Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02087


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Maritime Patrol Association 2014 Symposium heldFrom StaffShowing a strong comeback from last years sequestration-affected schedule of events, the 2014 Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) Symposium celebrated the members of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) past and present with the theme, Transition: On Station, aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville April 10-11. As we look at the history of our great community the people who design our aircraft, build them, maintain them and fly them we are reminded of the aviation expertise that has allowed our community to transi tion through numerous aviation platforms, said VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curt Phillips, vice president of MPA. Just as the P-2V Neptune flew side by side with the oncoming P-3 Orion in 1964 today, P-8A Poseidons from By StaffNAS Jacksonville and City of Jacksonville emer gency responders converged on Tillie Fowler Regional Park April 17 to participate in a simulated P-8A Poseidon aircraft crash exercise with multiple casualties. The drills scenario involved a P-8A aircraft assigned to VP-45 that was approaching the air field and declared a malfunction with one of its two engines. The NAS Jax control tower cleared them for a direct emergency approach from west of the station and immediately notified the air field crash crew and the Navy Region Southeast Regional Dispatch Center (RDC) of the situation. As the simulated VP-45 flight crew made their approach, the aircrafts second engine lost power causing it to crash in a heavily wooded area of the park. This integrated training exercise is designed www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 2014 I I D E 4TH FLEET COC Ballance Relieves Harris Page 3 ONE SPARK Navy Band Southeast Rocks VP-8El Salvador Outreach Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com From USS Harry S. Truman Public AffairsApproximately 6,000 Sailors and Marines assigned to the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) arrived at their homeports in Norfolk, Va., Jacksonville and Mayport, April 17, following a ninemonth deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation. While deployed, HST CSG conducted a full range of operations ranging from maritime security operations and multinational exercises, to providing air support for Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. HST CSG also conducted integrated operations with the French navys Charles de Gaulle Strike Group over a five-week period in the Gulf of Oman, Arabian Sea, and Arabian Gulf. I cannot overstate how proud I am of our young Sailors and Marines in the Truman Carrier Strike Group, said Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, commander, HST CSG. They performed magnificently during some very challenging times overseas. We were deployed for nine months, including seven and a half months straight supporting operations in the Middle East region with a focus on building trust and confidence with our regional partners. Across the spectrum of operations at sea and in the air over Afghanistan, our crews executed with precision and professionalism, and when called upon, with great lethality. Squadrons assigned to Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 flew 2,902 combat sorties totaling more than 16,450 hours in support of OEF from Aug. 27, 2013 to March 19. Team Battle Axe was on point, every day, on every mission, said Capt. George Wikoff, commander, CVW-3. Everyone remained focused on mission accom plishment, from the aircrew in the cockpits to the maintainers keeping the aircraft flying, determined to keep our coalition troops safe on the ground in Afghanistan. Everything we did as an air wing, we did as a team, said Wikoff. If it wasnt for Team Truman keeping the flight deck ready to launch and recover our aircraft, we wouldnt have been able to provide support to our coalition forces. Capt. Bob Roth, commanding officer, USS Harry S. Photo by MC2 Amanda Cabasos A crash vehicle arrives on scene during the aviation mishap drill, where firefighters begin pumping water onto the smoking Mobile Aircraft Firefighting Training Device that represents a P-8A Poseidon.Poseidon goes down in mock emergencyPhotos by Clark PierceYoung Emma Wich, whose daddy is a pilot with HSM-74, expressed her feelings through a baby carriage poster prepared by her mom, Jennifer. After nine months of deployment with Carrier Air Wing-3 on board aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman, the Swamp Fox "show bird" No. 700 touches down on the seawall at NAS Jax on a gusty afternoon.CVW-3, H SM-74 RETURN HO ME See Page 9 See Page 6 See Page 8 Photo by Capt. Jane CampbellCommander, Fleet Forces Command Adm. Bill Gortney, addresses Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance officers from Wing-11 and VP-30 during his visit to NAS Jacksonville on April 10.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-7789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley From StaffApril 24 1778 Continental Navy Sloop Ranger captures HMS Drake. 1862 Battle of New Orleans. Union Navy under David Farragut runs past forts into Mississippi River. 1884 Navy steamer USS Bear left New York Naval Shipyard as part of the Greely Arctic Relief Expedition. Steamers USS Thetis and USS Alert would join the mission a week later. Greely and six other survivors were found at Cape Sabine on June 23. 1906 Ceremonies at U.S. Naval Academy com memorate John Paul Jones, with President Theodore Roosevelt delivering keynote address. 1917 U.S. destroyer squadron departs Boston for European service. 1959 Organization of American States (OAS) asks U.S. to establish naval patrols off east coast of Panama to prevent invasion of Cuban forces. 1974 Naval forces begin minesweeping operations in the Suez Canal Zone. April 25 1862 Union naval forces occupy New Orleans, La. 1914 First combat observation mission by Navy aircraft (two Curtiss Model F flying boats) at Veracruz, Mexico. 1959 USS Eversole (DD 789) rescues 14 Nationalist Chinese fishermen from their sinking fishing trawler in the Formosa Strait. April 26 1869 The Good Conduct medal was authorized. 1952 USS Hobson (DMS-26)) sinks after collision with aircraft carrier USS Wasp (CV-18) in the North Atlantic 176 lives lost. April 27 1861 President Lincoln extended blockade of Confederacy to Virginia and North Carolina ports. 1865 Body of John Wilkes Booth brought to Washington Navy Yard. April 28 1862 Naval forces capture Forts Jackson and St. Philip in Louisiana. 1965 Dominican Republic intervention. 1944 Navy LSTs (Landing Ship, Tank) attacked during Operation Tiger. 1993 SECDEF memo orders armed forces to train and assign women on combat aircraft and most combat ships, but not to ground combat positions. April 29 1814 Sloop-of-war USS Peacock (22 guns) captures the18-gun HMS Epervier. 1898 U.S. warships engage Spanish gunboats and shore batteries at Cienfuegos, Cuba. 1944 Fast carrier task force (12 carriers) commence two-day bombing of Truk. 1975 Operation Frequent Wind, the helicopter evacuation of American citizens from Saigon, begins. The last helicopter lifted off the roof of the United States Embassy at 7:52 p.m. carrying Marine security guards. April 30 1798 Congress establishes Department of the Navy. 1973 The last Marine Corps NAP (enlisted Naval Aviation Pilot) retired. Master Gunnery Sgt. Patrick ONeil enlisted during World War II and completed over 30 years of active duty. 1975 Saigon falls to North Vietnamese forces. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorLast week, I posted the following on Facebook: Why didnt anyone tell me that this parenting stuff just keeps get ting harder? The responses were amusing: We didnt want to scare you. At least you have boys! We wanted you to hand onto that little bit of hope. Its on a need-to-know basis. Until my college roommate, Jenny, who just had a baby last month, wrote, What!?! Harder??!! Im in month one! I thought it was supposed to get easier. Oops. I looked at Jennys page and saw picture after picture of someone in new mom mode: air-dried hair pulled back in a pony tail, dark circles under the eyes, and the timid smile of some one who isnt quite sure yet. Jenny is in the thick of sleepless nights. But there is her newborn baby, peacefully asleep on her shoulder. This weighing of the pros and cons is familiar to any woman who has made a decision to quit having babies, only to find herself strangely mesmerized and exhausted (at the same time) by any newborn. On the one hand, having a child who sleeps 90 percent of the day seems like a piece of cake compared to having a moody teenager. On the other hand, my teenager puts himself to bed, and when he gets up at 5 a.m., he lets me sleep in. Its hard to know, then, which stage is easiest. Below, Ive tried to sort it out. 0-2 Years Pros God doesnt let new babies walk for a reason moms arent ready yet. Like the speed on a treadmill, mother hood, in the beginning, advances incrementally. Life for the new mom is seemingly unaffected.* The baby goes where it wants, when it wants. He doesnt even have much of an opinion about it yet either. Cons *Mom is lucky if she gets two uninterrupted hours of sleep each night, her hormones are out of control, and getting out the door for something as simple as a doctors appointment feels like it requires written instruc tions. And thats to say nothing of the diapers. 3-4 Years Pros Whats more cute than a tod dler in overalls whose bottom is heavily padded by a diaper? There is no school calendar yet. No after-school activi ties. Baby fits into moms life (he goes to yoga and sleeps in the baby carrier; he attends parties suspended and immo bile on moms back) not the other way around. Cons The Terrible Twos are a lie. It all goes downhill at age 3, and the moods dont get better again until the child goes to college. (So Im told.) The best birth control is being around a 3-year-old before dinner. Elementary School Pros Freedom. At last, they are off doing their own thing (school) six hours of the day. Their homework is easy and you can help them with it. Cons Freedom. They are gone six hours a day. Their homework is easy, and therefore, you have no excuse: you have to help them with it. Middle School Pros Math just got infinitely harder. You are off the hook for homework help. The kids bathe themselves and go to bed on their own. You can go to the grocery store and leave them at home. Cons Well, its middle school. And its puberty. So its like having a scary 3-year-old again, only with longer, hairier legs. Band-Aids dont fix much any more. Neither does kissing the boo boo. Big kids equal bigger problems. The same night of my Facebook post, I talked to my friend Dawn. She is ahead of me in the parenting business, as hers are all grown. She had bad news for me: the heart ache of motherhood doesnt end. Neither do the sleepless nights, the dark circles and the smile that says, Am I doing any of this right? My response was somewhat like Jennys on Facebook: What? You mean it doesnt get easier? Even when they are grown? Dawn threw me a bone: at least, with time comes perspective and insight. And this is why mothers new and old have each other. Dawn is my road side flagger on the highway: Prepare to stop! Bumps ahead. Theres a little bit of wonderful and a whole lot of self-doubt and heartbreak at every stage. But even a green mom like Jenny has the biggest lesson of all figured out. On her Facebook page soon after, she posted, So Ive decided, its really hard being a mom. Period. This Week in Navy HistoryU.S. Navy photoA Douglas AD-4 Skyraider of Attack Squadron (VA) 195 "Dambusters" taking off from the aircraft car VA-195 was assigned to Carrier Air Group (CVG) Princeton. NASA photo are in the Apollo 16 recovery raft as a Navy diver helps secure the capsule and prepare it for craning aboard aircraft carrier USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14). An the three astronauts and flew them to Ticonderoga. HC-1 had the privilege of providing services in the Ticonderoga was sold for scrap a year later.Image from National ArchivesThe battle for Saigon, South Vietnam, came to an end From the HomefrontParenting doesnt get easier Hospital AwardsCapt. Gayle Shaffer (left), Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville commanding officer, presents the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal to Lt. Cmdr. Michele Sprosty during an awards ceremony at the hospital on April 18. Other award recipients included: HMC Wayne Nettles (Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal); HM3 Neon Michael Agno (Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal); HM2 Monica Green (Flag Letter of Commendation, Navy Medicine East); CSSN Anton Brown (Letter of Commendation, commanding officer NH Jacksonville); HM2 Monica Green, HM2 Olymphia Saincois and HM3 Emmanuel Washington (Letter of Appreciation, Palm Avenue Exceptional Student Center).Photo by Yan Kennon

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From U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsThe former director of the ater engagement for U.S. Southern Command assumed the responsibilities of com mander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and commander, U.S. 4th Fleet April 17 at the Ocean Breeze Conference Center at Naval Station Mayport. Rear Adm. George Ballance replaced Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, who will become the vice director for operations on the Joint Staff at the Pentagon. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet are responsible for U.S. naval forces that include Central and South America and the Caribbean Sea. Marine Gen. John Kelly, the commander of U.S. Southern Command, served as the presiding officer for the ceremony. I believe Sincs greatest accomplishment while com manding NAVSO has been his commitment to building partnerships with naval forces throughout the region, said Kelly. The presence of rep resentatives from Colombia, Brazil, Chile, and Peru at todays ceremony is a testa ment to the importance of those partnerships, which are critical for the United States and the region alike. Ballance, a Navy Reservist, has served as vice com mander of U.S. Naval Forces Europe and U.S. Naval Forces Africa, as director of U.S. 6th Fleets Maritime Partnership Program, and as deputy com mander of U.S. 7th Fleet. He is the 13th commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command since it was estab lished in 1942 and the fifth commander of U.S. 4th Fleet since it was re-established in 2008. Vice Adm. Robin Braun, chief of Navy Reserve, commander of Navy Reserve Force was in attendance as the senior Navy official. Its the partnerships and relationships with military and political leaders through out Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as your innovation, vision and char ismatic leadership, that make you larger than life and so deserving of the high esteem in which you are held. Your efforts here have directly supported the CNOs Global Maritime Partnership Initiative. Harris thanked Kelly and Braun for their support, and offered congratulations to what he described as a few of our great partners in South America. The courage and sacrifices of the people of Colombia as they close out their 50-year strug gle against armed revolution aries is phenomenal, and the nations execution of the mari time exercise UNITAS last year was inspiring, he said. He also praised the Chileans, Peruvians and Brazilians for their professionalism, partner ship and leadership. Brazil has been leading international naval forces off the coast of Lebanon for sev eral years and participated in Obangame Express, an exer cise conducted by U.S. Naval Forces Africa. Your leadership role amongst our partners is highly valued, specifically in a region Brazil understands so well, Harris said. We stand to learn much from you. Harris, who arrived in Mayport in 2012, previously served as commanding offi cer of Amphibious Squadron 4 and the USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Strike Group during human itarian assistance and disas ter relief operations following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 and during the noncom batant emergency evacuations of Lebanon in 2006. He also commanded Expeditionary Strike Group 5, provid ing disaster relief during the Pakistan floods of 2010, and served as director of the Navys Irregular Warfare Office on the staff of the chief of naval operations. He joked that he wasnt in a hurry to give up Floridas sun shine and his easy commute. But there is more than that Im sorry for, Harris said. For instance, he wont be present for the transit of the future USS America (LHA 6) around South America this summer; nor for the likely return of USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) on a Continuing Promise mission next year. Hell miss the transition to the era of the Littoral Combat Ship, the Joint High Speed Vessel and patrol craft and hell miss something even big ger, he said. As our relationship con tinues to deepen in the hemi sphere, I truly believe that a combined maritime force will one day come to fruition, as no nation can afford to protect the sea lanes alone, and we are all inextricably tied together, Harris said. From Canada to Chile, we have shared values and concerns that we have seen demonstrated in our exercises and operations for more than 50 years. Navy League hosts USNA superintendentBy AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterVice Adm. Mike Miller, 61st superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy, addressed the Navy League Jacksonville Council during a lun cheon held April 17 at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club. Many Navy League members in attendance were graduates of the Naval Academy and are interested its future. I want to hear about the new things the Academy has going go. My father-in-law, who was killed during World War II, my son, and I are all academy grads. I want to know what the Academy has in store for my 6-year-old grand son as class of 2026, said retired Adm. Tom Watson. There were more than 75 people attending the luncheon and over half had the opportunity to work with or for Miller at some time during their naval careers. Vice Adm. Miller was my skipper when I was stationed with VS-24 and Ive never for gotten him, said retired AOC Richard Arajo. He was the kind of guy you wanted to work for. The luncheon opened with all members stand ing to recite the Pledge of Allegiance followed by an invocation delivered by Navy League Jacksonville Council Chaplain Matt Tuohy. After finishing their lunch, retired Capt. Bob Buehn, Navy League Jacksonville Council President, introduced J.B. Renninger, Navy League Jacksonville Council Program Chair. Renninger announced Millers military back ground and accomplish ments before turning over the podium to the guest speaker. I am so honored that you all came and joined us today. It is humbling for me to come back here, Miller said. Back when I was stationed at Ceil Field those days, with the people in this room were so important to me and thats why Im standing here today. He went on to dis cus the Naval Academy today and where its headed by presenting a PowerPoint presenta tion about the institu tion and discussed a few inspirational graduates, including Brad Snyder class of 2006. Snyder was an Explosive Ordinance Disposal officer. During his 2001 tour in Afghanistan, he lost vision in both eyes as the result of an impro vised explosive device detonation. A year later, Snyder qualified for the Paralympic swimming team and won a silver medal in the 50-meter freestyle, gold in the 100meter freestyle, and 400meter freestyle. Now if that doesnt speak for the quality of the character of people that attend the Naval Academy, I dont know what does, said Miller. He went on to discuss new programs available to the brigade of midshipmen, including a Powered Flight Program designed to reduce the midship man attrition rate at flight school. The program consists of four sessions of ground school, an ini tial instrument test, and 10 flights to prepare the midshipman for a solo flight. What we believe is that if our midshipmen know what they are getting into before flight school, they will succeed when they get there, Miller added. In closing, Miller expressed his apprecia tion for those in atten dance, I cant leave without telling you all that you have shaped my life and given me so much in many cases when I didnt deserve it. You had enough faith to believe in me through tough times and great times. Some of the best times of my life were right here, in this great place, in Jacksonville, Florida. US Naval Forces Southern Command, US 4th Fleet welcomes new commanderRear Adm. George Ballance Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers tours Jax facilityOn April 16, AE2 Joshua Johnson (left), a production supervisor at the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Avionics (600) division, explains to Rear. Adm. Paul Sohl, commander, Fleet Readiness Centers, how an avionics tiger team devised a $5 repair for a test set as Holly Martinez, the FRCSE production director, and AE3 Derrick Fletcher listen in. The FRCSE team led by Lou Deppe (not pictured) repaired a mounting bracket, reattached wires, and re-soldered connections on a P-3 Orion temperature datum amplifier test set to make the inexpensive repair for a cost avoidance of $22,700 per unit.Photo by Victor Pitts Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesRet. Capt. Bob Buehn, Navy League Jacksonville Council president, presents Vice Adm. Mike Miller, superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy, a copy of the Navy League History Book as a token of appreciation for the guest speaker. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 3

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Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax Sailor of the Quarter AT1 Antonio Hart Junior Sailor of the Quarter AO2 Herson Sanchez Commander, Navy Region Southeast Senior Sailor of the Quarter YN1 Abdul Beyah Junior Sailor of the Quarter YN3 Reaunta Evans Commander, Patrol Reconnaissance Wing Eleven Sea Senior Sailor of the Quarter AWO1 Ernesto Espinosa Jr. Junior Sailor of the Quarter AWO2 Aldric Quinto Blue Jacket of the Quarter OSSN Keighahna Powell Shore Senior Sailor of the Quarter Junior Sailor of the Quarter Blue Jacket of the Quarter YNSN Paul Kennepohl Costal Riverine Squadron 10 Active/Full Time Support Sailor of the Quarter OS1(EXW/SW) Carlo Noid Junior Sailor of the Quarter ET2(EXW) Troy Kruyer Selected Reserves Junior Sailor of the Quarter ET2(EXW) Tiffany Nails Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Sea Senior Sail of the Quarter PS1 Maxo Decat Sailor of the Quarter AM2 Stephanie Dorval Junior Sailor of the Quarter AD3 Amanda Olivas Blue Jacket of the Quarter PRAN James Carney Shore Senior Sailor of the Quarter AM1 Ryan Blair Sailor of the Quarter AZ2 Yanier Cabrera Junior Sailor of the Quarter Blue Jacket of the Quarter AZAA Jacob Parkins Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville Senior Sailor of the Quarter AC1 Gregory Klein Junior Sailor of the Quarter Blue Jacket of the Quarter AC3 Chayenne Thomas HSM-72 Sailor of the Quarter NC1 Mailyn Juhlin Junior Sailor of the Quarter AWR2 Jason Rodriguez Blue Jacket of the Quarter AM3 Thomas Fiedler NAS Jacksonville Senior Sail of the Quarter AO1 Kendric Stockdale Sailors of the Quarter honoredBy AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterNAS Jacksonville recognized 84 top Sailors from the base and tenant commands for the second quarter during the Sailor of the Quarter (SOQ) luncheon at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center April 16. The United States Navy is a professional fight ing force pursuing excellence at every turn. Just look around this room at the men and women we are honoring today. You are the single reason why we are considered the greatest Navy in the world. They exemplify the Navy Core Values and the Navy Ethos. They represent the best of the best, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre. She continued, Admiral Zumwalt established the Sailor of the Year/Sailor of the Quarter program in 1972 to recognize outstanding sailors and their contributions. Today we honor 84 such sailors. From a young age, my grandfather taught me the necessity of duty through service. He did not know that as he opened up to me about his fears during combat, that his words would help me through my own time. The choices I made in the desert when I could smell the rockets and the tracers were so close they lit up the ground around me, were because of him, said Reisen. It is my sailors on the deckplate that are the real reason I am successful. This award means the world to me and is truly humbling, Reisen added. At the end of the day, leadership is recognizing success, identifying failures, taking responsibly for your actions, and not making concessions to our core values. Following lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander thanked the Sailors and their spouses. Congratulations to all of you who have been selected as Sailor of the Quarter and to your families for their service, said Undersander. I want to share with you an award that I had the honor to receive last week on behalf of all of your efforts. HandsOn Jacksonville hosted an event to celebrate the exceptional volunteer efforts of different people and organizations. This year, the HandsOn Service in Uniform Award was presented to NAS Jax. Undersander read the award citation, As a result of their efforts, NAS Jax has cultivated a culture of service, built a mutual respect with the city of Jacksonville and received multiple Navy wide recognition awards. This award was unsolicited. I believe that all of the Sailors of the Quarter played a part in NAS Jax win ning this award. Part of why you were selected for SOQ was your leadership. Part of leadership is being a good steward a good steward to your people, the equipment entrusted to you, and the environment, he continued. Stewardship is a continuous process. Your selec tion as SOQ is not the end of a journey, but an affirmation that we believe in your capabilities. You should feel great about your accomplishment, but also feel a sense of increased responsibility to lead by example, live our core values and make our motto Americas Navy, A Global Force for Good more than a slo gan. Make it your mission at home and abroad, said Undersander. Again, congratulations to you and your family members. Its ourteam effort on the home front that makes us successful. Undersander then presented each SOQ an award envelope containing a $25 gift card from VyStar Credit Union, a letter of recognition, and First Command Coin. The Navy Band Southeast Brass Quintet performed the national anthem and NAS Jacksonville Chaplain (Lt.) Andrew Hayler delivered the invocation. The guest speaker was VP-5 Senior Sailor of the Quarter AWO1 James Reisen. Sponsors included USAA, First Command Financial Planning, USA Discounters, University of Phoenix, and Columbia College who covered the cost of the buffet for the SOQs and their family members. Neither the U.S. Navy nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesVP-5 Senior Sailor of the Quarter, AWO1 James Reisen (left), shakes hands with NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander before receiving a letter of recognition, a $25 gift card, and First Command Coin during the Sailor of the Quarter luncheon. CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre expresses her admiration for the accomplishments of the Sailors of the Quarter (SOQ) during the SOQ luncheon held on April 16. Sailors of the Quarter See SOQ LIST, Page 5 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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Sailor of the Quarter AC2 Vladimir Kurenyshev Junior Sailor of the Quarter Blue Jacket of the Quarter ACAN April GregoryWilliams Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Jax Senior Sailor of the Quarter IT1 Breanna Schneider Junior Sailor of the Quarter IT2 Marcus Thomas Blue Jacket of the Quarter ET3 Rebekah Ray Naval Hospital Jacksonville Senior Sail of the Quarter CS1 Joseph Cook Sailor of the Quarter Junior Sailor of the Quarter HM3 John Williams Blue Jacket of the Quarter HN Kelsey Hudson Navy Operational Support Center Sailor of the Quarter HM1 Charla Joesph Junior Sailor of the Quarter HM2 Michael Bruns Blue Jacket of the Quarter PSSN Bon Ryan Pecaoco Navy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command Sailor of the Quarter YN1 Dawn Achane Junior Sailor of the Quarter South East Regional Calibration Center Senior Sailor of the Quarter AZ1 Steven Guarnieri Junior Sailor of the Quarter EM2 John Prokop Blue Jacket of the Quarter EM3 Racquel Gunnell Transient Personnel Unit/ Sailor of the Quarter STS1 Stephan Raines Junior Sailor of the Quarter QM2 Shante Dickerson Tactical Support Center Sailor of the Quarter STG1 Daniel Dye Junior Sailor of the Quarter OS2 Andrew Vu VP-5 Senior Sailor of the Quarter AWO1(NAC/AW) James Reisen Junior Sailor of the Quarter IT2(AW/IDW) Elijah Brimmer Mad Fox of the Quarter AE3(AW) Peter Bowen VP-8 DEPLOYED Senior Sailor of the Quarter AD1 Shaun A. Kilpatrick Junior Sailor of the Quarter Blue Jacket of the Quarter AOAN Samantha R Taylor VP-10 Senior Sailor of the Quarter AWO1 Chad M. Bowles Junior Sailor of the Quarter AWO2 Victor J. Romancharriez Blue Jacket of the Quarter VP-16 (DEPLOYED) Senior Sailor of the Quarter NC1 Daniela Pradon Junior Sailor of the Quarter AE2 Crystal A. Ybarra Blue Jacket of the Quarter AT3 Austin K. Gwin VP-26 Senior Senior Sail of the Quarter AM1 Daniel Mendezmauricio Sailor of the Quarter Junior Sailor of the Quarter AT3 Eric O. Gonzalez Blue Jacket of the Quarter PRAN Alex J. Abhold VP-30 Senior Sail of the Quarter AWO1 Johnathan Rumage Sailor of the Quarter Junior Sailor of the Quarter AM3 Christopher Sabella Blue Jacket of the Quarter VP-45 Senior Sailor of the Quarter AM1 John R. Ernest Junior Sailor of the Quarter AT2 Christopher E. Riley Blue Jacket of the Quarter AOAN Joshua M. Whitney VP-62 Full Time Support Sailor of the Quarter AWF1 Stephen Ryczek Junior Sailor of the Quarter AWO2 Jacob Mora Blue Jacket of the Quarter Selected Reserves Junior Sailor of the Quarter AM2 Ray Turrentine Blue Jacket of the Quarter AE3 Theodore Chancellor VR-58 Full Time Support Sailor of the Quarter AZ1(AW) Toby Saine Junior Sailor of the Quarter AZ2(AW) Menell Bonn Blue Jacket of the Quarter AWF3(NAC/AW) Joshua Brown Selected Reserves Sailor of the Quarter AWF1(NAC/AW) Misty Ward Junior Sailor of the Quarter Blue Jacket of the Quarter AEAN Samantha Nunez SOQ List (from Page 4) Expect relatively quiet hurricane season, researchers sayFrom StaffThe 2014 Atlantic hurricane season (June 1 through Nov. 30) will be less active than in the past 20 years, but still in line with overall averages from 1950 to the present, according to researchers at North Carolina State University. Eight to 11 named storms should form in 2014 in the Atlantic basin, which includes the entire Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea, according to Dr. Lian Xie, professor of marine, earth and atmospheric sciences (MEAS), and collaborators Dr. Montserrat Fuentes, professor of statistics, Marcela Alfaro-Cordoba, graduate research assistant in statistics and Bin Liu, research assistant professor in MEAS. This number is slightly lower than but within the margin of error for the (1950-2013) 63-year average of 10.8 named storms. Of those named storms, four to six may grow strong enough to become hurricanes, and one to three may become major hurricanes. This years numbers for the Gulf are in keeping with historic averages: Xies data indicate the likelihood of three