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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Sunday Report
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Opinion
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section C: Life
 Section D: Business & Home
 Section D: Classified Advantag...
 Section E: Medical & Governmen...














The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/00095
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: April 17, 2005
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:00095
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Sunday Report
        page A 2 (MULTIPLE)
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Opinion
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Sports
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
    Section C: Life
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
    Section D: Business & Home
        page D 1
        page D 2
        page D 3
        page D 4
    Section D: Classified Advantage
        page D 5
        page D 6
        page D 7
        page D 8
    Section E: Medical & Government
        page E 1
        page E 2
        page E 3
        page E 4
        page E 5
        page E 6
        page E 7
        page E 8
        page E 9
        page E 10
        page E 11
        page E 12
        page E 13
        page E 14
Full Text







Meca & Government

't 3 of our 4 part, month-long series detailing the area in which we live.
SECTION E


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Sunday
April 17, 2005
Lake City, Florida


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75e
Weather
Mostly Sunny
High 74, Low 45
Forecast on 8A


Mayoral candidates share personal history


Those seeking office
share vision; some
explain criminal pasts.
By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City residents will
elect a mayor for the second
time this year.
On May 10, five candidates
will vie for the unexpired
term of former Mayor Ray
Kirkland, who resigned in
February after more than
eight years in office.


The candidates
are as follows:
Glenel Bowden,
James L.
"Skipper" Hair,
Debi Myer
Friedman ,
Stephen M. Witt Bowden
and Margaret
Wuest.
Because there are more
than two candidates, to win
outright, one must take at
least 50 percent, plus one
vote, of all ballots cast in the
special election. Otherwise
the top two vote-getters will


Hair


meet in a May 24 runoff.
In an attempt to better
inform the voters of Lake
City as to who their choices
for mayor are and what they
see as important issues fac-
ing the city, the Lake City
Reporter talked with each of


an Witt Wue
the candidates about them-
selves and their vision for the
community.
To research each candi-
date thoroughly, the
Reporter also conducted
criminal background checks
on all five candidates


through the
Department of
Law Enforcement
database.
While two of the
candidates had no
t record, the
Reporter found
that three of the candidates
had past criminal arrests in
Florida. One candidate
served several years in
prison for a murder convic-
tion.
Each of those three candi-
dates were able to explain


INSIDE
Glenel Bowden .....PAGE 6A
'Skipper' Hair....... PAGE 7A
Debi Friedman...... PAGE 7A
Stephen Witt......... PAGE 7A
Margaret Wuest.... PAGE 5A
Our View Background
checks necessary in political
arena................... PAGE 4A
their records to the Reporter,
and all five shared why they
are running for office, what
they would focus on if elect-
ed and why people should
make them their next mayor.


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CALL US:
(386)
752-1293
SUBSCRIBE:
755-5445


TODAY


Classified ...... .5D
Life ........... .1C


Business .......1D
Stocks ......... 3D


Obituaries ...... .6A
Opinion ........ 4A


Puzzles ........ 3C
Scoreboard ...... 2B


Motley Fool ..... 2D
Weather ........ 8A


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Page 2A
April 17, 2005


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SEAN JAREM/Lake City Reporter
WalkAmerica
ABOVE: J.Jones (left) Melissa Spurlock (center) and Leslie
Williams (right) enjoy a Saturday morning walk through
downtown Lake City during the March of Dimes'
WalkAmerica annual event.
LEFT: Chris Buchner reaches for water provided by Sandie
Nobles of First Federal Savings Bank of Florida. The bank
raised more than $22,000 for the event, which promotes
awareness of premature birth. Event organizers estimated
Saturday's walk raised about $80,000.


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BRIEFS


First Federal
helps raise funds
First Federal Savings Bank
teamed up with the Advent
Christian Village in Dowling
Park to raise money for the
new W.B. Copeland Clinic
that is being constructed in
the village.
First Federal donated $1


for each signature-based
transaction the residents
made with their First Federal
Debit Card, up to 10,000
transactions.
Susan Moore, financial
specialist and branch manag-
er for First Federal's Dowling
Park Branch, presented
Craig Carter, Vice President,
Resource Development for


the Advent Christian Village,
a $10,000 check to assist with
the new building.

LCMC hosts
awards banquet
Lake City Medical Center
recently honored 47 employ-
ees during its annual service


awards banquet at the
Quality Inn.
The employees were
awarded for five, 10, 15 and
20 years of service The
employees have provided
more than 425 combined
years. Numerous employees
were awarded for perfect
attendance in 2004.
Compiled from staff reports


FRE LkeCiy Rpote ppe


Little Caesars


- U -


LAKE CITY REPORTER
HOW TO REACH US CLASSED
Main number ......... .(386) 752-1293 To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


A .:....4 .. a f
0F7363 SW Baya Dr. 961-8898
0Hwy 47 & 1-75 755-1060
Offer limited to first 150 customers of the day



2005





CLASSES

^ Apply & Register NOW

t April 20-Aug 11

Prepare for exciting CAREERS or transfer to
UF, FSU, ST. LEO, UNF, or other great universities!


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*


iax number ............... 752-9400
Circulation ................ .755-5445
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fla. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard ... .754-0418
(mleonard @ lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson .......... 754-0428
(twilson @ lakecityreporter.com)
ADVETSG
Advertising Director
Terry Ward .................. 754-0417
(tward@lakecityreporter.com)
Sales ...................... 752-1293
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)


Controller Sue Brannon .......754-0419
(sbrannon @ lakecityreporter.com)
ERCUULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next
day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters ... .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
13 Weeks .................... $23.54
26 W eeks .............. ... $42.80
52 W eeks ..................... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
13 W eeks .................. $44.85
26 W eeks ..................... $89.70
52 Weeks .................. $179.40


Correction policy
The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


For more information call
(386) 754-4287
www.lakecitycc.edu
LCCC is an Equal Access/Equal
Opportunity Institution


LAME CET'vv
COMMUNITY tiiLLttli


Lottery
MIAMI Here are the
winning numbers in
Saturday's Florida Lottery:
Cash 3: 9-6-3
Play 4: 1-8-2-8


"YurPrterfrSheFtue


Fantasy 5:11-5-16-17-10
Lotto: 23-39-48-5-11-31
Friday's Fantasy 5: 34-8-
5-27-4
Friday's Mega Money:
12-24-27-32
Mega Ball: 6


4b 4@P-NDwim


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005 3A

LOCAL


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ir-PPEDIC
* PRESSURE RELIEVING
W SWEDISH MATTRESSES AND PILLOWS
The Furniture Showplace
Wholesale Sleep
US 90 West (next to 84 Lumber) 752-9303


The Lake
would like


City Reporter
to congratulate


K R Home Town Title
on their March 29, 2005 groundbreaking
ceremony for their new expansion located
at 2744 US Hwy 90 West, Lake City


Small

business


Saturday, April 23, 10am-3pm
at the Lake City Mall
Come see what our community's
small businesses have to offer.
For More Info: 752-3690
Sponsored By
Lake City /Columbia County Chamber of Commerce

L^ i I 9,, Ii I


Congratulations Metabolic Centers on your loss
of 5972 lbs in February and a gain of $5972 for
the Tsunami Relief to be donated in your honor.
ATTENTION

*$ City of Lake City
Employees
SPECIAL METABOLIC
MARCH APPRECIATION
1/3 OFF PROGRAM FEE*
WITH FREE YEAR OF MAINTENANCE
*Up to 50 Ibs program with employee ID
Call Today. Start Losing Tomorrow


MEAOLIC 155-800
RESEARCH CENTER


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4A LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


RWPORTER
SERVING COLUMBIA COUNTY SINCE 1874
MICHAEL LEONARD, PUBLISHER
TODD WILSON, EDITOR
SUE BRANNON, CONTROLLER
THE LAKE CITY REPORTER IS PUBLISHED WITH PRIDE FOR
RESIDENTS OF COLUMBIA AND SURROUNDING COUNTIES BY
COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS INC. OF ATHENS, GA. WE BELIEVE
STRONG NEWSPAPERS BUILD STRONG COMMUNITIES -
"NEWSPAPERS GET THINGS DONE!" OUR PRIMARY GOAL IS TO
PUBLISH DISTINGUISHED AND PROFITABLE COMMUNITY-ORIENT-
ED NEWSPAPERS. THIS MISSION WILL BE ACCOMPLISHED
THROUGH THE TEAMWORK OF PROFESSIONALS DEDICATED TO
TRUTH, INTEGRITY, LOYALTY, QUALITY AND HARD WORK.
DINK NESMITH, PRESIDENT TOM WOOD, CHAIRMAN

DI I -"


Voters deserve to

know the facts

Criminal background checks are
necessary in the political arena
in this day and time. A back-
ground check is a factual record
of past occurrences. Nothing
more, nothing less.
Registered voters of Lake City deserve
to know of any past criminal activity that
clouds the past of an individual who wahts
to serve in a public office.
We have taken on the responsibility and
the expense of completing criminal back-
ground checks on the five mayoral candi-
dates that will ask for the votes of the com-
munity in the coming weeks. We have
done this because we have an obligation to
the public to provide information.
During the primary and general elec-
tions last fall, we received many tips of
questionable past behavior by several can-
didates seeking public office. We investi-
gated all of them. Some were true and
were printed; some never materialized,
were bad rumors and did not amount to .
anything.
Af this experience, we decided to
investigate all of our candidates seeking
office before the rumors began.
On the front page today are the results
of our findings.
These are not personal attacks. These
are facts.
These are not published as an indication
of who should be our next mayor. The vot-
ers will decide this on May 10.
This information is for the people of
Lake City to read and digest and fully real-
ize who their candidates for mayor really
are.
The past is in the past. People can
change. People deserve a second chance.
And voters deserve all the factual infor-
mation possible before they head to the
polls.



Today is Sunday, April 17, the 107th day
of 2005. There are 258 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On April 17, 1961, about 1,500 CIA-
trained Cuban exiles launched the disas-
trous Bay of Pigs invasion in a failed
attempt to overthrow the government of
Fidel Castro.

On this date:

In 1790, American statesman Benjamin
Franklin died in Philadelphia at age 84.
In 1861, the Virginia State Convention
voted to secede from the Union.
In 1941, Yugoslavia surrendered to
Germany in World War II.
In 1969, a jury in Los Angeles convicted
Sirhan Sirhan of assassinating Sen. Robert
F. Kennedy.
In 1969, Czechoslovak Communist
Party chairman Alexander Dubcek was
deposed.
In 1970, the astronauts of Apollo 13
splashed down safely in the Pacific, four
days after a ruptured oxygen tank crippled
their spacecraft.
In 1975, Phnom Penh fell to Communist
insurgents, ending Cambodia's five-year
war.
Ten years ago: An Air Force jet explod-
ed and crashed in a wooded area in east-
ern Alabama.
President Clinton signed an executive
order stripping the classified label from
most national security documents that
were at least 25 years old.
Five years ago: World finance officials in
Washington closed out the most tumul-
tuous meetings in the history of the


International Monetary Fund.


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Called to duty once more


Our local Florida National Guard
153rd Engineering Company was
recently activated called to duty
and shipped out to eventually go
to Afghanistan. So, this seems like
a fitting time to look way back in history at the
local Guard's first three out-of-town activations
to Miami, Raiford Prison, and Tallahassee, all
three occurring between 1929 and 1934.
The first occasion was following the disas-
trous Miami hurricane of 1929. The unit, then
called Company H of the 124th Infantry
Regiment, a machine gun company, was sent to
Miami for more than a month to prevent loot-
ing and help maintain civil order.
The second activation was in 1930 and had
national implications.
Anti-government extremist Guiseppe
Zangara attempted to assassinate president-
elect Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) who
was in Miami to make a speech.
Zangara's shots missed FDR but mortally
wounded visiting Chicago Mayor Anton
Cermak who was also on the speaker's plat-
form with FDR. Justice was swift. Zangara was
arrested, tried, convicted, and sent to Raiford
Prison's Death Row, to await electrocution -
all in just three months.
But rumors started that Zangara had links to
the Chicago mob that his intended target
had been Mayor Cermak, not FDR and that
the mob might organize a major strike force
and try to break Zangara out of prison. This
prompted Florida Gov. David Sholtz to activate
Company H's expert machine gunners to
guard the prison.
They mounted .30 caliber machine guns on
the four corners of the Death House roof and
were ordered to shoot to kill anybody trying to
break into the prison. Either the rumors were
wrong or the show of power scared off the
would-be intruders but nobody tried to break
in, and Zangara was electrocuted without inci-
dent March 20, 1930. Company H then
returned to Lake City.
The third time was during the 1933-34 fruit
fly embargo. Health officials feared a fruit fly
infestation had contaminated Florida fruit and
ruled that no citrus would be allowed to leave
Florida for at least one year.
To help enforce this rule, Company H was
ordered to Tallahassee and manned the inspec-
tion stations on all highways leaving
Tallahassee going north or west.
Local guardsman Henry Lee Segars was
reportedly killed accidentally at one of these
posts.
Of course the next activation was in 1940 just
prior to Pearl Harbor when our Guard Unit was
sent to fight in World War II where they served
with honor and distinction, just as our present


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all 4


MORRIS
WILLIAMS


unit headed for Afghanistan is sure to do.
Going back to the local Guard's early histo-
ry, the first commander of Company H was
Capt. Talmadge Young in about 1919.
He resigned in 1924 and was replaced by
Capt. Edmund Wright Sr. Other leaders includ-
ed Lt. Austin Brown, Lt. Hugh Wilson, Jr., Lt.
Ike Garner, Lt. Bob Harkness, and excellent
Mess Sgt. Guy Markham. These Guardsmen
were all, of course, citizen-soldiers.
Apart from their National Guard service,
they, like today's Guard members, had regular
jobs in the community. For example, Captain
Young had a hardware store, Lt. Garner had a
clothing store, and Sgt. Markham was a rural
mail carrier. There were also several high
school students in the Guard.
Incidentally, Lt. Harkness, whose physician
father founded Lake Shore Hospital, rose to the
rank of general and the local National Guard
armory is named after him.
My thanks go to Air Force Col. (Ret.)
Edmund Wright Jr. (CHS 1939, West Point
1943) for providing much of the information in
this column.
Ed was in the local Guard unit himself as a
youngster and later, after graduating from West
Point, he entered World War II and heroically
flew 32 combat missions. Ed is now retired and
lives in Ormond Beach.
Add Jay Brown
Last week I wrote that E. A. McColskey and
Ralph Powers were the only two Lake Citians
ever to serve on the State Road Board.
Thanks go to Dr. R. L. McCaleb who remind-
ed me that Jay Brown also served on that board
in 1967 and was the first professional engineer
to do so.
Dr. Doak S. Campbell, once president of
Florida State College for Women (now FSU)
and namesake of the Seminoles' football stadi-
um, was the graduation speaker for the CHS
class of 1942.
NASA recently launched several cows into
orbit for an experiment.
They called it the herd shot round the world.

Morris Williams is a resident of Columbia
County and a historian. Contact him at 755-
8183 or williamsh2@firn.edu.


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Margaret Wuest to


focus on economic


development


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter.com
Margaret Wuest says that
Lake City is growing "by leaps
and bounds." She believes the
challenges that this growth
presents are among the impor-
tant issues facing the commu-
nity.
As a candidate for mayor,
Wuest, 73, said that "economic
development is the most
important thing."
But the second most impor-
tant goal, she said, is managed
growth in the city to make sure
that business and residential
areas are properly separated.
Wuest said she wants to see
a strong downtown revitaliza-
tion effort to make it what it
once was years ago.
She said she would like to
see more community events
and entertainment held down-
town, perhaps even on a week-
ly basis, to draw people of all
cultures to the area to meet
and connect with their fellow
residents.
"These are the things I want
to see happen in Lake City,"
she said.
More areas also need to be
serviced by city utilities, she
said. As mayor she would like
to have a full-time grant writer
to go after grants for both large
and small city projects.
Wuest is a native of the
Jacksonville, N.C., area, mov-
ing to Lake City in 1962. She is
a former lifestyles writer for
the Lake City Reporter, serv-
ing in that role from 1984-1996.
She also worked with the
Lake City Veterans Affairs
Medical Center from 1996-


Wuest


1997 with the public affairs
office and from 1997-2001 with
Southern Mediplex in commu-
nity relations and advertising.
Now retired from official
work, Wuest has volunteered
her time since 2001 to create
the Columbia County Senior
Services Advocates, a group
that now has more than 450
members. She met her hus-
band Harry, an accomplished
musician, soon after he moved
to the area to become Lake
City Community College's
band director in 1989. While
with the Reporter, she was sent
on an assignment to interview
him. About 14 months later
they married. Wuest has been
involved in many local commu-
nity efforts, but her most
important work, she said, is
the seniors advocacy group,
with hopes to grow its mem-
bership to 1,000 people. Wuest
said she believes the people of
Lake City are what make the
community great
She said she is "not a politi-
cian" and doesn't know how to
be one. "I just go with my
heart."


a- -


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- -


Know where you stand when

it comes to your health.

Women's Health Fair And Screenings


Free event sponsored by Women's Advantage
Tuesday, April 19, 2005 8 to 11am


Shands at Lake Shore,
368 NE


1st Floor Conference Room
Franklin St


(Refreshments provided)
* Cholesterol profile includes total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides, risk
factors and glucose. For more accurate results, fast 8 to 10 hours before
screening. Non-members $5 fee.
* Blood pressure checks
* Body composition testing
* Free health information

Reservations required. Screenings subject to change.


SHANDS
at Lake Shore
shands.org


Women's Advantage
A FREE me IIrihil, ipro,rnm
affiliated with Shands HealthCare


COLUMBIA COUNTY SCHOOL SYSTEM


' April


28th, 2005


Lloyd & Charlie-,
PRESENTING
"DO YOUR BEST'
An uplifting and powerful presentation which uses art and music
to promote, "Doing your personal best." You will learn how to
use your skills and talents to motivate children to build on the
positive part of life and move forward with purpose. This message
is about respect, responsibility and learning to get out of life what
you earn...

All programs will be presented / '(/' Present<
at the Columbia County School ( 10:00 c
Board Auditorium located at 372 ;'/ 6 6 OR
West Duval Street, Lake City, FL P:0 p.n,


For more information, contact Evening child care provided by Pride &
Tina Roberts at 758-4872 Joy RESERVATIONS REQUIRED
District Parent Involvement i


For m mbers ip r eeraions :cal 00-49742 ad prs 1


pwitfiveParenting Program


9h,


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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005

LOCAL


Glenel Bowden explains past, vows progress for city's future


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter. corn

Glenel Bowden has the
most political experience of
any of the five mayoral candi-
dates. But he is also the only
one who has served time in
prison, although he openly
admits his criminal past and
how it changed him.
"I tell people I went to
prison as a boy and came out
a man," Bowden said.
A former city councilman
for 16 years and the district
director for U.S.
Congresswoman Corrine
Brown for 12 years, Bowden,
55, also has served on the
board of directors for
Florida's League of Cities
and the league's insurance
trust. He also is a husband of
27 years to Aldonia and
father to two grown children,
Shomari and Akilah, along
with three grandchildren.
But as a young man in
1971, the Lake City native
was arrested and charged
with murder in Fort
Lauderdale. He was found
guilty for his involvement in
a robbery of a convenience
store that left an employee
dead. Bowden, who was not
the person to do the killing
but was party to the crime,
was convicted on a second-
degree murder charge. He
was sentenced to 20 years,
but served only six.
Explaining his life at the
time, Bowden, a U.S. Army
veteran, said he had just
returned from the Vietnam
War in 1970 and was addict-
ed to drugs.
At 22-years-old, he said he
went absent without leave


Bowden
Bowden


from the Army and wound
up living in South Florida
with drugs controlling his
life. Bowden said in
September of 1971, he and
two other young men went to
a convenience store in Fort
Lauderdale to rob the busi-
ness in order to get money
for drugs.
The crime resulted in one
of the young men shooting
and killing the store clerk.
Following his arrest,
Bowden was convicted and
sentenced within three
months after pleading guilty
to a lesser charge of second-
degree murder. Bowden said
many people in the commu-
nity know about his time in
prison and that he does not
attempt to hide that part of
his past.
"I've always been remorse-
ful and regretful for it," he
said.
"It's nothing I'm proud of.
I'm extremely dissatisfied
with that part of my life."
But instead of "wallowing"
in the situation, Bowden
said, "I chose to make some-


thing out of myself." He said
he used the time in prison to
reassess his life and educate
himself.
After he was released from
prison, he said he moved to
Lake City where he was wel-
comed with open arms.
Within a year he was elected
president of the local
NAACP chapter and in 1982
ran for City Council. He won
and was subsequently
reelected until losing to cur-
rent Councilman Eugene
Jefferson in 1998.
If elected mayor, Bowden
said his experience with City
Council and serving on
every city committee for
more than 16 years is an
advantage that none of the
other candidates have.
As mayor, he said impor-
tant issues that he would
address are balanced
growth, better job opportuni-
ties for local residents, more
business recruitment and
improved infrastructure.
Bowden said areas such as
U.S. 441 and U.S. 41 inter-
sections with Interstate 10
could be used for more
development.
But in order to do that, and
prevent any more septic sys-
tems that could harm the
area's groundwater, he said
the city must look to expand
its sewage service. While the
large cost to expand such
infrastructure can eventually
be recovered, Bowden said
once the environment is
damaged, "You can't get it
back."
The special election marks
the second time Bowden has
run for mayor, the first time


was in 2000 when he lost to
the incumbent former Mayor
Ray Kirkland.
Following that election,
city records show Bowden
never filed a final report for
his campaign account.
According to state law, a
candidate is required to file a
final report within 90 days
after the election.
City records show a letter
was sent to Bowden on Dec.
12, 2000 when the report was
overdue by a week.
When asked about why he
failed to file his report and
close his account, Bowden
said he didn't remember
receiving the letter.
He said if he needs to still
file a final report, he said he
will do so.
Bowden also is the only
one of the five mayoral can-
didates with a lawsuit pend-
ing against the city.
In 2002, Bowden, then
president of the local
NAACP chapter, helped plan
a protest of the city's logo
during the Olustee Battle
Festival parade because it
featured the Confederate
battle flag.
The day before, he was
arrested after putting fliers
on city utility poles to pro-
mote the NAACP protest. In
Lake City, posting docu-
ments on utility poles is
against city ordinance.
According to Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement records, the
charges were dropped. But
more than two years after
the incident, Bowden filed a
suit against the city in the fall
of 2004.


According to a claim sent
to the city from local lawyer
Merrill C. Tunsil, dated July
12, 2004, it alleged Bowden
was harassed, intimidated
and wrongfully arrested on
Feb. 15 2002, the day before
the scheduled protest of the
Olustee Battle Festival
parade.
"On that date, and perhaps
prior to that time, officers
and/or employees of the
City of Lake City targeted
Mr. Bowden in a calculated
effort to deprive Mr. Bowden
of his rights to free speech
and association and to be
unconstrained by the arbi-
trary, capricious and wrong-
ful acts of persons operating
under the color of law,"
according to the claim.
It also states Bowden is
demanding $150,000 for
"compensatory damages."
Bowden told the Lake City
Reporter this week that he
filed the suit because he
believes he was targeted by
police officers.
According to police
reports from the Feb. 15,
2002 incident, officers saw
Bowden at more than one
location in downtown Lake
City stapling posters promot-
ing a protest of the city's
logo during the Olustee
Battle Festival parade.
According to reports, that
morning the officers told
Bowden he was in violation
of city ordinance and read
him the ordinance aloud.
Bowden responded to the
officers, "I've been told,"
according to reports.
He was again seen later in
the day stapling posters to


utility poles.
This time, reports say the
officers issued Bowden a
notice to appear for violation
of the city ordinance.
According to reports, the
officers caught up with
Bowden again and told him
he needed to go back and
remove the posters from the
utility poles.
Reports say that Bowden
refused to do so and was
again told he was in violation
of city ordinance.
Bowden then, according to
reports, said, "I see what
direction this is going, let's
just take this to its final end,"
before grabbing his staple
gun and putting up another
poster on a utility pole in
front of the officers.
He was arrested and taken
to the Columbia County
Detention Center. He was
charged with failure to obey
a lawful order and violating a
municipal ordinance, though
both charges were later
dropped.
Bowden said, "I feel like I
was wronged at that point in
time," adding that he has
seen many people post fliers
on utility poles without being
arrested.
He did not say whether he
would drop the suit if elected
mayor.
Bowden said he can be an
aggressive person, but is not
naturally abrasive.
"I know how to get along
with people and work with
the council for the best inter-
ests of the city.
"I don't think my commit-
ment to the City of Lake City
is in question."


Obituaries


Roger Edwin Blair
Mr. Roger Edwin Blair, Sr., 66, of
Lake City died Friday, April 15,
2005, at the North Florida Regional
Hospital in Gainesville. A native of
North Carolina, Mr. Blair had been a
resident of Lake City for 52 years
having moved here from Madison,
FL, and was the son of the late Ira E.
and Lois Richardson Blair. Roger
owned and operated Blair and Sons
Cabinets in Lake City for thirty five
years, was Past President and mem-
ber of the Columbia County Hunting
Club, enjoyed hunting, fishing, and
little league baseball. Mr. Blair was
preceded in death by his sister, Judy
Clark in 2005.
Mr. Blair is survived by his wife
Sandra Blair of Lake City; six sons,
Eddie (Debbie) Blair, Allen Blair,
Mark Blair, Michael Blair, Chuc.k
Wood and Wayne "B.B." Wood all
of Lake City; two daughters, Heidi
Blair of Lake City, and Paris Bass
(Windell) of Greenville, Florida;
twelve grandchildren and 12 great-
grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Blair will be
conducted at 11:00 A.M. Monday,
April 18, 2005 at the Gateway-
Forest Lawn Funeral Home Chapel
with Pastor Lonnie Johns of Christ
Central Ministries officiating.
Interment will follow at 2:30 P.M.
Monday at the Macedonia Cemetery
in Madison, Florida. Visitation with
the family will be held from 4:00-
6:00 P.M. Sunday afternoon at the
funeral home. Arrangements are


under the direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 S. HWY 441, Lake
City. (386) 752-1954. Please sign
the guest book at www.gateway-
forestlawn.com.

Stuart George "Tin Man"
Haley
Stuart George "Tin Man" Haley, 60,
a resident of Lake City, Florida died
April 13, 2005 at his home.
Mr. Haley was a resident of Lake
City for the past forty five years.
He is the son of the late Stuart Felix
and Dorothea Helen Monsees Ha-
ley. He loved to ride motorcycles.
Survivors include his daughter:
Stephanie Davis, Lake City, Fl., One
Sister: Patricia Haley, Bainbridge,
Ga. Two Grandchildren: Angela
Davis and Joshua Davis, Lake City,
Florida. Two nieces: Melissa
Smith Starke, Florida and Amy At-
kinson, Bainbridge, Ga.
Memorial Services will be conduct-
ed Friday April 22, 2005 at 7:00
P.M. at Mr. Haley's Home. In lieu
of flowers donations may be made
to the family of Mario Poirier,
please contact Alan Fishman at 386-
454-9461. GUERRY FUNERAL
HOME 2659 SW. Main Blvd. is in
charge of arrangements 386-752-
2414.

Obituaries are paid advertisements.
For details, call the Lake City
Reporter's classified department at
752-1293


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005 7A

LOCAL


'Skipper' Hair says mayor must use


teamwork to achieve controlled growth


Debi Friedman hopes

to be people's voice


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter. corn

James L. "Skipper" Hair II
is a mayoral candidate for the
second time within a year and
believes joining the fray again
after facing an established
incumbent shows his determi-
nation.
"I hope the fact that the
hard work that I went through
the (previous) election and
the hard work I am going to
go through in the special elec-
tion is going to be appreciated
by the public and show them
the dedication that I have to
serve," he said.
Husband to Crystal
(Nelson) and father to Linzie,
7, and Gracie, 2, Hair ran
against former Mayor Ray
Kirkland and was defeated by
the three-time incumbent in
the Aug. 31 primary.
He said that experience did
nothing to lessen his desire to
serve the people of Lake City,
however.
Hair, 34, a lifelong Lake
Citian and local businessman,
said he believes Lake City's
next mayor has to have the
qualities and vision that will
lead the ever-expanding com-
munity to controlled growth.
"I feel like we need to have
a mayor who's going to be
able to work effectively with
other public officials," he said.
If elected, Hair said impor-
tant issues that he would
address are recreation, pro-
tecting the environment by


Hair


improving city infrastructure
and construction of a new cen-
ter for local senior citizens.
Having volunteered as a
coach for several recreational
and school sports over 14
years, including football from
the youth to high school level,
Hair said there needs to be
more recreation options for
local citizens.
He said the city also needs
to do its part to protect the
environment by building a
new wastewater treatment
plant that will treat waste-
water (sewage and stormwa-
ter) to the point that it could
be recharged into the envi-
ronment without negative
consequences.
"With the growth that
we've got, we have to prepare
ourselves so that it doesn't
affect us negatively as a com-
munity," Hair said.
He also said a new
Columbia County Senior


Services center needs to be a
project moved forward. Hair
said a piece of land for the
project needs to be selected
and the construction begun
while there is still a grant
available to help pay for its
cost.
"I feel like those are the
three things that are immedi-
ate and very important," he
said.
Hair said he understands
the importance of teamwork
and joining with other elected
officials to accomplish goals.
The general manager of
Hair Home and Auto for 10
years, which his father
opened as Western Auto in
1937, Hair said his knowl-
edge of how to prepare a
budget and meet with the
public would serve him well
in the position of mayor.
Since the previous election,
Hair said he has attended
City Council meetings, stud-
ied the city's budget, gone
door-to-door to meet with
people and sat down with
local officials to talk and
understand the issues facing
the city.
"I feel like the thing that
separates me from everybody
else is I've done my home-
work for the last year," Hair
said.
If elected, he said he is pre-
pared to "step right in and
work with the council to
move the city forward."
During the past election,
Hair cleared the air about a


previous arrest in his youth
and apologized for any mis-
takes he made in the past.
Shortly before the past
election, the Lake City
Reporter learned -that Hair
had a prior arrest and convic-
tion for domestic violence.
Hair was arrested on Nov. 2,
1994, for battery domestic
violence following a fight with
his then girlfriend, according
to Florida Department of Law
Enforcement (FDLE)
records. He later pled guilty
to a misdemeanor charge
before being convicted and
sentenced to one year proba-
tion.
FDLE records also show
Hair was arrested on July 20,
1991, for driving under the
influence and resisting an
officer without violence.
However, those charges were
never pursued by the State
Attorney's Office and were
dropped.
Of the charge and his
guilty plea on the domestic
violence charge, Hair told the
Reporter in August that he
regretted the incident, but
accepted the responsibility
for his actions and the conse-
quences.
"I feel like I've worked very
hard to earn the right to
serve Lake City as its mayor."
"And every day that I wake
up I try to be a better person
for my family, for my children
and hopefully for this com-
munity after the new elec-
tion," Hair said.


Stephen Witt wants to give back to


hometown, ensure proper growth


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter. com

Stephen M. Witt is a native
Lake Citian who says he wants
to give back to the community
which gave so much to him.
The mayoral candidate and
longtime local lawyer said he
chose to run in the upcoming
special election as a way to con-
tinue his history of community
service through personal con-
tribution.
"I've always been motivated
to do this type of thing through
organizations or through the
city," Witt said. "I have children
that are growing up here, and I
want the city to be better for
them."
As a former member and
chairman of the city's Planning
and Zoning Board for 13 years,
along with an undergraduate


degree in accounting to com-
pliment his legal expertise,
Witt, 53, said his experience
makes him an ideal candidate
for mayor.
Husband to Jodi, a father of
four grown children, Jamie,


Leah, Trey, Trevor, as well as a
grandfather to three grandchil-
dren, Witt said, "I think I've got
something to give back."
As important issues facing
the city, Witt believes that man-
aged growth and economic
development will need regular
attention from the next mayor.
"We are going to grow
whether we want to or not, and
I think it's how we control it,'"
he said.
Witt said the city must bring
in the "right" jobs and indus-
tries that are not "detrimental"
to the community. As mayor,
he said, he would also be a
champion of the continued
development and revitalization
of downtown.
"It's like a jigsaw puzzle," he
said. "If you put it together
right, then it matches up. If you
don't, then you've got conglom-


eration."
Witt said he believes the
county and city have worked
well together so far, but would
like to see the two local gov-
ernments partner even more to
help provide more activities for
local youth, revitalization of
historical sites and ensure
there is proper infrastructure
to support new development.
Witt is a graduate of the
University of Florida for both
undergraduate and law school.
He opened his law practice in
1977. He is also a Florida
Supreme Court certified family
law mediator and a special mas-
ter to circuit judges in pro se
cases.
Because he runs his own
firm, Witt said he can adjust his
schedule to meet the demands
the office of mayor would
require.


By JUSTIN LANG
jiang@lakecityreporter.com

Debi Myer Friedman says
she is a "fair person" who
would look at both sides of
any given issue to make sure
decisions are in the best
interest of the city.
A fifth-generation native of
the area, Friedman, 47, cur-
rently works in the Florida
Department of
Transportation's District 2
public information office.
Friedman has a 13-year-old
son, Matthew.
She said she can help con-
tribute to the city's continued
progress.
"I want to be the people's
voice, their key to the gov-
ernment."
She said the city will need
to continue to focus on infra-
structure and ensure man-
aged growth as the commu-
nity swells with new resi-
dents and businesses.
"We need to make sure the
infrastructure is in place
before we go wild with
expansion," she said. "But I
feel the people that live with-
in city limits have already
paid for this, and it shouldn't
be an additional burden on
them."
Before working with the
FDOT, Friedman was work-
ing with the Lake City
Reporter in advertising.
According to Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
records, in November of
1998, she was arrested for
contempt of court for failing
to appear at a civil hearing
for bankruptcy proceedings,
though the charges were
later dropped.
Explaining the circum-
stances that led to the arrest,
Friedman said while working
with the Reporter she had
just moved back to Lake City
following a divorce and her
income was significantly
reduced.
As a result, she said she
was unable to meet the finan-
cial demands already placed
on her and "just couldn't
make it."
Friedman said she was
considering filing bankrupt-
cy and on the day of the hear-
ing, a few of her co-workers
did not come into work.
She said because she
became busy, she forgot
about the hearing.
Later, she said, a deputy
from the sheriff's office
came to her home and
served her a contempt of
court notice for not appear-
ing and left.
But she said he soon came
back and told her that he
would have to arrest her and


take her to jail.
"I was mortified," she said.
Friedman said she bonded
out of the Columbia County
Detention Center, her hear-
ing was re-scheduled, and
the contempt of court charge
was dropped.
She described herself as
"very honest."
With her family's (Myer)
longtime presence in the
community, Friedman said
she has a "vested interest" in
wanting to be mayor.
"I am trustworthy,"
Friedman said. "I am aggres-
sive, and I have financial
knowledge."
She said she is also trained
in negotiations and noted
that she has worked closely
with the public for more than
30 years.
If elected, she said she
wants her constituents to
know they can call her with
any concerns. She said she
will attempt to help them if
doing so will aid "many peo-
ple in the city."
'Then we will take a look
at what we need to do and
see if we can get it done," she
said.
Like other candidates,
Friedman said she also
would like to see the contin-
ued revitalization of down-
town Lake City with more
entertainment options for
people to enjoy in that area,
With more people moving
in, she said, entertainment
needs to be improved.
While Friedman said the
local bowling alley and skat-
ing rink are "great," she
added that she would like to
see more restaurants and
perhaps a civic center that
could host various events.
Although she is in favor of
bringing new features to
Lake City, Friedman said
some of the existing infra-
structure is old and needs to
be brought up to current
standards.
"I just think we've been
going in the right direction. I
just want to make sure we
continue to go in that direc-
tion," she said.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


THE WEATHER


MOSTLY
SUNNY



HI 74 LO


MOSTLY
SUNNY


V PARTLY
,'-CLOUDY


HI 79 LO HIsi LO'


PAR
CLOt



S HI81IU


.; .-- ^ -: ,


-TLY PARTLY
UDY <- CLOUDY;



3 HI 81 LO'


A NATIONAL FORECAST: High pressure will allow for quiet conditions across much of the eastern U.S.
Isolated showers and thunderstorms will be possible from the central Plains into the central and south-
ern Rockies. A low pressure system at the surface will be responsible for showers and thunderstorms
over the northern High Plains. An upper-level trough of low pressure will bring scattered showers to the
Northwest. Mostly sunny skies will be the rule across the Southwest.


