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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/00253
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 30, 2005
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:00253
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




WEATHER


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Hi: 67
Low: 45


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Yet So Far...


I- CHS bovs. sirls fall
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LIBRARY OF FL HISTORY
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Lake



Friday, December 30, 2005


City


Background
SBlunders?
Are businesses getting
R the correct information?
Business, 5A






Reporter


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 131, No. 291 N 50 cents


THE YEAR IN REVIEW



County tackles changes


Tough stance on
sex offenders among
key issues in 2005.
By TONY BRITT
*tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
During the past 12 months, the
Columbia County Board of
Commissioners. has experienced
many first-time historic
occurrences.
The historic year for the com-
mission began in November 2004
when Jennifer Flinn became the
first woman county commission
chairman.
Under her leadership, the
county established several poli-
cies to benefit the local popula-
tion, but there was also
controversy.
During the past 12 months, the
county has come under fire for its
commissioner's travel policy, cen-
sured one of its own for failing to
meet commission standards and
stoked controversy for its use of a
$25,000 discretionary fund that
was increased to $50,000 this
fiscal year.
However, Flinn said, contend-
ing with the county's growth was
a top priority during her stint as
commission chairwoman.
"I think that managing growth
is the top issue for the county and
it's not something that will be
resolved in a one-year period of
time because you are constantly
having to deal with changes," she
said. "I see for the next chair, and
10-20 years down the road, the
top priority is going to be manag-
ing growth and everything that
goes along with growth and
managing jobs."


Flinn said another issue the
commission resolved was pro-
tecting Columbia County
through the sexual
predator/offender ordinance.
"The. State of Florida was
under the spotlight because of
the horrible things that have hap-
pened to children in Florida and
elsewhere in the United States,"
she said. "So, I think it was impor-
tant that Columbia County
stepped up to the plate and set
and example by establishing the
2,500-foot buffer."
"Passing the sexual offend-
er/predator ordinance was one
of the highlights of the year,
because I was a victim of sexual
assault," said Ron Williams, vice
chair of the commission last year.
"Passing that ordinance meant a
lot to me in the protecting of
others."
The final issue Flinn cited was
fire protection in Columbia
County.
"In the next year, I believe the
commission is going to be look-
ing at a better way to provide fire
services for the people outside.
the cis limits in the rural areas,"
she said. "That includes getting
the most and best fire services
they can get for their tax dollars.
It's a big issue and I think that's
the number one issue coming up
next year."
The county established its first
travel policy for commissioners
during the last fiscal year by a
split decision vote.
"I think the travel policy that
was set was fair," Flinn said. "It
does not allow for unnecessary
travel, but it does allow for
COUNTY continued on 7A


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Volunteer Firefighter Clint Pittman steps out of a new tanker engine at
Columbia City Volunteer Fire Station No. 44., Fire services has been a growing
issue in both city and county governments.


City Hall among Lake City's highlights


Lake City
moved into
the new City
Hall location
at 205 N.
Marion
Avenue in
2005. City
officials cited
the move as
one of the
city's biggest
highlights of
2005,


Water treatmentplant,
wastewater issues also
mark busy year for city.
By LINDA YOUNG
l lyoung@lakecityreporter.com
�m' Snug in their niew digs, Lake City offi-
cials reflected on moving there, beginning
construction on a new water treatment
plant and grappling with wastewater
issues during 2005.
Those were their top issues city officials
l- . ' say they faced in d ring the year.
j lA move from the old City Hall "was
i something we had been working on for a
long time," said Lake City Council
Member Eugene Jefferson. "In my
opinion, it was a smooth transition here."
Structural problems at the old City Hall,
located at 150 N AlachuaSt. led to con-
JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter demnation of City COuncil chambers, said


City Manager Joe Cone. '
"It was embarrassing to hold city coun-
cil meetings in such confined quarters,"
Cone said, adding the council met in his
cramped office or in borrowed space at
the Girl's Club.
The building simply didn't meet the
city's needs, with staff members working
in closets, a lack of storage space, a heat-
ing and air-conditioning system that often
didn't work and a lack of parking spaces
for the public, officials said.
' "We were looking at tearing down the
old City Hall and building on that site,"
.said Council Member George Ward.
"When this building (205 N. Marion Ave.)
became available, we jumped at it. It was a
good opportunity at a great price. It's
turned out to be a real good thing for
morale, for productivity for everybody that
works at City Hall."
CITY continued on 7A


Residents

give their

New Year's

resolutions

Idea for a better 2006:
'You're starting over,
you're starting fresh.'
By LINDSAY DOWNEY
Idowney@lakecityreporter.com
With the new year comes a clean slate.
The 2006 calendar is blank, opening up end-
less possibilities for the year ahead. Many
Lake City residents reflect on the 'things
they would like to change in their lives and
in the city as Jan. 1 approaches.
For 71-year-old Chucky Dobbs, the new
year is an opportunity to cash in some of his
bets.
"I've got to cut down on my gambling a
little bit," Dobbs said as he pulled a
$1,000 winning scratch-off lottery ticket
from his coat pocket Thursday.
The Pennsylvania resident, who has
been visiting Lake City every year for about
25 years, said he enjoys playing the lottery
and placing bets on dog -races and horse
races because he is careful about how
much he spends. Still, he said he wants to
spend a little less time at the tracks in 2006.
"I'm not a promoter of gambling. It's
risky business," Dobbs said, adding that
many young people get sucked into the pas-
time because they spend all of their
winnings to try and get out of the hole.
Lake City resident Jamie Simpson also
has concerns about how she will spend her
money in 2006. The 20-year-old said her
bank account dwindled during the holidays
and she needs to save money next year for
her wedding.
"I've got to spend less," she said. "But I've
been doing better. Slowly but surely."
New Year's Eve for Nathan Boeckman,
21, likely will mean dinner at a restaurant
where he can rid himself of meat -
cold-turkey.
"I want to become a vegan," Boeckman
said. "It just makes your body better -
more healthy. Maybe the night before I'll
have a big 'ole steak to say goodbye."
When asked what they hope to see
change in Lake City next year, several local
residents said they would like more
restaurants and entertainment in the area.
Simpson plans to have dinner with her
fiance and his parents at Carrabba's Italian
Grill in Gainesville on New Year's Eve. She
said Lake City needs more restaurants,
because when she gets out of work at the
mall in the evenings, many places are
closed.
Dobbs, who will travel to Pompano
Beach after the new year, said he wishes
there were more things to do when he
comes to Lake City.
"It needs more entertainment," Dobbs
said of the city. "They need a trotting track
or a dog track."
Boeckmnan would like to see 2006 bring
more entertainment to the area in the form
of live bands and hang-outs for young
2006 continued on 7A


Law enforcement officials give advice for a safe holiday


Designated drivers,
'Tow to Go' programs
encouraged for parties.

By TROY ROBERTS,
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
Many people in Columbia County
and across the nation celebrate on
New Year's Eve at friend's houses,
counting down the seconds until the
ball drops to ring in the new year.
Many of these people celebrate with
drinking, then driving home - a
deadly combination on one of the most


dangerous nights of the year.
Last year, 24 people were killed in'
traffic crashes in Florida during the
three-day period between Dec. 31 and
Jan 2. More than 40 percent of those
involved a drunk or impaired driver.
"A lot of people think that it won't
happen to them, that it is always going
to happen to someone else," said Lt.
Mike Burroughs, public information
officer for Troop B of the Florida
Highway Patrol. "They don't make
preparations, go to a party and find
themselves with a buzz and think they
can drive themselves home."
Burroughs said that a "buzzed"


driver can be the most dangerous
person on the road.
"Drunks normally know when
they're drunk; a buzzed person
doesn't know and they think they can
drive home," Burroughs said. "A
bdizzed driver (is) the most danger-
ous, because they're not going to
adjust their driving habits because
they don't feel impaired."
According to FHP reports, most
chronic alcoholic impaired drivers
stay home during this time of year.
fIThe chronic drunk drivers stay
home because they know how hard it
is Pfor a; buzzed driver to drive,"


Burroughs said.
To combat this, it is best to always
have a designated driver, Burroughs
said.
"If you are unable to get a designat-
ed driver, or haven't made plans, there
are other ways to get home other than
driving home if you have been
drinking," Burroughs said.
AAA has started a program called
'Tow-to-Go" where an impaired driver
can call 1-800-AAA-Help and AAA will
send a tow truck to take the driver and
vehicle, home.
SAFETY continued on 7A


"If you are unable
to get a designated
driver, or haven't
made plans, there
are other ways to
get home other
than driving home
if you have been
drinking."
- Lt. Mike Burroughs,
Florida Highway Patrol


IIAVl - ,llAL U'S:_ ---_-'-'-, IN S ID E , - -- ' - - . - . - : - -' "
1111111 IIllIIIllllllllllll CA.LLUS: .. . IN SID E


I I !-L. I .


(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


Business .......... . . 5A
Classified . . ........ . 6B
Comics . . . . . . . . . . . . 5B
Local & Nauon .. . ..... 3A


Obituaries
Opinion .
Puzzles
Spotlight .


. . . . . . . . . . 6A
. . . . . . . . . 4A
. . . . . . . 2B


TODAY IN THE COMING
SPOTLIGHT SATURDAY
Pierce Br sri.n ta ke -,e n . - i Faithl-
diticti, arnti-Bond r ole. 4B &".'alue-


� I � I


*7


,








LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


4 '",� f; '
.* \,. ', r, ,'
Thursday:
5-4-8


4
Thursday:
5-7-3-2


rant
Wednesday:
1-4-17-18-30


FLORI DA
LOTTO.
Wednesday:
1-39-31-29-26-22


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Photog won't be charged in crash


LOS ANG F .FS- The photographer
whose collision with actress Lindsay
Lohan lI < ,. 'p ';' ,1 (!i L orlroi, to
adopt ai .ui [\i1t-,.:.:.i law won't be
charged with a crime, ith district
.-tIm ol's offi,'e said,
Deputy District Attorney William
Hodgman said Wednesday there was
an evinev t.,.aigrapher Galo Cesar
. '.- ;,",,ihe're' i crashed his
minivan into Lohan's Mercedes-Benz.
"Based upon the damage sustained to
boith the victim's and the suspect's cars


Cast off to get own
modeling show
NEW\\ YORK - Cast off by
�America's Next Top Model,"
Janice Dickinson will get her
own reality modeling show on
the Oxygen network.
Dickinson, who claims she
was the first supermodel, was
ousted from the UPN show in
May. During her four seasons
on the show, she was the
harshest critic of the model
hunt's judging panel and often
quarreled with fellow judges.
She'll winnow 500 aspiring
models down, to five as she,
starts her own Hollywood
modeling agency on what is
tentatively titled, "The Janice


it appears that, although the suspect
was most likely driving carelessly when
he collided with the victim's car, it was
not an intentional assault," Hodgman
said.
Ramirez, 24, was one of several
photographers following Lohan from a
trendy Los Angeles restaurant on May
31 when the actress made a U-turn and
their cars collided. No one was hurt.
Lohan said she was trying to get
away from the paparazzi when crash
occurred.


Dickinson Project." Oxygen
has ordered 10 episodes,
which are expected to begin
airing in the spring.
"She's starting a new
business with all its
challenges, while trying to be
a good mom and guide new
models through a tough
business," Debby Beece,
president of programming at
Oxygen, said in a statement
Tuesday.
Dickinson, 52, is the author
of "No Lifeguard on Duty:
The Accidental Life of the
World's First Supermodel"
and "Everything About Me Is
Fake ... and I'm Perfect"


Celebrity Birthdays


* Singer-musician Bo Diddley
is77.
* Actor Joseph Bologna is 71.
* Actor Russ Tamblyn is 71.
* Baseball Hall-of-Famer
Sandy Koufax is 70.
* Actor Jack Riley is 70.
* Folk singer Paul Stookey is
68.
* TV director James Burrows
is 65.
* Actor Fred Ward is 63.
* Singer-musician Michael
Nesmith is 63.
* Singer Davy Jones is 60.


Lindsay Lohan


Sly can keep 'Sly'
on newsstands
NEW YORK - Sylvester
Stallone can keep his
magazine, "Sly," on
newsstands despite the
complaints of an Internet
magazine with the same
name that a judge suggested
was more of a shoe "fetish"
publication.
Judge Richard Casey said
the 59-year-old actor, who
gained fame in the "Rocky"
movies, could continue to
produce the lifestyle and
fitness magazine for
middle-age men even though
it carries the same title as the
Internet magazine.


"There is a little difference
between shoe fetish and-Mr.
Sylvester Stallone," Casey
said at a hearing Tuesday.
John Bostany, a lawyer for
the Internet magazine that
brought a lawsuit seeking
$1 million in damages,
protested the judge's
characterization.
"My clients, magazine is
not a fetish mag," he said.
Despite the victory, it was
unclear how long Stallone's
magazine would last. The
current issue was the last of
four scheduled to be
published before the
magazine was to be evaluated
to determine its future.
I Associated Press
i ,


Thought for Today


* Singer Patti Smith is 59.
* Rock singer-musician Jeff
Lynne is 58.
* TV host Meredith Vieira is
52.'
* Actress Sheryl Lee Ralph is
50.
* Actress Patricia Kalember is
49.
* Country singer Suzy
Bogguss is 49.
* NBC newscaster Matt
Lauer is 48.
* Actress-singer Tracey
Ullman is 46.


"Work is a dull thing; you cannot
get away from that.The only
agreeable existence is one of
idleness, and that is not,
unfortunately, always compatible
with continuing to exist at all."
- Rose Macaulay,
English poet and essayist (1881-1958)


MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR


Karen Gardener, 55
Lake City, Retail Sales Clerk
at Haven Hospice Attic

* Family: Husband.

* Hobbies: Bowling

* Favorite pastimes:
Reading

* What would you most
like to see improved in
your town?: "We need a
bigger shopping mall with
more stores."

* Who is your hero or
inspiration, and why?: "My
inspiration is God because
he's everything and he
shows us the way."



Lake City
HOW TOREACH US
Main number ......... (386) 752-1293/
Fax number ................752-9400
Circulation .................755-5445
Online . .... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fla. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard ... .754-0418
(mleonard@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson ..........754-0428
(twilson @ lakecityreporter.com)

Sales .. .......... .. .... 752-1293
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)


CORRECTION


Karen Gardener


Meet Your Neighbor is a daily
feature of the Lake City
Reporter. We interview people
in the community in order to get
to know our neighbors better.


In the Dec. 15 issue of the Lake City Reporter, the gas tax
article should have said the Second Local Option Gas Tax was
approved by the Columbia County Board of Commissioners, with a
super-majority vote, not by a referendum on the ballot.
In Wednesday's issue, Camp Blanding is located in Clay County,
near Starke. Its location was misidentified on Page 1A.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Minister sentenced
on sex charge
PENSACOLA - A former
Lutheran minister was
sentenced to nearly three
years in prison for seeking
sex over the Internet from an
undercover officer he
thought was a 14-year-old
boy.
MichaelAnthony Harris,
43, said during his sentencing
Wednesday that he is not a
pedophile.
"I can't begin to tell you
how sorry I am ... for the
pain, sorrow and
embarrassment this has
caused my family, my wife,
my son and my
congregation," Harris said.
He was removed from his
post after his arrest.
Circuit Judge Nick Geeker,
sentenced him to two years
and 10'/2 months. Harris
pleaded no contest last
month to third-degree felony
charges of attempted lewd or
lascivious battery and using a
computer to solicit the sexual
conduct of a crime.
Harris was arrested
April 13 after arranging a
meeting with the undercover
officer.
Harris began
communicating with the boy
in an online chat room April 4
and steered the conversations
toward the topic of sex, said
Escambia County sheriff's
officials.

Rapalo considered
raping while out
MIAMI - A serial rape
suspect who escaped jail said
he considered committing a
rape while he was on the
loose for nearly a week,
authorities said.
Reynaldo E. Rapalo told
investigators he spent six
days in a makeshift shelter
hidden in the brush of
southwest Miami-Dade
County.
During a six-hour
interrogation after he was
caught Monday, Rapalo said


he came out of hiding and
stopped by a party on
Christmas Eve where he
considered raping two
people.
"He actually contemplated
committing a sexual act on
these two people,"
Miami-Dade police
Sgt. Robert Perez said
Wednesday.
A tipster led police to
Rapalo on Monday night at a
Miami shopping center. He
escaped jail Dec. 20 by '
prying open a ceiling vent,
.cutting through bars and
rappelling down the side of
the building using tied-up bed
sheets.
After escaping, Rapalo said
he ran south alongside
railroad tracks.
'The entire time he was
trotting down the rail tracks,
he was looking up at the sky
to see if helicopters were
upon him," Perez said.
Some homeless men gave
him money, which he used at
a gas station to buy a soda and
make a phone call to someone.
Detectives would not say who
that person was, but did say
the person brought Rapalo
food and the two stayed that
night in the bushes nearby.
It is unclear whether that
person will face charges.

Police: Couple was
homicide victims
FORT MYERS - A cou-
ple found dead in their home
after their 2-year-old son
called 911 were victims of a
double homicide, the Lee
County Sheriff's Office said
late Wednesday.
Steven and Michelle
Andrews, both 28, were
found dead at home in their
gated community shortly
after 7 a.m. Tuesday. Police
responded to a 911 call by
the couple's toddler son,
who was found unharmed,
sheriff's spokeswoman
Ileana LiMarzi said.
Officials did not provide
details on the cause of
death, including whether a
weapon was used. They said


the deaths apparently
occurred between 11 p.m.
Monday and 6 a.m. Tuesday.
A preliminary autopsy
report ruled out
homicide-suicide, Maj. Jeff
Taylor of the Sheriff's Office
violent crimes unit said.

Company accused
of false advertising
MIAMI - Prosecutors have
asked a judge to issue an
injunction and restraining
order to halt the sale of
products that were allegedly
falsely advertised online as
federally approved medicines
for cancer, migraines and the
flu.
The Food and Drug
Administration not only never
approved the drugs Cancer
Control, Migraine Miracle and
Flu Fighter, but the Boca
Raton company advertising
them never filed new drug
applications seeking FDA
approval for any of their
products, according to the
Dec. 22 request signed by U.S.
Attorney R. Alexander Acosta.

Lion Country Safari
erects fence
LOXAHATCHEE - Years
of sneaky visitors cracking
open car windows in hopes of
an intimate encounter with the
kings of the jungle has caused
Lion Country Safari to finally
erect a fence between man
and its beasts.
Roaming lions, warning
signs and admonishing
keepers couldn't convince
visitors to follow the rules in
the drive-through wildlife park
and stay in their cars with
their windows rolled up. Most
visitors crack open a car
window or a door, but some
have even gotten out and
attempted to feed the lions.
Officials at the Palm Beach
County park said they have
been considering a fence for
years, fearing a serious injury
or a lawsuit.
* Associated Press


S MOSTLY
SUNNY


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I * Valdosta Jacksonville
TallahaT e 67 '46 * 66/44 City .Sat


67/48
Pensacola Panama City
69/58 667.-56


Lake City.
67/45
Gainesville* Daytona Beach
69 48
67.45 40
Ocala* Cape Canaveral
684rliand0 *69/50
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70.,,55


West Palm Beach
74. 56*


Ft. Myers* Ft. Lauderdale
75.'55 75,61.
SNaples
74/'59 Miami
Key West 76/64
75/670


Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
Lake City
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Tallahassee
Tampa
Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


* S ., . ,a . :;


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TEMPERATURES SUN a :2 a.m
High Triursda,, 7 SrCr, i-c ra, 7:26 a.m
Lorw Tlursday 54 Sunstel ic-Ja, 5.JO p.m
Normal nigh 66 Surinse ton,. 7:27 a.m. LOW:
[Iormai- l,',, 43 Sun u'st m on-. :41pn. 4 testo


Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month. iloal
'rear Irtal
Normal month-to-date
;Normal year-to date


92 in 1929
23 in 1961

0.00"
i. 35'.
-19.79
2.36"
48.16"


MOON
lniu'jrinsi, on r'0,

K')0rinse? tonm.


7:10 a.m

8:12 am.
6 19 pr -


Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan.
30 6 14 22
New First Full Last


On this date in
1879, the tempera-
ture at Dayville, Ore.
hit 81 degrees to
establish a state
record for December.


Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An excsIwe
service
brought to
our ;,- ,
S by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


. - Forecasts, data and graphics
- � 2005 Weather Central,
, ww w Inc., Madison, Wis.
' www.weatherpubllsher.com


Connected
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~It~91~8~~


Page Editor: S. Michael Manley, 754-0429


s a w* . -.*K .iK- T-- ' - --- - ,-.


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Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


Fire department continues collection

drive for family displaced by fire


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
As the wind blew the
flowers at 225 Deer St., there
were constant reminders that
a .family's life had forever
been changed.
The charred foundation of
their three-bedroom mobile
home and a melted lawn
mower was all that remained
from last week's pre-
Christmas Eve fire which
destroyed the home and
their possessions.
The fire occurred
10:12 a.m. Friday, Dec. 23,
and five fire fighting units
were needed to douse the
flames.
No one was injured, but as
a result of the fire, the family
is now living with a relative.
According. to Lake City
Fire Department Capt. Frank
Armijo, the fire was officially
listed as accidental.
In the meantime, Armijo
and firefighter Don Wilson
have started a collection
drive for the Brannen family
which has raised closed to
$2,000.
"We have a double-wide
(trailer) that has been
donated to them, and we
have to call the family in a lit-
tle while and have them go
look at it," Wilson said.
"Once the house is set up


TONY BRITTILake City Reporter
A pre-Christmas Eve fire last week gutted this home at 225 Deer
St. The Lake City Fire Department has been conducting a food
and clothing drive to collect goods for the four-member family who
lost all their possessions to the blaze.


they are going to need
furnishings and things like
that for the house because
they lost. all they had. We're
going to be collecting until
we get everything they
need."
Wilson said cash, clothing
and other donations have
been coming in steadily over
the past few days for the
family of four, but they still
need items like socks,
T-shirts and underwear.
"Personal hygiene items


for the family is -the main
thing we're working on col-
lecting," he said. "We'll work
on getting the furnishings
and all that when they get
the house set up. They still
have to get the burned house
torn down and moved away."
Though Armijo said the
fire has been ruled
accidental, he said the
flames from the day of the
blaze were so intense, they
melted a battery-operated
child'splastic four-wheeler.


"The radiated heat melted
it," he said. "It's gone."
"Both lawnmowers were
on fire," added Wilson. "We
had hazards. When we first
got there, a power line was
down on a fence and the
whole fence was charged all
the way around the
neighborhood. Flames were
all over the propane tank.".
Armijo said the fire
department tries to help
everyone who's had a struc-
ture fire or been displaced
from their home because of a
structure fire.
"With this being around
the holidays, they can really
use the extra contributions,"
he said.
To help the family, contact
Don Wilson at Station 1 .of
the Lake City Fire
Department by calling
752-3312. Contributions can
also be mailed in to Fire
Fund, Attn: Brannen Family,
Post Office Box 2121, Lake
City, Fl. 32056. Checks can
be made out to the Brannen
Family.
"We'd like to thank the
community for helping,"
Wilson said. "Every time
we've needed the communi-,
ty, it's always stood up and
helped us anytime we've
asked for it."


