Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
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Newspaper
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English
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United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
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May 30, 2013
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Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
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30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MAY 8, 2014 I I D E HURREXHurricane Drill UnderwayPage 3 BETTER GOLF NAS Jax Course Improvements Pages 4-5 COQTop Civilians Recognized Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Triton UAV squadron growing in facilities, personnelBy MC2 Amanda CabasosStaff WriterThe Navys first squadron designated to fly the MQ-4C Triton unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is taking shape at NAS Jacksonville. Unmanned Patrol Squadron (VUP) 19 Officer in Charge Cmdr. Shannon Clark recently explained developments in the program since the squadron stood up Oct. 1, 2013. Were currently working to expand VUP-19 from an administrative entity to a more functional perspective, said Clark. We will start some training on the actual air vehicle this summer to assist with some upcoming testing. However, our primary focus right now is ensuring that the administrative and operational sides of the squadron are properly functioning for the arrival of VUP-19s first commanding officer (CO). This way, the CO can concentrate on assuming the duties of this command and focusing on the squadrons mission. According to Clark, 21 officers and enlisted personnel will be assigned to VUP-19 at NAS Jacksonville by the end of this fiscal year. Approximately half of the Sailors will be aircrew/operators and the other half will be administra tive support. By the end of 2015, VUP-19, nick named Big Red, will have approxi mately 100 Sailors at the squadrons detachment site located at Naval Base Ventura County/Point Mugu, Calif. Currently, operators assigned to VUP19 will receive training at NAS Patuxent River, Md. Flight training will eventu ally shift to VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville as soon as the Triton curriculum is validated and training equipment is installed. The initial teaching will be this summer at NAS Pax River under Northrop Grumman instruction. Training received is in preparation for our involvement in the Operational Assessment and Operational Evaluation testing periods for this platform, explained Clark. Other facilities aboard NAS Jacksonville that will support the UAVs mission include the MQ-4C Triton Mission Control Center that is currently under construction, with a projected completion date of December 2014. This two-story structure, with an array of rooftop antennas, will house the squadrons mission control stations said Clark. In this facility, UAV Operators will Weinzatl named NFO of the yearBy Lt. j.g. Joseph BayoVP-26 Public Affairs OfficerCommander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic (CNAL) recently select ed Lt. Jacob Weinzatl, from NAS Jacksonvilles VP-26, as the 2013 naval flight officer (NFO) of the year. Weinzatl previously earned the Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group nomination and was selected from NFO nominees from all other aviation communities on the East Coast. Weinzatl hails from Buckner, Mo. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 2009 with a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engi neering. He was designated a naval flight officer in December of 2010. He checked aboard VP-26 in March of 2011 after completing initial P-3C Orion training at VP-30 in Jacksonville. During his time with the Tridents, Weinzatl served as schedules officer, assistant training officer, NFO tactics officer and NFO NATOPS officer. He deployed to the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility in 2011 and 2013, respectively. He qualified ahead of squadron and wing standards, setting himself up for an extremely successful 2013. Based on his strong tactical performance in the Advanced Readiness Program and Fleet Instructor Under Training syl labi, he was selected to fire VP-26s first AGM-65F Maverick missile since 2011. He was also deep-selected to take the NFO Blue Card Check Ride and earned qualification as the commands primary NATOPS evaluator. A natural leader of VP-26s Instructor Tactical Coordinator (TACCO) and Mission Commander cadre, he was chosen to lead his crew as the first on deployment and first on detachment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility in May 2013. By the end of deployment seven months later, Weinzatl had led his crew on 10 detachments, including three as Detachment Officer in Charge, and had conducted no less than four significant collections of data never before collected by a P-3 Orion. VP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, had words of praise for Weinzatl. He has been an asset to the squad ron since his arrival. His outstanding leadership and exceptional knowledge and aeronautical skills make him a standout in an outstanding wardroom. As an instructor, he made a tre mendous impact on our mission and training effectiveness. This is an honor for him, Team Trident, and the entire Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force. I am confident that he will continue to do great things for the mari time patrol community as an instructor at VP-30. By MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsNAS Jax concluded the month of April by holding the 10th annual Take Back the Night event at Hangar 117 to emphasize and reflect on Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Take Back the Night is a time to come together as a community to speak out against sexual assault, domestic vio lence, sexual abuse and other forms of sexual violence. Nearly 100 members from Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), NAS Jax Coalition for Sailors Against Destructive Descriptions, Rape Recovery Team with Womens Center of Jacksonville, and victim advocates from NAS Jax attended the ceremony to show their support. FFSC Sexual Assault Response Coordinator Tina Vaughn opened the ceremony. I want to thank each one of you for coming out tonight. Our mission is to stand with and honor those who have been victimized by sexual violence, to cast light into the places where dark ness would like to live. Though this month of awareness is over, we are ever vigilant on our course forward. Vaughn introduced NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. I am truly honored to be here tonight to celebrate the Take Back the Night event with all of you Photos by Clark Pierce VUP-19 aircrew stand with a scale model of the MQ-4C Triton unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), in the lobby of VP-30's new UAV operator training facility May 2. (From left) VUP-19 Officer in Charge (OIC) Cmdr. Shannon Clark, VUP-19 Assistant OIC Lt. Cmdr. Rob Wilhelm, VUP-19 Safety Officer Lt. Hunter Korbelik and VUP-19 Safety Petty Officer AWO2 Brandon Jenkins. Masonry workers set dozens of concrete blocks May 2 at the construction site for the new MQ-4C Triton Mission Control Center at NAS Jacksonville. Lt. Jacob WeinzatlPhoto by MC2 Amanda CabasosNaval Hospital Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Christine Sears speaks during the Take Back the Night event held aboard NAS Jax on April 30. The event is an opportunity for the community to come together to speak out against sexual assault and all forms of sexual violence. One of the key reasons we observe Sexual Assault Awareness Month is to show our support for victims, said Sears. Over the past year, Navy Medicine has increased capability to care for victims and perform the medical examinations for evidence used to convict those who perpetrate this heinous crime.NAS Jax takes back the night See Page 7 See Page 7 See Page 6

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 Wealth trainingRufus Bundridge, personal finance manager at Fleet and Family Support Center, instructs a dozen Sailors and Marines during the two-day Million Dollar Sailor program on April 29. The program teaches personal wealth building strategies and covers topics such as financial goal setting and implementation, debt reduction, saving, and investing. From StaffMay 8 1911 Birth of naval aviation as Navy orders its first airplane, the Curtiss A-1. 1942 Battle of Coral Sea ends with Japanese retir ing from area and USS Lexington (CV-2) scuttled due to extensive battle damage. 1945 VE Day, Germanys unconditional surrender to the Allies. 1972 U.S. Navy and Marine Corps aircraft mine Haiphong Harbor in North Vietnam. May 9 1926 Lt. Cmdr. Richard Byrd and ADC Floyd Bennett make first flight over North Pole. Both receive Congressional Medal of Honor. 1942 USS Wasp (CV-7) in Mediterranean launches 47 Spitfire fighter aircraft to help defend Malta. May 10 1775 Force under Ethan Allan and Benedict Arnold cross Lake Champlain and capture British fort at Ticonderoga, New York. 1800 The 44-gun heavy frigate USS Constitution captures Letter of Marque Sandwich. 1862 Confederates destroy Norfolk and Pensacola Navy Yards. 1949 First shipboard launching of Lark guided missile by USS Norton Sound (AVM-1). 1960 USS Triton (SSRN-586) completes submerged circumnavigation of world in record 84 days follow ing many of the routes taken by Magellan and cruising 46,000 miles. At 447 feet long, it was one of the largest submarines ever built. May 11 1862 CSS Virginia blown up by Confederates to prevent capture. 1898 Sailors and Marines from the light cruiser USS Marblehead (CL-2) cut trans-oceanic cable near Cienfuegos, Cuba, isolating Cuba from Spain. 1943 Naval task force lands Army troops on Attu, Aleutians. 1965 U.S. destroyers deliver first shore bombard ment of Vietnam War. May 12 1780 In the fall of Charleston, S.C., three Continental Navy frigates (Boston, Providence and Ranger) are captured, and one frigate (Queen of France) was sunk to prevent capture. 1846 U.S. declares war against Mexico. 1975 SS Mayaguez seized by Khmer Rouge and escorted to Koh Tang Island. 1986 Destroyer USS David R. Ray (DD-971) deters an Iranian Navy attempt to board a U.S. merchant ship. May 13 1908 Navy Nurse Corps (female) is established. 1908 Pearl Harbor Navy Yard, later called Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, was officially established in the Territory of Hawaii as a coaling station for U.S. Navy ships transiting the Pacific Ocean. 1943 Bureau of Navigation renamed Bureau of Naval Personnel. 1945 Aircraft from fast carrier task force begin twoday attack on Kyushu airfields, Japan. 1964 Organization and deployment of worlds first all-nuclear-powered task group (USS Enterprise, USS Long Beach and USS Bainbridge) to 6th Fleet. May 14 1801 Tripoli declares war against the United States. 1836 U.S. Exploring Expedition authorized to conduct exploration of Pacific Ocean and South Seas, first major scientific expedition overseas. Lt. Charles Wilkes led the expedition in surveying South America, Antarctica, Far East and North Pacific. SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-7789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorAs kids get older, there are some things, thank fully, that get easier. One of these is doing errands alone. This is the only hope I can offer new parents: Someday, you will go to the grocery store alone, and it will feel like Ferris Buellers Day Off. No arranging babysitters. No car seats. No screaming, Hes breathing on my side of the car, Mom! Tell him to breathe on his own side! Of course, this type of freedom only comes when you have a child whos old enough to be your free babysitter. Im sorry, I mean, once you have a child whos old enough to have the opportunity to care for his younger siblings and learn things like responsibility and time management. The universally accepted age for this privilege is 12 or 13, but it depends on the child and the age of his would-be charges. My brothers, Van and Will, were certainly old enough (14 and 11) to babysit me when I was in first grade, but I suspect Mom had second thoughts 30 years later when she hears the stories. One time, Will chased me around the room with the sprayer from the kitchen sink. To get him back, I threw a whole bucket of water on him in the foyer. We had wood floors. Another time, Will let me hide in the bushes with him to spy on and identify neighborhood pranksters who planned to egg our house. It was 10 p.m. on a school night. I was barefoot and in my pajamas. Mom never knew. I also remember Van and Will calling me into the living room like it was an emergency. Sarah, quick! Get in here! Hurry! Id come running and sliding down the hall, scared out of my mind only to get to the living room and have Will say, Can you change the channel for us. This was before remote controls, back when younger siblings were the remote control. But my favorite memory is the time Van and Will were babysitting and they threw my dress-up purse onto the roof of the house. I watched in disbelief from the sidewalk, standing in my dress-up high heels and fake fur coat. That has moms jewelry in it, you know, I told them. The boys ran to get a ladder from the garage. When mom got home, both my brothers were standing on top of the two-story roof. The purse, of course, did not have jewelry in it. Its scary now when I think about that through the lens of a parent, but those are some of my fondest memories of my brothers. For years, moms and dads intervene and choreograph their childrens lives and relationships with one another. Then that crucial day comes when Mom goes to the grocery store alone, and the siblings left behind really start to bond. This is when they form memories of their own, separate from Mom or Dad. My oldest son/free babysitter has a cell phone, so Im not as blissfully unaware as my mom might have been back in the 1980s. I get regular updates from home that are, by themselves, entertaining. Some of my favorite texts with Ford while he was babysitting: Me: Everyone doing OK? Im almost done at the store. Ford: Everyones fine. Lindell wants to know if you got chocolate Krave? Me: Yes. Ford: Also, he has bubble gum stuck to the back of his neck. Me [after my phone rang during a meeting]: Youre only supposed to call me if its an emergency. Ford: I know, Mom. Me: Is this an emergency? Ford: Sort of. Are we allowed to play Wii? I save these texts because they are tiny windows into the stories they will share with their children and spouses when they are grown. But they are also solid reminders of how much my boys are learning and growing, how they are caring for one another, yadda, yadda, yadda. Okay, they will also be great items to display at their weddings, where we all laugh about how so little has changed. Ford: Mom, Im really sorry. I gave Lindell soda, and it had caffeine in it. Me: I bet you are sorry. Ford: Hes really wild. Am I in trouble? Me: What you are about to experience will be punishment enough. Ford [an hour later]: I cant believe how crazy he got from caffeine. Me: Ford, how many times have I told you, you dont feed the gremlin after midnight. And you never get him wet. This Week in Navy HistoryU.S. Navy photos1942 Battle of Coral Sea Japanese aircraft caught USS Lexington (shown here in 1941) in a converging "anvil" attack and planted two torpedoes on her port side. Then dive bombers struck, hitting Lexington on the port side of the flight deck and another in the island. Despite her damage and the loss of many lives, USS Lexington (CV-2) corrected a seven-degree list and resumed flight operations. However, deep inside her explosion gravely impaired internal communications. Even so, the carrier steamed at 25 knots, while continuing to land her planes. Her crew was fighting a losing damage control battle. Another explosion caused more internal havoc and Lexington's problems were now out of control. She suspended flight operations and asked for help from other ships. By 1630, she was forced to secure her ship and she was scuttled. From the HomefrontWhen moms away, the siblings will play Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha Jones

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HURREX/Citadel Gale 14 exercise underwayFrom Commander, Navy Installations Command Public AffairsCommander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) and U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) is jointly conducting the annual hurricane preparedness exercise HURREX/Citadel Gale 2014, from May 5 15, in preparation for the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean areas hurricane season. The purpose of HURREX/Citadel Gale 2014 is to prepare the Navy to respond to weather threats to U.S. coastal regions, and to maintain the ability to deploy forces even under the most adverse weather condi tions. Tropical storms have the potential to cause great damage to areas they pass over and the Navy prepares every year to mitigate that damage. HURREX/Citadel Gale 2014 provides Navy regions and installations the opportunity to exercise and assess their ability to prepare for, respond to, and recover from the threat of a natural disaster, as well as validate Memorandums of Understanding/ Agreements with non-federal government partner agencies. said Bill Clark, CNIC Exercise Program manager. This years exercise consists of two simulated tropical cyclones that will develop and intensify to hur ricane strength, and threaten the Eastern Coast of the U.S., the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean coastal regions. All Navy commands with personnel in NRMA, NDW, and NRSE, ashore and afloat, in port and underway, will participate. The exercise includes reviewing and exercising heavy weather instruc tions and procedures and accounting for Sailors and Navy families in the affected regions through the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS). Forward deployed units will not participate in the exercise tracking and warning phase. For exercise preparation, region command ers, senior officers present afloat (SOPA), and SOPA administrators will review disaster preparedness plans and conduct individual and team training. Region commanders will also conduct pre-exercise and pre-tropical cyclone season discussions with disaster preparedness officers of subordinate com mands to address exercise scenarios, emergency plans and recovery efforts. The destruction and devastation caused by storms such as Hurricanes Sandy, Irene and Katrina reinforce the need for proper training and preparedness prior to the threat of a real world natural disaster. There were 13 named storms in 2013, and with the onset of the Atlantic hurricane season June 1, the Navy remains committed to the safety, security and well being of its Sailors, civilians and their family members. Rear Adm. Rick Williamson, commander, Navy Region Southeast, serves spaghetti at a USO "No Dough Dinner" at Fleet Reserve Association (FRA) Branch 91. The "No Dough Dinner" program is a year-round effort that offers free hot meals to Sailors and their families on evenings before military paydays. More than 90 Sailors and their families attended the Navy League sponsored dinner, that was the first of its kind in the NAS Jacksonville area. The Greater Jacksonville Area USO intends to make the dinners a regular event at FRA Branch 91. The organization has already had success hosting "No Dough Dinners" near Naval Station Mayport, serving more than 300 people twice a month. For more information about USO "No Dough Dinners," contact the Greater Jacksonville Area USO at 778-2821 or visit the office aboard NAS Jacksonville.Photo by MC1 Greg Johnson 'No Dough Dinner' JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 Golf course undergoes major improvementsBy MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS JAX Public AffairsFacing substantial improve ments at the 9-hole blue course, followed by the red and white courses, the NAS Jax Golf Course is undergoing renova tions projected to be completed by Sept. 1. Project Manager Ensign Gregory Smith from Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Public Works Department (PWD) said, The project includes enlargement and new construction of some tee boxes, asphalt cart paths and concrete curbs, bunker reconstruction with drainage, drainage improvements, irrigation replacement, new practice putting green, new synthetic putting range tee and conver sion of a gravel cart path by the driving range to a concrete cart path. Costing a grand total of $2.2 million, the project is being renovated by experienced con tractors from Waldsworth Golf Construction Company. There are five to 10 work ers on sight every day remov ing asphalt from the cart paths, removing sod, or working on the drainage structures around the facility, said Smith. According to Smith, the Project is a Morale Welfare & Recreation (MWR) funded project. The main goal is to provide service members and their families facilities and activities that they can enjoy in order to improve morale. The golf course is the larg est MWR facility on base that is used by active, reserve and retired military and their fam ilies, continued Smith. The course was in need of drainage repair and updating in order to make the full course usable at all times. The improvements to the course are also making the course more challenging with alteration of several holes. Smith explained that the outdoor project can easily be impeded by rain and storms, hence a challenge they could encounter. However, he said, The rain should not slow the project down because the contrac tors take historic rainfall data into account when building their schedule, so they have accounted for rain days. Elite and amateur golfers are thrilled to learn the renova tions are taking place. NAS Jax Community Equipment operator Omar Hernandez from Wadsworth Golf Construction Company drives a Bobcat Skid Steer to level soil in preparation to rebuild the womens tee box at NAS Jax Blue Golf Course March 21. Loader operator Sergio Diaz-Ocampo (left) fills a dump truck with sand for transport to tee boxes as truck driver Carlos Segura (right) stands by to warn about potential safety hazards. Utilities Commodity Manager Jay Caddy checks out the wastewater facility that recycles wastewater to help irrigate the NAS Jax golf course and base softball fields. Caddy said, Our domestic wastewater plant treats wastewater to a high enough stan dard so that it can be reclaimed and used for irrigation rather than dumping and discharging the water into the St Johns River. Also, the recycled water contains nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients that are beneficial to the turf. Wadsworth Golf Construction Company Project Manager Eric Wadsworth speaks with Ensign Gregory Smith, project manager with Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast Public Works Department about the completion of the new bunker at the blue course on April 9. Recycled wastewater flows into a two-acre pond near the NAS Jax Golf Course and used to irrigate the course when necessary. Although recycled water meets drinking water standards, cur rently state and federal laws restrict the use of the reclaimed water. After wastewater undergoes proper treatment, it flows from the wastewater plant through a pumping system into a two-acre pond and used to irrigate the base golf course as needed. See GOLF COURSE, Page 5

