• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Sunday Report
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Opinion
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section C: Life














Group Title: Lake City reporter
Title: The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/00077
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Lake City reporter
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: March 27, 2005
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028308
Volume ID: VID00077
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
notis - ABZ6316
oclc - 33283560
lccn - sn 95047175
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Sunday Report
        page A 2
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Opinion
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Sports
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
    Section C: Life
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
Full Text



Understanding Athletic Trainers

National Athletic Training Month
observed in March.
nnr+. *, 01 n


Love Dogs?

Lake City shop offers
unique canine treats.
Life, IC


Sunday
March 27, 2005
Lake City Florida


75o
Weather
Chance Showers
High 81, Low 60
Forecast on 8A


Etiquette survival


Social -
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graces lost

over years,

some say
By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com
For many people sitting up
straight, chewing with their
mouth closed and saying the
magic words, "please" and
"thank you" are habits
learned as youngsters.
For others, manners are
something from the past.
Lawrence R. Douglass, a
native of Lake City and mem-
ber of the American Society
for Quality (ASQ), has
watched the decline of social
graces over the years.
"I do not appreciate being
called 'guys' by waiters or
waitresses," he said. "In addi-
tion, I do not believe my wife
resembles any man."
He said many times when
he receives the wrong order
at restaurants, the waiter or
waitress tries to correct him
by saying he ordered the
wrong item.
"I was taught better than
that," he said. "You never tell
customers they are wrong,
even if they are."
He is also appalled by men
who wear their hats in restau-
rants and who don't pull out
chairs or open doors for
women.
"My father taught me that
wearing a hat indoors was dis-
respectful to all the ladies
inside," he said. "I still believe
that today."
Douglass attributed some
of the decline of manners to
lack of social education from
parents and schools.
Indeed, manners range
from common courtesies to
ETIQUETTE
continued on page 6A


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Minding your manners: A few tips


As with any social activity,
there are acceptable as well
as expected behaviors that
accompany it. Some of these
behaviors are the result of
culture or the environment
whereas some may be said
to reflect "common sense."
Just in case, here are a few
tips to help guide the way:
Men should still pull out
chairs for women.
Saying please and thank
you are essentials.
Napkins should be
unfolded in half and put on
laps, never shake it out
entirely.
Guests should not eat
until everyone has been
served or instructed by the
host.
Ties should not be
tucked in shirts unless
among friends.
The table host or per-
son sitting closest to the
bread basket should take
the basket, offer a piece of
bread to the person on the
left, take one for himself or
herself and then pass the
basket to the right.
Never spit out unwant-
ed food into a napkin.


Instead, insert a fork in your
mouth, push the food onto it
with your tongue and place
the food on the edge of the
plate.
Pace yourself when eat-
ing; you shouldn't be the
first or last done.
Don't allow a utensil to
touch the table again after
the first use.
To reach for more food,
bend at the waist, not at the
head.
Blot with your napkin,
don't wipe.
Put your napkin on your
chair if you leave the table
for a moment and come
back, leave it on the side of
the plate if you are leaving
and not returning.
Pass salt and pepper
shakers together to avoid a
search later.
Combat nervousness by
smiling, keeping eye contact
and trying to relax.
Never overindulge in
hors d'oeuvres or drink.
Never use cell phones
during meals or blow your
nose at the table.
Never pick food off of
your teeth or apply lipstick or


cosmetics at the table.
M Avoid being rude or
ignoring the waiter or wait-
ress.
EMen should stand when
a woman leaves or returns.
If you are not using a
hand place it on your lap.
Doors should be opened
for guests.
When invited some-
where, it is rude to ask who
else will be there before
accepting the invitation, as it
shows your main concern is
whether the other attending
are worth your attending.
Don't ask to bring a date
to a party, unless the hosts
invites you to do so.
Thank you notes are still
essential.
Utensils should be used
course by course working
from' the outside in toward
the plate.
When you are finished
eating, place the fork and
knife across the center of the
plate.
Never season food
before tasting it.
Butter on butter plates is
for rolls only; don't use it for
potatoes or vegetables.


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Residents sought to

discuss possible skate

park in Lake City


City county and school
officials to take part in
presentation on April 5.
By JUSTIN LANG
fjlang@lakecityreporter.com
Local officials are inviting
the community to come out
and help build support for a
proposed skate park.
Otherwise it may never
become a reality.
"What we are trying to do is
determine the amount of com-
munity interest in construct-
ing a skate park facility," said
City Manager Joe Cone.
A presentation on a pro-
posed skate park on property
north of Youngs Park next to
Memorial Stadium, currently
occupied by dilapidated rac-
quetball courts, is scheduled


for 6 p.m. April 5 at the
Columbia Coiunty School
Board Administrative
Complex auditorium.
Cone said the presentation
will be given by David Moss
of Rep Services Inc., a branch
of Landscape Structures,
which builds pre-made skate
park equipment.
He said the event is "intend-
ed for anyone that has an
interest in constructing a
skate park in the community."
In addition to local parents
and students who are encour-
aged to attend if they have an
interest in the proposed park,
he said that local officials
from the city, county and the
school board will also be pres-
ent.


PARK
continued on page 6A


Artist to speak about environmental issues


Gainesville artist to
discuss changing
environment of springs.

By ASHLEY CISNEROS
acisneros@lakecityreporter.com
The deep indigo hues
dance with vibrant green
swirls on Margaret Ross
Tolbert's paintings of North
Florida's treasured springs.
Her skillful strokes breathe
life onto the canvases and
murals she paints, making the
viewer want to jump in for a
refreshing dip.
The accomplished painter
and environmental activist
will be speaking at the
Alfonso Levy Performing Arts
Center at 7:30 p.m. April 7.
Tolbert will also speak to
students in art and environ-
mental classes at Columbia
High School during the day.
Her presentations will
serve as a prelude to Lake
City Appreciation Day at


Ichetucknee Springs April 9.
The artist will speak about
her long love of the springs of
Florida and the changes she
has observed in the environ-
ment over the years.
Tolbert earned her bache-
lor's and master's degrees
from the University of Florida
and has painted springs such
as Ichetucknee, Wakulla and
Manatee Springs for more
than 20 years.
Her speeches in Lake City
will focus on Ichetucknee
Springs.
Tolbert uses her artwork as
an expression of her love of
the springs and the impor-
tance of conservation.
"I would like to encourage
all residents to take interest in
the springs and make moves
to protect them," she said.
Her work has been enjoyed
by art-lovers all over the state,
country and globe.
The Gainesville artist
believes that the springs are
one of the most exotic fea-


Artist Margaret Ross Tolbert of Gainesville begins a painting
while at Ichetucknee Springs' head spring. Tolbert's paint-
ings have been displayed in Sweden, Australia and Turkey.


tures of the state.
She has noticed the effects
of pollution on the springs.
"I have watched my paint-
ings change over the years


due to changes in the ecology
of the springs," she said. "For
ARTIST
continued on page 6A


TODAY


Classified


. . . .4D


Life ........... 1C


Local & State .. .3A
Business .......1D


Obituaries ...... .6A
Opinion ........ 4A


Puzzles ........ 3C
Scoreboard ..... .2B


Stocks ......... 3D
Weather ........ 8A


________ 34 N. -~


U


CALL US:
(386)
752-1293
SUBSCRIBE:
755-5445










Page 2A
March 27, 2005


FLORIDA


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Easter coloring champs
Winners in the Lake City Reporter Easter Coloring Contest were
11, (ages 10-12 category); Cassidy Lear, 5, (4-6 category); and
egory).


RANDY ROUGHTON/Lake City Reporter

Connie Driggers (from left),
Brandon Givens, 8, (7-9 cat-


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LAKE CITY REPORTER
HOW TO REACH US CLASSIFIED
Main number ..........(386) 752-1293 To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
rP- ume.-.-.......oe-oquu


Fax number ............... ./752-9400uu
Circulation ................. 755-5445
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
'Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fla. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard ... .754-0418
(mleonard@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295. '
Editor Todd Wilson ..........754-0428
(twilson @ lakecityreporter.com)
Advertising Director
Karen Craig ................. 754-0417
(kcraig@lakecityreporter.com)
Sales ...................... 752-1293
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)


Controller Sue Brannon ....... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next
day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters ... .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
13 W eeks ................ . . $23.54
26 W eeks ..................... $42.80
52 Weeks ..................... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
13 W eeks ................ . . $44.85
26 W eeks ..................... $89.70
52 W eeks ............... . . .$179.40


Correction policy
The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Little Caesars &


363 SW Baya Dr. 961-8898
Hwy 47 & 1-75 755-1060
Offer limited to first 150 customers of the day '


Lottery
MIAMI Here are the
S . winning numbers in
- Saturday's Florida Lottery:
Cash 3: 1-2-6
Play 4: 2-8-5-3


Fantasy 5: 29-17-28-24-8
Lotto: 6-52-15-12-42-41
Friday's Fantasy 5: 6-12-
14-20-30
Friday's Mega Money:
13-25-42- 43
Mega Ball: 11


REPORT


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2005 3A


LO.AfLATUATATE!ww--


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Fallen Brother Benefit
John Smith, 9, helps James Greer polish the chrome under the hood of Greer's 1957
Oldsmobile during the Fallen Brother Benefit at the American Legion facility off U.S. 41
South Saturday afternoon. The benefit was held to help raise funds for Billy Lockwood who
lost his leg in a motorcycle wreck last year.