1-

Tallahassee
S 76/430
Pensacola Panama City
* 75/51 '*75/50
.


-.21


* Valdosta Jacksonville
75'43 70. 47
Lake City5
74/45
Gainesville* Daytona Beach
74/47 7253
Ocala* Cape Canaveral
"751/ rlando *72/57

76/55


Tampa
77/57


West Palm Beach
77/63,


Ft Myers'* Ft. Lauderdale
79/57 78/66*
Naples
79/59 Miami

Key West 79/66
76/68*


~cwn~1 n. ~s.oav. '54ns4


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
Lake City
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Tallahassee
Tampa
Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


Monday

75/57/s
80/68/pc
83/60/pc
78/52/s
76/53/s
79/71/s
79/51/s
81/68/pc
82/61/pc
80/52/s
80/57/s
77/53/s
76/55/s
79/50/s
81/60/s
80/51/s
80/66/pc


Tuesday

77/59/pc
81/69/pc
84/61/s
81/54/pc
77/54/s
80/72/pc
81/54/s
82/68/pc
83/62/s
82/54/pc
82/59/pc
79/59/pc
76/58/pc
81/54/pc
81/62/s
81/54/pc
80/67/pci


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


High: 93 Thermal; Calif.Low: e


. '. ,- I.


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


7p
M(


72
50
80
55
90 in 1967
27 in 1962


0.00"
4.22"
12.05"
1.69"
12.85"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset torn.


7:01 a.m.
7:59 p.m.
7:00 a.m.
8:00 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 1:48 p.m.
Moonset today 3:23 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 2:45 p.m.
Moonset tom. 3:58 a.m.



April May May May
24 1 8 16
Full Last New First


la 6a.


onday


Hratr Fd hoean


On iris ilae rin
1965, the
Mississippi River
reached a flood crest
at Saint Paul, Minn.
four feet higher than
any previous mark.


HIC Jl i
, : I, ,,' ., .- -


15mutetobm I: W J
Toda,, s .
ultra-ouet
radiation rsL I
or torin are'.a i
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'-


S.Forecasts, data and graphics
-'-~ 2005 Weather Central,
Inc., Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


Cnnec ed

www.IkedppTeprtecm


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Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
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Chicago
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Dallas
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Memphis
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Section B
Sunday, April 17, 2005
Lake City, Florida
www.lakecityreportercom


CHS FOOTBALL
Q-back Club to
meet Monday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club will meet
at 7 p.m. Monday in the
senior dining area at
Columbia High.
For details, call Delvey
Dicks at 752-9284.

SEMINOLES
Bobby Bowden
Day is Tuesday
Bobby Bowden Day is
Tuesday at Southern Oaks
Golf Club. The golf tourna-
ment is a shotgun start at
11 a.m. Cost is $50 per play-
er. The banquet will be held
at the Quality Inn & Suites.
Social hour is 6 p.m.. with
dinner at 7 p.m. Tickets to
the banquet are $25 each,
and reserved seating is $35
each. Hole sponsors are
available and include golf
and/or banquet tickets.
For details and registra-
tion, call Harold Mann at
303-2030 or Derriel Cribbs
at 623-6042.

IN THE ZONE
Top athlete
nominations
In the Zone with Shayne
Edge and Trey Hosford is
seeking nominations for a
weekly player of the week
award. Nominations must
include why they are
deserving. A player will be
presented each Monday on
the show, which airs at 7:30
p.m.
E-mail nomination to
inthezonecolumbiacounty@
yahoo.com.

ADULT SOCCER
Registration
ends Saturday
Registration for co-ed adult
soccer (high school and
older) continues through
Saturday. Those interested
can register at the CYSA
Gazebo from 5:30-7 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays or
at Brian's Sports. The entry
fee is $25. The season lasts
from May-July.
For details, call Paul
Short at 755-8621 or
Scooter Houston at 755-
4383, or visit
dilladiv@direcway. com.

YOUTH SPORTS
Registration at
Springville
Competitive activities in
entertainment is Monday-
Thursday from 4:30-6 p.m.
at Springville Community
Recreation Center on
Suwannee Valley Road.
Registration is Monday-
Thursday from 2:30-6 p.m.
and the one-time fee is $10.
Class is limited to the first
25 who sign up. Registration
ends Monday. Required
documents for registration
include parent's signature
and proof of health and acci-
dent insurance.
For details, call Barbara
T. Edwards at 397-0612.

GOLF
Cattle Baron's
tournament
The 3rd Annual Cattle
Baron's Golf Tournament is
May 13 at Southern Oaks
Golf Club. There will be a
silent auction and raffle of
sports memorabilia and golf
packages, with proceeds
going to support the
American Cancer Society.
Sponsorships and spon-
sor/player packages are
available.


For details, call Jennifer
Jeffres at 888-295-6787, Ext.
120.
Compiled from staff reports.


Scoreboard 2B
MLB 3B
NASCAR 4B


CHS tennis heads into districts


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
Columbia High's tennis
teams are in Ocala to compete
in the District 4-3A tourna-
ment. Play begins Monday at
Coehadjo Park for the girls
and Tuscawilla Park for the
boys.
The 4-3A high schools are
Columbia, Belleview, East-
side, Forest, Gainesville, Lake
Weir and Vanguard.
In the boys singles competi-
tion, Columbia's No. 1


through No. 5 players are
Mallory Leighty, Matt Yelken,
Chester Tan, Travis Green
and Kyle Townsend. Leighty
and Townsend play No. 1 dou-
bles, while Yelken and Tan
are No. 2.
"We have a slight worry
with an injury, and our first
alternate is Zach Waters,"
coach Sean Adams said prior
to leaving for the seeding
meeting. "I think Chester will
get a seed (top two are seed-
ed). Other than that, maybe
our No. 2 doubles. That will


probably come down to a coin
toss."
Gainesville is generally con-
ceded the district title, but the
rest of the field should be
competitive.
"Realistically, we could fall
anywhere from two to five,"
Adams said. "You never know
how your kids will respond in
this. If we play up to our
potential, we can compete for
second, for sure. The same
goes for Vanguard, Forest and
CHS continued on page 4B


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Matt Yelken returns the ball during a recent
practice.


On to regionals


Indians ready

for Bolles meet
By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter.com

Now that districts are over,
the members of the Fort
White High boys and girls
track teams can focus their
attention on this Thursday's
regional meet at Bolles High
in Jacksonville.
"I think now we've got a bet-
ter chance of some of these
guys going to state," Indians
track coach Demetric Jackson
said after this week's district
meet
Almost 20 athletes qualified
for the regionals, including
Elijah Serrano-Prusinski, who
advanced in three different
events. .
"Hopefully I'll pull my way
into states," he said. "Gotta
make it happen."
Serrano-Prusinski's best
event is the 300-meter hur-
dles, where he coasted to vic-
tory in a time of 41.7 seconds.
"I feel that I can go a lot
faster than that," he said. "I've
just got to train and get myself
to produce."
He also will be competing
in the 110-meter hurdles and
as a member of the 4x400-
meter relay team.
Nicole Waddington will
compete in two events the
400 meters and as part of the
4x800-meter relay team.
Elizabeth Weddle, Adrienne
Wray and Niecey Alexander
will also compete in two dif-
ferent events in Jacksonville.
Tim Robinson, James Pope,
Trevares Holden, Ashley
Waddington, Kathleen
Robinson, Teisha Conley,
Amber Thomas, Natasha
Easley and Antwan Ruise will
also be competing in single
events.


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Adrienne Wray practices on the hurdles early in the season. Wray qualified
for two events at this week's regional track meet at Bolles High.


Last year, sprinter Willie Jo
Cook was the only Indian to
qualify for states in the 100-


meter dash. This year states
will take place in Coral Gables
on April 30.


Kabmh raplWum liwirk rn











"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content .

Available from Commercial News Providers"


"It would be a dream come
true (to get there), that's for
sure," Serrano-Prusinski said.


PREP ROUNDUP

Tigers split

two games

From staff reports

Playing a doubleheader in
two different towns on the
road isn't typical, but
Columbia High managed to
earn a split against Fleming
Island High and Middleburg
High on Saturday.
"It was a big week for us,"
Tigers coach Andy Bennett
said. "Four district games
on the road, which we split.
Today's effort and attitude
was outstanding. They ran
out of gas at the end. It was
a good experience."
The Tigers beat Fleming
Island 4-3 in the first game.
Michael Kirkman (4-2)
pitched six innings and
struck out 11. Kirkman
allowed four hits, walked
three and allowed three
earned runs.
. Brian Pitman earned the
save after pitching one
inning and striking out two
batters. He walked two.
Seth Carswell was 2-4
with two RBIs and a run
scored. Eric Brooks had a
stolen base and a run
scored. Kirkman was 2-3
with two RBIs, a single and a
triple. Hunter Allen went 1-2
with a run scored. Stoney
Coulther was 1-3 with a run
scored.
Columbia fell 8-3 to
Middleburg in the nightcap.
Pitman took the loss after
pitching two innings and
allowing three earned runs
on six hits. He walked two
and struck out one.
Ted Fuller pitched two
innings and allowed one
earned run on three hits.
Danny Genung pitched an
inning and allowed two
earned runs on two hits.
Craig Thomas pitched an
inning and gave up one
earned run on two hits and
walked one.

PREP continued on page 4B


Central Florida shuts

out Timberwolves


By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter.comrn
The Lake City Community
College baseball team picked
a bad time for their bats to go
cold. Despite amassing 11
hits, the Timberwolves went
just 1-8 with runners in scor-
ing position with no RBIs and
were shut out for the second
time in three games in a 3-0
loss to Central Florida Com-
munity College on Saturday.
"We're not just getting the
hits with runners on base,"
LCCC coach Tom Clark said.
'We're not coming through
with the clutch hits."
Twice the 'Wolves had
runners at second and third
base with just one out, and
they couldn't push a run
across either time.
Lake City is still mathe-
matically alive for a playoff
berth, but with just two
games left in the season, the
chances of getting into the
postseason are slim.
Duente Heath (3-5) took
the loss after pitching seven


innings and allowing two
earned runs on four hits. He
struck out three and walked
four with two of the walks
turning into runs. Central
Florida scored its other run
on an error.
Mike Ryan pitched the
eighth and allowed one hit
and struck out one.
Chris Petrie led off because
Travis Jones sat out with a
pulled hamstring and went 2-4
and was caught stealing once.
Steven Rassel had a single and
Brandon Hall had two singles.
Mark Davis singled, Augustin
Montanez was 2-3 and Luis
Sanchez was 1-3. Matt
Mahony started for an injured
Ibrahim Lopez in left field and
doubled and a singled.
The 'Wolves also had con-
secutive runners thrown out
trying to stretch singles into
doubles in the seventh inning.
Lake City (27-21, 10-11
conference) hosts St. Johns
River in the final home game
of the season on Monday at 3
p.m. Stephen Barnes (6-3)
will get the start.


LA'ZEICITY- REPOSTER.









LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
ARENA FOOTBALL
1 p.m.
NBC Regional coverage, Colorado at
Chicago or Las Vegas at Philadelphia
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m.
FOX NASCAR, Nextel Cup, Sam-
sung/Radio Shack 500, at Fort Worth, Texas
1 p.m.
CBS American Le Mans, Grand Prix
of Atlanta, at Braselton, Ga.
SPEED -Speed GT Championship, Road
Atlanta, at Braselton, Ga. (same-day tape)
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Summitracing.com
Nationals, at Las Vegas (same-day tape)
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
4 p.m.
ESPN --Arizona at UCLA
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Spanish
Open, at Sotogrande, Spain
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, MCI Heritage, final
round, at Hilton Head Island, S.C.
4:30 p.m.
TGC Canadian Tour, Northern Cali-
fornia Classic, final round, at Stockton, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
WGN Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh
8 p.m.
ESPN Atlanta at Philadelphia
MOTORSPORTS
3 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP 250, at Estoril,
Portugal (same-day tape)
4 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP World Champion-
ship, at Estoril, Portugal (same-day tape)
NBA
1 p.m.
ABC National coverage, Cleveland at
Detroit
3:30 p.m.
ABC Regional coverage, Indiana at
Miami or Dallas at LA Lakers
6 p.m.
NBA TV Philadelphia at New Jersey
RODEO
4 p.m.
NBC PBR, U.S. Army Invitational, at
Colorado Springs, Colo. (same-day tape)
TENNIS
1 p.m.
ESPN WTATour, Family Circle Cup,
championship, at Charleston, S.C.

Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Regional coverage, Chicago
Cubs at Cincinnati or Florida at Washington
8 p.m.
TBS Atlanta at Houston
NBA
10 p.m.
TNT Denver at Phoenix




NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pet GB
x-Boston 44 35 .557 -
Philadelphia 41 38 .519 3
New Jersey 39 40 .494 5
Toronto 32 47 .405 12
New York 32 47 .405 12
Southeast Division
W L Pet GB
z-Miami 56 23 .709 -
x-Washington 44 35 .557 12
Orlando 35 44 .443 21
Charlotte 17 62 .215 39
Atlanta 12 67. .152 44
Central Division
W L Pct GB
y-Detroit 52 27 .658 -
x-Chicago 46 34 .575 61
x-Indiana 43 36 .544 9
Cleveland 40 39 .506 12
Milwaukee 29 50 .367 23
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pet GB
y-San Antonio 58 21 .734 -
x-Dallas 55 24 .696 3
x-Houston 49 31 .613 9%1
Memphis 44 35 .557 14
New Orleans 18 61 .228 40
Northwest Division
W L Pet GB
y-Seattle 51 28 .646 -
x-Denver 48 32 .600 31,
Minnesota 42 37 .532 9
Portland 25 54 .316 26
Utah 25 54 .316 26
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
y-Phoenix 60 19 .759 -
x-Sacramento 49 30 .620 11
LA Clippers 35 44 .443 25
L.A Lakers 34 45 .430 26
Golden State 32 48 .400 281'
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Saturday's Games
New York 100, Charlotte 98
Chicago 114, Atlanta 105
Houston 115, Denver 87
Orlando at Milwaukee (n)
Memphis at San Antonio (n)
Sacramento at Phoenix (n)
New Orleans at LA. Clippers (n)
Today's Games
Charlotte at Washington, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Indiana at Miami, 3:30 p.m.
Dallas at LA Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
Seattle at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at New Jersey, 6 p.m.
Atlanta at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Utah at Portland, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Indiana at Orlando, 7 p.m.


Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
LA Clippers at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.


RA R IRA T.T.

AL standings


Toronto


East Division
W L Pct
8 4 .667


Baltimore
Boston
Tampa Bay
New York


Chicago
Minnesota
Cleveland
Detroit
Kansas City


Los Angeles
Oakland
Seattle
Texas


7 4 .636
6 5 .545
4 7 .364
4 7 .364
Central Division
W L Pet
8 3 .727
8 3 .727
4 7 .364
4 7 .364
4 7 .364
West Division
W L Pct
6 5 .545
5 6 .455
5 6 .455
5 7 .417


Friday's Games
Boston 10, Tampa Bay 0
Minnesota 3, Cleveland 2
Baltimore 8, N.Y. Yankees 1
Texas 4, Toronto 2
Chicago White Sox 6, Seattle 4
Kansas City 6, Detroit 5
LA. Angels 6, Oakland 1
Saturday's Games
Minnesota 6, Cleveland 4
Chicago White Sox 2, Seattle 1
Detroit 7, Kansas City 1
Oakland 1, LA Angels 0, 10 innings
Baltimore 7, N.Y. Yankees 6
Boston 6, Tampa Bay 2
Toronto 8, Texas 0
Today's Games
Minnesota (Mays 0-0) at Cleveland
(Sabathia 0-0), 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (KBrown 0-0) at
Baltimore (Cabrera 0-1), 1:35 p.m.
Toronto (Towers 1-0) at Texas
(C.Young 0-1), 2:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Kazmir 0-0) at Boston
(Wakefield 1-0), 2:05 p.m.
Detroit (Maroth 0-1) at Kansas City
(R.Hernandez 1-1), 2:10 p.m.
Seattle (Meche 0-0) at Chicago White
Sox (Garcia 1-0), 3:05 p.m.
LA Angels (Lackey 1-0) at Oakland
(Saarloos 1-1), 4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Toronto at Boston, 11:05 a.m.
Detroit at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Oakland at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox, 8:05
p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Seattle at LA. Angels, 10:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pet GB
Washington 7 4 .636 -
Atlanta 6 5 .545 1
New York 6 5 .545 1
Florida 5 6 .455 2
Philadelphia 5 6 .455 2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 5 4 .556 -
Cincinnati 5 5 .500 1'
Houston 5 5 .500 1-
Milwaukee 5 5 .500 1'
Chicago 5 6 .455 1
Pittsburgh 4 7 .364 2
West Division
W L Pet GB
Los Angeles 7 2 .778 -
San Francisco 5 4 .556 2
Arizona 6 5 .545 2
San Diego 5 5 .500 21A
Colorado 1 8 .111 6

Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 8, Chicago Cubs 5
Atlanta 11, Philadelphia 4
N.Y. Mets 4, Florida 0
Houston 11, Cincinnati 2
St. Louis 3, Milwaukee 0
San Francisco 13, Colorado 6
LA Dodgers 4, San Diego 0
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Mets 4, Florida 3
Cincinnati 3, Houston 2
St. Louis 5, Milwaukee 3
Philadelphia 2, Atlanta 1
Chicago Cubs 4, Pittsburgh 3
Washington 9, Arizona 3
San Francisco at Colorado (n)
San Diego at LA Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Arizona (Halsey 1-0) at Washington
(Loaiza 0-0), 1:05 p.m.
Florida (AJ.Burnett 1-1) at N.Y. Mets
(Glavine 0-1), 1:10 p.m.
Houston (Duckworth 0-0) at Cincinnati
(Harang 1-1), 1:15 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Maddux 0-1) at
Pittsburgh (Redman 1-0), 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis (Marquis 1-0) at Milwaukee
(Santos 0-0), 2:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Rueter 0-1) at Colorado
(Jennings 0-2), 3:05 p.m.
San Diego (Redding 0-1) at L.A.
Dodgers (Weaver 1-0), 4:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Hampton 1-0) at Philadelphia
(Myers 1-0), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Florida at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
LA Dodgers at Milwaukee, 7:35 p.m.
Atlanta at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Arizona at Colorado, 8:35 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Race week

NEXTEL CUP
Samsung/RadioShack 500
Site: Fort Worth, Texas.
Schedule: Today, race (FOX, 12:30
p.m.).
Track: Texas Motor Speedway (oval,
1.5 miles, 24 degrees banking in turns).
Race distance: 500 miles, 334 laps.
NHRA
SummitRacing.com Nationals
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Today, eliminations, 2 p.m.
(ESPN, 7 p.m., tape).
Track: The Strip at Las Vegas Motor
Speedway.

Samsung/RadioShack

At Texas Motor Speedway
Fort Worth, Texas
Friday qualifying
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (12) Ryan Newman, Dodge, 192.582
mph.
2. (19) Jeremy Mayfield, Dodge,
192.431.
3. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 191.734.
4. (21) Ricky Rudd, Ford, 191.557.
5. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 191.435.
6. (2) Rusty Wallace, Dodge, 191.286.


7. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 191.042.
8. (38) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 190.631.
9. (01) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet,
190.611.
10. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
190.590.
11. (8) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
190.570.
12. (07) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
190.550.
13. (40) Sterling Marlin, Dodge,
190.510.
14. (10) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 190.342.
15. (91) Bill Elliott, Dodge, 190.248.
16. (6) Mark Martin, Ford, 190.174.
17. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
190.154.
18. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
190.047.
19. (97) Kurt Busch, Ford, 189.860.
20. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 189.833.
21. (15) Michael Waltrip, Chevrolet,
189.687.
22. (18) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
189.627.
23. (43) Jeff Green, Dodge, 189.580.
24. (25) Brian Vickers, Chevrolet,
189.281.
25. (77) Travis Kvapil, Dodge, 189.248.
26. (4) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet,
188.976.
27. (88) Dale Jarrett, Ford, 188.772.
28. (45) Kyle Petty, Dodge, 188.765.
29. (11) Jason Leffler, Chevrolet,
188.488.
30. (49) Ken Schrader, Dodge, 188.147.
31. (42) Jamie McMurray, Dodge,
188.048.
32. (41) Casey Mears, Dodge, 187.983.
33. (7) Robby Gordon, Chevrolet,
187.950.
34. (09) Johnny Sauter, Dodge, 187.735.
35. (5) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, 187.709.
36. (22) Scott Wimmer, Dodge, 187.617.
37. (66) Hermie Sadler, Ford, 187.227.
38. (32) Bobby Hamilton Jr., Chevrolet,
187.220.
39. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 187.149.
40. (36) Boris Said, Chevrolet, 187.058.
41. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 185.899.
42. (0) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, owner
points.
43. (44) Terry Labonte, Chevrolet,
186.838.
Failed to Qualify
44. (37) Kevin Lepage, Dodge, 185.179.
45. (92) Stanton Barrett, Chevrolet,
182.921.
46. (34) Randy LaJoie, Chevrolet,
182.285.

O'Reilly 300 lineup

At Texas Motor Speedway
Fort Worth, Texas
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (32) Shane Hmiel, Chevrolet, 189.840
mph.
2. (8) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet,
189.640 mph.
3. (60) Carl Edwards, Ford, 189.480
mph.
4. (44) Justin Labonte, Chevrolet,
189.341 mph.
5. (9) Mark Martin, Ford, 189.102 mph.
6. (33) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
188.910 mph.
7. (47) Jon Wood, Ford, 188.811 mph.
8. (66) Greg Biffle, Ford, 188.772 mph.
9. (20) Denny Hamlin, Chevrolet,
188.725 mph.
10. (1) Johnny Sauter, Dodge, 188.725
mph.
11. (10) Michel Jourdain Jr., Ford,
188.712 mph.
12. (99) Michael Waltrip, Chevrolet,
188.699 mph.
13. (5) Blake Feese, Chevrolet, 188.475
mph.
14. (87) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet,
188.370 mph.
15. (41) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 188.337
mph.
16. (64) Jamie McMurray, Dodge,
187.924 mph.
17. (25) Ashton Lewis Jr., Ford, 187.370
mph.
18. (6) Jeremy Mayfield, Dodge,
187.240 mph.
19. (90) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 187.117
mph.
20. (11) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
187.117 mph.
21. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 186.981
mph.
22. (22) Kenny Wallace, Ford, 186.968
mph.
23. (35) Jason Keller, Ford, 185.957
mph.
24. (27) David Green, Ford, 185.906
mph.
25. (38) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 185.714
mph.
26. '(52) Eric McClure, Ford, 185.420
mph.
27. (78) Jerry Robertson, Chevrolet,
185.306 mph.
28. (14) David Stremme, Dodge,
185.065 mph.
29. (2) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 185.027
mph.
30. (40) Sterling Marlin, Dodge, 184.849
mph.
31. (21) Brandon Miller, Chevrolet,
184.742 mph.
32. (72) Geoffrey Bodine, Chevrolet,
184.641 mph.
33. (12) Tim Fedewa, Dodge, 183.748
mph.
34. (16) David Ragan, Chevrolet,
183.567 mph.
35. (59) Stacy Compton, Ford, 183.299
mph.
36. (0) Kertus Davis, Chevrolet, 183.038
mph.
37. (58) Brent Sherman, Dodge,
181.935 mph.
38. (28) Derrike Cope, Ford, 181.898 mph.
39. (36) Stanton Barrett, Chevrolet,
181.671 mph.
40. (34) Randy LaJoie, Chevrolet,
181.020 mph.
41. (4) Ryan Hemphill, Dodge, Owner
Points
42. (18) JJ. Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points
43. (49) Steve Grissom, Ford, Past
Champion.
Failed to qualify


44. (43) Aaron Fike, Dodge, 181.488
mph.
45. (7) Mark Green, Chevrolet, 177.743
mph.
46. (23) Shawna Robinson, Chevrolet
47. (57) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet.


TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Activated
LHP C.C. Sabathia from the 15-day DL
Optioned RHP Matt Miller to Buffalo of the
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a capitalized cost (including any applicable cap cost reduction) of $36,631 and a residual value of $22,952. 36 monthly payments total $16,884. Option to purchase at lease end for an amount to be determined at lease signing. GMAC must approve
lease. Take delivery by 5/31/05. Mileage charge of $.20/mile over 36,000 miles. Lessee pays for maintenance, repair and excess wear. If lease terminates early, lessee is liable for all unpaid monthly payments. Payments may be higher in some
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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


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CHS
Continued from page 1B.

Eastside.
"It should be a good, fun
tournament."
Seniors Tan and Yelken are
confident, particularly in doubles.
"We can compete with
those other teams," Yelken
said. "We are easily one of
those who can compete
against all the district, except
Gainesville."
"For all the time we have
spent practicing and all the
games we played and for what
we have learned, everything
is going to show," Tan said
about districts.
Eastside, Vanguard and
Gainesville are the favorites in
the girls.
Lady Tigers singles are
(No. 1-No. 5) Christine
Moses, Alexis Howell, Neha
Gulley, Samantha Turner and
Amy Rowand. The No. 1 dou-
bles is Moses/Howell and No.'
2 is Gulley/Turner.
"I think our girls are peak-
ing just at the right time,"
coach Gary Hart said. "They
are going to compete.
Unfortunately, the No. 1 spot
is tough and Christine will
meet some good competition.
The same goes with Alexis.
We will give a couple of those
teams a run for their money at
Nos. 3-5."
Moses agreed. "There is
pretty stiff competition," she
said. "Hopefully, we can get
some lower draws the first day
and hang with some of them."
The breakthrough could
come in doubles.
"I think we can do pretty
well," Howell said. "We did start
off strong and beat some peo-
ple we weren't expected to."
"In the beginning we were
doing good, then we slacked
off," Moses said. "All that mat-
ters is districts.


PREP
Continued from page 1B
Carswell was 1-3 with a run
scored and a stolen base.
Corey Burk was 1-3 with a
double.
Brooks went 2-4 with two
singles. Austin Peters was 1-3
with an RBI. Allen was 1-2 with
a double. Coulther scored a
run, and Josh Boris went 1-1
with an RBI and a run scored.
Columbia (8-8, 6-3) plays at
Ridgeview High on Tuesday
at 3:30 p.m.

Fort White baseball

The Indians completed a 3-0
week by beating Santa Fe
High 12-4 on Saturday.
"I was real proud of the way
the guys played and compet-
ed," Indians coach Mike Rizzi
said.
Justin Dorris got the win
after pitching five innings and
allowing one run. He also
went 3-4 with three RBIs and a
double as the Indians totaled a
season high 20 hits.
Kyle Espenship was 4-5
with four runs scored. Jacob
Tillotson was 4-5 with three'
runs scored. Jeremy Harrell
went 3-4 with three runs
scored and two RBIs. Dusty
Parrish went 2-5 with an RBI
and a double. Matt Huesman
went 2-4 with two RBIs and a
run scored. Elven Sheppard
was 2-4 with a run scored.
Fort White also defeated
Branford High 3-1 on Friday.
Huesman (3-1) earned the win
after pitching four innings and
allowing three hits. Tillotson
relieved and Parrish earned
the save.
Parrish was 1-2 with a triple
and two runs scored. Brandon
Wheeler went 1-3 and made a
diving catch to end the game.
Harrell was 1-2 with a run
scored and a double.
Fort White (7-7, 4-4) hosts
Bronson High at 4:30 p.m. on
Monday.


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Page 1C
Sunday April 17, 2005
Lake City, Florida
ww' w.lakecityreporter:con


Butterflies find safe haven in Columbia


By SUSAN SLOAN
Special to the Reporter
Butterflies are
appearing through-
out the county, in
direct competition
with the colorful
blossoms that are springing
up all over. The grace and
beauty of butterflies are irre-
sistible to watch and are the
driving force for the current
popularity in butterfly gardens.
There are many types of but-
terflies that call Columbia
County home. Some are year-
round residents, and some are
seasonal visitors. With each
day bringing warmer weather,
the variety of butterflies is
increasing. Garden shops are
full with flowering plants just
waiting to be planted. So if you
are thinking of adding to your
garden, consider adding some
plants that will increase the
butterfly population in your
yard.
A butterfly garden does not
have to be a labor-intensive
undertaking. A simple pot gar-
den is just as effective as a
large, elaborately laid out gar-
den. The important thing,
according to master gardener
Karl Burkhardt, is to provide
the necessities of a butterfly's
life ... shelter, water, host plants
and nectar plants.
This area is blessed with lots
of trees and shrubs, as well as
water sources for the butterfly,
including the abundant morn-
ing dew. The host plant is nec-
essary to give the butterfly a
place to lay its eggs and to pro-
vide the larva, the caterpillar, a
source of food.
The caterpillar can be quite
picky about its food source, so
if you are looking for a particu-
lar species, you will need to
investigate what it likes to eat.
For example, the larva of the
monarch, a well-recognized
type of butterfly, would be
happy with a few butterfly
weed plants that it can feed on
even after it transforms into a
beautiful butterfly. Butterfly
weed is readily available in
local nurseries and is a hardy
perennial.
Although a permanent resi-
dent in South Florida, the mon-
archs seen in our area are usu-
ally migrating from Mexico
where they spend the winter.
Master gardener Yvette
Graham reports that the
monarch has been spotted in
Texas, so it should not be long
before the species completes
its migration through the pan-
handle to our area.
Once you start trying to
identify the types of butterflies
in your garden, it becomes
clear that there really are more
than 150 varieties that spend
time in Florida. The
Swallowtail species is another
well-known type of butterfly
that has several sub-species
that either live in our area year-
round or reside part-time in the
warm spring and summer
months. Called swallowtails
because the species has two
long "tails" extending from its
rear wings, the different sub-
species have very different
food requirements.
The Eastern Tiger
Swallowtail is right at home in
Columbia County with plenty
of wild cherry and magnolia
trees to feed the caterpillars
and honeysuckle and butterfly
weed growing wild for the
adult butterflies.
The abundant oaks in
Columbia County are a great
draw for several sub-species of
the small delicate species
known as "hairstreaks."
While not a pretty name,
these butterflies are noted for
their gossamer wings and
metallic coloration. The red-
banded hairstreak lays its eggs
on the ground on the leaves of
sumac and oak trees. The
caterpillar crawls up the tree
and feeds on the green leaves
until transforming into a pretty
tan, orange and grayish blue
butterfly.
A family of butterflies called
-brush-footed butterflies has


COURTESY PHOTO
About 150 butterfly species are found throughout Florida. A Miami Blue butterfly is shown here. This type of butterfly is considered one of. the rarest


butterfly species in the world.
some of the most brilliantly col-
ored members. Look for a red-
spotted purple feeding around
the wild cherry tree where the
larva feeds. Its iridescent pur-
ple wings and colorful mark-
ings are a sight to behold.
Some of the other sub-species
have markings of lime green,
red, orange and blue.
The family of sulfur and
whites is the most common of
all butterflies. The cloudless
sulfur is so prolific in our area
as they migrate south in the fall
that they have been seen flit-
ting about at University of
Florida's football games. The
larva feed off the clovers plant-
ed by farmers and the adult
butterflies compete with hum-
mingbirds that favor the same
type of flower nectar. If you
watch for them, you may see
the male cloudless sulfur chas-
ing a female in a courtship
dance. Once the male has
found a willing female, he will
hover above her "romancing"
her with his scent until she suc-
cumbs. They attach for about
30 minutes usually on the
ground, but sometimes even


SUSAN SLOAN/Special to the Reporter
The Friends of the Columbia County Public Library and the Columbia County Extension
Service Master Gardeners provided the funding and labor for the butterfly garden dedicated
on June 6, 2004.


flying while mating.
The cabbage white butterfly
is widely seen in our area, most
likely because of the large
plantings of cabbage, collards
and mustard greens that can
be found in backyard gardens.
The caterpillars can be unwel-
come pests as they feed on the
garden greens. And this feed-
ing on vegetation is the dilem-


ma. Do you sacrifice your
plants to obtain the end result?
Serious butterfly enthusiasts
say it's a sacrifice you have to
be willing to make. Balancing
nature with esthetics is tough.
You don't want to use insecti-
cides that will kill the caterpil-
lars and butterflies, but this
can result in a garden overrun
with pests. The natural solution


is to encourage birds along
with your butterflies. The bird
is a natural predator of insects
and fortunately they often are
attracted to the same flowers
and plants as the butterfly. If
you must use an insecticide,
the master gardeners of
Columbia County want you to
read the label that will tell you
exactly how toxic the product


SUSAN SLUAN/Special to the Reporter
The group of 2005 Master Gardeners are proud of their efforts in creating the Columbia County West Branch's Reading and
Butterfly Garden.


is. There are many insecticides
on the market that won't harm
birds or butterflies.
Even without knowing
which species requires what
plant, you can still have a gar-
den that will attract adult but-
terflies. Flowers and shrubs
that you might just plant for
their beauty may in fact be a
source of nectar for the butter-
fly. Asters, sunflowers, phlox,
black-eyed Susan, azaleas,
porterweed, pentas, coneflow-
ers, sweet William and of
course, butterfly weed and but-
terfly bush are all easy to grow
and will draw butterflies of
many species.
And if all that seems like too
much work, you can always
make a trip to the west branch
of the Columbia County Public
Library. There, with funds pro-
vided by "Friends of the
Columbia County Library" the
master gardeners of the
Columbia County Extension
Service program have done all
the work for you.
The design created by Ann
Opgenorth, a master gardener
and local artist, features a foun-
tain providing a water source
for the butterflies as well as a
soothing background noise for
visitors who stop to watch the
butterflies or sit and read on
the benches surrounded by
the colorful flowers favored by
butterflies. The garden is a
hands-on site for this year's
class of master gardeners who
maintain the garden. As the
library prepares for its first
anniversary, the master gar-
deners are tending to the pen-
tas, plumbago, Johnny jump-
ups and numerous other annu-
als and perennials that will
bring back the butterflies again
this spring and summer. Pick
up one of the many butterfly
guides available at the library,
or stop by the extension serv-
ice office and purchase the but-
terfly gardening book offered
by the service, which includes
pictures of both the caterpillars
and butterflies that you might
see while enjoying the fruits of
the master gardeners labors.


