Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
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Newspaper
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English
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United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
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30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
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UF00028307:02090


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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MAY 15, 2014 I I D E JOINT WARRIORS VP-10, VP-5 in UK Exercise Page 3 HOMELESS HELP Lunch at Sulzbacher Center Page 4 SEAT BELT Click It -Or Ticket Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com By MC2 Amanda CabasosStaff WriterThirteen Sailors aboard NAS Jax were either selected or volunteered by their tenant commands to complete train ing in the Auxiliary Security Force (ASF) academy at the base security department. The three-week course, held once every quarter, is designed to shape the nonMA-rating Sailors into an additional and efficient security force for the base. NAS Jax ASF Coordinator MA1 Ronald Hughes from the base secu rity department said, The purpose of the course is to train members from various commands in Anti-Terrorism/ Force Protection (AT/FP), as well as law enforcement practices and procedures. The course is designed to train ASF members to augment base security dur ing heightened AT/FP conditions and during special events as dictated by the commanding officer. Examples of such events could include an air show or a plane crash, Hughes added. Although the academy is short, Sailors are exposed to many possible live sce narios. In order to respond properly to the scenarios, students are required to engage in many course activities includ By AWFCS Mike WendelinVR-62 Public AffairsCommander, Naval Reserve Forces announced April 14, that Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 62 won the Reserve Component Personnel Program Excellence Award for exceeding retention goals for fiscal year 2013. More commonly known as the Golden Anchor award, this honor is earned by com mands that meet or exceed pre-determined Navy-wide Personnel Program goals. The Nomads previously won this award for exceeding retention goals in fiscal year 2012. VR-62s unsurpassed metrics were as follows: percent across all zones completed within timeline Waypoints Reenlistment appli cations Indoc/RASW/FTSW (docu mented in cims) Development Program completion in FLTMPS ment Exam discrepancy per centage of 0 percent tions in Career Waypoints The Career Development Program can only be success ful when there is complete buy in from the squadron leadership and the command possesses a motivated career development team, said NC1 Kenneth Swan, VR-62s com mand career counselor. He went on to say, We have the leadership and the team at VR-62 which is why our Sailors continue to have great success. I could not be more proud of the commitment shown by the Nomad team. Swan also praised the work of VR-62s divisional collat eral duty career counselors, including AZ2 Milton Taltoan, AZ2 Crystal Janes, AM2 Jose Delacruz, AWF2 Timothy Williams, AWF1 Joshua Simmons, AWF2 Kyle Noviskie and AZ2 Christian Scanell. VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Bryon Smith said, Not only did NC1 Swan do his part to make this happen, but his team of divisional career counselors working behind the scenes showed the true Nomad work ethic of Be the Best! It is awesome to work with the dedicated team of profession als here at VR-62. VR-62 is a Navy Reserve logistics squadron based at NAS Jacksonville that operates five of the Navys 24 C-130T Hercules logistics aircraft. The VR-62 Nomads sup port Navy high-priority airlift requests around the globe and around the clock. ASF academy students endure vigorous training By Lt. j.g. Joseph BayoVP-26 Public Affairs OfficerVP-26 Maintenance Duty Section 3 recently completed the annu ally required intermediate main tenance concept (IMC) inspec tion on P-3C Orion 765 at NAS Jacksonvilles Hangar 1000, home of the Tridents. Aircraft maintenance encom passes a very broad range of activities, ranging from a few minutes of aircraft servicing (checking oil levels or taking fuel samples, for example) to months of overhaul in an industrial facility. In naval aviation, aircraft main tenance is divided into three dis tinct levels: organizational maintenance; intermediate maintenance; and depot maintenance. Task complexity, space require ments, level of skill of assigned personnel, and scope of support responsibility are the basis for determining which tasks are com pleted at each maintenance level. The mission of intermediate level maintenance is to sustain the combat readiness of a squadron by providing quality and timely material support at the nearest location with the lowest practical resource expenditure. It includes shop-type repair and test work on aircraft, components and equipment from supported units. In the case of aircraft 765, which was deployed to the U. S. 4th Fleet Photo courtesy of VP-26VP-26 Maintenance Duty Section 3 with the P-3C Aircraft 765. They expedited a complex inspection and maintenance procedure to help sister P-3C squadron VP-8.Expediting IMC on 765 Golden Anchor drops at VR-62, twicePhotos courtesy of VR-62 (From left) YN2 Andrew Nightwine, LS2 Gina Linderos, AE2 Jeremy Shelton, NC1 Kenneth Swan, PS1 James Holton and AME2 Glen Taylor worked together on the VR-62 Career Development Program. This is the second year that VR-62 has celebrated winning the Golden Anchor award. (From left, standing) PS1 James Holton,YN2 Andrew Nightwine, AME2 Glen Taylor and VR-62 Command Career Counselor NC1 Kenneth Swan. (Sitting) AE2 Jeremy Shelton and LS2 Gina Linderos.Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosMA1 Keith Danalewich of NAS Jax Security Department pepper sprays AS2 Mark Dial of the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jacksonville as part of one of the requirements for the Auxiliary Security Force academy held at NAS Jax May 8. PRAN Beatriz Salgado of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast secures the suspect, ET2(SW/AW) Jeremy Pugh of Fleet Air Control Surveillance Facility Jacksonville; while Major Olimpia Jackson of NAS Jax Police Department observes the students technique.See Page 7 See VP-26, Page 8 Allegheny Road closureFrom StaffAllegheny Road directly south of Akron Road will be installation of new storm drain piping.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-7789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley U.S. Navy photosOn May 16, at about 6 p.m., three Navy-Curtiss (NC) flying boats of Seaplane Squadron One took off from Trepassey Bay, Newfoundland, to attempt the first trans-Atlantic flight. NC-4, commanded by Lt. Cmdr. Albert Read, landed safely at Horta, Azores, after more than 15 hours in the air. The other two NC aircraft were not so fortunate -both lost their bearings in thick fog and sustained damage when landing on the water and were unable to resume flight. USS Farragut (DD-348) is underway during maneuvers staged for Movietone News off San Diego in 1936. She is being overflown by five Catalina flying boats. Produced by Consolidated Aircraft, the PBY Catalina was one of the most widely used multi-role aircraft of World War II. From StaffMay 15 1800 Capt. Preble, commanding the 36-gun frigate Essex, arrives in Batavia, Java, to escort U.S. merchant ships. 1942 First Naval Air Transport Service flight across Pacific. 1969 Sinking of USSGuitarro (SSN665) in 35 feet of water next to its fit ting-out pier, due to negligent shipyard workers. 1991 Amphibious Task Force arrives at Chittagong, Bangladesh, for relief operations after Cyclone Marian. May 16 1820 The 38-gun heavy frigate USS Congress becomes first U.S. warship to visit China. 1919 Three Navy flying boats begin first trans-Atlantic flight from Newfoundland. 1965 First U.S. gunfire support in Vietnam by destroyer Henry W. Tucker (DD-875). May 17 1940 President Roosevelt announces plans to re-commission 35 mothballed destroyers. 1942 USS Tautog (SS-199) sinks Japanese sub I-28; while USS Triton (SS201) sinks I-164. 1951 Carrier aircraft attack bridges between Wonsan and Hamhung, Korea. 1962 Naval amphibious ready group lands Marines to guard Thailands borders from communist probes. 1966 Naval Support Activity Saigon established. 1973 First woman to hold a major Navy command, Capt. Robin Quigley, assumes command of Navy Service School, San Diego. 1987 USS Stark (FFG-31) struck by Iraqi Exocet missile in Persian Gulf, killing 37 and wounding 21. 1990 USS Roark (DE 1053) rescues 42 refugees from unseaworthy craft in South China Sea May 18 1775 Benedict Arnold cap tures British sloop and renames her Enterprise, the first of many famous ships with that name. 1798 Appointment of Benjamin Stoddert as first Secretary of the Navy. 1969 Launch of Apollo 10, dress rehearsal for first lunar landing mis sion. Cmdr. John Young, was the Command Module Pilot and Cmdr. Eugene Cernan was the Lunar Module Pilot. During the 8-day mission, the craft made 31 lunar orbits in 61.6 hours. Recovery was by HS-4 helicopters from USS Princeton (LPH-5). May 19 1912 Navy establishes North Atlantic Ice Patrol following RMS Titanic disas ter. 1965 30th Naval Construction Regiment activated at Danang, Vietnam. May 20 1801 Four warships sent to Mediterranean to protect American commerce. 1815 Commodore Stephen Decatur (38-gun frigate Guerriere) sails with 10 ships to suppress Mediterranean pirate raids on U.S. shipping. 1844 USS Constitution sails from New York on an around-the-world cruise. 1943 Establishment of 10th Fleet in Washington, D.C., under command of Adm. King to coordinate U.S. antisub marine operations in Atlantic. May 21 1850 Washington Navy Yard begins work on first castings for the Dahlgren guns. 1917 USS Ericsson (DD-56) fires first torpedo of World War I. 1944 During preparations for the invasion of Saipan, an accidental ord nance blast on LST 353 sets off cata clysmic ammunition explosions at West Loch, Pearl Harbor, killing 163 and injuring 396. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorWill you encourage your three boys to join the military? Thats a question I get often because my husband, dad and father-in-law are Navy pilots. But its one that I struggle with. Choosing the military always means choosing sacrifice. There is no question that a civilian engineer has the opportunity to make more money than one employed by the U.S. military. And yet, comparing military pay to civilian pay is a fools errand, mostly because of the benefits. If you look at a military pay chart, you arent getting the full picture. We get housing allowances and free (I always use that term loosely) healthcare. Historically, choosing sacrifice was offset by these benefits the militarys promise to take care of its own. Last week, Gen. Martin Dempsey, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, defended to Congress the Pentagons proposal to change military pay and benefits in 2015. Under the proposed plan, pay raises would be 1 percent, healthcare fees would increase, and housing allowances would shrink by 5 percent. It may seem nominal, because they are giving ser vice members a raise, after all. However, according to a military.com report, that 1 percent raise is actually 0.8 percent lower than the employment cost index [and] below the inflation rate. Meaning the value of a service members pay check would go down. And as for housing, ours has never covered expenses for reasonable housing. Even before a 5 percent reduction, we have always supplemented out-of-pocket. Responding to criticism, the military claims they will use the money saved to support services for families and service members. Im not great with math, but I understand this word problem: Were going to take away some of your pay and spend it in a way we think will be better for you in the long run. The end of this equation is the military loses its best people and struggles to recruit more. Because the biggest problem with the budget is not personnel costs but waste. In response to a question on my Facebook page, military spouses and service members sounded off about waste: After 20-plus years of watching military units waste billions of dollars at the end of a fiscal year on nonoperational items such as televisions and popcorn poppers, I remain unconvinced that the way to save money is by reducing pay and benefits. Having worked in a government budget office, [I know] travel for the most part can be stopped. Why have conferences in Vegas when most things can now be accomplished via Internet? [Not] allowing commands to make smart purchases . [for instance], buying a $29.99 case of copy paper at a local store instead of using the $89 case from the militarys contracted company [is wasteful]. I support a less popular choice: closing base com missaries and giving military families equivalent discounts at civilian stores. A majority of retirees and reservists dont even live near a commissary, so they miss this benefit. But the commissary has powerful lobbyists behind it, so, dont worry, its here to stay. There are almost endless ways the military wastes money, but none of them involve paychecks, housing or healthcare. And the most disturbing part about all of this is that the proposed cuts are supported by the people who promised to take care of us. Even worse, those people have claimed its what service members want. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Greenert held town hall meetings across the country to gauge service members feelings about the budget cuts. His takehome: Navy men and women understand the mili tarys need to balance personnel costs with readiness. Interestingly, the Association of the U.S. Navy found a different take-home: their survey of service mem bers revealed that 90-percent do not want the pay cuts. So dont bother with the results of the CNOs town halls. Check out #KeepYourPromise on Twitter and Facebook, and see how unhappy families are. At a time when the military is asking more of its people longer and more frequent deployments, more administrative duties they are about to ask them to do it with less pay and benefits. This is called having your cake and eating it, too. And its terrible for retention and recruiting. So, will I encourage my sons to join the military? The answer is no. In fact, Id like to opt them out of the recruiter list. If they feel moved to serve, we will know it. But having my sons courted by a recruiter who will tell them about the great deal that is military life, in my mind, exposing them to a promise that is quickly becoming an illusion. This Week in Navy History From the HomefrontPentagons proposed pay cuts will be devastating RAAF warrant officer tours NAS JaxRoyal Australian Air Force (RAAF) MCPON Equivalent, Warrant Officer of the Air Force, Mark Pentreath meets with NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Teri McIntyre during a courtesy call with NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander on May 6. Pentreath toured the base to become familiarized with the available P-8A Poseidon training opportunities. Photo by MC2 Amanda Cabasos

