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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Sunday Report
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 Section A: Main: Opinion
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section C: Life
 Section D: Business & Home
 Section D: Classified Advantag...














The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/00135
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: June 5, 2005
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:00135
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Sunday Report
        page A 2
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Opinion
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
    Section B: Sports
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
    Section C: Life
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
    Section D: Business & Home
        page D 1
        page D 2
        page D 3
        page D 4
    Section D: Classified Advantage
        page D 5
        page D 6
        page D 7
        page D 8
Full Text




Dream Come True?

Lake City pitcher awaits

draft day decision.


This Cud's for You

A dairy farm takes a

unique approach to quality

Inside, 1C


75e
Weather
T-storm chance.
High 87, low 70.
Forecast on 2A


Sunday
June 5, 2005
Lake City, Florida


Old school still has life


Historic building has
united community over
the last seven decades.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
WHITE SPRINGS -
Embedded on the southern
end of Hamilton County, where
the banks of the Suwannee
River buffers Columbia
County, White Springs is a for-
mer resort town with 'hey-
days' that can be traced back to
the early 1900s.
While the town's current
claim to fame is the Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park and the world's
largest set of tubular bells, the
town of
White INSIDE
Springs Grants could
doesn't make difference
have a PAGE 8A
colossus industry or factory
which employs hundreds.
There is no economic boom
predicted in the area and the
town's sense of community
pride is not even provided by
the numerous bed and break-
fast nooks that dot and dash
the town and attract many visi-
tors each year.
The building and attraction
that has been described as the
heart of White Springs is the
red-bricked, 68-year-old school
building known as South
Hamilton Elementary School,
formerly known as the White
Springs High School.
Through the years, the
school has gone through
changes, especially in its battle
with the affects of aging and
time, but always remained a
source of pride for the town's
806 residents since 1938.
White Springs Town Council
person, Tracy Woodard, said
she believes a school is the
heart of any community.
"Our children are our future
and the closer that we can
keep our children to our heart,
then the better our children
will do and the better our com-
munity will do," she said. "My
children attended that school
and they walked to school
every morning. From my
house, I could watch them go
all the way down the street
until they were inside the
crossing guard. That sense of
safety and community, I want
for future generations for the


HEART
Continued on Page 8A


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
The new City Hall location stands at the corner
of Marion Avenue and Madison Street in the
former CNB Bank building. It could be open for
business by August.


Hall


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
South Hamilton Elementary School was built in 1937-38, currently has about 150 students and oper-
ates with a faculty and staff of about 23 employees.


Community school looking



to be reborn, maintained


Efforts underway to make
sure building stays in use.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
WHITE SPRINGS Johnny
Bullard is known to joyfully walk
down the halls of South Hamilton
County Elementary School as if he
has no problems or cares in the
world.
Why would he?
He's the principal of the school
building where he and his brother
attended; the building where his
father graduated high school and
the building that received an 'A'
ranking in Governor Jeb Bush's
A+ Education plan last year and
had First Lady Columba Bush as a
guest in December because of stu-
dent reading scores.
Yet, there is uneasiness that
accompanies Bullard an uneasi-
ness that can only come from
knowing the community and what
the school has meant to the town.
An uneasiness that grew as talk of
closing the historic building for a
more modern structure elsewhere


771


Casey Davis (left), 8, does spelling activities on the computer as
reading coach Joan Radford looks through papers during South
Hamilton School summer activities.
in the county became more ram- but it also serves as a place where
pant. churches have special meetings
'The school is the community and funerals have been held in the
center for the town of White auditorium," he said.
Springs," Bullard said. "Not only Bullard said the Stephen Foster
does it serve as the only educa- Folk Culture Center has utilized
tional facility for children in the
town of White Springs, where they s NEW LIFE
attend Pre-K through sixth grade, Continued on Page 8A


l i Two Lake Citians to compete

,a in Veterans Wheelchair Games


ASHLEY CISNEROS/Lake City Reporter
Wiliam Ethridge (center) holds a bow and
arrow with his coach, Ben Givens, and
wife Lorraine outside of the Lake City
Veterans Affairs Medical Center.


Trade would enable county to
continue with road construction.
By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.corm
William Ethridge and Jamie Clark know
what it's like to compete in Olympic-style
games.
They've got the medals to prove it.
The two veterans and former patients of
Lake City Veterans Affairs Medical Center
will be competing in the 25th National
Veterans Wheelchair Games in Minneapolis,
Minn., June 27-July 1.
More than 500 disabled veterans are
scheduled to compete in the event, the
largest annual wheelchair sports event in the


world.
"We are proud of these talented athletes,
our volunteers who make the Games possi-
ble, and the communities that open their
doors and their hearts to these heroes," said
Secretary of Veterans Affairs Jim Nicholson.
The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)
and the Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA)
sponsors the Wheelchair Games.
The Games are open to all U.S. military vet-
erans who use to wheelchairs for sports com-
petition.
Veterans will compete in track and field,
swimming, baseball, weightlifting, softball,
air guns, quad-rugby, nine-ball, bowling, table
WHEELCHAIR
Continued on Page 9A


could open


by August

Building's renovation is on schedule.
By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter.com
City Hall could be moved from its current loca-
tion to the old CNB Bank Building two blocks to
the east by August.
Grayson Cason, city project manager, said the
work going inside the historic bank building at
Madison Street and Marion Avenue is to prepare
it to become the city's center of government
'"We are marching down a path to move into that
building in the end of July, first of August," Cason
said. 'That's where we are going and we are
marching down that road."
Local contractor J.L. DuPree Construction
Services was awarded the $150,000 contract for
the renovations more than a month ago by City
Council.
Cason said that work is going as scheduled and
within budget.
"We are trying to get all of the things done to be
in operation over there," he said.
Most of that work is strictly cosmetic or minor
changes that are required to make the building
function as a City Hall.
Cason said about 90 percent of the renovations
are to create a new council chambers on the sec-
ond floor of the three-story building.
CITY HALL
Continued on Page 9A



Hurricane


tax holiday


in full swing

Stock up now on storm supplies.
By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com
Local residents are stocking up on hurricane
preparation items due to a 12-day tax holiday.
Gov. Jeb Bush approved the state's first sales
tax holiday for the purchase of hurricane supplies
such as batteries, flashlights and generators on
May 23. INSE
The holiday began on NsthDE
June 1, the first day of Now is the
hurricane season. PAtGE pare
The break was pro-
posed by two Broward County Democrats, Rep.
Ron Greenstein of Coconut Creek and Sen. Skip
Campbell of Fort Lauderdale, in an effort to
encourage Floridians to avoid last-minute shop-
ping later in the season.
Connie Bash, assistant manager at Wilson's
Ace Hardware in Lake City, said business is going
amazingly well.
"We have sold a lot of batteries, flashlights and
generators," she said. "People are encouraged by
TAX HOLIDAY
Continued on Page 9A


CALL US:
(386)
752-1293
SUBSCRIBE:
1 42640021 8 755-5445
., Taay :- : .-


TODAY


Classified ...... .5D
Lottery ......... 2A


Local & State ... .3A
State .......... 5A


Obituaries ...... .6A
Opinion ........ 4A


Puzzles


. . .6D


Scoreboard ...... 2B


World .......... 9A
Weather ....... 10A


- *-~'-. -~42e'~1 3-pl; q,-


THE HE.AXRT OF


r.=7.77 ,













REPORT


0i Bush haLs emnall


In autLstk teen


Seeing double
Seven-year-old twins Kynsie (left) and Lynsie Witt of Ellisville celebrate Twins Day at Olustee
Park Saturday afternoon. The event coordinated by Columbia County Parks and Recreation
featured activities for twins of all ages.


-ie)-


"Copyrighted Material



--- Syndicated Content



. Available from Commercial News Providers"


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


% *040m
0


* *


LAKE CITY
HOW TO REACH US
Main number .......... (386) 752-1293
Fax number ................752-9400
Circulation ................. 755-5445
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fla. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard ... .754-0418
(mleonard @ lakecityreporter.com)

If you have a news tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson .......... 754-0428
(twilson @ lakecityreporter.com)
ADvirbL'J. iG
Advertising Director
Terry Ward .................. 754-0417
(tward@lakecityreporter.com)
Sales .......................752-1293
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)


REPORTER
CLASSH'IED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.

Controller Sue Brannon .......754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CRCULATON
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next
day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters ... .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
13 Weeks .................... $23.54
26 Weeks ..................... $42.80
52 Weeks ..................... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
13 W eeks ................ . $44.85
26 W eeks ..................... $89.70
52 Weeks ................ ....$179.40


Correction policy
The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Lottery
MIAMI Here are the
winning numbers in
Saturday's Florida Lottery:
Cash 3: 4-9-3
Play 4: 2-1-2-8


Fantasy 5: 28-3-30-8-20
Lotto: 44-11-52-22-9-16
Friday's Fantasy 5: 13-
17-14-8-24
Friday's Mega Money:
6-40-25-33
Mega Ball: 15


Page 2A
June 5, 2005


!NWF~


* *


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**


oft am momo







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005 3A

LOCAL & STATE



YMCA kicks into summer with


membership drive, expansion II
B ^ u \SB~te ff^^u^! pi S sI --


By RANDY ROUGHTON
rroughton@lakecityreporter. corn
The Lake City Family
YMCA begins its first sum-
mer with a wellness center
and a full array of programs.
The growth doesn't show any
signs of stopping anytime
soon.
The YMCA is in the middle
of a membership drive, with
joiner fees, which normally
cost between $40 and $60, dis-
counted to $25 through June
30.
Members can also take
advantage of discounted rates
on a long list of programs, as
well as utilize a wellness cen-
ter that has the family in
mind, said executive branch
director Kristie Blenco.
"We offer for the whole
family," she said. "We have
free child watch for children
from 6 to 8 months up to 8
years old. So while Mom and
Dad are working out, we can


take care of the kids. All of
our employees in that depart-
ment are certified in first aid
and CPR.
'This is a place where Mom
and Dad and the kids can all
come and have an activity
going at the same time.
"Plus, there's the financial
benefit because we have a
more reasonably priced mem-
bership, and we do have a lot
to offer. Our motto is -
'Building Healthy Mind, Spirit
and Body,' and we do try to
encompass all of those com-
ponents."
Summer is a busy time at
the YMCA, with the wellness
center that opened in
December already expanding
into the area formerly used as
the 'Fun Zone.' The new
space will almost double what
is currently being used in
wellness, Blenco said.
Summer camp is under
way, and youth T-ball (for 3 to
8-year-olds) begins Tuesday


at the Westwind Softball
Complex. The $40 fee ($55 for
non-members) includes jer-
sey and trophy. Games will be
played on Tuesdays and
Thursday, and the season
ends on July 28.
There are also several new
classes: conditioning, yoga,
children's yoga and abdomi-
nals.
The swimming pool at the
Hall of Fame YMCA is now
open to members from 11
a.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays and
noon to 5 p.m. Saturday.
Swimming lessons, eight 30-
minute sessions, are also
available all summer for $40
($50 for non-members).
Scholarships are available,
made possible through a
donation by Scherer
Construction and
Engineering, for any of the
beginner classes.
The summer camp, which
also includes swimming two
or three times a week and a


weekly field trip, is open from
7 a.m. to 6 p.m., also at the
Hall of Fame location.
"We try to keep the kids
busy, and they have fun,"
Blenco said.
"We teach a lot of life skills,
and Christian development is
a big issue. But we also try to
utilize the skills of our volun-
teers."
Another addition is the
YMCA's senior program, a
club free to members, and
guests can attend for $3. In
this program, senior citizen
members can get together to
discuss books, read, or any
other activity they wish,
Blenco said.
"I'm going to survey the
members, so they can tell me
what they want," she said.
"We're taking what the com-
munity tells us they want and
putting it into action."
For more information on
YMCA activities, call 719-
9622.


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Miss Blueberry
Miss Wellborn Blueberry 2004, 11-year-old Jessica Lewis,
holds a blueberry pie entered in the bake-off contest during
the festival Friday evening.


"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available'from Commercial News Providers"


BRIEFS

Coalition meets
Wednesday
The Early Learning
Coalition of Florida's
Gateway Executive
Committee will meet at 8:45
a.m. Wednesday, followed by
a quality program committee
meeting, in the ELC-FG
Resource Center, Suite 140,
at 484 SW Commerce Drive.
Anyone interested in
attending this meeting who
has a disability that requires
special assistance should
call Heidi Moore at 752-
9770.

Newcomers to
meet this week
The regular monthly
meeting of the Lake City
Newcomers will be held at
11:15 a.m. Wednesday at the
Quality Inn.
Luncheon cost is $9.50.
Entertainment includes an
hour with songs by "Elvis."
Also at the meeting will be
Shirley McManus, director
of Christian Services.
Members are asked to bring
donations of toiletries includ-
ing toothbrushes, towels,
wash cloths, deodorant,
shampoo, soap and other
items. It is suggested that
they be travel size.
For more information, call
754-2695 or 752-4552.

Red Cross posts
June classes
The American Red Cross
will offer the following class-
es in June:
Infant/Child CPR and
First Aid, 6 to 10 p.m.
Friday; Infant/Child/Adult
and First Aid; Adult CPR, 6-9
p.m. June 14 and June 28;
and First Aid, 6-9 p.m. June
30. All classes will be at the
Red Cross office at 264 NE
Hernando St., Suite 102.
Compiled from staff reports


Lake City Medical Center
welcomes

SPe,.D


Belk


Super Tuesday


3 GREAT WAYS TO SAVE STOREWIDE


1SENIORDAY!


ann

- I
/*0~


We invite all customers 55 and older to take an


extra % 10% off
a15 Off home
your ENTIRE PURCHASE' regular, sale & clearance priced merchandise
"If you're 55 or older save an extra 15%, or 10% in our home department, on your
purchases for the day Just show proof of age to any Sales Associate. Normal exclusions apply Excludes
lease departments, bonus buys, doorbusters. Selection varies by store Valid Tuesday, June 7, 2005 only.
For her: 25-50% OFF LADIE'S ALFRED DUNNER, KORET, MORE
Orig. 26.00-88.00, SALE 12.99-66.00 + EXTRA 15% OFF
For him: 30-40% OFF IZOD SPORTSWEAR
Reg. 25.00-50.00, SALE 14.99-34.99 + EXTRA 15% OFF
Shown is representative of our full assortment.


2


Gateway Cenler on US Hwy. 90
ENROLLMENT SPECIAL GOING ON NOW!
k; May 16th June 30th
S 125 Joiners Fee Special
Stop By Today & See What We Have To Offer!



.^ ^,r i


* Wellness Center
* Cardio Equipment
* Free Weighls
* Yoga Class
* Personal Training
* Jogging Classes


Fitness Assessments
Childwatchr
Karate
Dance
Preschool Gymnastics
dg J1T r' ,,I] elA


Come Visit Our New Facility
719-9622


Gateway Plaza
Hwy 90 & Baya


shop Belk for
red-hot savings
storewide!
SENIORS TAKE
AN EXTRA 15% OFF!
(10% off home)
SHOWN ARE JUST A FEW OF
THE SAVINGS IN-STORE:


39.99
CO PLAYERIMVBOOM BOX
tB&W TV. am/Ira ,FjiD
atnd CD piaVV rFaig.70M4W


12.99-19.99
MENI MMNOTS BY
SAWJLLOMB.OUCEO.ioar
& HAGGW NL 4o-witoo


going on now
SENIORS TAKE
AN EXTRA 15% OFF!
ROCKPORT "
"PRO WALKER" .
Reg. 64.99,
SALE 49.99


With our convenient 30-60-90
Credit Plan


1037 Us Hwy 90 West
Ste. 150 Lake City


14.9nieso
LADIES' TOPS. SNORTS A& 5110MB
BV 'tie Rogs'i Fopu~pftil'
Bill Bls ftaSOig u00Cr-


I1


WORLD TOUR"
Reg. 8999,
SALE 69.99


**Styles and colors nay valy.
See store for full assoritroit.


LAKE CITY MALL
M onSaet 10 t aO 9 r II, Soun 1 30 t u-,o I'm ,


bel k com


I BELK SUMMER SALE! I


.... l


br odwf








4A LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005


4 31wt PI 10


SERVING COLUMBIA COUNTY SINCE 1874
MICHAEL LEONARD, PUBLISHER
TODD WILSON, EDITOR
SUE BRANNON, CONTROLLER
THE LAKE CITY REPORTER IS PUBLISHED WITH PRIDE FOR
RESIDENTS OF COLUMBIA AND SURROUNDING COUNTIES BY
COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS INC. OF ATHENS, GA. WE BELIEVE
STRONG NEWSPAPERS BUILD STRONG COMMUNITIES -
"NEWSPAPERS GET THINGS DONE!" OUR PRIMARY GOAL IS TO
PUBLISH DISTINGUISHED AND PROFITABLE COMMUNITY-ORIENT-
ED NEWSPAPERS. THIS MISSION WILL BE ACCOMPLISHED
THROUGH THE TEAMWORK OF PROFESSIONALS DEDICATED TO
TRUTH, INTEGRITY, LOYALTY, QUALITY AND HARD WORK.
DINK NESMITH, PRESIDENT TOM WOOD, CHAIRMAN






Town



rallies



around




school

White Springs emerged as a
winner when it learned
that it would get to keep
its South Hamilton
Elementary School in
place in the community. No long bus rides
for students and the presence of the age-
old school would remain.
It was a huge victory for the community.
In a small town, the school is its heart-
beat. The fact that a community is on the
brink of losing its school is a situation that
requires intensive care.
White Springs earned the attention it
received and a unified effort between the
community and the school district in
Hamilton County kept the doors open.
The building has a 68-year-old history
and originally was constructed as White
Springs High School. But we all know and
fully realize that a school is only shrouded
by a building. A school is people inside
caring enough to teach children and pre-
pare them for life.
For a town without a school, life is
bleak.
White Springs made a statement recent-
ly when it stood up for its school and
urged Hamilton County school officials to
preserve the elementary school in the
town. The statements made reflect pride
and the desire to preserve one of the most
historic buildings in the county not to
mention a education seasoned with special
attention and memories for all the children
in the town.
There was a lot of pride shown in the
effort established to preserve the South
Hamilton Elementary School. The people
of White Springs should be proud and we
are, too.



Today is Sunday, June 5, the 156th day of
2005. There are 209 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

One year ago, on June 5, 2004, Ronald
Wilson Reagan, the 40th president of the
United States, died in Los Angeles at age 93
after a long twilight struggle with
Alzheimer's disease.

On this date:

In 1783, Joseph and Jacques Montgolfier
publicly demonstrated their hot-air balloon
in a ten-minute flight over Annonay,
France.
In 1794, Congress passed the Neutrality
Act, which prohibited Americans from
enlisting in the service of a foreign power.
In 1917, about 10 million American men
began registering for the draft in World
War One.
In 1933, the United States went off the
gold standard.
In 1940, the Battle of France began dur-
ing World War II. In 1947, Secretary of
State George C. Marshall gave a speech at
Harvard University in which he outlined
aid program for Europe.


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"

aii.~~ iaz


How Lake City went from


'Number Please' to dial tone


On June 4, 1961, Lake City's Southern Bell
(now Bell South) telephone system completed
100 percent conversion to the dial system.
The dial system was faster and more effi-
cient, but took most of the personal contact
out of the individual call. Until dial, each call
was handled personally by a polite, efficient
telephone operator like Gwen Dekle, Naomi
Koon, Geraldine Cox Snipes, Mildred
Richardson, or Wanda Kato.
More than 50 of these operators, all women,
worked 24-7 in eight-hour shifts to give Lake
City its phone service. Each call followed the
same procedure. The caller lifted the phone
from its cradle, the operator said 'Number,
Please", the caller spoke a number (or a com-
bination of numbers and letters), the operator
said, "Thank You" and then completed the call
by plugging a jack into a switchboard.
The numbers and letters identified the cus-
tomer and told whether the person had a pri-
vate or party line. For example, private lines
had only numbers. Dix's Grocery was '191.'
Bevan Brothers Cleaner was '5.' Dr. L.J.
Arnold's home number was '482'. I often won-
dered who had the number '1', what the high-
est number was, and who had the very first
phone in Lake City.
Party lines were shared by two, four, or
eight customers. If a letter followed a'number,
that could be a two or four party line. Grace
Barfield's number was 490-J, Howard Van
Arsdall's was 340-J. A number followed by a
letter followed by a number was an eight-party
line. M.C. Houser's number was 506-J-1. R.
E. Persons number was 509-J-1.
The operator had to be a fast thinker and
know exactly how many rings were assigned
to each party line customer. Anybody on a
party line could pick up the phone on some-
one else's call and listen in but nobody ever
did that of course. Wink wink.
Pay phone numbers always had four digits
and always began with a '9.' To report a fire,
you just told the operator, "I want to report a
fire." The number of the Lake City Police
Department was '43.' Interestingly, the LCPD
number stayed almost the same under the dial
system, 752-4343.
Long distance calls were either 'person-to-
person' or 'station-to-station'.
In 'station' calls, customer charges began
when anybody at the number started talking.
In 'person' calls, the charges didn't start until
you were connected to the person you had
requested but these calls were a little more
expensive. A three-minute 'station' call to
Gainesville was 40 cents but a 'person' call was

0S


1 0 I 1


MORRIS
WILLIAMS


55 cents.
In the early years the operators worked in a
small brick building at 111 North Columbia
Street, kind of behind Ruppert's Bakery. Inez
Pierce was the Chief Operator and overall
supervisor. Just under the Chief Operator, was
a Service Assistant who directly supervised
the employees. Annie Tompkins Perkins
Dicks, Edna Tompkins, and Imogene
Touchton Connolly were three of the longer
serving Service Assistants.
Most of the employees were local ladies
who were glad for the employment and some
made Southern Bell their career. For exam-
ple, Annie Perkins Dicks graduated from
Columbia High School in 1934, went to work
immediately as an operator, was soon promot-
ed to Service Assistant, and worked 36 full
years at the Lake City office.
On special occasions a war's end, a scan-
dal, election night, etc. the operators would
be kept busy non-stop connecting people want-
ing to talk about the news. Operator Wanda
Kato told me once that the day Tanner Brock
murdered his young song near Buzzard's
Roost, the entire switchboard was 100 percent
jam-packed for over four hours with people
calling each other.
Today, dial phones and pay phones are
themselves getting scarce, often replaced by
the seemingly everywhere cell phones. But
some older people still miss hearing the
friendly voice of a personal operator saying
'Number Please' and Thank You.'
By the way, Lake City was the last city in
Florida to go 100 percent dial. When someone
asked the company president why we were the
last, he replied with refreshing candor; "I
don't have the slightest idea."
JOCK JOKE
A University of Florida football coach joked
that a Tennessee football player once took a
journalism course because he thought he
could learn how people in the obituaries
always manage to die in alphabetical order!
Morris Williams is a historian and longtime
Columbia County resident. Contact him at
williams h2@firn.edu or 755-8183.


me hbp op uto Nk"q?


MICHAEL
LEONARD


Time is now


to prepare

Just like a bad penny, hurricane season has
turned up again here in North Florida... and
we want it to go back where it came from.
We haven't completely finished cleaning up
after last year's high winds and flooding in
some areas of Columbia County. Trees still
lay where they fell uprooted in many yards,
fields and patches of woods. The effects of
last September's heavy rains from hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne have been compounded
by a wet winter and spring to inhibit drying
conditions, hence pasture land and low lying
property remains underwater in a number of
areas.
Not to wish for a drought, but I think we all
wouldn't mind a little dry spell. People more
knowledgeable than me fear that if a hurri-
cane roars through our area with the water
table as high as it is now, the number of
downed trees and amount of flooding we saw
last September would be easily surpassed.
In 2004, a large percentage of us were
caught unprepared for the effects of Frances
and Jeanne. It had been so many years since
a tropical storm had imposed a major impact
on our area of North Florida that we had
become complacent, perhaps even overconfi-
dent.
This year everybody seems to have adopt-
ed the Boy Scout motto of "Be Prepared."
Hurricane season officially began on
Wednesday, with forecasters predicting an
Atlantic hurricane season even more active
than 2004. And though storms typically don't
threaten Florida until August or September,
people don't want to be caught short in case
an early tropical depression forms and comes
our way.
Florida state government has done its part
by establishing a state sales tax holiday
through June 12 on hurricane preparedness
related items such as flashlights and batter-
ies, tarps, battery-powered radios, generators
and many more items. Local stores have got-
ten busy and stocked up on the tax free items
and are doing a brisk business selling the nec-
essary supplies.
There is more to preparedness than mak-
ing sure the supply closet is full, however.
Homeowners and businesses should check
the condition of roofing for loose or missing
shingles and leaks, flashing around chim-
neys, guttering that is clogged with debris or
sagging, trees and tree limbs that may be
weak and/or leaning toward structures,
drainage ditches and culverts, and much
more.
The Lake City Reporter produced and
printed a comprehensive publication on
Wednesday titled Hurricane Preparedness
2005 that includes a preparedness checklist
and a tracking map to make it easy for read-
ers to follow the path of storms. I hope you
saved yours with your Wednesday newspa-
per. If not, we have a limited number of extra
copies for sale at the newspaper office.
*
Speaking of special publications, I hope you
all saw and read the annual Best of the Best
reader's choice awards tabloid in last
Sunday's Reporter. The popular annual sec-
tion contains ads from the appreciative win-
ners of most categories, and a listing of all
winners.
Readers of the newspaper took the time to
complete and return Best of the Best ballots
and our staff tabulated the thousands of
entries and votes to determine the winners.
Most businesses are very competitive in their
drive to win the Best of the Best designation.
Those who win have the right to trumpet
their recognition all year long, until the next
year's reader's choice contest.
The Lake City Reporter is proud to sponsor
the Best of the Best awards. It's the original
and exclusive reader's choice contest in
Columbia County. Our readers and our
friends and customers in the business com-
munity have fun with it.
One other item to pass along before closing
is a reminder to mark your calendars for the
big July 4th fireworks display in Lake City
along the shores of Lake DeSoto. The Lake
City Reporter has recently agreed to become
a major donor and title sponsor for the annu-
al Independence Day event, partnering with
Columbia County and Lake City govern-
ments, the Downtown Action Corporation
and other local businesses.
This year's display promises to be even big-
ger and better than the 2004 fireworks. Please
be sure to come as our guests.
Michael Leonard is publisher of the Lake
City Reporter Contact him at 754-0428 or
mleonard@lakecityreportercom.







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005 5A

LOCAL


ROAD REPORT
W, .J. -.


The following is a list of
roadwork under way by the
Florida Department of
Transportation that may
impact traffic:

Alachua County
Northwest 39th
Avenue (State Road 222):
Daytime lane closures
Tuesday through Thursday
while inmate crews re-paint
the roadway symbol markings
such as turn arrows, etc.
Williston Road (State
Road 121): Crews will be
repainting the roadway lines
between Hawthorne Road
(State Road 20) and the Levy
County line. Motorists should
not cross between the paint
truck and the safety truck fol-
lowing and may want to avoid
the area if possible.
U.S. 27: Daytime lane
closures Monday through
Thursday while inmate crews
re-paint the roadway symbol
markings such as turn
arrows, etc. from Newberry
south to the county line.
Southwest and
Northwest 13th Street
(U.S. 441): Crews will be
repainting the roadway lines
between Interstate 75 and the
Marion County line. Although
this is a moving operation,
drivers should not go in
between the painting truck
and the safety truck following
because of the wet paint.
Interstate 75: Crews
will be placing new pavement
markings near the inter-
changes with Northwest 39th
Avenue, Archer Road and
Williston Road beginning
Tuesday and continuing


THE

REPORT
















through the week. One lane
will be closed between 9 p.m.
and 6 a.m.
Southwest 16th
Avenue (State Road 226):
Daytime lane closures
between South Main Street
and Southwest 13th Street
(U.S. 441) for repaving.
Please be aware of slow-
moving, merging traffic and
vehicles that are entering and
leaving the roadway. On-street
parking between Archer Road
(State Road 24) and
Southwest 13th Street
(U.S. 441): is not permitted
while construction crews are
present.
South Main Street
(State Road 329): The road
is closed to through traffic
between Williston Road and


Southwest 16th Avenue for
approximately one more
week. Motorists will be
detoured to either Williston
Road or 13th Street. Only local
traffic is allowed. Crews are
working on the intersection
with Williston Road.
Williston Road (State
Road 331): Daytime lane
closures for southbound traf-
fic at the South Main Street
intersection as workers pre-
pare the new intersection for
opening in the next week.
University Avenue
(State Road 26): Daytime
lane closures after rush hour
between the Woman's Club
and Northwest 22nd Street so
GRU can replace utility poles.
Southwest Second
Avenue (State Road 26A):
Possible daytime lane clo-
sures near the UF Golf
Course for utilities work pre-
ceding the reconstruction
project beginning in August.
Hawthorne Road
(State Road 20): Semi-
trucks, trailers and RV's are
prohibited from using the new
overpass because of the
restricted lane width and are
diverted to the ramps to cross
or access U.S. 301.
Motorists may encounter
daytime lane closures for con-
crete, paving and signal work.
Trucks are entering and
leaving the roadway between
U.S. 301 in Hawthorne and
Cross Creek Road (County
Road 325) as work is under
way to provide a four-lane
divided highway. The speed
limit from U.S. 301 to Stadium
Drive has been reduced to 25
mph.


