Citation
Jax air news

Material Information

Title:
Jax air news
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville, FL
Jacksonville, FL
Publisher:
Kaylee LaRocque - Public Affairs Officer, Clark Pierce- Editor
Florida Times-Union- Ellen S. Rykert - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 6, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
000579555 ( ALEPH )
33313438 ( OCLC )
ADA7401 ( NOTIS )
sn 95047201 ( LCCN )

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com VOL. 76 NO. 16 NAS J ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2018 ECONOMICS CNRSE Speaks at Event Page 3 HONORING 50 TH Anniversary of Battle of Hu City Page 3 NH JAX Wins Customer Service Award Page 8 From Staff Capt. Michael Connor relieved Capt. Sean Haley as the 48the commanding officer of Naval Air Station Jacksonville (NAS Jax) during a change of command ceremony April 12. Commander, Navy Region Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar was the guest speaker. Today you will witness the formal passing of command. Navy regulations and tradition are very clear about this event and its importance, said Bolivar. The change of command is a corner stone of our Navy providing a chance to celebrate past accomplishments and look toward the future. Today, Capt. Haley will read his orders and acknowledge that he is ready to be relieved. Capt. Connor will then read his orders and accept the great responsibility of command, said Bolivar. For as long as our nation has had a Navy, this has been done in roughly the same manner so there is never any question about who is in charge. And for the last 18 months, theres been no doubt that Capt. Haley has been in charge. Every great team needs a great leader. At no time was that more apparent than during Hurricanes Matthew and Irma. He made sure his Sailors, families and civilians were informed and safe. FRCSE makes the grade Fleet Readiness Center Southeast detachments pass aviation maintenance inspections with flying colors By Clifford Davis Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Public Affairs With respective grades of 98.9 and 95.6, Sailors at Fleet Readiness Center Southeasts detachments at Naval Air Station Jacksonville (NAS Jax) and Naval Station Mayport should be beaming after their units aced major inspections recently. FRCSE, as the Navy avia tion maintenance, repair and overhaul facility is known, employs civilians to do indepth work on military aircraft at its headquarters aboard NAS Jax. Sailors at their detach ments perform the more fre quent, day-to-day mainte nance required and the Navy inspects them every 18 months for safety, quality and efficien cy. These inspections are so important, FRCSE Command Master Chief Donald Henderson said. Not only does it give us an honest assessment of what kind of job were doing, it ensures that we are sending the very best equipment pos sible to our warfighters on the front lines. Lt. Cmdr. Derek Tindell, the officer in charge of Detachment Mayport, credited his Sailors. A 95.6 is a great score, and its a credit to a lot of the hard work the Sailors put in every 50-year time capsule installed in Heritage Park By Reggie Jarrett Editor Jax Air News There is a new addition in the Stearman Building at Heritage Park aboard Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville. The building houses historic arti facts from NAS Jacksonvilles past. Now it also contains something for the future. A time capsule containing about 75 items donated from the tenant com mands was placed there April 5. It will be opened in 50 years, in the year 2068. Ron Williamson, safety manager for NAS Jacksonville and unofficial base historian, was the driving force behind the project. It came about because I thought we needed something unique to cel ebrate the 75th anniversary of NAS In Memoriam From Staff Naval Air Station Jacksonville (NAS Jax) Emergency Management (EM) Officer Ray Anthony Edmond Sr., 57, passed away April 9. He was born Feb. 9, 1961 in St. Louis, Missouri, to David and Juanita Edmond. When the family relocated to Flint, Michigan, Ray attended St. Marks Baptist Church where he accepted Christ into his life at an early age and was baptized. After graduating from Flint Northwestern High School, he joined the U.S. Navy in 1979. Following boot camp at Recruit Training Center (RTC) Great Lakes, Illinois and Hull Technician A School, Ray reported to USS Nicholson (DDG-982) in Charleston, South Carolina where he advanced to petty officer third class. From October 1983 to March 1985, he worked as a petty officer second class aboard USS Frank Cable (AS 40) in Charleston. At that point in his career, Ray real ized he enjoyed training junior Sailors and decided to become a recruit com pany commander and instructor at Recruit Training Center Great Lakes, Illinois in June 1985. There, he taught new recruits damage control, chemical warfare and firefighting tactics. During Connor assumes command of NAS Jacksonville Photo by Julie Lucas Members of the Naval Air Station Jacksonville (NAS Jax) Honor Support Team display the colors during the playing of the national anthem at the NAS Jax Change of Command April 12 as the official party renders honors. From left on stage, NAS Jax Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Donald Baker, Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Sean Haley, NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Michael Connor and NAS Jax Command Master Chief Jeffery Waters. See COMMAND, Page 4 Photo by Victor Pitts AD2 Amanda Olivas (left) and AD3 Ryan Draper work on a compressor rotor for a T-700 engine at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Detachment Mayport. The Detachment scored a nearperfect 95.6 on the Aviation Maintenance Inspection last month, carried out by a team from Commander, Naval Air Forces. Photo by Reggie Jarrett Ron Williamson stands behind the time capsule that was put in the Stearman Building in Heritage Park aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville April 12. A plaque will be installed on the concrete structure that contains the time capsule that will be opened in 2068. See FRCSE, Page 7 See MEMORIUM, Page 7 See TIME CAPSULE, Page 6 Ray Edmond Sr.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2018 From Staff April 19 1783 George Washington proclaims end of hostilities. 1861 President Lincoln orders blockade of southern ports from South Carolina to Texas. 1955 USS Albany (CA-123) and USS William M. Wood (DD-715) begin to pro vide disaster relief to citizens of Volos, Greece. April 20 1796 Congress authorizes completion of three frigates. 1861 Norfolk Navy Yard abandoned and burned by Union forces. 