Citation
Jax air news

Material Information

Title:
Jax air news
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville, FL
Jacksonville, FL
Publisher:
Kaylee LaRocque - Public Affairs Officer, Clark Pierce- Editor
Florida Times-Union- Ellen S. Rykert - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 6, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
000579555 ( ALEPH )
33313438 ( OCLC )
ADA7401 ( NOTIS )
sn 95047201 ( LCCN )

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE, FLA VP-5/VP-8On Deployment Page 3 NAS JAX SECRET SEight Places You May Not Know Pages 4-5 FINDING HOMESRPP Helps Sailors Page 9 THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2018 From Staff Navy training schedules indicate car rier-based jet fighters and other types of aircraft will be conducting training out of Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville starting now through Feb. 20. Residents in neighborhoods sur rounding NAS Jacksonville may notice an increase in aircraft activity and noise during this training period. This training operation is in support of aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and embarked Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8 staff, which is departing Naval Station Norfolk to begin Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). COMPTUEX is a robust test combin ing technology, training, and tactics into multiple scenarios leading to certifica tion for deployment. The strike group is being evaluated on their performance during the simulated surface and sub-surface threats, and ship movements they may encounter during a strait transit or in the vicinity of hostile waters. Throughout the exercise, fictitious geopolitical scenarios are used to repli cate real-world circumstances the strike group may encounter during deploy ment. USS Harry S. Truman is the eighth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier of the United States Navy, named after the 33rd President of the United States. USS Harry S. Truman staffs CSG 8, Carrier Air Wing 7 and its squadrons; Destroyer Squadron 28 staff and guidedmissile cruiser USS Anzio (CG 68); and destroyers, USS Bainbridge (DDG 96), USS Bulkeley (DDG 84), USS Gonzalez (DDG 66), USS Gravely (DDG 107), USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), USS Mitscher (DDG 57), and USS Ramage (DDG 61). The email address for noise complaints is:NASJAX_NOISE_COMPLAINTS@ NAVY.MIL. By Reggie JarrettJax Air News EditorIn preparation for deployment, Mobile Tactical Operations Center (MTOC) units Five and Nine held an exercise where they took over flight operations aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville from Jan. 22-29. MTOC units are an extension of the Tactical Operations Center (TOC) and the bi-annual exercise is designed to mimic being deployed. The TOC is not in operation during the MTOC exercise. It is an Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE) for the two squad rons that are going on deployment and the two MTOCs that are attached to those squadrons and go with them on deployment, said CWO4 James Hawkins. The ORE evaluated both MTOC units together to save time and money. MTOC-5 is attached to Patrol Squadron (VP) 45 and they will soon deploy to the Pacific. MTOC-9 is attached to VP-10 and they will be deployed to Europe. During the weeklong operational period of the exercise, the two MTOC units handled the flight operations for six to eight flights a day. Flight operations consist of pre-mis sion briefs, data collection, flight fol lowing and post-flight analysis. Increased aircraft activity at NAS JaxPhoto by MCSN J. Keith WilsonThe guided-missile destroyer USS Bulkeley (DDG 84) departs Naval Station Norfolk. Bulkeley is underway for a composite training unit exercise (COMPTUEX), which evaluates the strike group's ability as a whole to carry out sustained combat operations from the sea ultimately certifying the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group for deployment. Photo by Hannah SimmonsMaintenance crews aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville work on F-18 Tomcats that are flown in to act as the aggressors during the Composite Training Unit Exercise running through Feb. 20. Photo by Reggie JarrettThe "Guardians" of Mobile Tactical Operations Command 9 assemble outside the exercise area aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville Jan. 29.MTOC handles flight ops during exercise By Reggie JarrettEditor Jax Air News In a scenario that was three months in planning and designed to be as real istic as possible, an active shooter drill involving base security personnel, first responders, Sailors and civilians was held aboard Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville Feb. 1. The drill was part of Solid CurtainCitadel Shield 2018, an annual week long exercise held at all Navy bases in the continental United States. Photo by Reggie Jarrett MA2 Steven Tagliaferro (right) and Patrolman Robert Cook of the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Security Department, conduct a perimeter sweep looking for suspects and victims during the active shooter drill aboard the station Feb. 1. The drill was part of the Navy's Exercise Solid Curtain/Citadel Shield. The annual exercise is designed to train Navy installation security forces and first responders to react to potential threats to installations and units. NAS Jax holds active shooter drill to evaluate tactics and procedures See MTOC, Page 8 See Page 6

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, ursday, February 8, 2018 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication Shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, FL, 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Sean Haley Executive Officer Capt. Michael Connor Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Jeffery Waters Public Affairs Officer Kaylee LaRocque Public Affairs Specialist Julie Lucas Staff Writers AZ2 Sarah Morris Hannah Simmons Editor Reggie Jarrett Design/Layout George Atchley From StaffFeb. 8 1862 Joint amphibious force cap tures Roanoke Island, N.C. key to Albemarle Sound. 1890 USS Omaha sailors and marines assist Hodogary, Japan in sub duing large fire. Feb. 9 1799 USS Constellation (under Capt. Truxtun) captures French lInsurgente. 1943 Organized Japanese resistance on Guadalcanal ends. Feb. 10 1862 Union gunboats destroy Confederate ships at Elizabeth City, N.C. 1900 Appointment of first naval gov ernor of Guam, Commodore Seaton Schroder. 1960 USS Sargo (SSN-583) surfaces at North Pole. Feb. 11 1862 SECNAV directs formation of organization to evaluate new inventions and technical development that eventu ally led to National Academy of Science. 