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 5 Planning and Liaison Officer Matt Schellhorn said, The highlight of this project for me is updating the drainage system. I think that it will make the course play much better, especially after it rains. The course has a tendency to get so soggy and at times very dif ficult to play. With the drainage improvement, I think it will help dry those areas out. Also, I know they are redoing the cart paths and some of the tee boxes. It will visually make the golf course more appealing. The project is going really well, said Smith. Im excited about it. Its a cool project to be able to work on a golf course. Something you dont to do too often. When the project is completed, it will provide a much better useable facility for the base. GOLF COURSEFrom Page 4General laborer Catauno Mancilla cuts drainage pipe to create a new catch basin, which is a small portion of the drainage improvements on the blue course. Loader operator Sergio Diaz-Ocampo scoops up a load of sand with his tractor to transport fill substance to a tee box at the blue course. Workers from Wadsworth Construction Company work on improving the drainage system at the golf course by replacing old pipes. Workers from Wadsworth Golf Construction Company lay down new piping as a way to improve the drainage system. Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosTruck driver Sergio Diaz-Ocampo (left) assists equipment operator Roel Zarate with removing dirt and measuring the road in preparation of widening the cart path at the base golf course on March 21. Superintendent and safety officer for Wadsworth Golf Construction Company Cuauhtemoc Fabian discusses the procedures for leveling tee boxes to attain the final grade with Ensign Gregory Smith, a project manager with Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast Public Works Department. Concrete finishers and floaters from Wadsworth Golf Construction Company work together spreading and smoothing the surface of the new and improved cart path at the base golf course on April 25. (From left) Concrete finishers Felix Hernandez and Justin Southerland stand by for concrete buggy operator Catalino Mancilla to dump a fresh batch of concrete for the workers to continue spreading as part of a project to complete a new and improved cart path at the NAS Jax Golf Course April 25. (From left) General laborer Balfred Rodriguez; general laborer Carlos Segura; machine operator Gerardo Ancira and general laborer Omar Hernandez from Wadsworth Golf Construction Company, lay sod around the perimeter of the No. 6 tee box on the blue golf course April 25. Equipment operator Omar Hernandez from Wadsworth Golf Construction Company, removes and levels dirt for the rebuilding of a tee box as part of NAS Jax Golf Course renovation project. Concrete finisher Felix Hernandez from Wadsworth Golf Construction Company, uses a hand float tool to smooth the edges of freshly laid concrete to mold a new cart path as part of a project held at the base golf course.

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Weinzatl currently serves as the VP-26 NFO NATOPS Officer and Crew Resource Management Program Manager as well as and the Mission Commander and Tactical Coordinator of Combat Aircrew Two. At the conclusion of his tour with VP-26, Weinzatl will report to VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville for duty as a fleet replacement squadron instructor training the fleets newest Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force naval flight officers. This is an honor and a privilege. The truth is that I would not have been able to succeed on station without the help of the entire squadron and the support of Team Tridents outstanding mainte nance department, said an apprecia tive Weinzatl. NFOFrom Page 1 From the NAS Jax All Officers Spouses ClubThe NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club is sponsoring three $1,000 scholarships based on scholarship merit and community service. Eligibility: U.S. Navy active/reserve duty and active/reserve duty depen dents who are currently in their senior year of high school or a high school graduate, attached to NAS Jacksonville and planning to attend an accredited college in the fall of 2014 or spring of 2015. Scholarships are to be used only for tuition and tuition-based fees charged by the college and will be sent to the college. Three scholarships will be awarded; each in the amount $1,000 one active duty, one officer dependent, and one enlisted dependent. Criteria: Recipients will be selected on scholarship merit and community service. Deadline for application is June 7. Selection of recipients will be made by June 30. Scholarship application may be picked up at NAS Jacksonville Navy College Office or found on-line at: https://www.fcef.com/wp-con tent/uploads/CHP-ScholarshipApplication3-14.pdf. You may submit the application by mail to: NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, c/o Mrs. Pam Undersander, 5065 Mustin Road, Jacksonville FL 32212. Questions may be sent to nasjax aosc@gmail.comNeither the NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal govern ment officially endorses any company, sponsor, or its products or services.Three $1,000 college scholarship opportunities announced Photo by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, BU1(SCW/EXW/IDW) James Vossler of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202, Detachment Jacksonville, NAS Jax Marina Manager Phil Collins of Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR), and Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast Construction Manager Celio Cedeno (far right) participate in a ribbon-cutting ceremony to signify the completion of the Mulberry Cove Marina Pavilion aboard NAS Jax April 29. Undersander said, "This pavilion represents whats great about installation work. The completion of this project represents camaraderie and teamwork among a lot of different people, including the Seabees, MWR and Navy Jax Yacht Club. I think it is a neat story and an example of the coordination and use of different streams to complete three separate projects, the last being the pavilion, with Installation Excellence Award money that now exhibits a first class marina environment and a facility that everyone can enjoy." New marina pavilion opens at Mulberry Cove 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014

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execute all phases of the mis sion, mission planning, mission control and data analysis. From here, the Triton will be operated around the globe by crews consisting of air vehicle operators, naval flight officers and aviation warfare opera tors. The Triton is designed to provide long-range, long-endur ance maritime patrol coverage for Naval Air Forces Atlantic; 5th, 6th and 7th fleets; Fleet Forces Command operations in Atlantic; Task Force 80; and support the U.S. Northern and Southern commands as required. According to the Navys Persistent Maritime Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program Office (PMA-262), as an adjunct to the P-8A, the MQ-4C Triton will provide combat informa tion to operational and tacti cal users such as expedition ary strike groups, carrier strike groups and joint forces mari time component commanders. and some of our key leadership on this base. Take Back the Night started back in the 1970s and is now an international event with the mission of ending sexual violence in all forms. The common purpose is to advocate for the right of everyone to feel safe from sexual violence, Undersander said. Many sexual assaults hap pen due to a lack of respect for an individuals dignity. Lack of respect is not in our Navys culture and we need to work together to bolster this up through our core val ues of Honor, Courage and Commitment. We must focus on and foster a culture of prevention. That is my commitment tonight at NAS Jax we will work to prevent sexual assault from all angles. Undersander described sev eral of the installation pro grams offered, including Bystander Intervention and Spiritual Fitness classes, to help prevent this crime. Commander, Navy Region Southeast Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Manager Capt. Steve Holms, said, In the southeast region, which covers from Texas to South Carolina and all the way down to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, weve had 21 fewer incidents this year compared to last year when we had a total of 140 incidents across the region. Just by being here you have shown that you care. Continue doing that and we can take back the night. We can also take back the day and take back showing respect and care for one another. Naval Hospital (NH) Jax Executive Officer Capt. Christine Sears said, One of the key reasons we observe Sexual Assault Awareness Month is to show our sup port for victims. Over the past year, Navy medicine has increased capability to care for victims and perform the medical examinations for evi dence used to convict those who perpetrate this heinous crime. Our hospital and all of our branch health clinics have the capability to profession ally provide this expert care. We increased the number of trained caregivers to perform the evidence exams and have a full time nurse at the hospi tal who manages this program. I know we still have victims who choose not to report their sexual assault case. I under stand many of the reasons why they may not report, yet I want every victim to know that Navy medicine and Navy leadership are here to support you. We are committed to showing you our solidarity as you heal and move from being a victim to being a survivor, she added. Next a moment of silence was led by NAS Jax Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Dennis Andrews. Tonight, let us do two things. Let us honor those present and absent, those we know and those who are strangers, who have been victimized by sexual assault. Lets reflect on how each person here can do even more to prevent this crime from damaging any more lives. FFSC Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Civilian Advocate LaTresa Henderson introduced sex ual assault victim/survivor Ebony Payne-English who told her personal story by recit ing a poem. Payne-English explained how she was victimized and how she was able to move forward in life. First, you have to admit that the crime happened. You have to say it to someone who is in a position to help. And you must admit that this crime is not okay. Once you address what took place, you can begin to heal internally and emotion ally, she added. Someone in the U.S. is sex ually assaulted every two minutes, according to the U.S. Department of Justices National Crime Victimization Survey. These statistics dont include survivors who dont seek help. Although the military intends to put an end to this crime, sexual assault cases are estimated at 19,000 occur rences in the military each year but only about 2,500 are reported. Vaughn concluded, For every woman and man who has ever been impacted by sexual violence, may they know tonight and forever that they are not alone, may their voices be heard and guide our way forward and most important ly, may they be unburdened by the blame and shame that rightly belongs to another. Anyone in immediate danger should call 911. For confiden tial help, support or learn how to intervene or help (any time of the day or night from any location) contact DoDs Safe Helpline at www.safehelpline. org or (877) 995-5247 or text 55247. For NAS Jacksonville, contact (912) 467-1979 or 5424717. For NH Jacksonville, contact 542-9030. TAKE BACKFrom Page 1 Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander shares his remarks during the Take Back the Night, event held to honor and support victims of sexual assault crimes. Guest Speaker Ebony Payne-English, a sexual assault victim and survivor, recites a poem to express her story as a victim of this crime. TRITONFrom Page 1 Photo by Clark Pierce A P-8A Poseidon turns onto a taxiway after emerging from the station rinse rack on April 23. The shower rinses off harmful salt water and other pollutants to control possible corrosion. Fighting corrosion at the rinse rack JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 7

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By MC2 Amanda CabasosStaff WriterNAS Jax Information Technology (IT) Specialist Terri Hicks and Engineer Justin Uhrmacher from NAS Jax Fire Department were named NAS Jax Senior and Junior Civilians of the Second Quarter 2014, respectfully. upgrade the operat ing system and associ ated core applications to Windows 7 and Office 2010 for more than 540 workstations via the automated In Place Load process. She also utilized the HP Service Manager tool to manually sub mit tickets to reimage all workstations in Building 1 and most department head workstations in the outlying area. During the manual process, Hicks accessed each workstation remotely, backing up required data and storing it on CDs and DVDs. Once workstations were returned with Windows 7 operating system, Hicks restored the data back to each com puter and helped the end-user set up their desk, Outlook, Internet Explorer and printers, as well as providing the end-user with complete backup of their data. NAS Jax IT Director Terrence Marshall said, Terri has always been doing an outstanding job for the IT Department. This particular quar ter we finished up an In Place Load. It deals with a remote procedure that Navy Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI) pushed out to upgrade our com puter Windows XP to Windows 7. Terri took the lead on this project. By doing so, she ended up getting more than 540 NAS Jax computers updated with minimal inconveniences to the end-users. She does a wonderful job every day and deserves this award. I am always getting compliments from the endusers on what a great job she is doing. Hicks said, It feels awesome to be recog nized. I love my job and helping others and it feels great to be recognized for doing something I enjoy. I could never do this alone. We have IT representatives in each Department that help us all the time and my coworkers are awesome. As my grandson would say when we work together to accomplish a goal team work. responsible over the last year for ensuring 100 percent of all Department of Defense Firefighter Certification packages for NAS Jax are complete and up to date. In addi tion to his firefighting duties, emergencies calls, scheduled training and daily work schedule, he has taken the lead, and ensuring nearly 70 fire fighters accomplish required training and are scheduled for testing. Despite the absence of an assigned training officer, he has completed this task with little to no supervision. NAS Jax Fire Chief Mark Brusoe said, Justin is a young, hardworking civilian employee who is highly motivated and takes his career in the fire service very seriously. Uhrmacher said, Its very honorable to receive this award because of the hard work we put in. There are a lot of tasks around the fire depart ment that one can do on a daily basis; howev er, there are also things one can do to go above and beyond. Despite the many responsibili ties around here, there are many job-related duties that need to get done, such as ensur ing firefighters complete required certifications not necessarily what a specific job title has to oversee. By putting time and effort in doing addition ally work, its actually very nice to be recog nized. I feel very hon ored. Ive been helping with the training, mak ing sure the firefighters understand the job and continue to move on with their qualifications. We all work together as a team and teach each other. Thats how we become better firefight ers. NAS Jax announces Senior, Junior Civilians of the Second QuarterInformation Technology (IT) Specialist Terri Hicks, assigned to NAS Jax IT Department, works at her desk at Building 1 April 28.Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosEngineer Justin Uhrmacher; assigned to NAS Jax Fire Department stands by a fire truck aboard NAS Jax April 28. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014