;Fr-i
lii i'-j

i::P i,


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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005

LIFESTYLE ________


ENGAGEMENTS


Carswell-ichardson


COURTESY PHOTO
Matthew Richardson and
Haley Carswell
Ty and Pam Carswell of
Lake City announce the
approaching marriage of
their.daughter, Haley Lauren
Carswell of Lake City, to
Matthew James Richardson
of Lake City, son of James
and Janie Richardson of Lake
City.
The wedding is planned
for 4 p.m. Saturday, May 7, at
First United Methodist
Church of Lake City. A recep-
tion will follow at Touch of
Class in Lake City.
Haley is a 2003 CHS grad-
uate and a current student at
LCCC.
Matthew is a 2003 CHS
graduate and a current nurs-
ing student at LCCC.

Clayton-Henry


OuuRnToE PnHOT
Laura Clayton and Tywan
Henry

Isaiah Clayton, Jr. and
Laura Saulsby of Lake City
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage of
their daughter, Laura Mae
Clayton to Tywan Lavon
Henry, son of Janet Davis
and Amos Henry, Jr. of Lake


city.
The wedding is planned
for 4 p.m. Saturday, April 23
at Olivet Missionary Baptist
Church. A reception will fol-
low at Winfield Recreation
Center.
No local invitations will be
sent, all family and friends
are invited to attend.
Laura is a 1995 CHS grad-
uate and attends LCCC. She
is employed by Shands at
Lake Shore as an LPN.
Tywan is a 1992 CHS grad-
uate and attends Roadmaster
School of Trucking. He is
employed by International
House of Pancakes.

Lang-Harrison


Jenny Lang and Jeffrey
Harrison


John and Shirley Lang of
Lake City announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daugh-
ter, Jenny Corrine Lang of
Lake City, to Jeffrey Franklin
Harrison of Wellborn, son of
John and Debra Harrison of
Lake City.
The wedding is planned
for 5 p.m. Saturday, May 21,
at Fellowship Baptist Church
in Suwannee County. A
reception will follow at the
church fellowship hall.
All family and friends are
invited to attend.
Jenny is a 2000 Suwannee
High School graduate and a
2005 University of South
Florida graduate with a
Bachelor's degree in speech-
language pathologist.
Jeffrey is a 1999 Suwannee
High School graduate and is
the owner of Harrison Tile,
Inc. of Lake City.


Enjoy the blooms of April


DON
GOODE


From time to time, I
receive requests to identify
plants. This is especially true
when unique or showy plants
are in bloom. Some of the
iwildi plants you might see
while driving or walking can
be quite attractive in bloom.
Others are small, almost
insignificant plants some
would call weeds but in a
group along the road side
they can collectively add a lot
of color to the surroundings.
I enjoy looking at plants
while I drive. One of the
"weeds" that are in bloom
now is the Lyre Leaf Sage.
The basal leaves on this little
plant have the shape of the
musical instrument known as
a lyre. The bloom stalk is 8 to
12 inches tall with small blue
blowers along the stem. This
little plant has been used by
some in the landscape as a
ground cover. A quick search
of the Internet also reveals it
is an edible herb and has
been used for medicinal pur-


poses. When found in a
grouping along the roadside
or in a field, these little
"weeds" will make your head
turn to get a second look. At
least they have that effect on
me.
One of our native trees is in
bloom now with a display of
fine, dangling creamy white
blooms. This tree is known as
Old Man's Beard or other-
wise as the Fringe tree. It
makes a small to medium size
tree and does well in the land-
scape. Birds will eat the small,
dark blue fruit.
Wisteria vines are display-
ing their blue to pink flowers
this month. Wisteria can be
pruned and trained to have a
strong enough trunk to form
a bush like plant. Left to grow
naturally, the vine can climb
up into neighboring trees or
onto walls or other struc-
tures. It is sometimes found
in the wild where an old
homestead used to be locat-
ed.
You may have noticed
some small bushy plants, with
white flowers, scattered
beneath pine trees or on the
edge of the woods. This is the
Pawpaw. The flower will pro-
duce a very fragrant fruit that
can be made into a jelly. This
native plant is the only host to


the caterpillar of the zebra
swallowtail butterfly. If you
see a pawpaw bush that
appears to be eaten up by
caterpillars, leave it alone so
these beautiful butterflies can
complete their life cycle. The
Pawpaw plant will recover
and put on another crop of
leaves in the weeks to come.
The Cherokee rose is
blooming now. This heirloom
variety is an aggressive climb-
ing rose with large white
blooms. Thought to be a
native to China, it was intro-
duced to England in 1757 and
to the States shortly there-
after. It was named as a
memorial for the 1893 forced
migration of the Cherokee
Indians (who widely planted
this rose in their territory.)
Left untended, the vines of
this rose will climb into trees
and along fence lines. Not
only does it look pretty this
time of year, it adds an extra
deterrent to trespassers
climbing your fence.
The Majestic Beauty shrub
is a landscape plant that does
well in this North Florida
area. It has eye-catching clus-
ters of pink flowers. This
shrub can be maintained at a
moderate height of 5-8 feet
tall if pruned but will reach
approximately 20 feet if left to


grow naturally. It is related to
the Indian Hawthorne that is
commonly grown in our area
as a short hedge and border
plant (also blooming now with
white flowers).
P r o g r a m
Announcement: The Master
Gardeners will be having
their annual plant sale the
morning of Saturday, April 23
this year (9 a.m.-1 p.m.) The
sale will be held at the
Extension Service office on
the Lake City fairgrounds. A
wide variety of plants are
being grown by the Master
Gardeners for the sale. ,Other
garden related items and
books will also be available
for purchase. Proceeds go
toward educational programs,
community service projects
and youth gardening activi-
ties. Please come out and
support them.

Dr. Don Goode is the
Director and Horticulture
Agent of the Columbia County
Extension Service ( a branch
of the University of Florida.
He can be reached at the office
(on the Fairgrounds), on the
phone (752-5384), by e-mail
(dzgoode@ifas.ufl.edu) or
through the Internet
(http://columbia. ifas. ufl. edu)


GWou Avg WIm .o


"
COpyrighted Material


Syndicated Content.

Available from Commercial News Providers"
S


BIRTHS


Crews
Briah and Karena Crews of
Lake City announce the birth
of their son Weston Blake
Crews March 8 in North
Florida Regional, Gainesville.
He weighed nine pounds,
five ounces and measured 21
inches.
He joins Turner Crews age
three.
Grandparents are: Frankie
Crews and the late Patsy
Crews of Lake City and
Howard and Joyce Horton of
Orlando.
Great-grandparents are:
Dot Brown of Lake City, the
late Mr. and Mrs. Ernest
Crews of Lake City and the
late Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Turner of Orlando.


Maxwell
Wesley and Randi Maxwell
of Gastonia, NC announce
the birth of their daughter,
Addison Leigh Maxwell
March 31 in Carolina
Medical Center, Charolette,
NC.
She weighed seven
pounds, one ounce and meas-
ured 19 and three-fourth
inches.
Grandparents are: Charles
and Sharla Maxwell, Amanda
and Jeff Stephens and Skibo
and Teresa Homrne.
Great-grandparents are:
the late Carlos and Mildred
Maxwell and the late Ethel
Ford, Henry L. and June
Brannon and Leo and Liz
Horne.


WEDDINGS


Dicks-Wade


Is



COURTESY PHOTO
Kiley Dicks and Jordan Wade


Kiley Ann Dicks and
Jordan Kimball Wade were
married in the Orlando
Temple of The Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-Day
Saints on March 26.
Kiley is the daughter of
Regal and Shirlene Dicks of
Lake City.
Jordan is the son of Rusty
and Sandra Wade of Lake
Butler.
Bishop David Morse con-
ducted the reception with
Tim Roberts as speaker.
Bobby and Susie Cabral


sang "Come What May" and
"From This Moment."
Jackie Britt directed the
reception.
Hostesses for the recep-
tion were Kathryn Little,
Brooke Bedenbaugh, Barbi
Bedenbaugh, Melissa
Douglas, Janice Cox, Gail
Peacock and Pam Archer.
Nancy Oliver and Tori
Jenkins attended the bride's
book.
Barbara Meeks and
Jeanette Clemons served
the bride's cake.
Tammy Wade served the
groom's cake.
After a wedding trip to
Saint Augustine Beach the
couple will live in Lake City.
Kiley was a 2004 CHS
honor graduate and will
graduate from LCCC in June
with a degree in cosmetol-
ogy.
Jordan was a 2001 Union
County High School high
honor graduate. Jordan
served a two year mission
for The Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-Day Saints
in the Arizona Tempe
Mission and is currently a
sophomore at LCCC.


. _- _____., _- ...... *,


Stop By The
glDUnt iS Lake City Reporter
for your


^#.* (


These fine merchants
wedding special. Pick

JC Penney
752-2822


Etheridge
Furniture
752-2752


Ward's Jewelers
752-5470


9w/Iyd1


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up your package today...

Sandy Kishton
Realtor Associate
961-9795


Sterling Entertainment
Rusty Bailey
752-0292 965-4940


Quality Inn
Conference Center
752-3901


Our
Bridal Registry
Couples Registered
Deserae Bolton
Dusty Bailey

Janna Blanton
Chris Hornbaker

Haley Carswell
Matthew Richardson

Kiley Dicks
Jordan Wade

Bethany Harden
Justin Jenkins

Kristin Khachigan
Josh Roberts

Katie Moore
John Beroset

Megan Markham
James Hansen

Erin Moses
Marc Spiwak


Heather Poole
Kraig Conn

Brooke Sherman
Thomas McDuffie

Jessica Swanko
Devin Dupree

Kimmy Tompkins
Bo Bush

Visit us when shopping for
a gift. We'll help you select
the gift that the bride
really wants. We'll gift-wrap
it. We'll send it.
And the services are free!

( WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS A


156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


A06y'r,


big rob








LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


DEAR LENT

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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


.NUAL


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and Enter Your Name For The Random Drawing. Anyone Can Win...
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Section D
Sunday, April 17, 2005
Lake City, Florida
www.lakeeityUjreDorter:comt


Local home sale price up more than $20K for first quarter


Total sales volume in county

reached about $17.5 million in

first quarter, Realtors say.


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter. corn

Following a banner year in
2004, the local real estate mar-
ket again appears prepared to
rise beyond levels previously
unsurpassed.
For the first quarter of this
year (Jan. 1 to March 31), data
from the North Florida
Multiple Listing Service
shows that local home sales
are up significantly when
compared to the same time
last year. While the number of
single-family site built homes
sold during the first quarter of
2005 is only six more than the
same time period for 2004,
going from 122 to 128, the
average sale price was up
about $21,000.
"We are in a seller's market
right now, a lot of the sellers
are able to get their asking
price, and we are seeing a lot
of multiple offers," said Dan
Gherna, executive vice presi-
dent of the Lake City Board of
Realtors, explaining the
increased price. "We are see-
ing offers over the listing
prices, which has not
occurred here very often in
the past."
Not only are people getting
what they ask for their homes,
with many transactions often
cash, he said there's also far
less inventory so far this year.
Currently, Gherna said there
are about 850 properties on
the market, where as in July
of 2004, there were more than
2,000.
For the first quarter of this
year, for single family site-
built homes in Columbia
County listed through the


MLS, the average sale price
was $136,459 with a total of
128 units (properties) sold to
make up a total sales volume
of about $17.5 million. On
average, those homes spent
about 116 days on the market.
For 2004, according to the
MLS, the average sale price
was $115,867 for 122 units
sold, making for a total sales
volume of $14.1 million. On
average, during the first quar-
ter of last year, single family
site-built homes were also on
the market slightly longer at
129 days.
According to the MLS,
compared to the first quarter
figures of just two years ago,
the most marked change in
local real estate prices has
taken place just within the
past year.
In 2003, the average sale
price during the first quarter
for single family site-built
homes was $116,623 with 85
units sold for a total volume of
about $9.9 million. And those
properties were on the mar-
ket for 173 days on average.
While the MLS listed
homes sold for about the
same average price in the first
quarters of 2003 and 2004, the
number of homes and the
length of time they spent on
the market is noticeably dif-
ferent.
Though the price and num-
ber of homes sold over the
past two years shows a dra-
matic increase, it doesn't
account for all of the real
estate transactions in
Columbia County.
Those MLS statistics also
do not include sales data such
as condos, townhouses,


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
A 'For Sale By Owner' sign sits in the front yard of this house in the Woodcrest subdivision in Columbia County. Local
Realtors say now is a seller's market with most property being sold at their asking price.


duplexes, manufactured
homes, vacant land, or any
property not listed with the
service, such as homes sold
by owners.
While the average sale
price has gone up significant-
ly in the past two years,
Gherna said compared to the
state average for a single fam-
ily site-built home of about
$200,000, '"We are a bargain."
That may be attractive to
someone new coming to the
area who is used to higher
prices, but for local people
looking to move up, he said
they will probably experience
some "sticker shock."
And many of the properties
sold in Columbia County may
never be seen by a lot of
potential buyers.


Gherna said because a
Realtor has 72 hours before
they are required to put a
home on the market, they will
often be able to talk with peo-
ple they know have ready and
able buyers, with a contract
put on the home before it is
ever listed.
Stan Batten, broker and
owner of Stan Batten Real
Estate, said much of the
interest in local real estate in
recent years has come from
South Florida.
But he said those people
are often not native
Floridians, but instead peo-
ple who moved from the
North only to find South
Florida too crowded and/or
too hot and enjoy the more
seasonable temperatures and


slower pace of Columbia
County.
However, Batten said
there are not only people
looking to move to the area
to make it there home, but
also investors who are buy-
ing homes or "raw" land with
hopes that it can later be sold
or subdivided for a profit.
"It's pretty diverse as far as
what we've got," he said.
"Both land values and home
values have kind of been sky-
rocketing."
Batten said there haven't
been many bidding wars for
local properties yet, but
noted the "demand is great
and the supply is pretty limit-
ed right now."
For new construction, he
said the price is also going


up because of the increased
cost of building materials,
part of which can be attrib-
uted to the demand created
by the reconstruction efforts
after four hurricanes in 2004.
Batten said only two years
ago the average price per
square-foot to build a house
in Columbia County could
have been $55 to $65. Now,
he said, that has risen closer
to $70 to $80 per square foot.
"And it's not just Lake City,
it's everywhere," he said:
As far as the potential for
local people to be priced out
of the market, Batten said,
"It's kind of like a two-edged
sword."
"You hate it when you are
buying it, and you are loving
it when you are selling it."


ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS 1.64-acre lot on beautiful
Lake Jeffery's waterfront! Build your dream home and
enjoy the breath-taking view! Call 755-5110 for details
#43675


IDEAL LOCATION! 2 acres with 189 foot frontage on
US-90 between Wellborn & Lake City $59,500 Call 755-
5110 for details #44738


NEW & SPACIOUS in "Plantations"! 4BR/3BA has
family rm w/fireplace; formal living rm or parlor, dining
room & master suite w/whirlpool tub! $254,900 Call
755-5110 for floor plan #44126








95,798 SqFt building in Live Oak on US-129! 67,058
SqFt Retail 28,739 SqFt storage; 474 parking spaces -
all on 14 acres! Perfect for retail or office space Call
755-5110 for details #44598





V
I


OVER 1,400' frontage on US-90 just west of Lake City!
Prime property currently zoned agriculture! GREAT
INVESTMENT! DANIEL CRAPPS 755-5110 #42938


ON THE SUWANNEE! Cute 2BR/2BA home w/gorgeous
deck overlooking river! If you want privacy this retreat
is for you! $164,900 Call 755-5110 for details #42127


5 ACRE MINI FARM! 2,537 SqFt 4BR/3BA home, family
rm w/massive FP, exquisite master suite, too many
amenities to list! Call for Appt! $299,900 KATRINA
BLALOCK 961-3486 #41391


NEED ROOM? 5 bedrooms/3 bath home built in
2000 has 2052 SqFt, large kitchen, open & airy! 2-
car carport, front & back porches; near town
$114,900 KATRINA BLALOCK 961-3486 #44849


BISHOP REALTY, INC. 1
U.S. 90 West Across from Wal-Mart 752-4211
ColdwellBanker.com s 1
Independently Owned and Operated L-E- O


New Listing in Great Area! Gorgeous lot. May-Fair Subdivision. Excellent location,
3/2 split plan. Ceramic tile, storage building, great floor plan. 3/2, large rooms, nice
covered porch w/patio. $159,900. master suite, oversized garage. Well
MLS#44906. Ask for Elaine K. Tolar 386- maintained home, won't last long.
755-6488. $179,900. MLS#44604. Ask for Lori Giebeig
Simpson 752-2874.
I nt


Outstanding Brick House in Lake Butler Zoned R/IO Turn of the Century, 1893
at reasonable price to sell. $50,900. sq. ft. built in 1900. Current use as rental,
MLS#44765. Call today for info Hansel 3BR/2BA, with 1BR/1BA being added. Has
Holton 386-984-5791. had new wiring. Frame with vinyl siding.
Near everything downtown. $105,000.
MLS#44063. Contact Nell or Hansel Holton
for more info, 386-984-5046.


Affordable Housing This 3/2 MH is near
town, near most conveniences on the
Westside. Very nice interior, front porch,
trees. Just $39,900. MLS#44467. Call Nell
or Hansel Holton for info 984-5046.


Country Side Jennings, FL. 1620 sq. ft.,
3/2 DW MH on 1 acre lot. Needs appliances,
little TLC but otherwise in good condition.
$49,900. MLS#43569. Contact Nell or
Hansel Holton 984-5046.


1999 MH w/3BR/2BA on 1 acre. Very
good condition, with appliances. New on
market. $49,900. MLS#42623. Contact Nell
or Hansel Holton 386-984-5046.


1999 DW MH Needs some minor repairs
& TLC. 3/2, 1440 sq. ft., 1 acre lot. Small
pond in back corner. $47,900. MLS#44335.
Call Nell or Hansel Holton, 386-984-5046.


Brick Home in the Country Lovely, 1698
sq. ft., 3/2, on 10 acres, in Union County.
Porch all across front & a back porch. Wood
burning FP, wood flooring, solid oak
cabinets in kitchen. $184,900. MLS#44870.
Call Nell or Hansel Holton 386-984-5046.


Block Home, 2/1.5, on 5 acres. Office,
family room, dining room, upgraded
kitchen. Includes 2 older MH's. Paved road,
Suwannee County, O'Brien area. $120,000.
MLS#44740. Contact Nell or Hansel Holton
386-984-5046.







In 3 Rivers Estates Very nice DW MH,
3BR/2BA, FP, 1736 sq. ft., front porch, apx. 1
acre lot. $59,900. MLS#41828. Contact
Listing Agents, Nell or Hansel Holton
386-984-5046.







Convenient to Lake City & Gainesville,
this 1248 sq. ft. DW MH on .80 acre includes
double carport & 20x30 barn with concrete
floor and electricity. Immaculately cared for.
$69,900. MLS#43484. Ask for Mary Brown
Whitehurst 965-0887.


Now Selling lots in Carter Chase S/D. 1/2 acre lots! In town location. Lots of trees. Won't last long. Bring your
own builder. Reserve your homesite now. Only $49,900 each. MLS#41543. Call Lori 752-2874 or Elaine 755-6488
for more details.
Home Under Construction! Quality, Convenience, Comfort. 3/2, open floor plan, located on 1/2 acre. 2 car garage,
covered back porch. $154,900. Ask for Lori Giebeig Simpson 386-752-2874.
Great Commercial lot in center of town! Would make a great spot for a small shop or a drive through. $59,900.
MLS#44745. Call Mary Brown Whitehurst 386-965-0887.
Like New! 2003 D/W mobile home on half acre lot. Convenient location, paved road. $66,500. MLS#42871. For
more info, ask for Don or Sherry Ratliff, 386-365-8414.


I


I -- I .. ,


LANE CITY REPORTER


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005




The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights

Y NYSE 3 Amex 3 Nasdaq
6,958.35 -223.15 T 1,425.38 -42.21 T 1,908.15 -91.20


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
vjGrace 10.38 +2.17 +26.4
Systemax 7.02 +1.42 +25.4
FrankCov 2.83 +.52 +22.5
Genentch s 69.35+11.69 +20.3
vjUSG 41.22 +5.46 +15.3
Bluegreen 14.47 +1.76 +13.8
McDerl 21.11 +2.20 +11.6
OCAIncIf 4.53 +.47 +11.6
CapSenL 6.09 +.59 +10.7
Mentor 37.71 +3.52 +10.3

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
CashAm 14.61 -7.57 -34.1
AdMkSv If 4.26 -1.85 -30.3
Salton 2.10 -.67 -24.2
INCOwt 12.80 -3.85 -23.1
CmclMtl s 25.94 -7.72 -22.9
OreStl 17.95 -4.60 -20.4
HarleyD 45.80-11.47 -20.0
Magntk 3.94 -.96 -19.6
Triumph 31.65 -7.66 -19.5
WhitingPet 31.85 -7.71 -19.5

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Pfizer 1856516 27.71 +1.11
Lucent 1663290 2.40 -.25
FordM 1321626 9.50-1.53
GenElec 1181618 35.75 +.01
ExxonMbl 1092466 56.19 -3.82
Texinst 862211 22.76-2.15
Citigrp 826786 45.75 +.35
WalMart 814343 47.70 -.87
Elan .807887 4.02 +.28
NortelN If 792599 2.55 -.14

Diary
Advanced 961
Declined 2,566
New Highs 131
New Lows 242
Total issues 3,582
Unchanged 55
Volume 10,922,191,863


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GeoGlobi n 2.60 +.66 +34.0
Adventrx n 2.60 +.49 +23.2
Asconi 2.10 +.30 +16.7
AvanirPh 2.64 +.23 +9.5
WirelessT 2.64 +.21 +8.6
BrookeCps 12.57 +.99 +8.5
InovioBio 3.40 +.24 +7.6
VCG Hold n 3.06 +.21 +7.4
SCEd pfD 20.00 +1.25 +6.7
BiotechT 153.90 +9.45 +6.5

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
CVDEqp 4.14 -2.22 -34.9
HiShearT 3.69 -1.63 -30.6
Milestone 2.58 -1.05 -28.9
ArenaR wt 4.50 -1.40 -23.7
InterOil gn 24.65 -7.61 -23.6
Wstmind 18.65 -5.05 -21.3
Xenonicsn 3.80 -1.00 -20.8
Intermix n 6.05 -1.52 -20.1
KFX Inc 11.34 -2.76 -19.6
Gurunet n 17.50 -4.14 -19.1

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SPDR 4257166114.15 -3.85
SemiHTr 1415110 29.91 -2.58
SP Engy 1034305 39.73 -2.99
iShRs2000 815013115.64 -5.66
iShJapan 670116 10.07 -.51
DJIA Diam 433226100.70 -3.76
SP Fncl 377066 27.73 -.59
OilSvHT 350207 89.46 -6.54
IvaxCps 177786 17.61 -1.81
SP Matls 156470 27.52 -2.47

Diary
Advanced 280
Declined 799
New Highs 25
New Lows 96
Total issues 1,117
Unchanged 38
Volume 1,511,020,010


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Noland 73.65+26.23 +55.3
ComsyslTn15.95 +3.71 +30.3
GrandToyn 3.10 +.66 +27.0
TalxCp s 24.80 +5.21 +26.6
Mossimo 4.21 +.85 +25.2
KeithCo 20.87 +3.77 +22.0
Brookstns 19.86 +3.44 +21.0
LasrCard 5.97 +1.02 +20.6
OrcktCms 21.05 +3.45 +19.6
NthfldLb 14.22 +2.25 +18.8

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
VelctyE h rs 6.03 -5.43 -47.4
Magma 5.74 -3.59 -38.5
MemryPh 2.72 -1.68 -38.2
Q Med 6.77 -3.98 -37.0
SyntroCp wt 5.25 -2.65 -33.5
Phazar 17.55 -8.32 -32.2
724 Sol 9.68 -4.32 -30.9
Travelzoo 31.35-13.41 -30.0
eCost.cm n 4.50 -1.87 -29.4
Simclar 4.17 -1.67 -28.6

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Nasd100Tr6484623 34.74-1.90
Intel 3410764 22.12-1.17
Microsoft 3364207 24.46 -.48
Cisco 3133884 17.20 -.70
AppleC s 2749144 35.35 -8.39
JDS Uniph2726400 1.48 -.02
SunMicro 2123444 3.66 -.45
Oracle 2114527 11.70 -.66
ApldMatl 1905381 14.50-1.57
eBays 1542369 31.97-3.19

Diary
Advanced 639
Declined 2,680
New Highs 90
New Lows 385
Total issues 3,379
Unchanged 60
Volume 9,431,226,337


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
Wkly Wkly YTD Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg
AT&T NY .95 18.46 -.77 -4.0 -3.1 JDS Uniph Nasd 1.48 -.02 -1.3 -53.3
Alltel NY 1.52 55.62 -.80 -1.4 -5.3 JeffPilot NY 1.67 47.91 -.93 -1.9 -7.8
AppleC s Nasd ... 35.35 -8.39 -19.2 +9.8 LowesCos NY .16 51.64 -3.13 -5.7 -10.3
ApldMati Nasd .12 14.50 -1.57 -9.8 -15.2 Lucent NY ... 2.40 -.25 -9.4 -36.2
AutoZone NY 82.78 -2.51 -2.9 -9.3 McDnlds NY .55 30.30 -.84 -2.7 -5.5
BkofAms NY 1.80 44.28 -.40 -0.9 -5.8 Microsoft Nasd .32 24.46 -.48 -1.9 -8.5
BellSouth NY 1.08 25.54 -.93 -3.5 -8.1 Nasdl0oTrNasd .38 34.74 -1.90 -5.2 -13.0
BobEvn Nasd .48 20.92 -.49 -2.3 -20.0 NY Times NY .62 34.00 -1.57 -4.4 -16.7
CNBFnPAsNasd .52 14.90 -.35 -2.3 -2.4 NobltyH Nasd .20 20.00 +.09 +0.5 -14.8
CSX NY .40 38.22 -3.32 -8.0 -4.6 OcciPet NY 1.24 65.50 -6.72 -9.3 +12.2
ChmpE NY 8.65 -.79 -8.4 -26.8 Oracle Nasd ... 11.70 -.66 -5.3 -14.7
ChevTex s NY 1.60 52.21 -4.48 -7.9 -.6 Penney NY .50 45.49-2.99 -6.2 +9.9
Cisco Nasd ... 17.20 -.70 -3.9 -11.0 PepsiCo NY .92 54.83 +1.75 +3.3 +5.0
CocaCi NY 1.12 41.29 -.81 -1.9 -.8 Pfizer NY .76 27.71 +1.11 +4.2 +3.0
ColBgp NY .61 20.15 -.18 -0.9 -5.1 Potash s NY .60 80.20 -8.04 -9.1 -3.4
Delhaize NY 1.50 67.69 -1.06 -1.5 -10.8 QualcomsNasd .36 32.69 -2.21 -6.3 -22.9
DollarG NY .16 21.50 -.50 -2.3 +3.5 Ryder NY .64 39.38 -2.13 -5.1 -17.6
eBay s Nasd 31.97 -3.19 -9.1 -45.0 SearsHidgs Nasd ... 134.91 -7.16 -5.0 +36.3
ExxonMbl NY 1.08 56,19 -3.82 -6.4 +9.6 SemiHTr Amex .18 29.91 -2.58 -7.9 -10.4
FPLGps NY 1.42 39.94 -.39 -1.0 +6.9 SiebelSys Nasd ... 8.67 -.29 -3.2 -17.3
FamDIr NY .38 27.85 -1.12 -3.9 -10.8 SiriusS Nasd ... 5.15 -.26 -4.8 -32.4
FordM NY .40 9.50 -1.53 -13.9 -35.1 SouthnCo NY 1.43 31.95 ... ... -4.7
GenElec NY .88 35.75 +.01 ... -2.1 SPDR Amex 2.26 114.15 -3.85 -3.3 -5.6
GaPacif NY .70 32.81 -2.80 -7.9 -12.5 SPEngy Amex .53 39.73 -2.99 -7.0 +9.4
GdyFam Nasd .12 8.23 -.22 -2.6 -10.0 SunMicro Nasd ... 3.66 -.45 -10.9 -32.1
HCA Inc NY .60 55.25 +.33 +0.6 +38.3 TimeWarn NY ... 17.31 -.66 -3.7 -11.0
HomeDp NY .40 36.11 -1.37 -3.7 -15.5 WalMart NY .60 47.70 -.87 -1.8 -9.7
Intel Nasd .32 22.12 -1.17 -5.0 -5.4 Yahoo s Nasd ... 32.46 -2.30 -6.6 -13.9

Stock Footnotes: = Dividena anrd earnings in Canaaiain dollars h = Does not meel corninueda liatibr
alandara1 1 = Late8 ing win SEC n = New In pa.l 52 weeks pi = Prelenrred rs = Stock na undeigor.~
a reverse slock plid of .31 leasi 50 percent wflir, the pal1 year ri = Rgr. to10 buy security ar a apecfine
pnca = Sio.: had. splI Dy 3a lea.l 20 percent whiin the 13 year un = Units vj = In Dankruprc.y or
rwa:alrsr.i, wd = Wrier, d itnibuted v = Wer.r. issued *1 = Wnantri
Mutual Fund Footnotes: x = Ex cash dcaend fNL = No up-ironi males charge p = Fund assets used to
pay diinsbutrion cosis r = Redamption lee or contingent delerreM sales load may apply I = Born p anda
Gainers and Losers musl be worth at least .S2 to be hi=ed .n table at leh Most Actives mu-i- be worn
a] least S1 Volume in nundreas of shares Source: Te AsEOcIwrad Parss Salef figures are unoftic.al


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 5.75 5.75
Discount Rate 3.75 3.75
Federal Funds Rate 2.875 2.75
Treasuries
3-month 2.73 2.74
6-month 3.01 3.04
5-year 3.87 4.14
10-year 4.24 4.48
30-year 4.60 4.76


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.2994 1.2984
Britain 1.8914 1.8818
Canada 1.2475 1.2417
Euro .7748 .7796
Japan 107.76 108.12
Mexico 11.0970 11.1040
Switzerind 1.2015 1.2124
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Weekly Dow Jones


Dow Jones 11,000

industrials v- 10000

For the week ending 900
Friday, April 15 ....000


8,000

10,087.51
Record high: 11,722.98 I i i I I I i I 7,000
Jan. 14,2000 A M J J A S 0 N D J F M A M



MUTUAL FUNDSl :
Total Assets Total ReturnlRank Pct Min InIt
Name Obj ($MIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 n SP 80,949 105.34 -3.9 +2.9/A -9.3/A NL 3,000
American Funds A: InvCoAA p LV 63,944 29.46 -3.7 +4.0/C +15.9/C 5.75 250
American Funds A: WshMutA p LV 62,011 29.38 -3.0 +3.5/D +29.3/B 5.75 250
American Funds A: GwthFdA p XG 60,313 25.97 -4.3 +1.9/A +2.3/A 5.75 250
Fidelity Invest: Magellan n LC 57,371 97.88 -4.0 -0.5/D -16.4/C NL 2,500
PIMCO Inst PIMS: TotRet n IB 47,891 10.66 +0.9 +5.0/A +47.0/A NL 5,000,000
Fidelity Invest: Contra n XG 46,697 54.70 -4.8 +6.5/A +13.3/A NL 2,500
Dodge&Cox: Stock XV 45,216 124.93 -3.6 +10.7/A +77.5/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: IncoFdA p MP 43,669 17.85 -2.5 +8.9/A +54.8/A 5.75 250
American Funds A: EupacA p IL 37,515 34.79 -4.8 +10.0/0 -1.0/C 5.75 250
Vanguard Instl Fds: Instldx n SP 35,997 104.47 -3.9 +3.0/A -8.8/A NL 10,000,000
Fidelity Invest: LowPr m MV 35,551 38.43 -4.8 +11.2/B +136.5/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: CapInBIA p MP 35,185 51.49 -2.1 +13.5/A +68.1/A 5.75 250
American Funds A: NewPerA p GL 32,895 26.26 -5.1 +5.2/D +5.8/B 5.75 250
Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk n XC 32,057 27.05 -4.1 +3.6/C -3.2/C NL 3,000
Fidelity Invest: Groinc LC 31,050 36.37 -2.7 +3.2/B -1.6/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Fds: Wndsll LV 30,355 30.06 -3.0 +10.6/A +45.8/A NL 3,000
American Funds A: BalA p BL 30,077 17.37 -2.1 +3.3/C +53.6/A 5.75 250
American Funds A: CapWGrA p GL 29,844 32.88 -4.6 +12.7/A +45.1/A 5.75 250
Vanguard Fds: Welltn n BL 28,937 29.31 -2.7 +7.0/A +43.6/A NL 3,000
Fidelity Invest: Equtlnc n El 25,985 49.34 -4.7 +3.5/E +23.9/C NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: Diverlntl n IL 25,325 28.12 -4.3 +10.7/D +30.0/A NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: Puritan BL 23,671 18.22 -3.0 +3.9/B +30.4/A NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: GroCo n XG 23,264 50.92 -4.0 -2.3/C -28.6/C NL 2,500
Vanguard Admiral: 500AdmI n SP 22,428 105.35 -3.9 +3.0/A NS NL 250,000
Vanguard Fds: Prmcp r XC 22,002 57.34 -5.0 +2.8/C -4.3/C NL 25,000
Fidelity Invest: BlueChipGr LC 21,953 38.98 -3.0 -2.6/E -24.7/D NL 2,500
BL-Balanced, El -Equity Income, GL-Global Stock, HB -Healtviotech, IB -Intermediate Bond, IL-Internationl Stock, LC-LargeCap Core, LG
-Large-Cap Growth, LV -Large-Cap Val., MP -Stock/Bond Blend, MT -Mortgage, SP -S&P 500, SS -Single-State Muni, XG -Mufi-Cap Growth.
Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom
20%. Min It Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA= Not avail. NE = Data in question. NS = Fund rot in existence. Source: Upper, Inc.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
ABB Ltd ... ..... -.20 +10.2 6.24
ACE Ltd .84 2.1 10 -.91 -8.1 39.29
AESCp ... ... 27 -.46 +20.8 16.51
AFLAC .44 1.2 14 -1.38 -10.4 35.70
AKSteel ... ... 4 -1.14 -36.4 9.20
AMR ... ... ... -.89 -5.9 10.30
AT&T .95 5.1 -.77 -3.1 18.46
AUOptron .36 2.4 -.58 +5.7 15.14
AbtLab 1.10 2.2 24 +2.29 +6.9 49.87
AberFitc .50 .9 24 -4.52 +16.1 54.49
Accenture ... ... 17 -1.20 -16.7 22.50
AMD ... ... ... -1.64 -29.8 15.45
Aetna s .02 ... 10 -4.36 +13.3 70.67


Agere
Agilent
AirProd 1.28
Albertsn .76
Alcatel
Alcoa .60
AllegTch .24
Allstate 1.28
Alltel 1.52
Altria 2.92
Amdocs
AmHess 1.20
AMovilL .21
AmAxle .60
AEP 1.40
AmExp .48
AmIntGp If .50
AmTower ...
AmerisBrg .10
Anadrk .72
AnalogDev .24
Anheusr .98
Apache .32
ArchCoal .32
ArchDan .34
Ashland 1.10
AutoData .62
Avaya
Avon s .66
BB&TCp 1.40
BHP BilILt .46
BJ Svcs .32
BMC Sft ...
BakrHu .46
BkofAm s 1.80
BkNY .80
BarrPhm
BarrickG .22
Baxter .58
BearingP If...
BeazrHm s .40
BellSouth 1.08
BestBuy .44
BlackD 1.12
Blockbstr .08
Boeing 1.00
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.12
Brunswick .60
BurlNSF .68
BurlRsc s .34
CMS Eng
CSX .40
CVS Cp .29
CablvsnNY ...
Caesars
Alpine
Cameco gs .24
CapOne .11
CardnlHIth .12
CaremkRx ..
Carnival .60
Caterpillar 1.64
Cendant .36
CenterPnt .40
Centex .16


