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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Sunday Report
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Opinion
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section C: Life
 Section D: Business & Home
 Section D: Classified Advantag...
 Section E: Community














The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/00101
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: April 24, 2005
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:00101
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Sunday Report
        page A 2
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Opinion
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Sports
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
    Section C: Life
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
    Section D: Business & Home
        page D 1
        page D 2
        page D 3
        page D 4
    Section D: Classified Advantage
        page D 5
        page D 6
        page D 7
        page D 8
    Section E: Community
        page E 1
        page E 2
        page E 3
        page E 4
        page E 5
        page E 6
        page E 7
        page E 8
        page E 9
        page E 10
        page E 11
        page E 12
        page E 13
        page E 14
        page E 15
        page E 16
        page E 17
        page E 18
        page E 19
        page E 20
        page E 21
        page E 22
        page E 23
        page E 24
Full Text











G. : 1 ES.. ........ ..I.. .




Sunday
April 24, 2005
Lake City Florida


Community


Part 4 of our 4 part,


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High 66, Low 38
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A fleeting abundance


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Service station evokes

memories of a lifetime


Family of the late George
Presnell recall life of a
'true gentleman.'
By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com
George Presnell loved serv-
ing people.
He served his country in
World War II, served cus-
tomers by pumping their gas
at his service stations and
later assisted people in pur-
chasing a new car.
He made it his business to
help Lake City residents get
to their desired destinations
in the 1950s and '60s.
After fighting in World War


Want More?
Discover what makes
Columbia County a place
called home.
Section E
II as part of the National
Guard, Presnell and his wife
Ruth adopted two children,
Gerald and Susan.
Presnell opened a service
station in the city and eventu-
ally became a leading car
salesman.
"I have a lot of great memo-
ries of my father when he was
a salesman at Powers
Service," said Presnell's
daughter, Susan Hatch.
PRESNELL
Continued on Page 6A


Reece Chasteen, 3, of Lake City takes a sip of running well water from a garden hose.
Water officials say conservation is the key to ensuring long-term water supply and
quality.

Plenty of water now, but drought

could easily return, officials say


Experts call for
conservation and
protection of water.

By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter.com
Driving around Columbia
County one can see various
low-lying areas full of water
only feet from the roadside.
While passing for ponds
now, as little as five years
ago, they were probably
just patches of thirsty soil
begging for a drop of rain.
In the past several years,
periods of rain have come
and gone from North
Central Florida, leaving the
area too moist or too dry,
but rarely at a level that's
just right. Since hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne
dumped more than two feet
of rain on the area in less
than six weeks in August
and September, areas that
were once dry are now
brimming with water.
Following a wet winter
and early spring, only with-
in the past few weeks has a
drier weather pattern
emerged. But with just a
glance at the Santa Fe and
Suwannee rivers, its easy to


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JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Ichetucknee Springs State Park visitors dip their feet in
spring water at the head spring. Recent rains caused
water levels to rise considerably.


see they are still swollen
well beyond their banks.
But local water officials
know that an overabun-
dance of water now doesn't
mean people shouldn't be
concerned about protecting
and conserving the pre-
cious natural resource.
The Live Oak-based
Suwannee River Water
Management District
(SRWMD) covers about
7,640 square-miles in North
Central Florida, including
all or part of 15 counties


and important natural
watersheds and systems for
the Ichetucknee, Suwannee
and Santa Fe rivers.
In Columbia. County and
others in its coverage area,
the district is responsible
for water quality manage-
ment, natural systems pro-
tection, flood protection
and water supply manage-
ment.
About the current


Continued on


WATER
Page 6A


Community continues support of local 153rd 5.


Group organizing projects
to help troops during
overseas deployment.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
About three weeks ago,
members of the Florida
National Guard 153rd
Engineer Company, based in
Lake City, began their deploy-
ment duties.
The troops left Columbia
County in a wake of public
support during a send-off cel-
ebration, which featured par-
ticipation from several hun-
dred residents as well as state
and local officials.


1 ..vJi l l I


CALL US:
(386)
752-1293
SUBSCRIBE:
755-5445


However, now that the
troops are away for their train-
ing before heading ,to
Afghanistan, the organization
that sponsored the send-off
celebration is continuing its
effort to let the troops know
they are remembered.
Columbia County commis-
sioners Ron Williams and
Dewey Weaver were mem-
bers of the five-member send-
off committee, along with
Lake City Reporter Publisher.
Michael Leonard, Editor Todd
Wilson and National Guard
Lt. Col. Dennis Roberts, who
organized the 153rd's send-off
celebration earlier in the
month.
The group is continuing its


Classified' ..... .5D
Business .......1D


project by organizing other
events in honor of the troops.
"We have $2,500 currently
to go toward purchasing
phone cards in the future as
we need them," Weaver said.
"We hate to set a time frame
that we are going to do a col-
lection drive because we real-
ly don't know the troops'
need, and we're waiting for
them to get to Afghanistan.
Then, we can be in communi-
cation with them and find out
what their needs are and sup-
ply them with what they really
need. If it's phone cards or
other things, we'll do that."
Weaver said the group
plans to start another commu-
nity drive when they learn of


Local & State .... 3A
Life ........... 1C


items the guardsmen need.
"Above all, we're not going
to forget about our men and
women from this area," he
said. "We are going to let
them know our community
supports them and we're
behind them."
Commissioner Ron
Williams said the organization
is still excited about assisting
the members of the 153rd and
their families.
Williams said it's important
to keep the guardsmen in
mind, so that they'll know
they have support from their
home county and local resi-
TROOPS
Continued on Page 7A
TODAY
Obituaries ...... .6A
Opinion ........ 4A


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Members of the Florida National Guard 153rd Engineer
Company, based in Lake City, walk down the hall of Columbia
High School in late March as students show support. The
local company began their deployment duties about three
weeks ago.


Puzzles ........ 3C
Scoreboard .. .2B


Sports ......... .1B
Weather ........ 8A


month-long series detailing the area in which we live.
SECTION E


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Page 2A
April 24, 2005


REPORT


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Available from Commercial News Providers"


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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS
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LAKE CITY REPORTER
HOW TO REACH US CLASSIFIED
Main number ......... .(386) 752-1293 To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Fax number ................ .752-9400
Circulation ................. 755-5445


The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fla. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard ... .754-0418
(mleonard @ lakecityreporter.com)
If you have a news tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson ..........754-0428
(twilson @ lakecityreporter.com)
ADVETIGM
Advertising Director
Terry Ward .................. 754-0417
(tward@lakecityreporter com)
Sales ...................... 752-1293
(ads @ lakecityrpporter.com)


Controller Sue Brannon ....... 754-0419
(sbrannon @ lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCUL&TION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next
.day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters ... .754-0407
watersr@ lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
13 W eeks .................. $23.54
26 W eeks ..................... $42.80
52 W eeks ..................... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
13 W eeks .................... $44.85
26 Weeks .................... $89.70
52 W eeks .................. $179.40


S

S


JLittle Caesars 7 '


'363 SW Baya Dr. 961-8898
Hwy 47 & 1-75 755-1060
Offer limited to first 150 customers of the day


Correction policy
The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Lottery
MIAMI Here are the
winning numbers int
Saturday's Florida Lottery:
Cash 3: 4-9-1
Play 4: 3-2-0-9


Fantasy 5: 17-36-12-32-11
Lotto: 9-14-19-18-12-23
Friday's Fantasy 5: 2-16-
25-28-33
Friday's Mega Money: 5-
15-34-38
Mega Ball: 2


. 4bmmmD


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005 3A
LOCAL & STATE


Area students place


in Tropicana contest


Staff Reports


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ipants from local elementary
schools.
Anne Graves, 4-H pro-
gram assistant, said the con-
test has been held locally for
at least 15 years.
For the contest, student
speech winners were select-
ed from classroom competi-
tions, which were followed
by school-level contests.
Winners from the school-


level contest went on to
compete at the county com-
petition.
Graves said the two win-
ners will get-a scholarship to
4-H Camp in Ocala.
The winners received
plaques and medallions.
Winners will go on to dis-
trict competition at Five
Points Elementary School,
May 7.


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Business Expo
John Pierce (middle) talks to Derick Thomas at the Hospice of Suwannee Valley booth at the
Sixth Annual Small Business Expo at Lake City Mall on Saturday. Hospice and Score, anoth-
er exhibit Pierce operated, were two of 30 exhibits featured in the event. The expo, spon-
sored by the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, attracted more than 2,000
visitors, twice the number from last year's event, said Gina Reynolds, chamber of commerce
assistant executive director. 'Columbia County is experiencing a substantial amount of
growth, and this event gave the residents of Lake City and outlying areas a chance to learn
about some of the new businesses in the area, as well as learn about the products and
services the existing businesses have to offer,' she said. 'Not only was the expo superb for
business for the exhibitors, it was also a good event for the businesses located inside the
mall.'




targeting eu nt



culture of lawsuits


COURTESY PHOTO
Fourth-grade winners of the 4-H Tropicana Speech contest were (from left) Alex Milton, fifth
place; Katie Dooley, fourth place; Kaleigh Kitaif, third place; Danielle Mathis, second place
and first place winner, Riley Carpenter.
!!! !!!ti -.,..A 2 -,MAS i tl,3


COURTESY PHOTO
Sixth-grade winners of the 4-H Tropicana Speech contest were (from left) Rigen Saltivan, first
place; Karissa Varnum, second place; Alexandra Padgett, third place; J.R. Dixon, fourth
place and Brya McGuire, fifth place.


"Copyrighted Material


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BACK
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We're Cookin' Again!! The Boarding House Restaurant is proud to
announce that we are back and better than ever! Come on down to enjoy
the best Southern cooking' around. Collard Greens & Cornbread Cakes, or
ho' cakes as we call 'em, are just a small taste of Mama' Mary's cooking .
NII Quality Inn

& Conference Center

752-3901

Om 3559 US Hwy 90 West Lake City
8 Y CNOI C F H OT F I S


Congratulations Metabolic Centers on your loss
of 5972 lbs in February and a gain of $5972 for
the Tsunami Relief to be donated in your honor


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City of Lake City
Employees


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RESEARCH CENTER


Several Columbia County
fourth, fifth and sixth grade
students recently participat-
ed in the annual 4-H
Tropicana Speech Contest.
This year's contest was
held April 15 at the
Columbia County
Cooperative Extension
Service office with 10 partic-


RANDY ROUGHTON/Lake City Reporter








4A LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005
LAKEIT


REWU1RME
SERVING COLUMBIA COUNTY SINCE 1874
MICHAEL LEONARD, PUBLISHER
TODD WILSON, EDITOR
SUE BRANNON, CONTROLLER
THE LAKE CITY REPORTER IS PUBLISHED WITH PRIDE FOR
RESIDENTS OF COLUMBIA AND SURROUNDING COUNTIES BY
COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS INC. OF ATHENS, GA. WE BELIEVE
STRONG NEWSPAPERS BUILD STRONG COMMUNITIES -
"NEWSPAPERS GET THINGS DONE!" OUR PRIMARY GOAL IS TO
PUBLISH DISTINGUISHED AND PROFITABLE COMMUNITY-ORIENT-
ED NEWSPAPERS. THIS MISSION WILL BE ACCOMPLISHED
THROUGH THE TEAMWORK OF PROFESSIONALS DEDICATED TO
TRUTH, INTEGRITY, LOYALTY, QUALITY AND HARD WORK.
DINK NESMITH, PRESIDENT TOM WOOD, CHAIRMAN





Protecting



precious



resources
We can't live without water.
We have an abundance of
it in North Florida, and we
must keep it. We must
protect this precious natu-
ral resource.
During the past year, we have felt the
woes of too much water. Hurricanes, 28
inches of rain last September and an abun-
dance of sinkholes keep reminding us of
the bad things abundant water brings to
Columbia County.
We have felt the pain of flooded homes,
washed out roads and stagnant ponds
where lush pastures once existed.
We must realize, however, that weather
is cyclical.and there will be periods of
drought maybe as soon as this year. We
may not always have abundant water. We
' ust be careful with our crystal clear, liq-
uid resource. In recent times, our area has
been the target of desire for South
Floridians wanting additional freshwater.
Thankfully, these discussions have been
short and stamped out by our own state
legislators, but we must keep our guard up
that we don't trade away possibly our best
asset for short-term gain.
And, as we've said many times before,
we must take care of our environment and
preserve our springs-based ecosystems
that still run pure, but is in danger from
unmanaged growth and pollution.
We can't waste water.
Not now, not ever.



Top-notch


training


coming soon
E mbry-Riddle's expansion into a
teaching and training facility at
the Lake City Municipal Airport
is a welcome addition to
Columbia County. It places
another positive mark beside our name on
the registry of expanding economies.
It's a big deal to have such a prestigious
aeronautical university locate even a small
outlet for learning in Lake City. No ques-
tion that Timco's smart presence at the
airport and its continually expanding
needs helped prompt Embry-Riddle to
commit to Columbia County.
Whether it's engine repair or fine-tuning
high-tech aeronautical electronics or other
projects, Embry-Riddle is one of the
nation's top institutions for aviation learn-
ing.
Now, we have them here as part of our
community. They are welcomed with open
arms.

OPINIONS WANTED

BY MAIL: Letters,
P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056;:
or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. down-
town.


I --


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b 1000


Remembering a war hero


James Young Wilson (CHS 1934) served
with valor and distinction in World War
II, even leading a successful invasion of
a small, Japanese-held Pacific island in
1945. Here is the story of that invasion.
e island Major Wilson's forces invaded
was Romblon, near the Philippine island of
Mindora, and it was defended by only aboutl00
Japanese troops. But these 100 troops were like
the Japanese soldiers who defended the infa-
mous island of Iwo Jima They were hard-core
loyal to their country and committed 100 per-
cent to dying in battle and, like Iwo Jima, they
were also committed to killing 10 Americans
each before being killed themselves.
Major Wilson was selected to lead the inva-
sion. force based on his previous outstanding
war record. His force was composed of small
landing craft carrying eight army tanks aug-
mented by an infantry unit. The Japanese
defenders were armed with rifles, machine
guns, and mortars and their tenacious com-,
mitment to fight to the death. Major Wilson's
group would invade without benefit of any air
support and little naval support. They were
pretty much on their own, and they knew it
could be dangerous. But, while Major Wilson
and his forces were preparing for the invasion,
on the nearby American-held island of
Mindora, he got a lucky break.
Quite by chance, he met fellow Lake Citian,
Capt. Ed Wright (CHS 1939; West Point 1943),
a military pilot. After discussing the impending
invasion, Major Wilson asked Capt. Wright to
fly him on an informal, unofficial reconnais-
sance flight over Romblon, which Capt. Wright
agreed to do. Flying over Romblon at just 100
feet altitude, Major Wilson mapped out the
Japanese defense positions.
Using this valuable information, Major
Wilson developed an invasion plan that was so
successful that, incredibly, not one American
was killed and just a few were wounded. The
Japanese soldiers predictably chose to die
fighting so there were no enemy prisoners.
Later Major Wilson and Capt. Wright Jim
and Ed met again on Mindora and small
world they met two other Lake City guys
there, Robert Montague and Alvin Hosford.
Robert was flying the huge B-24 Liberator
bombers, and Alvin was with an anti-aircraft
unit. The four Lake Citians got together for a
water buffalo steak dinner hosted by Jim's tank
unit. That was the last time the four men saw
each other until after the war.
After the war, James Young Wilson also had
an outstanding civilian career. He became an
attorney, a businessman, a State
Representative, a church leader, and president


MORRIS
WILLIAMS


of the University of Florida statewide alumni
association. He is well-known for his civilian
accomplishments, and he also deserves to be
remembered for his outstanding wartime serv-
ice as well.
There are several "by the ways" to this story.
Capt. Wright retired from the U. S. Air Force as
a full colonel. His dad, Capt. Ed Wright Sr., was
the second commander of the local National
Guard Company H back in the 1920s and his
mother was my Sunday school teacher. Both of
J. Y. Wilson's brothers, Hugh and Kennerson,
were also military .officers during World War ILI
and served in combat zones in Italy and
Kennerson was killed in action. Nearby Wilson
Springs was named in his honor and memory.
Remarkably, Alvin Hosford was our official
Columbia County tax collector even' while he
served in the Pacific and he was so popular
he got reelected even though he was out of the
country during the reelection campaign.
My thanks go to Edmund Wright
Jr., (Colonel, USAF Ret.) for sharing this story
with me so I could share it with you.

Shorty's wit
The late E W. "Shorty" Bedenbaugh, long-
time local barber and state representative was
a riveting public speaker who always injected
wit and wisdom into his speeches. Here are
several Shortyisms "Out of the mouths of our
children come words we should never have
spoken."
"A man with six children is happier than a
millionaire." "The millionaire always wants
more."
"I read the obituaries first thing every morn-
ing. If some morning I see my name in there,
I'm not going to work that day!"
A preacher called the Health Department
about a dead mule and was told, 'I thought you
preachers took care of the dead.' Miffed at the
man's rudeness, the preacher replied, 'We do
but we always notify the closest relative first!'"
Morris Williams is a resident of Columbia
County and a historian. Contact him at 755-.
8183 or williamsh2@firn.edu.


rpnimit $wumis


L


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BY FAX: (386) 752-9400

BY E-MAIL: info @lakecity
reporter.com


Calif., and Westford, Mass.
In 1968, leftist students at Columbia
University in New York began a weeklong
occupation of several campus buildings.


"Copyrighted Material


a I


lose


The anguish


of oil prices

W world oil prices have been
soaring, with few indications
that they will go back down
anytime soon. The implica-
tions are many, ranging from
reduced consumer spending to deepened
trade deficits.
Indeed, the U.S. Commerce Department
recently reported slowing retail sales and a
record monthly trade deficit, with higher
energy costs bearing much of the blame.
Just the other day, the government reported
that the Index of Leading Indicators fell last
month, signaling slowed growth.
Consider that a year ago, the price of oil
was about $37 a barrel deemed high -
and that recently, it had approached $60,
before slipping back to the mid-50s. Now $60
to $65 a barrel is seen as an impending pos-
sibility; a recent report by Goldman Sachs
went so far as.to predict a price of $104.
What's going on?
Part of this is basic economics: Demand in
such developing giants as China and India is
growing faster than supply. Demand also
continues to climb in the developed world.
An example: SUVs' contributing to a 2 per-
cent increase in U.S. gasoline demand over
last year.
Add to that the interruptions in oil sup-
plies from Iraq, because of sabotage; cut-
backs, because of the recent explosion at a
refinery in Texas City, America's third
largest; and problems in oil-producing
Venezuela. Any new supply from the Arctic
National Wildlife Refuge a controversial
proposition would take years to reach the
market; even then, it would be only a drop in
the bucket of U.S. consumption.
Moreover, how stable will the govern-
ments of such major oil producers as Iraq,
Iran and Saudi Arabia remain over the next
few years?
Such questions cause the biggest con-
sumers from whole nations, such as
China, to airline companies -to-examine
their hedging strategies. Will prices contin-
ue going up? Then, lock in contracts at exist-
ing prices for five or so years. Or will prices
retreat? Then, wait it out.
The oil traders including those lively
ones working for hedge funds, who make
their money by zeroing in on markets on the
move have lately been frantically busy.
Think of the range of products, in addition
to fuel, derived from petroleum: plastics, fer-
tilizers, pesticides, polyester, synthetic rub-
ber, medicines, dyes and detergents, as well
as electricity, much of which is produced by
burning fuel oil. Not for nothing is oil called
the lifeblood of the industrial world. No won-
der the stock markets are gyrating.
Meanwhile, with gasoline prices now well
over $2 a gallon, the bloom may finally be off
America's love affair with the SUV. In
February, sport-utility-vehicle sales fell 21
percent from the year before after
January's decline of 31 percent.
Goldman Sachs warned in its report that
gas prices might have to reach $4 a gallon
before "American consumers ... stop buying
gas-guzzling sport utility vehicles and
instead seek fuel-efficient alternatives."
Then again, gasoline at $4 a gallon may not
be all that far away.


Today is Sunday, April 24, the 114th day of
2005. There are 251 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:
On April 24, 1800, Congress approved a
bill establishing the Library of Congress.
On this date:
In 1792, the national anthem of France, "La
Marseillaise," was composed by Capt.
Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle.
In 1877, federal troops were ordered out of
New Orleans, ending the North's post-Civil
War rule in the South.
In 1898, Spain declared war on the United
States after rejecting America's ultimatum to
withdraw from Cuba.
In 1915, the Ottoman Turkish Empire
began the brutal mass deportation- of
Armenians during World War I.
In 1916, some 1,600 Irish nationalists
launched the Easter Rising by seizing sever-
al key sites in Dublin. The rising was put
down by British forces several days later.
In 1953, British statesman Winston
Churchill was knighted by Queen Elizabeth
II.
In 1962, the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology achieved the first satellite relay
of a television signal, between Camp Parks,








LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005 5A

LOCAL & NATION


What is a sinkhole?


"11


By Dr. MUSTAPHA KANE
LCCC associate professor of earth
science
Sinkholes seem to be pop-
ping up everywhere in Florida.
Why is that, and why Florida?
Sinkholes are simply a part of
Earth's geo-
logical I
processes.
In California
they have
earthquakes A .
and land- ^
slides. In
Florida we .
have ,e
well...sink- Kane
holes. The
main problems with sinkholes
are property destruction and
contamination of groundwater,
other than that they're cool as
springs, ponds, and lakes.
What creates sinkholes?
Sinkholes, sinking creeks,
caverns, and caves, are part of
Earth's landscape known as
Karst topography, named after
the Krs region in Slovenia
(part of former Yugoslavia)
where such topography is well
developed. Karst topography
forms when carbonate rocks,
(calcite or dolomite rich
rocks) such as limestone and
dolostone, or other soluble
rocks, like salt beds or gyp-
sum rocks, are dissolved by
slightly acidic (from reaction
with carbon dioxide in the air)
groundwater or runoff.
Groundwater circulating
along fissures and cracks on
carbonate rocks, simply dis-
solves the rocks. The results
are openings that get bigger
and bigger as more of the rock
is dissolved, until the roof col-
lapses. Sinkholes can also be


created by excess withdrawal
of groundwater. When
groundwater is pumped out
quicker than it is replenished,
as it often happens in fast
growing cities or in semi-arid
to arid regions, the aquifer
(water bearing rock) is then
emptied, and the ground col-
lapses producing a giant sink-
hole. This is known as land
subsidence. To prevent land
subsidence from occurring,
treated wastewater or surface
water is collected and injected
through injection wells, into
the ground.
Any major natural or
human-induced modifications
to the groundwater flow sys-
tem, either by diverting it,
adding to it, or pumping out
huge quantities of water, are
likely to destabilize the fragile
aquifer and create sinkholes.
The most common type of
sinkhole in Florida is the col-
lapse sinkhole with steep-
sided, deep holes in the
ground.
It is frequently caused by
fluctuations in the groundwa-
ter table that stresses and
weakens the roof of the cavity
created in the limestone. It
occurs when the limestone
rock is overlain by thick soils
and clay that collapse. Florida
ponds, lakes, and springs are
commonly the result of sink-
hole formation.
Why are there so many
sinkholes in Florida?
Sinkholes are prevalent in
any reg:,n where carbonate
rocks are a predominant geo-
logical formation.
This is the case for Florida
which Karst topography
reflects the abundance of car-
bonate rocks. What makes


Florida. have so many carbon-
ate rocks such as limestone?
To answer this question we
have to look at the geological
history of the peninsula. Until
some 1.5 million years ago
much of Florida was under the
ocean. During that period,
dying marine organisms accu-
mulated at the bottom of the
ocean.
Layers and layers of shells
were then cemented and com-
pacted on the seafloor to form
sedimentary rocks. These lay-
ered rocks formed from sea
shells are commonly known as
limestone.
When the Spanish landed
on the coast of Florida they
used coquina (a limestone
rock) to build St. Augustine
Fort because it was the easiest
and most abundant construc-
tion material they could find
on the peninsula.
Phosphate deposits mined
in Florida, as well as shark
teeth found in some people's
backyard are also a reminder
that this area was once at the
bottom of the ocean.
What can we do to
prevent sinkholes from
occurring?

Sinkholes can pop up from
out of. nowhere in karstic
regions, but there are some
warning signs such as the for-
mation of small ponds, falling
trees or fence posts, cracks in
walls and floors, etc., that can
help detect them early. The
sure way to prevent sinkhole
formation is surveying.
Sinkhole risk can be
assessed in any area by sur-
veying the ground using
Ground Penetrating Radar. An
airborne Infrared imaging sur-


vey can also help detect areas
with potential for sinkholes.
The thickness of limestone
layers and their depth vary
from area to area in Florida.
Not all places have the same
risk of developing sinkholes.
Besides being a geohazard,
sinkholes .in Florida constitute
the primary pathway
(recharge area) for rainwater
to quickly replenish the
groundwater.
Therefore, they are an
important part of the aquifer
system that supplies 95 per-
cent of the state drinking
water and produces the many
springs that make our sun-
shine state a beautiful place.
However, the problem is that
sinkholes can also be, in many
cases, a major,, quick, and sure
pathway for polluted surface
water to reach and contami-
nate the groundwater.
Rapid increase in urbaniza-
tion also contributes to sink-
hole formation as it lowers the
water table and alters the
drainage pathways. The num-
ber of human-induced sink-
holes appears to have doubled
since the 1930s.
Florida, now the fourth
most populous state in the
nation is also one of the
nation's most highly urbanized
states, and contains some of
the fastest-growing cities and
counties in the U.S.
If nothing is done to better
manage population growth
and urbanization, and pre-
serve the vital resource that is
the groundwater, we can
expect the number of these
human-induced sinkholes, the
property damage, and the
groundwater pollution that
goes with it, to increase dra-
matically in the near future.


Ibs -i-w
mil umIi


wi mIp Copyrighted Material


a m


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"
0- 0 -


A -


- 0


. -M a e


VOTE Sorn

DEBI MYER

FRIEDMAN

FOR

MAYOR


*Hardworking
*Ambitious
*Team Player
*Voice For the
People
*5th Generation
Resident


hl .5.
*0il


I promise to
put the best
interests of Lake
City first and to
strive for a
cost-conscious
common sense
government.


2005





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LCCC is an Equal Access/Equal
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I a7*


.l









LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


PRESNELL
Continued From Page 1A

"He worked his way up and
was promoted to sales man-
ager after only working there
five years, she said.
Hatch remembers her
father as an exceptional man
who would help anyone.
"He would feed the hungry
and was a calm, true gentle-
man," she said.
Presnell died in 1968 when
Hatch was 15.
"It was very hard for me,"
she said.
"I was definitely daddy's lit-
tle girl."
Hatch's memories of her
father were of him in a white
shirt, dress pants and a tie.
"He worked most of the
time, but we spent most
weekends visiting family,"
Hatch said. "Life just wasn't
as hectic as it is now."
The family watched very
little TV and spent most of
their time talking together.
One of Hatch's fondest
memories was the day the
family got a new pet.
"One day I stayed home
from school and when my
father came, he opened his
coat and a little baby squirrel
poked his head out of my
father's shirt pocket," she
said. "He had been driving


WATER
Continued From Page 1A

amount of water in North
Central Florida, Jerry
Scarborough, executive direc-
tor of the SRWMD said, "If
you ask me today, fortunately
we have plenty."
But while area rivers and
streams might be flowing
heartily with water now, he
said in 1998 and 2000, "We
were in a drought situation,
which just goes to show you
how quickly it can change."
Knowing that all to well,
Scarborough said, "We are
blessed with an ample supply
of water, and it's not some-
thing we should take for grant-
ed."
"It's very obvious we need,
to become better stewards of
our water and do conservation
and make sure we don't over-
allocate permits (for commer-
cial use)," he said. "We have to
make sure we have enough
water for our environment and
for our economy, so it's a bal-
ancing act we take very seri-
ously."
Kirk Webster, deputy execu-
tive director of the SRWMD,
was part of the district's
recently completed "Water
Supply Assessment."
Among other things, the
lengthy report projects water
use for the district through
2050. As Florida is expected to
swell with millions more peo-
ple in the next, 45 years,
Webster said, 'We are going to
get a fair share of that growth"
in the SRWMD.
"There's no question about
it," he said. "We are working
with the farmers, our agricul-
ture, to encourage more effi-
cient water use with irrigation
systems and in the future we


1 0 = @Q6.6- -- W W1. ----- fz- -- IuU-"1 "PHUOI
George Presnell owned this Amoco service station in downtown Lake City in the 1950s before buying a Texaco station. Later
he worked as a successful car salesman for Ralph Powers.


home and saw the squirrel in
the road, so he brought it
home."


hope to work more closely
with communities to establish
minimum flow programs that
define how much flow is need-
ed to maintain healthy springs,
rivers or lakes. And as we
determine what these needs
are, we still need to meet the
needs for economic growth.
But conservation will certainly
be a part of that."
And it will probably be nec-
essary. In the executive sum-
mary of the SWRMD's assess-
ment report, by 2020 the with-
drawal demand for water in
the district is estimated to
increase from about 314 mil-
lion gallons per day (in 2000)
to 546 million gallons per day.
And by 2050, the report says,
the withdrawal demand will be
an -estimated 895 million gal-
lons per day.
According to the report, the
biggest users of water in the
district are commercial opera-
tions, such as industry, mining
operations and power compa-
nies. Coming in second is agri-
cultural use, followed by
municipalities such as the city
and then public supply, that
which includes the average
homeowner.
While the report concludes
there is enough water supply
to accommodate those
demands now and should be
for the next several years,
Webster said he will never say
there's too much water, even if
there are flooded conditions
throughout the district.

"All water has a purpose in a
natural system," he said. "It is
helping a river maintain itself
the way it should be. You have
people who say, 'You have so
much water going out to the
Gulf (of Mexico) and it's just
wasted.' But all that water
serves a purpose somehow to
support the critters and


They called the squirrel
Grumpy and he soon became
part of the family.


plantlife. And our challenge as
a water management district is
to maintain and keep those
systems healthy, but at the
same time we recognize we
have to have sufficient water
for our future, so it all boils
down to good planning and
good implementation."
And even if there is plenty of
water, Webster said it has to be
of good quality.
"Water quality is just as
important as water quantity,"
he said. "You may have plenty,
but what if you can't use it
when its available to you."
Mark Lander, Columbia
County Health Department
director of environmental
health, said water quality
seems to be fine.
"We certainly have our
areas of concern, like any
county would have, such as
the area of Pinemount (Road),
around the sinkholes," he said,
referring to the boil-water
notice issued around the site
of several sinkholes that
opened in March and early
April.
Lander said the flooding
rivers also cause a concern for
drinking water contamination
or residents who live near
them. However, for the most
part, he said based on regular
testing his department has
done throughout the county,
the water "seems to be fine as
far as any bacteriological
issues."
Lander said with the excep-
tion of the sinkholes, there is a
lot of natural filtration of water
through the soil of Columbia
County. Also, he said that he
doesn't know of any instances
where someone is intentional-
ly polluting the county's
groundwater system. Anytime
his department gets a com-
plaint of sanitary or contami-


"Grumpy would watch my
father shave in the morn-
ings," Hatch recalled.


nation issues, Lander said the
problems have been quickly
identified and corrected.
Over the entire county, he
said about 10 percent of sam-
ples test positive for coliform
bacteria, which is not a health
risk but does indicate there is
some infiltration somewhere
in a well system. For the poten-
tially dangerous E. coli bacte-
ria, he said that number drops
to less than L percent of all
samples tested.
Perhaps the quality is due to
many area residents taking an
interest and pride in their
groundwater.
That regard revealed itself
when about a year and half
ago, there was a concern
among many residents in the
SRWMD that developers and
officials in South Florida were
eyeing North Florida and its
mostly ample supply.
What got it all started was a
Florida Council of 100 report
that concluded South Florida
should consider looking to its
northern neighbors for addi-
tional water supply.
Public outcry, however, was
quick and loud from many
North Floridians, which
included a public meeting in
Chiefland where people
expressed vehemently -
their beliefs against South
Florida interests taking their
water.
"I think the uproar that
occurred when the Council of
100 report came out is indica-
tive of the feeling of most peo-
ple in North Florida," Webster
said.
Still, he said, from the dis-
trict's perspective, "We believe
it is better for each area to
develop their water supply and
that's pretty much the policy
we've had here for years and
we would certainly discourage


Obituaries


Denise M. Glover
Mrs. Denise M. Glover, 39, of
Lake City, died Thursday at her res-
idence.
Funeral Arrangements are incom-
plete at this time, but will be avail-
able after noon on Monday by call-
ing 961-9500. Arrangements are
under the direction of the DEES
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME &
CREMATION SERVICES 768
West Duval St., Lake City.

Billie Joe Stephens
Billie Joe Stephens, age 81, of
Lake City, FL, passed away
Saturday, April 23,
2005 at Lake City
Ve t e r a n s
Administration
Medical Center in Lake City, FL.


Stephens was born in Swifton,
Arkansas on November 10, 1923 to
the late Jasper and Ollie Stephens.
He moved to the Hamilton County
area in 1967 and worked at
Occidental (PCS) for 25 years.
Stephens was a veteran of the
United States Navy and was a mem-
ber of the First Baptist Church in
White Springs, FL.
Survivors include his wife of 59
years, Wanda Stephens, Lake City;
two daughters and sons-in-law,
Brenda Sue and Glen Williams,
Roanoke, AL. and Linda Lou and
Tom Lathinghouse, White Springs,
FL.; two brothers, Bobbie Stephens
of Indiana and Charles Stephens of
Arkansas; two grandchildren, Terry
and Stephen Lathinghouse; three
great-grandchildren, Jacob, Julie
and Mark Lathinghouse.


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V PAYMENT PLAN AVAILABLE Nahed Sobhy, M.D.
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Funeral services will be held at
lla.m. Tuesday, April 26 at First
Baptist Church in White Springs.
Interment will follow in Riverside
Cemetery in White Springs.
The family will receive friends
between the hours of 5- 7 p.m.
Monday, April 25 at Harry T. Reid
Funeral Home, Jasper, FL.


HARRY T. REID FUNERAL
HOME is in charge of arrange-
ments.
Obituaries are paid advertisements.
For details, call the Lake City
Reporter's classified department at
752-1293


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One
Hatch's
decided


day Grumpy bit
mother, and it was
that Grumpy needed


inter-district water transfers."
While someone might look
to North Florida now and see
plenty of water for the taking,
he said it is important to
remember "we go in cycles."
"Just a few years ago we
were in. the middle of a
tremendous drought,"
Webster said. "And there will
be another drought. There will
be another serious drought.
And with each drought you
have to put in increasing water
use from various users, so the
potential impact on many
rivers and lakes becomes
great."
"We know we are going to
have flooding and we know we
are going to have drought, but
we have to look at how can we
best avoid adverse conse-
quences from these event."
While getting a larger user
such as a major industry to
reduce its water consumption
requires detailed planning and
perhaps a high capital cost, the
average person can contribute
to less water use in the district.
And every little bit helps,
Webster said.
"I think people could make
improvements on their water
use, but I don't think people
consciously try to waste water,
no one really wakes up in the
morning and say, 'I want to
waste water today'," Webster
said.
But to do their part to con-
serve, other than using less
water for irrigation and other


to go out to the wild.
A family friend took
Grumpy out to his farm and
placed him in a tree.
"I hated to see him go,"
Hatch said.
Elwood Tyre also knew
Presnell.
"When I was 18 and still in
high school, Mr. Presnell gave
me a job," Tyre said.
"He had an Amoco station
on the corner of St. Johns
Street and Marion Avenue."
Later Presnell sold that sta-
tion and bought a Texaco sta-
tion.
"At that time, there were
four service stations there," he
said. "One on each corner."
Tyre called Presnell one of
the most courteous men he
knew.
"Back then most stations
were called service stations,
not filling stations, because the
customer was served by one
or two men," he explained.
"One man filled up the gas
and another washed the win-
dows and checked the fluids."
It didn't matter what kind of
car the customer had, they all
received the same personal
treatment.
"Later he started working
for Ralph Powers selling
Cadillacs and Oldsmobiles,"
he said."But he owned one of
the best service stations in
the city before that."


obvious ways, he said people
can go to their local home
improvement store and buy
newer, more water-efficient
toilets and appliances like dish
washers and washing
machines.
Also, with many people who
live outside of city limits that
are likely not on city water and
have their own private well,
Webster said while they may
not be billed for their water, it
isn't coming from an unlimited
source.
The only difference, he
said, because both city and
well water come from the
same Floridan aquifer, is that
the city water is treated.
But as far as the impact on
the ground water supply, it is
the same either way, free or
not, he noted.
"It's a matter of education,"
Webster said.
With high water levels, fol-
lowing a year drought, he said
that means there has been
enough rainfall for the natural
water systems to "rebound."
But the danger he said, "Is
when you are draining too
much water and when you get
the rainfall, the aquifer won't
rebound."
If only one person uses less
water, it may not help ensure
the ample supply continues
even if a drought arrives.
But if everyone uses less,
Webster said, it could have
some impact because "it's a
cumulative issue."


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I 4dI


M, t-tmin

Uveh mfru


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005 7A

n ltI mtsate lHuklngton pwr

Wr pla'pr takesamighty slide
m


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


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TROOPS
Continued From Page 1A
dents.
"It's important to continue
to show support for the troops
because of what they are
doing for me, Lake City and all
of America," Williams said.
Weaver said the organiza-
tion also plans to start making
preparations for Christmas
season events for the troops.


LAST,


THE PERFECT


"Even though we are six
months from Christmas sea-
son, these things take some
planning and organization to
get going to make sure we're
up and running by the
Christmas season," he said.
"We want the full community
to be involved in that effort.
Commissioner Williams and
myself will continue to spear-
head this effort to keep up
with our troops to give them
what they really need while
they're on their mission."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


I.


iON-


THE WEATHER


MOSTLY MOSTLY
S SUNNY SUNNY



HI 66 LO38 H175L051


MOSTLY CHANCE PARTLY
SUNNY ~ T-STORMS CLOUDY



HI 79L0 55 HI 81 LO55 HI 82 L055


SNATIONAL FORECAST: Low pressure will remain nearly stationary over the eastern Great Lakes today,
resulting in a chance of snow from Michigan to the central and southern Appalachians. Breezy and cool
over the Northeast, with a chance of showers over much of the region. Showers and thunderstorms
from Arizona to west Texas and showers over much of the West Coast.



S S* I I Ijaiia ^^ ^ M^ Ka'esE


Nfi M .M


Tallahassee
65/350
Pensacola Panama City
66/48 *66/42


* Valdosta Jacksonville
63/36 65/39
Lake Cityn
66/38
Gainesville DaytonaBeach
6/38. O ca *
Ocala* Cape Canaveral

67/33rlande *73/45
72/46


Tampa.
72/52


West Palm Beach
77/59.


Ft. Myers Ft. Lauderdale
76/51 79/60.
Naples
74/57 Miami
Key West 79/60
78/65 *


City Monday
Cape Canaveral 71/58/pc
Daytona Beach 73/56/s
Ft. Lauderdale 77/67/s
Fort Myers 78/61/s
Gainesville 75/51/s
Jacksonville 72/53/s
Key West 77/69/s
Lake City 75/51/c
Miami 79/67/s
Naples 77/62/s
Ocala 75/51/s
Orlando 77/57/s
Panama City 73/56/s
Pensacola 72/61/ts
Tallahassee 75/54/s
Tampa 75/59/s
Valdosta 74/51/s
W. Palm Beach 75/63/s


'h, VIVT~~~&


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


76
61
82
56
92 in 1964
41 in 1993


0.24"
4.46"
12.29"
2.30"
13.46"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

MOON


6:54 a.m.
8:04 p.m.
6:53 a.m.
8:04 p.m.


Moonrise today 8:39 p.m.
Moonset today 6:54 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 9:46 p.m.
Moonset tom. 7:30 a.m.



April May May May
.24 1 8 16
Full Last New First


On this date in
1987, showers and
thunderstorms pro-
duced heavy rain in
the Middle Atlantic
Coast Region. Up to
seven inches of rain
drenched Virginia in
three days.


HIGH:
15 miites to bumn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.




weather.corn


S f .Forecasts, data and graphics
.- 2005 Weather Central,
I- Inc., Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com

; *:,I^----


Connected

www .lakecftyreporter con

K. fUKI.-K


Saturday
CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 53/43/.25
Albuquerque 69/50/0
Anchorage 42/38/.02
Atlanta 61/52/0
Baltimore 7;0 .' ., ..3
Billings 61/34/0
Birmingham 62/51/0
Bismarck 55/22/0
Boise 67/57/0
Boston 63/44/.47
Buffalo 49 4 41 -.
Charleston SC 76/62/0
Charleston WV 56/40/.15
Charlotte 69/57/0
Cheyenne 56/34/0
Chicago 41/35/0
Cincinnati 55 3. ; 5
Cleveland 43/34/1.29
Columbia SC 72/59/.15
Dallas 67/51/0
Daytona Beach 78/59/0
Denver 65/37/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
58/37/sh
67/46/pc
55/35/s
55/34/s

65/38/pc
56/38/s
67/35/pc
63/43/sh
56/43/sh

63/40/s
42/34/sh
56/32/pc
52/33/c
50/37/c

37/33/sn
61/38/s
70/52/pc
69/43/s
50/35/sh


Saturday
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Des Moines 50/36/.02
Detroit 45/35/.25
El Paso 75/59/0
Fairbanks 52/29/0
Greensboro 68/56/.02
Hartford 59/45/1.24
Honolulu 82/72/0
Houston 74/59/0
Indianapolis 43/37/.17
Jackson MS 67/49/0
Jacksonville 79/60/.03
Kansas City 54/38/.01
Las Vegas 78/59/0
Little Rock 66/51/0
Los Angeles 63/49/0
Memphis 63/53/.01
Miami 86/65/0
Minneapolis 48/31/0
Mobile' 72/59/0
New Orleans 75/64/0
New York 59/50/0
Oklahoma City 63/43/0


Today
Hi/Lo/W
59/39/s
38/32/sn
81/53/ts
55/28/pc
54/34/pc
59/37/sh
84/70/pc
74/55/pc
47/36/c
64/40/s
65/39/s
61/42/s
70/53/sh
64/43/s
64/53/pc
62/45/s
79/60/s
60/40/pc
67/46/s
70/51/s
54/42/sh
65/45/pc


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane,
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
53/33/0
80/58/0
68/48/.30
88/62/0
56/40/.75
46/41/.68
57/49/.14
75/60/.03
58/29/0
57/43/0
.3 ',, 03,
58/53/.08
51/39/.12
71/51/0
74/62/0
66/53/0
63/53/0
63/53/0
68/47/0
78/66/.01
87/59/0
70/51/.07


Today
Hi/Lo/W
61/40/s
72/46/s
55/41/pc
80/64/ts
37/31/sn
51/41/sh
62/46/sh
56/36/pc
65/36/pc
57/35/sh
58/37/pc
69/48/sh
58/40/s
61/42/sh
70/56/c
65/57/pc
63/50/sh
63/48/sh
67/44/pc
72/52/s
78/51/ts
56/40/c


* I
Saturday Today Saturday Ioaay1


CITY
Acapulco
iAmsterdam
'Athens
-Auckland
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
88/75/0
63/39/0
69/49/0
66/59/0
73/50/0
55/37/0
77/57/0
86/64/.03
59/46/.01
82/57/0
41/27/0
84/75/0
84/75/0


Today
Hi/Lo/W
89/71/ts
59/42/c
64/45/c
69/55/sh
68/49/sh
54/34/c
72/51/sh
84/63/s
58/41/sh
85/68/s
45/30/pc
81/65/ts
88/78/pc


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
Hi/Lo/Pcp.
59/39/0
77/63/0
57/48/0
70/50/0
77/55/0
50/43/.61
39/34/.22
81/63/0
82/63/.71
103/93/0
54/27/0
91/73/0
66/50/.11


Today
Hi/Lo/W
57/36/sh
78/64/pc
60/43/c
76/55/pc
85/57/ts
59/46/sh
54/37/sh
82/60/ts
80/65/s
102/74/ts
51/33/s
93/74/pc
61/46/sh


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
na/na/na
63/41/0
83/75/.33
89/73/.08
70/48/0
67/46/0
93/81/0
73/59/0
81/68/0
67/50/0
46/43/.54
63/32/0
4.8 34 ,.