1914 In first call to action of naval avi ators, detachment on USS Birmingham (CL-2) sails to Tampico, Mexico. 1915 First Navy contract for lighterthan-air craft awarded. 1942 USS Wasp (CV-7) launches 47 British aircraft to reinforce Malta. 1947 Capt. L.O. Fox, supported by 80 Marines, accepts the surrender of Lt. Yamaguchi and 26 Japanese soldiers and sailors, nearly 20 months after the sur render of Japan. 1953 Battleship USS New Jersey (BB62) shells Wonsan, Korea from inside the harbor. 1964 USS Henry Clay (SSBN-625) launches a Polaris A-2 missile from the surface in first demonstration that Polaris submarines could launch mis siles from the surface as well as from beneath the ocean. Thirty minutes later the submarine launched another Polaris missile while submerged. April 21 1861 USS Saratoga captures slaver Nightingale. 1898 U.S. at war against Spain. 1906 Cmdr. Robert Peary discovered that supposed Arctic Continent did not exist. 1972 Moonwalk in the Descartes Highlands by Navy Capt. John Young, commander of Apollo 16. He was the ninth man to walk on the moon. Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Mattingly II, was the Command Module Pilot. Charles Duke was the Lunar Module Pilot. During the 11-day, onehour and 51-minute mis sion, 213 lbs. of lunar material was col lected. Recovery accomplished by HC-1 helicopters from USS Ticonderoga (CVS14). April 22 1778 Capt. John Paul Jones of the Continental Navy Sloop Ranger led land ing party raid on Whitehaven, England. 1898 U.S. warships begin blockade of Cuba. 1987 U.S. Navy ordered to provide assistance requested by neutral vessels under Iranian attack outside the exclu sion zone. April 23 1917 Launching of USS New Mexico, first dreadnought with turboelectric drive. 1918 USS Stewart destroys German submarine off France. 1945 In only U.S. use of guided mis siles in World War II, two BAT missiles release at Balikiapan, Borneo. 1956 Project Vanguard, earth satellite launching program, assigned to DCNO (Air). April 24 1778 Continental Navy Sloop Ranger captures HMS Drake. 1862 Battle of New Orleans. Union Navy under David Farragut runs past forts into Mississippi River. 1884 Navy steamer USS Bear left New York Naval Shipyard as part of the Greely Arctic Relief Expedition. Steamers USS Thetis and USS Alert would join the mis sion a week later. Greely and six other survivors were found at Cape Sabine on June 23. 1906 Ceremonies at U.S. Naval Academy commemorate John Paul Jones, with President Theodore Roosevelt deliv ering keynote address. 1917 U.S. destroyer squadron departs Boston for European service. 1959 Organization of American States (OAS) asks U.S. to establish naval patrols off east coast of Panama to prevent inva sion of Cuban forces. 1974 Naval forces begin minesweep ing operations in the Suez Canal Zone. April 25 1862 Union naval forces occupy New Orleans, La. 1914 First combat observation mis sion by Navy aircraft (two Curtiss Model F flying boats) at Veracruz, Mexico. 1959 USS Eversole (DD 789) res cues 14 Nationalist Chinese fishermen from their sinking fishing trawler in the Formosa Strait. Marshmallows and military adventure grab em while you can By Lisa Smith Molinari Special Contributor You know those people who open bags of M&Ms and dump the entire contents into their upturned mouths? Theyre the same ones who eat icing roses off of birthday cakes, open big presents before little ones, and ask for the good news first. Unfortunately, Im not one of those people. Throughout life, Ive strictly adhered to a save the best for last regi men. As a kid, I would squirrel away things trinkets, treats, rewards and ration them to myself, slowly and methodically until the best was left to savor. Take those M&Ms for example. I sort ed through them one by one, eating the misshapen ones first, until I had a per fect candy of each color. Those five, The Chosen, would be cer emoniously sacrificed in one final, tri umphant chomp. They didnt taste any different than the rest, so why the irra tional ritual? In junior high school, everyone col lected stickers, but while my friends were slapping theirs on books and lock ers, I stashed mine away for something special. Those stored stickers eventu ally lost their stick. I think my mother still has a sheet of crusty Smurf stickers in the desk drawer of my old room. Every Easter, Valentines Day, and Halloween, I would ration my candy, saving the best treats so long, that they often got too stale to eat. Decades later, Im still nibbling around center of cinnamon rolls and reading the most interesting magazine article last. Why? What has it ever gotten me but a rock-hard coconut egg and a shriveled Papa Smurf sticker? Has all my con trolled frugality been for naught? I consulted an expert (Google) and found that best for last tendencies have been researched extensively. Scientists have studied delayed grati fication, intuitive judgment, and peakend bias to find out why some eat muf fin tops first and others dont. In a 2011 University of Michigan experiment students were given a series of chocolates to eat. With each candy, the experimenter said, Here is your next chocolate. But, when the experimenter said, This is your last chocolate, the sub jects tended to rate that last candy as their favorite regardless of the flavor. Finally, my M&M sorting ritual makes sense! This experiment dovetails with peak-end bias research by Nobel Prize-winner Daniel Kahneman which shows that people irrationally judge experiences by what happened last. For example, if a mediocre vacation ended with a fantastic night in a five-star hotel, vacationers tend to remember the trip positively. Despite this illogical partiality for end experiences, there are ratio nal bases for saving the best for last. In the 1960s Stanford Marshmallow Experiments 600 preschoolers were offered one marshmallow now, or two 15 minutes later. The vast majority of subjects waited for the additional reward, proving that children understand delayed gratifica tion. A follow-up study showed that the ability to delay gratification was linked to higher SAT scores and lower body mass indexes. Somehow, that correlation skipped over me . . Finally, a 2013 Cornell University study showed that the tendency to save the best for last fades with age. Apparently, younger adults have longterm visions that require saving for later, while older folks think, Life is too short, eat dessert first. How does this apply to military families? Certainly we must be frugal, always saving and planning for our ever-changing futures. Living a life centered around serving ones coun try requires careful organization and