<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Opinion
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 Section B: What's Cookin'?
 Section C: Classified Advantag...














The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/00251
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 28, 2005
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:00251
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Opinion
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Sports
        page B 1
        page B 2
    Section B continued
        page B 3
    Section B: What's Cookin'?
        page B 4
    Section C: Classified Advantage
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
Full Text




WEATHER


Inside 2A

Hi: 70
Low: 5,0


Partly Sunny


The Skills
of a Pro I!
000015 032806 digitDIGT 32
LIBRARY OF FL HISTORY
P BOX 117007 32611-00
GAINESVILLE FL32611700


Lake


Wednesday, December 28,2005


City


Charitable Help
Columbia County Catholic
Charities gets help from
generous community.
Local, 7A


Reporter


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 131, No. 289 0 50 cents


Firearms




mishap


kills

Sheriff looks for
details in hunting
trip tragedy.
By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City man preparing
to hunt early Monday morn-
ing died after being shot by a
gun he was removing from a
friend's vehicle.
Robert Taylor, 50, of Lake
City, was on a hunting trip
with family at approximately
8 a.m., Monday morning near
White Springs Road in
Columbia County.
Taylor was killed when he
attempted to remove a rifle
from a companion's vehicle
and the gun accidentally fired,
according to reports.'
Deputies - from the.
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office and officers from the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Commission are investigating
the incident.
"At this point, it looks like a
terrible accident," said


man

Columbia County Sheriff Bill
Gootee. "We will continue
with the investigation, inter-
view witnesses and examine
physical evidence from the
scene, which will be compiled
with the results of the medical
examiner's autopsy before the
final disposition of the case."
Gootee said the case
seemed straightforward, but
all details of the incident must
be examined.
According to reports,
Taylor was planning to move
to Colorado in the coming
months.
The type and caliber of rifle
was not immediately released
by the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office because of the
ongoing investigation.
'This is a difficult reminder
to all the hunting enthusiasts
in our area," Gootee said.
"Regardless of the years of
experience or the knowledge
of weapons, you must use
extreme caution anytime a
firearm is involved.
"You never let your guard
down."


Dollar General

to expand store


Fort White retail
operation cleared
for new addition.
By LINDA YOUNG
lyoung@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE - Dollar
General is set to get a promo-
tion.
Plans to expand the Dollar
General were approved by the
city's planning and zoning
board in a meeting Monday
night that almost didn't hap-
pen.
The store currently has
6,500 square feet of display
space and 41 parking spaces.


The developer wants to
expand that to 10,720 square
feet, which required 71
spaces, said William "Bill"
Eldridge, chairman of the
Fort White Planning and
Zoning Board.
The town of Fort White fol-
lows the state standard of one
space for every, 150 square
feet of display space.
"So we kind of compro-
mised because the 71 seemed
kind of high," Eldridge said.
'They wanted 51; they will
have 60 (spaces)."
City officials said Dollar
General plans to expand its
GROWTH continued on 8A


NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIONS


JENNIFE
Eric North works out on the incline dumbbell press at M&M Fitness in the Westfield Plaza off Commerce Drive.


JENNIFER CHASTEENILake City Reporter
T.C. Gray walks on a treadmill at M&M Fitness in Lake City on
Tuesday.


Weighing


options

Workout sites become popular for
many looking to implement New
Year's resolutions to shed pounds.
By LINDSAY DOWNEY
Idowney@lakecityreporter.com
t's time to hit the gym. Many Americans vow to
lose weight in the new year and to get in shape
in time for beach weather - just after they fin-
ish off that last piece of pumpkin pie, that is. As
a result, local fitness centers everywhere see a
surge in membership right after the holidays.
'"We have a lot of existing members talking about
rededicating themselves at the first of the year and
people working off the holiday pounds," said M&M
Fitness Center manager Carrie Dopler. "We see a
pretty big increase in membership in January. And
they're all real enthusiastic about starting out the
new year with a bang."
Through Saturday, M&M Fitness Center is offer-
ing $150 off its two-year memberships and a $100
discount on one-year memberships. Members also
can take advantage of weight-loss programs and
personal training, which is about $50 per session.
Dopler said new exercise-enthusiasts often work
out as hard as they can when they begin a fitness
rtoLutine, which wears them down and makes them
give up quickly.
'They're not going to see the result they're looking
for overnight," Dopler said. "It takes time and com-
mitment. They didn't gain the weight overnight and
they're not going to lose it overnight. We do what we
can to help them stay motivated. They have to start
small."
Lake City Family YMCA personal trainer Raul
Roman agrees that too often people set unrealistic
HEALTHY continued on 8A


Fire damages office-area rooms

in rear of Spradley's Auto Repair


-i



JENNIFER CHASTEENILake City Reporter
Spradley's Auto Repair off Main Boulevard in Lake City was open
for business Tuesday despite being heavily damaged on the roof
and in back rooms by a fire that broke out Monday. No one was
injured in the blaze.


The blaze occurred INSIDE


when the shop
was closed.
By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
Just months after iiiiviing
into a new .place of business,
the employees of Spradley's
Auto Repair are being forced to
restore and rebuild after a
Monday fire.
A fire broke out at 11 a.m.,


*i Fii- gut: Live Oal 3A
Monday, at the business on
South Main Boulevard. The
,fire started in the rear of the
building, according to reports.
Firefighters from the Lake
City Fire Department battled
lthie flames for nearly two
hours, while traffic was
blocked and detoured on Main
Boulevard, said Shannon Hall


at Spradley's Auto Repair.
, Spradley's 'Auto Repair,
which is owned by .Doyle
Spradley, was closed Monday
for the Christmas holiday.
Much of the damage was
done to the rear of the build-
ing, burning out rooms and
hallways, leaving charred
remains and soot on the
ground and walls.
The garage and office areas
also sustained damage.
Vehicles in the garage at the
FIRE continued on 8A


"We've been
cleaning the
floors almost all
day.We've had
to throw away a
lot of stuff that
was damaged."
- Shannon Hall,
Spradley's Auto Repair


| CALLUS: INSIDE
I . ., ,- I-_ - Business . .... . .. .. . 5A Obituaries . . . . . ..... 6A
SUBSCRIBETO .........
THE REPORTER: Classified ... . ........ IC Opinion . . . . . . . . 4A
Voice: 75S-5445 Comics ........ . . . . 3B Puzzles . . . . . . . 2C
.i.ll .. Fax: 752-9400 Local & State ... . ... 3A Nation .... . ... 7A
, ~- . 1 *-- _ i i '-I . rji . L * I i b r .1 - I ". *LI1 ." Lj


TODAY IN
FOOD
The h,:T.,i:al dc nfall3
of holiday, fC t-it, ke. 4B


COMING
THURSDAY
c'rntesiorIr, c'f Columbia
:Count, 'ihopFer


I


ip,


;� ;1�i


jlrriP~ner









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


Tuesday:
3-1-7


4
Tuesday:
6-9-6-3


Monday:
2-8-10-28-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Judge squashes restraining order /


SANTA FE, N.M. - A state judge
has lifted a restraining order granted
to a Santa Fe woman who accused
talk-show host David Letterman of
using coded words to show that he
wanted to marry her and train her as
his co-host.
Judge Daniel Sanchez on Tuesday
granted a request by lawyers for
Letterman, host of CBS' "Late Show,"
to quash the temporary restraining
order that he earlier granted to
Colleen Nestler.


Black let loose Ecstasy
of crazy
once during 'Kong' started
NEW YORK - As if a says. "1
member
giant ape weren't enough to remain
get Jack Black going in running
"King Kong," the actor says around
he let loose one time while Ecstasi
making the film. chimney
"I had a bit of a lost over."
weekend while we were The
doing 'King Kong,"' Black he's sir
says in the January issue of is on a
GQ magazine. "Overall I'm Kong,"
very responsible on set. I'm Denhai
not one of those dudes who traps K
come drunk to the set." to New
"But there was a lost Blac
weekend where I had a little "The Si
time off and I did some Fidelity


Celebrity Birthdays


* Former United Auto
Workers union president Owen
Bieber is 76.
* Actress Dame Maggie
Smith is 71.
* Rock singer-musician
Charles Neville is 67.
* Rock singer-musician
Edgar Winter is 59.
* Rock singer-musician Alex
Chilton (The Box Tops; Big
Star) is 55.
* Actor Denzel Washington
is,51 .. . . .
(* Country singer Joe Diffie is


She alleged in a request filed
Dec. 15 that Letterman has forced her
to go bankrupt and caused her
"mental cruelty" and "sleep
deprivation" since May 1994.
Nestler requested that Letterman,
who tapes his show in New York, stay
at least 3 yards away and not "think of
me, and release me from his mental
harassment and hammering."
Lawyers for Letterman
contended the order was without
merit.


y and I went on a kind
y rampage and I
smoking (again)," he
Me and another
er of the cast, who will
nameless, just
g around, dancing
, drinking and
zing, smoking like a
ey. And then it was

36-year-old actor says
ice quit smoking and
strict diet. In "King
he plays Carl
m, a filmmaker who
:ong and brings him
York.
k's other films include
school of Rock," "High
r" and "Shallow Hal."


David Letterman


Rowling to wrap
up 'Potter' books
NEW YORK- J.K
Rowling expects to have a
busy 2006, "the year when I
write the final book in the
Harry Potter series."
"I contemplate the task
with mingled feelings of
excitement and dread,
because I can't wait to get
started, to tell the final part
of the story and, at last, to
answer all the questions
(Will I ever answer all of the
questions? Let's aim for most
of the questions); and yet it
will all be over at last and I
can't quite imagine life


without Harry," the British
author wrote in a recent
posting'on her Web site.
The sixth installment of
Rowling's fantasy series,
"Harry Potter and the
Half-Blood Prince," came out
last summer. It has sold
more than 10 million copies
Sin the United States alone.
Total worldwide sales of
the Harry Potter books top
300 million.
On her Web site, Rowling
said she had been
"fine-tuning the fine-tuned
plan of seven during the past
few weeks."
* Associated Press


Thou ht for Today


47.
- G Country musician Mike
McGuire (Shenandoah) is 47.
* Actor Chad McQueen is
45.
* Country singer-musician
Marty Roe (Diamond Rio) is
45.
* Actor Malcolm Gets is 41.
* Actor Mauricio Mendoza is
36.
* Comedian Seth Meyers is
32.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
John Legend is 27.


"Our chief defect is that we are
more given to talking about things
than to doing them."

- Jawaharlal Nehru,
Indian statesman (1889-1964)


MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR


Carrie Dopier
Lake City, Manager of M&M
Fitness

* Family: Husband, three
dogs, and one horse.
* Hobbies: Reading
* Favorite pastimes:
Working out and listening to
music
* What would you most
like to see improved in
your town?: "We could use
more restaurants and more
retail to keep up with our
growth."
* Who is your hero or
inspiration, and why?: "I
admire these young men
going to war. I've watched
some of our members go
through boot camp. They go
willingly and I admire them."



Lake City
HOWTO DEACHUS
Main number ..........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ................752-9400
Circulation .................755-5445
Online ...... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fla. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard ... .754-0418
(mleonard@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson .........754-0428
(twilson @ lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISIG
Sales ......................752-1293
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)


Carrie Dopier
Meet Your Neighbor is a daily
feature of the Lake City
Reporter. We interview people
in the community in order to get
to know our neighbors better.


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you,have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Debt may
be a downer
TALLAHASSEE - Now
that the holiday shopping
season is winding down, it'll
soon be time to pay the bills.
And some people may find
themselves with a lot of debt
and may want assistance.
Florida's Division of
Consumer Services is
warning folks to be careful
before signing up with a
credit counselor.
The state urges consumers
to be wary of services that
want big upfront fees, or
actually fails to make your
payment on time.
"People are very desperate
this time of year right after
the holidays when they may
not have realized how much
they have spent," consumer
services spokeswoman Liz
Compton said Tuesday. "But
you want to make sure that
where you turn is actually
helping you and not putting
you further in debt."
Credit counseling has
become a $7 billion industry
and not all the companies are
legitimate, Compton warned.
Legitimate firms are
usually accredited by either
the National Foundation for
Credit Counseling or the
Association of Independent
Consumer Crediting
Counseling Agencies. They
can provide some relief such
as negotiating lower interest
rates and payment plans for
clients.
'Taking care of your bills is
an important thing,"
Compton said. "But there are
some things that people need
to know."

Nineteen died in
state during holiday
TALLAHASSEE -
Nineteen people died on
Florida's roads during the
72-hour holiday period
between midnight early
Saturday and midnight
Monday, the Florida Highway
Patrol reported Tuesday.


The deaths, a preliminary
figure and involving only
accidents investigated by
FHP, occurred in 16 separate
accidents. It did not include
three deaths in Volusia
County investigated by
Ormond Beach authorities.
Fourteen' of the 19 deaths
occurred at night and five
were alcohol-related. Seven
others are pending, FHP said.
Five motorcyclists died in
weekend accidents, including
three who failed to wear
helmets. Three others killed
in car accidents did not wear
their seat belts..

Man gets third
death sentence
KISSIMMEE - A man
convicted of a 1995 Osceola
County murder about a
pickup truck was sentenced
to death for the third time
Tuesday.
The state Supreme Court
had twice thrown out the
death sentence given to
Jermaine LeBron, 31, for the
murder of Larry Neal Oliver,
22, about Oliver's customized
pickup truck. He was found
dead with a shotgun wound
to the back of the head.
The Supreme Court
vacated LeBron's first death
sentence in 2001 and ordered
a new penalty hearing
because the trial judge
overruled a jury's verdict that
LeBron had not fired the fatal
.shot but was guilty of felony
murder.
The next year, a second
jury recommended that
LeBron be sentenced to
death and the trial judge
agreed. But in a January 2005
opinion, the state's high court
said the judge erred by
allowing the jury to hear
details of a previous robbery
conviction. The court
ordered another new penalty
hearing.
Prosecutor Jeff Ashton said
he expected the sentence to
stand this time, the Orlando
Sentinel reported. Defense
attorney Bob Norgard said an
appeal would be automatic.


Man, 2 children
found dead
MILTON - A manr and
two small children were
found dead in an apparent
murder-suicide Monday in a
van parked near an isolated
church, authorities said.
A member of the Church of
the Living God found the van
in the parking lot with its
engine running, and a hose
extending from the tail pipe
to the vehicle's rear window,
Santa Rosa County Sheriff's
spokesman Marc Ward said.
The church member
turned off the ignition and
called deputies, Ward said.
The man, the young boy
and the young girl were
pronounced dead at the
scene. Authorities did not
release their identities,
pending family notification.
Autopsies were scheduled,
authorities said.
The man and the children
were not congregants, said
the Rev. Joe DeMarcus,
.pastor of the 20-member
church located on a winding
rural road.

Sailor rescued from
sinking boat
MIAMI - A Coast Guard
helicopter crew rescued a
sailor Monday from his
sinking boat in the Atlantic
about 260 miles east of
Jacksonville, officials said.
David Mast, 46, called for
help after losing his main
mast en route to the
Bahamas, the Coast Guard
said. His 44-foot sailing vessel
began taking on water when
its engines became disabled.
A C-130 plane and a
Jayhawk helicopter were
dispatched after heavy seas
prevented a nearby
commercial vessel from
reaching Mast's sailboat,
officials said.
The helicopter crew
hoisted Mast to safety in
50-mph winds, officials said.
* Associated Press


PARTLY MOSTLY PARTLY PARTLY
CLOUDY SUNNY CLOUDY -CLOUDY
SUNNY CLOUDY


HI 65 LO 'H 6 HI 68 LO i HI72LO HI'75LO:
-. * .- .*- z i* - s a. . ,-S .- . -. - - ',-.. E ,.


* Valdosta Jacksonville Cy T y
Tallahassee 69/46 * 70/50 City Thursday Friday
Tallahassee 69,46 Cape Canaveral 73 1J, ., ,1 J- i
70/44* Lake City. pe canaveral S
Pensa/44 Lake70 ity. 50 Daytona Beach :7 $ . ) .l1
Pensacola Panama Ci 70 50 Dayona Beach Ft. Lauderdale p
* 70/47 69/47 Gainesville. 7/yta Be Fort MyLersdale 79 I. ; 6,
72/52 Fort Myers ,6 c. p: 6'
71/50 ala * Gainesville is - ,: r ''J
Cape Canaveral Jacksonville .7 .:. p,: . -: i
r.anld 2,. 56 Key West 77 67pi: 77 6.,pc
72/53 Lake City 65 3: 6i 8 5 ' S
Tampa Miami 9 5' p: r . 6 s
71,'58 West Palm Beach Naples k75 di
76,/58* Ocala 70 414 pr ;2-50,
7Orlando ;i '.1.p.: .0 54 :
Ft. Myers* Ft. Lauderdale Panama City 65 .1 p.: 6 i .
75,.'59 76/.62. Pensacola 61, 47 ; 0 55 p,:
SNaples Tallahassee 6'7 4 p.: 7.1 46
i/59 Iiami Tampa 71/55/pc 72/58/s
SKey West\ 77/61 Valdosta 67/43/pc 68/49/si
eyes W. Palm Beach ;8 57;'p 76 5?
75 '67


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tue .da%
normal nigh
Normal low
Record high
Recor , 1i.:j '

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday,
rMor, rh o,'ai
Year total
Normal month-to-date
r Jrmal vear-to date


63
32
67
43
84 in 1942
24 In 1906e


0.00"-
?...S
49 79"
2.17"
47.97"


SUN
Sunnse today
Suriet- tc Sunnse tom.
Sunsel tom


7:26 a.m.
5:39 p.mr
7:26 a.m.
5:40 p m


MOON
Mloonnse today 4.54 a.m.
Moon.st today 3-11 p.m.
Moonnse lon 6:03 a.m.
M,:.:.nset ri. 4-. pn.,m.


Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan.
30 6 14 22
New First Full Last


On this date in
1869, a post
Christmas storm in
New York and
Vermont produced
record storm totals
of 30 inches at
Burlington, Vt., and
39 inches at
Montpelier, Vt. A pub-
lic emergency was
declared in Vermont.


An exclusive
i4 service


'Tby

tlor he area on | ane
a r.:Ie irua o


weatfher.com

i Forecasts, data and graphics
. -' 2005 Weather Central,
.-- , Inc., Madison, Wls.
S ,' ,www.weatherpubllsher.com


Connec ed
www.lakecityreporter.com


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.

Controller Sue Brannon .......754-0419
(sbrannon @ lakecityreporter.com)
CUL A O&IO
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next
day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is,
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters ....754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
13 Weeks .................. $23.54
26 Weeks .................... $42.80
52 Weeks ............... . .....$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tak.
Mail rates
13 Weeks .................. . $44.85
26 Weeks ..........: ........ ..$89.70
52 Weeks ........... ........$179.40


PARTLY
SUNNY


HI 70 LOW51


lli� Poll


M, RUIN, N


Page Editor: S. Michael Manley, 754-0429









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


Donate, recycle


live Christmas


trees after holiday


By UNDSAY DOWNEY
Idowney@lakecityreporter.com

Now that lights are being
unplugged and the ornaments
are coming down, it's time to
think about getting rid of the
live Christmas trees that filled
area homes with excitement
and evergreen aroma for the
last few weeks.
Columbia County residents
can donate trees to conserva-
tion groups, use them as mulch
or bird habitats in their own
yards, or have them taken to
local landfills.
Waste Management of
Columbia County, a private
company that is contracted by
the county, will pick up and dis-
pose of any Christmas tree--
no matter how big it is. Usually
the company asks that people
cut large trees for disposal, but
area residents don't have to
worry about breaking down
Christmas trees.
'This is the one time of the
year they don't have to," said
Scott Kishton, operations man-
ager for Lake City/Columbia
County.
Waste Management of
Columbia County will take
trees to the section of the land-
fill that is used for vegetation.
Southland Waste, which is
contracted by Lake City, also
will pick up Christmas trees,
but it asks that people cut large
trees before putting them out
with their trash.
"If it's over six feet they need
to cut it," Southland Waste
office manager Lisa McGee
said. 'They should probably
just cut it in half."


Although it takes a little
more effort, Floridians also can
take advantage of more envi-
ronmentally friendly ways to
dispose of trees.
"We are encouraging the
recycling of Christmas trees,"
said Niki Pocock, public rela-
tions coordinator for the
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection.
After Christmas, the trees
can be used for mulch or to pro-
vide habitat for fish and
wildlife. The DEP suggests
people hang fruit slices or seed
cakes on branches and place
trees in their yards to give
birds and other wildlife shelter
from the cold.
Some wildlife organizations
place trees in the bottom of
lakes to give fish habitat.
People should never try to do
this themselves, said Karen
Parker, public information
coordinator for the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission.
"They can't just take their
tree to the nearest lake and
dump it," Parker said, adding
that discarding trees in lakes
requires a permit.
Residents .who wish to
donate their trees to wildlife
groups can drop them off at the
Winfield Solid Waste Facility,
1347 N.W. Oosterhoudt Road,
Lake City.
"Last year we gave fish and
wildlife committees several
hundred trees," said Bill
Lycam, Columbia County Solid
Waste director for the
Windfield Landfill. "We give
them to organizations that want
them."


Fire rips through Live

Oak business Tuesday


From staff reports
LIVE OAK- Fire ravaged a
local business Tuesday after-
noon and reports from the
scene indicate the building was
burned to the ground.
Howell Office Supply, locat-
ed at 212 W. Howard St., Live
Oak, apparently caught fire late
Tuesday afternoon.
The Live Oak Fire


Department responded to the
fire and was on the scene for
several hours: 'One firetruck
from the Lake City Fire
Department assisted at the
scene later jn the afternoon.
The extent of the damage
was unknown, but reports from
businesses near Howell Office
Supply indicated the building
was destroyed.


Recaptured serial rape suspect


tracked through pay phone calls


By JESSICA GRESKO
Associated Press

MIAMI - A serial rape
suspect who escaped from
jail told another inmate he
would kill a prosecutor in his
case and leave for his native
Honduras after his jailbreak,
the State Attorney's office
said Tuesday.
A tipster led police to
Reynaldo E. Rapalo, who
escaped from jail Dec. 20 by
prying open a ceiling vent,
cutting through bars and rap-
pelling down the side of the
building using tied-up bed
sheets. He was recaptured
Monday night at a Miami
shopping center.
Rapalo made a brief
appearance in court Tuesday


by closed
circuit cam-
era from
jail. He was
denied bail
on an
escape
charge.
While


Rapalo


Rapalo was at large, officers
guarded prosecutors Joshua
Weintraub and Michael
Gilfarb, who are handling the
case, as well as State
Attorney Katherine
Fernandez Rundle, State
Attorney's office spokesman
Jose Arrojo said.
Officials also said they had
been' tracking Rapalo's pay
phone calls.
A day after escaping,
Rapalo, 34, made a phone call


to the father of another
inmate, Arrojo said. The
father notified authorities,
and officials were able to
track Rapalo's call to a pay
phone at the Dadeland North
Metrorail station.
Other calls made from the
pay phone around the same
time gave officials a list of
numbers Rapalo likely called.
One particularly long conver-
sation led officials to, monitor
calls to that number, which
continued to receive calls
from local pay phones at
night and in the early morn-
ings. Officials believed
Rapalo was calling, Arrojo
said.
On Friday the State
Attorney's office obtained an
emergency wiretap of the


number, which was a cell
phone. Rapalo had told at
least one inmate that his plan
after escaping was to return
to his native Honduras, but
to first kill the prosecutor on
his case, according to the
State Attorney's office.
Those threats were instru-
mental in allowing the
wiretap.
Investigators began listen-
ing to calls to that number on
Friday and intercepted calls
relevant to the case, Arrojo
said. The content of those
conversations could not yet
be released, he said.
From those conversations,
Rapalo's plans after the jail-
break did not appear to be
well-defined, Fernandez
Rundle said.


Busy year in politics as candidates prepare for 2006

Busy year in politics as candidates prepare for 2006


By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
AP Political Writer

TALLAHASSEE - With
Republican Gov. Jeb Bush on
his way out of office after the
2006 election, the race to
replace him got off to an
early start in 2005.
Democratic state Sen. Rod
Smith announced plans to
run for governor last
January, 22 months ahead of
the election. Democratic
U.S. Rep. Jim Davis entered
the race days later. In May,
Attorney General Charlie
Crist and Chief Financial
Officer Tom Gallagher


jumped into the Republican
primary.
And as busy as candidates
were scrambling for the seat
Bush has to leave because of
term limits, news from that
race was overshadowed in
June when U.S. Rep.
Katherine Harris announce-
ment that she will challenge
Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill
Nelson.
So while voters statewide
didn't go to the polls in 2005,
it was still an active year in
Florida politics.
The two top spots on the
2006 ballot - Nelson's seat
and the governor's race -


have dominated political cov-
erage, but by far they weren't
the only races heating up.
Two-time U.S. Senate can-
didate Bill McCollum said he
would join three Republican
lawmakers in seeking their
party's nomination to
replace Crist; Senate
President Tom Lee and state
Rep. Randy Johnson will be
in a Republican primary for
Gallagher's Cabinet seat;
and candidates were jockey-
ing to fill congressional seats
being vacated by Davis,
Harris and retiring
Republican U.S. Rep.
Michael Bilirakis.