Hi/Lo/W

64/46/c
85/77/c
87/76/pc
69/42/pc
63/44/c
92/76/ts
72/54/pc
82/61/c
64/47/pc
44/38/sh
56/36/c
51 *35 c,:


KEYTO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy, dr=drizzle, f=fair, fg=fog, h=hazy, i=ice, pc=partly cloudy, r=rain, s=sunny, sh-showers, sii-snow, ts=thunderstorms,nw=windy.


*L---


THE


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Tuesday
80/68/r
79/66/ts
80/69/ts
85/70/ts
79/56/ts
78/60/ts
85/76/pc
79/55/c
82/68/pc
81/66/ts
81/62/ts
82/63/ts
74/63/ts
76/61/ts
76/58/ts
78/67/ts
76/58/ts
81/69/pc


wml w -


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PM-MR


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LAN, CTY RRP ORTE


Section B
Sun d.i\. April 24, 2005
Lake City, Florida
iu'' w.l akec iftyreporter: co m


- e


Scoreboard 2B
Golf 3B
MLB 4B


Lady Indians gear up for districts
a^ n; s-1l ea '...


By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter. comr
The Fort White High varsi-
ty softball team enters the
District 4-3A tournament at
Bradford High on Monday as
the fifth seed against No. 4
Interlachen High. Game time
is 5 p.m. ,
"We really have a positive
outlook for districts," Lady
Indians coach Cindy Jordan
said. "Definitely Interlachen is
a team we can compete with."
Santa Fe High is the top seed
in the district, with Keystone
Heights High second, Bradford
High third and Union County


High sixth. Santa Fe and
Keystone have byes and will
not play until Tuesday.
Fort White will be heading
into the tournament short-
handed however, as pitcher
Christa Strickland was sus-
pended last week for fighting
and will be ineligible for the
tournament. Brandy Simmons
will start against Interlachen,
and Amanda Edenfield moves
up to the No. 2 role to take
Strickland's place.
"Amanda has done well
everytime she's gotten that
opportunity," assistant coach
Brenda Hunter said. "She's
been real steady, so I think


she'll do a good job."
The Lady Indians can also
draw strength from their
recent play. Fort White won its
last two games prior to a week-
end tournament at Trenton
High, including a dominant
12-1 victory over Branford
High on Senior Night. And the
Lady Indians have cut down
significantly on their errors as
the season has progressed.
"We're taking districts this
year," Jordan Spires said.
"We've improved so much.
Ever since Spring Break
DISTRICTS
continued on page 3B


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High softball coach Cindy Jordan (left) instructs
Kali Hunter during practice on Friday.


All-star camp coming to Lake City


By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter.com

The youth of Columbia
County will get a special treat
June 24-25, as local resident
and former NFL star Tama-
rick Vanover will bring a foot-
ball camp to Lake City.
The Tamarick Vanover/Joe
Horn Football Camp will take
place at Columbia High, and
the fee is $55 per child.
"I've been thinking about
doing it for a long time,"
Vanover said.
"I want to try to make this
an annual thing."
On hand for the camp will
be Vanover's best friend and
NFL Pro Bowl receiver, Horn
of the New Orleans Saints.
"We came into Kansas City
in '96," Vanover said. "We
took -the same path through
the CFL. We've been the best
of friends."
Tampa Bay Buccaneers
receivers coach Richard
Mann and Columbia High
football coach Danny Green
are also confirmed for the
camp.
"I know Coach Green pret-
ty good," Vanover said. "I like
his style of football. He loves
to have discipline." Vanover
helps out by coaching the jun-
ior varsity and varsity football
teams at' Columbia, and his
two sons Tamarick Jr. and
Dedrick play in the Lake
City/Columbia County Parks
and Recreation Little League
Football.
"He approached me with
this on Jan. 20 with the idea of
doing a football camp," Parks


I 'Wit





oil-


I,











I,"','.


I,


I


Lake City resident and former NFL player Tamarick
Lake City in June.


and Recreation Athletic
Director Mario Coppock said.
"We've been going back and
forth with him and his agent
to try and put this together."


MARIO SARMENTO/Lake City R
Vanover is bringing a football camp tc


Since Vanover returned
from San Diego where he
spent his last NFL season in
2002 he has been working
hard to make this camp a real-


ity. Vanover's wife Deidra is
from Lake City.
'We're excited someone of
his caliber wants to help out in
the community," Coppock


said.
The camp will be a fund-
raiser for the Columbia Youth
Football Association, which is
the booster organization for
the Parks and Recreation
Department.
The department will spon-
sor the event.
The two-day camp will be
from Friday-Saturday. There
will be a morning session for
kids 6-10 years old, and an
afternoon session for the
older kids.
Anyone no matter how
old who pays can attend
the camp. Vanover and his
friends will teach the funda-
mentals of football to the kids.
Vanover plans on inviting
such NFL and area stars as
Minnesota Vikings quarter-
back Daunte Culpepper, San
Diego Chargers receiver
Reche Caldwell, Washington
Redskins linebacker Brian
Allen, NFL draft prospect
Jerome Carter and former
NFL player Reinard Wilson.
"I think it's a small commu-
nity that seems to pull togeth-
er," Vanover said of Lake City.
"I love giving back. These
kids have a chance to interact
with some of their heroes (at
the camp)."
For those who are interest-
ed in signing up for the camp,
registration will be conducted
at Teen Town from 8:30 a.m.-
5 p.m. Monday-Friday start-
ing in the first week of June.
Those who register late must
pay $65 to attend. Parents
must fill out consent forms
and release forms and present
a proof of age.


- -


PREP ROUNDUP


Tigers, Indians place at state meet


WL *fb GbYI


From staff reports

Columbia High placed one
weightlifter at the state
weightlifting meet in Gaines-
ville on Saturday, while Fort
White High placed two.
Jeremiah Fulton was fifth in
the 238-pound weight class
with a 380-330-680.
"Anytime we have some-
body place, we're happy about
that," Tigers coach Dennis
Dotson said. "He placed third
last year, so we were hoping
to do better. He increased his
total by 10 pounds, but the
competition was better this
year."
Rene Perry had a 330-310-
640 total in the heavyweights.
For Fort White, George
Griffith was third in the 119s
with a 395 total.
"Third was the highest
place we've ever had," Indians
coach Mike Hunter said.
"(Former Indian) T.J. Robards
placed fourth a couple of
years ago."
Griffith almost didn't even
make the meet, weighing in at
118.9 pounds just moments
before it started.
Seventh-grader Chris Grif-
fith also placed with a finish of
sixth in the 129s with a 410
total. James Pope and
Jonathan James both lifted,
but did not place.


m W


MARIO SARMENTO/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High weightlifter George Griffith lifts during a
recent meet. Griffith had the highest finish in school history
at the state meet in Gainesville on Saturday, placing third.


Columbia baseball

Columbia High broke out
the bats on Saturday, pound-
ing out 14 hits in a 12-2 district
win over Middleburg High in
five innings.
'We came in today, I could
tell just by their attitudes that
they wanted this game bad,"
Tigers coach Andy Bennett
said. "It was offensively proba-
bly our best day so far. (Brian)
Pitman gave us a chance on
the mound. Threw strikes, got


ahead of guys. No errors. So
we made the routine plays. So
it was just a good, complete
game."
Pitman pitched the whole
way and allowed two runs on
five hits. He struck out five
and hit one batter.
Columbia was ahead 7-2
before putting the game away
in the fifth. Three walks, two
hit batters and a triple and sin-
gle scored five runs against
PREP continued on page 3B


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


SCOREBOARD


Leighty stars at Blue Mountain


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
ARENA FOOTBALL
1 p.m.
NBC Regional coverage,
Philadelphia at New York or Tampa Bay at
Nashville
AUTO RACING
Noon
SPEED Formula One, qualifying for
Grand Prix of San Marino, session 2, at
Imola, Italy (same-day tape)
1 p.m.
CBS Formula One, Grand Prix of
San Marino, at Imola, Italy (same-day tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. 4
ESPN2 Texas at Oklahoma St.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
4 p.m.
ESPN2 Iowa St. at Texas
GOLF
1 p.m.
ABC Champions Tour, Legends of
Golf, final round, at Savannah, Ga.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Houston Open, final
round, at Humble, Texas
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
TBS Philadelphia at Atlanta
2:10 p.m.
WGN Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m.
ESPN Oakland at L.A Angels
MOTORSPORTS
1 p.m.
SPEED FIM World Superbike, race
1, at Valencia, Spain (same-day tape)
2 p.m.
SPEED FIM World Superbike, race
2, at Valencia, Spain (same-day tape)
3 p.m.
SPEED AMA Supersport, at
Birmingham, Ala. (same-day tape)
5 p.m.
SPEED AMA Superbike, at
Birmingham, Ala.
NBA
3 p.m.
ABC Playoffs, first round, Game 1,
New Jersey at Miami
5:30 p.m.
TNT Playoffs, first round, Game 1,
Washington at Chicago
8 p.m.
TNT Playoffs, first round, Game 1,
Denver at San Antonio
10:30 p.m.
TNT Playoffs, first round, Game 1,
Memphis at Phoenix
NFL
11 a.m.
ESPN Draft, day 2, at New York

Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Regional coverage, Atlanta at
N.Y. Mets or Philadelphia at Washington




NBA playoffs

FIRST ROUND
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Miami vs. New Jersey
Today
New Jersey at Miami, 3 p.m.
Tuesday
New Jersey at Miami, 8 p.m.

Detroit vs. Philadelphia
Saturday
Detroit 106, Philadelphia 85
Tuesday
Philadelphia at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.

Boston vs. Indiana
Saturday
Indiana at Boston (n)
Monday
Indiana at Boston, 7 p.m.

Chicago vs. Washington
Today
Washington at Chicago, 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Washington at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Phoenix vs. Memphis
Today
Memphis at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Memphis at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.

San Antonio vs. Denver
Today
Denver at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Wednesday
Denver at San Antonio, 8 p.m.

Seattle vs. Sacramento
Saturday
Sacramento at Seattle (n)


Tuesday
Sacramento at Seattle, 10:30 p.m.

Dallas vs. Houston
Saturday
Houston 98, Dallas 86
Monday
Houston at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.

RAIR AT.T.

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 11 7 .611 -
Boston 10 8 .556 1
Toronto 9 10 .474 2!1
Tampa Bay 8 10 .444 3
New York 7 11 .389 4
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 13 4 .765 -
Minnesota 10 7 .588 3
Cleveland 7 10 .412 6
Detroit 7 10 .412 6
Kansas City 5 12 .294 8
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 9 8 .529 -
Oakland 9 .8 .529 -
Texas 10 9 .526 -
Seattle 8 9 .471 1

Friday's Games
Detroit 5, Minnesota 4, 10 innings
Tampa Bay 5, Boston 4
Baltimore 13, Toronto 5
Texas 5, N.Y. Yankees 3
Chicago White Sox 8, Kansas City 2
Cleveland 6, Seattle 1
Oakland 4, L.A Angels 3
Saturday's Games
(Late Games Not Included)
Texas 10, N.Y. Yankees 2
Minnesota at Detroit, ppd. snow
Baltimore 4, Toronto 1
Tampa Bay 6, Boston 5
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City (n)
Cleveland at Seattle (n)
Oakland at L.A. Angels (n)
Today's Games
Texas (Astacio 1-1) at N.Y. Yankees
(RJohnson 1-1), 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Radke 1-3) at Detroit
(Robertson 0-2), 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Ponson 2-1) at Toronto
(Halladay 3-0), 1:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Hernandez 2-1) at
Kansas City (D.Bautista 1-1), 2:10 p.m.
Boston (Arroyo 1-0) at Tampa Bay
(Nomo 2-1), 2:15 p.m.
Cleveland (Elarton 0-0) at Seattle
(Moyer 3-0), 4:05 p.m.
Oakland (Blanton 0-1) at LA Angels
(Escobar 0-0), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Baltimore at Boston, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 10:05
p.m.

NL standings


Florida
New York
Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia


St. Louis
Chicago
Cincinnati
Houston
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh


Los Angeles
Arizona
San Diego


East Division
W L
11 7
10 8
10 8
9 9
8 10


Central Division
W L Pct
11 5 .688
8 9 .471
8 9 .471
8 9 .471
6 11 .353
6 11 .353
West Division
W L Pct
s 12 4 .750
9 8 .529
8 9 .471


San Francisco 8 9 .471 4'1
Colorado 5 11 .313 7

Friday's Games
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, ppd., rain
Atlanta 6, Philadelphia 2
N.Y. Mets 3, Washington 1
Florida 4, Cincinnati 2
Colorado 9, LA. Dodgers 1
St Louis 8, Houston 7
Arizona 5, San Diego 3
Milwaukee 6, San Francisco 1
Saturday's Games
(Late Games Not Included)
Florida 4, Cincinnati 2
N.Y. Mets 10, Washington 5
St. Louis 1, Houston 0, 10 innings
Pittsburgh 4, Chicago Cubs 3
San Francisco 6, Milwaukee 2
Atlanta 11, Philadelphia 1
LA Dodgers at Colorado (n)
San Diego at Arizona (n)
Today's Games
Philadelphia (Padilla 0-1) at Atlanta
(Thomson 1-1), 1:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Claussen 0-1) at Florida
(Moehler 1-0), 1:05 p.m.
Washington (L.Hernandez 1-1) at N.Y.
Mets (V.Zambrano 1-1), 1:10 p.m.


Houston (Backe 1-0) at St. Louis
(Morris 1-0). 2:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Fogg 1-1) at Chicago Cubs
(Prior 2-0), 2:20 p.m.
LA Dodgers (Dessens 0-0) at Colorado
(Francis 1-0), 3:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Glover 0-1) at San
Francisco U.Williams 0-1), 4:05 p.m.
San Diego (Lawrence 1-2) at Arizona
(Estes 1-1), 4:40 p.m.
Monday's Games
Houston at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 8:10 p.m.
Arizona at LA Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Race week

FORMULA ONE
San Marino Grand Prix
Site: Imola, Italy.
Schedule: Today, qualifying, 4 a.m.
(Speed Channel, Noon, tape), race, 8 a.m.
(CBS, 1 p.m., tape).
Track: Enzo and Dino Ferrari
Autodrome (road course, 3.057 miles, 17
turns).
Race distance: 189.534 miles, 62 laps.

Bashas' Supermarkets 200

At Phoenix International Raceway
Avondale, Ariz.
(Starting position in parentheses)
1. (20) Greg Biffle, Ford, 200, $67,800.
2. (8) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 200, $53,651.
3. (11) David Stremme, Dodge, 200,
$48,753.
4. (7) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200,
$39,750.
5. (3) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 200,
$24,775.
6. (13) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet, 200,
$22,625.
7. (30) Michael Waltrip, Chevrolet, 200,
$21,085.
8. (5) Carl Edwards, Ford, 200, $20,995.
9. (9) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 200,
$36,700.
10. (4) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 200,
$23,775.
11. (6) Denny Hamlin, Chevrolet, 200,
$27,575.
12. (22) Stanton Barrett, Pontiac, 200,
$21,825.
13. (14) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 200,
$27,083.
14. (26) David Green, Ford, 200,
$20,875.
15. (2) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 200,
$21,025.
16. (12) Kenny Wallace, Ford, 200,
$20,575.
17. (24) Ashton Lewis Jr., Ford, 200,
$26,145.
18. (25) Jon Wood, Ford, 200, $18,845.
19. (29) Stacy Compton, Ford, 200,
$18,670.
20. (28) Justin Labonte, Chevrolet, 200,
$24,670.
21. (23) Jason Keller, Ford, 200,
$18,620.
22. (27) Mark Green, Chevrolet, 200,
$16,295.
23. (34) Jerry Robertson, Chevrolet,
200, $14,150.
24. (15) Brent Sherman, Dodge, 200,
$18,428.
25. (16) Kertus Davis, Chevrolet, 199,
$14,050.
26. (10) Johnny Sauter, Dodge, 199,
$13,875.
27. (43) Steve Grissom, Ford, 199,
$17,795.
28. (1) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 199,
$16,125.
29. (42) Derrike Cope, Ford, 199,
$17,695.
30. (36) A.J. Fike, Dodge, 199,
$18,095.
31. (41) Scott Gaylord, Chevrolet, 199,
$13,585.
32. (17) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 176,
$21,050.
33. (31) Shane Hmiel, Chevrolet, 173,
$15,515.
34. (32) Geoffrey Bodine, Chevrolet,
164, $13,480.
35. (18) Randy LaJoie, Chevrolet, 160,
accident, $15,450.
36. (19) Jamie McMurray, Dodge, 145,
accident, $13,415.
37. (40) Michel Jourdain Jr., Ford, 145,
$20,880.
38. (39) Eric McClure, Ford, 122,
engine failure, $13,320.
39. (35) Boston Reid, Chevrolet, 83,
accident, $15,270.
40. (33) Scott Lagasse Jr., Dodge, 81,
accident; $13,240.
41. (21) Tim Fedewa, Dodge, 60, acci-
dent, $15,200.
42. (37) Tyler Walker, Dodge, 55, acci-
dent, $13,160.
43. (38) David Gilliland, Chevrolet, 24,
accident, $13,124.


From staff reports


BLUE MOUNTAIN, MISS
- The Blue Mountain
College Topper Tennis Team
finished third at the
TranSouth Athletic Confe-
rence tennis tournament this
past weekend in Nashville.
The Toppers automatically
won a bid to play in the
Region XI tournament that
will be held in Nashville from
Thursday-Friday.
Sarah Leighty, a freshman
from Lake City, has had an
excellent first season with
the Toppers playing number
one positions in singles and
doubles.
Her strong leadership on
the court led the Blue
Mountain College team in
upsetting several unbeaten
teams in the Conference.
Sarah is the daughter of
Darren and Gail Leighty of
Lake City.


Jrj~l~lh. '
CA


k^


COURTESY PHOTO
Former Columbia High tennis player Sarah Leighty played No.
1 doubles and singles for Blue Mountain College in
Mississippi. Leighty's team earned a spot in the Region XI
tournament this week.


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DISTRICTS
Continued from page 1B

everyone's been on the ball,
ready to play."
Simmons pitched well the
last time Fort White faced
Interlachen, and she comes
into the game fresh off of a
one-hitter against Branford.
"She's been pitching great,"
Hunter said. "She's been hit-
ting her spots, so I think she'll
do a great job."
Fort White has a young
team, exemplified by eighth-

PREP
Continued from page 1B

three Broncos pitchers. In all,
eight Tigers went to the plate
and Middleburg couldn't
record a single out.
Seth Carswell was 2-3 with
two singles, two runs scored
and was hit by a pitch. Cory
Burk was 2-3 with a single,
double, walk, two RBIs and
two runs scored. Eric Brooks
was 2-4 with two singles, two
RBIs, two runs scored and he
was hit by a pitch. Chris
Schneiders was hit by a pitch,
walked and scored the game-
ending run in the fifth. Hunter
Allen was 2-3 with two singles,
a walk, he was hit by a pitch
and had two RBIs. Josh Boris
was 1-3 with a double, a walk
and two RBIs. Chris Martinez
was 1-4 with a run scored.
Stoney Coulther went 2-3 with
a double, single and a run
scored. Brandon Rolfe went 2-
3 with two singles, an RBI and
three runs scored.
Columbia (10-10, 7-4) hosts
Leon High at 7 p.m. on
Monday.


grader Alexi Hodson. Hodson
missed some time during the
season with a knee injury, but
she will be back behind the
plate for the tournament.
"It's good, it's a lot better


now," she said. "I feel good.
Very excited to be catching."
The Lady Indians hope to
ride the excitement of their
recent good play all the way to
the championship.


r ------- CO -- -- -- -
Complete Eyeglasses |



225
i From i
F only

I Includes frames and single vis.: .: ri.:, :.i, I
I good for Lake City store. Sor. :'..I:r ii:l
I Coupon required. f: i, ', "F 4
.I Expires 413(0 -': .
L------------ ic UPON------------
------0--- _-------


1 20off 1
S $1 One Complete Pair I
of Eyeglasses
'. I .:, .-i,-, :-:.: r:., lake City store. Excludes $25 I
SI z.), ., .: ._ :.-. required. Expires 4/30/05 I
S -------- -- -----. -----
- Buy One Pair of -l i- --- -on





1Buy One Pair of Glasses
1 And Get A Second Pair Free. I
Some Restrictions Apply C :,.]r : ..i i i
I1 Expirs 4/30 ii
L------------- COM- --------JU
Eyeglass Express K-Mar
Kmart Plaza Lake City Express

752-3733 Hwy90 \247


/


The Nestle Waters bottling facility in
Madison County, Florida is growing,
and we would like to invite you to grow with us.
Opportunities are available for:
Machine Operators Forklift Operators Maintenance Mechanics
Nestle Waters offers great pay and an outstanding benefits package
that includes health and dental insurance along with a 401K and profit-sharing plans.
Wages start at $11 per hour.
For information, call 850-971-2100. To pick up an application, drop by the
bottling plant (directions below).


From 1-10: Take exit 262 North
- through the town of Lee to SR 6.
Turn East (RIGHT) for approx.
3 miles to Hawthorn Road. Look for the
Deer Park sign. Turn RIGHT on Hawthorn
Road and follow the signs to the parking area.
From 1-75: Take exit 460 turn West approx. 15 miles.
Entrance is on LEFT.
Equal opportunity employer
M/FN/D


NORTH AMERICA


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AGrand Events
Images from the April 1, 2005 Send-off Event
held for soldiers and families of the
Florida National Guard, 153rd Engineering Company

Thanks to these citizens who gave money,
goods and services to help the soldiers leave
in style, and assist their families while on
duty in Afghanistan.


Columbia County *7,500
Board of Commissioners

New Millennium $2, 500
Building Systems


S&S Food Stores


*1,000


Photos by JENNIFER CHASTEEN, Lake City Reporter


* Don Kennedy
* Tyson Johnson of Parks Johnson
Agency, LLC
* Florida Pest Control
* Brown-Vann Carpet One
* North Florida Livestock Market
* Advance Cleaners
* Columbia Livestock Market
* Lowe's
* Food Lion
* Wayne's Marine, Inc.
* Don Allen Goodall
* Everett Yarborough of City Liquors
* Moses Cleaners
* Anderson Columbia Co., Inc..
* Thomas Allen of Florida Crown
Workforce Career Center
* H.O.P.E.
* Ronsonet Buick-GMC Truck, Inc.
* Duval Automotive, Inc.
* Mr. and Mrs. W.M. Campbell
* Chris Pottle
* Winn Dixie
* Blue Grey Army, Inc.
* Patron Bail Bonds
* Columbia County Bank
* Terry Zierke Construction
* 1st Street Music
* Mr. and Mrs. Richard Wells
* Brannon, Brown, Haley & Bullock,
P.A.
* Lake City Deli
* Hunter Printing
* Girl Scout Troop 648
* Atlantic Coast Federal Credit Union
* Ken's Bar-b-que
* Hunter Oil
* Delta Farms
* Simon Bradley
* Nettles Sausage
* K.C.'s Produce
* Lake City Wal-mart Supercenter
* Pepsi-Cola
* Hollywood Wholesale
* Columbia County Senior Services


* CARC
* Lake City Reporter
* PCS Phosphate
* Lake City Management Group
* Publix Supermarkets
* WQLC FM/Power Country 102
* North Florida Sales/Budweiser
* Columbia County Tourist
Development Council
* Lake City Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce
* Mobley Meats
* Corrections Corporation of America
* Spires Supermarket
* Save-A-Lot
* Claire Roberts
* Patt Vann
* VFW
* VFW Ladies Auxiliary
* Joseph Wilson
* Mrs. Debra Wright of CHS
* Columbia County Schools
* Girl Scout Troops 959 & 829
* Red Cross of Lake City
* Arline Craft
* City of Lake City
* First Federal Savings Bank of
Florida
* William and Bonnie Gootee
* New Bethel Baptist Church
* Julian E. Collins
* J. Michael and Melise I. Lee
* Lake City Medical Center
A Dwight Stansel
* Linard Johnson
* J. Doyle and Diane Crews
* O'Neal Roofing Company
* Mr. and Mrs. P. Dewitt Cason
* Lake City Management Group, Inc.
* Judy and Donald Morelan
* Richard and Sandra Carpenter
* Leo and Elizabeth Home
* Stephen M. Witt
* Ronald H. Brannon


-2 ~


lpil 0 we I 11117R.33 a' F.3251 Ij OWN IN ITWI I S








ZANECITYR-11ORTE


Page 1 C
Sunday, April 24, 2005
Lake City, Florida
www.lakecityreporte?:com





Columbia County's sweetest preacher


Peanut brittle to the

pulpit, local man serves

up the good stuff


By SUSAN SLOAN
Special to the Reporter
m he members of
* | Bethlehem Baptist
Church in Lake
I City are sweet on
their preacher,
and with good cause. Pastor
Lowell O'Steen not only
serves up a joyful sermon, but
quite often a side dish of
peanut brittle as well.
Candies by Lowell has an
interesting history. Lowell,
born in Providence, was a
member of the U.S. Air Force
and a preacher. He and his
wife, Gwen, were stationed at
Altus Air Force Base, Okla., in
1973 awaiting his upcoming
retirement after a long stint in
the service that had taken
them all over the country.
A friend who lived nearby
in Chickasha, Okla. had given
the O'Steens some peanuts.
Being a long way from her
southern roots in Lake City,
Gwen declared "Boy, I sure
would like some peanut brit-
tle," and Lowell, being an
enterprising kind of fellow,
shot right back "I can make
you some."
Somewhat skeptically,
Gwen sampled his efforts and
declared them to be perfect.
And Lowell has been making
peanut brittle ever since.
He figures he has literally
made tons of it.
Using recipes obtained
from friends and then later
from a candy-making book his
wife bought him, Lowell tin-
kered with basic recipes, giv-
ing them his own personal
touch.
As he pursued his ministry,-
he would give his homemade
candy as gifts at Christmas
and other special occasions.
He was ordained at
Bethlehem Baptist when he
got out of the service, and
from there went on to preach
at other churches in the area
until the 1990s when he was
called back to Bethlehem
Baptist. When he was
approached to become the
preacher at Bethlehem, he
and Gwen prayed on it, but
the deal was finally sealed
with the delivery of two egg
custard pies. The ladies of the
church knew how to make the
offer too good to refuse.
Throughout this time,


Lowell tinkered with his
candy recipes. Then one
Christmas in the 1980s, Mrs.
Vivian "Vi" Wilson called him
before Christmas asking
whether he could fix her up
with four gift boxes of candy
to give as Christmas presents.
She became Lowell's first cus-
tomer. They remained friends
until she passed away in 2003
and Lowell was able to honor
her by officiating at her funer-
al.
Thanks to Mrs. Wilson,
Lowell was blessed with a sec-
ond career. Adding a variety
of fudges, nut brittles, divinity,
mints and other novelty candy
items, Candies by Lowell has
turned into a much bigger
enterprise than either of the
O'Steens would ever have
imagined. All their business
comes from word of mouth,
and an order might be as
small as a one-pound box of
chocolates to take to a sick
friend in the hospital, to a 300-
pound order of peanut brittle
to be distributed by a corpora-
tion as a promotional item.
The candy kitchen is always
busy, -but especially so at
Christmas and Valentine's
Day.
Cameo heart-shaped edible
candy boxes are just one of
his specialties, and he never
knows .when an inspiration
might hit.
One night at 3 a.m., he
woke up with the perfect
recipe for his peanut butter
fudge. And an inquiry from
two elderly women as to
whether he knew how to
make penuche fudge led him
to create a recipe for a type of
fudge that at first he didn't
even know how to spell. But if
you asked the two women
who inspired the recipe, they
would say, "just like my mama
used to make." Lowell's
favorite, chocolate covered
peanut brittle, is just one of
those wild ideas that came to
him that turned out excep-
tionally well.
Lowell, with Gwen assist-
ing, operates out of the candy
kitchen in their home.
Working side-by-side,
exchanging good-natured
barbs and ribbing, the
O'Steens can whip out a batch
of chocolate covered peanut
brittle or divinity with amaz-
ing quickness.


SUSAN SLOAN/Special to the Reporter
ABOVE: Pastor Lowell O'Steen deftly adds sugar syrup to the divinity mixture with exact science. BELOW: O'Steen tosses a
sheet of peanut brittle similar to a pizza maker, to stretch and lighten the mixture.


Sometimes Gwen has to
keep Pastor Lowell on track
as his warmth and sense of
humor can sometimes get
him distracted, particularly
with a willing audience. But
they both know that candy
making is all about precise
timing and coPrect tempera-
tures. '"As Lowell jumps
between the mixer beating
the divinity and the peanut
brittle mixture bubbling on
the stove, Gwen is checking
temperatures, sometimes
relying on her nose to smell
when the mixture is just about
ready.
From state-of the-art equip-
ment, like the digital candy
thermometer to the "automat-
ic peanut brittle stirring
machine" that he and his
friend Dale Richards invent-
ed, the kitchen is a beehive of
activity. Fully licensed by the
state, the O'Steens prefer not
to wholesale their candy to
local stores, but rather take
direct'orders from local resi-
dents, and from some select
corporate clients who use
their candy as gifts or promo-
tional items.
While most of the business


is local, Lowell's candy has
been enjoyed as far away as
California and just about
everywhere in between, as
well as by customers in
Europe and Asia. It is also
probably likely that the
O'Steens give away as much
candy as they sell.
Lowell has a favorite say-
ing: "until one has discovered
the joy of giving, then one has
not realized the joy of living."
In his "spare" time, Lowell
can be found at local nursing
homes or schools for gifted or
special education children
demonstrating the art of
candy making.
During a recent inspection,
the inspector asked Lowell
about his business, wonder-
ing, "was this a hobby that gof
out of control?"
As far as Lowell is con-
cerned, it might not have
been his master plan, but he
believes it was the "Master's
Plan."
He never dreamed that his
candy business would grow to
be what it is today.
But he believes that it was
God's Plan as it has enabled
him to be the pastor of a small


church that could not afford
to fully support a preacher.
The popularity of his candy
has allowed the O'Steens to
supplement their income so
that they can serve God, and
if the congregation at
Bethlehem Baptist Church
benefits by being on the


receiving end of the best
peanut brittle and candy this
side of heaven at holidays and
special occasions, well, just
call it divine providence.
Candies by Lowell can be
sampled by calling 752-5156
or by e-mail at
losteen@se. rr. com.


." i .- '-.


SUSAN SLOAN/Lake City Reporter SUSAN SLOAN/Lake City Reporter
O'Steen and wife, Gwen stand over a wide variety of fudge, including a delectable concoction The O'Steens keep busy making an assortment of candy. The couple work long hours filling
named 'sour cream fudge.' orders large or small.








2C LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005

LIFESTYLE


ENGAGEMENTS


Harnage-Griffin


COURTESY PHOTO
Nicholas Harland and Deana
Harnage

Mike and Carol Harnage of
Sparks, Ga., announce the
engagement and approaching
marriage of their daughter,
Deana Denise "DeeDee"
Harnage of Sparks, Ga., to
Nicholas Harland "Nick"
Griffin of Adel, Ga., son of
William and Belinda Felts and
the late Felton and Dorothy
Griffin of Adel, Ga.
The wedding is planned for
11 a.m. Saturday, June 4, at
Antioch United Methodist
Church, Adel, GA. A recep-
tion will follow at the same
location.
All family and friends are
invited to attend.
Deana is a 1998 Cook High
School graduate, a 2001
Abraham Baldwin
Agricultural College graduate
with an Associates of Science,
a 2003 Valdosta State
University graduate with a
bachelor of business adminis-
tration in finance and a bache-
lor of business administration
in accounting. She is current-
ly employed with Ambling
Management of Valdosta as a
Senior Staff Accountant.
Nicholas is a 1993 Cook
High graduate, a 1995
Abraham Baldwin
Agricultural College graduate
with an Associates of
Agriculture Management and


Try blackberries for home-grown fruit


an Associates of Agriculture
Marketing. He is currently
employed with the YMCA in
Moultrie, Ga., as the Director
of Buildings and Grounds.

Roberts-Khachigan


COURTESY PHOTO
Joshua Roberts and Kristin
Khachigan

Glenn and Martha Jo
Khachigan of Lake City
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage of
their daughter, Kristin Nicole
Khachigan of Lake City, to
Joshua Glenn Roberts of Lake
City, son of Mark and Pat
Nodes and Glenn Roberts of
Lake City.
The wedding is planned for
2 p.m. Saturday, June 4, at
Gateway Baptist Church of
Lake City. A reception will fol-
low in the church's fellowship
hall.
All family and friends are
invited to attend.
Kristin is a Columbia High
honors graduate and a
Liberty University honors
graduate with a degree in
Psychology. She is currently
pursuing her Master's in
social work from Florida State
University and is employed
by Publix Supermarkets.
Joshua is a Fort White
High honors gradaute. He is
employed by New
Millennium Building
Systems, as a Lead Inspector.


BIRTHS


Fort
April and Bryan Fort of
lake City announce the birth
of their daughter Krista Lynn
Fort April 18 in North
Florida Regional, Gainesville.
She weighed six pounds,
four ounces and measured 20
inches.
She joins Sabrina.
Grandparents are: Larry
and Melinda Roth of Lake
City.
Great-grandparents are:
Bruce and Cindy Fort of
Homestead.

Guetherman
Walter and Regina
Guetherman of Lake City
announce the birth of their
daughter Sydney Rivas
Guetherman March 31 in
North Florida Regional
Medical Center, Gainesville.
She weighed seven
pounds, 15 ounces and
measured 21 inches.


Grandparents are: Angel .,
and Mercy Rivas of High'
Springs and Walter and --.
Mary Guetherman of
Pensacola.

Smith
Steven Cary Smith and
Jennifer Norris Smith of
Gainesville announce the
birth of their son Hayden
Andrew Smith March 7 in
Women's Center at North
Florida Regional, Gainesville.
He weighed eight pounds,
five ounces and measured 20
and a half inches.
He joins Hunter Chase
Smith age 6 years and
Evan Blayke Smith age 3
1/2.
Grandparents are: Donald
and Jan Norris and Herb and
Robbie Carson of Lake City
and Hudson and Anne Smith
of West Linn, Oregon.
Great-grandmother is Ruth
Wilson of Louisville, Ky.


DON
GOODE


I have fond memories of
picking blackberries as a
child with my grandmother.
We would put on our rubber
boots for tromping through
the Mississippi mud and early
morning dew. She taught me
not to jerk my arm out when a
thorn got me and how to tell
when the berries were ripe.
Of course it took several taste
tests for me to get the hang of
it which severely reduced my
harvest. She didn't seem to
mind though.
Blackberries can be found
growing wild throughout our
area in abandoned fields.
They ripen in May and June
with the end berry of the clus-
ter ripening first and the
younger berries in the cluster
following in the days to come.
When you pick blackberries,


look for the plumpist, darkest
berries. They should roll off
the stem with a slight tough.
If you have to tug with much
force, the berry would be bet-
ter left for a few more days.
If you want to plant some
blackberry bushes at home to
enjoy, there are several vari-
eties to choose from. Many of
these varieties come to us
from the University of
Arkansas blackberry breed-
ing program. Arkansas vari-
eties typically have names of
native American Indian tribes
such as Apache, Arapaho, and
Chickasaw.
Many people avoid picking
blackberries for two reasons.
One reason may be the mem-
ory or rumor of chigger
insect bites all over your legs.
I have not experienced chig-
gers much here in North
Florida but they were definite-
ly a problem in Mississippi. It
helps to wear long pants and
tuck them down under your
socks. Spray this protective
layer of clothing with an
insect repellent and you're
ready to go. After the harvest


outing, change out of those
clothes and take a shower to
remove any lingering chigger
hitchhikers.
The other reason some
people avoid blackberries is
the thorns. There are a few
blackberry varieties that are
thornless. Some of these are
Oklawaha, Flordagrand, and
Brazos. If you are planting
some blackberries for the
back yard, you might want to
consider these thornless vari-
eties.
Blackberries prefer a soil
pH that is slightly acidic
(around 5.5). They benefit
from the addition of organic
matter to the soil in the form
of compost or aged manure.
A good layer of mulch also
helps reduce weed problems
and conserve soil moisture.
Blackberries will tolerate full
sun to partial shade. They will
also benefit from irrigation
during dry periods especially
when the fruit is maturing. A
complete fertilizer such as 10-
10-10 in the Spring will
encourage healthy growth.
Blackberries typically bear


fruit on last years canes.
After fruiting, the cane will
die. At this point, the cane
can be pruned out (carefully
to avoid the thorns). Leave
the new canes to grow and
produce fruit next year.
Typically there are not
many problems with pests
and diseases for blackberries.
There may be the occasional
stink bug to flick off when
harvesting the berries (avoid
the urge to crush one). Wash
the harvested berries to
remove any tiny thrips or ants
that might be present. If a leaf
spot outbreak does occur, use
a fungicide labeled for black-
berries or as a general fruit
spray.

Dr Don Goode is the
Director and Horticulture
Agent of the Columbia County
Extension Service (a branch of
the University of Florida. He
can be reached at the office (on
the Fairgrounds), on the phone
(752-5384), by e-mail
(dzgoode@ifas. ufl. edu) or
through the Internet
(http://columbia. ifas. ufl. edu.)


Learning about business in the center of it all


By TRISHA FANCY
LCCC business major

Ever been to a working TV
station? Ever been taught to
sing by a Broadway actor?
Ever learned how sound is
dubbed on an animated film
like "Babe?" Ever been five
feet from a half billion dollars
in gold bricks? I'm a first-year
business major and I just had
the opportunity over Spring
Break to see the inner work-
ings of business in the center
of it all New York City.
Through a program at
Lake City Community
College (LCCC), I (and 36
others) traveled to New York
City with Professor Larry
Gunter, who taught us all
about the soul of theater on
Broadway and Dr. Sheri
Carder, a professor at LCCC,
who showed us the business
workings of one of the most
important cities in the world.
Imagine seeing Broadway
shows in a theater that seats
3,000 people and then'seeing
off-Broadway and off-off-
Broadway shows in a theater
that seats only 65 people.
One of the off-Broadway
shows ended in a snow
storm, with the audience
being covered in six inches
of "snow."
I also saw the "rich and
famous" while in New York
City. Nikki Hilton was in
Macy's, shooting a commer-
cial to promote her new per-
fume, Chick. Former
President Bill Clinton and his
Secret Service entourage
passed us in Penn Station on
his way to. give a speech in
Arlington. We also saw the
NBC Today Show with Matt


COLUMBIA COUNTY SCHOOL SYSTEM






April 28th, 2005

Lloyd & Charlie. "

"DO YOUR BEST'c,
An uplifting and powerful presentation which uses art and music
to promote, "Doing your personal best." You will learn how to
use your skills and talents to motivate children to build on the
positive part of life and move forward with purpose. This message
is about respect, responsibility and learning to get out of life what
you earn...

All programs will be presented Presentation for Parents:
at the Columbia County School -10:00 a.m.OR to 12:00 noon
Board Auditorium located at 372 / OR o
6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
West Duval Street, Lake City, FL Presentation for Teachers:
3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
For more information, contact Evening child care provided by Pride &
Tina Roberts at 758-4872. .. Joy. RESERVATIONS REQUIRED
District Parent Involvement a,-M'


Lauer, along
with Will
Smith who
performed
on the patio
outside the
show where Fancy
LCCC was
front and center. You may
have seen us holding up the
Lake City Community
College banner. I passed Bob
Saget, an actor on the televi-
sion show "Full House," on
the street and got John
Lithgow's autograph after a
Broadway show. We saw
many actors such as Tim
Curry, of "Rocky Horror
Picture Show" fame, Hank
Azaria, David Hyde Pierce
(who plays Frasier's brother
on television), and JoAnna
Gleason who plays the dis-
trict attorney on "Law and
Order," perform on
Broadway.
The group posed with the
huge bronze bull on Wall
Street and stood where
George Washington took his
oath of office as the first
President of the United
States. We learned all about
counterfeiting at the


American Financial History
Museum and each of us
received $118,000 (in shred-
ded money) from the Federal
Reserve Bank.
At the Museum of the
Moving Image (one of only
two such museums in the
world), we studied television
advertising for our presiden-
tial candidates from the
1950s to the present. We
even experimented with ani-
mation techniques. We
viewed the skeletal remains
of Lucy, the oldest known
(3.7 million years old)
upright primate at the
Museum of Natural History.
During our tour of the New
York studio for CNN, all the
news was about Terri
Schiavo in Florida, followed
by the Pope's impending
death.
A visit to the American
Society of Composers,
Authors and Publishers
(ASCAP), taught us about
the copyright protection
organization for music writ-
ers and publishers. Along
with a group of upcoming
musicians from Columbia
University we learned how


new technologies are affect-
ing the royalties that writers
receive. ASCAP collects
more than a half billion dol-
lars each year for writers.
Inside Macy's famous
department store, we saw
one million flowers and
plants displayed for their
yearly Flower Show. Watch
out if you have allergies. One
window display had Kermit
the Frog sitting in the midst
of a panorama of living, grow-
ing corn. The trip included a
walking tour of the immi-
grant neighborhoods in
lower New York learning
how the Irish, Jewish, and
Italians assimilated into the
New World.
The most fun part of the
trip was a hilarious workshop
with Broadway actor Jason
-Gillman, formerly' in "Annie
Get Your Gun," with Reba
McIntire. He tried to teach
us his feature song from the
Broadway show "Dirty
Rotten Scoundrels."
Our hotel was located right
in Times Square and we used
the subway system to travel
to all our destinations. Now,
this is education.