responsibility. However, military life also offers the luxury to splurge on experiences. Despite all those years I spent digging through plastic strands of grass to ferret out jelly beans while my peanut butter eggs dried up, our family didnt delay gratification when it came to our mili tary experiences. We ate the marshmallow, taking unique opportunities as soon as they arose. And my husbands 28-year mili tary career ended with a bang after a fun final tour in Newport, Rhode Island, we threw a huge retirement party that was WAY over our budget. Dont delay the adventure. Live over seas, rent a unique house, travel, try indigenous foods, go to military balls, eat the whole bag of M&Ms grab the bull by the horns and make the most of your military journey. The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, FL, 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue Jacksonville, FL 32202 904-359-4168 Advertising Sales (904) 359-4168 (800) 472-6397, Ext. 4168 FAX (904) 366-6230 Commanding Officer Capt. Michael Connor Executive Officer Capt. Brian Weiss Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Jeffery Waters Public Affairs Officer Kaylee LaRocque Public Affairs Specialist Julie Lucas Staff Writers Hannah Simmons Editor Reggie Jarrett Design/Layout George Atchley This Week in Navy History Meat & Potatoes of Life NASA photo Capt. John Young (left) and Lt. Cmdr. Ken Mattingly are in the Apollo 16 recovery raft as a Navy diver helps secure the capsule and prepare it for craning aboard aircraft carrier USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14). An SH-3 Sea King helicopter assigned to HC-1 recovered the three astronauts and flew them to Ticonderoga. HC-1 had the privilege of providing services in the recovery of Apollo missions 15, 16, 17 and Skylab missions II, III, IV. In 1972, Ticonderoga also took part in space flight recovery efforts for the Apollo 17 moon flight. Decommissioned in September 1973, Ticonderoga was sold for scrap a year later. Drivers course offered From Staff The AAA Driver Improvement Course is being offered April 20, 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m. and April 28, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Building 1. Teens are welcome to attend. Classroom attendance only no actu al hands-on driving. Call 542-3082 to register.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2018 3 Rear Adm. Bolivar speaks to Florida Economic Club By MC1 Brian G. Reynolds Navy Region Southeast Public Affairs Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar, commander, Navy Region Southeast, spoke at a lun cheon for the Economic Club of Florida at the Florida State University Alumni Center April 10. Bolivar provided remarks regarding the economic impact the seven naval installations in Florida have on the state and the local communities sur rounding those bases. The economic impact of an installation is made up of payroll, Bolivar said. Not only active duty military pay roll, but also retirees, civilians and contractors, along with the procurement of goods and ser vices. Bolivar also gave insight regarding the specific the mis sion sets of each of the naval installations spanning from the Florida panhandle to the Florida Keys, and how oversee ing these installations encom passes a lot of moving parts. Its important to understand that running a base is like run ning a small city, Bolivar said. We have our own public works centers, police and fire departments, medical and den tal facilities, child care cen ters, swimming pools and golf courses, aircraft centers, run ways and supply warehouses. Bolivar stressed how invest ment into these military instal lations in the form of defense spending has had a positive impact on the Florida economy as a whole. Defense spending was directly or indirectly respon sible for $84.9 billion, or 9.2 percent of Floridas 2016 gross state product, Bolivar said. That spending is made up of procurement, salaries and pensions or transfer payments, which is all those retired vet erans who come to settle in the state. Defense spending creates jobs in every Florida county, and most of those jobs are high wage positions. With the military hav ing such a strong presence in the state, economics are not the only positive impact that these installations have had in Florida. Our Sailors, civilians and family members are active volunteers in the commu nity, Bolivar said. They are coaching Little League, men toring, reading to students, working with Special Olympics and more. The Navy holds an annual community ser vice awards program and the Southeast Region consistently ranks high Navywide in the number of hours spent making our communities a better place to live and work. The Economic Club of Florida was established in 1977 is today recognized as one of the Souths most impor tant forums for distinguished speakers on issues of the day. The membership includes more than 350 of the Whos Who of Floridas capital city, including leaders from the halls of government, political strategists and the business savvy. From past governors, cabinet members and Supreme Court justices to business owners, chairs and CEOs of companies and organizations, the mem bership covers those who are well-established and those who are the up-and-coming pro fessionals in the political and business arenas. Photo by MC1 Brian G. Reynolds Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar, commander, Navy Region Southeast, speaks to the Economic Club of Florida about the economic impact of the Navy in the Southeast region at the Florida State University Alumni Center April 10. The Economic Club of Florida was established in 1977 and is recognized as one of the souths most important forums for distinguished speakers on issues of the day. Photos by MC2 Mark Andrew Hays Sailors from Naval Station (NS) Mayport and Marines from Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay present colors during the 50th Anniversary Battle of Hu City Memorial Ceremony in the Afloat Training Group Auditorium onboard NS Mayport. USS Hu City, a Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser, is the only ship named after a battle of the Vietnam War. Honoring 50th anniversary of Battle of Hu City (Above) Lt. Gen. (Ret.) George R. Christmas, Battle of Hu City survivor, speaks to service members and veterans during the 50th Anniversary Battle of Hu City Memorial Ceremony in the Afloat Training Group Auditorium aboard NS Mayport. (Below) BM2 Class Justin Plank (right) from the Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) and Sgt. Michael Houston from the Marine Corps Security Force Battallion, presents a wreath.