... ... -.09 -7.3 1.27
26 -.97 -15.4 20.40
2.3 20 -6.04 -2.4 56.60
3.8 17 -.09 -16.2 20.02
... ... -.62 -26.6 11.48
2.0 21 -2.31 -6.7 29.30
1.1 96 -4.30 -2.6 21.11
2.4 12 -.89 +3.1 53.31
2.7 16 -.80 -5.3 55.62
4.5 13 -.55. +6.4 64.98
24 -.70 +9.5 28.75
1.3 9 -6.71 +10.1 90.69
.4 ... -1.50 -4.1 50.19
2.7 7 -2.36 -27.9 22.10
4.1 12 -.34 -.4 34.19
.9 19 -.82 -10.0 50.72
1.0 12 -.80 -22.2 51.11
... ... -.77 -6.8 17.15
.2 16 +2.67 +3.1 60.50
1.0 11 -4.60 +10.6 71.66
.7 23 -2.83 -11.1 32.84
2.1 17 -.28 -9.9 45.72
.6 11 -4.99 +9.9 55.57
.8 23 -4.05 +14.0 40.50
1.6 19 -.91 -6.9 20.78
1.8 10 -5.15 +7.0 62.45
1.4 27 -1.77 -2.0 43.46
15 -1.38- -39.5 10.40
1.6 23 -3.70 +5.7 40.90
3.8 13 -1.54 -11.8 37.08
1.8 ... -3.26 +3.9 24.96
.6 21 -2.84 +7.3 49.92
... 34 +.23 -20.3 14.83
1.1 27 -1.60 +.9 43.06
4.1 12 -.40 -5.8 44.28
2.8 15 -1.17 -15.9 28.10
34 +2.46 +14.2 52.00
1.0 49 -1.48 -7.5 22.41
1.7 55 +.07 -.1 34.52
... ... -.57 -4.0 7.71
.9 7 -3.67 -9.0 44.37
4.2 10 -.93 -8.1 25.54
.9 17 -1.73 -17.9 48.70
1.4 15 +4.10 -6.3 82.75
.8 ... -.13 +5.7 10.08
1.8 25 -1.60 +10.1 57.00
24 -.57 -15.8 29.93
4.3 21 +.68 +1.3 25.95
1.4 15 -6.24 -13.5 42.82
1.4 22 -4.93 -.2 47.22
.7 13 -2.37 +10.9 48.25
20 -.52 +20.7 12.61
1.0 25 -3.32 -4.6 38.22
.6 23 +.21 +15.1 51.86
... ... -1.80 +6.1 26.43
... 21 -.23 +1.4 20.42
... ... -.50 -39.3 2.39
.7 ... -6.89 +4.1 36.39
.2 15 -1.36 -13.3 73.00
.2 19 -.38 -5.2 55.15
27 -3.36 -3.7 37.96
1.2 20 -2.28 -15.6 48.65
2.0 15 -7.23 -14.4 83.46
1.8 10 -.59 -10.0 20.07
3.4 ... -.19 +4.1 11.76
.3 8 -2.71 -7.4 55.19


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
Cenveo ... ...... +01 +172.6 8.45
Ceridian If ... ... 23 +.18 -6.7 17.06
ChesEng .18 .9 13 -1.87 +17.3 19.35
ChevTexs 1.60 3.1 8 -4.48 -.6 52.21
Chicos s ... ... 32 -3.75 +9.0 24.81
ChiYuc ... ... ... +.64 -16.3 11.12
CircCity .07 .4 47 +.15 -.5 15.56
Citigrp 1.76 3.8 14 +.35 -5.0 45.75
ClearChan .50 1.5 23 -1.24 -1.1 33.11
ClevClfs .40 .7 5-12.08 +10.2 57.24
Coach s ... ... 30 -2.63 -10.6 25.22
CocaCI 1.12 2.7 21 -.81 -.8 41.29
Coeur ... ... ... -.33 -18.8 3.19


ColgPal 1.16 2.2
CmcBNJ s .44 1.5
CmclMtl s .24 .9
CVRD s .89 3.3
CVRD pfs .89 3.9
CompAs .08 .3
CompSci
ConocPhil 2.48 2.5
ConsolEgy .56 1.3
ConEd 2.28 5.4
ConstellEn 1.34 2.6
CtlAir B
Corning
CntwdFn s .56 1.8
CrownHold ...
CypSem
DR Hortn s .27 1.0
DTE 2.06 4.6
Danahers .06 .1
Darden .08 .3
Deere 1.24 2.0
Delphi If .12 3.3
DeltaAir
DevonEs .30 .7
DiaOffs .25 .6
DirecTV
Disney .24 .9
DollarG .16 .7
DomRes 2.68 3.6
DonlleyRR 1.04 3.2
DoralFin .72 4.2
DowChm 1.34 3.0
DukeEgy 1.10 3.9
Dynegy
ETrade
EMC Cp ...
EOG Res s .16 .4
EMJorg n ...
Eaton 1.24 2.2
Edisonlnt 1.00 2.8
EIPasoCp .16 1.6
Elan
EDS .20 1.0
EmrsnEI 1.66 2.7
Emulex
EnCanag .40 .6
ENSCO .10 .3
Enterasys ...
Exelon s 1.60 3.5
ExxonMbl 1.08 1.9
FPLGps 1.42 3.6
FairchldS ...
FannieM If 1.04 *1.9
FedExCp .28 .3
FedrDS .54 .9
FirstData .24 .6
FirstEngy 1.65 4.0
FordM .40 4.2
FordC pfS 3.25 8.7
ForestLab ...
FrankRes .40 .6
FredMac 1.40 2.3
FMCG 1.00 2.9
FreescB n ...
FriedBR 1.36 10.0
Gap .18 .9


23 -.72 +3.2 52.82
17 -1.93 -9.5 29.14
7 -7.72 +4.6 25.94
12 -4.10 -7.1 26.96
... -3.21 -6.1 22.90
-.16 -12.4 27.20
14 -1.66 -22.0 43.96
9 -9.06 +15.2 100.07
19 -5.28 +2.2 41.97
19 +.01 -3.5 42.21
17 -1.06 +19.1 52.06
-.83 -11.7 11.96
... -.88 -5.7 11.10
9 -1.39 -14.4 31.67
48 -1.42 +3.7 14.25
... -.84 -5.4 11.10
8 -2.18 -11.0 26.91
18 -.99 +4.2 44.92
21 -3.26 -15.4 48.59
19 -.29 +10.0 30.52
11 -4.54 -16.0 62.47
13 -.41 -59.1 3.69
... -.17 -48.5 3.85
10 -2.99 +12.8 43.91
... -4.39 +12.9 45.20
... +.13 -12.5 14.64
24 -1.03 -1.5 27.37
20 -.50 +3.5 21.50
19 -1.69 +8.6 73.58
42 +1.53 -6.8 32.89
4 -2.83 -65.5 16.98


WHEN IT RAINS, IT POURS.
.--










757W Duval St.
S(Formerly Rick Bringger's office)


S(386) 755-6801 (fl e


2001 Allstate Insur ance Company, Northbrook Illinois.
Subject to avallability and qualflcatons. Flood insurance available through an Allstate Agent and provided by
The National Flood Insurance Program.


15 -4.76 -10.5 44.30 Wkly YTD Wkly
18 -.46 +10.1 27.89 Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


... -.24 -22.9 3.56
11 -.78 -26.3 11.02
32 -1.00 -22.4 11.54
17 -3.63 +22.3 43.62
... 9.00
13 -6.53 -20.5 57.55
13 -.30 +10.4 35.35
... -.74 -5.6 9.82
+.28 -85.2 4.02
61 -.91 -14.9 19.65
20 -2.77 -10.9 62.48
25 -3.06 -5.8 15.86
... -6.49 +11.3 63.51
48 -3.03 +4.2 33.08
... -.05 -55.0 .81
16 +.37 +3.9 45.77
14 -3.82 +9.6 56.19
16 -.39 +6.9 39.94
46 -1.29 -17.2 13.46
9 -.94 -23.9 54.21
18 -7.07 -14.8 83.95
16 -2.71 +6.5 61.54
18 -.76 -9.9 38.31
15 -.37 +4.4 41.23
6 -1.53 -35.1 9.50
... -5.40 -29.2 37.40
14 +1.68 -22.8 34.61
21 -3.66 --7.3 64.56
16 -2.23 -17.6 60.70
40 -4.01 -10.6 34.18
... -1.40 -10.1 16.50
7 -.88 -30.0 13.58
17 -.40 -.5 21.02


Gateway
Genentchs ...
GenMills 1.24
GM db32B 1.31
GM db33 1.56
GaPacif .70
Gillette .65
GlaxoSKIn 1.53
GlobalSFe .30
GoldmanS 1.00
Goodyear ...
vjGrace
GtAtPc
Gtech s .34
Guidant .40
HCA Inc .60
Hallibtn .50
HarleyD .50
HarmonyG .05
HarrahE 1.32
HartfdFn 1.16
HItMgt .16
HewlettP .32
Hilton .08
HomeDp .40
HonwIllntl .83
HovnanE ...
Huntsmn n ...
INCO
IngerRd 1.00
IBM .72
IntlGame .48


... ... -.27 -36.6 3.81
83+11.69 +27.4 69.35
2.6 18 -.88 -2.7 48.35
7.5 ... -1.19 -24.4 17.45
8.1 ... -1.68 -27.5 19.34
2.1 14 -2.80 -12.5 32.81
1.2 31 +.20 +16.9 52.35
3.2 ... +1.79 +.9 47.82
.9 55 -3.17 +2.2 33.83
.9 11 -6.44 +2.4 106.49
... 22 -1.33 -21.8 11.47
... ... +2.17 -23.7 10.38
... ... -.57 +56.2 16.01
1.4 16 +.38 -8.4 23.77
.5 46 +.16 +3.8 74.87
1.1 21 +.33 +38.3 55.25
1.2 ... -3.73 +3.5 40.60
1.1 15-11.47 -24.6 45.80
.7 ... -.62 -23.9 7.05
2.0 21 -1.48 +1.1 67.61
1.7 9 -1.86 -3.7 66.75
.6 19 +.19 +12.9 25.65
1.5 18 -.80 -.6 20.84
.4 37 -.81 -3.3 21.99
1.1 16 -1.37 -15.5 36.11
2.3 21 -1.92 +.7 35.66
... 8 -3.30 -3.1 48.00
... ... -1.42 -14.5 20.95
12 -4.27 -2.7 35.77
1.3 11 -4.21 -5.0 76.25
.9 15-10.90 -22.2 76.70
2.0 21 -2.70 -29.6 24.22


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
IntPap 1.00 2.9 ... -2.87 -18.0 34.43
IntlSteel ... ... 4 -2.50 -8.4 37.15
Interpub If ... ... ... -.12 -3.0 13.00
JPMorgCh 1.36 4.0 22 -.57 -13.0 33.93
Jabil 29 -2.56 +3.2 26.41
JanusCap .04 .3 18 -.72 -21.5 13.20
JohnJn 1.14 1.6 24 +.76 +9.4 69.40
KB Home 1.50 1.3 9 -7.56 +6.5 111.19
KerrMc 1.80 2.3 23 +2.86 +34.0 77.42
Keycorp 1.30 4.0 14 +.29 -4.8 32.27
KimbClk 1.80 2.8 18 -1.24 -1.9 64.53
KingPhrm ... ...... +.26 -36.9 7.82
Kohis ... ... 24 -1.41 +1.4 49.85
Kraft .82 2.6 21 -.72 -10.3 31.95
KrspKrm ... ...... -.03 -40.0 7.56
LSI Log ... ... ... -.46 -6.6 5.12
LaBrnch ... ... ... -.89 -11.6 7.92
LearCorp 1.00 2.6 7 -4.09 -35.7 39.20
LehmBr .80 .9 11 -3.53 +3.7 90.73
LennarA .55 1.0 9 -3.96 -6.5 53.00
LibtyMA 1.93 ...... -.14 -6.6 10.26
LillyEli 1.52 2.6 35 +3.76 +2.3 58.07
Limited .60 2.7 15 -1.04 -2.2 22.52
LaPac .40 1.7 6 -1.48 -14.5 22.86
Lucent ... ... 11 -.25 -36.2 2.40
Lyondell .90 3.7 81 -2.63 -15.7 24.37
MBIA 1.12 2.1 10 -1.93 -16.3 52.96
MBNA .56 2.4 11 -1.42 -16.8 23.45
MEMC ... ... 11 -1.96 -15.2 11.23
Manpwl .40 1.0 15 -2.35 -17.2 39.97
Marathon 1.12 2.5 12 -3.75 +17.0 44.00
MarshM .68 2.4 88 -1.75 -14.5 28.14


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
Masco .80 2.5 17 -1.29 -10.6 32.65
MasseyEn .16 .5 ... -4.51 +1.5 35.47
Mattel .45 2.4 14 -2.18 -4.2 18.67
Maxtor ... ... ... -.74 -7.2 4.92
MayDS .98 2.7 21 -.95 +23.3 36.25
Maytag .72 5.0 ... +.64 -32.4 14.27
McDerl ... ... ... +2.20 +15.0 21.11
McKesson .24 .6 -.85 +18.6 37.30
McAfee ... ... 16 -.23 -26.7 21.22
MedcoHIlth ... ...28 -3.72 +19.2 49.60
Medicis .12 .4 28 +.91 -16.9 29.16
Medtrnic .34 .7 29 -.20 +5.1 52.20
MellonFnc .72 2.7 14 -1.56 -14.9 26.47
Mentor .68 1.8 28 +3.52 +11.8 37.71
MerrillLyn .64 1.2 12 -3.41 -11.2 53.09
MetLife .46 1.2 11 -1.02 -5.0 38.47
MicronT ... ... 14 -.68 -22.9 9.52
Monsnto .68 1.2 47 -5.17 +1.3 56.28
MorgStan 1.08 2.1 12 -3.91 -7.3 51.49
Motorola .16 1.1 23 -.45 -14.2 14.75
NCRCps ... ... 23 -.80 -2.2 33.86
NatlCity 1.40 4.3 8 -.62 -12.6 32.81
NatGrid 1.84 3.9 ... +.36 -.7 47.67
NOilVarco ... ... 32 -4.09 +16.8 41.22
NatSemi s .08 .4 18 -1.71 +2.7 18.44
Navistar ... ... 8 -3.48 -27.3 31.99
NwCentFn 6.20 14.9 5 -3.90 -35.1 41.50
NewmtM .40 1.0 40 -2.21 -10.4 39.77
NewsCpAn.16 1.0 ... -.82 -14.3 16.00
NewsCpB n .06 .4 -.86 -13.6 16.59
NiSource .92 4.1 14 -.62 -2.1 22.30
NikeB 1.00 1.3 19 -6.45 -16.4 75.86
NobleCorp ... ... 47 -3.74 +3.9 51.68
NokiaCp .44 3.0 ... -.61 -5.9 14.74
NorflkSo .44 1.4 13 -4.19 -15.3 30.65
NortelN If ... ... ... -.14 -26.5 2.55
NoFrkBcs .88 3.3 15 -1.35 -7.0 26.83
Novartis .86 1.8 ... +.23 -6.5 47.25
Nucor s .60 1.2 7 -6.48 -6.8 48.79
Nuveenlnv .72 2.1 20 -.25 -14.4 33.80
OMI Cp .32 1.8 6 -1.62 +3.8 17.49
OcciPet 1.24 1.9 11 -6.72 +12.2 65.50
OffcDpt ... ... 20 -.88 +21.2 21.04
Owensll ... ... 19 +.41 +10.5 25.02
PG&ECp 1.20 3.5 3 -.52 +2.5 34.11
PNC 2.00 4.1 12 -1.32 -14.0 49.38
PeabdyE s .30 .8 29 -6.29 -2.7 39.36
Penney .50 1.1 26 -2.99 +9.9 45.49
PepsiBott .32 1.1 17 +1.51 +5.7 28.59
PepsiCo .92 1.7 22 +1.75 +5.0 54.83
PetroKaz g .80 5 -5.32 -16.5 30.98
Pfizer .76 2.7 18 +1.11 +3.0 27.71
PhelpD 1.00 1.2 8-14.26 -13.1 86.00
PioNtrl. .20 .5 17 -2.14 +17.4 41.20
PlacarD .10 .7 22 -1.29 -23.2 14.49
Polaris 1.12 1.9 24 -8.37 -15.4 57.53
Praxair .72 1.6 21 -3.66 +1.4 44.77
Premcor .08 .1 10 -8.45 +28.7 54.29
Pridelntl ... ... ... -2.07 +9.9 22.57
Providian ... ... 14 -.58 +.1 16.48
Prudentl .63 1.1 17 -1.48 +2.4 56.29
PulteHm .20 .3 9 -5.03 +6.4 67.90
QwestCm ... ...... -.41 -20.7 3.52
Raytheon .88 2.4 40 -2.19 -5.2 36.83
ReliantEn ... ... ... -.78 -20.1 10.91
Revlon ... ... ... -.13 +31.3 3.02
RiteAid ... ... 9 -.01 +8.7 3.98
RobtHalf .28 1.1 31 -.99 -15.5 24.87
RockwlAut .90 1.7 20 -6.12 +3.9 51.48
Rowan .25 .9 ... -2.91 +3.9 26.92
RylCarb .52 1.2 19 -1.65 -21.7 42.60
RoylDut 2.26 3.8 11 -2.08 +2.8 58.96
SAP AG .24 .6 ... -1.82 -16.4 36.96
SBCCom 1.29 5.6 13 -.75 -10.7 23.00
SLM Cp .76 1.6 12 -1.11 -8.5 48.83
Safeway ... ... 17 +.44 +7.0 21.12
StJudes ... 33 -.28 -13.8 36.16
StPaulTrav .88 2.6 18 -1.18 -8.0 34.10
Saks ... ... 22 -1.55 +20.4 17.47


Name Div
Sanofi .61
SaraLee .79
SchergPI .22
Schlmb .84
Schwab .08
SeagateT .32
SealAir
ShawGp
Sherwin .82
SilcnGph
Smithlntl .48
Solectrn
SouthnCo 1.43
SwstAirl .02
SpmtFON .50
StarwdHtl .84
StateStr .68
StorTch
sT Gold n ..
Stryker s .09
Suncor g .24
SunGard
Sunoco 1.60
SymbIT .02
Sysco .60
TJX .24
TXU Corp 2.25
TaiwSemi .09
Target .32
TelNorL 1.54
Templelns .90
TenetHIt ...
Teradyn
Terra
Tesoro
Texlnst .10
3M Co 1.68
TimeWam ...
TollBros ...
Transocn ...
Tribune .48
Tycolntl .40
USEC .55
vjUSG
UnionPac 1.20
Unisys
UtdMicro .32
UPS B 1.32
US Bancrp 1.20
USSteel .32
UtdhlthGp .03
Unocal .80
UnumProv .30
ValeroE s .32
VerizonCm 1.62
ViacomB .28
Vishay
Visteon
Vodafone .55
Wachovia 1.84
Walgrn .21
WA MutI 1.84
WsteMInc .80
Weathflnt
WellPoint
WellsFrgo 1.92
WDigitl
Weyerh 1.60
WmsCos .20
Wyeth .92
XTOEgys .20
Xerox
YumBrds .40
Zimmer


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
1.4 ... +.59 +10.0 44.04
3.6 12 -.33 -10.0 21.72
1.1 ... +1.32 -1.1 20.65
1.3 33 -3.00 ... 66.92
.8 48 -.47 -15.4 10.12
1.9 25 -2.58 -4.1 16.57
... 22 -.92 -2.4 52.00
... 33 -1.27 +5.7 18.86
1.8 16 +1.59 -.3 44.50
... ... -.01 -45.7 .94
.8 32 -3.80 +5.9 57.60
... 37 -.23 -37.5 3.33
4.5 16 ... -4.7 31.95
.1 33 +.34 -9.1 14.80
2.2 ... -.91 -9.0 22.62
1.5 31 -3.37 -3.4 56.40
1.7 17 -2.02 -17.2 40.68
... 16 -1.69 -13.9 27.22
... ... -.29 -3.2 42.40
.2 41 +.71 -4.1 46.28
... ... -3.72 +1.0 35.75
... 22 -.27 +20.5 34.14
1.7 12 -8.33 +18.2 96.55
.2 40 -.96 -24.0 13.15
1.7 24 -.99 -8.3 35.00
1.0 17 -.91 -7.4 23.27
2.8" ... '-2.06 +26.1 81'41
1.1- .. .-.44 -3.5 *-8.19
.7 14 -2.05 -7.6 48.00
10.8 ... -.29 -15.8 14.20
2.7 23 -2.52 -.9 33.90
... ... +.08 +8.3 11.89
... 15 -1.96 -27.9 12.30
... 10 -.93 -23.9 6.76
7 -5.09 +9.9 35.01
.4 21 -2.15 -7.6 22.76
2.1 22 -3.69 -1.5 80.86
24 -.66 -11.0 17.31
... 13-5.77 +7.0 73.41
... ... 61 +11.9 47.45
1.2 23 -.32 -8.5 38.55
1.3 23 -2.56 -12.3 31.33
4.0 45 -2.35 +40.6 13.62
6 +5.46 +2.4 41.22
1.9 27 -5.03 -6.4 62.97
... ... -.64 -34.8 6.64
... ... -.18 -10.2 3.17
1.9 23 -2.95 -19.6 68.75
4.3 13 -.41 -10.7 27.97
.7 5 -5.31 -16.3 42.91
22 -5.13 +6.0 93.27
1.5 12 -3.68 +27.5 55.12
1.9 ... -1.13 -10.8 16.00
.5 10 -9.59 +48.9 67.61
4.7 12 -.92 -15.7 34.15
.8 ... -1.00 -6.2 34.12
... 50 -.97 -27.5 10.89
... ... -.76 -51.5 4.74
2.1 ... -.58 -5.1 25.97
3.7 13 -1.14 -5.9 49.52
.5 30 -1.10 +12.2 43.07
4.9 11 -1.32 -10.6 37.78
2.9 17 -1.50 -6.3 28.05
23 -3.27 +4.7 53.71
20 -6.30 +5.4 121.20
3.2 14 -.43 -4.9 59.13
.. 16 -1.79 +10.6 11.99
2.4 12 -4.65 -1.6 66.17
1.2 53 -1.75 +1.6 16.55
2.0 49 +2.23 +5.4 44.90
.7 19 -3.69 +10.6 29.36
15 -1.55 -21.3 13.39
.8 21 -.32 +6.4 50.21
... 35 +.88 -3.3 77.50


... 24 -.15 -29.1 1.90
... ... -1.61 -7.0 14.81
... 17 -1.56 -20.2 15.48
+.17 +64.1 2.33
22 -.19 +1.9 15.42
.1 32 -6.60 -3.3 60.66
... 49 -.12 -5.7 12.29
... ... +.21 -.9 12.36
... 49 +.74 -36.3 6.85
... ... -.88 +3.7 2.81
... 25 -1.83 -11.7 18.28
... 24 -1.58 -25.4 33.02
.7 19 -2.93 +14.1 26.88
... 16 +.57 -21.9 11.11
... 33 +1.27 -6.5 59.95
... ... -.90 -52.8 3.15
39 -8.39 +9.8 35.35
.8 16 -1.57 -15.2 14.50
... ... -.59 -39.2 2.56
... 34 -.83 +2.7 27.48
... ... -.39 -39.0 2.39
... 35 -1.97 -16.6 31.66
... ... -.20 -70.1 .99
... 24 -.31 -17.2 7.34
... 23 -1.87 -4.7 37.96
... ... -.29 -46.3 35.79
.5 30 +1.35 -11.2 38.54
... ... +.01 -40.7 .35
... 44 -3.24 -14.9 27.48
... ... +.30 -54.1 4.1b
... 23 -.42 -30.0 5.35
... 12 -.11 -26.7 1.87
... 19 +.73 -18.2 32.73
... ... +.65 +39.8 37.07
... ... -.11 -43.8 1.26
... 23 -.29 -11.5 21.80
... ... +.01 -42.5 1.92
... 22 -.70 -11.0 17.20


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
CogTechs ... ... 57 -5.86 -5.6 39.94
Comcast ... ... 75 -.62 -2.5 32.45
Comcsp ... ... 75 -.70 -2.3 32.10
Compuwre ... ... 28 -.77 -4.4 6.13
Comvers ... ... 81 -2.33 -7.0 22.73
Conexant ... ... ... -.30 -41.7 1.16
Costco .40 .9 22 -1.32 -7.3 44.86
Creeinc ... ... 21 -+.60 -37.8 24.94
Cymer ... ... 20 -3.99 -20.6 23.46
DRDGOLD ... ...... -.09 -51.9 .74
Delllnc ... ... 30 -2.62 -15.6 35.56
DobsonCm ... ...... +.09 +14.5 1.97
DllrTree ... ... 15 -.94 -15.8 24.22
eBays ... ... 56 -3.19 -45.0 31.97
EchoStar 1.00 ... 63 -.20 -13.1 28.90
ElectArts ... ... 27 -.81 -18.5 50.25
EricsnTI .36 1.3 ... -.54 -10.3 28.25
ExtNetw ... ... 37 -.82 -32.2 4.44
FLIR Syss ... ... 26 -5.16 -23.3 24.46
FifthThird 1.40 3.4 15 -1.94 -13.4 40.96
Fiserv ... ... 21 +1.31 +1.7 40.87
Flextrn ... ... 21 -1.69 -24.4 10.45
Foundry ... ... 26 -.85 -33.4 8.76
Genzyme ... ... ... +.64 +1.8 59.12
GileadSci s ... ... 36 -1.79 +1.0 35.33
Googlen ... ... ...-7.05 -4.0 185.00
HumGen ... ... ... +.26 -9.2 10.92
HuntJB .48 1.2 18 -2.18 -11.3 39.78
IAC Interac ... ... ... -.48 -20.3 22.01
Imclone ... ... 23 -3.17 -31.8 31.41
Inamed ... ... 34 -5.55 -5.1 60.04
Instinet ... ... 38 +.55 +7.6 6.49
Intel .32 1.4 18 -1.17 -5.4 22.12
InvFnSv .07 .2 21 -6.14 -12.4 43.78
JDS Uniph ... ... ... -.02 -53.3 1.48
JetBlue ... ... 44 -1.24 -17.7 19.12
JnprNtw ... ... 79 -1.96 -27.4 19.75
KLATnc .48 1.2 20 -4.57 -13.4 40.36


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Cha %Cha Last Name Div YId PE Cha %Chg Last


Kos Phr
LamRsch ...
Level3
LexarMd
LinearTch .40
MCI Inc n 1.60
Magma
MarvellT s ...
Maxim .80
McLeoA ...
Medimun
Microsoft .32
MillPhar
Nasd100Tr .38
NetwkAp
NextlPrt
NwstAirl
Novell
Novlus
Nvidia
OSI Phrm ...
OmniVisn ...
Oracle
PETCO
PMC Sra ...
PacSunwr ..
ParmTc
PatUTI s .16
Paychex .52
Polycom
ProtDsg
Logic
Qualcom s .36
RF MicD ...
RedHat
RschMot s ...
SanDisk
Sanmina


... 16 +4.71 +33.0 50.06
.. 13 -2.13 -10.5 25.87
... ... ... -39.5 2.05
... ... -.09 -45.0 4.31
1.1 30 -1.83 -4.2 37.12
... ... +.19 +29.1 26.03
... ... -3.59 -54.1 5.74
70 -3.47 -7.2 32.92
2.1 26 -2.56 -8.5 38.79
... ... +.02 -73.6 .19
... ... -.65 -8.0 24.95
1.3 27 -.48 -8.5 24.46
... ... +.61 -27.8 8.77
1.1 ... -1.90 -13.0 34.74
... 49 -2.65 -22.0 25.91
... ... -.35 +16.4 22.75
... ... -.80 -44.6 6.06
... 6 +.22 -11.7 5.96
... 22 -3.11 -14.7 23.78
... 37 -2.10 -9.4 21.35
... ... +2.60 -36.0 47.90
... 11 -1.38 -26.3 13.52
... 21 -.66 -14.7 11.70
... 21 -5.44 -23.1 30.36
... 27 -.84 -31.6 7.69
17 -1.96 +7.7 23.97
17 -.44 -15.3 4.99
.7 36 -2.40 +18.4 23.03
1.6 37 -.10 -6.4 31.91
... 45 -.11 -33.1 15.61
... ... +1.06 -18.7 16.79
23 -5.68 -5.1 34.87
1.1 29 -2.21 -22.9 32.69
... ... -.93 -38.2 4.23
... 44 -.64 -21.0 10.55
... 64 -7.52 -15.4 69.70
... 18 -2.59 +4.8 26.16
... ... -.75 -49.2 4.30


SearsHIdgs...
Sepracor ...
SiebelSys ...
SigmaTel ...
SiriusS
SkywksSol ...
SmurfStne ...
Sonuson ...
Staples .25
Starbucks
StIDyna .40
StemCells ..
SunMicro ...
Symantec s ...
TASER s ...
Tellabs
TevaPh s .22
3Com
TibcoSft ...
TiVo Inc
Trnsmeta ...
Travelzoo ...
USF Corp .37
UTStrcm If ...
Verisign
Veritas
ViaNet
Vitesse
WebMD ...
WorldGate ...
Wynn
XM Sat ...
Xilinx .20
Xybmaut If ...
Yahoo s
YellowRd ...


... 12 -7.16 +36.3 134.91
... ... -2.21 -6.4 55.60
... 43 -.29 -17.3 8.67
.. 21 -5.71 -19.2 28.72
... ... -.26 -32.4 5.15
24 -.67 -44.5 5.23
S-.80 -25.1 13.99
... 37 -.17 -34.9 3.73
.9 21 -1.60 -13.2 29.25
... 46 -1.28 -24.1 47.34
1.4 5 -3.35 -24.8 28.47
+.22 -20.3 3.37
... 18 -.45 -32.1 3.66
... 26 -1.68 -26.7 18.89
... 29 -1.07 -74.4 8.09
... ... -.41 -22.0 6.70
.7 64 -.13 +7.7 32.17
... ... -.35 -24.9 3.13
... 33 -.59 -51.1 6.52
... ... +.15 -2.0 5.75
... ... -.27 -61.3 .63
... 83-13.41 -67.1 31.35
.8 52 -1.53 +16.3 44.14
... ... -.80 -53.5 10.31
... 35 -3.23 -24.6 25.33
... 25 -1.99 -27.9 20.58
... ... +.02 -72.9 .23
... ... -.40 -40.8 2.09
... 75 +.23 +9.7 8.95
... ... +.43 +9.2 5.45
... ... -3.31 -10.6 59.82
... ... -3.17 -26.9 27.50
.7 27 -1,61 -4.4 28.35
... ... +.04 -81.3 .23
... 56 -2.30 -13.9 32.46
... 13 -4.61 -10.5 49.84


Name Div YId
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BiotechT .04
Cambiorg ...
CanArgo n ...
Cheniere
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DHB Inds ...
DJIA Diam 2.03 1.8
DOR Bio
DSL.net h
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GeoGlobIn ...
GoldStr g ...
GreyWolf ...
Gurunetn ...
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iSh Kor .10 .3
iShTaiwan .08 .7
iShSP500 2.45 2.1
iShEmMkt 2.41 1.2
iSh20 TB 4.01 4.4
iSh EAFE 2.41 1.5
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iShROOO1 G .57 1.2
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iShRs2000 1.53 1.3
iShREst 5.12 4.5
iShSPSml 1.47 1.0
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Wkly YTD Wkly
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... -.02 -5.9 6.10
... +.49 +132.1 2.60
... +.23 -22.6 2.64
... -.31 -28.2 2.19
... +9.45 +.6 153.90
... -.10 -30.0 1.87
... -.19 +11.1 1.20
... -8.12 -5.6 60.14
... -.20 +5.8 3.80
11 -1.55 -60.9 7.45
... -3.76 -6.3 100.70
-.03 -46.9 .34
+.01 -47.8 .12
... -.07 -65.2 .23
... +.66+168.0 2.60
... -.32 -35.2 2.60
-.61 +13.1 5.96
... -4.14 +101.1 17.50
... -.03 -13.5 .45
19 -.11 -44.1 3.31
... -1.74 -4.8 21.17
... -.51 -7.8 10.07
... -2.16 +5.4 30.84
... -.34 -7.3 11.18
.. -3.80 -5.7 114.07
...-13.00 -3.2 195.30
... +2.14 +2.9 91.09
... -4.73 -2.8 155.77
-.77 -14.3 64.60
.. -2.39 -4.2 63.56
... -1.35 -7.1 45.66
... -3.24 -12.4 58.95
... -5.66 -10.7 115.64
... +3.40 -7.8 113.56
... -7.36 -7.5 150.50
... -1.52 +7.1 6.05
... -.07 -50.5 .46
... -3.42 -27.9 51.40


Name Div YId
InterOil gn ...
Investools ...
IvaxCp s
KFX Inc
LifePoint
MadCatzg ...
Nabors
NOriong ...
NthgtM g
OiISvHT .48 .5
PainCare ...
PaxsnC
PetrofdE g 1.92 ...
PhmHTr 1.68 2.2
ProvETg 1.44
Qnstake gn ...
RaeSyst
Ramp rs
RegBkHT 4.48 3.5
RetailHT 3.85 1.0
SemiHir .18 .6
SPDR 2.26 1.7
SP Mid 1.04 .9
SP Matls .52 1.9
SPHIthC .37 1.2
SP Consume .24 .8
SP Engy .53 1.3
SP Fncl .65 2.3
SP Inds .42 1.5
SP Tech .42 2.3
SP Util .90 3.1
TelcHTr 2.25 4.8
TransGIb ...
TurboCh rs ...
UltraPtg ...
WheatR g ...
Wyndham ...


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...-7.61 -34.9 24.65
... -.57 +41.2 4.80
23 -1.81 +11.3 17.61
.. -2.76 -21.9 11.34
... -.04 -72.4 .08
... -.31 +47.6 1.24
29 -2.96 +7.6 55.21
... -.42 -17.9 2.39
8 -.13 -30.6 1.18
... -6.54 +5.2 89.46
31 -.30 +50.6 4.64
... -.29 -21.0 1.09
... -.59 +6.6 13.90
... +2.30 +3.8 75.45
-.16 +1.8 9.65
-.03 -57.5 .17
51 +.02 -64.8 2.57
-.31 -70.0 1.04
-2.64 -9.1 129.02
... -1.92 -9.9 88.80
... -2.58 -10.4 29.91
... -3.85 -5.6 114.15
... -4.90 -5.0 114.95
... -2.47 -7.4 27.52
... +.34 +2.0 30.80
... -1.47 -10.8 31.47
... -2.99 +9.4 39.73
... -.59 -9.2 27.73
... -1.26 -6.8 28.95
... -1.12 -12.5 18.47
... -.44 +4.2 29.01
... -.87 -10.6 26.08
54 -.80 +5.5 5.40
37 -.24 -40.3 13.66
... -4.60 -7.3 44.61
... -.23 -.9 3.23
... +.08 -31.1 .82


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AdobeSy .05
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AltairNano ...
AlteraCp ...
Amazon
AEagleO s .20
AmrTrde
Amgen
AmkorT
AppleC s
ApidMall .12
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Biomet .20
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ChkPoint ...
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in Today's Stock Market
During periods of uncertainty in
the stock market, it's more important
than ever to remember...
the Basic Rules of
Successful Investing
I Buy quality
I Diversify
I Invest for the long term
Whether your investments are with
Edward Jones or elsewhere, I'd be
happy to discuss how well your
investment portfolio may stand the
test of time.
Call or stop by today to arrange a
fre4 face-to-face portfolio review.