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From Staff The Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. The keynote speaker will be Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson. This is an All-Service event featuring a joint color guard, All-Service Missing Person Table, Navy Band Southeast with all the Service Songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event to be held Saturday, June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. Numerous veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches of the military who served in prior conflicts, and those currently serving have been invited to attend. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War from the local area who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emotional and patriotic, as well as providing an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50; O6 and above $65. Civilians and retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform for O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/din ner dress white jacket optional; and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., dinner is served at 7 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales will end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Visit our website for more information www. mayportnlus.org. Tickets may be purchased from the following loca tions: NAVY LEAGUE MAYPORT Bob Price, 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 E-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net NAVY LEAGUE ST AUGUSTINE Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 E-mail: anuday00@aol.comTickets still available for Midway Dinner June 7 By Lt. Mark Flowerdew725 Squadron Public AffairsThe developing MH-60 Romeo helicopter capability of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) recently achieved another milestone with the graduation of MH-60R Operational Flying Training (OFT) Course Number 1, comprised ofthe first two pilots and aviation warfare officers of RAN 725 Squadron. The customary USN Zero Tension Release (ZTR) ceremony was held April 11,with the students of OFT 1 graduating alongside four of their U. S. Navy counterparts having just completed in-depth conversionand warfaretraining with Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 40 at Naval Station Mayport. As US. Navy tradition dictates, RAN 725 Squadron Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. T. Glynn was on hand to claim the RAN graduates from HSM-40 by remov ing their existing patches and replacing them with 725 Squadron insignia. The HSM-40 coursewas 36 weeks in duration and encompassed all of the skill sets required to make new Romeo aircrew Fleet Ready. Specific elements of the course include general flying and emergency han dling, embarked operations,anti-surface and antisubmarine warfare (ASW) operations. A course highlight for the two pilots was con ducting day and night deck landings on board the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG-66), an exciting and rare opportunity for RAN aircrew. In the words of Lt. Benjamin Thomson, Oneof many great aspects of the USN-provided train ingisthe depth of corporate knowledge weve been able to take advantage of over the last nine months. That corporate knowledge that the USN has gained over a number of years operating this platform hasbeen available to us from day one! For the aviation warfare officers stream, the distinct course highlight came late in the training syllabus with coordination of multiple aircraft and sensor sets in the prosecution of ASW targets with thenew MK 54 airbornelightweighttorpedo. This knowledge, coupled with the Romeosabil ity toconduct coordinated dipping sonar operations will go a long way in seeing the reintroduction of Dip Gang tactics in the RAN. Reviewing herpersonal experience from the tactics phase,Lt. Trine Themsen said, The MK 54 torpedo, combined with the Romeos advanced system capabilities, is bothextremely exciting and at the forefront of airborne anti-submarine warfare. The next challenge will be to return to Australia to develop andprogress our skills within our own warfare Community. All four of the graduates agree that operating within the USN construct has been both a personally and professionally broadening experience and believe that although the Seahawk is a tried and tested air frame, theRomeo continues to prove its capabilities and ability to adapt to the ever-changing environment of contemporary warfare. By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public AffairsNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast dispatched five civilian employees to Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola May 1 as part of a Contingency Engineering Response Team (CERT). The team departed Naval Air Station Jacksonville at dawn. The team of five consists of airfield pavement engineers, civil engineers and a geo graphic information system analyst. Severe weather with heavy rains pounded the Gulf Coast region April 29 30 impacting area military facilities includ ing NAS Pensacola. Many roads and bridges on board the base were flooded causing eroAussie MH-60R warfighting capability continues to expandPhoto by Lt. Mark Flowerdew(From left) Newly certified RAN 725 Squadron MH-60R pilots Lt. Aaron Shurink and Lt. Ben Thomson gather with graduate Aviation Warfare Officers Lt. Trine Themsen and Lt. Joel Bury at NAS Jax Hangar 1122.CERT deploys to Pensacola following severe weatherPhoto by Lt. Cmdr. Ken VargasMembers of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Contingency Engineering Response Team (CERT) review travel documents prior to deploying to NAS Pensacola where they will conduct damage assessment caused by the April 29 and 30 storms there. (From left) Team Lead Michael Herring, NAVFAC Southeast Contingency Engineer (not deploying) Don Maconi, GIS Analyst Joshua Coates, Civil Engineer Eric Cannon, Airfield Pavement Engineer Jon Hamilton (obscured) and Lead Airfield Pavement Engineer Jeff Frank. See CERT, Page 17 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 9

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From StaffOne of Floridas largest auto dealer groups announced April 25 that it was selected as the title sponsor of the 2014 NAS Jacksonville Air Show sched uled for Oct. 25 and 26. As the only company chosen for this prestigious sponsorship position, Hanania Automotive Group previously sponsored the 2011 Centennial of Naval Aviation NAS Jax Air Show and is proudly continuing this partnership in 2014. The dealer group will be represented at every part of the air show to actively support the nations military and the greater Jacksonville community. We are honored and excit ed to have once again been selected as the title sponsor and partner of the NAS Jax Air Show, commented Jack Hanania, president and CEO of Hanania Automotive Group. This thrilling event is a vital part of our community and region, and we are proud to be able to play such an important role. Our nations military is second to none. We all owe a great deal of gratitude to the men and women who defend us and support freedom and democracy around the world. The 2013 air show season saw much adversity with the federal budget sequesters that grounded the U.S. Navy Blue Angels and the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, as well as other military demonstration aircraft for the entire season. Sixtythree air shows were canceled in 2013. With the release of the Blue Angels 2014 show schedule, NAS Jax is once again hosting the Blues Oct. 25 and 26. This open house event also allows the surrounding com munity onto the base to get close to dozens of aircraft dis plays. We salute Hanania Automotive Group for return ing as this years title sponsor, said Mike McCool, operations manager, NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation. Hanania Automotive Groups commitment to support the NAS Jax 2014 Air Show is com mendable. Neither NAS Jacksonville, MWR or Jax Air News, nor any part of the federal government, officially endorses any company, sponsor or their products or services. By Keats ReynoldsNH Jacksonville Public Affairs AssistantOn May 1, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer proclaimed May 4-10 as Public Service Recognition Week (PSRW) throughout its six facilities in Florida and Georgia. It is an opportunity to thank the almost 650 civilian men and women who serve as physicians, nurses and support staff. Now more than ever, our federal employees are being asked to do more with less, Shaffer stated. Yet, they continue to press forward and support readiness and quality, patient-centered carefrom heal ing patients to ensuring we have the sup plies needed to do so. The theme for PSRW 2014 is Proud to Serve. The NH Jacksonville civil service team demonstrates this daily by the attentiveness they show to the approximately 67,000 enrolled patients across the com mand. Even through the furlough period of 2013, the federal workforce put service above self to ensure that medical care at the hospital and branch health clinics did not waiver. When someone becomes part of the U.S. Civil Service, they not only accept a job but an oath to support and defend the Constitution of the United States. Federal workers, like our military members, come from many different walks of life and fulfill many different missions. Together, they unite to uphold the pledge to serve and protect the U.S. government. In her proclamation to the command, Capt. Shaffer recalled of her time as NH Jacksonville commanding officer and expressed her gratitude for the public ser vice workers who continue to put service above self. It has been an honor and a privilege to be your commanding officer these past two years and as I will soon pass on the command to another, Ill take com fort in knowing that youour civil service employeesplay critical roles in the con tinuity of great care across Naval Hospital Jacksonville and our nation, said Shaffer. Your hard work does not go unnoticed, and I want you to know that I am proud to serve with you. Today, almost 3 million strong, federal employees are researching cures for can cer, developing solutions to address energy and climate crises, serving alongside warfighters and caring for the nations heroes. Each and every day, public service workers protect and defend the Constitution of the United States, ensuring that the U.S. gov ernment is the best in the world. For more information on ways to cel ebrate PSRW, visit www.psrw.org. NH Jacksonville CO proclaims Public Service Recognition WeekPhoto by Jacob Sippel Capt. Gayle Shaffer, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville commanding officer, proclaims May 4-10 as Public Service Recognition Week (PSRW) throughout its six facilities in Florida and Georgia. PSRW is an opportunity for NH Jacksonville its hospital and five branch clinics to recognize the almost 650 men and women who serve as physicians, nurses and support staff.Hanania Automotive Group named title sponsor of NAS Jacksonville Air ShowPhoto by Dan Bedinghaus(From left) NAS Jax Morale Welfare and Recreation Marketing Director Shannon Leonard and Installation Program Director John Bushick congratulate Jack Hanania, president and CEO of Hanania Automotive Group, on his NAS Jacksonville 2014 Air Show partnership. The air show is scheduled for Oct. 25-26. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 11

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Ribbons & Roses event is May 13 From Naval Hospital JacksonvilleNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Ribbons & Roses, a breast can cer support group, will meet May 13 at 7 p.m. The meeting takes place in the hospitals General Surgery Clinic, on the second floor of the east annex. Guest speaker is art ist Nadine Terk, a for mer art history teacher at both the University of North Florida and Flagler College. Terk began her career as a Japanese art historian, and in 2005 began studying classical drawing, figurative work and portraiture. Her lat est project, There for You, is an exhibition of paintings and inspiring audio stories about heal ing from breast cancer and the hope beyond the disease. Ribbons & Roses sup port group meets monthly at NH Jacksonville General Surgery Clinic on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. September through June. All are welcome are wel come to attend. For more information on Ribbons & Roses sup port group, call (904) 5427857. Flight Line Caf unveils energy saving improvementsBy Clark PierceEditorGalley culinary specialists joined NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander and other officials April 30 to cut the ribbon symbolizing the completion on a six-month energy and water conservation project at the Flight Line Caf. This project is a great exam ple of teamwork between our public works department, Flight Line Caf leadership and the contractor, CYE Enterprises, said Undersander. As you may know, many of our buildings on base are struggling with efficiency due to the age of the buildings. Thats why were always looking for more ways to conserve energy and water like this project and ultimately reduce our overall utility costs. NAS Jax Public Works Officer Cmdr. Anant Patel said, From our Sailors perspective, this project improves their quality of life by presenting a clean and safe dining facility. From the base perspective, we made sig nificant energy conservation improvements in line with the Secretary of the Navys aggres sive energy and water consumption goals laid out in 2009. Patel noted that the project included new refrigeration and air conditioning (HVAC) systems to assure safer food stor age, as well as the comfort of patrons. Overall, were making water and energy improvements one step at a time but it all adds up in the long run. CYE Enterprises President Erica Jackson said shes glad to conclude another success ful energy conservation project for Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast and NAS Jax Public Works Department. Theres no glory in rest rooms but our renovation for the galley eliminates paper towels with high-tech hand dryers, as well as conserving water through low-flow toilets. NAS Jax Supply Department LCPO CSCS Wendell Heyward said, Beside energy and water savings, the biggest improve ment is quality of life for the Sailors and Marines who dine at the Flight Line Caf. One example is the refurbished out side deck adjacent to the galleys dining area. We anticipate that utilization will increase thanks to new paint and an awning. Now, the galley can plan out door cooking events that offer protection to service members from exposure to sun or rain. Patel added, The core of this project was to find more ways to save energy. The future of the Navy is all about saving energy and money and were com mitted to doing our part at NAS Jax. Photos by Clark Pierce(From left) NAVFAC Southeast Project Manager Art Mosley, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, Galley Building Energy Monitor CS2(SW) William Freshwater, CYE Enterprises President Erica Jackson, CYE Site Superintendent Paul Willmott, and CYE Vice President William Jackson cut the ribbon April 30 symbolizing completion of the Galley Energy Conservation Project. (From left) CYE Enterprises Site Superintendent Paul Willmott presents Building Energy Monitor CS2(SW) William Freshwater with a service rec ognition award for scheduling construction work without disrupting food service to Sailors. After the ribbon cutting at the outdoor pavilion on April 30, galley staff and guests attended a commemorative cake cutting by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander and Building Energy Monitor CS2(SW) William Freshwater. The galley's refurbished outdoor pavilion features a new navy blue canopy beneath which Sailors can take part in a variety of events and activities. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. **New time Friday Social Hour 59 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke Lunch bingo Monday through Friday begins at 11:15 a.m. Freedom Lanes Bowling Center Call 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly handicap single tournament May 17, 1 4 p.m., $20 Scratch Sweeper May 24, 1 4 p.m., $30 *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open May 10 June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31 Outdoor pool opens for weekend recreational swim on May 10 Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Dive-in Movie May 23 featuring LEGO Movie Pool opens at 7 p.m., movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free popcorn. Concession stand will be open.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Jacksonville Jaguar tickets on sale soon! Adventure Landing Waterpark seasonal $85.50 Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Grill & Chill May 13 at 6 p.m. Free hamburgers and hotdogs Paintball Trip May 17 at 9 a.m. Movie in the Yard Barracks on May 20 at 8:30 p.m. Featuring Need for SpeedNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty May 13 & 27 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests May 15 & 29 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. Command Party Swing into savings & book your command golf tournament Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependent Skipper B Sailing Classes availableAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Summer Camp Registration going on now! Sign-in at the youth centerFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available including instrument, complex and commercial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.net Photos by Shannon LeonardPlayers participating in the 2014 MWR Intramural Winter Golf League end-of-season tournament gather for a photo prior to teeing off April 30. (From left) AEAN Christopher Monroe, AT2 Michal Tekac, AZC Tony Johnson, and AZ2 Matthew Huhn from Fleet Readiness Center Southeast proudly display their golden medals for winning the 2014 MWR Winter Golf League Championship. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 13

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Hospital awardsCapt. Gayle Shaffer (left), Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville commanding officer, presents the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal to CS2 Brandon Cleveland during an awards ceremony at the hospital on April 25. Other award recipients include: Lt. Cmdr. Jimmy Suvatne (Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal) and HM2 Shanell Jackson (Flag Letter of Commendation). A group Letter of Appreciation, commanding officer NAS Jacksonville, was presented to HM3 Alber Amayarivera, HM3 Terrence Bolton, HM3 John Holland, HM3 Alex Perez and HM3 John Williams. From StaffWhen the St. Johns Riverkeeper needed voices for a television panel discussion to educate the public about steward ship of the river, they looked no farther than NAS Jacksonville. The occasion was the April 24 airing on Jacksonville public television station WJCT-TV of Water Blues, Green Solutions, a film documenting the use of natural or green methods to solve major water issues around the U.S. The show was followed by a one-hour panel discussion in which NAS Jax Stormwater Program Manager John Young took part. As a major stakeholder on the river, said Young, we at NAS Jax never miss an oppor tunity to share the good things we are doing to keep the pub lic trust. It was great fun tell ing the audience about how we wash helicopters with col lected rainwater. And they can make use of the same principle at home. The only difference between a 50,000 gallon rain water cistern, and a 40-gallon rain barrel, is scale. The film highlighted public participation in water qual ity and conservation projects in Portland Ore., Philadelphia, San Antonio Texas, and the Bronx, N.Y., with an emphasis on local volunteerism. The idea of community par ticipation resonated with the studio audience at the program broadcast. People wanted to know what was happening with green infrastructure in our region, noted Young, and what they could do in the community and at home to participate. We were glad to tell them about our many rain gardens, our rainwater harvesting, and even the steps we are taking to reduce excess mowing. In response to a question about what future crisis might get the region moving in greener directions, Young stated his opinion that the phenomenon of sea level rise might be the signature crisis for northeast Florida, since rising salt water is a fact that citizens and communities are only just becom ing aware of. Among discussion of con crete curbing, Young spoke about a recent study in Sarasota County that proved the great advantages of grassed swales with vegetation over a curb and gutter system with concrete pipes. The runoff that went through a grassed swale, said Young, had 93 percent less nitrogen, 95 percent less sedi ment, and a four-fifths reduction in total volume, compared to the same amount going through a curb and gutter sys tem. However, Young observed that the perception among developers and the public is that neighborhoods with curb and gutter are more upscale than neighborhoods with the lowly open swale. We have some educating to do to shift this paradigm, Young said, since it should be the other way around. By MCSN Adam AustinIt ranges across a broad spectrum, from initiation rituals such as tacking on crows or field insignias, to off-color jokes about sexism and racism, all the way to outright abuse or assault. The offenders wear all types of collar devices; senior enlisted marching junior service members down a pier, forcing them to carry bags of human waste, or seamen taping their peers to chairs or forcing them down chutes. These types of actions and attitudes create physically and psychologically hostile climates that can lead to criminal acts, and victims may feel as though they have nowhere to turn for help. Its a problem the Navy is working hard to fix. Were moving our focus to what we call the left side of the continuum of harm, said Rear Adm. Sean Buck, the director of the Navy 21st Century Sailor Office. Were looking at some of the under lying behaviors, such as sexism, sexual Station stormwater manager joins TV panel discussionPhoto courtesy of WJCT(From left) Studio audience member USGBC Executive Director Sarah Boren expresses her viewpoint April 22 at the WJCT Public Television Studio. On the podium, James Orth, execu tive director of the St. Johns Riverkeeper, moderated the panel discussion after the broadcast of "Water Blues, Green Solutions." Panelists included Landscape Architect Eric Lycke, NAS Jax Stormwater Program Manager John Young, and Professional Engineer Doug Skiles. Photo by Jacob Sippel Navy announces changes to Equal Opportunity ProgramSee EOP, Page 16 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 Nestled in old Orange Park with ancient oaks and the St. Johns River as part of the landscape, Grace Episcopal Day School has been providing an environment conducive to learning, to socialization, to spiritual development and to realizing a childs full potential since 1950. We focus on the individual student and how to help every child succeed, said Head of School Sharon Chapman. We meet the child where he or she is, and our staff has the freedom to teach to the individual. That means, Chapman said, that the school is committed to curriculum choices that draw on the individuals strengths. Teachers choose curricula and materials to meet the needs of the student, she said. Because they have the freedom to make choices and work with children oneon-one, our teachers our entire staff enjoy being here. That creates a positive, loving, Christian atmosphere where students feel safe to be themselves and express their needs. The average student-to-teacher ratio at the PreK3 through 8th grade school is 10 to 1. Teachers consistently are able to give the 150 to 175 students the individualized attention they deserve. Between PreK4 and kindergarten, we have a unique program for students who may need some additional time and instruction to make the move into kindergarten, said Director of Admissions and Marketing Susan Williams. We call it Transition 5, or the gift of time and it focuses on further development of the skills needed for kindergarten. It is the bridge between PreK 4 and kindergarten. We stress academics, Williams said. Our 8th grade graduates are accepted into the best programs in the area, such as the International Baccalaureate Program, Bolles, Episcopal School Jacksonville, Douglas Anderson School for the Performing Arts, and others. Ten of our students entered the Clay County Science Fair, and they won nine awards. Visual and performing arts programs are not sacrificed for academics at GEDS. We firmly believe the arts enhance academic perfor mance, Williams said. Our dual approach to academics and arts results in a well-rounded educational experience and ultimately in a well-rounded student. Spiritual development is an important aspect of the overall school experience for students. Although our foundation is Episcopalian, we have students of all denominations, Chapman said. We are here to prepare children to live responsible lives in a community grounded in the Christian faith. The schools approach encompasses a challenging academic program, visual and performing arts, Christian and character formation, foreign language instruction, technology, physical education, an athletic program and opportunities for service. Extended day care, a summer program and vacation Bible school are also available. GEDS was voted the Best Private School and Middle School by Jax4Kids in 2013. GEDS, where excellence is afford able, is accredited by the Florida Council of Independent Schools and the Florida Kindergarten Council, and is a member of the Board of Regents of the Diocese of Florida and the National Association of Episcopal Schools. GEDS is located at 156 Kingsley Ave. For more information, visit www.geds.net, or call the office at 904 269-3718 (Susan Williams ext. 14). Grace Episcopal Day School: Tradition, Character, Excellence, Service The school year is drawing to end, and an exciting summer is ahead at Grace Episcopal Day School. Register now for eight weeks of sensational fun, with extended day care also available for preschool students.