U.S. 441: Possible day-
time lane closures in High
Springs when workers pour
concrete for new curbs. Also,
constructing a sidewalk from
U.S. 41 (Main Street) to the
Winn-Dixie Shopping Center.

Columbia County
County Road 242: The
road is closed to all traffic just
east of State Road 47 approxi-
mately three weeks. Crews
widening SR 47 will be tying in
the new section of CR 242A
which will intersect at Ring
Power Drive. Through
traffic will be detoured to
Michigan Street. The road will
be maintained up to the S&S
Food Store.
U.S. 441 North:
Daytime lane closures for
replacing sidewalk at the
intersection of side streets
including preparing them for
wheelchair (ADA) use.
This is in preparation for
the resurfacing of U.S. 441
between County Road 100A
and the Falling Creek Bridge
which should begin in about
two or three weeks.
State Road 47: Possible
daytime lane closures to
restripe roadway lines and
place reflective pavement
markers south of 1-75 to Ring
Power Road and at County
Road 242 (south of 1-75) to
work on signalization.
The speed limit is reduced
to 45 mph throughout the
project limits and sheriff's
deputies are enforcing the
speed limit with fines doubled
in construction zones when
workers are present.


BRIEFS


High Springs
holds auditions
HIGH SPRINGS -
Auditions will be held at the
High Springs Community
Theater at 7 p.m. June 11-12
for the play, "Alice in
Wonderland."
Sixteen characters, rang-
ing in ages from 8 to 18, are
needed for this production.
Six girls and three boys are
required, with seven other
roles that can be filled by
either boy or girl.
Performances will take
place two weekends in
August: Aug. 12-14 and 19-21.
The theater is located at 130
NE First Ave., at the corner
of First Avenue and Second
Avenue.
Kara Erdman, who recent-
ly captivated audiences by
her rendition of Amy in


"Little Women," is the direc-
tor. Rehearsals will begin in
mid-June.

Board sponsors
food program
The Columbia County
School Board will sponsor
the Summer Food Service
Program for Children in June
and July.
The program, which is
similar to the National School
Lunch Program, provides
nutrititious and appetizing
meals to needy children dur-
ing summer vacation when
school meals are not avail-
able.
All children, ages 1 to 18,
are eligible for free breakfast
and lunch.
The program will be at
these locations:
Richardson Middle


School, 646 SE Pennsylvania
Ave.
Melrose Park
Elementary School, 820 SE
Putnam St.
Eastside Elementary
School, 225 Defender Ave.
Five Points Elementary
School, 303 NW Johnson St.
Fort White Elementary
School, 18119 SW State Road
47 South
Fort White High School,
17828 SW State Road 47
Niblack Elementary
School, 505 NE Broadway St.
Columbia City
Elementary School, State
Road 47 South
Lake City Family
YMCA, 323 Hall of Fame
Drive
Miracle Tabernacle
Church, 1190 Sisters
Welcome Road.


LCCC trustee
board to meet
The Lake City Community
College District Board of
Trustees will meet at 4 p.m.
June 14 in the LCCC board
room.
The District Board of
Trustees is appointed by the
governor, and the trustees'
term is for a four-year period.
Anyone in the college's dis-
trict may send a nomination
to the governor for trustee
appointments.
A complete agenda will be
available prior to the meet-
ing. For more information,
call the public information
office at 754-4248. The meet-
ing is open to the public.

Compiled from staff reports


COURTESY PHOTO
A butterfly clings to the arm of Hannah Hancock, 11, as
she attempts to release it during the Columbia County
Public Library West Branch first anniversary celebration at
the library's Reading Garden,,Saturday morning.


West Branch library
0
celebrates anniversary

with butterfly release
By JENNIFER CHASTEEN receive envelopes containing
jchasteen@lakecityreporter.com live butterflies to release
inside the library's reading
More than 55 children and garden.
just as many adults gathered "It's great!," said six-year-
Saturday morning to cele- old Michael Turner of Lake
brate the first anniversary of City as he extended his hand
the Columbia County Public with a perched butterfly to a
Library West Branch with a boy next to him. "You have to
butterfly release, various share you know."
activities and refreshments. "I think they're pretty and
The celebration was spear- wonderful and great." said
headed by Columbia County Karli Hancock, 6.
Public Library Literacy "I like the water fountain in
Coordinator Glennis Pounds the garden the best. And the
and Friends of the Library. Zebra butterflies," comment-
Among a chorus of oohss" ed 11-year-old Hannah
and "ahs", children released Hancock.
butterflies from small wax Newly-hired Columbia
envelopes at the library's County Public Library
Reading Garden. Director Debbie Paulson was
Dan and Kay Greathouse, thrilled with the celebration.
owners of Greathouse 'This is a wonderful way to
Butterflies Inc., provided 63 start my directorship. It is a
butterflies of various species perfect example of communi-
to release during the celebra- ty involvement," she said.
tion. West Branch manager
Before the butterfly Barbara Gray congratulated
release, Dan Greathouse everyone involved in making
commented to the crowd that it a huge success.
he was impressed with the "Everyone involved did a
garden and the area sur- marvelous job. We hope that
rounding the library, this event will help more peo-
'The area is a wonderful ple know that we are here,"
butterfly habitat. There are Gray said.
plenty of food and nectar She hopes the event will
plants," Greathouse said. help promote more usage of
Children then lined up to the West Branch location.


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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005

NATION




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""Copyrighted Material



,,. Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"
ql ilb%1&19". %:A*i 6


I EGASS

EX~PRS.


_Obituaries


* ~m


Nita L. Ross
Nita L. (Cox) Ross, age 90, moved
to her heavenly home June 1, in El
Paso, Texas, but not until she helped
countless others discover the way to
heaven. She was not only welcomed
home by her Savior, Jesus Christ,
but also by her beloved husband,
Earl L. Ross who passed away in
1998, and by her beloved daughter-
in-law, Jan Ross who passed away
in 2002.
Nita began her earthly life on July
17, 1914, in Lake City, Florida. Be-
fore arriving at her final residence in
heaven she married Earl Ross in
Lake City on January 17, 1942.
From there they moved to Missis-
sippi in 1946 and in 1954 they
moved to New Mexico where they
ended settling in her much loved
Las Cruces. Because of age consid-
eration they made their final move
to El Paso, Texas in 1997. She will
be greatly missed by her family
which includes son Sam Ross and
his wife Linda of Las Cruces; son
Rodney Ross of El Paso; grand-
daughter Krista Ross of Las Cruces;
grandson Marine LCpl Justin Ross
of Camp Pendleton, CA; grandson
Ryan Ross and his wife Jennifer of
Arlington, TX; granddaughter Elle-
son of Arlington. She is also sur-
vived by many nephews and nieces


and their families, most of who still
reside in the Lake City area.
Nita was the last survivor of the
George Cox and Ginnie Lee (Hern-
don) Cox family of Lake City. She
is preceded in death by brothers In-
man, Ephraim, Johnny, Leonard,
Cyrus, Charlie and sister Annie Lee
(Cox) Markham. Even though she
missed being around her family in
Florida, she loved her "land of en-
chantment", her children, grandchil-
dren, friends, church and her moun-
tains. Her life was full and complete
because she loved much and was
loved much in return.
Nita's life and legacy goes beyond
the family because of her active and
obvious Christian faith. She was a
founding member of First Evangeli-
cal Free Church of Las Cruces and
remained a member there for over
35 years. When she made her final
move on this earth to El Paso the
member of the Adult 6 Department
at First Baptist Church received her
with open arms and were a tremen-
dous blessing to her.
Nita is now in her heavenly home
prepared for her by her Lord and
Savior. It seems only fitting for her
funeral celebration to be conducted
at First Evangelical Free Church,
1435 Pecos of Las Cruces, NM on
Monday, June 6 at 2:00 p.m. by her


pastor of 25 years, Reverend John
Powell. Burial will follow at Hill-
crest Memorial Gardens. Arrange-
ments are with GRAHAM'S
MORTUARY, 555 W. Amador,
Las Cruces. Mrs. Ross will lie in
state from 1:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Sunday, June 5, 2005 with visitation
from 6:00 p,m. to 8:00 p.m. Pall-
bearers, who are family and friends,
whom she loved dearly, are Merle
Osborn, nephew Tim Clifford, great
nephew Mark Clifford, Russell
Lowe, Brandon Wolfrom and Jared
Blong.
Obituaries are paid advertisements.
For details, call the Lake City
Reporter's classified department at
752-1293




*No Funeral Home
*No Embalming
*No Expensive Casket
*No Emotional Overspending
Call for FREE informational
brochure & price sheet.
TICS
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755-9292
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I includes flames and single v-is -n i:. .i i,
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b i 1 One Complete Pair I
of Eyeglasses
,_ n., -,-, 3' ,-, lake City store. Excludes $25 I
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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005 7A

WORLD


BRIEFS


a-- -


IrMqL I S tuSw thrfup a 6MpU^%


."Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005


TJ'W'ATU & STATE!wwi w--


School's

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn

WHITE SPRINGS From
the red bricks forming the
facade of the South Hamilton
County Elementary School to
the architectural style of the
building, the school in this
south Hamilton County town is
firmly entrenched in local his-
tory.
For 68 years there has been
a school in White Springs for
Hamilton County children to
attend.
South Hamilton Elementary
School was built as White
Springs High School in 1937-
38. The school was built with
red brick and funded with a
bond issue that was paid by cit-
izens on the southern end of
Hamilton County, as well as a
special $100,000 appropriation
from the Florida Legislature.
The school was constructed
as part of President Franklin D.
Roosevelt's Works Projects
Administration (WPA) and for-
mer Gov. Fred P Cone, who
was Florida's governor from
1937-1941, and was credited in
large part with securing the
special appropriation funding
for the county school.
Cone grew up in the White
Springs area, and his sister


history

taught at the White Springs
school for several years.
The majority of the land on
which the school was built was
deeded to the school board in
1937 by Cauley Carl Bullard Sr.
and Lou Cone Pritchard, who
was the town's post mistress as
a cousin to Gov. Cone.
The first class graduated
from the school in 1939 with
one graduate. Prior to that
year, students from White
Springs took a bus to Lake City
to attend high school.
The school served the com-
munity as White Springs High
School until 1965, when the
last graduating class received
their diplomas.
In the fall of 1966, consolida-
tion of the high school
occurred, and all high school
students were bussed to
Jasper, the county seat, to the
newly constructed Hamilton
County High School. White
Springs High School became
White Springs Elementary,
housing grades 1-8.
However, time has taken its
toll on the building, which is
included in the National
Registry of Historic Places and
now grant funding seems to be
the only way to modernize and
rejuvenate the facility.
Murray Laurie, historic


can be enriched w


Courtesy photo
South Hamilton School faculty and staff members stand out-
side the school building in 1958.


preservation consultant, is
working with local officials in
an attempt to preserve the
school with funding from a
state grant.
"It's been about a month or
so since I've been working on
the grant, but I worked with
Mr. Bullard and the Town of
White Springs a number of
years ago, in 1995-96, to .pre-
pare the nomination for the
Town of White Springs
Historic District," Laurie said.
"So, I'm familiar with the
school and the town and White
Springs."


At least 30 homes and hotels
in the White Springs, including
the school, are part of the
National Registry of Historic
Places.
'"The whole historic district
is where the older buildings in
White Springs are located,"
Laurie said. "White Springs is
an old town and was settled in
the 1800s. Some of the build-
ings go back to the 1800s, and
I'm glad they are still there. It's
one of the reasons why tourists
and people who don't live there
enjoy visiting White Springs."
The grant application was


4ith gran

sent to the Bureau of Historic
Preservation, which is under
the Secretary of State's office.
"This is called a special cate-
gory grant and funds are set
aside by the Florida
Legislature to fund projects
like this throughout the state,"
Laurie said. "It's important to
have a lot of local support for
this grant, because it will be
competing with other projects
around the state."
Support has come in the
form of letters from local resi-
dents and elected officials from
the state and national level,
which have been sent in with
the grant application.
The application is from the
Hamilton County School
Board and the grant amount is
for $198,000, plus a $50,000
cash match from the school
district.
If approved funds would
become available June 2006.
"Hopefully the legislature
will agree to fund the amount,"
Laurie said.
Laurie said she believes it's
important to secure grant fund-
ing because of the school's
relationship with the town's
historic district.
"The school building itself is
an important building in the
White Springs Historic


t funds

District," Laurie said. "It's been
there since 1937 and it's an
important building architec-
turally and it's important
because of the generations of
children that have attended the
school.
"If its historic fabric is pre-
served, it should be a school
building that can serve many
generations to come. Most of
the children that attend can
walk to school. As a unifying
factor in the community, it's a
school that all the children in
town attend."
Laurie said Pennington is
definitely for keeping the class-
es in the building.
"It's a very strong building,"
she said. "It's just like any
other building it just needs
to be kept in repair as any older
building. It's not a building
that's ready to be abandoned.
There's nothing a little paint
and a new roof won't fix."
Laurie, who has 25 years
experience with historical
preservation- grants, has been
working on the latest grant
application since April and com-
pleted it earlier in the week.
The Florida Historical
Commission will meet some-
time in September to evaluate
this grant and other special cat-
egory grants.


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
South Hamilton School Principal Johnny Bullard (center) and students (left to right)
Christopher Williams, Ricky Brown, Keith Murray, Ronteisha Owens, Chyanne Brannan, and


Ryan Stormant look at school photos.

HEART needs
Continued From Page 1A thdear t
Town of White Springs." people
Last year, that was threat- now. T
ened when the school building well
became the source of rumors grand
and there was talk of closure "Ha
and moving the students to few hi
school in Jasper, despite the have b
fact the school was an "A" school
ranked school under Gov. Jeb Jennin
Bush's A+ Education Plan. structu
Woodard said many resi- serve.
dents and the Town Council those
had concerns that the school school
would be abandoned, as pre- al beat
liminary plans indicated. Pen:
'We feel like the school is the is
the heart of our community," school
she said. "You move the school tion ru
outside the town and the town ported
has lost something vital." "I'b
She said they were also con- was ri
cerned that the move to close ent, th
the school wouldn't provide a school
real savings. She said spending all cos
the money on gas and for lots o:
bussing didn't seem to be the very
wisest way to save money, gradual
"If you're spending all that would
money on gas and buses, served
where is the gain?" she said. In a
"We're trying to build a walka- port
ble community here. Having Pennir
our children walk to school in a receive
safe environment is an impor- the H
tant part of the future." Board
However, the election of "I
Harry J. Pennington as the board
Hamilton County our 2
Superintendent last year has this
quelled all the rumors and now receive
the school has a renewed ener-
gy as officials attempt to secure
grant funding to make
improvements to the school.
Pennington, who has been In J
the Hamilton County School's WU
Superintendent since
November, said he felt it was 1
important for the residents of LO
White Springs to keep their
school.
"The main thing is I believe
in the community school con-
cept," Pennington said. "I CON
believe a school should be in
the community. That school
has been serving the education


of White Springs since
:e 1930s. That school is
o the heart of many of the
that live in that area
Mhey have attended it, as
as their children and
children.
milton County has very
historical structures that
been preserved and the
s in White Springs and

.gs are two historical
ires that we need to pre-
Anyone that passes by
schools, knows that is a
house by its architectur-
uty."
nington said he raised
ssue of keeping the
s open during his elec-
in and many people sup-
t the idea.
brought this up when I
running for superintend-
at I felt like both of those
Is should be preserved at
,ts," he said. "I've gotten
f positive feedback and
good feedback. Former
rates of those two facilities
like to see them pre-
1 at all costs."
addition to the moral sup-
offered by voters,
ngton's ideas have
ed financial backing from
[amilton County School

appreciate the school
committing $50,000 of
mill (local tax levy) for
as matching funds to
e a grant," Pennington


said. "It's not guaranteed, but
we feel like we have a good
chance of being awarded this
grant"
"We were thrilled to learn the
school would remain open,"
Woodard said. "We were
thrilled our superintendent was
supportive of that, supportive of
historic preservation and he
understands how important our
community schools are to us."
Pennington said securing a
grant to make improvements at
a school that was already rated
among the best in the area
would have an immediate
impact.
"It will definitely have a posi-
tive impact," he said. "One
thing is that it is ironic that the
two oldest schools in the dis-
trict are 'A' schools," he said.
"It's not the school building,
but the staff and community
that supports that school."
Pennington retired in 1996
after 30 years of being an edu-
cator teaching 18 years in
Hamilton County and serving
as an administrator for 12
years.
He said his decision to keep
the schools open will give local
educators a feeling of support.
"They definitely want those
schools to remain open," he
said. "I believe in the communi-
ty school concept and those
people working in those
schools believe in that also.
Both of those schools have
good community support."


NEW LIFE
Continued From Page 1A

the school's auditorium to hold
special workshops and the
building has been used by var-
ious civic groups throughout
the tri-county region.
When the South Hamilton
Elementary School was built in
1937-38, it was the White
Springs High School a
majestic building sitting on a
23-acre plot of land donated by
local families from the commu-
nity.
A building that former Gov.
Fred P. Cone, who grew up
and attended school in the
area, was able to get $100,000
appropriation from the state
legislature to have the school
built.
But how times have
changed over the last 60 years.
The school has become the
Hamilton County School
District elementary school in
the southern end of the county,
despite being a community
icon for White Springs' resi-
dents.
However, over the past six
months, Bullard's uneasiness
about the school has dimin-
ished.
Hamilton County's new
superintendent of schools,
Harry J. Pennington, has
promised to keep the building
open, though it needs a facelift
to disguise the years of aging
and a source of funding for
repairs.
Bullard said the school is in
desperate need of the repairs.
He said during the past two
superintendent administra-
tions, the school district's phi-
losophy was that the school
would be abandoned and new
facilities would be built in
Jasper.
'The present superintend-
ent believes in keeping the
community schools open," he
said. "The schools haven't
been neglected, but they've
been underserved as far as
maintaining maintenance over
the past eight years and it's
certainly telling on the build-
ing."
South Hamilton Elementary
School has about 150 students
and operates with a faculty and
staff of about 23 employees.
During the 2004-05 school
year, some the building's exte-
rior was re-painted, as was
some of the school's halls, but
other renovation and rejuvena-


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tion work is still needed.
School officials and town
folks hope that grant funding
can cure most of the ills time
has willed on the old brick
building.
'"The grant will be used pri-
marily to re-roof the school
and do some much needed
woodwork around 30 window
frames," Bullard said. "We also
plan to use the funds to repaint
and repair those window
frames and to repaint the front
gable and to do some work in
the auditorium, as well as
repaint the west wall of the
auditorium and it's damaged
plaster."
'We'd always thought about
getting this grant because it's
a natural way to renovate that
school," said White Springs
Town Council member Tracy
Woodard. "It's such a central
part to our community."
Woodard said she believes
the school provides a central
purpose for the town.
"Nurturing our children
and educating our children is
so vital to a community," she
said.
Around 1996, the White
Springs Historic Preservation
Society applied for a grant to


have more than 60 buildings,
homes and public facilities
added to the White Springs
Historic Preservation District.
"Most of the town is on the
National Registry of Historic
Places and this school is one
of the contributing buildings,"
Bullard said.
Since the school is on the
National Registry of Historic
Places, any maintenance work
must be in accordance with
historic character of the build-
ing and renovations must be
as historically accurate as pos-
sible.
Bullard said getting the
grant will aid the educational
.experience for the students.
,-"If you have a building that
looks good, it makes the chil-
dren feel good about coming
to school," he said. "A school
building may be old, but if it is
well-maintained and clean, it
makes the children and com-
munity feel better about it.
They deserve a nice, clean
place to go to school that's
well maintained. Public build-
ings ought to be well-main-
tained, so it does infuse that
sense of pride into the con-
stituents that are served by
it."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005 9A


LOCAfL & STATE!-.~w


CITY HALL
Continued From Page 1A

One of the projects in that
room includes adding a small
raised platform for the City
Council's desk and chairs, lift-
ing their vantage point slightly
above the audience.
In the current City Hall, the
council formerly met on the
second floor on a similar raised
platform. But since the second
floor was deemed "unsafe" by a
structural engineer in the sum-
mer of 2002, the council has
met in the former City
Manager's office, which
offered cramped facilities and
little audience seating.
Cason said the new council
chambers is expected to be set
up for about 70 people, com-
pared to the 25-30 people the
current chambers holds.
The new chamber will also
feature a speaker and micro-
phone system that will allow
the audience to better hear the
council members.
He said the remainder of the
work in the new City Hall build-
ing includes moving around
some partition walls, installing
new carpeting, rewiring electri-
cal and data lines, as well as the
installation of computer net-
works.
'"There is a lot going on over
the next couple of months,"
Cason said.
The new City Hall building
was originally a hotel before


WHEELCHAIR
Continued From Page 1A
tennis, archery, handcycling,
a motorized rally, wheelchair
slalom, and power soccer.
Trap shooting, golf, and a
power wheelchair relay will
be exhibition events this year.
Bill Ethridge, an Air Force
veteran, and his wife Lorraine
will be attending the games
together after celebrating
their one-year anniversary.
This will be his third time
attending games and says he
enjoys it all.
"It is inspiring to see how
hard they try and the fun they
have," said Lorraine Ethridge.
Last year, Ethridge let a fel-
low competitor win an
archery game to boost his
confidence.
"It seemed like if he didn't
win, he would get discour-
aged, so I let up so he could
win the gold medal," he said.
Ethridge still performed
well enough to win the silver
medal.
"I had to win something for
myself, too," he said, laugh-
ing.
Ethridge competes in
archery, basketball, bowling,
shot put and javelin.
He will also do the golf and
all-terrain competitions.
"I never played golf in my
life, but I am going to in
Minneapolis," he said.
He started training in
February at his local YMCA.
In the past, Ethridge has
won three gold medals and
two silver medals.
"You can smell the scent of
burnt rubber tires," he said.
'The competition is serious."
Lorraine Ethridge volun-
teers at the event by taking
water, ice and towels to the
athletes.
Health care professionals
are on-site to aid the players
should they need it.
"In the rugby games, the
men ran into each other, some
flip their chairs over," she
said. "In fact there are volun-
teers whose sole job is to help
them flip it upright again"
Jamie Clark, a Navy veteran
and Lake City resident, was
an athlete before he got hurt
on a ship.
After his injury triggered
his diabetes and other prob-
lems, he found the courage to
play sports again but in a
different way.
"I had to do s something, I
couldn't just sit around like
my life was going to stop," he
said. "I've seen people who
have been through worse and
met men who have never
walked before in their lives."
This year will also be

.J.ES PEDIC
PRESSURE RELIEVING
1 SWEDISH MATTRESSES AND PILLOWS
The Furniture Showplace
Wholesale Sleep
US 90 West (next to 84 Lumber) 752-9303


6We are marching
down a path to move
into that building in
the end of July, first
of August.
Grayson Cason,
City Project Manager

becoming the First National
Bank and later CNB National
Bank.
Once ready for occupancy,
signage will be added to identi-
fy the building as City Hall.
But otherwise, most of the
building's historical facade will
remain unchanged.
"Everything is going to look
basically the same as it is now,"
Cason said. "We are just trying
to move our location at the low-
est possible cost."
City Council approved the
purchase of the building in a
package deal for $2.1 million
from Mercantile Bank for it and
the former CNB National Bank
operations center it owned off
U.S. 90 East.
The city later sold the U.S. 90
East building to the county for
about $1 million for future use
by the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office.
City leaders decided against
an option to build a new City
Hall from the ground up, which
would have cost at least $3 mil-
lion. The bank renovation will
come in at less than half of that
amount.


Clark's third time at the
Games.
"I enjoy seeing friends that
I have made from before,
because I only get to see them
once or twice a year," he said.
In addition to the Games,
he also plays on a wheelchair
league in Jacksonville.
"When we go, we take over


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Irene and Lenny Lisetsky pick up hurricane season information at Publix Saturday morning.
The Columbia County Emergency Management Department co-sponsored a Hurricane
Awareness Day Saturday at five area businesses to help encourage residents to prepare for
hurricane season.


TAX HOLIDAY
Continued From Page 1A

this tax break and seem to feel
better about preparing early."
Dave Groh, operations man-
ager at Lowe's, has customers
waiting at the store prior to
opening to have a chance at
purchasing a generator.
"We have been selling gener-
ators the most and we are get-


the city, there is like 600 or
700 of us and we all under-
stand each other," Clark said.
" We all know why we're here
and we don't have to deal with
the looks or questions."
He enjoys competing in
basketball and softball at the
games, and won a gold medal
playing basketball.


..... ...








AA



........ ]


ASHLEY CISNEROS/Lake City Reporter
Jamie Clark shoots hoops at Richardson Community Center
in preparation for the 25th National Veterans Wheelchair
Games in Minneapolis, Minn., June 27-July 1. He will be com-
peting in basketball and softball.


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E1ICKE c iTY~
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"YurPatnr3orth Ftue


ting more slowly but surely," he
said.
Sunshine True Value
Hardware store manager Greg
Houston, ordered more genera-
tors than normal in anticipation
for the tax holiday.
"We've sold several genera-
tors in all sizes," he said. "I
think people are being a little
more cautious and not waiting;
a lot of people were left without
power for so long last year and


"You will see vets from
Vietnam, Korea, World War II
and even recent veterans," he
said.
Clark works out almost
every day, and hopes to start
a wheelchair athletic program
in Lake City.
He plays not just for him-
self, but for others too.
"I play for the patients I
have met while in the VA who
can't do this and for the chil-
dren," Clark said. "I feel like
this is my second chance and
I want to make the most of it."
Both athletes are part of a
larger southeastern team
called the "Wheels of Fire."
Ben Givens, recreation
therapy assistant at the Lake
City VAMC, coached the ath-
letes for the Wheelchair
Games.
"Everyone cheers each
other on, it is really some-
thing to see, Givens said. "It


want to avoid it this year."
Houston said he sold 205
generators in two days last year
and could have sold more if he
had more at the time.
Items eligible for the tax
break include batteries, tarps,
flashlights and portable-radio
supplies.
Plywood is not on the list due
to concerns about possible
stockpiling of lumber.
The tax holiday ends June 12.


is inspiring to watch these vet-
erans with no legs, some that
are paralyzed, playing and giv-
ing it their all."
Givens approached both
men about participating in the
games.
"Participants include quad-
riplegics and paralyzed veter-
ans," he said. 'They have to
get clearance from a doctor
and are selected to partici-
pate."
The Games are structured
like the Olympics and have an
opening ceremony, block
party, and closing ceremony.
"Ben has been with us in
the hospital and has wit-
nessed all of our pain and
struggles," Ethridge said. "He
has been with us the entire
way and shares in our joy and
triumph."
For more information,
please visit http://www.wheel-
chairgames.org


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THE WEATHER


887L 701


LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005


CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE
IT-STORMS T-STORMS T-STORMS



H1 91 7HI91L069 HI91LO 5


NATIONAL FORECAST: A storm system will trigger showers and thunderstorms across the Great Lakes,
into northern New England and south into Texas. Showers and thunderstorms will also be possible
from the Southeast into the central Appalachians. Mostly cloudy skies and areas of rain across the
Northwest and into northern California, with thunderstorms possible mainly from east of the Cascades
into the northern Rockies.


I 5 '3.p m.Itoda


.fONA FURECA


*0 iMta Jacksonvim
UI-- 87/70 86/70


i .... ... D e ad
.87/70 7/. i



88/72

88740 West Panlm Beach
88/766
FL es* FLauder*
90/74 87/77.
,Naples *
89/73 1
sWest 88/76
89/80*


City Monday
Cape Canaveral 82/71/pc


Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
Lake City
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Tallahassee
Tampa
Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


89/72/ts
86/77/ts
90/74/ts
89/71/ts
88/71/ts
89/80/ts
89/70/c
87/76/ts
90/74/ts
89/71/ts
90/71/ts
85/74/ts
89/73/ts
86/70/ts
88/73/ts
87/70/ts
87/76/ts


Tuesday
81/70/c
89/72/pc
87/77/pc
90/73/ts
90/71/pc
90/71/pc
89/80/ts
91/70/pc
87/78/ts
89/74/pc
90/71/pc
90/71/ts
88/74/pc
88/73/ts
89/69/pc
89/73/ts
88/70/ts
88/77/ts


Cold Front

Warm Front

Stationary
Front
Occluded
Front


Y~sT~WS td11ONviohtM 11


7" r, ''W


High Saturday
Low Saturday'
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low


Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-te-date


83
71
89
67
102 In 1985
60 in 1933


0.00"
0.45"
17.63"
0.75"
18.00"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

momO
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


6:29 a.m.
8:30 p.m.
6:29 a.m.
8:30 p.m.


