• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Sunday Report
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Opinion
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section C: Life
 Section D: Business & Home
 Section D: Classified Advantag...
 Section E: Business & Industry














Group Title: Lake City reporter
Title: The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/00083
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Lake City reporter
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: April 3, 2005
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028308
Volume ID: VID00083
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
notis - ABZ6316
oclc - 33283560
lccn - sn 95047175
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Sunday Report
        page A 2
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Opinion
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
    Section B: Sports
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
    Section C: Life
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
    Section D: Business & Home
        page D 1
        page D 2
        page D 3
    Section D: Classified Advantage
        page D 4
        page D 5
        page D 6
        page D 7
        page D 8
    Section E: Business & Industry
        page E 1
        page E 2
        page E 3
        page E 4
        page E 5
        page E 6
        page E 7
        page E 8
        page E 9
        page E 10
        page E 11
        page E 12
        page E 13
        page E 14
        page E 15
        page E 16
Full Text




SA Plce Called

d11e


i-long series detailing the area in which we live.
SECTION E


Spring ahead
jI r Remember
Sto set your
2' i* clocks an
hour ahead

4 ^'


75o
i Weather
Mostly Sunny

L -p High 70, Low 44
I Forecast on IOA


Sunday
April 3, 2005
Lake City, Florida


Pooe John Paul II dies at


in


LwM CSl saw u*m seek s daMCs s "fy led Mbe


0 .-.0 -ummm


"Copyrigkhted Material

Syndicated Co nte

Available from Commercial News Providers"
9,


By RANDY ROUGHTON
rroughton@lakecityreporter.com
LAKE CITY Not long
after Pope John Paul II's death
hit the news on Saturday,
Father Michael E. Morse's
telephone was ringing. Many
of the callers were people who
hadn't been in Epiphany
Catholic Church in some
time, but they were asking
about Mass.
"Even in his death, the Holy
Father is still bringing people
to Christ," Morse said a few
hours before Saturday night
Mass. The church plans a spe-
cial Memorial Mass for the
Holy Father at 7 p.m.
Wednesday.


INSIDE
President Bush reacts to
pope's death; list of popes
in the 20th century.
PAGE 5A, 8A

"It's almost like losing a
family member," Morse said.
"For almost two generations,
he's been the only pope we've
known. Most people are tak-
ing it as the loss of a family
member. He kind of became
grandfather to the world."
Morse met Pope John Paul
II several times during papal
audiences in Rome, including


PRIEST
continued on page 9A


Father Michael E. Morse, now of Epiphany Catholic Church in
Lake City, (far right) meets Pope John Paul 11 during a papal
audience in Rome more than 20 years ago.


The splinter of sexual assault: Local

center helps survivors find healing


Organization plans
assault awareness day
Thursday at Olustee Park

By RANDY ROUGHTON
rroughton@lakecityreporter. cornm
When the violence is over,
the rapist may be long-gone,
but the damage can remain
for years.
But the victim doesn't have
to remain in that painful place,
said Becky Bowen, director
and founder of the North
Central Florida Sexual
Assault Center. She describes
sexual assault as a splinter in
the hand. Once it's removed,
the healing can finally begin.
"If you continue to carry
that splinter around, it's going
to hurt," Bowen said. "But if
you cut it out, there might be
a scar, but it's not going to
udi U- "


CALL US:
(386)
752-1293
SUBSCRIBE:
755-5445


Erica Nix, a North Central Florida Sexual Assault Center vic-
tim advocate, counsels a client.


The NCFSAC, with Florida
Council Against Sexual
Violence funding through the
Florida Department of


Health, will sponsor Sexual
Assault Awareness Day 11
a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday at
Olustee Park. The event will


INSIDE
Tips to avoid abduction and
sexual assault.
PAGE 3A

feature children's games and
activities, such as an elemen-
tary coloring contest, food,
music and prizes, but the
focus is on remembering sex-
ual violence victims, increas-
ing public awareness and
encouraging citizen involve-
ment.
The NCFSAC provides sex-
ual assault awareness and pre-
vention education, informa-
tion and presentations to
clubs, organizations, schools,
churches and other communi-
ty groups in Columbia,
Hamilton, Lafayette and
Suwannee counties. It also
offers support counseling to
ASSAULT
continued on page 9A


Reporter welcomes

new advertising

director to staff


Terry Ward, a native of
Oklahoma, looks to
dive into community

From staff report
Terry Ward has joined the
Lake City Reporter as adver-
tising director, coming to
sunny and warm North
Florida from the snow and
cold of Watertown, S.D.
Ward, 32, began his duties
on March 28. He is a native of
Oklahoma, married, has five
children and says he is happy
be in Lake City.
"I am excited to work with
such a great team of newspa-
per professionals here in Lake
City, and I am anxious to get
involved in the community,"
Ward said.


Terry vvru


"Having recently left the
cold and frozen Dakotas it is
quite a treat to see the sunny
days here in Florida. If you
happen to notice a puddle
forming under my desk don't
be alarmed, it is just me thaw-
DIRECTOR
continued on page 9A


TODAY


Classified ...... .4D
Stocks ......... 3D


Local & State . .3A
Business ....... 1 D


Obituaries ...... .6A
Opinion ........ 4A


Puzzles ........ 3C
Scoreboard ..... .2B


W orld .......... 8A
Weather ....... 10A


'U ~. ~ d~ '


ming


IN


nurt anymore.--


11111 8











Page 2A
April 3, 2005


REPORT


FLORIDA



,Shlavo wfrom rnm



personal tragedy y it



natiomaifr debate


L opyrighted MXterial


Syndicatedonten



Available from Commercial News Providers'



-d -








^s B b^ m^y


opened "


speech and memory loss.


Little Caears,' v<,



363 SW Baya Dr. 961-8898
Hwy 47 & 1-75 755-1060
Offer limited to first 150 customers of the day
I


Ge~itivaD


Same great home healthcare services.
Now in a brand new location.

We're pleased to announce that our Lake City branch has moved
from 334 SE Commerce Blvd. to 1389 US Hwy. 90 W., 'Suite 190.
As America's homecare leader, we've been bringing great healthcare
home to families across the country for more than 30 years. And we
will continue to bring that same great care to you and your family.

Gentiva offers a full range of homecare services, including:


* Nursing
* Physical/occupational/speech therapy
* Infusion administration
* Orthopedic Program


* Safe Strides" Program
* Disease and pain management
* Wound care


S


- U


LAKE CITY
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ......... .(386) 752-1293
Fax number ................752-9400
Circulation .................755-5445
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fla. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard ... .754-0418
(mleonard @ lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson .......... 754-0428
(twilson @ lakecityreporter.com)
ADvKwizuNG
Advertising Director
Karen Craig .................754-0417
(kcraig @ lakecityreporter.com)
Sales ...................... 752-1293
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)


REPORTER
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.

Controller Sue Brannon ....... 754-0419
(sbrannon @ lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next
day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters ... .754-0407
watersr@ lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
13 W eeks .................... $23.54
26 Weeks ..................... $42.80
52 Weeks ..................... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
13 Weeks .................... $44.85
26 Weeks ..................... $89.70
52 Weeks .................... $179.40


Correction policy
The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


*


- *
.~ m


Lottery
MIAMI Here are the
winning numbers in
Saturday's Florida Lottery:
Cash 3: 0-6-6
Play 4: 5-5-4-4


Fantasy 5: 30-17-18-23-4
Lotto: 13-16-44-12-28-30
Friday's Fantasy 5: 18-1-
26-17-6
Friday's Mega Money:
35-19-33-36
Mega Ball: 17


For more information, call 386-758-3490
or vOT www.g iva.com
Medicare/Medicaid Certified/Insurance & Private Pay JCAFIO Accredited
f';1 'I' 11"Ilk ' If '0 '1"'1 "q ")i d"'t"Ibly, UIg 'f d"AI'd "u"a,
I If 11he Vel I .... .... ,, aq Ilhr 1,01( 1 1 Iq 1, 1111,10111 M- 1, 0, ves 611SO30-jAA


4b eb -






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005 3A


T~LOCAL &* STATE


--, ~ w - -- -


Learn how to protect your


child from abduction, assault


By RANDY ROUGHTON
rroughton@lakecityreporter. corn
Since the abduction and
murder of 9-year-old Jessica
Lunsford in Homosassa, par-
ents throughout the state
have been asking one ques-
tion What can I do to keep
this atrocity from happening
to my child?
In addition to its role of
providing sexual assault and
harassment awareness and
prevention education, the
North Central Florida Sexual
Assault Center offers tips for
parents and children on pre-
venting abduction and
assault which will be avail-
able at Sexual Assault
Awareness Day in Olustee
Park on Thursday.
"In light of all the things
going on in the media lately,
we will have information for
parents and grandparents on
how to prevent the abduction
and sexual assault of their
children," said NCFSAC
director, and founder Becky
Bowen.
"Often this has to happen
to you to get your attention.
But this is the day to come
out and get all the free infor-
mation you need.
"Don't be afraid of this
topic. Learn as much as you
can. Do this for your kids."
For parents who have been
concerned about keeping
their children safe with the
high-profile child abductions
and murders in recent years,
the NCFSAC offers these
tips:
M Establish family rules
for what to do in an emer-
gency.
M Let your child know who
would take care of him/her
in an emergency.


RANDY ROUGHTON/Lake City Reporter
Erica Nix, a North Central Florida Sexual Assault Center vic-
tim advocate, snuggles with a couple of stuffed animals in
the center's children's room. The center also has a child
victim rapid response team, designed to intervene with any
child who exhibits symptoms of victimization or has wit-
nessed sexual assault.


Teach your child
his/her phone number and
address.
Know your child's
whereabouts.
Let your child know
your whereabouts and how
you can be reached.
Know your child's
friends, associates and
employers.
Check references and
get background information
on people to whom you
entrust your child: baby-sit-
ters, youth group leaders and
coaches.
Never leave a young
child alone at home. Tell


older children not to open
the door to anyone.
M Don't leave young chil-
dren alone in a car or in any
public place.
Have a "buddy system"
so your child is with some-
one else while walking home
from school, going to the
store, etc.
Teach your child how to
handle phone calls (Never
tell anyone she's alone), and
hang up immediately if the
call is obscene or scary.
Teach your child emer-
gency phone numbers, and
keep them by the phone.
Teach your child to


avoid strangers, deserted
areas or places with few
exits, such as alleys or stair-
ways.
Teach your child to walk
near the curb, facing traffic.
Tell your child that if a
car approaches, to walk away
in a direction opposite to the
car and to go somewhere
safe.
Establish a neighbor-
hood system of "safe houses"
(of people you know and
trust) where children can go
if they become scared or
approached by someone.
Emphasize that your
child and his/her safety are
more important than proper-
ty.
Teach your child that
you'd rather have her overre-
act and be embarrassed than
under-react and get hurt.
Teach your child to lis-
ten to her own feelings and
judgments about a person or
situation, especially when
he/she's frightened or
uneasy.
Avoid having your
child's name, age, address or
picture together where any-
one could see it, such as a
newspaper, community direc-
tory or on clothing.
Information on regis-
tered sexual offenders is
available at
www.fdle.state.fl. us/sexual_pr
edators.
"I would also encourage
parents to listen to their kids
and answer their questions,"
Bowen said.
'Teach your children that
there's a difference between
tattling and reporting.
'This is a sensitive subject.
But don't wait until sexual
assault happens to talk about
it."


A tasty bite
Jada Taylor, 3, of Lake City enjoys a pork rib from Taylor's
Barbecue at the 12th Annual Lake City/Columbia County
Parks and Recreation Barbecue Cook-Off at Memorial
Stadium Saturday afternoon. Winners were: kid's under 10 -
Lil' Gobbler; age 10 and over Budmeister's; dessert.-
Darlene Smith; sauce Susan Sparks; anything but -
Budmeister's; wings Seriously Smokin; Florida BBQ
Association Professional Division Competition
Chicken The Arsonists; ribs DW's Kountry Cookers; pork -
Woodhouse Grill; brisket Wild Turkeys; Columbia County
Home Boys Budmeisters; Reserve Grand Champion -
HomeBBQ.com; Grand Champion The Woodhouse Grill.






J *
*. 0 -


- ~ -


Aftermath? pr brak trnmd


a~ ~aW
* -


'4


rb covmdp


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


-
p - -
S.. *.~ ~
- S


. Available from Commercial News Providers"


- -.. A
B -.


- -


- 0
* -


w - 4o


- 0 -


9* 0


S *







SwouO Pike to thank mi
clientss fot tie past 12 qeats.
U know 0 wi miss 1ou.
C7, the gids at Southetrn
S xposute, ooe ifqo an)
Stlhank qou Pot ao the goo?
W times we ve haa.
0Z tl kIZ- tlh, ..L ) omat the
oppotunttti he has affotea
Sme to have so much looe ana
Ssuppott f.om miq fPami/ll an
SI O', & cooking fotwa to the
blessings hie has in stome fot

nstallation _L -&,.You Ad, M
krea Rep a doa T3Bess,
11ey 4inee
*2357


Seabrook XNurseyn
WE'RE CLOSING After 19 years
HUGE Inventory Reduction SALE!
LOUISIANA IRIS ANTIQUE & OLD PERENNIALS,
Over350color6 GARDEN ROSE SHRUBS &VNES
Evergreen coming 180 var. 2 gal to 25 gai. 1 5% OFF
into bloom. carefree low IRONWORK,
m naltenance. CONCRETE & MOREI
25% OFF 15% OFF IL.I d d^ 2"Y
Mon.-Fri. 8:30 am-5 prm, Sal. 9:00 am-3:30 pm. Sun. 1:00 pm-4:00 pm
9924 N.W. 171 Terr., Aachua, FL 386-462-7999, seabrooknursery.com


COLUMBIA
DOOR COMPANY -
"Garage door installation & repair." "


$399at 5
Garage Door Tone Up :
5pt Inspection I
Check and Oil Hinges
,Inspect Cables
[Oil and Adjust Springs, ,,....m
VCheck Rollers
VfBasic Maintenance on operator


SThe
garage Door-

Speciaists,


386.754.99921


MERCY MEDICAL
URGENT CARE
V NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED
V JUST WALK IN
V OPEN 8AM-1OPM 7 DAYS/WEEK
V PAYMENT PLAN AVAILABLE Nahed Sobhy, M.D.
38675-29305 East Duval Street
386-758-2944 Lake City, FL




Congratulations Metabolic Centers on your loss
of 5972 lbs in February and a gain of $5972 for
the Tsunami Relief to be donated in your honor.


ATTENTION

City of Lake City
Employees


SPECIAL METABOLIC
MARCH APPRECIATION
1/3 OFF PROGRAM FEE*
WITH FREE YEAR OF MAINTENANCE
*Up to 50 Ibs program with employee ID
Call Today. Start Losing Tomorrow



mnEtAOLIC 755-8100
RESEARCH CENTER


a-


- 0


Coritrim


1 Stressed?
$ 5
2 1


.


- -


- *


o -


o


o Q


i







4A LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005
LAKE ITY REPORT


THE LAKE CITY REPORTER IS PUBLISHED WITH PRIDE FOR
RESIDENTS OF COLUMBIA AND SURROUNDING COUNTIES BY
COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS INC. OF ATHENS, GA. WE BELIEVE
STRONG NEWSPAPERS BUILD STRONG COMMUNITIES -
"NEWSPAPERS GET THINGS DONE!" OUR PRIMARY GOAL IS TO
PUBLISH DISTINGUISHED AND PROFITABLE COMMUNITY-ORIENT-
ED NEWSPAPERS. THIS MISSION WILL BE ACCOMPLISHED
THROUGH THE TEAMWORK OF PROFESSIONALS DEDICATED TO
TRUTH, INTEGRITY, LOYALTY, QUALITY AND HARD WORK.
DINK NESMITH, PRESIDENT TOM WOOD, CHAIRMAN

E D I T [0 __IAL



It's about



the people

Today marks the debut of A
Place Called Home, the first of
four special sections delivered
to your door in Sunday issues
of the Lake City Reporter in .
April. Today's first section chronicles busi-
ness and industry in Columbia County and
offers a different perspective on the daily
grind of industrial and commercial happen-
ings.
These sections, as much as we could
structure, is about people. We searched for
people behind the scenes the ones that
we never read about and the ones that
keep business and industry on the move in
Columbia County.
From a truck driver to a telephone
repair man to a longtime employee of the
FDOT, interesting stories are told in
today's business and industry special sec-
tion.
We also have chronicled several family
businesses that have been a long-time
mainstay of the Columbia County commu-
nity. Their fascinating stories are told here;
their success stories are recounted.
Our news and advertising staff has
worked many additional hours making
sure this section is unique for our readers
and advertisers. This is a keepsake issue
that once again chronicles a portion of our
beloved Columbia County. And while it has
consumed many of us, it also has proven
to be a lot of fun compiling. We have
learned interesting things about our
friends and neighbors that we didn't know.
These are positive stories that are recount-
ed here for public consumption. These
real-life facts have helped mold our com-
munity.
We found these stories interesting. We
hope you will too.



Today is Sunday, April 3, the 93rd day of
2005. There are 272 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:
On April 3, 1860, the legendary Pony
Express began service between St.
Joseph, Mo., and Sacramento, Calif.

On this date:

In 1865, Union forces occupied the
Confederate capital of Richmond, Va.
In 1882, outlaw Jesse James was shot to
death in St. Joseph, Mo., by Robert Ford,
a member of James' gang.
In 1936, Bruno Hauptmann was electro-
cuted in Trenton, N.J., for the kidnap-
murder of the Lindbergh child.
In 1946, Lt. Gen. Masaharu Homma, the
Japanese commander responsible for the
Bataan Death March, was executed out-
side Manila.
In 1948, President Truman signed the
Marshall Plan, which allocated more than '
$5 billion in aid for 16 European countries.
In 1968, the day before he was assassi-
nated in Memphis, Tenn., civil rights
leader Martin Luther King Jr. delivered
his famous "I've Been to the Mountaintop"
speech to a rally of striking sanitation
workers.
In 1968, North Vietnam agreed to meet
with U.S. representatives to set up prelim-
inary peace talks.
In 1974, deadly tornadoes struck wide
parts of the South and Midwest before
jumping across the border into Canada;
more than 300 fatalities resulted.
In 1979, Jane M. Byrne was elected
mayor of Chicago, defeating Republican
Wallace D. Johnson.


MICHAEL
LEONARD


4 .
Pq<


"Copyrighted Material


*


r" Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"

WAAE 6 O 00


O4


^4P


SERVING COLUMBIA COUNTY SINCE 1874
MICHAEL LEONARD, PUBLISHER
TODD WILSON, EDITOR
SUE BRANNON, CONTROLLER


My recent column "Seven Stores
Long Gone" attracted a lot of
attention. Quite a few people
called to tell me of their own
memories of those stores.
Jo Ann Cox grew up in the neighborhood-of
those long-gone stores and recalled those days
as some of the happiest of her life. Betty
Williams Stoltze (CHS 1947) wrote from Santa
Barbara, Calif., of her pleasant memories of
that neighborhood. Betty said she was glad
there was no television back then to keep kids
home because getting out and about every day
helped her to know the people in her neigh-
borhood and now she treasures those mem-
ories.
Retired banker Robert Louis Green (CHS
1942) said he happily remembered all those
stores. Then amazingly he began to recite from
memory most all of the old North Marion
stores from Duval Street to Railroad Street.
Sylvia Williams Lynch (CHS 1968) and I talked
in the DeSoto Drug Store and, like Robert, she
had an amazing and happy storehouse of mem-
ories of many of the North Marion stores from
her school days.
Then Phyllis Whitaker and Robert Pearce
spoke to me about the historic stores once
along the former East Orange Street (now
Justice Way). All those stores were demolished
to expand the parking lot south of Olustee Park
so Robert and Phyllis both suggested I men-
tion some of those stores since they can never
be again.
Of course there were different stores on
Orange Street in different eras too many to
write about here but here are some selected
from thel930s and 1940s. Starting on the east
corner, across North Hernando from the Court
House Annex, was the DeSoto Theater which
premiered such landmark movies as "Birth of
A Nation" and "Gone with the Wind."
Moving west, Mitch Evans ran the Western
Union office for many years and he was the
ideal man for the job. People said thousands of
confidential messages passed through Mitch's
hands over the years, and he never divulged
even one of them.
The Piggly Wiggly grocery store was next
and the manager had a memorable name, Billy
Graham, same as the famous preacher. Billy
enjoyed telling people he had once managed a
grocery store in Georgia called the Hoggly
Woggly. So, he had moved from Hoggly
Woggly to Piggly Wiggly.
On the corner of Orange Street and North
Marion was the Table Supply grocery store,
and Phyllis Whitaker thinks that store may
have later become Lake City's first Winn-Dixie


MORRIS
WILLIAMS


store, although their original name was Winn-
Lovett.
Robert Pearce (CHS 1954) reminded me
that various businesses and groups also used
the upstairs space over these stores. Dentist R.
L. McCaleb had an office over the Table
Supply. Rachel Wilson (CHS 1950) was his den-
tal technician, and Stan Anders (CHS 1952)
was one of his patients.
Robert says the First Christian Church (now
Cornerstone Community Church) started in an
upstairs room there under pastor C.R. Berry.
Surveyor W. K. Daugherty had an upstairs
office, and there was also a skating rink
upstairs and a small gym where boxing match-
es were held.
Some people will also remember other long-
time stores in that block like A.B. Clark
Appliances and Brown-Vann Paint Store. Even
the Lake City Reporter was once located there.
Going back to the DeSoto Theater, a teenage
Raymond Eugene (Cookie) Johnson (CHS
1952) stumped the theater manager with a rid-
dle one night and the manager rewarded him
by letting him see a movie free. Fifteen years
later Major Raymond E. Johnson was killed in
the Vietnam War and his name is on a monu-
ment in Olustee Park not 50 yards from where
he saw that free movie.
I mentioned Jo Ann Cox earlier. Jo Ann has
the distinction of being one of the original 13
remaining employees who opened the first
Walmart Store in Lake City in 1985. Before
that, Jo Ann worked 20 years at McCrory's
Five and Ten Cent Store in downtown Lake
City, another North Marion Street store that no
longer exists and maybe that will be a col-
umn for another day.

Early poverty
A Lake City man once told me he grew up so
poor that he slept in a bed with his four broth-
ers and when the weather got cold, "Mama
just threw on another brother!"
Morris Williams is a resident of Columbia
County and a historian. Contact him at 755-
8183 or williams h2@firn.edu.


I ET E ST HE E ITOR


Leave lot sizes
alone
I want to address the propos-
al to address the development
reduction from five acres down
to half to one acre size lots.
This is wanted by the real
estate developers. Something
has come up that is a lot bigger
than the developers and county


manager. That is sinkholes
opening up all across Columbia
County. Now, it's even affected
1-75 southbound lanes in
Alachua County. I believe that
all the land in Columbia County
needs to be tested for these
underground sinkholes before
any permits are issued to the
developers. Who would want to
have happen to them as has to


the Roberts? Sure, the subdivi-
sions would bring in more
money to the count. But at
what price though?
More sinkholes to be filled if
at all possible, endangering
lives of the citizens? Leave the
size of the lots alone.
Nancy Butterfield
Lake City


Trying times


ahead for


our 153rd

The men of the Florida National
Guard 153rd Engineer Company
gathered Friday night for a com-
munity send-off salute and din-
ner in Lake City. The event fea-
tured presentations, proclamations and
politicians, and while the barbecue was tasty,
the speakers eloquent and the proclamations
meaningful, the real stars of the show were
the men who are preparing to leave for
Afghanistan and their families and friends.
From my spot on the food service line I
watched the crowd.
Little girls clung to their daddies, tugging
on the pants leg of his military fatigues and
looking up for recognition until Dad reached
down and picked her up. Sons checked out
Dad's uniform and tried to emulate his sol-
dier stance: Head up, heels together, shoul-
ders back, jaw square.
How many months will pass before that
guardsman again feels his little girl's arms
around his neck or her soft kiss on his
cheek? How many times during the course of
advanced training in Mississippi and deploy-
ment overseas will he recall the image of his
son standing erect in admiration of Daddy?
Soldiers' parents could be seen drawing
deep breaths, struggling to control their
emotions as the national anthem was sung. A
shared glance between father and mother
told the story of 18 or more years of memo-
ries, times they've shared with that son now
grown from toddler into soldier.
The words of our country's song had spe-
cial meaning Friday night.
"And the rockets' red glare . ." A tear
dropped from Mother's eye countless
times it has looked upon her boy with com-
passion and love and rolled down her
cheek.
'"The bombs bursting in air.. .." The chin
which so often Dad has set in determination
and strength for his family began to quiver.
"Gave proof through the night, that our
flag was still there . ." And it was there
Friday night, in a place of honor at the front
of the auditorium where it could command
the attention of every soldier and civilian
present.
Also there were the wives and girlfriends.
Nothing can adequately prepare a wife for
the absence of her husband for 15 months,
the projected time these guardsmen will be
away. To commit your life to someone and
then face being without them for more than
a year must be a terribly hard thing to face.
The wives I observed Friday night were
behaving with exceptional bravery, though.
They must sense that their husbands need to
know that the home front will be fine while
they're serving America overseas. Smiles
dominated the wives' faces as they held his
hand or looped their arm through the crook
of his elbow.
Trying days may be ahead when those
wives will need the support of family, friends
and community, but Friday night was not the
time to show that concern.
Likewise the girlfriends. Fifteen months
away will be a time of testing for those rela-
tionships. Some will grow across the time of
separation, as absence makes the heart grow
fonder. Others will flame out. On Friday
night, all glowed.
And finally the men themselves. They are
an impressive group, the 153rd.
They looked tough. Hardiness and grit will
be needed for the job ahead.
They also appeared resourceful. Their job
in Afghanistan will be to help train the
Afghani soldiers. Resourcefulness is a must.
And they seemed ready. Certainly very
few of the soldiers are actually anxious to be
away from the friendly shores of the United
States, but in their eyes I saw the look of con-
fidence and superior preparation.
The 153rd draws guardsmen from not only
Columbia County, but as far south as Tampa
and north into South Georgia. They call Lake
City their military home, though.
As a resident of Lake City, I'm proud to
claim them as our 153rd.
And as an American, I'm glad to acknowl-
edge them as fellow citizens and trust my
safety to them.
My freedom. Your freedom. The expan-
sion of freedom around the world is in their
capable hands.
Michael Leonard is publisher of the Lake
City Reporter Contact him at 754-0418 or
mleonard@lakecityreporter comrn


AO I



tLa4,4


More stores long-gone


**s %






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005 ot

POPE JOHN PAUL II




. -& ,I


O


- 'S


- -'S -


ft,


"Copyrighted Material :---


. S". Syndicate'd'Co nt itW"
4 0-0"'


Available from CommercialNews Providers"


.~ -
a a
* - 0 0


- a


a


a -~
~0
-- -. a.~.
-. a *
- ..~a -


m
~ a
- 0


'a. --
~0 ~ a -
-~ *


- -' .~


a -~ -


-a.-


- 0


a -


- 0
a.


* a -


Thinking of
filing your taxes

make you want to
do this?


We make taxes
fun!

April 15th is just around the corner!
Let us help you file your taxes and give you peace of mind.
90 wMi lv.Se 1


r - -- -- -- -- -
Bring this ad and get

I n LIBERTY'
$20 Offn, TAX
Your Tax Preparation Fees! ERVICE


905 S.W. Main Blvd. Ste.115
(Lake City Plaza)
754-0311
Open 9AM-9PM Mon.-Fri.
9AM-5PM Sat.


* 30 Day to 5 year IRA's available
* Higher yields on higher deposits
* No annual service or maintenance fee
* Interest compounded & credited monthly
* Low minimum opening deposit of $1,000
on most IRA's.


Visit a
First Federal branch
or
Call
(386) 362-3433
(386) 755-0600


* Open a 18 month IRA for as low as $25,
then make automatic payments from your
checking account throughout the year to
reach you IRA contribution limits.*

See us for rates and terms. Save for your retirement. FIRST FEDERAL
SAVINGS BANK FLORIDA


Annual Percentage Yield (APY) of IRA's is subject to change A single taxpayer may make annual contributions to Traditional and/or
Roth IRA's as large as $3,000 for tax year 2004 ($3,500 if you are age 50 or over). You may have both a Traditional IRA and a Roth IRA,
but combined contributions in any tax year are limited to a total of the contribution limits. Penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal.
*18 month IRA may be opened for $25 and contributed to throughout the year for IRA contributions towards your 2005 taxes and IRA.
Please consult your tax advisor on IRA limits and your taxes. FDIC Insured


COLUMBIACOUNTY

BANK
IS GROWING AND IS LOOKING FOR QUALIFIED
CANDIDATES IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS:
Loan Operations
Loan Administrative Assistant
Mortgage Originator
Bookkeeping Clerk
Customer Service Associate
Teller
Columbia County Bank is proud to be the HOMETOWN ADVANTAGE and of our 93
year history in Columbia County. CCB is the oldest and largest community bank in
Lake City and Columbia County.
We are seeking positive team players with excellent computer and communications
skills. Customer relations with business and development skills are needed.
Generous Benefits will be offered to the right candidates. Benefits include
medical, dental, vision, cafeteria plan, and 401K.
Fax your resume to 752-4747, Attention: LoriAnne Lundy
Or complete an application at 173 N.W. Hillsboro Street in Lake City.
See our website www.ccbanc.com for more details.
EEO. M/F/D/V


- l


0
0


"Fawy


* p


8


- 4






6A LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


NATION


CoU e students domnh
qD o qbkh


In the dom


-- 4, -


-8 S


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"

*w o
a,*


. *


S


Imno -a


-a 0 C


A 4 4 o o 4*0* op 4m


LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3,2005


6A


6A


-.qD


* *0


qP O


4amw Gw -000


qM





LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


NATION


IOEEARLYTUEDAY*k


F1i

. -d


*

*


Lk
rm
4b m


In


-^a
0U -
vu 0!


4 Or
'--


(0 -


CE,'

C.
0(j-i


Belk
Super Tuesday
3 GREAT WAYS TO SAVE STOREWIDE


o.


Senior Day!
We invite all customers
55 and older to take an

EXTRA 5off
(10% off home)
your ENTIRE PURCHASE*
regular & sale priced merchandise
*If you're 55 or older save an extra 15%, or 10% in our home department, on
your purchases for the day. Just show proof of age to any Sales Associate.
Normal exclusions apply. Excludes Red Dot, lease departments, bonus buys
and doorbusters. Selection varies by store.


FO UNq. DAYS. SALE


p-rices ofthe-season!
| |i r;; : : ,,' -, ; : ,'*' .


.i :.O;,savee vn, more W.ith your Senior Day discount


"'.f ",


I


LAKE CITY MALL


E


~-a
n.

*

'4
-


belk.com


Estee Lauder Gift Time
Choose your shades. Your free gift with any


Estee Lauder purchase of 23.50 or more,


worth 65.00


A CHOICE OF SHADES:
* New. Pure Pops Lip Gloss
* ELECTRIC Intense LipCreme (full-size)
PLUS:
* Lash XL Maximum Length Mascara
* Hydra Complete Multi-Level Moisture Creme
* Advanced Night Repair Protective
Recovery Complex
* Striped Canvas Handbag
* Matching Cosmetic Bag


- .


- Pe,-PEDIC
IIi PRESSURE RELIEVING
S SWEDISH MATTRESSES AND PILLOWS
The Furniture Showplace
Wholesale Sleep
US 90 West (next to 84 Lumber) 752-9303


a,,


OL EAY


j Lose up to 301bs
by Mother's Day
Hunger Free Individualized
Grocery Store Food Affordable
Goals Reached & Maintained
Lose 3-7lbs per week '.
20 Yrs. Medical & Nutritional Experience .
We can help with "'A
cholesterol, high blood
pressure, diabetes
& thyroid
Weighless Weight Loss
719-8888 Hw y 90 Lakei V effreRd.
719-8888 Hwy 90 &Lake Jeffrey Rd. -r-


ESTEE LAUDER
Makeup Confidential Insider secrets for a perfect foundation
COME BY THE ESTEE LAUDER COUNTER NOW FOR MAKEUP CONFIDENTIAL,
THE FOUNDATION EVENT OF THE SEASON. You'll find the makeup that's right for you, from shade to finish.
Our top under-color agents won't quit till we've got your fit creme or liquid, compact or powder, we've got
you covered. Perfectly. Event begins April 3.
DOUBLE WEAR STAY-IN-PLACE MAKEUP SPF 10 FLAWLESS WITH TRUE STAYING POWER.
This worry-free, long-wearing makeup stays fresh, looks natural through heat, humidity, nonstop activity.
Won't change color, smudge or come off on clothes. Now in 20 shades, 32.50

(, k- i / nSLAKE CITY MALL
^^^"J~y /f^/ Jyy ^3lf*W1Mow-Sm 10 j..-9|]ni. Sw 122 p y~miim


be Ik co m


o












0 )0


p


qD


A





8A LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


NTA'UTIONT &WORLD


im& %ll-l v w w nex po tf
BCardinaL t sekd next pontiff


0


b -


-


"Copyrighted Material


11 Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"














By order of the United States Bankruptcy Court
Middle District of Florida
Case No. 3:04-BK-I 1360-3P7 C ommunilltVy

BANKRPTCY AdvertisingDeadline
Tues.- 4API7 12
SAUCON
LUXURY HOME LOCATED AT THE SOUTHERN
OAKS COUNTRY CLUB PLUS ADDITIONAL
ITEMS TO BE SOLD "PIECE BY PIECE" '.'/O7 Z ,
368 HARRIS LAKE DRIVE _a
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA )
11AM Saturday April 9






Home Features
_* 2,600 Sq.Ft.of Living Space* 4 Bedrooms* 3 Bathrooms* 1 Loft
768 Sq.Ft Garage* Located on Golf Course Green #1
Personal Property Features
i r. Original Picasso, Pico, Agam, Hallam, Botero,
Chagall, Dali, Erte, Tarkay, Lam, Miro, Deniz
and more. 1,000 Piece costume Jewelry
** 1Collection. Antique Furniture. Authenticated
"* ... Sports Memorabilia. Western, European and
'^ 'V ^^^SS Aquatic Bronze Statuary and Fountains.
Diamond Jewelry with Appraisals. 100% Silk
2 Oriental Rugs. Important European
Porcelains and Crystal. Add'l Items. M IIt
Personal Property Terms: Cash, Checks, Major Credits Cards accepted. 15% BP 7 5 ,,
PERSONAL PROPERTY PREVIEWS: 9:30AM Saturday, April 9th. REAL ESTATE ONLY PREVIEWS: REPORT i
12FM-4PM Friday, April 8th and 9:30AM day of Auction. PRR
SAuction Company of America is pter works for you
"America's #1 Auction Team" Licensed RE 3rokcr- Lic# AU2-ABI & 1144 /
S888.573.1616
AuctionCompanyofAmerica.com


i







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


PRIEST
Continued from page 1A

his last meeting two years ago.
Three photos of the priest and
the pope still hang in Morse's
church office. Father George
Kuruvilla, Epiphany's associ-
ate priest, also met the pope
when they concelebrated the
Mass together in India in the
early 1980s.
But perhaps Morse's fond-
est memory is when he was in
a papal audience not long after
the pope recuperated from his
1981 assassination attempt.
"I was a newly ordained
priest, and we were there in a
cool time of year and the only
jacket I had was a brown cor-
duroy jacket," Morse said. "He
was still vigorous then, and
walked down the center of the
audience hall to shake every-
one's hand. I happened to be
one of the people right on the
edge, and in English he asked
me, 'Are you from America?'