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NAS Jax squadrons participate in UK Joint Warrior 14-1By Lt.j.g. Andrew Smith and Lt.j.g. Brendan McGoeyVP-10 Public AffairsVP-10 recently returned from a three-week, combined Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) exercise at Royal Air Force (RAF) Lossiemouth, United Kingdom (UK). RAF Lossiemouth is situated on the northern coast of Scotland bordering the North Sea. Four P-3C Orion Combat Air Crews (CAC) from VP-10 and two P-8A Poseidon CACs from VP-5 participated alongside several MPRF assets from allied countries including the UK, Norway, New Zealand, France and Canada. In addition to MPRF aircraft, the exercise also includ ed surface, subsurface and rotary wing platforms from several other North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) nations. The Red Lancers sent CAC-1 led by Lt. Cmdr.Travis Bagwell, CAC-2 led by Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Colon, CAC10 led by Lt. Cmdr. Paul Nickell, and CAC-12 led by Lt. Justin Moore, and a maintenance detachment led by Lt. Christian Cruz. The Officer-in-charge (OIC) of the detachment was Lt. Cmdr. Christopher Metz who coordinated all VP-10 operations with the RAF Mobile Air Operations Command (MAOC) in order to ensure the success of each air crew involved. Joint Warrior provides an advanced NATO and allied joint coordinated operations environment which VP-10 took advantage of to achieve CAC qualifications as part of the squadrons Operational Readiness Exam. While in Scotland, each crew flew and completed four missions, earning various quali fications required prior to departing on deployment. The completed missions not only provided the Red Lancers with necessary deployment qualifications, but also provided a unique, invaluable opportunity to experience real-time, international operations with the multiple surface, subsurface and MPRF assets involved in the exercise. Joint Warrior provides a unique opportunity to work with allied nations in a tactical environment, said Moore, mission commander of CAC-12. The experience gained from our joint operations here at Joint Warrior will adequately prepare us for the operations we expect to see on deployment. In addition to gaining valuable experience in the P-3, the Red Lancers were able enjoy some of the benefits that the beautiful country of Scotland had to offer. On off days, crews toured historical castles, played golf or visited local distilleries to learn the art of Scotch whiskey. Joint Warrior 14-1 concluded with International Night in which each squadron involved in the exer cise brought food and beverage from their respective homelands. The night was a celebration of the MPRF brother/sisterhood with all officer and enlisted per sonnel taking part. In addition to their cuisine, the squadrons shared skits, stories and experiences from past Joint Warrior exercises. Lt.j.g. John Fabros, navigator of CAC-2, was particularly enthused by the prospect of multi-national cooperation, It was great to get to know other MPRF aircrew from around the world and speak to some of my MPRF counterparts in their native (French) language. VP-10 is home based at NAS Jacksonville and are currently in final preparations for their upcoming deployment. (From left) VP-5 Lt. Cmdr. Andrew Behlke, VP-10 Lt. Cmdr. Christopher Metz and RAF Squadron Leader Lloyd Barrett gather during 'International Night' at RAF Lossiemouth.Photo courtesy of VP-10 TRICARE HBAs remain on site at hospitalBy Jeanne Casey NH Jacksonville Deputy Public Affairs Officer While TRICARE Service Centers (TSCs) have eliminated walk-in service, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles TRICARE Health Benefits Advisors (HBAs) remain on site. TSC services are still available but only at www. tricare.mil, www.humana-military.com or (800) 4445445. Beneficiaries can change their Primary Care Manager (PCM), compare plans, enroll in a plan, see whats covered, check on referrals and claims, and more. NH Jacksonvilles on-site HBAs are still available to discuss options for complex issues but are unable to make changes on patients behalf. HBAs work for the hospital, while website and phone staff work for TRICAREs regional contractor (Humana Military). At NH Jacksonville, patients can walk in to see the TRICARE HBAs (located on the first floor of the hos pitals central tower) or call the HBAs at (904) 5429164/9165. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 FRCSE Sailors volunteer at homeless shelterBy Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsSailors from Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) delivered donated items, prepared, and served lunch to patrons of the I.M. Sulzbacher Center, a non-profit, homeless shelter in downtown Jacksonville, April 16. The FRCSE First Class Petty Officers Association coordinated a drive to collect donated toiletries and furniture for the center prior to the visit. About 20 Sailors from the command delivered the items, toured the facility, prepared the lunchtime meal and served hungry residents and homeless visitors. Having volunteered for various organizations for many years, for me its all about giving back, FRCSE Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Leonard Gage told the Sailors. There is a sense of pride and professionalism that goes with volun teering in the community. The folks living here have hit a bump in the road and are trying to integrate back into the community. This includes many homeless veterans. They come from all walks of life, just as we do. And, just like we value diversity in the Navy, this is our opportunity to show we are as much a part of the community as everyone else. I.M. Sulzbacher Center Public Relations and Marketing Manager Allison Ownby and Carlton Higginbotham, grant writer for the center, discussed the many pro grams available to residents as the Sailors toured the Barnett Childrens Building, Hugh H. Jones Medical and Dental Building, resident living areas and dining facility. We provide shelter to 350 res idents and are the largest homeless shelter in Northeast Florida, said Higginbotham. Our goal is to get people off the streets and find them permanent jobs with growth and housing. We especially try to not tear families apart and go out of our way to help them. Unfortunately, we currently have 90 families on our waiting list. We are at full capacity and there is no limitation on how long our residents can stay. After the tour, the Sailors spent several hours preparing food for the lunch time meal. The group pitched in making cookies, frying French fries, mak ing sandwiches, preparing bag lunches for distribution at outreach facilities throughout Jacksonville and serving nearly 500 plates of food to hungry patrons. The Navy has provided countless hours of support to the kitchen of the Sulzbacher Center, said Kevin Nacke, director of food services at the center. They provide the team effort needed to cook and serve those who are hungry in Jacksonville. We really appreciate the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Sailors volunteering here today, added Ownby. I think that when you are in the military, service is at the heart of it and so extending that into our community is an extension of the service they are providing our country. The I.M. Sulzbacher Center for the Homeless opened in 1995 as a mens shelter providing beds and meals to help the homeless reintegrate into the community. Today, the staff and volunteers offer continued care, addressing all aspects of homelessness. The center has also part nered with the City of Jacksonville Military and Veterans Services to provide dedicated help to veterans in need. The theory of the center is to provide everything a person needs to get back on their feet in one place, said Higginbotham. We continue to provide aftercare support and have a 95 percent success rate once they leave the center. We serve 1,500 meals a day utilizing volun teers to help accomplish this and are always looking for volunteers with different skill sets to help out. Volunteers help make the center run. For AT3 Brittany Wilkerson of FRCSE, visiting the shelter was an eye-open ing experience. Visiting the Sulzbacher Center was an enjoyable and educational experience for me, she said. The staff was very friendly and helpful while giving the tour and serving in the kitchen. It was nice to see that there are still caring and giving people who actually enjoy what they do. I will definitely visit again to help out and donate whatever I can. To close out the day, the Sailors gathered in the centers courtyard to reflect on their experience. You often see things on TV, but today you had the opportunity to see it in real life, Gage told the group. Each and every one of you probably touched someones life today. Thank you for volunteering and making a difference. Cherish the time with your families because with any hiccup in life, this could be the end result. I know that Im humbled, and I hope you are humbled as well and take something away from our visit here today. Lending a helping hand . .(From left) AM2 Alexandru Zamfira, ASAN Zachery Levendoski and AZ2(AW) Jose Prince load a donated book shelf onto a truck headed for the Sulzbacher Center, a homeless shelter in downtown Jacksonville on April 16. A group of Sailors from Fleet Readiness Center Southeast gather in front of the truck they loaded with donations for the I.M. Sulzbacher Center, a homeless shelter in downtown Jacksonville, before visiting the center. AM3 Luciano DelaFuente (left) and ASAN Bret Scharnhorst of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, load donations onto a truck for the Sulzbacher Center, a homeless shelter in downtown Jacksonville. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Leonard Gage, center, presents Allison Ownby, public relations and marketing manager for the I.M. Sulzbacher Center, a homeless shelter in downtown Jacksonville, and Carlton Higginbotham, grant writer for the center, with his Navy coin after a tour of the center. Allison Ownby, public relations and marketing manager for the I.M. Sulzbacher Center, a homeless shelter in downtown Jacksonville, explains some of the programs available to residents at the center during a tour for Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Sailors.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 5 (From left) ASAN Cory Marshall, AT2 Devin Rothgery and AT3 Brittany Wilkerson of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, make up plates of food for the lunchtime meal in the kitchen of the I.M. Sulzbacher Center, a homeless shelter in downtown Jacksonville. The Sailors prepared nearly 500 plates of food for the homeless during the community relations event. (From left) ATAN Sarah Jones and Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Leonard Gage of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, hand out utensils and dessert to hungry guests at the I.M. Sulzbacher Center during a community relations event. (From left) ATAN Kaitlin Griffin, AT3 Dustin Sheets and AT3 Andrew West of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, prepare breakfast sandwiches for a morning meal in the kitchen at the I.M. Sulzbacher Center. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Leonard Gage (left) and AT2 Devin Rothgery of FRCSE prepare trays of cookie dough for baking at the I.M. Sulzbacher Center.Photos by Kaylee LaRocque(From left) LSSN Recruit Thomas Jorkasky, ATAN Kevin Krieger, AE3 Chelsea Roberts and AT3 Nathaniel McFarlane of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast form a line to make up lunches for guests at the I.M. Sulzbacher Center. AT3 Dustin Sheets of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, serves lunch to residents of the I.M. Sulzbacher Center. ASAN Kyle Drummond of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast passes out a plate of food to a hungry guest during the April 16 lunchtime meal at the I.M. Sulzbacher Center. ASAN Kyle Drummond (front) and ASAN Cory Marshall of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast pre pare cups of peaches for the lunchtime meal at the Sulzbacher Center. ATAN Kevin Lenoir and LSSN Thomas Jorkasky wash dishes in the scullery. AM2 Alexandru Zamfira stirs a batch of French fries. AOAN Aldriick Kittles (front) and ASAN Cory Marshall of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast prepare bag lunches for distribution to the homeless in the kitchen of the I.M. Sulzbacher Center.

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From StaffNAS Jacksonville Unaccompanied Housing won its 5th CEL & Associates A List Crystal award for excellence in customer service, presented May 2014. The award recognizes prop erties that achieve the high est level and quality service as rated by their residents. The Crystal Award is based on a consolidated service score of at least 85 percent and a response rate of at least 20 percent. NAS Jacksonville Unaccompanied Housing, led by Manager Beverly Nix, received a service rating of 92.6 and an 88 percent response rate. Throughout the years, we strive to improve in custom er service, including main tenance response time. We assure our residents during our weekly indoctrination session that every effort will be made to make their stay in the bar racks comfortable, relaxing and safe. Nix continues to remind her staff to always treat their resi dents as they themselves would want to be treated. She and her staff thanked all of the residents who participated in the survey process and the tenant commands that provide weekly inspections. Nix expressed special thanks to NAS Jax Housing Director Mike Herbert, for his leader ship and to CSCS Wendell Heyward for supporting the barracks by providing person nel to accomplish various tasks. She concluded with a very special thanks to Wayne Jensen, public works facil ity manager, for ensuring that maintenance issues are cor rected in a timely manner. By Lt. j.g. Brendan McGoeyVP-10 Public Affairs OfficerVP-10 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Charles Stickney handed the reins of the Red Lancers to Cmdr. James Johnston during the change of command ceremony held on May 1, aboard NAS Jacksonville. Born in Charlotte, N.C. and raised in Chapin, S.C., Stickney graduated from Auburn University and was commis sioned in the U.S. Navy in 1995 with a degree in aerospace engineering. After being designated as a naval aviator in 1997, he was assigned to the Topcats of Sea Control Squadron (VS) 31, an S-3B Viking squad ron formerly based at NAS Jacksonville. In 2002, Stickney was select ed for community transition as part of the Viking Sundown Plan, and began flying the EP-3 ARIES as a member of the Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron 1 World Watchers in Whidbey Island, Wash., where he earned designations as mission com mander and instructor pilot. Subsequent tours included flag aide in Norfolk, Va. and reconnaissance operations officer for the U.S. Pacific Fleet in Honolulu, Hawaii. Stickney reported to VP-10 as executive officer in May 2012, where he transitioned to his third operational aircraft, the P-3C Orion. He became commanding officer on March 22, 2013, during a split deployment between U.S. 7th Fleet operating out of Japan and U.S. 4th Fleet operating from El Salvador. During the deployment, the Red Lancers directly sup ported joint task forces and host nation naval forces in the arrest of 33 suspected smug glers and the recovery or dis ruption of 16,129 kilograms of illicit narcotics with an esti mated street value of $1.6 bil lion. During the ceremony, Stickney commended VP-10, Be proud of yourselves as a Red Lancer team, of your abil ity to fix any gripe, prosecute any target, and to be outstanding ambassadors to any coun try around the world. It has been a true honor and deep ly humbling to serve as your commanding officer. I will miss all of you. Johnston assumed command of the squadron just a few months before VP-10 departs for their last deployment as a P-3C squadron prior to their transition to the P-8A Poseidon early next year. He takes over as the 78th commanding officer in the storied history of VP-10. Born and raised in Birmingham, Ala., Johnston enlisted in the Navy in 1988 and became a naval nuclear power instructor before being awarded an NROTC scholar ship to Auburn University, where he graduated in 1996. He earned his naval flight officer wings in April 1998 and qualified as instructor tactical coordinator and mission com mander with VP-46. He went on to become an ACTC level 5 weapons and tactics instructor with VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville. He also served as Flag Lieutenant to Commander, Carrier Strike Group 3, in various roles aboard Special Projects Patrol Squadron 2, and as the MQ-4C Triton Requirements Officer for the Chief of Naval Operations, before assuming the executive officer position at VP-10. During his remarks, Johnston urged the Red Lancers, . . you are the rea son we are here. We are called upon to support and defend the Constitution of the United States. I ask you to continue to build upon the Red Lancer character of humble sacrifice, hard work, servant leadership and commitment. Cmdr. Herb Lacy checked in as the squadrons new execu tive officer, following a suc cessful two-year tour as the test pilot requirements officer for OPNAV N98 at the Pentagon. Red Lancers change of commandCmdr. James JohnstonCmdr. Charles StickneyStation Unaccompanied Housing is CEL A List award winnerPhoto by Shannon LeonardNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (right) congratulates NAS Jax Unaccompanied Housing Manager Beverly Nix and her team for winning their fifth CEL & Associates A List Crystal award. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014

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ing Non-Lethal Weapons (OC, Expandable Baton, Defensive Tactics), Firearm training (M9 pistol, M500 shotgun, M4 rifle), Tactical Team Movements (clearing a building), crowd control, Vehicle and Personnel Inspections and Entry Control Procedures. Prior to graduating from the academy, students must pass four written exams and numer ous practical exams that are required. In addition, the stu dents must qualify with all three-weapon systems and qual ify with non-lethal weapons. If Sailors dont complete these requirements, they will not graduate the class, said Hughes. According to Hughes, the academy benefits NAS Jax by providing additional trained ASF personnel and aids the base in meeting and exceeding the AT/FP and law enforcement mission of the installation. Also, ASF-qualified Sailors receive the knowledge outside of their rate that is documented in the ETJ for the remainder of their career. Hughes said, Upon transfer ring to another command that requires security duties, these Sailors will have already quali fied. The academy is both physi cally and mentally challenging. We expect Sailors to show up with an open mind and willingness to learn, said Hughes. Sailors are also expected to be physically fit because they stand long hours wearing a ballistic vest and gun belt, he added. ASFFrom Page 1 By AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterThe NAS Jacksonville Commissary Team was awarded second place for the Directors Award in the Defense Commissary Agencys (DeCA) Best Commissary competition for FY 2013. The competition compared excellence in areas of accountability, customer satisfaction, unit cost, sales, and accident rate On May 8, NAS Jax Commissary Store Director Larry Bentley addressed employees. Our team makes $66 million in sales a year but whats more important is the 80,000 paying customers who walk through our doors every month. Thats who were here for and thats who were here to serve, Bentley said. Every day we strive to ensure the mil itary families in our community receive the highest quality service, he said. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander congratulated the employees. The positive attitude and outstand ing customer service that the NAS Jax Commissary team provides on a daily basis is what sets our commissary apart from the rest, said Undersander. I consider the commissary to be a main contributing member of the NAS Jax team because of all the work they do to benefit our military community and their families. Commissary team recognized for excellencePhotos by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, (center, right) presents the second place trophy of the Director's Award in DeCA's "Best Commissary" competition for FY 2013 to Larry Bentley, NAS Jacksonville Commissary store director, and the entire NAS Jax Commissary team. On May 8, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander con gratulated the NAS Jax Commissary Team for a job well done in the FY 2013 "Best Commissary" competition. Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosEACN Deanna Daniel of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 Det. Jacksonville rinses her eyes at the wash station after being pepper sprayed during the Auxiliary Security Force Academy on May 8. EACN Matthew Ebert of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 Det. Jacksonville utilizes face wash to help remove the burning sensation, after being exposed to pepper spray. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 7

