Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
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Newspaper
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English
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United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
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30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
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UF00028307:02091


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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 I I D E VP-16 COC Pennington hands reins to PappPage 9 CYCLISTS CARE Tour de Cure Page 4 AUSSIE BALL RAN 725 Squadron WinsCheck us out Online! jaxairnews.com By Clark PierceEditorTwo rescue swimmers and a pair of simulated survivors from HSM-72 took part in a May 22 exercise over the St. Johns River. The training was designed to keep aviation rescue swimmers and pilots proficient in search and rescue (SAR) situations over water. The NAS Jax Boathouse, a division of Air Operations, assisted HSM-72 in the training evolution with their 40-foot, twin-diesel SAR boat. BM1 David Brown said, Were always eager to work with rescue swimmer certification exercises because SAR proficiency can mean the difference between life and death. He added, Todays boat crew, con sisting of engineer EN2 Jeffrey Adkins and coxswain EM3 Marcellus Clark are expert boat handlers who are well aware of the procedures practiced by helicopter squadrons in the St. Johns River. HSM-72 safety observers, AWRC John Watson and AWR1 Wesley Cortez, were pleased with what they saw. For this training session, one survi vor is simulated unconscious, so each swimmer can work with the helicop ters rescue litter. They must success fully immobilize the survivor within the litter, while in the water, whenever a spinal cord injury is suspected, said Cortez. Watson added, The pilots who vol unteered to be survivors in todays sce nario (Lt. Michele DeGrothy and Lt. j.g. Andrew Powanda) will gain a better understanding of the rescue swimmers role in the squadron. In the future, it can improve their situational awareness of whats happening in the water while theyre flying in a hover position. The exercises MH-60 Romeo helicop ter was flown by Lt. Anthony Piunno and Lt. j.g. Brendon Hinz. The aircrew/ rescue swimmers were AWR3 Jake Brown and AWR3 Derek Nigron. AWR1 Will Dillon explained that Seahawk rescue swimmers receive the same training whether they fly the Romeo or Sierra variants of the Seahawk. For the MH-60R SAR/MEDIVAC configuration, we remove the (sonar) dipping center from the Romeo so theres more room for swimmers and survivors and the litter. When the squadron is at sea, one of our Romeo Seahawks is always tricked out in the SAR/MEDEVAC configuration, By MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsIt was standing room only at the VP-30 Auditorium May 22 when hun dreds of Sailors and civilian employ ees from Commander, Navy Region Southeast and NAS Jacksonville attend ed the holiday safety stand down. NAS Jax Safety Officer Ron Williamson welcomed the Sailors and civilians. He told the audience of the importance to make smart decisions that will help keep them safe over Memorial Day weekend and beyond. He mentioned that half the Navy con sists of E3s and E5s and that 60 percent of all the accidents are derived from this group. Williamson also mentioned the top five injury producing activities dur ing the summer, that include basket ball, bicycling, baseball, softball, jog ging and football. We like to set the tone for the sum mer around Memorial Day because that is the start of summer, said Williamson. And the summer is a high time for accidents involving Sailors. Everyone is participating in many activ ities and lots of recreation, driving and vacations. This stand down sets the tone and lets everyone know the safe choices you can make including the use of Operational Risk Management to think things through and prevent mishaps. The guest speakers, Greg McCarty and Ralph Jimenez of Florida Stay Alive from Education (S.A.F.E) Inc., presented their Street Smart program that dra matized the effects of risky behavior. McCarty said, We are trying to Safety stand down kicks off summer Photos by MC2 Amanda Cabasos(From left) Street Smart presenters Ralph Jimenez and Greg McCarty of Florida Stay Alive from Education Inc. place a neck brace on ACAN Caleb Shaw of NAS Jax Air Operations during a safety stand down May 22. "Street Smart" is a noholds-barred presentation that gets the members of the audience involved. The paramedics lead a discussion on the importance of making responsible decisions concerning their safety. ACAN Caleb Shaw of NAS Jax Air Operations vounteers as the vehicle crash dummy during a demonstration by Street Smart presenters of Florida Stay Alive from Education Inc. at the NAS Jax safety stand down May 22.HSM-72 Proud Warriors practice SAR jumps into riverPhoto by Clark Pierce In response to hand signals from the search and rescue swimmer, HSM-72s air crew lower a litter that will be used to immobilize a survivor before lifting him from the water during training on the St. Johns River May 22.See Page 7 See Page 7 Photo by Clark PierceRetired U.S. Army Maj. Cecil Tanner, 94, talks with AM1 Keith Delgado of HSM-74 about a restored World War II Jeep on display at the Green Cove Springs Memorial Day observance. The combat vehicles were on loan from the Military Museum of North Florida.Memorial Day honored across Northeast FloridaSee more Memorial Day coverage on Page 7 Photo by MC2 Marcus Stanley Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Rick Williamson stands with his former Edward White High School basketball coach and chairman of the Duval County Veterans Memorial Wall, Ray Moore, during the Pledge of Allegiance at the City of Jacksonville Memorial Day Observance May 26.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-7789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley From StaffMay 29 1781 USS Frigate Alliance captures HMS Atalanta and Trepassy off Nova Scotia. 1991 Amphibious task force in Bangladesh for cyclone relief is redeployed. May 30 1814 Navy gunboats capture three British boats on Lake Ontario near Sandy Creek, N.Y. May 31 1900 Sailors and Marines from cruiser USS Newark (C-1) and battleship USS Oregon (BB-3) arrive at Peking, China along with other Sailors and Marines from Britain, France, Russia, Italy and Japan to protect U.S. and foreign diplomatic legations from the Boxers. 1919 The NC-4 flying boats transatlantic mission ends at Plymouth, England. 1944 USS England (DE-635) sinks a record six Japanese submarines in 13 days. June 1 1813 The 38-gun frigate HMS Shannon captures 38-gun frigate USS Chesapeake. As the mortally wounded Capt. James Lawrence was carried below, he ordered, Tell the men to fire faster! Dont give up the ship! These words would live on in naval his tory. Oliver Hazard Perry honored his dead friend Lawrence when he had the motto sewn onto his pri vate battle flag flown during the Battle of Lake Erie. 1871 Rear Adm. Rodgers lands in Korea with a party of Sailors and Marines and captures five forts to secure protection for U.S. citizens after Americans were fired upon and murdered. 1914 General Order 99 prohibits alcohol on board naval vessels, or at navy yards or stations. 1915 First contract for Navy lighter-than-air air craft. 1939 Director of the Naval Research Laboratory, Captain Hollis Cooley, proposes research in atomic energy for future use in nuclear-powered submarines. 1944 ZP-14 airships complete first crossing of Atlantic by non-rigid lighter-than-air aircraft. 1954 First test of steam catapult on board USS Hancock (CV-19). June 2 1941 First aircraft escort vessel, USS Long Island (ACG-1), commissioned, then reclassified as an auxil iary aircraft carrier (AVC-1) and finally reclassified as an escort carrier (CVE-1) in July 1943. June 3 1785 Order to sell last ship remaining in Continental Navy, the frigate Alliance. No other Navy were ships authorized until 1794. 1949 Wesley Brown is the first African-American to graduate from the U.S. Naval Academy. 1966 Launch of Gemini 9, piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Eugene Cernan. The mission included 45 orbits over three days. Recovery by USS Wasp (CVS-18). June 4 1934 USS Ranger (CV-4), the first ship designed from the keel up as a carrier, is commissioned at Norfolk, Va. 1942 Battle of Midway (June 4-6) begins. During battle, the four Japanese carriers that attacked Pearl Harbor are sunk. This decisive U.S. victory was a turn ing point in the Pacific war. 1944 Hunter-killer group USS Guadalcanal cap tures German submarine, U-505. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorIn September, I intro duced you to my friend, Theresa. Three days after her Navy husband and Dustins former squad ron mate, Landon, was killed overseas, Theresa co-wrote a column with me about her experi ence. It was a fresh, raw glimpse at what being a new military widow really looks like and the story spread quickly on the Internet. It was always amazing to me that Theresa was able to write with such clarity so soon after los ing her husband. Of course, in many ways, her biggest struggles were yet to come. Landon is now buried at Arlington National Cemetery. The funeral flowers are gone, and the rest of the world has seemingly moved on. Thats why, on this Memorial Day, its impor tant to remember that Theresa is still here, still grieving. I asked Theresa to write again with updates about these first months with out Landon. What follows are her words: Eight months have passed since my husband was killed in the Red Sea. Landon was not killed by enemy fire, nor as a result of a mechanical failure. He was killed as he sat in his helicopter, rotors spinning and chained to the deck of a ship that was going too fast in high seas. A large wall of water hit the side of ship, shot up, and crashed onto the helicopter, causing it to break apart and eventu ally go over the side with both pilots still strapped in their seats. As I sat at my kitch en table and read the militarys investigation report, I felt like I was reading a book of fic tion. The helicopters door came loose. That means the pilots could escape! I was waiting for a different ending. But it never came. My children played in the next room as I read: the pilots were most like ly incapacitated before they hit the water. The accident hap pened five days before our 10th wedding anni versary and shortly before Landon was sup posed to come home. I remember filling out paperwork instead of cel ebrating with Landon. Rather than shopping for a dress for his home coming, I spent hours in the mall looking for an outfit I could wear (and still easily nurse our son, Hunter) to the funeral. On Veterans Day, Anthony, then 6 years old, bravely walked into his school, which was a sea of dads in military uniforms for the schools celebration. I cried the whole walk home, push ing Hunter in a stroller. Born while Landon was on that final deployment, Hunter will never feel his fathers arms. In December, I watched, alone, as my boys opened gifts on Christmas. I tried to hide my tears when Anthony looked at all the toys and said, this is the best Christmas ever! Another time, when I had the flu, I wept in a rocker with Hunter in the middle of the night because my husband wasnt there to help me. And the day I final ly went to the Navy Exchange to buy large containers to pack away my husbands things, I wanted to scream. People watched me teeter the large bins on top of the stroller. Do you know what I have to buy these for? I wanted to say. Please help me! Today, when Anthony asks, what if some thing happens to you? I hate that I cannot hon estly say, nothing ever will. All I can tell him is youll be taken care of. On the morning of Sept. 22, 2013, I had no idea my life would be like this today. Before that day, how ever, when I dared to think about the what ifs because every military spouse does I didnt picture it like this. I never realized how quickly Id lose my iden tity as a military wife or that the organization my husband vowed to serve and die for would ever fail me. I am no longer a Navy wife. Im the VAs problem now. Landon would be so disappointed. Yet, despite all this, Anthony, Hunter and I still man age to smile and laugh every day. We continue to live, and we try our best to move forward. We have come miles from those first few weeks in September, and I am optimistic that although we will have bumps in the road, we will be okay. At the funeral, the military gave the boys and me three perfectly folded American flags. Three flags to remind us of Landons sacrifice. Its such a small thing. But for two little boys, one of whom will never know his father, someday, it will mean everything, said Theresa. If youd like to help the Jones family, contribu tions can be made in per son at any Navy Federal Branch, through PayPal, or by mailing a check directly to Navy Federal. The address is 555 Saturn Blvd., Suite C, San Diego, CA 92154. Make checks payable to Landon Jones Memorial Fund. The PayPal account is land onjonesmemorialfund@ gmail.com, and the access code is 7406575.You can find more infor mation, including ways to help the other family who lost a loved one, at www. Facebook.com/Sarah. is.Smiley, too.U.S. Navy photos A Douglas SBD Dauntless scout plane and dive bomber passes over Wake Island, a small atoll in the Central Pacific. Beginning at the Battle of Midway, the Dauntless did more than any other aircraft to turn the tide of the Pacific War. By VJ Day, Dauntless crews had destroyed 18 Japanese warships, including a battleship and six carriers. Battle of Midway SBD Dauntless dive bombers from USS Hornet (CV-8) approach the burning Japanese heavy cruiser Mikuma to make the third set of attacks on her, during the early afternoon of June 6, 1942. Dead in the water, the Japanese heavy cruiser Mikuma, photographed from a USS Enterprise (CV-6) SBD Dauntless bomber during the afternoon of June 6, 1942, after she had been bombed by planes from Enterprise and USS Hornet (CV-8). This Week in Navy History From the HomefrontChecking in with a military widow