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Furry & friendlyThe American Red Cross "Ready Dog" welcomes patients at Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Red Cross volunteers provide support to military members and their families at its hospital and five branch health clinics. Services include linking military families during emergencies, connecting families with local resources (information and referral services), providing resiliency training (deployment services) and supporting wounded warriors. By MC1 (SW) Greg JohnsonNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsSearching for a new job can be stressful for anybody, but those on the hunt for a federal government position often have a number of questions unique to their own experience and many of those questions are related to the application process through USAJOBS. USAJOBS is afree, web-based job boardenabling federal job seekers access to thousands of job opportuni ties with hundreds of federal agencies and organizations. Prior to 2012, federal government job listings were spread out across a number of individual agencies. President Obama implemented an initiative for one, central location for applicants to go and thats when all agencies went to strictly using USAJOBS to announce their vacancies, said Aqueilla Grimmage-Smith, supervisor with the Navy Region Southeast Human Resources Department. The goal is to streamline the job-search process to make it faster and more convenient for people to access government listings. The first step to access USAJOBS list ings is to visit the website at http:// www.usajobs.gov and create a login. Applicants can then create and store up to five resumes per account, browse listings and apply to jobs for which they meet eligibility requirements. The steps for applying for specific listings are as follows: Locate the Announcement (Job search can be done by agency, occupa tion, grade, location, etc.) Click Apply Online Select the resume you wish to utilize Complete the eligibility questionnaire After uploading all required docu ments, submit your responses You will receive an email confirming your submissions According to Grimmage-Smith, cer tain listings on USAJOBS are restricted to applicants who meet specific requirements, such as wounded warriors, dis abled veterans, active-duty spouses and individuals with disabilities. These requirements, or appointment authorities, are listed under the Who may apply section of the listing. Many of the eligibility restrictions are geared toward our veterans as a result of the great sacrifices they have made during their service, but there is even more to it than that, GrimmageSmith said. Its about getting the right people into the right positions. Military mem bers are trained and have the specific skillsets we need on many of our mili tary bases. While they have earned their appointment authority through their service, it is also a major advan tage to management to be able to hire employees with their experience. Veteran applicants typically fall under four categories: Provisional Appointment of 30 percent or more Compensable Disabled Veterans; Veterans Recruitment Appointment (VRA); Veterans Employment Opportunity Authority (VEOA); and the Wounded Warrior Project. Appointments for compensable disabled veterans and wounded war riors are similar in that candidates from both categories may be appoint ed non-competitively to positions for which they qualify. Applicants must provide a letter from the Veterans Administration (VA) or branch of ser vice documenting a compensable ser vice-connected disability of 30 percent or more, SF-15 Application for 10-Point Veterans Preference, and DD Form 214 Certificate of Release. Veterans may also qualify for appointment under the VEOA. Eligible applicants must have completed at least three years of active-duty service with a separation under honorable conditions. While many USAJOBS appointment authorities apply to veterans, other applicants may still meet requirements for non-competitive positions. Spouses of active duty service members with orders specifying a permanent change of station, spouses of 100-percent dis abled service members and spouses of a service member who was killed while performing active duty are also eligible. Eligibility verification requirements can be found under the Who may apply section of the listing. Spouses put their careers on hold to support our service members, so this is an avenue for them to seek employ ment, Grimmage-Smith said. One appointment not entirely restricted to veterans and spouses is Schedule A. This authority allows fed eral agencies to hire individuals with severe physical, psychiatric or intellec tual disabilities. Applicants do not need to have any military or previous fed eral government experience. Eligibility requirements include medical docu mentation substantiating the appli cants disability. It is important to inform every-one of the different types of appointment authorities because we are an equal employment opportunity employer, Grimmage-Smith said. We dont discriminate based on disabilities, and we need applicants to understand that its not just geared toward veterans and spouses. USAJOBS offers federal government employment opportunities for everyone.USAJOBS offers wide range of Federal employment opportunities Photo by Jacob Sippel Hospital awardCapt. Gayle Shaffer (left), Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville commanding officer, presents the 2014 Biomedical Equipment Technician of the Year Award to HM1 Chad Sinclair during an awards ceremony at the hospital on May 2. This award is given to recognize individual dedication, achievement and excellence in the field of health care technology management.Photo by Jacob Sippel JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 15

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harassment, bullying, discrimination, that if condoned or tolerated and not addressed, could embolden someone to move across the spectrum to the right side . which turns into a criminal act. Each year, Command Climate Specialists (CCS), formerly known as Equal Opportunity Advisors, meet at the Annual Military Equal Opportunity (MEO) Training Summit to discuss ways of improving command climate and reducing damaging behaviors and attitudes. This years MEO Training Summit was held in April in Norfolk, Va. Its an opportunity to bring together as many of the CCSs and CMEOs that are currently serving in their respective roles around the world, together in one forum to put out all the new updates, to train, and to allow them to build a network amongst themselves, said Buck. Command Climate Specialists and Command-Managed Equal Opportunity (CMEO) program manag ers are experienced Sailors who have taken on the task of determining the climate of each command, providing training on equal opportunity issues, and ensuring that all formal complaints and command issues are effectively addressed. The main way that CCSs and CMEOS determine a commands cli mate is through annual surveys. The Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI) pro vides annual Organizational Climate Surveys (DEOCS) that allow all Sailors to provide feedback on command issues. A lot of times, Sailors in general do not want to go directly to an indi vidual to voice their problem, said Senior Chief Yeoman George Wooten, a Command Climate Specialist at Naval Service Training Command. Many command issues are brought to the surface in command climate surveys and thats when the concerns are addressed. This years summit announced changes to the DEOCS and how they are processed. Sailors voices will be heard louder than ever before. Congress, through the National Defense Authorization Act, mandated enhanced commander accountabili ty on command climate assessments, said George Bradshaw, the director of Navy Sexual Harassment Prevention and Equal Opportunity Office. DEOCS have previously only reached the commander of that particular command. Now, said Bradshaw, the DEOCS will be sent to the regional commanders (ISICS), ensuring that each commander is held accountable for any complaints from his or her command. The results of the survey are also reported on the commanders fitness report. I think our [Sailors] will continue to see more engaged leadership, more informed leadership, and I think theyre going to continue to feel more and more comfortable that theyre working for a company, the U.S. Navy . where they feel as though theyre treated fairly and that theyre feeling like theyre treated with dignity and respect, said Buck. EOPFrom Page 14 Knight defeats Guza in singles tennisFrom MWR SportsThe 2014 Mens Open Singles Tennis Tournament was played April 28 at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts aboard NAS Jax. There were 14 men and three women. The men played in four groups of three or four players playing each other. If a player lost twice in the pool play, they were eliminated from the tourna ment. Nine players advanced to the singleelimination tournament. One player was eliminated after the first round of the single-elimination tournament and four players were eliminated after the second round leaving four players remaining in the tourna ment. Ensign Matt Guza (VP-30) and DoD civilian Marshall Knight (NAVFAC) won their semi-final match to face off for first and second place. Knight ended up defeating Guza 6-1 to win the 2014 Mens Open Singles Tennis Tournament. Intramural Golf Summer League forming Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. The league plays Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. Contact base gym for rules and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Meeting May 14Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective designated representative attend receive and required paperwork.Wallyball League Meeting May 21Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet along with rules and required paperwork.Badminton Singles League Meeting May 28Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet noon with rules and required paperwork. Bean Bag Toss Singles Tournament June 23Tournament takes place at 5 p.m. in the NAS Jax Fitness, Sports and Aquatics Center. The tournament is open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Call the Fitness Center at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil to sign up by June 13. July 21-25Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for 14. Tournament July 28-31Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for 14. For more information about any of the sports articles, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil .Photo courtesy of MWR(From left) Ensign Matt Guza (VP-30) took silver and DoD civilian Marshall Knight (NAVFAC) won the gold medal at the 2014 MWR Men's Open Singles Tennis Tournament on April 28. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014

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USS Iwo Jima (LPH2/LHD7) Reunion Aug. 27-31 at Crowne Plaza Hotel in Jacksonville. Call 757-723-0317 or http:// ussiwojimashipmates.cfns.net/ (MOAA) Northeast Florida Chapter meets every third Wednesday, 6 p.m. at NAS Jax branches. Contact Johnnie.walsh@ gmail.com or call 282-4650. (NNOA) meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. at Jacksonville Urban Paul Nix at 542-2518 or paul.nix@navy.mil. Association of Aviation Ordnancemen meets the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on Collins Road. For information, visit www.aao9.com. Orange Park Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 5968 and its Auxiliary located at 187 Aurora Blvd. meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. VFW composed of combat veterans and eligible service members from the Active, Guard or Reserve forces. Go to www.vfwpost5968. org or call 276-5968. at NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military retirees and dependents. Work four hours a day, one day per week. Call 542-5790 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays to volunteer. Ribbons & Roses a breast cancer support group at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. Call 542-7857 for more info. Navy Jacksonville Yacht Club is open to active duty, reserve and retired military, plus, active or retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email commodore@njyc. org. COMPASS Spouse-to-Spouse Military Mentoring Program. Helping others help themselves. Visit www.gocompass.org for more info. Navy Wives Clubs of America DID No. 300 meets the second Thursday of each Church, 2246 Blanding Blvd. Call 272-9489. Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 p.m., 390 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach. Call 246-6855. National Active and Retired Federal Employees Clay County Chapter 1414 meets at 1:30 p.m. on the second Tuesday National Active and Retired Federal Employees Westside Jacksonville Chapter 1984 meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Murray Hill United Methodist Church, (Fellowship Hall Building) at 4101 College Street. Call 7867083. Retired Enlisted Association meets the fourth Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Hall at 7673 Blanding Blvd. Call 772-8622. sion and washouts. With the 2014 Hurricane Season on our heels, the preparation for a CERT deployment was very fresh on our minds, said NAVFAC Southeast Disaster Preparedness Officer Lt. Cmdr. Ken Vargas. The recent planning made the deploy ment of the CERT to NAS Pensacola extremely smooth. What we nor mally practice in four-day simulations, we executed in six hours. These engineers will work directly with our Public Works Department (PWD) in Pensacola, said NAVFAC Southeast Operations Officer Capt. Lore Aguayo. They will per form assessments to help get the base back to nor mal operations as soon as possible. In conjunction with PWD staff, the team will prioritize facili ties/infrastructure on NAS Pensacola and at nearby Corry Station. The team will deploy Disaster Assessment Teams (DATs) to identify and quantify the dam age caused by the storm. They will then record the damage to a sufficient degree to allow for cost estimations to be gener ated for the repairs. The Public Works Department currently manages the facilities, water, power, and sani tation for the base, said Aguayo. The team from Jacksonville will be working hard to assist the PWD and the installation commander set priorities and will support them with whatever they need to get the job done. Sending engineers around the world is not new to NAVFAC. We always have a trained CERT ready to go at a moments notice, said Vargas. Vargas explained that the CERT has DATs which consist of structural, electrical, and mechani cal engineers, architects, roofing specialists, com munity planners and construction contract specialists that deploy to begin Rapid Damage Assessments. It is during this phase that debris is removed and basic func tions are restored such as opening roadways, sani tation, water, electricity and communications. Typically, these teams are deployed to assess hurricane or other storm damage to military installations such as was the case in August 2012 when teams deployed to Gulfport, Miss. and New Orleans, La. in response to Hurricane Isaac. They are also called upon to deploy for humanitarian efforts such as a tsuna mi or the earthquake in Haiti in 2010. CERTFrom Page 9 U.S. Navy photoThe west gate to NAS Pensacola was closed due to flooding from the storm starting April 29. CERT surveyed many areas of the base that were inaccessible, with water measured in excess of 3.5 feet in low-lying areas. Community Calendar By AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterHoneywell and NASA have teamed up to ignite middle school students interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) concepts and careers. Named after Newtons Second Law of Motion (force equals mass time acceleration), FMA Live! is a travelling hiphop concert that uses dance, funny videos, giant Velcro walls, and extreme wrestling to show students the relevance of science and engineering con cepts in everyday life. Oceanway Middle School was nominated by the Department of Defense in col laboration with commander, Navy Region Southeast, to be one of the schools throughout the U.S. to host the tour. There were several distin guished guests in attendance, including Congressman Andrew Crenshaw. Its a priv ileged to represent you and your families in our nations capital. Im looking forward to this event and thank you for inviting me here today, he said during the tours opening remarks. NAS Jax CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre also attended the performance. FMA Live! catered to the students by bringing the sci ence and math element to life. This program brought dance and music together and used them in a leaning capacity. You could tell the performance inspired the children and hopefully they will take the importance of math and sci ence with them as they go for ward, she said. Tyree Saunders (12) a 6th grader at Oceanway, was cho sen to participate in the Velcrowall demonstration that put Newtons First Law of Motion to test. I had a great time and learned a lot during the presentation. I liked how interactive the show was and the music was really cool, he said. Photo by AE2 Samantha JonesU.S. Congressman Ander Crenshaw (second from right) meets with the FMA Live! cast and Oceanway Middle School Principal Alex Marx (far right) after the FMA Live! performance. Oceanway Middle School hosts science tour A P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft is towed toward NAS Jax Hangar 1000 on April 23, after maintainers calibrated the plane's compass at a special location north of the airfield.Photo by Clark Pierce Orion compass check JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 17