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Available from Commercial News Providers"


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h -P -PEDIC
L PRESSURE RELIEVING
SWEDISH MATTRESSES AND PILLOWS
The Furniture Showplace
Wholesale Sleep
US 90 West (next to 84 Lumber) 752-9303


Florida Gateway
Pro Rodeo/Carnival
Dog Show & Trail Classic Clinic
Featuring Hildebrand Rides, Florida's Choice
Giant Midway Coming to
Columbia County Fairgrounds
Thursday, March 24t -Sunday, March 27m










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FIREPLACES & MANTELS
.cvge Shoao~ 'Wai4
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Gainesville Sat. 9:30 4:00 e


Congratulations Metabolic Centers on your loss
of 5972 lbs in February and a gain of $5972 for
the Tsunami Relief to be donated in your honor.
ATTENTION
City of Lake City
Employees
SPECIAL METABOLIC
MARCH APPRECIATION
1/3 OFF PROGRAM FEE*
WITH FREE YEAR OF MAINTENANCE
*Up to 50 Ibs program with employee ID
Call Today. Start Losing Tomorrow


mflA3OLIC
RESEARCH CENTER


755-8700


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4A LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2005
LAKE ITY REPORT


1 PI 10N


REPOWRMER
SERVING COLUMBIA COUNTY SINCE 1874
MICHAEL LEONARD, PUBLISHER
TODD WILSON, EDITOR
SUE BRANNON, CONTROLLER
THE LAKE CITY REPORTER IS PUBLISHED WITH PRIDE FOR
RESIDENTS OF COLUMBIA AND SURROUNDING COUNTIES BY
COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS INC. OF ATHENS, GA. WE BELIEVE
STRONG NEWSPAPERS BUILD STRONG COMMUNITIES -
"NEWSPAPERS GET THINGS DONE!" OUR PRIMARY GOAL IS TO
PUBLISH DISTINGUISHED AND PROFITABLE COMMUNITY-ORIENT-
ED NEWSPAPERS. THIS MISSION WILL BE ACCOMPLISHED
THROUGH THE TEAMWORK OF PROFESSIONALS DEDICATED TO
TRUTH, INTEGRITY, LOYALTY, QUALITY AND HARD WORK.
DINK NESMITH, PRESIDENT TOM WOOD, CHAIRMAN

E D-I 0 I L



Mind your



manners

Yes, sir, manners are important.
We all enjoy being treated in a
polite fashion, but the reality of
the situation is people are not
always courteous.
Some people are hateful, some are uned-
ucated. Some know better, but would
rather be rude than show acceptable
behavior.
No, maam, rude behavior is never
acceptable. National experts in the field of
designing the proper table setting and
choosing the correct utensil are con-
cerned that manners and etiquette, espe-
cially in the business worll, are in a tail-
spin.
It doesn't take a genius or a PhD or a
white tablecloth event to reveal this fact.
We're all aware of it.
Many in Columbia County are blessed
with Southern charm and the basics in
courteous behavior, but we all need work
oni our manners.
We all can stand to look at ourselves and
diagram what needs the most improve-
ment. Business etiquette is being critiqued
across the country.
More and more employers are doing
subtle things such as taking job candidates
to lunch to look for courteous behavior
such as the opening of doors, the proper
table manners and other such marks of
finesse.
With the push in Columbia County to
obtain more high-quality restaurants and
amenities in our area, it is important that
we all do our part to brush up on our man-
ners whether we are a customer or a
potential employee at one of these estab-
lishments.
This is an individual quality of life
improvement that we all should strive to
accomplish.
It has been our pleasure to host your
attention on this fine Easter Sunday. Thank
you for reading and for your continued
support of the Lake City Reporter.
Please have a wonderful day.


Today is Easter Sunday, March 27, the
86th day of 2005. There are 279 days left in
the year.

Today's Highlight in History:
On March 27, 1977, 582 people were
killed when a KLM Boeing 747, attempting
to take off, crashed into a Pan Am 747 on
the Canary Island of Tenerife.


On this date:
In 1513, Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de
Leon sighted Florida.
In 1625, Charles I ascended the English
throne upon the death of James I.
In 1794, President Washington and
Congress authorized creation of the U.S.
Navy.
In 1836, the first Mormon temple was
dedicated, in Kirtland, Ohio.
In 1917, the Seattle Metropolitans
became the first U.S. team to win the
Stanley Cup as they defeated the Montreal
Canadiens.
In 1958, Nikita Khrushchev became
Soviet premier in addition to First
Secretary of the Communist Party.
In 1964, Alaska was rocked by a powerful
earthquake that killed 114 people.
In 1968, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin,
the first man to orbit the earth, died in a


plane crash.
In 1980, 137 workers died when a North
Sea floating oil field platform, the
"Alexander I. Keilland," capsized during a
storm.


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Welcome back, Coach Green


More than 175 CHS Tiger football
fans showed up at the fair-
grounds last Monday night to
enjoy Tony Robinson's delicious
barbecue and to say a rousing
welcome back to returning CHS football coach,
Danny Green. In a pep rally type atmosphere, a
steady parade of speakers recalled the great
on-field record Coach Green had compiled in
his recent nine year tenure here. Joe Robinson,
Quarterback Club mainstay and club secretary
for 25 years, also reminded us of two of Coach
Green's impressive off-the-field accomplish-
ments. First, Coach Green's constant emphasis
on academics resulted in a team Grade Point
Average (GPA) of 2.9 nearly a B average.
Second, Coach Green's phenomenal record of
getting his players four year college football
scholarships. Ask any parent how important
both items are. Special tributes were also paid
to Richard Anders and Bobby Simmons, two
fabled retired coaches who devoted their entire
coaching lives to serving local young men.

Coach Richard Anders

Coach Richard Anders was a local high
school football coach who came to the former-
ly all-black Richardson High School in 1949
and over time became a local legend by coach-
ing the Richardson Wolves to countless win-
ning seasons and several state championships
- and by molding the character of hundreds of
young black men. Statewide, Coach Anders
was known as the premier black coach in
Florida and he sent many young men to college
on football scholarships.
Coach Anders was also a 12-year School
Board member. He is the only person ever to
retire with 50 consecutive years of employment
with our school system, and the only person
ever to have a yearbook dedicated in his honor
at both Richardson High School and CHS.

Coach Bobby Simmons
Coach Bobby Simmons is Columbia High
School's all-time winningest head football
coach with 111 wins in 15 years. He led the
Tigers to many great victories in the Gateway
Conference, in post season bowl games, and in
the state playoffs.
Before that he was an assistant coach for
seven years and helped lead our Tigers to their
only state championship in 1967.
But Coach Simmons, career was always
about much more than winning football games.
He also imparted an enduring sense of sports-
manship and fair play that continued to exist in
the lives of his players long after their playing
days became just memories in a scrapbook. In


: MORRIS
uA WILLIAMS


short, Coach Simmons was a record-setting
football coach who is just as well known for
building character in his players as he is for
winning football games.

Wuerffel on Edge
Former Tiger and Gator football star Shayne
Edge also attended the banquet. In high school
and college, Shayne was known as a gifted,
rough and tumble athlete. In fact, this is what
Gator Heisman Trophy winner Danny
Wuerffel wrote about his former Gator team-
mate in his book "Tales from the Gator
Swamp:" "Shayne Edge had the mentality of a
linebacker and the extraordinary physical
skills of the position he played: punter. Shayne
always added drama, no matter what the situa-
tion was.
He was a great punter for the Gators and
made some incredible plays both punting
and running the ball on fake punts."
Shayne holds the Gator record for the sec-
ond longest punt in UF history, 76 yards versus
Vanderbilt in 1992, and ranks third in all-time
UF career punting average with a 42.5 average
on 145 punts.

Baby's new shoes
Continuing with sports, famous sports writer
Grantland Rice once captured the early mean-
ing of true sportsmanship in his well-known
poem that goes thusly: "When the One Great
Scorer comes to judge you by your name, it
matters not whether you won or lost but how
you played the game."
Writer John Lardner later captured more
realistically the modern view of sports, espe-
cially professional sports, in this poem: "Right
or wrong is all the same.
When baby needs new shoes, it isn't how you
play the game, but whether you win or lose."

The Metal Age
A senior citizen said he lived in "The Metal
Age: He had silver in his hair, gold in his teeth
and lead in his pants!"

Morris Williams is a resident of Columbia
County and a historian. Contact him at' 755-
8183 or williamsh2@firn.edu.