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2018 Today, this base with the P-8A Poseidon and Triton UAV, is the corner stone of the maritime patrol Navy, she continued. Our warfighters are able to focus on the mission because people like Capt. Haley and his team take care of every thing else. From airfield and runways, to security at the fence line, to the award-winning galley and outstanding child development center, to the many MWR programs, to the bachelor quar ters, to the Fleet and Family Support Center, Sailors and their families have everything they need to get the job done. Bolivar went on to mention some of the many quotables Haley is known for before presenting him with the Legion of Merit Award for an exceptional job well done. Haley was also recognized by Sen. Bill Nelson in a letter read by his repre sentative Michelle Barth; Sen. Marco Rubio in a letter read by his repre sentative Katie Ross; Congressman John Rutherford in a letter read by his representative Jackie Smith and Congressman Ted Yoho in a letter read by his representative Jessica Norfleet. NAS Jax Command Master Chief Jeffery Waters also presented Haley with a shadowbox on behalf of the NAS Jax Chiefs Mess and Lt. David Williams of Air Operations presented him with a handcrafted golf club on behalf of the NAS Jax Wardroom. As Haley took the podium, he thanked his family members for their support during his naval career. I would like to offer a special thanks to my family and friends in attendance today. My mother would have liked to have seen this event, but I know she is looking down with pride and is here with us today in spirit, he said. Twenty months ago, I stood before you and challenged you to remain laser focused on our mission to sup port the fleet, fighter and family; to treat each other with respect and dignity; to embrace innovation and never accept the status quo; and to continue to foster and build upon out outstanding rela tionship with the local community, said Haley. We have endured many challeng es along the way major construction projects, fires, security threats, major hurricanes, and numerous other chal lenges. Through it all, it was out sense of teamwork, and an unrelenting drive to support the fleet and warfighter that allowed us to persevere. Haley added, I stand before you to thank you for keeping our mission paramount, never losing sight of our purpose and direction, and having the courage to persevere through any and all adversity. As a surprise, Haley called Dan Schickler of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast Public Works Department, present ing him with the Meritorious Civilian Service Award for outstanding service to the station during the 2015-16 run way project and Hurricanes Matthew and Irma. He also presented ACCS Eddie McKinney of the Air Operations Department for managing operations at NAS Jax and Cecil Airport during the runway project. Haley then read his orders direct ing him to report to CNRSE as chief of staff before relinquishing command to Connor. After assuming command, Connor offered his remarks. Id like to recog nize and thank some family and friends who are with me today, said Connor, who went on to personally thank each of them for attending the ceremony. He also thanked the Jacksonville community for their support to the station. As the most military-friendly city in the U.S., we cannot thank you enough for your support of the mili tary and our veterans, said Connor. I am committed to ensuring NAS Jax maintains, and where able, furthers our relationship and cooperation on mutual interests as well as continues to remain a good steward of the environment. To our tenant command COs, NAS Jax exists to sustain your mission, enable your Sailors and civilians, and support your families, he continued. NAS Jax will strive to meet your needs with first-rate service. Connor also addressed the NAS Jax team. To the Sailors and civilians of NAS Jax, my expectations are simple and clear, said Connor. First, provide the very best service and facilities that COMMAND From Page 1 Naval Air Station Jacksonville officers, chief petty officers and junior Sailors gather in formation dur ing the change of command ceremony April 12 where Capt. Michael Connor relieved Capt. Sean Haley as the 48th NAS Jax commanding officer. Capt. Sean Haley, outgoing Naval Air Station Jacksonville (NAS Jax) commanding officer, salutes incoming NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Michael Connor as he arrives at the Change of Command ceremony April 12. Connor became the 48th commanding officer of the station. Incoming Naval Air Station Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Michael Connor (right) relieves Capt. Sean Haley of command during the Change of Command ceremony April 12. Commander, Naval Region Southeast Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar presents Capt. Sean Haley, outgoing Naval Air Station Jacksonville commanding officer, with the Legion of Merit award at the Change of Command ceremony April 12. Outgoing Naval Air Station Commanding Officer Sean Haley presents ACCS Eddie McKinney with the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal at the Change of Command ceremony April 12 for his outstanding service and dedication to the command. Outgoing Naval Air Station Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Sean Haley greets Jackie Smith, aide to Congressman John Rutherford, 4th District of Florida, as Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar looks on during the change of command ceremony. Lt. David Williams of the Naval Air Station Jacksonville (NAS Jax) Air Operations Department, left, presents outgoing NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Sean Haley with a special golf club on behalf of the base wardroom. Williams handcrafted the golf club incorporating several items signifying Haley's tenure as commanding officer. Outgoing Naval Air Station Jacksonville (NAS Jax) Commanding Officer Capt. Sean Haley presents the Meritorious Civilian Service Medal to Dan Schickler of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC SE) Public Works Department for out standing contributions to NAS Jax during the runway renovation proj ect. The award, signed by NAVFAC SE Commanding Officer Capt. Pat Garin, was presented during the NAS Jax Change of Command ceremony April 12 as a surprise to Schickler. Command Master Chief Jeffery Waters (right) presents outgoing Naval Air Station Commanding Officer Capt. Sean Haley with a gift from the Chief Petty Officer's Mess at the Change of Command ceremony April 12. See CHANGE, Page 5