State wants to assess children's music


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE- Readin',
writing , rithmetic' and music?
Fourth-grade students in
Florida may soon face another
standardized test, possibly by
next year, with a focus on
music.
Education officials are look-
ing at the possibility of adding
a music test developed by a
coalition of music teachers,
who fear that their specialty
has been neglected because it


isn't part of the Florida
Comprehensive Assessment
Test.
As part of the test, students
would listen to music and then
answer questions about the
instruments, void8s ardf'style'1
of music.
Education Commissioner
John Winn suggests the test
could be given on a voluntary
basis with high scoring
schools earning points toward
their overall school grades.
Winn said a voluntary


music test is a good idea in
areas where schools and par-
ents want to make music a
higher priority for students.
"A lot of times that'll tap a
hidden talent," Winn said. "If
they're not exposed to music
at an early age, they may not
begin to pursue that, whether
it's dance or singing or playing
instruments, the same'thing in
art."
About two-thirds of elemen-
tary school students were
enrolled in music classes last


Democrats are taking a
more practical approach to
the Cabinet races, with state
Sen. Skip Campbell alone in
seeking the Democratic
nomination for attorney gen-
eral and Alex Sink, the for-
mer head of Bank of
America's Florida opera-
tions, the party's only candi-
date for CFO.
In the Senate race, Harris
made national headlines
when she announced her
plans, largely because of the
fame she gained as Florida's
Secretary of State during the
disputed 2000 presidential
election.


knowledge
year. That's higher than six
years ago, but down from 20
years ago. Winn said he thinks
all students should be
exposed to music and art to
have a complete education.
" '."We ought to recognize it,"
Winn said. "It just seems to be
a perfect opportunity for our
school reading system to
incorporate bonus points for
areas of extraordinary accom-
plishment or high quality per-
formance in areas other than
our core academic areas."


POLICE REPORTS


Arrest Log
The following information was
provided by local law
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted. All
people are presumed innocent
unless proven guilty.
Thursday, Dec. 15
Lake City
Police Department
* Danyell Smith, 28, 410
Polk St., warrant: violation of
probation on charges of
possession of cocaine,and
possession of a controlled
substance, possession of more
than 20 grams of cannabis and
giving a false name to a law
enforcement officer.
Wednesday, Dec. 21
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
SLarissa West Shoecraft,
31, 15990 SR-47, Fort White,
warrant: violation of probation
on charges of burglary of
dwelling and credit card fraud.
a Kendrick Devaughn
Maeweather, 29, 394 NE Fronie
St., warrant: violation of
probation on charges of two
counts of possession of
cocaine.
,Thursday, Dec. 22
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Brenton T. Thoden, 31,
453 NE Colvin St., dealing in
stolen property and warrant:
violation of probation on
charges of credit card fraud.
* Jessie James Kelly, 51,
855 NW Redding St., warrant:


two counts of sale of cocaine
within 1000 feet of place of
worship and possession of
cocaine within 1000 feet of
place of worship.
* Jessie Dewayne Queen,
855 NW Redding St., warrant:
sale of cocaine within 1,000 feet
of a school, sale of cocaine
within 1000 feet of a place of
worship, and two counts of
possession of cocaine within
1,000 feet of place of worship.
Lake City
Police Department
* Nicholas Montague
Owens, 29, 843 SE Putnam
St., possession of cannabis
with intent to sell, possession of
less than 20 grams of cannabis
and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
Friday, Dec. 23
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Verndel Lamar Harris, 24,
16814 Mill St., White Springs,
aggravated assault.
Saturday, Dec. 24
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Recardoe Amound
Simmons, 23, 1602 Arrlington
St., warrant: possession of
cocaine, possession of drug
paraphernalia, resisting arrest
without violence and giving a
false name to a law
enforcement officer.
* Thomas Alan Dant, 19,
485 Ash Drive, warrant: fleeing
and eluding, possession of
alcohol by a person less than-
21 years of age and criminal
mischief.
* Chris Jones Ratliff, 20,
unknown address, aggravated


Jo Lytte, Realtor


DANIEL CRAPP MILLION DOLLAR CLUB
S agency, Inc.'
2806 West US Hwy. 90, Suite 101
Lake City, FL 32055-4746
Office: (386) 755-5110
Toll Free (800) 771-5110
Fax: (386 755-7851
Residence / (386) 758-2986
Cell Phone: (386) 365-2821
E-mail: jolytte@danielcrapps.com
Website: jolytte.com
"Put my honesty and experience to work for you"


battery and disorderly conduct.
* Brenton Todd Rhoden,
31, 453 NE Colvin Terrace, 24
counts of forgery, 24 counts of
uttering a forgery, grand theft
and 16 counts of dealing in
stolen property.
Lake City
Police Department
* Amia Shanique
Washington, 25, 843 SE
Putnam St., possession of
cannabis with intent to sell,
possession of less than 20
grams of cannabis and
possession of drug
paraphernalia.
Monday, Dec. 26
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office


I


SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITYIBU


* Kyle Donald Waltrip, 25,
143 SW Cromwell St., warrant:
failure to comply with judges
,orders on charges of
possession of cocaine,
possession of oxycodone and
third-degree grand theft.

Fire EMS Calls
Monday, Dec. 26
* 2:37 p.m., wreck, Marvin
Burnett Road and Bascom
Norris Drive, one primary unit
responded.
* 3:16 p.m., grass, Dan
Court, three primary units
responded.
* 4:37 p.m., vehicle,
McDonalds at Main Blvd. and


IF WE C~~ANT" WIN. NMO ONE CAN!S~
F~rwmer &cwI Securn~y 1"
Ex~recutivees endrd
Aredsoc wn Cftbes
twe oi!rI tw


''I,
.9 --n


since 1996, htanduri n tiW64 Ca'eis. Reo ,nsiderations, ad Hear





LOOK GREAT


LOSE WEIGHT
LOWEST FEE EVER


Baya Ave., one primary unit
responded.
* 5:35 p.m., unknown fire,
Unity Circle, three primary and
three volunteer units respond-
ed.
* 8:32 p.m., brush fire,
Branford Hwy, one primary and
two volunteer units responded.
* 9 p.m., rescue assist, US
90 W, two volunteer units
responded.
* 10:55 p.m., rescue assist,
Gwen Lake at Ashley St., one
primary unit responded.
Tuesday, Dec. 27
* 12:25 a.m., rescue assist,


Bear Road, one volunteer unit
responded.
N 1:44 a.m., wreck, 1-10
westbound mile marker 310,
one primary and one volunteer
unit responded.
* 7:18 a.m., lines down,
Pearce St. and Locklyn Terrace,
one primary unit responded.
* 11:13 a.m., structure,
Roberts Road, two primary and
two volunteer units responded.
E 1:22 p.m., rescue assist,
1115 NW Lake Jeffery Road,
one volunteer unit responded.
* From staff reports.


GREENE ASSOCIATES
COMMERCIAL & PERSONAL
INSURANCE
Offices in Lake City & Middleburg
Now Open in Lake City
417 W. Baya Drive * 755-1122
Call us today for a FREE quote!
IFpF I I Aft


c 755-8700
misEA BLIC Hwy 90 West, Lake City
RESEARCH CENTER
Individual results may varry Across from Lake City Mall


i~""~"""-~-"'-E*rs~?rareT~pr~iE~~i~li~~


Page Editor: S. Michael Manley, 754-0429


I













OPINION


Wednesday, December 28,2005


www.lakecityreporter.com


EDITORIAL


Sediment


system


sensibility

Filtering sediment from
stormwater runoff makes
good sense. Water delivered
in the form of rain is going to
run down hill, pick up trash
and lawn waste along the way and make
its way into our streams and lakes.
It's no secret that pollution exists in
alarming quantities and that water
following this path carries this trash
into our lakes. It's good this is
recognized and a filtering system is
planned and needed to keep the
pollution at a minimum.
Lake City is working to stay on top of
this very important issue.
The installation of the Continuous
Separation System is expensive, but
worthwhile when protecting the
environment is at stake. The system
catches water and uses a system of
screens to filter trash and allow water to
pass through to the lakes.
If we don't filter the runoff water,
trash will collect and dominate our lake
shores and ruin one of Lake City's
calling cards - the numerous lakes
that dot our city.
Trapping sediment is the most
effective way to protect the fragile
environment that is the recreational
watershed in our community. It's good
to see these steps taken to combat a
tremendous problem.
Let's continue to be proactive in
fighting the problem of pollution in
streams, creeks and lakes.


HIGHLIGHTS
IN H IS. TO RY

Today is Wednesday, Dec. 28, the
362nd day of 2005. There are three days
left in the year.
* On Dec. 28, 1945, Congress officially
recognized the Pledge of Allegiance.
* In 1694, Queen Mary II of England
died after five years of joint rule with her
husband, King William IIl.
* In 1832, John C. Calhoun became
the first vice president of the United States
to resign, stepping down over differences
with President Jackson.
* In 1846, Iowa became the 29th state
to be admitted to the Union.
* In 1856, the 28th president of the
.United States, Thomas Woodrow Wilson,
was born in Staunton, Va.
* In 1897, the play "Cyrano de
Bergerac," by Edmond Rostand, premiered
in Paris.
* In 1917, the New York Evening Mail
published a facetious - as well as ficti-
tious - essay by H.L. Mencken on the his-
tory of bathtubs in America.


Lake City Reporter
serving Columbia County since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is published with
pride for residents of Columbia and
surrounding counties by Community
Newspaper Inc. of Athens, Ga.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities - "Newspapers get
things done!"
Our primary goal is to publish
distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work.
Michael Leonard, publisher
Todd Wilson, editor
Sue Brannon, controller

Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


OUR POLI C Y
Letters to the Editor should be typed or
neatly written and double spaced. Letters
should not exceed 400 words and will be edited
for length and libel. Letters must be signed and
include the writer's name, address and
telephone number for verification. Writers can
have two letters per month published. Letters


and guest columns are the opinion of the
writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City
Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St.
downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com


TR~ TIAEUS.P~c~AYUNS


THE T2 oS- QKLYUNE

r��h.~~BNN


COMMENTARY


Focusing on the new year


've always looked at the
new year as a curve in
the road of life. We can't
look back and we never
know what is ahead, but
that does not stop us from
traveling on.
So it was with a man by the
name of Conrad Hilton. He
was born on Christmas Day,
1887. His parents were Mary
and Gus Hilton, natives of
Norway, who settled in
America in the mid 1880s
when hard work and dreams
could make a man rich. His
father loved to work and he
passed that on to his son. His
mother always told him to
pray. Both parents assured
him he had to have a dream.
That he did. From a run
down hotel, the Mobley, in
Cisco, Texas, to a chain of
Hilton Hotels which were the
most costly, most luxurious
and most famous of all hotels
which stood tall in many
nations around the world.
However, purchasing the
famous Waldorf-Astoria Hotel
was the apex of his career.
What intrigued me about
this very ambitious and
wealthy man was the fact that
he "kept his feet on the
ground" throughout his life.
In his biography he listed
10 ingredients which he
believed blended in each and
every one of us if we are to
live successful and fulfilled
life. His ingredients are:
E Find your own particu-
lar talent. Emerson said each
man (and woman) has his (or
her) own vocation. Finding
that talent is the first step to
successful living. It took
Hilton 32 years to find his own
niche. He was a banker before
he found that rundown hotel
in Texas and fell in love with

LETTER .TO


the hotel business. This is no
invitation to become a drifter,
a professional malcontent, but
every man has a right, a duty
to search humbly and prayer-
fully for the place that fits into
his Divine pattern.
* Think big, dream big,
and act big. Your value is
determined by the mold you
make for yourself. It doesn't
take any more energy to.
expect to be the best house-
wife, best businessman, finest
cook, and the most capable
carpenter. Most people court
failure by misjudging their
abilities and belittling their
worth and value. Be the best
that you can be in all areas of
your life. Do not get buried
into one facet of your life, and
neglect others that might be
more important to a success-
ful fulfilled life.
* Be honest. To be honest
is more than not cheating, not
lying nor stealing. It is a bold,
direct open stand for the truth
as we know it, both to others
and ourselves. I have never in
my life found anything to fear
from telling the full, direct
truth.
* Live with enthusiasm.
It has been my experience
that there is nothing worth
doing that can be done with-
out it. Ability you must have,
but ability sparked with enthu-
siasm. Use it and you will find

THE EDITOR


yourself constantly moving
forward to new forms of
expressing.
* Don't let your posses-
sions possess you. I have in
my lifetime had everything -
and nothing. In the Bible it
doesn't say that money is the
root of all evil, but the "love"
of money. I believe that to be
true and I believe the same
thing to be true of our
possessions. If you find one
you can't live without, hasten
to give it away. Your freedom
depends on it.
* Don't worry about
your problems. The success-
ful life is a balanced life that
includes thought, rest, action
and recreation. Of course we
are concerned, but patience in
the face of difficulties is one
of our biggest hurdles.
Worrying has never solved
anything. Instead it magnifies,
breeds resentment and self-
pity.
* Don't cling to the past.
To do so is to tie yourself to
a memory, for yesterday is
gone. It is wisdom to profit by
yesterday,s mistakes. It is fatal
to hang on to yesterday,s vic-
tories. Yesterday,s experi-
ences are the foundation on
which you build today
* Look up to people
when you can and down on
no one. We are all looking at
each other from outside, par-
tially blinded. The only thing
we are absolutely sure about
is the common denominator
within each, the Divine Spark,
life itself. Each person was
born in the image and like-
ness of God. If we try to
understand people, we are in a
better position to "love our
neighbors as ourselves."
* Margaret Wuest is a retired
journalist who lives in Lake City.


Battle lost, but 'intelligent' war ongoing


To the Editor:
U.S. District Judge John E.
Jones has ruled that a Dover
Area School Board policy
requiring the teaching of
"intelligent design" (ID) is
unconstitutional. This case
has been heralded as the
greatest courtroom battle
between faith and evolution
since the Thomas Scopes trial
in Dayton, Tenn., in 1925.
Maybe, maybe not. One thing
is sure; this battle may have
been lost but the.war between
competing philosophical views
of life's origin and continued
existence is not over.
Proponents of ID seem to
agree the policy failed
constitutional muster because
it was poorly worded and the
ensuing legal battle to defend
it was ill advised. My concern
is the issue has been postured
as faith vs. evolution.
Evolution is couched as a fact.


It is not.
Proponents of ID and
evolutionists do not disagree
on the facts revealed by
scientific investigation; they
disagree completely on what
the facts mean. I'll show you
what I mean.
Neither the proponents of
ID nor the evolutionists doubt
the existence of DNA. They
would agree that the huinan
gene is comprised of 23 pairs
of chromosomes. They would
agree that just one of the
chromosomes in a pair
contains approximately
3 billion base pairs of DNA.
They would agree that there
is enough genetic information
in a single human cell to fill a
complete 30-volume set of the
Encyclopedia Britannica three
to four times over. Both would
agree that to alter the
structure or sequence of
genetic information even


slightly would seriously
mutate the organism.
This is where they
disagree.
The evolutionist states that
the genetic
information contained in a
single human cell is the
random product of a mindless
process that began by
accident.
The proponents of ID claim
that the sheer
volume of information
contained in the human cell
and the delicate exactitude of
the sequencing imply
intelligent design.
I tend to agree with the
seventeenth century scientist
Francis Bacon who said, "A
little science estranges a man
from God. A lot of science
brings him back."
Gary B. King
Lake City


4A


C O M ME NTARY



It's good


to be King


George


s I was saying to a fellow peasant
just the other day, it is ironic that
this country should rebel against
one King George only to bow
i down before another monarch of
the same name more than 200 years later.
That our own King George - he of the
House of Bush - is truly of royal blood has
become clear in recent days with the
announcement that he has empowered the
National Security Agency to spy on
whomsoever and whatsoever it wishes under
royal decree.
Happily for
him if not his
subjects, this
cannot be
challenged by
the picky laws
and constitu-
tional concerns
that rule us Reg Henry
poor common rhenry@post-gozette.com
folk. It cannot
be challenged
because he says so, which is the traditional
way of kings.
Previously, before His Majesty assumed his
sovereign powers, the president - as he was
then quaintly known - had to go to a secret
court if he wanted permission for his agents
to snoop on enemies within the realm. The
esteemed judges of this court would take out
their official rubber stamp, and the matter
would be handled satisfactorily for all
concerned except for the knaves and
scoundrels, hopefully not all of them:
Democrats.
Although a rubber stamp administered in
secret was about the same covering for civil
liberties as a lace pasty applied to an exotic .
dancer, the common people nevertheless
rested easily, because a genuflection had been
made to their beloved Constitution.
But kings do not bow down before anyone
or anything. It is for us, the commoners, to
prostrate ourselves before their highnesses.
Thus did King George decree that it was too
risky for the security of his kingdom to rely
on a rubber stamp, which, after all, might
wear out.
Moreover, it was insulting for his agents to
be kept waiting while the judges came in from
the golf course.
So he reasoned that, as he was fighting a
war, one that conveniently for him was never
going to end, he could do anything he liked
because he was the king, or the commander
in chief in the old manner of speaking. Laws,
shmaws - what were they to one so noble?
Now everything is changed. Faith-based
policies have rediscovered the divine right of
kings. I hope the royal court realizes that I am
writing this in the groveling position like the
uncouth but humble person that I am.
To show my fealty, I tug my forelock in the
old ritual of subservience except that I haven't
got a forelock, as a result of male pattern
baldness, and therefore, as a substitute, I tug
my back mullet-lock in all honor and
obedience.
I pray King George for his gentle
forbearance because he has said that even
discussing his, new royal powers may aid the
enemy. Of course, the last thing I wish to do is
aid the enemy. It's just that the old habit of
free speech dies hard.
Now that King George has enthroned
himself, it is only right that he assume the
other trappings of monarchy. May I, his lowly
and worthless servant, suggest a coat of
arms? Perhaps a church built on the ruins of
the wall of separation between church and
state. Maybe lobbyists rampant on a field of
money.
His Majesty also needs royal titles tailored
to the American context. It is my honor to
suggest the following, which I hope the NSA
will record to my credit ...
Henceforth, throughout the land, let him be
proclaimed as His Royal Texas-ship, Defender
of the Faith, Interpreter of the Constitution,
Protector of the SUVs, Guardian of the Malls,'
Warrior King, Scourge of the Liberals, Bane
of the Activist Judges, His Most High Majesty
and Most Excellent King George W. the First
of Many.
We beseech you to institute a system of
hereditary peerage based upon loyalty so that
we peasants will have someone to look up to
other than the tawdry celebrities on TV. Sir
Rush of Bloviation, Sir Karl of Spin, these will
be names to conjure. Perhaps, as a goodwill


gesture, you could name Bill Clinton as a
knight of the garter belt. Please, sire, forgive
us our petulant
Bush-bashing of former days before we
realized you wore a crown.
* Reg Henry writes for the Pittsburgh
Post-Gazette.












Page Editor: S. Michael Manley, 754-0429 LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


Post-Christmas sales,



gift cards get shoppers to



continue spending money


By SARAH KARUSH
Associated Press

DEARBORN, Mich. -
Shoppers armed with newly
obtained gift cards and poor-
ly received presents headed
back to malls and stores in
search of returns, post-
Christmas discounts and
fresh merchandise.
The day after Christmas
offered merchants another
shot at getting consumers to
open their wallets, with retail-
ers hoping customers would
be lured by sales and come to
spend their gift cards, which
are recorded as sales only
after they are redeemed.
According to ShopperTrak
RCT Corp., the week after
Christmas accounted for
10 percent of holiday sales
last year, but analysts expect
the post-holiday period could
account for as much as
14 percent this year, given
the increasing popularity of
the cards.
At a Best Buy in Okemos,
Erik Sellen used a $40 gift
card and a bit of his own
money to buy three DVDs -


Gift cards boost holiday sales
Customers waited longer than last year to do their holiday'
and merchants are counting on the post-holiday season
by booming gift card sales.


Most gift cards are worth
between $10 and $50 ...


$11-$25


..; but many buyers
more than the card
3% /
Less .---'-


Same


... and will use the cards within a month


44%
Month
or less
I


38%
1-3
months
I


11%
4 - 6 months
,


SOURCE: Accenture 2005


"Gotti," 'The Usual
Suspects," "A Few Good
Men" - and a Johnny Cash
CD. The 23-year-old Holt res-
ident said the gift card was
nice because it let him pick
exactly what he wanted.
Mary Padgett in the


Fairlane Town
Dearborn said s
ing advantage
stock up on Chr
rations and gifts i
She said she ha
ing herself for
but was pleasant


"Its been nice so far -
easy parking," Padgett, 63,
said as she browsed a display
y shopping, of Christmas decorations at a
n boosted J.C. Penney store, where
much of the merchandise
will spend was 50 or 60 percent off the
s value regular price.
45% "I needed some things I
More asked for but didn't get," said
Troy Holcomb, 30, who
stopped at a Target and Best
Buy in Okemos to pick up
some DVDs with money he
got as a gift. He left with,
among other things, a
Looney Tunes collection.
In an effort to prop up prof-
7% its, a growing number of
6 months to stores such as Coach, Target,
one year and American . Eagle
' Outfitters rolled out some
spring merchandise while
KB Toys was pushing new
AP versions of Barbie and the
funky Bratz dolls.
Center in Consumer electronic
she was tak- chains such as Best Buy
of sales to were highlighting CDs,
istmas deco- DVDs and video games in
for next year. their advertising, counting
d been brac- on shoppers to feed the gadg-
big crowds, ets they received for the
ly surprised, holiday.


Natural gas futures plunge, triggering


broader dropoff in energy prices


Associated Press

NEW YORK - Natural
gas futures plunged 10 per-
cent Tuesday, settling at their.
lowest level in three and a
half months amid forecasts
calling for mild U.S. weather
over the next week. It was the
third straight decline for nat-
ural.i gas prices;,which,. have.,
fallen- 23 percent - since
Wednesday, and the selloff
triggered a decline in other
energy futures.
The drop in energy prices
knocked down the shares of
integrated oil and gas compa-
nies and independent
petroleum producers.
January natural gas futures
fell $1.261 to settle at $11.022
per 1,000 cubic feet on the
New York Mercantile
Exchange. It was the lowest


closing price since the Sept.
13 settlement of $10.763,
which was slightly above the
level on the day Hurricane
Katrina struck and knocked
out significant Gulf of Mexico
output.
Front-month natural gas
futures reached an all-time
,intraday' high of $15..78 in!
mid-December as colddweath-
er and predictions of snow
storms raised fears about
supplies.
Now, with weather fore-
casters calling for higher
than normal temperatures
over the next week, the
market sentiment has
shifted.
"Speculators are tripping
over themselves to get out,"
said Ed Silliere, a Nymex
floor trader at New York-


based Energy Merchant
Intermarket Futures.
Silliere said that if natural
gas futures failed to stabilize
in the next day or two, prices
could easily fall below $10.
"So much for $15," he said.
Light sweet crude for
February delivery briefly fell
,by more than"$1 a barrel,
then settled 27 cents lower at
$58.16 a barrel on Nymex,
where heating oil futures lost


6.83 cents to settle at $1.637 a
gallon and gasoline declined
3.71 cents to settle at
$1.5143 a gallon.
"It's all weather-related,"
said analyst Phil Flynn of
Alaron Trading Corp. in
Chicago. "Unseasonably
warm temperatures here in
the Midwest and elsewhere
have taken the fear out of this
market, at least for the near
term."


Lake City Medical Center

welcomes



Now Accepting New Patients
Internal Medicine - Primary Care

Board Certified in:
* Internal Medicine

Office Hours
Monday - Friday .
8:00 AM - 5:00 PN
Most insurances accepted
"Same Dayor Next Day
AppomLrmentsAvAailableb


A growing business requires a growing team.

Edward Jones believes that relationships are key to success.
We feel that the best way to develop strong relationships is
by doing business face-to-face. In order to meet the needs
of our growing business I'm pleased to announce that
Robert Woodard will be joining me to help provide you.
with one-to-one, personalized service and advice. Please
stop by or call for an appointment so we can be of service
to you.


Steve Jones Robert Woodard


Steve Jones
Robert Woodard
846 SW Baya Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 752-3847
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC

EdwardJones


Fast Professional


n 11 - .
,L 811 INOW.


Computer Repair 386-719-6853
386-719-6853


Network Support


brad@bradhandy.comr


Prescription Drug

Sign-Up Has Begun


Bava Pharmacy will have
Insurance Specialists at
Do ha - \C each location to sign up
Do youD, e
Do yo "- beneficiaries for the new
questions , Medicare Part D drug

about the ewi coverage.

Medicare,
- Call to schedule an
Prescripti appointmentor to get

6.. More information.









