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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/00250
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 27, 2005
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:00250
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Opinion
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
        page A 11
        page A 12
    Section B: Sports
        page B 1
        page B 2
    Section B continued
        page B 3
    Section B: Classified Advantage
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
Full Text




WEATHER Just For
Inside 2A Kicks

Hi: 64 00006 032806 ****3-DIGIT 32
w LIBRARY OF FL HISTORY
Low: 35 PO BOX1B 11007007
Mostly Sunny GAINESVILLE FL 32611


Hurricane Damage
Migrant workers lose work
due to storms that struck
South Florida.
State, 6A


Lake



Tuesday, December 27,2005


City


Reporter


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 131, No. 288 N 50 cents


Bush hopes for better year in 2006


After a year of
setbacks, president
looks to future.

By DEB RIECHMANN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
President Bush, bruised by
months of setbacks, enters
the new year hoping to win
congressional battles over tax
cuts and immigration, get


rebellious Republicans back
in step and nurture a new
democracy in Iraq - the
make-or-break issue of his
legacy.
Expect the president to
bring in 2006 the same way
he ended the old: Trumpeting
good economic news and talk-
ing, reassuringly, about Iraq
where excitement over a his-
toric ballot has been tem-
pered by growing
disenchantment with the war
and a death toll of U.S. troops


that tops
2,160.
The war in
Iraq and
sluggish
diplomatic
efforts to
deter the
nuclear ambi-


INSIDE
a Is this the
turning point
for the Bush
presidency?
4A


tions of Iran and North Korea
will continue to dominate for-
eign policy for the president,
who plans a trip early in the
new year to India. . ':'.
At home,.Bush will be after


Bush


the Senate to
con firmin
Samuel Alito to
the Supreme
Court in
January. He
also wants
immigration
reform, includ-


ing a guest worker program.'
Absent from his to-do list is
a plan to overhaul the tax
code. White House' advisers
say there may be some
efforts to simplify. it, but a


sweeping restructuring
would need more discussion.
Also off the list is revamping
Social Security, the one-time
centerpiece of Bush's domes-
tic agenda that failed to gain
traction even though he criss-
crossed the country to win
support for it.
White House advisers were
candid that next fall's con-
gressional elections will
cramp Bush's legislative
efforts.
"When the president puts


out a legislative and executive
agenda, we'll make sure we
reflect the fact that it's diffi-
cult for Congress to get any-
thing done in an election
year," said Dan Bartlett,
counselor to the president.
Bartlett said that doesn't
mean the president won't
introduce fresh initiatives,
which typically are tucked in
the State of the Union
address, tentatively
BUSH continued on 10A


BARGAIN HUNTERS



Frenzy ensues


LINuaAT uuvWNV iLaKe City Reporter
Sales associate Eloise Kent (left) assists Lake City resident Nealy Balkcom as Balkcom exchanges
Christmas presents Monday at Goody's.

Lines long for post holiday

sales; shoppers remain calm


Consumers flock
to Lake City for
bargains, returns.
By LINDSAY DOWNEY
Idowney@lakecityreporter.comrn
Christmas was finished but
the shopping frenzy
continued.
Long lines wrapped
around customer-service
counters in stores at the
Lake City Mall on Monday
morning as a slew of


shoppers exchanged
Christmas gifts and took
advantage, of post-holiday
sales. Most stores in the mall
opened at 6 a.m.
'There were quite a few
people standing outside the
front door this morning," J.C.
Penney catalog/credit super-
visor Carmen Barrington
said, estimating that about
10 people waited outside
until J.C. Penney opened its
doors at 6 a.m.


"Usually
customers are
cranky ... But it's
actually been a
good day today."
- Carmen Barrington,
J.C. Penney.catalog/credit card
supervisor


SHOP continued on 10A


YEAR IN REVIEW


Schiavo right-to-die case

captured world's attention


Brain-damaged
woman died after
heated battles.
By MITCH STACY
Associated Press ,
TAMPA - Lying in a
severely brain-damaged state
in a Florida hospice last
spring, Terri Schiavo became
a household name.
Few personally knew, the
41-year-old woman, who had
been in what court-appointed
doctors said was a persistent
vegetative state for 15 years,
but millions came to know her
name as her husband and par-
ents culminated a vitriolic
legal fight about, whether she
should be kept alive with a
feeding tube or be allowed to
die.


.. . " ASSOCIATED PRESS
Polly St. Raphael, of St. Petersburg, holds a large photo of Terri
Schiavo and her mother, Mary Schindler, as she walks through
the crowd March 30.


As the yearslong. battle
between Michael Schiavo and
Bob and Mary Schindler
came to a head in March, the
case drew in Congress, the.


U.S. Supreme Court, the
Vatican and the White House.
National TV networks

SCHIAVO continued on 10A


Entitlements consume growing

share of government spending


Three programs
used half of federal
spending in 2004.

By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Three
growing entitlement pro-
grams consumed nearly half
of all federal spending in
2004, and budget analysts
expect them to make up an
even bigger share in the
future.
Social Security, Medicare
and Medicaid accounted for
more than $1 trillion in the
2004 budget year, according


to the Consolidated Federal
Funds Report being
released Tuesday by the
Census Bureau.
Overall federal spending
was 82.2 trillion, an increase
of 5 percent from 2003.
"The total federal spend-
ing increase is actually down
a bit from recent years," said
Gerard Keffer, chief of the
Census Bureau's federal
programs branch. "It had
been running 6 to 8 percent
in the past several years."
For years, Washington
has been fighting over how
to manage the growth of
entitlement programs.
Analysts think the fight will
continue for years to come.


"I think it's absolutely
essential and inevitable that
we are going to reform
those programs," said
Rudolph Penner, a senior
fellow at the Urba n Institute,
a social issues research
organization. "How, is anoth-
er question. There's very
little interest, now."
President Bush has
pushed to overhaul Social
Security and establish pri-
vate accounts, but Congress
has balked.
Critics argue that private
accounts would do nothing
to slow the growth of Social
Security spending - unless
benefits are cut, a politically
unpopular option.


Violence increases around
Iraq; U.S. soldier among dead


At least two dozen
killed in shootings
and bombings.
By MARIAM FAM
Associated Press
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Violence
increased across Iraq after a lull
following the Dec. 15 parliamen-
tary elections, with at least two
dozen people including a U.S. sol-
dier killed Monday in shootings


and bombings mostly targeting
the Shiite-dominated security
services.
The Defense Ministry director
of operations, Brig. Gen. Abdul
Aziz Mohammed-Jassim, blamed
increased violence in the past two
days on insurgents trying to deep-
en the political turmoil following
the elections.
The violence came as three
Iraqi opposition groups
IRAQ continued on 10A


MOOUuIm/ 1 -u mCoo
Iraqi soldiers guard the site where a car bomb detonated
in the center of Baghdad, Iraq, on Monday.


Rice's star rising, even
as public sours on Bush


Diplomat gaining
popularity in
secondyear.
By ANNE GEARAN
AP Diplomatic Writer
WASHINGTON -
Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice has
become the most popular
member of the Bush admin-
istration and a potential can-
didate to succeed her boss


in the White House, even as
Americans lose confidence
in the president she serves
and patience with the Iraq
war she helped launch.
Entering her second year
as the country's senior
diplomat aid foreign policy
spokeswoman, Rice has
improbably shed much of
her image as the hawkish
"warrior princess" at
President Bush's side. The
RICE continued on 10A


CALLUS: INSIDE
6suBsCRIBE9TO Business ...............5A Obituaries ............. :6A
THE REPORTER: Classified .............. 6B Opinion ............. 4A
Voice: 755-5445 , Comics................. 3B Puzzles.................2B
1 4264l002 i Fax: 752-9400 State .................. 3A W orld ................ 12A '
t.


TODAY IN COMING
HEALTH WEDNESDAY
Exercise gets divine Good recipes in
intervention. 9A What's Cookin'?





_� L


Y-'









Page Editor: S. Michael Manley, 754-0429


LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005


Saturday:
1-1-7
Monday:
1-7-0


Saturday:
4-4-0-7
Monday:
5-3-8-5


Saturday
34-14-16-24-15
Sunday:
1-5-10-19-31


FLORIDA

Saturday:
1-26-50-22-40-48


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Parker cited for driving infraction


Eva Longoria and Tony Parker


'Producer' director
keeps it simple
MLAMI - When it came
time to make a movie out of
"The Producers," Susan
Stroman had a simple
approach: If it ain't broke,
don't fix it.
Stroman, who directed and
choreographed the
award-winning stage
production, was tapped by
Mel Brooks to transfer the
energy onto the screen with
stars Nathan Lane and
Matthew Broderick.
"Right from the start, Mel
said, 'Do the musical,"'
Stroman said in Friday's


SAN ANTONIO - San Antonio
Spurs guard Tony Parker was cited for
impeding traffic and failing to produce a
valid Texas driver's license during a
traffic stop in which "Desperate
Housewives" actress Eva Longoria was
his passenger, police said.
The incident happened early
Saturday. According to police, a bicycle
officer saw a stopped car impeding
traffic and rapped on the hood with his
hand.
Parker, who was behind the wheel,
questioned why the officer touched the


now to have had the
opportunity to direct a movie
musical - me, who has lived,
her whole life doing musicals
- is really beyond dreams'
realized."

Huffman had zero
risk in 'Trans' role
SAN FRANCISCO - Risk?
There was nothing to risk for
Felicity Huffman in playing a
man becoming a woman.
"I'm not a beauty. That's not
my thing. So it wasn't like I
was risking anything,"
Huffman said in Sunday's San
Francisco Chronicle. "What I


Miami Herald. "So it was
really about finding a way to
take this musical, which is in
proscenium, and give it four
walls and a sky."
Stroman said the musical
numbers gave her the
chance to pay homage to the
old movie musicals that
inspired her as a child,
including "Singin' in the
Rain" and "Seven Brides for
Seven Brothers."
"I ended up working in
theater, because the movie
musical genre was dead,"
she said, "but I still wanted
to fulfill the passion I felt
when I saw Fred Astaire and
Ginger Rogers dancing. So


Celebrity Birthdays


* Former U.S. Sen. James,
A. McClure (R-ldaho) is 81.
* Rockabilly musician
Scotty Moore is 74.
* ABC News correspondent
Cokie Roberts is 62.
* Singer Tracy Nelson is 61.
* Actor Gerard Depardieu is
57.
* Jazz singer-musician T.S.
Monk is 56.
,- Singer-songwriter Karla
Bonoff, S 54.
It Rock rimusician David
"F- ff!' ,I' ; ' : ;


Knopfler (Dire Straits) is 53.
* Broadcast journalist Arthur
Kent is 52.
* Actress Maryam D'Abo is
45. ,
* Country musician Jeff
Bryant is-43.:
* Actress Eva LaRue is 39.
* Rock musician Guthrie.
Govan (Asia) is 34.
* Musician Matt Slocum is
33.
* Actor Wilson Cruz is 32.
* Singer Olu is 32


car, and the couple "began screaming in
a verbally abusive and demeaning
manner," police said.
Police said Parker then began to
drive away, almost hitting a man
standing nearby. After being told to stop
and get out, Parker showed a French
driver's license, police said.
The officer who wrote the citations
said that Parker complained: '"This is all
the cops do, just mess with people," and
that Longoria shouted from the car:
"He's just a Mexican bike cop! He only
wants your autograph!"


was risking is whether I could
do it There are many places
to fall."
Huffman, 43, was
nominated for two best-
actress Golden Globes on
Dec. 14 - as Stanley/Bree in
the film '"Transamerica" and
as the beleaguered mom
Lynette in TV's "Desperate
Housewives."
As for rumors of dissension
with co-stars Nicollette
Sheridan, Teri Hatcher, Eva
Longoria and Marcia Cross,
Huffman denied them.
'"They were waiting for us
to fight before we even
started airing," she said.
* Associated Press


Thought for Today


"Everybody gets so much
information all day long that they
lose their common sense."

- Gertrude Stein,
American author (1874-1946)


0


'King Kong:' the box

office holiday champ


By JEFF WILSON
Associated Press Writer

LOS ANGELES - "King
Kong" and "The Chronicles of
Narnia: The Lion, the Witch
and the Wardrobe" battled for
the four-day box office .crown,
with the giant ape finally swip-
ing the Christmas holiday
prize.
A Sunday night surge gave
Universal's "King Kong" the
needed push for the No. 1 spot
over the Friday-through-
Monday period with $31.4 mil-
lion, edging Buena Vista's
"Chronicles of Narnia" with an
estimated $30.1 million take.
The box office lead shifted
back and forth all last week as
new releases cropped up, on
marquees Wednesday, Friday


Lake City
HOW TO REAMCUS
Main number ..........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............. 752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online ...... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit.Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fla. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard ... .754-0418
(mleonard@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson .........754-0428
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTIMI
Sales ....... .............752-1293
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)


and still more Christmas Day.
"It's a battle of the holiday
blockbusters. It was very close
for the No. 1 position," said
Paul Dergarabedian, president
of box office tracker Exhibitor
Relations Co. Inc.
"There's only so much room.
I think crowded is the fair term
.to describe the marketplace
right now," Universal Pictures
vice chairman Marc Shmuger
said Monday, noting overall
box office was up 20 percent
over the weekend compared to
the previous weekend.
'These two movies are ener-
gizing the business," said
Chuck Viane, president Buena
Vista Pictures Distribution,
adding "Narnia" is continuing
to lure audiences in its third
week of release.


Reporter
CLAssi'iED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSDNES
Controller Sue Brannon ......754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CROULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next
day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters ... .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)'
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
13 Weeks ... ............... $23.54
26 Weeks ............... . . . . .$42.80
52 Weeks .....................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
13 Weeks ..................$. 44.85
26 Weeks ....................$89.70
52 Weeks .......... .... .... $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this:.
space. And thaks forreadih '"" "
NW- EMMA% ir! ]


AROUND FLORIDA


**IUAOA


IHE WEAITHIR


Lawmaker: Start
school later
TALLAHASSEE - A state
lawmaker wants to require
public schools to wait until
the week before Labor Day
before opening their
classrooms.
State Rep. Dan Gelber,
D-Miami Beach, has filed a
bill to prohibit public schools
from starting earlier in
August. This year, more than
one-third of Florida's public
school districts started
classes during the first week
of August.
S. Gelber said he thinks
schools are starting classes
too early in August to have
more time to prepare
students for the Florida
Comprehensive Assessment
Test.
"The one-upmanship
between districts in trying to
get more preparation days
before the FCAT has created
really a system where the
school districts are moving
unilaterally their start dates
up earlier and earlier," Gelber
said.
Gelber said it doesn't make
sense to startbclasses in the
middle of hurricane season
' when there's a chance that
storms will shut down
schools. He said the early
start is also out of sync with
many summer enrichment
programs and family
vacations.
Gelber said his plan would
not change the total number
of days that children go to
school.

Seven dead in
holiday wrecks
ORMOND BEACH - A
15-year-old boy who was in a
coma following a car crash
died Christmas Day, only
hours after his brother and a
friend died from injuries in
the same accident, a police
official said Monday.
Alex Hubler died Sunday at
the Halifax Medical Center,
where he had been on life


support since the crash early
Saturday, said Brenda Cupak,
who works in the records
division at the Ormond
Beach police department.
Hubler's brother
Christopher, 17, and the
driver of the vehicle, Adam
Hylan, 18, also died from
injuries suffered in the crash,
which occurred about
12:30 a.m. Saturday.
Hylan was driving the
Hubler brothers home from
Ormond Beach's skate park,
his mother told The Daytona
Beach News-Journal.
Hylan lost control of the
vehicle on a curve, and it
struck a tree, said Sgt. Kenny
Hayes, Ormond Beach police
spokesman. All three
teenagers were thrown from
the vehicle. None were
wearing a seat belt and
excessive speed may have
been a factor in the crash,
Hayes told the newspaper.
In a separate accident
Saturday, a Perry police
officer, his wife and their
9-year-old son were killed
when a truck driven by a
teenager slammed into their
sport utility vehicle in
Madison County in north
Florida.
Authorities said Robert D.
'Johns, 41, his wife Kimberly,
38, and their son, Brett, were
traveling southbound on
County Road 370 shortly
after midnight when a pickup
truck driven by Paul
Williams, of Madison,
crossed the center line from
the northbound lane and
struck the family's vehicle
head-on.
Williams, 19, also died in
the collision. A passenger in
his truck was hospitalized
with minor injuries, the
Florida Highway Patrol said..

Autopsy reveals
man shot himself
LAKELAND - An autopsy
indicates that a man found
dead after a nearly 10-hour
standoff with deputies died of
a self-inflicted gunshot


wound, authorities said
Sunday.
Eric Cousins, 21, allegedly
shot a woman during a
robbery attempt early Friday,
then led Polk County
deputies on a car chase
before barricading himself in
a Lakeland home, authorities
said.
Cousins exchanged gunfire
with a deputy, but did not
respond when authorities
later attempted to contact
him and fired tear gas
canisters into the house,
sheriff's spokesman Michal
Shanley said.
A robot sent into the house
found Cousins dead at
11 a.m.
An autopsy showed
Cousins fatally shot himself
in the chest, Shanley said.

Juror: deliberations
were tense at times
TAMPA - Deliberations
during the terrorism trial of
Sami Al-Arian were tense at
times, and at the end jurors
were repeating the same
arguments before deciding not
to issue a guilty verdict for the
former University of South
Florida professor, a juror said.
' "It was very difficult at
times in the deliberation
area," Juror 211 told The
Tampa Tribune.' "It was hard.
We would state the way we
felt and vote the way we felt
and continually we were
asked, 'Where do you come
up with this?' We would go
over our points and other-
people couldn't see that. It
was frustrating."
SThe 66-year-old woman
voted to acquit AI-Arian on
eight of the 17 counts,
including conspiracy to
murder and maim people
abroad. But she was one of
two holdouts who believed
the professor and
co-defendant Hatim Fariz
were guilty of conspiracies to
commit racketeering and to
provide material support to
terrorists.
* Associated Press


CHANCE
SHOWERS


HI 70LO47


I *~


'~*1 . .~


Tallahassee
67/400
Pensacola Panama City
* 69/55 *67/50
. ,


* Valdosta Jacksonville
--67/38 * 63/38
Lake City,
64/35 Daytona Beach
Gainesville. Da 40a Beach
64/35 65/O 0
Ocala* Cape Canaveral
65 .'riand 64/44
65/41
Tampa,.
68/45 West Palm Beach
68,/530

Ft. Myers* Ft. Lauderdale
69/46 70/58.
a Naples
67/49 Miami
Key West 71,'58
70/600


. . . . . . . . . .


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low
PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to date
Normal year-to-date


57
42
67
43
82 in 1932
19 in 1985


0.00"
6.35"
49.79"
2.08'
47.88"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunnse tom.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonnse today
Moonset today
Moonrnse torn.
Moonset tornm.


7:25 a.m.
5:38 p.m.
7:26 a.m
5:39 p.m.

3:48 a.m.
2:27 p.m.
4:54 a.m.
3:11 p.m.


Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan
30 6 14 22
New First Full Last


On this date in
1947, New York City
received a record
26.4 inches of snow
in 24 hours, with as
much as 32 inches
reported in the sub-
urbs. The heavy
snow brought traffic
to a standstill.


Cape Canavel
Daytona Beac
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
Lake City
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Tallahassee
Tampa
Valdosta
W. Palm Beac


Wednesday Thursday
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SLOW
45 mfnitestobimi
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation ric,
for the area on
a scale from 0

JKa, 10-r.^W~vi


- ' Forecasts, data and graphics
. '" 2005 Weather Central;
* " ' . "_ Inc., Madison, WIs.
S www.wealherpubllsher.com
\JI


.71M =147k?


Connecte'd
wwwhlkedpyrportermom


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service
brought to
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LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE & NATION TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005


Florida hammered by another


brutal hurricane season in 2005


By JOHN PAIN
Associated Press
MIAMI - After Hurricane
Katrina killed more than
1,300 people on the Gulf Coast,
emergency managers and fore-
casters thought stormprone
Florida residents would be
more prepared and pay better
attention to warnings and
evacuation orders.
But less than 10 percent of
Florida Keys residents left for
Hurricane Wilma. And thou-
sands of South Florida resi-
dents flocked to distribution
sites for government supplies
of food and water the day after
the storm despite warnings
that they should be ready to
survive on their own for at least
three days.
While many people said they
couldn't afford to buy supplies
or evacuate, officials are
wondering how to ensure they
heed the danger or are
properly prepared for a
hurricane.
"Our memories are very,
very short," said Max
Mayfield, director of the
National Hurricane Center in
Miami. "The government
absolutely can't do this alone. If
we're going to get people to


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dean Hutton (left) and Jonathan Edgar sit in a bus stop shelter as
the ocean waves caused by Hurricane Rita crash around them in


Key West, on Sept. 20.
take that individual
responsibility, there's got to be
a team effort."
Working out any wrinkles in
the disaster plans have become
even more critical given pre-
dictions from forecasters that
hurricane seasons are going to
be more active than usual for at
least another decade - and
possibly as long as 50 years.
The last two seasons
underscore their warnings.
The 2005 Atlantic hurricane
season was the busiest in
154 years of storm tracking,
with .records set for the


number of named storms (26),
and hurricanes (13).
Forecasters used up their list
of 21 proper names (Arlene,
Bret, Cindy, etc.) and had to
use the Greek alphabet to
name storms for the first time.
Three hurricanes struck
Florida this year and one
brushed by, causing about
$7.5 billion in insured damage
and was blamed for 63 deaths.
Four hurricanes hit last year,
causing $19 billion in insured
losses and blamed for 123
deaths.
People are still suffering


Mother of teen missing in Aruba


advises class of 2006 to take heed


By SAM1RA JAFARI
Associated Press
MONTGOMERY, Ala. -
Beth Twitty did her homework
before letting her "daughter,
Natalee Holloway, head to
Aruba on her senior class trip:
She went to planning meet-
ings, and so did Holloway.
They asked questions. They
discussed underage drinking,
chaperones and traveling with
buddies.
In spite of all of the precau-
tions, Holloway vanished on
May 30, the last night of her
stay in Aruba.
Her unsolved disappearance
became a cautionary tale for
parents and the class of '06,
and Twitty hopes that teens
will listen.
"I think if kids can take
Natalee's story with them and
realize that you're not always
safe .... You are responsible for
yourself," said Twitty in a tele-
phone interview with The
Associated Press. "I think
Natalee can. show us firsthand
what can happen."
However, while Holloway's


disappearance may have
soured the senior trip experi-
ence for her friends in subur-
ban Mountain Brook, it has
swayed few others.
Travel groups such as AAA
Travel said a few travelers
switched destinations in the
weeks following Holloway's
disappearance, but those fears
subsided, even with a call by
Alabama's governor .for, a
boycott of Aruba. :.
This year, the most popular
destinations '6fifde the United'
States for senior trips are
Caribbean islands and Mexico,
according to the Michigan-
based Student & Youth Travel
Association. The most desired
domestic sites are South Padre
Island along the Texas coast;
Panama City Beach; Virginia
Beach, Va.; Myrtle Beach, S.C.,
and Daytona Beach.
Holloway, an 18-year-old
honors student from Mountain
Brook, was last seen leaving an
Aruba bar with Dutch national
Joran van der Sloot and
Surinamese brothers Deepak
and Satish Kalpoe. The young
men were arrested in June but


N." ' 46 � - tl r5 ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tears roll down the face of Beth Twitty as she stands with her
husband George 'Jug' Twitty during a prayer meeting in support of
families with missing children, Dec. 8, at the Governor's Mansion
in Montgomery, Ala.


were released after a court
ruled there was not enough
evidence to hold them.
As the new year approaches,
Holloway's mother has much
to dwell on.
"When I think about Natalee
being abducted in Aruba, I
can't help but know if she had
made a plan with friends to not
leave that establishment alone,
it would never put her in a situ-
ation where she was left


defenseless against her perpe-
trators," Twitty said. "But
regardless, it should not cost
our sons and daughters their
lives."
One., problem is that teens
are fearless.
"It's such a difficult age,"
Twitty said. "They're caught
between a delicate balance of
being under their parents'
watchful eye and being totally
independent."