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area of responsibility with the VP-8 Fighting Tigers, the nearest suitable location for intermediate maintenance was NAS Jacksonville. The lowest practical resource expen diture required assistance from the P-3 maintenance professionals sta tioned here. As Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) -11 hosting squadron VP-26 provided critical assistance to execute the IMC. While the average IMC on a P-3C Orion takes approximately 16 days in accordance with the sequence control chart, Duty Section 3 and a support ing element of VP-8 maintainers, led by AE1 Slemp, completed the work in just 12 days by working three continu ous 8-hour shifts around the clock and through a three-day weekend. Although the IMC team discovered an unexpect ed fuel cell leak, they were able to repair the leak and return the aircraft to VP-8 ahead of schedule. Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, commanding officer of VP-26, had words of praise for Duty Section 3. They demonstrated the dedication and professionalism that have kept the P-3 flying in support of our country for more than 50 years. The teamwork demonstrated across CPRW11 ensured a critical asset was returned to deployment in minimal time. I couldnt be more proud of Duty Section 3 and all of Trident Maintenance. VP-26From Page 1 By Lt. j.g. Chris MemmingerHSM-72 Public AffairsOn May 15, Cmdr. Torsten Schmidt assumed command of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 72 from Cmdr. Derek Fleck, during a change of command ceremony at NAS Jacksonville. The change of command came on the heels of a busy 15-month period that included major milestones for the Proud Warriors. Chief among notable events was the squadrons successful transition from HSL-42 to HSM-72 that included a wholesale change in aircraft inventory from legacy SH-60B to new MH-60R aircraft. As part of this transition, the Proud Warriors also converted from expedi tionary operations to Carrier Air Wingbased operations. Since February, HSM-72 has been an integral part of the Freedom Fighters of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. Flecks tenure as HSM-72 command ing officer began with the challenge of guiding the squadron through a safe-tooperate certification inspection allow ing them to operate the MH-60R for the first time. The first major employment of the new aircraft soon followed in June of 2013 when Proud Warrior aircrews and aircraft supported Exercises Bold Quest and Trident Warrior. During these two-week operating periods, HSM-72 aircraft conducted flight operations in conjunction with all four U.S. services, in addition to coalition partner nations Germany, France, Italy and Norway. Highlights included interoperabil ity testing of the Mode V Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) system and the Joint Tactical Information Distribution System between fourth and fifth generation air craft data link systems. During the summer of 2013, HSM72 welcomed Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron into the fold in preparation for their reception and ini tial operation of the MH-60R helicop ter. In addition to providing mainte nance, operational and fleet training to our Australian friends, the outstanding relationship forged between HSM-72 and RAN 725 Squadron ensured seam less exchanges of ideas and experiences that led to team-building camarade rie. The professional relationship that Fleck helped foster will set the tone for a successful future of MH-60R opera tions with the Australian Navy for years to come. Prior to his turnover, Fleck had the good fortune to stand-up not one, but two operational Detachments. Both the formation of Detachment 1 embarked with USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79) in support of Exercise Baltops and Detachment 2 forward deployed to Souda Bay Greece were accompanied by unique challenges. Both detachments were formed under a compressed time line in response to real-world national tasking. In addition to Flecks operational achievements as commanding officer, his exceptional leadership led to the squadron earning several command awards including the Blue M award for medical readiness, the Grampaw Pettibone Award for aviation safety, and the 2013 Secretary of the Navy Safety Excellence Award. Flecks next assign ment is the Industrial College of the Armed Forces in Washington D.C. Stepping in as Warrior One is Cmdr. Torsten Schmidt. A graduate of the State University of New York Maritime College, Schmidt played an important role in the squadrons successes as executive offi cer. He is now faced with the new chal lenge of leading the command towards their first operational deployment as an integrated part of CVW-7, supporting Carrier Strike Group 8, soon to embark with aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Filling the role of the executive offi cer is Cmdr. Jason Sherman, who reports aboard United States Southern Command in Miami, Fla. Polished, trained and ready for orders, the Proud Warriors stand ready to exe cute the mission. Schmidt is focused on maintaining the high level of pride and professionalism that serve as the founda tion of Proud Warrior success. HSM-72 embraces the challenges that lie ahead. Congratulations to Cmdr. Schmidt and Fair Winds and Following Seas to Cmdr. Fleck. Proud Warriors of HSM-72 change commandCmdr. Derek Fleck Cmdr. Torsten Schmidt From StaffVeterans in Northeast Florida now have a new source of assistance for preparing compensation claims to submit to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for disability. The new, twice-monthly VA Claims Preparation Workshop starts Jun 6, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Building 1 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Provided by AMVETS, the disability claims workshop is designed to expe dite VA processing by cutting through the red tape. Getting VA paperwork submitted correctly the first time is critically important to receiving your disabil ity ratings in a timely manner, said AMVETS National Service Officer David Sanders. Our primary purpose is to inter cede on behalf of veterans with the VA at no charge to the veteran. He added that participation in the workshop will require the service member to solicit command support. Seating is limited, so preregis tration is required via email to: david.d.sanders@navy.mil. Sanders added that attending the VA Claims Preparation Workshop increases the prospect of getting dis ability ratings back in a timely man ner.VA disability claims workshop on June 6 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014

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(From right) Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 Capt. Sean Liedman; Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. George Ballance; COMUSNAVSO/4th Fleet, CMDCM(SW/EXW/FMF) David Tellez; and CPRW-11 CMDCM(AW/SW) Debra Downs proceed to NAS Jax Building 852 May 7 for a briefing on Wing 11. Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonNAS Jax welcomes Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet(Right) NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, briefs Rear Adm. George Ballance, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command (COMUSNAVSO/U.S. 4th Fleet during an office call May 7 at NAS Jacksonville. Undersander also took the group on a windshield tour of the station. Ballance took command of COMUSNAVSO/4th Fleet in April.Photo by Jacob SippelCmdr. John Crane, associate director for clinical support services at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, explains the labor and delivery departments daily schedule to Rear Adm. George Ballance, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet, as Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding officer, looks on. During the May 7 hospital tour, Ballance saw firsthand areas such as labor and delivery, intensive care unit, physical therapy and occupational therapy clinics.Photo by Clark Pierce JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 9

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By Sgt. David BayotNAS Jax Police DepartmentThe NAS Jacksonville Law Enforcement Team, in conjunction with other law enforce ment agencies throughout the United States, will actively par ticipate in the 2014 Click It or Ticket seatbelt campaign May 19 through June 1. Failure to buckle-up in com pliance with state laws by the driver and/or passengers allows law enforcement offi cers to conduct a traffic stop and issue a citation for the infraction. In Florida and gov ernment installations, seatbelt usage is now considered a primary offense. NAS Jacksonville upholds a zero tolerance policy for fail ure to use vehicle seatbelts and maintains that non-compli ance of the seatbelt law is a primary offense. In May, the campaign will continue to focus on teens and young adult drivers while broadening its outreach to the military as traffic crashes are the leading cause of death for our service members and their families. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reveals that since the enforcement mobilizations program began, child fatali ties have dropped significantly. Child restraint use for infants under one-year-old has risen considerably, and restraint use among toddlers ages 1-4 has jumped even more dramatically over the past three years. Last year, adult seatbelt use rose to the nations highest utilization rate ever. With more than 80 million Americans buckling up you would think everybodys finally gotten the message. Last year Duval County still had some of the highest traffic fatalities in the State of Florida. Please join this effort to save lives and reduce injuries by promoting seatbelt usage. Dont become one of the 2014 fatal ity statistics by failing to buckle up. By Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer announced Cmdr. Michael Sunman as the next Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Jacksonville officer in charge (OIC), effective August. Sunman, a native of Ft. Myers, Fla., will report to BHC Jacksonville from BHC Paris Island, S.C., where he was interim OIC since January. Prior to that, he served as director of clinical support services at NH Beaufort from September 2013 to January 2014. He holds a Doctorate of Optometry from Southern College of Optometry, a Master of Business Administration from Webster University and a Bachelor of Science from Florida State University. He is an American Academy of Optometry Fellow and member of the Armed Forces Optometric Society and American Optometric Association. Sunmans military assign ments include: head of optom etry clinics, NH and BHC Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, S.C.; head of ancil lary services, NBHC Iwakuni, Japan; head of clinical support services, NBHC Mayport; and, operations officer, NBHC Parris Island, S.C. Sunman will replace Cmdr. Andrea Petrovanie, who has served as OIC since March 2013, will next head to NH Okinawa, Japan. Cmdr. George Sellock, NH Jacksonvilles associate direc tor for dental services, will serve as NBHC Jacksonvilles acting OIC until Sunmans arrival. BHC Jacksonville is one of NH Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient popula tion about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their familiesmore than 67,000 are enrolled with a pri mary care manager at one of its facilities. To find out more about BHC Jacksonville, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. Failure to use seatbelts now a primary offenseClick It or Ticket seatbelt campaign begins next weekPhoto by MC2 Amanda CabasosPatrolman Malcolm Watson from NAS Jax Security Department issues a seatbelt citation to a motorist aboard the base recently. Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville officer in charge selectedCmdr. Michael Sunman JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 11

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New uniforms for Team Navy Jax By Clark PierceEditorMembers of Team Navy Jax cycling club met at the VyStar Credit Union aboard NAS Jax May 2 to pick up their 2014 team cycling uniforms. VyStar President and CEO Terry West, a recreational cyclist, said donating the team jerseys and shorts was an easy decision. Were long-time supporters of these dedicated riders because they compete in cycling events that raise funds for charitable organizations such as the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and National Multiple Sclerosis Society. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (an honorary team member) congratu lated the clubs Sailors and civilians for their dedication and physical conditioning. Team Navy Jax trains by pedaling hundreds of miles before each fundraising event. They not only cycle for a sense of personal pride but also to support charitable community organizations. AS1(AW) Terry Yamin, of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, is the team leader. Right now, were training and fundraising for the ADA Jacksonville Tour de Cure May 17. Now, with our new team uniforms, courtesy of VyStar, well build a strong team identity throughout this years fundraising season.Neither NAS Jacksonville, MWR or Jax Air News, nor any part of the federal government, officially endorses any company, sponsor or their products or services. (From center) NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander and VyStar Credit Union President and CEO Terry West congraulate Team Navy Jax Leader AS1(AW) Terry Yamin, along with a dozen other team members. Their new uniforms will be visible at the ADA Jacksonville Tour de Cure on May 17. Photo by Clark Pierce Special Olympics Bowling Team(From front) Nicole Stanley (athlete), Mike Woods (athlete), Katarina Zeigler (partner) and Derek Freitag (partner) will represent Clay County at the Special Olympics National Games in Princeton, N.J., June 14-21. Stanley's and Zeigler's fathers are retired Navy. Travel expenses were supported by Navy Wives Clubs of America Jacksonville No. 86.Photo by Wilma Stanley Members of the United States military (active duty, veterans, retirees and reservists) over the age of 18 can apply for a permit to carry a concealed weapon in Florida without additional training or classes. Florida Statutes 790.06(2)(h)(5) and 790.062 exempt military personnel from classes required of non-military personnel. We think our military personnel should know they dont need to pay for classes to obtain a permit to carry a firearm, said Tom Eichling, owner/chief instructor at Accurate Edge and retired U.S. Navy. If you need additional or advanced training, weve got what you need. But dont shell out your hard-earned money for a course you dont need. Eichling firmly believes the right to carry weapons as guaran teed in the Second Amendment is accompanied by an all-important responsibility to use firearms safely and accurately. He is committed to providing training to help gun owners meet that responsibility. And, he is well credentialed to provide training. His military experience includes the Navy Auxiliary Security Force, the Marksmanship Team, the Navys Phase I Law Enforcement course and the Armys Marksmanship Training Unit Small Arms Firing School. He was rated a Navy expert in pistol, rifle and shotgun, and was 1st place champion in the Navys longrange pistol competition. As a civilian, he is an NRA Senior Training Counselor (Instructor Trainer) with 23 years firearm training experience and a Florida D&G licensed (unarmed and armed) security officer. He is a graduate of four civilian law enforcement academies in Florida. In November 2013, I became a Certified Instructor for the United States Concealed Carry Association, Eichling said. In Florida only Certified Instructors can provide training for concealed weapons licenses. Training received from an affiliate instructor has never met license requirements. Billy Woods is a training team member at Accurate Edge. Billy is a retired Marine Recon/Scout with years of rifle-training experience, Eichling said. He is an NRA-Certified Instructor and is scheduled to attend an NRA Training Counselor Workshop in October, making him an NRA Training Counselor. We will then be the only business in Northeast Florida with two Training Counselors on staff. Eichling is excited about the companys newest training tool. We were just approved to use Simunition rounds in our training, he said. Simunition was created to provide more realistic training to military and law enforcement agencies. We are planning classes using them for real-life scenario training. Until two years ago, they were allowed only for military and law enforcement. We have completed the process that allows us to add Simunition to our program. Accurate Edge has led the way in firearms training in other areas, as well. We were the first in Northeast Florida to be approved for the NRA Advanced Defensive Pistol mentoring program, Eichling said. To the best of my knowledge, we are still the only business in Northeast Florida approved to conduct that class. If you do not meet military exemption and need a class for car rying a concealed weapon, Accurate Edge can provide that training. When you are ready for advanced firearms training, Accurate Edge offers marksmanship fundamentals, basic and advanced defensive pistol training, various personal protection courses, all in small class settings. Accurate Edge will work with you to customize a course to meet your needs.Learn more about the classes and what you need to know to own, handle and use firearms safely, accurately and respon sibly. Visit online at www.Accurage-Edge.com, e-mail info@ Accurate-Edge.com, or call toll-free 1-877-781-1538. Having a Florida concealed carry license doesnt make you a safe, tactical defensive shooter any more than having a drivers license makes you a NASCAR driver. Tom Eichling, Accurate Edge. Accurate Edge: Teaching firearms safety and accuracyonly hits count Accurate Edge training takes place on 4 acres of privately owned property, zoned open rural, in Nassau County. With two live-fire ranges, a large heated/ cooled classroom, kitchen facilities, audio-visual equipment, a gun safe and other amenities, the training facility is relaxed, quiet and stress free. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014