EdwardJones


Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


Individual Investors Since 1871


Stocks
Mutual funds
Bonds
Government securities


Tax-free bonds
CDs
Money market funds
IRAs


... and much more. Call or stop by today!


Serving individual investors
from more than 9,131
offices nationwide.


Steve Jones
Investment Representati
846 SW Baya Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 752-3847


Bank-issued, FDIC-insured to $100,000

1-year 3.65% APT Minimum deposit $5,000

3-year 4.30% APY' Minimum deposit $5,000

5-year 4,55% APYT Minimum deposit $5,000

*Annual Percentage Yield (APY)-Interest cannot remain on deposit; periodic payout
of interest is required. Early withdrawal is not permitted. Effective 4/13/05. Subject to
availability and price change. The amount received from a sale of a CD at current
market value may be less than the amount totally invested.

Call or stop by today.


Call for Details.
Travis Henry
ive Investment Representative
1468 SW Main Blvd., Ste. 100
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 758-6888 866-877-5020


O S


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


Sdial-a-pro
LaktCiii qrtp \ Retpoter Swece Directoy
Classmeds .



Childcare

CHILD CARE Registered home
#R03C0001. M-F flexible hours.
Full Time. Infant to 4 years.
386-752-2220

CHILDCARE lic. FOCO0007 &
insured. Open Mon Fri. 6am 7:30
pm. Between High Spring &
Ellisville. 386-755-7875

Concrete Work

A.D.F. CONCRETE Construction
A.C.I. Certified. Resd'l Free Est.
Slabs, Driveways, Patios, & Side-
walks. 386-364-5845/ 688-7652

JEB'S CONCRETE: Spring
Specials Call NOW! Resd'l &
Comm'l. Sidewalks, Driveways,
Patios, Stucco, Block, and Repair.
Lic. & Insured. 386-961-8238

Fencing

A & B Professional Fence Company
Fencing-Installation & Repairs
Wood/Chain Link/Farm Fence
Free Estimates 386- 963-4861

FENCING & DECKS
Wood, Vinyl, Privacy, Chain Link,
and Pool enclosure. Free Estimates.
386-497-4757 or 352-427-9409

Painting Service

NICK'S PAINTING
Interior/Exterior. Quality Work!
Free Estimates. Will meet or beat all
other estimates. Call 386-344-4242

Home Improvements

For all your Home Repairs that
include plumbing fixtures, flooring,
trim work and much more, call
John Thomas at 386-755-6183

Home Maintenance

HOME REPAIR
Inside or Out.
Houses or Mobile Homes.
Free Estimates. Paul 386-623-2255

NO REPAIR too Small. Days,
Evenings, & Weekends. All at
reasonable rates. The Home Repair
Center 386-884-0004

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, design. Comn. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call 386-496-2820 lv msg.

GERALD'S LAWN Maintenance.
Mowing, Hedging, & Trimming.
"No Job To Small!" 386-752-2779
or 386-365-2651. no answer Iv mess
LAWN WORK GRASS CUT
FREE ESTIMATES!
Call Paul
386-623-2255

Services

First Class Premium
0 Detail "Is Back In
Action." 2245 SW
Main Blvd. Phillip 386-623-6154.
$20.- $25, Cars, $25.-$30. Trucks

FREE CLEANUP.
Pick up of unwanted metals,
tin, scrap vehicles.
386-755-0133 We Recycle.


HOME CLEANING
Good references, Low rates.
Dependable and Honest!
Call for more info. 386-719-7074
No More Mess When You Hire the
Best! Spic & Span Cleaning Svc.
Comm'l & Resid'l. Good rates, All
your cleaning needs. 386-984-0067
11| TRUE VIEW
Window Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
Resid'l & Comm'l. Lic
-A & Insured. 10 Years Exp.
386-719-6840

Pressure Cleaning

PRESSURE WASHING
Commercial or Residential
Great Price!!!!
Call 386-623-1700

Land Services

r Bulldozer Work! tractor work,
root raking, bush hogging, seeding,
sodding, disking, site prep &
landscape work. All types of
Fencing and Irrigation Repair &
Installation. Free Estimate!
Call 755-3890 or (386) 623-3200

Tree Service

Hazardous TREE TRIMMING
and removal. Senior discount.
15 years experience.
386-963-3360

Carpet Cleaning

KING OF STEAM
Have your Carpet Cleaned by the
Best! Call for FREE Estimate!
386-344-5100

Paralegal Services

A Bankruptcy/Divorce
Other court matters can be done
through a low cost, professional.
Area's best Paula 386-454-2378.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORI-
DA
CASE NO. : 04-447-CA
GreenPoint Credit, LLC, as authorized
servicing agent for BankAmerica Hous-
ing Services, a division of Bank of
America, FSB, a corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Robert L. Hartenstein, IF LIVING, AND
IF DECEASED, THEIR UNKNOWN
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, CREDITORS, AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
THEM; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE
AND ANY OTHER PERSONS) IN
POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT RE-
AL PROPERTY WHOSE REAL
NAMES ARE UNCERTAIN,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to
an order or a final judgment of foreclo-
sure entered in the above-captioned ac-
tion, I will sell the property situated in
COLUMBIA County, Florida, described
as:
Lot 32, BLOCK A OF COUNTRY
LANE ESTATES SUBDIVISION; A
SUBDIVISION AS PER THE PLAT
THEREOF FILED AT PLAT BOOK 5,
PAGES 77, 77-A AND 77-B, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
INCLUDING the following Manufac-
tured Home: 1997 Nobility Kingswood
24 x 42, Serial Numbers: N87919A &
N87919B.
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder for cash, at the front entrance of
the COLUMBIA County Courthouse,
Lake City, Florida at 11:00 a.m., on May
llth, 2005. Dated this 7th day of April,
2005.
-by- J. MARKHAM
Deputy Clerk
03524839
April 17,24, 2005
NOTICE OF INTENT BY THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY TO ADOPT RULE AND
SET PUBLIC HEARING
The School Board of Columbia County
will hold a public hearing on Tuesday,
May 24, 2005, at 7:00 p.m., in the Audi-
torium of the Columbia County School
Board Administrative Complex, 372 W.
Duval Street, Lake City, FL, on pro-
posed amendments to rules, regulations
and procedures for the operation of the
Columbia County School System. The
public is invited to attend. Action is an-
ticipated at this meeting.
Persons with disabilities who require as-
sistance to participate in the public hear-
ing are requested to notify the Office of
the Superintendent at 755-8000 at least
48 hours in advance so that their needs
can be accommodated.
TITLE: Job Description 18-A Director
of Federal Projects
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Changing ti-
tle to Director. Amending job descrip-
tion qualifications to require a Master's,
Specialist's or Doctorate Degree from an
accredited educational institution with
certification in one or more of the fol-
lowing areas: Administration and Super-
vision (K-12), Educational Leadership,
School Principal, or Professional School
Principal, and five (5) years successful
teaching experience. Also adding the fol-
lowing under performance responsibili-
ties: "Supervise assigned staff and coor-
dinate the parent involvement, technolo-
gy and professional development pro-
grams for Title I schools, and monitor
the implementation of the No Child Left
Behind Act".
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1012.22, 1012.23, Florida Statutes
A complete text of the proposed amend-
ed rules, regulations and procedures can
be obtained at the Office of the Superin-
tendent of Schools, 372 W. Duval St.,
Lake City, FL, between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday Fri-
day. Economic impact statements, where
applicable, are on file in the Office of
the Superintendent at the above listed
address.
DATED THIS 13TH DAY OF APRIL,
2005.
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY
by:/s/ STEVE NELSON
CHAIRMAN
by:/s/ GRADY D. MARKHAM
SUPERINTENDENT


Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly sworn,
do hereby declare under oath that the
names of all persons interested in the
business or profession carried on under
the name of
LEE ENTERPRISES at
P.O. Box 68, McAlpin, Florida 32062.
Contact Phone Number: 1-386-288-
8053, and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
NAME: Wannie Lee
EXTENT OF INTEREST:
100%
by:/s/ Wannie Lee
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF MADISON
Sworn to and subscribed before me this
12th day of April, A.D. 2005
by:/s/ Arthur G. Smith
Notary.
01552390
April 17, 2005



J0'J1rtLi


020 Lost & Found
LOST 04/11 Lulu area. Small black
dog w/tags. 755-0485/755-5762

TWO 10 month old Labs. Large
yellow male, small black female.
Lost 4/13 near king road & state rd
47. Reward offered. 386-755-6791

030 Personals
#1 IN BUSINESS SERVICES
Divorce, Bankruptcy, Resumes
RE Closings, Legal Forms
248 N Marion Av. 755-8717
03524804 S
Send a
Mothers Day .
greeting with a
picture in the
Lake City Reporter
for only $39.96. Stop by or mail
in your photo to:
The Lake City Reporter,
Classified Dept. 180 E. Duval
Street Lake City FL 32055.
Deadline for submission is
May 4th. 2005 to be placed in our
May 8th Mother's Day edition.
Call 386-755-5440 for more info.


060 Services
LPN 16 yrs exp. will care for your
loved one in your home.
Reasonable rates., contact TERRY
386-758-1670

100 Opportunities

MANAGER IN TRAINING
Hibbett Sports, a full line of
sporting goods, is hiring in Lake
City. Apply at: 2469 U.S. Hwy 90
W. suite 166, Lake City, FL 32055.
Hibbett Sports conducts drug
testing. www.hibbett.com

$ GET YOUR CLASS B $
CDL license fro $250. We train.
904-777-5995


*CHILD CARE WORKER*
M/F hrs. 6am-6pm
Call 752-4411 or fax qualifications
to: 752-0740
Must have clean background check.
01550382
NOW HIRING
Motivated individuals for Manu-
factured Housing Construction.
Company with GREAT benefits
and GREAT hours. 401K, health
insurance, life insurance, paid
vacations and holidays. Competi-
tive starting pay. Experience
helpful but not necessary. Apply
in person: Homes of Merit, Inc.
1915 SE Hwy. 100 E. Office
NO CALLS PLEASE! Homes of
Merit promotes a Drug Free
Workplace and is an Equal
Opportunity Employer.







Quality is our Recipe
This simple statement applies
not only to our products but our
people as well.

We currently have IMMEDIATE
openings for our 2 locations in
Lake City & Live Oak, FL. for
experienced Restaurant Managers.

We offer:
Five day work week (It's a fact)
Rotating Schedules (Quality of
ife)
No.total "Night shift managers"
SExceptional Health/Dental Plan
S1 week vacation after 6 months
Competitive salaries (Let's talk)
Monthly bonus program
Employer matched 401K pro-
gram
Personal growth and opportuni-
ties
And more......

If you are interested in becoming
part of a Winning Team, sign up
TODAY by faxing us your resume
or call to set up an appointment at:


229-226-0685 fax or em,
tmowry@ wen-star.co

Everybody's Someb
at Wendy's

Accurate Car Care is hirii
positions, cashier, greeter,
and manager. Apply in pe
Accurate Car Wash, 4114
Hwy 90. Telephone 755

4M 4b


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"Available from


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1 Job
100 Opportunities
01551868
V Professional Child Care I
Worker needed. Must have CDA
Opportunity to expand into
management. Salary range from
$7. $9 hr. Mail resume to:
P.O. Box 2127, Lake City, Fl.
32056 or call 386-752-4411

01552037




$2000.00 Sign on Bonus
Drivers with 1 yr T/T exp who
join our team in April will receive
a. Davis Express, Starke, FL.
98% FL. GA. TN. S.C. & AL
1 yr. exp. .34 cpm
0 2 yrs. exp. .35 cpm
0 3 yrs. exp. .36 cpm
100% lumper reimbursement
Safety bonus
Guaranteed hometime
Health, Life, Dental &
disability Ins. avail.
s 401K available.
Call 1-800-874-4270 #6
www.davis-express.com

01552214
Service Persons Needed:
GREAT PAY
Must have Mobile Home
Construction Exp. & be able to
work out of town 4-5 nights per
week. Apply in person:
HOMES OF MERIT
No Phone Calls Please.
Drug Screen, MVR,
Background Req.


01552233
THE LAKE CITY REPORTER
is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier for
Lake Butler area. Deliver the
Reporter in the early morning
hours Tuesday Sunday. No
delivery on Monday's. Carrier
must have dependable transporta-
tion. Stop by the Reporter today
to fill out a contractor's inquirers
form. No phone calls please!


01552327
SALES REPRESENTATIVE
One of the Nation's major
suppliers of in-home oxygen &
respiratory therapy seeks a Sales
Representative. Responsibilities
include establishing and
maintaining relationships with
referral sources in the medical
community. Previous experience
selling in the home health care
field preferred. Must have
excellent human relations skills,
and be computer literate. We offer
a competitive salary and benefits
package including health, dental,
vision, life insurance and 401K.
FAX: 386-754-2795
Drug Free Workplace. EOE

CLASS A CDL OTR Driver
needed for Florida Pine Straw.
2 yrs exp. required. Health
insurance, retirement, paid vacation.
Drug Free 386-294-3411


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1 Job
100 Opportunities
01552368
ATTENTION





Postal Positions in Lake City
Minimum Pay $11.00 an hour.
Paid Training/No Experience
Required. Get Prepared -
Call Mon.-Fri. 1-866-300-6495
Ad Code: P908

01552369
39-43 cpm
21 DRIVERS NEEDED!
Sign-on Bonus
$0 Lease
CDL 6 mo. exp.
1-800-635-8669

01552370
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT






Bulldozer, Backhoes, Load-
ers, Dump Trucks, Graders,
Scrapers, Excavators

Next Class: May 9th
National Certification
-> Financial Assistance
-* Job Placement

800-383-7364

Associated Training Services
www.atsn-schools.com

ACCURATE WIRELESS seeks a
motivated sales person to join our
staff. We are looking for a person to
sell business Nextel services. If you
have previous sales experience, and
are self directed, contact us.
Email your resume to
badams(0)4accurate.com, or
Fax to 752-0299. Applications
available at Accurate Car Care,
4114 W. US Hwy 90 in Lake City.


ioo Job
w100 Opportunities

03524840
The NORTH Florida/ South
Georgia Veterans Health System,
Gainesville, FL, is seeking a
Security Officer who will be
responsible for the planning and
direction of law enforcement and
security at our Medical Centers in
Gainesville and Lake City, as well
as three Outpatient Clinics and six
Community Based Outpatient
Clinics, located throughout
Northern Florida. Candidates
must be U.S. or naturalized
citizens and be proficient in
spoken and written English.
Beginning salary is $72,035.
Benefits include retirement,
health insurance, thrift savings
plan (401K), 10 paid holidays,
vacation and sick leave. Ample
cultural and recreational
opportunities year-round, a low
cost of living, easy access to both
coasts and major metropolitan
centers and no state income tax
make Northern Florida ideal form
of family living. An Equal
Opportunity/ Affirmative Action
Employer. Women and minorities
are encouraged to apply. For
further information on how to
apply, please contact
Christina Ramsey,
Human Resources Specialist, at
352-376-1611 Ext. 6805

03524755




BELLb

JOIN OUR TEAM
Seeking high-powered, high
performance, individuals for
Team Member Positions.
Apply in person at
Taco Bell or Krystal,
Hwy 90 W, Lake City.
Flexible Schedule
Vacation/ Benefits Package/...
401K
Bonuses
Advancement Opportunities
Competitive Pay
Discounted Meals
Students
Friday/ Saturday night off


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


too Jo0
0 Opportunities
01552' 96
Children's Home Society,
Florida's largest and oldest child
advocacy agency is currently
seeking individuals eager to make
a difference in the life of children.
Become part of the team whose
living philosophy is to "Embrace
Children, Inspire Lives."
Director of Development -
Gainesville
This position will manage all
aspects of the Divisions'
Development Program,
community relations, marketing
and public relations, and will
increase charitable funding from
individual, corporate,
organization and government
sources. Bachelor's Degree or
CFRE designation w/ min of 5
years exp in fund development,
community volunteer recruitment
and/or community relations, or
equivalent business exp required.
Dependency Case Manager -
Live Oak
Identify and assess client and
family needs of minors placed in
care by DCF due to abuse or
neglect by caretakers, with the
ultimate goal of permanency. To
evaluate, coordinate and ensure
necessary services and/or
treatment are provided; complete
required assessments; assist
individuals and families by using
such activities as delineating
alternatives, helping to articulate
goals and providing needed
information. Bachelor's in a
Human Services related field
required. Must possess State of
Florida Child Protection
Certification
LEAD DEPENDENCY CASE
MANAGERS Live Oak
Will provides continuity of care
with aim for permanent
placement, for children through a
case management model that
includes developing, expanding,
accessing and linking resources in
the community to the needs of the
child throughout the child's
experience in the system, while
documenting progress. Serves as
team leader and provides
guidance to assigned staff in the
delivery of case management
services. Bachelor's degree in a
Human Services related field and
a min of two years of exp in the
delivery of services in a
dependency environment. Must
possess State of Florida Child
Protection Certification
Program Director
Will have experience managing
family safety & clinical programs
as well as foster care services.
Proven exp in contracting proce-
dures, working knowledge of
Medicaid policies for childrefi's
services, strong supervision skills
& budgetary/fiscal mgmt exp a
must. Master's Degree in Human
Services field w/5 yrs exp
,required. Mental Health or Social
Work licensure preferred.
Case Manager I -
30 hours per week.
Will provide supervised visitation
services to families where
children have been removed from
their families due to domestic
violence, child abuse and neglect.
Travel between Gainesville and
Lake City required. Bachelors
degree in a Human Services
related field and three years
experience with children and
families reqd.
Family Support Worker -
Live Oak
Assist in developing and
maintaining client records and
program documentation according
to contract and CHS standards
(initial assessments, goal
planning, progress notes
termination summaries, etc.)
Previous exp working w/children
and families.
Secretary Lake City
The ideal candidate will provide
secretarial and clerical
support services. Excellent
communication skills
and computer
experience required. The ability
to multi-task is a plus.
Send resume to:
Human Resources
Children's Home Society
605 NE 1st Street
Gainesville, FL 32601
Or apply online at www.chsfl.org
EOE/DFWP

DANIEL'S TOWING & Recovery
S386-755-5154. Wanted Driver.
Must have Class A CDL. 25 yrs. or
older. Mechanical Knowledge a
plus. Apply in person ONLY.


100 Jb0
SOpportunities
03524801
TELL MOM
How Great She isT
Just fill out your A
Mother's Day Message ,
and return to :
Lake City Reporter
180 E. Duval Street
Lake City, FL 32055
or you can stop by The Lake City
Reporter to fill out a form. Forms
will be published in the May 13th,
20th, & 27th editions of
The Lake City Reporter.
Prices: 15 words for $6.75. Each
add'l word is 100 each. You may
add artwork for $2.50.
For additional information call
386-755-5440. Deadline for
entries is May 4th. 2005.

03524853
Driver
HOME WEEKENDS
NO NYC!
Great pay and Benefits
Excellent Equipment
Singles/ Teams/ Owner Ops
Wanted
Call 1-877-940-7600
Recruiting Center

03524881
Sales Manager & Counslers
Are you enthusiastic & positive?
Does meeting goals excite you?
Have you hired & trained a team
of winning sales professionals?
Are you clients' needs always
first? Are you always seeking to
grow & improve? Metabolic
Research Center is looking for
individual to lead our Lake City
weight loss center. Starting pay
$30K w/ potential of $70K.
Fax resume to: 386-755-3628

)3524904
Company Drivers
STAY IN THE SOUTH
Dedicated South and Southeast





Pemberton


6 months OTR Req. w/Hazmat
For more information
Call @ 888-PEMBERTON
888-736-2378

V Class A? V Good MVR?
V Dependable? V Safe?
V Want to be home daily?
V Like weekends off?
Want steady work w/stable Co.
Good equipment w/ good wages?
Call Columbia Grain
386-755-7700 Full & Part Time.
Accounting Support/Clerical.
Industrial Supply Company is
looking for a Detail Oriented
Person. Fax resume to 386-752-3751
ATTN: WORK at Home
Earn $450-$1500/monthly Part-time
$2000-$4500 Full-time
www.home-basedbusiness.com
BLUE JEAN JOB
$ Money $
Seeking sharp go getters, Able to
TRAVEL USA. Demo chemical
products. Good people skills &
enjoy working in a Rock in Roll
evir. Call Kelly 1-800-201-3293.
9-6. Must start immed.
CENTER MANAGER
AUTOMOTIVE
AFTERMARKET
Mr. Transmission TOWN
has an excellent opportunity
for an energetic, highly motivated
individual with excellent sales
ability and previous management
exp to manage busy automotive
repair facility. Previous automotive
exp a plus. Call 754-TRAN
CLERICAL
LAKE CITY & SURROUNDING
AREAS MANY POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
CALL FOR APPT
386-755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREENS/BACKGRD
REQ.
01552371
Driver Dedicated Lane
HOME EVERY WEEKEND
GUARANTEED!
No Touch Freight
85% Preloaded/Pretarped
Avg. $779- $1019/week
Jacksonville, FL Terminal
CDL A req'd. 877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com

CONCRETE FINISHER
NEEDED. Transportation &
Tools a plus. Call for interview.
386-961-8238


LEUKE CITY
COMMUNITY COtlltEE
HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT
149 SE College Place
LAKE CITY, FL 32025-2007

HEAD SOFTBALL COACH/INSTRUCTOR
Coaching and coordination of the Women's Intercollegiate Softball
program at LCCC with the expectation to teach in an academic
setting. Requires Master's Degree, or expected completion of
Master's Degree as determined by the VP for Instruction &
Student Services. Must possess valid Driver's License. Computer
literate. Salary $30,410.00 $47,116.00 Annually plus benefits.
Review of applications to begin April 18, 2005 and will continue
until position is filled.
Information: (386) 754-4314 FAX (386) 754-4594

E-MAIL: Boettcherg@lakecitycc.edu
Applications are available on WEB AT: www.lakecitycc.edu
VP/ADA/EA/EO COLLEGE IN EDUCATION & EMPLOYMENT


100 Job
SOpportunities

CONCRETE MIXER Drivers
A Materials Group has immediate
openings for Concrete Mixer
Drivers. Must have Florida CDL A
or B and no more than 7 points on
license. DOT physical and drug
screening required. Apply in person
at Anderson Columbia, 871 NW
Guerdon Road, Lake City, FL.
DFWP/EOE.

CUSTOMER SERVICE REP.
Career opportunity in a sales/service
environment available for qualified
individual with a strong work ethic
and dedication to the job. Min. 3
years Customer Service exp. in a
fast paced environment. Must enjoy
working with people Computer/
data Entry skills required as well as
Windows proficiency. Minimum 50
wpm. No Phone Calls Please.
Resumes Att: Joy
ws4140()earthlink.net
DRY CLEANERS: Front Counter,
exp. pressers, exp. cleaner/spotter.
Apply in person at Town & Country
Cleaners. 183 SW Bascom Norris
Dr. Ste. 101. Behind Zaxbys.
DRYWALL FINISHERS
Tools and transportation
required good pay call
386-431-1044
ELECTRICIANS
needed. Min. 1 yr experience.
386-752-5488.
Call for appointment
EXPERIENCED SALES People
needed. Will train. Call Turning
Wheel RV Center located on 441/41
Ellisville.at 386-758-8661
for an appointment.
Full Time Teller position avail.
M-F. Comp. salary & benefits. Prev.
exp. as Teller or cash handling req.
Fax resume: 386-754-6040 or Apply
in person: 224 SE. Clements P1.

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT
for subdivision utility work.
Jax area. Call 904-704-2606

GROWING DISTRIBUTION
COMPANY in Lake City is looking
for Customer Service Assistant/Rep.
Fax resume to 386-752-3751
INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY Company
is looking for Personel to assist in
Warehouse duties & Distribution.
Fax resumes to: 813-283-9024
INSIDE SALES person needed for
fast Growing Company. Good
people and computer skills required.
Fax resume to: 386-752-3751
JOURNEYMAN PLUMBER:
New construction, Resid'l &
Commer'l, fixtures & service.
Must have verifiable experience.
2091 SW Main Blvd
LABORER /MACHINE
SHOP EXPERIENCE.
Must pass drug test.
Must be able to do manual labor.
Apply in person Grizzly Mfg,
Cortez Street, across from airport.
Drug Free.
LANDSCAPING JOB
available with
Eartscapes Landscaping.
Call 386-758-8889
Lawn/Main/Janitorial worker.
40 hrs per week. M/T/TH/F/S. 1pm
to 9 pm. Clean Criminal background
check. Clean driving record.
Fax qualifications to: 386-752-0740
or call 386-961-2595
LEGAL SECRETARY
Need FT Legal Secretary with good
Phone Skills, Organization &
Typing experience, must be
Computer Literate & good at Multi
Tasking. Send reply to Box 03081,
C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Looking for Auto Body Tech.
Honest, dependable & a quality hard
worker. Must have exp. tools, DL &
ref. Ted or Teresa at 386-935-9334
Maintenance Person & PT Desk
Clerk. Apply in person at
Holiday Inns & Suites,
213 Commerce Dr. Lake City
Mgmt trainees earn 35-60K. Look-
ing for six aggressive people who
want a long term career with a 125-
year old company. Sales, Mgmt, or
PR background will help. Call
(352)373-2365 for an interview or
fax resume to (352)692-4475. EOC


OTR Drivers Wanted
Out 2-3 weeks
Bonus Program
Trucks Available Now
Excellent Pay
Call Southern Specialized
386-752-9754


ioo Job
Opportunities
MR. TRANSMISSION/ MILEX
COMING SOON TO TOWN!
Excellent opportunities for experi-
enced. dependable professionals for
the following positions:
Center Manager (3+ yrs exp
sales and management exp)
Transmission Rebuilder ( 5+ yrs
building exp)
R&R Technician (5+ yrs exp,
ASE Certifications a plus)
Call 754-TRAN EOE
MULTIPLE OPENINGS
1st & 2nd shift avail. Alachua area
warehouse has openings in a climate
controlled environment. Great
opportunity for steady hours & long
team work. Heavy lifting is
required. Call to set your
interview appointment.
755-1991
NEED FOR roadside maintenance
in Columbia Co. Experienced
batwing tractor driver, also people
to pick up litter, little walking.
Must be dependable. Good pay for
good people. 386-497-4983
NEEDED:
INSTALLER
FOR LOCAL TILE & MARBLE
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY.
MUST BE-ABLE TO LIFT
UP TO 70 LBS PLEASE
CALL FOR AN APPT.
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991.
Drug screen & Background Req.
Personal Assistant/Secretary
wanted to work for Distribution
Company in Lake City. Excellent
pay. Fax resume to 813-283-9024
PHISH HEADS now
accepting apps for servers, cooks,
& bus. Exp preferred, apply in
person M-F 2-4 p.m. at 1445 SW
Main Blvd LC, FL 32025
PRESCHOOL TEACHER.
CDA preferred (or in process).
Apply at Lake City Kiddy Club.
1290 SE Baya Dr. Lake City.
PROFESSIONAL DRIVERS
$1000 new hire bonus for experi-
enced drivers! Call about dry bulk
& flatbed positions @ our
Newberry Terminal 866-300-8759
PT SECURITY OFFICERS
Needed .Exc pay & benefits.
Class D lic req'd.,
Call 1-866-458-9523
01552376
Drivers CDL A

Huge Opportunity!
$3,000 Co Drivers Sign-On
($1,500 O/Operators)
Pre-Pass Plus, No NYC or
Canada, Optional NE, &
NO loading/Unloading
Call us 7 Days a Week
Get approved w/in 60 min!
Must be 23 w/lyr. OTR
No Hazmat Required
www.ptl-inc.com
1-800-848-0405
Paschall Truck Lines

REGIONAL FILTER Service has
immediate openings for the position
of Filter Service Techs. Good
driving record and pre-employment
drug screen a must. HVAC
experience a plus, but not required.
Travel throughout N. Florida with
some overnight stays. Vehicle
supplied. Fax resume to
727-528-1474
ROUNTREE-MOORE FORD
Looking for a counter
parts person and delivery driver.
If interested apply in person at
Rountree-Moore Ford and see
Jimmy Taylor Parts MGR.
TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED
Must have a class A CDL license
with a min. of 2 yrs exp & clean
driving record. Apply Direct at
Corbitt Mfg. Inc. Hwy 41 N and
Guerdon St. M-F 9AM to 3PM
only. DFW
Driver

SYOU WANT IT! 1


t BONUSES
| PAID
r WEEKLY


* Solos Owner
- T.. nOpenratnrsi


Student Lease
Graduates Purchase
an equal opportunity employer



No CDL? No Problem!


I Call 866-280-5309


I


i??? NEED???j



'??? CASH ???9


F $$$ WE CAN HELP!!! $

IClientLogic is hiring 100 Full Time Employees to start
work on April 251' for a 90 day special, temporary project I
* with the possibility of permanent employment! No experi- U
ence necessary paid training! Day Shifts Available! I


I
mt


COME IN AND FILL OUT AN APPLICATION AT OUR
OFFICES LOCATED AT 1152 SW BUSINESS POINT DR.
IN LAKE CITY.
CALL (386) 754-8600 FOR DIRECTIONS


oo J0ob
Opportunities
SALES POSITION
WELL ESTABLISHED
LENDING COMPANY
MUST HAVE STRONG SALES
EXPERIENCE & RESUME
PLEASE CALL FOR APPT.
WAL-STAFF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
DrugScreen & backgrd Req.
SEEKING EXP. Welder, PT.
Days or evenings. $8.00 per hour.
Please call 386-758-8533 any time.
If no answer leave message.
SEEKING MATURE Individual to
work in office. Position: Secretary/
receptionist. Hours : Tues Sat.
2091 SW Main Blvd.
STONE MASON
& Stone
Laborer needed.
Call: 386-758-8889
STRUCTURAL/MECHANICAL
DRAFTSMAN/DETAILER
AUTO CAD EXP. REQUIRED
Send resume: Draftsman
PO Box 1949, Lake City,
FL 32056 Must pass drug test.
Tire man/Mechanic. Evening shift.
4pm midnight. Will train. Apply in
person L&G Service Center. 14197
S. US Hwy 441. Behind Country
Station. Lake City. 386-755-1452.
UTILITY WORKERS
Great South Timber & Lumber
Sawmill in Lake City is currently
accepting applications for utility
workers. Please apply at 1135 SE
State Rd 100 or call 386-752-3774
for an appointment.
WANTED!! INDUSTRIAL
HARD WORKERS ONLY NEED
APPLY. ALL SHIFTS
AVAILABLE. MUST BE ABLE
TO LIFT 50 TO 70LB. CALL FOR
AN APPT NOW!!
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
DRUG SCREENS/
BACKGRD REQ.


100 Job
SOpportunities
WANTED: Skilled person for F/T
position. W/generous benefits. Must
have excellent secretarial skills, or-
ganizational skills & be quick at all
Microsoft Windows XP Professio-
nal software. Extra credit for some
experience w/HTML. Must be a
great communicator & team player.
Resumes only: Camp Weed & The
Cerveny Conference Center, 11057
Camp Weed Place, Live Oak, FL
32060. Deadline must be in hand by
Monday April, 25th.
WAREHOUSE
BODY PARTS OF AMERICA
seeks team oriented, hardworking
individuals. Health, dental, life in-
surance available. Monday-Friday.
If you are not afraid of honest,
hard work. Apply in person at:
385 SW Arlington Rd, Lake City
(no phone calls please.)
Waste Management Inc.
Lake City/ Gainesville
Has an immediate opening for a
hard working, flexible individual to
fill the position of Driver/Laborer
for Lake City and Gainesville. This
position requires a minimum Class
B CDL with air brake endorsement.
Waste Management offers a full
benefits package including health
insurance and 401 K plan. If you
feel you meet the requirements,
please apply by phone
1-877-220-JOBS (5627) or online at
WWW.WMCAREERS.COM
EOE/ADA/DFWP
WEST SIDE Barber shop now hir-
ing an experienced barber. High
commission, high customer volume.
Call 386-344-2950 or
386-752-8986. leave Mess.

LAKE CITY
I REPORT3, |


BUY IT! SELL IT!
FIND IT!
755-5440


Liberty National Life Insurance Co.
is expanding its operation and is looking for upwardly
mobile people to fill insurance sales & service positions.
Average annual earnings $42,000. Fringe benefit package: 2
retirement funds, health insurance, paid vacation, conven-
tion trips & many others. No experience necessary. We have
on the job training. Requirements: honesty, hard worker &
dependable transportation.
Contact Ronnie Harvey at 386-752-2583
Or fax resume to: 386-752-8724
Liberty National is an EOE Licensed Agents Welcome

iManagers,


Assistant Managers &

Customer Sales Associates

Convenience Store Company is seeking highly motivated, expe-
rienced and enthusiastic professionals for various locations in the
Lake City area. Full and part time positions are available. Please
fill out an application at:
Fast Track Chevron located at
4008 W US Hwy 90, Lake City
on Monday and Tuesday, April 18th and 19th.