"Then, with a wry grin on
his face, he said, 'I can tell by
the way you're dressed.' I
could tell that it was a little,
gentle dig. But the feeling that
I had was I was the only one in
the room. He was famous for
his humor and his ability to
touch people and make him-
self present for that one per-
son, even though the room
was filled with thousands."
Morse considers the pope's
influential role in ending the
Cold War as perhaps his most
important accomplishment.
"I'm actually a historian, and
I would have to say he was
more responsible for the end
of communism than anyone,"
Morse said. "He also guided
the church through some dif-
ficult times and always stayed
faithful to its traditions. He
was also the great champion
of human dignity. In some
ways, he brought the other
Christian denominations
together on life issues and the
dignity of the human person.


"He also took the papacy
outside the building and more
or less became pastor to the
whole world, and not just
Christianity. Instead of empha-
sizing the divisions of humani-
ty, this pope emphasized the
great things we have in com-
mon.
"He was the pope of the
common man."
The news of the pope's
death, although expected, hit
many local Catholics hard,
almost like losing a family
member, Morse said. In the
days leading to the pope's
death, they prayed fervently in
Epiphany services for his
recovery, or if that was not
God's will, that he have "a
peaceful passing," Morse said.
But now is a time to cele-
brate the pope's life and his
well-deserved entry into eter-
nal rest.
"It's the natural completion
of all of our destinies to go
home to God at the end of a
long and productive life,"


Morse said. '"The Holy Father
has guided the church for
almost 27 years through some
difficult, but also some won-
derful times.
"He deserves his rest."
In Saturday night's Mass,
Morse talked about how
Christians should not be over-
ly despondent because "the
pope was a servant of Christ
and humanity who lived the
great commandment to love
God and love neighbor,"
Morse said.
"Now he's gone on to be
with Christ and his eternal
reward as all good servants
will do.
"One of the things our cul-
ture doesn't do a good job
dealing with is death," he said.
"Here's a man who embraced
the cross at the end and real-
ized it was time and chose to
die with dignity at home.
Rather than trying to escape
death, he embraced it. So even
in his death, he's still teaching
us."


ASSAULT
Continued from page 1A
all victims. Since October, the
NCFSAC has assisted 140
clients. Anyone needing assis-
tance can call the 24-hour cri-
sis hotline: 1-866-631-8887.
In 2003, the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement recorded 12,756
reports of forcible rape
statewide. Columbia County
reported 36 forcible sexual
offenses in 2003, a number
that carries a mixed message
to the NCFSAC.
"It sounds like a small num-
ber, but when you consider
the statistic that only one in 10
report, it's a huge number,"
Bowen said. 'The numbers
are down, but does that mean
they're actually going down or
are less being reported?
"You have to ask yourself is
anyone you love including in
those offenses that weren't
reported? As far as I'm con-
cerned, one is too many."
One survivor, who prefers
to be named in this story as
"Jane" to protect her identity,
still carries the splinter, but
the pain is lessening.
From the age of four, Jane
was molested and physically
abused by her stepfather.
"For some reason, he
thought I was attractive at 4-
years-old," Jane said. "He
started with what they call
'grooming,' where he buys
you things to keep you quiet
so you don't tell someone
what's going on. Or he'll deny
it."
The physical and sexual
abuse continued for nine
years, culminating after mid-
night Dec. 18, 1992 when he
walked into her bedroom
when he thought everyone
else in the house was asleep.
"I turned over and saw his
face," Jane said.


Fortunately for Jane, her
stepfather's daughter, who
shared the room with her, was
awake and told her mother on
Jan. 4, 1993.
Her mother convinced Jane
to tell the court to let her step-
father come back into the
home a few years later and he
tried to molest her again
when she was 17. Two years
later, she was raped by a man
a friend introduced her to in
High Springs.
"This haunts you for the
rest of your life," Jane said.
"I've been diagnosed with
(post-traumatic stress disor-
der) and clinical depression,
put on four medications, had
to be put in a psychiatric
ward, and I have nightmares
and flashbacks that he will
come back. You become very
paranoid, looking over your
shoulder, thinking that person
is going to come back after
you.
"If someone gets too close
to me, I drop him at the drop
of a hat. You don't trust people
when this happens to you. You
isolate yourself."
But through counseling
and therapy at Meridian
Behavioral Health Care and
the NCFSAC, Jane is putting
her life back together. She
recently became engaged to a
man who understands what
she's going through and sup-
ports her and she plans to
return to school and study
computer graphics design.
Jane and her two children
plan to move to Savannah,
Ga., after her marriage, but
she hopes to continue her
education, as well as her emo-
tional progress.
'The splinter is still there,
but I'm getting a lot better,"
Jane said.
To learn more about the
NCFSAC or request a presen-
tation, call 719-9287 or visit
the center at 1149 Main Blvd.


DIRECTOR
Continued from page 1A

ing out from my frozen state."
Ward has been involved in
newspapers since his high
school days in Chickasha,
Okla. He began in the news-
room as an entertainment
reporter and quickly moved
into circulation. Assignments
in circulation and advertising
kept him in Oklahoma until
1998. From there Ward worked
in Indiana, Ohio and finally as
advertising director for the
Watertown Public Opinion in
Watertown, S.D.
His career has also been
marked by active involvement
in professional and community
organizations. In Watertown
he served with the chamber of
commerce, Boys and Girls
Club, Junior Achievement and
the American Red Cross. He
was also a member of the
Kiwanis Club. Ward's off-hours
activities include kayaking, rac-
quetball and church work.


'Terry is a person of very
high caliber, both professional-
ly and personally," said Lake
City Reporter Publisher
Michael Leonard. "He is a bun-
dle of energy and ideas. His
track record is impressive and
his credentials are solid.
'This move to Lake City is
for his family as much as his
career, Terry tells me. Terry
and his wife, Tana, are anxious
to sink roots into our commu-
nity, become involved in the life
of Columbia County and make
a home here. I think he's going
to be great."
Ward sums up his philoso-
phy of newspaper advertising
this way: '"Throughout my
career I have often told people,
'We are not in the business of
selling advertising, but rather
we are in the business of help-
ing businesses grow.'"
Ward will be moving about
in the community meeting cus-
tomers and making himself
known over the next days and
weeks. He encourages your
phone calls and visits.


THIS PICTURE ISN'T WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS.
IT'S WORTH A THOUSAND LIVES.




You may not know it. but you're looking at something amazing This is an image of the human
heart created using advanced cardiac imaging. We combine CT scans and MRI technology to
allow doctors to see the heart more clearly and diagnose cardiac problems more quickly and
accurately than they ever have before. UF&Shands is among the first in the nation to use
these technologies together. And we've found that it not only gives us a better view of the
heart. it allows patients to see hope where there was none. th C I E N C E o HO I -



UF&Shands
The University Of Florida Health System






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


THE


0 *


WEATHER


LOe


0 .


0.*


dnmdbmm mu-mi v '


m.


S-. v--' *



"C5pyrighted Mate'rial -


Syndicated Content:.h


Available from Commercial


News


Provide


ONO S S0 0 -
4mmmum
~ F.
zp-mm mm
4mS


S W


A CAMPUS Home Equity Loan fits ALL the bills. And...you borrow with a tax advantage!'


Even pay off
high-interest
credit cards!


. NO CLOSING COSTS
for loans $10,000 to $50,000


0 CALL. 7S4.-9O88 and press 1, then ext. 22111
| CLICK campuscu.com to apply online
< VISIT your local service center


CAMPUS
ISA
Count on CAMPUS.
www.campuscu.com

Membership is open
to everyone in Alachua,
Columbia and Marion counties!"


IConsult your tax advisor about possible deductions. oSubject to credit and property approval Your r ate may he higher based on credit worthiness and property valuation. Variable rates based on Wall Street journal Prire Rate and is subject to
change. Maximum interest rate is 18% Fixed-rato home equity loans are availiale 'or as low as 5 74% APR. Higher rates apply for non-owner-occuplied properties Offer excludes mobile homes. Property insurance is required ticood insurance
may be required. APR Annual Pece' tagre Rat.e. 'No closing costs on equity l.von $10,000 $50,000. Initial tnirnimurn draw of $10,000 is required. $300 off closing costs on loans over $50,000 Normal closing (on; ge tro $125 $1,000
Appraisal fees not incdlded in rcosing costs '"Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 required Mention this ad and we'll warve the $15 membership fee


LaeCt 13S aso ori r 'vle-E Cmu 20 W5h v. W Cmu 90 W3t S. Hner rsin 20NW4rpt
I oe qae 75S 5h t hnsatU omH1* Al Cm os90 N 9hAe Oaa39 W olg d


- -


Ado


rs"


w


NCUA


IL one


qmw qp4p


" mw
qmww ft


t:sl-
am
amw
oft
ftmm 0
asomp 0
40=0


qp
6&:Jr-
2L-l -


Abb- qm


w
birma













Section B
Sunday, April 3, 2005
Lake City, Florida
www.lakecityreporter.com


Scoreboard 2B
Tennis 3B
MLB 4B


NASCAR
Busch race
postponed
BRISTOL, Tenn. The
Busch Series race at Bristol
Motor Speedway was post-
poned Saturday because of
rain.
The Sharpie Professional
250 will be run on Monday
at 10:30 am.
NASCAR officials waited
all day Saturday to call the
race at Bristol because the
infield at the .533-mile is so
small, the sanctioning body
wanted the cars removed
before today's Nextel Cup
event.
But a steady rain finally
forced them to postpone
the Busch event.
Qualifying was also rained
out, so the field was set by
points. Carl Edwards is on
the pole, followed by Jeff
Burton, Clint Bowyer, Martin
Truex Jr. and Tony Raines.
Compiled from Associated
Press reports.

Prep schedule
MONDAY
LCCC baseball vs.
Central Florida CC, 3 p.m.
M Fort White High base-
ball vs. Interlachen High, 4
p.m. (JV-4)
Columbia High base-
ball vs. Lee High, 6 p.m.
Columbia High JV soft-
ball at Fort White High JV, 6
p.m.
TUESDAY
Columbia High track,
Fort White High track at
Suwannee High quad meet,
3 p.m.
Columbia High boys ten-
nis at Belleview High, 4 p.m.
Fort White High base-
ball vs. Madison County
High, 4 p.m.
Fort White High softball
at P.K. Yonge School, TBA
Fort White High JV
softball vs. LC Christian
School, 6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Fort White High
weightlifting at Union
County High, 11:30 a.m.
LCCC baseball at
Palatka CC, 3 p.m.
Columbia High
weightlifting at Leon High, 3
p.m.
Columbia High boys
and girls tennis vs. Baker
County High, 3:30 p.m.
Columbia High softball
at Paxon School, 6 p.m.
Columbia High base-
ball at Leon High, 7 p.m.
(JV-7)
THURSDAY
Fort White High track
at Hamilton County High, 3
p.m.
Columbia High girls
tennis at Belleview High, 4
p.m.
Fort White High soft-
ball vs. Trenton High, 6
p.m.
Columbia High JV soft-
ball at Bell High, 6 p.m.
Columbia High softball
at Suwannee High, 6:30
p.m.
Fort White High base-
ball at Hamilton County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4)
Columbia High JV
baseball vs. Leon High, 7
p.m.
FRIDAY
LCCC baseball vs.
Santa Fe CC, 3 p.m.
Fort White High girls
soccer banquet at Fort
White Community Recrea-
tion Center, 6:30 p.m.
Fort White High base-
ball at Interlachen High, 7
p.m. (JV-4)
U Columbia High base-
ball doubleheader at Mid-
dieburg High, TBA (JV-4)
Columbia High JV soft-
ball at Belleview High tour-
nament, TBA
Columbia High softball
vs. Middleburg High, 7 p.m.
Columbia High boys
and girls tennis at Suwa-
nnee High, 3 p.m.


SATURDAY
Columbia High JV soft-
ball at Belleview High tour-
nament, TBA


Lady Tigers finish sixth in Klassic


From staff reports

The Columbia High softball
team went 2-2 at the
Kissimmee Klassic, which
ended on Saturday. The Lady
Tigers finished sixth after a
13-3 loss to Buchholz High.
Rachel Parker was 3-3 with
two doubles and two RBIs.
Marie Croft was 2-3 with a run
scored. Kori Drake went 1-3
with a single.
On Friday, the Lady Tigers
shut out Milton High 1-0 in a
game that was delayed by rain
on Thursday.
Jenna Payne struck out 12
batters in the complete game
victory. She allowed four hits


and walked one batter.
The Lady Tigers scored the
games' only run in the sev-
enth inning, when Croft hit a
bunt single and was moved to
third after
a fielder's
choice and
a ground-
out. Amber TrGERS
Stormant
laid down a
suicide
squeeze
bunt that scored Croft. Ashley
Stalnaker and Stormant each
had a stolen base.
In the second game on Fri-
day, Columbia fell to Satellite
Beach High 5-1. Jamie


Daniels started and took the
loss. She pitched 4e1 innings
and allowed two runs one
earned on three hits and
walked three while striking
out four.
Payne relieved and pitched
2%, innings. She allowed three
runs non earned on two
hits and struck out three
while walking none.
The Lady Tigers scored
their only run in the second
inning. Payne walked and
went to second on Croft's
bunt. Two batters later,
Daniels hit into a fielder's
KLASSIC
continued on page 4B


LCCC loses another

one-runm game to FCCJ


By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter.com

The five-game winning
streak came to an end with a
thud on Saturday, as Lake
City Community College's
old problems resurfaced in a
7-6 loss at Florida Commu-
nity College at Jacksonville
on Saturday.
Lake City was up 6-2 with
two outs in the seventh
inning before allowing five
runs over the last two
innings in defeat. It was the
10th one-run loss for the


'Wolves this year.
"I think it's a missed oppor-
tunity," LCCC coach Tom
Clark said. "A win today and
we would have been in sec-
ond place in the conference."
Raleigh Evans appeared to
be cruising toward another
victory, but he ran out of gas
after seven innings. Evans
allowed four runs on six hits
and struck out seven. He
walked one batter.
Mike Ryan relieved and
took the loss to fall to 4-2. He

LCCC continued on page 4B


Down to the final two


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Illinois' Roger Powell Jr. reacts after making a basket in the second half
against Louisville in their semifinal game at the Final Four on Saturday at the
Edward Jones Dome in St. Louis.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
North Carolina's David Noel goes to the basket past Michigan State's Alan
Anderson in the first half of their semifinal game at the Final Four on
Saturday at the Edward Jones Dome in St. Louis.


11104'% \nIIAh *1nd1ru I1u't 1i04 ks 4%Anq m0:411 OM












"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


,Available from Commercial News Providers"
M lo wux d eto **I=0 g"M a

inmANW.A


l. I ..*


L A K E- 0 R EP 0 It TEX










LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
ARENA FOOTBALL
Noon
NBC Regional coverage, Los
Angeles at Orlando or Philadelphia at
Columbus
AUTO RACING
6 a.m.
SPEED) Formula One, qualifying for
Bahrain Grand Prix,. at Manama, Bahrain
(same-day tape)
7 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, Bahrain
Grand Prix. at Manama, Bahrain
12:30 p.m.
FOX NASCAR, Nextel Cup, Food
City 500, at Bristol, Tenn.
3:30 p.m.
ESPN IRL, IndyCar Series, Honda
Indy Grand Prix, at St. Petersburg, Fla.
4 p.m.
SPEED Rolex Sports Car Series,
Grand American 400, at Fontana, Calif.
BOWLING
1 p.m.
ESPN PBA, World Championship, at
Taylor, Mich.
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Open de
Portugal, final round, at Quinta da
Marinha, Portugal
3 p.m.
NBC PGA Tour, BellSouth Classic,
final round, at Duluth, Ga.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Boston at N.Y. Yankees
NBA
1 p.m.
ABC Philadelphia at Boston
3:30 p.m.
ABC Regional coverage, Dallas at
Cleveland or Minnesota at Sacramento
6 p.m.
NBA TV Seattle at Golden State
TENNIS
Noon
CBS ATP Masters Series, NASDAQ-
100 Open, men's championship match, at
Key Biscayne
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I tournament,
national semifinal, LSU vs. Baylor at
Indianapolis
9 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I tournament,
national semifinal, Tennessee vs. Michigan
State at Indianapolis

Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
ESPN2 Regional coverage, Kansas
City at Detroit or, at 1:30 p.m., Milwaukee
at Pittsburgh
2 p.m.
ESPN Regional coverage, N.Y. Mets
at Cincinnati or, at 1:30 p.m, Milwaukee at
Pittsburgh
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Regional coverage, Chicago
Cubs at Arizona or Minnesota at Seattle
WGN Chicago Cubs at Arizona
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
CBS NCAA Division I tournament,
championship game, teams TBA, at St.
Louis


B&SKETBALL

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 39 33 .542 -
Philadelphia 35 37 .486 4
New Jersey 35 39 .473 5
Toronto 30 42 .417 9
New York 29 42 .408 9%'
Southeast Division
W L Pet GB
y-Miami 54 19 .740 -
Washington 41 30 .577 12
Orlando 35 38 .479 19
Charlotte 15 56 .211 38
Atlanta 11 61 .153 42'4
Central Division
W L Pet GB
x-Detroit 45 27 .625 -
Chicago 40 31 .563 4'A
Cleveland 37 34 .521 74'
Indiana 37 34 .521 7/,
Milwaukee 27 45 .375 18
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Antonio 53 19 .736 -
x-Dallas 49 23 .681 4
Houston 44 29 .603 91
Memphis 40 31 .563 12)'
New Orleans 17 54 .239 35.
Northwest Division
W. L Pct GB
x-Seattle 50 22 .694 -
Denver 40 31 .563 9'.
Minnesota 38 35 .521 12't
Portland 24 47 .338 25)1
Utah 22 50 .306 28
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
y-Phoenix 55 17 .764 -


Sacramento 45
LA. Lakers 33
L.A. Clippers 32
Golden State 27
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division


Saturday's Games
Orlando 103, New Jersey 102
Miami at New Orleans (n)
Charlotte at Chicago (n)
L.A. Lakers at San Antonio (n)
Denver at Portland (n)
Today's Games
Indiana at Washington, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Boston, 1 p.m.
New York at Milwaukee, 2 p.m.
Dallas at Cleveland, 3:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Sacramento, 3:30 p.m.
Detroit at Toronto, 6 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Atlanta, 6 p.m.
Seattle at Golden State, 6 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled


NCAA Final Four

National Semifinals
Saturday
Illinois 72, Louisville 57
North Carolina vs. Michigan State (n)
Championship
Monday
Illinois (37-1) vs. North Carolina-
Michigan State winner, 9 p.m.


RAtCRAT.T.

Spring training

Saturday's Games
N.Y. Mets 12, Florida 4
Cleveland 9, Atlanta 5
Cincinnati 7, Toronto 6
Pittsburgh 4, Minnesota 0
Milwaukee 4, Chicago White Sox 2
Texas 7, Arizona 4
Washington 5, Tampa Bay 4
Chicago Cubs 3, Seattle 2
Oakland 3, San Francisco 1
St. Louis 4, Springfield (AA) 3
Colorado Springs (AAA) 5, Colorado 1
San Diego 15, Lake Elsinore (A) 4
Detroit at Philadelphia, ccd., weather
Kansas City 3, Houston 0
LA. Angels at LA. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Kansas City at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
Florida at Greensboro (A), 2:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Springfield (AA), 2:10 p.m.
Texas at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
LA. Angels at LA. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.

Regular season

Today's Game
Boston (Wells 12-8) at N.Y. Yankees
(Johnson 16-14), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Kansas City at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati, 2:10 p.m.
Oakland at Baltimore, 3:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 3:05
p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 3:05 p.m.
San Diego at Colorado, 4:05 p.m.
Toronto at Tampa Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 5:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Arizona, 5:10 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Food City 500 lineup

At Bristol Motor Speedway
Bristol, Tenn.
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (38) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 127.733
mph.
2. (07) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 127.444.
3. (2) Rusty Wallace, Dodge, 127.048.
4. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 126.964.
5. (77) Travis Kvapil, Dodge, 126.955.
6. (43) Jeff Green, Dodge, 126.603.
7. (12) Ryan Newman, Dodge, 126.537.
8. (19) Jeremy Mayfield, Dodge,
126.537.
9. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 126.503.
10. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 126.503.
11. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
126.461.
12. (25) Brian Vickers, Chevrolet,
126.403.
13. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
126.312.
14. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
126.303.
15. (40) Sterling Marlin, Dodge,
126.245.
16. (44) Terry Labonte, Chevrolet,
126.179.
17. (42) Jamie McMurray, Dodge,
126.104.
18. (32) Bobby Hamilton Jr., Chevrolet,
126.013.
19. (8) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
125.947.
20. (21) Ricky Rudd, Ford, 125.947.
21. (88) Dale Jarrett, Ford, 125.897.
.22. (4) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet,
125.897.
23. (92) Stanton Barrett, Chevrolet,


125.782.
24. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 125.716.
25. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 125.642.
26. (97) Kurt Busch, Ford, 125.568.
27. (15) Michael Waltrip, Chevrolet,
125.436.
28. (10) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 125.354.
29. (50) Jimmy Spencer, Dodge,
125.313.
30. (49) Ken Schrader, Dodge, 125.281.
31. (41) Casey Mears, Dodge, 125.003.
32. (22) Scott Wimmer, Dodge, 124.954.
33. (08) Shane Hmiel, Chevrolet,
124.954.
34. (6) Mark Martin, Ford, 124.922.
35. (66) Hermie Sadler, Ford, 124.889.
36. (11) Jason Leffler, Chevrolet,
124.646.
37. (45) Kyle Petty, Dodge, 124.581.
38. (18) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
124.259.
39. (5) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, 124.210.
40. (01) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet,
owner points.
41. (0) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, owner
points.
42. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, owner
points.
43. (00) Carl Long, Chevrolet, 124.387.
Failed to Qualify
44. (09) Johnny Sauter, Dodge, 124.162.
45. (37) Kevin Lepage, Dodge, 123.945.
46. (7) Robby Gordon, Chevrolet,
123.190.
47. (27) Brad Teague, Ford, 121.813.
48. (34) Randy LaJoie, Chevrolet,
120.999.
49. (89) Jason Jarrett, Dodge.

Sharpie Professional 250

At Bristol Motor Speedway
Bristol, Tenn.
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (60) Carl Edwards, Ford, owner
points.
2. (21) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, owner
points.
3. (2) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, owner
points.
4. (8) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet,
owner points.
5. (33) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, owner
points.
6. (41) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, owner
points.
7. (64) Jeremy Mayfield, Dodge, owner
points.
8. (25) Ashton Lewis Jr., Ford, owner
points.
9. (22) Kenny Wallace, Ford, owner
points.
10. (20) Denny Hamlin, Chevrolet,
owner points.
11. (38) Tyler Walker, Dodge, owner
points.
12. (14) David Stremme, Dodge, owner
points.
13. (32) Shane Hmiel, Chevrolet, owner
points.
14. (66) Greg Biffle, Ford, owner points.
15. (5) Blake Feese, Chevrolet, owner
points.
16. (47) Jon Wood, Ford, owner points.
17. (1) Johnny Sauter, Dodge, owner
points.
18. (44) Justin Labonte, Chevrolet,
owner points.
19. (35) Jason Keller, Ford, owner
points.
20. (34) Randy LaJoie, Chevrolet, owner
points.
21. (27) David Green, Ford, owner
points.
22. (12) Tim Fedewa, Dodge, owner
points.
23. (28) Derrike Cope, Ford, owner
points.
24. (59) Stacy Compton, Ford, owner
points.
25. (10) Michel Jourdain Jr., Ford,
owner points.
26. (90) Dale Jarrett, Ford, owner
points.
27. (6) Mike Wallace, Dodge, owner
points.
28. (11) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, owner
points.
29. (4) Ryan Hemphill, Dodge, owner
points.
30. (36) Stanton Barrett, Chevrolet,
owner points.
31. (40) Sterling Marlin, Dodge, owner
points.
32. (87) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet,
owner points.
33. (18) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, owner
points.
34. (58) Brent Sherman, Dodge, owner
points.
35. (43) Jeff Green, Dodge, owner
points.
36. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford.
37. (99) Michael Waltrip, Chevrolet.
38. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet.
39. (49) Steve Grissom, Ford, past
champion.
40. (72) Geoffrey Bodine, Chevrolet.
41. (23) Shawna Robinson, Chevrolet.
42. (0) Kertus Davis, Chevrolet.
43. (7) Mark Green, Chevrolet.
Failed To Qualify
44. (52) Brad Teague, Ford.
45. (16) Justin Ashburn, Chevrolet.
46. (85) John Hayden, Chevrolet.
47. (56) Tim Sauter, Chevrolet.
48. (75) Jay Sauter, Chevrolet, qualify-
ing draw.
49. (04) Eric McClure, Ford, qualifying
draw.


* 0
.-UM w k 4 [b

















"..


- S


.3 -
.3 -a -


- -e - a
0 S a -
- a


- -
.3 S


* -


- .3.3


--q


- a


m -


-qw


- C -
a e 5 -


4m .0
ddb 4r


%. I


-a-.


- a -


a
a


- .3


-b -


a - -


- .3 -


- w


- -


* '.3


*


a,-
. a ~


lo w -


v w -


- -


"W SSWbIw A U @db


S

- a


a


-
0 a










.3 ~- *
Q,* B -
.3 *


.3 -e


- .3


L'4 -b~ 04 bA?


- S

- 0


"Copyrighted Material






Syndicated Content-


S






0 S


Available from Commercial News Providers"


- -a


w3 -


- a.3


a -4


- 'No .


...


4w 40 4


- *


qiP qm,


- *


D


- m.


- *








LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


* -


or#


!~mpa Ib -odeq GE96
qmb


V


a -m


a- -
mm~m.


"Copyrighted Material



4PSyndicafed Content


m m m m


Available from Commercial News Providers
"


S -

S -





o -


S
C S -


w -
- -w. -


- ~. ~.


a *


0 -


a-
a a a -
__ a -
S -~
~ a. -


CLASSIC
Continued from page 1B

choice to score Croft.
Janay Economu was 1-1
and Croft went 1-2.
Satellite scored single runs
in the second and third
innings and pushed two
across in the seventh.
Columbia rebounded to
defeat Riverview High 5-1 in
another game that was
delayed by rain and ultimate-
ly finished on Saturday.
Payne pitched seven
innings and allowed one
unearned run on one hit. She
struck out eight and walked
one.
The Lady Tigers scored
four runs in the fifth and a
single run in the sixth.


In the fifth, Stormant
walked and Daniels reached
on an error. Tiffany Mallard
reached on a bunt and Blair's
base hit scored Stormant and
Daniels.
Croft then singled down
the left field line to score
Mallard and Bart doubled to
score Croft.
In the sixth, Economu
reached on an error and
Mallard ran for her. After a
sacrifice moved Mallard to
second, she scored on a
passed ball.
Bart was 2-4 with a run
scored. Blair was 1-3 with an
RBI. Croft went 3-4. Parker
went 2-4 with an RBI, and
Drake was 1-4.
The Lady Tigers (13-3)
play at Paxon School on
Wednesday at 6 p.m.


PONTILAC N


LCCC
Continued from page 1B

lasted just '/3 of an inning and
gave up three runs on two hits,
including a two-run home run.
Ryan walked one and hit a
batter.
Leonardo Calderon entered


and fared no better, allowing
one hit and walking two,
including the winning run in
the eighth inning.
Brian Schlitter returned
after a two-week absence and
got the Wolves out of the jam,
retiring the only batter he
faced to end the inning.
Chris Petrie was 2-4 with an


RBI and a stolen base. Bran-
don Hall was also 2-4 with two
RBIs and the 'Wolves' only
extra base hit, a double off of
the center field wall.
Mark Davis was 1-4 with two
RBIs and Avery Johnson
picked up another RBI when
he was hit by a pitch with the
bases loaded. Luis Sanchez


had Lake City's other hit.
"We've got Central Florida
(Community College) Monday
at home," Clark said. "They're
one game ahead of us. Every
game is crucial now."
Duente Heath will get the 3
p.m. start for the Wolves, who
are now 24-17 (7-7 in Mid-
Florida Conference).


~ffWc'anw&


Dennis Register
Service Manager


David Himle
Service Advisor


Martin "Marty" Munoz
Service Advisor


- 4b


C')
L..
- -
: o*

* -
S ~ *-~ E~II
Eb~

U-


L _


Lm.



0)







'U 0)

0- 1*.
%M 0l~


5


lowa


*- S


- a


So849s ::$19996
'2 for P50 4 for



P P55/80R1 3P175/70R13
Installed Installed
Call for other sizes & prices. Call for other sizes & prices.
White Stripe. No carry outs. No carry outs.
- -


4 for
I 96


19P175/70R14 I
I I
1I in s ta lle d I

I Call for other sizes & prices. I


r------ ---- -------------
1 Includes Rotate & Balance every 6,000
I miles plus 36 month road hazard policy
I with purchase of 2 or more tires.


1
I
I


Staring at99


AN AMER M m!4N6
R-=VOLIIION /,A


4 for




I Installed

! Call for other sizes & prices.


most vehicles 4d
most vehicles 41@


Istall brake, pads
& shoes
Resurface rotors &
drums
Adjust drum brakes
wheel disc brakes I
sightly higher.


I.-------------------------------

386-752-6933, ext. 7
90 West of 1-75, Lake City, FL
Open Monday-Friday 7:30am
Saturday 8:00am to 5pm


I I







N ct or le-s w nthetic blend.
SNlM() Cjr. & Ligoli Trucks
S Epires 4--30-05 Must present coupon
---- - ---mill--- i
-- MU m----------U



;M9


I ".'lot C.iar & Light Trucks I
Expires 4-30-05 Must present coupon
Lm--- ----------------..m









Refrigerant & other part addi:nal i
Most Cars & Light Trucks
Expires Expires 4-30-05 Must resent cou on


Hopkins 1-800-881-6862
752-5050
SHWY 90 WEST LAKE CITY
Visit us on www.hmcautos.com


* -


- - - - - - -


41b


o


eat -


4=0 .


I


emmmmmmmmm .


m mmmmm


i: &M


Ij







IA" v
a& ---A
dwb


Jartw rNI li
am A A. A a1


LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005

flue stemw tha t imn't go
h. A ^


l po U Wn U am-'r


aaMe RA'd SOflAvnk-Ys


"- ,* -


w, aens 0 w


"Copyrighted Mat i l


Syndicated Content


Availablef,1romWmmercial News Providers"
.....................S.


"I want to be there when
my customers are ready to buy."


Do we think alike or what?


9C L LAK C TY 1ANC8


*The ALLTEL Yellow Pages
It makes sense in so many ways.






.. i I,, |HL.
You got that right. LL EL i NiM
You got that right.


Do you want to reach your customers at a pivotal point in the buying process...
just as they are ready to make a purchase? If the answer is yes, secure an
advertisement in the 2005 ALLTEL Live Oak Directory. With many advertising
options to chose from, you can be sure your ad will be eye-catching and help
make your business top-of-mind for consumers. Advertising sales are currently
underway. Call your local ALLTEL Publishing representative and place your ad in
the 2005 ALLTEL Live Oak Directory today!


-204 TAVE

-RIERjIK E


50% nne. CIn Lnn


' _.__1_ Lr d E f li y
as low as
SI ,99900*
-- .,Payments
... as low as
$123/month
Complete R. V Collision Repair Free Estimates
(386) 758-8661 131 S.W. Webb Glenn "Exit 441/1-75
(386) 758-86Lake City


*k


"














Page IC
Sunday, April 3, 2005
Lake City, Florida
www.flakecityreporterucom




Humningbirds fly south to Columbia County


By SUSAN SLOAN
Special to the Reporter

beauty that draws
people to the area
is also responsible
for the yearly
return of the hummingbird to
Columbia County.
The hummingbird requires
a large quantity of food, name-
ly nectar and insects, to main-
tain its almost constant state of
activity. While the humming-
bird feeders that are provided
by human enthusiasts help
supply this food, it is the natu-
ral food sources that make this
area home to the ruby-throated
hummingbird.
The University of Florida
Extension Service suggests
that to successfully encourage
hummingbirds, there are
many native plants that you can
grow. It is not a coincidence
that the hummingbirds are
showing up throughout the
county just as the wild azaleas
and coral honeysuckles are in
bloom.
Other plants that you can
include in your garden to
encourage the hummingbirds
are mimosa, butterfly bush,
firebush, lantana, and four
o'clock.
There are many other native
species of plants and any good
bird-watching book or Internet
site can provide more informa-
tion on creating a suitable habi-
tat for the hummingbird. As for
insects, anyone who lives here
knows we have those in abun-
dance during the warm weath-
er months.
Perhaps our fascination with
hummingbirds exists because
it is a truly "American" bird. It
is only found in the Americas.
Sixteen of the more than 300
species of hummingbirds
reside in the United States, and
three of them are in Florida. It
is commonly thought that only
the ruby-throated humming-
bird can be found in our area,
but in fact the black-chinned
and rufous hummingbirds are
occasionally seen. The ruby-
throated hummingbird is tiny,
only 3 inches long. As with
many bird species, it is the
male that has the brilliant "red"
throat. This red throat is actu-
ally the result of air bubbles in
the throat feathers that give off
the iridescent red tone in
bright light.
A migrating species, the
ruby-throated hummingbird
travels from as far away as
Saskatchewan, Canada to as
far south as South America.
Many of the birds stop off in
Columbia County in about mid-
March and make our area their
home until the colder weather
of fall.
Hummingbird lovers like
Ben and Betty Culverhouse
believe that the same hum-
mingbirds return each year to
their home. And they may be
right. Limited research on the
migrating habits of the ruby-
throated hummingbird has
indicated that individual birds
may follow a set route year
after year, often arriving at the
same feeder on the same day.
Because hummingbirds
feed on insects in addition to
the fuel that nectar provides,
they usually fly to Central or
South America in the winter to
avoid starvation.
Occasionally a ruby-throat-
ed hummingbird might be
found along the Gulf coast in
winter perhaps because they
are older, sick or too young to
make the long migration flight
across the Gulf of Mexico.
Hummingbirds do not migrate
in flocks.
A solitary male may begin
its trip north as early as
January, stopping in the north-
ern coast of the Yucatan to
feast on insects and spiders to
build up a thick layer of fat for
its trip across the Gulf. The
males leave first and are fol-
lowed in about 10 days by the
females.
Each individual humming-
bird has its own internal map
and schedule, and "your" birds


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter


A hummingbird drinks a sweet solution from a feeder on the property of Ben and Betty Culverhouse in Columbia County.