5:17 a.m.
7:42 p.m.
5:58 a.m.
8:42 p.m.


im. June June June
6 14 21 28
New First Full Last


15 liimbs 1tMR
t Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
Sfor the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
i


brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
ChananeeL

Uia...,


Forecasts, data and graphics
01 2005 Weather Central,
Inc., Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


Saturday
CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 86/57/0
Albuquerque 74/54/0
Anchorage 62/46/0
Atlanta 83/64/.01
Baltimore 77/61/0
Billings 70/51/0
Birmingham 86/70/0
Bismarck 78/54/0
Boise 72/50/0
Boston 75/59/0
Buffalo 73/61/0
Charleston SC 86/72/0
Charleston WV 83.59./ 01
Charlotte 84/64/0
Cheyenne 52/42/1.10
Chicago 84/57/.37
Cincinnatl 84/60/.01
Cleveland 82/60/0
Columbia SC 84/70/0
Dallas 89/75/0
Daytona Beach 82/73/.02
Denver 51/42/.36


Today
HI/Lo/W
S5 65 pc
85/57/s
66/44/pc
84/67/ts
88/66/pc
80/53/pc
86/71/ts
75/53/pc
72/47/ts
82/57/pc
81, 70, ts
88/73/ts
88 66. is
87/68/ts
75/48/pc
88/65/ts
87/67/ts
86/69/ts
88/71/ts
91/74/pc
87/71/ts
78/50/pc


CITY
Des Molnes
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
82/64/.40 81/62/ts
83/61/0 87/68/ts
&6 71 0 93/66/s
62/48/0 65/47/pc
81 61 0 87 68 6L
85/59/0 88/62/pc
88 78 0 87/74/s
91/76/0 91/74/pc
82 64 0 88/67/ts
90/72/0 89/69/ts
83/72/0 86/70/ts
85/63/.81 82/63/pc
90 69 0 93 72's
94/71/0 88/70/ts
i0 62 0 69.60,s
95/71/0 93/73/pc
82/71/.59 88/76/ts
72/64/.39 75/59/ts
886,0 0 88/73/ts
91/73/0 90/75/ts
81/61/.13 86 68 pf"
91/73/0 89/69/ts


On this date in
1917, residents near
Topeka, Kan. report-
ed disk-shaped hail-
stones six to ten
inches in diameter,
and two to three
inches thick. The
hailstorm was
: accompanied by a
tornado.


Connect ed,

ww.lakecityreportercom

!


KEY TO CONDmONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-Ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny, sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w=windy.


When you turn 70, '



you can give away anything you want












7o ash bonus


on new auto or home equity loans'

(now thru 6/17/05 only)

+ Best-of-market rates

We'll match or beat any bank rate'

No closing costs on equity loans $10,000-$50,000


N


Celebrate with us

June 17

from to am-3 pm!


by any CAMPUS service center for FREE refreshments
and giveaways. (Delta Center corporate office excluded)


Membership is open to everyone in
Alachua, Columbia & Marion counties!4


CAMPUS


ir.< ,=,. ji r If il ,. l
Count On CAMPUS.
www.campuscu.com


Call 754-9088, press 1,
then ext. 22111
(to reach Lake City Service Center)


All olenr subject lo change. 1- Existing CAMPUS loans not eligible Must mention otter at trme of loan application t,:. rece,ne bonus Cannot be combined with arn other orers 2 Bank means an, local insliulon wi.h nthe
word "bank" in its name. Rate not to fall below minimum APR (Hloor). 3 No closing costs on equity loans $10 000 $50.000 Inial mnimurr,m rav. .I 110000 .s required 1300 ort closing cost. on loans o.er 150,000
Normal closing costs range from $125 1,000 Appraisal fees not included in closing costs *4 Credt appro.al and intal sa.-ng deposit o01 1 $5equred Menlor, this ad and ell .ante the $15 r.ewv member fee


NCUA


Lae iy 8 M Bso o"S r -fe- 5APS 15 'h v, W Cmu 30 W3thS. Hntr rsin 20NW4r t
Toe' qoe52 a 5ttS. Sa&at FFor -1 pW1f o mn -00NV 9hAe cl 07S olg d


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
78/64/.02
82/71/.12
76/61/.01
91/73/0
76 58 0
80/56/0
F 'i3. sur
85/64/0
65/56/0
78/50/0
SO 63 0
87/56/0
93 ;0 0
72/50/0
90/75/0
67/61/0
66/51/0
63/50/0
6-3 45 0
81/73/.05
aS 63 0u
76/62/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
82/61/ts
88/72/ts
86/67/pc
97/73/s
3 EF.6 u
81/53/sh
62/50/sh
89/69/pc
79/52/pc
74/46/pc
,; 7 11) :
79/51/pc
68 70 tu
84/58/pc
93/73/pc
67/62/s
65/52/pc
59/49/sh
62/44/ts
88/74/ts
96 6i'
87/70/pc


14ENTIONA


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
"Beling
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
88/73/0
63/54/0
83/64/0
59/54/0
90/66/0
72/61/.01
64/50/0
88/70/0
72/61/0
86/72/0
57/50/.31
88/81/1.87
91/84/0


Toaay
HI/Lo/W
91/76/s
66/48/c
82/61/pc
58/46/sh
79/61/sh
68/47/c
68/53/ts
89/68/s
74/50/pc
89/79/ts
63/46/r
86/75/pc
89/77/ts


CITY
La Paz
Uma
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
59. 26 0
64/63/0
68/54/.02
91/59/0
86/61/0
86/63/0
64/45/0
66/61/0
88/82/0
110/na/0
54/50/.38
88/79/0
66/52/0


Tooay
HI/Lo/W
56/34/pc
69/62/ts
65/51/c
84/61/s
88/60/pc
78/54/sh
67/46/r
77/63/sh
89/80/ts
105/85/sh
61/45/sh
88/78/ts
69/51/pc


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


saauraay
HI/Lo/Pcp.
na n3, r,a
81/59/0
92/80/0
89/78/0
61/43/0
74/na/0
90/82/.03
73/48/0
81/66/0
74/61/.75
72/63/0
77/59/.59
79/54/.07


loaayj
HI/Lo/W-
81 ;7 pc
79/60/sh
89/80/pc
88/78/pc
63/41/sh
73/59/pc
95/77/r
70/50/pc
78/63/sh
79/56/r
84/63/ts
71/52/r
69/51/r


CUT


I








LAKE ITT REPORT


Section B
Sunday, June 5, 2005
Lake City, Florida
ww w. lake ityreporter.corn


YOUTH VOLLEYBALL
FSU camp at
Fort White
Fort White High School
will be hosting a girls vol-
leyball camp July 9-10 from
9 a.m.-5 p.m. in the Fort
White gym.
The camp will be
instructed by graduate
assistant coaches from
Florida State University and
the cost is $100 per athlete.
This will be open for all
girls within the county, both
Fort White and Columbia
High School, grades 9-12.
For further information
and registration forms con-
tact Eric Larsen, Varsity
Coach at Fort White High
School, at 386-365-4094.

YOUTH BASEBALL
Sign-up for
tourney team
The National Youth
Baseball Association, Inc. is
looking for baseball players
between the ages of 15-19
who would like to be a part
of the 2005 Florida tourna-
ment team.
All interested players
must contact
nationalyouth@aol.com, or
call 773-264-1040 before
June 13.

YOUTH BASKETBALL
Recreation
league sign-up
The Lake City-Columbia
County Parks and
Recreation Department is
looking for children ages 6-
10 who are interested in
playing basketball to play in
a recreational league. Sign-
ups will be at Richardson
Community Center.
For more information,
contact Wayne Jernigan at
758-5417.

Stetson to hold
skills camp
The Derek Waugh
Stetson University Boys
Basketball Camp will be
held from Friday-26 on
campus.
The camp will start with a
Shooting Camp from June
10-12, and will finish with a
High School Team Camp on
June 25-26.
For details, call Sebastian
Singletary at 822-8101.

YOUTH FOOTBALL
Vanover, Horn
camp June 24
The Lake City/Columbia
County Parks and
Recreation Department and
the Columbia Youth Football
Association is sponsoring
the Tamaric Vanover-Joe
Horn All-Star Football Camp
on June 24-25 at Memorial
Stadium. The camp is open
to boys and girls between
the ages of 6-16.
Registration will be held at
the Teen Town Recreation
Center on June 11 and June
18 from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00
p.m. Cost is $55.
For details, call Mario
Coppock 754-3607 or
Vanover 623-5241.

CHS CHEERLEADING
Fundraiser day
on June 11
Columbia High varsity
and junior varsity cheer-
leaders are holding a
fundraiser day on June 11 at
Rountree-Moore Ford on
U.S. 90 West. From 7 a.m.
to 2 p.m., there will be a
yard sale, a car wash ($3
donation) and pork dinners


sold ($5).
For details, call George
Hudson at 623-2066.
Compiled from staff reports.


Scoreboard 2B
Golf 3B
MLB 4B


.aDin., n t lkeait. &w (*an

.. "Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers".


Realizing a dream


Tigers' Michael

Kirkman ready

for MLB Draft
By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter. corn
Every child dreams of who
they want to be or what they
want to accomplish when they
achieve adulthood. For most,
those dreams fade away -
either because the dream
changes or they are unable
for whatever reason to
achieve it.
But then there are a special
few, like Columbia High pitch-
er Michael Kirkman, who pos-
sess the desire and are given
the talent to fulfill those
dreams.
Tuesday, the Tigers senior
will achieve one of his dreams
when he is selected in the
Major League Baseball Draft.
"It's really been amazing,"
Kirkman said. "I never expect-
ed this entire year to have this
many teams interested and
get all these phone calls every
day. It's just really cool."
Kirkman said he has been
contacted by almost every
Major League Baseball team,
and it's no wonder.
A 6-foot-4 left-hander with a
blazing fastball clocked from
88-93 mph, Kirkman is a pro
scout's dream as a pitcher,
The irony is that if his mother
Lisa had her way, Kirkman
would be just another tall
righty.


MARIO SARMENTO/Lake City Reporter
The Kirkman family are (from left) Eric, Lisa, Scott, Michael and girlfriend Lorie Derange.
Michael, a Columbia High graduate, will be selected in Tuesday's Major League Baseball Draft.


"I tried to change that," she
said. "When he first started
eating with a fork lefthanded,
I put it in his right hand. I was
worried that he would get
hurt. They say tools are made
for righthanded people and
that was what was in my mind
as a young mother. But I'd


seen that he was very domi-
nant as a left-hander. I quit try-
ing to change it."
Kansas City scout and Lake
City resident Max Semler said
Kirkman has what it takes to
make it to the pros.
"He has shown some veloc-
ity," Semler said. "He has


made strides in getting better.
He has good command, better
secondary stuff. He's gone in
the right direction and has
advanced his position."
To his credit, Kirkman is a
good listener. He has solicited
DREAM continued on page 3B


Draft is a

busy time
By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter. com
The Major League
Baseball Draft may be the
culmination of years of
work for many athletes, but
for Major League scouts
and college coaches, it's the
most hectic time of the
year.
"Probably without a
doubt," Lake City Comm-
unity College coach Tom
Clark said. "Between this
and the recruiting, it's been
very busy."
During the season, Clark
fields several calls from
Major League scouts about
various players either on
his team or who have
signed with his team. Over
the last two weeks those
calls have intensified as the
draft date approaches.
Kansas City Royals scout
and Lake City resident Max
Semler is equally busy. This
is Semler's 12th draft with
the Royals, and he is
responsible .for canvassing
Alabama, the Panhandle
and over half of Georgia.
"After the SEC Tourna-
ment, I was able to go home
and make some phone
calls," he said.
"Before that, it was go-go-
go nonstop."
During that time at home
Semler was able to make
some final notations on the
players he had seen.
."Some of the things we
have to do is with signability,"
DRAFT
continued on page 3B


Trw~U~U I~wb rw' tII n'
*~ m m


ASHLEY CISNEROS/ Lake City Reporter
Tourney time
William Highland coaches the Lady Timberwolves
basketball team at Richardson. Community Center on
Saturday. A weekend tournament was held featuring five
teams of girls ages 14 and under.


I M ra% Mp% IK








LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
ARENA FOOTBALL
3 p.m.
NBC Playoffs, conference champi-
onship
AUTO RACING
1:30 p.m.
FX NASCAR, Nextel Cup, MBNA
RacePoints 400, at Dover, Del.
9 p.m.
SPEED FIA World Rally, Rally of
Turkey, at various sites in Turkey (same-
day tape)
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
1 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I, College
World Series, at Oklahoma City
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I, College
World Series, at Oklahoma City (if neces-
sary)
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Wales
Open, final round, at City of Wales, Wales
2 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, The Memorial
Tournament, final round, at Dublin, Ohio
3 p.m.
ESPN2 LPGA, Shoprite LPGA
Classic, final round, at Galloway Township.
N.J.
5 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Allianz
Championship, final round, at Polk City,
Iowa (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
3 p.m.
WGN Cleveland at Chicago White
Sox
8 p.m.
ESPN San Francisco at N.Y. Mets
MOTORSPORTS
2 p.m.
SPEED AMA Supersport, Road
America, at Elkhart Lake, Wis.
4 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP 250, Italian Grand
Prix, at Mugelo, Italy (same-day tape)
5 p.m.
SPEED AMA Superbike, Road
America, at Elkhart Lake, Wis.
6 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, Italian Grand Prix, at
Mugelo, Italy (same-day tape)
NFL EUROPE
1 p.m.
FOX Cologne at Berlin
TENNIS
9 a.m.
NBC French Open, men's champi-
onship, at Paris

Monday
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I, World
Series, championship series, game 1,
teams TBA, at Oklahoma City
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Regional coverage, Boston at
St. Louis or N.Y. Yankees at Milwaukee
WGN -.Toronto at Chicago Cubs
?-,i. :. -:. iNBAv' :-- -.
8:15 p.m.
TNT Playoffs, Eastern Conference
finals, game 7, Detroit at Miami


BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Detroit vs. Miami
Detroit 90, Miami 81
Miami 92, Detroit 86
Miami 113, Detroit 104
Detroit 106, Miami 96
Miami 88, Detroit 76
Saturday
Detroit 91, Miami 66, series tied 3-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE
San Antonio vs. Phoenix
San Antonio 121, Phoenix 114
San Antonio 1"11, Phoenix 108
San Antonio 102, Phoenix 92
Phoenix 111, San Antonio 106
San Antonio 101, Phoenix 95, San
Antonio wins series 4-1




French Open seeds

At Stade Roland Garros
Paris
Saturday
Singles
Women
Championship
Justine Henin-Hardenne (10), Belgium,
def. Mary Pierce (21), France, 6-1, 6-1.
Doubles
Men
Championship
Jonas Bjorkman, Sweden, and Max
Mirnyi (2), Belarus, def. Bob and Mike
Bryan (3), United States, 2-6, 6-1, 6-4.

RAImRAT.T.

AL standings
East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 32 22 .593 -
Boston 30 25 .545 2%i
Toronto 29 26 .527 3/.,
New York 28 27 .509 4.,
Tampa Bay 20 35 .364 12',
Central Division
W L Pct GB3
Chicago 37 18 .673 -
Minnesota 32 22 .593 4.,
Detroit 26 26 .500 9.,


Cleveland 25 29 .463 11,
Kansas City 17 38 .309 20
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 32 23 .582 -
Texas 31 23 .574 '
Seattle 22 31 .415 9
Oakland 21 33 .389 10''


Friday's Games
Boston 7, L.A. Angels 4
Detroit 5, Baltimore 3
Chicago White Sox 6, Cleveland 4
Minnesota 6, N.Y. Yankees 3
Kansas City 2, Texas I
Toronto 6, Oakland 2


Tampa Bay 6, Seattle I
Saturday's Games
(Late Games Not Included)
L..A. Angels 13, Boston 6
Texas 14, Kansas City 9
Chicago White Sox 6, Cleveland 5
N.Y. Yankees 4, Minnesota 3, 10 innings
Baltimore at Detroit (n)
Toronto at Oakland (n)
Tampa Bay at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Baltimore (Cabrera 4-4) at Detroit
(Maroth 4-5), 1:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Washburn 3-3) at Boston
(Miller 2-1), 2:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (K.Brown 4-5) at
Minnesota (Silva 3-3), 2:10 p.m.
Texas (Rogers 7-2) at Kansas City
(Greinke 1-6), 2:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Sabathia 4-3) at Chicago
White Sox (Buehrle 7-1), 3:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Nomo 3-5) at Seattle
(Moyer 5-2), 4:05 p.m.
Toronto (Gaudin 1-0) at Oakland
(Haren 2-7), 4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.
Toronto at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Milwaukee, 8:05 p.m.
Boston at St. Louis, 8:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Colorado, 9:05
p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings


Atlanta
Florida
New York
Washington
Philadelphia

St. Louis
Chicago
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Houston

San Diego
Arizona
Los Angeles
San Francis
Colorado


East Division
W L
30 25
28 24
29 26
29 26
28 27


Central Division
W L Pet
36 19 .655
28 25 .528
26 28 .481
25 29 .463
21 33 .389
20 34 .370
West Division
W L Pct
34 21 .618
30 25 .545
S 27 27 .500
co 23 30 .434
17 36 .321


Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 3, Atlanta 1
Washington 3, Florida 2, 11 innings
St. Louis 2, Houston 0
Colorado 12, Cincinnati 4
San Diego 6, Chicago Cubs 2
Milwaukee 7, L.A. Dodgers 5
Arizona at Philadelphia, ppd., rain
San Francisco at N.Y. Mets, ppd., rain
Saturday's Games
(Late Games Not Included)
N.Y. Mets 5, San Francisco 1
St. Louis 11, Houston 9
Atlanta 1, Pittsburgh 0
Philadelphia 10, Arizona 6, 1st game
Arizona at Philadelphia, 2nd game (n)
Florida at Washington (n)
Cincinnati at Colorado (n)
Chicago Cubs at San Diego (n)
Milwaukee at L.A. Dodgers (n)
-: "Today's Games "
Florida (A.J.Burnett 3-4) at Washington
(Patterson 2-1), 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Hampton 4-1) at Pittsburgh
(Ol.Perez 3-4), 1:35 p.m.
Arizona (Halsey 4-2) at Philadelphia
(Wolf 5-4), 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis (Mulder 7-2) at Houston
(Clemens 3-3), 2:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Claussen 2-3) at Colorado
(Jennings 3-6), 3:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Tomko 4-7 and Schmidt
3-1) at N.Y. Mets (Ishii 1-3 and Benson 3-2),
2, 4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Obermueller 1-0) at L.A.
Dodgers (Penny 2-2), 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (C.Zambrano 3-3) at San
Diego (Peavy 5-0), 4:35 p.m.
Monday's Games
Arizona at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
LA. Angels at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.
Toronto at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Milwaukee, 8:05 p.m.
Boston at St. Louis, 8:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Colorado, 9:05
p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

NCAA Regionals
At Alfred A. McKethan Stadium
Gainesville
Friday
North Carolina 5, Notre Dame 1
Saturday
Florida 8, Stetson 3
Notre Dame 7, Stetson 4, Stetson elimi-
nated
Game 4 Florida 5, North Carolina 2
Today
Game 5 Notre Dame (37-23-1) vs.
North Carolina (41-18-1), 2 p.m.
Game 6 Florida (42-20) vs. Game 5
winner, 6 p.m.
Monday
Game 7 Game 4 winner vs. Game 6
winner, 7 p.m., if necessary
At Mark Light Stadium
Coral Gables
Friday
Mississippi State 13, Florida Atlantic 2
Miami 6, Virginia Commonwealth 2
Saturday
Florida Atlantic 3, Virginia Common-
wealth 1, Virginia Commonwealth eliminat-
ed
Miami 4, Mississippi State 1
Today
Game 5 Florida Atlantic (37-23) vs.
Mississippi State (41-21), 3 p.m.
Game 6 Miami (40-17-1) vs. Game 5
winner, 7 p.m.
Monday
Game 7 Game 4 winner vs. Game 6
winner, 4 p.m., if necessary
At Mike Martin Field at Dick Howser
Stadium
At Tallahassee
Friday
Auburn 13, South Alabama 5
Florida State 3, Army 2
Saturday
Army 8, South Alabama 5, South
Alabama eliminated
Game 4 Florida State 4, Auburn 3
Today
Game 5 Army (39-13) vs. Auburn
(33-25), 1 p.m.
Game 6 Florida State (52-18) vs.
Game 5 winner, 7 p.m.
Monday
(Game 7 Game 4 winner vs. Game 6
winner, 7 p.m., if necessary


AUTO RACING

MBNA RacePoints 200

Saturday
At Dover Downs International
Speedway
Dover, Del.
1. (5) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 200.
2. (6) Reed Sorenson Dodge, 200.
3. (16) Jamie McMurray, Dodge, 200.
4. (17) Dale Jarrett, Ford, 200.
5. (21) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 200.
6. (11) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 200.
7. (12) Jason Keller, Ford, 200.
8. (4) Greg Biffle, Ford, 200.
9. (8) Kenny Wallace, Ford, 200.
10. (33) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet, 200.
11. (13) David Green, Ford, 200.
12. (43) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 200.
13. (15) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 200.
14. (7) Ashton Lewis Jr., Ford, 200.
15. (26) Stacy Compton, Ford, 200.
16. (30) Paul Wolfe, Dodge, 200.
17. (22) Randy LaJoie, Chevrolet, 200.
18. (27) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 200.
19. (3) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 200.
20. (35) Regan Smith, Dodge, 199.
21. (40) Geoffrey Bodine, Chevrolet, 199.
22. (24) Stanton Barrett, Chevrolet, 199.
23. (23) Justin Labonte, Chevrolet, 197.
24. (10) Denny Hamnlin, Chevrolet, 197.
25. (41) Jeff Fuller, Chevrolet, 196.
26. (38) Aaron Fike, Dodge, 196.
27. (39) Kertus Davis, Chevrolet, 196.
28. (25) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 195.
29. (2) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 193.
30. (37) Steve Grissom, Ford, 192.
31. (1) Carl Edwards, Ford, 189, engine
failure.
32. (34) Mark Green, Chevrolet, 180.
33. (9) David Stremme, Dodge, 161,
accident.
34. (29) Tim Fedewa, Dodge, 160, accident.
35. (20) Johnny Sauter, Dodge, 151,
accident
36. (36) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, 145,
accident.
37. (19) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet,
138, accident.
38. (32) Jeff Green, Dodge, 70, accident.
39. (42) Donnie Neuenberger, Ford, 69;
accident.
40. (14) Jon Wood, Ford, 34, accident.
41. (28) Michel Jourdain Jr., Ford, 33,
accident.
42. (18) Scott Lagasse Jr., Dodge, 33,
accident.
43. (31) Tyler Walker, Ford, 7, accident.

RacePoints 400 Lineup

At Dover Downs International
Speedway
Dover, Del.
1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
owner points..
2. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, owner
points.
3. (38) Elliott Sadler, Ford, owner
points.
4. (12) Ryan Newman, Dodge, owner
points.
5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, owner
points.
6. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, owner
points.
7. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, owner
points.
-'S. (99) CArlidwar'd, tFord, o'wit
points.
9. (42) Jamie McMurray, Dodge, owner
points.
10. (97) Kurt Busch, Ford, owner
points.
11. (2) Rusty Wallace, Dodge, owner
points.
12. (6) Mark Martin, Ford, owner
points.
13. (19) Jeremy Mayfield, Dodge,
owner points.
14. (88) Dale Jarrett, Ford, owner
points.
15. (8) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
owner points.
16. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, owner
points.
17. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, owner
points.
18. (15) Michael Waltrip, Chevrolet,
owner points.
19. (01) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet,
owner points.
20. (40) Sterling Marlin, Dodge, owner
points.
21. (10) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, owner
points.
22. (5) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, owner
points.
23. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, owner
points.
24. (18) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
owner points.
25. (07) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, owner
points.
26. (49) Ken Schrader, Dodge, owner
points.
27. (25) Brian Vickers, Chevrolet,
owner points.
28. (41) Casey Mears, Dodge, owner
points.
29. (0) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, owner
points.
30. (45) Kyle Petty, Dodge, owner
points.
31. (43) Jeff Green, Dodge, owner
points.
32. (21) Ricky Rudd, Ford, owner
points.
33. (77) Travis Kvapil, Dodge, owner
points.
34. (4) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, owner
pl)oints.
35. (22) Scott Wimmer, Dodge, owner
points.
36. (11) Jason Leffler, Chevrolet.
37. (37) Kevin Lepage, Dodge.
38. (32) Bobby Hamilton Jr., Chevrolet.
39. (7) Robby Gordon, Chevrolet.
40. (66) Hermie Sadler, Ford.
41. (92) Stanton Barrett, Chevrolet.
42. (34) Jeff Fuller, Chevrolet.
43. (00) Carl Long, Chevrolet.
Failed to Qualify
44. (27) Kirk Shelmerdine, Ford.
45. (23) Mike Skinner, Dodge.


Hr~Nrdrwua im wm*


a -


TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Recalled
RHP Jason Davis from Buffalo of the IL.
Optioned LHP Brian Tallett to Buffalo.
Named Robby Thompson bench coach for
the remainder of the 2005 season.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES-Placed LHP Mike
Hampton on the 15-day DL.
COLORADO ROCKIES-Placed RHP
Shawn Chacon on the 15-day DL, retroac-
tive to June 3.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005 d3





-- Copyrighted Material-.



Syndicated Content


Available from'Commercial News Providers"


S


DREAM
Continued from page 1B

advice from Semler, Lake City
Community College coach
Tom Clark and Tiger coaches
Andy Bennett and Tad
Cervantes.
. "The biggest thing was his
mood on the mound," Cer-
vantes said. "He would get
mad at himself and get mad in
the dugout. He's made chan-
ges. He also makes the adjust-
ments if the umpire's strike
zone is different from what he
feels it should be. Being a year
older also helps."
Kirkman took the advice
and used it to set a school
record with 124 strikeouts in
67 innings pitched, with 39
hits allowed and only 38 walks.
Kirkman went 7-3 with an ERA
of 1.43. He registered a 10-
strikeout game in every game
he pitched this season, includ-
ing a season-high 18 strike-
outs in one game this season.
He was the engine that
drove the Tigers to the state
playoffs for the second
straight season.
"I knew it was Michael's
dream, but it's pretty exciting
to see it come to pass," Lisa
said.
Michael's father Scott never
played high school baseball. "I
helped him out, but the tal-
ent's come from him the tal-
ent's come from the Lord," he
said.
The lofty position Kirkman
enjoys is no accident. Accor-
ding to Lisa, "He's been on top
pretty much since he started
playing baseball."
Michael didn't realize how
good he was until he was 11
and was pitching in the older
Babe Ruth division. "Yeah,
everybody was talking about,
'Yeah, you're going to play in
the Major Leagues one day.
You throw really hard.' Then I
realized, 'Hey, maybe I am
pretty good.'"
After an injury-plagued
freshman year, it wasn't until
last year that Kirkman first
started attracting notice from
pro scouts.
Bennett, who has watched
Kirkman progress since his
9th-grade year, said that every
game Kirkman pitched this
year was under scrutiny.
"If you didn't know him, you
wouldn't be able to tell (if the
pressure got to him)," Bennett


said. "He's been so calm and
collected. Every game he
pitched, her performed. Even
with all the scouts there every
day."
Scott said the scouts would
often ask he and Lisa about
Michael and what he wanted
and what his future plans
were. "I told them his dream
was to be drafted out of high
school and this is the opportu-
nity to live his dream and
that's what I told them," Scott
said.
The entire family recently
returned from Atlanta, where
Michael worked out for the
Braves.
"It was fun," Scott said.
"They treated us really well."
Unfortunately, the Braves
were in Washington playing
against the Nationals, so
Kirkman was unable to meet
John Smoltz or some of the
other pitchers on the staff.
The Kirkmans don't want
much credit for Michael's
development as a player, say-
ing that they just took him
everywhere he could play so
he could be seen by a lot of
people. But Michael knows
how strong their influence has
been on him.
"Every way possible they've
helped," he said. 'They've
kept me straight, kept me out
of trouble. And giving me
everything that I've needed."
Michael gives the credit for
his development on the
mound to Bennett and
Cervantes.


