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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Sunday Report
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 Section A: Main: Opinion
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section C: Life
 Section D: Business & Home
 Section D: Classified Advantag...
 Section E: Then & Now














The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/00089
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: April 10, 2005
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:00089
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Sunday Report
        page A 2
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Opinion
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
    Section B: Sports
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
    Section C: Life
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
    Section D: Business & Home
        page D 1
        page D 2
        page D 3
        page D 4
    Section D: Classified Advantage
        page D 5
        page D 6
        page D 7
        page D 8
    Section E: Then & Now
        page E 1
        page E 2
        page E 3
        page E 4
        page E 5
        page E 6
        page E 7
        page E 8
        page E 9
        page E 10
        page E 11
        page E 12
        page E 13
        page E 14
        page E 15
        page E 16
Full Text




A Place Called

orne


LIBRARY OF FL HISTORY
1 LIBRARY :EAST
UNIVERSITY OF FL..ORIDA
GAINESVILL.E, FL



Sunday I
April 10, 2005
Lake City, Florida


Then & Now
Part 2 of our 4 part, month-long series detailing the area in which we live.
SECTION


3261.1


75e
Weather
Mostly Sunny
High 81, Low 53
Forecast on 10A


Appreciating Ichetucknee


Residents -


enjoy a

day of fun,

education

By JASMINE RANGEL
jrangel@lakecityreporter.com
At around 8:30 a.m.
Saturday, Loye Barnard, vice
president of Save Our
Suwannee, said she saw a
swallowtail kite glide and sail
in the sky over the north
entrance to Ichetucknee
Springs State Park. The bird,
a native of South America that
nests in the Osceola National
Forest, was an omen, she
said.
"I could tell it would be a
good day," Barnard said.
The day Barnard knew
would be a success was Lake
City Appreciation Day.
Barnard and other local offi-
cials put the first-time event
together in an effort to pro-
mote and educate local resi-
dents about the Ichetucknee.
The event invited the public
to enjoy the park, free of
charge, before tubing season
officially begins. Those who
came out were able to partici-
pate in guided tours and view
exhibits about the
Ichetucknee Springs Basin.
Tom Brown, director of the
park, said he was pleased with
the number of people at the
park Saturday. Based on
turnout, Brown said it's possi-
ble the event would be organ-
ized annually.
"I think we were very
pleased with the results,"
Brown said.
He said he hoped the day
gave Lake City residents a
chance to realize the connec-
tion the river has with the city.
"Lake City and Ichetucknee
are partners in many ways,"
Brown said.
Among the displays at the
park Saturday were fossils
taken from the area and a
depiction of how water is
tracked as it travels under-
ground.
Pete Butt, who works with
Karst Environmental, spent
the day demonstrating how
his company uses dye tracing
to follow underground water
movement. He said most peo-
ple he spoke to understood
the dye-tracing technique.
"They either already knew
or, with minimal explanation,
understood what it was," Butt
said.
Guided tours were full most
of the day. Canoe trips were
popular, with some people
turned away because of a lack
of boats, Brown said. Some of
the lucky visitors who got a
chance to canoe down the
Ichetucknee Saturday were
able to spot one of Florida's
native endangered species -
a manatee mom and her calf.
People at the park Saturday
were a mix of long-time resi-
dents and relative newcomers
to the area, Barnard said. At
the Save Our Suwannee dis-
play alone, she spoke with a
family who had just moved to
SPRINGS
continued on page 9A
ull l!l] cALL US:l
I0 I 752-1293
1 il ii SUBSCRIBE:
1 2 8 755-5445


JUNIN-IEtR UIMATlitN/LaKe C1iy Reporter
Tom McNamara of Crystal River shoves off at the Ichetucknee Springs State Park head
spring canoe launch. Visitors took guided canoe tours during Lake City Appreciation Day.

Visitors get new perspective of

Ichetucknee after canoeing trip


By JASMINE RANGEL
jrangel@lakecityreporter. comr
The rain stopped early
Saturday and the sun shined
down on southern Columbia
County all day. It was the
perfect weather for enjoying
the Ichetucknee River.
Away from the grounded
exhibits teaching visitors
about the park's environ-
mental history and struc-
ture, canoers and tubers
floated down the river, bask-
ing in the sun that seemed to
magically appear after days
filled with dark skies and
rain.
Walt and Anita Douglas
were one couple who lucked
out. They were in one of the
three small groups able to
participate in canoe trips
along the river.
The Douglases had never
canoed before. Walt said he
thought Saturday's event
was a great chance for fami-
ly bonding.
"It's an opportunity to
spend quality time with my
wife," Walt Douglas said.
"We enjoy being outside."
Many of the groups at
Ichetucknee on Saturday
were families. Jeremy
Humphries of O'Brien came


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Amber Kohlhoff, 6, of Duette sprays down an educational
display depicting water pollution as mom, Brandi; brother,
Nathan, 8, and dad, Dennis, watch.


to the park with his father
and sister Amanda.
Humphries said he's been
canoeing and tubing the
Ichetucknee for 11 years,
but Saturday was different


because of the educational
programs.
"I learned stuff today I did-


CANOE
continued on page 9A


Two hurt




in wreck;




alcohol




involved


Charges pending in
single-vehicle wreck
Saturday on S.R. 47.
By SEAN JAREM
sjarem@lakecityreporter.com
Two people suffered
injuries Saturday morning
after their car struck a con-
crete barrier just south of
Lake'City on State Road 47.
According to a report from
the Florida Highway Patrol,
the driver, Michael D. Baker,
29, of Lake City was under the
influence of alcohol during
the wreck and suffered seri-
ous injuries.
Lt. Mike Burroughs of the
Florida Highway Patrol said
investigators took a blood
sample of the driver, which
revealed alcohol did play a
factor.
The passenger, Tasha
Hyatt, 17, of Lakeland


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received only minor injuries.
It was unknown whether alco-
hol was in her system, the
report stated.
Neither Baker nor Hyatt
were wearing seatbelts,
according to investigators.
According to the report, the
1994 Ford was traveling south
on S.R. 47 around 4:45 a.m.
when it swerved off the road
and struck a concrete barrier.
The vehicle then came back
onto the road and swerved off
the opposite side. After leav-
ing the road a second time,
Baker drove about 225 feet
and struck a utility pole and a
phone box with the left side of
the vehicle.
The vehicle then struck a
culvert and became airborne
before coming to a final rest in
the ditch on the east side of
S.R. 47, according to the
WRECK
continued on page 9A


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Environmental artist Johnny Dame works on a painting at the head spring Saturday
during Lake City Appreciation Day.
TODAY


Classified


. . .5D


Life ........... .1C


Local & State .... 3A
Business ....... 1 D


Obituaries ....... 6A
Opinion ........ 4A


Puzzles ........ 3C


Motley Fool


. .2D


Scoreboard ..... .2B Weather ....... 10A


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Page 2A
April 10, 2005


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JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter

Monster Mash
Monster truck T-Maxx wheelies through a demolition course during the 2005 Monster Mash
for Kids at the Columbia County Fairgrounds Friday evening. Proceeds go to Racing for a
Drug Free America, a program to educate kids on the dangers of drugs. Events conclude
today.


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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


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Sl1Hwy 47 & 1-75 755-1060
Offer limited to first 150 customers of the day


COLUMBIA r

DOOR COMPANY
"Garage door installation & repair."


$39'5 GeigeDoorv

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ACheck Rollers 386 754.9992
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LAKE CITY REPORTER


HOW TO REACHES
Main number .......... (386) 752-1293
Fax number ...............752-9400
Circulation .................755-5445
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fla. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard .... 754-0418
(mleonard @lakecityreporter.com)

If you have a news tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson .........754-0428
(twilson @lakecityreporter.com)

Advertising Director
Karen Craig .................754-0417
(kcraig @lakecityreporter.com)
Sales ....................752-1293
(ads @lakedcityreporter.com)


To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.

Controller Sue Brannon.......754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)

Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next
day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters ....754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
13 Weeks .................... $23.54
26 Weeks .................... $42.80
52 Weeks ................. $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
13 Weeks ................... $44.85
26 Weeks ................ $89.70
52 Weeks ....................$179.40


Correction policy
The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Lottery
MIAMI Here are the
winning numbers in
Saturday's Florida Lottery:
Cash 3: 0-7-5
Play 4: 0-3-2-1


Fantasy 5: 36-3-14-30-29-
Lotto: 15-49-23-10-35-28
Friday's Fantasy 5: 2-9-
16-19-21
Friday's Mega Money:
16-41-43-44
Mega Ball: 19


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005 3A

LOCAL & STATE


Vets and local


businesses plan


Hope fund-raiser


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter


Rainbow over Relay
A rainbow stretches over Tiger Stadium as walkers brave the rain during the Relay for


Life cancer walk Friday evening.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
Local veterans at the R.H.
Jenkins Jr. Veterans
Domiciliary are banding with
the local Wal-Mart to improve
children's lives.
Veterans of the HOPE
(Helping Other People Excel)
organization will work with
Wal-Mart employees as part a
Children's Miracle Network
fund-raising drive next week-
end to raise money for the
Wolfson Children's Hospital
in Jacksonville.
The event will begin Friday
morning at 8 a.m. when Wal-
Mart holds its grand re-open-
ing and will continue 11a.m. -
4 p.m. Saturday.
Sharon Feagle, Lake City
Wal-Mart Goodworks
Coordinator, said the fund-
raiser is being sponsored by
HOPE and Hopkins Motor
Company and the proceeds
will go to help the children's
hospital.
"With all the motorcycles,
we're going to have a big
parade from 10:30 a.m. 11
a.m. coming in from east of
town," she said. '"This is the
first event of this type in Lake
City for the Children's
Miracle Network and we
hope to have it every year
from now on."
Jack Denny, president of
HOPE, said the event will fea-


ture at least 250 motorcycles
that will travel through Lake
City on U.S. 90 from the air-
port to Wal-Mart, with
escorts provided by the
Florida Highway Patrol, Lake
City Police Department and
the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office.
"When we started this, I
went out to see Feagle and
immediately she said she
would need help," Denny
said.
"She knew I had the ability
to get things rolling and she
must have had enough feel-
ings about HOPE that she
asked us to sponsor this net-
work (fund-raiser). Once she
told me about it, I knew we
had a basketful. With her
capabilities and store manag-
er Dennis Morse's help, we
started laying this thing out."
The Backwoods Bar-B-Que
cooking team is cooking an
estimated 600 pounds of bar-
becue that will be sold at $3 a
plate as part of the fund-rais-
er. Hamburgers and hot dogs
will also be available.
"HOPE will be set up at the
doors to receive money, too,
and we'll have different
things that we are going to
auction off," Denny said.
"I'm looking forward to it.
We have months of planning
in this. We're not dead yet,
we've just slowed down a little
bit."


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V1T13 7!
The following is a list of
upcoming meetings for the
week:
Fort White Town
Council, 7:30 p.m. Monday at
Fort White Town Hall.
Shands at Lake Shore
Hospital Authority Board of
Trustees, 5:15 p.m. Monday,
first floor conference room.
Columbia County
School Board, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, preceded by a stu-
dent forum at 5:30. The
board meets at 372 W. Duval
St.
L-btE IIP -PEDIC
S PRESSURE RELIEVING
SSWEDISH MATTRESSES AND PILLOWS
S *]>i ni 4v qI:ml] =;Iill:rV ]*w0l i
The Furniture Showplace
Wholesale Sleep
US 90 West (next to 84 Lumber) 752-9303


BRIEF

Youth garden basic garden techniques.
The meeting will be at the
project planned extension service office on
the fairgrounds. A $1 regis-
The Columbia County tration fee will be collected to
Extension Service will hold a help cover project material
meeting 4-6 p.m. Thursday to costs. To reserve a seat, call
introduce the youth garden 752-5384 by Tuesday.
project for 2005 and discuss
Staff report

MERCY MEDICAL
URGENT CARE
V NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED
V JUST WALK IN "
V OPEN 8AM-1 PM 7 DAYS/WEEK
V PAYMENT PLAN AVAILABLE Nahed Sobhy, M.D.
305 East Duval Street
386-758-2944 Lake City, FL
VA A A A A.A A & ALa 'A A A


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Thinking of
filing your taxes
make you want to
do this?


We make taxes
fun!

April 15th is just around the corner!
Let us help you file your taxes and give you peace of mind.
r -------------t-- 905S.W. Main Blvd. Ste. 115
Bring this ad and get (Lake City Plaza)

$20 OffI LIBERTY. 754-0311
i 'I TAX Open 9AM-9PM Mon.-Frl.
. Your Tax Preparation Fees! '. ISERVICE 9AM-5PM Sat.


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4A LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005
LAKE ITY REPORT


SERVING COLUMBIA COUNTY SINCE 1874
MICHAEL LEONARD, PUBLISHER
TODD WILSON, EDITOR
SUE BRANNON, CONTROLLER
THE LAKE CITY REPORTER IS PUBLISHED WITH PRIDE FOR
RESIDENTS OF COLUMBIA AND SURROUNDING COUNTIES BY
COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS INC. OF ATHENS, GA. WE BELIEVE
STRONG NEWSPAPERS BUILD STRONG COMMUNITIES -
"NEWSPAPERS GET THINGS DONE!" OUR PRIMARY GOAL IS TO
PUBLISH DISTINGUISHED AND PROFITABLE COMMUNITY-ORIENT-
ED NEWSPAPERS. THIS MISSION WILL BE ACCOMPLISHED
THROUGH THE TEAMWORK OF PROFESSIONALS DEDICATED TO
TRUTH, INTEGRITY, LOYALTY, QUALITY AND HARD WORK.
DINK NESMITH, PRESIDENT TOM WOOD, CHAIRMAN

= Il a


Great to see


enthusiasm


for the springs


event held Saturday at
Ichetucknee Springs State Park
may have been misnamed. By
the mood of the crowd and the
enthusiasm shown toward the event, it felt
more like Ichetucknee Springs
Appreciation Day attended by many from
Lake City.
Most people realize what a precious
jewel the springs' fresh, clear water that
flows from within the earth is to all of us.
It's the lifeblood of our local ecosystem.
Those who haven't been convinced are
soon to be converted by the hundreds of
local residents who have unofficially adopt-
ed the Ichetucknee Springs Basin as their
own special project..
The overwhelming support for this area
is great to see.
Hosting a Lake City Appreciation Day
allowing free admission to the state park
and special tours and interpretive pro-
grams to residents of Lake City was a very
savvy move by springs protectors.
There has never been a finer example
laid out before us that shows just how
related in environmental terms we all
are. Everything we do directly affects the
Ichetucknee Springs Basin.
It's important to have special days focus-
ing on the springs and other fragile areas
in our region. It's important to realize our
place in relation to our environment. When
we turn on the tap or flush the toilet any-
where in Lake City or the county we
have some type of effect on the
Ichetucknee Springs Basin.
What we do with this enormous power
will determine the environmental future of
our area.


Today is Sunday, April 10, the 100th day
of 2005. There are 265 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On April 10, 1912, the RMS Titanic set
sail from Southampton, England, on its ill-
fated maiden voyage.

On this date:
In 1866, the American Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was incor-
porated.
In 1925, the novel 'The Great Gatsby," by
E Scott Fitzgerald, was first published.
In 1932, German president Paul Von
Hindenburg was re-elected, with Adolf Hitler
coming in second.
In 1953, the 3-D horror movie "House of
Wax," produced by Warner Bros. and star-
ring Vincent Price, premiered in New York.
In 1963, the nuclear-powered submarine
USS Thresher failed to surface off Cape Cod,
Mass., in a disaster that claimed 129 lives.
In 1972, the United States and the Soviet
Union joined some 70 nations in signing an
agreement banning biological warfare.
In 1974, Golda Meir announced her resig-
nation as prime minister of Israel.
In 1978, Arkady Shevchenko, a high-rank-
ing Soviet citizen employed by the United
Nations, sought political asylum in the
United States.
In 1981, imprisoned IRA hunger striker
Bobby Sands won election to the British
Parliament.
In 1998, the Northern Ireland peace talks
concluded as negotiators reached a land-
mark settlement to end 30 years of bitter


rivalries and bloody attacks.
Ten years ago: Sen. Bob Dole launched his
third bid for the White House in Topeka,
Kan.


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More Orange Street history


C olumn reader Andy Neal Dukes sent
me an informative e-mail that added
much to my column about old stores
on the former Orange Street. His
edited letter is self-explanatory.
'"The Table Supply store on Orange Street
that you mentioned was in fact the original
Lake City Winn-Dixie. I know about this
because my mom, Nell Dukes, is related to
Snead Davis, the former wife of A. D. Davis,
one of the company's founders. When Snead
would be passing through Lake City, she and
my mom would sometimes meet at that store to
visit.
At that time in the 1950s, Bill Harden was the
store's meat market manager and he continued
in that job with later Lake City Winn-Dixie
stores until the 1970s when he was forced to
retire due to ill health.
I also remember that the Columbia County
Health Department was upstairs over Brown-
Vann Paint Store.
In my pre-school days, I got my shots there,
and it was a long, dreaded walk up those stairs
to the top knowing what was in store for me
when I got there."
Thanks, Andy, for your fine letter. By the
way, reader Hillard Hartley said he also
remembered the long walk up those stairs to
get his shots.
Other readers also wrote. Bob Musgrave
remembered working at a Table Supply gro-
cery store as a bag boy in Hialeah in 1961
when Hialeah was about the size of Ft. White
- and that store eventually became a Winn-
Dixie. Thirty-five year resident Judy Sears
wrote that she still misses the Lovely Shop,
DeVane's, and Bruce's Clothing Store, all three
formerly located on North Marion.
Ivan and Louise Clements enjoyed reading
about the former stores on Orange Street and
also the pile on another brother, poverty joke.
Thanks to you all for writing.

Museum thanks
Thanks to Robert Louis Green for a photo of
CHS track stars Fred Kinard and Jim Pitman
the day they set state track records in the
Florida Relays at Florida Field in Gainesville in
1942. Both later became World War II pilots.
Thanks to Ernest and Sara Minkley for a
valuable 1945 Lake City phone book. Ernest
headed up Southern Bell (now BellSouth) in
Lake City June 4, 1961 when Lake City con-
verted 100 percent to the dial system, and Sara
was a telephone operator who later worked in
the Southern Bell business office.
Thanks to Roy Dicks, a 26-year principal at
Melrose Park Elementary, who has donated
his entire collection of Melrose yearbooks.
Thanks to Ed Montgomery and Glenn Jones


MORRIS
WILLIAMS


Sr., for a detailed printed guide to the Mt.
Tabor Cemetery, showing a.layout of the burial
plots and an alphabetical listing of all those
buried there. This guidebook was compiled by
Aubrey Adams, descendant of John J. Adams.

E.A. and Ralph
E. A. McColskey and Ralph Powers are the
only two Lake Citians ever to be appointed to
the powerful Florida State Road Board. E.A.
was appointed by Gov. Fred P Cone of Lake
City and Ralph was appointed by Governor
Farris Bryant. So many will miss the Rev. Mike
Brown who recently left Southside Baptist
Church where he provided extraordinary spir-
itual leadership for more than 19 years. He now
pastors First Baptist in Cross City.
Our heartfelt sympathy goes to the Richard
Anders family on the death of Charlotte
Anders, Richard's wife of 57 years.
The funeral service attendees included
retired educators Hayward Lofton, Bill Orr,
Gwen Robinson, and also the Rev. Isadore
Williams.
Sympathy also to the family of retired school
system employee Johnny Edgy who died
recently.
Johnny was a friendly, dedicated worker who
began in 1975 and retired 30 years later.
In his working days, he was our "key expert,
the only man who could open any door in the
school system.
Local artist Wally Reichert (758-7853) is
looking for a photo of an old time mule-operat-
ed cane grinder. Give him a call if you can help.

Florist friars
A group of Franciscan friars opened a highly
successful florist shop and this upset rival
florists who asked them to reduce their hours
or shut down. The friars refused and their
refusal especially angered a rival florist named
Hugh Taggart who beat them up, trashed their
shop, and ran them out of town. This proved
that Hugh, and only Hugh, can prevent florist
friars.
Morris Williams is a resident of Columbia
County and a historian. Contact him at 755-
8183 or williamsh2@firn. edu.


I ET E 0T HE E ITOR


Web site needs
improvement
I have been reading your
online lakecityreporter.com
since it first was published.
In the beginning it was a first
rate publication.
It has steadily declined in
quality, to a point where it is a
joke in the local community. I
do not understand how you
can keep any of your adver-


tisers. Three one paragraph
headlines is not an Internet
news publication.
I hope you will rebuild
your online publication to a
point where it can service the
community once again. It is
my belief that if you had a,
TRUE internet news publica-
tion (i.e. gainesvillesun.com)
it would enhance your news
organization.
How can anyone outside


the local area see what a
good product you have, and
want to subscribe. You do not
have to duplicate your daily
paper online, just post the
entire articles you do choose
to run. When I travel I MISS
not reading about "what's
going on back home"
You HAD a good prod-
uct....I hope it will return.
Thanks
Ron Preston


righted Material, ,


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005 5A

LOCAL & NATION


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ROAD REPORT_________


The following is a list of
roadwork under way by the
Florida Department of
Transportation that may
impact traffic:

Alachua County
U.S. 441 Daytime lane
closures in downtown
Gainesville while inmate
crews re-paint the roadway
symbol markings such as
turn arrows, etc.
South Main Street (State
Road 329) The road is closed
to through traffic between
Williston Road and Southwest
16th Avenue. Motorists are
detoured to either Williston
Road or 13th Street. Only
local traffic is allowed.
Northbound traffic is being
detoured at the intersection
with Williston Road (State
Road 331) which is closed for
reconstruction. Traffic is
being detoured to Southwest
16th Avenue (State Road 226).
This should last for approxi-
mately one month.
Southeast 156th Terrace:


The road is closed at the inter-
section with State Road 20
(Hawthorne Road) for recon-
struction through*


Wednesday,
Motorists are detoured
to Southeast 161st Street.
Southwest 16th Avenue
(State Road 226): Possible
daytime lane closures
between Williston Road to
Archer Road for work in the
median and at side streets.
Williston Road (State
Road 331): The intersection at
South Main Street (State
Road 329) is being recon-
structed. There may be day-
time lane closures beginning
at 8:30 a.m. and continuing
until 6 a.m. for paving opera-
tions between U.S. 441 and
East University Avenue. No
lane closures are allowed
between 6-8:30 a.m. Lane clo-
sures may also be encoun-
tered at side streets where the
sidewalk ramps are being
rebuilt.
Hawthorne Road (State
Road 20): Traffic has been
switched to the new U.S. 301
overpass. Semi-trucks, trail-
ers and RV's are prohibited
from using the new overpass
because of the restricted lane


width and are diverted to the
ramps to cross or access U.S.
301. Motorists may encounter
daytime lane closures for con-
crete, paving and signal work.
Trucks are entering and leav-
ing the roadway between U.S.
301 in Hawthorne and Cross
Creek Road
(County Road 325) as
work is underway to provide a
four-lane divided highway.
The speed limit from U.S. 301
to Stadium Drive has been
reduced to 25 mph.
U.S. 441: Daytime lane
closures in both directions
between High Springs and
Santa Fe High School to
resurface the roadway. Also,
constructing a sidewalk from
U.S. 41 (Main Street) to the
Winn-Dixie Shopping Center.
Columbia County
U.S. 41 (South Main
Boulevard): Daytime lane clo-
sures between 8:30 a.m. and
4:30 p.m. at St. Margaret's
Street to install new traffic sig-
nals.
This work is part of the
State Road 47 widening proj-


ect.
State Road 47: Daytime
lane closures between 8:30
a.m. and 4:30 p.m. at Bascom
Norris Drive to install new
traffic signals.
Possible daytime lane
closures from north of 1-75 to
U.S. 41 (South Main
Boulevard) as barrier wall is
being placed along the edge
of the roadway.
Traffic has been shifted to
the temporary pavement from
just north of Ridge Street
(south of 1-75) to Ring Power
Road and also from
Greenridge Drive to just past
Susan Glen.
Traffic has also been
shifted to the southbound
lanes of SR 47 under the 1-75
overpass for work on the
northbound lanes.
Utility companies are con-
tinuing to work on both sides
of the road relocating power
poles and installing water and
sewer lines. Possible closure
of side streets.
Mobile home transporters
should not use State Road 47


from U.S. 41 to south of 1-75
because of the narrowed
width of the lanes caused by
the placement of barrier wall.
The speed limit is reduced
to 45 mph throughout the
project limits and sheriff's
deputies are enforcing the
speed limit with fines doubled
in construction zones when
workers are present.
Also, motor carrier compli-
ance officers are patrolling
the area for oversize vehicles.
A fine of up to $3000 per load
can be written by these state
officers.
Suwannee County
SInterstate 75: The outside
lane in both directions over
the Suwannee River will be
closed Monday from 9 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. for routine bridge
inspection.
U.S. 129: Daytime lane
closures between 9 a.m. and 4
p.m. to install a traffic signal
at the intersection of
Winderweedle and Hamilton
streets. The sidewalks may
also be temporarily closed.


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Apr-iL 13, 14, & 15

Brother Elmer Crews


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WateRx

(Product/Service Information)
Health officials in our area have determined there is
a high contamination rjik to your rnkg water due
to the recent sink how. ..
We offer ,
Complete softenmng/Alterin/fUV system
to protect your whole h9use for safe
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" Payment plans available, -
Systems starting at .

$368900

Martin's Family Appliance Center
1809 N. Main St. Gainesville, FL 32609
(352) 372-0684 J.


The Lake City Reporter

would like to congratulate

Mary Slay/Allstate
on their April 5, 2005 ribbon cutting
for their new location at
757 W. Duval St. (formerly Rick Bringger's office)
Lake City, FL


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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005

TITCHEpTTUCTN .


Lake City Appreciation Day at the springs


located close to Mission Springs at the north end of chetucknee Springs State Park on Saturday.

.. ^'" .. .^--




S ... JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake CIty Reporter


11: II I 1: : I 1. .1 _...
Guided tour visitors got to see pristine, rarely viewed
Millpond Springs located at the north end of Ichetucknee
Springs State Park on Saturday during Lake City Appreciation
Day.


-AIL M- ..
JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
A crowd gathers around the Ichetucknee head spring to test the water and observe riverbed artifacts on display.


; ....;, ."




JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Ichetucknee State Park biologist Sam Cole shows off
artifacts found in the river through the years at Lake City
Appreciation Day on Saturday.


Guided canoe tours were -given to visitors during the Lake City Appreciation Day at the


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
park Saturday.


Obituaries


Carolyne Ann Martin
Carolyne Ann Martin, 69, a resi-
dent of Lake City, Florida died
Wednesday, April 6, 2005 after an
extended illness.
Ms. Martin was the daughter of
the late George & Ellen Foran
Sweeny. She had resided in Lake


City since 1990 coming from
Macon, Georgia. She was of the
Catholic faith and a member of
Epiphany Catholic Church. Ms.
Martin was a member of the Ladies
Golf Association at Quail Heights
Country Club and in her spare time
enjoyed playing golf, bridge and


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Bankruptcy $199 Wills $99
Corporations $299. Credit Repair $299
Document Express Services, Inc.
Affordable legal document preparation and related services.
(386) 719-6401 or 1-877-719-6401
219 SE Baya Dr., Lake City, FL Mon.-Fri. 10-6, After Hours by Appt.
Not a Law Firm


traveling.
Ms. Martin is survived by the
love of her life, Al Frungillo, Lake
City, Florida; two daughters:
Debbie E. (Rick) Queen, Juliette,
Georgia, Kellie A. (Woody)
Woodruff, Tipp City, Ohio; one son:
Keith A. (Debbie) Martin,
Jacksonville, Florida; six grandchil-
dren: Joshua Woodruff, Ben
Woodruff, Adam Queen, Nick
Queen, Janese Schenk and William
Fortune; one great-grandchild:
Joey Schenk.
Memorial services for Ms.
Martin will be conducted on
Monday, April 11, 2005 at 6:00pmr
in the Sherrill-Guerry Memorial
Chapel with Father Mike Morse,
Epiphany Catholic Church officiat-
ing. In lieu of flowers the family
asks that memorial donations be


made to Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley, 618 SW Florida Gateway
Blvd., Lake City, Florida 32024.
Cremation arrangements are
under the direction of SHERRILL-
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME,
458 South Marion Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32025 (386) 752-2211,
located one block north of the VA
Hospital.

Myrtis Mae "Chubby" Hall
Mrs. Myrtis Mac "Chubby" Hall,
57, of Lake City passed away Friday
afternoon, April 8, 2005 at her home
in Lake City following a brief ill-
ness.
Mrs. Hall has lived in Lake City
since 1988 and had worked for
Azteec Plastics in Lake City for the
past two and a half years. When
Mrs. Hall was younger she attended


the Red Damm Baptist Church in
Hardeeville, South Carolina where
she was raised. In her spare time,
Mrs. Hall enjoyed working in her
yard, growing flowers and enjoying
the company of her family and
friends. She was preceded in death
by her father, Lewis Lee Cooler in
1976.
Mrs. Hall is survived by her hus-
band of 20 years, Mr. Craig Hall,
Lake City, two daughters and a son.
Christian "Tina" Lombard Watson
(Glenn), Palm Coast, Fla.. Michael
Joseph Lombard. (Doris) and
Miranda Nicole Hall both of Lake
City and three brothers, Ricky
Cooler, Hardeevill, S.C. and Dennis
and Lewis Cooler both of Savannah.
G.a. Four grandchildren, Courtney
and Michael Watson both of Palm
Coast, Fla. and Christopher C. Davis


and Jessica R. Miller both of Lake
City.
Funeral services for Mrs. Hall
will be conducted on Tuesday, April
12, 2005 at 2 p.m. at the Gateway-
Forest Lawn Funeral Home Chapel.
Interment will follow at Corinth
Church Cemetery north of Lake
City.
Visitation with the family will be
from 5-7 p.m. Monday evening at
the funeral home. Arrangements are
under the direction of the GATE-
WAY-FOREST LAWN FUNER-
AL HOME. 3596 South Hwy. 441,
Lake City. (386) 752-1954.
Please sign the guesthook at
www.gateway loresi lawn.coml

Obituaries are paid advertisements.
For details, call the Lake City
Reporter's classified department at
752-1293








LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005 7A

NATION & WORLD


Anm town trifs to sav pe left by


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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005
WORLD


Cardlnals


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BRIEFS


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The Family 0
MiLTon WooFolk
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Happy 501' Birlhday
Tampa Gill.
May God Continue to

We LAvYou,
From Yoplgister Family
of Lake City


AcknowleOqe wi
qRaTeFuL appRecu
your kinO express
oF sympaThy.


r------- Feie--------*-
Complete Eyeglasses |
S From o.m$ 2
only

I Includes fram es and single visit :,- i l:..: :-,:, :.,,i I .
I good for Lake City store. Sor: : rr i:.: c.r I |
I Coupon required. F: ii 4." I
I Expires 4/30C, 1
L ---- COUPON _-----
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F .
J I off 1
I One Complete Pair I
of Eyeglasses ,
!.I : r :r .. .. : .-., Lake City store. Excludes $25 I
I i: r-n .:rr :,-, required. Expires 4/30/05 I
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WRECK

Continued from page 1A

report.
Wreck investigators said
the vehicle traveled about


430 feet from the first point of
impact to its final resting
spot. During the 430 feet,
investigators said there were
no signs of breaking.
Charges in the wreck are
pending.


Both the driver and the
passenger were transported
to Shands at Lake Shore hos-
pital.
Burroughs said Baker was
later treated at Shands at UF
in Gainesville.


SPRINGS

Continued from page 1A

Lake City from New York, as
well as Ethan and Cricket
Porter, who have lived in their


home near Fort White for
more than 60 years.
Annette Long, president of
Save Our Suwannee, said she
thought the event did a good
job of showing residents the
importance of the


Ichetucknee. She said resi-
dents should learn about the
Ichetucknee before it's too
late.
"You don't realize what
you've got 'till it's gone," Long
said.


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CANOE

Continued from page 1A

n't know about before," he
said.
Park guide Chuck
Brannaka toured the river
with canoeing families, point-
ing out the mullet swimming
under the boats and jumping
out over the water.
Brannaka'also tried to help
canoers find the visiting family
that was the talk of the park


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Saturday.
A manatee and her calf were
spotted on the river, but
Humphries and the Douglases
were part of the afternoon
canoe trip, the only group that
missed seeing them.
Still, canoers said the beau-
tiful weather lent itself to mak-
ing floating down the
Ichetucknee on Lake City
Appreciation Day enjoyable.
"We have gained a new
appreciation for the area's
water," Walt Douglas said.


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James ARThbu Pannedl
DecembeR 5, 1916 ApRiL 1, 2005

"The Real Daddy"
He will be missed by all and most of all by his
children. We, the children would like to thank
everyone for all the support, flowers, food, love,
comfort, and most of all the prayers that were said for
us. No words can express our thanks and gratitude for
everything you have done for us in our time of hurt.
Your thoughtfulness will be remembered forever

B Go Bless You All,
rrfJenzny, Dewey, Sue, Danny, & Dwayne

*T^c^^^l^' .41M001>_Z>


I 0/a Vae rearner


Congratulations Metabolic Centers on, your loss
of 5972 lbs in February and a gain of $5972 for
the Tsunami Relief to be donated in your honor.

=* ATTENTION


I


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City of Lake City

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mEZA30LIC
RESEARCH CENTER


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during iLe loss of our 0ear (h/a+Vla.

(Rey wil always be remembered &

c risked. '(May god bless you for your kindness!


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


THE WEATHER


r7 ^^ ,|3^ 3 ,^ ^^ ---l r, -
IMI II 11 THRD

PARTLY CHANCE PARTLY PARTLYY
-CLOUDY T-STORMS -CLOUDY CLOUDY

L 1

HI 82 LO 61 HI 83 LO 60 HI83 LO 56 --H182 L055


REIOA FRCATM rUna p i'


* Valdosta Jacksonville
80,54 75,55
Lake City*
81/53
Gainesville Daytona Beach
Gainesville 7~/~59
80/53. 76/
Ocala* Cape Canaveral
'8/15rlande *76/58

81/60


West Palm Beach
82/66,


Tampa
83/64


Ft. Myers* Ft. Lauderdale
85/63 82/680
Naples
83/64 Miami

Key West 83/67
81/73 '


City Monday
Cape Canaveral 74/63/pc
Daytona Beach 78/63/pc
Ft. Lauderdale 81/71/pc
Fort Myers 85/66/pc
Gainesville 81/61/s
Jacksonville 77/62/pc
Key West 82/75/pc
Lake City 82/61/s
Miami 82/69/pc
Naples 84/69/pc
Ocala 82/61/s
Orlando 83/63/pc
Panama City 77/67/pc
Pensacola 75/65/ts
Tallahassee 81/60/pc
Tampa 83/66/pc
Valdosta 81/63/pc
W. Palm Beach 80/68/pc


Tuesday
82/70/c
84/65/pc
84/71/pc
87/67/s
83/62/pc
81/60/pc
82/75/pc
83/60/pc
85/68/pc
84/70/pc
84/63/pc
86/66/pc
77/62/r
79/59/r
78/60/r
83/69/pc
80/60/r
84/67/pc


NATIONAL FORECAST: High pressure will provide quiet and dry conditions east of the Mississippi River
Valley. Rain will move inland along northern portions of the West Coast. High pressure will allow for
j sunny to partly cloudy skies across the remainder of the western U.S., while a storm system in the
Plains will trigger showers and thunderstorms from the Upper Mississippi Valley to Texas. Rain and
snow will be likely across the southern and central Rockies behind the system.


NAiON 3 .OCS7 T MAP 4,0.mil 6 av


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


83
59
79
53
90 in 1908
42 in 1939


0.01"
3.83"
11.66"
1.01"
12.17"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
runnie- lun'.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Mr.:.nrice r,. s,
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:09 a.m.
7:55 p.m.
7:O a ni,.
7:56 p.m.


8:09 a.m.
10:03 p.m.
5.4-1 ..r,.
11:06 p.m.


April April May May
16 24 1 8
First Full Last New


HIGH:
]5 Minutes te bum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
III' "


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.




wemther.com


S Forecasts, data and graphics
2005 Weather Central,
a Inc., Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


On this date in
1935, severe dust
storms across Iowa
and Kansas closed
schools and high-
ways. The sky was
almost as dark as
night at times during
the daylight hours.


rSOOED BY I


www~la~ecftyreoporer~com


IE


INTENATONA


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beijing
- Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


baturuay
HI/Lo/Pcp.
. 7T2',C
45/37/0
' .. .
6: Jl 0

72.52.0

- i.!' ''a
8J 5 9 ,:
46/31/0
85/73/0
E.6 9;..'


iuuay
Hi/Lo/W
91 72 p.:
43/31/pc
69/53'pc
1. .
62 J? p.1
4F .


413 31.
57, p.:
4 3 34.C:.c
84/66/c
89 76 pc


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


baturuay
HI/Lo/Pcp.
6.1 39 0C
75/64/0'
4' 30 C,
60/36/0
92 54 ,?
5J. 32., 0
60/41/0 .
78/64/.07
-1 70 0
a, c
46/31/0
88/75/.86
i, 35 06Ur,


Hi/Lo/W
62 4J3 :h
78/61/pc
4.5 35 PC
53/35/s
87 56 r-:"
49/30/pc
62/45/pc
79/63/ts
84 i2 [.C

40/25/c
87/77/ts
44/32/pc


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
90 ;5 n.j
63/55/.24
84/75/.08
90/73/0
,7 -42 I.
.2. 53, 5'
90/74/.02
81/64/0
S 0 55 0

5E 33 01
E65 .1 07
65 46 7o


Hi/Lo/W
8; i6 pC.
58/44/sh
84/76/pc
88/75/pc
4 .., 5, ,:
92/75/ts
75/59/pc
74 5'5 4c
71, 51, u
51/32/pc
51/34/sh
50, 7; ir


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy, dr-drizzle, f=fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i=ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s=sunny, sh=showers, sn-snow, ts=thunderstorms, w=windy.