B*
j Pha acy

Baya East Baya West Jasper Location
780 SE Baya Dr. 1465 US 90 W 1150 US 41 NW
Lake City Lake City Jasper
755-6677 755-2233 792-3355


MARKET REPORT


Dec.27,2005


Dow Jones
i;ndrilv ri A A A,


-105.50

10,777.77


Pct. change
from previous:


-0,97


11,000


/1- -10,750

IUnRnn


10,250

10,000


STOCK MARKET INDEXES
52-Week YTD 12-mo
High Low Name Last Chg %Chg %Chg %Chg
10,984.46 10,000.46 Dow Industrials 10,777.77 -105.50 -.97 -.05 -.71
4,282.31 3,348.36 Dow Transportation 4,216.26 -50.49 -1.18 +11.01 +10.62
438.74 323.79 Dow Utilities 409.02 -2.63 -.64 +22.11 +21.84
7,867.59 6,902.51 NYSE Composite 7,767.85 -74.05 -.94 +7.14 +7.20
1,778.74 1,186.14 Amex Market Value 1,740.94 -17.83 -1.01 +21.38 +22.05
2,278.16 1,889.83 Nasdaq Composite 2,226.89 -22.53 -1.00 +2.37 +2.28
1,275:80 1,136.15 S&P500 1,256.54 -12.12 -.96 +3.68 +3.54
752.00 623.57 S&P MidCap 739.25 -9.23 -1.23 +11.45 +11.59
693.63 570.03 Russell2000 676.58 -9.86 -1.44 +3.84 +3.36
12,787.08 11,195.22 Wilshire5000 12,586.30 -125:39 -.99 +5.14 +5.05

STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

NYSE 3 AMEX NASDAQ
S7,767.85 -74.05 1,740.94 -17.83 2,226.89 -22.53


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Nissin rs 28.25 +4.05 +16.7
TDK 67.30 +4.30 +6.8
Suntechn 23.25 +1.17 +5.3
CtlAir B 21.56 +1.04 +5.1
EnterpGP n 37.70 +1.76 +4.9
CCE Spin n 12.50 +.55 +4.6
VKAdvM 14.45 +.62 +4.5
FresMpr 30.50 +1.25 +4.3
AAR 24.51 +.97 +4.1
Bombay 2.83 +.11 +4.0
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
OfficeMax 24.35 -3.17 -11.5
MahangrT 6.41 -.64 -9.1
DeRigo 7.02 -.68 -8.8
Chiqutawt 5.80 -.50 -7.9
NatcoG 20.23 -1.62 -7.4
Fairchild 2.55 -.20 -7.3
VidSanNig 16.87 -1,29 -7.1
Kubota 42.62 -3.06 -6.7
Todco 37.88 -2.71 -6.7
EnerSys 13.02 -.83 -6.0
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Lucent 340710 2.75
Pfizer 248737 23.63 -.33
iShJapan 172321 13.36 -.29
ExxonMbl 170613 55.87 -1.23
GenElec 169402 35.06 -.36
TimeWarn156308 17.53 -.15
ChesEng 153965 30.68 -1.48
GnMotr 133159 18.99 +.16
WalMart 130103 47.73 -.61
BrMySq 118681 23.09 +.15
DIARY
Advanced 1,039
Declined 2,335
Unchanged 125
Total issues 3,499
New Highs 128
New Lows 64
Volume 1,560,729,270


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) ,
Name Last Chg %Chg
Bexil 34.70 +9.90 +39.9
BSDMedn 5.50 +.73 +15.3
AlmadMgn 2.24 +.24 +12.0
Kimbergn 2.12 +.20 +10.4
TanRng gn 5.90. +.49 +9.1
InfoSonic 17.25 +1.30 +8.2
FusionTin .2.70 +.20 +8.0
QuestCapgn2.15 +.16 +8.0
PresR A 8.30 +.60 +7.8
Congolm 3.00 +.21 +7.5
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Xfone n 2.30 -.45 -16.4
CD&L 2.48 -.30 -10.8
HemoSen n 6.44 -.66 -9.3
DocuSec 12.85 -1.24 -8.8
GascoEngy 6.41. -.62 -8.8
CoreMold 6.48 -.62 -8.7
Abraxas 5.40 -.50 -8.5
Endvrint 3.37 -.31 -8.4
EmpireFh 3.65 -.32 -8.1
TiensBio n 3.50 -.30 -7.9
MOST ACTIVE ($1 oR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SPDR 432190 125.47 -1.29
iShRs2000 s25563467.11 -1.02
SP Engy 254269 49.74 -1.51
SemiHTr 87186 37.29 -.53
DJIA Diam 86158 107.75 -1.00
OilSvHT 78275128.17 -3.97
SP Fncl 66528 31.94 -.25
iShEAFEs34431 59.25 -.55
SP Matls 28032 30.33 -.19
SPMid 25176135.00. -1.74
DIARY
Advanced 369
Declined 600
Unchanged 87
Total issues 1,056
New Highs 46
New Lows 20
Volume 244,072,572


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
NeoPharm 12.10 +4.15 +52.2
PeopEdun 5.70 +1.18 +26.1
Regenm 16.59 +2.83 +20.6
Replgn 3.80 +.61 +19.1
AmPac 7.89 +1.04 +15.2
IbisTech 2.76 +.36 +15.0
Innotrac- 4.40 +.53 +13.6
uotesmth 2.78 +.33 +13.5
eDiets.corn 6.07 +.70 +13.0
Reliv 15.29 +1.73 +12.8
LOSERS ($2 oR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
21CenHwt 3.60 -.88 -19.6
Bsquare rs 3.10 -.69 -18.2
CtpltCm 14.93 -2.35 -13.6
InterlnkElf 2.59 -.40 -13.4
SeraCarelf 7.88 -.99 -11.2
Epoch n 4.93 -.56 -10.2
ZixCorp 2.13 -.24 -10.1
GiblPay 2.27 -.24 -9.6
IAC nt wtl 4.52 -.48 -9.6
PW Eagle 18.70 -1.89 -9.2
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Nasd100Tr530689 41.04 -.37
SiriusS 474964 6.99 +.16
SunMicro 380052 4.29 -.07
Microsoft 369756 26.46 -.18
Cisco 295730 17.25 -.10
Intel 285146 25.46 -.51
AppleCs 209937 74.23 +.88
Oracle 206148 12.35 +.01
NeoPharm153395 12.10 +4.15
JDS Uniph138932 2.49 -.02
DIARY
Advanced 848
Declined 2,229
Unchanged 134
Total issues 3,211
New Highs 102
New Lows 53
Volume 1,269,080,429


.STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
YTD YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg
AT&Tlnc NY 1.33 5.4 21 24.63 ... -4.4 iShRs2000sAmex .88 1.3 .. 67.11 -1.02 +3.6
Alltel NY 1.54 2.4 15 62.86 -.49 +7:0 Intel Nasd .40 1.6 19 25.46 -.51 +8.8
AutoZone NY ...... 13 91.58 -.84 +.3 JeffPilot NY 1.67 2.9 14 57.26 -.20 +10.2
BkofAm NY 2.00 4.3 11 46.56 -.38 -.9 LowesCos NY .24 .4 21 66.99 -.47 +16.3
BellSouth NY 1.16 4.2 12 27.35 -.10 -1.6 Lucent NY ......11 2.75 ... -26.9
BobEvn Nasd .48 2.0 25 23.43 -.41 -10.4 McDnlds NY .67 2.0 18 34.10 -.45 +6.4
CNBFnPA Nasd .56 4.1 16 13.80 -.12 -9.6 Microsoft Nasd .36 1.4 22 26.46 -.18 -1.0
CSX NY .52 1.0 12 50.50 -.54 +26.0 NasdO00Tr Nasd .14 .3 ... 41.04 -.37 +2.8
ChmpE NY .. ... 38 13.67 -.38 +15.7 NYTimes NY .66 2.5 13 26.18 -.22 -35.8
Chevron NY 1.80 3.2 9 55.89-1.24 +6.4 NobltyH Nasd.20 .7 18 26.88 +.08 +14.5
Cisco Nasd .. ... 20 17.25 -.10 -10.7 OcciPet NY 1.44 1.8 7 79.64 -2.82 +36.5
CocaCI NY 1.12 2.7 19 40.97 -.18 -1.6 Penney NY .50 .9 17 55.30 -.42 +33.6
ColBgp NY .61 2.5 16 23.93 -.14 +12.7 PepsiCo NY 1.04 1.8 26 59.19 -.02 +13.4
Delhaize NY 1.13 1.7 ... 65.52 +.42-13.6 Potash NY .60 .8 17 78.13 -2.06 -5.9
DollarG NY .18 .9 18 19.10 -.17 -8.0 Ryder NY .64 1.6 12 41.22 -.97 -13.7
FPLGps NY 1.42 3.5 19 41.14 +.08 +10.1 SearsHldgs Nasd ... ...28 119.95 +.1 +21.2
FamDIr NY .38 1.5 19 24.65 -.48 -21.1 SiriusS Nasd ......... 6.99 +.16 -8.3
FordM , NY .40 5.1 8 7.89 -.01 -46.1 SouthnCo NY 1.49 4.2 16, 35.10 -.04 +4.7
GenElec NY 1.00 2.9 20 35.06 -.36 -3.9 SPDR Amex2.14 1.7 .. 125.47-1.29 +3.8
GdyFam Nasd .12 1.3 ... 9.58 +.02 +4.8 SunMicro Nasd ......... 4.29 -.07 -20.4
HCAlnc NY .60 1.2 16 51.55 -.32 +29.0 TimeWam NY .20 1.1 31 17.53 -.15 -9.9
HomeDp NY .40 1.0 16 41.02 -.57 -4.0 WalMart NY .60 1.3 19 47.73 -.61 -9.6

MONEY RATES CURRENCIES
Last Pvs Week Last Pvs Day
Prime Rate 7.25 7.25 Australia 1.3812 1.3746
Discount Rate 5.25 5.25 Britain 1.7270 1.7340
Federal Funds Rate 4.25 4.25 Canada 1.1741 1.1660
Treasuries Euro .8452 .8427
3-month 3.88 3.89 Japan 117.39 116.22
6-month 4.17 4.22 Mexico 10.7350 - 10.6670
5-year 4.29 4.4
10-year 4.34 44 Switzernd 1.3170 1.3124
30-year 4. British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show
dollar in foreign currency.

MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min Init
Name Obi ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
American Funds A: GwthA p XG 71,536 30.88 +2.0 +15.2/B +16.4/A 5.75 250
Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 SP 69,916 116.25 +0.1 +6.1/A +2.1/A NL 3,000
American Funds A: ICAA p LV 66,546 31.43 +1.0 +7.5/B +21.1/B 5.75 250
American Funds A: WshA p LV 62,683 31.01 +0.1 +4.6/D +24.6/B 5.75 250
Fidelity Invest: Contra XG 58,486 64.83 +0.9 +17.3/A +35.5/A NL 2,500
PIMCO nstlPIMS: TotRt IB 53,886 10.53 +0.7 +3.2/A +38.3/A NL 5,000,000
Fidelity Invest: Magelln LC 51,336 106.70 +1.9 +7.2/B -3.9/C NL 2,500
Dodge&Cox: Stock XV 51,035 140.53 +1.3 +10.5/B +68.4/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: IncoA p MP 48,074 18.17 +0.6 +3.8/D +47.5/A 5.75 250
American Funds A: CaplBA p MP 43,361 53.13 +0,9 +5.0/C +57.7/A 5.75 250
American Funds A:EupacApx IL 43,139 40.88 +4,1 +21.4/A +46.2/B 5.75 250
American Funds A: CapWGA p GL 39,841 36.46 +2.8 +15.1/B +68.2/A 5.75 250
Vanguard InstlFds: Instldx SP 39,138 115.33 +0.1 +6.2/A +2.7/A NL 5,000,000
Vanguard Admiral: 500Adml SP 38,091 116.28 +0.1 +6.2/A +2.5/A NL 100,000
Fidelity Invest: LowPr MV 36,517 40.82 +2.2 +10.1/C +124.9/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: N PerA px GL 35,790 28.57 +2.4 +11.5/C +33.9/B 5.75 250
American Funds A: BalAp BL 32,947 18.34 +0.2 +4.0/D +40.5/A 5.75 250
Fidelity Invest: Grolnc LC 31,527 34.59 -0.4 +3.7/D 0.0/B NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: Divlntl IL 31,025 32.36 +4.0 +17.6/B +58.8/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk XC 29,338 30.16 +0.3 +7.4/C +10.4/C NL 3,000
Vanguard Fds: Wndsll LV 28,867 31.44 +0.4 +8.1/B +32.3/A , NL 3,000
Fidelity Invest: GroCo XG 26,818 63.88 +1.6 +15.2/B -11.1/C NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: Eq Inc El 26,088 52.95 +0.2 +6.6/C +20.6/C NL 2,500
Vanguard Fds: Wellln BL 26,073 31.70 +0.7 +7.9/A +39.3/A NL 3,000
Fidelity Invest: Puritn BL 24,180 18.78 +0.4 +5.4/C +27.8/A NL 2,600
American Funds A: FdlnvA p LV 23,716 35.75 +2.0 +12.6/A +25.8/B 5.75 250
Dodge&Cox: Balanced BL 23,628 83.10 +1.0 +7.4/A +60.5/A NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: BlueChGr LC 22,577 43.42 +0.2 +5.3/C -14.4/E NL 2,500
Frank/Temp Frnk A:IncomA p MP 21,902 2.40 +0.7 +2.3/D +49.0/A 4.25 , 1,000
Vanguard Idx Fds: TotBnd IB 21,084 10.08 +0.8 +2.8/B +30.5/C NL 3,000
Frank/Temp Temp A: GwthA p GL 20,996 22.98 +2.8 +8.9/D +54.5/A 5.75 1,000
Vanguard Fds: Prmcp r XC 20,761 65.44 +1.5 +9.8/B +15.1/C NL 25,000
Vanguard Admiral: TStkAdm XC 20,223 30.16 +0.3 +7.51C +10.8/C NL 100,000
Fidelity Spartan: Eqldxlnv SP 20,051 44.44 +0.1 +6.2/A +2.0/A NL 100,000
Amer Century Inv: Ultra LG 19,570 30.40 -0.7 +4.1/E -6.6/B NL 2,500
Davis Funds A:NYVen A LC 18,903 33.82 +0.3 +11.8/A +22.5/A 4.75 1,000
PIMCO AdminPIMS:ToIRtAd IB 18,310 10.53 +0.7 +3.0/A +36.6/A NL 5,000,000
Price Funds: Eqlnc El 17,958 26.05 0.0 +5.3/D +33.4/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: BondA p AB 17,681 13.24 +0.3 +2.0/D +37.7/B 3.75 250
Fidelity Invest: DivGth LC 16,565 28.97 +0.8 +4.8/D +3.5/B NL 2,500
Vanguard Instl Fds: InsPI SP 16,372 115.34 +0.1 +6.2/A +2.9/A NL200,000,000
Vanguard Fds: HlthCre HB 16,340 140.66 +3.9 +17.3/B +34.1/B NL 25,000
Fidelity Invest: Balanc BL 15,999 .18.78 +1.8 +11.8/A +47.6/A NL 2,500
BL -Balanced, El -Equity Inc, EM -Emerging Mkts, GL -Global Stock, GM -Gen. Muni, IB -Intermd. Bond, IL-
Intemational Stock, LC -Large-Cap Core, LG -Large-Cap Growth, LV -Large-Cap Val., MP -Stock/Bond Blend, MT
-Mortgage, SB -Short-Term Bond, SP -S&P 500, SS -Single-State Muni, XC -Multi-Cap Core, XG -Multi-Cap
Growth, XV -Multi-Cap Val. Total Return: Chg in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs.
others with same objective: A Is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund.
NA = Not avail. NE = Data in question. NS = Fund not in existence. Source: Upper, Inc.
Stock Footnotes: g Dil.n..is , a mna eming, n Cannad.an illar, h = DOes noi meel rnrlnueld-IliOig stanoiidsI
II = Lain tin.] wi SEC r, flea in Oa, 5? aweas pi = Pialerted rs : Slt,< nha undletin a eveer.e ocI 'Ppillit 1 al least
i, [erSLrlnt wiarln e p8e year n Aigh1 I. t. buy i unry .al a spacilead irl.:e s ; SitO I spill by at leasi 21 percent wiin
Ih latI' yadl un Unlis vI In bankrunpl.:y or receilversnp w.J W, an .lrb11uled i = Wran l suA+1 at Wanants
Mutlul Funat Footnoles: x:= E. caio, Ol.oerl L : ti up irni L dlecarge p - Fund aSAe ub uel o o dpay dlinctbuin iif
I Radei.pll.n tee or icnilpngnlt dallend sriela load may apply = Buoth p and r
Galners and LoseBs mu l be wortn adl leasi 2 s tbe Isted in Islas al left Most Acllves mu~i be warh at laEl e1 olume in
h.undiedis i: share: Source he AThns Isled Pre'r Sals nurI are unofficial


SEP OCT NOV DEC


High Low Record high: 11,722.98
10,932.82 10,776.49 Jan.14,2000


- -M ualitpltComnputer .
VON b *"omponentt


z


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


Page Editor: S. Michael Manley, 754-0429


I


IIIUUOl, IOr










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


CALENDAR


* To submit your
Community Calendar
item, contact S.
Michael Manley at
754-0429 or by email
at smanley@
lakecityreporter.com.


Announcements

Blue Grey Army
to meet Jan. 10

The Blue Grey Army will
meet at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday,
Jan. 10, at the Columbia
County Public Library
Downtown Branch.
This will be a general
meeting of committees and
workers involved with
preparations for the Olustee
Festival 2006. Anyone
interested in working with this
group is asked to attend. For
questions, call Faye Bowling
Warren at 755-1097.

New Year's Eve dance
coming for singles group

LAKE BUTLER - Lake
Butler Singles Club will host its


New Year's Eve dance Dec. 31
at Lake Butler Community
Center. Dinner will be at 7 p.m.
and dance from 8-1 a.m. to the
music from South Street Band.
Bring finger food and enjoy the
evening with no smoking and
alcohol. For more information,
call Bob Collins at 752-5948.
The cost is $15 per person.

O'Leno State Park to
host 'Music in the Park'

"Music in the Park" is coming
Saturday, Jan. 7, staring Dick
Staber and Judith Chasnoff.
Bring a chair and relax by the
river while listening to a
beautifully sung mixture of
original and traditional
bluegrass and folk music.
2-4 p.m. O'Leno State Park, is
located six miles north of High
Springs on U.S. 441.
The show is free with park


admission.


MLK parade applications
now available

Applications are now being
accepted for the annual Martin
Luther King day parade, which
will be at 10 a.m., Jan. 16.
Contact Tyrone Taylor at
623-2194, coach Anders at
752-0959, or Leslie White.at
623-2198 to request an entry
application, or to obtain more
information on participating in
the MLK parade.
The following is a list of
activities scheduled for Martin
Luther King, Jr. Celebration:
* Jan.13: 7:30 p.m. Gospel
Festival, choirs, soloists,
instruments and dancers.
* Jan. 14: noon. Car
Show-Step Show, MLK
Classic-Basketball game.


* Jan. 15: 4 p.m. NAACP
commemoration service, Union
A.M.E. Church.
* Jan. 16: 10 a.m. Northeast
Florida Leadership Council
grand parade. Celebration at
the stadium.

Red Hat ladies
prepare for mall invasion
For those ladies who are
footloose and fancy free, come
join other Red/Pink Hatters for
some fellowship, fun, food,
laughter, shopping, games,
prizes and more.
This event is for anyone
looking for a RHS chapter to
join and for all Red Hat 'Ladies
at 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Jan. 5,
Center Court.
The RHS meet the first
Thursday of each month. For
more information contact:


Princess Michelle Parker of the
Red Whiners' official Red Hat
Society Chapter #55905 at
(386) 758-1726.

Columbia County science
fairs coming in January

* Lake City Community
College will host the 2006
Columbia County Science Fair.
The annual fair will be
Jan. 18 and 19 in the Howard
Gym on LCCC campus.
Approximately 250 student
projects will be on display.
Judging will take place from
8 a.m.-3 p.m., Jan. 18. Open
house to the public will be from
3-6 p.m. Jan. 18. The awards
ceremony will be 6-7 p.m.
Jan. 19 for the elementary and
7:30-8:30 p.m. for the middle and
high school in the Alfonso Levy
Performing Arts Center.


* Lake City Community
College will host the
2006 Regional Science and
Engineering Fair.
The annual fair will be
Feb. 22 and 23 in the Howard
Gym on the LCCC campus. The
Region comprises the
10 counties of Columbia, Union,
Suwannee, Bradford, Hamilton,
Lafayette, Baker, Gilchrist and
Madison.


U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson
coming to Lake City

At 1 p.m., Jan. 5, U.S.
Senator Bill Nelson is coming to
Lake City for a townhall
meeting. It will take place at
City Hall, located at 205 N.
Marion Ave. For more
information, call Nelson's office
at (850) 942-8415.


OBITUARIES


Kelvin A. Samson
Kelvin A. Samson, 53 passed away
Thursday Dec. 22, 2005 in North
Florida Regional Medical Center,
Gainesville, Fla.following a long ill-
ness.
The Dayton, Ohio native was born
August 21, 1952 and moved to the
Lake City, Fla. area in 1987 from
Jacksonville, Fla., he was a U.S.
Navy veteran of the Viet Nam
conflict. An electrical pipe maker
with Lamson and Sessions of High
Springs, Fla., a member of the
United Steel Workers of America
Union #775, and member of San
Juan Catholic Mission of Branford,
Fla.
Survivors include his wife, Janet
Samson of Lake City, Fla., two
daughters, Jennifer Marie and Keith
Cowie of Lake City, Fla., Rebekah
Slzanne Samson of Lake City, Fla.,
two sons, Christopher M. Samson of
Lake City, Fla., Joshua M. Samson
of Lake Ciy, Fla., three
sisters, Betty Bawidamann of
Dayton, Oh., Linda Minor of
Waldorf, Md., Delores Clawson of
Coahoma, Texas, one brother,
Charles Samson of Lakeland, Fla.,
an uncle, Jack Perry of Sylacauga,
Al., four grandchildren, Vinnie
Samson, Rachael Samson, Kiera
Samson aind Mercedes Sanis6oi' ""
Rosary services will be conducted
Monday evening Dec. 26, 2005 at
7 p.m. in Daniels Memorial Chapel.
Funeral mass will be conducted
Tuesday Dec. 26, 2005 at 11 a.m. in
San Juan Catholic Mission with
father Edward Murphy officiating.
Interment will follow in Pugh's
Cemetery, Lake City, Fla., visitation
will be held Monday evening 6-8
p.m. at the funeral home.
DANIELS FUNERAL HOME of
Branford is in charge of all
arrangements.


Lois Orie Williamson Harding
Lois Orie Williamson Harding, 92,
a resident of Lake City, Florida died
December 25, 2005 at the Health
Center of Lake City following an
extended illness.
Mrs. Harding was a native of Co-
lumbia County and is the daughter
of the late Joseph Perry and Minnie
Jessie Davis Williamson. She was a
member of the First Presbyterian
Church, Lake City, Florida. She is
preceded in death by her husband
Thomas Tom Harding one Grand-
son, Jamie Richards and four broth-


ers, Leroy Williamson, James Wil-
liamson, William Williamson, Sid-
ney Williamson and Don William-
son.
Survivors include her daughter: Ju-
lia Ann Townsend, Lake City, Fl.
One Son: Tommy (Jean) Harding,
Raiford, Florida. Four Sisters: Lor-
ene (Emory) Gray, Lake City, Fl.
Betty Thomas, Lake City, Fl., Joann
Green and Mary (Clifford) Duke
both of Pensacola, Florida. Two
Brothers: Gordon (Edie) William-
Sson, Jacksonville, Fl. and Walter
Williamson, Lake City, Fl. One Sis-
ter-In-Law: June Williamson, Lake
City, Fl. Grandchildren, Dell
Townsend and Carlene, Cathy (Ray)
Richards all of Lake City, Fl., Lisa
Mosher, Newberry, Fl., Greg (Hei-
di) Harding, Lake City, Fl., Diane
Andrews, Starke, Fl., John Paul
Johnson Keystone Heights, Fl. Den-
nis James Johnson, Lake Butler and
Sonnia Jean Brezee, Lake Butler,
Fl. Ronnie and Tami Drake, Lake
City, Florida. Fourteen Great
Grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Harding
will be conducted Wednesday De-
cember 28, 2005 at 2:00 P.M. in the
Hopeful Baptist Church. Interment
will follow in the Memorial Ceme-
tery., The family will. receive
friends Tuesday December 27, 2005
'f"om 6:00-8s:00 P.M. at the funeral
home. GUERRY FUNERAL
HOME 2659 SW. Main Blvd. Lake
City, Florida is in charge of all ar-
rangements. 386-752-2414.


Mr. Robert J. "B.J." Taylor,.
Mr. Robert J. "B.J." Taylor, 50, of
Lake City, Florida & Wellington,
Colorado, died early
Monday morn- ' "'
ing in a hunting
related accident. A
native of
1Hagerstown,
Ma r.y an d,
Mr. Taylor moved to
Lake City at a
very young age and
had been a resi- .
dent here for forty
years prior to his
job requiring him to move to Colo-
rado.
Mr. Taylor was educated in the Co-
lumbia County school system and
was a member of the 1974 Colum-
bia High School graduating class.
He then entered the United States
Marine Corps. and served until
1980. He owned and operated Tay-
lor Concrete for the past twenty five


CC'S FLOWER VILLA'
Your Full Service Florist

We're Ready To Serve

You In 2006!