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2018 5 Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar shares her remarks during the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Change of Command ceremony April 12. Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar acknowledges incoming Naval Air Station Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Michael Connor during the ceremony. Photos by Julie M. Lucas, Reggie Jarrett, and Hannah Simmons Outgoing Naval Air Station Jacksonville (NAS Jax) Commanding Officer Capt. Sean Haley thanks the NAS Jax team, tenant commands and local community for their support during his tenure as commanding officer during the ceremony. Incoming Naval Air Station Commanding Officer Michael Connor has the Command Ashore Insignia pinned on his uniform by his wife Cristin at the Change of Command ceremony April 12. Naval Air Station Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Michael Connor discusses the importance of providing assistance to tenant commands and working with the local com munity during his speech after taking com mand of the station. Cristin Connor, center, listens to her husband, Naval Air Station Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Michael Connor give his remarks after assuming com mand April 12. IT1 Tyler Simonsen of Naval Air Station Jacksonville (NAS Jax) Executive Department, rings the bell signifying the arrival of the official party during the NAS Jax Change of Command ceremony April 12 at Hangar 117. New Naval Air Station Jacksonville (NAS Jax) Commanding Officer Capt. Michael Connor, left, and former NAS Jax CO Capt. Sean Haley cut the cake at their change of command reception April 12 at the Rivercove Conference and Catering Center. The brass quartet from Navy Band Southeast plays "Anchors Aweigh" at the end of the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Change of Command ceremony. Naval Air Station Jacksonville's new Executive Officer Capt. Brian Weiss served as master of ceremonies during the change of command. you can to our tenants. They rely on it. That is our mission. We are in the customer service business. Second, be the very best version of yourself that you can be. This not only encompasses your professional performance, but also your physical and mental well-being. Seek continual improvement. And third, have fun. We have a saying in naval aviation, if you arent having fun, you arent doing it right. Following the ceremony, a reception was held at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center. CHANGE From Page 4

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2018 Jacksonville in 2015 and get folks excited about it, he said. We couldnt have an air show that year because of the runway project, so we decided we decided to do a time capsule. The Stearman Building was chosen because Williamson wanted the time capsule to be in a visible place. We have been looking for a great building to put this in, so people wont forget about it 50 years from now, he said. We didnt want to bury it, because we wanted people to see it. The time capsule was placed in front of the 1941 Stearman bi-plane for which the building is named. The donated items were placed in three ammu nition boxes, which were then encased in a con crete structure built by Seabees from Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202. The Seabees used 15 80-pound bags of cement to build the structure. It gives us a lot of pride to build this, said Seabee BU1 Justin Dashnaw. All of the Seabees have a lot of pride in the work that we do. As the concrete was setting, the Seabees placed in their command coin in the lower left corner on the top of the structure to let future generations know who built it. The concrete installment was made with rebar rein forcement. We wish them luck trying to bang into this 50 years from now, Williamson said. They are going to need a big hammer. The time capsule is not yet finished as a plaque will be installed on a future date. TIME CAPSULE From Page 1 Photos by Reggie Jarrett Ron Williamson, safety manager and unofficial histo rian for Naval Air Station Jacksonville, puts items in ammunition boxes, which will be put in a time cap sule to be opened in 50 years. BUCN Joseph Cinelli (left) and CE2(SCW) Jordan Short of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202, cut a piece of wood April 4 to construct a wooden form (seen at left) to build a time capsule that will be housed in the Stearman Building at Heritage Park aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville. Concrete will be poured in the form and rebar will be added to create the time capsule. Commands on the base submitted items, which were put in ammu nition boxes, for the time capsule. The time capsule will be opened in 50 years. BU3(SCW) Kurtis McQueary of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202, uses a piece of lumber to level the top of the concrete of the Naval Air Station Jacksonville time capsule. (From left) SW2(SWC/EXW) Brice Randall and CE2(SWC) Jordan Short of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202, prepare to mix concrete that will be poured into the wooden form to make the time capsule in the Stearman Building at Heritage Park aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville (NAS Jax) April 5. Commands aboard NAS Jax were asked to submit items for the capsule. The items were put into ammunition boxes, which will be encased in concrete. From left, SW2(SCW/EXW) Brice Randall, BU2 (SCW) John Harris, BUCN Joseph Cinelli and BU3 Kurtis McQueary of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202, pour concrete into the wooden form to create the time capsule, which will be housed in the Stearman Building at Heritage Park aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville. FFSC offers life skills workshops From FFSC Public Affairs Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC work shops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2018: Ombudsman Basic Training May 13-16 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 19-21 (8 a.m. 4 p.m.), Nov. 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.) Transition Assistance Program (TAP) Separation Workshop (7:30 a.m. 4:15 p.m.) May 6-10, May 13-17, June 3-7, June 17-21, July 8-12, July 15-19, Aug. 5-9, Aug. 19-23, Sept. 9-13, Sept. 16-20, Oct. 7-11, Oct. 21-25, Nov. 4-8, Dec. 2-6. Transition Assistance Program (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m. 4:15 p.m.) May 20-24, June 24-28, July 22-26, Aug. 26-30, Sept. 23-27, Oct. 28-Nov. 1, Nov. 18-22, Dec. 16-20. Federal Employment Workshop (9 a.m. noon) April 22, May 3, June 12, Aug. 16, Sept. 6, Oct. 17, Nov. 27, Dec. 11. (Noon-3 p.m.) July 2. Job Search & Interview Techniques Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) May 30, July 15, Sept. 5, Nov. 25. Resumes & Cover Letters Workshop (9:40 a.m. noon) May 30, July 15, Sept. 5, Nov. 25. Million Dollar Sailor Workshop (7:30 a.m. 4 p.m.) May 1-2, Aug. 14-15, Nov. 13-14. Command Financial Specialist Training (7:30 a.m. 4 p.m.) June 10-14, Sept. 30-Oct. 4, Dec. 9-13. Money, Debt and Credit Management Workshop (8-11 a.m.) April 30, July 2, Oct. 15. Strategies for First-time Home Buyers (1-3:30 p.m.) April 22, May 29, Sept. 4. Strategies for Best Deals in Car Buying (9-10:30 a.m.) May 29, Aug. 12, Nov. 26. PCS Sponsor Training (1:30-3 p.m.) June 13, Aug. 8, Oct. 10, Dec. 12. PCS Smooth Move Workshop (1:30-4 p.m.) May 9, July 11, Sept. 12, Nov. 14. Military Spouse 101 Workshop May 21 (5-6:30 p.m.), July 18 (1-2:30 p.m.) Sept. 14 (1-2:30 p.m.) Nov. 21 (5-6:30 p.m.) What About the Kids (9-11 a.m.) May 13, June 10, July 8, Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 9. Stress Management 101 Workshop (9-10:30 a.m.) May 14, June 11, July 9, Aug. 13, Sept. 10, Oct. 8, Nov. 5, Dec. 10. Extended Stress Management Workshop (8 a.m. noon) July 16 & 30, Oct. 15 & 29. Anger Management Workshop (8 a.m.