"They've helped me tremen-
dously," he said. "Especially
Coach Tad. The three years
that I've known him, he's
helped me in every way possi-
ble. From mentally, to pitching
to pretty much any way you
can think of. He's a big part in
where I am right now."
Cervantes and Kirkman
have what Cervantes calls a
"father-son relationship," with
Kirkman calling Cervantes all
the time and he and girlfriend
Laurie Derange even babysit-
ting Cervantes' children. The
two have seen each other
every day since school ended.
According to what the fami-
ly has heard, Kirkman will go
anywhere from the second-
fifth round. If he goes lower
than what he expects, he can
still play for the Timber-
wolves, who he signed with
earlier this year.
"It will probably depend on
money and how fast I can
move up the ladder to the big
leagues," Michael said.
Scott said the decision is
Michael's alone to make. "I
told him the decision he
makes is a decision you have
to live with," he said.
Michael will have 15 days to
make that decision after he is
drafted, which is the period
during which a Major League
team tenders a contract to a
drafted player. Michael's agent
is Doug Rogalski, who also
represents last year's 14th
overall pick, Billy Butler from
Wolfson High in Jacksonville.


Butler now plays in the K
City Royals farm system.
"Dez Hamilton, which
Michael's scout coach, hi
ommended him (Rogalski)
highly," Lisa said. "And an


thing is when he came into our
home, he's a fine person."
Michael's favorite team is
the Braves, but he wouldn't
have any objection to going
somewhere else to chase his
dream. Cervantes would like
Michael to play for his favorite
team, the Chicago Cubs, but
he said there are three teams
Michael could end up with.
"I know the Cleveland
Indians are big on lefthanders,
the Milwaukee Brewers are
big on lefties and the Atlanta
Braves," Cervantes said. "I
would think those are the
teams that are looking very
hard at him."
Tuesday the family plans to
celebrate with friends.
Cervantes will bring a grill and
the family plans to have some
ribs and celebrate Michael's
day, as well as brother Eric,
who will be celebrating his
15th birthday in an ironic coin-
cidence. It's a chance for both
brothers to get something spe-
cial in the same day.
Wherever he ends up,
.Semler believes that Kirkman
will be able to reach the dream
is has been after.
"I believe he's going to be a
starter (in the majors),"
Semler said.
That would be a sweet
dream indeed.


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DRAFT
Continued from page 1B

Semler said. "If you can't sign
him, the organization loses,
the player loses, and you could
lose your job. We also gather
final medical information. You
have to make sure you can sell
your players."
Friday, Semler was in
Kansas City for a meeting
that lasted from 9 a.m.-11
p.m. with the other East
Coast scouts. Each scout
made his case for players
they wanted the organization
to draft. Kansas City has the
second overall pick in
Tuesday's draft.
"It's an opportunity for our
S- scouting director to hear the
passion in our voice," Semler
said. "By hearing our voices,
they can tell how excited we
are about certain players."
Having the second pick in
- the draft narrows the choices
. for Kansas City, but Semler
said the first pick in any draft
is equally important.
"Just because it's No. 2 in
the draft doesn't mean it's any
more important than your
first pick in any other draft,"
he said. "I think the difference
in essence is that you can real-
ly isolate the guys you know
you have an interest in."
The last two years, the
process has yielded No. 1
draft picks like pitcher Zack
Greinke, who pitches with
the Royals now, and last
year's top pick, Wolfson
ansas High's Billy Butler.
Semler said he doesn't see
was the final draft board the
e rec- Royals will use in the draft, so
very he didn't want to speculate on
[other which player his team would


choose with their pick.
And once the draft begins,
Clark will be following the
process as closely as Semler
and the Royals will.
"I watch it very closely for
a kid we're still looking for,"
Clark said. "Kids that are on
our team that we could lose.
Kids that we could sign and
could lose."
Clark said this could be a
big year for Lake City play-
ers, with as many as seven
players from this year's
Wolves having the potential
to be drafted.
And that doesn't include
three signees who could go
- one of them being
Columbia High pitcher
Michael Kirkman.
Clark has simple advice for
those players who are eager-
ly awaiting their names to be
announced on Tuesday: "I
try to tell them to enjoy it," he
said. "I've told Michael that
same thing. Don't build your
hopes up too high. Keep me
informed and do what you
think is best."
Clark added that he never
tries to advise a player on
whether to stay in school or
sign with a Major League
team.
"I don't think you can do
that," he said. "They can come
back and not enjoy the experi-
ence and blame you for it."
Clark also said that lying to
the scouts to keep a player
can be detrimental both to
the program and to his rela-
tionship with those scouts.
"If they (players) go, they
can always give me someone
in return to fill that spot," he
said. "Also, when a kid goes
from here that puts our name
out there."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005


Bnrtu a Iwa( litrutei In 11wN ninth







"Copyrighted Material -El

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Page IC
Sunday, June 5, 2005
Lake City, Florida
www.lakecitlyreporter.com


INSIDE
Ted Turner complains
about CNN's coverage.
Page 3C


Down-home


dairy


life


Old traditions, new ways

mix daily at Kurtz Dairy


By SUSAN SLOAN
Special to the Reporter
Southwest of Live
Oak there is a fami-
ly-owned dairy that
does things just a lit-
tle bit differently
and is proud of it.
Howard (Bubba) Kurtz, his
wife Leslie, and his two
daughters, Amelia and
Virginia, run the 95-acre, 80-
plus cow farm with the help of
one full-time farm hand. And
while dairy farms are quite
common in our area, the
Kurtz farm is unique in sever-
al ways.
First and foremost, though,
is the fact that all of the Kurtz
cows are grass fed. What
makes this special is that milk
from grass-fed cows comes
with a variety of health bene-
fits. According to Bubba
Kurtz, grass provides one of
the important omega fatty
acids that according to
researchers are essential for
your health Omega-3 fatty
acids.
Eat Wild, a clearing house
for information about pasture-
based farming, reports that
the typical Western diet is
overloaded with Omega-6
fatty acids and deficient in
Omega-3s, upsetting a critical
balance. Fresh pasture has


in blocking tumor growth, as
well as abundant beta
carotene and Vitamins A, C
and D.
Grass feeding his cows has
also provided a host of health
benefits to his cows. Ten
years ago, Kurtz was plagued
with the assortment of health
problems associated with
grain-fed cows. He began an
intensive grazing system and
was amazed when these
health problems started going
away. He no longer had prob-
lems with foundering. Most
of the metabolic problems
were eliminated.
Instead of weekly visits by
the vet, the visits became few
and far between. It became
clear to Kurtz that cows were
not meant to eat grain and he
became serious about the
business of pasture-fed dairy
cows.
Grass feeding is not a popu-
lar concept for the main rea-
son that grass fed cows gain
weight at a slower rate.
According to Kurtz, grain-fed
cows' diet is composed of 65
percent grains and 35 percent
grass. Because this is con-
trary to nature, baking soda is
added to the feed to help the
cows digest the grain.
Kurtz' cows diet is 99 per-
cent pasture grass and 1 per-
cent grain. His fields are


Inquisitive cows wait patiently for milking time at Kurtz and Sons Dairy near Live Oak.


Clean milk means higher
quality milk. The dairy sells
the majority of its milk to a co-
op, but also bottles its own
line of whole milk. Every
Sunday the family milks the
cows and bottles fresh milk
for sale. According to Kurtz,
all of the natural health bene-


Bubba Kurtz stands amid the family's bottling plant on the farm.


two times more Omega-3 than
Omega-6 fatty acids. Milk
from grass-fed products pro-
vides the omega- 3 fatty acids,
helping to balance the ratio.
This is important because
essential fatty acids are linked
with a lower risk of cancer,
heart disease, diabetes, obesi-
ty, and mental disorders.
According to Kurtz, there
are other health benefits,
such as the presence of conju-
gated linoleic acid (CLA),
which occurs naturally in
grass fed cow's milk and has
been reported to be effective


planted with a variety of grass-
es rye, clover, oats,
Bermuda grass, bahia grass,
crabgrass and millet. Because
the weather and the seasons
effect what the cows eat,
Kurtz supplements the cows'
feed only with what is missing
from the pasture.
All of this has led to the
Kurtz and Sons dairy to be
consistently ranked in the top
20 dairies for having the
cleanest milk in the raw form
and they have even received
the top No. 1 ranking in this
category.


K l


SUSAN SLOAN/Special to the Reporter
Open milking stalls await the cows at Kurtz and Sons Dairy.


fits of milk are in the cream,
so they do not homogenize
their milk.
Homogenization is the
process of the milk being
forced under high pressure to
break up the fat molecules
(the cream) so that the milk
fat does not separate during
storage. Kurtz says this
changes the nature of the
cream and can cause diges-
tive problems, as the pancreas
has to work harder to digest
homogenized milk.
It is also a way to "correct"
the fat content of milk. Milk
does not have a consistent
level of fat. Kurtz cows range
from 3.5 percent during the
winter and early spring
months, and as high as 5 per-
cent during the summer
months. Homogenization
allows the bottler to produce a
consistent product such as
the 4 percent, 2 percent and 1
percent milk products found
at the grocery.
Skimming the cream also
allows them to produce other
products from the cream.
Kurtz' milk is unique in its
inconsistency and taste -
both of which change slightly
over the seasons. To the skim


milk drinker, it will be a dras-
tic difference, but to those
who regularly drink whole
milk, you might detect a sub-
tle, fresher, creamier taste.
Kurtz and Sons milk is also
different in the manner it is
pasteurized. Pasteurization is
the process of "sanitizing" the
milk and is required by law.
Kurtz says only milk sold as
"pet food" can be un-pasteur-
ized, so out of necessity, has
chosen the least offensive way
to pasteurize their milk.
Milk contains numerous
naturally occurring bacteria
and pasteurization is the
process of heating the raw
milk to kill all pathogenic bac-
teria that may be present.
Kurtz has chosen the
"batch" method, which heats
the milk to at least 145
degrees and holds it at that
temperature for at least 30
minutes. Using this method,
the naturally occurring vita-
mins are not effected which is
why he does not use the
"flash" method where the
milk is heated to 2,000
degrees for a split second.
With this manner of pasteur-
ization, the Vitamins A and D
must be replaced, most often
with vitamins obtained from
fish oil.
The Kurtz family must be
doing something right. They
sell over 400 half-gallons of
milk each week at a variety of
health food stores and mar-
kets around the area. In addi-
tion, Kurtz also has entered
the beef market. Dairy cows
are not generally associated


with producing beef and
thought of as unsuitable.
Kurtz disagrees.
At the dairy, as the cows
become unproductive, he
thins out the herd by hand
picking cows that to his eye
have the potential for good
meat and then proceeds to
allow them to fatten up. Cows
that don't make the grade go


SUSAN SLOAN/Special to the Reporter

In addition to sales at their
dairy at 11805 193rd Road,
Live Oak, FL 32060, you can
get Kurtz and Sons milk in
Lake City at the health food
store, Healthy Solutions, and
at Hitchcock's grocery in
Alachua.
You can also find the Kurtzs
at a variety of markets, health
food stores and farmers mar-


SUSAN SLOAN/Special to the Reporter
A dairy cow moos as it approaches the milking stalls at
Kurtz and Sons Dairy near Live Oak.


to the livestock market. The
result has been a side busi-
ness of selling cuts of beef
that routinely sell out based
on the reputation of Kurtz for
producing quality meat. In
addition, because Kurtz does
not separate the calves from
their mothers, he raises
healthier cows. As bull calves
are of no value to the dairy,
Kurtz does sell the humanely
produced veal.


kets from Jacksonville to
Gainesville, including on
Thursday afternoons at the
High Springs Farmers
Market and the Union Street
market in Gainesville.
For more information on
where you can get milk or
beef, Kurtz and Sons can be
best reached after dark
(except Thursday) at (386)
776-1038.


SUSAN SLOAN/Special to the Reporter
Bubba Kurtz poses with a half-gallon of milk from his family's dairy operation. The milk is
sold at the dairy and at selection locations in the area.


,-, '


---------








2C LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005

LIFESTYLE


ENGAGEMENTS

Hedgepath Bethea

Steve and Karen Hedgepath
of Lake City announce the
engagement and approaching
marriage of their daughter,
Amanda Elizabeth Hedgepeth
of Lake City, to Christopher
Michael Bethea of Lake City,
son of Steve and Linda Bethea
of Lake City.
The wedding is planned for
3 p.m. Saturday, June 11, at the
Lake City Woman's Club. A
reception will follow in the
same location. All family and
friends are invited to attend.
Amanda is a 2003 CHS grad-
uate and a 2005 LCCC gradu-
ate with an A.A. She will
attending UWF in the fall in
pursuit of a bachelor's in edu-
cation.
Christopher is a 2001 CHS
graduate and a LCCC gradu-
ate. He is currently employed
as a member of Pensacola's
Emergency Medical Services.

Johnson Underwood


The right plant in the right place


"Welcome to EPCOT. I'm
Don Goode." Those were the
first words of the gardening
talks I gave recently in
Orlando at the International
Flower and Garden Festival.
Each year the festival is host-
ed by the EPCOT theme park.
Throughout the landscape
there are flower beds, con-
tainer gardens and topiaries
to inspire the horticulturalist
in us all.
"How many of you have
ever visited your local county
extension service?" This was
one of the questions I asked
to get a feel for the nature of
my audience. It was surpris-
ing that over half of the people
that came to hear my presen-
tations had never been to
their extension office.
The title of my talks, repeat-
ed over two days, was 'The
Right Plant in the Right
Place." This concept can be
divided into two parts: 1)
making an informed decision
regarding the plant you want
and 2) deciding on where to
place the plant in the land-
scape based on its character-
istics and needs.


IN THE



I DON
GOODE


What happens when you
plant something in a place
that is not suited to its nature?
Most of us have done this at
one time or another. You
spend lots of time, energy,
water, pesticides, money and
prayer to try to keep it alive.
You struggle to keep it to the
size or shape you want it to
be. You may find out later that
is invasive or poisonous and
can cause harm to local
plants, wildlife or you. Finally,
after all that, it dies.
When making plant selec-
tions, you need to consider
the characteristics of the plant
and of your landscape. What
soil type do you currently
have? Do you have sandy or
heavier soil? Dry, well
drained conditions or wetter
soil? High pH or more acidic


soil?
Will this plant affect the
family, pets, or livestock
(thorns, poisonous, undesir-
able seed pods, etc?) Does it
tend to spread and run thus
requiring regular efforts to
confine it?
Does it have special care
requirements such as need-
ing regular sprays or extra
water? How hardy is the
plant? Will it grow in your
"zone?" We are in zone 8b in
the Columbia County area.
Perhaps there is a microcli-
mate in the landscape that will
support your plants unique
needs. How much sun or
shade do you have? A plant
that requires shade will
scorch if placed in full sun.
Is it a native plant? Natives
tend to be well adapted, pest
and disease resistant and tol-
erant of local weather condi-
tions. Native plants also help
attract wildlife including birds
and butterflies. This adds
interest and diversity to the
landscape (that was once
theirs).
Are there special pollina-
tion requirements to consider


for plants that produce fruit?
The "right plant" decision
may involve more than one
plant placed close enough to
pollinate each other. The
Extension office has a list of
recommended fruit trees for
our area and their pollination
needs.
What is the typical mature
size of the plant and variety
you are considering? Be sure
to allow enough space when
making your placement deci-
sions. This is especially
important for trees and
shrubs that can live for sever-
al years. Annual flowers are
easily relocated or thinned
out next time.
Group plants together in
the landscape, according to
their needs for shade, sun,
water, etc. This will make it
much easier for you to give
them the water, fertilizer and
maintenance they need while
saving water and fertilizer
and time on other areas of
the landscape.
My take home message
for you today is that the deci-
sions we each make as we
plant and maintain our land-


scapes have a big impact col-
lectively on our environ-
ment, local wildlife and our
own overall well being.
Thanks for coming today.
Are there any questions?
Program Announcement:
The Extension Service and
Master Gardeners of
Columbia County will be offer-
ing a horticulture day camp
on June 22-23 for children
from 6-14. We will have a vari-
ety of craft and gardening
activities as we learn about the
environment in our back yard.
There is a $5 registration fee
to help cover the costs of
materials. Please call the
Extension office at 752-5384
before June 17 to reserve your
seat since space is limited.

Dr Don Goode is the
Director and Horticulture
Agent of the Columbia County
Extension Service (a branch of
the University of Florida. He
can be reached at the office (on
the Fairgrounds), on the phone
(752-5384), by e-mail
(dzgoode@ifas.ufl.edu) or
through the Internet
(http://columbia.ifas. ufl.edu).


New teacher training academy at Lake City Community College


COURTESY PHOTO
Lonnie Underwood and
Chevette Johnson

Eddie and Mamie Johnson
of Live Oak announce the
engagement and approaching
marriage of their daughter,
Chevette Johnson of Lake
City, to Lonnie Underwood, Sr.
of Lake City, son of Ila Coke
and Isiah Underwood of Lake
City.
The wedding is planned for
5 p.m. Saturday June 11, at
New Bethel Baptist Church in
Lake City. A reception will fol-
low at the Shriner Club Hall in
Lake City. All family and
friends are invited to attend.
Chevette is employed with
Northeast Florida State hospi-
tal as a human services work-
er II.
Lonnie is employed with
Florida Rock and Lime as a
truck driver.

GRADUATE

Rodriguez

Anthony Rodriguez, a 2000
CHS graduate, graduated
from UF, "Summa Cum
Laude" on April 30, with a
master's in accounting
degree and a minor in trum-
pet performance.
Anthony received highest
honors for maintaining a 4.0
GPA from the Fisher School
of Accounting and will enter
the Fredric G. Levin College
of Law at the University of
Florida in August to pursue
his Juris Doctorate in Law.

IN THE SERVICE

Howell

Navy Petty Officer 3rd
Class Cedric G. Howell, son-
of Amos Howell of Jasper,
recently deployed to the
European Central Command
maritime area of responsibili-
ty in support of The Global
War on Terrorism, while
assigned to the amphibious
assault ship USS Saipan,
homeported in Norfolk, Va.
Howell is a 2001 graduate
of Hamilton County High
School of Jasper and joined
the Navy in October 2001.

Pate
Navy Fireman Kevin M.
Pate, son of Rhoda B. and
Michael W. Pate of Live
Oak, Fla., recently completed
U.S. Navy basic training at
Recruit Training Command,
Great Lakes, Ill.
The capstone event of boot
camp is "Battle Stations."
This exercisegives recruits
the skills and confidence they
need to succeed in thefleet.
Pate is a 2004 graduate of
Suwannee High School of
Live Oak.


Tracy Hickman
Executive director, Teacher Training
Academy at LCCC

Lake City Community
College (LCCC) is pleased to
announce the opening of the
Teacher Training Academy,
which is slated to begin offer-
ing classes in the fall of 2005.
The Teacher Training
Academy is LCCC's response
to the growing need for
teachers in our community.
Two main areas comprise
the Teacher Training
Academy, the Early
Childhood/Childcare and
the Educator Preparation
Institute. The academy is led
by Tracy Hickman, executive
director, with two coordina-
tors, Kim Stearns and Kristi
Feagle, managing the pro-
grams.
The Early
Childhood/Childcare divi-
sion of the academy provides
classes required for child-
care workers the Child
Development Associate
(CDA) certification and the
Associate in Science, (A.S.)
degree in Early Childhood.
Course offerings for daycare
employers and employees
are provided as needed and
as mandated by the state of
Florida. Both of these pro-


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kit
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f


grams are -,
established 6 .-.
within the
Workforce
a n d
Community -
Development
branch of Hickman
Lake City
Community College and have
been offered for some time,
but are now a part of the
Teacher Training Academy
in order to provide more
seamless service to our stu-
dents.
An associate in science
(A.S.) in Early Childhood is
currently being developed,
with course specific classes.
ready to be offered in the
spring semester of 2006.
Individuals interested in this
degree can begin general
education required courses
in the fall of 2005, while wait-
ing for final implementation
of the Early Childhood cours-
es. As this degree is devel-
oped, individuals with a CDA
may have the option of apply-
ing some of their certification
courses toward course
requirements for the A.S.
degree in Early Childhood.
More exciting news is
LCCC's pursuit of articula-
tion agreements with several
four year institutions for an


I ,.l ,,
,4


2





9
, .- ,. "^ -ft....


Give Yourself the Royal Treatment
Lady Primrose's delights in bringing luxuries that fulfill special moments. Bathing &
skin essentials with a lasting fragrance, elegantly presented to give you a gift within a
gift. Refillable so they can be used again and again. Enjoy a variety of product from
any of our fragrance collections including our best selling dusting silk, body creme,
soaps and experience the definition of pampering-Lady Primrose's style!
Exclusively at


( WARD'S 1
JEWELRY & GIFTS


156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City, FL
752-5470


A.S. to B.S. degree in Early
Childhood program with
courses provided at the Lake
City Community College
campus.
The Educator Preparation
Institute (EPI) encompasses
many aspects of educating on
teacher preparation, alterna-
tive certification, teacher
recertification and substitute
teacher training. The
Associate in Arts (A.A.)
degree with an education
track has been a part of
LCCC for many years and
will not change. Students are
able to earn an A.A. degree
and transfer seamlessly to
the state university of their
choice. The new state
endorsed alternative certifi-
cation process will be a new
program in the EPI begin-
ning in the fall. The new cer-
tification process allows indi-
viduals with four year
degrees or higher outside of
the field of education to com-
plete the courses, pass the
required Florida State
exams, the fingerprinting
and background check to
become a certified teacher


for the elementary or sec-
ondary classroom setting.
This process will be more
cost effective and produce
teachers that are better pre-
pared for the classroom set-
ting since most are special-
ists within their area, but
need some instruction on the
art of teaching. Since current
state and federal mandates
require teachers to seek
additional training, like the
Reading Endorsement and
the English for Speakers of
Other Languages (ESOL)
certification, the Teacher
Training Academy will also
work with local school dis-
tricts to provide support in
the areas of teacher recertifi-
cation and substitute teacher
training as needed.
Lake City Community
College also supports the
Future Teachers Club (FTC)
on campus, which is another
important component of the
Teacher Training Academy.
This is a group of students
working towards a degree in
the field of teaching, who vol-
unteer at schools within, the
districts. The FTC also held a


book drive for the students of
Niblack Elementary School
in December of 2004, where
they presented each student
on the campus with a book of
their choice to add to their
own personal library at
home. A group of students
also went to the Florida
Educational Technology
Conference held in Orlando
in January to learn more
about technology and its role
in the classroom.
The implementation of the
Teacher Training Academy is
an exciting step Lake City
Community College has
made in jts continued sup-
port of the surrounding com-
munities. Providing the serv-
ices our students and school
districts need is just one way
we at LCCC express our
commitment to you, the citi-
zens of our area.

For any additional ques-
tions in any of these fields,
please contact Tracy
Hickman, executive director of
the LCCC Teacher Training
Academy, at (386) 754-4324
or hickmant@lakecitycc. edu.


wish to help make your
up your package today...

Sandy Kishton
Realtor Associate
961-9795


Sterling Entertainment
Rusty Bailey
752-0292 965-4940


Quality Inn
Conference Center

752-3901


o"o Stop By The ,
--- etrninn,1 Lake City Reporter
for your


C


These fine merchants
wedding special. Pick

JC Penney
752-2822


Etheridge
Furniture
752-2752


Ward's Jewelers
752-5470


-.0.0 .........


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LAKE CITY REPORT


DEAR ABBY
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ER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005
HOROSCOPE


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Riley Wortham
Age: 8 months
Parents-
Kevin & Sarah Wortham
Grandparents:
Ted & Lee Johnson,
Richard Nichols


Jasmine Davis


Age: 18 months
Parents:
Abe & Robin Davis
Grandparents:
Richard Stevens
& Cathy Bristol


1ST, 2ND & 3RD Place Prizes
to be Awarded for Boys & Girls!
AGES 0-24 MONTHS


bu *mpobb d d


Your pride and joy could win fabulous prizes
for being the cutest button in town.

Send in the most adorable photograph of your child,
up to 24 months of age, and you could win!
To Enter:
bring your baby's picture along with entry fee ($29.95)
to the Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval St.,
or mail to P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056.
All pictures will be published along with the winners in
the Lake City Reporter's July 10, 2005 edition.
So show off your child, grandchild, godchild, niece or nephew.
For More Information Please Call Mary or Amanda at 755-5440
DEADLINE IS JULY 1ST, 2005


Available

I Ir i


Lake City


Reporter's


10th Annual


R13FOwzcLmLti


i








LAKE CISTY REPORTER


Section D
Sunday, June 5, 2005
Lake City, Florida
i/vu '.. luAeci/tyreporte:.com


Motley Fool, 2D
Stock Wrap, 3D


A


Fine system to promote property listing accuracy


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter.com

By August, area Realtors
who do not properly use the
North Florida Multiple
Listing Service could face
fines of anywhere from $20 to
$1,000.
In a fine system recently
approved by the regional
MLS' Board of Directors,
Realtors will be encouraged to
work among themselves to
correct information for real
estate listings when one dis-
covers inaccuracies. Only
after a series of courtesy calls
among themselves and then
from the NFMLS staff at the
Lake City Board of Realtors
could a fine of $25 to $50 be
levied by the board.
A $1,000 automatic fine, the
highest, would only come
down on a Realtor if one inten-.
tionally gave access to the
MLS service to a non-mem-
ber, excluding the staff mem-
bers of broker's offices, or
altered or delete information
from a broker's listing on pur-
pose.
Brett Deutsch, secretary of
the NFMLS Board of
Directors, said that the inac-
curate information in the area


MLS listings has been a prob-
lem, but usually because of
unintentional errors or igno-
rance, not malicious acts.
Still, she said, "the incor-
rect information wastes
agent's time and we want to
make it really clear, to make
sure it gets corrected."
"We are hoping we never
have to fine anybody, just fix
the information," Deutsch
added.
She said the new fine sys-
tem is a conglomeration of the
systems used by four other
regional multiple listing serv-
ices and its intent is to make
sure the NFMLS "is more
usable for everybody."
Deutsch said the $1,000
fine for granting non-member
access to the MLS or altering
a broker's listing is included
in the new fine system
because all of the other
regional listing services had it
in theirs, assuming they had
good reason to include it.
But it has not been a prob-
lem locally, she said.
"But it's there and it's avail-
able if it becomes an issue,"
she added.

FINES
Continued on Page 2D


JENNIFErc, iASTE N/L eCitt Liiy nepuo, ti
Multiple Listing Service Coordinator for Lake City Board of Realtors Wendy Williams checks updates on the North Florida
Multiple Listings Web page as she flips through the listings catalog. Realtors who do not properly use the service could face
fines by August under a new policy recently implemented.


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*e- "Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


S 6 .. >-





ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS 1.64-acre lot on
beautiful Lake Jeffery's waterfront! Build your
dream home and enjoy the breath-taking view!
Call 755-5110 for details #43675








ONLY A FEW REMAIN in panoramic Hunter's
Ridge just west of Lake City; build your new
dream home & enjoy the picturesque view; Deed
Restrictions will apply AVERY CRAPPS 984-5354
#38660


SERENITY can be yours on this 10.41 acres (6
acres fenced) w/beautiful oak trees, stocked
fish pond w/dock, pole barn, 2BR/1 1/2BA
home & greenhouse $235,000 KATRINA
BLALOCK 961-3486 #44851



S.'. r .
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i



NEED ROOM? 5 bedroom/3 bath home built in
2000 has 2052 SqFt, large kitchen, open &
airy! 2-car carport, front & back porches; near
town $114,900 KATRINA BLALOCK 961-3486
#44849


'*yf jj^ .. ,c .:..v. ,wk_., .-. ..o... ..s t "


3 LOTS AVAILABLE! Midtown Commercial
Center just off US-90 & Sisters Welcome Rd; 1/2-
acre lots for commercial use w/zoning that offers
wide range of uses $69,900 EACH #36476


I~


~IL


COZY 34BR/2BA brick home in established
neighborhood close to town & schools; study
could be 4th bedroom; nice fenced backyard
w/fruit trees $74,500 ANNE HURST 623-2531
#44979




S. .... .. .. .



BLACKBERRY FARMS! 2 lots available! These
lots will not last! Choose from either 6.2 or 4.7
acres! Gorgeous rolling land for your upscale
site-built homes! Call 755-5110 for details
#45444




o : .. ... 1



COMMERCIAL CENTER on CR-341! 6 units
range from 480 SqFt to 2400 SqFt w/paved
parking, retention areas; fencing on 1.28 acres
$725,000 DANIEL CRAPPS 755-5110 #42266


BISHOP REALTY, INC.
U.S. 90 West Across from Wal-Mart 752-4211 ......
ColdwellBanker.com [ 1 =
Independently Owned and Operated ............