~r
,A '~c


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
LEFT: A female ruby-throated hummingbird is tiny, only 3 inches long. As with many bird species, it is the male that has the brilliant 'red' throat. RIGHT:
Insects could be a problem when hanging a hummingbird feeder. Most feeders come with a bee guard, and to rid a feeder of ants, just coat the hang wire
with cooking oil.


may arrive anywhere within
the two-month span from
March to April. The need to
migrate is instinctive. A hum-
mingbird knows to put on
weight and to fly south. Once it
learns its route, it may follow it
every year. The reduction in
daylight hours as autumn
approaches signals it is time to
go. Some people believe it is
necessary to take down their
feeders to force hummingbirds


to leave, but this is not true.
When they are fat enough,
they know to go. If you remove
your feeder, birds will just feed
elsewhere, and may not return
next year. And like the trip
north, the males leave first to
be followed by the females in a
month or so.
The Culversons have been
hanging hummingbird feeders
for many years. They are
amazed at the fearlessness of


the birds, which flit in and
around their feeders despite
their presence only a few feet
away on their patio. Betty has
even been spied upon by one
bold bird that flew up to her
window to see what she was up
to.
The birds' amazing ability to
hover helicopter-like is possi-
ble because of the distinctive
design of its wings, and not
only can they suspend their


SUSAN SLOAN/Special to the Reporter
Ben and Betty Culverhouse have documented sightings of more than 40 different bird
species, including the ruby-throated hummingbird.


bodies in mid-air to look in win-
dows, they also can fly back-
ward, upward, even upside
down. Betty says the rapid
movement of their wings
(about 150-180 beats per sec-
-ond) make a high-pitched
humming sound not unlike the
buzz of a bee. The Culversons
find watching the birds very
therapeutic and say that early
evening before dark is the best
time as the hummingbirds
stock up on nectar to sustain
them overnight.
All of the hummingbirds'
high-speed activity requires a
large consumption of high-
energy food. Their long,
needlelike bills allow them to
reach nectar in deep tubular
flowers.
A hummingbird may feed
every few minutes from dawn
until dusk. The use of artificial
feeders satisfies this need with
easy access to food. Filled with
a one-part sugar, four-part
sugar solution, or a commer-
cially sold mixture, the feeders
can be placed almost any-
where.
The Culversons have found
that placing the feeders with
easy access to tree cover cre-
ates a sense of security for the
birds, allowing them to view
them from closer range.
There are numerous
designs of feeders from single
"ports" to multiple port mod-
els. The Culversons suggest
that the most important feature
is the ease of cleaning.
They chose to use two small


single-port feeders mainly
because there is less waste as
the syrup can become rancid
over time. Hummingbirds will
come to any feeder that holds
fresh syrup but will not eat ran-
cid syrup.
During warmer months,
Betty cleans her feeders every
other day. She also advises not
to use honey, which can be
lethal to hummingbirds.
Because the birds have no
sense of smell, it is the bright
color of the feeders that attract
the birds. For those simple
feeders like the Culversons,
you can add red food coloring
to the sugar syrup, and the
commercial mixes are red
when mixed as directed.
Because insects can be a
problem, most feeders come
with bee guards, and to keep
the ants away, coat the hanging
wire with cooking oil. To avoid
rapid bacterial growth, place
the feeders out of direct sun-
light.
Once you have established
where you want to place your
feeder, sit back and enjoy the
show. The Culversons say that
their birds almost immediately
find the feeders, and they are
entertained as they watch the
pecking order be established
among their resident birds.
The dominant bird will not
tolerate another bird feeding
from the same feeder at the
same time and will run the oth-
ers off. So put up more than
one feeder or the others will
just have to wait their turn.


LAKE CITY REPORTER









2C LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005

LIFESTYLE ____________


ENGAGEMENT
Bradley-Parker


Gardening can be fun for the whole family
power garden tools, such as a vest and how a few seeds (or doesn't wear out. Please call the Extension
tiller or chipper, small chil- a few of our actions and deci- Encourage your child to Service at 752-5384 if you are
dren should be kept at a dis- sions) can lead to a larger har- have a row in the family gar- interested in this gardening
tance while the adult uses vest later on. Children can be den or to plant one or more project and to reserve your
these implements. Consider taught to appreciate where container gardens. The time seat at the orientation meet-
SDON using a sun screen and gar- their food comes from and the together will be well worth it. ing.


GOODE


Andrea Bradley and Erich
Parker
Mitt and Juanita Bradley
of Fort White announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daugh-
ter, Andrea Lynn Bradley, to
Erich Alexander Parker, son
of Richard Parker of
Gainesville and the late Olga
Jonsson.
The wedding and recep-
tion are planned for April 30
at Sweetwater Branch Inn,
Gainesville.
Andrea graduated from
Santa Fe High School, the
University of Florida, and is
currently attending Valdosta
State University completing
her Master's degree in
Speech- Language Pathology.
Erich graduated from RK.
Yonge High School, the
University of Florida, and the
American Intercontinental
University with a Master's
degree in Business
Administration. He is cur-
rentlyworking at Nationwide
Insurance Company as a
Commercial Property Claims
Adjuster in Nashville,
Tennessee.

ANNIVERSARY
Crews


v4W


&. ,
M.ar aU- ei
Mary and Lenvil Crews


Mary Sheridan Cornell of
Sarasota and formerly of Lake
City and Lenvil Crews of
Sarasota and formerly of Lake
City were united in marriage
March 13, 1955 in Lake City.
They celebrated their 50th
anniversary on Saturday,
March 12, with family and
friends with a party in their
honor given by their children.
The couple have four chil-
dren, Michael Crews and
Sherri Tsonas, both of
Sarasota, Jeanne Crews of
Bradenton and Dean Crews of
Miami.
They have five grandchil-
dren.
Mary is a homemaker.
Lenvil is a General Building
Contractor.
The couple has lived in
Sarasota for 43 years.

BIRTHS
Kariton
Chip and Denise Karlton of
Palm Bay announce the birth
of their daughter Riley Rose
Karlton March 3 in Wuesthoff
Hospital in Melbourne.
She weighed six pounds,
seven ounces and measured
18 and a half inches.
Grandparents are: Richard
and Anne Tucker of Lake City
and Nancy Karlton and the
late George Karlton of Lake
city.
Great-grandparents are:
Roslyn Smith of Live Oak and
Martha Riggin of Lake City.

Shinn
Jody and Brad Shinn of
Melborne announce the birth
of their son Noah Bradly
Shinn March 11 in Lakeland
Regional Medical Center,
Lakeland.
He weighed six pounds,
eight ounces and measured
20 inches. He joins Morgan-
age 10 years, Madison- age 8
years, Nathan age 6 years
and Noel age 5 years.
Grandparents are: Bob and
Melissa Thon and John and
Tina Celentano.


Involving children in your
garden activities can be
rewarding for you and for
them. Older adults often
appreciate the ability of chil-
dren to bend and work at
ground level. Older children
have strength and stamina
that the elderly may be losing.
On the other hand, adults can
tap into their experiences to
teach children lessons of life
as illustrated in the natural
setting of the garden.
Some precautions need to
be taken when gardening
with children. If pesticides
must be used to control a pest
or disease, use the least toxic
option and observe any pre-
cautions mentioned on the
product label. Children are
curious and may investigate a
sharp tool or prickly weed so
it is a good idea to keep a first
aid kit handy. When using


Navy Chief Petty Officer
Aaron D. Crews
Navy Chief Petty Officer
Aaron D. Crews, son of Beth
M. Worley of Lake City and
David R. Crews of Bowling
Green, recently made a
scheduled port visit to Pusan,
Republic of Korea while
assigned to the aircraft carri-
er USS Kitty Hawk, forward
deployed to Yokosuka, Japan.
Crew s and approximately 3,
200111 of his fellow shipmates
had a chance to sightsee,
shop and enjoy recreational
activities, as well as partici-
pate in other cultural
exchanges with the citizens of
Puson.
LISS -Kitty- Hawk -is
America's oldest active ship
and the first of the "super car-
riers, commissioned April
29, 1961. Ships like USS Kitty
Hawk .deploy worldwide in
support of United States com-
mitments and respond to
global crises and peacetime
presence.
Crews is a 1992 graduate of
Columbia High School of


V





I


JC Penney
752-2822


Etheridge
Furniture
752-2752


Ward's Jewelers
752-5470


den hat on your children to
protect their skin from our
hot Florida sun.
With children, we need to
be mindful of health issues
that we might ignore as
adults. Small children like to
put objects and fingers in
their mouth. Be sure not to
leave garden chemicals and
fertilizers in open containers
and accessible to your chil-
dren. Fresh animal manures
are excellent additions to our
sandy soils but they should be
run through a hot compost
pile before use to reduce risks
to children from bacteria and
parasites. Finished compost is
an excellent mulch or fertiliz-
er and teaches children about
recycling and the cycle of life.
Children can learn other
lessons from the garden. If
given the duty of tending a
plant or a row in the garden,
they can learn the value of
responsibility and the conse-
quences of neglect. They can
be taught the law of the har-


Lake City and joined the Navy
in April 1993.

Navy Petty Officer 3rd
Class James A. Davis
Navy Petty Officer 3rd
Class James A. Davis, son of
Sandra Kay Snow of Mc Alpin
and James R. Davis of Lake
City and more that 300 of his
fellow sailors recently took
part in commissioning the
Navy's newest guided-missile
destroyer, USS Nitze (DDG-
94), during a ceremony held
at the ship's homeport of
Naval Station Norfolk, Va.
Nitze is the U.S. Navy's
44th Arleigh Burke-class
destroyer and is equipped
with the AEGIS weapons sys-
tem, an MK 41 Vertical
Launch System that fires a
combination of up to 96 sur-
face-to-air and Tomahawk
missiles as well as vertically
launched ASROC torpedoes.
In addition, Davis' ship can be
outfitted with a remote con-
trolled minehunting vehicle
which can detect, locate and
identify mines in deep and


agricultural heritage of our
country. Proper diet and
nutritional habits can be
taught at an early age using
fresh produce from the family
garden. There are also
aspects of art, history and
math that can be gathered
from the garden to make
school work practical and
enjoyable.
Children may enjoy grow-
ing plants that are shorter or
smaller in scale. A quick look
at the seed packets in local
garden centers reveals that
there are sunflower varieties
of various heights and colors
that might interest your chil-
dren. There are also shorter
vine "bush" type varieties of
cucumbers and watermelons
that fit better into a child's
garden than the longer vining
varieties. Consider growing
some plants that are ready to
harvest quickly such as
radishes, lettuce, and cherry
or grape tomatoes so the
child's patience until harvest


shallow water.
Nitze is named after former
Secretary of the Navy and
presidential advisor Paul H.
Nitze.
Davis is a 2002 graduate of
Columbia High School of
Lake City and joined the Navy
in June 2002.

Marine Corps Cpl.
Richard T. Eadie
Marine .Corps Cpl. Richard
T. Eadie, son of Peggy A.
Eadie of Jasper and Anthony
E. Eadie of White Springs,
recently reported for duty
with Anti-Terrorism
Battalion, 4th Marine
Expeditionary Brigade,
Camp Lejeune, N. C.
Eadie is a 2002 graduate of
Hamilton County High
School of Jasper and joined

the Marine Corps in June
2002.

Navy Seaman Apprentice
Kristopher L Hughens
Navy Seaman Apprentice
Kristopher L. Hughens, son


Sandy Kishton
Realtor Associate
961-9795


Sterling Entertainment
Rusty Bailey
752-0290 965-4940


Quality Inn
Conference Center

752-3901


Program Announcement:
Any child or teenager that
would like to participate in a
gardening project this year is
invited to an orientation
workshop on April 14 from 4-
6 p.m.
At the meeting we will dis-
cuss basic gardening tech-
niques and give an overview
of the project guide book.
This project is designed for 4-
H clubbers but could also be
tailored to a Scouting project
(membership in these organ-
izations is not required to
participate.) Master
Gardener volunteers will
help coach the gardeners.
Gardeners will gather month-
ly during the project period
to share success stories, get
solutions to problems and
enjoy activities from the
Junior Master Gardener cur-
riculum. At the end of the
project, the gardens will be
scored and ribbons and
prizes will be awarded.


of Jacki L. Hughens of
Pensacola and Fredrick D.
Hughens of Live Oak, recent-
ly completed U.S. Navy basic
training at Recruit Training
Command, Great Lakes, Ill.
During the eight-week
program, Hughens complet-
ed a variety of training which
included classroom study


Annual Plant Sale
Coming Up: The Master
Gardeners will be having
their annual plant sale the
morning of Saturday, April
23 this year.
The sale will be held at the
Extension Service office on
the Lake City fairgrounds. A
wide variety of plants are
being grown by the Master
Gardeners for the sale.
Proceeds go toward educa-
tional programs, community
service projects and youth
gardening activities. Please
come out and support them.

Dr Don Goode is the
Director and Horticulture
Agent of the Columbia County
Extension Service (a branch of
the University of Florida. He
can be reached at the office (on
the Fairgrounds), on the phone
(752-5384), by e-mail
(dzgoode@ifas.ufl.edu) or
through the Internet
http://columbia.ifas.ufl.edu.


and practical instruction on
naval customs, first aid, fire-
fighting, water safety and
survival, and shipboard and
aircraft safety. An emphasis
was also placed on physical
fitness.
Hughens is a 1998 gradu-
ate of Pensacola Christian
Academy of Pensacola.


. . d.



... ....


Stop By The


for your


W9YA qlleC( c7 w4/


IN THE SERVICE


These fine merchants wish to help make your
wedding special. Pick up your package today...


e""P"kv








LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005




.u bs d o 4m


* @0000
O ,0 -


MOMa


0 *
404OP


* 0


- e

0


. w


*AD


b -


00000
- -


000
Am. *0
SQ -


U


- 0


- ~ p


a a 46


".Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


p
- 000
~ m


* ~



* S..
pp .



p


000


Avivalable from Commercial News.Providers"


-


* -






0


00-

* S


**
*


4w


go -=S __ease*


F *. *
0 0 0 0

6@*





h. * *




~ 0e 0
So 0


Ib~q4~fdkn I gmuwbo UA4A


- ft


* S
0.


. 4D


go 40 mm


-b - p


- 1


a -


4049


mmw


4WAO


o


Q


*


o


Q





4C LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


T.TVV.aQuFYTZ


Celebrate Floridas rtae 1th CC
Ce~m;eFlor& 10'S brtta hi wCC


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"
VH I n15r kw faro m riltaum Mb to mWmr


a 44 -4


('win4'i


a.


POO LOUNGESU $eIh~


i


- ft















Section D
Sunday, April 3, 2005
Lake City, Florida
ww iv lakecityreporteri :on


Bank's renovation features unique technology, security


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter. corn

In Columbia County, there
are plenty of places to bank.
But some local financial
institutions like the Florida
Credit Union have taken great
steps to differentiate them-
selves from the competition.
With the grand re-opening
of its Lake City branch off U.S.
90 West (Duval Street) it is
now one of the more secure
and technologically-advanced
banks in the community.
The Gainesville-based credit
union began renovations on its
local branch in April of last
year and completed the project
in early March for its grand re-
opening last week.
The year-long project was
preceded by the acquisition of
adjacent property west of the
former bank to build additional
parking and add a detached
drive-thru (cameras and video
screens are used for cus-
tomer/teller interaction), as
well as a full renovation and
expansion of the bank building
itself. Amanda Giddens, mem-
ber service specialist, said the
need for more parking, more
space and increased amount of
teller stations was mainly
because of the credit union's
membership growth in the
area.
Regardless of why, the
result is now a modern build-
ing with eye-catching architec-
ture and far easier access to
the business with a larger park-
ing lot and multiple exits and
entrances from U.S. 90 West
and side streets.
But it's inside the bank
lobby that the branch is differ-
ent from others in Lake City.
Instead of walking in and
seeing a teller desk, the cus-
tomer is instead greeted by
several stations trimmed in
natural wood and feature TV
monitors, phones, cameras


JUS1ill LANl/LaKe uily Keporter
ABOVE: Jason Davison of Lake Butler fills out a transaction slip before using one of many remote stations that now greet
customers as they walk into the lobby of the Florida Credit Union in Lake City. BELOW LEFT: Tellers inside a secure back
room at the renovated branch of the Florida Credit Union take customers' transactions from a total of 14 vacuum tubes.
BELOW RIGHT: A full renovation and addition to the Florida Credit Union's local branch on U.S. 90 West (Duval Street) was
recently completed.


and vacuum tubes with canis-
ters sitting ready for transac-
tions.
As a customer walks up to
the station, he or she puts the
transaction slip and check or
money into the canister and
send it to the teller, who is hid-
den away in a separate, secure
room. The teller then pops up
on the screen in front of the
customer and greets them. If
the person wants more privacy


when discussing their transac-
tion with the teller, there's also
a telephone handle to pick up.
"It's like a walk-up drive-
thru," Giddens said. "You don't
have that face-to-face contact,
but it's been done for security
reasons."
With several bank robberies
in Lake City in theppast few
years; Giddens said the system
at the Florida Credit Union is
"a big deterrent"


A potential bank robber
would no longer be able to
walk up to the teller and per-
sonally hand any note to
demand money and/or threat-
en violence. A series of doors
with locks requiring security
codes separate any potential
robber from the tellers. While
there are member service per-
sonnel in the bank lobby for
loans, account management
and other transactions, they


also do not have direct access
to money.
Capt. Gary Laxton, Lake
City Police Department public
information officer, said he
"absolutely" believes the
bank's new system will deter
robberies.
"You don't have that human
contact and there is the
unknown element when they
go in," Laxton said. "I love it."
In a back room of the bank,


four tellers sit around a series
of 14 vacuum tubes that are
color and number coordinated
to the customer station where
they came from.
There the tellers can take
transactions from customers at
the detached drive-thru about
100 yards away or those in the
bank lobby, as all go to the
same place.
As each teller can be respon-
sible for up to seven different
transactions, a small control
pad attached to a microphone
allows the teller to press any
number to bring up the camera
on the station used by any
given customer. The teller can
see not only the customer from
their hidden-away station, but
also have a wide-angle view of
what is behind them.
For people who have to have
in-person contact with the
teller or are turning in coins to
be cashed or deposited, there
is a teller station inside the
lobby, but it features thick, bul-
let proof glass and a small
access door.
Giddens said the new sys-
tem used in the bank makes
the employees feel much safer.
"It's been nothing but posi-
tive for us," she said. "We love
it."
Giddens said the system has
also decreased the amount of
time it takes for customer
transactions.
"I think it's something that's
going to be more popular in
the future and we just got a
jump-start on it," she said.
Customers like Jason
Davison of Lake Butler enjoy
the new system.
"Get in and get out; that's
the main thing."
He also said it is probably
unlikely a bank robber would
go into the bank to use the sys-
tem to steal money.
"I think it would be kind of
hard to hold up a bank with a
telephone."


ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS 1.64-acre lot on beautiful LUXURIOUS 4BR/3BA home on 5+ acres just off CR-
Lake Jeffery's waterfront! Build your dream home and 250 w/screened pool, jacuzzi, spa, plus new 4+ car
enjoy the breath-taking view! Call 755-5110 for details garage! All the exquisite amenities imaginable! Call
#43675 755-5110 for details! #41200


BEHIND THE GATES at Marion Place, living is easy in
this 2BR/2BA decorator fresh home that offers
community pool & clubhouse! The answer to care-free
living! Call 755-5110 for details #40383


PRIME 18.87 ACRES w/over 1,400' frontage on US-90
just west of Lake City! 18-19 year old pines; currently
zoned agriculture! This property won't last long!
DANIEL CRAPPS 755-5110 #42938

,,






PARADISE! Fish in 1-acre stocked pond & enjoy
serene 10-acres! Beautiful 2-story w/2000+ SqFt &
large balcony overlooking property! Privacy &
seclusion at $255,000 CHRISTY SKETTINI H/963-1568
#44165


IDEAL LOCATION! 2 acres with 189 foot frontage on
US-90 between Wellborn & Lake City $59,500 Call 755-
5110 for details #44738


ON THE SUWANNEE! Cute 2BR/2BA home w/gorgeous
deck overlooking river! If you want privacy this retreat
is for you! $164,900 Call 755-5110 for details #42127









COMMERCIAL CENTER on CR-341! 16 units range
from 480 SqFt to 2400 SqFt w/paved parking,
retention areas; fencing on 1.28 acres $725,000
DANIEL CRAPPS 755-5110 #42266


BISHOP REALTY, INC.
U.S. 90 West Across from Wal-Mart 752-4211
ColdwellBanker.com
Independently Owned and Operated LENDER


ih~jj~


New Brick Home in Creekside. Terrific
area, prime lot. 3/2 split plan w/front & back
porches. Versatile color scheme. $154,900.
MLS#43979. Ask for Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488.


The Welcome Mat is out! Beautiful home
in Woodborough on 3/4 acre lot. Great floor
plan with 2752 sq. ft., 3BR/2BA, and a 3 car
garage. Inground pool, covered, $295,000.
MLS#44130. Contact Nell or Hansel Holton,
Listing Agents 386-984-5046.


May-Fair Subdivision. Excellent location, Location, Location, Location! New home
great floor plan. 3/2, large rooms, nice in Creekside. Excellent floor plan. 1680 sq.
master suite, oversized garage. Well ft., 3/2, Ig. master suite, den, 2 car garage.
maintained home, won't last long. Only $169,900. MLS#44354. Ask for Lori
$179,900. MLS#44604. Ask for Lori Giebeig Giebeig Simpson 752-2874 or Elaine K.
Simpson 752-2874. Tolar 755-6488.
-. r m -


Outstanding Brick House in Lake Butler
at reasonable price to sell. $50,900.
MLS#44765. Call today for info Hansel
Holton 386-984-5791.






DWMH- Ned

1999 DW MH Needs some minor repairs
& TLC. 3/2, 1440 sq. ft., 1 acre lot. Small
pond in back corner. $47,900. MLS#44335.
Call Nell or Hansel Holton, 386-984-5046.


Zbned RIO Turn of the Century, 1893
sq. ft. built in 1900. Current use as rental,
3BR/2BA, with 1BR/1BA being added. Has
had new wiring. Frame with vinyl siding.
Near everything downtown. $105,000.
MLS#44063. Contact Nell or Hansel Holton
for more info, 386-984-5046.


Convenient to Lake City & G
this 1248 sq. ft. DW MH on .80 ac
double carport & 20x30 barn wit
floor and electricity. Immaculately
$69,900. MLS#43484. Ask for M
Whitehurst 965-0887.


On the Fairway!!! This unique & spacious
house sits on 1/2 acre off the 1" fairway at
Lake City Country Club. This 3BR/2.5BA,
2364 sq. ft. house with office, wood burning
fireplace, family rm, wet bar, spa, and a 2
car garage! Recently reduced $20,000!
Seller very motivated. $219,900.
MLS#43242. Call Kimberly Wynne
386-965-5630.


Block Home, 2/1.5, on 5 acres. Office,
family room, dining room, upgraded
kitchen. Includes 2 older MH's. Paved road,
Suwannee County, O'Brien area. $120,000.
MLS#44740. Contact Nell or Hansel Holton
386-984-5046.
r e-L Xf,=b.l,- ,


Affordable Housing This 3/2 MH is near
town, near most conveniences on the
Westside. Very nice interior, front porch,
trees. Just $39,900. MLS#44467. Call Nell
or Hansel Holton for info 984-5046.


ainesville, Country Side Jennings, FL. 1620 sq. ft.,
re includes 3/2 DW MH on 1 acre lot. Needs appliances,
h concrete little TLC but otherwise in good condition.
y cared for. $49,900. MLS#43569. Contact Nell or
lary Brown Hansel Holton 984-5046.


Great Commercial lot in center of town! Would make a great spot for a small shop or a drive through. $59,900. MLS#44745.
Call Mary Brown Whitehurst 386-965-0887.
Now Selling lots in Carter Chase S/D. 1/2 acre lots! In town location. Lots of trees. Won't last long. Bring your own builder.
Reserve your homesite now. Only $49,900 each. MLS#41543. Call Lori 752-2874 or Elaine 755-6488 for more details.
Like New! 2003 D/W mobile home on half acre lot. Convenient location, paved road. $66,500.MLS#42871. For more info, ask for
Don or Sherry Ratliff 386-365-8414.
In 3 Rivers Estates Very nice DW MH, 3Br/2B, FP, 1736 sq. ft., front porch, apx. 1 acre lot. $59,500. MLS#41828. Contact Listing
Agents, Nell or Hansel Holton.


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Business & Rome





2D LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


0 ql 4m


he otle \ I ool


I ,


Ava


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
able from Commercial News Providers"


,# e s I N


RInut frm
mrdfw quirk


~4wo


a m 40










LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005 31




The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights

A NYSE Amex 3 Nasdaq

7,136.36 +7.56 1,462.91 +14.12 '1,984.81 -6.25


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Cenveo 5.50 +1.25 +29.4
WIdFuels 32.82 +6.43 +24.4
VenrDGC If 30.37 +5.10 +20.2
Saks 18.60 +3.00 +19.2
ImpacMtg 19.13 +2.71 +16.5
ParTch 16.39 +1.99 +13.8
Wellcare n 31.63 +3.83 +13.8
Weider 6.28 +.72 +129
GoodrPet 21.90 +2.37 +12.1
CAEIncg 4.95 +.52 +11.7

Losers (S2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Elan 3.38 -4.03 -54.4
Waters 35.84 -11.16 -23.7
RussBers 16.15 -4.70 -22.5
NtwkEq 5.65 -1.45 -20.4
Salton 2.16 -.49 -18.5
Solectrn 3.50 -.76 -17.8
AdMkSvlf 6.10 -1.28 -17.3
Texlnd 53.40-11.04 -17.1
NCR Cps 33.42 -5.83 -14.9
KrspKrm 7.48 -1.28 -14.6

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Elan 2259366 3.38 -4.03
AmlntGp 1789858 50.95-4.66
Lucent 1525373 2.71 -.05
HewlettP 1343661 21.71 +1.90
Pfizer 1105230 26.15 -.02
ExxonMbl 1052476 60.55 +1.55
GenElec 897893 35.47 -.26
WalMart 824288 48.99-1.67
Solectrn 785641 3.50 -.76
TimeWarn 773762 17.45 -.26

Diary
Advanced 1,983
Declined 1,536
New Highs 111
New Lows 190
Total issues 3,574
Unchanged 55
Volume 10,751,326,136


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
CVD Eqp 4.60 +3.54 +334.0
FarmTel 2.50 +.80 +47.1
Arhyth 17.98 +4.04 +29.0
IvaxDiag 4.16 +,87 +26.4
Cenuco n 3.12 +.62 +24.9
AccesslT 7.00 +1.30 +22.8
AdvPhot 2.59 +.48 +22.7
Milestone 3.98 +.72 +22.1
TetonPet 3.65 +.63 +20.9
CreatvCpt 2.35 +.39 +19.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Tag-It 4.10 -1.25 -23.4
ImpintSc 5.60 -1.60 -22.2
MSBIIB08 n 3.56 -.94 -20.9
CGIHIdgn 3.95 -.94 -19.2
Cognitrn 3.92 -.88 -18.3
MexcoEn 7.85 -1.64 -17.3
IntegBioPh 5.31 -1.05 -16.5
CortexPh 2.07 -.35 -14.5
Rewards 4.15 -.70 -14.4
RoweCos 3.85 -.64 -14.3

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SPDR 3383312117.38 +.24
SemiHTr 1311518 32.08 -.57
^P F,,, 662543 43.93 +1.90
,ir,.J,f:p 548226 10.46 -.25
iShRs2000 492159121.64 -.46
SP Fncl 362368 28.00 -.10
DJIA Diam 332588104.05 -.35
OilSvHT 283792 98.70 +5.31
BemaGold 190502 2.63 +.04
RetailHT 177733 94.13 -1.51

Diary
Advanced 506
Declined 552
New Highs 35
New Lows 93
Total issues 1,112
Unchanged 54
Volume 1,356,110,750


Wkiy YTD Wkly
Name Div Yia PE Cna Cnaq Last


,CE Ltd .x 4 I
WESCp .
\FLAC .2 i "
\K Steel
WMR
6T&T .'. i
\U Optron .:,. 4
\btLab 1.2 1' :
\ccenture .
IMD
metna s ',-
ftCmpS .
\gere
,gereB
6gilent
rTran ... ..
mlbertsn .0 .2 .
,lcatel
\lcoa .'.
MlegTch .04 1.0
1dWaste ...
llstate 1.28 2.4
,lltel 1.52 2.8
\ltria 2.92 4.5
6mHess 1.20 1.2
\MovilL .21 .4
\EP 1.40 4.1
\mExp .48 .9
\umlntGp .50 1.0
kmTower ...
kmerisBrg .10 .2
kmSouth 1.00 3.9
knadrk .72 '.9
\nalogDev .24 .7
\nheusr .98 2.1
nnTaylr s ...
kon Corp .60 2.7
\pache .32 .5
\rchCoal .32 .7
VrchDan .34 1.4
outoNatn
utoData .62 1.4
kvaya
\von s .66 1.6
3B&T Cp 1.40 3.6
3HPBilILt .46 1.6
3J Svcs .32 .6
3akrHu .46 1.0
IkofAm s 1.80 4.1
3kNY .80 2.8
3arrickG .22 .9
3axter .58 1.7
3earingPt ...
3eazrHm s .40 .8
3ellSouth 1.08 4.2
3estBuy .44 .9
3iockbstr .08 .9
3oeing 1.00 1.7
3ostonSci ...
lrMySq 1.12 4.5
3urlNSF .68 1.3
3urlRsc s .34 .7
3ITGp ..52 1.4
;MS Eng ...
SX .40 1.0
WVS Cp .29 .6
;ablvsnNY ...
,adence
Daesars
alpine
ameco gs .24 .5
DapOne .11 .1
.ardnlHlth .12 .2
-aremkRx ...
-arMax
Carnival .60 1.2
Jaterpillr 1.64 1.8
3emex 1.10 3.0
Jendant .36 1.8


h c -c 4 ll' '.
-,. r I ,:.


















16 +.18 -6.1 55.15
13 +1.46 +6.7 65.18
10 +3.93 +19.5 98.4 I
19 +.74 -9.7 50.90

... +.02 -1.4 18.15





-12 +4.11 +20'. I









17 -.15 -7.1 47.13
29 -.26 +16.1 25.00
S, I. _- cJ 8 *..










11 +. 1 15.6 2 2.531
12 +3.08 +24.1 62.74
91 +.24 -21.2 7.31
12 +.64 +3.2 53.40
16 +.18 -6.1 55.15
13 +1.46 +16.7 65.18
10 +3.93 +19.5 98.43
+.03 -.4 52.12
12 +.74 -.6 34.13
19 +.74 -9.7 50.90
12 -4.66 -22.4 50.95
... +.02 -1.4 18.15
15 -4.75 +1-4.0 56.36
15 +.63 -1.3 25.57
12 +4.11 +20.6 278.820
25 -.09 -3.3 35.71
17 -.15 -7.1 47.13
29 -.26 +16.1 25.00
11 +.11 -5.6 22.53
12 +3.08 +24.1 62.74
25 +.51 +24.8 44.35
23 +.57 +11.9 24.97
12 -.10 -2.6 18.72
28 -.32 +1.18 44.83
17 -.70 -33.3 11.47
24 +.55 +9.6 42.42
14 +.08 -7.9 38.73

23 +3.11 +13.9 53.02
29 +2.68 +6.7 45.55
12 +.26 -6.3 44.01
16 -.11 -13.6 28.89
52 +.25 -1.2 23.94
54 -.35 -2.3 33.75
... -.06 +5.2 8.45.
8 -1.88 +3.4 50.39
10 +.37 -6.9 25.86
19 -1.14 -14.7 50.60
-.54 -6.5 8.92
25 +1.98 +13.5 58.78
23 -.41 -19.4 28.67
21 +.20 -2.7 24.94
25 -2.41 +12.6 53.28
13 +2.28 +18.6 51.60
11 -1.18 -17.8 37.67
20 -.01 +24.3 12.99
27 -.92 +4.3 41.81
23 -1.89 +14.4 51.56
...-1.25 +12.4 28.00
60 +.34 +8.6 15.00
20 -.11 -2.6 19.62
... -.16 -30.5 2.74
+.48 +27.6 44.60
15 -.37 -11.3 74.68
19 -2.46 -6.0 54.68
28 +.51 +1.0 39.81
29 -1.69 -1.4 30.60
21 -.35 -11.9 50.78
16 -3.43 -7.5 90.15
-.79 +1.2 36.85
10 -.06 -8.9 20.31


Name Div
S ,,'r Proi 401

,Cr,:E r,,. Is
CtlTi i

C riupCar I 7

: 1,r 76



l-lT,. I- I 44



CoinPstel .3
C .;.i'.jr i I...
i: ,:,JHL l 9 1:



Coyi$01em .56
ConEd 2.28
ConstellEn 1.34
CtlAir B
CoopCam ...
Corning
CntwdFn s .56
Crompton .20
CrwnCstle ...
CrownHold..
CypSem
DR Horns .27
DTE 2.06
Danaher s .06
Darden .08
Deere 1.24
Delphi .12
DeltaAir
DevonE s .30
DiaOffs .25
DirecTV ..
Disney .24
DollarG .16
DomRes 2.68
DoralFin .72
DowChm 1.34
DukeEgy 1.10
Dynegy
ETrade
EMC Cp
EOGRess .16
Eaton 1.24
Edisonlnt 1.00
ElPasoCp .16
Elan
EDS .20
EmrsnEl 1.66
Emulex
ENSCO .10
EqOffPT 2.00
Exelon s 1.60
ExxonMbl 1.08
FPL Gp s 1.42
FairchldS
FannieM If 1.04
FedExCp .28
FedrDS .54
Feldman n .27
FidlNFn s 1.00
FirstData .24
FirstEngy 1.65
FishrSci
FordM .40
ForestLab ...
FredMac 1.40
FMCG 1.00
Freescalen ...
FreescB n ...
FriedBR 1.36
Gap .18


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Simclar 6.80 +2.79 +69.6
Bookham 2.76 +1.01 +57.7
SyntroCpwt 8.15 +2.77 +51.5
Dglmpct 3.46 +1.17 +51.1
Syntrol wt 9.60 +2.64 +37.9
LanVision 3.67 +.92 +33.5
SyntroCp 13.62 +3.28 +31.7
EDPTM 4.62 +1.05 +29.4
Firstwv 2.95 +.65 +28.3
Inforte 5.13 +1.11 +27.6

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Corgentch 2.40 -2.86 -54.4
SynrgyB 2.25 -1.73 -43.5
RedEnvel 7.40 -4.84 -39.5
TEL Off 9.81 -5.77 -37.0
Ligand B If 5.68 -2.55 -31.0
CentlFrght 2.96 -1.24 -29.5
PrvtMed 3.24 -1.17 -26.5
DigtlVid rs 2.25 -.81 -26.4
MatrixSv 4.90 -1.72 -26.0
GWilliFd s 5.38 -1.84 -25.5

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Nasd100Tr5213665 36.20 -.07
Microsoft 3098557 24.12 -.16
Intel 2689336 23.01 -.17
Cisco 2458546 17.70 -.18
JDS Uniph2045843 1.61 -.01
SiriusS 1808263 5.56 +.23
Oracle 1770978 12.53 +.13
SunMicro 1442208 4.05 +.02
ApIdMatl 1322833 16.01 -.62
Yahoo s 1259196 34.28+2.87

Diary
Advanced 1,399
Declined 1,927
New Highs 135
New Lows 281
Total issues 3,391
Unchanged 65
Volume 8,870,501,727





WKly YTD" WKly
Yla PE Cng '.Chg Last
1 4 1 h .5 7 ,I I 4
3 8 -1 3 ".'4
8 15 48 :r. 4 22 49

36 ," :16 -' 13
-' II '3 t ':,':,

I :| 14 16 -7J .446
1 7 7 .00. -f, I 3lI 9i
1I 24 .4 + .I 1: 4 I T
S .' 1 8 41 38

4J l i;i
S4 l6 5 41 -4 1 .1 71
.8 14 5 4C, + 1115 :I ,i2
".] 4 +55 12.31 :
9 9 +.3 -l3 307.14