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By Yan KennonNH Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville performed its first neurostimulator implant procedure April 7 at its hospital for one of its active duty patients, as part of a spinal cord stim ulation (SCS) treatment plan. The outpatient SCS procedure was per formed to treat chron ic testicular pain in a patient who did not respond favorably to mul tiple, less invasive thera pies. Spinal cord stimula tion for chronic testicular pain is a novel approach to treatment just begin ning to be used nation wide, said Capt. Jerry Foltz, NH Jacksonvilles pain management physi cian. My hope is that the patient can start to enjoy routine daily activities that were once very dif ficult. During the procedure, the neurostimulator about the size of a stop watch was inserted under the patients skin and the devices electri cal leads were placed in the epidural space of the spinal column. Once the leads and stimulator were in position, the patient was awakened from anesthesia and the stimulator was tested. After confirming good stimulation in the pain area, the neurostimulator was then sutured under the skin. The devices battery will last eight to 10 years, is fully rechargeable and can be programmed by a wire less connection. Foltz expects the patient to start resuming more normal activities in about two months. Patient total recovery time is expected to be between two and three months with some limitations. While SCS does not eliminate the source of pain nor does it treat underlying causes, it is used to treat chronic pain. It provides pain relief by applying an electrical current to the back of the spinal cord, thus blocking initial pain signals before they reach the brain. And as pain changes or improves, stimulation can be adjusted as necessary. SCS decreases the need for oral pain medications such as narcotics or opioids medications that often cause a range of side effects, from drowsiness to addiction. Plus over time, some oral pain relievers may eventually lose their effectiveness. SCS was first approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1989. It has since become a stan dard of treatment for patients experiencing chronic pain who have been unable to find relief through other treatments. Exceptionally skilled doctors and staff, and the abil ity to offer an array of specialty services make NH Jacksonville a leader in Navy Medicine. The command is home to 32 surgeons across eight specialty areas, from urology to orthopedics where it has seven fel lowship trained surgeons in sports medicine, foot/ ankle, total joint, hand, hip preservation and pediat rics. (From left) Capt. Jerry Foltz, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles pain management physician and anesthesiologist, and Cmdr. Mark Dobbertien, general surgeon, perform the hospitals first neuro stimulator implant pro cedure on April 7. The neurostimulator, about the size of a stopwatch, provides pain relief by applying an electri cal current to the back of the spinal cord, thus blocking the pain sig nal before it gets to the brain. Hospital performs first neurostimulator implant procedure A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. Photo by Jacob Sippel Driver improvement class June 13Ideal for teen driversFrom Cape Fox Professional ServicesStatistically speaking, new drivers are more likely to be involved in an accident or receive a ticket within the first 12 months of obtaining their drivers license. As a parent of a new driver, that can cause a lot of worry and sleepless nights. What can you do about it? NAS Jax Safety Office has set aside a Driver Improvement Class specifically for dependent, young drivers between the ages of 15 and 21 years old. They do not have to have a drivers license to attend. This class will offer safety tips, how to respond to driving emergencies, bring awareness to risks of driv ing and much more. There will be videos and driver quizzes concluding with a multiple-choice drivers test. There will not be any time behind the wheel of a vehicle, only a classroom session. Participants receive AAA Driver Improvement Class completion certifi cates. Drink and snack machines are available. If you feel your teen can benefit from driving tips presented by professional instructors, sign them up for this Driver Improvement Class. Call Linda at the base safety office 542-3082 or Cindy at 542-2584. The class will take place at NAS Jax Building 1, on June 13, from 8 a.m. 1 p.m. A CFC Participant provided as a public service.Do not accept defeat .Fight deadly childhood diseases. 800-8 22-6344 stjude.org JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Team Navy Jax rides for a cureBy Kaylee LaRocque Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Public Affairs Members of Team Navy Jax cycled in the ninth annual Jacksonville Tour de Cure, rais ing more than $6,300 to benefit the Jacksonville Chapter of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), May 17. The 34 cyclists pedaled with hundreds of others for 30, 65 or 100 miles during the event which takes riders through the back roads of Northeast Florida. The ADA holds the event each year to help research a cure for diabetes, advocate for the cause and educate the public about the disease affect ing millions of people world wide. Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases result ing from high blood sugar. For several members of the Touchton family who joined Team Navy Jax several years ago, the ride is for a cause that hits close to home. We are out here today riding for a cure because my grand mother has diabetes, said AO3 Stuart Touchton of VP-26. My father participated in the ride with me last year, and now we have my brother join ing us, so its definitely a family event. We are excited to be rid ing the 100-mile century ride today and are happy to be part of Team Navy Jax. This really is a great team. Its well orga nized and everyone is so sup portive. Several other team members were riding because diabetes affects their family members. Im here today to ride a sig nificant distance because I have several family members that have been diagnosed with diabetes, said Lt. Cmdr. Kris Sanchak of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, who has been with the team for two years. This event is for a good cause, and its a really great team to ride with. Team Navy Jax cyclists spend numerous hours preparing for events by participating in team rides and attending spinning classes at the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Departments Fitness Source. Many spend their free time raising funds to participate in the events. I am proud of our team and their enthusiasm to par ticipate in this event, said AS1 Terry Yamin of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. The award for best team spirit goes to our team jokers, Anthony Glass, Kris Sanchack, and Jason Wilkes. They know how to keep it fun and always put a smile on the team mem bers faces. Yamin, who recently took over as team captain added, We have a great group of cyclists on the team and a great sponsor. VyStar Credit Union is always supporting our team by donating jerseys and shorts. We really appreciate them for making our team look like a team. The ride challenged new and veteran riders, especially with the strong northern head winds. We were very strong in numbers and aggressive with the distance each of us select ed, said Yamin. Out of the 32 Team Navy Jax cyclists, 10 of us chose to ride the 100-mile century ride. It was a very safe ride, and the camaraderie of our team really made it a great event. Lt. Cmdr. Rich Mercado of VP-30, was one of the first to complete the century ride with a time of four hours and 44 minutes. It was an honor to ride for a great cause. I look forward to doing it again next year, he said. According to Tour de Cure event manager Neeta Nicholson, Team Navy Jax members are a huge part of the annual event. Team Navy Jax has been with us since the very begin ning our inaugural ride nine years ago, she said. We are so thrilled to have them. They are a consistent, strong team that has really helped fight diabetes. The Tour de Cure is a series of cycling events held in more than 80 cities nationwide to benefit the ADA. The tour is a ride, not a race, with routes designed for everyone from the occasional rider to the experi enced cyclist.Neither the U.S. Navy, NAS Jacksonville, MWR or Jax Air News, nor any part of the federal government, officially endorses any company, sponsor or their products or services. Members of Team Navy Jax gather near the starting line of the annual Tour de Cure in Saint Johns, Fla., May 17. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Production Support Officer Lt. Cmdr. Victor Feal, a member of Team Navy Jax, prepares his bicy cle before offloading it from his car and heading to the start line of the annual Tour de Cure. Tour de Cure volunteer Nicole Holmes checks in Patrick Hall of Team Navy Jax, before the bicycle ride May 17. Hall has been a member of Team Navy Jax since the team formed in 2006 and has raised thousands of dollars for the ride which is held each year to promote research, advocacy and education to find a cure for diabetes. AO3 Stuart Touchton of VP-26 and a member of Team Navy Jax for the past two years, sets off for the starting line of the annual Tour de Cure. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Executive Officer Capt. Chuck Stuart, a mem ber of Team Navy Jax, attaches his ride numbers to his bicycle before setting off for the start ing line. Team Navy Jax member Chris Townsend signs some waivers during the check-in process.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 5 Team Navy Jax members head out for a day of cycling as they take off for a 65-mile ride during the annual Tour de Cure in Saint Johns, Fla. A group of Team Navy Jax members leave the Tour de Cure starting line on May 17 for the 65-mile ride of the annual event in Saint Johns, Fla. Team Navy Jax members Jerry Dryden and Cecilia Hennig get ready to hit the starting line.Photos by Kaylee LaRocque AS1 Terry Yamin, team captain for Team Navy Jax, ensures the tires on his bicycle are inflated correctly before heading out for the 100-mile century ride. Mark Fetzer of Lakeshore Bicycle and Fitness, helps Team Navy Jax member Cecilia Hennig prepare her bicycle before the annual Tour de Cure. Team Navy Jax member Lt. Cmdr. Kris Sanchack of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, (center, right) pedals through the starting line of the annual Tour de Cure in Saint Johns, Fla., May 17 with hundreds of other cyclists in the 100-mile century ride.

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 From Naval History & Heritage CommandAfter the first recorded land ing on the atoll in 1859, Midway became a United States posses sion in 1867. A trans-Pacific cable station was established in 1903. In 1935, Pan American Airways used Sand Island as a stop over on its new seaplane route between the U.S. and Asia. In 1939, a study of U.S. defense needs recommended Midway as a base for Navy patrol planes and submarines. Soon there after, construction began on a seaplane hangar and other facilities on Sand Island and an airfield on the smaller Eastern Island. Midway occupied an impor tant place in Japanese military planning. According to plans made before Pearl Harbor, the Japanese fleet would attack and occupy Midway and the Aleutian Islands in Alaska as soon as their position in South Asia was stabilized. Two Japanese destroyers bombarded the Navy base on Midway on December 7, 1941, damaging buildings and destroying one patrol plane. In the spring of 1942, flush with victory after victory in the Pacific, Japan prepared to establish a toehold in the Aleutians; to occupy Midway and convert it into an air base and jumping off point for an invasion of Hawaii and to lure what was left of the U.S. Pacific Fleet into the Midway area for a decisive battle that would fin ish it off. The Americans had their own plans for the atoll. With the fall of Wake Island to the Japanese in late December 1941, Midway became the westernmost U.S. outpost in the central Pacific. Defenses on the atoll were strength ened between December and April. Land-based bombers and fighters were stationed on Eastern Island. U.S. Marines provided defensive artillery and infantry. Operating from the atolls lagoon, seaplanes patrolled toward the Japaneseheld Marshall Islands and Wake, checking on enemy activities and guarding against further attacks on Hawaii. There were occasional clash es when planes from Midway and those from the Japanese islands met over the Pacific. Adm. Chester Nimitz, Commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, inspected Midway in early May 1942, conferring with the local commanders, Navy Capt. Cyril Simard and Marine Col. Harold Shannon. Based on U.S. intelligence reports, Nimitz believed the Japanese were planning an attack on Midway. Top Naval officers in Washington were not so sure. They could not believe that the Japanese would send a huge fleet to take a small atoll. It would be like fishing for min nows with a harpoon. Nimitz asked Simard and Shannon what they needed to hold the islands. They reeled off a long list. He asked Shannon: If I get you all these things you say you need, then can you hold Midway against a major amphibious assault? The reply was a simple Yes, sir. Within a week, anti-aircraft guns, rifles, and other war materiel arrived at Midway. Eastern Island was crowd ed with Marine Corps, Navy, and Army Air Force planes fighters, dive bombers and larger B-17 and B-26 bombers. Every piece of land bristled with barbed wire entangle ments and guns, the beaches and waters were studded with mines. Eleven torpedo boats were ready to circle the reefs, patrol the lagoon, pick up ditched airmen, and assist ground forces with anti-air craft fire. Nineteen submarines guarded the approaches from 100 to 200 miles northwest and north. By June 4, 1942, Midway was ready to face the approach ing Japanese. By Lt. j.g. Alec VeroneVP-45 Assistant Quality Assurance OfficerThe Pelicans of Patrol Squadron (VP) 45 recently detached a team of eight air crewmen and 10 maintenance personnel on a P-8A Poseidon flight to NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. Combat Aircrew (CAC) 2 integrated with Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 10 to aid in VP-40s Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE) in prepara tion for VP-40s upcoming P-3C Orion deployment. It was a great opportu nity for the VP-40 Fighting Marlins to work with a P-8A on-station during a range of tactical missions said Lt. John Leeds, officer-in-charge of the detachment. The Marlins were able to familiarize themselves with the Poseidons new capa bilities during overland ISR and ASW events. We were proud to show our new capabilities our world class maintenance crew had the plane working flawlessly the whole week. Having a P-8A on-station during VP-40s ORE was a CPRW-10 priority because the Fighting Marlins will be fly ing with the Poseidon on their upcoming deployment in the 7th Fleet AOR. The ORE events allowed the Pelicans to execute their first-ever level II P-8A detach ment. The eight-day, six-flight det came less than eight weeks after VP-45 earned Safe-forFlight certification. A level II detachment con sists of an airplane, aircrew and maintenance person nel operating independently away from their home airfield during a period of high oper ational tempo, said Patrol Plane Commander Lt. Jordan Schneider. Going on detach ment during home-cycle pre pares us for hub-and-spoke operations that have become the norm during deployment. Our dedicated maintenance/ aircrew team paved the way for future successful Pelican detachments. We were on-sta tion, on-time for 100 percent of our flights. The Pelicans were also given the unique opportunity to tour the Boeing Companys 737 manufacturing line in Renton, Wash. Boeing really rolled out the red carpet for us. We toured the commercial 737 line as well as the P-8A line, said AT2 Brett Mikota. The amount of detailed craftsmanship and the speed of manufacturing that goes into each 737 is astonish ing. I also enjoyed talking to the engineers and technicians that design and build the systems that I work on daily. The Pelicans are looking for ward to performing at high lev els during upcoming detach ments to NAS Fallon, the Baltic Region, RIMPAC, and a number of other places during a busy Inter-deployment Readiness Cycle. From StaffAt Balfour Beatty Communities (BBC), our primary goal is to provide quality housing and customer service, so that our resi dents have a positive, enjoyable experi ence living with us, said BBC Community Manager Diana Heintz in an interview at her office aboard NAS Jax. Beginning June 18, residents are invited to provide their opinions on BBC opera tions through our CEL Resident Satisfaction Survey. This annual survey is an important part of our continuous improvement pro gram that helps us analyze performance and make any necessary changes and enhancements to ensure we consistently deliver quality service across all aspects of our community operations, explained Heintz. Surveys will be available at the CEL KickOff Splash Event, June 18, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the NAS Jax outdoor swimming pool on Allegheny Rd. If you are unable to attend the pool event, please stop by our Community Management Office on base at 960 Ballard St. to pick up a survey or call us at 908-0821 and we will deliver a survey to your residence, said Heintz. Residents who submit their completed survey by June 20 will be entered in a prize drawing. Topics covered in the survey include resi dent experience with leasing, community management, maintenance and quality of the homes. All surveys are confidential, so and residents are encouraged to provide open and honest insights. The CEL Resident Satisfaction Survey allows us to see where we excel operation ally and where there is room for improve ment, said Heintz. We encourage all resi dents to complete the survey so that we may better meet their needs, as well as those of our future residents. Completed surveys should be sealed in the postage-paid envelope provided and either mailed or returned to the authorized locked mailbox located in BBC Management Offices. The final day for residents to submit their completed Resident Satisfaction Survey is July 8. From the NAS Jax All Officers Spouses ClubThe NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club is sponsoring three $1,000 scholarships based on scholarship merit and community service. Eligibility: U.S. Navy active/ reserve duty and active/reserve duty dependents who are cur rently in their senior year of high school or a high school graduate, attached to NAS Jacksonville and planning to attend an accredited college in the fall of 2014 or spring of 2015. Scholarships are to be used only for tuition and tuition-based fees charged by the college and will be sent to the college. Three scholarships will be awarded; each in the amount $1,000 one active duty, one offi cer dependent, and one enlisted dependent. Criteria: Recipients will be selected on scholarship merit and community service. Deadline for application is June 7. Selection of recipients will be made by June 30. Scholarship application may be picked up at NAS Jacksonville Navy College Office or found on-line at: https://www.fcef. com/wp-content/uploads/CHPScholarship-Application3-14.pdf. You may submit the application by mail to: NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, c/o Mrs. Pam Undersander, 5065 Mustin Road, Jacksonville FL 32212. Questions may be sent to nasjax aosc@gmail.comNeither the NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the fed eral government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Midway: Before the battleU.S. Navy photoPilots of the four PBY-5A Catalina patrol bombers that flew the torpedo attack mission against the Japanese fleet's Midway Occupation Force during the night of June 3, 1942.(From left) Lt. j.g. Douglas Davis ( VP-24), Ensign Allan Rothenberg (VP-51), Lt. William Richards XO of VP-44, who flew in a VP-24 aircraft on this mission, and Ensign Gaylord Propst (VP-24).Pelicans P-8A detached to NAS Whidbey IslandThe VP-45 detachment to NAS Whidbey Island isn't complete without a visit to the Boeing Company's Renton, Wash. 737 assembly plant. Members of CPRW-10 and VP-45 Combat Aircrew 2 in front of Poseidon No. 434, parked on the apron of NAS Whidbey Island, Wash.Photos courtesy of VP-45Aircrew and maintainers of the recent VP-45 detachment to NAS Whidbey Island, Wash.Balfour Beatty set to make splash with annual housing survey College scholarships deadline is June 7 ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS 13 MILLION ACRES AND COUNTING Help us conserve another 13 Million acres.