FDLE increases reward

for escaped suspect


Associated Press
MIAMI - Authorities dur-
ing the weekend increased
the reward for tips leading to
the arrest of an accused serial
rapist who escaped from jail
last week by rappelling down
the building on bed sheets.
The reward for Reynaldo E.
Rapalo was increased by
$5,000 bringing the total to
$36,000, Florida Department
of Law Enforcement spokes-
woman Paige Patterson
Hughes said.
"We certainly hope an
increase in reward money will
.bring more tips and more
leads," Hughes said.
Rapalo is accused of sexual-
ly assaulting seven girls and
women and attacking four oth-
ers in the Little Havana area in
2002 and 2003. He was await-
ing a February trial that could
have sent him to prison for
life.
Rapalo and another inmate,
Idanio Bravo, climbed
through a vent in the 7-foot
ceiling of Bravo's single-man
cell on the sixth floor Tuesday


and made it to the roof on the
same level, officials said.
The vent, which connects to
the roof, was supposed to be
locked, but had been pried
open, and bars blocking it
were cut.
There were indications that
someone was planning to
meet Rapalo after he escaped,
Miami Police Chief John
Timoney,has said.
Bravo, who was also await-
ing trial on sexual assault
charges, was captured outside
the jail after breaking his legs
when he jumped.
Meanwhile, officers are
scouring neighborhoods, air-
ports, train stations and ports
for Rapalo, a 34-year-old
Honduran. Guards have been
assigned to victims who still
live in the area.
"We are searching every-
where we can for him,"
Hughes said.
She added that federal
agencies were involved and
said Honduran authorities
have been notified about his
escape.


from the pummeling during
the 2005 season. The damage
from the hurricanes and the
frustrations that developed
afterward are etched in their
minds.
Thousands were forced into
shelters. And many people
whose homes were damaged
or destroyed by the storms still
haven't found a permanent
place to live. Some were still in
shelters after the season
ended. Others are living in gov-
ernment trailers, hotels, or
with relatives.
The booming real estate
market has made finding new
homes pricey and difficult. And
repairs to damaged or inhabita-
ble housing can take months
because there aren't enough
materials and contractors to do
all the work created during the
past two years from storm
damage.
And the worst of the storms
to hit Florida in 2005 -
Hurricane Wilma in October
- will be remembered as
much for the way it paralyzed
South Florida and left many
residents frustrated. Millions
endured curfews, weeks with-
out power, hours-long lines for
gasoline and frustrating delays
at some disaster aid sites.


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Confidential information on
Gov. Jeb Bush and other top
officials was allegedly sent
overseas as a cost-saving strat-
egy, according to a complaint
by a former employee.
A subcontractor hired by
Cincinnati-based Convergys
Corp. used overseas scanning
and indexing services to save
money without telling the
Cincinnati-based company that
operates Florida's new private-
ly run personnel system, attor-
ney John Newcomer told The
Tallahassee Democrat in
Sunday's editions.
Newcomer filed the com-
plaint on behalf of Tara
Gilmore.and Kristina Pagano.
two former " C,nver-.'s
employees.
GDXdata, the subcontractor,
allegedly ,hired at least three
foreign companies from about
June 2003 to November 2004
to perform indexing for
Florida state employee records
to save a couple .cents per


image, the complaint states.
"During this time period,
hundreds of workers in foreign
countries had access to mil-
lions of images containing the
entire gamut of personal inden-
tifiable and sensitive informa-
tion on state employees which
were to be safeguarded under
the (Department of
Management Services)
contract," the complaint states.
The complaint includes
copies of GDXdata e-mails dis-
cussing operations in India and
Barbados that were sent to
Gilmore. It also claimed
GDXdata gave Convergys false
work documents that showed
the work had been performed
domestically.
GDXdata President Nancy
Sauer declined to comment.
"After reviewing informa-
tion, the allegations put for-
ward in the lawsuit are without
merit," Sauer told the newspa-
per. "Additionally, GDXdata
will work with outside counsel
to vigorously respond to these
allegations in court"


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Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404













OPINION


Tuesday. December 27, 2005


www.lakecityreporter.com


EDITORIAL


Is this the


turning


point for


president?
t must have been with great relief
that President Bush left
Washington last week to spend
Christmas at Camp David and
then on to his ranch in Texas.
The past week might have marked a
turning point in the Bush presidency
and not in a good way. The once-docile
Republican-run Congress suddenly has
a mind of its own, and the courts,
which once gave him the benefit of the
doubt on the war on terror, issued a
severe rebuff to his expansive view of
presidential powers.
The Senate finally passed a Bush-
backed budget measure, more than
three months late and then only with
the aid Vice President Cheney, brought.
hastily back from overseas to cast a
tie-breaking vote. Several small
changes the Senate inserted in the bill
mean the House will have to vote on it
again. The bill achieves only token
deficit reduction - $40 billion a year -
largely at the expense of student loans
and Medicaid. Even that modest
progress will be wiped out if Congress
goes through with $100 billion in tax
cuts.
For the fifth year, the president failed
to get Congress to open Alaska's Arctic
National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling.
The White House grudgingly agreed
to a one-month renewal of the Patriot
Act rather than risk having key
provisions expire. This is a law that
Congress basically rubber-stamped the
first time around. Bush will likely get
his renewal, but the price may be
unwanted curbs on the sneak-and-peek
and gag provisions and searches ,
authorized only by national security
letters.
What a difference a year makes.
E Scripps Howard News Service

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY

Today is Tuesday, Dec. 27, the 361st
day of 2005. There are four days left in
the year.
* On Dec. 27, 1932, Radio City Music
Hall opened in New York,
* In 1822, scientist Louis Pasteur was
born in Dole, France.
* In 1831, naturalist Charles Darwin set
out on a voyage to the Pacific aboard the
HMS Beagle. (Darwin's discoveries during
the trip helped to form the basis of his
theories on evolution.)
* In 1900, militant prohibitionist Carry A.
Nation carried out her first public smashing
of a bar, at the Carey Hotel in Wichita.


Lake City Reporter
serving Columbia County since 1874
The Lake City Reporter.is published with
pride for residents of Columbia and,
surrounding counties by Community
Newspaper Inc. of Athens, Ga.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities - "Newspapers get
things done!"
Our primary goal is to publish
distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished '
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work.
Michael Leonard, publisher
Todd Wilson, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


OUR POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be typed or
neatly written and double spaced. Letters
should not exceed 400 words and will be edited
for length and libel. Letters must be signed and
include the writer's name, address and
telephone number for verification. Writers can
have two letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of the
writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City


Reporter.
I BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St.
downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com


COMMENTARY


A lack of intelligence


W ell, just when
I thought
California was
leading the
country with
liberal judicial activisim from
the infamous 9th Circuit
(Remember? That's the court
that ruled the Pledge of
Allegiance unconstitutional
and declared that schools
know more about how to
teach sex education than
parents), a judge in
Pennsylvania has just sprinted
to catch up with them. . ..
On Dec. 20, U.S. District
Judge John E. Jones ruled that
public schools may not offer
students even a hint that the
theory of intelligent design
may have some credibility.
Ever since Darwin's theory
of evolution was so warmly
embraced by the scientific
community, the public
_education systemhas
vacillated about what to teach
students. Disregarding what
they deem the unprovable,
and therefore unscientific
belief in Creationism,
scientists largely support
Darwin, even though a theory,
by definition, is not proven
fact and should be open for
discussion. In recent years,
however, some scientists who
support the belief that life and
living things didn't just
"happen" by randomtprocess,
have advanced what they call
the Theory of Intelligent
Design (ID).
In simple terms, the
proponents of ID, many of
whom are not religious,,
nevertheless believe that the
origin of life had to have an
intelligent creator. They hope
that presenting their theory in
a scientific way will make it
acceptable by the courts as
scientific, rather than
religious. With astounding
(and perhaps unprecedented)
judicial clairvoyance, Judge
Jones read their minds,
however and didn't hesitate to
accuse the school board
members who had defended
teaching ID, of lying to cover
up their "real motives." Jones
declared that ID is "nothing
less than the progeny of
creationism ... No serious
alternative to God as the
designer, has been proposed
by the members of ID ..."


OTHER


Scandal threatens many lawmakers


H ow many rats does
it take to spoil the
holiday season for
a potential
boatload of
lawmakers? Well, so far there
have been two and now it
looks like the king rodent in a
burgeoning lobbying scandal
is in the process of jumping a
sinking ship.


Carolyn Abell
carbell 1020@rmchsi.com


Hey, Judge, did you know
God was the first one to
declare murder a crime when
He gave Moses the Ten.
Commandments? Maybe you
should rule the Pennsylvania
law against homicide
unconstitutional, since it
comes from obvious religious
origins. And, oh yes, what
about that Constitution in your
state? It starts off with the
preamble: "We, the people of
the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania, grateful to
Almighty God for the
blessings of civil and religious
liberty, and humbly invoking
His guidance, do ordain and
. establish this Constitution."
Gee, can you declare a state
constitution unconstitutional?
According to Judge Jones, if
ID proponents can't come .up
with some "designer" other
than God, their theory flies in
the face of the "Constitutional"
separation of church and
state. Never mind that the
U.S. Constitution has no such
provision, and the widely
touted "separation clause"
actually came from a letter
written, by Thomas Jefferson
- a letter, incidentally, in
which he also offered "prayers
for the protection and blessing
of the common Father and
creator of man..." It is more .
than a little ironic that a clause
from that very letter
acknowledging a "creator of,
man" would become the
foundation some two hundred
years aIter for eliminating God
or anything alluding to His,
possible existence in the
public sector as
"unconstitutional," including
the idea of an intelligent
creator.
The very respected
Discovery Institute, a
self-described "secular think
tank," whose Board members,;
and Fellows include members
from Protestant, Roman


Pardon all the mixed
metaphors, but according to
news reports super influence
peddler Jack Abramoff is
talking about a deal in the
Federal investigation that
openly has targeted one
House member and is delving
into the activities of a number
of others, including the
former Republican majority


leader Tom DeLay, already
under indictment in his home
state of Texas.
As we all know, Abramoff's
two partners, Adam Kidan.and
Michael Scanlon, already have
cut deals with the feds to rat
on Abramoff and'those they
tried to influence with money
from Indian tribes.
* Scripps Howard News Service


Catholic, Eastern Orthodox,
Jewish, and agnostic persua-
sions, does give scientific
credibility to ID. Careful to
distinguish ID from
creationism, the Institute
declares that "Unlike
creationism, the scientific
theory of intelligent design is
agnostic regarding the source
of design and has no
commitment to defending
Genesis, the Bible, or any
other sacred text."
A 2002 resolution by the
American Association for the
Advancement of Science
(AAAS) denounced ID as an
unscientific theory. With
abundant irony, the resolution
was notably unscientific,
attacking ID based on shallow
"evidence" gleaned from
unidentified sources. Some
board members involved in
making the resolution,
apparently did so without
having read or studied any of
the academic books and
.articles by scientists
proposing the theory.
There was a time when
students were encouraged to
think, study and analyze. They
weren't ridiculed for
expounding on beliefs that
differed from their peers. The
tide seems to have turned in
much of the educational
community, now, however, and
anyone who keeps to an
opinion that is unpopular
among the self-styled
"intelligentsia," especially if it
smacks of anything
resembling a belief in God as
Lord and Creator, is now
denounced as hopelessly
old-fashioned and out of
touch. In Pennsylvania, a
teacher who dares to offer an
alternative to Darwin's theory
of evolution,.could even be
arrested, presumably.
With such close-minded
"theorists" among the
scientific and educational
community, it is little wonder
that so many parents are
opting to home-school their
children, where they can
present ideas that have as
much or more credibility than
those most often supported by
certain public education
systems.
* Carolyn Abell, formerly of Lake
City, is a freelance writer who
lives in Tifton, Ga.


- Felicity Huffman,
Actress, describing her new movie role.
(Complete story on Page 2


4A


VIEWS


�'


C O M M E N TA RY



Hattie



Hudgins'



home in


heaven


I t's been 26 years this month since my
grandmother, Mama Hudgins, died. She
was living easy: waited on hand and
foot, never cooking a meal, never
mopping a floor, never feeding the cats.
And then she died. She was 91.
.She was in a nursing home, of course, but
she didn't know that.
She thought all those people had come to
her house to wait on her.
"I don't ever have to cook anymore," she
said one time.
Mama Hudgins was suffering from
dementia. Well,
suffering is the
wrong word.
Actually she N
seemed to
enjoy
dementia.
It was a
Blessing, really
We worried Phil Hudgins
that she phudgins@cninewspaperscobm
wouldn't be
happy in a
nursing home, and she struck out down the
highway to prove us right.
Fortunately a motorist figured this little
lady with her hair in a bun shouldn't be hiking
down the road carrying not even a tow sack,
and he picked her up and took her back.
She'd already made it a half-mile toward
home.
The second time, staff members caught her
at the end of the driveway.
.After that, with dementia setting in, she.'
must have decided to just sit back and enjoy
her time off. She was due.
She had worked hard most of her life:
milking a cow before daybreak, slopping the
hogs, churning butter, hoeing a garden,
canning vegetables, cooking on a wood'stove,
stoking coal in the Warm Morning, keeping.
house, taking drinking water to Papa in the
field. Now she rested.
She may have thought she'd gone to
heaven, if that's what heaven is like.'
I thought of Mama Hudgins the other night
as Barbara Walters interviewed all of those
religious leaders and a. couple of Hollywood
celebrities - as if I care what celebrities think
- about heaven. I wasn't inspired.
The first I ever heard about heaven was at
Belmont Baptist Church, where Mama
Hudgins was a dedicated member, the one
who made the wine for communion, but
wouldn't touch it any other time.
It was there I heard preacher Sam Jones,
whose fiery sermons could scare the hell out
of anyone.
He was a gentle, friendly soul, though.
Just longing for heaven.
At my young age, I longed more for the
spread of food at homecoming, mostly for
Mama Hudgins' apple pie and a glassful of
cold, tart lemonade made in a washtub and
poured from a long-handled dipper. Now that
was heaven.
They talked about heaven when Mama
Hudgins died on Christmas Eve of 1979 and
then at her funeral two days later.
They didn't mention lemonade or Mama's
apple pie, pie so firm and flat you could hold a
piece in your hand. But I imagine they're both
available.
And if Hattie Hudgins had a choice, she'd
rather be working and serving than sitting
around letting a bunch of folks wait on her.
Whatever she's doing, she likes it.
Otherwise, she'd wave and smile, the way she
always did, and strike out down the highway
toward home.
* Phil Hudgins is senior editor of Community
Newspapers Inc.

They Said It...


"I'm not a beauty.That's
not my thing. So it
wasn't like I was risking
anything."







LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005


Theme park attendance shows strong gains in 2005


By MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press
ORLANDO - Powered by
strong investment in new
rides, the 50th anniversary of
Disneyland and a hurricane
season that bypassed the
theme park capital of Orlando,
attendance at North
America's 50 most popular
amusement parks rose 4.2
percent in 2005.
An estimated 176 million
visitors went to North
America's most popular parks,
according to an annual survey
to be released Monday by the
trade publication Amusement
Business and the research
firm Economics Research
Associates.
Worldwide, amusement
park attendance increased 2.2
percent to 253 million visitors
in 2005.
Neither a rainy spring in
California nor a parade of
destructive hurricanes in the
southeast slowed down
growth in the $10 billion
industry, which had strong
momentum from last year, the
first year attendance had
increased since the Sept. 11
attacks hobbled the U.S.
tourism and travel industry.
Most major parks don't
release their attendance fig-
ures, but the Amusement
Business numbers are consid-
ered the most reliable esti-
mates in the industry.
Those parks that acquired
new rides in 2005 saw their
investments pay off while
those parks that had an off-
year in their capital invest-
ment cycle, for the most part,
experienced attendance dips,
said James Zoltak, editor of
Amusement Business.


Universal's two parks in
Orlando, Universal Studios
and Islands of Adventures,
each saw declines of 81/2 per-
cent, while Universal Studios
Hollywood had an attendance
dip of 6 percent. All three
parks came off strong atten-
dance increases in 2004 and
the parks in 2005 didn't intro-
duce an excitement-generat-
ing thrill ride comparable to
2004's Revenge of the
Mummy ride.
"There was an appetite and
sometimes you don't want to
miss out on that when there is
that appetite, if you're in a
rebound kind of year," Zoltak
said. "Universal was left a little
flat-footed because they did
their big Revenge of the
Mummy rollout the year
before."
Tom Schroder, a Universal
spokesman, said 2004's high-
flying attendance figures were
a tough act to follow.
"The bar was raised so
incredibly high for us by spec-
tacular attendance in 2004,
combined with a very compet-
itive environment to higher
gas prices," Schroder said.
"2005 was just slightly less
great than 2004."
Amusement Business also
said a worldwide marketing
juggernaut highlighting the
50th anniversary of
Disneyland at Disney's parks
around the world may also
have siphoned off some atten-
dance at the Universal parks.
Disney's four parks in
Florida and two parks in
California benefited from the
celebration with new rides,
stage shows and parades. The
Florida parks had attendance
increases of between


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Visitors at Sea World get a chance to get close and pet a dolphin in Orlando, on Friday, Dec. 16. With a strong investment in new rides
and a hurricane season that bypassed the theme park capital of Orlando, attendance at North America's 50 most popular theme parks
rose 4.2 percent in 2005.


5 percent and 61/2 percent,
while Disneyland and
Disney's California Adventure
in Anaheim, Calif. respective-
ly saw growth of 8k percent
and 3.6 percent.
The Magic Kingdom at
Walt Disney World in


Orlando, with 16.1 million vis-
itors, and Disneyland in
California, with 14.5 million
visitors, were not only the two
most visited parks in North
America in 2005, but they
were the best-attended parks
in the world. In North


America, the remaining top 5
spots were filled out with
Disney's other Florida parks:
Epcot, Disney-MGM Studios
and Animal Kingdom.
Disney parks in the United
States, Japan and France took
up the top eight spots in


attendance worldwide.
"We think that certainly the
50th anniversary of
Disneyland' has resonated
with consumers, not just here
in California but really all over
the world," said Lisa Haines,
Disney spokesperson.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Teresa Guzman and her husband Ronald hold an eviction notice
they received Dec. 15, to vacate the Jolly Roger trailer park in
Grassy Key. Residents are now scrambling to find other housing
before the June deadline runs out.Up and down the Keys, a limited
supply of buildable land has fed a redevelopment frenzy that in
recent years has begun to redefine the commercial face of these
islands along lines of class and wealth.

Keys motels quickly

renovated into condos


By JENNIFER BABSON
The Miami Herald
LAYTON - Sipping an iced
tea and picking at a plate of
chicken Parmesan, retired
mechanic Gary Nichols Sr.
recalls a time - half a century
ago - when he packed up the
family's black Chevy and
headed south on U.S. 1 to an
island chain where tiny
motels and fish camps catered
to everybody, from parents
with kids to men scouting
snapper.
"A working family can't do,
that anymore," Nichols, 70,
who now lives in Lower
Matecumbe, lamented recent-
ly over lunch at Little Italy, a
restaurant and local institu-
tion that has dished out mari-
nara and fresh bread under
one name or another since at
least the 1950s.
Now, he sighs, "the future
of the Keys is for the very rich
and the famous."
Up and down the Keys, a
limited supply of buildable
land has fed a redevelopment
frenzy that in recent years has
begun to redefine the com-
mercial face of these islands
along lines of class and
wealth.
Mom-and-pop motels


whose neon palm trees and
effusive pink signs once beck-
oned visitors to an affordable
"paradise" are rapidly becom-
ing relics, replaced by private
units and "condo-hotels" with
higher price tags and deep-
pocketed clientele.
"It's brought in a lot of peo-
ple who are well-to-do and
weaned out the people that
used to come that didn't have
that much money," said Irving
Eyster, 86, a Keys historian.
"It's something that can't be
helped, I guess. When we first
came here, we were the
eighth ones to build on Lower
Matecumbe. It was almost
like a private island."
Not anymore. State-
imposed growth curbs that
have curtailed commercial
construction for years have
done little to deter a flurry of
redevelopment projects that
has turned the Keys into a
bonanza for building contrac-
tors, plumbers and painters.
Even Layton's beloved
Little Italy now flirts with
extinction at the whim of
growth.
The owners of the adjacent
Lime Tree Bay Resort,
Layton's only motel, plan to
flatten the homestyle stay in
favor of a condo development.