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By Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public AffairsLt. William Shumaker, a Navy Nurse Corps officer at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, was awarded the 2014 Auburn University School of Nursing Distinguished Alumni Award in a cer emony held May 4. This recognition is bestowed annu al on an alumnus or alumna who has established clinical distinction in nursing through scholarly endeavors, pro motion of health care, professional service or has contributed remarkable service to the community, state or other beneficiary organizations. I am very grateful and honored to have been selected for this prestigious award, said Shumaker. Iowe so much to Auburn University and the professorsat the School of Nursing who were always there for me. Their willingness and dedication to see me through were instrumental in my course completion. Shumaker, a native of Birmingham, Ala., enlisted in the Navy in 1997 after high school. Upon completion of Hospital Corpsman A School, he was assigned to 2nd Medical Battalion, 2nd Force Service Support Group at Camp Lejeune, N.C. He was later selected for Broadened Opportunity for Officer Selection and Training (BOOST) at Newport, R.I. After completion of the 10-month BOOST program, Shumaker enrolled at Auburn University where he earned his Bachelor of Science in Nursing, and Navy commission in 2005. Shumakers military assignments as a Navy Nurse Corps officer include: Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Va., NH Beaufort, S.C. and NH Jacksonville since 2011. In 2013 he deployed to Camp Lemonnier Expeditionary Medical Facility in Djibouti, Africa. For eight months he served as ward nurse manager and was one of four nurses who cared for more than 6,200 U.S. military personnel assigned to the Horn of Africa area of operation. In support of the local African com munity, Shumaker conducted weekly orphanage visits to care, feed and play with children, who constantly inspired him to focus on the important things in life. He also coordinated multiple humanitarian supply shipments from various organizations to the orphanage. Shumaker also earned a Master of Arts in Pastoral Counseling from Liberty University while deployed to Djibouti. I cannot think of a more deserv ing person for this award than Lt. William Shumaker, said Dr. Jenny Schuessler, associate dean for the Auburn University School of Nursing and Shumakers former instructor. His professionalism and compassion as a student, as well as his exemplary leadership and service as a Navy Nurse Corps officer justify his selection. Shumaker currently serves as charge nurse and scheduling officer at NH Jacksonvilles maternal infant unit. He plans to transfer to NH Okinawa, Japan in November. He and his wife Rebecca are the proud parents of three daughters: Olivia, Elizabeth and Anna. Apply by May 30By NH Jacksonville Public AffairsThe American Red Crosss Northeast Florida Chapter at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, is currently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. It offers an excellent opportunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionals physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and technicians as well as contribute to a positive experience for patients at the hospital located at NAS Jacksonville. The program is open to 20 high school students ages 15-17 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Those interested should apply online by May 30, at www.redcross.org/fl/ jacksonville/volunteer/join-us. At the website, click youth volun teer application. Fill out the applica tion, select Northeast Florida Chapter and create a Volunteer Connection account. After submitting the application, complete the online orientation. All applicants are required to attend a kick-off event (which includes an interview) on June 7 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the hospitals 2nd floor conference room in the central tower (next to the chapel). For more info, call NH Jacksonville Junior Red Cross volunteer coordina tor Terry Miles or Red Cross Chairman Mary Miciano at 904-542-7525; or email terry.miles2@med.navy.mil or mary.miciano@med.navy.mil. From the NAS Jax All Officers Spouses ClubThe NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club is sponsoring three $1,000 schol arships based on scholarship merit and community service. Eligibility: U.S. Navy active/reserve duty and active/reserve duty depen dents who are currently in their senior year of high school or a high school graduate, attached to NAS Jacksonville and planning to attend an accredited college in the fall of 2014 or spring of 2015. Scholarships are to be used only for tuition and tuition-based fees charged by the college and will be sent to the college. Three scholarships will be awarded; each in the amount $1,000 one active duty, one officer dependent, and one enlisted dependent. Criteria: Recipients will be selected on scholarship merit and community service. Deadline for application is June 7. Selection of recipients will be made by June 30. Scholarship application may be picked up at NAS Jacksonville Navy College Office or found on-line at: https://www.fcef.com/wp-con tent/uploads/CHP-ScholarshipApplication3-14.pdf. You may submit the application by mail to: NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, c/o Mrs. Pam Undersander, 5065 Mustin Road, Jacksonville FL 32212. Questions may be sent to nasjax aosc@gmail.comNeither the NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal govern ment officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. NH Jacksonville nurse receives distinguished alumni awardPhoto by Phil ShumakerDean of Auburn University School of Nursing Gregg Newschwander (left), presents Lt. William Shumaker with the Distinguished Alumni Award at a cer emony held on May 4. The annual recognition is bestowed on an alumnus or alumna who has established clinical distinction in nursing through scholarly endeavors, promotion of health care, professional service or has contributed remarkable service to the community, state or other beneficiary organizations. Experience Navy Medicine as a Junior Red Cross volunteerCollege scholarships deadline is June 7 Improving lives. Curing type 1 diabetes (T1D). JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. **New time Friday Social Hour 59 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke Lunch bingo Monday through Friday begins at 11:15 a.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly handicap single tournament May 17, 1 4 p.m., $20 Scratch Sweeper May 24, 1 4 p.m., $30 *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open through June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31 Outdoor pool opens for weekend recreational swim Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Dive-in Movie May 23 featuring LEGO Movie Pool opens at 7 p.m., movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free popcorn. Concession stand will be open.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil. ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Orlando Shopping Trip July 26 $20 St. Augustine Scenic Cruise August 30 $20 Mt. Dora Trip October 25 $20 Jacksonville Jaguar tickets on sale soon! Adventure Landing Waterpark seasonal $85.50 Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Paintball Trip May 17 at 9 a.m. Movie in the Yard Barracks on May 20 at 8:30 p.m. Featuring Need for Speed Jacksonville Suns Game May 29 at 6 p.m. Free admission and transportationNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty May 27 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests May 29 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. Command Party Swing into savings & book your command golf tournamentMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependent Skipper B Sailing Classes availableAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Summer Camp Registration going on now! Sign-in at the youth centerFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available including instrument, complex and commercial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.net By Bill BonserMWR Sports CoordinatorThe Intramural Winter Golf League finished in April with 12 teams participating. The format for the league was a two-person Captains choice scoring based on one point for bogey, two points for par, four points for birdie and eight points for an eagle. The 12 teams played for eight weeks to determine which eight teams would go to the playoffs. Navy Computer and Telecommunications Station finished first and VP-45 finished second. The 2014 Intramural Winter Golf League end-ofyear tournament took place April 30 at the NAS Jax Golf Course. Eleven teams participated in the fourperson format, Captains choice scoring for tournament prizes. Players also received a free dinner to wrap up the 18-hole tournament. The season-ending event gave all the league par ticipants a chance to have fun together while playing as a four-person group. They also had a chance to win prizes for winning the tournament and for shooting the longest drive and closest to the pin. The U.S. Navy, the Department of Defense, and the federal government do not officially endorse any company, sponsor, advertiser, or their products or services. Intramural Golf Summer League forming Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. The league plays Wednesday at 11:30 a.m., beginning May 21. Contact base gym for rules and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Forming Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Contact base gym for rules and required paperwork. Wallyball League Meeting May 21 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork. Badminton Singles League Meeting May 28 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork. Bean Bag Toss Singles Tournament June 23 Tournament takes place at 5 p.m. in the NAS Jax Fitness, Sports and Aquatics Center. The tournament is open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Call the Fitness Center at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil to sign up by June 13. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for Sign up by July 14. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for Sign up by July 14. For more information about any of the sports articles, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. Standings As of May 9 Team Wins Losses Hit it-n-Quit it 1 0 NAS-ty Slammers 1 0 Bad News Babes 0 1 Pitch Slaps 0 1 Team Wins Losses FRCSE 5 0 HS-11 5 1 HITRON 4 1 VP-30 Students 4 1 TPU/PCF 3 1 HSM-72 4 2 BHC Jax 3 3 VP-26 3 3 VP-45 2 3 VP-62 Broad Arrows 1 3 FRCSE F-18 PMI 1 5 NAVFAC 1 5 NAVHOSP 0 4 VR-62 0 4 Team Wins Losses VR-62 3 0 NAVFAC Blue 2 1 NAVFAC Gold 2 1 NCTS Gold 2 1 TPU/PCF 2 1 Team Wins Losses VP-62 Broadarrows 2 1 FACSFAC 1 2 Navy Band 1 2 NCTS Blue 1 2 VP-45 1 2 VP-5 0 3 Team Wins Losses VP-26 7 0 NAVHOSP 8 1 VP-30 8 1 FRCSE Rabid Possums 5 2 VP-45 Sluggers 5 2 VR-62 5 2 CNRSE/Navy Band 4 2 HS-11 5 3 VR-58 4 3 NCTS 3 4 FACSFAC 3 5 AIR OPS 3 6 CBMU202 2 4 FRCSE 900 2 4 CRS-10 2 5 FRCSE Thrusters 2 7 FRCSE Tweaks & Geeks 1 7 NBHC Honey Badgers 0 5 VP-45 Scared Hitless 0 7 Team Wins Losses VP-26 2 0 CNATTU 2 1 FACSFAC 1 1 NAVFAC 1 1 NECE 0 3 MWR intramural golf tournament held 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014

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By Marcia HartU.S. Navy officers and distinguished visitors from Missouri and Illinois gathered for a cer emony in St. Louis May 5 to celebrate production of the 100th EA-18G Growler. The Growler, the newest advancement in the Navys electronic attack (EA) arse nal, is a variant of the Block II F/A-18F Super Hornet and is the Navy replacement for the EA-6B Prowler. The airborne electronic attack aircraft combines mod ern advances in EA systems and weapons with the tacti cal versatility, advancements and capabilities of the Block II Super Hornet. The EA-18G Growler is a high demand asset that is equally critical in disrupting our enemies operations as it is enhancing our own, said Capt. Frank Morley, program man ager for the F/A-18 and EA-18G Program Office (PMA-265) during the ceremony at Boeing. Next week, Capt. Darryl Walker, commander of the Electronic Attack Wing, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CVWP), will accept delivery of the air craft on behalf of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 129 in Whidbey Island, Wash., before its transfer to a designated operational squadron in the fleet. The Growler is designed to perform an array of airborne electronic attack missions, operating from either the deck of an aircraft carrier or landbased fields, similar to the EA-6B Prowler. Through these capabilities, warfighters may jam or suppress enemy radar and communication systems to protect friendly assets in the air and on the ground. NAVAIR (Naval Air Systems Command) is continuing to advance the capabilities of the Growler as the U.S. Navys electronic attack mission becomes more robust and potential adversaries up their game with increasingly lethal air defens es, Morley said. With new technologies, such as the Next Generation Jammer (NGJ), the Growler will have greater capabilities in the EA arena then its predecessor. Currently, the Growler still uses the Prowlers ALQ99 Jammer Pods, slated to be replaced with the NGJ in the early 2020s. The NGJ features active electronically scanned array antennas and a lighter, more aerodynamically shaped pod, which can allow for fast er airspeed bringing greater lethality and capability to the EA-18G. The EA-18G program remains on the same schedule and cost projected when the program began in 2003, and the aircraft is projected to serve beyond 2040. The Navy accepted its first Growler Aug. 3, 2006. By MC1 Brianna DandridgeNavy Recruiting District JacksonvilleThe senior Sailor at Navy Recruiting District (NRD) Jacksonville was frocked to the rank of master chief petty officer at a pinning ceremony May 5. NCCM James Whitter, a native of Clearwater, Fla., enlisted in the Navy in 1988. He currently serves as the NRD Jacksonville command assistant chief recruiter. Following the frocking orders at the ceremony Whitter acknowledged the departmental chief petty officers and recruiters of NRD Jacksonville for their hard work and dedication. First I would like to thank my Lord and savior, and my family for support ing me and my career, said Whitter. During the ceremony, Whitters wife and mother assisted by pinning him with his new rank. According to Master Chief Navy Counselor Penny White, chief recruit er at NRD Jacksonville, hard work and dedication lead to this milestone. His passion for the job is one of the traits that helped him to reach this career pinnacle, said White. Whitter also credited the work and efforts of the recruiting team, saying that motivation and perseverance is the key to success for recruiting. Remember to stay the course and keep pushing, said Whitter. The very reason you chose to come recruiting will be what motivates you to be successful in recruiting. The chief petty officer rating was first established April 1, 1893. Senior chief petty officers and master chief petty officers were established June 1, 1958, under an amendment to the Career Compensation Act of 1949. With 70 percent of the world covered by water, with 80 percent of the worlds population living near coasts and 90 percent of the worlds commerce trav eling by water, Americas Navy is very much a global force for good. NRCs mission is to recruit the best men and women for Americas Navy to accomplish todays missions and meet tomorrows challenges.For more news from Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville, visit www.navy.mil/ local/nrdjax/. Navys electronic attack aircraft reaches centennial milestonePhoto by MC3 Karl AndersonAn EA-18G Growler assigned to the Zappers of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAW) 130 launches from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) in March 2014 during Harry S. Truman's final mission supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. New master chief pinned at Navy Recruiting DistrictPhoto by MC1(SW) Brianna Dandridge NCCM James Whitter, assistant chief recruiter of Navy Recruiting District (NRD) Jacksonville was promoted to his current rank of master chief by NRD Commanding Officer Cmdr. Brent Cower May 5. FLIGHT LINE CAFE May 22, 2014: 1100-1230 Meal Rate: $4.65 Pacific Asian Stir Fry Soup Szechwan Chicken Aloha Roast Pork Egg Foo Young (made to order before your eyes) Steamed Rice Pancit Lumpia Oriental Vegetable Stir Fry Ronton Crab Salad New master chiefs at FRCSENewly frocked AFCM(AW/SW) Michael Piunno, of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, is pinned by his daughters during a frocking ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1000 on May 5. Piunno attributes his successful 22-year Navy career to the support of his family, the Sailors with whom he has worked with and his two mentors for providing guidance and knowledge. Photos by Victor PittsFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna, right, presents a frocking letter to PRCM(AW/ SW/FPJ) Aaron Carroll during a frocking ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1000 May 5. Carroll recently reported to FRCSE from Naval Amphibious Base Coronado in San Diego and is the only newly frocked PRCM in the Navy. Carroll, a 21-year veteran, attributes his success to his family, the Sailors he has worked with and the chiefs' mess.Photo by Jacob SippelHospital Sailors recognizedCapt. Gayle Shaffer (left), Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville commanding officer, presents the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal to HM2 Shanell Jackson during an awards ceremony at the hospital on May 9. Other award recipients included Cmdr. Andrea Petrovanie (Meritorious Service Medal); Lt. Cmdr. Warren Cantrell (Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal); and HM2 Roberto Garcia (Letter of Appreciation, NAS Jacksonville commanding officer). JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 By Clark PierceEditorSailors, Marines and Airmen from a variety of commands in Navy Region Southeast, Navy Region Northwest, and Navy Region Hawaii assembled in the Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11 Auditorium at NAS Jacksonville April 28 May 2 to learn the basics of the Link 16 tactical communications net work. Lt. Jordan Brye, Fleet Introduction Training Division Officer at the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapons School was liaison with the mobile training team from the Joint Multi-Tactical Data Link School stationed at Pope Army Airfield in Fort Bragg, N.C. Link 16 is a U.S. and allied government-backed jam-resis tant, digital data link network that exchanges tactical infor mation across a variety of air, sea and ground-based plat forms, said Brye. OSC Stephanie McConnell is senior enlisted leader of the Joint Interoperability Division. This five-day course gives service members an overview of joint operations in a multi-tac tical data link network. They get an understanding of how the Link 16 network operates, along with the parameters required to work in a joint networked environment. Link 16 fills a capability gap with the Navys maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft. Now, AWOs can feed their radar or sonobuoy con tacts directly to tactical opera tions centers that in turn dis seminate the information to joint service or international commands. Sailors from the P-3 and P-8 communities, in addition to the MH-60R community, may now exchange real-time situ ational awareness information and voice communications across the battlespace. McConnell added that Link 16 represents a tremendous knowledge opportunity for all branches of the military to communicate more effectively. For example, Link 16 can facilitate simultaneous com munications of a Navy P-3 air craft talking to a carrier strike group, talking to an Air Force operations center, talking to a Marine company, talking to an Army battalion as well as working with international coalition partners. Sailors offered limited opportunity to volunteer for early separationFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsDue to the excellent retention and outstanding recruiting suc cess, the Navy is reinstating the Enlisted Early Transition Program (EETP), according to a message released May 8. According to NAVADMIN 103/14, EETP allows eligible Sailors in targeted ratings to apply for a voluntary early separation up to 24 months prior to their End of Obligated Service as Extended (EAOS). The new version of the program is ongoing, quota-controlled, and will help reduce the need for involuntary force management. Early separation will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis. Available quotas are identified by rating, paygrade, year group and Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC). A list is available at http:// www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/enlisted/community/pages/ eetp.aspx. Quotas will be reviewed periodically and updated as required. Early Separation requests will not be approved for the following Sailors: requirement, including overseas tour extension incentive pro grams for which a benefit has been received. Commanding officers will maintain final disapproval author ity and do not need to forward requests they cannot support. Final approval authority rests with Navy Personnel Command, Performance Evaluation Division, with positive commanding offi cer endorsement.For more information, read the message at www.npc.navy. mil or contact the Navy Personnel Command Customer Service Center at 1-800-U-ASK-NPC (827-5672) or at uasknpc@navy.mil. USO Night at Adventure Landing May 28From StaffVyStar Credit Union recently donated $15,000 to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO to support Military Appreciation Night May 28 at Adventure Landing on Beach Blvd. near the Intracoastal waterway. This is the eighth year that VyStar has been the title sponsor of his event for Sailors and family members, said USO Executive Director Mike OBrien at his office near the main gate of NAS Jacksonville. We cant do what we do without companies like VyStar that step forward and make a difference for area service members. And thats important to organizations like USO that is completely self-funded. OBrien said the gates will open at 6 p.m. for military fun seekers who can enjoy go-carts, miniature golf, laser tag, video games and much more. Photo by Clark Pierce A civilian instructor with the mobile training team from Pope Army Airfield discusses some basic features of the Link 16 tactical communications network April 29 at NAS Jacksonville.Link 16 network course attracts 70 studentsPhoto by Clark Pierce (From left) NAS Jax VyStar Branch Manager Brad Smith and VyStar Regional Vice President Russell Buck, pres ent Greater Jacksonville Area USO Executive Director Mike O'Brien with a check for $15,000 to underwrite Military Appreciation Night May 28 at Adventure Landing in Jacksonville Beach. Photo by Kaylee LaRocqueAir Force maintainers visit FRCSEKevin Fowler, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) aircraft engine mechanic supervisor,left, explains how artisans dismantle and repair a high pressure compressor for a TF-34 engine at the Crinkley Engine Facility, the Navy's largest engine repair facility, to a group of maintainers and logisticians from Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., on May 2. The TF-34 turbofan engine powers the A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft, used exclusively by the United States Air Force. Photo courtesy of AM1 Michael OrinskiFRCSE Sailors mentor studentsSailors from the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) First Class Petty Officers Association (FCPOA) gather with students from the Orange Park Junior High (OPJH) Graduation Success Team at the World of Nations event in downtown Jacksonville on May 1. FRCSE FCPOA Sailors work with the students through mentoring and assisting with homework. Other events the Sailors participate in include sports pep rallies, Thanksgiving meal preparations, OPJH Beautification Campus Cleanup Day, and student recognition award ceremonies.