-noon) April 23, May 21, June 25, July 23, Aug. 27, Sept. 24, Oct. 22, Nov. 26, Dec. 17. Personal Anger Control Group May 2 June 6 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), June 25 July 30 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.), Aug. 15 Sept. 19 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), Oct. 8 Nov. 12 (2-4 p.m.). Individual Communication (11 a.m. 1 p.m.) May 14, July 9, Sept. 10, Nov. 19. The Seabees from Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 put their command coin in the corner of the concrete structure they built to house the time capsule aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2018 7 day, Tindell said. The program managers really spent a lot of time and did deep dives into their pro grams to ensure we were doing everything effectively and efficiently. Though preparing for the inspection is important, FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. Trent DeMoss said scores like this come from sustained hard work and dedication. You dont just get ready for an inspection like this during the last three months or the last two weeks, he said. They stay ready. Theyre ready all the time. The scope of the inspection was massive. The main tenance department aboard a carrier can be inspected in as little as two or three days, by a 10-man Aviation Maintenance Management Team. Detachment Jacksonvilles inspection took two weeks. We usually schedule inspections to last for a week at the most, said Chief Daniel Castro a member of Aviation Maintenance Management Team Four. But because this is a Fleet Readiness Center, were going to be here for two weeks. DeMoss said such widespread success under thor ough scrutiny reflects the detachments culture. The two detachments had 78 of their 79 programs rated on-track, and these are major pro grams like hydraulic con tamination, non-destruc tive inspection and tool con trol You dont just fix that in a week, DeMoss said. So that means theyve been doing it all along. That its a normal culture and way of doing business. However, the scores from both detachments are anything but normal. They stand out, even for sea soned Sailors. Ive never seen a score of 98.9, said Detachment Jacksonvilles Master Chief Fred Flaherty. The squad ron that did the best of any Ive been a part of person ally was a 94. That speaks volumes about where our Sailors are within the mindset of doing work right the first time not just for themselves, but for the Navy. this tour, he cross-rated to the damage controlman rating and advanced to petty officer first class. In November 1988, Ray reported to USS Connolly (DD 979) at Naval Station (NS) Norfolk, Virginia where he completed several Middle East deployments during the Iraqi War. He was proud to put on his chief petty officer anchors during this tour. Reporting to NS Norfolk in in 1993, as a leading chief petty officer, Ray inspected naval vessels, conducted quality assurance and oversaw a pre ventive maintenance program. Three years later, he trans ferred to Afloat Training Group at NS Mayport as a senior dam age control inspector. This job entailed inspect ing, assessing and developing training programs and test ing damage control readiness of naval vessels within the Atlantic Fleet and foreign U.S. ally naval vessels. Heading back to sea, Ray reported to USS Chosin (CG 65) in June 1999 as the Senior Enlisted Damage Control Program manager and train er overseeing all immediate level maintenance and repair of damage control equipment and systems, development and management of damage con trol training programs for ship board personnel, and prepar ing vessels for inspections. He also led security teams aboard captured foreign oil smug gling vessels during Operation Desert Shield. In February 2000, Ray report ed to NAS Jax as the station disaster preparedness coordi nator where he directed the EM program. This entailed con ducting disaster drills, rede signing the base Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and acting as liaison between the station and city/state EM offi cials. He retired with 24 years of honorable naval service on Sept. 30, 2003. Following retirement, he worked for the Florida Department of Health, Office of Disaster Preparedness as the EM planner, trainer and con sultant. This job consisted of over seeing all EM operations, plan ning and executing disaster exercises and acting as damage assessment team leader during Hurricanes Charley, Frances, Ivan and Jeanne throughout the state. In 2008, he graduated from Southern Illinois University with a Bachelors Degree in Workforce Education/ Development and Instructional Design and returned to NAS Jax as the EM officer. Here, he ensured the command could effectively plan, respond, and operate the EOC during any natural or man-made crisis. Earning his FEMA trainer certification, Ray educated oth ers on their role in EM, mak ing sure the NAS Jax team was prepared during drills, inspections, and real-world incidents. He is credited with developing a comprehensive hurricane/destructive weath er plan, used during when Hurricanes Matthew and Irma hit Northeast Florida. His expertise and dedication to the command earned him recognition as the 2018 NAS Jax Civilian of the Year. He is survived by his wife, Claribel Vargas-Edmond; sons, Rashan Smith, Ray (RJ) Edmond Jr.; daughters, Qiana Smith, Toni Smith, LaTia (Michael) Thomas, Porshia (Adrian) Mills, Angelina and Angelica Edmond; grand daughters, Hailee Clack, Aminah Thomas, Ayannah Thomas, Amayah Thomas, Sarai Mills and Saylin Mills; grandsons, Princeton Clack, Amari Thomas, Rashan Smith Jr.; sisters, Virdean (Larry) Moore, Debra Edmond, Frankye Edmond (who pro ceeded him in death), Shannon Edmond and Kenyatta Bleckley; brothers, Derrick (Grace) Edmond and Darwin Edmond; father and motherin-law Antonio and Expedita Vargas; brothers-in-law Antonio (Gloria) Vargas Jr., Gil (Odalis) Vargas; sister-in-law Altagracia (Claude) Massicott, and a host of aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, coworkers and friends. FRCSE From Page 1 MEMORIAM From Page 1 Photo by Victor Pitts AT2 Shaun Darneille (left) and AT2 Justin Morgan work in the avion ics shop at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Detachment Jacksonville. The detachment aced its Aviation Maintenance Inspection in March with a score of 98.9. Military Appreciation Night at the Jacksonville The fifth annual Military Appreciation Night at the Jacksonville Zoo sponsored by St. Vincents Health System and Navy Federal Credit Union is May 18 from 6-9 p.m. Wristbands are available for purchase at the Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport USO offices and Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay ITT office. Wristbands are $5 each and include zoo admission, unlim ited train rides, and the land of the tiger exhibit. This event is open to active duty, retirees, National Guard, veterans and Department of Defense per sonnel and dependents. Please note that dependent children are not authorized to purchase wrist bands.Please get your wristbands now, they will not be sold at the venue. No Dough Dinner The Naval Air Station Jacksonville USO will host a No Dough Dinner will be held April 25from 5-7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Association #91 located at 5391 Collins Road. This is free for active duty, National Guard and Reservists on active orders, and their dependents. On the Go with USO File photo NAS Jax Emergency Management Officer Ray Edmond checks a five-day weather forecast in the Emergency Operations Center Oct. 26, 2017. Edmond passed away April 9. A celebration of his life was held April 17 at the NAS Jax All Saints Chapel.