1971 U.S. and USSR sign a treaty prohibiting the deployment of nuclear weapons on the ocean floor. Feb. 12 1945 USS Batfish (SS-310) sinks sec ond Japanese submarine within three days. 1947 First launching of guided mis sile (Loon) from a submarine, USS Cusk (SS-348). Feb. 13 1854 Admiral Perry anchors off Yokosuka, Japan to receive Emperors reply to treaty proposal. 1913 Naval Radio Station at Arlington, Va. begins operations. 1945 First naval units enter Manila Bay since 1942. 1968 Operation Coronado XI begins in Mekong Delta. Feb. 14 1778 John Paul Jones in Ranger receives first official salute to U.S. Stars and Strips flag by a European country, at Quiberon, France. 1813 Essex becomes first U.S. war ship to round Cape Horn and enter the Pacific Ocean. 1814 USS Constitution captures British Lovely Ann and Pictou. 1840 Officers from USS Vincennes make first landing in Antarctica on floating ice. By Lisa Smith MolinariSpecial ContributorIt was another gloomy winter after noon in our working-class English vil lage. Ever since wed been stationed at Joint Analysis Center (JAC) Molesworth in the flat Cambridgeshire countryside know as The Fens, Id found myself counting the minutes until my hus band, Francis, got home from work. At that latitude, the sun set around four oclock, leaving me with nothing to do but pop in a Barney video for our toddler it was the 90s after all and contemplate dinner. I wandered nonchalantly to the pan try expecting to see the usual line up of canned vegetables, dried noodles and jarred pickles. But there it was, staring at me from between the peanut butter and salsa with smug indignation. It had belonged to the woman who had come before me. She had bought it, presum ably, for a cozy dinner with the man who was now my husband. It was her box of Shake n Bake. Michelle was Francis old girlfriend. Her Shake n Bake had, along with her gawd-awful dining room chairs and etched wine glasses, mingled with our joint marital property. After we mar ried, I moved in with Francis, and then we moved together three more times. Somehow, the Shake n Bake had sur vived. At first, I had thought the crumb mix ture was Francis. But then Id remem bered that when I met him, his diet con sisted of baloney sandwiches, cereal and take out. The Shake n Bake mustve been Michelles. I had put up with the chairs and glasses out of necessity we needed all the hand-me-downs we could get back in those early days but I didnt need this lousy box of Shake n Bake. I didnt use tawdry cooking shortcuts. It was cheap, just like Michelle with her frizzy red hair, overdone make-up and Boy George hats. I wanted rid of this relic of Francis past life, once and for all. The vacuum-sealed pouch of pork chop coating may not have expired, but I had sentenced it to death. I grabbed the offending box from the shelf and headed for the rubbish bin. But wait, I thought. Why not use this as a teaching moment? The mixture seemed surprisingly fresh for being four years old. I followed the package instructions, throwing meat into the bag with the pouch ingre dients, and laying the coated pieces out on a cookie sheet. When Francis arrived home, our Michelle Memorial Dinner was ready. While Francis changed out of his uniform, I eagerly anticipated his reaction to the meal. I envisioned the disappointment that would most cer tainly appear on his face as he bit into the cheapened chop. I would ask inno cently, Do you like it, Honey? I made it with that old box of crumb coating. Wasnt it . oh, whats her name again . Michelles Shake n Bake? Surely he would spit the bite into his napkin and declare the meal a culi nary embarrassment. He would con fess that I was a much better cook than Michelle. That I was the love of his life and Michelle was a mistake. Smells good, Francis said as I doled pork, green beans and potatoes onto his plate. He carved a particularly large bite of pork, plunged it into his potatoes and opened wide. I watched intently for a grimace, a groan, a gag. Mmm, Francis mumbled, shovel ing forkfuls into his mouth. I waited patiently for my opportunity to blame Michelle for his inevitable disgust. This is delicious, hon, Francis said, spearing a second chop. I nibbled a bite myself, and had to concede that he was right. The Shake n Bake wasnt half bad after all. I realized that I was the only culi nary embarrassment in our kitchen that night. My insecurities had driven me to kill an innocent box of bread crumbs in effigy. The Shake n Bake hadnt been a threat to my marriage any more than Michelle had been. I was being silly. I confessed my Michelle Memorial Dinner plot, and we both laughed hard at my ridiculousness. I raised a glass to Michelle, giving credit where credit is due, and promised to make her signa ture recipe again. After all, it wasnt a mistake, it was just Shake n Bake. Military Saves Week teaches savings initiativesFrom Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsMilitary Saves Week is Feb. 26 through March 3 and is an annual opportunity forinstallationsand organizations to promote positive savings behavior. Its a good time for service mem bers and their families to assess their own saving status. Fleet and Family Service Centers are there to help Sailors and fami lies with financial counseling and education services. Authorized by the undersecre tary of defense for personnel and readiness, Military Saves Week is a simple annual process modeled after the CFC to invite personnel to increase their personal finan cial readiness of service members, Department of Defense employees and their families. Healthy finances and open com munication about money contrib utes to marital stability and gives kids a solid foundation for the future. Personnel and the families are encouraged to take the pledge today Be a responsible saver, and spread the savings message to your family and friends. REALSENSE Tax Service availableFrom StaffFree tax help is available! Dont pay to have your 2017 tax return prepared and filed. If your household income was less than $66,000 in 2017 you may be eligible for free tax help at one of more than 60 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) and Tax-Aide sites throughout Northeast Florida. IRS-certified volunteers are ready to assist you to prepare and electronically file your 2017 tax return. This service is supported by United Way of Northeast Florida and AARP. For more information and to find a free tax-preparation site near you, visit www.unitedwaynefl.org/realsense/free-tax-filing/, or call United Ways 2-1-1 or 904-632-0600. If you are outside Northeast Florida, visit theIRS. gov Tax Site Lookup to find a free tax-preparation site in your community. Appointments can be made online for both locations at https://booknow. appointment-plus.com/y7smjk18/. Representatives will be at NAS Jacksonville, Building 13 at the Yorktown gate on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 9 a.m.4 p.m. and Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m.