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NCUA


Lak Cty18 .S Bscm orisDr Gvie- E. Cmps120 S W 5th Ave Camps *190 ASW A3th*St Huntrs.Cr ssig 20 W 3d*t
I owrSquare 525 SW 7th St.Shad tU omH1 Srn ls Cm on 20 NW 39h* Ave. Ocala 5097S Clee* d


Pensacola
* 76/63


Tallahassee
80/55*
Panama City
*78/60


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


Saturday
Hi/Lo/Pcp.
62 31 I:




;' 7-, 1
35 36' 0
42'!.': O
63 35 0,
46 42 0
T 111
5 3 3 6 "

75 40, C0
7 :_, 25 0
73 60 0j
81/57/0
, *, 17
S2, "-9. ,:,


Today
Hi/Lo/W
63 si ic .,
5L. 34 ;r,
m. ; 3 p,
S 44 .

S) 55 [Dc
_f 3 -,

63 42 r2,


3 .i.,/s
35'15 r-
:3. 51, p.:"
3. JJ p,:
3 51:
81/58/ts

38/27/sn


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


Saturday
Hi/Lo/Pcp.


;9 5_.,;
:, I :. 1,
c.E 54 ,)
',*- 7,"*
31 i3. 03
78/55/0
42 13 0,
'9 i 0
4 0

16 6 0

6i3 50 0
9 5 .1 ':
91 63 'J
73/48/0
;,. ., 0
62/47/0
81/57/0


Today
Hi/Lo/W


6.8 l1: pC
40/18/c
'6.2, .". p.
i5 ;2 A,:
81/66/c
7r 55 p.:
" !, 6i, p,-

74/56/ts
68/49/s
77/60/pc
6.9 5_ ,-

83/67/pc
68/52/ts
7 64 ,:
Sr. p.:
75 '!, .


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
78/55/0
79/59/0
63 -15 '
6"., 5.. ,3
6. 4J 0
58/28/0
5;.38 0
68/52/.02
56 3J 00
J6, 3-' 0
.65. 4?
61/46/.01
76/47/0
50/37/.15
82 59 0
6.1, i,. 1
60 49, 0
52/40/0
50 31.0 0
77/62/0
6.,1 0u
64, J7 0


Today
Hi/Lo/W
67 50 Ls
81/60/pc
.9 4 pc
P., .,
73/46/pc
59/29/pc
56/46/sh
72/47/s
54 30) c
61, 35,.
70 45 s
73/48/pc
7; '61,c
52/30/pc
84 55 1s
68/54/s
64/49/pc
55/43/sh
56. 3; PC
83/64/pc
71/44/s
69/46/s


UNDAY,-1


LAKE CITY ALMANAC


WEATHER BY -THE-HOUR


I


AL













Section B
Sunday, April 10, 2005
Lake City, Florida
www.lakecityreporter com


Scoreboard 2B
NASCAR 3B
MLB 4B


"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


Making his mark


- %a I
oft lmp


Fort White High's
Jacob Tillotson makes
Junior Olympic team,
impression on Indians

By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter.com

Jacob Tillotson doesn't look
like he just turned 14 years
old two weeks ago. He
already sports an older child's
stubble, and he isn't gawky or
gangly like most adolescents.
And by all accounts, he's very
mature for someone who is
still two years away from get-
ting his driver's license.
There's one other thing
about Tillotson: He's a pretty
good baseball player. As a sev-
enth-grader, he's already in
his second season as a third
baseman/second
baseman/pitcher for the Fort
White High varsity baseball
team. And he was also recent-
ly picked to play in the 2005
Junior Olympic Baseball
Championships at the Roger
Dean Stadium Complex in
Jupiter from June 17-25.
"I was real excited," Jacob's
father Mike said when Jacob
got the call. "That's what you
play for. That's what you prac-
tice for."
Jacob's reaction to the news
was typical: "It was cool," he
said, but the big smile showed
how happy he was with his
accomplishment.
And that accomplishment
has been the result of some
very hard work. When coach-
es and Tillotson's father talk
about him, they inevitably talk
about his work ethic and his
desire to play the game and to
improve.
"He's got a batting cage in
his backyard," Fort White
High coach Mike Rizzi said.
"His dad works with him a lot.
He's played a lot of AAU ball.


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Jacob Tillotson gets ready to throw the ball during a recent practice.
Tillotson was recently selected to play for the Southern Selects in the Junior Olympics from
June 17-25.


in baseball you've got to
play a lot of ball to get better."
Mike said that after Jacob is
finished being homeschooled
by his mothei- Sandy, he'll hit
the ball to Jacob and field
balls and Jacob will work out
in the cage. "I'll beg him and
say, 'Let's go in the house,' "
Mike said. But Jacob will stay
outside until he does exactly
what he needs to have done.
Jacob has been playing
baseball since he was five
years old in T-ball, and Mike
said that he didn't really real-
ize how special his son was
until other coaches started
talking about him.
"I knew he always had an
arm," Mike said. "I realized
that he could throw the ball
and had good accuracy when
he threw the ball."
Jacob said he didn't know
he was that good himself until


he was 10. "Pitching no-hit-
ters and hitting home runs,
stuff like that," he said.
Jacob first fell in love with
the game watching his older
brother Micah play at
Columbia High. He taught
Jacob a lot of things, like
throwing curveballs and how
to hit. Brother-in-law Chris
Williams has also been a
strong influence.
From there it was on to
AAU ball, where Tillotson was
part of a state championship
team. And as a member of the
Fort White High Middle
School team last year,
Tillotson helped his team to
the SMAC title.
Last year, Tillotson was
called up to the varsity as a
sixth-grader. His teammates
instantly recognized his tal-
ent. "I thought it was crazy,"
Indians shortstop Kyle Espen-


ship said. "Everyone's like,
'He's on JV, he's bad.' And
then I hit a couple of shots to
him and I was like, 'Yeah, he
looks pretty good.' So I
thought he had talent as soon
as I saw him."
For Tillotson, it took a little
longer for him to feel like he
belonged.
"A couple of games," he
said. "When I started feeling
good."
After a slow start this year,
Tillotson has come on to hit
.346 through eight games,
fourth-best on the team. He
has scored four runs, hit two
doubles and he has three
RBIs this year. Tillotson has
played mostly at second and
third base, and his hitting has
improved enough that Rizzi
has moved him from the bot-
tom of the order to the No. 2
hole.


"We talked about bringing
him along kind of slow," Rizzi
said. "You sit there and look at
his talent, and you think 'God,'
he can handle some of this
stuff.' If there is a weakness
right now, it's probably a little
bit at the mental side. He has-
n't seen enough at this level to
be able to react sometimes to
what's going on. He'll make
some mental mistakes here
and there. But again, it rolls
off his back... he learns from
it, and usually he doesn't
make the same mistake
twice."
Mike has been happy with
his son's progress.
"Coach Rizzi and Coach
(John) Wilson have really
helped him out a lot," he said.
"And everything's positive.
Everything they say is posi-
tive, and I like that a lot. And
when he goes home he says,
'I love playing baseball.' And
that means a lot."
Right now, Tillotson is a
spray hitter, but Rizzi thinks
his power will come in time.
He also has cut down on his
strikeouts immensely since
the season started, making
him a solid contact hitter.
As for fitting in with team-
mates who are 2-4 years older
than him, Tillotson is getting
along just fine in that area as
well.
"The guys have really
accepted him," Rizzi said.
"And they recognize his abili-
ty also. And anytime you've
got a guy who can play, the
guys are usually going to
accept him. He's a real quiet
kid, so he doesn't really talk a
lot. And again, that's going to
help him fit in with the older
kids."
Espenship added, "I like
him. He's like a little brother
to me." Espenship, Indians
TILLOTSON
continued on page 3B


T-Ball registration under way 14 lab% nrwr%

msarmento@lakecityreporter.com l. e


T-Ball registration for the
Lake City/Columbia County
Parks and Recreation Depart-
ment was held on Saturday for
returning players.
"It's a good indication,"
Parks and Rec Department
Athletic Director Mario
Coppock said. "Especially the
6-and-7-year olds. We've got
five teams in that league, and
one's already full."
Registration lasted from 7
a.m.-7 p.m., and next Saturday
all new players who wish to
play can sign up in the same
time frame.
"We've found that having
Saturday registration from 7
a.m.-7 p.m. really is conven-
ient for our parents," Coppock
said.
"And it takes a lot of stress
off the parents who work 8-5
who don't have a real long
lunch break. And at 5 o'clock
we close."
Last year 257 players partic-
ipated in the program, with
Coppock expecting similar


b d


COURTESY PHOTO
Dr. Joseph Charles deals with Lake City/Columbia County
Parks and Recreation Department staff member Beth
Harden while Samantha Thomas (right) fills out paperwork
for her son Wade Ballew (center).


numbers this year.
T-Ball is for both boys and
girls, and it has grown from
six teams in Coppock's first
year to 16 teams now. There is
a 4-and-5-year-old league,
which consists of 11 teams, as
well as the older league.
The season lasts three-and-
a-half weeks from the first of


May until the second week of
June. There are no place fin-
ishes, and all the kids get a
cap, T-shirt and a trophy.
'"That trophy is the biggest
of all deals to them," Coppock
said. "They really enjoy it."
Coppock was assisted by

T-BALL continued on page 3B


Indians fall to Interlachen


From staff reports

The Fort White High varsi-
ty baseball team fell 3-0 to
Interlachen High on Friday.
Jacob Tillotson took the
loss to fall to 0-1.
He surrendered a two-run
home run in the third
inning. Justin Dorris relie-
ved and gave up a run in the
sixth.


Kyle Espenship was 1-4
with a triple. Jeremy Harrell
was 2-3 with two doubles.
Dorris was 1-3 and Elven
Sheppard was 1-3.
"My biggest problem was
that we struck out 15 times,
and 11 of them were look-
ing," Indians baseball coach
INDIANS
continued on page 3B


-OUG0


LAKE CITY REPORTER










LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
ARENA FOOTBALL
1 p.m.
NBC Regional coverage, Phila-
delphia at Colorado or San Jose at Chicago
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m.
FOX NASCAR, Nextel Cup, Advance
Auto Parts 500, at Martinsville, Va.
4 p.m.
NBC IRL, IndyCar Series, Grand
Prix of Long Beach, at Long Beach, Calif.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Spring Nationals, at
Baytown, Texas (same-day tape)
11 p.m.
SPEED FIA World Rally, Rally of
New Zealand, at Auckland, New Zealand
(same-day tape)
BOWLING
1 p.m.
ESPN PBA, Tournament Of Champ-
ions, at Uncasville, Conn.
GOLF
2:30 p.m.
CBS The Masters, final round, at
Augusta, Ga.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
TBS N.Y. Mets at Atlanta
2:10 p.m.
WGN Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m.
ESPN Chicago White Sox at
Minnesota
MOTORSPORTS
3 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP World Champ-
ionship, Spanish Grand Prix, at Jerez de la
Frontera, Spain (same-day tape)
6 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP 250, Spanish Grand
Prix, at Jerez de la Frontera, Spain (same-
day tape)
NBA
1 p.m.
ABC Regional coverage, Detroit at
Miami or New York at Indiana
3:30 p.m.
ABC L.A. Lakers at Sacramento
TENNIS
1 p.m.
ESPN2 WTA Tour, Bausch & Lomb
Championships, championship match, at
Amelia Island

Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2:10 p.m.
WGN San Diego at Chicago Cubs
3 p.m.
ESPN N.Y. Yankees at Boston
7:30 p.m.
TBS Washington at Atlanta
NBA
7 p.m.
NBA TV Cleveland at Orlando
10:30 p.m.
NBA TV Phoenix at LA. Lakers





NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 41 35 .539 -
Philadelphia 39 37 .513 2
New Jersey 38 39 .494 3A1
Toronto 31 44 .413 9b1
New York 29 46 .387 111
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB,
z-Miami 56 20 .737 -
Washington 41 35 .539 15
Orlando 35 41 .461 21
Charlotte 15 60 .200 40'%
Atlanta 12 64 .158 44
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Detroit 48 27 .640 -
Chicago 43 32 .573 5
Indiana 41 34 .547 7
Cleveland 39 37 .513 9'
Milwaukee 29 47 .382 19%
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Antonio 55 20 .733 -
x-Dallas 51 24 .680 4
Houston 45 31 .592 10%
Memphis 43 32 .573 12
New Orleans 18 57 .240 37
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-Seattle 50 25 .667 -
Denver 44 31 .587 6
Minnesota 40 37 .519 11
Portland 24 51 .320 26
Utah 24 51 .320 26
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
y-Phoenix 57 18 .760 -
x-Sacramento 47 30 .610 11
LA Clippers 34 42 .447 231,
L.A Lakers 34 42 .447 231
Golden State 31 45 .408 261
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference

Saturday's Games
New Jersey 99, Boston 86
Atlanta 105, Minnesota 98
Philadelphia 112, Washington 106
Cleveland 98, Milwaukee 81
Tor6nto at Chicago (n)
Utah at Dallas (n)
Seattle at Denver (n)'
Houston at Phoenix (n)
San Antonio at L.A. Clippers (n)
Today's Games
Detroit at Miami, 1 p.m.
New York at Indiana, 3:30 p.m.
LA Lakers at Sacramento, 3:30 p.m.
Portland at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Memphis, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Golden State, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
Indiana at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Washington, 7 p.m.


Cleveland at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Memphis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Golden State at Denver, 9 p.m.
Houston at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Phoenix at LA Lakers, 10:30 p.m.


RARMIRAT.T.

AL standings


Toronto


East Division
W L Pct
3 2 .600


New York
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
Boston


Chicago
Detroit
Kansas City
Minnesota
Cleveland


Los Angeles
Oakland
Seattle
Texas


3 2 .600
3 2 .600
2 3 .400
2 3 .400
Central Division
W L Pct
4 1 .800
3 2 .600
2 2 .500
2 3 .400
2 3 .400
West Division
W L Pct
2 2 .500
2 3 .400
2 3 .400
2 3 .400


Friday's Games
Cleveland 4, Detroit 3
Baltimore 12, N.Y. Yankees 5
Boston 6, Toronto 5
Tampa Bay 3, Oakland 2, 10 innings
Chicago White Sox 5, Minnesota 1
Seattle 9, Texas 6
Kansas City 6, LA Angels 2
Saturday's Games
Detroit 11, Cleveland 1
N.Y. Yankees 8, Baltimore 5
Toronto 12, Boston 5
Texas 7, Seattle 6
Tampa Bay 11, Oakland 2
Chicago White Sox 8, Minnesota 5
Kansas City at LA Angels (n)
Today's Games
Baltimore (Lopez 1-0) at N.Y. Yankees
(Pavano 0-0), 1:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Ja.Davis 0-0) at Detroit
(Bonderman 1-0), 1:05 p.m.
Boston (Clement 0-0) at Toronto (Lilly
0-0), 1:07 p.m.
Oakland (Harden 0-0) at Tampa Bay
(Brazelton 0-1), 2:15 p.m.
Texas (Drese 0-1) at Seattle (Meche 0-
0), 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City (BAnderson 0,0) at LA
Angels (Colon 1-0), 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 1-0) at
Minnesota (Santana 1-0), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
LA Angels at Texas, 2:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 3:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 3:05
p.m.
Seattle at Kansas City, 4:10 p.m.
Toronto at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.


NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 4 1 .800 -
Washington 3 2 .600 1
Florida 2 3 .400 2
Philadelphia 2 3 .400 2
New York 0 5 .000 4
Central Division
W L Pet GB
Milwaukee 3 1 .750 -
Cincinnati 3 1 .750 -
Houston 2 1 .667 1k
St. Louis 2 2 .500 1
Chicago 2 3 .400 1A
Pittsburgh 1 3 .250 2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 3 1 .750 -
San Francisco 3 2 .600 %.
Arizona 2 2 .500 1
San Diego 2 2 .500 1
Colorado 1 3 .250 2

Friday's Games
Milwaukee 6, Chicago Cubs 3, 12
innings
St. Louis 6, Philadelphia 5
Atlanta 3, N.Y. Mets 1
Florida 9, Washington 0
Houston 3, Cincinnati 2
LA. Dodgers 8, Arizona 7
Pittsburgh 3, San Diego 2
San Francisco 10, Colorado 8
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 10, St. Louis 4
Chicago Cubs 4, Milwaukee 0
San Francisco 4, Colorado 2
Washington 3, Florida 2, 10 innings
Atlanta 6, N.Y. Mets 3
Cincinnati at Houston (n)
LA Dodgers at Arizona (n)
Pittsburgh at San Diego (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Mets (PMartinez 0-0) at Atlanta
(Smoltz 0-1), 1:05 p.m.
Washington (Patterson 0-0) at Florida
(Beckett 1-0), 1:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Milton 1-0) at Houston
(Oswalt 0-1), 2:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Lieber 1-0) at St. Louis
(Carpenter 1-0), 2:15 p.m.
Milwaukee (Santos 0-0) at Chicago
Cubs (Maddux 0-1), 2:20 p.m.
Pittsburgh (D.Williams 0-0) at San
Diego (Redding 0-0), 4:05 p.m.
Colorado (Kennedy 0-0) at San
Francisco (Schmidt 1-0), 4:15 p.m.
LA Dodgers (Lowe 0-1) at Arizona
(Ru.Ortiz 1-0), 4:40 p.m.
Monday's Games
Houston at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 2:05 p.m.
San Diego at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Philadelphia at Florida, 7:05 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.


GOIF

Masters

Saturday
At Augusta National Golf Club
Augusta, Ga.
Third Round
(a-amateur)
Note: Play suspended due to darkness
with 44 players not finishing. Round will be
completed this morning.


Chad Campbell 73-73-68
Steve Flesch 76-70-70
Justin Leonard 75-71-70
Retief Goosen 71-75-70
Shingo Katayama 72-74-73
Fred Couples 75-71-77
Did Not Finish
Chris DiMarco 67-67
Thomas Bjorn 71-67
Tiger Woods 74-66
Vijay Singh 68-73
David Howell 72-69
Mark Hensby 69-73
Phil Mickelson 70-72
a-Ryan Moore 71-71
Kirk Triplett 75-68
Jim Furyk 76-67
Ryan Palmer 70-74
Stewart Cink 72-72
Nick O'Hern 72-72
Casey Wittenberg 72-72
Rod Pampling 73-71


Tim Herron
Kenny Perry
Luke Donald
Stuart Appleby
KJ. Choi
Mike Weir
Jerry Kelly
Thomas Levet
Jonathan Kaye
Mark O'Meara
Ian Poulter
Trevor Immelman
a-Luke List
Adam Scott
Craig Parry
Scott Verplank
Stephen Ames
Joe Ogilvie
Jay Haas
Todd Hamilton
Chris Riley
Darren Clarke
Tim Clark


73-73 146


Miguel Angel Jimenez 74-74 148
Bernhard Langer 74-74 148
Tom Lehman 74-74 148
Jeff Maggert 74-74 148
Ernie Els 75-73 148
Craig Stadler 75-73 148
Leader Board
SCORE THRU
Chris DiMarco -13 9
Tiger Woods -9 9
Thomas Bjorn -8 9
Rod Pampling -4 12
Vijay Singh -4 10
Mark Hensby -4 9


AUTO AIrqtg

Race week

NEXTEL CUP
Advance Auto Parts 500
Site: Martinsville, Va.
Schedule: Today, race (FOX,
12:30 p.m.).
Track: Martinsville Speedway (oval,
0.526 miles, 12 degrees banking in turns)
Race distance: 263 miles, 500 laps.
CHAMP CAR WORLD SERIES
Toyota GP of Long Beach
Site: Long Beach, Calif.
Schedule: Today, race (NBC, 4 p.m.).
Track: Streets of Long Beach (tempo-
rary road course, 1.968 miles, 11 turns)
Race distance: 159.408 miles, 81 laps.
NHRA
O'Reilly Spring Nationals
Site: Baytown, Texas
Schedule: Today, eliminations, Noon
(ESPN2, 7 p.m., tape).
Track: Houston Raceway

Advance Auto Parts 500

At Martinsville Speedway
Martinsville, Va.
1. (10) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 96.671
mph.
2. (12) Ryan Newman, Dodge, 96.657.
3. (19) Jeremy Mayfield, Dodge, 96.583.
4. (2) Rusty Wallace, Dodge, 96.558.
5. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
96.376.
6. (18) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
96.259.
7. (20) Tdny 'tewvarit Chevrolet, 96.195.
8. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 96.127.
9. (97) Kurt Busch, Ford, 96.063.
10. (01) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet,
96.015.
11. (49) Ken Schrader, Dodge, 95.917.
12. (11) Jason Leffler, Chevrolet,
95.888.
13. (21) Ricky Rudd, Ford, 95.864.
14. (43) Jeff Green, Dodge, 95.748.
15. (0) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 95.743.
16. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 95.728.
17. (77) Travis Kvapil, Dodge, 95.699.
18. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 95.574.
19. (45) Kyle Petty, Dodge, 95.554.
20. (40) Sterling Marlin, Dodge, 95.458.
21. (5) Kyle Busch,.Chevrolet, 95.280.
22. (6) Mark Martin, Ford, 95.271.
23. (4) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 95.208.
24. (41) Casey Mears, Dodge, 95.194.
25. (38) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 95.170.
26. (8) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
95.127.
27. (25) Brian Vickers, Chevrolet,
95.089.
28. (32) Bobby Hamilton Jr., Chevrolet,
95.046.
29. (42) Jamie McMurray, Dodge,
95.008.
30. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 94.955.
31. (15) Michael Waltrip, Chevrolet,
94.917. *
32. (88) Dale Jarrett, Ford, 94.865.
33. (22) Scott Wimmer, Dodge, 94.652.
34. (75) Mike Garvey, Dodge, 94.614.
35. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 94.562.
36. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 94.519.
37. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
94.491.
38. (66) Hermie Sadler, Ford,\94.336.
39. (34) Randy LaJoie, Chevrolet,
94.129.
40. (09) Johnny Sauter, Dodge, 93.929.
41. (37) Kevin Lepage, Dodge, 93.530. .
42. (07) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 93.525.
43. (7) Robby Gordon, Chevrolet, 93.354.
Failed to Qualify
44. (92) Stanton Barrett, Chevrolet,
92.956.
45. (61) Jeff Fuller, Dodge, 92.833.
46. (27) Kirk Shelmerdine, Ford, 92.461.
47. (00) Carl Long, Chevrolet, 91.931.


TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL
American League
DETROIT TIGERS-Placed OF Ramon.
Martinez on the 15-day DL Recalled OF
Marcus Thames from Toledo of the IL
MINNESOTA TWINS-Placed RHP
Carlos Silva on the 15-day DL.
National League
COLORADO ROCKIES-Traded RHP
Allan Simpson to Cincinnati for RHP Jose
Acevedo.
BASKETBALL
American Basketball Association
ABA-Named Demetrius Ford vice
president of investor relations and corpo-
rate finance.
NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA
BREAKERS-Named Al Clocker coach.
Women's National Basketball
Association
LOS ANGELES SPARKS-Signed G
Taleesha Hardy and G Nicole Kaczmarski.
WASHINGTON MYSTICS-Signed F
Mactabene Amachree.
COLLEGE
WYOMING-Announced the resigna-
tion of Leroy Washington, men's assistant
basketball coach, to take the same position
at Idaho.


MARIO SARMENTO/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High junior varsity soccer award winners are (from left): Amber Harrell, Stacy
Sistrunk, Brittany Kent, Theresa Rinker and Kathleen Robinson.


MARIO SARMENTO/Lake
City Reporter
Fort White High
Middle School
girls soccer
award winners
are (from left)
Kristal Butler,
Alexi Hodson
and Taylor
Bass.


MARIO SARMENTO/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High girls
soccer Scholar
Athletes are (from left):
Ashley Waddington
(varsity), Katelyn
Wilson (middle school)
and MacKenzie Hayden
and Amber Harrell
(junior varsity).


Fort White JV baseball wins again


From staff reports


The Fort White High junior
varsity baseball team
improved to 9-0-1 with an 8-3
win over Interlachen High on
Friday. The Indians jumped
out to an 8-0 lead in the first
two innings and never looked
back.
Lefthander Gilliam Barker


got his first start of the sea-
son and, pitched two hitless
innings to get the win. Four
other pitchers also saw action
on the mound.
Hayden Espenship and
Austin Lawrence each had
two hits, and Barker and Matt
Milatz each drove in two
runs.
The Indians play at Union


County High at 4 p.m. on
Monday, then face' Keystone
Heights High on Tuesday and
Friday and wrap up the sea-
son against Santa Fe High on
Saturday. Both Keystone
games are make-ups. The
Indians' canceled game
against Hamilton County
High on Thursday will not be
made up.


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T-BALL young people who could
come out on this Saturday to
Continued from page 1B work for us," Coppock said.
Parents must accompany
volunteers Lesley Cox, Kelly their child to sign permission
Williams, Beth Harden, slips and provide a copy of
Joanna McNeil, Krystal the birth certificate or some
Norris and Teresa Harris. proof of age. The registration
"I want to thank all the fee is $30.


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TILLOTSON
Continued from page 1B

senior Tony Basile and catcher
Jeremy Harrell stop by at
Tillotson's house to hit in the
cage and play video games
from time to time, and Mike
appreciates how well his son
has been treated.
"The kids have been great,"
he said.
"They've really helped him
out. They treated him so good.
They tease him a lot about
how young he is, cause Jacob's
a real shy person. He doesn't
talk much."
Basile said it's only been
recently that the soft-spoken
Tillotson has started to open
up. "He likes to crack jokes
with us now about our vehi-
cles," Basile said. "Pretty good
kid."
On the field, coaches and
players talk about Tillotson's
smooth and quick hands, and
how he moves around the
infield so gracefully despite
having size 14 feet. Tillotson
has a .952 fielding percentage
and has committed only two
errors all season.
He also has a fastball that
reaches the mid-80s with
regularity, and he was clocked
at 81 mph as a 12-year-old.
Before Friday's loss against
Interlachen High, Tillotson
had pitched 52 innings
through eight games. He was


0-0 with one save and had
allowed eight runs on eight
hits for an ERA of 7.40. He also
had walked one batter while
striking out eight.
After Espenship graduates,
Tillotson will take over at
shortstop, conceivably for the
rest of his high school career.


He also will be a regular in the
Indians' starting rotation.
Surprisingly though, the 14-
year-old prefers the infield to
the pitcher's mound.
"You don't get to do as
much," Tillotson said of being
on the mound.
Tillotson is also thrilled by


the opportunity to compete
with some of the best players in
the country as a member of the
Southern Selects team in the
tournament. If he plays well
enough, Tillotson could be
selected to the 2005 USA
Baseball Youth National Team,
which will compete in the IBAF


"AA" Youth World Champion-
ships in Mexico.
And this could just be the
beginning.
"If he keeps getting better,
he could be a Division I or pro
prospect," Rizzi said.
Basile said he.is looking for-
ward to the day when Tillotson


will be a senior.
"He's going to have a couple
of state championship rings,"
he said. "He's going to be awe-
some. I'm ready for him to
hurry up so I can come back
and I can show my kids what I
used to play with when he was
only 13."


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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005

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Sunday, April 10, 2005
Lake City, Florida







Planting by the moon and the stars



Area farmers use natural cycles of the moon to plant crops


By SUSAN SLOAN
Special to the Reporter
In the Bible, it is written
"Let there be lights in
the firmament of the
heaven to divide the day
from the night; and let
them be for signs, and for sea-
sons, and for days, and years."
Long before there was the
Weather Channel, the county
extension service or even the
Farmer's Almanac, farmers
looked to the sky to deter-
mine the weather and when to
plant. There is an ancient
Greek poem, "Works and
Days," informing farmers
which constellations rose
before dawn at different sea-
sons of the year instructing
them on the right time for
plowing, sowing and harvest-
ing.
The moon, the most visible
object in the night sky, was
often used as a signal to farm-
ers. Ancient farmers, and
even Benjamin Franklin
believed that the moon as it
passed through its various
phases had an effect on not
only the tides, but plant life as
well.
The general theory is that
the time between the new and
full moon is an advantageous
one for planting above-ground
crops while the period
between the full and new moon
would be beneficial to plant
below-ground crops. As the
moon moves from a new moon
to a full moon, the amount of
moonlight would be increasing
daily, corresponding to the
increasing growth of a newly
planted above-ground crop
such as a tomato plant.
Correspondingly, planting a
root crop with a diminishing
moon would allow the develop-
ment of the underground crop
without aggressive growth of
the above-ground vegetation.
Our rural ancestors were
instinctively using the natural
cycles of the moon in a method


that reputedly has proven stu
cessful over time and is sl
relied upon by many garden
today.
The concept can be simlr
or complex. If you ask F,:
White farmer Ethan Port
when is the best time to pla
corn, he will tell you "bt-fo
the first full moon in March.'
simple concept. But ask hij
about peanuts, and lie will
say, "When the signs are in
the feet." What?
To take the celestial
method of planting one
step further, a long- /
time gentleman /
farmer and on-site .
gardening advisor at i
Delta Farm Center,
"Uncle Bert" ,i
Alexander, will tell
you that this
means when the <
moon is in Pisces. -"
The moon
moves through
each'of the signs of
the zodiac every
month. Each sign of
the zodiac was
believed by ancient
astrologers to influ-
ence a specific part of
the body: Aries, the ,
head; Taurus, the neck:
Gemini, the arms, Cancer,
the breast; Leo, the heart:
Virgo, the belly; Libra, the ki
neys; Scorpio, the loin
Sagittarius, the thigil
Capricorn, the knei
Aquarius, the legs; and Pisc
the feet.
Not only that, but cert;
signs have other anributi
Libra is said to be airy, moi
semi-fruitful and masculir
Scorpio, watery, fruitful a
feminine; Sagittarius, fiei
dry, barren and masculine
Capricorn, earthy, moi
somewhat productive and fe
inine; Aquarius, airy, dry, b
ren and masculine; Pisco
watery, fruitful and feminir
Aries, fiery, dry, barren a
masculine; Taurus, earti


ic- niciist. Prirductiviid nnfer-n-
11irll ine: (7imini. a]!,\-

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nr


,of Sagittarius, Aquarius.
VAries. Gemini and Virgo.
Plow, rill and cultivate in the
"dry" sign of Aries. And if ,Au
want tV- gel really complicated.
there are directive-s for which
planrt- to plant in specific quar-
ters- of the nih.u n.
If you wonder when to har-
vest. folklore says to do so
when thie moo-n is waning.
They are said io keep longer.
Plant flowers when the moon is
in Libra, the sign that repre-
sents be-auty. Take a good look
at any calendar here in the
South, and in aLmanacs. such
as the Old Farmers Almanac or
Grier's Almanac, and you will
find charts that provide a daily
indication of the moon's posi-
tion in the heavens, planting
days according to moon signs
and other folklore pointers
related to gardening.
Are these directives accu-
rate? Ask Ethan Porter and he
will say yes. Ask Uncle Bert
and he will tell you that he was
made a believer by his wite's
family. He would be told
L when the signs were right,
Sand after a string of suc-
cesses, he too was a believ-
i er. Not that he thinks
1 Everyone is convinced.
. I I _.i n_ % I..'


S- He says theI
SM al of Florlda
S .' to plant
V ican, an

but 1
[tha
oi

atery,
.ry fruitful
nd feminine: -
co. fiery, barren.
ry and masculine; and
irgo, earthy, dry or barren '
nr d fei nln "we


It is recommended that
planting be done when the
moon is in the "fruitful" con-
stellations of Scorpio, Pisces,
Taurus and Cancer; while trim-
ming and weed killing should
be done in the "barren" signs


University
will tell you
when you
d he dis-
with that,
ie realized
it reliance
n the stars
and moon
is lading
away as
Ik. th e


young people just don't seem
to care about the old folklore
anymore.
But enough interest still
exists that he not only gets
calls about the moon and the
stars for planting, but also as to


SUSAN SLOAN/Special to the Reporter
Many area growers are beginning to put out tomato sets.
Some farmers in the county rely on the natural cycle of the


moon to know the best time to

other facets of life, such as
weaning children, castrating
animals and when to have sur-
gery.
Wendell and Eudine Bailey
rely heavily on the accuracy of
the signs. As owners of
Bailey's Farm on County Road
131, the more than 20 acres
that they plant for their U-pick
operation must produce. And
that doesn't include the 480
i. additional acres that they
keep for cattle and hay. The
Baileys plant by the almanac
and are gearing up for addi-
tional planting of above-
ground crops.
According to the almanacs,
April 13 through 25 is just
right for the above-ground


crops such as the peppers,
tomatoes, eggplant, peas and
beans that will be sold at the
U-pick.
Wendell was a skeptic at
first, but like Uncle Bert, he
was converted after some
experimentation that proved
the theory right. If you look
around their home, it would
be hard to dispute. The dis-
play of amaryllis, Johnny
Jump-ups, roses and other
beautiful flowers would indi-
cate that Eudine is doing
something right.
And if you don't think
orange and citrus trees do
well in our area, well the
Baileys might say it just
depends on when you plant.


SUSAN SLOAN/Special to the Reporter
LEFT:Paster Lowell O'Steen (left) of Bethlehem Baptist Church is shown the Delta Farm Calendar, which provides moon and star planting guides, by resident expert, 'Uncle Bert' Alexander.
RIGHT: The 20 acres of U-pick vegetables will all be planted by Wendell and Eudine Bailey according to the moon and star planting guides.


LANE CITY REPORTER-









2C LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005

LIFESTYLE.
'rI U S


Try


DON
GOOD


Do you find gardening
a challenge due to space l
tions? Do you have ph:
limitations that make it dif
to work the soil? Do you
an abundance of weeds o
pests (such as mole cri
and nematodes?) Do ra
eat your lettuce as soon a
get it planted? Do you li
travel and don't want to w
about keeping your ga
watered? Hydroponics cai
solution to these problem
Hydroponics is the gro
of .plants in water with


growing plants

E solved nutrients. No soil is be 4 foot 1 inch by 8 feet 1 inch flowers or top hea
needed. The plants get all their to have enough room for the bles may need a tre
nutrients from the water and Styrofoam to float up and down them up.
fertilizer mixture. Typically, a on the solution. The wooden We have had go
soluble fertilizer such as frame is then lined with heavy with a variety of pl
Peters or Miracle Grow may duty polyethylene plastic in the floating hydr
IE be used. Mix 2 teaspoons of which is then secured to the on display at the
fertilizer with each gallon of frame with wooden batten Service. Leaf lettu
water that you put in your strips. Smaller pools may be eral herbs (basil, c
hydroponic garden. To supply constructed or a kiddie pool or ley, etc.) grow we
to be magnesium, a plant nutrient a 5 gallon bucket may be used such as zinnias, ma
imita- that is sometimes lacking in depending on the space avail- nasturtiums also gi
ysical these fertilizers, add 1 tea- able. the hydroponi
fficult spoon of Epsom salt per gallon To support the plants, you Cucumbers make a
have of the fertilizer mixture. can use coffee cups with play if grown out of
)r soil While there are several notches cut in the edge of the hydroponic trash
ckets hydroponic systems to choose bottom. Use a circular saw bit allowed to cascade
Lbbits from, one that is easy to build to cut holes in the Styrofoam side. Bell peppers
s you involves a sheet of 1" sheet for the cups. The cups also but tend to fall
ke to Styrofoam floating in a pool of are inserted in the Styrofoam supported. Many
vorry nutrient solution. The pool sheet and the plants are simply about growing ton
Lrden may be constructed out of 2" placed in the cup. The roots floating garden.
n be a by 6" or 2" by 8" treated lum- will grow down into the solu- have been grown s
s. ber to the size you desire. To fit tion. Most leafy crops will have in hydroponic greer
)wing the full 4' by 8' sheet of enough support from the cup teams that use a
dis- Styrofoam, the frame needs to but other crops such as tall nutrient solution bu


without soil


avy vegeta-
ellis to hold

od success
ants grown
oponic bed
Extension
ce and sev-
hives, pars-
11. Flowers
rigolds and
row well in
ic bed.
showy dis-
the top of a
can and
down the
do nicely
over unless
people ask
natoes in a
Tomatoes
successfully
house sys-
circulating
it so far we


have not had much success
with them in the floating gar-
den. Strawberries have even
performed well in a floating
garden but since they are
short plants they need to be
grown in short cups to allow
the plant to expand and have
good air circulation to the fruit.

Program Announcement:
Any child or teenager that
would like to participate in a
gardening project this year is
invited to an orientation work-
shop on Thursday from 4-6
p.m. At the meeting we will
discuss basic gardening tech-
niques and give an overview of
the project guide book. This
project is designed for 4-H
clubbers but could also be tai-
lored to a Scouting project
(membership in these organi-
zations is not required to par-
ticipate.) Please call the


Extension Service at 752-5384
if you are interested in this
gardening project and to
reserve your seat at the orien-
tation meeting.

Annual Plant Sale
Coming Up: The Master
Gardeners will be having their
annual plant sale the morning
of April 23 this year (9 a.m.-1
p.m.). The sale will be held at
the Extension Service office
on the Lake City fairgrounds.

Dr Don Goode is the
Director and Horticulture
Agent of the Columbia County
Extension Service (a branch of
the University of Florida. He
can be reached at the office (on
the Fairgrounds), on the phone
(752-5384), by e-mail
(dzgoode@ifas.ufl.edu) or
through the Internet
(http://columbia.ifas.ufl.edu.)


IN THE SERVICE


Pvt. Jason R. Novotny

Marine Corps Pvt. Jason
R. Novotny, son of Richard J.
Novotny of High Springs,
recently completed 12 weeks
of basic training at Marine
Corps Recruit Depot, Parris
Island, S. C. designed to
challenge new Marine
recruits both physically and
mentally.
Novotny and other
recruits also received
instruction on the Marine
Corps' core values--honor,
courage and commitment.
Novotny and fellow
recruits ended the training
phase with The Crucible, a
54-hour, team evolution cul-
minating in an emotional cer-
emony in which recruits are
presented the Marine Corps
Emblem, and addressed as
"Marines" for the first time
in their careers.