Gorgeous Stucco Home on 5 acres. Nearly
new! 4/3, security system, surround sound,
F.RP., 10 ft. ceilings, formal LR & DR, family rm,
tub & shower in master bath. Beautiful kitchen!
Lots of upgrades. $324,900. MLS#44925. Ask
for Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488.


V
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~ttw
1, ~
-t


Block Home, 2/1.5, on 5 acres. Office, family
room, dining room, upgraded kitchen. Includes
2 older MH's. Paved road, Suwannee County,
O'Brien area. $110,000. MLS#44740. Contact
Nell or Hansel Holton 386-984-5046.
- 1-


SW MH in Woodgate Village 2/2, fireplace,
all appliances & hot tub remain. 1 acre lot, CL
fenced. Handicap access & paved parking.
$47,000. Ask for Nell or Hansel Holton
386-984-5046. MLS#34231.


Great Commercial lot in center of town!
Would make a great spot for a small shop or a
drive through. $59,900. MLS#44745. Call Mary
Brown Whitehurst 386-965-0887.


This is a beautiful show place in
prestigious Woodborough. This contem-
porary stucco home with stacked stone
accents welcomes you into a 4BR/3BA split
plan. There is a formal LR with fireplace, dining
room, family room with open kitchen, all with
loft ceilings and crown molding. The glassed in
office overlooks a fenced back yard & in
ground pool. The pool has a child guard fence.
$305,000. MLS#45377. Call Mary Brown
Whitehurst 386-965-0887






Nicely renovated 3BR/1BA, 1104 sq. ft.
home near downtown. New metal roof, new
wiring,m etc. Cozy & comfortable. $65,000.
MLS#45431. Call Nell or Hansel Holton 386-
984-5046.


Convenient to Lake City 7 Gainesville, this
1248 sq. ft. DW MH on .80 acre includes double
carport & 20x30 barn with concrete floor and
electricity. Immaculately cared for. $69,900.
MLS#43484. Ask for Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887.



Too New for Photo


Brand New 4 Bedroom Brick Home under
way in Creekside. Split plan. Spacious rooms.
Covered porch. Corner lot. $199,900. Ask for
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488.


w'% ... .
Zoned R/O Turn of the Century, 1893 sq. ft.
built in 1900. Current use as rental, 3BR/2BA,
with 1BR/1BA being added. Has had new
wiring. Frame with vinyl siding. Near
everything downtown. $105,000. MLS#44063.
Contact Nell or Hansel Holton for more info,
386-984-5046.


Affordable Housing This 3/2 MH is near
town, near most conveniences on the Westside.
Very nice interior, front porch, trees. Just
$39,900. MLS#44467. Call Nell or Hansel
Holton for info 984-5046.

." .





Looking for Investment Property? 2 MH's on
.97 acre lot. Ready for residential or rental use.
$57,900. MLS#45609. Contact Nell or Hansel
Holton, 386-984-5791.


Move In Condition On the Westside, Lamar
St., 24x60 MH, 3/2, neat & clean with new
stove & refrigerator, has 4 ton HPA-A, paved
street, .67 acre lot. $47,900. MLS#45686. Call
Hansel or Nell Holton for info, 386-984-5791.


Now Selling lots in Carter Chase S/D. 1/2 acre lots! In town location. Lots of trees. Won't last long.
Bring your own builder. Reserve your homesite now. Only $49,900 each. MLS#41543. Call Lori
752-2874 or Elaine 755-6488 for more details.
12 acres MOL with planted pines. Scenic area. Great homesite. Just off paved road. $120,000. Ask
for Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488.
Investors! Two 40+ acre tracts on CR 158 near the new Jai-Alai stadium in Hamilton County. $239,800
& $264,680. MLS#45317 & 45318. Call Patti Taylor 386-623-6896.


UL


Business
'm







2D LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005

BUSINESS


dmb qft qumm


& a..


I he \otlc I 0l


I I


- -.


"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


OrT


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ale 0-


FINES
Continued From Page 2D
Dan Gherna, executive vice
president of the Lake City
Board of Realtors, which the
NFMLS is a subsidiary of,
said the move to establish the
fine system also coincides
with the rapid growth of the
MLS and the number of
Realtors who use the service
in the area.
'The main reason we did
this was because we are grow-
ing," he said. "We thought it
was better to bring it in right
now."
With so many new people
and busy brokers, he said
some haven't taken the time
to review the rules and regula-
tions of the MLS and make
sure the information the have
on the service is accurate and
up-to-date.
The Board of Directors
decided the fine system would
allow a recourse for those who
didn't update incorrect infor-
mation and serve as a deter-
rent for failing to do so, he
said.
But Gherna made it clear
"they are not going to be fined
immediately."
'They are going to receive a
courtesy phone call and are
encouraged to go agent to
agent so it doesn't come to the
(MLS) staff," she said. "And
when it comes to staff we are
going to make a courtesy
phone call. And if they don't
change it then, then that's
when they are going to be
fined."
Gherna said the NFMLS
Board of Directors will review
the fine system after its first
six months and "see how it
works out."


According to a notice sent
to broker's offices through
the NFMLS service area,
including those in Lake City
and Live Oak, "users are
encouraged to notify each
other if they notice a discrep-
ancy before reporting it to the
MLS staff. Once an infraction
is reported to staff, the user
(and the participating broker)
will receive a courtesy call and
given two business days to
make the correction. If the
problem is not corrected after
two business days, the infrac-
tion will be reported to the
Board of Directors and a fine
of $20 to $50 will be charged
on the broker's monthly MLS
invoice. The offender's name
will be logged into a
[Microsoft] Excel file and
recurring offenses will result
in an escalated fine."
Each of the fines can be
challenged by the broker on
record for a listing, and the
NFLMS' Professional
Standards Committee will
hear those issues to make a
determination. The Board of
Directors meanwhile will
serve to hear appeals of com-
mittee decisions, if necessary.
Gherna said the fine system
policy for the NFMLS begins
July 1, but there will be a one-
month grace period until actu-
al fines are imposed (in
August), to allow the Realtors
to become accustomed to the
new standards.
Deutsch said the board
believes "it's going to be a
good thing" and will help the
Realtors better serve their
clients.
"The only way they are
going to be able to give better
service is if the information is
correct."


El
a


gP7o


I qb. I


m








LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005 31




The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights

7 NYSE A Amex I Nasdaq
7,169.21 -15.69 5 1,502.80 +27.98 2,071.43 -4.30


Gainers (S2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GpoTMMA 2.99 +:62 +26.2
VeriFonen 15.95 +3.05 +23.6
Oxfordlnds 41,75 +6.50 +18.4
AmWest 6.45 +.97 +17.7
Elscint 6.31 +,90 +16.6
ChiMerc 246.19+33.39 +15.7
Esco 97.00+12.75 +15.1
Microfncl 4.40 +.55 +14.3
StorTch 36.34 +4.51 +14.2
MidwstAir 2.20 +.27 +14.0

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Cantel s 18.26-12.42 -40.5
HarvNRes 8.13 -2.44 -23.1
FstMarb 34R63 -9.42 -21.4
Fiat pf 5.00 -1.10 -18.0
BIdBearn 22.11 -4.77 -17.7
Enesco 3.30 -.57 -14.7
Visteon 6.90 -.97 -12.3
Elan 7.03 -.88 -11.1
Greif B 60.00 -7.25 -10.8
GreifA 63.87 -7.33 -10.3

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
NortelNet 912008 2.86 +.20
Lucent 829890 2.84 +.01
Pfizer 770313 27.96 -.39
ExxonMbl 718066 57.15 +.35
Elan 671298 7.03 -.88
TimeWarn 668599 17.25 -.34
GenElec 667125 36.70 -.18
SpmtFON 650274 24.20 +.94
FordM 604724 9.90 -.17
Corning 569670 16.07 +.57

Diary
Advanced 2,348
Declined 1,156
New Highs 370
New Lows 47
Total issues 3,576
Unchanged 72
Volume 7,382,632,441


Gainers (S2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
CmceEgyn 2.10 +.55 +35.5
Aerosonic 5.56 +1.37 +32.7
CoreMold 10.80 +2.41 +28.7
Lannett 5.81 +1.17 +25.2
MexcoEn 8.40 +1.65 +24.4
Tarpon n 4.75 +.86 +22.1
TurboChrs 13.55 +2.41 +21.6
Adventrx 2.61 +.46 +21.4
Sunair 11.05 +1.91 +20.9
Tippery 5.45 +.85 +18.5

Losers ($2 or more)
Name. Last Chg %Chg
iMergent n 9.55 -1.65 -14.7
RegeneRx n 3.00 -.50 -14.3
GlobeTel n 3.25 -.53 -14.0
ScolrPh 3.16 -.50 -13.7
VitaFd 2.01 -.29 -12.6
CuisineS n 6.54 -.92 -12.3
Isolagen 3.61 -.43 -10.6
RaeSyst 2.63 -.27 -9.3
Bexil 12.75 -1.25 -8.9
MarineP s 13.89 -1.35 -8.9

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SPDR 2105997120.15 -.10
SemiHTr 1100426 34.82 +.29
SP Engy 487713 42.63 +.63
iShJapan 428041 10.17 +.01
iShRs2000 402939123.51 +.56
SP Fncl 253164 29.28 -.05
DJIA Diam 214090104.72 -.65
OilSvHT 173113 95.36 +2.05
BemaGold 143771 2.27 +.20
iSh20 TB 124234 95.25 +1.76

Diary
Advanced 650
Declined 409
New Highs 82
New Lows 40
Total issues 1,125
Unchanged 66
Volume 929,875,818


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
IntrntlnitJ 9.26 +3.49 +60.5
AnchrGis 2.26 +.77 +51.7
BluDolp 3.20 +1.00 +45.5
NaviSite 2.09 +.63 +43.2
DobsonCm 2.93 +.85 +40.9
CDCCpA 3.45 +1.00 +40.8
BluCoat 25.01 +6.64 +36.1
Euroweb 4.12 +1.09 +36.0
Dataram 6.32 +1.67 +35.9
MTI Tch 2.25 +.57 +33.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Renovis 13.11 -3.99 -23.3
Pharmos rs 2.40 -.70 -22.6
Parkrvsn 3.85 -.92 -19.3
ViryaNet 2.30 -.50 -17.9
Authentdte 2.88 -.60 -17.2
BioProg n 6.75 -1.35 -16.7
AbleLabs 4.42 -.86 -16.3
BadgrP 3.24 -.63 -16.2
Symetric 9.52 -1.80 -15.9
DCAP Gp n 4.25 -.78 -15.5

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Nasd100Tr3547279 38.10 -.11
SunMicro 2607550 3.66 -.21
Intel 2495778 27.33 -.06
Microsoft 2073638 25.43 -.64
Cisco 2055728 19.40 -.39
SiriusS 1521717 6.00 +.03
JDS Uniph1494330 1.58 -.03
Oracle 1435488 12.59 -.26
ApldMatl 976575 16.87 +.22
Google n 940768280.26+14.26

Diary
Advanced 1,732
Declined 1,530
New Highs 219
New Lows 107
Total issues 3,355
Unchanged 93
Volume 7,035,099,253


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg
AT&T NY .95 18.79 -.20 -1.1 -1.4
Alltel NY 1.52 59.65 +1.77 +3.1 +1.5
AppleCs Nasd 38.24 -2.32 -5.7 +18.8
ApldMatl Nasd .12 16.87 +.22 +1.3 -1.3
AutoZone NY ... 91.76 +1.10 +1.2 +.5
BkofAms NY 1.80 45.78 -.42 -0.9 -2.6
BellSouth NY 1.08 26.98 +.17 +0.6 -2.9
BobEvn Nasd .48 23.41 -.08 -0.3 -10.4
CMGI Nasd .. 2.22 +.06 +2.8 -12.9
CNBFnPA Nasd .56 14.90 -.08 -0,5 -2.4
CSX NY .40 42.07 +.51 +1.2 +5.0
ChmpE NY ... 9.64 -.03 -0.3 -18.4
Chevron sNY 1.80 55.06 +.48 +0.9 +4.9
CienaCp Nasd ... 2.22 -.14 -5.9 -33.5
Cisco Nasd ... 19.40 -.39 -2.0 +.4
CocaCI NY 1.12 44.23 -.70 -1.6 +6.2
ColBgp NY .61 22.34 -.10 -0.4 +5.2
Delhaize NY 1.13 59.64 -.66 -1.1 -21.4
DollarG NY .18 20.11 +.28 +1.4 -3.2
eBay s Nasd 37.80 -.50 -1.3 -35.0
ExxonMbl NY 1.16 57.15 +.35 +0.6 +11.5
FPL Gp s NY 1.42 40.71 +.24 +0.6 +8.9
FamDIr NY .38 24.67 -.88 -3.4 -21.0
FordM NY .40 9.90 -.17 -1.7 -32.4
GenElec NY .88 36.70 -.18 -0.5 +.5
GaPacif NY .70 33.63 +.10 +0.3-10.3
GdyFam Nasd .12 6.81 -.37 -5.2 -25.5
Google n Nasd ... 280.26 +14.26 +5.4 +45.4


Name Ex Div Last


Wkly Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg %Chg


HCA Inc NY .60 53.75 -.06 -0.1 +34.5
HomeDp NY .40 39.72 -.25 -0.6 -7.1
Intel Nasd .32 27.33 -.06 -0.2 +16.8
JDS Uniph Nasd .. 1.58 -.03 -1.9 -50.2
JeffPilot NY 1.67 49.41 -1.00 -2.0 -4.9
LowesCos NY .24 56.96 -.19 -0.3 -1.1
Lucent NY ... 2.84 +.01 +0.4 -24.5
McDnlds NY .55 30.51 -.75 -2.4 -4.8
Microsoft Nasd .32 25.43 -.64 -2.5 -4.8
Nasdl00TrNasd .38 38.10 -.11 -0.3 -4.5
NY Times NY .66 30.94 -.66 -2.1 -24.2
NobltyH Nasd .20 24.21 +.20 +0.8 +3.1
NortelNet NY ... 2.86 +20 +7.5 -17.6
OcciPet NY .1.24 75.42 +1.90 +2.6 +29.2
Oracle Nasd ... 12.59 -.26 -2.0 -8.2
Penney NY .50 50.56 -.78 -1.5 +22.1
PepsiCo NY 1.04 56.01 -.59 -1.0 +7.3
Pfizer NY .76 27.96 -.39 -1.4 +4.0
Potash s NY .60 89.30 -.75 -0.8 +7.5
Ryder NY .64 36.70 -.53 -1.4 -23.2
SearsHIdgsNasd ... 154.08 +4.88 +3.3 +55.7
SemiHTr Amex .18 34.82 +.29 +0.8 +4.3
SiriusS Nasd ... 6.00 +.03 +0.5 -21.3
SouthnCo NY 1.49 34.43 +.29 +0.8 +2.7
SPDR Amex 2.26 120.15 -.10 -0.1 -.6
SunMicro Nasd 3.66 -.21 -5.4 -32.1
TimeWarn NY .20 17.25 -.34 -1.9 -11.3
WalMart NY .60 47.35 +.08 +0.2 -10.4


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing
standards. It = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pi = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone
a reverse stock split of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified
price, s = Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or
receivership, wd = When 3isr,,,i- n = v.'n'r,,r, .J i =, i Wavrrrnif
M utual Fund Footnotes: = E cjrr, ,a..Oe r, IrL = 1J.) up ironi -a 1ie l -, .|,3 i = r aj-i i niel u? .,j ic
pay distribution costs. r = R-.Je-rrpii.:r, len c. onluc ,-im alecriod Saiss IC Cd m., appi, I = B.ir, p anr,. r
Gainers and Losers must be vinrr, ,al re i 12 Io t.e I.-:les] i r.iaie" ai len Most Actives music Dn onrr,
at least $1. Volume in hundreds,. o-,r. ee Souice- Tr.,- As.:.xi3ia PreS. Sale's ligue l e ,j nnrloh:ili


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 6.00 6.00
Discount Rate 4.00 4.00
Federal Funds Rate 3.00 3.00
Treasuries
3-month 2.94 2.89
6-month 3.04 3.05
5-year 3.73 3.82
10-Vear 3.98 4.08
30-year 4.28 4.43


Currencies


Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.3235 1.3274
Britain 1.8123 1.8155
Canada 1.2467 1.2483
Euro .8185 .8148
Japan 107.82 108.25
Mexico 10.8300 10.8090
Switzerlnd 1.2549 1.2514
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Weekly Dow Jones


Dow Jones 11,000

industrials -10,000


For the week ending
Friday, June 3


-9,000


-8,000


10,460.97

Record high: 11,722.98 I I I i I 7,000
Jan. 14,2000 J J A S O N D J F M A M J J



MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct MIn I
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Inm


Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 n SP
American Funds A: InvCoAA px LV
American Funds A: WshMutA p LV
American Funds A: GwthFdA p XG
Fidelity Invest: Magellan n LC
PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRet n IB
Fidelity Invest: Contra n XG
Dodge&Cox: Stock XV
American Funds A: IncoFdA p MP
American Funds A: EupacA p IL
American Funds A: CapInBIA p MP
Vanguard Instl Fds: Instldx n SP
Fidelity Invest: LowPr rn MV
American Funds A: NewPerA p GL
Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk n XC
Fidelity Invest: Grolnc LC
Vanguard Fds: Wndsll LV
American Funds A: CapWGrA px GL
American Funds A: BalA p BL
Vanguard Fds: Welltn n BL
Fidelity Invest: EqutInc n El
Fidelity Invest: Diverlntl n IL
Fidelity Invest: Puritan BL
Fidelity Invest: GroCo n XG
Vanguard Admiral: 500Adml n SP
Dodge&Cox: Balanced n BL
Fidelity Invest: BlueChipGr LC


79,283
62,558
61,184
59,057
54,856
49,113
45,594
44,394
43,804
36,921
36,013
35,678
33,715
32,005
31,727
30,598
30,408
30,180
30,138
28,878
25,356
25,299
23,381
22,691
22,228
21,692
21,380


+8.9/A
+9.7/D
+8.8/D
+10.3/B
+6.2/D
+8.2/A
+14.0/A
+16.2/A
+12.9/A
+17.2/B
+16.2/A
+9.0/A
+17.7/B
+11.8/C
+10.4/B
+8.0/C
+16.2/A
+17.9/A
+7.7/C
+11.9/A
+8.9/E
+16.1/B
+8.4/C
+9.4/C
+9.0/A
+11.8/A
+4.2/E


-12.8/A
+10.7/C
+24.5/B
-4.7/A
-20.1/D
+49.9/A
+11.5/A
+68.6/A
+53.7/A
+0.1/B
+63.6/A
-12.2/A
+129.1/A
+3.2/B
-7.6/C
-6.5/B
+37.9/A
+42.5/A
+49.6/A
+42.0/A
+18.0/0
+27.5/A
+27.4/A
-31.3/C
NS
+65.6/A
-28.8/E


NL 3,0
5.75 2
5.75 2
5.75 2
NL 2,5
NL 5,000,0
NL 2,5
NL 2,5
5.75 2
5.75 2
5.75 2
NL 10,000,0
NL 2,5
5.75 2
NL 3,0
NL 2,5
NL 3,0
5.75 2
5.75 2
NL 3,0
NL 2,5
NL 2,5
NL 2,5
NL 2,5
NL 250,0
NL 2,5
NL 2,5


BL -Balanced, El -Equity Income, GL -Global Stock, HB -Healthi8iotech, IB -Intermediate Bond, IL -Intemational Stock, LC -Large-Cap Core
-Large-Cap Growth, LV -Large-Cap Val., MP -Stock/Bond Blend, MT -Mortgage, SP -S&P 500, SS -Single-State Muni, XG -Mulli-Cap Gr
Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in be
20%. Min [nit Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA = Not avail. NE = Data in question. NS = Fund not in existence. Source: Upper


-81.58


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
AES Cp ... ... 20 -.23 +5.3 14.40
AFLAC .44 1.0 17 +.89 +6.1 42.29
AK Steel ... ... 6 -.67 -51.3 7.04
AMR ... ... ... +1.13 +27.2 13.93
AT&T .95 5.1 ... -.20 -1.4 18.79
AU Optron .36 2.1 ... -.15 +20.1 17.20
AbtLab 1.10 2.3 23 +.27 +3.5 48.27
AberFitc .50 .8 27 +7.48 +38.6 65.08
Accenture ... ... 18 +.36 -13.1 23.46
AMD ... ... ... +.87 -22.4 17.08
Aeropstl ... ... 19 +1.29 -2.8 28.61
Aetna s .02 ... 11 +1.66 +27.9 79.75
AffCmpS ... ... 17 -.66 -16.7 50.15
Agere rs ... ... ... -.37 -10.7 12.15
Agilent ... ... 32 +.15 -.2 24.06
AirTran ... ... ... +.16 -5.6 10.10
Albertsn .76 3.6 18 -.25 -12.6 20.86
Alcoa .60 2.2 20 -.15 -13.0 27.32
AllegTch .24 1.1 14 +.39 -.3 21.61
Allergan .40 .5 29 +5.63 +2.5 83.13
AldWaste 57 +.33 -13.7 8.01
Allstate 1.28 2.2 12 +.33 +13.3 58.61
Alltel 1.52 2.5 16 +1.77 +1.5 59.65
Altria 2.92 4.3 14 -.31 +10.0 67.24
Amdocs ...... 22 -.65 +3.1 27.06
AmHess 1.20 1.2 11 +2.09 +17.7 96.94
AmWest ... ... ... +.97 -2.0 6.45
AEP 1.40 3.9 12 +.39 +4.3 35.80
AmExp .48 .9 19 +.93 -3.9 54.18
AmintGp If .50 .9 15 -1.18 -16.1 55.09
AmStand .60 1.4 31 -.18 +4.3 43.09
AmTower ... ... ... +.89 +1.5 18.68
AmerisBrg .10 .2 19 +.08 +10.9 65.10
Anadrk .72 .9 11 +.08 +17.5 76.17
AnalogDev .24 .6 28 +1.19 +2.6 37.88
Anheusr .98 2.1 17 -.31 -6.8 47.29
Aon Corp .60 2.4 12 -.31 +3.5 24.69
Apache .32 .5 11 +.92 +18.7 60.03
Aquila ... ... ... -.07 -3.5 3.56
ArchDan .34 1.7 18 +.21 -9.4 20.22
AutoNatn ... ... 12 +.10 +3.6 19.90
AutoData .62 1.4 26 -.85 -1.5 43.67
Avaya ... ... 19 -.54 -47.7 8.99
Avon .66 1.7 22 +.03 +2.7 39.75
3JSvcs .32 .6 20 +.29 +9.8 51.11
3MC Sft ... ... 40 +.33 -7.8 17.15
BakrHu .46 1.0 26 +.82 +10.2 47.02
3kofAms 1.80 3.9 12 -.42 -2.6 45.78
3kNY .80 2.8 16 -.16 -13.7 28.84
3arrickG .22 .9 45 +.21 -4.2 23.20
Baxter .58 1.6 53 -.05 +6.8 36.89
BearingP If ... ... ... +.04 -18.1 6.58
BellSouth 1.08 4.0 11 +.17 -2.9 26.98
BestBuy .44 .8 19 +1.99 -4.2 56.84
Blockbstr .08 .9 ... +.04 -1.4 9.41
Boeing 1.00 1.5 29 +1.64 +24.9 64.66
BostonSci ... ...19 -.15 -21.8 27.80
BrMySq 1.12 4.4 24 -.31 -1.6 25.22
BIdBearn ... ... 19 -4.77 -37.1 22.11
BurlNSF .68 1.4 21 6 .56 +6.1 50.21
BurlRsc .34 .7 12 -.41 +17.3 51.02
CMSEng ... ... 9 +.51 +31.5 13.74
CSX .40 1.0 11 +.51 +5.0 42.07
CVSCp .29 .5 27 +2.31 +27.1 57.27
CablvsnNY ....... +.95 +7.0 26.64
Cadence ... ... 50 -.12 +.7 13.90
Caesars ... ... 25 +.35 +7.6 21.68
Alpine ... ... ... +.13 -28.2 2.83
CapOne .11 .1 15 +.06 -11.0 74.93
CaremkRx. ... ... 29 +.44 +13.2 44.65
CarMax ... ... 25 +.94 -15.8 26.14
Carnival .80 1.5 22 -.54 -9.2 52.30
Caterpillar 1.64 1.7 15 -.34 -3.6 93.97
Cendant .36 1.7 15 -.04 -3.9 21.42
CenterPnt .28 2.3 ... +.28 +9.6 12.38
Centex .16. .2 9 +1.20 +10.7 65.95
ChesEng .18 .9 14 +.71 +27.3 21.00
Chevrons 1.80 3.3 9 +.48 +4.9 55.06
ChiMerc 1.84 .7 35+33.39 +7.6 246.19




Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ASML Hid ...
ATI Tech ...
Aastrom
AbleEnr
AbleLabs ...
Activist s, ...
AdobeSy s ...
Alamosa
AlteraCp
Amazon
AEagleO s .20
Ameritrade ...
Amgen
AmkorT
Amylin
AppleC s
ApIdMatl .12
AMCC
Atmel
Autodsk s .03
Avanex
3EA Sys ...
BedBath ...
Biogenldc ...
Brdcom
BrcdeCm ...
CDC CpA ..
CMGI
Celgene s ...
Cephln
ChartCm
CienaCp
Cisco
CitrixSy
Cognos g
Comcast
Comic sp
Compuwre...