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MAY 8, 2014 I I D E HURREXHurricane Drill UnderwayPage 3 BETT ER GOLF NAS Jax Course Improvements Pages 4-5 COQTop Civilians Recognized Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Triton UAV squadron growing in facilities, personnelBy MC2 Amanda CabasosStaff WriterThe Navys first squadron designated to fly the MQ-4C Triton unmanned aer ial vehicle (UAV) is taking shape at NAS Jacksonville. Unmanned Patrol Squadron (VUP) 19 Officer in Charge Cmdr. Shannon Clark recently explained developments in the program since the squadron stood up Oct. 1, 2013. Were currently working to expand VUP-19 from an administrative entity to a more functional perspective, said Clark. We will start some training on the actual air vehicle this summer to assist with some upcoming testing. However, our primary focus right now is ensuring that the administrative and operational sides of the squadron are properly func tioning for the arrival of VUP-19s first commanding officer (CO). This way, the CO can concentrate on assuming the duties of this command and focusing on the squadrons mission. According to Clark, 21 officers and enlisted personnel will be assigned to VUP-19 at NAS Jacksonville by the end of this fiscal year. Approximately half of the Sailors will be aircrew/operators and the other half will be administra tive support. By the end of 2015, VUP-19, nick named Big Red, will have approxi mately 100 Sailors at the squadrons detachment site located at Naval Base Ventura County/Point Mugu, Calif. Currently, operators assigned to VUP19 will receive training at NAS Patuxent River, Md. Flight training will eventu ally shift to VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville as soon as the Triton curriculum is validated and training equipment is installed. The initial teaching will be this summer at NAS Pax River under Northrop Grumman instruction. Training received is in preparation for our involvement in the Operational Assessment and Operational Evaluation testing periods for this platform, explained Clark. Other facilities aboard NAS Jacksonville that will support the UAVs mission include the MQ-4C Triton Mission Control Center that is currently under construction, with a projected completion date of December 2014. This two-story structure, with an array of rooftop antennas, will house the squadrons mission control stations said Clark. In this facility, UAV Operators will Weinzatl named NFO of the yearBy Lt. j.g. Joseph BayoVP-26 Public Affairs OfficerCommander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic (CNAL) recently select ed Lt. Jacob Weinzatl, from NAS Jacksonvilles VP-26, as the 2013 naval flight officer (NFO) of the year. Weinzatl previously earned the Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group nomination and was selected from NFO nominees from all other aviation communities on the East Coast. Weinzatl hails from Buckner, Mo. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 2009 with a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engi neering. He was designated a naval flight officer in December of 2010. He checked aboard VP-26 in March of 2011 after completing initial P-3C Orion training at VP-30 in Jacksonville. During his time with the Tridents, Weinzatl served as schedules officer, assistant training officer, NFO tactics officer and NFO NATOPS officer. He deployed to the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility in 2011 and 2013, respectively. He qualified ahead of squadron and wing standards, setting himself up for an extremely successful 2013. Based on his strong tactical performance in the Advanced Readiness Program and Fleet Instructor Under Training syl labi, he was selected to fire VP-26s first AGM-65F Maverick missile since 2011. He was also deep-selected to take the NFO Blue Card Check Ride and earned qualification as the commands primary NATOPS evaluator. A natural leader of VP-26s Instructor Tactical Coordinator (TACCO) and Mission Commander cadre, he was chosen to lead his crew as the first on deployment and first on detachment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility in May 2013. By the end of deployment seven months later, Weinzatl had led his crew on 10 detachments, including three as Detachment Officer in Charge, and had conducted no less than four significant collections of data never before collected by a P-3 Orion. VP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, had words of praise for Weinzatl. He has been an asset to the squad ron since his arrival. His outstanding leadership and exceptional knowledge and aeronautical skills make him a standout in an outstanding wardroom. As an instructor, he made a tre mendous impact on our mission and training effectiveness. This is an honor for him, Team Trident, and the entire Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force. I am confident that he will con tinue to do great things for the mari time patrol community as an instruc tor at VP-30. By MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsNAS Jax concluded the month of April by holding the 10th annual Take Back the Night event at Hangar 117 to emphasize and reflect on Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Take Back the Night is a time to come together as a community to speak out against sexual assault, domestic vio lence, sexual abuse and other forms of sexual violence. Nearly 100 members from Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), NAS Jax Coalition for Sailors Against Destructive Descriptions, Rape Recovery Team with Womens Center of Jacksonville, and victim advocates from NAS Jax attended the ceremony to show their support. FFSC Sexual Assault Response Coordinator Tina Vaughn opened the ceremony. I want to thank each one of you for coming out tonight. Our mission is to stand with and honor those who have been victimized by sexual violence, to cast light into the places where dark ness would like to live. Though this month of awareness is over, we are ever vigilant on our course forward. Vaughn introduced NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. I am truly honored to be here tonight to celebrate the Take Back the Night event with all of you Photos by Clark Pierce VUP-19 aircrew stand with a scale model of the MQ-4C Triton unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), in the lobby of VP-30's new UAV operator training facility May 2. (From left) VUP-19 Officer in Charge (OIC) Cmdr. Shannon Clark, VUP-19 Assistant OIC Lt. Cmdr. Rob Wilhelm, VUP-19 Safety Officer Lt. Hunter Korbelik and VUP-19 Safety Petty Officer AWO2 Brandon Jenkins. Masonry workers set dozens of concrete blocks May 2 at the construction site for the new MQ-4C Triton Mission Control Center at NAS Jacksonville. Lt. Jacob WeinzatlPhoto by MC2 Amanda CabasosNaval Hospital Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Christine Sears speaks dur ing the Take Back the Night event held aboard NAS Jax on April 30. The event is an opportunity for the community to come together to speak out against sex ual assault and all forms of sexual violence. One of the key reasons we observe Sexual Assault Awareness Month is to show our support for victims, said Sears. Over the past year, Navy Medicine has increased capability to care for victims and perform the medical examinations for evidence used to convict those who perpetrate this heinous crime.NAS Jax takes back the night See Page 7 See Page 7 See Page 6

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 Wealth trainingRufus Bundridge, personal finance manager at Fleet and Family Support Center, instructs a dozen Sailors and Marines during the two-day Million Dollar Sailor program on April 29. The program teaches personal wealth building strategies and covers topics such as financial goal setting and implementation, debt reduction, saving, and investing. From StaffMay 8 1911 Birth of naval aviation as Navy orders its first airplane, the Curtiss A-1. 1942 Battle of Coral Sea ends with Japanese retir ing from area and USS Lexington (CV-2) scuttled due to extensive battle damage. 1945 VE Day, Germanys unconditional surrender to the Allies. 1972 U.S. Navy and Marine Corps aircraft mine Haiphong Harbor in North Vietnam. May 9 1926 Lt. Cmdr. Richard Byrd and ADC Floyd Bennett make first flight over North Pole. Both receive Congressional Medal of Honor. 1942 USS Wasp (CV-7) in Mediterranean launches 47 Spitfire fighter aircraft to help defend Malta. May 10 1775 Force under Ethan Allan and Benedict Arnold cross Lake Champlain and capture British fort at Ticonderoga, New York. 1800 The 44-gun heavy frigate USS Constitution captures Letter of Marque Sandwich. 1862 Confederates destroy Norfolk and Pensacola Navy Yards. 1949 First shipboard launching of Lark guided mis sile by USS Norton Sound (AVM-1). 1960 USS Triton (SSRN-586) completes submerged circumnavigation of world in record 84 days follow ing many of the routes taken by Magellan and cruising 46,000 miles. At 447 feet long, it was one of the largest submarines ever built. May 11 1862 CSS Virginia blown up by Confederates to prevent capture. 1898 Sailors and Marines from the light cruiser USS Marblehead (CL-2) cut trans-oceanic cable near Cienfuegos, Cuba, isolating Cuba from Spain. 1943 Naval task force lands Army troops on Attu, Aleutians. 1965 U.S. destroyers deliver first shore bombard ment of Vietnam War. May 12 1780 In the fall of Charleston, S.C., three Continental Navy frigates (Boston, Providence and Ranger) are captured, and one frigate (Queen of France) was sunk to prevent capture. 1846 U.S. declares war against Mexico. 1975 SS Mayaguez seized by Khmer Rouge and escorted to Koh Tang Island. 1986 Destroyer USS David R. Ray (DD-971) deters an Iranian Navy attempt to board a U.S. merchant ship. May 13 1908 Navy Nurse Corps (female) is established. 1908 Pearl Harbor Navy Yard, later called Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, was officially established in the Territory of Hawaii as a coaling station for U.S. Navy ships transiting the Pacific Ocean. 1943 Bureau of Navigation renamed Bureau of Naval Personnel. 1945 Aircraft from fast carrier task force begin twoday attack on Kyushu airfields, Japan. 1964 Organization and deployment of worlds first all-nuclear-powered task group (USS Enterprise, USS Long Beach and USS Bainbridge) to 6th Fleet. May 14 1801 Tripoli declares war against the United States. 1836 U.S. Exploring Expedition authorized to con duct exploration of Pacific Ocean and South Seas, first major scientific expedition overseas. Lt. Charles Wilkes led the expedition in surveying South America, Antarctica, Far East and North Pacific. SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-7789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorAs kids get older, there are some things, thank fully, that get easier. One of these is doing errands alone. This is the only hope I can offer new parents: Someday, you will go to the grocery store alone, and it will feel like Ferris Buellers Day Off. No arranging babysitters. No car seats. No screaming, Hes breath ing on my side of the car, Mom! Tell him to breathe on his own side! Of course, this type of freedom only comes when you have a child whos old enough to be your free bab ysitter. Im sorry, I mean, once you have a child whos old enough to have the opportunity to care for his younger siblings and learn things like responsibility and time management. The universally accepted age for this privilege is 12 or 13, but it depends on the child and the age of his would-be charges. My brothers, Van and Will, were certainly old enough (14 and 11) to babysit me when I was in first grade, but I suspect Mom had second thoughts 30 years later when she hears the stories. One time, Will chased me around the room with the sprayer from the kitchen sink. To get him back, I threw a whole bucket of water on him in the foyer. We had wood floors. Another time, Will let me hide in the bushes with him to spy on and identify neighborhood pranksters who planned to egg our house. It was 10 p.m. on a school night. I was barefoot and in my pajamas. Mom never knew. I also remember Van and Will calling me into the living room like it was an emergency. Sarah, quick! Get in here! Hurry! Id come running and sliding down the hall, scared out of my mind only to get to the living room and have Will say, Can you change the channel for us. This was before remote controls, back when younger siblings were the remote control. But my favorite memory is the time Van and Will were babysitting and they threw my dress-up purse onto the roof of the house. I watched in disbelief from the sidewalk, standing in my dress-up high heels and fake fur coat. That has moms jewelry in it, you know, I told them. The boys ran to get a ladder from the garage. When mom got home, both my brothers were standing on top of the two-story roof. The purse, of course, did not have jewelry in it. Its scary now when I think about that through the lens of a parent, but those are some of my fondest memories of my brothers. For years, moms and dads intervene and choreograph their childrens lives and relationships with one another. Then that crucial day comes when Mom goes to the grocery store alone, and the siblings left behind really start to bond. This is when they form memories of their own, separate from Mom or Dad. My oldest son/free babysitter has a cell phone, so Im not as blissfully unaware as my mom might have been back in the 1980s. I get regular updates from home that are, by themselves, entertaining. Some of my favorite texts with Ford while he was babysitting: Me: Everyone doing OK? Im almost done at the store. Ford: Everyones fine. Lindell wants to know if you got chocolate Krave? Me: Yes. Ford: Also, he has bubble gum stuck to the back of his neck. Me [after my phone rang during a meeting]: Youre only supposed to call me if its an emergency. Ford: I know, Mom. Me: Is this an emergency? Ford: Sort of. Are we allowed to play Wii? I save these texts because they are tiny windows into the stories they will share with their children and spouses when they are grown. But they are also solid reminders of how much my boys are learning and growing, how they are caring for one another, yadda, yadda, yadda. Okay, they will also be great items to display at their weddings, where we all laugh about how so little has changed. Ford: Mom, Im really sorry. I gave Lindell soda, and it had caffeine in it. Me: I bet you are sorry. Ford: Hes really wild. Am I in trouble? Me: What you are about to experience will be pun ishment enough. Ford [an hour later]: I cant believe how crazy he got from caffeine. Me: Ford, how many times have I told you, you dont feed the gremlin after midnight. And you never get him wet. This Week in Navy HistoryU.S. Navy photos1942 Battle of Coral Sea Japanese aircraft caught USS Lexington (shown here in 1941) in a converging "anvil" attack and planted two torpedoes on her port side. Then dive bombers struck, hitting Lexington on the port side of the flight deck and another in the island. Despite her damage and the loss of many lives, USS Lexington (CV-2) corrected a seven-degree list and resumed flight operations. However, deep inside her explosion gravely impaired internal communications. Even so, the carrier steamed at 25 knots, while con tinuing to land her planes. Her crew was fighting a losing damage control battle. Another explosion caused more internal havoc and Lexington's problems were now out of control. She suspended flight operations and asked for help from other ships. By 1630, she was forced to secure her ship and she was scuttled. From the HomefrontWhen moms away, the siblings will play Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha Jones

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HURREX/Citadel Gale 14 exercise underwayFrom Commander, Navy Installations Command Public AffairsCommander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) and U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) is jointly con ducting the annual hurricane preparedness exercise HURREX/Citadel Gale 2014, from May 5 15, in prepa ration for the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean areas hurricane season. The purpose of HURREX/Citadel Gale 2014 is to prepare the Navy to respond to weather threats to U.S. coastal regions, and to maintain the ability to deploy forces even under the most adverse weather condi tions. Tropical storms have the potential to cause great damage to areas they pass over and the Navy prepares every year to mitigate that damage. HURREX/Citadel Gale 2014 provides Navy regions and installations the opportunity to exercise and assess their ability to prepare for, respond to, and recover from the threat of a natural disaster, as well as validate Memorandums of Understanding/ Agreements with non-federal government partner agencies. said Bill Clark, CNIC Exercise Program manager. This years exercise consists of two simulated tropi cal cyclones that will develop and intensify to hur ricane strength, and threaten the Eastern Coast of the U.S., the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean coast al regions. All Navy commands with personnel in NRMA, NDW, and NRSE, ashore and afloat, in port and underway, will participate. The exercise includes reviewing and exercising heavy weather instruc tions and procedures and accounting for Sailors and Navy families in the affected regions through the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS). Forward deployed units will not participate in the exercise tracking and warning phase. For exercise preparation, region command ers, senior officers present afloat (SOPA), and SOPA administrators will review disaster preparedness plans and conduct individual and team training. Region commanders will also conduct pre-exercise and pre-tropical cyclone season discussions with disaster preparedness officers of subordinate com mands to address exercise scenarios, emergency plans and recovery efforts. The destruction and devastation caused by storms such as Hurricanes Sandy, Irene and Katrina reinforce the need for proper training and preparedness prior to the threat of a real world natural disaster. There were 13 named storms in 2013, and with the onset of the Atlantic hurricane season June 1, the Navy remains committed to the safety, security and well being of its Sailors, civilians and their family members. Rear Adm. Rick Williamson, commander, Navy Region Southeast, serves spaghetti at a USO "No Dough Dinner" at Fleet Reserve Association (FRA) Branch 91. The "No Dough Dinner" program is a year-round effort that offers free hot meals to Sailors and their families on evenings before military paydays. More than 90 Sailors and their families attended the Navy League sponsored dinner, that was the first of its kind in the NAS Jacksonville area. The Greater Jacksonville Area USO intends to make the dinners a regular event at FRA Branch 91. The organization has already had success hosting "No Dough Dinners" near Naval Station Mayport, serving more than 300 people twice a month. For more information about USO "No Dough Dinners," contact the Greater Jacksonville Area USO at 778-2821 or visit the office aboard NAS Jacksonville.Photo by MC1 Greg Johnson 'No Dough Dinner' JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 Golf course undergoes major improvementsBy MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS JAX Public AffairsFacing substantial improve ments at the 9-hole blue course, followed by the red and white courses, the NAS Jax Golf Course is undergoing renova tions projected to be completed by Sept. 1. Project Manager Ensign Gregory Smith from Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Public Works Department (PWD) said, The project includes enlargement and new construction of some tee boxes, asphalt cart paths and concrete curbs, bunker recon struction with drainage, drain age improvements, irrigation replacement, new practice putting green, new synthetic putting range tee and conver sion of a gravel cart path by the driving range to a concrete cart path. Costing a grand total of $2.2 million, the project is being renovated by experienced con tractors from Waldsworth Golf Construction Company. There are five to 10 work ers on sight every day remov ing asphalt from the cart paths, removing sod, or working on the drainage structures around the facility, said Smith. According to Smith, the Project is a Morale Welfare & Recreation (MWR) funded project. The main goal is to provide service members and their families facilities and activities that they can enjoy in order to improve morale. The golf course is the larg est MWR facility on base that is used by active, reserve and retired military and their fam ilies, continued Smith. The course was in need of drainage repair and updating in order to make the full course usable at all times. The improvements to the course are also making the course more challenging with alteration of several holes. Smith explained that the outdoor project can easily be impeded by rain and storms, hence a challenge they could encounter. However, he said, The rain should not slow the project down because the contrac tors take historic rainfall data into account when building their schedule, so they have accounted for rain days. Elite and amateur golfers are thrilled to learn the renova tions are taking place. NAS Jax Community Equipment operator Omar Hernandez from Wadsworth Golf Construction Company drives a Bobcat Skid Steer to level soil in preparation to rebuild the womens tee box at NAS Jax Blue Golf Course March 21. Loader operator Sergio Diaz-Ocampo (left) fills a dump truck with sand for transport to tee boxes as truck driver Carlos Segura (right) stands by to warn about potential safety hazards. Utilities Commodity Manager Jay Caddy checks out the waste water facility that recycles wastewater to help irrigate the NAS Jax golf course and base softball fields. Caddy said, Our domes tic wastewater plant treats wastewater to a high enough stan dard so that it can be reclaimed and used for irrigation rather than dumping and discharging the water into the St Johns River. Also, the recycled water contains nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients that are beneficial to the turf. Wadsworth Golf Construction Company Project Manager Eric Wadsworth speaks with Ensign Gregory Smith, project manager with Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast Public Works Department about the completion of the new bunker at the blue course on April 9. Recycled wastewater flows into a two-acre pond near the NAS Jax Golf Course and used to irrigate the course when necessary. Although recycled water meets drinking water standards, cur rently state and federal laws restrict the use of the reclaimed water. After wastewater undergoes proper treatment, it flows from the wastewater plant through a pumping system into a two-acre pond and used to irrigate the base golf course as needed. See GOLF COURSE, Page 5