Stop By The
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| InningS Lake City Reporter
%for your


WTTymeAt c7w4


These fine merchants wish to help make your
wedding special. Pick up your package today...


JC Penney
752-2822


Etheridge
Furniture
752-2752


Ward's Jewelers
752-5470


Sandy Kishton
Realtor Associate
961-9795


Sterling Entertainment
Rusty Bailey
752-0292 965-4940


Quality Inn
Conference Center
752-3901











LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


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ETEhIR.TAINME!NT ------


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LAEVIY 4 OTE .


Section D
Sunday, April 24, 2005
Lake City, Florida
/).,,'r ]'(ikf<: i/t relJoIte1: (.coin


Business &


Two new businesses open in resurgent downtown


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter. com

Downtown Lake City was
once the center of all business
and commerce for local peo-
ple and tourists alike.
But by the 1970s, the area
saw many of its steadfast busi-
nesses leaving for newly built
shopping centers and develop-
ments along U.S. 90 West,
threatening the vitality of the
town's center.
After periods of ups and
downs in the 1980s and early
1990s, since the mid-1990s the
area has seen a noticeable
resurgence in its look and pop-
ularity. With the city establish-
ing the downtown historic dis-
trict and seeing to various
improvement projects such as
sidewalk beautification and the
Olustee Park renovation, as
well as the efforts of the
Downtown Action Corporation,
new life has been pumped into
the heart of Lake City.
As further evidence of down-
town again becoming a place of
destination and being more
desirable for business, two new
ventures recently opened to
serve locals and passers-
through:
Silver Chest
As a full-time project manag-
er of the Florida Department of
Transportation, for David
Charron selling jewelry was
once just a hobby.
But about a year and a half
ago, he had a gold ring that he
was looking to sell. He quickly
found a buyer and some extra
money.
"And I thought, that was
easy," he said.
Soon he bought more gold
jewelry and again quickly
found a buyer for profit.
Eventually Charron said one of
the people he was selling to
asked him if he had any silver.
So he bought that and sold it


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
LEFT: Baresta John Relyea serves pita sandwiches to Paul Richardson (from left), Josiah Rogers, and Evangelina Blandon at the Marion Street Cafe.
Richardson surfs the Web using the cafe's wireless Internet access. RIGHT: Amber Hancock of The Silver Chest displays its selection of unique silver jewel-
ry. The business recently opened off North Marion Avenue.


easily as well.
Having always liked silver,
Charron said he then began
taking more of an interest in
the precious metal and
researched where to get it.
Through a friend, he met
someone in Jacksonville that
introduced him to Tasco silver,
from the region of the same
name in Southern Mexico.
Charron soon traveled there to
find suppliers of fine hand-
made silver jewelry from that
region.
There, he discovered a
unique supply line and bought
many pieces, which he then
began selling as a vendor vari-
ous horse shows throughout
Florida.
"I did that for a little bit and
still do occasionally," Charron
said. "But then I was driving
downtown one day and I saw a


'for rent' sign (in a vacant
Marion Avenue store front)
and a little light bulb went off in
my head and I said, 'I'll try
downtown here'."
Opening his. new silver jew-
elry business at 124 North
Marion Avenue (directly
across from the Courthouse
Annex) and naming it, appro-
priately, Silver Chest, he said
he chose downtown because
the rent was less than that of
most local retail centers and
because of location.
"We get people walking
around down here," Charron
said. "I didn't want to be off by
myself. We have a lot of spon-
taneous buyers that are walk-
ing by. I've got good exposure."
But also, he said, "I was look-
ing out near Interstate 75 and I
just couldn't afford it."
Now, Charron is working


part-time at the store as he
keeps up with his job at the
FDOT, while his store manag-
er Amber Hancock helps
watch over the business during
the day.
In addition to selling all sil-
ver jewelry, much of it hand-
crafted and inlaid with precious
stones, Charron also sells.
high-end pottery from Mexico
and Nicaragua, as well as hand-
woven wool rugs.
"I try to sell everything
that's hand made. I have some
chains that are made in Italy,
like the Omega chains. They
are made by a machine, but
everybody loves them," he
said.
Charron said if his business
takes off, in a "couple of years,"
he would like to oversee the
jewelry business full-time, per-
haps even opening more stores


in surrounding towns.
Though Silver Chest is
Charron's first venture into
small business, he said its
something he has always want-
ed to do.
"I always knew sales is
where the money is at if you
are selling something you like
to sell, you aren't going to be
selling it if you don't like it," he
said.
Becoming part of downtown
at the time he is, Charron said
he is encouraged about how
the area is gaining more inter-
est with new business develop-
,ments and attractions, such as
an interactive fountain recently
approved by the city for the
center of Olustee Park.
Charron said he plans to
soon join the DAC and hopes
that any additional empty store
fronts will filled with new busi-


nesses.
"It's looking real down
here," he said.
Silver Chest is open
Tuesday-Saturday from 10
a.m.-6 p.m.
Marion Street Cafe
Tammy Robbins thought
Lake City could use a unique
place for people to join togeth-
er to relax and enjoy each
other's company.
And it had to be downtown.
So, when the building at 279
North Marion Ave. came up
for sale (formerly housing
Second Hand Rose) last year,
she knew that was the place for
her first foray into small busi-
ness.
With the help of friends,
family and volunteers, Robbins

BUSINESS
Continued on Page 2D


BISHOP REALTY, INC.
U.S. 90 West Across from Wal-Mart 752-4211
ColdwellBanker.com
Indronepnntlv wnedI and )nprated LENDER


Gorgeous Stucco Home on 5 acres.
Nearly new! 4/3, security system, surround
sound, F.P., 10 ft. ceilings, formal LR & DR,
family rm, tub & shower in master bath.
Beautiful kitchen! Lots of upgrades.
$324,900. MLS#44925. Ask for Elaine K.
Tolar 386-755-6488.

;. : *..*< : .




Brick Home in the Country Lovely, 1698
sq. ft., 3/2, on 10 acres, in Union County.
Porch all across front & a back porch. Wood
burning FP, wood flooring, solid oak
cabinets in kitchen. $184,900. MLS#44870.
Call Nell or Hansel Holton 386-984-5046.


Block Home, 2/1.5, on 5 acres. Office,
family room, dining room, upgraded
kitchen. Includes 2 older MH's. Paved road,
Suwannee County, O'Brien area. $120,000.
MLS#44740. Contact Nell or Hansel Holton
386-984-5046.







Affordable Housing This 3/2 MH is near
town, near most conveniences on the
Westside. Very nice interior, front porch,
trees. Just $39,900. MLS#44467. Call Nell
or Hansel Holton for info 984-5046.


New Listing in Great Area! Gorgeous lot.
3/2 split plan. Ceramic tile, storage building,
covered porch w/patio. $159,900.
MLS#44906. Ask for Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488.


Price Reduced! Nice Updated 2 story -
Frame, 3B/3B, FP, new carpet/ceramic tile,
paint, granite countertops. Built 1985, 1
acre lot, 2259 sq. ft. nice deck. Privacy,
peaceful setting. $180,000. MLS#43329
Call Nell or Hansel Holton for info 984-5046


May-Fair Subdivision. Excellent location,
great floor plan. 3/2, large rooms, nice
master suite, oversized garage. Well
maintained home, won't last long.
$179,900. MLS#44604. Ask for Lori Giebeig
Simpson 752-2874.


Fixer-Upper Brick, 3/1.5 on paved street in
Lake Butler. Needs TLC! Pain t & elbow
grease! Priced @ $50,900. MLS#44765 Call
today for info Hansel Holton 386-984-5791


Convenient to Lake City & Gainesville, Zoned R/0O Turn of the Century, 1893
this 1248 sq. ft. DW MH on .80 acre includes sq. ft. built in 1900. Current use as rental,
double carport & 20x30 barn with concrete 3BR/2BA, with 1BR/1BA being added. Has
floor and electricity. Immaculately cared for. had new wiring. Frame with vinyl siding.
$69,900. MLS#43484. Ask for Mary Brown Near everything downtown. $105,000.
Whitehurst 965-0887. MLS#44063. Contact Nell or Hansel Holton
for more info, 386-984-5046.


1999 MH w/3BR/2BA on 1 acre. Very
good condition, with appliances. New on
market. $49,900. MLS#42623. Contact Nell
or Hansel Holton 386-984-5046.


Country Side Jennings, FL. 1620 sq. ft.,
3/2 DW MH on 1 acre lot. Needs appliances,
little TLC but otherwise in good condition.
$49,900. MLS#43569. Contact Nell or
Hansel Holton 984-5046.


Great Commercial lot in center of town! Would make a great spot for a small shop or a drive through. $59,900.
MLS#44745. Call Mary Brown Whitehurst 386-965-0887.
Home Under Construction! Quality, Convenience, Comfort. 3/2, open floor plan, located on 1/2 acre. 2 car garage,
covered back porch. $154,900. Ask for Lori Giebeig Simpson 386-752-2874.
In 3 Rivers Estates Very nice DW MH, 3BR/2B, FP, 1736 sq. ft., front porch, apx. 1 acre lot. $59,900. MLS#41828.
Contact Listing Agents, Nell or Hansel Holton.
1999 OW MH Needs some minor repairs & TLC. 3/.2, 1440 sq. ft., 1 acre lot. Small pond in back corner.
$47,900.MLS#44335. Call Nell or Hansel Holton, 386-984-5046.


-.






FISHING, HUNTING & just country living abounds on
this 40 acres w/custom built 2000 SqFt home built in
2003; pasture, pond, Ig granddaddy oaks $475,000
KATRINA BLALOCK 961-3486


IDEAL LOCATION! 2 acres with 189 foot frontage on
US-90 between Wellborn & Lake City $59,500 Call 755-
5110 for details #44738


RETIREMENT AT ITS FINEST! 2 lots available in
Eastside Village! Community host a pool & clubhouse,
exercise facility & RV parking along with other
activities SANDY KISHTON 344-0433 #42896


GREAT LOCATION! 2 acres on Turner Rd zoned for
commercial or light industrial; 200' frontage $103,000
per acre SANDY KISHTON 344-0433 #44975


ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS 1.64-acre lot on beautiful
Lake Jeffery's waterfront! Build your dream home and
enjoy the breath-taking view! Call 755-5110 for details
#43675&


IT'S HERE! Panoramic Hunter's Ridge S/D west of Lake
City just off US-90; offers a picturesque view to build
your new dream home! Deed Restrictions will apply
AVERY CRAPPS 984-5354 #38660









SERENITY can be yours on this 10.41 acres (6 acres
fenced) w/beautiful oak trees, stocked fish pond
w/dock, pole barn, 2BR/f 1/2BA home & greenhouse
$235,000 KATRINA BLALOCK 961-3486 #44851




J.;1-- .



COMMERCIAL CENTER on CR-341! 16 units range
from 480 SqFt to 2400 SqFt w/paved parking,
retention areas; fencing on 1.28 acres $725,000
DANIEL CRAPS 755-5110 #42266


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


2D


40M WM 01 IIM-S


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"Copyrighted Material



-- ASyndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


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BUSINESS
Continued From Page 1D
was able to.renovate ,the build-
ing into a cozy, eclectic caf6 tfie
likes of something more akin to
a metropolitan area. Thus, after
six months of work, the Marion
Street Caf6 opened this year in
February.
Having lived in Lake City for
three years after moving from
Mayo, Robbins, a Connecticut
native, said she met another
downtown business owner
Patty Kimler of A Company of
Angels who helped foster her
new business idea.
"I thought it would be great
to have a place for the people of
Lake City to come and talk and
be social and not be drinking
alcohol," she said. "We drink
coffee."
In addition to serving the tra-
ditional coffee house fare such
as espresso and cappuccino,
the Marion Street Caf6 also
serves coffee "freezers," milk-
shakes, ice cream, a variety of
teas, including chai, as well as a
variety of sandwiches and other
light food choices.
Robbins said when she start-
ed the business she knew little
about coffee, but luckily met
someone who was very pas-
sionate and knowledgeable
about the beverage and its vari-
eties. She said John Relyea,
who befriended her and volun-
teered to work at the caf6, has
been a "Godsend."
All of the help and support
she has received from local
people and downtown business
owners has been "phenome-
nal," she said.
Taking the caf6 a step fur-
ther than a place to just get a
bite to eat and/or cup of coffee,
Robbins has also established
her businesses as a place for
people to gather and share
their creativity.
"There is a lot of very smart,
talented people in Lake City
and we need them to have an
outlet," she said.
Every Thursday night, she
said, the caf6 is hosting an
"open mic night," starting any-
where form 8-9 p.m., where
locals can go to either enjoy lis-
tening to people playing
acoustic guitar, reading poetry
and/or participate themselves.
This week, Robbins said about
40 people attended. People typ-
ically stay and enjoy the cama-


raderie well into the night, she
.said.
There is also a sketch club
that meets at 11:30 a.m. on
Siunday, and poetry remain at
6 p'.m.-on Fridays. A book,'lub"
was als just started aid ill' be
meeting Wednesday -nights.
Additionally, Robbins also
put shelving up around the cafe
to house used books for sale
and customer enjoyment. She
also has chess sets (there's an
unofficial chess tournament
most Friday nights) board
games and marbles, if someone
is so inclined to stay a while and
play with old or new friends.
"We want people to feel at
home, so that's what we've
done," Robbins said.
For seating there is the stan-
dard caf6 table and chairs, but
there are also comfortable
couches, as is common in a
true coffee house. Robbins said
there is also wireless Internet
capability for people to use
their laptop computers with
while at the caf6, or there are
two house laptops that can be
used for someone without their
own.
Robbins said she feels like
Marion Street Cafe isn't some-
thing she did by herself, but
instead with the help of people
who wants to see downtown as
successful as she does.
"People need to do more
downtown," she said. "I would
have done it anywhere else in
Lake City but downtown."
Robbins said she would like
to see more local people, espe-
cially young adults going into
business for themselves, rather
than only people from outside
the area taking advantage of
emerging markets.
She would also like to see
more downtown businesses
open on Saturday for local peo-
ple who work during the week
to enjoy the area more easily.
"I think if people gather in a
beautiful place they want to
enjoy it and get involved,"
Robbins said.
Marion Street Cafe is open
seven days a week, operating
from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. on Monday
and Tuesday, 8 a.m.-9 p.m. on
Wednesday, opening again at 8
a.m. on Thursday and Friday,
with no set closing time either
of those nights. And on week-
ends, for Saturday, it opens at 9
a.m. with no set closing time
and opens on Sunday from
11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.


4)


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


A NYSE A Amex Nasdaq
7,015.85 +57.50 1,449.97 +24.59 1,932.19 +24.04


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
FrankCov 3.48 +.65 +23.0 ApogeeTc 2.00 +.70 +53.8 Pozen 5.95 +2.11 +54.9
ChmpE 10.46 +1.81 +20.9 AccessPh 2.88 +.96 +50.0 Devcon 14.25 +3.64 +34.3
LoneStTch 42.35 +6.55 +18.3 iMergentn 11.31 +3.19 +39.3 ElecBtq 55.04+13.92 +33.9
TerraNitro 22.50 +3.44 +18.0 RaeSyst 3.40 +.83 +32.3 MncTech 6.25 +1.54 +32.7
DeVry 23.20 +3.38 +17.1 AMCONrs 22.75 +4.90 +27.5 Britesmle 4.50 +1.10 +32.4
Ipscog 51.75 +7.44 +16.8 ArenaRwt 5.43 +.93 +20.7 SunHydr 29.98 +6.79 +29.3
Hombeck 24.10 +3.37 +16.3 Cenucon 3.55 +.60 20.3 CdtdThern 6.32 +1.40 +28.5
Oakley 14.00 +1.90 +15.7 Carderogn 3.07 +.51 +19.9 Nasdaq n 13.43 +2.97 +28.4
CypSem 12.80 +1.70 +15.3 CEFmkg 5.87 +.92 +18.6 ApplDiglrs 3.42 +.75 +28.1
EMCCp 13.30 +1.76 +15.3 MetroHftn 2.64 +.41 +18.4 Nitches 4.85 +1.06 +28.0


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Applica 3.12 -1.38 -30.7
BearingP If 5.78 -1.93 -25.0
Spirent 3.22 -1.05 -24.6
StarGas 2.20 -.70 -24.0
Maytag 10.89 -3.38 -23.7
KrspKrm 5.80 -1.76 -23.3
Xanser 2.43 -.67 -21.6
PiperJaf 27.75 -7.60 -21.5
MBNA 18.45 -5.00 -21.3
BuckTch 7.90 -1.93 -19.6

Most Active (s$1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Lucent 2831166 2.52 +.12
Pfizer 1248337 27.22 -.49
GenElec 1106385 36.10 +.35
ExxonMbI 1016040 59.42 +3.23
EMCCp 1000581 13.30+1.76
MBNA 965785 18.45-5.00
FordM 956760 9.89 +.39
BearingP If 898178 5.78 -1.93
Motorola 897452 15.78 +1.03
Avaya 833601 8.52-1.88

Diary
Advanced 2,173
Declined 1,327
New Highs 64
New Lows 256
Total issues 3,576
Unchanged 76
Volume 11,145,855,825


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Rotonic 3.30 -1.45 -30.5
AXM Ph 2.03 -.57 -21.9
TetonPet 2.35 -.65 -21.7
Congolm 4.30 -.90 -17.3
MS AV05 n 8.92 -1.81 -16.9
ImplntSc 3.58 -.72 -16.7
Telkonet 2.90 -.56 -16.2
Jinpan 5.65 -1.08 -16.0
Intermix n 5.10 -.95 -15.7
Stephan s 3.80 -.71 -15.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SPDR 4528416115.57 +1.42
SemiHTr 1560203 30.65 +.74
SP Engy 991140 42.04 +2.31
iShJapan 873471 10.13 +.06
iShRs2000 796789117.37 +1.73
SP Fncd 517938 27.74 +.01
DJIA Diam 455382101.80 +1.10
OilSvHT 264013 95.00 +5.54
RetailHT 206944 87.40-1.38
IvaxCps 123409 17.43 -.18

Diary
Advanced 597
Declined 466
New Highs 22
New Lows 121
Total issues 1,116
Unchanged 53
Volume 1,578,574,630


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
UtdAHIth 2.07 -3.25 -61.1
Neurochg 7.56 -3.51 -31.7
EmplreRst 3.30 -1.48 -31.0
Harmonic 6.27 -2.63 -29.6
CtpitCm 14.42 -5.77 -28.6
0sn11.85 -4.10 -25.7
25.75 -8.72 -25.3
Digirad n 5.00 -1.66 -24.9
QEP Co 10.66 -3.32 -23.7
X-Rite 11.61 -3.56 -235

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Nasd100Tr5835493 35.09 35
Microsoft 4077636 24.98 + 52
Intel 4024506 23.24 .1 12
Cisco 2611033 17.43 .23
Oracle 2401317 11.92 +.22
SunMicro 2149211 3.49 -.17
JDS Uniph2116270 1.55 +.07
eBays 1909069 31.51 -.46
SiriusS 1814388 5.10 -.05
AppleCs 1773462 35.50 +.15

Diary
Advanced 1,739
Declined 1,575
New Highs 92
New Lows 420
Total issues 3,386
Unchanged 72
Volume 9,726,191,977


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg
AT&T NY .95 18.73 +.27 +1.5 -1.7
Alltel NY 1.52 57.93 +2.31 +4.2 -1.4
e Nasd ... 35.50 +.15 +0.4 +10.2
MatI Nasd .12 14.96 +.46 +3.2 -12.5
AutoZone NY 82.34 -.44 -0.5 -9.8
BkofAms NY 1.80 44.37 +.09 +0.2 -5.6
BellSouth NY 1.08 25.81 +.27 +1.1 -7.1
BobEvn Nasd .48 21.25 +.33 +1.6 -18.7
CNBFnPAsNasd .52 14.93 +.03 +02 -2.2
CSX NY .40 39.59 +1.37 +3.6 -1.2
ChmpE NY ... 10.46 +1.81 +20.9 -11.5
ChevTex s NY 1.60 53.87 +1.66 +3.2 +2.6
Cisco Nasd ... 17.43 +.23 +1.3 -9.8
CocaCI NY 1.12 42.13 +.84 +2.0 +1.2
ColBgp NY .61 20.98 +.83 +4.1 -1.2
Delhaize NY 1.50 67.64 -.05 -0.1 -10.8
DollarG NY .16 20.56 -.94 -4.4 -1.0
eBays Nasd ... 31.51 -.46 -1.4 -45.8
EMCCp NY 13.30 +1.76 +15.3 -10.6
ExxonMbi NY 1.08 59.42 +3.23 +5.7 +15.9
FPLGps NY 1.42 41.57 +1.63 +4.1 +11.2
FamDIr NY .38 27.59 -.26 -0.9 -11.7
FordM NY .40 9.89 +.39 +4.1 -32.4
GenElec NY .88 36.10 +.35 +1.0 -1.1
GaPacif NY .70 33.22 +.41 +1.2 -11.4
GdyFam Nasd .12 8.00 -.23 -2.8-12.5
HCAInc NY .60 53.12 -2.13 -3.9 +32.9
HomeDp NY .40 36.02 -.09 -0.2 -15.7


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex DIv Last Chg %Chg %Chg
Intel Nasd .32 23.24 +1.12 +5.1 -.6
JDSUniphNasd .. 1.55 +.07 +4.7 -51.1
JeffPilot NY 1.67 48.07 +.16 +0.3 -7.5
LowesCos NY .16 51.88 +.24 +0.5 -9.9
Lucent NY ... 2.52 +.12 +5.0 -33.0
McOnlds NY .55 30.06 -.24 -0.8 -6.2
Microsoft Nasd .32 24.98 +.52 +2.1 -6.5
Nasd100TrNasd .38 35.09 +.35 +1.0 -12.1
NYTimes NY .62 32.72 -1.28 -3.8 -19.8
NobltyH Nasd .20 20.00 +.00 ... -14.8
OcdPet NY 1.24 71.47 +5.97 +9.1 +22.5
Oracle Nasd ... 11.92 +.22 +1.9-13.1
Penney NY .50 46.39 +.90 +2.0 +12.1
PepsiCo NY .92 54.47 -.36 -0.7 +4.3
Pfizer NY .76 27.22 -.49 -1.8 +1.2
Potash s NY .60 82.50 +2.30 +2.9 -.7
Qualcom s Nasd .36 33.92 +1.23 +3.8 -20.0
Ryder NY .64 38.60 -.78 -2.0 -19.2
SearsHldgsNasd ... 131.03 -3.88 -2.9 +32.4
SemiHTr Amex .18 30.65 +.74 +2.5 -8.2
SiebelSys Nasd ... 9.08 +.41 +4.7 -13.4
SidusS Nasd ... 5.10 -.05 -1.0 -33.1
SouthnCo NY 1.49 33.00 +1.05 +3.3 -1.6
SPDR Amex 2.26 115.57 +1.42 +1.2 -4.4
SunMicro Nasd ... 3.49 -.17 -4.6 -35.3
TimeWam NY ... 17.3 +.05 +0.3 -10.7
WalMart NY .60 46.81 -.89 -1.9 -11.4
Yahoos Nasd ... 34.87 +2.41 +7.4 -7.5


Stock FoolnaltM g Dividends and earnings In Canadian dollars. h = Does not meel continued-Inting
standards If = Late filing with SEC. n = New In past 52 weeks. pf Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone
a reverse stock ap of at east 60 percent within tne past year. rt Right to buy security at a specified
price. a. Stock has spll by at least 20 percent wiltin the last year. un = Units. vj = In Dankmplcy or
recelverBhp. wd = When distributed wl = When Issued. wt = Warrants
Mutual Fund Footnolte a = Ex cash liaimend. NL = No up-front sales charge, p = Fund assets used to
pay distribution costs. r Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. I Both p and r
Gainers nd Losn- must be worth at lesal $2 to be listed In taDtes at left. Most Actives must be worth
at least $1. Volume In hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unoffcial.


Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 5.75 5.75
Discount Rate 3.75 3.75
Federal Funds Rate 2.75 2.875
Treasuries
3-month 2.86 2.73
6-month 3.05 3.01
5-year 3.92 3.87
10-vear 4.25 4.24
30-year 4.58 4.60


Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.2794 1.2905
Britain 1.9150 1.9088
Canada 1.2356 1.2376
Euro .7649 .7658
Japan 106.04 106.86
Mexico 11.0450 11.0330
Switzerind 1.1802 1.1822
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


For the week ending
Friday, April 22




10,157.71
Record high: 11,722.98
Jan.14,2000


II I I I I
AM J J AS


Total Assets
Name Ob) ($Mlns)


Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 n
American Funds A: InvCoAA p
American Funds A: WshMutA p
American Funds A: GwthFdA p
Fidelity Invest: Magellan n
PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRet n
Fidelity Invest: Contra n
Dodge&Cox: Stock
American Funds A: IncoFdA p
American Funds A: EupacA p
Vanguard Insl Fds: Instldx n
Fidelity Invest: LowPr m
American Funds A: CaplnBIA p
American Funds A: NewPerA p
Vanguard ldx Fds: TotStk n
Fidelity Invest: Grolnc
Vanguard Fds: Wndsll
American Funds A: BelA p
American Funds A: CapWGrA p
Vanguard Fds: Welltn n
Fidelity Invest: Equtlnc n
Fidelity Invest: Diverlntl n
Fidelity Invest: Puritan
Fidelity Invest: GroCo n
Vanguard Admiral: 50OAdmI n
Vanguard Fds: Prmcp r
Fidelity Invest: BlueChIpGr


a ~aS. 1


I I I I I I
ON D0J FM


1,000


Vt-'10,000


9,000


-8,000


I 17,000
AM


Total Return/Rank Pct MinInI
NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-vear Load Invt


80,949 106.23
63,944 29.68
62,011 29.60
60,313 26.29
57,371 98.85
47,891 10.68
46,697 55.48
45,216 125.68
43,669 17.98
37,515 35.20
35,997 105.36
35,551 38.49
35,185 51.73
32,895 26.57
32,057 27.27
31,050 36.46
30,355 30.29
30,077 17.42
29,844 33.23
28,937 29.55
25,985 49.75
25,325 28.51
23,671 18.33
23,264 52.04
22,428 106.24
22,002 58.04
21,953 39.21


+2.8/A
+3.9/D
+3.4/D
+2.3/A
-0.4/D
+5.2/A
+6.3/A
+9.8/A
+8.8/A
+10.4/0
+2.9/A
+9.2/B8
+13.4/A
+5.4/D
+3.2/C
+2.6/B
+10.2/A
+3.1/C
+12.8/A
+7.2/A
+3.2/E
+11.8/C
+3.7/B
-2.0/C
+2.8/A
+1.9/D
-2.9/E


-13.5/A
+13.2/C
+26.9/B
-2.4/A
-20.3/D
+47.5/A
+9.9/A
+73.9/A
+55.5/A
+0.1/C
-13.0/A
+130.8/A
+692/A
+4.4/B
-8.1/C
-6.2/B
+42.7/A
+52.5/A
+45.5/A
+42.3/A
+21.8/D
+31.5/A
+28.6/A
-32.5/C
NS
-9.4/D
-29.3/E


NL 3,00(
5.75 251

NL 2,50(
NL 5,000,00(
NL 2,50(
NL 2,50(
5.75 25(
5.75 25(
NL 10,000,00(
NL 2,50(
5.75 250
5.75 25(
NL 3,00(
NL 2,501
NL 3,001
5.75 251
5.75 250
NL 3,00(
NL 2,501
NL 2,50(
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
NL 250,000
NL 25,000
NL 2,501


BL-ealanid,El -Equlyincome, GL -oklSlock, HB -Hedtl IB-dIntemedle Bod, IL.temtialStockLC Core, L
*Lage Growth, LV .aar-geC Val, MP -StodriId MT -Mortgage, SP -S&P 500M, SS Mate Muni XG -iCap Gro
Total Return: Chgin NAV with d .ide d smHesed. Ra Hw hd perfu edvs.ol their sams .o o* .: A i top 20, E inba
20%.Mn Init nvtMin $ needed to inestin und.NA= Notaval.NE= Dta in queson.NS= Fundnot in exislance SurcUpper,b


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
AES Cp ... ... 28 +.08 +21.4 16.59
AFLAC .44 1.2 15 +.91 -8.1 36.61
AGCO ... ... 10 +1.08 -19.4 17.65
AK Steel ... ... 4 +.43 -33.4 9.63
AMR ... ... ... -.09 -6.8 10.21
AT&T .95 5.1 ... +.27 -1.7 18.73
AU Optron .36 .2.4 ... -.13 +4.8 15.01
AbtLab 1.10 2.3 23 -2.30 +2.0 47.57
Accenture ... ... 16 -.75 -19.4 21.75
AMD ... ......-.85 -33.7 14.60
Aetnas .02 ... 10 -.81 +12.0 69.86
AffCmpS ... ... 16 -2.83 -20.5 47.85
Agere ... ... ... -.02 -8.8 1.25
AgereB ... ... ... -.03 -8.1 1.24
Agilent 27 +.70 -12.4 21.10
Albertsn .76 3.8 17 -.12 -16.7 19.90
Alcoa .60 2.1 21 -.10 -7.1 29.20
AllegTch .24 1.0 16 +3.20 +12.2 24.31
AlliData ... ... 34 +5.41 -9.9 42.79
AldWaste ... ...89 +.12 -23.5 7.10
Allstate 1.28 2.3 11 +1.26 +5.5 54.57
Alltel 1.52 2.6 15 +2.31 -1.4 57.93
Altria 2.92 4.5 14 -.18 +6.1 64.80
AmbacF .50 .8 10 -8.09 -19.3 66.27
Amdocs .....22-1.88 +2.4 26.87
AmHess 1.20 1.3 10 +4.93 +16.1 95.62
AMovilL .21 .4 ... -.71 -5.5 49.48
AmWest ... ... ... -.78 -35.1 4.27
AEP 1.40 4.0 13 +.78 +1.8 34.97
AjnE)(p.. ...48. -1.0 19 -.91 -11.6 49.81
AmIr.ip ii .50..1.. 12 -.76 -23,3 50.35
AmTower ... ...... -.06 -7.1 17.09
Americdt ... ... 13 -.05 -6.8 22.78
AmerisBrg .10 .2 16 -.50 +2.2 60.00
AmSouth 1.00 4.0 14 +.20 -2.3 25.30
Anadrk .72 1.0 12 +2.15 +13.9 73.81
AnalogDev .24 .7 23 +.96 -8.5 33.80
Anheusr .98 2.1 17 +1.28 -7.4 47.00
Apache .32 .5 12 +3.41 +16.5 58.90
ArchCoal .32 .7 25 +4.49 +26.6 44.99
ArchDan .34 1.7 19 -.43 -8.8 20.35
ArmorH ... ... 13 +3.71 -20.8 37.25
AutoData .62 1.4 26 +.88 ... 44.34
Avaya ... ... 18 -1.88 -50.5 8.52
Avon s .66 1.6 23 -.62 +4.1 40.28
3B&TCp 1.40 3.7 13 +1.10 -9.2 38.18
3HP BillLt .46 1.7 ... +1.42 +9.8 26.38
3J Svcs .32 .6 23 +3.15 +14.0 53.07
BJsWhIs ... ... 17 -.94 -6.0 27.37
BMC Sft ... ... 38 +1.42 -12.6 16.25
BakrHu .46 1.0 29 +2.94 +7.8 46.00
BkofAmus 1.80 4.1 1.1 +.09 -5.6 44.37
BkNY .80 2.9 15 -.63 -18.4 27.27
3arrickG .22 1.0 49 +.19 -6.7 22.60
Baxter .58 1.6 52 +2.11 +6.1 36.63
BearSt 1.00 1.1 10 -.08 -7.3 94.84
BeadngP If ... ..... -1.93 -28.0 5.78
BeazrHms .40 .9 7 +1.23 -6.4 45.60
BellSouth 1.08 4.2 11 +.27 -7.1 25.81
BestBuy .44 .9 17 +.09 -17.9 48.68
Blockbstr .08 .8 ... -.09 +4.7 9.99
Boeing 1.00 1.7 25 +.88 +11.8 57.88
BostonSci ... ... 21 -.58 -17.4 29.35
BrMySq 1.12 4.4 21 -.24 +.4 25.71
IurlNSF .68 1.4 23 +1.72 +3.4 48.94
BudRscs .34 .7 13 +2.16 +15.9 50.41
CITGp .64 1.6 11 +4.49 -12.8 39.94
CMS Eng ... ... 20 +.25 +23.1 12.86
CVSCp .29 .6 22 -1.28 +12.0 50.50
CablvsnNY ... ...... +.27 +7.2 26.70
Cadence ... ... 57 +.38 +2.3 14.13
Alpine ... ...... -.20 -44.4 2.19
CampSp .68 2.4 18 -.22 -3.7 28.77
CapOne .11 .2 14 -2.35 -16.1 70.65
CardnlHIth .12 .2 19 -.67 -6.3 54.48
CaremkRx ... ... 28 +1.45 -.1 39.41
Carnival .80 1.6 20 +.56 -14.6 49.21
Caterpillar 1.64 1.8 15 +6.76 -7.9 89.81
Celesticg ... ... ... +.82 -15.7 11.90



Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ADC Tel ...
ASML HId ...
ATI Tech ...
Aastrom
Activist s ...
AdobeSy .05
Adtran .32
AlignTech ...
AltairNano ...
AlteraCp ...
Amazon
AEagleO s .20
AmrTrde
Amgen
AmkorT
Andrew
AppleCs
ApplDigl rs ...
ApidMatl .12
AMCC
AskJvs
Atmel
Autodsk s .03
3EA Sys ...
BedBath ...
Biogenldc ...
3iomet .20
3iopure
Brdcom
BrcdeCm ...
CMGI
CV Thera ...
Celgene s ...
ChartCm ...
ChkPoint ...
CienaCp
Cisco
CitrixSy


... 29 +.41 -13.8 2.31
... ... +.70 -2.6 15.51
... 18 +.62 -17.0 16.10
...... -.28 +44.4 2.05
... 21 -.79 -3.3 14.63
.1 32 -.37 -3.9 60.29
1.5 23 +3.40 +8.0 20.67
... 51 +1.31 -24.1 8.16
... ... -.04 +2.2 2.77
... 26 +.73 -8.2 19.01
... 24 +.02 -25.4 33.04
.8 18 -.86 +10.5 26.02
... 15 -.61 -26.2 10.50
... 30 -1.06 -8.2 58.89
... ... +.16 -50.4 3.31
... 47 +1.25 -9.9 12.28
... 39 +.15 +10.2 35.50
...... +.75 -49.3 3.42
.8 17 +.46 -12.5 14.96
... ... +.15 -35.6 2.71
... 34 -.15 +2.2 27.33
... ... -.27 -45.9 2.12
... 36 +.96 -14.0 32.62
... 23 -.21 -19.5 7.13
... 22 -.89 -6.9 37.07
...... -.41 -46.9 35.38
.5 30 -.17 -11.6 38.37
... ... +.00 -40.5 .35
... 43 +2.44 -7.3 29.92
... 23 -.04 -30.5 5.31
... 12 +.02 -25.9 1.89
... ... +.18 -9.1 20.91
... ... +3.03 +51.2 40.10
... ... +.03 -42.4 1.29
... 19 -.90 -15.1 20.90
... ... -.01 -42.8 1.91
... 22 +.23 -9.8 17.43
... 24 +.12 -8.7 22.33


Wkly YTD Wily
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
Cemex 1.10 3.2 ... -.97 -5.6 34.38
Cendant .36 1.8 10 -.33 -11.4 19.74
Centex .16 .3 8 +1.55 -4.8 56.74
ChmpE ... ... 25 +1.81 -11.5 10.46
ChesEng .18 .9 13 +1.29 +25.1 20.64
ChevTexs1.60 3.0 9 +1.66 +2.6 53.87
Chicoss ... ... 33 +1.00 +13.4 25.81
CircCity .07 .4 47 +.02 -.4 15.58
Citigrp 1.76 3.8 14 +.57 -3.9 46.32
CitzComm 1.00 8.1 54 +.08 -10.2 12.39
ClearChan .50 1.5 23 -.58 -2.9 32.53
Coach s ... ... 31 +.54 -8.7 25.76
CocaCI 1.12 2.7 21 +.84 +1.2 42.13
CocaCE .16 .8 16 -.58 -6.1 19.58
Coeur ... ... ... +.32 -10.7 3.51
ColgPal 1.16 2.3 22 -1.15 +.4 51.38
CmcBNJs .44 1.6 17 -.99 -12.6 28.15
CVRDs .89 3.2 13 +1.29 -2.6 28.25
CompAs .08 .3 ... -.13 -12.8 27.07
ConocPhil 2.48 2.3 9 +6.89 +23.2 106.96
ConEd 2.28 5.3 18 +.96 -1.3 43.17
ConstellEn 1.34 2.5 17 +.57 +20.4 52.63
CtlAirB ... ... ... -.06 -12.1 11.90
CoopCam ... ... 32 +2.19 +3.9 55.92
Coming 1... ......+1.22 +4.7 12.32
CntwdFns a .56 1.7 9 +.58 -12.9 32.25
Crompton .20 1.5 ... +.63 +15.6 13.64
CrownHold ... ... 48 +1.49 +14.6 15.74
Cummins 1.20 1.7 8 +7.44 -14.9 71.29
CypSem ... ...... +1.70 +9.1 12.80
DR Hortn s .27 .9 8 +2.33 -3.3 29.24
DTE 2.06 4.5 18 +.41 +5.1 45.33
DanaCp .48 3.9 55 +1.20 -29.8 12.16
Danaher s .06 .1 21 +2.33 -11.3 50.92
Deere 1.24 1.9 11 +2.10 -13.2 64.57
Delphi if .12 3.2 14 +.10 -58.0 3.79
DetaAir ... ... ... -.21 -51.3 3.64
DevonEs .30 .7 11 +2.17 +18.4 46.08
DiaOffs .25 .5 ...+2.81 +19.9 48.01
DirecTV ... ...... -.63 -16.3 14.01
Disney .24 .9 24 -.07 -1.8 27.30
DollarG .16 .8 20 -.94 -1.0 20.56
DomRes 2.68 3.6 20 +.67 +9.6 74.25
DoralFin .72 4.6 4 -1.22 -68.0 15.76
Dover .64 1.8 17 -.57 -16.3 35.11
DowChm 1.34 3.0 15 +1.03 -8.4 45.33
DukeEgy 1.10 3.8 19 +1.06 +14.3 28.95
Dynegy ... ... ... -.30 -29.4 3.26
ETrade ... ... 11 +.01-26.2 11.03
EMCCp ... ... 32 +1.76 -10.6 13.30
EOGRess .16 .3 18 +3.73 +32.7 47.35
Eaton 1.24 2.1 13 +2.76 -16.7 60.31
EIPasoCp .16 1.5 +.53 -.5 10.35
Elan ... ... ... -.16 -85.8 3.86
EDS .20 1.0 61 -.26 -16.1 19.39
EmrsnEI 1.66 2.6 21 +1.70 -8.4 64.18
Emulex ... ... 26 +.51 -2.8 16.37
ENSCO .10 .3 51 +2.40 +11.8 35.48
Enterasys ... ... ... -.0.4 -57.2 .77
EqOffPT 2.00 6.6 ... -.48 +4.2 30.35
Exelon 1.60 3.4 17 +1.18 +6.5 46.95
ExxonMbl 1.08 1.8 15 +3.23 +15.9 59.42
FPLGps 1.42 3.4 17 +1.63 +11.2 41.57
FairchidS ... ... 46 -.05-17.5 13.41
FannieMf 11.04 2.0 9 -1.43 -25.9 52.78
FedExCp .28 .3 19 +1.66 -13.1 85.61
FedrDS .54 .9 16 -.19 +6.2 61.35
FirstData .24 .6 18 -.85 -11.9 37.46
FirstEngy 1.65 3.9 16 +1.15 +7.3 42.38
FishrScl ... ... 35 +1.71 -7.2 57.91
FordM .40 4.0 6 +.39 -32.4 9.89
ForestLab ... ... 16 +1.10 -20.4 35.71
FortuneBr 1.32 1.5 17 +.72 +13.7 87.75
FredMac 1.40 2.3 16 -.53 -18.4 60.17
FMCG 1.00 2.8 23 +2.06 -5.2 36.24
Freescalen ... ...... +2.28 +3.6 18.46
FreescBn ... ...... +2.37 +2.8 18.87
FriedBR 1.36 9.7 7 +.43 -27.7 14.01
GameStp ... ... 23 +2.04 +5.8 23.65


, M M New York Stock Exchang
.. .


"WE CAN ALSO


INSURE YOUR


FREEDOM".


CALL US ABOUT
MOTORCYCLE INSURANCE.