754-5200
Toll Free 888-433-3216
563 SW S47 (Corer of McFarlane Ave. & SR47) _
E visit our website www.ccflowers.com -


You... NOW HIRING!
* Positive Attitude
* Dynamic Personality
* Computer Experience

* Casual, Fun Work Environment
* Various Schedules Apply today
* Benefits Package 1152 SW Business Point Drive
S-lLake City, Florida 32025
- L CLiENTLOGIC


Let's Connect!


386-754-8600
www.cllentlogic.com


years. He operated in Lake City un-
til eight years ago when he moved
to Wellington, Colorado and was
currently moving himself and his
family back to Lake City. Mr. Tay-
lor was a very active member of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter
Day Saints. He was recently named
to the Bishopric of the Riverside
Ward in the Fort Collins, Colorado
Stake. He held the Melchizedek
Priesthood and was an ordained
High Priest. In his spare time Mr.
Taylor enjoyed spending time with
his daughters and was an avid fish-
erman.
Mr. Taylor is survived by his wife
of twenty-two years, Beverly Wa-
ters Taylor; five daughters, Crystal
Rose Taylor-Janasiewicz (Adam),
Lake City; Rheanne Charise Taylor,
Celena Gayle Taylor; Mariah Bev-
erly Taylor all of Wellington, Colo-
rado; and Erika Taylor of Gunters-
ville, Alabama; his parents, Jimmy
& Ruth Johnson of Lake City; his
mothers & fathers-in-law, Martin &
Barbara Griner, Lake City; Lonnie
Earl & Frances Waters of Lake But-
ler, Florida; a brother, Timmy Grif-
fith (Dede), Lake City; six sisters,
Susie Roberts (Red), Lake City;
Lorraine Odom (David), Tallahas-
see, Florida, Nancy McDowell
(John), Orlando, Florida; Faith Ann
Hoffer (Jim), Huntingdon, Pennsyl-
vania; Robyn Arrington (Denise
Hannah), Lake City; and Jamie Cray
(Donnie), of Lake City; brothers-


inlaw, Mitchell Waters (Dorene),
Fort Lipton, Colorado; Richard
Waters (Elizabeth), Wellington,
Colorado; Martin E. "Burt" Griner
IV (Brenda) Mesa, Arizona; sisters-
in-law, Debbie Svir, Lake City,
.Florida, and
Cindy Mason (John) of Fort Collins,
Colorado. Numerous aunts, uncles,
nieces, nephews, church friends and
other family members also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Taylor will
be conducted at 10:00 A.M., Friday,
December 30, 2005 in the Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
(Old Country Club Road) with
Bishop David Morse and Bishop
Jack Whittier (Fort Collins, Colora-
do) conducting. Interment will fol-
low in the Oak Grove Cemetery in
Lake Butler, Florida with military
honors. The family will receive
friends from 5-8 Thursday evening
at the Church of Jesus Christ of Lat-
ter Day Saints. Arrangements are
under the direction of the DEES
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME &
CREMATION SERVICES, 768
West Duval St., Lake City, Florida.
(961-9500)

FERN BOWEN
Fern Bowen, 64 of Rotonda West,
Florida died Suhdav.' December 25,
2005 at the Port Ci,.,, I...|,[ Tideweil'
Hospice Home.
Born on April 12, 1941 in Columbia
County, Florida, she had been a res-


ident of Florida two and a half years
coming form Raleigh, North Caroli-
na.
Mrs. Bowen retired as a secretary
from Alcatel, .a telecommunications
manufacturer, after twenty years in
2000. She was a loving wife, moth-
er and homemaker for her family.
Survivors include her husband of
twenty-five years: Robert M. Bo-
wen of Rotonda West, FL; two
sons: Sean L. Bowen of Minot, ND
and Donn P Bowen of Abilene, TX;
one brother: Daniel O'Neal of Lake
City, FL; and five grand children.
A memorial service will be held on
Saturday, December 31, 2005 at 1
Pm at the ENGLEWOOD COM-
MUNITY FUNERAL HOME &
CREMATION SERVICES, 3070
South McCall Road, with the Rev.
Carl Kaltreider, officiating.
Memorial contributions may be
made to the American Cancer Soci-
ety, 2801 Fruitville Road, Suite 250,
Sarasota, Florida 34237.

Mrs. Zona Lee Zschiedrich
Mrs. Zona Zschiedrich, 88, passed
away Sunday, December 18, 2005
at the Christian City Convalescent
Center in Atlanta, Georgia after an
extended illness. Mrs. Zona was, a
native' pfo'LL'.e C%\ "SIc v. A;
mnenimbc r"o1' the First' Pr.'l.i, i ll.,ri
-Church of Lake City. She loved to
travel and spent a good portion of
time in Europe. She is preceded in


death by her parents; Thomas L. &
Nettie Avery, her first husband of
thirty-two years, Russell Dale Ri-
chardson, her second husband of
twenty-six years, Rudolph Kurt
Zschiedrich, two brothers; Roy &
J.W. Avery and one sister, Betty
Deckard. She is survived by her two
daughters; Sandra Dale & Steve
Martin, of Pagosa Springs, CO. and
Janie & Pete Michaud, of Atlanta,
GA. One sister; Mary NesSmith, of
Bloomington, IN.: 5 grandchildren,
12 great grandchildren & 1 great
great grandchild also survive.
Graveside services will be held;
Thursday, December 29, 2005 @
2:00 p.m. At Memorial Cemetery
(Lake Jeffery Rd.). SHERRILL-
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 (386) 752-2211 is in charge
of arrangements.

Obituaries are paid advertisements.
For details, call the Lake City
Reporter's classified department at
752-1293






JY T * SELL IT!
FIND IT!
~~-~ 8iff~~a


come and get your love-



CiLtel
wireless


SAltel Retail Stores
Alachua
U.S. Hwy. 441 & Main St.
(386) 462-1553
Chiefland
7021 N.W 140th St.
(352) 490-6170


Gainesville
Butler Plaza
3626 S.W. Archer Rd.
(352) 491-2500


The Marketplace (Express)
4138 N.W. 16th Blvd.
(352) 491-2530


Live Oak
206 White Ave.
(386) 362-8000


Lake City Ocalo
2750 U.S. Hwy. 90W. 2606 S.W 191h Ave Rd.
(386) 961-0300 1352) 2373344


4980 E. Silver Springs Blvd.
(352) 236-2163 9
Starke
1252 S. Walnut
(904) 964-3977


Phone Promotion: Phone available at sale price to new customers & eligible existing customers. Contact Alleol to determine if you are eligible. Limit 1 rebate per qualifying purchase. Phone cannot be , ,
returned once mail-in rebate certificate has been submitted. Customer pays applicable taxes. See rebate certificate for details. $9.99 Add Lines: 1 line must be a primary line of service on select rate plans ST;
$59.99 & higher, with no more than 4 secondary lines at $9.99/month each. 2-year service agreement required for each line in conjunction with a phone promotion. Additional Information: Limited-time " ' ~ \
offer at participating locations. While supplies last. Activation of a qualifying Alltel rate plan, credit approval & approved handset required. $20 non-refundable activation fee applies per line. $200 early f Cm r
termination fee may apply per line. Nickelack photo & "All the Right Reasons" cover art 29005 The All Blacks B.V. Nokia & Nokia 62551 are trademarks or registered trademarks of Nokia Corporation. ,*
Bluetooth is registered trademark of Bluetooth, SIG, Inc. Offers are subject to the Alltel Terms & Conditions for Communications Services available at any Alltel store or alltel.com. All product & service '- -
marks referenced are the names, trade names, trademarks & logos of their respective owners. ". ..


Only from Alltel

Get the FREE


when you buy the NOKIA

6255i


MP3 Player / FM Radio
Flash Camera & Video Phone
Bluetooth Connectivity

$8499
1, I -


JamPack also includes: .
>2 FREE
Wallpapers

�2FREE



Bue W Pkeunlr ao
B30 Days
FREE Mod one OJ'

- FREE


Zuma . by PopC .p

Word Po.r eour.
Tomas Hold 'Em


access


I SHERRILL-GUERRY

Funeral Home


Local People
Serving Local Families


The Very Best Service at The Very Best Value
Located 1 Block North of VA Hospital * 752-2211
Visit us at our website sherrillguerryfh.com


Proud Sponsor of:


Business Sales
13861 119 1111
Lake City
1352) 231.7945
Ocala


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


Q









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


Hurricane evacuees find help


from many Lake City businesses


From staff reports
Catholic Charities Bureau
of the Diocese of Saint
Augustine continues to reach
out to victims of Hurricane
Katrina and Rita, most espe-
cially in the Lake City office.
Because of its location along
Interstate 10, several Gulf
Coast evacuees traveled to
Lake City seeking assistance
in rebuilding their lives.
"We have received hun-
dreds of hurricane evacuees
in Lake City looking for emer-
gency assistance and we are
thankful.to the many individu-
als and businesses in the com-
munity that have stepped for-
ward to help," said Suzanne
Edwards, director of the Lake


"We have received hundreds of
hurricane evacuees in Lake City
looking for emergency assistance and
we are thankful to the many individuals
and businesses in the community that
have stepped forward to help."
- Suzanne Edwards,
director Lake City Catholic Charities office.


City Catholic Charities office.
Shortly after the hurricanes
ravaged neighboring states,
several business leaders in
the community began pulling
their resources to help meet
the immediate needs of storm
victims. Leading the way was
Dr. Minesh Patel, who helped
collect nearly $9,000. The


funds were placed in the
Columbia County Bank and
Catholic Charities has been
selected to help direct the
funds to the evacuees.
The Diocese of Saint
Augustine has offices in
Gainesville, High Springs,
Jacksonville and St.
Augustine. Catholic Charities


has collected about
$1.2 million throughout the
17-county area of the diocese
for hurricane relief. The
funds, according to Bill Beitz,
diocesan director of Catholic
Charities Bureau, Inc., are
dispersed to each of the
regional offices. So far, more
than $28,000 has been sent to
the Lake City office and more
is expected as needs of
families are identified.
"We are so very thankful to
all the people in our commu-
nity who donated funds, food,
clothing, time and their love
to help others in their time of
need," Edwards said. "Our
office continues to be blessed
with many volunteers and an
awesome staff."


New Orleans hotels: Full of relief workers

and residents, become new town squares


By ERIN TEXEIRA
AP National Writer
NEW ORLEANS - Before
the sun rises on the hotels of
New Orleans, doctors in
scrubs pile into elevators,
shoulder-to-shoulder with
construction workers wield-
Sing their sledgehammers.
The doors open and they're
off to work.
Soon, children are tearing
through the hallways, push-
ing their toy trucks or playing
tag as they get underfoot. A
woman shuffles through the
lobby wearing hair curlers
and velvet bedroom slippers.
A man lugs two bulging
garbage bags up to his room;
they contain all he has left.
The lobbies are bustling all
day with everyone from FBI
agents to real estate specula-
tors. Later, in the bar, city law-
makers huddle over, stiff
drinks to plot their next move.
4~Helcome -to .New-Orleans'-


new town square. Hotels that
once were at the heart of the
city's tourist economy have
now morphed into a combina-
tion homeless shelter, board
room and Wild West saloon.
'"he courtyard downstairs
in the lobby, it's like a large liv-
ing room," Jared C. Brossett,
an aide to a New Orleans city
councilwoman, said of the
Sheraton. He's lived there with
city funding since losing his
apartment. "You sit in the
lobby and just look. It's kind of
surreal, really. You have to ask
yourself sometimes, 'How did
I get here - living in a hotel?"'
Part of the reason is simple:'
The few hotels that stayed
open through Hurricane
Katrina quickly become oases
of normalcy for the people
trying to get the city back on
its feet.
Even now it's startling to
drive through the mud-caked
streets and into the valet
parking lot of the Sheraton or


the Royal Sonesta.
"My hotel is full of people
who need to work here but
they don't.have a home," said
Dan King, the Sheraton's
general manager. "We've had
to shift gears a little bit -
we're more like a dormitory
now."
Indeed, many hotel guests
have put small.kitchen appli-
ances - microwave ovens,
coffee makers, hot plates - in
their rooms. Bellhop carts
normally reserved for suitcas-
es often are filled with
groceries. On the Sheraton's
eighth floor, management
has installed coin-operated
washing machines and dryers.
Rooms at the Sheraton
start at about $200 a night.
King said the hotel has a long-
term contract with the
Federal Emergency
Management Agency.
Of 140 hotels listed on the
city's official marketing site,
91 are open, but at least 21 are


booked up for months, often
on long-term contracts with
private companies or with the
federal government;
Some are calling the
Sheraton the new City Hall.
Several city council members
live there and the mayor con-
ducts his town hall meetings
in a ballroom. (The real City
Hall also is open for
business).
And its not just home to
politicians.' A whole host of
other types walk the hallways:
journalists, church group'
volunteers and disaster
specialists, to name a few.
'To stand at Starbucks with
two guys in fatigues carrying
M-16s,. it's like 'OK, this is
now part of the new normal,"'
said Laura Claverie, editor of
NewOrleansOnline.com, the
city's tourism Web site.
Then there are just folks -
New Orleanians aching to be
back home,, waiting for'life to
restart :,,- :.,�: -. ,,'i i - ..


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Smoke from a grass fire fills the sky near Troup, Texas, as more
than 200 acres burns, threatening homes, on Saturday.

Grass fires burn homes

in Oklahoma and Texas


By TIM TALLEY
Associated Press
MUSTANG, Okla. - Grass.
fires driven by gusty wind
damaged several homes in
Oklahoma and threatened
others in North Texas on
Tuesday. Three Oklahomans
suffered minor -injuries,
authorities said.
The biggest fire burned at
least a square mile in a rural
area near the town of
Mustang, southwest of
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
City Fire Maj. Brian Stanaland
said. He said he did not know
exactly how many homes
were damaged there. One
civilian suffered minor
injuries.
TV station helicopter
footage showed at least a
half-dozen structures were
burned in Mustang, but
conditions appeared to
improve by late afternoon.
"Everybody is out now
watering their yards and
standing in their yards," said
Harold Percival, who lives
,about ia mile., from. ,the


Mustang fire.
Several other grass fires
were brought under control in
three areas of Oklahoma City.
Onefirefighter suffered heat
exhaustion and a child suf-
fered minor burns on his
hands when a shed caught
fire.
In Texas, Fort Worth Fire
Department Lt. Kent Worley
said crews had fought nine
brush fires within city limits
during the first half of the day
and he expected more. His
department also helped battle
a blaze in nearby Kennedale.
The Dallas Morning News
said flames in Kennedale
threatened two apartment
complex.
There were no immediate
reports of injuries in Texas.
The cause of the Oklahoma
blazes was under investiga-
tion, but officials said sparks
from power lines were one
possibility.
The wind in Oklahoma was
clocked'at 25 to 35 mph, with
gusts as high as 40 mph ,.. :


IMPORTANT NOTICE




CONCERNING




COLUMBIA COUNTY GAS TAX





The Columbia County Board of County Commissioners


advises the


cent Local Option Gas Tax that began on


January 1, 2001 will expire on December 31, 2005. This is


the Tax that was enacted to build the Bascom Norris


Connector Road.





The Board of County Commissioners sincerely appreciates


the efforts and sacrifices of its citizens in supporting this


project with your gas tax contributions. We further wish a


happy, prosperous and safe new year to all. Thank you for

making Columbia County a great place to live, work and


play.


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404








LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


Page Editor: Todd Wilson, 754-0428


I' ' J'HEALTHY: New goals include workouts


TROY ROBERTSILake City Reporter
The back side and interior of Spradley's Auto Repair in Lake City sustained the most damage from a
fire Monday morning. The business remained open Tuesday amid the cleanup.


TROY ROBERTSILake City Reporter
Shelby Overstreet, (from left) TJ Hall and Lauren Hall
help mop and clean the office area of Spradley's Auto
Repair on Tuesday. Katie Hall (not pictured) also
helped with the cleanup. The business was severely
damaged by a fire in the rear of the structure Monday,
Sbu.oRened for business on Tuesday.
-, -


FIRE
Continued From Page 1A

time of the fire were damaged by the
flames and falling sections of the
roof.
Many of the rooms were damaged by
smoke.
"The office floors were completely
blackened," Hall said.,
"We've been cleaning the floors almost
all day. We've had to throw away a lot of
stuff that was damaged."
Hall said she was unsure of how the fire
started, but indicated a heater in one of the
back rooms could have been one of the
causes.
Hall said she was unsure when the build-
ing would be completely repaired, but
believed work would begin soon.
'We're hoping to have (the building)
fixed soon," Hall said.
'They're going to have to tear off the
roof and replace it, and we have to have the
building fixed before we can get our
electricity back."
However, even with the extensive dam-
age, Spradley's Auto Repair is still open for
business.
"Before I came in today, I got a gen-
erator for the house so my father
(Doyle Spradley) can still work," Hall
said. "We will remain open for
business." .


Continued From Page 1A
weight-loss goals and give up
when they don't see any
results.
"It seems people start up as
a new year's resolution and
then it kind of tapers down,"
Roman said. "You can get
overwhelmed if you're train-
ing for three or four months
and you want to lose
50 pounds and its just not com-
ing off."
To motivate beginners, the
YMCA will waive its initiation
fee beginning Jan. 3, which
will save new members up to
$50. Future Fitness currently


is offering a discounted $107
six-month membership and
provides two free personal
training sessions.
"We're incorporating per-
sonal training this year to help
people with their new year's
resolutions," Future Fitness
personal trainer Zach Dancy
said.
Local fitness centers all say
people who want to shed
pounds should utilize personal
trainers and incorporate
weight training into their rou-
tines if they want to see
results.


"A treadmill alone will not
get them where they want to
be," Dancy said.
People should set small,
attainable goals, such as los-
ing five pounds and avoid step-
ping onto the scales because
it's the inches that matter, not
how much you weigh, Roman
said.
"Women are always getting
up on the scales but that's the
worst thing you can do," he
said. "When you lose weight,
your energy level goes up and
you can tell by how your
clothes start fitting."


line of grocery items. in the
new space.
"Right now, we have frozen
food, lunch meats, dairy, eggs
and bacon, and all the basics
but we'll be expanding. The
proposal is to have more of
those type things available,"
said Sam Taylor, store
manager.


Eldridge was reached by
'telephone Tuesday afternoon
and said he was about to head
out the door to buy groceries
in High Springs or Lake City.
"Anything that would
relieve that kind of travel
would be a real boon,"
Eldridge said.
Eldridge said the developer


is "ready to dig holes as soon
as they get the town's
-approval" and work is expect-
ed to take six months. The
town council will hear that
request at its next meeting on
Jan 24. The meeting'to
approve the expansion plan
almost didn't happen because
of board disorganization.


"GOD LOVES US, WARTS AND ALL"
Joy, hope, faith, commitment, and love
are qualities of our church family at
First Presbyterian Church.
We are all sinners in the sight of God yet
are loved... Warts and all.

S We are especially proud of the.church's pas-
sion and commitment for helping others in
the community and the world. We have been
truly blessed by our church family.
Jordan, Bonnie, and Lane Green Come worship with Jordan, Bonnie and Lane Sunday!

Wear00pupoe rienchrc


First Presbyterian Church
697 SW Baya Dr., Lake City, FL
752-0670 fpclc@bellsouth.net
www.f irstpreslakecity.org


WORSHIP
Contemporary Worship
Traditional Worship
SLnd.a,' School


9:00AM
11:00AM
10:00AM


50" off'
ALL Black & Decker
and Strait-Line
Laser Levels
Offer good through 1/2/06.
Discount taken at register.


now.
$139t
was s HITACHI
14-Volt 4-piece
Combo Kit #35986


20"
ALL Kobalt I
Tool Storage

Offer good through 1/2/06..
Discount taken at register.


off:


n-Stock


Improving Home Improvement"


A. 32-Gallon Holiday B. 78-Quart Clear Visual Tote C. Vertical Wrap Organizer
Storage Container #140888 #226226 #180803
^ _ . � . - _ L i _ � n ii/m - ^ , - _ Im n 1 1 i L l 1 - - _ _ - I-i m i 1 .T Ti - T I - I I * 1. , . - -. . .i 11. i. - 1. . M


6 days only!


F '
4'


I�----


12/28/05
through
1/2/06


,.. ,


ALL In-Stock
Small Appliances


10" off
ALL Whirlpool In-Stock
Washers, Dryers, and Dishwashers


Small appliances includes: coffee makers, blenders, mixers, toaster ovens, food processors, and more. Offer good through 1/2/06. Discount taken at register.


75"0 off
ALL In-Stock Holiday
Decorations
Excludes holiday storage. Includes artificial trees, wreaths, lights,
ornaments, outdoor d6cor, rugs, holiday plants, books, and more.
Discount taken at register.


ASK FORZERO
PAYMENTS& INTEREST FOR
12 MONTHS
IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 12 MONTHS*
On any Major Appliance or Tool purchases of $299 or more made on your
Lowe's Consumer Credit Card 12/28/05 through 1/2/06. ,


Prices may vary after January 2, 2006 if there are market variations. "Was" prices in this advertisement were in effect on December 21, 2005, and may vary based on Lowe's Every Day Low Price policy. See store for details regarding product warranties. We reserve the right to limit quantities. 'Applies to single-
receipt, in-store Major Appliance or Tool purchases of $299 or more made 12/28/2005 through 1/2/2006 on a Lowe's consumer credit card account. No monthly payments will be required and no finance charges will be assessed on this promo purchase If you pay the following in full within 12 months: (1) the promo
purchase amount, and (2) any related optional credit Insurance/debt cancellation charges. If you do not, finance charges will be assessed on the promo purchase amount from the d,.,. ...I II, .. . i. I . .. irii. , i : I,,, ,i:.,iI .11 c -e e uir ..- -,, J . ..,ri ,n r,': ,,.1, ., c.,, c:,-,,, : , .. i'1-, : APR Is 21%
(13.9% for purchases of $2,000 or more). Min. finance charge is $1.00 ($.50 in IA). Offer is subject to credit approval. Excl. Business Accounts. �2005 by Lowe's. All rights reserved. I-,. .. . I Ir. .- j i1. i: r. ,... -...lii I. r'] .,:,.> ...- . i .: L LL'. iF I. t While supplies last
00116303/003,004,005,007,009,011,013,014,016,017,018,019,021,022,023,026,027,028,030,031,033,034,036,037,038,040,041,045,046,049,052,054,056,057,058,059,060,061,062064065066,067,068069,072073,075077,078,079082083084086087088089,090091092,093,09409509609810210310410510107108112115117123124125
26.127.128.129.130.131.132.133.134.135.136.137.138
'A!


GROWTH: Dollar General will expand
Continued From Page 1A


now now

189, *996"
was a 129 was .'
Reciprocating Saw 51-Piece Set
and 3/8" VSR Drill #191953 #123101


"


I-~- ��-�I-~-- -- 7 7 -


1~��11~(�~�;-�111���I-^�-L��L� 111 �L1(ICC L -------���IC ~---- C -C- - 7 7


Prie eflct


''


I


~Llli~a~e


r r
".~t~
'''









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


. Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom
Wednesday, December 28, 2005


SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS


COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Meyer expects
physical bowl game
TAMPA - Florida coach
Urban Meyer has no doubt
that next week's Outback
Bowl game against Iowa
will be a physical affair.
"I think it's classic Big 10
vs. SEC," Meyer said.
"Iowa is a physical outfit.
It's a great matchup. I think
it's two
evenly
matched
teams."
Iowa
(7-4)
, aver-
aged
30.5 points this season.
The Hawkeyes closed
out the regular season by
beating Wisconsin and
Minnesota following a pair
-of tough losses against
Michigan and
Northwestern.
'They remind me of a
Big 10 football team ... a
top 2 or 3 Big 10 football
team the way they play,"
Meyer said.
S Florida's defense is
ranked seventh in the
nation, allowing an average
of 289.8 yards.
The Gators (8-3)
practiced in full pads on
Tuesday during their sec-
ond workout since arriving
in Tampa one day earlier.
"It was a great day
today," Meyer said. "A lot
of times you worry about
S attitudes. It was a great
practice."
A victory over the
Hawkeyes would make
Meyer the third Florida
coach - joining Ray
Graves and Steve Spurrier
- to win nine games in his
first season at the school.

Wisconsin, Auburn
stars weigh NFL
ORLANDO - Brian
Calhoun, Joe Thomas and
Stanley McClover are all
doing their best to focus on
the
Capital
One
Bowl, but
they're
also
weighing
decisions
for their McClover
futures.
The three juniors for
Wisconsin and Auburn all
said Tuesday they haven't
made up their minds on
whether to return for their
senior seasons or enter the
NFL draft.
Thomas, the Badgers'
6-foot-8 offensive tackle,
said his evaluation from
NFL officials pegged him
as a first-round pick.
Calhoun, Wisconsin's
versatile tailback, and
McClover, Auburn's defen-
sive end, both said they
haven't received the results
of their own requests for
information yet.
Calhoun, a second-team
'Associated Press
All-American, said he
wouldn't think much about
the NFL decision until after
Monday's game.
"It's unfair to (my team-
mates), it's unfair to the
coaches, for me to be
focusing on that, so I'll
cross the bridge when it
comes," he said.
McClover had 6.5 sacks
in Auburn's last three
games after a six-game
stretch without one.
He also didn't shed light
on his future plans.
"I just want to focus on
this last game with
Wisconsin," he said.
"I'll just worry about (the
NFL) as it comes."