-Noon.To schedule an appointment, call (904) 515-3481. This Week in Navy History Meat & Potatoes of LifePhoto by Twilla BurnsCommander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar signs a proclamation recognizing Military Saves Week in front of members of the Navy Region Southeast Family Readiness Program Feb. 1. Military Saves Week runs from Feb. 26 through March 3 and promotes good savings behavior and a chance for service members and their families to assess their own saving status. The initiative is recognized at the national level and involves numerous activities, along with tips for sav ing money no matter what one's income level is currently. Pork chop envy U.S. Navy photo The NC-4 was one of four Navy Curtiss (NC) flying boats built during World War I to patrol for German U-boats.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, ursday, February 8, 2018 3 By Lt.j.g. Ridgely RiggsVP-5 Public AffairsFour months into deployment and still going strong, the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 dispatched an aircraft to Naval Station Rota to par ticipate in an anti-submarine war fare (ASW) exercise, one of many the squadron has taken part in since departing from Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville in the fall of 2017. The talented aviators, flight officers and sensor operators of Combat Air Crew (CAC) 4 departed early morning on Jan. 19 from NAS Sigonella, Italy, where VP-5 is currently deployed in support of U.S. 6th Fleet operations. Upon arrival at Rota, the crew wast ed no time preparing for the subse quent flight events. The first mission flown was a training flight involving the employment of an expendable mobile ASW training target (EMATT). An EMATT is a small torpedo-shaped device that travels through the water and mimics the acoustic signatures and movements of a submarine. EMATTs are deployable through the P-8As sono buoy launch system (SLS) and provide valuable training for the crew. Our training syllabus is thorough, said AW2 Lawrence Rosado. But hours in the books have a dimin ishing return after a certain point. Training opportunities like these are what truly allow us to hone our skills and learn to work effectively as a crew. The crew then flew multiple missions to practice operations against an actual submarine. A U.S. submarine assumed the role of an adversary vessel for the duration of the exercise. Accompanied by a Spanish warship and a U.S. guid ed-missile destroyer, with its onboard helicopter, CAC-4 skillfully employed the aircraft in prosecution of the sub marine. Once gaining contact, the crew demonstrated its tactical proficiency by executing simulated attacks. We were enthusiastic about this detachment opportunity before arriv ing here, and I can safely say our experi ence was no disappointment, said Lt. Sean Conkle. We experienced first-hand the pro fessionalism of our allies on the Iberian Peninsula and its comforting to know theyre both willing and very able to hunt submarines. VP-8 Fighting Tigers promote interoperability with the JMSDFBy Lt. j.g. Danielle TatchioThe Fighting Tigers of Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 participated in a coor dinated training exercise with members of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF), Fleet Air Wing (FAW) 5 Jan. 26-29. The exercise demonstrated U.S. and Japanese interoperability and tacti cal proficiency in a series of AntiSubmarine Warfare and Anti-Surface Warfare scenarios designed to prepare participating units for potential realworld operations. The exercise began with a day of mission planning, which allowed the participants to discuss the capabilities each crew could bring to the fight. The early consultation provided the forces an opportunity to compare resources and procedures at the tactical level. During the exercise, VP-8 Combat Aircrew One (CAC) 1 flew the P-8A Poseidon, whose next-generation capa bilities allow for significant advances in coordinated collection, prosecution and strike scenarios against both sur face and sub-surface targets of interest. CAC-1 flew alongside FAW-5 in their P-3C Orion. This exercise allowed the aircrews of both squadrons to operate side by side and further their own training while demonstrating the capabilities of each aircraft. The U.S. Navy and JMSDF work close ly together in a number of warfare areas through a shared interest in preserv ing peace and theater security coopera tion throughout the Asia-Pacific region. Coordinated operations such as this promote the shared commitment to freedom of navigation, respect for inter national law and unimpeded and lawful commerce. This was a unique opportunity to work intense coordinated operations with the JMSDF, and it resulted in a very successful event, said Lt. Patrick Murphy, the tactical coordinator of CAC-1. The Japanese aircrews are highly capable and professional in these operations, and we demonstrated today what kind of capability we can bring to the fight together in various warfare areas. Photos by MC1 Jerome D. JohnsonLt. Mark Becker (right) assigned to the "Fighting Tigers" of Patrol Squadron (VP) 8, conducts preflight checks with Members of Japan Maritime SelfDefense Force, Fleet Air Wing-5 on a P-8A Poseidon at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Lt. Patrick Murphy (left) assigned to the Fighting Tigers of Patrol Squadron-8, explains the operations of a Sonobuoy Rotary Launcher to Members of Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, Fleet Air Wing-5, aboard a P-8A Poseidon at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Photo by Lt. j.g. Eric MahlerThe Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 aircrew demonstrates the tactical capabili ties of the P-8A Poseidon to mem bers of Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, Fleet Air Wing-5 Jan. 28. VP-8 is currently forward deployed to the 7th Fleet area of operations conduct ing missions and providing maritime domain awareness to supported units throughout the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. VP-5 joins Spain in anti-submarine warfare exercisePhoto by AT1 Livinisitone AsetaThe Chief's Mess and First Class Petty Officers of Patrol Squadron 5 volunteered for a church revitalization project in Catania, near their deployment site at Naval Air Station Sigonella, Italy.