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 5 Planning and Liaison Officer Matt Schellhorn said, The highlight of this project for me is updating the drainage system. I think that it will make the course play much better, especially after it rains. The course has a tendency to get so soggy and at times very dif ficult to play. With the drainage improvement, I think it will help dry those areas out. Also, I know they are redoing the cart paths and some of the tee boxes. It will visually make the golf course more appealing. The project is going really well, said Smith. Im excited about it. Its a cool project to be able to work on a golf course. Something you dont to do too often. When the project is completed, it will provide a much better useable facility for the base. GOLF COURSEFrom Page 4General laborer Catauno Mancilla cuts drainage pipe to create a new catch basin, which is a small portion of the drainage improvements on the blue course. Loader operator Sergio Diaz-Ocampo scoops up a load of sand with his tractor to transport fill substance to a tee box at the blue course. Workers from Wadsworth Construction Company work on improving the drainage system at the golf course by replacing old pipes. Workers from Wadsworth Golf Construction Company lay down new piping as a way to improve the drainage system. Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosTruck driver Sergio Diaz-Ocampo (left) assists equip ment operator Roel Zarate with removing dirt and measuring the road in preparation of widening the cart path at the base golf course on March 21. Superintendent and safety officer for Wadsworth Golf Construction Company Cuauhtemoc Fabian dis cusses the procedures for leveling tee boxes to attain the final grade with Ensign Gregory Smith, a project manager with Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast Public Works Department. Concrete finishers and floaters from Wadsworth Golf Construction Company work together spreading and smoothing the surface of the new and improved cart path at the base golf course on April 25. (From left) Concrete finishers Felix Hernandez and Justin Southerland stand by for concrete buggy oper ator Catalino Mancilla to dump a fresh batch of con crete for the workers to continue spreading as part of a project to complete a new and improved cart path at the NAS Jax Golf Course April 25. (From left) General laborer Balfred Rodriguez; gener al laborer Carlos Segura; machine operator Gerardo Ancira and general laborer Omar Hernandez from Wadsworth Golf Construction Company, lay sod around the perimeter of the No. 6 tee box on the blue golf course April 25. Equipment operator Omar Hernandez from Wadsworth Golf Construction Company, removes and levels dirt for the rebuilding of a tee box as part of NAS Jax Golf Course renovation project. Concrete finisher Felix Hernandez from Wadsworth Golf Construction Company, uses a hand float tool to smooth the edges of freshly laid concrete to mold a new cart path as part of a project held at the base golf course.

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Weinzatl currently serves as the VP-26 NFO NATOPS Officer and Crew Resource Management Program Manager as well as and the Mission Commander and Tactical Coordinator of Combat Aircrew Two. At the conclusion of his tour with VP-26, Weinzatl will report to VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville for duty as a fleet replacement squadron instructor train ing the fleets newest Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force naval flight officers. This is an honor and a privilege. The truth is that I would not have been able to succeed on station without the help of the entire squadron and the support of Team Tridents outstanding mainte nance department, said an apprecia tive Weinzatl. NFOFrom Page 1 From the NAS Jax All Officers Spouses ClubThe NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club is sponsoring three $1,000 scholar ships based on scholarship merit and community service. Eligibility: U.S. Navy active/reserve duty and active/reserve duty depen dents who are currently in their senior year of high school or a high school graduate, attached to NAS Jacksonville and planning to attend an accredited college in the fall of 2014 or spring of 2015. Scholarships are to be used only for tuition and tuition-based fees charged by the college and will be sent to the college. Three scholarships will be awarded; each in the amount $1,000 one active duty, one officer dependent, and one enlisted dependent. Criteria: Recipients will be selected on scholarship merit and community service. Deadline for application is June 7. Selection of recipients will be made by June 30. Scholarship application may be picked up at NAS Jacksonville Navy College Office or found on-line at: https://www.fcef.com/wp-con tent/uploads/CHP-ScholarshipApplication3-14.pdf. You may submit the application by mail to: NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, c/o Mrs. Pam Undersander, 5065 Mustin Road, Jacksonville FL 32212. Questions may be sent to nasjax aosc@gmail.comNeither the NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal govern ment officially endorses any company, sponsor, or its products or services.Three $1,000 college scholarship opportunities announced Photo by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, BU1(SCW/EXW/IDW) James Vossler of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202, Detachment Jacksonville, NAS Jax Marina Manager Phil Collins of Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR), and Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast Construction Manager Celio Cedeno (far right) participate in a ribbon-cutting ceremony to signify the completion of the Mulberry Cove Marina Pavilion aboard NAS Jax April 29. Undersander said, "This pavilion represents whats great about installation work. The completion of this project represents camaraderie and teamwork among a lot of different people, including the Seabees, MWR and Navy Jax Yacht Club. I think it is a neat story and an example of the coordination and use of different streams to complete three separate projects, the last being the pavilion, with Installation Excellence Award money that now exhibits a first class marina environment and a facil ity that everyone can enjoy." New marina pavilion opens at Mulberry Cove 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014

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execute all phases of the mis sion, mission planning, mission control and data analysis. From here, the Triton will be operated around the globe by crews consisting of air vehicle operators, naval flight officers and aviation warfare opera tors. The Triton is designed to pro vide long-range, long-endur ance maritime patrol coverage for Naval Air Forces Atlantic; 5th, 6th and 7th fleets; Fleet Forces Command operations in Atlantic; Task Force 80; and support the U.S. Northern and Southern commands as required. According to the Navys Persistent Maritime Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program Office (PMA-262), as an adjunct to the P-8A, the MQ-4C Triton will provide combat informa tion to operational and tacti cal users such as expedition ary strike groups, carrier strike groups and joint forces mari time component commanders. and some of our key leadership on this base. Take Back the Night started back in the 1970s and is now an international event with the mission of ending sexual violence in all forms. The com mon purpose is to advocate for the right of everyone to feel safe from sexual violence, Undersander said. Many sexual assaults hap pen due to a lack of respect for an individuals dignity. Lack of respect is not in our Navys culture and we need to work together to bolster this up through our core val ues of Honor, Courage and Commitment. We must focus on and foster a culture of prevention. That is my commitment tonight at NAS Jax we will work to prevent sexual assault from all angles. Undersander described sev eral of the installation pro grams offered, including Bystander Intervention and Spiritual Fitness classes, to help prevent this crime. Commander, Navy Region Southeast Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Manager Capt. Steve Holms, said, In the southeast region, which covers from Texas to South Carolina and all the way down to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, weve had 21 fewer incidents this year compared to last year when we had a total of 140 incidents across the region. Just by being here you have shown that you care. Continue doing that and we can take back the night. We can also take back the day and take back showing respect and care for one another. Naval Hospital (NH) Jax Executive Officer Capt. Christine Sears said, One of the key reasons we observe Sexual Assault Awareness Month is to show our sup port for victims. Over the past year, Navy medicine has increased capability to care for victims and perform the medical examinations for evi dence used to convict those who perpetrate this heinous crime. Our hospital and all of our branch health clinics have the capability to profession ally provide this expert care. We increased the number of trained caregivers to perform the evidence exams and have a full time nurse at the hospi tal who manages this program. I know we still have victims who choose not to report their sexual assault case. I under stand many of the reasons why they may not report, yet I want every victim to know that Navy medicine and Navy leadership are here to support you. We are committed to showing you our solidarity as you heal and move from being a victim to being a survivor, she added. Next a moment of silence was led by NAS Jax Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Dennis Andrews. Tonight, let us do two things. Let us honor those pres ent and absent, those we know and those who are strangers, who have been victimized by sexual assault. Lets reflect on how each person here can do even more to prevent this crime from damaging any more lives. FFSC Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Civilian Advocate LaTresa Henderson introduced sex ual assault victim/survivor Ebony Payne-English who told her personal story by recit ing a poem. Payne-English explained how she was victim ized and how she was able to move forward in life. First, you have to admit that the crime happened. You have to say it to someone who is in a position to help. And you must admit that this crime is not okay. Once you address what took place, you can begin to heal internally and emotion ally, she added. Someone in the U.S. is sex ually assaulted every two minutes, according to the U.S. Department of Justices National Crime Victimization Survey. These statistics dont include survivors who dont seek help. Although the military intends to put an end to this crime, sexual assault cases are estimated at 19,000 occur rences in the military each year but only about 2,500 are reported. Vaughn concluded, For every woman and man who has ever been impacted by sex ual violence, may they know tonight and forever that they are not alone, may their voices be heard and guide our way forward and most important ly, may they be unburdened by the blame and shame that rightly belongs to another. Anyone in immediate danger should call 911. For confiden tial help, support or learn how to intervene or help (any time of the day or night from any location) contact DoDs Safe Helpline at www.safehelpline. org or (877) 995-5247 or text 55247. For NAS Jacksonville, contact (912) 467-1979 or 5424717. For NH Jacksonville, con tact 542-9030. TAKE BACKFrom Page 1 Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander shares his remarks during the Take Back the Night, event held to honor and support victims of sexual assault crimes. Guest Speaker Ebony Payne-English, a sexual assault victim and survivor, recites a poem to express her story as a victim of this crime. TRITONFrom Page 1 Photo by Clark Pierce A P-8A Poseidon turns onto a taxiway after emerging from the station rinse rack on April 23. The shower rinses off harmful salt water and other pollutants to control possible corrosion. Fighting corrosion at the rinse rack JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 7

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By MC2 Amanda CabasosStaff WriterNAS Jax Information Technology (IT) Specialist Terri Hicks and Engineer Justin Uhrmacher from NAS Jax Fire Department were named NAS Jax Senior and Junior Civilians of the Second Quarter 2014, respectfully. upgrade the operat ing system and associ ated core applications to Windows 7 and Office 2010 for more than 540 workstations via the automated In Place Load process. She also utilized the HP Service Manager tool to manually sub mit tickets to reimage all workstations in Building 1 and most department head workstations in the outlying area. During the manual process, Hicks accessed each workstation remote ly, backing up required data and storing it on CDs and DVDs. Once workstations were returned with Windows 7 operating sys tem, Hicks restored the data back to each com puter and helped the end-user set up their desk, Outlook, Internet Explorer and printers, as well as providing the end-user with complete backup of their data. NAS Jax IT Director Terrence Marshall said, Terri has always been doing an outstanding job for the IT Department. This particular quar ter we finished up an In Place Load. It deals with a remote procedure that Navy Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI) pushed out to upgrade our com puter Windows XP to Windows 7. Terri took the lead on this project. By doing so, she ended up getting more than 540 NAS Jax computers updated with minimal inconveniences to the end-users. She does a wonderful job every day and deserves this award. I am always getting com pliments from the endusers on what a great job she is doing. Hicks said, It feels awesome to be recog nized. I love my job and helping others and it feels great to be recognized for doing something I enjoy. I could never do this alone. We have IT representatives in each Department that help us all the time and my coworkers are awesome. As my grandson would say when we work together to accomplish a goal team work. responsible over the last year for ensuring 100 per cent of all Department of Defense Firefighter Certification packages for NAS Jax are complete and up to date. In addi tion to his firefighting duties, emergencies calls, scheduled training and daily work schedule, he has taken the lead, and ensuring nearly 70 fire fighters accomplish required training and are scheduled for testing. Despite the absence of an assigned training officer, he has completed this task with little to no supervision. NAS Jax Fire Chief Mark Brusoe said, Justin is a young, hardworking civilian employee who is highly motivated and takes his career in the fire service very seriously. Uhrmacher said, Its very honorable to receive this award because of the hard work we put in. There are a lot of tasks around the fire depart ment that one can do on a daily basis; howev er, there are also things one can do to go above and beyond. Despite the many responsibili ties around here, there are many job-related duties that need to get done, such as ensur ing firefighters complete required certifications not necessarily what a specific job title has to oversee. By putting time and effort in doing addition ally work, its actually very nice to be recog nized. I feel very hon ored. Ive been helping with the training, mak ing sure the firefighters understand the job and continue to move on with their qualifications. We all work together as a team and teach each other. Thats how we become better firefight ers. NAS Jax announces Senior, Junior Civilians of the Second QuarterInformation Technology (IT) Specialist Terri Hicks, assigned to NAS Jax IT Department, works at her desk at Building 1 April 28.Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosEngineer Justin Uhrmacher; assigned to NAS Jax Fire Department stands by a fire truck aboard NAS Jax April 28. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014

