since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is published with
pride for residents of Columbia and
surrounding counties by Community
Newspaper Inc. of Athens, Ga.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities - "Newspapers get
things done!"
Our primary goal is to publish
distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work.
Michael Leonard, publisher
Todd Wilson, editor
Sue Brannon, controller

Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


OUR POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be typed or
neatly written and double spaced. Letters
should not exceed 400 words and will be edited
for length and libel. Letters must be signed and
include the writer's name, address and
telephone number for verification. Writers can
have two letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of the
writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City
Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St.
downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com


COMMENTARY


The wheelchair


A another meeting
called me away
from home. It
seemed that I was
always gone when
some desperate emergency
occurred. My brother who
lived in the same city that we
lived in called me. "Jack, you
have to come home. Robbie is
sick. They think he has polio.
Ann called and I rushed over.
His arms and legs were just
like rubber. You have to
cancel the meeting and come
home NOW!"
Since I felt my primary
calling was to go out and save
the world, I asked my brother
to check out the condition of
my son and call me back. I
wanted to be sure his
condition was that serious.
How dumb can you be?
(Amen!). He called and I
cancelled the meeting and
drove the distance in half the
time.
My son was in Ware County
Hospital. I approached the
main building from the west
wing and then I saw the huge
'iron lung' stationed just
outside the room at the far
end of the hall. We served a
small congregation at that
time and a number of
believers saw me and were
alerted. They ran down the
hall and grabbed me, crying
and kissing my cheeks and
forehead.
What a silly thing I thought
when I first looked at the body
of our little boy. "He'll never
play football!" Dumb again,
but then I was just 23 years
old and what did I know about
life?
The doctor was bold and
blunt. "He'll never live
through the night. He has
ascending type Bulbar polio
and as soon as it reaches vital
organs, the fight will be over."
Ann had been praying
constantly and did not believe
what the doctor said. We went
outside and fell on the grassy
slope and just cried and cried.
Loved ones prayed and when


Jack Exum
Phone: (386) 755-9525
jhexum@netzero.net

dawn came, Robbie was alive.
Now, 54 years later, he
continues to be the most
cheerful outgoing son in the
family. He was confined to
braces, corsets, head traction
and special shoes and a
wheelchair. His new home
was Warm Springs, Ga., where
all his special needs were met.
He became a singer at an
early pre-school age and,
worse than that, he made up
his own songs. I was in the
kitchen and he was singing,
"When I get to heaven ...
know what I'm gonna do ...
I'm gonna run up the stairs
and run down the stairs ... hey
Dad, any crippled boys in
heaven?" I answered, "Nope."
Then I heard him say in a soft
voice, "Boy, I wish I could
hurry up and go there!"
A preacher friend sent me
the following story: A young
successful executive was
traveling down a
neighborhood street, going a
bit too fast in his new Jaguar.
He was watching for kids
darting out between parked
cars and slowed down when
he thought he saw something.
As the car passed, no
children appeared. Instead, a
brick smashed into the Jag's
side door! He slammed on the
brakes, and backed up to
where the brick had been
thrown. He grabbed the
nearest kid and pushed him
utp against the side of the car
shouting, "What was that all
about and who are you? Just
what are you, doing? This is a
new car and that brick you
just threw is going to cost me


a wad of money. Why did you
do such a stupid thing?"
The young boy was
apologetic. "Please, mister,
please ... I'm sorry but I didn't
know what else to do. I threw
the brick cause that was the
only way I could get anyone to
stop." With tears dripping
down his face and off his chin,
the youth pointed to a spot
just around the parked car.
"It's my brother," he said. "He
rolled off the curb and fell out
of the wheelchair and I can't
lift him up."
Now sobbing, the boy asked
the stunned executive, "could
you please help me get him
back in the wheelchair? He's
hurt bad and he's too heavy
for me. I've got to get him
home so Mom can fix him."
Moved beyond words, the
driver tried to swallow the
lump in his throat. He gently
lifted the injured lad back into
the wheelchair and took out a
linen handkerchief and
dabbed at the fresh cuts and
bruises. A quick look told him
that everything was going to
be okay. 'Thank you for
helping me with my brother
and have a happy new year." It
was New Year's Eve.
Too shook up for words, the
man simply watched the boy
push his wheelchair-bound
brother down the sidewalk
toward home. It seemed like a
long, slow walk back to the
Jaguar. The damage was very
noticeable, but the driver
never did repair the dented
door. He left the dent to
remind him of this message ...
"Don't go through life so fast.
Someone my have to throw a
brick at you to get your
attention."
We call him "Bob" now and
if you around town and just
happen to hear someone
singing, look around -for the
wheelchair - it may just be
him.
E Jack Exum is a minister and
motivational speaker. He is an
Amy-Award winning religious
writer and resides in Lake City.


Whether it's
helping a
family
displaced by a
home fire or
dispatching aid to those
devastated by hurricanes in
the Gulf Coast - the
American Red Cross is there.
That's why the American
public cannot be sidetracked
by the negative publicity
generated with the
resignation earlier this month
of the organization's
president, Marsha Evans -
the second change at the top
in three years.
If anything, that signals an


organizational problem, not
one of mission, that needs
serious attention.
Evans reportedly resigned
because of friction with the
board of governors. Her
predecessor, Dr. Bernadine
Healy, said she was forced to
resign partly because of
disagreements with the board
over whether money coming
in after Sept. 11 should be
placed in a separate fund or a
general disaster fund. Some
donors were upset that
$200 million was set aside for
future terrorist incidents.
That the two resignations
are only three years apart and


both in the wake of major
disasters is reason enough for
serious soul-searching, both
within and without the
agency.
The prospects of trying to
work with a 50-member board
of directors is daunting
indeed, and the search for
corrective action within the
organization should focus on
changes in that situation, not
who is the director.
In the meantime, the fuss
cannot be allowed to disrupt
the efforts of local chapters to
help those in need.
* Yakima (Wash.)
Herald-Republic


4A


COMMENTARY

What New Year's

resolutions are

being made now?

WASHINGTON
M ost resolutions are not worth
much, but as we face what we
all hope and pray will be a far
better year than nasty 2005
was, it's a near certainty what
some resolutions made in Washington will be.
Here's predicting that President Bush will
resolve to spend a little more time vetting his
next Supreme Court nominee, who won't be
named Harriet, and will be careful what he
says about what's been accomplished when he
gets on board an aircraft carrier. And the next
time there's a natural disaster and he's on
vacation, he'll a re
be quicker to
leave the ranch.
Vice
President i
Cheney is
resolving to
strip the word
"torture" from, Ann McFeatters
his vocabulary amcfeatters@nationalpress.com
and will refuse
to lobby anyone
on Capitol Hill about what methods the CIA
needs or doesn't need to get information from
detainees. He will never again hire anyone
named "Scooter."
Senior White House aide Karl Rove will be
extremely careful before he talks with
reporters about anyone with the name of
"Valerie" or who works or has ever worked for
the CIA.
The folks at the National Security Agency,
who have been listening in on Americans'
conversations with people overseas, will be
more assiduous in using that black crayon
they're supposed to use in blocking out
American names from reports they forward to
other agencies.
Defense Chief Donald Rumsfeld, if he
remains chief of defense, will not throw
around phrases such as "old Europe" so glibly.
When his generals tell him they need more
troops, he will smile and pat them on the back
before he says "no" and fires them. o.. ...
The next time there is a move to consolidate
22 fractious agencies into one department,
such as the unwieldy Department of
Homeland Security, members of Congress are
resolved to ask more questions.
The next time Tom DeLay tells fellow
Republicans that a good way to get the public's
ear is to show up in a hospital room of a
comatose patient and try to second-guess a
bunch of doctors, GOP leaders are resolved to
run in the opposite direction.
It's a good bet that the new school board
members in Dover, Pa., have resolved never to
string together the words "intelligent" and
"design."
Samuel Alito Jr. is resolved that during his
confirmation hearings on his Supreme Court
nomination he will not repeat his impassioned
1985 ridicule of the idea that the Constitution
guarantees a right to privacy that is used as a
legal basis for abortion.
Retiring Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day
O'Connor, who will be the grand marshal for
the 2006 Rose Parade, following Mickey
Mouse who reigned in 2005, is resolved not to
be a referee in the next heavyweight boxing
championship of the world.
New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is
resolved not to "double dog dare" transit
workers to strike.
All White House aides are resolved never to
tell the president that anything at all about
Iraq, Saddam Hussein or weapons of mass
destruction is a "slam dunk" case.
Martha Stewart is resolved that if she is
ever again confronted by federal officials, she
will offer them cookies and milk and nothing
more until she talks to her lawyers.
Civil libertarian Democrats resolve never
more to permit the word "patriot" to be
stamped on the title of a piece of legislation
that has anything to do with law and order.
The United Nations undoubtedly is resolved
not to get into any more "oil-for-food" scams,
after investigations showed its contract with
Iraq was mired in abject corruption.
Charismatic Illinois Democrat Barack
Obama, is resolved not to peak too soon after a
solid first year as a new senator. He also is
determined to keep his sense of humor, which
he displayed by noting that he was so
overexposed he made even Paris Hilton look
like a recluse.
And that other Democrat, Hillary of New
York, certainly is resolved to keep the guessing
game going on whether or not she'll run for
president in 2008. Once she declares, the
mystery is over and the gloves will come off.
And, finally, after a bad year for the press,
we journalists resolve to be more accurate,
more balanced, more thoughtful, more
insightful and more resolute about finding out
the truth.


Who knows? Unlike losing weight,
exercising and saving more money, perhaps
such resolutions will even be kept.
* Ann McFeatters is Washington Bureau chief of
the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Toledo Blade.


OTHER VIEWS

Support for Red Cross must continue


____











Page Editor: S. Michael Manley, 754-0429 LAKE ~~ITY REPORTER BUSINESS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2005


7 R! F '



2005 among worst



years in recent memory



for state agriculture


By MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press Writer

ORLANDO - Vegetable
pickers are harvesting only
about half the volume of toma-
toes and peppers that they
normally would this time of
year at the Six Ls farm in
southwest Florida where
Hurricane Wilma's destruc-
tive winds tore through fields
in October.
"We had total devastation of
anything that was four weeks
of age or younger," said Jamie
Williams, a Six Ls official.
Hurricanes made 2005 one
of the worst years in recent
memory for Florida agricul-
ture. Four storms that struck
the state not only caused an
estimated $2.2 billion in dam-
age to the state's crops and
farming infrastructure, but
the storms are believed to
have spread dreaded citrus
diseases that threaten the
state's signature citrus crops.
"We haven't had a loss of
this magnitude since the
freeze of 1989," said Tim
Nance, director of operations
in the eastern United States
for Gargiulo, one of the
nation's largest growers of


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Becker Holdings Corporation Chairman - CEO Tom Hurley,
(right) shows Sen. Mel Martinez, R-Fla., (center) and Rep. Mark
Foley, R-Fla., hurricane damaged grapefruit crops on Oct. 31.


tomatoes. "Nobody has seen
this level of devastation for
about 16 years."
The four hurricanes caused
estimated damages of $1.1 bil-
lion to the state's nursery and
foliage industry, $370 million
to the sugar sector, $180 mil-
lion to citrus and $44.1 million
to tropical fruit, according to
the Florida Fruit & Vegetable
Association.


Wilma also has raised con-
cerns about an impending
labor shortage for Florida
agriculture as workers have
stayed away or taken jobs in
construction rebuilding dam-
aged homes, industry execu-
tives said. Gargiulo's opera-
tions in southwest Florida, for
instance, usually attracts
1,000 workers in the winter
but only about half that figure


has returned this season.
Hurricane Wilma's late-sea-
son sprint across Florida flat-
tened sugar cane fields, blew
off greenhouse roofs and
drowned newly planted win-
ter vegetables. Florida sup-
plies more than half of the
nation's fresh vegetables
between the months of
November and February.
Many tomatoes growers
lost plants that had been in
the ground for only a few
weeks since Wilma flooded
fields and tore up plastic
mulch. Others have been try-
ing to rehabilitate more
mature plants that survived
but likely won't harvested
until late January or early
February.
Wilma's winds couldn't
have come at a worse time -
right after tomato and veg-
etable plants had been in the
ground and close to the
height of picking season.
"After late December and
into January, produce is going
to be very scare," Nance said.
"Of course, the cold season,
we haven't even talked about
that yet. In a worse-case sce-
nario, God forbid, we could
have other losses ahead."


Stocks drop on last day of trading in 2005


By MICHAEL J. MARTINEZ
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK - Investors
marked the last trading day
of 2005 Friday with the same
conundrum they faced all
year - trying to find a good
reason to, buy stocks and
coming up short, Stocks fell,
to their December lows, and
the Dow Jones industrials fin-
ished the year with a loss.
With little news to spur
buying, stocks fell as
investors consolidated their
meager profits on the year.
As a result, the Dow suffered
its first down year since 2002,
although the other major
indexes posted modest gains
for 2005.
This year was marked by
skyrocketing energy prices,
a slowing economy, hot-and-
cold inflation threats and the
Federal Reserve steadily


raising interest rates - all of
which made investors nerv-
ous about the state of the
economy and kept stocks
volatile but ultimately little
changed since the end of
2004.
Looking ahead, investors
hope.the Fed will stop raising
. rates .as early, as possible in
2006 to avoid slowing the
economy unnecessarily, and
nervousness on this point
has kept stocks in check
through December.
"It's really the Fed at this
point that's kept the market
in check," said Hans Olsen,
managing director and chief
investment officer at
Bingham - Legg Advisers.
'The historic conversation
between the Fed and the
markets has become a bit of
an argument over whether
there's really inflation, and
whether we need those rate


hikes."
The Dow fell 67.32, or
0.62 percent, to 10,717.50. The
Dow needed to remain above
10,783.01 for a positive 2005.
Broader stock indicators
also lost ground. The
Standard & Poor's 500 index
fell 6.13, or 0.49 percent, to
1,248.29, and the Nasdaq
composite index fell 12.84, or
0.58 percent, to 2,205.32.
Bonds moved lower in
volatile trading, with the yield
on the 10-year Treasury note
rising to 4.40 percent from
4.36 percent late Thursday.
The inversion of the yield
curve this week - with two-
year bonds now yielding
more than the 10-year -
pressured stocks, as many on
Wall Street feel that such an
inversion augurs a slower
economy and a possible
recession.
The dollar rose against


most major currencies, while
gold prices also moved
higher.
Energy prices built on the
previous session's gains, with
a barrel of light crude set-
tling at $61.04, up 72 cents,
on the New York Mercantile
Exchange. Crude futures
rose 40 percent in 2005.
Those high energy prices
and their impact, real and
potential, on consumer spend-
ing, inflation and corporate
profits kept Wall Street on
edge for much of the year,
although investors' attitudes
remained bullish. Wall Street
bought heavily into each rally
this year, but while the Dow
flirted with the psychological-
ly important 11,000 in both
March and November, caution
ultimately prevailed each time
and investors cut those rallies
short in order to preserve
profits.


Delta says it lost $182 million in November


By HARRY R. WEBER
AP Business Writer

ATLANTA - Delta Air
Lines Inc., the nation's third-
largest carrier, said Friday it
lost $182 million in
November, pushing its red
ink to $11.6 billion since
January 2001.
The Atlanta-based airline,
which filed for Chapter 11
bankruptcy protection in
New York on Sept. 14, also
said in a .court filing that it
spent $2.39 billion in the
30-day period.
It must file a monthly oper-
ating report with the
bankruptcy court.
The latest loss, which is
equivalent to 96 cents a
share, includes $1 million in
preferred stock dividends
that Delta accrued but did
not pay, spokeswoman Chris
Kelly said. It still considered
the money part of its loss.
Excluding reorganization
items, Delta said its loss in
November was $164 million.
Revenue for the month
totaled $1.3 billion. It said it
ended the month with
$2.07 billion in cash on hand.
Delta had lost $8.52 billion
between Jan. 1, 2001, and
Dec. 31, 2004. So far this
year, it reported losses of
$1.08 billion in the first quar-
ter, $388 million in the sec-
ond quarter and $1.13 billion
in the third quarter. Kelly
said the airline lost
$300 million in October.
The latest earnings report
comes as Delta's 6,000 pilots


earlier this week approved
another round of deep pay
cuts.
The 14 percent cut in
wages and other cuts equal to
an additional 1 percent wage
reduction that pilots agreed
to Wednesday are on top of a
32.5 percent pay cut the
pilots agreed to last year as


part of a $1 billion annual
concessions package.
Delta had been seeking to
void the pilot contract so it
could impose $325 million in
new concessions on its pilots,
but agreed to an interim deal
worth less than half that. The
two sides will now try to
work out a comprehensive


deal by March. If they can't, a
three-person arbitration
panel will decide the fate of
the pilot contract.
The pilot union's threat of
a strike is on the back burner
for now. But if the contract is
ultimately thrown out by the
arbitration panel, the threat
could resurface.


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MARKET REPORT


Dec, 30,2005

Dow Jones
!nAiiefiale A A


-67.32

10,717.50


Ar


1--- 11,000

.-A 10,750


SEP OCT NOV DEC


Pct. change High Low
from previous: -0.62 10,783.86 10,709.42


10,500
10,250

10,000


Record high: 11,722.98
Jan.14,2000


STOCK MARKET INDEXES
52-Week "YTD 12-mo
High Low Name Last Chg %Chg %Chg %Chg
10,984.46 10,000.46 Dow Industrials 10,717.50 -67.32 -.62 -.61 -.61
4,306.09 3,348.36 Dow Transportation 4,196.03 -45.31 -1.07 +10.48 +10.48
438.74 323.79 Dow Utilities 405.11 -1.52 -.37 +20.95 +20,95
7,867.59 6,902.51 NYSE Composite 7,753.95 -34.19 -.44 +6.95 +6.95
1,778.74 1,186.14 Amex Market Value 1,759.08 +1.54 +09 +22.64 +22.64
2,278.16 1,889.83 Nasdaq Composite 2,205.32 -12.84 -.58 +1.37 +1.37
1,275.80 1,136.15 S&P500 1,248.29 -6.13 -.49 +3.00 +3.00
752.00 623.57 S&P MidCap 738.05 -4.16 -.56 +11.27 +11.27
693.63 570.03 Russell 2000 .673.22 -4.74 -.70 +3.32 +3.32
12,787.08 11,195.22 Wilshire5000 12,517.69 -59.02 -.47 +4.57 +4.57

STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

NYSE A AMEX 3 NASDAQ
7,753.95 -34.19 3 1,759.08 +1.54 2,205.32 -12.84

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
NatlRVh 6.69 +.53 +8.6 GlobeTeln 3.68 +1.49 +68.0 InterinkEIf 3.59 +.61 +20.5
Duq pfE 36.00 +2.75 +8.3 Diomed 2.03 +.23 +12.8 EDPTM 5.64 +.95 +20.3
MatSciIlf 14.10 +.93 +7.1 Q0Comm 3.00 +.33 +12.4 WIdGafeIlf 2.06 +.30 +17.0
TelNteCel h 7.45 +.47 +6.7 IntelliCk 3.89 +.41 +11.8 IbisTech 3.50 +.46 +15.1
PrimusGty 13.05 +.77 +6.3 FusionTi n 2.68 +.28 +11.7 NatnHIth wt 2.87 +.37 +14.8
MgHiYP 4.59 +.25 +5.8 KFX Inc 17.14 +1.67 +10.8 ADA-ES 18.24 +2.24 +14.0
Unifi 3.04 +.16 +5.6 GlcWatrh 21.00 +1.80 +9.4 MultiColor 27.75 +3.25 +13.3
McDerl 44.61 +2.31 +5.5 HanaBio n 5.87 +.49 +9.1 Cadiz n 21.50 +2.50 +13.2
Duq pfC 34.50 +1.50 +4.5 AmBiltrt 10.85 +.85 +8.5 OmniEnr 3.68 +.42 +12.9
SalEMDt 18.02 +.78 +4.5 Sifco 3.90 +.30 +8.3 Micrvisn 3.60 +.40 +12.5
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
Cryolifepf 38.00 -4.25 -10.1 InterlknG.n 5.35 -.95 -15.1 TriplCrwwi 12.25 -3.25 -21.0
Fairchild 2.55 -.22 -7.9 WstsdeEn n 3.50 -.40 -10.3 Arrowhd 4.25 -1.00 -19.0
Clark Inc 13.25 -1.05 -7.3 CenucolIf 2.95 -.31 -9.5 XcyteTh pf 3.71 -.52 -12.3
LamSessn 25.02 -1.50 -5.7 Cognitrn 2.41 -.23 -8.7 ChemGnxn 6.35 -.88 -12.2
MidwGm 18.97 -1.14 -5.7 InfoSonic 16.24 -1.51 -8.5 Syneron 31.75 -3.94 -11.0
Conseco wt 2.75 -.15 -5.2 SeabGId g 9.40 -.64 -6.4 BkMcKen 9.30 -.95 -9.3
HeclaM 4.06 -.22 -5.1 Minefnd g 5.14 -.34 -6.2 DCAP Grp 2.58 -.26 -9.2
FedAgric 29.93 -1.55 -4.9 Tarpon n 2.63 -.17 -6.1 OmegaFRxn 17.39 -1.61 -8.5
Trex 28.05 -1.43 -4.9 FlightSaf 2.48 -.15 -5.7 Quidel 10.76 -1.00 -8.5
BKFCapIlf 18.95 -.92 -4.6 GeoGlobal 12.77 -.76 -5.6 LrnTree 12.83 -1.16 -8.3