Air boater awaits pay

for Katrina assistance


WEST PALM BEACH -
After Hurricane Katrina
struck, Jim Osborne used his
airboat to save the lives of sur-
vivors stranded by the storm
in the New Orleans area.
The 47-year-old Port St.
Lucie letter carrier navigated
through debris to get to a
.church where he found an old


woman who had waited days
for help to arrive. He said he
burst into the attic of a water-
ravaged house to find a family
of six dead.
But now Osborne finds
himself part of a group of 30
airboaters who were promised
pay for their rescue efforts by
Cat 5 Disaster Services.


MARKET REPORT

EDITOR'S NOTE: Wall Street financial markets were closed
Monday in observance of the Christmas holiday. A full daily
market report will resume in Wednesday's issue.


Kellie Shirah
Realtor/Associate


123 E. Howard Street
Live Oak, Florida 32064
Kellies@alltel.net
Kellieshomes.com


Office:
Mobile:
Fax:
Toll Free:


(386) 362-4539
(386) 208-3847
(386) 364-4539
(800) 557-7478


Prescription Drug
Sign-Up Has Begun


S. Baya Pharmacy will have
S.. , Insurance Specialists at
o . each location to sign up
y1 AN beneficiaries for the new
questions Medicare Part D drug
about t'he new coverage.
Medicare.
p.v'" -. - ;Call to schedule an
Prescri o appointment or to get
8 . more information.


Baya Eas
780 SE Baya
Lake City
755-6677


per Location
50 US 41 NW
Jasper
792-3355


Community








GOING OUT




OF BUSINESS



SALE IS IN ITS



FINAL DAYS!


What's Going to Happen

to All the Merchandise

That Didn't Sell Before

Christmas?


It Will Be Sold at Some

Ridiculous Price Starting

Tuesday at 10 a.m.




EVERYTHING LEFT WILL

GO AT SOME PRICE

INCLUDING FIXTURES,

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All Sales Final. No Refunds or Exchanges.

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Page Editor: Todd Wilson, 754-0428


I[l~j~








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005


CALEN


* To submit your
Community Calendar
item, contact S.
Michael Manley at
754-0429 or by email
at smanley@
lakecityvreorter.com.


Announcements
O'Leno State Park to
host 'Music in the Park'
"Music in the Park" is coming
Saturday, Jan. 7, staring Dick
Staber and Judith Chasnoff.
Bring a chair and relax by the
river while listening to a beauti-
fully sung mixture of original
and traditional bluegrass and
folk music from 2-4 p.m.
O'Leno State Park, is located
six miles north of High Springs
on U.S. 441.
The show is free with park
admission.

MLK parade applications
now available
Applications are now.being
accepted for the annual Martin
Luther King Day parade, which
will be at 10 a.m., Jan. 16.
Contact Tyrone Taylor at
623-2194, coach Anders at
752-0959, or Leslie White at
623-2198 to request an entry
application, or to obtain more
information on participating in
the MLK parade.
The following is a list of
activities scheduled for Martin
Luther King, Jr. Celebration:
* Jan.13: 7:30 p.m. Gospel
Festival, choirs, soloists,
instruments and dancers.
* Jan. 14: noon. Car
Show-Step Show, MLK


Classic-Basketball game.
* Jan. 15:4 p.m. NAACP
commemoration service, Union
A.M.E. Church.
* Jan. 16: 10 a.m. Northeast
Florida Leadership Council
grand parade. Celebration at
the stadium.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson
coming to Lake City
At 1 p.m. Jan. 5, U.S.
Senator Bill Nelson is coming to
Lake City for a townhall meet-
ing. It will take place at City
Hall, located at 205 N. Marion
Ave. For more information, call
Nelson's office at
(850) 942-8415.

Red Hat ladies
prepare for mall invasion
For those ladies who are
footloose and fancy free, come
join other Red/Pink Hatters for
some fellowship, fun, food,
laughter, shopping, games,
prizes and more.
This event is for anyone
looking for a RHS chapter to
join and for all Red Hat Ladies
at 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Jan. 5
Center Court, Lake City Mall.
The RHS meet the first
Thursday of each month. For
more information contact:
Princess Michelle Parker of the
Red Whiners' official Red Hat
* Society Chapter #55905 at


(386) 758-1726.


Columbia County science
fairs coming in January
* Lake City Community
College will host the 2006
Columbia County Science Fair.
The annual fair will be
Jan. 18 and 19 in the Howard
Gym on LCCC campus.
Approximately 250 student
projects will be on display.
Judging will take place from
8 a.m.-3 p.m., Jan. 18. Open
house to the public will be from
3-6 p.m. Jan. 18. The awards
ceremony will be 6-7 p.m.
Jan. 19 for the elementary and
7:30-8:30 p.m. for the middle
and high school in the Alfonso
Levy Performing Arts Center.
N Lake City Community
College will host the
2006 Regional Science and
Engineering Fair.
The annual fair will be
Feb. 22 and 23 in the Howard
Gym on the LCCC campus.
The Region comprises the
10 counties of Columbia, Union,
Suwannee, Bradford, Hamilton,
Lafayette, Baker, Gilchrist, Dixie
and Madison. Judging will take
place from 3-6 p.m. Feb. 22.
Open house to the public will
be from 3-6 p.m., Feb. 22. The
awards ceremony will be
10 a.m., Feb. 23 in the Alfonso
Levy Performing Arts Center.


Volunteer development
board to meet in 2006
The Volunteer Development
Board of the Lake City
Community College Foundation
will meet at noon Jan. 10, in the
Lake City Community College
Foundation Board Room,
downtown Lake City. For more
information, contact Mike Lee,,
executive director of the LCCC
foundation at 754-4392 or
754-4433.

LCCC executive board
to meet Jan. 17
The Executive Board of the
Lake City Community College
Foundation will meet at noon
Jan. 17, in the Lake City
Community College Foundation
Board Room, downtown .Lake
City. For more information
contact Mike Lee, executive
director of the LCCC foundation
at 754-4392 or 754-4433.

LCCC is closed
through Jan.2
All Lake City Community
College offices and facilities will
be closed through Jan. 2, for the
holiday season. Upon return, late
registration will be from
8 a.m.-6:30 p.m. in Building 015
Jan. 3-5 and from 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
Jan. 6. All fees will be due at
3 p.m. at the end of each day.


For more information, contact
the Registrar's Office at
(386) 754-4205.

Bridge class coming
early next year
Learn bridge or update your
bidding system by taking the
Modern Bidding Bridge Classes
every Wednesday for nine weeks
beginning from 10-11:30 a.m.
Jan. 4, at the Blanche Hotel.
Presented by John Donovan,
Certified ACBL Instructor, tuition
and room rental is $91.25 plus
textbook. For enrollment, call
Janet Harpster at
(386) 364-8063.

Classes
Pottery classes coming
to Stephen Foster
WHITE SPRINGS - Spend
Monday nights working at the
potter's wheel in classes being
.offered at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park.
Classes begin Jan. 9 and.
continue through Feb. 27.
The cost for the classes is
$125, plus $25 for materials,
which will be paid throughout the
class. For more information, call
Craft Square at 397-1920 or visit
the web site at
www.stephenfostercso.org.


Performing Arts center
looking for members
Ms. Nadine Center for the
Performing Arts is currently
accepting applications for new
memberships. Children ages
5 to 18 years old are welcomed
to join. Students will learn
dancing, drama and much more.
For more information, contact
Ms. Nadine at (386) 344-2540.

Tae Kwan Do
class offered
The Lake City-Columbia
County Parks and Recreation
Department will host Tae Kwan
Do classes that will meet from
6:30-8 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday and is open to
anyone age 8 and older. Cost is
$40 per month. Instructors will be
Jeff Foster and Teresa Burne,
master and certified instructor in
Tae Kwan Do. For more
information or to register, call
Heyward Christie at 758-5448.

Historical museum
to host volunteer class
Lake City/Columbia County
Historical Museum is
forming a volunteer training
class. For more information,
contact Glenda Reed at
historicsewing@aol.com. or
call the museum at 755-9096.


Migrants lost work due to hurricanes,


struggle to send funds back home
By LAURA WIDES-MUNOZ . . money he was able to save.
AP Hispanic Affairs Writer Ie . ' -- ." - . . He settled on two plastic


HOMESTEAD - When
Wilma swept through
Southern Florida, it trampled
the tulips and hibiscuses at the
nursery where Leopoldo
Gomez worked, as well as his
hopes of sending extra money
home to his family for this
year's holiday fiestas.
Instead of the steady nurs-
ery work, Gomez spent much
of the fall looking for day jobs
in construction and gardening.
Gomez is among thousands
of migrant workers in Florida
whose families in their home
countries rely on their contri-
butions but who have little to
offer this holiday season due to
the year's devastating
hurricane season.
Experts say nationwide
migrants may send more
money back in 2005 due to the
spike in construction jobs in
areas such as New Orleans
that were hit hardest by the
storms, but in South Florida,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Migrant workers, who preferred not to be identified, walk by local
businesses used by foreign workers to send money to their
families in Central America, on Dec. 14, in Homestead,


agricultural advocates and
workers say it is a struggle to
save the cash to send home.
. "It's a time when many of us
save money in the last months
of the year to send a little extra
home for the fiestas, but every-
one is saying they basically
only have enough for rent and
to eat," said Lucas Benitez,


co-founder of the Coalition of
Immokalee Workers.
On a recent December
evening, Gomez joined dozens
of men browsing stores along
the brick-paved Washington
Boulevard in the rural town of
Homestead, searching for
cheap items to send home to
his family along with what little


cars and a toy keyboard for his
three young boys.
"'I have to send them some-
thing. They.are waiting for it,"
he said. "Usually you can send
S300 home a week at this time,
but now it is more like $150."
The nursery industry in
South Florida was among the
areas hardest hit by Hurricane
Wilma, with more than
$1.1 billion in crop losses and
structural damage from the
entire hurricane season,
according to the Florida
Agriculture Commission.
Tomato plants, cane fields and
orange orchards were also
crushed. All told, Florida agri-
culture suffered $2.2 billion in
losses from Hurricanes
Katrina, Rita and Wilma.
Linda Adams, associate vice
president of the Florida
Nursery, Growers and
Landscape Association, said
she believed many nurseries
were in need of more workers
to help with cleanup.


Gay rights advocates ready to fight for adoption


By GREG BLUESTEIN
Associated Press
ATLANTA - Another
January, another dreaded leg-
islative session for Georgia's
beleaguered gay lobby.
Fresh off a failed try to tank
the state's new constitutional
ban on same-sex marriages,
gay rights advocates are brac-
ing for proposals that could
limit their ability to adopt chil-
dren and discourage students
from joining gay-friendly
clubs.
Yet activists, say there's a
glimmer of hope for their
cause this session: Enough
Georgia lawmakers may find
the legislation so egregious
that they will vote it down.
The constitutional amend-
ment to ban gay marriage,



Lois Orie Williamson
Harding
Lois Orie Williamson Harding, 92,
a resident of Lak City, Fla. died
Dec. 25, 2005 at the
Health Center of
Lake City following
an extended illness.
Mrs. Harding was a
native of Columbia
County and is the
daughter of the late Joseph Perry
and Minnie Jessie Davis
Williamson. She was a member of
the First Presbyterian Church, Lake
City, Fla. She is preceded in death
by her husband Thomas Tom
Harding one grandson, Jamie
Richards and four brothers, Leroy
Williamson, James Willamson,
William Williamson, Siney
Williamson and Don Williamson.
Survivors include her daughter:
Julia Ann Townsend, Lake City,


which Georgia voters over-
whelmingly approved in 2004,
divided some in the homosex-
ual community. Some argued
that civil unions should be
debated by lawmakers before
the issue of marriage was
broached.
A bid to prohibit gay cou-
ples from adopting children
would have the opposite
effect, polarizing the entire
community while drawing
compassion from mainstream
voters throughout the state,
said Chuck Bowen, executive
director of Georgia Equality.
"It's not about taking away
rights from gays and lesbians'
as much as it is denying the
best opportunity for family
and children," Bowen said.
"By injecting children into the-


argument, they don't have the
same strength they had."
No known sponsors. have
materialized yet for a pro-
posed ban on gay adoptions,
but the idea is being dis-
cussed, said Senate president
pro-tem Eric Johnson, a
Savannah Republican.
"I hear background noise,
but I haven't heard any specif-
ic legislation or author,"
Johnson said.
Pro-gay lawmakers aren't-
holding their breath, said
state Rep. Karla Drenner,
Georgia government's only
openly gay lawmaker. When
the session starts Jan. 9, she
said, "bills take on a life of
their own."
And gay advocates aren't
encouraged by Gov. Sonny


Perdue's recent appointment
of Mary 'Dean Harvey to head
the state's Division of Family
and Children Services. When
in a similar role in Nebraska,
Harvey issued a directive bar-
ring foster children from
being placed with homosexu-
als or unmarried couples.
"We feel like the extreme
conservative right feel like,
after the election last year,
they have us on the run,"
Bowen said. "They'll continue
to chip away at any rights
gays and lesbians might
have."
The lobby will also play
defense on a revived push
from lawmakers to require
parental notification before
students can join school
clubs.


OBITUARIES


Fla. One son: Tommy (Jean)
Harding, Raiford, Fla. Four sisters:
Lorene (Emory) Gray, Lake City,
Fla., Betty Thomas, Lake City,
Fla., Joann Green and Mary
(Clifford Duke both of Pensacola,
Fla. Two brothers: Gordon (Edie)
Williamson, Jacksonville, Fla., and
Walter Williamson, Lake City, Fla.
One sister-in-law: June
Williamson, Lake City, Fla.
Grandchildren: Dell Townsend and
Carlene, Cathy (Ray) Richards all
of Lake City, Fla., Lisa Mosher,
Newberry, Fla., Greg (Heidi)
Harding, Lake City, Fla., Diane
Andrews, Starke, Fla., John Paul
Johnson, Keystone Heights, Fla.,
Dennis James Johnson, Lake
Butler and Sonnia Jean Brezee,
Lake Butler, Fla., Ronnie and Tami
Drake, Lake City, Fla. Fourteen
great-grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Harding
will be conducted Wednesday Dec.


28, 2005 at 2 p.m. in the Hopeful
Baptist Church. Interment will fol-
low in the Memorial Cemetery.
The family will receive friends
Tuesday Dec. 27, 2005 from 6-8
p.m. at the funeral home. GUER-
RY FUNERAL HOME 2690 SW.
Main Blvd. Lake City, Fla. is in


charge of arrangements.,
(386)-752-2414.

Obituaries are paid advertisements.
For details, call the Lake City
Reporter's classified department at
752-1293


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Arts festival
Stryder Diabo, from the Canadiandance group, Kehewin Native ,
Performers, performs during the first day of the week-long 31st
annual Miccosukee Arts Festival at the tribal village, 25 miles 'est
of Miami in the heart of the Everglades. The festival features
traditional dancing, songs, food and artwork.


Perry police officer,

family killed in collision


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE - A Perry
police officer, his wife and their
9-year-old son were killed
Saturday when a truck driven
by a teenager slammed into
their sport utility vehicle in
Madison County, authorities
said.
Robert D. Johns, 41, his wife
Kimberly, 38, and their son,
Brett, were traveling south-
bound on County Road
370 shortly after midnight
when a pickup truck driven by
Paul Williams, of Madison,
crossed the center line from
the northbound lane and
struck the family's vehicle
head-on, according to the
Florida Highway Patrol.
Williams, 19, also died in the
collision. A passenger in his


truck was hospitalized with
minor injuries, troopers said.
Meanwhile, two teenagers
were killed and a third was crit-
ically injured after their car
failed to make a turn and hit a
tree around 12:30 a.m. in
Volusia County, police said.
All three teens were thrown
from the car, Sgt. Kenny Hayes
of the Ormond Beach Police
Department said.
Adam Hylan, 18, the driver,
was pronounced dead at the
scene and Christopher Hubler,
17, was, pronounced dead a
short time later at a Daytona
Beach hospital, Hayes said.
Hubler's 15-year-old brother,
Alex, remained on life support
at Halifax Medical Center,
Hayes said.


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Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


C








Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005


Chinese food a popular


choice for holiday diners


By BOB SALSBERG
Associated Press
SAUGUS, Mass. - It's not
exactly chestnuts roasting on
an open fire. But for many peo-
ple, Moo Goo Gai Pan or
maybe even the Pu Pu Platter
are traditional dishes for
Christmas.
On Christmas Eve,
Christmas Day and through-
out the holidays, Chinese
restaurants do some of their
best business of the year.
"As the years went on, we
became busier and busier dur-
ing the holidays," said Stanley
Wong, whose family has
owned the Kowloon restaurant
in Saugus for more than a half
century.
Jewish customers account
for much of Wong's business
this time of year. Chinese food
has long been a popular desti-
nation for Jews on Christmas,
when few other restaurants are
open.
"Chinese restaurants, Asian-
owned restaurants, those own-
ers tended to be the only folks
who didn't have Christmas,
too," said Rabbi David Kay of
Congregation Ohev Shalom in
Orlando.
He said the many vegetarian
items on Chinese menus are


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stanley Wong poses in the family owned Kowloon restaurant in
Saugus, Mass., on Sunday.
appealing to people who keep Day, said Yang's wife, Li Su.
kosher. Coincidentally, the Jewish
For David and Maure festival of Hanukkah began at
Gardner, eating kosher sundown on Christmas. For
Chinese food on Christmas is a that reason, the restaurant
tradition. added potato latkes to the
"On Thanksgiving, we have menu, which features plenty of
turkey," said Maure Gardner, fish, chicken and duck but is
who'was dining with her hus- free of pork and shellfish. A
band at the Eden Wok in New rabbi monitors the kitchen to
York City. "Christmas Day, we make sure the food is prepared
always go out for Chinese in accordance with Jewish law.
food." In San Francisco, the
Jun Yang just opened a 13th Annual Kung Pao Kosher
restaurant offering kosher Comedy Show at the New Asia
Chinese food in Brookline, a Restaurant ran Thursday
town bordering Boston that through Sunday, with two
has a large Jewish population, shows a night. The dinner
Shalom Beijing's 120 seats show featured a seven-course
were nearly, filled on Chinese dinner and a
Christmas Eve and Christmas 90-minute comedy show.


Bid to deny citizenship to

children of illegal immigrants
By DAVID CRARY co-sponsors, Georgia huge magnet" attracting illegal
AP National Writer Republican Rep. Nathan Deal immigrants. He cited estimates
tried to include a revocation of - challenged by immigrant
NEW YORK - A proposal birthright citizenship in an advocates - that roughly
to change long-standing feder- immigration bill passed by the 10 percent of births in the
al policy and deny citizenship House in United States, or close to
to babies born to illegal immi- mid-December. GOP House 400,000 a year, are babies born
grants on U.S. soil ran aground leaders did not let the proposal to illegal immigrants.
this month in Congress, but it come to a vote. "It's an issue that We are
is sure to resurface - kindling "Most Americans feel it very concerned about," said
bitter debate even if it fails to doesn't make any sense for Michele Waslin, director of
become law. people to come into the coun- immigration policy research
At issue is "birthright citi- try illegally, give birth and for the National Council of La
zenship" - provided for have a new U.S. citizen," said Raza, a Hispanic advocacy
since the Constitution's iraMehlmtan of the Federation organization that opposes any
14th Amendment was ratified of American Immigration effort to revoke birthright
in 1868. Reform, which backs Deal's citizenship.
Section 1 of that amend- proposal. "But the advocates '"This was always seen in the
ment, drafted with freed slaves for illegal immigrants will past as some extreme, wacko
in mind, says: "All persons make a fuss; they'll claim proposal that never goes any-
born or naturalized in the you're punishing the children, where," she said. "But these
United States, and subject to and I suspect the leadership so-called wacko proposals are
the jurisdiction thereof, are doesn't want to deal with that." becoming more and more
citizens of the United States." Deal has said he will contin- mainstream - it's becoming
Some conservatives in ue pushing the issue, describ- more acceptable to have .a
Congress, as well as advocacy ing birthright citizenship as "a discussion about it"


groups seeking to crack down
on illegal immigration, say the
amendment has been misap-
1. plied through the years, that it
was never intended to grant cit-
; izenship automatically to
babies of illegal immigrants.
Thus they contend that federal
legislation, rather than a diffi-
cult-to-achieve constitutional
amendment, would, be
sufficient to end birthright
citizenship.
With more than 70

BRIEF


New drug for
macular degeneration
WASHINGTON - The
Food and Drug
Administration on Friday
approved a new drug
designed to treat the leading
cause of blindness in older
Americans.
Age-related macular
degeneration destroys the
light-sensitive tissue in the
center of the retina, causing.
vision to fail gradually from
the center outwards.
The new drug, Macugen,
attacks the rapidly progress-
ing "wet" type of AMD, in
which new blood vessels form
behind the retina and then
leak, damaging the macula.
That form affects an esti-
mated 1.6 million Americans
over 50, and some 6.3 million
are expected to be affected by
2030 as the massive "baby
boom" generation ages.
Macugen inhibits the
protein VEGF, slowing the
growth of these blood vessels.
VEGF has been shown to play
a role in abnormal blood
vessel growth.
* Associated Press


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Five found dead in related shootings


Associated Press
GREAT FALLS, Va. -
Police expressed shock and
frustration Monday following a
pair of Christmas Day shoot-
ing incidents that left five
people, including the gunman,
dead.
"This is obviously a complex
investigation with separate
crime scenes and five victims.
The events of (Sunday) have
certainly shocked and sad-
dened us all," said Col. David
Rohrer, chief of the Fairfax
County, Va., Police
Department.
Investigators believe Nathan
W. Cheatham shot and killed
his mother in the driveway of
her McLean home. He then
drove 10 miles to a home in
Great Falls and fired more
than 50 shots that killed three
other people, before turning
the gun on himself.
"Perhaps we'll never be able
to answer the question that is
most prevalent, and that is
why," said Rohrer.
Cheatham, 27, had been
arrested on several occasions


by Fairfax County police for
what they described as "minor
infractions." He also had a
history of mental problems,
investigators said.
He had been living with his
mother, Sheila G. Cheatham,
53, for at least two weeks. He
had also stayed with his two
brothers at another location in
Fairfax County. Police are
hoping they can learn some
indication of his demeanor,
which may lead to an under-
standing of what led him to go
on a rampage.
Police believe he broke into
the second home and system-
atically went from room to
room, fatally shooting Janina
C. Price, 50, and her son Adam
S. Price, 19, who both lived
there, and Christopher J. Buro,
20, of Great Falls, who was
visiting.
Another member of the
Price family hid in the base-
ment and was able to call for
help as Cheatham opened fire.
He escaped after the gunfire
stopped.
Police said Cheatham was


er




---
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nathan William Cheatham, 27,
of McLean, Va., is the suspect
in a shooting Christmas Day
that left his mother and three
other victims dead before he
shot and killed himself.
an acquaintance of the Price
family. He had called them
earlier in the day and was
asked not to go to the home.
'There was a phone conver-
sation between Nathan and
somebody atthe house," said
Maj. Bob Callahan, command-
er of the police department's
criminal investigation bureau.