*UUUU AV EIAUIE
EXPECTATION WANTED IMMEDIATELY!
5 MEN OR WOMEN FOR EXECUTIVE SALES POSITION
.Paid Insurance
0401K Plan
*Quality Work Schedule
*Advancement Opportunity
*We provide Demos
"Career Path into Management
E**s3000 Sign Up Bonus for
Experienced Auto Sales Professionals
*Our Top Performers Earn an
Average of '9000 Per Month
"$3000 sign up bonus for professional automobile sales persons with strong documented track record.
EDDIE ACCARDI
CHEVROLET-MAZDA










You'll feel at home here at Lake City Medical Center; surrounded by
fri'e' ,,z,, d neighbors who care about our community just as
nuwI, a, you do! We are currently seeking the following:

Physical Therapist FT
Physical Therapy Assistant PRN
Pre-Admission Coordinator FT
Dietitian PRN
Physician Service Coordinator FT
Registered Nurses
ER FT Day, Night & PRN
ICU, Med/Surg PRN Days
Respiratory Therapist FT, Weekends & PRN
Sleep Tech FT & PRN

To find the perfect home for your skills, contact us today at:
LAKE CITY MEDICAL CENTER
Human Resources 340 NW Commerce Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32055 Phone: (386) 719-9020
Jobline: (386) 719-9333 Fax: (386) 719-9028
www.lakecitymedical.com


Your Healthcare Resource, Services, Information, Education


CLIENTL GIC
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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


1 Medical
120 Employment
03524539
MERIDIAN BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE, INC.
Add Specialist- MIST & Adult
Programs- FT/PT G'ville & PRN
Lake City
Child Welfare Case Manager
Trainee- FT
Adult Case Manager- FT G'ville
Children Case Manager- FT
G'ville, Cross City
Counselor IV/ Sr. Clin'n FT
Jasper, Live Oak, FT Outpatient
Adults/Child'n, FT/PRN Foster
care, FT Fam Crisis Trtmnt
G'ville
Counselor III-FT Lake City
Adolescent Therapeutic Group
Home
Counselor II- FT G'ville
Counselor I- FT G;ville
Certified Behavioral Analyst -
FT Fam Crisis Trtmnt G'ville
Acute Care Program Director-
FT G'ville
Emergency Svcs Intake Evalua-
tor- FT G'ville, Lake City
Driver- FT G'ville, CDL Re-
quired
Clerk Specialist.- PT G'ville
Unit Clerk FT G'ville
Sr. Client Relations Specialist-
FT Live Oak
Maintenance Worker FT
G'ville
Housekeeping- FT G'ville
Staff Assistant- FT G'ville CSU
Sr. Admin Asst- FT G'ville CSU
LPN FT/PRN G'ville & Lake
City
Facility Manager- FT G'ville
Psych Tech PRN G'ville &
Lake City
Security tech FT G'ville
RN FT G'ville & Lake City
Comp Assessor- PRN G'ville,
Lake City
Staff Psychiatrist- FT G'ville
Excellent benefits.
For details visit
www.meridian-healthcare.orgor
call (352) 374-5600 ext. 8277.
Send resumes to:
Meridian Behavioral Healthcare,
Inc., Human Resources,
4300 SW 13th St., Gainesville,
FL 32608, fax (352) 374-5608,
e-mail: jobs(@mbhci.org, ATTN:
refer to Sun Ad. EOE, DFWP

CNA's for In-Home Service
Columbia County Senior Services
Inc. is accepting applications for de-
pendable, hardworking state certi-
fied CNA's to do in-home service
for seniors. Drug test and back-
ground screen required. Drug Free
Workplace. Applications available
at CCSS, 480 SE Clements PI. EOE

Florida Department of Corrections,
DENTAL SERVICES, is a critical
component of Florida's nationally
recognized correctional health care
program. Accepting State of Florida
applications for Senior Dentist at
Hamilton C.I., Jasper, FL. Starting
salary is $85,000/yr. plus a generous
benefit package. For further infor-
mation contact: Contact: Sharon
McKinnie, R.N. @ 386-922-6645


1 Medical
120 Employment
FT Dietary Technician
for 180-bed Facility
Must have minimum of 2 year
degree in Nutrition Therapy or a
related field and at least 1 year
experience. Contact Bette Forshaw
NHA@ 386-362-7860 or apply in
person Suwannee Health Care
Center 1620 E Helvenston Street
Live Oak, Florida 32064
EOE, DV, M/F
IMMEDIATE OPENING
Medical Office Receptionist.
Mature, Responsible, Self Starter.
Good Computer & phone skills.
Booking Appts. Collecting Co-pays,
Daily Billing & Filing. Knowledge
of Medical Manager system helpful.
Good starting salary & benefits.
Send Resume to: 495 S.W. Lynn-
wood Ave. Lake City, FL 32024
LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL
/ Physical Therapist PRN
/ Radiology Supervisor- FT
/ OR Technologist -
PRN w/call.
/ Respiratory Therapist FT
/ Registered Nurse PT,
Baylor, PRN
v/ Radiology Technologist -
PRN w/call.
/ Licensed Practical Nurse-PT,
Baylor, PRN
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386)496-2323,
FAX (386) 496-1611
LAKE BUTLER
HOSPITAL
CARPENTER FT
Renovation work, interior &
exterior, Cabinetry experience re-
quired. Excellent opportunity;
Great salary and benefits.
For further information, please
visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386)496-2323,
FAX (386)496-1611
Medical Transcriptionist wanted
immediately for Private practice in
Lake City. Experience with Medical
Manager and Word perfect required.
Please fax resumes to HR
(352) 373-9870, or email to
simedpa@yahoo.com.

140 Work Wanted
MATURE FEMALE
Seeks temporary office
work. 30 yrs exp
386-963-4230
17O Business
Opportunities
Premier Business Systems
Work from Any Location.
Up to $2000-$5000/mo part time.
Full Training (888)275-1798
THE UPS STORE for sale, Lake
City, profitable, owner retiring. 4
weeks training, owner financing.
Call Mr. Grossman, 877-578-6499


190 Mortgage Money

HOMEOWNERS! SAVE
$50,000 to $150,000 IN MORT-
GAGE INTEREST!!! TOTALLY
FREE SERVICE NO COSTS TO
YOU! Email request for FREE Info
to gigalol0(aearthlink.net or call
386-344-0559 leave message


310 Pets & Supplies

FREE TO Good Home 3 kittens.
386-935-6645

GERMAN SHEPHERD Puppy.
For Sale $300. AKC, all white,
Parents on site. DOB: 03/06/05
Call 386-496-3654
LAB PUPPY Black Male,
Beautiful, Call 386-454-7202
PUBLISHERS NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health certifi-
cate from a licensed veterinarian
documenting they have mandatory
shots and are free from intestinal
and external parasites. Many species
of wildlife tnust be licensed by Flor-
ida Fish and Wildlife. If you are un-
sure, contact the local office for in-
formation.

330 Livestock &
330 Supplies

REG. AQHA/PBA Palomino
Yearling Filly.
Big & Beautiful.
$2,500. 386-755-1771


361 Farm Equipment

1953 FORD Golden Jubilee
anniv. model. New tires, new motor,
with 5ft bush hog squealer mower.
Used reg. $5,000. 386-752-2442


401 Antiques

ANTIQUE SALE
4/16 & 4/17 10-75%
Webb's, 1-75 exit 414.
Hours 9-6 Ph. 386-758-5564


402 Appliances

KENMORE HEAVY Duty,
Washer & Dryer. White.
Moving, must sell. $225. cash for
pair. Call 386-288-3581 after 5 pm.
Accepting Applications
Good, Bad & No Credit
Call for 1st & 2nd Mortgages
Established full service co.
(800) 226-6044
WE BUY MORTGAGES
2622 NW 43rd St.
FHANA/Conv. Specialist Gainesville, FL 32606
GAINESVILLE MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC.
Licensed Mtg. Lender


403 Auctions

ESTATE AUCTION
Mon April 18th @ 6pm.
High Springs, FL. Hwy 27 N.
We Buy or Consign Estates ;
Estate fum./Glassware,
Tools, Coins, Dia. Jewelry,
Antique/ Modem Fum., Bedding,
Box Los; 10% B.P.,
Red Williams Au 437/AB270
1-386-454-4991


407 Computers

Computer Monitor 2001 Gateway
VX920. Diamondtron 19" color, flat
screen w/cables. Exc. Cond. $90.
386-755-1837 after 5pm


408 Furniture

FUTON
w/wood arms
Like new mattress. $80.
386-754-2588

LAZY BOY Electric lift chair.
$500 FIRM.
386-752-4197
If no answer leave message.
SOFA LAZY Boy Recliner.
Pastel, multi color.
Like New. $300
386-758-4521
TWIN, FULL OR
KING
Bed Frame. $20.
386-754-2588

4 19 TV-Radio &
Recording

Web TV w/printer. $89. Surf
internet/email on TV. 386-754-8908






PRETTY COUNTRY SETTING 3BR/2BA
home on a little over an acre not far from
town. Large rooms, lots of storage, well
maintained. MLS#44603 Call Sharon
Johnson 365-1203 or Julia DeJesus
344-1590

.ggW A
^afl.r Tej. -a


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
Timber Co. Payment in advance for
standing pine timber. Large or small
tracts. Call 386-758-7636.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Effective October 1, 2003
All Yard Sale Ads
must be prepaid

440 Miscellaneous
03524801
TELL MOM
How Great She is!
Mother's Day Message '"'
and return to :
Lake City Reporter
180 E. Duval Street
Lake City, FL 32055
or you can stop by The Lake City.
Reporter to fill out a form. Forms
will be published in the May 13th,
20th, & 27th editions of
The Lake City Reporter.
Prices: 15 words for $6.75. Each
add'l word is 100 each. You may
add artwork for $2.50.
For additional information call
386-755-5440. Deadline for
entries is May 4th, 2005.
INTERIOR FLAT
Latex paint. 5 gal. buckets.
$30. each. MORRELL'S
386-752-3910
New Shipment
Trusses, $8.00 each
MORRELL'S
386-752-3910
New shipment
Vinyl Siding.
$38.-$42. per square.
MORRELL'S 386-752-3910


463 Buildind
463 Materials

01552328
HAND SELECTED LUMBER
$ per Bd. ft. -:
Cherry, $2.50 to $3.; QSawn.Oak,
$2.; Red Cedar $2.50 to $3.;
Heart Pine $3.; Curly Pine $10.;
Pecky Cyp $3. to $5.; Clear LL
Pine (molding grade) $1.50; wide
Pine (16" to 20") $2.50; Barn
Bd's & Logs $1. to $2. MISC.
386-961-4444
8 32' Span Trusses; 6/12 pitch
$200.00 Call 386-752-5152
800 SF New Roofing Metal, Blue
Painted Steel Panels, 16" Wide x
Various Lengths. $650 OBO,
CALL 386-867-1439


520 Boats for Sale

2000 AQUA Sport 205 Osprey.
center console boat. less than 20 hrs,
garage kept. 150 hp mercury,, salt
water series, GPS, fish finder,
marine radio& T top. $19,995.
386-792-1135 or 386-938-3482
l
\630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2br/lba Mobile Home in park.
$200. dep and $400 mo.
NO PETS!
386-984-5875

CANNON CREEK MOBILE
HOME PARK. New Ownership.
2 & 3 br homes. $400 $600 mo.
Deposit. required. 386-752-6422.
FOR RENT DW 3BR/2BA $700
mth $400 deposit. 3BR/ 1 1/2
BA,Frame house w/ 2 car garage
$850 mth, $500 Deposit.
(727)323-0894 386-454-3238 or
727-710-1223

ilL. a-. ^'' .. ,.JB"


INVESTIGATE THE TAX BREAKS as an HOW ABOUT 173 ACRES ON THE
investor. Mobile Home Park 8 units, city RIVER? Your own private retreat
water and sewer, 0 vacancy rate, 10% with over 900 feet river frontage,
Cap. Rate. MLS#43009 Call Tanya pasture, woods, barns, frame farm
Shaffer 755-5448 house. MLS#43354 Call Ginger
Parker 752-6704.


,,-kl-,;Aj-;+k 1-


ROCKING CHAIR PORCHES. Two story OPPORTU
log home on 8 acres of wooded privacy. home on
on Lake
2469 sq. ft. 3BR/3BA barns, extra house and
storage buildings. MLS#43691 Call kitchen an
Libby Ausgood 752-6142 755-0466
CONTACT A REALTOR WITH
EXPERIENCE THAT WILL WORK
FOR YOU!!! GIVE US A CALL!
386-755-6600


UNITY KI
Lake Hai
Harris. 2
i an eqi
id baths.
after ho


NOCKS! Over 46UU sq. t. SPRINU SPtECIAL. UouDIewI e witn large
rris with 18+ park-like acres 10'x58' front screened porch, wheel chair
20x40 pool, screened pool access, nice, quiet location close to town on a
dipped cook house. All new little over an acre. $69,500 MLS#41519 Call
MLS#42218 Call Janet Creel Bryan Sithey 965-29222
urs. Bryan Smithey 965-29222



Real Estate of Lake City, Inc.
TOLL FREE 877-755-6600


3101 US HWY 90 WEST, Suite #101
^Lake City, FL 32055
QLAL ac Business (386) 752-6575
21 2001 Toll Free 1-800-333-4946

THE DARBY-ROGERS COMPANY visit our website www.century2lco
www.c21darbyrogers.com visit our website www.cenury21.com


New Upscale Neighborhood...
Beautiful home presented by Blake
Construction. 2,628 sf. 4BR/3.5BA.
Bonus room with bath could be 51"
BR. Split plan, formal dining room,
gas fireplace, hardy board & brick
exterior. MLS#43002 $319,900.


Enjoy Peace & Serenity in this
Majestic 2 story home on the
Suwannee River, with 4BR/3BA. 2nd
Master has balcony overlooking the
river. Sit on the screened front porch
and enjoy river living at it's best.
MLS#44317 $375,000.


Under Construction! Begin the
summer in this 3BR/2BA brand new
home on .5 ac. 1192 sf. with 1 car
garage. MLS#44121 $109,000


New Listing...Sturdy brick home on
5 fenced acres. New carpet, ceram-
ic tile, stainless steel appliances.
Brick BBQ outback w/porch swing.
Nicely wooded in back. $115,000
MLS#44801


Wooded and very private. DWMH
on 5 beautiful acres close to the
Ichetucknee, 1296 sq. ft., scteened
porch, outbuilding with electricity.
MLS#44675 $104,500.


Nice little house 3/1.5, great Oak woodlands surround this
kitchen. With a little TLC would make newer 3BR/2BA, 1642 sf.home in
a wonderful home in the heart of Hamilton Co. Located across the
quaint little community of Jasper. street from a conservation area.
Close to Valdosta, Ga. $63,000 MLS#44231 $184,900
MLS#44263


Do You Love Golf? Then this home
is for you, well maintained 3/2 brick
home located on golf course. Open
floor plan wit split bedrooms.
Screened back porch, custom win-
dows and much more! MLS#44547
$175,900.


Showcase Home...Gorgeous
5BR/2.5BA country home on 1 acre.
5"$ BR could be office, bonus rom or
game room. Back yard completely
fenced, detached garage & large
grilling porch. $289,900 MLS#44564


-~

a


very unique nome...un o+ eautin-
ful acres. This 2 story home has 3/2.
In-ground screened in pool. Large
shed can park 3 cars, a workshop
w/AC unit. Come see it today!
MLS#44617 $200,800.


Spectacular Sunsets and Runway
Views...Beautiful new well-main-
tained home. Open floor plan w/2
master suites & many upgrades.
Includes 2000sf hanger w/Wilson
door and apt for guests or home
office. And so much more. A must
see! MLS#44511 $329,900


This lovely corner home has it
all...3BR/2BA, stone wall w/insert
fireplace. Huge kitchen. Florida
room, enclosed front porch. Just
move in and enjoy. MLS#44448
$169,900.


cou





RI1


ENTRY





ERS


REALTY, INC.



Our office has been on the corner of US

27 & St. Rd 47 for over 25ears serving:

Columbia, Suwannee Girs..Gtltist coun-
ties Real Estate needs. L someone-who


knows Ft. White work o or behalf,

whether you are-buy.ing.or.selling!!




Call for your Free Market Analysis today!




.tOfice: 386-497-3305


E-Mail: crr(&countryrivers.com




ThoniDuncan, Susan Moore, Sandra Gentes,

De wey Glenn and "Sandy" Sanders

Se-Habla Espanol Sandra Gentes


Customized DWMH, ceramic tile, oak floors, workshop, 5 beautiful ac. $79,900. MLS#44839.
10 Acres w/DWMH needs abundant repairs. Pole barn. $68,500. MLS#44807.
3/2 DWMH on 11+ acres, fireplace. Great hunting! $79,900. MLS#44804.


Fort White Home of








LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
IN PARK Mobile Homes for Rent
2BR/2BA 1st & sec. required.
Applications & references required.
386-719-2423
LATE MODEL MOBILE HOMES
Starting $365 month, Beautiful
Pond setting, w/trees. CH/A & ca-
ble. No pets. Call 386-961-0017
640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
ABSOLUTELY "THE BEST"
Mobile Homes and Modulars
Move over Palm & Jake, the new
#1 home is here. Guaranteed
Gary Hamilton Homes 758-6755
HUNTERS SPECIAL 12 x 60
MH, For sale 4BR/4BA. $29,995
Call 386-752-2986 or
386-397-0807. Anne
MOBIL HOME Mover
State Certified
Insured and Bonded
Free estimates
Call: 386-755-1783
MOBILE HOME FINANCING
Refinance/lower rates or Purchase.
Investment home O.K. Land Home
or Home Only. (904)225-2381
Timberlane MH Park. Adult park
in Lake City, FL. Aval. NOW.
3br/2ba. Split plan DW, w/big
kitchen & Ig shed. Appliances inc.
269 SW Woodberry Ct. $34,500
386-758-9640

650 Mobile Home
6 & Land .
4BR/2BA Loaded, on 1/2 acre.
(close in) $89,999.00. 6% fixed, 30
years. Ready to occupy. Gary Ham-
ilton. Homes. 386-758-6755
FOR SALE. Like New 3/2,'01 MH,
in S/D. Paved St., City water, CH/A
& appli. Ideal for retiree/starter.
Near town 386-752-1212/365-3094
HORSE FARM/ 6 acres, 1991 28 x
60 3BR/2BA DW. Fence, cross-
fence, pond & a pool. Results Real-
ty Jack Ambrosine 386-752-6947
Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
All very nice.
Convenient location.
Call 386-755-2423
APT FOR RENT: $415 dep. $415
per mo. 2br/lba., CH/A. No Pets!
Lg fenced yard. 6 mi. out on Bran-
ford Hwy. Contact 386-752-7578.
FRESHLY PAINTED
1 & 2 BEDROOM APT.
Starting at $400 Plus security
Call Lea.386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
70 For Rent
2br/2ba Furnished Eff. on private
gated estate in Cannon Creek Air-
park. No Pets. Avail. NOW. $525
mo. plus utilities. 386-758-4746

7301 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2 BEDROOM 1 1/2 BATH
TWO STORY ON 1/2 ACRE LOT
$650.00 MO
352-494-3400 OR 352-494-0885


n Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3BR/ 1 1/2 BA CH/A, Washer &
Dryer Hook up, Please call 755-
2423 for more details

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference. limita-
tion or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability, fami-
lial status or national origin, or any
intention to make such preference,
limitation or discrimination." Fami-
lial status includes children under
the age of 18 living with parents or
legal custodians, pregnant women,
and people securing custody of chil-
dren under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this newspa-
per are available on an equal oppor-
tunity basis. To complain of dis-
crimination call HUD toll-free at 1-
800-669-9777. The toll free tele-
phone number to the hearing im-
paired is 1-800-927-9275

750 Business &

800 sq ft. Finished OFFICE
SPACE. 1000 add'l sq. ft. possible.
Will build to suit. Off US90 Call
752-6058 for more information.
GREAT LOCATION
Office/Retail
$950/mo. incl. Utilities
386-752-5035
A Bar Sales, Inc.
7 Days 7 am-7 pm


OFFICE BLDG. for Lease
E. Baya Ave. 2100 Sq. Ft.
Excellent for Professional use.
Call 386-752-5826

805 Lots for Sale
5 ACRES, scattered trees, near
Lake City. Cash or small down
payment, owner financing.
386-497-3637

810 Home for Sale

03524804
Send a
Mothers Day ,
greeting with a
picture in the
Lake City Reporter
for only $39.96. Stop by or mail
in your photo to:
The Lake City Reporter,
Classified Dept. 180 E. Duval
Street Lake City FL 32055.
Deadline for submission is
May 4th, 2005 to be placed in our
May 8th Mother's Day edition.
Call 386-755-5440 for more info.

NEW HOUSE
3br/2ba on 1/2 ac. Quiet, Close to
town. New school District.
386-752-7277

TWIN LOTS w/giant oaks. 5 min
from down town. Plus 3BR/2BA
home $129K, will divide. Owner
Finance. 904-724-6545


820 Farms&
O2 Acreage
28 BEAUTIFUL wooded acres
on paved rd. 1.5 mi. Ichetucknee
Springs. Brokers protected.
$249,000. 386-497-4983
5 AC mini farm
3br/2ba DW. lbr/lba cottage
all fenced w/ 3 pastures Suwannee
County $129,000. 386-658-2947
BEAUTIFUL 5 ac restricted home
sites on paved road. 3 & 1/2 miles
from 1-75 & US 90. From $49,900.
386-365-1563 or 365-8007
SPORTSMAN PARADISE
YEARLY MEMBERSHIPS
Hunting, fishing, lodging and meals
all part of this offer conveniently lo-
cated in White Springs, Florida.
For Details call 386-397-1989 or
www.bienville.com
SUMTER CO., GA
82 Ac $1,725/AC
Great hunting tract! Planted
pines, lot of hardwoods with
creek adjoining farmland.
404-362-8244
St. Regis Paper Company, LLC
830 C Commercial
O Property
2+ ACRES COMMERCIAL Land
for Lease. 1 block from 1-75.
All utilities are available.
Call Kevin at 386-984-5943

860 Investment
Property
Looking for Private Investors
to help me purchase Single Family
Home's in Columbia County. area.
Call Now 386-755-7873 / 623-2110

940 Trucks
1986 CHEVY SILVERADO 305.
New Paint Job. Glass pipes. Resto-
ration started. $3,200 or willing to
trade for small truck. 386-365-2429
2003 RED Chevy Dually, Crew
Cab. Loaded completely.
Towing package. Low miles.
386-867-1660

950 Cars for Sale
*Hondas from $500*
Police Impounds!
For listings call
1-800-749-8116 ext A760


1980 OLDS Good Cond Rebuilt
motor. $1,500 obo 386-867-1627
1989 TOYOTA Celica. A/C, A/T.
145K miles. $1500 386-754-7367
1995 Dodge Spirit.
New Paint, runs good.
Asking $1,400 or Make Offer.
386-754-2312 or 352-271-0765
1999 CHRYSLER 300M. Loaded.
$9,000 OBO. 386-758-8389
2004 Intrepid. $800 down & take
payments. Debra 386-867-1627
95 ACCORD LX Sedan, 5 speed
manual, AM/FM cassette, 6 disc cd
changer, excellent condition. 134K
Mis. $3,200. 386-755-2364 evening
97 MERCURY Grand Marquis.
Very dependable.
Excellent condition.
$5,500. obo. 386-497-1412


951 Recreational
51 Vehicles
1976 AIR STREAM Argosy 26 ft.
Self contained, good condition.
$5,000 or best offer.
386-961-8885 or 352-286-9695
2005 CELEBRITY. Fire place,
super slide, washer & dryer,
2 CH/A. Much more!! $22,500.
(813)495-1178 or 888-670-0781
35 FT Travel Trailer 5th wheel,
Marathon. Nice, great for hunting.
AC, stove, fridge & much more!!
$900. Call 386-623-2255
93 COACHMAN
27' travel trailer. Very clean
& good condition. Tag along.
$4,995. 386-497-4983
CLEAN 5TH Wheel. 3 slides,
38 ft. $18,000. 386-719-7278

952 Vans & Sport
95 Util. Vehicles
-
03 Mazda Tribute LX; Selling for
payoff $13,700. 386-719-9719


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445


REPORTER


House Plan of the Week


ci


5.t .5.
Ois.~ I:

g


t -
-_: ^, ,,:- ,. .;. .



Savy home shoppers reach for the classified ads

before they hit the streets. The newspaper

classified section offers everything they need to

make an informed purchasing decision.

Want to make a move?

Check the classified ads first.



classified





thefirst place to look foreverything


BISHOP REALTY, INC.
U.S. 90 West Across from Wal-Mart 752-4211
www.coldwellbanker.com '. 1S
Independently Owned and Operated .MLS

OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, April 17 2PM-4PM
Iii^L, _. u y M a,_ ."pr.


S. .

Reasonably Priced: $121,900.
Directions: 90 W, turn left onto Pinemount Hwy, go to sign on left.
(Before curve)
Hosted by: Hansel & Nell Holton 984-5046



Own Your Own Home


The Northlake is a minimalist's
dream. This cozy vacation cottage
would be at home on a lake, ocean
beach, or tucked into a mountain
grove.
Slender wooden posts support a
gabled entry porch, while perennially
charming Craftsman-style windows
sparkle across the front. Cedar shin-
gles fill the two front-facing gable
ends, both of which are accented by
decorative supports.
Abundant natural light spills into
the vaulted entry and living room
through a transom and clerestory win-
dows. This room has a surprisingly
spacious feel. The ceiling line rises up
from the front, peaks, then slopes
down at the rear. Even the lowest parts
of the ceiling are several feet higher
than average.
Natural. heat emanates from a
clean-burning, low maintenance pellet
stove that nestles into a brick lined
alcove by the stairs. The built-in cabi-
net that fills most of the rear wall has
a display area on top. This could serve
as shelving for books and games,
while housing a home entertainment
center as well.
Sliders on the left access a
screened porch, ideal for bug-free out-
door meals.
The kitchenette is directly to the
right of the entry. Its ceiling is lower,
but otherwise this space is totally open
to the great room. Cupboards, coun-
ters and appliances rim two walls.
Twin windows fill half of the third,
creating a delightful view from the
kitchen table.
A combination bathroom/utility
room and a storage room fill out the
rest of the Northlake's main floor.
Washer and dryer are stacked, to max-
imize space usage. Additional storage
is also available under the stairs.
Double doors in the vaulted loft
upstairs open onto a front-facing bal-
cony with a wooden handrail.
For a review plan, including
scaled floor plans, elevations, section
and artist's conception, send $25 to
Associated Designs, 1100 Jacobs Dr.,
Dept. W, Eugene,-OR 97402. Please
specify the Northlake 30-504 and
include a return address when order-
ing. A catalog featuring more than 400
home plans is available for $15. For
more information, call (800) 634-
0123, or visit our website at
www.associateddesigns.com.


First Floor 918 sq.ft.
Second Floor 328 sq.ft.
Living Area. 1246 sq.ft.
Screened Porch 140 sq.ft.
Dimensions 47'x 30'

www.associateddesigns.com


2005 Associated Designs, Inc.


Brand
New
Site BuiltAs Low As Down (w.a..)



THREE RIVERS HOUSING CORP.
Call 754-6770 Leave Message
Open Monday-Friday
A not for profit tax exempt Florida Corp. An Equal opportunity housing program.

AREA MORTGAGE RATES
30 fixed 15fixed 1ARM FHA/
Institution Phone rate! pts rate pts rate pts VA
Absolute Mortgage Co. (888) 90-HOMES 5.63 / 0.00 5.25 / 0.00 3.38 /0.00 No Quote
Accountable Mortgage (800) 840-8771 5.63 /0.00 5.25 /0.00 3.75 /0.00 6.75 / 0.00
All Fund Mortgage (866) 535-8987 5.75 / 0.00 5.38 / 0.00 No Quote No Quote
American Federal Mortgage (888) 321-4687 5.38/ 1.63 5.00/ 1.00 3.25 / 0.00 5.75 /0.00
American Home Finance (888) 429-1940 5.63 /0.00 5.25 /0.00 3.63 /0.00 No Quote
America's Best Mortgage (800) 713-8189 5.25/2.00 4.75 /2.00 4.75/0.00 5.88/0.00
Amicus Mortgage Group (877) 385-4238 5.88 /0.00 5.50 /0.00 No Quote 5.88 /0.00
Amtrust Funding (800) 774-0779 5.63 / 0.00 5.25 / 0.00 3.00 /0.(X00 5.75 / 0.00
Borrowers Advantage Mtg. (888)510-4151 5.75/0.00 5.38/0.00 No Quote 5.75/0.00
Century Home Funding (800) 224-7006 5.25 / 3.00 4.75 / 3.00 3.38 / 2,00 5.38 / 3.00
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participate in this service, please call (610) 344-7380. For additional information on mortgages, go to:
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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005 Section E

r PA Place Called


j .-iI icai I G Iovernment


Part 3 of our 4-part, month-long series detailing the area in which we live
and the people involved.


















\ .: ..

SThrough years of hard work Dr.


patient care at the Lake City
Veterans Affairs Medical Center.
.. ... *. r



By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@Ilakecityreporter.comn
Sr. P. Rajasekhar, associate chief of staff for extended care.
could be one of the most dedicated doctors at Lake City
Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Dr. Raj, as she is called
by staff and patients alike, is so committed to her job, she
worked on call the day she was scheduled to deliver her
"I was on call until 7 p.m. and around 6:15 1 started to have contrac-
tions," she said. "I left work in time to drive to Gainesville and had my
son at 7:30 p.m."
Rajasekhar oversees the long-term care units at the medical center.
She joined the VA system in 1982 in Pittsburgh and moved to Lake
City in 1983 because she was attracted to the warmer weather.
When she arrived in the area, she was guided by Dr. William
Henderson. a longtime doctor in Lake City.
"He worked at the VA for more than 45 years and taught me so
much," Rajasekhar said.
In 1994. Rajasekhar became associate chief of staff for extended

Rajasekhar says she has watched the VA evolve into a source offer-
ing a continuum of care.
"We offer excellent primary care, acute, and sub-acute care." she
said. WIn addition, the fact that our records are all computerized means
that we can serve our patients quicker and more efficiently."
The Computerized Patient Records system allows health care pro-
fessionals to retrieve records instantly no matter what locations the
patient visited prior.
"A cardiologist can look up information and notations from other
physicians who examined the patient to find out symptoms, treatments
and medicines administered," Rajasekhar said. "We are light-years
ahead of other facilities who still rely on paper notes that are more
prone to errors due to difficulty reading the handwriting."
Rajasekhar also has watched the medical center expand throughout

RAJ
Continued on Page 2E
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. ,- .-, ..;







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


A Plqce Cql1led


Medical & Government --


RAJ
Continued From Page 1E
her years.
"In 1983, there were no
long-term care buildings, but
about two years later, two
nursing home units opened
with 60 beds each," she said.
The nursing home expand-
ed again in the 1990s with a
total of 230 beds now.
With a new unit, the
patients were no longer
mixed as they were before
and received care that was
more tailored to their needs.
"Today, Lake City has so
many special programs,"
Rajasekhar said.
"Our inpatient services
include a nursing home unit,
a hospice and palliative care
unit."
Additional outpatient pro-
grams under geriatrics and
extended care unit, include
home care programs, home
based primary care, intermit-
tent skilled care, home health
aid, hospice and a Tech Care
coordination program.
"Our focus is to enhance
the quality of life of our
patients by helping them
become as functionally inde-
pendent as possible,"
Rajasekhar said.
"I think many people would
prefer to be at home rather
than a nursing home; we try
to make that possible."
The doctor says the best
change she has seen was the
integration of the Lake City
VA and Malcom Randall
Veterans Affairs Medical
Center in Gainesville.
"Now we are working
together as one hospital
instead of two separate ones,"
Rajasekhar said.
"We have the two medical
centers as well as nine outpa-
tient satellite clinics to better
serve our patients."
Rajasekhar says there is
stricter criteria to be admit-
ted into the hospital and
increased care to ensure that
a patient's visit is as .short as
possible.
"We now investigate the


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Dr. P. Rajasekhar, Veterans Affairs Medical Center associate chief of staff for extended care,
talks enthusiastically about her years at the VA with her long-term care patients.


patient's support system,"
she said.
"We meet with the families,
train them to care for their
loved ones, and make sure
they have the equipment they
need such as proper beds."
Often, when meeting with
the family, Rajasekhar asked
them to identify a reasonable
goal for their loved one.
"They may tell me, 'I want
my father to be able to walk
from the bed to the chair,'"
Rajasekhar said.
"We work with them to
make this possible if we can."
There is greater attention to
ensuring that patients are as
functional as possible.
With older people, their
sickness might be resolved,
but they might not be ready to


walk because of their bed rest,
Rajasekhar said.
"Pneumonia affects them
greater than it would a 35-year-
old and they could lose func-
tionality in only a few days,"
she said.
The doctor says that the
improvement in the quality of
care is important in preparing
for a graying nation.
"By the year 2030, 20 per-
cent of the population in
Florida will be over 65,"
Rajasekhar said.
One program the VA offers
is its Respsite program.
Families can bring their
loved one for a two-week stay
knowing that he or she will
receive excellent care and
attention.
"It is a break for both the


families and the patients,"
Rajasekhar said.
"Families can visit with fam-
ily in other places and patients
can experience 24-hour care."
Many families often plan
ahead for these breaks and the
break decreases the rate of
burn out.
"The patients enjoy the
exclusive care they receive
and often sleep better,"
Rajasekhar said.
In addition to her supervis-
ing duties, Rajasekhar also
cares for 35 patients herself.
"I enjoy caring for them and
wouldn't change it for the
world," Rajasekhar said.
'The veterans deserve our
appreciate for all they sacri-
ficed for our country."


INDEX




Dr. P. Rajasekhar ......................................... 2E
VA Hospice, dietary clerk............................... 3E
Evolution of nursing, county development........4E
James Montgomery....................................... 5E
Mental health services at the VA .....................6E
Veterans online chat room............................. 7E
Top goals for the city...................................... 8E
Volunteering at the VA...................................9E
County charter, Governor Frederick P. Cone..10E
Top goals for the county, student president.....11 E
VA rich in history........................................... 12E
Politicians recount time in office .................... 13E
Q uery coordinator........................................ 14E






On the Front



Staff writer Ashley Cisneros takes
a look into the life and career of Dr.


P. Rajasekhar,


associate


chief of


staff for extended care at Lake City
Veterans Affairs Medical Center.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


Cdlled Ho e Medical & Government


Dietary clerk cooks up an


extra helping of healing


By ASHLEY CISNEROS

(,inL th>- cxtrt mile it.n't
jut a sayiin.g f-r D r-,r:oth.v
Babinr:c
It is lire-rall' ;N a% a ,t lif,.
Tht Lake City Medical
CL-nicr r.dir-try clerk does
whatever she has to do to
make her patients happy, even
if it means getting in the car to
drive to Publix to find the food
they are craving.
Babinec has lived in Lake
City for 17 years and worked
at the medical center for 16
years.
Before moving to Columbia
County, she spent 32 years in
Ft. Lauderdale.
She spent many years man-
aging a restaurant.
"My primary goal is pleas-
ing my patients," Babinec
said.
"I go upstairs, ask patients
if they are hungry and ask
them what they would like to
eat."
If the kitchen does not have
the food requested by
patients, Babinec occasionally
makes a trip to a grocery
store if she needs to.
"Some of our patients are
vegetarians and request foods
like tofu," she explained.
Almost all of her patients
like the cottage cheese and
fruit plates Babinec offers.
While she used to cook
meals for the medical center's
doctors, these days Babinec
sees to it that all her patients
eat what they like, if possible.
"I know that I am not going
to satisfy everyone," she said.
"But I do my best."
Babinec knows that eating
good food is healing in itself.
"My greatest satisfaction is
making patients happy," she
said.
Over the years, Babinec
says that the family atmos-


I. .. -




F, *,,~


.


SHLl r : F ~ ,
Dorothy Babinec, or 'Mama D' as her coworkers call her,
stands outside the Lake City Medical Center cafeteria. The
dietary clerk goes the extra mile for her patients by going as
far as driving to local supermarkets in search of foods to sat-
isfy them.


phere at her job has stayed
the same.
"I always tell my coworkers
that they are fantabulous,"
she says with a smile
"We work together and
make a great team."
Her coworkers love her just
as much and call her "Mama
D" as a nickname.
The staff became a strong
support system when she lost
her husband and sons.
"I had four sons," Babinec
said. "Now I have one son in
Coral Springs who works as


an assistant fire chief."
She also gains strength
from her husband's family in
Lake City.
"I have learned that you
have to lean on family and
friends, keep the Lord in your
life and put a smile on your
face," Babinec said.
She says she loves her job
,and the people she works
with.
"Without their prayers, I
wouldn't have made it,"
Babinec said.


