Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
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Newspaper
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English
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Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
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30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
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UF00028307:02088


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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MAY 1, 2014 I I D E WINGS OF GOLD VP-30 Salutes New NFOsPage 3 WHAT FUN! MWR Barracks Bash Pages 4 & 5 VISITING NURSE NMCRS ReunionPage 9Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com From HS-11 Public AffairsPilots and aircrew assigned to the HS-11 Dragonslayers at NAS Jacksonville flew a pair of HH-60H Seahawk helicopters to Camp Blanding Joint Training Center April 16 to support a joint training evolution with the 3rd Battalion, 20th Special Forces Group (Airborne). HS-11 is conducting joint training with special opera tions forces (SOF) to sharpen our helicopter rope suspension skills in preparation for our upcoming Helicopter Advanced Readiness Program evaluation before deployment, said HS-11 Training Officer Lt. Cmdr. Justin Cobb. The Dragonslayers landed on the camps parade field and shut down in order to conduct the air By Lt. Mark FlowerdewRAN 725 Squadron Public AffairsMembers of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron commemo rated ANZAC Day April 25 at Jacksonvilles Memorial Park in Riverside. ANZAC Day is the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War. In 1915, the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) formed part of the allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli pen insula in Turkey, explained Cmdr. David Frost, com manding officer of RAN 725 Squadron. The ANZAC force landed on Gallipoli on April 25 and met fierce resistance from the Ottoman Turkish defend ers. What had been planned as a bold stroke to knock Turkey out of the war became a stale mate and dragged on for eight months. Frost spoke of the signifi cance of ANZAC day, the sacrifices made by those initial ANZACs and how their actions instilled an identity in a young nation. He also spoke of the relationship that the RAN has with the USN and how that close relationship continues to be strengthened by the daily operations of those currently stationed in Jacksonville. The ceremony was also attended by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, officers of NAS Jacksonville-based aircraft squadrons, representatives from the Jacksonville Mayors office, and families and friends By Lt. Jen Wright and Cmdr. Peter ObenauerThe Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) and U. S. Navy Medical Research Unit No. 3 (NAMRU3) partnered with the Liberian Institute for Biomedical Research (LIBR) April 9 18 to present a custom-designed Public Health Pest and Vector Control Course to members of the Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL). The course is part of a larger initiative to assist in building and maintaining health capacity in Liberia. The U.S. Navy became engaged with the AFL in 2003 during Operation Sheltering Sky, when 44 of 225 Marines became infected with malaria while ashore. Six years later, an active duty service member succumbed to malaria while deployed with his Seabee Unit. Funded by the DoD Global Emerging Infection Systems, the course was designed to build skills within AFL Preventive Medicine Unit person nel leading to the reduction of malaria among AFL members. Twenty students participated in the interactive course that culminated in a joint residual insecticide spray of the AFL barracks. The goal of this mission was to train the trainers by providing an intense, two-week course on integrated pest management that will then be taught by the AFL preventative medicine team to other members of the AFL and Liberian community, said Joesph Diclaro, NAMRU-3 entomology department head. Most importantly, this training allows us to add sustainable value to the AFL that will not just have a onetime affect but that the preventative medicine officers can take ownership for themselves. This mission is an excellent example of the benefits of collaboration, said Capt. Eric Hoffman, NECE officer in charge. NECE, NAMRU-3, LIBR and OOL under AFRICOM all worked to make this happen by using our diverse expertise to come together and create an innovative new curriculum for use in the AFRICOM region. These unique training opportunities not only increase joint capability with our allies, but also benefit the readiness of our Navy instructors as well, said NECE Instructor Lt. Yans. This training provided us with new tools for understanding collaborative operations with our African counter parts, as well as a broader cultural awareness that is critical for successful OCONUS missions. As Operation Onward Liberia (OOL) winds down, it is critical that we enable the AFL to operate independently and give them the proper tools for success, explained HM1 Crystal Goeddel, an OOL mentor who participated in the class. The participants used the informa tion provided during the two-week course to successfully execute the treatment of over 200 barracks and will independently spray the remaining AFL barracks providing preventative medi cine support to more than 1,000 soldiers and their families. HS-11 drills with 20th Special Forces GroupPhoto courtesy of HS-11Lt. Trent Daiuto (right) delivers the air mission brief to a group of HS-11 pilots, aircrew and 3/20 SOF personnel April 16 at Camp Blanding Joint Training Center. Photo courtesy of NECENavy instructors congratulate the graduating class of the Public Health Pest and Vector Control Course, outside the Edward Binyah Kesselly Health Clinic in Liberia. NECE trains Liberians to kill deadly malarial mosquitoAustralians commemorate ANZAC Day Young Preston Watson was wide awake and all smiles at the dawn commemorative service for ANZAC Day in Jacksonville's Memorial Park.Photos by Cristine WatsonMembers of Royal Australian Navy 725 Squadron commemorate ANZAC Day at dawn on April 25 at the World War I statue near the St. Johns River at Jacksonville's Memorial Park in Riverside. See Page 10 See Page 10

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)5487789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley From StaffMay 1 1898 Battle of Manila Bay, Adm. Dewey defeats Spanish at Manila, Philippines. 1934 Lt. Akers demon strates blind landing system at College Park, Md. in OJ-2 air craft. 1945 Vice Adm. Barbey lands Australian troops on Tarakan Island, Borneo, sup ported by naval gunfire. 1951 USS Princeton aircraft attack Hwachon Dam using aerial torpedoes, only use of this weapon in Korean War. 1980 Eleven Navy ships begin operations assisting Coast Guard in rescuing Cuban refugees fleeing Cuba in over crowded boats. May 2 1975 U.S. Navy departs Vietnamese waters at end of evacuation. May 3 1861 USS Surprise cap tures Confederate privateer Savannah. 1898 Marines land at Cavite, Philippines and raise U.S. flag. 1949 First Navy firing of a high altitude Viking rocket at White Sands, N.M. May 4 1917 First Navy ships (Destroyer Division 8) arrive at Queenstown, Ireland, to pro vide convoy escorts against German U-boats. 1942 Battle of Coral Sea, the first carrier vs. carrier battle, begins. 1945 Japanese attempt to land on Okinawa is repulsed; kamikaze attacks damage six U.S. Navy ships. 1961 Pilot Cmdr. Malcolm Ross, USNR, and medi cal observer Lt. Cmdr. Victor Prather Jr., ascended in two hours to more than 110,00 feet in Strato-Lab 5, a 411foot hydrogen filled balloon launched from from the deck of USS Antietam. This was the highest altitude attained by man in an open gondola. Tragically, Prather drowned during the recovery. May 5 1944 USS Comfort is com missioned in San Pedro, Calif., the first ship to be manned jointly by Army and Navy per sonnel. 1948 VF-17A becomes first carrier qualified jet squadron (on board USS Saipan). 1961 Cmdr. Alan Shepard Jr. makes first U.S. manned space flight. Freedom 7 (Mercury 3) traveled 15 min utes and 28 seconds to reach the altitude of 116.5 statute miles with a velocity of 5,134 mph. Recovery was by HUS1 helicopter of HMR(L)-262 from USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39). 1980 USS Robert E. Peary rescues 440 Vietnamese refu gees from disabled craft south of Thailand. May 6 1909 Great White Fleet anchors in San Francisco. 1916 First ship-to-shore radio telephone voice con versation from USS New Hampshire off Virginia Capes to SECNAV Josephus Daniels in Washington, D.C. 1942 Capt. Milton Miles arrives in Chungking, China, to begin building an intelligence and guerilla training organization, Naval Group China. 1945 Naval landing force evacuates 500 Marshallese from Jaluit Atoll, Marshall Islands May 7 1779 Continental Navy sloop Providence captures British brig Diligent off Cape Charles. 1934 USS Constitution completes tour of principal U.S. ports. 1940 FDR orders Pacific Fleet to remain in Hawaiian waters indefinitely. 1942 Carrier aircraft sink Japanese carrier Shoho during Battle of Coral Sea. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorWhen I wrote about depression three months ago, I was still, for the most part, in the throes of it. Happily, with time and distance comes more perspective some good, some not so good. I was overcome by the amount and quality of responses I received to that column. It seems that everyone knows someone who has dealt with depression. And yet, the experience still feels foreign and shameful for those of us going through it. In early January, I went to see a counselor because I couldnt find a reason to get up in the morning. Even things that used to make me smile finishing a knit hat, going to my kids school functions, eating dinner as a family brought nothing. I felt hollowed out and flat. Worse, I couldnt stop crying, and I didnt know why. I reached out to the counselor in a moment of des peration. My boys started to recognize that something was wrong, and with my Navy husband gone so often, I am their constant. I could see the worry in their eyes. The counselor saw me as often as needed. I think I went every day that first week. I clung to my appointment times like little islands of hope. It was only later that I learned my insurance, TRICARE, doesnt cover that particular counselor. In a moment of despair, I had reached into the yellowpages grab bag and picked the wrong name. By then, however, it was too late. The counselor and I had already covered so much ground. She was helping me get better. How could I start over? TRICARE offered no solution, except for me to see someone else 90 miles away. This is a horrible flaw in the industrys view of mental health. When someone is having a heart attack, they dont call around first to see whom their insur ance will let them see. No, they get to the emergency room and sort it out later. Likewise, when someone is suffering from depres sion, they usually dont have the clarity to wade through jargon and complicated phone trees to figure out which counselor they can see. If were lucky, these people pick up the phone, call a counselor and say, I need to talk with someone. Also, mental health services are unique in that they require a deeply personal, working relation ship between the provider and patient. Just because TRICARE says I should see counselor X doesnt mean counselor X can help me. In the end, my husband wrote a big check for all those appointments I had while in crisis mode. And now Ive quit going to counseling partly because Im doing so much better but mostly because I never could figure it out with TRICARE, and paying 100 percent is too expensive. How many other people out there are in the same situation, and still suffering? Another thing I learned during this time was how peoples perceptions of me changed because of my condition. There were other people in the waiting room when I arrived at a large local hospital to get my medication. We were all from different socioeconomic starting-points, but we were at the same finish line with weary bodies, tear-stained faces and wearing yesterdays sweatpants. In March, I returned to the hospital for a followup appointment. I was feeling better now, thanks to anti-depressants, and it was like a curtain had lifted. I was out of my sweat pants, and I had curled my hair. I smiled at people. I was participating in the world again. I had come through to the other side, and I couldnt wait for my appointment to be done so I could get on with my life. As I drove away, I was excited about a new hat I would finish knitting for Owen that night. I felt joy. But I still think about the people I left behind in the waiting room, the ones whose curtains remain closed. Thats the humbling part about depression. Once youve been through it, you know that we are all one crisis away from being in the hospital waiting room. And were probably going to pay out of pocket for it later, too. U.S. Navy photos In 1941 at NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy and Marine Corps student pilots prepare for primary flight training in Ryan NR-1 Recruit aircraft. The two-seat, open cockpit monoplane was powered by a 160 hp Kinner 5-cylinder, air-cooled radial engine with a top speed of 131 mph. A flight of five U.S. Navy Consolidated P4Y-1Ps fly in formation. The VJ-62 "Tigers" photographic squadron was established in April 1952 at NAS Jacksonville. VJ-62 was redesignated heavy photographic squadron (VAP) 62 in July 1956 and disestablished Oct. 15, 1969. VAP-62 played an important intelligence role during the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis. This Week in Navy HistoryDepression doesnt play favorites, but insurers do From the Homefront From Staff The Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. This is an All-Service event featur ing a joint color guard, All-Service Missing Person Table, Navy Band Southeast with all the Service Songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event to be held Saturday, June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The keynote speaker is Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) Adm. Mark Ferguson. Numerous veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches of the military who served in prior conflicts, and those currently serving have been invited to attend. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War from the local area who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emo tional and patriotic, as well as providing an excellent opportunity to con nect with survivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50; O6 and above $65. Civilians and retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform for O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional; and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., dinner is served at 7 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales will end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Visit our website for more information www. mayportnlus.org. Tickets may be purchased from the following locations: NAVY LEAGUE MAYPORT Bob Price, 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 E-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net NAVY LEAGUE ST AUGUSTINE Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 E-mail: anuday00@aol.comFerguson is keynote speaker at Midway Dinner June 7

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By Jeanne CaseyNaval Hospital Jacksonville Deputy Public Affairs Officer Beginning May 2, a new, 24/7 Nurse Advice Line is available. Call 800-TRICARE (800-874-2273) and select option 1 for help with urgent care, day or night including holidays. A registered nurse (RN) assesses symptoms, can direct patients to care, and assist with self-care. Nurses can advise parents about childrens medical issues, as well. The Nurse Advice Line is staffed by nurses who give medical advice and customer service staff who verify TRICARE eligibility. If needed, staff can connect the patient with the military treatment facility for an urgent-care appointment, or make a referral to urgent care in the TRICARE network. The Nurse Advice Line works together with our Medical Home Port teams existing resourcesour local appoint ment lines and secure email to con nect you to the care you need, when you need it, said Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. Our care teams are wholly focused on meeting all of your health needs: preventive, routine and urgent. Appointment lines remain the same. At the hospital, call 904-542-4677 or 800-529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. At Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Jacksonville for active duty, call 904546-7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. The hospital is open extended hours in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics: Monday to Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Patients can securely email their doctor for non-urgent issues, with RelayHealth. Sign up at www.relay health.com or the command website. To see photos of the doctors at the hospital and branch clinics, go to the com mand website click on Medical Home Port and select a team. NH Jacksonville is an early adopter of the Nurse Advice Line, which is rolling out across the military health system in the U.S. this spring. Most TRICARE beneficiaries are eligible to use the Nurse Advice Line including TRICARE Prime, TRICARE Prime Remote, TRICARE Prime Remote for Active Duty Family Members, TRICARE Standard and Extra, TRICARE Young Adult, TRICARE For Life, TRICARE Reserve Select and TRICARE Retired Reserve. To find out more about NH Jacksonville, visit the command web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax VP-30 wings Navys new NFOsBy Lt. Brian MorganVP-30 Public Affairs OfficerOn April 11 in the Patrol Squadron (VP) 30 Auditorium, retired Capt. Richard Heimerle and VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to the fol lowing officers: Ensign Chad Fox, Ensign Lance LaFlamme, Lt. j.g. Laura Podgorski, Ensign Zachary Sipe and Ensign Nathan Woodason. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer (UMFO) syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted Wings of Gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT I syllabus, they will report to operational Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours at either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii; Whidbey Island, Wash.; or Jacksonville, Fla. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, Fla., where all aviation officers undergo a classroom syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation that includes aerodynamics, meteorology and prin ciples of navigation. After completing API, all stu dent NFOs report for primary training at Training Squadron (VT) 10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10, they transition from a classroom learning environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. New 24/7 Nurse Advice Line goes live tomorrowPhoto courtesy of VP-30 (From left) Retired Capt. Richard Heimerle, Ensign Chad Fox, Ensign Nathan Woodason, Lt. j.g. Laura Podgorski, Ensign Zachary Sipe, Ensign Lance LaFlamme and VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 By Morgan KehnertMWR MarketingHundreds of Sailors and Marines enjoyed a sunny, yet breezy after noon on April 24 at the Spring Barracks Bash presented by NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department and the Liberty Program. The free event featured picnic-style food, T-shirts and prizes that included gift packages from the Jacksonville Suns, Beats Studio headphones, area restaurant gift cards, an Xbox One and much more. This has always been a great event and it continues to get better every year! said Liberty Program Manager Tom Kubalewski. The barracks bash events are always high energy, unique and everyone always has a great time. As soon as the event is over, people already start asking when the next one will be. It is a pleasure for us to plan and implement an event like this that has such a high impact with our military personnel. Entertainment includ ed music by Chillula, a dance band based in St Augustine, Fla., that spe cializes in blending the styles of R&B, Funk, HipHop, Soul, Rock, Reggae and Jazz. Barracks bashers look ing for competitive entertainment could choose from the 26-foot climb ing wall, volleyball, the inflatable slam dunk hoop, gladiator jousting, bag toss, human bowling, the splash blast and the test-of-strength machine high striker. Volunteer and attendee YNSN Arnick Alinaya of NAS Jax said, The bash was a great way to let off some steam this week. The raffle was a nice surprise and free food is the best type of food! I was just glad I could partake and volunteer in this event. MWR thanks every one who participated in or volunteered for this event. Sponsors University of Phoenix, USAA, the Jacksonville Suns and VyStar Credit Union were generous in their support of the Spring Barracks Bash.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. NAS Jax Spring Barracks Bash is a hit The volleyball court was very popular with Sailors at the MWR Spring Barracks Bash held near the outdoor pavilion by the barracks. (From right) Tom Kubalewski, MWR Liberty Center manager, presents the Beats Studio headphones to VP-30's AWO3 Joseph Westberry. When CS2 Rodteashia Washington of Naval Hospital Jax heard her name called as the winner of the Xbox One, she sprinted to the DJ Booth where MWR Liberty Center Manager Tom Kubalewski presented her with the highly sought after prize. (Left) HM3 Lyndon Acosta of Naval Hospital Jax tests his strength by hitting the mallet against the high striker game. He successfully rang the bell at the top of the tower. (Right) Referee Lance Cpl. Luis Diaz (center) explains the rules of the ring to boxing competitors HM Justina Dubrey and CSSN Jonathan Beck, both of Naval Hospital Jax. MWR Aquatics Director Justin Jonsson served as the resident grill master at the Barracks Bash cookout. The menu included hot dogs, burgers, baked beans, coleslaw and a variety of cold drinks. Bullseye! The new dunk tank game "Splash Blast" proved to be very popular with Sailors, especially AEAN Sean Webber of CNATTU Jax, who thoroughly enjoyed being the guy who got splashed.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 5 As Sailors enjoyed the cookout, Chillula, a St. Augustine dance band, took to the stage for an entertaining, high-energy set. MWR Liberty Center volunteer Momoyo Harris mans the raffle table and helps to distribute the free t-shirts given to the first 300 sailors that attended the MWR Spring Barracks Bash. AWFAN Mykal Sykes and AWO3 Jessica Myrick of VP-30 enjoy a game of bag toss at the April 24 MWR Spring Barracks Bash. AWF3 Donny Smith of VP-30 sets up to roll a strike as his shipmate, AWFAN Jesus Hernandez, acts as a human bowling ball. This gladiator joust was a full-fledged battle between PRAA Cedrick Washington of FRCSE and AME Darrious Francis of VP-45. ATAN Colin Hoy of NAS Jax Air Operations catches major air as he goes in for the inflatable slam-dunk hoop! AWO3 Kelly Hein of VP-30 climbs her way to the top of the 26-foot rock climbing wall.