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Lucent 455759 2.66 -.04
Pfizer 312223 23.32 -.13
GnMotr 203231 19.42 +.41
FordM 202322 7.72 -.09
Visteon 192068 6.26 -.13
GenElec 178448 35.05 -.14
ExxonMbl 144168 56.17 -.07
BkofAm 133661 46.15 -.04
VerizonCm133079 30.12 -.15
TimeWarn132446 17.44 -.04
DIARY
Advanced 1,352
Declined 1,956
Unchanged 143
Total issues 3,451
New Highs , 45
New Lows ..' . 77
Volume 1,476,256,560


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SPDR 398681 124.51 -.68
iShRs2000 s27527766.72 -.43
GlobeTel n229423 3.68 +1.49
SP Engy 121017 50.31 +.21
SemiHTr 83800 36.64 -.28
SP Fncl 51068 31.67 -.17
DJIA Diam 49824106.95 -.73
OilSvHT 49015 128.80 +.65
iShEAFEs42270 59.43 -.27
SP Mid 27864 134.69 -.42
DIARY
Advanced 467
Declined 492
Unchanged 98
Total issues 1,057
New Highs 31
New ows, . , . 21
Volume 259,818,973


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Nasd100Tr576358 40.41 -.31
Microsoft 471574 26.15 -.12
Cisco 386484 17.12 -.12
JDS Uniph343195 2.36 -.05
SiriusS 310524 6.70 -.04
SunMicro 310515 4.19 -.06
Intel 305585 24.96 -.11
Oracle 221794 12.21 -.08
AppleCs 221044 71.89 +.44
WholeFd s199109 77.39 -.85
DIARY
Advanced 1,320
Declined 1,751
Unchanged 158
Total issues 3,229
New Highs 45
New Lows 58
Volume 1,318,590,885


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
YTD YTD
Name Ex DIv YId PE Last Chg%Chg Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg
AT&T Inc NY 1.33 5.4 21 24.49 -.13 -5.0 JDS Uniph Nasd ......... 2.36 -.05 -25.6
Alltel NY 1.54 2.4 15 63.10 -.16 +7.4 JeffPilot NY 1.67 2.9 14 56.93 -.20 +9.6
AuloZone NY 13 91.75 -.64 +.5 LowesCos NY .24 .4 21 66.66 -.49 +15.7
BkofAm NY 2.00 4.3 11 46.15 -.04 -1.8 Lucent NY ...... 11 2.66 -.04 -29.3
BellSouth NY 1.16 4.3 12 27.10 -.18 -2.5 McDnlds NY .67 2.0 18 33.72 -.42 +5.2
BobEvn Nasd .48 2.1 25 23.06 -.15 -11.8 Microsoft Nasd .36 1.4 22 26.15 -.12 -2.1
CNBFnPA Nasd .56 4.0 16 14.11 +16 -7.6 NasdlOOTr Nasd .14 .3 ... 40.41 -.31 +1.2
CSX NY .52 1.0 12 50.77 -.32 +26.7 NY Times NY .66 2.5 13 26.45 +.01 -35.2
ChmpE NY ...... 38 13.62 -.18 +15.2 N asd .lt l Nad18 27.02 +.53 +15.1
Chevron NY 1.80 3.2 9 56.77 +.30 +8.1 OcciPet NY 1.44 1.8 7 79.88 +.12 +36.9
Cisco Nasd ...... 20 17.12 -.12 -11.4 Penney NY .50 .9 17 55.60 +.16 +34.3
CocaCI NY 1.12 2.8 18 40.31 -.29 -3.2 PepsiCo NY 1.04 1.8 25 59.08 -.46 +13.2
ColBgp NY .61 2.6 16 23.82 -.12 +12.2 Pfizer NY .96 4.1 21 23.32 -.13-13.3
Delhaize NY 1.13 1.7 ... 65.47 +.23 -13.7 Potash NY .60 .7 17 80.22 -.03 -3.4
DollarG NY .18 .9 18 19.07 -.16 -8.2 Ryder NY .64 1.6 12 41.02 -.65 -14.1
FPLGps NY 1.42 3.4 19 41.56 -.16 +11.2 SearsHIdgs Nasd . 27 115.53 -1.27 +16.8
FamDIr NY .38 1.5 19 124.79 -.12 -20.6 SidiusS Nasd ......... 6.70 -.04 -12.1
FordM NY .40 5.2 8 7.72 -.09 -47.3 SoulhnCo NY 1.49 4.3 16 34.53 -.21 +3.0
GenElec NY 1.00 2.9 20 35.05 -.14 -4.0 SPDR Amex2.14 1.7 ... 124.51 -.68 +3.0
GdyFam Nasd .12 1.3 ... 9.59 +.03 +4.9 SunMicro Nasd ... ... ... 4.19 -.06 -22.3
HCA Inc NY .60 1.2 16 50.50 -.35 +26.4 TimeWam NY .20 1.1 31 17.44 -.04 -10.3
HomeDp NY .40 1.0 16 40.48 -.26 -5.3 WalMart NY .60 1.3 18 46.80 -.68 -11.4

MONEY RATES CURRENCIES
Last Pvs Week Last Pvs Day
Prime Rate 7,25 7.25 Australia 1.3635 1.3661
Discount Rate 5,25 5.25 Britain 1.7203 1.7240
Federal Funds Rate 4.0625 4.25 Canada 1.1629 1.1644
Treasuries Euro .8450 .8441
3-month 3.99 3.90 Japan 117.92 117.76
6-month 4.22 4.17 Mexico 10.6070 10.6440
5-year 4.35 4.32
10-year 4.40 437 Switzerlnd 1.3139 1.3131
30-year 4.461 British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show
30-year 4.61 4.55 dollar in foreign currency.

MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank PctMin Init
Name Obi ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
American Funds A: GwlhAp XG 71,536 30.86 +0.7 +14.2/B +16.3/A 5.75 250
Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 SP 69,916 114,92 -1.2 +4.6/A +2.1/A NL 3,000
American Funds A: ICAA p LV 66,546 31.36 +0.1 +6.7/B +20.9/B 5.75 250
American Funds A: WshA p LV 62,683 30.84 -0.8 +3.4/D +23.8/B 5.75 250
Fidelity Invest: Contra XG 58,486 64.76 -0.3 +16.0/A +35.2/A NL 2,500
PIMCO Insl PIMS: TotRt IB 53,886 10.50 +1.2 +3.0/A +37.7/A NL 5,000,000
Fidelity Invest: Magelln LC 51,336 106.44 +0.2 +6.3/B -3.7/C NL 2,500
Dodge&Cox: Stock XV 51,035 137.22 +0.4 +9.2/B +68.7/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: IncoA p MP 48,074 18.11 -0.1 +3.0/D +47.1/A 5.75 250
American Funds A: CaplBA p MP 43,361 53.03 +0.7 +4.4/C +57.1/A 5.75 250
American Funds A: EupacA p IL 43,139 41.10 +3.9 +21.0/A +46,2/B 5.75 250
American Funds A: CapWGA p GL 39,841 36.57 ;2.7 +14.6/B +68.1/A 5.75 250
Vanguard Instl Fds: Instldx SP 39,138 114.01 -1.2 +4.8/A +2.8/A NL 5,000,000
Vanguard Admiral: 500AdmI SP 38,091 114.92 -1.2 +4.7/A +2.5/A NL 100,000
Fidelity Invest: LowP r MV 36,517 40.84 +0.6 +8.7/C +122.4/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: N PerA p GL 35,790 28.63 +1.7 +11.0/C +33.9/B 5.75 250
American Funds A: BalA p BL 32,947 17.82 -0.5 +3.0/D +39.9/A 5.75 250
Fidelity Invest: Grolnc LC -31,527 34.40 -1.6 +2.5/D -0.3/B NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: Divintl IL 31,025 32.54 +3.8 +17.2/B +57.5/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Idx Fds: TolStk XC 29,338 30.00 -1.2 +5.8/D +10.2/C NL 3,000
Vanguard Fds: Wndsll LV 28,867 31.33 -0.5 +6.9/B +32.3/A NL 3,000
Fidelity Invest: GroCo XG 26,818 63.63 +0.4 +13.3/B -10.6/C NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: Eq Inc El 26,088 52.78 -0.8 +5.7/C +20.3/C NL 2,500
Vanguard Fds: Welln BL 26,073 30.35 -0.1 +6.8/A +39.1/A NL 3,000
Fideliy Invest: Puritn BL 24,180 18.73 -0.2 +4.7/C +27.4/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: FdlnvAp LV 23,716 35.40 +0.8 ;11.6/A +25.5/8 5.75 250
Dodge&Cox: Balanced , BL 23,628 81.34 +0.5 +68.5/A +60.6/A NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: BlueChGr LC 22,577 43.16 -1.2 +3.8/0 -14.0/E NL 2,500
Frank/Temp Fink A: IncomA p MP 21,902 2.40 +0.8 +1.9/D +49.0/A 4,25 1,000
Vanguard Idx Fds: TotBnd IB 21,084 10.06 +1.2 +2.5/B +30.2/C NL 3,000
Frank/Temp Temp A:GrwthAp GL 20,996 22.94 +2,2 +8.1/D +53.0/A 5.75 1,000
Vanguard Fds: Prmcp r XC 20,761 65.31 +0.3 +8.3/B +15.6/C NL 25,000
Vanguard Admiral: TStkAdm XC 20,223 30.00 -1.2 +5.9/D +10.6/C NL 100,000
Fidelity Spartan: Eqldxlnv SP 20,051 44.16 -1.2 +4.7/A +2.1/A NL 100,000
Amer Century Inv: Ultra LG 19,570 30.09 -2.4 +1.8/E -6.7/B NL 2,500
Davis Funds A: NYVen A LC 18,903 33.70 -0.6 +10.6/A +20.8/A 4.75 , 1,000
PIMCOAdmin PIMS: TotRtAd IB 18,310 10.50 +1.2 +2.7/A +36.0/A NL 5,000,000
Price Funds: Eqlnc El 17,958 25.92 -1.0 +4.1/0 +33.4/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: BondA p AB 17,681 13.22 +0.5 +1.8/0 +37.3/B 3.75 250
Fidelity Invest: DivGth LC 16,565 28.79 -0.3 +3.3/0 +3.5/B NL 2,500
Vanguard Insll Fds: InsPI SP 16,372 114.01 -1.2 +4.8/A +2.9/A NL200,000,000
Vanguard Fds: HIthCre HB 16,340 139.45 +2.1 +15.1/B +32.1/B NL 25,000
Fidelity Invest: Balanc BL 15,999 18.76 +0.4 +10.8/A +47.3/A NL 2,500
BL -Balanced, El -Equily Inc. EM -Emerging Mkts, GL -Global Stock. GM -Gen. Muni, IB -Inltermd. Bond, IL -
International Stock, LC -Large-Cap Core, LG -Large-Cap Growth, LV -Large-Cap Val., MP -Stock/Bond Blend, MT
-Mortgage, SB -Short-Term Bond, SP -S&P 500, SS -Single-State Muni, XC -Multi-Cap Core, XG -Multi-Cap
Growth, XV -Multi-Cap Val. Total Return: Chg in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs.
others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund.
NA = Not avail. NE = Data in question. NS = Fund not in existence. Source: Lipper, Inc.
StOCk Footnotes Q = rl.l,]- di i,, J r .,r,.l., in r. ,,,.jiljr. , i..'lhi In r, = - o al r L .I ira-v ..L',hir,.L-,' IIl,,l .h1 ',l,.,,J-
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Mutual Fund Footnoes . - l., .r ,i.1i ,r .1 rlL i- r,:,r' ,U I i.- .,-, ,, 'i.: [' =- Fr,ir,, D i , ,J - '-- I , ,lIhI|L,,,I,-,.- ,- f
i. = RlllelfTll', fyI .l. Ail l ,il" I' rl ITl l I : ai'lv l1" r i
Gainers and LuO ee; 0ljl t1 r.. 1n i.,il l i ,. ti- - iei iJ il ril i h l isI"I Moii ActlMiea nlnlJii -r 1 ,, J u ii,,i, i r *-I : -,6 1lJl hi"
r,-ri[,.I;-ja...l riiaie. Source T11 a '.P.-.,:i ,r ,iF - �.� , rji , ,ii" j ijai-nsicai i


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Page Editor: S. Michael Manley, 754-0429


AI


LAE TYREORERBUSINESSSAUDYDEMBR3,20


IIIUUi lIs










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2005


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your
Community Calendar
item, contact S.
Michael Manley at
754-0429 or by email
at smanley@
lakecityreporter., com.


Announcements


Chamber annual meeting
scheduled for Jan. 26
The Lake City/Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce
will host its 84th annual meeting
beginning at 6:30 p.m. with a
reception, dinner at 7 and the
program to follow on Jan. 26 at
the Lake City Community
College gymnasium. The guest
speaker this year will be Dr.
Jeqrome S. Osteryoung, dean of
Florida State University School
.of Business. Osteryoung is an
author of more than 60 articles
on entrepreneurial and finance
subjects.
Tickets are $30 each and
tables of eight are available.
Call the Chamber of Commerce
for reservations. Reservations
not canceled before Jan. 13 will
be billed. For more information,
call 752-3690.

CFA Cat Show coming
soon to Jacksonville
JACKSONVILLE -
Absolutely Abyssinians Cat
Club is sponsoring the CFA
Greater Jacksonville Cat Show
from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday,
Jan. 7 and Sunday, Jan. 8 at
the Morocco Shrine Auditorium
on St. Johns Bluff Road,
Jacksonville. More than 300
pedigree cats and household
pets are expected to compete.
Admission is $5 for adults
and $4 for seniors and children.
'For more information, call Mona
or Ray at (904) 269-5871.

Project Hope extends
help to Katrina victims
Project Hope is looking to
help Hurricane Katrina survivors
who were adversely affected by
the storm. Victims who live or
work in the following counties
are eligible for assistance:
:Alachua, Bradford, Citrus,
Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist,
Hamilton, Hernando, Lafayette,
Lake, Levy, Levy, Marion, Putnam,
SSumter, Suwannee and Union.
Contact Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare's Dr. Dawn Snipes
at 374-5600, ext. 8309, Corlis
-Duncan-Nelson at 374-5615,
ext. 8280 or (800) 330-5615,
ext. 8013 for Shanna or Barbie.

Newcomers to host
monthly meeting
Due to a date conflict with
Quality Inn, the regular meeting
will be on the first Wednesday
of January. This change is only
for the month of January -
at 11:15 a.m. Jan. 4. The


meeting will be at the Quality
Inn on U.S. 90. The program
will be presented by Columbia
County Sheriff Bill Gootee. This
should be a very informative
meeting. Come with your
questions. All members, guests
and visitors are welcome. For
information, call 754-2695 or
752-4552.

Newcomers to host
Friendship Luncheon
The Friendship Luncheon will
be held on the second
Wednesday of January. -This
change is only for the month of
January. The Luncheon will be
at 11:15 a.m. Jan. 11 at Phish
Heads Restaurant located at
1445-170 SW Main Blvd. All
members, guests and
visitors are welcome. For
information, call 758-6946 or
754-2695.

Bluegrass Pickin comes to
Trenton Community Center
The Trenton Community
Center will host the Suwannee
Valley Bluegrass monthly Pickin
at 6 p.m. Jan. 7. Various
bluegrass bands will begin
playing, so bring your bluegrass
band or come and hear some
of the best bluegrass in North
Florida.
For more information, call
(800) 990-5410 or
(352) 284-0668 and ask for
Cloud.

Olustee Festival Pageant
contestants sought
Contestants are being sought
for the 2006 Olustee Festival
Pageant to take place at the
Columbia County School
Administrative Auditorium on
Saturday, Jan. 28. Girls must
be between 2 and 20 years old.
Trophies, crown, savings bonds
and educational scholarships
are among the prizes for the
winners.
Applications can be picked
up at the Columbia County
Library or the Lake City
Chamber of Commerce. For
more information, call Elaine
Owens at 752-3430.

Lake City Medicare Part D
workshop coming soon
GAINESVILLE - Rep. Ed.
Jennings, Jr. (D-Gainesville) is
teaming with the Mid-Florida
Area Agency on Aging to
present a workshop on
Medicare Part D prescription
drugs from 9-11 a.m. on
.Thursday, Jan. 5 at the
Columbia County School Board
Administration Complex


Auditorium located at 372 W.
Duval St.

SRWMD to have
meeting Jan. 10
On Tuesday, Jan. 10, the
Suwannee Valley River Water
Management District's
Governing Board will meet at
9 a.m. at District Headquarters,
Hwy. 49 and U.S. 90 East, Live
Oak. The meeting is to consider
district business and conduct
public hearings on regulatory
and land acquisition matters. A
workshop will follow the board
meeting. For more information,
call (386) 362-1001.

Breast Cancer support
group to meet Jan. 9
The Breast Cancer Support
Group of Lake City will meet
from 5:30-6:30 p.m., Jan. 9, at
the Columbia County Public
Library, 308 NW Columbia
Avenue, Lake City.
All those who have had
personal experience with breast
cancer and those who have
questions or concerns about
breast cancer are invited.
For further information, call
755-0522.

DAC to host
visionary workshop
The Downtown Action
Corporation will host a visioning
workshop from 5:30-8 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 12, at the
Columbia County Public Library.
The meeting is open to the
public and all area residents are
cordially invited to attend and
provide input.
The purpose of the meeting
to define priorities and a work
plan for projects benefiting the
downtown area. More than
70 individuals completed a
questionnaire for the visioning
process and those results will
also be distributed. For
additional information, contact
Paulette Lord at 758-1367.

Blue Grey Army
to meet Jan. 10
The Blue Grey Army will
meet at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, .
Jan. 10, at the Columbia
County Public Library
Downtown Branch.
This will be a general
meeting of committees and
workers involved with
preparations for the Olustee
Festival 2006. Anyone
interested in working with this
group is asked to attend. For
questions, call Faye Bowling
Warren at 755-1097. -


New Year's Eve dance
coming for singles group
LAKE BUTLER - Lake
Butler Singles Club will host its
New Year's Eve dance
Saturday at Lake Butler
Community Center. Dinner will
be at 7 p.m. and dance from
8 p.m. -1 a.m. to the music from
South Street Band. Bring finger
food and enjoy the evening with
no smoking and alcohol. For
more information, call Bob
Collins at 752-5948. The cost is
$15 per person.


"Music in the Park" is coming
Saturday, Jan. 7, staring Dick
Staber and Judith Chasnoff.
Bring a chair and relax by the
river while listening to a
beautifully sung mixture of
original and traditional
bluegrass and folk music.
2-4 p.m. O'Leno State Park, is
located six miles north of High
Springs on U.S. 441.
The show is free with park
admission.