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said Dillon. DeGrothy said, Todays SAR/MEDEVAC exer cise gave me a better apprecia tion for what the rescue swim mers do. It was interesting to see the SAR mission from in the water, rather than from inside the cockpit. Our aircrew work in a very hostile environ ment because of wave action and the downwash caused by the propeller blades. Physical conditioning is important, too, because rescue swimmers wear a lot of gear during a SAR mission. HSM-72From Page 1make a difference by informing service members to be safety aware and pre vent making poor choices, such drink ing and driving, not wearing seatbelts or texting and driving. We want to cut down on the number of people we are loosing from making those bad choos es. We add some humor to our presenta tions so we are not beating the individu als down, but it is all factual stuff that we tell them. Hopefully, after the presentation we can make a difference. We are loosing way too many people, especially in the military, to seatbelt and alcohol-related crashes. During the brief, McCarty and Jimenez presented live scenarios involving people driving under the influence of alcohol and drugs, neglect ing to wear seatbelts and other irre sponsible choices. According to the presenters, sending or receiving a text takes a drivers eyes from the road for an average of 4.6 sec onds at 55 miles per hour the equiva lent of driving the length of a football field blind. The animated presenters added a taste of humor, while seriously conduct ing the discussion of highway safety using graphic photos. We do see a difference with this pro gram, said McCarty. We teach in high schools, colleges and military bases and we have numerous people come up to us later thanking us for being here even though we showed them some real intense photos. Half way through the brief, the pre senters chose ACAN Caleb Shaw of NAS Jax Air Operations to be their vehicle crash dummy on stage. McCarty said, We use powerpoint, description of events and a volunteer who will undergo a simulated vehicle crash to emphasize our points. The vol unteer is strapped on a backboard and we explain all the various tubes and needles we use as paramedics to save a life, as well as other equipment a hospital uses to treat trauma victims. At the end, we tell the audience you get to make choices. You can use the informa tion we give you or chose not to and the odds are that you may meet fire fighters and paramedics like us down the road. In conclusion of the event, Jimenez said, On behalf of Greg and myself, it is an honor to present this presentation to you all and thank-you for everything you do for us. Thank you for participat ing in our potentially life-saving pro gram. According to the www.safeprogram. com, S.A.F.E. presenters of Street Smart is a non-profit organization ded icated to making young adults aware of the dangers of driving under the influ ence of alcohol or drugs, texting and/ or e-mailing while driving, not wearing seat belts, and the trauma associated with these dangers. SAFETYFrom Page 1 Photo by MC2 Amanda CabasosStreet Smart presenter Ralph Jimenez of Florida Stay Alive from Education Inc., demonstrates being tossed from a vehicle under the influence during the NAS Jax Summer Traffic Safety StandDown at VP-30 Auditorium May 22. Lt. Michele DeGrothy, simulating a spinal cord injury, is secured in a SAR litter by an HSM-72 rescue swimmer who holds the line steady as the survivor is winched up to the helicopter. An HSM-72 rescue swimmer is winched into the helicopter cabin after sending up a simu lated survivor in a rescue litter on May 22 over the St. Johns River.Photos by Clark Pierce(From left) EN2 Jeffrey Adkins and EM3 Marcell Clark, of the NAS Jax Boathouse, monitor the SAR boats proximity to the survivors and swimmers in the waters near the Buckman Bridge during the exercise. Memorial DayRemembering the cost of freedomFrom StaffIn what many would consider one of Floridas best small towns, Green Cove Springs civic leaders and citizens observed Memorial Day as part of the 26th Riverfest celebration on the banks of the St. Johns River. Green Cove Springs Mayor Felecia Hampshire welcomed NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Executive Officer Capt. Chuck Stuart, and Chief Matthew Rouse, U.S. Coast Guard Mayport Sector. Hampshire said, Throughout our history, men and women have chosen to give a part of their lives to serve in the armed forces of the United States. They have proved time and again that free dom and the preservation of our repub lic do not happen without a cost. Wanamaker remarked, It stirs your heart to see all these people come out and honor fellow citizens and some times family members who made the ultimate sacrifice in defense of our nation. Its my privilege to reflect on the sacrifices that have been made to defend our nation. Todays ceremony reminds us that freedom comes from eternnal vigilance. As the Clay County Community Band performed the hymn of each service, members of Boy Scout Troop 577 pre sented the flag of that service branch. Falling in behind each flag carrier were Clay County veterans of that service branch, who individually introduced themselves to the audience and named the various commands or era in which they served ranging from World War II, the Korean conflict and Vietnam to Kuwait, Iraq and Afghanistan. Photos by Clark Pierce (From left) NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker and Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Executive Officer Capt. Chuck Stuart congratu late Red Lonberg, 87, on his 28 years of naval service that began in World War II. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker passed along his appreciation to Green Cove Springs Mayor Felecia Hampshire and her team. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker, left, and FRCSE Executive Officer Capt. Chuck Stuart salute during the playing of Taps by Scott Boyer, lead conductor of Clay County Community Band, at the end of the Memorial Day tribute to fallen service members.Photo by Dan Alexander JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 7

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By MC1(SW) Greg JohnsonNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsThe 2014 Heroes at Home Jacksonville Military Spouse of the Year was announced during a ceremony aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville May 22. A panel of judges selected Kandi Debus, wife of ITCS(SW/IDW) Christopher Debus, as the inau gural winner of the award recogniz ing military spouses in the greater Jacksonville area. Debus, an employee of Commander, Navy Region Southeast, said her dedication to military fami lies and the community demonstrated through her extensive volunteer and community service accomplishments were key to her selection. There were a lot of other great spous es who were nominated and that do great things, so its really a humbling experience to be selected, Debus said. At the same time, its gratifying to see such appreciation for what military spouses do, day in and day out. It takes patience and sacrifice, but as military families, we take pride in seeing our Sailors wear the uniform. The Heroes at Home Military Spouse Awards program was launched in the Hampton Roads, Va., region in 2005 by the Norfolk, Va., Navy newspaper The Flagship, and was later expanded to Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Fort Lee, Va., and now military serv ing in Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia. Its about honoring and recogniz ing military spouses for what they do behind the scenes in support of their families and the community where they live, said Adair Wells, sales devel opment manager for The Flagship/ Military Newspapers of Virginia and the founder of the program. They move every few years, they raise their families, they work, and they do all the things that a normal spouse would do, but its intensified by their situation. Their spouses are sometimes deployed for extended periods of time and its tough. Southern Chevy Dealers were the pri mary sponsor of this event. Other spon sors included the Florida Times-Union, USA-Discounters, St. Leos University, Navy Mutual, First Coast News and the City of Jacksonville. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown honored nominees dur ing the lunch, citing their sacrifices while embracing them as citizens of Jacksonville. More than 100 people attended the ceremony, including 11 finalists and their families. A panel of judges selected the finalists from 34 original nomina tions provided by family, friends and community organizations. Debus hus band, who is assigned to the ArleighBurke class guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68), submitted her nomination. He said that she is always there for Sailors and their families as the Navy Region Southeast ombudsman, sup porting both her command and ombudsmen at installations throughout the southeast. No matter whats going on in our lives, sometimes we have to take a back seat, while my wife takes care of anoth er family who is in need or simply has a question, Senior Chief Debus said. Weve come to accept it. My children admire her and remind her in some offthe-wall comment about taking care of her Sailors. No matter what age or pay grade, once you come in contact with my wife, you are now an extension of our family. During the ceremony, Rear Adm. Rick Williamson, commander, Navy Region Southeast, expressed his gratitude to all military spouses. Our Sailors in the fleet could not do their jobs safely if it werent for your leadership back home in taking care of our families, Williamson said. Your commitment and dedication gives our Sailors the peace of mind required to operate safely and effec tively. Thank you for all your leadership and for everything you do for our Navy. Without you, we would not be the Navy we are. Individual selection criteria for the award was based on volunteer efforts, fortitude during deployments, personal sacrifices, support for other military families, and impact on the communityNeither the U.S. Navy, NAS Jacksonville, MWR or Jax Air News, nor any part of the federal government, officially endorses any company, sponsor or their products or services. 2014 Military Spouse of the Year recognizedPhotos by MC1 Greg JohnsonKandi Debus celebrates with her husband, ITCS(SW/IDW) Chris Debus and children, Jakob and Caleb, after winning the 2014 Heroes at Home Jacksonville Military Spouse of the Year Award during a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville May 22. Kandi Debus (center) accepts the 2014 Heroes at Home Jacksonville Military Spouse of the Year Award from Adair Wells and Billie Nimnicht during a cer emony at NAS Jacksonville May 22. The ceremony was the first of its kind in the Jacksonville area. Happy 30th Anniversary, Hilltop Club 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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War Eagles change leadershipBy Lt. j.g. Christi MorrisseyVP-16 Public Affairs OfficerSix P-8A Poseidon aircraft silent ly presided over the flight line as Cmdr. Daniel Papp relieved Cmdr. William Pennington Jr. as com manding officer of the War Eagles of VP-16. The ceremony took place May 21, in Hangar 3672 on Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. The guest speaker was Vice Adm. William Moran, deputy chief of naval operations, for manpower, personnel, training and education. Today, right here, right now we couldnt ask for a clearer sign of whether this [the P-8A] transi tion, this transformation really, is going to succeed. Theres no limit to what the War Eagles are capable of doing, Moran observed during his remarks. I have never been in a command where Sailors are as hungry to excel as we are, Papp stated as he took charge of the War Eagles. We do not speak in terms of modest improvements. We are not mildly interested in doing better. We are not content with good enough. We get up early, hit it hard, and actively seek ways to improve at our trade. He continued, Skipper Pennington set a standard for excellence within VP-16. He will be greatly missed, but I know our Sailors and aircrew will continue to challenge themselves, set ting the bar even higher not just for our squadron, but for the entire Maritime Patrol Reconnaissance Force as well. Pennington assumed command of the War Eagles in the middle of the squadrons inaugural P-8A inter-deployment readiness cycle. He has led the squadron through the initial segment of their histor ic sunrise deployment with the Poseidon, supporting U.S. Navy 7th Fleet commanders. There really is nobody better suited to serve as the next leader of the War Eagles, Pennington said of his relief. As a weapons and tactics instructor, Cmdr. Papp has brought an extraordinary level of expertise and experience to our squadron. Beyond that, his genu ine care and concern for his Sailors is evident throughout his day-today interactions with members of the squadron. I am confident that he will guide our fine Sailors and aircrew to continued success on the remainder of this deploy ment and upon their return to NAS Jacksonville. Papp, a native of Chicago, Ill. ,graduated with honors from Northern Illinois University in 1993, receiving a Bachelor of Science degree in technology. Following two years of enlisted service, he earned his commission from the Officer Candidate School in Pensacola, Fla. and was desig nated as a naval flight officer in February 1998. He has served on flying tours with VP-40 at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash., and VP-30 in Jacksonville, Fla., as well as Special Projects Patrol Squadron 2 at MCAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, flying the venerable P-3C Orion aircraft. In addition, he also served tours aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, Naval Personnel Command, and NAVAIRSYSCOM PMA-205 where he served as the P-8A Poseidon assistant program manager for training systems. In September 2012, he departed NAVAIR for tran sition training in the P-8A Poseidon before joining the War Eagles as executive officer in May of 2013. Papp assumes command midSailors assigned to the VP-16 "War Eagles," bow their heads for the invo cation during the squadron's change of command ceremony May 21 where Cmdr. William Pennington Jr. was relieved by Cmdr. Daniel Papp as commanding officer of VP-16. The squadron is currently deployed in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility supporting security in the IndoAsia-Pacific region. Photos by MC2 Eric PasterCmdr. William Pennington Jr., (left) the outgoing commanding officer of VP-16, salutes Cmdr. Daniel Papp, the incoming commanding officer, during their change of command ceremony on May 21 in Okinawa, Japan.way through VP-16s historic P-8A inaugural deploy ment. He is joined by new Executive Officer Cmdr. Daniel Boman. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 9 Nestled in old Orange Park with ancient oaks and the St. Johns River as part of the landscape, Grace Episcopal Day School has been providing an environment conducive to learning, to socialization, to spiritual development and to realizing a childs full potential since 1950. We focus on the individual student and how to help every child succeed, said Head of School Sharon Chapman. We meet the child where he or she is, and our staff has the freedom to teach to the individual. That means, Chapman said, that the school is commit ted to curriculum choices that draw on the individuals strengths. Teachers choose curricula and materials to meet the needs of the student, she said. Because they have the freedom to make choices and work with children oneon-one, our teachers our entire staff enjoy being here. That creates a positive, loving, Christian atmosphere where students feel safe to be themselves and express their needs. The average student-to-teacher ratio at the PreK3 through 8th grade school is 10 to 1. Teachers consistently are able to give the 150 to 175 students the individualized attention they deserve. Between PreK4 and kindergarten, we have a unique program for students who may need some additional time and instruction to make the move into kindergarten, said Director of Admissions and Marketing Susan Williams. We call it Transition 5, or the gift of time and it focuses on further development of the skills needed for kindergar ten. It is the bridge between PreK 4 and kindergarten. We stress academics, Williams said. Our 8th grade graduates are accepted into the best programs in the area, such as the International Baccalaureate Program, Bolles, Episcopal School Jacksonville, Douglas Anderson School for the Performing Arts, and others. Ten of our students entered the Clay County Science Fair, and they won nine awards. Visual and performing arts programs are not sacrificed for academics at GEDS. We firmly believe the arts enhance academic perfor mance, Williams said. Our dual approach to academics and arts results in a well-rounded educational experience and ultimately in a well-rounded student. Spiritual development is an important aspect of the overall school experience for students. Although our foundation is Episcopalian, we have stu dents of all denominations, Chapman said. We are here to prepare children to live responsible lives in a communi ty grounded in the Christian faith. The schools approach encompasses a challenging academic program, visual and performing arts, Christian and character formation, foreign language instruction, technol ogy, physical education, an athletic program and opportu nities for service. Extended day care, a summer program and vacation Bible school are also available. GEDS was voted the Best Private School and Middle School by Jax4Kids in 2013. GEDS, where excellence is afford able, is accredited by the Florida Council of Independent Schools and the Florida Kindergarten Council, and is a member of the Board of Regents of the Diocese of Florida and the National Association of Episcopal Schools. GEDS is located at 156 Kingsley Ave. For more information, visit www.geds.net, or call the office at 904 269-3718 (Susan Williams ext. 14). Grace Episcopal Day School: Tradition, Character, Excellence, Service The school year is drawing to end, and an exciting summer is ahead at Grace Episcopal Day School. Register now for eight weeks of sensational fun, with extended day care also available for preschool students.