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Future NAVAIR leaders hone managerial acumenBy Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsNaval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) employees convened at Naval Air Station Jacksonville April 7-11 to participate in the NAVAIR Leadership Development Program (NLDP) capstone class, culminating a lengthy journey designed to enhance their leadership skills. The class is the final requirement for NLDP participants and focuses on business ethics, basic analyti cal techniques for decision-making, communication skills, productivity improvement and NAVAIRs longrange strategy. NLDP brings together a unique blend of leader ship experiential learning opportunities interwoven with continuous process improvement fundamentals to better prepare participants for success in their future leadership roles, explained Stephanie Gleason, NLDP program manager with the NAVAIR Total Force Strategy and Management Department. The program is now deployed organically and aims to develop the next generation of NAVAIR leaders to work toward a shared vision. Instructors from the Naval Post Graduate School (NPS) Defense Resource Management Institute (DRMI) delivered the capstone course material. NPS DRMI Professor Kent Wall and NPS DRMI Assistant Professors Cameron MacKenzie and Jay Simon dis cussed the analytical approach to decision-making, structuring decision problems, ways to identify objectives, cost effectiveness and the uncertainty and risks of making decisions. The 15 participants also visited Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), a military aviation depot, for a familiarization tour of the F/A-18 Hornet and P-3C Orion aircraft production lines and Industrial Manufacturing division. Another tour on board USS Simpson (FFG 56) at Naval Station Mayport, helped the group learn about shipboard life that Sailors experience while on sea duty. Many of our NLDP participants have never visited NAS Jax or FRCSE, said Gleason. So by touring the military depot, it exposes them to command business and site operations. Additionally it connects them to the fleet and the work we do to support our Sailors and Marines. FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna who discussed his three Widely Important Goals team, schedule and cost, also briefed NLDP participants. NLDP events are vital to our workforce develop ment, said Kemna. It is a great opportunity to broaden their knowledge of the organization and establish a valuable network between peers and leaders across the enterprise. Guest speaker Dr. Richard Pimentel, internation ally renowned speaker, author and disability activist, joined the group during a working lunch April 8 to discuss leadership and diversity. I have three sources for wisdom Aristotle, Henry Thoreau and Steven King, said Pimentel. Aristotle stated that, he, who cannot be a good follower, cannot be a good leader. Perhaps one of the hardest things a leader will ever do is to ask someone to make a sacrifice for a goal or vision. Leadership is about having a vision, but people need to know how it relates to them. Sometimes you learn more from the poor leaders, Pimentel told the group. Seek knowledge and wisdom so that you can be a competent leader. A company president once asked me to sum up what a leader is in one sentence. What I came up with is this. Here is what leaders know, people are more important than stuff! Photos by Kaylee LaRocqueJay Simon, assistant professor of the Defense Resources Management Institute, Naval Postgraduate School, discusses managerial structuring decision problems and ways to identify objectives during the Naval Air Systems Command Leadership Development Program at NAS Jacksonville on April 8. Lt. Cmdr. Joshua Filbey, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) F/A-18 Hornet production officer and test pilot explains the production schedule of the FRCSE F/A-18 line to Naval Air Systems Command Leadership Development Program participants on April 7. During a tour at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, participants of the Naval Air Systems Command Leadership Development Program examine an F/A-18 Hornet separated in two halves to replace the center barrel. Lt. Cmdr. Rick Foster, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) P-3 product officer, discusses the P-3C Orion overhaul capabilities at FRCSE with Naval Air Systems Command Leadership Development Program participants during a tour of FRCSE. Lt. Cmdr. Rick Foster, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) P-3 product officer, discusses the P-3C Orion overhaul capabilities at FRCSE with Naval Air Systems Command Leadership Development Program participants. Terry Cox Sr., Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) machine shop supervisor, explains how FRCSE artisans make F/A-18 aeronautical parts to Naval Air Systems Command Leadership Development Program participants Phillip Rooney (center) and Charles Barrow (right). Dr. Richard Pimentel, internationally renowned speaker, author and disability activist, talks about some of the challenges he's faced during his various careers and his perception of various leadership qualities with Naval Air Systems Command Leadership Development Program participants (from left) Cmdr. Richard Braunbeck, Hely Gonzalez and Judy Overhauser-Duett at NAS Jacksonville on April 8.See NLDP, Page 7 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014

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By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public AffairsNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast awarded a $5.4 million contract April 17 to Industrial Power Systems Inc., of Maumee, Ohio, to replace underground piping at the Navy Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) in Jacksonville. There is a need to replace an exist ing single wall underground trans fer pipeline, built in 1952, said FLC Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Duke Heinz. The work includes the construction of new above-ground fuel piping, new PIG (pipeline inspection gauges) launching and receiving stations, and a new meter proving station with an option for the removal of the existing underground piping. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) requires that all underground fuel pip ing be brought above ground or be placed into secondary containment by the year 2010. The FDEP approved allowing the piping for this location to remain in operation beyond 2010 provided this project was submitted, said Heinz. New construction is the only feasible alternative to meet FDEP requirements to bring underground fuel piping above ground. The Defense Fuel Supply Point (DFSP) Jacksonville is a primary storage point for JP-5 in the Southeast. Reliable pip ing transfer and environmentally-com pliant pipelines is key. DFSP Jacksonville has been called upon to re-supply locations including Patrick Air Force Base (AFB), MacDill AFB, DFSP Tampa, Homestead Air Reserve Base, NAS Key West, and NAS Pensacola. The project is expected to be com plete by February 2016. NAVFAC Southeast awards $5 million contract for fuel piping workAccording to NLDP participants Kristen Pedersen and Cmdr. Rick Braunbeck, the capstone course proved beneficial in closing out the programs journey. The capstone class for NLDP was a wonderful culmination of the NLDP experience, said Pedersen, the Triton affordability lead at NAVAIR. The experts we met in and out of the classroom were inspiring, both for what they have done and for the tools they have shared to foster our growth. I am also fortunate to have been able to attend the class at NAS Jax that included a tour of the production hangars and manufacturing spaces at FRCSE. As one of the few active duty par ticipants in NLDP, the program has provided me with deeper insight into how NAVAIR functions at all levels, added Braunbeck, NAVAIR maintenance offi cer and deputy aircraft controlling custodian officer. The time we spent touring FRCSE and NAS Jax was very beneficial. I appreciate the time and attention provided to our class at FRCSE from the men and women on the floor to the commanding officer. I work daily with Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers in Patuxent River, Md., so I had some pride in having my classmates see the impressive activities the artisans per form at FRCSE. This is an outstanding course to benefit our future leaders, said Gleason. It is critical that we continue to invest in our people and prepare them for suc cess in a dynamic and challenging program. NLDPFrom Page 6 Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesEducation mattersNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (right) delievers welcoming remarks at the 2014 Florida Advisory Council for Military Education (FL-ACME) Educational Symposium for Education Service Officers (ESO) and Military Educational Advisors on April 22. This three-day symposium aims to help active duty military and veterans build a better future through education. Im very proud of the training and education the Navy provides to our Sailors, and thankful to the ESOs who enable them to change their lives through the guidance and educational counseling they provide, Undersander said. As the Navy achieves its retention goals, higher education and the right credentials become even more important. The more we can motivate Sailors to continue to pursue college degrees, the better off our 21st century Navy will be. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 7

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Newly certified victim advocates recognizedBy MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsNearly 50 military and civilian vic tim advocates joined leaders from various tenant commands gathered at NAS Jax Mulberry Cove Marina Pavilion for a Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) victim advocate appreciation cookout. Sponsored by NAS Jax SAPR Program, the event was held to show apprecia tion to personnel who volunteered their time to learn serve as victim advocates and support victims of sexual assault. Sexual Assault Prevention Coordinator Tina Vaughn from Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) welcomed the guests. As part of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, we wanted to bring unit and civilian victim advocates together to say thank you for stepping up, explained Vaughn. Vaughn then introduced NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. I want to thank you all for your time, effort and dedication in completing the substantial amount of training required to become a certified victim advocate. Over the last year, the Navy has increased focus on this issue of sexual assault, as well as increas ing the training for victim advocates. I appreciate your devotion and loyalty to this program. Your role as a victim advocate will answer an important need in the military. Undersander also acknowledge that solutions to prevent this crime will most likely come from the younger peer groups, and encouraged the victim advocates to funnel ideas to him so he could represent them to the executive steering committee. Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer share her toughts about the importance of the event. We play an important role in helping our victims from sexual assault crimes. We now have the capability at our hospital to do safe examinations, as well as at our branch clinics. We also maintain a memorandum of understanding with hospitals out in town, just in case someone doesnt feel comfortable coming to base. To me, you are all heroes. As a commanding officer, I am comforted because I know that when victims come to you, they are in the very best hands possible. I know you all will do every thing you can to help the victims to get the care and support they need. I know you all dedicated a tremendous amount of time and energy to complete this course, she said. At the award ceremony, Undersander and Shaffer presented a Letter of Appreciation to each victim advocate. HM2(AW) Carla Nicholas of Naval Hospital Jacksonville said, It feels good to be recognized for the completion of this course. I decided to become a vic tim advocate because I want to help people. Sexual assault is present in the military and so many people feel like they dont have a voice. So my part as an advocate is to help victims of this crime realize their different options and to give them that voice to speak up. Individuals responsible for sexual crimes need to be brought to justice. According to Vaughn, the certified victim advocates undergo constant training to maintain their certification that must be refreshed every two years. SAPR Support Civilian Victim Advocate LaTresa Henderson from FFSC said, This gathering is a great opportunity for advocates to network with each other outside of the training environment and become familiar with other advocates who may assist them in the future with resources or their experiences while working as vic tim advocates. For more information on victim advocacy, contact Tina Vaughn at 904-5424717. Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander thanks victim advocates for their time and support during an appreciation cookout held on April 24 at Mulberry Cove Marina Pavilion. Sexual Assault Response Coordinator Tina Vaughn from NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center congratulates the newly certified victim advocates. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Underander (left) and Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer (right) present a Letter of Appreciation to AO2 Devanae Bradley from NAS Jax for the completion of a victim advocate certification. Three $1,000 college scholarship opportunities announced From the NAS Jax All Officers Spouses ClubThe NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club is sponsoring three $1,000 scholarships based on scholarship merit and community service. Eligibility: U.S. Navy active/reserve duty and active/reserve duty dependents who are cur rently in their senior year of high school or a high school graduate, attached to NAS Jacksonville and planning to attend an accredited college in the fall of 2014 or spring of 2015. Scholarships are to be used only for tuition and tuition-based fees charged by the college and will be sent to the college. Three scholarships will be awarded; each in the amount $1,000 one active duty, one offi cer dependent, and one enlisted dependent. Criteria: Recipients will See SCHOLARSHIP, Page 13 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014

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By Barbie SmolinskiSpecial ContributorShortly after returning home from giving birth to her first child, a navy spouse received a phone call from a Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMRCS) visiting nurse, inquiring if she would like a home visit. Ather accepted the offer. Sandra Jackson, a visiting nurse for NMRCS Jacksonville, called Ather as a way to maxi mize her time. I saw on my list of patients that two new mothers lived in the same neighborhood. I was in the area, so I called Kendra to see if she would like a home visit for her new child. Jacksons call came at just the right time. I was having trouble nursing and thought it might be great to get some help, said Ather. With baby scale and stetho scope in tow, Jackson knocked on the door of Athers home in Middleburg. Jackson never expected to see a familiar face on the other side. When Ather and her mother, Catherine Carter, came to the door to greet Jackson she and Carter stood in shock as they recognized each other. We looked at each other like, This cant be. Is it really her? said Jackson. They had met 20 years ago when Jackson had been the visiting nurse for Carter when Ather was born. Carter and Jackson embraced, while Ather stood by perplexed. I wondered how does my mom know this lady? said Ather. I was really surprised to find out Sandra had been my visiting nurse, too. Jackson made several home visits to Carter (a retired first class petty officer dental tech nician) in 1993 and meeting again so many years later felt like a family reunion. To my knowledge, this has never happened before in all of the Society, and Im glad it happened to me, Jackson said of being a visiting nurse for three generations of the same family. Jackson has been an NMCRS visiting nurse for the past 27 years and is currently the lon gest-serving visiting nurse in the Society. I wanted to find a nursing job that allowed me to spend more time with my children, said Jackson. I saw an advertisement in the paper for a part-time posi tion as a visiting nurse with Navy Marine Corps Relief Society. I applied and was hired February 24, 1987. In 1922, NMCRS started the visiting nurse program because of the lack of medical care for dependents in naval hospitals. The vision of the visiting nurse program has shifted since those early days of pro viding in-home medical care to providing health educa tion for new moms and baby wellness through personalized home visits. I base my visits on the needs of the mother. I assist them with any questions or issues they may have. I check their vitals, and all of my find ings are reported back to the hospital. Jackson loves and takes pride in her work, and is thankful for the bonds she has created in this position through the years. My patients are like family, said Jackson. This has truly been the highlight of being a visit ing nurse. I will never forget this experience, these great ladies and their little man who brought us all back together. From Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsMost importantly, how will having a child affect your naval career? The policy instruction on pregnancy and parenthood (OPNAVINST 6000.1C) in the Navy was released in 2007. While the Navy Office of Womens Policy is working on an updated version due out next year, now is good time to review some of the policies and responsibilities that affect you and your family. Notify your command So youve just found out that youre having a baby! Sailors are required to inform their commands of their preg nancy and parenthood status as soon as possible, but no later than two weeks from the time the pregnancy is con firmed by a medical professional. This ensures the safety of the servicewoman and child. OPNAVINST 6000.1C lists the forms that service members are required to submit to their administrative office, and provides a samples of the pregnancy notification to the Commanding Officer (CO) or Officer in Charge (OIC) and pregnancy counsel ing form. Family Care Plan Single parents and dual military couples with eligible children are responsible for completing a family care plan (in accordance with OPNAVINST 1740.40, Navy Family Care Policy). This plan is submitted to their respective com mands to ensure that their child or children will be cared for during the service members absence. The plan identi fies a caregiver and potential logistical relocation plans and financial arrangements. Commanding Officers Responsibility COs are responsible for creating an environment where Sailors are treated NMCRS Visiting Nurse helps next generationPhoto by Barbie Smolinski (From left) NMCRS Visiting Nurse Sandra Jackson, Kendra Ather holding her infant son, and Catherine Carter.Parenthood and pregnancy in the Navy: 6 things Sailors should knowSee PREGNANCY, Page 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 9 Whatever your age, history of injuries or experience with yoga, your body and mind will benefit from the yoga classes offered at Prana Yoga Studio, now open in Orange Park. Prana Yoga will offer a hot yoga mixture of 60and 90-minute classes with 26 posi tions originally developed by Bikram Choudhury, said Sergio Gonzales, studio owner and instructor. The heated room 105 degrees Farenheit and a humidity index of 40 -allows for a deeper stretch and movement among the ligaments, joints and muscles and facilitates the release of toxins. While heat adds to the chal lenge, the major focus is being still and breathing, Gonzales said. Postures in hot yoga focus on decompressing the spine, he said. Its said that a healthy spine means a healthy life and a healthy life means a happy life. Hot yoga increases blood flow and flexibility and a low-impact cardiovascular workout equiva lent to running a mile. Over time, hot yoga is known to improve metabolism, aid in weight loss, improve nervous system function and flexibility. Hot yoga tones the muscles, builds the immune sys tem and improves blood circulation and the overall wellbeing of the mind and body. In January 2013, Gonzales retired as an officer with 23 years in the U.S. Army. He complet ed rigorous training courses and took part in operations in Iraq that took its toll on his body. He eventually had cervical neck surgery and surgery on both feet. Fortunately, hot yoga provided healing effects for the mind and body before and after the surgeries. Gonzales graduated from the Bikram yoga teacher training course in the fall of 2012 and has been teaching since January of 2013 at area yoga studios. He is currently completing a Hatha teachers training 200-hour course. Instructor Humberto Castillero has been on a spiritual search over the past 25 years that would allow him to connect mind, body and spirit to eventually attain enlightenment. He will be offer ing Kundalini yoga and med itation classes to be scheduled monthly and will increase fre quency based on the needs of the community. Kundalini yoga focuses on opening energy cen ters, or chakras, by regular practice of meditation, pranayama, chanting mantra and yoga asana. My ultimate goal is to conquer all fears, self-doubts and judgment, and to live a free and fulfilling life while connecting to the universal mind, Castillero said. I live by the motto, Today I am alive, today I live my life. Castillero is scheduled to obtain his 500-hour teacher cer tification which includes 200 hours of Hatha yoga, 200 hours of Kundalini yoga and 100 hours of Ayurveda. He will become a 500-hour registered yoga teacher in June. Located in the Toys R Us center at 1980 Wells Road, Orange Park, Prana Yoga Studio is offering a free day of yoga during its grand opening May 3. Visit on Facebook (Prana-Yoga-OrangePark) or online at pranayogaorangepark.com for a schedule of classes, pricing and complete details about the programs offered and the instructors. Take the first step to better health today. Free day of yoga at Prana Yoga Studio May 3 Sergio Gonzales Humberto Castillero