to four named storms forming, and one to two becoming hurricanes. In the Caribbean, Xies numbers are as follows: three to five tropical cyclones forming, with one to two becoming hurricanes. In this scenario, the Caribbean may see one major hurricane this season. Xies methodology evaluates data from the last 100 years on Atlantic Ocean hurricane positions and intensity, as well as other variables including weather patterns and sea-surface temperatures, to predict how many storms will form and where they will make landfall. For more details concerning Xies methodology, input data and predictions, visit the research groups website at: http://cfdl.meas.ncsu.edu/research/ TCoutlook_2014.html. Photo by MCSN Justin DiNiroFC2 Dustin Gower, assigned to the PUMA unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) detachment on board the Military Sealift Command joint high-speed vessel USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1), throws a UAV during flight operations on March 27 as part of a U.S. and Ghana navy combined maritime law enforcement operation, under the African Maritime Law Enforcement Partnership program. Mini-UAV does SAR and more JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 to test our pre-planned response, as well as the interrelated roles of NAS Jacksonville first responders, in coordination with Duval County emergency management and Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department (JFRD), said NAS Jax Training Officer Jim Butters. During his safety brief, Butters reminded drill observers and evaluators to call a safety time out whenever they see a potentially hazardous situation involving personnel or equipment. When a safety time out is communicated to the incident command post (ICP), the scenario will stop and the appropriate action will be taken to correct the unsafe condition. Only then will the ICP leader allow the drill to continue, said Butters. Jacksonville Navy Metro Fire & Emergency Services Fire Chief Mark Brusoe said the responders worked well to promptly bring the mock emergency under control. Our Incident Command Post did very well allocating resources in this multiple agency envi ronment. The communications network performed beyond expectations. Taking time to participate in an exercise like the one we are conducting is critical in understanding where and how the station personnel respond to and handle disaster response -and how we work jointly with our city counter parts, said NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. From E-1 to the most senior member aboard the station, we must understand our collective roles and responsi bilities when it comes to responding to and recovering from an emergency. This type of exercise enables us to achieve more effective and efficient responses, processes and procedures in order to emerge as a cohe sive and solid team of professionals. Jacksonville Navy Metro Fire & Emergency Services Battalion Chief Mick McClain and Lt. John Rhoads delivered the Mobile Aircraft Firefighting Training Device (MAFTD) from Naval Station Mayport. The MAFTD, with its programmable smoke and flames, adds realism and challenge to the exercise scenario, said McClain. JFRD Fire Chief Martin Senterfitt was pleased with what he observed. Very well coordinated. The various teams showed excellent synergy and focus. So far, Id say the exercise went off without a hitch. CWO4 Keith Miltner observed the exercise for Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, where he is the aviation safety officer. In an aviation mishap, its important to establish effective coordination and communications between first responders, the RDC, the station EOC, the squadron and other tenant commands. VP-45 volunteered flight crew and acoustic operators for the exercise. An NAS Jax Firefighter carries a mannequin to safety from a burning aircraft during a drill on April 17. CRASH DRILLFrom Page 1 An NAS Jax crash vehicle responds quickly to a mock aircraft crash during the drill at Tillie Fowler Regional Park. Mock casualty AWO1(NAC/AW) Adam Corner of VP-45 waits for medical assistance from the City of Jacksonville Fire and Rescue team working with NAS Jax firefighters during the drill. NAS Jax Firefighter Alex Guerra transports Lt. j.g. Gregory Stewart from VP-45 on a gurney away from the scene of an aviation mishap drill held at Tillie Fowler Regional Park. Fire Inspector Angel Roman (right) and Incident Command Post Leader Chief Jeff Harrell review the action plan and allocate resources during the aviation mishap drill.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 7 Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax and City of Jacksonville firefighters extinguish a simulated fire on a Mobile Aircraft Firefighting Training Device as part of a drill held at Tillie Fowler Regional Park on April 17. A City of Jacksonville firefighter heaves a hose to allow for slack to the firefighter ahead of him during the aircraft mishap drill. A firefighter with Jacksonville Navy Metro Fire & Emergency Services checks pressure gauges on a tank truck supplying water for the exercise. NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker (left) dicusses communications issues with NAS Jacksonville Training Officer Jim Butters. NAS Jax OSHA Specialist Gregg Gillette (left) speaks with NAS Jax Training Officer Jim Butters after the exercise safety brief held at the Tillie Fowler Regional Park Nature Center. AWO2 Matthew Goebel from VP-45 portrays a mock causality while receiving assistance from a City of Jacksonville firefighter during the aviation mishap drill.

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VP-16 fly side by side with Orions from VP-46 in the same Pacific theatre, pav ing the way for continued transition . on station. The keystone event of the symposium, the heri tage dinner held in his toric Hangar 117, attracted a crowd of more than 300 active duty, retired and civilian guests. One of the many dis tinguished attendees, guest speaker Adm. Bill Gortney, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, spoke about the value of all U.S. Naval communities working together to bring power projection for our country and commended the MPRF for being inte gral to our national secu rity strategy. As the maritime com munity transitions from the P-3 to the P-8, youve set the gold standard for operational excellence, said Gortney. You have a worldwide reach, and the impact has not gone unnoticed. Gortney continued by congratulating the com munity for delivering the new platform under budget and faster than promised by managing the test and evaluation concept at the same time of transitioning and training. Now, youre proving yourself in an operational theater, said Gortney. Lately, I cant turn on CNN without seeing one of your Poseidons taking off, landing or patrolling the seas west of Australia. After commending the present leadership and members of maritime patrol for their dedication to the future of the MPRF, the dinner presentation turned toward the past to honor those individuals who built the foundation upon which the modern standards and practices of the community were developed. Included in that group of standouts were the two individuals inducted into the MPRF Hall of Honor for 2014. Retired Rear Adm. Paul Mulloy had a profound effect on the MPRF com munity as he pushed the force of newly arriving P-3Cs hard on tactics, readiness, safety and pro fessionalism ensuring all squadrons deployed com bat ready. He was instrumental in the development of antisurface warfare tactics utilizing the P-3C and was responsible for bringing the Harpoon missile capa bility to the maritime fleet. Attending the dinner with his three sons, Mulloy accepted his Hall of Honor recognition with humble ness. One constant through out my wonderful VP career was serving with VPs magnificent men and women. They, not the equipment, made the dif ference, he said. Retired Cmdr. David Weisbrod, who enlisted as an aviation radioman in 1951, was so skilled as an antisubmarine war fare (ASW) operator he was subsequently dubbed the ASW Wizard by his squadron CO. Throughout his career, Weisbrod was on the lead ing edge of ASW opera tions, culminating in his standing up and com manding the Naval Ocean Processing Facility, Ford Island, in Hawaii. Unable to attend the dinner, Weisbrod sent a video acceptance of his award expressing his gratitude for a rewarding career with lasting friendships. On April 11, the MPA Symposium turned to the future by hosting a twowave, 140-player golf tour nament to benefit the MPA Scholarship fund. At the end of the day, there were two winning foursomes and more than $6,000 was raised for the scholarship fund. In May, MPA will award $5,000 in scholarships to qualified dependents of past and present MPRF personnel a significant increase over the $2,000 awarded in 2013. Symposium guests wrapped up the event with a scholarship 5K run and a flight suit social, that brought nearly 300 guests together to reminisce and network with former and current shipmates and friends. Established in 2011 and headquartered in Jacksonville, the Maritime Patrol Association is a 501(c)(3) Florida non-profit corporation representing the U.S. Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance com munity by promoting the use of the patrol and reconnaissance aircraft in the U.S. Navy. The Maritime Patrol Association is a non-fed eral entity operated and controlled by individu als acting in their private capacities. It is not a part of the U.S. Department of Defense or any of its com ponents and has no gov ernmental status.For more information, contact Executive Director September Wilkerson at (904) 563-4036 or info@maritimepatrolassociation.org. MPAFrom Page 1 Photos by Clark PierceThe sun sets behind a P-8 Poseidon and a P-3 Orion during the 2014 MPA Heritage Dinner held at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117. The awards banquet theme was, Transition: On Station. Accepting the MPA Hall of Honor award for retired Cmdr. David Weisbrod were longtime friends (from left) retired Capt. Peter Baxter and retired Capt. Tom Spink. They were joined on stage by retired Rear Adm. Paul Mulloy, Adm. Bill Gortney (Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces), Commodore Vince Segars (CPRW10), Rear Adm. Matt Carter (Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group) and Commodore Sean Liedman (CPRW-11). The VP-30 Allied Crew (Royal Air Force), winners of the 2014 ASW Fleet Challenge, (back row, from left): Sgt Jon Brereton, MACr Mark "Flash" Utting, Sqn Ldr Andy Bull, Sqn Ldr Mark Faulds, MACr Keith Treece, Sgt Steve Dixon, Flt Lt Rob Butler, Flt Lt Ian Tuff. Front row: Lt. Lindsey Sinnett (Fleet Challenge 2014 Coordinator) and Lt. Cmdr. Ron Rumfelt (Fleet Training Officer). 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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Truman (CVN 75), praised his crew for their dedica tion, professionalism, and like Wikoff, his commands ability to work as a team. Nine months at sea as a forward-deployed com bat team is an immense undertaking, he said. The days were long and the work was challenging, but Team Truman never missed a beat and we met every challenge. The teamwork between the ship and air wing was spectacular and a model for how it should be done. I couldnt be more proud to be a part of this combat-proven team. CVW-3 was embarked on board Harry S. Truman with its associated squadrons Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 32 Swordsmen, VFA-37 Ragin Bulls, and VFA-105 Gunslingers; Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 312 Checkerboards; Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 126 Seahawks; Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 130 Zappers; Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7 Dusty Dogs; and Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74 Swamp Foxes. HSM-74From Page 1 More than 100 shipmates, spouses, children, friends and retirees turned out April 17 to welcome home seven MH-60R Seahawk helicopters assigned to the "Swamp Foxes" of HSM-74. HSM-74 Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. Rob Elizondo was never happier to embrace his family wife, Elizabeth, and their children Jacob, Emma, William and Bobby.Photos by MC2 Amanda Cabasos Lt. j.g. Joe Granata of HSM-74 reunites with his wife, Christie as he is introduced to his twoweek-old daughter, Rosie, for the first time during the HSM-74 home coming celebration at NAS Jacksonville. (From left) Paige Shelton, 6, Hayley Shelton, 4, and Addison Shelton, 6, anxiously wait for the arrival of their father's airlift April 18 at NAS Jacksonville, after a nine-month deployment. As one Swamp Fox taxis to its spot on the seawall, two more fly over the St. Johns River and approach their landing zones. Intermittent rain showers didnt stop AD2(AW) Adam Dumbleton of HSM-74 from hugging his daughter Madison, 4, while his wife Julie and daughter Miley, 7, patiently wait for their turn during the squadrons April 18 home coming celebration. HSM-74 pilot Lt. j.g. A.J. Wich eagerly greets his wife, Jennifer, and their toddler, Emma, after landing on the seawall of NAS Jax Hangar 1122. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 9

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By Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe increase to Career Sea Pay (CSP) and Career Sea Pay Premium (CSP-P), announced in March by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, will be implemented May 1 and eligible Sailors will see the increase in their mid-month paycheck according to Navy officials. In addition to base pay, CSP and CSP-P compensate Sailors and Marines serving aboard ships whose primary mission is conducted at sea. CSP rates are based upon a members pay grade and cumulative years of sea duty. CSP-P is an additional incentive for members who exceed 36 consecu tive months at sea. The increase to both pays is part of a larger Navy-wide effort to reduce gaps at sea by incentivizing sea duty. Those Sailors and Marines on sea duty, deployed away from home around the world, are the backbone of the Navy and Marine Corps, and enable us to provide and maintain our global presence, said Mabus in March. This change to Career Sea Pay will both improve critical sea-duty manning and reward those who take these chal lenging sea-going assignments. This increase is long overdue and is meant to reward our Sailors and Marines for their continued sacrifices as part of Americas Away Team. All pay grades with at least three years of cumulative sea duty will receive a 25 percent increase in regu lar CSP, while service members who exceed 36 months of consecutive sea duty will receive an increase in CSP-P from $100 to $200 per month. Consistent with current policy, in lieu of receiving CSP-P, Sailors and Marines in grades E5-E9 with eight years of cumulative sea duty receive a higher CSP rate, equivalent to receiving CSP-P whenever assigned to a ship regardless of consecutive sea time. This is the first increase of CSP and CSP-P since 2001. Approximately 100,000 Sailors receive CSP and approximately 13,000 receive CSP-P; this spe cial pay increase is expected to cost $66 million/year. CSP and CSP-P Increase begins May 1 Photos by Morgan KenhertAt only 15 months old, Levi Page is beyond ecstatic when the Easter Bunny gives him a hug just before the MWR Easter Egg Hunt begins on April 16 at the McCaffrey Softball Complex. Provided by the NAS Jax Yacht Club, the Easter Bunny led 900 excited children and parents onto the fields.MWR Easter Egg HuntHannah Scott, 3, dashes onto the outfield with her Easter basket and starts collecting some of the 15,000 eggs scattered among the four softball fields. Getting ready to charge onto the field designated for ages 4-6, (from left) Carmelo Felix patiently stands with his friend Zyere Screen and sister Nai'layah Felix before they start filling their baskets with goodies. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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By MC1 Electa BerassaNavy Office of Community OutreachA 2008 Keystone Heights High School graduate and Keystone Heights, Fla., native boasts a unique distinction that of serving in the Navy as part of a pre mier Navy engineer unit. Seaman Sean Leverette, a logistics specialist, is assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 11, based in Gulfport, Miss., and recently returned from deployment to Guam. NMCB 11 is a Seabee battalion spe cializing in advance base construction, battle damage repair, contingency engineering, humanitarian assistance and disaster recovery support to fleet and unified commanders. Naval Mobile Construction Battalions, more commonly known as the Seabees, are the premier military engineer units in the world today. Born out of necessity in the early days of World War II, their exploits are legend ary. This legacy is carried on today by the men and women of the Naval Construction Force who build and fight. For more than 70 years, the men and women of the Naval Construction Force have been deployed around the world, around the clock. Leverette and the rest of the battalion returned from their six-month deployment earlier this year, where they were in charge of providing engineering support to four combatant command are as of responsibility. While deployed, Leverette and the other Navy Seabees of NMCB 11 were responsible for exe cuting a countless number of projects, ranging from security improvements to bases in Africa to the construction of a submarine support facility in Guam. Leverette said it is an exciting time to be in the Navy. I have seen a lot of things I guarantee some people would not have been able to see. At age 24, Ive been around the world twice and would not have had that chance in the civilian world. It has all helped me develop a greater appreciation for the little things that can be taken for granted. This deployment was a huge success for the Naval Expeditionary Task Force Europe and Africa, and for us as a crew, said Cmdr. Steve Stasick, commander of NMCB 11. The Sailors did very well executing the mission. Weve been very pleased with the support of the Naval Station Rota community at large, said Stasick. It enabled us to operate in 19 countries in four COCOMS [combatant commands]. The Seabees are very team-orient ed, said Leverette. That makes the job easier when everyone pulls together. Through concentrated planning and operations, Leverette and other Seabees of NMCB 11 were able to assist local populations and add an unparalleled level of responsiveness and flexibility to the fleet and unified commanders in the area. Keystone Heights native serves with Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 11Seaman Sean Leverette NMCB-11 Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesNAS JAX the Turtle visited the Child Development Center as a part of the continual environmental conservation outreach program and to get the children excited about Earth Day on April 22.NAS Jax environmental outreachNAS JAX the Turtle steps out of NAS Jax Environmental Department solar powered vehicle and marches toward the Child Development Center during his visit April 15. Angela Glass, NAS Jax assistant natural resources manager, holds Lucy the Florida Box Turtle while McKenzy Thomason (5) gets a chance to feel the turtle's shell. "Lucy was so squishy! I'm glad both turtles came to visit us!" she said. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 11

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By MC2 Amanda Cabasos Staff WriterNAS Jacksonville Sailors participated in Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) training held at the base chapel April 15. It was to reinforce the necessity of all hands to work together to eliminate sexual misconduct within the Navys ranks. The session began when NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker told the audience, I want you all to know that this training is extremely important. There are some great new topics that will be covered today, so please lis ten closely. A three-person team con ducted the training: led by NAS Jacksonville SAPR Coordinator ACC(AW/SW) John Jones from Air Operations; Sexual Assault Response Coordinator Tina Vaughn from Fleet and Family Support Center; and Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions president AC3 Alexis Ray from Air Operations. Jones said, We are having this training to reinforce that April is Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness month. We want our Sailors to be aware that sexual assault is a problem in the mili tary and we want to reinforce the Navys Core Values to help emphasize to Sailors the impor tance of making the right deci sions. Jones utilized a PowerPoint presentation to emphasize how important this topic is in the Navy. He defined consent, and explained how Sailors can get help and support when a crime occurs and elaborated on how to prevent the crime in the first place. The Navy has a zero toler ance for sexual assault and you will be separated from the mili tary if convicted for this crime, he said. Vaughn said, These train ing opportunities are invaluable to genuinely engage personnel and to have serious conversa tions around this topic. SAPR is creating necessary tension and conversations around issues that relate. So we may better under stand the extent to which we have internalized beliefs, atti tudes and social norms that contribute to a climate where sexual assault is possible. SAPR stand downs such as this, cast light into shadows and call bystand ers to action, she said. Several videos demonstrated to Sailors how to recognize a sexual assault case and to inter vene as a bystander before the crime occurs. Ray said, We need to be continuously reminded that sexual assault can happen every day. This training reminds us to keep our eyes open and recognize when to step in and to prevent a potential sexual assault case. Near the conclusion of the training, NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM (SW/AW) Teri McIntyre added her per spective. I know, its another training on SAPR. But, we must keep training because sexual assault keeps happening. I can stand here. The XO can stand here. The skipper can stand here. And we can all tell you that sexual assault cases are still From StaffRegistration is underway for military dependents ages 9 to 12 who want to engage in positive, healthy lifestyles as drugfree citizens. The free Drug Education For Youth (DEFY) program includes the resident summer camp at YMCA Camp McConnell in Micanopy, Fla., June 8 13. Our six-day, five-night Camp DEFY is free of charge to interested Department of Defense dependents, said AWOC Kraig Vavruska, who volunteered to coordinate the VP-30-sponsored regional DEFY program for 2014. Through application of the DEFY curriculum, we strengthen military families by devel oping positive life skills in our youths. Camp McConnell has host ed Camp DEFY for the past four years and provides a host of activities including: class room activities, horseback rid ing, rock wall climbing, swim ming, archery and many other team building and confidence enhancing activities. Campers are provided with three meals a day in the YMCA dining facility, as well as daily snacks. If you are interested in attending Camp DEFY 2014, e-mail Kraig.vavruska@navy. mil for the necessary forms to fill out and sign. When complete, drop off your forms at the VP-30 Duty Office or scan and email by May 16. Apply early because space is limited. Sign up for free DEFY program summer camp by May 16Jax Air News photosIn 2013, DEFY mentors, AWO1(NAC/AW) Brett Aasen (front left), HN John Holland (front right), PR2(AW) Terrell Manigault (rear left), and AWO1(NAC/AW) Gerry Boysen demonstrated one of the camps team-building exercises the four-man push up. In 2013, DEFY mentor AD2(AW) Megan Kehoe, of VP-30, helped two DEFY campers design and decorate their team flags. DEFY camper Brooke Lankhorst was pleased with her choice of horse in 2013 as she prepared to start the Camp McConnell horseback riding activity. NAS Jax holds SAPR stand downPhotos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre stresses the importance of understanding the Sexual Assault and Response training to NAS Jax Sailors on April 15 at the base chapel.See SAPR, Page 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke Lunch bingo Monday through Friday begins at 11:15 a.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Scratch Sweeper: April 26, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open May 10 June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31 Outdoor pool opens for weekend recreational swim on May 10 Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Dive-in Movie May 23 featuring LEGO Movie Pool opens at 7 p.m., movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free popcorn. Concession stand will be open.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Kanapaha Botanical Gardens Trip May 3, $25 Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Barracks Bash April 24, 4 8 p.m. Free food, entertainment and prizes Grill & Chill May 13 at 6 p.m. Free hamburgers and hotdogs Paintball Trip May 17 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. Command Party Swing into savings & book your command golf tournamentMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Summer Camp Registration going on now! Sign-in at the youth center Operation: Megaphone Worldwide Lock-in April 25 at 8 p.m. Open to all CYP teens 13 18Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available including instrument, complex and commercial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.netSand Volleyball League forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard Cup points along with rules and required paperwork. Greybeard Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Intramural Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Kickball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Game play at lunch time. Contact the NAS Jacksonville Sports Department at 542-2930 for rules and the required paperwork. Tournament April 28Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Intramural Golf Summer League Meeting May 7Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at 11:30 a.m. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Meeting May 14Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at noon at along with rules and required paperwork.Wallyball League Meeting May 21Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork.Badminton Singles League Meeting May 28Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork.Bean Bag Toss Singles Tournament June 23Tournament takes place at 5 p.m. in the NAS Jax Fitness, Sports and Aquatics Center. The tournament is open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Call the Fitness Center at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil to sign up by June 13. StandingsAs of April 18SoftballTeams Wins Losses CRS-10 3 0 NAVHOSP 3 0 VP-30 3 0 FRCSE 900 2 0 VP-26 2 0 VP-45 Sluggers 2 0 FRCSE Rabid Possums 2 1 AIR OPS 2 2 HS-11 2 2 CNRSE/NAVY BAND 1 1 VR-62 1 1 VR-58 1 1 FACSFAC 1 2 FRCSE Thrusters 1 3 CBMU 202 0 2 NBHC Honey Badgers 0 2 FRCSE Tweaks & Geeks 0 3 NCTS 0 3 VP-45 Scared Hitless 0 3Soccer Teams Wins Losses FRCSE 3 0 HITRON 3 0 TPU/PCF 2 0 HS-11 2 1 HSM-72 2 1 VP-26 2 1 VP-30 Students 2 1 BHC Jax 1 1 NAVFAC 1 2 VP-45 1 2 NAVHOSP 0 1 VP-10 0 1 Air Ops 0 2 VP-62 0 2 FRCSE F-18 PMI 0 3 VR-62 0 3 happening, so dont do it and watch each others backs. But this is not working. These crimes are happening around you right now. McIntyre continued, We need to treat our ship mates with respect, both on and off duty. We need to step up when we see something wrong. For example, if you see someone in the club and it looks like a person is going to take advantage of them, have the courage to step in and have the courage to report it. She continued, The best thing you can do is respect one another and look out for each other. This is how you can play your part in stopping sexual assault cases. Wanamaker wrapped up the event by saying, We want you all to be part of the solution by really thinking about this topic. If you see something, say something. Remember, sexual assault is a crime. We have these stand downs so we can talk, reflect and begin to fix this problem that we have in our military. Get more information and resources to combat sexual assault at http://www.sapr.navy.mil. SAPRFrom Page 13 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (left) and Pat Dooling (right), former Navy Region Southeast public affairs officer, pres ent the Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award to Kaylee LaRocque, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Public Affairs Specialist, for her invaluable performance and professionalism while serving as public affairs specialist at the NAS Jax Public Affairs Office from May 2008 to February 2014. "I am extremely humbled to be presented this award," said LaRocque. "As a member of the NAS Jax Public Affairs Team for the past 13 years, my job has always been to promote and showcase base events and the accomplishments of our Sailors and civilians. I recently transferred to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Public Affairs and although I greatly miss working with the NAS Jax Team, I have not ventured far. My heartfelt thanks to everyone for your tremendous support and friendship throughout the years!" Photo by Kaylee LaRocqueNAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd and his wife, Miranda are saluted by sideboys as they he goes ashore for the last time during his retirement ceremony on April 17 at Hangar 117. Hundreds of military officers and enlisted Sailors, civilian employees, City of Jacksonville personel, family and friends attended the retirement ceremony to pay tribute to Shepherd's distinguished career and recognize the contributions of his family to the U.S. Navy. Photo by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (left) presents NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd with the Navy and Marine Corps Meritorious Service Medal for his numerous contributions to NAS jax and 110 tenant commands dur ing his retirement ceremony at Hangar 117. Shepherd retired with 30 years of honorable naval service. NAS Jax CMC retires Photo by AE2 Samantha JonesSeawall FOD walk down The Proud Warriors of HSM-72 and Royal Australian Navy 725 Squadron team up and walk the seawall in search of foreign object damage (FOD) during the base wide FOD walkdown on April 9. Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesLaRocque recognized JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 15