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From StaffVeterans in Northeast Florida now have a new source of assistance for preparing compensation claims to submit to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for disability. The new, twice-monthly VA Claims Preparation Workshop starts June 27, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Building 1 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Provided by AMVETS, the disability claims workshop is designed to expe dite VA processing by cutting through the red tape. Getting VA paperwork submitted correctly the first time is critically important to receiving your disabil ity ratings in a timely manner, said AMVETS National Service Officer David Sanders. Our primary purpose is to intercede on behalf of veterans with the VA at no charge to the vet eran. He added that participation in the workshop will require the service member to solicit command support. Seating is limited, so pre-reg istration is required via email to: david.d.sanders@navy.mil Sanders added that attending the VA Claims Preparation Workshop increases the prospect of getting disability ratings back in a timely manner within the 90 to 180 days projected by the VA. By MC3 Jennifer LebronDefense Media CenterEstablished during the Civil War as a burial ground for Union sol diers, Arlington National Cemetery has taken in the remains of more than 400,000 Americans. More than 4 million people visit the cemetery annually. From May through June of this year, the cemetery will host a series of events to commemorate Arlingtons 150 years as a national cemetery. This celebration is on behalf of the people who have served and sacri ficed, for every man and woman who has worn that uniform, said Patrick Hallinan, director of the cemetery. Its taking a look back and saying, heres the heritage, heres the mili tary heritage of service and sacrifice [because] everyone has served that has worn the uniform, everyone has contributed, and many have made the supreme sacrifice. There are nearly 5,000 unknown soldiers buried at Arlington National Cemetery. The Tomb of the Unknowns has never been officially named and is guarded 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Last year, remains recovered from the USS Monitor were interred in Arlington National Cemetery. The remains were discovered dur ing the summer of 2002, in an attempt to recover the ships 150-ton gun tur ret. Navy divers discovered human remains inside the turret. The remains were sent to be identified, but after a decade, were unsuccessful. The Monitor was made famous for battling the Confederate ship CSS Virginia, formerly USS Merrimack, on March 9, 1862, at Hampton Roads, Va., in the first fight between ironclad war ships. The cemetery will also host lectures and tours that highlight the history of the United States through the eyes of the heroes buried at Arlington and the military conflicts that shaped the cemetery and the nation. Theres a lineage and theres a tradition and thats what we honor, Hallinan said. So as comrades, as fel low citizens and as patriots, I think its important that we get together and acknowledge that. Summer SplashOutdoor Pool PartySaturday, June 711 a.m 6 p.m.Boat Regatta DJ & Karaoke Prizes Free hotdog, chips & drink*Quantities are limitedSponsored by For more information call (904) 542-2930/3518 Arlington National Cemetery: 150 years of serviceVA disability claims workshop June 27 Photo by MC3 Scott Barnes'Spartans' at work in Arabian GulfAn MH-60R Seahawk helicopter assigned to the "Spartans" of HSM-70 takes off from the flight deck of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Truxtun (DDG 103) May 19. Truxtun is deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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Sailors saving livesBy AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterThirty Sailors aboard NAS Jax made a choice on May 20 that may help save lives of persons suffering from blood cancer and other fatal diseases such as leukemia or lymphoma by par ticipating in the C.W. Bill Young Department of Defense Marrow Donor Program. Ever year, more than 12,000 people are diagnosed with diseases such as leukemia or lymphoma, which require an infusion of blood-producing stem cells. Since more than 70 percent of patients do not have an appropriate match within their family, they require an unrelated donor. Since the program began in 1991, over 750,00 individu als have volunteered to join the fight against blood cancer and other fatal diseases. Because of the low compatibly rate between patient and donor, we need to recruit as many people as possible to screen, said AD2 Luciano Zinzani, CNATTU Jax AD phase instructor, who will be taking over as NAS Jax DoD Bone Marrow Representative shortly. In order to join the national registry of volunteer donors, you will need to complete a consent form and swab the inside of your checks using the testing kit provided. It is important to know that I run a walk-in registration site. Any person that wants to join the registry can come see me at CNATTU Jax to fill out the By Lt. j.g. John BellezzaVP-5 Public AffairsOn May 2, VP-5 took a break from their busy inter-deployment readi ness cycle to host the Clay County High School Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (JROTC) unit. The Mad Foxes gave the JROTC students a glimpse into the mari time patrol and recon naissance force aspect of naval aviation. The stu dents were given tours of the Navys newest avia tion platform, the P-8A Poseidon. The cadets were greet ed by VP-5 Executive Officer Cmdr. Al Djock and CMDCM Terrence Mitchell. Following intro ductions, they viewed a short video on the cele brated history of the mad foxes and had the chance to ask questions. Sophomore cadet Matthew Romito said that he enjoyed hearing stories about the careers of Djock and Mitchell. The highlight of the JROTC visit was touring the P-8A Poseidon. They enjoyed learning about the new aircraft and had numerous questions for the aircrew. Lt. Sarah Jones, Lt. J.g. Jason Cromwell, AWO2 Stephanie Castaneda, and AWO2 Chance Passen discussed the mission of the P-8A Poseidon and how the different aircrew posi tions work together to make an effective combat aircrew. The tour allowed the students to inter act with the Mad Foxes and provided them with a small taste of what the maritime patrol mission entails. Many of the stu dents said that one day they hoped to fly for the Navy. The students are very busy throughout the school year with uniform inspections, drill practic es and other activities. Retired Capt. Mike Boyer, U.S. Navy Reserve, who is the senior naval science instructor for the unit, discussed how JROTC gives the students a basic foundation to be a model citizen. The opportunity to view the squadron pro vides them a vision of where their hard work and dedication can lead them in the future. VP-5 is currently in its inter-deployment readi ness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville.Clay County High School JROTC visits VP-5 Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesHM Shannon Brown (left) assists SW2 Kaylynn Barajas (right) with the swab testing kit that will be used to determine Barajas' Human Leukocyte Antigen type. After completing the consent form, PR1 Jamie Hill of VP-62 uses the testing kit to takes four swabs of the inside of her cheek which will determine if she is a match for a patient that requires a stem cell transplant. See MARROW, Page 15 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. **New time Friday Social Hour 59 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke Second Tyme Around Band performs Friday June 13 at 6 p.m. Lunch bingo Monday through Friday begins at 11:15 a.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly handicap single tournament June 21, 1 4 p.m., $20 Scratch Sweeper May 24 & June 28, 1 4 p.m., $30 *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open through June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31 Outdoor Pool Hours effective June 2, 2014 June 2 6 Lap swim 6 8 a.m. and 11 a.m. 1:00 p.m. (short course only) Open recreation swim 4 7 p.m. June 9 (Monday Friday) through the summer Lap swim 6 8 a.m. Swim lessons 8 11 a.m., open recre ation swim 11 a.m. 7 p.m.... Every Saturday and Sunday Open rec reation swim 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Summer Splash Pool Party June 7, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free food, games and prizes! I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Blue Man Group Month $49 Orlando Shopping Trip July 26 $20 St. Augustine Scenic Cruise August 30 $20 Mt. Dora Trip October 25 $20 Jacksonville Jaguar tickets on sale soon! Adventure Landing Waterpark seasonal $85.50 Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance in Sanford, FL. (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Motley Crew Concert, Oct. 19 Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while sup plies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Pirates Museum St. Augustine $4 $21.75 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Jacksonville Suns Game May 29 at 6 p.m. Free admission and transportation USA Vs. Nigeria Soccer Match June 7 at 4 p.m. $20 per person Free Paintball Trip June 14 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty June 10 & 24 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests May 29, June 12 & 26 Golf Course Construction Special Play 18-holes with cart and green fees Monday Friday for only $20! Not appli cable on holidays. Command Party Swing into savings & book your com mand golf tournamentMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependent Skipper B Sailing Classes availableAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Summer Camp Registration going on now! Sign-in at the youth centerFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available includ ing instrument, complex and commer cial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.net MWR photoMWR bowling champs(From left) AWFC Ben Sessions, AMC Chris Licata and ATC Mike Keef win the 2014 Captain's Cup Winter Bowling League Championship May 16 at NAS Jax Freedom Lanes. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 13

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By Sgt. David BayotNAS Jax Police DepartmentThe NAS Jacksonville Law Enforcement Team is actively partici pate in the 2014 Click-It or Ticket seatbelt campaign through June 1. Failure to buckle-up in compliance with state laws by the driver and/or passengers allows law enforcement officers to conduct a traffic stop and issue a citation for the infraction. In Florida and government installations, seatbelt usage is now considered a primary offense. NAS Jacksonville upholds a zero tolerance policy for failure to use vehicle seatbelts and maintains that non-compliance of the seatbelt law is a primary offense. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reveals that since the enforcement mobilizations program began, child fatalities have dropped significantly. Child restraint use for infants under one-year-old has risen considerably, and restraint use among toddlers ages 1-4 has jumped even more dramatically over the past three years. Last year, adult seatbelt use rose to the nations highest utilization rate ever. With more than 80 million Americans buckling up you would think everybodys finally gotten the message. Last year Duval County still had some of the highest traffic fatalities in the State of Florida. Please join this effort to save lives and reduce inju ries by promoting seatbelt usage. Dont become one of the 2014 fatality statis tics by failing to buckle up. Photo by MC2 Amanda CabasosPatrolman Malcolm Watson from NAS Jax Security Department issues a seat belt citation to a motorist aboard the base April 30. Click-It or Ticket seatbelt campaign ongoing until June 1 Intramural Golf Summer League forming Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. The league plays Wednesday at 11:30 a.m., beginning May 28. Contact base gym for rules and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Forming Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Contact base gym for rules and required paperwork. Roster forms due by May 30. Wallyball League Forming Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. required paperwork. Roster forms due by June 6. Badminton Singles League Meeting May 28 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet noon along with rules and required paperwork. Bean Bag Toss Singles Tournament June 23 Tournament takes place at 5 p.m. in the NAS Jax Fitness, Sports and Aquatics Center. The tournament is open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Call the Fitness Center at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil to sign up by June 13. Tournament July 21-25 Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for their command or third place. Sign up by July 14. Tournament July 28-31 Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for their command or third place. Sign up by July 21. For more information about any of the sports articles, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil Visit the MWR website at www.cnic. navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjax mwr. StandingsAs of May 23Team Wins Losses Bad News Babes 2 1 NAS-ty Slammers 1 1 Hit it-n-Quit it 1 2 Pitch Slaps 0 2Team Wins Losses NAVHOSP 11 1 VP-30 12 1 VP-26 9 2 FRCSE Rabid Possums 8 3 VP-45 Sluggers 8 3 CNRSE/Navy Band 6 4 FRCSE 900 6 4 HS-11 6 4 VR-62 6 5 HSM-74 3 1 NCTS 5 5 CRS-10 4 6 AIR OPS 5 8 FACSFAC 3 7 NBHC Honey Badgers 2 8 CBMU202 2 9 VP-45 Scared Hitless 2 9 FRCSE Thrusters 2 11 FRCSE Tweaks & Geeks 1 11 Final StandingsTeam Wins Losses CNATTU 3 1 VP-26 3 1 FACSFAC 3 1 NAVFAC 1 3 NECE 0 4 A CFC Participant provided as a public service. While he works to defend our country, St. Jude works to save his son from a deadly disease.St. Jude patient, Aaron, with his father Lieutenant Commander, Scott Photos by Morgan KenhertAustralian footballOn May 17, Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron and the Fighting Squids of Ft. Lauderdale gathered at Sea King Park aboard NAS Jacksonville to play an 'Australian Rules' football game. The fast-paced combination of speed, athleti cism, skill and physical toughness combined for very entertaining afternoon. After four exciting quarters, the Aussies proved to be victorious, winning 67-37. Robert Watson of the Fighting Squids is in good field position as he kicks the ball and ultimately scores a goal. During the first quarter, players from both teams collided in the air in an attempt to gain possession of the ball. After the game, Aussie team members signed two jerseys to be presented as a thank-you to the Fighting Squids, as well as to MWR's Sports Coordinator Bill Bonser, for organizing the game. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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By Lt. j.g. Mark BadenVP-8 Public Affairs OfficerSailors from the VP-8 Fighting Tigers deployed at Cooperative Security Location Comalapa in El Salvador supported the La Gran Comision Church nutrition program May 19 by participating in a charity 8K running event. A total of 46 Sailors donated cash to support the squadrons 20 runners. The event raised more than $600 for the nutritional program at La Gran Comision Church in La Libertad, El Salvador. Through charitable donations and fundraising events on their current deployment, the Fighting Tigers have raised more than $5,000 for community outreach events, in addition to donating 2,000 pounds of clothes and supplies. Helping the local community any way we can is a mission of ours, said Lt. Joel Pena, VP-8 Community Relations Coordinator. The run was a fantastic opportunity to continue VP-8s legacy of community service and outreach in a way that was fun and engaging for squadron members. The La Gran Comision Church is a non-denominational congregation of local residents and missionaries who work to improve the lives of the less fortunate. Some of their work includes nutritional programs that provide healthy meals to children whose fami lies may not be able to afford a balanced diet. They also provide a safe haven for battered and abused women and chil dren. The care and assistance provided by the church is a vital lifeline to the El Salvadoran community. The Fighting Tigers are currently deployed to the 4th and 5th fleet areas of responsibility, assisting in Counter Trans-National Organized Crime efforts and providing humanitarian assistance. By AWFCS Mike Wendelin VR-62 Public AffairsAO1(AW) Robin Anton has been selected for the Limited Duty Officer (LDO) Program as an Aviation Maintenance Duty Officer (6335) dur ing the FY-15 LDO board. Anton was selected as the VR-62 Sailor of the Year for 2012 and 2013. She was also selected as Commander, Fleet Logistics Support Wing, Sailor of the Year for 2013. Anton Joined the Navy Reserve in 1999 after completing active duty and a nine-year break in service. Her first com mand was HS-75, and she spent time at a number of other helicop ter commands. One of her most interesting assignments was at Theatre Field Confinement Facility Kuwait where she served as a guard commander. She joined the VR-62 Nomads in July of 2010. Anton said VR-62 has provided me with a wealth of opportunity and I feel privileged to call myself a Nomad. She went on to say, the leadership at VR-62 has been fantastic, particu larly that of my mentor AZCM Karen Quinn, who has been nothing less than amazing. She always believed in me and insisted that I sub mit a package to the LDO board. Anton is sched uled to attend Direct Commissioning Officer School at Naval Station Newport R.I. in the fall. The Nomads are very proud of petty offi cer Anton, because she exemplifies the Nomad slogan of Be the best, said VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. B.T. Smith. Skipper Smith went on to say, Anton has shown that hard work and deter mination can and does pay off. We congratulate her and wish her the best on her new career path in the Navy Reserve. Nomad selected for Limited Duty Officer ProgramAO1(AW) Robin AntonFighting Tigers raise bucks for family nutritionPhoto courtesy of VP-8Twenty VP-8 Sailors and their shipmates took part in an 8K run that raised money for a local San Salvador nutritional program. Hundreds of golfers showed up on May 16 to support NMCRS at the tournament sponsored by VP-30 at the Golf Club at South Hampton in St. Augustine.Photos by Barbie Smolinski Almost $33,000 was raised May 16 at the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Golf Tournament this year. (From left) VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips, NMCRS CEO retired Adm. Steve Abbot, NMCRS Jacksonville Director Monika Woods, NMCRS vice president retired USMC Brig. Gen. Pete Collins, Lt. Strittmatter and Lt. Shane Heller.Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Golf TournamentVolunteers Delores Wise, Lindsay Potts-Szoke, Linda Brown and Sandy Faraldo helped the tournament run smoothly. form and make the swab, Zinzani added. To register with the DoD Marrow Program (also known as Salute to Life), prospective donors must be: Reserve, Coast Guard, National Guard; military dependent; or DoD civilian employee. example, the program cannot accept donors with HIV, heart disease, auto immune disorders, hepatitis B or C, kidney or liver disease, or bleeding disorders.For further information, please visit www.salutetolife.org MARROWFrom Page 12 JOIN TODAY! ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS A CFC participant provided as a public service JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 15