MLK parade applications
are now available
Applications are now being
accepted for the annual Martin
Luther King day parade, which
will be at 10 a.m., Jan. 16.
Contact Tyrone Taylor at
623-2194, coach Anders at
752-0959, or Leslie White at
623-2198 to request an entry
application, or to obtain more
information on participating in
the MLK parade.
The following is a list of
activities scheduled for Martin
Luther King, Jr. Celebration:
* Jan.13: 7:30 p.m. Gospel
Festival, choirs, soloists,
instruments and dancers.
* Jan. 14: noon. Car
Show-Step Show, MLK
Classic-Basketball game.
* Jan.15: 4 p.m. NAACP
commemoration service,, Union
A.M.E. Church.
* Jan. 16: 10 a.m. Northeast
Florida Leadership Council
grand parade. Celebration at
the stadium.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson
coming to Lake City
At 1 p.m., Jan. 5, U.S.
Senator Bill Nelson is coming to
Lake City for a townhall
meeting. It will take place at
City Hall, located at 205 N.


Marion Ave. For more
information, call Nelson's office
at (850) 942-8415.

Volunteer Development
Board to meet in 2006
The Volunteer Development
Board of the Lake City
Community College Foundation
will meet at noon Jan. 10 in the
Lake City Community College
Foundation Board Room,
downtown Lake City. For more
information, contact Mike Lee,
executive director of the LCCC
foundation at 754-4392 or
754-4433.


The Executive Board of the
Lake City Community College
Foundation will meet at noon
Jan. 17 in the Lake City
Community College Foundation
Board Room, downtown Lake
City. For more information
contact Mike Lee, executive
director of the LCCC foundation
at 754-4392 or 754-4433.

Columbia County science
fairs coming in 2006
* Lake City Community
College will host the 2006
Columbia County Science Fair.
The annual fair will be
Jan. 18 and 19 in the Howard
Gym on LCCC campus.
Approximately 250 student
projects will be on display.
Judging will take place from
8 a.m.-3 p.m., Jan. 18. Open
house to the public will be from
3-6 p.m. Jan. 18. The awards
ceremony will be 6-7 p.m.
Jan. 19 for the elementary and
7:30-8:30 p.m. for the middle
and high school in the Alfonso
Levy Performing Arts Center.
* Lake City Community
College will host the
2006 Regional Science and
Engineering Fair.
The annual fair will be
Feb. 22 and 23 in the Howard
Gym on the LCCC campus.
The Region comprises the
10 counties of Columbia, Union,
Suwannee, Bradford, Hamilton,
Lafayette, Baker, Gilchrist, Dixie
and Madison. Judging will take
place from 3-6 p.m. Feb. 22.
Open house to the public will
be from 3-6 p.m., Feb. 22. The
awards ceremony will be
10 a.m., Feb. 23 in the Alfonso
Levy Performing Arts Center.


LCCC is closed
through Jan.2
All Lake City Community


College offices and facilities will
be closed through Jan. 2 for the
holiday season. Upon return, late
registration will be from
8 a.m.-6:30 p.m. in Building 015
Jan. 3-5 and from 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
Jan. 6. All fees will be due at
3 p.m. at the end of each day.
For more information, contact
the Registrar's Office at
(386) 754-4205.

Classes

Pottery classes coming
to Stephen Foster
WHITE SPRINGS - Spend
Monday nights working at the
potter's wheel in classes being
offered at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park.
Classes begin Jan. 9 and
continue through Feb. 27.
The cost for the classes is
$125, plus $25 for materials,
which will be paid throughout the
class. For more information, call
Craft Square at 397-1920 or visit
the web site at
www.stephenfostercso.org.


Performing Arts center'
looking for members
Ms. Nadine Center for the
Performing Arts is currently
accepting applications for new
memberships. Children ages
5 to 18 years old are welcomed
to join. Students will learn
dancing, drama and much more.
For more information, contact
Ms. Nadine at (386) 344-2540.

Tae Kwan Do
class offered
The Lake City-Columbia
County Parks and Recreation
Department will host Tae Kwan
Do classes that will meet from
6:30-8 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday and is open to
anyone age 8 and older. Cost is
$40 per month. Instructors will be
Jeff Foster and Teresa Burne,
master and certified instructor in
Tae Kwan Do. For more
information or to register, call
Heyward Christie at 758-5448.

Historical museum
to host volunteer class
Lake City/Columbia County
Historical Museum is
forming a volunteer training
class. For more information,
contact Glenda Reed at
historicsewing@aol.com. or
call the museum at 755-9096.


Iraqi infant with birth defect flying to U.S. for free medical care


By MIKE STOBBE
Associated Press

ATLANTA - An Iraqi
infant with a severe birth
defect began, her journey
Friday to the United States,
where she will receive med-
ical care at the urging of U.S.
soldiers who discovered her
during a raid.
Noor al-Zahra, who is
3 months old, and her family
took off in a military transport


plane from the Baghdad air-
port on the first leg of a trip
that was to bring them to
Atlanta on Saturday.
Noor - also known as
"Baby Noor" or, to the
Americans, "Baby Nora" -
was discovered by U.S. troops
three weeks ago during a raid
on a house in Abu Ghraib, the
poverty-stricken town west of
Baghdad.
Soldiers noticed paralysis in
the baby's legs and what


appeared to be a tumor on her
back, said Debbie Stone, a
Douglasville social worker.
Stone received an e-mail
about it from her friend,
Lt. Jeff Morgan, who is part of
the Georgia-based Charlie
Company of the 48th Brigade
Combat Team's 1st Battalion.
Morgan asked her to try to
arrange for medical assis-
tance for the child. The par-
ents can't pay for care, and the
Army will not treat Iraqi


civilians, he wrote.
Soldiers later learned the
child has a severe form of
spina bifida, a birth defect in
which the backbone and
spinal cord do not close
before birth. The "tumor" on
the baby's back was actually a
fluid-filled sac containing part
of the spinal cord.
Skin had grown over it,
apparently giving it the
appearance of a tumor, said
Dr. Roger Hudgins, an Atlanta


pediatric neurosurgeon' who
reviewed the case.
Children's Healthcare of
Atlanta has agreed to treat the
child. Doctors have seen
e-mailed photos of the child
and received some medical
information, but will need to
do a full evaluation before
attempting surgery to fix the
problem.
The care is to be provided
for free, said Hudgins, who
said the surgery and


accompanying care would
cost $200,000 if it were billed.
Hudgins said the child's
back and spinal cord will have
to be repaired in a surgery
that may not take place until
about a week after she arrives
in Atlanta. The bowels and
bladder will also have to be
checked and possibly treated,
and orthopedists will have to
examine the reported paraly-
sis in her legs. It may not be
possible to fix that.


OBITUARIES


Mr. George Andrew Foster
Mr. George Andrew "Andy" Foster,
66, passed away suddenly at his res-
idence inGainesville, FL. on Friday
morning December 30, 2005. -
He was employed by O'Steen
Brothers of Gainesville. Arrange-
ments are incomplete at this time.
Arrangements are under the direc-
tion of DEES FAMILY FUNER-
AL & CREMATION SERVICES,
768 West Duval Street, Lake City,
Florida. (386-
961-9500)
John Warren Leach
John Warren Leach, 39, of Lake
City, died at home early Thursday
morning, December 29, 2005.
John grew up in North Miami and
later lived in Cooper City and Coral
Springs, FL. John was a cancer sur-
vivor of more than 21 years and a
truly spirited fighter. John is loved
by all who knew him and will be
greatly missed. John is survived by
his daughter, Kelly Melissa, par-
ents, John B. & Helen M. Leach;
brother, Bruce Leach; sisters, Debra
Arnold, Janice Leach, Joyce Harris,
Linda Fernandez; nieces, Christina
Rine-hart-Gonzalez, Lisa and Lori
Leach; nephews, Eric & Mark
Leach, Andrew & Jonathan
Fernandez, Noah Wayne Rinehart-
'Gonzalcz, as well as other close
family and friends. A memorial
,service will be held on Saturday,
January 31, 2005 at 2:00 P.M. at
Pinewood Chapel, 357 NW


Wilks Lane, Lake City, FL. In lieu
of flowers, donations can be made
to Haven Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley, 4200 NW 90th Blvd., Gain-
esville, FL 32606-3809.
Robert "Bob" Konrady, Sr.
Robert "Bob" Konrady, Sr., 75, of
Lake City, Florida, passed away on
Wednesday, December 28, 2005 at
McLeod Hospice House in Flor-
ence, South Carolina. Services will
be held at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday,
December 31, 2005 at Sacred Heart
Catholic Church with interment fol-
lowing in Magnolia Park Cemetery.
Visitation will be one hour prior to
the service at Sacred Heart Catholic
Church. Memorials may be given to
McLeod Hospice House, 1203 E.
Cheves Street, Florence, SC, 29501;
The American Cancer Society, PO
Box 1544, Warner Robins, GA
31099 or The Alzheimer's
Association, 277 Martin Luther
King Blvd., Suite 201, Macon, GA
31201. Mr. Konrady was born on
May 23, 193,0 in Odebolt, Iowa. He
lived in Lake City, Florida since
1972 and moved to South Carolina
in November 2005. In 1964, he
founded the Mobile Manor Trailer
Park in Warner Robins and owned it
for over twenty years. He was a Sur-
veyor and Mark Maintenance Engi-
neer for the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration for
thirty-five years, where he received
numerous outstanding achievement
and merit awards during his career.


His parents, Peter Augustine and
Helena Schoenherr Konrady, pre-
ceded him in death.
Survivors include his son, Robert P.
Konrady, II (Valerie), Tickfaw,
Louisiana; daughter, Jayme L. Kon-
rady Ferger (Brian), Hartsville,
South Carolina; grandchild, Rebec-
ca V. Ferger, Hartsville, South Car-
olina; and brother, Donald P. Kon-
rady (Iris), Marksville, Louisiana.
Go to www.mcculloughfli.com to
sign the Online Registry for the
family. McCullough Funeral Home
has charge of arrangements.

Robert Gene Pope
Robert Gene Pope, 67, a resident of
Lake City, Florida died December
28, 2005 at the North Florida Re-
gional Hospital following an ex-
tended illness.
Mr. Pope was a native and lifelong


resident of Columbia County, Flori-
da. He attended and
graduated from the
Ft. White High .
School and was
a heavy equipment
operator for the
Columbia County Road Depart-
ment. He was also a member of the
Southside Baptist Church, Lake
City, Florida. He is preceded in
death by a sister Edna Louise
Baughman. Mr. Pope was a veteran
of Korea serving in the U.S. Army.
Survivors include his wife: Joan
Pope, Lake City, Fl. One daughter:
Robbie Ann (Ronnie) Thompson,
Lake City, Fl. One Son: Shane
Pope, Lake City, Florida. Two
Sisters: Grace (Thomas) Barry,
Rockford, Tenn. And Geraldine
White, Lakeland, Florida. One
Brother: Richard (Linda) Pope,


Lakeland, Florida. Four
Grandchildren Lukas Tanner Pope,
William Robert Thomas, Patricia
Ann (Eli) Cawley and Timothy
Jordan Thomas. One
Great Grandchild Bailey Leann
'Hendricks.
Funeral services for Mr. Pope will
be conducted Monday, January 2,
2006 at 2:00 P.M. in the Southside
Baptist Church with the Rev. Char-
lie Knight, officiating. Interment
will follow in the Forest Lawn
C e m -
etery. The family will receive


friends Sunday January 1, 2006
from 5:00 to 8:00 P.M. at the funer-
al home. In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to the American
Cancer Society at: NCICFUL, PO
Box 102454, Atlanta, GA., 30368-
2454.GUERRY FUNERAL
HOME 2659 SW. Main Blvd. Lake
City is in charge of all arrange-
ments.
Obitaries are paid advertisements.
For details, call the Lake City
Reporter's classified department at
752-1293


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Page Editor: S. Michael Manley, 754-0429








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2005


Mother of a teen who went



to Iraq is relieved he left war


By KELLI KENNEDY
Associated Press

FORT LAUDERDALE -
Shatha Atiya has not decided
how she will punish her
16-year-old son for running off
to Iraq to pursue a job as a
journalist without telling any-
one.
Right now, the Fort
Lauderdale mother says she's
too worried and too tired to
think about it.
"When he first gets off the
plane, I'm going to hug him,"
says Atiya. "Then I'm going to
collapse for a few hours and
then we're going to sit down
for a long discussion about the
consequences."
Although Farris Hassan has
left Baghdad safely, his family
said they still do not know
when he will return to his Fort


Lauderdale home.
Since word broke about her
Hassan's trip to Iraq, which
included ,stops in Lebanon
and Kuwait, Atiya said she's
been worrying nonstop, pray-
ing and doing media
interviews.
An immersion journalism
class at Pine Crest School in
Fort Lauderdale had the stu-
dent hounding his parents to
take him to Iraq, .where he
hoped he could witness first-
hand "the struggle between
good and evil," he wrote in an
e-mail to his teachers.
Atiya promised to take him
to Iraq when it was safer.
Undaunted, Farris Hassan
asked his mother for the
phone number of her brother
who lives in Iraq. She told him
that she did not have it.
Atiya, and Farris' father,


Redha K Hassan, a doctor at
Broward General Hospital,
were born in Iraq, but have
lived in the United States for
about 35 years.
"He has a lot of confidence,
but I never thought he would
be able to pull this together,"
said Atiya.
Hassan gathered $900 for a
plane ticket and told only two
classmates, before heading off
on his trip. It was not until an
e-mail on Dec. 11 that his fam-
ily found out his whereabouts.
'We didn't know where he
was. He was missing for a cou-
ple of hours. We thought he
was at a movie," said his
23-year-old brother Hayder
Hassan.
Farris Hassan is the
youngest of Atiya's four chil-
dren. The others are enrolled
at universities.


Justice Department begins

investigation into leak of


Bush's domestic spying


By TONI LOCY
Associated Press

WASHINGTON - The
Justice Department has
opened another investigation
into leaks of-classified infor-
mation, this time to deter-
mine who divulged the exis-
tence of President Bush's
secret domestic spying.
program.
The inquiry focuses on dis-
closures to The New York
Times about warrantless sur-
veillance conducted by the
National Security Agency
since the Sept. 11 terrorist
attacks, officials said.
The newspaper recently
revealed the existence of the
program in a front-page story
that also acknowledged that
the news had been withheld
from publication for a year,
partly at the request of the
administration and partly
because the newspaper wanted
more time to confirm various
aspects of the program.
White House spokesman
Trent Duffy said Justice
undertook the action on its
own, and Bush was informed
of it Friday.
'The leaking of classified
information is a serious
issue. The fact is that al-
Qaida's playbook is not print-
ed on Page One and when
America's is, it has serious
ramifications," Duffy told
reporters in Crawford,
Texas, where Bush was
spending the holidays.
Catherine Mathis, a
spokeswoman for the Times,


"The leaking of classified information is
a serious issue.The fact that al-Qaida's
playbook is not printed on Page One
and America's is, it has serious
ramifications."

- Trent Duffy,
White House spokesman


declined to comment.
Disclosure of the secret
spying program two weeks
ago unleashed a firestorm of
criticism of' the administra-
tion. Some critics accused
the president of breaking the
law by authorizing intercepts
of conversations - without
prior court approval or over-
sight - of people inside the
United States and abroad
who had suspected ties to
al-Qaida or its affiliates.
Bush, who publicly
acknowledged the program's
existence and described how
it operates, has argued that
the initiative is legal in a time
of war.
The inquiry launched
Friday is only the most
recent effort by the Bush
administration to determine
. who is disclosing information
to journalists.
Two years ago, a special
counsel was named to inves-
tigate who inside the White
House gave reporters the
identity of CIA operative
Valerie Plame, an effort that
led to perjury and obstruc-
tion of justice charges


against Vice President Dick
Cheney's top aide, Lewis I.
"Scooter" Libby.
More recently, the Justice
Department has begun
examining whether classified
information was illegally dis-
closed to The Washington
Post about a network of
secret CIA prisons in Eastern
Europe and elsewhere.
The NSA leak probe was
launched after the Justice
Department received a
request from the spy agency.
It is unclear whether
Attorney General Alberto
Gonzales will recuse himself
from the inquiry. He was
White House counsel when
Bush signed ,the executive
order authorizing the NSA,
which is normally confined to
overseas operations, to spy
on conversations taking
place on American soil.
For the past two weeks,
Gonzales also has been one of
the administration's point men
in. arguing that the president
has the constitutional authority
to conduct the spying.


' .,

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Shatha Atiya displays photos, of her 16-year-old son, Farris
Hassan, who traveled to Iraq during the Christmas holidays, in her
Fort Lauderdale home on Friday.


Lawyers say Padilla

wants to stay in

military custody


By TONI LOCY
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Lawyers for Jose Padilla, a
U.S. citizen held as an enemy
combatant for 31/ years, said
Friday he wants to stay in
military custody until the
Supreme Court decides
whether to hear his chal-
lenge to President Bush's
power to detain Americans
when the nation is at war.
The lawyers urged the
high court to reject a
request filed Wednesday by
Solicitor General Paul
Clement seeking Padilla's
immediate transfer from the
custody of the military to
law enforcement authorities
in Florida.
The Bush administration
wants the high court to over-
turn last week's decision by
the Richmond-based 4th
U.S. Court of Appeals,
which refused to transfer
Padilla and sharply criti-
cized the government's tac-
tics in the lengthy case.
The 4th Circuit took the
administration to task for
using one set of facts before
the courts to justify Padilla's
detention without charges
and another to persuade a
grand jury in Miami to indict
him last month on terror-
ism-related charges.
"What the government
clearly wants is for this
court to reject the 4th
Circuit's strong criticism of
the government's conduct,"
Padilla's lawyers wrote in a


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response requested by the
high court.
Padilla's lawyers accused
the administration of trying
to bypass normal judicial
procedures. By getting
Padilla transferred quickly
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argue, the government is
attempting to bolster its
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CHURCH
Continued From Page 1A
The church members will
judge a cake bake-off and a
chili cook-off beginning at
5:30 p.m. Sunday, followed by
a year-in-review slideshow and
fireworks at approximately
7:15 p.m.
The church's theme for 2006
will be "the year of the family,"
which will include marriage
enrichment events Jan. 27 and
28. Baker said it's important to
make New Year's resolutions
so people can assess where
they are in their lives.
"It's kind of like starting
anew and fresh with a clean
slate," Baker said. "Maybe
this year you can be successful
and victorious in a goal you
set. This Sunday I'll be able to
say 'Not only did you start off
the week right, but you started
off the year off right by being
in the house of the Lord."

GAS
Continued From 1A
Friday afternoon.
Scott Beary, who is from
Gainesville but was travel-
ing to Tifton, Ga., to visit
family, said he-was unsure
why prices were so high in
Lake City while filling up
Friday.
"Prices are quite a bit
more expensive here,"
Beary said. "You would
think they would be cheaper
since this is a smaller town.
(The gas tax) just sounds
like a bad situation. It is
probably like when retail
stores put stuff on sale, but
jack up the prices the day
before. Then when it goes
on sale, it's not actually on
sale, but people think it is."
Calls were placed to the
S&S Food Store officials
Friday afternoon, but no one
was available for comment.


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Page Editor: Joseph DeAngelis, 754-0424


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2005


FA LY T E S A
F AM I LY T IE S


A
By Mr. Kim Mailes
Te�- � r.. tio.



Being honest didn't always come
easy, but it was always worth it.