... ... -.03 +3.5 16.48
... 17 +.09 -21.3 15.26
... ... ... +85.2 2.63
... ... +3.65 +653.2 21.09
... 5 -.86 -80.6 4.42
... 24 +.23 +3.1 15.61
... 34 -.63 +3.7 32.54
... ... +.49 +1.5 12.66
... 30 -.07 +7.2 22.19
27 +.09 -19.6 35.59
.7 18 +.34 +23.7 29.13
... 22 +.51 +4.8 14.90
... 31 -1.36 -4.1 61.49
... ... +1.05 -31.0 4.61
... ... -.93 -32.9 15.67
... 42 -2.32 +18.8 38.24
.7 20 +.22 -1.3 16.87
... ... +.09 -30.9 2.91
... ... -.14 -26.3 2.89
... 36 -1.23 -2.7 36.92
... ... +.06 -66.5 1.11
... 26 +.01 -4.1 8.50
... 25 +.72 +3.3 41.14
... ... -3.24 -45.4 36.40
... 52 +.45 +12.9 36.44
... 13 +.17 -45.8 4.14
... ... +1.00 -25.2 3.45
... 14 +.06 -12.9 2.22
... 76 -1.11 +51.2 40.09
... ... -3,47 -22.4 39.49
... ... -.09 -51.3 1.09
... ... -.14 -33.5 2.22
.. 23 -.39 +.4 19.40
... 24 -3.07 -9.7 22.08
... 23 -3.86 -21.9 34.40
.. 59 -.26 -4.5 31.77
... 58 -.19 -5.1 31.18
... 34 +.08 +5.8 6.78


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
Chicoss ... 41 +.31 +50.1 34.16
CircCity .07 .4 50 +.05 +6.3 16.63
Citigrp 1.76 3.7 14 +.28 -1.3 47.56
CitzComm 1.00 7.5 67 -.19 -2.9 13.39
ClearChan .75 2.5 23 -.01 -11.3 29.72
Coach s ... ... 35 +2.46 +12.6 31.76
CocaCI 1.12 2.5 23 -.70 +6.2 44.23
Coeur ... ... ... +.22 -13.7 3.39
ColgPal 1.16 2.4 22 -.97 -4.0 49.09
CmcBNJs .44 1.6 16 -.23 -14.2 27.63
CVRDs .89 3.0 12 +.32 +3.2 29.93
CompAs .16 .6 ... -.30 -13.1 27.00
ConAgra 1.09 4.2 18 -.77 -12.3 25.82
ConocPhilsl1.24 2.3 8 +1.24 +26.7 55.01
ConocPhil 2.48 2.3 8 +2.60 +26.9 110.15
ConsolEgy .56 1.1 29 +2.79 +23.2 50.59
ConEd 2.28 5.0 20 +.66 +5.1 45.99
ConstellA s ... ... 24 +2.01 +20.5 28.03
ConstellEn 1.34 2.5 16 +.76 +22.2 53.40
CtlAirB ... ... ...+1.31 +7.1 14.50
CoopCam ... ... 30 +.72 +11.6 60.03
Corning ... ... .. +.57 +36.5 16.07
CntwdFns .60 1.6 10 +.60 +2.7 38.00
Coventry ... ... 17 -.01 +29.7 68.85
CrwnCstle ... ... 25 +.52 +9.7 18.25
CrownHold.... ...46 -.14 +9.9 15.10
Cummins 1.20 1.7 8 +2.46 -14.8 71.37
CypSem ... ... ... +.86 +18.3 13.88
DPL .96 3.7 13 +1.15 +4.1 26.14
DR Hortn s .36 1.0 10 +.49 +16.0 35.07
DTE 2.06 4.4 23 +.31 +9.6 47.27
Danaher .06 .1 23 +.56 -3.9 55.16
Darden .08 .2 21 +.11 +18.6 32.91
Deere 1.24 1.9 10 -1.75 -13.2 64.57
Delphi If .12 2.7 16 +.11 -49.9 4.52
DeltaAir ... ... ... +.12 -45.2 4.10
DeutTel .80 4.4 -.64 -18.9 18.39
DevonE s .30 .6 10 +.43 +20.7 46.98
DiaOffs .25 .5 ... +1.75 +21.7 48.74
DirecTV ... ... ... +.13 -10.4 15.00
Disney .24 .9 22 -.56 -1.7 27.32
DollarG .18 .9 19 +.28 -3.2 20.11
DomRes 2.68 3.8 19 +.98 +5.0 71.10
DoralFin .72 6.0 3 +.51 -75.6 12.03
DowChm 1.34 3.0 11 -.58 -8.5 45.30
DrmwksA n ... ... 9 -3.09 -22.0 29.26
DukeEgy 1.10 3.9 13 +.24 +10.1 27.89
Dynegy ... ... ... +.16 +4.1 4.81
ETrade ... ... 12 +.30 -17.1 12.40
EMCCp ... ... 35 +.13 -3.9 14.29
EOG Ress .16 .3 17 +.77 +44.8 51.67
Eaton 1.24 2.1 13 -1.16 -17.8 59.49
Edisonlnt 1.00 2.7 12 +.20 +17.2 37.54
EIPasoCp .16 1.5 ... +.46 +2.1 10.62
Elan ... ... ... -.88 -74.2 7.03
EDS .20 1.0 55 -.62 -16.7 19.25
EmrsnEl 1.66 2.5 21 -.90 -5.5 66.23
EnCana s .30 .8 ... +.50 +25.9 35.93
ENSCO .10 .3 41 +.80 +7.7 34.17
EqOffPT 2.00 6.0 ... +.69 +13.7 33.10
EqtyRsd 1.73 4.8 19 +.12 -.4 36.05
Exelon 1.60 3.3 16 +1.53 +10.0 48.46
ExxonMbI 1.16 2.0 13 +.35 +11.5 57.15
FPLGps 1.42 3.5 17 +.24 +8.9 40.71
FairchdS ... ... 47 -.64 -15.4 13.76
FamDIr .38 1.5 16 -.88 -21.0 24.67
FannieM If 1.04 1.8 10 -2.13 -17.7 58.61
FedExCp .32 .4 20 +.81 -7.9 90.69
FedrDS .54 .8 17 +.18 +-17.5 67.90
FirstData .24 .6 19 +1.53 -6.7 39.70
FstMarb ... ... 14 -9.42 -38.4 34.63
FirstEngy 1.65 3.7 17 +.70 +13.9 45.00
FordM .40 4.0 6 -.17 -32.4 9.90
ForestLab ... ... 17 -.81 -15.3 37.99
FredMacIf 1.40 2.1 17 +.20 -10.4 66.00
FMCG 1.00 2.7 23 +1.28 -3.7 36.82
Frontline s12.50 28.3 3 -.19 +16.6 44.15
Gannett 1.08 1.5 15 -.75 -9.4 74.05
Gap .18 .9 17 -.35 -1.3 20.84


ANNUITIES CAN PROVIDE INCOME FOR LIFE. GIVE ME A CALL ABOUT
OUR GUARANTEED, FIXED-RATE ANNUITIES.


Mary Slay
Lake City
386-755-6801
P.S. Notary Public available


Allstate.
You're in good hands.


Allstate Life Insurance Company. Home Office. Northbrook. IL. Securities offered by Personal Financial Representatives through
Allstate Financial Services LLC. Registered Broker-Dealer. Member NASD. SIPC. Main Office: 2920 South 84th Street. Lincoln NE
68506. 877-525-5727. 2004 Allstate Insurance Company.


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Gateway
Genentch ...
GenMills 1.24
GMdb32B 1.31
GMdb33 1.56
Genworth n .26
GaGulf .32
Gillette .65
GlobaISFe .30
GoldFLtd .11
Goldcrpg .18
GoldWF s .24
GoldmanS 1.00
Goodyear ...
GrantPrde ...
GtAtPc
Guidant .40
HCA Inc .60
Hallibtn .50
HarleyD .64
HarmonyG .05
HarrahE 1.32
HartfdFn 1.16
HitMgt .16
HeclaM
HewlettP .32
Hilton .08
HomeDp .40
HonwIllInI .83
Hospira
HostMarr .32
HovnanE


... ... -.23 -45.4
97 +2.13 +49.5
2.5 18 +.91 +1.8
7.2 ... +.64 -21.4
7.4 ... +.01 -20.9
.9 12 +.08 +6.1
.9 9 +2.17 -31.1
1.2 30 -.50 +17.9
.8 47 +.68 +13.0
1.0 ... -.27 -14.1
1.3 33 +.71 -4.8
.4 15 -1.97 -.8
1.0 10 +1.80 -6.5
... 11 -.29 -2.5
... 37 +.84 +24.7
... ... -.05+147.9
.5 44 -.51 +1.9
1.1 19 -.06 +34.5
1.2 ... +.34 +10.6
1.3 16 -1.49 -20.3
.6 ... +.17 -15.4
1.8 21 +1.50 +8.4
1.6 10 -.82 +6.8
.6 18 +.53 +11.8
... ... +.15 -21.8
1.4 19 -.05 +8.3
.3 37 +1.09 +9.5
1.0 17 -.25 -7.1
2.3 21 -.29 +2.6
20 +1.35 +16.7
1.9 ... +.19 -2.2
. 10 -.47 +22.4


Name


INCO .40
IngerRd 1.00
IBM .80
IntlGame .48
IntPap 1.00
Interpub If
JPMorgCh 1.36
JanusCap .04
JohnJn 1.32
KB Homes .75
KerrMcG .20
Keycorp 1.30
KimbClk 1.80
KingPhrm ...
Kohls
KrspKrm If ...
L-3 Com .50
LSI Log
LaBrnch
LehmBr .80
LennarA .55
Lexmark
LibtyMA
LillyEli 1.52
Limited .60
Lucent
Lyondell .90
MBIA 1.12
MBNA .56
MEMC
MGMMir s ..
Manpwl .40


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Comvers
Conexant ...
Costco .46
CredSys
DRDGOLD ...
Dellnc
DitechCo ...
DobsonCm ...
DbleClck ...
DynMatl
eBay s
ErthLink
ElectArts ...
EricsnTI .36
ExideTc
Eyetech
FifthThird 1.40
Finisar
Fiserv
Flextrn
Gemstar
GeneLTc ...
Geores
GileadSci s ...
Googlen
HotTopic
HudsnCity .84
HuntJB s .24
IAC Interac ...
IntgDv
Intel .32
IntrntlnitJ ...
Isonics
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
JoyGlbi s .45
JnprNtw
KLA Tnc .48


... 70 +1.56 +2.9 25.16
... ... +.16 -21.6 1.56
1.0 22 +.82 -4.7 46.12
... ... +.05 -12.2 8.03
... ... -.14 -36.4 .98
... 32 -.15 -4.7 40.16
... 3 -1.00 -54.6 6.79
... ... +.85 +70.3 2.93
... 42 +.12 +6.9 8.32
... ... +.95 +239.6 41.23
... 61 -.50 -35.0 37.80
... 9 -1.27 -19.4 9.29
... 33 +.92 -14.1 52.97
1.1 ... -.16 -.2 31.43
... ... +.40 -62.3 5.20
... ... -.82 -72.1 12.68
3.3 16 -1.26 -11.3 41.97
... ... +.07 -44.7 1.26
... 20 +.36 +7.2 43.09
... 22 +.26 -5.9 13.01
... ... +.17 -40.9 3.50
... ... +.11 -59.2 .49
... 39 +3.17 +345.8 13.64
... 39 +.42 +18.4 41.43
... ...+14.26 +45.4 280.26
... 26 +.47 +27.7 21.95
2.4 26 +.95 -3.7 35.47
1.2 18 -.27 -8.5 20.53
... ... +.38 -9.7 24.93
... ... +.24 +10.1 12.73
1.2 20 -.06 +16.8 27.33
... ... +3.49 +90.1 9.26
... ... +.21 -39.3 3.33
... ... -.03 -50.2 1.58
... 63 +.32 -5.0 22.07
1.3 30 -1.11 +22.8 35.54
... 84 -.57 -7.2 25.22
1.1 20 -.14 -2.5 45.43


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


KnghtCap ...
LaJollPh ...
LamRsch
LawsnSfl ...
Level3
LinearTch .40
LookSmart ...
MCI Incn 1.60
MarvellT s ...
Maxim .80
McLeo A
McDataA ...
Merclntr
Microsoft .32
MillPhar
MnstrWw
Nasd100Tr .38
NetwkAp
NextlPrt
NwstAirl
Novell
Novlus
Nvidia
OpnwvSy ...
Oracle
PMC Sra
PacSunwr ..
ParmTc
PattUTI s .16
Paychex .52
Powrwav
Qlogic
Qualcom s .36
RF MicD ...
RealNwk
RedHat
Renovis
RschMols ...


... 13 -.26 -33.0
... ... +.43 -50.3
... 16 +1.69 +8.8
... ... -.88 -26.9
+.01 -33.9
1.0 28 +.54 -1.3
... ... +.09 -65.8
... ... -.13 +26.5
65 -.33 +13.1
2.0 25 -.02 -6.0
... ... +.02 -80.6
... ... +.11 -33.7
44 -3.16 -7.3
1.3 25 -.64 -4.8
... ... -.40 -32.9
43 +1.94 -14.0
1.0 ... -.11 -4.5
49 -.17 -13.4
... 65 +1.39 +28.8
... ... +.64 -43.0
... 7 +.49 -6.2
... 23 +.89 -3.9
... 35 +.78 +20.1
... ... +1.39 +8.5
... 23 -.26 -8.2
44 +.24 -21.6
... 16 +1.44 +1.3
17 +.19 +5.9
.6 32 +1.60 +41.1
1.7 35 +.22 -12.6
... ... +.50 +11.6
20 -.13 -10.5
1.0 33 +.44 -11.3
... ... -.06 -31.7
... ... ... -23.3
... 52 -.49 -6.3
... ... -3.99 -8.8
... 74 -.09 -2.6


Name Div
SanDisk
Sanmina
SearsHIdgs ...
Shop.com n ...
SiebelSys
Sina
SiriusS ..
SkywksSol ...
SmurfStne
Sonus n
Staples s .17
Starbucks ...
StemCells ...
SunMicro ...
Symantec s ...
TASER s ...
TelwestGI n ...
Tellabs
TevaPh s .24
3Com ...
TibcoSft
TiVo Inc
UTStrcm ...
UtdOnln .80
UtdGlblCm
Verisign
Veritas ...
VersoTch ...
ViroPhrm ...
Vitesse
WebMD
WetSeal ...
Wynn
XM Sat
Xilinx .28
Yahoo


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cha %Cha Last


1.0 13 +.27 +6.7 39.26
1.3 10 -2.93 -6.0 75.47
1.1 15 -1.31 -23.1 75.79
1.7 25 ... -17.4 28.41
3.0 ... +.33 -21.7 32.87
+.22 -6.0 12.60
3.8 28 -.25 -8.9 35.55
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2.0 22 -.99 +4.8 66.44
1.1 11 +1.11 +29.1 67.37
.3 18 +.32 +27.4 73.60
4.0 14 -.03 -3.3 32.77
2.8 18 -.33 -2.1 64.42
... 48 +.06 -23.1 9.53
... 24 +3.08 +5.2 51.75
... ... +.30 -33.7 8.35
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... ... +.67 +38.3 7.58
... ... -.19 -39.7 5.40
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... 16 -.46 -19.4 68.52
95 -.03 -4.9 10.44
2.6 29 -1.40 +1.6 57.65
2.8 15 +.93 -7.8 21.23
11 +.01 -24.5 2.84
3.7 82 +.59 -15.4 24.48
2.0 10 +.55 -11.3 56.15
2.6 13 -.10 -24.6 21.25
... 12 +.05 +6.0 14.05
28 +3,25 +9.3 39.75
1.0 16 +.18 -15.2 40.98




Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... 17 -.57 +2.2 25.52
... ... +.16 -38.7 5.19
... 14 +4.88 +55.7 154.08
...... +3.02 -26.4 20.79
70 -.19 -13.3 9.10
29 +2.79 -3.9 30.81
... ... +.03 -21.3 6.00
... 22 +.08 -31.7 6.44
-.07 -40.4 11.14
55 +.08 -22.9 4.42
.8 22 +.10 -3.0 21.80
... 51 -.17 -11.1 55.46
... ... +.16 -5.2 4.01
... 18 -.21 -32.1 3.66
... 30 +.19 -12.9 22.44
... 44 +.13 -64.9 11.10
... ... +.39 +19.5 21.00
... ... +.14 -3.1 8.32
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... ... -.15 -15.1 3.54
... 34 +.45 -49.2 6.78
... ... +.26 +19.1 6.99
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7.3 6 -1.95 -4.8 10.98
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38 +1.60 -2.0 32.94
... 26 +.15 -12.6 24.95
... ... +.11 -50.0 .36
... 22 +.77 +66.8 5.42
... ... -.02 -30.6 2.45
... 78 +.70 +24.1 10.13
... ... +1.20 +137.4 5.39
... ... +9.73 -17.8 55.02
... ...+1.79 -10.7 33.60
1.0 32 +.09 -4.9 28.22
... 58 +.65 +.6 37.92


Masco .80
MasseyEn .16
Mattel .45
Maxtor
MayDS .98
McGrwHs .66
McKesson .24
McAfee
MeadWvco .92
MedcoHIlth ...
Medtrnic .34
MellonFnc .80
MerriliLyn .80
MetLife .46
MicronT
MobileTel s .57
Monsnto .68
MorgStan 1.08
Motorola .16
NCR Cps ...
NatlCity 1.40
NatGrid 2.17
NOilVarco ...
NatSemi .08
NY CmtyB 1.00
NewellRub .84
NewfExps ...
NewmtM .40
NewsCpA n .16
NewsCpB n .06
NiSource .92
NobleCorp .08
NobleEngy .20
NokiaCp .44
Nordstr .68
NorflkSo .44
NortelNet ...
NoFrkBcs a.88
Novartis .86
Nucor s .60
OcciPet 1.24
OffcDpt
Owenslll
PG&ECp 1.20
PallCp .40
PaylShoe
PeabdyE s .30
Penney .50
PepsiCo 1.04
Pfizer .76
PhelpD 1.50
Pier 1 .40
PioNtrl .20
PlacerD .10
Premcor .08
Pridelntl
Providian
Prudentl .63
PulteHm .20
QtmDSS
Quiksilvr s ..
QwestCm
Raytheon .88
RegalEnt s 1.20
ReliantEn ...
RiteAid
Rowan .25
RylCarb .52
RoylDut 2.82
SAP AG .36
SBC Com 1.29
SLM Cp .88
STMicro .12
Safeway .20
StJude s ...


Name Div
AbdAsPac .42
Ableauctn ...
Adventrx
ApexSilv ...
ApolloG g ...
Avitar
BemaGold ..
BiotechT .04
CalypteBn ...
CanArgo
CelsionCp
Crystallx g
DHB Inds
DJIA Diam 2.07
DSL.net h ...
DesertS gn ...
ENGlobal ...
EagleBbnd ...
GlobeTel n ...
GoldStr g ...
GreyWolf ...
Harken
Hersha .72
Hybridon
ISCO Intl ...
iShBrazil .46
ISh HK .27
iShJapan .04
iShMalasia .16
iShMexico .28
iShTaiwan .08
iShSP500 2.45
iShEmMkt 2.41
iShSPBaG 1.30
iSh20 TB 4.07
iSh EAFE 2.41
iShNqBio ...
iShR1000V1.54


13 +1.09 +32.9
26 +2.09 +10.4
-.02 -11.9
21 +.43 .+7.9
15 -.01 -11.4
51 +1.13 +17.8
13 -.16 -7.0
... +.37 +9.4
24 +.04 +30.2
22 -.02 -4.8
... -.05 +27.8
23 -.12 -3.2
... +.08 -14.5
27 -1.86 +21.0
36 -.35 +7.3
15 -.16 -10.6
12 -.38 -9.4
10 -1.27 +7.2
16 -.25 -12.4
60 -1.98 -8.2
50 +.60 +6.1
11 -.35 -11.9
26 +.40 +3.1
22 -.49 +5.4
9 -.29 -8.2
-.08 +3.7
30 +.74 +27.9
19 +.29 +13.9
15 -.60 -12.9
... -.15 -7.4
16 +2.14 +32.6
39 +.46 -14.3
... -.33 -14.1
-.26 -13.3
15 -.05 +5.3
48 +1.60 +16.4
13 +2.20 +22.4
... -.12 +9.0
21 +2.85 +35.0
13 +.16 -11.3
... +.20 -17.6
14 +.01 -5.9
-.52 -2.7
6 +.03 +2.8
11 +1.90 +29.2
20 +1.59 +23.6
14 -.99 +10.2
9 -.18 +8.1
24 +.24 -.6
84 +.86 +43.3
32 +2.99 +23.4
22 -.78 +22.1
22 -.59 +7.3
23 -.39 +4.0
7 +3.56 -8.2
23 -.80 -19.0
16 +.81 +17.1
24 +.45 -25.2
11 +.81 +64.0
... +1.36 +15.3
14 +.26 +9.0
14 -1.72 +11.1
9 +.07 +19.3
... -.09 -.8
23 +.68 +9.8
... -14.4
39 -.14 +.6
36 -.99 -7.4
... +.08 -9.7
9 -.07 +9.0
58 +.88 +9.3
19 +1.58 -14.7
10 -.49 +3.4
... -.37 -5.6
16 -.33 -9.4
12 -.18 -9.0
29 +.16 -19.6
16 +.19 +14.1
35 +.45 -2.7


YId PE


Name Div YId
StPaulTrav .92 2.4
Salesforc n ...
SaraLee .79 3.9
SchergPI .22 1.1
Schlmb .84 1.2
Schwab .09 .8
SciAtlanta .04 .1
SeagateT .32 1.6
SvceCp .10 1.3
SierrPac
SilcnGphh ...
Smithlntl .48 .8
SmithfF
Solectrn
SouthnCo 1.49 4.3
SwstAirl .02 .1
SovrgnBcp .16 .7
SprntFON .50 2.1
StarwdHtl .84 1.5
StateStr .68 1.4
StorTch
sT Goldn ...
SymbiT .02 .2
Sysco .60 1.6
TECO .76 4.3
TJX .24 1.1
TXU Corp 2.25 2.8
TaiwSemi .09 .9
Target .32 .6
TelMexL s .54 2.9
TempurP ...
TenetHIt ...
Teradyn
Tesoro .20 .4
Texinst .10 .4
3M Co 1.68 2.2
TimeWarn .20 1.2
TitanCp
TollBros
Transocn ...
Tribune .72 2.0
Tycolntl .40 1.4
Unisys
UtdMicro .32 ...
UPS B 1.32 1.8
US Bancrp 1.20 4.1
USSteel .40 1.0
Utdhlth s .01
Unocal .80 1.4
UnumProv .30 1.7
ValeroE s .40 .6
VarianM s ...
VerizonCm 1.62 4.6
ViacomB .28 .8
VimpelC s ...
Vishay
Visteon
Vodafone .75 3.0
Wachovia 1.84 3.6
Walgrn .21 .5
WA Mutl 1.88 4.5
WsteMInc .80 2.7
Weathflnt ...
WellPoints ...
WellsFrgo 1.92 3.1
WDigitl
Weyerh 2.00 3.1
WmsCos .20 1.1
Wyeth .92 2.1
XTO Egy s .20 .6
XcelEngy .86 4.6
Xerox
YumBrds .46 .9
Zimmer


Wkly YTD W
PE Chg %Chg L
46 +.23 +3.5 38
... +.69 +21.3. 20
13 -.17 -15.3 20
... -.12 -6.4 19
28 +2.41 +6.2 71
58k +.35 -2.3 11
22 +.58 +4.5 34
26 -.33 +19.4 20
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77 +.68 +17.1 12
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29 -.11 +8.7 59
10 -1.80 -2.6 28
41 +.16 -31.5 3
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... +.29 -3.7 42
28 -.64 -37.5 1C
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27 -.18 +9.5 23
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38 +.34 -21.3 13
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26 +.23 +13.6 27
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24 -.34 -11.3 17
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76 +1.87 +21.2 51
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3 -1.11 -23.4 36
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... -.86 -6.6 34
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32 +.35 +19.5 45
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37 -.77 +1.1 43
19 +.55 +18.7 31
24 +.40 +3.4 18
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21 +.06 +10.3 52
32 +1.05 -1.7 78


AMEX Most Active

Wkly YTD Wkly Wkly YTD W
Chg %Chg Last Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg L


... +.11 -3.1 6.28
... +.03 -38.6 .51
... +.46 +133.0 2.61
... +1.60 -17.6 14.15
... +.03 -59.8 .33
... -56.3 .07
+.20 -25.6 2.27
-.59 +10.3 168.70
... -.02 -46.2 .21
-.01 -26.9 .79
... +.04 -19.3 .46
... +.22 +3.1 3.70
11 -.07 -59.3 7.75
... -.65 -2.6 104.72
... -52.2 .11
... +.12 -15.2 1.40
31 +.45 +18.7 3.68
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... +.06 -26.9 2.93
38 -.11 +22.2 6.44
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69 -.11 -15.2 9.71
... -.07 +31.3 .63
... +.01 -27.8 .26
+.72 +10.6 24.60
-.03 -1.2 11.94
+.01 -6.9 10.17
-4.9 6.80
... +.02 +3.8 26.11
-1.3 11.90
... -.17 -.8 119.98
... +1.14 +3.8 209.54
... -.22 -.3 57.58
... +1.76 +7.6 95.25
... -1.25 -2.8 155.75
... -1.68 -13.1 65.55
... +.14 +.5 66.69


iShROOO1G .57
iShR2000G .22
iShRs2000 1.53
iShREst 5.12
iShSPSml 1.47
IntrNAP
IntntHTr
IvaxCp s
KFX Inc ...
MadCatzg ...
Nabors
NOrion g ...
NthgtM g ...
NutriSys
OilSvHT .48
PhmHTr 1.79
PionDril
ProvETg 1.44
Qnstake gn
RegBkHT 4.53
RetailHT 3.94
SemiHTr .18
SPDR 2.26
SP Mid 1.04
SP Matls .52
SP HIthC .37
SP Consume .24
SP Engy .53
SP Fncl .65
SP Tech .42
SP Util .90
TelcHTr 2.14
TurboCh rs ...
UltraPt gs ...
UtilHTr 3.65
Viragen rs ...
Yamanag ...


... -.12 -1.4 48
... +.07 -6.1 62
... +.56 -4.6 122
... +1.88 +.6 123
... +.67 -1.0 161
... +.01 -49.5
... -.10 -17.9 58
28 +.30 +25.2 19
... +.61 -6.2 12
... +.05 +89.3 1
25 +2.67 +12.1 57
... +.06 -16.2 2
8 +.10 -30.6 1
... +.79 +356.1 13
+2.05 +12.1 95
-.62 +1.9 74
48 +.25 +41.2 14
... +.05 +6.3 1C
... -45.0
-.43 -4.6 135
... +.52 -4.5 94
... +.29 +4.3 34
-.10 -.6 12C
... +.88 +2.2 123
...+07 -5.5 28
... -.13 +3.5 31
... -.05 -6.4 33
... +.63 +17.4 42
... -.05 -4.1 29
... -.06 -4.1 20
... +.44 +9.4 30
... +.11 -7.1 27
21 +2.41 -40.8 13
... +.77 +13.7 27
...+1.37 +9.0 106
... +.20 -25.0
... +.41 +15.6 3


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005


BUSINESS


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005


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-r,:,, 755-5440


Personal Merchandise


', ]:! "_ :37 *:*
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4 line minimum'2.55 per line You can call us at 755-5440. Monday through Friday
Add an additional St 00 per ad for each from 8 00 am lo 5 00 p m
Wednesday nsertion Some people prefer to place their classified ads in
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*4 .or only the firsti Incorrect insertion, and adveriseir on Ihelirsi day of publication. Credit fo
$* 50 I '"" only the charge for the ad space in error. published errors wil be allowed tor the lirsi insedior
$ 2 5 5 0 r. 1 Please call 755.5440 immediately for prompt tfor hal porlon ol the adverisement which was incor
.2. 1,"*3 Directio.lnal signs correction and billing adjustments, reel. Further. Ihe Publisher shall nol be liable tor any
Picking stickers C e ons Normal ader sing deadl omission o advesements ordered to be published
--.1o Pari- c ning stigno Cancellatilons. Normal advertising deadlines nor for any general, special oronsequential dam
SNo Parkingsign applytorcancellation, ages. Advertising language must comply will
Helpful garage Federal, State or local laws regarding Ihe prohibilior
na an letps t Gdraitf her information be required regarding pay- accommodations. Standard abbreviation s are accept
Sat menls or credit limits, your call will be trans- able; however, the lirs word olf each ad may not bi
www~.akecityreporter.comn lerred Io he accounting department. abbreviated.
r L-. I I FN( R NeedHelp? S LelUsilteiYourCassifiedAd


020 Lost & Found
Found pure breed Puppy. 441 N.
area. Call to identify. 386-867-0099
Lost Golden Retriver, Reward!
Brown Road area. 386-623-3828
REWARD!!! 1 yr old male wire
hair. Jack Russell. Missing 5/28
from Old Ichetucknee Rd. area.
Black Collar. 386-758-9332

060 Services

Expert Computer & Satellite
repair. Excellent Rates!
FREE Estimates! Operating
Since 2000. 386-752-2654
100 Job
Opportunities
$ GET YOUR CLASS B $
CDL license for $250. We train.
904-777-5995

*A/C Service Tech w/ exp.& EPA
card. Will pay well for experience
& productivity. Sales skills a plus.
Must have valid driver's license.
(386) 752-8558
01552233
S .' '. :.


THE LAKE CITY REPORTER
is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier for
small in town Lake City area.
Great second job!!!!
Deliver the Reporter in the early
morning hours Tuesday Sunday.
No delivery on Monday's. Carrier
must have dependable transporta-
,tion. Stop by the Reporter today
to 1'i!i out a contractor's inquirers
form. No phone calls please!

01553425
ALOHA!
39-43 cpm
Sign on Bonus
$0 Lease
CDL + 6 mos. Exp.
800-635-8669


100 Job
100 Opportunities

01552433
NOW HIRING
Motivated individuals for Manu-
factured Housing Construction.
Company with GREAT benefits
and GREAT hours. 401 K, health
insurance, life insurance, paid
vacations and holidays. Competi-
tive starting pay. Experience
helpful but not necessary. Apply
in person: Homes of Merit, Inc.
1915 SE Hwy. 100 E. Office
NO CALLS PLEASE! Homes of
Merit promotes a Drug Free
Workplace and is an Equal
Opportunity Employer.

01552870



Want steady work w/stable
Company. Good equipment
w/ good wages & a full benefits
Pkg. Home daily, off weekends.
CDL-A req'd. F/T & P/T. Call
Columbia Grain 386-755-7700

11553220
DAVIS
EXPRESS,
INC.,
a refrigerated trucking co., located
in Starke, is seeking highly
motivated & professional people
to help strengthen & grow its Op-
erations team. The individual
must have computer skills incl.
knowledge of basic Windows. A
college degree &/or trucking exp.
is a plus. Possible job assignments
incl. Cust. Svc Rep. or Driver
Manager. Both req. a commitment
to meeting company goals &
objectives & have the responsibil-
ity to make decisions that affect
other employees. The applicant
must have excell. people skills &
be willing to work in a fast paced
environment. To find out more
about our company visit us at
www.davis-express.com.
Email your resume to
joshua@davis-express.com or
fax: 904-964-5378, no phone calls


100 Job
Opportunities

01552910




LAKE CITY REPORTER
DISTRICT SALES
MANAGER
The Lake City Reporter's
Circulation department is
currently taking applications for
District Sales Managers are
responsible to ensure that their
carriers deliver newspapers to our
customers on time each day.
Work schedule varies and will
include weekends. It's a great job
for a person who likes a fast
paced environment, and who has
a combination of great
interpersonal and product
management skills.

Our District Sales Managers
interview, coach, resolve
problems and motivate. Most of
all, they take pride in the quality
of service provided.