Novotny is a 2004 gradu-
ate of Santa Fe High School
of Alachua.

Pfc. Michael F.
Stanley

Marine Corps Pfc.
Michael F Stanley, son of
Chris Stanley of Lake Butler.
and Earl Stanley of Lake
Butler, recently, graduated
from the Cannon Crewman
Course while assigned with
Marine Detachment, U.S.
Army Field Artillery School,
Fort Sill, Okla.
During the course, Stanley
received instruction on the
identification and use of
artillery ammunition, and
the characteristics, functions
and duties of his assigned
job. Stanley is a 2004 gradu-
ate of Union County High
School of Lake Butler.


ENGAGEMENTS


Hardwick-Lizotte


COURTESY PHOTO
Lisa Hardwick and Jered
Lizotte
Richard and Linda
Hardwick of Lake City
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage of
their daughter, Lisa Evonne
Hardwick of Lake City, to
Jered Patrick Lizotte of Lake
City, son of Roger and
Margaret Lizotte of Lake
City.
The wedding is planned
for 10 a.m. Saturday, June 11,
at Stephen Foster Memorial
State Park. A reception will
follow at the same location.
All friends and family are
invited to attend.
Lisa is a 2002 CHS gradu-
ate and will graduate Saint
Leo University in May with a
bachelor's in Elementary
Education.
Jered is a 2002 CHS gradu-
ate and attends the Baptist
College of Florida in
Granceville, pursuing a
degree in leadership and
music.


Howard-Lucas


COURTESY PHOTO
Randy Lucas and Sandy
Howard
He knew he loved her, it
was something he couldn't
hide.


So he asked her to marry.
She said, "Yes, I'll be your
bride"
Invitations will be sent to
witness the continuing
romance as Sandy-Howard
and Randy Lucas are married
at 4 p.m. May 21.

McKenzie-McKenzie


James McKenzie and Eddie
McKenzie

Eddie and Emma Adams
of Lake City announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daugh-
ter, Eddie Mae Wiggins
McKenzie of Lake City, to
James McKenzie of St.
Petersburg, son of Willie and
Alvenia McKenzie (both
deceased) of St. Petersburg.
The bride is also the
daughter of Eddie Davis
Wiggins, Jr.
The wedding is planned
for 5 p.m. Saturday, April 16,
at New Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church 550 MLK Dr.
Lake City.
A reception will follow at
the church annex.
Eddie is a Richardson
High School graduate and
obtained an A.S. in mental
health from LCCC in 1980.
She attended the University
of South Florida in St.
Petersburg. She was
employed and retired from
the State of Florida for 30
years. She ia a member of
the Columbiaires Club of
Lake City.
James is a gradaute of
Montezuma High School in
GA. He is presently
employed with the City of St.
Petersburg for 48 years. He
is a current member officer
of the Nite Riders Van Club
of St. Petersburg.


What exactly is Cafe Politico?


By JIM MORRIS
Executive director of library and
community services at LCCC

The January issue of
National Geographic maga-
zine has an excellent article
about caffeine, and of course
it mentions Howard Schultz,
the inventor of Starbucks.
Schultz. pointed out that the
key to his success is more
than great coffee. He speaks
of community and conversa-
tion, and connecting with oth-
ers. Coffee is a medium for
establishing these connec-
tions and Starbucks is one of
the places where this connec-
tion occurs.
Another place where it
occurs is the library at Lake
City Community College.
Students and other library
patrons bring in their coffee
and drinks, even their sand-
wiches and pastries. The
library is always on the look-
out for donations of good
couches and comfortable
chairs to make the place even
more inviting. It has even
incorporated the idea of a cof-
fee house into its schedule of
annual events. Any plans for
renovation or a new building
for the library will include a
coffee shop in that design. In
the meantime, several years


BIRTHS

Grubb
Shaun and Rachel Grubb of
Lake City announce the birth
of their son Seth Thomas
Grubb Jan. 27 in North
Florida Regional. He weighed
three pounds, three ounces
and 16 inches.
Grandparents are: Mike
and Becky McClellan of Lake
City and Tom and Kathie
Grubb of Greensboro, NC.
Great-grandparents are:
Ken and Janet Willis, the late
Elton and Lucille McClennan,
Ormil and the late Grace
Kline, the late Herbert and
Margaret Grubb.

Jones
David Jones and Casey
Jones of Lake City announce
the birth of their daughter
Carley Alexa Jones March 29
in North Florida Women's
Center. She weighed seven
pounds, nine ounces and
measured 19 and one-fourth
inches.She joins brother
Jakob, three.
Grandparents are: Charley
and Kim Nelson of Alachua
and Randy and Wanda Jones
of Lake City.

Jones
Kevin and Florinda Jones of
Pensacola are proud to
announce the birth of their
daughter, Kasie Lynne Jones,
March 24 in the Pensacola
Naval Hospital. She weighed
eight pounds, one ounce and
measured 20 inches.She joins
Connor, five and Toby, two.
Grandparents are: Mr. and
Mrs. John Carlson of South
FL and Lois L. Jones and the
late Alfred L. Jones of Lake
City.


ago we start- .-
ed "Jazz and
Java," an
event during
one Friday
night in the
fall when we
have live Morris'
music with
Harry Wuest and his jazz
ensemble, poetry readings at
an open microphone, and
plenty of great coffee.
It was during the latest Jazz
and Java that a community
member and friend of the col-
lege told me she had been dis-
cussing an idea with LCCC
President, Chuck Hall. She
envisioned a regular event in
the library, bringing together
students, faculty, staff, admin-
istrators, and members of the
community for an open and
civil discussion of current top-
ics. She called it "Caf6
Politico." We were impressed
by this suggestion and imple-
mented it straightaway. The
first one held just prior to the
semester break, and the
planned topic was the recent
election. Seventeen people
attended, including faculty
and staff, community, and stu-
dents. The conversation went
beyond. politics to race rela-
tions, class in America, and
the power of words to incite,


inflame, or inspire. It was
deemed a success by all who
attended. On January 21, we
followed up with a second
Cafe Politico with the chosen
topic of the Asian Tsunami
and the world response to it.
Of course, this discussion
expanded to include
American foreign policy, the
issue of foreign aid, and the
meaning of the words "altru-
ism" and "humanitarianism."
Our third Caf6 discussion
took place on February 18,
with sixteen people participat-
ing in a wide ranging discus-
sion that included gender
issues. Again, the discussion
continued until 6 p.m., well
past our Friday closing time
for the library.
The event has not been
promoted widely. Initially we
wanted to experiment within
the campus community. Prior
to the first two events we put
up signs in the library (over
300 students and patrons
pass through our gates daily)
and we e-mailed all staff and
faculty. We asked that faculty
encourage their students to
attend and John Gillette,
associate professor of speech
and English, guides the
debate and discussion. The
students are not timid about
speaking their minds. With


this article we now hope to
reach out to the community.
This is one place where you
certainly can discuss religion
or politics! We seek people
who want to engage in dis-
cussion but who are not so
fixed and defensive about
their stand on issues that
they cannot hear what others
are saying. Caf6 Politico is
made up of good listeners,
good contributors of ideas,
not shouters or people who
are easily offended by ideas
with which they are not in
agreement.
Civil discussion and
debate is at the heart of
democracy. We hear a lot
about democracy every day
in the news. We all know it is
a good thing. Here is a
chance to participate in one
of democracy's most basic
elements.

For more information
regarding upcoming events,
call the Lake City Community
College library at 754-4337.

Jim Morris is the executive
director of library and com-
munity services at Lake City
Community College and can
be reached via e-mail at mor-
risj@lakecitycc.edu or 754-
4337.


r


wisn to neip maKe your
up your package today...

Sandy Kishton
Realtor Associate
961-9795


Sterling Entertainment
Rusty Bailey
752-0290 965-4940


Quality Inn
Conference Center
752-3901


These fine merchants
wedding special. Pick

JC Penney
752-2822


Etheridge
Furniture
752-2752


Ward's Jewelers
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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


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Section D
Sunday, April 10, 2005
Lake City, Florida
www.lakecityreporterecom


Local Belk store receives a face-lift


Store in Lake City Mall

serves as prototype for new

customer service features


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter. corn

While price scanning
kiosks have become the
norm in many major discount
retail stores like Target and
Wal-Mart, it isn't as common
to see the service in a mall-
based department store.
But Belk in the Lake City
Mall is one of the company's
stores selected to be a proto-
type to test out customer
response to those type of cus-
tomer service features.
"What we've changed in
the store is to ensure that
we've improved our customer
service," said Anthony
Patrick, store manager of the
local Belk. "We've installed
price look-up kiosks in our
store to allow our customers
to walk up to that kiosk and
check the price to see if it's
on sale and how much they
are saving as far as the sale
price is concerned."
Officially rolling out that
feature and others with a
grand re-opening Saturday,
Patrick said the store also fea-
tures phones in its fitting
rooms that allow the cus-
tomer to call customer serv-
ice employees to have them
bring a different size, style or
color of clothing to try on.
"And an associate can
bring that merchandise with-
out the customer having to
leave the sitting room area,"
he said.
The store has also received
a face-lift, with updates to
freshen the store with new


JtlNINrc UnMA ILI,/LaKe uniy repuLer
Sales associate Linda Land
uses a price check scanner
at the Belk store in the Lake
City Mall.
paint and signs to define its
different departments that
are larger and more eye-
catching.
As are a staple at many
retail stores, at its checkout
counters, the local Belk store
has also added "pin pads" to
allow customers to more easi-
ly use debit/ATM, credit card
transactions.
'That is to help the cus-
tomer complete that sale a lit-
tle faster," Patrick said.
The changes to the store
began about three weeks ago
and were mostly complete
earlier this week.
Patrick said Belk is seeking
to explore "customer service
strategies" such as the price
look-up kiosks and fitting
room phones after the compa-
ny conducted customer sur-
veys asking them what they
want to see in a store.
"Our store was selected to
be basically this prototype
store," he said.


Cheryl Evans of Lake City slides her credit card through as sales associate Karen Patrick adds
Belk store in the Lake City Mall.


"It's not being introduced
at all of our Belk stores, but
hopefully if we get great
response from our customers
and things run efficiently and
smoothly, the company will
roll it out in all of the stores."
So far Patrick said cus-


tomer response to the store's
new features has been posi-
tive.
"Customers really are very
excited about the changes
that they are seeing in our
store, they realize that it's for
them as far as the shopping


experience is concerned," he
said.
For the grand re-opening
ceremony Saturday, cus-
tomers were able to enter
into a $250 store gift card
drawing and could also par-
take in complimentary


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
up her purchases at the


refreshments and cosmetic
makeovers.
As part of the grand re-
opening, Patrick said special
sales continue at the store
through Tuesday, including
today when the store opens
at 12:30 p.m.


7qy


ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS 1.64-acre lot on beautiful
Lake Jeffery's waterfront! Build your dream home and
enjoy the breath-taking view! Call 755-5110 for details
#43675


NEW & SPACIOUS in "Plantations"! 4BR/3BA has
family rm w/fireplace; formal living rm or parlor, dining
room & master suite w/whirlpool tub! $254,900 Call
755-5110 for floor plan #44126








PARADISE! Fish in 1-acre stocked pond & enjoy
serene 10-acres! Beautiful 2-story w/2000+ SqFt &
large balcony overlooking property! Privacy &
seclusion at $255,000 CHRISTY SKETTINI
H/963-1568 #44165


NEED ROOM? 5 bedroom/3 bath home built in 2000
has 2052 SqFt, large kitchen, open & airy! 2-car
carport, front & back porches; near town $114,900
KATRINA BLALOCK 961-3486 #44849


LUXURIOUS 4BR/3BA home on 5+ acres just off CR-
250 w/screened pool, jacuzzi, spa, plus new 4+ car
garage! All the exqluisite amenities imaginable! Call
755-5110 for details! #41200


ON THE SUWANNEE! Cute 2BR/2BA home w/gorgeous
deck overlooking river! If you want privacy this retreat
is for you! $164,900 Call 755-5110 for details #42127


5 ACRE MINI FARM! 2,537 SqFt 4BR/3BA home, family
rm w/massive FP, exquisite master suite, too many
amenities to list! Call for Appt! $309,900 KATRINA
BLALOCK 961-3486 #41391


COMMERCIAL CENTER on CR-341! 16 units range
from 480 SqFt to 2400 SqFt w/paved parking,
retention areas; fencing on 1.28 acres $725,000
DANIEL CRAPPS 755-5110 #42266


BISHOP REALTY, INC.
U.S. 90 West Across from Wal-Mart 752-4211
ColdwellBanker.com
Independently Owned and Operated LDER
r -" ,,


May-Fair Subdivision. Excellent location,
great floor plan. 3/2, large rooms, nice
master suite, oversized garage. Well
maintained home, won't last long.
$179,900. MLS#44604. Ask for Lori Giebeig
Simpson 752-2874.


On the Fairway!! This unique & spacious
house sits on 1/2 acre off the 1" fairway at
Lake City Country Club. This 3BR/2.5BA,
2364 sq. ft. house with office, wood burning
fireplace, family rm, wet bar, spa, and a 2
-car garage! Recently reduced $20,000!
Seller very motivated. $219,900.
MLS#43242. Call Kimberly Wynne
386-965-5630.
,~~. 'MENDll


Zoned R/0O Turn of the Century, 1893 Block Home, 2/1.5, on 5 acres. Office,
sq.ft. built in 1900. Current use as rental, family room, dining room, upgraded
3BR/2BA, with 1BR/1BA being added. Has kitchen. Includes 2 older MH's. Paved road,
had new wiring. Frame with vinyl siding. Suwannee County, O'Brien area. $120,000.
Near everything downtown. $105,000. MLS#44740. Contact Nell or Hansel Holton
MLS#44063. Contact Nell or Hansel Holton 386-984-5046
for more info, 386-984-5046. 386-984-5046.


1999 MH w/3BR/2BA on 1 acre. Very
good condition, with appliances. New on
market. $49,900. MLS#42623. Contact Nell
or Hansel Holton 386-984-5046.



E. (M


1999 DW MH Needs some minor repairs
& TLC. 3/2, 1440 sq. ft., 1 acre lot. Small
pond in back corner. $47,900. MLS#44335.
Call Nell or Hansel Holton, 386-984-5046.


Outstanding Brick House in Lake Butler
at reasonable price to sell. $50,900.
MLS#44765. Call today for info Hansel
Holton 386-984-5791.


Affordable Housing This 3/2 MH is near
town, near most conveniences on the
Westside. Very nice interior, front porch,
trees. Just $39,900. MLS#44467. Call Nell
or Hansel Holton for info 984-5046.


Row,%.DOE V

Iji~ ft SJ


In 3 Rivers Estates Very nice DW MH,
3BR/2BA, FP, 1736 sq. ft., front porch, apx. 1
acre lot. $59,900. MLS#41828. Contact
Listing Agents, Nell or Hansel Holton
386-984-5046.


You Have To See This. 2BR/2BA SWMH
(was 3BRs) in Woodgate Village. Very clean!
Has front porch & back porch. All
appliances, 8 capacity hot tub, chain link
fence & paved parking. $47,000. Assumable
loan w/$2500 down. Ask for Nell or Hansel
Holton 386-752-2235 if after hours.
MLS#34231.


Country Side Jennings, FL. 1620 sq. ft.,
3/2 DW MH on 1 acre lot. Needs appliances,
little TLC but otherwise in good condition.
$49,900. MLS#43569. Contact Nell or
Hansel Holton 984-5046.






Convenient to Lake City & Gainesville,
this 1-248 sq. ft. DW MH on .80 acre includes
double carport & 20x30 barn with concrete
floor and electricity. Immaculately cared for.
$69,900. MLS#43484. Ask for Mary Brown
Whitehurst 965-0887.


Now Selling lots in Carter Chase S/D. 1/2 acre lots! In town location. Lots of trees. Won't last long. Bring your own builder.
Reserve.your homesite now. Only $49,900 each. MLS#41543. Call Lori 752-2874 or Elaine 755-6488 for more details.
Home ifnder Construction! Quality, Convenience, Comfort. 3/2, open floor plan, located on 1/2 acre. 2 car garage, covered back
porch. $154,900. Ask for Lori Giebeig Simpson 386-752-2874.
Great Commercial lot in center of town! Would make a great spot for a small shop or a drive through. $59,900. MLS#44745.
Call Mary Brown Whitehurst 386-965-0887.
Like New! 2003 D/W mobile home on half acre lot. Convenient location, paved road. $66,500. MLS#42871. For more info, ask for
Don or Sherry Ratliff, 386-365-8414.


LANE CITTREPORTER


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


The Week in Review


F Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


A NYSE A Amex A Nasdaq
7,181.50 +45.14 1,467.59 +4.68 1,999.35 +14.54


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Cenveo 8.44 +2.94 +53.5
Saton 2.77 +.61 +28.2
ChiYuc 10.48 +2.21 +26.7
MechelStl n 33.70 +5.75 +20.6
AldDmcq 48.26 +7.76 +19.2
ShopKo 26.02 +3.84 +17.3
EEIChile 22.66 +2.93 +14.9
Chiqutawt 10.50 +1.35 +14.8
Blockbstr 10.21 +1.29 +14.5
Gotchk 11.85 +1.47 +14.2

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Welder 4.39 -1.89 -30.1
Paxar 17.08 -4.15 -19.5
CornPdtss 21.20 -4.70 -18.1
CatoCp 26.38 -5.52 -17.3
Enesco 5.65 -.95 -14.4
Imagistics 29.45 -4.78 -14.0
Bombay 4.51 -.69 -13.3
ArchDan 21.69 -3.28 -13.1
Katylnd 3.36 -.44 -11.6
PetroKazg 36.50 -4.37 -10.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Lucent 2229408 2.65 -.06
Pfizer 1988705 26.60 +.45
AmntGp If 1405005 51.91 +.96
Elan 950136 3.74 +.36
ExxonMbl 853480 60.01 -.54
WalMart 843249 48.57 -.42
GenElec 820825 35.74 +.27
ChevTex s 699391 56.69 -2.62
SprntFON 677894 23.53 +.79
Citigrp 660949 45.40 +.78

Diary
Advanced 1,913
Declined 1,572
New Highs 187
New Lows 118
Total issues 3,567
Unchanged 82
Volume 9,476,757,359


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
HiShearT 5.32 +1.52 +40.0
CVD Eqp 6.36 +1.76 +38.3
I-Sector 7.03 +1.82 +34.9
TriValley 11.97 +2.85 +31.3
RegeneRx n 3.75 +.85 +29.3
CoreMold 6.49 +1.43 +28.3
Adventrx n 2.11 +.46 +27.9
Riviera s 13.99 +2.24 +19.1
Aerocntry 3.85 +.60 +18.5
IvaxDiag 4.91 +.75 +18.0

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
RaeSyst 2.55 -.57 -18.3
BrookeCps11.58 -2.22 -16.1
TetonPet 3.07 -.58 -15.8
ImplntSc 4.76 -.84 -15.0
CEFrnkg 5.57 -.83 -13.0
LazKap 9.95 -1.45 -12.7
Telkonet 3.62 -.47 -11.5
NatlVis 4.78 -.61 -11.3
ArenaRes 11.88 -1.50 -11.2
BoltTech 5.80 -.70 -10.8

Most Active (s$1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SPDR 2822205118.00 +.62
SemiHTr 1214281 32.49 +.41
SP Engy 644916 42.72 -1.21
iShRs2000 509839121.30 -.34
iShJapan 441665 10.58 +.12
SP Fncl 436882 28.32 +.32
OilSvHT 340063 96.00 -2.70
DJIA Diam 278130104.54 +.49
PaxsnC 233176 1.38 +.76
Ramprs 198796 1.35 +.41

Diary
Advanced 587
Declined 478
New Highs 47
New Lows 78
Total issues 1,116
Unchanged 51
Volume 1,199,206,970


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
VelctyE h rs11.46 +7.65 +200.8
DigtlVid rs 5.00 +2.75 +122.2
CncrdCom 16.63 +6.81 +69.3
ArtWay 9.38 +3.58 +61.7
ShoePav 8.12 +2.46 +43.5
EdgarOnI wt 2.37 +.67 +39.4
EntreMd 3.11 +.86 +38.2
RF Mono 6.46 +1.69 +35.4
Feathrlte 9.33 +2.39 +34.4
BioSrce 9.48 +2.24 +30.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
CancerVax 2.88 -3.44 -54.4
NMSCm 2.64 -1.39 -34.5
VisualNet 2.00 -1.00 -33.3
MentGr 9.01 -4.44 -33.0
Elctrgis 2.75 -1.25 -31.3
RSA Sec 11.78 -4.05 -25.6
Firstwv 2.23 -.72 -24.4
Borland 6.16 -1.87 -23.3
Altiris 18.74 -5.23 -21.8
Magma 9.33 -2.45 -20.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Nasd100Tr4260290 36.64 +.44
JDS Uniph3405777 1.50 -.11
Microsoft 3383538 24.94 +.82
Intel 2619509 23.29 +.28
Cisco 2384924 17.90 +.20
Oracle 2000167 12.36 -.17
SiebelSys 1877208 8.96 -.50
SiriusS 1340792 5.41 -.15
SunMicro 1139808 4.11 +.06
ApidMatl 1039020 16.07 +.06

Diary
Advanced 1,557
Declined 1,737
New Highs 146
New Lows 285
Total issues 3,382
Unchanged 88
Volume 8,343,070,949


I STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg
AT&T NY .95 19.23 +.57 +3.1 +.9
Alltel NY 1.52 56.42 +1.27 +2.3 -4.0
AmlntGp If NY .50 51.91 +.96 +1.9 -21.0
AppleC s Nasd 43.74 +2.85 +7.0 +35.8
ApldMati Nasd .12 16.07 +.06 +0.4 -6.0
AutoZone NY ... 85.29 +.26 +0.3 -6.6
BkofAms NY 1.80 44.68 +.67 +1.5 -4.9
BellSouth NY 1.08 26.74 +.88 +3.4 -3.8
BobEvn Nasd .48 21.41 -1.58 -6.9 -18.1
CNBFnPA s Nasd .52 15.25 +.40 +2.7 -.1
CSX NY .40 41.54 -.27 -0.6 +3.6
ChmpE NY 9.44 +.08 +0.9 -20.1
ChevTex s NY 1.60 56.69 -2.62 -4.4 +8.0
Cisco Nasd ... 17.90 +.20 +1.1 -7.3
CocaCI NY 1.12 42.10 +.72 +1.7 +1.1
ColBgp NY .61 20.33 +.13 +0.6 -4.2
Delhaize NY 1.50 68.75 +.80 +1.2 -9.4
Delllnc Nasd ... 38.18 +.15 +0.4 -9.4
DollarG NY .16 22.00 +.60 +2.8 +5.9
eBay s Nasd 35.16 -1.91 -5.2 -39.6
Elan NY ... 3.74 +.36 +10.7 -86.3
FPLGps NY 1.42 40.33 +.20 +0.5 +7.9
FamDIr NY .38 28.97 -.68 -2.3 -7.2
FordM NY .40 11.03 -.15 -1.3 -24.7
GenElec NY .88 35.74 +.27 +0.8 -2.1
GaPacif NY .70 35.61 -.27 -0.8 -5.0
GdyFam Nasd .12 8.45 -.37 -4.2 -7.5
HCA Inc NY .60 54.92 +1.12 +2.1 +37.4


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg
HomeDp NY .40 37.48 -.12 -0.3 -12.3
Intel Nasd .32 23.29 +.28 +1.2 -.4
JDS Uniph Nasd 1.50 -.11 -6.8 -52.7
JeffPilot NY 1.67 48.84 +.39 +0.8 -6.0
LowesCos NY .16 54.81 -1.38 -2.5 -4.8
Lucent NY ... 2.65 -.06 -2.2 -29.5
McDnlds NY .55 31.14 +.14 +0.5 -2.9
Microsoft Nasd .32 24.94 +.82 +3.4 -6.7
Nasd100TrNasd .38 36.64 +.44 +1.2 -8.2
NY Times NY .62 35.57 -.43 -1.2 -12.8
NobltyH Nasd .20 19.91 -.65 -3.2 -15.2
OcciPet NY 1.24 72.22 -1.42 -1.9 +23.7
Oracle Nasd ... 12.36 -.17 -1.4 -9.9
Penney NY .50 48.48 -1.43 -2.9 +17.1
PepsiCo NY .92 53.08 +.32 +0.6 +1.7
Pfizer NY .76 26.60 +.45 +1.7 -1.1
Potash s NY .60 88.39 +1.20 +1.4 +6.4
Ryder NY .64 41.51 -.02 ...-13.1
SearsHIdgsNasd ... 142.07 +6.68 +4.9 +43.6
SemiHTr Amex .18 32.49 +41 +1.3 -2.6
SiebelSys Nasd ... 8.96 -.50 -5.3 -14.6
SiriusS Nasd ... 5.41 -.15 -2.7 -29.0
SouthnCo NY 1.43 31.95 ... ...-4.7
SPDR Amex2.26 118.00 +.62 +0.5 -2.4
SunMicro Nasd ... 4.11 +.06 +1.5 -23.7
TimeWarnNY 1Z.97 +.52 +3.0 -7.6
WalMart NY .60 48.57 -.42 -0.9 -8.0
Yahoos Nasd .. 34.76 +.48 +1.4 -7.7


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 5.75 5.75
Discount Rate 3.75 3.75
Federal Funds Rate 2.75 2.875
Treasuries
3-month 2.74 2.78
6-month 3.04 3.09
5-vear 4.14 4.12
10 -year 4.48 4.45
30-year 4.76 4.72


Currencies


Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.2958 1.3043
Britain 1.8836 1.8695
Canada 1.2283 1.2230
Euro .7740 .7780
Japan 108.30 108.62
Mexico 11.1250 11.1790
Switzerlnd 1.1984 1.2071
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Weekly Dow Jones


Dow Jones 11,000

industrials l 10,000


For the week ending
Friday, April 8


10461?.34

10.461.34


. -9,000


-8.000


R8 I I I I I I I I I I I I t I 7,000
Record high: 11,722.98 7000
Jan. 14,2000 A M J J A S 0 N D J F M A M



MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min Inl
Name Obi ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
~+54A -16-.- .- -- -. 1/ NL 3,000 -


Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 n SP
American Funds A: InvCoAA p LV
American Funds A: WshMutA p LV
American Funds A: GwthFdA p XG
Fidelity Invest: Magellan n LC
PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRet n IB
Fidelity Invest: Contra n XG
Dodge&Cox: Stock XV
American Funds A: IncoFdA p MP
American Funds A: EupacA p IL
Fidelity Invest: LowPr rn MV
Vanguard Instl Fds: Instldx n SP
American Funds A: CaplnBIA p MP
American Funds A: NewPerA p GL
Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk n XC
Fidelity Invest: Grolnc LC
Vanguard Fds: Wndsll LV
American Funds A: BalA p BL
American Funds A: CapWGrA p GL
Vanguard Fds: Welltn n BL
Fidelity Invest: Equtinc n El
Fidelity Invest: Diverlntl n IL
Fidelity Invest: Puritan BL
Fidelity Invest: GroCo n XG
Fidelity Invest: BlueChipGr LC
Vanguard Admiral: 500Adml n SP
Vanguard Fds: Prmcp r XC


63,515 108.88
65,063 30.38
63,234 30.23
60,637 26.96
59,656 100.98
47,158 10.58
46,664 57.05
44,909 129.16
43,843 18.20
38,221 35.89
36,402 39.81
35,318 107.98
34,578 52.12
33,806 27.24
32,260 27.98
31,572 37.27
30,307 30.94
30,005 17.68
29,405 33.90
29,132 29.90
26,562 51.08
25,305 29.04
24,057 18.60
23,934 53.35
22,686 40.08
22,603 108.89
22,476 59.81


+5.4/A
+6.3/C
+5.9/D
+4.6/A
+1.8/D
+3.3/A
+9.2/A
+12.9/A
+9.8/A
+11.5/C
+13.3/B
+5.5/A
+13.4/A
+7.2/C
+5.8/B
+4.9/B
+12.5/A
+4.6/B
+14.3/A
+8.4/A
+6.1/E
+11.8/C
+5.1/B
+0.7/C
-0.6/E
+5.5/A
+6.2/B


-16.1/A
+11.1/C
+29.0/B
-9.4/A
-24.4/D
+45.7/A
+4.0/A
+77.6/A
+55.8/A
-3.7/C
+128.6/A
-15.6/A
+67.8/A
+2.2/B
-12.9/C
-8.7/B
+44.7/A
+53.7/A
+43.0/A
+43.6/A
+23.1/D
+25.8/A
+27.7/A
-41.4/C
-33.5/E
NS
-12.8/C


NL 3,00
5.75 250
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 5,000,000
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 10,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
NL 3,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
NL 2,50C
NL 2,500
NL 250,00C
NL 25.000


BL -Balanced, El -Equity Income, GL -Global Stock, HB -Heathflliotech, IB -Intermediate Bond, IL -Intematonal Stock, LC -Large-Cap Core, L
-Large-Cap Growth, LV -Large-Cap Val., MP -Stock/Bond Bend, MT -Mortgage, SP -S&P 500, SS -Singe-State Muni, XG -Multi-Cap Growl
Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in botto
20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA = Not avail. NE = Data in question. NS = Fund not in existence. Source: Upper, In


31 -.17 +7.6 6.90
90 +.13 +2.5 25.06
... +6.81 +50.1 16.63
... +.01 -26.6 1.46
22 +2.39 -4.6 46.18
22 +3.04 -39.3 24.34
... -.04 -46.1 .83
32 +.15 -9.4 38.18
15 -3.17 -12.5 25.16
61 -1.91 -39.6 35.16
12 -.12 -23.0 8.87
27 -.86 -17.2 51.06
44 -.65 -19.7 5.26
16 +.05 -9.3 42.90
25 +.24 -12.2 12.14
33 +3.04 +275.4 15.69
... +3.0 21.67
... -.09 -61.7 .46
... +2.49 +.7 58.48
34 +.63 +237.3 10.32
38 +1.79 +6.1 37.12
...+12.01 -.4 192.05
... +1.37 -11.3 10.66
... +.34 -18.6 22.49
... +.61 -45.0 3.19
... +.62 -24.0 5.61
26 -.17 -25.0 34.58
18 +.28 -.4 23.29
... -.11 -52.7 1.50
47 +1.96 -12.3 20.36
87 +.18 -20.2 21.71
22 -.32 -3.5 44.93
16 -.46 -3.1 28.00
+.03 -39.5 2.05
-.57 -43.9 4.40
... -.27 -53.5 5.41
31 +1.18 +.5 38.95
-9-K 4AA4Q 1 1


MCI Incn 1.60
MarvellT s ...
Maxim .80
McLeoA ...
Medlmun
MentGr
MercIntr
Microchp .28
Microsoft .32
MillPhar
MissnRes ...
NMSCm ...
Napster
Nasd100Tr .38
NetwkAp ...
NextlPrt ...
NwstAirl
Novell
Novius ...
Nvidia
NyerMd
OSI Phrm ...
OmniVisn ...
Oracle
PMC Sra ....
PacSunwr ...
PattUTIs .16
PetsMart .12
PinnSyst ...
Polycom
ProtDsg
Qlogic
Qualcom s .36
RF MicD ...
RSA Sec ...
RedHat
RschMot s ...
CmFinlint,


New York Stock Exchange
mr"-. -


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


... ... +.29 +13.8
2.1 10 +.27 -6.0
28 +.44 +24.1
1.2 15 -.02 -6.9
... 5 -1.00 -28.5
... ... +.74 +2.2
4.9 ... +.57 +.9
2.3 ... +.47 +9.8
2.3 23 +1.67 +2.6
.8 26 +2.46 +25.7
... 18 -.74 -12.2
... 68 +.90 -22.4
... 21 -1.43 +4.0
.. 11 +1.25 +20.3
... 18 -.04 -13.7
... ... -.04 -.7
... ... ... +1.5
... 28 -.70 -11.3
... 69 +.83 -10.1
3.7 17 4.29 -15.0
1.6 56 +1.26 -12.0
1.9 23 +1.34 +.6
.9 ... +.58 +17.3
... 92 +.06 -20.6
2.4 12 +.80 +4.8
4.5 14 +.35 +7.3
... 25 +1.13 +12.2
1.2 10 -1.03 +18.2
.4 ... -.43 -1.3
4.1. 13 +.40 +.6
.9 19 +.64 -8.6
1.0 12 +.96 -21.0
... ... -.23 -2.6
.2 16 +1.47 -1.4
.9 12 -1.94 +17.7
.7 25 -.04 -3.4
2.1 17 -1.13 -9.3
2.6 11 +.12 -5.1
.5 12 -2.18 +19.8
1.6 20 -3.28 -2.8
1.4 28 +.40 +2.0
17 +.31 -31.5
1.5 25 +2.18 +15.2
1.6 ... -.17 +17.5
.6 23 -.26 +13.4
... 19 -.40 +4.7
34 -.51 -21.5
1.0 28 -.89 +4.7
4.0 12 +.67 -4.9
2.7 16 +.38 -12.4
.9' 52 -.05 -1.4
1.7 55 +.70 -.3
... ... -.17 +3.1
.8 8 -2.35 -1.4
4.0 10 +.88 -3.8
.9 17 -.17 -15.0
48 +.04 +35.3
.8 ... +1.29 +7.0
1.7 25 -.18 +13.2
25 +1.83 -14.2
4.4 21 +.33 -1.4
1.3 25 -1.13 +10.2
.7 13 -.98 +16.4
21 +.14 +25.6
1.0 27 -.27 '+3.6
.6 23 +.09 +14.6
... ... +.23 +13.4
.. 57 -.73 +3.3
... 22 +1.03 +2.5
+.15 -26.6
.1 15 -.32 -11.7
.2 19 +.85 -4.5
29 +1.51 +4.8
1.2 21 +.15-11.6
1.8 16 +.54 -7.0
1.7 10 +.35 -7.3
3.3 ... +.01 +5.8
.3 8 -.89 -2.8
... ... +2.94 +172.3


6.44
40.20
16.97
37.08
10.34
11.19
19.23
15.72
47.86
59.01
23.70
17.09
30.60
75.03
51.96
1.36
1.37
21.37
9.62
20.30
38.58
31.61
25.41
7.37
54.20
65.53
29.45
97.40
51.69
34.53
51564
51".91
17.92
57.83
76.26
35.67
46.00
22.65
60.56
21.69
45.23
11.78
44.60
28.22
52.76
30.49
14.60
44.66
44.68
29.27
23.89
34.45
8.28
48.04
26.74
50.43
12.38
10.21
58.60
30.50
25.27
52.15
50.62
13.13
41.54
51.65
28.23
14.27
20.65
2.89
74.36
55.53
41.32
50.93
90.69
20.66
11.95
57.90
8.44


... 26 +.04 -23.5
.... ... +.04 +3.1
... 19 -.28 -12.1
... ... +.05 +52.1
23 +.19 +3.1
.1 35 +.50 +7.2
... ... +.11 +36.2
... 28 +.76 -2.9
... 25 +.59 -21.9
.7 21 +1.06 +26.6
... 15 +.34 -25.9
... 32 +1.33 -8.5
... ... +1.09 -21.0
... 71 +2.85 +35.8
.7 18 +.06 -6.0
... ... -.08 -25.2
... 35 +.34 +5.8
... ... -.16 -29.1
... 37 +3.52 -11.4
... 25 -.24 -13.7
... 24 +3.43
...... +1.34 -45.8
.5 29 +1.44 -14.3
...... +.02 -42.4
... 44 -1.87 -47.3
... 49 +1.23 -4.8
... 25 -.11 -24.5
... 12 ... -22.4
... ... -.08 -62.7
... 19 -1.46 -20.0
... +2.66 +37.3
... ... -.16 -38.8
... 23 +.25 -10.3
... ... +.21 -42.8
... 23 +.20 -7.3
... 32 +.49 -3.1
... 77 -.32 -.6
7R qq 1


Name Div YId
ChesEng .18 .8
ChevTex s 1.60 2.8
Chicos s
ChiYuc
CircCity .07 .5
Citigrp 1.76 3.9
CitzComm 1.00 7.9
ClearChan .50 1.5
Coach s
CocaCI 1.12 2.7
Coeur
ColgPal 1.16 2.2
CmcBNJs .44 1.4
CVRD s .89 2.8
CompAs .08 .3
ConAgra 1.09 4.1
ConocPhil 2.48 2.3
ConsolEgy .56 1.2
ConEd 2.28 5.4
ConstellEn 1.34 2.5
CtlAirB
CoopCam
CornPdtss .28 1.3
Corning
CntwdFn s .56 1.7
Coventry
Crompton .20 1.4
CrwnCstle ...
CypSem
:DRHortns' .27 .9
DTE 2.06 4.5
Danahers .06" .1,
Darden .08 .3
Deere 1.24 1.9
Delphi If .12 2.9
DeltaAir
DevonE s .30 .6
DiaOffs .25 .5
Dillards .16 .6
DirecTV
Disney .24 .8
DollarG .16 .7
DomRes 2.68 3.6
DoralFin .72 3.6
DowChm 1.34 2.7
DukeEgy 1.10 3.9
Dynegy
ETrade
EMC Cp ...
EOG Res s .16 .3
Edisonlnt 1.00 2.8
ElPasoCp .16 1.5
Elan
EDS .20 1.0
EmrsnEl 1.66 2.5
Emulex
EnCana g .40 .6
ENSCO .10 .3
Enterasys ...
EqOffPT 2.00 6.5
EqtyRsd 1.73 5.4
Exelon s 1.60 3.5
ExxonMbl 1.08 1.8
FPLGps 1.42 3.5
FairchldS
FannieM If 1.04 1.9
FedExCp .28 .3
FedrDS .54 .8
FidlNFnk 1.00 3.1
FirstData .24 .6
FirstEngy 1.65 4.0
FishrSci
FleetEn
FordM .40 3.6
ForestLab ..
FredMac 1.40 2.2
FMCG 1.00 2.6
Freescale n ...
FreescB n ...