Iwas out for a run the other evening when a little black car
approached. Hesitating a moment, I waved for the driver to
stop. With a quizzical look, he halfheartedly waved back, and
then grinned widely as he recognized me and pulled to the side
of the road. As I jogged to the car, memory took me back in time
and I was 19 again, sitting in a cafe on old Route 66 with my
grandfather, a used car dealer I called Papa.
That autumn I spent working for him turned out to be a bet-
ter education than the second year of college I was avoiding. He
was wise, old, and crippled. I was dumb, young, and agile as a
deer. We made a good team.
Born dirt-poor and lame, he had worked long dirty hours to
save enough to buy his first car, which he sold for a small profit.
Repeating the process over many years, he now owned a lot full
of bright, shiny cars, and it was my job to wash them.
Observing him day after day, I began to see how much people
respected him and the integrity he wore as modestly as an old
denim jacket.
But my favorite part of the job was going with him to buy
cars. That's what we were doing in the cafe that day. As the little
bell over the door signaled our arrival, the waitress looked up
from the table she was wiping and smiled. "You two are running


late." And she was right, because 20 miles down the road from
the last town Papa had abruptly turned and gone back.
While we ate lunch I asked, "Why did we turn around and go
back?"
"Because this morning at the coffee shop I promised a man I'd
stop and look

before we left
town, and I
forgot," he
replied.
"But you
knew before
we turned
around that
you weren't '
going to buy .
that car, didn't
you?
"Yes, I FIRST CAR: Author Kim Mailes poses with his grandfath
knew," Papa his son Colton, and Colton's first car.
said, picking
up the check and sliding a tip under his plate. "But because I
kept my word this time, he'll tell me about a bargain someday."
Papa wasn't preaching, just talking, but it all began to make
sense. "Son," he said, looking me right in the eye, "if you don't
keep your word in the little things, you won't be successful in the
bigger things in life."
That was a long time ago, but when I waved that car down the
other evening, I was a kid again, remembering Papa's lesson. The
driver had overpaid me and the money sat in the bottom drawer
' of my desk at the carlot, Papa's carlot, the one I own now. I had
been real tempted to just keep the money-no one would know.
The car stopped and he greeted me warmly while his pretty


wife smiled beside him. They are fine people, immigrants who
work at a farm outside town and pastor a small Hispanic church
on the side. Money is in short supply at their house.
"Salvador," I said, "I'm glad I ran into you. You overpaid me
the other day. Stop by my office tomorrow." As he drove away I
turned and
s ,, starting run-
.w jning down
ithe road
S "- - again, my
. ' steps a little
lighter.
"s Picking up
the money
the next day,
he said, "You
know, we
never drive
down that
, Ira Burr, and his first car in 1972, and 30 years later, with road you
boyr_ _ _ _ _ who___ were jogging
on. But my
wife suggested we take a different way. We were running short on
money this week, and then we ran into you. Isn't it funny how
things work out?"
Yeah, it's funny how a lesson in honesty taught in a cafe now
empty on a road now abandoned by a man now dead caused the
boy who became a man to do the right thing.
My 18-year-old son has been working for me at the carlot this
summer before he goes to college in the fall. This week when we
stop for lunch while we're out buying cars, I think I'll tell him a
story about his great-grandfather. It's a family tradition.

Mr. Kim Mailes writes from Neosho, Missouri.


1. GEOGRAPHY: \\here is the win-
ter-sports resort city of Innsbruck?
2. ARCHITECTURE: What,
London's largest cathedral?
3. MILITARY: VWhat was the name
of the last U.S. battleship built?


4. LITERATURE: Which atirical
novel's main character is named Yossarian?
S. TELEVISION:.Whendid "ILove
L[ticy"'go on the mli.
6. U.S. PRESIDENTS: W\hot was
president when the United States bought
Alaska?
7. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: In the
Census of 1810, roughly what was the
population of the United States?


8. MYTHOLOGY: Th lecgend.an
Midas with the golden touch was said to
be king of ,here'
9. HISTORY- \\hl- ndid till
AmTincican Rel ol utionarn ar\ \r end
10. CARTOONS : \ho supplies the
voice of Lisa on the animated series "The
Simpsons"'
ill s .I,"P'. "Ol -'' I "6
i .uJid 1 * " Cil l " 9, -Ii I ) * 't.,1

/11hi t\" >;, I "T 9 * ,l1td s " rZ111 "l


Moments

j intime

THE HISTORY CHANNEL

ON JAN. 5, 1914,theFordMotor
Company rolls out a series of initiatives aimed
at improving the lives of its workers. Ford dou-
bled the minimum wage to a lofty $5 per day
and cut the workday to eight hours.

ON JAN. 6, 1 936,PorkyPigmakes his
world debut in a Warner Brothers cartoon,
"Gold Diggers of'49." When Mel Blanc.joined
Warner Brothers the following year, he became
the famous voice behind Porky as well as other
Warner Brothers characters.

0ON J A N . 2, 19 41, the Andrews Sisters
record the classic World War II hit "Boogie
Woogie Bugle Boy" on Decca Records. The
Andrews Sisters were the most popular "girl
group" of their time, and set the stage for the
"girl group era" of the mid-1960s.

ON , J AN. 3, 19 5 9, President Dwight D.
Eisenhower signs a special proclamation
admitting the territory of Alaska into the
Union as the 49th and largest state. The $7.2
million purchase of Alaska in 1867, negotiated
by Secretary of State William Seward, was
ridiculed at the time as "Seward's folly,"
"Seward's icebox" and President Andrew
Johnson's "polar bear garden."

ON JAN. 8, 1 9 6 2, at the National
Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., Leonardo
da Vinci's masterpiece, the Mona Lisa, is exhib-
ited for the first time in America. First lady
Jacqueline Kennedy and Andre Malraux, the
French minister of culture, arranged the loan of
the painting from the Louvre Museum in Paris.

ON JAN. 4, 1 9 74, President Richard
Nixon refuses to hand over tape recordings and
documents that had been subpoenaed by the
Senate Watergate Committee. Nixon resigned
from office in disgrace eight months later.


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e-mail mortgage@porchsyndicate.com or call 888-480-5444.


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Page Editor: Joseph DeAngelis, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2005 9


The snow falls softly and quietly from the gray winter sky. It
coats the ground and trees with a mantle of pure white. Howi


CI oriu 200. K eler ,, r, Se." P,, Tri,- rA 2206 rvarnw ..:r CicE o
Copirigni 20t6 KvitieriViioal,-,ri-v'. -pzarer S~r. cez P Cs .:.\ 81 S Criaric.tiep.lie '.,A 229-:106 \' .sjr-�---es cofr.


I h-,r l i *. - .1 ;."' _
O'NEAL.
ROOFING CO LMPNY
ROOFING * INSULATION


I V M\ DENTiST
255 SV Main Blvd.
Lake City
752-2480

Ronsonet
Buick-GNIC Truck Inc.
-f90 E. Dusal SI. (U.S. 90 East I
Lake Cit). FL 32055
1-386-752-2180

,:4; Ironwood Homes
iSC ! of Lake City
God Bless Thti New Year'
A Sprial thanks To jtl uur CU rrie -I 200I /OOJ
From Larry Mant [raigq Iji. - Rjisly MIms
Trre Wnilcriaro and Billy Reg,: er
Phone- 386-754-8844 * FAX 386.54..0190
4109 U.S. 90. 90 W. 1a ry. FL 32055



Supercenter
"LO\l PRICES E IERY D.Y"
US 90 WEST 755-6304

GWV Hunter,; Ic.
"r, Chevron Oil
| Jobber


C i,, /h, , ,t' . i . .
ACCURATE CAR CARE
Car Wash
4114 \\ L S H . , 1i L: ,..-it., FL
386-755-1125


FOOD STORES
Oprr. *'Di, a \, \rk
11136 F Dutal Si., Lakt 6 Cii I L
rrin MNki. I rLh P,.,.dat!


LAKE CIT\
CHRISTIAN SUPPLY
;16s f ; ,|jin Blh
1.al 6 (11. II. 32.')25
Phoun i386i '54 .5175i I a\ a 1i.i 54. '-3
M ,,rn.-frl. 1" _ j iIn."'
rmail. . i ,iilk . at I ,:,.n

~( COLUMBIA
s . i. , READY MIX
CONCRETE, INC.
COMMERCIAL * INDUSTRIAL * RESIDENTIAL
LAKE CITY 386-755-2458
LIVE OAK 386-362-4422
_ W \ v\.,\ , ictrtl,:,:' rirelte ,'.', m


.ibselule Jilnep s. Inc.. ... . .... .
Gbei In fGear [or Boot (1mip SMarLt
.April 5'
6 Week Course
386-755-4800 L,:[..a !. i, D.L,w ,kI.,' i L e ,

JORDAN'S CONCRETE
Footerr * Houe Floors � Drivea'
Shop; * Pario, * Side.-alk . * A. ddiionr,
"Q 11 i t)ORl %\1 \ IIII\ II'n j ."
r. 386-755-4919<-
Licensed & Insured � FREE ESTIMATES


HICH SPRIGS LNGULC.\N FEllOWSHIP
j36-462 1 1 i * �"30 IN\V Fiti Streei
ISeventh Day Adcentl[ Church'
Suiland I(0 01)JAM
hutp ,'w ivvanglican -fllowi ;hip org
Pastir. Re\. Claudia kabs

BEREA BAPTISM CHURCH
SR47- '. 755-.iqOi
Sund.a ' school 9 3),\AM
'undai, Worslup . l0.45AM & 7PM
Wedriesda Eie. Service 7F'M
Pastor. Larr. F Sweat

FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH
- C242Wsi or ,uC252 \est
Siinda',' L.ht..ol 10 A.'M
Sun. \\orhip II AM ,I & b 'PM
Wed Night Serpke 7iPM
Re'. lohn Ham-.orj, Pastor
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
"The Place for New Beginnings!"
P,-ior. Troi', Varoum
SUTNDA
biile Srudn 9 15 AM
Morning Worship 10:30 AM
Sunday Etening Worship 6.00 PM)
WEDNESDAY
Fanulb Supper 5 30 FPM
Student Minisutry 6:00 PM
Pra.er & Bible Srudy 6-15 PM
C.Iildren'; Mjnst5 6 15 I-M
2 blk iLks Eai ol US 411 on Hw y90
in Downtuwn lake City *386-752.5422
OL-ET MISSIONARY APTIST CHURCH
'5ill N E Ddvis Sirefl
386Ii 752'1990
Roiiad 'V Walers. Pasior
.undav School 9 4';AMN
Sunday> M'.'inrng W'rlor p 1 i:LOuA
Wed N-Mid Wek Wor)jp :OOPMNI
In and's Word Will . WaV"

PARk~1EW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW ILke leffre, Rd. * 7520681
i.,Lj e I iltl', F ,rld.l .301J,5
Sundae\ Seivice-
Earl\ ,iorslhip 8 3u AM
Bible Study 9:45 AM
Morning Wir-lup [1 iUt .AM
F, envig k.n\orhip .i.01) PM
Wed Eve. Schedule
arrul\ Supper ileservanuiil 5 PM
'..ith \\'ursliip 5.i30 PM
'tavr Mleeigiin b PM
Pa,.tur: joseph M. Builer
CELEBRATION COMMUNITY CHURCH
H,;\ 47beinveei Fi.While & ulumbia Ciry
SuLIndly Ser'frvic.
Bible Stud\ 9AM
V'Worship 10 5I -a
Wi-dnesd,i\ Lning Shedule
AWrANA 6 30PM
Praver and Bible Study 7 PM"I
Pa-t.n DI.l , Sh rt h * ,4- 1114

HOPEFUL BAPTIST CHURCH
"Ihe Cartrig Place"
415 i' CHS, leh on i R 252
t..i P.R ':. P ce. Ie ter-ki
nghi on Price Creel. 2 miles - 752 413r'
Wtrship Snvice i30& 1 A.1
hi-ldrei i, liC'tcIr(h l it & 11 .M
'urind.a S1-ol 9 -I1ii 14 AM
Evening Worship 7 PM
Wednesday\ Schedule
mjnil Slupp,-r 6 PM
'tuth Senrvic' 6 45 P1
Children', L'Chir h.15 PM
Bible Situl' 6 )4I' PM
Nruisq-iv Iruvited


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Senices Iu.:30)AM
Pasirr F.lder Herman Griffin
752-4198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
600 E Baya Avenue
Bible Study 9:15 AM
Sun Mlorn. Worship 10-30AI
Sunday Eke 6 151SM
Wed Prayer Meeting 6 15PMN
NWRJIRYPRon)' f
TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
i Independent Baptisti
144 SE Montrose Ate. 75:' 1274
Sunday school ]i AN'
Sun Morn. Worship II AM
Suindjy Eve h PMI
Wed Prjyer Meeting 7 30 PMI
Pastor- Mlke Norman


EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
360) S Mariro Si *752-44711
Saturday Vigdi Mas' . 5 PM
Sunday) Mass 8:15 AA1. in:310,IA.
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)
Sa':rament of Prenance Sarurday
12 br. before 7PM Mass
and 12 Ir. before 10 30 AM
Mass on Sunday



LAKE CITm CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwi 247 S.-755-94j6
Sunday Schoril 9.30jAMS
Sun Mittin Worship 10.30 AM
Wed. Pra\et Meeting 7 PM

FIRS] ADVENT CHRISTIAN CHURCH
i located at Ilwy 417 South &
McFarlanrAve * 752-390il
Sundih School tall ages) 10 I) AM
Worship II(10 ANM
Pastor- Rev LarryV . Yeaioin


CENTRAL CHURCH OF CHRIST
" Where i hnstins Mii:l'
61ji b (.IS 441
755-1320
Sun AM Bible Classes 930AM
Sun. AM AsseinbI 1i:.iOIAM
Sun PM Assembly F,:)00PM
Wed. PI'M Bible -.lasses 7'il(IPM
Minister- Denis Wesion

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF CHRIST
3614 H- 47 South 752-60110
Sun Bible Study 9 AM
Sun Morn kmothip 1l) A'
Sun E. being Wrsliip u PMS
Wed. Bible Study 7:110 PM
Minister: Ryan Tuien
LAKEVIEW CHURCH OF CHRIST
So. Marion Si * 758-15Uh
Bible Study Sunday i0:00AMI
Wor.lup SunddY II 00,1
Sunday\ Fining 6:00PM
Mid eek Bible Study Wed. 7:30tPM
Preacher Bob lohnson* 755-9573


LAKE CIT CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St., 752.'-965
Sunday, ' Sthool 9 5AM
S'it Wui ship 10 ilAF.lM & f):011pM
Wed. Fjmilv Night 7 PM
Wed \ouih Servii e 7 PM
Padsor C,,rrcll Lee


ETANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
iR 242 A&Ari dhead RH - -55.1 I
Sunday Schi.ul 9.45 AM
Sunday WuoriAp 1110-50& 6-.ll
Wed Spiritual Eni:hinent 7PM
"Shnicl 'outh Churh '
Buis and Guls 0'lubd
Bible Srudy
Pasior Inhn R. Haihawiad


ST. IAMES EPISCOPALCHURCH
Corner McFdrlane & Bascom Norris
Hik SW Malnrn-
Lake Cir, FL 3202.5--78. *75'2.2218
e-mail s ames'atjanuc.nei
Holy Eucharist Wed.- 5-30PM
Holy EucharisiSun B4MA\ & 10-30ta!
Sunday School 9.30AM1
Fellowship Dinnerlst &i 3rdWed 6 l5P')]
louth Ministry:l & 3'Sun. 4:30PM
Soga Cla.,sesMnn 5.00PNM - Wed. .01)1AM
Mtn's Yogd Tues 5 uilJPM
PrIest. The Rev. Dr left Robinson
Deacon: The Rev Jimmie Hunsinger

BETlHELEHEM LUTHERPN
II milessouth on Hwy 4 I
Sunday School 10 0111AM
Sun. morning worship Il1 0IAM
Pastor- Wilbur Rock

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
I 12nmiles S. of1.75onSR47
755,-4299
Sunday Servics 9:3M)AM
(Nursers Prutidedi
Christian Education IHour
For all age al d10.45AM
Pastor: Re ' Bruce- Alkite

SPIRIT OF CHRISI LUTHERAN
Hwv 0, 1.5 miles West of 1-75 * 752-38ti7
Sunday \Woship 10:011.AM
Fanuly Night Munthl;
Call for Details * Handicap Accessible
Pastor lames Bezaire


TRINITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Hwy47S Imi.N ofi.75*752-7175
Sunday School 9:4. API
Sunday MorningWortrhip i1 AM
Sunday Evening 6 3tUPI
Wednesday Dare-To-Care 7PM

FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
445 SWAlchua Ave *�752-2313
Lake City, FL 32025
Mi.e Elans, Pjsior
Sunday Si houl 9 4.5 A
Sunday AM Worship 10:45 AMI
Sunday Evenuig and Wednesdayv:30 PM


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
973 S. Marion Ave
Sunday School 9:45 AMI
Sunday Morning Worship
Contemporary Service 8 30 AM
rtadinonal Service 11:00 AM
Program opportunities available
in all areas for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at 752-4488
Pastor Dand PRaul
PLEASANT GROVE. UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
I nrle S ofl 75onSR47.? 52 316
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00,AM
Nursery Proided
FPstor. David FKui
WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane, 752-3513
vwwix . esleimeni.r nm
(Adjacent 10 Sumnmers School;
Sunday School 9-15 AM
Sunday Worship 8-10AM & 10-10AM
Youth Meering 5 PM
Praise & Worship 6 PM
NURSERYPROKWED
Pastor: Loule Mabrey

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
J.S 90 sF turn on Corlei (ne\t to Quality
Ind.i right on Okinawa
Sunday School 9"4', IAM
Sun. Worship ILAM I& 6PM
Wed Night Service 7 PM
Paslor, Randy Oghurn


FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
1231kW, Baya Avr, * 752 0-,u
Early Contemporary Serice 9 00,AN
Sunday School 9:50 AM
Traditional Setnice 11:00 AM
Yothii Programn in Wed.
kindtgarten dtru Si. High
NURSERY PROVIDED
Pastor: Dr Ro1 A Martin
Associate lPstor Re\ lance C. ki,
Minster of Music: Bill Poplin


FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE VilanuWay & NE Washington St
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 1I:I)IJAN
Evangelistic Service 6 u0) PM
Youth Services - Wednesday 7.00PM
Mid-week Service - Wednesday 7-00 PM
For inmll tall T .; 3418- Lver,,nitt \ lkome
Pasioit Rev. Sitan E.is
NEW LIFE CENTER OUTREACH
MINISTRIES, INC.
Hw\ I7South7S95 7647
Pastors Russell & Elaine Mc Daniel
Schedule of Services
Sunday School '4-i M
WVorsinip Sore ice 11.ILo AM
Wed. Service 7 i0 'PM
For Outreach Ministries
Call 758-8133


CI(RIS CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Leadership Sertic , .'.*45A I
SutiRj.\ kl:rningri 10 1U VL
\Vednc-da-, Bible Study' ..011PM
Ityal Rd , .ftuni Hwy 91J lake
Sister-, .elco:niet Rd go 5 nule-, buUth
':hurch ,'.r I .-It * S' .
Sr Pjasi..r I,.'riLer hln,.
Al',sociale lPdaur Mark lriohns
"A Chufi oin the Mniv,-"

CHRISTLAN HERIlAGE CHURCH
I'ornei SfR 1& Hud-oin .Circle
Sunday' .elbri ti .i lii ,0.' k1
Pa'Lor Eddie Tp1lort 752. 911l
1 Hiopnal lor i he Hurting'

MEADE. MINISTRIES
[iii Hiv, 47. to r'lumbritiai ,,
one ntme Ej-[ on CR 240i
Sunday |ilAM ,nid 7PM
[Ihiuda,' 8PM
No Nu.r,-i A. ajilabire
�pit t Filled \Vur'ldill
Healing and Deliverance
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
FalUing Cre,. Road * 75'5-3811
Firsi and Third Sundavy 9:30i A.M.
Second and Furth Sunda\s i ill PM.
[*i.
KOL HAMNASHIACH
Messianic Israel Congregation
Pinet-mounit . [i Suley thn lEft
755..92,2 ur ?7, .18- l,,ur idrn
Sarurdat Sabbath inrahi Sc 3PM
Tueday Scriprure Study 7PM
Isl , rd. Thurs .3 mionith
Dj rice as t. ursliip . Ij. " 7PM
leach hing the Hebrew Boats otl the
Inshrtian Faith
Come I-arn with us'




To List





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on the





Church





Directory





Call





752-1293!


, a i


SiClay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com

I/HlY W Hwy 90
KFC 752-1123
Stop In After Church and See
Our Newly Remodeled Store
and Try Our Delicious Buffet.