I ET E T HE E ITOR


Liberals siding with death
Does the fight over Terri
Schiavo have other implica-
tions? Most liberals have
aligned themselves with
Terri's husband and want her
lifeline, feeding tube removed.
Supposedly Terri told her hus-
band, when she was about 26
years old that she would not
want to live without quality of
life.
Does any 26 year old think
about being in a vegetative
state?
Generally, 26 year olds
think of life and being invinci-
ble.
Why have liberals sided to
end Terri's life? Liberals have
been adamant about protect-


ing the rights and welfare of
our enemy combatants.
Liberals don't want us to
scare, withhold sleep, threat-
en, confuse or withhold food
from our enemy combatants,
but they want Terri to starve
to death.
Liberals will advocate to
spend millions to defend these
enemy combatants and other
ravaged criminals but they
will not defend Terri. Liberals
are sympathetic with the crim-
inally insane, but not Terri. If
anyone kills or injures a mana-
tee, liberals will want them
incarcerated forever, but they
won't take up for Terri.
We should not drill for oil in
Alaska for fear of destroying


caribou habitat, but we can
destroy Terri.
I believe the liberals are
looking at a different intent
that determines their actions.
The words "pro-choice" are at
stake in this decision of life or
death for Terri. Liberals can-
not lose the power of the
words "pro-choice."
If that power is lost, abor-
tion issues will go back to
what they were before legal-
ized abortion. The most
feared phrases for liberals are
pro-life and right-to-life. I
believe abortion is the real
issue here, not Terri Schiavo.
That's my opinion.
Bill Glover
Lake City


MICHAEL
LEONARD


Memories of


the sandlot


Christian images of the cross and
resurrection, and secular icons
such as the Easter bunny and col-
ored eggs. As important as these
are, this time of year also inspires memories
in my life of spring break from school and
endless sandlot baseball games with other
boys in the neighborhood.
What days those were. Breakfast was
wolfed down by 8 a.m. and chores done by
8:15. By 8:30, 9 a.m. at the latest, we were all
gathered in that season's backyard of choice
ready to choose sides and play ball.
Everybody had a player they idolized and
tried to play like, and there were often argu-
ments over who got to be what player on a
given day. Because we were the two oldest and
biggest, my best friend Frank "Pepe lePew"
Depew and I always got to be who we wanted.
We formed our own miniature Murderer's
Row, Frank posing as Minnesota Twins slug-
ger Harmon Killebrew and me as the incom-
parable Say-Hey Kid, Willie Mays.
One of the younger kids on our team, Mikey
Kestner, had a few older cousins who lived a
couple of blocks away and these boys had
their own team of wannabe stars. Mikey start-
ed talking trash to his cousins about how our
team could whup their team and, of course, a
challenge was issued.
The date for this grudge match was set for
Thursday during the week after Easter. The
site was Kestner's back yard.
Our team included boys from Seth Place,
Croydon Avenue and Park Road. Since
Kestner's house faced Park and that was also
the site of the field, we dubbed ourselves the
Park Road Boys.
When our opponents showed up, they
announced that their club was called the
Maryvale Mob, so named because they lived
near Maryvale Elementary School and they
looked, well, like mobsters.
These guys were only 10-12 years old, like
us, but already they had hair under their arms.
Some even had the hint of a shadow on their
lips, and we're not talking about a chocolate
Ovaltine shadow. And to a man I mean, boy
- they chewed bubble gum before lunchtime,
a sure sign that they were headed for the pen
before they turned 20.
The game for us started with an ominous
sign. When Chippie went into his windup, he
kicked a little too high. From my position in
centerfield I could hear the rip as the seat of
his pants gaped open, then the hoots and
shouts as the Maryvale Mob got the first
laugh on us.
Fortunately Chippie lived next door and
could just hop the fence, change shorts and
get back on the pitcher's mound. But in this
game having a reason to make fun of the other
team was almost as important as scoring a
run. An important psychological point had
been lost.
Maryvale Mob broke'on top and held the
lead through eight innings. Then our rally
began. By the time everybody went home for
lunch, the game was tied at 32 runs apiece and
we were in the 17th inning.
Defense was not the strong suit of either
team. Through 40 innings we'd battled these
bigger, hairier boys and held our own. Now it
looked like we were going to lose.
Jack led off with a scratch single, barely
beating out a throw that rolled most of the way
to the first baseman's glove. I followed with a
double, but Jack only advanced to third
because he tripped over second base, the leg
of the Kestner's swingset.
Up to bat walked Harmon, I mean Frank.
He fouled off the first pitch and swung wildly
at the second. With the count 0-2, I was seri-
ously thinking about whether I should get a
new best friend.
Then Frank connected. It was a mammoth
shot. The Spalding sphere arced over the
swingset, cleared the fence and plopped with a
thud on Mr. Hogenmiller's roof.
"You *@#!~&% boys," Hogenmiller yelled as
he grabbed our ball. "This will take care of
you." And he marched inside.
An argument broke out as to which team
won, but fortunately Mrs. Kestner appeared
before the Maryvale Mob broke out the brass
knuckles and everybody went home.
Major League baseball is now embroiled in
a scandal over steroids and the purity of the
game is for me, lost. I prefer to remember
baseball as it was, Willie Mays, Harmon
Killebrew and the boys staring down the
Maryvale Mob in a 40-inning classic.

Michael Leonard is publisher of the Lake
City Reporter Contact him at 754-0418 or
mleonard@lakecityreporter com.








LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2005 5A


LOCAL & STATE


ROAD REPORT
__ -*"*s /


The following is a list of
roadwork under way by the
FDOT that may impact traf-
fic:

Alachua County
Archer Road ( State
Road 24): Daytime lane clo-
sures between 13th Street
and SW 34th Street for rou-
tine sidewalk repair.
13th Street (U.S. 441):
Daytime lane closures on the
four-lane section in
Gainesville for re-painting
the highway markings.
University Avenue
(State Road 26): The outside
westbound lane at the
Hogtown Creek Bridge (just
west of SW 34th Street) will
be closed Tuesday and
Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. for routine bridge main-
tenance.
Newberry Road (State
Road 26): Night-time lane
closures at side streets
between Tower Road and
Northwest Eighth Avenue to
remove the patterned cross-
walks starting Monday night
for the entire week (post-
poned from last week). Rain
may delay the work again.
University Avenue
(State Road 26): Daytime
lane closures from NW 34th
Street to NW 22nd Street for
utility crews to move power
poles.
South Main Street (State
Road 329): Daytime lane clo-
sures while road is being
resurfaced between Williston
Road and Southwest 16th
Avenue. Northbound traffic
is being detoured at the inter-
section with Williston Road
(State Road 331) which is
closed for reconstruction.
Traffic is being detoured to
Southwest 16th Avenue
(State Road 226).
Southwest Second
Avenue (State Road 26A):
Daytime lane closures possi-
ble between Northwest 22nd
Street and Northwest 34th
Street as utility crews relo-
cate power poles in prepara-


tion for construction project
beginning in August.
Newberry Road (State
Road 26): Daytime lane clo-
sures to landscape the medi-
an between County Road 241
South and U.S. 41 at
Newberry.
Southwest 16th Avenue
(State Road 226): Possible
daytime lane closures
between Williston Road to
Archer Road for work in the
median and at side streets.
Williston Road (State
Road 331): The intersection
at South Main Street (State
Road 329) is being recon-
structed.
There may be daytime lane
closures beginning at 8:30
a.m. and continuing until 6
a.m. for paving operations
between U.S. 441 and East
University Avenue.
No lane closures are
allowed between 6-8:30 a.m.
Lane closures may also be
encountered at side streets
where the sidewalk ramps
are being rebuilt.
Hawthorne Road (State
Road 20): Traffic has been
switched to the new U.S. 301


overpass. Semi-trucks, trail-
ers and RV's are prohibited
from using the new overpass
because of the restricted lane
width and are diverted to the
ramps to cross or access U.S.
301. Motorists may
encounter daytime lane clo-
sures for concrete, paving
and signal work. Trucks are
entering and leaving the
roadway between U.S. 301 in
Hawthorne and Cross Creek
Road (County Road 325) as
work is underway to provide
a four-lane divided highway.
The speed limit from U.S.
301 to Stadium Drive has
been reduced to 25 mph.
U.S. 441: Daytime lane
closures in both directions
between High Springs and
Santa Fe High School to
resurface the roadway. Also,
constructing a sidewalk from
U.S. 41 (Main Street) to the
Winn-Dixie Shopping Center.

Columbia County
Interstate 75: The two
outside northbound lanes
over the County Road 250
overpass north of Lake City
will be closed Sunday and
IMIonday nights from 7:30
p.m. to 4:30 a.m. for routine
bridge maintenance.
South Main Boulevard
(U.S. 41): The northbound
outside lane will be closed
Monday while a new traffic
signal pole in installed in the
northeast quadrant of the
intersection at St. Margret's
Street. The work is part of
the State Road 47 widening
project.
State Road 47: Daytime
lane closures from north of I-
75 to U.S. 41 (South Main
Boulevard) as barrier wall is
being placed along the edge
of the roadway.
Traffic has been shifted to
the temporary pavement
from just north of Ridge
Street (south of 1-75) to Ring
Power Road and also from
Greenridge Drive to just past
Susan Glen.
Traffic has also been shift-


ed to the southbound lanes of
SR 47 under the 1-75 overpass
for work on the northbound
lanes.
Utility companies are con-
tinuing to work on both sides
of the road relocating power
poles and installing water
and sewer lines. Possible clo-
sure of side streets.
Mobile home transporters
should not use State Road 47
from U.S. 41 to south of 1-75
because of the narrowed
width of the lanes caused by
the placement of barrier wall.
The speed limit is reduced
to 45 mph throughout the
project limits and sheriff's
deputies are enforcing the
speed limit with fines dou-
bled in construction zones
when workers are present.
Also, motor carrier compli-
ance officers are patrolling
the area for oversize vehi-
cles. A fine of up to $3000 per
load can be written by these
state officers.
U.S. 41/441: Crews will
be repainting the roadway
lines from Lake City to
Ellisville during the week
This is a moving operation
which may slow down traffic.
Motorists should not pass in
between the paint truck and
the safety truck following
and avoid tracking over the
paint until dry.
U.S. 441 North: Crews
will be repainting the road-
way lines from Interstate 10
to Deep Creek. This is a mov-
ing operation which may
slow down traffic.
Motorists should not' pass
in' between the paint truck
and the safety truck follow-
ing and avoid tracking over
the paint until dry.

Suwannee County
U.S. 129: Daytime lane
closures between 9 a.m. and
4 p.m. to begin installing a
traffic signal at the intersec-
tion of Winderweedle and
Hamilton streets. The side-
walks may also be temporari-
ly closed.