Body of missing N.J. officer found near bridge
By WAYNE PARRY helping with the search, said night. drove back across the bridge,
Associated Press Paul Browne, spokesman for The body of the other offi- its operator raised the middle
the New York police. cer, Shawn Carson, 40, was span to allow a tugboat'to pass


NEWARK, NJ. - Divers
recovered the body of a police
officer Thursday afternoon
near the drawbridge where he
and another officer plunged
to their deaths on Christmas
night.
The body of Jersey City
Officer Robert Nguyen was
found by New York City
police divers who were


. Nguyen's flag-draped body
was driven slowly over the
bridge as scores of police offi-
cers and firefighters stood
and saluted.
Nguyen was in an emer-
gency services vehicle that
plummeted 45 feet off the
open drawbridge in blinding
rain and fog into the frigid
Hackensack River on Sunday


found about 90 minutes after
the accident.
The officers were at the
Lincoln Highway Bridge to
help place warning cones and
flares because the safety bar
and bell used to warn
motorists when the bridge
was open had been damaged
in a truck accident.
Before the two officers


underneath. The truck went
into the water despite efforts
by horrified colleagues to flag
the officers down, police said.
Mason Nguyen said the dis-
covery of his brother's body
"helps some of the pain."
"Now we have to continue
and give him a proper burial,"
he said. "He was my brother,
he was my hero. I loved him."


POLICE REPORTS ,


Arrest Log
The following information was
provided by local law
enforcement agencies. . The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted. All
people are presumed innocent
unless proven guilty.

Wednesday, Dec. 28
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Jessie James Gibson,,
22, 650 SE Hugo Lane,
warrant: felony fleeing and
eluding, reckless driving and no
valid driver's license.
* Lovie S. Lee, 55, 815 NW
Hamp Farmer Road, resisting
arrest without violence and
warrant: false report of child
abuse and fleeing and eluding.

Fire EMS Calls

Wednesday, Dec. 28
* 3:25 p.m., wreck, Koonville
Road, one primary and three
volunteer units responded.
* 4:07 p.m., rescue assist,,
South Columbia Street, two
primary units responded.
* 4:53 p.m., rescue assist,
Steadley Road, three volunteer
units responded.


* 9:12 p.m., rescue assist,
Washington Street, one primary
unit responded.
Thursday, Dec. 29
N 1:42 a.m., rescue assist,
McGriff Road, one volunteer unit
responded.
* 2:03 a.m., rescue assist,
Webster Street, one primary unit
responded.
* 7:22 a.m., grass, 1-10
westbound between U.S. 41


t /A Company of /f


"Gifts for the human spirit"
281 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City a 752-5200


Live Entertainment

Dec. 30 & 31
New Year's Eve Party with
Blues Highway Band
Jan. 6 8 7
Crooked Counsel
^ Every Wednesday

Karaoke with Billy
Party 'Til 2 AM
US 441 at 1-75, Exit 399
Alachua, FL - (386) 462-9081


and U.S. 441, one primary and
two volunteer units responded.
* 9:29 a.m., rescue assist,
44 E. Brown Road, one primary
unit responded.
* 11:54 a.m., rescue assist,
Blue Road, one volunteer unit


responded.
* 2:06 p.m., rescue assist,
Washington Street and Alachua
Street, two primary units
responded.
* From staff reports.


Jo Lytte, Realtor


DANIEL CRAPPS MILLION DOLLAR CLUB
' agency, inc.
2806 West US Hwy. 90, Suite 101
Lake City, FL 32055-4746
Office: (386) 755-5110
Toll Free (800) 771-5110
Fax: (386) 755-7851
Residence (386) 758-2986
Cell Phone; (386) 365-2821
E-mail: jolytte@danielcrapps.com
Website: jolytte.com
"Put my honesty and experience to work for you"


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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Fugitive search
Garfield County Sheriff's deputy Randy Coleman holds a rifle as
search teams look for three male suspects who fired shots at
anhydrous ammonia railway tankers outside Koch Nitrogen
Company on Thursday, in Enid, Okla. All three males were placed
under arrest, and one is to be charged as a juvenile.


Illinois bank robber

turned in by own sons
By JOHN O'CONNOR prostitutes.
Associated Press Ginglen pleaded guilty in
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. - July to pulling seven bank rob-
Before last year, William berries in 2003 and 2004. His
Alfred Ginglen had no criast year, Winallam double life, which he detailed
Alfreord glto speak of -had noeven in a diary, began to unravel in
record to speak of- not even August 2004, when one of his
a traffic ticket. sons, Peoria police officer
Now the small-town father, Jared Ginglen, recognized his
husband and ex-Marine is like- father as thGingle masked figure on
ly to spend the rest of his life in surveillance videos posted on
federal prison after being a law enforcement Web site.
sentenced Thursday to The three Ginglen boys -
40 years for a spring of rural Jared, Clay and Garrett -
bank robberies. Ginglen was have said it was their father
turned in by his sons after one who taughtthem to always do
recognized him from a police the right thing.
surveillance tape. 'There are no winners here
U.S. District Judge Jeanne today. The whole thing has
Scott struggled to reconcile been a tragedy for my family,"
the 64-year-old nian's history Jared Ginglen said after his
as a civic leader and family father's sentencing. He said
man with his recent history of there were no regrets about
crime. turning his father in: "It had to
"You pose a dilemma in be done."
trying to figure out what in the In court, the judge called
world happened to you," Scott Ginglen's sons "the greatest
said. credit of your life."
"He was a good man who 'They acted in an exempla-
somehow went horribly ry fashion under circum-
wrong," his ex-wife, Donna, stances that must have been
wrote to the court, a incredibly difficult," she said.
description the judge deemed Ginglen's attorney, Ron
"generous" before handing. Hamm, pleaded with the judge
down the .minimunmsentence ,;it consider Ginglen's service
r recommended by prosecutors. a villagee trustee, zoning
The judge also ordered board chairman, auxiliary
Ginglen to pay $56,382 in police officer and firefighter
restitution for the money when handing down the
authorities say he stole to sentence. But he descended
support a girlfriend, a crack into a life of crime after losing
cocaine habit and visits to two jobs.


"/off
S I One Complete Pair

S , of Eyeglasses
^ ' : "." 7.H ,'-'rr:r -:i"-t' , 3 t.:lake City store. Excludes $25
S '" *.: 'r ,.:,.-uc:-r. required. Expires 12/31/05
- -t-li - ------- -P... --------


LAK CTYREORERLOCAL & NATION FIADCME 020


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404












OPINION


Friday, December 30, 2005


www.lakecityreporter.com


EDITORIAL


Firearms

safety a

must for all

tragic mishap. A Lake City
man died this week when a
firearm apparently
discharged accidentally.
The gun was being removed from a
vehicle when it discharged.
Firearms safety is something that
must be practiced at all times. The
checklist is long, but the basic rules are
simple:
* Keep the firearm's muzzle pointed
Sin a safe direction.
* Treat-every firearm as if it were
loaded.
* Do not point the firearm, at
anything you do not wish to shoot.
The list continues, but the point is
made: Firearms have the potential to be
dangerous and they must be handled
correctly and safely in all instances.,
One slip of a basic rule of safety and a
tragedy can develop quickly.
Lives are changed forever.
The most veteran'hunters and those
who are new to the sport must adhere.
to these rules at all times when
firearms are present. They are simple
rules, but unforgiving if broken.
,Shooting sports are a great way to
introduce young people to the outdoors
and to establish family traditions
Centered around quality-time outings.
Guns are not evil, but they must be
handled with knowledge.
And with that knowledge comes a
responsibility to handle firearms safely.

HI GH LI G H T S
IN HISTORY
Today is Friday, Dec. 30, the 364th
day of 2005. There is one day left in the
year.
N On Dec. 30, 1903, about 600 people
died when fire broke out at the recently
opened Iroquois Theater in Chicago.
* In 1852, future U.S. president
Rutherford B. Hayes married Lucy-Ware
Webb in Cincinnati.
* In 1853, the United States bought
some 45,000 square miles of land from
Mexico in a deal known as the Gadsden
Purchase.
* In 1911, Sun Yat-sen was elected the
first president of the Republic of China.
0 In 1922, Vladimir I. Lenin proclaimed
the establishment of the Union of Soviet'
Socialist Republics.
* In 1936, the United Auto Workers
union staged its first "sit-down" strike, at
the Fisher Body Plant No. 1 in Flint, Mich.
* In 1940, California's first freeway, the
Arroyo Seco Parkway connecting
Los Angeles and Pasadena, was officially
opened.
- In 1972, the United States halted its
heavy bombing of North Vietnam.

Lake CiO Reporter
serving Columbia County since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is published with
pride for residents of Columbia and
surrounding counties by Community
Newspaper Inc. of Athens, Ga. "
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities - "Newspapers get
things done!"
Our primary goal is to publish
distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished '
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work.
Michael Leonard, publisher
Todd Wilson, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


OUR POLICE Y
Letters to the Editor should be typed or
neatly written and double spaced. Letters
should not-exceed 400 words and will be edited
for length and libel. Letters must be signed and
include the writer's name, address and
telephone number for verification. Writers can
have two letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of the
writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City


Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St.
downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com


C OMM E N TA RY


The prejudice against the rich


p prejudice against the much as they otherwise would
rich can be harmful . They control politics in this
to thepoor, and I country. Slap these slugs the
will tell y ouwhy I way they ought to be slapped,
think that's-true ' a and the poor willnrise.
after first telling you about an ' The truth is that you cannot
e-mail Ireceived and what I have a successful economy th
think was iTong with it. punishes the successful or
It came in response to an Jay Ambrose disallows the accumulation of
opinion piece I had written . SpeaktoJoaaol.crn . great wealth, that the rich in
saying that it seemed to me a ' America often display a
misreading of the New philanthropic streak that runs
Testament to suppose Jesus T More importantly, I should mile wide, that it's middle cla
favored socialism, as some have said it's a textbook votes more than any other
contend. , illustration of blatantprejudice single factor that shape
Jesus certainly urged that to assume someone is within a American politics and that
people care for the poor, I said, given economic class because many of the rich worked hard
adding that it struck me as of his attitude about the overall to get there from middle class
ludicrous to suppose he was benevolence offree markets, or backgrounds and served the
also advocating an economic to assume that being within oe a
system that actually mad ' t s that class would render arest of us in the process. Mar
system that actually made ersoninsetisitive to thv ., who climbed the ladder in

our religious understandings, The woman told me she had additional national wealth and
but not the kind of technical The woman told me she had toa at.oaeat a
and historicalinosightadising met rich people who had no increased opportunities of all
and historicalnsightadvising idea what it was like to be poor. kinds for hundreds of
usthat relatively unhampered I don't doubt her. But has she thousands of us.
free-market economies have maybe met people from one or Ignore such facts and you
been the most powerful another racial group who were could end up hurting the poo
weapon ever devised to defeat dishonest and did she then Maybe what you do is curse
poverty. suppose whenever she heard of President Bugh's "tax cuts for
A woman with a theological a dishonest act that the guilty the rich,' forgetting that if yo
degree responded by e-mail, party must be from that group? are going to cut taxes to
saying, among a variety of I hope not Has she never met stimulate the economy, you
other things, that I must be people who did not have much have to cut them for the peop
rich. If not, I would have shown money themselves but did have who pay most of them. Even
far more sympathy for the utter disdain for programs today, after those tax cuts, the
down-and-out among us by .helping the poor? I have. Has wealthiest 25 percent of
tempering my enthusiasm for she' happened to notice that taxpayers are paying almost
capitalism. Part of my response many politically active leftists 84 percent of federal income
to her was a few sentences of today are multimillionaires? taxes, an economic writer
financial biography intended to They are. notes
call hr conclusion into I am carrying os i abput this But thanks in part to those
question. I should have left that' because my e-mail tax cuts that many Democrat
alone. It wasn't relevant. correspondent seems to me to want to reverse, we have had
I should have said instead typify a prejudicial view of the economic growth of immense
that this portion of her e-mail . rich found in endless importance to' the poor, and
was anad hominem argument commentaries and flowing have had it despite a host of
attacking me instead of a from the lips of countless pbemindinrapi
logical argument attacking my demagogic politicians. The problems, including rapidly
position. Even if Il had been 'rich, it's figured, are mostly rising oil prices. In this
bathed in riches all my life arid ' greedy. They got their wealth instance, as in a l6ofig list of
didn't mind that many less through luck or crookedness others, acting on prejudices
fortunate people were and by stomping on average against the rich would be a w
subjected to misery, that would folks. Their attainment of of kicking the poor in the tee
not prove ine wrong about free riches, it's supposed, mean . n Jay Ambrose is a columnist
markets and socialism. poorer people cannot have as living in Colorado.

OTHER VIEWS

Students facing college-loan squeeze


unanimous .
Supreme Court
found this month
that the
government can
withhold Social Security money
to collect on old student loans.
Much as this could impose a
hardship on some retirees, the
decision is just. Ten years ago,
students were defaulting in
droves on educational loans.
from the federal government;,
today, a smaller fraction
continues the trend.
Yet, needless to say, students
are not owed these resources.
Those who shrug off their
obligation make a mockery of
those who do repay, often at,
great sacrifice.
To reach its decision, the
court had to determine the
combined effect of several
overlapping statutes. James


Lockhart, a postal worker .
disabled by diabetes and heart
disease, had brought suit three
years ago to block a
$93-a-month reduction in his
benefits. Hesaid he needed all
of his monthly, allotment
(around $900) to pay for food
and medicine.
Lockhart had taken out about
$80,000 in federally guaranteed
loans to attend school in the
1980s. He argued that a
statutory time limit prevented
Social Security monies from
being taken for debts more than
10 years old. The court
disagreed, citing a 1991 law that
got rid of time limits on
collecting student loans.
The ruling undoubtedly will
spell difficulties for Baby
Boomers who retire in the
coming years with outstanding
student loans. The


d.


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ot
hat



sa




s

'v

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r.

u

>le

5e





ts

e





ray
th,


government's brief in the
Lockhart case noted that about
$33 billion in student loans is
currently in default.
Unfortunately, the other side
of the coin is that the newest
generation of college graduates
is being saddled with a
staggering amount of debt -
as colleges raise their tuitions
yearly at considerably more
than the inflation rate.
Two-thirds to three-quarters
borrow money to cover their
bills. And they graduate with
average debts ranging from
$17,000 to almost $23,000,
depending on whether they
attended public or private
institutions.
It is fine for Congress to get
tough with debtors. But at the
same time, it should not trap
students in a high-stakes game.
* The Providence Journal


t-�o r-�r=Ev dA>L STu7
v-Ac-O - Lvs X~C:: cU

'�TrAE CO~'~o
fv\#bS)[ ak$, EA7


really?
I'm pretty sure I heard those guys at the gym
change the radio station after I left. I would
have too.

* Marsha Mercer is Washington bureau chief for
Media General News Service.


'DEL~ C~A


4A


� �


COMMENTARY


Who wrote


the book


of love?

WASHINGTON.
T he buzz about baby boomer
decrepitude finally sent me back to
the gym. It was empty, a
pre-New Year's lull, and the radio
played classic rock. The music was
good, mostly. I knew the words. I forgot about
advancing age.
. Two 20-something guys came in. One was
recounting the plots of obscure - to me - '80s
sitcoms. Then'
they started
imagining what
they'd do if they e
.won free
shopping
sprees ina
music-video
store. Marsha Mercer
straight to the mmercer@mediageneral.com
'90s music,".. the
first declared.
TheTV buff said he'd head to the television
DVDs, because "there's such a rich field there."
Neither was even a little embarrassed to be
talking like that,.
I couldn't remember a thing about '90s music
- except that maybe Eric Clapton had a hit,
during the decade. Offhand, I couldn't conjure
one TV show from the '80s I'd want to watch
again, let alone own.
Suddenly, I heard the music on the radio
differently.g The tunes I loved must have
sounded to those guys the way Bing Crosby or
Perry Como sounded to me in the 1970s. That
made me smile.
They didn't notice, of course. Gen X and
Gen Y don't see baby boomers, the oldest of
whom turn 60 today. Yes, I'm in the baby boom
generation, and, no, I'm not turning 60. In fact.
my.mother is going to be mad at me for
admitting I'm a boomer at all. The youngest
boomers are a ripe 42 this year. hardly in the
blush ofyouth ' "
Butlpet's frot obsess about it.
TherCensus Bureau calculates that
7,900 boomers will turn 60 each day of 2006.
That's 330 every hour.
"People; get ready, there'sa train a-comin' ..."
Curtis Mayfield.
My generation likes to claim it invented sex,
drugs, rock 'n' roll, TV, WVoodstock, hair, the
counterculture, Rolling Stone and Dave Barry.
And then we created sushi. OK, we didn't do all
that
But we witnessed it. The trees that fell in
society's forest made noise because we were
there to hear. them. The great questions of our
youth were: "Who wrote the book of love?" and,
for the historically minded, "Who put the
.bomp?"
We're not even a little embarrassed to talk
like that
We grew up. And, naturally, life didn't turn
out the way we thought. We didn't change the
world. War, poverty, discrimination - all the
things we marched against - are still with us.
We didn't save the planet; we made it safe to
spend $4 on a cup of coffee.
But since there are so many of us -
78 million, says the Census bureau - it's
always about us.
Now, in the words of the philosopher Bruce
Springsteen, "We got one last chance to make it
real...."
' We can reinvent old age.
I'm sick, frankly, of the whole boomer
birthday bit But we are the age we are.
Democrats, Republicans, red states and
blue, we're all marching inexorably into the
next.phase of life. It doesn't have to mean early
bird specials, naps and worrying about

and our second, George W. Bush, are both
turning 60 this year. They can lead the way.
Lord knows, each could use more of a legacy
than he's got so far.
We in the news media make a mistake by
lumping boomers together as if they're all the
same. Everybody in that generation wasn't a
hippie. George W. Bush was a cheerleader at
prep school.
We were individuals in the 1960s and'70s,
and we arie now. We each have talents and, yes,
gifts we can use in the years ahead. There will
be plenty of calls for our time and our expertise.
We can rise above the jokes and make a
difference. It's late, but it's not too late.
People blame boomers for being
self-indulgent and self-centered. Pretty soon,
they'll be blaming us for more pollution and
global warming from all those birthday candles.
We can't turn back time. But who wants to,


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


Background checks by




companies spark worries


By JOHN CHRISTOFFERSEN
AP Business Writer
STAMFORD, Conn. -
Jessica Smith thought she was
a shoo-in for a cashier's job at
an Office Depot in Minnesota
last summer. The store man-
ager was encouraging, saying
he just needed to run a
criminal background check.
But a week later, Smith
received a rejection letter that
cited a lengthy rap sheet,
including drug convictions in
Washington.
"I have no record," Smith,
19, said as she flipped through
court documents. 'They all
say felony and guilty. I've
never even been to
Washington."
Smith, who fought for six
weeks to clear her name
before eventually landing the
job, was a casualty of one of
the latest trends in business
hiring. Companies increasing-
ly rely on pre-employment
background checks to ease
security concerns and protect
against costly lawsuits.
"It's very important and it's
getting more important," said
Robert Belair, a privacy attor-
ney in Washington, D.C., and
editor of the Privacy and
American Business newslet-
ter. "The incidence of negli-
gent hiring lawsuits is way
up."
But the burgeoning field
lacks consistent standards,
causing errors that can
disqualify reputable job


applicants, some industry
experts and consumer advo-
cates say. When criminals slip
through with clean records,
the consequences are more
severe.
Early this month, FedEx
Corp. was accused in a lawsuit
of hiring a sex offender who
was later charged with molest-
ing an 8-year-old boy while at
work in Fairfield.
FedEx, spokeswoman
Sandra Munoz said the compa-
ny's background check did not
reveal a criminal history. The
company conducts criminal
background checks on all job
candidates, she said.
"That person is either lying
or Federal Express is wildly
incompetent in how they do
the background checks," said
Neal Rogan, the boy's
attorney.
But people with knowledge
of the industry were not
surprised by the charges.
"There are no standards for
what is a background check,"
said Tal Moise, chief executive
of Verified Person, a New-York
based company that performs
background checks. '"This is
an industry that has delivered
historically a very low-quality
product"
A national task force funded
by the Justice Department this
month recommended national
standards for screening
companies.
'The nation's security, as
well as on-the-job efficiency,
and certainly civil liberties and


. .... : " - :I . ... .

ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Fairfield, Conn., FedEx/Kinko store is photographed Thursday.
The FedEx Corp. was accused in a lawsuit of hiring a sex offender
who was later charged with molesting an 8-year-old boy at this
location. FedEx says a background check revealed no criminal
history.


privacy interests, all demand
the development of a blue-
print," the task force
concluded.
Background screeners say
companies must conduct thor-
ough searches to determine
whether applicants have crimi-
nal records. That means
searching multiple counties
and checking for addresses not.
listed on job applications. .
In the FedEx case, the
employee worked in.
Connecticut but had a criminal
record in Maine, according to
the family's lawsuit. The FBI's
criminal database is generally
not public, except for law


enforcement and some organi-
zations. State depositories are
often sealed or prohibitively
slow, so screeners send
runners from courthouse to
courthouse..
"It's very easy to miss it,
even if it's done properly,"
said Mary Poquette, co-chair-
woman of the National
Association of Professional
Background Screeners.
'There is no way to be
absolutely sure the person
they're hiring does not have a
criminal record or a pending
case because the records
are scattered throughout
3,142 counties."


Tourism expected to slow after strong year in 2005


By MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press

ORLANDO - In most years
when the thermometer drops
up north, Florida tourism oper-
ators rub their hands in antici-
pation of the money they'll
earn from visitors flying to the.
balmy beaches and theme
parks of the nation's, second
most-popular vacation destina-
tion. But this winter there is
cause for concern.
Higher fuel prices in the
Northeast could have a domi-
no effect several months later
on the state's $57 billion
tourism industry, leading to
what is predicted to be a slight
slowdown in tourism growth
next year.
Tourism officials also have
another, perhaps bigger
worry: the threat of another
turbulent hurricane season.
Four hurricanes - Dennis,
Rita, Katrina and Wilma -
struck Florida in 2005 follow-
ing 2004, when another four
hurricanes also hit the state.
As a result, Florida tourism
officials are -predicting only a
3.2 percent increase in visitors
for 2006, higher than the
2 percent increase expected in


visits to the United States, but
lower than 7 percent increase
in Florida tourism between
2003 and 2004.
Part of the concern stems
from the fact that many leisure
travelers plan summer vaca-
tions months in advance, when
they:will be dealing with the
higih'6t bf-o6wer this winter. ;
'"People will be coming off-
the sticker shock of high fuel
prices, heating and home fuel
prices," said Jim Atchison,
general manager of SeaWorld
Adventure Park in Orlando.
"From a timing perspective, I
think that will be something
fresh in their minds as they
begin to plan their summer
vacations."
Figures for 2005 won't be
available until next February,
although third-quarter esti-
mates were more than
9 percent higher than the same
period in 2004, putting Florida
on track to have more than
80 million visitors for the year.
"I'm constantly surprised by
the resiliency of Florida
tourism," Gov. Jeb Bush said.
"We've had threats of hurri-
canes, high gas prices ... While
there was a worry, the people
coming to Florida have met


Prescription Drug

- Sign-Up Has Begun,


Baya Pharmacy will have
. .:. S, aInsurance Specialists at

Doy� _ v|e ^ each location to sign up
Doyoy,01 ave
ue i0 beneficiaries for the new
quest o ".SL M", medicare Part D drug

about the new. coverage.

Medical '
V Call to schedule an
Prescription appointment or to get

lpan?-, mre information.