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MAY 15, 2014 I I D E JOINT WARRIORS VP-10, VP-5 in UK Exercise Page 3 HOMELESS HELP Lunch at Sulzbacher Center Page 4 SEAT BELT Click It -Or Ticket Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com By MC2 Amanda CabasosStaff WriterThirteen Sailors aboard NAS Jax were either selected or volunteered by their tenant commands to complete train ing in the Auxiliary Security Force (ASF) academy at the base security department. The three-week course, held once every quarter, is designed to shape the nonMA-rating Sailors into an additional and efficient security force for the base. NAS Jax ASF Coordinator MA1 Ronald Hughes from the base secu rity department said, The purpose of the course is to train members from various commands in Anti-Terrorism/ Force Protection (AT/FP), as well as law enforcement practices and procedures. The course is designed to train ASF members to augment base security dur ing heightened AT/FP conditions and during special events as dictated by the commanding officer. Examples of such events could include an air show or a plane crash, Hughes added. Although the academy is short, Sailors are exposed to many possible live sce narios. In order to respond properly to the scenarios, students are required to engage in many course activities includ By AWFCS Mike WendelinVR-62 Public AffairsCommander, Naval Reserve Forces announced April 14, that Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 62 won the Reserve Component Personnel Program Excellence Award for exceeding retention goals for fiscal year 2013. More commonly known as the Golden Anchor award, this honor is earned by com mands that meet or exceed pre-determined Navy-wide Personnel Program goals. The Nomads previously won this award for exceeding retention goals in fiscal year 2012. VR-62s unsurpassed metrics were as follows: percent across all zones completed within timeline Waypoints Reenlistment appli cations Indoc/RASW/FTSW (docu mented in cims) Development Program comple tion in FLTMPS ment Exam discrepancy per centage of 0 percent tions in Career Waypoints The Career Development Program can only be success ful when there is complete buy in from the squadron leadership and the command possesses a motivated career development team, said NC1 Kenneth Swan, VR-62s com mand career counselor. He went on to say, We have the leadership and the team at VR-62 which is why our Sailors continue to have great success. I could not be more proud of the commitment shown by the Nomad team. Swan also praised the work of VR-62s divisional collat eral duty career counselors, including AZ2 Milton Taltoan, AZ2 Crystal Janes, AM2 Jose Delacruz, AWF2 Timothy Williams, AWF1 Joshua Simmons, AWF2 Kyle Noviskie and AZ2 Christian Scanell. VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Bryon Smith said, Not only did NC1 Swan do his part to make this happen, but his team of divisional career counselors working behind the scenes showed the true Nomad work ethic of Be the Best! It is awesome to work with the dedicated team of profession als here at VR-62. VR-62 is a Navy Reserve logistics squadron based at NAS Jacksonville that operates five of the Navys 24 C-130T Hercules logistics aircraft. The VR-62 Nomads sup port Navy high-priority airlift requests around the globe and around the clock. ASF academy students endure vigorous training By Lt. j.g. Joseph BayoVP-26 Public Affairs OfficerVP-26 Maintenance Duty Section 3 recently completed the annu ally required intermediate main tenance concept (IMC) inspec tion on P-3C Orion 765 at NAS Jacksonvilles Hangar 1000, home of the Tridents. Aircraft maintenance encom passes a very broad range of activi ties, ranging from a few minutes of aircraft servicing (checking oil levels or taking fuel samples, for example) to months of overhaul in an industrial facility. In naval aviation, aircraft main tenance is divided into three dis tinct levels: organizational mainte nance; intermediate maintenance; and depot maintenance. Task complexity, space require ments, level of skill of assigned personnel, and scope of support responsibility are the basis for determining which tasks are com pleted at each maintenance level. The mission of intermediate level maintenance is to sustain the combat readiness of a squadron by providing quality and timely mate rial support at the nearest location with the lowest practical resource expenditure. It includes shop-type repair and test work on aircraft, components and equipment from supported units. In the case of aircraft 765, which was deployed to the U. S. 4th Fleet Photo courtesy of VP-26VP-26 Maintenance Duty Section 3 with the P-3C Aircraft 765. They expedited a complex inspection and maintenance procedure to help sister P-3C squadron VP-8.Expediting IMC on 765 Golden Anchor drops at VR-62, twicePhotos courtesy of VR-62 (From left) YN2 Andrew Nightwine, LS2 Gina Linderos, AE2 Jeremy Shelton, NC1 Kenneth Swan, PS1 James Holton and AME2 Glen Taylor worked together on the VR-62 Career Development Program. This is the second year that VR-62 has celebrated winning the Golden Anchor award. (From left, standing) PS1 James Holton,YN2 Andrew Nightwine, AME2 Glen Taylor and VR-62 Command Career Counselor NC1 Kenneth Swan. (Sitting) AE2 Jeremy Shelton and LS2 Gina Linderos.Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosMA1 Keith Danalewich of NAS Jax Security Department pepper sprays AS2 Mark Dial of the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jacksonville as part of one of the requirements for the Auxiliary Security Force academy held at NAS Jax May 8. PRAN Beatriz Salgado of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast secures the suspect, ET2(SW/AW) Jeremy Pugh of Fleet Air Control Surveillance Facility Jacksonville; while Major Olimpia Jackson of NAS Jax Police Department observes the students technique.See Page 7 See VP-26, Page 8 Allegheny Road closureFrom StaffAllegheny Road directly south of Akron Road will be installation of new storm drain piping.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-7789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley U.S. Navy photosOn May 16, at about 6 p.m., three Navy-Curtiss (NC) flying boats of Seaplane Squadron One took off from Trepassey Bay, Newfoundland, to attempt the first trans-Atlantic flight. NC-4, commanded by Lt. Cmdr. Albert Read, landed safely at Horta, Azores, after more than 15 hours in the air. The other two NC aircraft were not so fortunate -both lost their bearings in thick fog and sustained dam age when landing on the water and were unable to resume flight. USS Farragut (DD-348) is underway during maneuvers staged for Movietone News off San Diego in 1936. She is being overflown by five Catalina flying boats. Produced by Consolidated Aircraft, the PBY Catalina was one of the most widely used multi-role aircraft of World War II. From StaffMay 15 1800 Capt. Preble, commanding the 36-gun frigate Essex, arrives in Batavia, Java, to escort U.S. merchant ships. 1942 First Naval Air Transport Service flight across Pacific. 1969 Sinking of USSGuitarro (SSN665) in 35 feet of water next to its fit ting-out pier, due to negligent shipyard workers. 1991 Amphibious Task Force arrives at Chittagong, Bangladesh, for relief operations after Cyclone Marian. May 16 1820 The 38-gun heavy frigate USS Congress becomes first U.S. warship to visit China. 1919 Three Navy flying boats begin first trans-Atlantic flight from Newfoundland. 1965 First U.S. gunfire support in Vietnam by destroyer Henry W. Tucker (DD-875). May 17 1940 President Roosevelt announces plans to re-commission 35 mothballed destroyers. 1942 USS Tautog (SS-199) sinks Japanese sub I-28; while USS Triton (SS201) sinks I-164. 1951 Carrier aircraft attack bridges between Wonsan and Hamhung, Korea. 1962 Naval amphibious ready group lands Marines to guard Thailands bor ders from communist probes. 1966 Naval Support Activity Saigon established. 1973 First woman to hold a major Navy command, Capt. Robin Quigley, assumes command of Navy Service School, San Diego. 1987 USS Stark (FFG-31) struck by Iraqi Exocet missile in Persian Gulf, killing 37 and wounding 21. 1990 USS Roark (DE 1053) rescues 42 refugees from unseaworthy craft in South China Sea May 18 1775 Benedict Arnold cap tures British sloop and renames her Enterprise, the first of many famous ships with that name. 1798 Appointment of Benjamin Stoddert as first Secretary of the Navy. 1969 Launch of Apollo 10, dress rehearsal for first lunar landing mis sion. Cmdr. John Young, was the Command Module Pilot and Cmdr. Eugene Cernan was the Lunar Module Pilot. During the 8-day mission, the craft made 31 lunar orbits in 61.6 hours. Recovery was by HS-4 helicopters from USS Princeton (LPH-5). May 19 1912 Navy establishes North Atlantic Ice Patrol following RMS Titanic disas ter. 1965 30th Naval Construction Regiment activated at Danang, Vietnam. May 20 1801 Four warships sent to Mediterranean to protect American commerce. 1815 Commodore Stephen Decatur (38-gun frigate Guerriere) sails with 10 ships to suppress Mediterranean pirate raids on U.S. shipping. 1844 USS Constitution sails from New York on an around-the-world cruise. 1943 Establishment of 10th Fleet in Washington, D.C., under command of Adm. King to coordinate U.S. antisub marine operations in Atlantic. May 21 1850 Washington Navy Yard begins work on first castings for the Dahlgren guns. 1917 USS Ericsson (DD-56) fires first torpedo of World War I. 1944 During preparations for the invasion of Saipan, an accidental ord nance blast on LST 353 sets off cata clysmic ammunition explosions at West Loch, Pearl Harbor, killing 163 and injuring 396. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorWill you encourage your three boys to join the mili tary? Thats a question I get often because my husband, dad and father-in-law are Navy pilots. But its one that I struggle with. Choosing the military always means choosing sac rifice. There is no question that a civilian engineer has the opportunity to make more money than one employed by the U.S. military. And yet, comparing military pay to civilian pay is a fools errand, mostly because of the benefits. If you look at a military pay chart, you arent getting the full picture. We get housing allowances and free (I always use that term loosely) healthcare. Historically, choosing sacrifice was offset by these benefits the militarys promise to take care of its own. Last week, Gen. Martin Dempsey, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, defended to Congress the Pentagons proposal to change military pay and bene fits in 2015. Under the proposed plan, pay raises would be 1 percent, healthcare fees would increase, and housing allowances would shrink by 5 percent. It may seem nominal, because they are giving ser vice members a raise, after all. However, according to a military.com report, that 1 percent raise is actually 0.8 percent lower than the employment cost index [and] below the inflation rate. Meaning the value of a service members pay check would go down. And as for housing, ours has never covered expenses for reasonable housing. Even before a 5 percent reduc tion, we have always supplemented out-of-pocket. Responding to criticism, the military claims they will use the money saved to support services for fami lies and service members. Im not great with math, but I understand this word problem: Were going to take away some of your pay and spend it in a way we think will be better for you in the long run. The end of this equation is the military loses its best people and struggles to recruit more. Because the big gest problem with the budget is not personnel costs but waste. In response to a question on my Facebook page, military spouses and service members sounded off about waste: After 20-plus years of watching military units waste billions of dollars at the end of a fiscal year on nonoperational items such as televisions and popcorn poppers, I remain unconvinced that the way to save money is by reducing pay and benefits. Having worked in a government budget office, [I know] travel for the most part can be stopped. Why have conferences in Vegas when most things can now be accomplished via Internet? [Not] allowing commands to make smart purchas es . [for instance], buying a $29.99 case of copy paper at a local store instead of using the $89 case from the militarys contracted company [is wasteful]. I support a less popular choice: closing base com missaries and giving military families equivalent discounts at civilian stores. A majority of retirees and reservists dont even live near a commissary, so they miss this benefit. But the commissary has powerful lobbyists behind it, so, dont worry, its here to stay. There are almost endless ways the military wastes money, but none of them involve paychecks, housing or healthcare. And the most disturbing part about all of this is that the proposed cuts are supported by the people who promised to take care of us. Even worse, those people have claimed its what service members want. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Greenert held town hall meetings across the country to gauge service members feelings about the budget cuts. His takehome: Navy men and women understand the mili tarys need to balance personnel costs with readiness. Interestingly, the Association of the U.S. Navy found a different take-home: their survey of service mem bers revealed that 90-percent do not want the pay cuts. So dont bother with the results of the CNOs town halls. Check out #KeepYourPromise on Twitter and Facebook, and see how unhappy families are. At a time when the military is asking more of its people longer and more frequent deployments, more admin istrative duties they are about to ask them to do it with less pay and benefits. This is called having your cake and eating it, too. And its terrible for retention and recruiting. So, will I encourage my sons to join the military? The answer is no. In fact, Id like to opt them out of the recruiter list. If they feel moved to serve, we will know it. But having my sons courted by a recruiter who will tell them about the great deal that is military life, in my mind, exposing them to a promise that is quickly becoming an illusion. This Week in Navy History From the HomefrontPentagons proposed pay cuts will be devastating RAAF warrant officer tours NAS JaxRoyal Australian Air Force (RAAF) MCPON Equivalent, Warrant Officer of the Air Force, Mark Pentreath meets with NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Teri McIntyre during a courtesy call with NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander on May 6. Pentreath toured the base to become familiarized with the available P-8A Poseidon training opportunities. Photo by MC2 Amanda Cabasos