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, ursday, February 8, 2018 1 Food trucksThe Navy Exchange (NEX) has contracted with several local food trucks to bring additional lunch options for employees aboard the station. Food trucks are located outside the NEX, VyStar Credit Union, Hangar 511, near Fleet Readiness Center Southeast on Enterprise Avenue and the Car Care Center. A variety of food options are now available. 2 Community Rec Rental ProgramThe Morale, Welfare and Recreation Community Recreation at Naval Air Station Jacksonville offers a rental program of recreational equipment for command functions and personal use. They have bounce houses, Cornhole boards, sound equipment, yard games, sports equipment, coolers, canopies, and more. Two 18-foot trailers specifically for command events are fully stocked with all the essentials. There is no cost for official command functions. The trailers come with 20 tables, 100 chairs, two bounce houses, two Cornhole sets, two 10x10 pop-up can opies, Ladder ball, two 120-quart coolers and an assorted sports pack of balls such as soccer, football, and basketballs. Numerous items can be added to the trailer for free or some for an extra cost. Add-ons include extra canopies, chairs, tables, gas grills, speaker systems, inflatable obstacle courses and coolers. Items can also be rented for personal use for a nominal fee. Forms can be found at www.navymwrjacksonville.com under recreation. Reservations can be made up to six months in advance. The Community Recreation office is located in the Auto Hobby Shop, Building 622. They can be reached at 542-3681. 4 Not New ShopThe Not New Shop is a thrift shop operated by the Navy Wives Club of America No. 86 at the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Main Gate, Building 13. Clothes, toys and household goods may be donated by anyone and are sold for a small fee to raise money that goes to charities such as the USO and Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society. The shop is open Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more information, call 542-1582. 3 Free bowling at NAS Freedom LanesThe Bowling Center is located on Gillis Street in Building 609 and offers numerous specials throughout the week including free bowling for active duty military on Thursdays from 11 a.m.1 p.m. The facility offers 24 lanes with automatic scoring and bumpers for children. The flooring to the lanes is a flush surface which makes it easily accessible for children and the young at heart. The center offers open bowling, league bowling and Xtreme bowling, a high energy bowling experience with music and lights. The Gutterball Grill, a snack bar, is located in the center and serves food and beverages daily. The center also has a pro shop with professional fitting and drilling services. For more information, call 542-3494. Eight top secrets aboard NAS JacksonvillePhoto by Julie M. Lucas George Chisholm (left) and Ron Cournoyer of Morale, Welfare and Recreation, open a Community Recreation trailer filled with items ranging from chairs to bounce houses. Naval Air Station Jacksonville currently has two trailers available for command function use.Photo by Julie M. LucasLt. Mike Tato of Patrol Squadron 16 checks out the menu of one of the many food trucks at Hangar 511. The food trucks rotate to various locations around the station. Photo by AZ2 Sarah MorrisAD3 Christopher Miller (left) and AM2 Patrick Esposito bowl at Freedom Lanes during their lunch hour. Freedom Lanes offers free bowling for active duty mem bers every Thursday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Photo by AZ2 Sarah Morris ETSN Jonathan Norris checks out with Chris McCloskey after shopping at the Not New Shop Jan. 23. The thrift store offers gently-used military uniform items, household goods, children's toys and much more.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, ursday, February 8, 2018 5 5 Family Fitness CenterThe Family Fitness Center is located above the Youth Activities Center Gym in Building 2069. The fitness center provides an environment for promoting healthier lifestyles to families in the Naval Air Station Jacksonville community. The goal of the center is to keep the entire family healthy by providing an environment for families to meet their fitness needs. A qualified fitness trainer is available to assist patrons with their fitness goals. The center offers a full circuit of Life Fitness equipment and fitness classes daily. For more information, call 778-9772/542-2930. 8 Greater Jacksonville USO By Hannah Simmons Staff Writer The United Service Organization (USO) provides care and comfort to the US military and their families. For over 76 years the USO has been the top organization assisting men and women in the US military. There are more than 200 USO centers across the US, extending to countries on every continent in the world. In 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt sought after the unification of service associations in hopes of cre ating one organization to nurture and encourage the U.S. Armed Forces. The Salvation Army, Young Mens Christian Association, young Womens Christian Association, National Catholic Community Services, National Travelers Aid Association and the National Jewish Welfare Board collectively came together as the USO. The USO is a private organization, not associated with the federal government. Their mission is adapt ing to the diverse needs of military members and their families, whether they are deployed overseas or at home. The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is responsible for more than $1 million amenities across various platforms. Some of the services they offer are connect ing families via Skype, assisting with homecoming celebrations and deployments, distributing USO Care Packages, and providing discounted and free tickets for concerts, sporting events, theme parks and attrac tions. Free dinners called No Dough are offered every month for young service members and families at the Fleet Reserve Association #91 located at 5391 Collins Road. Many local restaurants sponsor the event offer ing healthy meals. A Vintage USO Stars and Stripes Dinner and Dance will be held Feb. 17. Tickets are $75 per person benefit ing the USO. Currently, the USO has tickets to the Jacksonville IceMen minor league hockey games. Commands can receive 25 free tickets for each home game. The USO continues to add and adjust services according to the needs of military members. For further infor mation, email info@usojax.org or call 778-2821. Photo by Demi CruzPatrons at the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Family Fitness Center, located behind the Youth Activities Center participate in a Muscle Max Class led by Fitness Trainer Brian Williams, right. The center offers a variety of classes and equip ment, as well as a children's area so parents can watch their young ones as they work out. Photo by Demi CruzFamily members participate in a Muscle Max Class at the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Family Fitness Center. Classes cater to all age groups. Photo by AZ2 Sarah Morris Sgt. 1st Class Allen Jeffries checks into the Greater Area Jacksonville USO using their online check-in service. Photo by Julie M. Lucas AWO1 Jacob Mora of Patrol Squadron 30 gets a free plate of barbecue during the USO's No Dough Dinner Jan. 31. The USO offers the free meal month ly at the Fleet Reserve Association 91 on Collins Road. 7 Skeet shooting rangeBy Reggie JarrettEditor, Jax Air NewsFor those who like to do some shooting during their lunch hour (and who doesnt?), Naval Air Station Jacksonville has the Skeet and Trap Facility on base. The facility is operated by MWR and is open to all authorized MWR patrons. A round of skeet or trap is $3.50 and includes 25 targets. There is an additional charge for ammo. The facility has 12 gauge and 20 gauge shotguns available for use. Annual memberships are available for $12 per year. Members are allowed to bring guests to the range and are also allowed to bring their own guns. Individual shooting classes are also available. All of the workers, including the range masters, are volunteers. We are here to help grow the sport and to give something back, said Henry Warren, club president and one of the range masters. We are also here for the Sailors on the weekend who want to do something different than playing golf. The range is located on Perimeter Road and the hours of operation are Wednesdays 9 a.m.1 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays 9 a.m.3 p.m. For more information, call Henry Warren at 904-864-1003 or email warrencw01@ gmail.com. Photo by Reggie JarrettAEC Brian Callipo of the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax, takes aim with a 12-gauge shotgun at the skeet shooting range aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville Jan. 24. Callipo is using the safe method of never putting your finger on the trigger until you are ready to shoot. 6 Manatee PointBy Hannah SimmonsNature can be seen all around Naval Air Station Jacksonville. There are playgrounds, nature trails, as well as an area where you can look for manatees. Manatee Point is located on the bank of the St. Johns River. Fishing is allowed on the north side of Casa Linda Lake and the St. Johns River. Fishing permits are required for anyone between the ages of 15-65 and can be purchased at Mulberry Cove Marina. Fishing is strictly catch and release only. Parks and picnic grounds are located in multiple locations around the base. There are shelters, restrooms, barbeque pits, ball fields and playground equip ment. Reservations are required and can be made up to six months in advance. For more information contact: 542-3260. Photo by AZ2 Sarah Morris Picnic areas at Manatee Point create the perfect spot for a relaxing lunch.