I9' 1 i 4 .544 ." Illl ;l-l
I. I t1.'1 t6.9 47.99
5.4 18 +.08 -4.4 41.84
2.6 17 +1.39 +19.3 52.14
... ... +.66 -14.3 11.61
.33 +3.04 +7.9 58.06
... ... +.28 -5.4 11.14
1.8 9 -.06 -14.1 31.80
1.4 ... -.47 +24.0 14.63
... 16 +.54 -2.1 16.29
... 51 -.83 +11.5 15.32
... ... -.71 +5.5 12.37
.9 9 +-.33 -.3 30.14
4.5 18 +.81 +5.4 45.46
.1 23 -1.28 -8.4 52.60
.3 20 +1.05 +11.9 31.05
1.9 12 -1.74 -11.0 66.24
2.8 15 -.20 -52.1 4.32
... ... -.04 -46.1 4.03
.6 11 +3.65 +27.3 49.55
.5 ... +3.10 +29.2 51.74
... ... +.02 -13.8 14.43
.8 25 +.83 +2.8 28.58
.7 20 -.45 +3.0 21.40
3.6 20 +1.51 +11.1 75.27
3.3 6 -.38 -55.8 21.75
2.7 17 -1.95 -.7 49.14
3.9 18 +.67 +11.8 28.32
... ... -.02 -15.2 3.92
12 -.18 -21.1 11.80
34 +.20 -16.9 12.36
.3 20 +4.77 +40.9 50.26
1.9 16 -1.76 -10.1 65.04
2.9 13 +.70 +9.4 35.05
1.5 ... +.18 +2.4 10.65
...... -4.03 -87.6 3.38
1.0 65 +.52 -10.5 20.67
2.6 21 -2.23 -8.8 63.96
30 +.37 +12.8 19.00
.3 56 +2.69 +22.4 38.86
6.6 ... +.88 +4.6 30.46
3.5 17 +1.14 +4.2 45.90
1.8 16 +1.55 +18.1 60.55
3.5 16 +.64 +7.4 40.13
31 -.59 -8.0 14.96
2.0 9 -.97 -25.2 53.24
.3 20 -1.54 -6.2 92.35
.9 16 +1.74 +8.7 62.81
... ... +.17 -7.0 12.10
3.1 8 +1.96 -6.0 32.30
.6 17 -.92 -8.6 38.90
3.9 16 +1.16 +6.2 41.97
34 -3.75 -10.0 56.15
3.6 7 -.11 -23.6 11.18
15 -.64 -18.2 36.71
2.3 16 -1.99 -17.4 60.85
2.5 47 +1.29 +4.7 40.01
... ... -.40 -6.2 16.72
... -.41 -7.1 17.06
8.6 8 +.14 -18.8 15.74
.8 18 +.21 +1.8 21.51


' STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg
AT&T NY .95 18.66 +.19 +1.0 -2.1
Altel NY 1.52 55.15 +.18 +0.3 -6.1
AmIntGp NY .50 50.95 -4.66 -8.4 -22.4
ApIdMatl Nasd .12 16.01 -.62 -3.7 -6.4
AutoZone NY ... 85.03 -.15 -0.2 -6.9
BkofAms NY 1.80 44.01 +.26 +0.6 -6.3
BellSouth NY 1.08 25.86 +.37 +1.5 -6.9
BobEvn Nasd .48 22.99 -.72 -3.0 -12.1
CNBFnPAsNasd .52 14.85 -.01 -0.1 -2.8
CSX NY .40 41.81 -.92 -2.2 +4.3
ChmpE NY 9.36 -.17 -1.8 -20.8
ChevTexsNY 1.60 59.31 +1.10 +1.9 +12.9
Cisco Nasd ... 17.70 -.18 -1.0 -8.4
CocaCl NY 1.12 41.38 +.18 +0.4 -.6
ColBgp NY .61 20.20 .. ... -4.9
Delhaize NY 1.50 67.95 -.54 -0.8 -10.4
DollarG NY .16 21.40 -.45 -2.1 +3.0
Elan NY ... 3.38 -4.03 -54.4 -87.6
ExxonMbI NY 1.08 60.55 +1.55 +2.6 +18.1
FPLGps NY 1.42 40.13 +.64 +1.6 +7.4
FamDIr NY .38 29.65 -.57 -1.9 -5.1
FordM NY .40 11.18 -.11 -1.0 -23.6
GenElec NY .88 35.47 -.26 -0.7 -2.8
GaPacif NY .70 35.88 +.07 +0.2 -4.3
GdyFam Nasd .12 8.82 +.42 +5.0 -3.5
HCA Inc NY .60 53.80 +4.50 +9.1 +34.6
HewlettP NY .32 21.71 +1.90 +9.6 +3.5
HomeDp NY .40 37.60 -.43 -1.1 -12.0


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg
Intel Nasd .32 23.01 -.17 -0.7 -1.6
JDS Uniph Nasd ... 1.61 -.01 -0.6 -49.2
JeffPilot NY 1.67 48.45 +.25 +0.5 -6.8
LowesCos NY .16 56.19 -.62 -1.1 -2.4
Lucent NY ... 2.71 -.05 -1.8 -27.9
MCI Incn Nasd 1.60 25.29 +2.03 +8.7 +25.4
McDnlds NY .55 31.00 -.58 -1.8 -3.3
Microsoft Nasd .32 24.12 -.16 -0.7 -9.7
Nasd100TrNasd .38 36.20 -.07 -0.2 -9.3
NY Times NY .62 36.00 +.44 +1.2 -11.8
NobItyH Nasd .20 20.56 +.14 +0.7 -12.4
OcciPet NY 1.24 73.64 +3.84 +5.5 +26.2
Oracle Nasd ... 12.53 +.13 +1.0 -8.7
Penney NY .50 50.04 +4.00 +8.7 +20.9
PepsiCo NY .92 52.76 +.84 +1.6 +1.1
Pfizer NY .76 26.15 -.02 -0.1 -2.8
Potashs NY .60 87.19 +3.64 +4.4 +5.0
Ryder NY .64 41.53 -.87 -2.1 -13.1
SearsHIdgsNasd ... 135.39 +2.87 +2.2 +36.8
SemiHTr Amex .18 32.08 -.57 -1.7 -3.9
SiriusS Nasd ... 5.56 +.23 +4.3 -27.0
SouthnCo NY 1.43 31.95 +.24 +0.8 -4.7
SPDR Amex 2.26 117.38 +.24 +0.2 -2.9
SunMicro Nasd ... 4.05 +.02 +0.5 -24.9
Symantec sNasd ... 21.77 +.84 +4.0 -15.5
TimeWarn NY ... 17.45 -.26 -1.5 -10.3
WalMart NY .60 48.99 -1.67 -3.3 -7.3
Yahoos Nasd ... 34.28 +2.87 +9.1 -9.0


Stock Footnoles: g = -Dedend rand e3amings in Car.a1r,an dollar: r = Does noi meel cor.nlriO.jai:ihig
1landerd1 II = Lite illinQ wii, SEC r. = New Ir. paai c.2 weeks pf = Prleerej re = Stioc. ra3. unaergr.ei
a rFr,ei -e icl:kW: hl lt al Ia, i 50 pcerce .l iir.n iTe pawi ye,i 1 = z Hgri bu .Secunr .T r : fr, 3 ] ie -
pnie .a .Slic as ;pl, i i it.' .i leii '0 pe ,'reni winin Ine la-s. )e3r ur, = Un.l vi = in r.inr, upicy or
iecee,r3nl.p &.I = wreen .rienIuled a, = Wren er.ue* w l Wdreanrni
Mutual Fund Footnotes: e = E' -,sn a.vaend NL -= o up-liori Sale n char.er,i p = Fund .ai el- us.ed 10
ae a.aiiDuior. costs 31 = Reaemnpiin lee or coilnqgeri deferred al;c: il ad mi.y appll I = B3oin p .and r
Gainers and Losers mul' be wunrrr ait I Bi l1 ti De I.ile. ,iaole, a i ien Most Actbves mrr.uis ol r ain
ai leaasi i tolum e in rundrreas J: snare Source: The AaluC1ie'd Pre:,s SaIle fig ur are ur,_f',ali


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 5.75 5.75
Discount Rate 3.75 3.75
Federal Funds Rate 2.875 2.75
Treasuries
3-month 2.78 2.78
6-month 3.09 3.06
5-year 4.12 4.30
10-vear 4.45 4.60
30-year 4.72 4.85


Currencies
Last Pvs Day


Australia 1.2972 1.2923
n iatirB 1 8807 1.8898


12. 129


Euro .7749 .7717
Japan 107.61 107.18


Mexico


11.1680 11.1660


Weekly Dow Jones


Dow Jones 11,000

industrials r-10000


For the week ending
Friday, April 1

[; -4W


Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 n
American Funds A: InvCoAA p
American Funds A: WshMutA p
American Funds A: GwthFdA p
Fidelity Invest: Magellan n
PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRet n
Fidelity Invest: Contra n
Dodge&Cox: Stock x
Amercan Funds A: IncoFdA p
American Funds A: EupacA p
Fidelity Invest: LowPr m
Vanguard Instl Fds: Instldx n
American Funds A: CaplnBIA p
American Funds A: NewPerA p
Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk n
Fidelity Invest: Grolnc x
Vanguard Fds: Wndsll
American Funds A: BalA p
American Funds A: CapWGrA p
Vanguard Fds: Welltn n
Fidelity Invest: Equtlnc nx
Fidelity Invest: Diverlntl n
Fidelity Invest: Puritan x
Fidelity Invest: GroCo n
Fidelity Invest: BlueChipGr
Vanguard Admiral: 500Adml n
Vanguard Fds: Prmcp r


Wkly
Name Div Yid PE Cha


IT'S NOT TOO LATE. OPEN AN ALiSTATE IRA BY APRIL 15, 2005 AND HAVE
IT COUNT TOWARD THE 2004 TAX YEAR. CALL ME TO LEARN MORE.


Mary Slay,Allstate
757W.Duval St.
(Formerly Rick Bringger's office)
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 755-6801


P.S. Appointments to fit your schedule.


Allstate.
You're in good hands.


Certain restrictions apply to contributions, rollovers, deductions and distributions from an IRA. Consult your tax
advisor for specic information. Allstate Life Insurance Company. Home Office., Northbrook, IL Securities offered by
Personal Financial Representatives through Allstate Financial Services, LLC. Registered Broker-Dealer. Member
NASD, SIPC. Main Office: 2920 South 84th Street. Lincoln, NE 68506. 877-525-5727. 2004 Allstate Insurance
Company


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yid PE Chg %Chg Last


Gateway
Genentchs ...
GenMills 1.24
GM db33 1.56
Genworth n .26
GaPacif .70
Gillette .65
GlaxoSKIn 1.53
GlobalSFe .30
GoldWF s .24
GoldmanS 1.00
Goodyear ...
GrafTech ...
GtAtPc
Guidant .40
HCA Inc .60
Hallibtn .50
HarleyD .50
HarmonyG .11
HarrahE 1.32
HartfdFn 1.16
HItMgt .16
Heinz 1.14
HewlettP .32
Hibern .80
Hilton .08
HomeDp .40
HonwIllntI .83
Humana
Huntsmnn ...
ITW 1.12


... ... -.08 -33.6 3.99
77 -2.47 +3.4 56.28
2.5 18 -1.20 -2.1 48.65
7.6 ... -1.28 -23.1 20.50
.9 12 +.81 +2.3 27.61
2.0 15 +.07 -4.3 35.88
1.3 30 -.08 +11.7 50.02
3.4 ... -.53 -4.3 45.33
.:8 62 +2.38 +15.2 38.13
.4 15 +1.46 -2.1 60.14
.9 12 +.90 +5.1 109.30
... 25 -.81 -10.9 13.06
... 32 -.67 -42.3 5.46
... ... +.32 +48.8 15.25
.5 45 -.75 +2.4 73.84
1.1 21 +4.50 +34.6 53.80
1.1 ... +2.59 +13.8 44.65
.9 19 -2.16 -6.5 56.78
1.4 ... +.02 -15.1 7.87
2.1 20 -.89 -4.4 63.98
1.7 9 -.75 -3.0 67.25
.6 19 +1.05 +14.3 25.97
3.1 17 +.18 -6.5 36.44
1.5 19 +1.90 +3.5 21.71
2.5 17 -.11 +8.1 31.90
.4 37 +.24 -2.2 22.23
1.1 17 -.43 -12.0 37.60
2.2 22 -.17 +4.5 37.00
... 19 +1.12 +9.7 32.57
... ... -.78 -4.6 23.38
1.3 20 -2.06 -3.7 89.26


ImpacMtg 3.00 15.7 5 +2.71 -15.6 19.13


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


INCO
IngerRd 1.00
IBM .72
IntlGame .48
IntPap 1.00
IntlSteel
Interpublic
JPMorgCh 1.36
Jabil
JanusCap .04
JohnJn 1.14
KB Home 1.50
KerrMc 1.80
KeyEng If ...
Keycorp 1.30
KimbClk 1.80
KingPhrm ...
Kohls
Kraft .82
KrspKrm
LSI Log
LehmBr .80
LennarA .55
LibtyMA 1.93
LibtProp 2.44
LillyEli 1.52
Limited .60
Lucent
Lyondell .90
MBIA 1.12
MBNA .56
MEMC


13 -.08 +8.1 39.76
11 -2.35 -.7 79.72
18 -.26 -8.3 90.44
22 +.10 -22.9 26.52
... -.92 -13.5 36.35
4 -.31 -1.4 39.99
... +.17 -9.1 12.18
22 -.68 -12.2 34.25
31 +.22 +10.1 28.16
19 +.01 -17.6 13.85
24 -1.24 +5.4 66.85
10 -.01 +14.0 119.00
24 +1.35 +38.3 79.90
... +.50 -.8 11.70
14 +.52 -5.6 32.01
18 +.65 -.5 65.46
... -.51 -34.0 8.18
24 +.41 +3.7 50.97
21 +1.11 -7.9 32.78
...-1.28 -40.6 7.48
... -.45 +.5 5.51
11 ... +6.1 92.78
9 +1.01 +1.1 57.29
... +.09 -5.7 10.35
21 +.22 -9.5 39.11
31 -1.71 -9.8 51.19
16 +.74 +4.7 24.11
13 -.05 -27.9 2.71
96 -.71 -.9 28.65
9 -4.75 -17.6 52.12
12 -.40 -14.2 24.20
13 -.23 ... 13.25


Mariwl 40 9
1.1,rarri rn I 1i 3
M .3it.r 88 ai 3
Ma-i evEr. 16 4


NMavDS 98 .7
Maylyi.l 7.2 5
McKenson 24 6.
McAlee
M.d'o-Hiin
MeN.iloc 12 4
M.elairnic 34 7
M ll:c,nFr,: 72 2 5
MerrilLyn 64 I1
MeILe 46 1 2
MlconT
MCnsn,;r., 68 I 1
M.l,rg.l.a, 1 I 08 1 I
Motorola .16 1.1
NCR Cps .
NRG Egy ...
NatlCity 1.40 4.2
NatGrid 1.84 4.0
NOilVarco ..
NatSemis .08 .4
Navistar
NwCentFn 6.20 13.3
NewellRub .84 3.8
NewmtM '.40' .9
NewsCpAn .16 .9
NewsCpB n .06 .3
NiSource .92 4.0
NikeB 1.00 1.2
NobleCorp ...
NokiaCp .44 2.9
NorflkSo .44 1.2
NortelNet ..
NoFrkBcs .88 3.2
Nucords .60 1.0
OMICp .32 1.7
OcciPet 1.24 1.7
OffcDpt
OfficeMax .60 1.8
PG&ESCp 1.20 3.5
PNC 2.00 3.9
PacifCre
Pactiv
ParkHan .80 1.3
Penney .50 1.0
PepsiCo .92 1.7
PerkElm .28 1.4
PetrbrsA .58 1.5
Petrobrs 1.75 3.9
Pfizer .76 2.9
PhelpD 1.00 1.0
PioNtrl .20 .5
PlacerD .10 .6
Pridelntl ...
Providian ...
Prudent .63 1.1
PulteHm .20 .3
QwestCm ...
RadioShk .25 1.0
Raytheon .88 2.3
ReliantEn ...
Rhodia .52 ..
RiteAid
RockwlAut .66 1.2
Rowan .25 .8
RylCarb .52 1.2
RoylDut 2.26 3.8
SBCCom 1.29 5.5
SLMCp .76 1.5
Safeway
StJude s
StPaulTrav .88 2.5
Saks


83,515 108.08
65,063 30.20
63,234 30.00
60,837 26.81
59,656 100.20
47,158 10.59
46,664 56.86
44,909 128.58
43,843 18.12
38,221 35.53
36,402 39.74
35,318 107.18
34,578 51.87
33,806 26.99
32,260 27.81
31,572 36.89
30,307 30.70
30,005 17.56
29,405 33.64
29,132 29.77
26,562 50.73
25,305 28.71
24,057 18.52
23,934 52.48
22,686 39.72
22,603 108.08
22,476 59.46


YTD Wkly
.*Cna Last Name


16 -103 -11 4 4281
I .2 60 .28 3 48 25
19 23 -79 1 39 .7
17 04 -6 1 34 225
-91 +ei3. 4049
15 +09 12-0 20C 1
1 1.0 .1 2 4:

2' +40 .2582 :681
-04 -344 1385
-19 .203 37 86
21 Q 12 -'0 31 10i
28 .cit .184 4')2.
3) .6.1' -'3' 3048
28 4.1 .1 7 5,'0 1
15 +.14 -65 28 36
I3 -163 -.4 55. 'i
II .5 -4l 366
15 *0"' -) l ,1 26
54 e54. 1. 4 6466
13 .1 28 .24 5. 87
23 -.05 -13.4 14.89
22 -5.83 -3.5 33.42
19 -.23 -3.7 34.72
8 ... -11.6 33.20
... -.34 -3.1 46.50
37 -.03 +33.3 47.05
19 -.46 +12.0 20.11
11 -2.37 -16.8 36.60
6 +2.09 -27.2 46.54
... +.74 -9.4 21.92
43': "+.66 -'t ."42.45
... -.28 -9.2 16.95
-.13 -8.4 17.59
14 +37 +.5 22.89
21 -.62 -8.5 83.00
53 +4.01 +17.2 58.30
... +.09 -1.6 15.42
16 -1.24 +1.6 36.78
... +.01 -21.9 2.71
15 +.48 -3.5 27.83
8 -2.93 +11.6 58.40
7 +.16 +14.5 19.29
12 +3.84 +26.2 73.64
21 -.45 +26.7 22.00
19 +.66 +6.8 33.50
3 +.05 +2.9 34.25
12 +.91 -10.7 51.31
18 -2.08 -.3 56.35
23 +.60 -7.9 23.30
14 -6.99 -20.0 60.56
28 +4.00 +20.9 50.04
22 +.84 +1.1 52.76
27 -1.77 -9.6 20.32
... +2.05 +7.7 39.00
... +2.76 +12.6 44.81
17 -.02 -2.8 26.15
10 -1.04 +2.5 101.41
18 +2.22 +25.7 44.12
25 +.18 -15.5 15.93
... +.05 +23.2 25.30
13 -.75 +1.8 16.76
17 +.54 +3.9 57.11
10 +2.19 +16.4 74.25
... -.14 -18.0 3.64
12 -.30 -25.7 24.42
42 +.64 +.3 38.96
... -.22 -17.3 11.29
... -.29 -24.1 2.05
22 +.06 +7.1 3.92
22 -2.25 +14.1 56.56
... +1.58 +18.4 30.66
20 +1.10 -18.7 44.27
11 +.38 +4.7 60.06
13 +.36 -8.2 23.66
12 +.04 -8.0 49.10
15 -.12 -7.5 18.26
32 -1.89 -16.4 35.06
19 -.90 -4.6 35.36
23 +3.00 +28.2 18.60


SaiaLen 7,9
Scr,ei.Pi 22
SrlimlT 84
sc.rNt, D 08
SAllria u 04
E.aqaiemT .12


SonyCp 24
SoTulrrinC 1 4;3
SwsvIArl 12
S,' ogrB,':. 1.
SprniFO J 5i
STIrm.dHil 84
SlaleSir 68
"T G:Ild r,

Sunc:,,r j 24
SunGad ...
Sunoco 1.60
SymbIT .02
Sysco .60
TJX .18
TXU Corp 2.25
TaiwSemi .09
Target .32
TelNorL .73
Templelnl 1.80
TenetHft ..: .
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texlnst .10
ThermoEl ...
3M Co 1.68
Tiffany .24
TimeWarn ...
Timken .60
TollBros
Transocn ...
TriadH
Tycolntl .40
USEC .55
UST Inc 2.20
UnionPac 1.20
Unisys
UtdMicro .32
UPSB 1.32
US Bancrp 1.20
USSteel .32
UtdhlthGp .03
Univision
Unocal .80
UnumProv .30
ValeroE s .32
VerizonCm 1.62
ViacomB .28
Vodafone .55
Wachovia 1.84
Walgrn .21
WAMutI 1.84
WsteMInc .80
Waters
Weathflnt ...
WellPoint
WellsFrgo 1.92
WDigitl
Weyerh 1.60
WmsCos .20
Wyeth .92
XTOEgys .20
XcelEngy .83
Xerox
YumBrds .40
Zimmer


+5.3/A
+6.2/C
+5.4/D
+5.2/A
+1.8/D
+2.5/A
+10.3/A
+12.6/A
+8.6/A
+10.7/D
+13.1/C
+5.4/A
+11.8/A
+6.9/D
+5.7/C
+4.4/B
+12.1/A
+3.9/C
+13.3/A
+7.6/A
+6.0/E
+11.2/C
+4.8/B
+0.9/C
-0.5/E
+5.4/A
+6.6/B


-15.7/A
+11.9/C
+28.7/B
-8.9/A
-24.4/D
+46.8/A
+2.9/A
+78.3/A
+55.2/A
-5.4/B
+129.9/A
-15.2/A
+67.0/A
+1.8/B
-13.1/D
-8.3/B
+44.4/A
+53.1/A
+42.0/A
+44.8/A
+23.3/D
+22.3/A
+28.9/A
-41.8/C
-33.5/E
NS
-11.1/C


- 9.000


-8,000


NL 3,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 5,000,000
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 10,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
NL 3,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
NL 250,000
NL 25,000


Switzerind 1.2033 1.1960 BL-Balanced, El -Equity Income, GL-Global Stock, HB -HealBiotech, IB -Intermediate Bond, IL -Intemational Stock, LC -Large-Cap Core, L
-Large-Cap Growth, LV -Large-Cap Val., MP -Stock/Bond Blend, MT .Mortgage, SP -S&P 500, SS -Single-State Muni, XG -Muld-Cap Growtl
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth- Total Retum: Chng in NAV wilh dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in holloi
ers show dollar in foreign currency. 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA= Not avail. NE = Data in question. NS = Fund not in existence. Source: Upper, In


Wkty YTD WKhl
Div Yid PE Chg '.Chg Las


36 13 .28 -88 020,
12 -I1 -143 178'
l2 35 1 59 .70 l 716.
8 50 .-4 -126 104
I 18 .45 -141 28 3
16 30 -43 .12 3 194
8 36 .2.3 .16.2 6.34
1 : -76 -34 3 3 5
6 -I6) .9 393
45 1 +.24 -1 7 1 9'
1 3 1 18 -1414 14 11
S16 c ,6 -20 2-'1` '
22 +23 -85 24-7
14 32 .1 34 .1 7 5941
16 16 .e5 -117 2453
.23 -27 42.
2 39 -1 "0 -86 441
.286 .i7 4i ,
... i t2.93 t2t. 34.4,
1.5 13 +5.95 +31.6 107.51
.1 44 -.32 -16.9 14.3"
1.7 25 +1.07 -7.0 35.4f
.7 18 +.05 -3.6 24.21
2.8 ... +1.91 +25.2 80.8
1.1 .. +.18 +.8 8.5(
.6 14 -.69 -4.9 49.41
4.7 .., +.68 -7.2 15.6,
2.5 25 -6.66 +7.0 731
S... .. .+.57 +5.4 5
17 -.36 -16.3 14.2(
8 +4.10 +26.7 40.31
.4 24 -.55 +1.4 24.91
4. 11 -.90 -17.2 25.0(
2.0 23 -.16 +3.7 85.1,
.7 16 +1.08 +5.4 33.6t
... 24 -.26 -10.3 17.4,
2.2 18 +.40 +3.7 26.91
...14 +2.97 +17.0 80.2
...... +4.79 +25.6 53.2
20 +3.66 +33.8 49.7,
1.2 25 -.53 -6.4 33.4,'
3.4 54 -.44 +67.7 16.21
4.3 16 -2.30 +5.7 50.81
1.7 30 -.31 +2.1 68.61
63 +.09 -32.2 6.9(
... ... +.01 -5.7 3.3;
1.8 25 -.30 -15.9 71.91
4.2 13 +.50 -9.0 28.51
.6 6 -3.30 -.1 51.1f
... 24 +3.01 +8.9 95.8,
38 +.81 -5.6 27.6,
1.2 14 +4.75 +48.8 64.31
1.8 ... -.50 -7.0 16.61
.4 12 +5.54 +71.3 77.71
4.6 13 +.43 -13.1 35.11
.8 ... -.06 -4.2 34.8"
2.1 ... -.36 -3.8 26.3'
3.7 13 +.08 -4.3 50.3'
.5 31 -2.52 +13.9 43.7
4.7 11 +.23 -7.0 39.3a
2.8 18 -.16 -3.4 28.9;
... 20-11.16 -23.4 35.8'
... 26 +3.21 +15.0 58.91
... 20 +1.61 +8.4 124.6,1
3.2 15 +1.04 -4.4 59.4C
17 +.86 +19.0 12.91
2.3 13 +.60 +1.8 68.41
1.0 61 +.31 +17.0 19.0O
2.2 46 +.19 -2.1 41.61
.6 23 +2.89 +30.4 34.51
4.8 18 +.40 -5.3 17.22
17 +.03 -12.0 14.9"
.8 21 -1.12 +8.5 51.21
... 34 -4.73 -6.8 74.6"


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yid PE Chg %Chg Last


25 -.04 -25.0 2.01
... -.54 +2.9 16.38
20 +.77 -10.7 17.32
... -.21 +48.6 2.11
... -.98 -33.7 6.86
22 -1.08 +1.9 15.42
35 +.22 +6.4 66.76
... +.40 -6.2 11.70
... -.64 +32.1 3.58
27 +.05 -6.5 19.35
24 +1.13 -23.2 34.01
20 +1.44 +22.1 28.75
15 +.03 -28.3 10.20
32 -1.63 -10.6 57.35
... -2.09 -25.6 17.37
71 +1.63 -8.8 73.64
66 -1.61 +27.0 40.89
18 -.62 -6.4 16.01
... +.11 -23.3 3.23
... +.08 -14.8 1.38
35 +1.02 +4.6 27.97
... -.14 -25.0 2.94
33 +1.31 -20.7 30.11
25 -.05 -10.9 7.89
24 +.83 -8.6 36.40
... -4.06 -47.8 34.74
28 -2.05 -17.6 35.75
... -.03 -45.8 .32
47 -.21 -8.6 29.49
26 +.07 -23.0 5.88
12 -.10 -22.4 1.98
20 -1.52 -16.4 33.46
... +.83 +27.3 33.76
... -.03 -31.7 1.53
23 +1.05 -11.3 21.84
... -.12 -49.1 1.70
22 -.18 -8.4 17.70
29 -1.00 -2.2 43.09


Name Div YId PE


Comcast
Comc sp
Compuwre...
Comvers
Conexant ...
Corgentch ...
Costco ..40
CredSys
DRDGOLD ...
Dellinc ....
Dglmpct
DobsonCm ...
DynMatl
eBay s
EchoStar 1.00
ElectArts ...
EltekLtd
EricsnTI .36
ExtNetw
FifthThird 1.40
Fiserv
Flextrn
Foundry
Genzyme ...
GileadScis ...
Google n
Harmonic
HlywdE
IAC Interac ...
Imclone
Immersn
Intel .32
j2Glob
JDS Uniph ..
JetBlue
JnprNtw
KLA Tnc .48
Kos Phr ...


Nasdaq Most Active

Wkly YTD Wkly Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Chq Last Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last Name


... 78 +.25 +.3 33.39
... 77 +.37 +.9 33.13
... 32 -.40 +10.3 7.07
... 89 +.41 +2.0 24.93
... ... +.01 -27.1 1.45
... ... -2.86 -71.0 2.40
.9 21 +.19 -9.5 43.79
... ... +.55 -13.6 7.91
... ... -.12 -43.5 .87
... 32 -.35 -9.8 38.03
... ... +1.17 +143.7 3.46
... ... -.06 +14.5 1.97
... 65 -2.70 +185.0 34.60
... 64 +1.57 -36.3 37.07
... 64 +.77 -11.9 29.29
... 28 -3.25 -15.8 51.92
... ... -.20+202.3 3.87
1.3 -.46 -10.6 28.15
... 49 +.09 -9.8 5.91
3.3 16 +1.15 -9.4 42.85
... 21 +1.65 -1.7 39.50
... 24 -.26 -13.9 11.90
... 29 -.51 -25.6 9.79
... ... -1.12 -3.6 55.99
... 36 -.04 +1.0 35.33
... ... +.79 -6.6 180.04
-.12 +14.5 9.55
... 12 -.86 +1.4 13.27
... ... +1.06 -19.8 22.15
... 26 -3.75 -24.6 34.75
... ... +.25 -17.7 6.00
1.4 18 -.17 -1.6 23.01
28 -5.51 -.3 34.38
-.01 -49.2 1.61
... 43 +.54 -20.8 18.40
... 86 -.05 -20.8 21.53
1.1 23 -.64 -2.9 45.25
... 14 +8.83 +12.9 42.50


LamRsch ...
Level3
LexarMd
Ligand B If ...
LinearTch .40
MCI Incn 1.60
MarvellT s ...
Maxim .80
McLeo A ...
Medlmun
Merclntr
Microsoft .32
MillPhar
MovieGal .12
Nasdi00Tr .38
NetwkAp
NextlPrt
Novatel
Novell
Novlus
Nvidia
OmniVisn ...
Oracle
PMC Sra ...
palmOne ...
ParmTc
PattUTIs .16
Paychex .52
Phazar
Qualcom s .36
RF MicD ...
RedHat
RschMot s ...
ResConns ...
SanDisk
Sanmina
SearsHIdgs
Sepracor


... 16 +.18 -1.6 28.46
... ... -.03 -40.4 2.02
... ...-1.35 -36.6 4.97
... ... -2.55 -51.2 5.68
1.1 30 -.34 -2.6 37.77
... ... +2.03 +25.4 25.29
80 +.40 +6.2 37.68
2.0 27 -.98 -5.3 40.14
... ... -.01 -74.9 .18
... ... +.09 -12.1 23.83
... 56 +.09 +2.7 46.80
1.3 26 -.16 -9.7 24.12
... ... -.24 -32.0 8.26
.4 18 +3.75 +45.8 27.81
1.0 ... -.07 -9.3 36.20
... 51 -.69 -18.0 27.25
... ... +.45 +12.0 21.88
... ... +4.30 -52.5 21.10
... 6 +.61 -9.3 6.12
... 25 -.60 -4.9 26.52
... 41 -1.60 -.1 23.53
... 12 -.61 -17.8 15.08
... 23 +.13 -8.7 12.53
... 31 -.14 -24.0 8.55
... 40 -1.46 -20.3 25.14
19 +.33 -3.9 5.66
.6 40 +.67 +32.7 25.81
1.6 37 -1.02 -5.4 32.23
... 32 +5.20 -38.4 30.20
1.0 32 -.21 -16.2 35.55
... ... -.18 -25.0 5.13
... 58 +1.53 -8.9 12.16
... 55 +.61 -8.9 75.11
... 21 -2.12 -22.8 20.96
... 19 +.02 +11.2 27.77
... ... -.21 -40.3 5.06
... 12 +2.87 +36.8 135.39
... ... -1.69 -6.0 55.78


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


SiebelSys ...
SigmaTel ...
SignatBk ...
Sina
SiriusS
SkywksSol ...
Sonus n
Staples .25
Starbucks
StlDyna .40
StemCells ...
SunMicro ...
Symantec s ...
TASER s ...
Tekelec
TelwestGI n...
Tellabs
TevaPh s .22
3Com
TibcoSft ...
TiVo Inc
Trnsmeta ...
Travelzoo ...
UTStrcm ...
US Enr
UtdGlblCm...
Verisign
Veritas
VersoTch ...
ViaNet
Vitesse
WebMD
XM Sat
Xilinx .20
Xybrnaut
Yahoo s


47 +.86 -9.8
26 -.01 +3.6
24 +.63 -17.8
28-+1.94 +2.8
... +.23 -27.0
28 -.08 -33.7
42 -.22 -26.9
22 -.54 -9.7
50 -.59 -17.8
7 -2.38 -9.2
... -.35 -25.5
... +.02 -24.9
29 +.84 -15.5
37 -3.49 -67.1
28 -1.60 -24.2
... +.62 +.6
... +.06 -15.6
61 +.25 +2.9
... -.04 -15.8
38 -.12 -43.0
... -.31 -10.7
... +.02 -38.7
... +8.78 -42.9
9 -1.51 -50.7
-.25 +98.3
... -.16 -3.7
39 +1.53 -16.9
29 +.59 -17.3
... +.01 -51.4
... -78.8
... -.05 -26.1
71 -.23 +4.8
... +.39 -18.3
28 -.21 -3.0
... -.35 -80.5
59 +2.87 -9.0


9.46
36.82
26.59
32.97
5.56
6.25
4.19
30.45
51.26
34.40
3.15
4.05
21.77
10.42
15.50
17.68
7.25
30.72
3.51
7.61
5.24
1.00
54.49
10.92
5.87
9.30
27.92
23.62
.35
.18
2.61
8.55
30.73
28.78
.24
34.28


Name Div
AbdAsPac .42
Ableauctn ...
Avitar
BemaGold ...
BiotechT .04
CalypteBn ...
CanArgo n ...
Cheniere
DHB Inds
DJIA Diam 2.25
DSL.neth ...
Darling
EagleBbnd
GascoEn n ...
GoldStrg ...
GreyWolf ...
Gurunetn ...
Harken
iShBrazil .46
ISh HK .27
iShJapan .04
iSh Kor .10
iShSing .28
iShTaiwan .08
iShSP500 2.45
iShEmMkt 2.41
iSh20 TB 4.01
iSh EAFE 2.41
iShNqBio
iShR1000V1.54
iShR1000G .57
iShR2000G .22
iShRs2000 1.53
iShREst 5.12
iShSPSml 1.47
IntrNAP
IntntHTr
IvaxCp s


Wkly YTD
YId PE Chg %Chg


... -.03 -4.8 6.17
... -.14 -31.3 .57
... -.01 -43.8 .09
... +.04 -13.8 2.63
... -5.18 -8.8 139.42
... -.01 -28.2 .28
... -.12 +27.8 1.38
... -1.41 +3.5 65.95
13 -.57 -53.0 8.94
... -.35 -3.2 104.05
... -.02 -43.5 .13
11 -.05 -11.7 3.85
... -.07 -51.5 .32
... +.01 -25.8 3.16
... +.26 -27,2 2.92
... +.22 +26.9 6.69
...+1.28+117.9 18.96
... +.05 +1.9 .53
... +.82 +4.3 23.20
... -.08 -5.4 11.44
... -.25 -4.2 10.46
... +.34 +10.1 32.20
... -.17 7.17
... +.13 -3.3 11.66
... +.27 -3.1 117.24
.. +3.99 +1.1 204.00
... +1.43 +.8 89.30
... -.80 -1.1 158.50
-2.70 -16.4 63.00
+.46 -1.0 65.72
... -.31 -5.4 46.52
... -.48 -7.5 62.27
... -.46 -6.1 121.64
... +1.09 -8.7 112.50
... -.94 -2.8 158.11
... +.03 -35.5 .60
... +2.31 -22.6 55.21
27 +.56 +25.9 19.91


Wkly
Last Name Div YId


KFX Inc
LadThalFn ...
MadCatzg ...
Nabors
NOrion gn' ...
NthgtM g
OilSvHT .48
PainCare
PaxsnC
PetrofdE g 1.92
PhmHTr 1.68
PionDril
ProvETg 1.44
RaeSyst
RegBkHT 4.48
Rentech
RetailHT .94
SemiHTr .18
SPDR 2.26
SP Mid 1.04
SP Matls .52
SP HIthC .37
SP CnSt .37
SP Consum .24
SP Engy .53
SP Fncl .65
SP Inds .42
SP Tech .42
SP Util .90
TelcHTr 2.25
Terremark ...
TransGlb ...
Transmont ...
UltraPt g ...
UtilHTr 3.61
VaalcoE n ...
WheatRg ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Las
... +.14 -4.2 13.9
... -.02 +8.6 .6,
... +.03 +96.4 1.6.
31 +2.44 +17.6 60.3
... -.19 -2.7 2.8&
9 -.03 -17.6 1.4(
... +5.31 +16.0 98.7(
32 +.21 +56.2 4.8
... -.04 -55.1 .6;
... -.07 +14.7 14.9(
... -.37 -1.8 71.31
81 +.35 +36.8 13.8(
... +.15 +6.4 10.01
62 -.06 -57.3 3.11
... +.92 -7.7 130.9"
... +.15 -39.3 1.31
...-1.51 -4.5 94.12
... -.57 -3.9 32.01
... +.24 -2.9 117.31
... +.21 -.7 120.2(
-.18 +1.1 30.0"
-.20 -2.0 29.6(
-.11 -1.2 22.8(
-.02 -6.8 32.9(
+1.90 +21.0 43.9,
-.10 -8.3 28.0(
-.33 -3.0 30.1'
... +.02 -8.1 19.31
... +.53 +5.0 29.21
... +.23 -8.6 26.6"
... -.07 -4.7 .6
66 +.37 +29.3 6.6;
16 +.03 +31.8 8.01
... +3.55 +9.8 52.81
... +1.86 +5.8 103.31
10 +.05 +1.8 3.9,
... +.05 +9.5 3.5"


10,404.30

Record high:11,722.98 I I I i I i I i I I I 1 7,000
Jan.14,2000 A M J J A S 0 N D J F M A M



MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min Init
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


New York Stock Exchange


\DC Tel
\SML Hid
\TI Tech
,astrom
\bgenix
6ctivisn s
,dobeSy
6Mamosa
6ltairNano
,lteraCp
\mazon
,EagleO s
6mrTrde
6mgen
amylin
\polloG
4ppleC s
plIdMatl
6MCC
,rotech
,skJvs
Mtmel
Autodsk s
BEA Sys
3edBath
3iogenldc
3iomet
3iopure
3rdcom
3rcdeCm
3MGI
SareerEd
Selgene s
DhartCm
'hkPoint
DienaCp
Disco
bognos g


I


1 2156


1.2092







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


Personal Merchandise


$3o00
4 lines %., '" ' ..
6 days
Ad must be placed at the LCR
and paid in advance.
LQVIII 1MVAR"V


$9oo
4 lines F- r j I r:l.,:,r !l
6 days '1 1)
111110 iT g "T1T n^T rPfil1a7"^*'
^^^-=1M7
""^"*"c~i~iaa egfr.!'1-


$ s2S $ OO'
One item per ad





$2550 $2250
5.... ,


r-LJ.q i u ,ri a


$1975
4 lines E I adi dfl il
3 days lint '1 0


4 line minimums2.55 per line
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.