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Veterans Affairs Medical Center nurse Sharon Timmons, manager of hospice, gives a hug to
Air Force veteran Bobby Rolison inside his room.


VA Hospice offers patients


compassion, quality of life


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com

Brightly colored flowers,
butterfly balloons and flower
arrangements adorn the
entrance to the hospice unit at
Lake City Veterans Affairs
Medical Center.
"We seek to make' our
patients as comfortable as pos-
sible and create a cheerful
home environment for the
patients and families alike,"'
said Sharon Timmons, nurse
manager of hospice and pallia-
tive care.
"One of our registered nurs-
es, Paula Powers, oversees the
decorations with the help of
staff."
Timmons has lived in Lake
City all of her life.
She did her clinical at the
Lake City VAMC while she was
in nursing school.
"I felt so fulfilled at the VA
and decided to apply here," she
said.
Timmons has supervised
the 20-bed hospice unit since
its construction.
"It is challenging, but
extremely rewarding,"
Timmons said. 'The patients


require emotional care in addi-
tion to physical care."
In addition, the families also
require compassion and emo-
tional support, she said.
The number one goal of the
hospice staff is pain care man-
agement, and to ensure that
the patients are the most com-
fortable they can possibly be.
"What we do is extremely
rewarding because we are giv-
ing so much at the most crucial
part of their lives," Timmons
explained. "We will do whatev-
er it takes to make them
happy."
One example involves a
patient who worked as a chef.
To make him happy, the
nurses set up the kitchen for
him to cook in.
"We fulfilled his greatest
desire in the last three to four
months before he died,"
Timmons said.
Another patient made blan-
kets, so nurses set up the day
room with supplies for him to
work on his projects.
Timmons called her staff
very dedicated.
'They were interviewed
specifically for these positions
before it opened in 2003," she


said. "They were pulled from
throughout the hospital and
each were asked what they
would do to go the extra mile."
The emphasis is on the
expectation to go beyond the
call of duty.
The unit also has a family
room equipped with a sink,
microwave, DVD player, televi-
sion and VCR among other
amenities to make the family as
comfortable as possible.
Several donations from the
community also benefit the
hospice unit.
"Recently a stereo system
was donated to play music in
the unit and we hope to make a
peace garden with waterfalls,
plants and birds for the
patients and their families,"
Timmons said.
Additionally, she hopes to
one day have private rooms for
the veterans. Timmons said
that the unit would not be what
it is without the volunteers and
support from the community.
Bobby Rolison, an Air Force
veteran, enjoys reading at the
hospice unit.
"I have had excellent care
here and couldn't ask for
more," he said.


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Brought to you courtesy' of the Columbia Count)y Board of Count)' Commissioners


I A Place







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


A Pkice Cilled


Medical & Government


Education, responsibility driving force in nursing over the years


By JASMINE RANGEL
jrangel@lakecityreporter. com


White dresses, pantyhose
and a hat were standard uni-
forms for nurses more than 40
years ago. The clothes have
changed since then, and so
has a nurse's responsibility
and work.
Pat Davis and Blanche
Vanzant remember the days
when nurses were typically
women and medical supplies
were reused. Both now teach
in the Lake City Community
College nursing program.
Davis and Vanzant were
trained as nurses in the 1960s.
Both say nursing education
has grown far beyond the
standards they followed in
school.
"It basically was on the job
training," Vanzant said.
Nurses in those days had
more responsibility earlier in
their training, but students
now do more, Davis said.
In Davis and Vanzant's stu-
dent days, nurses-in-training
went straight into learning the
profession. By 18, Davis said
she was in charge of 30
patients.
A three-year school was the
common place for nurses to
train, though none exist in
Florida now. Vanzant went to
Emory University, but had to
move to New York to work in
Columbia University's -hospi-
tal to train in pediatrics. Davis
received her training at
Milledgeville State Hospital in
Georgia, a psychiatric facility.
Davis lived for three
months in dorms next to the
hospital's 12,000 patients, in a
time when doctors didn't use
psychotropic medicines and
instead administered "a lot of
shock therapy," she said.
Now, requiring students to


4 .


S..*
*4!*
t. ,


UUURIESY HMUIU
Blanche Vanzant (top row, third from right) poses in 1960 with the graduating nursing class of Emory University. Vanzant now works in the nursing program at
Lake City Community College.


live at the facility where they
train would be hopeless,
Davis said.
"They have husbands,
wives, children and jobs," she
said. "Many of our students, if
we did that, could not be in
the program."
Students having wives was
especially uncommon in the
1960s, because few men
trained to be nurses. Davis
said of 500 students she


trained with, none were male.
At LCCC now, Vanzant said
about 12 percent of nursing
students are male.
Davis said she thinks it's a
societal problem.
"Interesting they say some-
one is a male nurse, but not a
female nurse," she said.
"Until society accepts them as
just a nurse," the numbers
won't change significantly,
she said.


As far as schooling goes,
both Davis and Vanzant said
today's practice of requiring
student nurses to take gener-
al education classes, and not
just nursing courses, has
been a good change.
"You become a more well-
rounded person," Vanzant
said.
Nurses now don't just wait
for what the doctor tells them
to do, as was the standard in


the 1960s, Davis said. Nurses
were not allowed to tell
patients anything without a
doctor's order, even the
patient's temperature or
blood pressure, Davis said.
Now, Vanzant thinks the
idea of blindly taking a doc-
tor's orders is a thing of the
past, because people today
tend to question medical deci-
sions they might not agree
with. Nurses are part of that


change, empowering patients
to take control of their own
wellness.
"We're encouraging people
to take charge of their health
themselves," Vanzant said.
Changes over the past 40
years have come with more
education.
"With more knowledge,
you learn that you can do
things differently," Vanzant
said.


County wants more land for subdividing; demand for property grows


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter. corn

"Want land? Sure, we've got
plenty."
"Oh, a half-acre lot? I'm
sorry, fresh out."
This is the kind of dialogue
the county and local real
estate developers fear will
soon be a reality in Columbia
County.
During the past several
years, development of resi-
dential land in the county has
been a topic of concern for
county government and real
estate interests.
Both say that if more land
isn't opened for residential
development in the county,


with the constant tide of new
residents moving into the
community, there won't be
enough to go around and
property values will become
outrageous for all but the well-
heeled.
In an attempt to prevent
that possibility, the county is
currently in ongoing negotia-
tions with the state
Department of Community
Affairs to make changes to
the county's Comprehensive
Land Use Plan.
As part of those changes
the county wants to expand its
Designated Urban
Development Area, which dic-
tates where residential lots
can be subdivided to a size


less than five acres. Outside
the DUDA, land must be
divided into lots five acres or
larger.
Local Realtors and county
officials have said while there
is a demand for five-acre and
larger lots, it is far higher for


more manageable half to one-
acre lots.
Local broker and developer
Daniel Crapps said if some-
thing isn't done soon to open
more land for that type of
development, "in the next
couple of years that's when


we will run out ... it's tight
right now."
But the DCA has complete
oversight of allowing any of
Florida's 67 counties to
amend their land use plan.
Knowing much of the coun-
ty's residential growth is


going south and southwest of
Lake City in the Ichetucknee
Springs' Basin and Trace, the
DCA is concerned allowing
the DUDA to be expanded in


DUDA
Continued on Page 5E


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


A Place Called r Medical & Government


Longtime commissioner remembers changes, expects more


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

From the black, tanic-acid-
colored waters of Falling
Creek rumbling across rocks,
to the metal and steel girders
of new industry, Columbia
County has experienced
unimaginable changes in the
past 30 years.
Over much of the same
period of time, James "Mr.
Mont" Montgomery, has par-
ticipated in and experienced
the local traditions as well as
many of those changes as a
public servant.
Montgomery, who had
been Columbia County com-
missioner for 28 years, retired
in November after serving
two stints as a county com-
missioner, one in the 1970s
and the other from 1980 until
2004.
After serving for more than


DUDA
Continued From Page 4E
that area will have negative
effects on the water quality
unless certain conditions are
met and precautions taken.
The DCA wants to look
closely at proposed solutions
such as sewage service and
advanced septic tank technol-
ogy to prevent harmful
nitrates from reaching the
groundwater. They want
those options fully researched
and considered before consid-
ering expanding the DUDA.
The county's current plan
and the DUDA were adopted
in 1987 after it became a
requirement by the state, with
a new law passed by the legis-
lature in 1985. Intended to
encourage controlled growth
and limit urban sprawl, the
county's plan and its DUDA
have not changed since.
Since January 2004, the
Columbia County
Commission has petitioned


two decades
as a county -
commission-
e r
Montgomery .,-*
said he
noticed
Columbia Montgomery
County has a
special and unique govern-
ment.
"I think what is unique is
the citizenry has direct con-
nection with the Columbia
County government," he said.
"I'm sure in the larger com-
munities the citizens don't
have the same connections."
He said local residents feel
confident in talking to their
elected officers and often get
to see them in public venues.
"We know everybody, and
the people in office, and we
feel comfortable talking to
them and seeing them," he
said. "This is also a very hon-


the DCA three times to allow
the county to amend its land
use plan and expand the
DUDA by three miles in
every direction.
However, the county and
developers say they mainly
want it extended south and
west of Lake City where
demand for residential prop-
erty has been the highest.
The county most recently
met with the DCA on April 1
and is planning another meet-
ing within the next few weeks.
Out of that most recent
meeting, however, County
Manager Dale Williams said
the county made counter pro-
posals to requests from the
DCA.
He said the DCA wants the
county to adopt the state's
new development standards,
but made their own counter
offers with localized alterna-
tives for most of the stan-
dards.
"In some cases we said we
are not going to do it, in other


est government. You have
people that come before the
board that have taken money
in other places and in my 28
years, I have never seen any-
thing like that take place in
our government."
While the changes in
Columbia County have been
numerous and plentiful dur-
ing Montgomery's tenure in
office, he said one of the
biggest changes from when
he was first elected is that
government has gotten more
complicated.
"When I first went on as a
commissioner in 1972, the
Clerk of Court handled all the
county business," he said.
"We are lucky to have Dale
Williams. All during the
1970s, we hired a county man-
ager, but he didn't last but a
few years. The public just
couldn't handle having a
county manager. We realize it


cases it was just a matter of
changing the language and in
some cases we said OK, we
can do that," Williams said.
But before where the DCA
said the areas of the
Ichetucknee Springs basin
and trace were of primary
concern, he said "now they
are saying every inch of
Columbia County is sensitive,
either a groundwater
recharge area, stream to sink
or part of the Ichetucknee
Trace."
In order to expand the
DUDA, however, Williams
said depending on the DCA's
requirements the county is
willing to do "certain" things.
For instance, if the DCA
requires the county to make a
central public utility for sewer
and water as a requirement
for any new development
inside the DUDA, in
exchange for expanding its
boundaries, he said "we are
not opposed to that." But if
the name of that utility is


i I think what is
unique is the
citizenry has direct
connection with the
Columbia County gov-
ernment.
James Montgomery
former Columbia County
commissioner


was getting to the point,
where we couldn't keep going
without a county manager and
at that point in the late 1970s,
the public turned against hav-
ing a county manager."
It wasn't until the 1980s that
Columbia County employed a
county manager that lasted
more than a few years as


required to be put in the land
use plan documentation, such
as "City of Lake City,"
Williams said the county
shouldn't have to be specific
because it may not be the city
which provides utilities to an
area, instead being private or
regional utilities.
"And it should not matter to
the DCA," he said.
The county is hopeful that
by working with the North
Central Florida Regional
Planning Council to try, to
come up with an agreement
with the DCA it can see the
DUDA expanded.
But the county is still wait-
ing for a response from the
DCA on whether it is agree-
able to the alternatives pro-
posed on April 1, he said.
"I don't think that we are
going to come to any agree-
ment in the next two meet-
ings," Williams said.
Crapps seems even less
optimistic.
"I can't see where there has


Mike Null became that first
county manager.
"For years we didn't call
him the county manager, what
we called Dale Williams' job
was called the county coordi-
nator up until the charter,
because of the stigma,"
Montgomery said. "His job
description was the same, we
just didn't put that 'manager'
there because it sparked
some bad feelings."
Though the inner-workings
of local government settled in
time, Montgomery also expe-
rienced changes in local poli-
cies and services offered by
the government.
He said in 1972, the county
dumped all of its garbage in a
hole with water in the Osceola
National Forest.
"There was just a big hole
in the national forest and we
backed the truck up and
dumped the garbage. It's a


been one common agreement
on anything, other than to
meet again," he said.
Regardless, the demand for
real estate in the county does-
n't appear to be slowing.
According to the most
recent sales figures from the
North Florida Multiple
Listing Service, the local real
estate market appears to be
booming, with demand and
price steadily increasing.
For the first quarter of this
year (Jan. 1 to March 31), for
single family site-built homes
in Columbia County listed
through the MLS, the average
sale price was $136,459 with a
total of 128 units (properties)
sold to make up a total sales
volume of about $17.5 million.
On average, those homes
spent about 116 days on the
market.
According to the MLS,
compared to the first quarter
figures of just two years ago,
in 2003, the average sale price
during the same time period


wonder we're still alive and
didn't contaminate all of our
water," he said.
He said when he first
became a commissioner the
forest service said the county
could no longer dump the
trash in the forest. During his
retirement reception, he
remarked that was one night
he lost sleep as a county com-
missioner, as he tried to fig-
ure out what to do.
'Today we have an exem-
plary landfill," Montgomery
said. "When we moved from
dumping it from a hole in the
ground in 1972, we found a
piece of land and that was the
first time we had ever dug a
cell."
Montgomery said he
believes the county has
improved tremendously as a


MONTGOMERY
Continued on Page 6E


for single family site-built
homes was $116,623 with 85
units sold for a total volume of
about $9.9 million. And those
properties were on the mar-
ket for 173 days on average.
Considering those statis-
tics, since the first quarter of
two years prior, the average
sale price for a single family
site-built home is up about
$20,000, 43 more properties
were sold and they spent
nearly 60 days less on the
market.
Those MLS statistics also
do not include sales data such
as condos, townhouses,
duplexes, manufactured
homes, vacant land, or any
property not listed with the
service.
Crapps said until the issues
of providing water and sewer
to develop lands in the
Ichetucknee basin and trace
can be solved, he hopes the
DCA will agree to at least
expand the DUDA further on
U.S. 90 West.


Left to right: Vice Mayor George Ward. Councilman Mike Lee,
Cit) Manager, Joe Cone, Councilman John Robertson,
Councilman, Eugene Jefferson


k







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


, f 'I-


MONTGOMERY
Continued From Page 5E

county government during
the last 30 years.
'The biggest thing is having
a county manager and having
Dale Williams and we've
added on a lot of employees,"
he said. "I can remember our
previous tax collector, H. Ray
Walker, was our first building
inspector and he went from
there to the tax collector's
office."
Montgomery also noted
that another important
change that occurred around
that time was the county
implemented emergency
medical services.
"Back then, the funeral
homes went and picked peo-
ple up," he said. 'There were
no emergency units. The
funeral homes, on a rotating
basis, put injured people in
the back of their hearses and
took them to the hospitals.
Having an emergency service
is just in the past 20 years."
While some changes in the
county were greeted with
open arms, other changes
needed more time before they
were accepted by local resi-
dents. One was the planning
department.
"One of the two most con-
troversial things we did in the
28 years I was commissioner,
was we tried putting in the
comprehensive plan the
state comprehensive plan in


the 1970s for development in
Columbia County,"
Montgomery said, noting area
farmers complained that the
government couldn't tell them
what to do with their land.
"We would have to rent the
school board auditorium for
our meetings because there
were so many people there."
He said the second most
controversial thing was the ad
valorem tax, a special assess-
ment tax, for fire, rescue and
solid waste.
'That was very controver-
sial because a lot of people
didn't pay taxes before they
started paying that special
assessment and they didn't
like it," he said. "In this North
Central Florida area, and I
think now every county does a
special assessment now, out-
side of Alachua County. We
were the first county to go to a
special assessment. We had to
do it we had no choice -
every bit of the property tax
goes to the criminal justice
system. We had to go to anoth-
er way of raising money for
that."
While the county has expe-
rienced significant changes in
the last 30 years,
Montgomery said he believes
other changes are on the hori-
zon."I think Columbia County
is going to have to go into util-
ities," he said 'We've held off
as long as we could for utilities
out in the county to supply
water and sewer. If we are
going to protect the
Ichetucknee Trace, the coun-


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
James Montgomery describes President George Washington's life in a homeschooling history class. Montgomery has served
as longtime county commissioner and high school history teacher to Columbia County.


ty is going to have to go into
utilities."
He said county officials
made that decision on the
1970s, not to do utilities in the
county, but with the county's
growth, the decision may have
to be revisited.
'There are too many subdi-


visions that are right outside
the city and they're putting in
their septic tanks and every-
thing," he said.
Another change
Montgomery said he expects
to see is the county taking
over the fire departments,
especially with the county pay-


ing a majority of the budget.
Montgomery said he
believes recreation will be an
area of special concern for the
county government.
"Recreation constantly
needs upgrading," he said.
"We. are just getting bigger
and bigger and when you have


the number of people we have
now, you've got to set aside an
area for recreation before it's
too late.
"We've got to stay ahead of
it. Right now the most imme-
diate thing is to complete the
adult softball fields at
Southside (Recreation Park)."


Veterans Affairs offers wide variety of mental health services


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com
For many soldiers, battles
don't end when they return
home.
Lake City Veterans Affairs
Medical Center offers various
psychiatry services that
include community residen-
tial care, mental health care
and'treatments for post trau-


matic stress disorder and sub-
stance abuse.
'The North Florida South
Georgia Veterans Health
System offers mental health
services to veterans and cer-
tain dependents," said Dr.
Allan E. McLaughlin. "And
they are not all from Lake
City."
The Lake City facility's area


extends as far as 100 miles
north and west and 60 miles
south and east, with a poten-
tial veteran population of
almost 230,000.
Veterans benefit from serv-
ices provided by social work-
ers, psychologists, nurses and
psychiatrists.
There is a rapid screening
process with mental health


assessments and medication
and therapy opportunities
offered as treatment.
The psychiatry consult
identifies persons with post
traumatic stress disorder who
may experience flashbacks,
hallucinations, and react to
cues that remind them of the
situation.


The symptoms can cause
distress at home and work.
The screenings cover fami-
ly, social life, military service,
employment and education
among other factors.
Diagnosis and goals are
identified at the end of the
screening, with potential
referrals for medication and


therapy.
"We get quite a few refer-
rals, McLaughlin said.
"Problems can range from.
nightmares to substance
abuse to domestic violence."
The unit also has a residen-
SERVICES
Continued on Page 7E


(L(( Hearing



N' Solutions, Inc.

Hearing Solutions, Inc., a locally owned and operated company, celebrates

its 7th year in business this year. Dr. Debra K. Griffin was born and
raised in Lake City. She is a graduate of Columbia High School class of
1981 and played volleyball and softball at LCCC. Not knowing what direction to
go next, she managed a clothing store in St Augustine for a couple of years.
While in St. Augustine, she developed a compassion for the hearing impaired,
serving students for the F1 School for the Deaf and Blind.' Once deciding to go on
to college, she enrolled in the Florida State University's School for Audiology and
Speech/Language pathology. Once the Bachelors and Masters degrees were com-
pleted, her training was completed at Shand's UF, Communication Disorders
Clinic and Shands Hospital. After working for a well known ENT surgeon for 5
years, she began to spread her wings in the private practice realm. The Wal-Mart
Hearing Centers recruited her and she opened the First of 7 Hearing Centers, It
was located in Mandarin and was the most successful of the stores. The Wal-
Mart experience gave me the confidence I needed to open a business on my own
which I did in 1998." Lake City residents were still going to Gainesville or
Jacksonville for Audiology services and it was due time to have local services.
Hearing Solutions, Inc. opened its doors in June of 1998 in Lake City. While get-
ting the practice started, she also completed the Doctor of Audiology program at
UF. Being back in my hometown and serving the residents of Columbia and sur-
rounding counties is a real pleasure.

Our mission statement:
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and rehabilitation. lie understand that our patients want the best hearing
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Our staff includes Cynthia E. Thomas, Office Manager and Hearing Instrument
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I I







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


A Place Called jIO yi-j Medical & Government


.I o-- -.cm


Online: Veterans can chat to each other in comfort of home


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com

Lake City Veterans Affairs
Medical Center provides a
program for veterans to chat
with other veterans and a
social worker without step-
ping foot outside their
homes.
Matt DeWein and Carol
Alderson started the
Veterans Video Network in
2000.
"We split some 75 veterans
down the middle geographi-
cally," DeWein said. "She has
Gainesville and South
Florida, and I handle Lake
City and North Florida and
southern Georgia."
The program involves pro-
viding computers in veterans
with serious mental illnesses
for weekly education ses-
sions.
The sessions involve
instant messaging, video mes-
saging and e-mail.
"We have gotten away from
video unless it is one-on-one
because some veterans, espe-
cially in outlying areas, do not


have cable or DSL Internet so
they do not have the band-
width needed to see the video
as it was meant to be viewed,"
DeWein said.
He does more social work
by going out into the commu-
nity.
'We came up with idea for a
care coordinator, but had no
idea how it would take shape,"
he said.
The program uses a free
messaging service called
Paltalk the provides real time
text.
Veterans can receive simple
training for use of the pro-
gram.
"Carol uses more of e-mail
and I go to assisted living
facilities," DeWein said.
The program's success is
measured by noting whether
hospitalization rates have
dropped.
"If the patients are going
less, the program is working,"
he said.
DeWein offers two group
sessions a week that last from
50 minutes to an hour on
Tuesday and Thursday.


A


ASHLEY CISNEROS/ Lake City Reporter
Matthew DeWein, Care Coordinator for the Veterans Video Network, signs on to an online
educational and support session for mentally ill patients. The program is offered at Lake City
Veterans Affairs Medical Center.


"The sessions offer support
and education, and we edu-


cate the veterans on Internet sign release forms to partici-
security," DeWein said. "They pate."


Up to eight patients are
involved in any one session.
One person speaks at a
time.
There is a "raise your hand"
icon to let the group know
that a veteran has something
to say.
'The main benefit is that
they don't have to leave their
homes," he said.
Patients are referred to the
program and admitted if they
match the criteria, one being
that they are seriously mental-
ly ill.
The number of times the
patient has been in an inpa-
tient psychiatry unit is also
considered.
DeWein says he has a hand-
ful of consistent veterans that
he knows will sign on for his
sessions.
Others come and go.
One problem that comes up
a lot is anger management.
"Anger is one problems
they deal with," DeWein said.
"Many have seen their friends
die in battle and were not
received well when they
came back."


SERVICES
Continued From Page 6E

tial area for 10 patients to 90-
day-stays.
"This area contains the
most difficult population
including schizophrenic or
manic depressive bipolar
patients," McLaughlin said.
The objective is to drastical-
ly increase quality of life while
drastically decreasing certain
medications.
Six months ago, Project
Seamless Transition was
introduced to help active duty
military by providing medical
services in an accessible man-
ner.
Many of these soldiers are
currently serving in the
Middle East.


"Soldiers are told that they
have access to VA facilities
while they are still on active
duty," said Margaret
Himmelheber, nurse practi-
tioner.
The soldiers are given tests
to diagnose disorders like
post traumatic stress disor-
der.
"Most vets are in the hon-
eymoon stage the first six to
nine months when they first
get back," she explained.
Later they can be
depressed, anxious, irritable,
and have nightmares among
other problems.
Post traumatic stress disor-
der happens when a person is
exposed to extreme trauma or
perception of trauma and are
not able to work it out.
It is 'not limited to veterans,


but can also occur in rape vic-
tims and victims of natural
disasters like the tsunami
tragedy in Asia.
"Some Vietnam veterans
cannot handle the sound of
helicopters or the scent of
diesel fuel," McLaughlin said.
He said that because sol-
diers overseas are able to pur-
chase drugs and alcohol
cheaply and easily,, they often
return home with addictions.
Himmelheber agrees.
"Fourth of July is hell for
them," she said. 'They are the
ones always looking over
their shoulder and often sit in
the back of church so that
they can watch everyone
else."
Often people with post trau-
matic stress disorder are mis-
understood and even


ridiculed.
They may lose their jobs
and have problems with rela-
tionships.
There have been reports of
male veterans hitting their
wives while sleeping and
increased incidents of domes-
tic violence.
Many veterans experience
divorce.
"Vets in the 1970s were not
welcomed, but were treated
awfully," Himmelheber said.
"We didn't know what post
traumatic stress disorder was
and told them go ahead and
get married."
Nowadays, soldiers may
receive medication and thera-
py to treat mental health dis-
orders.
With the new program,
they are screened and treated


within 30 days.
"In addition to medications,
treatments like hypnosis and
group therapy are used,"
McLaughlin said.
"Sometimes it works, some-
times it doesn't."
Group therapy usually
includes discussion sessions
with 12 members or so and a
facilitator.
Currently there are 57 vet-
erans involved in the pro-
gram, McLaughlin said.

Operations Iraqi Freedom,
Enduring Freedom
Services are available to
veterans of current and recent
military operations seeking
medical care and benefits.
The Veterans Affairs can
provide medical care for dis-


charged veterans of OIF or
OEF, two years from the vet-
eran's discharge date.
Treatments are available
for conditions believed to be
related to service regardless
of income or eligibility status.
The VA offers priority
health care and benefits assis-
tance even if the veteran is
still on active duty, or is an
activated member of the
National Guard or Reserve.
For information or assis-
tance, please call the appropri-
ate "Point of Contact":
Gainesville VAMC Paul
Crouch, LCSW 1-800-324-8387
ext. 6661
Lake City VAMC Ray
Kneppar, LCSW 1-800-308-
8387 ext. 2952
For other locations, please
visit www. va.gov


F


a


rmMEDIATE.


.OPENINGS


IN ALL AREAS...






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


A Place Calledo j Medical & Government


Looking to grow: City priorities for future


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter.com
With the development in
Lake City and surrounding
areas changing the local land-
scape almost weekly, the city
has attempted to identify its
priorities for the coming
years.
Recognizing that growth is
coming whether its wanted or
not, City Manager Joe Cone
said the city's top five current
goals "all are of equal impor-
tance and all are interrelated."
While in no particular
order, the city's priorities and
how they are being addressed
are as follows:
Water and sewer
The city has been planning
for several years to build a
new water treatment plant to
compensate for growing
demand on its current water
system.
It is already installing a new
20-inch water "loop" line that
will serve many areas not cur-
rently serviced by city water,
the ongoing project was start-
ed several years ago could
cost $4 million or more once
complete.
Construction will also soon
begin on a new $13 million
water treatment plant east of
Lake City that will exceed the
capacity of the current system
by 3 million gallons per day
and is easily expandable to
meet future demand by
adding new wells.
Demand for utilities has
also affected the city's waste-
water (sewer) plant which is
regularly operating near or
above its rated peak capacity.
A study is currently being
'done to find out what needs to
be done to expand the plant,
build new or add smaller
plants for certain areas and
how much each option might
cost.
Some city officials say they
would also like to increase the
treatment standards of the
wastewater so that it could be
retised for irrigation without
- harming the groundwater.
Downtown
The city has enhanced
downtown Lake City with
many projects in recent years
including new parking, tree
planters, brick pavers and
lampposts. One of the biggest
changes, however, was a com-
plete renovation of Olustee
Park.
Now the city is working
with the Downtown Action
Corporation to install a "danc-
ing," interactive fountain in
the south end of the park in
time for July 4 in hopes it will
draw more residents down-
town. To help fund such proj-
ects, the city created a down-
town taxing district several
years ago that established a
Tax Increment Fund via an
additional property tax assess-
ment on downtown property.
The city is also helping local
developer and contractor Jody
DuPree with a new retail cen-
ter he plans to build on an
entire city block off North
Marion Avenue and
Washington Street. The city
will pay for demolition, light-
ing and utility line upgrades
for the project in return for
public parking on the site to
help encourage people to go to
businesses in the area with
easier accessibility. There is
also hope DuPree's new busi-
ness will help revitalize down-
town and promote similar proj-
ects in the future.
Transportation
Many people still pass
through Lake City on U.S. 90
West and U.S. 41/441. But
many local residents also use
the roads to get around town.
The city hopes to keep its
infrastructure of roads viable
and meet the necessary
improvements to all of its
streets, from main thorough-
fares to side streets, as well as
address any traffic flow prob-
lems.
Once the Bascom Norris


Drive construction is com-
plete from Lake Jeffery to U.S.
90 West, the city hopes the
alternate route will see traffic
flow greatly increased around
the city, especially on the west
side of town.


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
A bulldozer spreads limerock during construction of Bascom Norris Drive. The completion of Bascom Norris Drive will help


increasing traffic flow off U.S. c


Economic development

The city is believed to have
been a key player in having
New Millennium Building
Systems select a site off Lake
Jeffery Road for its steel
joist/deck manufacturing


SMartii
ORTHODONTIC
"Superior Care In a Warm
Caring Environment Since 1979"
Dr. Celia S. Martin, D.M.D.
3695 Hwy. 47 South
Lake City, FL 32025
MEMBER OF AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
OF ORTHODONTISTS FLORIDA
ASSOCIATION OF ORTHODONTISTS


facility that will eventually
employ about 175 people with
an average annual salary of
$48,000. City officials were
among the first locally to
meet with the company's
president and are part of a
local incentive package that
included providing sewer and
water extensions to the


ADULTS
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CHILDREN

CREDIT PLANS

-Izifllll


S 3TE1PLrXIij*%*M .

wrrcuY~p


618 E. Duval Street
P.O. Box 2064
Lake City, FL 32056


Phone
386-755-0876


industrial site. *
The city has also been able
to use the Lake City
Municipal Airport as a major
economic center with an
industrial park and its main
tenant, aircraft maintenance,
overhaul and repair company
Timco. The city recently


YOU'RE NOT 1.


JUST A NUMBER


used a $750,000 to put in a
fire suppression system in
hangars it leases to Timco so
that, once complete, the com-
pany will be eligible for more
contracts. The city is hopeful
the increased business will
lead to more local jobs and
hopes to undertake similar


partnerships in the future.
Timco and the city are also
seeking funding for an
Instrument Landing System
to be installed at.the airport.
The ground-based ILS com-
municates with systems on
planes and jets to help pilots
land safely even in inclement
weather such as heavy fog.
Such a system would likely
increase traffic to the airport
and make Timco eligible for
more contracts with compa-
nies that require their aircraft
to use airports with an ILS.
Housing
In recent years, the city
has used Community
Development Block Grants
from the state to rehabilitate
some dilapidated houses of
city residents and hopes to
undertake similar projects in
the future.
The city also works with
the Suwannee River
Economic Council, the State
Housing Initiative Program
and Rural Development to
improve area housing for res-
idents able to afford decent
housing but who need some
help getting started.
The hope is to eliminate
substandard housing in the
city and, over time, improve
the overall housing stock.
The city also helps with the
local chapter of Habitat for
Humanity with several of the
city's staff members taking
an active personal interest in
the organization.
The city has also pledged
to help with water and sewer
connections for the project
homes, the first of which is
almost complete.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


A Place Called ~,Ieg Medical & Government


Inspiring by example: Residents donate talent, energy at VA


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Veterans
Affairs Medical Center is a
brighter place because of 577
community members who
donate their time, talents and
energy without asking for any
compensation.
They volunteer in every
area of the facility from doing
clerical work to serving
refreshments.
The medical center is cele-
brating National Volunteer
Week, a nationwide celebra-
tion April 17-23, with the
theme "Inspire By Example."
"The volunteers inspire
the patients they serve, the
staff they assist and others in
the community to join in,"
said Ron Joyner, assistant
chief of voluntary service.
Robert and Virginia
Weaver do their part to wel-
come family members and
friends to the medical center
by serving them coffee and
doughnuts on Fridays.
Weaver, a veteran himself,
has been a patient at the
medical center and calls the
service he received "top
notch."
In the late 1970s, the cou-
ple started volunteering with
a bingo program for veter-
ans. Now the Weavers volun-
teer four hours a week every
other week.
'There is no feeling like
the one you get when you see
someone walk in that door
who is tired and worried
about their loved one, and
you are able to make their
day by serving them simple
refreshments," Virginia
Weaver said.
She served as a nurse for
26 years and as a supervisor
as Shands at Lake Shore and
now enjoys using her talents
to continue to care for oth-
ers.
The couple has watched
the medical center change
for the better of the years.
"One of the biggest
changes I remember was


when President Eisenhower
ordered a fence that sur-
rounded the facility to be
taken down because he said
the hospital was not a
prison," Robert Weaver said.
He remembers having to
park his car along Baya
Avenue and check in with a
guard.
"All that's gone now, thank
goodness," he said.
Sarah Nell King donated
so much of her time, a spe-
cial award had to be created
just for her.
She received the highest
award for community service
for more than 55,000 hours of
service.
Kings is a representative of
the Veterans Affairs
Voluntary Service (VAVS),
which includes more than
350 veteran, civic, service
and community organiza-
tions.
The World War II veteran
also serves as member of the
Veterans of Foreign Wars.
King started volunteering
in 1978.
"I needed something to
occupy my time after my hus-
band died, and I decided to
volunteer as a way to give
back," she said. "Seeing
patients smile and say thank
you makes it all worthwhile."
King also been a patient at
the VA and says she couldn't
have asked for better care.
While serving in the
Women's Army Corp, she
traveled to Italy, France,
Germany and Japan.
She says she enjoyed
Japan the best.
Her main duties at the VA
include making new patients
feel welcomed.
"We give out goody bags
and toiletry items to newly
admitted patients so they are
able to clean up before the
doctor comes," she said. 'We
also make phone calls for
them if they ask."
King volunteers four days
a week and usually arrives at
5 a.m. to prepare goody bags
and leaves at 1 or 2 p.m.


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Veterans Affairs Medical Center volunteers Alice and Lee Quinn give their time and experience to the VA twice a week.


"Raised as an only child, I
love the companionship of
the other volunteers I serve
with and the company of the
veterans and staff," she said.
Lee and Alice Quinn were
selected as volunteers of the
year for their clerical support
of medical specialists at the
VA since they started in
2001.
"It has been a rewarding
experience, and the best part
is the interaction with the
patients," said Lee Quinn,
who served as a Navy corps-
man.
The couple enjoys seeing
many of the patients; condi-
tions improve.
"I would encourage any-
one interested in volunteer-
ing to come and investigate
the opportunities available
for all different aspects of the


hospital," he said.
Like. most of the volun-
teers, the couple are also
seen at the medical center
and enjoy showing their
appreciation by giving back.
"It is a labor of love, I'll tell
you that," Quinn said.
Joyner says that there is
something for everyone at
the VA.
"We have a big range of
volunteers from second
graders to the young at
heart," he said.
"Volunteerism provides
exposure to different disci-
plines, an opportunity to
obtain experience and a
chance to strengthen your
resume."
Annually, Joyner cooks a
breakfast for his volunteers


as a way to say thank you. -
In addition, he says that
the staff try to do what they
can to express their apprecia-
tion to the volunteers for
helping them out.
"I don't have a job, but an
adventure," Joyner said. "We
have the best volunteers in
the world."
The National Volunteer
Week is a 32-year tradition
the serves as a special time
to recognize and celebrate
the contribution of volun-
teers.
Volunteer centers, non-
profit organizations, govern-
ment agencies, hospitals,
schools and many other
agencies, use the week to
thank their volunteers and
support service projects.