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By Barbie SmolinskiNMCRS Publicity AssistantPauline Ebersolehas been a volunteer at Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) Jacksonville for seven years, where she has serves as a client services assistant (CSA). As a CSA, she is the first point of contact to greet and guide active-duty service members and their families toward the appropriate NMCRS services. She loves volunteering for NMCRS and is a valued volunteer with more than 1,000 hours of volunteer time. Ebersole is a native of North London, England. There she met her late husband, a Vietnam veteran and security service officer for the U.S. Air Force. She has two children. She and her family had the pleasure of being stationed in Texas and overseas. Her favorite duty stations were in Greece and Taiwan. While stationed in Greece for four years, Ebersole worked for the commissary. She loves the Greek culture, people and beautiful scenery. In Taiwan, she had furniture handmade that she still cherishes today. Ebersole splits her time between Maryland in the summer and Florida in the winter. Her hobbies are traveling and oil painting. Do you want to meet interesting people like Pauline Ebersole? Then check out the volunteer opportunities at NMCRS by calling the chairman of volunteers at 904-5423515. Please make the Society your first resource. From the Office of the Chief of InformationThe following reports the results of Special and General Courts-Martial tried within the United States Navy in March 2014. Cases are listed by the Navy region in which they were tried. Naval District Washington Navy Yard, Washington, D.C., a Midshipman was tried for sexual assault and false official statements. On March 20, the military judge returned a verdict of not guilty for aggravated sexual assault, and the Convening Authority dismissed the charge of false official statement. Yard, Washington, D.C., ET1 Robert Moriarty, USN pleaded guilty to a false official statement and wrongful use of controlled substances. On March 4, the Military Judge sentenced him to be discharged with a Bad Conduct Discharge, reduction in rank to paygrade E-1, and confinement for 45 days. Yard, Washington, D.C., MM2 Charles Stamos, USN pleaded guilty to larceny. On March 11, the military judge sentenced him to a reprimand, reduction in rank to paygrade E-4, and hard labor without confinement for 90 days. Navy Region Mid-Atlantic Hans Silvera, USN was tried for sexual assault and violating military protective orders. On March 26, a panel of members returned a verdict of guilty to all charges and sentenced him to reduction in rank to paygrade E-3 and confinement for 90 days. Brian Provorse, USN was tried for engaging in lewd acts and taking indecent liberties with a child. On March 26, a panel of members returned a verdict of guilty to all charges and sentenced him to be dis charged with a Dishonorable Discharge and confinement for six years. Richard McKenney, USN pleaded guilty to theft of military property. On March 5, the military judge sentenced him to reduction in rank to paygrade E-1, a fine of $5,000, and confinement for six months. Damien Donald, USN pleaded guilty to assault con summated by a battery and conduct unbecoming an officer and gentleman. On March 19, the military judge sentenced him to a reprimand, forfeit $2,500 pay for one month, and restriction for 30 days. Navy Region Southeast Gregory Mayo, USN pleaded guilty to receipt and possession of child pornography. On March 4, the military judge sentenced him to be discharged with a Dishonorable Discharge, reduction in rank to pay grade E-1, a fine of $2,000, and confinement for 20 months. AGAN Alexander Lopuchin, USN was tried for sexual assault. On March 20, the panel of members returned a verdict of guilty and sentenced him to be discharged with a Dishonorable Discharge, reduction in rank to paygrade E-1, and confinement for 60 days. Jason Robinson, USN pleaded guilty to dereliction of duty, false official statement, fraud against the government, and uttering a worthless check. He was found guilty of larceny by the military judge. On March 5, the military judge sentenced him to be discharged with a Bad Conduct Discharge, reduction in rank to paygrade E-1, and confinement for four months. HN John Ragosta, USN pleaded guilty to violating an order, wrongful use of a controlled substance, unauthorized absence, and wrongful appropriation of military property. On March 11, the military judge sentenced him to reduction in rank to paygrade E-2, forfeit $800 pay per month for five months, and con finement for 165 days. Christopher Owens, USN pleaded guilty to assault consummated by a battery, unlawful entry, and mal treatment. On March 25, the military judge sentenced him to a reprimand, reduction in rank to paygrade E-4, confinement for 45 days, and restriction for 45 days. Clifford Holmes III, USN pleaded guilty to abusive sexual contact and violation of a general order. On March 26, the military judge sentenced him to be discharged with a Bad Conduct Discharge, reduction in rank to paygrade E-1, and confinement for 50 days. Brian Mikolitch, USN pleaded guilty to assaults con summated by battery. On March 26, the military judge sentenced him to be discharged with a Bad Conduct Discharge, reduction in rank to paygrade E-1, and confinement for eight months. Special and General Courts-Martial for March NMCRS Volunteer Spotlight: Meet Pauline EbersolePauline Ebersole Photos courtesy of Navy Band SoutheastThe Navy Band Southeast Dixieland Brass Band performed on the Hemming Plaza stage April 12. (From left) MU3 Andrew Cummings, MU3 Fred Vaughan, MU2 Eric Sider, MU1 Justin Albritton, MU3 Richard Hanks and MU1 Chris Birkby.Navy Band Southeast performs at Jacksonville's One Spark crowdfunding festivalNBSE's rock band "Pride," performed on The Jacksonville Landing riverfront stage April 11. (From left) MU3 Chris Lapidas, MU2 Marc Heskett, MU3 David Estrada, MU1 Scott Verville and MU3 Luke Franco. NBSEs Rock Band, Pride, entertained with classic rock covers to an appreciative crowd. (From left) MU1 Scott Verville, MU3 Luke Franco and MU3 David Estrada. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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By Lt. Sarah Aguero, JAGC, USN RLSO SE Corpus Christi, TexasWhen it comes to renting property, remember Ben Franklins adage, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Most common problems can be prevented or minimized with just a few hours of care while selecting and moving into a property. If this step is neglected, it may be too late to fix issues without losing many more hours and hundreds or even thousands of dol lars. To protect yourself, follow the tips below. 1. Understand your contractual obligations. Your obligations as a tenant (a per son renting real property) should be described in your rental contract. They typically include paying rent by a cer tain date, registering vehicles parked on the premises, minimizing noise and disruption to other tenants, performing basic maintenance and upkeep, etc. If you do not perform these obligations, you may be evicted from the premises and charged unpaid rent for the rest of the contract term. Before signing the contract, ensure you understand your obligations. 2. Ensure the contract does NOT include a waiver of rights under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA). The SCRA gives you the right to ter minate a rental contract if you or your active-duty spouse receives permanent change of station orders or orders to deploy for at least 90 days. It prevents you from having to continue paying rent on a property that you had to move out of. You can voluntarily give up this right, by signing a contract including a waiver of SCRA protections. Make sure your contract does not include this waiver! 3. Complete a move-in inspection with the landlord. While the property is still empty of furniture, complete a move-in inspec tion with the landlord. Note all dam ages and discrepancies on a piece of paper, and have the landlord sign/date the sheet confirming agreement with the inspection results. Be thorough! Test switches, appliances, electrical outlets, windows, etc. A good move-in inspection will discourage the land lord from trying to charge you for property damage when you finally move out. 4. Get help! Make an appointment with a legal assistance attorney to review the lease. If you have any questions about a rental agreement, contact your near est Region Legal Service Office to set up an appointment with a legal assis tance attorney. Office locations can be found online at http://www.jag.navy. mil/legal_services/legal_services_loca tor_rlso.htm The attorney will assist you with fully understanding not only the contract but also state-specific rental laws and protections that may apply. By Amaani LyleAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe senior enlisted advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff met with Sailors at Naval Station Mayport April 14 to learn about the bases strategic home-porting and recapitalization plans and advise the Sailors about transition assistance resources. Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan Battaglia completed the first of a two-day command tour at the third-largest fleet concentration in the United States, with its 3,400 acres along the Atlantic Ocean and St. Johns River and 6,400 active duty Sailors. Weve been able to see some of the ships, capabili ties and potential growth of NS Mayport, where the litto ral combat ships will be, and weve been able to look at the recapitalization of real estate, Battaglia said. Its nice to see growth on a military installa tion when most of our conver sations are about base realign ment and closure. The arrival of the littoral combat ships USS Freedom (LCS 1) and USS Independence (LCS 2) and their accompany ing training and support facilities are programmed into a cumulative $70 million budget through fiscal year 2017. Mayports Amphibious Readiness Group welcomed the arrival of amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) in December. Officials expect the amphibi ous dock landing ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43) and multi purpose amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) in August, Battaglia said. The sergeant major also conducted an interactive all hands call to field questions and address concerns about qual ity-of-life improvements, ben efits, entitlements and deploy ments. He told the Sailors that DoD offers a free download able book entitled, The NonCommissioned Officer and Petty Officer Backbone of the Armed Forces, thats designed to help junior enlisted service members define their roles within the profession of arms. Every so often, we come together as a joint force, Battaglia said. There are times when you belong to a larger task force [or] a combat com mand in an operational the ater, so the more you know about what your peer group, subordinates and superiors do, the more helpful it is to your charter. He also emphasized the importance of resilience, which he described as the ability to build fitness and strength in psychological, behavioral, physical, nutritional domains to return the mind, body and spirit to an optimal level of performance after facing adversity. Fitness is much more than just push-ups and running, Battaglia said to the Sailors. Its a total sense of well being and the ability to take care of ourselves and each other. The Fleet and Family Support Center here contin ues to provide life-enhancing programs such as Transition Goals, Plans, Success for more than 17,000 total force personnel and their families, Battaglia said. Id like to see people planning early getting into Transition GPS at least 12 months out and no later than 90 days before their dates of separation, he said. The program, he explained, involves enhanced network ing resources and exit surveys to better gauge the value of the class to departing service members. [Transition GPS] will prove its worth if that service mem ber who is separating walks off base enrolled in college, hired for a job or even starting his or her own business, the ser geant major said. Battaglia discusses growth, transition with Mayport SailorsDoD photo by Army Master Sgt. Terrence HayesA Navy chief petty officer talks with Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan Battaglia, senior enlisted advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, about the capabilities of USS Zephyr (PC-8), one of the patrol craft home-ported at Naval Station Mayport. During the SEAC's visit on April 14, he met Sailors, toured a patrol craft and discussed the benefits of the new Transition GPS curriculum for transitioning service members and their families.Entering into a Lease: Invest a little time now, save $ later JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 17

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By Ensign Mark BadenVP-8 Public Affairs OfficerTwelve Sailors from Patrol Squadron (VP)-8 at Cooperative Security Location Comalapa, El Salvador supported the Love and Hope Childrens Home in nearby San Salvador at an April 19 community outreach event. The VP-8 Sailors, also known as the Fighting Tigers, setup an Easter egg hunt for the children, followed by sports con tests and smacking a piata filled with treats. The VP-8 personnel donated $1,118 for this special event. We value the opportunity to reach out to the local commu nity, especially with the chil dren from Love and Hope, said AWV2 Tony Willard. Seeing their smiling faces and interacting with them has been one of the most rewarding parts of our deployment here in El Salvador. Love and Hope Childrens Home was established in 2003 after outreach workers discov ered orphaned, abused, aban doned and neglected children with no where to live. Since then, the orphanage has pro vided food, shelter, safety, edu cation and love to more than 30 children. We are so grateful VP-8 decided to spend their Easter with us, said Rachel Sanson, director and founder of Love and Hope Childrens Home. Thanks so much to VP-8 for putting on such a fun event for the children! The children here at Love and Hope are a joy to visit, said Lt. j.g. Paxie Cordova, a pilot with VP-8. Weve been fortu nate to be able to visit the children often, and the Easter egg hunt today will be a true high light of this deployment. The Fighting Tigers are cur rently deployed to the 4th and 5th Fleets areas of responsibil ity, assisting in counter-drug efforts and providing humani tarian assistance. By GM2(SW) Camille Perez Cooperative Security Location ComalapaThe military deputy com mander of U.S. Southern Command visited Cooperative Security Location (CSL) Comalapa and Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 on April 11. Lt. Gen. Kenneth Tovo and his staff came aboard CSL Comalapa for briefings and a tour of the compound. Tovo made several other stops while in El Salvador, including visits with the U.S. country team and key military and governmental leaders to discuss counter-illicit traffick ing efforts and other aspects of countering transnational orga nized crime. His visit demonstrates the U.S. commitment to El Salvador and reinforces the already strong relationship between our two govern ments, said Lt. Cmdr. Jose Gomez, the Navy section chief of U.S. Security Cooperation Office El Salvador. Tovo received updates from Cmdr. Odin Klug, command ing officer of CSL Comalapa, and from Lt. Cmdr. Charles Dennison, officer in charge of VP8. After the presentation, Klug escorted Tovo on a tour of the site, pointing out construc tion projects, opportunities for initiatives and other items of interest. Sharing our mission set and downrange perspective with Lt. General Tovo is vitally important to help shape the comprehensive understand ing of what and how CSL Comalapa provides and con tributes to the broader counterillicit trafficking mission, Klug said. Dennison then took Tovo aboard one of VP-8s P-3C Orion aircraft, explaining its features and capabilities. It was truly an honor to have Lt. General Tovo visit our Fighting Tigers detachment, said Dennison. The opportunity to discuss what the P-3 brings to the fight with such a distinguished offi cer and give him a tour of our aircraft is definitely a high light of VP-8s deployment. CSL Comalapa provides criti cal logistics, infrastructure and operational support to forward deployed U.S. and part ner nation aviation units par ticipating in Joint Interagency Task Force South assigned counter-illicit trafficking operations, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command-directed humanitarian missions, and search and rescue efforts. CSL Comalapa: VP-8 Sailors raise funds for childrens homeBy GM2(SW) Camille PerezCSL Comalapa Public AffairsSailors from Cooperative Security Location (CSL) Comalapa and Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 concluded two weeks of raising money for a local childrens home April 10 with an unusual activity: washing a P-3C Orion aircraft on the flight line. Participants raised more than $1,100 for an Easter meal and egg hunt that will be held at the Love and Hope Childrens Home in San Salvador. Money not spent on