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NAS Jax squadrons participate in UK Joint Warrior 14-1By Lt.j.g. Andrew Smith and Lt.j.g. Brendan McGoeyVP-10 Public AffairsVP-10 recently returned from a three-week, combined Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) exercise at Royal Air Force (RAF) Lossiemouth, United Kingdom (UK). RAF Lossiemouth is situated on the northern coast of Scotland bordering the North Sea. Four P-3C Orion Combat Air Crews (CAC) from VP-10 and two P-8A Poseidon CACs from VP-5 participated alongside sev eral MPRF assets from allied countries including the UK, Norway, New Zealand, France and Canada. In addition to MPRF aircraft, the exercise also includ ed surface, subsurface and rotary wing platforms from several other North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) nations. The Red Lancers sent CAC-1 led by Lt. Cmdr.Travis Bagwell, CAC-2 led by Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Colon, CAC10 led by Lt. Cmdr. Paul Nickell, and CAC-12 led by Lt. Justin Moore, and a maintenance detachment led by Lt. Christian Cruz. The Officer-in-charge (OIC) of the detachment was Lt. Cmdr. Christopher Metz who coordinated all VP-10 operations with the RAF Mobile Air Operations Command (MAOC) in order to ensure the success of each air crew involved. Joint Warrior provides an advanced NATO and allied joint coordinated operations environment which VP-10 took advantage of to achieve CAC qualifications as part of the squadrons Operational Readiness Exam. While in Scotland, each crew flew and completed four missions, earning various quali fications required prior to departing on deployment. The completed missions not only provided the Red Lancers with necessary deployment qualifications, but also provided a unique, invaluable opportunity to experience real-time, international operations with the multiple surface, subsurface and MPRF assets involved in the exercise. Joint Warrior provides a unique opportunity to work with allied nations in a tactical environment, said Moore, mission commander of CAC-12. The experience gained from our joint operations here at Joint Warrior will adequately prepare us for the opera tions we expect to see on deployment. In addition to gaining valuable experience in the P-3, the Red Lancers were able enjoy some of the benefits that the beautiful country of Scotland had to offer. On off days, crews toured historical castles, played golf or visited local distilleries to learn the art of Scotch whiskey. Joint Warrior 14-1 concluded with International Night in which each squadron involved in the exer cise brought food and beverage from their respective homelands. The night was a celebration of the MPRF brother/sisterhood with all officer and enlisted per sonnel taking part. In addition to their cuisine, the squadrons shared skits, stories and experiences from past Joint Warrior exercises. Lt.j.g. John Fabros, navigator of CAC-2, was particu larly enthused by the prospect of multi-national coop eration, It was great to get to know other MPRF air crew from around the world and speak to some of my MPRF counterparts in their native (French) language. VP-10 is home based at NAS Jacksonville and are currently in final preparations for their upcoming deployment. (From left) VP-5 Lt. Cmdr. Andrew Behlke, VP-10 Lt. Cmdr. Christopher Metz and RAF Squadron Leader Lloyd Barrett gather during 'International Night' at RAF Lossiemouth.Photo courtesy of VP-10 TRICARE HBAs remain on site at hospitalBy Jeanne Casey NH Jacksonville Deputy Public Affairs Officer While TRICARE Service Centers (TSCs) have eliminated walk-in service, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles TRICARE Health Benefits Advisors (HBAs) remain on site. TSC services are still available but only at www. tricare.mil, www.humana-military.com or (800) 4445445. Beneficiaries can change their Primary Care Manager (PCM), compare plans, enroll in a plan, see whats covered, check on referrals and claims, and more. NH Jacksonvilles on-site HBAs are still available to discuss options for complex issues but are unable to make changes on patients behalf. HBAs work for the hospital, while website and phone staff work for TRICAREs regional contractor (Humana Military). At NH Jacksonville, patients can walk in to see the TRICARE HBAs (located on the first floor of the hos pitals central tower) or call the HBAs at (904) 5429164/9165. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 FRCSE Sailors volunteer at homeless shelterBy Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsSailors from Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) delivered donated items, prepared, and served lunch to patrons of the I.M. Sulzbacher Center, a non-profit, homeless shelter in downtown Jacksonville, April 16. The FRCSE First Class Petty Officers Association coordinated a drive to col lect donated toiletries and furniture for the center prior to the visit. About 20 Sailors from the command delivered the items, toured the facility, prepared the lunchtime meal and served hungry residents and homeless visitors. Having volunteered for various organizations for many years, for me its all about giving back, FRCSE Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Leonard Gage told the Sailors. There is a sense of pride and pro fessionalism that goes with volun teering in the community. The folks living here have hit a bump in the road and are trying to integrate back into the community. This includes many homeless veterans. They come from all walks of life, just as we do. And, just like we value diversity in the Navy, this is our opportunity to show we are as much a part of the community as everyone else. I.M. Sulzbacher Center Public Relations and Marketing Manager Allison Ownby and Carlton Higginbotham, grant writer for the center, discussed the many pro grams available to residents as the Sailors toured the Barnett Childrens Building, Hugh H. Jones Medical and Dental Building, resident living areas and dining facility. We provide shelter to 350 res idents and are the largest homeless shelter in Northeast Florida, said Higginbotham. Our goal is to get people off the streets and find them permanent jobs with growth and housing. We especially try to not tear families apart and go out of our way to help them. Unfortunately, we currently have 90 families on our waiting list. We are at full capacity and there is no limitation on how long our residents can stay. After the tour, the Sailors spent several hours preparing food for the lunch time meal. The group pitched in making cookies, frying French fries, mak ing sandwiches, preparing bag lunches for distribution at outreach facilities throughout Jacksonville and serving nearly 500 plates of food to hungry patrons. The Navy has provided countless hours of support to the kitchen of the Sulzbacher Center, said Kevin Nacke, director of food services at the center. They provide the team effort needed to cook and serve those who are hun gry in Jacksonville. We really appreciate the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Sailors volun teering here today, added Ownby. I think that when you are in the military, service is at the heart of it and so extending that into our community is an extension of the service they are providing our country. The I.M. Sulzbacher Center for the Homeless opened in 1995 as a mens shelter providing beds and meals to help the homeless reintegrate into the community. Today, the staff and volunteers offer contin ued care, addressing all aspects of homelessness. The center has also part nered with the City of Jacksonville Military and Veterans Services to provide dedicated help to veterans in need. The theory of the center is to provide everything a person needs to get back on their feet in one place, said Higginbotham. We continue to provide aftercare support and have a 95 percent success rate once they leave the center. We serve 1,500 meals a day utilizing volun teers to help accomplish this and are always looking for volunteers with dif ferent skill sets to help out. Volunteers help make the center run. For AT3 Brittany Wilkerson of FRCSE, visiting the shelter was an eye-open ing experience. Visiting the Sulzbacher Center was an enjoyable and educa tional experience for me, she said. The staff was very friendly and helpful while giving the tour and serving in the kitchen. It was nice to see that there are still caring and giving people who actually enjoy what they do. I will definitely visit again to help out and donate whatever I can. To close out the day, the Sailors gathered in the centers courtyard to reflect on their experience. You often see things on TV, but today you had the opportunity to see it in real life, Gage told the group. Each and every one of you probably touched someones life today. Thank you for volunteering and making a difference. Cherish the time with your families because with any hiccup in life, this could be the end result. I know that Im humbled, and I hope you are humbled as well and take something away from our visit here today. Lending a helping hand . .(From left) AM2 Alexandru Zamfira, ASAN Zachery Levendoski and AZ2(AW) Jose Prince load a donated book shelf onto a truck headed for the Sulzbacher Center, a homeless shelter in downtown Jacksonville on April 16. A group of Sailors from Fleet Readiness Center Southeast gather in front of the truck they loaded with donations for the I.M. Sulzbacher Center, a homeless shelter in downtown Jacksonville, before visiting the center. AM3 Luciano DelaFuente (left) and ASAN Bret Scharnhorst of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, load donations onto a truck for the Sulzbacher Center, a homeless shelter in downtown Jacksonville. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Leonard Gage, center, presents Allison Ownby, public relations and marketing manager for the I.M. Sulzbacher Center, a homeless shelter in downtown Jacksonville, and Carlton Higginbotham, grant writer for the center, with his Navy coin after a tour of the center. Allison Ownby, public relations and marketing manager for the I.M. Sulzbacher Center, a homeless shelter in downtown Jacksonville, explains some of the programs available to resi dents at the center during a tour for Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Sailors.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 5 (From left) ASAN Cory Marshall, AT2 Devin Rothgery and AT3 Brittany Wilkerson of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, make up plates of food for the lunchtime meal in the kitchen of the I.M. Sulzbacher Center, a homeless shelter in down town Jacksonville. The Sailors prepared nearly 500 plates of food for the home less during the community relations event. (From left) ATAN Sarah Jones and Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Leonard Gage of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, hand out utensils and dessert to hun gry guests at the I.M. Sulzbacher Center during a community relations event. (From left) ATAN Kaitlin Griffin, AT3 Dustin Sheets and AT3 Andrew West of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, prepare breakfast sandwiches for a morning meal in the kitchen at the I.M. Sulzbacher Center. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Leonard Gage (left) and AT2 Devin Rothgery of FRCSE prepare trays of cookie dough for baking at the I.M. Sulzbacher Center.Photos by Kaylee LaRocque(From left) LSSN Recruit Thomas Jorkasky, ATAN Kevin Krieger, AE3 Chelsea Roberts and AT3 Nathaniel McFarlane of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast form a line to make up lunches for guests at the I.M. Sulzbacher Center. AT3 Dustin Sheets of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, serves lunch to residents of the I.M. Sulzbacher Center. ASAN Kyle Drummond of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast passes out a plate of food to a hungry guest during the April 16 lunchtime meal at the I.M. Sulzbacher Center. ASAN Kyle Drummond (front) and ASAN Cory Marshall of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast pre pare cups of peaches for the lunchtime meal at the Sulzbacher Center. ATAN Kevin Lenoir and LSSN Thomas Jorkasky wash dishes in the scullery. AM2 Alexandru Zamfira stirs a batch of French fries. AOAN Aldriick Kittles (front) and ASAN Cory Marshall of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast prepare bag lunches for distribution to the homeless in the kitchen of the I.M. Sulzbacher Center.

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From StaffNAS Jacksonville Unaccompanied Housing won its 5th CEL & Associates A List Crystal award for excellence in customer service, presented May 2014. The award recognizes prop erties that achieve the high est level and quality service as rated by their residents. The Crystal Award is based on a consolidated service score of at least 85 percent and a response rate of at least 20 percent. NAS Jacksonville Unaccompanied Housing, led by Manager Beverly Nix, received a service rating of 92.6 and an 88 percent response rate. Throughout the years, we strive to improve in custom er service, including main tenance response time. We assure our residents during our weekly indoctrination session that every effort will be made to make their stay in the bar racks comfortable, relaxing and safe. Nix continues to remind her staff to always treat their resi dents as they themselves would want to be treated. She and her staff thanked all of the residents who participat ed in the survey process and the tenant commands that pro vide weekly inspections. Nix expressed special thanks to NAS Jax Housing Director Mike Herbert, for his leader ship and to CSCS Wendell Heyward for supporting the barracks by providing person nel to accomplish various tasks. She concluded with a very special thanks to Wayne Jensen, public works facil ity manager, for ensuring that maintenance issues are cor rected in a timely manner. By Lt. j.g. Brendan McGoeyVP-10 Public Affairs OfficerVP-10 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Charles Stickney handed the reins of the Red Lancers to Cmdr. James Johnston during the change of command ceremony held on May 1, aboard NAS Jacksonville. Born in Charlotte, N.C. and raised in Chapin, S.C., Stickney graduated from Auburn University and was commis sioned in the U.S. Navy in 1995 with a degree in aerospace engineering. After being designated as a naval aviator in 1997, he was assigned to the Topcats of Sea Control Squadron (VS) 31, an S-3B Viking squad ron formerly based at NAS Jacksonville. In 2002, Stickney was select ed for community transition as part of the Viking Sundown Plan, and began flying the EP-3 ARIES as a member of the Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron 1 World Watchers in Whidbey Island, Wash., where he earned designations as mission com mander and instructor pilot. Subsequent tours included flag aide in Norfolk, Va. and reconnaissance operations officer for the U.S. Pacific Fleet in Honolulu, Hawaii. Stickney reported to VP-10 as executive officer in May 2012, where he transitioned to his third operational aircraft, the P-3C Orion. He became commanding officer on March 22, 2013, dur ing a split deployment between U.S. 7th Fleet operating out of Japan and U.S. 4th Fleet operat ing from El Salvador. During the deployment, the Red Lancers directly sup ported joint task forces and host nation naval forces in the arrest of 33 suspected smug glers and the recovery or dis ruption of 16,129 kilograms of illicit narcotics with an esti mated street value of $1.6 bil lion. During the ceremony, Stickney commended VP-10, Be proud of yourselves as a Red Lancer team, of your abil ity to fix any gripe, prosecute any target, and to be outstand ing ambassadors to any coun try around the world. It has been a true honor and deep ly humbling to serve as your commanding officer. I will miss all of you. Johnston assumed command of the squadron just a few months before VP-10 departs for their last deployment as a P-3C squadron prior to their transition to the P-8A Poseidon early next year. He takes over as the 78th commanding officer in the storied history of VP-10. Born and raised in Birmingham, Ala., Johnston enlisted in the Navy in 1988 and became a naval nuclear power instructor before being awarded an NROTC scholar ship to Auburn University, where he graduated in 1996. He earned his naval flight officer wings in April 1998 and qualified as instructor tactical coordinator and mission com mander with VP-46. He went on to become an ACTC level 5 weapons and tactics instructor with VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville. He also served as Flag Lieutenant to Commander, Carrier Strike Group 3, in various roles aboard Special Projects Patrol Squadron 2, and as the MQ-4C Triton Requirements Officer for the Chief of Naval Operations, before assuming the executive officer position at VP-10. During his remarks, Johnston urged the Red Lancers, . . you are the rea son we are here. We are called upon to support and defend the Constitution of the United States. I ask you to continue to build upon the Red Lancer character of humble sacrifice, hard work, servant leadership and commitment. Cmdr. Herb Lacy checked in as the squadrons new execu tive officer, following a suc cessful two-year tour as the test pilot requirements officer for OPNAV N98 at the Pentagon. Red Lancers change of commandCmdr. James Johnston Cmdr. Charles StickneyStation Unaccompanied Housing is CEL A List award winnerPhoto by Shannon LeonardNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (right) congratulates NAS Jax Unaccompanied Housing Manager Beverly Nix and her team for winning their fifth CEL & Associates A List Crystal award. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014

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ing Non-Lethal Weapons (OC, Expandable Baton, Defensive Tactics), Firearm training (M9 pistol, M500 shotgun, M4 rifle), Tactical Team Movements (clearing a building), crowd control, Vehicle and Personnel Inspections and Entry Control Procedures. Prior to graduating from the academy, students must pass four written exams and numer ous practical exams that are required. In addition, the stu dents must qualify with all three-weapon systems and qual ify with non-lethal weapons. If Sailors dont complete these requirements, they will not graduate the class, said Hughes. According to Hughes, the academy benefits NAS Jax by providing additional trained ASF personnel and aids the base in meeting and exceeding the AT/FP and law enforcement mission of the installation. Also, ASF-qualified Sailors receive the knowledge outside of their rate that is documented in the ETJ for the remainder of their career. Hughes said, Upon transfer ring to another command that requires security duties, these Sailors will have already quali fied. The academy is both physi cally and mentally challenging. We expect Sailors to show up with an open mind and will ingness to learn, said Hughes. Sailors are also expected to be physically fit because they stand long hours wearing a ballistic vest and gun belt, he added. ASFFrom Page 1 By AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterThe NAS Jacksonville Commissary Team was awarded second place for the Directors Award in the Defense Commissary Agencys (DeCA) Best Commissary competition for FY 2013. The competition compared excellence in areas of accountability, customer sat isfaction, unit cost, sales, and accident rate On May 8, NAS Jax Commissary Store Director Larry Bentley addressed employees. Our team makes $66 million in sales a year but whats more important is the 80,000 paying customers who walk through our doors every month. Thats who were here for and thats who were here to serve, Bentley said. Every day we strive to ensure the mil itary families in our community receive the highest quality service, he said. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander congratulated the employees. The positive attitude and outstand ing customer service that the NAS Jax Commissary team provides on a daily basis is what sets our commissary apart from the rest, said Undersander. I consider the commissary to be a main contributing member of the NAS Jax team because of all the work they do to benefit our military community and their families. Commissary team recognized for excellencePhotos by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, (center, right) presents the second place trophy of the Director's Award in DeCA's "Best Commissary" com petition for FY 2013 to Larry Bentley, NAS Jacksonville Commissary store direc tor, and the entire NAS Jax Commissary team. On May 8, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander con gratulated the NAS Jax Commissary Team for a job well done in the FY 2013 "Best Commissary" competition. Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosEACN Deanna Daniel of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 Det. Jacksonville rinses her eyes at the wash station after being pepper sprayed during the Auxiliary Security Force Academy on May 8. EACN Matthew Ebert of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 Det. Jacksonville utilizes face wash to help remove the burning sensation, after being exposed to pepper spray. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 7