* From Associated Press
reports..


Tigers stay perfect at Daytona Beach


Columbia wins first
game of Classic against
Kentucky team.
From staff reports

Even with all the problems in get-
ting to Daytona Beach, there was no
stopping the Columbia High basket-
ball team from remaining undefeated
on the season.


Kenny Williams scored 16 points,
Cameron Reynolds added 10 and
Jakeem Hill scored nine in
leading the Tigers to a 57-42
win against Estill County High
from Kentucky on Tuesday.
"We came out, I didn't
know what to expect," Tigers
coach Trey Hosford said. "It
was a tough time getting to
Daytona. We had problems getting a
rental car and left an hour late. There


was a lot of traffic, so we didn't get into'.
Daytona until after 2 for a 2:30 game. I
was just proud we came away
with a win."
Columbia led 10-8 in the
first quarter, then outscored
Estill County 16-8 in the
Second to start to pull away.
"Our press defense was
starting to work," Hosford said.
"Anytime you hold a team to 16 points in
a half, the defense did an excellent job."


Byron Shemwell added seven points,
Jeremy Rayford scored five, Tavaris
Reynolds scored four, and Gerry
Harris, Williams Lucas and Jamal
Brown scored two for the Tigers (9-0).
Next up for Columbia is a 1:30 p.m.
game today against Norfolk Collegiate
Oaks of Virginia. Norfolk boasts
Karolis Petrukonis, a 6-foot-ll player
who has already signed to play at
Clemson University. The Tigers are off
Thursday, then play again on Friday.


Former

pitcher

arrested

Reardon charged
with robbing a
jewelry store.
Associated Press

PALM BEACH GAR-
DENS - Jeff Reardon, one
of the top relief pitchers in"
history, was charged with
robbing a jewelry store,
then blamed his arrest on
medication he was taking
for depression.
The 50-year-old Reardon,
retired since 1994 and sixth
in career saves, walked into
Hamilton Jewelers at the
Gardens Mall on Monday
and hand-
ed an
employee
a note say-
ing he had
a gun and
the store
was being
robbed d, Reardon
robbed,
police said Tuesday.
Reardon, who starred
with the Montreal Expos,
Minnesota Twins and
Boston Red Sox, fled the
store with an undisclosed
amount of cash. Police
found him at a nearby
restaurant, recovered the
stolen money and charged
him with armed robbery.
Lt. David O'Neill said
Reardon did not have a gun
and offered no resistance
when handcuffed.
"He said it was the med-
ication that made him do it
and that he was sorry,"
O'Neill said.
He said Reardon has lived
in the city for more than
20 years and has never
caused any problems.
Reardon briefly appeared
in court Tuesday and was to
be released on $5,000 bail,
said his attorney, Mitchell
Beers.
He said Reardon had a 20-
year-old son who died of a
drug overdose in February
2004, which has been "very
difficult for him and his fam-
ily," and has been on med-
ication for depression.
Reardon, who is married
and has two other children,
also underwent a heart
angioplasty last week and
has been taking medication
REARDON continued on 2B


teaches kids in camp.
By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter.com
Michael Kirkman was back
on familiar ground Tuesday
afternoon, toeing the rubber
and going into his windup at the
Columbia High baseball field.
But he didn't have a base-
ball in his hand.
Instead, Kirkman was
instructing Lake City Middle
School sixth-grader Shane
Hartopp on how to stride
toward the plate.
It was just one of many les-
sons the former Tigers and
current Texas Rangers minor
league pitcher had dispensed
during the Tiger Pitching
Camp, which began last
Wednesday and ends today.
The camp sprung from an
idea that Kirkman and Tigers
pitching coach Tad Cervantes
cooked up last season.
"With Michael going pro
this summer, we had an idea
of bringing Michael out here
- the kids would love it,"
Cervantes said.
That was the main reason
kids like Hartopp attended
the camp. When asked why
he signed up, Hartopp
replied, "We had a big-leaguer
helping us."
Kirkman said, "I like being
able to work with people and
teach them what I've learned."
The main thing Kirkman
said he learned in the minors
which he brought to the camp
was teaching the kids how to
make adjustments.
"It's the biggest thing in
pitching, and being able to
balance what you have
learned," he said.
Among the items kids
worked on were pitching
mechanics, and they partici-
pated in different drills like
pitcher fielding practice.
The oldest player at the
camp was 13-year-old
Richardson Middle School
pitcher Jeremy Dohrn, who
said he signed up to "hopeful-
ly get more speed on my fast-
ball and better control on my
curveball."
Dohrn is a longtime family
friend of Kirkman's, and he
said of the camp, "It's been
fun. It's been exciting."
Lane Pendergrast, 10, said
he learned how to throw a bet-
ter curveball, how to field a


MARIO SARMENTOILake City Reporter
Lake City Middle School pitcher Shane Hartopp (left) begins his windup while former Columbia High
pitcher and current Texas Rangers minor leaguer Michael Kirkman looks on. Kirkman and pitching
coach Tad Cervantes teamed up for a Tiger Pitching Camp that ends today.


ground ball properly and how
to cover first base.
He added that he learned "a
lot of stuff' from working with
Kirkman. Cervantes and
Kirkman had a video camera
on hand to record each play-
er's mechanics, and each tape
will be given to the player
when the camp ends so he can
study it. Cervantes said he let
Kirkman review the tapes
with the kids each day to
show them what they had
learned.
Attendees had the


additional treat of receiving
baseballs and shirts that
Kirkman signed himself, and
at the end of the camp they
will all receive a T-shirt cour-
tesy of Brian's Sports. Zaxby's
also provided a meal for the
players each day of the camp.
Cervantes said most of the
proceeds from the $150 sign-
up fee for each player will go
back into the Columbia base-
ball program, with whatever is
left over divided between
Kirkman and Cervantes for
coaching the camp.


Ages ranged from 9-14,
although an 8-year-old was
also allowed to attend.
Cervantes said the younger
kids showed the most
improvement from the begin-
ning of the camp, while
Kirkman said getting an
opportunity to work with
them was as much fun for him
as it was for the kids to work
with a professional player.
"It's awesome," he said.
'They tend to listen. They lis-
ten really well, they do what
we ask, and they're learning."


Tigers take out Buffaloes


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Colorado's Hugh Charles (center) runs for a short gain against
Clemson's Tramaine Billie (20) and Charles Bennett (right) during
the first half of the Champs Sports Bowl college football game in
Orlando on Tuesday. The Tigers won 19-10.


James Davis runs for
150 yards and is the
MVP of the game.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press

ORLANDO - James Davis
ran for 150 yards and a touch-
down, Charlie Whitehurst
scrambled for a score and No.
23 Clemson beat Colorado
19-10 in the Champs Sports
Bowl on Tuesday, handing the


Buffaloes their fourth
consecutive loss.
Davis' 6-yard TD run with
1:38 remaining sealed a fourth
straight victory for Clemson
(8-4) and capped a disappoint-
ing season for Colorado (7-6).
The .Buffs made it close,
though, something they didn't
do in their previous two
games - losses to Nebraska
and Texas by a combined
score of 100-6.
Backup quarterback Brian
White replaced starter James


Cox midway through the
fourth quarter and led
Colorado on a 69-yard scoring
drive that made it 13-10. His 2-
yard TD pass to Quinn
Sypniewski ended a streak of 14
quarters without a touchdown
and gave the Buffs a chance.
But Davis and Whitehurst
answered, moving the Tigers
61 yards in 4:07 to put the
game away.
Davis ran 28 times and was
named the game's most
valuable player.


Section B


Learning from a pro

FormerTigers .
pitcher Kirkmnan I


_











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION


TV Sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
4:30 p.m.
ESPN - MPC Computers Bowl, Boston
College at Boise St.
8 p.m.
ESPN - Alamo Bowl, Michigan vs.
Nebraska, at San Antonio
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 - Oklahoma St. at UAB


FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


y-New England
Miami
Buffalo
N.Y. Jets


x-lndianapolis
z-jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston


y-Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland


y-Denver
Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland


East
W L
9 5
8 7
5 10
3 11
South
W L
13 2
II 4
4 II
2 13
North
W L
II 4
10 5
6 9
5 10
West
W L
12 3
9 6
9 6
4 11


Pct PF PA
.643 322 289
.533 290 291
.333 245 337
.214 189 298


Pct PF
.867 422
.733 321
.267 286
.133 243

Pct PF
.733 418
.667 354
.400 249
.333 212

Pct PF
.800 372
.600 366
.600 411
.267 269


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
xx-N.Y.Giants 10 5 0 .667 392 293
Washington 9 6 0 .600 328 273
Dallas 9 6 0 .600 315 288
Philadelphia 6 9 0 .400.290 357
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Tampa Bay 10 5 0 .667 273 261
Carolina 10 5 0 .667 347 248
Atlanta 8 7 0 .533 340 297
New Orleans 3 12 0 .200 222 371
North
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Chicago 1I 4 0 .733 250 168
Minnesota 8 7 0 .533 272 334
Detroit 5 10 0 .333 233 310
Green Bay 3 12 0 .200 275 327
West
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Seattle 13 2 0 .867 435 248
Arizona 5 10 0 .333 298 370
St.Louis . 5 10 0 .333 343 419
San Francisco 3 12 0 .200 219 411
x-clinched conference
Syclinched drij :ic1n -'..i
z-clinchied wild'cJard
xx-clinched playoff spot
Monday's Game
New England 31,N.Y. Jets 21
Saturday
Denver at San Diego, 4:30 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Oakland, 8 p.m.
Sunday
Buffalo at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Carolina atAtlanta, I p.m.
Detroit at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Arizona at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Seattle at Green Bay, I p.m.
Miami at New England, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Kansas City, I p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, I p.m.
New Orleans atTampa Bay, I p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Tennessee at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 4:15 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.

College bowl games

New Orleans Bowl
Southern Miss 3I,Arkansas State 19
GMAC Bowl
Toledo 45, UTEP 13
Las Vegas Bowl
California 35, BYU 28
Poinsettia Bowl
Navy 51, Colorado State 30
Fort Worth (Texas) Bowl
Kansas 42, Houston 13
Hawaii Bowl
Nevada 49, Central Florida 48, OT
Motor City Bowl
Memphis 38, Akron 31
Champs Sports Bowl
Clemson 19, Colorado '10
Insight Bowl
Arizona State vs. Rutgers (n)
Today
MPC Computers Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Boise State (9-3) vs. Boston College (8-3),
4:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Michigan (7-4) vs. Nebraska (7-4), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Thursday
Emerald Bowl
At San Francisco
Utah (6-5) vs. GeorgiaTech (7-4),4:30 p.m.
(ESPN)


Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Oregon (10-1) vs. Oklahoma (7-4), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Friday, Dec. 30
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
Virginia (6-5) vs. Minnesota (7-4), Noon
(ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El PasoTexas
Northwestern (7-4) vs. UCLA (9-2),2 p.m.
(CBS)
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Missouri (6-5) vs. South Carolina (7-4),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Peach Bowl
AtAtlanta
Miami (9-2) vs. LSU (10-2), 7:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday, Dec. 31
Meineke Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
South Florida (6-5) vs. North Carolina
State (6-5), II a.m. (ESPN2)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Fresno State (8-4) vs. Tulsa (8-4), I p.m.
(ESPN)
Houston Bowl
TCU (10-1) vs. Iowa State (7-4), 2:30 p.m.
(ESPN2)
Monday, Jan. 2
Cotton Bowl
At Dallas
Alabama (9-2) vs.Texas Tech (9-2), II a.m.
(FOX)
Outback Bowl
AtTampa
Iowa (7-4) vs. Florida (8-3), II a.m.
(ESPN)

BASKETBALL

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division


New Jerse)
Philadelphi;
Boston
NewYork
Toronto


Miami
Washingtoi
Orlando
Charlotte
Atlanta


Detroit
Cleveland
Indiana
Milwaukee
Chicago


W L Pct
S 15 12 .556
a 14 13 .519
11 15 .423
7 19 .269
6 21 .222
Southeast Division
W L Pct
16 12 .571
n 12 14 .462
10 15 .400
9 19 .321
7 19 .269
Central Division
W L Pct
22 3 .880
17 9 .654
15 10 .600
15 10 .600
12 15 .444


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Dallas 21 7 .750 -
SanAntonio 21 7 .750 -
Memphis 16 10" .615 4
New Orleans . II .'15 .423 9
Houston 10 15 .400 9'A
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 13 12 .520 -
Denver 14 14 .500 '
Seattle 12 14 .462 I'/�
Utah 12 16 .429 2%2
Portland 9 18 .333 5
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 16 10 .615 -
Phoenix 16 10 .615 -
L.A.Lakers 15 13 .536 2
Golden State 14 14 ..500 3
Sacramento 10 17 .370 6/
Monday's Games
Orlando 108, Milwaukee 93
Cleveland 102, Chicago 91
Washington 94, LA. Lakers 91
New Jersey 109,NewYork 101
Phoenix 103, Minnesota 89
Dallas 102, Indiana 80
Utah 105, Memphis 102, OT
Seattle 118, Boston I I
Portland 105, Sacramento 92
Denver 118, Golden State 112
Tuesday's Games
(Late Games Not Included)
Charlotte 93,Atlanta 90
Milwaukee at Miami (n)
Toronto at Detroit (n)
Cleveland at New Jersey (n)
Utah at Houston (n)
Indiana at San Antonio (n)
Philadelphia at Denver (n)
Sacramento at L.A. Clippers (n)
Today's Games
Phoenix at Washington, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Toronto, 7 p.m.
New York at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Charlotte, 7:30 p.m.
Houston vs. New Orleans at Oklahoma
City, 8 p.m.
Seattle at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Portland, 10 p.m.
Memphis at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Boston at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Tuesday's Games
No. 4 Memphis 83, No. 8 Gonzaga 72
No. 13 Boston College 81, Duquesne 69
No. 20 Nevada vs. Norfolk State (n)
Today's Games
No. 2 Connecticut vs. Stony Brook at the


Hartford Civic Center, 7 p.m.
No. 6 Illinois vs. Southeast Missouri State,
8 p.m.
No. 9 Michigan State vs.Tennessee Tech, 7
p.m.
No. 10 Louisville vs. Fairleigh Dickinson, 7
p.m.
No. 14 Oklahoma vs. Oral Roberts, 8 p.m.
No. 16 Maryland vs. Delaware State,'8 p.m.
No. 19 N.C.State vs. New Hampshire, 7 p.m.
No. 21 Ohio State vs. Gardner-Webb, 8
p.m.
No. 23 North Carolina vs. North Carolina-
Asheville, 8 p.m.
No. 24 Wisconsin vs. Louisiana Tech, 8 p.m.
Thursday's Games
No.7Washington vs.Arizona State, 10 p.m.
No. I I UCLA vs. Stanford, 10:30 p.m.
No. 20 Nevada vs. Louisiana-Lafayette, 10
p.m.
Friday's Games
No. 2 Connecticut vs. Quinnipiac at the
Hartford Civic Center, 7 p.m.
No. 4 Memphis vs. Purdue, 8 p.m.
No. 5 Florida vs. FloridaA&M, I p.m.
No. 6 Illinois vs.Tennessee-Martin, 8 p.m.
No. 12 George Washington at No. 19 N.C.
State, 7 p.m.
No. 15 Texas vs. Prairie View, 8 p.m.
No. 18 Kentucky vs. Ohio at U.S. Bank
Arena, Cincinnati, 8 p.m.
No. 22 Wake Forest vs. Charleston
Southern, 7 p.m.
No. 25 West Virginia vs. Canisius, 7 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. I Duke vs. North Carolina-
Greensboro at Greensboro Coliseum, I p.m.
No. 3 Villanova vs.Temple at the Palestra, 4
p.m.
No. 7 Washington vs.Arizona, 2 p.m.
No. 8 Gonzaga vs. Saint Joseph's, 6 p.m.
No.9 Michigan State vs. Coppin State, I p.m.
No. 10 Louisville vs. Miami at Office
Depot Center, Sunrise, Fla., 4 p.m.
No. II UCLA vs. California, 4 p.m.
No. 13 Boston College at Rhode Island, I
p.m.
No. 14 Oklahoma vs.Alabama, 4:30 p.m.
No. 16 Maryland vs.VMI, 2 p.m.
No. 17 Indiana at Ball State,4 p.m.
No.20 Nevada at Saint Mary's, Calif., 7 p.m.
No.21 Ohio State vs. LSU, I p.m.
No. 24 Wisconsin at Pittsburgh, 6 p.r.

HOCKEY

NHL standings


EAST
A


Philadelphia
N.Y. Ranger
N.Y. Island
New Jersey
Pittsburgh


Ottawa
Buffalo
Toronto
Montreal
Boston


Carolina
Tampa Bay
Atlanta
Florida
Washington


a
rs
ars


*ERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W LOT Pts GF
22 8 5 49 131
21 12 4 46 113
17 16 2 36 116
IS 16 5 35 100


8 19 7 23
Northeast Division
W LOT Pts
25 6 3 53
25 II I 51
19 14 3 41
17 II 6 40
12 17 6 30
Southeast Division
W L OT . Pts
23 9 3 49
19 15 3 41
16 16 5 37
13 20 5 31
12 19 2 26


92


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W LOT Pts GF
Detroit 24 9 3 51 136
Nashville 23 7 3 49 109
Chicago 13 18 4 30 98
Columbus 10 25 I 21 76
St. Louis 8 21 4 20 90
Northwest Division
W LOT Pts GF
Calgary 21 II 4 46 92
Edmonton 21 12 4 46 123
Vancouver 20 11 5 45 122
Colorado 19 15 3 41 139
Minnesota 16 16 4 36 101
Pacific Division
W LOT Pts. GF
Dallas 23 10 I 47 118
Los Angeles 23 14 I 47 131
Phoenix 18 17 2 38 104
Anaheim - 16 14 6 38 103
San Jose 15 15 5 .35 105
Monday's Games
Buffalo 6, N.Y. Islanders 3
Atlanta 4, Montreal 0
Columbus 4, Chicago 3, OT
Philadelphia 3, Florida 2, SO
Ottawa 6, N.Y Rangers 2
Toronto 2, New Jersey I
Tampa Bay 5, Carolina 4, OT
Dallas 6, St. Louis I
Colorado 7, Phoenix 4
Minnesota 4, Edmonton I
Calgary 2,Vancouver I
Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3
Tuesday's Games
Boston atWashington (n)
Toronto at Pittsburgh (n)
Detroit at Dallas (n)
Nashville at Calgary (n)
Today's Games
Boston at Florida, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Columbus, 7 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at N.Y Islanders, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Montreal atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Los Angeles at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Nashville at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Phoenix at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


Pats top Jets in final Monday Night game


By ANDREA ADELSON
Associated Press

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
- When Mike Vrabel trotted
onto the field for the second
time with the Patriots offense,
everyone knew what to expect.
Another touchdown. Some-
how, Jets cornerback David
Barrett missed the memo.
The standout linebacker
scored two touchdowns on
Barrett, taking the spotlight in
the "Monday Night Football"
finale on ABC as the Patriots
beat the uninspired Jets 31-21.


Vrabel is known for his
touchdown prowess on
offense. He. had already
scored on a 1-yard catch in the
first quarter. His 2-yard grab
in the second quarter came on
the same exact play. Barrett
said he goofed both times.
"One touchdown's awe-
some, but two," Vrabel said.
Exactly why Barrett was so
frustrated.
"It's not like me to make
stupid mistakes like that; but
if you weren't human you
wouldn't make mistakes,"
Barrett said. "I was frustrated


about it. You don't want the
same thing to happen two
times in a row."
The game marked the end
ABC's 35-year "Monday Night
Football" run. It began with a
31-21 Jets loss to Cleveland on
Sept. 21, 1970. Next year, 'the
Monday games move to ESPN
and NBC takes over the show-
case telecast on Sunday nights.
There was plenty of nostal-
gia to go around, as the Jets'
Vinny Testaverde became the
first quarterback to throw a
touchdown pass in 19 straight
seasons.


Mowrey, McKeithen, DeMoss


win Dec. 21 Men's Day Blitz


We had 36 players who
played in the Men's Day Blitz
on Dec. 21. Jeff Mowrey won
top honors in the A Division
with a +4. Mike McCranie
was second with a +3. Jerry
West came in third with a +1.
Donald Roberts was fourth
with a -1.
Lex McKeithen won top
honors in the B Division with
a +16. Curtis Davis was sec-
ond with a +8. Ron Keller
came in third with a +6. Frog
Niwisch and Chris Sanders
were fourth with a +4.


QUAIL HEIGHTS
Carl Ste-Marie
www.quoilheights.com

Bob DeMoss won the C
Division with a +6. Al Cohoon
was second with a +5. Chuck
White came in third with a +2.
Jesse Lamb, Bobby Williams,
Hugh Sherill, Duane Rogers
and Chuck Sanders were
fourth with a -2. The pot hole
was Creeks No. 6. There
were three birdies, therefore
the pot worth $48 carries
over to today.


For more information on
events and tournaments at
Quail Heights, please check
our Web site.
Upcoming events:
* Jan. 14, MGA
Pot-of-Silver;
* Jan. 20, Awards Banquet;
* Jan. 21, CHS Tigerettes.
We had 15 players who
played in the Top-of-the-Hill
on Dec. 19. Williams won the
top honors in the A Division
with a +6. West was second
with a +4. Curtis Davis and
Cohoon were third with a +3.


Dungy, friends remember son


By FRED GOODALL
Associated Press

LUTZ - Tony Dungy
blinked back tears, straining
to compose himself.
"Parents hug your kids
every chance you get," he
said. "Tell them you love
them every chance you get
because you don't know when
it's going to be the last time."
The Indianapolis Colts
coach buried his eldest son,
James, on Tuesday, lovingly
recalling the 18-year-old who
died in an apparent suicide
last week as a "mama's boy"
with a "compassionate heart."
Someone who loved to smile
and have fun.
Dungy spoke for nearly 20
minutes during an emotional
two-hour 'funeral service
attended by NFL stars, past
and present, league officials,
including commissioner Paul
Tagliabue, the entire Colts
team and four other NFL head
coaches - Herman Edwards,
Dennis Green, Lovie Smith
and Jack Del Rio - along
with University of Washington
coach Ty Willingham.
Hall of Famer Mean Joe
Greene and ex-Washington
Redskins cornerback Darrell
Green were also among the
2,000 mourners who came to
Idlewild Baptist Church.
Dungy dabbed away tears
at times, but his message
throughout was clear: His son
was a "sweet young boy" who
struggled with many of the
same issues as others his age.
"As he got a little older, like
all teenagers, he was search-
ing for who that person was
inside of him. Who he was
going to be .... And like most
of us, I think he went through
a time as a teenager that, he
wasn't sure his parents
always had the best advice.
He wasn't sure that we always
had his best interest at
heart," the coach said.
"My daughter Tiara said it
best the other day. She said: 'I
just wish he could have made
it until he was 20. Because
when you're 17 or 18, some-
times the things you guys say
to us don't always make sense.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Indianapolis Colts coach Tony Dungy and his wife Lauren (center)
leave the Idlewild Baptist Church in Tampa on Tuesday, after the
funeral for their son, James. James Dungy, 18, died last week in
an apparent suicide.


... When I got to 20, they
started making sense again."'
Tiara, the eldest of Dungy's
five children, is 21.
Before leaving for the
cemetery, Dungy made a
brief statement outside the
church and, on behalf of his
wife, Lauren, and family,
thanked friends and fans for
their support.
"We loved our son very
much, he loved us and 'twe
miss him terribly. James was
a good young man with a
compassionate heart and we
were glad to have him for 18
years .... God has him now for
the rest of eternity," he said.
Shortly before the service
began, the Colts entered a
side door to the main audito-
rium of the 5,200-seat church,
filed past the open casket and
took their seats to the right of
the family section.
Dungy, with his right arm
draped around his wife's shoul-
der, led the family in and stood
in front of the cherrywood cas-
ket to say a final goodbye. The
couple took seats in a pew a
few feet away, then watched
solemnly as the lid was closed
and the service began.
Dungy left the Colts last
Thursday, the day his son was
found, and it remains
uncertain when he will return.
A preliminary autopsy


report indicated the teen took
his own life, but the exact
cause of death won't be
released until a toxicology
examination is completed in
four to six weeks.
The coach addressed his
players during the service,
calling them some of the
greatest role models in the
country and urging them to
reach out to young people.
"I want to urge you to con-
tinue being who you are
because our young boys in
this country, they need to
hear from you," he said. "If
anything, be bolder in who
you are. Because our boys are
getting a lot of the wrong mes-
sages about what it means to
be a man in this world. About
how you should act, and how
you should dress, and how
you should talk, and how you
should treat people. They
don't always get the right
message, but you guys have
the right messages."
He also cautioned parents
against taking their children
for granted. He recalled
Thanksgiving, which was the
last time he saw his son, as the
teen rushed off to the airport.
"I said, 'I'll see you later.' I
didn't get to hug him. I knew
I'd see him again pretty soon,
so it didn't really bother me
very much," Dungy said.