C rg st * 45sJnur' I I2006


B * * ao





PhIacy

Baya East Baya West Jasper Location
780 SE Baya Dr. 1465 US 90 W 1150 US 41 NW
,Lake City Lake City Jasper
755,6677 755-2233 792-3355


and beat our expectations." numbers dipped precipitously
Florida is the nation's after the Sept. 11, attacks,
second most-popular tourist tourism officials said.
destination, after California. "International visitors have
New York, Texas and Illinois absolutely, completely recov-
follow, according to the Travel ered," said Nicki Grossman,
Industry Association of president of the: Greater Fort
America. , ,,, Lauderdale, Convention &
SOverall, Florida tourism,; ,Visit.rs,,Bureau.,"We've seen
operators rhte'd 2005 a strong', an increase ,ini.UK, German
year.' - and Canadian business'tiere?" -''
Walt Disney World Many businesses, such as
attendance grew by 10 percent the Holiday Inn Cocoa Beach
in the last quarter of the Oceanfront Resort, that closed
company's fiscal year, led by their doors for repairs after the
visits from local and interna- hurricanes of 2004 reopened to
tional travelers, said Jacquee stronger business in 2005. The
Polak, a Walt Disney Co. resorts fortunes, like much of


spokeswoman.
Anecdotal evidence points to
a recovery around the state in
international visitors, whose


Brevard County's tourism
industry, were boosted by the
return to flight of the space
shuttle.


REVIVAL

Evangelist

DR. BILL SAYE

Sunday, January 8h

Thru

Friday, January 13,

Hear this dynamic man of God share his life
story and how God set him free from organized
crime, drugs, prostitution, murder, prison and
betrayal.

Watertown Congregational

Methodist Church
U.S. 90 East of Lake City, turn on Cortez Ter. (across from
airport) to Okinawa St. Turn right-one block on right.
For more information please call 386-752-1329



REDBUD

ENTERPRISES, INC.

& RICKS CRANE
previously on Branford Hwy,



HAS MOVED!


Now located at 25A (Old Valdosta Hwy)




Same Great People,
Same Great Service


386-752-5696


MARKET REPORT


Dec. 29,2005 11,,000

Dow Jones 10,750

industrials 10,500

-11.44 1 t0,250
-10,000
10,784.82 SEP OCT NOV DEC
Pct. change High Low Record high: 11,722.98
from previous: -0.11 10,825.24 10,779.22 Jan. 14, 2000

STOCK MARKET INDEXES
52-Week YTD 12-mo
High Low Name Last Chg %Chg %Chg %Chg
10,984.46 10,000.46 Dow Industrials 10,784.82 -11.44 -.11 +.02 -.14
4,306.09 3,348.36 Dow Transportation 4,241.34 +17.41 +.41 +11V67 +11.36
438.74 323.79 Dow Utilities 406.63 -.42 -.10 +21.40 +20.71
7,867.59 6,902.51 NYSE Composite 7,788.14 -7.62 -.10 +7.42 +7.37
1,778.74 1,186.14 Amex Market Value 1,757.54 -1.39 -.08 +22.53 +22.90
2,278.16 1,889.83 Nasdaq Composite 2,218.16 -10.78 -.48 +1.96 +1.83
1,275.80 1,136.15 S&P500 1,254.42 -3.75 -.30 +3.51 +3.37
752.00 623.57 S&P MidCap 742,21 -1.92 -.26 +11.89 +11.69
693.63 570.03 Russell 2000 677.96 -2.12 -.31 +4.05 +3.81
12,787.08 11,195.22 Wilshire5000 12,576.71 -34.13 -.27 +5.06 +4.91

STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

NYSE AMEX 3 NASDAQ
7,788.14 -7.62 1,757.54 -1.39 2,218.16 -10.78


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GoldcpwtA 4.22 +.51 +13.7
Suntechn 28.00 +3.35 +13.6
Trex 29.48 +2.55 +9.5
Lubys 13.01 +1.04 +8.7
Fairchild 2.77 +,22 +8.6
Hilton 24.00 +1.70 +7.6
Blockbstr 3.66 +.25 +7.3
HancFab 4.05 +.26 +6.9
BckbstrB 3.20 +.19. +6.3
Yanzhou s 33.50 +1.98 +6.3

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AlliancOne 3.85 -.35 -8.3
OrmatTo 25.20 -1.79 -6.6
Valmont 33.10 -1.63 -4.7
ToddShp 26.00 -1.17 -4.3
CarrSrv " 4.80 -.20 -4.0
ChiYuc 7.86 -.32 -3.9
AMD 30.53 -1.17 -3.7
BoisdArcn 16.13 -.60 -3.6
SturmR 7.06 -.26 -3.6
LehTOY21 8.00 -.29 -3.5
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (0O0) Last Chg
Lucent 296374 2.70 -.03
Pfizer ' 247726 23.45 -.15
GnMotr 212992 19.01 +.40
FordM 164566 7.81 -.03
GenElec 160907 35.19 +.08
VerizonCm157288 30.27 +.02
iShJapan 151333 13.61 +.01
ExxonMbl 141071 56.24 -.01
Motorola 122369 22.80 -.10
TimeWarn118902 17.48 +.02
DIARY
Advanced 1,603
Declined 1,683
Unchanged 183
Total issues 3,469
New Highs 78
New Lows 71
Volume 1,428,077,530


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
interlknG n 6.30 +1.40 +28.6
Miramar 2.35 +.28 +13.5
MetroHIth 2.43 +.24 +11.0
NwGoldg 6.88 +.64 +10.3
WlssXces n 4.80 +.44 +10.1
CD&L 2.65 +.24 +10.0
UQMTech 3.94 +.35 +9.7
CoreMold 7.35 +.62 +9.2
NDynMng 5.13 +.42 ' +8.9
CumbRsg 2.25 +.18 +8.7
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GlobeTeln 2.19 -.47 -17.7
CuisineS n 8.65 -1.35 -13.5
InovioBio 2.18 -.21 -8.8
Sunair 5.31 -.44- -7.7
Endvrint 3.25 -.25 -7.1
PathlNet 2.00 -.15 -7.0
FlexSolu 2.89 -.21 -6.8
Tarpon n 2.80 -.20 -6.7
RELM n 7.04 -.46 -6.1
Bodisen n 14.40 -.90 -5.9
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (O0) Last Chg
SPDR 31109812:.19 -.56
iShRs2000 s20478767.15 -.36
SPEngy 125555 50.10 -.39
CovadCm n84391 1.02 +.06
SemiHTr 75096 36.92 -.51
iSh EAFEs 61013 59.70 +.02
OilSvHT 57660 128.15 -2.08
On2 Tech 51377 1.12 +.10
GlobeTel n 42600 2.19 -.47
GoldStr g 35541 2.72 -.02
DIARY
Advanced 440
Declined. 506
Unchanged 97
Total issues 1,043
New Highs 33
New Lows 20
Volume 220,871,130


STOCKS'OF LOCAL INT
S E,, i YTD
Name E' Exl Div YId PE Last Cho%Chq -g Nme


AT&TlInc NY 1.33
All/el NY 1.54
AutoZone NY
BkolAm NY 2.00
BellSouth NY 1.16
BobEvn Nasd .48
CNBFnPA Nasd .56
CSX ' NY .52
ChmpE NY
Chevron NY 1.80
Cisco Nasd ...
CocaCl NY 1.12
ColBgp NY .61
Delhaize NY 1.13
DollarG NY .18
FPLGps NY 1.42
FamDIr NY .38
FordM NY .40
GenElec NY 1.00
GdyFam Nasd .12
HCAInc NY .60
HomeDp NY .40


... -4.5
+.01 +7.7
+.39 +1.2
-.08 -1.7
-.03 -1.8
-.22 -11.2
+.08 -8.6
+.44 +27.5
+.15 +16.8
-.23 +7.5
-.05 -10.8
-.18 -2.5
-.05 +12.8
+.04 -14.0
+.04 -7.4
+.13 +11.6
-.06 -20.2
-.03 -46.7
+.08 -3.6
-.04 +4.6
-.18 +27.3
-.35 4.7


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Arrowhd 5.25 +1.85 +54.4
Quidel 11.76 +2.29 +24.2
MultiFnElc 47.66 +8.98 +23.2
Quotesmth 3.14 +.52 +19.8
Nitches 6.16 +.91 +17.3
Cheroklnt 4.70 +.68 +16.9
Micrusn 8.80 +1.15 +15.0
HaupgDig 5.33 +.69 +14.9
ForgntNtw 2.5. +.33 +14.8
Compugn 4.20 +.50 +13.5
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SyntaxBril 4.55-. - 13.3
GMXwtA 25.50 -3.79 -12.9
OmegaFx n 19.00 -2.44 -11.4
Amtech 7.40 -.83 -10.1
GMX Rs 37.42 -3.93 -9.5
Syneron 35.69 -3.50 -8.9
Zanett 3.31 -.32 -8.8
MoscwCble 5.06 -.44 -8.0
Astealnt 14.18 -1.16 -7.6
NeoPharm 10.73 -.88 -7.6
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
JDS Uniph468496 2.41 +.01
Nasd100Tr451607 40.72 -.27
SiriusS 422816 6.74 -.01
Cisco 357948 17.24 -.05
Microsoft 342281 26.27 -.12
SunMicro 295097 4.25 -.07
Intel 265428 25.07 -.37
Oracle 210717 12.29 +.01
AppleCs 173687 71.45 -2.12
Quidel 163963 11.76 +2.29
DIARY
Advanced 1,364
Declined 1,678
Unchanged 173
Total issues 3,215
New Highs 59
New Lows 51
Volume 1,210,5'S


rEREST
YTD
Ex 0Div YId PE Last Ch /%Chq


Intel Nasd .40
JDS Uniph Nasd ...
JeffPilot NY 1.67
LowesCos NY .24
Lucent NY
McDnlds NY .67
Microsoft Nasd .36
Nasd1OOTr Nasd .14
NYTimes NY .66
NobltyH Nasd ...
OcciPet NY 1.44
Penney NY .50
PepsiCo NY 1.04
Potash NY .60
Ryder NY .64
SearsHIdgs Nasd ...
SiriusS Nasd ...
SouthnCo NY 1.49
SPDR Amex2.14
SunMicro Nasd
TimeWam NY .20
WalMedrt NY .60


19 25.07
... 2.41
14 57.13
21 67.15
11 2.70
18 34.14
22 26.27
... 40.72
13 26.44
18 26.49
7 79.76
17 55.44
26 59.54
17 80.25
12 41.67
27 116.80
... 6.74
16 34.74
... 125.19
. 4.25
31 17.48
18 47.48


-.37 +7.2
+.01 -24.0
-.33 +9.9
*+.14 +16.6
-.03 -28.2
-.05 +6.5
-.12 -1.7
-.27 +2.0
-.12 -35.2
-.07 +12,8
-.82 +36.7
-.87 +33.9
+.21 +14.1
+.50 -3.4
+.31 -12.8
-1.58 +18.0
-.01 -11.5
-.23 +3.6
-.56 +3.6
-.07 -21.2
+.02 -10.1
-.36 -10.1


MONEY RATES CURRENCIES
Last Pvs Week Last Pvs Day
Prime Rate 7.25 7.25 Australia 1.3661 1.3742
Discount Rate 5.25 5.25 Britain 1.7240 1.7160
Federal Funds Rate 4.1875 4.25 Canada 1.1644 1.1637
Treasuries , Euro .8441 .8449
3-month 3.91 3.92 Japan 117.76 117.83
6-month 4.19 4 exico 10,6440 7560
5-year 4.32 Mexico 10.6440 10.7560
10-year 4.36 4.43 Switzerlnd 1.3131 1.3159
30-year 4.51 4.6 British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show
0-year4.51 4.6 dollar in foreign currency.

MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank PctMin Init
Name Obi ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
American Funds A: GwthA p XG 71,536 30.97 +2.5 +14.7/B +16.7A 5.75 250
Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 SP 69,916 115.48 +0.5 +5.2/A +2.6/A NL 3,000
American Funds A: ICAA p LV 66,546 31.47 +1.6 +7.1/B +21.3/B 5.75 250
American Funds A: WshA p LV 62,683 30.97 +0.8 +3.8/0 +24.3/B 5.75 250
Fidelity Invest: Contra XG 58,486 65.04 +1.8 +16.7/A +35.8/A NL 2,500
PIMCO Instl PIMS:TotRt IB 53,886 10.51 +1.0 +3.3/A +37.9/A NL 5,000,000
Fidelity Invest: Magelln LC 51,336 106.90 +2.4 +6.8/B -3.3/C NL 2,500
Dodge&Cox: Stock XV 51,035 137.89 +2.2 +9.8/B +69.5/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: IncoA p MP 48,074 18.17 +0.9 +3.5/D +47.5/A 5.75 250
American Funds A: CaplBA p MP 43,361 53.18 +1.5 +5.0/C +57.6/A 5.75 250
American Funds A:EupacAp IL 43,139 41.30 +5.7 +22.5/A +46.9/B 5.75 250
American Funds A: CapWGAp GL 39,841 36.73 +4.0 +15.6/1B +68.9/A 5.75 250
Vanguard Instl Fds: Instldx SP 39,138 114.57 +0,5 +5.3/A +3.3/A NL 5,000,000
Vanguard Admiral: 500Adml SP 38,091 115.49 +0.5 +5.3/A +3:0/A NL 100,000
Fidelity Invest: LowP r MV 36,517 41.01 +2.2 +9.3/D +123.3/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: N PerA p GL 35,790 28.78 +3.6 +12.1/C +34.6/B 5.75 250
American Funds A: BalA p . BL 32,947 17.89 +0.7 +3.5/D +40.4/A 5.75 . 250
Fidelity Invest: Grolnc LC 31,527 34.56 +0.1 +3.1/D +0.2/B NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: Divlntl IL 31,025 32.70 +5.8 +18.4/B +58.3/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk XC 29,338 30.14 +0.6 +6.4/D +10.7/C NL 3,000
Vanguard Fds: Wndsll LV 28,867 31.43 +1.0 +7.2/B +32.7/A NL 3,000
Fidelity Invest: GroCo XG 26,818 64.04 +2.6 +14.2/B -10.0/C NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: Eq Inc El 26,088 52.99 +0.9 +6.1/C +20.8/C NL -2,500
Vanguard Fds: Welltn BL 26,073 30.46 +1.2 +7.4/A +39.6/A NL 3,000
Fidelity Invest: Puritn BL 24,180 18.78 +0.9 +5.1/C +27.7/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: FdlnvA p LV 23,716 35.55 +2.6 +12.2/A +26.0/B 5.75 250
Dodge&Cox: Balanced BL 23,628 81.61 +1.6 +7.0/A +61.1/A NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: BlueChGr LC 22,577 43.38 +0.6 +4.4/C -13.6/E NL 2,500
Frank/Temp Frnk A: IncomA p MP 21,902 2.40 +1.6 +1.9/D +49,0/A 4.25 1,000
Vanguard Idx Fds: ToSlBnd IB 21,084 10.06 +1.0 +2.8/B +30.2/C NL 3,00
Frank/Temp Temp A:GrwthAp GL 20,996 23.09 +4.1 +9.3/D ,+54.0/A 5.75 1,000
Vanguard Fds: Prmcp r XC 20,761 65.56 +2.2 +8.7/B +16.0/B NL 25,000
Vanguard Admiral: TStkAdm XC 20,223 30.14 +0.6 +6.5/C +11.1/C NL 100,000
Fidelity Spartan: Eqldxlnv SP 20,051 44.38 +0.5 +5.2/A +2.6/A NL 100,000
Amer Century Inv: Ultra LG 19,570 30,29 -0.5 +2.5/E -6.0/B NL 2,500
Davis Funds A: NYVen A LC 18,903 33.84 +1.0 +11.1/A +21.3/A 4.75 1,000
PIMCO Admin PIMS: TolRtAd IB 18,310 10.51 +1.0 +3.0/A +36.1/A NL 5,000,000
Price Funds: Eqlnc El 17,958 26.04 +0.5 +4.7/D +34.0/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: BondA p AB 17,681 13,23 +0.5 +2.1/D +37.4/B 3,75 250
Fidelity Invest: DivGth LC 16,565 28,94 +1.1 +4.0/D +4.0/B NL 2,500
Vanguard Instll Fds: InsPI SP 16,372 114.57 +0,5 '+5,3/A +3.4/A NL200,000,000
Vanguard Fds: HlthCre HB 16,340 140.54 +4.1 +16.3/B +33.1/B NL 25,000
Fidelity Invest: Balanc BL 15,999 18.80 +1.9 +11.2/A +47.6/A NL 2,500
BL -Balanced, El -Equity Inc, EM -Emerging Mkts, GL -Global Stock, GM -Gen. Muni, IB -Intermd. Bond, IL -
Intemational Stock, LC -Large-Cap Core, LG -Large-Cap Growth, LV -Large-Cap Val., MP -Stock/Bond Blend, MT
-Mortgage, SB -Short-Term Bond, SP -S&P 500, SS -Single-State Muni, XC -Multi-Cap Core, XG -Multi-Cap
Growth, XV -Multi-Cap Val. Total Return: Chg in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs.
others with same objective: A Is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund.
NA = Not avail. NE = Data in question. NS = Fund not in existence. Source: Lipper, Inc.
Sto k Footno es-te lm l,.-..n, :i.',' + rn.iW ',r r Ir, , r.in lr ', ,r, n . L.i-, r. ic, , r.oT i ,, , ..:.,i[,rn-. ,: ,, r srw, 'l.,;
II - La we Irhing wllh rELC r. = niew n pn al p, ac'-e E pik = Pl.lt-nv.j r = S :: r.at , r..I.ir, .l..,n, d 1vee .Il. v i ..I :t 31 I.-.:t
S.0 parcur.i within r.e prip l yer ri : Rir h i , a buay *w.unrly bi .6 in ed pried *. : pr i *:.*:l. iri , ipi t'y atl lea.l 2J 1 ,6.:rl wilhr.
lihe lIsi y a. u1 i un -i .;r vi = in b riri.tDrpii .:,. r,� ,,i, r'rip, w,. = ria,', 1:hliIa . l .i = -ir r, Ir. "u, o, ; er . i' "na, fr3 I
Mutual Fund Footnotes - = E. c -r, rlilr.rJ L = It...,g i i..r i -.I.; ; . -r,i I,, [. = z a,lI ,,,: .uV.it- jiel . pa, v l.Ill..uhrl....,- l:
r = : R, 6rmpplion fe .:'..n ilg.itn , I, t , i' .jfiil, .rl e .,,l IT.) ij ,ri ' I : '611", p ,Adrn i-
Gainers and Losers a. tI 6 w .:.nr, rd I A i i .I t ,,h. h0 - l .bIi IiIi i lfr Mott Ao ivcl i toes , I.it , :lih - u le,' ii '.:.I6.nT ,
hunarrds .:.1 ar,eai s Source: Tr.., �A� io-lle l Pr :,. Sal- II.jsu ,: ia l , un...InicilI


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


II.. �- - -.-d --'-- _,~p~ . - .---�i


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your
Community Calendar
item, contact S.
Michael Manley at
754-0429 or by email
at smanley@
lakecityreporter.com.


Announcements

Newcomers to host
monthly meeting
Due to a date conflict with
Quality Inn, the regular meeting
will be on the first Wednesday
of January. This change is only
for the month of January -
Jan. 4 at 11:15 a.m. The meet-
ing will be at the Quality Inn on
U.S. 90. The program will be
presented by Columbia County
Sheriff Bill Goottee. This should
be a very informative meeting.
Come with your questions. All
members, guests and visitors
are welcome. For information,
call 754-2695 or 752-4552.

Newcomers to host
Friendship Luncheon
The Friendship Luncheon will
be held on the second
Wednesday of January. This
change is only for the month of
January. The Luncheon will be
held on Jan. 11 at 11:15 at
Phish Heads Restaurant locat-
ed at 1445-170 SW Main Blvd.
All members, guests and
visitors are welcome. For
information, call 758-6946 or
754-2695.

Bluegrass Pickin comes to
Trenton Community Center
The Trenton Community
Center will host the Suwannee
Valley Bluegrass monthly Pickin
at 6 p.m. Jan. 7. Various


bluegrass bands will begin
playing, so bring your bluegrass
band or come and hear some
of the best bluegrass in North
Florida.
For more information, call
(800) 990-5410 or
(352) 284-0668 and ask for
Cloud.

Olustee Festival Pageant
contestants sought
Contestants are being sought
for the 2006 Olustee Festival
Pageant to take place at the
Columbia County School
Administrative Auditorium on
Saturday, Jan. 28. Girls must
be between 2 and 20 years old.
Trophies, crown, savings bonds
and educational scholarships
are among the prizes for the
winners.
Applications can be picked
up at the Columbia County
Library or the Lake City
Chamber of Commerce. For
more information, call Elaine
Owens at 752-3430. .

Lake City Medicare Part D
workshop coming soon
GAINESVILLE - Rep. Ed.
Jennings, Jr. (D-Gainesville) is
teaming with the Mid-Florida
Area Agency on Aging to
present a workshop on
Medicare Pairt D, .prescription
drugs from 9-11 a.m. on
Thursday, Jan. 5 at the
Columbia County School Board
Administration Complex


Auditorium located at 372 W.
Duval St.

SRWMD to have
meeting Jan. 10
On Tuesday, Jan. 10, the
Suwannee Valley River Water
Management District's
Governing Board will meet at
9 a.m. at District Headquarters,
Hwy. 49 and U.S. 90 East, Live
Oak. The meeting is to consider
district business and conduct
public hearings on regulatory
and land acquisition matters. A
workshop will follow the board
meeting. For more information,
call (386) 362-1001.

Breast Cancer support
group to meet Jan. 9
The Breast Cancer Support
Group of Lake City will meet
from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Jan. 9 at
the Columbia County Public
Library, 308 NW Columbia
Avenue, Lake City.
All those.who have had
personal experience with breast
cancer and those who have
questions or concerns about
breast cancer are invited.
For further information, call
755-0522.

DAC to host
visionary workshop
The Downtown Action
Corporation will host a visioning
workshop from 5:30-8 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 12, at the


Columbia County Public Library.
The meeting is open to the
public and all area residents are
cordially invited to attend and
provide input.
The purpose of the meeting
to define priorities and a work
plan for projects benefiting the
downtown area. More than
70 individuals completed a
questionnaire for the visioning
process and those results will
also be distributed. For
additional information, contact
Paulette Lord at 758-1367.

Blue Grey Army
to meet Jan. 10
The Blue Grey Army will
meet at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday,
Jan. 10, at the Columbia
County Public Library.
Downtown Branch.
This will be a general
meeting of committees and
workers involved with
preparations for the Olustee
Festival 2006. Anyone
interested in working with this-
group is asked to attend. For
questions, call Faye Bowling
Warren at 755-1097.

New Year's Eve dance
coming for singles group
LAKE BUTLER - Lake
Butler Singles Club will host its
New Year's Eve dance
Saturday at Lake Butler
Community Center. Dinner will
be at 7 p.m. and dance from,


8 p.m. -1 a.m. to the music from
South Street Band. Bring finger
food and enjoy the evening with
no smoking and'alcohol. For
more information, call Bob
Collins at 752-5948. The cost is
$15 per person.

O'Leno State Park to
host 'Music in the Park'
"Music in the Park" is coming
Saturday, Jan. 7, staring Dick
Staber and Judith Chasnoff.
Bring a chair and relax by the
river while listening to a
beautifully sung mixture of
original and traditional
bluegrass and folk music.
2-4 p.m. O'Leno State Park, is
located six miles north of High
Springs on U.S. 441.
The show is free with park
admission.