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 I I D E VP-16 COC Pennington hands reins to PappPage 9 CYCLISTS CARE Tour de Cure Page 4 AUSSIE BALL RAN 725 Squadron WinsCheck us out Online! jaxairnews.com By Clark PierceEditorTwo rescue swimmers and a pair of simulated survivors from HSM-72 took part in a May 22 exercise over the St. Johns River. The training was designed to keep aviation rescue swimmers and pilots proficient in search and rescue (SAR) situations over water. The NAS Jax Boathouse, a division of Air Operations, assisted HSM-72 in the training evolution with their 40-foot, twin-diesel SAR boat. BM1 David Brown said, Were always eager to work with rescue swimmer certification exercises because SAR proficiency can mean the difference between life and death. He added, Todays boat crew, con sisting of engineer EN2 Jeffrey Adkins and coxswain EM3 Marcellus Clark are expert boat handlers who are well aware of the procedures practiced by helicopter squadrons in the St. Johns River. HSM-72 safety observers, AWRC John Watson and AWR1 Wesley Cortez, were pleased with what they saw. For this training session, one survi vor is simulated unconscious, so each swimmer can work with the helicop ters rescue litter. They must success fully immobilize the survivor within the litter, while in the water, whenever a spinal cord injury is suspected, said Cortez. Watson added, The pilots who vol unteered to be survivors in todays scenario (Lt. Michele DeGrothy and Lt. j.g. Andrew Powanda) will gain a better understanding of the rescue swimmers role in the squadron. In the future, it can improve their situational awareness of whats happening in the water while theyre flying in a hover position. The exercises MH-60 Romeo helicopter was flown by Lt. Anthony Piunno and Lt. j.g. Brendon Hinz. The aircrew/ rescue swimmers were AWR3 Jake Brown and AWR3 Derek Nigron. AWR1 Will Dillon explained that Seahawk rescue swimmers receive the same training whether they fly the Romeo or Sierra variants of the Seahawk. For the MH-60R SAR/MEDIVAC configuration, we remove the (sonar) dipping center from the Romeo so theres more room for swimmers and survivors and the litter. When the squadron is at sea, one of our Romeo Seahawks is always tricked out in the SAR/MEDEVAC configuration, By MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsIt was standing room only at the VP-30 Auditorium May 22 when hun dreds of Sailors and civilian employ ees from Commander, Navy Region Southeast and NAS Jacksonville attended the holiday safety stand down. NAS Jax Safety Officer Ron Williamson welcomed the Sailors and civilians. He told the audience of the importance to make smart decisions that will help keep them safe over Memorial Day weekend and beyond. He mentioned that half the Navy consists of E3s and E5s and that 60 percent of all the accidents are derived from this group. Williamson also mentioned the top five injury producing activities during the summer, that include basket ball, bicycling, baseball, softball, jog ging and football. We like to set the tone for the sum mer around Memorial Day because that is the start of summer, said Williamson. And the summer is a high time for accidents involving Sailors. Everyone is participating in many activities and lots of recreation, driving and vacations. This stand down sets the tone and lets everyone know the safe choices you can make including the use of Operational Risk Management to think things through and prevent mishaps. The guest speakers, Greg McCarty and Ralph Jimenez of Florida Stay Alive from Education (S.A.F.E) Inc., presented their Street Smart program that dra matized the effects of risky behavior. McCarty said, We are trying to Safety stand down kicks off summer Photos by MC2 Amanda Cabasos(From left) Street Smart presenters Ralph Jimenez and Greg McCarty of Florida Stay Alive from Education Inc. place a neck brace on ACAN Caleb Shaw of NAS Jax Air Operations during a safety stand down May 22. "Street Smart" is a noholds-barred presentation that gets the members of the audience involved. The paramedics lead a discussion on the importance of making responsible decisions concerning their safety. ACAN Caleb Shaw of NAS Jax Air Operations vounteers as the vehicle crash dummy during a demonstration by Street Smart presenters of Florida Stay Alive from Education Inc. at the NAS Jax safety stand down May 22.HSM-72 Proud Warriors practice SAR jumps into riverPhoto by Clark Pierce In response to hand signals from the search and rescue swimmer, HSM-72s aircrew lower a litter that will be used to immobilize a survivor before lifting him from the water during training on the St. Johns River May 22.See Page 7 See Page 7 Photo by Clark PierceRetired U.S. Army Maj. Cecil Tanner, 94, talks with AM1 Keith Delgado of HSM-74 about a restored World War II Jeep on display at the Green Cove Springs Memorial Day observance. The combat vehicles were on loan from the Military Museum of North Florida.Memorial Day honored across Northeast FloridaSee more Memorial Day coverage on Page 7 Photo by MC2 Marcus Stanley Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Rick Williamson stands with his former Edward White High School basketball coach and chairman of the Duval County Veterans Memorial Wall, Ray Moore, during the Pledge of Allegiance at the City of Jacksonville Memorial Day Observance May 26.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-7789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley From StaffMay 29 1781 USS Frigate Alliance captures HMS Atalanta and Trepassy off Nova Scotia. 1991 Amphibious task force in Bangladesh for cyclone relief is redeployed. May 30 1814 Navy gunboats capture three British boats on Lake Ontario near Sandy Creek, N.Y. May 31 1900 Sailors and Marines from cruiser USS Newark (C-1) and battleship USS Oregon (BB-3) arrive at Peking, China along with other Sailors and Marines from Britain, France, Russia, Italy and Japan to protect U.S. and foreign diplomatic legations from the Boxers. 1919 The NC-4 flying boats transatlantic mission ends at Plymouth, England. 1944 USS England (DE-635) sinks a record six Japanese submarines in 13 days. June 1 1813 The 38-gun frigate HMS Shannon captures 38-gun frigate USS Chesapeake. As the mortally wounded Capt. James Lawrence was carried below, he ordered, Tell the men to fire faster! Dont give up the ship! These words would live on in naval his tory. Oliver Hazard Perry honored his dead friend Lawrence when he had the motto sewn onto his pri vate battle flag flown during the Battle of Lake Erie. 1871 Rear Adm. Rodgers lands in Korea with a party of Sailors and Marines and captures five forts to secure protection for U.S. citizens after Americans were fired upon and murdered. 1914 General Order 99 prohibits alcohol on board naval vessels, or at navy yards or stations. 1915 First contract for Navy lighter-than-air air craft. 1939 Director of the Naval Research Laboratory, Captain Hollis Cooley, proposes research in atomic energy for future use in nuclear-powered submarines. 1944 ZP-14 airships complete first crossing of Atlantic by non-rigid lighter-than-air aircraft. 1954 First test of steam catapult on board USS Hancock (CV-19). June 2 1941 First aircraft escort vessel, USS Long Island (ACG-1), commissioned, then reclassified as an auxiliary aircraft carrier (AVC-1) and finally reclassified as an escort carrier (CVE-1) in July 1943. June 3 1785 Order to sell last ship remaining in Continental Navy, the frigate Alliance. No other Navy were ships authorized until 1794. 1949 Wesley Brown is the first African-American to graduate from the U.S. Naval Academy. 1966 Launch of Gemini 9, piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Eugene Cernan. The mission included 45 orbits over three days. Recovery by USS Wasp (CVS-18). June 4 1934 USS Ranger (CV-4), the first ship designed from the keel up as a carrier, is commissioned at Norfolk, Va. 1942 Battle of Midway (June 4-6) begins. During battle, the four Japanese carriers that attacked Pearl Harbor are sunk. This decisive U.S. victory was a turning point in the Pacific war. 1944 Hunter-killer group USS Guadalcanal cap tures German submarine, U-505. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorIn September, I intro duced you to my friend, Theresa. Three days after her Navy husband and Dustins former squad ron mate, Landon, was killed overseas, Theresa co-wrote a column with me about her experi ence. It was a fresh, raw glimpse at what being a new military widow really looks like and the story spread quickly on the Internet. It was always amazing to me that Theresa was able to write with such clarity so soon after los ing her husband. Of course, in many ways, her biggest struggles were yet to come. Landon is now buried at Arlington National Cemetery. The funeral flowers are gone, and the rest of the world has seemingly moved on. Thats why, on this Memorial Day, its important to remember that Theresa is still here, still grieving. I asked Theresa to write again with updates about these first months with out Landon. What follows are her words: Eight months have passed since my husband was killed in the Red Sea. Landon was not killed by enemy fire, nor as a result of a mechanical failure. He was killed as he sat in his helicopter, rotors spinning and chained to the deck of a ship that was going too fast in high seas. A large wall of water hit the side of ship, shot up, and crashed onto the helicopter, causing it to break apart and eventu ally go over the side with both pilots still strapped in their seats. As I sat at my kitch en table and read the militarys investigation report, I felt like I was reading a book of fic tion. The helicopters door came loose. That means the pilots could escape! I was waiting for a different ending. But it never came. My children played in the next room as I read: the pilots were most likely incapacitated before they hit the water. The accident hap pened five days before our 10th wedding anni versary and shortly before Landon was sup posed to come home. I remember filling out paperwork instead of celebrating with Landon. Rather than shopping for a dress for his home coming, I spent hours in the mall looking for an outfit I could wear (and still easily nurse our son, Hunter) to the funeral. On Veterans Day, Anthony, then 6 years old, bravely walked into his school, which was a sea of dads in military uniforms for the schools celebration. I cried the whole walk home, push ing Hunter in a stroller. Born while Landon was on that final deployment, Hunter will never feel his fathers arms. In December, I watched, alone, as my boys opened gifts on Christmas. I tried to hide my tears when Anthony looked at all the toys and said, this is the best Christmas ever! Another time, when I had the flu, I wept in a rocker with Hunter in the middle of the night because my husband wasnt there to help me. And the day I final ly went to the Navy Exchange to buy large containers to pack away my husbands things, I wanted to scream. People watched me teeter the large bins on top of the stroller. Do you know what I have to buy these for? I wanted to say. Please help me! Today, when Anthony asks, what if some thing happens to you? I hate that I cannot hon estly say, nothing ever will. All I can tell him is youll be taken care of. On the morning of Sept. 22, 2013, I had no idea my life would be like this today. Before that day, how ever, when I dared to think about the what ifs because every military spouse does I didnt picture it like this. I never realized how quickly Id lose my iden tity as a military wife or that the organization my husband vowed to serve and die for would ever fail me. I am no longer a Navy wife. Im the VAs problem now. Landon would be so disappointed. Yet, despite all this, Anthony, Hunter and I still man age to smile and laugh every day. We continue to live, and we try our best to move forward. We have come miles from those first few weeks in September, and I am optimistic that although we will have bumps in the road, we will be okay. At the funeral, the military gave the boys and me three perfectly folded American flags. Three flags to remind us of Landons sacrifice. Its such a small thing. But for two little boys, one of whom will never know his father, someday, it will mean everything, said Theresa. If youd like to help the Jones family, contribu tions can be made in person at any Navy Federal Branch, through PayPal, or by mailing a check directly to Navy Federal. The address is 555 Saturn Blvd., Suite C, San Diego, CA 92154. Make checks payable to Landon Jones Memorial Fund. The PayPal account is land onjonesmemorialfund@ gmail.com, and the access code is 7406575.You can find more infor mation, including ways to help the other family who lost a loved one, at www. Facebook.com/Sarah. is.Smiley, too.U.S. Navy photos A Douglas SBD Dauntless scout plane and dive bomber passes over Wake Island, a small atoll in the Central Pacific. Beginning at the Battle of Midway, the Dauntless did more than any other aircraft to turn the tide of the Pacific War. By VJ Day, Dauntless crews had destroyed 18 Japanese warships, including a battleship and six carriers. Battle of Midway SBD Dauntless dive bombers from USS Hornet (CV-8) approach the burning Japanese heavy cruiser Mikuma to make the third set of attacks on her, during the early afternoon of June 6, 1942. Dead in the water, the Japanese heavy cruiser Mikuma, photographed from a USS Enterprise (CV-6) SBD Dauntless bomber during the afternoon of June 6, 1942, after she had been bombed by planes from Enterprise and USS Hornet (CV-8). This Week in Navy History From the HomefrontChecking in with a military widow