REARDON: Once was a top closer


Continued From Page 1B

for that condition.
"He asked me to apologize
to his fans and friends," Beers
said. 'This bizarre incident is
completely uncharacteristic of
Jeff Reardon."
He said Reardon, who made
more than $11.5 million dur-
ing his career, according to
baseballreference.com, was not
having financial problems.
Bert Blyleven, Reardon's
teammate on Minnesota's
1987 championship team,
said he knew Reardon was
still deeply, affected by his
son's death.
"It's very uncharacteristic
of Jeff Reardon to do what he
did," said Blyleven, now a TV
analyst for the Twins. "I've
been very fortunate, and my
wife has, not to lose any of
our children. I can't imagine
what he's going through in
the holidays."
"Hopefully, he can get help
and move forward on his
life," Blyleven added. '"Thank
God no one was hurt."
Reardon had a save in the
Twins' World Series victory
over St. Louis. But five years
later, he gave up a two-run


homer to Toronto's Ed
Sprague in the ninth 'inning,
allowing the Blue Jays to tie
Atlanta at one game apiece.
Toronto eventually won the
1992 World Series in six
games.


The four-time All-Star was
73-77 with 367 saves and a
3.16 ERA in 16 seasons with
the New York Mets, Montreal,
Minnesota, Boston, the
Atlanta Braves, Cincinnati
Reds and New York Yankees.


Announces...

Ladies Night

Every Thursday

Live Entertainment By

Local Traffic

Rockin' the night from 8-12

Ladies' Wells-$1 & Drafts-751
R-10 PM


Page Editor: Mario Sarmento, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


DILBERT


FOXTROT


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY B.C.
SORRY,THE GENERAL. DON'T THIS IS HIS WAKE HIM LUP!
CAN'T COME TO THE TRY TO MEETING!!
PHONE, HE'S INA CON ME,
uAAECTIki. -- WIVI CV


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


ZITS

MG', I " +�W'lGJ'g~ VIII
VO~cNGBTCANI - li
AR1ZONl ON
T'IFAVCVO77 Q








FOR BETTER OR WORSE


FRANK & ERNEST


GARFIELD


CLASSIC PEANUTS


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): The good cheer you take
with you will be well received
and put you in everyone's
good graces for the upcoming
year. Your thoughtfulness will
be remembered and the trou-
bleshooting done along the
way appreciated. -k*****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Make any last-minute
adjustments to your invest-
ments, A contract you have
been mulling over should
probably be taken care of
before the end of the year. Get
everything in writing. Be
careful - minor mishaps will
set you back. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You'll be on the go from
morning to night. Take in all
you can and listen to the
options being offered. An
older relative will do some-
thing special for you. Money
can be made. -***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You'll be inclined to try to
fit too much into your day. An
older relative may need your
help at the last minute.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

Prepare to have someone else
take care of the things you
can't get to yourself. ***-
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Turn this into a fun-filled day.
A little extra pampering or
shopping will make you feel
better about yourself. Mix
business with pleasure.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Not everyone will agree
with you today. Focus on your-
self and lifting your own
spirits. The people you are
closest to will not understand
your needs. Partnerships may
be difficult. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You can get everything
taken care of and be well on
your way to new deals, new
concepts and new ways of
doing things. Consider a short
trip if it will help you accom-
plish even more. You may want
to include someone you really
like in your plans. ***-*


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: E equals D
" KHKWT YNWL NY BEEXOZ XNA
XJ SBE, AN LBZZKW GFKZFKW
ZFK ABWONZXO SK BRONFNR
NW LNWVFXAK NW XEKBRXJL."
- OBWR UMJZBH IMAU:
PREVIOUS SOLUTION - "The mind is its own place, and In itself can make a
heaven of hell, a hell of heaven." - John Milton
(c) 2005 by NEA, Inc. 12-28


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You are going to have to
give others the benefit of the
doubt. Not everyone will want
to do things your way. If you
are difficult to get along with,
someone close to you may not
want to tell you the whole
truth. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Love, emotions and
socializing will all be at the top
of your list today. Tell it like it
is and you will avoid any prob-
'lems later on. It will be a per-
fect day to share with
someone you really adore.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't let your
changing mood get you into
trouble. Stick to what you
promised and give everything
you've got to doing things
right. As long as you are con-
sistent, you will remain in
control. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You can have pretty
much whatever you want as
long as you go about it the
right way. Force or being stub-
born will not be the answer.
Use your head and outsmart
those around you. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You will be emotional and
tend to change your mind a lot
about personal matters. Don't
let anyone confuse you about
what you can and can't do.
Follow your heart. An infatua-
tion will get you into
trouble.**
Birthday Baby: You are
quick to react and will attempt
things that most wouldn't. You
are an adventurer and a free-
thinker. You are creative,
imaginative and carefree.


DEAR ABBY


Wife props up husband

who puts himself down


DEAR ABBY: I have been
married to my soul mate and
best friend, "Herbert," for a
year and a half. There's only
one downside to our mar-
riage. Herbert speaks horri-
bly about himself several
times a day. It began after our
wedding and used to be limit-
ed to bill-paying time. But
over the last few months, he
has been doing it several
times a day.
He says he's a bad provider.
(He's not! We're no worse off
than millions of other newly-
wed couples.) He says he's
ugly. (Again, he isn't. I find
him very attractive.) He says
he is lazy and that I married
someone who, "if it weren't
for bad luck, would have no
luck at all." The list goes on
and on.
At first, I'd disagree, but
recently I have gone from
arguing with him to suggest-
ing counseling. Of course,
Herbert will have none of
that. He says we can't afford
counseling, which brings on
another round of his opinion
that he's worthless.
Abby, it's exhausting to
defend someone who con-
stantly attacks himself. What
are my options here? I adore
Herbert, but it would be nice
to be able to talk about some-
thing other than, "No, you're
not worthless. No, you're not
a bad provider."
Please don't reveal my
name or location. If he knows


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com

I've written to you, he'll start it
again. Help! - GOING MAD
IN THE SOUTHEAST
DEAR GOING MAD: You
have married a man with low
self-esteem - a bottomless
pit. It would be interesting to
know how he was treated as a
child, because your husband
appears so accustomed to ver-
bal abuse that if he doesn't get
it from someone else, he must
do it to himself. Thus, you are
forced into the position of hav-
ing to constantly inflate his
sagging ego - which I'm
sure is exhausting and
frustrating.
The next time he starts in,
try this: Say, "I would never
tolerate anyone else talking
this way about the man I love,
and I refuse to tolerate it from
you, either. Are you trying to
make me respect you less? If
you don't stop, you'll destroy
our marriage." Then insist on
some sessions with a licensed
professional to sort this out.
It's NOT too expensive; it's
something you can't afford to
do without. Almost any luxury
sacrificed will be worth it.
And if he still refuses, go


without him. I promise if you
do, you'll gain much-needed
insight.
DEAR ABBY: I am a
35-year-old man who recently
reunited with his birth moth-
er. I had a very close relation-
ship with my. adoptive family
and was not desperate to meet
my birth family, but I have
enjoyed making the connec-
tion and like them very much.
I am being married next
year, and because my adop-
tiye parents are deceased, and
because my adoptive sisters
(both in their early 50s) mean
so much to me, I plan to have
them escorted down the aisle,
in place of my mother.
My fiancee believes I
should also have my birth
mother escorted down the
aisle. I am afraid this would
hurt the feelings of my sis-
ters, who, while being sup-
portive of my new connection,
are still a bit sensitive about
"losing" me to this new family.
What do you think? - MUD-
DLED IN MISSISSIPPI
DEAR MUDDLED: I
agree with your fiancee. Talk
to your sisters about this now,
and impress upon them that
they are not "losing" you to
-your birth mother. She is join-
ing THEM in your life, and
this is a time of celebration
that should be enjoyed by all
- not a turf battle.

* Write Dear Abby at P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


SNUFFY SMITH


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404














WHAT'S COOKING ?


Wednesday, December 28, 2005


www.lakecityreporter.com


Jam tarts ... 'pure' olive

oil ... taste for tapas

ring in the New Year


Dear Lynne - So far four
jars of very classy jam have
arrived and I think more will
pile up before the New Year.
There is only so much
toast and PB&J's in anyone's
Life. What can I do with the
jams that won't insult their
status? - Jammed Up in
Milwaukee
Dear Jammed Up - Jam
tarts are an easy way to go.
Use a sweet crust
(store-bought is fine here),
bake it off, cool it, and spread
on the jam. Top with whipped
cream.
The fancy-titled sugar
cookie riff on this is "Galette
of Jam and Cream." Dollop
the jam on sugar cookies or
shortbreads and top with
whipped cream.
Another idea, perhaps for
New Year's, is a sort of Italian
trifle. In a glass bowl,
alternate layers of each jam
with panna cotta. Since this
needs to set up in the
refrigerator, you could pull it
off a day ahead. Panna cotta
recipes are all over the Web.
My pick is on our Web site,
www.splendidtable.org (add
another'/ teaspoon of gelatin
to it for the trifle).

Dear Lynne - HELP! I
purchased a case of 17-ounce
bottles of "Imported 100"
Pure Olive Oil - Extra Light
Taste - The Gourmet's
Choice."
Accidentally it got frozen
for a week. The oil thawed
24 hours at room temperature
to cloudy with, like, fat
particles floating around. Is it
still good, or do I have to
dump the whole case? -
Nancy in Retail
Dear Nancy - Your oil is
fine. Use it as you normally
would. Do keep it away from
light and heat which spoils all
oils.
That word, "pure" dupes a
lot of us. For future
reference, know that "pure"
olive oil isn't truly pure. It is
processed with solvents and
heat which compromise its
nutrients. Next time consider
"extra-virgin." This is the
purest and most nutritious
olive oil, pressed within hours
of picking without heat or
chemicals of any kind.
When you buy "light" oil,
the calories are the same.
What you are getting is a
more refined oil, which,
again, can diminish its
nutrients:

Dear Lynne - For New
Year's Eve we are doing a
tapas party. Flan and fruits
will be dessert, and we have
the sherries and wine. We
need help with the tapas.
Recipes are all over the place,
but we would like your ideas.
- Topping Off 2005 with
Tapas
Dear Tapas Types -You
must be psychic, as we just
pulled this list together for an
upcoming dinner. Tapas are
about sparking appetites, so
think primal flavors like
sweet, tart, salt, meaty, hot,
smoked and occasionally
creamy.
Rather than recipes, use
these basic concepts as
springboards for
improvisation.


SPLENDID TABLE

V, W -4- O


Lynne Rossetto
Kasper
www.splendidtoble.com


A SHORT TAPAS IMPROVE
FOR NEW YEAR'S EVE
Keep everything bite-sized,
or easily spooned onto bread
and crackers, or picked up
with toothpicks.
* Serrano Ham with
Tart Honey Onions.
Thin-cut ham on small
crackers is delicious just as
is. Offer the honey onion
option on the side. Marinate
chopped red onion in honey,
vinegar, salt and pepper for
an hour or more. Drain and
set out in a bowl.
* Pimenton Roasted
Almonds. Whole almonds
roasted at 325: with a little
olive oil, coarse salt, cumin
and hot Spanish paprika
(pimenton), or other good
tasting chile powder. (This
same seasoning sauteed with
whole shrimp becomes
another tapa).
* Manchego Cheese
with Green Grape and
Almonds. Set out Manchego
with sliced baguette. In a
bowl have Green
Grape- Almond Condiment.
Blend halved green grapes
with rough crushed roasted
almonds and a hint of garlic.
* Lemon Scented Olives.
Toss good-tasting green
olives with grated lemon zest,
lemon juice, fresh thyme,
black pepper, ground
coriander, and olive oil.
Refrigerate up to a week.
* Cream Cheese with
Fresh Coriander. This is my.
own improvisation of cream
cheese cubes with olive oil, a
little vinegar, lots of chopped
fresh coriander, and chopped
onion. (Grilled portobello
mushrooms are good
marinated in this sauce).
* Garlic Pork Bits in
Tomato-Wine Sauce. Saute
in olive oil until golden
2 chopped medium onions
with 4 big cloves of minced
garlic, and a teaspoon of
fennel seeds. Add% cup white
wine and boil down to
nothing. Stir in a 28-ounce
can tomatoes and 10 fresh
basil leaves: Simmer
10 minutes to thicken. Then
add bite-size pieces of pork
shoulder. Simmer, partially
covered, until pork is tender.
SStir in a/4 cup raisins.
Serve warm with toothpicks.
Simplest of all are the
beloved home foods, like
sauteed seafood dressed with
good olive oil and lemon, a
plate of Spanish cheeses -
Cabrales, Idiazabal, Roncal,
Mahon, and Garrotxa for
example, and pickled Spanish
peppers and onions.
A Happy New Year to all.
* Lynne Rossetto Kasper hosts
The Splendid Table, Minnesota
Public Radio's weekly national
show for people who love to eat.


Pudding, ,, .
Florida-style "
This photo provided by 4
Florida Department of
Citrus shows Orange Rice ,
Pudding With Minted
Orange and Cranberry
Glaze. This is a dessert
that could make any day
seem like a holiday even if '
it isn't. Its ingredients give it '' ,-
a sunny look, taste good
and are good for you - it
will satisfy your sweet tooth n ..: .
while delivering good
nutrition.
ASSOCIATED PRESS


How fruitcake went



from delicacy to outcast


By VANESSA MILLER
Scripps Howard News Service

I t's become the gift you'd rather
give than receive, the untouched
option at the end of a holiday
buffet, that brown-and-green
hunk collecting frost in your
freezer.
But the fruitcake hasn't always been
the Christmas outcast it is today.
The British fell in love with the cake
concoction in the 15th century. By the
18th century, it was integral to
nut-harvest celebrations across
Europe, according to
www. WhatsCookingAmerica.net, a Web
site that details the cake's history.
Fruitcake started out stale from its
inception. It was baked at the end of
the year's harvest using that year's
nuts, and then saved and eaten during
the following year's harvest. Farmers
believed it would bring blessings for
another successful harvest.
Originally called plum cake,
fruitcake was considered a delicacy in
the early 18th century and became
popular at weddings and holiday
celebrations. Authorities outlawed the
cake throughout Europe in the
18th century because of its "sinfully
rich" flavor, according to the Web site.
Traditional fruitcake recipes include
spices, nuts and dried fruit like raisins
and dates.
Because of the cake's long shelf life,
Queen Victoria is rumored to have ,
waited a year to eat a fruitcake she got
for her birthday. She said it showed
restraint and moderation, according to
the historical Web site.
But despite its prestigious history,
the fruitcake has become one of the
most ridiculed desserts. Even Johnny
Carson once joked, "There really is
only one fruitcake in the world. It is
passed from family to family,"
according to Wikipedia.com.
In Boulder, Colo., the fruitcake has
gained a reputation for its ability to fly,
not its flavor, thanks to the Boulder
Fruitcake Throw.
The throw is no longer practiced,
but Peter Richards pulled it off
successfully in 1998 and 1999. The
events challenged participants to use a
giant slingshot to catapult the cakes


SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE
The fruitcake hasn't always been the outcast in the holiday food selection.


across an elementary-school
playground and into an adjacent
cemetery.
"I have nothing against fruitcake,"
Richards said. "But it's an easy thing to


pick on."
In fact, Richards said he wouldn't
turn down a slice of his grandmother's
fruitcake.
"I'd like to eat a good one," he said.


Soup can help fight off the sniffles

By J.M. HIRSCH
Associated Press


CONCORD, N.H. - Been thinking a
lot about soup lately.
It's not because of the cold; it's
because of a cold. Or rather, because of
three colds, all of them belonging to my
son.
Parker started with the sniffles
almost a month ago. It wasn't so bad, at
least not until the sniffles turned into
full blown stuffiness turned into wheez-
ing turned into wake-him-from-a-deep-
sleep coughing.
Ever try to get a 15-month-old to blow
his nose? They don't. You vacuum it out.
Which is why my wife and I recently
found ourselves in the bathroom at
3 a.m. with a crying toddler, shower
blasting hot water as we tried to steam
my son's sinuses clear.
It's a good thing he's so cute.
Then there was last night.. Parker
began hacking and wailing at 2 a.m.,
just about the same time the cat found a
mouse at the foot of our bed, a discov-
ery that spurred her to apoplectic fits as
she tried and failed to catch it.
It's a good thing they're both so cute.
When does life get back to normal?
Which brings me back to soup, about
which Parker has compelled me to
think about a lot lately. Great source of
fluids. Great source of veggies. And the
sooner Parker is healthy, the sooner my
wife and I get to sleep through the night
again.
My goal was a soup that was brothy,
but still packed with vegetables. It
should be flavorful and well seasoned,
but nevertheless minimally seasoned.
In other words, a few star seasonings
that shine, not an assembly of lesser
players.
Speaking of minimal, labor should be
little more than chopping and tossing it
all in a stockpot. My plan was to make
this during Parker's often all-too-brief
nap, so there was no time for fussing.
Choosing the vegetables was easy -
anything colorful, common and easy to
chop. For seasonings, I was wooed by


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rosemary and Ginger Vegetable Soup is brothy, but still packed with vegetables.


my grocer's bushy, full stalks of fresh
rosemary. I opted for an entire stalk,
which was about 6 inches long.
For a bit of gentle heat, I also added
grated fresh ginger. That should clear
those sinuses a bit.
Finally, some stale sourdough bread.
Cut into cubes and stirred into the soup
just before serving, the bread adds a
nice texture and a wonderful taste to
the broth. For more substance, you also
could add a can of white beans during
simmering.
As for technique, it couldn't have
been easier. After I set it on the stove to
simmer, I actually forgot about the soup
and fell asleep on the couch, waking up
an hour later to a wonderful smell.
Got to love any recipe you can sleep
your way through.
Rosemary and Ginger.
Vegetable Soup
(Start to finish 45 minutes, 10 minutes active)
* INGREDIENTS: 3 tablespoons
olive oil
1 large stalk fresh rosemary
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger
1 large yellow onion, diced
1 green bell pepper, finely chopped


1 red bell pepper, finely chopped
2 carrots, cut into thin rounds
8 ounces (about 2 cups) button
mushrooms, stemmed and cut into
quarters
2 medium potatoes, cut into small
cubes
'/2 small butternut squash, cut into
small chunks
4 cups vegetable broth
1 cup crushed tomatoes
Salt and freshly ground black pepper,
to taste
4 slightly stale sourdough dinner
rolls, cut into cubes
E DIRECTIONS: Heat the oil over a
medium heat in a medium stockpot.
Use a rolling pin to gently bruise the
rosemary by rolling over it several
times. Add the entire stalk to the pot.
Add the garlic and ginger and cook,
stirring frequently, 1 minute.
Add the onion, green and red
peppers, carrots, mushrooms, potatoes
and squash, then saute 3 minutes,
stirring often. Add the broth and
tomatoes and bring to a simmer. Lower
heat, cover and simmer 30 minutes, or
until potatoes are tender.
Taste and season with salt and
pepper. Discard rosemary stalk. Ladle
soup into serving bowls and stir one
dinner roll, cut into cubes, into each.
Makes 4 servings.


4B








Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005



4 line minimumS2.55 per line
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.


7-l "* ' ' - h �-' "' j BUY IT Tnak'e.Diantage of the Reporter Clnssifieds!

III FIND IT 755-5440.
,.... _ .-. - SELLIT

' Eery Wednesdavy or our paid circulation & e, er[ Thursdav for our non-sub.cribers

Personal Merchandise


I-UndeIr


$ oo
4 lines Each additional
6 days line .50'
One item per ad
Ad must be placed at the LCR
and paid in advance.






2$ 0
4 lines Each additional
6 days lee 11.35 i
One item per ad


$ OO
4 lines e e irda ,l,,i)rin ji
6 days line S1.00 .
One item per ad
imep100


$4525
4 lines Each additional
6 days W Line 1.05
S One item per ad


$550 8 50
Sdays 86 dai


Ia


Number of Insertions


Per line Rate


I 3 ........................1.65
3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1 .65
4-6 ..................... . . 1.50
7-13 ...................... 1.45
14-23 .................... .S1.20
24 or more .................. 990
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.



Limited to service type advertising only.
4 lines, one month .............. .60.00
$9.50 each additional line
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.


Ad Errors- Please read your ad on the first
day of publication. We accept responsibility
for only the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space in error.
Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt
correction and billing adjustments.

Cancellations- Normal advertising deadlines
apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440. Should fur-
ther information be required regarding pay-
ments or credit limits, your call will be trans-


You can call us at 755-5440, Monday through Friday
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their classified ads in
person, and some ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad copy to the
Reporter.

FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the
Classified Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.com


Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 am. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.



Advertising copy is subject to approval by the
Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or
classify all advertisements under appropriate head-
ings. Copy should be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of publication. Credit for
published errors will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement which was incor-
rect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered to be published,
nor fo'r any general, special or consequential dam-
ages. Advertising language must comply with
Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition
of discrimination in employment, housing and public
accommodations. Standard abbreviations are accept-
nklnb hn% Anz%,l hin firzt drirwri nf fannh nri moxf nr~t ha


lake io t tthe ao ..... , iiuwvvveI, LI , i rst worl oUI eac a m ay ,not be
WWW.Iakecityreporter.com ferred to he accounting department, abbreviated.
sl i -, NeedlHelp? , NLetUsWriteYour ClassifiedAd

. ...... . ,B .- , - 'PW'~s~r I E.ffi^Sa..s?`l'SHI; lfl^Bcii^B lll2l^:O ` 4`L`;1 ': i " I'Hf ~ ~ ( .~-gh rB..ff,'^ f-i r-nB,=a .ii i'"~ -i A "


Computer Services
A PROFESSIONALLY
DESIGNED WEBSITE FOR
YOUR BUSINESS
A Perfect Christmas Gift!
Lake City area resident discount.
MSN.Net Hosting 877-467-7932
COMPUTER NOT WORKING?
We help with all your computer
needs. Virus & Spyware Repair,
Network & New Computer Setup.
Tutoring and anything else!
Call Dave"at 352-870-7467.

Roofing & Gutters
SOUTHLAND REMODELING
Specializing in Reroofs,
Roof Repair, Roof Cleaning.
Call 386-697-3134

Concrete Work
JSH CONCRETE INC.
Slabs, footings, drives, etc. Licensed
& Insured. Home Owner Discounts.
Call 386-719-9918

Painting Service
Painting & Handyman Service
Painting, Home Repair, Remodel,
Drywall Repair, & Pressure Wash
Call Mike Lainhart 386-454-7060
Professional Painting & Pressure
Washing. 20 yrs exp. Quality Work,
Free Estimates. Will Meet or Beat
all other Estimates. 386-344-4242

Home Improvements
MITCHELL/ HILGERSON LLC
Kitchen & Bath Remodeling.
Electrical repairs, Carpentry.
Paint & Trim Call 386-365-9909

Lawn & Landscape Service
Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, design. Com. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call 386-496-2820 Iv msg.
TIME TO MULCH
.Make your flower beds look like
new. Delivered & spread or just
delivery. 386-935-6595

Services
FREE CLEANUP.
Pick up of unwanted metals,
tin, scrap vehicles.
386-755-0133 We Recycle.


Drywall Services

DRYWALL Hang, Finish;
Textures; Plaster & Stucco Repairs;
Interior & Exterior Painting.
386-752-2412

Pressure Cleaning

Andrews Pressure Washing
Lic. & Insured,
Free Estimates.
Call'386-755-2065
EARL'S PURE
Pressure Washing & Painting.
Free Estimates Earl Goff
386-935-3230

Land Services

SBulldozer Work! Tractor
work, root raking, bush hogging,
seeding, sodding, disking, site prep
& landscape work. Custom Lawn
care. Irrigation Repair &
Installation. Free Estimate!
Call 755-3890 or (386) 623-3200
Look! We can dig your Trench for
less than you can rent a Trencher!
. Free estimates.
Call A-1 Electric at 386-752-5488

Woodworking

F. THOMAS ENTERPRISES
Unique Wood, Designs and
Fabrication.Call 386-752-7387 or
email ftc206(Sbellsouth.net

Tree Service

Hazardous TREE TRIMMING,
removal & stump grinding. Senior
discount. 15 years experience.
386-590-7798 or 386-963-3360

Construction

Plumb Level Construction Co.
New Construction, Remodeling,
Re Roofing, Shingle & Metal
Call 386-792-4061 or 365-2819

Bankruptcy/Divorce

#1 IN BUSINESS SERVICES
Divorce, Bankruptcy, Resumes
RE Closings, Legal Forms
248 N Marion Av. 755-8717


" ' Divorce I

TURN THAU i

nenrca sBest Warlran LrINTO A
rea Bet'~ooo-mr a 1' E WILL IW"ORK WITH
5-year/SO. OOO-mile ANY DAMAGED CREDIT
bumper-to-bumper * Do you believe to 'sgiec?
--ye ar/ 0O ,000- m ,,' Call Jrrf Theisen for Prc-Approval
o8er 6r1ai -888-609-6566
T f I 'm 1mmA me u u - I -- mmmm m-gi . ...