MLK parade applications
now available
Applications are now being
accepted for the annual Martin
Luther King day parade, which
will be at 10 a.m., Jan. 16.
Contact Tyrone Taylor at
623-2194, coach Anders at
752-0959, or Leslie White at
623-2198 to request an entry
application, or to obtain more
information on participating in
the MLK parade.
The following is a list of
activities scheduled for Martin
Luther King, Jr. Celebration:


* Jan.13: 7:30 p.m. Gospel
Festival, choirs, soloists,
instruments and dancers.
* Jan. 14: noon. Car
Show-Step Show, MLK
Classic-Basketball game.
* Jan. 15: 4 p.m. NAACP
commemoration service, Union
A.M.E. Church.
* Jan. 16:10 a.m. Northeast
Florida Leadership Council
grand parade. Celebration at
the stadium.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson
coming to Lake City
At 1 p.m., Jan. 5, U.S.
Senator Bill Nelson is coming to
Lake City for a townhall
meeting. It will take place at
City Hall, located at 205 N.
Marion Ave. For more
information, call Nelson's office
at (850) 942-8415.

Volunteer Development
Board to meet in 2006
The Volunteer Development
Board of the Lake City
Community College Foundation
will meet at noon Jan. 10 in the
Lake City Community College
Foundation Board Room,
downtown Lake City. For more
information, contact Mike Lee,
executive director of the LCCC
foundation at 754-4392 or
754-4433.


OBITUARIES


Bessie Lee Ross
Bessie Lee Ross, age.88 resident of
211 Curt Street, Lake City, Florida
died Monday
December 26, 2005
at Shands Lake
Shore Hospital ter-
minating an illness.
Born in Savannah,
Ga. She was the
daughter of the late
Mr. Benjamin and Mrs. Maggie
Brown, she received her education
in the public schools of Savannah,
Ga.
She accepted Christ under the Rev.
H.M. Moss, Sr. and attended the
Olivet Baptist Church faithfully,
serving on the Deaconess Board un-
til her demise.
She leaves to cherish her memories:
her loving, dedicated and devoted
husband, brother Booker T. Ross;
one daughter, Rose Lee Taylor
(Henry), one son Lonnie Jones, Jr
(Sheila) both of Ft. Lauderdale,
Florida; other children, Lucille,
Mary Ann, Veronica, Henrietta and
Rose Mae all of Lake City, Florida.
Two sister-in-laws, Laura Griffin
and Viola Griffin both of Micanopy,
Florida; Grandchildren, Great
Grandchildren, and Great Great
Grandchildren, a loving and devoted
Granddaughter Anita Jernigan Da-
vis (Mickey), A special friend,, Mrs.
Florrie Grigger and a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins and sorrowing
friends.
Funeral services for Bessie Lee
Ross, will be 2:00 pm Saturday De-
cember 31, 2005 at Olivet Mission-
ary Baptist Church with Rev. Ro-
nald Walters, pastor, officiating. In-
terment will follow in the Garden of
Rest cemetery.
Arrangements entrusted to COOP-
ER FUNERAL HOME, 251 NE
Washington St., Lake City, Florida.

Mrs. Inez Tate Watson
Mrs. Inez Tate Watson was born to
the late Deacon Frank Tate, Sr. and
Mrs. Leola Lewis of
Lake City,
Florida.
Mrs. Watson's early
education was
in the school system
of Columbia
and Duval Counties. She graduated
from the Bethune Cookman College
and Florida A&M University, and
studied at the Indiana State Univer-
sity. Mrs. Watson taught in the Co-


lumbia County School System for,
many years.
She was married to the late Simon
Watson, Sr. who preceded her in
death. Also preceding her in death
were'sons Simon, Jr. and James A.
Watson.
Mrs. Watson is survived by daugh-
ters, Inez W. Davis, Adell W. Gray,
and Dasye W. Houston; sister, Dor-
cas T. Combs (Milfrank); daugh-
ters-in-law Daisy B. Watson and
Bobie T. Watson, grandchildren,
nieces, nephews, and other relatives
and friends.
Visitation with the family will be
Friday, December 30, 2005, from
5:00-6:00 P.M. at Combs Funeral
Home Chapel. Funeral services will
be held Saturday December 31,
2005 at 1:00 P.M. at Galilee Baptist
Church, Lake City, Florida, Rev.
Stanford Jackson, Interim Pastor.
Arrangements are under the direc-
tion of COMBS FUNERAL
HOME, 292 NE Washington Street.
386-752-4366. Marquis Combs-
Turner, L.F.D.

Shirley Ann Davis Carter
Shirley Ann Davis Carter, age 56,
resident of 368 NE Chestnut Ave.
died Saturday
December 24, 2005
following a brief ill-
ness. Born in
Columbia County
she was the
daughter of the late
Mrs. Georgia Mae Scott and Mr.
Ben Davis.
She attended the public schools of
Columbia County and was em-
ployed for more than 20 years at
Happy House Day Care Center. Sur-
vivors include one son, Ronald L.
Davis; grand daughter, Ms. Kateur-
ah Davis, Lake City, Florida; sister,
Ms. Maynelle Brown, Deer Park,
New York; brother, Mr. Jimmy
Rickey Davis, Buena Park, Califor-
nia; two aunts, Mrs. Rubie Hudson,
Fort Washington, Maryland and Ms.
Bernice Scott, Gainesville, Florida;
cousins, Ms. Ruby Lee Scott
McCall, Jacksonville, Florida, Mr.
Willie McCray, Maryland, Mrs.
Betty Poole, Gainesville, Florida;
one brother-in-law, Mr. Raymond
Brown, Deer Park, New York; one
sister-in-law Mrs. Vicky Davis,
Buena Park, California; two nieces,
two hiephews, and a great number of
other relatives, friends and neigh-
bors.


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Funeral services for Shirley Ann
Davis Carter, will be 1:00 pm Satur-
day December 31, 2005 at Mt. Pis-
gah AME Church with Rev. Coles,
Pastor officiating. Interment will-
follow in the Garden of Rest Ceme-
tery.
Arrangements entrusted to COOP-
ER FUNERAL HOME 251. NE
Washington St. Lake City, Florida.

Isaiah James, Underwood
Isaiah James Underwood, age 58
resident of 1688 SW Brim St. died
Monday December
26, 2005 at Lake
City Medical Center
Terminating a
sudden illness. He
was the son of
the late Lonnie and
Frances Jones Underwood. He
received his education in the public
schools of Columbia County, and
was a graduate of Richardson High
School. He con-fessed' Christ at an
early age and was a member of
Fellowship Missionary Baptist
Church. He was employed, as a
masonry contractor up until his
health failed.
Survivors include three sons, Vin-
cent Scott Underwood (Vette), Lon-
nie Frank Underwood (Chevette)
both of Lake City and Michael Alan
Underwood (Rosalyn) of Miami,
Florida; Brothers Willie Underwood
(Gloria), Rivera Beach, Florida;
Daniel Underwood (Marget) Pom-
pano Beach, Florida and Jeremiah
Underwood, Lake City, Florida; sis-
ters, Rosa Lee Kelsey (Willie) and-
Amanda Ellis, Lake City, thirteen
grandchildren; Great Grand, a host
of nieces, nephews, cousins, and
other relatives and friends.
Funeral Services for Isaiah James
Underwood, will-be 11:00 am Satur-
day December 31, 2005 at Fellow-
ship Missionary Baptist Church
with Rev. Wallace, pastor, officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in the
Fellowship Cemetery.
Arrangements entrusted to COOP-
ER FUNERAL HOME, 251 NE
Washington St, Lake City, Florida.

Mr. Earl Thomas Landis, Sr.'
Mr. Earl Thomas Landis, Sr., 78, of
Lake City, died Wednesday after-
noon at his residence following an
extended illness. A native of
Culpeper County, Virginia, Mr.
Landis had been a resident of Lake


City for the past sixteen years hav-
ing moved here from Orange, Vir-
ginia. Mr. Landis was the son of the
late Arlie & Winifred Jackson
Landis. Mr. Landis had been em-
ployed as a long distance truck driv-
er for many years prior to his retire-
ment. In his spare time he enjoyed
watching NASCAR races and had
enjoyed hunting and fishing. Mr.
Landis was of the Methodist faith.
Mr. Landis is survived by his wife
of sixty-one years, Annie Marie
Landis; his son, Earl T. Landis, Jr.
(Anna) of Orange, Virginia; a broth-
er, Alfred Lee Landis, Hampshire
County, West Virginia;. a sister,
Barbara Jean Landis Gilmore,
Culpeper, Virginia; a grand-daugh-
ter, Pamala Lynn Lawson (Edward)
his great grand-son Brandon Wayne
Lawson and his three great-grand-
daughters Makenzie Taylor Lawson,
Jessie Lawson and Jamie Lawson
all of Orange, Virginia.
Private family services for Mr.
Landis were conducted in Lake City
on Thursday.'
Interment will be held later this
week in the Graham Cemetery in
Orange, Virginia.
Arrangements are under the direc-
tion of the DEES FAMILY FU-
NERAL HOME & CREMATION
SERVICES, 768 West Duval
Street, Lake City. (961-9500)

Mr. Alfred Johnson
Mr. Alfred Johnson Expired at his
residence on December 28, 2005 af-
ter an illness. He was
born in Lake
City on December
27, 1948 and re-
ceived his education
in the Public
School system of
Columbia County.
He accepted Christ at an early age
and became a Deacon at the New
Day Springs MBC under the leader-
ship of Moderator George Francis.
He was the oldest son of Mrs. Ka-
therine Freeman and Emory John-
son. He was a TV Repairman by
trade andoften known as the TV
Man. Other survivors are: A Loving
wife Mary E. Johnson, His children
Alfred Jr., Vilinda (Phillip) Rossin,
Mickel Johnson, Lake City, FL. A
Step-son George (JJ Dawn) Wil-
liams of Asbury Park, N.J. Brothers
Rooselvelt (Mary) Tolbert of Lake
City, FL., Micheal Johnson, 'Sister
Pam Johnson of Detroit Michigan.


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(16) Grandchildren (1) Great Grand.
A host of Aunts and Uncles and (4)
Special friends Clarine T., Gloria
D., Willie and Mark.
Funeral services will be Saturday
December 31, 2005 at 11:00 A.M.
at the New Day Springs MBC with
Mod. George Francis, officiating.
Interment will follow at the Forest
Lawn Memorial Garden Cemetery.
Visitation for family and friends
will be from 5-8 p.m. Friday at the
Funeral Home.
RUDOLPH MIZELL FUNERAL
HOME, 365 N.W. Washington
Street, Lake City is in charge of all
arrangements. Independently owned
and operated since 1980. E-mail: ru-
dolmize@aol.com.

Mr. Danny Siler
Mr. Danny Siler, 61, of Lake City,
died late Wednesday evening in the
E.T. York Hospice House in Gain-
esville, following an extended.ill-
ness. A native of Jellico, Tennessee,
Mr. Siler had been a resident of
Lake City for the past sixteen years
having moved here from Old Town,
Florida. He was the son of the late
Paul & Gertie Lawson Siler. Mr. Si-
ler had been an independent long
distance truck driver whose C.B.
handle was "Chief" until his ill


health forced his retirement. In. his
spare time Mr. Siler enjoyed watch-
ing wrestling with his son and tin-
kering with cars. He was of the Bap-
. tist faith. Mr. Siler was preceded in
death by his parents and a brother,
Paul Siler, Jr.
Mr. Siler is survived by his wife of
seventeen years, Pat Siler; two sons,
Wayne Robinson, East Manatee,
Florida; Tyson Siler, Lake City; two
step-sons, David Malloney & Dean
Nelson both of Lake City; two-step
daughters, Deannda "DeeDee" Bay-
lis & Dawn Ervin both of Crystal
River, Florida; and three sisters,
Faye Wiseman, Cartersville, Geor-
gia; Jeanette Cook, Crystal River,
Florida and Arletta Dolan of Dunel-
Ion, Florida. Nine grandchildren al-
so'survive.
Private family visitation and serv-
ices will be conducted prior to cre-
mation. Arrangements are under the
direction of the DEES FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME & CREMA-
TION SERVICES, 768 West Duv-
al Street, Lake City (961-9500)

Obituaries are paid. advertisements.
For details, call -the Lake City
'Reporter's classified department at
752-1293


Our Angel Jacob

You were always so ready with a smile, hug or kiss.
How were we to know you were an angel in our midst.
By just walking in you could light up a room,
No way to prepare us God took you so soon.
You had so much more of this life left to live,
So much more love and happiness to give.
You had such a presence, joyous spirit and that grin!
We miss you so much our precious son, brother, friend.
Hearts are still broken sometimes it's insane.
What do we do with all this love-pain?
We'll hold to it closely and still let love in,
And pray it's not long until
we're together again.

In Loving Memory of

SSGT. Jacob Lucas Livingston

United States Air Force
May 17 1981 - Dember 26 200 1













Jacob,
You accomplished more in your short life than
many people do in their entire lives.
You sacrificed for your country and others
unselfishly, you taught & showed us what real
love is. We'll cherish your memory always.
All Our Love. Moeta, John
& all who were blessed to know you


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Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404









Page Editor: Joseph DeAngelis, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


SAFETY
Continued From Page 1A
"A lot of people won't use it if
they think that it is tie into law
enforcement," Burroughs said.
"It is not. We don't receive any
notification from AAA when it
is done, and it is a service pro-
vided by AAA in an effort to
.reduce impaired driving."
To reduce drinking and driv-
ing, law enforcement agencies
in Florida have joined together
for Operations Lights for Life.
"We want to send a strong
message to the motoring pub-
lic that we won't tolerate drunk
driving and to also remember
the victims and the families of
the victims that have been
killed in the past as a result of
a drunk driver," Burroughs
said. "We're also using this
operation to show the motor-
ing public that we are renew-
ing our commitment to reduce
the amount of drunk driving
crashes on our roadways."
Burroughs said many driv-
ers have become complacent
about drunk driving.
"The thing that. goes unno-
ticed and almost totally forgot-
ten is that everyone in a crash
with a drunk driver doesn't
die," Burroughs said.
"They have to live their lives
with whatever injuries they've
sustained and their families
have to help."


2006
Continued From Page 1A
people.
"We need a better music
scene," he said.
Boeckman said he doesn't
think many people stick with
their new year's resolutions,
but making them is tradition.
Whether resolutions last days,
weeks or the entire year, many
area residents will be trying to
improve some aspect of their
lives when they wake up in
2006.
'.You're starting over,"
Simpson said. "You're starting
fresh."


COUNTY: Consolidation worth a look
Continued From Page 1A


commissioners who need to
conduct county business
outside of Columbia County."
Another issue that was
heavily discussed was the
commissioner's discretionary
fund. The county has had a
discretionary .fund for com-
missioners for several years
and -this year, increased the
fund amount from $25,000 to
$50,000.
'"The discretionary funds
allow the commissioners to
provide for people in their dis-
tricts and improve the quality
of life through community
centers, health programs and
whatever the people 'in the
individual districts are in need
of," Flinnsaid. 'They are to
work for the good of all people
and I think that's what -the
commissioners have done to
improve the quality of life."
Flinn said she enjoyed her
tenure working as the county


commission chairman.
"It was a great honor to be
the first woman chair and it
was enjoyable for me to work
with the board," she said.
"Every commissioner on our
board is looking out for the
best for Columbia County. We
have a' wonderful board and
they all work to better
Columbia County. I enjoyed
being chair and working along
with them. It was a wonderful
learning experience."
Williams said he has mixed
emotions about last year and
some actions by the
commission.
"One of the things I was
real proud of was for the coun-
ty to be a sovereign county,
where we have fund reserves,
in excess of $20 million," he
said. "I think it was something
where we listened to our
finance department in order
to meet the needs of the coun-


ty. I think that is a priority of
all the commissioners."
On the contrary, he said he
was disappointed in, and
hopes the relationship with
the City of Lake City and the
county, improves.
"On the surface, there
looks like a good relationship
between the county and city,"
he said, but noted the rela-
tionship is not as relaxed as it
seems. "We need to forget
about one another's turf and
work to the good of everyone.
The only thing that is going to
solve that is working together
and if that can't happen we
really need to look at
consolidation."
"When you shuck it down
to the cob, Columbia County
did some great things last
year," he said. "We had great
year."


CITY: Getting a handle on water issues


Continued From Page 1A
If the 24,000-square foot
building on Marion Avenue
hadn't become available, the
city was considering building
a new 16,000-square foot City
Hall for as much as $5 million,
Cone said.
Cone said he isn't sure
where that kind of money
would have come from, but
the city had the $1.2 million
purchase price, plus the
$150,000 - for renovations to
the new City Hall - in the
general fund reserves.
The second biggest issue of
the past year was breaking
ground to begin construction
of the new water treatment
plant located east of the city
near the airport The purpose
of the new plant is to replace
the 1970's water plant now
surrounded by residences and
Melrose Elementary School.
"We had been working the
last nine years to expand and
build a new water treatment
plant and get the old obsolete
one out from in back of the


school," Ward said. '"There
were safety issues" which
included a chlorine leak that
caused evacuation of the
school, traffic to the plant and
the risk of contamination of
the well field from
surrounding properties.
Growth is necessary
because the .plant currently
exceeds the 6 million gallon
limit of potable water on a
daily basis. In addition, sever-
al wells collapsed during
drought conditions.
"A great deal of research
went into determining, where
the well fields should be to
avoid any future contamina-
tion of the wells. Essentially
we were able to partner with
the (Suwannee River) Water
Management District to
acquire the 12-acre site on the
east side of town."
The third issue was the
wastewater crisis that began
when the quantity of sewer
water flows into the system
exceeded the capacity the


plant was permitted to treat.
For that reason, the city could
not renew the wastewater
plant's operating permit in
June 2005.
"It was unanticipated,"
Cone said.
According to projections,
the plant should have handled
customer use until 2012. But
heavy rains and infiltration of
stormwater into the deterio-
rating sewer collection lines
increased flows into sewer
lines - putting 3.5 million
gallons of wastewater a day
into the plant permitted to
handle 3 million gallons a day
Cone said.
That problem resulted in
the city entering into a con-
sent order with the Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection in October to con-
tinue operating at that daily
flow rate for now, city officials
said.
"We're starting to get an
idea now of where we're
heading," Witt said.


THE YEAR IN REVIEW


New office,


911 change


mark year for


sheriff's office


By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
As the first year of Bill
Gootee's tenure as Columbia
County sheriff winds down, he
is able to look back at the many
goals he had for the year and
look toward the new year.
"It has been an exciting first
year," Gootee said.
Gootee said he had many
.goals for the county when he
took office in
January and was "There
able to realize quite
many of them
during his first has ha
year in office., over th
One of his of thi
main goals was to
acquire a new
facility for use by - Bil
the Columbia Columbia
County Sheriff's
Office.
"With the acquisition of the
new facility on East (U.S.) 90, we
are able to house the whole
sheriff's office under one roof,"
Gootee said. "That was one of
my main goals. It. happened
rather quickly and that was a
good thing. It has been a morale
boost, a nice place to call home
where we can bring other sher-
iff's offices and citizens to and
show them a real nice facility."
Another one of Gootee's pri-
orities that he was able to
accomplish, in the first year
is the acquisition of the
911 dispatch.
"I am thankful the Board of
County Commissioners had
faith in me to merge the sher-
iff's office and 911 dispatch,"
Gootee said. "It is an ongoing
process and we're still


a
al

is


enhancing that as we go. It has
been an exciting adventure for
us so far."
Gootee also noted the
acquisition of new vehicles for
patrol purposes.
"The county and the board
allowed us to purchase new
vehicles, which were desperate-
ly needed," Gootee said. "We
had more than 200,000 miles on
several of our vehicles, and the
new designs
has been and striping on
the vehicles
bit that gives us a more
opened professional
look and
e course design."
year." Gootee was
also proud of
Gootee, the additional
countyy Sheriff security recent-
ly added at the
Columbia
County Courthouse, which
include cameras and an X-ray
machine.
'"There has been quite a bit
that has happened over the
course of this year," Gootee
said.
Gootee said the year has been
"exciting."
"I can't think of doing some-
thing else," Gootee said. "It has
been a great year. We've had a
few little bumps in the road,
nothing that most cities don't
experience at some point in
time. (The county) is growing at
a tremendous rate, but we still
have that small town atmos-
phere. My philosophy is to be
more involved in the communi-
ty, and I believe I have a fine
group of officers and staff that
are doing a great job."


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LAK CTYREORER LOCAL FIADCME 020


Page Editor: Joseph DeAngelis, 754-0424






Page Editor: Joseph DeAngelis, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


-,--..' -'
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It's Your


|) " CHANCE

YEAR-END TAX CREDIT SAVINGS
GROSS VEHICLEWEIGHT RATINGS (GVWR) of 6,000 to 10,000 lbs
Maybe Eligible for Accelerated Small Business Tax Deductions for Trucks & SUVs!
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1ie Walt's 2006 Ford F-150 2006 Ford Escape XL Keep
Live Oak MSRP ..... 21,280 MSRR...... 21,800 Sip
Family Wishes Simple
Everyone A Pricing On
Happy the Window
New Year


I ~ ~S ve IS61lI
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2005 Ford Explorer


2006 Ford Freestar


Save

'. ..s20,603


2006 Mercury Grand Marquis
MSRP .....25,600


re '4967
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2006 Ford F-250
jM(EE.. 27,295


2006 Ford Taurus 2005 Rercury Grand Marquis 2005 Lincoln Town Car




95 5 6,995


2Save
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V~Quality Checked Certified Pre-owned
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04 F-150 supercrew
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02 CHEVY TAHOE
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Sl j m j m. , 1. i


Dealer remains all rebales May re luire ir.ancir.g through Ford Molor Credil Must own Lincoln or Mercury plus $249.95 dealer fee. See dealer for details. Art for illustration purposes only.
OVER 1 MILLION
LIV E 1 H * w P iP ^ aiDOLLARS IN Madison '(/
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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Friday, December 30, 2005


SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


CHEAP SEATS


Utah crushes Georgia Tech


Tim Kirby
Phone: 754-0421
tkirby@akecityreportercom

Jones to

play in

Peach

When listing
the former
Columbia
High
football
players that would partici-
pate in bowl games,
Rashaun Jones of Miami
was omitted. Earlier in the
season, Jones was nursing
an injury and a decision was
made for him to redshirt.
Not so, as his
grandmother, Emma Clark,
called to report. Jones was
declared to play and has a,
couple of punt returns to
his credit. Look for him at
today's Peach Bowl.
Dylan Bass and Morris
Marshall were two other.
Columbia County students
who won sectionals and qual-
ified for the Punt, Pass and
Kick competition at Alltel
Stadium in Jacksonville.
Marshall attends Five Point
and Bass goes to Eastside.
One week after being
featured as one of three
bowlers to roll a 300'game
in one week. Zech Strohl
had a 300 game in the
Wednesday Nite League.
It was the sixth perfect
game for Strohl, and he
finished with a 706 series
that night.
Golf must run in the
Smithy family, as Steve's
dad, Glenn, recently
recorded a hole-in-one. It
was the fourth ace for
Glenn. When Steve called
to congratulate him Glenn
gave his son the old,
"When you have had a
many of these as I have, it's
hard to get excited."
The final Beef '0' Brady's
Top 25 all-classification poll
came out with Class 5A
state champion Lakeland
completing its wire-to-wire
run at No. 1. The
Dreadnatights are also
ranked No. I by USA Today.
Three CHS opponents
finished in the Top 25 -
Nease at No. 3, Niceville at
No. 10 and Madison
County at No. 16 - while
Eastside (kickoff classic)
and East Ridge also
received votes. All are back
on the schedule for 2006.
Offensive tackle Sam
Young of St. Thomas
Aquinas was named
Gatorade State Football
Player of the Year.
Tennessee (6-5) took it
on the chin this year and is
sitting home during bowl
season. Sixty seasons ago,
Lake City's Bob Dobelstein
was captain of the
Volunteers, who played in
the 1945 Rose Bowl.
Columbia's District 4-5A'
had two volleyball players
named to the all-state teams.
Elise Burke of Gainesville
High was a
second-team outside hitter
and Jessica Brady of
Leesburg was honorable
mention as an outside hitter.
David Laxton, former
CHS wrestling coach now
back at Suwannee High,
was one of the six-member
class of inductees to the
National Wrestling Hall of
Fame & Museum Florida
Chapter in ceremonies in
August.
* Tim Kirby is sports editor of
the Lake City Reporter.