the celebration will be used to enhance the home. Sailors from the two com mands paid $1 per vote for peers to wash the aircraft, and every Sailor for whom votes were cast had the opportunity to buy him or herself out. In the end, the top 10 vote-getters were selected to assist the VP-8 Fighting Tigersmaintenance depart ment in washing the aircraft. MA2 Leslie Callejas was one of those selected to wash the plane. Raising money for the childrens home made me proud to be part of the CSL Comalapa/VP-8 team, Callejas said. I look forward to providing a fun Easter celebration for the children, but also for future events that will enhance quality of life for this group of youngsters, she said. CSL Comalapas plane washers included Callejas, YNC Joel De Los Santos, HM1 Isidro Avalos, MA1 Henry Ridgeway and MA3 Kenisha Dickson. They were joined by five Sailors from VP-8: Lt. j.g. Paxie Cordova, IS1Jorge Soldevilla, HM2 William Meyers, PS2 Michael Jones, and ITSN Thomas Steransky. Avalos was glad to be given the opportunity to help, saying, A little hard work for a good cause can go a long way. Photo courtesy of VP-8 VP-8 Sailors gather Love and Hope Children together prior to the April 19 Easter egg hunt and other events.VP-8 Easter outreach US Southern Command deputy commander visits CSL Comalapa, VP-8Photos by GM2 Camille PerezAt CSL Comalapa, El Salvador, Lt. Cmdr. Charles Dennison, officer in charge of the VP-8 detachment, and Lt. Gen. Kenneth Tovo, the military deputy commander of U.S. Southern Command, exit a P-3C Orion after a tour of the aircraft on April 11. (From left) Lt. Cmdr. Charles Dennison, the officer in charge of the VP-8 detachment and Cmdr. Odin Klug, the commanding officer of CSL Comalapa, escort Lt. Gen. Kenneth Tovo, the military deputy commander of U.S. Southern Command, from the flight line after touring a P-3C Orion patrol and reconnaissance aircraft. Photo by GM2 Camille Perez Under the shade of a P-3C Orion wing, Sailors receive a safety brief on April 10 before beginning a volunteer plane wash at Cooperative Secuirty Location (CSL) Comalapa in El Salvador. AD2 Spencer Berg shows HM1 Isidro Avalos a trick to properly inspecting and cleaning a P-3C Orion during the VP-8 volunteer plane washing event on April 10 at Cooperative Secuirty Location (CSL) Comalapa in El Salvador. PS2 Michael Jones and MA2 Leslie Callejas scrub down the underside of a VP-8 "Fighting Tigers" P-3C Orion during a volunteer plane wash. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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From NH Jax Public AffairsNational Infant Immunization Week is April 26 May 3, an annual observance that promotes the importance of protecting infants and toddlers from vaccine-preventable dis eases. Myths and misinforma tion about vaccine safety often confuse parents. The bottom line: vaccines save lives. Each year, thousands of children become ill from diseases that could have been prevented by basic child hood immunizations, said Mary Buskohl-Coulton, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville immunizations supervisory nurse specialist. Vaccines are among the most successful and cost-effective public health tools avail able for preventing and reducing the spread of infectious diseases. By law, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration con ducts years of testing before a vaccine is licensed, and once licensed, the vaccine is con tinually monitored for safety and effectiveness. Like any medication, vaccines can cause side effects, but the benefits of vaccines far outweigh possible side effects for almost all chil dren. Vaccines can protect infants and children from 14 diseases. And thanks to vaccines, some diseases are almost gone in the U.S. The elimination of polio and smallpox in the U.S. are powerful examples of why we vaccinate. Immunization can save families time and money. Children with vaccine-preventable dis eases may not be allowed to attend school or daycare. Some vaccine-preventable diseases require hospitalization that could result in permanent disabilities, causing a financial burden. Immunizing infants can also protect future generations. Birth defects associated with rubella (German measles) are no longer seen in the U.S. By continuing to vaccinate now, some of todays diseases will no longer be around to harm future generations. If vaccinations were to stop, the protection that has been built through years of vacci nations would cease to exist. Gradually, more and more people would become infected with disease, spread diseases to others and many may die. This would essentially undo the progress made over the years with the elimination of diseases. Because of the success of vaccines in preventing disease, parents may not have heard of some of todays vaccines or the serious diseases they prevent. These diseases can be espe cially serious for infants and young children. That is why it is important to follow recom mended immunization sched ules to protect them by pro viding immunity early in life, before exposure to potentially life-threatening diseases. Vaccine-preventable dis eases still circulate around the world, including in the U.S. Continued vaccination is nec essary to protect everyone from potential outbreaks. Even when rare in the U.S., diseases can be brought into the country, put ting unvaccinated children at risk. Just recently within the U.S. there have been two dis ease increases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Fortynine states and District of Columbia reported pertussis increases in 2012 compared to 2011, with 48,277 cases including 20 deaths. The incidence rate among infants exceeded that of all other age groups, with the majority of deaths occurring among infants younger than three months. In 2013, data showed a higher than nor mal number of measles cases nationally and in individual states, including an outbreak of 58 cases in New York City the largest reported outbreak of measles in the U.S. since 1996. Currently, the U.S. has the safest, most effective vaccine supply in its history. Its longstanding vaccine safety system ensures that vaccines are as safe as possible. And as new information and science become available, the system will continue to be updated and improved. Immunization is a shared responsibility. Families, health care professionals and public health officials must continue to work together to help protect the entire community. Parents are encouraged to talk to their childs primary care manager to ensure that their infant is up to date on immunizations. Remember to vaccinate. Its the single best way to be pro tected. For more information on vaccinations, call NH Jacksonvilles immunization clinic at 904-542-7810 or go to http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines. NH Jacksonvilles immuni zation clinic is open Monday to Wednesday and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saving childrens lives through vaccinationPhoto by Jacob SippelHospitalman Christian Snyder, assigned to Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Maternal Infant Unit, sterilizes the skin of 11-month old Cameron Kee prior to administering an annual influenza (flu) vaccination in this 2013 photo. It is recommended that everyone age six months and older get an annual flu vaccination. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 19

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Family night out Gamin and GrillinBy MC2 Amanda CabasosStaff WriterMore than 60 Sailors and their families from various commands aboard NAS Jax attended the second annual Gamin and Grillin event held at the base chapel April 11. Sponsored by NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), the event was conducted as a way to promote aware ness for child abuse prevention month and also to encourage families to spend a fun outing together. Family Advocacy Program Educator Erika Clark from FFSC said, We want to bring children and their parents together here on base to rec ognize child abuse prevention and to also have a one big family night. Its really important to get our military families together. Children, parents and spouses are often separated because of deployments and their daily busy schedules so our goal is to bring families together to eat and have some good fellowship. I really believe it builds morale. At 6 p.m., the doors opened and the first guests arrived to be greeted by FFSC staff volunteers and free food fresh from the grill. Activities included finger printing, face painting, games and a demonstration by a Security Department Military Working Dog (MWD)team. A booth was set up with complimentary handouts on child abuse prevention month and many other programs offered by FFSC. FFSC Counseling and Advocacy Supervisor Rose Ann Lickenbrock said, This event will increase awareness because we have a table full of different flyers and brochures we are handing out and also it will encourage people to visit FFSC. This is how we can educate families on what programs and classes FFSC offers. The guests displayed their enjoyment of the event. Navy Spouse Yuki Smiley said, I am really enjoying my time here, especially the food thats hot off the grill. Its been real special having family time and this event is always lots of fun for us. The MWD demonstration, conducted by MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich, MA2 Andrew Barnhart and their MWD dog, Doly, from NAS Jax Security Department, was a highlight for many of the families, espe cially the children. Navy dependent Emerson Smiley, 6, said, I really loved watching the security dog. She is so pretty. Colin Clark, 7, said, I am having a great time. I really enjoyed watching the MWD demonstration. It was awesome having the oppor tunity to try on handlers vest and helmet, even though it was kind of heavy. I want to be a police officer one day and work with the dogs. As dusk arrived, families slowly departed while the vol unteers cleaned and secured the chapel. A Home Visitor, with New Parent Support, Christine Williams from FFSC said, The event went well. We had a great turn out. Wonderful food. Every thing was just great and everyone seemed to have a fun time. We hope to do this event next year. It is in the planning. From StaffThe American Military Partner Association (AMPA), the nations premier organization for LGBT (les bian, gay, bisexual and transgender) military spouses and their families, recently announced in a news release that Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Military Community and Family Policy Rosemary Williams will keynote AMPAs inaugural national gala dinner May 17 in Washington, D.C. We are truly honored and excited to be welcoming Deputy Assistant Secretary Williams as the keynote speaker at AMPAs first national gala dinner, said Stephen Peters, president of AMPA and the husband of an active duty Marine Corps officer. Our community has benefited greatly from her openness, inclusion and support and we look forward to formally thanking her as we celebrate our progress and our modern military families at AMPAs inaugural gala dinner. In her role as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Military Community and Family Policy, Ms. Williams is responsible for policy, advocacy, and oversight of all community support to service members and their families, as well as quality of life issues, family programs, and military spouse career advancement. Prior to her appointment, Williams served as Director for Communication and Public Liaison at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, and as Senior Advisor for Strategic Communications to the Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, where she also served as the Department of Veterans Affairs representative to the White House Council on Military Families. The American Military Partner Association (AMPA), a non-partisan and non-profit 501(c)3 organization based in Washington D.C., is the nations premier resource and support network for LGBT military spouses and their families. Founded and led by same-sex mili tary partners in 2009 as the Campaign for Military Partners, AMPA is com mitted to connecting, supporting, honoring and serving the partners and spouses of Americas LGBT service members and veterans. Clay County Philippine Festival May 3, from 9 a.m.5 p.m. at Orange Park Town Hall, at U.S. 17 and Kingsley Ave. Entertainment, food, arts & crafts. www. USS Iwo Jima (LPH2/LHD7) Reunion, Aug. 27-31 at Crowne Plaza Hotel in Jacksonville. Call 757-723-0317 or http:// ussiwojimashipmates.cfns.net/. (MOAA) Northeast Florida Chapter meets every third Wednesday, 6 p.m. at NAS Jax branches. Contact Johnnie.walsh@gmail. com or call 282-4650. (NNOA) meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. at Jacksonville Urban Paul Nix at 542-2518 or paul.nix@navy.mil. Association of Aviation Ordnancemen meets the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on Collins Road. For information, visit www.aao9.com. Orange Park Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 5968 and its Auxiliary located at 187 Aurora Blvd. meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. VFW composed of combat veterans and eligible service members from the Active, Guard or Reserve forces. Go to www.vfwpost5968. org or call 276-5968. at NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military retirees and dependents. Work four hours a day, one day per week. Call 542-5790 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays to volunteer. a breast cancer support group at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. Call 542-7857 for more info. Navy Jacksonville Yacht Club is open to active duty, reserve and retired military, plus, active or retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email commodore@njyc.org COMPASS Spouse-to-Spouse Military Mentoring Program. Helping others help themselves. Visit www.gocompass.org for more info. Navy Wives Clubs of America DID #300 meets the second Thursday of each month 2246 Blanding Blvd. Call 272-9489. Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 p.m., 390 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach. Call 246-6855. National Active and Retired Federal Employees Westside Jacksonville Chapter 1984 meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Murray Hill United Methodist Church, (Fellowship Hall Building) at 4101 College Street. Call 7867083. Retired Enlisted Association meets the fourth Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Hall at 7673 Blanding Blvd. Call 772-8622. Community CalendarAmerican Military Partner Association announces keynote speaker for annual gala Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosVolunteer Clown Larry Lickenbrock performs a special artistic design on the cheek of Eli Delgado, 3, during the Gamin and Grillin event held at the NAS Jax Chapel on April 11. MA2 Andrew Barnhart from NAS Jax Security Department performs a bite work demonstration with Military Working Dog, Doly, for families attending the Gamin and Grillin event held at the chapel. While guests stay clear of the hot grill, Direct Admin Assistant Jefry Klein, from Fleet and Family Support Center, volunteers as the grill master flipping hamburgers and monitoring hot dogs during the family night occasion. Exceptional Family Member Liaison Shannon Klein, from Fleet and Family Support center, plays a game of Quoits with her son Joey, 13, during the Gamin and Grillin event. Jacksonville Special Agent Sabrina Friday from Naval Criminal Investigative Serivce assists Troy Barber Jr., 5, with fingerprinting for documenta tion purposes in support of the child abuse prevention month. MA2 Andrew Barnhart from NAS Jax Security Department allows Eli Delgado, 3, try on his Bomb Protection Gear after the Military Working Dog demonstration. Kaitlynn; 8; spins her Hula Hoop as part of one of the activities available for the children at the Gamin and Grillin event. Adrian, 2, throws a beanbag aiming to score during a game of Cornhole.