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mission brief with the SOF. Cobb said, Since the SOF personnel are descending freely without the aid of a harness, safety and training are paramount in this exercise. The training at Camp Blanding allowed the Navy and Army person nel to practice basic fast rope and rap pelling operations, as well as more advanced assaults at Camp Blandings Military Operation in Urban Terrain (MOUT) facility, for both day and night operations. The MOUT complex allowed aircrew and fast ropers to practice hovering or landing on the roof of a building. Located near Starke, Camp Blanding is the primary military reserva tion and training base for the Florida National Guard, including the 3-20th Special Forces Group one of two Army National Guard groups assigned to the U.S. Army Special Forces. HS-11From Page 1of the RAN members stationed in Jacksonville. At the end of the Second World War, ANZAC Day was expanded to include Australians who died in that war. In subsequent years, ANZAC Day has been further broadened to include Australians killed in all the military operations in which Australia has been involved. For members of 725 Squadron, it was a solemn time to reflect on the sacrifices of all those that have served and a time to remember those that have paid the ultimate sacrifice whilst serving their country. It was also a time to think about those who are currently serving in areas of conflict both ashore and at sea. Speaking on behalf of his squadron in remembrance of those who bravely served, Frost said, We dont remember ANZAC day as a victory or for some glorification of the horrors of war. We remember ANZAC day as a testament to the human spirit possessed in those who have fought and died. Wreaths were placed at the base of the World War statue. A bugler played the Last Post, followed by a minute of silence. The ceremony was concluded with the playing of the national anthems of the United States and Australia. On completion of the service, members of 725 were joined by their families and USN counterparts for a special breakfast aboard NAS Jacksonville. with dignity and respect. As such, COs must ensure that pregnant servicewomen are not subjected to harassment, imposition of personal opinions, or infringement of legal rights. Once pregnancy is confirmed, COs will ensure servicewomen receive counseling on military entitlements to obstetrical care, policy on worldwide assignability, and have been afforded the opportu nity to be counseled by a Health Care Professional (HCP). Leave for the Birth of a Child COs will make an effort to allow new parents to take 10 days of Parental Leave (formerly known as Paternity Leave) in conjunction with their wife giving birth to their child. Its free leave and does not count against your regular leave balance. New mothers are granted a minimum of 42 days of convalescent leave (CONLV) upon leaving the hos pital after the birth of their child. If the servicewomen experienced any medi cal complications, the mothers doctor can recommend an extension of CONLV beyond the 42 days, notifying the mothers command of the extension. Getting back in shape for the PFA Postpartum servicewomen are required to gradually resume an indi vidual exercise program under the guidance of their HCP. Postpartum servicewomen are exempt from par ticipating in a physical fitness assess ment (PFA) for six months following convalescent leave and upon return to full duty status by an HCP. At the con clusion of this six month period, ser vicewomen are required to participate in the next PFA cycle, as outlined the Command Fitness Leader Operating Guide: Managing PFA Records for Pregnant/Postpartum Servicewomen. Adopting a Child COs can authorize up to 21 days of non-chargeable leave to any service member adopting a child in a qualify ing adoption, to allow the service member to bond with their adopted child and work out family arrangements and schedules. Adoption leave may be used in conjunction with regular leave. Additionally, a service member who adopts a child is authorized four months operational deferment. PREGNANCYFrom Page 9 HS-11 Training Officer Lt. Cmdr. Justin Cobb and Lt. Sam Ansel conduct a tactical approach to a 20-foot hover in an HH-60H Seahawk helicopter with AWR1 Daniel Mills, AWR2 Alex Reeder and AWR3 Elijah Perry who assisted special forces to egress via fast rope. As dusk falls, HS-11 pilots Lt. Ben Smith and Lt. Trent Daluto hold a 20-foot hover with AWR1 Thomas Nutzmann, AWR2 Clayton Miller and AWR3 Jason Odle while inserting special operations personnel via fast rope. Photos courtesy of HS-11As the "Dragonslayers" HH-60H Seahawk helicop ter hovers at 20 feet, two Army special operations soldiers toss out the line specially designed for fast roping. Army special forces per sonnel at Camp Blanding inspect the rigging of a fast rope that they will soon depend on to descend from a 20-foot hover above the ground. Soldiers from the 3/20 Special Forces Group at Camp Blanding practice their fast rope insertion from an HH-60H Seahawk helicopter assigned to the HS-11 "Dragonslayers." Photo by Cristine WatsonRoyal Australian Navy 725 Squadron members gathered in front of the World War I statue at Jacksonvilles Memorial Park in Riverside after their dawn remembrance service on April 25 for ANZAC Day. RANFrom Page 1 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014

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Train track extractionBy Clark PierceEditorHundreds of feet of a military rail road spur, dating back to the 1940s, was recently removed from the NAS Jax apron due to aircraft safety concerns. The train rails, running from the NAS Jax fuel farm to Hangar 1000, represented a puncture threat to Navy aircraft and vehicle tires. Corrosion was causing pieces of track to elevate above the concrete apron. Basically, we pulled up the old rail, cleaned the space, and filled it with fresh concrete, said Airfield Facilities Deputy Manager Winston Rogers. When we pulled up enough track to fill a truckload, we notified the base Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) department. They had a recycling agreement with a local scrap yard and turned the abandoned rails into a modest money maker for MWR. NAS Jax Occupational Safety Manager Ron Williamson has writ ten extensively about the history of the base. The Navy had its own rail system that primarily served supply facilities around NAS Jax. One of the last aban doned rail spurs on base runs from the aircraft wash rack at Hangar 113 to a terminus near the NAS Jax Boathouse. He added, Many old timers will remember the railroad crossings at the Yorktown and Birmingham gates, as well as the tracks that paralleled Allegheny Road. This corroded World War II-era rail spur embedded in the airport apron is being removed to assure aircraft and vehicle safety.Photos by Clark PierceIn this archival photo, a Navy switch engine crosses Yorktown Avenue near the main gate. It is a GM 44-ton dieselelectric military version locomotive built during World War II with a drop cab. The former USN 65-000345 switcher assigned to NAS Jax was sold to the Florida Gulf Coast Railroad Museum in Parrish, Fla. Photo courtesy of Ron WilliamsonAfter the rails are removed, a paving crew prepares the void for new concrete.Weve been workin on the railroad . .Near NAS Jax Hangar 1000, workers pour and finish concrete that fills the void left by the removal of a train spur. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 11

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FRCSE artisans train the fleetBy Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsArtisans at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) are training service members and Department of Defense civilians on corrosion control and painting techniques to better sustain aircraft in the fleet. The Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Aircraft/Ground Support Equipment (GSE) Corrosion Control Course is a weeklong class required for mili tary members and civilians who maintain aircraft and GSE. Students learn the fundamentals of detecting cor rosion on aircraft or GSE, how to remove corrosion by grinding and sanding the areas, and how to use the appropriate protective coatings, sealers, primers and paints based on various types of metals. This course is a 40-hour class consisting of class room and laboratory instruction, explained FRCSE Aircraft Corrosion and Paint Instructor Eric Crook, one of three facilitators at the military depot. We offer about 40 corrosion classes each year with students coming here from all over the world. We also offer 15 classes at various bases to provide instruction as requested through NAVAIR. This accommodates large numbers of students, saves money and meets the overall training demand. This is a very informative class, stated AD1(AW/ SW) Thomas Moranz of HSM-40. I work on helicopters and am learning the proper way to look for corrosion and do repair work on the fuselage of the aircraft. I dont normally do this at my squadron, but I need to learn how to so I can ensure my petty officers are doing it correctly. This [course] is required to become quality assurance certified. After completing the corrosion course and earning a certification, students can continue the learning process by attending the NAVAIR Paint, Touch-up and Markings Course. This 10-day course teaches students the safety guidelines required when using toxic and flammable chemicals, and basic applications including layout of insignia and lettering, masking tape skills, stenciling, priming and painting. According to David Baird, an aircraft corrosion and paint instructor at FRCSE for the past 13 years and retired Navy chief petty officer, the corrosion course is a prerequisite for the painting course. The students have to know how to safely and cor rectly handle corrosion issues before they tackle priming, masking and painting the aircraft or GSE, he said. Once they are certified in corrosion control, they can attend the paint class. We offer 22 classes each year. Students spend time in the classroom learning safety requirements, use of the proper tools and the specifics of insignia measurements, coloring and the exact placement of insignia on the aircraft or equip ment. The instructors task students with masking letters and insignias on sheet metal after practicing their stenciling skills on paper. Once they have completed this assignment, the students will prime and paint the sheet metal. Every insignia or letter on an aircraft is made by Photos by Kaylee LaRocqueDavid Baird (right) a paint training leader at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) explains how to configure stencil insignia and letters on military aircraft to students AM2(AW) Nicholas McCully of VP-10 (center) and AMAN Matthew Cornell of VP-30 on April 1 during a lettering and painting class at FRCSE. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Aircraft Corrosion and Paint Instructor Eric Crook (right) shows AWF1(NAC/AW) David McKinney of VP-30 how to apply primer to cover corrosion areas on a piece of sheet metal before painting during a corrosion class at FRCSE on April 2. AE2(AW/SW) Stephen Peterson of HSM-40 applies a layer of Alodine to seal a corro sion area on a piece of sheet metal during a corrosion class at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. AMAN Addie Schaefer of VP-30 practices her masking skills during an exercise to create words containing 18 letters using "military font" during a lettering and painting class at Fleet Readiness Center. AM2(AW) Nicholas McCully of VP-10 practices creating aircraft stencils during a lettering and painting class at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. AM2(AW) Justin Petersik of VP-30 carefully measures letters as he masks a board to be painted with Navy aircraft words and insignia at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast during a lettering and painting class. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Aircraft Corrosion and Paint Instructor Eric Crook (right) demonstrates how to use a grinder to remove corrosion from sheet metal to students, AM3 Franklin Randall of VP-30 (center) and AE2(AW) Christian Helstrom of HSM-72. (From left) AE2(AW/SW) Stephen Peterson of HSM40, AM3 James Kaczmarowski of HSM-72, AE2(AW) Christian Helstrom of HSM-72 and AM3 Franklin Randall of VP-30 clean off their pieces of sheet metal after revealing corrosive areas using a chemical compound. See FRCSE, Page 13 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 13 Intramural Golf Summer League Meeting May 7 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at 11:30 a.m. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Meeting May 14 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at noon at along with rules and required paperwork. Wallyball League Meeting May 21 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork. Badminton Singles League Meeting May 28 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork. Bean Bag Toss Singles Tournament June 23 Tournament takes place at 5 p.m. in the NAS Jax Fitness, Sports and Aquatics Center. The tournament is open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Call the Fitness Center at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil to sign up by June 13. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for Sign up by July 14. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for Sign up by July 14. For more information about any of the sports articles, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com /nasjaxmwr. StandingsAs of April 25SoccerTeam Wins Losses FRCSE 4 0 HITRON 3 0 TPU/PCF 3 0 HS-11 3 1 VP-30 Students 3 1 BHC Jax 2 1 HSM-72 2 2 VP-26 2 2 VP-45 2 2 NAVFAC 1 3 NAVHOSP 0 1 VP-62 0 3 VR-62 0 3 FRCSE F-18 0 4Teams Wins Losses FACSFAC 1 0 NAVFAC Blue 1 0 NAVFAC Gold 1 0 NCTS Gold 1 0 VP-62 1 0 VR-62 1 0 HS-11 Slayers 0 1 Navy Band 0 1 NCTS Blue 0 1 TPU/PCF 0 1 VP-45 0 1 VP-5 0 1Intramural Spring Softball Teams Wins Losses NAVHOSP 5 0 VP-26 4 0 VP-45 Sluggers 4 0 VP-30 4 1 FRCSE Rabid Possums 4 1 CRS-10 3 2 AIR OPS 3 3 CNRSE/NAVY BAND 2 2 FRCSE 900 2 2 VR-58 2 2 VR-62 2 2 FACSFAC 2 3 HS-11 2 3 NCTS 2 3 CBMU202 1 3 FRCSE Tweaks & Geeks 1 4 FRCSE Thrusters 1 5 NBHC Honey Badgers 0 3 VP-45 Scared Hitless 0 5Greybeard Spring Softball Teams Wins Losses NAVFAC 1 0 VP-26 1 0 FACSFAC 0 0 CNATTU 0 1 NECE 0 1hand using masking tape and has to be the exact measurements, said Baird. It takes a lot of practice to become a skilled painter and this is an excellent starting point. I really love the paint class, said AM3 Emma Kopischke of VP-30. Ive learned how to paint sheet metal and layout letters and stars. I plan to go back to my squadron and use the skills Ive learned here. Once back out in the fleet, the students are encouraged to consult with the experts at FRCSE for any questions that may arise. We are here to help them if they need guidance, said Baird. We love teaching and want them to be successful after they leave our classrooms, so we are always receptive to offering support to them in the field. FRCSEFrom Page 12 be selected on scholarship merit and community service. Deadline for application is June 7. Selection of recipients will be made by June 30. Scholarship application may be picked up at NAS Jacksonville Navy College Office or found on-line at: https://www.fcef.com/wp-content/uploads/CHPScholarship-Application3-14.pdf. You may submit the application by mail to: NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, c/o Mrs. Pam Undersander, 5065 Mustin Road, Jacksonville FL 32212. Questions may be sent to nasjaxaosc@gmail.comNeither the NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. SCHOLARSHIPSFrom Page 8 DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke Lunch bingo Monday through Friday begins at 11:15 a.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open May 10 June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31 Outdoor pool opens for weekend recreational swim on May 10 Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Dive-in Movie May 23 featuring LEGO Movie Pool opens at 7 p.m., movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free popcorn. Concession stand will be open.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Jacksonville Jaguar tickets on sale soon! Kanapaha Botanical Gardens Trip May 3, $25 Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT! The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Grill & Chill May 13 at 6 p.m. Free hamburgers and hotdogs Paintball Trip May 17 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty May 13 & 27 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests May 15 & 29 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. Command Party Swing into savings & book your command golf tournamentMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Summer Camp Registration going on now! Sign-in at the youth centerFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flightAdditional ratings are available including instrument, complex and commercialFind more info. online at jaxnfc.net Photos by Bill BonserCaptain's Cup Soccer MatchA Branch Health Clinic Jax player attacks against VP-26 "Tridents" while the VP-26 players converge in an attempt to steal the ball. VP-26 forwards and Branch Health Clinic Jax defenders go after the ball looking for an advantage over the other team.

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By Lt. Hanayo ArimotoNECE Public AffairsThe Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) hosted members of the Florida Chief Petty Officers Association (FLCPOA) on April 10 as part of the FLCPOAs annual Spring Fling. FLCPOA, established in 1993, holds a spring and fall fling every year. The purpose of the annual event is to reconnect with the Navy and stay in touch with old friends. Fourteen members from FLCPOA took part in the visit to NECE. The members explained that they had an option of touring a ship out in Mayport, but chose NECE because it was a unique opportunity to visit a place that is not widely known. The tour kicked off in the classroom where NECEs Senior Enlisted Leader, HMCS Randall Oakes gave a presenta tion about the command and its 70-year history. The group was lead through the photograph-laced hallways of NECE to the insectary where the entomolo gists rear insects such as Yellow Fever Mosquitoes, Asian Tiger Mosquitoes, and German and American cockroaches, for use in various projects. The group was then guided to NECEs backyard where they were brought into an outdoor enclosure and shown the mosquito larvae breeding pools. Both were constructed in the fall of 2013 and are currently being utilized to test new methods to trap and con trol mosquitoes. At NECEs Testing and Evaluation Department, EN1 Jeremy Anderson gave an equipment demon stration, showcasing different mod els of handheld thermal foggers an Entomologist or a Preventive Medicine Technician would use to apply pesti cides against disease vectors during deployment. The tour concluded in the classroom where the guests were shown a selec tion of NECEs impressive pinned insect collection and live bed bugs. Within the group of touring retired Chiefs, lies a deeper story. Collectively, the group has over 100 years worth of Navy knowledge and experience. During the tour the Chiefs shared sea stories from a different era. Some sto ries told of insect problems in the past where they commented on the lack of chemical options they had or of a par ticularly nasty fire ant situation. I talked with HMC Lorentz A. Semple (Retired), who was a Preventive Medicine Technician, and it was great to discover what Chief culture and tra ditions have been preserved and passed on to future Navy Chiefs, said Oakes. From a chiefs perspective, I saw that the FLCPOAs visit to NECE enhanced not only the entomology community but also the Chief Petty Officers com munity as a whole, Oakes continued. This was the first time NECEs been selected as a destination point by the FLCPOA. By ADC Christopher CobbCNATTU Jacksonville Public AffairsThe Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville will conduct the retirement cere mony to honor the Navys most senior aviation support equip ment technician. ASCM(AW) Michael King, the Senior Enlisted Leader of CNATTU Jacksonville, will retire May 1 at 10 a.m. in the NAS Jacksonville BOQ Pavilion. The ceremony will be pre sided over by Cmdr. Ed Twining, commanding officer of CNATTU Jacksonville. The guest speaker will be retired Cmdr. Daryl Pierce, a for mer commanding officer of CNATTU Jacksonville. King graduated from Milan High School in Michigan in 1973 and enlisted in the U.S. Navy Reserve later that year. He attended recruit train ing in 1974 at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. He attended Aviation Support Equipment Technician Hydraulics (ASH) A school at Naval Aviation Technical Training Center, Millington, Tenn. In 1974, he reported to Naval Air Facility Detroit, Mich., where he drilled as a reservist for 11 years and advanced to the rank to petty officer second class. In March 1985, he transi tioned to active duty. His sub sequent assignments include NAS Cecil Field, Fla., from May 1985 to December 1988, where he served as training petty officer, work center supervisor, and production control leading petty officer. From January 1989 to February 1992, he served as IM-4 Division Leading Chief Petty Officer on board USS Forrestal (CV59). From March 1992 to December 1995, he served as logs and records supervisor and maintenance control supervi sor at Patrol Squadron (VP) 30 aboard NAS Jacksonville. From January 1996 to April 1997, he served as maintenance and operations departmental leading chief petty officer at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. From May 1997 to May 1999, he served as AMMT Team Program Process Inspector/ Evaluator at Commander Naval Air Force U.S. Atlantic Fleet. From May 1999 to June 2002, he served as 900 Division LCPO and AIMD Production Control Supervisor at Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD), Jacksonville. From July 2002 to July 2005, he served as IM-4 LCPO, Quality Assurance/ Analysis Supervisor, and Maintenance Master Chief Petty Officer on board USS Ronald Reagan (CVN76). From August 2005 to December 2008, he served as Aviation Support Equipment Technician Career Manager at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training (CNATT), Pensacola. From December 2008 to September 2011, he served as Quality Assurance/Analysis Supervisor and Maintenance Master Chief Petty Officer on board USS Carl Vinson (CVN70). In October 2011, he gradu ated from the Senior Enlisted Academy and was assigned to CNATTU Jacksonville as Senior Enlisted Leader for 185 Navy and Civilian personnel. For 23 years, King has con tributed immeasurably to the development and training of countless new chief petty offi cers, while upholding the stan dards, traditions and legacy of the U.S. Navy Chiefs Mess. His contributions will continue to make a positive impact in the chiefs community for many years to come. He is married to his wife of 35 years, Carole, and has four children Michael, Christopher, Katherine and Heather as well as two grandchildren, Emily and Charles. Florida Chief Petty Officers Association tours NECE JaxPhotos by MC2 Amanda CabasosLt. Hanayo Arimoto from Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) shows Lorentz Semple (right) and Harold Davis from the Retired Chief Petty Officers Association the American cockroach during a tour of NECE April 10. Davis said, I was absolutely fascinated to see so many roaches in one display. HMCS(SW) Randall Oakes of the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence aboard NAS Jax; explains the purpose of the outdoor enclosure to individuals from the Retired Chief Petty Officers Association during a tour. According to Oakes; the facility is designed to test and evaluate new equipment and technologies used against pests. EN1(EXW) Jeremy Anderson (right) from Navy Entomology Center of Excellence informs 14 retired chiefs and their spouses about the current pesticide equipment used in the Navy. Eighty-nine-year-old retired Chief Norman King said, I served in the Navy for 33 years and never knew we had a program for pest control. I can see the importance of the program because it has been saving thousands of lives. What they do is a beautiful thing.King retires from CNATTU with more than 40 years serviceASCM(AW) Michael King Hornet travels low and slowArtisans at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) use a crane to remove an F/A-18C Hornet Strike Fighter aircraft from a flatbed truck at the aviation maintenance facility on April 2. The aircraft, assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 251, based in Beaufort S.C., arrives at FRCSE for repairs to the hydraulic system that left it unsafe for flight. It is also due for planned maintenance and a high-flight-hour induction to check for cracks and corrosion caused by stress fatigue and water intrusion. Photo by Victor Pitts 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014