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From Staff The Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. The keynote speaker will be Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson. This is an All-Service event featuring a joint color guard, All-Service Missing Person Table, Navy Band Southeast with all the Service Songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event to be held Saturday, June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. Numerous veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches of the military who served in prior conflicts, and those currently serv ing have been invited to attend. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War from the local area who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emotional and patriotic, as well as providing an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50; O6 and above $65. Civilians and retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform for O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/din ner dress white jacket optional; and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., dinner is served at 7 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales will end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Visit our website for more information www. mayportnlus.org. Tickets may be purchased from the following loca tions: NAVY LEAGUE MAYPORT Bob Price, 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 E-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net NAVY LEAGUE ST AUGUSTINE Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 E-mail: anuday00@aol.comTickets still available for Midway Dinner June 7 By Lt. Mark Flowerdew725 Squadron Public AffairsThe developing MH-60 Romeo helicopter capability of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) recently achieved another milestone with the graduation of MH-60R Operational Flying Training (OFT) Course Number 1, comprised ofthe first two pilots and aviation warfare officers of RAN 725 Squadron. The customary USN Zero Tension Release (ZTR) cer emony was held April 11,with the students of OFT 1 graduating alongside four of their U. S. Navy counter parts having just completed in-depth conversionand warfaretraining with Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 40 at Naval Station Mayport. As US. Navy tradition dictates, RAN 725 Squadron Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. T. Glynn was on hand to claim the RAN graduates from HSM-40 by remov ing their existing patches and replacing them with 725 Squadron insignia. The HSM-40 coursewas 36 weeks in duration and encompassed all of the skill sets required to make new Romeo aircrew Fleet Ready. Specific elements of the course include general flying and emergency han dling, embarked operations,anti-surface and antisubmarine warfare (ASW) operations. A course highlight for the two pilots was con ducting day and night deck landings on board the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG-66), an exciting and rare opportunity for RAN aircrew. In the words of Lt. Benjamin Thomson, Oneof many great aspects of the USN-provided train ingisthe depth of corporate knowledge weve been able to take advantage of over the last nine months. That corporate knowledge that the USN has gained over a number of years operating this platform hasbeen available to us from day one! For the aviation warfare officers stream, the distinct course highlight came late in the training syllabus with coordination of multiple aircraft and sensor sets in the prosecution of ASW targets with thenew MK 54 airbornelightweighttorpedo. This knowledge, coupled with the Romeosabil ity toconduct coordinated dipping sonar operations will go a long way in seeing the reintroduction of Dip Gang tactics in the RAN. Reviewing herpersonal experience from the tactics phase,Lt. Trine Themsen said, The MK 54 torpedo, combined with the Romeos advanced system capabil ities, is bothextremely exciting and at the forefront of airborne anti-submarine warfare. The next challenge will be to return to Australia to develop andprogress our skills within our own warfare Community. All four of the graduates agree that operating within the USN construct has been both a personally and professionally broadening experience and believe that although the Seahawk is a tried and tested air frame, theRomeo continues to prove its capabilities and ability to adapt to the ever-changing environment of contemporary warfare. By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public AffairsNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast dispatched five civilian employees to Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola May 1 as part of a Contingency Engineering Response Team (CERT). The team departed Naval Air Station Jacksonville at dawn. The team of five consists of airfield pavement engineers, civil engineers and a geo graphic information system analyst. Severe weather with heavy rains pounded the Gulf Coast region April 29 30 impacting area military facilities includ ing NAS Pensacola. Many roads and bridges on board the base were flooded causing ero Aussie MH-60R warfighting capability continues to expandPhoto by Lt. Mark Flowerdew(From left) Newly certified RAN 725 Squadron MH-60R pilots Lt. Aaron Shurink and Lt. Ben Thomson gather with graduate Aviation Warfare Officers Lt. Trine Themsen and Lt. Joel Bury at NAS Jax Hangar 1122.CERT deploys to Pensacola following severe weatherPhoto by Lt. Cmdr. Ken VargasMembers of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Contingency Engineering Response Team (CERT) review travel documents prior to deploying to NAS Pensacola where they will conduct damage assessment caused by the April 29 and 30 storms there. (From left) Team Lead Michael Herring, NAVFAC Southeast Contingency Engineer (not deploying) Don Maconi, GIS Analyst Joshua Coates, Civil Engineer Eric Cannon, Airfield Pavement Engineer Jon Hamilton (obscured) and Lead Airfield Pavement Engineer Jeff Frank. See CERT, Page 17 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 9

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From StaffOne of Floridas largest auto dealer groups announced April 25 that it was selected as the title sponsor of the 2014 NAS Jacksonville Air Show sched uled for Oct. 25 and 26. As the only company chosen for this prestigious sponsorship position, Hanania Automotive Group previously sponsored the 2011 Centennial of Naval Aviation NAS Jax Air Show and is proudly continuing this part nership in 2014. The dealer group will be rep resented at every part of the air show to actively support the nations military and the great er Jacksonville community. We are honored and excit ed to have once again been selected as the title sponsor and partner of the NAS Jax Air Show, commented Jack Hanania, president and CEO of Hanania Automotive Group. This thrilling event is a vital part of our community and region, and we are proud to be able to play such an important role. Our nations military is second to none. We all owe a great deal of gratitude to the men and women who defend us and support freedom and democracy around the world. The 2013 air show season saw much adversity with the federal budget sequesters that grounded the U.S. Navy Blue Angels and the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, as well as other military demonstration aircraft for the entire season. Sixtythree air shows were canceled in 2013. With the release of the Blue Angels 2014 show schedule, NAS Jax is once again hosting the Blues Oct. 25 and 26. This open house event also allows the surrounding com munity onto the base to get close to dozens of aircraft dis plays. We salute Hanania Automotive Group for return ing as this years title sponsor, said Mike McCool, operations manager, NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation. Hanania Automotive Groups commitment to support the NAS Jax 2014 Air Show is com mendable. Neither NAS Jacksonville, MWR or Jax Air News, nor any part of the federal government, officially endorses any company, sponsor or their products or services. By Keats ReynoldsNH Jacksonville Public Affairs AssistantOn May 1, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer proclaimed May 4-10 as Public Service Recognition Week (PSRW) throughout its six facilities in Florida and Georgia. It is an opportunity to thank the almost 650 civilian men and women who serve as physicians, nurses and support staff. Now more than ever, our federal employees are being asked to do more with less, Shaffer stated. Yet, they continue to press forward and support readiness and quality, patient-centered carefrom heal ing patients to ensuring we have the sup plies needed to do so. The theme for PSRW 2014 is Proud to Serve. The NH Jacksonville civil service team demonstrates this daily by the atten tiveness they show to the approximately 67,000 enrolled patients across the com mand. Even through the furlough period of 2013, the federal workforce put service above self to ensure that medical care at the hospital and branch health clinics did not waiver. When someone becomes part of the U.S. Civil Service, they not only accept a job but an oath to support and defend the Constitution of the United States. Federal workers, like our military members, come from many different walks of life and fulfill many different missions. Together, they unite to uphold the pledge to serve and protect the U.S. government. In her proclamation to the command, Capt. Shaffer recalled of her time as NH Jacksonville commanding officer and expressed her gratitude for the public ser vice workers who continue to put service above self. It has been an honor and a privilege to be your commanding officer these past two years and as I will soon pass on the command to another, Ill take com fort in knowing that youour civil service employeesplay critical roles in the con tinuity of great care across Naval Hospital Jacksonville and our nation, said Shaffer. Your hard work does not go unnoticed, and I want you to know that I am proud to serve with you. Today, almost 3 million strong, federal employees are researching cures for can cer, developing solutions to address energy and climate crises, serving alongside warf ighters and caring for the nations heroes. Each and every day, public service workers protect and defend the Constitution of the United States, ensuring that the U.S. gov ernment is the best in the world. For more information on ways to cel ebrate PSRW, visit www.psrw.org. NH Jacksonville CO proclaims Public Service Recognition WeekPhoto by Jacob Sippel Capt. Gayle Shaffer, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville commanding officer, pro claims May 4-10 as Public Service Recognition Week (PSRW) throughout its six facilities in Florida and Georgia. PSRW is an opportunity for NH Jacksonville its hospital and five branch clinics to recognize the almost 650 men and women who serve as physicians, nurses and support staff.Hanania Automotive Group named title sponsor of NAS Jacksonville Air ShowPhoto by Dan Bedinghaus(From left) NAS Jax Morale Welfare and Recreation Marketing Director Shannon Leonard and Installation Program Director John Bushick congratulate Jack Hanania, president and CEO of Hanania Automotive Group, on his NAS Jacksonville 2014 Air Show partnership. The air show is scheduled for Oct. 25-26. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 11

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Ribbons & Roses event is May 13 From Naval Hospital JacksonvilleNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Ribbons & Roses, a breast can cer support group, will meet May 13 at 7 p.m. The meeting takes place in the hospitals General Surgery Clinic, on the second floor of the east annex. Guest speaker is art ist Nadine Terk, a for mer art history teacher at both the University of North Florida and Flagler College. Terk began her career as a Japanese art historian, and in 2005 began studying classical drawing, figurative work and portraiture. Her lat est project, There for You, is an exhibition of paintings and inspiring audio stories about heal ing from breast cancer and the hope beyond the disease. Ribbons & Roses sup port group meets month ly at NH Jacksonville General Surgery Clinic on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. September through June. All are welcome are wel come to attend. For more information on Ribbons & Roses sup port group, call (904) 5427857. Flight Line Caf unveils energy saving improvementsBy Clark PierceEditorGalley culinary specialists joined NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander and other officials April 30 to cut the ribbon symbolizing the completion on a six-month energy and water conservation project at the Flight Line Caf. This project is a great exam ple of teamwork between our public works department, Flight Line Caf leadership and the contractor, CYE Enterprises, said Undersander. As you may know, many of our buildings on base are strug gling with efficiency due to the age of the buildings. Thats why were always looking for more ways to conserve energy and water like this project and ultimately reduce our overall utility costs. NAS Jax Public Works Officer Cmdr. Anant Patel said, From our Sailors perspective, this project improves their quality of life by presenting a clean and safe dining facility. From the base perspective, we made sig nificant energy conservation improvements in line with the Secretary of the Navys aggres sive energy and water consump tion goals laid out in 2009. Patel noted that the project included new refrigeration and air conditioning (HVAC) systems to assure safer food stor age, as well as the comfort of patrons. Overall, were making water and energy improvements one step at a time but it all adds up in the long run. CYE Enterprises President Erica Jackson said shes glad to conclude another success ful energy conservation project for Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast and NAS Jax Public Works Department. Theres no glory in rest rooms but our renovation for the gal ley eliminates paper towels with high-tech hand dryers, as well as conserving water through low-flow toilets. NAS Jax Supply Department LCPO CSCS Wendell Heyward said, Beside energy and water savings, the biggest improve ment is quality of life for the Sailors and Marines who dine at the Flight Line Caf. One example is the refurbished out side deck adjacent to the galleys dining area. We anticipate that utilization will increase thanks to new paint and an awning. Now, the galley can plan out door cooking events that offer protection to service members from exposure to sun or rain. Patel added, The core of this project was to find more ways to save energy. The future of the Navy is all about saving energy and money and were com mitted to doing our part at NAS Jax. Photos by Clark Pierce(From left) NAVFAC Southeast Project Manager Art Mosley, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, Galley Building Energy Monitor CS2(SW) William Freshwater, CYE Enterprises President Erica Jackson, CYE Site Superintendent Paul Willmott, and CYE Vice President William Jackson cut the ribbon April 30 symbolizing completion of the Galley Energy Conservation Project. (From left) CYE Enterprises Site Superintendent Paul Willmott presents Building Energy Monitor CS2(SW) William Freshwater with a service rec ognition award for scheduling construction work without dis rupting food service to Sailors. After the ribbon cutting at the outdoor pavilion on April 30, galley staff and guests attended a commemorative cake cutting by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander and Building Energy Monitor CS2(SW) William Freshwater. The galley's refurbished outdoor pavilion features a new navy blue canopy beneath which Sailors can take part in a variety of events and activities. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. **New time Friday Social Hour 59 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke Lunch bingo Monday through Friday begins at 11:15 a.m. Freedom Lanes Bowling Center Call 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly handicap single tournament May 17, 1 4 p.m., $20 Scratch Sweeper May 24, 1 4 p.m., $30 *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open May 10 June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31 Outdoor pool opens for weekend recreational swim on May 10 Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Dive-in Movie May 23 featuring LEGO Movie Pool opens at 7 p.m., movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free popcorn. Concession stand will be open.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the fol lowing: Jacksonville Jaguar tickets on sale soon! Adventure Landing Waterpark seasonal $85.50 Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel prop erties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty mem bers. Call 542-1335 for information. Grill & Chill May 13 at 6 p.m. Free hamburgers and hotdogs Paintball Trip May 17 at 9 a.m. Movie in the Yard Barracks on May 20 at 8:30 p.m. Featuring Need for SpeedNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty May 13 & 27 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests May 15 & 29 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. Command Party Swing into savings & book your command golf tournament Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependent Skipper B Sailing Classes availableAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Summer Camp Registration going on now! Sign-in at the youth centerFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available including instru ment, complex and commercial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.net Photos by Shannon LeonardPlayers participating in the 2014 MWR Intramural Winter Golf League end-of-season tournament gather for a photo prior to teeing off April 30. (From left) AEAN Christopher Monroe, AT2 Michal Tekac, AZC Tony Johnson, and AZ2 Matthew Huhn from Fleet Readiness Center Southeast proudly display their golden medals for winning the 2014 MWR Winter Golf League Championship. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 13

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Hospital awardsCapt. Gayle Shaffer (left), Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville commanding officer, presents the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal to CS2 Brandon Cleveland during an awards ceremony at the hospital on April 25. Other award recipients include: Lt. Cmdr. Jimmy Suvatne (Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal) and HM2 Shanell Jackson (Flag Letter of Commendation). A group Letter of Appreciation, commanding officer NAS Jacksonville, was presented to HM3 Alber Amayarivera, HM3 Terrence Bolton, HM3 John Holland, HM3 Alex Perez and HM3 John Williams. From StaffWhen the St. Johns Riverkeeper needed voices for a tele vision panel discussion to edu cate the public about steward ship of the river, they looked no farther than NAS Jacksonville. The occasion was the April 24 airing on Jacksonville public television station WJCT-TV of Water Blues, Green Solutions, a film documenting the use of natural or green methods to solve major water issues around the U.S. The show was followed by a one-hour panel discussion in which NAS Jax Stormwater Program Manager John Young took part. As a major stakeholder on the river, said Young, we at NAS Jax never miss an oppor tunity to share the good things we are doing to keep the pub lic trust. It was great fun tell ing the audience about how we wash helicopters with col lected rainwater. And they can make use of the same principle at home. The only difference between a 50,000 gallon rain water cistern, and a 40-gallon rain barrel, is scale. The film highlighted public participation in water qual ity and conservation projects in Portland Ore., Philadelphia, San Antonio Texas, and the Bronx, N.Y., with an emphasis on local volunteerism. The idea of community par ticipation resonated with the studio audience at the program broadcast. People wanted to know what was happening with green infrastructure in our region, noted Young, and what they could do in the com munity and at home to partici pate. We were glad to tell them about our many rain gardens, our rainwater harvesting, and even the steps we are taking to reduce excess mowing. In response to a question about what future crisis might get the region moving in green er directions, Young stated his opinion that the phenomenon of sea level rise might be the signature crisis for northeast Florida, since rising salt water is a fact that citizens and com munities are only just becom ing aware of. Among discussion of con crete curbing, Young spoke about a recent study in Sarasota County that proved the great advantages of grassed swales with vegetation over a curb and gutter system with concrete pipes. The runoff that went through a grassed swale, said Young, had 93 percent less nitrogen, 95 percent less sedi ment, and a four-fifths reduction in total volume, compared to the same amount going through a curb and gutter sys tem. However, Young observed that the perception among developers and the public is that neighborhoods with curb and gutter are more upscale than neighborhoods with the lowly open swale. We have some educating to do to shift this paradigm, Young said, since it should be the other way around. By MCSN Adam AustinIt ranges across a broad spectrum, from initiation rituals such as tacking on crows or field insignias, to off-color jokes about sexism and racism, all the way to outright abuse or assault. The offenders wear all types of collar devices; senior enlisted marching junior service members down a pier, forcing them to carry bags of human waste, or seamen taping their peers to chairs or forcing them down chutes. These types of actions and attitudes create physically and psychologically hostile climates that can lead to criminal acts, and victims may feel as though they have nowhere to turn for help. Its a prob lem the Navy is working hard to fix. Were moving our focus to what we call the left side of the continuum of harm, said Rear Adm. Sean Buck, the director of the Navy 21st Century Sailor Office. Were looking at some of the under lying behaviors, such as sexism, sexual Station stormwater manager joins TV panel discussionPhoto courtesy of WJCT(From left) Studio audience member USGBC Executive Director Sarah Boren expresses her viewpoint April 22 at the WJCT Public Television Studio. On the podium, James Orth, execu tive director of the St. Johns Riverkeeper, moderated the panel discussion after the broadcast of "Water Blues, Green Solutions." Panelists included Landscape Architect Eric Lycke, NAS Jax Stormwater Program Manager John Young, and Professional Engineer Doug Skiles. Photo by Jacob Sippel Navy announces changes to Equal Opportunity ProgramSee EOP, Page 16 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 Nestled in old Orange Park with ancient oaks and the St. Johns River as part of the landscape, Grace Episcopal Day School has been providing an environment conducive to learning, to socialization, to spiritual development and to realizing a childs full potential since 1950. We focus on the individual student and how to help every child succeed, said Head of School Sharon Chapman. We meet the child where he or she is, and our staff has the freedom to teach to the individual. That means, Chapman said, that the school is commit ted to curriculum choices that draw on the individuals strengths. Teachers choose curricula and materials to meet the needs of the student, she said. Because they have the freedom to make choices and work with children oneon-one, our teachers our entire staff enjoy being here. That creates a positive, loving, Christian atmosphere where students feel safe to be themselves and express their needs. The average student-to-teacher ratio at the PreK3 through 8th grade school is 10 to 1. Teachers consistently are able to give the 150 to 175 students the individualized attention they deserve. Between PreK4 and kindergarten, we have a unique program for students who may need some additional time and instruction to make the move into kindergarten, said Director of Admissions and Marketing Susan Williams. We call it Transition 5, or the gift of time and it focuses on further development of the skills needed for kindergar ten. It is the bridge between PreK 4 and kindergarten. We stress academics, Williams said. Our 8th grade graduates are accepted into the best programs in the area, such as the International Baccalaureate Program, Bolles, Episcopal School Jacksonville, Douglas Anderson School for the Performing Arts, and others. Ten of our students entered the Clay County Science Fair, and they won nine awards. Visual and performing arts programs are not sacrificed for academics at GEDS. We firmly believe the arts enhance academic perfor mance, Williams said. Our dual approach to academics and arts results in a well-rounded educational experience and ultimately in a well-rounded student. Spiritual development is an important aspect of the overall school experience for students. Although our foundation is Episcopalian, we have stu dents of all denominations, Chapman said. We are here to prepare children to live responsible lives in a communi ty grounded in the Christian faith. The schools approach encompasses a challenging academic program, visual and performing arts, Christian and character formation, foreign language instruction, technol ogy, physical education, an athletic program and opportu nities for service. Extended day care, a summer program and vacation Bible school are also available. GEDS was voted the Best Private School and Middle School by Jax4Kids in 2013. GEDS, where excellence is afford able, is accredited by the Florida Council of Independent Schools and the Florida Kindergarten Council, and is a member of the Board of Regents of the Diocese of Florida and the National Association of Episcopal Schools. GEDS is located at 156 Kingsley Ave. For more information, visit www.geds.net, or call the office at 904 269-3718 (Susan Williams ext. 14). Grace Episcopal Day School: Tradition, Character, Excellence, Service The school year is drawing to end, and an exciting summer is ahead at Grace Episcopal Day School. Register now for eight weeks of sensational fun, with extended day care also available for preschool students.