I.a^ n Ti


mm=-I


TIREMART OF LAKE CITY
Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054


Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Fri. 8:00-5:30, Sat. 9:00-5:00. Closed Sunday
Mon-Fri 9:00-5:00 . .
Closed Wednesday /
Northside Motors, Inc.
In God We Trust
Patty Register
1780 E. Duval Street, Suite 113 (386) 961-9505
Lake City, FL 32055 Fax: (386) 758-8520

ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL *INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation * Road Building * Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
2 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

S. HARRY'S
."*".."**.. Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
4121& Harry Mosley, President

PuOon 752-2308 X

Freedom Homes
Committed to Serving
Your needs
386-752-5355
www.freedomhomeslnc.com

i THE MOVE Wid',
CONNECTION
Lo al Mt rin ., Slorage * Lor Di Oiain.:
F' .:.le;.:. ,,:r . ,ujnleOu- P* '. r i.ij lri.. r
200 N. Chestnut St. * Lake City. FL 32055
(386) 755-5595* (800) 755-5595

To Advertise
in this
Church Directory
Call 755-5440

MIKEL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Nour Laj. nI, Gardr H adquarincr.
itER S * CH iNS 2S. S * TRiMMERS
1152 US t901 WEST * LAKE CITlY. FL.
386-752-8098

lake city Gu Lrup RIleSAvailat..l
e Cit.) v ir, c,",..an,:ej
120 1W j^ It- e r.iliorn
Phone 755-2206
* BRIAN MEEK .*:
Owner'Manager :*2


Curvs
30 Minutes Fitness & Weight Loss Centes"
(Please call for an appoint ienrt
386-754-5422
Highway 41, Lake City (Across fromn Clay Electric)


HORIZON
INDUSTRIAL SUPPLIES
229 NW Wilks Lane
Lake City
386-755-4330




LAKE CITY
1701 S. Ist Street �
m 755-7050


BAYWAYja.itorial services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Commeircial
755-6142

BROWN-VANN
CARPET ONE
U Carpet * Vinyl * Tile * Wallpaper
5 West 7l2A9f
DuvalSt 752-3420


POL9LA4 cGAZ9
Everything's A Dollar, Everyday!
New Items Arrive Weekly
Located Between Wal-Mart & Lowes


T a e si h Cu 3ra Cl55


Page Editor: Joseph DeAngelis, 754-0424













FAITH


Saturday, December 31, 2005


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

Lawmakers poised
to address cloning
LINCOLN, Neb. - The
Nebraska Legislature session
that opens next Wednesday
will address the
long-simmering, religiously
freighted issues of cloning and
stem-cell research.
One proposal would ban
both reproductive cloning and
so-called therapeutic cloning
- the creation of embryos for
stem-cell research using
somatic cell nuclear transfer.
Another bill would ban
reproductive cloning but
permit embryo research for
therapeutic cloning.
A pre-session survey of
members of Nebraska's
unicameral legislature showed
20 supported the broader ban,
11 backed the second bill,
12 favored neither and 6 did
not answer. On a different
point, 23 said the state should
encourage stem-cell research,
though many opposed
embryonic research and four
wanted to ban all stem-cell
research.

Court upholds
Kentucky display
LEXINGTON, Ky. -A
federal appeals panel has ruled
that a courthouse in central
Kentucky can keep a Ten
Commandments display
because other historical
documents are included.
A three-judge panel for the
U.S. 6th Circuit Court upheld
a lower court decision favoring
a display at the Mercer County
courthouse in Harrodsburg
that shows the
commandments alongside
nine other documents with
equal"f6nt size, including the
Bill of Rights and Declaration
of Independence.
The ruling said the
American Civil Liberties
Union relied on a false
understanding of the
Constitution in opposing the
display and this "construct has
grown tiresome.... The First
Amendment does not demand
a wall of separation between
church and state. Our nation's
history is replete with
governmental
acknowledgment and in some
cases, accommodation of
religion."

Aid poor before
debt, Bishop says
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil -
The president of Brazil's
Roman Catholic bishops'
conference said the
government was wrong to pay
foreign creditors before
settling its "social debt" with
the nation's poor millions.
Cardinal Geraldo Majella
Agnelo of Sao Salvador da
Bahia said that 2005 was
"wasted" by President Luiz
Inacio Lula de Silva, whose
government promised to help
the poor but has been mired
in a corruption scandal.
"I sincerely hope that
2006 will be the year of
redemption for the
government and programs
that directly benefit the
extremely poor," Agnelo said.
The bishops were among
many church groups that
supported Silva's leftist
Workers Party in the
2002 campaign. But they
turned against him when he
adopted a conservative
economic policy to fight
inflation and attract foreign
investment.
The cardinal targeted Silva's
decision to move up Brazil's
debt repayments of some
$18 billion to the International
Monetary Fund and the Paris
Club of creditors.
He also addressed Silva's
denials that his government
was involved in a scheme to


illegally finance campaigns
and pay legislators monthly
"allowances" to support his
party.

* Associated Press


Mormons look to future




on founder's birthday


By JENNIFER DOBNER
Associated Press
SALT LAKE CITY - Though The
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day
Saints is one of the world's fastest-
growing religions - though 120 mil-
lion copies of the Book qf Mormon
are in print - believers still endure
suggestions by mainstream church-
es that they are not authentically
Christian.
Yes, the Mormons once called
themselves "a peculiar people." But
as the church celebrates the 200th
anniversary of founder Joseph Smith
Jr.'s birth, its president says his flock
is well within the Christian fold.
"Of course we're Christian. The
very name of the church declares
that," said Gordon B. Hinckley, in a
recent interview with The
Associated Press.
"No one believes more strongly in
the divinity of the Lord Jesus Christ.
No one believes more strongly in the
power of his redeeming sacrifice.
The Book of Mormon is another wit-
ness for the divinity and reality of
Jesus Christ," he said. 'The more
people see us and come to know us,
the more I believe they will come to
realize that we are trying to exempli-
fy in our lives and in our living the
great ideals which he taught."
Smith founded the Mormon
church in April 1830, 10 years after
he claimed to experience a vision of
God and Jesus in a grove of trees
near his family home in Palmyra,
N.Y. He said an angel, Moroni, later
led him to a buried set of gold plates
inscribed with the story of a lost
tribe of Israel that had settled North
America. Smith's.translation of the
plates becanit. known as The Book of
Nlornmon, the first of the unique,
scriptures the church follows
alongside the Bible.
The church teaches that Smith


Gordon B. Hinckley, president of the Mormon church,
Hinckley, 95, uses a hearing aid and cane.

was a prophet and considers the men and west
who succeeded him as church presi- traveled i
dent to this day as the "prophet, seer About h
and revelator" on earth for outside th
Mormons. It also
Even more than the 78-year-old generation
Pope Benedict XVI, the 95-year-old appointed
Hinckley bears weighty responsibili- respond
ties for his church. Hinckley holds church pr
authority to convey divine guidance The de
to church members and direct cized in r
appointment of the leaders of every of posth
regional body and local congregation sands of
worldwide and all the tens of thou- them Ho:
sands of Mormon missionaries, of other
This year alone, he visited Africa, individual
Russia, Iceland, Korea, Taiwan, India religion c


tern Europe - the most
president in church history.
alf of all Mormons live
ie United States.
falls to Hinckley, a third-
on Mormon who was
i president in 1995, to
to those who question
practices and teachings.
nomination has been criti-
ecent years for the practice
unlmutly baptizing thou-
f deceased Jews (among
locaust victims) and those
faiths. Mormons believe
ls' ability to choose a
continues beyond the grave.


Asked about the practice,
Hinckley said performing the bap-
tisms only provides the option for
non-Mormons to convert, "so there's
no injury done to anybody."
The church also has tried to dis-
tance itself from its history of
polygamy, but some fundamentalist
Mormons still support the practice.
Hinckley said the doctrine of
polygamy "came of revelation and
,was discontinued by revelation."
"We believe in honoring, obeying
and sustaining the law. And so, we
have very little sympathy with those
who disobey the law in this manner,"
he said.


Debate surrounds Texas border


church that aids illegal immigrants


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rosa Elia Navejas looks up as she finishes praying in the chapel
where a statue dubbed 'The Undocumented Christ' hangs from a
crucifix at Our Lady of Refuge Catholic Church in Eagle Pass,
Texas, on Dec. 6.


By ABE LEVY
Associated Press
EAGLE PASS, Texas -
For illegal immigrants weary
from a long desert journey,
the Rev. Jim Loiacono is there
with food, shelter and some-
times a trip to Western
Union.
He asks only to see U.S.
Border Patrol papers, proof
that the immigrant has prom-
ised to appear before a judge.
Loiacono, and other priests
along the border, reflect
Roman Catholic social teach-
ing that recognizes the right
of nations to control their bor-
ders, but also asserts that
people who cannot support
themselves have a right to
find work in another country


for their survival.
But promoting such com-
passion for illegal immi-
grants, and helping them
once they are inside the
United States, is a tough sell
these days. Pressure grows
on government officials to
better secure American bor-
ders, especially after the
Sept. 11 attacks.
Chris Simcox, co-founder
of the Minuteman Project, a-
burgeoning vigilante group
which fights illegal immigra-
tion, said there should be lim-
its to mercy for people who
break federal law.
"We have a long history of
churches being sanctuaries
because they perceive these
people as being just children
of God,", he said. "But how do


. they know they're not aiding
and abetting terrorists?"
An estimated 9 million to
13 million illegal immigrants
live in the United States,
according to the U.S. Census
Bureau.
In recent years, Eagle
Pass, a town of about 22,000,
has seen a rise in illegal
immigrants, attracted by its
central location between San
Antonio and Monterrey,
Mexico.
Some have darted across
the city's golf course, whose
fairways line the banks of the
Rio Grande. Others bunch on
sidewalks en route to the
downtown bus station. As
many as 150 a day have
passed through Eagle Pass
this year.


CHURCH NOTES


Revival
coming soon
Watertown Congregational
Methodist Church will have a
revival Jan. 8-13. The
Evangelist Bill Saye will be
the revival speaker and will
be speaking each evening..
The church is located at
U.S. 90 East of Lake City.
Turn on Cortez Terrace to
Okinawa Street turn right.
For more information, call
752-1329.

Watch Night
service tonight
St. Paul Missionary Baptist
Church will have a watch
night service at 10 p.m. today.
The church will have morn-


ing service at 10 a.m. Sunday. Gospel Singing Mayo. birthday
Watch Night planned for tonight celebration Sunday
t i ht


New Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church will have
watch night service at
9 p.m. today at New Bethel
Missionary Baptist Church.
The church is located at
55 NE Martin Luther King
Street. The Rev. Alvin J.
Baker, will deliver a special
New Year's message.

Watch Night
service tonight
At 10 p.m. today Union
A.M.E. Church, Winfield
Community will be having
night watch service.


Fort White Baptist Church
will have a Gospel Sing from
8 p.m.-midnight today. The
church is located at the
corner of SR 47 and 27 in
Fort White.

Watch Night
service tonight
New Beginning Church
will have watch night service
at 8 p.m. today, and will
feature "Dave and Sherri"
from Tylor Church. There
will be refreshments and
communion, also everyone is
invited. The church is located
on Highway 242 east of
Branford Highway.


Jerusalem Primitive Baptist
Church will have an
appreciation and birthday
celebration for mother
Fances Bowles Mayo.
Deaconess Mayo is
99 years old today. The public
is invited.

Martin Luther King


program planned
The Columbia County
NAACP Branch, WIN
(Woman in NAACP)
committee will be having its
first Martin Luther King
program at 3 p.m., Jan. 8.
This program will be at
Trinity United Methodist


Church, located at 310
Martin Luther King Drive.
The speaker will be Sister
Maggie-Lewis Butler of
Tallahassee. Music will be
performed by Philadelphia
Missionary Baptist Church
choir.
For more information, call
Minister Paukine Harrison at
752-1919 or Patricia Carter at
7545-2690.

Watch night
service tonight
Olivet Missionary Baptist
Church along with Fellowship
Baptist Church will be having
watch night service at 7 p.m.,
today, at Olivet Missionary
Baptist Church.
E From staff reports


IOA


ASSOCIATED PRESS
answers questions during an interview, on Nov. 23, in Salt Lake City.


II - -L -








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
' 754-0421
I tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Saturday, December 3 1, 2005


SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


COLUMBIA BASKETBALL
Alumni game to be
played Jan. 14
A Columbia High boys
basketball alumni game will
be played at 6 p.m. Jan. 14
at the Columbia High gym-
nasium. Jake Hill will put
together one team and
Coach Trey Hosford will
assemble another.
Admission is $3, and all
proceeds go to the
SColumbia High boys
basketball boosters.
For more information,
call Hosford at CHS at
755-8103 (after Jan. 5), or at
752-0729.
S CHS SOFTBALL
Softball tryouts
are on Jan. 9
Softball tryouts for the
Columbia High School
varsity and J.V. teams will
be at 3:45 p.m. on Monday,
Jan. 9. Please report to the
softball complex.
For information, call
Coach Jimmy Williams at
758-4913 or 755-6422.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Injured Gators
could play in bowl
TAMPA - Injured
Florida cornerback Vernell
Brown and guard Tavares
Washington are expected to
play in Monday's Outback
Bowl against Iowa.
Brown hasn't played
since early November
because of a broken leg.
Washington has a
dislocated kneecap.
"We're anticipating both
guys
to play
..it's
just
how
much
we'll
see,"
Florida coach Urban Meyer
said Friday. "Vernell Brown
was limited (in practice)
again today. Tavares didn't
practice. He'll practice
tomorrow. He's coming on."
Florida quarterback
Chris Leak has practiced all
week after being taken to
an emergency room at a
Tampa hospital last Sunday
after becoming ill.
"He wasn't sure if it was
food poisoning or just a
24-hour bug," Meyer said.
"They jam him full of fluid
and he's fine. Not a big
deal. He's 100 percent."
PRO BASKETBALL
Bryant suspended
for two games
NEW YORK - Kobe
Bryant was suspended for
two games without pay
Friday for elbowing Mike'
Miller in the throat.
During Wednesday's 101-
99 loss to Memphis, the
Lakers guard was called for
a flagrant foul with 8:24 to
play for elbowing Miller.
After
the game,
Bryant
was

had been
over his Bryant
left eye in
the second quarter when
Miller pushed him in the
face with his hand; the cut
required three stitches.
"Any player that was
going to come down the
lane at that point in time, I
S was going to let him know
S that he just can't walk
through there," Bryant
said. "I think we as a team
have to do a better job of
establishing that. And me,
as a leader of the ballclub,
I've got to take the initiative
to do that - and hopefully,
everybody will see that."


SFrom staff, Associated
Press reports.


Tigers bounce back to win at Classic


CHS tops Mount Pisgah;
Williams and Hill named
to All-Tournament Team.
By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter.com
The Columbia High boys basketball
team completed a successful tourna-
ment run with a 62-44 victory against
Mount Pisgah of Atlanta in the
Daytona Beach Classic on Friday. The


Tigers ended the classic with a 2-1
record.
"I thought the effort was
outstanding," Tigers coach
Trey Hosford said. "I was
anxious to see how we
would respond after a loss
since we hadn't had one all
season."
The answer was clear:
Very well.
I Cameron Reynolds hit a 3-pointer to
give Columbia a 3-2 lead, and. the


Tigers never trailed after that.
Reynolds went for eight points in the
first quarter and hit two
more 3s in the half on his
way to finishing with a
game-high 18 points.
...-- In the second period,
Jerry Thomas picked up the
slack with nine points, tak-
ing over when Jakeem Hill
and Jamal Brown went out
with foul trouble. Thomas also held
his own against a 6-foot-10 player and a


Bad peaches for Miami


LSU routs the
Hurricanes 40-3 at
the Peach Bowl.
By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press
ATLANTA - For weeks,
their mantra has been the
same. The Miami Hurricanes
truly believed that two
botched plays knocked them
from the national-title picture.
On Friday night, the prob-
lems went far deeper - and
resulted in a humbling loss.
Miami was simply dominat-
ed by LSU in the Peach Bowl,
giving up more than 300 yards
by halftime and doing nothing
right offensively against the
Tigers, who rolled to a 40-3 win.
It was the worst bowl defeat
in school history, was just the
second bowl loss in the
Hurricanes' last nine appear-
antes, and marked the most
one-sided beating absorbed
by a Miami team since
Nov. 28, 1998, when it lost
66-13 to Syracuse.
The night started with such
promise. Miami marched
down the field on its first pos-
session, taking a 3-0 lead on
Jon Peattie's chip-shot field
goal early in the first quarter.
Things soured quickly.
When Miami quarterback
Kyle Wright came up short on
a fourth-and-inches early in
the second quarter, LSU got
the ball - and seized momen-
tum. Playing before a decided-
ly pro-Tigers crowd, LSU
opened a 20-3 lead by half-
time, then scored the first
20 points of the second half
while heads drooped on the
Miami sideline.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Louisiana State's Craig Davis (3) celebrates with teammate Xavier Carter (23) after he scored on a
51-yard touchdown reception against Miami in the second quarter of the Peach Bowl on Friday.


The loss assures the
Hurricanes won't finish
ranked among the nation's top
10 teams and probably not as
the highest-rated club in the
Atlantic Coast Conference -
two of the team's biggest


goals entering the Peach
Bowl, which they won with
ease over Florida a year ago.
But there was nothing close
about this one.
Wright completed only
10-of-21 passes for 100 yards,


Mr. Smith goes to town


against South Carolina


Missouri QB runs
for three TDs, passes
for one in win.
By MARY FOSTER
Associated Press
SHREVEPORT, La. -
South Carolina's game plan of
keeping Brad Smith in check
worked great - for a half,
anyway.
Then, the Missouri quarter-
back broke loose, as he has
done so often in his career,
rushing for three touchdowns
- including a 1-yarder in the
final minutes - and passing
for another to rally the Tigers
for a 38-31 victory over the
Gamecocks in the
Independence Bowl on Friday.
Smith, who rushed for
1,151 yards and passed for
2,022 this season, accounted
for 431 yards of Missouri's 504
yards as the Tigers staged
their biggest comeback
victory of the year.
Missouri (6-6) trailed 21-0
after the first quarter as Steve
Spurrier's Gamecocks


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Missouri quarterback Brad Smith (16) looks for blockers as he
sprints for a fourth-quarter 60-yard gain against South Carolina at
the Independence Bowl on Friday.


dominated the first half. South
Carolina (7-5) outgained
Missouri 312 yards to 174 in
the first half and held the foot-.
ball almost 11 minutes longer
(20:02-9:58)
The Tigers didn't convert a


third-down until the final
58 seconds of the half.
Smith completed 21-of-37
passes for 282 yards, with one
touchdown and an
SMITH continued on 2B


victimized by drops and
never-ending pressure from
LSU's swarming defensive
front. The Hurricanes could-
n't stop LSU running back
Joseph Addai, who racked up
130 yards and a touchdown.


6-foot-9 player, the latter of which was
former NBA star Ralph Sampson's
son. The elder Sampson was not in
attendance at the game, however.
Hill added 14, Kenny Williams nine,
Tavaris Reynolds six, Byron Shemwell
scored four and Vince Folston two for
the Tigers (10-1).
For their efforts at the classic,
Williams and Hill were named to the
All-Tournament Team. "It's a great
TIGERS. continued on 2B


Gators


rout


FAMU

Noah's 18 points
lead Florida to its
12th straight win.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE - Joakim
Noah runs the floor,
rebounds on both ends and
pretty much stays in motion.
It's his way of creating
offense. It's also working
well for Florida.
Noah
had 18%
points ,
leading the
team in
scoring for
consecu- Noah
tive game,
and the fifth-ranked Gators
routed Florida A&M 84-47
Friday to stay unbeaten.
Florida (12-0) extended
the best start in school his-
tory and has one more game
to play - against Morgan
State on Tuesday - before
beginning the Southeastern
Conference schedule.
The Gators opened the
season trying to figure out
how they would replace
their top three scorers -
David Lee, Matt Walsh and
Anthony Roberson. Coach
Billy Donovan quickly fig-
ured out it would be,
someone different each
game.
GATORS continued on 2B


Cavs rally for win

at Music City Bowl


Virginia rallies
from 14 down to
win on a late FG.
By TERESA M. WALKER
Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Connor Hughes kicked a 39-
yard field goal with 1:08 left,
and quarterback Marques
Hagans helped Virginia over-
come a 14-point deficit to
beat Minnesota 34-31 Friday
in the Music City Bowl.
Minnesota (7-5) had every
opportunity to blow the
Cavaliers out and win this
bowl for the third time in four
years, but the nation's fifth-
best offense bogged down
after taking a 31-24 lead early
in the fourth quarter.
The Gophers had one last
chance to pull out their
fourth straight bowl victory,
but Marcus Hamilton inter-
cepted Bryan Cupito's ill-
advised pass into double cov-
erage in the end zone with
36 seconds remaining to seal
the game for Virginia. It was
the Cavaliers' first bowl win


. *

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Virginia cornerback Marcus
Hamilton (right) intercepts a
pass in the final moments to
seal a 34-31 win for Virginia in
the Music City Bowl on Friday.

since the 2003 Continental
Tire Bowl over Pittsburgh.
Virginia (7-5) already had
forced the .Gophers to punt
twice, and Hagans overcame
an interception in the fourth
quarter to rally the Cavaliers
with 10 straight points to end
the game. He finished with a
career-high 358 yards passing.