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Maritime Patrol Association 2014 Symposium heldFrom StaffShowing a strong comeback from last years sequestra tion-affected schedule of events, the 2014 Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) Symposium celebrated the members of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) past and present with the theme, Transition: On Station, aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville April 10-11. As we look at the history of our great community the people who design our aircraft, build them, maintain them and fly them we are reminded of the aviation expertise that has allowed our community to transi tion through numerous aviation platforms, said VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curt Phillips, vice president of MPA. Just as the P-2V Neptune flew side by side with the oncoming P-3 Orion in 1964 today, P-8A Poseidons from By StaffNAS Jacksonville and City of Jacksonville emer gency responders converged on Tillie Fowler Regional Park April 17 to participate in a simulated P-8A Poseidon aircraft crash exercise with multiple casualties. The drills scenario involved a P-8A aircraft assigned to VP-45 that was approaching the air field and declared a malfunction with one of its two engines. The NAS Jax control tower cleared them for a direct emergency approach from west of the station and immediately notified the air field crash crew and the Navy Region Southeast Regional Dispatch Center (RDC) of the situation. As the simulated VP-45 flight crew made their approach, the aircrafts second engine lost power causing it to crash in a heavily wooded area of the park. This integrated training exercise is designed www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 2014 I I D E 4TH FLEET COC Ballance Relieves Harris Page 3 ONE SPARK Navy Band Southeast Rocks VP-8El Salvador Outreach Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com From USS Harry S. Truman Public AffairsApproximately 6,000 Sailors and Marines assigned to the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) arrived at their homeports in Norfolk, Va., Jacksonville and Mayport, April 17, following a ninemonth deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation. While deployed, HST CSG conducted a full range of operations ranging from maritime security operations and multinational exercises, to providing air support for Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. HST CSG also conducted integrated operations with the French navys Charles de Gaulle Strike Group over a five-week period in the Gulf of Oman, Arabian Sea, and Arabian Gulf. I cannot overstate how proud I am of our young Sailors and Marines in the Truman Carrier Strike Group, said Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, commander, HST CSG. They performed magnificently during some very challenging times overseas. We were deployed for nine months, including seven and a half months straight supporting operations in the Middle East region with a focus on building trust and confidence with our regional partners. Across the spectrum of operations at sea and in the air over Afghanistan, our crews executed with precision and professionalism, and when called upon, with great lethality. Squadrons assigned to Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 flew 2,902 combat sorties totaling more than 16,450 hours in support of OEF from Aug. 27, 2013 to March 19. Team Battle Axe was on point, every day, on every mission, said Capt. George Wikoff, commander, CVW-3. Everyone remained focused on mission accom plishment, from the aircrew in the cockpits to the maintainers keeping the aircraft flying, determined to keep our coalition troops safe on the ground in Afghanistan. Everything we did as an air wing, we did as a team, said Wikoff. If it wasnt for Team Truman keeping the flight deck ready to launch and recover our aircraft, we wouldnt have been able to provide support to our coalition forces. Capt. Bob Roth, commanding officer, USS Harry S. Photo by MC2 Amanda Cabasos A crash vehicle arrives on scene during the aviation mishap drill, where firefighters begin pumping water onto the smoking Mobile Aircraft Firefighting Training Device that represents a P-8A Poseidon.Poseidon goes down in mock emergencyPhotos by Clark PierceYoung Emma Wich, whose daddy is a pilot with HSM-74, expressed her feelings through a baby car riage poster prepared by her mom, Jennifer. After nine months of deployment with Carrier Air Wing-3 on board aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman, the Swamp Fox "show bird" No. 700 touches down on the seawall at NAS Jax on a gusty afternoon.CVW-3, H SM-74 RETURN HO M E See Page 9 See Page 6 See Page 8 Photo by Capt. Jane CampbellCommander, Fleet Forces Command Adm. Bill Gortney, addresses Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance officers from Wing-11 and VP-30 during his visit to NAS Jacksonville on April 10.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-7789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley From StaffApril 24 1778 Continental Navy Sloop Ranger captures HMS Drake. 1862 Battle of New Orleans. Union Navy under David Farragut runs past forts into Mississippi River. 1884 Navy steamer USS Bear left New York Naval Shipyard as part of the Greely Arctic Relief Expedition. Steamers USS Thetis and USS Alert would join the mission a week later. Greely and six other survivors were found at Cape Sabine on June 23. 1906 Ceremonies at U.S. Naval Academy com memorate John Paul Jones, with President Theodore Roosevelt delivering keynote address. 1917 U.S. destroyer squadron departs Boston for European service. 1959 Organization of American States (OAS) asks U.S. to establish naval patrols off east coast of Panama to prevent invasion of Cuban forces. 1974 Naval forces begin minesweeping operations in the Suez Canal Zone. April 25 1862 Union naval forces occupy New Orleans, La. 1914 First combat observation mission by Navy aircraft (two Curtiss Model F flying boats) at Veracruz, Mexico. 1959 USS Eversole (DD 789) rescues 14 Nationalist Chinese fishermen from their sinking fishing trawler in the Formosa Strait. April 26 1869 The Good Conduct medal was authorized. 1952 USS Hobson (DMS-26)) sinks after collision with aircraft carrier USS Wasp (CV-18) in the North Atlantic 176 lives lost. April 27 1861 President Lincoln extended blockade of Confederacy to Virginia and North Carolina ports. 1865 Body of John Wilkes Booth brought to Washington Navy Yard. April 28 1862 Naval forces capture Forts Jackson and St. Philip in Louisiana. 1965 Dominican Republic intervention. 1944 Navy LSTs (Landing Ship, Tank) attacked during Operation Tiger. 1993 SECDEF memo orders armed forces to train and assign women on combat aircraft and most com bat ships, but not to ground combat positions. April 29 1814 Sloop-of-war USS Peacock (22 guns) captures the18-gun HMS Epervier. 1898 U.S. warships engage Spanish gunboats and shore batteries at Cienfuegos, Cuba. 1944 Fast carrier task force (12 carriers) commence two-day bombing of Truk. 1975 Operation Frequent Wind, the helicopter evacuation of American citizens from Saigon, begins. The last helicopter lifted off the roof of the United States Embassy at 7:52 p.m. carrying Marine security guards. April 30 1798 Congress establishes Department of the Navy. 1973 The last Marine Corps NAP (enlisted Naval Aviation Pilot) retired. Master Gunnery Sgt. Patrick ONeil enlisted during World War II and completed over 30 years of active duty. 1975 Saigon falls to North Vietnamese forces. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorLast week, I posted the following on Facebook: Why didnt anyone tell me that this parenting stuff just keeps get ting harder? The responses were amusing: We didnt want to scare you. At least you have boys! We wanted you to hand onto that little bit of hope. Its on a need-to-know basis. Until my college roommate, Jenny, who just had a baby last month, wrote, What!?! Harder??!! Im in month one! I thought it was supposed to get easier. Oops. I looked at Jennys page and saw picture after picture of someone in new mom mode: air-dried hair pulled back in a pony tail, dark circles under the eyes, and the timid smile of some one who isnt quite sure yet. Jenny is in the thick of sleepless nights. But there is her newborn baby, peacefully asleep on her shoulder. This weighing of the pros and cons is familiar to any woman who has made a decision to quit having babies, only to find herself strangely mesmerized and exhausted (at the same time) by any newborn. On the one hand, having a child who sleeps 90 percent of the day seems like a piece of cake compared to having a moody teenager. On the other hand, my teenager puts himself to bed, and when he gets up at 5 a.m., he lets me sleep in. Its hard to know, then, which stage is easiest. Below, Ive tried to sort it out. 0-2 Years Pros God doesnt let new babies walk for a reason moms arent ready yet. Like the speed on a treadmill, mother hood, in the beginning, advances incre mentally. Life for the new mom is seem ingly unaffected.* The baby goes where it wants, when it wants. He doesnt even have much of an opinion about it yet either. Cons *Mom is lucky if she gets two uninterrupted hours of sleep each night, her hormones are out of control, and getting out the door for something as simple as a doctors appointment feels like it requires written instruc tions. And thats to say nothing of the diapers. 3-4 Years Pros Whats more cute than a tod dler in overalls whose bottom is heavily padded by a diaper? There is no school calendar yet. No after-school activi ties. Baby fits into moms life (he goes to yoga and sleeps in the baby carrier; he attends parties suspended and immo bile on moms back) not the other way around. Cons The Terrible Twos are a lie. It all goes downhill at age 3, and the moods dont get better again until the child goes to college. (So Im told.) The best birth control is being around a 3-year-old before dinner. Elementary School Pros Freedom. At last, they are off doing their own thing (school) six hours of the day. Their homework is easy and you can help them with it. Cons Freedom. They are gone six hours a day. Their homework is easy, and therefore, you have no excuse: you have to help them with it. Middle School Pros Math just got infinitely harder. You are off the hook for homework help. The kids bathe themselves and go to bed on their own. You can go to the gro cery store and leave them at home. Cons Well, its middle school. And its puberty. So its like having a scary 3-year-old again, only with longer, hair ier legs. Band-Aids dont fix much any more. Neither does kissing the boo boo. Big kids equal bigger problems. The same night of my Facebook post, I talked to my friend Dawn. She is ahead of me in the parenting business, as hers are all grown. She had bad news for me: the heart ache of motherhood doesnt end. Neither do the sleepless nights, the dark circles and the smile that says, Am I doing any of this right? My response was somewhat like Jennys on Facebook: What? You mean it doesnt get easier? Even when they are grown? Dawn threw me a bone: at least, with time comes perspective and insight. And this is why mothers new and old have each other. Dawn is my road side flagger on the highway: Prepare to stop! Bumps ahead. Theres a little bit of wonderful and a whole lot of self-doubt and heartbreak at every stage. But even a green mom like Jenny has the biggest lesson of all figured out. On her Facebook page soon after, she posted, So Ive decided, its really hard being a mom. Period. This Week in Navy HistoryU.S. Navy photoA Douglas AD-4 Skyraider of Attack Squadron (VA) 195 "Dambusters" taking off from the aircraft car VA-195 was assigned to Carrier Air Group (CVG) Princeton. NASA photo are in the Apollo 16 recovery raft as a Navy diver helps secure the capsule and prepare it for craning aboard aircraft carrier USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14). An the three astronauts and flew them to Ticonderoga. HC-1 had the privilege of providing services in the Ticonderoga was sold for scrap a year later.Image from National ArchivesThe battle for Saigon, South Vietnam, came to an end From the HomefrontParenting doesnt get easier Hospital AwardsCapt. Gayle Shaffer (left), Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville commanding officer, presents the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal to Lt. Cmdr. Michele Sprosty during an awards ceremony at the hospital on April 18. Other award recipients included: HMC Wayne Nettles (Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal); HM3 Neon Michael Agno (Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal); HM2 Monica Green (Flag Letter of Commendation, Navy Medicine East); CSSN Anton Brown (Letter of Commendation, commanding officer NH Jacksonville); HM2 Monica Green, HM2 Olymphia Saincois and HM3 Emmanuel Washington (Letter of Appreciation, Palm Avenue Exceptional Student Center).Photo by Yan Kennon