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8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2018 Keeping our sewers fat-free By Scott Dombrosky NAS Jax Environmental Department Fats, oils, and grease arent just bad for our personal health; they are bad for the health of our sewer system as well. Just as we must be careful as to what we put into our bodies to maintain our optimal health, we must likewise be careful what we put down the sinks and drains in our homes and food establishments. Specifically, fats, oils, and grease, when improperly disposed in the sanitary sewer system or storm drain system, can cause proper ty damage, health hazards and environmental problems. When cleaning up after din ner, pouring a little meat fat from your frying pan down the kitchen sink may not seem like such a bad thing. After all, what harm can that little bit of grease cause? However, grease sticks to the insides of sewer pipes; both on your property and in the street. Over time, the small quantities of grease can build up and block the entire pipe. Garbage disposals do not keep grease out of the plumbing system. They only shred solid material into smaller pieces but do not prevent grease from solidifying in the drain. The result can be sewage backing up and overflowing in your or your neighbors homes, yards, streets, wetlands, or the river. When this occurs, it is not just the oils and grease that over flow but untreated sewage as well. This would involve an expensive and unpleasant cleanup and possibly cause contact with disease-causing organisms. The best way to solve the grease problem and help pre vent overflows of raw sewage is to keep this material out of the sewer system in the first place. How you can help: Never pour cooking fats, oils, or grease down sink drains or into toilets. Pour liquid waste cooking oil and grease into a metal can (soup, vegetable, etc.). Let the grease cool and solidify (you can place the container in the refrigerator or freezer), then place it in the garbage can for disposal. Scrape or wipe grease and food scraps from trays, plates, pots, pans, utensils and grills and cooking surfaces into the trash for disposal. Do not put grease or greasy foods down garbage dispos als. Put baskets/strainers in sink drains to catch food scraps and other solids, and empty the drain baskets/strainers into the trash for disposal. Do not run water over dishes to wash oil and grease down the drain. Restaurants that have grease traps in place still need to fol low the proper disposal prac tices for fats, oils, and grease. Grease traps serve as a back up and only remove minimal amounts of grease. Restaurants with grease traps or grease interceptors should ensure the traps are inspected and cleaned regularly in order for them to be effective. Onetime events such as cookouts and holiday par ties can sometimes generate a large quantity of used cook ing oil. This should never be dumped onto the ground or down storm drains. Squadrons and tenant commands may obtain assistance in disposing of used cooking oil from these types of events by calling the Environmental Department at 542-3016/2732. Photo by Jacob Sippel NH Jax customer service awards Capt. Matthew Case, Naval Hospital Jacksonville commanding officer, presents the Customer Service Excellence Award to the Allergy Clinic during an awards ceremony at the hospital April 6. The Customer Service Excellence Award, selected by the Patient and Family Advisory Council, recognizes a department for providing superior service. Other awardees included: HM1 George Lynch (Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal), HM2 Justin Blatch (Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal), YN2 Julian Black (Carrier Strike Group 10 Flag Letter of Commendation), and ST2 Jason Kataria (Commander Submarine Group 10 Flag Letter of Commendation). NH Jacksonville's priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nation's heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the Navy's third largest hospital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient population (163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen, and their families), almost 85,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager and Medical Home Port team at one of its facilities.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2018 9 The league is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, DoD contractors, dependents at NAS Jacksonville and retirees. The games are played in the evenings. All interested personnel should contact the NAS Jax Sports Department to receive a copy of the rules and to get the required paperwork to join the league. The entry form and roster are due. The tournament is open to all authorized MWR patrons 18 and older attached to NAS Jacksonville. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. and will be held at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. The winners will receive medals. Call the NAS Jax Athletic Department to sign up by April 27. The tournament is open to all authorized MWR patrons 18 and older attached to NAS Jacksonville. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. and will be held at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. The winners will receive medals. Call the NAS Jax Athletic Department to sign up by April 27. The league is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, DoD contractors, military spouses assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville and retirees. The meeting will be held in the classroom or designated representative attend the points All interested personnel should attend the meeting to discuss rules and to get the required paperwork to register for the league. The league is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, DoD contractors, military spouses assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville and retirees age 30 and up. The games are played at lunchtime on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The meeting will be held in the classroom outside or designated representative attend the points. All interested personnel should attend the meeting to discuss rules and to get the required paperwork to register for the league. The league is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, DoD contractors, military spouses assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville and retirees. The games are played in the evenings. The meeting will be held at the NAS Jax Gym in the conference room at noon. Commands having their cup points. All interested personnel should attend the meeting to discuss rules and to get the required paperwork to register for the league. The league is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, DoD contractors, military spouses assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville and retirees. The meeting will be held in the classroom or designated representative attend the points. All interested personnel should attend the meeting to discuss rules and to get the required paperwork to register for the league. The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, military spouses, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. and will be held at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Participants will earn participation points for their command toward the NAS Jax Athletics to sign up by May 18. The league is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, DoD contractors, military spouses assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville and retirees. The games are played in the evenings. The meeting will be held at the NAS Jax Gym in the conference room upstairs outside or designated representative attend the points. All interested personnel should attend the meeting to discuss rules and to get the required paperwork to join the league. The league