Mary Slay, Allstate
757 W. Duval St.
(Formerly Rick Bringger's office)
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 755-6801


SAIIstate.
Ymre in good hands.
Insurance subject to availability and qualifications.
Alutem ndemnity Company., Northbrook. Illinois.
S2000 Allstace Insurance Company


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
Gannett 1.08 1.4 15 -2.70 -7.3 75.71
Gap .18 .8 18 +.27 +.8 21.29
Gateway ... ...... -.10 -38.3 3.71
Genentchs ... ... 83 +.49 +28.3 69.84
GenMills 1.24 2.6 18 +.21 -2.3 48.56
GM db33 1.56 8.0 +.06 -27.2 19.40
GaPacif .70 2.1 14 +.41 -11.4 33.22
Gillette .65 1.3 31 -.80 +15.1 51.55
GlobalSFe .30 .8 57 +1.71 +7.3 35.54
Goldcrpg .18 1.3 33 +.69 -9.6 13.59
GoldmanS 1.00 1.0 11 -2.05 +.1 104.19
Goodyear ... ... 22 +.30 -19.7 11.77
vjGrace ... ... ... -.23 -25.4 10.15
GtAtPc ... ...... -.60 +50.3 15.41
Gtech s .34 1.4 16 +.78 -5.4 24.55
Guldant .40 .5 44 -.68 +2.9 74.19
HCA Inc .60 1.1 19 -2.13 +32.9 53.12
Hallibtn .50 1.1 ... +3.24 +11.7 43.84
HarleyD .50 1.1 15 +.91 -23.1 46.71
HarrahE 1.32 2.0 19 -1.74 -1.5 65.87
Hasbro .36 1.9 20 -.48 -2.9 18.81
HItMgt .16 .6 19 -.49 +10.7 25.16
Heinz 1.14 3.1 17 +.47 -7.1 36.23
HewlettP .32 1.5 18 -.06 -.9 20.78
Hilton .08 .4 36 -.11 -3.8 21.88
HomeDp .40 1.1 16 -.09 -15.7 36.02
Honwillntl .83 2.3 20 +.39 +1.8 36.05
ITW 1.12 1.3 19 +.04 -8.2 85.11
INCO .40 1.1 12 +2.03 +2.8 37.80
IngerRd 1.00 1.3 11 +3.53 -.6 79.78
IBM .72 1.0 15 -2.49 -24.7 74.21
IntlGame .48 1.9 23 +1.48 -25.2 25.70


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Cha Last


IntPap 1.00 3.0 ... -.58 -19.4 33.85
Interpub If ... ... ... +.07 -2.5 13.07
JPMorgCh1.36 3.9 28 +.94 -10.6 34.87
Jabil 30 +.79 +6.3 27.20
JanusCap .04 .3 15 -.01 -21.5 13.19
JohnJn 1.14 1.7 23 -.91 +8.0 68.49
JohnsnCtl 1.00 1.8 12 +1.93 -13.5 54.86
KB Home 1.50 1.4 9 -1.99 +4.6 109.20
KerrMc 1.80 2.3 24 +1.85 +37.2 79.27
Keycorp 1.30 4.0 14 +.44 -3.5 32.71
KimbClk 1.80 2.8 18 -1.00 -3.5 63.53
KingPhrm ... ...... +.04 -36.6 7.86
Kohls ... ... 23 -1.27 -1.2 48.58
Kraft .82 2.7 18 -1.67 -15.0 30.28
KrspKrm ... ...... -1.76 -54.0 5.80
LSI Log ... ... ... +.19 -3.1 5.31
LaBrnch ... ...... -.64 -18.8 7.28
LVSands n ... ...... -3.85 -22.9 37.00
LearCorp 1.00 2.7 6 -2.43 -39.7 36.77
LehmBr .80 .9 11 -.26 +3.4 90.47
LennarA .55 1.0 9 -.45 -7.3 52.55
LibtyMA 1.93 ...... +.03 -6.3 10.29
LillyEli 1.52 2.6 30 +.33 +2.9 58.40
Limited .60 2.7 14 -.55 -4.6 21.97
LaPac .40 1.7 6 +.88 -11.2 23.74
Lucent ... ... 10 +.12 -33.0 2.52
Lyondell .90 3.6 85 +.98 -12.3 25.35
MBIA 1.12 2.1 9 -.71 -17.4 52.25
MBNA .56 3.0 11 -5.00 -34.6 18.45
MEMC ... ... 12 +.68 -10.1 11.91
MGM Mr ... ... 23 -3.97 -8.3 66.70
Manpwl .40 1.0 16 -.64 -18.6 39.33


Not .~. r~ .. .C


WMly YTD Wly Wkly YTD Wkly
Name" Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


CogTechs ...
Comcast ...
Comc sp
Compuwre ...
Comvers
Conexant ...
Costco .46
Craylnc
Cree Inc
DeckOut ...
DellInc
DbleCIck ...
DynMatl ...
eBay s
ElectArts ...
ElecBtq
EricsnTI .36
ExtNetw ...
F5 Netw ...
FifthThird 1.40
Fiserv
Flextm
Forward
Foundry
Genta
Genzyme ..
GileadScis ...
Google n ...
Harmonic ...
IACInterac...
Instinet
Intel .32
Intuit
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
JnprNtw
KLA Tnc .48
KnghtTrd ...


... 59 +1.47 -2.2 41.41
... 74 -.64 -4.4 31.81
... 73 -.59 -4.0 31.51
... 29 +.19 -1.4 6.32
... 83 +.38 -5.5 23.11
...... +.18 -32.7 1.34
1.1 20 -4.69 -17.0 40.17
...... -.14 -54.9 2.10
... 20 -1.40 -41.3 23.54
... 11 -8.72 -45.2 25.75
... 31 +.75 -13.8 36.31
... 33 +1.39 +10.2 8.57
... 51 +3.00+123.6 27.15
... 51 -.46 -45.8 31.51
... 27 +.36 -17.9 50.61
... 26+13.92 +28.2 55.04
1.2 ... +2.22 -3.2 30.47
... 39 +.19 -29.3 4.63
... 36 +.59 -8.1 44.76
3.3 16 +.84 -11.6 41.80
... 22 +.94 +4.0 41.81
... 23 +.76 -18.9 11.21
... 33 +3.26 +280.6 15.91
... 25 -.24 -35.3 8.52
. +.25 -34.7 1.15
. -.24 +1.4 58.88
... 37 +4.22 +13.0 39.55
... 86+30.81 +11.9 215.81
...... -2.63 -24.8 6.27
... ... -.19 -21.0 21.82
... 31 -1.30 -13.9 5.19
1.4 17 +1.12 -.6 23.24
... 26 +.18 -3.4 42.52
... .... +.07 -51.1 1.55
... 57 +.86 -14.0 19.98
... 75 +2.87 -16.8 22.62
1.2 21 +.67 -11.9 41.03
... 15 -.67 -25.0 8.21


LamRsch ...
Level3
LexarMd ...
UnearTch .40
MCI Incn 1.60
Macrmdia ...
MarvellT s ...
Maxim .80
Medlmun ...
Merclntr
Microchp .28
Microsoft .32
MillPhar ...
MnstrWw ...
Nasd100Tr .38
Nasdaq n ...
NetwkAp ..
NorTrst .84
NwstAid ...
Novell
Novius
Nvidia
OmniVisn ...
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle
Overstk
PMC Sra ...
palmOne
ParmTc
PattUTIs .16
Paychex .52
ProtDsg
Qlogic
Qualcom s .36
RF MicD ..
RedHat
RschMots ...
SanDisk ...


... 13 +1.02 -7.0 26.89
... ... -.31 -48.7 1.74
...... +.06 -44.3 4.37
1.1 27 -.93 -6.6 36.19
...... +.66 +32.4 26.69
... 51 +7.10 +30.3 40.55
... 75 +2.20 -1.0 35.12
2.2 25 -1.81 -12.8 36.98
...... +.59 -5.8 25.54
... 44 -.57 -7.1 42.31
1.1 25 +.76 -4.6 25.36
1.3 27 +.52 ,-6.5 24.98
... ... +.08 -27.1 8.85
... 39 +.16 -28.1 24.20
1.1 ... +.35 -12.1 35.09
... ...+2.97 +26.5 13.43
... 50 +.66 -20.0 26.57
1.9 19 +1.37 -8.8 44.32
...... -.56 -49.7 5.50
... 6 +.19 -8.9 6.15
... 21 +.25 -13.8 24.03
... 39 +.89 -5.6 22.24
... 11 +.95 -21.1 14.47
... ... -.08 -33.9 3.00
... 22 +.22 -13.1 11.92
...... -6.74 -50.5 34.15
... 43 +.90 -23.6 8.59
... 36 -.44 -28.2 22.65
... 17 +.02 -14.9 5.01
.6 40 +2.61 +31.8 25.64
1.7 36 -1.16 -9.8 30.75
... ... +.23 -17.6 17.02
... 24 +1.26 -1.6 36.13
1.1 30 +1.23 -20.0 33.92
... ... +.16 -35.8 4.39
... 46 +.55 -16.9 11.10
... 60 -4.18 -20.5 65.52
... 17 -.84 +1.4 25.32


Name DIv YId


Sanmina
SearsHIdgs ...
Sepracor ...
ShirePh .17
SlebelSys ..
SigmaTel
SiriusS
SkywksSol ...
SmurfStne
Sonus n
Staples s .17
Starbucks ...
SunMicro ...
Symantec s ..
TASER s ..
Tellabs
TesseraT ...
TevaPh s .22
3Com
TibcoSft ...
TiVo Inc
Tmskry
Trnsmeta
USF Corp .37
UtdGIblCm ...
Verisign
Veritas
ViaNet If ...
Vitesse
WebMD
Wynn
XM Sat
Xilinx .28
Xybrnautif ...
Yahoo s
YellowRd ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last


...... +.46 -43.8 4.76
... 12 -3.88 +32.4 131.03
... ... +4.68 +1.5 60.28
.5 ... -3.62 -3.1 30.97
45 +.41 -13.4 9.08
14 -1.66 -23.8 27.06
S-.05 -33.1 5.10
... 25 +.30 -41.4 5.53
... ... -.41 -27.3 13.58
39 +.13 -32.6 3.86
.9 21 -.01 -13.3 19.49
... 44 -1.78 -26.9 45.56
... 17 -.17 -35.3 3.49
... 26 +.09 -26.3 18.98
... 31 +.72 -72.2 8.81
... ... +1.09 -9.3 7.79
... 25 -6.66 -13.9 32.04
.7 64 -.03 +7.6 32.14
... ... ... -24.9 3.13
... 36 +.60 -46.6 7.12
+.31 +3.2 6.06
... +4.55 +34.5 34.15
+.09 -55.8 .72
.8 52 -.27 +15.6 43.87
... ... +.03 -5.0 9.18
... 33 +3.67 -13.7 29.00
... 25 +.18 -27.3 20.76
... ... -.07 -81.2 .16
... ... +.06 -39.1 2.15
... 76 +.19 +12.0 9.14
... ... -6.81 -20.8 53.01
... ... -.97 -29.5 26.53
1.0 31 -1.28 -8.8 27.07
... ... +.03 -78.9 .26
... 54 +2.41 -7.5 34.87
... 12 +.32 -10.0 50.16


Wy YTD Wy Wly YTD Wklh
Name DIv YId PE ChI %Cha Last Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Las


Marathon 1.12 2.3 13 +3.94 +27.5 47.94
MarIntA .34 .5 24 -.24 +1.4 63.86
MarshM .68 2.4 87 -.24 -15.2 27.90
Masco .80 2.5 16 -.43 -11.8 32.22
Mattel .45 2.4 14 ... -4.2 18.67
Maxtor ... ...... +.26 -2.3 5.18
MayDS .98 2.7 21 -.07 +23.1 36.18
Maytag .72 6.6 ... -3.38 -48.4 10.89
McKesson .24 .7 ... -2.22 +11.5 35.08
MedcoHith ... .... 30 +2.42 +25.0 52.02
Medicis .12 .4 28 -.84-19.3 28.32
Medtmic .34 .7 28 -1.66 +1.8 50.54
MellonFnc .80 2.9 14 +.98 -11.8 27.45
MerrillLyn .80 1.5 12 +.09 -11.0 53.18
MetLife .46 1.2 11 +.13 -4.7 38.60
MicronT ... ... 14 -.11 -23.8 9.41
MobileTel s .57 1.7 66 -.63 -1.2 34.22
Monsnto .68 1.2 49 +2.30 +5.5 58.58
MorgStan 1.08 2.1 12 -1.24 -9.5 50.25
Motorola .16 1.0 24 +1.03 -8.3 15.78
NCR Cp s ... ... 22 -.36 -3.2 33.50
NatlCity 1.40 4.2 9 +.74 -10.7 33.55
NatGrid 1.84 3.8 ... +.40 +.2 48.07
NOilVarco ... ... 33 +1.60 +21.3 42.82
NatSemis .08 .4 18 +.51 +5.6 18.95
Navistar ... ... 8 -.74 -28.9 31.25
NwCentFn 6.20 14.6 5 +1.00 -33.5 42.50
NYCmtyB 1.00 5.6 15 +.38 -13.0 17.90
NewellRub .84 3.8 ... +.41 -9.4 21.91
NewmtM .40 1.0 41 +.96 -8.3 40.73
NewsCpAn .16 1.0 ... -.05 -14.5 15.95
NewsCpB n .06' .4 ... -.01 -13.6 16.58
NiSource .92 4.0 14 +.64 +.7 22.94
NikeB 1.00 1.3 19 +1.96 -14.2 77.82
NobleCorp ... ... 45 +3.05 +10.0 54.73
NoklaCp .44 2.7 ... +1.57 +4.1 16.31
NorflkSo .44 1.3 14 +2.07 -9.6 32.72
NortelN If ... ... ... +.13 -22.8 2.68
NoFrkBcs .88 3.2 14 +.87 -4.0 27.70
Novartis .86 1.8 ... +1.45 -3.6 48.70
Nucors .60 1.1 6 +4.36 +1.5 53.15
OMI Cp .32 1.7 6 +1.64 +13.5 19.13
OcciPet 1.24 1.7 12 +5.97 +22.5 71.47
OffcDpt ... 19 -.74 +16.9 20.30
OfficeMax .60 1.8 28 -.05 +3.5 32.48
Owensll ... ... 14 +.37 +12.1 25.39
PG&E Cp 1.20 3.4 3 +1.20 +4.1 35.31
PNC 2.00 3.9 12 +2.42 -6.8 51.80
Pactiv ... ... 19 -.52 -13.8 21.79
PeabdyE s .30 .7 29 +5.25 +10.3 44.61
Penney .50 1.1 26 +.90 +12.1 46.39
PepsiCo .92 1.7 22 -.36 +4.3 54.47
Pfizer .76 2.8 22 -.49 +1.2 27.22
PhelpD 1.00 1.1 9 +4.79 -8.2 90.79
PloNtim .20 .5 18 +2.02 +23.1 43.22
PlacerD .10 .7 23 +.33 -21.4 14.82
Praxair .72 1.6 22 +.97 +3.6 45.74
Pridelntl ... ...... +1.07 +15.1 23.64
Providian ... .... 13-1.05 -6.3 15.43
Prudent .63 1.1 17 -.39 +1.7 55.90
PulteHm .20 .3 9 +1.11 +8.2 69.01
QwestCm ......... +.03 -20.0 3.55
RadioShk .25 1.0 12 -.47 -26.8 24.06
Raytheon .88 2.4 40 -.07 -5.3 36.76
RellantEn ... ...... -.19 -21.5 10.72
RiteAid ... ... 9 -.06 +7.1 3.92
RobtHalf .28 1.2 24 -.62 -17.6 24.25
Rowan .25 .9 ... +1.78 +10.8 28.70
RylCarb .52 1.2 18 +.01 -21.7 42.61
RoylDut 2.26 3.8 11 +.79 +4.1 59.75
Ryland s .24 .4 9 +.49 +2.7 59.11.
SAP AG .24 .6 ... +2.64 -10.4 39.60
SBC Com 1.29 5.6 13 +.20 -10.0 23.20
SLM Cp .76 1.6 12 -2.75 -13.7 46.08
Safeway ... ... 17 -.36 +5.2 20.76
StJudes ... ... 34 +3.84 -4.6 40.00
StPaulTrav .88 2.6 19 +.35 -7.1 34.45
Saks ... ... 23 +.66 +24.9 18.13
Saralee .79 3.6 12 +.01 -10.0 21.73


SchergPI .22
Schimb .84
Schwab .08
SciAtlanta .04
SeagateT .32
SvceCp .10
SiicnGph
Smithlntl .48
Solectm
SouthnCo 1.49
SwstAid .02
SovrgnBcp .16
SpmtFON .50
StarwdHtl .84
StateStr .68
sT Goldn ...
Strykers .09
Suncor g .24
SunGard
Sunoco 1.60
SymbIT .02
Sysco .60
TCF Fncl s .85
TJX .24
TXU Corp 2.25
TaiwSemi .09
Target .32
TelMexL 1.20
Templeln s .90
TempurP ...
TenetHit ...
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texlnst .10
3M Co 1.68
Tiffany .24
TimeWam ...
TollBros
Transocn
Tribune .48
Tycolntl .40
vjUSG
Unisys
UtdMicro .32
UPS B 1.32
US Bancrp 1.20
USSteel .32
UtdhithGp .03
Univision
Unocal .80
UnumProv .30
ValeroEs .40
VerizonCm 1.62
VlacomB .28
Vishay
Vodafone .55
Wachovia 1.84
Walgm .21
WA MutI 1.88
WsteMInc .80
Weathflnt ...
WellPoint
WellsFrgo 1.92
WDigitI
Weyerh 2.00
Whrpl 1.72
WmsCos .20
WilllsGp .86
Wyeth .92
XTOEgys .20
XcelEngy .83
Xerox
YumBrds .40
Zimmer ...


1.1 ... +.10 -.6 20.7
1.2 35 +4.00 +5.9 70.9
.8 50 -.22 -17.2 9.9
.1 19 +3.48 -7.8 30.4
1.8 23 +1.68 +5.7 18.2
1.5 20 -.60 -7.9 6.0
...... -.04 -48.0 .9
.8 34 +3.43 +12.2 61.0
38 +.08 -36.0 3.4
4.5 16 +1.05 -1.6 33.0
.1 32 -.30 -10.9 14.5
.8 14 -.94 -10.7 20.1
2.2 ... +.45 -7.2 23.0
1.5 31 -.20 -3.8 56.2
1.5 19 +4.92 -7.2 45.6
...... +.99 -.9 43.3
.2 39 +1.99 ... 48.2
...... +2.20 +7.2 37.9
... 22 -.14 +20.0 34.0
1.6 13 +4.51 +23.7 101.0
.1 42 +.59 -20.6 13.7
1.7 24 -.30 -9.1 34.7
3.4 13 -1.48 -21.6 25.2
1.1 17 -.58 -4.7 22.6
2.7 ... +3.16 +31.0 84.5
1.1 ... -.09 -4.6 8.1
.7 13 -1.37 -10:2 46.6
3.6 ... -.29 -12.6 33.4
2.8 22 -1.36 -4.9 32.5
... 23 +1.08 -6.1 19.0
... ... -.09 +7.5 11.8
... 33 -.73 -32.2 11.5
8 +4.21 +23.1 39.2
.4 22 +1.66 -.8 24.4
2.2 20 -3.80 -6.1 77.0
.8 15 -.83 -2.9 31.0
... 24 +.05 -10.7 17.3
... 13 -.91 +5.7 72.5
...... +3.00 +19.0 50.4
1.3 21 -1.29 -11.6 37.2
1.2 24 +.92 -9.8 32.2
... 6 +.75 +4.2 41.9
...... -.22 -36.9 6.4
... ... +.04 -9.1 3.2
1.9 22 -.85 -20.5 67.9
4.4 12 -.77 -13.2 27.2
.7 5 +2.51 -11.4 45.4
... 22 -2.01 +3.7 91.2
... 36 -.33 -11.2 25.9
1.4 13 +1.18 +30.2 56.3
1.9 ... +.06 -10.9 15.9
.5 10 +7.43 +65.3 75.0
4.8 12 -.09 -15.9 34.0
.8 ... +.98 -3.5 35.1
... 49 -.02 -27.6 10.8
2.1 ... +.17 -4.5 26.1
3.6 13 +1.06 -3.8 50.5
.5 29 -1.20 +9.1 41.8
4.8 12 +1.03 -8.2 38.8
2.9 17 -.55 -8.1 27.5
... 25 +2.75 +10.1 56.4
... 19 -3.43 +2.4 117.7
3.3 14 -.46 -5.6 58.6
14 +.21 +12.5 12.2
3.2 11 -2.70 -5.6 63.4
2.7 11 +.67 -6.8 64.5
1.1 58 +1.45 +10.5 18.0
2.5 ... -1.41 -16.6 34.3
2.1 38 -1.16 +2.7 43.7
.6 19 +2.26 +19.2 31.6
4.7 20 +.60 -3.7 17.5
... 16 +.12 -20.6 13.5
.8 19 -2.35 +1.4 47.8
... 36 +1.35 -1.6 78.8


Wy YTD WMly Wkly YTD Wklj
Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Lat


Ableauctn .. .
Adventrx n ...
ApolloG g ... ...
Avitar
BemaGold ... ...
BiotechT .04 ...
CalypteB n ... ...
CanArgo ...
Cheniere ... ...
DHB Inds ...
DJIA DIam 2.03 1.8
DOR Bio ...
DSL.neth ...
EagleBbnd ...
GoldStrg ...
GreyWolf ...
Gurunet n ...
Harken
ISCO Intl ...
iShBrazll .46 2.1
iShJapan .04 .4
iShMalasia .16 2.3
iShMexico .28 1.2
iShTaiwan .08 .7
iShSP500 2.45 2.1
iShEmMkt 2.41 1.2
ISh20TB 4.01 4.4
iShl-3TB 1.81 2.2
.iSh EAFE 2.41 1.5
iShNqBio
IShR1000V1.54 2.4
iShR1000G .57 1.2
iShR2000V3.13 1.8
iShR2000G .22 .4
iShRs2000 1,53 1.3
iShREst 5.12 4.5
iShSPSmI 1.47 1.0
Intermix n ...


... +.07 -36.1 .53
... +.25 +154.5 2.85
... +.03 -47.6 .43
... ... -43.8 .09
... +.11 -24.6 2.30
... +1.25 +1.5 155.15
... -.03 -41.0 .23
... -.10 +1.9 t.10
... +3.07 -.8 63.21
11 -.38 -62.9 7.07
... +1.10 -5.3 101.80
... +.01 -45.3 .35
... -.01 -52.2 .11
... +.04 -59.1 .27
+.05 -33.9 2.65
... +.61 +24.7 6.57
... +.42 +106.0 17.92
... -.02 -17.3 .43
... -.05 -16.7 .30
... +.97 -.4 22.14
... +.06 -7.2 10.13
... +.08 -4.5 6.83
... +.17 -8.1 23.13
... -.04 -7.6 11.14
... +1.41 -4.6 115.48
... +4.30 -1.1 199.60
... +.38 +3.3 91.47
... -.09 -.5 81.05
... +1.73 -1.7 157.50
. +.30 -13.9 64.90
... +.87 -2.9 64.43
... +.24 -6.6 45.90
... +2.17 -8.1 177.30
... +1.15 -10.7 60.10
... +1.73 -9.4 117.37
... +1.37 -6.7 114.93
... +2.38 -6.0 152.88
... -.95 -9.7 5.10


IntrNAP ...
IntntHTr ...
IslandPac ... ...
IvaxCp s ... ...
KFX Inc ...
UfePoint ...
MadCatzg ...
Nabors
NOriong ...
NthgtMg ...
OilSvHT .48 .5
On2 Tech
PainCare ...
PaxsnC
PhmHTr 1.68 2.3
ProvETg 1.44 ...
RaeSyst
RegBkHT 4.48 3.4
RetailHT 3.85 1.0
SemlHTr .18 .6
SPDR 2.26 1.7
SPMid 1.04 .9
SP Matils .52 1.9
SP HIthC .37 1.2
SP CnSt .37 1.6
SP Consum .24 .8
SPEngy .53 1.3
SP Fncl .65 2.3
SP Inds .42 1.4
SP Tech .42 2.2
SP Util .90 3.0
TelcHTr 2.25 4.7
Telkonet ... ...
Terremark ...
TransGIb ...
UltraPt g ...
VaalcoEn ...


... +.01 -49.5 .4
... +1.22 -26.2 52.6
... +.03 -55.1 .2
23 -.18 +10.2 17.4
... +.56 -18.0 11.9
... -.01 -75.9 .0
... +.01 +48.8 1.2
31 +3.77 +15.0 58.9
... +.17 -12.0 2.5
8 +.09 -25.3 1.2
... +5.54 +11.7 95.0
-.04 -12.7 .5
32 +.09 +53.6 4.7
... -.07 -26.1 1.0
... -.90 +2.6 74.5
+.38 +4.5 9.9
68 +.83 -53.4 3.4
+1.78 -7.9 130.8
-1.38 -11.4 87.4
+.74 -8.2 30.6
+1.42 -4.4 115.5
.+1.55 -3.7 116.5
... +.56 -5.5 28.0
... -.31 +1.0 30.4
... -.24 -2.0 22.6
... -.13 -11.2 31.3
... +2.31 +15.7 42.0
... +.01 -9.1 27.7
... +.34 -5.7 29.2
... +.35 -10.8 18.8
... +.71 +6.7 29.7
... +.26 -9.7 26.3
... -.56 -47.8 2.9
... +.03 -3.1 .6
57 +.32 +11.7 5.7
... +6.77 +6.8 51.3
9 +.08 -8.5 3.5


Dow Jones

industrials


. i I i .







4D LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005

BUSINESS


, 46I r Reynolds joins


A116 Chamber staff


From staff reports

Gina Reynolds has joined
the Lake City-Columbia
County
Chamber of ..
Commerce i
as assistant '
executive ., ,,
director. ';,
Reynolds
joined the
Chamber's
staff on Reynolds
April 1.
She formerly was affiliated
with the Madison Chamber
of Commerce and also
served in a volunteer capaci-
ty with the Lake City-
Columbia County Chamber
before accepting the full-time
position.
"I want to get out and visit
with businesses in our com-
munity and let them know
we're here and that we want


to help them," Reynolds said.
"I want to focus on promot-
ing business. My back-
ground can help businesses.
I understand how difficult it
is to run a small business."
While working with the
Madison Chamber of
Commerce, membership
increased by 35 percent.
Reynolds spent 12 years
working as a project manag-
er for Highland Mint, a
maker of commemorative
athletic collectibles, in
Melbourne.
She is married to Scott
Reynolds, who is the assis-
tant finance director for the
City of Lake City. The couple
has one son, Ryan, 4.
"I grew up in a military
family and I have lived every-.
where," Reynolds said. "I can
adapt to new areas and
understand where business
people are coming from. I
want to help people."


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"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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FDOT employee
of quarter named
Florida Department of
Transportation announced
that Lealand Pinkard has
been selected as the employ-
ee of the quarter for January
through March.
The criteria used in select-
ing the employee of the quar-
ter is:
They must be nominat-
ed by a fellow employee.
They must meet or
exceed work standards.
Other areas to evaluate
include community involve-
ment, community service,
safety awareness, team spirit
and leadership abilities.

Time Warner,
Comcast agree
NEW YORK After
months of haggling and fend-
ing off a bid from a rival suit-
or, Time Warner Inc. and
Comcast Corp. have sealed a
deal to purchase the assets of
Adelphia Communications
Corp., the bankrupt cable TV
company based in Colorado.
The $17.6 billion cash-and-
stock deal announced
Thursday will also allow
Time Warner to float shares
in its cable subsidiary, open-
ing the possibility of even
more consolidation in the
cable industry.

Airline losses hit
$33B since '01
ATLANTA Losses
reported by two major air-
lines Thursday Delta and
Northwest pushed red ink
at the six big legacy carriers


to nearly $33 billion since
2001, when terrorist attacks
led to an industry tailspin
exacerbated by high labor
costs and now, four years
later, by expensive fuel.
There doesn't appear to be
an end in sight to the suffer-
ing. With losses expected to
get worse, some executives,
particularly at Delta Air Lines
Inc., are touting employee
pension reform as a way to
help ease the financial bleed-
ing.
Pensions aside, high fuel
prices are the most immedi-
ate threat to the major carri-
ers, and many have blamed
the issue for contributing to
their first quarter losses.
Saying record fuel prices are
masking the success it's had
cutting costs elsewhere,
Atlanta-based Delta reported
a nearly $1.1 billion first
quarter loss Thursday, the
highest among its peers so
far in the January-March
period.

Qwest ups MCI
bid to $9.74B
DENVER Qwest
Communications submitted
another higher offer for MCI
Inc. Thursday, increasing its
cash-and-stock bid to $9.74
billion, about 30 percent
higher than the buyout deal
that MCI has accepted from
Verizon Communications Inc.
Qwest's latest bid of $30 a
share injects fresh uncertain-
ty into a deal in which MCI
directors who have twice
embraced Verizon over
Qwest could now be
forced to accept a far higher
offer.
Compiled from staff wire.
reports


o


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- 0


- .
.









LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


4 line minimumS2.55 per line
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.

a -


Number of Insertions


Personal Merchandise *li "- -


$300 s9ool 1

Ad must be placed at the LCR I I '
and paia in advance p, [i l '






$1 25 $2200
a 4 yn; 5 ..... 1 O4 li nes O item er ad diin al


Per line Rate


3 .... ... ............. 1.65
4-6 ....................... 1.50
7-13 ...................... '1.45
14-23 ..................... 1.20
24 or more ................ .990
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.



Limited to service type advertising only.
4 lines, one month .............. 60.00
$9.50 each additional line
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.






Ad Errors- Please read your ad on the first
day of publication. We accept responsibility
for only the first incorrect insertion, and


You can call us at 755-5440, Monday through Friday
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their classified ads in
person, and some ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad copy to the
Reporter.

FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the
Classified Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.com




w6


Ad is to Appear:
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday


Call by:
Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Wed., 10:00 a.m.
Thurs., 10:00 a.m.
Fri., 10:00 a.m.
Fri., 10:00 a.m.


Fax/Email by:
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.


These deadlines are subject to change without notice.



Advertising copy is subject to approval by the
Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or
classify all advertisements under appropriate head-
ings. Copy should be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of publication. Credit for


Sln f tioddiiil)liiii only the charge for the aa space in error. published errors will be allowed for the first insertion
S50 3 days I' i L'J Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt for that portion of the advertisement which was incor
4nes ..I, correction and billing adjustments. rect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any
ays ,,6 d i,,, recona sgnomission of advertisements ordered to be published
.. Pricing stickers Cancellations- Normal advertising deadlines nor for any general, special or consequential dam
SNo Parking signs apply for cancellation. ages. Advertising language must comply witt
Helpful garage Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition
sale tips Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440. Should fur- of discrimination in employment, housing and public
I Priet adr their information be required regarding pay- accommodations. Standard abbreviations are accept
Sl aL, a ments or credit limits, your call will be trans- able; however, the first word of each ad may not be
wwwdakecityreporter. om ferred to the accounting department. abbreviated.

aooB 4 o 6 ,70_ 9LNeedHep LetUsWiteYourClassiedAd
LA "" "WW" r 1r1 ,NeedlHelp if! e 'm,


Legal


Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly sworn,
do hereby declare under oath that the
names of all persons interested in the
business or profession carried on under
the name of
FLORIDA CRACKER HORSE TACK
& AUCTION
at 294 N.E. Cheshire Lane, Lake City.
FL. 32055
Contact Phone Number: 386-755-7104
or Call 386-288-2424 and the extent of
the interest of each, is as follows:
Name: REX ED WILKINSON
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Rex Ed Wilkinson
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me this
21 day April, A.D., 2005
by:/s/ Kathleen A. Riotto
Notary
01552512
April 24, 2005


Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORI-
DA
CASE NO.: 04-447-CA
GreenPoint Credit, LLC, as authorized
servicing agent for BankAmerica Hous-
ing Services, a division of Bank of
America, FSB, a corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Robert L. Hartenstein, IF LIVING, AND
IF DECEASED, THEIR UNKNOWN
SPOUSES., HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, CREDITORS, AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
THEM: JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE
AND ANY OTHER PERSONS) IN
POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT RE-
AL PROPERTY WHOSE REAL
NAMES ARE UNCERTAIN,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to
an order or a final judgment of foreclo-


Legal

sure entered in the above-captioned ac-
tion, I will sell the property situated in
COLUMBIA County, Florida, described
as:
Lot 32, BLOCK A OF COUNTRY
LANE ESTATES SUBDIVISION; A
SUBDIVISION AS PER THE PLAT
THEREOF FILED AT PLAT BOOK 5,
PAGES 77, 77-A AND 77-B, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
INCLUDING the following Manufac-
tured Home: 1997 Nobility Kingswood
24 x 42, Serial Numbers: N87919A &
N87919B.
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder for cash, at the front entrance of
the COLUMBIA County Courthouse,
Lake City, Florida at 11:00 a.m., on May
llth, 2005. Dated this 7th day of April,
2005.
-by- J. MARKHAM
Deputy Clerk
03524839
Aoril 17,24., 2005


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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 05-154-CA
JUNE M. ALLSOP
Plaintiff,
Vs.
THOMAS J. MITCHELL, JR.,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: THOMAS J. MITCHELL, JR., aka
THOMAS J. MITCHELL, aka THO-
MAS J. MITCHELL, III, whose last
known address was 7855 South 103rd
West, Clearwater, Kansas 67026, if liv-
ing, and unknown spouse of said defend-
ant, and the unknown heirs, legatees, de-
visees, grantees, or assignees of said de-
fendant:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to
cancel a mortgage on the following
property in Columbia County, Florida:
Begin at the Southwest comer of NW
1/4 of Section 10, Township 4 South,
Range 16 East, and run North I degree
45'45" West along West line of NW 1/4
of SW 1/4 a distance 222.33 feet; thence
N 87 degrees 59'09" E and parallel to
North live of NW 1/4 of SW 1/4 a dis-
tance of 1025.58 feet to West line of a
50 foot street known as Asena Avenue;
thence S l degree 42'30" E along said
West street line and parallel to the East
line of said NW 1/4 of SW 1/4 a distance
of 221.26 feet to the South line of said
NW 1/4 of SW 1/4; thence S 87 degrees
55'25" W along said South line 1025.37
feet to the point of beginning.
has been file against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on MARY B.
STEDDOM, the plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is 210 SE 15th Avenue,
Ocala, Florida 34471, on or before May
31, 2005, and file the original with the
Clerk of the Couft, either before service
on the plaintiff's attorney or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
Date on April 21, 2005.
by-/s/ J. MARKHAM
Deputy Clerk
03524999
April 24, 2005
May 1,8,15, 2005
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 04-414-CA
ASSOCIATES HOUSING FINANCE,
LLC,
Plaintiff,
v.
ROBERT D. TOUCHTON A/K/A
ROBERT DWAYNE TOUCHTON;
JANE DOE TOUCHTON, THE UN-
KNOWN WIFE OF ROBERT D.
TOUCHTON A/K/A ROBERT
DWAYNE TOUCHTON; JOY E.
TOUCHTON ; JOHN DOE TOUCH-
TON, THE UNKNOWN HUSBAND
OF JOY E. TOUCHTON; IF LIVING,
INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN


- ,-.- _-._- -_








Copyrighted Material -


Syndicated Content __


)le from Commercial News Provide
-a .


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,
-


Legal

SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS,
IF REMARRIED, AND IF DE-
CEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UN-
KNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANT-
EES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIE-
NORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS; JOHN
DOE, UNKNOWN TENANT; JANE
DOE, UNKNOWN TENANT,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a
Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure
entered in the above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Columbia County, Flor-
ida, I will sell property situate in Colum-
bia County, Florida, described as:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF SECTION 12, TOWN-
SHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST,
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AND THENCE SOUTH 139'57" EAST
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID
SECTION 12, A DISTANCE OF
1759.92 FEET; THENCE NORTH
88*35'30" EAST 3457.31 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID
POINT BEING ON THE SOUTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF A 60
FOOT ROAD; THENCE NORTH
88'35'30" EAST ALONG SAID
SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE 159.85
FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVA-
TURE OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT
HAVING A RADIUS OF 50 FEET
AND AN INCLUDED ANGEL OF
143"07'49"; THENCE SOUTHEAS-
TERLY, EASTERLY AND NORTH-
ERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE (BEING ON A CUL-DE-SAC)
A DISTANCE OF 124.90 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 88*35'30" EAST
250.62 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF
WEST 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4
OF SAID SECTION 12; THENCE
SOUTH 1'43'07" EAST ALONG THE
EAST LINE OF SAID WEST 1/2 A
DISTANCE OF 903.75 FEET TO THE
SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTHEAST
1/4, THENCE SOUTH 88'21'00" WEST
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID
NORTHEAST 1/4 A DISTANCE OF
500.62 FEET; THENCE NORTH
1"41'54" WEST 875.86 FEET TO THE
SOUTH LINE OF SAID 60 FOOT
ROAD AND THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. ALL LYING AND BEING IN
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TO INCLUDE: A 1989 SPRINGER
DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME
WITH V.I.N GAFLJ34A10994SH, TI-
TLE #47440472 AND V.I.N.
GAFLJ34B 10994SH, TITLE
#47345134.
A/K/A SOUTHWEST BEAR LANE,
FORT WHITE, FL 32038.
At public sale, to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, at the west door of the
Columbia County Courthouse, 145 N.
Hemando Street, Lake City, FL 32056,
at 11:00 A.M., on the 18 day of May,
2005.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
by:/s/ J. MARKHAM
Deputy Clerk


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- -.-*--- -- --







*I ,i
4G7


Hazardous TREE TRIMMING
and removal. Senior discount.
15 years experience.
386-963-3360

Carpet Cleaning


KING OF STEAM
Have your Carpet Cleaned by the
Best! Call for FREE Estimate!
386-344-5100

V VA Paralegal Services

A Bankruptcy/Divorce
Other court matters can be done
through a low cost, professional.
Area's best Paula 386-454-2378.


dial-a-pro
/lakt Cfty pon epter p.~p Semice DIetoiy




Childcare

CHILDCARE lic. FOCO0007 &
insured. Open Mon Fri. 6am 7:30
pm. Between High Spring &
Ellisville. 386-755-7875

Concrete Work

A.D.F. CONCRETE Construction
A.C.I. Certified. Resd'l Free Est.
Slabs, Driveways, Patios, & Side-
walks. 386-364-5845/ 688-7652
JEB'S CONCRETE: Spring
Specials Call NOW! Resd'l &
Comm'l. Sidewalks, Driveways,
Patios, Stucco, Block, and Repair.
Lic. & Insured. 386-961-8238

Fencing

A & B Professional Fence C6mpany
Fencing-Installation & Repairs
Wood/Chain Link/Farm Fence
Free Estimates 386- 963-4861

FENCING & DECKS
Wood, Vinyl, Privacy, Chain Link,
and Pool enclosure. Free Estimates.
386-497-4757 or 352-427-9409

Painting Service

NICK'S PAINTING
Interior/Exterior. Quality Work!
Free Estimates. Will meet or beat all
other estimates. Call 386-344-4242

Home Improvements

For all your Home Repairs that
include plumbing fixtures, flooring,
trim work and much more, call
John Thomas at 386-755-6183

Home Maintenance

HOME REPAIR
Inside or Out.
Houses or Mobile Homes.
Free Estimates. Paul 386-623-2255

NO REPAIR too Small. Days,
Evenings, & Weekends. All at
reasonable rates. The Home Repair
Center 386-884-0004

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, design. Corn. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call 386-496-2820 lv msg.

LAWN WORK GRASS CUT
FREE ESTIMATES!
Call Paul
386-623-2255
Noland Landscape Maintenance
A cut above.Specializing in
manicured lawns. Affordable
quality work. Lics. & Ins. Free
Estimate. Call 386-984-7709
TIME TO MULCH
Make your flower beds look like
new. Delivered & spread or just
delivery. 386-935-6595

Services

First Class Premium
Detail "Is Back In
Action." 2245 SW
Main Blvd. Phillip 386-623-6154.
$20.- $25, Cars, $25.-$30. Trucks

FREE CLEANUP.
Pick up of unwanted metals,
tin, scrap vehicles.
386-755-0133 We Recycle.
HOME CLEANING
Good references, Low rates.
Dependable and Honest!
Call for more info. 386-719-7074
No More Mess When You Hire the
Best! Spic & Span Cleaning Svc.
Comm'l & Resid'l. Good rates, All
your cleaning needs. 386-984-0067
fI -. TRUE VIEW
I' Window Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
Resid'l & Comm'l. Lic
& Insured. 10 Years Exp.
S386-719-6840

Pressure Cleaning

PRESSURE WASHING
Commercial or Residential
Great Price!!!!
Call 386-623-1700

Land Services

S Bulldozer Work! tractor work,
root raking, bush hogging, seeding,
sodding, disking, site prep &
landscape work. All types of
Fencing and Irrigation Repair &
Installation. Free Estimate!
Call 755-3890 or (386) 623-3200

Tree Service


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


Legal

01552478
April 24. 2005
May 1. 2005

REQUEST FOR PROPSOAL
Day-Labor Projects
3Bil File #3065
April 20, 2005
The Columbia County School Board is
interested in receiving proposals for
Day-Labor Contracts for constructions,
renovation, remodeling, and mainte-
nance of existing facilities as provided in
Chapter 1013.45 Florida Statutes. All
such contracts shall be for projects esti-
mated at $200,000 or less. The School
Board may use its own forces in addition
to subcontractors for portions of day-la-
bor projects. All day-labor projects shall
include contract documents (plans and
specifications) and are subject to the
same laws, rules, and codes as for new
construction and shall be subject to in-
spection by the UBCI following issuance
of appropriate permits from the School
Board Maintenance Department. Sub-
contractors contracted under the day-la-
bor contracts shall be state licensed as
required by Chapter 489, F.S., or locally
registered, and shall carry required insur-
ance.
The School Board shall furnish all re-
quired necessary materials. Circumstan-
ces requiring the subcontractor to furnish
material will be only upon authorization
of the Director of Maintenance whereby
material cost plus 7 1/2 percent mark up
shall be reimbursed upon receipt of in-
voice(s). Any subcontractor contracted
shall perform work only within the trade
licensed to do so; the subcontractor will
not be permitted to further subcontract
said work. All invoicing from the sub-
contractor will identify the hours and the
approved rates; no additional charges
outside the scope of this contract will be
allowed.
All work under the terms of this con-
tract, shall be at the direction of the Di-
rector of Maintenance. All work under
the terms of this contract shall be done in
the most efficient manner. All trash and
debris generated by the subcontractor
shall be recovered by the subcontractor
and disposed per direction of Director of
Maintenance or his designated supervi-
sor. All work performed under the terms
of this contract will be performed during
hours mutually agreed with the Director
of Maintenance and may vary depending
upon the specific project.
All work shall be paid at an hourly rate
for:
Subcontractor hourly rate
Technician hourly rate
Laborer or helper hourly rate
Proposals will be accepted for the fol-
lowing trades:
Electrical
Site Work
Concrete Forming Finishers
Masonry
BID INFORMATION: Call (386) 755-
8031 to obtain a copy of the Proposal
documents. Licensed contractors inter-
ested in performing work as a subcon-
tractor for one of the identified trades
must complete and submit the Bid Form
no later than 2:00 PM.
May 10, 2005 and submit the proposal in
a sealed envelope identified as DAY-
LABOR CONTRACT Bid File #3065
addressed or delivered to:
Columbia County School Board
Mr. R. M. "Mike" Null, Director of Pur-
chasing
372 West Duval Street
Lake City. FL 32055
Any proposal received after the desig-
nated time shall -not be considered.-,
Questions pertaining to the submission
of this bid shall be directed to Mike Null
at (386) 755-8034; questions related to
the scope of work shall be directed to
Fred Gaylard at (386) 755-8065.
The Columbia County School Board re-
serves the right to reject any and all pro-
posals and to award to the lowest most
responsive bidder.
01552487
April 24, 2005
May 1,2005


020 Lost & Found

Lost Male Yorkie. Red & Black.
Lost in Hopefull CI. 386-754-6992


030 Personals

#1 IN BUSINESS SERVICES
Divorce, Bankruptcy, Resumes
RE Closings, Legal Forms
248 N Marion Av. 755-8717

03524804 Send a
Send a
Mothers Day I.N
greeting with a
picture in the
Lake City Reporter
for only $39.96. Stop by or mail
in your photo to:
The Lake City Reporter,
Classified Dept. 180 E. Duval
Street Lake City FL 32055.
Deadline for submission is
May 4th. 2005 to be placed in our
May 8th Mother's Day edition.
Call 386-755-5440 for more info.