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Furry & friendlyThe American Red Cross "Ready Dog" welcomes patients at Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Red Cross volunteers provide support to military members and their families at its hospital and five branch health clinics. Services include linking military families during emergencies, connecting families with local resources (information and referral services), providing resiliency training (deployment services) and supporting wounded warriors. By MC1 (SW) Greg JohnsonNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsSearching for a new job can be stressful for anybody, but those on the hunt for a federal government position often have a number of questions unique to their own experience and many of those questions are related to the application process through USAJOBS. USAJOBS is afree, web-based job boardenabling federal job seekers access to thousands of job opportuni ties with hundreds of federal agencies and organizations. Prior to 2012, federal government job listings were spread out across a number of individual agencies. President Obama implemented an initiative for one, central location for applicants to go and thats when all agencies went to strictly using USAJOBS to announce their vacancies, said Aqueilla Grimmage-Smith, supervisor with the Navy Region Southeast Human Resources Department. The goal is to streamline the job-search process to make it faster and more convenient for people to access government listings. The first step to access USAJOBS list ings is to visit the website at http:// www.usajobs.gov and create a login. Applicants can then create and store up to five resumes per account, browse listings and apply to jobs for which they meet eligibility requirements. The steps for applying for specific listings are as follows: Locate the Announcement (Job search can be done by agency, occupa tion, grade, location, etc.) Click Apply Online Select the resume you wish to utilize Complete the eligibility questionnaire After uploading all required docu ments, submit your responses You will receive an email confirming your submissions According to Grimmage-Smith, cer tain listings on USAJOBS are restricted to applicants who meet specific require ments, such as wounded warriors, dis abled veterans, active-duty spouses and individuals with disabilities. These requirements, or appointment authori ties, are listed under the Who may apply section of the listing. Many of the eligibility restrictions are geared toward our veterans as a result of the great sacrifices they have made during their service, but there is even more to it than that, GrimmageSmith said. Its about getting the right people into the right positions. Military mem bers are trained and have the specific skillsets we need on many of our mili tary bases. While they have earned their appointment authority through their service, it is also a major advan tage to management to be able to hire employees with their experience. Veteran applicants typically fall under four categories: Provisional Appointment of 30 percent or more Compensable Disabled Veterans; Veterans Recruitment Appointment (VRA); Veterans Employment Opportunity Authority (VEOA); and the Wounded Warrior Project. Appointments for compensable disabled veterans and wounded war riors are similar in that candidates from both categories may be appoint ed non-competitively to positions for which they qualify. Applicants must provide a letter from the Veterans Administration (VA) or branch of ser vice documenting a compensable ser vice-connected disability of 30 percent or more, SF-15 Application for 10-Point Veterans Preference, and DD Form 214 Certificate of Release. Veterans may also qualify for appointment under the VEOA. Eligible applicants must have completed at least three years of active-duty service with a separation under honorable conditions. While many USAJOBS appointment authorities apply to veterans, other applicants may still meet requirements for non-competitive positions. Spouses of active duty service members with orders specifying a permanent change of station, spouses of 100-percent dis abled service members and spouses of a service member who was killed while performing active duty are also eligible. Eligibility verification requirements can be found under the Who may apply section of the listing. Spouses put their careers on hold to support our service members, so this is an avenue for them to seek employ ment, Grimmage-Smith said. One appointment not entirely restricted to veterans and spouses is Schedule A. This authority allows fed eral agencies to hire individuals with severe physical, psychiatric or intellec tual disabilities. Applicants do not need to have any military or previous fed eral government experience. Eligibility requirements include medical docu mentation substantiating the appli cants disability. It is important to inform every-one of the different types of appointment authorities because we are an equal employment opportunity employer, Grimmage-Smith said. We dont discriminate based on disabilities, and we need applicants to understand that its not just geared toward veterans and spouses. USAJOBS offers federal government employment opportunities for everyone.USAJOBS offers wide range of Federal employment opportunities Photo by Jacob Sippel Hospital awardCapt. Gayle Shaffer (left), Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville commanding officer, presents the 2014 Biomedical Equipment Technician of the Year Award to HM1 Chad Sinclair during an awards ceremony at the hospital on May 2. This award is given to recognize individual dedication, achievement and excellence in the field of health care technology management.Photo by Jacob Sippel JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 15

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harassment, bullying, discrimination, that if condoned or tolerated and not addressed, could embolden someone to move across the spectrum to the right side . which turns into a criminal act. Each year, Command Climate Specialists (CCS), formerly known as Equal Opportunity Advisors, meet at the Annual Military Equal Opportunity (MEO) Training Summit to discuss ways of improving command climate and reducing damaging behaviors and attitudes. This years MEO Training Summit was held in April in Norfolk, Va. Its an opportunity to bring together as many of the CCSs and CMEOs that are currently serving in their respective roles around the world, together in one forum to put out all the new updates, to train, and to allow them to build a net work amongst themselves, said Buck. Command Climate Specialists and Command-Managed Equal Opportunity (CMEO) program manag ers are experienced Sailors who have taken on the task of determining the climate of each command, providing training on equal opportunity issues, and ensuring that all formal complaints and command issues are effectively addressed. The main way that CCSs and CMEOS determine a commands cli mate is through annual surveys. The Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI) pro vides annual Organizational Climate Surveys (DEOCS) that allow all Sailors to provide feedback on command issues. A lot of times, Sailors in general do not want to go directly to an indi vidual to voice their problem, said Senior Chief Yeoman George Wooten, a Command Climate Specialist at Naval Service Training Command. Many command issues are brought to the sur face in command climate surveys and thats when the concerns are addressed. This years summit announced changes to the DEOCS and how they are processed. Sailors voices will be heard louder than ever before. Congress, through the National Defense Authorization Act, mandated enhanced commander accountabili ty on command climate assessments, said George Bradshaw, the director of Navy Sexual Harassment Prevention and Equal Opportunity Office. DEOCS have previously only reached the commander of that particular com mand. Now, said Bradshaw, the DEOCS will be sent to the regional commanders (ISICS), ensuring that each commander is held accountable for any complaints from his or her command. The results of the survey are also reported on the commanders fitness report. I think our [Sailors] will continue to see more engaged leadership, more informed leadership, and I think theyre going to continue to feel more and more comfortable that theyre working for a company, the U.S. Navy . where they feel as though theyre treated fairly and that theyre feeling like theyre treated with dignity and respect, said Buck. EOPFrom Page 14 Knight defeats Guza in singles tennisFrom MWR SportsThe 2014 Mens Open Singles Tennis Tournament was played April 28 at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts aboard NAS Jax. There were 14 men and three women. The men played in four groups of three or four players playing each other. If a player lost twice in the pool play, they were eliminated from the tourna ment. Nine players advanced to the singleelimination tournament. One player was eliminated after the first round of the single-elimination tournament and four players were elim inated after the second round leaving four players remaining in the tourna ment. Ensign Matt Guza (VP-30) and DoD civilian Marshall Knight (NAVFAC) won their semi-final match to face off for first and second place. Knight ended up defeating Guza 6-1 to win the 2014 Mens Open Singles Tennis Tournament. Intramural Golf Summer League forming Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. The league plays Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. Contact base gym for rules and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Meeting May 14Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective designated representative attend receive and required paperwork.Wallyball League Meeting May 21Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet along with rules and required paperwork.Badminton Singles League Meeting May 28Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet noon with rules and required paperwork. Bean Bag Toss Singles Tournament June 23Tournament takes place at 5 p.m. in the NAS Jax Fitness, Sports and Aquatics Center. The tournament is open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Call the Fitness Center at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil to sign up by June 13. July 21-25Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for 14. Tournament July 28-31Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for 14. For more information about any of the sports articles, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil .Photo courtesy of MWR(From left) Ensign Matt Guza (VP-30) took silver and DoD civilian Marshall Knight (NAVFAC) won the gold medal at the 2014 MWR Men's Open Singles Tennis Tournament on April 28. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014

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USS Iwo Jima (LPH2/LHD7) Reunion Aug. 27-31 at Crowne Plaza Hotel in Jacksonville. Call 757-723-0317 or http:// ussiwojimashipmates.cfns.net/ (MOAA) Northeast Florida Chapter meets every third Wednesday, 6 p.m. at NAS Jax branches. Contact Johnnie.walsh@ gmail.com or call 282-4650. (NNOA) meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. at Jacksonville Urban Paul Nix at 542-2518 or paul.nix@navy.mil. Association of Aviation Ordnancemen meets the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on Collins Road. For information, visit www.aao9.com. Orange Park Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 5968 and its Auxiliary located at 187 Aurora Blvd. meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. VFW composed of combat veterans and eligible service members from the Active, Guard or Reserve forces. Go to www.vfwpost5968. org or call 276-5968. at NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military retirees and dependents. Work four hours a day, one day per week. Call 542-5790 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays to volunteer. Ribbons & Roses a breast cancer support group at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. Call 542-7857 for more info. Navy Jacksonville Yacht Club is open to active duty, reserve and retired military, plus, active or retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email commodore@njyc. org. COMPASS Spouse-to-Spouse Military Mentoring Program. Helping others help themselves. Visit www.gocompass.org for more info. Navy Wives Clubs of America DID No. 300 meets the second Thursday of each Church, 2246 Blanding Blvd. Call 272-9489. Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 p.m., 390 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach. Call 246-6855. National Active and Retired Federal Employees Clay County Chapter 1414 meets at 1:30 p.m. on the second Tuesday National Active and Retired Federal Employees Westside Jacksonville Chapter 1984 meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Murray Hill United Methodist Church, (Fellowship Hall Building) at 4101 College Street. Call 7867083. Retired Enlisted Association meets the fourth Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Hall at 7673 Blanding Blvd. Call 772-8622. sion and washouts. With the 2014 Hurricane Season on our heels, the preparation for a CERT deployment was very fresh on our minds, said NAVFAC Southeast Disaster Preparedness Officer Lt. Cmdr. Ken Vargas. The recent plan ning made the deploy ment of the CERT to NAS Pensacola extremely smooth. What we nor mally practice in four-day simulations, we executed in six hours. These engineers will work directly with our Public Works Department (PWD) in Pensacola, said NAVFAC Southeast Operations Officer Capt. Lore Aguayo. They will per form assessments to help get the base back to nor mal operations as soon as possible. In conjunction with PWD staff, the team will prioritize facili ties/infrastructure on NAS Pensacola and at nearby Corry Station. The team will deploy Disaster Assessment Teams (DATs) to identify and quantify the dam age caused by the storm. They will then record the damage to a sufficient degree to allow for cost estimations to be gener ated for the repairs. The Public Works Department currently manages the facilities, water, power, and sani tation for the base, said Aguayo. The team from Jacksonville will be work ing hard to assist the PWD and the installation commander set priorities and will support them with whatever they need to get the job done. Sending engineers around the world is not new to NAVFAC. We always have a trained CERT ready to go at a moments notice, said Vargas. Vargas explained that the CERT has DATs which consist of structural, electrical, and mechani cal engineers, architects, roofing specialists, com munity planners and construction contract specialists that deploy to begin Rapid Damage Assessments. It is during this phase that debris is removed and basic func tions are restored such as opening roadways, sani tation, water, electricity and communications. Typically, these teams are deployed to assess hurricane or other storm damage to military installations such as was the case in August 2012 when teams deployed to Gulfport, Miss. and New Orleans, La. in response to Hurricane Isaac. They are also called upon to deploy for humanitarian efforts such as a tsuna mi or the earthquake in Haiti in 2010. CERTFrom Page 9 U.S. Navy photoThe west gate to NAS Pensacola was closed due to flooding from the storm starting April 29. CERT surveyed many areas of the base that were inaccessible, with water measured in excess of 3.5 feet in low-lying areas. Community Calendar By AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterHoneywell and NASA have teamed up to ignite middle school students interest in sci ence, technology, engineering and math (STEM) concepts and careers. Named after Newtons Second Law of Motion (force equals mass time acceleration), FMA Live! is a travelling hiphop concert that uses dance, funny videos, giant Velcro walls, and extreme wrestling to show students the relevance of science and engineering con cepts in everyday life. Oceanway Middle School was nominated by the Department of Defense in col laboration with commander, Navy Region Southeast, to be one of the schools throughout the U.S. to host the tour. There were several distin guished guests in attendance, including Congressman Andrew Crenshaw. Its a priv ileged to represent you and your families in our nations capital. Im looking forward to this event and thank you for inviting me here today, he said during the tours opening remarks. NAS Jax CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre also attended the performance. FMA Live! catered to the students by bringing the sci ence and math element to life. This program brought dance and music together and used them in a leaning capacity. You could tell the performance inspired the children and hopefully they will take the importance of math and sci ence with them as they go for ward, she said. Tyree Saunders (12) a 6th grader at Oceanway, was cho sen to participate in the Velcrowall demonstration that put Newtons First Law of Motion to test. I had a great time and learned a lot during the presen tation. I liked how interactive the show was and the music was really cool, he said. Photo by AE2 Samantha JonesU.S. Congressman Ander Crenshaw (second from right) meets with the FMA Live! cast and Oceanway Middle School Principal Alex Marx (far right) after the FMA Live! performance. Oceanway Middle School hosts science tour A P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft is towed toward NAS Jax Hangar 1000 on April 23, after maintainers calibrated the plane's compass at a special location north of the airfield.Photo by Clark Pierce Orion compass check JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 8, 2014 17

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