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Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Student Jeanna Giese (center) smiles as teachers at St. Mary's
High School sing to the students before recessing for winter break,
in Fond du Lac, Wis.


Unvaccinated rabies

survivor thrives


By GRETCHEN EHLKE
Associated Press
MILWAUKEE - Last
December, Jeanna Giese
spent Christmas in the hospi-
tal, unable to speak or walk as
she suffered from the effects
of rabies. This year, the
16-year-old is celebrating her
improbable survival at home
with her family.
The teenager, who is
the world's only known
unvaccinated human rabies
survivor, is regaining her abil-
ity to walk and talk. She has
returned to school, and has
plans to return to the volley-
ball team next year and
eventually, attend college.
"Every time that I look at
Jeanna, I feel how fortunate
we are. She's the only one in
the world, so you kind of look
at things a little bit different,"
said her father, John Giese.
Bitten by a rabid bat at her
church in Fond du Lac, Wis.,
onrl Sept. 12, 2004,Jeanna did
notse'e imtnediat ireatmen'tl1
;and became gravely ,ill a
month' lkter"' Rabies aftacks
the nervous , system and
normally results in death
within a week of symptoms
developing.
She was . admitted to
Children's Hospital in
Milwaukee where' doctors
administered an unproven
combination of drugs and
induced a coma in their-effort
to save her life.
When Jeanna was brought
out of the coma about a week
later, she was paralyzed and
without sensation, said Dr.
Rodney Willoughby, her lead
physician at Children's


Hospital and the Medical
College of Wisconsin.
Physicians detected brain-
wave activity, but were unsure
what was ahead after the
drugs would wear off.
"Within a day or two she
started giving us reflexes and
eye movements," Willoughby
said. 'This was a nail-biter. I
didn't relax until she left the
hospital."
After nearly 11 weeks,
Giese left the hospital in a
wheelchair on Jan. 1, 2005.
The long road to. recovery
was ahead, as she worked to
regain her faculties, including
her ability to speak and walk.
Jeanna said she remembers
nothing about her initial
weeks in the hospital and
it wasn't until around
Thanksgiving of last year that
she began to realize where
she was and what had
happened.
Now, she is in sync academ-
ically with her junior class at
St,. AMj:y^1'4 Spr.ings-aH-igh
School after spending the
ssut mm r hitting th'e books.
She manages the varsity girl's
basketball team. and has
earned her temporary
driver's license.
With .two dogs, three
rabbits and two pheasants as
family pets, she envisions a
future in veterinary science.
Physical therapy still
consumes a large chunk of
her time - nearly two hours,
three times a week. She also
gets speech therapy. In the
last month, she has developed
more control over her fine
motor skills and her gait, said
her mother, Ann Giese.


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Complications common for mastectomy

patients who decide to get breast implants


By LINDSEY TANNER
AP Medical Writer
CHICAGO - Breast
implants in women who have
undergone mastectomies
often result in complications
that require more surgery, a
study in Denmark found.
Over a period of up to four
years, about one-third devel-
oped, at least one potentially
serious complication, includ-
ing thick, tight scarring and
infections, the researchers
reported. Implant ruptures
were rare, with only five
reported among the
574 Danish women studied.
Overall, about 20 percent of
the women studied required
surgery to treat the problems,
according to the study by
Danish Cancer Society
researchers and scientists at
the International
Epidemiology Institute in
Rockville, Md.
One surgeon said in an
accompanying editorial that
the numbers are "alarmingly
high and arguably
unacceptable."
The study appears in the
December issue of Archives of


Surgery. It was paid for by the
institute, which receives fund-
ing from the Dow Corning
Corp., a former maker of
silicone breast implants.
Diana Zuckerman, presi-
dent of the National Research
Center for Women and
Families, said the complica-
tion rate for implants in mas-
tectomy patients is actually
much higher than the study
suggests.
Most participants got
implants several weeks after
breast removal surgery,
whereas, most U.S. mastecto-
my patients who choose
implants get them when their
breasts are removed,
Zuckerman said. That
method, involving a single
round of surgery, is often
easier psychologically
because women wake up from
their mastectomies with
refashioned breasts, but it is
also more stressful on the
body, she said.
Also, she said the partici-
pants in the study did not
undergo MRI scans, which are
the best way to detect
ruptures.
'This study is . really


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Meredith Cobb plays a board game with children, (from left) Zack,
2, Meghan, 6, and Eric, 12, at their home in Colorado Springs,
Colo., on Dec. 16. Cobb had breast implants after breast cancer
surgery in 2003 and now she faces more operations to fix the
implants.


missing the boat," .said
Zuckerman, whose group has
opposed efforts to return
silicone implants to the
market.
All of the women studied
got implants, most -of them
made of silicone.
Silicone implants have been
restricted in the United States
for more than a decade
because of fears that ruptures
and leakage might damage


women's health. But some
mastectomy patients have
continued to receive them.
The American Cancer
Society estimates more than
200,000 U.S. women will be
diagnosed with breast cancer
this year. At least half will
have mastectomies, and
Zuckerman said about two-
thirds of those patients
choose some type of
reconstructive surgery.


Overuse of certain pain pills can be dangerous


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON - Think
popping extra pain pills can't
hurt? Think again: Accidental
poisonings from the nation's
most popular pain reliever
seem to be rising, making acet-
aminophen the leading cause
of acute liver failure.
Use it correctly and aceta-
minophen, best known by the
Tylenol brand, lives up to its
reputation as one of the safest
painkillers. It's taken by some
100 million people a year, and
liver damage occurs in only a
small fraction of users.
But it's damage that can kill
or require a liver transplant,
damage that frustrated liver
.specialists insist should be
avoidable.

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The problem comes when
people don't follow dosing
instructions - or unwittingly
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acetaminophen is in hundreds
of products, from the over-the-
counter remedies Theraflu and
Excedrin to the prescription
narcotics Vicodin and
Percocet.
'The argument that it's the
safest sort of has overruled the
idea that people cannot take
any amount they feel like,"
says Dr. William Lee of the
University of Texas
Southwestern Medical Center,
who laments that acetamino-
phen is popped like M&Ms.
Acetaminophen bottles cur-
rently recommend that adults
take ' no more than
4,000 milligrams a day, or


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eight extra-strength pills.
Just a doubling of the maxi-
mum daily dose can be enough
to kill, warns Dr. Anne Larson
of the University of
Washington Medical Center.
Yet, "if two is good, 10 is bet-
ter in some patients' minds,"
she says with a sigh.
The .Food and Drug
Administration has long wres-
tled with the liver risk, warning
two years ago that more than
56,000 emergency-room visits
a year are due to acetamino-
phen overdoses and that
100 people die annually from
unintentionally taking too
much.
A study published this
month by Larson and Lee has
agency'1 'officials.,' weighing
whether to revisit the"igse: ...


During six years,
researchers tracked 662 con-
secutive patients in acute liver
failure who were treated at 22
transplant centers. (Acute liver
failure is the most severe type,
developing over days, unlike
chronic liver failure that can
simmer for years because of
alcohol abuse or viral
hepatitis.)
Almost half were acetamino-
phen-related. More remark-
able was the steady increase:
Acetaminophen was to blame
for 28 percent of the liver
poisonings in 1998, but caused
51 percent of cases in 2003.
That makes acetaminophen
the most common cause of
acute liver failure, the
researchers report in the'
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Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005


To win black consumers, fitness


industry using a touch of soul


By DIONNE WALKER
Associated Press
NORFOLK, Va. - Up
against the odds, Elaine
Green is calling on a little
divine intervention to get fit.
A recent evening found the
51-year-old at Norfolk's First
Baptist Church, shimmying
and sliding through a physical
fitness workout set to a gospel
beat.
"Amaaaazing grace," - left
leg up, and down.
"How sweet the sound," -
step left, step right.
'That saved a wretch, like
meeeee," - and squat, two,
three.
Keen-eyed marketers in the
fitness industry are spicing
their workout offerings with a
touch of gospel, soul and hip-
hop, tailoring the music and
dance in a direct appeal to
black consumers.
They found there was a
niche audience to tap into,"
said Keecha Harris, a spokes-
woman for the American
Dietetic Association.
That's because nationwide,
black waistlines are expand-
ing. One 2002 study by the
Centers for Disease Control
found 78 percent of black


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Debra Dollar (left) of Virginia Beach, Va., exercises to gospel music
with other members of the First Baptist Church in Norfolk, Va.,
on Dec 6.


women ages 20 to 74 were
overweight, with more than
50 percent qualifying as
obese.
Solutions are showing up
on store shelves and TV
screens. At Wal-Mart, Benita
Perkins' "Taking It to a
Higher Ground" DVD sets
step aerobics to a background
of Kenny Bobien and other
popular black gospel artists.
On the black-aimed TV One
network, fitness guru Donna
Richardson Joyner sets brisk


workouts to live R&B.,
And from New York to Los
Angeles, hip-hop yoga classes
like the one Arizona-based Ian
Lopatin teaches to entice
blacks who prefer trying the
"downward facing dog" while
listening to Snoop Dogg.
"It has roots in their cul-
ture," Lopatin said. "If you're
doing yoga to Tupac, it does-
n't seem so foreign anymore."
Tailoring health messages
to blacks is a common sense
response to an obvious


market, said Lucille Perez, a
health director with the
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored
People. In the past, she said
marketers didn't see any
value in expanding beyond
white consumers.
"It doesn't take a rocket sci-
entist to say if we are a popu-
lation that is disproportionate-
ly obese ... why wouldn't I
develop a market and market
to this population?" she said.
But packaging fitness for
black consumers comes with
challenges.
In the mid 1990s,
University of Pennsylvania
epidemiology . professor
Shiriki Kumanyika conducted
group interviews of blacks
that found many viewed exer-
cise as excess work that could
do more harm than good.
"Stories that are passed
down through generations
are that people were brought
here and forced to work," she
said. "It's kind of logical to
think that the idea of not hav-
ing to do this physical labor
would be something that
would be valued."


Federal research chief says drug makers

don't have incentive for AIDS vaccine


By JOHN SOLOMON
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - In an
unusually candid admission,
the federal chief of AIDS
research says he believes drug
companies don't have an incen-
tive to create a vaccine for the
HIV and are likely to wait to
profit from it after the
government develops one.
And that means the govern-
ment has had to spend more
time focusing on the processes
that drug companies ordinarily
follow in developing new


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Tramont testified in a deposi-
tion in a recent employment
lawsuit obtained by The
Associated Press.
Tramont is head of the AIDS
research division of the
National Institutes of Health,
and he predicted in his testi-
mony that the government will
eventually create a vaccine. He


testified in July in the whistle-
blower case of Dr. Jonathan
Fishbein.
"If we look at the vaccine,
HIV vaccine, we're going to
have an HIV vaccine. It's not
going to be made by a compa-
ny," Tramont said. '"They're
dropping out like flies because
there's no real incentive for
them to do it. We have to do it."
'They will eventually - if it
works, they won't have to
make that big investment And


they can make it and sell it and
make a profit," he said.
"That is simply not true.
America's pharmaceutical
research companies are firmly
committed to HIV/AIDS
vaccine research and develop-
ment with 15 potential vaccines
in development: today," said
Ken Johnson, senior vice
president of PhRMA, the
Pharmaceutical Research and
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The quest for better

artificial arms begins


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON - Bend
your elbow for a drink and
your hand squeezes instead,
crushing the cup: It's a frus-
tration common with artificial
arms.
Charles Wayne Briggs got
tired of forgetting if he'd left
his arm in the elbow or hand
position, and asked its inven-
tors for a fix. Within an hour,
they'd begun wiring a feed-
back mechanism that today
lets amputees move the pros-
thesis a little more like a real
arm.
It's a harsh reality:
Artificial hands and arms
aren't as advanced as replace-
ments for lower limbs that
have enabled amputees to
take to the ski slopes and run
marathons. �
Upper limbs are harder to
duplicate; think how many
motions a human hand
makes. But it's also an issue
of demand. There are fewer
upper-limb amputees - one
for every four lower-limb
amputations - half of whom
forgo prostheses altogether.
The war in Iraq may spur
change.. With dozens of
troops losing upper limbs,
the Defense Department-is
funding research to develop a
better functioning arm within
two years, and a brain-con-
trolled robotic arm that looks
and acts like a real one within
four years.
But prosthetics specialists
say the industry is poised for
steady improvements like the
one initiated by Briggs, a
62-year-old, Texas amputee
recruited to pilot-test new
limbs - and soldiers will
push those changes faster.


"Sadly enough, this war
will contribute to the quan-
tum leap," says Dan Conyers,
a prosthetist with Advanced
Arm Dynamics, the company
hired to custom-fit upper-
extremity prostheses for
troops treated at Walter Reed
Army Medical Center.
Conyers sits surrounded
by piles of artificial hands,
elbows and full-length arms.
Most are electronic, with
computer chips that move
them in different ways when
certain muscles flex. Some
look remarkably lifelike, with
cosmetic "skins" painted,
freckles and all, to match a
patient's remaining arm.
Others are electronic, pincers
- still the most functional
replacements for the hand,
nature's most complex tool.
Conyers calls these parts
his toolbox. His job is to cus-
tom-design, by. mixing and
matching body parts from
different manufacturers, the
most usable limb for each
patient's specific needs.
It's a painstaking process
that begins with making a
cast of the patient's socket,
precise measurements for
the sleeve that holds the
prosthesis in place. Maps of
patients' nerve signals deter-
mine where to place elec-
trodes inside the electronic
limb. Only then comes the
,trial-and-error of learning
which hands, elbows and
arms offer best function.
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Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


L-








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005


SHOP: Bargain hunters flock to stores
Continued From Page 1A


Barrington said some
shoppers seemed agitated as
they made their post-
Christmas returns, but others
remained pleasant.
"Usually customers are
cranky. They're coming to
exchange stuff and we don't
have the sizes, they want so
they're usually pretty
moody," Barrington said.
"But it's actually been a good
day today."
Sonja Mathis, 45, stood in
line at Goody's at about 9
a.m., to exchange a pair of
brown pants she got for
Christmas.
"I just came to do an even
exchange," Mathis said.
"They're too big. I need a
smaller size."
Mathis said she didn't plan
on doing any additional shop-
ping because she didn't like


the crowds of people and she
already got the only thing she
wanted for Christmas - a
digital camera.
Sixty-year-old C.L. Wood
also got most of the things he
wanted for Christmas, includ-
ing clothes and a latte maker,
but he and his wife hit the
mall at about 6:30 a.m. to
peruse the sales.
"We came to maybe find
some good deals," Wood said.
Branford Elementary stu-
dent Jessica Lewis, 12, sat on
a bench outside Dollar Tree,
holding a Claire's bag as she
waited for her grandmother
to finish shopping.
"I bought makeup and pic-
ture frames. I had a gift card,"
Jessica said of her purchases,
adding that her aunt and
uncle gave her the Claire's
card for Christmas.


Goody's manager DeeDee
Scott said many people are
eager to spend their
Christmas gift cards and to
find some good deals. Dec. 26
typically is one of the busiest
shopping days of the year.
"We will Mo a pretty good
day today," Scott said. "A lot
of people were in here first
thing this morning looking
for bargains."
Sale signs popped up from
racks in Goody's and
throughout the mall.
"Everything's. on sale,"
Scott said. "Our clearance is
an additional 50 percent off
and our Christmas stuff is,
like, 75 percent off. Most of
the sales we had the day after
Thanksgiving are going on
now."


RICE: Star is rising for Secretary of State


Continued From Page 1A

nickname was reportedly
bestowed by her staff at the
White House National
Security Council, where Rice
twas an intimate member of
Bush's first-term war council.
Rice resolutely defends the
post-Sept. 11 war on terror-
ism and the expansive execu-
tive powers that Bush claims
came with it. She has lately
sounded more optimistic than
Bush about the progress of
the Iraq war and the future
for that country.
Yet, it is unusual to hear,
anyone talk about Rice as an
architect of either of those
two defining undertakings of
the Bush presidency.
By a mix of charm, luck
and physical distance from
the White House, Rice has
managed to escape the fate of
Bush and Vice President
Dick Cheney, who saw their
public approval ratings fall to
historic lows before
rebounding slightly recently.
!Kurt Campbell, director of-.
the International Security
Program at the Center for


Strategic and International
Studies, credits Rice's heavy
travel schedule, an approach
to diplomacy that is more
pragmatic than other Bush
advisers, and a measure of
personal pluck.
"She appears to have sort
of skated away" from contro-
versies over U.S. intelligence
failures and aggressive U.S.
tactics in the hunt for terror-
ists, Campbell said, and from
the perception that the
United States is. "slogging"
along in Iraq.
"She appears at once to be
close to the president but sep-
arate and detached from
some of the foibles of the
administration, and that's a
very hard thing to pull off,"
he said.
Rice was as strong a public
voice as any for going to war.
in Iraq. She once famously
warned of Saddam Hussein's
presumed weapons of mass
destruction: "We don't want
the smoking gun to be a
mushroom cloud."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Secretary of State Condoleezza
Rice takes questions on the
Bush Administration's war on
terrorism and her role as the
nation's top diplomat, during an
interview with The Associated
Press, at the State Department
in Washington in this Dec. 16
file photo.


BUSH: Looks forward to fewer setbacks


Continued From Page 1A
scheduled this year for Jan.
31. But midterm elections
often mark the last lap of a
president's domestic agenda
as lawmakers turn their atten-
tion to re-election campaigns,
and presidents in their sixth
year move toward the end of
their Oval Office stay. Already,
2008 presidential hopefuls are
positioning themselves on
Iraq.
"I think he's going to fall
back on what he didn't want to
do, what he swore he wouldn't
do, but almost all second-term
presidents do, which is being
in a kind of caretaker status,"
said Norm Ornstein, a resi-
dent scholar with the
American Enterprise Institute.
Right after he was re-elected
with just a 3.5 million-vote
margin in the popular vote,
Bush proudly claimed a man-
date to pursue an aggressive
agenda. "I earned capital in the
campaign - political capital -
and now I intend to spend it. It
is my style," he said.
Among successes the White
House claims in 2005: A bank-
ruptcy law that made it harder
for Americans to wipe out
their debts, legislation to dis-
courage multimillion-dollar
class-action lawsuits and con-
firmation of John Roberts as
thief justice of the United

"When the
president puts
out a legislative
and executive
agenda, we'll
make sure we
reflect the fact
that it's difficult
for Congress to
get anything done
in an election
year."

- Dan Bartlett,
Counselor to President Bush


States. Bush also won a free
trade pact with six Latin
American countries. There
was a highway bill, at last, to
modernize the transportation
network. He also got major
energy legislation - the first


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such national plan in more
than a decade - although the
act does little in the near-term
to ease gas prices, which
topped $3 a gallon after the
hurricane.

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a minute

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Lake City Reporter
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IRAQ: At least 24 dead in attacks
Continued From Page 1A


threatened another wave of
protests and civil disobedi-
ence if allegations of fraud
are not properly
investigated.
The three blocs include
the secular Iraqi National
List, headed by former
Shiite Prime Minister Ayad
Allawi, and two Sunni Arab
groups.
Iraq's Electoral
Commission announced
Monday that final results of
the elections for the 275-seat
parliament could be
released in about a week.
Sunni Arab 2and secular
Shiite factions have demand-
ed that an international body
review more than


1,500 complaints, warning
that they may boycott the
new legislature. They have
also asked for new elections
in some provinces, including
Baghdad. The United
Nations has rejected an
outside review.
"We will resort to peaceful
options, including protests,
civil disobedience and a boy-
cott of the political process
until our demands are met,"
Hassan Zaidan al-Lahaibi, of
the Sunni-dominated Iraqi
Front for National Dialogue,
said in neighboring Jordan,
where representatives of the
groups have met in recent
days.
Among the complaints are


35 that the election commis-
sion considers serious
enough to change some
local results. But, said Farid
Ayar, a commission official,
"I don't think there is a rea-
son to cancel the entire
elections."
He also said preliminary
results from ballots in early
votes by expatriate Iraqis,
soldiers, hospital patients
and prisoners showed a
coalition of Kurdish parties
and the main Shiite religious
bloc each taking about a
third. . Those nearly
500,000 votes were not
expected to alter overall
results significantly.


SCHIAVO: Woman died of dehydration


Continued From Page 1A

chronicled every twist of the
hot-button issue..
Michael Schiavo wanted to
carry out what he said were
his wife's wishes not to be kept
alive artificially. The
Schindlers disputed their
daughter had such end-of-life
wishes and had kept hope that
she could have improved with
therapy. They said she had
interacted with them.
The dispute nearly created
a constitutional crisis.
Congress, the president and
Florida lawmakers moved to
block the court order that
Schiavo's feeding tube be
removed. The courts rebuffed
political efforts to undermine
its authority and the
separation of powers..


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Placard-toting right-to-life
and disability activists who
supported the Schindlers
camped out in front of the hos-
pice where Terri Schiavo lived
during the final weeks, under-
scoring the larger philosophi-
cal debate that swirled around
a bitter family feud.
A drama that divided the
nation also served to elevate
the awareness of end-of-life
choices and advance direc-
tives, said Kathy L.
Cerminara, a Nova
Southeastern University law
professor who specializes in
those issues. The details
stirred emotions and kept
people riveted as the story
played out, she said.
'There's no other single


grouping of facts that could
make you feel so torn - a
young woman cut down in the
prime of her life, near death
with food and water at issue
and a battle over whether her
life will continue," Cerminara
said. "It has every element of
every soap opera put
together."
Terri Schiavo died of dehy-'
dration at a Pinellas County
hospice on March 31 follow-
ing the removal of her feeding
tube 13 days earlier. Her death
came after the courts repeat-
edly blocked the efforts of the
Schindlers, Congress, Gov.
Jeb Bush and his older broth-
er, President Bush, to resume
her feedings.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER REMEMBER TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27,2005 11A


CE E R T O of-Y S A YI A R


AMERICAN TALES

When



rand aan d

Graduated by Shannon Rogers.