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By Tina StillionsSpace and Naval Warfare Systems Command Public AffairsThe Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) announced the formation of a Cyber Readiness Team (CRT) during the C4ISR Symposium, Apr. 24 in San Diego. Leadership from SPAWARs Fleet Readiness Directorate (FRD) said the CRT will address many of the fleets key cyber security issues. There are a range of things we are doing to improve fleet readiness, espe cially in regards to cyber, said Capt. John Robey, FRD program manager. We provide teams of folks to go out for cyber security inspections (CSI) to help get them ready. The mantra we operate under at the FRD is that we are the face to the fleet; if you have questions, call us. Robey and Rob Wolborsky, FRD executive director, joined Capt. David Wirth, director communications and informa tion systems at Commander, Third Fleet (N6) and Capt. Jose Cisneros, director communications and information sys tems at Commander Naval Air Forces (AIRPAC) N6, during a panel session to discuss improving tools and strength ening the fleets cyber readiness pos ture. Standing up the SPAWAR CRT will help address some of the major issues facing todays warfighter. The majority of the stuff causing ships to fail inspections at an alarming rate is the old systems, or legacy capa bilities, out there that arent secure, said Wolborsky. They arent secure by the standards of the testers. These tes ters test the systems to a certain level, as they should, because if we are ever in harms way, we need to be able to defend our warfighters. The problem, according to Wolborsky, is exacerbated because of outdated software and systems still in use around the fleet. Many of the afloat systems have not been as successful passing cyber inspections, said Robey. The afloat is harder because of more variation and differences in configurations. We are focusing our energies this year on helping them pass these inspections. Afloat CSI is a much larger hill to climb and a greater challenge. Embedding cyber security into soft ware, systems and programs is imper ative to warfighter effectiveness and adheres to SPAWARs core mission. The CRT, which is similar to an inte grated process team and includes FRD, program offices and SPAWAR engineering and corporate operations will collaborate to improve daily readiness and help mature tools so that the fleet can keep up with emerging requirements. The FRD exists to support the fleets immediate and future C4ISR readiness and includes installation management and execution, fleet support, data cen ter consolidation and cyber. Were very much aligned and get ting laser-focused to address the cyber issue, said Wolborsky, I put every thing into three basic areas in what we are trying to accomplish here. Those three areas include delivering ships out of their availability to the warfighter that are fully functional; making equipment more secure in light of all the legacy systems that are out there and at the root of the problem; and ensuring crews are proficient. According to the fleet waterfront participants, cyber security inspections have become the ends rather than the means. What we are seeing is our inability to sustain the level of effort required to meet inspection requirements, said Wirth. What the fleet really needs is the ability to sustain a consistent level of readiness. Right now, its like build ing a house and working down to the foundation. The SPAWAR CRT will leverage orga nizational expertise and work with industry partners to create processes to ensure a stronger cyber posture across the fleet. Navy lags behind many major private IT industry companies in keep ing its systems secure and safe in a growing non-kinetic environment in which networks have become the new battlefield. Layers of bureaucracy are hampering the Navys best effort to stay ahead of the curve. Without money, fleet forces cannot keep pace. The CRT is designed to help rather than hinder an already layered process. We need to look at investing money in IT training for our sailors, said Cisneros. We dont have the embedded support we need either. We need to take a look at how we are addressing those problems, too. The CRT is a new concept developed to help better understanding the exist ing information out there in order to make the best decisions for the vari ous fleet software baselines. The initial task will be to determine what the problems are and develop the right tools to address them. It is a major step in the right direction for addressing fleet concerns. The goal is to help FRD deter mine what to deliver to the fleet, ensure it is not causing additional problems, and work proactively with the fleet to improve its cyber posture from a tech nical authority and acquisition capability delivery perspective. As the Navys Information Dominance systems command, SPAWAR designs, develops and deploys advanced communications and infor mation capabilities for the warfighter. With nearly 10,000 acquisition profes sionals located around the world and close to the fleet, the organization is at the forefront of research, engineering and support services that provide vital decision superiority for the warfighter. SPAWAR stands up new Cyber Readiness Team to address key fleet issues Orion avionics upgradeArtisans from Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) conduct operational systems checks on avionics modifications recently installed on a P-3C Orion, near NAS Jax Hangar 1000 on April 23. FRCSE inducted the aircraft for phased maintenance inspections and upgrades on radio and navigation systems. Once the upgrades are installed, the aircraft is towed to an open area on the flight line for testing satellite communications. Photo by Clark Pierce JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 By Lt. j.g. Torrey Plum VP-8 Public AffairsNineteen Sailors assigned to VP-8 and VP-62 at Cooperative Security Location Comalapa, El Salvador, visited a church in San Salvador April 26 to help with much needed repair work and also to deliver vitamin supplements to the local com munity. Sailors from the VP-8 Fighting Tigers and VP-62 BroadArrows delivered six months worth of vitamins to Iglesia Gran Comision Church in La Libertad. The donations were made possible by squad ron members, families and friends. The Sailors also sanded and painted shelves they assem bled during a previous visit. It was gratifying to see the immediate impact of our contribution and the founda tion it laid for future projects to come, said Ensign Erik Arstein, a naval flight officer with VP-8. We are always happy to lend our support to the people of El Salvador. The Iglesia Gran Comision Church is a non-denomina tional congregation of local residents and missionaries who work to improve the lives of those less fortunate. Some of their work includes nutritional programs that provide healthy meals to children whose fami lies may not be able to afford a balanced diet. They also provide a safe haven for battered and abused women and children. The care and assistance La Gran Comision church provides is a vital lifeline to this El Salvadoran community. It was a great opportunity to interact with the local community, said LS2 Walter Murillo. Its rewarding to get to see first hand how we are having a positive impact on the lives of the people here. The Fighting Tigers are cur rently deployed to the 4th and 5th fleet areas of responsibil ity, assisting in Counter TransNational Organized Crime efforts and providing humani tarian assistance. By Kevin Robinson,DeCA public affairs specialistCommissary Rewards Card users can now download an Android app to access and clip digital coupons. Available free from the Google Play Store, the Commissary Rewards Android app joins the previously released iPhone/iPad app, giving commissary shoppers access to their rewards card accounts through a vast array of smart phones and tablets. Weve tested the Android app and received good reviews on its ability to con nect rewards card users with available coupons, said Marye Carr, the Defense Commissary Agencys rewards card man ager. Now with apps for both operating systems, our patrons have more flexibility on when and where they can clip coupons, review their lists of downloaded coupons and track which ones have been redeemed or expired. The apps also let custom ers connect to the nearest commissary via phone num bers and addresses. And, just like accessing their accounts from a desktop computer, Commissary Rewards Card users can always be plugged into new promotions and con tests customized for them. Kelloggs is offering one such contest, Win a Family 4th of July in Washington DC, from May 1-31 for patrons with Commissary Rewards Cards. The grand prize is a trip to Washington, D.C., with three guests to attend a Nationals baseball game scheduled for July 2. For more details and additional prizes, visit https:// deca.couponselectionpage. com/offers/all on or after May 1. Since it was unveiled in September 2012, the Commissary Rewards Card has become a game-changer for commissary patrons, opening up access to digital coupons redeemable in commissar ies, said DeCA Sales Director Randy Chandler. As the military changes, so is DeCA, and the Commissary Rewards Card is a way the commissary benefit is evolv ing to remain relevant to our service members and their families, Chandler said. Its amazing how card users can get to these electronic savings now more than 150 coupons at a time from either the click of a mouse or now from their own smart phones and tablets. From the programs start through April 4, Commissary Rewards Card users have downloaded more than 26 million digital coupons, and com missaries have redeemed over 3 million for a savings of $3.6 million to patrons. Using the rewards card has become as simple as 1-2-3, Carr said: Get a rewards card at a commissary. Register the card at http:// www.commissaries.com/ rewards/index.cfm Clip or download coupons to your account (they are automatically loaded to your card). Print a list of your coupons and bring it and your card with you on your next shopping trip. Present your card at check out so the cashier can scan it for coupons that match your purchased items. Digital coupons are automatically erased from the account as they are redeemed or if they expire. The savings from using coupons helps our patrons extend their savings even more, Carr said. And, with the mobile apps, they have even more options to access their Commissary Rewards Card accounts for digital savings. For more information about the Commissary Rewards Card, go to http://www.com missaries.com/rewards/index. cfm. To reach a customer service hotline, call 855-829-6219 or send an email to commissary support@inmar.com. Month of the Military Child carnivalBy Shannon Leonard MWR Marketing Director On a beautiful spring day, laughter and excite ment filled the air as hundreds of kids and their parents came out to enjoy the annual Month of the Military Child Carnival on April 12 at the Allegheny Softball Fields. The free event is coordinated each year by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Departments Youth Activities Center (YAC) to show military children how much they are appreciated. Its great to see military families enjoying the carnival. The weather is perfect and I am very pleased with the turnout, said YAC Director Jason McKenzie. The event featured numerous inflatables that provided lots of jumping, sliding and bouncing plus, a rock climbing wall, bungee-run, games, face painting by the staff of the Fleet and Family Support Center, free water and snow cones. Through the generosity of our sponsors, we are able to keep adding to the event, continued McKenzie. This is my second spring carnival and this one is even better. The kids love it. We are really having a good time and appreciate MWR for coordinating this event, said Lt. Robert Bombard, who brought his family to the event. This years sponsors were VyStar Credit Union, USAA, University of Phoenix and USA Discounters. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any com pany, sponsor or its products or services. NAS Jax patrol squadrons help transform livesPhoto courtesy of VP-8LS2 Walter Murillo and Lt.j.g. Andrew Kirchert paint shelves for the Iglesia Gran Comision Church in El Salvador.Commissary rewards card now offers Android appPhoto by Morgan KenhertA future champion at The Masters? Seven-year-old Jeremy Fox swings his golf club for 20 points as he plays the Chip Shot game during the carnival at NAS Jax Allegheny softball field. By Claudette RouloAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department is continuing to support the inter national search mission for miss ing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, Pentagon spokesman Army Col. Steve Warren said April 24. The total cost of the search to date is $11.4 million, Warren said. This figure includes $4,200 per flight hour for the two P-8 Poseidon aircraft involved in the search, he added. The plane and its 239 passengers disappeared March 8 on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. The costs break down as follows, Warren said: maintenance funds; humanitarian disaster and civic aid funds; and search equipment and support. The P-8A Poseidons continue conducting aerial search opera tions, and the Bluefin-21 autonomous underwater vehicle com pleted its 12th search mission, the colonel said. Bluefin-21 has now completed more than 90 percent of a focused underwater search. Unfortunately, no contacts of interest have been found, he said. The department has received no requests for additional underwater search assets, Warren said. The Military Sealift Command dry cargo ship USNS Cesar Chavez joined the task force April 10 to provide logistical support. Chavez is the Navys newest combat logistics force ship, and is operated by a crew of 125 civil service mariners. The ship also has a complement of 11 U.S. Navy personnel, who provide operational support and supply coordination, a Navy news release said.DoD maintains support to find missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 17 By Lt. Christy Chance, JAGCJacksonville Assistance Office, RLSO SEA lease is a binding contract between you and the landlord. Therefore, if you need to terminate your lease, there are steps that you need to take to ensure that you are protected legally and financially. Whether you want to terminate a lease at the end of the contract or earlier, there is a certain protocol you must follow. Living in uninhabitable conditions, renting in an unsafe area, entering active duty service, receiving permanent change of station (PCS) orders, or orders to deploy for a period of not less than 90 days are all reasons why a servicemember might need to terminate a lease early. The following information applies to servicemem bers and their dependents. Contact the JAG early. Your local legal assistance office can help you through the entire process of breaking your lease, including advising you on whether you can terminate your lease, drafting the notice to vacate, communicating with the landlord on your behalf, as well as attempting to recover your security deposit. Read your lease. Check your lease to see if it con tains a military clause. While the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) requires landlords to allow servicemembers out of their leases in specific situations, sometimes a military clause in a lease can provide additional protections for you or your family. writing. There are six items that should be included in every written notice of intention to vacate: (1) the names of the tenants vacating; (2) the date the notice was written and signed; (3) the intended termination date (4) the address and unit/apartment number of the residence that is being vacated; (5) a forward ing address; and (6) signature of the tenants. It is extremely important to provide a forwarding address if you want to get your security deposit back. Again, your local legal assistance attorney can help you draft proper notice. your lease under the SCRA because you entered active duty, have PCS orders or are deploying for a period of not less than 90 days, you need to provide written of your PCS/deployment orders, preferably with at least 30 days notice. If you do not have a copy of your PCS/deployment orders, then you must get verifica tion (preferably in writing) from your commanding officer, stating that you are moving out of the area on orders or deploying for a period of 90 or more days. more than 60 days notice) or if not specified in the lease then the amount of notice is determined by the length of the tenancy: it details how notice should be delivered. If your lease does not detail how to deliver notice, then the best method is to mail your written notice return receipt requested. Again, your local legal assistance office can help you ensure proper delivery of your notice. Steps to take when moving out to protect your security deposit and protect yourself from owing the landlord money for damages after you move out. ing with the vacating terms. Your lease may state that you are responsible for repainting, having the carpets cleaned professionally, or similar tasks prior to your move out. gives you an idea in terms of what you need to do before moving out in order to comply with the lease agreement. Also remove any trash or debris. that were included with the residence. It is a good idea to have the landlord sign a letter stating they received the above items along with the date they were returned. tion with the landlord prior to moving out. your belongings are moved out and you have cleaned the premises. If there is ever a dispute over damages or the state of the residence when you left, those photos and/or videos will be key to proving your case. If you would like more information or want to find the legal assistance office closest to you, contact us at any of our offices listed at: http://www.jag.navy.mil/ legal_services/rlso/rlso_southeast.htm. Clay County Philippine Festival, May 3, from 9 a.m.5 p.m. at Orange Park Town Hall, at U.S. 17 and Kingsley Ave. Entertainment, food, arts & USS Iwo Jima (LPH2/LHD7) Reunion Aug. 2731 at Crowne Plaza Hotel in Jacksonville. Call 757723-0317 or http://ussiwojimashipmates.cfns.net/ (MOAA) Northeast Florida Chapter meets every of all military branches. Contact Johnnie.walsh@ gmail.com or call 282-4650. (NNOA) meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. Cmdr. Paul Nix at 542-2518 or paul.nix@navy.mil. Association of Aviation Ordnancemen meets the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on Collins Road. For information, visit www.aao9.com. (VFW) Post 5968 and its Auxiliary located at 187 Aurora Blvd. meets on the second Wednesday of the service organization composed of combat veterans and eligible service members from the Active, Guard or Reserve forces. Go to www.vfwpost5968. org or call 276-5968. at NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military retirees and dependents. Work four hours a day, one day per week. Call 542-5790 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays to volunteer. Ribbons & Roses a breast cancer support group at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. Call 5427857 for more info. Navy Jacksonville Yacht Club is open to active duty, reserve and retired military, plus, active or retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email commodore@njyc.org. Mentoring Program. Helping others help themselves. Visit www.gocompass.org for more info. Navy Wives Clubs of America DID No. 300 meets the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at Call 272-9489. Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 monthly Rd., Atlantic Beach. Call 246-6855. National Active and Retired Federal Employees Westside Jacksonville Chapter 1984 meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Murray Hill United Methodist Church, (Fellowship Hall Building) at 4101 College Street. Call 7867083. Retired Enlisted Association meets the fourth Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Hall at 7673 Blanding Blvd. Call 772-8622. The right way to terminate a lease, and steps to take during move out STATE Week to Week Month to Month Quarter to Quarter Year to YearFLORIDA7 days notice15 days notice30 days notice60 days notice GEORGIA30 days notice30 days notice30 days notice30 days notice By Terri Moon Cronk American Forces Press Service Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, launched the Veterans Employment Center, the first online one-stop shop ping tool for veterans, transitioning service members and spouses in search of employment. The announcement was made April 23 at a third-anniversary celebration for their Joining Forces initiative at Fort Campbell, Ky. Joining Forces mobilizes all sectors of American society to support service members, veterans and their families. had the time or information they needed to prepare their resumes, to plot their career goals, to meet with employers and get the jobs they deserve. And thats simply not acceptable, the first lady said. As my husband has said, when youve fought for this country around the world, you shouldnt have to fight for a job when you return home. Starting today, she continued, every single service member, every veteran, and every military family will have access to a new online tool that will revolutionize how you find jobs in both the public and private sectors. The online tool is available at http:// ebenefits.va.gov. The new online resource is the first interagency tool to bring together a wealth of public and private job oppor tunities, a resume-builder, military skills translator and detailed career and training resources. In connection with Joining Forces, Affairs, Labor and Education and worked with employers to design and develop the site and incorporate fea tures of existing online employment tools within government. Veterans deserve an authoritative source for connecting with employers, said VA Secretary Eric Shinseki. The online Veterans Employment Center is the single, federal source for veterans looking for new career opportunities, service members transitioning to the civilian workforce, and spouses and beneficiaries looking to connect with job opportunities. Resumes are visible to all employers with an active LinkedIn or Google profile. To prevent spam, applicants names and email addresses are redacted, and are visible only to employers verified by VA as registered companies with the IRS. The site also is built using open data and an open application programming interface to attract private-sector innovation. At the Fort Campbell event, Biden Employment Partnership, which began in June 2011 with fewer than 60 companies. Today, she said, the partnership has 228 partner employers, more than 1.8 Portal, and more than 60,000 military spouse hires to its credit.White House launches one-stop shopping for vets seeking jobs Navy wives to gather May 15-17From Staff attend from clubs throughout the Eastern Region to discuss by-laws, as well as fundraising, for the many charitable non-profit organization, incorporated in 1939 and granted a federal charter in 1984. This organization was formed by a group of military spouses whose common goal was to support, befriend and assist other military spouses adjusting to the military way of life. There are curestablished in 1985. When BRAC closed Cecil Field in 1999, sands of volunteer hours and dollars to various causes, projects and organizations including the Florida Fallen Heros Foundation, the Carillon Bell Tower project located at the Jacksonville Humane Society, and Wreaths Across America, a remembrance wreath-laying ceremony to honor and remember our nations Veterans. Guard or the Active Reserve units of these services. Spouses of enlisted personnel, who have been honorably discharged, retired or have been transferred to the Fleet Reserve on completion of duty are also welcome. If you like to help others in our community, and have fun right for you. For more information, go to their Facebook Community Calendar