DRIEFS


Gray promoted
to vice president
First Federal Savings Bank
of Florida has promoted
Kevin Gray to Vice
President/Regional Manager.
Gray will now be responsi-
ble for retail banking activi-
ties and business develop-
ment for the Columbia
County market. Gray was
previously the Vice
President/Sales Manager
and he will continue working
from the First Federal


Financial
Center.
Jim
Moses,
Senior Vice
President of
Commercial
and Retail
Sales said
Gray "Kevin's
lending and
management experience will
make him a great asset in his
new position."
First Federal Savings Bank
of Florida was founded in
1962 and has offices in Lake


City, Live Oak, Jasper, Mayo,
and Dowling Park and
Amelia Island.
Slay purchases
Allstate Agency
Mary T Slay, former
Columbia County School
Counselor, has purchased
Rick Bringger's Allstate
Agency, located at 757 W.
Duval St., Lake City. Rick
recently retired after 25
years of dedicated service to
Allstate customers.
Mary, who has a Master's


Degree in School
Counseling, also brings over
20 years insurance experi-
ence to the agency. Mary and
her husband, Buddy, have
owned First South Insurance,
an independent Allstate
agency, since 1999.
The office will remain at
the same location. Linda
Howard, Rick's Customer
Service Representative for
six years and Nick Slay, an
agent for seven years, will
help service accounts.
Compiled from staff reports


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JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter

Winning dogs
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Weimaraner 'Anja' while visiting with Barbara Cook and
'Diva' during the American Kennel Club.dog show at the
Columbia County Fairgrounds Saturday morning.


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been diagnosed with chronic
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participate in a clinical
research study of an investi-
gational drug for diabetes.
The investigational drug is a
dry powder formulation of
human insulin that can be
inhaled through the mouth
from a hand-held aerosol
delivery device.

If you qualify for the study,
you will receive, at no cost to


you, a glucose test meter and
appropriate supplies that you
may keep, metered-dose
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required as part of your
study, and one of two possible
treatments: either inhaled
and injectable insulin or only
injectable insulin. You will also
receive compensation for
travel for each study visit
(This is an 18 month study).

Please call the Lake City VA
Medical Center, Mon.-Fri.
9AM-1PM at (386) 755-3016
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AKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2005

- r umluw mMb ,ar bummm


Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers"
I.. (a ...


PARK
Continued from page 1A
Cone said there are also sev-
eral churches in the communi-
ty who have said they were
interested in seeing a skate
park constructed.
At the presentation, he said
Moss will explain what type of
park his company can design
and build either at the basic,
cheapest level or that which is
more advanced.
From early estimates, Cone
said that a basic, no frills park
could be done for as little as
$10,000 or a more advanced,
larger .one could be had for
about $85,000.
So far, he said there has also
been some discussion about
starting small and building on
the park as time goes on.
Cone said he is hopeful that
the April 5 presentation will
help bring forward people will-
ing to organize a group that


will partner with the city and
cotinty's joint Recreation and
Parks Department to help
manage the skate park.
"We would like to see a
group step forward and man-
age the facility on a partner-
ship basis, similar to what we
have with the other sports
activities we have in the com-
munity," Cone said, mention-
ing local youth sports associa-
tions for soccer, baseball and
softball.
He said the City Council has
indicated it does not want to
take on the project by itself
because of the initial cost of
construction, as well as the
potential park's daily operation
and supervision of its users.
"The city wants to be a play-
er, but the city doesn't want to
be the lead," Cone said. "The
city has already committed the
property and the city and
county have talked about
donating some seed money to
get the project going."


Obituaries


Mrs. Arnold Nevesta
Combs
Mrs. Arnold Nevesta Combs, 91,
of Lake City, FL. passed away on
March 25, 2005.
Arrangements are incomplete at
this time but be available after 5 :00
p.m. Saturday, March, 26, 2005.
SHERRILL-GUERRY FUNER-
AL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave.
Lake City, FL. is in charge of the
arrangements. (386) 752-2211.

Mrs. Helen Kline
Mrs. Helen Kline, 94, passed
away March 25, 2005 at the Health
Care Center of Lake City.
She has lived in Lake City for the
past forty years coming from
Lansing, Michigan. She enjoyed
corresponding with people by writ-
ing them letters.
She is survived by her three
brothers; W.M. Perry of Grand
Ledge, MI, John Perry of
Diamondale, MI, and Otto Perry of
Eagle, MI, and two sisters: Ruth
Anibal of Venice, FL and Lillie
Skiffington of Lansing, MI.
A private family memorial serv-
ice will be held in Michigan.
Arrangements are under the
direction of SHERRILL-GUER-
RY FUNERAL HOME 458 S.
Narion Ave. Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 752-2211.

Mrs. Catherine Shores
Mrs. Catherine Shores, of
Gainesville, died late Friday


evening at her residence following
an extended 'illness. Funeral
arrangements are incomplete at this
time. Arrangements are under the
direction of the DEES FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME & CREMA-
TION SERVICES, 768 West
Duval Street, Lake City. (961-
9500)

Mr. Ronald Anthony Soto
Mr. Ronald Anthony Soto, 57, of
Lake City, died Friday following an
extended illness. Funeral arrange-
ments are incomplete at this time.
Arrangements are under the direc-
tion of the DEES FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME & CREMA-
TION SERVICES, 768 West
Duval Street, Lake City. (961-
9500)
Obituaries are paid advertisements.
For details, call the Lake City
Reporter's classified department at
752-1293


ARTIST
Continued from page 1A
example, there is algae in
some of my more recent paint-
ings that were not there
before."
Tolbert uses her work to
share her concerns with con-
servationists, locals, and art
lovers alike.
"I like to imagine that the
scene I see is the same others
saw hundreds of years
before." she said. "Yet, I know
that they have changed."
She attributes the changes
to expansion and growth.
"We have to be careful about


ETIQUETTE
Continued from page 1A
entire codes for eating food
properly, making introduc-
tions, writing letters and
answering the telephone.
They are making a come-
back, especially in corporate
America.
As done in the past, numer-
ous corporate interviewers are
taking their job candidates to
lunch in order to evaluate their
etiquette as a reflection of
their character.
The employers feel that
manners help put people at
ease.
If their employees can put
others at ease, they can gain
trust and respect from clients
and eventually their business.
Having good manners
makes people more confident,
professional and graceful in
various situations.
Helen Britt, placement and
career adviser at Lake City
Community College, teaches
students about job hunting,
interviewing skills and proper


the materials we allow to enter
in our aquifers," Tolbert said.
"What goes on now will show
up years later and then it will
be too late."
Her work has been admired
in countries including Turkey,
Sweden and Australia.
She said that traveling
around the world has height-
ened her awareness of the
treasures at home.
Some of her work depicts
underwater scenes with light
streaming from the water's
surface.
"You can't always tell what
the paintings are when you
first look at them," she said.


etiquette.
"Nowadays manners can
make or break you," she said.
Britt presents workshops on
interview preparedness when
instructors request them at
LCCC.
She says that many schools
are not including courses on
etiquette in their curriculum
as they did decades before.
"Corporate America is now
looking at bringing profes-
sionalism back into the work-
place," Britt explained. "First
impressions are crucial, if you
look like you don't care about
your appearance or manners,
the employer will not be inter-
ested in you."
She believes that the key to
success is moderation and
respect.
"It is not good to be too
causal, and familiar with your
prospective employer or so
rigid and proper that you for-
get about the objective of the
interview," Britt said.
She stressed that the inter-
viewing process requires a lot
of time, and employers will
not spend this time if a candi-



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"They show two worlds collid-
ing."
Tolbert works in oil because
she likes the way she can sim-
ulate light shimmering off the
water of the springs.
She sometimes ventures
through the springs in a canoe
with her brushes and supplies
tucked inside a Tupperware
container and an easel at her
side.
In addition, she enjoys tak-
ing a rejuvenating swim after-
ward.
She also writes about her
experiences and paintings to
further document the beauty
of the springs.


date lacks basic manners.
Karen Green, owner of
GeGee's Studio, believes that
if manners are incorporated in
daily life, they become a sub-
conscious habit.
Green trains, pageant com-
petitors and has coached
numerous clients on etiquette
for different events.
When training children,
one of the first things she
notices is how the child holds
his or her fork.
"A lot of children don't
know how to hold their forks
properly," she said. "They
need to learn not to clench in
their fists like a shovel."
She notes whether they are
using inside or outside voices
and whether or not they know
how to cut their meat.
Green has watched her
clients grow in confidence
and self-esteem after they
learn proper etiquette.
She also volunteers her tal-
ents to numerous events for
girls such as Girl Scout pro-
grams and girls' summits.
Green stressed the impor-
tance of nonverbal communi-


"You notice details later and
writing about them makes you
celebrate the beauty even
more," Tolbert said.
In Ichetucknee River, she
writes, As you go down the
river you leave a lot behind;
the burden of identity, stagger-
ing disappointments, heavi-
ness of pretensions.
Somewhere along the way,
you abandon these things, you
stop struggling. Lie on the
force of the water, it carries
you down. You don't have any
choice. The water moves you
along. You leave things
behind."