Section B


I~ - I . - - I -









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2005


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV Sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
II a.m.
ESPN2 - Meineke Car Care Bowl,
South Florida vs. N.C. State, at
Charlotte, N.C.
I p.m.
ESPN - Liberty Bowl, Fresno St. vs.Tulsa,
at Memphis,Tenn.
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 - Houston Bowl,TCU vs. Iowa St.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2 p.m.
FSN -Arizona at Washington
4 p.m.
FSN - Louisville vs. Miami, at
Sunrise
4:30 p.m.
ESPN -Alabama at Oklahoma
6 p.m.
ESPN2 - Saint Joseph's at Gonzaga
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
WGN - Phoenix at Chicago
NFL
4:30 p.m.
CBS - Denver at San Diego
8 p.m.
ESPN - N.Y. Giants at Oakland

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


y-New England
Miami
Buffalo
N.Y. Jets


x-Indianapolis
z-Jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston


y-Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland


y-Denver
Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland


East
W L T
9 5 0
8 7 0
5 10 0
3 11 0
South
W L T
13 ,2 0
11 4 0
4 11 0
2 13 0
North
W L T
II 4 0
10 5 0
6 9 0
5 10 0
West
W L T
12 3 0
9 6 0
9 6 0
4 11 0


Pct PF PA
.643 322 289
.533 290 291
.333 245 337
.214 189 298

Pct PF PA
.867 422 234
.733 321 256
.267 286 381
.133 243 411

Pct PF PA
.733 418 313
.667 354 237
.400 249 279
.333 212 285

Pct PF PA
.800 372 251
.600 36.6 322
.600 411 289
.267 269 353


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


East
W L T
xx-N.Y. Giants 10 5 0
Washington 9 6 0
Dallas 9 6 0
Philadelphia 6 9 0
South
W L T
Tampa Bay 10 5 0
;Carolina' 10 5,--0-,
Atlanta 8 7 0
New Orleans 3 -12- 0
North
W L T
y-Chicago II 4 0
Minnesota 8 7 0
Detroit 5 10 0
Green Bay 3 12 0
West
W L T
x-Seattle 13 2 0
Arizona 5 10 0
St. Louis 5 10 0
San Francisco 3 12 0
x-clinched conference
y-clinched division
z-clinched wild card
xx-clinched playoff spot
Today


Pct PF PA
.667 392 293
.600 328 273
.600 315 288
.400 290 357

Pct PF PA
.667 273 261
,.667 3473 248
.533 340 297
.200 222 371


Pct PF
.733 250
.533 272
.333 233
.200 275

Pct PF
.867 435
.333 298
.333 343
.200 219


Denver at San Diego, 4:30 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Oakland, 8 p.m.
Sunday
Buffalo at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, I p,m.
Detroit at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Arizona at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Seattle at Green Bay, I p.m.
Miami at New England, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Kansas City, I p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, I p.m.
New Orleans at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Tennessee at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 4:15 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.

College bowl games

New Orleans Bowl
Southern Miss 31,Arkansas State 19
GMAC Bowl
Toledo 45, UTEP 13
Las Vegas Bowl
California 35, BYU 28
Poinsettia Bowl
Navy 5I1 Colorado State 30
Fort Worth (Texas) Bowl
Kansas 42, Houston 13
Hawaii Bowl
Nevada 49, Central Florida 48, OT
Motor City Bowl
Memphis 38, Akron 31
Champs Sports Bowl
Clemson 19, Colorado 10
Insight Bowl
Arizona State 45, Rutgers 40
MPC Computers Bowl
Boston College 27, Boise State 21
Alamo Bowl
Nebraska 32, Michigan 28
Thursday
Emerald Bowl
Utah 38, Georgia Tech 10
Holiday Bowl
Oklahoma 17, Oregon 14
. Friday
Music City Bowl
Virginia 34, Minnesota 31 I
Sun Bowl
UCLA 50, Northwestern 38
Independence Bowl
Missouri 38, South Carolina 31 I
Peach Bowl
LSU 40, Miami 3
Today
Meineke Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
South Florida (6-5) vs. North
Carolina State (6-5), 11 a.m. (ESPN2)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Fresno State (8-4) vs. Tulsa (8-4), I p.m.
(ESPN)


Houston Bowl
TCU (10-1) vs. Iowa State (7-4), 2:30 p.m.
(ESPN2)
Monday
Cotton Bowl
At Dallas
Alabama (9-2) vs.Texas Tech (9-2), II a.m.
(FOX)
Outback Bowl
AtTampa
Iowa (7-4) vs. Florida (8-3), II a.m.
(ESPN)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Virginia Tech (10-2) vs. Louisville (9-2),
12:30 p.m. (NBC)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Wisconsin (9-3) vs. Auburn (9-2), I p.m.
(ABC)
Fiesta Bowl
AtTempe,Ariz.
Ohio State (9-2) vs. Notre Dame (9-2), 5
p.m. (ABC)
Sugar Bowl
At Atlanta
Georgia (10-2) vs. West Virginia (10-1)
8:30 p.m. (ABC)
Tuesday
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Penn State (10-1) vs. Florida State
(8-4), 8 p.m. (ABC)
Wednesday
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Texas (12-0) vs. Southern Cal (12-0), 8
p.m. (ABC)

BASKETBALL

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division


New Jersey
Philadelphia
Boston
Toronto
NewYork


Miami
Orlando
Washingtoi
Charlotte
Atlanta


W L Pct
S 17 12 .586
S 15 14 .517
I I 16 .407
8 22 .267
7 20 .259
Southeast Division
W L Pct
18 13 .581
121 15 .444
n 12 ' 16 .429
10- 20 .333
. 7 21 .250
Central Division
W L Pct


Detroit 24 3 .889
Cleveland 17 10 .630
Indiana 15 12 .556
Milwaukee 15 II .577
Chicago 12 16 .429
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 23 7 .767
Dallas 21 8 .724
Memphis 17 10 .630
New Orleans 12 16 .429
Houston . 10 17 .370
Northwest Division
W L Pct
,Minnesot J4 --13- ;i519S,'
Denver 14 .16 .467
Seattle 13 15 .464
Utah 13 16 .448
Portland 10 18 .357
Pacific Division
W L Pct
Phoenix 18 10 .643
LA. Clippers 16 II .593
Golden State 16 14 .533
LA. Lakers 15 14 .517
Sacramento II 17 .393


Thursday's Games
Detroit 106,Miami 101
San Antonio II I, New Orleans 84
Seattle 112, Denver 105
Friday's Games
(Late Games Not Included)
Miami 128,Washington 113
Toronto 99, Indiana 97
Orlando 107, Minnesota 87
Phoenix 110, Charlotte 100
New Jersey 99, Atlanta 91
Golden State II I, Dallas 109
NewYork at Milwaukee (n)
Boston at Sacramento (n)
Memphis at Portland (n)
Today's Games
Detroit at Cleveland, 1:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Dallas vs. New Orleans at Oklahoma City,


Golden State at Houston, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Utah, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Seattle, 9 p.m.
San Antonio at Denver, 9 p.m.


Boston at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.

College scores
Thursday
EAST
Navy 86, Susquehanna 54
Seton Hall 93, Morgan St. 46
Vermont 72, American U. 62
SOUTH
Auburn 64,Winthrop 62
ETSU 82, Morehead St. 70
Georgia Southern 84,Jacksonville 79
Marist 84, Florida Atlantic 75
Nicholls St. 93,Jackson St.87
Samford 91, Campbellsville 56
Tennessee 69, Lipscomb 58
Valparaiso 89, Centenary 74
W. Kentucky 87, Kentucky St. 71
MIDWEST
Bowling Green 81, Notre Dame Coll. 50
Kansas 73, New Orleans 56
Kansas St. 66, Belmont 62
Wis.-Green Bay 106, N. Michigan 58
Xavier 73, Southern U. 56
SOUTHWEST
Ark.-Monticello 81, UC Irvine 64
FAR WEST
Arizona 70,Washington St. 52
California 62, Southern Cal 58
Fresno St. 65, San Francisco 60
Nevada 65, Louisiana-Lafayette 58
Pacific 84, UC Davis SI5
Penn 58, Hawaii 55
Texas Tech 69, New Mexico St. 63
, UCLA 71, Stanford 54
UNLV 79, Loyola Marymount 60
Washington 91, Arizona St. 67
TOURNAMENTS
Big R Holiday Station Stores Classic
First Round
N. Dakota St. 76, Montana St. 75
N. Illinois 80, San Jose St. 78
Cable Car Classic
Championship
Santa Clara 77, Bucknell 68
Third Place
Boston U. 80, dC Riverside 69
College of Charleston Classic
First Round
Coll. of Charleston 77, Longwood 53
Rider 63, Long Island U. 59
Comcast Lobo Invitational
Championship
New Mexico 63,Texas-Arlington 51
Third Place
Radford 85, Dartmouth 78
Dr Pepper Classic
First Round
Chattanooga 90, Maine 74
Howard 78, Mercer 74
Flint Hills Islander Invitational
First Round
James Madison 79,Yale 69
Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 90, Savannah
St. 45
Gossner Foods Classic
First Round
Binghamton 95, Idaho St. 46
Utah St. 76,Ark.-Little Rock 44
Jack-in-the-Box Holiday Classic
First Round
Furman 83, Kennesaw St. 76
S. Carolina St. 71, Marshall 66
UCF Holiday Invitational
First Round
, Birmingham-Souther- 6?.7 V' ilir.cis 54.
UCF 69, North Florida 57

Top 25 schedule

Friday's Games
No. 2 Connecticut II 1, Quinnipiac 75
No. 4 Memphis 90, Purdue 70
No. 5 Florida 84, Florida A&M 47
No. 6 Illinois 84,Tennessee-Martin 46
No. 19 N.C. State .79, No. 12 George
Washington 58
No. 15 Texas 110, Prairie View 38
No. 18 Kentucky 71, Ohio 63
No. 22 Wake Forest 87, Charleston
Southern 47
No. 25 West Virginia 80, Canisius 68
Today's Games
No. I Duke vs. North Carolina-
Greensboro at Greensboro Coliseum, I p.m.
No. 3 Villanova vs. Temple at the Palestra,
4 p.m.
No. 7Washington vs.Arizona, 2 p.m:
No. 8 Gonzaga vs. Saint Joseph's, 6 p.m.
No.9 Michigan State vs.Coppin State, I p.m.
No. 10 Louisville vs. Miami at Office
Depot Center, Sunrise, 4 p.m.
No. II UCLA vs. California, 4 p.m.
No. 13 Boston College at Rhode Island,
I p.m.
No. 14 Oklahoma vs. Alabama, 4:30 p.m.
No. 16 Maryland vs.VMI, 2 p.m.
No.17 Indiana at Ball State, 4 p.m.
No. 20 Nevada at Saint Mary's, Calif., 7 p.m.
No. 21 Ohio State vs. LSU, I p.m.
No. 24 Wisconsin at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m.


"Atrordable quality" Phone (386) 497-1419
Licensed & Insured 9WRO
Free Estimates Toll Free (866) 9LW-ROOF


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirlon


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
TAING I
^ Z

02005 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
TAWLZ



LUFUES I


7 I--- | WHEN THE PILOT
s ASKEP FOR A
.ww. jmble.com RAI5E, H15 E055
5AI.;t--I
DOMBEY
/- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A: IT D L -iI1 "
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: LATHE BULLY JITNEY SURETY
Answer: What he gave the horse when it opened its
mouth - JUST A "BIT"


UCLA special teams lead to win


in Sun Bowl over Northwestern


By TIM KORTE
Associated Press

EL PASO, Texas - Bran-
don Breazell returned two
onside kicks for touchdowns
and Drew Olson recovered
from an awful first quarter by
throwing three TD passes,
leading No. 17 UCLA to a 50-
38 win over Northwestern in
the Sun Bowl on Friday.
With star tailback Maurice
Drew limited to punt returns


after a first-half shoulder
injury, Chris Markey finished
with 150 yards rushing and
Kahlil Bell added 136 yards.
The Bruins (10-2) gave coach
Karl Dorrell his first bowl
victory in three tries.
The Wildcats (7-5) pulled
within 36-31 with 2:29 to play
when Brett Basanez threw a
9-yard touchdown pass to
Mark Philmore, but Breazell
- a receiver lined up to make
sure the Bruins kept the ball


- returned the ensuing
onside kick 43 yards.
After Basanez added a
5-yard TD pass to Shaun
Herbert with 23 seconds
remaining, Breazell struck
again by taking the next
onside kick for a 41-yard
score, punctuating the high-
est-scoring Sun Bowl ever.
The Wildcats set a Sun Bowl
record with 584 total yards and
the teams combined for anoth-
er record with 1,037 yards.


SMITH: Missouri rallies from 21 down

Continued From Page 1B


interception. He passed for 200
or more yards for the 18th
time. He also ran for 150 yards
and three touchdowns on 21
carries.
The Gamecocks needed less


than 3 minutes to go 80 yards
for their first score. Blake
Mitchell's 23-yard pass to
Sidney Rice put Carolina up 7-0.
Rice finished with
12 receptions for 191 yards.


Marcus King gave Missouri
its first points, grabbing
Mitchell's pass at the goal line
and returning it 99 yards to
make it 21-7 in the second
quarter.


GATORS: Frontcourt dominates

Continued From Page 1B


Lately, it's been Noah.
"He's got great ability and
great talent," Donovan said.
"But the best part of his game
is he's a great competitor, has
great enthusiasm and he plays
to exhaustion."
The 6-foot-ll sophomore
forward, the son of tennis
great Yannick Noah, scored in
double figures for the sixth


consecutive game. Not bad for
someone who was considered
primarily a role player before
the season.
Noah was 9-of-13 shooting
from the floor and had four
dunks. He added five
rebounds, two steals, a
blocked shot and an assist
without a turnover.
"I'm having fun and the


whole team is having fun,"
Noah said. "I feel like we're on
the right path. We've just go to
keep doing what we're doing."
The Gators dominated
FAMU (4-8) down low, scor-
ing 44 points in the paint and
getting a combined 51 points
from the frontcourt foursome
of Noah, Richard, Adrian
Moss and Corey Brewer.


TIGERS: CHS plays three times next week


Continued From Page 1B

honor because there were
some great players there this
week," Hosford said.
Hill averaged nearly a dou-
ble double for the tournament
with nine points . and
10 rebounds per game, and
1Williams was his usual. steady
sell at the point. So steady, he'
did not commit a single
turnover in the win against
Mount Pisgah.


ACROSS

1 Fruit or bird
5 Stand behind
9 Weed
12 Party-tray
cheese
13 Dog-food brand
14 Um cousins
15 Say "yeth"
16 Microsoft
product
17 Gym iteration
18 Safe to drink
20 Barbecue garb
22 Notify.
23 Rap-sheet
letters
24 "I don't
mind --"
27 Show approval
31 Peat source
34 Scrape
aftermath
35 Ancient
cosmetic
36 Bedouin
38 Obligation
40 Harbor


Hosford said he was able to
find out two important things
about his team during the clas-
sic: "I found out what we're
made of after a loss," he said.
The second item Hosford
learned was how his under-
sized team 'yould. fare against
taller opponents.
"It prepares us for when we
have to play Ocala Vanguard
and in the district tourna-


41 Sweetie-pie
42 Send, as money
44 Purchase
46 Decree
49 New Mexico's
flower
52 Dappled
55--
shoestring
56 Zen riddle
58 Ms. Home
59 Quick swim
60 Brink
61 Thames school
62 Hatchet
63 Monster-
hunter's loch
64 Have the nerve

DOWN

1 Brown seaweed
2 - savant
3 Squander
4 Antelope
5 Cry noisily
6 Shampoo
additive
7 ER practice


ment," he said.
That will be at the end of a
three-game week for the hard-
working Tigers, who host
Ocala Vanguard at 7:30 p.m.,
on Saturday. Columbia
returns to action at home
against Union County High, at
7:30 p.m., on Tuesday, then
plays at district rival
Gainesville High at 7:30 p.m.
on Thursday.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

AMOK FAB VEG
RAWER APO OPE
MYNAH Q TS LI L
NOMS SPECS
SAUNA TAU

YIN DIVA GLOB
AR 1 ALEC S11 DE
MEMO BETA TDS
SNAG AR FS HES
LU G UTTER
AU GER FLEA
MRI AWE RHINE
ADS LAD SOLES
HUT SRS EIK iES


8 Big name
in cameras
9 Man of the haus
10 Sandwich-
cookie
11 Cable channel


PUZZLE ENTHUSIASTS: Get more puzzles in
"Random House Crossword MeqcaOmnibus" Vols. 1 & 2.


19 Sandwiches
21 Dog group
23 Scrapbook
25 Kind
of squash
26 Country road
28 Badminton
stroke
29 Detective's cry
30 Pilot a ferry
31 Harmful
32 Gold, in Peru
33 Square-dance
partner
37 Cartel
39 Recipe
direction
43 Named a book
45 Rouse up
47 Queen
of the Misty
Isles
48 It's above
baritone
49 Jedi master
50 PC system
51 Batman's garb
52 Kiosk lit.
53 Rightmost
column
54 Hamlet or
Ophelia
57 Keats opus


� 2005 by NEA, Inc.


DECEMBER 31, 2005


Page Editor: Mario Sarmento,- 754-0420


12-31









ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31,2005


DILBERT


ZITS


FOX TROT FOR BETTER OR WORSE


OUP KIDS A125 ADUL.-rr, I2mbM~E4g H6A ipr_
A12C -tZOlr'OVIC p so M5D O H A45e. ALL LK1iS
IFAer..I WANT 1M �4 M5�IN 14 14 RLVJ0Ll
I& TAtND E)LL FO . OW CAN F-
A WHMlL I ...~ a 13 AC AWT
rp -IL~N 7


BLONDIE FRANK & ERNEST


BEETLE BAILEY B.C.