When I was a junior in high school, my American
Studies teacher assigned us a community service proj-
ect that involved researching the fallen World War II
heroes from our town. We were to interview these veterans or
their families for a small documentary. Naturally, I went to my
grandfather first, and what I found out changed our relation-
ship forever.
Because of the hard times in this country during the war,
Grandpa was forced to drop out of school at the beginning of his
senior year in order to help his family. After working for a while,
he entered the army and was shipped off to Germany. He never
got to finish his senior year and never received his high school
diploma. That thought stayed with me as I worked on the project.
At the end of my junior year, I asked my teacher if we could
continue the project into my senior year-but add a new ele-
ment. We were going to give all the World War II veterans that
had never received their diplomas the chance to finally graduate.
After putting an ad in our local paper, we found seven World
War II and Korean War veterans who wanted to receive their
diplomas. They were all to graduate with my class. I went imme-
diately to my grandpa to tell him the good news. Being as hum-
ble as he is, he said he didn't deserve all this.
As the months went by, my grandpa and I got closer as he told
me more about what he did in the war. He was a first sergear t,


and one of his duties was to -
go through the concentra-
tion camps and make sure
everyone still living was out.
After hearing his story, I
knew he deserved his diplo-
ma and recognition for what
he did for our country.
Together Grandpa and I
g9t measured for our caps
and gowns. Together we
filled out how we wanted
our names on our diplomas. VICTORY WALK: Shannon Rogers and her
How many people get to do William I. Murphy, after receiving their di:
that with their grandfathers?
My teachers asked if I would like to be on stage when he
received his diploma. Of course I said yes. Then she asked if I
would like to hand him his diploma. With tears in my eyes, I said
yes. I don't think I've ever been happier in my life.
When I told him the news, he was just as excited as I was.
About two weeks before graduation, we got our caps and
gowns. We tried them on together, laughing over how silly the
caps looked.
Finally the day came. We met in the parking lot, and I grabbed.


Sgr
plo


.... : his hand while we walked toward the graduation
tent. My teacher met us there and went over the
last-minute details. We were also introduced to all
j the other veterans and their families. Then it was
time. We all lined up, and I marched them down
the aisle.
When it was time for the veterans to receive
their diplomas, I went on stage and waited. I
couldn't control my tears for very long. One by
one the veterans came up and got their diplomas,
the crowd cheering for them.
S The last veteran was my grandpa. The crowd got
quiet as the principal read his name, then intro-
duced me as the person handing him his diploma.
I watched him slowly walking up the ramp to the
stage. He was looking right at me the whole time,
just smiling. As soon as I handed him the diploma,
we both burst into tears and hugged each other as
the audience erupted with cheering and clapping.
We stood there for a minute just hugging. He said,
"Thank you," I told him, "I love you," and we
turned and walked down the ramp holding hands.
andfather, We were met by all our family at the bottom and
mas. were engulfed in a huge family hug. Everybody was
crying and smiling.
Afterward my Grandpa and.I.shared a nice graduation party.
Family and friends joined us in celebrating-the perfect ending
to a perfect day.
Nowadays Grandpa and I are closer than ever. His diploma is
sitting on his mantle. He never lets me forget how grateful he is,
and I never let him forget how grateful I am that he is my grand-
father.

Shannon Rogers writes from Greenfield, Massachusetts.


COLLECTING
By Larry Cox


FLATWARE
Q: I inherited a set of Wallace flatware from my grandmother
in the Romance of the Seas pattern. Who can I contact to sell it?
- Kathi, Spokane, Wash.
A: The market for both sterling and plate flatware is fairly
depressed. Some sets are worth less than half of their appraised
values made a decade or two ago. With that said, let me recom-
mend that you contact Wallace Silversmiths, a division of
Syratech, directly. Its addresses are 175 McClellan Highway,
Boston, MA 02128; consumerservicest@syratech.com and
www.syratech.com.


A good reference book is Warman's Sterling Silver Flatware by
Mark E Moan and published by KP Books. It is available at most
larger bookstores or can be ordered through the publishers by
calling 1-800-258-0929.

Q: I have a vintage accordion and would like to find out its
value. - Frank, Mankato, Minn.
A: Jared Snyder is an accordion expert and may be able to help
you. His address is 524B Glen Echo Road, Philadelphia, PA 19119.

Q: I have a large collection of LP records: 164 albums and 10
box sets. Where can I sell them? - Helen, Brattleboro, Vt.
A: Three dealers are Don Meannie, P.O. Box 75, Mendham, NJ
07945; Scott Neuman, Forever Vinyl, P.O. Box 526, Lakehurst, NJ
08733; and Jerry's Record Room, P.O. Box 1459, Meredith, NH 03253.


Q: Fifteen years ago I purchased an old Indian ring that is
crafted of silver. Who can I contact to appraise it? - M.K.,
Astoria, IIL
A: Michael D. Higgins has'bought and sold Indian art and
antiques for more than two decades. His address is 4429 North
Campbell Ave., Tucson, AZ 85718. He can help you.

Q: I have a lithograph of Charles Dickens that appears to be
quite old. Where can I find out how much it might be worth? '
- Susan, Phoenix, Ariz.' '
A: Gerald DiMinico is a collector who specializes in Dickens
material, including prints, lithographs and original art. His
address is 105 Park St., Montclair, NJ 07042.

You can reach Larry Cox at letters.kfivs@hearstsc.com


Moments

intime



ON DEC.' 26, 1917, President
Woodrow Wilson announces the nationaliza-
tion of a large majority of the nation's railroads
because the existing railroad system was not up
to the task of supporting the war effort. The
railroads became private property again in
1920.

"ON D E.C. 27, 1932,atthe'heightof the
Great Depression, thousands turn out for the
opening of, Radio City Music Hall in New York
City. Since its opening, more than 300 million
people have gone to Radio City to enjoy movies,
stage shows, concerts and special events.

ON JAN. 1, 1 9 51,theZenithRadio
Corporation of Chicago demonstrates the first
pay-per-view television system. The company
sent movies over the airways via scrambled sig-
nals, and the 300 families who participated in
the test could send telephone signals to decode
the movies for $1 each.

,O N DEC . 30, 198s5,rock musician
Rick Nelson, who got his start by starring in his
parents' TV series, "The Adventures of Ozzie
and Harriet'," is killed in a plane crash enroute
to a concert in Texas. Nelson was one of the
best-selling male singers of the 1950s, with 53
Hot 100 hits - 17 in the Top 10.


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Page Editor: S. Michael Manley, 754-0429


12A LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005


Soccer fans wait outside the Arnold Schwarzenegger stadium in
Graz, Austria, on Sunday, May 9, 20G04, for the start of the national
first league soccer match Sturm Graz versus Grazer AK

Schwarzenegger's name

removed from stadium

in his native Austria


By WILLIAM J. KOLE
Associated Press
VIENNA, .Austria -
Officials in Arnold
Schwarzenegger's hometown
quietly removed his name
from a soccer stadium
overnight, complying with the
California governor's demand
in a bitter -dispute about his
death penalty stance.
By early Monday, the large,
metal letters spelling out the
action star-turned-politician's
name were gone from the
15,300-seat stadium in the'
southern city of Graz.
. Schwarzenegger had writ-
ten to the mayor of Graz a
week ago asking that his name
bE removed after local activists
called for the stadium to be
renamed because of
Schwarzenegger's refusal to
block the Dec. 13 execution of
Stanley Tookie Williams.
Capital punishment is illegal
in Schwarzenegger's native
Austria, where many people
consider ; it barbaric.
Opposition had- run especially
high in Graz, whose official slo-
gan is "City of Human Rights."
The governor, turning the
tables on his critics, ordered
his nlamie remov-ed and,


returned a ring of honor that
Graz officials gave him in 1999.
With the Hollywood star's
name gone, the sign atop the
stadium in Graz, about
120 miles south of Vienna,
read simply: "Stadium Graz
Liebenau." Officials had
renamed the arena in
Schwarzenegger's honor in
1997.
Calls to the city hall in Graz
went unanswered Monday, a
national holiday in Austria.
Last week, Graz Mayor
Siegfried Nagl wrote to
Schwarzenegger urging him to
reconsider his decision to cut
ties to the city and to keep the
ring. Nagl said he reassured
Schwarzenegger that he
remains admired by most local
residents.
Nagl said he was worried
that severing ties to.
Schwarzenegger, , one of
Austria's most famous sons,
potentially could cost the city
millions in tourist revenue.
But a movement to scrap
Schwarzenegger's name from
the stadium had gained
momentum in recent weeks,
and a majority of the city coun-
cil in Graz was said to support
the idea - even before
Schw"arzent-,eri-r's demand.


One year out: World recalls the


fury of the Indian Ocean tsunami


By CHRIS BRUMMITT
Associated Press
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia
- Muhammad Yani stood on
the roof of a mosque, watch-
ing the tsunami's churning
waters surge past, roiling
with people and debris.
"I was not afraid at the
time," said Yani, 35, who
later. found out he had lost
his parents and younger
brother to the waves. "I was
more aware than ever that
my soul belonged to Allah."
The dried-fish vendor
pieced his life back together
with a donation of sailt and a
wheelbarrow, and now lives
in a ramshackle hut on a
swampy wasteland - he
rejected offers of cash -
testimony to the resilience
of those who survived the
disaster last Dec. 26.
The world united in grief,
and compassion Monday to
remember thel. devastation
wrought in a dozen nations'
around the Indian Ocean a
year ago.


, ASSOCIATED PRESS
An unidentified Thai woman drops flowers into the surf on Patong Beach in Phuket, Thailand, on
Monday in remembrance of those who were killed in the Asian tsunami one year ago.
At least 216,000 people throughout Asia died in the disaster.


Mourners filled mosques
in Indonesia's shattered
Aceh province, the region
hit hardest. Candlelight vig-
ils in chilly Sweden remem-
bered citizens lost during
sunny holidays. An achingly


personal tribute - a bou-
quet of white roses - stuck
in the sand in Thailand.
In a taped message,
President Bush recalled "the
acts of courage and kind-
ness that made us proud" in


the sorrowful days after the
disaster. Former President
Clinton, the U.N. special
envoy for tsunami recovery,
promised not to let the
world forget its pledges of
aid.


Sharon's party favors Palestinian state, but


his government moves


By MARK LAVIE
Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Prime
Minister Ariel Sharon's new
centrist party on Monday
declared Palestinian state-
hood as a central goal, and
Israel signaled it would drop a
threat to ban Jerusalem's
Palestinians from voting in
their parliamentary election.
The signs of a moderate
line for present and future
political moves were' tem-
pered, however, by an
announcement of new Israeli
settlement construction in the
West Bank.
Thl- latest building,


disclosed in newspaper ads
published Monday seeking
bids from contractors, would
violate Israel's commitments
under the U.S.-backed "road
map" peace plan.
The plans include
228 homes in the settlements
of Beitar Illit and Efrat - both
near Jerusalem.
Sharon aide Raanan Gissin
said plans for the latest con-
struction began more than
five years ago. He said the
construction would be in set-
tlements that Israel plans to
retain after a final peace settle-
ment with the Palestinians.
"These are the large settle-
ment blocs; they will be


to expand settlements
strengthened," he said. The settlement plans cam
The road map calls for a as Sharon's new political part.
freeze on all settlement con- Kadima, signaled it is ready t
struction in the West Bank, hand over more West Ban
which the Palestinians claim territory to the Palestinian
as part of a future state. Since and work toward an indepen
accepting the plan in June ent Palestinian state; after
2003, Israel has continued to Israeli elections March 2E
expand settlements. The Opinion polls forecast a strong
Palestinians also have not car- victory by Sharon's bloc.
ried out their initial road map On Monday, doctors di,
obligation to. disarm militant closed that Sharon, 77, wi
groups. have to undergo a procedure
Palestinian negotiator Saeb to close a tiny hole in hi
Erekat condemned the expan- heart.. The announcement
sion and urged the that the defect led to the mil
U.S. to intervene. U.S. stroke he suffered, Dec. 1
Embassy spokesmen in Israel drew further attention in th
,,were, riot, available for com- election campaign to Sharo'n
menIt. health.


le
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o
k
is
d-
;r
8.
g
s-
ill
re
is
It
Id
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ie
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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Tuesday, December


SPORTS


27,2005


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

CHS BASKETBALL
Alumni game will
be played Jan. 14
A Columbia High boys
basketball alumni game
will be played at 6 p.m. Jan.
14 at the Columbia High
gymnasium. Jake Hill will
:put together one team and
Coach Trey Hosford will
assemble another.
Admission is $3, and all
proceeds go to the
Columbia High
basketball boosters.
For more information,
call Hosford at CHS at
755-8103 after Jan. 5, or at
752-0729.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Gators arrive in
Tampa for bowl
TAMPA - Florida is
looking to end a bowl victo-
ry drought as the Gators
started
final
prepara-
tions
Monday
for next
week's
Outback
Bowl matchup with Iowa.
The No. 16 Gators (8-3)
had an afternoon practice
after arriving in Tampa
earlier in the day. Florida has
lost three straight bowl
games since beating
Maryland 56-23 in the
Orange Bowl on Jan. 2, 2002.
"It's a chance for us to
win a bowl game ...
something we haven't done
around here for a while,"
Gators linebacker Todd
McCullough said. ...,
Florida is looking to end
the season with consecutive
wins - including a bowl
game - for the first time
since 1997. The Gators
ended the 2005 regular
season by beating Florida
State 34-7 on Nov. 26.
"Since then we've had
some momentum going ...
It's a critical game," Florida
coach Urban Meyer said.
A victory would also give
Florida nine wins, which
was last accomplished in
2001. Meyer would also
become the first Gators
head coach to win his initial
bowl game at the school
since Charley Pell in a Dec.
1980 Tangerine Bowl
triumph over Maryland.
No. 25 Iowa (74) beat the
Gators 37-17 in the Outback
Bowl two years ago.
'They whooped our tail
last time we was here,"
injured Gators' wide receiv-
er Andre Caldwell said. "So
it's time for a little revenge,
and show that Florida foot-
ball is coming back."
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Millwood signs
deal with Rangers
ARLINGTON, Texas -
Free agent pitcher Kevin
Millwood reached a prelimi-
nary agreement on a
$60 million, five-year contract
S with
Texas, giv-
ing the
Rangers
the No. 1
starter
they have
been
seeing. Millwood
can void the fifth year of
the deal if Millwood doesn't
pitch a certain number of
innings in earlier years of
the contract. Millwood is
expected to undergo a
physical today, and the deal
likely will be finalized
Wednesday.
Millwood's decision to
accept Texas' offer was first
reported by the Fort Worth
Star-Telegram on its Web
site.


0 From staff, Associated Press
reports.


Memphis takes care of Zips.


Tigers' Williams
rushes for 233
yards, scores 3 TDs.
By LARRY LAGE
Associated Press,
DETROIT - DeAngelo
Williams set an NCAA record
with his 34th 100-yard rushing
game and scored three touch-
downs, leading Memphis to a
38-31 victory over Akron in


the Motor City Bowl on
Monday.
Williams ran for 233 yards
on 30 carries and finished his
career with 6,021 yards rush-
ing - trailing only Ron
Dayne, Ricky Williams and
Tony Dorsett in Division I-A
history - and an NCAA-
record 7,568 all-purpose
yards.
The Tigers (7-5) took a
21-point lead with 3:09 left, but
needed to recover an onside


kick with 55 seconds left to
seal the win after Luke Getsy
threw his fourth touchdown
pass to cut the lead to seven
points.
Akron (7-6) made a good
showing in its first Division
I-A bowl game.
Getsy was 34-for-59 for a
Motor City Bowl-record
455 yards, and tied Chad
Pennington's mark for pass-
ing touchdowns in the bowl's
nine-year history.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Memphis wide receiver Ryan Scott (83), defended by Akron
defensive back Reggie Corner (20) pulls in a 50-yard reception
during the second quarter of the Motor City Bowl on Monday.


Christmas soccer kicks off


Tournament starts
Wednesday for
Tigers, Indians.
By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter.com
In what is fast becoming a
tradition, the Columbia/Fort
White Christmas Soccer
Tournament returns to the
Columbia Youth Soccer
Association (CYSA) fields
Wednesday and Thursday.
The biggest change to this
year's event is the addition of
the girls varsity teams, as
Columbia High and Fort
White High will compete
against Taylor County High,
Ocala Forest High and
Newberry High for the title.
CHS starts at 2 p.m. on
Wednesday against Taylor
County High, while Fort
White plays Newberry at
10 a.m. Fort White and
Columbia will play at 6 p.m.
Both Lady Tigers coach
Beth Adkins and Lady Indians
coach Perry Sauls were push-
ing for the tournament to be
expanded to include the girls,
and after last year's event
went so well, organizers had
the time to bring in girls
teams from around the area.
There are only five teams in
the girls bracket, so a point
system will determine which
teams advance to the semifi-
nal round. Each team will play
two games Wednesday, with
the team with the fewest
points eliminated from compe-
tition. On Thursday, the
remaining four teams will play
two semifinal games, then the
championship game to
determine the winner.
Both Lady Tigers coach


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MARIO SARMENTO/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High midfielder Chris Mullen (right) holds the ball while Coach Trevor Tyler looks on during a recent practice. The Tigers and
Indians will be playing in the Columbia/Fort White Christmas Soccer Tournament for the second straight year.
', '. - ' :., .-' - --', .. .. .... _.-: .. . . ..... .. PP.. . . - . .. :- L
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Columbia-Hih midfieldrChris-Mulen (right-holds-the all while-oach ,r:v....ler.loo..on,,....garecen. pactice._ Th Tigers an
Indians wil be-playng in the Colum bia/ ort- W hiteC,-'istm as.Sc-,-- -o-r'-m ent" for the.2s'c'nd" str"a-g "t-y -a _.. . ._ " ""


Beth Adkins and Lady Indians
coach Perry Sauls feel good
about their teams entering the
tournament.
"I'm hoping we can show
everyone they've improved,"
Adkins said. "They really are a
different team from where
they started the year."
Sauls too is confident, espe-
cially after his Lady Indians
shut out district rival


P.K Yonge School on Dec. 16.
"After (that) performance
and the fact we were down 3-1
against .Newberry (the team
they play first on Wednesday)
and came back and tied them,
I'm confident of playing every-
one except for Forest," he said.
That's because Forest is
undefeated thus far this sea-
son, and the'Lady Wildcats
defeated the Columbia girls


Duke reigns at No. 1 again


Gators still at No. 5,
after getting off to
unbeaten start.
By JIM O'CONNELL
Associated Press
Duke kept the No. 1 spot it
.has occupied since the pre-
season rankings after a light
week of games failed to pro-
duce changes Monday at the
top of The Associated Press'
men's college basketball poll.
But there was some move-
ment near the bottom of the
rankings. Wisconsin came
into the poll for the first time
this season at No. 24, and
West Virginia returned at No.
25 after a four-week absence.
Connecticut, Villanova,
Memphis, Florida and Illinois
stayed second through sixth.
Wisconsin and West
Virginia replaced Tennessee,
which fell out after a one-week
appearance, and Iowa, which
fell out for the first time this
season despite being on a
three-game winning streak.
Duke (11-0), which beat St.
John's 70-57 in its only game
last week, was again an


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Duke's J.J Redick (4) shoots
over St. John's Anthony Mason
Jr. (2) during the Blue Devils'
70-57 win on Wednesday.
overwhelming choice at
No. 1. The Blue Devils
received 61 of the 69 first-
place votes and 1,714 points
from the national media panel.
Connecticut (9-0) set a
Gampel Pavilion scoring
record in a 129-61 victory over
Morehead State in its only
. game last week. The Huskies,


ranked second for a third
straight week, got seven No. 1
votes and 1,658 points.
Villanova (8-0) received the
only other first-place vote.
Washington jumped two
places to seventh, while
Gonzaga held on at No. 8.
Michigan State, Louisville,
UCLA, George. Washington
and Boston College all moved
up one spot from last week
and are ninth through 13th.
Oklahoma (6-2), which lost
92-68 to West Virginia last
week, fell from seventh to
14th.
Texas was No. 15, followed
by Maryland, Indiana,
Kentucky, North Carolina
State and Nevada.
Ohio State, Wake Forest,
North Carolina, Wisconsin
and West Virginia were the
last five ranked teams.
Wisconsin (9-1) moved into
the rankings on a five-game
winning streak that includes,
victories over in-state rivals
Wisconsin-Green Bay,
Marquette and Wisconsin-
Milwaukee. The Badgers'
only loss was 91-88 at Wake
Forest in the ACC-Big Ten
Challenge.