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By Yan KennonNH Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville performed its first neurostimulator implant procedure April 7 at its hospital for one of its active duty patients, as part of a spinal cord stimulation (SCS) treatment plan. The outpatient SCS procedure was per formed to treat chron ic testicular pain in a patient who did not respond favorably to multiple, less invasive thera pies. Spinal cord stimula tion for chronic testicular pain is a novel approach to treatment just begin ning to be used nation wide, said Capt. Jerry Foltz, NH Jacksonvilles pain management physi cian. My hope is that the patient can start to enjoy routine daily activities that were once very dif ficult. During the procedure, the neurostimulator about the size of a stop watch was inserted under the patients skin and the devices electri cal leads were placed in the epidural space of the spinal column. Once the leads and stimulator were in position, the patient was awakened from anesthesia and the stimulator was tested. After confirming good stimulation in the pain area, the neurostimulator was then sutured under the skin. The devices battery will last eight to 10 years, is fully rechargeable and can be programmed by a wireless connection. Foltz expects the patient to start resuming more normal activities in about two months. Patient total recovery time is expected to be between two and three months with some limitations. While SCS does not eliminate the source of pain nor does it treat underlying causes, it is used to treat chronic pain. It provides pain relief by applying an electrical current to the back of the spinal cord, thus blocking initial pain signals before they reach the brain. And as pain changes or improves, stimulation can be adjusted as necessary. SCS decreases the need for oral pain medications such as narcotics or opioids medications that often cause a range of side effects, from drowsiness to addiction. Plus over time, some oral pain relievers may eventually lose their effectiveness. SCS was first approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1989. It has since become a stan dard of treatment for patients experiencing chronic pain who have been unable to find relief through other treatments. Exceptionally skilled doctors and staff, and the ability to offer an array of specialty services make NH Jacksonville a leader in Navy Medicine. The command is home to 32 surgeons across eight specialty areas, from urology to orthopedics where it has seven fellowship trained surgeons in sports medicine, foot/ ankle, total joint, hand, hip preservation and pediat rics. (From left) Capt. Jerry Foltz, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles pain management physician and anesthesiologist, and Cmdr. Mark Dobbertien, general surgeon, perform the hospitals first neurostimulator implant pro cedure on April 7. The neurostimulator, about the size of a stopwatch, provides pain relief by applying an electri cal current to the back of the spinal cord, thus blocking the pain sig nal before it gets to the brain. Hospital performs first neurostimulator implant procedure A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. Photo by Jacob Sippel Driver improvement class June 13Ideal for teen driversFrom Cape Fox Professional ServicesStatistically speaking, new drivers are more likely to be involved in an accident or receive a ticket within the first 12 months of obtaining their drivers license. As a parent of a new driver, that can cause a lot of worry and sleepless nights. What can you do about it? NAS Jax Safety Office has set aside a Driver Improvement Class specifically for dependent, young drivers between the ages of 15 and 21 years old. They do not have to have a drivers license to attend. This class will offer safety tips, how to respond to driving emergencies, bring awareness to risks of driving and much more. There will be videos and driver quizzes concluding with a multiple-choice drivers test. There will not be any time behind the wheel of a vehicle, only a classroom session. Participants receive AAA Driver Improvement Class completion certifi cates. Drink and snack machines are available. If you feel your teen can benefit from driving tips presented by professional instructors, sign them up for this Driver Improvement Class. Call Linda at the base safety office 542-3082 or Cindy at 542-2584. The class will take place at NAS Jax Building 1, on June 13, from 8 a.m. 1 p.m. A CFC Participant provided as a public service.Do not accept defeat .Fight deadly childhood diseases. 800-8 22-6344 stjude.org JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Team Navy Jax rides for a cureBy Kaylee LaRocque Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Public Affairs Members of Team Navy Jax cycled in the ninth annual Jacksonville Tour de Cure, raising more than $6,300 to benefit the Jacksonville Chapter of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), May 17. The 34 cyclists pedaled with hundreds of others for 30, 65 or 100 miles during the event which takes riders through the back roads of Northeast Florida. The ADA holds the event each year to help research a cure for diabetes, advocate for the cause and educate the public about the disease affecting millions of people world wide. Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases result ing from high blood sugar. For several members of the Touchton family who joined Team Navy Jax several years ago, the ride is for a cause that hits close to home. We are out here today riding for a cure because my grand mother has diabetes, said AO3 Stuart Touchton of VP-26. My father participated in the ride with me last year, and now we have my brother join ing us, so its definitely a family event. We are excited to be riding the 100-mile century ride today and are happy to be part of Team Navy Jax. This really is a great team. Its well orga nized and everyone is so sup portive. Several other team members were riding because diabetes affects their family members. Im here today to ride a sig nificant distance because I have several family members that have been diagnosed with diabetes, said Lt. Cmdr. Kris Sanchak of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, who has been with the team for two years. This event is for a good cause, and its a really great team to ride with. Team Navy Jax cyclists spend numerous hours preparing for events by participating in team rides and attending spinning classes at the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Departments Fitness Source. Many spend their free time raising funds to participate in the events. I am proud of our team and their enthusiasm to par ticipate in this event, said AS1 Terry Yamin of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. The award for best team spirit goes to our team jokers, Anthony Glass, Kris Sanchack, and Jason Wilkes. They know how to keep it fun and always put a smile on the team mem bers faces. Yamin, who recently took over as team captain added, We have a great group of cyclists on the team and a great sponsor. VyStar Credit Union is always supporting our team by donating jerseys and shorts. We really appreciate them for making our team look like a team. The ride challenged new and veteran riders, especially with the strong northern headwinds. We were very strong in numbers and aggressive with the distance each of us select ed, said Yamin. Out of the 32 Team Navy Jax cyclists, 10 of us chose to ride the 100-mile century ride. It was a very safe ride, and the camaraderie of our team really made it a great event. Lt. Cmdr. Rich Mercado of VP-30, was one of the first to complete the century ride with a time of four hours and 44 minutes. It was an honor to ride for a great cause. I look forward to doing it again next year, he said. According to Tour de Cure event manager Neeta Nicholson, Team Navy Jax members are a huge part of the annual event. Team Navy Jax has been with us since the very begin ning our inaugural ride nine years ago, she said. We are so thrilled to have them. They are a consistent, strong team that has really helped fight diabetes. The Tour de Cure is a series of cycling events held in more than 80 cities nationwide to benefit the ADA. The tour is a ride, not a race, with routes designed for everyone from the occasional rider to the experi enced cyclist.Neither the U.S. Navy, NAS Jacksonville, MWR or Jax Air News, nor any part of the federal government, officially endorses any company, sponsor or their products or services. Members of Team Navy Jax gather near the starting line of the annual Tour de Cure in Saint Johns, Fla., May 17. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Production Support Officer Lt. Cmdr. Victor Feal, a member of Team Navy Jax, prepares his bicycle before offloading it from his car and heading to the start line of the annual Tour de Cure. Tour de Cure volunteer Nicole Holmes checks in Patrick Hall of Team Navy Jax, before the bicycle ride May 17. Hall has been a member of Team Navy Jax since the team formed in 2006 and has raised thousands of dollars for the ride which is held each year to promote research, advocacy and education to find a cure for diabetes. AO3 Stuart Touchton of VP-26 and a member of Team Navy Jax for the past two years, sets off for the starting line of the annual Tour de Cure. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Executive Officer Capt. Chuck Stuart, a mem ber of Team Navy Jax, attaches his ride numbers to his bicycle before setting off for the starting line. Team Navy Jax member Chris Townsend signs some waivers during the check-in process.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 5 Team Navy Jax members head out for a day of cycling as they take off for a 65-mile ride during the annual Tour de Cure in Saint Johns, Fla. A group of Team Navy Jax members leave the Tour de Cure starting line on May 17 for the 65-mile ride of the annual event in Saint Johns, Fla. Team Navy Jax members Jerry Dryden and Cecilia Hennig get ready to hit the starting line.Photos by Kaylee LaRocque AS1 Terry Yamin, team captain for Team Navy Jax, ensures the tires on his bicycle are inflated correctly before heading out for the 100-mile century ride. Mark Fetzer of Lakeshore Bicycle and Fitness, helps Team Navy Jax member Cecilia Hennig prepare her bicycle before the annual Tour de Cure. Team Navy Jax member Lt. Cmdr. Kris Sanchack of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, (center, right) pedals through the starting line of the annual Tour de Cure in Saint Johns, Fla., May 17 with hundreds of other cyclists in the 100-mile century ride.

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 From Naval History & Heritage CommandAfter the first recorded landing on the atoll in 1859, Midway became a United States possession in 1867. A trans-Pacific cable station was established in 1903. In 1935, Pan American Airways used Sand Island as a stop over on its new seaplane route between the U.S. and Asia. In 1939, a study of U.S. defense needs recommended Midway as a base for Navy patrol planes and submarines. Soon there after, construction began on a seaplane hangar and other facilities on Sand Island and an airfield on the smaller Eastern Island. Midway occupied an impor tant place in Japanese military planning. According to plans made before Pearl Harbor, the Japanese fleet would attack and occupy Midway and the Aleutian Islands in Alaska as soon as their position in South Asia was stabilized. Two Japanese destroyers bombarded the Navy base on Midway on December 7, 1941, damaging buildings and destroying one patrol plane. In the spring of 1942, flush with victory after victory in the Pacific, Japan prepared to establish a toehold in the Aleutians; to occupy Midway and convert it into an air base and jumping off point for an invasion of Hawaii and to lure what was left of the U.S. Pacific Fleet into the Midway area for a decisive battle that would fin ish it off. The Americans had their own plans for the atoll. With the fall of Wake Island to the Japanese in late December 1941, Midway became the westernmost U.S. outpost in the central Pacific. Defenses on the atoll were strength ened between December and April. Land-based bombers and fighters were stationed on Eastern Island. U.S. Marines provided defensive artillery and infantry. Operating from the atolls lagoon, seaplanes patrolled toward the Japaneseheld Marshall Islands and Wake, checking on enemy activities and guarding against further attacks on Hawaii. There were occasional clash es when planes from Midway and those from the Japanese islands met over the Pacific. Adm. Chester Nimitz, Commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, inspected Midway in early May 1942, conferring with the local commanders, Navy Capt. Cyril Simard and Marine Col. Harold Shannon. Based on U.S. intelligence reports, Nimitz believed the Japanese were planning an attack on Midway. Top Naval officers in Washington were not so sure. They could not believe that the Japanese would send a huge fleet to take a small atoll. It would be like fishing for min nows with a harpoon. Nimitz asked Simard and Shannon what they needed to hold the islands. They reeled off a long list. He asked Shannon: If I get you all these things you say you need, then can you hold Midway against a major amphibious assault? The reply was a simple Yes, sir. Within a week, anti-aircraft guns, rifles, and other war materiel arrived at Midway. Eastern Island was crowd ed with Marine Corps, Navy, and Army Air Force planes fighters, dive bombers and larger B-17 and B-26 bombers. Every piece of land bristled with barbed wire entangle ments and guns, the beaches and waters were studded with mines. Eleven torpedo boats were ready to circle the reefs, patrol the lagoon, pick up ditched airmen, and assist ground forces with anti-air craft fire. Nineteen submarines guarded the approaches from 100 to 200 miles northwest and north. By June 4, 1942, Midway was ready to face the approaching Japanese. By Lt. j.g. Alec VeroneVP-45 Assistant Quality Assurance OfficerThe Pelicans of Patrol Squadron (VP) 45 recently detached a team of eight air crewmen and 10 maintenance personnel on a P-8A Poseidon flight to NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. Combat Aircrew (CAC) 2 integrated with Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 10 to aid in VP-40s Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE) in prepara tion for VP-40s upcoming P-3C Orion deployment. It was a great opportu nity for the VP-40 Fighting Marlins to work with a P-8A on-station during a range of tactical missions said Lt. John Leeds, officer-in-charge of the detachment. The Marlins were able to familiarize themselves with the Poseidons new capa bilities during overland ISR and ASW events. We were proud to show our new capabilities our world class maintenance crew had the plane working flawlessly the whole week. Having a P-8A on-station during VP-40s ORE was a CPRW-10 priority because the Fighting Marlins will be fly ing with the Poseidon on their upcoming deployment in the 7th Fleet AOR. The ORE events allowed the Pelicans to execute their first-ever level II P-8A detach ment. The eight-day, six-flight det came less than eight weeks after VP-45 earned Safe-forFlight certification. A level II detachment con sists of an airplane, aircrew and maintenance person nel operating independently away from their home airfield during a period of high oper ational tempo, said Patrol Plane Commander Lt. Jordan Schneider. Going on detach ment during home-cycle pre pares us for hub-and-spoke operations that have become the norm during deployment. Our dedicated maintenance/ aircrew team paved the way for future successful Pelican detachments. We were on-sta tion, on-time for 100 percent of our flights. The Pelicans were also given the unique opportunity to tour the Boeing Companys 737 manufacturing line in Renton, Wash. Boeing really rolled out the red carpet for us. We toured the commercial 737 line as well as the P-8A line, said AT2 Brett Mikota. The amount of detailed craftsmanship and the speed of manufacturing that goes into each 737 is astonish ing. I also enjoyed talking to the engineers and technicians that design and build the systems that I work on daily. The Pelicans are looking for ward to performing at high levels during upcoming detach ments to NAS Fallon, the Baltic Region, RIMPAC, and a number of other places during a busy Inter-deployment Readiness Cycle. From StaffAt Balfour Beatty Communities (BBC), our primary goal is to provide quality housing and customer service, so that our resi dents have a positive, enjoyable experi ence living with us, said BBC Community Manager Diana Heintz in an interview at her office aboard NAS Jax. Beginning June 18, residents are invited to provide their opinions on BBC opera tions through our CEL Resident Satisfaction Survey. This annual survey is an important part of our continuous improvement pro gram that helps us analyze performance and make any necessary changes and enhancements to ensure we consistently deliver quality service across all aspects of our community operations, explained Heintz. Surveys will be available at the CEL KickOff Splash Event, June 18, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the NAS Jax outdoor swimming pool on Allegheny Rd. If you are unable to attend the pool event, please stop by our Community Management Office on base at 960 Ballard St. to pick up a survey or call us at 908-0821 and we will deliver a survey to your residence, said Heintz. Residents who submit their completed survey by June 20 will be entered in a prize drawing. Topics covered in the survey include resident experience with leasing, community management, maintenance and quality of the homes. All surveys are confidential, so and residents are encouraged to provide open and honest insights. The CEL Resident Satisfaction Survey allows us to see where we excel operation ally and where there is room for improve ment, said Heintz. We encourage all resi dents to complete the survey so that we may better meet their needs, as well as those of our future residents. Completed surveys should be sealed in the postage-paid envelope provided and either mailed or returned to the authorized locked mailbox located in BBC Management Offices. The final day for residents to submit their completed Resident Satisfaction Survey is July 8. From the NAS Jax All Officers Spouses ClubThe NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club is sponsoring three $1,000 scholarships based on scholarship merit and community service. Eligibility: U.S. Navy active/ reserve duty and active/reserve duty dependents who are cur rently in their senior year of high school or a high school graduate, attached to NAS Jacksonville and planning to attend an accredited college in the fall of 2014 or spring of 2015. Scholarships are to be used only for tuition and tuition-based fees charged by the college and will be sent to the college. Three scholarships will be awarded; each in the amount $1,000 one active duty, one offi cer dependent, and one enlisted dependent. Criteria: Recipients will be selected on scholarship merit and community service. Deadline for application is June 7. Selection of recipients will be made by June 30. Scholarship application may be picked up at NAS Jacksonville Navy College Office or found on-line at: https://www.fcef. com/wp-content/uploads/CHPScholarship-Application3-14.pdf. You may submit the application by mail to: NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, c/o Mrs. Pam Undersander, 5065 Mustin Road, Jacksonville FL 32212. Questions may be sent to nasjax aosc@gmail.comNeither the NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the fed eral government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Midway: Before the battleU.S. Navy photoPilots of the four PBY-5A Catalina patrol bombers that flew the torpedo attack mission against the Japanese fleet's Midway Occupation Force during the night of June 3, 1942.(From left) Lt. j.g. Douglas Davis ( VP-24), Ensign Allan Rothenberg (VP-51), Lt. William Richards XO of VP-44, who flew in a VP-24 aircraft on this mission, and Ensign Gaylord Propst (VP-24).Pelicans P-8A detached to NAS Whidbey IslandThe VP-45 detachment to NAS Whidbey Island isn't complete without a visit to the Boeing Company's Renton, Wash. 737 assembly plant. Members of CPRW-10 and VP-45 Combat Aircrew 2 in front of Poseidon No. 434, parked on the apron of NAS Whidbey Island, Wash.Photos courtesy of VP-45Aircrew and maintainers of the recent VP-45 detachment to NAS Whidbey Island, Wash.Balfour Beatty set to make splash with annual housing survey College scholarships deadline is June 7 ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS 13 MILLION ACRES AND COUNTING Help us conserve another 13 Million acres.