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MAY 1, 2014 I I D E WINGS OF GOLD VP-30 Salutes New NFOsPage 3 WHAT FUN! MWR Barracks Bash Pages 4 & 5 VISITING NURSE NMCRS ReunionPage 9Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com From HS-11 Public AffairsPilots and aircrew assigned to the HS-11 Dragonslayers at NAS Jacksonville flew a pair of HH-60H Seahawk helicopters to Camp Blanding Joint Training Center April 16 to support a joint training evolution with the 3rd Battalion, 20th Special Forces Group (Airborne). HS-11 is conducting joint training with special opera tions forces (SOF) to sharpen our helicopter rope suspension skills in preparation for our upcoming Helicopter Advanced Readiness Program evaluation before deployment, said HS-11 Training Officer Lt. Cmdr. Justin Cobb. The Dragonslayers landed on the camps parade field and shut down in order to conduct the air By Lt. Mark FlowerdewRAN 725 Squadron Public AffairsMembers of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron commemo rated ANZAC Day April 25 at Jacksonvilles Memorial Park in Riverside. ANZAC Day is the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War. In 1915, the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) formed part of the allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli pen insula in Turkey, explained Cmdr. David Frost, com manding officer of RAN 725 Squadron. The ANZAC force landed on Gallipoli on April 25 and met fierce resistance from the Ottoman Turkish defend ers. What had been planned as a bold stroke to knock Turkey out of the war became a stale mate and dragged on for eight months. Frost spoke of the signifi cance of ANZAC day, the sac rifices made by those initial ANZACs and how their actions instilled an identity in a young nation. He also spoke of the relationship that the RAN has with the USN and how that close relationship continues to be strengthened by the daily operations of those currently stationed in Jacksonville. The ceremony was also attended by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, officers of NAS Jacksonville-based aircraft squadrons, representatives from the Jacksonville Mayors office, and families and friends By Lt. Jen Wright and Cmdr. Peter ObenauerThe Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) and U. S. Navy Medical Research Unit No. 3 (NAMRU3) partnered with the Liberian Institute for Biomedical Research (LIBR) April 9 18 to present a custom-designed Public Health Pest and Vector Control Course to members of the Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL). The course is part of a larger initiative to assist in building and maintaining health capacity in Liberia. The U.S. Navy became engaged with the AFL in 2003 during Operation Sheltering Sky, when 44 of 225 Marines became infected with malaria while ashore. Six years later, an active duty service member succumbed to malaria while deployed with his Seabee Unit. Funded by the DoD Global Emerging Infection Systems, the course was designed to build skills within AFL Preventive Medicine Unit person nel leading to the reduction of malaria among AFL members. Twenty students participated in the interactive course that culminated in a joint residual insecticide spray of the AFL barracks. The goal of this mission was to train the trainers by providing an intense, two-week course on integrated pest management that will then be taught by the AFL preventative medicine team to other members of the AFL and Liberian community, said Joesph Diclaro, NAMRU-3 entomology department head. Most importantly, this training allows us to add sustainable value to the AFL that will not just have a onetime affect but that the preventative medicine officers can take ownership for themselves. This mission is an excellent example of the benefits of collaboration, said Capt. Eric Hoffman, NECE officer in charge. NECE, NAMRU-3, LIBR and OOL under AFRICOM all worked to make this happen by using our diverse exper tise to come together and create an innovative new curriculum for use in the AFRICOM region. These unique training opportunities not only increase joint capability with our allies, but also benefit the readiness of our Navy instructors as well, said NECE Instructor Lt. Yans. This training provided us with new tools for understanding collaborative operations with our African counter parts, as well as a broader cultural awareness that is critical for successful OCONUS missions. As Operation Onward Liberia (OOL) winds down, it is critical that we enable the AFL to operate independently and give them the proper tools for success, explained HM1 Crystal Goeddel, an OOL mentor who participated in the class. The participants used the informa tion provided during the two-week course to successfully execute the treat ment of over 200 barracks and will independently spray the remaining AFL barracks providing preventative medi cine support to more than 1,000 soldiers and their families. HS-11 drills with 20th Special Forces GroupPhoto courtesy of HS-11Lt. Trent Daiuto (right) delivers the air mission brief to a group of HS-11 pilots, aircrew and 3/20 SOF personnel April 16 at Camp Blanding Joint Training Center. Photo courtesy of NECENavy instructors congratulate the graduating class of the Public Health Pest and Vector Control Course, outside the Edward Binyah Kesselly Health Clinic in Liberia. NECE trains Liberians to kill deadly malarial mosquitoAustralians commemorate ANZAC Day Young Preston Watson was wide awake and all smiles at the dawn commemorative service for ANZAC Day in Jacksonville's Memorial Park.Photos by Cristine WatsonMembers of Royal Australian Navy 725 Squadron commemorate ANZAC Day at dawn on April 25 at the World War I statue near the St. Johns River at Jacksonville's Memorial Park in Riverside. See Page 10 See Page 10

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)5487789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley From StaffMay 1 1898 Battle of Manila Bay, Adm. Dewey defeats Spanish at Manila, Philippines. 1934 Lt. Akers demon strates blind landing system at College Park, Md. in OJ-2 air craft. 1945 Vice Adm. Barbey lands Australian troops on Tarakan Island, Borneo, sup ported by naval gunfire. 1951 USS Princeton aircraft attack Hwachon Dam using aerial torpedoes, only use of this weapon in Korean War. 1980 Eleven Navy ships begin operations assisting Coast Guard in rescuing Cuban refugees fleeing Cuba in over crowded boats. May 2 1975 U.S. Navy departs Vietnamese waters at end of evacuation. May 3 1861 USS Surprise cap tures Confederate privateer Savannah. 1898 Marines land at Cavite, Philippines and raise U.S. flag. 1949 First Navy firing of a high altitude Viking rocket at White Sands, N.M. May 4 1917 First Navy ships (Destroyer Division 8) arrive at Queenstown, Ireland, to pro vide convoy escorts against German U-boats. 1942 Battle of Coral Sea, the first carrier vs. carrier battle, begins. 1945 Japanese attempt to land on Okinawa is repulsed; kamikaze attacks damage six U.S. Navy ships. 1961 Pilot Cmdr. Malcolm Ross, USNR, and medi cal observer Lt. Cmdr. Victor Prather Jr., ascended in two hours to more than 110,00 feet in Strato-Lab 5, a 411foot hydrogen filled balloon launched from from the deck of USS Antietam. This was the highest altitude attained by man in an open gondola. Tragically, Prather drowned during the recovery. May 5 1944 USS Comfort is com missioned in San Pedro, Calif., the first ship to be manned jointly by Army and Navy per sonnel. 1948 VF-17A becomes first carrier qualified jet squadron (on board USS Saipan). 1961 Cmdr. Alan Shepard Jr. makes first U.S. manned space flight. Freedom 7 (Mercury 3) traveled 15 min utes and 28 seconds to reach the altitude of 116.5 statute miles with a velocity of 5,134 mph. Recovery was by HUS1 helicopter of HMR(L)-262 from USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39). 1980 USS Robert E. Peary rescues 440 Vietnamese refu gees from disabled craft south of Thailand. May 6 1909 Great White Fleet anchors in San Francisco. 1916 First ship-to-shore radio telephone voice con versation from USS New Hampshire off Virginia Capes to SECNAV Josephus Daniels in Washington, D.C. 1942 Capt. Milton Miles arrives in Chungking, China, to begin building an intelligence and guerilla training organiza tion, Naval Group China. 1945 Naval landing force evacuates 500 Marshallese from Jaluit Atoll, Marshall Islands May 7 1779 Continental Navy sloop Providence captures British brig Diligent off Cape Charles. 1934 USS Constitution com pletes tour of principal U.S. ports. 1940 FDR orders Pacific Fleet to remain in Hawaiian waters indefinitely. 1942 Carrier aircraft sink Japanese carrier Shoho during Battle of Coral Sea. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorWhen I wrote about depression three months ago, I was still, for the most part, in the throes of it. Happily, with time and distance comes more perspective some good, some not so good. I was overcome by the amount and quality of responses I received to that column. It seems that everyone knows someone who has dealt with depres sion. And yet, the experience still feels foreign and shameful for those of us going through it. In early January, I went to see a counselor because I couldnt find a reason to get up in the morning. Even things that used to make me smile finishing a knit hat, going to my kids school functions, eating dinner as a family brought nothing. I felt hollowed out and flat. Worse, I couldnt stop crying, and I didnt know why. I reached out to the counselor in a moment of des peration. My boys started to recognize that something was wrong, and with my Navy husband gone so often, I am their constant. I could see the worry in their eyes. The counselor saw me as often as needed. I think I went every day that first week. I clung to my appoint ment times like little islands of hope. It was only later that I learned my insurance, TRICARE, doesnt cover that particular counselor. In a moment of despair, I had reached into the yellowpages grab bag and picked the wrong name. By then, however, it was too late. The counselor and I had already covered so much ground. She was helping me get better. How could I start over? TRICARE offered no solution, except for me to see someone else 90 miles away. This is a horrible flaw in the industrys view of men tal health. When someone is having a heart attack, they dont call around first to see whom their insur ance will let them see. No, they get to the emergency room and sort it out later. Likewise, when someone is suffering from depres sion, they usually dont have the clarity to wade through jargon and complicated phone trees to figure out which counselor they can see. If were lucky, these people pick up the phone, call a counselor and say, I need to talk with someone. Also, mental health services are unique in that they require a deeply personal, working relation ship between the provider and patient. Just because TRICARE says I should see counselor X doesnt mean counselor X can help me. In the end, my husband wrote a big check for all those appointments I had while in crisis mode. And now Ive quit going to counseling partly because Im doing so much better but mostly because I never could figure it out with TRICARE, and paying 100 per cent is too expensive. How many other people out there are in the same situation, and still suffering? Another thing I learned during this time was how peoples perceptions of me changed because of my condition. There were other people in the waiting room when I arrived at a large local hospital to get my medication. We were all from different socioeconomic starting-points, but we were at the same finish line with weary bodies, tear-stained faces and wearing yesterdays sweatpants. In March, I returned to the hospital for a followup appointment. I was feeling better now, thanks to anti-depressants, and it was like a curtain had lifted. I was out of my sweat pants, and I had curled my hair. I smiled at people. I was participating in the world again. I had come through to the other side, and I couldnt wait for my appointment to be done so I could get on with my life. As I drove away, I was excited about a new hat I would finish knitting for Owen that night. I felt joy. But I still think about the people I left behind in the waiting room, the ones whose curtains remain closed. Thats the humbling part about depression. Once youve been through it, you know that we are all one crisis away from being in the hospital waiting room. And were probably going to pay out of pocket for it later, too. U.S. Navy photos In 1941 at NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy and Marine Corps student pilots prepare for primary flight training in Ryan NR-1 Recruit aircraft. The two-seat, open cockpit monoplane was powered by a 160 hp Kinner 5-cylinder, air-cooled radial engine with a top speed of 131 mph. A flight of five U.S. Navy Consolidated P4Y-1Ps fly in formation. The VJ-62 "Tigers" photographic squadron was established in April 1952 at NAS Jacksonville. VJ-62 was redesignated heavy photographic squadron (VAP) 62 in July 1956 and disestablished Oct. 15, 1969. VAP-62 played an important intelligence role dur ing the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis. This Week in Navy HistoryDepression doesnt play favorites, but insurers do From the Homefront From Staff The Navy League of Mayport is cel ebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. This is an All-Service event featur ing a joint color guard, All-Service Missing Person Table, Navy Band Southeast with all the Service Songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event to be held Saturday, June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The keynote speaker is Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) Adm. Mark Ferguson. Numerous veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches of the military who served in prior conflicts, and those currently serving have been invited to attend. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War from the local area who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emo tional and patriotic, as well as provid ing an excellent opportunity to con nect with survivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50; O6 and above $65. Civilians and retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform for O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional; and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., dinner is served at 7 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales will end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Visit our website for more information www. mayportnlus.org. Tickets may be purchased from the following locations: NAVY LEAGUE MAYPORT Bob Price, 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 E-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net NAVY LEAGUE ST AUGUSTINE Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 E-mail: anuday00@aol.comFerguson is keynote speaker at Midway Dinner June 7

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By Jeanne CaseyNaval Hospital Jacksonville Deputy Public Affairs Officer Beginning May 2, a new, 24/7 Nurse Advice Line is available. Call 800-TRICARE (800-874-2273) and select option 1 for help with urgent care, day or night including holidays. A registered nurse (RN) assesses symptoms, can direct patients to care, and assist with self-care. Nurses can advise parents about childrens medical issues, as well. The Nurse Advice Line is staffed by nurses who give medical advice and cus tomer service staff who verify TRICARE eligibility. If needed, staff can connect the patient with the military treatment facility for an urgent-care appointment, or make a referral to urgent care in the TRICARE network. The Nurse Advice Line works togeth er with our Medical Home Port teams existing resourcesour local appoint ment lines and secure email to con nect you to the care you need, when you need it, said Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. Our care teams are wholly focused on meeting all of your health needs: preventive, routine and urgent. Appointment lines remain the same. At the hospital, call 904-542-4677 or 800-529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. At Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Jacksonville for active duty, call 904546-7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. The hospital is open extended hours in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics: Monday to Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Patients can securely email their doctor for non-urgent issues, with RelayHealth. Sign up at www.relay health.com or the command website. To see photos of the doctors at the hos pital and branch clinics, go to the com mand website click on Medical Home Port and select a team. NH Jacksonville is an early adopter of the Nurse Advice Line, which is rolling out across the military health system in the U.S. this spring. Most TRICARE ben eficiaries are eligible to use the Nurse Advice Line including TRICARE Prime, TRICARE Prime Remote, TRICARE Prime Remote for Active Duty Family Members, TRICARE Standard and Extra, TRICARE Young Adult, TRICARE For Life, TRICARE Reserve Select and TRICARE Retired Reserve. To find out more about NH Jacksonville, visit the command web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax VP-30 wings Navys new NFOsBy Lt. Brian MorganVP-30 Public Affairs OfficerOn April 11 in the Patrol Squadron (VP) 30 Auditorium, retired Capt. Richard Heimerle and VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to the fol lowing officers: Ensign Chad Fox, Ensign Lance LaFlamme, Lt. j.g. Laura Podgorski, Ensign Zachary Sipe and Ensign Nathan Woodason. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer (UMFO) syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted Wings of Gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT I syllabus, they will report to operational Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours at either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii; Whidbey Island, Wash.; or Jacksonville, Fla. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, Fla., where all aviation officers undergo a classroom syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation that includes aerodynamics, meteorology and prin ciples of navigation. After completing API, all stu dent NFOs report for primary training at Training Squadron (VT) 10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10, they transition from a classroom learning environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipe line report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. New 24/7 Nurse Advice Line goes live tomorrowPhoto courtesy of VP-30 (From left) Retired Capt. Richard Heimerle, Ensign Chad Fox, Ensign Nathan Woodason, Lt. j.g. Laura Podgorski, Ensign Zachary Sipe, Ensign Lance LaFlamme and VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 By Morgan KehnertMWR MarketingHundreds of Sailors and Marines enjoyed a sunny, yet breezy after noon on April 24 at the Spring Barracks Bash presented by NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department and the Liberty Program. The free event featured picnic-style food, T-shirts and prizes that included gift packages from the Jacksonville Suns, Beats Studio headphones, area restaurant gift cards, an Xbox One and much more. This has always been a great event and it continues to get better every year! said Liberty Program Manager Tom Kubalewski. The barracks bash events are always high energy, unique and everyone always has a great time. As soon as the event is over, people already start asking when the next one will be. It is a pleasure for us to plan and implement an event like this that has such a high impact with our military personnel. Entertainment includ ed music by Chillula, a dance band based in St Augustine, Fla., that spe cializes in blending the styles of R&B, Funk, HipHop, Soul, Rock, Reggae and Jazz. Barracks bashers look ing for competitive enter tainment could choose from the 26-foot climb ing wall, volleyball, the inflatable slam dunk hoop, gladiator jousting, bag toss, human bowling, the splash blast and the test-of-strength machine high striker. Volunteer and attendee YNSN Arnick Alinaya of NAS Jax said, The bash was a great way to let off some steam this week. The raffle was a nice sur prise and free food is the best type of food! I was just glad I could partake and volunteer in this event. MWR thanks every one who participated in or volunteered for this event. Sponsors University of Phoenix, USAA, the Jacksonville Suns and VyStar Credit Union were generous in their support of the Spring Barracks Bash.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. NAS Jax Spring Barracks Bash is a hit The volleyball court was very popular with Sailors at the MWR Spring Barracks Bash held near the outdoor pavilion by the barracks. (From right) Tom Kubalewski, MWR Liberty Center manager, presents the Beats Studio headphones to VP-30's AWO3 Joseph Westberry. When CS2 Rodteashia Washington of Naval Hospital Jax heard her name called as the winner of the Xbox One, she sprinted to the DJ Booth where MWR Liberty Center Manager Tom Kubalewski presented her with the highly sought after prize. (Left) HM3 Lyndon Acosta of Naval Hospital Jax tests his strength by hitting the mallet against the high striker game. He successfully rang the bell at the top of the tower. (Right) Referee Lance Cpl. Luis Diaz (center) explains the rules of the ring to boxing competitors HM Justina Dubrey and CSSN Jonathan Beck, both of Naval Hospital Jax. MWR Aquatics Director Justin Jonsson served as the resident grill master at the Barracks Bash cookout. The menu included hot dogs, burgers, baked beans, coleslaw and a variety of cold drinks. Bullseye! The new dunk tank game "Splash Blast" proved to be very popular with Sailors, especially AEAN Sean Webber of CNATTU Jax, who thoroughly enjoyed being the guy who got splashed.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 5 As Sailors enjoyed the cookout, Chillula, a St. Augustine dance band, took to the stage for an entertaining, high-energy set. MWR Liberty Center volunteer Momoyo Harris mans the raffle table and helps to distribute the free t-shirts given to the first 300 sailors that attended the MWR Spring Barracks Bash. AWFAN Mykal Sykes and AWO3 Jessica Myrick of VP-30 enjoy a game of bag toss at the April 24 MWR Spring Barracks Bash. AWF3 Donny Smith of VP-30 sets up to roll a strike as his shipmate, AWFAN Jesus Hernandez, acts as a human bowling ball. This gladiator joust was a full-fledged battle between PRAA Cedrick Washington of FRCSE and AME Darrious Francis of VP-45. ATAN Colin Hoy of NAS Jax Air Operations catches major air as he goes in for the inflatable slam-dunk hoop! AWO3 Kelly Hein of VP-30 climbs her way to the top of the 26-foot rock climbing wall.