Number of Insertions Per line Rate
3 . . . . . . . .. . . .. .. s1.65
4-6 ...................... s1.50
7-1 3 .......................s1.45
14-23 ..................... s1.20
24 or more .................. 990
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.
. .. ...-. . ...... .......- .. ..:. .: -
" -- -- .-. -

Limited to service type advertising only.
4 lines, one month . ........... S60.O00
$9.50 each additional line
Add an a additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.


1. .. ..- .. .. a

Ad Errors- Please read your ad on the first
day of publication. We accept responsibility
for only the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space in error.
Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt
correction and billing adjustments.


You can call us at 755-5440, Monday through Friday
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their classified ads in
person, and some ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad copy to the
Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the
Classified Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.com


K ~, .~..
(7 s..


Ad is to Appear:
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday


Call by:
Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Wed., 10:00 a.m.
Thurs., 10:00 a.m.
Fri., 10:00 a.m.
Fri., 10:00 a.m.


Fax/Email by:
Mon.; 9:00 a.m.
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.


These deadlines are subject to change without notice.


Advertising copy is subject to approval by the
Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or
classify all advertisements under appropriate head-
ings. Copy should be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of publication. Credit for
published errors will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement which was incor-
rect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any


4 lnes 1111W i-.,.01,. --1 3 Directional signs
6 days :,6 dayonai s omission of advertisements ordered to be published,
.... .. ~~,r f Jr ffrll Pricing stickers i Cancellations- Normal advertising deadlines nor for any general, special or consequential dam-
I -No Parking signs apply for cancellation, ages. Advertising language must comply with
O Sa* Helpful garage Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition
sale tips Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440. Should fur- of discrimination in employment, housing and public
Pri t Lin e their information be required regarding pay- accommodations. Standard abbreviations are accept-
SaBe a ments or credit limits, your call will be trans- able; however, the first word of each ad may not be
ferred to the accounting department. abbreviated.
......010 "-A: 100 1150.t 300. 400 700Go o t o/ 900 ii O
.. 50 60 0S : 0 (7 ( Need Help? < m LetlUsWriteYourClassifiedAd


dial-a-pro
ake City Repoer Reporter Setvke Directry




Childcare
CHILD CARE Registered home
#R03C0001. M-F flexible hours.
Full Time. Infant to 4 years.
386-752-2220
CHILDCARE lic. FOCO0007 &
insured. Open Mon Fri. 6am 7:30
pm. Between High Spring &
Ellisville. 386-755-7875

Concrete Work
A.D.F. CONCRETE Construction
A.C.I. Certified. Resd'l Free Est.
Slabs, Driveways, Patios, & Side-
walks. 386-364-5845/ 688-7652
JEB'S CONCRETE
Residential & Commercial.
Sidewalks, Driveways, Patios,
Stucco, Block, Brick, Signage Deco
Stone and Repair. 386-961-8238

Fencing
A & B Professional Fence Company
Fencing-Installation & Repairs
Wood/Chain Link/Farm Fence
Free Estimates 386- 963-4861
A+ FENCING INC.
Aluminum, chain link or Vinyl.
Call for a free estimate.
(386)719-6521 or (386)344-2442

Painting Service
NICK'S PAINTING
Interior/Exterior. Quality Work!
Free Estimates. Will meet or beat all
other estimates. Call 386-344-4242

Home Maintenance
NO REPAIR too Small. Days,
Evenings, & Weekends. All at
reasonable rates. The Home Repair
Center 386-884-0004

Lawn & Landscape Service
Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, design. Comn. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call 386-496-2820 lv msg.
GERALD'S LAWN Maintenance.
Mowing, Hedging, & Trimming.
"No Job To Small!" 386-752-2779
or 386-365-2651. no answer Iv mess

Services
HOUSE KEEPING I Opening for
bi-monthly/weekly cleaning.
Dependable w/ exc. work Ref. In
Columbia or Suw. Co 386-497-4522
No More Mess When You Hire the
Best! Spic & Span Cleaning Svc.
Comm'l & Resid'l. Good rates, All
your cleaning needs. 386-984-0067

Land Services
s Bulldozer Work! tractor work,
root raking, bush hogging, seeding,
sodding, disking, site prep &
landscape work. All types of
Fencing and Irrigation Repair &
Installation. Free Estimate!
Call 755-3890 or (386) 623-3200

Tree Service
Hazardous TREE TRIMMING
and removal. Senior discount.
15 years experience.
386-963-3360

Paralegal Services
A Bankruptcy/Divorce
Other court matters can be done
through a low cost, professional.
Area's best Paula 386-454-2378.


Stick With Us to
Stay Posted on
News and Events
Around Town
and Across
the Country.



REPORTER


Toplaceanadcall7540401or754.0402






To place an ad call 754-9491 or 754-0402


* :lot NO


Q e



*
*


Zen
* bm
* mn


Connected




wwwlakecityreportercom




REPORTER


eas
%Iam

me




4
0*

~
*o



o a






*'e


a ______ -
e a.


e q
4


* 0*51,0


a
Sr


* a---
*OV
* a a




* 4Man
.4a


ee,- nm ror

.romC hterialM*s




___ ('Copyrig ro- =

Syndird Cotentenm


Available from Commercial News Providers-


L


*


-S 0


.9* 9
a A A


S-.j


A *


hLa--..-.


- a-. Al- --.M-


a- 0Ab- A


* --
* O
*-
-









LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


Legal

NOTICE OF PROCEEDINGS FOR
THE CLOSING OF A ROAD
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
YOU WILL NOTICE that the BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
will conduct a public hearing to consider
and determine whether or not the County
will vacate, abandon, discontinue, re-
nounce and disclaim any right of the
County and the public in and to the fol-
lowing described road located in Colum-
bia County, Florida, to-wit:
A part of the right-of-way of SW Ponce
De Leon Avenue as shown on a plat of
LAKESIDE HEIGHTS, SECTION 1. a
subdivision recorded in Plat Book 1.
Page 18 of the public records of Colum-
bia County, Florida, being described as
follows: Begin at the Southwest comer
of Lot 13, Block 5, of said LAKESIDE
HEIGHTS, SECTION 1, and run S 88
55'00" W along the Westerly extension
of the Northerly right-of-way line of SW
Balboa Place (formerly Iowa Street) a
distance of 3.00 feet; thence run North-
erly along a line 3.00 feet West of and
parallel to the Easterly right-of-way line
of SW Ponce De Leon Street a distance
of 140.25 feet to its intersection with the
Westerly extension of the South line of a
20 foot alley as shown on said plat of
LAKESIDE HEIGHTS, SECTION 1;
thence N 89 17'51" E along said line
3.00 feet to the Northwest comer of said
Lot 13, Block 5; thence Southerly along
the West line of said Lot 13, Block 5, a
distance of 140.25 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING. Containing 421 square
feet, more or less.
A public hearing to receive comments
from affected property owners and to au-
thorize the adoption of the proposed res-
olution will be held at 7:00 p.m. at the
April 21, 2005 meeting of the BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA, at
the Columbia County School Board
Complex, 372 West Duval Street, Lake
City, Florida. Copies of the proposed
resolution for the road closing are availa-
ble for inspection at the office of the
County Coordinator located in the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse Annex, 135
NE Hemando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida, between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Mon-
day through Friday.
Any person wishing to appeal any deci-
sion of the Board of County Commis-
sioners with respect to any matter con-
sidered at the above-noticed meeting
will need a record of the proceedings,
and for such purposes, that person may
need to ensure that a verbatim record is
made of the proceedings, which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. In
accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, a person needing spe-
cial accommodations or an interpreter to
participate in this proceeding should
contact Lisa Roberts 386/758-1005 or
T.D. services 904/758-2139, at least sev-
en (7) days prior to the date of the hear-
ing.
If you have any questions, please contact
the Board of County Commissioners of
Columbia County, Florida, at 386/755-
4100.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION-
ERS
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Jennifer Flinn
Jennifer Flinn, Chairman
ATTEST: /s/ P. DeWitt Cason
P. Dewitt Cason, Clerk of Court
01552062
April 3, 2005

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUST-.
EES OF LAKE CITY COMMUNITY
COLLEGE WILL RECEIVE BIDS FOR
THE FOLLOWING: LAKE CITY
COMMUNITY COLLEGE HVAC
SYSTEMS REPLACEMENT BUILD-
INGS NO. 002 & 003 LAKE CITY,
FLORIDA
ARCHITECT'S PROJECT NO. 0503
L.C.C.C. BID FILE NO. 01-001-05
Date & Time for Receiving Bids:
2:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 2005
Contractor's Prequalification: ALL
CONTRACTORS WISHING TO BID
THIS PROJECT MUST BE PREQUA-
LIFIED. Contractors wishing to pre-
qualify should submit documentation a
minimum of two (2) weeks prior to the
bid date directly to the Director of Pur-
chasing, LCCC, showing five (5) years
experience with similar projects, along
with references for the listed projects.
Date, Time and Place for Pre-Bid Con-
ference: All interested bidders are re-
quired to attend the MANDATORY
PRE-BID CONFERENCE at the Job
Site, to be held at 10:00 A.M. local time
on Thursday, APRIL 14, 2005
Place for Receiving Bids:
Bids may be mailed as follows:
Lake City Community College
Purchasing Department
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Hand delivered bids are to
be presented to:
Lake City Community College
Purchasing Department
198 S.E. Staff Way


Legal

Administration Building 001, Room 138
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
All bids must arrive and be date/time
stamped by a Purchasing Department
representative prior to the specified bid
opening date/time. The College will not
be responsible for Postal or other deliv-
ery service delays that cause a bid to ar-
rive at Room 138, Building 001 after the
designated bid opening date/time. Bids
that are mailed must be clearly marked
on the outside of the envelope "BID #1-
001-05 April 26, 2005"
Bid Documents
Prepared By:
CRAIG SALLEY & ASSOCIATES,
ARCHITECTS
3911 Newberry Road, Suite D
Gainesville, FL 32607
(352) 372-8424, FAX (352) 377-4945
Bid Documents
Available From:
The Architect's Office
Deposit for Bid
Documents: Prime Contractors for de-
posit of $100.00 per set made out to
Craig Salley & Associates with a two (2)
set maximum. Deposits of Contractors
are refundable upon submission of a bo-
na fide Bid and return of said Bid Docu-
ments in good and usable condition
within ten (10) days after Bid opening.
Project Description: This project in-
volves the removal of the existing
HVAC Systems and ductwork and the
replacement with new systems, includ-
ing new exterior insulated ductwork in
Buildings 2 and 3 in the Fine Arts Com-
plex at Lake City Community College.
The existing acoustical tile ceiling sys-
tem will be removed to allow the instal-
lation of the new supply and return duct-
work. New acoustical tile ceiling sys-
tems (fire rated in Corridors) will be in-
stalled, re-using the existing fluorescent
light fixtures.
New Mezzanines are being constructed
in the interior of both buildings to ac-
commodate the new chilled water/steam
air handlers. The existing roof mounted,
chilled water multi-zone units are to be
removed from both buildings as a part of
this project.
The existing campus chilled water and
steam systems will be extended and con-
nected to the new air handlers. The Col-
lege is direct purchasing the air handlers
for both buildings, since they are the on-
ly long-lead items in the project. It is
anticipated that they will be delivered to
the Campus for installation as a part of
this project in mid -June, 2005.
April 2, 3 & 5, 2005
FOR THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF LAKE CITY COM-
MUNITY COLLEGE
Charles W. Hall, President
01552026
April 2, 3, 5, 2005


020 Lost & Found

FOUND PUPPY Male, black & tan
found on Hubble ST. 386-758-6070

LOST at Florida Buffet on Easter
Sunday. Small white zippered purse
containing Family Jewelry very
sentimental. I found call 386-752-
2487 Reward! Please Be Honest!


030 Personals

#1 IN BUSINESS SERVICES
Divorce, Bankruptcy, Resumes
RE Closings, Legal Forms
248 N Marion Av. 755-8717

A Bankruptcy/Divorce. Moved/Di-
al-A-Pro Section Paula 454-2378.

100 Jo0
100 Opportunities

$ GET YOUR CLASS B $
CDL license fro $250. We train.
904-777-5995

01550382
NOW HIRING
Motivated individuals for Manu-
factured Housing Construction.
Company with GREAT benefits
and GREAT hours. 401K, health
insurance, life insurance, paid
vacations and holidays. Competi-
tive starting pay. Experience
helpful but not necessary. Apply
in person: Homes of Merit, Inc.
1915 SE Hwy. 100 E. Office
NO CALLS PLEASE! Homes of
Merit promotes a Drug Free
Workplace and is an Equal
Opportunity Employer.

ATTN: 23 needed people to lose up
to 30 lbs. By Summer! 100% Natu-
ral, 100% guaranteed. No Ephedra
Call Lisa: (800) 442-6101 or visit:
www.daretobethin.com


LACKECITY
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
INSTRUCTOR
ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING PROGRAM
198 Duty Days full-time Tenured track position to conduct the
learning experience in the classroom, laboratory and/or clinical
area. Prepare for instruction (syllabi, lesson plans, tests; and rec-
ommending course offerings, sequence, faculty assignments).
Requires MSN in Nursing, State of Florida Licensed RN or
License eligible, plus 3 years experience as staff nurse. Computer
literate. Open until filled. Review applications to begin April 18,
2005
INQUIRIES:
HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT
LAKE CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-8703
Information: (386) 754-4314 FAX (386) 754-4594
Require College Application, Resume & Transcripts
E-MAIL: Boettcherg@lakecitycc.edu
Applications are available on WEB AT: www.lakecitycc.edu
Lake City Community College is accredited by the Commission on
Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION COLLEGE IN EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT
VETERAN'S PREFERENCE


100 Job
100 Opportunities


015510599
THE LAKE CITY REPORTER
is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier for
Ft. White & Lake City. Deliver
the Reporter in the early morning
hours Tuesday Sunday. No de-
livery on Monday's. Carrier must
have dependable transportation.
Stop by the Reporter today to fill
out a contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!


0155168
W Professional Child Care #
Worker needed. Must have CDA
Opportunity to expand into
management. Salary range from
$7. $9 hr. Mail resume to:
P.O. Box 2127,
Lake City, Fl. 32056


01552019
Auto/Motor home/Med. Truck
Technician Needed. Immediate
opening. 5 day work week, vaca-
tion pay, benefits avail..Santa Fe
Ford, Alachua. 386-462-2802 ext
14 ask for John. D/F/W/P EOE


01552030
Draftsman Needed
Must have experience in Auto
Cad & residential drawings.
Call Suzanne Henderson for
appt. at (386)963-5647.


01552037




$2000.00 Sign on Bonus
Drivers with 1 yr T/T exp who
join our team in April will receive
a. Davis Express, Starke, FL.
98% FL. GA. TN. S.C. & AL
0 1 yr. exp. .34 cpm
S2 yrs. exp. .35 cpm
3 yrs. exp. .36 cpm
100% lumper reimbursement
Safety bonus
Guaranteed hometime
Health, Life, Dental &
disability Ins. avail.
0 401K available.
Call 1-800-874-4270 #6
www.davis-express.com

01552053
The largest aircraft repair
station in South Florida is seeking
qualified candidates in the
following areas:
-, Director of Logistics
-- A&P Mechanics, Avionics
and Sheetmetal Technicians
-, Quality Control Inspectors
-> Maintenance Managers
and Team Leaders
-, Maintenance Planners
-, Materials Planners
Buyers
-, Interiors Manager
- Stock Clerks & Tool Room
Clerks
A minimum of 5 years experience
in Aviation is required. All
candidates should send resumes
to: aviationjobs(lhotmail.com

01552076
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT

*- ^




Bulldozer, Backhoes, Load-
ers, Dump Trucks, Graders,
Scrapers, Excavators

Next Class: April 18th
-, National Certification
-> Financial Assistance
Job Placement

800-383-7364

Associated Training Services
www.atsn-schools.com


ioo Job
Opportunities


01552087
Driver Flatbed
A OWNER OPERATORS *
Tired of not getting
Paid for EMPTY Miles?
WE PAY ALL MILES!
S.E. REGIONAL DIVISION
95 Loaded/90 Empty
95/95 (after 1 yr)
Plus: 100% Fuel Surcharge!
Min. 23 yrs old, Must have Class
(A) CDL & 1 yr OTR Flatbed
exp.
Call Bonnie: 800-793-0953
Sunbelt Transport
Or Apply Online!
www.patriottrans.com


03524539
MERIDIAN BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE, INC.

Add Specialist- MIST & Adult
Programs- FT/PT G'ville & PRN
Lake City
Adult Case Manager- FT G'ville
Children Case Manager- FT
G'ville, Cross City
Counselor IV/ Sr. Clin'n FT
Jasper, Live Oak, FT Outpatient
Adults/Child'n, FT/PRN Foster
care, FT Fam Crisis Trtmnt
G'ville,FT Achievement Center
Lake City
Certified Behavioral Analyst -
FT Fam Crisis Trtmnt G'ville
Emergency Svcs Intake Evalua-
tor- FT G'ville, Lake City
Family Support Wkr FT
G'ville
Health Support Tech- FT
G'ville
Driver- FT G'ville, CDL Re-
quired
Clerk Specialist PT G'ville
Unit Clerk FT G'ville
Maintenance Worker FT
G'ville
LPN FT/PRN G'ville & Lake
City
Facility Manager- FT G'ville
Program Director, Acute Care -
FT G'ville
Psych Tech PRN G'ville &
Lake City
Security tech FT G'ville
RN FT G'ville & Lake City
Family Care Supervisor- FT
G'ville
Sr. Client Relations Specialist-
PT Lake City, FT Lake Butler
Comp Assessor- PRN G'ville,
Lake City
Staff Psychiatrist- FT G'ville
Excellent benefits.
For details visit
www.meridian-healthcare.org or
call (352) 374-5600 ext. 8277.
Send resumes to:
Meridian Behavioral Healthcare,
Inc., Human Resources,
4300 SW 13th St., Gainesville,
FL 32608, fax (352) 374-5608,
e-mail: jobs()mbhci.org, ATTN:
refer to Sun Ad. EOE, DFWP


V Class A? V Good MVR?
V Dependable? V Safe?
V Want to be home daily?
V Like weekends off?
Want steady work w/stable Co.
Good equipment w/ good wages?
Call Columbia Grain
386-755-7700 Full & Part Time.

Driver
-vStab ility-


STRENGTH

0 BONUSES
PAID
1 WEEKLY


* Solos Owner
0 Teams Operators
.* -Sturdent Lease


Graduates Purchase
an equal opportunity employer



No CDL? No Problem!


I Call 866-280-5309


Lake Citv and Live Oak Routes Now Available.
Your own franchise. Think of it. Total control of your own future. Build a
successful business that you can look at and say "Yes, that is mine!"
Your schedule will be dictated by nobody but yourself.
You have the smarts. You have the people skills. You have the desire to be
in control of your own destiny.And with Snap-on's training, products
and name behind you, a successful business is within your reach.
If you are looking for that rare opportunity that matches best-of-class
products, proven business strategies and a company that is
driven to deliver, take a new look at the Snap-on organization.
You may have found your place. Call us at 877-4SNAPON "
for more information.


Kenosha, WI
Snap-on and Snap-on Tools are
trademarks of Snap-on Incorporated.


100 J0ob
Opportunities
03524697
University of Florida Jacksonville
Healthcare is currently seeking
Medical Assistant/ Customer
Service Rep. for our Lake City
office. Join us now for a
brilliant future that reflects
your true potential.

Medical Assistant/ Customer
Service Rep.

In this position you'll be
responsible for the scheduling of
patient appointments and obtaining
the necessary documentation from
patients for billing/ insurance
purposes. In addition you will be
serving as a liaison between
patients and physicians.
Qualifications include a HS
diploma or equivalent and
graduation from an approved
Medical Assistant program.
Knowledge of ambulatory health
care or related health care
fields is required. The ability to
multi-task is a must.

For consideration, please apply
on-line at: www.ufhscj.edu/ufjp
Drug Free Workplace
EOE

Accepting Applications for:
Hostess/ cashier & cooks. Drug Free
Workplace Apply in person at
QUALITY INN, Lake City.

Aluminum, screen room & vinyl
siding installer.
Experience necessary.
Call 752-6367

ASBESTOS REMOVERS
needed. Will train. Transportation &
Drug screen required.
Good pay 1-888-327-8207

Bath & Body Works in The
Lake City Mall is Hiring for PT
Key-holders. Experience Preferred.
Please Apply Within.

BELLSOUTH
Hiring National Directory Assis-
tance Operators In Lake City
Full time variable shifts
Free Medical Insurance

First, Register online at
www.bellsouth.com
Step 1. Go to About Us
Step 2. Go to Careers
Step 3. Click on Find a Job
Step 4. Click on Occupational
/Hourly Positions
Step 5. Search Job # 0501803
F/T and 0501805 P/T Lake
City, FL
Step 6. Click Send Resume

Call Lee Anne @ 1-888-771-2562
for assistance

BLUE JEAN JOB
$ Money $
Seeking sharp go geters, Able to
TRAVEL USA. Demo chemical
products. Good people skills & en-
joy working in a Rock in Roll evir.
Call Kelly 1-800-201-3293. 9-6.
Must start immed.


100 J0ob
100 'Opportunities

CARETAKER NEEDED: Mature
and Dependable. 40 hrs. a week.
Night shift. Starting $8.00 hr. Leave
name & number. 386-758-9658

CLASS A CDL OTR Driver
needed for Florida Pine Straw.
2 yrs exp. required. Health
insurance, retirement, paid vacation.
Drug Free 386-294-3411
CLERICAL
LAKE CITY & SURROUNDING
AREAS MANY POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
CALL FOR APPT
386-755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREENS/BACKGRD
REQ.
COLIN GAY MASONRY, INC
is looking for Mason tenders
to work in Lake City and
Lake Butler. 386-365-3992
01552072
Driver Dedicated Lane
HOME EVERY WEEKEND
GUARANTEED!
No Touch Freight
85% Preloaded/Pretarped
*Avg. $779 $1019/week
Jacksonville, FL Terminal
CDL A req'd. 877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com

COUNTRY INN AND SUITES
Housekeepers! Applicants who
are mature, serious & seeking
long term employment & have
cleaning experience. Apply at
Country Inn and Suites, Florida
Gateway Dr. 1-75 & Hwy 90.
Excellent working environment,
competitive pay, benefits incl.
vacation & holiday.
Cracker Barrel is now hiring grill
cooks, servers & dishwashers. You
can achieve 3 raises in your 1st
year. Apply in person.
CUSTOMER SERVICE REP.
Career opportunity in a sales/service
environment available for qualified
individual with a strong work ethic
and dedication to the job. Min. 3
years Customer Service exp. in a
fast paced environment. Must enjoy
working with people Computer/
data Entry skills required as well as
Windows proficiency. Minimum 50
wpm. No Phone Calls Please.
Resumes Att: Joy
ws4140@(earthlink.net
DELIVERY DRIVER with clean
Class D CDL. Must have
knowledge of Lake City,
Gainesville & Macclenny areas and
be able to lift heavy objects. Good
benefits offered after 90 days (100%
employee medical, Holiday pay &
Life Ins.), 401K & vacation offered
after 1 yr. of employment. Pick up
application at Lake City Industries,
250 NW Railroad Street.
FLAT BED DRIVERS
Atlantic Truck Line
Class A, in state & home every
night. $600-$750/wk. Yearly $1,000
safety bonus. 3 yrs. exp. Paid vac.,
health/dental. Call 1-877-328-7512
Mon-Friday,


$50,000 AVERAGE
EXPECTATION WANTED IMMEDIATELY!
5 MEN OR WOMEN FOR EXECUTIVE SALES POSITION
*Paid Insurance
401K Plan
*Quality Work Schedule
"Advancement Opportunity
We provide Demos
"Career Path into Management
***S3000 Sign Up Bonus for
Experienced Auto Sales Professionals
*Our Top Performers Earn an
Average of S9000 Per Month
"$3000 sign up bonus for professional automobile sales persons with strong documented track record.
EDDIE ACCARDI
CHEVROLET-MAZDA









3 SALES PEOPLE


NEEDED IMMEDIATELY


LAKE CITY

REPORTER


BUY IT! SELL IT! FIND IT! 755-5'








LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY,.APRIL 3, 2005


100 0ob
SOpportunities
DONOR RECRUITER
LifeSouth Community Blood
Centers, Inc. seeks Donor Recruiter.
This is a full-time position working
with media, planning special events,
and recruiting donors. Weekends
Required. Must be outgoing, have
strong written and verbal communi-
cation skills and possess excellent
customer service skills. Sales
background desired. Submit
resume, cover letter, and application
to: 833 SW SR 47, Lake City, FL
32025. NO CALLS PLEASE
EOE/DFWP.
DRIVER NEEDED
Fuel Tanker Driver needed Sunday
thru Thursday PM (6pm-6am). Off
Friday and Saturday Must have
Class A CDL, Tanker, Hazmat,
Clean MVR, 2 years driving experi-
ence, Truck based in Columbia and
Suwannee Counties.
Full Health Insurance, 401K,
Uniforms, Paid Vacation, Late
Model Equipment. Apply in person
Mon.- Fri. between 3pm and 6pm @
Johnson & Johnson Inc. 1607 US 90
East Madison, Florida 32340 con-
tact person Ronnie Blanton at
(800)226-5434
Dump Truck Drivers Wanted
Class A or B license
Contact V&J's at
386-497-1080
EXPERIENCED OTR
DRIVERS NEEDED.
1-800-367-2640
BRANDY OR JIM
EXPERIENCED PLASTERERS
& Laborers. Transportation a must.
Call between 5pm & 9pm.
386-755-9005
FIBERGLASS WORKER needed:
Experienced Chopper operator
and gel coater. Call (904)275-2800
ask for Larry or Phyllis.
GREENLEAF AUTO
RECYCLERS
Positions avail, for sales personnel
w/computer skills, local drivers
w/Class D (CDL a plus) & disman-
tier with own tools. Paid vacations,
Medical, Dental & 401K benefits.
Drug Free Environment, EOE.
Apply in person or send resume to:
4686 E. US Hwy. 90, Lake City, FL
32055. Fax # (386) 755-2145
GROWING DISTRIBUTION
COMPANY is looking for
Customer Service Professional.
Fax resume to 386-752-3751.
HARD WORKER needed $8. -
$10. per hour, depending upon your
abilities. Clearing land w/bush ax
Lunch Included. 386-752-1957
Heavy TRUCK MECHANIC
Needed. Apply at Southern
Specialized LLC. on US 41 North
or call 386-752-9754
HELP WANTED
Drywall Stockers P/T now,
working up to F/T soon.
Call Ron (352) 267-8903
in H.,, LP,WANTED for stair ..
manufacturing company. Carpentry
iskiflk iided. Call f6r appointment.
386-755-2556


100 Job
1 Opportunities
Help Wanted Full or Part time.
Presser for Advanced Dry Cleaners.
Benefits available. Apply in person,
Publix Plaza. No Phone Calls!
HIPP CONSTRUCTION
is Now Hiring Experienced:
Asphalt Laborers
General Laborers
Asphalt Roller Operator
Lute Rate Person
Dump Truck Driver
Please Call 386-462-2047.
Competitive Wages/Benefits
EOE/ DFWP
HOLIDAY INN is Now hiring for
Book Keeper and Taking
Applications for Front Desk.
386-754-1411
Hunter Insurance Agency has an
office position open. Full time &
Salary w/benefits. Call for Appt.
9am-5pm. Mon.-Fri. 386-752-6990
IF YOU are 55 years of age or
older, meet low income guidelines,
reside in Columbia or Baker
Counties, and would like to work
the Senior Community Service
Employment Program (SCSEP)
may be able to assist you. For more
information contact Tom Fussell,
Program Assistant at 386-755-9026
extension 3132, or Doris Cedar at
386-752-2577 extension 4503.
IMMEDIATE OPENING for
Certified GM Automotive
Technician. Must have own tools
and transportation. Top pay and
benefits. Apply in person at
Scoggins Chevrolet, Buick, Inc.
1424 N Young Blvd, Chiefland, FL.
or send resume to
vernon l()bellsouth.net.
EOE, DFWP
LABORER /MACHINE
SHOP EXPERIENCE.
Must pass drug test.
Must be able to do manual labor.
Apply in person Grizzly Mfg,
Cortez Street, across from airport.
Drug Free.
Lake City Bowl is now accepting
applications for Part time nights and
weekends. Apply in person 1995
Branford Hwy. No Phone Calls
Lawn/Main/Janitorial worker.
40 hrs per week. M/T/TH/F/S. 1pm
to 9 pm. Clean Criminal background
check. Clean driving record.
Fax qualifications to: 386-752-0740
Live Oak Paint & Carpet Center
is looking for experienced flooring
installers. Top Pay. Must have all
current legal paperwork.
Call Brad or John at 386-362-7066
LOCAL GRASSING Company
looking for 3, Class A, CDL
Tractor/ Trailer Drivers. Hauling
Sod; Hay & equipment. Most jobs
are local within 60 miles of Lake
City. Normal work week M-F, some
Saturday work required. Hourly pay
based on experience. Apply in
person US 441 North of Five Points.
1/2 mile South of 1-10 on west side
of road. Gray vinyl siding house
with maroon shutters. We are a
Drug Free Work Place.


o10 OOpportunities
Local Professional Office is looking
for an Office Manager. Must be
proficient in Quick Books, w/ exp in
payroll and bookkeeping.
Send reply to Box 01041, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
LUCAS TRUCKING
DRIVER NEEDED
for log hauling.
Call 752-8410
MED TECH Positions Available.
FT Night w/ No Weekends & PRN.
850-973-2271, fax 850-973-8158.
E-mail: mcmhck( earthlink.net
01552075
39-43 cpm
24 CDL DRIVERS!
'06 Trucks
Sign-On Bonus
$0 Lease-$1.07
1-800-635-8669

MTR INCORPORATED is look-
ing for 1 qualified Truck & trailer
Mechanic & 1 Mechanic helper.
Apply in person at 1200 NW 173rd
St. Alachua, Fl. 386-462-4850.
NEEDED:
INSTALLER
FOR LOCAL TILE & MARBLE
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY.
MUST BE-ABLE TO LIFT UP TO
70 LBS NON-SMOKER PLEASE
CALL FOR AN APPT.
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991.
Drug screen & Background Req.
01552108


[",<:PIcr

RECEPTIONIST FT
Responsibilities include
answering incoming calls,
coordinating mail and other
general office duties. HS
diploma/equivalent and a mini-
mum of one to two years related
office experience is imperative.
For details call our job line at:
352-379-6228 or visit our website
at www.hospicecares.org. Email
resume to: employment@hospice-
cares.org, fax to: 352-379-6206,
or apply in person at: 618 SW
Florida Gateway Dr., Lake City,
FL. Please include the title of the
position on your resume.
EOE/DFWP

OUTDOOR CAREERS
Hiring working Foremen for utility
contract field crews. Physical
outdoor work, paid training at
$10+/hr, $14/hr plus bonuses after
promotion, company truck &
benefits. Must have strong
leadership skills, a good driving
record, and be flexible to travel in
Florida and SE States.
Osmose, Inc.
Call Toll-Free for Information
1..877-676-6731
EOE M/F/D/V
www.osmose.com


100 0ob
100 Opportunities
01552060
Drivers CDL A

Check Out Our Bonuses:
$3,000 Company Drivers
$1,500 O/Operators
Pre-Pass Plus, No NYC or
Canada, Optional NE, &
NO loading/Unloading
O/Ops: Get paid $1.05 on
All Dispatched Miles!
Call us 7 Days a Week
Get approved w/in 60 min!
Must be 23 w/lyr. OTR
No Hazmat Required
www.ptl-inc.com
1-800-848-0405
Paschall Truck Lines

RECEPTIONIST
Full or part- time position
available, based on experience.
Must possess excellent
communication skills and friendly
demeanor. Multi line phone,
filing and computer experience
required, proficient in Microsoft
Word & Excel a plus. Must be able
to multi task in a fast paced office
environment and be attentive to
detail. Drug Free Workplace.
Fax resume to (386) 961-8200,
email to acctdquest-aviation.com
or mail to 173 SE Newell Drive,
Lake City, FL 32025.
No phone calls please.
SALES POSITION
WELL ESTABLISHED
LENDING COMPANY
MUST HAVE STRONG SALES
EXPERIENCE & RESUME
PLEASE CALL FOR APPT.
WAL-STAFF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
DrugScreen & backgrd Req.
SALESPERSON
Eager, Aggressive & desire to earn
with an expanding company. Gary
Hamilton Homes. 386-758-6755
SERVICEMAN
Tools, Experience & Drivers
License a must. Hamilton Homes
386-758-6755
SKIPS DELI needs
Deli help. Apply in person
between 2-4 p.m.
No Phone Calls!!!
STRUCTURAL/MECHANICAL
DRAFTSMAN/DETAILER
AUTO CAD EXP. REQUIRED
Send resume: Draftsman
PO Box 1949, Lake City,
FL 32056 Must pass drug test.
THE PACKAGE STORE. US 90
W. & 1-75. Next to Econolodge,
seeks cashier/stockperson. Apply in
person 9am-3pm. 386-755-2881
WANTED!! INDUSTRIAL
HARD WORKERS ONLY NEED
APPLY. ALL SHIFTS
AVAILABLE. MUST BE ABLE
TO LIFT 50 TO 70LB. CALL FOR
AN APPT NOW!!
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
DRUG SCREENS/
BACKGRD REQ.


too Job
100 Opportunities

WANTED!!!
ASSISTANT
FOR LOCAL TILE & MARBLE
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY
MUST BE ABLE TO LIFT
.UPTO 70 LBS
NON-SMOKER
RELIABLE TRANSPORTATION A
MUST EXPERIENCE A PLUS
PLEASE CALL
WAL-STAFF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
Drug Screen & Backgrd Req.