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area of responsibility with the VP-8 Fighting Tigers, the nearest suitable location for intermediate maintenance was NAS Jacksonville. The lowest practical resource expen diture required assistance from the P-3 maintenance professionals sta tioned here. As Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) -11 host ing squadron VP-26 provided critical assistance to execute the IMC. While the average IMC on a P-3C Orion takes approximately 16 days in accordance with the sequence control chart, Duty Section 3 and a support ing element of VP-8 maintainers, led by AE1 Slemp, completed the work in just 12 days by working three continu ous 8-hour shifts around the clock and through a three-day weekend. Although the IMC team discovered an unexpect ed fuel cell leak, they were able to repair the leak and return the aircraft to VP-8 ahead of schedule. Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, commanding officer of VP-26, had words of praise for Duty Section 3. They demonstrated the dedication and professionalism that have kept the P-3 flying in support of our country for more than 50 years. The teamwork demonstrated across CPRW11 ensured a critical asset was returned to deployment in minimal time. I couldnt be more proud of Duty Section 3 and all of Trident Maintenance. VP-26From Page 1 By Lt. j.g. Chris MemmingerHSM-72 Public AffairsOn May 15, Cmdr. Torsten Schmidt assumed command of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 72 from Cmdr. Derek Fleck, during a change of command ceremony at NAS Jacksonville. The change of command came on the heels of a busy 15-month period that included major milestones for the Proud Warriors. Chief among notable events was the squadrons successful transition from HSL-42 to HSM-72 that included a wholesale change in aircraft inventory from legacy SH-60B to new MH-60R air craft. As part of this transition, the Proud Warriors also converted from expedi tionary operations to Carrier Air Wingbased operations. Since February, HSM-72 has been an integral part of the Freedom Fighters of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. Flecks tenure as HSM-72 command ing officer began with the challenge of guiding the squadron through a safe-tooperate certification inspection allow ing them to operate the MH-60R for the first time. The first major employment of the new aircraft soon followed in June of 2013 when Proud Warrior aircrews and aircraft supported Exercises Bold Quest and Trident Warrior. During these two-week operating periods, HSM-72 aircraft conducted flight operations in conjunction with all four U.S. services, in addition to coalition partner nations Germany, France, Italy and Norway. Highlights included interoperabil ity testing of the Mode V Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) system and the Joint Tactical Information Distribution System between fourth and fifth generation air craft data link systems. During the summer of 2013, HSM72 welcomed Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron into the fold in preparation for their reception and ini tial operation of the MH-60R helicop ter. In addition to providing mainte nance, operational and fleet training to our Australian friends, the outstanding relationship forged between HSM-72 and RAN 725 Squadron ensured seam less exchanges of ideas and experiences that led to team-building camarade rie. The professional relationship that Fleck helped foster will set the tone for a successful future of MH-60R opera tions with the Australian Navy for years to come. Prior to his turnover, Fleck had the good fortune to stand-up not one, but two operational Detachments. Both the formation of Detachment 1 embarked with USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79) in support of Exercise Baltops and Detachment 2 forward deployed to Souda Bay Greece were accompanied by unique challenges. Both detachments were formed under a compressed time line in response to real-world national tasking. In addition to Flecks operational achievements as commanding officer, his exceptional leadership led to the squadron earning several command awards including the Blue M award for medical readiness, the Grampaw Pettibone Award for aviation safety, and the 2013 Secretary of the Navy Safety Excellence Award. Flecks next assign ment is the Industrial College of the Armed Forces in Washington D.C. Stepping in as Warrior One is Cmdr. Torsten Schmidt. A graduate of the State University of New York Maritime College, Schmidt played an important role in the squadrons successes as executive offi cer. He is now faced with the new chal lenge of leading the command towards their first operational deployment as an integrated part of CVW-7, supporting Carrier Strike Group 8, soon to embark with aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Filling the role of the executive offi cer is Cmdr. Jason Sherman, who reports aboard United States Southern Command in Miami, Fla. Polished, trained and ready for orders, the Proud Warriors stand ready to exe cute the mission. Schmidt is focused on maintaining the high level of pride and professionalism that serve as the founda tion of Proud Warrior success. HSM-72 embraces the challenges that lie ahead. Congratulations to Cmdr. Schmidt and Fair Winds and Following Seas to Cmdr. Fleck. Proud Warriors of HSM-72 change commandCmdr. Derek Fleck Cmdr. Torsten Schmidt From StaffVeterans in Northeast Florida now have a new source of assistance for preparing compensation claims to submit to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for disability. The new, twice-monthly VA Claims Preparation Workshop starts Jun 6, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Building 1 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Provided by AMVETS, the disability claims workshop is designed to expe dite VA processing by cutting through the red tape. Getting VA paperwork submitted correctly the first time is critically important to receiving your disabil ity ratings in a timely manner, said AMVETS National Service Officer David Sanders. Our primary purpose is to inter cede on behalf of veterans with the VA at no charge to the veteran. He added that participation in the workshop will require the service member to solicit command support. Seating is limited, so preregis tration is required via email to: david.d.sanders@navy.mil. Sanders added that attending the VA Claims Preparation Workshop increases the prospect of getting dis ability ratings back in a timely man ner.VA disability claims workshop on June 6 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014

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(From right) Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 Capt. Sean Liedman; Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. George Ballance; COMUSNAVSO/4th Fleet, CMDCM(SW/EXW/FMF) David Tellez; and CPRW-11 CMDCM(AW/SW) Debra Downs proceed to NAS Jax Building 852 May 7 for a briefing on Wing 11. Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonNAS Jax welcomes Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet(Right) NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, briefs Rear Adm. George Ballance, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command (COMUSNAVSO/U.S. 4th Fleet during an office call May 7 at NAS Jacksonville. Undersander also took the group on a windshield tour of the station. Ballance took command of COMUSNAVSO/4th Fleet in April.Photo by Jacob SippelCmdr. John Crane, associate director for clinical support services at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, explains the labor and delivery departments daily schedule to Rear Adm. George Ballance, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet, as Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville command ing officer, looks on. During the May 7 hospital tour, Ballance saw firsthand areas such as labor and delivery, intensive care unit, physical therapy and occupational therapy clinics.Photo by Clark Pierce JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 9

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By Sgt. David BayotNAS Jax Police DepartmentThe NAS Jacksonville Law Enforcement Team, in conjunc tion with other law enforce ment agencies throughout the United States, will actively par ticipate in the 2014 Click It or Ticket seatbelt campaign May 19 through June 1. Failure to buckle-up in com pliance with state laws by the driver and/or passengers allows law enforcement offi cers to conduct a traffic stop and issue a citation for the infraction. In Florida and gov ernment installations, seatbelt usage is now considered a pri mary offense. NAS Jacksonville upholds a zero tolerance policy for fail ure to use vehicle seatbelts and maintains that non-compli ance of the seatbelt law is a pri mary offense. In May, the campaign will continue to focus on teens and young adult drivers while broadening its outreach to the military as traffic crashes are the leading cause of death for our service members and their families. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reveals that since the enforcement mobilizations program began, child fatali ties have dropped significantly. Child restraint use for infants under one-year-old has risen considerably, and restraint use among toddlers ages 1-4 has jumped even more dramatical ly over the past three years. Last year, adult seatbelt use rose to the nations highest uti lization rate ever. With more than 80 million Americans buckling up you would think everybodys finally gotten the message. Last year Duval County still had some of the highest traffic fatalities in the State of Florida. Please join this effort to save lives and reduce injuries by promoting seatbelt usage. Dont become one of the 2014 fatal ity statistics by failing to buckle up. By Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer announced Cmdr. Michael Sunman as the next Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Jacksonville officer in charge (OIC), effective August. Sunman, a native of Ft. Myers, Fla., will report to BHC Jacksonville from BHC Paris Island, S.C., where he was interim OIC since January. Prior to that, he served as director of clinical support services at NH Beaufort from September 2013 to January 2014. He holds a Doctorate of Optometry from Southern College of Optometry, a Master of Business Administration from Webster University and a Bachelor of Science from Florida State University. He is an American Academy of Optometry Fellow and member of the Armed Forces Optometric Society and American Optometric Association. Sunmans military assign ments include: head of optom etry clinics, NH and BHC Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, S.C.; head of ancil lary services, NBHC Iwakuni, Japan; head of clinical support services, NBHC Mayport; and, operations officer, NBHC Parris Island, S.C. Sunman will replace Cmdr. Andrea Petrovanie, who has served as OIC since March 2013, will next head to NH Okinawa, Japan. Cmdr. George Sellock, NH Jacksonvilles associate direc tor for dental services, will serve as NBHC Jacksonvilles acting OIC until Sunmans arrival. BHC Jacksonville is one of NH Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient popula tion about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their familiesmore than 67,000 are enrolled with a pri mary care manager at one of its facilities. To find out more about BHC Jacksonville, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. Failure to use seatbelts now a primary offenseClick It or Ticket seatbelt campaign begins next weekPhoto by MC2 Amanda CabasosPatrolman Malcolm Watson from NAS Jax Security Department issues a seatbelt citation to a motorist aboard the base recently. Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville officer in charge selectedCmdr. Michael Sunman JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 11

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New uniforms for Team Navy Jax By Clark PierceEditorMembers of Team Navy Jax cycling club met at the VyStar Credit Union aboard NAS Jax May 2 to pick up their 2014 team cycling uniforms. VyStar President and CEO Terry West, a recreational cyclist, said donating the team jerseys and shorts was an easy decision. Were long-time supporters of these dedicated riders because they compete in cycling events that raise funds for charitable organizations such as the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and National Multiple Sclerosis Society. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (an honorary team member) congratu lated the clubs Sailors and civilians for their dedica tion and physical conditioning. Team Navy Jax trains by pedaling hundreds of miles before each fundraising event. They not only cycle for a sense of personal pride but also to support charitable community organizations. AS1(AW) Terry Yamin, of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, is the team leader. Right now, were train ing and fundraising for the ADA Jacksonville Tour de Cure May 17. Now, with our new team uniforms, courtesy of VyStar, well build a strong team identity throughout this years fundraising season.Neither NAS Jacksonville, MWR or Jax Air News, nor any part of the federal government, officially endorses any company, sponsor or their products or services. (From center) NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander and VyStar Credit Union President and CEO Terry West congraulate Team Navy Jax Leader AS1(AW) Terry Yamin, along with a dozen other team members. Their new uniforms will be vis ible at the ADA Jacksonville Tour de Cure on May 17. Photo by Clark Pierce Special Olympics Bowling Team(From front) Nicole Stanley (athlete), Mike Woods (athlete), Katarina Zeigler (partner) and Derek Freitag (partner) will represent Clay County at the Special Olympics National Games in Princeton, N.J., June 14-21. Stanley's and Zeigler's fathers are retired Navy. Travel expenses were supported by Navy Wives Clubs of America Jacksonville No. 86.Photo by Wilma Stanley Members of the United States military (active duty, veterans, retir ees and reservists) over the age of 18 can apply for a permit to carry a concealed weapon in Florida without additional training or classes. Florida Statutes 790.06(2)(h)(5) and 790.062 exempt military personnel from classes required of non-military personnel. We think our military personnel should know they dont need to pay for classes to obtain a permit to carry a firearm, said Tom Eichling, owner/chief instructor at Accurate Edge and retired U.S. Navy. If you need additional or advanced training, weve got what you need. But dont shell out your hard-earned money for a course you dont need. Eichling firmly believes the right to carry weapons as guaran teed in the Second Amendment is accompanied by an all-important responsibility to use firearms safely and accurately. He is committed to providing training to help gun owners meet that responsibility. And, he is well credentialed to provide training. His military experience includes the Navy Auxiliary Security Force, the Marksmanship Team, the Navys Phase I Law Enforcement course and the Armys Marksmanship Training Unit Small Arms Firing School. He was rated a Navy expert in pistol, rifle and shotgun, and was 1st place champion in the Navys longrange pistol competition. As a civilian, he is an NRA Senior Training Counselor (Instructor Trainer) with 23 years firearm training expe rience and a Florida D&G licensed (unarmed and armed) security officer. He is a graduate of four civilian law enforcement academies in Florida. In November 2013, I became a Certified Instructor for the United States Concealed Carry Association, Eichling said. In Florida only Certified Instructors can provide training for concealed weapons licenses. Training received from an affiliate instructor has never met license requirements. Billy Woods is a training team member at Accurate Edge. Billy is a retired Marine Recon/Scout with years of rifle-training experience, Eichling said. He is an NRA-Certified Instructor and is scheduled to attend an NRA Training Counselor Workshop in October, making him an NRA Training Counselor. We will then be the only business in Northeast Florida with two Training Counselors on staff. Eichling is excited about the companys newest training tool. We were just approved to use Simunition rounds in our training, he said. Simunition was created to provide more realistic training to military and law enforcement agencies. We are planning classes using them for real-life scenario training. Until two years ago, they were allowed only for military and law enforcement. We have completed the process that allows us to add Simunition to our program. Accurate Edge has led the way in firearms training in other areas, as well. We were the first in Northeast Florida to be approved for the NRA Advanced Defensive Pistol mentoring program, Eichling said. To the best of my knowledge, we are still the only business in Northeast Florida approved to conduct that class. If you do not meet military exemption and need a class for car rying a concealed weapon, Accurate Edge can provide that training. When you are ready for advanced firearms training, Accurate Edge offers marksmanship fundamentals, basic and advanced defensive pistol training, various personal protection courses, all in small class settings. Accurate Edge will work with you to customize a course to meet your needs.Learn more about the classes and what you need to know to own, handle and use firearms safely, accurately and respon sibly. Visit online at www.Accurage-Edge.com, e-mail info@ Accurate-Edge.com, or call toll-free 1-877-781-1538. Having a Florida concealed carry license doesnt make you a safe, tactical defensive shooter any more than having a drivers license makes you a NASCAR driver. Tom Eichling, Accurate Edge. Accurate Edge: Teaching firearms safety and accuracyonly hits count Accurate Edge training takes place on 4 acres of pri vately owned property, zoned open rural, in Nassau County. With two live-fire ranges, a large heated/ cooled classroom, kitchen facilities, audio-visual equipment, a gun safe and other amenities, the training facility is relaxed, quiet and stress free. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014