is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, DoD contractors, military spouses assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville and retirees. The games are played in the evenings. The meeting will be held at the NAS Jax Gym in the conference room upstairs outside or designated representative attend the points. All interested personnel should attend the meeting to discuss rules and to get the required paperwork to join the league. For more information about any of the sports articles, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil Standings As of April 13 CNATTU 6 0 FRC Tailgators 4 1 NAVHOSP Inglorious Batters 4 1 VP-26 4 1 VR-62/VR-58 4 2 HSM-70 3 2 VP-62 Broad Arrows 3 2 FRCSE Stingers 3 3 NAVHOSP Off in Church 3 3 1 VP-16 2 3 Air Ops 2 3 1 FRCSE Nerd Herd 2 4 NMCLANT 2 4 HSM-74 1 4 NAVHOSP Galley Rats 1 5 CBMU202 0 0 SERCC 0 2 TPU-PCF/VUP-19 0 4 NAVHOSP Loblollies 4 0 VP-30 Wardroom 3 0 VP-16 4 1 FRCSE Tree huggers 3 1 FRCSE Lake Dodgers 3 1 NAS Jax 3 1 HSM-74 2 1 HITRON 3 2 VP-26 Tridents 1 2 MPRWS/TPU-PCF 0 3 RLSO/DSO 0 4 VR-62/VR-58 0 4 NAS Jax Sports Photos by MC3 Kristopher Haley Pilots from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 74 "Swamp Foxes" perform a flyover in their MH-60R helicopters at the Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimps open ing game April 11. The Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp beat the Mobile BayBears, 9-5. Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar, commander, Navy Region Southeast, throws the first pitch at the Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimps opening game April 11 where they achieved a 9-5 win against the Mobile BayBears. First pitch

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10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2018 Get Connected with MWR navymwrjacksonville.com facebook.com/nasjaxmwr twitter.com/nasjaxmwr instagram.com/nasjaxmwr nasjaxmwr@navy.mil Community Recreation Call 542-3227 across from Deweys River Cove Catering & Conference Center Call 542-3041 Deweys Call 542-3521 more! Bingo at Deweys times. Freedom Lanes Bowling Center Call 542-3493 p.m. always welcome! Fitness, Sports & Aquatics Call 542-2930 com. Visit www.navymwrjacksonville.com now available. information. treatments. For a complete list The Liberty Recreation Center Trips & events are for all E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members & reservists only. Call 5421335 for information. Free NAS Jax Golf Club Golf Course: 542-3249 Mulligans Restaurant: 542-2936 by payment. Appreciation Days Mulberry Cove Marina Call 542-3260 Auto Skills Center Call 542-3681 Youth Activities Center Call 778-9772 Family Fitness Center Call 771-8469 Jax Navy Flying Club Call 542-8509 commercial Community Recreation Call 542-3318, Email directly at nasjaxtickets@navy.mil A representative will be available What to do this year? Local Fun Trips! Current Ticket Promotions Include the Following: For Florida residents only. Must be exchanged for applicable pass at a ticket booth at the Magic Kingdom, Epcot, Animal Kingdom or Hollywood Studios. Proof of a Florida residential to be shown at time of exchange. Acceptable forms of Florida Residency: Fla. Drivers License, Fla. State ID (must have Fla. Address or a Fla. Base Military ID). Tickets may not be used after June 24, 2018 Parking not included. No blackout dates. Tickets valid January 1, 2018 and expire December 19, 2018. (Redeemable through 12/31/18, ticket expires on this date) (Redeemable through 12/31/18, ticket expires on this date)

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2018 11 Green Cove Springs Silver CreekCommunity Garage Sale Sat. April 7th 8am-Noon on Sandridge Between Henley & Russell Rd. MANDARIN FRI. 4/20 & SAT. 4/21, 8am-5pm Furn., Golf equip., Large glass pet enclosure & supplies, Household, more. 12166 Blackfoot Ct. 32223. SR13 Marbon Rd. Follow signs. NORTHSIDE The Victoria Pointe HOA and the Victoria Preserve HOA are having a Multi Community Wide Garage Sale on Sat., April 21st from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. located off of Duval Station Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32218 ORANGE PARKThe Preserve at Oakleaf Community Yard Sale Sat. 4/21, 8am-12:30pm 785 Oakleaf Plantation Pkwy 32065 ST. AUGUSTINE The Las Calinas Amenity Club is having a Community Wide Garage Sale on Sat., April 21st from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. located off of US1 in St. Augustine, FL 32095 WestsideBentCreekCommunity Sale Fri. 4/20 & Sat. 4/21; 8am-3pm I-295westto103rdleftonPiper GlenacrossfromBishopSnyder H.S. PUBLIC WELCOME!! Appliances Buy-Sell-Trade-Repair W/Ds,Refrigs.,stove,$85up,wrnty Mon-Sun 9-7. Delivery. 904-695-1412 LADIESLEATHERCOAT w/purseredsuedesize12, $75.00 Levismenssuit grey/beigejacketS738R pants33Wx29L$35.00ea. 904-384-7809 ANTIQUE LAWYER BOOK CASE 3 Tier, 49 Tall, 34 Wide, Glass Doors, Dark wood, Excellent condition $295. Call 904-510-6387 CHANDELIERS (a) Etched glass bells for 3 lights nickel $100. (b) Gold 7 lights & 5 dz glass crystals. (c) Gold 12 lights. RUG 6 1/2x5 8w $55. Like new. Call 904-384-7809 RadialArmSaw10" Craftsmanwithanew bladeandsolidtableon wheels.Worksgreat.$175 OBO (904) 482-2668. BIKESGirls20Tiresfor younggirltoteen,white, pink&purple$55.Girls Bananaseatbike,white, pink,withbasket12x18 $65. Both in excel. cond. Call 904-384-7809 MICHELIN Latitude Tour P275-55-R18 4 tires for car or truck, original sticker, never been mounted. $195.00 each, call 904-384-7809 SONY 24 TRINITRON $40. SHARP TV 19 $40. SONY 9 Trinitron $30. ZENITH 17 $30. All color TVs & cable ready. 904-384-7809 TrailerHitch20,000lb for Chevy20172500or3500GMpart#84133717New $300. CALL 904-476-7544 WICKER MIRROR Beautifullycarved,white wickermirror,w/4 border&7clothflowers, hangs19x29$50.Potted SAGOS. Call 904-384-7809 CONDO FOR SALE 3 bedroom, 2 bath on the NE side of the St Johns River. Fouth floor with elevators.This is an end unit with a panoramic view, extremely nice, gated community,small pets allowed,and has a boat dock with available slips. This unit is 1700 sq. ft. Ownere will consider financing $250,000 will negotiate 1-386-590-7798 MIDDLEBURG LOOKING FOR QUIET COMFORT AND A TOUCH OF THE COUNTRY? THEN THIS RENTAL HOME IS Perfect for you! On 3/4 acres of land, yard is spacious, has outdoor porch, fenced yard with large gazebo only 20.62 miles from NAS JAX. Youre only a few short mins from shopping, schools, church and the reast of town. 3/2, with bonus rm, 2 car gar, liv room w/fireplace, fridge, elec stove, microwave and dishwasher. $1650/mo. + untilities, pet friendly/ small pets with small dep. Avail May 1st 2018 904-514-8887 AFFORDABLE $100 & up per week clean, quiet, furnished, in Murray Hill on bus line, A/C, cable, laundry. Call 904-742-4747 AFFORDABLE $100 & up per week clean, quiet, furnished, inMurrayHillonbusline,A/C, cable, laundry. Call 904-742-4747 ROOMS DOWNTOWN FULLY FURNISHED all utilities included. $150 a week or $500/mo. w/$175 dep. Please call from 9am-6pm (904) 866-1850 CHEVY CORVETTE 1980 32k original miles, metallic grey, garage kept, immaculate condition $17,500 obo, appointment only. 904-234-0654 Toyota Scion XB 2008 79,000 mi., Auto. Trans., A/C w/new Compressor, P/B (just re-built), P/W, P/L with remote, P/S, New Batt., Tinted Windows, AM/ FM/ CD. Car is in excellent cond. $6,995. Cute, cute, cute. 904-525-4828. 1987 WELCRAFT STEP LIFT V-20 with 200HP OMC Sea Drive, Bimini top with Overnight cabin for 2 people, runs great, tandem aluminum trailer $3,500. Jim 904-384-7809 Garage Sales Appliances Clothes Furniture/Household Machinery and Tools Miscellanous Condominiums Intracoastal West North Jacksonville Westside Houses Unfurnished Rooms to Rent Automobiles Boats Automobiles

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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2018