During the 2004 fiscal
year, more than 600 volun-
teers provided more than
65,000 hours of supplemental
assistance.
In addition to time, mone-
tary and physical donations
have exceeded $404,000.
E L. Malphurs, director of
the North Florida South
Georgia Veterans Health
System called the VAVS
priceless.
'They take the time to lelid
an ear, give a warm smile,
and go out of their way to
provide assistance to veter-
ans."
For more information on
volunteer opportunities,
please call the Voluntary
Service office at 386-755-
3016, ext. 2135.


We are the founder and leader
of the private corrections
industry.
Our Lake City Correctional
Facility accommodates 350
inmates and is currently under
expansion to provide an
additional 550 beds, with a
staff of 250 by summer 2005.


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Ronnie Brannon

Tax Collector

(386) 758-1077


Email: cctc.columbiataxcollector.com

"It is an honor and privilege to serve you in our office. Our goal is to provide
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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


A Phw~x -(Illed


: Medical & Government}


County charter still in infancy stage


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Columbia County
Charter was approved by
local voters in the November
2002 general election and
went into affect Jan. 2003.
Since then the county has
been governed in accordance
with the new document,
which was designed to give
local voters more power and
serve as a mini-constitution
for the county.
While the Columbia County
charter is still in its infancy,
there are mixed reactions as
to whether the document has
been successful to this point.
"I'm not sure the charter
has been in effect long
enough for most people to
really have formed an opinion
- good or bad unless they
work with it on a regular
basis," said Dale Williams,
county manager.
Williams said the charter
allows residents to control
things that would otherwise
be handled by legislative offi-


cials.
"The charter was a tool that
was put in place to give the
public the right to have a big-
ger say, should they desire to
do so, in their government,"
he said. "The Columbia
County Charter allows the cit-
izens of Columbia County to
be able to tweak their govern-
ment, based on their needs
and desires as opposed to leg-
islation through Tallahassee."
Cities are created by char-
ters and counties are created
by the state constitution. In a
charter form of government,
there could be more than five
county commission members
and the charter has the right
to change the salary as
opposed to what the state
says, as well as the right to
determine the office term of
an elected official. Without
the charter, county officials
would have to follow the state
constitution.
Mike Null, vice chairman of
the initial Columbia County
Charter Commission, said the
objective of the charter was to


provide a local objective of
government as opposed to
that provided by the state's
legislature for any county in
the state.
Null and 14 other charter
commission members
worked on the document for
more than a year with Tom
Brown serving as the chair-
man.
For the most part, Null said
he believed the charter has
meet the needs of local resi-
dents thus far.
"There have been some
provisions in the charter that
are not yet complete, but I
believe the county has made a
good effort in completing
most provisions and at least,
initiating the others since the
charter was enacted," he said.
"I think there can be some
tweaking, but that will be up
to the charter review commis-
sion to determine."
Null said the Columbia
County Charter is a very
basic charter, because the ini-
tial charter commission didn't
change the constitutional offi-


cers and kept the same
salaries.
"The primary difference
we made was commissioners,
as well as constitutional offi-
cers, all became non-partisan,
but their terms of office and
salary stayed the same," he
said. "I believe the charter
works because it's the law
and the elected officials are
charged with carrying that
out. I feel that the county
commissioners, as well as the
county manager, do what they
have to do to carry out that
law that was approved by the
voters. It is basically a mini-
constitution for the county
government."
Williams said when the
charter was adopted in 2002,
he believes Columbia County
was too small to be a charter
government.
'There is a lot of education
that still goes on as it relates
to the charter. The commis-
sioner's roles changed as well
as the role of county manag-
er," he said, noting the char-
ter only added one additional


responsibility to the county
manager position the pub-
lic works department. "The
charter tried to clarify to a
great extent that commission-
er roles were more policy-
making than hands-on."
"I would say we are better
off with the charter in it's
present format," Null said. "I
favor the format we have.
There were some presented
formats I didn't favor, but I
think the end result is the
charter has made for a more
accountable county govern-
ment."
Now that the Columbia
County charter has been the
rule of the land for two years,
Null said he believes resi-
dents will be able to see the
effect of the charter within
the next two years.
"I think it will become
more apparent within the
next two years because initial-
ly, it was different and we had
to have a transition period for
the county manager and the
commissioners," he said.
"That transition has taken


place, as well as the provi-
sions of the charter being ini-
tiated, and full-implementa-
tion will take every bit of the
two years."
The Columbia County
Charter is up for its first
review this year and officials
are getting ready to form a
charter review commission.
The charter review commis-
sion is charged with deter-
mining whether the county
has successfully carried out
the provisions in the charter
and to determine if there
should be proposed revisions.
Revisions would have to be
approved by the voters dur-
ing an election.
Williams said after the ini-
tial charter review, he
believes the residents will
have a better idea of how the
charter works and what kind
of a tool it has been for them.
"I really don't think the
charter has been in effect
long enough to gauge
whether it is a good tool or an
unnecessary burden," he
said.


Claim to fame


Lake City home to for


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com
Perhaps ore of the proudest
moments in Lake City history
was when one of the city's own
became governor.
In November 1936,
Frederick P Cone was elected
governor of Florida.
He served until 1941.
Born in 1871 and raised on a
Columbia County plantation,


he was the ninth child of 13
children of Captain William
Henry Cone and Sarah Emily
Evanch.
His father served in the
Indian War of 1857 as com-
mander of a company.
In the bicentennial issue of
the Lake City Reporter, Fran
Hesser reported about the
city's pride when Cone defeat-
ed "Miami folk" to win the seat
in 1936.


Cone's campaign urged
Florida to "lower the budget to
balance taxes instead of raising
taxes to balance the budget."
His family is one of oldest in
Florida. Members of the Cone
family also took part in the War
of 1812. The first Cone traced
was Daniel Cone in 1650 in
New England.
The family traveled to
Florida from the Virginias, the
Carolinas and Georgia.


mer governor

Cone was a well-known first month the odds we
banker and lawyer in Lake City. 1.
He served as mayor for By the week before tt
three terms then served eight primary, he boasted he
years in the Florida senate. every town except Key M
He was elected president of The newspapers in
the senate in 1911. Florida called him a p
As an active Democrat, he tornado. The Columbia
went to several national con- School band travel
ventions for his party. Tallahassee to perform
At first, his odds were listed inaugural parade. Cone
at 10 to 1, but by the end of the on July 28, 1948.


re 2 to
he first
visited
West.
south
political
a High
ed to
in his
e died


Frederick P. Cone


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Community Activist :
*Presented a key to the city for participation in the revitalization ot
downtown Lake City.
* Received the Lake City Reporter "Gate Keepers" award for
Public Service
* Wrote a three-part series on the degradation of Lake Alligator
that spured the restoration of the lake.
* Received a "Public Service Award" from Altrusa International of
Lake City and Lake City Community College
* Founder of the Senior Advocates for Senior Citizens which today has 450 members
Vote for Continued Progress for Lake City
* Economic development is more important now than ever. Because of the rapid growth in
the Lake City area, much though should be given to land management and innovation in
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" I will continue to make sure all city ordinances and codes are updated to conform to 21"
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* I will work to make downtown Lake City a destination for all people, including the
tourist, by developing and implementing promotional campaigns.
* I will work to expand utility services to areas of growth which will help in the
development of all areas around Lake City.
Paid political advertisement paid for and approved by Margaret Wuest for Mayor of Lake City.




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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


ML


County looks


optimistically


to the future


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
As Columbia County pre-
pares to head into its future,
county officials have been
given the task of guiding the
county on this trek.
County officials have been
trying to devise a way to make
the transition to the future as
effortless as possible, but
have noted that several things
need to happen in Columbia
County's immediate future in
order for the county to reach
its full potential.
Dale Williams, county man-
ager, said Columbia County
has at least five goals, based
on the things the Columbia
County Commission has said,
done and reflected in its poli-
cies, that officials plan to
address in the near future.
Columbia County priorities
(listed in no particular order)
E Modify the county's
land development regula-
tions to better accommo-
date the county's growth
Last year Columbia County
issued 900 permits outside
the Designated Urban
Development Area.
"Assuming that those 900
permits were on the average,
five-acre lot size some were
larger, that's 4,500 acres of
unincorporated area land
used," Williams said. "Now
the county is not trying to
entice more people to move
here they're doing it on
their own, but of those, you
have to wonder how many of


them would have preferred
smaller acreage. That acreage
is not available to them and
that is the heart of the conver-
sation that we're having with
DCA."
Williams said county offi-
cials and DCA representatives
have been discussing the
issue for three years as the
county looks to change the
existing land use plan.
"We tried to offset the prob-
lem before the problem
occurred, but unfortunately,
government wheels are slow
and we've still got a way to go,
I'm sure, before we're ever
going to come to some meet-
ing of the minds," Williams
said. "That's all part of these
discussion with the
Department of Community
Affairs."
Improving Public
Safety
County officials plan to
improve the county's public
safety by improving law
enforcement, fire protection
and emergency medical serv-
ices.
Recently, the county pur-
chased seven fire trucks for
area volunteer. fire depart-
ments and other equipment
has been purchased on a reg-
ular basis, to help the various
public service agencies.
One of the primary things
Williams spoke about was
EMS services and their
duties.
"EMS is really being
taxed," he said. 'We've got


Continued on


COUNTY
Page 12E


A Place Called me Medical & Government


CHS senior stays busy with school, college

plans and serving the student body


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com
Brandon Hill walks down
the halls of Columbia High
School saying hello to almost
every student who passes him
by.
"How are you doing?" he
asks a student at a water
fountain.
Hill is a young man who
knows where he is going.
Born in the Bahamas, he
and his family moved to Lake
City when he was in the
fourth grade.
The Columbia High
School senior juggles numer-
ous obligations and performs
all of his tasks remarkably
well.
Hill plans to attend Lake
City Community College to
obtain his associates degress
and then a bachelor's from
Saint Leo University in ele-
mentary education
"Since serving as a mentor
at Melrose Park Elementary,
I have learned more about
the education field," he said.
"I would like to teach fifth
grade and then move on to
secondary education."
As student body president
at CHS, Hill is one of the
most well-known students on
his campus.
Yet, he says it hasn't
always been that way.
"I wasn't a part of the 'in-
crowd' as an eight grader
coming into high school, but
I heard about Mrs. [Debra]
Wright and her program and
wanted to get involved as a
freshman."
Hill joined student govern-
ment in ninth grade and
served in numerous posi-
tions every year, winning stu-
dent body president his sen-
ior year.
"I wanted to get involved
and serve the school and its


ASHLEY CISNEROS/ Lake City Reporter
Brandon Hill serves as Columbia High School student body
president. He one day hopes to run for school superintend-
ent for the county.


students," he said.
"I have been in the leader-
ship class program since
ninth grade and watched
each president before me
and tried to evaluate what
could be done to improve the
school."
As he prepares for gradua-
tion, Hill reflects on his sen-
ior year.
"This has been a smooth,
organized year," he said.
Hill says that being elected
as student body president is
his biggest accomplishment
so far.
"I am humbled to be elect-


ed by more than 1,800 stu-
dents who make up the high
school," he said.
In his free time, Hill enjoys
being outdoors, bicycle rid-
ing and power walking.
In addition, Hill also
serves as county coordinator
and county representative
for Students Working
Against Tobacco, and is
active in Key Club, Interact
and Students Against
Destructive Decisions.
He is. also the president of
new club, Young Democrats.
Hill fund-raises for Relay
of Life benefiting the March


of Dimes.
He says he is inspired by
L.C. Bradley, assistant super-
intendent of instruction and
curriculum of Columbia
County Schools.
"He started as a teacher
and worked his way up and I
would like to follow his
example," Hill said.
Hill plans on eventually
getting a master's degree in
education administration and
running for school superin-
tendent.
"If I could change two
things about the schools, I
would improve the cleanli-
ness of the schools and reno-
vate some of the facilities to
update them," he said.
Hill also would like to see
an increase discipline by
making stricter rules.
"If you take out the cancer,
the body will run smoother,"
he explained.
If Hill could change any-
thing about Lake City, he
said he would improve the
roads and bring better enter-
tainment and shopping busi-
nesses to city.
"If teens have more to do,
they wouldn't be getting in
trouble for being in parking
lots," he said.
Hill says after he gradu-
ates, he plans on staying in
the community.
"I love Lake City and don't
care for big cities," he said.
One of his biggest events
has been coordinating a sum-
mer Tiger Camp for upcom-
ing freshman.
"More than 300 freshman
attended and I called all the
eighth graders to invite
them," Hill said.
Helping others makes him
the happiest.
As Debra Wright, student
activities director, walks by,
Hill grins.
"I hope to have her job one
day," he said.


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11E







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


A ace ed Medical & Government
4 ; 1W -v-I LI


Lake City Veterans Affairs Medical Center rich in history


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com

The Veterans Health
Administration began in 1865
when Congress created the
National Asylum for Disabled
Volunteer Soldiers and Sailors
for those injured in the Civil
War.
It was renamed the National
Home for Disabled Volunteer
Soldiers in 1873.
At first, there were 11
branches that were spread
across the country.
After World War I, the
Veteran Bureau was created.
Later this was renamed to


the Veterans Administration in
1921.
The current building of the
Lake City Veterans Affairs
Medical Center was the origi-
nal site of the Florida
Agricultural College, estab-
lished in 1883.
The college was renamed
the University of Florida in
1903 and was moved to
Gainesville three years later.
The site later became
Columbia College until 1917.
In February 1920, the build-
ing and land became property
of Lake City.
Later the federal govern-
ment bought the land for


$75,000.
By the end of 1920, the
building was renovated as U.S.
Public Health Service Hospital
Number 63.
The transition from the pub-
lic health hospital to a veterans
bureau hospital began in 1924.
Six years later President
Herbert Hoover created the
Veterans Administration.
In 1955, the VA hospital
obtained a 230-bed addition
and in 1978, the VA hospital
was renamed to a VA Medical
Center.

HISTORY
Continued on Page 13E


I.
a.

S ~. ~
~ *gx


S,,,rE- : I. .,
This photo dating back to the 1940s shows the Veterans Affairs Medical Center Building.


COUNTY
Continued From Page 1E


three duty crews and there's
about 5,500 calls and we've
really got to look at a fourth
duty crew. It's expensive and it
doesn't generate any new rev-
enue. All it will do is divide the
5,500 calls among four differ-
ent duty crews. The employ-
ees are literally pushed to their
limit. That's something we're
really going to take a long,
hard look at."
He said future plans for the
agency could include a new
home base for the fourth duty
crew, but no ideas have been
put to paper yet.
"I think one has to assume
that if we add a fourth duty
crew, we've got to add a fourth
station to house them," he
said.
Emergency management is
also a part of public safety and
officials have really put more
emphasis on that area of pub-
lic safety after Columbia
County was adversely affected
by hurricanes Charley and
Jeanne last year.
Williams said making
improvements has become a
priority because of the recent


weather patterns and the
improvement plans also
extend to emergency manage-
ment.
"We would very much like
to enhance our EOC
(Emergency Operations
Center)," he said. "A lot of
what we identified as being
problematic, was only because
we had a level of activation in
our EOC, more so than in pre-
vious years, which exposed
some areas we'd like to
improve."

Improve quality of life
services
County officials plan to
improve services such as the
public library and recreation,
including expanding current
services as well as developing
possible new sites and loca-
tions.
'The way we view it is, we
have a lot of people in
Columbia County who pay a
pretty substantial ad valorem
bill," Williams said. "Every bit
of the ad valorem tax revenue
collected by the Columbia
County Board of
Commissioners, goes to the
justice system in some way.
Whether it's the sheriff's
office; the cost of courts, what-
ever the case maybe, it goes to


them in some way."
He said if residents are law-
abiding citizens, they're not
the ones taxing the justice sys-
tem.
'The two biggest things we
can do for the citizens is give
them the quality of life servic-
es as best we can deliver,"
Williams said. 'We are con-
stantly looking for ways to
make our library better and
constantly looking for ways to
make our recreational pro-
grams better."
He said recreation covers a
big spectrum including parks,
playing fields and everything
in between, including walking
trails and other,items associat-
ed with recreation.
"Here in Columbia County
we've always talked about the
quality of life and what sup-
ports it," Williams said. "We
look at our quality of life serv-
ices as being recreation,
library and these things that
we do like the July 4 fireworks
display and things that we call
recreation. Those are the
things we believe are really
important. Quality of life is
measured by those things in
the community, so they are
very important."
He said officials will try to
maximize the revenue they


can get from the state and
other sources in an attempt to
improve the local quality of
life.

MEconomic Development
Attracting jobs and industry
to the community will be an
important part of Columbia
County's future and play a
major role in the county's eco-
nomic development.
"Economic development
does so much for a communi-
ty," Williams said, noting it
gives people a chance to work.
"If people can work, people
can solve their own prob-
lems."
He said economic develop-
ment also provides revenue
for the local government.
"The more revenue eco-
nomic development provides,
the less revenue we have to
depend on for other things
from other sources," he said.
Williams said economic
development was also the
backbone of the charitable
side of the county. He said the
introduction of new business-
es in the last three or four
years has helped the county.
'They (business and indus-
try) become a part of the fab-
ric of the community and it's


very important," he said. "I
think without doubt, the new
businesses have helped the
county."
Williams said the county
will continue with an aggres-
sive attitude toward getting
new economic development
opportunities for local resi-
dents and the county.
"We've been trying to push
the envelope on economic
development and hopefully it's
starting to show," he said. "I
think Jim Poole has done a
real good job of pushing it and
I think the county commission
has done a real good job of
providing the tools that he
needs to push it."
Williams said public money
has gone into attracting new
businesses from land purchas-
es, to providing infrastructure
and roads and other services
for new companies to come to
the county.
"We do get some grant
money, but grants don't near
about cover the costs," he
said. "It's not a free ride. We've
taken a lot of the public's
money and spent on economic
development."

Diversification of the
county's revenue streams


As the county continues to
press ,into the future, officials
want to cut their dependency
on property tax.
"The ultimate goal is to try
to get away from being so
dependent on property tax,"
Williams said. "I really believe
that's the goal of any govern-
ment, whether it's city, county
or what have you."
He said there are a number
of reasons for that and one of
the first is a property tax is
just a tough tax.
"'The more we can diversify
the tax base, the better it is for
all concerned," Williams said.
He said with sales tax, when
the economy is good people
spend more money, and the
revenues are up; but when the
economy slows down, people
spend less and the revenues
are down. It sort of adjusts.
'Through good times and
bad, property taxes are
there," he said.
'They don't adjust near as
quick as other forms of taxes."
He said the county's popula-
tion growth and things that
cause the population to grow,
such as economic develop-
ment, could help facilitate the
movement away from depend-
ency on property tax.


"Thanks
to our community
for letting us serve you
in 2004"


"We continue to
meet local needs
with local resources"


i~j '


Our patients family and friends can now dial directly to
patient rooms w-ith our Direct-in-Dialing s. stem.



V e have added three additional rooms in the Emergency Department
that are Fast Track' rooms where less critical patients are seen by a
Nurse Practitioner helping to decrease the time waning in the Emergency
Department, and also decreases the total time of the patient's visit in the Emergency Department.


Patients no longer need to travel out of town for surgery.
Lake City Medical Center and Gateway Surgical Group are proud to
bring two highly qualified board certified general surgeons to our
community, Edwin Gonzalez, NI D., FACS and Alex Soler, M.D., FACS.


/.. -
.


- .
S J. Doyle Crews
Property Appraiser

Serving Columbia County
,t for 21 Years!


* Tax Estimator

* Download Forms

*More

MAIN OFFICE
135 NE Hernando Ave., Ste. 238
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1083

FT. WHITE OFFICE
1509 SW Dortch St.
Ft. White, FL 32038
(386) 497-1626


Dr. EalIn Gonzalez Dr Alex Sol


ImpovngPaiet ar


Our Patient Care Module is a documentation system that allows health ^
care personnel access, to patients' medical histon and bedside charting,
and allow nurse- to spend less time with documentation and more time with the patient




I Sinc[ the opening of our Cardiovascular Center in August
of 200, we have performed over 6(i0 heart catheteriiations
at the onl\ cardiovascular cath lab in take Citn which is located
next to our hospital on York Drive ,,,


w*f


Dedicated 6tIs our'comI


X\\ e have donated $4202.1000 to Lake ( in (ommunmi College to putirchase .
SimMan, a patient simulator, as well as two other patient -,imulators
SimMan is essentially a computer enclosed in a life-size adult dummy, which will be used
by nursing and paramedic students to learn procedures such as inserting a tube into a
patient's lungs, inserting chest tubes and inserting IVs.


Elizabeth P. Horne
SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS, COLUMBIA COUNTY


"Your vote is a


terrible thing to waste."


izV P- Hme


- KUM[UTis the# Poeri~tyTax Lay
ColumbiaCounty


I


Lake Cit) Medical Center is the top Real Property Tax Payer and
number five Tangible Personal Property Tax Payer totaling
$700,688.82 paid to Columbia County in 2004.


34 N CMMRC DIV LKECIYFOR~gg~~aim i~iiauimi 0 iIDA 32055 386-719-9000n
P h y s i c i a n9 R e e r a 8 0 2 5 3 4S-w w l a e i y m d c l So


Office (386) 758-1026 Fax (386) 755-7233
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102 Lake City, Florida 32055-3728
www.cceofl.com Email: election@cceofl.com


S,.., .'... .


I


mommod


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--Immlmm


661.1w







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


A Place Called fIMg Medical & Government


Local politicians recount time in public office, offer advice


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter.com

At least every four years, if
not every two, residents of
Lake City 'and Columbia
County get ready to vote for
the people who will make the
decisions that impact their
lives on a local level.
Sometimes the majority
chooses the newcomer, hoping
for a fresh start with someone
promising his or her devoted
service and innovation, or they
go with the incumbent, pleased
with their service thus far and
hoping it will continue
unchanged or perhaps just
considering them the lesser of
two evils.
Regardless, there have been
some .local politicians who
have been able to stick
through any voter fickleness
and navigate the perils of dis-
satisfaction to be repeatedly
elected into office. There are
also others whose election has
marked a significant milestone
for local office.
As a result, some of those
people have developed a
unique perspective on what it
means to be in local politics, do
their job and stay popular with
their constituency:,
Gerald Witt
Gerald Witt is a former Lake
City mayor
who served a
total of 18
years in the ,-
office.
Though he
served from
1976 to 1978 Witt
filling the
unexpired


HISTORY
Continued From Page 12E

"The Lake City VAis the sec-
ond largest employer in the
area," said Mary Kay
Hollingsworth, public affairs


term of James Ward, who
resigned, the majority of his
time in office was consecutive,
being mayor from 1980 to
1996. He got into politics full-
time after selling his regional
liquefied petroleum (LP) gas
business in 1977.
"I didn't have anything left to
do but be mayor," Witt said.
After his successful run, he
eventually lost in the 1996
elected to former Mayor Ray
Kirkland, who recently,
resigned in his third term. But
Witt, 89, is still about town and
proud to be a city resident.
Remembering his 18 years
in office, the former faithful
city servant said "I tried to do
whatever I thought the city
wanted to be done."
Witt said one of his biggest
goals, especially early in office,
was to make sure the tradition-
ally black neighborhoods in
Lake City received the same
services, such as water and
sewer, that other city residents
received. He said he also tried
to maintain a close relationship
with the state government.
During his tenure, Witt said
one of the projects he is most
proud of was getting a swim-
ming pool for the community,
what became the Columbia
County Aquatic Complex.
Witt said at the time, in the
early 1980s, the state represen-
tative whose area included the
city at the time was Speaker of
the House and was able to pro-
cure about $350,000 in state
monies for the pool, with the
understanding that the city
would put up that same amount
to make for $700,000 to com-
plete the project.


officer. "The national objective
is to have one VA and in 1998,
our facility was integrated with
Gainesville."
In 2003, the VAMC was in
trouble.
"The VA had a nationwide
initiative called Capital Asset


"I tried to pretend we were
going to pay the other half and
we didn't have that kind of
money," Witt said with a hint of
humor in his voice.
Obligated to find funding, he
soon learned a federal grant
that was scheduled for discon-
tinuation was available. Witt
said the city was able to apply
and receive the funds to com-
plete the project
"We were successful in get-
ting that grant and I guess
that's the biggest thing I did,"
Witt said.
Giving little credit to his pop-
ularity, when asked why people
repeatedly voted for him Witt
said "I guess you could say half
the time nobody would run
against me."
Though he said potential
candidates may have not run
because "I guess they thought
they couldn't win," he added
that he didn't know why they
would feel that way.
Witt said the local political
climate, at least in the city, is no
more unique than other com-
parable communities.
"I don't think we are cultur-
ally different from any other
city of our size in this part of
the state," he said.
Witt said he learned that
people usually vote for some-
one because they see things in
the community they believe
need to be done, and choose
"the politician that accomplish-
es those ambitions."
For anyone that wants to be
mayor, he said he or she needs
to be aware of what they want
to see changed or improved.
"That's the only incentive I
could see for anybody wanting


Realignment for Enhanced
Services (CARES) to look at
locations where enhancements
could be made," Hollingsworth
said. "Our facility was one that
was looked at, especially the
nursing home.
"However, many community


to be mayor," he said.
But in doing the job, he said
"it's important (the mayor)
keep in contact with the peo-
ple, he's got to find out what
they consider their needs."
Though he saw many
changes during his years as
mayor, and just as many since,
Witt said he's been most sur-
prised that "the growth of the
city has been outside of the city
limits as you might say."
But he said since leaving
office he has been pleased at
how the city has progressed
and attributes much of it to the
city manager form of govern-
ment Lake City has used since
1978.
"It was important that we
have a good city manager, hav-
ing had good city manager has
always meant a great deal to
our city and we have a good
one right now too (Joe Cone),"
Witt said.
Still, though he was 80 at the
time, Witt would have rather
retired voluntarily rather than
leave office by losing an elec-
tion.
"No one likes to be defeated
when he's running for office,"
he said.
Witt now spends most of his
time writing and reading from
his 1,000-volume private
library.
He said he doubts many city
residents remember his tenure
of nearly 20 years as their
mayor, other than "just the
longest one I guess you could
say."
"I don't think people care
anything about me now," he
said. "They forget But I don't
expect them to think of me any-


members did not want to facili-
ty to be taken away and a task
force was organized.
"We sent some 80,000 post
cards to government officials,"
she said. "We had card sign-
ings at local grocery stores and
people from other counties


more than anybody else
around."
But when someone is in
office for as long as he was,
Witt said the transition away
from political life isn't easy at
first
"You've done it so long won-
der if you can do anything
else," he said.
Bettye Lane
Former City Councilwoman
and retired
longtime
educator
Bettye Lane
made anoth-
er significant
achievement
in local poli- Lane
tics, being
the first
woman on council.
Lane was selected to fill the
unexpired term of former
Councilman Mike Null after he
moved out of city limits in 1996.
She then ran for the office
again in 2000 and won.
But after nearly eight suc-
cessful years in office, when
she was up for reelection in
2004, Lane decided to retire
from politics in favor of enjoy-
ing her family and personal life.
However, her time on coun-
cil was enough to develop a
healthy perspective on being a
local decision maker.
"The first thing you have to
do, and this is a fact, you have
to be sure you are not just aim-
ing to be popular," Lane said.
"And there are people who just
like to see their name in print
or their picture. But something
I have learned in both the pro-
fession of education and poli-
tics that is you try to have an


drove in to sign."
In 2004, the VA received
news that the Lake City facility
would be here to stay.
Currently the Lake City
VAMC receives 75 applications
a day from potential patients.
The Lake City VAMC is inte-


idea of where you want your
community to go and you for-
get about being popular,
because that's not really the
name of the game. And you
have to work, you never have
time for your personal agenda
and to only take a look at self.
You have to look at something
you think needs to be done and
say how best can I move it for-
ward."
Lane said for a politician to
be successful and serve the
people well, "you can't be afraid
of rubbing people the wrong
way."
Still, she said, "at the same
time you cannot be abrasive
because people have good
ideas" adding that they must
be at least listened too and con-
sidered on their own merit
While she was on council
and in her own personal deci-
sions, Lane said "every night
before I go to bed, I ask the
Lord to help me do this job
however you would want me to
be doing it."
"I've been guided," she said.
"Some people might call it
divine intervention or whatev-
er they want, but it's worked
for me."
As advice for someone that's
ever considered being in local
politics, particularly City
Council, Lane said "you have to
look at the greater good, you
have to serve everybody in
Lake City if you are on City
Council," not just one's own
district
When she was interviewed
in 1996 to fill Null's unexpired

POLITICIANS
Continued on Page 14E


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2005


A ['I CalledJ


Medical & Government I


- I -


Hospital employee enjoys keeping records straight


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com

In the busy atmosphere of
Lake City Medical Center, one
woman does her part to ensure
that her patients' records are
accurate every time.
Helen Tucker-Strawder
started working at Lake City
Medical Center seven years
ago as and now works as
Query Coordinator.
She serves as a security link
for an offsite coder.
"I handle discharge records
for patients when they go
home and send this informa-
tion to a coder in Gainesville,"
she explained. "Should the
coder have inquiries about the
records, I submit these queries


to the doctor so that the infor-
mation is coded properly."
At the hospital's annual
awards night, Tucker-Strawder
has received a special award
for last three years for her ded-
ication and perfect attendance.
Outside of work, Tucker-
Strawder donates her time to
others as president of the
American Legion Auxiliary
322.
She has been serving as
president for two years and
enjoys recruiting new mem-
bers.
"Our primary concern is car-
ing for our veterans and we
often visit them at Lake City
Veterans Affairs Medical
Center and play bingo with
them," she said.


In addition, Tucker-
Strawder is an active member
of Mount Pisgah A.M.E.
Church.
She says she enjoys her job
and enjoys working with peo-
ple.
"It is a beautiful, peaceful
atmosphere," Tucker-Strawder
said. "My hospital's vision is to
be the health-care provider of
choice."
She has been around hospi-
tal settings all here life, as her
mother, Selena Tucker,
worked as a nurse at Shands at
Lake Shore for 41 years. Her
father was the late professor
Clarence Tucker who served
as principal for the former New
Hope Elementary School.
In addition, he also served


as principal of Niblack
Elementary School at one
time.
"Being with my family
makes me happiest," Tucker-
Strawder said.
Over the years, she says the
city's evolution has been for
the better.
"It is growing," Tucker-
Strawder said. "When I first
started working here we were
not in this new facility yet."
She feels that more jobs are
needed for the community.
Tucker-Strawder calls the
advances in the medical field
extraordinary.
"Before, people died of sim-
ple problems," she said.
"Modern medicine and tech-
nology advances have


-, --t !a I iT ..** *a .='U e. :.. s*..- M ,. .- .- : a .w
Helen Tucker-Strawder smiles at her desk at Lake City
Medical Center. She serves as query coordinator and
ensures that patients' medical records are properly coded
once they are discharged.


enhanced care and treat-
ments."


Tucker-Strawder calls her-
self blessed.


POLITICIANS
Continued From Page 13E

term, she said she was not con-
cerned about being a black
woman or how that would be
perceived by the council mem-
bers interviewing her.
"I asked myself, can I get in
here and apply myself to this
position and learn and work as
hard as I need to work?," Lane
said. "If I were a male could I do
this?"
When she began on council
in 1996, there were many new
faces at City Hall, including a
new mayor, city manager and
another council member
besides herself.
As she desired, Lane said all
of those people were profes-
sional and didn't condescend
her because of her gender or
race. And that's just the way
she wanted it.
"Don't tell me you are going
to cut me some slack because I
am black and don't cut me
some slack because I am a
woman. Because if you do, then
you denigrate who I am," she
said.
While the men on council
still treated her gentlemanly,
which she appreciated, she said
once in meetings they "put me
on the spot like anybody else"
and "held me to the mark."
Lane said she believes peo-
ple voted for her into office fol-
lowing her first appointment,
"because I think that I gave it
my best, because I think that
they think that I did the job the
best I could."
While it's not always easy,
she said constituents who have
a special interest have to
understand "sometimes there
is not enough money" and
"sometimes the time is not
right, right now."
Though she was on the los-
ing end of some council votes,
sometimes 4 to 1, Lane said her
attitude was "once the vote is in
the council has spoken."
But "who are we if we don't
vote our conviction?," she said
"We have to do that."
"People respect you for
being true to who you are."
While not familiar with the
political climate in other towns,
Lane in Lake City it's "wonder-
ful how people get excited and
head-up about something."
"At least they are willing to
voice their opinions, assent,
dissent, whatever it is," she
said. 'That's the democratic
way and that's wonderful. It's
the same as our football, we get
all head-up about it, but if they
win or they lose, we still love
them."
But overall Lane said "Lake
City is generally a warm town,
I know that... you've got a lot of
different people in Lake City
and that makes life interesting.
That's why all the people keep
flocking here."
James Montgomery
For James
Montgomery, -
better known -
as "Mr. Mont," >,-_
it wasn't
enough to give
to his commu-
nity by being Montgomery
an educator in
local schools
for 44 years, he also served 28
years on the County
Commission.
Montgomery was first elect-
ed to the commission in 1972
and was subsequently reelect-
ed every four years until 1980,
when he decided to "take a


break." Then in 1984, the com-
mission called to him once
more and he again ran and
won. He then was reelected
every four years thereafter
until 2004, when he decided not
to run for reelection.
But while some people spend
much of their time campaign-
ing with signs and going door
to door, Montgomery did none
of those things during his
entire 28 years as a commis-
sioner.
To him, it's more important
what he did for his voters once
he got on the board.
"You have to hope that you
did things right, that you did a
good job is what you hope is the
reason (for being popular),"
Montgomery said.
But to be in local politics, he
said the biggest thing a person
must give up to be successful is
"time."
"If you attend everything you
are invited to or participate in,
you'd never be home,"
Montgomery said. "There are
just too many things going on."
But as a commissioner, he
said he attempted to go to
every event he could.
'You have to be part of the
community, so you have to go
to as many things .as you can,"
he said.
Though, to keep the voters
happy and do the job well,
Montgomery said a commis-
sioner must return their con-
stituents phone calls.
"You answer all of your calls,"
he said. "You must always
return people's phone calls
whether you can do anything
for them or not"
And in participating on the
commission, he said, "you must
go above and beyond what is
required of you."
Montgomery said it is impor-
tant for a local politician to take
an interest in something and
seek out ways to improve an
aspect of the community.
"For me recreation was
always my thing," he said.
During his tenure on com-
mission, Montgomery helped
to spearhead the construction
of the Columbia Youth Soccer
Association complex, tennis
courts at Columbia High
School, as well as creating the
Alligator Lake Recreation Area.
While he said "it's easy to sit
back and not do anything on
council," he said its better to
pick something and "see that it
gets done."
"You follow through on what
you say you are going to when
you get a project going,"
Montgomery said.
From his own work, he said
'"today I can't think of another
community that's our size that
has the recreation we do."
Although Montgomery was
popular with the voters in his
district, he never campaigned.
"I never put up signs, I never
went door-to-door," he said.
"My philosophy was if they
want you then good, if not then
there are a lot of other things to
be doing. And if you can't han-
dle losing then you better not
get into it to start with."
During his entire time on
commission he said no con-
stituent was ever "ugly" to him,
and believes the people of
Columbia County are "special."
But he said some newer resi-
dents are less accepting of the
government being unable to do
things for financial reasons
than longtime residents are,
wanting things done the way
they are used to "where they
came from."


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