LaTendresse is MVP
with 16 catches for
214 yards in game.
By GREG BEACHAM
Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO -
Although a whole new bunch of
players and coaches are wear-
ing Utah red, these Utes still
can put on a postseason show.


Travis LaTendresse caught
16 passes for 214 yards and
four touchdowns, Brett Ratliff
passed for 381 yards and the
,Utes rolled up 550 total yards
in a 38-10 victory over No. 24
Georgia Tech in the Emerald
Bowl on Thursday.
Quinton Ganther ran for
120 yards and added a 41-yard
TD romp in the fourth quarter
for the Utes (7-5), who fin-
ished their follow-up season to


their 12-0 run through the
Bowl Championship Series in
2004 with an offensive per-
formance more than worthy
of former coach Urban
Meyer's sublime team.
Ratliff, who went 30-of-41,
and LaTendresse, the game's
offensive MVP, both set Utah
bowl records with a superb
afternoon of pitch-and-catch
UTAH continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Utah's Travis LaTendresse (center left) is mobbed by teammates
after making a touchdown reception against Georgia Tech during
the first quarter of the Emerald Bowl on Thursday.


A fantastic finish


Tigers fall on penalty
kicks; Lady Tigers
lose in title game.
By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter.com
The Columbia High dream
of winning both the boys and,
girls championships at the
Columbia/Fort White Christ-
mas Soccer Tournament fell
just one game short on
Thursday.
The boys were tied with
Suwannee High 2-2 through
two halves of soccer and two
extra periods, before the
Bulldogs won the game and
the championship 4-2 on
penalty kicks.
The girls were outgunned
by undefeated Ocala Forest
High, which ran its record to
19-0 with an S-0 win in a match
that was called in the second
half. The Lady Wildcats rolled
through the tournament,
outscoring their three
opponents 25-0.
In the boys' title game,
Columbia took the early lead
on a penalty kick by Chris
Mullen after Charles Cofield
was pushed down in the box.
The Bulldogs tied the score
later in the'half when Corey
Bridges lofted a shot from 20
yards out that settled just
under the crossbar for the goal.
In the second half,
Suwannee's Billy Moran was
pushed down inside the box,
leading to J.D. Hales' penalty
kick for the lead. Mullen got
the equalizer though, as he
ripped a shot from outside the
box that Bulldogs keeper
Matthew Yanossy got a hand
on, but was unable to stop.
The Tigers had the better
chances throughout the
game, but the old finishing
.problems that had plagued


JENNIFER CHASTEENILake City Reporter
Columbia High's Becky Gomez and Newberry High's Erica Berlin battle for the ball during their match
at the Columbia/Fort White Christmas Soccer Tournament on Thursday. The Lady Tigers won 1-0.


them all season returned.
Mullen had two excellent
chances, one on a breakaway
that Yanossy saved, and the
other off an indirect kick by
Nic Nyssen that he headed
just over the goal.
"Very good game, there


was very, very strong play by
both teams, it's just finishing,
that's it," CHS coach Trevor
Tyler said. "You don't get
goals, you can't win games."
The two extra periods were
tightly played, with neither
team having great scoring


Wright knows Miami has


much to play for in Peach


Hurricanes say
they're looking to
restore respect.
By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press
ATLANTA - Kyle Wright
isn't looking hard to find the
Peach Bowl's silver lining.
No, his first year as Miami's
starting quarterback won't
bring a national title. But beat-
ing LSU in today's Peach Bowl
would give the Hurricanes a
10-win season, plus likely
keep them the Atlantic Coast
Conference's highest-ranked
team.
'There's also a sense of
pride," Wright said. "I think
people kind of lost confidence
in us, especially down here
and even around the country.
... People lost respect for us."
Restoring that lost respect is
the biggest motivator for
Wright and No. 9 Miami (9-2),


which faces No. 10 LSU (10-2)
in one of only three bowl games
this season pitting two top-10
teams against one another.
The others? No. 1 Southern
California against No. 2 Texas
for the national championship
in the Rose Bowl, and No. 4
Ohio State facing No. 5 Notre
Dame in the Fiesta Bowl.
Not bad company.
'This is, I think, the best


team pos-
sible that
we could
have
played,"
Wright
said. "I


-E~IT


think it's going to be awe-
s. ome, going up against LSU."
Wright came to Miami tout-
ed as the next torchbearer of
"Quarterback U," but there
were still plenty of questions
about him entering the sea-
son. Before being named the
starter for 2005, Wright had
thrown only nine passes for


Miami - all in mop-uip duty
the previous year.
He quickly showed that the
hype was warranted.
Against Florida State in the
season-opener, with his team
trailing 10-7 and facing the
biggest crowd ever to see a
Seminoles' home game,
Wright took his team 94 yards
in the final minutes - from its
own 3 to the Florida State 3. A
bad snap cost Miami a snap at
a game-tying field goal, but
Wright had proven his mettle.
"He's really progressed
each week since then," Miami
offensive coordinator Dan
Werner said. "I'm really proud
of the way he's played. We're
looking forward to a great
career for him."
Wright finished the regular
season with 2,303 yards, com-
pleting 59.4 percent of his pass-
es, including 18 touchdowns.
He tied a school record with
five. touchdowns passes in a
win over Wake Forest.


chances. Then came the
penalty kicks, soccer's version
of Russian Roulette. The first
two Tigers had Yanossy beat-
en, but were unlucky enough
to hit the post. For Suwannee,
FINISH continued on 3B


FSU star

charged

with

assault

Team suspends
A.J. Nicholson for
the alleged act.
4 s o ated Press

HOLLYWOOD - Florida
State starting linebacker A.J.
Nicholson was suspended by
the team and questioned by.
police Thursday after a 19-
year-old woman accused him
of sexually assaulting her.
A decision on whether to
charge. Nicholson, the
team's leader in tackles, will
be made following the com-
pletion of an investigation,
which will likely extend into
next week, police said.
Nicholson was released by
police and sent home by the
team, which arrived
\Vd nesday in South Florida
to play Penn State in the
Orange Bowl on Tuesday.
The woman called police at
3 a.m. Thursday and said she
had been assaulted by a
Florida State player, later
identified as Nicholson, police
detective Carlos Negron said.
The alleged incident occur-
red at the Westin Diplomat
Resort and Spa, Where the
Seminoles are staying.
Nicholson went to the
police station voluntarily and
was . questioned for two
hours; Negron said. The
woman was also interviewed
by detectives and taken to a
rape treatment center.
Negron declined to give
further details because the
case remains open.
Coach Bobby Bowden said
Nicholson was suspended
for violating a team rule but
declined further comment.


Gators are not

taking Iowa lightly


Florida, Iowa meet
in Outback Bowl
rematch Monday.
Associated Press

TAMPA - Florida safety
Jarvis Herring admits the
Gators didn't take Iowa seri-
ously two years ago
and wound up get-
ting pasted. The
senior said that will
not be the case
again when the
teams meet
Monday in the
Outback Bowl for the second
time in three seasons.
"We're taking them seri-
ously," Herring said
Thursday. "Everybody on the
team has a different attitude.
The way guys work. The way
guys hang out together."
Iowa beat Florida 37-17 in
the 2004 Outback Bowl. It
was the second of what has


become a streak of three con-
secutive bowl losses for the
Gators.
"Atthat time, I don't think it
was humbling at all," Herring
said. "Guys didn't care ... did-
n't care if you got whooped or
whatever. Nobody was
embarrassed after the game.
Guys were just ready to get it
over with and go
home and start a
new year."
"Most of us were
undisciplined play-
TM ers. Guys were just
going out and
having fun."
Herring said the players
are now taking the initiative
in getting practice going
instead of having the coaches
"bark at you" the whole time.
"A lot of guys were at that
game and played in that
game," Florida quarterback
Chris Leak said. "I think a lot
of guys are more focused
now."


Section B


- -










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV Sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN - Music City Bowl, Minnesota vs.
Virginia, at Nashville,Tenn.
2 p.m.
CBS - Sun Bowl, Northwestern vs.
UCLA, at El Paso,Texas
3:30 p.m.
ESPN - Independence Bowl, South
Carolina vs. Missouri, at Shreveport, La.
7:30 p.m.
ESPN - Peach Bowl, Miami vs. LSU, at
Atlanta
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 - Ohio at Kentucky

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


y-New England
Miami
Buffalo
N.Y. Jets


x-Indianapolis
z-Jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston


y-Cincinnati
Pittsburgh .
Baltimore
Cleveland


y-Denver
Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland


East
W L T
9 5 0
8 7 0
5 10 0
3 11 0
South
W L. T
13 2 0
11 4 0
4 11 0
2 13 0
North
W L T
1II 4 0
10 5 0
6 9 0
5 10 0
West
W L T
12 3 0
9 6 0
9 6 0
4 11 0


Pct PF PA
.643 322 289
.533 290 291
.333 245 337
.214 189 298

Pct PF PA
.867 422 234
.733 321 256
.267 286 381
.133 243 411


Pct PF
.733 418
.667 354
.400 249
.333 212

Pct PF
.800 372
.600 366
.600 411
.267 269


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T ' Pct PF PA


xx-N.Y. Giants .10 5 0 .667 392
Washington 9 6 0 .600 328
Dallas 9 6 0 .600 315
Philadelphia 6 9 0 .:400 290
South
W L T Pct PF
Tampa Bay 10 5 0 .667 273
Carolina 10 5 0 .667 347
Atlanta 8 7 0 .533 340
New Orleans 3 12 0 .200 222
North
W L- T Pct PF
y-Chicago 11 4 0 .733 250
Minnesota 8 7 0 .533 272
Detroit 5 10 0 .333 233
Green Bay 3 12 0 .200 275
West
W L T Pct PF
x-Seattle 13 2 0 .867 435
Arizon ,. 5 10 0 .333 298
St.Louis ' 5 10 0".333 343
San Francisco 3 12 0 .200 219
x-clinched conference
y-clinched division
z-clinched wild card
xx-clinched playoff spot
Saturday
Denver at San Diego, 4:30 p.m..
N.Y. Giants at Oakland, 8 p.m.
Sunday
Buffalo at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Carolina atAtlanta, I p.m.
Detroit at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Arizona at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Seattle at Green Bay, I p.m.
Miami at New, England, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Kansas City, I p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, I p.m.
New Orleans at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Tennessee at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 4:15 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.


293
273
288
357

PA
261 .
248
297
371

PA
168
334
310
327

PA
248
370
419
411


College bowl games

New Orleans Bowl
Southern Miss 31 ,Arkansas State 19
GMAC Bowl
Toledo 45, UTEP 13
Las Vegas Bowl
California 35, BYU 28
Poinsettia Bowl
Navy 51, Colorado State 30
Fort Worth (Texas) Bowl
Kansas 42, Houston 13
Hawaii Bowl
Nevada 49, Central Florida 48, OT
Motor City Bowl
Memphis 38, Akron 31
Champs Sports Bowl
Clemson 19, Colorado 10
Insight Bowl
Arizona State 45, Rutgers 40
Wednesday
MPC Computers Bowl
Boston College 27, Boise State 21
Alamo Bowl
Nebraska 32, Michigan 28
Thursday
Emerald Bowl
Utah 38, Georgia Tech 10
Holiday Bowl
Oregon vs. Oklahoma (n)
Today
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
Virginia (6-5) vs. Minnesota (7-4), Noon
(ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso,Texas
Northwestern (7-4) Vs. UCLA (9-2), 2 p.m.
(CBS)
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Missouri (6-5) vs. South Carolina (7-4),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Peach Bowl
At Atlanta
Miami (9-2) vs. LSU (10-2), 7:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday
Meineke Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
South Florida (6-5) vs. North
Carolina State (6-5), II a.m. (ESPN2)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Fresno State (8-4) vs. Tulsa (8-4), I p.m.
(ESPN)
Houston Bowl
TCU (10-1) vs. Iowa State (7-4), 2:30 p.m.
(ESPN2)


Monday, Jan. 2
Cotton Bowl
At Dallas
Alabama (9-2) vs. Texas Tech (9-2), II a.m.
(FOX)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Iowa (7-4) vs. Florida (8-3), II a.m.
(ESPN)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Virginia Tech (10-2) vs. Louisville (9-2),
12:30 p.m. (NBC)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Wisconsin (9-3) vs. Auburn (9-2), I p.m.
(ABC)
Fiesta Bowl
At Tempe,Ariz.
Ohio State (9-2) vs. Notre Dame (9-2), 5
p.m. (ABC)
Sugar Bowl
At Atlanta
Georgia (10-2) vs. West Virginia (10-1),
8:30 p.m. (ABC)
Tuesday, Jan. 3
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Penn State (10-1) vs. Florida State
(8-4), 8 p.m. (ABC)
Wednesday, Jan. 4
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Texas (12-0) vs. Southern Cal (12-0), 8
p.m. (ABC)

BASKETBALL

NBA standings


New J
Philad
Bosto
Newc
Toron


Miami
Washi
Orland
Chark
Atlant


Detro
Clevel
Indian;
Milwau
Chicag



San An
Dallas
Mempi
New C
Houst


Minne;
Denve
Utah
Seattle
Portlar


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
Jersey 16 12 .571
elphia 15 14 .517
n II 16 .407
York 7 20 .259
to 7 22 .241
Southeast Division,
W L Pct
17 12 .586
ngton 12 15 .444
do II 15 .423
otte 10, 19 .345
a 7 20 ' .259
Central Division
W L Pct'
it 23 3 .885
and 17 10 .630
a 15 II .577
ukee IS II .577
go 12 16 .429
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
ntonio 22 7 .759
21 7 .750
his 17 10 .630
Orleans 12 15 .444


on


sota
rd


nd


Phoenix


10 17 .370
Northwest Division
W L Pct
14 12 .538
14 15 .483
13' 16 .448
12 15 .444
10 18 .357
Pacific Division
W L Pct
17 10 .630


L.A. Clippers 16 11I .593 I
Golden State 15 14 .517 3
LA Lakers 15 14 .517 3
Sacramento II 17 .393 6'A
Wednesday's Games
Phoenix 104,Washington 99
Toronto 108,Atlanta 102
Orlando 105, NewYork 95
Charlotte 93, Chicago 80
New Orleans 92, Houston 90
Minnesota 108,'Seattle 95
Portland 95, Philadelphia 91
Memphis 100, LA. Lakers 99, OT
Golden State I1I 1, Boston 109
t* Thursday's Games
(Late Games Not Included)
Miami at Detroit (n)
New Orleans at San Antonio (n)
Seattle at Denver (n)
Friday's Games
Miami atWashington, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Charlotte, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
New York at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.rm.
Golden State at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Boston at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Memphis at Portland, 10 p.m.

College scores

Wednesday
EAST
Albany, N.Y. 62, Brdwn 47 .
Carnegie-Melloh 51, Princeton 46
Connecticut 85, Stony Brook 52
La Salle 85, St. Francis, Pa. 55
Monmouth, N.J. 56, Hartford 54
Penn St. 74,1PFW 59
Siena 75,Youngstown St. 67
SOUTH
Austin Peay 83, Middle Tennessee 67



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

ETHAL


02005 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.

LYBULT




INJEYT


WmT I I I I I


L I I 1 i


I


Bethune-Cookman 75, South Florida 68,
OT
Coastal Carolina 109, Ohio Valley 76
East Carolina 87, Limestone 54
Georgia 72, Clemson 69
Louisville 89, Fairleigh Dickinson 66
Maryland 68, Delaware St. 54
N.C. State 81, New Hampshire 62
North Carolina 89, N.C.-Asheville 47
Pittsburgh 58, South Carolina 5 I
S. Illinois 57, Murray St. 53
UAB 90, Oklahoma St. 71
Virginia 77, UMBC 66
MIDWEST
Cincinnati 75, Miami (Ohio) 65
Illinois 89, SE Missouri 64
Iowa St. 59,Tennessee St. 5 I
Marquette 88, Lewis 40
Michigan 81, Coppin St. 53
Michigan St. 80,Tennessee Tech 63
Missouri 68, E. Illinois 56
Notre Dame 85, Fordham 49
Ohio St. 87, Gardner-Webb 58
Purdue 62,Tenn.-Martin 54
Saint Louis 58, Chicago St. 52
Toledo 64, Oakland, Mich. 61
Wichita St. 66, Indiana St. 62
Wisconsin 78, Louisiana Tech 52
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas St. 69,Ark.-Pine Bluff 60
Lanmar 112, St. Gregory's 60
North Texas 101,Texas-Permian Basin 62
Oklahoma 81, Oral Roberts 73
SMU 76, Harvard 55
TCU 79, Grambling St.64
FAR WEST
Air Force 54, Georgia Tech 46
Colorado St. 106, Colo.-Colo. Springs
10
Oregon St. 78,Texas-Pan American 54
Pepperdine 87, CS Northridge 72
Saint Joseph's 70, Saint Mary's, Calif. 66
UC Santa Barbara 76, Portland 53
Utah .80, High Point 44
Weber St. 69, Utah Valley St. 62
TOURNAMENT
Cable Car Classic
* First Round
Bucknell 63, Boston U. 57
Santa Clara 63, UC Riverside 61
Comcast Lobo Invitational :
. First Round
New Mexico 66, Dartmouth 60
Texas-Arlington 83, Radford 66
FlU Holiday Classic
Championship
Texas-San Antonio 76, St. Bonaventure 55
Third Place
Cal St.-Fullerton 74, Fla. International 57
Panasonic Holiday Festival
Championship
St. John's 51, Massachusetts 49
Third Place '"'
St. Peter's 63, Columbia 54
State Farm Sun Bowl Tournament
Championship
Georgetown 76, UTEP 64
' Third Place
Colgate 64, MVSU 53


Top 25 schedule

Thursday's Games
No. 7 Washington vs.Arizona State (n)
No. II UCLA vs. Stanford (n)
No. 20 Nevada vs. Louisiana-Lafayette (r
Today's Games
No. 2 Connecticut vs. Qtiinniplac at tI
Hartford Civic Center, 7 p.m.
No. 4 Memphis vs. Purdue, 8 p.m.
No. 5 Florida vs. Florida A&M, I p.r
No. 6 Illinois vs. Tennessee-Martin, 8 p.m
No. 12 George Washington at No. 19 N.'
State, 7 p.m.
No. 15 Texas vs. Prairie View, 8 p.m.
No. 18 Kentucky vs. Ohio at U.S. Ban
Arena, Cincinnati, 8 p.m.
No. 22 Wake Forest vs. Charlest<
Southern, 7 p.m.
No. 25 WestVirginia vs. Canisius, 7 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL scores
Wednesday's Games
Florida 6, Boston 4
Philadelphia 4,Atlanta 3, OT
Columbus I,Anaheim 0
N.Y. Rangers 6, N.Y. Islanders 2
Ottawa 6, Carolina 2
Montreal 4,Tampa Bay 3
New Jersey 7,Washington 2
St. Louis 2, Chicago I
Minnesota 4, Edmonton 2
Los Angeles 5, Colorado 3
Phoenix 5, San Jose 4
Vancouver 4, Nashville 3
Thursday's Games
(Late Games Not Included)
Philadelphia 4, Carolina 3, OT
Pittsburgh 6, New Jersey 2
Toronto 4, Buffalo 3, SO .
St. Louis at Dallas (n) '
Los Angeles at Phoenix (n)
Minnesota at Calgary (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Boston atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Montreal at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Buffalo, 8 p.m. ,
Columbus at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Nashville at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Colorado at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold jnd Mike Argirlon


Want some, Nellie?


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise 'answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: A
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: COLIC BANJO DISARM JACKAL
I Answer: When an after-dinner drink was offered, the
guest's reply was - "CORDIAU"


DECEMBER 30, 2005


Dungy returns to Colts


By MICHAEL MAROT
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS - Two
days after burying his son,
Tony Dungy rejoined the
Indianapolis Colts on
Thursday, hugging his play-
ers and assistant coaches and
thanking the public for its
support while he dealt with
his personal tragedy.
"It was the right time to
come back," he said following
an afternoon workout. "I talked
about it with my wife, and we
went through the grieving
process and now we're starting
with the healing process."
Dungy left the team
Dec. 22 when his 18-year-old
son, James, died. A prelimi-
nary autopsy report indicated
the teen took his own life, but
the exact cause of death won't
be released until a toxicology
examination is completed in
four to six weeks.
Team president Bill Polian
and owner Jim Irsay urged


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Indianapolis Colts head coach
Tony Dungy waits for the start of
practice in Indianapolis on
Thursday. Dungy rejoined his
team, a week after his oldest
son's death.


Dungy to stay with his family
as long as needed while assis-
tant head coach Jim Caldwell
filled in. On Tuesday, players,
coaches and team officials
flew to Tampa for the funeral,


the first time they had seen
their coach since he left to be
with his family.
His return surprised and
excited everyone, as did his
announcement that he would
coach Sunday's regular-sea-
son finale in Arizona.
A locker room that had been
subdued during Dungy's
absence suddenly came alive.
The Colts also appeared to walk
off the field with more pep.
"It's great to have him
back," Polian said. "It's been a
long ordeal for him and his
family, and I think it will be a
long, long time before they
have a sense of peace and
consolation. But I hope this is
one place he can find some
peace and consolation."
Dungy said he spent
Wednesday with his family at
the Tampa Zoo. He said he
discussed the decision with
his wife, Lauren, and flew
back to Indianapolis late
Wednesday night with his
other teenage son, Eric.