8-0 and 4-0 in their two
meetings this year.
Both coaches say the girls
are excited, and they realize
this tournament provides
them with the opportunity to
stay sharp before the district
season begins again. In Fort
White's case though, the Lady
Indians will be starting a
brought stretch next week after
Christmas Break ends, partly


due to having to reschedule
two games against Hamilton
County High that were
postponed due to rain.
"I do want the girls to be
sharp, but had I known we
had eight games in two weeks
we might have thought about
it (entering)," Sauls said. "But
we're committed to it and
TOURNEY continued on 2B


Colorado, No. 23

Clemson battle in

Champs Sports Bowl


Buffaloes enter
game with interim
coach Hankwitz.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press

ORLANDO - Colorado
has an interim coach, a three-
game losing streak and a
pretty significant reputation
problem.,
The Buffaloes also have a
chance to start altering their
image against No. 23
Clemson in the Champs
Sports Bowl on Tuesday.
"We need a win, we really
do, just to get us back to
where we're supposed to be
and getting guys feeling good
again," linebacker Thaddaeus
Washington said. "It would be
great for everyone in the pro-
gram - the players, the
coaches, the fans."
The Buffs (7-5) desperate-
ly want to turn around a
once-promising season that
became sour after three


straight losses, the last two
by a combined score of 100-6.
"We want to end the sea-
son how we started it - by
winning," quarterback James
Cox said.
,Colorado was 7-2 at one
point, losing only to Miami and
Texas, and there was talk
about a contract extension for
embattled coach Gary Barnett
Consecutive losses to
Texas, Iowa State and
Nebraska ended that thought
as well as Barnett's tenure in
Boulder.
Barnett had survived a
sordid recruiting scandal and
a suspension following
derogatory remarks about a
female kicker who alleged
she was raped by a teammate
in 2000. But the losses -
most notably the 70-3 drub-
bing against Texas in the Big
12 title game - ultimately
led to his forced resignation
nearly three weeks ago.
The school has hired
CHAMPS continued on 2B


Section B









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV Sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
5 p.m.
ESPN - Champs Sports Bowl, Clemson
vs. Colorado, at Orlando
8:30 p.m.
ESPN - Insight Bowl, Arizona St. vs.
Rutgers, at Phoenix
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 - Gonzaga at Memphis
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
OLN - Boston atWashington

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


y-New England
Miami
Buffalo
N.Y.Jets


x-Indianapolis
z-Jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston


y-Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland


y-Denver
Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland


East
W L "
9 5
8 7
5 10
3 II
South
W L "
13 2
II 4
4 I C
2 13
North
W L "
II 4
10 5S
6 9
5 10
West
W L "
12 3
9 6
9 6
4 11


Pet PF PA
.643 322 289
.533 290 291
.333 245 337
.214 189 298

Pet PF PA
.867 422 234
.733 321 256
.267 286 381
.133 243 411

Pct PF PA
.733 418 313
.667 354 237
.400 249 279
.333 212 285

Pct PF PA
.800 372 251
.600 366 322
.600 411 289
.267 269 353


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
xx-N.Y. Giants 10 5 0 .667 392 293
Washington 9 6 0 .600 328 273
Dallas 9 6 0 .600 315 288
Philadelphia 6 9 0 .400 290 357
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Tampa Bay 10 5 0 .667 273 261
Carolina 10 5 0 .667 347 248
Atlanta 8 7 0 .533 340 297
New Orleans 3 12 0 .200 222 371
North
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Chicago II 4 0 .733 250 168
Minnesota 8 7 0 .533 272 334
Detroit 5 10 0 .333 233 310
Green Bay 3 12 0 .200 275 327
West
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Seattle 13 2 0 .867 435 248
Arizona 5 10 0 .333 298 370
St. Louis 5 10 0 .333 343 419
San Francisco 3 12 0 .200 219 411
x-linched conference.
clinched division .. , . , .
z-clinched wild card
xx-clinched playoff spot
Saturday's Games
Miami 24,Tennessee 10
Detroit 13, New Orleans 12
Washington 35, N.Y. Giants 20
Buffalo 37, Cincinnati 27.
Dallas 24, Carolina 20
Jacksonville 38, Houston 20
San Francisco 24, St. Louis 20
Kansas City 20, San Diego 7
Tampa Bay 27,Atlanta 24, OT
Pittsburgh 41, Cleveland 0
Arizona 27, Philadelphia 21
Seattle 28, Indianapolis 13
Denver 22, Oakland 3
Sunday's Games
Chicago 24, Green Bay 17
Baltimore 30, Minnesota 23 '
Monday's Game
New England at N.Y. Jets (n)
Saturday, Dec. 31
Denver at San Diego, 4:30 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Oakland, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. I
Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, I p.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, I p.m..
Detroit at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Arizona at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Seattle at Green Bay, I p.m.
Miami at New England, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Kansas City, I p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, I p.m.
New Orleans at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m..
Tennessee at Jacksonville,4:05 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 4:15 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.

College bowl games

New Orleans Bowl
Southern Miss 31,Arkansas State 19
GMAC Bowl
Toledo 45, UTEP 13
LasVegas Bowl
California 35, BYU 28
Poinsettia Bowl
Navy 5 I, Colorado State 30
Fort Worth (Texas) Bowl
Kansas 42, Houston 13
Hawaii Bowl
Nevada 49, Central Florida 48, OT
; Monday
Motor City Bowl
Memphis 38, Akron 31
Today
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando
Clemson (7-4) vs. Colorado (7-5), 5 p.m.
(ESPN)
Insight Bowl
At Phoenix
Arizona State (6-5) vs. Rutgers (7-4),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Wednesday
MPC Computers Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Boise State (9-3) vs. Boston College (8-3),
4:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Michigan (7-4) vs. Nebraska (7-4), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Thursday
Emerald Bowl
At San Francisco
Utah (6-5) vs. Georgia Tech (7-4),4:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Oregon (10-1) vs. Oklahoma (7-4), 8 p.m.


(ESPN)
Friday, Dec. 30
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
Virginia (6-5) vs. Minnesota (7-4), Noon
(ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso,Texas
Northwestern (7-4) vs. UCLA (9-2),2 p.m.
(CBS)
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Missouri (6-5) vs. South Carolina (7-4),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Peach Bowl
At Atlanta
Miami (9-2) vs. LSU (10-2), 7:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday, Dec. 31
Meineke Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
South Florida (6-5) vs. North Carolina
State (6-5), 11 a~m. (ESPN2)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Fresno State (8-4) vs. Tulsa (8-4), I p.m.
(ESPN)
Houston Bowl
TCU (10-1) vs. Iowa State (7-4), 2:30 p.m.
(ESPN2)
Monday, Jan. 2
Cotton Bowl
At Dallas
Alabama (9-2) vs.TexasTech (9-2), 11 a.m.
(FOX)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Iowa (7-4) vs. Florida (8-3), II a.m. (ESPN)

BASKETBALL

NBA standings


NewJ
Philade
Boston
NewYt
Toroni


Miami
Washir
Orland
Charlo
Atlanta


Detroi
Clevela
Indiana
* Milwaul
Chicag


San An
Dallas
Mempi
New C


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
ersey 14 12 .538
elphia 14 13 .519
n II 14 .440
ork 7 18 .280
to 6 21 .222
Southeast Division
W L Pet
16 12 .571
ngton II 14 .440
do 9 15 .375
otte 8 19 .296
S7 18 .280
Central Division
W L Pct
it 22 3 .880
and 16 9 .640
S15 9 .625
ukee 15 9 .625
0o 12 14 .462
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
itonio 21 7 .750
20 7 .741
his 16 9 .640
Orleans I IS 15.423


Houston


Minnesota
Denver
Seattle
Utah
Portland


L.A. Clippel
Phoenix
L.A. Lakers
Golden Sta
Sacramento


10 15 .400
Northwest Division
W L Pct
13 II .542
13 .13 14 .481
II 14 .440
II 16 .407
8 18 .308
Pacific Division
W L Pct
rs 16 10 .615
15 10 .600
S 15 12 .556
te 14 13 .519
10 16 .385


Sunday's Games
Detroit 85, San Antonio 70
Miami 97, LA. Lakers 92
Monday's Games
Milwaukee at Orlando (n)
Chicago at Cleveland (n)
L.A. Lakers atWashington (n)
New Jersey at New York (n)
Phoenix at Minnesota (n)
Indiana at Dallas (n)
Memphis at Utah (n)
Boston at Seattle (n)
Portland at Sacramento (n)
Denver at Golden State (n)
Today's Games
Charlotte at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Utah at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Indiana at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Denver, 9 p.m.
Sacramento at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25

The top 25 teams in The Associated Press'
men's college basketball poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through Dec.
25, total points based on 25 points for a first-
place vote through one point for a 25th-place
vote and last week's ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1.Duke (61) 11-0 1,714 � I
2. Connecticut (7) 9-0 1,658 2
3.Villanova (1) 8-0 1,595 3.



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one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

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www.jumble.com
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4. Memphis 9-1 1,459 4
5. Florida 11-0 1,401 5
6. Illinois 12-0 1,361 6
7.Washington 10-0 1,270 9
8. Gonzaga 9-2 1,267 8
9. Michigan St. 10-2 1,136 10
10. Louisville 9-1 989 II
I 1.UCLA 10-1 987 12
12. George Washington 8-0 932 13
13. Boston College 8-2 801 14
14. Oklahoma 6-2 735 7
15.Texas 9-2 651 15
16. Maryland 8-2 638 16
17. Indiana 7-2 564 18
18. Kentucky 8-3 521 19
19.N.C.State 9-1 482 21
20. Nevada 8- I 413 20
2 1.Ohio St. 8-0 392 24
22.Wake Forest 9-2 268 22
23. North Carolina 6-2 169 17
24.Wisconsin 9-1 136 -
25.West Virginia 7-3 135 -
Others receiving votes: Arizona 125,
Pittsburgh 118, Iowa 116, Bucknell 90,
Tennessee 66, Syracuse 53, Indiana St. 40,
Clemson 39, N. Iowa 23, Michigan 20,
Cincinnati 18, Southern Cal 12,Vanderbilt 7,
Buffalo 5, Colorado 4, Oklahoma St. 4,
Alabama 3,Arkansas 3, Iona 2, l6wa St. 2,Texas
A&M I.

ESPN/USA Today Top 25

The top 25 teams in the USAToday-ESPN
men's college basketball poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through Dec.
25, points based on 25 points for a first-place
vote through one point for a 25th-place vote.
and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
L. Duke (30) 11-0 774 I
2. Connecticut (1) 9-0 739 2
'3.Villanova 8-0 716 3-
4. Memphis 9-1 667 4
5. Florida 11-0 643 5
6. Illinois 12-0 632 6
7.Washington 10-0 583 7
8. Gonzaga 9-2 533 9
9. Michigan State 10-2 470 II
10. Louisville 9-1 453 10
11I. UCLA 10-1 444 12
12. George Washington 8-0 402 13
13. Boston College 8-2 342 14
14. Maryland 8-2 311 16
15. Oklahoma 6-2 304 ' 8
16.Texas 9-2 287 15
17. Indiana 7-2 271 17
.18. N.C. State 9-1 264 18
19. Kentucky 8-3 184 20
20. Ohio State 8-0 172 22
21. Nevada 8-1 16,8 21
22.Wisconsin 9-1 116 23
23. Pittsburgh . 9-0 84 25
24.Wake Forest 9-2 79 24
25. North Carolina 6-2 61 19
Others receiving votes: Syracuse 48,
Arizona 41, Bucknell 38, Tennessee 29, West
Virginia 28, Northern Iowa 23, Iowa 22,
Colorado 21, Clemson 18, Indiana State 18,
Air Force 17, Michigan 17, Missouri State 12,
Oklahoma State, 10, Texas A&M 8, Notre
Dame 7, lonas 6, Buffalo 4, Cincinnati 4,
Vanderbilt 3, Kansas State 2.

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games ,
No. 4 Memphis vs. No. 8 Gonzaga, 7 p.m.
No. 13 Boston College at Duquesne, 7
p.m.
No. 20 Nevada vs. Norfolk State, 8 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
No. 2 Connecticut vs. Stony Brook at the
Hartford Civic Center, 7 p.m.
No. 6 Illinois vs. Southeast Missouri State,
8 p.m.
No. 9 Michigan State vs.Tennessee Tech, 7
p.m.
No. 10 Louisville vs. Fairleigh Dickinson, 7
p.m.
No. 14 Oklahoma vs. Oral Roberts, 8 p.m.
No. 16 Maryland vs. Delaware State, 8 p.m.
No. 19 N.C. State vs. New Hampshire, 7 p.m.
No. 21 Ohio State vs. Gardner-Webb, 8
p.m.
No.23 North Carolina vs. North Carolina-
Asheville, 8 p.m.
No. 24\Visconsin vs. LouisianaTech, 8 p.m.

College scores

Saturday
SOUTH
Louisville 56, Detroit 48

HOCKEY

NHL scores

Monday's Games
N.Y. Islanders at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Florida, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Ottawa (n)
New Jersey at Toronto (n)
Carolina atTampa Bay (n)
Dallas at St. Louis (n)
iPhoenix at Colorado (n)
Minnesota at Edmonton (n)
Calgary atVancouver (n)
San Jose at Los Angeles (n)

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Arglrion


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans: A
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: WHEAT CROON FURROW MINGLE
Y d Answer: What the disobedient student had to do -
WRITE A WRONG.


DECEMBER 27, 2005


CHAMPS: Clemson goes for Top 20 slot


Continued From Page 1B

Boise State coach Dan
Hawkins to replace Barnett,
but defensive coordinator


Mike Hankwitz will coach the
team against Clemson (7-4).
"We want to finish the


season ranked in the top 20,"
Clemson cornerback Tye Hill
said.


TOURNEY: Tigers look for the repeat

Continued From Page 1B


we're going to do it."
Both girls teams will be
missing key players for
various reasons.
Sauls will be without
Vanessa Schueble, who is on
vacation, as well as injured
players Rebecca Sherrer and
Nicole Waddington. He has
brought up junior varsity play-
ers Kathleen Robinson and
Brittany Onorati, who both
played well against PK. Yonge.
For Adkins, she will be
without at least one player,
and she will call up whatever
junior varsity players she
needs to fill roles on her team.
The boys face the same
dilemma. Fort White coach
Bob Hochmuth, who organ-
ized the tournament last year
along with former CHS coach
Dale Hermann, will field a
team without injured starter
Brandon Milliken, who has
missed most of. the season
with an ankle injury.
Tigers coach Trevor Tyler
has to replace three key play-
ers, including leading scorer
Nic Nyssen and top defender
Brad Rigdon, who are compet-
ing in the Sun Bowl this week
with their travel teams. The
Sun Bowl gives high school
players an opportunity to be
recognized by college scouts,
since many will be present at
the event. Defender David
Wester will also miss the tour-
nament because of a .pre-
planned vacation to Greece.
Mullen said, "We've got a
lot of talent on the field and off
the field. A lot of the players
who don't get to play as much
are still exceptional players."
J. Ben Parker will move up
to sweeper to replace Rigdon,
with David Watson playing in
the back with Brad Witt.
Charles Kamback will move
up top and Tyler might try'
Aaron Barber on the outside.
Columbia was also missing


ACROSS

1 Fort-
(gold repository)
5 Air rifle ammo
8 Containers
2 Quartet
3 Circle part
4 Brawl
5 "Wool"
on clay sheep
6 Derisive snort
7 Early movie dog
8 Vote in favor
20 More lofty
22 Jinx
25 Corn serving
26 Magazine execs
27 Environmental
prefix
a8 Richness
31 Pizazz
33 - Perce,
14 Nefertiti's god
38 Graceful wrap
39 Before: pref.
40 High flier
41 Measly
14 Veto


key players like leading scor-
er Matt Rowan, Mullen and
Nyssen last year, and the
Tigers still rolled to the
tournament win.
There will be six teams in
this year's event instead of the
eight that took part in 2004.
Those teams are: Newberry,
Keystone Heights High,.
Suwannee High and Panama
City Arnold High, and they
are split into two brackets.
Columbia will be in Group A
with Newberry and Keystone.
Fort White will be in Group B
with Suwannee and Arnold.
The games start at noon
with Fort White playing
Suwannee and Columbia play-
ing Newberry. The Tigers
also take on Keystone Heights
at 8 p.m., while the Indians
face Arnold. The two third-
place teams in each group will
face off at 2 p.m. on Thursday,
with the two second-place
teams playing at 4 p.m. The
two group winners play at
6 p.m. .for the championship.
And it's set up so that Fort
White and Columbia could
possibly meet in the final.
"That's what we'd like to
see," Tyler said. "And that
would be the ultimate. They'd
get another chance at us again.
We already beat them once 5-0,
but anything could happen
once you get in that situation.
You've already played two
games, and two games puts a
toll on your body.- So, it's any-
body's game, whoever wants it.
"We want to win of course.
We want to win our tourna-
ment. My expectation is for
the seniors who are going to
be there, Brad Witt and Chris
Mullen, to step up. And even
though we lose a bunch of
players, we can still get it
.donqe. And ,also Charles.
Cofield, I want to see him
score goals. He's very fast."
It's a responsibility Cofield


45 Portable bed
48 Mass-transit
vehicle
49 Skipper's
bellow
51 "I" trouble?
53 Road map info
54 Supplements
55 Python
57 Element 26
61 Apply caulking
62 Water,
on the Seine
63 1492 ship
64 "Only Time"
singer
65 JAMA
readers
66 Breathe hard

DOWN

1 Fast-food chain
2 Kabuki kin
3 Paris yes
4 Lab photos
(hyph.)
5 Raisin cake
6 Bikini top


readily accepts. "Definitely,"
he said. "But I'm probably
going to have Alan Watson
helping me out. He's strong."
Last year, the Indians had not
won a game entering the tour-
nament. But this year, Fort
White has already won three
games and is coming off one of
its strongest performances of
the season, a 5-0 win against
Ocala-St. Johns High on Dec. 17.
"Guys I think have the con-
fidence, and they can compete
with any of the teams in the
tournament," Hochmuth said.
Fort White players are also
hoping to exact a measure of
revenge after losing 5-0 twice to
Columbia this season, includ-
ing a preseason classic game.
"Now. we've set them up,"
Indians striker Andrew
Sherrer said. "Now they think
they've got it if-they play us.
But that (the last meeting)
was kind of a fluke game for
us. They put things together
they hadn't all year."
Sherrer and teammate
Connor Hayden know several
players from CHS, so there
will be a lot of talk leading up
to the event.
The CYSA will co-sponsor
the tournament, with 'the
money to be evenly distrib-
uted to both schools' soccer
programs: Ticket prices for
adults are $7 on .Wednesday.
and $5 on Thursday. Children
ages five or younger get in
free. Soccer boosters for both
teams will provide conces-
sions, with ball runners pro-
vided for all games and two
University of Florida trainers
present at all times.
Tyler said the Tigers know
the pressure is on them to
defend their title.
"We're looking to win our
own tournament," he said.
"We don't want to go out there,
and give something up,
especially on our home field."


Answer to Previous Puzzle

JEEP GAP SOL
ALDA ELLA Q U E
BENT OPAL UTE
CARED NOMADS

VLE HOCB
GILS JA N
ACE EASA WA


CO ONT EO


V SSA D C KS
AK C VANS HIPS
LEA EPEE ELIA
ERR PAL SONG


7 Whiskery dog
8 Grouch
9 Usher's beat
10 Eminent
11 Features
19 Sushi fish


PUZZLE ENTHUSIASTS- Get rnmore puzzles in
' "Random House Clossword MecaOmni'oiius" Vols. 1 & 2.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11



15 16 17



22 23 24 25 226


12-27


21 Puckster
Bobby -
22 So-so grades
23 West Coast
campus
24 Bellow
25 Strains
29 Fathomless
30 Shaggy beast
32 Playful bite
35 Ike's ex
36 Elevator guy
37 On deck
42 College degs.
43 Veer
45 Desist
46 Rhymester
- Nash.
47 Currently
50 Contending
52 "La - Bonita"
53 Herr's abode
56 Boathouse
gear
58 Narrow
inlet
59 Switch
positions
60 Snooze


� 2005 by NEA, Inc.


I


Page Editor: Mario Sarmento, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005


DILBERT

DOGBERT'S TECH SUPPORT I CLONE YOURSELF, PUT EVIDENTLY YOUR
THE CLONE UP FOR 1 PARENTS SLAPPED
I ADOPTION, AND HOPE _, TOGETHER VERSION 1.0
TRY REBOOTING INTELLIGENCE CAN BE - OF YOU AND HOPED NO
YOURSELF. INFLUENCED BY THE . ONE WOULD NOTICE
ENVIRONMENT. | THE BUGS..

-^^-i-a !^0
_____ ac r ^


FOXTROT


so, you cAME NioMF y
HELAicopr NE.-HoW COc.
S' TrHPr -










FRANK & ERNEST


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BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


Ibb


0-2 zi


B.C.


GARFIELD


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): This is not the time to sit
back when there is so much
you can accomplish. Get your-
self geared up for the future
and put all efforts into what
you need to do to secure .a
brighter and better year ahead.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Watch what everyone
else does. This will give you a
good indication of what you
can do and how you can do it
better. Emotional matters will
crop up, so be ready to put
someone's mind at ease. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Traveling will be in your
best interest The more people
you get to see and talk to, the
better. You will learn a great
deal from the encounters you
have and be able to get a han-
dle on what it is you want to do
next year. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You will be at an emotion-
al high, so take advantage of
this and let others know how
you feel. Be open, honest and
to the point, and you will feel so
much better about your own


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

future. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You may have a lot of questions
on your mind, but now is not a
good time to ask. Sit back and
let nature take its course. To
pursue something new today
will only end in defeat and dis-
appointment. **-
. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You won't be able to sit
still, so don't bother trying.
Make this a day to remember
by doing things with someone
you want to make a more
important part of your future.
You don't have to divulge your
plans just yet. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): A chance to try some-
thing altogether new will get
you thinking about your future.
Don't hesitate to follow
through and check out the pos-
sibilities. This is a great day to
implement your new year's
plans. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You may have put on a


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: R equals M
"YWH R JFZ JN JYN BUF CSXIH,
X FZ J F J Y NHS M ,IX F RXEH X
WH X KHF B M WHSS, X WHSS B M
WH X KHF." - PB W F R.JSY B F
PREVIOUS SOLUTION - "Mystery on all sides! And faith the only star In this
darkness and uncertainty." Henri Arnlel
(c) 2005 by NEA, Inc. 12-27


couple of unwanted pounds
during the past couple of days.
Spend some time at the gym to
ensure you will move into the
new year in great condition,
able to wear those new outfits.

SAGITrARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Your changeable
mood will bewilder some of the
people who are closest to you.
Don't keep secrets get other
opinions before you unleash
your new enterprise or the low-
down on your plans for the
future. *-**-
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Talk to someone
about your plans and you will
get valuable information. You
will be able to prove yourself if
you take the initiative and fol-
low through. It's time to stay
ahead of the competition.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You can expect to have
some problems with the peo-
ple you hang but with today.
Keep things in perspective and
avoid arguments at all costs.
You can't win today, so keep
things light. ***-
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You will be working
through things and will have a
better idea of what it is you
want to pursue in the future.
This is a day to rid yourself of
what isn't working in your life
and start fresh with the new
year. *****
Birthday Baby: You have a
certain intrigue that draws oth-
ers to your side. You are indus-
trious but also creative, and
this combination makes you
unique. You tend to think and
do things on a large scale.