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Future NAVAIR leaders hone managerial acumenBy Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsNaval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) employees convened at Naval Air Station Jacksonville April 7-11 to participate in the NAVAIR Leadership Development Program (NLDP) capstone class, culminating a lengthy journey designed to enhance their leadership skills. The class is the final requirement for NLDP partici pants and focuses on business ethics, basic analyti cal techniques for decision-making, communication skills, productivity improvement and NAVAIRs longrange strategy. NLDP brings together a unique blend of leader ship experiential learning opportunities interwoven with continuous process improvement fundamentals to better prepare participants for success in their future leadership roles, explained Stephanie Gleason, NLDP program manager with the NAVAIR Total Force Strategy and Management Department. The program is now deployed organically and aims to develop the next generation of NAVAIR leaders to work toward a shared vision. Instructors from the Naval Post Graduate School (NPS) Defense Resource Management Institute (DRMI) delivered the capstone course material. NPS DRMI Professor Kent Wall and NPS DRMI Assistant Professors Cameron MacKenzie and Jay Simon dis cussed the analytical approach to decision-making, structuring decision problems, ways to identify objec tives, cost effectiveness and the uncertainty and risks of making decisions. The 15 participants also visited Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), a military aviation depot, for a familiarization tour of the F/A-18 Hornet and P-3C Orion aircraft production lines and Industrial Manufacturing division. Another tour on board USS Simpson (FFG 56) at Naval Station Mayport, helped the group learn about shipboard life that Sailors expe rience while on sea duty. Many of our NLDP participants have never visited NAS Jax or FRCSE, said Gleason. So by touring the military depot, it exposes them to command business and site operations. Additionally it connects them to the fleet and the work we do to sup port our Sailors and Marines. FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna who discussed his three Widely Important Goals team, schedule and cost, also briefed NLDP participants. NLDP events are vital to our workforce develop ment, said Kemna. It is a great opportunity to broad en their knowledge of the organization and establish a valuable network between peers and leaders across the enterprise. Guest speaker Dr. Richard Pimentel, internation ally renowned speaker, author and disability activist, joined the group during a working lunch April 8 to dis cuss leadership and diversity. I have three sources for wisdom Aristotle, Henry Thoreau and Steven King, said Pimentel. Aristotle stated that, he, who cannot be a good follower, cannot be a good leader. Perhaps one of the hardest things a leader will ever do is to ask someone to make a sacrifice for a goal or vision. Leadership is about having a vision, but people need to know how it relates to them. Sometimes you learn more from the poor leaders, Pimentel told the group. Seek knowledge and wisdom so that you can be a competent leader. A company president once asked me to sum up what a leader is in one sentence. What I came up with is this. Here is what leaders know, peo ple are more important than stuff! Photos by Kaylee LaRocqueJay Simon, assistant professor of the Defense Resources Management Institute, Naval Postgraduate School, discusses managerial structuring decision problems and ways to identify objectives during the Naval Air Systems Command Leadership Development Program at NAS Jacksonville on April 8. Lt. Cmdr. Joshua Filbey, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) F/A-18 Hornet production officer and test pilot explains the production schedule of the FRCSE F/A-18 line to Naval Air Systems Command Leadership Development Program participants on April 7. During a tour at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, participants of the Naval Air Systems Command Leadership Development Program examine an F/A-18 Hornet separated in two halves to replace the center barrel. Lt. Cmdr. Rick Foster, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) P-3 product officer, discusses the P-3C Orion overhaul capabilities at FRCSE with Naval Air Systems Command Leadership Development Program participants during a tour of FRCSE. Lt. Cmdr. Rick Foster, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) P-3 product officer, discusses the P-3C Orion overhaul capabilities at FRCSE with Naval Air Systems Command Leadership Development Program participants. Terry Cox Sr., Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) machine shop supervisor, explains how FRCSE artisans make F/A-18 aeronautical parts to Naval Air Systems Command Leadership Development Program participants Phillip Rooney (center) and Charles Barrow (right). Dr. Richard Pimentel, internationally renowned speaker, author and disability activist, talks about some of the challenges he's faced during his various careers and his perception of various leadership qualities with Naval Air Systems Command Leadership Development Program participants (from left) Cmdr. Richard Braunbeck, Hely Gonzalez and Judy Overhauser-Duett at NAS Jacksonville on April 8.See NLDP, Page 7 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014

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By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public AffairsNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast awarded a $5.4 million contract April 17 to Industrial Power Systems Inc., of Maumee, Ohio, to replace underground piping at the Navy Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) in Jacksonville. There is a need to replace an exist ing single wall underground trans fer pipeline, built in 1952, said FLC Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Duke Heinz. The work includes the construction of new above-ground fuel piping, new PIG (pipeline inspection gauges) launching and receiving stations, and a new meter proving station with an option for the removal of the existing underground piping. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) requires that all underground fuel pip ing be brought above ground or be placed into secondary containment by the year 2010. The FDEP approved allowing the piping for this location to remain in operation beyond 2010 provided this project was submitted, said Heinz. New construction is the only feasible alternative to meet FDEP requirements to bring underground fuel piping above ground. The Defense Fuel Supply Point (DFSP) Jacksonville is a primary storage point for JP-5 in the Southeast. Reliable pip ing transfer and environmentally-com pliant pipelines is key. DFSP Jacksonville has been called upon to re-supply locations including Patrick Air Force Base (AFB), MacDill AFB, DFSP Tampa, Homestead Air Reserve Base, NAS Key West, and NAS Pensacola. The project is expected to be com plete by February 2016. NAVFAC Southeast awards $5 million contract for fuel piping workAccording to NLDP participants Kristen Pedersen and Cmdr. Rick Braunbeck, the capstone course proved beneficial in closing out the programs journey. The capstone class for NLDP was a wonderful culmination of the NLDP experience, said Pedersen, the Triton affordability lead at NAVAIR. The experts we met in and out of the classroom were inspiring, both for what they have done and for the tools they have shared to foster our growth. I am also fortunate to have been able to attend the class at NAS Jax that included a tour of the production hangars and manufacturing spaces at FRCSE. As one of the few active duty par ticipants in NLDP, the program has pro vided me with deeper insight into how NAVAIR functions at all levels, added Braunbeck, NAVAIR maintenance offi cer and deputy aircraft controlling cus todian officer. The time we spent tour ing FRCSE and NAS Jax was very benefi cial. I appreciate the time and attention provided to our class at FRCSE from the men and women on the floor to the commanding officer. I work daily with Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers in Patuxent River, Md., so I had some pride in having my classmates see the impressive activities the artisans per form at FRCSE. This is an outstanding course to ben efit our future leaders, said Gleason. It is critical that we continue to invest in our people and prepare them for suc cess in a dynamic and challenging pro gram. NLDPFrom Page 6 Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesEducation mattersNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (right) delievers welcoming remarks at the 2014 Florida Advisory Council for Military Education (FL-ACME) Educational Symposium for Education Service Officers (ESO) and Military Educational Advisors on April 22. This three-day symposium aims to help active duty military and veterans build a better future through education. Im very proud of the training and education the Navy provides to our Sailors, and thank ful to the ESOs who enable them to change their lives through the guidance and educational counseling they provide, Undersander said. As the Navy achieves its retention goals, higher education and the right credentials become even more important. The more we can motivate Sailors to continue to pursue college degrees, the better off our 21st century Navy will be. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 7

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Newly certified victim advocates recognizedBy MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsNearly 50 military and civilian vic tim advocates joined leaders from vari ous tenant commands gathered at NAS Jax Mulberry Cove Marina Pavilion for a Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) victim advocate appreciation cookout. Sponsored by NAS Jax SAPR Program, the event was held to show apprecia tion to personnel who volunteered their time to learn serve as victim advocates and support victims of sexual assault. Sexual Assault Prevention Coordinator Tina Vaughn from Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) wel comed the guests. As part of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, we wanted to bring unit and civilian victim advocates together to say thank you for stepping up, explained Vaughn. Vaughn then introduced NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. I want to thank you all for your time, effort and dedication in completing the substantial amount of training required to become a certified victim advocate. Over the last year, the Navy has increased focus on this issue of sexual assault, as well as increas ing the training for victim advocates. I appreciate your devotion and loyalty to this program. Your role as a victim advocate will answer an important need in the military. Undersander also acknowledge that solutions to prevent this crime will most likely come from the younger peer groups, and encouraged the victim advocates to funnel ideas to him so he could represent them to the executive steering committee. Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer share her toughts about the importance of the event. We play an important role in helping our victims from sexual assault crimes. We now have the capability at our hos pital to do safe examinations, as well as at our branch clinics. We also maintain a memorandum of understanding with hospitals out in town, just in case some one doesnt feel comfortable coming to base. To me, you are all heroes. As a commanding officer, I am comforted because I know that when victims come to you, they are in the very best hands possible. I know you all will do every thing you can to help the victims to get the care and support they need. I know you all dedicated a tremendous amount of time and energy to complete this course, she said. At the award ceremony, Undersander and Shaffer presented a Letter of Appreciation to each victim advocate. HM2(AW) Carla Nicholas of Naval Hospital Jacksonville said, It feels good to be recognized for the completion of this course. I decided to become a vic tim advocate because I want to help people. Sexual assault is present in the military and so many people feel like they dont have a voice. So my part as an advocate is to help victims of this crime realize their different options and to give them that voice to speak up. Individuals responsible for sexual crimes need to be brought to justice. According to Vaughn, the certified victim advocates undergo constant training to maintain their certification that must be refreshed every two years. SAPR Support Civilian Victim Advocate LaTresa Henderson from FFSC said, This gathering is a great opportunity for advocates to network with each other outside of the training environment and become familiar with other advocates who may assist them in the future with resources or their experiences while working as vic tim advocates. For more information on victim advo cacy, contact Tina Vaughn at 904-5424717. Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander thanks victim advocates for their time and support during an appre ciation cookout held on April 24 at Mulberry Cove Marina Pavilion. Sexual Assault Response Coordinator Tina Vaughn from NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center congratulates the newly certified victim advocates. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Underander (left) and Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer (right) present a Letter of Appreciation to AO2 Devanae Bradley from NAS Jax for the completion of a vic tim advocate certification. Three $1,000 college scholarship opportunities announced From the NAS Jax All Officers Spouses ClubThe NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club is sponsoring three $1,000 scholarships based on scholarship merit and community service. Eligibility: U.S. Navy active/reserve duty and active/reserve duty dependents who are cur rently in their senior year of high school or a high school graduate, attached to NAS Jacksonville and planning to attend an accredited college in the fall of 2014 or spring of 2015. Scholarships are to be used only for tuition and tuition-based fees charged by the college and will be sent to the college. Three scholarships will be awarded; each in the amount $1,000 one active duty, one offi cer dependent, and one enlisted dependent. Criteria: Recipients will See SCHOLARSHIP, Page 13 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014

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By Barbie SmolinskiSpecial ContributorShortly after returning home from giving birth to her first child, a navy spouse received a phone call from a Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMRCS) visiting nurse, inquiring if she would like a home visit. Ather accepted the offer. Sandra Jackson, a visiting nurse for NMRCS Jacksonville, called Ather as a way to maxi mize her time. I saw on my list of patients that two new mothers lived in the same neighborhood. I was in the area, so I called Kendra to see if she would like a home visit for her new child. Jacksons call came at just the right time. I was having trouble nursing and thought it might be great to get some help, said Ather. With baby scale and stetho scope in tow, Jackson knocked on the door of Athers home in Middleburg. Jackson never expected to see a familiar face on the other side. When Ather and her mother, Catherine Carter, came to the door to greet Jackson she and Carter stood in shock as they recognized each other. We looked at each other like, This cant be. Is it really her? said Jackson. They had met 20 years ago when Jackson had been the visiting nurse for Carter when Ather was born. Carter and Jackson embraced, while Ather stood by perplexed. I wondered how does my mom know this lady? said Ather. I was really surprised to find out Sandra had been my visiting nurse, too. Jackson made several home visits to Carter (a retired first class petty officer dental tech nician) in 1993 and meeting again so many years later felt like a family reunion. To my knowledge, this has never happened before in all of the Society, and Im glad it hap pened to me, Jackson said of being a visiting nurse for three generations of the same family. Jackson has been an NMCRS visiting nurse for the past 27 years and is currently the lon gest-serving visiting nurse in the Society. I wanted to find a nursing job that allowed me to spend more time with my children, said Jackson. I saw an advertisement in the paper for a part-time posi tion as a visiting nurse with Navy Marine Corps Relief Society. I applied and was hired February 24, 1987. In 1922, NMCRS started the visiting nurse program because of the lack of medical care for dependents in naval hospitals. The vision of the vis iting nurse program has shifted since those early days of pro viding in-home medical care to providing health educa tion for new moms and baby wellness through personalized home visits. I base my visits on the needs of the mother. I assist them with any questions or issues they may have. I check their vitals, and all of my find ings are reported back to the hospital. Jackson loves and takes pride in her work, and is thankful for the bonds she has created in this position through the years. My patients are like family, said Jackson. This has truly been the highlight of being a visit ing nurse. I will never forget this experience, these great ladies and their little man who brought us all back together. From Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsMost importantly, how will having a child affect your naval career? The policy instruction on pregnancy and parenthood (OPNAVINST 6000.1C) in the Navy was released in 2007. While the Navy Office of Womens Policy is working on an updated version due out next year, now is good time to review some of the policies and respon sibilities that affect you and your family. Notify your command So youve just found out that youre having a baby! Sailors are required to inform their commands of their preg nancy and parenthood status as soon as possible, but no later than two weeks from the time the pregnancy is con firmed by a medical professional. This ensures the safety of the servicewoman and child. OPNAVINST 6000.1C lists the forms that service members are required to submit to their administrative office, and provides a samples of the pregnancy notification to the Commanding Officer (CO) or Officer in Charge (OIC) and pregnancy counsel ing form. Family Care Plan Single parents and dual military cou ples with eligible children are responsi ble for completing a family care plan (in accordance with OPNAVINST 1740.40, Navy Family Care Policy). This plan is submitted to their respective com mands to ensure that their child or chil dren will be cared for during the service members absence. The plan identi fies a caregiver and potential logistical relocation plans and financial arrange ments. Commanding Officers Responsibility COs are responsible for creating an environment where Sailors are treated NMCRS Visiting Nurse helps next generationPhoto by Barbie Smolinski (From left) NMCRS Visiting Nurse Sandra Jackson, Kendra Ather holding her infant son, and Catherine Carter.Parenthood and pregnancy in the Navy: 6 things Sailors should knowSee PREGNANCY, Page 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 9 Whatever your age, history of injuries or experience with yoga, your body and mind will benefit from the yoga classes offered at Prana Yoga Studio, now open in Orange Park. Prana Yoga will offer a hot yoga mixture of 60and 90-minute classes with 26 posi tions originally developed by Bikram Choudhury, said Sergio Gonzales, studio owner and instructor. The heated room 105 degrees Farenheit and a humidity index of 40 -allows for a deeper stretch and movement among the ligaments, joints and muscles and facilitates the release of toxins. While heat adds to the chal lenge, the major focus is being still and breathing, Gonzales said. Postures in hot yoga focus on decompressing the spine, he said. Its said that a healthy spine means a healthy life and a healthy life means a happy life. Hot yoga increases blood flow and flexibility and a low-impact cardiovascular workout equiva lent to running a mile. Over time, hot yoga is known to improve metabolism, aid in weight loss, improve nervous system function and flexibility. Hot yoga tones the muscles, builds the immune sys tem and improves blood circula tion and the overall wellbeing of the mind and body. In January 2013, Gonzales retired as an officer with 23 years in the U.S. Army. He complet ed rigorous training courses and took part in operations in Iraq that took its toll on his body. He eventually had cervical neck sur gery and surgery on both feet. Fortunately, hot yoga provided healing effects for the mind and body before and after the surger ies. Gonzales graduated from the Bikram yoga teacher training course in the fall of 2012 and has been teaching since January of 2013 at area yoga studios. He is currently completing a Hatha teachers training 200-hour course. Instructor Humberto Castillero has been on a spiritual search over the past 25 years that would allow him to connect mind, body and spirit to eventually attain enlightenment. He will be offer ing Kundalini yoga and med itation classes to be scheduled monthly and will increase fre quency based on the needs of the community. Kundalini yoga focuses on opening energy cen ters, or chakras, by regular prac tice of meditation, pranayama, chanting mantra and yoga asana. My ultimate goal is to con quer all fears, self-doubts and judgment, and to live a free and fulfilling life while connecting to the universal mind, Castillero said. I live by the motto, Today I am alive, today I live my life. Castillero is scheduled to obtain his 500-hour teacher cer tification which includes 200 hours of Hatha yoga, 200 hours of Kundalini yoga and 100 hours of Ayurveda. He will become a 500-hour registered yoga teacher in June. Located in the Toys R Us cen ter at 1980 Wells Road, Orange Park, Prana Yoga Studio is offer ing a free day of yoga during its grand opening May 3. Visit on Facebook (Prana-Yoga-OrangePark) or online at pranayogaorangepark.com for a schedule of classes, pricing and com plete details about the programs offered and the instructors. Take the first step to better health today. Free day of yoga at Prana Yoga Studio May 3 Sergio Gonzales Humberto Castillero