cation.
"Maintaining eye contact,
smiling and showing genuine
interest is essential to good
manners," she said.
She also offered several
tips for basic etiquette.
For example, she said one
should never air their feet in
public or bite their bread.
"You should break off a
small piece of the bread, but-
ter only that piece and eat it,
then repeat," Green said. "You
never want to show lipstick
markings on your bread."
She advised individuals to
never cut their meat all at one
time, but to only cut a small
piece at a time.
There are several books on
proper etiquette and manners.
Two consulted for this arti-
cle include "Finishing
Touches: A Guide to Being
Poised, Polished, and
Beautifully Prepared for Life"
by Anne Oliver and "The Amy
Vanderbilt Complete Book of
Etiquette," rewritten and
updated by Nancy
Tuckerman and Nancy
Dunnan.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2005 7A


NATION & WORLD


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Syndicated Content'
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Available from Commercial News Providers"


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Sunday, March 27, 2005
Lake City, Florida
www.lakecityreporter.com

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Understanding athletic trainers

March is'Atltc
National Athletic


Training Month

By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter.com
They are in the background
at most sporting events,
almost unnoticeable until an
injury occurs on the field. Yet
they are also one of the most
indispensable parts in an ath-
letic program. They are the
athletic trainers, and they
often are misunderstood.
That is why March has
been officially designated as
National Athletic Training
Month.
"It comes from our national
organization, the National
Athletic Trainers' Associ-
ation," Columbia High athletic
trainer Laura Kunkel said.
"It's to educate the public on
who we are, what we do."
That is because people
often do not know what an
athletic trainer is or where
their expertise lies.
'That's a big challenge,"
Kunkel said. "Especially when
we're trying to get people to
say athletic trainer."
An athletic trainer is some-
times confused with a physi-
cal trainer, but an athletic
trainer diagnoses injuries,
offers initial evaluation and
management and then aids in
the rehabbing of the injury. A
physical trainer only performs
the last of those tasks.
"Basically we're a cross
between a physical trainer
and EMTs is what I try to tell
people," Fort White High ath-
letic trainer Kathy Ottopal
said.
An athletic trainer must be
well-versed in the workings of


COURTESY PHOTO
Athletic trainer Laura Kunkel (center) attends to football players at Augustana College in 2003. Kunkel is the athletic trainer
at Columbia High.


the human body. Kunkel said
she has taken several classes
that have taught her about the
body, including anatomy, the
evaluation of injuries and
nutrition.
About the only time an
injured athlete is recommend-
ed to a doctor is when the ath-
lete has an injury that requi-
res surgery or an MRI or X-
rays. Otherwise, the athletic
trainer is responsible for the
diagnosis, management and
rehabilitation of the injury.
Both Kunkel and Ottopal
are in their fifth years as ath-


letic trainers. Kunkel worked
as an undergraduate at Aug-
ustana College in Sioux Falls,
S.D., while Ottopal was at
Wilmington College in Ohio.
Both are enrolled in the two-
year graduate program at the
University of Florida and both
are at the high schools as part
of their graduate assistance-
ships. Their tuitions are paid
for and they are given a small
stipend on which to live.
Each athletic trainer took
and passed the national test to
become certified.
"It's situational questions,


there's written in some parts,
a multiple choice answer part
and an oral-practical where
they make you perform some
of the things you might have
to do on the field," Ottopal
said. 'That gets everybody
stressed out because you
have to do it in front of a line
of judges."
As the first athletic trainers
to work full-time at the two
Columbia County schools,
Kunkel and Ottopal have
found that they've had to edu-
cate others about their jobs.
"Especially at the high


school setting," Kunkel said.
'"They don't understand what
I'm capable of."
She added, "Most of the
parents have gotten to know
me and trust me. The hardest
thing is that I'm at a very big
school. I have 500 athletes to
cover, so I've become very
good at multi-tasking."
Ottopal has faced the same
struggles as Kunkel in her
time as an athletic trainer.
"It's definitely one of the
TRAINERS
Continued on page 3B


Dog day afternoon at fairgrounds


Suwannee

Valley Kennel

Club Dog Show

comes to town
By MARIO SARMENTO
msarmento@lakecityreporter. corn
They came from as far away
as California, Maine and even
Brazil with dogs of various
sizes and colors. Their desti-
nation was the Columbia
County Fairgrounds, and
their purpose was the Suwa-
nnee Valley Kennel Club's
annual dog show on Saturday.
"First of all we have the
breed judging, and we have
the best-of-breed winner,"
Suwannee Valley Kennel Club
of Florida President Rita
Dawson said. "And all our
best-of-breed winners go into
a group. We have seven
groups and from there we'll
have first place in the groups
and then they all go back and
we pick the Best in Show."
Dogs earn points that can
qualify them for the West-
minster Dog Show. The top 25


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
.......- .... .-


MARIO SARMENTO/Lake City Reporter
Amy Wendling checks on her Afghan hound Chris at the
Suwannee Valley Kennel Club Dog Show at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds on Saturday.


in points also get automatic
invitations to the Eukanuba
Dog Show next year.
Ocala native Amy Wendling
has been showing dogs for 18
years, and she is the co-owner
of an Afghan hound named
Chris with her Brazilian
friend, Dorana Dielodit.


Wendling purchased the dog
in July in Brazil, where she
said he was the No. 1 dog in
the country.
"He was invited to the invi-
tational, Eukanuba in Tampa
this year, and he's working on
DOG continued on page 3B


%N No "










LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2005


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PI'(A Tour, Indonesia
Open, liiad round, at Jakarta. Indonesia
(samr-day tape)
1:30 p.m.
NBC Pt A Tour. The Players
Championship. final round, at Ponte Vedra
I p.m.
ABC IlGA. Kraft Nabisco
Championship. final round, at Rancho
Mirage, Calift
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2:30 p.m.
CBS NCAA Division I tournament,
doubleheader, regional finals, at Syracuse,
N.V. and Austin. Texas
NBA
1:15 p.m.
ABC Houston at San Antonio
7:30 p.m.
FSPN Philadelphia at L.A. Lakers
SOCCER
1 p.m.
ESPN2 Men's World Cup qualifier,
U.S. vs. Mexico, at Mexico City
TENNIS
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 ATP Masters Series, NAS-
DAQ-100 Open, early round, at Key
Biscayne
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN NCAA Div. I tournament, East
Regional semifinal, Texas Tech vs.
Tennessee, at Philadelphia
2:30 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Div. I tournament, East
Regional semifinal, Rutgers vs. Ohio State,
at Philadelphia
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Div. I tournament,
Midwest Regional semifinal, Vanderbilt vs.
Michigan State, at Kansas City, Mo.
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Div. I tournament,
Midwest Regional semifinal, Connecticut
vs. Stanford; at Kansas City, Mo.

Monday
NBA
8:30 p.m.
NBA TV Memphis at Chicago
TENNIS
1 p.m.
ESPN ATP Masters Series, NAS-
DAQ-100 Open, early round, at Key
Biscayne
3 p.m.
ESPN2 ATP Masters Series, NAS-
DAQ-100 Open, early round, at Key
Biscayne
8 p.n.
ESPN2 ATP Masters Series, NAS-
DAQ-100 Open, early round, at Key
Biscayne (same-day tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I tournament,
regional final, teams and site TBA
9 p.m.
ESPN NCAA divisionn I tournament,
regional final, teams and site TBA


BASKETBALL

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 38 31 .551 -
Philadelphia 34 34 .500 3',
New Jersey 32 38 .457 6',
New York 29 38 .433 8
Toronto 29 40 .420 9
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
xy-Miami 53 18 .746 -
Washington 37 30 .552 14
Orlando 32 37 .464 20
Charlotte 15 53 .221 36'A
Atlanta 11 58 .159 41
Central Division
W L Pet GB
Detroit 42 26 .618 -
Chicago 36 31 .537 5',
Cleveland 35 31 .530 6
Indiana 35 33 .515 7
Milwaukee 27 41 .397 15
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division


W L Pet GB
x-San Antonio 51 18 .739 -
l)allas 45 23 .662 51a
Houston 42 27 .609 9
Memphis 39 28 .582 11
New Orleans 15 53 .221 35'1
Northwest Division
W L Pet GB
Seattle 48 20 .706 -
Denver 37 30 .552 10',
Minnesota 36 34 .514 13
Portland 23 44 .343 24',
Utah 21 47 '.309 27
Pacific Division
W L Pet GB
x-Phoenix 52 17 .754 -
Sacramento 43 27 .614 9,
L.A. Lakers 32 36 .471 19'4
L.A. Clippers 32 37 .464 20
Golden State 24 45 .348 28
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Saturday's Games
(Late Games Not Included)
Minnesota 96, New Jersey 75
Toronto 109, Atlanta 104
Phoenix 118, Orlando 116
Charlotte 94, Miami 92
Boston at Detroit (n)
New Orleans at Memphis (n)
Indiana at Chicago (n)
Cleveland at Dallas (n)
Milwaukee at Utah (n)
Sacramento at Denver (n)
New York at Portland (n)
Today's Games
Houston at San Antonio, 1 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at LA Lakers, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Seattle, 8 p.m.