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Page Editor: Mario Sarmento, 754-0420


I --------








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


FINISH: Fort White boys place third after beating Keystone
Continued From Page 1B


Moran converted, as did
Steven Pate. Brad Witt got
Columbia on the board, but
Bridges kept the pressure on
with his goal. Charles
Kamback made his clutch
kick, then Cullen Boggus
drilled home the goal that gave
the Bulldogs the title.
For coach Frank Johnson, to
- say this win was a surprise was
an understatement.
"We were missing three
* starters - off skiing - so I'll
be honest, when we came in
the tournament, I didn't expect
to be in the championship
game," he said. Suwannee
avenged last year's title defeat
to the Tigers.
Tyler noted the strong play
of his defense, which was bol-
stered by the return of :Brad
Rigdon.
Rigdon and Nyssen had
been playing in the Sun Bowl,
but when their team was elimi-
nated early Thursday, they
made the drive back to Lake
City for the contest.
J. Ben Parker, Witt and Alan
Watson were named to the


All-Tournament Team for
Columbia, as were Moran,
Salvador Mendosa and
Yanossy, who took home Most
Valuable Player honors.
"I played pretty good,"
Watson said. "My first two
games I played pretty good,
but the last game I hurt my
calf, so I didn't play very well
this last one."
The Tigers (7-6-2) get a
chance for revenge when they
play Suwannee on Wednesday.
For girls coach Beth Adkiris,
there was no 'shame in losing
to one of the top teams in the'
state.
"We were working with a
mismatched group of girls,"
she said.
"Not, all of our varsity play-
ers were here. The JV players
really stepped up and helped
us out."
Columbia played without
Ana Moore, Anjali Mhatre and
Lyndsey Goodson - "our
three heavy hitters," as Adkins
called them.
, But Julie Hanson and
Megan Hill returned from


illness and Julie Hanson,
Raychel Robertson and Tyler
Bicknell were able to step up
for the Lady Tigers.
Shelley Giebeig and Kelly
Hunter were named to the All-
Tournament Team, as was the
Forest quartet of Leah
Brabant, Kim Schwenk, Diana
Williams and tournament
MVP Kristin Burton.
The Columbia girls
advanced to the championship
game with a 1-0 victory against
Newberry High in their early
game.
Giebeig scored the lone goal
from a sharp angle on the right
side of the field late in the con-
test to send the Lady Tigers to
the title game.
. "It was a crazy paced game,
on the edge of your seats, won-
dering if we were going to
score," Adkins said. "In the
end we finally pulled it out. It
was a rough game for both
sides."
Strong performances by
Christen Jones, Giebeig,
Hunter, Kayla Brill and Mary
Doonan helped the Lady


Tigers (3-11-2) reach the inau-
gural girls' championship in
front of the home fans.
The Fort White boys soccer
team also had a strong show-
ing, as the Indians held off
Keystone Heights High 2-1 in a
dramatic game for third place.
"I feel awesome," Indians
coach Bob Hochmuth said.
"We struggled through
injuries, moved things around
and found people that want to
produce in unusual ways, and
they really found a passion in
the second half of the game."
Matt Case scored the first
goal on a bullet from 18 yards,
then Mike Williams found
Connor Hayden on a through
ball for the winning goal.
Williams and Indians keeper
Stephen Lynch were also
named to the All-Tournament
Team.
Lynch earned those honors
with a superb performance
that put Fort White (4-5-3) in
*the third-place game. Earlier
in the day, the Indians won a
shootout 4-1 against Arnold
High to advance. Lynch made


two saves, and Case drilled
home the winner to break the
tie between the two teams.
"One of the guys just lined
up over the ball and kind of
tipped off where he was
going," Lynch said. On the
other save, Lynch said he
made an "educated guess."
The sophomore keeper
admitted he had gotten "no
sleep" the previous night in
anticipation of the shootout,
and he looked more relieved
than excited when his team-
mates mobbed him after
Case's strike won it for Fort
White.
The girls had the misfor-
tune of. playing the Lady
Wildcats in their early game,
and they lost 8-0. Then Fort
White (5-5-5) lost the battle for
third place in a shootout with
Newberry High. After two
rounds and the with score still
tied, the Panthers scored on
their only penalty kick in the
last round to clinch third.
In the boys' game for fifth
place, Arnold routed
Newberry 5-0.


UTAH
Continued From Page 1B
against the Yellow Jackets'
bewildered secondary. First-
year head coach Kyle
Whittingham, Meyer's
defensive coordinator, won
his bowl debut in style.
LaTendresse seemed to
be open .all day while the
Utes embarrassed the
favored Yellow Jackets (7-5),
who practically didn't show
up to their ninth straight
bowl appearance.
Each of LaTendresse's four
TD catches of 14, 23, 25 and
16 yards came on simple post
patterns down the middle.
Reggie Ball passed for
258 yards for Georgia Tech,
which seemed disappointed
to be so far from Atlanta for
the postseason.
Cornerback Eric Weddle,
the Mountain West
Conference's top defensive
player and the Emerald
Bowl's defensive MVP, did a
bit of everything for the
Utes - running the ball,
engineering a fake field goal
as a holder, even throwing a
terrible interception.


Brad Smith
likes the
attention he's
receiving

By MARY FOSTER
SAssociated Press
SHREVEPORT, La.
. Missouri quarterback Brad
SSmith didn't exactly squirm as
he fielded questions before
today's Independence Bowl.
He acknowledged he'd rather
skip the spotlight before the
game, however.
He's not shy, though, about
the attention he'll get from
S6uth Carolina,' whose
defense has labeled him as pri-
ority No. 1.
"I like that," Smith said. "I
enjoy that challenge." .''
SDefensive end Orus
' Lambert
' had no
trouble
stating l
t h e


p I an ,-
when
South
Carolina (7-4) takes on
Missouri (6-5).
"Pretty much all we have to
do- is stop Brad Smith,"
Lambert said.,
:Spoken like a man who has
studied the Tigers' stats.
, Missouri put up 4,653 yards
inlotal offense this season and
Smith accounted for 3,173,
rushing for 1,151 yards and
passing for 2,022. That made
Smith the first player in NCAA
Division I-A history to pass for
2,000 and run for 1,000 in two
seasons. Smith completed 216
of 362 passes with 12 TDs and
eight INTs this season.
And he really doesn't care
how he makes a play, just that
it's a big one.
."Big plays, any way you make
them are exciting," Smith said.
"It's more making the right
decision, the one that works."
Smith already owns 59
school, Big 12 and NCAA sin-
gle-game, season and career
records.
"He's 'an excellent athlete
with his ability to run, just like
the Texas quarterback, Vince
Young," South Carolina coach
Steve Spurrier said. "You hope
to try to make him throw the
ball' and not beat you running.
We're going to try to contain
him and try to cover their guys
and try to get pressure on him."
An Independence Bowl vic-
tory would be big for both of
these teams, which seemed
long-shots to make it to a bowl.
South Carolina lost its first
three Southeastern
Conference, games before a
strong finish landed them the
first bowl bid since going to
the Outback Bowl after the
2001 season.
"It didn't start out all that
pretty," Spurrier said.
After a rough couple of
years with the Washington
Redskins, Spurrier gave up
golf for a chance to turn the
Gamecock's , around. He
described his team as a work
in progress.


Local Dealer Shocks Community:


"Cars To Sell For $29* Down & $99**/month!"

Area Auto Shoppers Express Disbelief But Dealer Remains Optimistic

As Unprecedented 6 Day Sale Approaches, 6 Days Only.


SUNBELT CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE


LAKE CITY, FL - Dennis Conway and Randy
Sears, Sales Managers of Sunbelt Chrysler-.
Jeep-Dodge, announced plans today for a great
new way to buy cars that's simple and inex-


Cherokee and more.
For auto shoppers looking for a veryA low
monthly payment there will be many choices,
including a loaded 2000 Dodge Neon with


pensive. This unique sales event, also known automatic and air conditioning, full power for


'as the' "Automotive 'Insider" Sale,? has been-
sweeping the U.S. Customers who come to
this sale are on the 'Inside' to great savings on
the new or used vehicle of their choice, all for
just a low initial down payment of only $29*
based 'on lender approval and creditworthi-
ness.
The event will be held for just six days, from


Monday,


December


26th thru Saturday,


December 31st, regardless of weather.
Conway offers a simple explanation for this
unprecedented sale, "As one of the largest
dealerships in the area we're overstocked with
high quality vehicles from lease turn-ins, pro-
gram car trade-ins, new vehicle duplications
and more." He adds, "I can't remember the
last time so many rare opportunities were
available to us at one time so we decided to let
our customers take advantage of these incred-
ible. values rather than sell them to whole-
salers or strangers at the auctions." During
"The Automotive 'Insider' Sale," every vehicle
will be clearly marked and available for the low
down payment of $29*. Every effort will be
made to obtain credit approval for those who
may have had challenges in the past.
During the event, selection couldn't be bet-
ter. Many of the vehicles offered are late
model vehicles with low mileage and the bal-
ance of their factory warranty remaining.
There will be many makes and models to
choose from including: Ford, Chrysler, Dodge,
Chevrolet, Honda, Toyota and an abundance of


S.U.V.'s
Escape,


will also
Explorer,


be featured,


Tahoe,


incl


Blazer,


eluding:
Grand


just 99/month.** Sample


payments will be.


clearly marked on vehicles. All you'll need to
do is obtain credit approval, pick a vehicle and
a payment. It's that simple.
Sears cites more examples, a 1997 Geo
Tracker with automatic and air conditioning
or a 2000 Ford F-150 with CD also for only
$99/month.** For those auto shoppers looking
to trade their current vehicle, all trades are
welcome, paid for or not. You won't want to
miss this unique opportunity to obtain a new
or pre-owned car, truck, van or sport utility
with an unbelievably low down payment of just
twenty-nine* dollars!
In order to assist buyers with loan process-
ing, finance representatives will be on hand
for immediate approval, and release of the
great deals offered at this event.
Conway would like to remind customers that
the event is first-come, first-served, so it's crit-
ical to come early to have the best chance of
getting the vehicle of your choice. The exclu-
sive site for this event is Sunbelt Chrysler-
Jeep-Dodge, Hwy 90 West, just 3/4 mile past I-
75 for six days only, Monday, December 26th
thru Saturday, December 31st from 9am-7pm.
Hurry for the best selection. For further


information


on the


"Automotive 'Insider'


Sales Event," please call (386) 755-3444.

*$29 denotes down payment, all sales subject to lender and
credit approval. Exact rate and terms varies by vehicle and
buyer. Vehicles subject to prior sale. **Examples: 1) 2000
Dodge Neon, $29 down, $99/mth for 60 months @ 7.99% APR.
Cash price $4085. 2) 1997 Geo Tracker, $29 Down, $99/mth for
48 months @ 6.99% APR. Sale price $4164. 3) 2000 Ford F-150
1500. '$29 Down, $99/mith for 60 months @ 6.99% APR. Sale
price $5029.


Pag e Editor: Mario Sarmento, 754-0420


::I














SPOTLIGHT


Friday, December 30, 2005


www.lakecityreporter.com


CULTURE SHOCK


Dick Clark making 'Rockin' Eve'


show his post-stroke coming out


Phone: 754-0429
smonley@lakecityreporter.com

Singin'

the year

end blues
It's the end of the year
2005. The terminal's
just around the corner
and most people
already have plans
worked out with whom they
are going to be kissing as
soon as they get the image
of Dick Clark out of their
head.
Being new to the Lake
City/North Florida area, I
haven't a clue as to what to
do after I am unchained
from my desk on the Lake
City Reporter night crew -
which leaves me with
approximately 15 seconds to
get to where I need to be to
see the bail drop.
OK, it's more like
5 seconds, but you get the
point.
I received a phone call
from a new Lake City
resident the other day about
this very topic. I asked
around the news room, and
surprisingly, the answers
were similar: '"There are
things to do in Lake City at
night?"
Not to bash the place I
call home, but for youngin's
like myself and a few others
on the Reporter staff,
there's absolutely no night'
life in this town. At least not
one that I've been able to
find - and I'm awake until
about 4 a.m. every day.
The closest thing to
resemble a night life is
Gainesville from what I've
been told. True, there are a
couple of bars within
walking distance of my
apartment complex, but by
the time I get there, last call
has already been, well,
called.
Last year, I spent my New
Year's Eve as a groomsman
in a good friend's wedding.
It was cold, it was snowy,
and I didn't get to use any of
my good one liners I
thought of for a speech to
the bride and groom.
So, here's my challenge to
those of you who tune into
this weekly entertainment
page, who happen to look at
this column: E-mail some
suggestions on night life in
Lake City. Popular places to
hang out that don't have the
words Wal or Waffle in
them.


If there is one person in
the television industry who
will be missed this coming
year, it's John Spencer.
Spencer died Dec. 16 after a
heart attack. He was four
days away from his
59th birthday.
Spencer played tough,
but lovable Leo McGarry
on the vastly popular
NBC political drama "The
West Wing."
It was Spencer's talent
that drew me into 'The
West Wing" during the
end of the summer when I
first moved to Lake City,
and has since strung me
along to buy the first five
seasons on DVD.
It was a sad day when
creator Aaron Sorkin left the
show, but nothing is sadder
than losing the most
talented actor on a show
that is stocked full of
talented actors.
Rest in peace, Mr.
Spencer.
* S. Michael Manley covers
entertainment for the
Reporter.


By JEFF WILSON
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - As he has for
decades, Dick Clark is planning to let
his TV work speak for itself- and for
him.
The 76-year-old Clark, the focus of
increasing speculation as his annual
New Year's Eve hosting gig draws
closer, has shunned public appear-
ances and interviews since a stroke
nearly 13 months ago,
Thursday, responding to reports
questioning if he is healthy enough to
work, the "American Bandstand"
icon said through a spokesman that
he's looking at "New Year's Rockin'
Eve," airing live on ABC, as his
personal coming-out celebration.
"He's in New York. He's going to
be on TV Saturday," Clark publicist
Paul Shefrin said from New York as
he fielded still another request for an
interview with the man known as
America's oldest teenager.
"He just wants the show to be the
coming out party," Shefrin noted.
"He's walking and talking as he has
been for months. He's looking for-
ward to doing the show Saturday,"
Shefrin added, saying Clark will wel-
come the new year as he always has
- kissing his wife, Kari.
Clark and co-host Ryan Seacrest
are set to welcome in 2006 from New
York's Times Square. Mariah Carey
will perform. -
Clark suffered a stroke on Dec. 6,
2004, and was hospitalized for more
than seven weeks at a Burbank hos-
pital, forcing him to cancel as host of
last year's "New Year's Rockin' Eve."
Regis Philbin filled in and Clark


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dick Clark'brings in the New Year from New York's Times Square in this undated publicity photo. Clark, who suffered a
stroke last December, won't be in a wheelchair when he appears Saturday on ABC's 'New Year's Rockin' Eve' said co-host


Ryan Seacrest in a recent interview.

promised to be back this year.
"It will be good to be back in New
York again for New Year's and I'm
elated that Ryan has agreed to join
me in ushering in New Year's," Clark
said in a statement months ago.
Recent tabloid photographs show-
ing Clark using a walker are months
old, Shefrin said.


"He's doing fine. He's walking.
He's talking," the publicist said. "He'll
keep doing some rehab stuff. He
wants to get close to perfect."
Seacrest, who is making his debut
as "New York's Rockin' Eve" co-host,
said earlier that Clark "is one of the
most driven and focused individuals
on the planet."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo provided by The Weinstein Company, a traveling salesman, Danny Wright (Greg
Kinnear), accidentally meets up with Julian Noble (Pierce Brosnan), a hit man, at a Mexico City
bar. Their subsequent evening together intertwines their lives in an unexpected, but lasting
bond in 'The Matador.'


'The Matador' a late


end of the year gift


By CHRISTY LEMIRE
AP Movie Critic

Pierce Brosnan stars as a
cynical, washed-up, irre-
sistible cad of a hit man in
'The Matador."
It's the kind of role you'd
expect to see Billy Bob
Thornton play, or Jack'
Nicholson, if the movie had
come out 20 years ago. We
know Brosnan's Julian
Noble is devilish from the
first time we see him with
tattoos and a bad mus-
tache, waking up in a hotel
bed with an empty bottle of
Maker's Mark on the night-
stand on one side and a
naked woman lying next to
him on the other.
You could call Julian
Noble the anti-James Bond
- even more so than the
part Brosnan played in,
"The Tailor of Panama,"
which was considered the
anti-Bond when that film
came out in 2001. This
character is even more
twisted and tormented, and
Brosnan wears it as com-
fortably as one of 007's
custom-made tuxedos.
And in "The Matador,"'
writer-director Richard
Shepard has crafted for
Brosnan and Greg Kinnear
a breezy, stylish, darkly
funny thriller that


Film Review
"The Matador"
RATED R: strong
sexual content,
language.
RUN TIME: 97
minutes
*** out of ****



transcends the cliches of
the mismatched-buddy
movie genre.
Julian goes 'down to
Mexico City to perform a
job, something he's done
expertly for the past
22 years, but lately with
less enthusiasm.' While
he's there he meets
Kinnear's Danny Wright,
an optimistic, straight-
laced Denver businessman,
at the hotel bar.
Each of them has had
way too many margaritas
- it's Julian's birthday and
he's been drinking alone
because he has no friends;
Danny's been celebrating
the 'deal he thinks he
closed earlier in the day -
and they forge an unlikely
connection.
Of course they're total
opposites, a fundamental
element of this kind of film.
Danny sees Julian as


dangerous and exciting
and finds himself unexpect-
edly fascinated by his
globe-trotting lifestyle;'
Julian sees allure in the sta-
bility and normalcy of
Danny's suburban exis-
tence, complete with a lov-
ing wife who's waiting for
him at home! (Hope Davis,
naturally smart and funny
as always).
We know from the outset
that these two disparate
creatures will change each
others' lives, but in
Shepard's film, the journey
is the destination.
Seemingly in a nod to
Brosnan's days of Bond-
style worldwide intrigue,
the journey hops from
Mexico City to Vienna,
Moscow, Budapest and
back to Denver.
"You a spy, something
like that?" Danny asks
early in the film, another
clever acknowledgment of
Brosnan's best-known
screen role, as he and
Julian puff on cigars at a
bullfight.
Julian reveals reluctantly
that he's an assassin, but
prefers to think of himself
as a "facilitator of
fatalities."
"I do what I'm asked to
do," he adds with a twinkle
in his eye.


"And so when he puts his mind to
something and when he wants to do
something like this television show
and be there for everybody to see
him, he'll do it," Seacrest said.
"New Year's Rockin' Eve," which
Clark originated in 1972, will air on
ABC starting at 10 p.m. (EST and
PSI) Saturday.


Entertainment 2005 ...

What might have been


By JAKE COYLE
AP Entertainment Writer

NEW YORK - It may not
have been evident at the time,
but when Tom Cruise was
leaping up and down on Oprah
Winfrey's couch, he was like a
piston, churning the wheels of
fate.
Had Cruise not chosen to
express his love for Katie
Holmes on that momentous
May day, 2005 might have
been very different. Just
imagine:
Hurt by Cruise's cold,
somber manner on "Oprah,"
Holmes storms out of the stu-
dio and announces that she's
leaving the "War of the
Worlds" star.
"He could have at least
hugged an ottoman," Holmes
says.
Spurned by the 27-year-old
beauty, Cruise undergoes a
period of self-examination and
gives up Scientology.
Devastated about losing its
most famous member, the
church quickly recruits
Russell Crowe.
Enlightenment soothes
Crowe's anger, and the notori-
ous phone-tossing incident
never happens (although
there are reports .of the actor
flicking a Cheez-It at a hotel'
bellboy).
His good reputation takes a
hit, though, when Crowe (pro-
moting "Cinderella Man")
calls 'Today" host Matt Lauer
"glib" while discussing med-
ication. The word is apparently
central to Scientology beliefs
- like "sin" is for Catholics.
Crowe's "Cinderella Man"
co-star, Renee Zellweger,
thrown by the brouhaha,
seeks solace not in country






RUMOR HAS IT (PG-13) DIG (1200 230 510) 735
1020
THE RINGER (PG-13) DIG (1145 215 445) 725 1000
CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN 2 (PG) DIG (1215245
515)740 1010
FUN WITH DICK AND JANE (PG-13) DIG * (1230
300 520) 745 1015
KING KONG (PG-13) DIG (1130330)730'
CHRONICLES OF NARNIA (PG) DIG (100410)720
1030


star Kenny Chesney, but
someone just as surprising.
She marries "American Idol"
finalist Bo Bice, a decision
criticized by Simon Cowell.
The wedding news breaks
just as the circulatory dating of
Brad Pitt, Angelina Jolie,
Jennifer Aniston and Vince
Vaughn hits full stride. It
becomes too much for tabloid
editors, who begin referring to
them as Brangelinastonaughn.





"-7 ��"

.! ' -


Nell MoCoy.......................Fab 11
Winter Jamn.....................Feb 18
with Newsboys. Toby Mao, Noaisong
Hawk Nelso.1, ZOEgirl, Krystal Myers
andimq-toroole stunt leamSphere of Fear
Willle Nelson................Feb 25'
Taoe Adklns
A cralg Morgan...............Mar 11
George Thorogood............Mar 18
'. All onoerts/events Cree
' with Pai adilsslon


4B


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


DILBERT


FOXTROT


Z1TS


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
WAMFtN AND I P~MIMS- yoo,\IF- CH055Nrms 1 r4~1Th SOUNPS Lllr F A I1r cH0prMAS, -y -
rEP 'r 10 K-P N 1OUCM, P'ICFMAN OVFgi-? e &Os~t? ,10P-I G.NSOULD ALL il'e' eF4I
~U Ir~BT'f-fT PIILOT )HW IOMAN-fIC! j aJRI-rf AMUT V117 T1ty4-ffF- N A~... LOWE- 1RADMfoN
i oN' KrNOW I r -you P0o-AND FHA'JN& AAN AP.cr'Me



"YK-T' 00s




FRANK & ERNEST


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY B.C.


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


CLASSIC PEANUTS'


HOROStOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Take a jaunt that will get
you into the new year's
groove. A trip down memory
lane will do you a world of
good. Once you look back,
you'll realize how far you've
come and how much you can
accomplish. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You can have a little fun
without going overboard. You
may find yourself upset with
someone you thought you
could trust. A relationship will
take a turn, putting you in a
much better position.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Look to your friends for
answers. You will be able to
solve a problem, making it
easier for you to go out and
enjoy yourself with friends.
Understanding what other
people want is half the battle.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): You'll be full of mixed
emotions today. Don't let the
uncertainty that someone
else has put you in an awk-,
ward position. Do what you
want and don't worry about


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

what others are up to. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Take a good look at yourself
to see what changes you'd
like to make to your looks,
personal life or any other
area of your life that you
aren't fully satisfied with.
This is a great day to make
your new year's to-do list.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You have a lot more
going for you than you real-
ize. Take a good look at the
past and what you've accom-
plished, knowing the year
ahead will be equally as pro-
ductive. Travel, education
and a change of lifestyle are
all still beckoning you.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You can make a deci-
sion regarding your work or
a project you've been
involved in. You will be inter-
ested in something you have
never tried before. Enjoy an
evening of entertainment.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: F equals W
" NMH EI WOMRV ND R,H SH G NS
F DICA'H C WI USHG VRCGMXCS-K
EMOSVW WOA MG'H DXSO WCC
NDRIH SZSIL AWL." - GDV
NWOJH, DO HGSZSO HXMSCPSIU
'PREVIOUS SOLUTION - "A man like Verdi must write like Verdi." - Verdi
"We do not compose - we are composed." - Gustav Mahler
(c) 2005 by NEA, Inc. 12-30


You need someone to make
you smile for a change. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Your mind will be on
money-making plans you
want to implement as soon as
possible. A chance to move in
a new direction will suit you
just fine, but it may not sit
well with your partner.
Consider others' feelings
before you move ahead.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): You will be pas-
sionate, emotional and a little
bit explosive today. Don't
over-indulge or make promis-
es that are ridiculous. Sort
out each issue one at a time
until you feel comfortable
that you are moving in a
positive direction. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You've got every-
thing under control, -so stop
fretting so much. It's time for
you to show your friends and
colleagues you know how to
have a good time. You will
surprise everyone. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Someone you
thought you could trust will
let you down. Don't tell your
secrets, and keep your reso-
lutions for the new year to
yourself. You don't want to
leave yourself in a vulnerable
position. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Lighten up, smile and
the whole world will smile
with you. You set the atmos-
phere, and you will see how
easy it is to get what you
want. Money deals can be
closed if you are specific
about your demands. ****


DEAR ABBY


Budding bully doesn't listen

to parents reason of rebuke


DEAR ABBY: My daugh-
ter is a tall, thin, blond-haired,
blue-eyed bully. She calls
other girls at school fat and
ugly to the point of bringing
them to tears. The mothers
complain to the teacher, who
calls me and her father. Today
her teacher told me that a
schoolmate asked my daugh-
ter for a piece of candy, and
she replied, "You don't need
it. You're fat enough already."
The kicker, Abby - my
daughter is only 5!
I don't know where she
learns these things. We have
always taught our children
never to call names or pick on
others because they are dif-
ferent. She has certainly
never heard things like that at
home. Her older brother is a
sweet,, well-mannered child
who has never given us a
moment's trouble.
Before this, I always
thought that bullies were
from homes where they were
neglected or abused in some
way, so they took it out on
other kids.
But my daughter comes
from a happy, loving family,
and I can't for the life of me
figure out how she can be so
mean-spirited at such a young
age. I didn't think kids that
age were even aware of their
appearance, but my daughter
will tell you in a heartbeat that
she's "beautiful" or "skinny."
Her father and I talk and
punish, but it does no good.