This could be your next career
move, especially if you:
Enjoy managing a group of
people to achieve positive
results.
Can learn about the
newspaper distribution
process and apply it to
direct operation.
Can follow direction but
can also think on our feet.
Want to be a part of the
Lake City Reporter's success.
Will take initiative to
improve district operations.
For consideration, please mail or
fax your application and/or
resume. Applications are
available at the front counter of
the Reporter. You may also e-mail
your resume and or
questions:
Lake City Reporter
Attention Circulation Director
180 East Duval Street
lake City, Florida 32055
Fax: (386)752-9400
rwaters(alakecitvreporter.com
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE


100 Job01
Opportunities


01553041

REPORTER

THE LAKE CITY REPORTER
is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier for
the White Springs area.
Deliver the Reporter in the early
morning hours
Tuesday Sunday. No delivery on
Monday's. Carrier must have
dependable transportation. Stop
by the Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!

01553227
FORESTER KOPPERS INC.
RESPONSIBILITIES:
v Oversee the procurement of
wood
v Control of inventory & quality
of material
v Pricing & pricing contract
management
, Inspect logging operations
v Meet w/ producers -
Road Warrior.

QUALIFICATIONS:
v Forestry Background
, Strong written & verbal skills
v Ability to set priorities,
analyze problems, work
independently & manage time.
v Proficiency w/ Microsoft Word,
Outlook, Excel.
401-K, Retirement, Medical,
Dental, Truck.
"Koppers is an Equal
Opportunity Employer"

01553364




$2000.00 Sign on Bonus
Drivers with 1 yr T/T exp who
join our team will receive a
$2000. sign on Bonus.
Davis Express, Starke, FL.
98% FL. GA. TN. S.C. & AL
0 1 yr. exp. .34 cpm
0 2 yrs. exp. .35 cpm
0 3 yrs. exp. .36 cpm
100% lumper reimbursement
Safety bonus
0 Guaranteed hometime
Health, Life, Dental &
disability Ins. avail.
401K available.
Call 1-800-874-4270 #6
www.davis-express.com

(01553376

REPORT R

THE LAKE CITY REPORTER
is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier for
242/Branford/O'Brien area.
Deliver the Reporter in the early
morning hours
Tuesday Sunday. No delivery on
Monday's. Carrier must have
dependable transportation. Stop
by the Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!


100 Job
Opportunities

(11553377



THE LAKE CITY REPORTER
is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier for
441 N/Five Points /Deep Creek
area. Deliver the Reporter in the
early morning hours
Tuesday Sunday. No delivery on
Monday's. Carrier must have
dependable transportation. Stop
by the Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!

01553423
Driver-CDL-A req'd
Home Every Night &
Weekend Guaranteed
Dedicated Shorthaul
Avg. $768-$999/wk
No Touch Freight
85% Preloaded/Pretarped
Sunday calls welcome!
Jacksonville, FL Terminal
877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com

)1553424
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT
Jl





Bulldozer, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump Trucks,
Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators

Next Class: June 20th
-+ National Certification
Financial Assistance
Job Placement

800-383-7364
Associated Training Services
www.atsn-schools.com

01553435
First Federal Savings Bank
of Florida has a position open for
a Financial Center Specialist in
the Jasper market. Provide
financial services to both existing
and new bank customers.
Assesses their long term financial
goals and recommends
opportunities that will allow the
bank to assist them in meeting
their goals. Identify qualifying
leads for existing customers.
Provide financial products which
will include loans, deposits
products, investments etc. Assist
with marketing and sales
initiatives. Strong sales, excellent
organizational and
communication skills. You may
pick up an employment
application at any First Federal
Branch and forward to Human
Resources P.O. Box 2029,
Lake City, Fl. 32056
Equal Employment Opportunity.

035251201 .
Orlando Welcome Center
looking for sales people, Full or
Part time. Paid Training available.
Excellent Poistion. 386-754-2500


100 Job
Opportunities


01553431
Children's Home Society,
Florida's largest and oldest child
advocacy agency is currently
seeking individuals eager to make
a difference in the life of children.
Become part of the team whose
living philosophy is to "Embrace
Children, Inspire Lives."

LEAD DEPENDENCY CASE
MANAGERS Live Oak
Will provides continuity of care
with aim for permanent
placement, for children through a
case management model that
includes developing, expanding,
accessing and linking resources in
the community to the needs of the
child throughout the child's
experience in the system, while
documenting progress. Serves as
team leader and provides
guidance to assigned staff in the
delivery of case management
services. Bachelor's degree in a
Human Services related field and
a min of two years of exp in the
delivery of services in a
dependency environment. Must
possess State of Florida Child
Protection Certification

Case Manager I 25 hours per
week Lake City
Will provide supervised visitation
services to families where
children have been removed from
their families due to domestic
violence, child abuse and neglect.
Bachelors degree in a Human
Services related field and one
year experience with children and
families reqd.

Send resume to:
Human Resources
Children's Home Society
605 NE 1st Street
Gainesville, FL 32601
Or apply online at www.chsfl.org
EOE/DFWP

03525474
Management Opportunities
Great Things Start Here! If you
have a strong passion for
satisfying customers and want to
be a part of the best restaurant
system, fax your resume to
(386) 755-2296, or obtain an
application at any of the
following locations.






Lake City Lake City
Starke Live Oak
Macclenny
Live Oak
Chiefland


ACOUSTICAL CEILING
Installers. Experienced only need
apply. Must have transportation.
Group dental and 401K available.
EOE. Drug Free. 800-616-1925

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
for FT & PT Team members..
Apply in person at Tractor Supply
Company on Hwy 90.


L o dial-a-pro


ake City Reporte Reporter Service Directory



l assl ifieds To place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in ColumbIa and surrounding Counties


Highlight Your Reporter SeMce Directory Ad With Artwork-Ask Your Representative For Details


Concrete Work

A.D.F. CONCRETE Construction
A.C.I. Certified. Resd'l Free Est.
Slabs, Driveways, Patios, & Side-
walks. 386-364-5845/ 688-7652
JEB'S CONCRETE: Spring
Specials Call NOW! Resd'l &
Comm'l. Sidewalks, Driveways,
Patios, Stucco, Block, and Repair.
Lic. &.Insured. 386-961-8238

Fencing

A+ FENCING INC.
Wood, chain link, Aluminum, Vinyl
& field fencing. FREE Estimates.
386-755-3152 or 386-344-2442

Home Improvements

All Home Improvements!
Drywall, tile trim paint & fences.
FREE Estimates.
Call 386-344-5724 for appointment.
For all your Home Repairs that
include plumbing fixtures, flooring,
trim work and much more, call
John Thomas at 386-755-6183

Lawn & Landscape Service

01553442
GROFF PROPERTY CARE
A Total lawn and landscape
company. Caring for your
property like its ours!
FREE Quotes! 1-386-433-6096

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, design. Com. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call 386-496-2820 Iv msg.


Lawn & Landscape Service

TIME TO MULCH
Make your flower beds look like
new. Delivered & spread or just
delivery. 386-935-6595


Services

AUTO DETAILING: We will pick
up & deliver your vehicless.
All services available Wash, wax,
detail, etc. 352-283-2627


FREE CLEANUP.
Pick up of unwanted metals,
tin, scrap vehicles.
386-755-0133 We Recycle.


LICENSED COMMERCIAL
Cleaning. Experienced & reliable.
References on request. Please call
Carmen Hicks at 386-758-1970

LYNN'S tMdil;h)iMSNG. Dogs
rinne indivirni illy MnsI hi-rre i k ie
I to 1.5 hr. By appt only. 30 yrs.
exp. Open 7 days. 386-288-5966

u,:, Bulldozer Work! Tractor
work, root raking, bush hogging,
seeding, sodding, disking, site prep
& landscape work. Custom Lawn
care. Irrigation Repair &
Installation. Free Estimate!
Call 755-3890 or (386) 623-3200

We do Tractor Work, mowing
drive ways, culverts, fencing, tree &
debris removal, fill dirt & lime rock,
& Site clean up. 386-623-2816


Masonry

ELSHADIE MASONRY
All types, free est. Satisfaction
guaranteed. We lay them fast
and straight. 386-935-0331

Tree Service

01552912
Jake's Stump Grinding.
Self propelled machine. Enters
36" gate. Satisfaction Guaranteed
or double your stumps back.
386-935-0742 or 344-4469

Hazardous TREE TRIMMING,
removal & stump grinding.
Senior discount. 15 years
experience. 386-963-3360
Outlaw Tree Service.
Ready to Get you Hurricane Ready.
Pro. Climbing and Hauling. Free
Estimates. Scott @ 386-590-4486

Bankruptcy/Divorce

#1 IN BUSINESS SERVICES
Divorce, Bankruptcy, Resumes
RE Closings, Legal Forms
248 N Marion Av. 755-8717
0155274,1
Save $$$ in Legal Fees.
Document Preparation Services.
Divorce, $299; Bankruptcy,
$199.; Trust Pkgs. $399. Call for
a FREE Consult. 386-719-6401
Document Express Services, Inc

Area's best for 12+ Yrs. Low cost,
courteous, prof. svcs. File Bankrupt-
cy before changes. Wills, power/at-
torney, etc. Paula 386-454-2378.


Advertise It Here!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation
vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your
vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an
additional $10 you can run your ad for an additional
10 days. A picture will run every day with a descrip-
tion of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash,
check or credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring
your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you.
Private Party Only!


SPACES


r- ------- --- -- ----- --- -
IName:

Phone:

Address:
I I
I I
I Year, Make & Model
I Description (One Character Per Line)
I I

I I
1- - - I

I I
I- - - -


I Phone # in ad

Payment Method: Q Cash Q Check U Credit Card
I Amount: $
I
SVisa U Master Card
I I

Exp. Date:____

Signature:
II
S .... 180 E.Duval St. or
REPORTER P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fl. 32056
--__ -_- _ _J


20 ft. 1986 Deep V
Bowrider Chaparral

$3,200
198 F. 175 Evenrude, PT&T,
Galvanized Trialer, Very
Dependable
Owner: 386-935-3919






1999 THOR
$49,500
36ft., Like New,
Fully Equipped,
One Slide-Out
Ask For Joe
386-984-0437


Coronet
$10,500
Push Button Transmission.
Inside Restored.
Engine Runs Good
Ask For Joe
386-984-0437



',

01 25 ft. Trail Lite
Travel Trailer
$8,900
A/C, Stove, Refrigoeator,
Bathroom, Very Clean. Sleeps
8, Ft White Area
(561) 602-4022 Cell
(386) 497-2091 Leav Mossage




2000 Chrysler
Cirrus LXi Sedan 4D
V6 2.5 Liter,
Automatic,
Front Wheel Drive,
63,000 Miles
$7,000
Call Maria at 719-4366


or

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r.
y

ih
b
n
c
be









LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005


100 Job
00Opportunities
Driver Co and 0/0
SUPER REGIONAL:
No NYC, EZ Pass, CDL A/hazmat
w/l year exp., immediate approval,
Co. pay: 36 cpm, 0/0 pay: $1.01
cpm. (including fuel surcharge)
(800)299-4744,
www.amoldtrans.com
Assistant needed in a busy
professional office. Requires
computer, typing, phone &people
skills. Prefer someone w/knowledge
/exp. in real estate transactions. All
inq.will be held in strict confidence.
Send reply to Box 01046, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
ASSISTANT/RESTUARANT
MANAGERS. $28-$40k plus.
National Company. Excellent.bene-
fits. Local position. 813-969-3166
ATTN STUDENTS
College/05 HS Grads Great pay!
Flex scheds sales/svc, will train,
all ages 17+. Conditions apply.
Work in Lake City or Gainesville.
Call NOW!!! 352 335-1422
ATTN: WORK at Home
Earn $450-$1500/monthly Part-time
$2000-$4500 Full-time
www.home-basedbusiness.com
BOOKKEEPER
Part-time position, approximately
20 hours per week, with a flexible
schedule. Accounting and computer
skills required; salary based on
experience. Please mail resume to
First Presbyterian Church, P.O. Box
469, Lake City, FL 32056. We are
an Equal Opportunity Employer.
Buddys Home Furnishing is now
taking applications for Manager
trainee, Assistant manager &
Account manager for the
Tallahassee area. Apply at the
Lake City location on Hwy 90 or
online at www.buddyrents.com.
Carpenters needed for storage
building co. Tools & trans a must.
Must have clean MVR & criminal
background check. Workers comp a
plus & general liability req.
Earn up to $1200.00 weekly.
Please call 866-218-4100
Cashier/Clerk. Will train. Apply in
person L&G Service Center. 14197
S. US Hwy 441. Behind Country
Station. Lake City. 386-755-1452.
City of Lake City is accepting appli-
cations for the following positions:
Parking Enforcement Specialist
0405(69)
For a complete list of minimum
qualifications and to fill out an
application please visit City Hall,
150 NW Alachua Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055.
Deadline for these positions is
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2005
an EEO/AAADA/VP employer
City of Lake City is accepting appli-
cations for the following positions:
Maintenance Worker 0405(71)
For a complete list of minimum
qualifications and to fill out an
application please visit City Hall,
150 NW Alachua Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055.
Deadline for these positions is
FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 2005
an EEO/AAADA/VP employer
CLASS A CDL OTR Driver
needed for Florida Pine Straw.
2 yrs exp. required. Health
insurance, retirement, paid vacation.
Drug Free 386-294-3411
CLERICAL
LAKE CITY & SURROUNDING
AREAS MANY POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
CALL FOR APPT
386-755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREENS/BACKGRD
REQ.
Closer needed in busy real estate
office. Must have good typing ,
computer and people skills. Self
motivated and knowledge of the real
estate field a must. Looking for only
the best to join our great team!
Benefits provided. Please Send
reply to Box 01043, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
COLUMBIA READY-MIX
is looking for Mixer drivers &
Flatbed drivers. Min. Class B
license. No Phone calls. Apply:
516 NW Waldo St. Lake City.
COOK.
Day Care Center.
Breakfast, lunch, snack.
30hrs/wk. 352-392-2330
DELIVERY DRIVER with clean
Class A, B, or D CDL. Must have
knowledge of Lake City,
Gainesville & Macclenny areas and
be able to lift heavy objects. Good
benefits offered after 90 days (100%
employee medical, Holiday pay &
Life Ins.), 401K & vacation offered
after 1 yr. of employment. Pick up
application at Lake City Industries,
250 NW Railroad Street.
Delivery Route Driver needed, F/T
position. Class B license a must.
Salary plus Health & Dental. 401K
programs avail. Call 386-754-5561
DO YOU LOVE TO TALK?
Why not get paid for it.! No exp.
req. We train you to make $500.
plus every week. 386-344-0800
DOCTORS OFFICE has opening
for front office clerk, knowledgea-
ble in insurance a plus, send resume
to: 763 S.W. Main Blvd., Lake City,
FL 32025, or fax to: 386-755-1858.


DRIVERS HOME Weekly.
2 years OTR, CDL-A w/HM.
Owner Operators & Company
Drivers, New Pay Scale first year.
NO NE. Call Southern Freight
877-893-9645
Drivers Needed! Earn $800.-
$1000. per wk. Local, Regional,
O.T.R. No CDL no problem.
Class "A" training provided. School
Grads Welcome.
Call AMG 1-866-374-0764
EXPERIENCED MIG Welders
Local company now taking
applications for FT positions. Must
pass welding test. Apply in person
only! Southeastern Metal Products,
1440 N. Marion


100 Job
SOpportunities
Drivers: Run Mega or Short Haul
Home Nightly &/OR
Once during the
Week & weekends!
Lease/Purchase available.
Own your own Truck!
No Money/Credit? No Problem!
CDL -A w/2yrs TT exp.
SheltonTrucking
800-877-3201
DUCT MECHANIC Needed.
Experience helpful but not
necessary. Must be able to pass
drug test and background check.
Must have dependable
transportation. Please apply in
person at: Touchstone Heating and
Air, Inc. 490 S.E. 3rd Avenue
Lake Butler, FL 32054
EXPERIENCED ASSISTANT
needed for professional office.
Legal/financial bkground preferred.
Fax resumes to 386/755-8781.
Experienced Roofers in build up,
shingle & single ply systems
needed. Also needed Formen.
Good pay. Call (904)259-8633
FLAT BED DRIVERS
Atlantic Truck Line
Class A, in state & home every
night. $600-$750/wk. Yearly $1,000
safety bonus. 3 yrs. exp. Paid vac.,
health/dental. Call 1-877-328-7512
Mon-Friday,
FLORIDA PEST CONTROL &
Chemical Company now hiring
service technicians. Full time posi-
tions for dynamic individuals look-
ing for progressive company with
unlimited potential. Good starting
pay full benefit package-will train-
drug free work place. Good Driving
Record required. Apply in person at
536 S.E. Baya Dr. 386-752-1703
FOOD BANK MANAGER:
Desire to serve &help others, team
player, organizational & computer
skills req'd. Send resumes to: 772
East Duval St. Lake City, FL. 32055
Fuel & Lube Truck Driver, w/haz-
mat & Dump Truck Driver, both
need Class B. Clean MVR.
Competitive wages & benefits.
John C. Hipp Construction.
EOE D/F/W/P 386-462-2047
Gilman Building Products Company
is accepting applications for Securi-
ty Guard/Grounds keeper at the
Sawmill located in Lake Butler.
High school diploma or equivalent
is required. Computer knowledge
required. We have competitive rates
& 401K, dental & health insurance,
paid vacation & holidays & promo-
tional opportunities. Interested ap-
plicants should apply in person
Mon. thru Fri. 8:00 am 3:30 pm at
front office. Applicants must bring
SS card, picture ID & diploma.
Heavy Equipment Mechanic
needed. Experience a must. Apply
at Anderson Columbia Co., Inc.,
871 NW Guerdon Road, Lake City,
FL. Applicants will be drug tested.
DFWP/EOE
HELP WANTED Experienced
Shingle Roofers only. Must have
Tools & transportation. Please call
(352)375-8343 or 386-867-0327
Kaam Transmission needs exp.
Auto Tech. Must have own tools.
Apply in person 125 NE Jonesway
Lake City, 32055 or 386-758-8436


pm o

.~dam
dow


*NOW


100 Job
SOpportunities
If You like to travel & like animals.
we have the job for you. Looking
for someone to travel the East
Coast. June Oct. Must like talking
to people & have a valid drivers
license. Randy at 352-514-4864
Local construction company has im-
mediate opening for an equipment
operator. Candidates must be 21
years of age and drug free with a
clean class A CDL driving record.
Job requires frequent travel in and
out of state Hourly rate $15 to $18
D.O.E. Interested parties please
contact John at 386-752-0141. We
are an Equal Opportunity Employer.
LOCAL DRIVERS NEEDED
Tractor trailer dump operation,
looking for dependable drivers.
Good pay. M-F. No Weekends. Call
Southern Aggregate, LLC @
386-752-9754
MYSTERY SHOPPERS NEEDED!
Earn While You Shop!
Call Now Toll Free
1-888-255-6040 Ext. 13252
NEEDED: HEAVY Duty Truck
Mechanic. Must have own tools,
and must have experience.
Call North Florida Truck Parts at
386-752-8238
OTR Drivers Wanted
Out 2-3 weeks
Bonus Program
Trucks Available Now
Excellent Pay
Call Southern Specialized
386-752-9754
PAINTERS NEEDED:
Experience &
travel required.
Call Clay at 386-397-5706
01552022
AMERICA'S AIR FORCE
Jobs available in over
150 careers, plus:
Enlistment bonuses for certain
careers
Up to $10,000 Student Loan
Repayment
Up to 100% tuition assistance
High tech training
High-school grads age 17-27
call 1-800-423-USAF or
visit AIRFORCE.COM.



44
U.S. AIR FORCE

CROSS INTO THE BLUE

PRESCHOOL/TODDLER
TEACHER Full- time 9am 6pm
Great working atmosphere!
Call 386-758-2368


a "-odw4
doa* a

1aw a
a" quom


100 J0ob
Opportunities
RECEPTIONIST/SECRETARY:
Small office has opening for
receptionist. Must have: positive
people & communication skills;
valid Florida driver's license;
computer literate. Reply/resume to
A -. ... .. ,' I5,. ... o r
fax to 386-755-7065.

SALES FORCE Expanding.
Full Benefits
38 year old business.
Call Bobby at 386-752-7751
Storage building co. seeks
Field Supervisor. Tools,
transportation, clean criminal
background check & MVR a must.
Salary range $600-$650 a week.
Fax resume to 850-222-2283
032562 8
Driver
Drive Less Earn More!
$1000/wk average
Plus bonus & benefits!
I yr tractor trhir &
Class A CDL req'd
Owner Operators Needed!!
$1.10 $1.30/mile avg.
S.S.I.
877-724-4554
TRI COUNTY TREE SERVICE
is looking for Bucket Truck
Operator, with experience in Tree
Work.. Pay based on experience.
386-963-5000
TRI COUNTY TREE SERVICE
is looking for ground person, With
possible class B/CDL. Pay based on
experience with tree work.
386 963-5000
TRUCK DIESEL Mechanic: 2
openings. F/T. Send resume to
Columbia Motor Sales, Inc. 4484 E.
U.S. Hwy 90, lake City, FL 32055
TRUCK DRIVER needed. Class A
CDL. Home nights & weekends.
Call & leave name & number. All
calls returned 386-362-1671
WANTED!! INDUSTRIAL
HARD WORKERS ONLY NEED
APPLY. ALL SHIFTS
AVAILABLE. MUST BE ABLE
TO LIFT 50 TO 70LB. CALL FOR
AN APPT NOW!!
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
DRUG SCREENS/
BACKGRD REQ.
WAREHOUSE
BODY PARTS OF AMERICA
seeks team oriented, hardworking
individuals. Health, dental, life in-
surance available. Monday-Friday.
If you are not afraid of honest,
hard work. Apply in person at:
385 SW Arlington Rd, Lake City
(no phone calls please.)


Driver
I "f- iX gt a I =1*]-t : l =1 =l g :pe] U [1 =M-0
NEW COVENANT REFRIGERATED DIVISION
*Separate Dispatch *Solo or Teams Wanted
*Limited Size of Fleet *Open Door to Management
*1100 Mile Average Length of Haul -Incentive Pulp Pay
*Call Bridgett at ext. 3806
Dedicated & OTR Available
0h 1M MI iT M Iii 111 tai Illal:g1'1i[;]iill -1 mi(l1t.:1(I R .l.Mau i i I h-M


888-MORE-PAY
888-667-3729
Covenant Transport


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100 Job
SOpportunities

03525685
DRIVERS
Our OTR Co. Drivers avg.
$40,000 to $55,000
Paid all miles
Loading/Unloading pay
Good Home Time 2 to 3 days off
Time out 5 to 10 days.
No Tank Exp.? Will Train as
long as you have 1 yr T/T
experience
BENEFITS
Medical, Vision, Dental,
Drug & Life Insurance
Retirement 401(K) with Co.
Match + Profit Sharing
Family Atmosphere
We Require:
Class A CDL w/ X end.
1 yr OTR Exp.
Please call Rogers Cartage
866-388-0840
www.rogerscartage.com
*.DRIVER NEEDED.*:
Exp. driver for local parts company
Clean driving record required.
Mon-Fri. Apply in person: 385 SW
Arlington Blvd, Lake City.

120 Medical
Employment

FRONT DESK Person.
Dental terminology a must.
Live Oak/Lake City. $9.25 hr.
Fax resume to: 386-961-9086

FULL TIME Receptionist need, for
busy medical office. Experience a
must. Mail resume to: Samantha
Brantley, 4355 NW American Lane,
Lake City, FL 32055


1 Medical
120 Employment

01553429




Medical Records Assistant
Full-Time

This position is responsible for
the clerical functions related to
maintaining accurate and
organized patient and vendor
records, as well as collecting,
maintaining, processing and
responding to request for
documentation for medical
records. Assists with other
functions including data entry
and administrative support.
Must have HS diploma/
equivalent with 1-2 yrs. of
related office exp. including
computer, data entry and
medical records.
Family centered working
environment. Excellent benefits.
Please email a resume to:
employment(5)Hospicecares.org
fax a resume to: 352-379-6206
or apply in person at: 4200 NW
90th Blvd., Gainesville, FL
32606. EOE/DFWP.

CNA's for In-Home Service
Columbia County Senior Services
Inc. is accepting applications for
dependable, hardworking state
certified CNA's to do in-home
service for seniors. Drug test and
background screen required. Drug
Free Workplace. Applications
available at CCSS,
480 SE Clements PI. EOE


TECHNICAL FIELD

SPECIALISTS



DIGITAL

RECEPTION

SERVICES, INC.
Digital Reception Services is a growing Regional Service Provider for
DISH Network the industry leader in satellite TV. We are seeking
dependable individuals with a good driving record for our LAKE
CITY LOCATION. Must be mechanically inclined. Electrical, cabling,
phone and alarm experience a plus but will train the right
individual. Check out this great opportunity. We provide:

* Company Truck and Tools Paid Training
* Steady Schedules Strong Advancement Opportunities
* Excellent Pay & Benefits Including Health, 401K, Vacations
Join our team and learn how to put your talent to work for you.
Please fax resume or letter of interest to: (386) 752-0070. E-mail:
daniel.davis@dowelectronics.com or phone: (386) 527-5351. DRS is
a drug/smoke-free EOE.


Shands Rehab Hospital

SWhat: Nursing Job Fair
When: Wednesday, June 8, 2005
Where: Shands Rehab Hospital Lobby
4101 NW 89th Blvd- Gainesville
(Health Park off of 39th Avenue)
Time: 3:00pm 6:30pm

*RNs New graduates & experienced RNs
r" *LPNs Licensed LPNs 6 months experience
./ required and IV certification preferred \.
\ *CNAs CNA or equivalent, prior patient care
experience required, nursing student upon
Li completion of 1 st semester of nursing school ^
) *Therapeutic Attendants PRN positions only, high ._
school grad or equivalent required
The Rehab Hospital is a 40 bed comprehensive medicalrehab
I hosital where nwsirg works with udividuak and their
families after stroke, rain ijur, spinal cor ijqury, ortho
conditions, anmputations, burns and neuAr conditions to assist
them in returning home.
0 Over 80% of owf pafiefs improve and are discharged
home ajer rehaMbitain.
BE PART OF OUR TEAM
There will e interviews, tours, and refreshments.

SInterested but able to attend?
Please contact Human Resou ces at (352) 265-0441 ext, 8-5300
(^11111 1111"- 7' t ^P ----'" "'1


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005


12 ^f Medical
120 Employment

0 1553446


Gentiva-
Home Health Services

Registered Nurses
Physical Therapist
Home Health Aides
Full and per diem positions
available in the
Lake City/Live Oak area.

Home Care Training Provided
Excellent Salary/Benefits.