Name Div
Compuwre ...
Comvers
CncrdCom ...
Conexant ...
Costco .40
Cree Inc
DRDGOLD ..:
Dellnc
DllrTree ...
eBay s ...
ErthLink
ElectArts ...
ExtNetw
FifthThird 1.40
Flextrn
Forward
FrghtCar n ...
GeneLTc ...
Genzyme ...
Geores
GileadScis ...
Googlen ...
HumGen
IAC Interac...
IPIX Cp
Identix ...
Imclone
Intel .32
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
JnprNtw
KLA Tnc .48
LamRsch ...
Level3
LexarMd
Ligand B If ...
LinearTch .40
1 nidplu,,


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
14 -1.27 +28.6 21.22
9 -2.62 +8.0 56.69
37 +.43 +25.5 28.56
... +2.21 -21.1 10.48
50 -.26 -1.5 15.41
14 +.78 -5.8 45.40
55 -.22 -7.7 12.73
24 +.18 +2.6 34.35
33 +.06 -1.2 27.85
21 +.72 +1.1 42.10
... -.09 -10.4 3.52
23 +2.02 +4.7 53.54
19 -.64 -3.5 31.07
14 -.50 +8.6 31.50
... +.10 -11.9 27.36
18 +.18 -8.8 26.85
9 -1.15 +25.7 109.13
22 -.74 +15.1 47.25
19 +.36 -3.5 42.20
17 +.98 +21.5 53.12
... +1.18 -5.5 12.79
33 -1.07 +5.9 56.99
17 -4.70 -20.8 21.20
... +.84 +1.8 11.98
9 +1.26 -10.7 33.06
19 +2.16 +32.0 70.05
... -.32 +21.3 14.31
17 +.55 +1.2 16.84
... -.43 +1.8 11.94
9 -1.05 -3.8 29.09
18 +.45 +6.4 45.91
23 -.75 -9.7 51.85
20 -.20 +11.1 30.81
12 +.77 -9.9 67.01
15 -.22 -54.5 4.10
... -.01 -46.3 4.02
11 -2.65 +20.5 46.90
... -2.15 +23.8 49.59
19 -.56 -.8 26.66
... +.08 -13.3 14.51
25 -.18 +2.2 28.40
21 +.60 +5.9 22.00
20 ... +11.1 75.27
5 -1.94 -59.8 19.81
17 -.08 -.9 49.06
18 +.03 +11.9 28.35
... -.12 -17.7 3.80
12 ... -21.1 11.80
35 +.18 -15.7 12.54
18 -2.97 +32.5 47.29
13 +.60 +11.3 35.65
... -.09 +1.5 10.56
+.36 -86.3 3.74
64 -.11 -11.0 20.56
21 +1.29 -6.9 65.25
30 -.08 +12.4 18.92
...-2.18 +22.7 70.00
52 -2.75 +13.8 36.11
... -.46 -52.2 .86
... +.36 +5.8 30.82
22 -.06 -11.4 32.04
16 -.50 +3.0 45.40
15 -.54 +17.1 60.01
16 +.20 +7.9 40.33
31 -.21 -9.3 14.75
9 +1.91 -22.6 55.15
20 -1.33 -7.6 91.02
16 +1.44 +11.2 64.25
8 -.20 -6.6 32.10
17 +.17 -8.2 39.07
16 -.37 +5.3 41.60
35 +1.57 -7.5 57.72
... +.80 -30.7 9.33
6 -.15 -24.7 11.03
13 -3.78 -26.6 32.93
17 +2.08 -14.6 62.93
45 -1.57 +.5 38.44
... +.79 -1.7 17.51


Yj 74 1LLi
LkyP~tEI-i" ifS

PDLYL~iU


IT'S NOT TOO LATE. OPEN AN ALLSTATE IRA BY APRIL 15, 2005 AND HAVE
IT COUNT TOWARD THE 2004 TAX YEAR. CALL ME TO LEARN MORE.


.Mary SlayAllstate
757 W. Duval St.
(Formerly Rick'Brirgger's office)
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 755-6801


P.S. Appointments to fit your schedule.


Allstate.
You're in good hands.


Certain restrictions apply to contributions, rollovers, deductions and distributions from an IRA. Consult your tax
advisor for specific information. Allste Life Insurance Company. Home Office, Northbrook, IL Securities offered by
Personal Financial Representatives through Allistate Financial Services, LLC. Registered Broker-Dealer. Member
NASD, SIPC. Main office: 2920 South 84th Street, Lincoln, NE 68506. 877-525-5727. 2004 Allstate Insurance
Company


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


FriedBR 1.36
Gap .18
Gateway
Genentchs
GnGrthPrp 1.44
GenMills 1.24
GM db32B 1.31
GMdb33 1.56
Genworth n .26
Gillette .65
GlaxoSKIn 1.53
GlobalSFe .30
Goldcrp g .18
GoldmanS 1.00
Goodyear ...
vjGrace
GrantPrde ...
GtAtPc
Guidant .40
HCA Inc .60
Hallibtn .50
HarleyD .50
HarrahE 1.32
HartfdFn 1.16
HItMgt .16
HealthNet ...
HewlettP .32
Hilton .08
HomeDp .40
HonwIllntl .83
Huntsmn n ...


9.4 7 -1.28 -25.4 14.46
.8 18 -.09 +1.4 21.42
... ... +.09 -32.1 4.08
78 +1.38 +5.9 57.66
4.2 28 +.05 -5.8 34.05
2.5 18 +.89 -1.0 49.23
7.0 ... +.24 -19.2 18.64
7.4 ... +.52 -21.2 21.02
.9 12 -.04 +1.9 27.50
1.2 31 +2.13 +16.5 52.15
3.3 ... +.70 -2.9 46.03
.8 60 -1.13 +11.7 37.00
1.3 34 -.42 -7.6 13.90
.9 12 +3.63 +8.5 112.93
.. 24 -.26 -12.7 12.80
... ... +.46 -39.7 8.21
... 51 -.50 +19.1 23.87
... ... +1.33 +61.8 16.58
.5 46 +.87 +3.6 74.71
1.1 21 +1.12 +37.4 54.92
1.1 ... -.32 +13.0 44.33
.9 19 +.49 -5.7 57.27
1.9 21 +5.11 +3.3 69.09
1.7 10 +1.36 -1.0 68.61
.6 19 -.51 +12.1 25.46
92 +2.05 +21.4 35.05
1.5 18 -.07 +3.2 21.64
.4 38 +.57 +.3 22.80
1.1 17 -.12 -12.3 37.48
2.2 22 +.58 +6.1 37.58
... ... -1.01 -8.7 22.37


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


INCO
IBM .72 .8
IntlGame .48 1.8
IntPap 1.00 2.7
Interpub If ...
JPMorgCh 1.36 3.9
Jabil
JanusCap .04 .3
JohnJn 1.14 1.7
KB Home 1.50 1.3
KerrMc 1.80 2.4
Keycorp 1.30 4.1
KimbClk 1.80 2.7
KineticC
KingPhrm .. ...
Kohis
Kraft .82 2.5
KrspKrm
LSI Log
LaBrnch
LehmBr .80 .8
LennarA .55 1.0
LibtyMA 1.93 ...
LillyEli 1.52 2.8
Limited .60 2.5
LionsGtg ...
Lucent
Lyondell .90 3.3
MBIA 1.12 2.0
MBNA .56 2.3
MGM Mr
Manpwl .40 .9


14 +.28 +8.9 40.04
18 -2.84 -11.1 87.60
23 +.40 -21.7 26.92
... +.95 -11.2 37.30
+.94 -2.1 13.12
22 +.59 -11.6 34.50
32 +.81 +13.3 28.97
19 +.07 -17.2 13.92
24 +1.79 +8.2 68.64
10 -.25 +13.7 118.75
22 -5.34 +29.0 74.56
14 -.03 -5.7 31.98
18 +.31 -.1 65.77
... -2.75 -25.5 56.83
... -.62 -39.0 7.56
24 +.29 +4.3 51.26
21 -.11 -8.3 32.67
... +.11 -39.8 7.59
... +.07 +1.8 5.58
... -.32 -1.7 8.81
11 +1.48 +7.8 94.26
9 -.33 +.5 56.96
... +.05 -5.3 10.40
33 +3.12 -4.3 54.31
15 -.55 +2.3 23.56
... -1.10 -4.9 10.10
13 -.06 -29.5 2.65
90 -1.65 -6.6 27.00
10 +2.77 -13.3 54.89
12 +.67 -11.8 24.87
26 +2.49 +.2 72.87
16 -.49 -12.4 42.32


... ... +.55 +28.2
... 77 -1.29 +2.6
1.9 28 +1.21 -2.5
... ... -.01 -76.4
... ... +1.77 -5.6
... ...-4.44 -41.1
... 55 -1.11 +.3
1.1 25 +.55 -2.8
1.3 27 +.82 -6.7
... ... -.10 -32.8
... ... +.25 +27.9
... 29 -1.39 -58.2
... ... +.92 -22.2
1.0 ... +.44 -8.2
... 54 +1.31 -14.0
... ... +1.22 +18.2
... ... +.33 -37.2
... 6 -.38 -15.0
.. 25 +.37 -3.6
... 41 -.08 -.5
... ... +.01 +1.8
... ... +4.48 -39.5
... 12 -.18 -18.8
... 22 -.17 -9.9
... 30 -.02 -24.2
19 -1.45 +16.5
.6 40 -.38 +30.7
.4 ... -.70 -22.2
... ... +.11 -6.4
... 45 -1.04 -32.6
... ... +.10 -23.9
27 +.23 +10.4
1.0 31 -.65 -17.7
... ... +.03 -24.6
... 23 -4.05 -41.3
... 47 -.97 -16.2
... 71 +2.11 -6.3
PO i i A 11 1


25.84
36.39
41.35
.17
25.60
9.01
45.69
25.84
24.94
8.16
7.47
2.64
7.28
36.64
28.56
23.10
6.86
5.74
26.89
23.45
2.85
45.30
14.90
12.36
8.53
25.93
25.43
27.64
5.71
15.72
15.73
40.55
34.90
5.16
11.78
11.19
77.22
00 79


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Sanmina
SearsHIdgs ...
Sepracor ...
SiebelSys ..
SigmaTel
Sina
SiriusS
SkywksSol ...
Sonus n
Staples .25
Starbucks ...
SunMicro ...
Symantec s ...
TASERs ...
TelwestGI n ...
Tellabs
TevaPh s .22
3Com
TibcoSft ...
TiVo Inc
Trnsmeta ...
UTStrcm If ...
UtdGIblCm...
VelctyE h rs ...
Verisign
Veritas
ViaNet ...
Vitesse ...
WetSeal ...
Wynn
XM Sat ...
XOMA
Xilinx .20
Xybrnaut If ...
Yahoo s
VolltnllDi


... -.01 -40.4 5.05
13 +6.68 +43.6 142.07
... +2.03 -2.6 57.81
45 -.50 -14.6 8.96
25 -2.39 -3.1 34.43
26 -2.99 -6.5 29.98
... -.15 -29.0 5.41
27 -.35 -37.4 5.90
39 -.29 -31.9 3.90
22 +.40 -8.5 30.85
47 -2.64 -22.0 48.62
... +.06 -23.7 4.11
28 -1.20 -20.1 20.57
33 -1.26 -71.1 9.16
... +1.25 +7.7 18.93
... -.14 -17.2 7.11
65 +1.58 +8.2 32.30
... -.03 -16.5 3.48
36 -.50 -46.7 7.11
... +.36 -4.6 5.60
... -.10 -44.8 .90
... +.19 -49.8 11.11
... -.14 -5.2 9.16
.. +7.65 -18.1 11.46
40 +.64 -15.0 28.56
28 -1.05 -20.9 22.57
... +.03 -75.3 .21
... -.12 -29.5 2.49
... -.43 +61.6 3.67
... -2.91 -5.7 63.13
.... -.06 -18.5 30.67
... +.19 -54.4 1.18
29 +1.18 +1.0 29.96
... -.05 -84.6 .19
60 +.48 -7.7 34.76
1 SO-KA4 -;0 9 ;44 4.


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
Marathon 1.12 2.3 13 -.50 +27.0 47.75
MarsIaM .68 2.3 93 +.17 -9.1 29.89
Masco .80 2.4 17 -.15 -7.1 33.94
MasseyEn .16 .4 ... -.51 +14.4 39.98
Mattel .45 2.2 15 -.13 +7.0 20.85
Maxtor ... ... ... +.26 +6.8 5.66
MayDS .98 2.6 22 +.39 +26.5 37.20
Maytag .72 5.3 ... -.22 -35.4 13.63
McKesson .24 .6 +.29 +21.3 38.15
McAfee ... ... 16 -1.60 -25.9 21.45
MedcoHlIth ... ... 30 +4.07 +28.2 53.32
Medicis .12 .4 27 -2.23 -19.5 28.25
Medtrnic .34 .6 29 +1.89 +5.5 52.40
MellonFnc .72 2.6 15 -.33 -9.9 28.03
MerrillLyn .64 1.1 13 +.55 -5.5 56.50
MetLife .46 1.2 11 +.63 -2.5 39.49
MicronT ... ... 15 -.06 -17.4 10.20
MobileTel s .55 1.5 72 +2.92 +8.3 37.51
Monsnto .68 1.1 52 -3.04 +10.6 61.45
MorgStan 1.08 1.9 13 -1.20 +.3 55.67
Motorola .16 1.1 24 +.31 -11.6 15.20
NCR Cps ...... 23 +1.24 +.1 34.66
NatlCity 1.40 4.2 8 +.58 -11.0 33.43
NatGrid 1.84 3.9 ... +.81 -1.4 47.31
NOilVarco ... ... 35 -1.74 +28.4 45.31
NatSemi s .08 .4 19 +.04 +12.3 20.15
NwCentFn 6.20 13.2 6 +.41 -26.5 46.95
NewellRub .84 3.7 ... +.55 -7.1 22.47
NewmtM .40 1.0 42 -47 -5.5 41.98
NewsCpAn .16 1.0 .. -.13 -9.9 16.82
NewsCpB n .06 .3 -.14 -9.1 17.45
NiSource .92 4.0 14 +.03 +.6 22.92
NikeB 1.00 1.2 21 -.69 -9.2 82.31
NobleCorp ... ... 51 -2.88 +11.4 55.42
NokiaCp .44 2.9 ... +.37 -2.0 15.35
Nordstr .52 .9 20 +.53 +17.2 54.75
NorflkSo .44 1.3 15 -1.94 -3.7 34.84
NortelN If ... ... ... -.02 -22.5 2.69
NoFrkBcs .88 3.1 15 +.35 -2.3 28.18
Novartis .86 1.8 ... +.65 -7.0 47.02
Nucor s .60 1.1 8 -3.13 +5.6 55.27
Nuveenlnv .72 2.1 21 +.01 -13.7 34.05
OcciPet 1.24 1.7 12 -1.42 +23.7 72.22
OffcDpt ... ... 20 -.08 +26.3 21.92
OfficeMax .60 1.8 19 +.30 +7.7 33.80
PG&E Cp 1.20 3.5 3 +.38 +4.1 34.63
PeabdyEs .30 7 34 -1.80 +12.8 45.65
Penney .50 1.0 27 -1.43 +17.1 48.48
PepsiCo .92 1.7 22 +.32 +1.7 53.08
PetrbrsA .58 1.5 .... -.44 +6.5 38.56
Petrobrs 1.75 3.9 -.46 +11.5 44.35
Pfizer .76 2.9 18 +.45 -1.1 26.60
PhelpD 1.00 1.0 10 -1.15 +1.4 100.26
Pier 1 .40 2.4 24 -1.38 -15.5 16.65
PioNtrl .20 .5 18 -.78 +23.5 43.34
PlacerD .10 .6 24 -.15 -16.3 15.78
Praxair .72 1.5 23 +.79 +9.7 48.43
Premcor .08 .1 12 -1.26 +48.8 62.74
Pridelnt ... ... ... -.66 +20.0 24.64
Providian ... ... 14 +.30 +3.6 17.06
Prudentl .63 1.1 17 +.66 +5.1 57.77
PulteHm .20 .3 10 -1.32 +14.3 72.93
QwestCm ...... +.29 -11.5 3.93
RadioShk .25 1.0 12 +.68 -23.7 25.10
RangeRsc .08 .3 46 +1.25 +24.7 25.51
Raytheon .88 2.3 42 +.06 +.5 39.02
ReliantEn ... ... ... +.40 -14.4 11.69
Revlon ... ... ... +.28 +37.0 3.15
RiteAid 9 +.07 +9.0 3.99
RobtHalf .28 1.1 33 -.36 -12.1 25.86
Rowan .25 .8 ... -.83 +15.2 29.83
RylCarb .52 1.2 19 -.02 -18.7 44.25
RoyIDut 2.26 3.7 11 +.98 +6.4 61.04
SAPAG .24 .6 ... -.93 -12.3 38.78
SBC Com 1.29 5.4 13 +.42 -7.8 23.75
SLM Cp .76 1.5 12 +.84 -6.5 49.94
Safeway ... ... 17 +2.42 +4.8 20.68
StJude.s ... ... 33 +1.38 -13.1 36.44
StPaulTrav .88 2.5 19 -.08 -4.8 35.28


Name Div YId
Ableauctn ...
Adventrx n ...
ApolloG g ...
BemaGold ...
BiotechT .04 ..
CVD Eqp ...
CalypteBn ...
Cambiorg ...
CanArgo n ...
CelsionCp ...
Crystalix g ...
DHB Inds
DJIA Diam 2.25 1.9
DSL.net h ...
DigitAngel ...
EagleBbnd ...
GascoEnn ..
GeoGlobl n ...
GoldStrg ...
GreyWolf ...
Gurunet n ...
Harken
HooperH .06 1.8
ISCO Intl ...
iShBrazil .46 2.0
ISh HK .27 2.3
iShJapan .04 .4
iShMalasia .16 2.4
iShMexico .28 1.2
iShEmMkt 2.41 1.2
iSh20TB 4.01 4.5
iSh EAFE 2.41 1.5
iShNqBio ...
iShR1000V1.54 2.3
iShR2000G .22 .4
iShRs2000 1.53 1.3
iShREst 5.12 4.6
iqhqPQml 1I 47 q


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
... -.06 -38.6 .51
... +.46 +88.4 2.11
... -.06 -51.2 .40
... -.13 -18.0 2.50,
... +5.03 -5.5 144.45
...+1.76 +364.2 6.36
... -.05 -41.0 .23
... -.20 -26.2 1.97
+.01 +28.7 1.39
... +.01 -42.1 .33
... +.43 +11.4 4.00
13 +.06 -52.7 9.00
... +.49 -2.8 104.54
... -.02 -52.2 .11
.. +.26 -36.9 4.88
-.02 -54.5 .30
+.39 -16.7 3.55
... +.80 +100.0 1.94
... -27.2 2.92
... -.12 +24.7 6.57
... +2.68 +148.7 21.64
... -.05 -7.7 .48
20 -.17 -42.2 3.42
... +.03 -8.3 .33
-.29 +3.0 22.91
+.22 -3.6 11.66
... +.12 -3.1 10.58
... -.04 -6.3 6.70
... -.20 -4.4 24.05
... +4.30 +3.2 208.30
... -.35 +.5 88.95
... +2.00 +.2 160.50
... +2.37 -13.3 65.37
... +.23 -.6 65.95
... -.08 -7.6 62.19
... -.34 -6.3 121.30
... -2.34 -10.6 110.16
-qnl 17ARR


Wkly YTD Wkl)
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Las
Saks ... ... 24 +.42 +31.1 19.0
Sanofi .61 1.4 ... +1.35 +8.5 43.4
SaraLee .79 3.6 13 +.04" -8.7 22.0
SchergPI .22 1.1 ... +1.44 -7.4 19.3
Schlmb .84 1.2 34 -1.70 +4.4 69.9
Schwab .08 .8 -50 +.14 -11.5 10.5
SeagateT .32 1.7 29 -.25 +10.9. 19.1
ShawGp ... ... 35 -2.04 +12.8 20.1
ShopKo ... ... 18 +3.84 +39.3 26.0
SilcnGph ... ... ... -.22 -45.1 .9
Smithlntl .48 .8 34 -2.03 +12.8 61.4
Solectm ... ... 40 +.06 -33.2 3.5
SouthnCo 1.43 4.5 16 ... -4.7 31.9
SwstAirl .02 .1 37 +.46 -11.2 14.4
SpmtFON .50 2.1 ... +.79 -5.3 23.5
StateStr .68 1.6 18 -.65 -13.1 42.7
StorTch ... ... 17 -1.18 -8.5 28.9
sT Goldn ... ... ... +.07 -2.5 42.6
Stryker s .09 .2 40 +1.42 -5.6 45.5
Suncorg .24 ...... -2.03 +11.5 39.4
SunGard ... ... 22 -.07 +21.5 34.4
Sunoco 1.60 1.5 13 -2.67 +28.4 104.8
SymblT .02 .1 43 -.26 -18.4 14.1
Sysco .60 1.7 25 +.51 -5.7 35.9
TJX .24 1.0 18 -.04 -3.8 24.1
TXU Corp 2.25 2.7 .. +2.66 +29.3 83.4
TaiwSemi .09 1.0 ... +.07 +1.6 8.6
Talbots .44 1.5 17 -1.92 +8.3 29.5
Target .32 .6 14 +.65 -3.6 50.0
TelMexL 1.20 3.4 "... + .56 4-8.7- '84.9
Templeln s .90 2.5 25 -.17 +6.5 36.4
TenetHIt ... ... ... +.24 +7.6 11.8
Teradyn ... ... 17 -.03 -16.5 14.2
Tesoro 8 -.26 +25.9 40.1
Texlnst .10 .4 24 -.05 +1.2 24.9
3M Co 1.68 2.0 23 -.57 +3.0 84.5
TimeWarn ... ... 25 +.52 -7.6 17.9
TollBros ... ... 14 -1.06 +15.4 79.1
Transocn ... ... ... -1.17 +22.8 52.0
TriadH .. .. 20 +1.15 +36.9 50.9
Tycolntl .40 1.2 25 +.44 -5.2 33.8
Tyson .16 1.0 15 +.24 -8.9 16.7
vjUSG ... ... 5 +4.13 -11.2 35.7
Unisys ... 66 +.38 -28.5 7.2
UtdMicro .32 +.02 -5.1 3.3
UPSB 1.32 1.8 24 -.20 -16.1 71.7
US Bancrp 1.20 4.2 13 -.12 -9.4 28.3
USSteel .32 .7 6 -2.96 -5.9 48.2
UtdhlthGp .03 ... 25 +2.57 +11.8 98.4
Univision ... ... 38 +.34 -4.5 27.9
Unocal .80 1.4 13 -5.35 +36.0 58.8
UnumProv .30 1.8 ... +.45 -4.5 17.1
ValeroE s .32 .4 12 -.56 +70.0 77.2
VerizonCm1.62 4.6 13 +.29 -13.4 35.0
ViacomB .28 .8 ... +.25 -3.5 35.1
Vishay ... ... 54 -.49 -21.0 11.8
Vodafone .55 2.1 ... +.21 -3.0 26.5
Wachovia 1.84 3.6 13 +.32 -3.7 50.6
Walgrn .21 .5 32 +.46 +15.1 44.1
WA Mutl 1.84 4.7 11 -.24 -7.5 39.1
WsteMInc .80 2.7 18 +.63 -1.3 29.5
Weathfint ... ... 25 -2.00 +11.1 56.9
WellPoint ... ... 21 +2.85 +10.9 127.5
WellsFrgo 1.92 3.2 15 +.13 -4.2 59.5
WDigitl ... ... 18 +.88 +27.1 13.7
Weyerh 1.60 2.3 13 +2.37 +5.4 70.8
WmsCos .20 1.1 59 -.76 +12.3 18.3
Wyeth .92 2.2 47 +.98 +.2 42.6
XL Cap 2.00 2.9 8 -3.04 -11.6 68.6
XTO Egy s .20 .6 22 -1.54 +24.6 33.0
XcelEngy .83 4.8 17 -.11 -5.9 17.1
Xerox 17 -.03 -12.2 14.9
YumBrds .40 .8 21 -.57 +7.3 50.6
Zimmer ... ... 35 +1.95 -4.4 76.6


Name Dlv
InSiteVis ...
IntrNAP ...
IntntHTr ...
IvaxCp s
KFX Inc ...
MadCatzg ...
Nabors
NthgtM g
OilSvHT .48
On2 Tech ...
PacRim
PainCare ...
PaxsnC
PetrofdE g 1.92
PhmHTr 1.68
PionDril
ProvETg 1.44
RaeSyst
Ramp rs
RegBkHT 4.48
RetailHT 3.85
SemiHTr .18
SPDR 2.26
SP Mid 1.04
SP Matls .52
SP HIthC .37
SP CnSt .37
SP Engy .53
SP Fncl .65
SP Tech .42
SP Util .90
Terremark ...
UltraPt g
UtilHTr 3.61
VaalcoE n ...
WheatR g ...


Wkly YTD WkIl
YId PE Chg %Chg Las
... ... +.07 -40.9 .5
... ... -.07 -43.0 .5
... ... -.39 -23.1 54.8
... 26 -.49 +22.8 19.4
... ... +.19 -2.9 14.1
... ... -.10 +84.5 1.5
.. 30 -2.14 +13.4 58.1
... 9 -.09 -22.9 1.3
.5 ... -2.70 +12.8 96.0
... ... +.03 +4.8 .6
... ... -.07 +5.2 .6
... 33 +.13 +60.4 4.9
... ... +.76 ... 1.3
... ... -.31 +12.3 14.6
2.3 ... +1.82 +.7 73.2
... 82 +.15 +38.3 13.9
... ... -.28 +3.5 9.8
... 51 -.57 -65.1 2.5
... ... +.41 -61.1 1.3
3.4 ... +1.00 -7.2 131.7
.9 ... -.38 -8.0 90.7
.6 ... +.41 -2.6 32.4
1.6 ... +.62 -2.4 118.0
.9 ... -.35 -1.0 119.8
1.7 ... -.08 +.9 29.9
1.2 +.86 +.9 30.4
1.6 ... +.29 ... 23.0
1.2 ... -1.21 +17.6 42.7
2.3 ... +.32 -7.2 28.3
2.1 ... +.20 -7.2 19.5
3.1 ... +.20 +5.7 29.4
... ... +.01 -3.1 .6
... ... -3.64 +2.2 49.2
3.5 ... +.35 +6.1 103.6
... 10 +.10 +4.4 4.0
... ... -.11 +6.1 3.4
0 -17 0 A 7


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and -a .3r.ga ir, Canadian dollarr n = Doea n 3t maee cor.tinued-Isilng
*lanaar.ds i1 La= 1-3 li ng with SEC n = New in past 52 aeeks pt = Preeneorr rs = S-xi(K nas undergone
a ,eerSe l-xk s5pin of at least 50 percent wnin tre past yar r = Fier, to ouye -:ecury a a specflaed
price s = SIl c ha e piil y ar leasI 20 percent wihin tnr, e ila3t ear un = Units vi = in Dal3nkiuplt, or
roce&. hrrip = Wen dnbuid wWhendbidw = When, i.Sed w= Warranrt
Mutual Fund Footnotes: x = E cash atlderind lL = Nc, up-lrLoni satle. charge p = Fur.a asi ei usea to
-3,y Idlnoution co. ia r = Rederrmpion 1le or cornlingent deferred sales load may apply I = Both p ana d
Gainers and Losers murru e worn at least 2 to oe liSted ,n ilaOie latian Most Actives must t*e ronh
at leait 1 Volurre in runrreds 01 snares Source: The AsaoCiled F'resa Saeles iguraa are uncoflcial


ABB Ltd
ACE Ltd .84
AES Cp ...
AFLAC .44
AK Steel ...
AMR
AT&T .95
AU Optron .36
AbtLab 1.10
AberFitc .50
Accenture ...
AMD
Aeropstl
Aetna s .02
AffCmpS ...
Agere
AgereB
Agilent
AirTran
Albertsn .76
Acan .60
MAlcoa .60
AllegTch .24
AldWaste
Allstate 1.28
Altria 2.92
Amdocs
AmHess 1.20
AMovilL .21
AEP. 1.40
AriExp .48
AmlnitGp If .50
AmTower ...
AmerisBrg .10
Anadrk .72
AnalogDev .24
Anheusr .98
Aon Corp .60
Apache .32
ArchDan .34
AutoData .62
Avaya
Avon s .66
BHP BillLt .46
BJ Svcs .32
BJs Whis ...
BMCHSfV .
BakrHu .46
BkofAm s 1.80
BkNY .80
BarrickG .22
Baxter .58
BearingP If ...
BeazrHm s .40
BellSouth 1.08
BestBuy .44
Beverly
Blockbstr 08
Boeing 1.00
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.12
BurlNSF .68
BurlRsc s .34
DMS Eng
DSX .40
CVS Cp .29
CablvsnNY ...
Cadence
Caesars ...
Calpine
CapOne .11
CardnlHith .12
CaremkRx ...
Carnival .60
Caterpillar 1.64
Cendant .36
CenterPnt .40
Centex .16
Cenveo


Wkly YTD
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg


... +.84 -2.5 17.90 ImpacMIf 3.00 17.1 5 -.83 -22.6 17.55


Nasdaq Most Active

Wkly YTD Wkly Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AMEX Most Active


ADC Tel ...
ASML Hid ...
ATI Tech ...
Aastrom
Activisn s ...
AdobeSy .05
AltairNano ...
AlteraCp ...
Amazon
AEagleO s .20
AmrTrde
Amgen
Amylin
AppleC s
ApidMatl .12
AMCC
AskJvs
Atmel ...
Autodsk s .03
BEA Sys ...
BedBath, ...
Biogenldc ...
Biomet .20
Biopure
Borland
Brdcom
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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


Personal Merchandise





! and paId in advance. '"" '" '

21 5ady itR




i u' e a em per at 6t days Ontem pe l
S,/, M I .4
41. lo


$550 $0Q50
.25. .-
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In Print and On Line
www.Iakecityreporter.com


020 Lost & Found
FOUND Male Hound. Week of
3/14. Lulu area. 386-755-5762

FREE TO good home Female Cat,
UlA-]-, d au ScdlUU J386 .72C <5050n


declawed and sped o

REWARD: RETURN
of "or" information
leading to Recovery of
Lost in Lake City @ 5
Points B.P. Station.,
John (601)347-2177 81b.
red/blonde Pom 1 year.
"Heart Condition"
4, 1/2 lb Male Red Pom
1 year "Very Frail"


$j975
4 les Io Amin!

* 3 Direciional signs
* Pricing stickers
* No Parking signs,
* Helpful garage
sale tips a
Sale


030 Personals
#1 IN BUSINESS SERVICES
Divorce, Bankruptcy, Resumes
RE Closings, Legal Forms
248 N Marion Av. 755-8717


.... J100 Job
100 Opportunities
$ GET YOUR CLASS B $
CDL license fro $250. We train.
904-777-5995

*CHILD CARE WORKER*
S. 1 M/F hrs. 6am-6pm
V Call 752-4411 or fax qualifications
L to: 752-0740


Must have clean background check.



dial-a-pro

lake CifiReporter Reporer Service Directory


Classifilods u reiru Drdr Adith t lqairiu t l

Vs^ eW oll Wte DrSentctdy Ad WitrftF-AskYotllFp r i js


Childcare

CHILD CARE Registered home
#R03C0001. M-F flexible hours.
Full Time. Infant to 4 years.
386-752-2220

CHILDCARE lic. FOCO0007 &
insured. Open Mon Fri. 6am 7:30
pm. Between High Spring &
Ellisville. 386-755-7875


Concrete Work

A.D.F. CONCRETE Construction
A.C.I. Certified. Resd'l Free Est.
Slabs, Driveways, Patios, & Side-
walks. 386-364-5845/ 688-7652

JEB'S CONCRETE
Residential & Commercial.
Sidewalks, Driveways, Patios,
Stucco, Block, Brick, Signage Deco
Stone and Repair. 386-961-8238

Fencing

A & B Professional Fence Company
Fencing-Installation & Repairs
Wood/Chain Link/Farm Fence
Free Estimates 386- 963-4861

A+ FENCING INC.
Aluminum, chain link or Vinyl.
Call for a free estimate.
(386)719-6521 or (386)344-2442
FENCING & DECKS
Wood, Vinyl, Privacy, Chain Link,
and Pool enclosure. Free Estimates.
386-497-4757 or 352-427-9409

Painting Service

NICK'S PAINTING
Interior/Exterior. Quality Work!
Free Estimates. Will meet or beat all
other estimates. Call 386-344-4242

Home Improvements

For all your Home Repairs that
include plumbing fixtures, flooring,
trim work and much more, call
John Thomas at 386-755-6183

Home Maintenance

HOME REPAIR
Inside or Out.
Houses or Mobile Homes.
Free Estimates. Paul 386-623-2255

NO REPAIR too Small. Days,
Evenings, & Weekends. All at
reasonable rates. The Home Repair
Center 386-884-0004


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, design. Com. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call 386-496-2820 lv msg.
GERALD'S LAWN Maintenance.
Mowing, Hedging, & Trimming.
"No Job To Small!" 386-752-2779
or 386-365-2651. no answer Iv mess
LAWN WORK GRASS CUT
FREE ESTIMATES!
Call Paul
386-623-2255

Services

HOME CLEANING
Good references, Low rates.
Dependable and Honest!
Call for more info. 386-719-7074
HOUSE KEEPING I Opening for
bi-monthly/weekly cleaning.
Dependable w/ exc. work Ref. In
Columbia or Suw. Co 386-497-4522
No More Mess When You Hire the
Best! Spic & Span Cleaning Svc.
Comm'l & Resid'l. Good rates, All
your cleaning needs. 386-984-0067

Pressure Cleaning

PRESSURE WASHING
Commercial or Residential
Great Price!!!!
Call 386-623-1700

Land Services

i Bulldozer Work! tractor work,
root raking, bush hogging, seeding,
sodding, disking, site prep &
landscape work. All types of
Fencing and Irrigation Repair &
Installation. Free Estimate!
Call 755-3890 or (386) 623-3200

Tree Service

Hazardous TREE TRIMMING
and removal. Senior discount.
15 years experience.
386-963-3360

Carpet Cleaning

KING OF STEAM
Have your Carpet Cleaned by the
Best! Call for FREE Estimate!
386-344-5100

Paralegal Services

A Bankruptcy/Divorce
Other court matters can be done
through a low cost, professional.
Area's best Paula 386-454-2378.


4 line minimum'2.55 per line
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.



Number of Insertions Per line Rate
3 .. ... .. .. .. .. .. ... .. 1.6 5
4-6 .. ............... 1.50
7-13 .................. ... 1.45
14-23 ................ . 1.20
24 or more ................ ..990
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.



Limited to service type advertising only.
4 lines, one month .............. 160.00
$9.50 each additional line
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.






Ad Errors- Please read your ad on the first
day of publication. We accept responsibility
for only the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space in error.
Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt
correction and billing adjustments.

Cancellations- Normal advertising deadlines
apply for cancellation.

Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440. Should fur-
ther information be required regarding pay-
ments or credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting department.


You can call us at 755-5440, Monday through Friday
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their classified ads in
person, and some ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad copy to the
Reporter. -

FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the
Classified Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.com


Ad is to Appear:
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday


Call by:
Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Wed., 10:00 a.m.
Thurs., 10:00 a.m.
Fri., 10:00 a.m.
Fri., 10:00 a.m.


Fax/Email by:
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Thurs., 9:00 a.mrn.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.


These deadlines are subject to change without notice.



Advertising copy is subject to approval by the
Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or
classify all advertisements under appropriate head-
ings. Copy should be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of publication. Credit for
published errors will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement which was incor-
rect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered to be published,
nor for any general, special or consequential dam-
ages. Advertising language must comply with
Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition
of discrimination in employment, housing and public
accommodations. Standard abbreviations are accept-
able; however, the first word of each ad may not be
abbreviated.


o[ o lojIa ;,[Q =oC ooI HNeedHelp? > Lt Us Wte YourClassiiedOAd


10 Job
10 Opportunities
01550382
NOW HIRING
Motivated individuals for Manu-
factured Housing Construction.
Company with GREAT benefits
and GREAT hours. 401K, health
insurance, life insurance, paid
vacations and holidays. Competi-
tive starting pay. Experience
helpful but not necessary. Apply
in person: Homes of Merit, Inc.
1915 SE Hwy. 100 E. Office
NO CALLS PLEASE! Homes of
Merit promotes a Drug Free
Workplace and is an Equal
Opportunity Employer.

01550599
THE LAKE CITY REPORTER
is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier for
Providence/Ellisville area.
Deliver the Reporter in the early
morning hours Tuesday Sunday.
No delivery on Monday's. Carrier
must have dependable transporta-
tion. Stop by the Reporter today
to fill out a contractor's inquirers
form. No phone calls please!

01551737
THE LAKE CITY REPORTER
is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier for
Ft. White area. Deliver the
Reporter in the early morning
hours Tuesday Sunday. No de-
livery on Monday's. Carrier must
have dependable transportation.
Stop by the Reporter today to fill
out a contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!

01551868
4 Professional Child Care V
Worker needed. Must have CDA
Opportunity to expand into
management. Salary range from
$7. $9 hr. Mail resume to:
P.O. Box 2127, Lake City, Fl.
32056 or call 386-752-4411

01552019
Auto/Motor home/Med. Truck
Technician Needed. Immediate
opening. 5 day work week, vaca-
tion pay, benefits avail.Santa Fe
Ford, Alachua. 386-462-2802 ext
14 ask for John. D/F/W/P EOE

01552030
Draftsman Needed
Must have experience in Auto
Cad & residential drawings.
Call Suzanne Henderson for
appt. at (386)963-5647.