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, ursday, February 8, 2018 By Clifford DavisFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsSome people go through life never knowing what career field is right for them; NC1 Danielle Weisner is not one of those people. Now, her drive and focus aimed at helping her fellow Sailors make the most of their careers has earned her Sailor of the Year honors for Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. I love being a career coun selor, she said. When you have a Sailor whos been hav ing a hard time getting that C-WAY quota and then you tell them, Hey, we got this to work out for you, or when they earn that promotion I just love see ing it. Weisner has known she wanted to join the Navy since she was a child. Her mother, a retired senior chief, took her to work with her when she was still on active duty. It was the first taste of the Navy Id actually seen from her side of it, other than just being the children who moved around or at the family picnics that they did, she said. When we left that day, I told her I wanted to join the Navy. Her mother rightfully doubt ed her sincerity at the time, but Weisner stuck to her guns. I made the decision my senior year in high school, she said. So I went to a recruiting sta tion with my dad and signed up. I knew I wasnt ready for college, but I wanted to do something productive. To say shes been productive would be putting it mildly. She serves as the career advi sor and information manager across three FRCSE geographi cal locations, accounting for 911 personnel. In 2017 alone, submissions she championed for her fellow Sailors resulted in two Blue Angels selections, a Seaman to Admiral-21 Nurse Corps selection, three selec tions for conversion to crypto logic technician-networks and many others. She developed training pro grams for her career informa tion team and 32 divisional career counselors. In addition, Sailors under her charge received awards includ ing Junior Sailor of the Year, Blue Jacket of the Quarter, two Junior Sailors of the Quarter and five Sailors of the Month. Her Sailors also had a 100-per cent college enrollment rate and 100-percent Physical Fitness Assessment pass rate. Its been a lot of work for the married mother of two. Weisner credits much of her success to the chief petty offi cers whove mentored her along the way. I believe the things that you need to be a great Sailor and leader are to be patient, you need to be proactive and you need to be positive, said Maintenance Master Chief Fred Flaherty. NC1 Weisner has all three of those things. Shes the backbone of our admin department, ensuring that our Sailors get up to date information for their careers and where they need to go. FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. Trent DeMoss said that Weisner has excelled at a level expected of a seasoned chief petty officer. Petty Officer Weisner epito mizes those admirable quali ties most sought in todays Sailors, DeMoss said. She is one of the strongest junior deck-plate leaders that I have observed during my 27-year tenure of naval service. The cascading drill started when a disgrun tled former employee ran the Birmingham Gate then pulled up to the Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) building where he followed an employee in and then began shoot ing. One of the key aspects of these drills is to be realistic, said Capt. Michael Connor, executive officer of NAS Jacksonville and leader of the active shooter drill. Taking real-world sce narios that have hap pened in the past, also at the same time being cre ative and looking for dif ferent avenues of attack, different possible vul nerabilities. Its true you cannot prepare for every type of incident, but by training regularly we can achieve better results in execution and have a favorable outcome to the incident. When the shooting drill started, employ ees in the building were evacuated and base secu rity personnel entered to apprehend the shooter and search for victims. In an effort to be real istic, Jim Butters, NAS Jacksonville training officer and coordinator of the drill, applied mou lage to building employ ees who volunteered to be victims. Moulage is the process of applying mock wounds for train ing purposes. After the shooter was apprehended, the vic tims were removed from the building and went through triage process and then were treated by base first responders. Realism was also a goal for security personnel participating in the drill. They wore StressVests that simulated being shot. The weapons used in the drill send out a laser and if the laser hits the vest it sends a reaction to the belt which gives me an electrical shock to let me know that I have been shot, said Chris Leonard, a CNRSE instructor who played the shooter in the drill. Preparation for the drill started three months ago when employees started doing web-based active shooter training. Now we put it into action and see how employees and staff members react to an active shooter com ing into their building, Butters said. Unfortunately, these types of situations are becoming more common. In the past several years, active shooter incidents have become more and more frequent, Connor said. Certainly the Navy has seen a num ber of these incidents. It is absolutely critical that the employees under stand if there is an active duty scenario what to do if they find themselves in that situation. The drill leaders were pleased with how it went. For what the security forces had to get done, all of their objectives were met, Butters said. The most important thing is that we had no safety issues. That is the key goal in any exercise. There will be another active shooter drill with a full response later in the year. In addition, from February to May, each building aboard NAS Jacksonville will do an active shooter walkthrough. An important part of these drills is to evaluate our tactics and our pro cedures, Connor said. We look at how we did and see if there are any areas we need to improve upon, so we can make those adjustments for future drills and any realworld incidents. SHOOTERFrom Page 1 FRCSE Sailor of the Year found success in helping others Photo by Clifford DavisFleet Readiness Center Southeast's 2017 Sailor of the Year NC1 Danielle Weisner, left, helps AT2 Lindsey Pierson put together packets in the counseling office. Photo by Hannah SimmonsRole-playing victims Melissa Tubens, left, and Rebecca Jones comfort each other during the active shooter drill aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville Feb. 1.Photo by Julie M. LucasRole-play victim Kevin Glover is placed in the ambu lance to be treated for his simulated gunshot wounds during an active shooter drill aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville Feb. 1. Photos by Reggie JarrettSecurity officers converge on a shooting suspect dur ing an active shooter drill aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville Feb. 1. The drill was part of the Navy's Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield training exercise. The shooter was played by Chris Leonard, who simulated attacking civilian and military employees in their workplace as part of Exercise Solid Curtain/Citadel Shield. Naval Air Station Jacksonville police officers MA2 Steven Tagliaferro (right) and Patrolman Robert Cook take the suspect into custody during an active shooter drill on the base.