DEAR ABBY


Husband continues denials


despite proof of his affairs


DEAR ABBY: I am writing
in response to your advice to
'Threatened in N.Y.," who
received an anonymous phone
call that her husband was
cheating. You. advised her that
it was probably a crank call.
My comment is, "Where
there's smoke, 'there's fire!"
She should insist that her hus-
band take a lie detector test to
resolve any doubts she might
have.
My husband travels for busi-
ness. I had been concerned
about him possibly cheating,
and we went to counseling
where he swore that he was
faithful. I later learned that he'd
been having an affair at the
time, and had another one after
her. Even after I had proof of
his affairs,' he continued trying
to lie about the extent of his
infidelities. We are now in
counseling, and he's seeing a
psychiatrist. - WISER NOW
IN FULLERTON, CALIF.
DEAR WISER NOW: Your
husband obviously has some
serious 'issues, and you have
my sympathy. However, I stand
by my answer. I have received
a bushel of mail regarding that
letter, and less than 2 percent
of it agrees with you. Read on:
DEAR 'ABBY: I, too,
received an anonymous call
about my husband's "infideli-
ty." It was in the days before
caller I.D. Each time, the
woman left a sleazy message
,on my answering machine
after midnight. However, I was


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
lucky. My husband was known
by a different name than .the
one listed in the phone directo-
ry, which indicated that the
caller was lying.
I hope "Threatened" will
take your advice. The person
who called her is a misery-
loves-company instigator who
can't stand to see a happy cou-
ple. My husband died a year
later, and I thank God I didn't
ruin my short time with him by
believing some sick tramp who
made midnight phone calls. -
BEEN THERE IN MARY-
LAND
DEAR ABBY: I am a mem-
ber of the clergy. My wife got
one of those phone calls. At the
time, I was an official in the
local union and was getting
ready to go to a meeting when
our phone rang. My wife
answered, and all I could hear
was her saying, "Oh, he is? Are
you sure? You don't mean
that!" etc. When she hung up,
she turned to me and said,
"You won't believe this; You're
in the back booth at the union
hall making out with another
woman." Imagine the "kick"
we got out of that. Please warn


"Threatened" not to believe
everything she hears. - REV.
JIM IN INDIANA
DEAR ABBY: You were
absolutely right that the call
could have been made by a kid.
Years ago, when most women
were homemakers, I would
look up names and numbers in
the phone book, and when the
woman would answer I'd say,
"Is 'Harry' home?" When she
replied that she was his wife,
I'd say, "Oh! He never said he
was married!" As a high school
girl, I thought it was very
funny. As an adult, I realize I
could have caused irrevocable
harm. - SORRY NOW IN
BALTIC, CONN.
DEAR SORRY: Better late
than never! Your letter was one
of a stack of similar confession-
al letters on my desk piled 3
inches thick. When I was in
high school, I heard a similar
story about some students
who did the same thing to an
English teacher they
disliked.
DEAR ABBY: A similar
-incident happened to me years
ago. I trusted my husband
enough to know it couldn't be
true, so I asked the caller to
describe him - was he tall,
short, dark or blond, skinny or
heavy? And do you know what
the caller did? She immediately
hung up! - OPAL IN
ROSEVILLE

* Write Dear Abby at P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


ZITS


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


BLONDIE


1W/yB evN&
W12I~r-E:PTo


w


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005


Personal Merchandise

$300 900 $1525.
*, .. . .. L . . ... . . .. . ...




2200 255os0 $2850








In Print and On Line
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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 05-487-CA
INRE:
Forfeiture of
1997 Oldsmobile 88 Sedan
VIN 1G3HN52KOW4815364
-and-
One Thousand-Thirty-One 63/100 Dol-
lars
($1,031.63) In U.S. Currency
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE COM-
PLAINT
TO: HENRY LLEWELLYN MANN
1334 NE Triple Run Road
Lake City, FL 32055
and all persons who claim any right title
or interest one (1) 1997 Oldsmobile 88
Sedan, VIN 1G3HN52KOW4815364
and One Thousand-Thirty-One 63/100
Dollars ($1,031.63) in U.S. Currency
Any persons claiming any right, title or
interest in and to the property is required
to. serve a copy of their written defenses
to the Forfeiture Complaint, if any, on
M. BLAIR PAYNE, Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is 285 NE Hernando Ave-
nue, P.O. Drawer 1707, Lake City, Flori-
da 32056-1707, on or before January 15,
2006, and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service on the
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise, a default will be entered
and the complaint for forfeiture will be
granted.
DATED this 15th day of December,
2005..
P. DeWTT CASON, Clerk of Court
by: J. MARKHAM
Deputy Clerk
04501084
December 20, 27, 2005
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORI-
DA
GENERAL IRISDICTION DI\ VISION
t %SE Nt' 1-5. `-' -C \
GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORA-
TION,,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGN-
EES, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES AND ALL WHO MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST IN. THE ES-
TATE OF CONNIE S. LANG, DE-
CEASED, ET AL.,
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: SHANNON LANG
whose residence is unknown if
he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they
be dead, the unknown defendants who
may be spouses,, heirs, devisees, grant-
ees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trust-
ees, and all parties claiming an interest
by, through, under or against the De-
fendants, who are not known to be dead
or alive, and all parties having or claim-
ing to have any right, title or interest in


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Legal

the property described in the mortgage
being foreclosed herein.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on the
following property:
LOT 58, UNIT 11, OF WOODGATE
VILLAGE, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE
84, PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-
BIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A 1999 REDMAN
INDUSTRIES, INC. MOBILE HOME,
VIN# "FLA14613669A AND
FLA14613669B.
has been filed against you and you are-
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on DAVID J.
STERN, ESQ Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is 801 S. University Drive #500,
Plantation, FL 33324 on or before Janu-
ary 23, 2006 (no later than 30 days from
the date of the first publication of this
notice of action) and file the original
with the clerk of this court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; other wise a default
will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition
filed herein.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court at COLUMBIA County, Florida,
this 14th day of December, 2005.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
by: J. MARKHAM
DEPUTY CLERK
LAW OFFICES OF DAVID STERN
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
801 S. UNIVERSITY DRIVE SUITE
500
PLANTATION, FL 33324
05-43579(FNMA) GMAP
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation should contact
COURT ADMINISTRATION, at the
COLUMBIA County Courthouse at
3RD, 1-800-955-8771 (TTD) or 1-800-
o55-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
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December 20, 27, 2005


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person, and some ad categories will require prepay-
ment Our office Is located at 180 East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad copy to the
Reporter,
FAX; 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the
Classified Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreportercom
7 . ....


Ad Is to Appear: Call by: Fax/rnall by:
Tuesday Mon., 1t0:00 a.m. Men., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 am, Mon.. 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10.00 a m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Thur., 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri., 1000 a m. Fri., 9.00a.m.
Sunday Fri, 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9,00 a m.
These deadlinesare subject to change without notice. ,

* Advertising copy is subject to approval by the
Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or
classify all advertisements under appropriate head-
ings. Copy should be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the tirst day of publication. Credi tfor
published errors will be allowed for the first Insertion
lor Ihat portion of the advertisement which was Incor-
rect, Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission o0 advertisements ordered to be published,
nor for any general, special or consequential dam-
ages. Advertising language must comply with
Federal, Slate or local laws regarding the prohibitlan
of discrimination in employment, housing and public
accommodations. Standard abbreviations are eccept-
able; however, the first word of each ad may not be
abbreviated.


020 Lost & Found

HELP ME FIND MOMMY
IN TIME FOR CHRISTMAS
I'M PURE GRAY WITH
NO STRIPES OR SPOTS
MOM LIVES ON WEST
END OF LAKE CITY
386-344-4262
LOST: Siamese Cat
Shadow Wood area.
$100. Reward
Call 386-758-3238


030 Personals

05509167
Lonely? Young at Heart?
Over 65? Looking for a great
companion? If so, we would be
great together. 386-961-8453



060 Services

ACCIDENT VICTIMS ALL
Accident & Injury Claims *AUTO-
MOBILE *BIKE/BOAT/BUS
*ANIMAL BITES *WORKERS
COMPENSATION *WRONGFUL
DEATH *NURSING HOME
INJURIES A-A-A Attorney
Referral Service (888)733-5342.
ARRESTED NEED a Lawyer?
All Criminal Defense. *Felonies
*Misdemneanors *Domestic
Violence *DUI *Wrongful Death'
"Protect Your Rights" A-A-A
Attorney Referral Service
(888)733-5342. 24 HOURS
7 DAYS A WEEK.
DIVORCE$275-$350*COVERS
-1 CHILDREN, etc. Only one
signature required! *Excludes govt.
fees! Call weekdays (800)462-2000,
ext:600. (8am-7pm) Alta Divorce,
LLC. Established 1977.
Private CNA is looking for new
position. Call Sheila 386-935-4473

100 Job
100 Opportunities
!! LOOK! LOOK!!
You Too Can Sell Real Estate!
BIG BUCKS!
Call 386-466-1104
05509181
Survey Draftsman &
Instrument Person w/EFB exp
Company Benefits include Health
& Disability Ins., Sick Leave,
Vacation & Retirement Plan.
Call 386-755-6166


10 nJob
1o0 Opportunities

03527992
Lake City Reporter

is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier
for Columbia City to Old Wire
Rd/SR47, Herlong Deliver the
Reporter jn the early morning
hours Tuesday - Sunday. No
delivery on Monday's.,
Carrier must have dependable
transportation. Stop by the
Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!

03528396
FULL TIME Receptionist/
Business Office Assistant needed:
Also needed Full Time Certified
Activities Assistant (Some
Weekends). Seeking someone
mature, professional and
dependable. Send reply to Box
04004, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056

04500113

Lake City Reporter
Creative Director
Immediate opening for person
with high level of design and
creative skills. Musthave
experience using Quark Xpress,
Photo Shop, Illustrator, Adobe
InDesign and Acrobat. Person
will oversee daily operation of
Creative Services department.
2-4 years newspaper or other
graphic position and supervisory
experience helpful. Salary will be
based on work experience and
creative abilities. Medical benefits
and 401k available.
Send resume to:
Dave Kimler
180 E. Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055
email:
dkimler(c lakecityreporter.com

05508839
Wanted Exp. Shop Technician
for construction/forestry
equipment dealer in the Lake
City, Starke, & Live Oak areas.
Competitive pay, benefits &
excellent training program. Call
386-752-9544 or fax to: 755-6882
or send resume to:
Industrial Tractor Co.
PO Box 2439 Lake City, 32056

05509141
Seeking Office Assistant
F/T for busy agency. Must be:
* Very Organized.
* Professional
* Proficient in MS Office,
Internet
* Previous office exp a must.
* Friendly & outgoing.
-Salary commensurate .w/exp.
Call Ashley at 386-752-9440

05509161
Salesperson-Lumber Sales
Must be people savvy
Will train - Great benefits
Apply in person
Idaho Timber of Florida
1786 SE SR 100
Lake City, FL. 32025
Call 386-755-5555

FLAT BED DRIVERS
Atlantic Truck Lines
$4,000.00 Sign on Bonus
Class A, in state & home every
night. $600-$750/wk. Yearly $1,000
safety bonus. 3 yrs. exp. Paid
vacation, health/dental. Call
1-800-577-4723 Monday-Friday


Computer Services

A PROFESSIONALLY
DESIGNED WEBSITE FOR
YOUR BUSINESS
A Perfect Christmas Gift!
Lake City area resident discount.
MSN.Net Hosting 877-467-7932

COMPUTER NOT WORKING?
We help with all your computer
needs. Virus & Spyware Repair,
Network & New Computer Setup.
Tutoring and anything else!
Call Dave at 352-870-7467.


Roofing & Gutters

SOUTHLAND REMODELING
Specializing in Reroofs,
Roof Repair, Roof Cleaning.
Call 386-697-3134


Concrete Work

JSH CONCRETE INC.
Slabs, footings, drives, etc. Licensed
& Insured. Home Owner Discounts.
Call 386-719-9918


Painting Service

N & N: We come from the old
school. Affordable painting &
pressure washing. Since 1952. Save
$100 on all paint jobs by calling:
386-965-0482 or 386-697-6237
Free Estimates.

Painting & Handyman Service
Painting, Home Repair, Remodel,
Drywall Repair, & Pressure Wash
Call Mike Lainhart 386-454-7060
Professional Painting & Pressure
Washing. 20 yrs exp. Quality Work,
Free Estimates. Will Meet or Beat
all other Estimates. 386-344-4242


Home Improvements Land Services


MITCHELL / HILGERSON LLC
Kitchen & Bath Remodeling.
Electrical repairs, Carpentry.
Paint & Trim Call 386-365-9909

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, design. Comn. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call 386-496-2820 Iv msg.
TIME TO MULCH
Make your flower beds look like
new. Delivered & spread or just
delivery. 386-935-6595

Services

AUTO - MOBILE DETAILING
Wash & Vac $ 25.00.
Total Works- $ 80.00.
We will come to you 386-965-4987
FREE CLEANUP.
Pick up of unwanted metals,
tin, scrap vehicles.
386-755-0133 We Recycle.

Drywall Services

DRYWALL Hang, Finish;
Textures; Plaster & Stucco Repairs;
Interior & Exterior Painting.
386-752-2412

Pressure Cleaning

Andrews Pressure Washing
Lic. & Insured,
Free Estimates.
Call 386-755-2065

EARL'S PURE
Pressure Washing & Painting.
Free Estimates Earl Goff
386-935-3230


ow Bulldozer Work! Tractor
work, root raking, bush hogging,
seeding, sodding, disking, site prep
& landscape work. Custom Lawn
care. Irrigation Repair &
Installation. Free Estimate!
Call 755-3890 or (386) 623-3200

Look! We can dig your Trench for
less than you can rent a Trencher!
Free estimates.
Call A-1 Electric at 386-752-5488


Woodworking

F. THOMAS ENTERPRISES
Unique Wood, Designs and
Fabrication.Call 386-752-7387 or
e-mail ftc206(@bellsouth.net


Tree Service

Hazardous TREE TRIMMING,
removal & stump grinding. Senior
discount. 15 years experience.
386-590-7798 or 386-963-3360


Construction

Plumb Level Construction Co.
New Construction, Remodeling,
Re Roofing, Shingle & Metal
Call 386-792-4061 or 365-2819


Bankruptcy/Divorce

#1 IN BUSINESS SERVICES
Divorce, Bankruptcy, Resumes
RE Closings, Legal Forms
248 N Marion Av. 755-8717


Advertise It Here!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck; motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here,for 10 consecutive days. If your
vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $10 you can run your ad for an additional
10 days. A picture will run every day with a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring
your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private Party Only!


10 AYFROY$


% : ?pLeliUs Wrie Ylour Classified Ad
MA NOR;... .. . ......= . .


10n Job
100U Opportunities

05509172
PARALEGAL
The Department of Transportation
has an opening for a Paralegal
Specialist. Bi-Weekly Salary
Range ($891.60 - $1400.00).
Minimum Qualifications: Must be
or have the ability to become a
notary public in Florida;
knowledge of civil litigation
office practices such as
calendering, setting hearings,
scheduling court reporters, and
coordinating. See online ad for
more qualifications. Refer to
,Requisition Number 55004630.
Please apply online at:
https://jobs.myflorida.com. Only
State of Florida Applications will
be accepted - no resumes, please.
Ad closes 12/30/05.
EO/AA/VP Employer.

05509173
Seeking an enthusiastic
Maintenance Professional
to oversee the management of
daily operations and physical
plant maintenance for enclosed
regional mall in Lake City,
FL. Attention to detail and the.
ability to'handle multiple projects
simultaneously are essential.
'Knowledge of roofing, HVAC,
.plumbing and electricity are a
plus. Basic computer skills and
familiarity with computer systems
are a must. Flexibility in working
hours required. E-mail resumes to
lisaac(@hullstorey.com or fax to
706-868-7457 attention L. Isaac.

05509178




STAY IN THE
"SWEET PART"
OF THE SOUTH
FL., GA., SC., NC., TN., AL.
- Top pay-up to .40 cpm w/5 yrs
",* Guaranteed Hometime
- Health & Disability Ins. Avail.
*-Life & Dental Ins. Provided
*401K available
* Safety Bonus
Call 800-874-4270 # 6
Highway 301 South, Starke; FL.
www.davis-express.com

CYPRESS TRUCK LINES, INC
Driver Designed Dispatch. FLA
ONLY/Flat Bed students welcome.
Home Every WeekEnd Most Nights
(800)545-1351
www.cypresstruck.com.
DENTAL ASSISTANT
Highly Experienced Dental
Assistant needed for busy quality
general practice. $17.00 hr plus paid
insurance, vacation & bonuses.
Fax resume to: 386-752-7681
or call 386-752-8531 �
DRIER NEEDED Person iv.th
CDL & Mobile Home Delivery
Experience. Call 386-364-1340.
. Ask for Billy.
DRIVER- COVENANT
TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay &
Benefits for Experienced Drivers,
0/0, Solos, Teams & Graduate
Students. Bonuses Available.
Refrigerated Now Available.
(888)MORE PAY (888-667-3729).
DRIVER- NOW HIRING
QUALIFIED DRIVERS for Central
Florida Local & National OTR
positions. Food grade tanker, no
hazmat, no pumps, great benefits,
competitive pay & new equipment.
Need .2 years experience.
Call Bynum Transport for your
' opportunity today. (800)741-7950.


Classified Department: 755�5440


oo J0ob
SOpportunities
EDUCATIONAL SALES REP.
Sell books to schools
in your local area. To apply visit
www.DeeBooks.com
Click on 'Join DEE'.
FT Food Service Workers for
correctional setting. Benefits after
90 days. 401K, Stock Bonus,
Vacation. No criminal record. Food
Service Experience helpful. Apply
in person @ CCA Lake City CI.
386-755-3379 ext 2251
EOE/M/F/D/V.
HELP WANTED
FAULKNER PLUMBING
Plumbers
Call 386-755-1568 & leave message
HUNGRY HOWIES is hiring
delivery drivers. Must have car
w/insurance & 2 yrs. driving exp.
Flex schedule. F/T & P/T avail.
CASH PAID DAILY!
Earn $8. - $15./ hour. Apply in
person at 857 SW Main Blvd.
IMMEDIATE OPENING!
Production Workers needed for sign
shop. Experience a plus.
Call 386-755-2006.
Kaam Transmission needs exp.
Auto Tech, or R&R Mechanic with
experience. Must have own tools.
Apply in person 125 NE Jonesway
Lake City, 32055 or 386-758-8436
Legal Secretary
Phone-& Computer skills required.
Send reply to Box 05007, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
LOCAL TRUCK DRIVER
Position open, CDL Lic. 2 yrs exp.
preferred, good driving record.
Assistants required loading &
unloading. Paided Vac. & holidays
avail. Call 386-754-5282 or
fax resume to 386-754-0103
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY,
Lowboy drivers to transport heavy
equipment in the Gainesville area.
Apply in person at-Watson
* Construction, New Berry Florida
352-472-9157 ask for Alan or Steve..
OTR DRIVERS NEEDED
Heavy Haul,Class A CDL,
2 week turnaround,good pay,
Call Southern Specialized,LLC
386-752-9754
P/T Warehouse Workers
Sat. Only. Must apply in person, no
phone calls. H & M Bay,
State Farmers Market,
2920 CR 136, Unit 2; Office 7
White Springs, FL
Must be 18.yrs old to apply.
SALES REPRESENTATIVES
WE ARE SO CONFIDENT IN
OUR LEADS WE PAY YOU TO
RUN THEM EVEN IF YOU
DON'T SELL. Are you a
self-motivated positive person?
Are you presently earning
$1000 - $1500 per week? Qualified
guaranteed income during training
periodd. Qualified $2000 SIGN-ON.
BONUS. We offer... a solid training
program with 2-3 Pre-set qualified
confirmed leads daily. With our
"NEW" credit process means All
leads are pre-approved before you
run the appointments. Management
opportunities. Unlimited income
potential. Call: ERIC
(888)563-3188. ',
Short Term & Long Term
Temn to Perm
Many different positions available!!
Call Wal-Staf Personnel
386-755-1991 or 386-755-7911
SMALL DEALERSHIP
looking for parts person and outside
sales for new territory upcoming
for new year. Call for Application
(800)556-7577.


a








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005


100 Job
0 Opportunities

WANTED EXPERIENCE CNC
Operator. Apply in Person at
Walsh Race Craft at 1725 S Ohio
Ave, Live Oak, FL 32064 or
call 386-364-4942 ask for Mike.

Waste Management Inc.
Lake City/ Gainesville
Has an immediate opening for a
hard working, flexible individual to
fill the position of Driver/Laborer
for Lake City and Gainesville. This
position requires a minimum Class
B CDL with air brake endorsement.
Waste Management offers a full
benefits package including health
insurance and 401 - K plan. If you
feel you meet the requirements,
please apply by phone
1-877-220-JOBS (5627) or online at
WWW.WMCAREERS.COM
EOE/ADA/DFWP
WELDERS/LABORERS
MACHINE SHOP EXP.
Apply in person Grizaly Mfg.
174 NE Cortez Tsrrace
Lake City, FL (Across from airport)
YOUNG 1 . F ; I i ' Person for
Manufactured Home sales, Business
degree a plus, Will train right
person, Call 386-364-1340.
Ask for Mr, l!ili or Mr. Corbet


12U Employment



PA/ARNP
SHANDS
LAKE SHORE
' caurrunil% seeking qualified
jpAIv.s :''r , lull lime position
:or - OrihiopeJdic Practice. Must
be a graduate of an accredited
PA/ARNP program, currently
Florida Licensed as PA/ARNP.
Experience in an Orthopedic
Setting preferred. Shands offers
great benefits and competitive
salary. Apply on-line today at:
www.shands.org or call
Bonnie Price. Human Resources
386-754-8147. EOE/M/F/D/V
Drug Free Work Place


120 Medical
Employment


BUSY FAMILY Practice Seeks
Receptionist: Position involves
answering multiline phone system,
scheduling, patient relations &
medical records. Prior experience
required. Fax or mail resume to:
386-719-9494; PO Box 159,
Lake City, FL 32056.


Experienced Medical Assistant
Needed for fast paced
Doctors Office.
Fax resume to: 386-758-5987


RN NEEDED, Part-Time,
3-1 lp & llp-7a. Please apply at
The Health Center of Lake City,
560 SW McFarlane Avenue,
Lake City. Equal Opportunity
Employer/ Drug Free Work
Place/Americans with
Disabilities Act.