A Bankruptcy/Divorce. File Now
before changes occur.386-454-2378.


060 Services

LAWN MAINTENANCE. Mow-
ing, weed eating, hedge trimming
all done prof. Also specialize in irri-
gation. Clint 386-344-3976 Lv Mess


o100 Opportunities

MANAGER IN TRAINING
Hibbett Sports, a full line of
sporting goods, is hiring in Lake
City. Apply at: 2469 U.S. Hwy 90
W. suite 166, Lake City, FL 32055.
Hibbett Sports conducts drug
testing, www.hibbett.com

$ GET YOUR CLASS B $
CDL license fro $250. We train.
904-777-5995

*CHILD CARE WORKER*
M/F hrs. 6am-6pm
Call 752-4411 or fax qualifications
to: 752-0740
Must have clean background check.

01552037




$2000.00 Sign on Bonus
Drivers with 1 yr T/T exp who
join our team in April will receive
a. Davis Express, Starke, FL.
98% FL. GA. TN. S.C. & AL
0 1 yr. exp. .34 cpm
0 2 yrs. exp. .35 cpm
0 3 yrs. exp. .36 cpm
0 100% lumper reimbursement
Safety bonus
Guaranteed hometime
Health, Life, Dental &
disability Ins. avail.
401K available.
Call 1-800-874-4270 #6
www.davis-express.com

01552214
Service Persons Needed:
GREAT PAY
Must have Mobile Home
Construction Exp. & be able to
work out of town 4-5 nights,per
week. Apply in person:
HOMES OF MERIT
No Phone Calls Please.
Drug Screen, MVR,
Background Req.

01552233
THE LAKE CITY REPORTER
is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier for
CR 245/Lulu/Lake Butler area.
Deliver the Reporter in the early
morning hours Tuesday Sunday.
No delivery on Monday's. Carrier
must have dependable transporta-
tion. Stop by the Reporter today
to fill out a contractor's inquirers
form. No phone calls please!

01552404
Entertainment
Center Manager
Valdosta, Georgia
Up to $40,000!
Seeking experienced candidate
from the Family
Entertainment Industry.
Must be skilled in game repair.
-* Proficient'in Excel and Word
programs
Proven ability to increase sales
Must work weekends and
holidays.
All qualified individuals should
send resumes to:
Thanks,
Sheri DeFreitas
HR Manager
Fernandez Entertainment
91-246 Oihana St.
Kapolei, HI 96707
Bus. (808) 682-5767
Fax (808) 440-4157

01552433
NOW HIRING
Motivated individuals for Manu-
factured Housing Construction.
Company with GREAT benefits
and GREAT hours. 401K, health
insurance, life insurance, paid
vacations and holidays. Competi-
tive starting pay. Experience
helpful but not necessary. Apply
in person: Homes of Merit, Inc.
1915 SE Hwy. 100 E. Office
NO CALLS PLEASE! Homes of
Merit promotes a Drug Free
Workplace and is an Equal
Opportunity Employer.

01552442

EADS
AEROFRAME
SERVICES
EADS Aeroframe Services,
located in Lake Charles,
Louisana, is seeking experienced
and qualified personnel for a new
long term contract........
/ Systems A&P Mechanics
/ Structures Mechanics
/ QC Inspectors
/ Sr. Buyer
/ Non-Routine Negotiator
E.A.D.S. offers great
Benefits & 401K.
Please submit resumes to:
Melvin L. Coe P.O.B 18070,
Lake Charles, La. 70616
Fax: 337-312-2439 or Email:
mcoe(Saeroframeservices.com
EOE. M/F


100 Opportunities

01552461
EXPERIENCED FRAMERS
WANTED
386-719-2240

01552470
Lake City Extended Care
has the following open positions:
PT Activities Assistant
PT Laundry Aide
Applicants must have a clean
background. Apply in person at
587 SE Ermine Ave. EOE

01552485 DRIVERS
Connors Ref. Transport is
Seeking safe, dependable
drivers! Class A CDL, clean
MVR, current physical & good
references req.
Regular runs, Good pay,
Home weekly. 800-373-2278

01552492
ATTENTION





Postal Positions in Lake City
Minimum Pay $11.00 an hour.
Paid Training/No Experience
Required. Get Prepared -
Call Mon.-Fri. 1-866-300-6495
Ad Code: P908

01552502
PART-TIME GRANT FUNDED
HOMELESS SERVICES
COORDINATOR
This contractual position requires
completing grant requirements,
attending monthly meetings,
correspondence, advocacy on
behalf of the homeless. Day to
day operation interacting &
assisting clients.
Training Provided
Applicant should have good
communication skills and
knowledge of the social service
agencies. Send resume to:
258 NW Burk Avenue,
Lake City, FL 32055 or
fax to 386-754-5325.

01552511
The Division of Forestry is now
accepting for an OPS, (other
personnel services) automotive
mechanic. This position pays
$11.77 hourly, but has none of the
benefits-package associated with
Career Service positions.
Experience with heavy equipment
is preferred but not required.
Apply on line at MyFlorida.com
or stop by our office at
Highway 137 SE Forestry Circle,
(90 East) in Lake City.
The Division of Forestry is
"AN EEO/AA/VP EMPLOYER"
Dee Dee Murphy 386-758-5716

01552513
39-43 cpm
21 DRIVERS NEEDED!
Sign-on Bonus
$0 Lease
CDL 6 mo. exp.
1-800-635-8669 *

01552515
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT






Bulldozer, Backhoes, Load-
ers, Dump Trucks, Graders,
Scrapers, Excavators

Next Class: May 9th
National Certification
Financial Assistance
-o Job Placement

800-383-7364

Associated Training Services
www.atsn-schools.com

City of Lake City is accepting appli-
cations for the following positions:
Full-time Public Safety Dispatcher
0405(56)
For a complete list of minimum
qualifications and to fill out an
application, please visit City Hall,
150 NW Alachua Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055.
Deadline for these positions is
FRIDAY
APRIL 29, 2005
an EEO/AAADA/VP employer
No phone calls please.


100 Opportunities
Sales Professionals
Wanted: Sales Dynamos!
Heartland Payment Systems wants
you to succeed! We help you reach
your potential by providing sales
support personnel, sales training,
online tools, trade shows, and
printed collateral. If you are a sales
dynamo with 2+ years outside sales
experience, excellent
communication skills and a strong
drive to succeed, we want to talk to
you! In addition to supporting your
sales efforts, we offer generous
benefits, weekly signing bonus &
monthly residual pay. Visit:
.www.hpsteammates.com. Email
resume: hr@e-hps.com or
Fax: 904-565-8336. EOE
03524801
TELL MOM
How Great She is!
Just fill out your i
Mother's Day Message
and return to :
Lake City Reporter
180 E. Duval Street
Lake City, FL 32055
or you can stop by The Lake City
Reporter to fill out a form. Forms
will be published in the May 13th,
20th, & 27th editions of
The Lake City Reporter.
Prices: 15 words for $6.75. Each
add'l word is 100 each. You may
add artwork for $2.50.
For additional information call
386-755-5440. Deadline for
entries is May 4th, 2005.

03524927
PDS Aviation Services
is hiring military and commercial
A&P Mechs. and Aircraft Struct.
and Avi.Techs. in SC, TX, FL and
WV. Min. of 3 yrs. exp, as a
technician. Speak to a recruiter at
888-737-0055 or fax res. toll free
877-762-8148 or email to
abright(5)pdstech.com.

03524991
HELP WANTED
Machine operators & forklift
operators needed. Must have
experience in woodworking.
Medical & investment packages
offered. Apply in person or
call Gary at 386-963-5647.

33524996
Company Drivers
STAY IN THE SOUTH
Dedicated South and Southeast





Pemberton


6 months OTR Req. w/Hazmat
For more information
Call @ 888-PEMBERTON
888-736-2378

03525013
Drivers
Contract Couriers
P/T work for almost F/T pay.
Use your own vehicle to
deliver film to the Jacksonville
area. You must have a
winning attitude, appearance,
& a reliable Mini-Van.
Call 800-818-7958
for a personal interview!
www.networkexpressinc.com


ACCURATE WIRELESS seeks a
motivated sales person to join our
staff. We are looking for a person to
sell business Nextel services. If you
have previous sales experience, and
are self directed, contact us.
Email your resume to
badams(@)4accurate.com, or
Fax to 752-0299. Applications
available at Accurate Car Care,
4114 W. US Hwy 90 in Lake City.

Driver

r YOU WANT IT!


t BONUSES
t PAID
a WEEKLY


Solos Owner
S* Teams Operators
Student Lease
Graduates Purchase
an equal opportunity employer


i


No CDL? No Problem!
Call 866-280-5309


$50,000 AVERAGE
EXPECTATION WANTED IMMEDIATELY!
5 MEN OR WOMEN FOR EXECUTIVE SALES POSITION
"Paid Insurance
"401K Plan
*Quality Work Schedule
*Advancement Opportunity
"We provide Demos
*Career Path into Management
****3000 Sign Up Bonus for
Experienced Auto Sales Professionals
*Our Top Performers Earn an
Average of '9000 Per Month
"$3000 sign up bonus for professional automobile sales persons with strong documented track record.
EDDIE ACCARDI
CHEVROLET-MAZDA



________ I 't I 'I' I


10 nnJob
100 Opportunities

01552528
Drivers CDL A
Find what you've been
looking for at PTL!
$3,000 Co Drivers Sign-On
($1,500 Owner Operator)
Pre-Pass Plus, No NYC or
Canada, Optional NE, &
NO loading/Unloading
Call us 7 Days a Week
Get approved w/in 60 min!
Must be 23 w/lyr. OTR
No Hazmat Required
www.ptl-inc.com
1-800-848-0405
Paschall Truck Lines

DRIVERS
Are you getting a pay raise in 2005?
Roehl drivers are! Van drivers up
to 390 plus bonus. Flatbed drivers-
up to 410 plus bonus, plus tarp.
Sign-on bonus. Students Welcome.
Class A required. EOE Call Roehl,
"THE TAKE HOME MORE, BE
HOME MORE
CARRIER."
$$$ 800-626-4915 $$$
www.GoRoehl.com

V Class A? V Good MVR?
V Dependable? V Safe?
V Want to be home daily?
V Like weekends off?
Want steady work w/stable Co.
Good equipment w/ good wages?
Call Columbia Grain
386-755-7700 Full & Part Time.


03525008
Check Out
Our Cars...

We really mean it! At
Enterprise Rent-A-Car, the
largest car rental company
in North America, we not
only want to rent the most
cars we also want to rent
the cleanest, best
maintained cars. That's
where you come in. If you
can check out our cars and
make them shine, we have a
great job for you!

CAR
PREP

You'll clean and prep rental
cars. We require a clean
driving record and valid
Florida driver's license.
Candidate must also be 21
years old or a full-time
college student.

You'll make at least
$7.00/hr. in this part-time
position. Apply in person at
129 N Gwen Lake Ave,
Lake City, FL 32055
EOE, M/F/D/V
City of Lake City is accepting appli-
cations for the following positions:
Temporary Customer Service Clerk
0405 (53)
Temporary Girls Club Leader
0405 (54)
Maintenance Worker 0405 (55)
For a complete list of minimum
qualifications and to fill out an
application please visit City Hall,
150 NW Alachua Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055.
Deadline for these positions is
THURSDAY
APRIL 28, 2005
an EEO/AAADA/VP employer
No phone calls please.


10 nnJob
100 Opportunities

03525002
Driver
ROUTE DRIVER
($300 Signing Bonus)
"$100 upon hire,
$200 after 90 days"
EBY- BROWN CO., a privately
owned wholesale distributor,
is looking for an energetic,
dependable candidate for our
Route Driver position.
Route Drivers earn $13/hour and
are eligible for a monthly
attendance bonus after 30 days.
Position requires a valid CDL
Class A Lic. and good
driving record. Warehouse work
and heavy lifting required.
Approx. 40-45 hrs per wk.;
4 days per wk.;
Home every night!
Full benefits/Bonuses
DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE
Fax resume to: (407)857-7960;
or email:
florida.payroll@eby-brown.com
EOE M/F/D/V

Accurate Car Care is hiring for all
positions, cashier, greeter, finisher,
and manager. Apply in person at
Accurate Car Wash, 4114 W. US
Hwy 90. Telephone 755-1125
Assistant Manager/Collector
Sunbelt Credit, a recognized leader
in the consumer loan industry, is
now accepting applications for the
above position. If you are dedicated
to excellence in customer service,
motivated by achieving results
through teamwork, and a positive
thinker with a drive to succeed, we
want to talk with you about joining
our team. Prior customer service
and or finance experience preferred.
Must have access to reliable
transportation for field collection
work. Competitive pay and
comprehensive benefits
package. Apply in person at:
265 SW Malone St. Ste. 113
Lake City, FL 32025.
Equal Opportunity Employer
ASSISTANT NEEDED Retail
Optical seeks full time assistant for
making and assembling eye glasses.
No experience necessary. Mechani-
cal skills helpful. Salary $300-$400
per week. Apply 9am-noon on
Tuesday April 26th at Eyeglass
Express K-Mart Plaza.

ATTN STUDENTS
College/05 HS Grads Great pay!
Flex scheds sales/svc, will train,
all ages 17+. Conditions apply.
Work in Lake City or Gainesville.
Call NOW!!! 352 335-1422
ATTN: WORK at Home
Earn $450-$1500/monthly Part-time
$2000-$4500 Full-time '
www.home-basedbusiness.com
Bailey, Bishop & Lane, Inc.
is looking for an experienced
Survey Party Chief and an
instrument Operator. Please fax"
resume to 386-755-7771 or email
to: sallbritton@bblmail.com.
CLASS A CDL OTR Driver
needed for Florida Pine Straw.
2 yrs exp. required. Health
insurance, retirement, paid action.
Drug Free 386-294-3411
CLERICAL
LAKE CITY & SURROUNDING
AREAS MANY POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
CALL FOR APPT
386-755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREENS/BACKGRD
REQ.


WALT'S LIVE OAK FORD-MERCURY

Looking for experienced Sales Representatives

with proven track record. Sign-on bonus.

Call 386-362-1112
Ask for Rick or Dave for confidential interview.


Liberty National Life Insurance Co.
is expanding its operation and is looking for upwardly
mobile people to fill insurance sales & service positions.
Average annual earnings $42,000. Fringe benefit package: 2
retirement funds, health insurance, paid vacation, conven-
tion trips & many others. No experience necessary. We have
on the job training. Requirements: honesty, hard worker &
dependable transportation.
Contact Ronnie Harvey at 386-752-2583
Or fax resume to: 386-752-8724
Liberty National is an EOE Licensed Agents Welcome






LAAKE CITY
COMMUNITY COLLEfE
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, CHEMISTRY
(168 Duty Days-Tenured Track) To Commence FALL 2005
Teach variety of chemistry courses with labs including General
Chemistry I, II; Organic Chemistry I, II; Prepare laboratory
reagents; maintain laboratory equipment and supplies; participate
in department and college-wide initiatives and committees and
advise students in class selections. Prepare, review and update
course outlines, syllabi and tests. Minimum Qualifications Master's
Degree with at least 18 graduate hours in Chemistry, Biochemistry
or Chemical Engineering.
REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS TO BEGIN: May, 2005
To be considered an applicant, an application, vita and photocopies of transcripts,
must be received by Human Resources Development All foreign transcriptsidegrees
must be submitted with an official translation and evaluation.
INQUIRIES:
HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT
LAKE CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE
149 S. E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-2007
INFORMATION (386) 754-4314; FAX (386). 754-4594
E-MAIL: Boettcherg (lakecitycc.edu
Applications are available on WEB AT: www.lakecitycc.edu
VP/ADA/EA/EO COLLEGE IN EDUCATION & EMPLOYMENT


Office Help Needed

Busy auto dealership is now hiring for full-time AP/AR person.
Experience required, must be proficient, dependable and have
references. Part-time position also available for general office
clerk. Computer and phone skills needed, cashier experience a
must. Apply in person Mon.-Fri. 9am-4pm, Ask for Sharon.






Chrysler-Jeep-Dodge
Hwy 90 West, Lake City


I We 0;?Vacte t7d 1


-1


3


I


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


100 J0ob
100 Opportunities
01552493
Driver/Dedicated Reg. Lane
HOME EVERY WEEKEND
GUARANTEED!
No Touch Freight
85% Preloaded/Pretarped
*Avg. $888 $1019/week
Jacksonville, FL Terminal
CDL A req'd. 877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com

CUSTOMER SERVICE REP.
Career opportunity in a sales/service
environment available for qualified
individual with a strong work ethic
and dedication to the job. Min. 3
years Customer Service exp. in a
fast paced environment. Must enjoy
working with people Computer/
data Entry skills required as well as
Windows proficiency. Minimum 50
wpm. No Phone Calls Please.
Resumes Att: Joy
ws4140(earthlink.net
DATA ENTRY CLERK
S & S Office is hiring for a
Full-Time Data Entry Clerk.
Computer Experience needed.
Apply in person at S & S Office,
134 SE Colbum Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025
Drug Free Workplace/ EOE
DRIVER NEEDED
Class A CDL
Min. 2 years Exp.
386-755-5095
DRY CLEANERS: Front Counter,
exp. pressers, exp. cleaner/spotter.
Apply in person at Town & Country
Cleaners. 183 SW Bascom Norris
Dr. Ste. 101. Behind Zaxbys.
DRYWALL FINISHERS
Bead Applicators,
And Helpers PT/FT
Call Joe (386)984-8892
EXC ASSIST. Opening for FT
position for a social service agency.
Organization, communication,
problem solving, computer skills,
team player. Submit resume & ref.
to Box 03084, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
Executive Assistant Opening for
P/T or F/T position for a real estate
office. Organization, Communica-
tion, Problem solving, & Computer
skills req. Pay starting at $8/hr & up
based on qualifications. Email re-
sum6 to: jobs@lakecityhome.com
EXPERIENCE DRIVER wanted,
for light hauling. No CDL required,
clean MVR a must. Please call
386-758-9152
FARM LABOR. "RELIABLE"
Tractor and fence work, & other
misc duties. Ref required,
Fort White area. 904-742-6295
FIBERGLASS WORKER needed:
Experienced Chopper operator
and gel coater. Call (904)275-2800
ask for Larry or Phyllis.
FINISH DOZER Operators
needed for Live Oak Landfill
project. Starting pay $15.00 per
hour. 1-800-324-6369
FLOORING INSTALLER
for Vinyl & carpet. Tools &
transportation required. Licensed &
Insured, 386-755-0041
FSBO 10 acres. Pasture for horses,
pine trees and hardwood. 22 up
graded Mobile Home. Call for more
info at 386-330-2332
FT Bookkeeper/Office Manager
needed for growing Const. Co. Exp.
in Word, Excel & QuickBooks req.
Starting at $11/hr. Email resume to:
lakecitybuilder@gmail.com
or mail to: Bookkeeper, PO Box
2183 Lake City, FL 32056
Guidance Counselor.
Part-time position in private school
setting. Must have Masters in
Counseling. Mail resumes to: Pat
Tiemey; 1165 Old St. Augustine
Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32241
HAIR STYLIST: Creative Images
is seeking 2 F/T stylists. 2 yrs min.
exp. Commission base pay. Located
in Lake City Mall. 386-758-6850
HELP WANTED Top Climber/
Bucket Operator. CDL class B,
with air, minimum License.
Dedge Tree Service 386-963-5026
Housekeepers, P/T Maintenance/
Security. Must be able to work
wkends & Holidays. Apply at
Best Western Inn 1-75 & US 90 W
ICHETUCKNEE SPRINGS has
Toll Collector, Driver & Field Staff
positions available for the upcoming
summer season. May 27 Sept. 5.
2005. $6.15 per hour, weekends req.
applications available at https://npeo-
plefirst.mvflorida.com/logon.htm.
For further information please call
(386)497-4690.
Immediate openings. Carpenters,
Concrete Finishers, Welders, Iron
Workers & Mechanics needed.
Call (229)244-6707
Janitorial Company is seeking
exp. persons. Mon. Fri. evenings,
Must have good references and
clean background. 386-752-2147
Kens Bar-B-Que is now hiring
cashiers at the Main St location.
Apply in person between
2 pm-5pm NO PHONE CALLS!
LEGAL SECRETARY for busy
Law Firm. Real Estate background a
plus. Proficient typing & organiza-
tional skills required Proficiency in


Wprd & Word Perfect is necessary.
Salary commensurate with experi-
ence. Mail Cover letter & resume to
P.O. Box 1707 Lake City, FL
32055. or fax to 386-755-4569.
Licensed "Above Ground" pool
installer needed. Apply in person at
3585 NW Bascom Norris Dr. Lake
City. No Phone Calls Please.
LICENSED INSURANCE Agent
to sell Health and Life insurance.
Some leads Provided.
Call IRV at 386-755-3476
LUMBER GRADER
Great South Timber & Lumber, Inc.
is accepting applications for a Certi-
fied Southern Yellow Pine Lumber
Grader. Please apply in person or
call 386-752-3774 for an appt.


1000Job
100 Opportunities
Mgmt trainees earn 35-60K. Look-
ing for six aggressive people who
want a long term career with a 125-
year old company. Sales, Mgmt, or
PR background will help. Call
(352)373-2365 for an interview or
fax resume to (352)692-4475. EOC
MULTIPLE OPENINGS
1st & 2nd shift avail. Alachua area
warehouse has openings in a climate
controlled environment. Great
opportunity for steady hours & long
team work. Heavy lifting is
required. Call to set your
interview appointment.
755-1991
MYSTERY SHOPPERS NEEDED!
Earn While You Shop!
Call Now Toll Free
1-888-255-6040 Ext. 13252
NEEDED:
INSTALLER
FOR LOCAL TILE & MARBLE
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY.
MUST BE-ABLE TO LIFT
UP TO 70 LBS PLEASE
CALL FOR AN APPT.
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991.
Drug screen & Background Req.
NEEDED: FRAMERS, Stucco,
Drywall Hangers & Finishers
386-752-4089

NEEDED: LABORERS & Masons
with experience. Please call
386-755-7498 between
the hours of 8 5 pm.
01552421



HOSPICE

Hospice offers excellent benefits,
competitive salary, PTO accruals
and much more. Great career
opportunities available!

Licensed CNAs FT
-Crisis Care_
Opportunities throughout 16
county service area.

Licensed CNAs FT
ET York Hospice Care Center -

Licensed CNAs FT
Home Care Teams -

LPNs FT, PT and PRN
Crisis Care -
Days or Nights 12 hour shifts in
patients homes. Opportunities
throughout 16 county service
area.

RN Patient Care
Coordinator FT
Must have BSN, will supervise
our inpatient facility in Cheifland.

RN PT (20 hours)
Primary On Call RN position.
Evening & weekend hours.

RN PT (20 hours)
Admissions -
Weekends 7:30am 6:30pm,
Sat. & Sun.

Interested parties, please
email a resume to:
employment@hospicecares.org
or fax a resume to :
352-379-6206, Attn: HR. You
may also mail a resume to: 4200
NW 90th Boulevard, Gainesville,
FL 32606. EOE/DFWP.

OTR Drivers Wanted
Out 2-3 weeks
Bonus Program
Trucks Available Now
Excellent Pay
Call Southern Specialized
386-752-9754
OUTSIDE LABORER
Call for more information.
386-588-4084

PART TIME Transaction
Coordinator needed. Experience a
must. Knowledgeable in Real
Estate, from contract to close. Must
have good phone skills, computer
knowldege & multi-tasking ability.
Send resume to 1129 SW Flagler
Ct, Lake City, FL 32025
PART TIME: weekdays, weekends
& evenings. References &
experience required. Gas station
/Convenient store 386-755-5793
Personal Assistant/Secretary
wanted to work for Distribution
Company in Lake City. Excellent
pay. Fax resume to 386-754-0103
PT SECURITY OFFICERS
Needed .Exc pay & benefits.
Class D lic req'd.,
Call 1-866-458-9523
Roofing Company needs helper.
Requires valid drivers lic, reliable
transportation. No exp necessary.
$8.00hr call Becky 386-754-2877
Sales Manager/Sales Rep.
We are seeking sharp, self-
motivated sales professionals to
market voluntary employee benefit
programs in your area. $60K-$100K
first year. Email resume to:
Donnie.Vance@coloniallife.com
SALES POSITION
WELL ESTABLISHED


LENDING COMPANY
MUST HAVE STRONG SALES
EXPERIENCE & RESUME
PLEASE CALL FOR APPT.
WAL-STAFF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
DrugScreen & backgrd Req.
SOUTHERN OAKS GOLF CLUB
Part time positions: Pro Shop-Golf
Cart attendant, Beverage Cart
Driver. Weekend hours necessary.
Call 752-2266 7am-6pm for info.
STRUCTURAL/MECHANICAL
DRAFTSMAN/DETAILER
AUTO CAD EXP. REQUIRED
Send resume: Draftsman
PO Box 1949, Lake City,
FL 32056 Must pass drug test.


100 Job
100 OOpportunities
TRI COUNTY TREE SERVICE
is looking for Bucket Truck
Operator, with experience in Tree
Work.. Pay based on experience.
386-963-5000
TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED
Must have a class A CDL license
with a min. of 2 yrs exp & clean
driving record. Apply Direct at
Corbitt Mfg. Inc. Hwy 41 N and
Guerdon St. M-F 9AM to 3PM
only. DFW
01552494
Drivers




USA TRUCK
Is Now Paying A
$1,000
Sign On
For Exp'd OTR Drivers!
No NYC& Pay On Delivery
Dedicated & Regional Availa-
ble. Company Owner Op's
Teams & Student Grads. Call 7
Days a Week.
800-237-4642
www.gousatruck.com
eoe m/f/h/v


WANTED!! INDUSTRIAL
HARD WORKERS ONLY NEED
APPLY. ALL SHIFTS
AVAILABLE. MUST BE ABLE
TO LIFT 50 TO 70LB. CALL FOR
AN APPT NOW!!
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
DRUG SCREENS/
BACKGRD REQ.
Waste Management Inc.
Lake City/ Gainesville
Has an immediate opening for a
hard working, flexible individual to
fill the position of Driver/Laborer
for Lake City and Gainesville. This
position requires a minimum Class
B CDL with air brake endorsement.
Waste Management offers a full
benefits package including health
insurance and 401 K plan. If you
feel you meet the requirements,
please apply by phone
1-877-220-JOBS (5627) or online at
WWW.WMCAREERS.COM
EOE/ADA/DFWP
WEST SIDE Barber shop now
hiring an experienced barber. High
commission, high customer volume.
Call 386-344-2950 or
386-752-8986. leave Mess.

110 Sales
Employment
HELP WANTED. Part time
sales associate. Apply in person
at Belles Pet Alley.
386-755-8668
ORLANDO WELCOME Center
on US 90, Lake City. is looking for
sales people. Commission base
only. Contact Wilma. 386-754-2500

Medical
120' Employment

03524995
MERIDIAN BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE, INC.

Add Specialist- MIST & Adult
Programs- FT/PT G'ville & PRN
Lake City
Child Welfare Case Manager
Trainee- FT
Adult Case Manager- FT G'ville
Children Case Manager- FT
G'ville, Cross City
Counselor IV/ Sr. Clin'n FT
Jasper, Live Oak, FT Outpatient
Adults/Child'n, FT/PRN Foster
care, FT Fam Crisis Trtmnt
G'ville
Counselor III-FT Lake City
Adolescent Therapeutic Group
Home
Counselor II- FT G'ville
Counselor I- FT G;ville
Certified Behavioral Analyst -
FT Fam Crisis Trtmnt G'ville
Acute Care Program Director-
FT G'ville
Emergency Svcs Intake Evalua-
tor- FT G'ville, Lake City
Driver- FT G'ville, CDL Re-
quired
Sr. Client Relations Specialist-
FT Live Oak
Maintenance Worker FT
G'ville
Housekeeping- FT G'ville
Staff Assistant- FT G'ville CSU
Sr. Admin Asst- FT G'ville CSU
LPN FT/PRN G'ville & Lake
City
Facility Manager- FT G'ville
Psych Tech PRN G'ville &
Lake City
Security tech FT G'ville
RN FT G'ville & Lake City
Comp Assessor- PRN G'ville,
Lake City
Staff Psychiatrist- FT G'ville
Excellent benefits.
For details visit
www.meridian-healthcare.org or
call (352) 374-5600 ext. 8277.
Send resumes to:
Meridian Behavioral Healthcare,
Inc., Human Resources,
4300 SW 13th St., Gainesville,
FL 32608, fax (352) 374-5608,


e-mail: jobs(t)mbhci.org, ATTN:
refer to Sun Ad. EOE, DFWP

BUSY MEDICAL Practice is look-
ing for a Mid Level Practitioner &
Medical Assistant. Willing to work
in a family environment. Some
computer skills are required, but not
nec. Send resume to: P.O. Box
2204, Lake City, FL 32056
Fast growing Laboratory in need of
License Medical Technologist for
PRN/FT employment. Please fax
resume w/cover to: 386-752-9647
Insurance Billing Assistant
Medical billing exp. req'd. Must be
dependable & efficient. Send
Resume to: Administrator,
P.O. Box 489, Lake City, FL 32056


1 Medical
120 Employment

Florida Department of Corrections,
DENTAL SERVICES, is a critical
component of Florida's nationally
recognized correctional health care
program. Accepting State of Florida
applications for Senior Dentist at
Hamilton C.I., Jasper, FL. Starting
salary is $85,000/yr. plus a generous
benefit package. For further infor-
mation contact: Contact: Sharon
McKinnie, R.N. @ 386-922-6645

FT Dietary Technician
for 180-bed Facility
Must have minimum of 2 year
degree in Nutrition Therapy or a
related field and at least 1 year
experience. Contact Bette Forshaw
NHA @ 386-362-7860 or apply in
person Suwannee Health Care
Center 1620 E Helvenston Street
Live Oak, Florida 32064
EOE, DV, M/F
Medical Receptionist wanted PT
for Private practice in Lake City.
Experience with Medical Manager
preferred. Please fax resumes to HR
(352) 373-9870, or email to
simedpa@yahoo.com.
Medical transcriptionist needed to
transcribe at home for busy medical
practice experience preferred must
have own equipment.
Fax resume to: 386-755-0602.
Medical Transcriptionist wanted
immediately for Private practice in
Lake City. Experience with Medical
Manager and Word perfect required.
Please fax resumes to HR
(352) 373-9870, or email to
simedpa@yahoo.com.


141 Babysitters

BABYSITTER NEEDED
In home, $120.00 per week.
Monday Friday
386-697-1738

17O Business
71 Opportunities

Premier Business Systems
Work from Any Location.
Up to $2000-$5000/mo part time.
Full Training (888)275-1798

THE UPS STORE for sale, Lake
City, profitable, owner retiring. 4
weeks training, owner financing.
Call Mr. Grossman, 877-578-6499


310 Pets & Supplies

BOXER male pup, 11 wks, Huge
Fawn $300. 386-758-7807

Boxer- 2 year. CKC Female $200.
Flashy Brindle Must see!! 758-7807
Dachshunds. 3 Males, Black & tan,
1 solid. 386-755-6456
Fish Tank 55 gal, salt water set up.
wood cabinet. $450 386-397-2920
JACK RUSSELL PUPS, 9 weeks,
Health Cert..$250.863922.92.Q. .


310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHERS NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health certifi-
cate from a licensed veterinarian
documenting they have mandatory
shots and are free from intestinal
and external parasites. Many species
of wildlife must be licensed by Flor-
ida Fish and Wildlife. If you are un-
sure, contact the local office for in-
formation.

330 Livestock &
33 Supplies

AUCTION: Gator Classic Horse
Sale. Starke FL. Sat. April 30, 1:00
pm Tack, 3:00 pm Horses. Consign
now. 478-627-2727 FLN 2120

REG. AQHA/PBA Palomino
Yearling Filly.
Big & Beautiful.
$2,500. 386-755-1771


402 Appliances

KENMORE HEAVY Duty,
Washer & Dryer. White.
Moving, must sell. $225. cash for
pair. Call 386-288-3581 after 5 pm.

Signature 200 heavy duty washer.
Good Con. $50. 386-755-5295
STOVE, GE Spectra, White.
Self cleaning. Two years new.
$250. Ft. White.
386-497-1033


403 Auctions
ESTATE AUCTION
Mon April 25th @ 6pm.
High Springs, FL. Hwy 27 N.
Jewelry Gold/Dia, Coins,
Antique/ Modem Fum.,
Glassware, Pottery, China, Tools,
BR/DR Sets, & Sofas. 10% B.P.,
Red Williams Au 437/AB270
1-386-454-4991


408 Furniture
-
All wood chest Of Drawers. Very
nice. $65. 386-755-5295

Couch, Chair & Coffee Table
$150.00 good cond.
(386)719-9745
Leave Message
HANDSOME CUSTOMER Made
Sideboard, Walnut. $300 754-2316
TWIN BED w/all frame
work & bedding. $75.
Mint cond. Call after 7pm.
386-961-8815 for appointment

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment

MASSEY FERGUSON Tractor,
135 diesel w 5ft finish mower.
Excellent condition .$5,400.
386-963-5350


411 oMachinery &
411 Tools

CRATSMAN RADIAL
ARM SAW
W/ CABINET $250.
386-961-8374


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
Timber Co. Payment in advance for
standing pine timber. Large or small
tracts. Call 386-758-7636.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Effective October 1, 2003
All Yard Sale Ads
must be prepaid


440 Miscellaneous

03524801
TELL MOM
How Great She is!
Just fill out your
Mother's Day Message
and return to:
Lake City Reporter
180 E. Duval Street
Lake City, FL 32055
or you can stop by The Lake City
Reporter to fill out a form. Forms
will be published in the May 13th,
20th, & 27th editions of
The Lake City Reporter.
Prices: 15 words for $6.75. Each
add'l word is 100 each. You may
add artwork for $2.50.
For additional information call
386-755-5440. Deadline for
entries is May 4th. 2005.
EXTREME REALTORS
four talking houses,
still in boxes. Never used.
386-365-2863

New Shipment
Trusses, $8.00 each
MORRELL'S
386-752-3910
New shipment
Vinyl Siding.
$38.-$42. per square.
MORRELL'S 386-752-3910


520 Boats for Sale

1991 BAYLINER Capri
50 US Force Marine Motor.
Needs TLC. $1,200. or Trade.
386-754-3817

20' CLASSIC Pro-Line Boat.
115 HP outboard. Full Transom,
tandem axle, all-aluminum, trailer.
$6000. (386)963-4941

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

CANNON CREEK MOBILE
HOME PARK. New Ownership.
2 & 3 br homes. $400 $600 mo.
Deposit. required. 386.752-6422.
No Pets Allowed!


3101 US HWY 90 WEST, Suite #101
Lake City, FL 32055
QI SER CC Business (386) 752-6575

S2001 Toll Free 1-800-333-4946

THE DARBY-RERS CObMPANY visit our website www.century2l.com
.www.c2ldarbyrogers.com -~MS


Surrounded by Oaks... Beautiful
home presented by Blake
Construction. 2,628 sf. 4BR/
3.5BA. Bonus room with bath
could be 51" BR. Split plan, formal
dining room, gas fireplace, hardy
board & brick exterior.
MLS#43002 $319,900.


Fore Your Golfer... Then this
home is for you, well maintained
3/2 brick home located on golf
course. Open floor plan wit split
bedrooms. Screened back porch,
custom windows and much more!
MLS#44547 $175,900.


Just What You're Looking For!
3BR/2BA 2003 DWMH on 1 acre,
covered front porch, back
screened porch, His & Her's work-
shop, above ground pool, carport.
Call for appt. And see it today.
MLS#45000. $99,900.


Enjoy Peace & Serenity in this
Majestic 2 story home on the
Suwannee River, with 4BR/3BA.
2nd Master has balcony overlook-
ing the river. Sit on the screened
front porch and enjoy river living at
it's best. MLS#44317 $375,000.


:..-- .






Showcase Home... Gorgeous
5BR/2.5BA country home on 1
acre. 5'" BR could be office, bonus
rom or game room. Back yard
completely fenced, detached
garage & large grilling porch.
$289,900 MLS#44564

T, .-*

A .". '**,-,-''-4


What a Showplace...2BR/2BA
home with modern kitchen, new
stove and frig, lighted display cab-
inet, island/bar in kitchen.
Fireplace w/gas logs. MB is
incredible w/spa/l whirlpool and so
much more a must see!
MLS#44939 $167,900.


r m ." .M' ...


Oak woodlands surround this
newer 3BR/2BA, 1642 sf.home in
Hamilton Co. Located across the
street from a conservation area.
MLS#44231 $184,900


f 4a i..A



Beautiful "New Home" by Plumb
Level Construction. Split bed-
rooms, eat-in kitchen, covered
patio, glamour bath, all brick, great
room. Come see it today!
MLS#44053 $179,900.


Unique & Special...6BR/4BA
spacious rooms with lots of light.
Impressive front entry, large multi-
level back deck overlooking the
pool area. This large home has
everything you could want and
then some. Make an appt. to see it
today! MLS#43021 $252,900.


3/2 SWMH on 1 wooded acre. Lots of potential. MLS#43874 $52,900
3/2 DWMH on .6 acre. Lots of updates. MLS#43916 $69,500
.63 Acre home site in Arbor Green. $28,000 MLS#43963
Newer 2004 DWMH on .5 acre. Great floor plan.MLS#44027 $69,900
Peace & Quiet...4/2 DWMH on 5 acres in Jennings. $84,500 MLS#S44047
Small 2/1 frame house in good condition. Well worth $44,900 MLS#44175
Heavily wooded 8+ acre tract. Perfect for mobile or site home. $69,900 MLS#44255
1999 4/2 DWMH on .5 acre. Great location near all amenities. MLS#44679 $64,900







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
IN PARK Mobile Homes for Rent
2BR/2BA 1st & sec. required.
Applications & references required.
386-719-2423

LATE MODEL MOBILE HOMES
Starting $365 month, Beautiful
Pond setting, w/trees. CH/A & ca-
ble. No pets. Call 386-961-0017

640 Mobile Homes
0 for Sale
2000 DW 28X44. Many up grades.
Must be moved.
Call for information.
386-362-6092. Ask for Ida

ABSOLUTELY "THE BEST"
Mobile Homes and Modulars
Move over Palm & Jake, the new
#1 home is here. Guaranteed
Gary Hamilton Homes 758-6755
FIXER UPPERS. 3 older SW
Mobiles. Good for storage barn,
hunting camps & exc.. Need lots of
work. First $500 dollars OBO. Must
be moved soon. 352-475-3133
MOBIL HOME Mover
State Certified
Insured and Bonded
Free estimates
Call: 386-755-1783
MOBILE HOME FINANCING
Refinance/lower rates or Purchase.
Investment home O.K. Land Home
or Home Only. (904)225-2381
Timberlane MH Park. Adult park
in Lake City, FL. Aval. NOW.
3br/2ba. Split plan DW, w/big
kitchen & Ig shed. Appliances inc.
269 SW Woodberry Ct. $34,500
386-758-9640

650 Mobile Home
0 & Land
4BR/2BA Loaded. on 1/2 acre.
(close in) $89,999.00. 6% fixed, 30
years..Ready to occupy. Gary Ham-
ilton Homes. 386-758-6755

FOR SALE. Like New 3/2,'01 MH,
in S/D. Paved St., City water, CH/A
& appli. Ideal for retiree/starter.
Near town 386-752-1212/365-3094

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
All very nice.
Convenient location.
Call 386-755-2423

2BR/1BA DUPLEX,
Near the airport. $550. mo. Security
Dep. $500. 141 Plant St. #101
(904)317-4511 ext. 18

730 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent
3/2, BRICK House, 2400 Sq Ft, in
Providence area. In ground pool,
fireplace, fenced back yard. $1,000
mo, Plus security. 386-697-3490

3br/2 ba Brick. W/D,stove,refrig.
Lawn care incl. Lg. fenced back
yard. Close to V.A. $825.00 mo,
1st, last, sec. req. Call Richard,
Licensed Realtor. 386-755-6653
Renters why pay rent, when you
can own your own home. Free spe-
cial Report. www.howtostoppaying-
rentnow.com. Remax Professionals.


730 Unfurnished
U Home For Rent
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference. limita-
tion or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability, fami-
lial status or national origin, or any
intention to make such preference,
limitation or discrimination." Fami-
lial status includes children under
the age of 18 living with parents or
legal custodians, pregnant women,
and people securing custody of chil-
dren under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this newspa-
per are available on an equal oppor-
tunity basis. To complain of dis-
crimination call HUD toll-free at 1-
800-669-9777. The toll free tele-
phone number to the hearing im-
paired is 1-800-927-9275


750 Business &
S Office Rentals
GREAT LOCATION
Office/Retail
$950/mo. incl. Utilities
386-752-5035
A Bar Sales, Inc.
7 Days 7 am-7 pm
OFFICE BLDG. for Lease
E. Baya Ave. 2100 Sq. Ft.
Excellent for Professional use.
Call 386-752-5826


805 Lots for Sale
5 ACRES, scattered trees, near
Lake City. Cash or small down
payment, owner financing.
386-497-3637


810 Home for Sale
$33,900! 3br/2ba foreclosure
available now!
For listing call
1-800-749-8124 ext H411
03524804
Send a
Mothers Day ."
greeting with a
picture in the
Lake City Reporter
for only $39.96. Stop by or mail
in your photo to:
The Lake City Reporter,
Classified Dept. 180 E. Duval
Street Lake City FL 32055.
Deadline for submission is
May 4th, 2005 to be placed in our
May 8th Mother's Day edition.
Call 386-755-5440 for more info.

HOMEBUYERS Hot new
listings. Beat others to the best
properties in your price range.
www.newlistingsfla.com
RE/MAX Professionals

Accepting Applications
Good, Bad & No Credit
Call for 1st & 2nd Mortgages
Established full service co.
(800) 226-6044
WE BUY MORTGAGES
2622 NW 43rd St.
#A-1
FHAVNA/Conv. Specialist Gainesville, FL 32606
GAINESVILLE MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC.
Licensed Mtg. Lender


BISHOP REALTY, INC. ___;_
U.S. 90 West Across from Wal-Mart 752-4211
www.coldwelibanker.com _,, T
Independently Owned and Operated L MEDE

OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, April 24 2PM-4PM
'.. je .,, .., ._:... .- .
":-

q'. i .