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, ursday, February 8, 2018 7 By Lt.j.g. Ridgely RiggsVP-5 Public AffairsFour months into deployment and still going strong, the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 dispatched an aircraft to Naval Station Rota to par ticipate in an anti-submarine war fare (ASW) exercise, one of many the squadron has taken part in since departing from Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville in the fall of 2017. The talented aviators, flight officers and sensor operators of Combat Air Crew (CAC) 4 departed early morning on Jan. 19 from NAS Sigonella, Italy, where VP-5 is currently deployed in support of U.S. 6th Fleet operations. Upon arrival at Rota, the crew wast ed no time preparing for the subse quent flight events. The first mission flown was a training flight involving the employment of an expendable mobile ASW training target (EMATT). An EMATT is a small torpedo-shaped device that travels through the water and mimics the acoustic signatures and movements of a submarine. EMATTs are deployable through the P-8As sonobuoy launch system (SLS) and provide valuable training for the crew. Our training syllabus is thorough, said AW2 Lawrence Rosado. But hours in the books have a diminishing return after a certain point. Training oppor tunities like these are what truly allow us to hone our skills and learn to work effectively as a crew. The crew then flew multiple missions to practice operations against an actual submarine. A U.S. submarine assumed the role of an adversary vessel for the duration of the exercise. Accompanied by a Spanish warship and a U.S. guid ed-missile destroyer, with its onboard helicopter, CAC-4 skillfully employed the aircraft in prosecution of the sub marine. Once gaining contact, the crew demonstrated its tactical proficiency by executing simulated attacks. We were enthusiastic about this detachment opportunity before arriv ing here, and I can safely say our expe rience was no disappointment, said Lt. Sean Conkle. We experienced firsthand the professionalism of our allies on the Iberian Peninsula and its com forting to know theyre both willing and very able to hunt submarines. VP-5 joins Spain in anti-submarine warfare exercise From CNATTU Public Affairs The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jacksonvilles newest school house was visited by a delega tion of 11 officers from 10 dif ferent countries Jan. 25. Building 513 is where Sailors, some new to Naval Aviation and some changing aircraft platforms, converge to learn their new maintenance roles in support of the P-8A Poseidon aircraft. The building is staffed by the hand-selected senior enlist ed Sailors of Maintenance Training Unit 1014, who are experts in their field and use their skills and experience to increase maintenance readi ness for this new platform. The visiting foreign military members came from many countries including Timor Leste, Honduras, Seychelles, Hungary, Somalia, Suriname, Mauritius, Oman, Morocco and Antigua. They were escorted here by personnel from the Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, Pensacola, and had a chance to observe students in action as they operated Virtual Maintenance Trainers and simulated hardware tasks as By Lt. j.g. Joseph BrandtVP-26 Public Affairs OfficerThe Tridents of Patrol Squadron (VP) 26 hosted five members of the Orlando City Soccer Club and their team psychologist for a Leadership Exchange Jan. 30. The players rep resent the clubs Leadership Core comprised of Jonathan Spector, Dom Dwyer, Sacha Kljestan, Joe Bendik, and Will Johnson. The discussion was facilitated by the Tridents Commanding Officer Cmdr. Drew Klosterman and moderated by Lt. Cmdr. Michael Garcia, who also coordinated the event. The players, mixed with a cross-section of VP-26 leadership, discussed subjects like building team culture, discipline, mentorship, and accountability. After the round table, Orlando City fans and soccer enthusiasts within the squadron met the players and collected autographs. Lt. Elizabeth McNaught also gave the players a guided a tour of the P-8A Poseidon aircraft. Before the team departed, Lt. Derrick Bruce introduced the players to the High-Fidelity P-8A simulator. Their competitive nature came to light as they each took turns trying to land an approach into Naval Air Station Jacksonville. The unique opportunity allowed the posi tive interaction for professionals from different walks of life to exchange ideas and perspectives. VP-26 Tridents host soccer team leadership Photo by MC2 Sean R. Morton Sailors from Patrol Squadron 26 hosted members of the Orlando City Soccer Club for a leadership exchange aboard Naval Air Jacksonville Jan. 30. CNATTU hosts international visitors AME1 Jonathon Jackson (foreground) of the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit, shows Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity representatives the P-8A Poseidon ordnance load trainer sensor stations while describing the benefit of allowing the students an opportunity to get a visual representation of what they have learned during their classroom time. Courtesy photosA group of foreign military members from Timor Leste, Honduras, Seychelles, Ethiopia, Hungary, Somalia, Suriname, Mauritius, Oman, Morocco and Antigua gather with Sailors from the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax follow ing a tour of the facility Jan. 25.See CNATTU, Page 9

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8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, ursday, February 8, 2018 Flight following, which is keep ing in contact with the aircraft, requires extensive communication systems. We have radio communica tions, high frequency (HF), ultrahigh frequency (UHF), satel lite communications, all types of radio frequencies that we need to talk to the aircraft in flight if they need something or if we have to task them a different way, said Hawkins. The operations are done out of four main tents, each about 28-feet by 12-feet. One tent is the briefing area, where crews are briefed when they return. A second tent is a gen eral holding area, where crews can do post-mission products. Postmission products are the results of the mission. They are putout to the fleet to let them know how successful the mission was or if there were any issues. The third tent is the watch floor for watch officers and watch super visors and where the radios and phones are housed tomonitor mis sions and create specific mission briefs on site. The fourth tent con tains the technicians and most of the computers and equipment. It is the brains of the operation, Hawkins said. There is no external