Suwannee Medical Personnel
Home Care needing per diem RN's
for 4-6hr IV infusions. Coverage
areas are Branford, Mayo and
Providence. $25.00 per hr.
Please Call Rose 1-877-755-1544
or (386) 755-1544


170 Business
'v Opportunities


ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do
you earn $800/day? 30 Machines,
Free Candy All for $9,995.
(888)629-9968 B02000033. CALL
US: We will not be undersold!


LOG HOME DEALERS
WANTED Great Earning Potential,
Excellent Profits, Protected
Territory, Lifetime Warranty.
American Made - Honest Value.
Call Daniel Boone Log Homes
(888)443-4140.


Advertisement
Homeowners with money worries
may qualify for low-interest loans
LOANS: Direct lender loosens its req- ments? Financial problems? Medical
uirements for homeowners who need bills? IRS liens?It doesn? matter!
money now. If you are a homeowner with sufficient
Hale youbeen turned down fora loan? equity, there's an excellent chance you
ob you need more than $10,000 for my will qualify for a loan- usually within 24
reason? Are you paying more than 10% hours.
interest on anyotherloans orcreditarids? You can find out over the phone-and
If you are a homeowner and answer- free of charge-if you qualify. Honey
ed"yes"o anyof these questions, they Mae Mortgage is licensed by the FL
can tell you over the phone and without Deptof Financial Services. Open 7 days
obligation ifou qualify a week for your convenience.
High edit card deb. Less-than-perfect
credit? Self employed? Late house pay- 1-800-700-1242 ext.253





24 Log Home Packages To Be Offered At Public Auction.
S r- Jn.. , Rogers Realty & Auction Co.
Saturday Jan. 14th "FL License #AU2922
11:00 A.M. 336.789.2926 or www.rogersrealty.com
Orlando, FL r F,
(Portlof Sanford) ' t j_r r lI r'-

For More Information! 1.888.562.2246
Or Log Onto: www.auctionloghomes.com






DOUBLE YOUR INVESTMENT IN ONLY 1 YEAR!

Builders Lots Available in the |

Fastest Growing Areas in Florida a

WHOES1:LE PRICING
- A 5S-50


I--fourlor u as . yuuiy Pnone (36) 49I7-141
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates Toll Free (866) 9LW-ROOF


Liberty National Life Insurance Co.
is expanding its operation and is looking for upwardly
mobile people to fill insurance sales & service positions.
Average annual earnings $42,000. Fringe benefit package: 2
retirement funds, health insurance, paid vacation, conven-
tion trips & many others. No experience necessary. We have
on the job training. Requirements: honesty, hard worker &
dependable transportation.
Contact Ronnie Harvey at 386-752-2583
Or fax resume to: 386-752-8724
Liberty National is an EOE Licensed Agents Welcome

Advertisement
Homeowners with money worries
may qualify for low-interest loans
LOANS: Direct lender loosens its req- ments? Financial problems? Medical
uirements for homeowners who need bills? IRS liens?It doesn't matter!
money now. If you are a homeowner with sufficient
Hawynbeen turned down foraloan? equity, there's an excellent chance you
Do you needmorewthan$10,000 for a Vwill qualify fora loan-usuallywithin 24
reason? Are you paying more than 10% hours.
interest on any other loans orcreditcards? You can find out over the phone-and
If you are a homeowner and answer- free of charge-if you qualify. Honey
ed"yes"to arnyofthesequestions, they Mae Mortgage is licensed bythe FL
can tell you over the phone andwithout DeptofFinancial Services. Open 7 days
obligation if you qualify. Dept oonealerv c.
High cdit card debt? Less-than-perfect a week for your convei
credit? Self employed? Late house pay- 1-800-700-1242 ext.253


Classified Department: 755-5440


180 Money to Loan

04501021
NEED MONEY?
ARE BANKS TURNING
YOU AWAY?
LOOKING FOR A
FRESH START
CALL FOR A FREE
CONSULTATION
1-866-708-6663
FAST APPROVAL,
FAST CASH!
MANY PROGRAMS
SUITABLE FOR YOU.
VARIOUS LOANS
AVAILABLE.

240 Schools &
2 Education
Want to be a CNA? Don't want to
wait? Express Training Services of
Gainesville is now offering our
quality CNA exam Prep classes.
Day/Eve classes. Class for 1 week,
certification test the next week.
Class size is limited. Next class
1100rr A Cr 1 <1-l '1SZA'7r~1;-cA Affl


PUPPIES-PURE BRED
CATAHOULA w/papers, from
championship lines. Catahoulas are
Americas' oldest rare breed. They
make great pets and have a wide
range of abilities. 386-935-6857


403 Auctions


310 Pets & Supplies
DWARF RABBIT
Complete with cage, water bottle &
feeder. 1 yr old. Very tame & good
w/children. $30 Call 386-867-0049

HELP ME FIND MOMMY
IN TIME FOR CHRISTMAS
I'M PURE GRAY WITH
NO STRIPES OR SPOTS
MOM LIVES ON WEST
END OF LAKE CITY
386-344-4262
MINI DACHSHUND,
AKC Red, Health Cert.
Cute & Cuddly. $350.
Call 386-776-2233


408 Furniture

04500704
V : .2


BEDROOM - 7 pc. Complete
Louis Philippe Cherry set!
Custom built, dovetail
double-glide drawers, hidden
storage w/felt lining. Brand NEW
still in boxes! Retail $5,200.
Sacrifice $1,400. 352-264-9799


416 Sporting Goods

POOL TABLE - Gorgeous Brand
new 8' wood table. Leather pockets,
Italian 1" slate, carved legs. Still in
Crate! Cost $4,500. Sell $1,350.
Can Deliver. 352-494-0333


4 19 TV-Radio &
Recording


/09/uo6, Canllo-/6-75 u4 24 LOG HOME PACKAGES to be3-86-75---.. www.onlinetidewatertec.com.
SOffered at Public Auction. Saturday, R 3 TV in e
310 Pets & Supplies January 14, 11:00 AM, Orlando, FL RCA 361N TV, $400. Pioneer ______________
310 Pets & Supplies(Port of Sanford), Rogers Realty & Receiver, 101 cd changer. 2 deck HOT TUB - $1,795. LOADED!
(orAuction, License # AU2922. & tape player, 5 speaker surround Never used. Waterfall, therapy jets,
Auction, License # AU2922. s $ s a etetanuent LEDlghts, cupholde ral 0lts
Black Cocker Spaniel, Female, Free brochure, Buffalo Log Homes, sound. $750.6 ft tall entertainment LED lights, cupholders, vranty.
Free to good home. Call 758-8681 (888)562-2246 or center, black. $125. or $1,000 for energy efficient. With warranty.
www.auctionloghomes.com, all. Call 386-752-5274 Can deliver 352-376-1600


II I I I I


I 202CHYSER30


Boorid araBekInwsth ms
imotntproni ou h
-csomr '9-. o'e ourselves o fi r * IdealsI i

quait srvie ndresec t Ou ciets


*1U*


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
Payment in advance for standing
pine timber. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-454-1484 or 961-1961.



440 Miscellaneous


BUILDING SALE! "Extended 3
Weeks!" 20x26 Now $3340.
25x30, $4790. 30x40, $7340.
40x60, $11,490 Factory Direct,
25 Years. Many Others.
Ends/accessories optional.
Pioneer (800)668-5422.


EARN DEGREE online from
home. *Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Computers. Job
Placement Assistance.
Computer & Financial
aid if qualify. (866)858-2121









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005


440 Miscellaneous

MEDICARE "D" DRUG PLAN
CONSULTANTS INDEPENDENT
PHYSICIAN MANAGED WE
WILL SAVE YOU MONEY! WE
WORK FOR YOU, NOT
INSURANCE COMPANIES CALL
(888)325-PILL WWW.MEDICAR-
EDRUGHELP.NET.

RUN YOUR ad STATEWIDE!!!
For only $450 you can place your
25 word classified ad in over 150
newspapers throughout the state
reaching over 5 MILLION readers.
Call this newspaper or Advertising
Networks of Florida at
(866)742-1373. Visit us online at
www.florida-classifieds.com.
Display ads, also available.
SAWMILLS FROM only
$2,795.00 Convert your LOGS TO
VALUABLE LUMBER with your
Norwood portable band sawmill.
Log skidders also available.
www.norwoodindustries.com
-Free information:
(800)578-1363 ext 300N.


4 0 Good Things
45 to Eat

PECAN HOUSE exit 414 & 1-75.
Elliot Pecans, Choctaw Pecans, &
other pecans'for sale. Also shell pe-
cans. 386-752-1258 or 386-6976420

Pinemount Rd 252 Taylorville.
The Nutcracker 22 yr exp.
Buy & Sell Cracked &-Shelled
Pecans. Also available Tomatoes at
same location. 2738 CR 252 .
Lake City, FL 32024. 386-963-4138

463 Buildin
SMaterials

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$
Buy Direct From Manufacturer. 20
colors in stock with all Accessories.
Quick turn around! Delivery
Available Toll Free (888)393-0335.

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent

FOR RENT: 2BR/2BA MH,
'Excellent condition. Large lot, quiet
neighborhood. No Pets. $400 mo,
1st, last & Sec required. Located 4
1/2 miles West of Lake City.
Call 386-454-5688 Leave msg.

IN PARK Mobile Homes for Rent
2BR/2BA 1st & sec. required.
Applications & references required.
386-719-2423

LATE MODEL MOBILE HOMES
Starting $400 month, Beautiful
Pond setting, w/trees. CH/A, Cable
avail. No pets. Call 386-961-0017

640 Mobile Homes
60U for Sale

2000, 1456 SqFt. Doublewide
4 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Glamour bath,
Beautiful Deck. 20% Down, Only
$517.66 per/mth. MUST SELL!
Call Ron 386-397-4960

31 Used Doublewides from Disney
Area. Now in Lake City. A/C, steps,
cable ready w/TV, telephone,
furnished, pots & pans, dishes, &
silverware. Perfect for Rental
Properties or Starter Home.
Great Deals, While they Last!
386-752-5355

ABSOLUTELY "THE BEST"
Mobile Homes and Modulars
Move over Palm & Jake, the new
#1 home is here. Guaranteed
Gary Hamilton Homes 758-6755
BEAUTIFUL 3 BEDROOM
2 BATH DOUBLEWIDE,
W/FIREPLACE, OPEN FLOOR
PLAN, LOTS OF EXTRAS. WILL
DELIVER. DOUG 386-288-2617
BUY NEW Dream Home For Only
5% Down, With a 750 Beacon.
Will Finance.
Call Buddy 386-364-1340
CASH DEALS. We Love Em! We
will give you the very best.pricing
in North Florida on new or used
manufactured homes! 800-769-0952

IF YOU OWN LAND OR HAVE A
LARGE DOWN PAYMENT, I
MAY BE WILLING TO OWNER
FINANCE A NEW
MANUFACTURED HOME FOR
YOU! CALL STEVE 386-365-8549
NEED A Home?
Call 386-364-1340 Ask For Buddy.
We have several
New & Used to Choose from.


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

USED DOUBLEWIDE
MUST BE SOLD BY
CHRISTMAS! FURNITURE AND
AC INCLUDED. CALL GEORGE
386-719-0044

USED DOUBLEWIDE,
MUST SELL!
MAKE OFFER!
CALL TIM 386-288-2016

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land

!! Owner Finance!!
1998 24X48 3/2 on small lot
1903 SW Judy Glen
Call 386-867-0048

!!! FREE FREE FREE!!!
3/2 DW. A/C on 1.5 acre lot
in Worthington Springs
Call 386-466-1104
10 ACRES - 4 BR/2 BA Mobile
Home, approx. 4 miles from 1-75 &
47. Can be divided, $179,000.
386-752-5123 or 386-754-2582
4 BEDROOM 2 bath
home on land. Must sell.
In Beautiful Deer Creek -
Only & $774 per/mth
Call Doug 386-288-2617
Brand New 2280 Sqft 4/2
w/ concrete foundation, driveway &
walk, deck & more. $134,900.
Close in. Gary Hamilton

Clean 1560 sf 3/2 1993 DW, private
wooded acre, all lino, deck, new
metal roof. $63,900. Cash Only
Call 386-961-9181
FSBO 1998 Redman 28X52 3/2
on 1/2 acre lot. 5 min. from
Walmart, perfect location.
Call Steve at 386-590-1413
, Handyman Special
3/2 DWMH on Gorgeous Oak
Shaded 5 acres, Owner Financing.
Zero down, $1,285 mth. $125K.
Call 352-215-1018

LAND HOME
Packages, while they last!
Call Ron Now!
386-397-4960

71 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent '

1, 2, and 3 BR include MW, DW,
pool, fitness center and more.
Close to everything, Call Windsong
today 386-758-8455

2/1 Fresh Paint & New Carpet
Starting at $600/mth.
Plus security. Pets allowed w/fee.
Call Lea.386-752-9626
2BR/1.5BA LUXURY
Apartment with garage. 5 min. from
TiMco & downtown.
386-755-4590 or 386-365-5150


750 Business &
Office Rentals
GREAT LOCATION
1235 SF Building
All Utilities Furnished
$975/month
A Bar Sales, Inc.
386-752-5035
7 Days 7 am-7 pm
Medical Office Space for Rent
in Live Oak. Office has 2,10 sqft, 2
waiting areas & 8 exam rooms.
Lease for $1,850 mth. Contact
Poole Realty 386-209-1766
Warehouse in good neighborhood.
Great Location!
Must See!$850 mth
Call Lea 386-752-9626
Warehouse: 2 Offices for Lease.
Cannon Creek Industrial Park.
$800/mth per office space
386-755-9041

805 Lots for Sale
FSBO: 5.37 Acres. 452 feet
frontage on Hwy 242 in Timucuan
Crossing Subdivision. Lot size
452x661. Near Sister Welcome
Caution light. $97,000.
386-752-9363 or 365-7353

810 Home for Sale
GRANDVIEW VILLAGE
3BR/2BA, 1,380 sq ft. (Heated)
Will not last at this price, $149,900
Call 386-754-5678

820 Farms &
820 Acreage
Columbia City Area
5 ac.wooded homesite
$89,900 owner finance
352-472-3660
INDIVIDUAL SEEKS Acreage.
Wooded or open.,
Cash buyer- quick closing.
Please call 386-755-7541


820 Farms &
Acreage

WINDING FOREST, 5 & 7 Ac.
lots starting at $89K.
Owner Financing. 386-754-7529
Chris Bullard Owner/Broker

Out of Town
840 Property

ASHEVILLE, NC AREA
ACREAGE 1 to 8 acre mountain
view and riverfront homesites from
the $60s. Gated community, custom
lodge. Near natural hot springs.
Don't miss out! Call (866)292-5762.

BEAUTIFUL NORTH
CAROLINA. MUST SEE
BEAUTIFUL & COLORFUL
FALL FOLIAGE! WESTERN NC
MOUNTAINS Homes, Cabins,
Acreage & Investments.
Cherokee Mountain Realty
GMAC Real Estate, Murphy
www.cherokeemountainrealty.com
Call for Free Brochure
(800)841-5868.
EAST ALABAMA Mountain
Property For Sale One hour west of
Atlanta in Piedmont, AL Beautiful
View 48 acres $144,000 14,400
down 1,087 per month owner
financed. Call Glenn
(850)545-4928.
MURPHY NORTH CAROLINA
COOL SUMMERS MILD
WINTERS Affordable Homes &
Mountain Cabins CALL FOR FREE
BROCHURE (877)837-2288
EXIT REALTY MOUNTAIN
VIEW PROPERTIES
www.exitmurphy.com.
NC MOUNTAINS-LOG cabin
$89,900. Easy to finish cabin on
secluded site. Million $$$ Views
Available on 1-7 acre parcels
$29,900-$79,900. Free Info
Available! (828)256-1004.


0 Out of Town
840- Property


NORTH CAROLINA Gated
Lakefront Community 1.5 acres
plus, 90 miles of shoreline.
Never before offered with
20% pre-development discounts,
90% financing, Call (800)709-5253.
TENNESSEE ACREAGE FOR
SALE Near Chattanooga. Beautiful
new lakeside community. I to 5
acre homesites from the $40s.
Limited number of private boat
slips. Call for appt. (866)292-5769.
TENNESSEE WATERFRONT
Land Sale! Direct Waterfront
parcels from only $9,900! Cabin
Package from $64,900! 4.5 acres
suitable for 4 homes and docks only
$99,900! All properties are new to
the market! Call toll-free
(866)770-5263 ext. 8.
WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS
North Carolina Where there is: Cool
Mountain Air, Views & Streams,
Homes, Cabins & Acreage. CALL
FOR FREE BROCHURE OF
MOUNTAIN PROPERTY SALES
(800)642-5333. Realty Of Murphy
317 Peachtree St. Murphy, N.C.
28906. www.realtyofmurphy.com.

850 Waterfront
850 Property
COASTAL SOUTHEAST Georgia
Large wooded water access, marsh
view, lake front, and golf oriented
homesites from the mid $70's
Live oaks, pool, tennis, golf.
(877)266-7376.
www.cooperspoint.com.


940 Trucks

2003 F-150
Lariat Supercrew
Red, Gray Leather, Tow Pkg.,
Loaded. Call Keith 800-814-0609


940 Trucks


2004 Nissan Titan V8
Low miles, White
Nice Truck
Call Keith 800-814-0609


950 Cars for Sale
*Hondas from $500*
Police Impounds!
For listings call
1-800-749-8116 ext A760
05508634
1994 Mitsubishi Galant LS
MUST sell for payoff.
$1,200 OBO
Call 386-697-1923

2005 Mitsubishi Eclipse Spyder
Blue, Black Convertible Top
Low Miles. Cal Keith
800-814-0609
Need a Fun Gift Idea?
2005 Mustang
Gray, Low Miles, Warranty.
Call Keith 800-814-0609

9 1 Recreational
951 Vehicles
2005/06 FEMA Trailers!
Up to 50% off retail!
Call 386-758-8661
www.turningwheelrv.com

952 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
2005 ELITE Travel Trailer, 33ft,
Super slide out. Washer/Dryer,
CA/H. Asking $17,900. Trailer is
local. (228)343-2701 cell.
Handicapped Van
96' Dodge Ram 3500
Side lift, optional hand brakes, &,
gas, special operated seat. 5 K on
Michelins. Exc/Cond. in and out.
$8995' OBO..
Call Bob 386-754-6890


~W' ~


2BR/1BA w/ Garage
$700 + Sec. Pets w/fee.
Call 386-752-9626


DELUXE TOWNHOUSE
Second Story. 2/2, 1,700 sqft.
Country Privacy, deck, secure.
$700/mth. $1,800 needed.
Call 386-961-9181

730 Unfurnished
730 Home ForRent

3BR/2BA Brick Home Near VA
Large fenced yard w/washer &
dryer, stove, refrig, lawn, maint., &
garbage p/up included. $850 mth,
1st, last & Sec/Dep. req. Call
Richard, Licensed Real Estate
Agent Call 386-867-1414

4/2 2nd Fairway, Southern Oaks
Golf Club. Avail. Jan. 1.
$1,300/mth
Call 386-755-3898
Large Home For Rent
3/2.5, 2600sqft. Home or
home/office. $1,000/mth rent, plus
security/$ 1,000. Call 386-623-7400
Quail Hgts. on 10th Fairway
3/2, 2400 sqft + 16X40 storage
bldg. $1,300/mth, 1st, last & Sec.
Call 386-755-0327

750 Business &
750 Office Rentals

Historic Henderson House
Office/Retail 3000 total sqft.
$l,875/mnthly. 207 S. Marion Ave.
386-867-0048 or 386-752-7951


S- - - . -


_ - -


93. Buick Century White 3988.00
S04 Buick Century Cust. Wnite. $14988.00 j
� 94 Buick . Lasbre ... White $3988.00
S O':00o: Biuck-t Lasabre Ltd. Bronze " $13988.00
S03 1 Buick Lasabre Ltd.' Silver . $19988.00 :-,
'95 ; Buick Park Avenue Beige $6988 00
S01 . Buick Regal LS White $1098800
S03 Buick Rendezvous Gray $19988.00
S01 i' Cadillac Catera Black 516988.00
S-03 ': Chevrolet'z Impala- .. Gold: $15988.00
S . . .02 Cnevrolet -Avalanche White $22988.00
. 03 Chevrolet Avalanche. Black - $24988.00
02 Chevrolet " Express White $15988.00
01 Chevrolet Tahoe Pewter $12988.00
S03 Chevrolet Truck 4WD Black $19988.00
S04 ; Chevrolet , Truck Ext. Cab White $19988.00 .
96 ' GMC 'Con.Van - White $ 7988.00
03 GMC , Envoy . Black h 20988.0 0
03 GMC Savana Whie . $17988 00 ,
. 96 GMC Sonoma Ext. Cab, Red A $6000.00
' 06 GMC Truck Crew Can' Red $26588.00 41.
S 02 GMC Truck 4WD" . White $17988.00
.04 GMC Truck Ext Cab Gold $2298800
-02 GMC . Truck Ext Cab 4W0 Red $21588 00 -
03 Jeep '. Grand Cherokee Charcoal $17988.00
. 03 Lincoln - Navigator Black .i; $129988.00
-94 Mazda Protege;, Beige Sig $5198800.
. 04 Nissan Titan SE ' Red ,'; $24988.00
S 99 Oldsmobile Alero ,.-r', Black 5 $5988 00
', 95 Oldsmobile Cutlass,', Turquoise $4988.00
96 , Pontiac Grand Am Green $398800
0, c 04 Pontiac - Gd PrixGTI Gray f'" $1698800 :
05, Toyota;y Camry XLE Blue $21988.00 .
S 92 Toyota ' 4 Runner *1 Red ; $4988 00
S 04'' Toyota -. Sienna ' Beige $23988 00


i"�. yU E. D-C.'-A .E ,l- CA.' - ..t, " ..
~ ~I .'AI G r w ,Y THE N AGHT CAR' '


RONSONET

BUICK GMC TRUCK
HWY 9go EAST - LAKE. CITY

a M C WE ARE PROFESSIONAL GRADE


www.RonsonetBuickGMC.com *See Dealer for Details


R E PRTERi


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Classified Department: 755-5440