NCAA Tournament

SYRACUSE REGIONAL
Semifinals
Friday
Wisconsin 65, North Carolina State 56
North Carolina 67, Villanova 66
Championship
Today
Wisconsin (25-8) vs. North Carolina
(304), 2:40 p.m.
CHICAGO REGIONAL
Championship
Saturday
Illinois 90, Arizona 89, OT
AUSTIN REGIONAL
Semifinals
Friday
Michigan State 78, Duke 68
Kentucky 62, Utah 52
Championship
Today
Michigan State (25-6) vs. Kentucky (28-
5), 5:05 p.m.
ALBUQUERQUE REGIONAL
Championship
Saturday
Louisville 93, West Virginia 85, OT

NIT

Quarterfinals
Saturday
Maryland 85, Texas Christian 73




Spring training

Saturday's Games
N.Y. Mets vs. Atlanta, ccd., rain
Baltimore 7, Florida 3, 7' innings, rain
Cincinnati 9, Toronto 3
Cleveland 7, Detroit 4
Tampa Bay 4, Boston 0
St. Louis vs. Houston, ccd., rain
N.Y. Yankees 5, Minnesota 3
Pittsburgh 9, Philadelphia 7
Colorado 7, Chicago Cubs 6
Arizona 11, San Diego 2
Oakland 6, LA Angels 2
Texas 7, Chicago White Sox 2
Milwaukee 8, San Francisco 3
Seattle 8, Kansas City 3
LA. Dodgers vs. Washington (n)
Today's Games
Detroit vs. Toronto at Dunedin, 1:05
p.m.
Florida vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Boston at Fort Myers,
1:05 p.m.
Atlanta vs. LA. Dodgers at Vero Beach,
1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Cleveland at Winter
Haven, 1:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Philadelphia at


Clearwater, 1:05 p.m.
Washington vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St.
Lucie, 1:10 p.m.
Houston vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa,
1:15 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Baltimore at Fort
Lauderdale, 1:35 p.m.
Colorado vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m.
San Diego vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. Arizona at Tucson,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Seattle at Peoria,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. San Francisco at
Scottsdale, Ariz., 7 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz.,
9:05 p.m.


AUTO RA'Cl

Pepsi 300

At Nashville Superspeedway
Lebanon, Tenn.
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (1) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 225,
$67,771.
2. (12) Kenny. Wallace, Ford, 225,
$45,825.
3. (7) Shane Hmiel, Chevrolet, 225,
$34,258.
4. (3) Carl Edwards, Ford, 225, $20,905.
5. (2) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 225,
$29,695.
6. (19) Bobby Hamilton, Dodge, 225,
$16,355.
7. (14) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 225,
$17,055.
8. (17) Jason Keller, Ford, 225, $19,555.
9. (5) Denny Hamlin, Chevrolet, 224,
$24,780.
10. (23) Stacy Compton, Ford, 224,
$15,455.
11. (9) Jamie McMurray, Dodge, 224,
$13,730.
12. (8) Jon Wood, Ford, 224, $18,855.
13. (26) Justin Labonte, Chevrolet, 224,
$24,613.
14. (13) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet,
223, $25,205.
15. (15) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 223,
$13,830.
16. (10) Johnny Sauter, Dodge, 223,
$18,705.
17. (25) Tyler Walker, Dodge, 223,
$15,280.
18. (21) David Green, Ford, 222,
$17,225.
19. (11) Ashton Lewis Jr., Ford, 221,
$22,650.
20. (29) Jeff Green, Dodge, 221,
$13,930.
21. (37) Geoffrey Bodine, Chevrolet,
220, $13,030.
22. (38) Michel Jourdain Jr., Ford, 220,
$22,510.
23. (22) Brent Sherman, Dodge, 219,
$13,288.
24. (43) Steve Grissom, Ford, 219,
$12,920.
25. (28) Brandon Miller, Chevrolet, 218,
$14,975.
26. (4) Tim Fedewa, Dodge, 218,
$16,860.
27. (20) David Stremme, Dodge, 218,
$16,825.
28. (33) Randy LaJoie, Chevrolet, 217,
transmission, $16,795.
29. (42) Derrike Cope, Ford, 215,
$14,735.
30. (30) Boston Reid, Chevrolet, 213,
$15,120.
31. (39) Ryan Hemphill, Dodge, 213,
$20,150.
32. (35) Kertus Davis, Chevrolet, 212,
$12,610.
33. (24) Jerry Robertson, Chevrolet,
191, engine failure, $12,590.
34. (40) Tim Sauter, Chevrolet, 189,
$12,565.
35. (18) Aaron Fike, Ford, 186, $14,545.
36. (16) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 170,
$16,545.
37. (27) Sterling Marlin, Dodge, 168,
engine failure, $12,495.
38. (6) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 151,
$16,455.
39. (32) Stanton Barrett, Chevrolet, 149,
accident, $16,435.
40. (41) Mark Green, Chevrolet, 132,
rear end, $12,395.
41. (34) Eric McClure, Ford, 75, engine
failure, $12,375.
42. (31) Stuart Kirby, Chevrolet, 37,
accident, $12,355.
43. (36) Mike Harmon, Pontiac, 35,
engine failure, $12,296.


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DOG
Continued from page 1B

his American Championship
- he's about halfway there,"
Wendling said.
Part of the lure of the shows
is getting to know the people,
as Wendling can attest.
"It's very social," she said.


"We know people all over the
world in our breed. You find a
breed that you love and try to
increase the knowledge of it
and try to breed the very best
that you can in that breed.
Enjoy your friends, they be-
come like family."
Wendling said it takes three
hours to groom Chris. He is
bathed and his fur is blown


out. "We just do minor touch-
ups to trim him and make him
look neat for a show," she said.
An Affenpinscher in the toy
breeder group named The
Tamarin Tip-Off won Best in,
Show on Saturday. The dog is
owned by Dr. Loren G. Lipson.
The dog show starts at 8:30
today, and a new Best in Show
will be crowned.


TRAINERS
Continued from page 1B

hardest parts is standing up to
the parents and the coaches,"
she said. "We're in between
the doctors, the players, the
coaches. We're kind of the
come-to."
Both said they are at the
point now where the parents,
coaches and players under-
stand their roles, and the skep-


ticism they first encountered
no longer exists.
As for celebrating this
month, Kunkel said she has
put up a few banners and
posters around her workplace
to inform the athletes about
certain injuries.
"The kids are still at that age
where they're curious enough to
ask about the injuries and how
they're caused," Kunkel said.
Fort White High football
coach Mike Hunter appreci-


ates the difference the athletic
trainers have made.
"Being a school that's isolat-
ed from hospitals, having
somebody there that's certi-
fied, that was one of the best
things they ever did at Fort
White," he said.
For those who want to find
more information about athlet-
ic trainers and what they do,
they can visit the National
Athletic Trainers' Association
Web site at www.nata.org.


- -
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$ 1 2 Adjust drum brakes
most vehicles 4-wheel disc brakes
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Open Monday-Friday 7:30am
Saturday 8:00am to 5pm


REPORTER and Ji
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Tuesday-Saturday. Sunday= $1.59. All prices plus Florida sales tax.


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Page lC ...4
Sunday, March 27, 2005 -
Lake City Florida i
www.lakecityreporter:corn --- :






Doggone good doggie treats


Dardie's Doggie


Desserts offer


unique experience


By SUSAN SLOAN
Special to the Reporter
Soger Caras said,
"Dogs are not our
whole life, but they

whole." For those
who agree, Dardie's Doggie
Desserts offers a whole new
way to reward four-legged
friends for their affection.
This gourmet dog store fea-
turing cookies, treats, toys
and more was the end result
of a toxic reaction to onions
by Dardie and Shannon
Christy's beloved Scottie,
Tigger.
After discussing food aller-
gies and toxicity of certain
foods with her veterinarian,
Dardie went home and began
making homemade treats for
Tigger and their other
Scottie, Gracie. The treats
were a hit, and soon Dardie
was passing out samples to
her neighbors. With favorable
reviews from the neighbors'
dogs, she hit the fair circuit.
.Realizing that there are many
dog lovers in Lake City, the
Christys opened Dardie's
Doggie Desserts in 2002.
Dardie's dog cookies are
. ot the average run-of-the-mill
dog treats. To meet the
demand, Dardie and Shannon
bake six to eight batches of
dog treats a day. The cookies
contain no sugar, food color-
ing or chocolate. They are
inade with organic pastry
flour or rice flour. She uses all
natural ingredients in her
recipes, such as olive oil,
yogurt, carob, peanut butter,
molasses and honey. The
honey is obtained from
Thomas Honey in Lake City,
where the owner's dog, Toto,
is a big fan of the store's bite-
sized training treats.
I The creations by Dardie
are works of art. Having more
than 700 cookie cutters and
innumerable candy molds, no
holiday or event passes by
without a Dardie treat to mark
the occasion. For the Daytona
500, the store's doggie clien-
tele could purchase race-
themed treats adorned with
the number of their master's
favorite driver. For Easter,
Dardie helped the Easter
Bunny along by creating


yogurt ducks, Easter eggs
and "chocolate" (carob-fla-
vored) Easter rabbits. Plastic
eggs stuffed with little treats,
Easter dog collars and Easter-
themed dog toys made up in
an Easter basket are sure to
please any canine companion.
Her creative bent is also
showcased in the "Doggie
Bag of the Month Club." The
doggie bags contain 30 cook-
ies in 10 different flavors,
packaged to match the theme
of the month. For "April
Showers Bring May Flowers,"
the flower-themed treats
might be packaged in colorful
flowerpots. Other monthly
themes have been "Let it
Snow," "Circus Circus" and
the Southwest.
Other months might reflect
a major holiday, like Easter,
Valentine's Day or Halloween.
Club members sign up at the
store and join for a little as
one month or for the entire
year. The doggie bags are
usually available around mid-
month and are looked for-
ward to by hounds all around
the county.
Can't love your dog enough?
How about treating him or her
to some "deviled eggs."
Dardie's version made from
yogurt "eggs" stuffed with
yogurt and rice crispy treats
really do look good enough to
eat. Another unique treat, the
Avalanche, is made with a-
tasty cinnamon cookie topped
with a yogurt and popcorn mix
and sprinkles. Peanut butter
kisses and barbecued "ribs"
are also among the canine
world's favorite treats. When
Dardie is baking her ginger-
bread men, dogs for miles
around are sniffing the air in
delight.
Her "Muddy Paw" cookies
make one dog droll at the
words, "I've been to Miss
Dardie's," and one Jack
Russell that accompanies his
master on his over-the-road
truck route, is just not home
unless he is welcomed by at
least two or three packs of
"Freedom Fries," a sweet pota-
to cookie that he just loves. In
case your pooch needs a little
ice cream with his cookies,
that can be found at Dardie's
as well. Home-churned real
frozen yogurt is another of


SUSAN SLOAN/Special to the Reporter
Dardie Christy with store mascot, Gracie, spends the day baking and waiting on customers at Dardie's Doggie Desserts in
Lake City. The store offers a unique collection of dog treats.