power source for the MTOC. Power for all the computers, communica tions equipment and environmen tal control units comes from four 30,000-watt generators that are set up next to the tents. Our goal is to be able to go out in the middle of nowhere, any where in the world, be able to take the gear, set it up, have stable power, be able to communicate with the airplanes, do our job and then pack up and move somewhere else, said ET1 Michael Schiano of MTOC-9. The expectation for the MTOC units is have everything fully set up and running less than one day after landing. MTOCFrom Page 1 Photo by Reggie JarrettMobile Tactical Operations Command (MTOC) 9 personnel assemble tents and equipment for the last phase of an exercise aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville Jan. 31. MTOC began operations Jan. 22 and con cluded them Jan. 30 in preparation for their upcoming deployment. Photo by Jacob SippelFebruary is Heart monthCmdr. Jerry Chandler, a cardiologist at Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles internal medicine clinic, checks Kelly Merrells heart. February is American Heart Month. Spread the word about stopping this deadly disease and encourage people to live heart-healthy lives. Photo by Jacob Sippel Red Dress event at NH JaxCharlene Rees, Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles regional health promotion coordinator, edu cates LS2 Victoria Washington of HSM-70 on heart health during a Red Dress event at the hospital. Heart disease is the number one killer of women. Controllable risk factors for heart disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, obe sity, poor diet and tobacco use.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, ursday, February 8, 2018 9 Housing program helps Sailors find homesBy Hannah SimmonsStaff WriterMilitary moves can be hectic and stressful. Arriving to a new city without knowing where you and your family are going to live can be overwhelming. There might be a limited amount of accommodations on base, and there may be a waiting list. Did you know there is a program at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, designed to provide affordable and comfortable offbase housing to service members? The Navy Housings Rental Partnership Program (RPP) is a partnership between the Housing Service Center (HSC) and landlords around the community of Jacksonville. Private individuals can rent their homes, apartments, and townhomes to military service members through this program. HSC Director Lorenzo Steele coordinates with more than 30 personnel including maintenance and custodial personnel to find adequate housing for military members. The first step of the RPP is to contact the HSC. A staff member will welcome you and conduct a consultation to ensure that the program is right for you. You will need to bring a copy of your current Permanent Duty Station orders and Leave and Earnings Statement to qualify for the RPP. In order to meet the requirements, you must be on active duty with a minimum of 180 days remaining prior to your end of active obligated service or projected rotation date. Single Sailors E-4 and below with less than four years of service, must have approval from their command to live off base. Rental properties are inspected, security deposits are waived or reduced and application/administrative fees may not exceed $50. Service members cannot be denied for poor credit. After the qualification process, a service member housing release form will be sent to the perspective landlord. To finalize the housing agreement, the landlord will send a letter of intent to the HSC. From there, the Navy Housing RPP service member application and service member counseling sheet must be completed and turned in. Leases normally fall between seven to 12 months. Once a lease expires, service members can continue the RPP on a monthto-month basis or sign a new lease. The amount of homes participating in the RPP across Jacksonville is innumerable due to the growing demand of off-base housing. The list of available homes, condos, and apartments is continuously updated to ensure each service member is accommodated. The HSC is dedicated to helping their military members at NAS Jacksonville. When I see a new family enter our doors in need of a home, we try to help them as soon as possible, said Housing Referral Specialist Cynthia Johnson. Moving to a new city without having a place to stay is uncomfortable. RPP has helped countless military families, and there are new landlord applications daily. Before arriving in Jacksonville, Sailors can search for participating RPP homes at https://www.homes. mil/homes/DispatchServlet/HomesEntry The website provides customers with the ability to find community housing across the world. For further information, contact the HSC Office by calling 542-2996 or email jacksonvillehousing@navy. mil Promoting cultural changeFrom the FFSCPure Praxis is a social theater group dedicated to cultural change by empowering individuals into exploring positive ways to respond to conflict and to step up and actively intervene in potentially negative situations. The team will visit Naval Air Jacksonville Feb. 22 and will conduct two presentations of 70 to 90 minutes each: 8-9:30 a.m. and 2-3:30 p.m. at Deweys. All ranks/commands are welcome to attend. Topics of discussion will be: activity ostracism, maltreatment and how it affects victims ist remarks offenses For more information, call 542-5935. Wounded Warrior Trials coming to NS MayportBy Hannah Simmons Staff WriterThe Wounded Warriors Invictus Games are annual international sports events for active duty and veteran military members. The games inspire recovery, sup port rehabilitation, and spread awareness and respect for wounded servicemen and women. The games bring attention to the sacrifices these men and women have made, and their determination to overcome. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Michael Connor said, The Warrior Games exist to provide an oppor tunity for athletes to grow physically, mentally and spiritually from the sportsmanship and camaraderie gained by representing their respective service teams in a friendly and spirited competition. It is an oppor tunity for athletes to showcase their enduring warrior spirit in the presence of their families and a grateful nation. Competitors partake in a variety of sports including wheelchair basketball, indoor rowing, volleyball, and more. In the Invictus Games 2018, 500 participants from 18 nations will arrive in Sydney, Australia to compete in 10 different sport events. tion for this years Invictus Games. There will be Wounded Warriors Trials held in Jacksonville this month. The dates for events are:Event Date/Time Location Field Trials Feb. 20, 8 a.m.-Noon Fletcher High Swimming Trials Feb. 20, 1:15-5:15 p.m. Fitness Center Pool Shooting Trials Feb. 21, 8 a.m.-Noon Fitness Center Seated Volleyball Trials Feb. 21, 1:15-5:15 p.m. Fitness Center Archery Trials Feb. 22, 8 a.m.-Noon Fitness Center Wheelchair Basketball Trials Feb. 22, 1:45-5:15 p.m. Fitness Center Cycling Trials Feb. 23, 8 a.m.-5:15 p.m. Hanna Park Track Trials Feb. 24, 8 a.m.-5:15 p.m. Fletcher High part of their maintenance training. The visitors were impressed with the state of the art facility and the diligence and thorough ness that went into the training environment. They spoke highly of the level of expertise dis played by the guides and the enthusiasm of the students. The tour was conducted by AME1(AW) Jonathon Jackson, AD1(AW) Bernard Steinhauer, and AT1(AW) Anthony Crayon. The visit to Jacksonville was the last stop for the group before returning to Pensacola. CNATTUFrom Page 7