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


GARFIELD


SNUFFY SMITH


CLASSIC PEANUTS


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): It's a new year headed
your way with great new pos-
sibilities. You will have the
discipline now to finish what
you couldn't in the past.
Follow through, do your best
and promote whatever you
believe in. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Overindulgence will lead
to trouble. Be attentive toward
the ones you love, and let
bygones be bygones with
those who have upset you in
the past. Start off with a clean
slate. *****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You will be flirtatious,
but be careful not to ignore
or hurt the one who counts
most in your life. Love can
take a turn if you aren't
thoughtful, generous and
loyal. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You will dazzle every-
one if you put yourself in the
mainstream today. This is a
perfect time to entertain or
to let others entertain you. A
chance to do things a little
differently will lead to many
more changes. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

Don't let anyone make you
feel guilty. Do your thing
with friends, even if someone
wants to ruin your plans.
Stay calm and refuse to let
anyone get the better of you.
Be true to yourself. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Be careful not to do
anything that might get you
into trouble. Going away for
the weekend or visiting good
friends will be a great way to
bring in the new year. This is
a good time to reflect on days
gone by. **-***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You can have all the fun
you want, but make sure you
have someone you can count
on by your side. A chance to
hook up with someone inter-
esting will spark an idea for a
new project. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You won't be able to
count on anyone, so if you
are going to go out, prepare
to walk, take a cab or stay
home and have friends visit
you. Be responsible and you


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher ryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands tor another.
Today's clue: A equals D
"WCET XLFHTX CK OWT
OWMTXWCHA CD OWT PTGM '
OC Y CLT, JW FX ETMF K V O W GO
FO JFHH IT WGEEFTM."
- GHDMTA, HCMA OTKKPXCK
PREVIOUS SOLUTION - "His cranium houses the world's largest multiplex
cinema and it's open all hours every day." - Tom Hanks, on Steven Spielberg
(c) 2005 by NEA, Inc. 12-31


will start the new year off on
the right foot. Listen to what
others have to say. ****
SAGIITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Your mind
should be on money and
making more of it in the new
year. Attend any event that'
will place you with people
you find stimulating. You
may find yourself talking to
someone who can alter the
way things unfold for you.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): It's time to clear
the air and rid yourself of all
the burdens you've been car-
rying on your shoulders.
Nobody will know how you
feel if you don't tell them.
Move into the new year with
everything behind you -
fresh and without baggage.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Overindulgence
will be your demise. Don't
yield to temptation; be
responsible. You will not get
away with wrongful doings,
so don't even try. Abide by
the rules. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You are on a winning
streak. Play the odds, but
don't bet what you can't
afford to lose. Having fun is
what it's all about. You are
more than ready to make a
change. ****
Birthday Baby: You are
incredibly courageous, calcu-
lating and very cool. You are
steady and can easily gain
respect. You back down from
nothing and no one. You are
strong, determined and
willful.


DEAR ABBY


Dementia turns mild mother

into an unpredictable crank


DEAR ABBY: My mother
is suffering from an
Alzheimer's-like dementia,
and her personality has
changed greatly. Mother has
gone from being a conscien-
tious and polite woman -
most of my high school
friends called her "June
Cleaver" - to losing the
checks and balances that pre-
vent her from saying
whatever comes to mind.
Specifically, my mother can
be very unpredictable in
restaurants. She has, several
times, while the hostess has
been walking up to the table,
demanded in a loud voice that
they "turn off the damn
music!" No matter what we
say to her, she does not
understand that this behavior
isn't acceptable. What can we
say to people in a situation
like this that doesn't denigrate
my mother, but will help them
understand the situation? -
TORN IN FRAMINGHAM,
MASS.
DEAR TORN: I know this
situation is painful, and you
have my sympathy. You
should quietly inform the host
or hostess of the truth, that
your mother was not always
like this, but is suffering from
dementia. That's not "deni-
grating." It is the truth. That
way, they won't assume that
your mother is rude and
demanding; they will under-
stand that she is not
responsible for what she's
saying.


'� 1


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com

DEAR ABBY: My wife
passed away a little over a
year ago from cancer. I am a
widower now. My question
concerns how I should refer
to my wife in conversation. I
don't want to say "my dead
wife." It seems a bit insensi-
tive or maybe a little
off-putting.
I was recently on an air-
plane going back east to visit
my former brother- and sister-
in-law. During the flight I got
into a wonderful conversation
with one of the flight atten-
dants. She seemed really
interested in me - until I told
her the reason for my trip.
Then it was like an invisible
barrier went down between
us. The minute I mentioned
my wife had died, the "con-
nection" was over. Can you
help me? - DANNY IN
PHOENIX
DEAR DANNY: I don't
know what caused the flight
attendant to back off from
what seemed like a promising
beginning, but it's possible
that she wasn't as interested-
in pursuing a relationship as
you assumed. Had she been


interested, mentioning that
you are widowed would have
been the signal that made her
forge ahead. In the future, it's
perfectly acceptable to men-
tion the fact that your wife
passed away. It means you're
eligible. Simply refer to her as
your deceased wife.
DEAR ABBY: We recently
moved and would like to meet
more of our new neighbors by
inviting them for wine and
cheese.
However, many of the near-
by residents are young par-
ents with small children, and I
do not relish merlot and brie
spilled onto our new white
carpets by visiting toddlers
who may be into rough-and-
tumble games.
Can you suggest a firm but
polite way to say, "Please
come, but leave the kids at
home"? Help! - FLORIDA
READER
DEAR READER: Allow
me to offer some suggestions.
First, schedule the party from
8 to 9 p.m., which will better
the chances that it will be past
the little ones' bedtime.
Second, when you invite these
neighbors, state that alcohol
will be served and the party is
for adults only. And last, just
in case some of your guests
show up with children in tow
anyway (it does happen), skip
the merlot and serve white
wine.

* Write Dear Abby at P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


LAKE CITY REPORTER




























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Ad is to Appear: Call by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m.
Saturday . Fri., 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m.


Fax/Email by:
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.


These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Advertising copy is subject to approval by the
Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or
classify all advertisements under appropriate head-
ings. Copy should be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of publication. Credit for
published errors will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement which was incor-
rect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered to be published,
nor for any general, special or consequential dam-
ages.. Advertising language must comply with
Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition
of discrimination in employment, housing and public
accommodations. Standard abbreviations are accept-
able; however, the first word of each ad may not be
abbreviated.


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Computer Services

A PROFESSIONALLY
DESIGNED WEBSITE FOR
YOUR BUSINESS
A Perfect Christmas Gift!
Lake City area resident discount.
MSN.Net Hosting 877-467-7932
COMPUTER NOT WORKING?
We help with all your computer
needs. Virus & Spyware Repair,
Network & New Computer Setup.
Tutoring and anything else!
Call Dave at 352-870-7467.

Roofing & Gutters

SOUTHLAND REMODELING
Specializing in Reroofs,
Roof Repair, Roof Cleaning.
Call 386-697-3134

Concrete Work

JSH CONCRETE INC.
Slabs, footings, drives, etc. Licensed
& Insured. Home Owner Discounts.
Call 386-719-9918

Painting Service

N & N: We come from the old
school. Affordable painting &
pressure washing Since 1952.
386-965-0482 or 386-697-6237
Free Estimates.
Painting & Handyman Service
Painting, Home Repair, Remodel,
Drywall Repair, & Pressure Wash
Call Mike Lainhart 386-454-7060
Professional Painting & Pressure
Washing. 20 yrs exp. Quality Work,
Free Estimates. Will Meet or Beat
all other Estimates. 386-344-4242

Home Improvements

MITCHELL / HILGERSON LLC
Kitchen & Bath Remodeling.
Electrical repairs, Carpentry.
Paint & Trim Call 386-365-9909

Home Maintenance

Grey Wolf Enterprises
Custom Site Built Sheds
& Vinyl/Hardy Board Siding. Home
Maint. & Improvements
All Major Credit Cards Accepted
Call For Estimate 386-697-6765

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, design. Comn. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call 386-496-2820 Iv msg.
TIME TO MULCH
Make your flower beds look like
new. Delivered & spread or just
delivery. 386-935-6595


Services

CLEAN FREAKS
Mobile Auto Detailing at your home
or office. Complete Details starting
at $55.00 Call 386-623-1052
FREE CLEANUP.
Pick up of unwanted metals,
tin, scrap vehicles.
386-755-0133 We Recycle.

Drywall Services

DRYWALL Hang, Finish;
Textures; Plaster & Stucco Repairs;
Interior & Exterior Painting.
386-752-2412

Pressure Cleaning

Andrews Pressure Washing
Lie. & Insured,
Free Estimates.
Call 386-755-2065
EARL'S PURE
Pressure Washing & Painting.
Free Estimates Earl Goff
386-935-3230

Land Services

iw Bulldozer Work! Tractor
work, root raking, bush hogging,
seeding, sodding, disking, site prep
& landscape work. Custom Lawn
care. Irrigation Repair &
Installation. Free Estimate!
Call 755-3890 or (386) 623-3200
Look! We can dig your Trench for
less than you can rent a Trencher!
Free estimates.
Call A-1 Electric at 386-752-5488

Woodworking

F. THOMAS ENTERPRISES
Unique Wood, Designs and
Fabrication.Call 386-752-7387 or
e-mail ftc206(lbellsouth.net

Tree Service

Hazardous TREE TRIMMING,
removal & stump grinding. Senior
discount. 15 years experience.
386-590-7798 or 386-963-3360

Construction

Plumb Level Construction Co.
New Construction, Remodeling,
Re Roofing, Shingle & Metal
Call 386-792-4061 or 365-2819

Bankruptcy/Divorce

, #1 IN BUSINESS SERVICES
Divorce, Bankruptcy, Resumes
RE Closings, Legal Forms
248 N Marion Av. 755-8717


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 05-226-CP
Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
UNA NOLAN
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Una
Nolan, deceased, .whose date of death
was September 7, 2005; is pending-in the'
Circuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is PO Box 2069, Lake City. Flori-
da 32056. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set
forth below. All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is required to
be served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other
creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this no-
tice is December 24, 2005
Attorney for Personal Representative:
John J. Kendron
Attorney for Gabriel Joseph Hamill
Florida Bar No. 0306850
Robinson, Kennon, Kendron, PA.
PO Box 1178
Lake City, Florida 32056-1178
Telephone: (386) 755-1334
Personal Representative:
Gabriel Joseph Hamill
#5 Malcolm Street
Bellport, Florida 11713
04501152
December 24, 31, 2005

030 Personals

05509167
Lonely? Young at Heart?
Over 65? Looking for a great
companion? If so, we would be
great together. 386-961-8453


100 Job
Opportunities
!! LOOK! LOOK!!
You Too Can Sell Real Estate!
BIG BUCKS!
Call 386-466-1104
03527992
Lake City Reporter

is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier
for Columbia City to Old Wire
Rd/SR47, Herlong Deliver the
Reporter in the early morning
hours Tuesday - Sunday. No
delivery on Monday's.
Carrier must have dependable
transportation. Stop by the
Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!

Accounting Clerk
Experience in G/L, A/R, A/P & P/R
Salary Open. Fax resume to:
386-397-1130


100 J0o
100 Opportunities
04501261

Lake City Reporter
Creative Director
Immediate opening for person
with high level of design and
creative skills. Must have
experience using Quark Xpress,
Photo Shop, Illustrator, Adobe,
InDesign and Acrobat. Person
will oversee daily operation of
Creative Services department.
2-4 years newspaper or other
graphic position and supervisory
experience helpful. Salary will be
based on work experience and
creative abilities. Medical benefits
and 401k available.
Send resume to:
Dave Kimler
180 E. Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055
email:
dkimler(a~lakecityreporter.com

04501272
OPPORTUNITY
IN SALES
Are you currently in sales, but
need to make more money?
Apply today to join a team of
professionals where the average
Salesperson earns $50,000 a
year and where Superstars are
earning $100,000 + Salary during
training, plus many other
company benefits will be offered
to successful applicants. If you
are ready for a serious career
opportunity, send your
employment history for the last
5 years (with earnings) to:
Travel Country
RV Center
530 SW FL Gateway
Center Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32024
or Call Jeff at: 386-752-3723
for an appointment.
All relies are strictly confidential.
www.travelcountryrv.com

05509132
Immediate Job Openings.
Some positions require
experience, some available for
training. We offer competitive
compensation plan. Excellent
fringe benefit package, which
includes paid vacation, holidays,
group health insurance, and a
401K Plan. Some hand tools
required. Please apply in person
at Hunter Marine on Highway
441 in Alachua, Fl., for
the following jobs:
Autobody Technician
Spray Painter-Night Shift
Fiberglass Bonder
Carpenter

Bookkeeper.
Office Manager
Local manufacturing company
seeks full-time bookkeeper/office
manager. Computer skills
necessary. Accounting knowledge
preferred. Insurance & 401K
benefits. Send resume
& salary requirements to:
Send reply to Box 05005, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
' Lake City, FL, 32056
FLAT BED DRIVERS
Atlantic Truck Lines
$4,000.00 Sign on Bonus
Class A, in state & home every
night. $600-$750/wk. Yearly $1,000
safety bonus. 3 yrs. exp. Paid
vacation, health/dental. Call
1-800-577-4723 Monday-Friday


100 Job
100 Opportunities
05509178




!! $2,000 Sign On Bonus!!
STAY IN THE
"SWEET PART"
OF THE SOUTH .
FL, GA.. i '-. .* r, , I . '
* Top pay-up to .40 cpm w/5 yrs
*" Guaranteed Hometime
- Health & Disability Ins. Avail.
*Life & Dental Ins. Provided
*401K available
* Safety Bonus
Call 800-874-4270 # 6
Highway 301 South, Starke, FL.
www.davis-express.com

05509181
Survey Draftsman &
Instrument Person w/EFB exp
Company Benefits include Health
& Disability Ins., Sick Leave,
Vacation & Retirement Plan.
Call 386-755-6166

05509227
Comfort Inn is looking for Full
& Part-Time Housekeepers.
Benefits include vacation &
holiday pay, ins. & 401K.
Must be able to work weekends.
Apply weekdays after 10:00 AM.
US 90 & 1-75. No Phone Calls
Please. EOE/DFW

05509247


Mike's Tastee Hot Dog's
Accepting applications
for dedicated individuals. Must be
young at heart and have the
ability to learn & have fun.
Call 386-867-9053

05509269
Salesperson-Lumber Sales
Must be people savvy
Will train - Great benefits
Apply in person
Idaho Timber of Florida
1786 SE SR 100
Lake City, FL. 32025
Call 386-755-5555

City of Lake City
Currently has openings for
The following positions:
Coordinator-Human Resources
Coordinator-Customer Service
Accounting/Payroll Clerk
Firefighter Private
Construction Project Inspector
P/T Girls Club Leader
Maintenance Technician
IT Director
IT Technician
P/T Public Safety Dispatcher
P/T Recreation Aide
Obtain detailed job descriptions and
applications by visiting
City Hall, 205 N. Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055,
Human Resources Dept
or visit our website at
1www.ci.lake-city.fl.us
The City of Lake City is an
EEO/AA/ADA/VP employer
GRADER OPERATOR needed
immediately. Top pay for high
production operator. Complete
benefits package available. Apply in
person at Watson Construction.
Call 352-472-9157 for directions.


100n ob
100 Opportunities

05509270



FLORIDA SHERIFFS
BOYS RANCH

UNIT DIRECTOR

The Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch,
an 80 bed residential group home
located in Live Oak on the
Suwannee River, is looking for a
bright, energetic individual to
provide administration, training,
evaluation, and consultation to
Cottage Parents who are
responsible for the treatment and
care of dependent and neglected
youth. Masters Degree in Human
Services or related field and 2
years experience is required.
Compensation package includes
excellent salary, housing, utilities,
vehicle, and benefits. For more
information contact Linda Mather
lmather@youtuhranches.org at
(386) 842-5555 or
1/800/765-2697. Fax resume to:
386/842-1029. EOE/DFWP

05509302
Wanted Exp. Shop Technician
for construction/forestry
equipment dealer in the Lake
City, Starke, & Live Oak areas.
Competitive pay, benefits &
excellent training program. Call
386-752-9544 or fax to: 755-6882
or send resume to:
Industrial Tractor Co.
PO Box 2439 Lake City, 32056

Asphalt Plant Technician
Level II Certified
Hipp Construction
Call 386-462-2047
E.O.E./ D/F/W/P

Best Western Inn is looking for
FT & PT Front Desk Clerk. Must be
able to work Weekends, Nights &
Holidays. Apply at 1-75 & US 90 W
Cashier Needed. 10PM - 6 AM
Texaco in Ellisville, 1-75 & Hwy
441 S. Apply in person ONLY
Drug Free Workplace
COUNTRY INN AND SUITES
Housekeepers! Applicants who
are mature, serious & seeking
long term employment & have
cleaning experience. Apply at
Country Inn and Suites, Florida
Gateway Dr. 1-75 & Hwy 90.
Excellent working environment,
competitive pay, benefits incl.
vacation & holiday.

0450120-1
TECHNICIANS/MECHANICS
NEEDED
Seeking technicians/mechanics
3-5 years exp. repairing Heavy
Equip. Must have own hand
tools. Apply in person at
Ring Power, 390 SW Ring Ct.,
Lake City, FL 32025 or online
at www.rinepower.com. EOE

DENTAL ASSISTANT
Highly Experienced Dental
Assistant needed for busy quality
general practice. $17.00 hr plus paid
insurance, vacation & bonuses.
Fax resume to: 386-752-7681
or call 386-752-8531

DRIVER NEEDED Person with
CDL & Mobile Home Delivery
Experience. Call 386-364-1340.
Ask for Billy.


Classified Department: 755-5440
/' . ..* . . � -.



You can call us at 755-5440, Monday through Friday
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their classified ads in
person, and some ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad copy to the
Reporter.

FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the
Classified Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.com


-- -- .-- -- IN- �


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Classified Department: 755-5440
100 Job
100 OOpportunities
DUMP TRUCK DRIVER.
Experienced w/min. 2 yrs
clean MVR & Class A CDL.
Starting Pay $10.50/ph
Drug Free Workplace 386-623-2853
Experienced Tandem Dump Truck
Driver. Asphalt, Milling Exp.
Class B CDL & clean driving
record. PDOE. 386-590-0783
FORKLIFT TECH Manufacturing
Firm has full time position for
positive enthusiastic tech. Must be
experienced. Excellent pay &
benefits. Call 904-275-2833 M-F
Front Desk Employee needed for
busy Pediatric office.
Medical experience helpful.
Call 386-758-0003
FT Food Service Workers for
correctional setting. Benefits after
90 days. 401K, Stock Bonus,
Vacation. No criminal record. Food
Service Experience helpful. Apply
in person @ CCA Lake City CI.
386-755-3379 ext 2251
EOE/M/F/D/V.
HELP WANTED
FAULKNER PLUMBING
Plumbers
Call 386-755-1568 & leave message
HUNGRY HOWIES is hiring
delivery drivers. Must have car
w/insurance & 2 yrs. driving exp.
Flex schedule. F/T & P/T avail.
CASH PAID DAILY!
Earn $8. - $15./ hour. Apply in
person at 857 SW Main Blvd.
IMMEDIATE OPENING!
Production Workers needed for sign
shop. Experience a plus.
Call 386-755-2006.
Kaam Transmission needs exp.
Auto Tech, or R&R Mechanic with
experience. Must have own tools.
Apply in person 125 NE Jonesway
Lake City, 32055 or 386-758-8436
Legal Secretary
Phone & Computer skills required.
Send reply to Box 05007, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
M&L Trucking needs a Truck
Driver for hauling logs with clean
CDL's. MUST be willing to work!
Leo Brady at 386-961-1133,
386-344-5035, after 7 pm. 752-6259
OTR DRIVERS NEEDED
Heavy Haul,Class A CDL,
2 week turnaround,good pay,
Call Southern Specialized,LLC
386-752-9754
P/T Warehouse Workers
Sat. Only. Must apply in person, no
phone calls. H & M Bay,
State Farmers Market,
2920 CR 136, Unit 2; Office 7
White Springs, FL
Must be 18 yrs old to apply.
Sheet metal roofers needed.
No criminal background,
According Pay
Call 386-288-3470
Short Term & Long Term
Temp to Perm
Many different positions available!!
386-755-1991 or 386-755-7911
Waste Management Inc.
Lake City/ Gainesville
Has an immediate opening for a
hard working, flexible individual to
fill the position of Driver/Laborer
for Lake City and Gainesville. This
position requires a minimum Class
B CDL with air brake endorsement.
Waste Management offers a full
benefits package including health
insurance and 401 - K plan. If you
feel you meet the requirements,
please apply by phone
1-877-220-JOBS (5627) or online at
WWW.WMCAREERS.COM
EOE/ADA/DFWP
WELDERS/LABORERS
MACHINE SHOP EXP.
Apply in person Grizzly Mfg.
174 NE Cortez Terrace
Lake City, FL (Across from airport)
YOUNG ENERGETIC Person for
Manufactured Home sales. Business
degree a plus, Will train right
person. Call 386-364-1340.
Ask for Mr. Selph or Mr. Corbet

120 Medicalent

04501242
HOME SUPPORT Staff to work
with developmentally disabled
individuals in 6 bed group homes.
Requires High School Diploma or
GED, valid Fl drivers license with
good driving record. $7.00 per
hour plus benefits. EOE for Lake
City home 386-755-4637 Starke
904-964-8082 or 904-964-1468


0Baya Pointe Nursing Center
Has the following Open Positions:
AFT LPN/ RN
3:00 pm-ll:00 pm
ACNA 3:00 pm-11:00 pm
PT Weekend LPN/RN
7:00am-3:00pm
aFront Office Receptionist
Mon-Fri 10:00am-6:00 pm
Sat-Sun 9:00am -5:00pm
SApply in Person to:
587 SE Ermine Ave
Lake City, Fl 32025


Accounts Payable Secretary
Org. Excel, MS Word, QuickBooks,
and Multi-task for fast paced Medi-
cal Office. Must be dependable, ef-,
ficient. Resume to: Administrator
P.O. Box 489, Lake City, FL 32056
CNA/ MA - Needed for LK City
Medical Office. Experienced
preferred. Fax resume to:
386-754-1712.
Experienced Medical Assistant
Needed for fast paced
Doctors Office.
Fax resume to: 386-758-5987
Medical Office Help Wanted
6 months exp required
Please bring resume to:
155 NW Enterprise Way, Lake City,
Fl 32055 or contact us at
(386) 755-9457


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2005


120 Medical
120 Employment
RN NEEDED, Part-Time,
3-1 lp & 1lp-7a. Please apply at
The Health Center of Lake City,
560 SW McFarlane Avenue,.
Lake City. Equal Opportunity
Employer/ Drug Free Work
Place/Americans with
Disabilities Act.