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mission brief with the SOF. Cobb said, Since the SOF personnel are descending freely without the aid of a harness, safety and training are para mount in this exercise. The training at Camp Blanding allowed the Navy and Army person nel to practice basic fast rope and rap pelling operations, as well as more advanced assaults at Camp Blandings Military Operation in Urban Terrain (MOUT) facility, for both day and night operations. The MOUT complex allowed aircrew and fast ropers to prac tice hovering or landing on the roof of a building. Located near Starke, Camp Blanding is the primary military reserva tion and training base for the Florida National Guard, including the 3-20th Special Forces Group one of two Army National Guard groups assigned to the U.S. Army Special Forces. HS-11From Page 1of the RAN members stationed in Jacksonville. At the end of the Second World War, ANZAC Day was expanded to include Australians who died in that war. In subsequent years, ANZAC Day has been further broadened to include Australians killed in all the military operations in which Australia has been involved. For members of 725 Squadron, it was a solemn time to reflect on the sacrifices of all those that have served and a time to remember those that have paid the ulti mate sacrifice whilst serving their country. It was also a time to think about those who are cur rently serving in areas of conflict both ashore and at sea. Speaking on behalf of his squadron in remembrance of those who bravely served, Frost said, We dont remember ANZAC day as a victory or for some glorifi cation of the horrors of war. We remember ANZAC day as a testament to the human spirit possessed in those who have fought and died. Wreaths were placed at the base of the World War statue. A bugler played the Last Post, followed by a minute of silence. The ceremony was concluded with the playing of the national anthems of the United States and Australia. On completion of the service, members of 725 were joined by their families and USN counterparts for a special breakfast aboard NAS Jacksonville. with dignity and respect. As such, COs must ensure that pregnant servicewom en are not subjected to harassment, imposition of personal opinions, or infringement of legal rights. Once preg nancy is confirmed, COs will ensure servicewomen receive counseling on military entitlements to obstetrical care, policy on worldwide assignability, and have been afforded the opportu nity to be counseled by a Health Care Professional (HCP). Leave for the Birth of a Child COs will make an effort to allow new parents to take 10 days of Parental Leave (formerly known as Paternity Leave) in conjunction with their wife giving birth to their child. Its free leave and does not count against your regular leave balance. New mothers are granted a minimum of 42 days of convalescent leave (CONLV) upon leaving the hos pital after the birth of their child. If the servicewomen experienced any medi cal complications, the mothers doctor can recommend an extension of CONLV beyond the 42 days, notifying the moth ers command of the extension. Getting back in shape for the PFA Postpartum servicewomen are required to gradually resume an indi vidual exercise program under the guidance of their HCP. Postpartum servicewomen are exempt from par ticipating in a physical fitness assess ment (PFA) for six months following convalescent leave and upon return to full duty status by an HCP. At the con clusion of this six month period, ser vicewomen are required to participate in the next PFA cycle, as outlined the Command Fitness Leader Operating Guide: Managing PFA Records for Pregnant/Postpartum Servicewomen. Adopting a Child COs can authorize up to 21 days of non-chargeable leave to any service member adopting a child in a qualify ing adoption, to allow the service mem ber to bond with their adopted child and work out family arrangements and schedules. Adoption leave may be used in conjunction with regular leave. Additionally, a service member who adopts a child is authorized four months operational deferment. PREGNANCYFrom Page 9 HS-11 Training Officer Lt. Cmdr. Justin Cobb and Lt. Sam Ansel conduct a tactical approach to a 20-foot hover in an HH-60H Seahawk helicopter with AWR1 Daniel Mills, AWR2 Alex Reeder and AWR3 Elijah Perry who assisted special forces to egress via fast rope. As dusk falls, HS-11 pilots Lt. Ben Smith and Lt. Trent Daluto hold a 20-foot hover with AWR1 Thomas Nutzmann, AWR2 Clayton Miller and AWR3 Jason Odle while inserting special operations personnel via fast rope. Photos courtesy of HS-11As the "Dragonslayers" HH-60H Seahawk helicop ter hovers at 20 feet, two Army special operations soldiers toss out the line specially designed for fast roping. Army special forces per sonnel at Camp Blanding inspect the rigging of a fast rope that they will soon depend on to descend from a 20-foot hover above the ground. Soldiers from the 3/20 Special Forces Group at Camp Blanding practice their fast rope insertion from an HH-60H Seahawk helicopter assigned to the HS-11 "Dragonslayers." Photo by Cristine WatsonRoyal Australian Navy 725 Squadron members gathered in front of the World War I statue at Jacksonvilles Memorial Park in Riverside after their dawn remembrance service on April 25 for ANZAC Day. RANFrom Page 1 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014

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Train track extractionBy Clark PierceEditorHundreds of feet of a military rail road spur, dating back to the 1940s, was recently removed from the NAS Jax apron due to aircraft safety concerns. The train rails, running from the NAS Jax fuel farm to Hangar 1000, represent ed a puncture threat to Navy aircraft and vehicle tires. Corrosion was causing pieces of track to elevate above the concrete apron. Basically, we pulled up the old rail, cleaned the space, and filled it with fresh concrete, said Airfield Facilities Deputy Manager Winston Rogers. When we pulled up enough track to fill a truckload, we notified the base Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) department. They had a recycling agreement with a local scrap yard and turned the abandoned rails into a mod est money maker for MWR. NAS Jax Occupational Safety Manager Ron Williamson has writ ten extensively about the history of the base. The Navy had its own rail system that primarily served supply facilities around NAS Jax. One of the last aban doned rail spurs on base runs from the aircraft wash rack at Hangar 113 to a terminus near the NAS Jax Boathouse. He added, Many old timers will remember the railroad crossings at the Yorktown and Birmingham gates, as well as the tracks that paralleled Allegheny Road. This corroded World War II-era rail spur embedded in the airport apron is being removed to assure aircraft and vehicle safety.Photos by Clark PierceIn this archival photo, a Navy switch engine crosses Yorktown Avenue near the main gate. It is a GM 44-ton dieselelectric military version locomotive built during World War II with a drop cab. The former USN 65-000345 switcher assigned to NAS Jax was sold to the Florida Gulf Coast Railroad Museum in Parrish, Fla. Photo courtesy of Ron WilliamsonAfter the rails are removed, a paving crew prepares the void for new concrete.Weve been workin on the railroad . .Near NAS Jax Hangar 1000, workers pour and finish concrete that fills the void left by the removal of a train spur. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 11

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FRCSE artisans train the fleetBy Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsArtisans at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) are training service members and Department of Defense civilians on corrosion control and painting techniques to better sustain aircraft in the fleet. The Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Aircraft/Ground Support Equipment (GSE) Corrosion Control Course is a weeklong class required for mili tary members and civilians who maintain aircraft and GSE. Students learn the fundamentals of detecting cor rosion on aircraft or GSE, how to remove corrosion by grinding and sanding the areas, and how to use the appropriate protective coatings, sealers, primers and paints based on various types of metals. This course is a 40-hour class consisting of class room and laboratory instruction, explained FRCSE Aircraft Corrosion and Paint Instructor Eric Crook, one of three facilitators at the military depot. We offer about 40 corrosion classes each year with students coming here from all over the world. We also offer 15 classes at various bases to provide instruction as requested through NAVAIR. This accommodates large numbers of students, saves money and meets the overall training demand. This is a very informative class, stated AD1(AW/ SW) Thomas Moranz of HSM-40. I work on helicopters and am learning the proper way to look for corrosion and do repair work on the fuselage of the aircraft. I dont normally do this at my squadron, but I need to learn how to so I can ensure my petty officers are doing it correctly. This [course] is required to become quality assurance certified. After completing the corrosion course and earning a certification, students can continue the learning process by attending the NAVAIR Paint, Touch-up and Markings Course. This 10-day course teaches students the safety guidelines required when using toxic and flammable chemicals, and basic applications including layout of insignia and lettering, masking tape skills, stenciling, priming and painting. According to David Baird, an aircraft corrosion and paint instructor at FRCSE for the past 13 years and retired Navy chief petty officer, the corrosion course is a prerequisite for the painting course. The students have to know how to safely and cor rectly handle corrosion issues before they tackle prim ing, masking and painting the aircraft or GSE, he said. Once they are certified in corrosion control, they can attend the paint class. We offer 22 classes each year. Students spend time in the classroom learning safety requirements, use of the proper tools and the specifics of insignia measurements, coloring and the exact placement of insignia on the aircraft or equip ment. The instructors task students with masking letters and insignias on sheet metal after practicing their stenciling skills on paper. Once they have completed this assignment, the students will prime and paint the sheet metal. Every insignia or letter on an aircraft is made by Photos by Kaylee LaRocqueDavid Baird (right) a paint training leader at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) explains how to configure stencil insignia and letters on military aircraft to students AM2(AW) Nicholas McCully of VP-10 (center) and AMAN Matthew Cornell of VP-30 on April 1 during a lettering and painting class at FRCSE. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Aircraft Corrosion and Paint Instructor Eric Crook (right) shows AWF1(NAC/AW) David McKinney of VP-30 how to apply primer to cover corrosion areas on a piece of sheet metal before painting during a corrosion class at FRCSE on April 2. AE2(AW/SW) Stephen Peterson of HSM-40 applies a layer of Alodine to seal a corro sion area on a piece of sheet metal during a corrosion class at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. AMAN Addie Schaefer of VP-30 practices her masking skills during an exercise to cre ate words containing 18 letters using "military font" during a lettering and painting class at Fleet Readiness Center. AM2(AW) Nicholas McCully of VP-10 practic es creating aircraft stencils during a lettering and painting class at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. AM2(AW) Justin Petersik of VP-30 carefully measures letters as he masks a board to be painted with Navy aircraft words and insignia at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast during a lettering and painting class. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Aircraft Corrosion and Paint Instructor Eric Crook (right) demonstrates how to use a grinder to remove corrosion from sheet metal to students, AM3 Franklin Randall of VP-30 (center) and AE2(AW) Christian Helstrom of HSM-72. (From left) AE2(AW/SW) Stephen Peterson of HSM40, AM3 James Kaczmarowski of HSM-72, AE2(AW) Christian Helstrom of HSM-72 and AM3 Franklin Randall of VP-30 clean off their pieces of sheet metal after revealing corrosive areas using a chemical com pound. See FRCSE, Page 13 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 13 Intramural Golf Summer League Meeting May 7 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at 11:30 a.m. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Meeting May 14 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at noon at along with rules and required paperwork. Wallyball League Meeting May 21 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork. Badminton Singles League Meeting May 28 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork. Bean Bag Toss Singles Tournament June 23 Tournament takes place at 5 p.m. in the NAS Jax Fitness, Sports and Aquatics Center. The tournament is open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Call the Fitness Center at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil to sign up by June 13. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for Sign up by July 14. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants earn participation points for Sign up by July 14. For more information about any of the sports articles, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com /nasjaxmwr. StandingsAs of April 25SoccerTeam Wins Losses FRCSE 4 0 HITRON 3 0 TPU/PCF 3 0 HS-11 3 1 VP-30 Students 3 1 BHC Jax 2 1 HSM-72 2 2 VP-26 2 2 VP-45 2 2 NAVFAC 1 3 NAVHOSP 0 1 VP-62 0 3 VR-62 0 3 FRCSE F-18 0 4Teams Wins Losses FACSFAC 1 0 NAVFAC Blue 1 0 NAVFAC Gold 1 0 NCTS Gold 1 0 VP-62 1 0 VR-62 1 0 HS-11 Slayers 0 1 Navy Band 0 1 NCTS Blue 0 1 TPU/PCF 0 1 VP-45 0 1 VP-5 0 1Intramural Spring Softball Teams Wins Losses NAVHOSP 5 0 VP-26 4 0 VP-45 Sluggers 4 0 VP-30 4 1 FRCSE Rabid Possums 4 1 CRS-10 3 2 AIR OPS 3 3 CNRSE/NAVY BAND 2 2 FRCSE 900 2 2 VR-58 2 2 VR-62 2 2 FACSFAC 2 3 HS-11 2 3 NCTS 2 3 CBMU202 1 3 FRCSE Tweaks & Geeks 1 4 FRCSE Thrusters 1 5 NBHC Honey Badgers 0 3 VP-45 Scared Hitless 0 5Greybeard Spring Softball Teams Wins Losses NAVFAC 1 0 VP-26 1 0 FACSFAC 0 0 CNATTU 0 1 NECE 0 1hand using masking tape and has to be the exact mea surements, said Baird. It takes a lot of practice to become a skilled painter and this is an excellent starting point. I really love the paint class, said AM3 Emma Kopischke of VP-30. Ive learned how to paint sheet metal and layout letters and stars. I plan to go back to my squadron and use the skills Ive learned here. Once back out in the fleet, the students are encour aged to consult with the experts at FRCSE for any questions that may arise. We are here to help them if they need guidance, said Baird. We love teaching and want them to be successful after they leave our classrooms, so we are always receptive to offering sup port to them in the field. FRCSEFrom Page 12 be selected on scholarship merit and community ser vice. Deadline for application is June 7. Selection of recip ients will be made by June 30. Scholarship application may be picked up at NAS Jacksonville Navy College Office or found on-line at: https://www.fcef.com/wp-content/uploads/CHPScholarship-Application3-14.pdf. You may submit the application by mail to: NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, c/o Mrs. Pam Undersander, 5065 Mustin Road, Jacksonville FL 32212. Questions may be sent to nasjaxaosc@gmail.comNeither the NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. SCHOLARSHIPSFrom Page 8 DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live enter tainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke Lunch bingo Monday through Friday begins at 11:15 a.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open May 10 June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31 Outdoor pool opens for weekend recre ational swim on May 10 Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Dive-in Movie May 23 featuring LEGO Movie Pool opens at 7 p.m., movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free popcorn. Concession stand will be open.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Jacksonville Jaguar tickets on sale soon! Kanapaha Botanical Gardens Trip May 3, $25 Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while sup plies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT! The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Grill & Chill May 13 at 6 p.m. Free hamburgers and hotdogs Paintball Trip May 17 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty May 13 & 27 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests May 15 & 29 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. Command Party Swing into savings & book your com mand golf tournamentMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Summer Camp Registration going on now! Sign-in at the youth centerFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flightAdditional ratings are available including instrument, complex and commercialFind more info. online at jaxnfc.net Photos by Bill BonserCaptain's Cup Soccer MatchA Branch Health Clinic Jax player attacks against VP-26 "Tridents" while the VP-26 players converge in an attempt to steal the ball. VP-26 forwards and Branch Health Clinic Jax defenders go after the ball looking for an advantage over the other team.

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By Lt. Hanayo ArimotoNECE Public AffairsThe Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) hosted members of the Florida Chief Petty Officers Association (FLCPOA) on April 10 as part of the FLCPOAs annual Spring Fling. FLCPOA, established in 1993, holds a spring and fall fling every year. The purpose of the annual event is to recon nect with the Navy and stay in touch with old friends. Fourteen members from FLCPOA took part in the visit to NECE. The members explained that they had an option of touring a ship out in Mayport, but chose NECE because it was a unique opportunity to visit a place that is not widely known. The tour kicked off in the classroom where NECEs Senior Enlisted Leader, HMCS Randall Oakes gave a presenta tion about the command and its 70-year history. The group was lead through the photograph-laced hallways of NECE to the insectary where the entomolo gists rear insects such as Yellow Fever Mosquitoes, Asian Tiger Mosquitoes, and German and American cockroach es, for use in various projects. The group was then guided to NECEs backyard where they were brought into an outdoor enclosure and shown the mosquito larvae breeding pools. Both were constructed in the fall of 2013 and are currently being utilized to test new methods to trap and con trol mosquitoes. At NECEs Testing and Evaluation Department, EN1 Jeremy Anderson gave an equipment demon stration, showcasing different mod els of handheld thermal foggers an Entomologist or a Preventive Medicine Technician would use to apply pesti cides against disease vectors during deployment. The tour concluded in the classroom where the guests were shown a selec tion of NECEs impressive pinned insect collection and live bed bugs. Within the group of touring retired Chiefs, lies a deeper story. Collectively, the group has over 100 years worth of Navy knowledge and experience. During the tour the Chiefs shared sea stories from a different era. Some sto ries told of insect problems in the past where they commented on the lack of chemical options they had or of a par ticularly nasty fire ant situation. I talked with HMC Lorentz A. Semple (Retired), who was a Preventive Medicine Technician, and it was great to discover what Chief culture and tra ditions have been preserved and passed on to future Navy Chiefs, said Oakes. From a chiefs perspective, I saw that the FLCPOAs visit to NECE enhanced not only the entomology community but also the Chief Petty Officers com munity as a whole, Oakes continued. This was the first time NECEs been selected as a destination point by the FLCPOA. By ADC Christopher CobbCNATTU Jacksonville Public AffairsThe Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville will conduct the retirement cere mony to honor the Navys most senior aviation support equip ment technician. ASCM(AW) Michael King, the Senior Enlisted Leader of CNATTU Jacksonville, will retire May 1 at 10 a.m. in the NAS Jacksonville BOQ Pavilion. The ceremony will be pre sided over by Cmdr. Ed Twining, commanding officer of CNATTU Jacksonville. The guest speaker will be retired Cmdr. Daryl Pierce, a for mer commanding officer of CNATTU Jacksonville. King graduated from Milan High School in Michigan in 1973 and enlisted in the U.S. Navy Reserve later that year. He attended recruit train ing in 1974 at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. He attended Aviation Support Equipment Technician Hydraulics (ASH) A school at Naval Aviation Technical Training Center, Millington, Tenn. In 1974, he reported to Naval Air Facility Detroit, Mich., where he drilled as a reservist for 11 years and advanced to the rank to petty officer second class. In March 1985, he transi tioned to active duty. His sub sequent assignments include NAS Cecil Field, Fla., from May 1985 to December 1988, where he served as training petty offi cer, work center supervisor, and production control leading petty officer. From January 1989 to February 1992, he served as IM-4 Division Leading Chief Petty Officer on board USS Forrestal (CV59). From March 1992 to December 1995, he served as logs and records supervisor and maintenance control supervi sor at Patrol Squadron (VP) 30 aboard NAS Jacksonville. From January 1996 to April 1997, he served as maintenance and operations departmental leading chief petty officer at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. From May 1997 to May 1999, he served as AMMT Team Program Process Inspector/ Evaluator at Commander Naval Air Force U.S. Atlantic Fleet. From May 1999 to June 2002, he served as 900 Division LCPO and AIMD Production Control Supervisor at Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD), Jacksonville. From July 2002 to July 2005, he served as IM-4 LCPO, Quality Assurance/ Analysis Supervisor, and Maintenance Master Chief Petty Officer on board USS Ronald Reagan (CVN76). From August 2005 to December 2008, he served as Aviation Support Equipment Technician Career Manager at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training (CNATT), Pensacola. From December 2008 to September 2011, he served as Quality Assurance/Analysis Supervisor and Maintenance Master Chief Petty Officer on board USS Carl Vinson (CVN70). In October 2011, he gradu ated from the Senior Enlisted Academy and was assigned to CNATTU Jacksonville as Senior Enlisted Leader for 185 Navy and Civilian personnel. For 23 years, King has con tributed immeasurably to the development and training of countless new chief petty offi cers, while upholding the stan dards, traditions and legacy of the U.S. Navy Chiefs Mess. His contributions will continue to make a positive impact in the chiefs community for many years to come. He is married to his wife of 35 years, Carole, and has four chil dren Michael, Christopher, Katherine and Heather as well as two grandchildren, Emily and Charles. Florida Chief Petty Officers Association tours NECE JaxPhotos by MC2 Amanda CabasosLt. Hanayo Arimoto from Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) shows Lorentz Semple (right) and Harold Davis from the Retired Chief Petty Officers Association the American cockroach during a tour of NECE April 10. Davis said, I was absolutely fascinated to see so many roaches in one display. HMCS(SW) Randall Oakes of the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence aboard NAS Jax; explains the purpose of the outdoor enclosure to individuals from the Retired Chief Petty Officers Association during a tour. According to Oakes; the facility is designed to test and evaluate new equipment and tech nologies used against pests. EN1(EXW) Jeremy Anderson (right) from Navy Entomology Center of Excellence informs 14 retired chiefs and their spouses about the current pesticide equipment used in the Navy. Eighty-nine-year-old retired Chief Norman King said, I served in the Navy for 33 years and never knew we had a program for pest control. I can see the importance of the program because it has been saving thousands of lives. What they do is a beautiful thing.King retires from CNATTU with more than 40 years serviceASCM(AW) Michael King Hornet travels low and slowArtisans at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) use a crane to remove an F/A-18C Hornet Strike Fighter aircraft from a flatbed truck at the aviation maintenance facility on April 2. The aircraft, assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 251, based in Beaufort S.C., arrives at FRCSE for repairs to the hydraulic system that left it unsafe for flight. It is also due for planned mainte nance and a high-flight-hour induction to check for cracks and corrosion caused by stress fatigue and water intrusion. Photo by Victor Pitts 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014