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10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, ursday, February 8, 2018 Get Connected with MWR navymwrjacksonville.com facebook.com/nasjaxmwr twitter.com/nasjaxmwr instagram.com/nasjaxmwr nasjaxmwr@navy.milCommunity RecreationCall 542-3227 someone. The cost is $5 per person. A variety of Valentine card and craft last. Patrons are welcome to bring Paint Night Great Hall opens at 5 pm; sorting will River Cove Catering & Conference Center Call 542-3041 DeweysCall 542-3521 Friday Family Night promotions and times. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493 League Call for details. Fitness, Sports & AquaticsCall 542-2930 top men and women in each division. participating commands. Visit www.navymwrjacksonville.com for now available. Call the base gym for pricing information. Patrons can select from a variety treatments. For a complete list of center.MWR Digital Library The run is free and open to all authorized gym patrons. for participating. The run will be held on Perimeter Road at the end of Mustin Road at the Antenna Farm at 11:30 a.m. Registration will be held at the race site from 10:30-11:15 a.m. The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, DoD contractors, and dependent spouse women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Call the NAS Jax Gym to sign up by Feb. 15. The league is open to active duty, selective reservists, DOD civilians, DOD contractors, dependent spouses assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville and retirees. The games are played in the evenings. The meeting will be interested personnel should attend the meeting to discuss rules and to get the required paperwork to join the league. The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, DoD contractors, and dependent spouse men assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Call the NAS Jax Gym to sign up by Feb. 22. The league is open to active duty, selective reservists, DOD civilians, DOD contractors, dependent spouses assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville and retirees age 30 and up. The games are played at lunchtime on Tuesdays. The meeting will be held at the base gym in the classroom on cup points. All interested personnel should attend the meeting to discuss rules and to get the required paperwork to join the league. The league is open to active duty, selective reservists, DOD civilians, DOD contractors, dependent spouses assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville and retirees. The games are played in the evenings on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The meeting will be held at the base gym in locker room at 12:00 p.m. Commands having their athletic should attend the meeting to discuss rules and to get the required paperwork to join the league. The league is open to active duty, selective reservists, DOD civilians, DOD contractors, dependents at NAS Jacksonville and retirees. The games are played in the evenings. The meeting will be held at the base gym in the classroom on p.m. All interested personnel should attend the meeting to discuss rules and to get the required paperwork to join the league. We now have a professional tennis instructor on base to offer tennis lessons to all authorized MWR patrons. Interested personnel can contact the base gym at 5422930 to get more information about the tennis lessons and to make an appointment for a lesson. Private Lessons Adults and Juniors: 60 minutes = $40 90 minutes = $60 Additional hours if person takes more than two hours per week = $25 Semi-Private (2 people) Lessons Adults and Juniors: 60 minutes = $20 each person Group/Clinic Lessons (3 or more people taking lesson(s) together : Adults: 3-8 people (60 minutes for 3 people; 90 min for 4 or more people) = $15 per person Note: The minimum of each clinic is 3 people and maximum is 8. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com nas jaxmwr.StandingsAs of Feb. 2 NAVFAC Gold 4 1 VR-62/RCC 3 1 VP-62/NAVSUP FLCJ 2 1 TPU/PCF 2 2 CNATTU 1 2 NAVFAC Red 0 5 FRC Blue 3 0 NAVHOSP (2) 3 0 NAVHOSP B 3 0 VP-16 3 0 NMC/NAVY RESERVE 3 1 VP-62/NAVSUP FLCJ 2 1 VR-58/VR-62 2 1 HITRON 1 2 VP-10 1 2 VUP-19 1 2 HSM-70 0 3 HSM-60 0 3 VP-30 0 3 TPU/PCF 0 4 NAS Jax Sports Courtesy photoNAVFAC wins bowling titleFrom left, Robby Smith, Brent Kupfer and Jason Bohrmann of Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, proudly display the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Intramural Fall Bowling League Championship trophy Jan. 26. See MWR, Page 11

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, ursday, February 8, 2018 11 for assistance.The Liberty Recreation CenterTrips & events are for all E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members & reservists only. Call 542-1335 for information. NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf Course: 542-3249 Mulligans Restaurant: 542-2936 $25 after noon daily. applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260 Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3681 Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness CenterCall 771-8469 Jax Navy Flying Club Call 542-8509 complex and commercial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.netCall 542-3318, Email directly at nasjaxtickets@navy. mil Gatornationals Admission. 28 Take advantage of these vacations at an affordable Choice Hotels www.choicehotels.com and click on click apply. What to do this year? Local Fun Trips! th Current Ticket Promotions Include the Following: Port of Palm Beach. $22. For Florida residents only. Must be exchanged for applicable pass at a ticket booth at the Magic Kingdom, Epcot, Animal Kingdom or Hollywood Studios. Proof of a Florida be shown at time of exchange. Acceptable forms of Florida Residency: Fla. Drivers License, Fla. State ID (must have Fla. Address or a Fla. Base Military ID). Tickets may not be used after June 24, 2018 Parking not included. No blackout dates. or 5 day available hopper option Hopper ticket with Hopper ticket with water park Tickets valid January 1, 2018 and expire December 19, 2018. Coming soon! Armed Forces Tickets vary by price per game. (Redeemable through 12/31/18, ticket expires on this date) Valid 4 days of admission to (Redeemable through 12/31/18, ticket expires on this date) Valid for 4 From Page 10

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