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said Dillon. DeGrothy said, Todays SAR/MEDEVAC exer cise gave me a better appreciation for what the rescue swimmers do. It was interesting to see the SAR mission from in the water, rather than from inside the cockpit. Our aircrew work in a very hostile environment because of wave action and the downwash caused by the propeller blades. Physical conditioning is important, too, because rescue swimmers wear a lot of gear during a SAR mission. HSM-72From Page 1make a difference by informing service members to be safety aware and pre vent making poor choices, such drink ing and driving, not wearing seatbelts or texting and driving. We want to cut down on the number of people we are loosing from making those bad choos es. We add some humor to our presentations so we are not beating the individuals down, but it is all factual stuff that we tell them. Hopefully, after the presentation we can make a difference. We are loosing way too many people, especially in the military, to seatbelt and alcohol-related crashes. During the brief, McCarty and Jimenez presented live scenarios involving people driving under the influence of alcohol and drugs, neglecting to wear seatbelts and other irre sponsible choices. According to the presenters, sending or receiving a text takes a drivers eyes from the road for an average of 4.6 seconds at 55 miles per hour the equivalent of driving the length of a football field blind. The animated presenters added a taste of humor, while seriously conducting the discussion of highway safety using graphic photos. We do see a difference with this program, said McCarty. We teach in high schools, colleges and military bases and we have numerous people come up to us later thanking us for being here even though we showed them some real intense photos. Half way through the brief, the pre senters chose ACAN Caleb Shaw of NAS Jax Air Operations to be their vehicle crash dummy on stage. McCarty said, We use powerpoint, description of events and a volunteer who will undergo a simulated vehicle crash to emphasize our points. The volunteer is strapped on a backboard and we explain all the various tubes and needles we use as paramedics to save a life, as well as other equipment a hospital uses to treat trauma victims. At the end, we tell the audience you get to make choices. You can use the information we give you or chose not to and the odds are that you may meet fire fighters and paramedics like us down the road. In conclusion of the event, Jimenez said, On behalf of Greg and myself, it is an honor to present this presentation to you all and thank-you for everything you do for us. Thank you for participating in our potentially life-saving pro gram. According to the www.safeprogram. com, S.A.F.E. presenters of Street Smart is a non-profit organization dedicated to making young adults aware of the dangers of driving under the influ ence of alcohol or drugs, texting and/ or e-mailing while driving, not wearing seat belts, and the trauma associated with these dangers. SAFETYFrom Page 1 Photo by MC2 Amanda CabasosStreet Smart presenter Ralph Jimenez of Florida Stay Alive from Education Inc., demonstrates being tossed from a vehicle under the influence during the NAS Jax Summer Traffic Safety StandDown at VP-30 Auditorium May 22. Lt. Michele DeGrothy, simulating a spinal cord injury, is secured in a SAR litter by an HSM-72 rescue swimmer who holds the line steady as the survivor is winched up to the helicopter. An HSM-72 rescue swimmer is winched into the helicopter cabin after sending up a simulated survivor in a rescue litter on May 22 over the St. Johns River.Photos by Clark Pierce(From left) EN2 Jeffrey Adkins and EM3 Marcell Clark, of the NAS Jax Boathouse, monitor the SAR boats proximity to the survivors and swimmers in the waters near the Buckman Bridge during the exercise. Memorial DayRemembering the cost of freedomFrom StaffIn what many would consider one of Floridas best small towns, Green Cove Springs civic leaders and citizens observed Memorial Day as part of the 26th Riverfest celebration on the banks of the St. Johns River. Green Cove Springs Mayor Felecia Hampshire welcomed NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Executive Officer Capt. Chuck Stuart, and Chief Matthew Rouse, U.S. Coast Guard Mayport Sector. Hampshire said, Throughout our history, men and women have chosen to give a part of their lives to serve in the armed forces of the United States. They have proved time and again that free dom and the preservation of our republic do not happen without a cost. Wanamaker remarked, It stirs your heart to see all these people come out and honor fellow citizens and some times family members who made the ultimate sacrifice in defense of our nation. Its my privilege to reflect on the sacrifices that have been made to defend our nation. Todays ceremony reminds us that freedom comes from eternnal vigilance. As the Clay County Community Band performed the hymn of each service, members of Boy Scout Troop 577 pre sented the flag of that service branch. Falling in behind each flag carrier were Clay County veterans of that service branch, who individually introduced themselves to the audience and named the various commands or era in which they served ranging from World War II, the Korean conflict and Vietnam to Kuwait, Iraq and Afghanistan. Photos by Clark Pierce (From left) NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker and Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Executive Officer Capt. Chuck Stuart congratu late Red Lonberg, 87, on his 28 years of naval service that began in World War II. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker passed along his appreciation to Green Cove Springs Mayor Felecia Hampshire and her team. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker, left, and FRCSE Executive Officer Capt. Chuck Stuart salute during the playing of Taps by Scott Boyer, lead conductor of Clay County Community Band, at the end of the Memorial Day tribute to fallen service members.Photo by Dan Alexander JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 7

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By MC1(SW) Greg JohnsonNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsThe 2014 Heroes at Home Jacksonville Military Spouse of the Year was announced during a ceremony aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville May 22. A panel of judges selected Kandi Debus, wife of ITCS(SW/IDW) Christopher Debus, as the inau gural winner of the award recogniz ing military spouses in the greater Jacksonville area. Debus, an employee of Commander, Navy Region Southeast, said her dedication to military fami lies and the community demonstrated through her extensive volunteer and community service accomplishments were key to her selection. There were a lot of other great spouses who were nominated and that do great things, so its really a humbling experience to be selected, Debus said. At the same time, its gratifying to see such appreciation for what military spouses do, day in and day out. It takes patience and sacrifice, but as military families, we take pride in seeing our Sailors wear the uniform. The Heroes at Home Military Spouse Awards program was launched in the Hampton Roads, Va., region in 2005 by the Norfolk, Va., Navy newspaper The Flagship, and was later expanded to Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Fort Lee, Va., and now military serv ing in Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia. Its about honoring and recogniz ing military spouses for what they do behind the scenes in support of their families and the community where they live, said Adair Wells, sales development manager for The Flagship/ Military Newspapers of Virginia and the founder of the program. They move every few years, they raise their families, they work, and they do all the things that a normal spouse would do, but its intensified by their situation. Their spouses are sometimes deployed for extended periods of time and its tough. Southern Chevy Dealers were the primary sponsor of this event. Other sponsors included the Florida Times-Union, USA-Discounters, St. Leos University, Navy Mutual, First Coast News and the City of Jacksonville. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown honored nominees dur ing the lunch, citing their sacrifices while embracing them as citizens of Jacksonville. More than 100 people attended the ceremony, including 11 finalists and their families. A panel of judges selected the finalists from 34 original nomina tions provided by family, friends and community organizations. Debus hus band, who is assigned to the ArleighBurke class guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68), submitted her nomination. He said that she is always there for Sailors and their families as the Navy Region Southeast ombudsman, sup porting both her command and ombudsmen at installations throughout the southeast. No matter whats going on in our lives, sometimes we have to take a back seat, while my wife takes care of another family who is in need or simply has a question, Senior Chief Debus said. Weve come to accept it. My children admire her and remind her in some offthe-wall comment about taking care of her Sailors. No matter what age or pay grade, once you come in contact with my wife, you are now an extension of our family. During the ceremony, Rear Adm. Rick Williamson, commander, Navy Region Southeast, expressed his gratitude to all military spouses. Our Sailors in the fleet could not do their jobs safely if it werent for your leadership back home in taking care of our families, Williamson said. Your commitment and dedication gives our Sailors the peace of mind required to operate safely and effectively. Thank you for all your leadership and for everything you do for our Navy. Without you, we would not be the Navy we are. Individual selection criteria for the award was based on volunteer efforts, fortitude during deployments, personal sacrifices, support for other military families, and impact on the communityNeither the U.S. Navy, NAS Jacksonville, MWR or Jax Air News, nor any part of the federal government, officially endorses any company, sponsor or their products or services. 2014 Military Spouse of the Year recognizedPhotos by MC1 Greg JohnsonKandi Debus celebrates with her husband, ITCS(SW/IDW) Chris Debus and children, Jakob and Caleb, after winning the 2014 Heroes at Home Jacksonville Military Spouse of the Year Award during a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville May 22. Kandi Debus (center) accepts the 2014 Heroes at Home Jacksonville Military Spouse of the Year Award from Adair Wells and Billie Nimnicht during a cer emony at NAS Jacksonville May 22. The ceremony was the first of its kind in the Jacksonville area. Happy 30th Anniversary, Hilltop Club 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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War Eagles change leadershipBy Lt. j.g. Christi MorrisseyVP-16 Public Affairs OfficerSix P-8A Poseidon aircraft silently presided over the flight line as Cmdr. Daniel Papp relieved Cmdr. William Pennington Jr. as com manding officer of the War Eagles of VP-16. The ceremony took place May 21, in Hangar 3672 on Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. The guest speaker was Vice Adm. William Moran, deputy chief of naval operations, for manpower, personnel, training and education. Today, right here, right now we couldnt ask for a clearer sign of whether this [the P-8A] transi tion, this transformation really, is going to succeed. Theres no limit to what the War Eagles are capable of doing, Moran observed during his remarks. I have never been in a command where Sailors are as hungry to excel as we are, Papp stated as he took charge of the War Eagles. We do not speak in terms of modest improvements. We are not mildly interested in doing better. We are not content with good enough. We get up early, hit it hard, and actively seek ways to improve at our trade. He continued, Skipper Pennington set a standard for excellence within VP-16. He will be greatly missed, but I know our Sailors and aircrew will continue to challenge themselves, set ting the bar even higher not just for our squadron, but for the entire Maritime Patrol Reconnaissance Force as well. Pennington assumed command of the War Eagles in the middle of the squadrons inaugural P-8A inter-deployment readiness cycle. He has led the squadron through the initial segment of their histor ic sunrise deployment with the Poseidon, supporting U.S. Navy 7th Fleet commanders. There really is nobody better suited to serve as the next leader of the War Eagles, Pennington said of his relief. As a weapons and tactics instructor, Cmdr. Papp has brought an extraordinary level of expertise and experience to our squadron. Beyond that, his genu ine care and concern for his Sailors is evident throughout his day-today interactions with members of the squadron. I am confident that he will guide our fine Sailors and aircrew to continued success on the remainder of this deploy ment and upon their return to NAS Jacksonville. Papp, a native of Chicago, Ill. ,graduated with honors from Northern Illinois University in 1993, receiving a Bachelor of Science degree in technology. Following two years of enlisted service, he earned his commission from the Officer Candidate School in Pensacola, Fla. and was desig nated as a naval flight officer in February 1998. He has served on flying tours with VP-40 at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash., and VP-30 in Jacksonville, Fla., as well as Special Projects Patrol Squadron 2 at MCAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, flying the venerable P-3C Orion aircraft. In addition, he also served tours aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, Naval Personnel Command, and NAVAIRSYSCOM PMA-205 where he served as the P-8A Poseidon assistant program manager for training systems. In September 2012, he departed NAVAIR for transition training in the P-8A Poseidon before joining the War Eagles as executive officer in May of 2013. Papp assumes command midSailors assigned to the VP-16 "War Eagles," bow their heads for the invocation during the squadron's change of command ceremony May 21 where Cmdr. William Pennington Jr. was relieved by Cmdr. Daniel Papp as commanding officer of VP-16. The squadron is currently deployed in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility supporting security in the IndoAsia-Pacific region. Photos by MC2 Eric PasterCmdr. William Pennington Jr., (left) the outgoing commanding officer of VP-16, salutes Cmdr. Daniel Papp, the incoming commanding officer, during their change of command ceremony on May 21 in Okinawa, Japan.way through VP-16s historic P-8A inaugural deploy ment. He is joined by new Executive Officer Cmdr. Daniel Boman. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 9 Nestled in old Orange Park with ancient oaks and the St. Johns River as part of the landscape, Grace Episcopal Day School has been providing an environment conducive to learning, to socialization, to spiritual development and to realizing a childs full potential since 1950. We focus on the individual student and how to help every child succeed, said Head of School Sharon Chapman. We meet the child where he or she is, and our staff has the freedom to teach to the individual. That means, Chapman said, that the school is committed to curriculum choices that draw on the individuals strengths. Teachers choose curricula and materials to meet the needs of the student, she said. Because they have the freedom to make choices and work with children oneon-one, our teachers our entire staff enjoy being here. That creates a positive, loving, Christian atmosphere where students feel safe to be themselves and express their needs. The average student-to-teacher ratio at the PreK3 through 8th grade school is 10 to 1. Teachers consistently are able to give the 150 to 175 students the individualized attention they deserve. Between PreK4 and kindergarten, we have a unique program for students who may need some additional time and instruction to make the move into kindergarten, said Director of Admissions and Marketing Susan Williams. We call it Transition 5, or the gift of time and it focuses on further development of the skills needed for kindergarten. It is the bridge between PreK 4 and kindergarten. We stress academics, Williams said. Our 8th grade graduates are accepted into the best programs in the area, such as the International Baccalaureate Program, Bolles, Episcopal School Jacksonville, Douglas Anderson School for the Performing Arts, and others. Ten of our students entered the Clay County Science Fair, and they won nine awards. Visual and performing arts programs are not sacrificed for academics at GEDS. We firmly believe the arts enhance academic perfor mance, Williams said. Our dual approach to academics and arts results in a well-rounded educational experience and ultimately in a well-rounded student. Spiritual development is an important aspect of the overall school experience for students. Although our foundation is Episcopalian, we have students of all denominations, Chapman said. We are here to prepare children to live responsible lives in a community grounded in the Christian faith. The schools approach encompasses a challenging academic program, visual and performing arts, Christian and character formation, foreign language instruction, technology, physical education, an athletic program and opportunities for service. Extended day care, a summer program and vacation Bible school are also available. GEDS was voted the Best Private School and Middle School by Jax4Kids in 2013. GEDS, where excellence is afford able, is accredited by the Florida Council of Independent Schools and the Florida Kindergarten Council, and is a member of the Board of Regents of the Diocese of Florida and the National Association of Episcopal Schools. GEDS is located at 156 Kingsley Ave. For more information, visit www.geds.net, or call the office at 904 269-3718 (Susan Williams ext. 14). Grace Episcopal Day School: Tradition, Character, Excellence, Service The school year is drawing to end, and an exciting summer is ahead at Grace Episcopal Day School. Register now for eight weeks of sensational fun, with extended day care also available for preschool students.