Directions: CR 100, turn right onto 245, right on Plant, continue
straight on Plant, follow directions to house on right.
Hosted by: Hansel & Nell Holton 984-5046


AREA MORTGAGE RATES
Institution Phone 30 fixed 15 fixed 1 ARM FHA/
Institution Phone rate / pts rate/ pts rate/ pts VA
Absolute Mortgage Co. (888) 90-HOMES 5.38 /0.00 5.00 / 0.00 3.38 / 0.00 No Quote
Accountable Mortgage (800) 840-8771 5.63/0.00 5.13/0.00 3.75/0.00 6.75/0.00
All Fund Mortgage (866) 535-8987 5.75 /0.00 5.38 /0.00 No Quote No Quote
American Federal Mortgage (888) 321-4687 5.00 / 2.25 5.00/0.63 3.25/0.00 5.50/0.00
American Home Finance (888) 429-1940 5.50 / 0.00 5.13/0.00 3.63/0.00 No Quote
America's Best Mortgage (800) 713-8189 5.25 /2.(X00 4.75/2.00 4.75/0.00 5.88/0.00
Amicus Mortgage Group (877) 385-4238 5.88 / 0.00 5.50 / 0.00 No Quote 5.88/0.00
Amtrust Funding (800) 774-0779 5.38 / 0.00) 5.00 /0.00 3.00 / 0.00 5.63 /0.00
Borrowers Advantage Mtg. (888) 510-4151 5.75 / 0.00 5.38 / 0.00 No Quote 5.75 / 0.00
Century Home Funding (800) 224-7006 5.13 / 3.00 4.63 / 3.00 3.38 / 2.00 5.38 / 3.00
Fast and Easy Mortgage Co. (813) 404-7304 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote
First Rate Mortgage (800) 887-9106 5.63 /10.(X) 5.13/0.00 No Quote No Quote
Florida Mortgage Corp. (888) 825-6300 5.50 / 0.00 5.25 /0.00 4.13 / 0.00 5.38 /0.00
Golden Rule Mortgage (800) 991-9922 5.13/ 1.63 4.63/ 1.63 2.50/ 1.00 5.25 / 1.00
Guardian Mortgage (800) 967-3060 5.50/0.00 5.00/0.00 No Quote No Quote
H.D. Financial (888) 368-0655 6.00 / 0.(X00) 5.50 / 0.00 No Quote No Quote
Home Finance of America (8(X)) 358-LOAN 5.38 /0.00 5.00 / 0.00) 3.00 / 0.00 No Quote
Homestead Mortgage (888) 760-6006 No Quote No Quote 4.00) / 0.00 5.50 / 0.00
Lighthouse Mortgage (81X)) 784-1331 5.50 / 0.00 5.13/0.00 No Quote No Quote
Sovereign Mortgage (800)1996-7283 5.63/0.00 5.13/0.00 4.88/0.00 5.50/0.001
Stepping Stone Lending (800) 638-2659 5.50 /0.00 5.00 / 0.00 No Quote 5.88 / 0.00
Summit Mortgage (800)) 377-0623 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote
Rates provided by The National Financial News Services. Rates are valid as of April 210, 2005. Rates are
inclusive of all fees and are subject to change without notice. Call lender directly for APR's. Lenders wishing to
participate in this service, please call (610) 344-7380. For additional information on mortgages, go to:
www.onmnortgage.com or call the consumer Help Line (800) 264-3707 .


810 Home for Sale
HOMES FROM $199./mo.
4% down, 30 years @ 5.5%
1-3br. Foreclosures Listings
1-800-749-8124 F388
HOMESELLERS Find out what
the home down the street sold for!
FREE Computerized list of area
home sales and current listings.
www.homesalesfla.com
RE/MAX Professionals
not intended to solicit homes listed for sale
NEW HOUSE
3br/2ba on 1/2 ac. Quiet, Close to
town. New school District.
386-752-7277

820 Farms&
O vAcreage
FSBO. 10 ac. of Pasture Land,
Suwannee Co., near Charles
Springs. Located on County dirt
road, just 100 yds from paved road.
$7,500/acre, call 386-590-0636
SPORTSMAN PARADISE
YEARLY MEMBERSHIPS
Hunting, fishing, lodging and meals
all part of this offer conveniently lo-
cated in White Springs, Florida.
For Details call 386-397-1989 or
www.bienville.com
SUMTER CO., GA
82 Ac $1,725/AC
Great hunting tract! Planted
pines, lot of hardwoods with
creek adjoining farmland.
404-362-8244
St. Regis Paper Company, LLC
830o Commercial
830 Property
2+ ACRES COMMERCIAL Land
for Lease. 1 block from 1-75.
All utilities are available.
Call Kevin at 386-984-5943
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY.
1 acre with house. 277 of Baya Ave.
Frontage. For more information.
Call 386-752-4072

Q870 Real Estate
87U Wanted
WANTED: ACREAGE
High & Dry in the Lake City
and surrounding areas.
Call 786-290-9177, (954)907-0253

930 Motorcycles
1987 HARLEY 883 Sportster.
Custom paint. Very clean,
w/ 7400 miles. $6,250.
386-365-0723

940 Trucks
1976 Chevy step side pick up.
Rebuilt engine & transmission.
$2,800.00
386-754-0988
79 FORD 4x4. (4 speed)
Mud Truck. 460 cu. in. w/new
750 Edlebrock Carb. Runs Great!
$2,500.00. 386-754-0881


TOPPER FOR Truck with sliding .
doors 62'x87'. $300. 386-755-5295


Skylights abound in the
Avondale, an eye-catching update of
the Victorian stick house, named for
the slender decorative trusses at its
apex. The home is interesting from
the sides and back too. From every
viewing angle you can see triangu-
lar windows slanting up to echo the
shape of the gables they underlie.
Generously sized outdoor living
spaces are an important feature of
this plan. On both levels, partially
covered decks span the entire front
facade. Access to the lower deck is
through the dining room and living
room. The upper deck is essentially
private, since the master suite fills
the entire upper floor.
Rich in skylights and windows,
this home needs little artificial light-
ing during daylight hours. The
vaulted living room has more win-
dows than walls. Two levels of win-
dows flank the stone veneer fire-
place, and tall windows face the
front.
A long eating bar is all that sep-
arates the kitchen and dining room.
The roomy kitchen has a double-
door pantry, and the dining room
has a service bar with built-in cabi-
netry above and below.
Utilities are nearby, hidden
behind folding doors next to the first
floor bathroom. Two bedrooms are
right across the hall.
Designed to serve as an adult
retreat, the Avondale's luxurious
vaulted master suite is as bright and
spacious as the living room. In addi-
tion to its private deck, it has eight
skylights, windows on three sides,
and space for a freestanding wood
stove.
The walk-in closet is huge, and
the vaulted master bathroom boasts
a spa tub as well as a separately
enclosed shower and water closet.
For a review plan, including
scaled floor plans, elevations, sec-
tion and artist's conception, send
$25 to Associated Designs, 1100
Jacobs Dr., Dept. W, Eugene, OR
97402. Please specify the Avondale
10-347 and include a return address
when ordering. A catalog featuring
more than 400 home plans is avail-
able for $15. For more information
call (800) 634-0123, or visit our
website at www.associated-
designs.com.


950 Cars for Sale
*Hondas from $500*
Police Impounds!
For listings call
1-800-749-8116 ext A760
1994 HONDA ACCORD.
Only $499.00! Must Sell!
For listings.
Call 1-800-749-8116 A834
1998 BUICK Park Ave. Burgundy.
7400K. $8500. 386-755-5295
1999 OLDSMOBILE Aurora.
Good condition. $6,000 752-6879
84 MERCURY Grand Marquis.
$700 or best offer. 386-719-4979
CADILLAC SEDAN Deville
Driven daily. Lots of Highway
miles. Runs great. $1,300. obo.
386-754-3817

e951 Recreational
95i Vehicles
'01 25 ft. Trail Lite Travel Trailer.
A/C, stove, refrigerator, bathroom.
Very clean, sleeps 8. Ft. White area.
$9,400. (561)602-4022
1984 RV for sale 35 ft.
Excellent Condition.
Stabilizer Bars. $4,500
386-719-2136
1999 CHATEAU 31' Motor Home.
22K miles, Excellent Cond.
Lots of Storage. $28,000 OBO.
752-3083 or 961-4277
1999 COACHMAN Leprechaun 29
ft, only 18,919 miles. Ford Chassis.
Looks & runs like new. $35,000.
Must See!!!!!. 386-752-9783
1999 Coachman Lite Travel Trailer
20 foot. $6,000 386-758-9154
2003 COACHMAN FREEDOM 21
ft. 4,900 miles. Sleeps 6, loaded,
extended warranty. $34,995.
386-755-5989 or 386-623-7490


952 _Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
1993 FORD F150, 4x2, Flare side,
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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


Section E


Tr W A Place Called


Part 4 of our 4 part, month-long series detailing the area
and the people involved.


in which we live


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Close-knit community keeps

identity as area blossoms

into bustling center of

commerce and industry.


By JUSTIN LANG


meaning of community. The description is determined by their heart,
mind or a combination of both. For people living in Lake City or any-
where in Columbia County it may mean knowing their neighbors,
being ready to help out one another or sharing an appreciation for the
natural beauty of the area, being content that it is like no place else.
It may also be a feeling of belonging and pride in continued progress while
maintaining the local traditions of the area.
To others, community might mean lingering a little longer than necessary out-
side their favorite restaurant after a meal to talk with an old friend toothpick
in hand about nothing in particular.
But for some local people who have been around the area for a period of time
and active in community service, they have formed their own perspective on
what it means to be a part of the place they call home.
Faye Bowling-Warren is a coal miner's daughter from West Virginia and not a
native of the Lake City area. But after moving here more than 45 years ago with
her first husband for his job at the Lake City Veterans Affairs Medical Center, she

COMMUNITY
Continued on Page 2E


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


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Coln munity


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COMMUNITY
Continued From Page 1E

said "this is my home."
Soon after moving to town
in 1960, Bowling-Warren start-
ed work as a receptionist with
the city. By the time she
retired in 2002 after fur-
thering her education at Lake
City Community College and
Florida State University she
was assistant city manager,
overseeing many aspects of
the city's operations, including
the Lake City Municipal
Airport.
Living here and working
closely with the community for
most of her adult life, she said
"to me, community is your
home. It's where you work,
where your kids go to school,
where you have a marriage
and where you have a home
that you can be proud of and
take care of. It's your church.
It's your friends. It's your iden-
tity.",
An active member of several
local community boards,
Bowling-Warren said "I'm
very proud of Lake City, per-
sonally, and I want to do what I
can to make it a better place
and I approach life in that man-
ner."
To her, she said, making a
personal contribution to its
betterment helps someone to
feel more like an integral part
of the community.
As Columbia County has
swelled with people over the
past 10 years, Bowling-Warren
said the community is still full
of "the same everyday people
that I still enjoy associating
with."
"And there are a lot of new
people that are good people
that I am finding and meeting
every day," she added. "Many
of them love Lake City and
they've made Lake City their
home."
State of mind
Dr. Charles "Chuck" Hall
moved to Lake City in 1997 for
his job as president of Lake
City Community College. To
him, community is "a.state of
mind."
"I think community is a feel-
ing of people who coexist,
have the same goals, direc-
tions and a real sense of mutu-
al support," he said.
Hall said since moving to
the area several years ago, he
has noticed that local support
for the community has only
grown.
In efforts to improve local
economic development, edu-
cation and people's involve-
ment with government, he
said officials and interested cit-
izens have worked hard to
make sure any additions to the
community are truly upgrades
that benefit the local people.
Hall said local officials are


COURTESY PHOTO
A trolley runs down dirt streets of downtown Lake City during the early 1900s. The trolley
helped connect the community when horse and buggies were the most common form of
transportation.


being selective and making
sure that new industry is clean
with high salaries and good
benefits, rather than just a
business that will only
increase the local tax base and
be a good utility customer, but
not necessarily irfmprove the
quality of life.
But as the area grows rapid-
ly, Hall said, "I'm concerned
with when you have growth
and development how there
will be people who feel dis-
placed or not included and
have different goals."
He said there are likely
many people who don't want
Lake City and Columbia
County to change, who would
rather not .have new growth
and development or more traf-
fic.
But by increasing the
amount of local industries and
quality businesses, Hall said it
provides more jobs to help
improve the economic status
of the area's citizens and aids
the local government in
improving services.
"I do not want to say it's a
necessary evil, but you have to
take a lump or two to get
where you want to go," he
said.
Still, Hall said there are peo-
ple who don't feel like they are
a part of what is happening in
the community, who "no mat-
ter what you do, feel disenfran-
chised."
To help counteract that, he
suggested the city and county
utilize town hall meetings for
people to study a topic and
come together as a group to
discuss it.
"And everyone has an input
in the Town Hall process,
everyone has a chance to com-
ment and talk about what they
like and they don't like," he
said.
Hall 'said with many senior
citizens living in Columbia
County, they are a resource
that largely goes untapped. As
a way for those people to share
their valuable experiences and


wealth of knowledge, he said
they could work more with
local youth to help act as men-
tors and role models.
But mostly, he said, at
LCCC, "we tell everyone that
Lake City is a wonderful spot
you can come and relax and
you can work hard and it is a
great place to raise your chil-
dren."
"We just think it's a wonder-
ful family place to be and with
a county that has its eyes on
controlled, focused growth,"
he said.
Once a person gets here,
however, he said how much
they feel like part of the com-
munity may be up to them.
"I think people come in and
make it as much or as,little as
they want it to be," Hall said,
noting the community's vari-
ous civic organizations and
opportunities to volunteer.
Being responsible for law
enforcement and protection of
residents county-wide,
Columbia County Sheriff Bill
Gootee, who moved to the
area about 20 years ago, can
offer a unique perspective on
community.
"Community, basically, I feel
is the heart and soul of a town
that goes with the infrastruc-
ture," Gootee said.
"Community is made up of dif-
ferent nationalities, different
ethnic groups who all have dif-
ferent needs and cares and
make up the whole of the
county."
When he thinks of commu-
nity, he said he doesn't just
think of Lake City proper, but


of the county's 60,000-plus
people, "who I am responsible
for their safety and their pro-
tection."
While encountering many
unlawful people in his 30 year
career in law enforcement,
Gootee said he tries to look for
the good in everyone and
believes that "as a whole, the
county is made up of good peo-
ple that honestly care about
their community and environ-
ment."
And when a crime or acci-
dent results in someone's
death, especially that of a
child, Gootee said this com-
munity rallies behind one
another. Whether they knew
the person or not, everyone
supports each other and the
family members who lost their
loved one.
"When someone is hurt or
grieves, the whole community
grieves," he said.
But in order to improve the
sense of community in the
county and help with the sher-
iff's office's goals to prevent
more crime, Gootee said he
would like to see more people
establish community crime
watches.
He said unlike many years
ago when people watched out
for one another, that people
have an increasing tendency
to withdraw into their homes
and not watch out for or inter-
act with their neighbors.
Within different 'neighbor-
hoods and subdivisions,


INDEX





Reflections of our community .........................2E

History of Columbia High School....................3E

Court administrator, LCCC student..................4E

Attractions in Columbia................................... 5E

Attractions continued ..................................... 6E

C ity finances................................................. 7E

C ity planning.................................................. 8E

Columbia County budget overview..................9E

County employment, library services..............10E

Tourism in Columbia..................................... 11E

CHS football history...................................... 12E

Employee recalls years of service ................ 13E

Passing time, real estate success..................14E

Fort White High School history......................15E

First black church in county.......................... 16E

The Blanche Hotel, history of churches .........17E

O lustee Festival............................................ 18E

Richardson High School...............................19E

Fort W hite sports.......................................... 21 E

Superintendent Sam Markham ....................22E

Elections employee recalls service.................23E

Falling Creek: A jewel of Columbia..................24E





On the Front

Staff writer Justin Lang profiles a

caring community with strong

morals, natural beauty and an eye
r"


lor progress.
COMMUNITY
Continued on Page 3E


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\Fl .c~ I-- -111 J j t4j


Community


Columbia High, one of Florida's first schools, still striving


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia County is one of
the state's oldest counties
and the home of one of the
first schools in the state.
A free school for white
children was established in
Lake City in the 1850s when
the area was still called
Alligator.
In the decade beginning
the year 1870, the public
schools of the state received
donations from the Peabody
Fund for their support. In
1878 the Lake City Public
School for white youth adopt-
ed the name Peabody and
was known as the Peabody
Graded and High School.
At that time the school was
located on West St. Johns
Street and in 1893 a school
site on West Duval Street was
purchased by the county
school board and the school
was removed.
In 1903 the name of the
school was changed from
Peabody to Columbia Graded
and High.
As time passed and the
county population continued
to grow, the Columbia High
School moved to other loca-
tions to accommodate the
growth, including a location


COMMUNITY
Continued From Page 2E

Gootee said he would like to
see people get to know their
trustworthy neighbors, let
each other know when they
aren't going to be home and
watch out for each other's
homes.
"Those times seem to have
slipped away from us and I
would like to see those times
come back again and see us
lending a helping hand to each
other," he said.
In what he called a "faith-


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High School graduating class of 1941 poses on the steps of the former Columbia High School. The School Board Administration Building is now
housed inside the former Columbia High School off U.S. 90.


on Pennsylvania Avenue to
its current location on SE
Fighting Tiger Drive.
Melinda Moses, a 1970
Columbia High School gradu-
ate and present guidance
counselor and co-athletic


based" community, Gootee
said with more people moving
in to the area, people need to
make an effort to get to know
one another in general. They
should also still be able to talk
to their sheriff in person, he
added.
For his office, he said his
goal is for a staff full of role
models for the community and
to have "many good-caliber
officers, which we do already,
and have young people in
schools look up to our offi-
cers."
"I think the sheriff's office
has to be part of the communi-


director at the school, moved
to Lake City in 1968 as a jun-
ior in high school from
Virginia Beach, Va.
Moses remembers that
even in the 1970s, Columbia
High School served as a


ty and not separated from it,"
he said. "We are a link to the
community. We are not there
just to arrest people, we are
there to be more proactive in
the community and in helping
to deter crime."
While some residents may
be concerned with the increas-
ing population and develop-
ment in the county and how
law enforcement will be affect-
ed, Gootee said he believes
"we are going to be fine."
'"The people coming in are
good people and I think the
good outweighs the bad here
in Columbia County, I really


source of community pride.
"Everything was connect-
ed to Columbia High partic-
ularly football," she said.
"Football just brings the com-
munity together and that's
what we'd like to get back at


do," he said.
James Montgomery is a life-
long county resident who
taught in local schools for 44
years and served 28 on the
County Commission and has
family ties that go back before
the turn of the 20th century.
Growing up in the 1930s,
1940s, and early 1950s,
Montgomery said he believes
he grew up in the "golden age
of Lake City."
"When everything was
downtown and you could walk
everywhere you wanted and
everyone wanted to and every-
body knew each other."


Columbia High that feeling
of community through
sports."
Michael Flanagan, former
school district superintend-
ent who was a math teacher
at Columbia High School for


"When you hit the 60s, it
began to change," he said.
But instead of lamenting the
drastic changes Lake City has
undergone in the 40-plus since,
Montgomery said he has real-
ized "there's nothing bad about
growth," and there's no stop-
ping change.
"It's like the old saying, it's
like spitting on a railroad track
to stop a freight train," he said.
Montgomery said now when
he sees new people around
town, he finds himself wanting
to know who they are and a lit-
tle bit about their life, because
to him community "means the


18 years, said Columbia High
School played a significant
role in county history -
especially during the time

CHS
Continued on Page 24E


fact that you know one another
and that you have a connection
with one another."
Bowling-Warren called that
the "hometown atmosphere"
that everyone either stays here
for or comes to find.
"It's just the feeling of 'gosh,
it's nice to be here' and having
the friendliness that everybody
seems to show," she said. "And
it's OK to smile and talk to peo-
ple because even though you
may not know them, it's all
right. It just makes everybody
feel like they are one family
and I think that's very impor-
tant."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005
|


A Fl ~ GiIIcJ ~ ~ 4:;~-~,-~
I


Community


I- -~ -


Court administrator reflects on 32 years of service


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com

One of the first things that
is noticed in Goldie Hudson's
office in the Columbia
County Courthouse is her
collection of pictures of her
family.
"They are my greatest
rewards," she says beaming
at the photos of her three
children and two grandchil-
dren shared with her hus-
band, Wayne.
Hudson, senior deputy
court administrator, has
lived in Lake City all of her
life.
She has worked 32 years
in the judicial system.
Hudson assists the court
administrator in keeping a
judges' calendar, maintaining
a master calendar for the cir-
cuit which includes seven
counties, and scheduling
court reporters and media-
tion sessions.
"Mediation is a pre-trial
intervention where the con-
flicting parties come togeth-


er with an impartial third
party serving as facilitator,"
she explains.
"It provides an opportunity
to give input in the decision-
making of the case and to
potentially settle the con-
flict."
Many cases can be solved
at this point, saving time for
judges.
Hudson says the hardest
thing about her job is having
enough hours in the day to
get everything done.
She is also involved in a
senior judge program where
retired judges come in to
assist judges when they are
overloaded.
"In the early 1970s when I
started, everything was done
manually," Hudson said.
"Now everything is on the
computer."
One example is jury selec-
tion.
Before, a list was obtained
from the supervisor of elec-
tions that had names and
addresses printed on perfo-
rated paper.


ASHLEY CISNEROS/ Lake City Reporter
Goldie Hudson, senior deputy court administrator, works in her office in the Columbia County
Courthouse. The Lake City native has witnessed numerous changes in the legal system due
to technology.


These were detached and
dropped in a big, black box.


"Names were then picked
at random," she said. "Now a


computer does it."
With more technology,


Hudson says there is more
correspondence, but says
that the technology makes it
manageable.
Staff attorneys also assist
the judges with this.
Other changes are attrib-
utable to growth.
"When I came here there
was one courtroom that
seemed adequate, many
offices were located all in
one building but now that is
not possible," Hudson said.
In her free time, she
spends time with her large
family including her chil-
dren, daughter-in-laws, son-
in-law, and grandchildren.
"When we get together at
Christmas and Easter, we
have about 95 people," she
said.
"I have seven brothers and
sisters, with all but one living
in Columbia County."Hudson
calls her family her support
system.
"I love Lake City and think
it is a great place to be," she
said.


LCCC student active in making Lake City a better place to live


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com

Jeffrey Dove checks his
watch as he walks briskly to
his next appointment.
With school, pastoral
duties, and community com-
mitments, Dove is an expert
in time management and
dreams of one day running
for U.S. Senate.
The Lake City Community
College student was born in
Jacksonville and served in
the Army.
At LCCC, Dove served as
president of the
Multicultural Student Union,
served on the Black History
Month Committee and wrote
the college's diversity state-
m ent. ... ....
In addition, Dove is serv-
ing his second year as pastor
of Mount Zion A.M.E.
Church in Live Oak.
His congregation started
with 10 and has grown to 25
members.
"We are a small church
with big hearts," he says.
The membership started
an outreach program to men
in jail.
"We seek to help these
men while they are there so
that hopefully when they get
out, they will turn their lives
around and maybe join our
church," Dove said.
He also developed and
coordinated a teen summit
five years ago at his home
church, Mount Pisgah
A.M.E. Church.
The last one was held April
2.
Dove calls it a "successful
event that stresses the need
for teens to make wise deci-
sions in life."
This year, 125 teens and 75
adults attended the event.
The program included
workshops to raise the teen's
awareness of HIV and AIDS,
drugs, and the importance of
dressing for success.
This year another work-
shop was added to the pro-
gram educating teenagers on
the potential dangers of dat-
ing someone too old.
Even with all these creden-
tials, Dove seeks to continue
to fly.
"I would like to attend a
four-year institution, to obtain
my bachelor's degree in ele-
mentary education," he says.
"I would like to teach third or
fourth grade because at this
age, children really need pos-
itive male role models in
their lives."
Dove also has political
aspirations to serve on the
city council or serve as a
county commissioner.
"My ultimate goal is to run
for the Senate," he said.
There are still a lot of
issues that need to be
addressed in the Lake City
community, Dove says.
"I believe race relations is
at the forefront," he said,
"Lake City is a fabulous place
to live and has grown due to


residents of the county -
the children.
"I don't think the financial
support to children is equally
allocated in all communities
in the county," Dove said. "In
addition, there is a lack of
recreational opportunities in
this area."
He is especially concerned
with the students at Niblack
Elementary.
"This school doesn't
receive the funding and sup-


port it needs to move from an
F school to an A school,"
Dove said. "Everyone should
be concerned about this, not
just the African-American
community."
He advises other young
leaders to stay grounded in
their local church and obtain
every degree of education
possible.
"My biggest accomplish-
ment has been finding God
and my Lord and Savior


Jesus Christ at age 28," Dove
said'
Balancing obligations of
school, pastoral duties and
community services, Dove
says he has little time for fun.
He lives his life by a quote
that often motivates him to
keep going.
"If you are not part of the
solution, you are part of the
problem," he says.


"HOW MUCH



LIFE INSURANCE



DO YOU REALLY



NEED?"


ASHLEY CISNEROS/ Lake City Reporter
Jeffrey Dove balances numerous leadership positions at
Lake City Community College and within the community. Dove
dreams of one day running for U.S. Senate. He's serving his
second year as pastor of Mount Zion A.M.E. Church in Live
Oak.


the location near the two
major Interstates, however
more needs to be done."


Dove says that to advance,
the adults of the county must
be dedicated to the smallest


T mrnmy l. Fi,, j,) F 1rell. l eli ,ilr i ar Clr riL J.:.,r,:r.n
Mike Cason, Bill Marshall, Kirbi Fera, Jeff Faunce, Jimmy Sanchez
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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


A Place Calledcole


Community ]


Attractions have unique place in Columbia history


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
Long before the phrase "If
you build it, they will come"
was first uttered, residents in
Columbia County had already
established a knack for
attracting tourists.
Attractions, from family-ori-
ented theme parks to unusual
events and places that stir the
curious nature of people, have
always held a place in
Columbia County history.
There have been several
attractions that have come
and gone over the past 17
decades since the county was
first born. These continue to
tug at the memories of people
who've visited the areas, and
still manage to attract people
who make the Lake City-
Columbia County area their
home.
Aunt Aggie's Bone Yard
One of Columbia County's
earliest attractions was Aunt
Aggie's Bone Yard, which
existed in Lake City in 1883.
Columbia County served as
a major point of entry into the
state and lots of tourists on
their way to South Florida,
paused in Lake City and other
surrounding areas to visit
local attractions. According to
information found in "A
History of Columbia County,
Florida," White Springs and
Olustee were favorite sites,
while Aunt Aggie's Bone Yard
emerged as one of the most
unusual attractions in the
area.
Aunt Aggie and her hus-
band, Jenkins "Uncle Jenks"
Jones, established a home in a
northern section of Lake City.
The garden that Aunt Aggie
maintained and which attract-
ed visitors from Lake City and
distant areas alike was unique
in its collection of animal
bones which were wired and
fastened together to form
elaborate gateways, arches


COURTESY PHOTO
Harvey Campbell, formerly of the Lake City Reporter, pets a lioness at former attraction Alligator Town. Lake City and
Columbia County has had a number of unique attractions through the years.


and trellises for climbing
plants and vines.
"Aunt Aggie Jones and her
house and garden offered
attractions to visitors
unmatched by the more con-
ventional tourist sites," the
author wrote. "Flower beds,
garden paths and walk-ways
of white sand were edged with
bone formations."
The attraction was a popu-
lar site for young couples and
many families who visited the
garden on Sunday afternoons.
"Aunt Aggie charged no
admission, but she usually
had flowers and vegetables
for sale and visitors frequently
left freewill offerings," the


author wrote.
While the date of her birth
is uncertain, the author wrote
that Aunt Aggie was well in
her nineties when she died in
1918.
Alligator Town
One of Columbia County's
more popular modern tourist
attractions in the 1980s was
Alligator Town, a small zoo
which featured alligators,
otters, snakes, baboons, and
even monkeys and lions.
The park was run by Ross
Allen, who was a friend of
Johnny Weissmuller (the
actor who played Tarzan) and


was known internationally for
his work with snakes and alli-
gators.
Helen Campbell, worked in
Alligator Town in its snack
bar for a few months and said
the attraction was pretty-good
sized and very nice.
"People came from every-
where. It was fun to work
there," she said. "It was fun
because of the people I
worked with and in interact-
ing with the people that came
there to see the alligators."
Though Mrs. Campbell has
fond memories of working at
Alligator Town because of the
people she worked with, she
did recall an interesting twist


with one of the animals.
"One day one of the
baboons got loose and got in
the snack bar with me, and
me and that little fellow went
round and round," she said.
"He was screaming at me and
I was screaming at him."
Harvey Campbell, Helen's
husband and Columbia
County Tourist Development
Council Director, said
Alligator Town was an attempt
at professional entertainment
in a local attraction.
"Lake City had always want-
ed to be more than just a con-
venient stop-over en route to
Orlando and Disney World,"
he said. "Alligator Town was


WANT MORE?
Tourism industry thrives in
Columbia County.
PAGE 11E

Lake City's first serious ven-
ture at having an attraction.
While it was never a smashing
success, it did draw pretty
good crowds."
Campbell said the attrac-
tion featured alligator shows,
snake handling and other
crowd-pleasing entertain-
ment.
'This was a step up beyond
the road-side stand attrac-
tion," he said. "Ross Allen
brought a prestige and raised
the caliber of expectations to a
professional, serious level."
Campbell said the attrac-
tion only remained open for a
few years and he believed its
demise was a result of Allen's
death.
TNT Miniature Golf and
Games
While the county had its
share of attractions to draw
tourists in, through the years
there was also some attrac-
tions that were designed to
get the attention of local resi-
dents.
In the late 1980s and early
1990s, TNT Miniature Golf
and Games was one of the
county's most popular spots,
Wayne Hudson said TNT
Miniature Golf and Games
was his sons' enterprise and
they operated it for close to
seven or eight years. TNT
Miniature Golf and Games
has been closed for at least 10
years.
'They were teenagers and I
did it for them," Hudson said.
"It was a pretty popular thing
in the 1990s."
Hudson's oldest son,
Tommy, who is'now 31 years
old and a full-time minister,
ran the operation when he
ATTRACTIONS
Continued on Page 6E


oon fl Schoo0/


Sports:
Football

Baseball

Softball

Basketball

Soccer

Volley Ball

Tennis
Golf
Power Lifting

Wrestling

Track
:High Jamp

Swimming


m*^3


The


Vision


I Elementary Schools:

Five Points

East Side
4 Melrose
S1|1 Coldumbia Cit9

West Side

Ft. White
Summers

Niblack
Middle Schools:

Richardson
Lake City
High Schools:

Columbia High
SFt. White High

Challenge Learning Center


Touching Tomorrow Through Teamwork Today







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


I'
I


Community


ATTRACTIONS
Continued From Page 5E

was about 16 years old.
Tommy ran the operation with
his younger brother, Tim, and
their sister, Terran, as child
proprietors.
"When they were operating
it, he (Tommy) was probably
16 or 17 years old," Hudson
said. "It was opened for five-
eight years."
TNT Miniature Golf and
Games was an 18-hole minia-
ture golf course, along with a
basketball court game that
had various obstacles for its
participants. There was also a
paddle boat operation in the
pond on the property.
"Inside there was a game
room where they had a lot of
birthday parties," Hudson
said.
Hudson said he decided to
open the operation because
there seemed to be a need in
the Columbia County area.
"We saw a need for the
youth, children and young
people in the area to have
something to do," he said.
"Something for clean fun local-
ly and it made a great party
place locally for birthday par-


ties."
Hudson said the operation
closed when the kids grew up
and went off to college and
started working full-time.
"It was never a deal they
took money out of," he said. "I
don't ever remember them
taking a dollar out of it and we
didn't everything that came
in, we put back into the busi-
ness in the form of advertising
and operations."
Though TNT Miniature
Golf and Games didn't turn out
out to be a money-making ven-
ture, Hudson said it served a
large, more important goal for
the community, by noting how
popular it was.
"It was pretty popular and
successful as far as meeting
the need it was intended to do
- be the hangout for young
people and birthday parties,"
Hudson said, noting it wasn't
uncommon for several hun-
dred people to be at the site.
"At the best times, particularly
on Saturday, we had about
seven or eight birthday parties
with a couple hundred peo-
ple."

The Magnolia Bar-B-Cue
While some local attractions
were developed as places for


attracting tourists, others
became attractions because
they drew local residents in
huge numbers. For more than
20 years, one of Columbia
County's most popular places
was the Magnolia Barbecue
Restaurant, which was located
on U.S. 90.
Grady Markham bought
The Magnolia on May 6, 1943,
his birthday, when it was 3
years old and it was opened for
35 years as a family barbecue
restaurant. His son, Grady
"Sam" Markham took over the
business years later after his
father became ill in 1968.
"It was the most popular
from the 1950s to the 1970s,"
Markham said. "I taught
school, served on the school
board and ran The Magnolia
from 1968 until we sold it in
1979. I did all the barbecuing,
kept the books and made the
sauce."
Markham said The
Magnolia was popular because
of its curb service and it gave
local teens a cruising point and
hangout spot as they headed
to and from other parts of
town.
'The Magnolia was popular
because it was one of the few
businesses that had curb serv-
ice where people could drive


...-04

t Iv


COURTESY PHOTO
The Magnolia Barbecue was a popular gathering place for teenagers from the 1950s through
the 70's and featured curb-side service.


COURTESY PH
In the 1880s 'Aunt' Aggie Jones maintained a unique collection of animal bone garden
structures that attracted visitors on Sunday afternoons.


up and park in the front and it
was place for the young people
to socialize," Markham said.
"It was just a gathering place
for just about all the teenagers
in the county."
Markham said the Kit Kat
was established across the
street and also provided curb
service, as it started to grow
in popularity.
He estimated that several
hundred people would visit
The Magnolia Bar-B-Cue on
the weekend.
"You could put about 25
cars on the lot and Friday and
Saturday nights the parking
lot stayed full from 6:30 p.m.
to 11 p.m. when we closed,"
he said.
Though The Magnolia
Barbecue restaurant served
breakfast, dinner and supper,
Markham said the biggest
seller was barbecue pork and
beef sandwiches.
"Hamburgers were very
popular and we sold chicken
and shrimp boxes," he said. "I
used to buy 5,000 pounds of
shrimp at one time and break-


fast was $1.25. Our gross
sales increased every year for
35 years. We never had 4 year
that we didn't show an
increase in business."
Markham said he is fond of
the memories and times he
experienced at The Magnolia
Bar-B-Cue Restaurant and
believes it provided similar
joyous moments to other
Columbia County residents.
"I was a young, 6 years old
when my dad bought The
Magnolia Bar-B-Cue
Restaurant and 41 years old
when we sold it, so for me
and the old-timers, it was the
hub for young teenagers to
socialize," he said. "I've been
told by many people, in its
time, it probably served some
of the best barbecue in
Columbia County. At night, it
just became a hub for the
young people to come and
socialize just a place for
the young people to come eat
French fries and drink Coke.
Most of the people in
Columbia County know
where the Magnolia were.


After a football game on
Friday night, there was so
many people out there, you
couldn't stir them with a
stick."


Dogs

Suds

Dogs
" N "
Suds, a
loca l
restau-


DnG t


rant owned by Alex and Pat
Stevens in the 1960s was a
business that became a local
attraction for the masses.
Don Stevens, Alex's and
Pat's son, worked at the
restaurant with his brother
when the Dogs "N" Suds
restaurant was at the peak of
its popularity.
"My brother and me, we
just worked there," Stevens

ATTRACTIONS
Continued on Page 7E


| Serving North Central Florida

SSince 1961



In 1961, Lester and Anne Scaff purchased a small market
on the north side of Lake City. As the years passed, they
purchased a few more stores, and with the introduction
of self-serve gas pumps, their business grew into
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Today, S&S consists of 47 stores located
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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


I A Ph":cIII~


Commiunity-


ATTRACTIONS
Continued From Page 6E

said.
The Dogs "N" Suds
Restaurant was opened in the
early 1960s and served as a
popular teen and family
attraction along with another
local restaurant, The
Magnolia.
"You had two places to go
in Lake City, because there
wasn't many restaurants,"
said Stevens, who worked at
Dogs "N" Suds until he grad-
uated high school in 1967. He
worked there along with his
brother A.H., who graduated
high school in 1965, and Ray
Sweat, who also graduated in
1965.
"Everybody would take the
route back and forth from
Dogs "N" Suds to the


COURTESY PHOTO
The Hudson family, owner of TNT Miniature Golf and Game, poses inside their former busi-


ness State Road 47.
Magnolia. It was good clean
fun."
The Dogs "N" Suds was


opened from 1962-1967.
"I just worked there off and
on," Stevens said. "We waited


on cars It was the 'car-hop'
kind of thing, just like the
Magnolia was. Friday and


Saturday night it was just
completely packed. The busi-
ness was a kind of a waiting
line. The whole parking lot
was just filled and the parking
lot east of there was full, too. It
was just the gathering place."
Some of the food items in
the restaurant included Coney
dogs (chili dog), Texas burger,
and the frosty Root Beer
served in a mug.
"I think it was popular
because there was not a whole
lot of competition," Stevens
said.
'"There wasn't a lot of restau-
rants. It was a teen restaurant
and family restaurant and had
good, clean fun and atmos-
phere."
Through the restaurant's
popularity, another tradition
developed much to the dis-
may of the restaurant owners.
Stevens said many nights


after the restaurant closed
and his parents did inventory,
they would notice that cus-
tomers had taken some of the
mugs.
"We had the frosty mug
and everybody liked to take a
mug as a souvenir and daddy
and mom didn't want them to
do that," he laughed.
The Dogs "N" Suds was
leased to another business
owner in the early 1970s and
when Stevens returned from
college in 1971, he said it was-
n't actually the 'Dogs "N"
Suds' anymore.
Though the restaurant has
been gone from town for
more than 30 years, Stevens
said he still has fond memo-
ries of the. Dogs "N" Suds.
"I remember the first juke
boxes out front and the first
Beetles song I heard," he
said. "Dog "N" Suds was kind


City says finances in good order with room for the unexpected


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter.com

As far as the city's money
goes, officials say it's ready to
weather both expected and
the inevitable unplanned
expenses.
Though the city is current-
ly undertaking costly proj-
ects, such as a new $13 mil-
lion water treatment plant,
City Manager Joe Cone said
"overall the city is in very
good financial condition, peri-
od."
Having been city manager
since 1996, Cone said he and
the City Council have tried to
run the city like a business in
the past several years, which
includes making investments
that return the capital within
three to five years and main-
taining strict accounting pro-
cedures.
Wherever possible, he said
the city also tries to seek out
federal and state grants and


low-interest loan funds to help
with more expensive endeav-
ors such as building new facil-
ities and adding infrastruc-
ture.
But Vice Mayor, and
Councilman of eight years,
George Ward said "I think
first and foremost I think we
do a really good job in the
budgeting process, we try to
outline all of the expenses we
are going to incur in the com-
ing year."
Ward said certain unexpect-
ed expenses usually arise in
any given fiscal year, but
added that the city attempts to
keep those at a minimum.
"We do try to run it like a
business from that standpoint,
in that we are pretty well pre-
pared through the course of
the year," he said. "One thing
we definitely do that for is
travel and education expens-
es. We scrutinize that pretty
hard and most of it is already
budgeted for the upcoming


year, so very little comes up
during the year."
The city's primary finances
are made up of five different
funds from various revenue
sources and include the gen-
eral, water and sewer, fire spe-
cial assessment, airport and
natural gas funds.
While the general fund, the
city's main source for operat-
ing costs, is comprised of mul-
tiple revenue sources, the
other four funds are mostly
self-sufficient and are sus-
tained by their own revenues
generated by services or
assessments. In the case of
the fire fund, however, which
pays for the fire department's
operating costs, the general
fund does provide some help.
Cone said the city also
makes sure its finances are
prepared for any unplanned
costs with most of its operat-
ing funds having built-in
reserves for contingency.
While some of the fund


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City of Lake City budget for

2004-05
fiscal year (Oct. 1-Sept. 30)

General Fund
Operating budget: $13,249,764
Contingency: $250,000
Water and Sewer Fund
Operating budget: $6,299,640
Contingency: $104,050
Natural Gas Fund
Operating budget: $3,902,656
Contingency: $50,000
Fire Special Assessment Fund
Operating budget: $2,668,596
Contingency: none
Airport Fund
Operating budget: $627,199
Contingency: $10,000


such as that for water and
sewer generate a constant
stream of revenue, he said
others like the general fund


have to have an adequate
amount of money set aside to
sustain operating costs for up
to several months if the city


Ne use I Diese









02 40~' Ul imt danag


were to be hit with "unexpect-
ed disasters."
In total, he said there is cur-
rently about $414,000 in con-
tingency among all of its
funds for the current fiscal
year. However, in the carry-
forward reserves that don't
show up on the city's annual
budget, there is about $6.1
million in the general fund
and about $3.98 million in the
water and sewer fund.
Cone noted that much of
-the reserve monies also have
specific limitations on their
use.
For the tax-paying citizens
of Lake City, Cone said he
believes the city acts as good
stewards of their money, but
added that most of the city's
revenue is not from ad val-
orem property tax assess-
ments.
Out of the city's general
fund budget of $13.2 million
FINANCES
Continued on Page 8E


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005

C] .Coimmunitv
.'- ,, -*1. .


City planning for its future with increased demand on utilities


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang~@'laecrtvrepor ter.comn
As more people move to
Columbia County, a higher
demand is being put on public
utilities.
But officials say it isn't new
city residents putting the
most additional strain on its
systems.
The amount of people living
within city limits has actually
changed very little over the
past several years, fluctuating
between about 10,000 to
10,500. Many of the new peo-
ple who move to the area wind
up living just outside of Lake
City where they are still
served by city water, sewer
and possibly natural gas utili-'
ties. In addition, there has
also been increased demand
from various new industries
and other commercial opera-
tions.
As a result, the city has
found itself planning to meet
those new demands head on.
With work on a new high-
tech, high-capacity water
treatment plant already under
way, a detailed study by a gov-
ernment consulting firm is
also being done on options
the city has to meet future
demand for its
wastewater/sewer facilities.


FINANCES
Continued from Page 7E
for the 2004-05 fiscal year, Cone
said property tax assessments
on private property within the
city limits made up only $1.7
million of that amount.
He said the majority of the
city's revenues are from state
revenue sharing such as that
for taxes on communications
and sales tax, as well as fees for
its water, sewer and natural gas
utilities.
In recent years, the city has
also attempted to be creative
and move quickly in getting


"For the past several years,
it's been mostly new commer-
cial business, but of late there
seems to be more interest on
the residential side," City
Manager Joe Cone, said of the
increased strain on city utili-
ties.
And for commercial
demand on city utilities, Cone
said "they like to have the
water, but it is to the point
they have to have sewer serv-
ices."
But with recent information
coming to light about how
septic systems may negatively
affect the groundwater sys-
tems of the county, he said
more emphasis is being put
on the importance of also hav-
ing residential developments
served by both water and
sewer.
City Councilman John
Robertson has been the chair-
man of the city's Utility
Committee for the past seven
years. During that time, he
said much of his work with
that body of councilmen and
city employees has been dis-
cussing and planning for the
new water treatment plant,
which will be constructed east
of town near Lake City
Community College.
"I'd say the city has been
very proactive planning for


what it needs at the lowest cost
possible.
In 2004, knowing it was in
need of a new City Hall, with
increasingly cramped space
and questionable structural
integrity in the current one,
council jumped at an offer from
Mercantile Bank (formerly
CNB National) to sell off its
buildings at the corner of
Marion Avenue and Madison
Street as well as a former oper-
ations center off U.S. 90 East.
After moving quickly, the city
was able to get both buildings
as a package discount for about
$2:1 million. With the intention


- ~.4wi


* r


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
The Lake City wastewater plant off St. Margaret's Street serves Lake City residents.