01552037




$2000.00 Sign on Bonus
Drivers with 1 yr T/T exp who
join our team in April will receive
a. Davis Express, Starke, FL.
98% FL. GA. TN. S.C. & AL
1 yr. exp. .34 cpm
0 2 yrs. exp. .35 cpm
0 3 yrs. exp. .36 cpm
100% lumper reimbursement
Safety bonus
Guaranteed hometime
Health, Life, Dental &
disability Ins. avail.
*401K available.
Call 1-800-874-4270 #6
www.davis-express.com

011552140
Housekeepers/Experienced
Looking for permanent
employment, must work
weekends. Apply in person
at Motel 6 US Hwy 90 West.
No phone Calls.

CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS
Testing Laboratory Technician. Full
Time. Must be hard worker and
dependable. Will train. $9.00/hr.
Call 352-372-3392 or Fax Resume
to 352-336-7914. DFWP


Opportunities

01552214
Service Persons Needed:
GREAT PAY
Must have Mobile Home
Construction Exp. & be able to
work out of town 4-5 nights per
week. Apply in person:
HOMES OF MERIT
No Phone Calls Please.
Drug Screen, MVR,
Background Req.

03524702



BODY SHOP
PORTER NEEDED
Must have clean driving rec. Will
be responsible for keeping the
shop clean, some parts pick up &
delivery and help with detailing
of trucks. Apply in person, 1-75 &
Hwy 47 Cannon Creek Business
Park, Lake City. 386-754-8822
Rhonda or Bobby

Auto AC Technician needed.
Excellent Pay, benefits available.
Sante Fe Ford, Alachua. 386-462-
2802 ext 14. DFWP. EOE.



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100 Opbportunities

01552215
Advent Christian Village
658-JOBS (5627)
www.ACVillage.net
RN/Education Director
FT RN/Education Director.
Unrestricted Florida license,
knowledge of LTC regs, and
experience in LTC setting
required. Training experience
desired. Competitive wages,
good benefits, great working
environment. Apply in person at
Personnel Department Mon. thru
Fri., 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m.,
Carter Village Hall, 10680 CR
136, Dowling Park, FL,
fax resume to (386)658-5160.
EOE/DFW

01552233
THE LAKE CITY REPORTER
is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier for
Lake Butler area. Deliver the
Reporter in the early morning
hours Tuesday Sunday. No
delivery on Monday's. Carrier
must have dependable transporta-
tion. Stop by the Reporter today
to fill out a contractor's inquirers
form. No phone calls please!

DONOR RECRUITER
LifeSouth Community Blood
Centers, Inc. seeks Donor Recruiter.
This is a full-time position working
with media, planning special events,
and recruiting donors. Weekends
Required. Must be outgoing, have
strong written and verbal communi-
cation skills and possess excellent
customer service skills. Sales
background desired. Submit
resume, cover letter, and application
to: 833 SW SR 47, Lake City, FL
32025. NO CALLS PLEASE
EOE/DFWP.



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100 Job
100 Opportunities
01552234
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT


Bulldozer, Backhoes, Load-
ers, Dump Trucks, Graders,
Scrapers, Excavators

Next Class: May 9th
National Certification.
Financial Assistance
Job Placement

800-383-7364

Associated Training Services
www.atsn-schools.com

01552248
ASAP!
39-43 cpm
Sign-on Bonus
$0 Lease $1.07
CDL 6 mo. exp.
1-800-635-8669

CUSTOMER SERVICE REP.
Career opportunity in a sales/service
environment available for qualified
individual with a strong work ethic
and dedication to the job. Min. 3
years Customer Service exp. in a
fast paced environment. Must enjoy
working with people Computer/
data Entry skills required as well as
Windows proficiency. Minimum 50
wpm. No Phone Calls Please.
Resumes Att: Joy
ws4140(@earthlink.net


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


100 Job
SOpportunities

O 155 2272
TELLER
Campus USA Credit Union a
financially strong organization
with exceptional employee
development opportunities
currently has an opening for a full
time teller. Hours rotate from 8:45
am to 5:15 pmin and 9:45 am to
6:15 pm with 2 Saturdays a month
from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm.
Previous cash handling experi-
ence a plus. Excellent customer
service skills required. All
applicants must have good credit
and maintain a professional
appearance. Applications will be
accepted at our Lake City
location, 183 SW Bascom Norris
Dr. Suite 105 (Behind Zaxby's) or
email your resume to
iharper@campuscu.com
EEO employer M/F/V/D

01552274
Mortgage Loan Officer
Campus USA Credit Union,
$600 million, Gainesville, FL., is
seeking an experienced Real
Estate Loan Officer to work in
our Lake City Service Center.
Candidate should have 1-3 years
of experience in 1st Mortgage
Loan Origination and be familiar
with secondary market underwrit-
ing. Familiarity with BYTE
software and previous Consumer
Lending experience beneficial.
Qualified candidate should be
comfortable making public
presentations to represent and
offer Campus USA Credit
Union's products and services.
Campus offers competitive salary
and benefits. Fax or email resume
and salary requirements to:

Human Resources
Campus USA Credit Union
PO Box 147029
Gainesville, FL 32614-7029
FX: (352) 335-1094
Email: Jharper(@campuscu.com

01552275
Tower Hill
In surance
SECURITY OFFICER
Tower Hill Insurance Group has
experienced tremendous growth
and we are now Alachua County's
6th largest private employer.
Come join a friendly, supportive
staff in our fast-paced corporate
environment! Candidates must
have flexibility towards schedul-
ing and overtime to meet safety
and security needs, outstanding
communication and social skills
as well as, the ability to lift/move
up to 501bs. State of Florida Class
D License preferred. To apply
email resume and cover letter
indicating position of interest to:
hrdept(5thig.com. Visit us at
www.thig.com. DFWP

CLERICAL
LAKE CITY.& SURROUNDING
AREAS MANY POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
CALL FOR APPT
386-755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREENS/BACKGRD
REQ.


100 Job
0 Opportunities

03524n539
MERIDIAN BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE, INC.

Add Specialist- MIST & Adult
Programs- FT/PT G'ville & PRN
Lake City
Adult Case Manager- FT G'ville
Children Case Manager- FT
G'ville, Cross City
Counselor IV/ Sr. Clin'n FT
Jasper, Live Oak, FT Outpatient
Adults/Child'n, FT/PRN Foster
care, FT Fam Crisis Trtmnt
G'ville.FT Achievement Center
Lake City
Certified Behavioral Analyst -
FT Fam Crisis Trtmnt G'ville
Emergency Svcs Intake Evalua-
tor- FT G'ville, Lake City
Driver- FT G'ville, CDL Re-
quired
Clerk Specialist PT G'ville
Unit Clerk FT G'ville
Maintenance Worker FT
G'ville
LPN FT/PRN G'ville & Lake
City
Facility Manager- FT G'ville
Psych Tech PRN G'ville &
Lake City
Security tech FT G'ville
RN FT G'ville & Lake City
Family Care Supervisor- FT
G'ville
Comp Assessor- PRN G'ville,
Lake City
Staff Psychiatrist- FT G'ville
Excellent benefits.
For details visit
www.meridian-healthcare.org or
call (352) 374-5600 ext. 8277.
Send resumes to:
Meridian Behavioral Healthcare,
Inc., Human Resources,
4300 SW 13th St., Gainesville,
FL 32608, fax (352) 374-5608,
e-mail: jobs@mbhci.org, ATTN:
refer to Sun Ad. EOE, DFWP

03524755



TACO
BELL

JOIN OUR TEAM
Seeking high-powered, high
performance, individuals for
Team Member Positions.
Apply in person at
Taco Bell or Krystal,
Hwy 90 W, Lake City.
Flexible Schedule
Vacation/ Benefits Package/
401K
Bonuses
Advancement Opportunities
Competitive Pay
Discounted Meals
Students
Friday/ Saturday night off

V Class A? V Good MVR?
V Dependable? V Safe?
* Want to be home daily?
/ Like weekends off?.
Want steady work w/stable Co.
Good equipment w/ good wages?
Call Columbia Grain
386-755-7700 Full & Part Time.
Bath & Body Works in The
Lake City Mall is Hiring for PT
Key-holders & Sales Associates.
Experience Preferred. 386-754-2113


Lake City and Live Oak Routes Now Available.
Your own franchise. Think of it. Total control of your own future. Build a
successful business that you can look at and say "Yes, that is mine!"
Your schedule will be dictated by nobody but yourself.
You have the smarts. You have the people skills.You have the desire to be
in control of your own destiny. And with Snap-on's training, products
and name behind you, a successful business is within your reach.
If you are looking for that rare opportunity that matches best-of-class
products, proven business strategies and a company that is
driven to deliver take a new look atthe Snap-on organization
You may have found your place Call us at 877-4SNAPON &
for more information. ,,,"* ,


Kenosha, WI -


LAKE CITY
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, CHEMISTRY
(168 Duty Days-Tenured Track) To Commence FALL 2005
Teach variety of chemistry courses with labs including General
Chemistry I, II; Organic Chemistry I, II; Prepare laboratory
reagents; maintain laboratory equipment and supplies; participate
in department and college-wide initiatives and committees and
advise students in class selections. Prepare, review and update
course outlines, syllabi and tests. Minimum Qualifications Master's
Degree with at least 18 graduate hours in Chemistry, Biochemistry
or Chemical Engineering.
REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS TO BEGIN: May, 2005
To be considered an applicant, an application, vita and photocopies of transcripts,
must be received by Human Resources Development. All foreign transcripts/degrees
must be submitted with an official translation and evaluation.
INQUIRIES:
HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT
LAKE CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE
149 S. E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-2007
INFORMATION (386) 754-4314; FAX (386) 754-4594
E-MAIL: Boettcherg@lakecitycc.edu
Applications are available on WEB AT: www.lakecitycc.edu
VP/ADA/EA/EO COLLEGE IN EDUCATION & EMPLOYMENT


100 Job
1 0Opportunities

BLUE JEAN JOB
$ Money $
Seeking sharp go getters, Able to
TRAVEL USA. Demo chemical
products. Good people skills &
enjoy working in a Rock in Roll
evir. Call Kelly 1-800-201-3293.
9-6. Must start immed.
Cashier/Clerk. Evening shift. 4pm
midnight. Will train. Apply in
person L&G Service Center. 14197
S. US Hwy 441. Behind Country
Station. Lake City. 386-755-1452.
City of Lake City is accepting appli-
cations for the following positions:
Equipment Operator 1 0405 (51)
For a complete list of minimum
qualifications and to fill out an
application please visit City Hall,
150 NW Alachua Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055.
Deadline for these positions is
TUESDAY
APRIL 12, 2005
No phone calls please.
CLASS A CDL OTR Driver
needed for Florida Pine Straw.
2 yrs exp. required. Health
insurance, retirement, paid vacation.
Drug Free 386-294-3411
01552231
Driver Dedicated Lane
HOME EVERY WEEKEND
GUARANTEED!
No Touch Freight
85% Preloaded/Pretarped
Avg. $779 $1019/week
Jacksonville, FL Terminal
CDL A req'd. 877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com

CUSTOMER SERVICE REP.
Nat'l leader in home respiratory
services seeks customer service
representative. Must have computer
experience, exceptional organiza-
tional skills and be able to handle
busy office environment. Knowl-
edge of DME/Respiratory related
equipment. We offer an excellent
benefits package. Fax resume to:
386-754-2795
DANIEL'S TOWING & Recovery
386-755-5154. Wanted Driver.
Must have Class A CDL. 25 yrs. or
older. Mechanical Knowledge a
plus. Apply in person ONLY.
DRIVER NEEDED
Class A CDL
Min. 2 years Exp.
386-755-5095
EXPERIENCED PLASTERERS
& Laborers. Transportation a must.
Call between 5pm & 9pm.
386-755-9005
EXPERIENCED SALES People
needed. Will rain. Call Turning
Wheel RV Center located on 441/41
Ellisville.at 386-758-8661
for an appointment.
FESSLER AVIATION in Live
Oak has immed need for 2
positions: experienced book keeper
( part time) and licensed A & P
mechanic call Jim 386-330-0291.
FIBERGLASS WORKER needed:-
Experienced Chopper operator
and gel coater. Call (904)275-2800
ask for Larry or Phyllis.
Lawn/Main/Janitorial worker.
40 hrs per week. M/T/TH/F/S. 1pm
to 9 pm. Clean Criminal background
check. Clean driving record.
Fax qualifications to: 386-752-0740
or call 386-961-2595


100 Job
SOpportunities
FLAT BED DRIVERS
Atlantic Truck Line
Class A, in state & home every
night. $600-$750/wk. Yearly $1,000
safety bonus. 3 yrs. exp. Paid vac.,
health/dental. Call 1-877-328-7512
Mon-Friday,
Fulltime Billing Clerk needed for
busy Medical Billing Office. Candi-
date must have a positive attitude
and be an ambitious, hard working,
dependable, fast learning, team
player. Previous computer experi-
ence required. medical experience
preferred. Send reply to Box 01042,
C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
HELP WANTED
Drywall Stockers P/T now,
working up to F/T soon.
Call Ron (352) 267-8903
HELP WANTED
Part Time Store Clerk Position.
Available at Waynes RV Resort.
Apply in person 9am 1pm
HELP WANTED: Experienced
plumber for High Springs Plumbing
& Electric, Inc. Must have valid FL
DL. 386-454-1407
HOLIDAY INN is Now hiring for
Book Keeper and Taking
Applications for Front Desk.
386-754-1411
JEWELRY SALES PERSON!
30-40 hours a week.
Apply weekdays
Community Jewelers
LABORER /MACHINE
SHOP EXPERIENCE.
Must pass drug test.
Must be able to do manual labor.
Apply in person Grizzly Mfg,
Cortez Street, across from airport.
Drug Free.
LEGAL SECRETARY
Requires proficiency in using
computers and word processing
programs such as Word Perfect 11.
Good communication skills are a
must. Spanish-speaking encouraged
to apply. Salary DOE.
Equal Opportunity Employer.
Mail resume to:
Donna S. MacRae, Three Rivers
Legal Services, Post Office Drawer
3067 Lake City, FL 32056-3067
Live Oak Paint & Carpet Center
is looking for experienced flooring
installers. Top Pay. Must have all
current legal paperwork.
Call Brad or John at 386-362-7066
MED TECH Positions Available.
FT Night w/ No Weekends & PRN.
850-973-2271, fax 850-973-8158.
E-mail: mcmhck(5)earthlink.net
Mgmt trainees earn 35-60K. Look-
ing for six aggressive people who
want a long term career with a 125-
year old company. Sales, Mgmt, or
PR background will help. Call
(352)373-2365 for an interview or
fax resume to (352)692-4475. EOC
MILLER MASONRY looking for
experienced Mason Tender.
Transportation a must.
386-623-2486
MULTIPLE OPENINGS
1st & 2nd shift avail. Alachua area
warehouse has openings in a climate
controlled environment. Great
opportunity for steady hours & long
team work. Heavy lifting is
required. Call to set your
interview appointment.
755-1991


*50,000 AVERAGE
EXPECTATION WANTED IMMEDIATELY!
5 MEN OR WOMEN FOR EXECUTIVE SALES POSITION
*Paid Insurance
*401K Plan
*Quality Work Schedule
*Advancement Opportunity
*We provide Demos
"Career Path into Management
S**s3000 Sign Up Bonus for
Experienced Auto Sales Professionals
*Our Top Performers Earn an
Average of 19000 Per Month
-"$3000 sign up bonus for professional automobile sales persons with strong documented track record.
EDDIE ACCARDI
CHEVROLET-MAZDA











Y..i II t' i., r ,';ome here at Lake City Medical Center, surrounded by
Na .l," .d neighbors who care about our community just as
,at, a.: you do! We are currently seeking the following:

Physical Therapist FT
Physical Therapy Assistant PRN
Pre-Admission Coordinator FT
Dietitian PRN
Physician Service Coordinator FT
Registered Nurses
ER FT Day, Night & PRN
ICU, Med/Surg PRN Days
Respiratory Therapist PRN
Sleep Tech FT & PRN

To find the perfect home for your skills, contact us today at:
LAKE CITY MEDICAL CENTER
Human Resources 340 NW Commerce Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32055 Phone: (386) 719-9020
Jobline: (386) 719-9333 Fax: (386) 719-9028
www.lakecitymedical.com





l.,r Hi il-..,r. Resource, Services, information, Education P(.M


too Job
100 Opportunities
MORRELL'S
Receptionist needed for part-time
position, M-F 8:00-1:30 P.M. Must
have excellent phone and customer
service skills. Will need filing,
computer experience and be able to
answer a multi-line phone. Must be
self-motivated, dependable and be
able to multi-task well.
Please fax resume to
386-752-6607
MTR INCORPORATED is look-
ing for 1 qualified Truck & trailer
Mechanic & 1 Mechanic helper.
Apply in person at 1200 NW 173rd
St. Alachua, Fl. 386-462-4850.
MYSTERY SHOPPERS NEEDED!
Earn While You Shop!
Call Now Toll Free
1-888-255-6040 Ext. 13252
NEEDED:
INSTALLER
FOR LOCAL TILE & MARBLE
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY.
MUST BE-ABLE TO LIFT
UP TO 70 LBS PLEASE
CALL FOR AN APPT.
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991.
Drug screen & Background Req.
NOW EXCEPTING
apps for servers, cooks, & bus.
Exp preferred, apply in person
M-F 2-4 p.m. at Phish Heads
1445 SW Main Blvd LC, FL 32025
NOW HIRING at all locations.
Apply in person Kens Bar-B-Que
between 2 pm-5pm
NO PHONE CALLS!
OFFICE MGR/PATIENT Care
Coordinator/Phone support. Must be
self motivated, dependable, can
work independently, multi task well
Sand possess proficiency in Micro-
soft applications. Related experi-
ence a plus. Please Fax resume to
386-754-6713 and call 754-6711.
OPENING SOON
Mr. Transmission. Now hiring
management, min 2 years
automotive management exp,
transmission rebuilders, R& R
Technicians, must be ASE certified.
Call the professionals 352-235-0047
OWNER OPERATORS
Round trip containers,
Out of Jacksonville, no over weights
Plate program, HOSP INS.
Mason Dixon 866-360-7483
PART-TIME EVENINGS:
light cleaning commercial buildings.
Background check, drug test, own
transportation. 386-454-9390
HIPP CONSTRUCTION
is Now Hiring Experienced:
Asphalt Laborers
General Laborers
Asphalt Roller Operator
Lute Rate Person
Dump Truck Driver
Please Call 386-462-2047.
Competitive Wages/Benefits
EOE/ DFWP
PRESCHOOL TEACHER.
CDA preferred (or in process).
Apply at Lake City Kiddy Club.
1290 SE Baya Dr. Lake City.
PROFESSIONAL DRIVERS
$1000 new hire bonus for experi-
enced drivers! Call about dry bulk
& flatbed positions @ our
Newberry Terminal 866-300-8759
Retail Management
OPEN HOUSE
Join Aaron's Lake City,
a Billion $ Retailer,
Mgmt. Training Program
Pd training, benefits, bonus
NO Sunday!
APPLY IN PERSON
Thurs. 10am-5pm
Hwy. 41 S. Rt 10
386-755-2419
franmaun@msn.com


100 Job
100 OOpportunities
01152271
Drivers CDL A

Huge Opportunity!
$3,000 Co Drivers Sign-On
($1,500 O/Operators)
Pre-Pass Plus, No NYC or
Canada, Optional NE, &
NO loading/Unloading
Call us 7 Days a Week
Get approved w/in 60 min!
Must be 23 w/lyr. OTR
No Hazmat Required
www.ptl-inc.com
1-800-848-0405
Paschall Truck Lines

REGIONAL FILTER Service has
immediate openings for the position
of Filter Service Techs. Good
driving record and pre-employment
drug screen a must. HVAC
experience a plus, but not required.
Travel throughout N. Florida with
some overnight stays. Vehicle
supplied. Fax resume to
727-528-1474
RESIDENTIAL COUNSELOR
Part-time position at residential
facility for adolescents in Lake City.
Must be willing to work evenings, a
wknd day, and participate in on-call
rotation. Master's required; exp.
w/ CINS/FINS population pref.
Send resume to Rhonda Lockwood,
Regional Coordinator, Corner Drug
Store, Inc. 1300 NW 6th Street,
Gainesville FL 32601. EOE/DFWP
SALES POSITION
WELL ESTABLISHED
LENDING COMPANY
MUST HAVE STRONG SALES
EXPERIENCE & RESUME
PLEASE CALL FOR APPT.
WAL-STAFF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
DrugScreen & backgrd Req.
STRUCTURAL/MECHANICAL
DRAFTSMAN/DETAILER
AUTO CAD EXP. REQUIRED
Send resume: Draftsman
PO Box 1949, Lake City,
FL 32056 Must pass drug test.
TELEPHONE OPERATOR
Need Part-time help for weekend &
evening shifts. Only serious inquire.
Apply in person at
INTELLA COMMUNICATIONS
224 SE. Hernando Ave.
Tom Nehl Truck Company
Lake City Freightliner is looking for
a parts personnel. Must have valid
driver license and clean MVR. Drug
Free Work Place. Please apply at
383 SW Arrowhead Ter.
Lake City, FL 32024

rStability-


STRENGTH


I BONUSES
S PAID
WEEKLY


Solos Owner
C o .. Operators


* Student Lease
Graduates Purchase
an equal opportunity employer
C 1 0I. .09

No CDL? No2Problem!
| Call 866-280-5309


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


100 portunities
Opportunities


TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED
Must have a class A CDL license.
with a min. of 2 yrs exp & clean
driving record. Apply Direct at
Corbitt Mfg. Inc. Hwy 41 N and
Guerdon St. M-F 9AM to 3PM
only. DFW

01552217
Drivers




USA TRUCK
Is Now Paying A
$1,000
Sign On
For Exp'd OTR Drivers!
No NYC& Pay On Delivery
Dedicated & Regional Avail.
Owner Op's, Teams &
Student Grads Welcome
CALL 7 DAYS A WEEK
800-237-4642
www.gousatruck.com
eoe m/f/h/v


UTILITY WORKERS
Great South Timber & Lumber
Sawmill in Lake City is currently
accepting applications for utility
workers. Please apply at 1135 SE
State Rd 100 or call 386-752-3774
for an appointment.

4+DRIVER NEEDED+:*
Exp. driver for local parts company
Clean driving record required.
Mon-Fri. Apply in person: 385 SW
Arlington Blvd, Lake City.

WANTED!! INDUSTRIAL
HARD WORKERS ONLY NEED
APPLY. ALL SHIFTS
AVAILABLE. MUST BE ABLE
TO LIFT 50 TO 70LB. CALL FOR
AN APPT NOW!!
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
DRUG SCREENS/
BACKGRD REQ.

WAREHOUSE
BODY PARTS OF AMERICA
seeks team oriented, hardworking
individuals. Health, dental, life in-
surance available. Monday-Friday.
If you are not afraid of honest,
hard work. Apply in person at:
385 SW Arlington Rd, Lake City
(no phone calls please.)

Waste Management Inc.
Lake City/ Gainesville
Has an immediate opening for a
hard working, flexible individual to
fill the position of Driver/Laborer
for Lake City and Gainesville. This
position requires a minimum Class
B CDL with air brake endorsement.
Waste Management offers a full
benefits package including health
insurance and 401 K plan. If you
feel you meet the requirements,
please apply by phone
1-877-220-JOBS (5627) or online at
WWW.WMCAREERS.COM
EOE/ADA/DFWP


100 Job
Opportunities

WELDER/WELDER HELPER
Apply in person at QFab,
3631 U.S. 90 East, Across
from airport, Lake City, FL
MUST PASS DRUG TEST


Window dept. help needed. Duties
will include clerical, customer
service and data entry being a plus.
After 90 days-(100% employee
medical paid) Life Ins., 401K &
Vac. pay offered after 1 yr of
employment. Pick up application at
Lake City Industries,
250 NW Railroad St.

n120 Medical
120 Employment

01552179
Lake City Extended Care
Center Now hiring CNA's for all
shifts. Experience in long term
care helpful. Competitive wages
and benefits. Apply in person at
587 SE Ermine Ave. Lake City.

01552180
Lake City Extended Care
Center Now accepting applica-
tions for LPN/RN for FT 11-7
shift, LPN/RN PRN all shifts.
Experience in long term care
helpful. Competitive wages and
benefits, flexible scheduling.
Apply in person at
587 SE Ermine Ave. Lake City.

01552254
LAKE BUTLER
HOSPITAL
PARAMEDIC FOR ER
FT, PT, PRN
12 HOUR SHIFTS
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com

RN
Gambro Healthcare, a leading
provider of dialysis, has an
exceptional opportunity in Madison
County. We offer outstanding
benefits including 401K and
work/life balance. Apply at
www.gambrohealthcare.com, call
800-381-7063, ext 2777 or fax
resume to 800-232-1451, reference
job id #14455. EOE, Drug and
Background screens required.
Gambro Healthcare

FT Dietary Technician
for 180-bed Facility
Must have minimum of 2 year
degree in Nutrition Therapy or a
related field and at least 1 year
experience. Contact Bette Forshaw
NHA @ 386-362-7860 or apply in
person Suwannee Health Care
Center 1620 E Helvenston Street
Live Oak, Florida 32064
EOE, DV, M/F

Healthcore Physical Therapy of
Lake City is seeking a FT Licensed
Physical Therapy Assistant. Salary
based on experience. Benefits
available. Fax resume to
386-754-9059.
All resumes are confidential.


Own Your Own Home


10 Medical
120 Employment
IMMEDIATE OPENING
Medical Office Receptionist.
Mature, Responsible, Self Starter.
Good Computer & phone skills.
Booking Appts. Collecting Co-pays,
Daily Billing & Filing. Knowledge
of Medical Manager system helpful.
Good starting salary & benefits.
Send Resume to: 495 S.W. Lynn-
wood Ave. Lake City, FL 32024

LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL

/ Physical Therapist PRN
/ Radiology Supervisor- FT
V Respiratory Therapist FT
/ Registered Nurse PT,
Baylor, PRN
/ Radiology Technologist -
PRN w/call.
V Licensed Practical Nurse-PT,
Baylor, PRN
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386)496-2323,
FAX (386) 496-1611
LAKE BUTLER *
HOSPITAL
CARPENTER FT
Renovation work, interior &
exterior, Cabinetry experience re-
quired. Excellent opportunity;
Great salary and benefits.
For further information, please
visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386)496-2323,
FAX (386)496-1611
MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST
Must be a mature team player with
strong experience working in a
doctor's office and have excellent
computer skills. Please fax resumes
to: 386-755-7911
Medical Records Assistant wanted
part-time for doctor's office in Lake
City. Please fax resume Attn:
Human Resources (352) 373-9870
or email simedpa@yahoo.com
Medical Transcriptionist wanted
immediately for Private practice in
Lake City. Experience with Medical
Manager and Word perfect required.
Please fax resumes to HR
(352) 373-9870, or email to
simedpa@yahoo.com.
RN NEEDED. Please apply at
The Health Center of Lake City,
560 SW McFarlane Ave, Lake City.
Equal Opportunity Employer/ Drug
Free Work Place/ Americans with
Disabilities Act
WANTED: Dental Hygienist.
Part-time, fee-for service, busy
general family practice emphasizing
restorative and preventative.
Call Kathleen 850-973-4792.
Accepting Applications
Good, Bad & No Credit
Call for 1st & 2nd Mortgages
Established full service co.
(800) 226-6044
WE BUY MORTGAGES
2622 NW 43rd St.1
#A-1
FHA/VA/Conv. Specialist Gainesvile, FL 32606
GAINESVILLE MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC.
Licensed Mtg. Lender


170 Business
SOpportunities
NO BLUE Sky
Gas & Food Convenience Store
for Lease
813-286-8600
Premier Business Systems
Work from Any Location.
Up to $2000-$5000/mo part time.
Full Training (888)275-1798
THE UPS STORE for sale, Lake
City, profitable, owner retiring. 4
weeks training, owner financing.
Call Mr. Grossman, 877-578-6499

190 Mortgage Money
HOMEOWNERS! SAVE
$50,000 to $150,000 IN MORT-
GAGE INTEREST!!! TOTALLY
FREE SERVICE NO COSTS TO
YOU! Email request for FREE Info
to gigal01 @earthlink.net or call
386-344-0559 leave message

310 Pets & Supplies
2 Female AKC German Shep-
herds, 2 yrs old, 1 spayed. Also,
CKC Male Pomeranian, 1 year old.
2 Cockatiels w/cage. 386-961-8480.
2 YEAR old Cocker Spaniel, Free
to good home. 386-755-5435
GERMAN SHEPHERD Puppy.
For Sale $300. AKC, all white,
Parents on site. DOB: 03/06/05
Call 386-496-3654
LAB PUPPIES, black & yellow.
Ready 4/15 Call 386-454-7202
PUBLISHERS NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health certifi-
cate from a licensed veterinarian
documenting they have mandatory
shots and are free from intestinal
and external parasites. Many species
of wildlife must be licensed by Flor-
ida Fish and Wildlife. If you are un-
sure, contact the local office for in-
formation.


310 Pets & Supplies
RETRIEVER/AUSTRALIAN
SHEPHERD Puppies. Adorable.
Free to good home. 386-755-6541


330 Livestock &
33 Supplies
3 STALLS Available.
New facility. Individual turnout.
Large ring, wash rack.
386-688-4761

FEEDER PIGS. 50Ibs and up.
386-755-3500
FOR SALE Angus & Angus cross
beef yearling. 386-755-3500

REG. AQHA/PBA Palomino
Yearling Filly.
Big & Beautiful.
$2,500. 386-755-1771

n360 Feed, Seed
360 & Plants
PLANTS FOR SALE!
Tomato Plants, Peppers, Cabbage,
Collards, & Broccoli Plants.
386-752-4033. Cheshire

402 Appliances
KENMORE HEAVY Duty,
Washer & Dryer. White.
Moving, must sell. $225. cash for
pair. Call 386-288-3581 after 5 pm.

403 Auctions
ESTATE AUCTION
Mon April 11th @ 6pm.
High Springs, FL. Hwy 27 N.
Estate of furn./Glassware
Estate shed full of tools:
Drill presses, 12" band saw, drills,
hand saws, router, sockets,
welding pcs., sofas, beds, chests,
bookcases, BR/DR sets; 10% B.P.,
Red Williams Au 437/AB270
1-386-454-4991


403 Auctions

03524796
ONLINE
AUCTION
Wednesday, April 13th
DeAngelo Brothers
Jacksonville

TOYOTA TRUCKS,
GMC TOP KICK
TRUCKS, PICKUPS,
SUV'S, ATV'S,
VOLKSWAGEN
POWERED BUGGIES,
BOATS, TRAILERS,
TOW BEHIND
MOWERS & MORE!!!
www.asset-auctions.com
ASSET AUCTIONS
800-303-6511


408 Furniture
3 CHESTER Drawers, 1 fairly
new, 2 sightly used. 386-755-5295
LIGHT WOOD Dinnet set, sets 4.
Must see! $75 386-755-5295
TWIN BED wall frame
work & bedding. $100.
Mint cond. Call after 7pm.
386-961-8815 for appointment

413 Musical
413 Merchandise
BALDWIN ORGAN, good
condition, $150, Call 386-963-4837

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
Timber Co. Payment in advance for
standing pine timber. Large or small
tracts. Call 386-758-7636.


LAKE HARRIS Over 4600 sq. ft. home with 18+ LAKEWOOD- ESTATES Lake Jeffery PRETTY COUNTRY SETTING 3BR/2BA
park-like acres gracefully rolling down to lake access and view. Large 4BR/2BA brick home on a little over an acre not far from
where you will find an entertainment area
featuring 20x40 pool, screened pool house and home on 1+ acre. Vaulted ceilings, large town. Large rooms, lots of storage, well
an equipped cook house. Home renovated with screen porch, fireplace. MLS#43727 Call maintained. MLS#44603 Call Sharon
all new kitchen and baths. MLS#42218 Call Julia DeJesus 344-1590 Johnson 365-1203 or Julia DeJesus
Janet Creel 755-0466 after hours. 344-1590


.. .- .'" .




MOVE IN THIS SUMMER Brand new 4BR/3BA TWO STI
home on a full acre South of town in a great wooded
location. Living room with wood floors, woe
breakfast room, Florida room. The walls are barns, e:
going up now! Choose your colors! paddock
MLS#44743 Call Ginger Parker 752-6704 Ausgood

CONTACT A REALTOR WITH
EXPERIENCE THAT WILL WORK
FOR YOU!!! GIVE US A CALL!
386-755-6600


ORY LOG HOME on 8 acres of
privacy. 2469 sq. ft.3BR/3BA
xtra storage buildings, fenced
area. MLS#43691 Call Libby
752-6142


BRICK HOME with huge family room.
2291 sq. ft. On the South side,
convenient to town $142,500 Call Janet
Creel 755-0466 MLS#42243


- ~flavh


Real Estate of Lake City, Inc.
TOLL FREE 877-755-6600 .


Brand .
New
site Built / flfl
Nome AsLw Low As 0 V Down (w.a.c.)


THREE RIVERS HOUSING CORP.
Call 754-6770 Leave Message
Open Monday-Friday
A not for profit tax exempt Florida Corp. An Equal opportunity housing program.


AREA MORTGAGE RATES
IStitution Phone 30fixed 15fixed 1 ARM FHA/
Institutirate P pts rate pts rate I pts VA
AABC Mortgage (800) 321-0592 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote
Absolute Mortgage Co. (888) 90-HOMES 5.63 /0.00 5.13 / 0.25 3.38 / 0.00 No Quote
Accountable Mortgage (800) 840-8771 5.75/0.00 5.25 /0.00 4.25/0.00 6.75/0.00
All Fund Mortgage (866) 535-8987 5.75 / 0.00 5.38 / 0.00 No Quote No Quote
American Federal Mortgage (888) 321-4687 5.25/ 1.75 5.00 / 1.00 3.38/0.00 5.63/0.00
American Home Finance (888) 429-1940 5.63 /0.00 5.25/0.00 3.63/0.00 No Quote
America's Best Mortgage (800) 713-8189 5.25 / 2.00 4.75 / 2.00 4.75 / 0.00 5.88 / 0.00
Amicus Mortgage Group (877) 385-4238 5.88 / 0.00 5.50 / 0.00 No Quote 5.88 / 0.00
Amtrust Funding (800) 774-0779 5.63 /0.00. 5.25 / 0.00 3.00 / 0.00 5.75 / 0.00
Borrowers Advantage Mtg. (888) 510-4151 5.88/0.00 5.50/0.00 No Quote 5.75/0.00
Century Home Funding (800) 224-7006 5.38 / 3.00 4.88 / 3.00 3.38 / 2.00 5.38 / 3.00
Fast and Easy Mortgage Co. (813) 404-7304 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote
First Rate Mortgage (800) 887-9106 5.88/ 0.00 5.38/0.00 No Quote No Quote
Florida Mortgage Corp. (888) 825-6300 5.63 / 0.00 5.25 / 0.00 4.13 / 0.00 5.50 / 0.00
Golden Rule Mortgage (800) 991-9922 5.25 / 1.63 4.88 / 1.50 2.63 / 1.00 5.50 / 1.00
Guardian Mortgage (800) 967-3060 5.63 / 0.00 5.25 / 0.00 No Quote No Quote
H.D. Financial (888) 368-0655 6.00 / 0.00 5.50 / 0.00 No Quote No Quote
Home Finance of America (800) 358-LOAN 5.63 /0.00 5.25 / 0.00 3.25 / 0.00 No Quote
Homestead Mortgage (888) 760-6006 No Quote No Quote 4.00 / 0.00 5.50 /0.00
Lighthouse Mortgage (800) 784-1331 5.63 / 0.00 5.25 / 0.00 No Quote No Quote
Sovereign Mortgage (800) 996-7283 5.63 / 0.00 5.25 / 0.00 4.88 / 0.00 5.50 / 0.00
Stepping Stone Lending (800) 638-2659 5.63 /0.00 5.25 / 0.00 No Quote 5.88 / 0.00
Summit Mortgage (800) 377-0623 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote
Rates provided by The National Financial News Services. Rates are valid as of April 6, 2005. Rates are
inclusive of all fees and are subject to change without notice. Call lender directly for APR's. Lenders wishing to
participate in this service, please call (610) 344-7380. For additional information on mortgages, go to:
www.onmortgage.com or call the consumer Help Line (800) 264-3707 .


contemporary-Craftsman
Whitingham offers observers a wide
spectrum of eye-catching details.
Shingles blanket the chimney as
well as the gable ends, which are fur-
ther accented by decorative supports.
Stone veneer wainscoting adds a coun-
try look, and most of the windows have
craftsman-style gridding on their upper
edges. Slender posts flank the entry,
and another set highlights the third
garage door.
Plenty of natural light washes into
the foyer through multipaned side-
lights and a gracefully arched transom.
On the right, double doors swing open
to access a den with a gas fireplace.
This room could be furnished as a
home office, library/study, or whatever
is needed.
Next to those doors, an arched
opening leads into the master suite. A
wider arch, directly ahead, guides you
into the spacious family living area.
This is clearly the heart of the
home. Dining room, living room and
kitchen flow together here for comfort-
able family living. All parts are visual-
ly open, but the long, raised eating
counter does allow the kitchen crew to
conceal cooking clutter.
Standing behind that counter, you
can enjoy watching flames dance in the
wood-burning fireplace across the
room. Or linger at the kitchen sink to
take in the changing seasons as they
play out in the view to the rear. The
large, partially covered patio can be
accessed from either the kitchen or the
living room.
The Whitingham's master suite is
in the right wing. Secondary bed-
rooms, utilities, and a two-section
bathroom fill the left wing. The master
bedroom offers direct patio access,
plus a luxurious bathroom that boasts a
dual vanity, oversized shower, private
toilet, and huge walk-in closet with a
pull-down ironing board.
For a review plan, including
scaled floor plans, elevations, section
and artist's conception, send $25 to
Associated Designs, 1100 Jacobs Dr.,
Dept. W, Eugene, OR 97402. Please
specify the Whitingham 30-501 and
include a return address when order-
ing. A catalog featuring more than 400
home plans is available for $15. For
more information, call (800) 634-0123,
or visit our website at www.associated-
designs.com.