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From StaffVeterans in Northeast Florida now have a new source of assistance for preparing compensation claims to submit to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for disability. The new, twice-monthly VA Claims Preparation Workshop starts June 27, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Building 1 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Provided by AMVETS, the disability claims workshop is designed to expe dite VA processing by cutting through the red tape. Getting VA paperwork submitted correctly the first time is critically important to receiving your disabil ity ratings in a timely manner, said AMVETS National Service Officer David Sanders. Our primary purpose is to intercede on behalf of veterans with the VA at no charge to the vet eran. He added that participation in the workshop will require the service member to solicit command support. Seating is limited, so pre-reg istration is required via email to: david.d.sanders@navy.mil Sanders added that attending the VA Claims Preparation Workshop increases the prospect of getting disability ratings back in a timely manner within the 90 to 180 days projected by the VA. By MC3 Jennifer LebronDefense Media CenterEstablished during the Civil War as a burial ground for Union sol diers, Arlington National Cemetery has taken in the remains of more than 400,000 Americans. More than 4 million people visit the cemetery annually. From May through June of this year, the cemetery will host a series of events to commemorate Arlingtons 150 years as a national cemetery. This celebration is on behalf of the people who have served and sacri ficed, for every man and woman who has worn that uniform, said Patrick Hallinan, director of the cemetery. Its taking a look back and saying, heres the heritage, heres the mili tary heritage of service and sacrifice [because] everyone has served that has worn the uniform, everyone has contributed, and many have made the supreme sacrifice. There are nearly 5,000 unknown soldiers buried at Arlington National Cemetery. The Tomb of the Unknowns has never been officially named and is guarded 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Last year, remains recovered from the USS Monitor were interred in Arlington National Cemetery. The remains were discovered dur ing the summer of 2002, in an attempt to recover the ships 150-ton gun tur ret. Navy divers discovered human remains inside the turret. The remains were sent to be identified, but after a decade, were unsuccessful. The Monitor was made famous for battling the Confederate ship CSS Virginia, formerly USS Merrimack, on March 9, 1862, at Hampton Roads, Va., in the first fight between ironclad warships. The cemetery will also host lectures and tours that highlight the history of the United States through the eyes of the heroes buried at Arlington and the military conflicts that shaped the cemetery and the nation. Theres a lineage and theres a tradition and thats what we honor, Hallinan said. So as comrades, as fellow citizens and as patriots, I think its important that we get together and acknowledge that. Summer SplashOutdoor Pool PartySaturday, June 711 a.m 6 p.m.Boat Regatta DJ & Karaoke Prizes Free hotdog,chips & drink*Quantities are limitedSponsored by For more information call (904) 542-2930/3518 Arlington National Cemetery: 150 years of serviceVA disability claims workshop June 27 Photo by MC3 Scott Barnes'Spartans' at work in Arabian GulfAn MH-60R Seahawk helicopter assigned to the "Spartans" of HSM-70 takes off from the flight deck of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Truxtun (DDG 103) May 19. Truxtun is deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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Sailors saving livesBy AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterThirty Sailors aboard NAS Jax made a choice on May 20 that may help save lives of persons suffering from blood cancer and other fatal diseases such as leukemia or lymphoma by par ticipating in the C.W. Bill Young Department of Defense Marrow Donor Program. Ever year, more than 12,000 people are diagnosed with diseases such as leukemia or lymphoma, which require an infusion of blood-producing stem cells. Since more than 70 percent of patients do not have an appropriate match within their family, they require an unrelated donor. Since the program began in 1991, over 750,00 individu als have volunteered to join the fight against blood cancer and other fatal diseases. Because of the low compatibly rate between patient and donor, we need to recruit as many people as possible to screen, said AD2 Luciano Zinzani, CNATTU Jax AD phase instructor, who will be taking over as NAS Jax DoD Bone Marrow Representative shortly. In order to join the national registry of volunteer donors, you will need to complete a consent form and swab the inside of your checks using the testing kit provided. It is important to know that I run a walk-in registration site. Any person that wants to join the registry can come see me at CNATTU Jax to fill out the By Lt. j.g. John BellezzaVP-5 Public AffairsOn May 2, VP-5 took a break from their busy inter-deployment readi ness cycle to host the Clay County High School Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (JROTC) unit. The Mad Foxes gave the JROTC students a glimpse into the mari time patrol and recon naissance force aspect of naval aviation. The stu dents were given tours of the Navys newest avia tion platform, the P-8A Poseidon. The cadets were greet ed by VP-5 Executive Officer Cmdr. Al Djock and CMDCM Terrence Mitchell. Following introductions, they viewed a short video on the cele brated history of the mad foxes and had the chance to ask questions. Sophomore cadet Matthew Romito said that he enjoyed hearing stories about the careers of Djock and Mitchell. The highlight of the JROTC visit was touring the P-8A Poseidon. They enjoyed learning about the new aircraft and had numerous questions for the aircrew. Lt. Sarah Jones, Lt. J.g. Jason Cromwell, AWO2 Stephanie Castaneda, and AWO2 Chance Passen discussed the mission of the P-8A Poseidon and how the different aircrew posi tions work together to make an effective combat aircrew. The tour allowed the students to inter act with the Mad Foxes and provided them with a small taste of what the maritime patrol mission entails. Many of the stu dents said that one day they hoped to fly for the Navy. The students are very busy throughout the school year with uniform inspections, drill practic es and other activities. Retired Capt. Mike Boyer, U.S. Navy Reserve, who is the senior naval science instructor for the unit, discussed how JROTC gives the students a basic foundation to be a model citizen. The opportunity to view the squadron pro vides them a vision of where their hard work and dedication can lead them in the future. VP-5 is currently in its inter-deployment readi ness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville.Clay County High School JROTC visits VP-5 Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesHM Shannon Brown (left) assists SW2 Kaylynn Barajas (right) with the swab testing kit that will be used to determine Barajas' Human Leukocyte Antigen type. After completing the consent form, PR1 Jamie Hill of VP-62 uses the testing kit to takes four swabs of the inside of her cheek which will determine if she is a match for a patient that requires a stem cell transplant. See MARROW, Page 15 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. **New time Friday Social Hour 59 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke Second Tyme Around Band performs Friday June 13 at 6 p.m. Lunch bingo Monday through Friday begins at 11:15 a.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly handicap single tournament June 21, 1 4 p.m., $20 Scratch Sweeper May 24 & June 28, 1 4 p.m., $30 *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open through June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31 Outdoor Pool Hours effective June 2, 2014 June 2 6 Lap swim 6 8 a.m. and 11 a.m. 1:00 p.m. (short course only) Open recreation swim 4 7 p.m. June 9 (Monday Friday) through the summer Lap swim 6 8 a.m. Swim lessons 8 11 a.m., open recreation swim 11 a.m. 7 p.m.... Every Saturday and Sunday Open recreation swim 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Summer Splash Pool Party June 7, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free food, games and prizes! I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Blue Man Group Month $49 Orlando Shopping Trip July 26 $20 St. Augustine Scenic Cruise August 30 $20 Mt. Dora Trip October 25 $20 Jacksonville Jaguar tickets on sale soon! Adventure Landing Waterpark seasonal $85.50 Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance in Sanford, FL. (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Motley Crew Concert, Oct. 19 Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Pirates Museum St. Augustine $4 $21.75 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Jacksonville Suns Game May 29 at 6 p.m. Free admission and transportation USA Vs. Nigeria Soccer Match June 7 at 4 p.m. $20 per person Free Paintball Trip June 14 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty June 10 & 24 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests May 29, June 12 & 26 Golf Course Construction Special Play 18-holes with cart and green fees Monday Friday for only $20! Not applicable on holidays. Command Party Swing into savings & book your command golf tournamentMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependent Skipper B Sailing Classes availableAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Summer Camp Registration going on now! Sign-in at the youth centerFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available including instrument, complex and commercial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.net MWR photoMWR bowling champs(From left) AWFC Ben Sessions, AMC Chris Licata and ATC Mike Keef win the 2014 Captain's Cup Winter Bowling League Championship May 16 at NAS Jax Freedom Lanes. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 13

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By Sgt. David BayotNAS Jax Police DepartmentThe NAS Jacksonville Law Enforcement Team is actively partici pate in the 2014 Click-It or Ticket seatbelt campaign through June 1. Failure to buckle-up in compliance with state laws by the driver and/or passengers allows law enforcement officers to conduct a traffic stop and issue a citation for the infraction. In Florida and government installations, seatbelt usage is now considered a primary offense. NAS Jacksonville upholds a zero tolerance policy for failure to use vehicle seatbelts and maintains that non-compliance of the seatbelt law is a primary offense. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reveals that since the enforcement mobilizations program began, child fatalities have dropped significantly. Child restraint use for infants under one-year-old has risen considerably, and restraint use among toddlers ages 1-4 has jumped even more dramatically over the past three years. Last year, adult seatbelt use rose to the nations highest utilization rate ever. With more than 80 million Americans buckling up you would think everybodys finally gotten the message. Last year Duval County still had some of the highest traffic fatalities in the State of Florida. Please join this effort to save lives and reduce inju ries by promoting seatbelt usage. Dont become one of the 2014 fatality statistics by failing to buckle up. Photo by MC2 Amanda CabasosPatrolman Malcolm Watson from NAS Jax Security Department issues a seatbelt citation to a motorist aboard the base April 30. Click-It or Ticket seatbelt campaign ongoing until June 1 Intramural Golf Summer League forming Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. The league plays Wednesday at 11:30 a.m., beginning May 28. Contact base gym for rules and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Forming Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Contact base gym for rules and required paperwork. Roster forms due by May 30. Wallyball League Forming Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. required paperwork. Roster forms due by June 6. Badminton Singles League Meeting May 28 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet noon along with rules and required paperwork. Bean Bag Toss Singles Tournament June 23 Tournament takes place at 5 p.m. in the NAS Jax Fitness, Sports and Aquatics Center. The tournament is open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Call the Fitness Center at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil to sign up by June 13. Tournament July 21-25 Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for their command or third place. Sign up by July 14. Tournament July 28-31 Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for their command or third place. Sign up by July 21. For more information about any of the sports articles, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil Visit the MWR website at www.cnic. navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjax mwr. StandingsAs of May 23Team Wins Losses Bad News Babes 2 1 NAS-ty Slammers 1 1 Hit it-n-Quit it 1 2 Pitch Slaps 0 2Team Wins Losses NAVHOSP 11 1 VP-30 12 1 VP-26 9 2 FRCSE Rabid Possums 8 3 VP-45 Sluggers 8 3 CNRSE/Navy Band 6 4 FRCSE 900 6 4 HS-11 6 4 VR-62 6 5 HSM-74 3 1 NCTS 5 5 CRS-10 4 6 AIR OPS 5 8 FACSFAC 3 7 NBHC Honey Badgers 2 8 CBMU202 2 9 VP-45 Scared Hitless 2 9 FRCSE Thrusters 2 11 FRCSE Tweaks & Geeks 1 11 Final StandingsTeam Wins Losses CNATTU 3 1 VP-26 3 1 FACSFAC 3 1 NAVFAC 1 3 NECE 0 4 A CFC Participant provided as a public service. While he works to defend our country, St. Jude works to save his son from a deadly disease.St. Jude patient, Aaron, with his father Lieutenant Commander, Scott Photos by Morgan KenhertAustralian footballOn May 17, Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron and the Fighting Squids of Ft. Lauderdale gathered at Sea King Park aboard NAS Jacksonville to play an 'Australian Rules' football game. The fast-paced combination of speed, athleticism, skill and physical toughness combined for very entertaining afternoon. After four exciting quarters, the Aussies proved to be victorious, winning 67-37. Robert Watson of the Fighting Squids is in good field position as he kicks the ball and ultimately scores a goal. During the first quarter, players from both teams collided in the air in an attempt to gain possession of the ball. After the game, Aussie team members signed two jerseys to be presented as a thank-you to the Fighting Squids, as well as to MWR's Sports Coordinator Bill Bonser, for organizing the game. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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By Lt. j.g. Mark BadenVP-8 Public Affairs OfficerSailors from the VP-8 Fighting Tigers deployed at Cooperative Security Location Comalapa in El Salvador supported the La Gran Comision Church nutrition program May 19 by participating in a charity 8K running event. A total of 46 Sailors donated cash to support the squadrons 20 runners. The event raised more than $600 for the nutritional program at La Gran Comision Church in La Libertad, El Salvador. Through charitable donations and fundraising events on their current deployment, the Fighting Tigers have raised more than $5,000 for community outreach events, in addition to donating 2,000 pounds of clothes and supplies. Helping the local community any way we can is a mission of ours, said Lt. Joel Pena, VP-8 Community Relations Coordinator. The run was a fantastic opportunity to continue VP-8s legacy of community service and outreach in a way that was fun and engaging for squadron members. The La Gran Comision Church is a non-denominational congregation of local residents and missionaries who work to improve the lives of the less fortunate. Some of their work includes nutritional programs that provide healthy meals to children whose fami lies may not be able to afford a balanced diet. They also provide a safe haven for battered and abused women and chil dren. The care and assistance provided by the church is a vital lifeline to the El Salvadoran community. The Fighting Tigers are currently deployed to the 4th and 5th fleet areas of responsibility, assisting in Counter Trans-National Organized Crime efforts and providing humanitarian assistance. By AWFCS Mike Wendelin VR-62 Public AffairsAO1(AW) Robin Anton has been selected for the Limited Duty Officer (LDO) Program as an Aviation Maintenance Duty Officer (6335) dur ing the FY-15 LDO board. Anton was selected as the VR-62 Sailor of the Year for 2012 and 2013. She was also selected as Commander, Fleet Logistics Support Wing, Sailor of the Year for 2013. Anton Joined the Navy Reserve in 1999 after completing active duty and a nine-year break in service. Her first com mand was HS-75, and she spent time at a number of other helicopter commands. One of her most interesting assignments was at Theatre Field Confinement Facility Kuwait where she served as a guard commander. She joined the VR-62 Nomads in July of 2010. Anton said VR-62 has provided me with a wealth of opportunity and I feel privileged to call myself a Nomad. She went on to say, the leadership at VR-62 has been fantastic, particu larly that of my mentor AZCM Karen Quinn, who has been nothing less than amazing. She always believed in me and insisted that I sub mit a package to the LDO board. Anton is sched uled to attend Direct Commissioning Officer School at Naval Station Newport R.I. in the fall. The Nomads are very proud of petty offi cer Anton, because she exemplifies the Nomad slogan of Be the best, said VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. B.T. Smith. Skipper Smith went on to say, Anton has shown that hard work and deter mination can and does pay off. We congratulate her and wish her the best on her new career path in the Navy Reserve. Nomad selected for Limited Duty Officer ProgramAO1(AW) Robin AntonFighting Tigers raise bucks for family nutritionPhoto courtesy of VP-8Twenty VP-8 Sailors and their shipmates took part in an 8K run that raised money for a local San Salvador nutritional program. Hundreds of golfers showed up on May 16 to support NMCRS at the tournament sponsored by VP-30 at the Golf Club at South Hampton in St. Augustine.Photos by Barbie Smolinski Almost $33,000 was raised May 16 at the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Golf Tournament this year. (From left) VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips, NMCRS CEO retired Adm. Steve Abbot, NMCRS Jacksonville Director Monika Woods, NMCRS vice president retired USMC Brig. Gen. Pete Collins, Lt. Strittmatter and Lt. Shane Heller.Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Golf TournamentVolunteers Delores Wise, Lindsay Potts-Szoke, Linda Brown and Sandy Faraldo helped the tournament run smoothly. form and make the swab, Zinzani added. To register with the DoD Marrow Program (also known as Salute to Life), prospective donors must be: Reserve, Coast Guard, National Guard; military dependent; or DoD civilian employee. example, the program cannot accept donors with HIV, heart disease, auto immune disorders, hepatitis B or C, kidney or liver disease, or bleeding disorders.For further information, please visit www.salutetolife.org MARROWFrom Page 12 JOIN TODAY! ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS A CFC participant provided as a public service JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 29, 2014 15

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