I


VOW,
C=1
Includes 21pl inspection
95
1 w,5 qts or less w--svnIhC-liC olencl
Most cars & ligril. trucks
21
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Lake City


18 million by adding new
wells, Robertson said "we will
be in excellent shape for
potable water for many, many
years down the road."
The city has also been
working for several years on
the installation of a 20-inch
diameter "loop" water line
that runs around the perime-
ter of Lake City that is intend-
ed to compliment the new
water treatment plant and will
serve even more customers
outside of city limits. The proj-
ect, once complete, could cost
more than $4 million.
Cone said a similar project
for additional sewer capacity
and service is far more diffi-
cult and expensive, however.
Additionally, he said the busi-
ness of sewage utility is far
less profitable.
"For generating new rev-
enue with new customers,
water service is where you
actually make a little money
and sewer is difficult to even
make or break even," he said.
"So if you are going to gener-
ate revenue you are going to
focus on water service."
Still, the city is conducting
an in-depth study into what
needs to be done to meet
WATER
Continued on Page 9E


plant, its capacityis about 6
million gallons per day, with
the average draw from cus-
.tomers is about 3.2 million
gallons per day.
However, at times in recent
years, Stephen Roberts, city
water facilities manager said
the plant has peaked at 5.4
million per day, especially
from April-June.


"That's why we are doing
what we are doing, that's what
sets things in motion," he
said. "As soon as 80 percent is
hit that's were you begin the
plan and when you hit 90 per-
cent that's when you make it
happen. That's what we did."
With the new plant set to
take on 9 million gallons per
day and readily expandable to


utilities with a testament to
that being the new water
treatment plant," Robertson
said. "While not yet under
construction, it is a reality."
Robertson said the city
began considering a new
plant knowing that the capaci-
ty of its current plant would
soon be obsolete.
For the city's current water


on council and as a longtime
city resident, Lee said "I think
overall the city does an excel-
lent job of managing its
finances and its money."
Still, he said within the next
six months to a year, the city is
"going to have to make some
very important decisions."
With expensive projects
looming on the horizon, Lee
said the city will have to be
careful to prioritize its finances
and make sure it meets basic
needs first, such as services
like utilities, fire, police and
public works. He likened the
process to a household budg-


et, where extra items can only
be purchased after the costs of
essentials like food, shelter
and clothing are met.
"You look at, 'what do I have
leftT and think of what your
priority is to spend that money
on," Lee said.
He said his personally phi-
losophy of spending leans to
the conservative side and asks
himself for every financial
decision facing the city, what
he would do if it were his per-
sonal bank account.
"I think that is a good meas-
ure to use whenever you make
a decision."


of using the downtown building
as a new City Hall, it later sold
off the operations center build-
ing and the 14-property to the
county for about $1 million.]
Now the city will have a City
Hall in excellent condition, and
with ample space, for about $1.1
million, which is about $2 mil-
lion less than the estimated cost
to construct a new building.
Ward said the cost for the
three-story building that
requires only minimal renova-
tions wound up at about $41 a
square-foot, much lower than
the $107 per square-foot the city
paid for the recently completed


two-story Public Safety
Building, which came in at
about $3.2 million.
I think it was the best thing
the city could have done and
we are already under notice
that the building we are in is
substandard," he said.
Mike Lee, the newest coun-
cil member having been elect-
ed in 2004, said he is just
beginning to learn the ins and
out of the city's finances- and
helping to develop a budget
for the city's upcoming fiscal
year (2005-06) for the first
time.
But from his several months


*(^


David Himle
Sm ice Ad0kor


Pea 14 5eua P+o








Dennis Register
Ser% ice. Manager






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005
= 1i


. A L ... i '4I | -j;


CoIImillunity


County budget increases more tha


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn

Twenty years ago, the
Columbia County operations
budget was approximately
$20 million. In 2005, the
county's operations budget is
approximately $50 million -
a 150 percent increase from
1985.
'The increase in the budg-
et has much to do with prop-
erty values the growth of
the county brings added rev-
enues," said Dale Williams,
county manager.
Another contributing fac-
tor to the county's increasing
operations budget has been
increases in other forms of
taxation.
Columbia County govern-
ment levies a gas tax, one
cents sales tax and a bed tax,
which contributes to the
county's operation's budget.


Gas taxes There are 12
cents worth of gas tax. The
county formerly had a seven
cents gas tax and the funding
goes to the operations of the
county public works depart-
ment and general road
improvement fund. The
money from the last five
cents gas tax goes toward
building the Bascom Norris
Connector Road. (All of the
gas taxes have a sunset
date.)
Penny (one cent) sur-tax
(sales tax) A general rev-
enue tax and the funding can
be used for any legal, lawful
purpose. The tax was origi-
nally enacted to create a pro-
gram where the county could
do its courthouse renovation
work. (No sunset date.)
Bed tax A tax on
rooms that are rented for
less than certain period of
time. (No sunset date.)


Williams said levying the
three taxes has benefited the
county.
"Columbia County,
because of it's growth spurt,
has benefited from those
taxes," he said.
"Unfortunately, they haven't
equated to a reduction on
property taxes, which would
be the ultimate goal at some
point."
He said county officials
hope that someday the coun-
ty will be able to switch from
property tax to some other
form of taxes that would be
more fair and more equal.
Williams said most of the
spending that is generated
from the funds from taxes is
dedicated to the anything that
has to do with the criminal
justice system.
"When the county funds
the sheriff's department, it's
not only funding law enforce-
ment, but it's funding correc-


n 100 percent over 20-year
tions, including the jail," he projects that some segment of If the
said. "We still have costs asso- the public does not deem to continues
ciated with the courts, so it's be needed and helpful," he Williams
the biggest expenditure is the said. should be
courts, public works and 'There is always need. We condition,
other public safety (fire, res- try to weight those needs Columbia
cue, other things)." against all the other needs a small coi
While some taxes are creat- with the amount of revenue He said
ed locally to subsidize local that's available." population
interests, other forms of taxa- Because of its size, 58,000 peo
tion come from the state as Columbia County still gets a officials k
part of legislative orders. break from some forms of that amou
Williams said the county is taxation and state mandated Howeve
subject to whatever the legis- costs based on the size of its for a sma
lature deems as appropriate, population, tion is 75,(
"A lot of the increase in a "We are by definition, still a He sail
local government's budget, is small county," Williams said. being a s
not at the choosing of local "By legislative standards, a impact of
government," Williams said. small county is made up of lessened
"It's because it's a mandate 75,000 people or less in popu- counties
and we're required to do it." lation, which we are. And benefits
Even with the $50 million there are certain legislative' "It is 1
budget, Williams said he requirements which small from a
believes local requests will counties are exempt from, or standpoint
continue to be made to the because you are small county, county
legislature for additional there may be less of an Williams s
funding for special projects. impact, but there are others day is go
'There is no shortage of where it doesn't matter." that's notg


period
population growth
at its current rate,
said the county
e in good financial
for the days when
isn't considered as
unty.
the county's official
n count is about
)ple, but technically,
now they're over
nt of people.
r, the state's cutoff
11 county classifica-
000 people.
d the benefits of
mall county is the
f the mandates is
because smaller
get some financial

to our advantage,
dollars and cents
t, to be in the small
classification,"
said. "We realize the
ing to come when
going to happen."


WATER
Continued From Page 8E

growing demand for waste-
water services.
Robertson said he believes
the current wastewater treat-
ment plant is a "for all practical
purposes is at capacity."
Linda Andrews, wastewater
facilities superintendent, said
the maximum flow at the plant
is 3 million gallons per day,
with the average usage in the
past several months about 2.7
to 2.8 million gallons per day.
However, she said for March
the average flow was about 3.1
million gallons per day, mainly
because of excess stormwater.
She-said that going over the
maximum is not a major con-
cern unless there are sus-
tained periods of flow to the
plant of about 4-5 million gal-
lons per day.
However, Andrews said per
Department of Environmental


Protection standards, whenev-
er a wastewater plant goes
over 75 percent of its peak flow
on a regular basis, the .utility
must begin planning for
expansion, which the city has.
- Cone said the study will
look at the actions the city can
take and how much it will cost
to expand the current sewage
treatment plant off St.
Margarets Street, build a new
plant or build a series of sev-
eral small "package" plants to
serve specific areas.
He said there is also the
question of the city's current
effluent sprayfield where all
of its treated wastewater is
released.
The sprayfield is in the
Ichetucknee Basin and even
has sinkholes and a nearby
creek that feed that springs
and river water system.
Cone said because the city
is sensitive to the environ-
mental concerns that pres-
ents, the study will also look


at increasing the treatment
standards for water at it
wastewater facility to bring it
up to a higher quality that
could not affect the ground-
water negatively.
"That's a desired course of
action because it solves a lot
of problems, but the question
is then, can you afford it?"
Cone said.
Though the cost is current-
ly unknown, Robertson said
he is all for the city waste-
water treatment being
increased to a drinking water
standard so that it could be
reused for irrigation without
harming groundwater.
"You could take that
potable water and irrigate the
stew out of a whole bunch of
things," Robertson said.
He said he is interested to
know the costs of the various
options that will be available
to the city for expanding its
sewage capabilities, but
added that he would not be


surprised if a new wastewater
plant were to cost $20 million.
At the very least,
Robertson said the current
plant has to be expanded, oth-
erwise the city at some point
would have to stop new hook-
ups to the system.
"But you can't do that, not
in reality, because the area
will continue its growth and
development and there will
still be the question of how
public needs are met and
whose going to do it?," he
said.
The city is certain about
one aspect of that, however.
Vice Mayor George Ward
said that he believes all of
council are "on the same page
from the standpoint that peo-
ple who live in the city already
on water and sewer should
not have to underwrite the
cost" for new utilities because
of growth outside the city.
Currently, people live out-
side of city limits but use city
utilities pay a 50 percent sur-


charge of their monthly bill,
every month.
While that may seem
extreme to some, Ward point-
ed out that people outside of
city limits do not contribute to
other city taxes such as prop-
erty tax and communications
taxes such as those for phone,
cell phone and cable services.
Ward said the city should
also consider raising tap and
impact fees to hook up to the
city's utilities systems for new
construction both inside and
outside of city limits, to be
sure pre-existing citizens of
Lake City don't pay for addi-
tional growth.
"It guess it's let growth pay
for growth," Ward said.
Still, the city also has no
plans to do any mass annexa-
tions to expand the city limits
to increase its tax base or pop-
ulation.
Ward said while the city
had attempted to do an annex-
ation by referendum (vote)
back in the 1970s, the turnout


for the vote was low and those
who did vote unanimously
decided not to do so.
He said the city plans to
continue to annex on a volun-
tary basis. However, for some
people they can't annex into
the city even if they want to
because adjacent property
may not yet be part of the
incorporated area. It is
against state law to create an
enclave of unincorporated
area within city limits.
Getting rid of the 50 per-
cent surcharge to utilities cus-
tomers who are outside of city
limits can often be incentive
to annex, Ward said.
But with growth outside of
city limits mostly responsible
for higher demand on city
utilities; Robertson said the
city and county need to con-
sider working together to
develop a regional utility.
WATER
Continued on Page 10E


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Classes offered at

Lake City Community College


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Tuesday and Wednesday
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- j






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


A Place Called [ime


Community


Library a community staple despite its short history


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn

One of Columbia County's
most stable and popular insti-
tutions also happens to be
one of the county's youngest
institutions.
Though it is only 46 years
old, the Cojumbia County
library has remained popular
since it was first introduced.
In fact, it's become such a
community staple, two other
branches have been added,
with the latest coming in
2004 on the west side of
town.
Katrina Evans, Columbia
County Public Library
Assistant Director and cur-
rent interim director, said
even from its outset, the
Columbia County Public
Library had a history of
being a community-based
resource.
According to information
from the Columbia County
Public Library records, in
1959 members of the Lake
City Woman's Club spear-
headed a movement to take
advantage of federal funds
that were available to provide
library services for rural
counties. The group
launched a grassroots cam-
paign to get community sup-
port and on May 7, 1959, the
organization presented a


request for the local match-
ing funds to the Columbia
County Board of
Commissioners, which
agreed to provide the match-
ing funds, to make Columbia
County a part of the
Suwannee River Regional
Library System. When
Columbia County joined the
Suwannee River Library
System on Oct. 1, 1959, it
formed the system with
Gilchrist, Hamilton,
Lafayette, Madison,
Suwannee and Taylor coun-
ties. Later that month, the
library opened in a small
building (formerly a police
building) on the southwest
corner of what is now NW
Main Boulevard and NW
Madison Street. Nellie
Brown was the first librarian
and county and library offi-
cials held the library's offi-
cial dedication on Feb. 21,
1960.
Records say when the
library first opened in 1959,
it had a collection of 5,000
books and was open for 40
hours a week; from noon to 5
p.m. and 6 p.m. 9 p.m. on
Monday and from 8:30 a.m.
- 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. -
5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays,
Thursday, Fridays and
Saturday. The library was
closed Wednesdays and
Sunday.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia County's first librarian, Nellie Brown, shelves books in the 1960s at the Columbia
County Branch of the Suwannee River Regional Library.


The library had two book-
mobiles with a total of 4,000
books that made 26 stops
each month at locations
throughout the county.
In 1964, the library moved
into a two-story brick build-
ing between Orange and
Madison streets and in 1978,
a new 8,000 square-foot
library was completed,
which is half of the current
building. A year later,
Columbia County withdrew
from the Suwannee River
Regional Library System and


became a single-county
library.
In 1987, library hours
were expanded to the cur-
rent schedule of 68 hours
and in 1988, the Fort White
Branch Library was opened.
Then in 1991, an addition
was added to the main
branch, roughly doubling the
building's size, while in 1993,
the Fort White Branch
moved to its current location,
adjacent to the Fort White
Town Hall.
Roughly three years later,


Evans, who has been a librar-
ian for 10 years and has been
an employee at the Columbia
County Public Library for
eight years, became a library
employee.
Evans said she's seen lots
of changes in the local
library and with its media
during her employment, but
she still considers herself a
librarian, rather than a media
specialist.
"I wouldn't call myself a
media specialist. Media spe-
cialist is a term we see used


mainly in schools to describe
school librarians. I think pub-
lic, academic, university and
community college libraries
still use the term librarian and
that's how I describe myself,"
she said. "The biggest change
I've seen in the Columbia
County Public Library since
I've been here, and I think it's
a change that's reflected
through libraries across the
country, is the changes due to
technology and the changes in
technology. When I came here
we offered very minimal
Internet access for the public
and now it is a major part of
the library services for us. We
register people for between
2,000 3,000 Internet sessions
per month in our three branch-
es."
Evans said other modern
adjustments include trends to
on-line data bases, either in
lieu of, or in addition to their
print counterparts.
"When I first came here, we
were in the process of switch-
ing to a new automation sys-
tem," she said. "We were one
of the first libraries in Florida
to be automated, but it was a
home-grown system that oper-
ated off a huge, main-frame
computer."
When the library changed
LIBRARY
Continued on Page 11E


County government growth seen in employee numbers


By TONY BRITTr
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Over the past few years, the


WATER
Continued From Page 9E
Though the city is paying


Columbia County population
has steadily been on the
increase.
As the Columbia population


for the 20-inch loop line to be
put around the city and will
service many residents out-
side of city limits that want to
hook -into it, Robertson said


increased, so to did the size of
county government.
One of the most noticeable
changes in the size of county


"the city on its own cannot
continue to afford to do those
kinds of things."
He said a united approach
by the city and county should


government has been the
increase in the amount of
employees.
Dale Williams, County man-


be used to service areas out-
side of the city limits.
"Due to our size and every-
thing, the county would be
able to take great advantage


ager, said measuring the
county in terms of employees
and the budget, the county is
growing.


of resources with grants and
low-interest rate loans,
because the city can't do that
outside our own city limits,
but they could," Robertson


"In the past 10 years, from
EMPLOYEES
Continued on Page 12E


said.
'There must be a way for
these two local bodies to work
together to plan for our
future."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005
i


- --- -A Place Called


Community


LIBRARY
Continued From Page 9E
to the new automation system,
the books were bar coded but
continued to be arranged by
the Dewey Decimal System.
Evabs said the clientele has
also changed with the technol-
ogy through the years.
"We do get a lot of people in
to use the Internet," she said,
noting that some people get
library cards just to take advan-
tage of the Internet services.
"We have a lot of kids, students
and business people. A lot of
people just come in for recre-
ational reading, videos and
DVDs. We just have a lot of
variety."
Evans said the libraries start-
ed offering DVDs close to 18
months ago and that's probably
the newest form of media the
library has.
She said most of the chang-
ing trends taking place at the


Columbia County Public
Library are in line with
changes taking place at
libraries across the globe.
"The library is an important
part of the local community
and offers a wide variety of
services to local residents," she
said. "We provide information
for people relating to their jobs
or their business; provide assis-
tance and information that
helps them with their educa-
tion; provide opportunities for
social interaction through pro-
grams for children and pro-
grams we offer for adults and
recreational and entertainment
material. There's just a wide
variety of services that we
offer."
Evans said library officials
are in the process of beginning
their long range planning as
they try to address future
needs of the clientele.
"In the next couple of
months we're going to be start-
ing that process and that's


going to be planning for future
library services," she said.
In the short term, she said
the library will offer summer
programs for children begin-
ning in June and the library has
been awarded a Community
Library and Caring Grant
which will enable the library to
do additional work with local
childcare centers.
"We've had outreach servic-
es with our local childcare cen-
ters for 20 years," she said.
"This new grant is going to
enable us to refresh some of
our rotating deposit collections
to provide some permanent
deposit collections at some
childcare centers. It will also
enable us to work with the
Department of Children and
Family Services in their part-
nership for strong families pro-
gram to provide some pro-
grams to show families how to
share books in reading with
their families. We're excited
about that opportunity."


Tourist industry thriving in Columbia


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com
With the clear shimmering
waters of its lakes, rivers and
springs and its prime location,
Lake City has developed as a
tourist attraction.
Harvey Campbell, execu-
tive director of the Tourism
Development Council of
Columbia County, has been
instrumental in sharing the
city's beauty to the world.
"Lake City was always
blessed because of its location
to the Interstates," he said. "It
has really been our bread and
butter."
Tourism accounts for a
large percentage of the gas
tax, Campbell said.
The location of the
Interstates is what makes
Columbia County different
from other counties around it.


"Retail businesses by inter-
state and restaurants prosper
because they are by the
Interstate 75," he said.
As the first major exit peo-
ple find when they enter
Florida, Lake City is the place
where generations of tourists
have stopped at on trips to
Florida.
Campbell says that Sept. 11
required a reassessment of
tourism.
He said that following the
attack, the airline industry
suffered greatly because peo-
ple were afraid to fly.
"Now I believe the automo-
bile and airline industries are
back around 50/50,"
Campbell said.
The attack also renewed
interest in natural attractions
as tourists sought to get away
from highly crowded areas.
Campbell points to natural


attractions such as the
Ichetucknee as a magnet for
tourism.
"Olustee is one of the pre-
mier festivals in the nation,"
he said. "We also provide
accommodations for people
who attend other events like
the Florida Folk Festival."
Campbell says that the
Suwannee River Wilderness
Trail is a positive addition to
the area.
More than 160 articles have
been written about Columbia
county's tourist attractions.
"Articles carry better
weight than paid advertise-
ments so we have benefited
from this coverage," he said.
Rather than being con-
strained by county lines,
Columbia County has worked
TOURISM
Continued on Page 13E


9



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Class sizes average 15 students per class which allows
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INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL 752-2320 OR STOP BY OUR SCHOOL,
WHICH Is LOCATED AT
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(CORNER OF S. MARION AVE. & MALONE DR.)


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QUALIFICATIONS
* BSBA in Accounting, University of Florida
* Juris Doctorate, University of Florida
* Private law practice, beginning in 1977
* Served on Planning and Zoning Board as
chairman for 13 years
* Leadership positions in Social and
Community Organizations


VOTE May 10
****** **'


ISSUES TO ADDRESS
* Controlled City Growth
* Activities for the youth
* Preservation of Historical landmarks
* Redevelopment of Downtown area

FAMILY
* Born in Lake City on October 25, 1951
* Family in area since 1850s
* Married to Jodi Witt
* Children are Jamie, Leah, Trey and Trveor
* Grandchildren are James, Elizabeth
and Connor
* Attended and had children and grandchildren
attend public schools of Columbia County


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VISIT FLORIDA


May 7-15, 2005

Visit our Great Local Attractions


* Alligator Lake Recreation Area
* Big Shoals State Park
* Cinema 90 theatre
* Columbia County Aquatic
Center
* Columbia County Historical
Museum
Columbia Skate Palace
* Desoto Lake
* Ichetucknee Springs State Park
* O'Leno Slate Park


* Olustee Battlefield State Park
* Osceola Natational Forest
* Lake Montgomery
* Lake Isabella
* Quail Heights Country Club
* River Rise State Preserve
* Southern Oaks Golf Club
* Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park
* Suwannee River State Park
* Youngs Park


Hiking Biking Bird Watching
Picnicing Scuba Snorkel
Horseback Riding Boating
Canoeing Kayaking Fishing
Golfing Skating Tubing
Swimming Museums & Movies


G eat Festivals and Events

May 27, 29, 2005- Florida Folk Festival, White Springs

June 4, 2005- Wellborn Blueberry Festival, Wellborn


July 4, 2005- 4th of July Celebration, Lake Desoto, Lake City

This made possible with financial assistance of VISIT FLORIDA www.VISITFLORIDA.com


FOR MORE


L***********


I I I loy-A W-11 DO A







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


A Phqc(- Called


Community


p -


Friday night football: A staple in Lake City's past


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

Like cotton, high school
football was once king in the
south. While the sport has not
declined in importance as
much as those white pods, it
is no longer the be-all and
end-all of Fridays in Columbia
County.
There are highs and lows in
the history of football's fall
from the only game in town to
a jewel in the tiara of other
team and individual sports.
Who better to analyze that
evolution than Jimmy Pitman,
a 1942 graduate of Columbia
High who is the most prolific
patron of football in Lake City.
At the end of the 2004 sea-
son, Pitman had attended 662
Columbia High football
games. Included were the
ones he played in at CHS from


EMPLOYEES
Continued From Page 10E
1994 2004, we've added 40
employees all departments
included," he said, noting the
count doesn't include constitu-
tional officers. "In 1994 we had
189 employees and in 2004 and
including today, we have 229
employees. Over that 10-year
period, employee growth was
21 percent."
Williams said the 21 percent
increase in the county's work-
force is about equal with the
county's other growth indica-
tors, however, the 21 percent
is less than the county's popu-
lation growth during the same
period of time.
'The most new employees
generated have been in the
area of public works, but we've
also created a lot of new
departments in those 10
years," he said.
While the population count
has increased, Williams noted
that the number of ordinances


1938-4 1, 1
when he was
a captain his .,.
senior year.
"There
were so few ''
other things 4
going on in Pitman
town, all of
the student body went to the
football games, Pitman said of
his high school years. 'The
school had pep rallies for
every game. The students not
only were going to the games,
but to the dance afterward.
"We held them on the stage
at what is now the
Administration building. Mr.
Sam Eff played records and
everybody came."
In those pre-World War II
days football was almost liter-
ally a family affair, a kinship
we strive for today across eco-
nomic and social lines.


and laws being introduced to
county codes has not
increased as rapidly.
"A lot of that has to do more
with legislation than it has to
do with need," Williams said.
"As a governmental entity, we
are now required to do more
things by ordinance than
before. Some ordinances we
do out of legislative need and
some, we do out of community
need."
He said legislative needs,
including land-use amend-
ments, ordinances and regu-
lations, are almost unmanage-
able for local governments
since they are a result of leg-
islative mandates and
changes.
"Those ordinances which
we do out of communitywide
need I don't know exactly
how many in this period of
time that we've adopted, but I
don't think it's excessive," he
said. "A lot of it was taking
ordinances that we already
had and modifying them. It's
not so much new law as it is


"Lake City was a small town
and nearly everybody grew
up here," Pitman said. 'They
knew the players and their
families and CHS Tigers was
ingrained in them. There was
very little competition from
other sports and there was
lots of school spirit."
Columbia had a basketball
team and the football coach
concentrated on track in the
spring. Pitman was a two-time
state champion in track and
set the state record in the low
hurdles. For the girls, there
was only basketball and
cheerleading.
Pitman attended Georgia
Tech, but his class had to sign
up for the reserves to stay in
school and he was called up in
three months. After the war,
Pitman returned to college
but not before noticing some
changes.


clarification and expansion of
existing law."
Though Columbia County
is governed by a new county
charter, Williams said he
doesn't believe the charter
has had an impact on the
number of ordinances adopt-
ed as county rule.
"I think the ordinances
adopted by the Board of
County Commissioners,
whether you're a charter gov-
ernment or not, would be the
same," he said.
Williams said as Columbia
County becomes a county of
more people and is exposed
to new and different prob-
lems associated with the pop-
ulation increase, he believes
there will be a change in the
amount of ordinance adopted.
He said he doesn't believe the
county will adopt 15-25 per-
cent more ordinances just to
deal with its growth and prob-
lems that may accompany
that growth.
"I still believe, to a great
extent, that what we're going


"Football had good support
before and after the war, but I
could tell a difference with the
kids their attitudes and the
things they were doing,"
Pitman said. "We had a Navy
base in town and it gave them
ideas from people all over the
country. There were different
walks of life and ways of liv-
ing."
Pitman returned from col-
lege in 1950 and began his
career at the Department of
Transportation. He noticed
more differences.
'There was more competi-
tion from other sports and a
variety of sports. Baseball had
come on strong and track had
dropped off. The coaches
were just using it for condi-
tioning for football players."
Lake City, too, was growing
and football took its first hit.
"We had such an influx of


to do is modify existing ordi-
nances," he said. "Nobody
has a crystal ball, but that's
what I think."
In addition to the county
gaining more employees over
the past 10 years, another
form of growth in the county
government has been the
addition of women commis-
sioners.
Columbia County was
more than 160 years old
before it had its first woman
commissioner and within the
last five years, two women
have been voted in as county
commissioners, Jennifer Finn
and Elizabeth Porter.
Flinn, made the local histo-
ry books in 2002, when she
became the first woman in
Columbia County history to
be elected as a county com-
missioner. She followed that
historic event up by being
named the first female com-
mission chairwoman in 2004.
"It feels wonderful to be
the first woman commission-
er in Columbia County histo-


Columbia High's Gene Cox scores a touchdown during the
1951 season.


population from other areas, it
took away from the home-
grown families," Pitman said.
"Mixed with newcomers and
aging people who were not


ry," she said. "It's a wonder-
ful opportunity and I always
try to be a good example to
my children and my daugh-
ter. I think it's a wonderful
thing for them to have their
mother be the first female
county commissioner, but I
also wanted to set an example
for all the women in the coun-
ty to run for office and partic-
ipate in their community..."
Flinn said she believes her
election win was a direct
result of the county's growth.
"I think that things are
changing and there are peo-
ple who are moving here
from different states and
countries and Columbia
County is getting many differ-
ent cultures and that's a good
thing that's positive," she
said.
As commissioner chair-
woman, Flinn said she under-
stands that county govern-
ment and the amount of
employees will grow as the
population continues to
increase.


going to games anymore,
there was not as much sup-
FOOTBALL
Continued on Page 13E


"I think that when you have
growth, you are obviously
going to have to increase the
nuntber of county employ-
ees," she said.
She said several county
departments have increased
in size as a direct result of the
county's growth, including
emergency services, law
enforcement and public
works.
"I look for the growth trend
to continue," she said.
"Florida, in general, the
growth is moving north. Back
in the 1980s, people were
moving to Ocala, now the
growth is moving farther
north and we see that -
they're coming here and
they're looking for less
expensive land and people
are moving here to retire.
Columbia County is growing
very quickly and I think there
is going to be an increased
need for all sort of senior
services and everything is
going, to change but
change is good."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


Community


I


FOOTBALL
Continued From Page 12E

port"
Football maintained the feel-
ing of community since it was
still city vs. city. Columbia's
opponents were Tallahassee,
Gainesville, Ocala, Perry,
Palatka, Starke and Live Oak,
which were still one-school
towns at the time.
Lake City was one of the
smaller towns and took its licks
in the late '50s and early '60s.
'There were some lean
years," Pitman said. "The sup-
port was there. They were dis-
gruntled, but they were loyal."
The golden age of Paul
Quinn spiked interest, includ-
ing a quarterback club that
topped 1,000 members.
"That included every sales-
man who came to town being
hit for a membership, but we
had 150-200 attend the meet-
ings," Pitman said. "Quinn was
a personality he was the 'Big
Redhead.' He used to show
movies and give a real rundown
of the game. He was aggres-
sive. If you asked him a ques-
tion, he would cut your head
off. He was not that mean, it
was more like 'You do your job
and I will do the coaching.'"
The interplay dropped off
after Quinn left, but it was not
due to a change in coaching


attitude toward club members.
"Mainly what killed it was
Monday Night Football on TV,"
Pitman said. "Everybody want-
ed to get home to watch that
game."
Hometown football took
another hit, not with the leav-
ing of Quinn but with CHS
moving up in class. The 2A
Tigers also entered the
Gateway Conference and most
of the games were against
Jacksonville schools. Even
Suwannee High, the archest of
rivals, was dropped from the
schedule for six years.
When we started playing
Jacksonville schools, most of
the people didn't like it,"
Pitman said. "There were some
real diehard football people
that thought moving up in class
would be tougher competition
and good for us."
There were far more good
years than bad ones when
coach Bobby Simmons began
taking on Duval County and,
when Joe Montgomery came
along, Columbia began domi-
nating the Gateway
Conference schools.
"The Jacksonville schools
loved it," Pitman said. "They
thought we have that little Lake
City to beat up on. We had a
winning record against them
the whole time."
In 1994, Columbia football
moved from Memorial
Stadium, near downtown, to


the campus of CHS. Some cite
that as causing a decline in
support, but Pitman doesn't
see it.
"I had mixed opinions," he
said. "I loved the old field and
the tradition we had there, but
I thought we needed a new sta-
dium."
Columbia did have bad luck
with storms on Friday nights in
the inaugural year of the stadi-
um and many might have used
that as an excuse to quit attend-
ing games.
Pitman said the empty seats
are not due to the program. (It
may not bad as bad as it looks,
since Columbia High Stadium
holds 8,000 people.)
"There are other things to do
and numerous other sports
that have come in to divide the
interest," Pitman said. "You
have different combinations of
people whQ haven't grown up
here and been brainwashed
with that tradition over the
years. There is less attendance
by students than there used to
be."
Pitman rarely misses games
in other sports, but plans on
expanding his football atten-
dance record.
"I still love to go and don't
miss a game if I can avoid it,"
he said. "Football was way
down a few years back, but I
think it will prosper and remain
the prominent game in high
school."


Lake City employee recalls 33

years of hard work, dedication


By JASMINE RANGEL
jrangel@lakecityreporter.com
Jack Castillo's roots are
firmly in Lake City, both in
his personal and professional
life.
He has lived in Lake City
for 57 years, his whole life.
For more than half of his life,
he's worked for the city's util-
ities department.
Currently, Castillo main-
tains lift stations for the city.
It's not a job he planned on,
but there's been a good rea-
son he hasn't wanted to
change careers.
"Everybody over with the
city is great," he said. "I get
along with everyone."
Castillo describes himself
as friendly with his cowork-
ers, evident by the ability to


JUS I OIN LAiNU/LaK ICiy wptuJI Lwr
Steadfast city employee Jack Castillo stands beside his work
truck at the city's wastewater treatment plant. Castillo has
been a city employee for 33 years in various positions involv-
ing city utilities.


reach him by calling the util-
ities office and simply asking
for "Jack."


CASTILLO
Continued on Page 24E


CORRECTIONS CORPORATION OF AMERICA

"Excellence in Corrections"


TOURISM "'The year 2004 was a record
year and all the numbers for
Continued From Page 9E the first quarter of the 2005
have surpassed those
with neighboring counties to records," he said.
market the region as the 'The two dangers that could
"Suwannee River Valley" and dampen this are domestic ter-
the "the Original Florida." rorism acts and gasoline
The latter term is shared prices."
with 16 counties, of which 14 Campbell said that thus far
are rural. there has been little change
"We are producing a 64- due to the gas prices experi-
page full color magazine, enced recently.
expected to come out in June, He would still like to see a
all about the area," Campbell meeting facility constructed in
said. the county that could accom-
The recent additions of new modate several thousand peo-
hotels have also attracted ple.
tourists to the area. "I believe there is a good bit


of support in the hotel indus-
try, and the county could raise
the bed tax from 2 per cent to
as high as 5 per cent to pay for
such a facility." Campbell said.
In addition, Campbell envi-
sions a family entertainment
complex, more minorities, and
greater support for the camp-
ground industry.
"I would like to have a 30-
minute video preprogrammed
that would be shown in hotel
room televisions all the time,"
he said, 'Tourists who come
through the area would see
the fishing, canoeing and bicy-
cling attractions that we have
here."


LAKE CITY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY


We are the founder and leader
of the private corrections
industry.
Our Lake City Correctional
Facility accommodates 350
inmates and is currently under
expansion to provide an
additional 550 beds, with a
staff of 250 by summer 2005.


WeAre rod o emart O Th
L~a~e ityCol'mia CunyWrkoc


1936

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1952

1953

1954

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1967


At Columbia County Bank, we got to be 93
years young by helping our customers. By
providing safety, security and a complete
range of financial services... from low interest
loans to high interest earnings on your money,
we've served you well.
We believe outstanding customer service is what
you expect and deserve... we're committed to
providing just that.

COLUMBIACOUNTY
BANK
Banking on a First Name Basis

1912-2005


South 514 S.W. SR 47 (386) 755-2755 Turner Road 4785 W. U.S. Hwy 90 (386) 719-8810
Downtown 173 N.W. Hillsboro St (386) 752-5646 West 1720 W. U.S. Hwy 90 (386) 752-3322


A Place Called '- -
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Member FDIC


I


13E







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005
i


-~ -m- -


L. A F'I~ccCle


Community


I Local Realtor reflects on successful

ventures through the years in Lake City


ASHLEY CuSNEROS/ Lake lCiy Reporter
Irma Brown (from left), Glenn Jones and Leroy Feagle listen to Aubrey Adams talk about the
'good 'ol days' of North Florida.

Passing time in Lake City before

TVs, computers and video games


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com
Before the advent of TV,
computers and video games,
Columbia County teens
found other ways to amuse
themselves.
Leroy Feagle's family was
one of the first families to set-
tle in Columbia County. He
traced his ancestors back to
Germany, where his family
spelled their name as Fegal.
"I was a country boy and
they didn't add a light post
out where I was for many
years," he said.
"We had to make up our
own toys and games because
we didn't have any."
He and his friends would
use sticks to shake the
ground with the purpose of
making worms come out for
fishing.
The girls enjoyed hop


scotch.
"On Saturdays, Marion
Avenue was shoulder to
shoulder similar to what we
would say bumper to bumper
today," Feagle said.
"You went to see and be
seen."
Irma Brown, another life-
time resident remembers
days before cars.
"Back then, there were no
paved roads and people still
used horse and wagons," she
said.
She said that. Saturday
were spent in town and if
people couldn't find what
they needed in Lake City,
they would go to
Jacksonville.
"Trips to Jacksonville
seemed to take forever, the
roads were unpaved and
when it would rain we had to
use curtains on our Model A
Ford," she said.


Aubrey Adams of
Gainesville had family in
Columbia County and
remembers summers where
the boys picked tobacco and
the girls strung the leaves on
sticks.
"Tobacco just isn't a pri-
mary crop anymore," he
said.
After working in the fields
he says that boys played with
sling shots, went swimming'
and hunted and fished.
Brown's brother Glenn
Jones, said he knew all his
neighbors when he was
young.
"Back then everyone knew
everyone else so if you did-
n't, you would go up and
introduce yourself," Jones
said.
Teens went to cane grind-
ings for fun and peanut boil-
ings to learn to court, he
said.


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com
Virginia Bishop has helped
hundreds make Lake City
their home. through her
years as a Realtor.
Bishop, one of the former
owners of Coldwell Banker
Bishop Realty of Lake City,
says the business will be 50
years old in October.
"We were the first in the
city," Bishop said. "We devel-
oped at least four subdivi-
sions and had one of the first
homes in Forest Hills."
Bishop is the widow of for-
mer state representative and
senator, W.E. Bishop.
The couple's son, W.E.
Bishop, Jr., is an attorney in
Ocala and their daughter
lives in Atlanta.
Bishop has called Lake
City home since 1947.


"The city has changed
immeasurably," she said.
"When we came here there
were no four-lane highways,
it was before Interstates 10 or
75 and U.S. 90 was only two
lanes."
Bishop explained that
most of the people she
helped in her career came to
Columbia County from south
Florida.
"They first moved from up
north to south Florida, then
grew tired of its heavy traffic
and wanted to live in a small-
er town like Lake City," she
said.
As the years passed
Bishop's realty soon grew to
include an insurance agency
and a building company.
"It was a 6-day-a-week job,"
Bishop recalled.
In addition to work, the
Bishops remained active in


the community.
"I have always been a big
chamber booster and Lake
City booster," she said. "I
love the small town, friendly
atmosphere here."
Bishop enjoys remember-
ing the way things used to
be.
"When my husband ran for
his positions, the race was
very clean, unlike today." she
said. "Television was still
very new so we spent about
$700 on newspaper advertise-
ments, posters, and cards."
The couple also helped
start a real estate board in
the city.
"Everybody took a position
because they had to," she
said. "I was president, secre-
tary, you name it, I did it."
In addition, Bishop was
also a member of the Florida
Real Estate Commission.


II '~, I .i C


GulfCoast

Financial

Services
Inc.


'"SW






John G. Kuykendall
President


229 SW Main Blvd., Lake
(386) 755-9018
www.gulfcoastfinancial.com


City, FL 32025


tr,.,,fd A-J1 ..-r, wni:'. ilei.!d iic- .-.m FJc.jLr, rr., R i, ~.F-h Inc A Ri irp .'Ifut jLk ivt, ri %su ir..:


Little Caesars Pizza.


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In May of 2004, a ne,, Little Caesars pizza store was opened in Lake City on
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The Little Caesars located on Baya Drive is a family business with a partnership
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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


A Place Called J'pf


Community


Fort White High re-emerges in southern portion of county


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
The town of Fort White
was settled about 1870,
based in large part on
rumors regarding a new rail-
road line was coming to the
area.
The town was formally
incorporated in 1884 and was
surveyed and platted in 1890.
Although no actual start
date of the first school in
Fort White has been found,
school board records make
reference to a school in 1890.
Those records from 1893 say
the Fort White School was
opened five months with a
total enrollment of 124
pupils.
A second wooden school
was built in 1897 and occu-


pied in 1898. Records say the
school had three rooms, with
two teachers and a principal.
A separate black school
also existed in the immediate
Fort White area, records say.
Due to overcrowding
issues, the next few years,
many requests were made to
enlarge the Fort White
School and money was set
aside for the project.
On Thursday, May 20,
1915, the Columbia County
School Board unanimously
agreed to build a new brick-
constructed school for about
$6,000.
According to information
from Fort White residents,
the original Fort White
Public School was a two-
story brick building in 1915.
The building housed four


classrooms on the first floor
and an auditorium on its sec-
ond floor. In 1922, a two-
story addition was built
adding four more class-
rooms.
In 1937, the Works Project
Administration built a one
story, brick building which
housed younger students
and the next year the WPA
completed the 'auditorium.
The original brick building
was abandoned in 1970 and
the high school students
were transported to Lake
City.
In the mid 1970s 1990s,
the original brick building
was used to store school sur-
plus, school furniture and
supplies.
However, talk of tearing
the original building down


was now beginning to be a
constant rumor.
In the early 1990s, a group
of concerned citizens applied
for a grant to place the origi-
nal brick structures on the
National Register of Historic
Places and was successful.
The group then applied for
a grant to restore the build-
ings and received more than
$700,000 in state funding and
financial assistance for the
Columbia County School
Board.
Marilyn Little, a Fort White
resident, said she attended
the old Fort White Brick
School.
"It was first 12 grades,"
she said.
"I started there in 1947 and
graduated in 1952. In 1948, I


and Carl Wilson, my brother
in law now, decided to name it
the Fort White Indians and
that's where the name came
from."
She they came up with
Indians because there was an
old Indian fort in the area.
"We wanted red warm up
clothes and couldn't by them,"
she recalled.
"We dyed our warm up
suits red in a wash pot and
when they came out, they
were stretched so long they
would have fit somebody 10-
feet tall. We played basketball
on a clay court. We could win
home games because we
knew all the holes to dodge."
It was during the Florida
No Fence Law and pigs were
coming to the school yards.


She said a sow gave birth to a
bunch of pigs under the
school and that was the class
biology lesson.
"One of the school's neigh-
bors had goats, and the goats
would come on the school
yard and try to eat everything
and the school people built a
stile, because the little kids
would keep forgetting to shut
the game," Little said.
She said in 1969 the last
class graduated from the Fort
White brick building and
school officials closed the
school and bused the children
to Lake City until they opened
the new school five years ago.
She noted only the first 8th
grade students and high
school students were bussed
to Columbia High.


1~7 '~~'-~ -


COURTESY PHOTO
Students stand in front of the original Fort White public school in 1903. The one room
wooden building was replaced with a two-story building in 1915.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005
_ Community


First black church in Columbia keeps strong roots


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com

Trinity United Methodist
Church is believed to be the
oldest black church in the
area, said Rev. Jeffrey Y.
Oglesby.
"We are the first African-
American church in the
county as far as we know,"
Oglesby said.
"We were established in
1863."
The original structure was
burned down in a fire, but
the church was rebuilt on its
current location.
The congregation is made
up of 150 members.
"I believe that the initial
name of the church was
Gethsemane Methodist
Episcopal Church.
Current projects include a
revitalization project within
the church and several out-
reach programs including
work with the Girl Scouts.
The church also offers a
technology program called
(tc) which represents the
Trinity Community
Technology Center.
"Our goal is to use this
multifaceted program to
bridge the digital divide in
economically challenged
communities," Oglesby said.
One program, High Flyers,
provides tutoring to elemen-
tary age students.
The program is specifically
targeted for third-grade stu-
dents because that is the first
grade level tested by the
Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test.
"But we accept and tutor
elementary school students
of all grades in this pro-
gram," he said.
A second program is called
Big Stuff and is coordinated
with the Florida Crown
Workforce.
The program provides
tutoring and guidance for
youth ages 14 to 18.