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By Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public AffairsLt. William Shumaker, a Navy Nurse Corps officer at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, was awarded the 2014 Auburn University School of Nursing Distinguished Alumni Award in a cer emony held May 4. This recognition is bestowed annu al on an alumnus or alumna who has established clinical distinction in nurs ing through scholarly endeavors, pro motion of health care, professional service or has contributed remarkable service to the community, state or other beneficiary organizations. I am very grateful and honored to have been selected for this prestigious award, said Shumaker. Iowe so much to Auburn University and the professorsat the School of Nursing who were always there for me. Their willingness and dedication to see me through were instrumental in my course completion. Shumaker, a native of Birmingham, Ala., enlisted in the Navy in 1997 after high school. Upon completion of Hospital Corpsman A School, he was assigned to 2nd Medical Battalion, 2nd Force Service Support Group at Camp Lejeune, N.C. He was later selected for Broadened Opportunity for Officer Selection and Training (BOOST) at Newport, R.I. After completion of the 10-month BOOST program, Shumaker enrolled at Auburn University where he earned his Bachelor of Science in Nursing, and Navy commission in 2005. Shumakers military assignments as a Navy Nurse Corps officer include: Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Va., NH Beaufort, S.C. and NH Jacksonville since 2011. In 2013 he deployed to Camp Lemonnier Expeditionary Medical Facility in Djibouti, Africa. For eight months he served as ward nurse manager and was one of four nurses who cared for more than 6,200 U.S. military personnel assigned to the Horn of Africa area of operation. In support of the local African com munity, Shumaker conducted weekly orphanage visits to care, feed and play with children, who constantly inspired him to focus on the important things in life. He also coordinated multiple humanitarian supply shipments from various organizations to the orphanage. Shumaker also earned a Master of Arts in Pastoral Counseling from Liberty University while deployed to Djibouti. I cannot think of a more deserv ing person for this award than Lt. William Shumaker, said Dr. Jenny Schuessler, associate dean for the Auburn University School of Nursing and Shumakers former instructor. His professionalism and compassion as a student, as well as his exemplary leadership and service as a Navy Nurse Corps officer justify his selection. Shumaker currently serves as charge nurse and scheduling officer at NH Jacksonvilles maternal infant unit. He plans to transfer to NH Okinawa, Japan in November. He and his wife Rebecca are the proud parents of three daughters: Olivia, Elizabeth and Anna. Apply by May 30By NH Jacksonville Public AffairsThe American Red Crosss Northeast Florida Chapter at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, is currently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volun teers. It offers an excellent opportunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionals physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and technicians as well as contribute to a positive experience for patients at the hospital located at NAS Jacksonville. The program is open to 20 high school students ages 15-17 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hos pital, and receive CPR training. Those interested should apply online by May 30, at www.redcross.org/fl/ jacksonville/volunteer/join-us. At the website, click youth volun teer application. Fill out the applica tion, select Northeast Florida Chapter and create a Volunteer Connection account. After submitting the application, complete the online orientation. All applicants are required to attend a kick-off event (which includes an interview) on June 7 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the hospitals 2nd floor confer ence room in the central tower (next to the chapel). For more info, call NH Jacksonville Junior Red Cross volunteer coordina tor Terry Miles or Red Cross Chairman Mary Miciano at 904-542-7525; or email terry.miles2@med.navy.mil or mary.miciano@med.navy.mil. From the NAS Jax All Officers Spouses ClubThe NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club is sponsoring three $1,000 schol arships based on scholarship merit and community service. Eligibility: U.S. Navy active/reserve duty and active/reserve duty depen dents who are currently in their senior year of high school or a high school graduate, attached to NAS Jacksonville and planning to attend an accredited college in the fall of 2014 or spring of 2015. Scholarships are to be used only for tuition and tuition-based fees charged by the college and will be sent to the college. Three scholarships will be awarded; each in the amount $1,000 one active duty, one officer dependent, and one enlisted dependent. Criteria: Recipients will be selected on scholarship merit and community service. Deadline for application is June 7. Selection of recipients will be made by June 30. Scholarship application may be picked up at NAS Jacksonville Navy College Office or found on-line at: https://www.fcef.com/wp-con tent/uploads/CHP-ScholarshipApplication3-14.pdf. You may submit the application by mail to: NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, c/o Mrs. Pam Undersander, 5065 Mustin Road, Jacksonville FL 32212. Questions may be sent to nasjax aosc@gmail.comNeither the NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal govern ment officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. NH Jacksonville nurse receives distinguished alumni awardPhoto by Phil ShumakerDean of Auburn University School of Nursing Gregg Newschwander (left), presents Lt. William Shumaker with the Distinguished Alumni Award at a cer emony held on May 4. The annual rec ognition is bestowed on an alumnus or alumna who has established clinical distinction in nursing through scholarly endeavors, promotion of health care, professional service or has contributed remarkable service to the community, state or other beneficiary organiza tions. Experience Navy Medicine as a Junior Red Cross volunteerCollege scholarships deadline is June 7 Improving lives. Curing type 1 diabetes (T1D). JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. **New time Friday Social Hour 59 p.m., live enter tainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke Lunch bingo Monday through Friday begins at 11:15 a.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly handicap single tournament May 17, 1 4 p.m., $20 Scratch Sweeper May 24, 1 4 p.m., $30 *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open through June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31 Outdoor pool opens for weekend recreational swim Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Dive-in Movie May 23 featuring LEGO Movie Pool opens at 7 p.m., movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free popcorn. Concession stand will be open.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil. ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Orlando Shopping Trip July 26 $20 St. Augustine Scenic Cruise August 30 $20 Mt. Dora Trip October 25 $20 Jacksonville Jaguar tickets on sale soon! Adventure Landing Waterpark seasonal $85.50 Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel proper ties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Paintball Trip May 17 at 9 a.m. Movie in the Yard Barracks on May 20 at 8:30 p.m. Featuring Need for Speed Jacksonville Suns Game May 29 at 6 p.m. Free admission and transportationNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty May 27 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests May 29 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. Command Party Swing into savings & book your command golf tour namentMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependent Skipper B Sailing Classes availableAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Summer Camp Registration going on now! Sign-in at the youth centerFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available including instru ment, complex and commercial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.net By Bill BonserMWR Sports CoordinatorThe Intramural Winter Golf League finished in April with 12 teams participating. The format for the league was a two-person Captains choice scoring based on one point for bogey, two points for par, four points for birdie and eight points for an eagle. The 12 teams played for eight weeks to determine which eight teams would go to the playoffs. Navy Computer and Telecommunications Station finished first and VP-45 finished second. The 2014 Intramural Winter Golf League end-ofyear tournament took place April 30 at the NAS Jax Golf Course. Eleven teams participated in the fourperson format, Captains choice scoring for tourna ment prizes. Players also received a free dinner to wrap up the 18-hole tournament. The season-ending event gave all the league par ticipants a chance to have fun together while playing as a four-person group. They also had a chance to win prizes for winning the tournament and for shooting the longest drive and closest to the pin. The U.S. Navy, the Department of Defense, and the fed eral government do not officially endorse any company, sponsor, advertiser, or their products or services. Intramural Golf Summer League forming Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. The league plays Wednesday at 11:30 a.m., beginning May 21. Contact base gym for rules and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Forming Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Contact base gym for rules and required paperwork. Wallyball League Meeting May 21 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork. Badminton Singles League Meeting May 28 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork. Bean Bag Toss Singles Tournament June 23 Tournament takes place at 5 p.m. in the NAS Jax Fitness, Sports and Aquatics Center. The tournament is open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Call the Fitness Center at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil to sign up by June 13. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for Sign up by July 14. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for Sign up by July 14. For more information about any of the sports articles, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. Standings As of May 9 Team Wins Losses Hit it-n-Quit it 1 0 NAS-ty Slammers 1 0 Bad News Babes 0 1 Pitch Slaps 0 1 Team Wins Losses FRCSE 5 0 HS-11 5 1 HITRON 4 1 VP-30 Students 4 1 TPU/PCF 3 1 HSM-72 4 2 BHC Jax 3 3 VP-26 3 3 VP-45 2 3 VP-62 Broad Arrows 1 3 FRCSE F-18 PMI 1 5 NAVFAC 1 5 NAVHOSP 0 4 VR-62 0 4 Team Wins Losses VR-62 3 0 NAVFAC Blue 2 1 NAVFAC Gold 2 1 NCTS Gold 2 1 TPU/PCF 2 1 Team Wins Losses VP-62 Broadarrows 2 1 FACSFAC 1 2 Navy Band 1 2 NCTS Blue 1 2 VP-45 1 2 VP-5 0 3 Team Wins Losses VP-26 7 0 NAVHOSP 8 1 VP-30 8 1 FRCSE Rabid Possums 5 2 VP-45 Sluggers 5 2 VR-62 5 2 CNRSE/Navy Band 4 2 HS-11 5 3 VR-58 4 3 NCTS 3 4 FACSFAC 3 5 AIR OPS 3 6 CBMU202 2 4 FRCSE 900 2 4 CRS-10 2 5 FRCSE Thrusters 2 7 FRCSE Tweaks & Geeks 1 7 NBHC Honey Badgers 0 5 VP-45 Scared Hitless 0 7 Team Wins Losses VP-26 2 0 CNATTU 2 1 FACSFAC 1 1 NAVFAC 1 1 NECE 0 3 MWR intramural golf tournament held 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014

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By Marcia HartU.S. Navy officers and distin guished visitors from Missouri and Illinois gathered for a cer emony in St. Louis May 5 to cel ebrate production of the 100th EA-18G Growler. The Growler, the newest advancement in the Navys electronic attack (EA) arse nal, is a variant of the Block II F/A-18F Super Hornet and is the Navy replacement for the EA-6B Prowler. The airborne electronic attack aircraft combines mod ern advances in EA systems and weapons with the tacti cal versatility, advancements and capabilities of the Block II Super Hornet. The EA-18G Growler is a high demand asset that is equally critical in disrupting our enemies operations as it is enhancing our own, said Capt. Frank Morley, program man ager for the F/A-18 and EA-18G Program Office (PMA-265) dur ing the ceremony at Boeing. Next week, Capt. Darryl Walker, commander of the Electronic Attack Wing, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CVWP), will accept delivery of the air craft on behalf of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 129 in Whidbey Island, Wash., before its transfer to a designated operational squadron in the fleet. The Growler is designed to perform an array of airborne electronic attack missions, operating from either the deck of an aircraft carrier or landbased fields, similar to the EA-6B Prowler. Through these capabilities, warfighters may jam or suppress enemy radar and communication systems to protect friendly assets in the air and on the ground. NAVAIR (Naval Air Systems Command) is continuing to advance the capabilities of the Growler as the U.S. Navys elec tronic attack mission becomes more robust and potential adversaries up their game with increasingly lethal air defens es, Morley said. With new technologies, such as the Next Generation Jammer (NGJ), the Growler will have greater capabilities in the EA arena then its prede cessor. Currently, the Growler still uses the Prowlers ALQ99 Jammer Pods, slated to be replaced with the NGJ in the early 2020s. The NGJ features active electronically scanned array antennas and a lighter, more aerodynamically shaped pod, which can allow for fast er airspeed bringing greater lethality and capability to the EA-18G. The EA-18G program remains on the same schedule and cost projected when the program began in 2003, and the aircraft is projected to serve beyond 2040. The Navy accept ed its first Growler Aug. 3, 2006. By MC1 Brianna DandridgeNavy Recruiting District JacksonvilleThe senior Sailor at Navy Recruiting District (NRD) Jacksonville was frocked to the rank of master chief petty officer at a pinning ceremony May 5. NCCM James Whitter, a native of Clearwater, Fla., enlisted in the Navy in 1988. He currently serves as the NRD Jacksonville command assistant chief recruiter. Following the frocking orders at the ceremony Whitter acknowledged the departmental chief petty officers and recruiters of NRD Jacksonville for their hard work and dedication. First I would like to thank my Lord and savior, and my family for support ing me and my career, said Whitter. During the ceremony, Whitters wife and mother assisted by pinning him with his new rank. According to Master Chief Navy Counselor Penny White, chief recruit er at NRD Jacksonville, hard work and dedication lead to this milestone. His passion for the job is one of the traits that helped him to reach this career pinnacle, said White. Whitter also credited the work and efforts of the recruiting team, saying that motivation and perseverance is the key to success for recruiting. Remember to stay the course and keep pushing, said Whitter. The very reason you chose to come recruiting will be what motivates you to be successful in recruiting. The chief petty officer rating was first established April 1, 1893. Senior chief petty officers and master chief petty officers were established June 1, 1958, under an amendment to the Career Compensation Act of 1949. With 70 percent of the world covered by water, with 80 percent of the worlds population living near coasts and 90 percent of the worlds commerce trav eling by water, Americas Navy is very much a global force for good. NRCs mission is to recruit the best men and women for Americas Navy to accomplish todays missions and meet tomorrows challenges.For more news from Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville, visit www.navy.mil/ local/nrdjax/. Navys electronic attack aircraft reaches centennial milestonePhoto by MC3 Karl AndersonAn EA-18G Growler assigned to the Zappers of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAW) 130 launches from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) in March 2014 during Harry S. Truman's final mission supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. New master chief pinned at Navy Recruiting DistrictPhoto by MC1(SW) Brianna Dandridge NCCM James Whitter, assistant chief recruiter of Navy Recruiting District (NRD) Jacksonville was promoted to his current rank of master chief by NRD Commanding Officer Cmdr. Brent Cower May 5. FLIGHT LINE CAFE May 22, 2014: 11001230 Meal Rate: $4.65 Pacific Asian Stir Fry Soup Szechwan Chicken Aloha Roast Pork Egg Foo Young (made to order before your eyes) Steamed Rice Pancit Lumpia Oriental Vegetable Stir Fry Ronton Crab Salad New master chiefs at FRCSENewly frocked AFCM(AW/SW) Michael Piunno, of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, is pinned by his daughters during a frocking ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1000 on May 5. Piunno attributes his successful 22-year Navy career to the support of his family, the Sailors with whom he has worked with and his two mentors for providing guidance and knowledge. Photos by Victor PittsFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna, right, presents a frocking letter to PRCM(AW/ SW/FPJ) Aaron Carroll during a frocking ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1000 May 5. Carroll recently reported to FRCSE from Naval Amphibious Base Coronado in San Diego and is the only newly frocked PRCM in the Navy. Carroll, a 21-year veteran, attributes his success to his family, the Sailors he has worked with and the chiefs' mess.Photo by Jacob SippelHospital Sailors recognizedCapt. Gayle Shaffer (left), Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville commanding officer, presents the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal to HM2 Shanell Jackson during an awards ceremony at the hospital on May 9. Other award recipients included Cmdr. Andrea Petrovanie (Meritorious Service Medal); Lt. Cmdr. Warren Cantrell (Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal); and HM2 Roberto Garcia (Letter of Appreciation, NAS Jacksonville commanding officer). JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 15, 2014 By Clark PierceEditorSailors, Marines and Airmen from a variety of commands in Navy Region Southeast, Navy Region Northwest, and Navy Region Hawaii assembled in the Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11 Auditorium at NAS Jacksonville April 28 May 2 to learn the basics of the Link 16 tactical communications net work. Lt. Jordan Brye, Fleet Introduction Training Division Officer at the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapons School was liaison with the mobile training team from the Joint Multi-Tactical Data Link School stationed at Pope Army Airfield in Fort Bragg, N.C. Link 16 is a U.S. and allied government-backed jam-resis tant, digital data link network that exchanges tactical infor mation across a variety of air, sea and ground-based plat forms, said Brye. OSC Stephanie McConnell is senior enlisted leader of the Joint Interoperability Division. This five-day course gives ser vice members an overview of joint operations in a multi-tac tical data link network. They get an understanding of how the Link 16 network operates, along with the parameters required to work in a joint net worked environment. Link 16 fills a capability gap with the Navys maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft. Now, AWOs can feed their radar or sonobuoy con tacts directly to tactical opera tions centers that in turn dis seminate the information to joint service or international commands. Sailors from the P-3 and P-8 communities, in addition to the MH-60R community, may now exchange real-time situ ational awareness information and voice communications across the battlespace. McConnell added that Link 16 represents a tremendous knowledge opportunity for all branches of the military to communicate more effectively. For example, Link 16 can facilitate simultaneous com munications of a Navy P-3 air craft talking to a carrier strike group, talking to an Air Force operations center, talking to a Marine company, talking to an Army battalion as well as working with international coalition partners. Sailors offered limited opportunity to volunteer for early separationFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsDue to the excellent retention and outstanding recruiting suc cess, the Navy is reinstating the Enlisted Early Transition Program (EETP), according to a message released May 8. According to NAVADMIN 103/14, EETP allows eligible Sailors in targeted ratings to apply for a voluntary early separation up to 24 months prior to their End of Obligated Service as Extended (EAOS). The new version of the program is ongoing, quota-controlled, and will help reduce the need for involuntary force management. Early separation will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis. Available quotas are identified by rating, paygrade, year group and Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC). A list is available at http:// www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/enlisted/community/pages/ eetp.aspx. Quotas will be reviewed periodically and updated as required. Early Separation requests will not be approved for the following Sailors: requirement, including overseas tour extension incentive pro grams for which a benefit has been received. Commanding officers will maintain final disapproval author ity and do not need to forward requests they cannot support. Final approval authority rests with Navy Personnel Command, Performance Evaluation Division, with positive commanding offi cer endorsement.For more information, read the message at www.npc.navy. mil or contact the Navy Personnel Command Customer Service Center at 1-800-U-ASK-NPC (827-5672) or at uasknpc@navy.mil. USO Night at Adventure Landing May 28From StaffVyStar Credit Union recently donated $15,000 to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO to support Military Appreciation Night May 28 at Adventure Landing on Beach Blvd. near the Intracoastal waterway. This is the eighth year that VyStar has been the title spon sor of his event for Sailors and family members, said USO Executive Director Mike OBrien at his office near the main gate of NAS Jacksonville. We cant do what we do without companies like VyStar that step forward and make a difference for area service members. And thats important to organizations like USO that is completely self-funded. OBrien said the gates will open at 6 p.m. for military fun seekers who can enjoy go-carts, miniature golf, laser tag, video games and much more. Photo by Clark Pierce A civilian instructor with the mobile training team from Pope Army Airfield discusses some basic features of the Link 16 tactical communications network April 29 at NAS Jacksonville.Link 16 network course attracts 70 studentsPhoto by Clark Pierce (From left) NAS Jax VyStar Branch Manager Brad Smith and VyStar Regional Vice President Russell Buck, pres ent Greater Jacksonville Area USO Executive Director Mike O'Brien with a check for $15,000 to underwrite Military Appreciation Night May 28 at Adventure Landing in Jacksonville Beach. Photo by Kaylee LaRocqueAir Force maintainers visit FRCSEKevin Fowler, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) aircraft engine mechanic supervisor,left, explains how artisans dismantle and repair a high pressure compressor for a TF-34 engine at the Crinkley Engine Facility, the Navy's largest engine repair facility, to a group of maintainers and logisticians from Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., on May 2. The TF-34 turbofan engine powers the A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft, used exclusively by the United States Air Force. Photo courtesy of AM1 Michael OrinskiFRCSE Sailors mentor studentsSailors from the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) First Class Petty Officers Association (FCPOA) gather with students from the Orange Park Junior High (OPJH) Graduation Success Team at the World of Nations event in downtown Jacksonville on May 1. FRCSE FCPOA Sailors work with the students through mentoring and assisting with homework. Other events the Sailors participate in include sports pep rallies, Thanksgiving meal preparations, OPJH Beautification Campus Cleanup Day, and student recognition award ceremonies.

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