WANTED:
Truck Driver.
386-755-2556

Waste Management Inc.
Lake City/ Gainesville
Has an immediate opening for a
hard working, flexible individual to
fill the position of Driver/Laborer
for Lake City and Gainesville. This
position requires a minimum Class
B CDL with air brake endorsement.
Waste Management offers a full
benefits package including health
insurance and 401 K plan. If you
feel you meet the requirements,
please apply by phone
1-877-220-JOBS (5627) or online at
WWW.WMCAREERS.COM
EOE/ADA/DFWP
WELDER/WELDER HELPER
Apply in person at QFab,
3631 U.S. 90 East, Across
from airport, Lake City, FL
MUST PASS DRUG TEST
Youth Care Worker
Help needed for PT position in a
male dormitory of a residential pro-
gram for adolescents in Lake City.
Fri./Sat. 11 pm to 7am. AA Degree
and prev. residential exp. preferred.
Send resume to Comer Drug Store,
Inc., Attention: Rhonda Lockwood,
Regional Coordinator, 1300 NW 6th
St., Gainesville, FL 32601.
EOE/DFWP

120 Medical
120 Employment

03524580
North Florida Surgery Center
has Immediate opening for
RN-PRN, No Nights or Week-
ends. Fax resume to 386-755-
2169 or mail to: 256 Professional
Glen, Suite 101, Lake City, FL
32025

DIRECT CARE Staff needed for
large group home, located off 47
near 232. CPR, First Aid,
Medication administration,
certificate required. Must be eligible
for back ground screening and hold
a current FL drivers license.
Call between 9 am & 6pm at
386-454-0968.

MAINTENANCE DIRECTOR
Nursing facility seeks Maintenance
Director FT. Health Care fIlac l ex-
perience preferred. Please send ri "
sume to Administrator, 587 SE Er-
mine Ave., Lake City, FL 32025.


1 Medical
120 Employment


FT Dietary Technician
for 180-bed Facility
Must have minimum of 2 year
degree in Nutrition Therapy or a
related field and at least 1 year
experience. Contact Bette Forshaw
NHA @ 386-362-7860 or apply in
person Suwannee Health Care
Center 1620 E Helvenston Street
Live Oak, Florida 32064
EOE, DV, M/F


LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL
/ Registered Nurse PT
/ Physical Therapist PRN
/ Respiratory Therapist FT
/ Radiology Technologist -
PRN W/call
/ Certified Registered
/ Anesthetists PRN
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com

LAKE BUTLER
HOSPITAL
CARPENTER FT
Renovation work, interior &
exterior, Cabinetry experience re-
quired. Excellent opportunity;
Great salary and benefits.
For further information, please
visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386)496-2323,
FAX (386)496-1611


Medical Records Assistant wanted
part-time for doctor's office in Lake
City. Two years in a medical office
setting required. Please fax resume
Attn: Human Resources (352) 373-
9870 or email simedpa(@yahoo.com

RN's & RESPIRATORY
THERAPIST
Ed Fraser Memorial Hospital has
immediate positions available for
PRN Med/Surg and Emergency
Room RN's, 12 hour shifts. One
year Med/Surg or ER experience
and Florida License required.
Respiratory Therapist PRN, 12 hour
shifts. Florida License required.
Ed Fraser Memorial Hospital
159 N. 3rd St.
Macclenny, FL 32063
904-259-3151 ext 2210
Fax 904-259-3279
DRUG FREE
WORKPLACE/EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

PHYSICAL THERAPY Assistant,
for Rehabilitation Center. Salary
$25/hr. Please call 904-259-4873
or fax resume to 904-259-5381.
ATTN: Rebecca Matheny
Administrator.

WANTED:
Niirse Practitioner for busy
Family Practice. Fax resumes to
386-758-7998 Attn: Mary


Q_ 3101 US HWY 90 WEST, Suite #101
OQv 0_ Lake City, FL 32055
VQ Business (386) 752-6575
S2001Toll Free 1-800-333-4946
THE DARBY-ROGERS COMPANY v]
Dwww.c2darbyrogers.com PAvisit our website www.century21.com
www.c2ldarbyrogers.com


Spectacular Sunsets and Runway
Views...Beautiful new well-main-
tained home. Open floor plan w/2
master suites & many upgrades.
Includes 2000sf hanger w/Wilson
door and apt for guests or home
office. And so much more. A must
see! MLS#44511 $329,900


Enjoy Peace & Serenity in this
Majestic 2 story home on the
Suwannee River, with 4BR/3BA. 2"1
Master has balcony overlooking the
river. Sit on the screened front porch
and enjoy river living at it's best.
MLS#44317 $375,000.


This lovely corner home has it
all...3BR/2BA, stone wall w/insert
fireplace. Huge kitchen. Florida
room, enclosed front porch. Just
move in and enjoy. MLS#44448
$169,900.


Dare to Compare! Spacious 5BR/
2.5BA brick home on 1 + acre. 5'h BR
could be bonus room, game room or
home office. Large grilling room
w/Jacuzzi hook-up. Beautiful oak
cabinets, formal dining & living
rooms. Gorgeous fireplace. A must
see! MLS#44564 $289,900.


Do You Love Golf? Then this home
is for you, well maintained 3/2 brick
home located on golf course. Open
floor plan wit split bedrooms.
Screened back porch, custom win-
dows and much morel MLS#44547
$175,900.


New Upscale Neighborhood...
Beautiful home presented by Blake
Construction. 2,628 sf. 4BR/3.5BA.
Bonus room with bath could be 5"h
BR. Split plan, formal dining room,
gas fireplace, hardy board & brick
exterior. MLS#43002 $319,900.


Very Unique Home...on 6+ beauti-
ful acres. This 2 story home has 3/2.
In-ground screened in pool. Large
shed can park 3 cars, a workshop
w/AC unit. Come see it today
MLS#44617 $200,800.


i dl,.; I ll I -
Nice little house 3/1.5, great Just Reduced Cute Little
kitchen. With a little TLC would make Bungalow!! 3BR/1BA, hardwood
a wonderful home in the heart of floors thru-out. Would make a great
quaint little community of Jasper. rental or family home. MLS#44146
Close to Valdosta, Ga. $63,000 $69,900.
MLS#44263


-~ ~ -- or


Beautiful "New Home" by Plumb
Level Construction. Split bedrooms,
eat-in kitchen, covered patio, glam-
our bath, all brick, greatroom. Come
see it today! MLS#44053 $179,900.


Oak woodlands surround this
newer 3BR/2BA, 1642 sf.home in
Hamilton Co. Located across the
street from a conservation area.
MLS#44231 $184,900


Under Construction! Begin the
summer in this 3BR/2BA brand new
home on .5 ac. 1192 sf. with 1 car
garage. MLS#44121 $109,000


Directions: Take 252 B to Troy Rd. Turn right, go to Russwood entrance, turn right, go
to Dusty Glen, turn left, 2nd house on the right. For additional info call BJ
Federico/Realtor 386-752-6575.


Mike Foster



386-288-3596




BUY RENT SELL

Real Estate is my chosen FULL-TIMNE profes-
sion. Specializing in Suwannee and Columbia

County and surrounding area. Resident of the City
of Branford.

Need your property to rent and/or manage for
I you. Don't want to rent, your property? I can sell
. it for you. I have buyers waiting for properties to
buy. Please let me sell you your next "Dream

Home." FREE Comparative Market Analysis. I have
people looking for vacant land in O'Brien.


Well maintained Homes of
Merit with open floor plan.
Large master suite with
garden tub. Fireplace

never been used. Stone
Driveway. Attached carport
S on cement. Detached

workshop with carport on
cement. Chain link fence
surrounds property. Prep-
ped for an electric gate

opener. Also comes with
1997 Clayton 14x70 single
wide MH, 2BR, 2BA, like

new condition.


115 SW Ohio Ave.


advantage Live Oak


Realty oLke CityInc. 388-8862-4664


_____ L1~1MLSI~


~4I


711


.. .. .. -










LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


120 ^Medical
120 Employment

(1552109


HOSPICE

Hospice offers excellent benefits,
competitive salary, schedule flexi-
bility, PTO accruals and much
more. Great career opportunities
available!
Gainesville Primary
Care Center
RN-PRN
LICENSED CNA's- FT & PRN
KITCHEN ASST. PRN

Gainesville Primary On-Call
RN-PRN
Hr. vary: Evenings, nights,
weekends, & holidays.
Pegasus Pediatric Hospice
Homecare Team
SOCIAL WORKER
(LCSW) PRN
Must have previous pediatric
oncology or hospice exp.
Alachua County
Nursing Home Team
o RN-FT
Must be flexible to go into patient
homes as needed.

Starke Home Care Team
RN FT
Must be flexible to go into nurs-
ing homes as needed.
CRISIS CARE
Home Visits 12 hr. shifts.

LPN and CNA positions
available in Alachua,
Branford, Union, Clay, Baker,
Levy, Dixie, Gilchrist and
Duval counties.

Interested parties, please email a
resume to: employment@hospice-
cares.org.
or fax a resume to: 352-379-6206,
Attn: HR. You may also mail a
resume to: 4200 NW 90th Boule-
vard, Gainesville, FL 32606.
EOE/DFWP


160 Investments

Beat Bank CD Rates
Earn 8% return on seasoned
mortgage. Excellent payment record
and security. 386-365-1130
To place your
classified ad call

755-5440O


Accepting Applications
Good, Bad & No Credit
Call for 1st & 2nd Mortgages
Established full service co.
(800) 226-6044
WE BUY MORTGAGES
2622 NW 43rd St.
#A-1
FHANVA/Conv. Specialist Gainesville, FL 32606
GAINESVILLE MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC.
Licensed Mtg. Lender


170 Business
17 Opportunities

01551809
FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITY
COVERALL
CLEANING CONCEPTS
Own a COVERALL
Franchise for as little
as $1,500 Down
Guaranteed Customers
Complete Training & Support
equipment & Supplies
Guaranteed Financing
Our secret can be your success!
CALL NOW:
FREE BROCHURE
(800) 249-2532

NO BLUE Sky
Gas & Food Convenience Store
for Lease
813-286-8600

FURNITURE STORE
For Sale, Excellent Buy.
Tom Eagle, Daniel Crapps Realtors
386-755-5110

THE UPS STORE for sale, Lake
City, profitable, owner retiring. 4
weeks training, owner financing.
Call Mr. Grossman, 877-578-6499


310 Pets & Supplies

2 MALE Poodles. White & Apri-
cot. CKC. $150 ea. 386-364-1652

AKC mini Dachshund, smooth coat.
$350. Information/call 397-2717

Dachshunds. 3 Males Black & tan, 1
solid. $350 each 386-755-6456

FREE PUPPIES
Boxer & Australian Blue Mix
8 weeks old. Ft. White Area.
386-497-4484

LAB PUPPY AKC. chocolate
yellow & black. POP. 386-752-2276

Male Black &Tan Mini Daschund.
$150. 386-364-1652

POINTER Bird Dog Puppies Health
certificate. $150 each 386-364-1652


310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHERS NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health certifi-
cate from a licensed veterinarian
documenting they have mandatory
shots and are free from intestinal
and external parasites. Many species
of wildlife must be licensed by Flor-
ida Fish and Wildlife. If you are un-
sure, contact the local office for in-
formation.


330 Livestock &
3 Supplies

REG. AQHA/PBA Palomino
Yearling Filly.
Big & Beautiful.
$2,500. 386-755-1771


360 Feed, Seed
S& Plants

PLANTS FOR SALE!
Tomato Plants, Peppers, Cabbage,
Collards, & Broccoli Plants.
386-752-4033. Cheshire


401 Antiques

ANTIQUE DARK OAK
Rocking Chair w/Split Hickory
Seat, $125., FIRM, CASH ONLY.
386-961-0013


402 Appliances

KENMORE DISHWASHER
Works & looks Great.
Have all manuals. $100.
386-754-0730


403 Auctions

ONLINE AUCTION
Wed, April 13th
DeAngelo Brothers. Jacksonville
Pickups, SUV's, ATV's,
Volkswagen Powered Buggies,
Boats, Trailers, Mowers and more.
www.asset-auctions.com
Asset Auctions
800-303-6511


408 Furniture

48" Glass PATIO TABLE
with four chairs $75.
386-752-9500


BLUE SWIVEL
Rocker $25.
386-752-1749


Couch, oak trim,
blue/rose floral print,
excellent. condition. $150.
386-752-1749

Dining Set, Drop table w/2 Ivs. 6
chairs, China Cab. w/bubble glass
& side lites. 3 shelves & low cab.
w/2 doors; E. Amer. Maple, Like
New, $925, Cash Only, 961-0013

DOUBLE OAK
Rocker
$75.00
386-752-9500

EARLY AMERICAN "Windsor"
Rocking Chair, Hard Rock Maple,
$110., FIRM. CASH ONLY.
386-961-0013

KITCHEN SET, Green tile & oak
table, 4 chairs. $100. Provential
dining room set, oak table w/ leaf.
+ 6 chairs. $400. 386-752-0917

TWIN MATRESS/BOX SPRINGS.
and Frame. $69.00
386-754-2588 or
365-0651


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Effective October 1, 2003
All Yard Sale Ads
must be prepaid


440 Miscellaneous

FRIGIDAIRE FREEZER
Large. 2 yrs old, like new.
$350.00 or best offer.
386-961-8628


INTERIOR FLAT
Latex paint. 5 gal. buckets.
$30. each. MORRELL'S
386-752-3910


520 Boats for Sale

FOR SALE 1998 16 ft.
Monarch Bass Boat, w/25 HP Mer-
cury Motor & trailer. $3,500.
386-397-2952


520 Boats for Sale


STUMPKNOKER II boat
15HP + trolling motor with drive on
trailer. Excellent Condition!
$1,895.00 386-752-9500



Mobile Homes
630 for Rent


2br/2 full ba. in Ft. White.
Electricity on. $600. per mo. 1st, -
last & security. 386-365-1705 or
386-497-1464. On private property.


IN PARK Mobile Homes for Rent
2BR/2BA 1st & sec. required.
Applications & references required.
386-719-2423


LATE MODEL MOBILE HOMES
Starting $365 month, Beautiful
Pond setting, w/trees. CH/A & ca-
ble. No pets. Call 386-961-0017


BISHOP REALTY, INC.
U.S. 90 West Across from Wal-Mart 752-4211 (
www.coldwellbanker.com
Independently Owned and Operated I .mLS



Sunday, April 3, 2-4 May-Fair Subdivision


BISHOP REALTY, INC. 1
U.S. 90 West Across from Wal-Mart 752-4211 '
www.coldwellbanker.com n
Independently Owned and Operated Ms lt,


SUMMER IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER MAKE WISE INVESTMENTS. Mobile home 19 ACRES with doublewide mobile
12 acres. In-ground pool and patio. Large park with 8 units. Zero vacancy, city water home. 3BR/2BA, over 1600 sq. ft.-Plenty
country kitchen, great room-with big brick and sewer. 10% Cap. Rate. Great cash flow. of room for the Spring'Garden! $185,000
fireplace, vaulted ceilings. 2700 sq. ft. Call Tanya Shatter for more information at MLS#43281 Call Kay Priest 365-8888
MLS#43943 Call Janet Creel 755-0466 755-5448.' MLS#43009 ' ' :' '


I Come see this 2752 sq. ft. home with a 3 car garage and an inground pool!
Dir: Lake Jeffery Rd (CR 250), left into Woodborough S/D. Right on Lake Valley
Terrace. Second house on right. Hosted by: Hansel & Nell Holton 984-5046


CONTACT A REALTOR WITH
EXPERIENCE THAT WILL WORK
FOR YOU!!! GIVE US A CALL!
386-755-6600


Real Estate of Lake City, Inc.
TOLL FREE 877-755-6600


Own Your Own Home


House Plan of the Week


-777
- Brand
New
Site Built J HH
4HomeS As Low As V V Down (w.a.c.)


THREE RIVERS HOUSING CORP.
Call 754-6770 Leave Message
Open Monday-Friday
A not for profit tax exempt Florida Corp. An Equal opportunity housing program. ,-,


AREA MORTGAGE RATES
Institution Phone 30fixed 15 fixed 1 ARM FHA/
rate / pts rate / pts rate/ pts VA
AABC Mortgage (800) 321-0592 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote
Absolute Mortgage Co. (888) 90-HOMES 5.75 /0.00 5.38 /0.00 3.50 /0.00 No Quote
Accountable Mortgage (800) 840-8771 5.75 / 0.00 5.38 / 0.00 3.75 /0.00 6.75 / 0.00
All Fund Mortgage (866) 535-8987 5.75 /0.00- 5.38 / 0.00 No Quote No Quote
American Federal Mortgage (888) 321-4687 5.50/ I.50 5.13/1.00 3.50 / 0.00 5.75 / 0.00
American Home Finance (888) 429-1940 5.75/0.00 5.38/0.00 3.63 / 0.00 No Quote
America's Best Mortgage (800) 713-8189 5.75/0.00 5.38/0.00 4.75/0.00 5.75 /0.00
Amicus Mortgage Group (877) 385-4238 5.88 /0.00 5.50 /0.00 No Quote 5.88 /0.00
Amtrust Funding (800) 774-0779 5.75 /0.00 5.38 / 0.00 3.00 / 0.(X00 5.75 /0.00
Borrowers Advantage Mtg. (888) 510-4151 5.88 /0.00 5.50 /0.00 No Quote 5.75 /0.00
Century Home Funding (800) 224-7006 5.25 / 3.00 4.63 / 3.00 3.38 / 2.00 5.38 / 3.00
Fast and Easy Mortgage Co. (813) 404-7304 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote
First Rate Mortgage (800) 887-9106 5.88 / 0.00 5.50 / 0.00 No Quote No Quote
Florida Mortgage Corp. (888) 825-6300 5.75 / 0.00 No Quote 4.13 / 0.00 5.50 / 0.00
Golden Rule Mortgage (800) 991-9922 5.38/ 1.63 5.00/ 1.75 2.63 / 1.00 5.50 / 1.000
Guardian Funding (800) 967-3060 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote
H.D. Financial (888) 368-0655 6.00 /0.00 5.50 /0.00 No Quote No Quote
Home Finance of America (800) 358-LOAN 5.75 /0.00 5.38 /0.00 3.25 /0).00 No Quote
Homestead Mortgage (888) 760-6006 No Quote No Quote 4.00 /0.00 5.50 /0.00
Lighthouse Mortgage (800) 784-1331 5.75 / 0.00 5.38 / 0.00 No Quote No Quote
Sandhills Bank (866) 812-8793 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote
Sovereign Mortgage (800) 996-7283 5.75/0.00 5.38/0.00 4.88/0.00 5.50 / .00
Stepping Stone Lending (800) 638-2659 5.75 /0.00 5.38/0.00 No Quote 5.63 /0.00
Summit Mortgage (800) 377-0623 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote
Rates provided by The National Financial News Services. Rates are valid as of March 30, 2005. Rates are
inclusive of all fees and are subject to change without notice. Call lender directly for APR's. Lenders wishing to
participate in this service, please call (610) 344-7380. For additional information on mortgages, go to:
www.onmortgage.com or call the consumer Help Line (800) 264-3707 .


The Centralia's impressive size
bespeaks stateliness and permanence,
as do its comer quoins, keystone arch-
es, brick facade, and multiple gables.
Half-round windows and a copper-
roofed dining room bay add grace.
No doubt about it, this is a large
home. It boasts more than 3,500
square feet of living area, plus a huge
bonus room and a three-car garage.
Stepping inside, you pass under a
plant shelf into the two-story entry.
Plants glory in natural light spilling
down through the arched window over
the door.
Ahead, another plant shelf caps
an arched opening that leads into a
dramatic vaulted great room. Glass
fills more than half of the rear wall,
while a fireplace nestles between cab-
inetry that could house a home enter-
tainment center or be filled with books
and art. A wide arch, flanked by
columns, leads into the kitchen's
bright eating nook.
Spacious and lavishly appointed,
the kitchen easily accommodates mul-
tiple chefs. Notable features include: a
bay window, roomy pantry and ram-
bling work island.
From there, one passageway leads
to an elegant dining room with a tray
ceiling and wide bay window. Another
leads to a large utility room equipped
with a pull-down ironing board, deep
sink, long folding counter, and a clos-
et for hanging clothes.
Large and luxurious, the master
suite is the only bedroom on the main
floor. The unique walk-in closet wraps
around two sides of an octagonal bath-
room with a spa tub, oversized show-
er, private toilet, and dual vanity bay.
Upstairs, a huge loft or study
overlooks the Centralia's vaulted great
room, and each bedroom has its own
bathroom. That huge sky-lit bonus
room is ripe with possible uses.
For a review plan, including
scaled floor plans, elevations, section
and artist's conception, send $25 to
Associated Designs, 1100 Jacobs Dr.,
Dept. W, Eugene, OR 97402. Please
specify the Centralia 30-164 and
include a return address when order-
ing. A catalog featuring more than 400
home plans is available for $15. For
more information, call (800) 634-
0123, or visit our website at
www.associateddesigns.com.


First Floor 2551 sq.ft.
Second Floor 990 sq.ft.
Living Area 3541 sq.ft.
Bonus Room 490 sq.ft.
Garage 841 sq.ft.
Dimensions 71' x 70'

www.assoclateddeslgns.com


- - - - .... .....


I-t









LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
ABSOLUTELY "THE BEST"
Mobile Homes and Modulars
Move over Palm & Jake, the new
#1 home is here. Guaranteed
Gary Hamilton Homes 758-6755
MOBIL HOME Mover
State Certified
Insured and Bonded
Free estimates
Call: 386-755-1783
MOBILE HOME FINANCING
Refinance/lower rates or Purchase.
Investment home O.K. Land Home
or Home Only. (904)225-2381

650 Mobile Home
& Land
3/2,'01 MH, on lot. Paved St., City
water, CH/A & appli. Ideal for retir-
ee or young family. Between LC &
White Springs. Lease/purchase.
WAC 386-752-1212 or 365-3094
4BR/ 2BA 2001 28x70. New
Berber Carpet, Tape & Texture.
New CH/A, gas log fireplace.
Partially furnished, all appliances.
5 min from Wal-Mart on over 1/2
acre. Must See!!!! $85,000.00 OBO
386-867-1097
4BR/2BA Loaded. on 1/2 acre.
(close in) $89,999.00. 6% fixed, 30
years. Ready to occupy. Gary Ham-
ilton Homes. 386-758-6755
MCALPIN/OWNER FINANCE
1998 16x80 3br/2ba on
5.6 acres. 252 to 89th Rd.
386-867-0048

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent
1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
All very nice.
Convenient location.
Call 386-755-2423
2BR/1BA DUPLEX,
Near the airport. $550 mo. Security
Dep. $500. 1163 Plant St. #101
(904)317-4511 ext. 18
DELUXE 2BR/1.5 BA
1 car garage. W/D hookup, 1 yr
lease. $630 per mo. plus $700 dep.
386-961-9490
FRESHLY PAINTED
1 & 2 BEDROOM APT.
Starting at $400 Plus security
Call Lea.386-752-9626
On the Golf Course 2BR/2BA
duplex. Free water & sewer. 1 year
lease. $700. mo. plus security dep.
386-752-9626

730t Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent
3br/lba, wood frame house North of
Lake City. Lg. yard, washer/dryer
stove, frig. Lawn maint. incl. $625.
mo. Section 8 ok. Call Richard li-
censed Realtor 386-755-6653
3br/2ba Home w/1,756 sq. ft.,
carport, fireplace, fenced back yard,
$900/month, 1 year lease, $900
security; must have references.
386-963-5510 after 6:00 pm.
4br/2ba 2400 sqft. CH/A
$995. month. 1st & last mo. rent
& $500 deposit. FIRM
386-752-7559 evenings
NEW HOUSE for Rent 3br/2ba.
Price Creek area. $700. per month.
1st month plus security deposit.
386-697-6117
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference. limita-
tion or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability, fami-
lial status or national origin, or any
intention to make such preference,
limitation or discrimination." Fami-
lial status includes children under
the age of 18 living with parents or
legal custodians, pregnant women,
and people securing custody of chil-
dren under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this newspa-
per are available on an equal oppor-
tunity basis. To complain of dis-
crimination call HUD toll-free at 1-
800-669-9777. The toll free tele-
phone number to the hearing im-
paired is 1-800-927-9275
Small, Very CLean 2BR/1BA in
Lake City. Hwy 90 E. Poppyway St.
$450mo. 1st, last, plus security.
386-497-1116 No Pets!

750 Business &
Office Rentals
Building for Lease
2128 SW Main Blvd., Suite 105
Approx 1200 sq ft., Utilities Incl.
$950. per month
386-752-5035
A Bar Sales Inc.
7 Days 7am-7pm
FOR LEASE Office/Warehouse
space. 3000-20,000 sq ft. Ware-
house storage on 3&1/2 acres of
land. 3 miles off 1-75. Lease all or
part. Call Bruce at 386-365-3865
LEASE SPACE available at
Country Club Plaza, East Baya Ave.
starting April I1st. Good for Retail,
offices or combination. Call


386-497-4762 or 386-566-8079
Office or Retail Building for
Lease. 7500 sq. ft. on US 90 E.
Tom Eagle 386-755-5110
Daniel Crapps Realtor
OFFICE SPACE. 800 sq ft.
Off US90 W. $850.mo + tax.
Available 4/01/05. Call 752-6058
for more information.

760 Wanted to Rent
Family looking for a house to lease
/rent. Husband working in LC. Wife
& children living in AR. Need 3br/l
or 2 ba., Ig yard & pet freindly.
Please help! Can be in/out of town
w/land 479-883-8601/479-883-8522


790 Vacation Rentals
IBD/1BA ON Ichetucknee River.
Dock, Furnished. Linens. Rent
Weekly, Weekends, or Monthly.
386-497-3637
3 BD/3BA on Ichetucknee River.,
Dock. Furnished. Linens, Rent
weekly and weekends.
386-497-3637
CHERRY LAKE 4BR/3BA log
home. Sleeps 16, near Valdosta.
www.radloffretreat.com


805 Lots for Sale
5 ACRES, scattered trees, near
Lake City. Cash or small down
payment, owner financing.
386-497-3637

810 Home for Sale
$34,900! 4br/2ba foreclosure
available now!
For listing call
1-800-749-8124 ext H411

2400 SQ FT 4BR/2BA 6.7 acres
12 miles from Lake City on 247. 6
car garage/workshop. $176,000
935-3364
FOR SALE Cypress Log Home.
4BR/ 3 1/2 BA, on 5 acres.
Horse Barn, Fenced Pasture, &
Much More. $285K 386-365-4981
NEW HOUSE
3br/2ba on 1/2 ac. Quiet, Close to
town. New school District.
386-752-7277
TWIN LOTS w/giant oaks. 5 mnin
from down town. Plus 3BR/2BA
home $129K, will divide. Owner
Finance. 904-724-6545

820 Farms &
820 Acreage
5 Acres for 2 home sites. w/SW
trailer & 2 utility sheds. Well/septic.
SE CR245, SE Ebenezer Rd. SE
Smart Rd. Opportunity of Lifetime.
386-697-1395

BEAUTIFUL 5 ac restricted home
sites on paved road. 3 & 1/2 miles
from 1-75 & US 90. From $49,900.
386-365-1563 or 365-8007


820 Farms &
S Acreage
LAND WANTED 1 to 100 acres.
Owner financing, residential &
commercial. Also 3/2 home wanted
w/ Owner Financing. 561 )254-4566
WANTED 25+ Acre parcels, Zoned
RSF2. Will pay up to 10,000 per
acre. 386-365-4379

l83O Commercial
OJ0 Property
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY.
I acre with house. 277 of Baya Ave.
Frontage. For more information.
Call 386-752-4072
FOR LEASE
Warehouse space from
$300 per month.
386-365-3865

920 Auto Parts
92 & Supplies
22" Rozzi Rims and Tires for sale.
Only six months old !!!
Asking 1500.00
Call David at 386-965-6951
4-15 IN Tires. $40.
386-752-0477

930 Motorcycles

2002 Honda VFR 800 Interceptor.
4800 miles. $6,900 386-758-9750
97 HARLEY Davidson Bad Boy.
Collectors Series. Cover &
Helments included. $2,500 & take
over payments. 386-754-5060

940 Trucks
1 Ton 1984 Chevrolet Truck.
Fair condition. $1,200.
Call F.J. Hill Construction
386-752-7887
1987 FORD Ranger $750.
386-752-0477
1993 TOYOTA Tacoma. Reg. Cab
4x4. Engine needs some TLC.
New Clutch & 4 Tires. $1200.00
Daniel 352-225-1625
2003 MAZDA Truck. Ex Cab
w/ tool box & bed liner.
Excellent Con. 12K mil $14,000.
386-755-9942 or 386-623-5257

Q 0 Cars fnr snale


FSBO 80 Ac. of Pine Tree Planted -,v .
Land Adjacent to Resd'l Area Can 1989 DODGE Shadow
Sub-Divide $20,000/Acre or $1.5 $600. 386-752-0477
Mil. For all 80 Acres (904)219-7.045 $600. 386-752-0477


950 Cars for Sale

*Hondas from $S50(
Police Impounds!
For listings call
1-800-749-8116 ext A760

1994 HONDA ACCORD.
Only $550.00! Must Sell!
For listin-s.
Call 1-800-749-8116 A834

2003 NISSAN Altima S. 24K miles,
spoiler, Woodgrain accent Int., CD.
One Owner. Warranty. Exc. Cond.
$15,800. obo 386-719-8830

93 NISSAN Altima, needs head
work. All other parts & stereo good
or new. Parts good for 93-97. $500
obo. 386-755-9637. Iv message.

FOR SALE 1993 Nissan 300 ZX
2+2, White, t-tops, excellent cond.
129k miles. $11,000. 386-965-2226
or 352-278-0707.

FOR SALE:1986 Dodge Lancer
$1800 obo call 386-697-3449


951 Recreational
Vehicles


1970 AIRSTREAM.
Good Condition. $2,900.
Call F.J. Hill Construction
386-752-7887


DELUXE GOLF CART
Loaded: Lights, horn, cover, trunk
and wheel covers w/battery charger.
$2,200 OBO. After 6 p.m. 752-1865


, Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles

02 CHEVY Avalanche, Z66
package. Loaded, Leather, Heated
seats. 50,215 miles. $18,500 Firm!
386-755-0305 or 386-758-9811

1986 CHEVY Van. High Top,
Work Van. Runs Good. 2 new
Tires. $1200.00 OBO
386-758-8868

1994 NISSAN Quest GXE.
Fully Loaded, Leather Interior,
Dual AC & a Sun Roof. $4,600
OBO. Call 386-965-4614


If you're not reading

the paper daily, you're

missing out on the lat-

est news from around

the world, plus in-depth

P n i u gtY u coverage on everything

-from fashion to enter-

tainment,


13 weeks home deliv-

er\,



'23,54








k ib

IN o 4


-


. Ni






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


Section E


A Place Called


siness & Industry

Part 1 of our 4 part, month-long series detailing the area in which we live
and the people involved.


P111t1 2


------


, k


Nestled deep amid sky high pine trees in

southern Columbia County is a stained glass

studio where Truett George works diligently

on making glass come to life.
By ASHLEY CISNEROS
a c5neros. Iai, t.rpor .L (At epr r.Lomf


FORT I'HITE
S sunlight streams through one ot Truett George's many stained glass .windows making
the rich blue hu>_s dance across the walls. While it is difficult to discern what the
abstract illusiorl is at first, George quickly points to features of a man and a horse
- Don Quixote and his hoirs,- Rocinantc
Welco-me t, A rint (-las-, Works. Inc.. the birthplace of hundreds of
stained glass wiindo:,- that no,-w adorn churches throughout the
United States, PuerIo Ri,.- and even in countries like
Venezuela.


* ~
.9'


-~- &. ~


GLASS
0 PHORM I/ud on Jagi 2E







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


A Place Called of Business & Industry


I ___ u_ -, -TXLmwww


INDEX.

C county grow th................................................... 2E
Terry Dicks Trucking, Morrell's...................... 3E
Nettles Sausage.......................................... 5E
Barbara Knutson Pottery..................... ........6E
W ard's Jew elry.................................................. 7E
Ed and Barb's Cream Donuts........................9E
Giebeig Construction.................. .............. 10E
DeSoto Drug Store......................................11 E
FDOT, Bell South..............................12E
Etheridge Furniture..........................................13E
Economics at a Glance.................................... 14E
Girl Scouts of America ................................ 15E


On the Front
Ashley Cisneros takes a look into the life of
Truett George, a stained glass artist, mayor and
family man of Fort White.