Commit to us, We'll commit to
you. Call Jill toll free
1/866-GENTIVA or
Jill.Lindsey@gentiva.comn
HHA#206340963&299991379

Come home to Gentiva
America's home healthcare leader

03525541
CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANT
Full Time or Part time all Shifts
Call Amelia Tompkins
At 386-362-7860
Or apply at
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 Helvenston Street S.E.
Live Oak FL 32064
EOE/D/V/M/F

03525646
MERIDIAN BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE, INC.
Counselor IV/ Senior Clinician-
FT Outpatient Adults/FT/PRN
Specialized Theraputic Foster
Care G'ville, Bronson; FT Family
Crisis Treatment G'ville
Add Specialist- MIST & Adult
Programs- FT/PT G'ville & PRN
Lake City
Child Welfare Case Manager
Trainee- FT G'ville, Lake City,
Trenton, Live Oak
Children's Case Manager- FT,
Cross City, Lake City, Trenton,
Jasper
Adult Case Manager- FT
G'ville, Lake City, Trenton
Counselor III-FT Lake City
Adolescent Therapeutic Group
Home
Counselor II- FT G'ville, Lake
City
Counselor I- FT G'ville
Acute Care Program Director-
FT G'ville
Emergency Svcs Intake
Evaluator- FT G'ville, Lake City
Sr. Client Relations Specialist-
G'ville
Maintenance Worker FT
G'ville,
Staff Assistant- FT G'ville CSU
LPN FT/PRN G'ville & Lake
City Adolescent Therapeutic
Group Home
Facility Manager- FT G'ville
Psych Tech FT/ PRN G'ville &
Lake City
Comp Assessor- PRN G'ville,
Lake City
Staff Psychiatrist- FT G'ville
Family Care Manager- FT
Family Crisis Treatment, G'ville
Emergency Svcs. Driver- PRN
Lake City
Admin. Asst.- FT G'ville
Executive Admin. Asst.- FT
G'ville
HR Supervisor- FT G'ville
Excellent benefits.
For details visit
www.meridian-healthcare.org or
call (352) 374-5600 ext. 8277.
Send resumes to:
Meridian Behavioral Healthcare,
Inc., Human Resources,
4300 SW 13th St., Gainesville,
FL 32608, fax (352) 374-5608,
e-mail: jobs@mbhci.org, ATTN:
refer to Sun Ad. EOE, DFWP

03525702
Homecare Billing Specialist
Experience in Medicare,
Medicaid, and Private Insurance
Billing and Collections, for fast
paced corporate office. Must be
detail oriented, dependable and
organized. Responsible for
processing, maintaining, and
collecting homecare billing and
records. Quickbooks, Excel and
computer proficiency preferred.
Send Resume to: P.O. Box 567,
Lake Butler, Florida 32054
Attn: G. Roberts,
Fax to Attn:
G. Roberts 386-496-1034,
or Email
groberts( suwanneemedical.com


120\ Medical
120 Employment

03525647
COUNSELOR III
( Lake City Group Home)
Provide direct care for
severely emotionally disturbed
adolescents. Be able to implement
behavior modification program.
Model socially appropriate
interventions for residents, as well
as direct care staff. Work
effectively in a team. Participate
in social activities with the
residents. Must have a Bachelors
Degree in related field. Excellent
benefits. For details visit
www.meridian-healthcare.org
or call (352) 374-5600 ext. 8277.
Send resumes to:
Meridian Behavioral Healthcare,
Inc., Human Resources, 4300 SW
13th St., Gainesville, FL 32608,
or fax to: (352) 374-5608,
ATTN: refer to Sun Ad.
EOE, DFWP

03525652
LPN
( Lake City Group Home)
Administer medical nursing
treatment and medication to
severely emotionally disturbed
adolescents in the Lake City
Group Home. Provide assistance,
training, supervision, and
monitoring of basic living skills
to clients according to their needs,
skills, and functioning level.
$19.00/hourly.
Minimum Qualifications:
Graduation from an accredited
school of nursing. One year of
experience, including some
psychiatric crisis stabilization or
emergency room. Must possess
a valid, active license as a
professional licensed nurse in the
State of Florida and an active
CPR certification card.
Excellent Benefits.
For details visit:
www.meridian-healthcare.org or
call (352) 374-5600 ext. 8277.
Send resumes to:
Meridian Behavioral Healthcare,
Inc., Human resources
4300 SW 13th St., Gainesville,
FL 32608, Fax (352) 374-5608,
ATTN: Refer to Sun Ad.
EOE, DFWP

03525656
HR SUPERVISOR
Meridian Behavioral Healthcare,
Inc. has an immediate opening for
a Human Resources Supervisor
knowledgeable in benefit
administration, employment and
privacy legislation, worker's
comp issues, recruitment,
applicant screening, employment
verifications, background
screening, new hire orientation
and HR/payroll functions.
Must be proficient in a variety
of software programs including
Word & Excel. Requires
2-4 years progressively
responsible HR Generalist
experience and a Bachelor's
degree in related field. Possess
excellent verbal & written skills;
organizational skills & proven
ability to set priorities &
manage multiple tasks.
Submit resumes w/cover letter to
Human Resources, Meridian
Behavioral Healthcare Inc.,
4300 SW 13th Street, Gainesville,
FL 32608 or fax to
(352) 374-5608 or email
tellis(5mbhci.org
Meridian Behavioral Healthcare,
Inc. is a drug free/smoke free
work place. We are an equal
opportunity workplace and
encourage diversity in the
work force. EOE M/F/D/V

FT Dietary Technician
for 180-bed Facility
Must have minimum of 2 year
degree in Nutrition Therapy or a
related field and at least 1 year
experience. Contact Bette Forshaw
NHA @ 386-362-7860 or apply in
person Suwannee Health Care
Center 1620 E Helvenston Street
Live Oak, Florida 32064
EOE, DV, M/F

Medical Records Assistant wanted
part-time for .doctor's office in Lake
City. Please fax resume Attn:
Human Resources (352) 373-9870
or email simedpa@(yahoo.com

NURSES AIDE For Lovely
Elderly woman. 24 hour shifts.
Smoke free environment.
386-963-5256


141 Babysitters
CHILD CARE Registered home
#R03C0001. M-F flexible hours.
Full Time. Toddlers school age.
386-752-2220

17O Business
Opportunities

01553367
FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITY
IN NORTH FLORIDA
COVERALL
CLEANING CONCEPTS
Own a COVERALL
Franchise for as little
as $1,500 Down
Guaranteed Customers
Complete Training & Support
equipment & Supplies
Guaranteed Financing
Our secret can be your success!
CALL NOW:
(800) 249-2532

LOOK
WANT TO GET
RICH
CALL 386-466-1104
WELL ESTABLISHED
Floral Shop in Lake City for sale.
Entire business including contents.
386-497-1905
i 1

190 Mortgage Money
NEED CASH Fast?
Do you have a house or mortgage
note that you need to cash out?
Call 347 451-7652.


310 Pets & Supplies
AKC REG w/ Health Cer.. Dober-
man Puppies. 3 female, I black & 2
red. Reduced price to $375 each.
386-365-0430

AKITA PUPPIES
9 weeks old.
All Champion Lines.
386-755-1771
Boston Terrier.
female
$250.
386-364-1652
ENG.BULLDOG PUPPYS
2 males 2 females
ready 6-16-05. $1,800 each.
386-754-7167
LYNN'S PET GROOMING. Dogs
done individually. Most breeds take
1 to 1.5 hr. By appt only. 30 yrs.
exp. Open 7 days. 386-288-5966
Male Black
Mini Daschund.
$150.
386-364-1652
MALE BLACK Pug.
Under 1 yr old.
CKC reg. $500.
386-364-1652
POINTER Bird
Dog Puppy.
Health certificate. $100
386-364-1652
PUBLISHERS NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health certifi-
cate from a licensed veterinarian
documenting they have mandatory
shots and are free from intestinal
and external parasites. Many species
of wildlife must be licensed by Flor-
ida Fish and Wildlife. If you are un-
sure, contact the local office for in-
formation.

360 Feed, Seed
360 & Plants
FOR SALE Centipede Sod for your
lawn. Small or Large orders.
Also, Pensacola Bahia sod for
erosion control. Call 386-963-2827.
Dwight Stansel Farm & Nursery.


402 Appliances
GE DISHWASHER. White,
1 year old. Excellent Cond.
$145.00 386-935-6619 or
386-288-3596


408 Furniture
"HENRY LINK" Wicker Twin
Bed, $75.00 OBO. 3 Wicker
night stands $25.00 Firm.
386-754-2316


Mortgage Sales Consultant/Loan Officer


The market is demanding your talents. A great career oppor-

tunity with high earnings potential awaits you at CCB, your

hometown bank. We are seeking high energy mortgage sales

consultants capable of building strong partnerships with

builders, realtors, and developers. If you can sell, manage

your time, and effectively communicate where it matters, we

want to talk to you. A competitive base salary plus sales

incentive are available for the right candidate.



A great ground floor opportunity awaits you at CCB. Call

today 386-752-5646 or email your resume to

jobs@ccbanc.com.

CCB is an equal opportunity employer. M/F/D/V


408 Furniture
LOVE SEAT, beige, sleeper.
Excellent Condition.
$75.00
386-754-2316

Machinery &
411 Tools
11x40 Harrison geared HD metal
lathe, 8" crescent jointer, power
matic tennon machine, vises, mikes,
lathe chucks, die filer, much misc,
tooling, calipers. $20-$2,750.
386-754-9233


416 Sporting Goods
38 SPECIAL. Stainless steel
S&W. 4 inch barrel. Adjustable site.
$450. Excellent shape!
386-961-8468
500 MOSBERG
12 gauge shot gun with
two barrels. $225 FIRM
386-397-1131
EXERCISE BIKE.
$35.00
Excellent shape!
386-961-8468
NORDIC TRAC
SKI MACHINE $100.00
Excellent shape!
386-961-8468
REMINGTON 700
30.06 Synthetic, w/scope. $450.00
Excellent shape!
386-961-8468
STAIR STEPPER
$35.00
Excellent shape!
386-961-8468


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
Payment in advance for standing
pine timber. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-454-1484 or 961-1961.
WANTED TO Buy From Owner.
DW MH 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath.
Close to Lake City. Low $40's.
Please call 352-860-0398


430 Garage Sales
,PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
must be prepaid

YARD SALE!
Saturday. June 4th 8 2
Villa Ct. between 247 & 47,
off 242. Lots of misc. stuff.
YARD SALE. Sat & Sun. 8 ? 300
SE Defender. Off Baya. Look for
signs. Furn., Kids items, baby stuff,
electronics. Too much to list!


440 Miscellaneous
BBQ SMOKER, New Braunfels
#4800 Black Diamond, Wood
Firebox or Charcoal, $80.00
386-754-5397.


440 Miscellaneous
BOY'S BICYCLE. 24-inch.
15 speed. Red.
Good condition. $25.
386-466-0951
JUST ARRIVED
Sheet Rock &Paneling
Morrell's
386-752-3910

630{ Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
1,2, & 3 Bedroom MH avail For
immediate occupancy at Wayne's
RV Resort. Central AC, pool &
laundry mat. Call or visit
9am-5pm for more information.
2/1 CH/A. Clean, Quite, Well
maintained park. Fishing pond,
large wooded lots, Screened porch..
Long term rentals only. $385 mth,
$385 Security. 386-719-9169
No Pets.
IN PARK Mobile Homes for Rent
2BR/2BA 1st & sec. required.
Applications & references required.
386-719-2423
LATE MODEL MOBILE HOMES
Starting $365 month, Beautiful
Pond setting, w/trees. CH/A, Cable
avil. No pets. Call 386-961-0017
MANUFACTURED. HOME
for rent. 4BR/2BA, 1 acre lot.
41 North close to Hwy 10 $700
Dep., $700 month 386-758-8429
QUIET PARK
2br/lba. $400 mo. plus utilities.
1st & last required. Kelly's
RV/MH Park. 386-397-2616

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
1997 24 X 44 MH. Remodeled on
cozy 1 acre wooded lot, with creek.
NW of Town. $55,000.
386-867-4738
1997 FLEETWOOD MH
14x70. 3br/2ba. Great shape.
Pay off balance $18,000.
Must be moved. 386-758-3124
ABSOLUTELY "THE BEST"
Mobile Homes and Modulars
Move over Palm & Jake, the new
#1 home is here. Guaranteed
Gary Hamilton Homes 758-6755
DOUBLE WIDE on 1/2 acre.
3br/2ba. Like new. Close to town.
$64,900. 386-365-2770.
Broker Owner.
GOVERNMENT BACKED
financing available with as little
as $500 down. Prestige Homes
386-752-7751
MOBILE HOME FINANCING
Refinance/lower rates or Purchase.
Investment home O.K. Land Home
or Home Only. (904)225-2381
We are the FACTORY
Building manufactured homes for
38 years. Quality homes, low prices.
386-752-7751
WE HAVE down payment,
gift assistance
programs available
call 1-800-355-9385


Q
1TYSERVICE

2001


B-R R oP
THE DARBY-ROGERS COMPANY
www.c21darbyrogers.com


I, : _. -- ..




Country Showplace...5BR/2.5 BA brick home on 1
acre. 5th BR could be office, bonus room or game room.
Detached 2 car garage. Formal living room, fireplace,
beautiful user friendly kitchen. Large screened in grilling
porch with hookup for spa. $289,900. MLS#44564


2 For 1 Sale...Bring the whole family to enjoy this 11.4
acres at the intersection of 2 paved roads. Easy access
to Live Oak, Lake City or Branford. Beautiful trees and
open pasture. Includes one DWMH and one SWMH.
Asking $139,900 MLS#45564


Let's Go Fishing...Newer 4/2 DWMH in a great subdi-
vision with a stocked pond. This home comes with 2
decks and privacy fencing. Won't last long at this price.
$94,500 MLS#45475


Great Value...Older 3BR/2BA mobile on 5 acres just off
a paved road. Features fireplace and built in buffet in din-
ing room. Needs some TLC but priced right! MLS#45535
$69,900



Currently rented. 3/2 DWMH on fenced, treed lot.
SWMH in rural subdivision. 3/2 on 1 acre. Priced t
Cute bungalow has 3BR/1 BA with hardwood floor
Like new 3BR/2BA DWMH on 1.12 acres. MLS#4
10 Wooded vacant acres close to the river. $100,


650 Mobile Home
650 & Land

CLEAN, WELL-KEPT 1991
2br/2ba. 14x72 on private green hi-
dry acre. 6 mi. to VA off Moore Rd.
$46,000. Cash Only 386-961-9181

FOR SALE. Like New 3/2,'01 MH,
in S/D. Paved St., City water, CH/A
& appli. Possible Owner finance.
Near town 386-752-1212/365-3094
FOR SALE. Like New Lg 3/2,'01
MH, Loaded w/FP. Paved St., CH/A
& appli. Possible Owner finance.
Near town 386-752-1212/365-3094
OWNER FINANCE
14x70,3br/2ba, I ac. 41N to Suwan-
nee Valley Rd., to Everatt Rd. to
Lonnie, to Belfry Ct. 386-867-0048

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
2BR/2BA LUXURY Apartment
with garage. 5 min. from
Timco & downtown.
386-755-4590 or 386-365-5150
BRANDYWINE APARTMENTS
Spacious 1,2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartments. Rental Rates Beginning
at $272 + Utilities. Handicap Units
Available. For Rental Information
call: (386) 752-3033
730 SW Brandywine Dr., Lake City
Mon-Fri 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Freshly painted, 2br/2ba duplex on
the Golf Course. Water, sewer &
garbage included. $750. mo. Plus
security Call Lea.386-752-9626

n730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2br/lba Home for rent. CH/A, paid
utilities includes cable. Columbia
City area. $700 mth, 1st, last & sec
Call 386-752-2380 after 6 p.m.

3BR/1BA HOME in town. Fenced
in backyard. Ref. required. 1st, last
and security deposit required!
$750 a month. Call 386-365-4708
3br/2 ba Brick. W/D,stove,refrig.
Lawn care incl. Lg. fenced back
yard. Close to V.A. $825.00 mo,
1st, last, sec. req. Call Richard,
Licensed Realtor. 386-755-6653
3br/2ba Brick home w/garage,
located in a very nice & quiet s/d.
$925. mo. Ref required,
1st last &sec. 386-623-4375
3BR/2BA HOME for Rent on CR
245. CH/A. $600 month, $500
Security, No Pets, Ref Required.
386-752-4597
3BR/2BA-1998 SQ/FT.- Inground
pool. Private Neighborhood.
$1100/mo 1st mo & sec dep. $1100
req. 12 mo. Lease. 386-623-4654.
FOR LEASE 3br/2ba like new
home. No pets. For more
information call 386-752-4864 or
call 386-397-0678
FOR RENT nice large 4br/2 1.5ba
brick home with fire place, 2 car
garage on 1.5 acre, New paint and
carpet. $1,375 mth, plus Sec & Last.
Call Bruce 386-365-3865


3101 US HWY 90 WEST, Suite #101
Lake City, FL 32055
Business (386) 752-6575
Toll Free 1-800-333-4946

visit our website www.century21.com





: ". %ia-"' -
.. I. ,. '.-i




Surrounded by Oaks...Beautiful home presented by
Blake Construction. 2,628 sf. 4BR/3.5BA. Bonus room
with bath could be 5'" BR. Split plan, formal dining room,
gas fireplace, hardy board & brick exterior. MLS#43002
$319,900









Bring Your Horses...Beautiful 3BR/2.5BA home on 3
acres. Spacious floor plan with large kitchen. 100x22
concrete floor building with a game room, storage &
workshop. All this plus a 4 stall horse barn. $339, 900
MLS#45673









Just Listed... Very nice 2002 home with 1,648 sf. on .5
acre. Located on a corner lot in Emerald Lakes.
MLS#45681 $185,100





TOO NEW FOR PHOTO



Too New For Photo...Under construction. 3/2 with split
bedrooms, large master bath, French doors lead out to
grilling porch, boxed ceilings in the great room. Located
in Creekside Subdivision on .68 acre. $196,900
MLS#45387


. MLS#44788 $55,900
to sell @ $35,000 MLS#44619
rs. $69,900 MLS#44146
13944 $78,500
,000 MLS#45665


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2005


Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference. limita-
tion or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability, fami-
lial status or national origin, or any
intention to make such preference,
limitation or discrimination." Fami-
lial status includes children under
the age of 18 living with parents or
legal custodians, pregnant women,
and people securing custody of chil-
dren under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this newspa-
per are available on an equal oppor-
tunity basis. To complain of dis-
crimination call HUD toll-free at 1-
800-669-9777. The toll free tele-
phone number to the hearing im-
paired is 1-800-927-9275

750 Business &
Office Rentals
800 sq ft. Finished OFFICE
SPACE. 1000 add'l sq. ft. possible.
Will build to suit. Off US90. Call
752-6058 for more information.


COMMERCIAL LEASE. 780 or
1560 sq ft. Next to Winn Dixie.
High Traffic area. 780 or 1560 plus
cam per month. Open June 1.
800-342-0135
GREAT LOCATION
Office/Retail
$950/mo. incl. Utilities
386-752-5035
A Bar Sales, Inc.
7 Days 7 am-7 pm
OFFICE FOR Rent on
East Duval St. $400 per month.
Call John Pierce at
386-758-4264

760 Wanted to Rent
RETIRED COUPLE would like to
rent a nicely furnished living facili-
ty. Mobile or double wide home,
camper etc. Live Oak or Lake City
area. Have local ref. 386-623-9390

810 Home for Sale
$35,000! 3br/2ba foreclosure
available now!
For listing call
1-800-749-8124 ext H411
5 pretty ac. & small 2br/lba block
cottage. Fruit trees, new septic, etc.
House needs some updates. 3 mi. to
1-75. $79k obo. 386-330-0331
NICE 1800 sq ft. home on
7.5 acres. 3br/1.5ba.
Fireplace, pool, $194,500.
386-755-5045 Iv. message

820 Farms &
82 Acreage
80 acres. Homestead. Oaks, hard-
woods, Pasture. 3/2 MH. $800,000.
Janice Ambrosine. Results Realty.
386-752-6947 or 365-3032


820 Farms &
Acreage
03525693
Wanted: 2 to 5 acres, between
Lake City & Live Oak.
ALSO
Wanted: 20 to 40 acres
ALSO
Wanted: 100 to 200 acres in
Columbia or Suwannee County.
Call Jane S. Usher, Lic Real
Estate Broker. 386-755-3500
7, 10 acres. Wellborne area, West of
Lake City, off of Hwy 90. 7 acres
w/well, septic, power pole. 10 acres
square. Owner may help finance.
Jane S. Usher. Lic. Real Estate
Broker. 386-755-3500
CHICKEN FARM. Broiler houses
need not be up to standard.
Phone 636-625-1884,
Fax 636-625-1747
TURNER COUNTY
SOUTH GA
242 AC @ $525,000
Pine/Hardwood/Pond
Paved Road
Call Owner
478-477-1000
830 Commercial
8 Property
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY.
I acre with house. 277 of Baya Ave.
Frontage. For more information.
Call 386-752-4072
860 Investment
860 Property


ARE YOU tired of only making
2-4% on your savings, IRA's etc.
I pay at least 10% for Real Estate
backed loans. Call 386-623-2110

920 Auto Parts
92 & Supplies
20 IN" Rims, 5 lug
universal. $800 OBO.
386-697-4083 or
386-758-8707

940 Trucks
1993 CHEVY S 10. Automatic,
V6, 4.3, Short bed. Sharp
125K miles. $3,500.
(352)339-5158

950 Cars for Sale
*Hondas from $500*
Police Impounds!
For listings call
1-800-749-8116 ext A760
1988 FORD Wagon, with Tow
package. AC, PS. Runs good,
Looks ok, Radio Bad. $750.
386-755-8941
1992 SAAB 900 model. Runs great,
CD. Needs brake work.
93K miles. $1,700 OBO.
Call 386-963-2271
1994 SUBARU Legacy Wagon.
I owner, 4 door, 5 speed, AC.
35mpg. Looks and drives great.
$1,950. (352)339-5158
1995 HONDA Civic CX. 2 door,
Automatic, good AC.
Very, Very Nice. $2,950.
(352)339-5158


Own Your Own Home

" '-, ,,


Brand
SNew

Home As Low As V Pown (w.a.c.)


THREE RIVERS HOUSING CORP.
Call 754-6770 Leave Message
Open Monday-Friday
A not for profit tax exempt Florida Corp. An Equal opportunity housing program. ,-

AREA MORTGAGE RATES
Institution Phone 30 fixed 15 fixed 1 ARM FHA/
Institution Phone rate /pts rate / pts rate pts VA
Absolute Mortgage Co. (888) 90-HOMES 5.25 / (.00 4.88 /0.(X) 3.38 /0.(X)00 No Quote
Accountable Mortgage (8(X)) 840-8771 5.38 / .00 5.00 / .(X) 4.00/0.00 6.75 / 0.(8)
All Fund Mortgage (866) 535-8987 5.75 / .010 5.38 / O.X) No Quote No Quote
American Federal Mortgage (888) 321-4687 5.(X) / 1.88 4.75 / 1.0(X) 3.25 / 0.00 5.38/ .00X)
American Home Finance (888) 429-1940 5.25/0.00 4.88 /O.() 3.38 /0.(X) No Quote
America's Best Mortgage (800) 713-8189 5.50/0.00 5.00/0.00 No Quote 5.88/0.00
Amicus Mortgage Group (877) 385-4238 5.38/0.00 5.13 /10.(1) No Quote 5.50/0.0 X)
Amtrust Funding (8(X00) 774-0779 5.38/0.00 4.88 / 0.) 3.00/0.00 5.50 / .00
Borrowers Advantage Mtg. (888) 510-4151 5.38/0.00(1 4.88 /(0.(X) No Quote 5.38 /10.(X)
Century Home Funding (8(X)) 224-7(006 5.(X) / 3.00) 4.50 / 3.(X) 3.38 / 2.(X00 5.25 / 3.(X)
Fast and Easy Mortgage Co. (813) 404-7304 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote
First Rate Mortgage (8(X00) 887-9106 5.63 /0.00 5.25/0.00 No Quote No Quote
Florida Mortgage Corp. (888) 825-63(0) 5.25 / 0.00 4.88 / 0.() 4.38 / 0.(X) 5.25 / 0.(00
Golden Rule Mortgage (8(X)) 991-9922 4.88 / 1.75 4.50 / 1.75 2.50 / 1,00 5.25 / 1.(X)
Guardian Mortgage (800) 967-3060 5.38 /0.00 4.88 / 0.(X) No Quote No Quote
H.D. Financial (888) 368-0655 5.75/0.00 5.38 / 0.(X) No Quote No Quote
Home Finance of America (800) 358-LOAN 5.25 /0.00 4.88 / .(18 3.00 / 0,(X) No Quote
Homestead Mortgage (888) 760-6006 5.38 / 0.00 5.00 / 0.00 4.00 / 0.() 5.50 / O.()
Lighthouse Mortgage (800) 784-1331 5.38 / 0.00 4.88 /0.00 No Quote No Quote
Sovereign Mortgage (8(X)) 996-7283 5.25 / 0.00 4.88 / 0.O0 4.88 / 0.(X) 5.25 / (1.00
Stepping Stone Lending (800)) 638-2659 5.38 / 0.00 4.88 / 0.(X) No Quote 5.75 /0.00
Summit Mortgage (800) 377-0623 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote
Rates provided by The National Financial News Services. Rates are valud as of June 1, 2005. Rates ?are
inclusive of all fees and are subject to change without notice. Call lender directly for APR's. Lenders wishing to
participate in this service, please call (610) 344-7380. For additional information on mortgages, go to:
www.onmorlgage.conm or call the consumer Help Line (800) 264-3707,


950 Cars for Sale
2000 CADILLAC Deville.
Clean, clean car.
Low miles. Priced to sell!
386-623-6657
2002 HONDA Civic.
Low, Low Miles!
Cheap, cheap payment.
386-623-6657
97 VW JETTA GT
Power locks, sunroof, 5 sp. manual,
new tires, great condition, $3,500 or
OBO, Call 497-5193.
BEEN ON the Job 6 months?
$1,800.00 month income?
You can buy a car!
386-623-6657
GOOD Credit, BAD Credit?
I can get you Approved
for your next car!
386-623-6657
OH MY 0 Down is
back on many different
Cars, Trucks & Suv's!
386-623-6657
O51 Recreational
951 Vehicles
2001 COLEMAN TACOMA
Pop-up. Sleeps 10, no air, like new.
Call for details. $4,000.
386-867-1190
Accepting Applications
Good, Bad & No Credit
Call for 1st & 2nd Mortgages
Established full service co.
(800) 226-6044
WE BUY MORTGAGES
(Rr= Q{ 2622 NW 43rd St.
FHA/VA/Conv. Specialist Gainesville, FL 32606
GAINESVILLE MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC.
Licensed Mtg. Lender

G E TI ww.lakecityreporter.com

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75554401




REPORTER:
0.. .1


GREAT LITTLE INVESTMENT. 3BR &
1 1/2BA home with new central
air/heat on 1.6 acres REDUCED TO
$42,000. MLS#45304 Call Sharon
Johnson 365-1203 or Julia DeJesus
344-1590


BRANFORD HIGHWAY. Plenty of dogwood NEARLY
and fruit trees. 4 acres with small home and doublewid
detached shelter used at one time for Features im
business. Irrigation throughout property, large kitch
$79,500 Call Ginger Parker 365-2135 the split
MLS#45355 Saundra S
CONTACT A REALTOR WITH
EXPERIENCE THAT WILL WORK
FOR YOU!!! GIVE US A CALL!
386-755-6600


2806 West US Highway
Suite 101, Lake City, FL


m -F-
DANIEL CRAPPS 7
agency, inc.






I -.-


TF


LA


(386
Cell:
Email:


90 ~M5S


90
L 32055







LAVIS


AND

Realtor
9 Difference is
Service"

) 755-5110
(386) 590-0636
land@se.rr.com
,Ij F


WHAT IS YOUR

HOME OR LAND


10 ACRES. Quaint cottage situated in
shade trees with plenty of room to grow!
Big country that is fenced and ready for
horses! $175,000 MLS#45639 Call
Sharon Johnson 365-1203 or Julia Jesus
344-1590


NEW. Lovely 4 bedroom/2 bath
e on an acre, not far from town.
include a wet bar, a fireplace, and a
ien. You'll love the family room, and
bedroom plan. MLS#44994 Call
cott 752-9085


WORTH?


CALL US FOR


A FREE


MARKET STUDY.


m2W2f riiIii i.


Real Estate of Lake City, Inc.
[MLS, TOLL FREE 877-755-6600


NEED HELP!


Fo Yo!ca675-40 4oa


House Plan of the Week


The neo-traditional Remmington
is a two-story country-style home with
a contemporary flavor.
Classic keystones accent the
graceful arches that crown two wide
banks of front-facing windows. A third
keystone highlights the smaller arched
window centered over the two-car
garage. (An additional third-car garage
is inside the next door.) Classic brick
wainscoting skirts the entire front
facade, while supporting columns
flank and support the arched entry.
Natural light spills into the vaulted
entry through sidelights and an arched
transom. Double doors on the right
open into a room that could be outfitted
as a parlor, library, or home office.
The double doors on the left are
recessed slightly, and crowned by a
high shell ideal for displaying art or
plants. Passing through these doors,
you enter the peaceful realm of the
master suite. Luxuries here include: a
roomy walk-in closet, soaking tub, and
dual vanity, plus separately enclosed
toilet and shower.
Family living areas wrap around
from the right side and spread across
the entire rear of the first floor, creating
plenty of space for entertaining. The
spacious family room is at center, open
on the right to the dining room and
kitchen. A clean-burning gas stove
serves as a focal point, nestled between
an entertainment center and another
built-in cabinet of about equal size.
This space is bright. High win-
dows let in light on both sides of the
Remmington's gas fireplace, while
more light washes through wide
expanses of glass to the right and left.
Kitchen amenities are
abundant, including a pantry, work
island, eating bar, and nearby utility
room.
Two bedrooms and a bathroom are
upstairs, along with a balcony, two
storage closets and a huge bonus room.
For a review plan, including
scaled floor plans, elevations, section
and artist's conception, send $25 to
Associated Designs, 1100 Jacobs Dr.,
Dept. W, Eugene, OR 97402. Please
specify the Remmington 30-460 and
include a return address when order-
ing. A catalog featuring more than 400
home plans is available for $15. For
more information, call (800) 634-0123,
or visit our website at www.associated-
designs.com.


2005 Associated Designs, Inc.


Rommington
1 1]
PLAN 30-460


I


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