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By Tina StillionsSpace and Naval Warfare Systems Command Public AffairsThe Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) announced the formation of a Cyber Readiness Team (CRT) during the C4ISR Symposium, Apr. 24 in San Diego. Leadership from SPAWARs Fleet Readiness Directorate (FRD) said the CRT will address many of the fleets key cyber security issues. There are a range of things we are doing to improve fleet readiness, espe cially in regards to cyber, said Capt. John Robey, FRD program manager. We provide teams of folks to go out for cyber security inspections (CSI) to help get them ready. The mantra we operate under at the FRD is that we are the face to the fleet; if you have questions, call us. Robey and Rob Wolborsky, FRD exec utive director, joined Capt. David Wirth, director communications and informa tion systems at Commander, Third Fleet (N6) and Capt. Jose Cisneros, director communications and information sys tems at Commander Naval Air Forces (AIRPAC) N6, during a panel session to discuss improving tools and strength ening the fleets cyber readiness pos ture. Standing up the SPAWAR CRT will help address some of the major issues facing todays warfighter. The majority of the stuff causing ships to fail inspections at an alarming rate is the old systems, or legacy capa bilities, out there that arent secure, said Wolborsky. They arent secure by the standards of the testers. These tes ters test the systems to a certain level, as they should, because if we are ever in harms way, we need to be able to defend our warfighters. The problem, according to Wolborsky, is exacerbated because of outdated soft ware and systems still in use around the fleet. Many of the afloat systems have not been as successful passing cyber inspections, said Robey. The afloat is harder because of more variation and differences in configurations. We are focusing our energies this year on help ing them pass these inspections. Afloat CSI is a much larger hill to climb and a greater challenge. Embedding cyber security into soft ware, systems and programs is imper ative to warfighter effectiveness and adheres to SPAWARs core mission. The CRT, which is similar to an inte grated process team and includes FRD, program offices and SPAWAR engineering and corporate operations will collaborate to improve daily readiness and help mature tools so that the fleet can keep up with emerging requirements. The FRD exists to support the fleets immediate and future C4ISR readiness and includes installation management and execution, fleet support, data cen ter consolidation and cyber. Were very much aligned and get ting laser-focused to address the cyber issue, said Wolborsky, I put every thing into three basic areas in what we are trying to accomplish here. Those three areas include delivering ships out of their availability to the warfighter that are fully functional; making equip ment more secure in light of all the leg acy systems that are out there and at the root of the problem; and ensuring crews are proficient. According to the fleet waterfront par ticipants, cyber security inspections have become the ends rather than the means. What we are seeing is our inability to sustain the level of effort required to meet inspection requirements, said Wirth. What the fleet really needs is the ability to sustain a consistent level of readiness. Right now, its like build ing a house and working down to the foundation. The SPAWAR CRT will leverage orga nizational expertise and work with industry partners to create processes to ensure a stronger cyber posture across the fleet. Navy lags behind many major private IT industry companies in keep ing its systems secure and safe in a growing non-kinetic environment in which networks have become the new battlefield. Layers of bureaucracy are hampering the Navys best effort to stay ahead of the curve. Without money, fleet forces cannot keep pace. The CRT is designed to help rather than hinder an already layered process. We need to look at investing money in IT training for our sailors, said Cisneros. We dont have the embedded support we need either. We need to take a look at how we are addressing those problems, too. The CRT is a new concept developed to help better understanding the exist ing information out there in order to make the best decisions for the vari ous fleet software baselines. The initial task will be to determine what the prob lems are and develop the right tools to address them. It is a major step in the right direction for addressing fleet con cerns. The goal is to help FRD deter mine what to deliver to the fleet, ensure it is not causing additional problems, and work proactively with the fleet to improve its cyber posture from a tech nical authority and acquisition capabil ity delivery perspective. As the Navys Information Dominance systems command, SPAWAR designs, develops and deploys advanced communications and infor mation capabilities for the warfighter. With nearly 10,000 acquisition profes sionals located around the world and close to the fleet, the organization is at the forefront of research, engineering and support services that provide vital decision superiority for the warfighter. SPAWAR stands up new Cyber Readiness Team to address key fleet issues Orion avionics upgradeArtisans from Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) conduct operational systems checks on avionics modifications recently installed on a P-3C Orion, near NAS Jax Hangar 1000 on April 23. FRCSE inducted the aircraft for phased maintenance inspections and upgrades on radio and navigation systems. Once the upgrades are installed, the aircraft is towed to an open area on the flight line for testing satellite communications. Photo by Clark Pierce JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 By Lt. j.g. Torrey Plum VP-8 Public AffairsNineteen Sailors assigned to VP-8 and VP-62 at Cooperative Security Location Comalapa, El Salvador, visited a church in San Salvador April 26 to help with much needed repair work and also to deliver vitamin supplements to the local com munity. Sailors from the VP-8 Fighting Tigers and VP-62 BroadArrows delivered six months worth of vitamins to Iglesia Gran Comision Church in La Libertad. The donations were made possible by squad ron members, families and friends. The Sailors also sanded and painted shelves they assem bled during a previous visit. It was gratifying to see the immediate impact of our contribution and the founda tion it laid for future projects to come, said Ensign Erik Arstein, a naval flight officer with VP-8. We are always happy to lend our support to the people of El Salvador. The Iglesia Gran Comision Church is a non-denomina tional congregation of local residents and missionaries who work to improve the lives of those less fortunate. Some of their work includes nutritional programs that provide healthy meals to children whose fami lies may not be able to afford a balanced diet. They also provide a safe haven for battered and abused women and children. The care and assistance La Gran Comision church provides is a vital lifeline to this El Salvadoran community. It was a great opportunity to interact with the local commu nity, said LS2 Walter Murillo. Its rewarding to get to see first hand how we are having a positive impact on the lives of the people here. The Fighting Tigers are cur rently deployed to the 4th and 5th fleet areas of responsibil ity, assisting in Counter TransNational Organized Crime efforts and providing humani tarian assistance. By Kevin Robinson,DeCA public affairs specialistCommissary Rewards Card users can now download an Android app to access and clip digital coupons. Available free from the Google Play Store, the Commissary Rewards Android app joins the previously released iPhone/iPad app, giving commissary shoppers access to their rewards card accounts through a vast array of smart phones and tablets. Weve tested the Android app and received good reviews on its ability to con nect rewards card users with available coupons, said Marye Carr, the Defense Commissary Agencys rewards card man ager. Now with apps for both operating systems, our patrons have more flexibility on when and where they can clip coupons, review their lists of downloaded coupons and track which ones have been redeemed or expired. The apps also let custom ers connect to the nearest commissary via phone num bers and addresses. And, just like accessing their accounts from a desktop computer, Commissary Rewards Card users can always be plugged into new promotions and con tests customized for them. Kelloggs is offering one such contest, Win a Family 4th of July in Washington DC, from May 1-31 for patrons with Commissary Rewards Cards. The grand prize is a trip to Washington, D.C., with three guests to attend a Nationals baseball game scheduled for July 2. For more details and additional prizes, visit https:// deca.couponselectionpage. com/offers/all on or after May 1. Since it was unveiled in September 2012, the Commissary Rewards Card has become a game-changer for commissary patrons, opening up access to digital coupons redeemable in commissar ies, said DeCA Sales Director Randy Chandler. As the military changes, so is DeCA, and the Commissary Rewards Card is a way the commissary benefit is evolv ing to remain relevant to our service members and their families, Chandler said. Its amazing how card users can get to these electronic savings now more than 150 coupons at a time from either the click of a mouse or now from their own smart phones and tablets. From the programs start through April 4, Commissary Rewards Card users have downloaded more than 26 mil lion digital coupons, and com missaries have redeemed over 3 million for a savings of $3.6 million to patrons. Using the rewards card has become as simple as 1-2-3, Carr said: Get a rewards card at a com missary. Register the card at http:// www.commissaries.com/ rewards/index.cfm Clip or download coupons to your account (they are auto matically loaded to your card). Print a list of your coupons and bring it and your card with you on your next shopping trip. Present your card at check out so the cashier can scan it for coupons that match your purchased items. Digital coupons are automat ically erased from the account as they are redeemed or if they expire. The savings from using cou pons helps our patrons extend their savings even more, Carr said. And, with the mobile apps, they have even more options to access their Commissary Rewards Card accounts for dig ital savings. For more information about the Commissary Rewards Card, go to http://www.com missaries.com/rewards/index. cfm. To reach a customer service hotline, call 855-829-6219 or send an email to commissary support@inmar.com. Month of the Military Child carnivalBy Shannon Leonard MWR Marketing Director On a beautiful spring day, laughter and excite ment filled the air as hundreds of kids and their parents came out to enjoy the annual Month of the Military Child Carnival on April 12 at the Allegheny Softball Fields. The free event is coordinated each year by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Departments Youth Activities Center (YAC) to show military children how much they are appreci ated. Its great to see military families enjoying the carnival. The weather is perfect and I am very pleased with the turnout, said YAC Director Jason McKenzie. The event featured numerous inflatables that provided lots of jumping, sliding and bouncing plus, a rock climbing wall, bungee-run, games, face painting by the staff of the Fleet and Family Support Center, free water and snow cones. Through the generosity of our sponsors, we are able to keep adding to the event, continued McKenzie. This is my second spring carnival and this one is even better. The kids love it. We are really having a good time and appreciate MWR for coordinating this event, said Lt. Robert Bombard, who brought his family to the event. This years sponsors were VyStar Credit Union, USAA, University of Phoenix and USA Discounters. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any com pany, sponsor or its products or services. NAS Jax patrol squadrons help transform livesPhoto courtesy of VP-8LS2 Walter Murillo and Lt.j.g. Andrew Kirchert paint shelves for the Iglesia Gran Comision Church in El Salvador.Commissary rewards card now offers Android appPhoto by Morgan KenhertA future champion at The Masters? Seven-year-old Jeremy Fox swings his golf club for 20 points as he plays the Chip Shot game during the carnival at NAS Jax Allegheny softball field. By Claudette RouloAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department is continuing to support the inter national search mission for miss ing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, Pentagon spokesman Army Col. Steve Warren said April 24. The total cost of the search to date is $11.4 million, Warren said. This figure includes $4,200 per flight hour for the two P-8 Poseidon aircraft involved in the search, he added. The plane and its 239 passengers disappeared March 8 on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. The costs break down as follows, Warren said: maintenance funds; humanitarian disaster and civic aid funds; and search equipment and support. The P-8A Poseidons continue conducting aerial search opera tions, and the Bluefin-21 autono mous underwater vehicle com pleted its 12th search mission, the colonel said. Bluefin-21 has now completed more than 90 percent of a focused underwater search. Unfortunately, no contacts of interest have been found, he said. The department has received no requests for additional underwater search assets, Warren said. The Military Sealift Command dry cargo ship USNS Cesar Chavez joined the task force April 10 to provide logistical support. Chavez is the Navys newest combat logistics force ship, and is operated by a crew of 125 civil ser vice mariners. The ship also has a complement of 11 U.S. Navy personnel, who provide operational support and supply coordination, a Navy news release said.DoD maintains support to find missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 1, 2014 17 By Lt. Christy Chance, JAGCJacksonville Assistance Office, RLSO SEA lease is a binding contract between you and the landlord. Therefore, if you need to terminate your lease, there are steps that you need to take to ensure that you are protected legally and financially. Whether you want to terminate a lease at the end of the contract or earlier, there is a certain protocol you must follow. Living in uninhabitable conditions, renting in an unsafe area, entering active duty service, receiving permanent change of station (PCS) orders, or orders to deploy for a period of not less than 90 days are all reasons why a servicemember might need to terminate a lease early. The following information applies to servicemem bers and their dependents. Contact the JAG early. Your local legal assistance office can help you through the entire process of breaking your lease, including advising you on wheth er you can terminate your lease, drafting the notice to vacate, communicating with the landlord on your behalf, as well as attempting to recover your security deposit. Read your lease. Check your lease to see if it con tains a military clause. While the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) requires landlords to allow ser vicemembers out of their leases in specific situations, sometimes a military clause in a lease can provide additional protections for you or your family. writing. There are six items that should be included in every written notice of intention to vacate: (1) the names of the tenants vacating; (2) the date the notice was written and signed; (3) the intended termination date (4) the address and unit/apartment number of the residence that is being vacated; (5) a forward ing address; and (6) signature of the tenants. It is extremely important to provide a forwarding address if you want to get your security deposit back. Again, your local legal assistance attorney can help you draft proper notice. your lease under the SCRA because you entered active duty, have PCS orders or are deploying for a period of not less than 90 days, you need to provide written of your PCS/deployment orders, preferably with at least 30 days notice. If you do not have a copy of your PCS/deployment orders, then you must get verifica tion (preferably in writing) from your commanding officer, stating that you are moving out of the area on orders or deploying for a period of 90 or more days. more than 60 days notice) or if not specified in the lease then the amount of notice is determined by the length of the tenancy: it details how notice should be delivered. If your lease does not detail how to deliver notice, then the best method is to mail your written notice return receipt requested. Again, your local legal assistance office can help you ensure proper delivery of your notice. Steps to take when moving out to protect your secu rity deposit and protect yourself from owing the land lord money for damages after you move out. ing with the vacating terms. Your lease may state that you are responsible for repainting, having the carpets cleaned professionally, or similar tasks prior to your move out. gives you an idea in terms of what you need to do before moving out in order to comply with the lease agreement. Also remove any trash or debris. that were included with the residence. It is a good idea to have the landlord sign a letter stating they received the above items along with the date they were returned. tion with the landlord prior to moving out. your belongings are moved out and you have cleaned the premises. If there is ever a dispute over damages or the state of the residence when you left, those pho tos and/or videos will be key to proving your case. If you would like more information or want to find the legal assistance office closest to you, contact us at any of our offices listed at: http://www.jag.navy.mil/ legal_services/rlso/rlso_southeast.htm. Clay County Philippine Festival May 3, from 9 a.m.5 p.m. at Orange Park Town Hall, at U.S. 17 and Kingsley Ave. Entertainment, food, arts & USS Iwo Jima (LPH2/LHD7) Reunion Aug. 2731 at Crowne Plaza Hotel in Jacksonville. Call 757723-0317 or http://ussiwojimashipmates.cfns.net/ (MOAA) Northeast Florida Chapter meets every of all military branches. Contact Johnnie.walsh@ gmail.com or call 282-4650. (NNOA) meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. Cmdr. Paul Nix at 542-2518 or paul.nix@navy.mil. Association of Aviation Ordnancemen meets the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on Collins Road. For information, visit www.aao9.com. (VFW) Post 5968 and its Auxiliary located at 187 Aurora Blvd. meets on the second Wednesday of the service organization composed of combat veterans and eligible service members from the Active, Guard or Reserve forces. Go to www.vfwpost5968. org or call 276-5968. at NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military retirees and dependents. Work four hours a day, one day per week. Call 542-5790 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays to volunteer. Ribbons & Roses a breast cancer support group at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. Call 5427857 for more info. Navy Jacksonville Yacht Club is open to active duty, reserve and retired military, plus, active or retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email commodore@njyc.org. Mentoring Program. Helping others help themselves. Visit www.gocompass.org for more info. Navy Wives Clubs of America DID No. 300 meets the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at Call 272-9489. Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 monthly Rd., Atlantic Beach. Call 246-6855. National Active and Retired Federal Employees Westside Jacksonville Chapter 1984 meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Murray Hill United Methodist Church, (Fellowship Hall Building) at 4101 College Street. Call 7867083. Retired Enlisted Association meets the fourth Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Hall at 7673 Blanding Blvd. Call 772-8622. The right way to terminate a lease, and steps to take during move out STATE Week to Week Month to Month Quarter to Quarter Year to YearFLORIDA 7 days notice 15 days notice 30 days notice 60 days notice GEORGIA 30 days notice 30 days notice 30 days notice 30 days notice By Terri Moon Cronk American Forces Press Service Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, launched the Veterans Employment Center, the first online one-stop shop ping tool for veterans, transitioning ser vice members and spouses in search of employment. The announcement was made April 23 at a third-anniversary celebration for their Joining Forces initiative at Fort Campbell, Ky. Joining Forces mobilizes all sectors of American society to support service members, veterans and their families. had the time or information they need ed to prepare their resumes, to plot their career goals, to meet with employ ers and get the jobs they deserve. And thats simply not acceptable, the first lady said. As my husband has said, when youve fought for this country around the world, you shouldnt have to fight for a job when you return home. Starting today, she continued, every single service member, every veteran, and every military family will have access to a new online tool that will revolutionize how you find jobs in both the public and private sectors. The online tool is available at http:// ebenefits.va.gov. The new online resource is the first interagency tool to bring together a wealth of public and private job oppor tunities, a resume-builder, military skills translator and detailed career and training resources. In connection with Joining Forces, Affairs, Labor and Education and worked with employers to design and develop the site and incorporate fea tures of existing online employment tools within government. Veterans deserve an authoritative source for connecting with employers, said VA Secretary Eric Shinseki. The online Veterans Employment Center is the single, federal source for veterans looking for new career oppor tunities, service members transitioning to the civilian workforce, and spouses and beneficiaries looking to connect with job opportunities. Resumes are visible to all employers with an active LinkedIn or Google pro file. To prevent spam, applicants names and email addresses are redacted, and are visible only to employers verified by VA as registered companies with the IRS. The site also is built using open data and an open application program ming interface to attract private-sector innovation. At the Fort Campbell event, Biden Employment Partnership, which began in June 2011 with fewer than 60 compa nies. Today, she said, the partnership has 228 partner employers, more than 1.8 Portal, and more than 60,000 military spouse hires to its credit.White House launches one-stop shopping for vets seeking jobs Navy wives to gather May 15-17From Staff attend from clubs throughout the Eastern Region to discuss by-laws, as well as fundraising, for the many charitable non-profit organization, incorporated in 1939 and granted a federal charter in 1984. This organiza tion was formed by a group of military spouses whose com mon goal was to support, befriend and assist other military spouses adjusting to the military way of life. There are cur established in 1985. When BRAC closed Cecil Field in 1999, sands of volunteer hours and dollars to various causes, proj ects and organizations including the Florida Fallen Heros Foundation, the Carillon Bell Tower project located at the Jacksonville Humane Society, and Wreaths Across America, a remembrance wreath-laying ceremony to honor and remember our nations Veterans. Guard or the Active Reserve units of these services. Spouses of enlisted personnel, who have been honorably discharged, retired or have been transferred to the Fleet Reserve on completion of duty are also welcome. If you like to help others in our community, and have fun right for you. For more information, go to their Facebook Community Calendar

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