GLASS
Continued from page 1E
George's business provides
any type of art glass including
leaded, painted, faceted,
beveled and etched glass in
addition to museum-quality
restoration.
The Kentucky native has
lived in fast-paced New York
City, musical Nashville, Tenn.,
and beautiful Savannah, Ga.,
before choosing to settle down
in Fort White.
Known as daddy, husband
and grandpa to his family, most
of Fort White knows George
simply as their mayor and long-
time business-owner.
After spending many years in
the advertising industry,
George decided to follow his
interest in stained glass in the
early 1970s and opened his stu-
dio in Fort White in 1974.
"I felt that the lifestyle adver-
tising required wasn't good for
my family life," he said.
George's interest in stained
glass started when -he was
young.
While studying business at
Columbia University in New
York City, he used a stained
glass panel on the window of
his apartment for privacy.
When it shattered after a bur-


glar entered his apartment,
George learned to repair the
glass.
After moving to Fort White
in 1974, George began making
bathroom windows and side-
lights for a construction compa-
ny in Gainesville.
Soon, he decided to develop
his design skills and attended a
stained glass designing school in
Massachusetts in 1977.
At first his business was cen-
tered on the front porch of his
house, but grew to be a massive
studio with several' additions
over the years.
He used the name "advent"
for more reasons than it simply
being a religious term.
"It means 'beginning,' and it
symbolized a risk but also a
new beginning for me," he said.
"It also gets you listed in the
phone book first."
To launch his business,
George purchased a mailing
list of the addresses of more
than 2,000 different churches
within 300 miles of his home.
He also did cold calls to let
people know about his servic-
es.
Soon he got some contracts
which led to many more as
news of his business spread via
word of mouth.
Now, his artwork can be
seen in numerous churches in


Lake City, Fort White, White
Springs, Live Oak and Jasper.
He designed windows in the
chapel at Lake City Veterans
Affairs Medical Center and
another chapel in Caracas,
Venezuela.
He also spent three and a
half months working on restor-
ing windows in a cathedral in
San Juan, Puerto Rico.
"We were able to enjoy sail-
ing, fishing, diving and sight-
seeing while there in our spare
time," George said.
George draws the designs
for about half of what his busi-
ness produces, but also has
artists in England, France and
other states in the U.S.
Customers visit George with
a request and then they dis-
cuss themes, style and window
types.
George provides drawings
of his ideas which he submits
to his clients until a final
design is agreed upon.
After a contract is issued,
production begins that can
take months or years depend-
ing on the job.
Once a design is issued, it is
not sold again.
George held up a picture of
one of his latest creations.
"It is a depiction of Jesus'
fishers of men story," he said.
The-window was done for an


Episcopal church in Georgia.
The member of the church
who helped pay for it said it
carried special symbolism for
him because it reminded him
of a good friend who passed
away.
They often fished together
and he felt the window was
showing him and his friend in
addition to the Biblical pas-
sage.
George said he gets his
inspiration from talking to peo-
ple or from things he sees.
"I get inspired by all types of
things like a sunset, seeing the
formation of a rock or the way
a particular plant is growing,"
he said.
His largest job was a restora-
tion job in St., Augustine that
took three and a half years.
His biggest window was for
a Methodist church that was
15 feet wide and 47 feet tall.
Currently half of George's
work is new work and half is
restoration work.
The majority of his work is
traditional Biblical artwork,
and the rest is contemporary.
The hardest aspect about his
business is keeping organized,
George said surveying his
huge desk with its mountain of
books, papers and notes on
everything from art to parlia-
mentary procedure.


County
By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter.com
Sitting at the intersection
of two major interstates and
centrally located in North
Florida, Columbia County
has always seemed naturally
poised for unlimited growth.
Along with those primary
thoroughfares, there are also
several U.S. highways and
two railroads. These all run
directly through Lake City
and have served as a crux of
commerce when the county
seat made notable develop-
ments in the late 1800s and


growing
early 1900s.
Geographically, the county
is almost equidistant
between the state capitol and
Florida's largest city (by land
area), Jacksonville. It also
features the first city of any
size for people traveling
through Florida on their way
to locations throughout the
state.
So even before the inter-
state system was champi-
oned by President Dwight D.
Eisenhower, Columbia
County was a likely place to
become a center of com-
merce and transportation as


rapidly
the "Gateway to Florida."
The area grew steadily
throughout the latter half of
the 20th century. It was dur-
ing the past 15 years that the
county's population boomed,
when compared to the 20
years prior, however. Even
during the past five years,
the area has grown at an
unprecedented rate.
According to the most
recent population estimates
from the U.S. Census Bureau
the population of Columbia
County was about 60,000 in
2004. By comparison, in 1990
the population was about


with people, businesses


42,500, rising by about
18,000 people in less than 15
years.
In 1970, just over 25,000
people called the county
home.
The Census Bureau esti-
mates Columbia County may
have more than 68,000 peo-
ple by 2010 if current growth
rates continue.
Jim Poole, executive direc-
tor of -the Lake City-
Columbia County Chamber
of Commerce and Industrial
Development Authority, said
he believes the census num-
bers are off and that there


are already near that many
people.
"I think we are about
66,000 in the county," he
said.
As the area continues to
add more people, so grow
the job opportunities as well
as demand for various servic-
es. In another 15 years, Poole
said, "I think there are going
to be some drastic changes."
With the expansion of area
highways such as State Road
47 and more commercial and
residential development
throughout the county,
including lesser-populated


areas like Ellisville and Fort
White, he said "the whole
county is going to bust at the
seams."
"I don't see any end to it
real soon," Poole said. "My
personal feeling is we have a
good strong five to 10-year
period coming."
In 2004, the community
landed one of its biggest
employers in recent years.
New Millennium Systems of .
Butler, Ind., selected Lake
City and Columbia County as


GROWTH
continued on page 3E


$ SAVE $


4V4p~
II S Qpp
e


MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT

Sat., April 9th 8 a.m.-2 p.m.


OFFICE MAX PARKING LOT

SAVE HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS


Factory Reps and Loan Reps On Site


1 Year Interest
FREE Financing


$SAVE $

$ SAVE S


& TES"

$ SAVE $


"HOW MUCH



LIFE INSURANCE



DO YOU REALLY


NEED?"


IS ONE YEAR'S SALARY
ENOUGH? CALL ME.
Connie M. Eadie, Agency Owner
4447 NW American Lane, Suite 101 I
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-6058
Fax 386-752-7928
Toll Free 877-369-1333
Auto, Home, Business and Life


Allstate.
You're in good hands.


$ SAVE $


a


t, --


I






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


A Place Called ,
id'


Business & Industry I


GROWTH
Continued from page 2E


the site of its second steel
joist and deck manufacturing
facility.
The company started its
joist production in February
and plans to have its deck


plant operating this month.
Once work at its 75-acre
industrial site off Lake
Jeffery Road goes full bore, it
is expected to employ about
175 people with an average
annual salary of more than
$45,000.
Poole said being able to
draw businesses like New
Millennium was important


because it will only encour-
age more similar or better
projects in the future.
"I think the success we've
had is helping to get our
name out better than we've
done in the past and the qual-
ity of the projects we are
working on are steadily get-
ting better and better," he
said.


Poole said he is currently
working on at least one proj-
ect, which he is bound by
confidentially agreements not
to name, that people would
"get really excited about" if it
comes through.
While there will be demand
for new businesses, jobs and
both private and governmen-
tal services, there will also be


problems providing the nec-
essary infrastructure to help
those projects along.
The county and city are
already working to expand
the area of land that can be
developed for residential and
commercial use, capacity for
services such as water and
sewer utilities, and the num-
ber of paved roads for


improved transportation.
Poole said it is good the
local government is consider-
ing those issues now,
"because it will definitely pro-
vide us with challenges and
we need to be sure we have
infrastructure to support it."
However, he said, "I think
it's going to be some positive
challenges."


After thousands of miles,


there is no place like home


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com

Wayne Crews has traveled
miles and miles but says there
is no place like home.
The Terry Dicks Trucking
employee started driving
trucks by accident when he
was 17.
"I was born on a farm and
when I was 17, I began work-
ing for a wholesale grocer
who is not here anymore," he
said.
"I was volunteered to drive
a load one day, and before
long I was taking a load every
day."
Crews has now worked as
a trucker for more than 45
years, 23 of those being for
TDT.
He transports materials
such as equipment and build-
ing materials including steel
and lumber.
"The farthest place I have
ever been was 100 miles
south of New Brunswick,
Canada where it was 40
degrees below zero on New
Year's Day," he said.
Crews said he has enjoyed
seeing new places and meet-
ing new people. Yet, no place
compares to Lake City.
"There is nothing like
Florida, although I do like the
Carolinas," he said.
He also misses his family
when he is away and hasn't
had the opportunity to
explore the places he travels
to because of his strict dead-
lines.
"There is not a lot of time
to mess around," Crews said.
The most challenging part
of his job is being cautious of
other drivers.
"You can prepare yourself
for bad weather, but not for
bad drivers," he said. "I have
seen a lot of bad wrecks in
my life."
One wreck involved a
woman and her child.


: .
--- : ,:- :




^ -i


ASHLEY CISNEROS/Lake City Reporter
Wayne Crews, of Terry Dicks Trucking, started driving trucks
when he was 17. Having traveled thousands of miles across
the country, he stillbelieves that there is no place like
home.


Crews stopped to help
because no ambulance had
arrived and saw the woman
pinned inside the car.
"She was cut in half," he
said.
'On another occasion, a
young girl passed him and
crashed head-on with anoth-
er vehicle.
"The car exploded," he
said.
Crews said the addition of
Interstate highways and the
higher speed limits make his
trips quicker than before.
"Before it took longer to
get places," he said.
Crews used to travel in the
northeastern part of the
country through New York,
Maine and the edge of
Canada.
He even won a three mil-


lion mile award for safe driv-
ing a few years ago.
Crews said he has stayed
in the trucking business
because it pays decent for
this area, despite long hours.
He listens to country
music on his trips, but some-
times prefers peace and
quiet.
Crews enjoys riding at
fight b&ecauie he "ays there
is less traffic and it is cooler.
As he has gotten older, he
travels less and less.
"Now in a week I travel
2,800 to 3,200 miles a week
and am home two to three
days a week or more," he
said.
Crews says he has enjoyed
his career as a trucker and
says it has allowed him to see
the world.


Morrell's marks 40


years in Lake City


By JUSTIN LANG
jlang@lakecityreporter. comr

After 40 years and nearly
65,000 square-feet later,
Morrell's has changed from
a fledgling business run out
of a back bedroom to a local
household name for every-
thing home-related.
"We try to cover all the
bases," said David Morrell,
president of the family-
owned business. "Whether
you have a rental project you
are working on or a $500,000
home, we try to have some-
thing for everybody."
But in 1965, Morrell's start-
ed literally as a "ma and pop"
operation with Wayne and
Emma Jean running a salvage
operation out of a back bed-
room behind their Pinemount
Road home (now Deputy Jeff
Davis Lane). There they sold
mainly salvaged mobile home
supplies, most of it upholstery.
As a purchasing agent for a
mobile home manufacturer,
Wayne used natural business
sense to build a list of contacts
that enabled him to regularly
buy a surplus of supplies and
salvaged items. Meanwhile,
Emma Jean handled the sales
side of the business at home.
As the business slowly grew
into the 1970s, their two eldest
children David and Gwen
became teenagers and took on
gradually more responsibility.
By then and into the early


AWhether you have a
rental project you are
working on or a
$500,000 home, we
try to have something
for everybody.
David Morrell
president of Morrell's

1980s, Morrell's grew into
buildings built on the property
behind the family home, which
is still standing today.
By the time the siblings
graduated high school, both
were working full-time at the
family business, then known
as Morrell's Salvage.
"He slipped it to us very eas-
ily and very gently," David said
of the transition. "It's kind of
like being a kid and learning to
ride a bike, you think they are
back there holding you up, and
you turn around and they are
gone."
While their parents, who are
mostly retired from Morrell's,
but still live in the area,
focused on cabinets, drapery,
paneling and other salvaged
material, the younger Morrell
saw the potential for growing
the business with new mer-
chandise.

MORRELL'S
continued on page 4E


~1SA
C N&r.., r -..
'N


-
~0flding ~
IL
-
~ JEW ~ Ein~.,... -


P-XTF- kIOk


A t Isaac Construction, placement of
your new home really makes a dif-
ference. Our expertise, paired with
your personal idea, makes the
ideal placement.


oinlc it n1 -m


hen the interior of a new
home begins to take
shape with paint, tile,
columns, cabinets, etc., this is
when the quality really starts to
speak for itself.


v I


12


MUMMEMEMMM"






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


Business & Industry


MORRELL'S
Continued from page 3E
D[)avid. nu-, 43. said he and
his sister began carrying "run-
ning lines" 'of merchandise.
items that could be re-ordered
and weren't just salvaged or
discontinut-d goods looking to
be liquidated
Though they continued the
salvage part of the business his
father utilized so, well. and still
do. he said "newter merchan-
dise as more appealing to us."
EventuallI Gwen IParrishi
and David were joined in the
business by their other siblings
Vonada iBarwick) and Rhonda
iMabilei. but each of the sis-
ters has left in the past several
years to focus on their families.
David has been left alone as
the only Morrell still actively
running the business, though
his brother-in-law. Paul Mabile,
is the general manager.
Now the one building that
housed Morrell's Salvage and
its 15-20 employees has
become six different buildings
that have been expanded more
than 17 times with currently
about 40 employees. Those
buildings account for about
65,000 square-feet of space.
They house Morrell's various
departments, including fur-
nishings, carpeting, cabinetry,
home decorations, building
supplies and yes, some of those
salvaged mainstays.
"We still have a niche and a
knack for buying building
materials," David explained.
While he said no one part of
the current business domi-
nates, "the furniture has really
taken off and gone extremely
well" following a full renovation
of its furniture building in 2004.
And a good part of that,
David said, is special orders of
furniture for certain colors, fab-
rics and designs, something
hard to come by at a salvage
operation.
"That's been a real big part
of our growth," he said.
But to attain 40 years of suc-
cess, the business' many "tal-
ented" employees are in large
part responsible for ensuring


, t*g~ 4 '-


..L *.4 t,-


David Morrell (left) and Paul Mabile stand beside a collection of carpet samples inside Morrell's cabinet and carpet showroom.


Morrell's interior decorator Erin Harris arranges display inside one of the showrooms.


Morrell's ideals of customer
service while offering "reason-
ably priced and quality mer-
chandise."
'"They understand what your


goals are as far as taking care
of the customer and being com-
pany oriented," David said.
While newer stores have
come into town like Lowe's and


Wal-Mart, and "took a lot of the
attention at first," he said sec-
ond and now third generations
return to Morrell's because
"we try to be steady with our


customer service."
"We knew that was key," he
said. 'We try to add that per-
sonal touch."
While David said he can't
compete with corporate buying
power on many items, "we just
have to find our niche and do it
and do it well."
But by buying salvaged and
obsolete materials, he said he
can occasionally meet or beat
the prices on certain items car-
ried by corporate giants.
"When the price is right, I
buy it," he said.
Like any longtime privately
owned establishment,
Morrell's has seen business
ebb and flow over the years,
but David said staying compet-
itive often means "being differ-
ent" and offering as little or as
much as the customer wants.
In recent years, for example,
the business has started offer-
ing detailed design consulting
services, including a software
program that can render a
three-dimensional layout of


,


'Il


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter


anyone's kitchen to show what
it would look like with new cab-
inetry, paint and countertops.
He said Morrell's also con-
stantly adds new merchandise
and re-arranges its layout to
keep displays fresh and inter-
esting even for regular cus-
tomers.
Doing so has helped it to
regularly draw customers from
a 75-mile area, with out-of-town
business accounting for at
least half of Morrell's traffic,
he said.
While David said he strives
to "carry the good reputation
that my Dad had 3540 years
ago," he also said his father is
(mostly) pleasantly surprised
about the success of Morrell's.
"I think they are proud of the
way it's moved forward. Dad
had no idea it would be any-
thing like it is today," he said.
"But he probably regrets
some of the growth because I
don't have the time to go fish-
ing with him as much as he
would like."


i, .


White Springs has been an

intergral part of this community
for over 40 years.


People, Caring


and Sharing.












PCS

Phosphate


WHITE SPRINGS


oSal


-- -t.






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


A Place CalleiOme Business & Industry
ys-ra/i^.^ I' -I,1U 7


I


Nettles Sausage linked to success since 1945


By JASMINE RANGEL
jrangel@lakecityreporter. com
The sausages can be found
in supermarkets and conven-
ience stores from Lake
Okeechobee to Tallahassee
and in some parts of South
Georgia, but they are pro-
duced daily in Columbia
County.
Since 1945, Nettles
Sausage has been operating
in a building on County Road
240 and owned by the same
family.
Seth Nettles began the
company and ran it until
1959, when his son, Joe, took
over. Joe Nettles was in
charge until 2002, when he
retired.
Joe Nettles comes around
and still has his own office,
but it's his sons Billy, Bruce
and Jerry, along with his son-
in-law John Osburn, who are
in charge.
Nettles Sausage began as
strictly a wholesale business,
in a small building. Now, it
has grown, selling to stores
outside of North Florida and
making their products and
other fresh meats available
to the public.
In January 2004, the
Nettles added a market to
their property, where their
signature sausages, as well
as other fresh meats and var-
ious sauces, are sold.
"We only make sausages
on site, but we have beef,
pork, chicken," Billy Nettles
said.
Nettles sausages are made
five days a week, from pigs
slaughtered every Friday.
The pigs used in Nettles
sausages don't come locally.
They used to, but now it
seems like most of the land
that used to be fields and
pastures has been divided up
into five acres and a house,
Billy Nettles said.
The meat instead comes
usually from the Midwest, as


:' '11

d .
[f, '



4 ix


'4.











r



~ /.~t ~

/






2~ ~


V
^n*'"


xto


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter


A Nettles employee stuffs sausages in the Nettles Sausage building off County Road 240 at Watermelon Park.


far away as Iowa, Billy
Nettles said. Every week, a
shipment of hogs also
arrives from North Carolina.
The public can come to the
Nettles market and buy a
whole pig, but Billy Nettles
suggests having the butch-
ers in the market do the
work.
"With a hog, you're better
off buying it cut," Billy
Nettles said.
The company has about 20
employees. Billy Nettles, 48,
said he's been working full-


time for 31 years.
All three Nettles sons have
been working at the compa-
ny since they were able.
Jerry Nettles said from the
age of seven or eight years
old, he remembers mowing
the grass or collecting soda
bottles for cash refunds.
Nettles sausages, "country
made by country folks," as
their slogan says, have been
made with the same recipe
for years, but not always the
same way.
The sausage production


line began running faster
two years ago with the intro-
duction of new machines.
The sausage stuffing
machine produces 2,000
pounds an hour and 30,000
pounds a week, Billy Nettles
said.
Once stuffed, the sausages
go into a smoking room.
The smoked sausages are
then vacuum sealed, three
sausages to a pack.
Billy Nettles said the busi-
ness continues to grow.
"It just keeps expanding all


the time," he said. "It has for
years."
For now though, extend-
ing the company's reach will
be taking a backseat to tak-
ing care of business. There's
still hurricane damage to
contend with, because hurri-
canes Frances and Jeanne
did considerable damage to
the roof, Billy Nettles said.
Even though expansion is
taking a break, it's not over.
"We're going to continue
growing," he said.
"We're not through with all


the expansion."
So who will eventually be
running the show?
Possibly Osburn's son
Kyle, now 15.
Billy Nettles said he comes
around and does some work
now and then.
With a company 60 years
in the same family, Kyle has
a long to tradition to work
with.
The Nettles Sausage mar-
ket is open to the public
Monday through Saturday,
from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.


COURTESY PHOTO
Seth Nettles, founder of Nettles Sausage, stands with a Columbia County Fair contestant
and her prize-winning steer. Nettles began the company and ran it until 1959.


Pay bills in .

minu tes
online!
No stamps.
No checks.
4 . No hassle.


FIRST FEDERAL
FDIC INSURED
&- SAVINGS BANK of FLORIDA 2 EQUAL HOUSING LENDER


"4"


Occasional


.0~ ~
~


Making your house a home for over 40 years.



eridq9e Furniture 1052 SW MAIN BLVD.
Fine Furniture, Accessories and Design for over 30 years. 752-2752


Li i.' ii i Roomn


l)InIInIa(R~OOM1


* Broyhill


\


Bedroom


[No kidding!]


First Federal Bill
Payment is Free
Pay anyone online, the phone
company, your dentist, even your child
in college. It's an easier, more convenient
way to stay on top of your finances.

Fast, secure and easy to enroll,
call our Customer Service to register.
386 754-0090 or 386 362-7990
.w.... www.ffsb.com


k


I






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


A Place Called 1 {j Business & Industry


Pottery business takes shape


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE For
Barbara Knutson, bowls
aren't just bowls and cups are
more than simply cups.
They are works of art that
she creates one at time at her
pottery studio located on
State Road 47.
The Vermont native and her
husband Carl Miller moved to
Fort White approximately two
years ago. Miller had a ceram-
ic business in New York that
he sold before the couple
moved to Florida.
"It has been a big change
culturally, but we love the
area and our neighbors,"
Knutson said. "I needed light
and this area was perfect for
my art."
Knutson owns a large stu-
dio and showroom near her
home in Fort White.
"We are artists, not manu-
facturers and make each
piece one at a time," she said.
The new studio is a blend of
the couple's former business-
es in New England.
Inside the studio are
machines that roll clay
between two large pieces of
canvas forming long sheets of
clay to be used to make beau-
tiful pottery.
Knutson used to be an
Audubon guide for junior
high school students and
most her art is nature-based
with pottery incorporating
leaves, fish and the like.
One of Miller's specialties
is creating birds out of clay.
He uses stuffing to raise up
clay to create shape until the
clay dries and hardens.
The studio also has a sec-
tion housing the couple's gas
fired reduction kiln.
It takes months to fill up the
kiln with art and then they
use propane gas to fire it up.
First the water is dried out


A .. '. .,


N


1*


V.


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Barbara Knutson works on a pottery piece in her studio. The Vermont' native and her husband, Carl Miller, moved to Fort White approximately two years ago.
of the pottery, then it is Knutson said. know how each piece will turn thing desired and is full of from patterns still have their
glazed, and it goes into the She also creates her own out and what will happen possibilities, own personality.
kiln again, glaze formula. when you open the kiln door," When she find something "We can accentuate certain
"We use a gas kiln because Knutson says her work can she said. "You don't know if that works, she makes a pat- items on these pieces to give
it yields special colors, tones sometimes be unpredictable. someone will purchase it." tern, just as a dressmaker
and flavors to art, not pro- "There is always an ele- She said clay is magical in would. POTTERY
duced by electric kilns." ment of risk in that you don't that it can be molded into any- However, even pieces made continued on page 7E


- and Suites


Business.


The driving force


of


C -
-. : ., :, 1 l
,-'3" ; .' o : .: ,.,* 't; -.J


a community


your business i
right direction
... :- ;.:.*^ i .-^ -


)



I


n the


FREE Business Checking

Same Day Credit

FREE Online Bill Payer

Commercial Mortgages
Owner anrid nrn-ciwner ,1:1:: Ijpc il

Equipment Loans

Vehicle Loans

Construction loans


f oe niL C redit


[ I Merchant Processing




S ] NCUAE ,

0........ ... III


I


Lake Ci


r


Flnrida CLJ can ouide






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


SPlce ClkJomme Business & Industry


POTTERY
Continued Ithum page oE
theni life."- In j ,aiid "In .a-,;h
piece- wat itht,:l _r ai .,e Si -,l-ir
own spirit."
Knut,-,n li,_-n- I music
while ;he w,,rk-.
Thu inurldA _Ut j11Zz. ble-
gras and clis-sical mu-ic v.ith
harp and flute g~-r her cre-athli-
ty going.
"A lht i:t m\ in-pirariiin
colme- frion place- whii-rr- I
havi, been andL things I hate
seen," shn- said.
Every year, she also tries t,.
create su_,mething for h,:rs-elf
such a-s a garden seatr she ha-,
on her lay. n.
She studied at Rhod: Island
School if D-sign but mos-t Of
her skills are self-taught
"My techniques are
obtained frurn trial and error
on mVy ':wn part." -he
explained.
Knutson also teaches work-
shops and classes at art cen-
ters in Florida.
She obtain- many positions
because of her Web -ite,
tu'u''. Barba raKn uslil onPi iottt: :
o m.
She and Miller travel to Newt
England for one show each
year and art-_nd several shows
throughout Florida.
Through these shows,
Knutson build- her customer
base and creates special
orders in addition to selling
her nature-based work.
For example, she created
spirit hou-es influenced by
Asian art that her clients pur-
chased for their gardens in
memorial of a loved one who
died.
For one exhibit called
"Visualize the Word" she will
be creating a piece based on a
poem.
"I have learned that when
you see wonderful works, you
never know how many pieces
the artist threw away before
creating what you see," she
said.
"You grow to respect the
craft."


L


Ward's Jewelry keeps


business successful for


more than five decades


, ./A


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Barbara Knutson used to be an Audubon guide for junior high
school students and most her art is nature-based with
pottery incorporating leaves, fish and other natural scenes.


01 -v


By JUSTIN LANG
lng-i' k ,"i rcrtl er oter ccr'

George \Ward was only 21
when his father offered him
the family business.
"And I didn't need time to
think about it," he said. "I
thought "Yeah. this is what I
want to do.'"
Now after more than 30
years since that day in 1972,
the 53-year-old Ward has kept
the original intentions of
integrity and quality service
set forth by his father, Roy
Ward, in 1951.
As owner and operator of
Ward's Jewelry and Gifts on
North Marion Avenue, Ward
has worked in the business
since he was six-years-old, all
the while watching Lake City
change around the steadfast
store.
"Wlihen I was younger
everything was down here,
there was no mall or Wal-
Mart." said the graying, ener-
getic Ward. "It was really a
thriving, bustling center of
business for the city."
The business first opened
in 1951 when Roy. a disabled
World War 11 veteran and
Quitman. Ga.. native, bought
an existing jewelry and pawn
shop business several blocks
further north on Marion.
As he phased out the pawn
side of the business and
focused more on jewelry with
the help of his wife Frances.
Roy expanded to offer sales
and service for appliances and
televisions. He also moved the
business, then known as Roy
Ward's Jewelers, to its larger,


JUSTIN LANG/Lake City Reporter
George Ward sizes a ring in a workshop and storage area in
the rear of his store. Ward performs much of the repair, siz-
ing and maintenance for customers' jewelry himself.


more southerly location
across from Olustee Park in
1955, where it remains today.
There, his son George soon
found himself taking just as


much interest in the business
as his father.
WARD'S
continued on page 8E


Lake City Appreciation Day
at

Ichetucknee Springs State Park

Saturday, April 9, 2005

9:00 am-4:00 pm


Bring the Family for Day of Fun and Education
Guided walks, canoe trips, exhibits and films
Learn about the prehistoric animals and Indians
that once roamed the Ichetucknee


FREE ADMISSION

For more information call 497-4690 or visit
www.floridasprings.org or www.lakecityjournal.com


Ma1 Bring Your Lunch-Spend the Day!

Vp,"S This made possible with financial assistance of the florida Tourism Industry Marketing Corporation d/b/a VISIT FLORIDA


1/2 to 7/10 acre lots $32,900
Brand New Homes Available
Great location, underground power.
ElaineK.Toiar.cGRI,RS Directions: From Hwy 90. take CR 341 (Sister's Welcome
Home s 7we.4-M Road) South, Creekside is on the right.
O11ce L3861 752-4211
Ema eW ise Estaligruptes


IlFIl Glebeig Simpson. GRS.
CRS REArri.T)i
H~onme(386) 752-28174
Office (3001 752-4211


Brand New Homes Available
Restricted, paved streets, underground power, close to town
Directions: Take SR 47S, right on CR 242. Go 1.2 miles.
Wise Estates on right.


Call Today!

Coming Soon... Cannon Creek 1- MLs


LJ


I


I


Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty, Inc,.






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


A PLace Caled JHie Business & Industry


WARD'S
Continued.r)'in page 7E

"At about the age of I hadl
to cu n-e down hiere i' st.eei
and take ouLt tljhe artbaie." he
said.
Liter during his teens.. Rni
expand:led the bu-ine-- lur-
ther and split the al:es and
service of plumbing., air c-ndi-
tioning and appliances tromn
the jewvelry operation
Creating another business,
further south on Marion
known as \Ward's Service
Center. Ward found himself
digging trenches, installing
air-conditioning duct work
and learning how to repair tel-
evisions.
"I pretty much did whatever
they told me to do," he said.
After graduating from
Columbia High Schiol. \Ward
went to M)ercer Uiniversity in
Macon, Ga.. and while playing
recreational football, frac-
tured his skull.
The injury forced him to
drop out of school, and he
subsequently lost his funding
for tuition at the private
school. But once he had
recovered and was ready to
return to school, Ward's num-
ber was drawn in the Vietnam
War draft lottery. He soon vol-
untarily enlisted in the Marine
Corps and served three years.
Moving home after his
service, Ward's interest for
the family business hadn't
waned.
When his father had heart
complications in 1972, Roy
Ward's doctor told him to get
his business in order because
he wouldn't live much longer.
He lived 19 more years, but
heeding the doctor's advice,
went ahead and officially sold
the business to his son.
"He said, 'Do you want the
business' and I said, 'Yeah, I
want it'," Ward said. "I really
did, I enjoyed it. I enjoyed
every aspect of it really, both
businesses."
Though he technically
owned the business, Ward
knew he would eventually
take it over completely and


' e-nt Li t I University oi
Nor th Florida in lacksonville
ftir a d:igree in accounting
while hi-s father continued t(o
liandic day-t,-da\ operations.
In 1 W77 \ard graduated,
then i'amei back to the -store
permanently as his father
helped to ,.iersec the transi-
tin oil the business tu his son
and bu. iNwelrh merchandise.
Thr_,ugh the 19Sn?. Ward
:ias bI) tlicn a father of three
and huLsband to the former
.1J.,an Gore-- of Jacksonville.
noiw a fir-st-grade teacher at
Melrose Park Elementary.
He continued to oversee
both family businesses as his
father stayed involved helping
withl the ieweNlr\ operation.
But in 1991. Roy Ward died.
nearly 2110 \ears after his doc-
t.r predicted he would.
Finding himself with t[wo
businesses to run, Ward tried
tu keep both going. But by
1992 it was too much. He liq-
uidated the assets of Ward's
Service Center and closed the
operation.
Torn between the two busi-
nesses and the legacy of his
father, Ward said with a family
the jewelry business was
more favorable to quality of
life.
Because the appliance and
air-conditioning service busi-
ness involved regular com-
mercial work, he said, it often
demanded his attention at all
hours of the day. Though he
had employees on call, Ward
said people recognized him as
the face of the business and
would call him with problems
at any time.
"Since I have made the deci-
sion I have yet to have anyone
call me at 2:00 in the morning
and tell me their diamond is
loose," Ward said.
As the jewelry business
expanded to offer a larger
selection of gifts, such as fine
housewares, Ward changed
the name of Roy Ward's
Jewelers to Ward's Jewelry
and Gifts.
By the mid-1990s, Ward had
a successful second-genera-
tion jewelry business with
annual sales percentage


-q %


- r i-


ri-4"No~. r


)i


Ii
'I


,1q


ii' I
II



I i -


\ -i.


I- I I L I . 5 .
Second-generation business owner George Ward stands in front of Ward's Jewelry and Gifts on North Marion Avenue. The
business has been in the location since 1955, and was established in 1951 by his father Roy Ward.


growth. He found his interests
drawn toward giving back to
the community.
In 1997, when former City
Councilman Mike Collins
-moved out of city limits and
resigned his seat, Ward
applied and was selected by
council to fill the unexpired
term.
Having been a longtime
'downtown merchant and
serving with other local
boards, Ward said "I just felt
like I had something to con-
tribute to the city."
In 1998, Ward ran for the
council seat and won, doing
so again in 2002. Now in his
third term, as the current
Vice Mayor he has taken over
the duties of mayor after Ray
Kirkland resigned. His duties
will continue until a new
mayor is elected in May.
Though he has been asked,
Ward said he doesn't current-
ly have any intentions to run
for mayor himself. Though he
tends to city business now as
a councilman, as mayor focus-
ing on both his business and


the demands of office would
likely be too much, he said.
"I've got to be here to run
the business, there's no
doubt about that," he said..
Ward has no plans to retire
soon and said he intends to
go least 15 more years. Then,
though, he isn't sure what
will happen to the business.
Though he has three
grown sons, Chris, 26 and
Stephen, 21, of Vero Beach, as
well as Jeff, 25, of Caribbean
island St. Maarten (himself a
retail business owner), none
have shown an interest in the
business. He. also never
attempted to groom them to
take over.
"I encouraged them to go
get a profession and do some-
thing else," he said. "There
will always be a place for a
jeweler who has good service
and the ability to do custom
work."
While he said he will offer
it to his sons if they are inter-
ested, if not, he will look to
sell. While it would be up to
the buyer, he would like to


see the "Ward's" name live on
one way or another.
"It would be nice. I'd like to
see the name carry on," he
said.
With four employees and
jewelry sales comprising
about 75 percent of his gross
sales, Ward has managed to
keep the business viable and
growing yearly despite the
threat of large retailers and
chain jewelry stores.
By carrying unique items
and gift wares not found at
large retail outlets, as well as
offering attentive customer
service, Ward said "it has not
affected us that much."
"Wal-Mart, if anything,
changed the product mix we
offer," he said.
Though its been almost five
decades for Ward in the fami-
ly business, he said, "I'm
always excited'to get up in the
morning and come to work.
He does so at least five days a
week for the six-day business.
Selling jewelry is still his
favorite, he said, having been
responsible for helping pro-


vide the wedding bands and
engagement rings of many
couples over the years.
"With that, you know
you've made somebody
happy," Ward said.
With the help of his wife,
he also maintains the gift side
of his business, as she selects
much of that merchandise.
"I think she's got a pretty
good eye," Ward said.
But instead of trying new
gimmicks and moving into
different areas of merchan-
dising, he said he only plans
to do what has kept the busi-
ness a downtown success for
more than 50 years.
"I think we do a few things
pretty well and I am going to
continue focusing on those."
After all, he has the her-
itage to ensure.
As his father told him,
"Anybody can have the same
merchandise that you have,
but what we have is a good
name and better service, and
we try to give better service
than what you have anywhere
else."


HUM TER
H E PRITINGCO

"Your One Stop Printing and Advertising Store"


* Newsletters
* Letterheads
* Rubber Stamps
* Laminating
* Diecutting
* Invoices
* Graphic Design
* Fax Service
* Digital Printing


* Computer Forms
* Tags
* Posters
* Business Cards
* Specialty Items
* Announcements
* Brochures
* Notary Service
* Blueprinting


FREE Pick-up & Delivery
...and so much more!

1'E'RE OPEN
Monday Friday: 8:00- 5:00

For Your Convenience Our Copy Center Is Also Open
Saturday: 8:00- 12:00


1330 SW Main Blvd.. Lake City, FL 32025

(386) 752-2707


Stop by and check out another NEW & Exciting Service

offered by Hunter Printing...


FULL.COLOR VINYL & PAPER BANNERS

MAGNETIC SIGNS, MOUNTED & LAMINATED POSTERS

NOW AVAILABLE!


( I FREE

SECURITY

SOFTWARE


Call 752-6161

or Go To

www.twnfl.com



LIMITED TIME OFFER
Triple the speed o DSL claim s based on Road Ruone s standard maumum download p ,d wsiusi the landaid OSL package 1 5 Mbps maimum download speed
Actual speeds may vary Dial up speed compan ons are based on average download spl7ds ol ?28 and 56h modems

IM A0 Wae ,, Br, as,, Ei ""tai it. 1,
(sOS)


With Road Runner,
FAST IS NOW
A WHOLE LOT

FASTER


~a-s


,- ,... .. ,.,. ;"4"..:"





- . . .. .


N ~ ~ij~i.~j ~


is I Ii! -.J. ., -p~j'


Triple the speed of the standard DSL package and more than 1OOx faster than dial-up.**


$9.95 INSTALLATION


PLUS FIRST 6 MONTHS


AT $29.95 PER MONTH!


?OAD RUNNER
HIGH SPEED ONLINE '


'-i's--si. V.


NA E' ~WAR NE R


r


I


am.


n. .--


P.m.