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com

Is she just spoiled, or is this
something serious we should
be worried about? - DIS-
TURBED MOM IN
DELAWARE
DEAR MOM: If your
daughter were my child, I'd be
concerned for a couple of rea-
sons. She seems never to have
learned that while "pretty" is
an asset, it's more important
to be a. nice person.
Regardless of how attractive
people may tell her she is -
or she thinks she is - she has
developed an extremely unat-
tractive personality trait. And
her fixation on "skinny" could
lead to an eating disorder
when she's older.
I am also concerned
because your daughter seems
unwilling or unable to learn
when you correct her. A child
psychologist might help you
understand what's going on. If
I were you, I would have her
see one NOW. You need to
understand why your child
has no empathy for others,
and why she doesn't learn
from being reasoned with or
punished.


DEAR ABBY: I met a guy
through an online dating serv-
.ice. We talked on the phone
and e-mailed each other for a
couple of weeks. He said he
wanted a picture .of me, so I
sent him a couple.
I didn't hear from him for a
few days. Then he sent me an
e-mail and a text message. His
message said, "U R moving
way 2 fast for me." I have tried
to e-mail and call him, but he
doesn't answer. I stopped call-
ing and sent him a couple
more e-mails, but again -
nothing.
I'm not sure what to do
next. I liked talking to him
because we both are looking
for the same thing in a rela-
tionship. I would still like to
meet him and straighten
things out and see how we get
along. Do you think there is a
chance we could get together?
- LONELY IN MICHIGAN
DEAR LONELY: What you
should do next is go back to
the online dating service and
continue fishing, because this
"catch" has lost interest. What
he was trying to say in his
e-mail, but didn't have the
courage to tell you on the
phone, is that the chemistry is
wrong for him. My advice for
you is, the sooner you move
on, the better you'll feel,
because pursuing this relation-
ship further is a waste of your
time.
* Write Dear Abby at P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


GARFIELD


I


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


Personal Merchandise


. $3o00 $900
ldays le~s .]l idlirjl

Ad must be placed at the LCR 6 days i ne 1 Ju
and paid in advance. --- ..-- -Tfi


4,:' .~.I. :mt4.*~~Br Vt


n,.
7 >XIK i; ~tT~*9
H' .a.k 5h7-dv'Yt,. .,.~,
'ti' e'*. .


4 line minimum'2.55 per line
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion. -




Number of Insertions Per line Rate
3 ... ................. . ... . 1.65
4-6 ....................... .1.50
7-13 ...................... .1 .45
14-23 ..................... .1.20
24 or more ................. 990
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.




Limited to service type advertising only.
4 lines, one month ........ . . . .... . 60.00
$9.50 each additional line,
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.


Classified Department: 755-5440




You can call us at 755-5440, Monday through Friday
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their classified ads in
person, and some ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad copy to the
Reporter.

FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the
Classified Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.com




l a


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$2200 $25so $25so
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AR day of publication. We accept responsibility
1 f: ;,, . for only the first incorrect insertion, and
V- , r'J.. i -,_. g. 4 only the charge for the ad space in error.
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Includes 2 Signs 4 Hls Each additional Cancellations- Normal advertising deadlines
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Advertising copy is subject to approval by the
Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or
classify all advertisements under appropriate head-
ings. Copy should be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of publication. Credit for
published errors will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement which was incor-
rect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered to be published,
nor for any general, special or consequential dam-
ages. Advertising language must comply with
Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition
of discrimination in employment, housing and public
accommodations. Standard'abbreviations are accept-
able; however, the first word of each ad may not be
abbreviated.


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DESIGNED WEBSITE FOR
YOUR BUSINESS
A Perfect Christmas Gift!
Lake City area resident discount.
MSN.Net Hosting 877-467-7932

COMPUTER NOT WORKING?
We help with all your computer
needs. Virus & Spyware Repair,
Network & New Computer Setup.
Tutoring and anything else!
Call Dave at 352-870-7467.


Roofing & Gutters

SOUTHLAND REMODELING
Specializing in Reroofs,
Roof Repair, Roof Cleaning.
Call 386-697-3134

Concrete Work

JSH CONCRETE INC.
Slabs, footings, drives, etc. Licensed
& Insured. Home Owner Discounts.
Call 386-719-9918

Painting Service

N & N: We come from the old
school. Affordable painting &
pressure washing Since 1952;
386-965-0482 or 386-697-6237
Free Estimates.

Painting & Handyman Service
Painting, Home Repair, Remodel,
Drywall Repair, & Pressure Wash
Call Mike Lainhart 386-454-7060
Professional Painting & Pressure
Washing. 20 yrs exp. Quality Work,
Free Estimates. Will Meet or Beat
all other Estimates. 386-344-4242


MITCHELL/ HILGERSON LLC
Kitchen & Bath Remodeling.
Electrical repairs, Carpentry.
Paint & Trim Call 386-365-9909

Home Maintenance

Grey Wolf Enterprises
Custom Site Built Sheds
& Vinyl/Hardy Board Siding. Home
Maint: & Improvements
All Major Credit Cards Accepted
Call For Estimate 386-697-6765

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawf care, sod, trim-
ming, design. Com. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call 386-496-2820 lv-msg.
TIME TO MULCH
Make your flower beds look like
new. Delivered & spread or just
delivery. 386-935-6595

Services

FREE CLEANUP.
Pick up of unwanted metals,
tin, scrap vehicles.
386-755-0133 We Recycle.

Drywall Services

DRYWALL Hang, Finish;
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Interior & Exterior Painting.
386-752-2412

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Andrews Pressure Washing
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Free Estimates.
Call 386-755-2065


EARL'S PURE
Pressure Washing & Painting.
Free Estimates Earl Goff
386-935-3230

Land Services

u Bulldozer Work! Tractor
work, root raking, bush hogging,
seeding, sodding, disking, site prep
& landscape work. Custom Lawn
care. Irrigation Repair &
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Call 755-3890 or (386) 623-3200
Look! We can dig your Trench for
less than you can rent a Trencher!
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F. THOMAS ENTERPRISES
Unique Wood, Designs and
Fabrication.Call 386-752-7387 or
e-mail ftc206()bellsouth.net

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Hazardous TREE TRIMMING,
removal & stump grinding. Senior
discount. 15 years experience.
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Call 386-792-4061 or 365-2819

Bankruptcy/Divorce

#1 IN BUSINESS SERVICES
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RE Closings, Legal Forms
248 N Marion Av. 755-8717


Legal

COLUMBIA COUNTY, PROBATE
DIVISION
File No. 05-221-GP
Division
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR,
FLORIDA IN RE: ESTATE OF
CARL .EDISON CLARK. alo kno.' n
.,' CRL E CL\RK
Deceased.
File No. 05-221-CP
Division: Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Carl
Edision Clark, also known as, Carl E.
Clark , deceased, whose date of death
was October 10, 2005, and whose Social
Security Number is 267-16-2974, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Colum-
bi.i County, Florida, Probate Divison,
the address of which is Columbia
County Courthouse, 173 Northeast Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida,
32055. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below-All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
t..py of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other
creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE-
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITH-
STANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this no-
tide is . December 30, 2005.
Personal Representative:
/S/ Carlette C. Snith
Attorney for Personal Representativel
DARBY, PEELE, BOWDOIN &
PAYNE
By: /S/ S. Austin Peele
Carlette C.Snith:
Florida Bar No..062231
285 Northeast Hernando Avenue Post'
Office Drawer 1707
Lake City, Florida 32056-1707
Telephone (386) 752-4120
1410 Hendrix Drive Birmingham, Ala-
bama 35214
05509262
December 30, 2005
January 6, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CO-
LUMBIACOUNTY.
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
SIN RE: ESTATE OF
MURIEL L. ROSEKE,
Deceased.
File No. 05-243-CP
Division
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Muriel L. Roseke
The administration of the estate of
deceased, whose date of death was
November 20, 2005 and whose Social
Security Number is 266-34-043 is
pending in the Circuit Court for Colum-
bia, County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is:
P.O. Drawer 2064, Lake City, Florida
32056-2064. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set
forth below. All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is required to
be served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN. THE LATER OP 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.


Legal

All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OP THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED-
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PE-
RIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S,
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this no-
tice is 30 December, 2005.
Attorney for Personal Representativel
DARBY, PEELE, BOWDOIN &
PAYNE
By: M. Blair Payne, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 0342378
Personal Representative:
Wayne E. Roseke
285 N.E. Hernando Ave. P.O. Drawer
1707, Lake City, Florida 32056-1707
Telephone: 386-752-4120
22060 47th Drive
Lake City. Florida 32024
05509261
December 30, 2QB5
January 6, 2006
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
'3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORI-
DA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 04-573-CA
BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE
IN TRUST FOR THE HOLDERS OF
THE EQCC HOME EQUITY LOAN
TRUST SERIES 2001-02.
Plaintiff,
vs.
NORA J. BRYANT, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant
to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
the 15th day of December, 2005, and en-
tered in Case No. 04-573-CA, of the Cir-
cuit Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in
and 'for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein BANK OF NEW YORK, AS
TRUSTEE IN TRUST FOR THE
HOLDERS OF THE EQCC HOME
EQUITY LOAN TRUST SERIES 2001-
02 is the Plaintiff and NORA J. BRY-
ANT; NORA J.' BRYANT; JOHN DOE;
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT
(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUB-
JECT PROPERTY are defendants. I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the COURTHOUSE at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, in LAKE
CITY, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 18th
of January, 2006, the following descri-
bed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:
LOT 10, GLENWOOD UNIT II, A
SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 96, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
In accordance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled
persons who, because of their disabili-
ties, need special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should contact
the ADA Coordinator at 145 N. Hernan-
do Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386) 758-1041 prior to such pro-
ceeding.
Dated this 15th day of December, 2005.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of The Circuit Court
By: J. MARKHAM
Deputy Clerk


Legal
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case Number: 05-362-CA
JAMES D. BUTLER and
LUISE K. BUTLER,
Plaintiffs. v.
,1 ADELINE C. PETRARA, trustee of
the NORTHERN PACIFIC FOUNDA-
TION TRUST dated June 16, 2004,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S.
CHAPTER.45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that under a Final
Judgment dated December 15, 2005 in
the above-styled cause, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at the
Columbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on January
18, 2006, the following described real
property situated in Columbia County,
Florida:
Begin at the Southwest comer of Lot 4,
in Block 8 of Golf Manor Subdivision
.according to the Plat thereof as recorded
in Plat Book 3, at Page 44 of the Public
Records of Columbia County, Florida
and running thence South 81 degrees, 36
minutes, East 119.67 feet along the south
boundary of said Lot 4 and across Rita
Street as shown on the said. Plat to a
point on the West boundary of Lot 10 of
Block 7 of said Subdivision; thence
South 8 degrees 24 minutes West ap-
proximately 25 feet to the Southwest
comer of said Lot 10; thence South 81
degrees 36 minutes East 125 feet to the
Southeast comer of said Lot 10; thence
South 8 degrees 24 minutes West 90 feet
to the Northwest comer of Lot 13 of
Block 7 of said Subdivision; thence
South 81 degrees 36 minutes East 125
feet to the Northeast comer of said Lot
13; thence South 8 degrees 24 minutes
West approximately 154 feet along the
East boundary of said Lot 13 and to a
point on the Ceriterline of Ronald Street
as shown on said Plat; thence South 88
degrees 18 minutes West approximately
400 feet along the said Centerline of Ro-
nald Street to the Southwest comer
of Lot 3, of Block 9 of said subdivision;
thence North 7 degrees 58 minutes East
352.26 feet along the Westerly bounda-
ries of Lots 3, 2, 1 respectively of said
Block 9 and across the right of way of
that certain unnamed street as shown on
said Plat to the Point of Beginning, con-
sisting of Lots 1, 2 and 3 of Block 9 and
Lots 11,13 and 14 of Block 7, together
with abutting or adjacent vacated and
closed rights of way of Rita Avenue, Ro-
nald Street and that certain unnamed
Street located between Lot 4 of Block 8
and Lot I of Block 9 all within said Golf
Manor Subdivision.
Lots 1 and 2 of Block 2 and Lots 1 and 2
of Block 3 and the vacated portions of
Craig Street, Elm Street and James
Street as borders Lots 1 and 2 of Block 3
,and the East 436 feet of Block 6 as
measured along the North line of said
Block 6 and lots 1,4,5, 7, 8, 9,10and
12of Block7and Lots7,10,11,14and 15of
Block5and Lot 10 of Block 4, all being a
part of Golf Manor Subdivision accord-
ing to the Plat there filed in Plat Book 3
at Page 44 of the Public Records of Co-
lumbia County, Florida subject to en-
cumbrances of record.
Dated: The 21st day of December
2005.
P. DeWITT CASON Clerk of Courts
By: J. Markham
Deputy Clerk
05509251
December 30, 2005
January 6, 2006


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


Legal

NOTICE OF SALE
Professional Lien & Title Service Corp.
will sell at public auction the following
vehicles to satisfy lien pursuant to chap-
ter 713.585 of the Florida Statutes on
January 20, 2006 at 10:00 AM.
Location: 10544 N.W. 26 ST. STE E-
102 MIAMI, FL 33172.
Inspect one week prior to auction at Lie-
nor's address, as is. where is. Bill Her-
rera
Lic: AU0001502. LOT 14708. 2002
Mazda SR5 Vin: JM1BJ225320571415
Customer: Shela Jones. Owner: Tyrone
Browder P.O.B. 623-991 Aberdeen St.
Lake City, FL 32056. Lien holder:
HSBC Auto Credit P.O.B. 17902. San
Diego, CA 92177
Located at: Wishes Auto Shop Repairs,
Inc. 790 SE ST Johns St. Lake City, FL
32025. PH: 386-754-0040. Lienor claims
a lien and cash sum sufficient to redeem
the vehicle is $4,769.23
(A) Notice to the owner that he has a
right to a hearing prior to the scheduled
date of sale by filing with the Clerk of
the Court. B) Owner has the right to re-
cover possession of the vehicle by post-
ing a bond in accordance with the Flori-
da Statutes Section 559.917. C) Proceeds
from the sale of the vehicles after pay-
ment Lien claimed by the Lienor will be
deposited with the Clerk of the Court
pursuant to Section (6) Florida Statutes
713.585. Any persons) claiming any in-
terest(s) in the above vehicles should
contact:
Professional Lien & Title Service Corp.
10544 N.W. 26 ST STE E-102 MIAMI,
FL 33172 PH: (305)592-6090 License
No: ABOO0001060. All Auctions are held
with reserve 20% buyers premium..
04501250
December 30, 2005
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY CIVIL DIVI-
SION
CITIFINANCIAL MORTGAGE COM-
PANY, INC.,
Plaintiff, vs.
CASE NO. 05-502-CA
MARIAH LUCINDA JONES A/K/A
MARIAH LUCINDIA JONES; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARIAH
LUCINDA JONES A/K/A MARIAH
LUCINDIA JONES; IF LIVING, -IN-
CLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF RE-
MARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGN-
EES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PER-
SONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; WELLS FARGO FI-
NANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC.;
WHETHER DISSOLVED OR PRES-
ENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER
WITH ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGN-
EES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR
TRUSTEES OF SAID
DEFENDANTS) AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST
DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #1; UNKNOWN
TENANT #2;
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MARIAH LUCINDA JONES
A/K/A ,MARIAH LUCINDIA JONES;
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MA-
Rl IH. LUCINDA. JONES A/K/A. MA-


Legal

RIAH LUCINDIA JONES; IF LIVING,
INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS,
IF REMARRIED, AND IF DE-
CEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UN-
KNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANT-
EES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIE-
NORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS;
Whose residence are/is unknown.
TO: UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #2;
Whose residence is: 361 SW JORDAN
STREET FT WHITE, FL 32038
YOU ARE HEREBY required to file
your answer or written defenses, if any,
in the above proceeding with the Clerk
of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof
upon the plaintiffs attorney, whose name
and address appears hereon, on or before
1/26/05 the nature of this proceeding be-
ing a suit for foreclosure of mortgage
against the following described property,
to wit:
THE NORTH HALF OF THE FOL-
LOWING PARCEL: ALL OF BLOCK
"D" SOUTH OF RAILROAD, TOWN
OF FORT WHITE.
A/K/A
361 SW JORDAN STREET
FT WHITE, FL 32038
If you fail to file your answer or written
defenses in the above proceeding, on
plaintiff's attorney, a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint or
Petition.
DATED at COLUMBIA County this
22nd day of December, 2005.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: J. Markham
In accordance with the American with
Disabilities Act of 1990, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to partici-
pate in this proceeding should contact
the ASA Coordinator no later than seven
(7) days prior to the proceedings. If hear-
ing impaired, please call (800) 955-9771
(TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice), via
Florida Relay Service.
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Tel (813) 915-8660
Fax (813) 915-0559
Attorney for Plaintiff
05509253
December .30, 2005
January 6, 2006





030 Personals

05509167
Lonely? Young at Heart?
Over 65? Looking for a great
companion? If so,we would be
great together. 386-961-8453


100 J0ob
100 Opportunities

!! LOOK! LOOK!!
You Too Can Sell Real Estate!
BIG BUCKS!
Call 386-466-1104


Classified Department: 755-5440


100 'Opportunities

03527992
Lake City Reporter

is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier
for Columbia City to Old Wire
Rd/SR47, Herlong Deliver the
Reporter in the early morning
hours Tuesday - Sunday. No
delivery on Monday's.
Carrier must have dependable
transportation. Stop by the
Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!

04501261

Lake City Reporter
Creative Director
Immediate opening for person
with high level of design and
creative skills. Must have
experience using Quark Xpress,
Photo Shop, Illustrator, Adobe
InDesign and Acrobat. Person
will oversee daily operation of
Creative Services department.
2-4 years newspaper or other
graphic position and supervisory
experience helpful. Salary will be
based on work experience and
creative abilities. Medical benefits
and 401k available.
Send resume to:
Dave Kimler
180 E. Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055
email:
dkimler(lakecityreporter.com

05508839
Wanted Exp. Shop Technician
for construction/forestry
equipment dealer in the Lake
City, Starke, & Live Oak areas.
Competitive pay, benefits &
excellent training program. Call
386-752-9544 or fax to: 755-6882
or send resume to:
Industrial Tractor Co.
PO Box 2439 Lake City, 32056

Asphalt Plant Technician
Level II Certified
Hipp Construction
Call 386-462-2047
E.O.E./ D/F/W/P


ioo Job
Opportunities

05509172
PARALEGAL
The Department of Transportation
has an opening for a Paralegal
Specialist. Bi-Weekly Salary
Range ($891.60 - $1400.00).
Minimum Qualifications: Must be
or have the ability to become a
notary public in Florida;
knowledge of civil litigation
office practices such as
calendering, setting hearings,
scheduling court reporters, and
coordinating. See online ad for
more qualifications. Refer to
Requisition Number 55004630.
Please apply online at:
https://jobs.myflorida.com. Only
State of Florida Applications will
be accepted - no resumes, please.
Ad closes 12/30/05.
EO/AA/VP Employer.

05509173
Seeking an enthusiastic
Maintenance Professional
to oversee the management of
daily operations and physical
plant maintenance for enclosed
regional mall in Lake City,
FL. Attention to detail and the
ability to handle multiple projects
simultaneously are essential.
Knowledge of roofing, HVAC,
plumbing and electricity are a
plus. Basic computer skills and
familiarity with computer systems
are a must. Flexibility in working
hours required. E-mail resumes to
lisaac(5hullstorey.com or fax to
706-868-7457 attention L. Isaac.

Bookkeeper
Office Manager
Local manufacturing company
seeks full-time bookkeeper/office
manager. Computer skills
necessary. Accounting knowledge
preferred. Insurance & 401K
benefits. Send resume
& salary requirements to:
Send reply to Box 05005, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
GRADER OPERATOR needed
immediately. Top pay for high
production operator. Complete
benefits package available. Apply in
person at Watson Construction.
Call 352-472-9157 for directions.


100 Job
t100 Opportunities

05509178

, ,^ - A ^ '. :^ ",,


STAY IN THE
"SWEET PART"
OF THE SOUTH
FL., GA., SC., NC., TN., AL.
i Top pay-up to .40 cpm w/5 yrs
* ; Guaranteed Hometime
*;- Health & Disability Ins. Avail.
*Life & Dental Ins. Provided
"*-401K available
"*- Safety Bonus
Call 800-874-4270 # 6
Highway 301 South, Starke, FL.
www.davis-express.com

05509181
Survey Draftsman &
Instrument Person w/EFB exp
Company Benefits include Health
& Disability Ins., Sick Leave,
Vacation & Retirement Plan.
Call 386-755-6166

05509227
Comfort Inn is looking for Full
& Part-Time Housekeepers.
Benefits include vacation &
holiday pay, ins. & 401K.
Must b le to work weekends.
Apply weekdays after 10:00 AM.
US 90 & 1-75. No Phone Calls
Please. EOE/DFW

05509247


Mike's Tastee Hot Dog's
Accepting applications
for dedicated individuals. Must be
young at heart and have the
ability to learn & have fun.
Call 386-867-9053

05509269
Salesperson-Lumber Sales
Must be people savvy
Will train - Great benefits
Apply in person
Idaho Timber of Florida
1786 SE SR 100
Lake City, FL. 32025
Call 386-755-5555


Housekeepers! Applicants who
are mature, serious & seeking
long term employment & have
cleaning experience. Apply at
Country Inn and Suites, Florida
Gateway Dr. 1-75 & Hwy 90.
Excellent working environment,
competitive pay, benefits incl.
vacation & holiday.
04501204
TECHNICIANS/MECHANICS
NEEDED
Seeking technricians/mechanics
3-5 years exp. repairing Heavy
Equip. Must have own hand
tools. Apply in person at
Ring Power, 390 SW Ring Ct.,
Lake City, FL 32025 or online
at www.ringpower.com. EOE


AGE 8: WORILDTRAVELER
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Start your child's explorations early in life by subscribing to the newspaper. This daily source of information opens chil-

dren's eyes and minds with enlightening information about the world around them. And the newspaper does more than just

educate, it also entertains with fun features like comics, puzzles and contests. So sign up for home delivery today...

IT WILL MEAN THE WORLD TO YOUR STUDENT.





ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION........... ONLY *83.46






Lake City Reporter





TO SUBSCRIBE CALL 386-755-5445

www.lakecityreporter.com


OW . LIVE OAK FORD MERCURY
;" (4) Men or Women for Sales Position
SPaid Insurance * 401 K Plan * Early Working Hours,.
S * Advancement Opportunity * Demo Available
* No Sundays * 5 Day Work Week
Apply in Person to our Sales Manager
Eddie McCullough
IVALT'S LIVE OAK FORD MERCURY.
, . .
:,.... Hwy 129 North Live Oak
. : ..-.. ... -386-362-1112-, ... ..4 . . '.