House Plan of the Week


-I4


---------- --- -- -
2000 SERIES


I0,








LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


420 Wanted to Buy
WANTED Trash/Water Pump
2" or 3" Call 386-961-9731


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Effective October 1, 2003
All Yard Sale Ads
must be prepaid

440 Miscellaneous
A SET of Town Craft Pots. Very
nice, Must See! $500 386-755-5295
INTERIOR FLAT
Latex paint. 5 gal. buckets.
$30. each. MORRELL'S
386-752-3910
New Shipment
Trusses, $8.00 each
MORRELL'S
386-752-3910
New shipment
Vinyl Siding.
$38.-$42. per square.
MORRELL'S 386-752-3910
51 Jet Ski's
50v for sale
'97 YAMAHA 1100 3-Seater.
Brand New Engine & '97 Yamaha
700 2-Seater only 100 hrs. Incl.
Double Trailer & Tool Box
$6500.00 386-623-3033
630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2BR DWMH Secluded.
Close to town $500. month.
Call F.J. Hill
386-752-7887
2br/2 full ba. in Ft. White.
Electricity on. $600. per mo. 1st,
last & security. 386-365-1705 or
386-497-1464. On private property.
CANNON CREEK MOBILE
HOME PARK. New Ownership.
2 & 3 br homes. $400 $600 mo.
Deposit. required. 386-752-6422.
FURNISHED 2BR/1BA
on 1 acre lot.
$450. mo. & $250 Deposit.
No Pets! 386-397-3043
IN PARK Mobile Homes for Rent
2BR/2BA 1st & sec. required..
Applications & references required.
386-719-2423
LATE MODEL MOBILE HOMES
Starting $365 month, Beautiful
Pond setting, w/trees. CH/A & ca-
ble. No pets. Call 386-961-0017
640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
ABSOLUTELY "THE BEST"
Mobile Homes and Modulars
Move over Palm & Jake, the new
#1 home is here. Guaranteed
Gary Hamilton Homes 758-6755
MOBIL HOME Mover
State Certified
Insured and Bonded
Free estimates
Call: 386-755-1783


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
MOBILE HOME FINANCING
Refinance/lower rates or Purchase.
Investment home O.K. Land Home
or Home Only. (904)225-2381
Timberlane MH Park. Adult park
in Lake City, FL. Aval. NOW.
3br/2ba. Split plan DW, w/big
kitchen & Ig shed. Appliances inc.
269 SW Woodberry Ct. $34,500
386-758-9640
650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
1993 14x70. 3br/2ba w/1 ac.
Near Ft. White. Would sell for
Cash offer or Owner Financing.
386-752-7670 or 386-344-4755
3/2,'01 MH, on lot. Paved St., City
water, CH/A & appli. Ideal for retir-
ee or young family. Between LC &
White Springs. Lease/purchase.
WAC 386-752-1212 or 365-3094
4BR/2BA Loaded. on 1/2 acre.
(close in) $89,999.00. 6% fixed, 30
years. Ready to occupy. Gary Ham-
ilton Homes. 386-758-6755
MCALPIN/OWNER FINANCE
1998 16x80 3br/2ba on
5.6 acres. 252 to 89th Rd.
386-867-0048
710 Unfurnished Apt.
71 For Rent
1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
All very nice.
Convenient location.
Call 386-755-2423
DELUXE 2BR/1.5 BA
1 car garage. W/D hookup, 1 yr
lease. $630 per mo. plus $700 dep.
386-961-9490
FRESHLY PAINTED
1 & 2 BEDROOM APT.
Starting at $400 Plus security
Call Lea.386-752-9626
On the Golf Course 2BR/2BA
duplex. Free water & sewer. 1 year
lease. $700. mo. plus security dep.
386-752-9626
720 Furnished Apts.
20 For Rent
2-story Guesthouse w/2br/lba,
screened porch. Ready Now.
Christian comm., peaceful sur-
roundings; 20 min. from Lake City;
NO Pets; $500. mo.386-935-0377
Neat as a Whistle! 1BR Apt. + util-
ities, AC, TV, cable, micro, modem
& clean, quiet & shady, close in
town 41 So., $450 month 755-0110

7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3/1 W/ATTACHED workshop,
recently remodeled for
sale/rent. $700/month. Pets OK.
Bryan 754-8485
3/2, BRICK House, 2400 Sq Ft, in
Providence area. In ground pool,
fireplace, fenced back yard. $1200
mo, Plus security. 386-697-3490


Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3BR/ 1 1/2 BA CH/A, Washer &
Dryer Hook up, Please call 755-
2423 for more details

3BR/2BA IN Woodcrest
Subdivision. Has a Garage, CH/A.
$850 a month & $800 deposit.
Call 386-961-8672
HOME for RENT
Small 2br/l ba in town.
$425 mo. plus deposit.
386-454-7764 or 386-365-1921
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference. limita-
tion or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability, fami-
lial status or national origin, or any
intention to make such preference,
limitation or discrimination." Fami-
lial status includes children under
the age of 18 living with parents or
legal custodians, pregnant women,
and people securing custody of chil-
dren under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this newspa-
per are available on an equal oppor-
tunity basis. To complain of dis-
crimination call HUD toll-free at 1-
800-669-9777. The toll free tele-
phone number to the hearing im-
paired is 1-800-927-9275
750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
800 sq ft. Finished OFFICE
SPACE. 1000 add'l sq. ft. possible.
Will build to suit. Off US90 Call
752-6058 for more information.
FOR LEASE Office/Warehouse
space. 3000-20,000 sq ft. Ware-
house storage on 3&1/2 acres of
land. 3 miles off 1-75. Lease all or
part. Call Bruce at 386-365-3865
LEASE SPACE available at
Country Club Plaza, East Baya Ave.
starting April 1st. Good for Retail,
offices or combination. Call
386-497-4762 or 386-566-8079
Office or Retail Building for
Lease. 7500 sq. ft. on US 90 E.
Tom Eagle 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Realtor.

790 Vacation Rentals
1BD/1BA ON Ichetucknee River.
Dock, Furnished, Linens. Rent
Weekly, Weekends, or Monthly.
386-497-3637
3 BD/3BA on Ichetucknee River,
Dock, Furnished, Linens, Rent
weekly and weekends.
386-497-3637
CHERRY LAKE 4BR/3BA log
home. Sleeps 16, near Valdosta.
www.radloffretreat.com


Q! 3101 US HWY 90 WEST, Suite #101
Lake City, FL 32055
LO fITSEif r Business (386) 752-6575

e 2001 Toll Free 1-800-333-4946
THE DARBY-ROGERS COMPANY visit our websewww.century2.co
www.c21darbyrogers.com visit our website www.century21.om
.~~~~x -. L- D,."- ,'. -- srxm


New Upscale Neighborhood...
Beautiful home presented by Blake
Construction. 2,628 sf. 4BR/3.5BA.
Bonus room with bath could be 5"1
BR. Split plan, formal dining room,
gas fireplace, hardy board & brick
exterior. MLS#43002 $319,900.


Enjoy Peace & Serenity in this
Majestic 2 story home on the
Suwannee River, with 4BR/3BA. 2"d
Master has balcony overlooking the
river. Sit on the screened front porch
and enjoy river living at it's best.
MLS#44317 $375,000.


Under Construction! Begin the
summer in this 3BR/2BA brand new
home on .5 ac. 1192 sf. with 1 car
garage. MLS#44121 $109,000


Very Unique Home...on 6+ beauti-
ful acres. This 2 story home has 3/2.
In-ground screened in pool. Large
shed can park 3 cars, a workshop
w/AC unit. Come see it today!
MLS#44617 $200,800.


New Listing...Sturdy brick home on
5 fenced acres. New carpet, ceram-
ic tile, stainless steel appliances.
Brick BBQ outback w/porch swing.
Nicely wooded in back. $115,000
MLS#44801


Nice little house 3/1.5, great
kitchen. With a little TLC would make
a wonderful home in the heart of
quaint little community of Jasper.
Close to Valdosta, Ga. $63,000
MLS#44263


Do You Love Golf? Then this home
is for you, well maintained 3/2 brick
home located on golf course. Open
floor plan wit split bedrooms.
Screened back porch, custom win-
dows and much more! MLS#44547
$175,900.


f 4



Just Reduced Cute
Bungalow!! 3BR/1BA, hard
floors thru-out. Would make a
rental or family home. MLS#
$69,900.





""I f '

Oak woodlands surround
newer 3BR/2BA, 1642 sf.ho
Hamilton Co. Located across
street from a conservation
MLS#44231 $184,900


Showcase Home...Gor
5BR/2.5BA country home on 1
5"1 BR could be office, bonus r
game room. Back yard comp
fenced, detached garage &
grilling porch. $289,900 MLS#


H


Little
wood
great
44146








I this
me in
ss the
area.










geous
acre.
rom or
pletely
large
44564


---, -. v ,-' ,1



Spectacular Sunsets and Runway This lovely corner home has it
Views...Beautiful new well-main- all...3BR/2BA, stone wall w/insert
trained home. Open floor plan w/2 fireplace. Huge kitchen. Florida
master suites & many upgrades. room, enclosed front porch. Just
Includes 2000sf hanger w/Wilson move in and enjoy. MLS#44448
door and apt for guests orhome $169,900.
office. And so much more. A must
see! MLS#44511 $329,900


Addionl isins


m


Customized DWMH, ceramic tile, oak floors, workshop, 5 beautiful ac. $79,900. MLS#44839.
10 Acres w/DWMH needs abundant repairs. Pole barn. $68,500. MLS#44807.
3/2 DWMH on 11 + acres, fireplace. Great hunting! $79,900. MLS#44804.


L-


805 Lots for Sale
5 ACRES, scattered trees, near
Lake City. Cash or small down
payment, owner financing.
386-497-3637
LOT FOR Sale By Owner. 5 acres
with well, septic & power pole.
11 miles South of Lake City.
$500 down & $500 a month.
386-752-4597

810 Home for Sale
$34,000! 3br/2ba foreclosure
available now!
For listing call
1-800-749-8124 ext H411
FOR SALE Cypress Log Home.
4BR/ 3 1/2 BA, on 5 acres.
Horse Barn, Fenced Pasture, &
Much More. $285K 386-365-4981
NEW HOUSE
3br/2ba on 1/2 ac. Quiet, Close to
town. New school District.
386-752-7277
TWIN LOTS w/giant oaks. 5 min
from dowhi town. Plus 3BR/2BA
home $129K, will divide. Owner
Finance. 904-724-6545

820 Farms &
2v Acreage
5 Acres for 2 home sites. w/SW
trailer & 2 utility sheds. Well/septic.
SE CR245, SE Ebenezer Rd. SE
Smart Rd. Opportunity of Lifetime.
386-697-1395
BEAUTIFUL 5 ac restricted home
sites on paved road. 3 & 1/2 miles
from 1-75 & US 90. From $49,900.
386-365-1563 or 365-8007
Crawford Co, GA
198 AC-$1,795/AC
Two PONDS, turkey, big deer
county, hardwoods, planted pines,
will not divide.
404-362-8244
St. Regis Paper Company, LLC
FSBO 80 Ac. of Pine Tree Planted
Land Adjacent to Resd'l Area Can
Sub-Divide $20,000/Acre or $1.5
Mil. For all 80 Acres (904)219-7045
LAND WANTED 1 to 100 acres.
Owner financing, residential &
commercial. Also 3/2 home wanted
w/ Owner Financing. 561)254-4566
WANTED 25+ Acre parcels, Zoned
RSF2. Will pay up to 10,000 per
acre. 386-365-4379

830 Commercial
Property
2+ ACRES COMMERCIAL Land
for Lease. 1 block from 1-75.
All utilities are available.
Call Kevin at 386-984-5943
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY.
I acre with house. 277 of Baya Ave.
Frontage. For more information.
Call 386-752-4072


83O Commercial
830 Property
FOR LEASE
Warehouse space from
$300 per month.
386-365-3865

Auto Parts
920 & Supplies
JASON CANOPY Cab high,
like new, fits 1 ton Dodge truck or
possible. other 1 ton truck.
$350 OBO 386-755-6016

930 Motorcycles
2003 Black Honda Valkyrie. 1500
GL. 2200 mi. Like new. Saddle
bags. Windshield, Sissy bar. Must
Sell! $11,500 386-935-1708

940 Trucks
1991 MAZDA Pickup, Club cab.
$1,500 Firm. 386-397-4126
It's Back
"0 Down" on many
Cars, Trucks, Vans, & SUVs
386-623-6657
TOPPER FOR Truck with sliding
doors 62'x87'. $300. 386-755-5295

950 Cars for Sale
*Hondas from $500*
Police Impounds!
For listings call
1-800-749-8116 ext A760
1992 FORD MUSTANG
Only $800.00! Must Sell!
For listings.
Call 1-800-749-8116 A834
1993 DODGE Colt.
Looks and Runs Good.
AC, New tires, $1,500. OBO.
386-344-3764
1999 CHRYSLER 300M. Loaded.
$9,000 OBO. 386-758-8389
2003 Avalanche Black, 29 k mi., 24
in. Lexani Rims, complete Alpine
stereo, power programmer, K+N
filter, loaded. Everything but sun-
roof. $28,000 Dan Register Jr. 365-
3702 or 386-752-6836. after 7pm
Been on the Job,
6 months, utility bill,
check stub, Your Approved!
386-623-6657
Just in time
for the Summer,
Many convertibles.
386-623-6657
MUSTANG COBRA
for sale. Nice & Clean
with plenty of Horsepower.
386-623-6657
SHAKY CREDIT?
BAD CREDIT?
NO CREDIT?
You can buy a Car! 386-623-6657


951 Recreational
95 Vehicles
1996 23' Ford Chateau
Excellent Condition
Has everything & Sat. TV.
$23,000.00. 386-754-8749
2000 Holiday Rambler Alumacape
26ft., 5th wheel. Hitch incl., 2 slide,
2 door fridge, gas stove, microwave,
AM/FM stereo, TV intenna, ele.
jacks, $13,800. 386-935-2623. Iv
message. All calls will be returned.
APACHE HARD sided, pop up
camper, 14ft, sleeps 4, refridg, AC,
Stove, sink, old but makes good
hunting camper. $500 OBO
386-497-3916
CLEAN 5TH Wheel. 3 slides,
38 ft. $18,000. 386-719-7278
MUST SELL! '03, 38 ft. Sierra,
pull type. 3 slideouts, Central Air.
Washer/dryer. Self contained. Roll
out awning. Many extras.
Best Offer takes it. 386-864-3985
952 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
1991 ISUZU Trooper.
V6, AC, 4 Wheel Drive,
good Condition. $2,400.
386-755-6073
1998 CHEVY Venture Minivan
129k mi, Excellent condition,
$5,500 obo 697-3147
www.tekmunki.com/venture
2002 GM Bravada. 4 WD, Auto,
24mpg Hwy, Silver, leather, bose,
Full warranty, original owner,55K
Hwy Mls. $16,488. 386-497-2386








--'4

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SThe Next Time You Are

Shopping for A New Vehicle

Come See Me...

The Guy In The Tie



at Sunbelt

Chrysler Dodge Jeep

Hwy 90 West, Lake City

a386-755-3444


S$Holder of Sales Record at Sunblet CDJ

ALake City's first car salesman with my

own independent website:



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(look for money Saving service coupons here)



I Thanks to all my customers for helping

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And remember...


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I


I








A Place Called




Part 2 of our 4 part, month-long series detailing the area in which we live
and the people involved.



S- -.i ,!,. 1i
















4e o rs














I 4



. Helena Powers opens up a edred









-- .- ', l k- ..i U',











Si~ .. and she beams remembering her husband,

Ralph, and their busy life together.
By ASHLEY CISNEROS
LZ .:; + .. .. ,
9 1,,...
:- i : _!K "


Snapshots of road dedications, din- Anyone who has cruised down the numer- an early age through the vehicle of hard work.
ners, speeches, meetings, gatherings ous Florida roads and interstates has been When he arrived in Lake City with his family
and even the presidential inauguration affected by Ralph Powers. from his hometown of Ladoga. Ind.. he started
Sof John F. Kennedy piece together a col- The map of Florida was changed forever in working at a grocery store and service station.
pI orful tale of how much Ralph Powers the early 1960s as he helped pave the way for Powers started what he called a "modest"
I- ', l, meant to Florida. the construction of many new roads and service station in 1935.
Newspaper clippings from the Lake Cit. bridges, connecting Floridians in ways unseen He had a knack for business and only two
I i5 Reporter, the Jacksonville Journal, the before. years later he founded a car dealership and
Florida Times-Union, and the Tallahassee "I miss him so much," Helena Powers whis- soon a line of trucks, too.
[ Democrat document the progress. pered. He did so well, by 1940 he bought out his oil
Flipping the page reveals additional clip- Route to Success wholesale supplier and opened up his own dis-
pings from the Jacksonville Beach News, tributorship, Columbia Oil Company.
S' Bradford County Telegraph, Levy County Born in Indiana, Ralph Powers moved to He constructed a new building for his busi-
SI Journal, Gainesville Sun, and Union County Columbia County when he was 11 years old,
I-- Times. says his wife. POWERS
__ They are all about Powers. Powers began his own route to success from continued on page 2E


LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


Section E










-~ -. ~


LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005

I ,, ,''' Then & Now


POWERS
Continued from page 1E

ness and called it Powers
Service, which included auto-
mobiles, farm equipment,
trucks and provided Sun Oil
Company oil to eight counties.
He sold Pontiac, Oldsmobile,
Cadillac, International Trucks
and Farmall Trucks.
Before long he opened up a
second office in Ocala.
Powers enjoyed being in
charge of his own businesses
and did well at whatever he pur-
sued.
He was quoted as saying, "I
look in the mirror to hold my
board meetings."
After he opened the Ocala
office, he met a local attorney,
Farris Bryant.
Powers helped Bryant cam-
paign for governor of Florida in
1956.
Bryant didn't win then, but
ran again in 1960.
This time he won and Powers
enjoyed celebrating the victory
with his friend.
Powers served as campaign
manager for Bryant in
Columbia County, and helped
him earn 78 percent of the vote.
A New Path
Bryant recognized Powers'
talent and dedication and
appointed him to be in charge
of the second district of the
Florida State Road Board when
he took office in January 1961.
"He viewed it as an honor to
be appointed," his wife remem-
bered.
The appointment was meant
to be a part-time job.
In the Sept. 21, 1963, issue of
the Jacksonville Journal, staff
writer Bill Sweisgood wrote an
article on Powers and his dedi-
cation to the Florida State Road
Board as part of the paper's
"Personality of the Week"
series.
In the article Powers said
that in addition to being a fami-
ly man and business owner, his
appointed position on the road
board was an 80-hour a week
job, but that he enjoyed it.
He was to receive $3,600 a
year until the legislature raised
the amontmtto 06,000 in 1963.
As was character to him,
Powers soared above and
beyond in his new position.
He spent some days talking
on the telephone for seven
hours about road problems and
solutions.
Powers spent most of his
earnings from the road board
paying for operating costs such
as his lengthy phone bill.
He said it actually cost him
money.
Powers called his appoint-
ment "a real experience" and
said he "wouldn't take anything
for it."
When citizens in
Jacksonville complained that it
seemed that the road system
seemed to be taking more cen-
tral routes, Powers defended
the board's work.
He emphasized that the
roads allowed more people to
travel easier, from north to
south and east to west.
"He promoted Lake City
wherever he went," Helena
Powers said. "People joked that
he made every major road
intersect in Lake City on pur-
pose."
Under Powers' work,
Interstate 75 and Interstate 10
were built, along with a multi-
tude of other roads.
While he was on the board,
more bridges and roads were
constructed than any other
board before them.
Powers' work also affected
the Jacksonville Expressway,
Jacksonville Riverside Viaduct,
Interstate 301, the four laning
of Duval Street, the Shands
Bridge, McFarlane Street,
State Road 100 and U.S. 27.
Additional projects included
work on State Road 232,
University Boulevard in
Jacksonville, U.S. 90, U.S. 441,
State Road 24, the Acosta
Bridge in Jacksonville, and
State Road 228.


In the June 3, 1963, issue of
the Jacksonville Journal, Lake
City was dubbed as the
"newest Gateway to Florida."
Writer Jimmy Walker pre-
dicted that the construction of
1-75 in the summer of 1964
would make Lake City a gate-
way city.
1-75 was to meet the Florida
Turnpike in Wildwood to allow
speedy travel to Tampa and


INDEX


COURTESY PHOTO
Helena Powers stands with her husband, Ralph Powers, and other officials after unveiling a
sign for Lake City on Interstate 75.


Ralph Powers


Miami.
The new construction was in
addition to the new 1-10 that
was completed in May of 1963.
Initially it connected Lake
City with Jacksonville and
eventually stretched to
Pensacola.
The construction extended
the interstate 65 miles west
from Jacksonville and was said
to the be the second longest
completed segment of the
interstate in Florida, according
to an article in the Florida
Times-Union.
Rewards Along the Road
Ralph and Helena Powers


frequently accompanied Gov.
Bryant and his wife Julia to
many functions.
After the dedication of 1-10,
the Powers hosted a buffet
luncheon at the home for the
Bryants.
One of Powers' favorite
memories is attending the inau-
guration of President John F
Kennedy and an address by
Kennedy in Miami Beach.
'The governor had the
Florida group on the train and
we attended a big reception at a
hotel for the president,"
Powers said.
She described the
Kennedys as "down to earth,
nice people."
While juggling his family
duties, growing businesses,
and road-board duties, Powers
remained active in the commu-
nity.
He served as president of
the Kiwanis Club and country
club, served as district chair-
man of the North Florida
Council of Boy Scouts of
America, was a member of the
chamber of commerce, mem-
ber of the Elks and
Sportsmen's Club, and wor-
shiped at a Methodist church.
He was also a member of the
Jacksonville Expressway
Authority, president of the
Lake City Automobile Dealers


Courtesy Photo
Ralph and Helena Powers were among a group from Florida
invited to the presidential inauguration of President John F.
Kennedy.


Association and member of the
board of the Florida
Automobile Dealers
Association.
Powers was entertained by
the Rockefellers in New York
and he and his wife attended
the 1964 World's Fair in New
York City.
Powers received an award
from Bryant at the Blanche
Hotel for his outstanding
achievement in industrial and
civic contribution.
The chamber of commerce
gave him a plaque in 1965 for
his services to Columbia
County.
In addition, Levy County
held a "Powers Day" in
Bronson in June 1963 to show
its appreciation for Powers'
work.
"My husband worked very
hard," Powers said. "I still don't
know how he did it all."


Ralph Powers ............................................... 2E

Old resort town of White Springs...................3E

Lake City Municipal Airport.............................4E

From Alligator to Lake City............................ 5E

Downtown business........................................6E

A history of CHS football.................................7E

Sports vary through the years.........................8E

A home for UF: missing courthouse clock...9E

County's founding questioned; Skunk Ape.....10E

Theories of Columbia's beginnings................11E

Stephen Foster State Park...........................12E

Fort W hite sees change ............................... 13E

Pat Sum m erall.............................................. 14E

Rich in professional athletics; U.S. 90 ............15E







On the Front



Staff writer Ashley Cisneros takes

a look into the life of Ralph Powers,

a man who helped shape roads and

lives throughout Florida.


We'eCmea LNaWa


"YurPatnr orth Ftue
Fo*nfrato0cl
(36 72182UEC0T
UM U IT UL*i


f
j, '- ---- ---- ..- ,
SConv.'enient location near 1- 75, 1-10
<"and HiuT. 90 at Branford Hiu'y
All u'ilthin minutes of shopping. entertainment'lt
and other set 'i prices. .... -
-- .. "4l Y "1-- '('" '


m #O)v 0 A 00 DOR







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


A Place Called "


Then & Now


Old resort town of White Springs boasts vivid memories


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter. corn
WHITE SPRINGS -
These days when Virginia
Daniel peers out of the win-
dows of her home, there are
few people she recognizes.
Yet, as a young girl grow-
ing up, White Springs was a
resort town that attracted
families from across the
country.
Daniel knew all of her
neighbors, and made many
friends during the summer
with children who were visit-
ing with their families.
She was born and lived on
the same spot her entire life.
She has played the organ
for her church since she was
8 years old.
Five weeks after she was
born, her house burned
down when a fire started in
the chimney.
Two years later, in 1917,
another house was built on
the property.
Daniel remembers her
days at the White Springs
springhouse very clearly.
"Before the white settlers
came to this area, the Indian
tribes were owners of the
spring," she said.
'They declared the land to
be sacred and the waters to
have medicinal qualities."
In 1835, a man named
Bryant Sheffield bought a
large amount of acres for a
plantation.
The land included the
spring.
"Later a lady named
Minnie Mosher Jackson pur-
chased the spring," Daniel
said. "She built a spring-
house on around it and peo-
ple enjoyed sitting on the lev-
els and watching the swim-
mers below."
Jackson's brother, a doc-
tor, also owned a facility
where the sick could stay
while they visited the springs
to drink the waters and wade
in it as a remedy for their ill-
nesses.
"Minnie Mosher Jackson


0 JENNIFER C iASTEEN/LaKe CkILy Reporter
The Spring House still stands at the entrance of Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park. along the Suwannee River in
White Springs. The Spring House was a popular tourist destination at the turn of the last century.


was Catholic, and closed the
spring on Sunday from 11
a.m. until 1 p.m. for church,"
Daniel said.
Often families would come
from Georgia on the town's
trains to enjoy picnic lunches
in the springhouse on the
weekends.
On Daniel's wall hangs a
watercolor her sister Eleanor
created on the springhouse
in its prime.
"I remember there was an
elevator there that would
take disabled visitors to the
water," Daniel said.
"The water was purely
clear and when my friends


dropped pennies in there I
would dive for them."
White Springs was a
tourist destination in those
days.
"You couldn't get a room
anywhere, because they
were booked," she said.
"Families would stay the
whole summer long."
At one time, Daniel said
she recalled there being
almost 30 hotels and board-
ing houses in her town, such
as the Hamilton Hotel, the
Edgewood Hotel and the
Telford House.
She said hotels were $2 or
$5 a day and included dinner.


Daniel went swimming
three times a day, after each
meal.
Every now and then she
would get out of the water to
warm up since the water
stayed approximately 72
degrees year round, she said.
"We played games where
the girls would stand on the
boys' shoulders' and be
pushed off to see who would
go farther," she said.
Daniel remembers that the
springhouse's staff would
turn the light off and then
back on as a signal that it was
time to get out of the springs
around 10 p.m.


Daniel was intrigued by
the many people who visited
the springs for its rejuvenat-
ing powers.
"People came from all over
to drink the miracle water,"
she said. "A 16-year-old boy
in a wheelchair took the ele-
vator down to the water and
moved his feet in it."
Later the boy asked his
mother he could go to a
movie with Daniel.
His mother gave him per-
mission as long as he took
along a pitcher of the water
to drink during the show,
Daniel said.
Daniel also remembers


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that the adults sat around the
spring and played games
such as bridge.
She would bring them
pitchers of water pumped
from the spring to sip as they
played.
Several visitors would bot-
tle the water or purchase bot-
tles of water from White
Springs to take home with
them.
'They enjoyed the mineral
taste," Daniel said. "A few
thought it had too much sul-
phur."
Daniel has a piece of paper
of the imprint of one of the
bottles of water.
She ran a purple crayon
over the bottle to show the
imprint of the letters spelling
out White Springs.
Most of her families came
to White Springs by train and
Daniel stayed in touch with
her new friends after they
rode the train back to their
home states.
"Some were from southern
Florida like Miami and
Pompano Beach," she said.
"Others were from Ohio,
South Carolina and New
York."
Daniel wrote letters and
visited her friends over the
years.
As she grew older, Daniel
continued to watch the her
town change.
She is an alumna of
Columbia High Schools class
of 1934, and was one of six
students who would ride to
Lake City with a neighbor,
Ella Neill, who worked in
Lake City.
"After school, us girls had
to wait for boys to finish prac-
ticing football and passed the
time walking around Lake
DeSoto," Daniel said.
She attended Florida's first
teacher's college, Florida
Normal College, established
in 1883 in White Springs.
Later Daniel said the
school was moved to Jasper.
'Things have changed so
much, but I have enjoyed it,"
she said.







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


A Phce Called -'f,


Then & Now


Airport once a Naval station, now a thriving economic center


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityrepor ter.com
From the ground, it may
look like any other municipal
airport. A few hangars, a
small Naval station and some
private planes parked around
the taxiway.
But it's from a pilot's per-
spective that one can truly
appreciate the scale of the
Lake City Municipal Airport
and understand what it means
to the vitality of the local com-
munity.
From the air, one can see its
spanning 1,200 acres with
8,000-foot and 4,000-foot run-
ways, its fixed base, long taxi-
way, traffic-control tower, as
well as several large industrial
businesses, including one
with six hangars that main-
tains and overhauls large
commercial aircraft (Timco).
"People don't see it from
above," said Assistant City
Manager Tom Sawyer, who is
responsible for managing the
city-owned airport. "They
don't see exactly what a great
facility it is."
But the airport wasn't
always such an integral part of
or owned by the local
community.
The basic structure, includ-
ing runways, of the current
airport was built in the early
1930s under the federal gov-
ernment's Work Program
Administration. During World
War II, it underwent several
improvements to become a
military installation as a Naval
Air Station, or "NAS Lake
City."
The facility had five run-
ways at the time and was used
to train pilots during World
War II.
Sawyer said the local NAS
was similar to those through-
out Florida such as Keystone
Heights and Williston, whose
own airports were formerly
training bases for World War
II.
"Florida has good weather


This aerial photo of the Lake City Municipal Airport, as seen from the west, shows the facilities, expansive runway and taxiway system as well as the indus-
trial business it hosts, such as Timco (upper right corner) and Great South Timber (right center).


for training air crews," he
explained.
But then in 1947 after the
war, the War Assets
Administration sought to
unload property that could be
diverted for use by local gov-
ernments under the Surplus
Property Act of 1944. As a
result, the city was given full
ownership of the local airport


and all its improvements.
Over the years and after the
1940s, the airport served
mostly a general aviation role
until it began hosting industri-
al business with the city play-
ing landlord and generating
revenues from property leas-
es.
By 1961 a business known
as Aero was leasing space


from the city to perform main-
tenance, overhaul and repair
on commercial and military
aircraft, utilizing pre-existing
hangars built by the govern-
ment and the long runways.
The business grew up and
down over time, but at its
peak employed about 1,400
people.
Later the business was pur-


chased by Timco, which also
performs similar work on air-
craft, including that of several
well-known airlines. With cur-
rent employee numbers near-
ing 900, the business is one of
the largest private-industry
employers in the county.
"It absolutely provides eco-
nomic benefit from the
employment the tenants pro-


vide," Sawyer said.
With the large facility and
space the airport property
has, it continued to expand
and provide more opportuni-
ties to lease space to business
and make the airport a self-
sufficient operation.


AIRPORT
continued on page 5E


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


-~
I.


AIRPORT
Continued from page 4E

In 1993, Sawyer said the
city completed the construc-
tion of an industrial park on
the airport's south side that
now has a few major tenants,
one of which is manufactured
home builder Homes of
Merit, which leases a portion
of its property from the city.
Others include Great South
Timber (formerly Daniels
Lumber) and a 17-acre, $3
million tanker base for the
U.S. Forestry Service that is.
currently under construction.
The airport also leases to
smaller business on new
service road frontage off U.S.
90 East, including CHC Labs
and Shands Healthcare's
Trauma One lifeflight team.
Sawyer said the airport is
run as a business and
because it receives federal


funding for maintenance and
improvements, the money it
generates is used only for the
airport's support and func-
tion.
Through it's property leas-
es and the sales of both gen-
eral aviation and jet aviation
fuels, he said the airport is
able to be self-sufficient.
And for at least the past 14
years, Sawyer said the airport
"has made more money than
it's spent."
He said key players in mak-
ing sure the airport is a viable
operation and continued suc-
cess include City Manager
Joe Cone, Vice Mayor George
Ward, Councilman John
Robertson, former Mayor
Ray Kirkland, former
Assistant City Manager Faye
Bowling Warren and former
Councilmen Mike Collins and
Richard Cole.
Sawyer also said funding
for vital improvements at the


airport have been helped by
Florida Department of
Transportation Aviation
Administrators Roland Luster
and the retired David Lee,
along with Federal Aviation
Administration Program
Manager Richard Owen.
But keeping the airport up
isn't an easy task and
requires regular mainte-
nance.
Because of heat and use,
like any airport, its expansive
runways and taxiways need
continual repair and the mas-
sive areas of grass have to be
mowed about six months out
of the year, Sawyer said.
That's not including any
maintenance of its buildings
and private aircraft hangars.
Currently it has about four
employees that oversee the
fixed base operation, includ-
ing airplane servicing, stor-
age and fuel sales.
But as successful as the air-


Then & Now


port has been and continues
to be, Sawyer, the city and
some of the airport's tenants
are hoping for even greater
ventures in the future.
Currently the city is part-
nering with Timco to seek
federal funding for an
Instrument Landing System
(ILS) that would help safely
land aircraft at the airport in
less than ideal weather.
"Certainly it would be a
great advantage to the air-
port, but also the whole com-
munity," Sawyer said.
The ILS helps planes land
safely even in inclement
weather such as heavy fog,
with a ground-based system
that can communicate with
the aircraft's on-board instru-
ments.
By doing so, the ILS can
help pilots safely find the run-
way even if they can't see it
through the aircraft's wind-
shield.


L- _ _


Many airlines and freight
carriers, as well as many pri-
vate owners, only like to use
airport facilities that have
ILS. Sawyer said the system
would likely make the airport
more attractive to various
types of businesses and allow
Timco a "great tenant" -
to expand even more, creat-
ing additional jobs for the
community.
The increased air traffic
could also help create addi-
tional fuel sales and make the
airport eligible for more fed-
eral funding.
"We've got a lot of opportu-
nity," Sawyer said.
The city is also currently in
the design phase with four
new "corporate" hangars that
will be large enough to house
everything from small single-
engine planes to private jets.
It is also underway with plans
for new security fending
around the airport property.


From Alligator


to Lake City, a


growing area


finds its identity


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com

When looking at maps of
Columbia County during the
1800s, Lake City is nowhere
in sight.
However, a city called
Alligator was.
Lake City had two differ-
ent names before its present-
day name was agreed upon.
According to "A History of
Columbia County Florida,"
by Edward E Keuchel, pres-
ent-day Lake City was called
Alligator.
Keuchel writes that the
Seminole leader Halpatter
Tustenuggee or "Chief
Alligator" established the vil-
lage of Alligator Town or
Halpata Tolophka.
White settlers established
the seat of government of
Columbia County in the
same spot and called it
Alligator in 1832.
In 1836, the name was
changed to Lancaster after a
military fort that was estab-
lished in present-day
Columbia County during the
second Seminole War.
Before the war ended, the
name was changed back to
Alligator.
Yet, not for long.
Alligator became Lake City
in January 1859.
Keuchel wrote that the leg-
islative council changed the
name because the wife of
William B. Ross feared that
the students at her daughter's
future school would tease her
if they knew she was from a
placed called Alligator.
No one knows how much of
this was true or what other


Want More History?
Lake City made a bid for the
University of Florida in 1880s.
PAGE 9E

factor prompted the name
change.
In the centennial issue of
the Lake City Reporter, the
same story was told, except
the name of the concerned
mother was reported as a
Mrs. Young.
On Dec. 14, 1858, Senator
W. W. McCall introduced a bill
to incorporate Alligator.
When reading it for the sec-
ond time that day, he made an
amendment that the name
"Lake City" be substituted for
every place the name
"Alligator" appeared in the
document.
Two days later, the bill was
voted on and was passed
unanimously.
However, the bill still had to
be approved by the House of
Representatives.
On Tuesday, Dec. 21, 1858,
the bill was read.
State Rep. John Frink of
Hamilton County moved to
amend the document by strik-
ing the word "Lake" from
"Lake City" and substituting
"Crocodile" instead.
Frink's motion did not
carry.
The bill passed in the
House on January 14, 1859,
with only Frink, Joseph S.
Christie of Leon County and
Thomas S. Hunt of Nassau
County opposing.
Gov. Edward Perry signed
the bill and the city was
named Lake City on Jan. 15,
1859, on the last day of the
session.


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"This is big business,"
Sawyer said. "I don't think
people realize what a big
business the airport is."
And from a financial per-
spective, the city is fortunate
to have been able to inherit
an airport to maintain and
improve, rather than build
one from scratch.
In Bay County, a new air-
port with 8,200-foot and
5,000-foot runways compara-
ble to Lake City's is being
constructed at an estimated
cost of about $275 million.
Though that also includes
construction of a 100,000
square-foot terminal, it does-
n't include the price of land as
4,000 acres for the facility and
10,000 acres for wetlands mit-
igation are being donated.
If the city were required to
undertake a similar project at
this point, "we couldn't do it,"
Sawyer said.








LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005
*


Ij A FL Ic CalkJlcrd~


Then & Now


Downtown once an epicenter of business


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter.comr

It was once the center of
everything and the very
lifeblood of Lake City.
For locals, it's where they
went to eat, get their hair cut,
visit friends, go to a movie, as
well as buy their hardware
supplies, groceries, clothes,
furnishings and anything else
they may need.
For visitors, it was where
the train dropped them off,
where they lodged at local
hotels, sought an evening of
entertainment or just stopped
for lunch on their way south.
Over more than 150 years
with more ups than downs
downtown Lake City
remains a thriving, integral
part of the community. It has
survived the Civil War, the
Reconstruction, the Great
Depression, fires and even
the booming development of
U.S. 90 West and Interstate
75, which included a mall and
Wal-Mart.
Though it now has asphalt
streets and only a smattering
of brick pavers compared to
what it once had, the area still
features many businesses and
restaurants that are frequent-
ed by locals and visitors alike.
Many of the buildings are also
the same basic structures as
those at the turn of the 20th
century.
Billy Wheeler, 69, is a life-
long resident of Columbia
County, growing up just north
of downtown Lake City and
remembers how it once was.
He said when he was a
child, "if it happened in Lake
City, it happened downtown."
Wheeler remembers the
days when downtown Lake
City was a place where every-
one not only did their busi-
ness, but went to see each
other and interact.
As a child, it's also where
he and his friends rode their
bikes, played and tried to stay
honest.
"If you came to town and
got in trouble before you got
home, your parents knew it,"
he said. "Because everybody
knew everybody."
Wheeler recalled going to
the Columbia Theater off
North Marion Avenue (then
Marion Street), which is now
a church, where the admis-
sion was but 9 cents and stop-
ping by the local five and dime
store.
In his memory, downtown
Lake City was a bustling cen-
ter of commerce and industry,
where all roads led to Marion,
both literally and figuratively.
And that's exactly the way it
started.
By the turn of the 20th cen-
tury the precursors to U.S.
441 and U.S. 41 were major
roads for people traveling
from the north. Because they
ran directly through the cen-
ter of Lake City, the town basi-
cally grew up around those
roads.
Railroads which ran just
north of downtown also pro-
vided service from the east
Jacksonville and Quincy to


~~iPFJ


ft


COURTESY PHOTO
Marion Street (Avenue) is seen from an elevated perspective from Duval Street as a parade marches down the downtown
thoroughfare. Horse-drawn carriages can be seen in the background and suggest this was North Marion Street of the early
1900s.


the west and helped to serve
as a way to move both people
and industrial products in and
out of the downtown area.
But in 1923 when the
"Jacksonville to Lake City"
highway (now U.S. 90 West)
was constructed, downtown
Lake City grew even more as
it had yet another major road
leading directly into the area.
According to "A History of
Columbia County Florida" by
Edward F Kuechel, by 1925
Lake City had been men-
tioned in an article in the


Saturday Evening Post, in
which the writer estimated
about half of the traffic going
to South Florida passed
through Lake City. The writer
referred to the area as '"The
Gateway to Florida."
According to Kuechel, in
1925, at the height of the
tourist season, the Lake City
Chamber of Commerce was
open for 18 hour days and the
"Boys Scouts of Lake City
made a check of tourists dur-
ing the (tourist) season of
1925 and found that south-


JUSTIN LANG/Lake City Reporter
Marion Avenue, which runs through the heart of downtown
Lake City, as seen today.

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I IinII I OWNER


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bound automobiles averaged
1,700 a day and had an aver-
age of four persons in each."
Clearly downtown Lake
City had plenty of exposure
and its significance to the
local economy continued
through the 1950s.
In addition to being a center
for travel in the early and mid
20th century, Lake City was
the county seat and the
Columbia County Courthouse
was the center of government
for the entire county. As a
result many locals had to go
downtown for any official
business.
Wheeler estimates that it
wasn't until 1963 when
Interstate 75 was constructed


west of Lake City that down-
town "died a slow death."
Though downtown hasn't
fallen off entirely and has
seen a resurgence in recent
years, Wheeler said "I don't
think it will ever be like it was,
of course that's my opinion."
"In fact, I hope I'm wrong,"
he added.
Some others, who have
stood by downtown regard-
less of its popularity over the
decades, are more optimistic
about its future.
Sue Rowand, owner of
Rowand's Mini-Mall, Antiques
and Collectibles, became a
downtown merchant about 22
years ago when she and her
late husband Tom opened a


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J.L. "Skipper" Hair, II

I l I 'lie\ thit jctnions spc.k louder ihj .
L .. [ r l I rI a'fr thi l o officee in the genei.i I eleci,_nr

__._ I 've attended c' jncil meeting g, for 0 ->\er Near




q n\ LI il .ind I hai% e rehiih| 'ur huine,,' in
S"B d ,,.r, t ,,. in ,2 a .tc t j l [ I ,,,i due I,-i 111
..r ^ i^ /. 1 I,,:pi.- i11} ju'[IN C '1 pr,.,\e ,e[ ',01.1u li>,,.. Hilpol7.1-i[
Si -f lhl', oppornurnil is to me

\ Please Vote...
J.L. "Skipper" Hair, II

for MAYOR
F i'd ( h .. ,-...1.1 I-:., I,,i 3,,,J a '. ,.r. i.,. I1 1, H ,,, II hi r.1 .m ..


0 COMPASSIONATE, PRC


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A fifth generation Columbia Counian,
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book store and sportswear
businesses in a former J.C.
Penney building. In the years
since, collectibles have taken
over the majority of the busi-
ness.
In the past two decades, at
one point, particularly in the
late 1980s and early 1990s,
Rowand watched the down-
town area decline with many
businesses closing shop and
moving to locations such as
U.S. 90 West or going out of
business altogether.
But Rowand's stuck
through those tougher times
and remained a downtown
staple.
"It went down," she said of
downtown Lake City. "But
now it's coming up and we
have a very positive feeling
with the restaurants and the
unique shops. We are very,
very excited about down-
town."
In recent years, projects to
improve the aesthetics and
structure of downtown have
been spearheaded by the
Downtown Action
Corporation, a conglomera-
tion of downtown merchants,
and the city.
Rowand said she knew
downtown could not stay
depressed forever and would
make a resurgence, other-
wise "we would not have gone
to the financial strain and put
this much into it if we thought
that downtown wouldn't make
it.
"We wouldn't have bought
this building if we thought
downtown was an area that
was not going to come back,"
she said.
Rowand said she believes
the continued success of
downtown has been because
of a handful of community-
minded people and merchants
who "never have given up on
downtown."
DOWNTOWN
continued on page 7E


phi molso,


L-


I







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005
2


Then & Now


CHS football: A history of success on the gridiron


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. corn
Columbia High's claim to
have the most football wins of
any high school in Florida has
gone unchallenged for two
years, and is now accepted as
fact.
That total stands at 568
after the 2004 season, accom-
panied by 283 losses and 35
ties.
There is evidence of CHS
football as far back as 1911,
though results for the first
couple of decades are sketchy.
The first 10-game season was
recorded in 1930 (see
"Columbia High School Tiger
Football From Memorial
Stadium to the Jungle," com-
piled by Shayne Morgan and
Morris Williams in 2002).
While every win is pre-
cious, there are decades, eras,
and special seasons that stand
out and six of those seasons
will be reviewed with com-
ments from players who lived
them.
The first great era of
Columbia football was when
Hobe Hooser arrived to take
over the program in 1931. In
Hooser's first four years, CHS
was 40-1-2 and 1932 produced
the first undefeated season.
Gerald Witt was a senior on


DOWNTOWN
Continued from page 6E

And in some cases, for
some, she said that devotion
may have even dictated finan-
cial success.
"Some people go into busi-
ness under-funded and it's
tough because the first few
years, you are going to have to
go through hard times,"
Rowand said. "I don't make a
lot of money but it keeps life
interesting."
In recent years, downtown
has seen projects to preserve


the 11-0 team in 1932 and he
reflected on the surge of suc-
cess when Hooser arrived.
"During that time, it was
during the Depression, there
were people who didn't go to
school," Witt said. "We start-
ed winning that was the big
recruiter and we had peo-
ple returning to school who
hadn't been there in so long.
There were big boys, too,
some weighed 240 pounds."
Witt said CHS ran the
Tennessee System, because
that was where Hooser was
from.
"I played quarterback with
Ernest McColsky," Witt said.
"My job was running the team
and Ernest threw most of the
passes. We had Eddie Joe
Long and he made All-
Southern for catching the
ball."
A vivid memory for Witt
was when Joe Coombs inter-
cepted a pass and returned it
for a touchdown to beat
Gainesville (7-0).
"We played Palatka and
Jasper and you always had to
beat Live Oak," Witt said.
In the days before seating
at Memorial Stadium, Witt
said fans would park on the
east and west sides of the field
and watch the games 'from
their cars.


its history and others that
brought new life to the busi-
ness district, such as tree
planters, brick pavers, new
street lights and the establish-
ment of the Lake City Historic
District.
Some people have a vision of
a downtown similar to what it
was in the early 20th century,
with people drawn to the area
as they were many years ago.
One of those is local devel-
oper and contractor Jody
DuPree who plans to build a
retail center known as
Downtown Plaza on an entire
city block at the intersection of


COURTESY PHOTOS


The 1967 Columbia High Tigers won the school's only state football championship with a 13-0 record.


Hooser's success tailed off
in his final six years and he
left CHS after the 1941 season
with 74 wins.
The war years and seasons
immediately following were
tough on CHS football, but
new coach Bill Armstrong
started a nice four-year run in
1949 with back-to-back seven-
win seasons. Broughton
Williams added 17 more wins
in his two years, including a
10-0 season in 1951 when the
Tigers were Northeast


North Marion Avenue and
Washington Street. To con-
struct the building he demol-
ished several dilapidated build-
ings on March 30.
The plaza will have several
retail spaces and a large public
parking lot that the city will
help pay for and lease from
DuPree until such time it takes
full ownership.
DuPree believes the new
retail, draw and parking will
help to bring more business
back to the downtown area and
help existing businesses have
more capital to improve their
operations.


Conference champions for the
first time since 1934.
Stan Anders was an end on
the 1951 team, that featured
Gene Cox who scored 18
touchdowns.
"The two-platoon system
and Gene Cox," Anders said,
when asked what made the
team so formidable. 'They
could not tackle him, he ran
so low. If you tackled him low,
he would kill you with his
knees; if you tackled him
high, he would just shed you


More people will also likely
be brought downtown with
additional parking that has
been built by the city in recent
years and with City Hall sched-
uled to move into the former
First National Bank building
(once the Powell Hotel) at the
corner of Madison Street and
Marion Avenue.
Olustee Park also under-
went a major renovation a few
years ago and an interactive
fountain is planned for the
south end of the park in a joint
venture between the city and
the DAC.
City Manager Joe Cone


off. I learned how to catch
passes, so I would be on
offense and not have to tackle
him."
Williams had played end at
Florida and suffered a knee
injury after going to the pros.
The Tigers wanted to take on
a Jacksonville opponent in a
bowl game to show what the
country boys could do, but
Williams nixed the idea for fear
someone would get hurt.
Williams explained his suc-
cess at CHS to the Lake City


noted that the city has also set
up a special taxing district for
downtown property that has
been earmarked solely to fund
its improvement.
"I think those types of acts
demonstrate that the city is
committed to the redevelop-
ment and improvement in
downtown," Cone said. "My
personal opinion of downtown
is when you think Lake City,
you think downtown and you
don't think of U.S. 90 West or
the airport, what flashes in
your mind is the downtown
area. I think that from a com-
munity standpoint that is


Reporter for an article in the
Bicentennial Edition of July 2,
1976.
"The two-platoon system
really helped us," Williams
told Wayne Peterson. "I had
boys who couldn't catch a
pass or run with the ball, but
they could put their head
down and really hit some-
body. We found out what each
player could do and tried to
FOOTBALL
continued on page 8E


important."
Even if the downtown isn't
seen as the heart of Lake City
by everyone, it still remains
the location of choice for vir-
tually all community celebra-
tions and festivals, such as
Fourth of July events and the
popular Olustee Battle
Festival.
"(Local) people come to
downtown and say 'this is just a
nice area'," Rowand said.
"People passing through town
stop in and say what a nice lit-
tle downtown. It happens all
the time, so that makes us
happy."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


A Place Called


Then & Now


FOOTBALL
Continued from page 7E
best take advantage of each
boy's talent."
Williams gave way to Jim
Reeves in 1953 and the pro-
gram almost hit rock bottom.
However, Reeves resurrected
the 1-8-1 Tigers in his second
year and went 9-0-1 and
again won the Northeast
Conference.
Bill Wheeler, a senior in
1954, explained the contradic-
tion.
"A.J. Reeves had trans-
ferred to Florida and was
first-string guard for two
years before he came to Lake
City to coach in 1953,"
Wheeler said. "He' was a
rough, tough, mean son-of-a-
gun. He started practice in
July and, before school start-
ed, three or four of our sen-
iors quit he was so tough on
everybody. If you messed
around at practice, he would
kick you as hard as he could
in the tail.
"We were probably the
team in the best shape, but no-
body was working together."
Returning the next year
was a breeze and Reeves
eased off a bit, said Wheeler,
who played fullback and line-
backer at 159 pounds.
"We just had another year
of seasoning behind us,"
teammate Emory Phillips
said. "I was a pulling guard in
our single-wing offense. I
never stayed on the line;
wherever the tailback was
going, I went. We had a
bunch of good ball players."
Phillips said to check the
average points to prove the




Sports


vary


over the


years

By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter. com
In the beginning, there was
only football and baseball. Now,
youth sports in Columbia
County encompass a variety of
activities, from swimming to
basketball to even soccer.
Lake City/Columbia County
Parks and Recreation
Department Athletic Director
Mario Coppock said the
changes he has seen just since
he's been at his post for the last
19 years have been staggering.
"No. 1, the growth has just
been unprecedented,"
Coppock said. "I can remem-
ber having four or five baseball
teams, five football teams and
no soccer."
As an example of the growth
Coppock spoke of, now the
parks and rec department
boasts 16 Little League
Football teams, 18 T-ball teams
and girls softball, which was
nonexistent in 1986.
There are also three travel
league basketball teams, and
Coppock said a second girls
travel team will be added next
year to bring the total to four.
The two sports that have
grown the most over the last 15
years are undoubtedly soccer
and girls softball. Coppock has
his theory as to why soccer has
become so popular.
"Because soccer is a sport
that both boys and girls can
play," he said. "It's fairly inex-
pensive. You can buy a soccer
ball and anyone can play."
Mason Farnell is considered
to be the father of soccer in the
community. The recently
retired Lake City Middle
School soccer coach started
both the girls and boys teams


in the early 1990s and has been
directly responsible for the
growth of soccer as a sport in
the community.
The last 10 years have also
seen girls softball rise as a pop-
ular sport, according to Girls
Softball Association of
Columbia County President
Jimmy Williams.
YOUTH
continued on page 9E


CHS domination, and it was
18.9-4.3.
Wheeler remembered the
Ocala game, when the Tigers
scored on a pass from Bobby
Sandlin to Gene Williams on
the last play of the game to
beat the home team 6-0.
Both men remembered the
Leon game, which was played
two weeks after the season
ended. The game during the
regular season was canceled
because of a polio outbreak.
The make-up game was
played to a scoreless tie, but
CHS owned the tiebreaker to
win the conference.
Reeves left after the confer-
ence championship season
and the CHS was 8-2 in the
first season under his former
assistant, Don Brown.
However, in the next eight
years under Brown and
Winton Criswell, the Tigers
were 11 games under .500.
Paul Quinn entered the
CHS scene and established
the most glorious of tenures
for Tiger coaches. Quinn was
71-8-2 in his seven years at
CHS.
He won a state title and was
runner-up in another. His
1969 team began 11-0 before
losing in the semifinal. His
1966 lost one game to
eventual state champion
Bradford High when the
Tornadoes blocked two punts
for touchdowns and won by
three points.
It was the 1967 team that
won all the marbles, finishing
with a 13-0 record.
"I didn't think so," said Dal
McDuffie, a senior on the
championship team, when
asked if the '67 team expect-
ed to be special. "The team


when we were juniors was the
best team, they just had some
bad luck. I thought we would
win eight games."
Columbia actually trailed
Orange Park High 7-6 with
four minutes left in the open-
ing game of the season,
before pulling out a win.
"We were very, very fortu-
nate to win that game,"
McDuffie said. 'That game
right there was the most
important of the season. If we
had lost, everybody would
have said we will be a good
team, but not as good as we
turned out."
Columbia extracted 59-6
revenge on Bradford and the
season came down to the
final-game matchup with
Suwannee High, which was
also 9-0. It was no contest, as
CHS won 40-13.
"Starke was a big game and
Live Oak, we basically killed
them, too," McDuffie said. "I
remember being on the
school bus and it took us
about 30 minutes to get
around the field, it was so
crowded."
Columbia beat Auburndale
27-7 in the championship
game, which was hosted by
the Bloodhounds.
"The support was a lot
greater, but back then there
were not so many sports,"
McDuffie said. "We had the
largest quarterback club in
the nation and I remember
they gave Coach Quinn a
brand new car."
Bobby Simmons came to
Lake City as an assistant with
Quinn and took over as head
coach when Quinn moved on
to Lakeland. Simmons stayed
at the helm 15 years, becom-


mow U~l


[" ""frit


U
Jil l


ing the all-time winner among
CHS head coaches with 111.
Despite Columbia moving
up in class, Simmons never
had a losing season until his
last in 1985, and even then
CHS won district and
advanced to the state playoffs
for his fourth time.
Simmons' greatest team
was in 1982, when the Tigers
went 10-2 and lost to
Woodham High, 31-28, in the
second round of the playoffs.
Woodham went on to easily
win the state championship,
23-14, over Miami Columbus
High.
Andrew Porter played on
the team and spoke about the
turnaround from a 5-5 season
the previous year.
'The junior class of that
year that came in at the skill
positions was outstanding,"
Porter said. "We had several
scholarship players and our
running game (Jeff Buiey,
Virgil Scippio) got a whole lot
better and we had a much
better quarterback (Mark
Dace)"
Columbia's run in state
started with Raines High, a
team that beat CHS in the
regular season. Under a "It
can be done, it will be done"
campaign, Columbia got
revenge, 20-12.
"It is not so much the
games I remember, as the
way the community absolute-
ly rallied behind the team,"
Porter said. "There were
signs everywhere lining the
streets. We had a leaflet drop
during practice and a pile of
buses that went to Pensacola.
I haven't seen anything like it
since."
Columbia rallied to take a


b~ 4<



I


late lead in the game, but
Woodham lived up to its No. 1
ranking in Florida.
"I can remember just like it
was yesterday," Scippio said.
"It was a dogfight from the
beginning. We weren't going
to give up and they weren't
going to give up. They kept
running that fullback over
and over and we couldn't stop
him."
Woodham surprised the
Tigers with a pass to keep the
winning drive alive.
'They just caught us slip-
ping," Scippio said. "They
hadn't thrown to the tight end
all year. That was the game to
win and we tried our best."
Simmons gave way to Joe
Montgomery who, after get-
ting his sealegs with a 3-7 sea-
son, won 39 games in his next
four years. His 1989 team
went 10-0, but was upset in
the first round of the playoffs.
Skip Wolf, the defensive
coordinator under Mont-
gomery, went 33-9 in the next
four seasons, but lost both of
his playoff games.
Danny Green returned to
his alma mater in 1995 and
took CHS to unprecedented
playoff success. Green's
teams made the playoffs all
nine years and the Tigers
advanced to the third round
six times, a level only visited
once before by the '67 cham-
pionship team.
Green's 1997 team won its
first 14 games, a school
record for wins in a season,
before losing in the state
championship game, 20-17, to
defending state champion
Miami Carol City High.
The '97 juggernaut came
on the heels of a 6-6 season.


"We had the same guys on
the team, the same amount of
talent," said Bobby Brewin, a
senior on the team. "I have
never seen a team come
together like that. When I
look back on it, it was unbe-
lievable. There was no self-
ishness and we were on the
same page all the time. It was
really a neat experience for
me.
"Coaching had a lot to do
with getting us on the same
page and working as a team."
Columbia beat Valdosta
High on the road and shut out
Lincoln High in Tallahassee
on statewide television, but
Brewin most remembers the
third-round playoff game
against Southeast High of
Bradenton.
Despite being undefeated
and playing at home, CHS
was a big underdog.
"Supposedly, they stopped
in Gainesville and walked
around Florida Field (site of
the state playoffs), because
that was where they expected
to be," Brewin said. "It was
our last home game and we
played in front of so many
people. They were supposed
to be everything and we
upset them."
Two weeks later, Columbia
made its own walk on Florida
Field for the state final.
"When we looked up in the
stands, it was covered in pur-
ple and gold," Brewin said.
"When we were riding out of
town on the bus, People were
holding up signs all along the
way. It is something I will
always remember."
Columbia High football
is also something to be
remembered.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


Then & Now


Lake City could have Original courthouse clock,


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.comrn
Lake City would be very dif-
ferent today if it was still the
home of the University of
Florida.
The massive institution's
student population of more
than 47,000 is almost five
times that of Lake City's popu-
lation.'
With more people, there
would undoubtedly be more
traffic, more businesses and


YOUTH
Continued from page 8E
"It started out at the tobacco
barns," Williams said. "A group
of parents got together, bought
equipment and played slow
pitch on one field."
Judge Collins, Vince Colletti,
Perry Sauls and Carol Brown
were some of the first parents
to take the initiative in starting
a softball league back in the
mid-1980s.
"There was nothing really for
girls to do prior to that time,"
Williams said.
After the games were moved
to the softball fields at
Southside Sports Complex,
Williams got the city involved
when he realized his daughter
was the only girl in a baseball
league for nine-year-olds.
"I got Coppock to go with me
and we started a rec league for
the summer," Williams said.
That eventually expanded into a
second season.
Williams estimated that in
the last four years participation
in the Columbia Girls Softball
League has doubled, and he
attributes that to the rise of
women's sports on television.
"Probably seeing more girls
play fast-pitch on TV in the
Olympics and in college, and


more money.
The orange and blue saga
of the formation of UF is as
complex as some of its
majors.
According to "A History of
Columbia County Florida" by
Edward F. Keuchel, Lake City
was home to the Florida
Agricultural College, a school
funded in part by a federal
land grant of 90,000 acres.
UF
continued on page 1OE


having role models like Lisa
Fernandez and Jennie Finch,"
he said.
The increase in opportuni-
ties to earn college scholar-
ships in softball has also
helped.
Another sport that has expe-
rienced tremendous growth in
the last decade is swimming. In
that time, the Columbia Swim
Team has gone from what was
once a summer operation to a
year-round enterprise.
Carl Allison got involved as
the boom was starting 11 years
ago, when his son started
swimming for the team. He
eventually became the treasur-
er of the Columbia Swim Team.
"A lot more kids are going
out for swimming," he said.
There are an estimated 100
kids involved in the swim team,
and there are more girls
involved in the program than
ever before. Allison also credit-
ed the swim team with supply-
ing more swimmers to
Columbia High's swim team.
As the community continues
to grow, so will the opportuni-
ties for kids to play a variety of
youth sports. What once
seemed impossible has now
become the norm, and in the
coming years Columbia County
could see the addition of even
more sports and more athletes.


cupola missing since 1958


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter. com

When renovations and addi-
tions to the Columbia County
Courthouse were completed in
2003, the cupola and clock that
were placed atop the building
were brand new.
They were replicas built
using a old photograph of the
courthouse taken before 1958
as reference. It was the only
way of recreating the originals.
That's because in 1958, the
clock and cupola were
removed for a former renova-
tion. And they have never been
seen since.
Though theories abound,
there has been no definitive
explanation of where they are
or who has them.
"That's considered one of
the great mysteries of
Columbia County," said
County Manager Dale
Williams.
Though he has heard many
theories, Williams said he
gives them very little credence.
"I don't think any of those
have ever been substantiated
and to this day I don't think
anybody knows where it is," he
said.
Larry Douglass, who grew
up in Lake City and moved
back to the area in 1992, is now
68, he has taken a personal

interest in the mystery, namely
the clock.
As a young boy, Douglass
said on some weekends, he
and his friends would sneak
into the courthouse through a
basement window to go inside
the cupola and look at the fas-
cinating clockworks.
Over the years, he too said
he has heard theories, but
believes the most popular one
has the clock having been seen
in the barn on the property of a


prominent local lawyer, who is
now deceased, as late as the
mid-1990s.
"My understanding is that
when the clockworks failed
this lawyer was supposed to
help find someone who could
repair it," Douglass said.
Douglass and other sources
wouldn't identify the lawyer out
of respect for his family who
still remains in the area, but
said that most of the barn's
contents were sold off in an
estate sale following his death.
At that time, when people
went to the barn before the
sale to study its contents, he
said the clock was not there.
The theory also doesn't men-
tion where the cupola may be
or why it would have been sep-
arated from the clock, but
Douglass believes it may have
some truth.
"I remain frustrated that the
clockworks being the county of
Columbia's belongings, some-
one has sequestered the clock-
works and is sitting and waiting
for a time when Larry
Douglass ain't going to remem-
ber that clock anymore," he
said.
Williams said before the
county began it's renovations
of the courthouse, it discussed
the original cupola and clock
and the possibility of attempt-
ing to track them down.
"We talked about it but from
the general consensus nobody
knew where the clock and
cupola were," he said. "You are
talking about a piece of proper-
ty that's been gone for 47
years."
Williams said he has person-
ally questioned a few people in
the community he believed
had knowledge of the clock
and cupola, "but in all of those
cases nothing has ever come of
it."


in.':,Tlll L ," 1_M ,r1 h. :..,rrF.-r
The Columbia County Courthouse seen today was renovated
and had extensive additions, which were completed in 2003.
The clock and cupola that sit on top of the building are repli-
cas on the originals that were recreated using an old photo-
graph.


He said even the family of
the former lawyer said they
heard the theories about the
clock being in his barn, but
gave it no credit.
"I just think that's part of
lore," Williams said of the theo-
ry.
Still, he said there is also
another possible explanation
for the missing cupola and
clock.
Williams said some people
also remember the contractor
who did the 1958 renovation
was from New York and claim
the clock and cupola were
loaded on a truck and taken to
that northern state.
Once there, he said the
items could have either been
used for another building or


sold for salvage.
But does the county intend
to ever seek out the clock and
cupola and attempt to return
the property that could right-
fully belong to it?
"I guess if the county knew
specifically where the clock
and the cupola were, it would
determine if it still has a legal
right in it at all and would go
from there, but I think it's
mostly just a mystery,"
Williams said.
While Douglass said he has
only met a couple of people
who claim they actually saw
the clock, again without regard
to the cupola, he is still hopeful
at least the clockworks will be
returned someday by whoever
knows where they are.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


A Place Called .'


Then & Now


County's founding date still questioned


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
Columbia County is 173
years old, but its birth and
meager beginnings are often
mysterious and obscure when
compared to other counties in
the state, though it is celebrat-
ed as one of Florida's earliest
counties.
The five leading historical
sources detailing the county's
birth confirm that Columbia
County was founded in 1832,


however, only one source "A
History of Columbia County
Florida" printed within the last
20 years, can provide a date for
when the county was actually
founded and the information
isn't based on a specific source.
The book states Columbia
County was founded Feb. 4,
1832.
Unlike many other counties
in the state, which have an offi-
cial founding date based on
various sources, Columbia
County's founding is largely


based on two separate theo-
ries.
Though both theories indi-
cate the county was originally
founded in 1832, one theory
only states that Columbia
County originally consisted of
all or parts of present-day
Suwannee, Bradford, and
Union counties. The other the-
ory states that Columbia
County developed after it split
from Alachua County.
Both Glenda Reed, presi-
dent of the Columbia County


Historical Museum and Pat
McAlhany, vice president of
the Columbia County
Historical Museum, say there
are several different theories
for how Columbia County was
created and founded.
"I really don't know why
there are so many theories,"
Reed said. "As the new presi-
dent of the. museum, this is
something very basic that we
need to know."
"It probably depends a lot
upon research and all the dif-


ferent sources," added
McAlhany. "Depending on
what research and why the
research was being conducted,
that many times determines
the sources people are going to
choose and I think that causes
a lot of variety in the informa-
tion."
Reed said the first theory
has information based on a
state census and would proba-
bly be more accurate than the
other.
"Ms. Ester Haworth's (arti-


cle) makes reference to the
census records of the 1830s
and documenting that should
settle it because that was a fed-
eral document and that's a pri-
mary source," she said. "In
proving history the census was
used a lot, because depending
on what a person's motive was
for writing an article, history
can be slanted. I'm rather new
to the county and I've heard
BEGINNING
continued on page 11E


UF
Continued from page 9E

While the state chartered
the school in 1870, it wasn't
built right away.
In 1851, monies were allo-
cated to create seminaries in
Florida.
A school opened in East
Florida in Ocala in 1853
according the University of
Florida Web site.
It was moved to Gainesville
in 1866.
The West Florida school
opened in Tallahassee in 1856.
When news about Florida
Agricultural College spread,
Alachua County presented
$50,000 and the Florida
Railroad offered 10,000 acres
if Gainesville was chosen for
the school's home.
Initially, officials chose to
establish the school in Eau
Gallie in Brevard County.
After some questions arose
regarding the Florida State
bonds that were purchased
with the money from the sale
of the federal land grant, con-
struction started in 1876.
When political problems
continued to simmer, the
school was never opened.
In 1882, it was decided that
the school should be relocat-
ed.
Joseph Baya and a group of
citizens from Columbia
County offered 112 acres of
land and the county offered
$1,000 to start construction if
the school was built in Lake
City.
The Morill Land Grant
College Fund offered a
$15,000 subsidy to pay the
salaries of five professors and
other expenses.
Lake City was selected as
the home for the Florida
Agricultural College in Feb.
1883 and students started
school there in the fall of
1884.
The school was located
where the Lake City Veterans
Affairs Medical Center stands
today.
At that time, the school was
only available for white males.
In addition to agricultural
studies, the men were offered
classical and military courses.
They were expected to
have at least $50 upon start-
ing school and the money was
to be given to the school.
A monthly statement was
issued to the men.
The students bought dress
uniforms for $20 and spent
$13.50 for fatigues.
They were asked to bring
what textbooks they had to
school and purchased other
texts from S. B. Thompson of
Lake City.
The men lived in dormito-
ries and were required to
attend a daily chapel service
and Sunday service at a
church of their choice.
In 1893, business courses
were added.
The three fraternities on
campus included Alpha Tau
Omega, Kappa Alpha and Pi
Kappa Alpha.
In 1901, Florida railroad
promoter and Standard Oil
millionaire Henry Flagler
donated $10,000 to the col-
lege for a gymnasium.
Two years later, the legisla-
ture changed the name of the
school to the University of
Florida.
Life was good in Lake City
and the residents were proud
of their school.
However, the celebration
didn't last long.
State superintendent of
public instruction William M.
Holloway, who won his posi-
tion in 1904, was the most


responsible for what hap-
pened next.
He previously served as
school superintendent of
Alachua County for 12 years
and lobbied to move UF to
Gainesville.
In May 1905, the Florida
Legislature considered a bill
to consolidate some of the
schools in the state so that the
state could maintain the insti-
tutions better financially.
The bill was presented by
Representative H.H.
Buckman of Duval County.
It passed on May 20, 1905,
in the House and May 26 in
the Senate.
On July 6, 1905, the board
of control and the state board
of education met to discuss
plans for consolidation.
While the colleges for
women and blacks were to
stay in Tallahassee, there
were a hot debate over where
the men's college should be.
The Gainesville group
made several offers, while the
Lake City proponents
stressed the fact that the col-
lege was already located
there, and highlighted the
recent addition of the new
gymnasium.
Gainesville made a final
offer of 517 acres, $40,000,
the use of the Gainesville
High School building and
free water.
Gainesville was chosen as
the' new home for UF on July
7, 1905, with the offer .offree.
water cited as the deciding
factor.
Dr. Andrew Sledd, the
president of the university in
Lake City was named presi-
dent of the school in
Gainesville.
UF remained in Lake City
until 1906 when construction


was complete in Gainesville.
Lake Citians were not
pleased to hear their school
would be taken and threats of
violence occurred against
Gainesvillians in the town.
Additionally, teamsters
were reported to be reluctant
to take the university's mate-
rials south to Gainesville.
In the Lake City Reporter's
centennial tabloid, Nettie
Ozaki and Anne Knight write
that The Tampa Tribune
accused Lake City's mule
team of refusing to take uni-
versity materials to
Gainesville.
The article states that
Gainesville had to send mules
up to obtain the materials.
In an article called "Keep
our school," by Anne Knight,
Dr. Andrew Sledd's daughter,
Frances Blake, described liv-
ing in Lake City to be difficult
after the decision was made
to move UF to Gainesville.
On one occasion a few citi-
zens decided to wait for Sledd
to leave the post office.
However, a nearby soldier
stopped them and threatened
to shoot them if they laid a
hand on Sledd.
Although some Lake
Citians threatened to shoot at
the first buggy taking the
university's materials to
Gainesville, not a fire was
shot.
Sledd led the way to
Gainesville with his buggy
.leading the caravan.
Classes began at the
Gainesville campus in 1906
with 102 students enrolled,
according to the UF Web site.
The former UF building in
Lake City became the home
of the Lake City Veterans
Affairs Medical Center in
1920.


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Fact or myth? Tales of Skunk Ape

known to many in Columbia Count


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter.com
In the Northwestern
United States it's known as
Bigfoot or Sasquatch. In the
Himalayas of Tibet it's the yeti
or abominable snowman.
But in Florida and other
parts of the South, it's the
Skunk Ape.
Yes, that's the name given
to the Sunshine State's very
own missing link, and like its
other legendary brethren
there are people who believe
fervently there is such a crea-
ture, think it's complete bunk
or ride somewhere in the mid-
dle.
"I haven't heard of anybody,
in the circles I run in, seeing
it," said Mark Crow, Florida
Division of Forestry's
Suwannee forestry district
manager and an avid out-
APE
continued on page 11E


COURTESY PHOTO
This photo of a supposed Skunk Ape in. Sarasota County was
created from first generation color prints by David Barkasy of
the Sarasota County Sheriff's Department with detail and
enlargement work done by Loren Coleman.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


___________________ ~A Place Called me


Then & Now


i mmml- --


APE
Continued from page IOE
doorsman. "I've just heard,
growing up around here, about
stuff like that but never really
anybody saying they've seen
this or that. But it sounds like a
pretty interesting deal."
As assigned by lore, the
Skunk Ape's name comes from
its description as a big, hairy
creature that smells like a com-
bination of rotten eggs, moldy
cheese and feces.
Legend has it standing more
than 7 feet tall, weighing more
than 300 pounds and generally
the color of brown mud.
Though it is rumored to have
mostly a vegetarian diet, it's
also been said to kill deer and
split them open, just to eat only


the liver (perhaps it has an iron
deficiency).
As a youth, Crow would hunt
in the Osceola National Forest
east and northeast of Lake City
and hear about what perils the
Skunk Ape presented from eld-
ers.
"Growing up, when I'd be out
there hunting in the national
forest, some of the old-timers
would talk some about that. I
think that was just trying to
keep their younguns in the
house at night maybe," he said.
But to some, the legend of
the Skunk Ape goes far beyond
a fun tale to scare children with.
There are several Internet
sites dedicated to compiling
data on the Skunk Ape and
Bigfoot legend, such as
www.bfro.net (Bigfoot Field
Research Organization) and


www.floridaskunkape. com,
which encourages people who
believe they have seen the
Skunk Ape to report their sight-
ings and submit any "proof'
such as pictures, audio or video
recordings.
In the case of the Bigfoot
Field Research Organization it
claims a more scientific
approach and will even send out
researchers to investigate the
more credible sightings.
According to its list of report-
ed sightings among Florida
counties, Columbia has none,
although nearby Alachua has
one, as does Dixie. But the
county with most sightings,
according to the Web site, is
Southwest Florida's Collier
County, having seven reported
sightings.
Karen Parker, public infor-


nation officer the for Florida
Wildlife Commission's North
Florida region, said there
haven't been any sightings of
the Skunk Ape in Columbia
County reported to the FWC,
but most who work for the
agency are aware of its sup-
posed existence.
"I think one of our biologists
was mistaken for a skunk ape at
one time because he was a very
large man and very bushy, but
it's always been kind of a joke
around here," Parker said. "But
everybody that's out in the
field, they are well aware of the
legend."
If a Skunk Ape were to live in
Columbia County and if it is the
wilderness-borne creature that
legend depicts, Crow said the
Osceola National Forest would
make a good home.


With the forest running
through much of eastern and
.northeastern Columbia County
all the way into Georgia and the
Okefenokee Swamp, he said
that would likely be an ideal
habitat
"You are talking about a mil-
lion acres of public lands from
Waycross down to 1-10 and
that's a pretty good chunk of
dirt," Crow said.
'There's no telling what
might be out there."
But what would the FWC do
if it found a Skunk Ape running
in the wilds of the Osceola
National Forest?
"For big animals we do tran-
quilize them, but we'd be fairly
interested to see some evidence
that this thing existed," Parker
said.
But is there any potential that


the Skunk Ape really exists?
The www.floridaskunkape.com
Web site makes its own argu-
ment.
"Is it possible? Well if you
take in to consideration that we
once thought the earth was flat.
And we once thought that the
moon was made of green
cheese. And a long time ago, we
even thought that Milli Vanilli
could sing. Anything is possi-
ble."
But whether it's true or not,
Crow said the folklore the
Skunk Ape represents is a
healthy part of regional culture.
"I think it's kind of neat thing
to have those things," he said. "I
think that's a good part of grow-
ing up and hearing stories like
that. Stuff to kind of make you
pay attention to what you're
doing and where you are."