170 Business
S Opportunities
A CASH COW!!!
90 VENDING MACHINE UNITS
YOU OK LOCATIONS
ENTIRE BUSINESS - $10,670
HURRY! 800-836-3464 #B02428

Schools &
240 Education
Want to be a CNA? Don't want to
wait? Express Training Services of
Gainesville is now offering our
quality CNA exam Prep classes.
Day/Eve classes. Class for 1 week,
certification test the next week.
Class size is limited. Next class
1/09/06. Call 386-755-4401


310 Pets & Supplies
AKC BOXER PUPPY.
WHITE MALE
Avail 1/25/06. $600
386-755-3807

BOSTON TERRIER Baby,
AKC, 9 wks. Health Cert.
$500. 386-935-4671

PUG BABY, AKC,
Beautiful Black, 11 wks.
Health Cert. $500.
Call 386-935-4671

330 Livestock &
33 Supplies
BULLS FOR SALE
386-755-3500


403 Auctions

04501248
Noon New Years Day
ANTIQUE AUCTION
Noon Sunday January 1, 2006
High Springs, FL. Hwy 27 W.
Civil War Rifles & Pistols,
410 DB Shotgun, Gold/Dia.
Jewelry & Rings, Coins,
Glassware, Mah, & Oak
DR/BR Sets, Chests, Sofas,
Case Pocket Knives, Hummel
Plates 71 to 86, 18 Elqin/Waltham
Pocket Watches, Flo-Blu,
Bronzes, Heisey, Fostoria,
Primitives. 10% B.P.,
Red Williams AU437/AB270
1-386-454-4991 Info.


408 Furniture
NOW OPEN!! CRAZY JOHNS
Fum & Auction. Daily Sales.
Consignments Welcome.
1-75 at Hwy 441/41 in Ellisville.
Call 321-297-7738/386-755-1012


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
Payment in advance for standing
pine timber. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-454-1484 or 961-1961.


430 Garage Sales
CRAZY JOHNS
Furn & Auction. Gigantic Used
Furn. Sale. Fri-Sat. Beds, Couches,
Dinettes & Appliances.
1-75 at Hwy 441/41 in Ellisville.
Call 321-297-7738/386-755-1012

440 Miscellaneous

SOLAR CROSS.
Angel, Flag/$38
ValdostaMemorials.com
Tel: 888.978.2883


450 Good Things
5 to Eat
Pinemount Rd 252 Taylorville.
The Nutcracker 22 yr exp.
Buy & Sell Cracked & Shelled
Pecans. Also available Tomatoes at
same location. 2738 CR 252
Lake City, FL 32024. 386-963-4138

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 MH Rentals:
2BR/2BA $650/mth + $650 S/D
3BR/2BA $650/mth + $650 S/D
Call 386-397-2619 or 386-623-5117
Ellisville 2br/lba Mobile Home,
Also avail in Lake City 3br/lba
DW MH
Call 386-365-7687
FOR RENT: 2BR/2BA MH,
Excellent condition. Large lot, quiet
neighborhood. No Pets. $400 mo,
1st, last & Sec required. Located 4
1/2 miles West of Lake City.
Call 386-454-5688 Leave msg.
IN PARK Mobile Homes for Rent
2BR/2BA 1st & sec. required.
Applications & references required.
386-719-2423
LATE MODEL MOBILE HOMES
Starting $400 month, Beautiful
Pond setting, w/trees. CH/A, Cable
avail. No pets. Call 386-961-0017

640 Mobile Homes
6U 40 for Sale
2000, 1456 SqFt. Doublewide
4 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Glamour bath,
Beautiful Deck. 20% Down, Only
$517.66 per/mth. MUST SELL!
Call Ron 386-397-4960
31 Used Doublewides from Disney
Area. Now in Lake City. A/C, steps,
cable ready w/TV, telephone,
furnished, pots & pans, dishes, &
silverware. Perfect for Rental
Properties or Starter Home.
Great Deals, While they Last!
386-752-5355
ABSOLUTELY "THE BEST"
Mobile Homes and Modulars
Move over Palm & Jake, the new
#1 home is here. Guaranteed
Gary Hamilton Homes 758-6755
BEAUTIFUL 3 BEDROOM
2 BATH DOUBLEWIDE,
W/FIREPLACE, OPEN FLOOR
PLAN, LOTS OF EXTRAS. WILL
DELIVER. DOUG 386-288-2617
BUY NEW Dream Home For Only
5% Down, With a 750 Beacon.
Will Finance. '
Call Buddy 386-364-1340
CASH DEALS. We Love Em! We
will give you the very best pricing
in North Florida on new or used
manufactured homes! 800-769-0952
IF YOU OWN LAND OR HAVE A
LARGE DOWN PAYMENT. I
MAY BE WILLING TO OWNER
FINANCE A NEW
MANUFACTURED HOME FOR
YOU! CALL STEVE 386-365-8549
NEED A Home?
Call 386-364-1340 Ask For Buddy.
We have several
New & Used to Choose from.
USED DOUBLEWIDE
MUST BE SOLD BY
CHRISTMAS! FURNITURE AND
AC INCLUDED. CALL GEORGE
386-719-0044
USED DOUBLEWIDE,
MUST SELL!
MAKE OFFER!
CALL TIM 386-288-2016

650 Mobile Home
6 & Land
!! Owner Finance !!
1998 24X48 3/2 on small lot
1903 SW Judy Glen
Call 386-867-0048
!!! FREE FREE FREE!!!
3/2 DW. A/C on 1.5 acre lot
in Worthington Springs
Call 386-466-1104
4 BEDROOM 2 bath
home on land. Must sell.
In Beautiful Deer Creek -
Only & $774 per/mth
Call Doug 386-288-2617
Clean 156.0 sf 3/2 1993 DW, private
wooded acre, all lino, deck, new
metal roof. $63,900. Cash Only
Call 386-961-9181


650 Mobile Home
6 & Land
Brand New 2280 Sqft 4/2
w/ concrete foundation, driveway &
walk, deck & more. $134,900.
Close in. Gary Hamilton
Call 386-758-6755
FSBO 1998 Redman 28X52 3/2
on 1/2 acre lot. 5 min. from
Walmart, perfect location.
Call Steve at 386-590-1413
LAND HOME
Packages, while they last!
Call Ron Now!
386-397-4960

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent
1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
All very nice.
Convenient location.
Call 386-755-2423
1, 2, and 3 BR include MW, DW,
pool, fitness center and more.
Close to everything, Call Windsong
today 386-758-8455
2/1 Fresh Paint & New Carpet
Starting at $600/mth.
Plus security. Pets allowed w/fee.
Call Lea.386-752-9626
2BR/1BA w/ Garage
$700 + Sec. Pets w/fee.
Call 386-752-9626

DELUXE TOWNHOUSE
Second Story. 2/2, 1,700 sqft.
Country Privacy, deck, secure.
$700/mth. $1,800 needed.
Call 386-961-9181
TOWNHOUSE
4br/3ba. Lake City. Lawn, garbage
& water Inc. $750 mo.plus $250
security deposit 386-208-2426

0 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3BR/1.5BA CH/A, Hardwood
Floors, Tile, Concrete Block.
$750/mth + Dep.
Call 386-752-0118 or 386-623-1698
3BR/2BA Brick Home Near VA
Large fenced yard w/washer &
dryer, stove, refrig, lawn, maint., &
garbage p/up included. $850 mth,
1st, last & Sec/Dep. req. Call
Richard, Licensed Real Estate
Agent Call 386-867-1414
BRAND NEW 4 & 3 Bedroom
Homes with 2 Car Attached Garage
on Huge Lots. $995 mo, $995 sec.
Call (904)317-4511
Mayfair Subdivision
3BR/2BA Brick Home
Quiet Neighborhood
Call 386-961-9959
Taking Applications for 3/2 fenced
home on 7 acres w/pond. Ft. White
School district, appliances, W/D
Hook-up. $650/mthly + Sec/Dep.
Ref. + Credit Check. 386-590-6048

7A 40 Furnished
4IT Homes for Rent
READY TO MOVE IN! 2BR/IBA
Great Neighborhood, Great
Location. $800 mo, w/first, last &
security. Open House Sat Dec 31
10- 2. 386-758-9362 or 365-5008

75 Business &
S Office Rentals
GREAT LOCATION
1235 SF Building
All Utilities Furnished
$975/month
A Bar Sales, Inc.
386-752-5035
7 Days 7 am-7 pm
Historic Henderson House
Office/Retail 3000 total sqft.
$1,875/mnthly. 207 S. Marion Ave.
386-867-0048 or 386-752-7951
Medical Office Space for Rent
in Live Oak. Office has 2,10 sqft, 2
waiting areas & 8 exam rooms.
Lease for $1,850 mth. Contact
Poole Realty 386-209-1766
OFFICE FOR RENT
1,400 sqft @$950/mth
Contact Poole Realty
386-209-1766
Warehouse in good neighborhood.
Great Location!
Must See!$850 mth
Call Lea 386-752-9626


Advertise It Here!
BRING THE PICTURE IN OR WE WILL TAKE IT FOR YOU!
advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat her for 10 consecu-
tive days. If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $10 you
,an place your ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a
Description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad
nust be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring
Vour vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!


4x4 Sportside


$8,995 OBO
Reg. Cab
Call
386-755-3179


SPACE

AVAILABLE

NOW!


, -. ' ,., - ' - *,



1999 Buick LeSabre
$3,000 OBO
30 MPG Hwy, Slate Green,
Good Condition, All Electric,
Everything Works
Call
386-755-0292


810 Home for Sale
FSBO: Wellborn. Horse friendly,
very rural 3+ acres, 3/2 home'
w/new kitchen, A/C, hot water,
floor, appliances, property also has
a 30X30 barn, 20X20 workshop.
Must See $189,900. 386-963-4270
GRANDVIEW VILLAGE
3BR/2BA, 1,380 sq ft. (Heated)
Will not last at this price, $149,900
Call 386-754-5678

820 Farms&
Acreage

04501315
REDUSED
Horse Farm: Beautiful rolling 46
acres with scattered trees. Lots of
Road Frontage with Board Fence.
Large barn, Corral,Additional
Facilites, Paddocks, Pasutres, Hay
Fields plus Two Mobile Homes.
Call Jane S. Usher
Lic. Real Estate Broker
386-755-3500 or386-365-1352

5 ACRES with 2 Bedroom Home
near city limits, West of 1-75.
Call Jane S. Usher, Lic. Real Estate
Broker 386-755-3500
or 386-365-1352

2 adjoining Tracks available. Grand
daddy oaks, Choose paved or grade
road. Owner to help with finance.
Call Jane S. Usher Lic. Real Estate
Broker 386-755-3500
Columbia City Area
5 ac.wooded homesite
$89,900 owner finance
352-472-3660
FL Timberland
8,120 AC intensively
managed timberland
Taylor Co. $16,240,000.
404-362-8244
St. Regis Paper Company, LLC
INDIVIDUAL SEEKS Acreage.
Wooded or open.
Cash buyer- quick closing.
Please call 386-755-7541
WINDING FOREST, 5 & 7 Ac.
lots starting at $89K.
Owner Financing. 386-754-7529
Chris Bullard Owner/Broker

O85o Waterfront
850 Property
Riverfront! Lovely Withlacoochee
river home just west of Live Oak.
Pristine old Florida setting.
2BR/2BA, built 2004 on Cul-de-sac
backing up to preserve. Secluded!
$299,900. Call Debbie Zeller at
Coldwell Banker M.M. Parrish at
352-538-2857 or 386-454-3442

940 Trucks
1994 Dodge Dakota Sport
Runs good, $900. 6 Cyclinder
Make good work truck
Call 386-752-1682

950 Cars for Sale
*Hondas from $500*
Police Impounds!
For listings call
1-800-749-8116 ext A760
05508634
1994 Mitsubishi Galant LS
MUST sell for payoff.
$1,200 OBO
Call 386-697-1923

1970 OLDSMOBILE DELTA 88
455 V-8. Runs perfect. Rusty.
Trailer hitch .inc. $600
Call (813)361-3512

Q951 Recreational
951 Vehicles
2005 ELITE Travel Trailer, 33ft,
Super slide out. Washer/Dryer,
CA/H. Asking $17,900. Trailer is
local. (228)343-2701 cell.


951 Recreational
S Vehicles
2005/06 FEMA Trailers!
Up to 50% off retail!
Call 386-758-8661
www.tumingwheelrv.com

952 _Vans & Sport
2 Util. Vehicles
1972 JEEP CJ5.
Hard Top, Restored,
Good Condition. $5,700 Cash.
Call 386-362-4987


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445



ME=ll^


Liberty National Life Insurance Co.
is expanding its operation and is looking for upwardly
mobile people to fill insurance sales & service positions.
Average annual earnings $42,000. Fringe benefit package: 2
retirement funds, health insurance, paid vacation, conven-
tion trips & many others. No experience necessary. We have
on the job training. Requirements: honesty, hard worker &
dependable transportation.
Contact Ronnie Harvey at 386-752-2583
Or fax resume to: 386-752-8724
Liberty National is an EOE Licensed Agents Welcome


WALT'S LIVE OAK FORD MERCURY
(4) Men or Women for Sales Position
* Paid Insurance * 401K Plan * Early Working Hours
* Advancement Opportunity * Demo Available
- No Sundays * 5 Day Work Week
Apply in Person to our Sales Manager
Eddie McCullough

WALT'S LIVE OAK FORD MERCURY
Hwy 129 North Live Oak
386-362-1112



PRITCHETT


TRUCKING



Has both local and regional driving positions available for both company
and owner operators. Must have class A CDL and at least one year expeL
rience. Apply in person on Hwy 121 in Lake Butler or call Wallace Christie
,I 496-2630
-- . -- - - m-m


1I www.pritchetttrucking.com


----------- i


ip- . L4







LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2005


"1


OPEN NEW YEARS EVE!E

UNTIL THE LAST CUSTOMER IS SERVED!

IT'S YOUR LAST CHANCE YEAR END TAX CREDIT SAVINGS
GROSS VEHICLE WEIGHT RATINGS (GVWR) of 6,000 to 10,000 lbs
Maybe Eligible for Accelerated Small Business Tax Deductions for Trucks & SUVs!
Now is the time to make sure that commercial and small business customers take advantage of this tax
relief. Consult your tax advisors for details, and see our sales people for a full list of eligible vehicles.

L 2006 Ford F-150 2006 Ford Escape XLS.J<
Lie Wakt's MSRP...... 21,280 MSRP...... 21,800 Kee

Family Wishes - ..-Sim
Everyone A Pricin
Happy ,- .the Wi
NewYear
-' ; :; * 4= , 9 , ^ "!' **


'4697.87

-~$ - 169582


-- ..


2006 Ford F-250
MSRR ...... 27,295


Save
'565.3

.:. 22, 162


0 - 0 ave'5611l

R * 1 8, 18 9


2005 Ford Explorer
MSRP.....131,875


Save '8064
'. "-. 309S,811


2005 Mercury Grand Marquis
3 to Choose From
.. ---- aawz:-Z7 ---


95


I I .1


. ......


-19.
pit
ple
ig On
indow


'1-I..
'3 L~


2006 Ford Freestar
~JlS25,210


Save
S14607
... 20,603


2005 Lincoln Town Car


96 CHEVY SUBURBAN
Li LC 3.l 1 OI ner ST.32MT0164


.-?,,,4. 995

05 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Clotrh STKuP2810



-T^16,995
04 Nissan Titan
Clean I OWner 300oOMile; S rTK22!O9AA


05 Fortd Mustang


00 DODGE CARAVAN
"ra:' :enger Cranterrv in colorc SYXR2' :i0.A


98 FORD F-150 SUPER CAB
-.'1 Loa-e O 5-i.(6?2015AB


01 FORD F-150 SUPERCAB
Flar-'iae a WneelDrire


99 DODGE INTREPID
No Engin-




02 FORD F-150 XLT
Super Cab, Flareside. Running Boards.
Rail Caps STK#262093A




03 Ford ZX2


- - 17,995
05 FORD F-150 SUPER CAB
XLT T F.PC2I1i


II--, $9�9 $
05* ountainear
STK#245607AB


98 CHEVY BLAZER
.1 IOCIr wflrlrSTI~r2E:113AB


05 FORD EXPEDITION
rT Cloin : iT P2BlO



=-.20 995
04 DODGE RAM QUAD CAB




- sa 25,995
04 F-150 Supercrew
150 Mile Si.rni w i [P- l Grill running BOaras
vhr, COOCl L0[ kIing unit ,rK�262C011A


05 Ford E-150
cargo Van, Very Clean, 21.800 Miles, Bal. of Fact
warr . No Charge . rKnP277
whplrd�--��7'


05 Mitsubishi Eclipse
Convertible


===17,995


I - retains all rebatesMay I financing through Ford Motor Credit. Must own Lincoln or Mercury plus $249.95 dealer fee. See deaer for details
Dealer retains all rebates. May require financing through Ford Motor Credit. Must own Lincoln or Mercury plus $249.95 dealer fee. See dealer for details.


99 PLYMOUNT VOYAGER
7 Se~tS BurgLinay STK#25400.25




02 F-350 CMEVI CAR
DleiS- Dull.;,/ 4X4 TOlPP~r TK. 62'O'CA


01 Ford Escape
V6, Bucket Seats, Tow Pkg.. Tinted Glass
*- 9TK -"-5012A



04 FORD F-250
4 Wheel Drive. Diesel


04 Ford Focus
White, 4Dr. Gas Saver




Art for illustration purposes only.


' at OVER 1 MILLION
LIVE QUALITY
PRE-OWNED Lak
FORD * MERCURY '__ INVENTORY Hwy.129
.. " . SERVICE PARTS HRS: M-F 7 30-6PM * SAT 8AM-5PM Lake City
FAX 3i,-362:-7348 * 1-800-814-0609 M-F 8AM-6PM * SAT 8AM-6PM
BODY SHOP HRS ' M-F 7 30AM-5.30PM
US ..29 North, Live Oak, FL RENTAL DEPT. HRS M-F 7:30AM-5-30PM 3-362
SAT 8AM-5.3OPM


!-1112


2006 Mercury Grand Marquis
MSRP.....'25,600
/asa in :x


(h. 2P?2. �4


Fve '4967
,633


2006 Ford Taurus

'Al-M&Pia


95


99 FORD EXPLORER
mT .2 Door STKF:P '''E


02 FORD EXPLORER XLT
Lo3ded .STrK252L.2A


05 FORD 500
S Door CICr,


A


04 Ford P-250
Super C3b. Diesel 4x4


03 Ford Mustang
AT, 1 Owner


I--


I


- - - - I


-- -- I


Classified Department: 755-5440


9
AN


t. '


~i~1"96,95