1.-I-I�


- - - -


In Print and On Line


MTM-7


61
myunDRI








2C

Legal

IN THE COUNTY COURT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
CASE NO. 04-646-CC
LENVIL H. DICKS,
Plaintiff,
vs.
KENNETH W. GAY and
BETTY A. GAY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the following
described real property:
Lot 30, Perry Place Phase 2, a subdivi-
sion as recorded in Plat Book 6, page
202, Columbia County, Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this Court,
at public sale, pursuant to the Final Judg-
ment rendered in the above styled action
dated December 15, 2005, at the Colum-
bia County Courthouse in Lake City,
Columbia County, Florida, at 11:00
A.M., on Wednesday, January 18, 2006,
to the best and highest bidder for cash.
WITNESS my hand and official seal in
the State and County aforesaid this 15th
day of December, 2005.
P. DEWITT CASON;
Clerk of Court
by: L. WHITCHARD
Deputy Clerk
04501098
December 21,28,2005
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 05-CA-490
ASSOCIATES FIRST CAPITAL COR-
PORATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERG-
ER TO ASSOCIATES FINANCIAL
SERVICES OF AMERICA, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DIANE LOUISE EYER; THE UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF DIANE LOUISE
EYER; GERALD KENNETH EYER
JR.,; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
GERALD KENNETH EYER JR.; 'IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFEND-
ANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF
DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UN-
KNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANT-
EES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIE-
NORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN
TENANT #2;
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
DIANE LOUISE EYER; THE UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF DIANE LOUISE


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


Legal

EYER; GERALD KENNETH EYER
,JR.,; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
GERALD KENNETH EYER JR.; IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFEND-
ANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF
DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UN-
KNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANT-
EES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIE-
NORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS;
whose residence are/is unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY required to file
your answer or written defenses, if any,
in the above proceeding with the Clerk
of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof
,upon the plaintiff's attorney, whose
name and address appears hereon, on or
before January 23, 2006; the nature of
this proceeding being a suit for foreclo-
sure of mortgage against the following
described property, to wit:
SE 1/4.OF BLOCK 66, FORT WHITE,
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.'
SUBJECT TO A RESERVATION TO
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, THE TI-
TLE TO AN UNDIVIDED 1/2 OF ALL
PETROLEUM AND PETROLEUM
PRODUCTS, AND TITLE TO AN UN-
DIVIDED 3/4 OF ALL OTHER MIN-
ERALS WHICH MAY BE FOUND ON
OR UNDER THE SAID LAND, TO-
GETHER WITH THE PRIVILEGE
OUTSIDE ANY MUNICIPALITY,
THIS DATED TO EXPLORE, MINE
AND DEVELOP IS TO BE CON-
DUCTED ON AND UNDER LAND
.INSIDE AND MUNICIPALITY THIS
DATE, ONLY WITH THE CONSENT
OF THE SURFACE OWNER. ALSO A
RESERVATION OF ALL FISSIONA-
BLE MATERIALS.
SUBJECT TO RESERVATION OF
ALL LANDS OUTSIDE OF ANY,MU-
NICIPALITY, UNTO THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, AN EASEMENT FOR
STATE ROAD RIGHT OF WAY, 200
FEET WIDE, LYING EQUALLY ON
EACH SIDE OF THE CENTER LINE
OF ANY STATE ROAD EXISTING
ON DATE OF DEED THROUGH SO
MUCH OF ANY PARCEL HEREIN
DESCRIBED AS IS WITHIN 100
FEET OF SAID CENTER LINE.
A/K/A
RR 1 BOX 1010
FORT WHITE, FL 32038
If you fail to file your answer or written
defenses in the above proceeding, on
plaintiff's attorney, a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint or Petition.
DATED at COLUMBIA County this
14th day of December, 2005.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
by: J. MARKHAM


Legal

Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the American with
Disabilities Act of 1990, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to partici-
pate in this proceeding should contact
the ASA Coordinator no later than seven
(7) days prior to the proceedings. If hear-
ing impaired, please call (800) 955-9771
(TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (Voice), via
Florida Relay Service.
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Tel (813) 915-8660
Fax (813) 915-0559
Attorney for Plaintiff
04501085
December 21,28,2005

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL ACTION NO.: 05-342-CA
DALE C. FERGUSON, as Trustee for
W.J. FERGUSON, JR. FAMILY
TRUST,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBERT WARD, LUDIE SHIPP,'and
JUANITA SHIPP, his wife,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY given that pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judgment en-
tered in the above styled cause and num-
bered case, which is a foreclosure suit, I
will sell the property situated in Colum-
bia County, Florida:
Lot 33, Pine Ridge, a subdivision as re-
corded in Plat Book 4, Pages 102-
102A, Columbia County, Florida, sub-
ject to restrictions as recorded in O.R.
Book 533, Pages 11-13, Columbia
County,, Florida and subject'to power
line easement and water line easements
as specifically stated in said restrictions
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder for cash, except that the Plaintiff,
under said Summary Final Judgment is
permitted to deposit less than the amount
bid, at the Front Door of the
Columbia County Courthouse, in Lake
City, Florida, between the
hours of 11:00 A.M. and 2:00 P.M. on
the 18th day of January, 2006.
Dated this 15th day of December, 2005,
at Lake City, Columbia County, Florida.
P. DeWitt Cason
BY: J. Markham
Deputy Clerk
05509080
December 21, 28, 2005


Legal

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that MARK SUL-
LIVAN C/F THOMAS SULLIVAN of
the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a Tax Deed to 'be issued
thereon. The certificate number and year
of issuance, the description of the prop-
erty, and name in which it was assessed
is as follows:
Certificate Number: 956
Year of Issuance: 1999
Description of Property: 16-6S-36-
04101-000, BEG 880 FT E OF NW
COR OF SE 1/4 OF SE 1/4, RUN E 105
FT, S 210 FT, W 105 FT, N 210 FTJTO
POB. ORB 454-114, 515-518.
Name in which assessed: EVELYN
YVONNE DAVIS
All of said property being in the County
of Columbia, State of Florida. Unless
said certificate shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the property described-in
such certificate will be sold to the high-
est bidder at the Courthouse on Monday
the 23RD day of January, 2006, at 11:00
A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
Dates of Publication: Dec 21 & 28, 2005
& Jan 4 & 11, 2006.
NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISA-
BILITIES: IF YOU ARE A PERSON
WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS
ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED TO,
AT NO COST TO YOU, THE PROVI-
SION OF CERTAIN -ASSISTANCE.
PLEASE CONTACT Katrina Vercher
AI ROOM 214, COLUMBIA COUN-
TY COURTHOUSE; P O BOX 2069,
LAKE CITY, FL 32056; (386)719-7580.
SUNCOM 839-7580, WITHIN 2
WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RE-
CEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU
ARE HEARING OR VOICE IM-
PAIRED, PLEASE CALL (386)758-
2139.
05509066
December 21, 28, 2005
January 4, 11, 2006

CALL


755-5440


TO PLACE

YOUR CLASSIFIED AD


Drivers: 2 Needed
FLATBED DEDICATED
Atlanta, GA
To Jacksonville, FL
To Savannah, GA
100% Owner Operators
Home Weekly
98% No Tarp Loads
Free Base/Permits
PAID Cargo/Liability
I yearflatbed exp. Req.
Lease purchase available
Call Faye @ 800-325-4436
1-88-5-Or Vine t q,
:-1,888-522-5046 Ei32'2-


Liberty National Life Insurance Co.
is expanding its operation and is looking for upwardly
mobile people to fill insurance sales & service positions.
Average annual earnings $42,000. Fringe benefit package: 2
retirement funds, health insurance, paid vacation, conven-
tion trips & many others. No experience necessary. We have
on the job training. Requirements: honesty, hard worker &
dependable transportation.
Contact Ronnie Harvey at 386-752-2583
Or fax resume to: 386-752-8724
Liberty National is an EOE Licensed Agents Welcome



SPRITCHETT


TRUCKING



Has both local and regional driving positions available for both company
and owner operators. Must have class A CDL and at least one year expe-
rience. Apply in person on Hwy 121 in Lake Butler or call Wallace Christie
1 , 496-2630


11 www.pritchetttrucking.com I


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
EDDAJ

S_'00? Tribjne Media Services, Inc.
511 ,..~r-i Reserved.
LUDGI _



TRUXAS


www.jumble.com
RIDFOB 1
, h
. L _ _


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion

Shut the window.













WHEN HI CAUGHT
A COL-P

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: A


Yesterday's. Answer:
SAnswer:


(Answers tomorrow)
CLUCK CHOKE GOODLY PARODY
When she spotted the rare species, the bird-
watchers said she was - A GOOD "LOOKER"


DECEMBER 28, 2005


REPORTER Classifieds

, In Print and On Line
0 0 -M / ,3"p b' F


ACROSS

1 Advantage
5 Longbow's
sound
10 Tigers and
bears
12 Merchant
13 Nightmare
14 More suggestive
15 Wax makers
16 - been had!
18 Above, to poets
19 First-stringers
(hyph.)
21 Second-year
student
25 Chewed
the scenery
29 Galvanize
31 Sketcher's need
33 Card holder
34 Flitted about
35 Temporary
wheels
37 Pounces
38 Small amount
40 Fond du -
43 Highest degree


44 Clothing
category
48 Honda rival
50 Showy flower
52 Silly talk
53 Adenoid
neighbor
54 Pert
55 Draft animals


DOWN


Marquette's title
Do dock work
Avails
oneself of
RR terminal
Leaves in a bag
Texas town
Never tell - -
Not e'en once
Rottweiler
warning
Float like a cork
Paper cut
Wished and
hoped
Notch shape
Concur


Answer to Previous Puzzle

KNOX BBS CA NS
FOUR ARC R I10 T
CH. A BIAH AASTA
YEA NOBLER
CURSE EAR E D S
E CO LUX UR Y
ELAN NEZ ATON
SARD I PRE KI T E





ADDS BOA IRON


ENYA DRS GASP


20 Confidence
21 Cut in two
22 By mouth
.23 Game
with mallets
24 Maui dance


PUZZLE ENTHUSIASTS: Get more puzzles in
S"Random House Crossword MeqaOmnibus" Vols. 1 & 2.


26 Weight
deduction
27 This, to Pedro
28 Like a bass
30 Never-ending
32 Hwys.
36 Squeal on
39 Talk online
40 Angelina Jolie
role
41 "Jake's Thing"
writer
42 Cleveland
NBAers
44 Tailless cat
45 What -
can I do?
46 Fritz's
refusal
47 Pitcher
- Maglie
48 Fabric means.
49 Attention
getter
51 Monkey haven


� 2005 by NEA, Inc.


Classified Department: 755-5440


12-28








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005 3C


Legal

Request for Proposals Landscape Serv-
ices
The Columbia County Tourist Develop-
ment Council will accept sealed bids for
landscape and maintenance services for
five (5) median islands on a one (1) mile
corridor from the 1-75 interchange to the
east on US 90 west.
Bids shall consist of the eight (8) follow-
ing elements:
1. All labor and materials necessary to
provide compliant Florida Department of
Transportation maintenance of traffic
(MOT) practices.
2. All labor and materials necessary to
weed, trim, edge, fertilize and clean out
all landscaped beds as well as to trim Sa-
bal palms as needed.
3. All labor and materials necessary to
install and maintain total coverage of ap-
propriate mulch at a consistent depth
throughout the contract.
4. All labor and materials necessary to
install and maintain sponsor signs in
each median.
5. All labor and materials necessary to
install comparable landscaping in vacant
median,
6. All labor and materials necessary to
mow all medians as directed for a period
of two (2) years with payments being
made to Contractor on a monthly basis.
7. Proof of restricted use license by the
Department of Agriculture and Consum-
er Affairs in three areas: core curricu-
lum, right of way and aquatics for all
herbicide applicators.
8. Supply previous work history for
similar projects) with references from
previous
customers or a Florida Registered Land-
scape Architect. Include bidder business
history and any other pertinent informa-
tion that may support business qualifica-
tion.
The winning bidder will be required to
provide documentation of workmen's
compensation coverage and liability cov-
erage of $1,000,000.00 (one million).
The winning bidder will be required to
comply and to continually adhere with
all safety standards and guidelines out-
lined by the Florida Department of
Transportation and the City of Lake
City. The winning bidder will be re-
quired to obtain and pay for any necessa-
ry permits required to carry out the work
plan.
Bids should be sent to: Columbia Coun-
ty Tourist Development Council, P.O.
Box 1847, Lake City, FL 32056. They
can also be hand delivered to 263 N.W.
Lake City Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055.
The deadline for bids is 5:00 p.m. on Fri-
day, January 20, 2006. Bids should in-
clude the initial cost for installation of
landscaping for the new median project
and the clean-up, mulching and sponsor-
ship signage for the existing four me-
dians. In addition, monthly maintenance
costs of the five medians is the second
bid element for a period of 24 months.
For additional information, contact Har-
vey Campbell,. Columbia County Tourist
Development Council, 386-758-1397.
05509241
December 28, 2005
January 4, 2006
SUWANNEE RIVER WATER MAN-
AGEMENT DISTRICT
REQUEST FOR BID NUMBER 05/06-
016LM
GALVANIZED CORRUGATED
STEEL AND ALUMINUM PIPE
The Suwannee River Water Manage-
ment District (District) is requesting bids
for galvanized corrugated steel and alu-
minum pipe. The District has budgeted
approximately $100,000 to purchase cul-
verts during Fiscal Year 2006. The Dis-
trict desires to purchase cublerts ftom,
the most successful biddilr throughout
the year on an as-needed basis. Within
this RFB is an immediate need for 80
36" x 40' long aluminum culverts. The
District will work with the supplier to
maximize fully loaded trucks.
The Bids will be openedat a public bid
opening at the District offices in Live
Oak at 3:00 p.m., January 13, 2006.
Contact Linda Smith, Procurement Co-
ordinator, to receive a complete bid
package at 386-362-1001 or 800-226-
1066 (FL only).
SUWANNEE RIVER WATER MAN-
AGEMENT DISTRICT
REQUEST FOR BID NUMBER 05/06-
017LM
ROAD CONSTRUCTION MATERI-
ALS
The Suwannee River Water Manage-
ment District (District) is requesting bids
for Rock Aggregate. The District has
budgeted approximately $100,000 to
purchase rock aggregate .during Fiscal
Year 2006. The District desires to pur-
chase various rock aggregate from the
successful bidder throughout the year on
an as-needed basis. Supplier selection
will be ,based on bid price and distance
from the mine to job site.
The Bids will be opened at a public bid
opening at the District offices in Live
Oak at 4:00 p.m., January 13, 2006.
Contact Linda Smith, Procurement Co-
ordinator, to receive a complete bid
package at 386-362-1001 or 800-226-
1066 (FL only).


Local Dealer Shocks Community:


"Cars To Sell For $29* Down & $99**/month!"

Area Auto Shoppers Express Disbelief But Dealer Remains Optimistic

As Unprecedented 6 Day Sale Approaches, 6 Days Only.


,r SUNBELT CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE


LAKE CITY, FL - Dennis Conway and Randy
Sears, Sales Managers of Sunbelt Chrysler-
Jeep-Dodge, announced plans today for a great
new way to buy cars that's simple and inex-
pensive. This unique sales event, also known
as the "Automotive 'Insider' Sale," has been
sweeping the U.S. Customers who come to
this sale are on the 'Inside' to great savings on
the new or used vehicle of their choice, all for
just a low initial down payment of only $29*
based on lender approval and creditworthi-
ness.
The event will be held for just six days, from
Monday, December 26th thru Saturday,
December 31st, regardless of weather.
Conway offers a simple explanation for this
unprecedented sale, "As one of the largest
'dealerships in the area we're overstocked with
high quality vehicles from lease turn-ins, pro-
gram car trade-ins, new vehicle duplications
and more." He adds, "I can't remember the
last time so many rare opportunities were
available to us at one time so we decided to let
our customers take advantage of these incred-
ible values rather than sell them to whole-
salers or strangers at the auctions." During
"The Automotive 'Insider' Sale," every vehicle
will be clearly marked and available for the low
down payment of $29*. Every effort will be
made to obtain credit approval for those who
may have had challenges in the past.
During the event, selection couldn't be bet-
ter. Many of the vehicles offered are late
model vehicles with low mileage and the bal-
ance of their factory warranty remaining.
There will be many makes and models to
choose from including: Ford, Chrysler, Dodge,
Chevrolet, Honda, Toyota and an abundance of
S.U.V.'s will also be featured, including:
Escape, Explorer, Tahoe, Blazer, Grand


Cherokee and more.
For auto shoppers looking for a very low
monthly payment there will be many choices,
including a loaded 2000 Dodge Neon with
automatic and air conditioning, full 'power for
just $99/month.** S'ample payments will be
clearly marked on vehicles. All you'll need to
do is obtain credit approval, pick a vehicle and
a payment. It's that simple.
Sears cites more examples, a 1997 Geo
Tracker with automatic and air conditioning
or a 2000 Ford F-150 with CD also for only
$99/month.** For those auto shoppers looking
to trade their current vehicle, all trades are
welcome, paid for or not. You won't want to
miss this unique opportunity to obtain a new
or pre-owned car, truck, van or sport utility
with an unbelievably low down payment of just
twenty-nine* dollars!
In order to assist buyers with loan process-
ing, finance representatives will be on hand
for immediate approval, and release of the
great deals offered at this event.
Conway would like to remind customers that
the event is first-come, first-served, so it's crit-
ical to come early to have the best chance of
getting the vehicle of your choice. The exclu-
sive site for this event is Sunbelt Chrysler-
Jeep-Dodge, Hwy 90 West, just 3/4 mile past I-
75 for six days only, Monday, December 26th
thru Saturday, December 31st from 9am-7pm.

Hurry for the best selection. For further
information on the "Automotive 'Insider'
Sales Event," please call (386) 755-3444.

*$29 denotes down payment, all sales subject to lender and
credit approval. Exact rate and terms varies by vehicle and
buyer. Vehicles subject to prior sale. **Examples: 1) 2000
Dodge Neon, $29 down, $99/mth for 60 months @ 7.99% APR.
Cash price $4085. 2) 1997 Geo Tracker, $29 Down, $99/mth for
48 months @ 6.99% APR. Sale price $4164. 3)-2000 Ford F-150
1500. '$29 Down, $99/mth for 60 months @ 6.99% APR. Sale
price $5029.


~,:.
i J4
IA.
l t,1-4


Classified Department: 755-5440


Lake ity Rporte


I \


i'








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


020 Lost & Found
FOUND COLLIE 12/20.
,90 West. Male, Black,
White & Tan Call
386-647-7094 or 386-365-3230 .

060 Services
Private CNA is looking for new
position. Call Sheila 386-935-4473
100 Job
SOpportunities
!! LOOK! LOOK!!
You Too Can Sell Real Estate!
BIG BUCKS!
Call 386-466-1104
03527992
Lake City Reporter
is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier
for Columbia City to Old Wire
Rd/SR47, Herlong Deliver the
Reporter in the early morning
hours Tuesday - Sunday. No
delivery on Monday's.
Carrier must have dependable
transportation. Stop by the
Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!
Cashier Needed. 10PM - 6 AM
Texaco in Ellisville, 1-75 & Hwy
441 S. Apply in person ONLY
Drug Free Workplace


100 Job
I Opportunities


04500113
Lake City Reporter
Creative Director
Immediate opening for person
with high level of design and
creative skills. Must have
experience using Quark Xpress,
Photo Shop, Illustrator, Adobe
InDesign and Acrobat. Person
will oversee daily operation of
Creative Services department:
2-4 years newspaper or other
graphic position and supervisory
experience helpful. Salary will be
based on work experience and
creative abilities. Medical benefits
and 401k available.
Send resume to:
Dave Kimler
180 E. Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055
e-mail:
dkimler( lakecityreporter.com

05508839
Wanted Exp. Shop Technician
for construction/forestry
equipment dealer in the Lake
City, Starke, & Live Oak areas.
Competitive pay, benefits &
excellent training program. Call
386-752-9544 or fax to: 755-6882
or send resume to:
Industrial Tractor Co.
PO Box 2439 Lake City, 32056


100 Job
SOpportunities
05509161
Salesperson-Lumber Sales
Must be people savvy
Will train - Great benefits
Apply in person
Idaho Timber of Florida
1786 SE SR 100
Lake City, FL. 32025
Call 386-755-5555

05509172
PARALEGAL
The Department of Transportation
has an opening for a Paralegal
Specialist. Bi-Weekly Salary
Range ($891.60 - $1400.00).
Minimum Qualifications: Must be
or have the ability to become a
notary public in Florida;
knowledge of civil litigation
office practices such as
calendering, setting hearings,
scheduling court reporters, and
coordinating. See online ad for
more qualifications. Refer to
Requisition Number 55004630.
Please apply online at:
https://jobs.myflorida.com. Only
State of Florida Applications will
be accepted - no resumes, please.
Ad closes 12/30/05.
EO/AA/VP Employer.
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY,
Lowboy drivers to transport heavy
equipment in the Gainesville area.
Apply in person at Watson
Construction, New Berry Florida
352-472-9157 ask for Alan or Steve.


; i




.'


Advertise It Here!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your
vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional.$10 you can run your ad for an additional
10 days. A picture will run every day with a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring
your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private Party Only!


o le s iho))ers reach for tihe cassified ads



before they hit thie streets The ne's)ar)e



classiRe section oifers eve 1ing1 theyneeci to



make an iniofrnfl purchasing decision




Want to make amove



Check the ciassifiei ads first


c!


assI'


II


II~


.r t'a-
4'


LakeCi


-�.1�


�;�

:6
.r
- : �
i
~.
e~
1 :� -
.C 1


,,
''
�-~- i

�:
~; "�.~:-


* ' . . � .
;:* "' ,7"^.\ ;.;�"
. .- *. , ,,

r . ; ..
4..


A~�


....~...............


Classified Department: 755-5440


�.��-
:1
: �
i, �, ~
:
x
:�
�t~. 'b
''
.i


�:�'
" �
r .



'I ''
'��
'�' ia~ .:�
~
�~.�
.�-


�I


Bgi2 0 IOi �iol ovo







LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


100 Job
100 Opportunities
05509173
Seeking an enthusiastic
Maintenance Professional
to oversee the management of
daily operations and physical
plant maintenance for enclosed
regional mall in Lake City,
FL. Attention to detail and the
ability to handle multiple projects
simultaneously are essential.
Knowledge of roofing, HVAC,
plumbing and electricity are a
plus. Basic computer skills and
familiarity with computer systems
are a must. Flexibility in working
hours required. E-mail resumes to
lisaac()hullstorey.com or fax to
706-868-7457 attention L. Isaac.
05509178



STAY IN THE
"SWEET PART"
OF THE SOUTH
FL., GA., SC., NC., TN., AL.
- Top pay-up to .40 cpm w/5 yrs
*- Guaranteed Hometime
- Health & Disability Ins. Avail.
*-Life & Dental Ins. Provided
*401K available
* Safety Bonus
Call 800-874-4270 # 6
Highway 301 South, Starke, FL.
www.davis-express.com
05509181
Survey Draftsman &
Instrument Person w/EFB exp
Company Benefits include Health
& Disability Ins., Sick Leave,
Vacation & Retirement Plan.
Call 386-755-6166

05509227
Comfort Inn is looking for Full
& Part-Time Housekeepers.
Benefits include vacation &
holiday pay, ins. & 401K.
Must be able to work weekends.
Apply weekdays after 10:00 AM.
US 90 & 1-75. No Phone Calls
Please. EOE/DFW
Asphalt Plant Technician
Level' II Certified
Hipp Construction
Call 386-462-2047
E.O.E./ D/F/W/P
Bookkeeper
Office Manager
Local manufacturing company
seeks full-time bookkeeper/office
manager. Computer skills
necessary. Accounting knowledge
preferred. Insurance & 401K
benefits. Send resume
& salary requirements to:
Send reply to Box 05005, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
COUNTRY INN AND SUITES
Housekeepers! Applicants who
are mature, serious & seeking
long term employment & have
cleaning experience. Apply at
Country Inn and Suites, Florida
Gateway Dr. 1-75 & Hwy 90.
Excellent working environment,
competitive pay, benefits incl.
vacation & holiday.
DENTAL ASSISTANT
Highly Experienced Dental
Assistant needed for busy quality
general practice. $17.00 hr plus paid
insurance, vacation & bonuses.
Fax resume to: 386-752-7681
or call 386-752-8531
DRIVER NEEDED Person with
CDL & Mobile Home Delivery
Experience. Call 386-364-1340.
Ask for Billy.
Experienced Tandem Dump Truck
Driver. Asphalt, Milling Exp.
Class B CDL & clean driving
record. PDOE. 386-590-0783
FLAT BED DRIVERS
Atlantic Truck Lines
$4,000.00 Sign on Bonus
Class A, in state & home every
night. $600-$750/wk. Yearly $1,000
safety bonus. 3 yrs. exp. Paid
vacation, health/dental. Call
1-800-577-4723 Monday-Friday
FT Food Service Workers for
correctional setting. Benefits after
90 days. 401K, Stock Bonus,
Vacation. No criminal record. Food
Service Experience helpful. Apply
in person @ CCA Lake City CI.
386-755-3379 ext 2251
EOE/M/F/D/V.
HELP WANTED
FAULKNER PLUMBING
Plumbers
Call 386-755-1568 & leave message
Kaam Transmission needs exp.
Auto Tech, or R&R Mechanic with
experience. Must have own tools.
Apply in person 125 NE Jonesway
Lake City, 32055 or 386-758-8436


100 J0b
1 Opportunities
HUNGRY HOWIES is hiring
delivery drivers. Must have car
w/insurance & 2 yrs. driving exp.
Flex schedule. F/T & P/T avail.
CASH PAID DAILY!
Earn $8. - $15./ hour. Apply in
person at 857 SW Main Blvd.