BEGINNING
Continued from page 10E
both stories, but this is the first
time I found reference about
the census report that
Columbia County was a part of
Alachua County. Haworth said
she looked at the census, but
we can't prove that."
"There is no agenda there,"
added McAlhany. "It's not a
matter of research that's
actually a federal document."
"Before we had libraries that
have all the census records,
like we have today, people just
passed information down by
word-of-mouth, and it became
changed in all innocence," con-
tinued Reed. "Now we have
access to the Internet and the
census records, it is so easy to
go back and prove things like
that."
Though there are no specific
reports or records listing why
Columbia County split from
Alachua County, McAlhany
said it could have been because
the area's population began to
increase.
"Most of the reasons coun-
ties split was because of the
interests of the people," she
said. "Once a population in an
area became sufficiently high


to warrant the need of any civi-
lization or sizable town, it was
in their own best interest to
have an area that was theirs. I
don't know the reasons for
Columbia County, but I do
know you see the changes
through Florida, as the popula-
tion grew."
Reed said that is normally
the case in all states and often
as counties grew, their bound-
aries changed and new coun-
ties emerged.
"Usually there was a small
amount of counties dependent
upon the population of the
state," she said. "As the popula-
tion grew, which it did in the
1830s and 1840s in Florida,
there was a need for more local-
ized government accessible to
the people because they had to
go to their county seat to do
everything. Officials had to
make it more available to the
population and that's how coun-
ties started to split-up and form
smaller counties. It usually had
to do with population growth."
Today, Columbia County's
borders extend more than 50
miles from the Georgia line
south to the Santa Fe River and
the county has an area of 789
miles. Its maximum width is
about 20 miles, going on a east
- west tract.


Two leading theories on the


beginning of Columbia County


Editor's Note: The following
information was taken from
the leading sources detailing
the founding of Columbia
County. The information is the
two leading theories detailing
how Columbia County was
founded.
From staff reports

Theory 1
According to information
taken from the writings of
deceased Columbia County
resident May Vinzant Perkins
and used in an article written
by Esther B. Haworth for a
book called 'The Ever-chang-
ing World," Florida was first
divided into East and West
Florida and in 1821 the United
States secured the title of
Florida and it went under the
American Flag.
Florida counties date back
to July 21, 1821 when
Escambia and St. Johns coun-


ties were formed. Then on
August 12, 1822, there was
another formation of counties,
adding Jackson and Duval
counties.
Florida's Territorial Days
began in 1822 and a unified
government of Florida was
established. On March 4,
1824, William P. Duval, who
had previously been a civil
governor became Florida's
first territorial governor.
Governor Duval named
Tallahassee the Capital of
Florida and in 1824, Duval
County was divided into three
parts: Nassau, Orange (origi-
nally called Mosquito) and
Alachua.
Columbia County was
formed from Alachua in 1832
and included Newnansville,
the county seat.
Newnansville remained the
county seat until 1835, when
the county line was moved
north to the Santa Fe River,
and Newnansville once again


became part of Alachua.
Alligator then became the
Columbia County seat.
A census taken of Alachua
County in 1830, showed many
settlers in and around
Alligator.
Theory 2
Reports from the
"Historical Survey of Lake
City," state Florida was
claimed for Spain by Juan
Ponce DeLeon, who first
explored its east coast in 1513
and the first European contact
with what became known as
Columbia County occurred
when Spanish explorer Don
Hernando DeSoto passed
through the area in 1539 en
route to Tallahassee. Spain
was never able to settle per-
manently in any part of
Florida, except St. Augustine,
during its first period of con-
trol. Then, for its role in back-
ing the defeated French in the
Seven Years War, in 1763 the


Spanish Crown was com-
pelled to surrender Florida to
England.
The British assumed con-
trol of a largely unpopulated
peninsular colony, and though
a few plantations were estab-
lished in northeast Florida
between 1763 and 1775, they
did not persevere long. The
outbreak of the Revolutionary
War undermined the security
of Britain in East Florida.
The American Revolution
altered the development of
the Florida peninsula as num-
bers of loyalists, mainly from
Georgia and South Carolina,
seeking economic stability
and political asylum, fled to
East Florida. The population
of the colony swelled from
about 3,000 in 1776 to 17,000
by 1784.
The return of Florida to
Spain in 1784 hampered fur-
THEORY
continued on page 12E


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


--- ----- -m


\ rI~. ilIJ
I


Then & Now


Stephen Foster State Park named after legendary songwriter


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter. corn
WHITE SPRINGS -
Stephen Foster Folk Culture,
Center State Park is named
after American songwriter,
Stephen C. Foster, the author
of Florida's state song, "Old
Folks at Home."
The legendary song made
the Suwannee River famous,
despite the fact that Foster
never set foot in Florida.
Today the park features a
museum, 97-bell carillon,
Craft Square, and camping
area in addition to other
attractions.
The formation of the
memorial and park must be
credited to a group of deter-
mined local ladies.
Barbara Beauchamp
worked at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park for many years.
"The Florida Federation of
Music Clubs was instrumen-
tal in creating the park," she
said.
In 1935 the Suwannee song
was chosen as the state's
song.
"First there was a call for a
monument to be dedicated to
Foster on the banks of the
Suwannee because he made
the river famous,"
Beauchamp said.
"You can go anywhere in
the world and hum that song
and people will join you."


THEORY
Continued from page iE

their economic growth of East
Florida and with the British
departure, the population fell
below 2,000.
The Spanish attempted to
encourage development and
permitted non-Catholics to
settle in Florida. An oath of
allegiance to the Spanish
Crown was a prerequisite for
land ownership, along with
*sufficient financial resources


.1'
a.;


II!!1


I


I,,~Ii


II~


S* .


z mJE11NIFER C'ASTE.N/LaKe City f.epor er
-- .







A monument stands in honor of American songwriter Stephen Foster in front of the Stephen Foster museum at Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center State Park in White Springs.


She said that while the
peace treaty was signed end-
ing World War II, the song
was playing.
"It represented a yearning
for home," Beauchamp
explained.
She said the formation of


to establish a farm or planta-
tion.
In 1817, Don Jose de la Maza
Arrendondo obtained a grant
of 20,000 acres in northern
Florida, which included what
became Columbia County. Part
of the Arrendondo Grant con-
sisted of an abandoned Indian
settlement called Alligator.
*Alligator had been estab-
lished by a tribe of Seminole
Indians on the banks of Lake
DeSoto in the early 1800s,
deriving its name from nick-
name of the tribal chief,


the memorial and park for
Foster came from the work of
determined women in the
area.
"Mrs. Leon Whitehurst of
Brookesville's husband sug-
gested that she ask the state
to build a monument for the


Halpatter Tuskenuggee.
Racked by the European
War and domestic turmoil, the
Spanish Crown was ill-pre-
pared to contend with the bor-
der chaos that gripped post-
revolutionary Florida.
During the second decade of
the nineteenth century, the
United States became increas-
ingly anxious to acquire both
East and West Florida. When
Andrew Jackson invaded
Florida in 1818 while chasing
Indians during the First
Seminole Indian War it created


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Suwannee," Beauchamp
explained. "Mrs. W. A.
Saunders, Mrs. E. E
Montgomery Sr. and Mrs.
Joseph L. Gray made a pro-
posal to the state to create a
memorial for Foster."
The women were told to


an opportunity and mounting
pressure from the United
States forcing the signing of
the Adams-Onis Treaty of 1819.
After diplomatic delays in
the transfer of authority, the
United States Territory of
Florida was established in
1821. Andrew Jackson was
named its first provisional gov-
ernor and in July he created St.
Johns and Escambia counties,
the first two political subdivi-
sions in the newly-formed terri-
tory. St. Johns County initially


find a place that was near a
major highway that didn't
flood.
Montgomery searched for
a place on the back of a truck.
Finally, Sanders' mother
told her to look at White
Springs.


encompassed all of Florida east
of the Suwannee River.
By 1825, the year of the first
territorial census, there were
5,077 people in all of East
Florida. The first white settlers
of what was to become Lake
City arrived in the early 1820s.
Among them were John D. and
James Osteen, who construct-
ed a house about two miles
east of Alligator Lake around
1824.
Noel Raulerson and Henry
Edwards had already built


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"It was an ideal place, didn't
flood and was a near a high-
way," Beauchamp said.
A proposal was made to the
legislature, but when the war
started the plans were stalled.
Saunders made sure she
followed through with the
project by soliciting dona-
tions of land from the town's
residents.
Many locals donated the
land that now makes up the
state park.
"At first the plan was to cre-
ate a memorial and an
amphitheater to hold pro-
grams and sing Foster's
songs," Beauchamp said.
The women were given
enough money to fence the
area.
,"When a post office in
Jacksonville, then called a
federal building, was going to
be torn down, the women
were told they could have the
granite if they sent for it,"
Beauchamp said.
They ended up getting the
granite but found it easier to
buy new material.
A fund-raising drive was
launched with students
across the state donating
dimes toward the new park.
On Oct. 4, 1950, the park
was dedicated.
"It was a huge affair,"
Beauchamp said.
FOSTER
continued on page 13E


dwellings on the site of the
abandoned Indian Village at
Lake DeSoto when the
Osteens arrived.
In 1832 Columbia County
was created. It originally con-
sisted of all or parts of present-
day Suwannee, Bradford, and
Union counties.
Roberts, a small settlement
around the home of John W.
Roberts, was named the first
county seat. Alligator became
the official capital of the coun-
ty in 1836.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005
1


A Place CalledjF ),I


Then & Now


From an old fort to a blossoming town, Fort White sees change


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.corn
FORT WHITE It is the
home of an old fort, a mission,
a plantation house, a log
cabin, a phosphate mine and a
$25 million dollar new high
school.
At one time, the town
resembled the frontier towns
of the American West, com-
plete with saloons and a pistol-
wielding marshal.
Fort White has come a long
way from the pioneer town it
once was.
From the Desk of the
Mayor
Longtime Mayor Truett
George has watched the town
blossom and has been instru-
mental in preserving its beau-
ty.
When the two-story brick
building used at one time for
Fort White High School was
scheduled to be torn down,
George and other members of
the town's historical society
made measures to save it.
"At one time grade six
through 12 went there,"
George said.
He said the biggest change
he has seen is an increase in


FOSTER
Continued from page 12E

"Collegiate bands from
Tallahassee came and James
Melton, a famous tenor
singer, came to sing Foster's
songs."
Florida Gov. Fuller Warren
was on hand to speak.
"White Springs held a large
celebration and served chick-
en and rice," Beauchamp
said.
Hundreds of people attend-
ed the celebration.
Beauchamp remembers
serving Coca-Cola at the
function from pumping sta-


population..
"It has really boomed due
to more people from other
cities moving in to escape the
busy cities," he said.
His daughter went to
school in Fort White until
1985, then attended high
school in Lake City until she
graduated in 1990.
George says that when she
was in kindergarten, talks
began on the construction of a
new high school.
His daughter, a physician,
is 32 now.
While it took a while, Fort
White is the home of a new
$25 million high school built
in 2000.
George credits Harvey
Campbell and Joe Kirkland of
the school board at that time
to being instrumental in get-
ting the school built.
When George came to Fort
White, he said it had two less
convenience stores than it
does now and less subdivi-
sions.
He said that the lure of
cheap land and good schools
bring more families to the
area.
"We got our water plant
here eight years ago and in a
few more years we may have a


tions while she was in high
school.
Born in Pittsburgh, Foster
wrote at least 200 songs.
Although he never visited
Florida, the state chose his
Suwannee song as the state
song.
"His brother was a book-
keeper and when he wrote
this song he used another
river in the Carolinas,"
Beauchamp said.
"When it didn't fit, his
brother took down the atlas
and found the Suwannee
River."
Foster exclaimed that the
name was perfect for his
song and took it to the pub-


,>
.*.-*,..*
~


The Fort White train depot building stands off U.S. 27 awaiting


sewage plant, you never
know," George said.
"I definitely see more sub-
divisions coming in the
future."
The mayor said he thinks
most people see growth as
inevitable.
Currently he is working on
getting the Fort White train
station registered in the


lisher that day.
"A lot of people probably
didn't know where Suwannee
was. They probably thought
it was a mythical river,"
Beauchamp said.
"But for us who live here, it
is a little magical."
Before it became a state
park, the White Springs
memorial was part of the
Florida Attraction
Association.
Foster was born near the
Allegheny River in
Lawrenceville, Pa., east of
Pittsburgh on July 4, 1856.
He, his brother Morrison
and good friend Charles
Shiras were members of the


national registry.
He said the station was built
in the 1880s, moved one hun-
dred years later and was
brought back to the town
three years ago.
He would like to add some
sitting areas and restrooms
and preserve the station as a
historical site of the town.
He remembers a time when


-M b _-=_L7_nTM
JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
An artist's rendition of
Stephen Foster hangs inside
the museum at the state
park.
all-male secret club called


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
restoration funding.
Ichetucknee River had no
gate and no admission.
George's home had no air
conditioning at the time, so he
and his family would go swim-
ming to cool off while their
dinner cooked.
He said times are better
now because there are more
conservation efforts to keep
the river safe.


Knights of the S. T. (said to
stand for square table).
Foster served as song
leader and composer for the
group, according to a
University of Pittsburgh Web
site.
His first published song,
"Open Thy Lattice Love,"
appeared when he was 18.
His first hit was "Oh!
Susanna."
In 1852, he and his wife
Jane took a delayed honey-
moon to New Orleans, his
only trip down south.
He wrote "Old Folks at
Home" in 1851. That was per-


George said that despite all
the growth, he would like to
keep Fort White a town for
families.
"I would like to see it con-
tinue to be a good place to
raise children, to go to church
and to know your neighbors,"
George said.
"Faith Proves Itself By
Works"
Betty Bush was born in
Fort White and made it home
after living in different cities
around the state.
She is one of the two
founders of the Fort White
Community Thrift Shop,
founded in June 1997.
Bush has watched her com-
munity change over the years.
"I never thought Fort
White would have a traffic
light," she said.
Her father, S.W. Moreland,
was 95 when he died and
wrote an article about the
town's history in the Lake
City Reporter's centennial
issue in 1974.
Bush's grandparents sold
their plantation in Georgia to
move to Columbia County.
CHANGE
continued on page 14E


haps his most famous song.
Other states have honored
Foster, including Georgia
and Kentucky.
Georgia named a state park
after the musician located
near an entrance to the
Okefenokee Swamp approxi-
mately 18 miles northeast of
Fargo, Ga.
.Kentucky chose his song
"My Old Kentucky Home,
Good Night" as its state song.
The famous Suwannee
River begins in the
Okefenokee Swamp and flows
through Florida before empty-
ing into the Gulf of Mexico.


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* Juris Doctorate, University of Florida
* Private law practice, beginning in 1977
* Served on Planning and Zoning Board as
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* Leadership positions in Social and
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VOTE May, 10


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* Controlled City Growth
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* Married to Jodi Witt
* Children are Jamie, Leah, Trey and Trveor
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1







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005
i ,


A Place Called Ir. p e
l~tilM~ii,-- ****&W1*"


Then & Now


Revered sports figure recalls life in Lake City


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

After broadcasting 28 Super
Bowls and announcing nuimer-
ous Masters and U.S. Open
tennis tournaments, Pat
Summerall is one of the most
recognized and revered sports
figures in the world.
For the first 33 years of his
life, he was one of the boys in
Lake City.
"The only thing I remember
doing for fun was, whatever
sports was in season, I played
them," Summerall said from
his home in Houston.
Summerall was a Boy Scout
in the Presbyterian troop and
a counselor at Camp O'Leno
- "just one of the guys."
"I remember going to the
theaters, the Grand or the
DeSoto, and it cost 9 cents,"
Summerall said. "For a quar-
ter, you could go to the movie,
get popcorn and something to
drink. There was no TV, so we
would go Saturday afternoon
and sit though six or seven
hours and see everything
twice. When we got out, we
played football 'til dark."
His well-known first name
was a product of Lake City, as
Summerall was christened
George Allen.
"I was basically raised by an
aunt, uncle and grandmother
and lived with my cousin Mike
Kennon," Summerall said. "In
those days, the Polish jokes
and jokes about various kinds


CHANGE
Continued from page 13E.

The town of Moreland, Ga.,
is named after her family.
Bush's father, S. W.
Moreland, was born in Fort
White in 1884 and remem-
bered the town at the turn of
the century.
His comments appeared in
the newspaper and in Edward
E Keuchel's book, "A History
of Columbia County Florida".
In the early years, the
town's economy was based on
timber, cotton and phosphate.
Moreland recalled that the
roads were not paved and
men 'paid' their taxes by cut-
ting vegetation from along-
side the roads to keep them
trimmed.
The town had a board walk
and the nights were lit by
kerosene lamps mounted to
posts.
All travel was done by train
or horses and Man Terry pro-
vided a livery stable.
Moreland wrote that
women did not venture out on
Saturday afternoons because
of the 'rough' atmosphere.
Similar to American fron-
tier towns of the West, Fort
White has saloons.
The main saloon was locat-
ed on Jordan Street and had a
swinging door.
Young men and boys were
not allowed in and
respectable residents crossed
the street to avoid walking
past it.
Moreland attended a one
room school house in the
country and also Fort White's
three- room school.
Students ate biscuits with
cane syrup and meat brought
in tin lunch pails.
They tried to be on their
best behavior in fear of being
disciplined by the teachers'
chinquapin or other switches.
The Pitts Phosphate
Company was one the largest
industries in the town.
A wood-burning locomotive
called cabbage head carried
phosphate to the town where
it was transferred to the Plant
railroad line and then to
Fernandina for exportation.
Moreland writes that order
was kept in the town night
marshal who carried a club
with string tied around his
wrist and a pistol.
The town's postmaster,
John McKenny, owned a gen-
eral store where residents
could purchase dry goods,
medicines, candy and cheese.
The town received newspa-
pers once a week from
Atlanta.
Bush remembers that her
father knew everyone in the
town, including the names of


of people who immigrated
were a big thing. I was nick-
named Pat and he was Mike
from the old joke about the
Irish. That is the first name I
remember being called."
Summerall played all the
sports in high school and,
when he was a junior,
Columbia High won the state
championship in basketball.
Summerall was surrounded
by four seniors on that team,
which was coached by Jim
Melton.
"I was a better basketball
player, I thought, than a foot-
ball player," Summerall said.
As evidence of his assess-
ment, Summerall received a
scholarship offer in basketball
from Kentucky. However, the
football offers poured in from
all over the Southeast and he


their dogs.
"I think it still looks the
same," she said. 'The road
still has those same two
curves."
Bush remembers old the
names of old businesses in
her town that are no longer
around.
"The old post office used to
be where Karen's Country
Cut. is now," she said. "My
uncle owned a general store
where Napa Auto Parts is
today."
She remembers attending
school in the town's two-story
brick building.
"Many of the boys left Fort
White after they grew older
because of they got jobs else-
where," Bush said.
After Bush married her
husband in 1949, the couple
lived in different cities includ-
ing Quincy, Orlando and
Gainesville.
Moreland left his daughter
his property when he died
and soon Bush returned
home to Fort White.
"There were quite a few
farms in the area," she said.
"My daddy grew corn,
peanuts and tobacco."
Bush and her sisters helped
their father by working in the
fields.
She says that the hardest
crop was tobacco.


chose Arkansas to play foot-
ball and also was on the bas-
ketball team.
"I wasn't a very good stu-
dent and wasn't going to get
any academic scholarships,"
Summerall said. "I had offers
from Florida, Georgia,
Georgia Tech and Alabama. I
almost went to West Point, but
it looked too much like a jail to
me."
A legendary CHS coach
played a part in Summerall's
decision. After leaving Lake
City after 11 years, Hobe
Hooser had gone to
Tennessee and now was at
Arkansas.
"Hobe Hooser was a good
friend of my uncle and had
friends in Lake City,"
Summerall said. "My aunt and
uncle and my high school
coaches thought if anybody
could keep me on a straight
path, it would be Hooser. He
was so respected in Lake
City."
Hooser came to Lake City
to give Summerall a tryout
and he ended up going to
Arkansas on a scholarship.
After Summerall graduated,
the NFL came calling.
'There were only 12 teams
then and I was drafted in the
second round," Summerall
said. "I didn't know too much
about it. They came to
Fayetteville and talked to me
about turning pro."
Growing up poor,
Summerall was impressed by


The family had cows, chick-
ens and hogs.
Bush used to go to
Ichetucknee Springs to go
swimming as a girl, but tubing
was not thought of yet.
"My mother would have
died if she would have seen
me on a tube," Bush said.
In addition, Bush and her
friends enjoyed going to
peanut boiling and cane
grindings.
"Cane grindings were held
at mills," Bush explained. "A
horse would go around caus-
ing the machine to squeeze
juice out of the cane to make
syrup."
Her grandfather bought her
father a car in the 1920s, Bush
remembers.
"My grandfather was a
devout Methodist, but 'our
church, Tustenuggee United
Methodist Church, was miles
away and too far to walk to,"
she said. "My family donated
land for Shiloh Baptist
Church, and my mother start-
ed taking us there for servic-
es since our church was too
far.
Soon Bush's mother played
piano for the church and her
father taught Sunday school
classes there.
Bush's grandfather was so
angry, he bought the family a
car so that they could go to


the offer $6,000 to play with
a $500 bonus.
"I didn't negotiate, I took
their first offer," Summerall
said. "I thought I was in high
cotton."
Summerall began to learn
the business side early. He
was drafted by Detroit, but
traded to the Chicago
Cardinals while he was play-
ing in the College All-Star
Game in Chicago.
He got another lesson after
five years with the Cardinals,
when the team changed head
coaches in 1957.
"I was living in Lake City in
the off-season and he (Frank
Ivey) called me and said I was
one of his key players, one of
the building blocks for the
team," Summerall said. "A
week later, I picked up the
Jacksonville Journal and saw I
had been traded to New York.
"It turned out to be the best
thing that ever happened to
me."
Summerall's home was in
Lake City and he returned
every winter to teach school.
He also kept active in sports,
particularly playing fast-pitch
softball, which was the biggest
game in town.
"It didn't make any differ-
ence to them," Summerall
said. "I was some guy who
grew up with them, just play-
ing another kind of ball. I had
a lot of friends."
The Cardinals later moved
to St. Louis, which might be


the Methodist church.
Bush still has the canceled
check for $390 for the car.
"But that was expensive in
those days, you see," Bush
said.
Today, Bush is happy to
work with her volunteers of
many different churches as
the thrift shop.
"We are interdenomination-
al," she said.
After retiring from a 30-year
career in banking, Bush co-
founded the Fort White
Community Thrift Shop with
the motto, "Faith proves itself
by works."
The shop was first held in a
garage and expanded to its
current location in 1999.
"I wanted to get involved
with helping people as we are
expected to by God," she said.
"Plus I didn't want to stay
home all day."
The store is fully staffed by
volunteers and the proceeds
benefit charities, disaster
relief projects and prisons.
"It offers a place for people
to do community service as
part of sentences for viola-
tions like DUIs," Bush said.
"Fellowship with the staff
has helped some of these peo-
ple turn their lives around."
In addition, students volun-
teer at the shop to apply for
collegiate scholarships.


the Gateway to the West, but
New York was the "Gateway to
the World" for Summerall.
While both teams had good
players, Summerall said the
Giants were a first-class organ-
ization with the best coaches.
Jim Lee Howell was head
coach, then the offensive
coach was Vince Lombardi
and the defensive coach was
Tom Landry.
"I played both ways, so I got
exposed to both of their teach-
ings," Summerall said. 'They
were both dynamic men."
Landry also taught
Summerall the fine points of
kicking, something he had
taken up at Arkansas as "an
afterthought."
Kickoffs were not going
well and the Razorback coach-
es said anybody who wanted
to try kicking off should come
15 minutes early to practice.
Summerall won the job.
"As the year passed, they
said if you can kick off maybe
you can kick field goals and
extra points," Summerall said.
"As a senior, I led the nation
with four field goals."
The emphasis on kicking
wasn't much greater in the
pros. At practice, Summerall
didn't have a holder or snap-
per or anybody to shag balls.
When he worked on kicking
off, he had to go get the ball
after he kicked it.
"As more games started
being won by field goals, we
started practicing it more,"


The shop also has a pro-
gram with Fort White
Elementary that awards $25
to students who try to work to
the best of their ability, but
are rarely recognized for their
efforts.
Along with helping others,
Bush's other passion is music.
She learned how to play the
piano from her mother and
plays for her church.
"We played music and sang
hymns around the piano
because we didn't have televi-
sion or expensive toys like
children do now," she said.
Bush also passed a love for
music to her children.
, One of her sons, Stan Bush,
lives in Los Angeles and has
released 15 contemporary
rock albums.
Bruce Bush plays bass and
sings in a band called Area
Code.
Bush's daughter who lives
in Orlando also performs in
the band.
Working for the Public
If you want to know what's
going on in Fort White, ask
Edmund Hudson.
For almost 30 years he has
served as Public Works
Director and chief of the vol-
unteer fire department,
among other duties.
"The biggest thing that has
changed in Fort White has


Summerall said.
One of those victories was
Summerall's 49-yard field goal
in the snow against Cleveland
to force an Eastern
Conference tie with the
Browns and bring on a one-
game playoff that got the
Giants into the championship
game in 1958.
Summerall remembered
that 1958 game, won by the
Baltimore Colts in sudden
death, which is credited with
starting the popularity of the
NFL.
"Everybody talks about the
'1958 championship because it
was the first game that went
into overtime," Summerall
said. "We didn't even know
what to do when it went to
overtime."
Summerall had a radio
show on WGRO in Lake City
and had done some radio
work in New York. Teammate
Kyle Rote called him about an
opening in television for the
Giants game.
"I was still planning to play
some more and when I told
the people at CBS, they said
you are still a player and we
won't talk to you," Summerall
said. "I went to the Giants I
was only 31 at the time and
could have played 7-8 more
years and said I think I
want to try it. They said if you
want to retire we won't stand

SUMMERALL
continued on page 15E


been the increase in subdivi-
sions in the area," Hudson
said.
"Before you know it,, we
may see a new high school,"
he jokes.
He has noticed an increase
in fire and rescue calls.
"As the numbers grow, the
needs increase," he said.
Hudson was born in
Branford and grew up in Fort
White.
"The roads being paved is
something new, before they
were all dirt," he said.
He said he was in the last
class to graduate high school
in Fort White before students
were bussed to Columbia
High School in the late 1960s.
He was one of 16 in his
graduating class.
Hudson picked tobacco to
pay for his school clothes and
used old bicycle parts to
make himself a "two-story
high bike," as he called it.
"I called it the Jolly Green
Giant because it was green,"
he said.
Though he took a couple of
falls off his bike, but kept on
enjoyed towering over his
friends.
Hudson predicts that per-
haps a food store will be
added so that residents don't
have to travel far to buy gro-
ceries.


S Isaac Bratkovich had a Dream


O ver 5 years ago. Isaac started
his local residential construc-
tion company witLh a single con-
struction van. a few tools and one
employee all which operated out of
a home office.
The first home was built in
Callaway Subdivision when
the price of lots was selling
for $15,900 and the .=
average house was
2250 sq ft. with
a 2-car
garage. At _
this


time the homes sold for $137,900
which included the lot. My, how
times have changed!
Since then, we have grown much
larger with five company vehicles
loaded with many tools, 11 hard
working dedicated employees, office
and warehouse space.
The main focuses that we have,
no matter how large or how small
the home, is the quality of the final
product. Currently we build 45-50
homes per year in the local areas.
With a high level of quality control,
outstanding customer service and a
hard working staff, this would not
be possible.
"We have always taken great
pride in our work," said Isaac, "and
we hire the best sub-contractors
that are available. Our philosophy is
to keep long lasting relationships
\ with many of our clients.
Without them, we
would not be where we


The homes we're building are
located in Callaway, Plantations,
Cobblestone, Woodborough,
Southpointe, Oak Haven, etc. All of
the homes that we build are to cus-
tomer specifications. We have no
limit on the size of the home nor do
we have a limit on the amount of
things that one would want to add
to their home. We specialize in mak-
ing homeowners dreams come
true.
So we invite you to look at some
of our homes as you are out and
about in some of these areas and if
there is ever a time that you would
like to see some of our
floor plants, please give
us a call at
386-719-7143.
We appreciate everyone
in the community that
has worked with us and
a special thanks to all of
our customers.


i


I







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2005


A Place Called !a


Then & Now


U.S. 90 West goes from

country road to booming

business district


Columbia County has rich


history in professional athletics


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter.com

If you look at an aerial photo-
graph of U.S. 90 West from 30
years ago, there is no mall, no
Wal-Mart Supercenter, not
even a movie theater.
For many residents who've
been here for 20 years or less,
that is hard to imagine. But
even as late as the mid 1970s,
Lake City's biggest traffic
artery was a fledgling four-lane
road with a few businesses
scattered about. Much of
what's now densely developed
commercial property was but
pasture and farm land.
Jim Poole, executive director
of the Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce, grew up in Live
Oak and remembers how bar-
ren the area was compared to
now.
Coming to town on U.S. 90
West for athletic events in high
school, Poole said the distance
from the interstate to down-
town Lake City "seemed like a
nice little drive through the
country."
That's in sharp contrast to
what the roadway means and
has meant to the development
of the local economy and how
different it has become since
the 1960s.
Local attorney John Norris,
who started practicing in Lake
City in 1956, represented many
clients over the years who
developed real estate on U.S.
90 West
Though some people may
believe that the roadway's
development has taken away
the small town appeal of Lake
City Norris said "it's made
Lake City and put a lot of peo-
ple to work and it's good clean
property."
When Interstate 75 was
brought to Lake City in 1963,
there were only a few business
at the U.S. 90 West intersec-
tion, such as Howard Johnson,
the original Holiday Inn (now
Quality Inn and Conference
Center) and an American Inn,
as well as restaurants such as
the Hasty House and Wayside.
Jim'Burke, co-owner of Tire
Mart of Lake City, first opened
a Lake City 76 Truck Stop in
1972 with a restaurant known
as the Homestead on U.S. 90
West. The truck stop was locat-
ed on the same property as his
current business and the for-
mer restaurant is now used as
offices for C&G Mobile


SUMMERALL
Continued from page 14E

in your way."
Summerall took the job as
an analyst for Giants football
games. While teaching in Lake
City, he would commute to the
Giants game every weekend.
In 1964, Summerall got a call
from CBS to come to New
York. He was making about
$20,000 with the Giants gig and
did not really want to leave
Lake City.


Homes.
"It's nothing like it was when
we first got here," Burke said
of U.S. 90's changes.
While it was a four-lane road
by the early 1970s, he said the
Interstate passing through was
really what led to the quick
development of the U.S. 90
West corridor and establish-
ment of the dominant business
district.
By the early 1980s, he said
there were as many as 2,000
cars passing by his business
daily on U.S. 90 West and fast
food restaurants were quickly
cropping up along the roadway.
Soon, Burke and his co-
owner Dave Johnson phased
out the truck stop and restau-
rant and started the tire store.
"It wasn't a major change" he
said. "But I thought Lake City
was ready for a more upscale
tire and maintenance business,
because in the past their wasn't
one."
For the business name,
Burke said Wal-Mart (a smaller
precursor before the super-
center was opened in 1994)
was across the street and "I
said we got a Wal-Mart why
don't we be a Tire Mart?"
But even since. the early
1980s, he said the growth
along U.S. 90 West is "unbe-
lievable."
"You look at 90 and you just
wonder where are all those
cars come from," he said.
But when he originally
bought the property for the
truck stop, Burke said he felt
like he was 'going out on a
limb," having a vision few oth-
ers did and taking a gamble.
Though it turned out in his
favor, and that of others, he
said at the time "nobody under-
stood what the interstate repre-
sented and what it would do for
Lake City."
"Some people told us we
were crazy and told us that
would never succeed out
there," Burke said.
Norris said he 'remembers
similar stories, including.
landowners who sold property
for the original Holiday Inn
next to 1-75 for "practically
nothing."
Though some people may
complain about the growing
amount of traffic on U.S. 90
West, Norris said if people
understood what the road and
its intersecting interstate has
meant to Lake City "they can
tolerate a little traffic now and
then."


"They offered me starting
pay of $75,000, so we picked up
and moved," Summerall said.
"That's when everything got
rolling."
Summerall lived 25 years in
the New York area, some in
Stanford, Conn., and some in
New Jersey.
'"We had a lake house in
Lake City and would always go
back for a couple of weeks, so
we never lost total contact,"
Summerall said.
Summerall called the first
five Super Bowls. At the first


By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter. com

The lineage of Columbia
County athletes who made it
to the professional ranks can
be traced back to the begin-
ning of the last century, when
John "Stuffy" Stewart made
his big league debut with the
St. Louis Cardinals in 1916.
Stewart played parts of
eight seasons in the majors as
a second baseman, third
baseman and outfielder for
four different teams.
Stewart died in Lake City in
1980, but he was the first of
several athletes within the
county who would go on to
make their marks as profes-
sionals.
Probably the best-known
Lake Citian remains Pat
-Summerall, who is more
famous now for being an
announcer than for his
prowess as an athlete. But
Summerall was a three-sport
star at Columbia High who
went on to the University of
Arkansas and a 10-year career
in the NFL as a kicker and
defensive end. The most
memorable play in
Summerall's career was a 49-
yard field goal he made in the
snow to give the -New York
Giants a 13-10 victory over
the Cleveland Browns to set
up their 10-0 win in the
rematch the next week in the
Eastern Conference Playoff
Game.
New York went on to lose
23-17 in overtime to the
Baltimore Colts in the
"Greatest Football Game
Ever Played," the 1958 NFL
Championship Game.
Randy Jackson (CHS,
1962) was the next to ply his
trade in the NFL. Jackson, a
defensive tackle from the
University of Florida, was
drafted in 1966 by both the
Buffalo Bills of the AFL and
the Chicago Bears of the
NFL. Jackson chose; Chicago,
and, he. played with, future,
Hall-of-Famer Dick Butkus
from 1967-1974.
The current flood of
Columbia County athletes
into the NFL began with Scott
Adams, an offensive lineman
who played at the University
of Georgia and spent a season
with the Chicago Bears in
1995.
Shayne Edge also realized
his professional dream in
1997, when he played a sea-


one, both CBS and NBC had
broadcast teams and shared
cameras. Tickets to the first
Super Bowl were $12 and there
were 41,000 empty seats in the
Los Angeles Coliseum, he said.
"What shocked all of us was
how good the team from the
AFL (Kansas City Chiefs)
was," Summerall said. '"They
were a pretty good team and
when the Jets beat the Colts
(Super Bowl III), that really
caused the merger."
Summerall was part of
another monumental sports


Columbia High football players Yatil Green (left) and Reinard Wilson speak at Draft Day in
1992 at Winfield. The two graduates sponsored the event which was held at Winfield
Community Center.


Randall JacKson


son with the Pittsburgh
Steelers. Edge was a star
punter and defensive back at
Columbia High from 1988-
1990, and he played at Florida
for four years during the
Steve Spurrier Era.
Edge moved t9 the commu-
nity from Conyers, Ga., when
he was 13 years. old, and he
immediately realized the
importance of sports in Lake
City.
"I loved it," he said. "It was
always a sports town. No mat-
ter what we did, there was
someone other than the par-
ents watching."
There was no other high
school in the county when
Edge was playing at
Columbia, so the Tigers were
the only game in town. But


episode, when he and John
Madden left CBS to join Fox
Sports.
"I could have stayed at CBS,
but I just felt like, at the time, I
had been around football so
long and John and I wanted to
stay together, so we made the
move," Summerall said. "Fox
made it easier because they
hired all our production people
and camera people. I couldn't
imagine working with anyone
else. It was pretty lucrative
also."
The move cost Summerall


Edge thrived under the spot-
light.
"There was no more pres-
sure than you put on your-
self," he said. 'The communi-
ty was behind you regard-
less."
His best memories from
playing at CHS were, "Playing
at Memorial Stadium. The big
oak tree," he said.
Edge thought so much of
the community that he has
remained here with his fami-
ly, and he is the co-host of a
popular local sports talk
show, "In the Zone with
Shayne Edge and Trey
Hosford" every Monday
night.
The newest local addition
to the NFL will be Lake City's
own Jerome Carter, who
graduated from CHS in 2001.
Carter just finished a four-
year career as a defensive
back at Florida State
University and will be select-
ed in the NFL Draft in April.
Carter still visits Lake City
every chance he gets, and he
was in town recently when he
discussed playing sports.
Carter started playing foot-
ball in 1990, when he signed
up to play for the Lake
City/Columbia County Parks
and Recreation Department.
"Pretty much a good expe-
rience," he said.
Like Edge, Carter knew
the importance of football in
the community. But he also
never felt the pressure of per-


his spots at U.S. Open tennis
and the Masters, one of which
he said was his most memo-
rable moment in broadcasting.
"It was 1986 when Jack
Nicklaus won the Masters at
age 46, when nobody gave him
a chance," Summerall said.
"When he came up No. 18 they
gave him a standing ovation
that seemed like forever. It was
my most emotional time on the
air.
"I couldn't talk and I had no
reason to talk."
Summerall will return to


forming on Friday nights in
front of the entire community.
"It didn't really play a factor
with me," he said, and his
love for his hometown is no
secret.
"It means a lot to me," he
said. "I was born and raised
here. I had a lot of support in
Lake City."
Other Columbia County
athletes who made it to the
NFL are Reinard Wilson
(CHS, 1992), Yatil Green
(1992), Brian Allen (1995)
and Kendyll Pope (1999),
who just finished his first year
with the Indianapolis Colts.
Allen was the first Lake
Citian ever to appear in a
Super Bowl. The linebacker
was part of the St. Louis
Rams team that lost Super
Bowl XXXVI to the New
England Patriots, and he
played in the Carolina
Panthers' loss to New
England in Houston two
years ago.
This year, he gave back to
the school and community
that have meant so much to
him by speaking at the
Tigers' 2005 football banquet.
Allen, Carter, Pope, Edge,
Wilson, Green, Summerall,
Adams and Stewart are an
important part of the commu-
nity's sporting history, and
they will be remembered as
pioneers and leading lights
for future generations of
Columbia County athletes to
follow.


Jacksonville next month for a
yearly evaluation on the liver
transplant he received.
"My health is good," he said.
"I feel better than I have felt in
a long time."
He still has a soft spot for
Lake City.
'There is nothing like grow-
ing up in a small town,"
e Summerall said. "I wouldn't
take anything for it. We were
poor, but I didn't know it. I
have everlasting friends there
and always look forward to
going back."


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TERRY


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