Dardie's specialties. Standard
flavors like "Pawberry (straw-
berry), and Bonilla (vanilla)
and more exotic concoctions
like tutti-fruit (fruit and
coconut) or peanut butter with
Carob chips are favorites,
especially in the summer
months.
Dardie literally stayed
awake at night scheming up
these and the many other
doggy delights that she cre-
ates. While her husband
worked nights, she chased the
night frights away by spending
hours on the Internet
researching recipes, ingredi-
ents and design ideas.
Those sleepless nights paid
off for the dogs of Lake City.
Not only does the store offer
gourmet delights for the stom-
ach, it also provides a social
calendar. On Saturday,
Dardie's Doggie Desserts
held an Easter egg hunt where
50 or so plastic Easter eggs


with treats and store coupons
were hidden throughout the
store to be sniffed out by the
store's four-legged customers.
In the summer, Dardie has
hosted a doggy luau, complete
with plastic pink flamingos,
hula skirts and leis for the
guests. On Halloween, the
canine trick or treaters were
so numerous that they over-
flowed into neighboring' busi-
ness parking lots. The cos-
tume parade stopped traffic
along U.S. 441 as many owners
and dogs showed off their out-
fits.
And Santa made a repeat
appearance at the store's annu-
al Christmas party where he
endured lots of dog kisses
while posing with the guests
for pictures. If your dog's
social life needs a boost, you
can get on the store's mailing
list to receive information on
future events.
For those lucky dogs that


just can't be spoiled enough,
Dardie is also a canine party
planner. Either at the cus-
tomer's home or at the store,
Dardie provides all the mak-
ings for a dog's birthday party.
Decorations, party treat bags,
party collars and hats, birth-
day punch and birthday cake
and ice cream can be ordered.
She'll even provide the invita-
tions and plan the games, from
"Bobbing for Dawgs" to the
"Fastest Bandit," complete
with prizes and ribbons. At a
recent party, the dog's owner
had a special request for her
pup and his five doggy guests
so Dardie whipped up a bone-
shaped meatloaf for this well-
loved pooch. A recent custom
cake read "Happy Birthday to
the 12 Weenie Dogs!" while
another loving mistress hosted
a "Puppy Shower" complete
with a puppy shower cake.
To attend these doggy
events, every dog needs the


proper wardrobe. This, too,
can be obtained at Dardie's
Doggie Desserts. The store
offers star -spangled collars for
every. occasion. The collars
are such a hit that the manu-
facturer is coming out with a
college team line this summer
and will feature many of
Florida's favorite teams.
Sweaters, beds, stuffed toys,
frames and just about every
other kind of dog-themed item
can be found at the store.
Think of it as the Bass Pro
Shop for dogs.
If your dog can read, he's
probably tugging at your pants
leg right now asking to take a
road trip to Dardie's Doggie
Desserts.
But remember, just because
the treats look good enough to
eat, keep your paws off them...
they belong to the dogs.
Dardie's Doggie Desserts is
located at 642C South Marion
Avenue.


-ah




,eoe


LEFT: A batch of dog 'Easter cookies' sits at Dardie's Doggie Desserts in Lake City. The cookies contain
rice flour. RIGHT: The dog store offers a variety of events throughout the year for dogs and their owners.


no sugar, food coloring or chocolate. They are made with organic pastry flour or
Such events include Easter, Halloween and Christmas parties.


I


* 4, ~











2C LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2005

LIFESTYLE


ENGAGEMENTS ___


Brown-Everett


COURTESY PHOTO
Kelly Everett and Brandi
Brown
Brandi Nicole Brown,
daughter of Bob and Carol
Brown of Lake City, Florida
and Kelly Hoyt Everett, son of
Stansell and Vivian Everett of
High Springs, Florida will
exchange wedding vows on
Sunday, May 15th, 2005,in a
private ceremony, on the
Island of Kauai, HI. Family
members will accompany, to
honor them and the begin-
ning of their life together.
Brandi is a graduate of
Columbia High School and
the University of Florida. She
is employed by the North
Florida Investors Group of
Tallahassee, Fl. Kelly gradu-
ated from Sante Fe High
School and the University of
Florida. He is the manager of
the Suburban Propane
Company in Tallahassee. The
couple plans to make their
home in Tallahassee. A local
wedding reception is planned
for the couple upon their
return from their honey-
moon.

Graham-Stormant


COURTESY PHOTO
Bonnie Graham and Lamar
Stormant
Mr. and Mrs. Mark
Graham are proud to
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage of
their daughter, Bonnie
Marie Danielle Graham, to
Lamar Riley Stormant, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Bryan
Stormant of White Springs.
The wedding will be held
April 15 at 7 p.m. at
Friendship Baptist Church
in Jasper. The reception will
follow in the church fellow-
ship hall. No local invitations
are being sent, but all friends
and family are invited to
attend.
Bonnie is a graduate of
Tabernacle Baptist High


School in Live Oak and is
employed by Wal-Mart in
Lake City.
Lamar attended Joy
Explosion Christian
Academy in Lake City and is
employed by the
Department of Corrections.

Kitts-Jackson


COURTESY PHOTO
Sara Kitts and Jesse
Jackson, Jr.

Terry and Linda Kitts of
Gainesville announce the
engagement of their daugh-
ter, Sara Diane Kitts, to Jesse
Jackson, Jr. of Gainesville,
son of Jesse Jackson of High
Springs and Rinda Leguire of
Lake City.
Sara graduated from
Buchholz High School and is
a student of the Surgical
Technology program at Santa
Fe Community College.
Jesse graduated from
Union County High School
and now is a Pre-Med stu-
dent.
An August 20, 2005 wed-
ding is planned.

Paschall-Vercher


Larry and Wilda Drawdy of
Lake City announce the
engagement and approaching
marriage of their daughter,
Amanda Victoria Paschall of
Lake City, to Nicholas Adam
Vercher of Lake City, son of
William and Katrina Vercher
of Lake City.
The wedding is planned for
4 p.m.. Saturday, Dec. 17, at
Lake City Church of God,
located at corner of E. Duval
and Ermine Streets.
Arrangements to be
announced on the location of
the reception.
Amanda is a 2003 Columbia
High graduate and has been
attending Lake City
Community College as a full-


BIRTHS


Alston
Charles and Margaret
Alston of Jacksonville
announce the birth of their
son Alexander William Feb.
12 in Memorial Hospital in
Jacksonville.
He weighed seven
pounds, one ounce and
measured 21 inches.
He joins Savannah Leigh,
age two years.
Grandparents are: Vivian
Williams and the late Henry
E Williams and Richard and
Nancy Alston.
Great-grandparents are:
the late Henry J. Mildred
Williams and the late
Stanley and Edna Kirby.

Jossi
Philip and Shannon Jossi
of Lake City announce the
birth of their son Preston
Parker Jossi March 1 in
Alachua General Hospital.
He weighed six pounds,
14 ounces and measured 18
and three-fourth inches.He
joins Peyton Nicholas, age
two years.
Grandparents are: Sharon
Terry and Ross and Sandi
Terry of Lake City and
Ernest and Wendy Jossi of
Live Oak.

Karlton
Chip and Denise Karlton


of Palm Bay announce the
birth of their daughter Riley
Rose Karlton March 3 in
Wuesthoff Hospital in
Melbourne.
She weighed six pounds,
seven ounces and measured
18 and a half inches.
Grandparents are:
Richard and Anne Tucker of
Lake City and the late
George Karlton and Nancy
Karlton of Lake City.
Great-grandparents are:
Roslyn Smith of Live Oak
and Martha Riggin of Lake
City.

Kline
Jennifer and J.T. Kline of
Blue Eton, SC announce the
birth of their daughter
Grace Ashlyn Feb. 16 in
Hilton Head Regional
Medical Center, Hilton
Head, SC.
She weighed seven
pounds, 14 ounces and
measured 19 and a half
inches. She joins Parker
Joel, age two years.
Grandparents are:
Annette and Tommy Kline
of Lake City, Jimmy Willis of
Newport Richey and the late
Susan Willis of Newport
Richey. "
Great-grandparents are:
Jean PRescott of Sebring
and Hal Sewer of Fairborn,
OH.


time student.
Nicholas is a 2002
Columbia High graduate and
a 2003 Nashville Auto Diesel
College graduate. He is cur-
rently employed at Tom Nehl
Truck Company.