Student are aided in math-
ematics and receive career
readiness training.
'We hope to be able to pro-
vide Internet access where
people from the community
can establish an e-mail
account and gain Internet
assistance," he said.
The original building was
located on West Railroad
Street.
It was rebuilt in 1906
under the leadership of Rev.
C.B. Wilson.
In 1923, a fire that resulted
from a passing train burned
the church down.
According to historical
accounts, only the church
Bible and bell was saved.
Two members found the
cornerstone of the church in
1979 that displayed the
church's founding date.
While the church was
bring rebuilt, services were
given at Richardson
Academy, a ninth-giade cen-
ter at the time.
It was around this time,
that the church changed its
named to Trinity.
Under the leadership of
Rev. W.A. Johnson, the
church purchased land in the
northeastern part of Lake
City on August 8, 1927.
Rev. W.A. Johnson and a
congregation of less that fifty
built the church with Fred
Murray, who served as gen-
eral contractor.
After the construction was
finished, a parsonage was
built on the east side of the
building with six rooms and
two porches.
In 1962, an education
building was constructed
with a dining room, kitchen,
two restrooms, four class-
rooms and a pastor's study.
In 1976, Rev. William
Higgins bought additional
land now used as a parking
area.
Ten years later, the new
parsonage was completed.


imm,
. a .- rf,


l.. i
<1>t^ ---""


ASHLEY CISNEROS/ Lake City Reporter
Trinity United Methodist Church, believed to be the oldest black church in the area was established in 1863. Church records
show that the original name of the church was Gethsemane Methodist Episcopal Church.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


A Plae.-ic Wled 1c


COmIIITIULlitA,


L _____________


The legend behind the famous Blanche Hotel


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com

A reservation calendar at
the Blanche Office Center is
marked with receptions,
meetings and weddings.
The original glass tile
echoes in the empty lobby as
visitors walk through to enter
Tucker's Fine Dining or climb
the staircase leading to
offices.
Yet, more went on in the
building at 212 North Marion
Avenue when it was the famed
Blanche Hotel in the early to
mid 1900s.
The reservations made at
that time weren't just for
receptions, but were for visi-


tors passing through like Al
Capone.
In its prime, the hotel was
the social center of Lake City
in its prime.
Gov. Fred P. Cone liked it so
much he decided to live there
at one time.
The grand hotel took up
one entire city block; today
the area is broken into busi-
ness and office spaces.
It is home to the oldest ele-
vator in Florida.
The tiny closet-like elevator
is no longer in use, but it
reportedly still works.
Occupants had to manually
stop the elevator at the floor
they wanted.


ASHLEY CISNEROS/ Lake City Reporter
A sitting area is tucked in the right corner of the former
Blanche Hotel lobby by the entrance. The look of the parlor
has changed tremendously since its opening in 1902.


Will Brown built the hotel
in 1902 and named it after his
4-year-old daughter, Blanche.
Early promotional
brochures boasted about the
hotel's 14-foot ceilings.
On Oct. 3, 1919, N. G.
Wade of Jacksonville pur-
chased the Blanche Hotel for
$35,000.
The hotel's location made it
popular because travelers on
U.S. 441 could stop in on their
way to Chicago or Miami.
The hotel used to have a
swimming pool and barns for
horses and buggies.
It also had an adjoining
garage that accommodated
about 40 Model-T cars.
The hotel has three floors
and all but the third are open
today.
Gangster Al Capone was
said to stay in the hotel on his
way to and from Miami.
Some say he had a mistress
in the area, but there is no doc-
umentation of this, just local
lore.
The hotel was also rumored
to be a place of gambling, wild
parties and prostitution, but
there is also no documenta-
tion of this.
According to a tourism
booklet produced by the
chamber of commerce in the
1920s, first class rooms with
meals ran for $2.50 a night
and rooms with private baths
ran $3 to $4.
Weekly rates ranged from
$14 to $22.
The booklet contains pic-
tures of the hotel and stated
that it had 52 rooms at that
time.
On August 21, 1925, 100
rooms were added.
In 1925, the south wing was
added and the following year
the north wing was added as
well.
The hotel closed in 1967


ASHLET CIoiNERO/ Lake Ci.ty Repotrci
Since 1902, visitors, dignitaries, gangsters and brides have climbed the staircase at the for-
mer Blanche Hotel. The stairs offer a grand view of the hotel lobby.


and went through several drawers the night before.
revitalization projects later. Yet, she was the only one
Employees over the who had access to the desk.
years reported ghost f Other stories
sightings in the include female
hotel. :1 employees feel-
One story was ing finLers touching them
about a woman who whilee they worked and
worked in an office in .'. sightings of soldiers
the hotel. walking in the halls.
Every morning sh,- Robert Chasteen,
would go into h4:r owner of
office and find her sta- .- .- Chasteen s
pier standing straight up. D- o w nto w nD,
She would set it down .n remembers the
before leaving work and the Blanche before it
next morning it would be \ er- closed.
tical again. HIe has watched
Another story was about an the storefronts change over
employee who would come to the years.
work and find that someone "At one time, Belk's was
had gone through her desk located across from the hotel


and Dr. Harry Howell had his
office down here and deliv-
ered all the babies including
me," he said.
He pointed out where old
businesses once lined the
neighborhood around the
hotel.
'"There was the Columbia
Theatre, Bruce's clothing
store, JC Penney's, Cox
Furniture Co., and DuBose
and Cox," he said.
He recalls eating lunch
downtown each Sunday after
church.
"DuBose and Cox
Furniture bad the first
microwave," he said.
"I can remember a demon-
stration in the late 1950s and
early 1960s."


Columbia has long tradition of churches throughout history


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com

Hundreds of churches can
be found in the telephone
books for Columbia County,
Religion has always been an
important component of com-
munity and culture in Lake
City.
The beginnings date back to
the 1600s.
When Spanish missions
were located on the north
shore of Alligator Lake in 1606,
Chief Alligator wouldn't allow
his Timucuan people to enter
the mission or speak to. the
priests.
Later a priest visited the
chief and while he was there a
great storm damaged the
chief's homes.
He thought it was a sign
from God and accepted
Christianity then.
According to "A Century in
the Sun," a 1959 publication of
the Lake City Centennial
Celebration, Inc., the first
church in Florida was Alachua
Methodist.
The book also mentions that
a church in Newnansville was
established in 1656.
"Jottings and Echoes
Related to Newnansville, One
of the Earliest Settlements of
Alachua and Columbia
Counties" by Esther Bernice
Howell Haworth states that the
church was the birthplace of
Florida Methodism.
It mentions that the Fagan
family was instrumental in its
development.
It also states that when
Florida became an English
colony an Episcopal mission
was established around 1763
or 1764.
It is believed that this mis-
sion was an integral part in the
formation of Saint James
Episcopal Church that was
originally located on south
Alachua Street and West
Nassau, according to the book.
The church was established
in January 1870 and the actual
building was constructed in
1880.
According to "A History of
Columbia County, Florida" by
Edward E Keuchel, the
Baptists and the Methodists
were the first organized reli-


gious groups in the county.
The first established Baptist
church in Florida was the
Pigeon Creek Baptist Church
in present-day Nassau County
in 1821.
Old Bethel Methodist
Church is believed to have
been founded in 1820 under
the leadership of Zachariah
Randall Roberts.
It was established as a small
log building on the east side
of Alligator Lake, then moved
in 1856 to a location on
Highway 441.
Later the church was
moved in 1823.
Providence Baptist Church
or "Old Providence" was
established in 1832, by John
Tucker, John Prevatt, and
Elias Knight, in present-day
Union County.
Another church founded in
the area is New River Baptist
Church built in 1833.
Tustenuggee Methodist
Church started in Fort White
in 1835 when the growing
congregation met in a tool
house.
The original building was
destroyed in a hurricane in
1896, was later rebuilt.
A cornerstone for an old
church on Columbia and
Orange Streets had an inscrip-
tion stating, "First Methodist
Episcopal Church, south,
organized about 1840."
In 1845, Dr. J. C. Ley was
pastor of Ocean Pond
Mission, which served
Branford, Columbia,
Hamilton and Suwannee
counties.
Churches founded in 1847
include Rehoboth, Columbia
and South Prong.
A Methodist church was
established in 1852 where that
present-day Garden Club the
church opened in 1854.
In 1852, the first records of
property were found reflect-
ing property bought by the
Methodist church.
Churches founded in 1856
include Midway, Mount
Pleasant and Friendship
Residents in the southern
part of the county built Mount
Tabor Church in 1854.
The church was originally
built of logs.
Later, a cemetery was built


for the church; it is still used
today.
In 1856 Presbyterian minis-
ter Brazile E. Lanneau visited
the county.
On May 30, 1856 a meeting
was held where members
were accepted into the
church, which formed the
first congregation of the First
Presbyterian Church of Lake
City.
The meeting was held in a
Methodist church.


r,.:


The Presbyterian church
started with a small wooden
structure, then replaced by
brick structure until 1961
when it was 'moved to present
location.
The first pastor was Rev,
Henry C. Brown who started
serving in 1857.
The church has a gallery at
the rear and on two sides for
slave seating.
Bethlehem Lutheran
Church was established in


1859 by Rev. Charles H.
Bernheim.
The second building was
destroyed by the big storm in
September 1896.
The third building was built
a year later.
Bethlehem Lutheran is
believed to be the oldest
Lutheran church in the state.
Records state that a
Catholic congregation started
in 1864 when Bishop Verot
was sent from the Diocese of


Saint Augustine.
He preached and gave
Mass at City Hall, according
to. "A Century in the Sun."
Later, a priest named
Father Hugh came to Lake
City to build the present
church.
The Falling Creek Chapel
was used as a Methodist
Church after 1866, but is
believed to have started as a
Adventist Church and then
later a Baptist church.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


SA Place Called ., -


Community


_______ ______.....di ...... ~


Olustee Festival began with idea to show off local artwork


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter.com

Former Lake City resident
Charles Vocelle had an idea
about 28 years ago for a festi-
val in downtown Lake City
that would feature arts and
crafts.
Vocelle, now a retired
Florida workers' compensa-
tion judge and living in
Lakeland, was then president
of the Lake City Fine Arts
Council and a local lawyer.
He presented his idea to
the now defunct council as a
festival for local people to
show off their artwork, main-
ly paintings.
But then, the idea soon
became far more than what
Vocelle originally envisioned.
Vocelle has said Don
Caldwell the then Lake
City Reporter publisher -
suggested the festival be
done along with the Olustee
battle re-enactment which
had just begun in 1976.
Vocelle was sold on the
idea and the Olustee Battle
Festival, as we now know it,
became a reality in February
of 1978.
Though its become a year-
ly tradition and one most pop-
ular annual events in North
Central Florida, Vocelle didn't
have an easy time of convinc-
ing everyone at first, howev-
er.
When the festival was first
proposed, some local inter-
ests on the Fine Arts Council
felt too many people would
come from outside of Lake
City.
Undaunted and uncon-
cerned with that possibility,
Vocelle realized the council
was not the body to organize
the festival and he set out to
create a new committee with
the help of Alfonso Levy, a
longtime local educator (now
retired) and accomplished
musician.
To create the Blue-Grey
Army, which puts on the


A Union commander reenactor stands amid gunfire on the Union line during the Battle of Olustee Reenactment in February.


Olustee Battle Festival, start-
ed by writing letters for meet-
ings no one showed up for.
But he continued to beseech
more people to join the com-
mittee and was eventually
successful in finding enough
to form the committee.
Early opponents of the fes-
tival felt it was glorifying war
and the slave-holding tradi-
tion that was part of the
Confederacy's political agen-
da.
But in choosing Levy to be
his assistant in creating the
Blue-Grey Army and the first
festival, Vocelle felt he select-
ed the right person to sell the
event. However, Levy being
black and well known in the
community took some heat
for his involvement early on.
But Vocelle and Levy were
very careful about how the
festival was portrayed and
clear in their vision.


It was not intended to glori-
fy the Confederacy or to
encourage the resurgence of
its ideology, but instead to
have an event that would
combine the community with
all men, women and children
from every race and creed.
The name Blue-Grey Army,
came from an idea tossed
around in meetings and com-
mittee member Frank Powers
made the motion for its offi-
cial adoption. It is symbolic to
the committee in that it repre-
sents both the North and
South sides of the Civil War,
as the event remembers the
sacrifices and traditions of
Americans on both sides of
the Mason-Dixon Line.
Today the two-day Olustee
Battle Festival and the Battle
Reenactment which follows
on a final third day at the bat-
tlefield east of Lake City
draws thousands of visitors.


Usually held in the second
weekend of February, the fes-
tival brings in reenactors
from throughout the country
and tourists from all over the
Southeast.
Downtown Lake City along
Marion Avenue and around
Olustee Park are shut down
completely to traffic for the
event and people both
those local and from afar -
revel in the festivities which
includes arts and crafts and
food vendors, musical acts,
official presentations, a
parade, games for children in
a general atmosphere of rev-
elry.
While an official study is
being done by the University
of Florida on the local eco-
nomic impact of the festival
and reenactment, it is already
estimated to bring upwards of
$2 million to the local econo-
my.


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
A young field hospital runner reenactor carries a hospital flag
through the heat of the battle during the Battle of Olustee
Reeactment in February.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


A Place Called' i -,
I'- l-''i JIJ"a


Community


Richardson High School a community icon for black pride


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
Before local schools were
integrated, Columbia County
had one of the richest school
histories in the state for both
black and white students.
One of the most popular
and long standing schools
for blacks in the area was
Richardson Elementary and
High School, which was
established in Lake City
around 1870.
For the next 100 years, the
Richardson High School was
the premier learning institu-
tion for local blacks.
Around 1870, E.T. Holmes
of Jacksonville came to the
city during a school dispute
and operated a private school
for 50 cents per month per
student at the school known
as the Finley High School.
White citizens became
more interested in Negro
education after the Finley


school was in operation and
decided in the early 1900s to
make plans for an academy.
The academy had its begin-
ning at Watertown and was
called the Lake City School
for Colored in 1906, while
T.H. Owens was superintend-
ent as public schools.
H. Richardson, the first
principal, began his service
to the school in 1905 with
Annie Mattox as his assis-
tant. He served as head
teacher and principal from
1905-1913.
May Vinzant Perkins
wrote in "A Century In The
Sun", a history of Lake City
from 1859 1959, that the
first (Negro) school house, a
two-story frame building,
was built by the American
Freedmen's Bureau in 1870.
The building was sold in
1930 and a brick and stone
building was erected in a
new site.
The school separated its


grades and functioned as
Niblack Elementary School
and Richardson High School
in 1959.
L.C. Bradley, Columbia
School district assistant
superintendent of instruc-
tion, attended Richardson
High School in its later
years, from 1967-69.
Bradley said he vividly
remembers the school's ath-
letic programs.
"It was a winning program
and they brought a sense of
spirit and excitement to the
schools, with tradition," he
said.
He said he parallels the
traditions and athletic pro-
grams at Richardson High
School with the Florida A&M
University program, because
they have the same colors.
The sense of pride and
ownership for local blacks in
the community was strong
when it came to Richardson
High School and its history.


.~f; 4:


/


COURTESY PHOTO
The Richardson High School class of 1934 stands proud. This was the first senior class to
wear caps and gowns at a graduation.


"The sense of pride was'
given because the teachers
there were very genuine,
unique and individuals that
lived in our neighborhoods,"
Bradley said.
"Specifically, when there
were problems at school,
whether they be academic,
social or whatever, it would-
n't be unusual for a teacher
to ring your doorbell or come
to home knocking on the
door in the afternoon to tell
your parents about your
problems or your needs.
It was a family kind of
atmosphere. Back then
teachers were highly
respected and parents
received those teachers into
their homes with high
respect and listened atten-
tively to what they were say-
ing."


He said the school was
small by today's population
standards, but because of its
size, everyone knew every-
one else, which fostered the
family atmosphere.
As a sophomore, in the
1970s, Bradley was a student
at Richardson High School
when the school's spring
sports department was inte-
grated with Columbia High's
athletic program.
"I was attending
Richardson, but I was play-
ing baseball at Columbia
High School," he' said.
"Then the next year we
went to Columbia High
S c h o o .
They phased in the athletic
programs, then they went
into the traditional academic
settings that following year.
That was pretty strange for


me to be participating in
baseball at Columbia High
School, while attending
Richardson."
Bradley said having
Richardson High School in
the community was a benefit
for the black community in
the 1950s-1960s.
"Richardson was an icon
for the community," Bradley
said.
"It was a positive icon that
was an institution for learn-
ing where much of my fami-
ly, my child or myself could
go to comfortably and feel
welcomed and embraced. It
was like a family at
Richardson High School -
everybody was caring for
everybody."
Richardson Middle School
closed as a public school in
the early 70s.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


O-onor


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TERRY WARD, ADVERTISING
DAVE KIMLER, PRODUCTION
RUSSELL WATERS, CIRCULATION


MARINE-SPORTING GOODS, INC.
"Sales & Service"


1866 W. US Hwy 90 Lake City, FL 32055
Office: (386) 752-2500 Fax (386) 752-6755 www.mcduffiemarine.com
Monday Friday 8 5:30 Saturday 8 1

Badcock Barry Lawson "q
HOME UR NATURE Store Manager
(xmore. 382 N.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-6320
Toll Free 1-888-752-4615
Cell 386-208-4162
www.badcock.com



Morrell's
461 S.W. Deputy J. Davis Lane Lake City, FL
386-752-3910

HARRY'S
Heating & A/C
P.O. Box 1321 752-2300
In Business Since 1973

(386) 752- 2638RAM IN
BROWN FRAMING
Custom Picture Framing
SArt- DeDign Servrce
y" Since 1977
Since 1994
Tuckie Brown Maultsby 224 NW Hillsboro St.
Owner Lake City, FL 32055

community

17 ewelers
Since 1979
1037 West Highway 90, Suite 100 Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 755-0700

Auto Emporium
(Complete Auto Repair & Service Center)
Address: Local & Long Distance Dealer Specialty
PO Box 1927 Cars. Trucks, & 4x4's Road Service
Lake City, FL 32056 Insurance Claims Molor Homes Fax:
Located At: (1-386) 752-8246
2832 SW Main Blvd. Johnny Ward, Sr., Owner
Lake City, FL Email7 6
32025 (386) 755-6444 jward5099@yahoo.com
SRay Lussier IiSpasoo
*Fibergl.ss.P.. 386-758-7522 Above Ground Pools
Sales & service AProducts Pools



888-403-9261 757 SW SR 247
386-758-6932 fax Suite 101
www.advantagepools.com Lic#RP0066801 Lake City, FL 32025



Tom Nehl Trucking
383 S.W. Arrowhead Terrace
(386) 755-9527

j Interstate
Cycles
Sales 580 SW Florida Gateway Blvd.
Parts Lake City, FL
| Service 758-2453

MARY KAy7R
Independent Sales Director
L PO Box 1774
Lake City FL 32056
"/V ..i/y/ Cell: (386) 697-5373
S Home Office: (386) 754-6762
*- Toll-Free (866) 440-9681
www.PlNKBOUTIQUE.com


h4eridqg FURNITURE
1052 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 752-2752 Fax: (386) 755-7528
"Complete Commercial and Residential Decor!"
Betty Etheridge Brooks Etheridge Alice Peters
Becky Todd Sonja Giebeig


Ronald R. Foreman, O.D., P.A.
Kimberly M. Broome, O.D.


Frank A. Broome, III, O.D.
Julie L. Owens, O.D.


North Florida EyeCare'
EXAMINATION AND TREATMENT OF THE EYE
EYEGLASSES AND CONTACT LENSES
763 SW Main Blvd.
(386) 752-1722 Lake City, Fl 32025



Boats Motors Trailers Water Craft Parts & Acc.
BOB & CAROL BROWN, Owners
(386) 755-2611 P.O. Box 682
Fax: (386) 755-6937 1524 N.W. Main Blvd. (Hwy 441)
Web-Site: bobsmarineville.net 1 i ,. (w 441)
E-mail: bobsmarinevil@bellsouth.net Lake City, FI 32056
Approved Auto Repair

Semcee
Complete Auto Service & Towing
(386) 758-9463 Repair
(386) 752-7305 24 hr Towing
MV#11967
2550 SW Main Blvd. Jim Wilkinson Owner
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CENTRAL STATES ENTERPRISE
US 41 N. & Waldo St., P.O. Box 2331
(386) 755-7443


Unique Designs Expen Repair-3

Lae Cit Lapidanj `Jew n, &Inc.

Phone: (386) 755-9665
Jeff & Denise Mears 174 N. Marion Ave.
Owners Lake City, 32055

HUDSON'S
Jon DISCOUNT MARINE.
New & Used Boats *
New & Used Outboards *
Blaine Hudson And Parts Hwy 90 E. Lake City, FL
Sales/Manager (386) 758-0057
Sales/Manager Fax (386) 758-0066
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"Pay Your Respects, Not Your Life Savings!"
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Call For a FREE Informational Brochure & Price Sheet
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SAMERA
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386-752-6933, ext. 107
90 West of 1-75, Lake City, FL
Open Monday-Frickiy 7:30.n
Saturday 8:00am to 5pm MV#47669


HAIR'S MOWER PARTS & REPAIR -
Z% "Your Small Engine Parts Headquarters."


314 N. MARION AVE. LAKE CITY


B Goodwrnch Seravke

RONSONET BUICK GMC TRUCK
490 E. DUVAL ST. (U.S. 90 EAST)
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
1-386-752-2180


Antiques & Collectibles
(Formerly "The Bookcase")

261 N. Marion Ave. Lake City, FL 32055
10-6 Mon. Fri. 752-3550 10- 5 Sat.

DELTA FARM CENTER R


211 N.W. Franklin St. Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3775
fax: 386-755-2432 Anne Smithey


@Downtown 4


204 North Marion Avenue Lake City, Florida 32055
386.752.7504
l:ax 386.752.2316
IIours: Monday a Friday 7:30 a 4:00 p.m.
Owners: l,2olwurt and Emmie ClaIsteen
"We are also available for many of your catering needs."

Virginia Tiner
Bookkeeping and Tax Service
Tel: (386) 758-9808 Fax (386) 758 9869
2812 South Marion Avenue Lake City, FL 32025


Hair Graphics
is proud to serve our community for 20 years.
Come visit our New Facilities
948 SW Baya Dr.
755-2325
The /

Check Casher Pawn Shop Music Store
Steve Briscoe
1010 S.W. Main Blvd., Ste. 100 1034 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32025 Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 752-7828 (386) 752-7871 fax (386) 755-2060 *fax (386) 755-2990
steve@firststreetmusic.com
"IF ANYONE CAN THE MONEY MAN CAN!"


7)R J._MATOJ

West Hwy 90 Lake City, FL.
386-755-9444
Connie M. Eadie
Agency Owner
Allstate Insurance Company
4447 NW American Lane
Suite 101
Ill I Lake City, FL 32055
386.752.6058
You're in good hands. Fax 386.752.7928
Toll Free 877.360.1333
24 hr. Customer Service Email: 040579@allstate.com
Auto Home Business & Life


N beco-Tique.
168 N. MARION LAKE CITY
386-752-4009
BROWSE FOR ANTIQUES, ART, AND DECORATIVE ITEMS
ELIZABETH C. ALLUM, PROPRIETOR

Davis Towing"

& Recovery
1226 N.W. Main Blvd., Lake City, FL
386-752-9790


REPORT ER
SERVING COLUMBIA COUNTY SINCE 1874


MICHAEL LEONARD, PUBLISHER
TODD WILSON, EDITOR
SUE BRANNON, CONTROLLER


..... .....


.s


7N






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


K


Commnnunityl -


Fort White rallies around sports


By MARIO SARMENTO
mnsarmento@lakecityreporter.comrn
Sports can mean so much
to a community by rallying
people together in the com-
mon interest of rooting for a
team.
In the past five years, the
people of Fort White have
experienced this with the con-
struction of a new Fort White
High School and the addition
of athletic teams in a variety of
sports.


Many years ago there was
another Fort White High
School, but the school was
nowhere near as big as the
current one and was aban-
doned in the late 1960s. Since
then, Fort White residents
have had to look to their broth-
er to the north, Lake City, both
for education and for sports.
Students had to take buses
or car pool for 20 minutes just
to get to Columbia High.
"When we had the middle
school, that was the only type


iiiii Iggl' lik 7@
m'H'SE i-S" .- ;^ =^ :, ,-=i, .-
COURTESY PH
Fort White High football players gather, around Coach Mike
Hunter after a game during their first season.


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of athletic event we had," Fort
White football coach Mike
Hunter said. "And it was the
most well-attended event
around."
Hunter, who had coached
the middle school football team
for years, said there were
always whispers that the coun-
ty was going to build a new
high school, but there never
seemed to be a definitive
answer on when. Then, a
group of representatives
pushed for the new school to
be built, and in 2000 the new
high school was finally con-
structed.
"It was tremendous excite-
ment," Hunter said. "Getting
our school and athletic activi-
ties, so many people are
involved now."
Fort White student Robbie
Alford said, "It's a lot better
because I live five minutes
from the school. It's better to
watch a game when it's five
minutes from your house."
At the old Fort White High
School, the only sport available
was basketball. Betty Koon, a
1957 Fort White graduate,
recalled that when she played
basketball, she played on a clay
court. All the cars would park
around the clay court in the
cold weather, a sight Koon
never forgot.
"There were only 17 sen-
iors," she said. "We had bas-
ketball. We played other
sports, but it wasn't in competi-
tion."
Duey Glenn (Class of '61)
also played basketball at the
school. He said when he heard
the news that there would be a
new high school coming to the
area, he was "very excited.
Especially since my three
daughters graduated from
Columbia High School and my
eight grandchildren are in the
community."
Although Glenn loved to fol-
low Columbia High, he said,
"It's really great to follow the


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COURTESY PHOTO
Members of the Fort White High boys varsity soccer team prior to a game during the first


year of the program.
home team."
He added, "Just the fact that
we have these teams here. You
feel the pride in the community
to have the students partici-
pate."
Glenn and Koon have par-
ticipated as well, attending
several athletic events at the
new school.
Hunter still vividly remem-
bers the first high school foot-
ball game played at the new
Fort White, but it was not at
the school. The stadium had
not yet been completed, so the
Indians played the game at
Fort White Middle School.
"I never thought we would
see that day," he said. "So
many of the older people who
had been around in the com-
munity came out."
There wasn't sufficient


lighting on the field, so Hunter
asked Harvey Campbell if he
could arrange for portable
lights to be brought to the
field. "They weren't that tall
either," Hunter recalled with a
laugh. Two years later, the
football team made the play-
offs for the first time in school
history.
For Fort White coach
Demetric Jackson, the lure of
the community in which he
grew up was too strong to
resist. Jackson, who played
football at Columbia High in
the early 1990s, left a coaching
position at another high
school to return to Fort
White.
"I was a varsity-level coach
at Buchholz High School," he
said. "I left there to come and
coach the middle school


because I love Fort White. I
think that kind of shows how
much I wanted to get into this
community. This is me. This is
part of who I am. And I wanted
to be a part of building that
rich tradition. It's exciting to
me to be walking around with
that red and black on."
Jackson is hoping that there
are even bigger things in Fort
White's future and not just
on the athletic field. "I'm hop-
ing they will be extending the
stadium because it will be
standing room only at a foot-
ball game," he said. "And not
just football, but every single
sport here. Every aspect, we'll
have the great three As aca-
demics, athletics and attitude.
. my goal is that we don't sac-
rifice one aspect for the other
two."


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MARGARET


VUEST
for MAYOR


Community Activist
*Presented a key to the city for participation in the revitalization ol
downtown Lake City. ,
* Received the Lake City Reporter "Gate Keepers" award for
Public Service
* Wrote a three-part series on the degradation of Lake Alligator
that spurred the restoration of the lake.
* Received a "Public Service Award" from Altrusa International of
Lake City and Lake City Community College
* Founder of the Senior Advocates for Senior Citizens which today has 450 members
Vote for Continued Progress for Lake City
" Economic development is more important now than ever. Because of the rapid growth in
the Lake City area, much though should be given to land management and innovation in
seeking and securing new business & funding to help bring them here.
* I will continue to make sure all city ordinances and codes are updated to conform to 21"
century.
* I will work to make downtown Lake City a destination for all people, including the
tourist, by developing and implementing promotional campaigns.
* I will work to expand utility services to areas of growth which will help in the
development of all areas around Lake City.
Paid political advertisement paid for and approved by Margaret Wuest for Mayor of Lake City.


21E






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


- SM --~-~~ -=---~--- aa.me~b..fltt.L..~.


r A Phcc Cualled :


Community I


Superintendent Markham lives school history


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
Columbia County was
formed Feb. 4, 1832, but it
was more than 20 years later
before state officials estab-
lished a public school system
in the state.
According to an article by
May Vinzant Perkins in the
book, "Century In The Sun,
Lake City, 1859-1959", a sys-
tem of free public schools was
established in the state in
1853, sustained by a prorata
distribution of the general
school fund. The county pro-
bate judge and the county
commissioners formed the
school board.
A free school for white chil-
dren, one of the first in the
state, was established in Lake


City in the
m id 15 50 s
when the
town was
still known
as Alligator.
The Board
of Public


Markham


Instruction
was appointed March 2, 1869
and the Columbia County
school board was organized
May 8, 1869. Samuel T. Day
was chairman of the board.
"In the earliest days of the
Columbia County School sys-
tem, we did not actually a
school superintendent and a
school board," said Maurice
Williams, the curator of the
Columbia County School
museum. "The school system
was administered by what
may be called as an acting


superintendent, who was actu-
ally a judge of probate. The
county judges of probate
acted as the superintendent of
schools before 1869."
Robert Brown was record-
ed as being the first superin-
tendent, then in 1865 and
after, superintendents were
elected or appointed by a
board or commission and
called a county superintend-
ent of instruction. PA. Holt
first served in the position for
Columbia County. Holt served
from 1869-1870.
Today, Grady "Sam"
Markham, is the Columbia
County superintendent of
schools.
Markham started working
full-time for the Columbia
County School district in 1960
and has 45 years experience


as a school district employee.
During his 45 years as an
employee, Markham has
been a classroom teacher,
adult education teacher, sub-
stitute bus driver, elected to
school board in 1972, appoint-
ed principal of Five Points
Elementary in 1980 and
served there for 24 years as
principal before November
2004, when he became county
superintendent.
Markham is the first
Columbia school's superin-
tendent to have 10,000 stu-
dents as pupils in the area
public school system.
"It's scary," he said. "When
I think back when I started
teaching school in 1960, we
had 600 or 700 at junior high
and one high school with
about 800 students. When I
started there was probably no


more than 4,000 students in
the school system. 1 watched
it grow from 4,000 to close to
10,000 students and have seen
the number of schools grow
to 13 schools in the county. I
think that with the influx of
many new people moving into
the county it's a very impor-
tant time in the progression
on school system in Columbia
County. I see the school sys-
tem continuing to grow and in
the future, I see it growing at
even a faster rate."
Operating the local schools
today is much different from
Markham's early years
because of the development
and increased use of technolo-
gy.
'There was no computers,"
he said. "Almost everything
was done by hand. The first
year I was principal, I basical-


ly did my entire budget on a
yellow legal pad. The first
year I served as classroom
teacher in 1960, the entire
Columbia School System
budget was basically kept on
spread sheets. Our budget is
approximately $75 million and
I can remember when it was
probably $10 million."
Markham said most of the
changes he's seen in the
school system has to do with
computers and the use of
technology and how educa-
tors are now tasked with
preparing children to live in a
world that is surrounded by
technology.
"It's very important that we
keep up with technology and
MARKHAM
Continued on Page 24E


COLUMBIA

DOOR COMPANY

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386.754.9992
"", : .'.* :7


VOTE


J.L.


-Offomp--K y


"Skipi


VIAY10


per" Hair, II

II/t' fll i',n w ie.it 't lir 'Ii./ per -/ ,'" m: I I t 'mrun lt/1
/ ole ir i mania that behet /les
Our ihll hioul/d hei cut l 'uelr lri'end/t\l' tial l Itreat
/Iil i/c/o / /II//' i/) ity *unl /and I'(1c
I '/-ill inork ha.,rd to minirote the qtualir ,1 f /if(

th Il Ol i t' OI mIii ll/ .
i ii i i o r',""ur v /iiii iily. ;
It /I' i iM.,ir tl ilo ut0 io k' /l.icth'r wtfi all t'/''lc/ed
u'//ihi'/h lv, i/dlut' 1' cur i/.it r /i.iiuill' t.'in'/
Please Vote...
J.L. "Skipper" Hair, II
for MAYOR
F M,1 j,:,In[l" II l ,:j n :rlTnll] hja l] Il j,,,J rd).l : i i I lnl',l:,:n H, L n I ., r i .,,


S ANY 4 ROOMS CLEANED ~1
.$99.95 'TANL&X
(CLEANED AND PROTECTED '154.95)
STANLEY STEEMER.
Must present coupon. A room is an area up to 300 sq. ft. Liv/Din room combos or
j.P great rooms count as two rooms Residential only. Expires 5-31-05. '-
r- -ZIT-;- LIVING BRINGS IT IN. WE TAKE IT OUT.s"
CLEAN ONE SOFA (up to 7 ft.) AND ONE CHAIR I <,
88.00
(CLEANED AND PROTECTED 115,00)
STANLEY STEEMER.
Must present coupon. Residential or Commercial.
LCR Excluding leather & Haitian cotton. Expires 5-31-05.
CLEAN ANY 5 ROOMS I
$125.00
(CLEANED AND PROTECTED '199.00) .
STANLEY STEEMER. ,
Must present coupon. A room is an area up to 300 sq. ft Liv/Din room combos or
LCR great rooms count as two rooms. Residential only. Expires 5-31-05.
STILE AND GROUT CLEANING I ,
10% OFF Lake City
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STANLEY STEEMER. OR 1-800-STEEMER
Must present coupon. Residential or Commercial. Minimum charge is required I Schedule online at stanleysteemer.com
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23E


LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


- -m


A LI I'~~ EllJ U


Colmmunity


I m *-'


Longtime elections employee true to process


By JASMINE RANGEL
jrangel@lakecityreporter.com
Come election time, there
is guaranteed to be one per-
son in Lake City whose lawn
will be void of political signs
and car bumper free of candi-
date stickers.
Pauline Smith, one of the
longest working pollworkers
in Columbia County, said she
learned a long time ago to
stay tight-lipped during elec-
tion season.
"I learned some 60 years
ago not to discuss politics,"
Smith said.
Her husband would often
tell her she should vote the
same way he did, otherwise,
he said, her vote would "kill


my vote." It -
was then
she decided
she would l
keep her
political
opinions to -k
herself. Smith
Her neu-
tral political attitude drew
her toward post-retirement
work that requires keeping
mum during elections.
Smith has been working as
a poll clerk since she retired
in 1984. The first election she
worked was in 1986.
She said she doesn't really
remember who ran in that
election, in which Bob
Graham won a U.S. Senate
seat and Bob Martinez was


elected governor.
Smith's career choice
reflected her attraction to
working the polls. She
worked in personnel at the
Lake City Veterans Affairs
Medical Center.
"I like people and I like to
meet people," she said.
She currently works
precinct 14, with polls locat-
ed at the Woman's Club of
Lake City.
When probed about poll
activity during the 2004 gen-
eral election, she refers to
local races rather than the
presidential candidates, both
of which she said she had lit-
tle confidence in.
"We should be more inter-
ested in our local politi-


fi really feel you can
keep abreast of what
is happening in your
community by work-
ing the polls. Most of
the people who work
the polls feel the way
I do.
Pauline Smith
Columbia County
pollworker


cians," she said. Smith said
she was more excited about


close votes for sheriff and tax
collector than national races.
A pollworker's election
day begins early. Smith said
as a clerk she is at the polls
in between 4:30 a.m. and 5
a.m.
Pollworkers are not
allowed to leave the poll site
until polls close at 7 p.m.
Preparations for the May
10 mayoral election have
already begun.
New machines are coming
in and Smith has already
gone through training for
new voting machines set to
arrive soon.
Smith said she'd like to see
more young people work the
polls. Her colleagues are


usually older and will some-
times take a day off work to
be a pollworker.
She said neutrality during
elections isn't something
she's alone in advocating.
"Most of the people who
work the polls feel the way I
do," she said.
Though she won't talk pol-
itics, Smith said voting is a
paramount civic duty.
Taking it a step further
and being a pollworker is one
of the best ways to know
what is going on in Columbia
County, she said.
"I really feel you can keep
abreast of what is happening
in your community by work-
ing the polls," Smith said.


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1







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2005


, '


Community


Falling Creek: A jewel of Columbia County


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com

Falling Creek could be con-
sidered one of Columbia
County's jewels.
The waterfall is located in a
park now, which includes
grassy parking areas, picnic
tables and a boardwalk.
Cindy Johnson, communica-
tions coordinator of Suwannee
River Water Management
District, said that $334,100 was
paid for 148 acres on March 1,
2000 with Preservation 2000
funds.
"Columbia County manages
the park now," she said.
The park is located on
County Road 131, just north of
the State Road 441 and the
Interstate 10 interchange.
The park was founded in
2001.
The property was purchased
from the Parker and Hogan
families.
In the March 1993 edition of
Florida Living magazine,
Michelle Bush, wrote an arti-
cle about the founding of
Falling Creek.


MARKHAM
Continued on Page 22E


provide the hardware and the
teachers to prepare these chil-
dren for the world that we live
in," he said.
Another thing that I think is
important is the way we teach
children today is different
from the way we did years
ago. One of the things in the
future will be high school
reform.
'The way we teach subject
areas will be different in the
future," he said, noting high
schools in the future will be
designed to incorporate up to
three disciplines ini one class
period.
With the Columbia County
population steadily increas-


CHS
Continued From Page 3E
when there was only one pub-
lic high school in the county.
"As with Richardson High
School and Fort White High
School, many of our commu-
nity and state leaders graduat-
ed from these schools," he
said. "Through that,
Columbia High School had a
direct impact on the growth
of community and the state. It
was a factor which united the
community, not only the
sports, but with all school
activities. When it was the
only public high school, it
was a very central meeting
place for everyone. A bunch
of the community activities
revolved around Columbia
High School."
Moses taught at Lake City
Junior High School and then
at Lake City Middle School
before eventually moving to
Columbia High as a guidance
counselor. Looking back, she
said she remembers how
emotional high school was.
"I remember emotionally
that high school is so hard
and as older people we only
remember the fun times. I
remember the pranks we
played and working on the
year book, but it was real


CASTILLO
Continued on Page 24E
Before working for utili-
ties, Castillo worked for the
wastewater plant. He said he
had no reason to really move
from there, but he put in for
his current job, which he's
held for about 33 years.
He's lasted this long work-
ing for the city because he
knows to follow directions to
the best of his ability, Castillo
said.
"I do whatever I'm told to
do and do the best I can," he
said. "I do the best I can at
whatever I'm doing."
But the long career has to
one day end.


Celah Manker Rivers, the
wife of Abraham Rivers, had
stomach problems.
A friend of Rivers advised
him to take his wife to experi-
ence the healing waters of
Upper Springs, Florida, which
is present-day White Springs.
Heeding the advice, Rivers
and his family packed up their
bags and set off with 13 other
covered wagons in 1846.
Within two weeks, only one
wagon was left.
One night, the family
stopped by a bridge on the side
of a creek.
They admired the clear, cool
water flowing into a horseshoe-
shaped waterfall in the middle
of the creek.
They never made it to White
Springs.
The family stayed in their
new home and named it Falling
Creek.
The community made most
of his money by farming.
Cotton was the most popular
crop succeeded by tobacco.
Thomas Manker founded
the First Adventist Church of
Falling Creek before 1886,


ing, Markham said the need
for new schools may arise in
the near future.
He said they may need
another elementary school on
the northwestern side of town
near Lake Jeffery road and in
the future, have a true middle
school in Fort White, with
sixth, seventh and eighth
grades and just have a high
school 9-12 grades.
He said both middle school
are currently near capacity.
"We just have too keep an
eye on the growth and our
capital outlay," he said. "I've
seen many changes in my life
with the school system. You
see it on a daily basis and
don't often realize it, but when
you look back, you realize
them. I'm very proud people
in Columbia County had confi-
dence I could do the job."


hard moving to Lake City as a
junior in high school," she
said. "I loved having graduat-
ed from Columbia High
School, because everywhere I
go, I always run into people
that I graduated with. They
may not have been people I
hung out with, but there is a
bond. There is just such a
bond that is so comforting
when I see a face that I recog-
nize from high school."
Through her experiences
as a student at the school, as
well as member of the
school's staff, Moses said
she's also been able to see
how the students have
changed through time.
"Columbia High School has
gotten so much more
diverse," she said. "When I
was in high school there were
three kinds of kids the
preppy kids, the country kids
and the athletic kids, and now
there are just so many groups
and different kinds of kids,"
she said. "Since I was in high
school, things are much more
academically driven. When I
was in school it was competi-
tive, but now, it's much more
academically driven and
stressful.
"I think high school is a lot
more stressful now than it
was in 1970."


Castillo said he hopes to
retire in maybe the next five
or six years.
His retirement plans, so
far, include what he now tries
to do in his spare time fish-
ing.
Castillo said Lake City is
where he grew up and has
raised his two children,
Sherry Lee and William, with
his wife Janie Lee. His sisters
live in the area as well.
"My whole family lives in
Lake City," he said.
There are no ideas to move
from Columbia County in the
future. Castillo said he has no
reason to leave.
"I just ain't never wanted to
go nowhere," he said.


however no exact date is
known.
Manker was a widower who
had three married daughters
at the time.
He moved to Florida from
South Carolina and settled in
the area near Blounts Ferry
Road in the 1850s.
It is known that in 1886, the
land for the church was bought
for $1.
That same year, records
show that the Florida
Methodist Conference took
charge of the church.
According to an article by
Margaret Wuest, the building
was also used as a Baptist
church.
The church was then a
Methodist church, but is now
referred to as Falling Creek
Chapel.
According to church


JUSTIN LANG/Lake City Reporter
Falling Creek is one of Columbia County's most unique geological features. The portion of
the creek with the waterfall was made a county-managed public park in 2001, complete with
a boardwalk and picnic tables.
records complied by Marion Manker who donated the land. included John A. Mole, James
Moore, one of the first Sunday Church trustees named in rivers and Glen Clements.
school superintendents was the original deed of the Falling Creek Methodist
James W. Dicks, grandson for Methodist Episcopal Church Church.


- j


24E