Liberty National Life Insurance Co.
is expanding its operation and is looking for upwardly
mobile people to fill insurance sales & service positions.
Average annual earnings $42,000. Fringe benefit package: 2
retirement funds, health insurance, paid vacation, conven-
tion trips & many others. No experience necessary. We have
on the job training. Requirements: honesty, hard worker &
dependable transportation.
Contact Ronnie Harvey at 386-752-2583
Or fax resume to: 386-752-8724
Liberty National is an EOE Licensed Agents Welcome


IL'ILIPUI I Ky IIIN AINLPaul I rU


ioo Job
Opportunities

Accounting Clerk
Experience in G/L, A/R, A/P & P/R
Salary Open. Fax resume to:
386-397-1130

Best Western Inn is looking for
FT & PT Front Desk Clerk. Must be
able to work Weekends, Nights &
Holidays. Apply at 1-75 & US 90 W
Cashier Needed. 10PM - 6 AM
Texaco in Ellisville, 1-75 & Hwy
441 S. Apply in person ONLY
Drug Free Workplace
City of Lake City
Currently has openings for
The following positions:
Coordinator-Human Resources
Coordinator-Customer Service
Accounting/Payroll Clerk
Firefighter Private
Construction Project Inspector
P/T Girls Club Leader
Maintenance Technician
IT Director
IT Technician
P/T Public Safety Dispatcher
P/T Recreation Aide
Obtain detailed job descriptions and
applications by visiting
City Hall, 205 N. Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055,
Human Resources Dept
or visit our website at
www.ci.lake-cit.fl.us
The City of Lake City is an
EEO/AA/ADA/VP employer
SC'TTDVANRVINN ANDS4ITTF








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


100 Job
1 0 Opportunities
DENTAL ASSISTANT
Highly Experienced Dental
Assistant needed for busy quality
General practice. $17.00 hr plus paid
insurance, vacation & bonuses.
Fax resume to: 386-752-7681
or call 386-752-8531
DRIVER NEEDED Person with
CDL & Mobile Home Delivery
Experience. Call 386-364-1340.
Ask for Billy.
DUMP TRUCK DRIVER.
Experienced w/min. 2 yrs
clean MVR & Class A CDL.
Starting Pay $10.50/ph
Drug Free Workplace 386-623-2853
Experienced Tandem Dump Truck
Driver. Asphalt, Milling Exp.
Class B CDL & clean driving
record. PDOE. 386-590-0783
FLAT BED DRIVERS
Atlantic Truck Lines
$4,000.00 Sign on Bonus
Class A, in state & home every
night. $600-$750/wk. Yearly $1,000
safety bonus. 3 yrs. exp. Paid
vacation, health/dental. Call
1-800-577-4723 Monday-Friday
FORKLIFT TECH Manufacturing
Firm has full time position for
positive enthusiastic tech. Must be
experienced. Excellent pay &
benefits. Call 904-275-2833 M-F
Front Desk Employee needed for
busy Pediatric office.
Medical experience helpful.
Call 386-758-0003


100 Job
100 OOpportunities
FT Food Service Workers for
correctional setting. Benefits after
90 days. 401K, Stock Bonus,
Vacation. No criminal record. Food
Service Experience helpful. Apply
in person @ CCA Lake City CI.
386-755-3379 ext 2251
EOE/M/F/D/V.
HELP WANTED
FAULKNER PLUMBING
Plumbers
Call 386-755-1568 & leave message
HUNGRY HOWIES is hiring
delivery drivers. Must have car
w/insurance & 2 yrs. driving exp.
Flex schedule. F/T & P/T avail.
CASH PAID DAILY!
Earn $8. - $15./ hour. Apply in
person at 857 SW Main Blvd.
IMMEDIATE OPENING!
Production Workers needed for sign
shop. Experience a plus.
Call 386-755-2006.
Kaam Transmission needs exp.
Auto Tech, or R&R Mechanic with
experience. Must have own tools.
Apply in person 125 NE Jonesway
Lake City, 32055 or 386-758-8436
Legal Secretary
Phone & Computer skills required.
Send reply to Box 05007, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
M&L Trucking needs a Truck
Driver for hauling logs with clean
CDL's. MUST be willing to work!
Leo Brady at 386-961-1133,
386-344-5035, after 7 pm. 752-6259


100 Job
0 Opportunities

OTR DRIVERS NEEDED
Heavy Haul,Class A CDL,
2 week turnaround,good pay,
Call Southern Specialized,LLC
386-752-9754

P/T Warehouse Workers
Sat. Only. Must apply in person, no
phone calls. H & M Bay,
State Farmers Market,
2920 CR 136, Unit 2; Office 7
White Springs, FL
Must be 18 yrs old to apply.
Sheet metal roofers needed.
No criminal background,
According Pay
Call 386-288-3470
Short Term & Long Term
Temp to Perm
Many different positions available!!
Call Wal-Staf Personnel
386-755-1991 or 386-755-7911
Waste Management Inc.
Lake City/ Gainesville
.Has an immediate opening for a
hard working, flexible individual to
fill the position of Driver/Laborer
for Lake City and Gainesville. This
position requires a minimum Class
B CDL with air brake endorsement.
Waste Management offers a full
benefits package including health
insurance and 401 - K plan. If you
feel you meet the requirements,
please apply by phone
1-877-220-JOBS (5627) or online at
WWW.WMCAREERS.COM
EOE/ADA/DFWP


100 Job
100 'Opportunities
WELDERS/LABORERS
MACHINE SHOP EXP.
Apply in person Grizzly Mfg.
174 NE Cortez Terrace
Lake City, FL (Across from airport)
YOUNG ENERGETIC Person for
Manufactured Home sales. Business
degree a plus, Will train right
person. Call 386-364-1340.
Ask for Mr. Selph or Mr. Corbet

1 Medical
120 Employment
04501242
HOME SUPPORT Staff to work
with developmentally disabled
individuals in 6 bed group homes.
Requires High School Diploma or
GED, valid Fl drivers license with
good driving record. $7.00 per
hour plus benefits. EOE for Lake
City home 386-755-4637 Starke
904-964-8082 or 904-964-1468
055092711
Baya Pointe Nursing Center
Has the following Open Positions:
AFT LPN/ RN
3:00 pm-11:00 pm
*CNA 3:00 pm-11:00 pm
PT Weekend LPN/RN
7:00 am-3:00 pm
-AFront Office Receptionist
Mon-Fri 10:00am-6:00 pm
Sat-Sun 9:00am -5:00pm
Apply in Person to:
587 SE Ermine Ave
Lake City, Fl 32025


120 Medical
120 Employment
CNA/ MA - Needed for LK City
Medical Office. Experienced
preferred. Fax.resume to:
386-754-1712.
Experienced Medical Assistant
Needed for fast paced
Doctors Office.
Fax resume to: 386-758-5987
RN NEEDED, Part-Time,
3-11p & llp-7a. Please apply at
The Health Center of Lake City,
560 SW McFarlane Avenue,
Lake City. Equal Opportunity
Employer/ Drug Free Work
Place/Americans with
Disabilities Act.
Suwannee Medical Personnel
Home Care needing per diem RN's
for 4-6hr IV infusions. Coverage
areas are Branford, Mayo and
Providence. $25.00 per hr.
Please Call Rose 1-877-755-1544
or (386) 755-1544


180 Money to Loan

04501021
NEED MONEY?
ARE BANKS TURNING
YOU AWAY?
LOOKING FOR A
FRESH START
CALL FOR A FREE
CONSULTATION
1-866-708-6663
FAST APPROVAL,
FAST CASH!
MANY PROGRAMS
SUITABLE FOR YOU.
VARIOUS LOANS
AVAILABLE.

240 Schools &
240 Education
Want to be a CNA? Don't want to
wait? Express Training Services of
Gainesville is now offering our
quality CNA exam Prep classes.
Day/Eve classes. Class for 1' week,
certification test the next week.
Class size is limited. Next class
1/09/06. Call 386-755-4401

310 Pets & Supplies
BOSTON TERRIER Baby,
AKC, 9 wks. Health Cert.
$500. 386-935-4671

PUG BABY, AKC,
Beautiful Black, 11 wks.
Health Cert. $500.
Call 386-935-4671


Advertise It Heret
BRING THE PICTURE IN OR WE WILL TAKE IT FOR YOU!
dvertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat her for .10 consecu-
ive days. If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $10 you
an place your ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a
description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad
ust be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring
our vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
10DASFO 9Y 3


I f 'A


1997 Aquasport 245
$23,000
Twin 150 Johnsons, cuddy
cabin, offshore ready,
dual electronics.


SPACE

AVAILABLE
NOW!


Call Call Call
| 386-755-3179 386-984-0502 386-755-0292


4.
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Savvy home shoppers reach for the classified ads


before they hit the streets, The newspaper

cdassified section oilers ever,,thi ng thev. neec to



make an informed purchasing decision.



Want to make a move?


Check the classified ads first


classified


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he fstplace olookforeerything








Lake City Reporter


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Classified Department: �755-5440








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


403 Auctions
04501248
Noon New Years Day
ANTIQUE AUCTION
Noon Sunday January 1, 2006
High Springs, FL. Hwy 27 W.
Civil War Rifles & Pistols,
410 DB Shotgun, Gold/Dia.
Jewelry & Rings, Coins,
Glassware, Mah, & Oak
DR/BR Sets, Chests, Sofas,
Case Pocket Knives, Hummel
Plates 71 to 86, 18 Elqin/Waltham
Pocket Watches, Flo-Blu,
Bronzes, Heisey, Fostoria,
Primitives. 10% B.P.,
Red Williams AU437/AB270
S 1-386-454-4991 Info.


408 Furniture
NOW OPEN!! CRAZY JOHNS
Fum & Auction. Daily Sales.
Consignments Welcome.
1-75 at Hwy 441/41 in Ellisville.
Call 321-297-7738/386-755-1012

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
Payment in advance for standing
pine timber. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-454-1484 or 961-1961.

430 Garage Sales
CRAZY JOHNS
Fumrn & Auction. Gigantic Used
Fun. Sale. Fri-Sat. Beds, Couches,
Dinettes & Appliances.
1-75 at Hwy 441/41 in Ellisville.
Call 321-297-7738/386-755-1012

440 Miscellaneous
Lose Weight for the LAST TIME!
Free Samples!
Call 904-346-1127
www.StartANewYou.com
\630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 MH Rentals:
2BR/2BA $650/mth + $650 S/D
3BR/2BA $650/mth + $650 S/D
Call 386-397-2619 or 386-623-5117
3/2 Double Wide off of Brown Rd.
w/W&D Hook/up, CH/A, DW,
water/garbage inc., $550/mth +
$400 Dep., 1st & last. 386-397-3568
Ellisville.2br/lba Mobile Home,
Also avail in Lake City 3br/lba
DWMH
Call 386-365-7687
FOR RENT: 2BR/2BA MH,
Excellent condition. Large lot. quiet
neighborhood. No Peti. $4-101 mo.
1st, last & Sec required. Located 4
1/2 miles West of Lake Cuit
--Call -386-454-5688 Lea\e msg.
IN PARK Mobile Hrnmf.- ,r Rent
2BR/2BA 1st & sec. required.
Applicanons & references required.
386-719-2423
LATE MODEL MOBILE HOMES
Starting $400 month, Beautiful
Pond setting, w/trees. CH/A, Cable
avail. No pets. Call 386-961-0017
640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2000, 1456 SqFt. Doublewide
4 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Glamour bath,
Beautiful Deck. 20% Down, Only
$517.66 per/mth. MUST SELL!
Call Ron 386-397-4960
31 Used Doublewides from Disney
Area. Now in Lake City. A/C, steps,
cable ready w/TV, telephone,
furnished, pots & pans, dishes, &
silverware. Perfect for Rental
Properties or Starter Home.
Great Deals, While they Last!
386-752-5355
ABSOLUTELY "THE BEST"
Mobile Homes and Modulars
Move over Palm & Jake, the new
#1 home is here. Guaranteed
Gary Hamilton Homes 758-6755
BEAUTIFUL 3 BEDROOM
2 BATH DOUBLEWIDE,
W/FIREPLACE, OPEN FLOOR
PLAN, LOTS OF EXTRAS. WILL
DELIVER. DOUG 386-288-2617


IsUNBELT HONDA ()


4'WI NTERFSAIEEVENT

6 Days Only - 9AM until Last Customer is Served!

We Need To Say "Good-Bye To Our 2005 Leftovers To Make Room For The 06s,
So Now Is The Time To Get A Great Buy On A New Car, Truck or SUV


I -


2006 HONDA PILOT LX 2006 HONDA Accord 2006 HONDA Ridgeline
MODELa F1l8161EW . MODEL#CN5636EW LX Special Edition MODEL#YK162EW
SAutomatic * oded xv /All The Extras



6 V6 Eng4*e
"t Automaticaic
* AM/FM CD Changer g- /M - gf aS

2006 HONDA CRV 2006 HONDA S2000 2006 HONDA Odyssey
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:PRE-OWNED : 4 D
Y TR.LBAI *DG DU* 1 HODA 04TOYTA ACOA *A ILOT____


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SXT, Silver, 25K Miles
$16 r895| 9
I **- HOW


XT .. , L 2. . .1 5e h - :.3 SE, Blue, 4DR, 18K Miles, Like New

$21,295 $13,995-


01 FRD OCU


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Green, Low Miles 2 Door, Silver, Beautiful, 41K Miles
*21 "495 20.995


04 HOND ODYSSE


2DR, Sporty, Only 44KMil es


$20A9


02 FORD-RAat V -


cr E, o . tE 'he Gr. ar E.ono-., ar ' SE, White, Great Economy Cr ,, , 3 . . cr

$9.995 17.885 $14,945 I14.595 13,095


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$1 3rl61

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02 DODGE
NEON XT
Rc c 4 L Fr,
11 T h e Toys, Only Brown, 22K Miles

!4,995 15,861
le WAC See dealer for details. Art for illustration ourDoses onlv.


Pr-e-


What A Beauty, Blue, 2DR, 35K Miles

p1 9,963






4DR, Beautiful, 19K Miles

$1 4.867


4DR, Beise, Only 50K Miles
$14.961


North Florida


A monthly real estate magazine





Lak City:Reprte


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Classified Department: 755-5440


OS FORD TAURUS


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10B

6 40 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale __
BUY NEW Dream Home For Only
5% Down, With a 750 Beacon.
Will Finance.
Call Buddy 386-364-1340
CASH DEALS. We Love Em! We
will give you the very best pricing
in North Florida on new or used
manufactured homes! 800-769-0952
IF YOU OWN LAND OR HAVE A
LARGE DOWN PAYMENT. I
MAY BE WILLING TO OWNER
FINANCE A NEW
MANUFACTURED HOME FOR
YOU! CALL STEVE 386-365-8549
NEED A Home?
Call 386-364-1340 Ask For Buddy.
'Ve have several
New & Used to Choose from.
USED DOUBLEWIDE
MUST BE SOLD BY
CHRISTMAS! FURNITURE AND
AC INCLUDED. CALL GEORGE
386-719-0044
USED DOUBLEWIDE,
MUST SELL!
MAKE OFFER!
CALL TIM 386-288-2016

65 Mobile Home
650 & Land
!! Owner Finance !!
1998 24X48 3/2 on small lot
1903 SW Judy Glen
Call 386-867-0048
!!! FREE FREE FREE !!!
3/2 DW. A/C on 1.5 acre lot
in Worthington Springs
Call 386-466-1104
4 BEDROOM 2 bath
home on land. Must sell.
In Beautiful Deer Creek -
Only & $774 per/mth
Call Doug 386-288-2617
Brand New 2280 Sqft 4/2
w/ concrete foundation, driveway &
walk, deck & more. $134,900.
Close in. Gary Hamilton
Call 386-758-6755
Clea- 1560 sf 3/2 1993 DW, private
wooded acre, all lino, deck, new
metal roof. $63,900. Cash Only
Call 386-961-9181
FSBO 1998 Redman 28X52 3/2
on 1/2 acre lot. 5 min. from
Walmart, perfect location.
Call Steve at 386-590-1413
LAND HOME
Packages, while they last!
Call Ron Now!
386-397-4960

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent
1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
All very nice.
Convenient location.
Call 386-755-2423
1, 2, and 3 BR include MW, DW,
.pool, fitness center and more.
Close to everything, Call Windsong
today 386-758-8455
2/1 Fresh Paint & New Carpet
Starting at $600/mth.
Plus security. Pets allowed w/fee.
Call Lea.386-752-9626
2BR/1BA w/ Garage
$700 + Sec. Pets w/fee.
Call 386-752-9626

DELUXE TOWNHOUSE
Second Story. 2/2, 1,700 sqft.
Country Privacy, deck, secure.
$700/mth. $1,800 needed.
Call 386-961-9181
7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3BR/1.5BA CH/A, Hardwood
Floors, Tile, Concrete Block.
$750/mth + Dep.
Call 386-752-0118 or 386-623-1698
3BR/2BA Brick Home Near VA
Large fenced yard w/washer &
dryer, stove, refrig, lawn, maint., &
garbage p/up included. $850 mth,
1st, last & Sec/Dep. req. Call
Richard, Licensed Real Estate
Agent Call 386-867-1414
BRAND NEW 4 & 3 Bedroom
Homes with 2 Car Attached Garage
on Huge Lots. $995 mo, $995 sec.
Call (904)317-4511


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED


7 0 Unfurnished
730Home For Rent
Mayfair Subdivision
3BR/2BA Brick Home
Quiet Neighborhood
Call 386-961-9959

Quail Hgts. on 10th Fairway
3/2, 2400 sqft + 16X40 storage
bldg. $1,300/mth, 1st, last & Sec.
Call 386-755-0327
Taking Applications for 3/2 fenced
home on 7 acres w/pond. Ft. White
School district, appliances, W/D
Hook-up. $650/mthly + Sec/Dep.
Ref. + Credit Check. 386-590-6048

7 l Furnished
4 U Homes for Rent
READY TO MOVE IN! 2BR/1BA
Great Neighborhood, Great
Location. $800 mo, w/first, last &
security. Open House Sat Dec 31
10- 2. 386-758-9362 or 365-5008

75f Business &
I U Office Rentals
GREAT LOCATION
1235 SF Building'
All Utilities Furnished
$975/month
A Bar Sales, Inc.
386-752-5035
7 Days 7 am-7 pm

Historic Henderson House
Office/Retail 3000 total sqft.
$1,875/mnthly. 207 S. Marion Ave.
386-867-0048 or 386-752-7951
. Medical Office Space for Rent
in Live Oak. Office has 2,10 sqft, 2
waiting areas & 8 exam rooms.
Lease for $1,850 mth. Contact
Poole Realty 386-209-1766
OFFICE FOR RENT
1,400 sqft @$950/mth
Contact Poole Realty
386-209-1766
Warehouse in good neighborhood.
Great Location!
Must See!$850 mth
Call Lea 386-752-9626

810 Home for Sale
FSBO: Wellborn. Horse friendly,
very rural 3+ acres, 3/2 home
w/new kitchen, A/C, hot water,
floor, appliances, property also has
a 30X30 barn, 20X20 workshop.
Must See $189,900. 386-963-4270

GRANDVIEW VILLAGE
3BR/2BA, 1,380 sq ft. (Heated)
Will not last at this price, $149,900
Call 386-754-5678

820 Farms &
S Acreage
Columbia City Area
5 ac.wooded homesite
$89,900 owner finance
352-472-3660

FL Timberland
8,120 AC intensively
managed timberland
Taylor Co. $16,240,000.
404-362-8244
St. Regis Paper Company, LLC
INDIVIDUAL SEEKS Acreage.
Wooded or open.
Cash buyer- quick closing.
Please call 386-755-7541
WINDING FOREST, 5 & 7 Ac.
lots starting at $89K.
Owner Financing. 386-754-7529
Chris Bullard Owner/Broker

850 Waterfront
85 Property
Riverfront! Lovely Withlacoochee
river home just west of Live Oak.
Pristine old Florida setting.
2BR/2BA, built 2004 on Cul-de-sac
backing up to preserve. Secluded!
$299,900. Call Debbie Zeller at
Coldwell Banker M.M. Parrish at
352-538-2857 or 386-454-3442

940 Trucks
1994 Dodge Dakota Sport
Runs good, $900. 6 Cyclinder
Make good work truck
Call 386-752-1682


0 -q ~ ta w ow-of


hallmark@bizsea.rr.com.


. , -.... . . .. "



BRAND NEW for the New Year! West of town
on 1/2 acre, all brick 3BR/2BA, choose your
colors & carpet now!
Call Tanya Shaffer 755-5448


755-6600 btRIMLSI


I ,&~

I: .-.j. 4


NEW CONSTRUCTION! Pre-wired for media
and security! Vaulted ceilings, arched entries,
trey ceiling, breakfast room, quartz kitchen
counter tops. MLS#4B467
Call Bryan Smithey 965-2922


LAND! LAN
10 ACRES off County Road 242, not far from shop
2.07 COUNTRY ACRES Nice location, not far fro
$45,000 Call Julia DeJesus 344-1590
16.89 ACRES Paved frontage MLS#48763. Call Gi
5 ACRES Well and septic. Board fenced. Mobiles
755-5448
5 ACRES wooded, scenic, fast growing area. MLS


GEORGIAN BRICK Lovely home on full acre
with two master suites! 4BR/4.5BA, gourmet
kitchen, office, nursery, screened in ground
pool. MS#48722. Call Sharon Selder 365-1203
or Julia DeJesus 344-1590


ID! LAND!
pping. Homes only. MLS#48641, $140,000.
m town. Property has a nice roll. MLS#48823,
inger Parker 752-6704, $220,000
s OK. Reduced! MLS#48808 Call Tanya Shaffer
3#49481 Call Ginger Parker 752-6704


950 Cars for Sale
*Hondas from $500*
Police Impounds!
For listings call
1-800-749-8116 ext A760
05508634
1994 Mitsubishi Galant LS
MUST sell for payoff.
$1,200 OBO
Call 386-697-1923

1970 OLDSMOBILE DELTA 88
455 V-8. Runs perfect. Rusty.
Trailer hitch inc. $600
Call (813)361-3512
2004 Mercury Grand Marquis SL
Top of Line, Like New.
Full Power
Call 386-754-1876

Q91 'Recreational
951 Vehicles
2005 ELITE Travel Trailer, 33ft,
Super slide out. Washer/Dryer,
CA/H. Asking $17,900. Trailer is
local. (228)343-2701 cell.
2005/06 FEMA Trailers!
Up to 50% off retail!
Call 386-758-8661
www.tumingwheelrv.com

952 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
1972 JEEP CJ5.
Hard Top, Restored,
Good Condition. $5,700 Cash.
Call 386-362-4987


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440
^^^^m^^^BTI.,,^M^^


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


Classified Department: 755-5440


3 I?
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NEWSPAPER










ADVERISI*
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RONSONET 0

BUICK GMC TRUCK
H V q o E A S T 1- A K E C I( T

C M C I C WE ARE PROFESSIONAL GRADE


03 Lincoln ' Navigator Black $2998800
�94 Mazda Protege Beige ... $1988.00
04 Nissan , Titan SE Red $24988 00
99. Oldsmobile Alero Black $598800
-95 Oldsmobile Cutlass Turquoise $4988.00
-96 Pontiac '-" Grand Am Green 5398800
04 Pontac Gd Prix GTI Gray $1698800
-05 Toyota , Camry XLE Blue S2198800
92 Toyota . :.' 4Runner. * Red . . $498800
04 Toyota . Sienna . Beige $23988.00


,USEDoVEHICLES
' .THE AiGHT.WA'i THE RIGCH 'i , CAA


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