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


. A Place Called-


Business & Industry


Made fresh daily Ed and Barb turn out the doughnuts


By JASMINE RANGEL
jrangel@lakecityreporter. com

Under "Doughnuts" in the
phone book, there is only
one Lake City listing.
Ed and Barb's Cream
Donuts, 951 SW Main Blvd.,
is one of the only places to
get fresh doughnuts in a
town devoid of well-known
doughnut chains.
And though local super-
markets may carry Krispy
Kreme, Ed and Barb's prod-
ucts aren't shipped in from
out of town.
Every morning, the
doughnuts are made by 3:30
a.m. and delivered to local
businesses no later than 6
a.m. Ed and Barb Collings
deliver to several businesses
in Lake City, but also to a sub
shop in Live Oak, a coffee
shop in Mayo and Sugar &
Spice in Macclenny.
"Everything's fresh," Ed
Collings said.
"It costs me to do it, but it's
worth it because people keep
coming."
Ed and Barb began the
business five years ago, after
working at other doughnut
shops that closed down.
They started in Starke, but
moved to Lake City, because,
as Ed Collings said, it's a bet-
ter market.
Ed and Barb are owners,
but the business is not just
family-owned, it's also family-
run. The Collingses' daugh-
ter, Candice, and their son-in-
law, Timothy Girard, work
there as well but only for
now.
The business is currently
for sale. Candice, 24, says
she's unsure what career she
wants "maybe something
with animals" but she
knows she doesn't want to
run mom and dad's shop.
Ed Collings said he wants
to give up doughnuts
because he wants to retire
and work with his true pas-
sion motorcycles.
Ed currently owns two, a
Harley-Davidson Fat Boy and
an Iron Horse Tejas chopper.
Ed said he wants more
time to work on his bikes,
but he won't sell to just any-
one.
He's gotten offers, but
none near what he's asking.
"It's worth what I want," he
said. Part of the reason he
won't sell is because he's.
worked to keep the shop run-
ning, and it seems that poten-
tial buyers don't want to do
the same.
"You have to work some of
the time," he said. But,
because he's the owner, he
said he only regularly comes
in on weekends.
During last year's busy
hurricane season, Ed said his
shop got some of the best
business they'd ever had.
Because Ed and Barb's didn't
lose power and their home
did the Collings family
spent most of the time after
the hurricane working and
making a profit.
"We could use a hurricane
every week," Ed said.
Florida weather hasn't
always been specifically good
to Ed and Barb. They moved
from Elmira, N.Y., in 1989,
for the Sunshine State's well-


--~rn


.~ .~


I
I


~J


a

k


-4'


. .- A .
,, 4,o . -. .' -* **


. .


Timothy Girard holds a rack of freshly made doughnuts at Ed and


known weather. But it was
the one year in recent histo-
ry when it snowed.
"It's supposed to be warm
here," Ed said.
The warm weather attract-
ed them because it would be
compatible with riding his
motorcycles.
But so far, Ed said he has-
n't been able to do much rid-
ing.
"I don't have time, because
I'm always working," Ed said.
But, for the right price, Ed
may have more time soon.


Barb's Cream Donuts.

Bruce Drawdy
OWNER


DRAWDY
INSURANCE SERVICES, L.L.C.


........... RO /ISI lSpecialty g I-nsurance
M,;uynu,,r.,p AUTHORIZE E T AGET


738 SW MAIN BLVD.
LAKE CITY, FL 32025


Meet our ce
and our
depart


Tammy Ives, Floyd Ferrell, Kelli Streetman, Chris Johnson,
Mike Cason, Bill Marshall, Kirbi Fera, Jeff Faunce, Jimmy Sanchez
and Robert Stone.
(not pictured) Bobby Streetman and Patrick Cagle


TEL. (386) 758-1889
FAX (386) 758-1891


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter


Coenn Morgag Sevics, nc


Tom McGee
Licensed Mortgage Broker


386-755-3747
750 SW Main Blvd.
P.O.Box 2215
Lake City, FL 32056


j~lofloid Ral sateSrie


Daniel R. Thomas
Broker/Realtor


386-754-5011
Fax: 386-754-9552


EVROLET MAZDA


SERVICE DEPARTMENT

Service Department

Wrtified technicians
service & parts N
tment teams.L

Front Row LtoR: Harold Bundy, Mike Cason, 2nd Row LtoR: Stanley Perkins, Kirbi Fera, Bill Smith, Mike Kelley,
Jeff Jones, 3rd Row LtoR: Floyd Ferrell, Jeff Faunce, Kelli Streetman, Chuck Silcox, Tammy Ives, Leon Butler,
Leander Kelsey, 4th Row LtoR: Bill Marshall, Chris Johnson, Robert Stone, Lycrecia Dove, Ria Gaines,
Brenda Douglass, Mike Peoples, Matt White, Jimmy Sanchez.
(not pictured) Albert Bullard, Karen Mobley, Gwen Walker, Ronnie Purvis, Jeremy Home, Tim Ferrell, Duncan
Grinstead, Rhylee Gerber, Chris Frisbee and Kenton Blake


r .






JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Timothy Girard pours fresh
coffee to go with a dozen
doughnuts at Ed and Barb's
Cream Donuts.


Citgo 3000 Mile Service 150,000 Mile WarrantySI
with See advisor for details.ng System Service
I with B.&, M.OA.

i..,I t., ,,,,, ', D1.&F3,- ,.:1,BG Molor OalF


I Adduce 77 1,1,,, -'. ?4if.,


16---- -----U


- I

~,,,4, 4 :j:,:~~7 I


Starting


at"


L -- ----------------;-------__--J;_ a


It


%.


|
I
I
I
I
I


I
I
I
I







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


AMI: I.


Business & Industry I


Giebeig Construction a cornerstone of Columbia


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter. com

'There isn't a road or street
here that I haven't built or
remodeled on," said Jimmy
Giebeig, owner of Giebeig
Construction. "Well, except
the new ones."
Giebeig was born in Lake
City and has watched it
change drastically over the
years.
He and his father have liter-
ally built the city a long way
with their construction busi-
ness.
Construction runs in his
blood.
His father, Bud Giebeig,
founded Giebeig Construction
in 1947.
In addition, his first cousin,
Peter Giebeig, also has a con-
struction business.
Nowadays, Jimmy Giebeig
builds about one house a
year and couldn't be happier
about it.
He enjoys spending more
time with his wife, Shirley,
and family.
"In the 1950s my father and
I built more than 50 homes in
the Oak Hill subdivision
alone," he said.
"My dad did four or five
subdivisions just like it."
He said the company also
built the Florida Power and
Light building that was the
first to have a sloped
entrance so that semi trucks
could come in for deliveries.
His job was to sit on a
hump of dirt and count the
loads of dirt that came in.
"Back then a truckload of
dirt cost about $3," Giebeig
said. "Times sure have
changed, haven't they?"
In 1989, the construction
company was recognized as
one of "The Big 50," a list of
achievers in the remodeling
industry by Remodeling mag-
azine.
"I have built everything
from a sperm bank for bulls
to a crematorium, so I guess I
have covered life from start


* - ----- ---- -


The former home of Giebeig Construction still stands advertising the business name.


to finish," Giebeig laughed.
'The only thing we didn't do
was build a bridge."
The hardest time for busi-
ness was in the early 1980s
because of the high interest
rates at that time, he said.
"I couldn't have given hous-
es away then," Giebeig said.
He and his father got into
commercial construction
because of its stability.
With houses, there wasn't a
guarantee it would sell, he
said.
Yet, with commercial con-
struction, they knew they
would make money.
Over the years, Giebeig has


built doctor's offices in
Macclenny, convenience
stores in Tallahassee, subdivi-
sions in Jasper, and filling sta-
tions in High Springs.
Yet now Giebeig is content
in letting his business go.
He said his son works in
construction for his uncle in
Atlanta where a $3 million
project is considered small.
"He won't be taking over
this business," he said.
Currently Giebeig is repair-
ing one home off State Road
47 that had a tree fall on it.
"Now I am a paper contrac-
tor even though I never said I
would be one," he said. "I do


the paperwork and oversee
the work."
Giebeig said one of his
favorite memories was a time
when he received a thank-you
note from a customer he
worked for whose mother had
cancer.
During the job, Giebeig did
what he could to accommo-
date the family so that they
wouldn't have to move out dur-
ing their difficult time.
'The thank-you note I got
from that lady is something I
remember even years later,"
he said. "We weren't doing it
because of any other reason


than it was the right thing to
do."
Being born in Lake City,
Giebeig has watched to city
grow tremendously over the
years.
He has several memories
growing up during a time
where his family knew every-
one else in the city.
"I was born on a Friday
night at 7:30 p.m., and until
about three weeks before she
died, my mother would always
talk about how my father and
my doctor, Dr. Bates, rushed
out to a football game right
after I was born because the


doctor was team physician for
Columbia High football team."
Giebeig said at that time,
there were only three doctors
in the area.
'They spanked everyone
the first time and took care of
them growing into adulthood,"
he said.
Giebeig has spent most of
his life in Lake City except for
school.
He majored in entomology,
or the study of insects, at the
University of Georgia.
After graduation, he started
a pest control business in Lake
City for 20 years.
When he learned that those
in the pest control business
had higher death rates than
those in the FBI, he sold the
business in 1981.
After that he focused on
working with his father at the
construction business full
time.
Giebeig enjoys reminiscing
about the way things used to
be in Columbia County.
"I can remember getting out
of school at 3 p.m. and going
quail hunting with my
friends," he said. "There were
fields everywhere and we
would just ask the owners if
we could hunt there and they
would say yes. Now you can't
do that."
When he was in high
school, he said he knew every-
one in the city.
If he didn't he said the per-
son was either just passing
through and stayed at the
Blanche Hotel, or was visiting
someone.
"I knew people's mamas,
daddies, grandparents and
even cats and dogs," Giebeig
laughed.
As someone with a con-
struction background, he said
he is not against expansion but
says he thinks it could move
slower.
"I have really been blessed
and would not change any-
thing about my life," Giebeig
said.


CORRECTIONS CORPORATION OF AMERICA

"Excellence in Corrections"

^:: We are the founder and leader
-,. of the private corrections
'-. ,.**. industry.
Our Lake City Correctional
LAKE CITY Facility accommodates 350
CORRFCTIONAL FACILITY inmates and is currently under
.... expansion to provide an
. ,additional 550 beds, with a
Staff of 250 by summer 2005.

m-7

WeArPruToBPatOTh
LaeCtyClmia ContyWorkorc


At Baya Pharmacy, we are proud
to offer computerized prescription
service, low prices on a wide
selection of products; and the
caring, personalized service you
just won't find at the larger drug
stores and discount store chains.


Since 1984


For a full line of over-the-counter medications,
prescriptions and .supplies, we hope you will
continue to make us your first choice.
Drive through service available


iacy

US 41 NW ..-
Jasper
792-3355 :"


. ,

I .

Designer Baths from...


, it, ^ .,',



Consultations
by Appointment


... need we say more?



Ve could,
but ire would rather show you.



Stop In And Browse

Our Showroom!


Designer Faucets by...
DELTA Ia W I




Gas Fireplaces
by,
monTIGO


Designer Lavatories by...
SWANSTONE.
fARCLAY


Nutone
Central Vaccuum
Intercom Systems
Full Line of Exhaust Fans


Sunsh 0, IineuM


780 SE Baya
Lake City
755-6677


US 90 W
Lake City
755-2233


f -TPT-F


. . . . . . .


...







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


"~ I~*I i.,*~ II.c1 I ;~ __


Business & Industry [


Lasting memories of an old-time drug store


By JASMINE RANGEL
jrangel@lakecityrepor ter. com

The building is older than
most in the county, the soda
fountain has been in use for
decades and the floors, posts
and ceiling are completely
original.
"We wanted to make it look
like it would have looked,"
said Don Houston, owner of
DeSoto Drug Store.
Houston and his wife,
Phyllis, have owned DeSoto
since 1984. Reminiscent of an
old-time drug store, cus-
tomers coming in to pick up
pills at the pharmacy share a
space with those looking for a
meal at the adjoining restau-
rant.
Before the Houstons ran
DeSoto, it was located in the
Blanche Center, where
Chasteen's Restaurant is today.
The owners were Palmer and
Edith Purser.
Don Houston had been
working there for 13 years
when the Pursers decided
they wanted to sell. A graduate
of the University of Florida,
Don was what none of the
Pursers' five children wanted
to be a pharmacist.
Before final arrangements
for Houston to take over the
business had been made,
Palmer was diagnosed with
cancer. Six months later, he
died.
Edith Purser, also a pharma-
cist, stayed on working with
Houston for five years after he
took over. Houston said when
Palmer Purser died, it affected
not only him, but all of Lake
City.
"He was like a leader in the
city. He was like a father figure
for me," Houston said.
Once the business was
Houston owned, changes were
made. The first was to move
the drug store from the
Blanche Center to its current
location, a former hardware
store built in 1865.
Houston said he decided on
the move because he wanted-
to own the drug store's build-
ing.
After about a year of work,
the building was restored and
converted into what it looks
like now. Phyllis Houston
chose the lamps, tables, chairs
and other decorations.
"She's responsible for a lot
of what looks good about this
place," Don Houston said.
Being a pharmacist,
Houston runs that part of the
drug store.
He learned to be a pharma-
cist the old-fashioned way, by
checking long lists of medicine
names against prescriptions
and hoping he'd read the doc-
tor's handwriting correctly.
But, since the advent of com-
puters, Houston said he's
changed his ways.
After taking some classes at
Lake City Community College,
Houston upgraded the drug
store's system. Instead of
checking against long lists of
pills, Houston said in seconds
a scanner can verify prescrip-
tions.


Owners Don and Phyllis Houston share a a float inside the DeSoto Drug Store.


As far as competition
between local pharmacies may
go, Houston said it's not too
bad. If his store doesn't have a
certain medicine, he will call
other pharmacies and make
sure the customer gets what
he or she needs.
If no one in town has it, he
will order the medicine and
have it to the customer by the
next day.
For customers not feeling
well enough to leave their cars,
the store also has a window in
the back, where prescriptions
can be dropped off and filled.
"Priority goes to the cus-
tomer's health," Houston said.
On the other side of DeSoto,
Maggie Greene runs the
restaurant. Her family owned
G & H Food Store, where a
Subway and Dollar General
now stand on West U.S. 90, giv-
ing her a background in food
that elicits praises every day.
Carol Lowry, a waitress at
DeSoto, said customers always
rave about the food, especially
the date bacon walnut chicken
salad. Lowry said she often
hears this dish is "the best."
Houston said he can't


choose a favorite dish. He said
he eats there every day, and he
can't say there's been a day
when he hasn't liked the food.
And, he said, travelers stop
by DeSoto especially for the
food.
"People come through from
Tallahassee and Jacksonville
and stop here to eat," he said.
"It's Maggie's cooking."
Houston said he will be run-
ning DeSoto for awhile,
though he'd sell for the right
price.
With what he said are rising
costs of prescriptions and the
need to fill more each year, it's
getting harder to run DeSoto.
"It's hard for anybody in
business," he said.
"You have to be a worka-
holic to get by."
In the ideal situation,
Houston said he'd like some-
one to take over the way he
did, by working there for a
while and building a rapport
with customers.
'They [customers] trust
you, they depend on you, and
that's the real rewarding part
of running a pharmacy,"
Houston said.


Ask Us About Our Refer a Friend Program


I om inncibng Made S imple W


* Purchase/Re-financing

FHA / Conventional

Construction Permanent Loans

Sub Prime Loans


1st Time Buyers

No Down Payment

"Excellence from beginning to end"


//


(386) 754-0702


480S om eceDrSut 10B9LaeC it, L322


Help Is Just Around The Corner n.,
Complete Line of General Hardware
Plumbing & Electrical
Commercial Supplies


2 Coano, Yi ocatQ t/ons/

1420 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City

755-2660
Mon.-Sat: 7:30-6pm Sun- 9am-5prn

S.R. Hwy 47 N.
Ft. White

497-1708
I Mon.-Sat 8 30-5-30pn. Sun 9arn-Spm

S^ Q I l


r -------------*

II



699
2-Pc. Pruning Set
Perfect for garden pruning chores. Set includes 5/8"
bypass pruner and flower shears. Made of drop-forged
steel. 10 yr warranty S552 093 F12 whle supplies last
-- -
BARGAIN .





499 '
3-Pc. Roller Cover/Brush Combo Pack
Includes Iwo semi-smooth roller and a 2" beavertail
paint brush K 552 875 B12 .--*,.-u.

- - - -I- - -




888
2-Gal. Poly Tank Sprayer
16" flexible wand with
adjustable tip, full size dis-
charge and a funnel top for
Sasy llling, L 533 903 I
L .----- ---------- 1


I


b


. I






LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY. APRIL 3, 2005


A .i ,._ 'l ilt._. '


Business & Industry I


FDOT employee marks 35 years in construction


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

"Cleveland" Eugene Clark
doesn't worry about the days
of his life passing aimlessly
away.
A Live Oak native, Clark
admits to being an outdoor
lover, which would probably
explain how he has managed
to maintain his employment at
the Florida Department of
Transportation for the past 35
years his job keeps him in
the outdoor environment. So,
the chance of watching his life
roll along like the yellow lines
running down the interstate
doesn't bother him.
"I must like all the things
that are connected with the
job ... I've spent 35 years
here," he said. "I like seeing
things accomplished."
Clark, who has been a DOT
field supervisor for the last 12
years, started his career with
the DOT on Aug. 22, 1969, as
a laborer, when most of the
DOT's work was done by
hand.
"We've got a lot of heavy
equipment now, compared to
what we had," he said.
"There's backhoes, front-end
loaders, graders and other
equipment. (Back then) It
took a lot longer and we had a
lot more people about eight
times as many people as we've
got now. It was nothing to
have eight people on a crew
and you rode on the back of a
truck out to your job site
when I first started."
Clark can even recall the
days of digging ditches by
hand, when DOT workers
had to put shovels full of dirt
into the backs of dump
trucks.
"When I started out, I
started as a laborer, which
was really all hand-work," he
said. "We really didn't have a
lot of big equipment. We had


'.
.t.


Eugene Clark sprays water onto asphalt while working on an Interstate 10 construction
has been employed by the Florida Department of Transportation for more than 35 years


small dump trucks and we
loaded them by hand
because we didn't have a
loader like we do today."
With three decades worth
of experience under his belt,
Clark said he can operate a
variety of the DOT's mechan-
ical equipment on the various
construction projects, from
motor graders and loaders to
semis.
Clark's son works for the


Suwannee County
Maintenance Department as
a motor grader operator, and
Clark said it's a skill his son
probably inherited.
"I guess he fell in my foot-
steps, he loves running the
grader," he said. "He's proba-
bly a lot better than I am at it
or ever was."
Through his 35-year career
with the DOT, Clark has seen "
several changes at the DOT


in its on- and off-road
ment. He said one of ti
changes in today's D
the use of computer
paperwork, time sheet
maintenance crew
reports. Also, there ar
many employees.
"Now we've got so
equipment, we don't ha
same number of people
said. "I think the DOT
excellent place to worn


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
project. Clark, an avid turkey hunter,
S.

equip- good opportunities. I won't
he big say it's not hard work,
OT is because at times it is hard
rs for work, but it's not nearly as
ts and hard as it used to be. I like
work quality work and the people
en't as that work with me.
'That's one thing I like to
much stress. If you don't get. as
ve the much work done, but you get
e," he good, quality work, it's bet-
is an ter."
k with When he's not pounding


I- wt - v 1 i iftmomm -ammolk Imlimmir-71 1WOM77- ,


Jones logs three-plus decades with telecommunications company


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Ronnie Jones may work in
the communications indus-
try, but he'll be the first per-
son to tell you, he doesn't
talk much.
As it turns out, helping
people talk to one another is
Where Jones excels.
Jones, 60, has been a
BellSouth employee for the
past three decades, a trade
he learned while serving in
the Army.
"I needed a job," he said,
explaining how he first start-
ed with Bell South. "I did this
in the service communica-
tions."
Jones is a facility techni-
cian and has been employed
with BellSouth for 36 years.
As a facility technician,
Jones repairs customer
reports that are in the tele-
phone cables, such as cable
faults and instances where
customers don't have dial
tones on their telephones.
He said during his tenure


6I think it's great to
live and work in the


town
in.9


you grew up

Ronnie Jones
36-year employee of
BellSouth


with the company he's seen
many changes in the tele-
phone and telecommunica-
tions industry.
"I've gone from eight party
lines open wire circuits, to
high-speed data now in peo-
ple's houses, technology just
drastically changed over the
years and there's more com-
ing," he said. "We had, and
we had eight people on one
line, now we don't even offer
that. All we've got is private
lines and data circuits."
Jones, a Lake City native,
is employed through the
Lake City BellSouth office.
"I've been here my whole,
entire career," he said.


"1 think it's great to live
and work in the town you
grew up in. This is a good
place to live and raise your
family."
Though he isn't too much
for talking, Jones admitted
fishing is his hobby and he
delights in the pursuit of red
bellies, stump knockers,
pumpkin seeds and bream in
the Suwannee and Santa Fe
Rivers.
"I try to get off anytime I
can to go fishing," he joked.
Looking back on his 30
years with BellSouth, Jones
reflected on how the compa-
ny has affected his life.
"Bell South has been good
to me," he said.
"I've put two kids through
college, and both of them are
teachers at Columbia High
School. I don't always agree
with Bell South, and they
don't always agree with me,
but they've always paid me
on time. It's been a good
company to work for and
there are a lot of good people
there."


I



Li
'ml -

~ .

~I1 liii.,
K
I -
a'

ha~ I
/


41


Ronnie Jones, who has been employed by BellSouth for 36 years, checks telephone wires
during a recent service call. As a facility technician, Jones responds to customer reports that
involve telephone cables.
--


spen Open 6 Days
en Affordable a week

? :Excfllence Monday-Saturday

roup



Give us a call. We will see

you today or tomorrow.

------ ---- ---- ---.----. ------ Dr. RoberlJ H m


'I '|I* I 1 .. -' I .. .

"Soft-Touch" Initial Exam (ADA-00110) 3
Panoramic X-Ray(ADA-00330) f O
Diagnosis ilf needed) only "
with this ad. Reg. $110 I .
SCoupon #008 A savings of $76.00!
L-------- -- -- -------0- ----- H AIOJ6pO., ^^
L-- .,--Dr ameek MlNlir

1788 S.W. Barnett Way (Hwy. 47 South) 752-2336
.lMon., Tues. & Thurs. O1am--'pm, Iednesday 9-6, Fridar 8-5. nSat rdna 8-2

.m ** *. *. . . I" S aI


Ill A&
Sue Shattler


Home Town vr

Title ,

I OF NORTH FLORIDA
Nlickie Salter


Real Estate Closings

, Refinancing

Construction Loans

Quality, Professional
Service


..k A **2~(
"a; .* .. *
S I."


o/d~Jh / M,4 6t- i ol wmew


" Tile se'ices i (vailatle
Jor a/ll Florida couinies.

* CoiI-'eniicntih located eiev
to Sears, Hiwv. 90 lies'.

* Evening andi Saturday
appointments available.


2744 U.S. HFL. 90) West
Lake (C'ity. FL


12E


the pavement, Clark said he
likes to fish for "any fish that
bites," either saltwater or
freshwater..
"I like the open air it's
my hobby," he said. "I guess
it relates to the job because of
the open air. I don't like to be
shut up not that there is
anything wrong with coming
into the office, working and
doing work on the computer,
paperwork or anything I'd
just rather be out in the
field."
Clark lives near the
Suwannee River, his favorite
place to fish. He said the
biggest fish he's caught from
there has been a 43-pound
sturgeon.
"I was just fishing for cat-
fish when I caught him," he
said, noting he released the
protected fish.
However, his true outdoor
love is hunting deer and
turkey.
"If I'm not going to eat it,
I'm not going to shoot it," he
said. "I love to whitetail deer
hunt, but I really am a turkey
hunter from way back. My
father was a turkey hunter
and he taught me the tricks
of the trade."
In 2001, Clark used one of
his homemade turkey calls
and lured a 22-pound Jake,
with a 12-inch beard into his
shooting zone. Evidently the
turkey was the best turkey
he's ever bagged as he keeps
its beard and tail feathers
posted above his desk at
work.
Clark, who makes slate
and box calls for turkey hunt-
ing, estimates he's made 30-
50 yelpers throughout the
years.
"When turkey season is in,
it's hard to get me to come to
work," he said, jokingly.
"If I can get off, I'm in the
woods. If I'm not at work, I'm
turkey hunting."







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


S ____ A Place Called


Business & Industry [


'T.


Etheridge Furniture: 40 years and two generations strong


By TONY BRITT U
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comr


The names "Basset" and
"Broyhill Showcase Gallery"
were probably common
names in the household of
George and Betty Etheridge.
Though the names didn't
belong to a family member,
they were the names of prod-
ucts used in the family busi-
ness a family business
that has prospered here for
more than 40 years.
Etheridge Furniture has
been a staple in the Lake City
furniture business since
1964, and two generations of
the Etheridge family contin-
ues to proudly run the family
business as it enters its
fourth decade.
Betty Etheridge and her
husband, George are the
original owners, but now the
business is co-owned by
their children, Brooks
Etheridge, who serves as co-
owner, and Becky Todd, the
secretary/treasurer.
Etheridge Furniture
opened in January 1964 as a
dream George and Betty
shared.
"My husband worked with
a company in town, Dubose
and Cox Furniture, for 15
years before we started,"
Betty said.
"There was a need for an
upgrade in furniture (stores)
because a lot of people were
going to Jacksonville and
other areas to buy furniture.
We approached DuBose and
Cox about opening another
store and letting us buy into
it, but they didn't want to do
it.
So, when the Gateway
Shopping Center started, we
thought now or never. We
had a dream there was a
need (for another furniture
store in Lake City), and there
was and it proved to be a suc-
cess."
Before entering the world
of furniture sales, the
Etheridges both had govern-
ment jobs. George worked
with Airways Engineering
out of civil aeronautics in
Atlanta and Betty was with
safety regulations in
Columbia, S.C.
Betty said they came to
Florida one December and
tried to get in business while
looking into other opportuni-
ties,'but it didn't work out.
However, George's sister
worked at Dubose and Cox
Furniture and told them
about a job opening.
George got the job and
worked there for about 15
years, until he and Betty
opened their store in 1964.
"When we opened up, it
was very exciting," Betty
said with a smile, naming
many of the people who
attended the grand opening
ceremony.
"I still feel that excitement
when I come to work. I guess
that's one reason I haven't
retired. The other reason is
I don't know I still
enjoy what I'm doing. I prob-
ably should retire at my age,


rirjr J ,F TI 1-Ij I I,
Etheridge Furniture co-owner Becky Todd lays out a selection of upholstry fabric at the store's design table.


but as long as I enjoy what
I'm doing, and people are
interested in what we have, I
feel like Brooks and Becky
are very capable of taking


over completely."
Betty said she feels a
sense of pride and accom-
plishment knowing that sev-
eral Lake City residents have


furnished their homes
through the efforts of her
family's store.
She said during a furniture
show early in her career, she


was told not to give out infor- 'These people will call me on
nation, except for what peo- the telephone and say if you
ple pay for.
"I told them they don't ETHERIDGE
know Lake City," she said. continued on page 14


"^
' .f








LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


-I\Place C(Th11edl112-


Business & Industry[


ETHERIDGE



1 1 1 I I i t li t. I I II 1 .
i -. I- Il I '. I tIl. l l t. I h.- t ,,l ,I
1. i i- II i. I I. Q sIII
I l.. I li . I,
., .. .....I .l i b- n .

l..1 I, I II I I" [ .l l
. T i i llrI- il, i RI -,. -
'. ;. ,, T. l1,- ',i, cla i l. t l ir
I '., ,in .\ l!, i ( ,.i i ,,Il
with and kind.. r. of fel linto it,"
1il 11 .i l .i n :II' IL Irl. \' 1i-l l-, I:.,
I [ i l. n ',1 1
L 1 i. r 'l ;",_ .-i l h ,:r !,.,, n
,' ..'I, r. n 1 ,',r '. ,.U .' ,.I .a e t
i!,n,,r. l r ,.: I ,':i l sc-h ..... I-_.
: .I i' \ re li ..e 't hl-n CuI -
I g,-usS this \'.aS suLnI-
thing they were brought up
with and kind of fell into it,"
she said.


, i ,I r l. ,: ,ii i.. .. l ~~: .




"'\V. ,,l i i l '. ii liu r ii\
.iln Iti ,n ratingg w. ith




t ni l i i i. iWti wlhn it.
l.ill ; iii (r-iei- vld r m ain di:
-_ ill ,.r il_ l n trri, i tnre w. S


lT El r'rI' li, iil An Ire ainr-d


t,' 1 I lirr i e I. i CuIr-

"W I. ler ,cl! happy with
inl t n thi id. 1 town,"
-hA aiI
:,rie.inally p.lann d to
, l'I itl it .i e' ,tI l ,i- A ri 'l tarid
\-when t hi. lo-atiO becamein-
available, we decided to come
in this direction and it's been
very good."


* I.-.


-,. 2~..
V -
".*\ ..'~

~


-5---r.
......
4C-^


tw


a'


JENNIFER UHAS IE EN/LaKe City Reporter
Betty Etheridge (center), sits with daughter Becky Todd (left), and son Brooks Etheridge inside one of their numerous show-
rooms at Etheridge Furniture.
..~~~~~~~~~~~........ .-., ..............', :,: ,,- ..... ,--. -_


Columbia County's


Economics At a Glance
(numbers approximate)

Population: 60,250

Unemployment rate: 4.1 percent (Jan.

2005)
Labor Force: 25,500
Percent of county: 43 percent
Number unemployed: 1,100




Average Wage by Industry
(2002)

All Industries: $26,779
Agriculture, Natural Resources,Mining: $27,147

Construction and-Real Estate: $33,627
Education Services: $26,952
Finance and Insurance: $33,430

Government (including military): $30,972

Health Care and Social Assistance: $35.285
Information: $30,167
Manufacturing: $24,370

Other services: $17,982
Professional and Business Services: $25,897

Transportation/Warehousing: $31,240




Personal Income Per Capita


* 2000:
* 2001:
* 2002:


(local and state averages)
Columbia Florida
$18,736 $28,511
$19,189 $29,247
$19,547 $29;750


Top 10 employers
(numbers approximate)

1) Columbia County Schools 1,260
2) Veterans Affairs Medical Center 975
3) Timco 890
4) ClientLogic 550
5) Wal-Mart Supercenter 548
6) Florida Department of Transportation 540

7) Anderson Columbia Company 530
8) Florida Department of Corrections 430
9) Homes of Merit 420
10) Shands at Lake Shore hospital 415
Source: Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce
and Enterprise Florida


-I'. XLLf *._aVcsLx:ssjii~imss'sta


[.







LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


A PlFe C..aled F (Q] Business & Industry


Girl Scouts organization boasts early years in White Springs


By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com
WHITE SPRINGS What
started as a vision for a club
for girls in 1912 has blos-
somed into a worldwide
organization with 8.5 million
members in more than 144
countries.
The Girl Scouts of the USA
was founded almost 100 years
ago by Juliette Gordon Low in
Savannah, Ga.
That orginial 18-member
group now has a national
headquarters in New York
City, more than 400 employ-
ees, more than 300 local Girl
Scout councils or offices,
236,000 troops and 986,000
volunteers.
There is very little informa-
tion about the establishment
of the second Girl Scout troop.
However, after she founded
the Girl Scouts in Savannah,
Low took a trip south to the
resort town of White Springs.
Her friend, Minnie Mosher
Jackson, purchased the spring
in White Springs in 1903 and
eventually built a springhouse
around it.
The spring's waters were
said to have healing powers
and people arrived from
across the country to have a
taste and go for a swim.
While Low was visiting, she
helped found the second-ever
Girls Scouts troop in the coun-
try.
The second troop had nine
girls in the troop who met in
Jackson's home that she
shared with her brother, a
doctor.
Their home was located in
the same site where the
town's original teachers' col-
lege sat two decades prior.
Dr. Mosher turned the
building into a place where
the sick could stay during
their visit.
Jackson's niece, Stella
Mosher, served as the troop's
leader and Laura Waldron
served as assistant.
At the first meeting the girls
and their leaders designed


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Brownie and Junior Girl Scouts Audrey Angstadt (left) and Alexis Angstadt, both of Lake City, show their selection of cookies as they go door-to-door for


annual Girl Scout cookie sales.

their uniforms, which includ-
ed navy bloomers, white
blouses, navy blue sailor ties,
black shoes and stockings.
The girls were given free


swimming lessons at the
spring as long as they wore
their hose.
They also explored along
the Suwannee River and


camped in cottages in
Suwannee Springs.
The troop also went on hik-
ing trips every other week.
Later in 1965, Beverly, S.


Bullard helped establish a
Brownie troop of the Girls
Scouts, Troop #617.
The Girl Scouts of the
United States of America is


the globe's biggest organiza-
tion dedicated to assisting
girls build character and
teaching success skills for
daily life.


THE RIGHT COMBINATION OF EXPERIENCE
AND PERSONALIZED SERVICE TO GET YOUR
FINANCIAL WORLD IN ORDER.


GulfCoast Financial Services, Inc.
386-755-9018
www.gulfcoastfinancial.net
Registered Representative, Securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a Broker/Dealer,
Member NASD/SIPC
Investment Advisor Representative, Cambridge Investment Research Advisor, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.
Cambridge and Gulfcoast Financial Services, Inc., are not affiliated.


jt~ .~UkW.U.LL~


GeGees


I1A Day Spa & Modeling School
"'1iere It Begins ,'Viti TPersonal!"
Get Personal. Say "Thank You"
Administrative Assistant's
Week is April 24 29
jV Tacials

Massage

S 'Body 'Treatmen ts

|* Maanicures & Pedicures
Mother's Day May 8

440 Duval Street Lake City, FLa. 32055 Phone:


Thereareonly two ANYTHREEROOMSANDONEHALLCLEANED
S89.00
times you should ,I:,;LEA[ECOA[O|IHIITEUII, 'I ,111:11,

think about getting STANLEY STEEMER.
your carpet cleaned. ------------------
When it looks dirty, ONE SOFAu TO FT.iCLEANED AND ONE (1)LOVESEAT
When it looks dirty, 'I
and when it doesn't. lLEANrED ir,, it PiP(iTi : i, ,,1,,
STANLEY STEEMER.
SMust present coupon. Residential or Commercial.
E.. ., j. 1 Excluding leather & Haitian cotton. Coupon expires 4-30-05.
STANLEY STEEMER 5 ROOMS CLEANED
CARPT CLEAN R
'125.00
(CLEANED AND PROTECTION APPLIED '199.00)
755-1992 or : STANLEY STEEMER.
S- Must present coupon. A room is an area up to 300 square feet. Liv/Din combos or
Great rooms count as two rooms. Residential only. Copon expires 4-30-05.
1-800-STEEMER r----- ---------------
TILE AND GROUT CLEANING
mm e a. m 10 OFF
I I
GIVING BRINGS IT IN. WE TAKE IT OUT.8" STANLEY STEEMER.
Must present coupon. Residential or Commercial. Minimum charge is required.


1-800-STEEMER or schedule online at stanleysteemer.com


I


L


' COMMERCIAL

METALS CO.


386.752.4888


......... -. L1 ........ ... i"i.


............... - - - - - - - - -


-:.\'


Coupon expires 4-30-05.
- - - - - - - - - -





LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


__ I


- lR t = a M AN. -,
AVIATION SERVICES, INC.
TM
Quality Aircraft Services Accomplished with Home Town Pride









j I-

II


First Shift Team Members



ISecond Shift
Team Members






Third Shift
Team Members




w eoI. C, ,.,. th.gow h. -
Columba Couo year... t-e.Dlo-.-le- .lsnaing ll ti- high




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs