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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/00252
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 29, 2005
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:00252
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




WEATHER


Inside 2A


cs


Hi:65
Low: C
Party Cloudy


La,


CHS, Fort
White Tie
Girls soccer match
ends scori-' 2



tt0,100 3


-3


Kicked Out
Officials look to reintroduce
dog hunting at Camp Blanding
in Lake City.
Outdoors, 3B






orter


Thursday, December 29, 2005


www.Iakecityreporter.com


"BUTT" OUT


Igaftme


. i. .llu l3,on y TODD WILSONIL ae ,Cily Rep-.rner
Tobacco kills more than 14,000 people every day. This year, many smokers will try to adopt healthier lifestyles.


New ways help kick old habit


Lasers, acupuncture
are becoming more
popular to quit smoking.
By LINDSAY DOWNEY
Idowney@lakecityreporter.com
"This will be the year. I, will finally
quit."
Every year, thousands of nicotine
addicts-tell themselves that on Jan. 1,
they will put out their cigarette butts
once and for all. To stop smoking is the
No. 1 New Year's resolution for 2005,
according to the Smoke Free Society's
Web site.
As the, ball drops this year, many
Columbia County smokers probably
will be sticking nicotine patches to their
arms, chewing Nicorette gum and try-
'ing to quit cold-turkey. Some people
even will try more extraordinary treat-
ments, such as nicotine-laced water,
acupuncture and laser therapy.
Baya Pharmacy owner Carl Allison
said many customers start asking more
questions about nicotine-replacement
therapy at the beginning of the year.
"There's, much more interest in it,"
he said. "Everybody's making a New
Year's resolution."
, Allison kicked his own tobacco-dip-
ping habit in June with the help of


S Illustrtion by TODD WILSON/Lake City Reporter'
The No. 1 New Year's resolution last year was to stop smoking, according to the
Smoke Free Society's Web site.


smoking-cessation aids.
"I'm using the lozenges and the
gum," Allison said. "It wasn't bad at all.
I didn't miss the dip or the tobacco
because I was replacing it with the
gum."
But nicotine-replacement therapies
typically only work for serious quitters,
said Joel Rosenfeld, pharmacist at
North Florida Pharmacy, Inc.


"Whenever I've seen any literature, it
makes' it seem like most of the time
these things fail," Rosenfeld said. "My
personal opinion is that the person real-
ly has to want to stop. If they make it
(nicotine products) too much of a.
crutch, they end up going down in
flames."'
QUIT continued on 8A


Vol. 13 1, No. 290 E 50 cents




Police:



Companion



shot hunter


Monday morning
mishap is still
under investigation.

By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City man killed
Monday in a hunting mishap
was shot when a companion
attempted to remove a gun
from his vehicle.
'Robert "B.J." Taylor, 50, was
originally from Lake City. He
had lived in Colorado for a
number of years, but reports
indicated he had plans to
return to Lake City.
Taylor and family members
were on a hunting expedition
early Monday morning near


White Springs Road in
Columbia County when the
shooting happened.
"We're beginning to put the
pieces together that were col-
lected at the scene and talk to
family members," Columbia
County Sheriff Bill Gootee said.
"We plan on talking with the
two witnesses soon and
conduct in-depth interviews."
According to reports, two of
.Taylor's companions were in
one vehicle while Taylor was in
another.
One of Taylor's hunting com-
panions attempted to remove a
rifle from his vehicle when the
gun pointed in Taylor's direc-
tion fired, striking Taylor while
he was leaving 'his vehicle
SHOOTING continued on 8A


Local gas tax will

end on schedule


Department of
Revenue error will
not impact end date.'

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
While local motorists have
been looking forward to the.
county's second local option gas
tax coming to an end within the
next two days, the Florida
Department of Revenue incor-
rectly had the tax lasting until
next year.
According to Judy Lewis,
Columbia County internal audi-
tor, the county has had to send
copies of the local ordinance to
the DOR to rectify the problem
as quickly as possible.
. Lewis said she received a tele-
phone call from a local gas dis-
tributor, who said he had gotten
a new gas tax rate sheet from
the DOR, where the county's
new gas tax difference was not
included.
Lewis said the DOR told the
distributor the gas tax would not
conclude until December 2006,
which was incorrect.


"I told them there had to be a
mistake because the ordinance
clearly states it's going to come
off Dec. 31, 2005," she said. "I
faxed a copy of the ordinance to
the gas distributor and in the
meantime, someone from the
DOR called the county office
and wanted a copy of the ordi-
nance faxed to them and a DOR
employee called county
attorney Marlin Feagle."
Lewis said she received the
initial telephone call regarding
the gas tax rate. Tuesday.
Columbia County currently
has an 18 cents gas tax rate,
which will go to 13 cents when
the county sunsets its second
local option gas tax for 5 cents,
two days from now.
"As of Jan. 1, Columbia
County will have 13 cents in gas
tax per gallon," Lewis said, not-
ing the problem with the date
was created by a DOR error.
"All the county did was pass
an ordinance putting on a
5 cents tax from Jan. 1, 2001-
Dec. 31, 2005," Lewis said.
"Beyond that we have no
control over the rest of it."
TAX continued on 8A


High profile corner sits vacant awaiting cleanup


Gasoline tanks leaked,
causing volatile
groundwater pollution.

By LINDA YOUNG
lyoung@lakecityreporter.com
When Willene and William Giles
bought the old Geibeig's Amoco sta-
tion site Jan. 18, 1999, they knew
there was chance the old gas tanks
had leaked, but they figured it was
just a possibility.
But at some point gasoline tanks


on the site had leaked. A plume of
volatile petroleum chemicals con-
taminated groundwater under half
the property at the corner of Marion
Avenue and Nassau Street.
'That's a valuable piece of land if
they ever get it cleaned up," said
Doyle Crews, property appraiser,
Columbia County, as he pointed at a
1960 aerial map of Lake City show-
ing a gas station on the site even
then.
The value of the property
attracted Giles to buy it.
"We just bought it as an invest-
ment," Giles said. "It's aggravating


,for me. It's taking a lot of time it
shouldn't take. They'll come up here.
and work a day or two and not come
back for eight months."
Now the property is fenced in with
dirt piled into a berm, and the
cleanup is progressing slowly.
'This is what we would call a
weathered gasoline plume. They're
not going away naturally," said Scott
Pittenger, project biologist with
Earth Tech, the Orlando-based firm
contracted to clean up the site.
A lot of this type of cleanup is
CLEANUP continued on 8A


111111 11CALLUS: INSIDE
(386) 752-1293 INSIDE
sUBSCRIBE TO 11 Business ..... . . . . . . . . . 5A Obituaries .............. 6A
I SUBSCRIBETO ,~A
THE REPORTER: Classified ............ . . . 6B Opinion . . . . . . . . ..... .. 4A
Voice: 755-5445 Comics ................ 5B Puzzles ................ 2B
1 84264 0020 1 Fax: 752-9400 Local & State ............ 3A World . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 10A
^g


Contaminated soil
sits bundled in an
empty lot of a former
gas station off
SW Nassau Street
and Marion Avenue.


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter

TODAY IN COMING
NATION FRIDAY
Nearly 50 are accused of The latest Hollywood
bilking Red Cross, 6A movies are reviewed.


rr,








LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2005


Wednesday:
4-4-2


Online businesses
to pay 'Net tax?
ORLANDO - Lawyers for
Orange County plan to ask a
judge to clarify a tax law that
could allow the county to
collect more tourist taxes
from online hotel bookings.
Companies such as
Expedia.com and Orbitz.com
currently purchase or
reserve blocks of rooms from
hotels, often at lower rates.
The Internet companies pay
tourist taxes based on the
reduced prices, but then they
turn around and resell the
same rooms to online.
customers at marked-up
costs.
Orange County officials
have said that the online
businesses should be paying
taxes on the marked-up
prices.
The online businesses,
however, have said that the
final price they charge online
customers reflects additional
services, costs and profits
added to the room rate,
which a bed tax should not
apply to. The companies have
said they shouldn't be taxed
on the money they make by
providing a link between
hotels and their customers.

Deputy accidentally
shot himself
NAPLES - A Collier
County sheriff's deputy found
dead in his van on Christmas
Day is believed to have
accidentally shothimself in,
the leg and died from loss of
blood, authorities said.
Cpl. Kenneth J. Pocchio,
38, was discovered dead inside
the Toyota van on U.S. 17 in
DeSoto Countyat about
6:20 a.m. Sunday. The van was
parked in the median of the
highway with its engine
running and headlights on.
Pocchio, who had been
traveling from a family
gathering in Lakeland to his
Naples home, was alone in the
van.
The medical examiner's


4
Wednesday:
1-9-2-2


office hasn't released an
official cause of death, but the
DeSoto County Sheriff's
Office said in a report that
Pocchio shot himself in the
thigh and the wound caused
an extensive loss of blood.
There were no signs of foul
play, robbery or any other
crime.
Pocchio, born in Brooklyn,
worked at the Polk County
Sheriff's Office before joining
the Collier County agency in
2000. Survivors include his
wife and 5-year-old daughter.

Man escapes
charges in UF killing
JACKSONVILLE --
Charges have been dropped
against one of five men
charged with fatally beating a
University of Florida student.
The State Attorney's Office
in Duval County dropped its
case against Casey Michael
Schuurman, 20, of Jacksonville
last week, the office confirmed
Tuesday.
Schuurman was charged in
the beating of Thomas Oliver
Brown, 23, following the
Oct. 29 Florida-Georgia
football game in Jacksonville.
Schuurman's attorney said
evidence showed his client
was not a participant.
"The evidence showed that
Casey was a witness to the
crime, but there was nothing
that indicated that he partici-
pated in it whatsoever," Karl
Green said.'
Those charged in the killing
are Alex Samuel Canzano, 21;
Jeremy Alan Lane, 21; and
Mark Tyler Foss, 19, all of
Jacksonville; and Jeffery
Richard Gronczniak, 19, of
Ponte Vedra Beach. They are
being held at the Duval
County jail.

Marriot: timeshare
tapes missing
ORLANDO - Backup
computer tapes with data on
about 206,000 associates,
timeshare owners and
timeshare customers of


Tuesday:
3-26-31-35 6


Marriott Vacation Club
International are missing from
the corporate office in
Orlando, the company said in
a statement late Tuesday.
"We regret this situation has
occurred and realize this may
cause concern for our
associates and customers,"
said Stephen P. Weisz, MVCI
president. '"We have recently
mailed notifications to
associates, timeshare owners
and timeshare customers and
are available to answer any
questions they may have."
Vacation club officials
reported the missing data to
government authorities and
began their own investigation
into the tapes' disappearance,
according to the statement.
MVCI planned to search for
the tapes, to determine how
they disappeared and monitor
accounts for any unusual
activity or possible"rnisuse,
spokesman Ed Kinney said.

Fort Myers couple
found dead
FORT MYERS - The
parents of a 2-year-old boy
were found dead in their
home Tuesday after the
toddler called 911, authorities
said.
Steven and Michelle
Andrews, both 28, were
found in their home shortly
after 7 a.m., said Lee County
Sheriff's spokeswoman Ileana
LlMarzi. The couple's son
was found unharmed in the
home, and was taken to other
family members, LiMarzi
said.
Investigators said the boy
phoned 911. No information
was immediately released on
how the couple died.
The sheriff's office violent
crimes unit was investigating.
Neighbors at the gated
community told the Naples
Daily News that Steven
Andrews was a landscape
architect and his wife was a
nutritionist. The couple
apparently moved to the area
last year.
E Associated Press


Tuesday:
1-9-11-16-30


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Fatigue caused window damage


SANTA BARBARA, Calif. - Officials
now say that it was wear and tear, and
not a collision with a bird, that
damaged the windshield of
Oprah Winfrey's private jet and forced
it to return to the city airport.
'There was no bird involved, but the
pilot did tell my captain that he felt it
was a fatigue thing with the glass,"
Battalion Chief John Ahlman, a Santa
Barbara City Fire Department
spokesman, said Tuesday.


Klein won't send
Holmes baby gift
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -
Chris Klein says he won't be
sending ex-fiancee Katie
Holmes a gift or a.
congratulatory card after her
baby is born.
"No, I.don't think so," the
26-year-old actor told AP
Radio in a recent interview.
"Her and my relationship is
a time in the past. And it's a
time that I'll always look back
with in fondness, but her and
I have moved on, and she has
a separate life and I have a
separate life. And it's better
that we keep it that way."


Ahlman had earlier attributed the
damage to a bird.
Winfrey, host of "The Oprah
Winfrey Show," and her boyfriend,
Stedman Graham, weren't hurt in
Monday's incident, which occurred
just after the jet had taken off from
Santa Barbara Municipal Airport.
The 51-year-old talk-show host
bought a mansion on 42 acres
of land in the hills of Montecito
five years ago.


Holmes, who starred in the
TV series "Dawson's Creek,"
and Klein became engaged in
December 2003 after five
years of dating. They called
off their engagement in
. March.
"Mission: Impossible" star
Tom Cruise, 43, and Holmes,
27, went public with their
relationship in April and
became engaged in June.
Holmes' pregnancy was
reported in October.

Miller learns
valuable lesson
NEW YORK - Sienna
Miller says the biggest


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Inga Swenson is
73.
* ABC newscaster Tom
Jarriel is 71.
* Actress Mary Tyler Moore
is 68.
* Actor Jon Voight is 67.
* Country singer Ed Bruce
is 65.
* Rock musician Ray
Thomas is 64.
* Singer Marianne Faithfull
is 59.
* Jockey Laffit Pincay Jr. is


59.
* Actor Ted Danson is 58.
* Actor Jon Polito is 55.
* Singer-actress Yvonne
Elliman is 54.
* Actress Patricia Clarkson
is 46.
* Comedian Paula
Poundstone is 46.
* Rock singer-musician Jim
Reid (The Jesus and Mary
Chain) is 44.
* Actor-comedian Mystro
Clark is 39.


lesson she's learned this
year is "hold your cards
close to your vest."
"I've got a huge mouth,
especially when it comes to
my business," the
24-year-old actresstells Life
magazine in its Dec. 30
issue. "But I've realized that
if you start talking about
things, you open up a
floodgate."
Miller's engagement to
her "Alfie" co-s&r Jude Law
appeared to fall apart after
Law publicly apologized in
July for having an affair
with his children's nanny.
Reports in recent weeks
had suggested the couple


were back together.
"I find it odd that people
ask me things like, 'Why
did you take (Jude Law)
back?' I don't regret
anything," she tells the
magazine, when asked to
look back on 2005.
Miller stars in
"Casanova," which opened
in U.S. theaters on
Christmas Day.
When asked who is a
modern-day Casanova, she
replied: "I don't know ...
People think I should be an
expert on love, and I
haven't got a clue."
* Associated Press


Thought for Today


"The wise man must be wise
before, not after."

- Epicharmus,
Sicilian Greek comic poet (? - c.450 B.C.)


Eric North, 19
Lake City,. Works part time at
M&M Fitness

* Family: Mom and dad,
two sisters and one brother.
* Hobbies: Football,
basketball and baseball.
* Favorite pastimes:
Shooting baskets with
friends.
* What would you most
like to see improved in
your town?: "Lake City is
growing and we need more
affordable housing around
town."
* Who is your hero or
inspiration, and why?: "My
mom and dad are
inspirations to me because
of all the things they have
been through."


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ......... (386) 752-1293
Fax number ................752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online ...... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fla. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard ... .754-0418
(mleonard@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
if you have a news tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson ..........754-0428
(twilson @ lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Sales ..................... 752-1293
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)


Eric North


Meet Your Neighbor is a daily
feature of the Lake City
Reporter. We interview people
in the community in order to get
to know our neighbors better.


Reporter

To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.

Controller Sue Brannon.......754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CICUL&ITON
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 a.m. to report a service.error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next
day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters .... 754-0407
(rwaters@ lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
13 Weeks .................... $23.54
26 Weeks ........ ............ $42.80
52 Weeks .....................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
13 Weeks .................... $44.85
26 Weeks ................ ... $89.70
52 Weeks .................... $179.40


CORRECTION


In the Wednesday issue of the Lake City Reporter, the details of
Robert Taylor's death were incorrectly reported, based on
information provided by law enforcement agencies. Taylor died
when a hunting companion was removing a firearm from a vehicle
and it discharged. s : ..


THE WEATHER .



. PARTLY , MOSTLY - PARTLY PARTLY PARTLY
. "CLOUDY SUNNY -;CLOUDY CLOUDY - CLOUDY


H 165L37 H168 L44 HI73L053 HIL76LO H174LO,
. ........... J..




* Valdosta Jacksonville
Tallahassee 64/36 * 65/38 City Friday Saturday
66/37 Lake City, Cape Canaveral r 19.. ;6- 5.9 p,
p66,37o LakeCity Daytona Beach 6 - , 60 p
Pensacola Paama City 65/37 Daytona Beach 69 16 , E. 0P:
S6s7/46 P65/4 Gainesville Daytona Beach Ft. Lauderdale ;4 61' 80.'68 'p
/46 *65/45 i 73/42 Fort Myers ",6 . 7 79 6. p.:
66..38 c Gainesville 67 4 J 74 5:3
Ocala* Cape Canaveral Jacksonville 65. 45 7 556
68,4rand 7149 Key West ;5 6.9 , 78 71 pc
72.45 Lake City .8 -14 7 '3 p' :
Tampa. Miami '76 s , 6 p.
69,.'50 West Palm Beach Naples 76.' 56s 83. 61.64 p
Ocala ' i
7 * Orlando 9 77 62 p:
Ft. Myers* Ft. Lauderdale Panama City 661 53 , 71 525 'p
75/53 79/57, Pensacola '.9 60 p.: 72 58
aNaples Tallahassee 69 46 i 5.6 pr
75/55 Miami Tampa 71 5 .4 7 64
KeyWest 81/59 Valdosta 67 46 pic 3 .35 pC
KeyWest W. Palm Beach 73 5; 7 7 6 p
77/64
. I - .. . ,~~~ ~ ~~~~-, , -, . ,,- . -" 'T- " -- . . ..: "" --? - - ; . %.-: " L" " - " ,-: 7: ":d'


* n a A A~


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
NJormal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wedne-sda
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to date


68
37
66
43
82 in 1942
24 in 1925


0.00"
6.35"
49.79-
2.26"
48.06"


SUN
Sunnse tod,3
Sunset today
Sunnse ton.
Sunset tom..

MOON
Moonnse today
Moonset today


7:26 a.m.
5:40 p.m.
7:26 a.m.
5:40 p.m.

6:03 a n-i
4:05 p.m.


,LOW
45aumihto b


rad~d,aiiwwr,5'


M.rnslse ton. 7:10 a.m " ., 10 I.-"
IL 1' ,+.
Moonset tom. 5:08 p.m.


Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan. , For
30 6 14 22 "-.. :
New First Full Last I nc
ww


On this date in
1989, half a
dozen cities in the
northeastern U.S.
reported record low
temperatures for the
date, including
Elkins, W. Va. with a
reading of 13
degrees below zero.


IA


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel



weather.com


ecasts, data and graphics
2005 Weather Central,
., Madison, Wis.
ww.weatherpubllsher.com


*t ~ :


MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR


AROUND FLORIDA


dill


Conned'ed


Page Editor: S. Michael Manley, 754-0429








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2005


BRIEFS

DUI checkpoint
in Lake City
The Columbia County
Sheriff's Office is conducting
a DUI checkpoint tonight in
Lake City. '
The checkpoint, a part of
the "You Drink, You Drive,
You Lose" campaign, will be
staged at Bascom Norris
Drive and Malone Street near
the Columbia County Girl's
Softball Complex.
It will begin at 8 p.m. and
continue into the early
morning hours.
This is the second DUI
checkpoint this month. The
previous one was staged on
State Road 47 on Dec. 17.
Coast Guard
returned migrants
MIAMI -The Coast
Guard returned 159 illegal
Haitian and Cuban migrants
to their homelands
Wednesday, officials said.
Coast Guard crews
intercepted three separate
Cuban vessels and two
Haitian vessels between
Dec. 15 and 26.
* From staff and wire reports


Water woes dog city into new year


By LINDA YOUNG
lyoung@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Utility
Committee met for more than
two hours Wednesday after-
noon to discuss various items
and view the wastewater pres-
entation the city made to the
state in October.
With the decision between
either expanding the existing
wastewater plant or building a
new one pending, the commit-
tee tabled a request by the
new Hospice Center for
wastewater service.
"What all this comes back
to is to define our service
area," said John Robertson,
committee chairman and city
council .member.
City officials say that if a
joint agreement is reached
with the county for waste-
water treatment, then the
service 'area can be bigger. If
an agreement is not. reached,
the city does not have enough
money to build a plant to
service a large area.
"We don't have the financial
resources to continue a
westward expansion of these
services," said Lake City City
Manager Joe Cone.
Committee members dis-
cussed the need to define


what the cities sewer service
area should be. Several
members suggested outlining
service areas both with and
without the county. But since a
meeting with the county is not
scheduled until January, the
chairman made a suggestion
that met with approval from
the other committee
members.
"Let's just do the one (city
only) and leave the other
open," Robertson said.
The committee tabled
discussion bn septic tank
hauler tipping fees until it can
meet with the haulers present.
. Another item on the agenda
was an increase in the water
and sewer impact fees for new
construction.
'"The impact fees for water
and sewer are oriented to new
development,", said Henry
Sheldon, committee member.
He added the city could
project the costs for water
because the new treatment
plant was budgeted and under
construction.
"Sewer is another matter.
We don't even have a plan. We
do know that we're going to
have to upgrade just to stay in
business," Sheldon said.
The single item on the
agenda that consumed the


most time was showing the
committee the presentation
made to the Department of
Environmental Protection
(FDEP) staff. The presenta-
tion outlined the steps the city
has taken to comply with the
consent order to operate the
sewer plant at 3.5 million gal-
lons per day instead of the 3
million gallons per day it was
built to accommodate.
The presentation also
includes a plan to replace
Bermuda grass with a forest
of pine, cedar and cypress
trees,
"Bermuda grass is not sus-
tainable to grow without more
fertilizer," Sheldon said,
explaining _that because the
level of nitrogen in the city
wastewater discharge is so
low.
Although that is bad for
growing Bermuda grass, the
lower nitrogen 'levels are a
good thing for the Floridian
Aquifer.
Cone pointed, out that by
the time the water from the
sprayfields reaches the
Ichetucknee Springs the level
of nitrates Jis at naturally
occurring levels.


TODD WILSONILake City Reporter

WWII Medals
Lake City resident Joseph Wilson recently received medals he
earned while serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Wilson
served on the USS Casco, a PT boat and seaplane tender ship.
With his honorable discharge, Wilson received the uniform ribbons
.denoting his service, but never received the medals that coincide
with the ribbons. U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw assisted Wilson in
obtaining the medals and the Congressman mailed them to Wilson
recently. He received the World War II Victory Medal, the Navy
Good Conduct Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Theater Medal and the
American Campaign Medal. He also was awarded a lapel pin
denoting his honorable discharge from the Navy, plus a letter of
service thanks from Crenshaw.


POLICE REPORTS


Arrest Log
The following information
was provided by local law
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted. All
people are presumed innocent
unless proven guilty.

Tuesday, Dec. 27
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Marshall Raymond
Oshaugnessy, 47, 190
Defender Ave., burglary of an
occupied structure and criminal
mischief to a church.
* Deywanza Lamar
Dunning, 30, no address
given, warrant: possession of a
controlled substance,
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, resisting arrest without
violence, ,violation of probation
on charges of resisting arrest


without violence and battery
domestic violence.
* Tiara Martina Staples, 19,
1086 NE Jenkin Lane, violation
of probation on charges of
third-degree grand theft.
* Robert Williams, 56, 624
Williams Lane, warrant:
violation of probation on
charges of first-degree arson
and making false insurance
claim.
* Beryl Gatch, 77, 123
Kenmore Glen NW, warrant:
violation of probation on
charges of DUI with serious
bodily injury.
* Stephen Patrick
Gronotte, 39, 343 Lakeway
Drive, Georgetown, warrant:
violation of probation on
charges of dealing in stolen
property.
* Thomas A Jenkins, 32,
134 Gold Finch Loop SE,
warrant: violation of probation


on charges of grand theft.
Fire EMS Calls
Saturday, Dec. 24
* 5:50 a.m., rescue, Jordan
St.,.one volunteer unit
responded.
* 8:03 a.m., power line
down, Ichetucknee Road, one
primary unit responded.
* 9:00 a.m., rescue assist,
Turkey Troff Road, two
.volunteer units responded.
* 11:48 a.m., lifting
assistance, 841 SE Monroe St.,
one primary unit responded.
* 2:40 p.m., wreck, Bascom.
Norris Drive in front of Quiznos,
one primary unit responded.
* 3:48 p.m., wreck, Price
Creek Road, one primary unit
responded.
* 5:45 p.m., structure,
U.S. 41 N in White Springs,
four primary and three
volunteer units responded.


* 5:50 p.m., vehicle fire, 1-75
southbound mile marker 416,
four volunteer Units responded.
* 6:04 p.m., rescue assist,
Welton Road, orne volunteer
unit responded.
* 9:48 p.m., rescue assist,
Bear Road, one volunteer unit
responded.
Sunday, Dec. 25
* 1:50 a.m., rescue assist,
1173 Violet Way, one primary
unit responded.
* 2:19 a.m., fire alarm,
Happy Hearts Daycare, two
primary and one volunteer unit
responded.
* 2:31 a.m., vehicle fire, 1-10
northbound just north of the rest
area, one primary and three
volunteer units responded.
* 2:44 a.m., rescue assist,
Charles Road, two volunteer
units responded.
* 5:13 a.m.,' wreck, 'l'-
southbound between mile


markers 423 and 426, one
primary unit responded.
* 5:28 a.m., wreck, 1-75
northbound mile marker 423,
one primary unit responded.
* 7:28 a.m., wreck, U.S. 90
W and Brown Road, one
primary and one volunteer unit
responded.
* 11:19 a.m., rescue assist,
Combs Road, two volunteer
units responded.
* 9:21 p.m., rescue assist,
Howard Road, three volunteer
units responded.
Tuesday, Dec. 27
* 3:58 p.m., wreck,
Patterson St. and Lake Drive,
one primary unit responded.
* 3:58 p.m., assist, 212 W
H6ward St., Live Oak, one
primary unit responded.
* 5:22 p.m., vehicle, 1-10
; eastbound between mile
markers 299 and'363, one
primary and three volunteer


units responded.
* 7:26 p.m., rescue assist,
U.S. 41 N, two volunteer units
responded.
* 7:35 p.m.,.wreck, Mt.
Carmel Road, one primary and
one volunteer unit responded.
* 10:15 p.m., structure fire,
Huntsboro Drive, two primary
and five volunteer units
'responded.
Wednesday, Dec. 28
* 1:59 a.m., structure,
Dockery Road, two primary and
two volunteer units responded.
* 5:54 a.m., rescue assist,
Herlong Drive, one volunteer
unit responded.
* 11:31 a.m., wreck, 1-75
southbound mile marker 418,
one primary unit responded.
E 11:41 a.m., rescue assist,
Shellcracker Road, one
volunteer unit responded.
* From staff reports.


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Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


M-IF


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OPINION


Thursday, December 29, 2005


www.lakecityreporter.com


EDITORIAL



Local



retail



healthy

A 1l signs point to continued
growth in the retail
economy. That's locally and
nationally. It seems there's
no slowing.the shopping
frenzy that has continues across the
country.
In Lake City, businesses are talking
about consumers hitting their stores
and spending money at a healthier clip
than 2004, which most said was a good
year.
According to national reports,
after-Christmas shopping is at pace or
better than the run on stores in the
weeks before the holiday.
Shoppers in Lake City were out in
force Monday to hit the stores for
additional bargains for themselves.
There were very few returns compared
to new purchases.
And, the gift card revolution also
allows merchants to pace themselves in
terms of revenue. Gift cards don't count
on the bottom line - at most retailers
- until they are spent.
It's good to see continued life in the
economy of Lake City. Our retail base is
strong and has potential for growth in
the new year ahead.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY


Today is Thursday, Dec. 29, the 363rd
dayof 2005. There are two days left in
the year. -
* On Dec. 29, 1845,:Texas was
admitted as the 28th state.
* In 1170, Archbishop Thomas Becket
was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral in
England.
* In 1808, the 17th president of the
United States, Andrew Johnson, was born
in Raleigh, N.C.
* In 1813, the British burned Buffalo,
N.Y., during the War of 1812.
* In 1851, the first American Young
Men's Christian Association was organized,
in Boston.
- * In 1890, the Wounded Knee
massacre took place in South Dakota as
some 300 Sioux Indians were killed by,
U.S. troops sent to disarm them.
* In 1913, the first movie serial, "The
Adventures of Kathlyn," premiered in
Chicago.
* In 1934, Japan renounced the
Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 and the
London Naval Treaty of 1930.


Lake City Reporter
serving Columbia County since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is published with
pride for residents of Columbia and
surrounding counties by Community
Newspaper Inc. of Athens, Ga.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities - "Newspapers get
things done!"
Our primary goal is to publish
distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth; integrity and hard work.
Michael Leonard, publisher
Todd Wilson, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president.
Tom Wood, chairman

OUR POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be typed or
neatly written and double spaced. Letters
should not exceed 400 words and will be edited
for length and libel. Letters must be signed and
include the writer's name, address and
telephone number for verification. Writers can
have two letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of the
writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City


Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St.
downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com


COMMENTARY


Reflecting on 2005


The end of a year is
a time of
reflection - a
looking-back on
events that have
impacted our lives the most.
For me, 2005 was a year of
endings and new beginnings.
As my marriage and my life in
Lake City ended, life in Tifton,
Ga., began, starting new
friendships and reviving old
kinships.
My readers in both states
have been a true source of joy
and confirmation. For this last
column- of 2005, I want to
share some of the reader
comments and responses I
have been privileged to
receive.
Last January the tale of
'"The Marine and one good
cat" received lots of attention
- mostly from people who
identified with Don's Marine
attitude or Miss Kitty's
attitudede" Most people just
enjoyed the humor of
imagining a crusty old Marine
trying to train an
independent-minded cat.
In February, after I wrote in
support of Norma McCorvey's
petition for the U.S. Supreme,
Court to overturn Roe v.
Wade, I received a long letter
from an elderly gentleman,
detailing how his wife was
advised to abort their first
child, due to the threat to her
own health. She refused, and
her husband prayed for her
and the baby. Not only did
they both live, but she later
gave birth to several more
children, and lived to be a
grandmother. Her husband
wrote, 'Today tears run down
my cheeks when I think of
what might have been, had
my decision, our decision,
been a different one."
Roe v. Wade has not yet
been overturned, but I still
have hope.
Also in February, during
the celebration of 60 years
since the liberation of the
death camp at Auschwitz, I
wrote about my sad visit there
in 1994. Vivian Reeser and Jan


Carolyn Abell
carbell 020@mchsi.com


Brady both shared their very
emotional reactions to the
vivid description of that camp
of horrors.
As you probably remember,
the column entitled
"Exploring the FairTax
Proposal" in September
spurred a rather spirited
reader debate on the merits
and drawbacks to said
proposal. I know taxes are a
sensitive topic, but still think
-the FairTax would be a
welcome change.
When I described my Abell
family reunion during the
summer, I again didn't
anticipate so many positive
reader comments. Evidently
some families just don't -get
together; some are too small
to have a big reunion; and
some reunions turn into
fights. A few people want to
come to my next one.
In late September, my
reaction to Michael Newdow's
latest assault on the Pledge of
Allegiance prompted one
reader to nominate me for
President (Rave, Oct. 1, Tifton
Gazette). My neighbor, Tom
Mark, said he was jealous
because he hadn't been
nominated, so I've invited him
to be my running mate on a
non-partisan reform ticket.
Get ready for 2008!
Memories brought on by
returning to my old home
town for my 40th high school
reunion, and recalling my
daddy building a church
there, apparently stirred up
emotions and memories for
others, too. Even readers I
don't know seemed to either
identify or wish they could
identify with the closeness of


the class of '65. Several more
wished they had known my
father, James Abell.
The compliments on
"Reflections on the beauty of
autumn" were another
surprise. The most poignant
one was from Kathy Beasley,
from whom my mother and I
bought our home here. She
laughingly recalled the geese
in the road, and wistfully
relived the smell of Hubert
Wood's burn pile.
"Let's Teach the'Bible as
Literature" really resonated .
with readers. Several teachers
wrote to express their
support. One who
home-schools six children
stated "As we apply a unit
study centered on The
Sermon on The Mount' it
amazes me to see the rich
treasures contained in God's
Word and how
analogies are present to relate
math, science, history, and
even English to God and His
Word." The others noted
similar reactions and
suggested many ways besides
literature; to use the Bible as a
teaching text.
The recent column entitled
"Celebrating Christmas in
Heaven" was definitely a
favorite. Sharing the life
experiences of my Aunt
Norma, who was known to
many, it appealed emotionally
to even those who didn't know
her. One man said he had
known her for years, but had
no idea she had endured so
many profound tragedies. I
did make an error, in stating
that her brother built her
house. Although she treated
Raymond Harrell as a brother,
he was actually her brother-in-"
law, and I have extended my
heart-felt apology to him for
that error.
I am deeply grateful to
everyone who reads this
column, and especially those
who take the time to provide
your reactions.
S Carolyn Abell, formerly of Lake
City,'"is a freelance writer who
lives in Tifton, Ga.


Since the term
"intelligent design"
entered the lexicon,
its meaning and
educational merits
have been extensively
debated. No one has summed
up the matter better than U.S.
District Judge John E. Jones,
ruling this week in a
landmark Pennsylvania
schools case. Judge Jones
wrote that its presence in the
Dover, Pa., biology curriculum
"violates the centuries-old
ground rules of science by
invoking and permitting


supernatural causation," and
that it is nothing less than "a
religious view, a mere
relabeling of creationism."...
Predictably, some
denounced Jones as an
"activist judge," which is a
code word for liberal.
Considering that the jurist is a
church-going conservative
appointed by President Bush,
that's unlikely to stick.
Not that this will put an end
to the "breathtaking inanity"
the judge said characterized
the policy in Pennsylvania.
The National Science


Teachers Association reports
that a third of its members
feel pressure from students or
parents to teach creationism
or intelligent design ...
The whole uproar brings to
mind the words of Clarence
Darrow, who in 1925 defended
the teaching of evolution
during the Scopes Monkey
Trial: "History repeats itself.
That's one of the things
wrong with history." Let
history note the ruling that
intelligent design, as a matter
of faith, does not fit in school.
* Journal Star, Peoria, Ill.


COLUMBIA




O&A

TODAY'S TOPIC:
Did you do most of your shopping
before' Christmas or did you wait and hit
the after Christmas sales?'


"I did more
shopping before
Christmas, but I
did find some
good sales -
clothing sales -
after Christmas at
J.C. Penney's and
Goody's."


Elaine Owens
Lake City, 58


"I didn't get any
done because my
mother passed
away, but there
are some good
sales now, but I
probably won't
shop those - the
traffic's too bad."


Ann Cardwell
Blackshear, Ga., 52



"I did my
shopping before
Christmas - I'm
through with
shopping!"


Ruby Smith
Lake City, 53


"I did about the
same amount of
shopping before
and after
Christmas. I found
good sales at the
Regency and
Orange Park
Malls"


Mary Nodes
Lake City; 59


"We're shopping
the after
Christmas sales
because
everything's on
sale and the prices
are good."


Kathy Poirier
Lake City, 47


"I finished most
of my shopping
before Christmas.
I don't want to get
in the middle of all
the crowds
shopping now."


Carolyn Vredeveld
Lake City, 50

* Columbia Q&A was compiled by staff
photographer Jennifer Chasteen at the Dollar
General store on U.S. 90. The opinions
expressed are not necessarily those of the
newspaper.

They Said It...

"The evidence showed
that Casey was a witness
to the crime, but there
was nothing that
indicated that he
participated in it
whatsoever."
- Karl Green,
attorney for Casey Schuurman
(Complete story on Page 2A)


4A


OTHER VIEWS

The debate with 'intelligent design'


a











Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2005


By NAHAL TOOSI
Associated Press
NEW YORK - A tentative
contract for transit workers
reached after a three-day
strike stopped the city's buses
and subways is heading to
union members for final
approval.
The executive board of the
Transport Workers Union
approved the tentative deal
37-4 Tuesday night, clearing
the way for the union's 33,700
members to cast their votes.
The deal, announced late
Tuesday by union President
Roger Toussaint, requires
workers to contribute
1.5 percent of their salaries
toward their health care pre-
mitims. The union previously
paid no health care premiums.
Pay would increase by
10.9 percent over three years.
It does not require new
employees to contribute more
to their pensions, which had
been a sticking point in
negotiations.
"I apologize to the public
that we went on strike, but
overall we got what we want-
ed," said shop steward James
Rodriguez.
The union's general
membership will vote on the
contract using mail-in ballots
distributed this week.
Toussaint said the contract
provided "for a host of other
provisions that will go a long
way to help in improving the


relations" between transit
workers and the Metropolitan
Transportation Authority.
Mayor Michael Bloomberg
applauded both sides for ham-
mering out the agreement and
thanked New Yorkers "for
their patience and cooperation
during a very difficult three
days."
The tentative contract "pro-
vides the necessary cost-sav-
ings and productivity to keep
the MTA solvent, mitigate fare
increases and allow for
vital investments in our


transportation infrastructure,"
Bloomberg said.
The contract also would
establish Martin Luther King
Jr. Day as a holiday and
provide paid maternity leave
for workers, who previously
had to use sick leave. It also
would not raise the retirement
age for new hires from 55.
The MTA is a state agency,
and the city had no role in the
negotiations. A spokesman for
Gov. George Pataki declined to
comment on the deal.
The union's contract expired


Dec. 16. Union leaders called
the strike Dec. 20 when talks
became deadlocked about
wages, pension and health care
benefits. Transit workers
returned to work without a
contract three days later.
The shutdown : of the
nation's largest public transit
system forced millions of daily
subway and bus riders to walk,
bike or squeeze aboard
packed commuter train lines
in the freezing cold to get
around the city at the height of
the holiday shopping season.


Former top Enron accountant pleads guilty


By KRISTEN HAYS
AP Business Writer

HOUSTON - Former top
Enron Corp. accountant
Richard Causey pleaded
guilty to securities fraud
Wednesday and agreed to
help pursue convictions
against Enron founder
Kenneth Lay and former CEO
Jeffrey Skilling.
Lay, Skilling and Causey
were scheduled to be tried
together Jan. 17 on conspira-
cy, fraud and other charges
related to the scandal-ridden
company's collapse more than
four years ago. The deal
leaves Lay and Skilling with
another opponent rather than
an ally who has been part of
their united defense front
since the trio was first
indicted last year.
Causey will serve seven
years in prison and forfeit
$1.25 million to the govern-
ment, according to the plea
deal. However, if the govern-
ment is happy with his coop-
eration, prosecutors can ask
that his sentence be reduced
to five years.
The maximum penalty for
securities fraud is 10 years in
prison, . followed by three
years of probation.
Causey, the government's
16th cooperating witness in


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former Enron chief accounting
officer Richard Causey leaves
the federal courthouse in
Houston, Feb. 24.
exchange for a plea, had faced
more than 30 counts of
conspiracy, fraud, insider
trading, lying to auditors and
money laundering.
Many of the charges
against Causey overlapped
with the 35 counts of fraud,
conspiracy, lying to auditors
and insider trading pending
against Skilling. The pair are
accused of conspiring with
others to fool investors into
believing a wobbly Enrdn was
healthy in the years leading to
its December 2001 crash.
Some of Causey's charges


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also overlap with the seven
fraud and conspiracy counts
pending against Lay, in which
the former chairman is
accused of perpetuating the
ruse after Skilling's abrupt
resignation in August 2001.
Killing and Lay maintain
that they neither committed
nor knew of any crimes at
Enron, and both have pleaded
not guilty.
Causey, 45, could be more
damaging to Lay and Skilling
than former Enron finance
chief Andrew Fastow, who
pleaded guilty to two counts
of conspiracy in January 2004.
Unlike his former peer,
Causey didn't skim millions of,
dollars for himself from shady
deals.
Also, Lay has repeatedly
pointed to Fastow as the
crook who abused his trust,
highlighting the former


finance chief's admitted
skullduggery.
"There is some safety in
numbers from the govern-
ment's perspective. It's not
just Andy Fastow now, it's
another enior official. That
takes soye of the pressure
and burden off of Fastow,"
said Kirby Behre, a former
federal prosecutor. '"They
might make an effective
one-two punch in terms of
government witnesses."
Another former prosecutor
said the Lay and Skilling
defense teams knew a Causey
plea was possible.
"It, changes the face of the
trial for the prosecutors and
the;, defense," said Jacob
Frenkel. "They had to have
some contingency plan for
trial preparations for a case
without Causey. Now they just
put that plan in place."


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Dec.28, 2005

Dow Jones
:~.,,IfA M j'.t ,I ,,,


niiuu ia

+18.49

10,796.26
ct. change
from previous: +0.17
/


xr


- 11,000

- A - -10,750


SEP OCT NOV DEC


High
10,825.16


Low
10,778.33


10,500

10,250

10,000


Record high: 11,722.98
Jan.14,2000


STOCK MARKET INDEXES
52-Week YTD 12-mo
High Low Name Last Chg %Chg %Chg %Chg
10,984.46 10,000.46 Dow Industrials 10,796.26 +18.49 +.17 +.12 -.30
4,306.09 3,348.36 Dow Transportation 4,223.93 +7.67 +.18 +11.21 +10.86
438.74 323.79 Dow Utilities 407.05 -1.97 -.48 +21.53 +21.09
7,867.59 6,902.51 NYSE Composite 7,795.76 +27.91 +.36 +7.53 +7.64
1,778.74 1,186.14 Amex Market Value 1,758.93 +17.99 +1.03 +22.63 +23.28
2,278.16 1,889.83 Nasdaq Composite 2,228.94 +2.05 +.09 +2.46 +2.39
1,275.80 1,136.15 S&P500 1,258.17 +1.63 +.13 +3.82 +3.69
752.00 623.57 S&P MidCap 744.13 +4.88 +.66 +12.18 +12.24
693.63 570.03 Russell 2000 680.08 +3.50 +.52 +4.38 +4.09
12,787.08 11,195.22 Wilshire5000 12,610.84 +24.54 +.20 +5.34 .+5.25

STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

A NYSE A AMEX A NASDAQ
7,795.76 +27.91 1,758.93 +17.99 2,228.94 +2.05

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
Linens . 26.52 +2.61 +10.9 ProspMdn 5.80 +1.51 +35.2 CASMedn 8.55 +1.80 +26.7
HeclaM 4.15 +.34 +8.9 Tarpon n 3.00 +.58 +24.0 EngyConv 41.30 +7.06 +20.6
OfficeMax 25.83 +1.63 +6.7 CoffeeHn 7.05 +1:15 +19.5 AHPCHId 2.95 +.42 +16.6
WaterPk 21.93 +1.38 +6.7 Rivieras 16.37+1.94 +13.4 Ambaslntl 15.43 +2.07 +15.5
CCE Spin n 13.30 +.80 +6.4 MidwstAir 5.41 +.61 +12.7 MSGIs 4.37 +.57 +15.0
Alumina 21.75 +1.28 +6.3 EasyGrd pf 2.25 +.25 +12.5 CpstnTrb 3.31 +.43 +14.9
NSGrp 42.44 +2.52 +6.3 Barnwells 22.58 +2.48 +12.3 Spherix 3.76 +.43 +12.9
Suntechn 24.65 +1.40 +6.0 GoldStrg 2.74 +.28 +11.4 InPlay 3.17 +.36 +12.8
LLE Ry 2.88 +.14 +5.1 Xfone n 2.55 +.25 +10.9 InterDig 19.63 +2.10 +12.0
MahangrT 6.74 +.33 +5.1 EmpireRs 10.46 +.96 +10.1 AbleEnr 6.98 +.73 +11.7


LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name - Last Chg %Chg
ExprsJet 8.32 -2.31 -21.7
Nissin rs 25.29 -2.96 -10.5
Terra . 5.63 -.30 -5.1
Visteon 6.51 -.35 -5.1
Starret 15.67 -.73. -4.5
FriedBR 10.13 -.47 -4.4
TerraNitro 19.47 -.90 -4.4
ToddShp 27.17 -1.18 -4.2
HomeBanc 7.48 -.32 -4.1
MedStaff 5.20 -.22 -4.1
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
Lucent 359702 2.73 -.02
Pfizer 236175 23.60 -.03
GenElec 151177 35.11 +.05
ExxonMbl 147680 56.25 +.38
iShJapan 142317 13.60 +.24
TimeWarn 132368 17.46 -.07
VerizonCm126368 30.25 -.19
FordM 113773 7.84 -.05
GnMotr 111130 18.61 -.38
NortelNet 104703 3.10 +.03
DIARY
Advanced 2,166
Declined 1,169
Unchanged 143
Total issues 3,478
New Highs 58
New Lows 95
Vdlume 1,445,721,410


LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SilverlfR n 3.18 -.90 -22.1
FusionTI n 2.46 -.24 -8.9
SoftBrdsn 213 -.17 -7.4
Congolm 2.78 -.22 -7.3
AlmadM gn 2.08 -.16 -7.1
BSDMedn 5.11 -.39 -7.1
IvaxDiag 3.38 -.21 -5.9
DigitAngel 3.01 -.18 -5.6
BirchMt gn 7.42" -.43 -5.5
LawEnf n 2.46 -.14 -5.4

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SPDR 291290 125.75 +.28
iShRs2000 s20399967.51 +.40
SP Engy 176667 50.49 +.75
SemiHTr 85480 37.43 +.14
OilSvHT 76708130.23 +2.11
SP Util 63150 31.62 -.16
GoldStrg 59708 2.74 +.28
DJIA Diam 41280 107.85 +.10
SPFncl 40718 31.87 -.07
iShEAFEs 32389 59.68 +.43
DIARY
Advanced 533
Declined 411
Unchanged 87
Total issues 1,031
New Highs 28
New Lows 15
Volume 227,180,029


LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
PeopEdu n 4.96 -.74 -13.0
DiedrichC 4.44 -.57 -11.4
ADAM 8.44 -.90 -9.6
Innodata. 3.19 -.33 -9.4
Reliv 13.86 -1.43 -9.4
IDM Phar n 2.65 -.25 -8.6
CerusCp 9.72 -.90 -8.5
T-3Engy 9.00 -.77 -7.9
GPC Biot 12.45 -1.04 -7.7
NatnHIth wt 2.56 -.21 -7.6
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SiriusS 520448 6.75 -.24
Nasd100Tr491091 40.99 -.05
JDS Uniph409458 2.40 -.09
Cisco 380498 17.29 +.04
Microsoft 335482 26.39 -.07
SunMicro 297215 4.32 +.03
Intel 258764 25.44 -.02
Oracle 213017 12.28 -.07
Celgene 160400 60.85 +3.37
AppleCs 141130 73.57 -.66
DIARY
Advanced , 1,636
Declined 1,400
Unchanged 177
Total issues 3,213
New Highs 59
New Lows 52
Volume 1,212,151,926


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Name Ex DIv YId PE Last


AT&T Inc
,lltel
,utoZone
BkofAm
BellSouth -
BobEvn
ENBFnPA
3SX
3hmpE
Chevron
Cisco
CocaCI
ColBgp
Delhaize
DollarG
FPL Gp s
FamDIr
FordM
GenElec
3dyFam
HCA Inc
HomeDp


NY 1.33
NY 1.54
NY
NY 2.00
NY 1.16
Nasd .48
Nasd .56
NY .52
NY
NY 1.80
Nasd ...
NY 1.12
NY .61
NY 1.13
NY .18
NY 1.42
NY .38
NY .40
NY 1.00
Nasd .12
NY .60
NY .40


YTD
Chg%Chg
-.01 -4.5
+.39 +7.6
+.42 +.8
-.29 -1.5
-.04 -1.7
... -10.4
+.07 -9.2
+.15 +26.4
-.02 +15.5
+.81 +4.0
+.04 -10.5
-.19 -2.1
+.06 +13.0
-.32 -14.0
+,09 -7.6
+.45 +11.3
+.32 -20.0
-.05 -46.4
+.05 -3.8
+.02 +5.0
-.52 +27.7
+.07 -3.9


Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 7.25 7.25
Discount Rate 5.25 5.25
Federal Funds Rate 4.25 4.25
Treasuries
3-month' ,3.88 3.9C
6-month 4.19 4.2C
5-year 4.32 4.44


10-year
30-year


YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg


Intel Nasd .40
JDS Uniph Nasd
JeffPilot NY 1.67
LowesCos NY .24
Lucent NY
McDnlds. NY .67
Microsoft Nasd .36
Nasd1OOTr Nasd .14
NY Times NY .66
NobltyH , Nasd .20
OcciPet NY 1.44
Penney NY .50
PepsiCo NY 1.04
Potash NY .60
Ryder NY .64
SearsHldgs Nasd
SiriusS Nasd ...
SouthnCo NY 1.49
SPDR Amex 2.14
SunMicro Nasd ...
TimeWam NY .20
WalMart NY .60


19 25.44 -.02 +8.8
... , 2.40 -.09 -24.3
14 57.46 +.20 +10.6
21 67.01 +.02 +16.4
11 2.73 -.02 -27.4
18 34.19 +.09 +6.6
22 26.39 -.07 -1.2
40.99 -.05 +2.7
13 26.56 +.38 -34.9
18 26.56 -.32 +13.1
7 80.58 +.94 +38.1
17 56.31. +1.01 +36.0
26 59.33 +.14 +13.7
17 79.75 +1.62 -4.0
12 41.36. +.14 -13.4
27 118.38 -1.57 +19.6
6.75 -.24 -11.4
16 34.97 -.13 +4.3
125.75 +.28 +4.0
4.32 +.03 -19.9
31. 17.46 -.07 -10.2
19 47.84 +.11 -9.4


CURRENCIES
Last Pvs Day
Australia .1.3742 1.3812
Britain 1.7160 1.7270
Canada 1.1637 1.1741
Euro .8449 .8452
Japan . 117.83 117.39
Mexico 10.7560 10.7350
Switzerlnd 1.3159 1.3170
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show
dollar in foreign currency. .


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank PcI MIn Init
Name Obi ($MIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
American Funds A: GwthA p XG 71,536 30.99 +2.6 +14.9/B +15.8/A 5.75 250
Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 x SP 69,916 115.82 +0.2 +5.5/A +1.8/A NL '3,000
American Funds A: ICAA p LV 66,546 31.49 +1.2 +7.2/B +20.7/B 5.75 250
American Funds A: WshA p LV 62,683 31.05 +0.2 +4,1/D +24.0/8 5.75 250
Fidelity Invest: Contra XG 58,486 65.14 +1.7 +16.9/A +34.7/A NL 2,500
PIMCO nstl PIMS: TotRI IB 53,886 10.51 +1.0 +3.2/A +38.0/A NL 5,000,000
Fidelity Invest: Magelln LC 51,336 107.11 +2.3 +7.0/B -4.1/C NL 2,500
Dodge&Cox: Stockx . XV 51,035 137.96 +1.6 +10.0/B +67.91A NL 2,500
American Funds A: IncoA p MP 48,074 18.16 +0.5 +3.4/D +47.1/A 5.75 250
American Funds A: CaplBA p MP 43,361 53.09 +1.0 +4.7/C +56.9/A 5.75 250
American Funds A: EupacAp IL 43,139 41.03 +4.9 +20.9/A +46.5/B 5.75 250
American Funds A: CapWGAp GL 39,841 36.57 +3.3 +14.7/B +68.0/A 5.75 250
VanguardlnstlFds:Instldxx SP 39,138 114.90 +0.2 +5.6/A +2.5/A NL 5,000,000
Vanguard Admiral: 500Admlx SP 38,091 115.83 +0.2 +5.6/A +2.2/A NL 100,000
Fidelity Invest: LowP r MV 36,517 40.91 +2.2 +9.2/D +121.6/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: N PerA p GL 35,790 28.70 +3.1 +11.4/C +34.0/B 5.75 250
American Funds A: BalApx BL 32,947 17.91 +0.3 +3.6/D +40.0/A 5.75 250
Fidelity Invest: Grolnc LC 31,527 34.68, 0.0 +3.4/D -0.3/B NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: Divlntl IL 31,025 32.50 +4.7 +17.6/B +58.4/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Idx Fds: ToItSk XC 29,338 30.23 +0.5 +6.7/C +9.7/C NL 3,000
Vanguard Fds: Wndsll LV 28,8867 31.48 +0.4 +7.5/8 +32.0/A NL 3,000
Fidelity Invest: GroCo XG 26,818 64.23 +2.9 +14.5/B -11.6/C NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: Eq Inc El 26,088 53.08 +0.4 +6.3/C +20.2/C NL 2,500
Vanguard Fds: Welltn x BL 26,073 30.49 +0.8 +7.5/A +39.1/A NL 3,000
Fidelity Invest: Purtn BL 24,180 18.80 +0.5 +5.1/C +27.4/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: FdlnvA px LV 23,716 35.56 +2.3 +12.3/A +25.5/B 5.75 250
Dodge&Cox: Balanced x BL 23,628 81.64 +1.2 +7.1/A +60.2/A NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: BlueChGr LC 22,577 43.55 +0.6 +4.8/C -14.6/E NL 2,500
Frank/Temp FnmkA: ncomAp MP 21,902 2.40 +1.1 +2.3/0 +49.0/A 4.25 1,000
Vanguard dx Fds: TotBnd IB 21,084 10.06 +0.9 +2.7/B +30.3/C NL 3,000
Frankffemp Temp A: GrwthA p GL 20,996 22.99 +3.2 +8.8/D +53.7/A . 5.75 1,000
Vanguard Fds: Prmcp r XC 20,761 65.74 +2.3 +9.3/B +15.4/C NL 25,000
Vanguard Admiral: TStkAdm XC 20,223 30.23 +0.5 +6.8/C +10.0/C NL 100,000
Fidelity Spartan: Eqldxinv SP 20,051 44.51 +0.2 +5.6/A +1.8/A NL 100,000
Amer Century Inv: Ultra LG 19,570 30.42 -0.6 +3.0/E -7.5/B NL 2,500
Davis Funds A: NYVen A LC 18,903 33.91 +0.6 +11.4/A +21:5/A 4.75 1,000
PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd. IB 18,310 10.51 +0.9 +2.9/A +36.2/A NL 5,000,000
Price Funds: Eqinc El 17,958 26.10 +0.1 +4.9/D +32.7/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: BondA p AB 17,681 13.23 +0.5 +1.9/D +37.7/B 3.75 250
Fidelity Invest: DivGth ' LC 16,565 29.02 +0.9 +4.3/D +3.1/B NL 2,500
Vanguard Instl Fds: InsPI.x SP 16,372 114.91 +0.2 +5.6/A +2.6/A NL200,000,000
Vanguard Fds: HIthCre HB 16,340 141.05 +4.2 +16.8/A +32.8/B NL 25,000
Fidelity Invest: Balanc BL 15,999 18.83 +2.0 +11.5/A +47.5/A NL . 2,500
BL -Balanced, El -Equity Inc, EM -Emerging Mkts, GL -Global Stock, GM -Gen. Muni, IB -Intermd. Bond, IL -
International Stock, LC -Large-Cap Core, LG -Large-Cap Growth, LV -Large-Cap Val., MP -Stock/Bond Blend, MT
-Mortgage, SB -Short-Term Bond, SP -S&P 500, SS -Single-State Muni, XC -Multi-Cap Core, XG -Multi-Cap
Growth, XV -Mullli-Cap Val. Total Return: Chg in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs.
others with same objective: A is In top 20%, E In bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund.
NA = Not avail. NE = Data In question. NS = Fund not in existence. Source: Upper, Inc.
Sltoack Foolnolesa g : Driuerd and aarniangu in Canadian dollar% h = Doas raol meat conllnued IIting9 landaras
II LI' hI0nij 1 lin 1 E] na : E ., Ir. rpa ' 52 cee i s pl = Preenred rs : Siocp ha', undaeigne a reversir, atck spltl al & leant l
") pe..:,,r i lhiianins paiile l 1r n = Rnign , il y 0 acunt, al a s|perlfid pri:6 q 5 1.,k r,' w ill b y a i sI 20 percani wihin
r1. 1ml ,year ur. -Uii *. In tbriA ruplC ('.T re,'iverflhip Wtd = W iri ai, bu d tbaed Wi = Wi men i'vue' a: = WBirariai
Mutual Fund Footnoles: = E i cr'n divlerd riL,= No up-.riIG saiA,.i arge p . Furia aSa s uied to pay diintbuiion co'~s
r RA rdnspi:r, feei clorirgenrt delerred salbs luod may april 1 Both p ar.: er
Gainers and Losers muIl b worm al least f2 &o be allied in tables al lell Most Actiese mudt be wrjin at lea t V1 Volume In
r,'l,dil -A ,:1 l hares Souice. i'1, AaaoialerJ Pf, SuPEdrs lilies a e unlrficiil


NewYork transit workers union


announces tentative contract


MARKET REPORT


,ASSOCIATED PRESS
New York Transit Workers Union President Roger Toussaint announces a tentative new contract at
the union headquarters in New York, late Tuesday night.


LAE IT RPOTE'BUSINESS TUSADEEBR2,20


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


- Z


4.34 4.49









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2005


Nearly 50 accused of



bilking Red Cross funds

By OLIVIA MUNOZ cane calls. Others are in
Associated Press Niagara Falls, N.Y., and Falls
FRESNO, Calif. - The Church, Va. Operators provid-
number of people indicted in a ed qualifying victims with a
scheme that bilked thousands personal identification num-
of dollars from a Red Cross ber they then presented to
fund designated for Hurricane receive aid funds from
K(itrta victims has risen Western Union, authorities


49, federal authorities said.
At least 14 suspects worked
at a Red Cross call center in
Bakersfield and are accused of
helping family and friends file
false claims for 'aid money,
said Mary Wenger, a spokes-
woman for U.S. Attorney
McGregor Scott in
Sacramento.
Six have pleaded guilty to
federal wire fraud charges
since the first indictments
were announced in October,
she said Tuesday.
The fake claims drained at
least $200,000 from the fund,
with an average payout of
about $1,000, Red Cross
spokeswoman Devorah
Goldburg said. The total could
rise as the investigation con-
tinues, she said.
The Bakersfield site is the
largest of three Red Cross
centers set up to handle hurri-


said.
The Red Cross contacted
the FBI after it performed an
audit of the call center and
discovered an unusually high
number of claims were being
paid out at Western Union
outlets in the Bakersfield
area.
"It was the Red Cross that
found this problem," Jack
McGuire, the national group's
interim president, said
Wednesday on NBC's
'Today." '"We put into effect
these call centers to speed up
delivery of support to people
that needed it. As part of that,
we put into place mechanisms
to look for fraud up front and
to find fraud after the fact."
None of the indicted
employees worked directly
for the Red Cross.
Officials of ' Fort
Lauderdale, based Spherion,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kayla Richards (left) of Lafayette La., breaks up mold covered
drywall along with other workers in a flooded house in New
Orleans, Wednesday.


which operates the call cen-
ter, have said the company
didn't have time to run back-
ground checks on its 1,200
workers.
The indicted employees
were providing PIN numbers
to their friends and family
who would then go to
Western Union to collect the
funds, Scott said in October.
"Sometinies they'd give a
victim a PINK number and turn
around and call a buddy with
the same PIN, and there'd be
a race to Western Union," he


said.
McGuire said $200,000 was
a small percentage of the
approximately $1.4 billion Red
Cross provided to Katrina vic-
tims. And he said Red Cross
was working to improve its
delivery and anti-fraud sys-
tems for the future.
McGuire, executive vice
president of the charity's
Biomedical Services, was
named to serve as interim
leader after President Marsha
Evans announced her
resignation Dec. 13.


Reported hate crimes up 21 percent in 2004


By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
Associated Piess

TALLAHASSEE -
Reported hate crimes in 2004
were up 21 percent more than
the year before, the increase
was largely attributed to a
growing recognition of what
constitutes a hate 'crime, the
attorney general's office said
Wednesday.
There were 334 reported
hate crimes in 2004, .compared
to 275 in 2003. The total was
one short of the 2001 level, a
year when hate crimes moti-
vated by. religion: and ethnicity
spiked after the Sept. 11
terrorist attacks.
The number of race motivat-
ed crimes in 2004 was 190, or
almost 57 percent of the total.
The year terrorists flew planes


into the World Trade Center
and the Pentagon, only
39 percent of hate crimes were
race motivated.
Of the 95 law enforcement
agencies that reported hate
crimes, .St. Petersburg Police
easily had the most with
49 victims. Of those, 29 were
victims of violence after a jury
rejected a $1.6 million lawsuit
brought by the family of
TyRon Lewis, a black motorist
who was fatally shot by a white
officer eightyears earlier.
"Over half of our numbers
come from one night of
violence," said Bill Proffitt,
a St. Petersburg Police
spokesman. "We had about six
hours of civil unrest."
Seventeen of the incidents
were white drivers that had
rocks thrown at their cars


when driving past crowds of
blacks gathered to protest the
verdict, Proffitt said.\
Otherwise,'the city showed
a downward trend from the
previous two year, Proffitt said,
adding that the department
has a program that much more
aggressively reports hate
crimes compared to other
departments.
Attorney General Charlie
Crist's office cautions that it's
difficult to draw conclusion'
from the annual report
because law enforcement
agencies around ,the state
have different reporting
policies.
The numbers do seem
quirky, considering
Gainesville Police,' report
31 hate crimes and municipal
police departments in, Miami,


Tallahassee, Sarasota,
Daytona Beach, Fort Myers,
Ocala, West Palm Beach and
Key West didn't have any to
report. Fort Lauderdale police
reported only one, while the
nearby suburb of Sunrise
reported seven.
In all of Miami-Dade
County, which had an estimat-
ed 2.4 million people in 2004,
only 16 hate, crimes were
reported. But in Alachua
County, which contains
Gainesville, 39 hate crimes
were reported out of -an
estimated population of
223,090.
"Some agencies do a more
vigorous job than others of
reporting it, but that's really up
to local policy," said Jon Peck,
a spokesman for Crist's office.


Army sloppy in keeping

track of parts and tools


By ELISABETH GOODRIDGE
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The
Army can't account for
$68 million in parts and tools
shipped to contractors for
repairs in 2004 because it
doesn't demand receipts, con-
gressional- auditors said
Wednesday.
"Although the (Defense
Department) policy requires
the military services to con-
firm receipt of all assets
shipped to contractors, the
Army is not. consistently
recording shipment receipts,
in its inventory management
systems," the Government
Accountability Office said in a
34-page report.
In earlier audits, the GAO
found a similar lack of basic
accounting oversight with
Navy and Air Force parts and
tool shipments.
Each year, the Army ships
thousands of items, ranging
from small tools to turbine
engines, to private contractors
for repair, alterations or modi-
fications. Looking at data from
two inventory control points,
the GAO investigators said 15
percent - or $68 million - of
the unclassified shipments
they analyzed "could not be


confirmed as being received."
The GAO said another
$481.7 million in unclassified
items shipped for repair -
about 42 percent - couldn't
be reconciled with shipping
records. Discrepancies also
were found in records for
37 percent, or about $8.1 mil-
lion shipments, of classified
parts and tools.
'These data show that the
Army, on the basis of records
receipts maintained in its
inventory management :sys-
tems, cannot confirm that a
substantial portion of its
inventory items shipped to
repair contracts were in fact
received," the audit said.
The GAO said the head of
the Army's Material
Command should look at pro-
viding contractors advance
notice of shipments, require
quarterly status reports and
better document contractors'
receipt of shipments.
Jack Bell, the deputy under
secretary of defense for logis-
tics and materiel readiness,
agreed with the GAO recom-
mendations in a Nov. 29 letter
responding to a draft of the
report. The Army had no
immediate response
Wednesday to the final report


Man who confessed on

Web blog gets five years


Associated Press
TAVARES - A 19-year-old
man who confessed on his
Weblog to causing a crash
that fatally injured his friend
was sentenced Wednesday to
five years in prison, 10 years
of probation and a permanent
suspension of his driver's
license.
Blake . Ranking pleaded
guilty last week to DUI
manslaughter. Ranking was
accused of grabbing the steer-
ing wheel from the back seat
a. a prank, and sending the
car into a concrete culvert in
October 2004. Jason Coker,
17, was killed in the accident.
Another passenger, Nicole
Robinette, then 17, was
seriously injured.


"I. think it's sad for both
families," said Circuit Judge
Mark Hill, referring to the'
Coker and Ranking families,
after the sentencing. 'The
five-year sentence is bad
enough, but to know he lost a
best friend is something he'll
have to live with the rest of
his life."
Ranking wrote "I did it" on
his blurty.com journal three
days after the crash. He had
previously told investigators
he remembered nothing of
the crash and little of, its
aftermath.
' His blood alcohol content
after the crash measured
0.185, more than double the
legal limit.


OBITUARIES


Mr. Alfred Johnson
Mr. Alfred Johnson Expired at his
residence on December 28, 2005 af-
ter an illness. He was
born in Lake City on
December 27, 1948 "
and received his edu-
cation in the Public
School system of
Columbia County. ..
He accepted Christ at an early age
Sand became a Deacon at the New
Day Springs MBC under the leader-
ship of Moderator George Francis.
He was the oldest son of Mrs. Ka-
therine Freeman and Emory John-
son. He was a TV Repairman by
trade and often known as the TV
Man. Other survivors are: A Loving
wife Mary E. Johnson, His children
Alfred Jr., Vilinda (Phillip) Rossin,
Mickel Johnson, Lake City, FL. A
Step-son George (JJ Dawn) Wil-
liams of Asbury Park, N.J. Brothers,
Rooselvelt (Mary) Tolbert of Lake
City, FL., Micheal Johnson, Sister
Pam Johnson of Detroit Michigan.
(16) Grandchildren (1) Great Grand.
A host of Aunts and Uncles and (4)
Special friends Clarine T., Gloria
D., Willie and Mark.
Funeral services' will be Saturday
December 31, 2005 at 11:00 A.M.
at the New Day Springs MBC with
Mod. George Francis, officiating.
Interment will follow at the Forest
Lawn Memorial Garden Cemetery.
Visitation for family and friends
will be from 5-8 p.m. Friday at the
Funeral Home.
RUDOLPH MIZELL FUNERAL
HOME, 365 N.W. Washington
Street, Lake City is in charge of all
arrangements. Independently owned
and operated since 1980. E-mail: ru-
dolmize@aol.com.


Mrs. Sarah M. Hatcher
Mrs. Sarah M. Hatcher, 76 of Lake
City died early Wednesday morn-
ing, December 28,
2005 at The Avalon
Health Care in Lake
City following an
extended illness.
She was born in
Bainbridge, GA and A.
had lived in Lake City since 1965
after moving here from Panama
City, FL. She was the daughter of
the late John H. and Meda Johnson
Wilson. In her spare time, she was
a collector of Blue Willow China,
an avid Gator football fan who en-
joyed most pll sports. She was em-
ployed many years as a bookkeeper
for Great Lakes Mobile Home Com-
pany and she was of the Baptist
Faith.
Mrs. Hatcher is survived by one
son, Christopher T. Oaks, one
daughter, Alicia D. Hampson (Bob),
both of Lake City and three grand-
children, Taylor, Jordan and Ashley
also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Hatcher
will be conducted at 6:00 P.M., Fri-
day, December 30, 2005 at at Gate-
way . Forest Lawn Funeral Home
Chapel with Reverend Charles
Knight, Pastor of Elim Baptist
Church officiating. Visitation with
the family will be held from 4:00 -
6:00 P.M. prior to service at the fu-
neral home. In Lieu of flowers, me-
morials may be made to Haven Hos-
pice of the Suwannee Valley, 618
SW Florida Gateway Drive, Lake
City, FL 32024 Arrangements are
under the direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 S. HWY 441, Lake
City. (386) 752-1954. Please sign
the guest book at


www.gatewayforestlawn.com..

Mrs. Patty Dale Gill
Mrs. Patty Dale Gill, 49, of Lake
City died early Wednesday mnorn-
ing, December 28,.2005 at her iesi-
dence. She was born in Live Oak,
FL and was the daughter of ihe late
George Henry and Betty Cason
Dale and had been ,a resident 'pf
Lake City for the past 27 years.
Mrs. Gill was a 1974 graduate of
Suwannee High School, a graduate',
of the University of Florida in 1977.
and she retired for health reasons af-
ter 25 years of teaching at Five
Points Elementary School. She was
an avid Florida Gator football fan,
served as Treasurer of the Columbia
County Gator Club, and was a
member of Wesley Memorial Unit-
ed Methodist Church in Lake City.
Mrs. Gill is survived by her hus-
band, Paul Gill, take City, two
brothers, George Henry Dale (Viv-
ian), North Palm Beach, FL and-
Robert 0. Dale (Martha Sue), Gain-
esville, FL.
Funeral services for Mrs.Gill .will
be conducted at 11:00 A.M., Satur-
day, December 31, 2005 at Wesley
Memorial Methodist Church,, Lake
City with Pastor Louie Mabrey and,
Reverend John Green officiating.
Interment will follow at Live Oak
Cemetery. Visitation with the family
will be held from 5:00 - 7:00 P.M.,
Friday, December 30, 2005 at


Methodist Church.
In lieu of flowers donations
made to North Florida Gato
Patty Dale Gill Scholarship
P.O. Box 1812, Lake Ci
32056. Arrangements are ui
direction of GATEWAY-F(
LAWN FUNERAL HOME
S. HWY 441, Lake City. (38
1954. Please sign the guest
www.gatewayforestlawn.con

Mrs. Shirley F
\Burroughs
NMr. Shirley Edgley Burrou,
of'Phoenix, Arizona died
December 25, 2005
following an extend-
ed illness. A native of
Lake Cn), Shirley
had lived most of her
life in Lake City and
Wellborn and was of
the Baptist Faith. Shirley
gardening, camping, boatii
being with her family es1
shopping with her mother
gifts for her daughter. Shirl
preceded in' death by her ste
James J. Reinke in 1993.
Shirley is survived by her
Mary A. Reinke of Wellbo
her father, James J. Edgley
City, FL; one daughter, Reb
Douglas (Lewis Allen) of WV
FL; two brothers, Julius J. Ri


Southern Mediplex

David S. Saunders
MD, FRCSC, FACS, General Surgeon
720 SW 2N� Ave., Ste. 304 * Gainesville, FL. 32601
Phone (386) 376-2111 * Fax (352) 376-376-2312


& His Staff

Beverly, Jan

& Penny



oth 404 NW Hall of Fame Drive

Lake City, FL 32055

MEDIPLEX (386) 755-0421
' www.southernmediplex.com
We accept most insurance.


United Wellborn, FL, and Floyd C. Edgley
(Sandy) of Burlington, NC; one sis-
can be ter, Hope A. Reinke of Wellborn,
or Club, FL; one granddaughter, Jasmine
p Fund, LeAnn Douglas of Wellborn; one
ity, FL niece, Anastasia Reinke of Well-
nder the born, FL, and one nephew, Jake
OREST Edgley of Burlington, NC.
E, 3596 Funeral services for Mrs. Burroughs
i6) 752- will be conducted at 3:00 P.M. Sat-
book at urday, December 31, 2005 at Gate-
n. .way-Forest Lawn Funeral Home
Chapel with Pastor Forest Combs
officiating. Interment will follow at
Edgley Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens.
Visitation with the family will be
held from 5:00-7:00 P.M. Friday
ghs, 42, evening at the funeral home. Ar-
Sunday, rangements are under the direction
of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S. HWY
441, Lake City. (386) 752-1954.
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com.

enjoyed Mrs. Inez Tate Watson
peciallynd Mrs. Inez Tate Watson was born to
pec ally the late Deacon Frank Tate, Sr, and
to buy Mrs. Leola Lewis of
fathere, Lake City, Florida.
Spfather'Mrs. Watson's early
mother, education was
rn, FL; in the school system
of Lake of Columbia and
ecca A. Duval Counties. She
'ellborn graduated from the Bethune
einke of Cookman College and Florida A&M


University, and studied at the
Indiana State University. Mrs.
Watson taught in the Columbia
County School System for many
years.
She was married to the late Simon
Watson, Sr. who preceded her in
death. Also preceding her in death
were sons Simon, Jr. and James A.
Watson.
Mrs. Watson is survived by daugh-
ters, Inez W. Davis, Adell W. Gray,
and Dasye W. Houston; sister, Dor-
cas T. 'Combs; daughters-in-law
Daisy B. Watson and Bobie T. Wat-
son, grandchildren, nieces, neph-
ews, and other relatives and friends.
Visitation with the family will be
Friday, December 30, 2005, from
5:00-6:00 P.M. at Combs Funeral
Home Chapel. Funeral services will
be held. Saturday December 31,
2005 at 1:00 P.M. at Galilee Baptist
Church, Lake City, Florida, Rev.
Stanford Jackson, Interim Pastor.
Arrangements are under the direc-
tion of COMBS FUNERAL
HOME, 292 NE Washington Street.
386-752-4366. Marquis Combs-
Turner, L.F.D.
Obituaries are paid advertisements.
For details, call the Lake City
Reporter's classified department at
752-1293


DEE FA iyF EA HM


CUIDIE XHltELEII


Ownd adipertedbyDeba Prrsh ee
76IW Dva Sret9 ak Cty Ford
S -. -* 386-961-9500- -


Direct Cremation'

$595* Complete
*(Basic services of funeral director and staff, removal from place of death to funeral home
within 50 miles, refrigeration, cremation fee and cardboard alternative container.)

GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME
Ted L. Guerry Sr., L.F.D. & Brad Wheeler, L.F.D., Owners
3596 South Hwy 441 * Lake City, Florida 32025
(386) 752-1954 J


esey emora


.Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


W l M il


I


Al14T7 1 \\ i'i.iErP









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2005


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your
Community Calendar
item, contact S.
Michael Manley at
754-0429 or by email
at smanley@
lakecityreporter.com.


Announcements
Breast Cancer support
group to meet Jan. 9
The Breast Cancer Support
Group of Lake City will meet
from 5:30-6:30 p.m., Jan. 9, at
the Colombia County Public
Library, 308 NW Columbia
Avenue, Lake City.
All those who have had
personal experience with breas
cancer and those who have
questions or concerns about
breast cancer are invited.
For further information, call
755-0522.

DAC to host
visionary workshop
The Downtown Action
Corporation will host a-visioning
workshop from 5:30-8 p.m.,
Thursday, Jan. 12, at the
Columbia County Public Library
The meeting is open to the
public and all area residents'
are cordially invited to attend
and provide input.
The purpose of the meeting
is to define priorities and a work
Plan for projects benefiting the
downtown area. More than
70 individuals completed a
questionnaire for-the visioning
process and those results. will
also be distributed. For
additional information, contact
Paulette Lord at 758-1367.

Blue Grey Army
to meet Jan. 10
The Blue Grey Army will
neet at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday,-
Jan. 10, at the Columbia
County Public Library
' Downtown Branch.
This will be a general
.meeting of committees and
workers involved with
preparations for the Olustee
Festival 2006. Anyone,
interested in working with this
group is asked to attend. For
questions, call Faye Bowling
Warren at 755-1097.,

New Year's Eve dance
coming for singles group
LAKE BUTLER - Lake
Butler Singles Club will host its
New Year's Eve dance Dec. 31
at Lake Butler Community
Center. Dinner will be at 7 p.m..
and dance from 8-1 a.m. to the
music from South Street Band.
Bring finger food and enjoy the
evening with no smoking and
alcohol. For more information,
call Bob Collins at 752-5948.
The cost is $15 per person.


O'Leno State Park to
host 'Music in the Park'
"Music in the Park" is coming
Saturday, Jan. 7, staring Dick
Staber and Judith Chasnoff.
Bring a chair and relax by the
river while listening to a
beautifully sung mixture of:
original and traditional
bluegrass and folk music.
2-4 p.m. O'Leno State Park, is
t located six miles north of High
Springs on U.S. 441.
The show is free with park'
admission.

MLK parade applications
now available
Applications are now being
accepted for the annual Martin
Luther King day parade, which
will be at 10 a.m., Jan. 16.
Contact Tyrone Taylor at
623-2194, coach Anders at
752=0959, or Leslie White at
623-2198 to request an entry
application, or to obtain more
information on participating in
the MLK parade.
The following is a list Of
activities scheduled, for Martin
.Luther King, Jr. Celebration:
* Jan.13: 7:30 p.m. Gospel
Festival., choirs, soloists,,
instruments and dancers.
* Jan. 14: noon. Car
Show-Step Show, MLK
Classic-Basketball game.
* Jan. 15: 4 p.m. NAACP
commemoration, service, Union
A.M.E. Church.
* Jan. 16:10 a.m. Northeast
Florida Leadership Council
grand parade. Celebration at
the stadium.

Red Hat ladies
prepare for mall invasion
For those ladies who are
footloose and fancy free, come
join other Red/Pink Hatters for
some fellowship, fun, food,
laughter, shopping, games,
prizes and more.
This event is for anyone
looking for a RHS chapter to
join and for all Red Hat Ladies
r at4,10:30.atm,,:. -1p.m.,.Jah. 5, ,
center court.
The RHS meet the first
Thursday of each month. For
more information contact:
Princess Michelle.Parker of the,
Red Whiners' official Red Hat
Society Chapter #55905 at
(386) 758-1726.

Columbia County science
fairs coming in January
N Lake City Community
College will host the 2006
Columbtia County Science Fair.


Two murder-suicides in

two days in Panhandle


Associated. Press


PENSACOLA - Panhandle
authorities say they are inves-
tigating the second-murder
suicide in as many days. . ;
The bodies :of. Harlon
Adams, 50, and Lisa Michelle
Cyrus,,38,'were found inside
their home shortly after 1 a.m.
Tuesday, Escambia County
Sheriff'S officials said.
Adams apparently shot his
wife, Cyrus, and then turned
the gun on himself, Sgt. Mike,
Ward said.
"Our investigation is not
fully complete, but we believe
we know the gist of what
happened," Ward said.


Cyrus' three children, ages
7, 10, and 13, who also live at.
the home, did not witness the
shooting and were not
harmed, Ward said.
In nearby Santa Rosa
County, a father and his two
children were found dead in a
van parked at a church.
Scott Michaud, 34, his son,
Nathan, 7, and daughter,
Crystal, 5, died Monday of
carbon monoxide poisoning,
authorities said.
A member of Church of the
tLiving God found the van,
which had its engine running
and a hose attached from the
exhaust pipe to the vehicle's
back window.


PULMONARY CLINIC
TREATSALL
RESPIRATORY DISEASES
~ NEW PATIENTS WELCOME .

M. Choudhury, M.D.


155 NW Enterprise Way Suite A, Lake City '...:


The annual fair will be
Jan. 18 and 19 in the Howard
Gym on LCCC campus.
Approximately 250 student
projects will be on display.
Judging will take place from
8 a.ni.-3 p.m., Jan. 18. Open
house to the public will be from
3-6 p.m. Jan. 18. The awards
ceremony will be 6-7 p.m.
Jan. 19 for the elementary and
7:30-8:30 p.m. for the middle
and high school in the Alfonso
Levy Performing Arts Center.
i Lake City Community
College will host the
2006 Regional Science and
Engineering Fair.
The annual fair will be
Feb. 22 and 23 in the Howard
Gym on the LCCC campus. The
Region comprises the
10 counties of Columbia, Union,
Suwannde, Bradford, Hamilton,
Lafayette, Baker, Gilchrist and
Madison.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson
coming to Lake City
At'l p.m., Jan. 5, U.S.
Senator Bill Nelson is coming to_
Lake City for a townhall
meeting. It will take place at
City Hall, located at 205 N.
Marion Ave. For more
information, call Nelson's office
at (850) 942-8415.

Red Hat. ladies
prepare for mall Invasion
. For those ladies who are


footloose and fancy free, come
join other Red/Pink Hatters for
some fellowship, fun, food,
laughter, shopping, games,
prizes and more.
This event is for anyone
looking for a RHS chapter to
join and for all Red Hat Ladies
at 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Jan. 5, .
2006, Center Court.
The RHS meet the first
Thursday of each month. For
more information contact:
Princess Michelle Parker of the
Red Whiners' official Red Hat
Society Chapter #55905 at
(386) 758-1726.

Volunteer Development,
Board to meet in 2006
The Volunteer Development
Board of the Lake City
Community College Fourndation
will meet at noon Jan. 10 in the
Lake City Community College
Foundation Board Room,
downtown Lake City. For more
information, contact Mike Lee;
executive director of the LCCC
foundation at 754-4392 or
754-4433.

LCCC executive board
to, meet Jan. 17
The Executive Board of the
Lake City Community College
Foundation will meet at noon,
Jan. 17, in the Lake City
Community College Foundation
Board Roomn downtown' Lake
City. For mrbre information
.contact-Mike Lee, executive
director of the LCCC foundation


at 754-4392 or 754-4433.

Columbia County science
fairs coming in January
* Lake City Community
College will host the 2006,
Columbia County Science Fair.
The annual fair will be
.Jan. 18 and 19 in the Howard
Gym on LCCC campus.
Approximately 250 student
projects will be on display.
Judging will take place from
8 a.m.-3 p.m., Jan. 18. Open
house to the public will be from
3-6 p.m. Jan. 18. The awards
ceremony will be 6-7 p.m.
Jan. 19 for the elementary and
7:30-8:30 p.m. for the middle
and high school in the Alfonso,
Levy Performing Arts Center.
N Lake City Community
College will host the
2006 Regional Science and
Engineering Fair. ,
The annual, fair will be
Feb. 22 and 23 in the Howard
Gym on the LCCC campus.
The Region comprises the
10 counties of Columbia, Union,
Suwannee, Bradford, Hamilton,
Lafayette, Baker, Gilchrist, Dixie
and Madison. Judging will take
place from 3-6,p.m. Feb. 22. ,
Open house to the public will
be from 3-6 p.m., Feb. 22. The
awards ceremony will be
10 a.m., Feb. 23 in the Alfonso
Levy Performing Arts Center.

LCCC is closed
through Jan.2
All Lake City Community


College offices and facilities will
be closed through Jan. 2 for the
holiday season. Upon return, late
registration will be from
8 a.m.-6:30 p.m. in Building 015
Jan. 3-5 and from 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
Jan. 6. All fees will be due at
3 p.m. at the end of each day.
For more information, contact
the Registrar's Office at
(386) 754-4205.

Classes
Pottery classes coming
to Stephen Foster
WHITE SPRINGS - Spend
Monday nights working at the
potter's wheel in classes being:
offered at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park.
Classes begin Jan. 9 and
continue'through,Feb. 27.
The cost for the classes is
$125, plus $25 for materials,
.which will be paid throughout the
class. For more information, call
Craft Square at 397-1920 or visit
the web site at
www.stephenfstercso.org.

Historical museum
to host volunteer class
Lake City/Columbia County
Historical Museum is
forming a volunteer training
class. For more information,
contact Glenda Reed at
historicsewing@aol.com. or
call the museum at 755-9096.


Easy To Reach.


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LENDER


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


Q~F~L~IB,


~i~ 9r~2k~l~








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2005


Photo illustration by TODD WILSON/Lake City Reporter
On Jan. 1, many smokers will throw away their cigarettes in an
"attempt to kick their addictions for good.

QUIT: Kicking the habit
Continued From Page 1A


The Smoke Free Society, a
non-profit organization in Palm
-Beach, has been helping
srhokers quit gradually since
June 2004.
"With going cold-turkey
, you're not addressing the psy-
chological and the physical
:-aspects of quitting," founder
-Linda Seyedin said. "By wean-
ing themselves off, it makes
the withdrawal symptoms
'much less severe."
The organization aims to
help people give up their ciga-
rettes completely in 17 days
'through literature, seminars
for corporations Who want a
smoke-free staff and a support
systemm that, includes daily
e-mails.
Smoke Free Society's Web
site is offering a free download
of it's basic plan, which usually
is $39.95, through the month
of January.
: People who want a more
. physical smoking-cessation
plan are looking into laser ther-
apy. Anne Penman Laser
Therapy in Jacksonville has
been treating smokers with a
cold, non-invasive, laser for.
more than two years. Manager
Connie Hoefener said the laser
.helps about 60 percent of
smokers quit.
About 98 percent of those
who do benefit from the thera-
py need only one treatment
However, the company asks i
people to come in for at least
one follow-up "'booster ses-
sion" about two days after the
initial treatment. The entire
program costs about $269.
The laser targets specific
energy points: The ears, nose,
hands and wrist Hoefener said
the laser stimulates
endorphins and reduces
anxiety.
"It's a low-level light beam
That has a pulsating frequen-
cy," Hoefener said. "There's no
pain. A lot of people get a sense
of euphoria after this."
Hoefener said the laser cen-
:ter's phones' have been "ring-
:ing off the hook" with people
who want to extinguish their ,
'nicotine habits in 2006..
"I think you're going to start
seeing lasers crop uip
everywhere," she said.
While lasers are a new
development in the smokinr-
:cessation industry, acupunc-
ture is an ancient therapy that
.has been helping smokers quit
for thousands of years,
acupuncturist Ashley Dunn
said.
Dunn's acupuncture

SHOOTING
Continued From Page 1A

nearby, reports stated.
Reports Tuesday from the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office were unclear regarding
the circumstances
'surrounding the shooting.
The identity of the compan-
ion whose rifle killed Taylor
was not released by the
sheriff's office.
Gootee said he believes the
invesitigation will be concluded
next week.
"Guns are always as good as
those who handle them,"
Gootee said. "You should
'always treat every gun as if it
isloaded."


treatments have assisted at
least four people in their quest
to become smoke-free. He said
his success rate is low because
most people aren't truly com-
mitted to quitting. For some
clients, Dunn also prescribes
homeopathic tobacco reme-
dies that make cigarettes taste
bad or refers them to hyp-
notherapy, which he said'is.
sometimes helpful.
"It (acupuncture) won't
make you quit smoking, but it
helps to relieve the cravings,"
Dunn said.
Dunn uses hair-thin needles
to pierce six points in the ear
for every one of his clients. He
then targets different areas,of
the body based on individual
needs. :
"Some of the acupuncture
points in the ear (feel) like a
mosquito-bite sensation, but
the rest of the points in your
body are usually painless,"
Dunn said.
The acupuncture treatments
run about $50 per session.
Dunn recommends about two
or three of them in the first
week to get through the
"three-day hump," after which
the body's craving for nicotine
usually begins to subside. ,
"Then you're left with the
mental cravings," Dunn said.
"You have to really, really want
to stop smoking when you
come in to start the process.
You've got to make smoking
inconvenient for yourself.
There's nothing. out there
that's going to be a quick fix."


Lawyers want to know if



NSA spied on their clients


By TONI LOCY
Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Lawyers
for an Islamic scholar, a Fort
Lauderdale computer pro-
grammer and an Ohio trucker
want federal judges to deter-
mine whether evidence used
against their clients was gath-
'ered by a secret domestic spy-
ing program.,
. Jonathan. Turley, a George
Washington University law
professor, said Wednesday
there "seems to be a great like-
lihood" that Ahl al-Timimi, a


northern Virginia Islamic cler-
ic convicted for exhorting fol-
lowers after the Sept. 11
attacks to wage war against
U.S. troops overseas, was
"subject to this operation."
Attorney Kenneth Swartz of
Miami also said he wants to
know whether any evidence
was gathered by the National
Security Agency without a war-
rant 'and used to convince a
secret court to authorize six
years of wiretaps of his client,
Adham Amin Ijassoun.
Late Wednesday, attorney
David Smith said he also will


incorporate the NSA wiretaps
into his appeal on behalf of
lyman Faris, a truck driver
convicted of plotting to destroy
the Brooklyn Bridge. At his
sentencing hearing, prosecu-
tors acknowledged that federal
agents were led to Faris by a
telephone call intercepted in
another investigation.
. Last month, Hassounr and
Jose Padilla, a U.S. citizen held
for nearly four years as an
"enemy combatant,"'' were
charged with raising money to
support violent Islamic fight-
ers outside the United States.


President Bush has
acknowledged that within days
of the Sept. 11 attacks he
authorized the NSA to conduct
warrantless intercepts of con-
versations between people in
the United States and others
abroad whlo had suspected ties
to al-Qaida or its affiliates.
In doing so, the administra-
tion bypassed the nearly
30-year-old secret Foreign
Intelligence Surveillance Act
court established to, oversee
the government's handling of
espionage and terrorism
investigations.


CLEANUP: Nobody knows when pollution happened


Continued From Page 1A

funded by the state through
the Department of
Environmental Protection
(DEP), but funds are limited.
Giles said there was origi-
nally $150,01100 allocated for
cleaning the site.
But before Earth Tech -
the DEP certified contractor
- could begin, 'most of the.
money, was. spent to identify.
the problem.
It turned out neither the soil
nor deep Floridan Aquifer
were contaminated. Only the
shallow water table that
extends to depths no more
than 12 feet down was dam-
aged, Pettinger said.


In other words, saturated
sand under the soil on the lot
was contaminated .
With $80,000 left to pay for
cleanup, "we are trying to do it
as inexpensively as possible,",
,Pettinger said. 'It's ithe
cleanup design) a very low-key
non-mechanical design."
Pettinger said if they had
$100,000 they would be more
aggressive, dig the, soil up,
haul it off-site in less than a
week and bury it in a landfill.
This method is slower but
more environmentally friendly,
he said..
In order to get rid -of the
contaminants, the firm pulled


TAX: Set to end Saturday


Continued From Page 1A
The DOR is issuing a new
gas tax rate sheet to gas dis-'
tributors which shows
Columbia County's gas tax is
going to be 13 cents to
eliminate the problem.
Though the changes are
being made, Lewis said they
will have no affect on the con-
clusion of the second local
option gas tax scheduled for


Saturday night.
"The tax is coming to an end
two days from now because the
.DOR has no legal authority to
charge the tax anymore," she
said. 'The only legal authority
they had was from Jan. ,2001 to
Dec. 31, 2005. The ordinance is
the legal authority once-it's
recorded with the Secretary of
state to either start it or stop it."


l WORN
owC


TH EDs, AE


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clean soil off the site, piled it
up to form a berm and co-vered
it with impermeable plastic.
Next they covered that with
rock, pipe and a filtering cloth,
then dug the contaminated sat-
urated sand up - leaving a pit
to drain into - and piled the
sand on top of the filter cloth.
The water filters back into the
pit and once a month they
come up and operate an-
aerating fountain in the pit.
'We're not trying to make a
pretty fountain," Pettinger
said. "Because these com-
pounds are volatile they


evaporate."
Rain further rinses the sand
clean and sun exposure does
the rest.
"The Florida sun is an amaz-
ing treatment engine for treat-
ing volatile compounds and
evaporating water naturallyy"
Pettinger said.
Pettinger took water sam-
ples at the site last week and if
levels of contaminants are
down, he said he will begin
clean up on the other half of
the contaminated site and
expects to finish in six months.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2005


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Virginia Zoo Executive Director Lewis Greene (left) and Charles
Ryan (right) the zoo's maintenance supervisor, continue to dig in
the prairie dog exhibit, Monday, after a tunnel collapse in the
animals' exhibit last week.

Prairie dog exhibit

collapsed at Virginia Zoo
Associated Press There were 13 prairie dogs


NORFOLK, Va. - Workers
at the Virginia Zoo are trying
to help nature along by
rescuing prairie dogs that
were buried when their
exhibit collapsed because of
drenching rains.
Five of the burrowing
rodents were found alive
Saturday in a near-hiberna-
tion state, and two more were.
found Tuesday. -Workers
continued digging on
Wednesday.
'They're in pretty good
shape," said the zoo's execu-
tive director, Lewis Greene.
"They were awake, but a little
sleepy-headed."
The prairie dogs' burrows
collapsed last week. Zoo
officials originally were going
to let the rodents dig them-
selves out - as some experts
recommended - but started
the rescue operation
following a public outcry.
"We do have quite a few
people stopping by offering
condolences," said Alison
Swank, director of marketing.
One child brought a stuffed
bear to console zookeepers
after he had heard of the
collapse.

BRIEFS

Gunman opens fire
on Miami home

MIAMI - Pblice searched
Wednesday for a gunman
who allegedly fired into a
home, killing one man lying,
in a bed and injuring another
sitting inside.
The gunman, who got
away, never entered the
central Miami house, police
said.
� He allegedly fired a high
powered assault rifle, blowing
gaping holes through
windows and cement walls,
fatally wounding Emanuel
Griffin, 20, who was lying in'
his bed, said Lt. Bill
Schwartz, Miami police
spokesman.
Another man, Thomas
Castellanos, 48, who was
sitting on the couch, was shot
in the leg. A woman inside
the house was not harmed,
Schwartz said.


Bahamas to deport
grandmother

NASSAU, Bahamas - A
Florida woman who came to
the Bahamas to spend
Christmas with her
grandchildren will be deport-
ed for marijuana possession, a
judge ruled Wednesday.
Mary Brushe, 50, of
Melbourne, Florida, pleaded
guilty on Wednesday to having
three grams of marijuana. A
magistrate judge fined her
$500 and ordered her
deported.
Police arrested Brushe in
the parking lot of a local
shopping mall on Christmas
Eve. They thought she was
behaving suspiciously and
found the drugs in her purse
after a search, police said.
Brushe will be deported
'. Thursday and has been placed
, on a list of people never to be
* allowed back into the country.
" Associated Press
tr


when the exhibit opened
15 months ago. But since
their lives take place mostly
underground, officials said it
was hard to know exactly
how many were alive at the
time of the collapse.
The remains of three were
found during the rescue oper-
ation. Zoo officials believe
they died before the exhibit
collapsed, Swank said.
The rescued rodents are
being kept in straw-packed
cages indoors at the zoo.


Judge orders deportation of man, 85,


accused of being a Nazi camp guard


By M.R. KROPKO
Associated Press
CLEVELAND
Extending a 30-year legal
battle, an immigration judge
Wednesday ordered John
Demjanjuk, a retired
autoworker accused of being
a Nazi concentration camp
guard, deported to his native
,Ukraine.
Demjanjuk, 85, has been
fighting to 'stay in this country
since the 1970s. He was
suspected for a time of being
'the notoriously brutal guard
known as Ivan the Terrible
and was nearly executed in
Israel.
Chief U.S. Immigration
Judge Michael Creppy ruled
that there was no evidence to
substantiate Demjanjuk's
claim that he would be
tortured if deported to
his homeland. He said
Demjanjuk should be deport-
ed to Germany or Poland if
Ukraine does not accept him.
Demjanjuk can appeal the
ruling to the Board of
Immigration Appeals within
30 days.
Demjanjuk lost his
U.S. citizenship after a judge
ruled in 2002 that documents
from World War II prove he
was a Nazi guard at various
death or forced labor camps.
His attorney had argued at
a hearing last month that
sending Demjanjuk back to
Ukraine would be like


ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Demjanjuk (left) is helped by former son-in-law Ed Nichnis as he arrives for a deportation
hearing at the federal office building in Cleveland on Feb. 28.


throwing him "into a shark
tank."
John Broadley,
Demjanjuk's lawyer, said
Wednesday's ruling is the
judge's final order in the case.
It was required before a June
ruling authorizing the govern-
ment to deport Demjanjuk
could be appealed.
Broadley said he had not
read the entire, ruling issued
Wednesday, but that
Demjanjuk would appeal


Creppy's earlier decision.
The United States first tried
to deport Demjanjuk in 1977,
accusing him of being Ivan the
Terrible at the Treblinka con-
centration camp. Demjanjuk
was extradited to Israel, con-
victed and sentenced to hang,
but the Israeli Supreme Court
found that someone else
apparently was Ivan.
Demjanjuk returned to the
United States and his
U.S. citizenship was restored


before being lifted again.
The current case is based
on evidence uncovered by the
Justice Department alleging
he was a different guard.
Demjanjuk has denied the
allegations.




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Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404







Page Editor: Todd Wilson, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2005


Pace visits post A


in Qatar, troops 7-
A l. ..,


By KIM GAMEL
Associated Press
DOHA, Qatar America's
top military leader opened a
weeklong holiday trip to the
Middle East on Wednesday,
applauding U.S. troops for
their fight against terror just
days after the Bush adminis-
tration announced new troop
cuts in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Gen. Peter Pace, the chair-
man of the Joint Chiefs, of
Staff, also held talks with Gen.
John Abizaid and other senior
officers during his one-day
stay in this key U.S. ally - his
first official overseas visit
since taking the post three
months ago.
"This year has been an
incredible one in the war on
terrorism, and it's because of
what you do,".he said in a pep
talk to hundreds of American
forces following a show featur-
ing American Idol finalist
Diana DeGarmo at an air base
near Doha, Qatar.
Airmen at the base said
they did not expect.the troop
reduction to affect them in the
near term, but they welcomed
last week's Pentagon
announcement as a step
toward restoring peace in
Iraq.
"I think it would be great,"
said John Batty, 31, a pilot
from Kingsford, Mich. "Less
people would have to come
over and the Iraqis could take
care of themselves, and that's
what it's all about."
Christian Burbach, 32, an
Air Force weapons systems
officer from Great Falls, Va.,
said he was optimistic the
troop reductions would take
place. But he was doubtful
they would affect airmen like
himself who fly daily support
missions over Iraq.


"I think we'll still be here
supporting the troops on the
ground," Burbach said. "It
gives me pride to be able to
help those guys."
On Friday, Defense
Secretary Donald H.
Rumsfeld said during a sur-
prise visit to Iraq that
President Bush has author-
ized the reduction of
U.S. combat troops there to
below the 138,000 level that
held for most of this .year.
Rumsfeld did not reveal the
exact size of the troop cut, but
senior Pentagon officials have
said the number of American
troops in Iraq could drop to
about 100,000 by next fall.
Also last week, Rumsfeld
ordered the number of troops
in Afghanistan to be cut from
19,000 to about 16,500 by next
spring, while cautioning that
removing forces too quickly
would impede the long-term
hunt for terrorists.
Pace - the first Marine to
serve as chairman of the Joint
Chief of Staff, making him the
main military adviser to Bush
and Rumsfeld - did not com-
ment on the troop reductions
during his address
Wednesday. But he said earli-
er this week that American
units will steadily hand over
more security duties to Iraqi
forces in the coming months.
In those comments, he
stressed that the U.S. military
needs to be flexible enough to
increase or decrease forces
depending on security condi-
tions on the ground, political
developments and the ability
of Iraqi soldiers and police to
assume greater responsibility.
Pace, who was traveling
with his wife, Lynne, also
planned stops in Bahrain, the
United Arab Emirates, Iraq
and Afghanistan.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Two Lebanese army soldiers sit behind an anti-aircraft gun atop an armored personnel carrier while
another looks at Israeli warplanes, unseen, flying over the southern city of Sidon, Lebanon,
Wednesday. In their deepest strike into Lebanon in 18 months, Israeli planes attacked a base of the
Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine-General Command, a small, Syrian-backed group that
has been fighting the Jewish state for decades, a few miles outside the Lebanese capital Beirut, hours
after rockets fired from Lebanon hit a northern Israeli border town. Two guerrillas were lightly wound-
ed, the group said.


Lebanon condemns rocket

attack launched at Israel


By HUSSEIN DAKROUB
4ssc.C ,ate Pre-.
BEIRUT, Lebanon -
Lebanon's prime minister on
Wednesday :condemned a
rocket barrage fired a day ear-
lier into northern Israel, while
a U.N. envoy urged, the
Lebanese government to
assert control over the tense
border region to prevent
future' attacks on the Jewish
state.
The rockets landed in a res-
idential area of the northern
town of Kiryat Shmona, dam-
aging property but causing no


castisualties. : '
Israel accused a militant
pro-Syrian Palestinian group'
of firing the rockets and retal-
iated with airstrikes early
Wednesday against the
group's base outside Beirut -
Israel's deepest strike into.
Lebanon in 18 months. Two
guerrillas were wounded.
Maj. Gen. Udi Adam, head
of the Israeli army's northern
command, warned Israel
would retaliate if there were
any more rocket fire from
Lebanon.
"The main message that we
passed, and we are trying to


give, is that the Lebanese gov-
ernment must take responsi-
bility for what happens in its
territory," Adam told The
Associated Press. "If Kiryat
Shmona residents don't sleep
quietly, then the residents of
Beirut won't sleep quietly."
The comments by
Lebanese Prime Minister
Fuad Saniora were a rare
rebuke of such rocket fire
from his territory into Israel.
'These acts - the firing of
rockets and the Israeli raids
and air violations - are even-
tually aimed at, undermining
stability in Lebanon."


Prison


break


sees 8


killed

By JASON STRAZIUSO
Associated Press
BAGHDAD, Iraq -
Inmates stormed a prison
armory in a northern
Baghdad suburb Wednesday,,
with one grabbing an AK-47
rifle from an Iraqi guard and
firing indiscriminately, killing
eight people and wounding a
U.S. soldier, Iraqi and
American military officials
said.
The botched escape
attempt comes days after the
United States said it would not
hand over prisoners to Iraqi
officials until they improved
conditions in the overcrowded
prison system.
Wednesday's incident
occurred at the Justice
Ministry's A'dala Prison in the
suburb of Kazimiyah. The
facility used to be military
intelligence headquarters
under Saddam Hussein and
housed Iraqis and foreigners.
An Iraqi prisoner managed
to disarm a guard and fired
randomly with his assault
rifle, said Iraqi army Brig.
Gen. Jalil al-Mehamadawi.
Four guards and four inmates
were killed before the
gunman was restrained.
The U.S. military's account
differed somewhat. A state-
ment by Sgt. Keith Robinson
said "it was reported that
16 prisoners attempted to
escape the facility after first
storming the armory and
obtaining an undetermined
number of weapons."


German tourists missing

during kidnapping incident


By AHMED AL-HAJ
Associated Press
SAN'A, Yemen - Armed
men kidnapped a former
German diplomat and his fam-
ily touring the mountains of
eastern Yemen on Wednesday
and pressed the Yemeni gov-
ernment for the release of
jailed members of their tribe,
officials in both nations said.
The five missing Germans
- identified by a spokesman
for Germany's Foreign
Ministry as former Deputy
Foreign Minister Juergen
Chrobog, his wife and three


children - were traveling as
tourists in a two-car convoy
when a group of gunmen sur-
rounded their vehicles, forced
them into the kidnappers' cars
and sped off, said government
officials in Shabwa, the
province where the incident
occurred.
The German official spoke
on customary condition of
anonymity, and the Yemeni
officials were not authorized
to speak to the press.
Members of the tribe involved
in the kidnapping, who like-
wise refused to be named,
also said a former German


deputy foreign minister was
among the captives.:
The Germans are in good
health and have not been
threatened, said Nasser
Ba'oum, the deputy governor
of Shabwa, citing tribal elders
who visited the family.
Negotiations are under way to
win their release, Ba'oum
said.
The kidnappers were said
to belong to the al-Abdullah
bin Dahha tribe, a number of
whose members were
arrested two months ago
after a clash with another
tribe.


By DANIEL WOOLLS'
, ; ,:_s :_, i ,-..:, F r-.', 3 - .;'
MADRID, Spain, - Who
could turn. down a two-hour
lunch fueled with good wine
and the lure of a post-meal
siesta?
Spaniards would love to.
Many have schedules
chopped in half with extensive
breaks, making the work day


so long that home is a place
they only visit .
Now relief! is at hand, at
least for civil servants: gov-
ernment offices are closing
earlier and offering flex time
to help people spend more
time with friends and family.
Many Sp'anish civil ser-
vants work from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m., break for lunch, then
come back As late as 4:30 p.m.


for another three hours. Add
commuting time id the morn-
ing and evening and people
spend 12 hours orimore away
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Elsewhere across Europe,
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are done with work and out of
the office by 5 p.mn. or 6 p.m.,
with lunch breaks averaging
between 30 minutes and an
hour.


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom
Thursday, December 29, 2005


SPORTS


www.Iakecityreporter.com


THE SPORTS FAN







Mario Sarmento
Phone: 754-0420
msarmento@oakeciyreportercom

I Classic is

more than

basketball

traveling to
Daytona Beach
for a tourna-
ment might be
a good way for
the Columbia High
basketball team to stay
sharp during th'e Christmas
Break, but for Tigers coach
Trey Hosford, the event
serves another purpose.
"I played high school and
college basketball, and
some of my best memories
were from going off to stay
in hotels with my team-
mates," Hosford said.
At CHS, Hosford is
concerned with creating
new memories, like when
assistant coach John Brown
brings his horseshoes so
players and coaches can '
compete against each other
on the beach:
Columbia has been there
before. In 2002, the Tigers
finished second in the
classic under former coach
Bill Barnett.
And last summer, the
Tigers went 11-1 in a
summer tournament there.
For some players, it was
their first time in Daytona,
which Hosford said is "part
of the reason I like doing it."
The team stays in a hotel
right on the beach, so when
the players get up in the
morning, they just have to
step outside and they're on
the white sands of Daytona.
Then there are some of
the other events going on
around the classic.
On Tuesday, Tigers
players participated in a
dance for all 25 schools
competing in the
tournament - 16 boys
teams and nine girls teams.
Brown and junior varsity
coach Varibn Coppock
chaperoned the players
there, while Hosford
studied game film in-his
hotel room.
CHS player Gerry Harris
also finished third in a
three-point shooting
contest, but the real excite-
ment came when Kenny
Williams won the slam
dunk contest - all five-
foot-eight inches of him.
"Amazing to see
somebody his size do that,"
Hosford said. "I'm only an
inch taller than him, so I
can't imagine seeing him
fly through the air like
that."
Williams' winning dunk
came when he tossed the
ball off the backboard to
himself for a thunderous
jam - "kind of like Spud
Webb," Hosford said.
The dunk was so
impressive that two of the
three judges - who had
been giving out maximum
scores of five - pitt up 10s
for Williams.
Most amazing was the
fact Williams had to be
' talked into performing in
the. event at all.
"He's a guy who really
doesn't like being the center
of attention," Hosford said.
But like the streaking
Tigers, Williams is finding
that he can't escape the
spotlight for long.
U Mario Sarmento covers


sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Tigers lose first game to Norfolk Oaks


A 23-4 run by Norfolk
ends Columbia's nine-
game winning streak.
From staff reports

After nine consecutive victories to
start the season, the Columbia High
boys basketball team lost its first game


on Wednesday, 63-39 to
Collegiate Oaks at the
Daytona Beach Classic.
"It was a good run, but I
was trying not to think of it
as nine straight wins, wve
were taking it day by day,"
Tigers coach Trey Hosford
said. "I felt like the guys
competed well at times."


Norfolk


The Tigers shot 15-48 from the field
and hit 5-9 free throws.
Columbia was down 22-12 in
the second period before
and 8-0 spurt cut Norfolk's
lead to two. But the Oaks
responded with a 23-4 run
over the next two periods to
put the game out of reach.
Kenny Williams led CHS with


A day for soccer


Lady Tigers tie Lady
Indians on first day
of tournament.
By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter.com
The first day of the
Columbia/Fort White
Christmas Soccer Tourna-
ment was capped by a hard-
fought, 0-0 draw between the
host schools' girls teams.
The Lady Tigers had the
bulk of the possession in the
first half, but the Lady Indians
dominated the early part of
the second half. Fort White
outshot Columbia 5-4, but the
Lady Tigers had five corner
kicks to Fort White's one.
"For us to come out and
play the way we did was disap-
pointing because we should
have played that way
(Wednesday) morning," Fort
White coach Perry Sauls said.
The Lady Indians were sur-
prised in their early game
against Newberry High, 2-0.
For Columbia, which had
defeated Taylor County High
in its opening game of the
tournament, this result was
disappointing.
"We should have won,"
Coach Beth . Adkins said.
"Once again that team comes
out and plays hard."
It was the same result as
when the two teams met back
on Nov. 22 at Fort White, only
the score was 1-1. ,
Fort White captain Carmen
Figueroa said, "We did really,
good. We pressured them a
lot and we were good
defensively and offensively."
Sauls cited the defense of
Becky Mahony, Figueroa and
Rachel Register. for their
work.
Ashley Waddington had the
difficult task of marking CHS
striker Shelley Giebeig, and


MARIO SARMENTO/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High player Lyndsey Goodson (right) kicks the ball while teammate Danielle Hunter looks on
during the Lady Tigers' 3-2 win against Taylor County High at the Columbia/Fort White Christmas


Soccer Tournament on Wednesdal
although Giebeig was able to
generate some scoring
chances, she ha'd far fewer
opportunities than in the first
meeting between the teams.
"I think when you get the
ball they all have a tendency
to run at you," she said of the
difficulty in penetrating the
Lady Indians' defense.
Adkins said that Becky
Gomez, Kelly 'Hunter, Julie
Hanson and Raychel


Robertson all played strong
games for CHS.
'In the early game, Giebeig
scored twice and Lyndsey
Goodson scored for
Columbia.
The Lady Tigers (2-10-2)
were second in points and will
play third-place Newberry ,in
the opening, game today at
2 p.m.
.Fort White (5-4-5) finished
fourth in points and has the


unenviable task of playing top-
seeded Ocala Forest High at
4 p.m., after the Lady Wildcats
ripped through Taylor County
8-0 and blasted Newberry 9-0
in the first half in their first
two games.
'That's going to be
extremely tough," Sauls said.
"They're the class of the
tournament."
SOCCER continued on 2B


10 points. Cameron Reynolds scored
nine, Byron Shemwell added seven,
Jakeem Hill scored five,. Jeremy
Rayford and Tavaris Reynolds each
scored three and Jerry Thomas
scored two.
Karolis Petruknis had eight blocks
for the Oaks (7-2). Columbia (9-1)
plays Atlantic High or Mount Pisgah
out of Atlanta at noon on Friday.


'Noles


arrive in

South

Florida

Florida State is an
underdog against
Nittany Lions.
By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press
DAVIE - The Florida
State Seminoles arrived'
Wednesday in South
Florida, ready to reap the
rewards for their surprising
Orange Bowl berth.
That means a week in the
big city - and a crack at
No. 3-ranked Penn State on
Tuesday night.
"I'm quite sure we'll have
a little fun," running back
Leon Washington said. "We
have a lot of guys on the
team from this area. I'm sure
they'll take us out and show
us things around here. But
when it's time to take care of
business, we're going to take
care of business."
' In a game matching
coaches who rank. one-two
in career victories - Bobby
Bowden and Joe Paterno -
Florida State (8-4) is a
9'/2-point underdog against
Penn State (10-1).
At No. 22, the Seminoles
are the lowest-ranked team
in the Bowl Championship
Series. They lost their final
three regular-season games
and earned the Orange Bowl
berth - Bowden's eighth -
only by upsetting Virginia
Tech in the Atlantic Coast
Conference title game.
"People were doubting
us," cornerback Pat Watkins
said. '"They may have ques-
tions still, like we have to
prove something. But we
won the ACC championship."


Broncos' rally falls short


against Boston College


Matthew Ryan's
three first-halfTD
passes lead Eagles.
By TIM BOOTH
Associated Press
BOISE, Idaho - Matthew
Ryan and Ryan Glasper
spoiled Boise State coach Dan
Hawkins last game with the
Broncos, leading No. 19
Boston College to a 27-21 vic-
tory Wednesday in the MPC
Computers Bowl.
Ryan threw three first-half
touchdown passes, and
Glasper intercepted Jared
Zabransky's pass in the end
zone with 37 seconds left as
the Broncos tried to complete
a rally from a 27-0 deficit.
The Eagles (9-3) extended
the nation's longest bowl win-
ning streak to six and snapped
Boise State's 31-game home
winning streak. BC's last bowl
loss was to Colorado in the
1999 Insight Bowl, and Boise


State's last home loss was in
2001 - a 41-20 loss to
Washington State in Hawkins'
first home game after taking
over for Dirk Koetter.
The game was Hawkins'
last with the Broncos (9-4),
who failed to win 10 games for
the first time since 2001. He's
headed to Colorado after sign-
ing a five-year contract worth
$900,000 per year on Dec. 16
- with the stipulation that he
be' allowed to coach Boise
State in the bowl game.
But the Broncos were
lethargic and lifeless, and bul-
lied by the Eagles in the first
half. They staged a dramatic
rally for their coach, but
Glasper ended those hopes.
Boise State started its final
possession at the BC 47 with
1:56 left, and Zabransky com-
pleted a 32-yard, fourth-down
pass to Vinny Perretta to the
BC 14.
A pass-interference penalty
moved the ball to the 5, but
Zabransky was sacked by


Nick Larkin, and then Glasper
came up with his interception.
Zabransky's had' a 2-yard
TD run early in the fourth, the
Broncos' second score in 2:09.
He threw a 53-yard TD pass to
Drisan James with 1:24 left in
the third.
The Broncos got to 27-21
with 3:51 left after Quinton
Jones returned a punt
92 yards for a TD.
'Jones broke two tackles
inside his own 10, broke two
more and traversed the field
for the longest punt return in
the bowl's history.
Ryan was rarely pressured
and the sophomore picked
apart Boise State's secondary.
He threw for 178 yards in the
first half and finished with
262 on the famed blue turf
that had a slight coat of white
after a brief hail and sleet
storm in the third quarter.
Blackmon finished with five
catches for 144 yards, and
' Ryan Ohliger kicked field
goals of 26 and 30 yards.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boston College senior Will Blackmon (1) catches a 52-yard pass
against Boise State's Chris Barrios (right) and Quinton Jones (23)
during the second quarter of the MPC Computers Bowl college
football game Wednesday.


Section B


__









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2005


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV Sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
4:30 p.m.
ESPN - Emerald Bowl, Georgia Tech vs.
Utah, at San Francisco
8 p.m.
ESPN - Holiday Bowl, Oregon vs.
Oklahoma, at San Diego
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 - New Orleans at Kansas
10:30 p.m.
FSN - Stanford at UCLA
NBA
8 p.m.
TNT - Miami at Detroit
10,30 p.m.
TNT - Settle at Dnver

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


y-New England
Miami
Buffalo
N.Y.Jets


x-lndianapolis
z-Jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston


y-ancinnad
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland


y-Denver
Kansas City
San 'Diego
Oakland


East
W L
9, 5
8 7
5 10
3 11
South
W L
13 2
II1 4
4 II
2 13
North
W L
II 4
10 5
6 9
5 10
West
W L
12 3
9 6
4 II


Pct PF PA
.643 322 289
.533 290 291
.333 245 337
.214 189 298

Pct PF PA
.867 422 234
.733 321 256
.267 286 381
.133 243 411

Pct PF PA
.733 418 313
.667 354 237
.400 249 279
.333 212 285


Pct PF
.800 372
.600 366
.600 411
.267 269


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


East
W L' T
xx-N.Y. Giants 10 5 0
Washington 9 6 0
Dallas 9 6 0
Philadelphia 6 9 0
South
W L T
Tampa Bay. 10 5 0
Carolina 10 5 0
Atlanta 8 7 0
New Orleans 3 12 0
North.
W L T
y-Chicago II 4 0
Minnesota 8 7 0
Detroit 5 10 0
Green Bay 3 12 0
West
W L T
x-Seattle 13 2 0
.arzoni 5 10 '0
St. Louis 5 10 0
San Francisco 3 12 0
x-clinched conference
y-clinched division
z-clinched wild card
xx-clinched playoff spot
Saturday


Pct PF PA
.667 392 293
.600 328 273
.600 315 288
.400 290 357

Pct PF PA
..667 273 261
.667 347 248
.533 340 297
.200 222 371

Pct PF PA
.733 250 168
.533 272 334
.333 233 310
.200 275 327


Pct PF
.867 435,
.333 298
.333 343
.200 219


Denver at San Diego, 4:30 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Oakland, 8 p.m.
Sunday
Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, I p.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, I p.m.
Detroit at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Arizona at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Seattle at Green Bay, I p.m.
Miami at New England, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Kansas City, I p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, I p.m.
New Orleans at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Tennessee at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 4:15 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.


College bowl games

* New Orleans Bowl
Southern Miss 31 ,Arkansas State 19
GMAC Bowl
Toledo 45, UTEP 13
Las Vegas Bowl
California 35, BYU 28
Poinsettia Bowl
Navy 51, Colorado State 30
Fort Worth (Texas) Bowl
Kansas 42, Houston 13,
Hawaii Bowl
Nevada 49, Central Florida 48, OT
Motor City Bowl
Memph;s 38. Akron 31
Champs Sports Bowl
Clemson 19, Colorado 10
Insight Bowl
Arizona State 45, Rutgers 40
'Wednesday
MPC Computers Bowl
Boston College 27, Boise State 21
Alamo Bowl
Michigan v,s. Nebraska (n)
Today
Emerald Bowl
At San Francisco
Utah (6-5) vs. Georgia Tech (7-4), 4:30 p.m.
(ESPN) -
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Oregon (10-1) vs. Oklahoma (7-4), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Friday
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
Virginia (6-5) vs. Minnesota (7-4), Noon
(ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso,Texas
Northwestern (7-4) vs. UCLA (9-2), 2 p.m.
(CBS)
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Missouri .(6-5) vs. South Carolina (7-4),
3:30 pm. (ESPN)
Peach Bowl
At Adtlanta
Miami (9-2) vs. LSU (10-2), 7:30 p.m.
(ESPN),I
Saturday
Melneke Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
South Florida (6-5) vs. North Carolina
State (6-5), II a.m. (ESPN2)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.


Fresno State (8-4) vs. Tulsa (8-4), I p.m.
(ESPN)
Houston Bowl
TCU (10-1) vs. Iowa State (7-4), 2:30 p.m.
(ESPN2)
Monday, Jan. 2
Cotton Bowl
At Dallas
Alabama (9-2) vs.TexasTech (9-2), II a.m.
(FOX)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Iowa (7-4) vs. Florida (8-3), 11 a.m.
(ESPN)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Virginia Tech (10-2) vs. Louisville (9-2),
12:30 p.m. (NBC)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Wisconsin (9-3) vs. Auburn (9-2), I p.m..
(ABC)
Fiesta Bowl
AtTempe,Ariz.
Ohio State (9-2) vs. Notre Dame (9-2), 5
p.m. (ABC)
Sugar Bowl
At Atlanta
Georgia,(10-2) vs. West Virginia (10-1),
8:30 p.m. (ABC)
Tuesday, Jan. 3
Orange Bowl
AtMiami
Penn State (10-1) vs. Florida State (8-4), 8
p.m. (ABC)
Wednesday, Jan. 4
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Texas (12-0) vs. Southern Cal (12-0), 8
p.m. (ABC)

BASKETBALL

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New Jersey 16 12 .571 -
Philadelphia 15 13 .536 I
Boston II 15 -.423 4
New York 7 20 .259 81
Toronto 7 22 .241 9'/
Southeast Division-
W .L Pct GB
Miami 17 12 .586 -
Washington' 12 15 .444 4


Orlando
Charlotte
Atlanta


II 15 .423
10 19 .345
7 20 .259
Central Division
W L Pct


Detroit 23 3 .885
Cleveland 17 10 .630.
Indiana 15 II ' .577
Milwaukee 15 II .577
Chicago 12 16 .429
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct (
San Antonio 22 7 .759
Dallas 21 7 .750
Memphis 16 10 .615
New Orleans II IS .423
Houston 10 16 .385 I1
Northwest Division , /
. W L, ..P'ct " (
Minnesota - 13 12 ;.520
Denver ' ' 14 15 :483
Seattle 12 14 .462
Utah 13 16 .448
Portland 9 .18 .333
Pacific Division
W L Pct C
Phoenix 17 10 .630
LA. Clippers 16 II .593
LA. Lakers . 15 13 .536 :
Golden State 14 14 .500 :
Sacramento 11 17 .393 6
Tuesday's Games
Charlotte 93,Atlanta 90
Miami 109, Milwaukee 98
Detroit I 13,Toronto 106
New Jersey 96, Cleveland 91
Utah 82, Houston 74
San Antonio 99, Indiana 86
Philadelphia 108, Denver 106
Sacramento 110, LA. Clippers 93
Wednesday's Games
(Late Games Not Included)
Phoenix 104,Washington 99
Toronto 108,Adtanta 102
Orlando 105, NewYork 95
Charlotte 93, Chicago 80
Houston vs. New Orleans (n)
Seattle at Minnesota (n)
Philadelphia at Pordtland (n)
Memphis at LA. Lakers (ri)
Boston at Golden State (n)
Today's Games
Miami at Detroit, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Seattle at Denver, 10:30 p.m.


College scores

EAST
Boston College 81, Duquesne 69
Providence 80, San Diego St. 65
Syracuse 86,Towson 52
SOUTH .
Alabama 101,Jackson St. 66
Coll. of Charleston 81, N.C.-Wilmington



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I CLICO I


DARMISwmlc


George Mason 71, Holy Cross 38
Memphis 83, Gonzaga 72
Miami 65, Stetson 56
Southern Miss. 68,West Florida 59
Tennessee 93,Alabama A&M 68
Tulane 64, Richmond 41
Virginia Tech 74,William & Mary 64
MIDWEST
UMKC 75,Valparaiso 62
Wright St. 72, Northeastern 65
SOUTHWEST
Houston 67, Rhode Island 41
Texas A&M 81,Texas Southern 56
FAR WEST
BYU 97, E.Washington 66
Hawaii 66, N. Carolina A&T 60
Idaho St. 102, Rocky Mountain 76
Nevada 56, Norfolk St. 46
Pordtland St. 54, Oregon 52
Wis.-Milwaukee 84,Wyoming 69
TOURNAMENTS
FIU Holiday Classic
First Round
St. Bonaventure 69, Fla. International 65,
OT
Texas-San Antonio 88, Cal St.-Fullerton 76
Panasonic H.lidpay Festival
1 First IRound
Massachu,.ttu 66 St Perer 49
St.John's 63, Columbia 39
State Farm Sun Bowl Tournament
First Round
Georgetown 61, Colgate 45
UTEP 74, MVSU 58

Top 25 schedule

Tuesday's Games
No.4 Memphis 83, No. 8 Gonzaga 72
No. 13 Boston College 81, Duquesne 69
No. 20 Nevada 56, Norfolk State 46
Wednesday's Games
No. 2 Connecticut 85, Stony Brook 52
No. 6 Illinois. 89, Southeast Missouri State
64
No.9 Michigan State 80,TennesseeTech 63
No. 10 Louisville 89,Fairleigh Dickinson 66
No. 14 Oklahoma 81, Oral Roberts 73
No. 16 Maryland ,68, Delaware State 54
No.19 NC Sot 81,.Ne,, H.mpirre6; ,
No. 21 Ohio State 87, Gardner-Webb 58
No. 23 North Carolina 89, North
Carolina-Asheville 47
No. 24 Wisconsin 78, Louisiana Tech 52
Today's Games
No.7Washington vs.Arizona State, 10 p.m.
No. II UCLA vs. Stanford, 10:30 p.m.
No. 20 Nevada vs. Louisiana-Lafayette, 10
p.m.
Friday's Games
No. 2 Connecticut vs. Quinniplac at the
Hartford Civic Center, 7 p.m.
No. 4 Memphis vs. Purdue, 8 p.m.
No. 5 Florida vs. Florida A&M, I p.m.
No. 6 Illinois vs.Tennessee-Martin, 8 p.m.
No. 12 GeorgeWashington at No. 19 N.C.
State, 7 p.m.
No. 15 Texas vs. Prairie View, 8 p.m.
No. 18 Kentucky vs. Ohio at U.S. Bank,
Arena, Cincinnati, 8 p.m.
No. 22 Wake Forest vs. Charleston
Southern, 7 p.m.
No.25 West Virginia vs. Canisius, 7 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No I Dukle ' NorL'h Carolina.
dreensb6ro at Greensboro l61ieum I p ni
. No:3 Villahovavs..Telnpleat.th'eiPalestra,4.
p.m.
No. 7 Washington vs.Arizona, 2 p.m.
No. 8 Gonzaga vs. Saint Joseph's, 6 p.m.
No. 9 Michigan State vs. Coppin State, I p.m.
No. 10 Louisville vs. Miami at Office
Depot Center, Sunrise, 4 p.m.
No. II UCLA vs. California, 4 p.m.
No. 13 Boston College at Rhode island, I
p.m.
No. 14 Oklahoma vs.Alabama, 4:30 p.m.
No. 16 Maryland vs.VMI, 2' p.m.
No. 17 Indiana at Ball State, 4 p.m.
No. 20 Nevada at Saint Mary's, Calif., 7 p.m.
No. 21 Ohio State vs. LSU, I p.m.
No. 24 Visconsin at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL scores
Tuesday's Games
Boston 4,Washington 3, OT
Toronto 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT
Detroit 4, Dallas I
Nashville 4, Calgary 3
Wednesday's Games
(Late Games Not Included)
Florida 6, Boston 4
Philadelphia 4,Atlanta 3, OT
Columbus IAnaheim 0
N.Y. Rangers 6, N.Y. Islanders 2
Ottawa 6, Carolina 2
Montreal 4,Tampa Bay 3
New Jersey 7,Washington 2
St. Louis at Chicago (n)
Minnesota at Edmonton (n)
Los Angeles at Colorado (n)
Nashville at Vancouver (n)
Phoenix at San Jose (n)
Thursday's Games
Philadelphia at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary, 9 p.m.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print answer here: X XII
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: JADED GUILD SURTAX FORBID
I Answer: What the sarge turned into when he caught a
cold - A "DRAFT'" DODGER


DECEMBER 29, 2005


Armstrong is AP Male Athlete of Year


Associated Press


AUSTIN, Texas - Lance
Armstrong was honored
Wednesday as The
Associated Press Male
Athlete of the Year for the
fourth straight year. He is the
only athlete to be selected by
sports writers four times
since the honor first was


awarded in 1931.
Armstrong received 30 of
the 83 votes cast. Heisman
Trophy-winning running back
Reggie Bush of Southern
California was second with
23 votes, and Indianapolis
Colts quarterback Peyton
Manning was third with eight,
followed by tennis star Roger
Federer and golf's Tiger


Woods with seven each.

Sorenstam honored

Annika Sorenstam was a
landslide winner as the AP
Female Athlete of the Year,
making Sorenstam the first
golfer since Babe Zaharias
(1945-47) to win the award
three straight years.


SOCCER: Tigers advance to title game

-Continued From Page 1B


The winners of those games
play at 6 p.m. to decide the
championship.
On the boys' side of the
ledger, Tigers coach Trevor
Tyler liked what he saw on
Wednesday, because a CHS
team that has had trouble
scoring goals all season tallied
10 scores in two games with-
out star offensive player Nic
Nyssen and advanced to the
championship.
In the Tigers' opening 7-2
win against Newberry High,
Charles Cofield had a hat trick
and assisted on one goal,
Chris Mullen 'scored two
goals and dished out an assist
and Alan Watson scored once
and had two assists.
"The offense was much,
much improved," Tyler said.
'They were a good team. They
played very hard, but they're
not to the level of what
Columbia is' Cofield just
stepped up."
The forward scored two of
Columbia's first three goals,
'then registered the initial
score of the second half when
he took a through ball from
Watson on. a breakaway and
beat the Panthers goalie to
make it'5-2.
Watson scored his own goal
minutes later when he gath-
ered in a pass from David
Watson, made a move past
Newberry defender Chad Cox
to his right, then ripped a shot
that found the inside of the
right post from 25 yards out
for the goal.
SAlan Watson returned the
favoi- when he found Mullen
on a breakaway for his second
goal of the game to conclude


ACROSS 42 Obj
44 Roa
1 Intuitions 46 Mid
6 West Indies 51 Jap
dance mat
11 Concert windup 54 Bee
12 Lobster claw 55 Run
13 Harem jewelry to w
14 Running 56 WitI
in neutral atte
15 Lacquer 57 Sme
ingredient 58 Hop
16 Joy Adamson's
pet D
17 Vehicle
19 Cautious 1 Wat
23 Wahine's sou
welcome 2 Pen
26 Big celebration 3 Sou
28 Weep over para
29 Wheel 4 Hele
31 New shoot 5 Coll
33 Port near Kyoto 6 Top
34 Powerful 7 Wife
35 Min. fraction (hyp
36 Urchins 8 Spri
39 Cries of pain 9 "Wil
40 Mile. in 10 Wet
Barcelona 11 A lo


the scoring.
"Felt good," Cofield said.
"We've been 'working on a lot
of things in practice and just
listening to Coach and it's
helped me out a lot."
Kyle Houston also scored a
goal and Brad Witt had an
assist for Columbia.
Tyler also cited the play of
Witt at sweeper, Aaron Barber
on the attack and J. Ben
Rigdpn at the stopper position,
as well as Mullen and Watson
in the midfield.
The Tigers (7-5-2) won the
nightcap, 3-0 against Keystone
Heights High to clinch, first
place in Group A and a
rematch with Suwannee High
in the championship game
today at 6 p.m.
' "That's wonderful," Tyler
said. "We've got another
championship game against
Suwannee and we're going for
two in a row."
Watson scored two goals on,
assists from David Wester and
Brad Witt. Charles Kamback
scored the first goal on an
assist from Mullen.
The Tigers won despite los-
ing Brandon Coleman to a red
card in the second half.
Fort White will have a
shootout today at 1 p.m.
against Panama City Arnold
High to determine second
place in Group B. The teams
tied 2-2 on Wednesday.
The Indians went ahead 2-1
on a goal by Mike Williams off
an assist by Connor Hayden
with five minutes to play, only
to ha\e Arnold score 'on ;a'"
penalty kick with seconds
remaining to tie the game.
Arnold's other goal came on


ect
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all coins
p out of bed


)OWN

termelon
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int rival
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suffix
ng way off


a penalty kick, while Williams
crossed the ball to Hayden for
a header for Fort White's first
goal.
The Indians lost their first
game on a goal in the last five
minutes that gave Suwannee a
1-0 victory. Steve Pate scored
on a header off a corner kick
for the lone score.
"We battled hard, we
missed our chances in the first
half and that's really what the
game came down to," Indians
coach Bob Hochmuth said.
Fort White also lost striker
Andrew Sherrer in the second
half for the remainder of the
tournament when a recurring
back injury he suffered in a
car accident weeks ago forced
him to leave the game. Danny
Bowie also left the game with
an injured tailbone, but he was
able to return for the second
game.
Mike Williams and Mario
Barrera both played well in
the back, and Hochmuth said
he thought Jason Shiver and
Tim Robinson had strong
showings.
"I think we played tough,"
Barrera said. "We had some
mistakes, and people got hurt,
and that's what really killed
us."
Should Fort White (3-5-3)
win the shootout, the Indians
will play Group A second
place team Keystone Heights
High at 4 p.m.
If they lose, the Indians will
face third-place Newberry at
2 p.m.
In other games, Keystone
Heights defeated Newberry
3-0, and Suwannee topped
Arnold 2-0.


Answer to Previous Puzzle




RDIE A R C 1 IEARN
;PIL[US T WAING




EASOSUDE R ALSER
A L L A R T IE
LEESC IVE OER







YLOAM ER L E APS




YA'MAH^A AZALEA
DRIVEL TONSIL
S-ASSYOX EN


12 Jet jockey
16 Summer
in Savoie
18 Unexplained
sighting
20 Traffic indicator


PUZZLE ENTHUSIASTS: Get more puzzles in
"Random House Crossword MeqaOmnibus" Vols. 1 & 2.
1 12 13 . 14 15 6 17 18 19 10


21 Ghost towns
22 Safecracker
23 Dangerfield
persona
24 Put into law
25 Ugh!
27 Ballpark fig.
29 Ponderosa
name
30 Shogun's yes
32 Major leaguer
34 NNW opposite
37 Calf-length
skirts
38 Qt. parts
41 Standing wide
open
43 Tooth type
45 "Mister Ed"
actor
47 Kachina doll
maker
48 Poetry and
painting
49 Tick off
50 -'s
(ice cream
brand)
51 Koppel or
Knight
52 Spinks
defeated
53 Turkey or cat
54 Friar's title


12-29 � 2005 by NEA, Inc.


Page Editor: Mario Sarmento., 754-0420,







LAKE CITY REPORTER OUTDOORS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2005


Officials look to reintroduce


dog hunting at Camp Blanding


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission is hoping to use
its new plan to add more hunt-
ing at Camp Blanding for next
year's deer \hunting season.
According to FWC reports,
the FWC !and the Camp
Blanding Joint Training
Center have .created a propos-
al that could open the south
portion of the post to hunters.
Karen Parker, FWC
spokesperson for the North
Central Region, said officials
hope to implement the new
plan as soon as possible.
"We are trying to push this
proposal through so we can
implement it by the 2006-07
hunting season," she said. "If
we don't get the public sup-
port we need then we'll have
to put on the brakes and it
probably won't go into effect
until the 2007-08 hunting sea-
son."
Parker said since Sept. 11,
2001, the lands in the Camp
Blanding Wildlife
Management Area lying south
of State Road 16 have been
closed by the Department of
Military Affairs.
These lands, needed for
training exercises and troop
mobilization, are under tight
security that prohibits recre-
ational access under the
current hunting format.
'"This closure resulted in
the' loss of all recreational
access to the south post,"
added Roland Garcia, director
of FWC's North Central
Region, based in Lake City, in
a released statement.
A\


CAMP BLENDING
WILDLIFE MANAGEMI 11j l!,E'
56,197 acn ,
Clayv County [


Proposed dog
and - til
hunt areas




\
N
"" ,kr,


COURTESY PHOTO
This map shows the Camp Blanding areas that are proposed for
dog and still hunting areas. /


Garcia said Camp Blanding
arid FWC staffs have main-
tained communications in an
effort to reopen the closed
portions of the area and in
recent weeks, both parties
came up with a concept that
would reopen the south post
and restore deer-dog hunting
for the 2006-07 hunting


season. /
Parker noted the proposal
would require changes to
rules and/ hunting formats,
including locations of current
still and. dog hunt areas and
locations/where special quota
hunts would take place.
Parker said the hunts at
Camp Blanding will be quota


hunts and the numbers will
remain the same as it was
prior to The Sept. 11 terrorist
attacks.
For quota hunts, hunters
must send in applications for
the quota hunts as they would
for any other wildlife manage-
ment areas.
The proposal provides for
the same types and amount of
hunting days that currently
exist for still hunting, while
adding the deer-dog hunting
format back into the hunting
scheme.
Parker said in talking to the
military staff at the camp,
security issues were
/addressed and that's how, they
came uiwi'i fhle plan.
"We want to make the north
post .dog hunting and the
south post still hunting," she
said, noting that not all
hunting ceased on the base..
'"The north post remained
opened, it was the south post
that has been closed
September 11, 2001," she
said.
Military police, as well as
FWC officers and FWC staff
working at check stations will
be utilized to maintain the
post's security measures
during hunt season.
The FWC staff is scheduled
to present an overview of the
proposal to Commissioners at
the Feb. 1-2 Commission
meeting in Gainesville.
"We plan to present staff's
final recommendation at the
April 5-6 Commission meet-
ing in Tallahassee," Garcia
said.
"If changes are adopted,
they would become effective
July 1," Garcia said.


Web site launched for Florida hunters


FW C arrests three oysters from a closed area and failure to
I \ obtain required licenses to harvest or sell
for selling oysters saltwater products.
\g I The Florida Department of Agriculture
Fromstaff reports and Consumer Services designated all
Fromstaff reports zones in the Shired Island area closed to
oyster,, clam and mussel harvest since
A new Web site, www.huntersonly.com, Oct. 29 because of red tide contamination
has been launched for the hunters of along the coast.
Florida. The Web site is to hunters, from FWC investigators and officers went
hunters, by hunters, for hunters, to enjoy undercover to the Shired Island camp-
their favorite pastime online. This is not ground where the three Forehands lived.
club, organization, or industry-related, Officers established a relationship with
but it is a site for the average\everyday 'the trio and bought 118 oysters and
outdoorsman to visit and not be bothered 19 live blue crabs from them. After docu-
by pop-up ads, banner ads, or any adver- meeting the evidence, the officers
tising at all. It is to share stories, photos, returned the live products to the water.
ideas and advice, to trade or swap, or~rbuy Officers charged Robert Forehand
or sell, for less than 1.4 cents per day\ with harvest of oysters from a closed
For more information, call Olen area; commercial harvest/sale of oysters
Grimes at (610) 444-6544, or e-mail himr with no Saltwater Products License; com-
at olen@huntersonly.com. mercial harvest from . a vessel not con-
* The Florida Fish and Wildlife Wstructed to protect products from
Conservation Commission (FWC) inves- /ilge/contaminents; shellfish harvest
tigators ' recently arrested three people vessel not equipped with sewage disposal
selling oysters they harvested from the receptacle; and driving a vehicle with a
red tide-contaminated waters near the suspended driver's license.
Shired Island area in Dixie County. / Charges against Billy Forehand
FWC officers charged Robert 1ilton include harvest of oysters from a closed
Forehand, 55, Cross City, Anne Nightingale area; com iercial harvest/sale of oysters
Forehand, 50, and Billy Ray Foreand, 54, with no Saltwater Products License; and
both of Old Town, Nov. 23 on a varietyy of commercial narvest/sale of blue crabs
charges including illegal harvest and sale of with no Restricted Species Endorsement.


Officers charged Anne Forehand with
commercial harvest/sale of oysters with
no Saltwater Products License; and com-
mercial harvest/sale of blue crab with nb
Restricted Species Endorsement.
Unlicensed harvest/sale of saltwater
products can range from misdemeanor to
felony charges.
To report any natural resource viola-
tions, call the FWC's toll-free Wildlife
Alert hotline at (888) 404-3922. Callers
remain anonymous and receive a reward
if the information leads to an arrest.
* The FWC is seeking talented, artists
to participate in the 15th annual Manatee
Decal Art Contest. The winning artwork
will become the design for the 2005-06
state manatee decal and sold at county
tax collectors' offices to benefit manatee
research and protection programs.
The contest is open to all middle
school and high school students who
attend public, private or home schools in
Florida. This year is the first time high
school students are eligible to enter.
The FWC is accepting artwork post-
marked between Dec. 5-Saturday and
there are specific entry requirements.
Students need to work through their art
teachers, who will submit the artwork to
the FWC. Each school may submit up to
five entries. FWC staff will judge entries
on Feb. 14.


Unidentified members of the Saratoga Stryders start a snowshoe
workout in four inches of fluffy snow on Dec. 10 at the Saratoga
State Park in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 'It's a good workout,' the
54-year-old Munyon said.

Snowshoes evolve

for racing,

backcountry hiking
W a * %*


By MICHAEL VIRTANEN
Associated Press

ALBANY, N.Y. - Over the
past 30 years, snowshoes
have shrunk. Once resem-
bling huge wooden tennis
rackets strung with catgut,
most models now are about
twice the length of your boot
and only a few inches wider.
Snowshqers say the design
changes have revolutionized
the sport, making winter hik-
ing and backpacking more
popular while drawing more
endurance athletes into long-
distance racing over snow.
"The market used to be
people that harvested maple
syrup ... trappers and ice fish-
ermen," said Richard
Havlick, whose company
began making snowshoes in
1965 in Mayfield, in the
Adirondack foothills.
With aluminum ..frames"
about 8 inches wide and 25
inches long, most snowshoes
now have plastic decking,.
bindings and sharp metal
crampons underneath for
gripping ice and hard-packed
snow. A pair costs from $100
to more than $200.
Most snowshoes weigh
less than two pounds each.
Racing models tend to be
lighter and smaller, typically
worn over running shoes
instead of boots. Sanctioned
races require a minimum
120-square-inch functional
surface, said Mark Elmore,
United States Snowshoe
Association sports director.
Even for backcountry hik-
ing, they seldom are more
than 10 inches wide and 36
inches long. The oval bearpaw
design, with wood frames and
traditional laced decking, is
still preferred by a few tradi-
tionalists, especially for deep
powder in open areas.
According to Adirondack


guide Dennis Aprill, snow-
shoes were invented 6,000
years ago in Central Asia for
hunters and trappers to float
over deep snow, and they
stayed essentially the same
until the 1970s, when Sherpa
Inc. introduced aluminum
frames. A pivot bar at the open-
ing where boots attach to bind-
ings made 'it possible to affix
crampons or cleats for traction,
and the solid neoprene deck
could float more weight, per-
mitting a smaller surface.
"No longer did the snow-
shoer have to walk 'Popeye-
like' with wide awkward 13-by-
39 inch bear paws. The gait
could be more natural," Aprill
wrote in "Short Treks in the
Adirondacks and Beyond."
Havlick recalled attending
a 1977 race at Ticonderoga in
the eastern Adirondacks,
which commemorate, I the
snowshoeing . exploits of
Rogers Rangers in the
French and Indian War.
"Some teams came down
from Canada. Mostly every-
body was running on big old
wooden snowshoes," Havlick
said. 'They were running
and tripping and falling. It
was kind of fun."
Jeff Clark of Saratoga said
the racing equipment has
evolved even in the past six
years.
"When we first started out,
everybody wore a type of
snowshoe that had long
pointed tails, which throw up
a lot of snow," he said. "When
you started a race, it looked
like a snow cloud."
Racing shoes are generally
more oval now, Clark said.
"It's important to make
sure you have a good har-
ness and a good support," he
added. "Without a good har-
ness, you whang the snow-
shoes against each ankle as
you go."


Alligators found shot in Mallory Swamp


From staff reports

A large number of dead alliga-
tors found in the Mallory.
Swamp area in Lafayette County
has.the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) concerned.
According to Capt. Roy
Brown, area supervisor for
Lafayette County, numerous


FWC relocates
woodpeckers
From staff. reports

The FWC recently relocated
dozens of red-cockaded wood-
peckers from areas that have
excess birds to parts of the state
with critically small populations.
FWC biologists said the
process, called translocation, is
a powerful tool for conserving
red-cockaded woodpeckers,
which the state classifies as a
"species of special concern."


alligators have been found
shot and floating along the
North and South Canal grades
and the L.A. Bennett grade
which borders private lands
and the Mallory Swamp
Wildlife Management Area.
"We believe these are random
shootings. No parts are taken
after the animals are killed,"
Brown said. "This is a useless


and wasteful crime that tarnish-
es the image of ethical hunters."
In the past year, FWC offi-
cers hnve arrested six sub-
jects fo6 killing five alligators
in the general area. In those
cases,, however, the suspects
were apprehended with alliga-
tors or parts and thought to be
unrelated to\this latest spree,
according to Brown.


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Page Editor: Mario Sarmento, 754-0420


d








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2005


ZITS


FOXTROT FOR BETTER OR WORSE


FRANK & ERNEST


BEETLE BAILEY B.C.


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


CLASSIC PEANUTS


MORNING , PARSON !! YOU'LL PRAISE BE !! WHAT
BE GLAD TO kNOW CAUSED THIS SPIRITUAL
I'VE TAKEN UP AWAKENIN' ?!
PRAYER !!
SOME DAYS
I PRAY FER - '
HOURS AT IME!!
A TIME !! / , - \


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't take anything too
seriously today. You should be
out having fun. Travel or activ-
ities that bring you in touch
with ,people from different
backgrounds will give you
unique ideas for the
upcoming year. *****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Tie up loose ends and
finish off any personal paper-
work. This is a great time to.
invest in yourself, someone
you love or your own home.
Let an older relative help out.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Today, your imagination
will run wild, and you should
be able to come up with some
amazing ideas. Don't forget
to lend a helping hand to
someone who isn't as versa-
tile, mobile or able as you.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): A chance to get a deal
finished before the end of the
year looks good. Take a seri-
ous look at your future and
where you see yourself head-
ed. A move or a promotion
are looking better all the


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

time. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You will be a strong force that
will rule whatever arena you
play in today. Expect some-
one to be jealous - stay-calm
and let your adversary be the
one to look bad. You can get
involved in a workable
partnership. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Trouble is probably
brewing on the home front.
Someone will be just waiting
for you to make a mistake.
Stick to what you know, and
don't let anyone lead you into
unfamiliar territory. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Be creative in your
choices and you will reach
your goals. Take on some-
thing a little different or put
an interesting twist on some-
thing you already do. Put
your plans into motion before
year-end. ****-
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Get your act together
and go after your goals.


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: S equals C
"M U MG HXWT ITLFX . UPZY J LX YT
H X WT ITL FX . " - ITL F X
"JT FB GBY SBURBZT - JT MLT


S B U R B ZT . "


- EPZYMI UMKHTL


PREVIOUS SOLUTION - "Every form of addiction is bad, no matter whether
the narcotic be alcohol or morphine or idealism." - Carl Gustav Jung
(c) 2005 by NEA, Inc. 12-29


Recognition will be yours if
you push for the spotlight. A
different approach to some-
thing you do well will take
everyone by storm. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Lending a helping
hand to others will position
you well for advancement in
the future. A chance to solve
some problems ,for others
will separate you from the
crowd. Don't be afraid to be a
little different. **,*
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You'll have a lot to
ponder over as the year
comes to a close. There are
so many decisions to make
and, directions that you can
take. You are overdue for a
change. Make it and move
forward. A***
AQUARIUS (Jani, 20-
Feb. 18): You may have to
do a bit of traveling today to
find a solution to an ongoing
situation. Don't let anyone
provoke you. An argument
will not be worth your time
and effort. You -can help
someone you think highly of.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): If someone wants to
argue or do things different-
ly, don't put up a fuss. You
can make a difference even if
you only stop to listen to
someone's troubles. A prob-
lem with someone you work
with may make you feel
insecure. **
Birthday Baby: You are
inventive, imaginative and
intuitive. You are always look-
ing for excitement; you're
unpredictable and ready to
take action.


DEAR ABBY


Right words make a difference

when relaying telephone calls


DEAR ABBY: "Aaron in
Syracuse" asked whether it
was rude of him to ask, "May I
ask who's calling, please?"
when he answers the phone at
home. His wife says it's nosy
and people will think he's
screening his calls.
Abby, the person who
should decide if calls need to
be screened and callers identi-
fied should be the recipient of
the call. If the calls are for
Aaron's wife and she doesn't
want ,or need him to identify
the caller for her, then he
should not do it. On the other
hand, if she doesn't want to be
bothered by calls and requests
that he "screen" for her, that's
different.
Because he insists on doing
it over her objections, I wonder
if he's motivated out of inap-
propriate curiosity, jealousy or
insecurity.
Please note: My view is spe-
cific to adults in the household.
Whether parents identify
callers for their minor children
is a matter for parents to
decide. - CYNTHIA IN
ALBANY, N.Y.
DEAR CYNTHIA: You
have a point, but the mail that
came in response to "Aaron's"
query .indicates that various
readers saw the problem in a
different light. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: In my years
of work answering a company
telephone, I have discovered
that saying, "May I SAY who is
calling, please?" conveys the


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
idea that the tieed to know is to
relay the information to the call
recipient.
"May I ASK who is calling",
has a note of nosiness to it, and
does not imply that the need to
know is just to relay the name.
Before I learned this trick, peo-
ple would sometimes take
offense at the question.
However, using the word "say"
instead of the word "ask" has
never resulted in offense
taken. - DIANE IN
GARDINER, MAINE
DEARABBY: You missed a
golden opportunity to educate
your readers on proper phone
manners! I have always
stressed to my teenagers, and
their friends, that when they
make a phone call, they should
identify themselves first, then
ask for the person they wish to
speak to, as in, "Hello, this is
John. May I please speak to
Kenny?" Not only will this pre-
vent the problem of the person
wondering who is calling, it's
just common sense and good
manners.
I stress to them that in the
business world, it shows not
only good manners, but also


consideration for others, both
of which seem to be in short
supply these days. - WELL-
MANNERED IN
WASHINGTON STATE
DEAR ABBY: I agree with
your advice to "Aaron" - how-
ever, there is one exception.
When I was in my teens, my
mother became an ordained
minister. From that time on, if
someone called for her and
didn't identify him/herself, we
didn't ask, as there might be
confidentiality issues for the
caller. - MARGARET IN
PHIIADELPHIA
DEAR ABBY: About
40 years ago, a grand old New
York department store opened
a suburban branch in our area.
They had a team from the tele-
phone company come in and
give a few classes in telephone
etiquette to all the new
employees.
We were instructed to say,
"May I TELL her who is call-
ing?" and I have done it ever
since. People are invariably
politely responsive. Also, we
were told never to "mute" the
receiver against our
diaphragm while calling some-
one to the phone, because the
chest cavity acts as an amplifi-
er. Imagine a caller hearing,
"It's that pest again!" or some-
thing worse vibrating through
the phone. I enjoy your
column. - TAMPA READER
* Write Dear Abby at P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


DILBERT


BLONDIE


GARFIELD


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2005




Ad a4 line minimum$2.55 per line
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
. Wednesday insertion.

S1*] k144 I LUI71 U 77-74I,


Personal Merchandise
turnrrz r*"n.' ', ,


$300

One item per ad
Ad must be placed at the LCR
and paid in advance.


$90O $ 0 5
4 lines E ch addina 4 lines
6 days l .1 1 .11 6 days
i: r- ! iem [,. i 2l, rl""l I^T -=, ad


Lf.CTMr.tII'MT'


$2200 $25�8o50 $5
2li 2 , il.,.' l 4 l5 0 4 .line ay." ' ,l 4 8 0
6 d 1 -' f,6 da 1 ,u U 1 ,


ummrm


Number of Insertions Per line Rate
3 . ... .. ... .. ... . ... .. .... .1.65
4-6 . .. . . . . . . . .... . . 50
7-13. ..................... 1.45
s 14-23 ................... . 1.20
24 or more .................. 990
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
SWednesday insertion.


Limited to service type advertising only.
4 lines, one month .............. $60.00
$9.50 each additional line
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.






Ad Errors- Please read your ad on the first
day of publication. We accept responsibility
for only the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space in error.
Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt
correction and billing adjustments.

Cancellations- Normal advertising deadlines
apply for cancellation.

Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440. Should fur-
ther information be required regarding pay-
ments or credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting department.


You can call us at 755-5440, Monday through Friday
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their classified ads in
person, and some ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad copy to the
Reporter.

FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the
Classified Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.com


Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.



Advertising copy is subject to approval by the
Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or
classify all advertisements under appropriate head-
ings. Copy should be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of publication. Credit for
published errors will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of.the advertisement which was incor-
rect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered to be published,
nor for any general, special or consequential dam-
ages. Advertising language must comply with
Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition
of discrimination in employment, housing and public
accommodations. Standard abbreviations are accept-
. able; however, the first word of each ad may not be
abbreviated.


(10 Need Help? IT' Let Us Write Your Classified Ad


Computer Services Home Improvements Pressure Cleaning


A PROFESSIONALLY
DESIGNED WEBSITE FOR
YOUR BUSINESS
A Perfect Christmas Gift!
Lake City area resident discount.
MSN.Net Hosting 877-467-7932

COMPUTER NOT WORKING?
We help with all your computer
needs. Virus & Spyware Repair,
Network & New Computer Setup.
Tutoring and anything else!
Call Dave at 352-870-7467.


Roofing & Gutters

SOUTHLAND REMODELING
Specializing in Reroofs,
Roof Repair, Roof Cleaning.
Call 386-697-3134


Concrete Work

JSH CONCRETE INC.
Slabs, footings, drives, etc. Licensed
& Insured. Home Owner Discounts.
Call 386-719-9918


Painting Service

N & N: We come from the old
school. Affordable painting &
pressure washing Since 1952.
386-965-0482 or 386-697-6237
Free Estimates.

Painting & Handyman Service
Painting, Home Repair, Remodel,
Drywall Repair, & Pressure Wash
Call Mike Lainhart 386-454-7060
Professional Painting & Pressure
Washing. 20 yrs exp. Quality Work,
Free Estimates. Will Meet or Beat
all other Estimates. 386-344-4242


MITCHELL/ HILGERSON LLC
Kitchen & Bath Remodeling.
Electrical repairs, Carpentry.
Paint & Trim Call 386-365-9909

Home Maintenance

Grey Wolf Enterprises
Custom Site Built Sheds
& Vinyl/Hardy Board Siding. Home
Maint. & Improvements
All Major Credit Cards Accepted
Call For Estimate386-697-6765

Lawn & Landscape Service'

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, design. Con. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call, 386-496-2820 lv msg.

TIME TO MULCH
Make your flower beds look like
new. Delivered & spread or just
delivery. 386-935-6595

Services

FREE CLEANUP.
Pickup of unwanted metals,
tin, scrap vehicles.
386-755-0133 We Recycle.

Drywall Services

DRYWALL Hang, Finish;
Textures; Plaster & Stucco Repairs;
Interior & Exterior Painting.
386-752-2412

Pressure Cleaning

Andrews Pressure Washing
Lic: & Insured,
Free Estimates. ,
Call 386-755-2065


EARL'S PURE
Pressure Washing & Painting.
Free Estimates Earl Goff
386-935-3230

Land Services

SBulldozer Work! Tractor
work, root raking, bush hogging,
seeding, sodding, disking, site prep
& landscape work. Custom Lawn
care. Irrigation Repair &
Installation. Free Estimate! ,
Call 755-3890 or (386) 623-3200
Look! We can dig your Trench for
less than you can rent a Trencher!
Free estimates.
Call A-l Electric at 386-752-5488

Woodworking

F. THOMAS ENTERPRISES
Unique Wood, Designs and
FabricationCall 386-752-7387 or
e-mail ftc206(5)bellsouth.net

Tree Service

Hazardous TREE TRIMMING,
removal & stump grinding. Senior
discount. 15 years experience.
386-590-7798 or 386-963-3360

Construction

Plumb Level Construction Co.
New Construction, Remodeling,
Re Roofing, Shingle & Metal
Call 386-792-4061 or 365-2819

Bankruptcy/Divorce

#1 IN BUSINESS SERVICES
Divorce, Bankruptcy, Resumes
RE Closings, Legal Forms
248 N Marion Av. 755-8717


Legal

NOTICE OF SALE
Mini-Storage Units of Columbia County
located on Hwy 247 / Branford Hwy will
accept bids on the contents of the fol-
lowing units:
Unit A-3 belonging to Charles Schotta
Unit C-3 belonging to Kimberly Byrd
Unit E-2 belonging to Robee Richards
Unit E-30 belonging to Michelle Young
Unit F-l belonging to Jared Sinclair
Unit F-4 belonging to Clara Payton
Unit G-6 belonging to Tabitha Anderson
Units H-1 & 2 & 3 belonging to Earl
Hill
Unit J-4 belonging to Tomecla Simpklns
Unit L-4 belonging to Sheryle Austin-
Fisher
Unit N-29 belonging to James Starling
Unit R-16 belonging to Misty Cooper
Unit T-14 belonging to Robert Taylor Jr.
Unit V-7 belonging to Falesie Rawls
Unit V-20 belonging to William Brogen
Unit W-1 belonging to Elizabeth Lafleur
Unit X-20 belonging to Lloyd Pierce
Contents may be purchased in part of
whole. Payment must be made in cash.
Sale date is Wednesday, January llth,
2006 at 8:00 a.m. at the Hwy 247 / Bran-
ford Hwy Storage location. Mini-Storage
Units of Columbia County reserves the
right to bid.
04501104
December 29, 2005
January 5, 2006


030 Personals

05509167
Lonely? Young at Heart?
Over 65? Lookingfor a great
companion? If so, we would be
great together. 386-961-8453


060 Services

Private CNA is looking for new
position. Call Sheila 386-935-4473

100 Job
1o0 Opportunities

!! LOOK! LOOK!!
You Too Can Sell Real Estate!
$B G BUCKS!
Call 386-466-1104

03527992 *
Lake City Reporter
is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier
for Columbia City to Old Wire
Rd/SR47, Herlong Deliver the
Reporter in the early morning
hours Tuesday - Sunday. No
delivery on Monday's.
Carrier must have dependable
transportation. Stop by the
Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!

04500113

Lake City Reporter
Creative Director.
Immediate opening for person
with high level of design and
creative skills. Must have
experience using Quark Xpress,
Photo Shop, Illustrator, Adobe
InDesign and Acrobat. Person
will oversee daily operation of
Creative Services department.
2-4 years newspaper or other
graphic position and supervisory
experience helpful. Salary will be
based on work experience and
creative abilities. Medical benefits
and 401k available.
Send resume to:
Dave Kimler
180 E. Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055
email:
dkimler( lakecitvreporter.com


100 portunities
,Opportunities


F
05508839


05508839 .
Wanted Exp. Shop Technician
for construction/forestry
equipment dealer in the Lake
City, Starke, & Live Oak areas.
Competitive pay, benefits &
excellent training program. Call
386-752-9544 or fax to: 755-6882
or send resume to:
Industrial Tractor Co.
PO Box 2439 Lake City, 32056

05509172
PARALEGAL
The Department of Transportation
has an opening for a Paralegal
Specialist. Bi-Weekly Salary
Range ($891.60 - $1400.00).
Minimum Qualifications: Must be
or have the ability to become a
notary public in Florida;
knowledge of civil litigation
office practices such as
calendering, setting hearings,
scheduling court reporters, and
coordinating. See online ad for
more qualifications. Refer to
Requisition Number 55004630.
Please apply online at:
https://jobs.myflorida.com. Only
State of Florida Applications will
be accepted - no resumes, please.
Ad closes 12/30/05.
EO/AA/VP Employer.

05509173
Seeking an enthusiastic
Maintenance Professional
to oversee the management of
daily operations and physical
plant maintenance for enclosed
regional mall in Lake City,
FL. Attention to detail and the
ability to handle multiple projects
simultaneously are essential.
Knowledge of roofing, HVAC,
plumbing and electricity are a
plus. Basic computer skills and
familiarity with computer systems
are a must. Flexibility in working
hours required. E-mail resumes to
lisaac(@hullstorey.com or fax to
706-868-7457 attention L. Isaac.

Bookkeeper
Office Manager
Local manufacturing company
seeks full-time bookkeeper/office
manager. Computer skills
necessary. Accounting knowledge
preferred. Insurance & 401K
benefits. Send resume
& salary requirements to:
Send reply to Box 05005, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056


100 Job
100 Opportunities

05509178
.^ -^
. . :. . ---

STAY IN THE
"SWEET PART"
OF THE SOUTH
FL., GA., SC., NC., TN., AL.
"'- Top pay-up to .40 cpm w/5 yrs
-tI Guaranteed Hometime
*'- Health & Disability Ins. Avail.
*Life & Dental Ins. Provided
*401K available
* Safety Bonus
CallSI -S4 -270#'6
Highi, 31ui Soui,. Stirkc. FL..
�' >, >. d a ' i'-e \ p rc o m >'u ,Il '

05509181
Survey Draftsman &
Instrument Person w/EFB exp
Company Benefits include Health
& Disability Ins., Sick Leave,
Vacation & Retirement Plan.
.. Call 386-755-6166

05509227
Comfort Inn is looking for Full
& Part-Time Housekeepers.
Benefits include vacation &
holiday pay; ins. & 401K.
Must be able to work weekends.
Apply weekdays after 10:00 AM.
US 90 & 1-75. No Phone Calls
Please. EOE/DFW


a,


Mike's Tastee Hot Dog's
Accepting applications
for dedicated individuals. Must be
young at heart and have the
ability to learn & have fun.
Call 386-867-9053

05509269
Salesperson-Lumber Sales
Must be people savvy
Will train - Great benefits
Apply in person
Idaho Timber of Florida
1786 SE SR 100
Lake City, FL. 32025
Call 386-755-5555

Asphalt Plant Technician
Level II Certified
Hipp Construction
Call 386-462-2047
E.O.E./ D/F/W/P


WALT'S LIVE OAK FORD MERCURY
(4) Men or Women for Sales Position
* Paid Insurance * 401K Plan * Early Working Hours
* Advancement Opportunity * Demo Available
* No Sundays * 5 Day Work Week
Apply in Person to our Sales Manager
Eddie McCullough
WALT'S LIVE OAK FORD MERCURY
Hwy 129 North Live Oak
386-362-1112


Liberty National Life Insurance Co.
is expanding its operation and is looking for upwardly
mobile people to fill insurance sales & service positions.
Average annual earnings $42,000. Fringe benefit package: 2
retirement funds, health insurance, paid vacation, conven-
tion trips & many others. No experience necessary. We have
on the job training. Requirements: honesty, hard worker &
dependable transportation.
Contact Ronnie Harvey at 386-752-2583
Or fax resume to: 386-752-8724
Liberty, National is an EOE Licensed Agents Welcome


Classified Department: 755-5440


In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


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05509247








Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2005


100 Job
SOpportunities
Best Western Inn is looking for
FT & PT Front Desk Clerk. Must be
able to work Weekends, Nights &
Holidays. Apply at 1-75 & US 90 W
Cashier Needed. 10PM - 6 AM
Texaco in Ellisville, 1-75 & Hwy
441 S. Apply in person ONLY
Drug Free Workplace
COUNTRY INN AND SUITES
Housekeepers! Applicants who
are mature, serious & seeking
long term employment & have
cleaning experience. Apply at
Country Inn and Suites, Florida
Gateway Dr. 1-75 & Hwy 90.
Excellent working environment,
competitive pay, benefits incl.
vacation & holiday.


04501204
TECHNICIANS/MECHANICS
NEEDED
Seeking technicians/mechanics
3-5 years exp. repairing Heavy
Equip. Must have own hand
tools. Apply in person at
Ring Power, 390 SW Ring Ct.,
Lake City, FL 32025 or online
at www.ringpower.com. EOE

DENTAL ASSISTANT
Highly Experienced Dental
Assistant needed for busy quality
general practice. $17.00 hr plus paid
insurance, vacation & bonuses.
Fax resume to: 386-752-7681
or call 386-752-8531
DRIVER NEEDED Person with
CDL & Mobile Home Delivery
Experience. Call 386-364-1340.
Ask for Billy.
DUMP TRUCK DRIVER.
Experienced w/min. 2 yrs
clean MVR & Class A CDL.
Starting Pay $10.50/ph
Drug Free Workplace 386-623-2853
Experienced Tandem Dump Truck
Driver. Asphalt, Milling Exp.
Class B CDL & clean driving
record. PDOE. 386-590-0783
FLAT BED DRIVERS
Atlantic Truck Lines
$4,000.00 Sign on Bonus
, Class A, in state & home every .
night. $600-$750/wk: Yearly $1,000
safety bonus. 3 yrs. exp. Paid
vacation, health/dental. Call
1-800-577-4723 Monday-Friday
Front Desk Employee needed for
busy Pediatric office.
Medical experience helpful.
Call 386-758-0003
FT Food Service Workers for
correctional setting. Benefits after
90 days. 401K, Stock Bonus,
Vacation. No criminal record. Food
Service Experience helpful. Apply
in person @ CCA Lake City CI.
386-755-3379 ext 2251
EOE/M/F/D/V.
HELP WANTED
FAULKNER PLUMBING
Plumbers
Call 386-755-1568 & leave message
HUNGRY HOWIES is hiring
delivery drivers. Must have car
w/insurance & 2 yrs. driving exp.
Flex schedule. F/T & P/T avail.
CASH PAID DAILY!
Earn $8. - $15./ hour. Apply in
person at 857 SW Main Blvd.
IMMEDIATE OPENING!
Production Workers needed for sign.
shop. Experience a plus.
Call 386-755-2006.
Kaam Transmission needs exp.
Auto Tech, or R&R Mechanic with
experience. Must have own tools.
Apply in person 125 NE Jonesway
Lake City, 32055 or 386-758-8436
Legal Secretary
Phone & Computer skills required.
Send reply to Box 05007, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, .O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
M&L Trucking needs a Truck
Driver for hauling logs with clean
CDL's. MUST be willing to work!
Leo Brady at 386-961-1133,
386-344-5035, after 7 pm. 752-6259
OTR DRIVERS NEEDED
Heavy Haul,Class A CDL,
2 week turnaround,good pay,
Call Southern Specialized,LLC
386-752-9754


100 job
10 Opportunities
P/T Warehouse Workers
Sat. Only. Must apply in person, no
phone calls. H & M Bay,
State Farmers Market,
2920 CR 136, Unit 2; Office 7
White Springs, FL
Must be 18 yrs old to apply.
Sheet metal roofers needed.
No criminal background,
According Pay
Call 386-288-3470
Short Term & Long Term
Temp to Perm
Many different positions available!!
Call Wal-Staf Personnel
386-755-1991 or 386-755-7911
Waste Management Inc.
Lake City/ Gainesville
Has an immediate opening for a
hard working, flexible individual to
fill the position of Driver/Laborer
for Lake City and Gainesville. This
position requires a minimum Class
B CDL with air brake endorsement.
Waste Management offers a full
benefits package including health
insurance and 401 - K plan. If you
feel you meet the requirements,
please apply by phone
1-877-220-JOBS (5627) or online at
WWW.WMCAREERS.COM
EOE/ADA/DFWP
WELDERS/LABORERS
MACHINE SHOP EXP.
Apply in person Grizzly Mfg.
174 NE Cortez Terrace
Lake City, FL (Across from airport)
YOUNG ENERGETIC Person for
Manufactured Home sales. Business
degree a plus, Will train right
person. Call 386-364-1340.
Ask for Mr. Selph or Mr. Corbet

120 Medical
120 Employment

04501242
HOME SUPPORT Staff to work
with developmentally disabled
individuals in 6 bed group homes.
Requires High School Diploma or
GED, yalid F1 drivers license with
good driving record. $7.00 per
hour plus benefits. EOE for Lake
City home 386-755-4637 Starke
904-964-8082 or 904-964-1468

BUSY FAMILY Practice Seeks
Receptionist: Position involves
answering multiline phone system,
scheduling, patient relations &
medical records. Prior experience
required. Fax or mail resume to:
386-719-9494; PO Box 159,
Lake City, FL 32056.


CNA/ MA - Needed for LK City
Medical Office. Experienced
preferred. Fax resume to:
386-754-1712.
Experienced Medical Assistant
Needed for fast paced
Doctors Office.
Fax resume to: 386-758-5987
RN NEEDED, Part-Time,
3-1 lp & lp-7a. Please apply at
The Health Center of Lake City,
560 SW McFarlane Avenue,
Lake City. Equal Opportunity
Employer/ Drug Free Work
Place/Americans with
Disabilities Act.
Suwannee Medical Personnel
Home Care needing per diem RN's
for 4-6hr IV infusions. Coverage
areas are Branford, Mayo and
Providence. $25.00 per hr.
Please Call Rose 1-877-755-1544
or (386) 755-1544

180 Money to Loan

04501021
NEED MONEY?
ARE BANKS TURNING
YOU AWAY?
LOOKING FOR A
FRESH START
CALL FOR A FREE
CONSULTATION
1-866-708-6663
FAST APPROVAL,
FAST CASH!
MANY PROGRAMS
SUITABLE FOR YOU.
VARIOUS LOANS
AVAILABLE.


240 Schools &
240 Education
Want to be a CNA? Don't want to
wait? Express Training Services of
Gainesville is now offering our
quality CNA exam Prep classes.
Day/Eve classes. Class for 1 week,
certification test the next week.
Class size is limited. Next class
1/09/06. Call 386-755-4401

310 Pets & Supplies
BOSTON TERRIER Baby,
AKC, 9 wks. Health Cert.
$500. 386-935-4671

PUG BABY, AKC,
Beautiful Black, 11 wks.
Health Cert. $500.
Call 386-935-4671

408 Furniture
NOW OPEN!! CRAZY JOHNS
Furn & Auction. Daily Sales.
Consignments Welcome.
1-75 at Hwy 441/41 in Ellisville.
Call 321-297-7738/386-755-1012

419 TV-Radio &
tI Recording
RCA 36IN TV, $400. Pioneer
Receiver, 101 cd changer. 2 deck
tape player, 5 speaker surround
sound. $750. 6 ft tall entertainment
center, black. $125. or $1,000 for
all. Call 386-752-5274

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
Payment in advance for standing
pine timber. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-454-1484 or 961-1961.

430 Garage Sales
CRAZY JOHNS
Furn & Auction. Gigantic Used
Fum. Sale. Fri-Sat. Beds, Couches,
Dinettes & Appliances.
1-75 at Hwy 441/41 in Ellisville.
Call 321-297-7738/386-755-1012

450 Good Things
4 to Eat
PECAN HOUSE exit 414 & 1-75.
Elliot Pecans, Choctaw Pecans, &
other pecans for sale. Also shell pe-
cans. 386-752-1258 or 386-6976420
Pinemount Rd 252 Taylorville.
The Nutcracker 22 yr exp.
* Buy & Sell Cracked & Shelled
Pecans. Also available Tomatoes at
same location. 2738 CR 252
Lake City, FL 32024. 386-963-4138


630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
3/2 Double Wide off of Brown Rd.
w/W&D Hook/up, CH/A, DW,
water/garbage inc., $550/mth +
$400 Dep., 1st & last. 386-397-3568
Ellisville 2br/l ba Mobile Home,
Also avail in Lake City 3br/lba
DW MH
Call 386-365-7687
FOR RENT: 2BR/2BA MH,
Excellent condition. Large lot, quiet
neighborhood. No Pets. $400 mo,
1st, last & Sec required. Located 4
1/2 miles West of Lake City.
Call 386-454-5688 Leave msg.
IN PARK Mobile Homes for Rent
2BR/2BA 1st & sec. required.
Applications & references required.
386-719-2423
LATE MODEL MOBILE HOMES
Starting $400 month, Beautiful
Pond setting, w/trees. CH/A, Cable
avail. No pets. Call 386-961-0017

n640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale


_________Lu__ h


--i







Advertise It Here!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truc , motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your
vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $10 you can run your ad for an additional
10 days. A picture will run every day with a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring
your vehicle -by and we will take the picture for you. Private Party Only!

g i~ . ==Mod


1999 Chevy Z71
4x4 Sportside

'8,995 OBO
Reg. Cab
Call
386-755-3179


MUST SELL!
1996 ALTIMA
*1,200 OBO
4 cyl., PS/PB, Runs Good,
Economical, Rebuilt Engine, New
Radiator, Needs: Brakes, CV
Joints, Good Cleaning & TLC
Call
386-697-3187


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
31 Used Doublewides from Disney
Area. Now in Lake City. A/C, steps,
cable ready w/TV, telephone,
furnished, pots & pans, dishes,,&
silverware. Perfect for Rental
Properties of Starter Home.
Great Deals, While they Last!
386-752-5355
ABSOLUTELY "THE BEST"
Mobile Homes and Modulars
Move over Palm & Jake, the new
#1 home is here: Guaranteed
Gary Hamilton Homes 758-6755
BEAUTIFUL 3 BEDROOM
2 BATH DOUBLEWIDE,
W/FIREPLACE, OPEN FLOOR
PLAN, LOTS OF EXTRAS. WILL
DELIVER. DOUG 386-288-2617
CASH DEALS. We Love Em! We
will give you the very best pricing
in North Florida on new or used
manufactured homes! 800-769-0952
IF YOU OWN LAND OR HAVE A
LARGE DOWN PAYMENT. I
MAY BE WILLING TO OWNER
FINANCE A NEW
MANUFACTURED HOME FOR
YOU! CALL STEVE 386-365-8549
NEED A Home?
Call 386-364-1340 Ask For Buddy.
, We have several
New & Used to Choose from.
USED DOUBLEWIDE
MUST BE SOLD BY
CHRISTMAS! FURNITURE AND
AC INCLUDED. CALL GEORGE
386-719-0044
USED DOUBLEWIDE,
MUST SELL!
MAKE OFFER!
CALL TIM 386-288-2016

650 Mobile Home
0 & Land
!! Owner Finance!!
1998 24X48 3/2 on small lot
1903 SW Judy Glen
Call 386-867-0048
!!! FREE FREE FREE !!
3/2 DW. A/C on 1.5 acre lot
in Worthington Springs
Call 386-466-1104
4 BEDROOM 2 bath
home on land. Must sell.
In Beautiful Deer Creek -
Only & $774 per/mth
Call Doug 386-288-2617
Brand New 2280 Sqft 4/2
w/ concrete foundation, driveway &
walk, deck & more. $134,900.
Close in. Gary Hamilton
Call 386-758-6755
Clean 1560 sf 3/2 1993 DW, private
wooded acre, all lino, deck, new
metal roof. $63,900. Cash Only
Call 386-961-9181
FSBO 1998 Redman 28X52 3/2
on 1/2 acre lot. 5 min. from
Walmart, perfect location.
Call Steve at 386-590-1413
LAND HOME
Packages, while they last!
Call Ron Now!
386-397-4960

7 in Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
All very nice.
Convenient location.
Call 386-755-2423
1, 2, and 3 BR include MW, DW,
pool, fitness center and more.
Close to everything, Call Windsong
today 386-758-8455


2/1 Fresh Paint & New Carpet
Starting at $600/mth.
Plus security. Pets allowed w/fee.
Call Lea.386-752-9626
2BR/1BA w/ Garage
$700 + Sec. Pets w/fee.
Call 386-752-9626


710 Unfurnished Apt.
10 For Rent
DELUXE TOWNHOUSE
Second Story. 2/2, 1,700 sqft.
Country Privacy, deck, secure.
$700/mth. $1,800 needed.
Call 386-961-9181

730 Unfurnished
73 Home For Rent
3BR/1.5BA CH/A, Hardwood
Floors, TileConcrete Block.
$750/mth + Dep.
Call 386-752-0118 or 386-623-1698
3BR/2BA Brick Home Near VA
Large fenced yard w/washer &
dryer, stove, refrig, lawn, maint., &
garbage p/up included. $850 mth,
. 1st, last & Sec/Dep. req. Call
Richard, Licensed Real Estate
Agent Call 386-867-1414
4/2 2nd Fairway, Southern Oaks
Golf Club. Avail. Jan. 1.
$1,300/mth
Call 386-755-3898
BRAND NEW 4 & 3 Bedroom
Homes with 2 Car Attached Garage
on Huge Lots. $995 mo, $995 sec.
Call (904)317-4511
Mayfair Subdivision
3BR/2BA Brick Home
Quiet Neighborhood
Call 386-961-9959
Quail Hgts. on 10th Fairway
3/2, 2400 sqft + 16X40 storage
bldg. $1,300/mth, 1st, last & Sec.
Call 386-755-0327
ROOMY 2BR/1BA Older Home
on Isabella St, across'from VA.
$600 mo, First & Securtiy Deposit.
386-344-3074 or 386-752-5450
Taking Applications for 3/2 fenced
home on 7 acres w/pond. Ft. White
School district, appliances, W/D
Hook-up. $650/mthly + Sec/Dep.
Ref. + Credit Check. 386-590-6048

740 Furnished
4 Homes for Rent
READY TO MOVE IN! 2BR/1BA
Great Neighborhood, Great
Location. $800 mo, w/fiist, last &
security. Open House Sat Dec 31
10- 2. 386-758-9362 or 365-5008

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
GREAT LOCATION
1235 SF Building
All Utilities Furnished
$975/month
A Bar Sales, Inc.
386-752-5035
7 Days 7 am-7 pm
Historic Henderson House
Office/Retail 3000 total sqft.
$1,875/mnthly. 207 S. Marion Ave.
386-867-0048 or 386-752-7951
Medical Office Space for Rent
in Live Oak. Office has 2,10 sqft, 2
waiting areas & 8 exam rooms.
Lease for $1,850 mth. Contact
Poole Realty 386-209-1766
OFFICE FOR RENT
1,400 sqft @$950/mth
Contact Poole Realty
386-209-1766
Warehouse in good neighborhood.
Great Location! "
Must See!$850 mth
Call Lea 386-752-9626
Warehouse: 2 Offices for Lease.
Cannon Creek Industrial Park.
$800/mth per office space
"386-755-9041

805 Lots for Sale
FSBO: 5.37 Acres. 452 feet
frontage on Hwy 242 in Timucuan
Crossing Subdivision. Lot size
452x661. Near Sister Welcome
Caution light. $97,000.
386-752-9363 or 365-7353


810 Home for Sale
GRANDVIEW VILLAGE
3BR/2BA, 1,380 sq ft. (Heated)
Will not last at this price, $149,900
Call 386-754-5678

820 Farms &
S Acreage
Columbia City Area
5 ac.wooded homesite
$89,900 owner finance
352-472-3660
INDIVIDUAL SEEKS Acreage.
Wooded or open.
Cash buyer- quick closing.
Please call 386-755-7541
WINDING FOREST, 5 & 7 Ac.
lots starting at $89K.
Owner Financing. 386-754-7529
Chris Bullard Owner/Broker

940 Trucks
1994 Dodge Dakota Sport
Runs good, $900. 6 Cyclinder
Make good work truck
Call 386-752-1682
2003 F-150
Lariat Supercrew
Red, Gray Leather, Tow Pkg.,
Loaded. Call Keith 800-814-0609
2004 Nissan Titan V8
Low miles, White
Nice Truck
Call Keith 800-814-0609

950 Cars for Sale
*Hondas from $500*
Police Impounds!
For listings call
1-800-749-8116 ext A760
05508634
1994 Mitsubishi Galant LS
MUST sell for payoff.
$1,200 OBO
Call 386-697-1923

2004 Mercury Grand Marquis SL
Top of Line, Like New.
Full Power
Call 386-754-1876
2005 Mitsubishi Eclipse Spyder
Blue, Black Convertible Top
Low Miles. Cal Keith
* 800-814-0609
Need a Fun Gift Idea?
2005 Mustang
Gray, Low Miles, Warranty.
Call Keith 800-814-0609

951 Recreational
Vehicles
2005/06 FEMA Trailers!
Up to 50% off retail!
Call 386-758-8661
www.turningwheelrv.com

95 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
Handicapped Van
96' Dodge Ram 3500
Side lift, optional hand brakes, &
gas, special operated seat. 5 K on
Michelins. Exc/Cond. in and out.
$8995 OBO.
Call Bob 386-754-6890


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Call today,
755-5440.


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