Sapp-Jenkins
Levy and Laula'au Sapp of


Timothy Jenkins and Tyler
Sapp
Lake City announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daugh-
ter, Tyler Laine Sapp of Lake
City to Timothy Joseph
Jenkins of Jacksonville, son
of Joseph and Cheryl
Jenkins of Jacksonville.
The wedding is planned
for 1 p.m. Sunday, July, 10,
2005, at The Renaissance
Resort at World Golf Village.
The reception will follow at
the same location. All family
and friends are invited.
Tyler is a 2003 Columbia
High honors graduate. She
currently resides in
Jacksonville where she is
attending the University of
North Florida. Tyler is
majoring in Elementary
Education and will graduate
in 2007.
She is currently employed
with Alan B. Almand, PA., a
privately owned and operat-
ed Real Estate law firm.
Timothy is a 2003
Mandarin High honors grad-
uate.
He attends the University
of North Florida where he is
majoring in Building
Construction Management.
Upon graduation in 2007,
Timothy is planning on
attending the University of
Florida Graduate School
where he will receive his
Masters in Building
Construction.
He is currently employed
with Engle Homes, a nation-
al construction compnay
specializing in residential
building.


Take time to enjoy




the spring blooms


'.3
IN HE



DON
GOODE


Going down the road, I
enjoy looking at the plants in
bloom. Spring weather is
short lived here in Florida
and summer will soon be
upon us. We have a wide
variety of plants in bloom
right now. This is a perfect
time for a leisurely walk or
drive to enjoy the view.
Some plants are already at
the end of their bloom cycle.
Red maples, Redbuds and
wild plums have been show-
ing off for a few weeks
already. Japanese magnolias
with their showy purple
blooms are also nearing the
end of their season. Don't
forget the azaleas, what a
colorful display this year.
Dogwoods are coloring up
and should be in their peak
soon. Check out the Carolina
Jasmine vines as you enjoy
the outdoors. Their yellow
blooms decorate the fences
and trees along the roadside.
In addition to azaleas,
there are other landscape
shrubs that contribute to the
spring bloom display. With
its small, pink to red blooms,
Loropetalum shrubs are a
highlight to the landscape.
Another spring bloomer that
is perhaps overlooked
because of its small stature.
is the Indian Hawthorne
shrub.
With its display of white
blooms this time of year, it
serves as foundation plants
in many local landscapes. I
like the fact that it grows so
slow it only needs occasional
pruning.
Let's not forget the weeds
this time of year. Several of
our spring weeds have
attractive flowers and also
provide food for wildlife.
Driving by a hay field, you
may be greeted with the
sight of acres of land cov-
ered in red "weedy" plants.
The red sorrel plant has a


brightly colored seed stalk,
about a foot tall, that waves
in the air. Small birds enjoy
eating the seeds off the
-stalk. In a large grouping,
such as across an agricultur-
al field, the red color can be
quite spectacular. The plant
typically dies down before
causing a problem for the
pasture grasses.
Butterflies depend on
many Spring blooming
weeds for their early nectar
sources. Weeds such as hen-
bit and toadflax are visited in
my garden by these early
season butterflies. (Yes, I
have a few weeds too.) In
fact, I have been known to
mow around some of these
blooming weeds to let them
finish their season.
Most spring blooming
weeds die off with the warm-
ing weather and do not need
to be a cause for concern. In
the areas where you do not
want these spring bloomers,
you can pull them or mow
them. Spring weeds can also
be suppressed with a mulch
about two inches thick
around your winter vegeta-
bles or flowers.
For some people, the sight
of all these blooms is some-
thing to shy away from.
Allergy sufferers do not
enjoy this time of year with
all the pollen in the air. Here
are a few tips to help you
enjoy the blooms while
breathing easy. Pollen tends
to be at its peak in the air in
the morning. Save your out-
door activities for the after-
noon and evening. Keep the
windows rolled up in your
vehicle while driving to
reduce your exposure to the
pollen.
Also, check the Internet
for pollen count forecasts
such as on www.weather.com.
Web sites such as this can
give you an idea of how
heavy the pollen level is and
what plants are currently in
bloom.

P r o g r a m
Announcement: Any child
or teenager that would like
to participate in a gardening
project this year is invited to


4.--.

t u l Stop By The-
'-QCgilnincrn Lake City Reporter
D ll l for your "



Q^ ,/ ^.

These fine merchants wish to help make your
wedding special. Pick up your package today...


JC Penney
752-2822


Etheridge
Furniture
752-2752


Ward's Jewelers

752-5470


Sandy Kishton
Realtor Associate
961-9795


Sterling Entertainment
Rusty Bailey
752-0290 965-4940


Quality Inn


Conference Center

752-3901


an orientation workshop on
April 14 from 4-6 p.m. At the
meeting we will discuss
basic gardening techniques
and give an overview of the
project guide book.
This project is designed
for 4-H clubbers but could
also be tailored to a Scouting
project. Master Gardener
volunteers will help coach
the gardeners. Gardeners
will gather monthly during
the project period to share
success stories, get solutions
to problems and enjoy activi-
ties from the Junior Master
Gardener curriculum. At the
end of the project, the gar-
dens will be scored and rib-
bons and prizes will be
awarded.
Please call the Extension
Service at 752-5384 if you are
interested in this gardening
project and to reserve your
seat at the orientation meet-
ing.

Dr. Don Goode is the
Director and Horticulture
Agent of the Columbia County
Extension Service ( a branch
of the University of Florida.
He can be reached at the
office. (on the Fairgrounds),
on the phone (752-5384), by
e m a i 1
(dzgoode@ifas.ufl.edu) or
through the Internet
http://columbia.ifas.ufl.edu.


Our
Bridal Registry
Couples Registered
Deserae Bolton
Dusty Bailey

Janna Blanton
Chris Hornbaker

Haley Carswell
Matthew Richardson

Kiley Dicks
Jordan Hade

Bethany Harden
Justin Jenkins

Kristin Khachigan
Josh Roberts

Katie Moore
John Beroset

Megan Markham
James Hansen

Erin Moses
Marc Spiwak

Heather Poole
Kraig Conn


Brooke Sherman
Thomas McDuffie

Jessica Swanko
Devin Dupree

Kimmy Tompkins
Bo Bush

Visit us when shopping for
a gift. We'll help you select
the gift that the bride
really wants. We'll gift-wrap
it. We'll send it.
And the services are free!

( WARD'S
L JEWELRY&WGIFS


156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


I


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2005


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LAKE CITY REPORTER, SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2005


After Easter Sale

Publix will be closed on Sunday, March 27. We hope you'll enjoy the holiday,
and that we will see you when we resume our regular hours on Monday, March 28, 2005.


Ib
Boneless Pork
Loin Top Loin Chops
Or Boneless Pork Loin Butteflied Chops,
Public. Pork. All Natural. Full Flavor
SAVE UP TO 2.00 LB


Don't be blah.


Publix 99
Orange Juice ........................................ ..*
Original or With Calcium,
A Great After School Drink, 64-oz cont.
SAVE UP TO .51


French
Bread...... .......119
Baked Fre-h Daild, ,
From the Publi< Bakery,,
12-oz loaf
SAVE UP TO .20


.- .'.. .. .....





Publix Deli
Family Combo Meal .... 99
Hot or Chilled, Includes One ,Rotisserie
or 8-pc. Fried Chicken, Choice of Two
16-oz Sides, Potato, Slaw or Beans
and 1-pk. of 4-rolls, each
SAVE UP TO .50


Armour
Homestyle BUY ,a1 FREE
Meatballs .......... e
Original or Italian, 40-oz pkg.
SAVE UP 10 5.99


Selected
Coca-Cola
Products ........ ........... 8 9
2-L bot (L.n-it four on
selected ad-ern.sed varieties)
SAVE UP TO .46


[ GROCERY
Famous Amos Cookies ............ ... ............ u FREE
Assorted Varieties, 12-oz bag
SAVE UP TO 2.89

Publix 100% Colombian Regular Coffee .............................1.79
Automatic Drip or Perk Grind, 13-oz bag

Tostitos Tortilla Chips.. ............. ....... .2FOR5.00
Or Queso or Fritos Chili Cheese Dip, Assorted Varieties, Chips,
11 to 13.5 oz bag or Dip, 15.25 to 15.5-oz jar (Excluding Salsa and Baked Tostitos.)
(Limit two deals on selected advertised varieties.)


* HOUSEHOLD
Bounty o
Paper Towels . . . ..... .................... 3FOR.00
Fun Prints or White Big Roll or
Select-A-Size or Designer's Touch,
1-roll pkg.

a DAIRY
Publix
Yogurt ................................... 12FOR5.00
Assorted Varieties, 8-oz cup


U^j


r


Breyers FRE:
Ice Cream.......... GET NEREE
Assorted Varieties,
56 to 64.4-oz ctn.
SAVE UP TO 5.15


DiGiorno
Pizza3........ ......3.99
Assorted Varieties, 12" size,
22.1 to 33.5-oz box (Excluding Deep
Dish and Cheese Stuffed Crust.)
SAVE UP T o1 80


Gatorade
Thirst Quencher.......3 10.00
Assorted Varieties,
128-oz bot.
:,AVF UP T 0I Q7 ON 3


Kellogg's........... FREE
Pop-tarts........... GETER
Assorted Varieties, 8-ct.
14 to 15.2-oz box (Limit four deals
on selected advertised varieties.)
SAVE UP TO 1.99


P u b i u

IT'S BEEN OUF PLEASURE.


Prices Effective Monday, March 28
through Wednesday, March 30, 2005.
Only in Bay, Walton and Okaloosa, Columbia, Leon, Duval, Nassau, Flagler,
St. Johns, Clay, Marion, Putnam, Alachua and Volusia Counties in Fla.
Quantity Rights Reserved.

www.publix.com/ads ,1-




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