100 J0b
1 Opportunities
IMMEDIATE OPENING!
Production Workers needed for sign
shop. Experience a plus.
Call 386-755-2006.
Sheet metal roofers needed.
No criminal background,
According Pay
Call 386-288-3470


100 J0b
1 Opportunities

P/T Warehouse Workers
Sat. Only. Must apply in person, no
phone calls. H & M Bay,
State Farmers Market,
2920 CR 136, Unit 2; Office 7
White Springs, FL
Must be 18 yrs old to apply.


100 Job
1 Opportunities

Legal Secretary
Phone & Computer skills required.
Send reply to Box 05007, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056


100 Job
Opportunities

OTR DRIVERS NEEDED
Heavy Haul,Class A CDL.
2 week turnaround,good pay,
Call Southern Specialized,LLC
386-752-9754


ROUNTREE MOORE
Since '24 ... Ford
We're The... To Drive!


OVER 200 VEHICLES MUST BE SOL


I KEEP IT SIMPLE


HUGE SELECTION!

HUGE DISCOUNTS! TedJohnson
Sales Manager


Fusion Totally .NkEW Design
--RK '06 Mercury Milan


PRICED TOO

LOW TO

'ADVERTISE!!!


y cash, national rebates, owner loyalties, plus tax, tag, title & $399.95 adm. fee. Pictures are for illustration purposes only.


A 2002 FORD EX
q ,.
S LC,*LA M.lc: Le3air. SjunicoO

$13,995

LARGEST
2002
FORD
EXPEDITION


$*15 991
1 x gi


'- . 2004
FORD
MUSTANG
29K

$1559995


c u.m in

asno


PLORER 2003 FORD WINDSTAR 2004 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 2005 PONTIAC GRAND AM SE

13,995 516,995 E fo995

PRE-OWNED INVENTORY IN NORTH FLORIDA!
2002 2000 .t p 2002 2002 JEEP f
DODGE FORD - FORD [GRAND
DURANGO WINDST _ _ EXPLORER CHEROKEE -


Low Miles
$ 4 r995

2005
CHEVY


1$12,995


Chad Melton Levis Odom Buddy Jacobs Brad Howell George Hudson Danny Shelley Aureo DeLuna Joe Fiorentino Don Shaw Chris Shelley Buddy Simpkins Lyle Donald
Finance Sales Sales Sales Sales. Business Mgr. Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales




(-8)-S4S - 1 $ LINCOLN Mercury

1 Mile East of 1-75 on U.S. Hwy. 90 VWest * Lake City, FL
North Florida's Ford Place... Since 1924! ..15.
PSHOP AT YOUR CONVENIENCE 24 HOURS A DAY ON THE WEB: WUtIW.ROUNTREEMOORE.COM


JJI- JJ .i-JJJI JiJ
r.L �.: .$'�'�:1~ J ::7AS
fj* ~~�


Lake City Reporter




Swww.lakecityreporter.com


The price you see is the price
you 'II get. It 's simply a great value.
And Rountree Moore Ford, Lincoln,
Mercury is willing to shake on -it.


S2004

CHRYSLER
SEBRING

$1 3,995


& k.


Hom of.. E=-An
FACORYDIECT- 11, (
�3 BSIun


Clas~ifled Department: 755-5440


,:~~.m~ � I��:- �i~G�
s-z ~''
:�


-:03


i








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


100 Job
0Opportunities


05509145
PAY
INCREASE!


USA TRUCK'
Dedicated & Regional
Co., O/OP'S, Teams &
Student Grads
$1,000 Sign On
(For Exp'd OTR Drivers)
Call 7 Days a Week
800-889-5805
www'. ousatruck.com0
eoe m/f/h/v


05509144
Driver-Dedicated Regional
COASTAL TRANSPORT
HOME EVERY WEEKEND
GUARANTEED!
*65% Preloaded/Pretarped
+Avg. $818- $896/week
Jacksonville, FL Terminal
CDL-A req'd. 877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com


100 Job
SOpportunities
Short Term & Long Term
Temp to Perm
Many different positions available!!
Call Wal-Staf Personnel
386-755-1991 or 386-755-7911
Waste Management Inc.
Lake City/ Gainesville
Has an immediate opening for a
hard working, flexible individual to
fill the position of Driver/Laborer
for Lake City and Gainesville. This
position requires a minimum Class
B CDL with air brake endorsement.
Waste Management offers a full
benefits package including health
insurance and 401 - K plan. If you
feel you meet the requirements,
please apply by phone
1-877-220-JOBS (5627) or online at
WWW.WMCAREERS.COM
EOE/ADA/DFWP

WELDERS/LABORERS
MACHINE SHOP EXP.
Apply in person Grizzly Mfg.
174 NE Cortez Terrace
Lake City, FL (Across from airport)
YOUNG ENERGETIC Person for
Manufactured Home sales. Business
degree a plus, Will train right
person. Call 386-364-1340.
Ask for Mr. Selph or Mr. Corbet


120 Medical
120 Employment

04500167

PA/ARNP
SHANDS
LAKE SHORE
Is currently seeking qualified
applicants for a full time position
for the Orthopedic Practice. Must
be a graduate of an accredited
PA/ARNP program, currently
Florida Licensed as PA/ARNP.
Experience in an Orthopedic
Setting preferred. Shands offers
great benefits and competitive
salary. Apply on-line today at:
www.shands.org or call
Bonnie Price, Human Resources
386-754-8147. EOE/M/F/D/V
Drug Free Work Place

Accounts Payable Secretary
Org. Excel, MS Word, QuickBooks,
and Multi-task for fast paced Medi-
cal Office. Must be dependable, ef-
ficient. Resume to: Administrator
P.O. Box 489, Lake City, FL 32056
CNA/ MA - Needed for LK City
Medical Office. Experienced
preferred. Fax resume to:
386-754-1712.


120 Medical
120 Employment

BUSY FAMILY Practice Seeks
Receptionist: Position involves
answering multiline phone system,
scheduling, patient relations &
medical records. Prior experience
required. Fax or mail resume to:
386-719-9494; PO Box 159,
Lake City, FL 32056.

Experienced Medical Assistant
Needed for fast paced
Doctors Office.
Fax resume to: 386-758-5987
Suwannee Medical Personnel
Home Care needing per diem RN's
for 4-6hr IV infusions. Coverage
areas are Branford, Mayo and
Providence. $25.00 per hr.
Please Call Rose 1-877-755-1544
or (386) 755-1544

LAKE CITY



BUY IT! * SELL IT!
FIND IT!
755-5440


02 Chevioler Avalanche Whit l ,' $22988.00
03 Cneverole IAvalanche Black S$B24988.00
02 Chevrolet Express While $15988.00
- 01 Chevrolet Tahoe Pewter $12988.00
u3 Chevrolet Truck 4WD Black $19988 00
04 Chevrolet Truck Ext Cab While $19988.00
Im . r ., -.11 - .98 , ..
96 C Cony. Van While $7988.00
03 GM.C ' Envoy Black $98800
S03 S~GMC SVna Whhite $17988.00
.96 ..GMC .s Sonoma Et. Cab Red $6000.00
06 GMC Truck Crew Cab Red 52.00$
dI 02e �a'GMC -rmruckM C:' W - -
&C i - T D nWh;teA $179'78.00
S04 GMC Truck Ext. Cab Gold 229880
02 r GMC Truck Ext. Cab 4WD Red S21588.00
03 i',Jeep Grand Cherokee Charcoal 517988 00
"'.k 5'"'r.. . 0 r'2.~
03 Lincoln 'Navigatlor Black S,$29988.00
v ,. Mazda Protege Beige _$1988 00

V Nn Titan SE Red $24988.00
- -99 Oldemobile Alero Black 55988.00
S uOldsu....bile -Cutlass U zlrqui n4 988.00.
,96 rand AmGreen $3988.00
-04 3rPontlrac Gd. Prix GTI Gray 16988.00
05 Toyota Camry XLE Blue $21988.00
92 Toyola 4 Runner Red 4988.00
04ena S Be;ge 2398.00
C......ertifiA





RONSONET. "

BUICK GMC TRUCK
HWY 9o EAST - LAKE CITY

fiM c c WE ARE PROFESSIONAL GRADE


180 Money to Loan

04501021
NEED MONEY?
ARE BANKS TURNING
YOU AWAY?
LOOKING FOR A
FRESH START
CALL FOR A FREE
CONSULTATION
1-866-708-6663
FAST APPROVAL,
FAST CASH!
MANY PROGRAMS
SUITABLE FOR YOU.
VARIOUS LOANS
AVAILABLE.


BISHOP REALTY, INC.
386-752-4211 [

_.{1

Beautiful Country Home on 10 Acres
-Paved drive. 5BR-3.5 Baths. Lge
Rooms. Country Kitchen. Screened
back porch. Deck. Detached 3 car
garage. Pond with dock. Fencing.
$649,900. MLS#47993. Ask for Elaine
K. Tolar
386-755-6488


Results! Great
Our 9ame Te s Our Ston!



. .. .
Gorgeous 3/2 Home on 5 a6res has so
much to offer. This home is a must
see. Priced at $288,888. MLS#49664.
Call Barbie English

386-755-5747


BISHOP REALTY, INC.
3 8A-75 2-42 11 : ......



,_' .;._, . :-- ; - . ;, .' ,.
Gorgeous Tri Level Home on large lot.
4/3, Ige. mstr. suite w/Glamour bath.
Newly painted. Formal LR, DR, arid
Den w/FE Great location. $279,900.
�MLS#48438. Ask for Elaine K. Tolar
386-755-6488


Real Corner Lor, i.:.r-a . r c.'
McFarlane and Baya Ave. 3/1 con-
crete block home on .124 acre.
MLS#45818, $145,000. Call Mitchell
Lee
386-867-1155


A-' -386-752-3300






Like New 4/2 1,836 sq. ft. DW with
walk in closets & garden tub. Yard is
fenced, workshop included.
MLS#48186, $125,000. Todd Bowers
386-623-7400


^5 .# 386-752-3300






This 3/2 DWMH on 1.25 Acre is a
beautiful property. 1512 sq. ft. vault-
ed ceiling with open floor plan.
MLS#46324, $95,000. Todd Bowers
386-623-7400


240 Schools &
240 Education
Want to be a CNA? Don't want to
wait? Express Training Services of
Gainesville is now offering our
quality CNA exam Prep classes.
Day/Eve classes. Class for 1 week,
certification test the next week.
Class size is limited. Next class
1/09/06. Call 386-755-4401

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
wwwlakecityreportercom


BISHOP REALTY, INC. .
386-752-4211


./ " .;. : . :, ' : /

Country Estate With Development
Potential. Excellent location, close to
town. 3850 sf., 4BR/3BA. Large rooms,
open & spacious floor plan, too many
extras to list. 12.42 acres, in ground
pool, barn. Ask for Elaine K. Tolar
Eluine K. Tolur 386-755-6488 or
Lori Giebeig Simpson 386.752-2874

BISHOP REALTY, INC.
386-752-4211


Just Reduced! Country Charm at it's
Best. Brick home on 20 acres
3BR/2BA, fenced, paved rd. 24x36
barn with 2 sheds. Lge kitchen
w/huge utility & storage room.
Beautiful view from back porch.
MLS#46694, $399,000.
Ask for Elaine K. Tolar
386-755-6488

BISHOP REALTY, INC.
386-752-4211

r' _ '....'


Now This Is Country Living! 3/2 on 5
acres. Screened back porch. New roof
in 2003, new "Train" heat pump Sept.
2005. Pecan trees. 2 water heaters, 2
wells, & 2 septics. MLS#47878,
$289,900. Call Kimberly Wynne
386-965-5630

BISHOP REALTY. INC.
386-752-4211

. e5 . -. _ t I


Brand New at Cannon Creek -Brick
Home w/4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths.
Excellent floor design. Split plan.
Corner Lot. $219,900. MLS#49431.
Ask for Elaine K. Tolar

386-755-6488


Home For Tie Holida%' TiI.
brick home is ready for your family.
Newly remodeled on corner lot
priced to sell at $131,888, MLS#49651.
Call Barbie English
386-755-5747


�,i .3386-752-3300






Country Living! 1.69 acres just south
of Lake City. 3/1, 1196 sq. ft. home
with big oaks. A must see!
MLS#46350, $103,900. Todd Bowers
386-623-7400


54i0A0. 386-752-3300


!I
; . .; . .: ,- � ... .
This 3/2 Home is in the middle of
Lake City! Zoned RO and next to the
Chamber of Commerce. $92,000,
MLS#48504. Call Today! Todd Bowers
386-623-7400


REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

1 Residential, Acreage & Commercial im' LS
a"


Hiwt fEtillr
uw~ bl t, ,m~


Connected



CD . w-w..:2' *'oco
AW-J
Qi) l l m t ^f ^ r rI^^ " ^^ ^ ^ '~n~riJrBjBcj"iii f1illl* iririit nnoi~ iaMBjf.iiMim

^^^ ,,..,� Ilirir W9�X^W9YrfW9W9


Classified Department: 755-6440


4








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


408 Furniture
04500704



BEDROOM - 7 pc. Complete
Louis Philippe Cherry set!
Custom built, dovetail
double-glide drawers, hidden
storage w/felt lining. Brand NEW
still in boxes! Retail $5,200.
Sacrifice $1,400. 352-264-9799


416 Sporting Goods
POOL TABLE - Gorgeous Brand
new 8' wood table. Leather pockets,
Italian 1" slate, carved legs. Still in
Crate! Cost $4,500. Sell $1,350.
Can Deliver. 352-494-0333

419 lTV-Radio &
4 Recording
RCA 36IN TV, $400. Pioneer
Receiver, 101 cd changer. 2 deck
tape player, 5 speaker surround
sound. $750. 6 ft tall entertainment
center, black. $125. or $1,000 for
all. Call 386-752-5274

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
Payment in advance for standing
pine timber. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-454-1484 or 961-1961.

440 Miscellaneous
HOT TUB - $1,795. LOADED!
Never used. Waterfall, therapy jets,
LED lights, cupholders, 110v
energy efficient. With warranty.
Can deliver 352-376-1600

450 Good Things
450 to Eat
PECAN HOUSE exit 414 & 1-75.
Elliot Pecans, Choctaw Pecans, &
other pecans for sale. Also shell pe-
cans. 386-752-1258 or 386-6976420

630 Mobile Homes
.63 for Rent


3/2 Double Wide off of Brown Rd
w/W&D Hook/up, CH/A, DW,
water/garbage inc., $550/mth +
$400 Dep., 1st & last. 386-397-356
FOR RENT: 2BR/2BA MH,
Excellent condition. Large lot, quie
neighborhood. No Pets. $400 mo,
1st, last & Sec required. Located 4
1/2 miles West of Lake City.
Call 386-454-5688 Leave msg.
IN PARK Mobile Homes for Ren
2BR/2BA 1st & sec. required.
Applications & references required
386-719-2423
LATE MODEL MOBILE HOME
Starting $400 month, Beautiful
Pond setting, w/trees. CH/A, Cable
avail. No pets. Call 386-961-0017

640 Mobile Homes
S for Sale
2000, 1456 SqFt. Doublewide
4 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Glamour bath
Beautiful Deck. 20% Down, Only
$517.66 per/mth. MUST SELL!
Call Ron 386-397-4960
31 Used Doublewides from Disne
Area. Now in Lake City. A/C, steps
cable ready w/TV, telephone,
furnished, pots & pans, dishes, &
silverware. Perfect for Rental
Properties or Starter Home.
Great Deals, While they Last!
386-752-5355
ABSOLUTELY "THE BEST"
Mobile Homes and Modulars
Move over Palm & Jake, the new
#1 home is here. Guaranteed
Gary Hamilton Homes 758-6755
BEAUTIFUL 3 BEDROOM
2 BATH DOUBLEWIDE,
W/FIREPLACE, OPEN FLOOR
PLAN, LOTS OF EXTRAS. WILL
DELIVER. DOUG 386-288-2617
BUY NEW Dream Home For Onl
5% Down, With a 750 Beacon.
Will Finance.
Call Buddy 386-364-1340
CASH DEALS. We Love Em! W
will give you the very best pricing
in North Florida on new or used
manufactured homes! 800-769-095
IF YOU OWN LAND OR HAVE
LARGE DOWN PAYMENT. I
MAY BE WILLING TO OWNEF
FINANCE A NEW
MANUFACTURED HOME FOR
YOU! CALL STEVE 386-365-854
NEED A Home?
Call 386-364-1340 Ask For Buddy
We have several
New & Used to Choose from.
USED DOUBLEWIDE
MUST BE SOLD BY
CHRISTMAS! FURNITURE ANI
AC INCLUDED. CALL GEORGE
386-719-0044
USED DOUBLEWIDE,
MUST SELL!
MAKE OFFER!
CALL TIM 386-288-2016

650 Mobile Home
650 &Land
!! Owner Finance!!
1998 24X48 3/2 on small lot
1903 SW Judy Glen
Call 386-867-0048
!!! FREE FREE FREE !!!
3/2 DW. A/C on 1.5 acre lot
in Worthington Springs
SCall'386-466-1104
4 BEDROOM 2 bath
home on land. Must sell.
In Beautiful Deer Creek -
Only & $774 per/mth
; Call Doug 386-288-2617


650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
Clean 1560 sf 3/2 1993 DW, private
wooded acre, all lino, deck, new
metal roof. $63,900. Cash Only
Call 386-961-9181

FSBO 1998 Redman 28X52 3/2
on 1/2 acre lot. 5 min. from
Walmart, perfect location.
Call Steve at 386-590-1413


Handyman Special
3/2 DWMH on Gorgeous Oak
Shaded 5 acres, Owner Financing.
Zero down, $1,285 mth. $125K.
Call 352-215-1018
LAND HOME
Packages, while they last!
Call Ron Now!
386-397-4960

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent
1, 2, and 3 BR include MW, DW,
pool, fitness center and more.
Close to everything, Call Windsong
today 386-758-8455

2/1 Fresh Paint & New Carpet
Starting at $600/mth.
Plus security. Pets allowed w/fee.
Call Lea.386-752-9626


2BR/1BA w/ Garage
$700 + Sec. Pets w/fee.
Call 386-752-9626


DELUXE TOWNHOUSE
Second Story. 2/2, 1,700 sqft.
Country Privacy, deck, secure.
$700/mth. $1,800 needed.
Call 386-961-9181


U � - --- ------


730 fUnfurnished
730Home For Rent
3BR/1.5BA CH/A, Hardwood
Floors, Tile, Concrete Block.
$750/mth + Dep.
Call 386-752-0118 or 386-623-1698


3BR/2BA Brick Home Near VA
Large fenced yard w/washer &
dryer, stove, refrig, lawn, maint., &
garbage p/up included. $850 mth,
1st, last & Sec/Dep. req. Call
Richard, Licensed Real Estate
Agent Call 386-867-1414


4/2 2nd Fairway, Southern Oaks
Golf Club. Avail. Jan. 1.
$1,300/mth
Call 386-755-3898


Mayfair Subdivision
3BR/2BA Brick Home
Quiet Neighborhood
Call 386-961-9959
Quail Hgts. on 10th Fairway
3/2, 2400 sqft + 16X40 storage
bldg. $1,300/mth, 1st, last & Sec.
Call 386-755-0327


75 Business &
75 Office Rentals

GREAT LOCATION
1235 SF Building
All Utilities Furnished
$975/month
A Bar Sales, Inc.
386-752-5035
7 Days 7 am-7 pm

Historic Henderson House
Office/Retail 3000 total sqft.
$1,875/mnthly. 207 S. Marion Ave.
386-867-0048 or 386-752-7951


Classified Department: 755-5440


750 Business &
Office Rentals
Warehouse in good neighborhood.
Great Location!
Must See!$850 mth
Call Lea 386-752-9626
Warehouse: 2 Offices for Lease.
Cannon Creek Industrial Park.
$800/mth per office space
386-755-9041

805 Lots for Sale
FSBO: 5.37 Acres. 452 feet
frontage on Hwy 242 in Timucuan
Crossing Subdivision. Lot size
452x661. Near Sister Welcome
Caution light. $97,000.
386-752-9363 or 365-7353

810 Home for Sale
GRANDVIEW VILLAGE
3BR/2BA, 1,380 sq ft. (Heated)
Will not last at this price, $149,900
Call 386-754-5678

820 Farms &
2 Acreage
Columbia City Area
5 ac.wooded homesite
$89,900 owner finance
352-472-3660
INDIVIDUAL SEEKS Acreage.
Wooded or open.
Cash buyer- quick closing.
Please call 386-755-7541
WINDING FOREST, 5 & 7 Ac.
lots starting at $89K.
Owner Financing. 386-754-7529
Chris Bullard Owner/Broker


MilesI�CIs B le
SMiles Green, Low Miles 2 Door, Silver, Beautiful, 41K Miles
S*21__495 *20,995


DKR, SpOrtY (Jfnly 44n Miles

a8,995


950 Cars for Sale

*Hondas from $500*
Police Impounds!
For listings call
1-800-749-8116 ext A760

05508634
1994 Mitsubishi Galant LS
MUST sell for payoff.
$1,200 OBO
Call 386-697-1923

2004 Mercury Grand Marquis SL
Top of Line, Like New.
Full Power
Call 386-754-1876

951 iRecreational
95 Vehicles

2005/06 FEMA Trailers!
Up to 50% off retail!
Call 386-758-8661
www.tumingwheelrv.com

Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles

2005 ELITE Travel Trailer, 33ft,
Super slide out. Washer/Dryer,
CA/H. Asking $17,900. Trailer is
local. (228)343-2701 cell.

Handicapped Van
96' Dodge Ram 3500
Side lift, optional hand brakes, &
gas, special operated seat. 5 K on
Michelins. Exc/Cond. in and out.
$8995 OBO.
Call Bob 386-754-6890


- - --- -:- - - -. . . - , 7: ' ,--q
WIN TER SALES EVENT

6 Days Only - 9AM until Last Customer isSe

We Need To Say "Good-Bye To Our 2005 Leftovers To Make Room For The 06s,

So Now Is The Time To Get A Great Buy On A New Car, Truck or SUV


2006 HONDA PILOT LX 2006 HONDA Accord 2006 HON
MODELUYT1816EWV MODELtCN5636EW LX Special Edition MODEL#YK162EW
.8Au:-.ri-.\* Loaded w/All TheE

S.PR - [- % ;
- - P . .LB . A


* V6 Eng ine .
S A /C .. - , ,
" Automatic .... - (;q. , f,
* AM/FM CD Changer "q2~ 1e Ow -' a4j'Lc


58






it
I.
i.

S






























e
g
i2
A



49

y.



D
E


White, Only 48K Miles

1 9F097


-AT .-. L: SLE, BIue, 4DR, I8K Miles, LiKe New
$21' 95' 1$13,99,


1 I0 FRDFOCS 0'


I. 5'gl


2DR, Silver, Exc. Condition E ..n.r.2 Gart Econorn Car SE r.i c-ra EcrO n.. . PU, Red, 32K Miles

$9,995 $17,885 $14,945 14,595


04 FOD FOCS


S rrr , ""( " "," T, 22K Miles, Great Economy

3795 $14.195 13,161
95 $4a I


$'15,861


S-. 9C s ic ',r. 4 C'i
All The T:oy, Cnly

P-c4,995
Pre-Owned Drides after $2500 cash or trade WAC. See dealer for detE


2006 HONI
WAS
'22.995





t/,.-,'I&


2006 HONDA S2000 2006 HOT
WAS WAS
138,995 :36,995





0 ice e


4DA Ridgeline
xtra..

. -.








i,. n onH04





^Wld 4











',2,I,':: 44 - ' : z


[$24,1 95








White, 21K Miles



















. 4DR, Beige, Only 50K Miles

1"140961

Happy New 9IUear
from



EIim
G-;.ld 4 ':';'':'' ''.'i.�
$g - 95










S~lve


















^^961e

J-Cpp 3,9^ewy5
fronta~~~d V~L44


I


I I *' I1A l .I 0 I 0 ' I ' 0 0


Brand New 2280 Sqft 4/2
w/ concrete foundation, driveway &
walk, deck & more. $134,900.
Close in. Gary Hamilton
Call 386-758-6755


*


| * I


I


-----------'-


I


co-


....... ......


I


- - A --


- - AV


- - w


I USYI)


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445

|LmLjp~ni.


.




Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


5 DAYS ONLY


at


WEDNESDAY,
DEC. 28TH


THURSDAY,
DEC. 29TH


FRIDAY,
DEC. 30TH


SATURDAY,
DEC. 31ST


MONDAY,
JAN. 2ND


9ak


1"45wvvf�


4/


1�r~i
i� r; .r


MR.,a


~2�o~�e


wa&--


o"Z7 at-