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From U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsThe former director of the ater engagement for U.S. Southern Command assumed the responsibilities of com mander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and commander, U.S. 4th Fleet April 17 at the Ocean Breeze Conference Center at Naval Station Mayport. Rear Adm. George Ballance replaced Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, who will become the vice director for operations on the Joint Staff at the Pentagon. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet are responsible for U.S. naval forces that include Central and South America and the Caribbean Sea. Marine Gen. John Kelly, the commander of U.S. Southern Command, served as the presiding officer for the ceremony. I believe Sincs greatest accomplishment while com manding NAVSO has been his commitment to building partnerships with naval forces throughout the region, said Kelly. The presence of rep resentatives from Colombia, Brazil, Chile, and Peru at todays ceremony is a testa ment to the importance of those partnerships, which are critical for the United States and the region alike. Ballance, a Navy Reservist, has served as vice com mander of U.S. Naval Forces Europe and U.S. Naval Forces Africa, as director of U.S. 6th Fleets Maritime Partnership Program, and as deputy com mander of U.S. 7th Fleet. He is the 13th commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command since it was estab lished in 1942 and the fifth commander of U.S. 4th Fleet since it was re-established in 2008. Vice Adm. Robin Braun, chief of Navy Reserve, commander of Navy Reserve Force was in attendance as the senior Navy official. Its the partnerships and relationships with military and political leaders through out Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as your innovation, vision and char ismatic leadership, that make you larger than life and so deserving of the high esteem in which you are held. Your efforts here have directly supported the CNOs Global Maritime Partnership Initiative. Harris thanked Kelly and Braun for their support, and offered congratulations to what he described as a few of our great partners in South America. The courage and sacrifices of the people of Colombia as they close out their 50-year strug gle against armed revolution aries is phenomenal, and the nations execution of the mari time exercise UNITAS last year was inspiring, he said. He also praised the Chileans, Peruvians and Brazilians for their professionalism, partner ship and leadership. Brazil has been leading international naval forces off the coast of Lebanon for sev eral years and participated in Obangame Express, an exer cise conducted by U.S. Naval Forces Africa. Your leadership role amongst our partners is highly valued, specifically in a region Brazil understands so well, Harris said. We stand to learn much from you. Harris, who arrived in Mayport in 2012, previously served as commanding offi cer of Amphibious Squadron 4 and the USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Strike Group during human itarian assistance and disas ter relief operations following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 and during the noncom batant emergency evacuations of Lebanon in 2006. He also commanded Expeditionary Strike Group 5, provid ing disaster relief during the Pakistan floods of 2010, and served as director of the Navys Irregular Warfare Office on the staff of the chief of naval opera tions. He joked that he wasnt in a hurry to give up Floridas sun shine and his easy commute. But there is more than that Im sorry for, Harris said. For instance, he wont be present for the transit of the future USS America (LHA 6) around South America this summer; nor for the likely return of USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) on a Continuing Promise mission next year. Hell miss the transition to the era of the Littoral Combat Ship, the Joint High Speed Vessel and patrol craft and hell miss something even big ger, he said. As our relationship con tinues to deepen in the hemi sphere, I truly believe that a combined maritime force will one day come to fruition, as no nation can afford to protect the sea lanes alone, and we are all inextricably tied together, Harris said. From Canada to Chile, we have shared values and concerns that we have seen demonstrated in our exer cises and operations for more than 50 years. Navy League hosts USNA superintendentBy AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterVice Adm. Mike Miller, 61st superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy, addressed the Navy League Jacksonville Council during a lun cheon held April 17 at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club. Many Navy League members in attendance were graduates of the Naval Academy and are interested its future. I want to hear about the new things the Academy has going go. My father-in-law, who was killed during World War II, my son, and I are all academy grads. I want to know what the Academy has in store for my 6-year-old grand son as class of 2026, said retired Adm. Tom Watson. There were more than 75 people attending the luncheon and over half had the opportunity to work with or for Miller at some time during their naval careers. Vice Adm. Miller was my skipper when I was stationed with VS-24 and Ive never for gotten him, said retired AOC Richard Arajo. He was the kind of guy you wanted to work for. The luncheon opened with all members stand ing to recite the Pledge of Allegiance followed by an invocation delivered by Navy League Jacksonville Council Chaplain Matt Tuohy. After finishing their lunch, retired Capt. Bob Buehn, Navy League Jacksonville Council President, introduced J.B. Renninger, Navy League Jacksonville Council Program Chair. Renninger announced Millers military back ground and accomplish ments before turning over the podium to the guest speaker. I am so honored that you all came and joined us today. It is humbling for me to come back here, Miller said. Back when I was stationed at Ceil Field those days, with the people in this room were so important to me and thats why Im standing here today. He went on to dis cus the Naval Academy today and where its headed by presenting a PowerPoint presenta tion about the institu tion and discussed a few inspirational graduates, including Brad Snyder class of 2006. Snyder was an Explosive Ordinance Disposal officer. During his 2001 tour in Afghanistan, he lost vision in both eyes as the result of an impro vised explosive device detonation. A year later, Snyder qualified for the Paralympic swimming team and won a silver medal in the 50-meter freestyle, gold in the 100meter freestyle, and 400meter freestyle. Now if that doesnt speak for the quality of the character of people that attend the Naval Academy, I dont know what does, said Miller. He went on to discuss new programs available to the brigade of midship men, including a Powered Flight Program designed to reduce the midship man attrition rate at flight school. The program consists of four sessions of ground school, an ini tial instrument test, and 10 flights to prepare the midshipman for a solo flight. What we believe is that if our midshipmen know what they are getting into before flight school, they will succeed when they get there, Miller added. In closing, Miller expressed his apprecia tion for those in atten dance, I cant leave without telling you all that you have shaped my life and given me so much in many cases when I didnt deserve it. You had enough faith to believe in me through tough times and great times. Some of the best times of my life were right here, in this great place, in Jacksonville, Florida. US Naval Forces Southern Command, US 4th Fleet welcomes new commanderRear Adm. George Ballance Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers tours Jax facilityOn April 16, AE2 Joshua Johnson (left), a production supervisor at the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Avionics (600) division, explains to Rear. Adm. Paul Sohl, commander, Fleet Readiness Centers, how an avionics tiger team devised a $5 repair for a test set as Holly Martinez, the FRCSE production director, and AE3 Derrick Fletcher listen in. The FRCSE team led by Lou Deppe (not pictured) repaired a mounting bracket, reattached wires, and re-sol dered connections on a P-3 Orion temperature datum amplifier test set to make the inexpen sive repair for a cost avoidance of $22,700 per unit.Photo by Victor Pitts Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesRet. Capt. Bob Buehn, Navy League Jacksonville Council president, presents Vice Adm. Mike Miller, superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy, a copy of the Navy League History Book as a token of appreciation for the guest speaker. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 3

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Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax Sailor of the Quarter AT1 Antonio Hart Junior Sailor of the Quarter AO2 Herson Sanchez Commander, Navy Region Southeast Senior Sailor of the Quarter YN1 Abdul Beyah Junior Sailor of the Quarter YN3 Reaunta Evans Commander, Patrol Reconnaissance Wing Eleven Sea Senior Sailor of the Quarter AWO1 Ernesto Espinosa Jr. Junior Sailor of the Quarter AWO2 Aldric Quinto Blue Jacket of the Quarter OSSN Keighahna Powell Shore Senior Sailor of the Quarter Junior Sailor of the Quarter Blue Jacket of the Quarter YNSN Paul Kennepohl Costal Riverine Squadron 10 Active/Full Time Support Sailor of the Quarter OS1(EXW/SW) Carlo Noid Junior Sailor of the Quarter ET2(EXW) Troy Kruyer Selected Reserves Junior Sailor of the Quarter ET2(EXW) Tiffany Nails Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Sea Senior Sail of the Quarter PS1 Maxo Decat Sailor of the Quarter AM2 Stephanie Dorval Junior Sailor of the Quarter AD3 Amanda Olivas Blue Jacket of the Quarter PRAN James Carney Shore Senior Sailor of the Quarter AM1 Ryan Blair Sailor of the Quarter AZ2 Yanier Cabrera Junior Sailor of the Quarter Blue Jacket of the Quarter AZAA Jacob Parkins Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville Senior Sailor of the Quarter AC1 Gregory Klein Junior Sailor of the Quarter Blue Jacket of the Quarter AC3 Chayenne Thomas HSM-72 Sailor of the Quarter NC1 Mailyn Juhlin Junior Sailor of the Quarter AWR2 Jason Rodriguez Blue Jacket of the Quarter AM3 Thomas Fiedler NAS Jacksonville Senior Sail of the Quarter AO1 Kendric Stockdale Sailors of the Quarter honoredBy AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterNAS Jacksonville recognized 84 top Sailors from the base and tenant commands for the second quarter during the Sailor of the Quarter (SOQ) luncheon at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center April 16. The United States Navy is a professional fight ing force pursuing excellence at every turn. Just look around this room at the men and women we are hon oring today. You are the single reason why we are considered the greatest Navy in the world. They exem plify the Navy Core Values and the Navy Ethos. They represent the best of the best, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre. She continued, Admiral Zumwalt established the Sailor of the Year/Sailor of the Quarter program in 1972 to recognize outstanding sailors and their contri butions. Today we honor 84 such sailors. From a young age, my grandfather taught me the necessity of duty through service. He did not know that as he opened up to me about his fears during combat, that his words would help me through my own time. The choices I made in the desert when I could smell the rockets and the tracers were so close they lit up the ground around me, were because of him, said Reisen. It is my sailors on the deckplate that are the real reason I am successful. This award means the world to me and is truly humbling, Reisen added. At the end of the day, leadership is recognizing success, identify ing failures, taking responsibly for your actions, and not making concessions to our core values. Following lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander thanked the Sailors and their spouses. Congratulations to all of you who have been select ed as Sailor of the Quarter and to your families for their service, said Undersander. I want to share with you an award that I had the honor to receive last week on behalf of all of your efforts. HandsOn Jacksonville hosted an event to celebrate the exceptional volunteer efforts of different people and organizations. This year, the HandsOn Service in Uniform Award was pre sented to NAS Jax. Undersander read the award citation, As a result of their efforts, NAS Jax has cultivated a culture of service, built a mutual respect with the city of Jacksonville and received multiple Navy wide recogni tion awards. This award was unsolicited. I believe that all of the Sailors of the Quarter played a part in NAS Jax win ning this award. Part of why you were selected for SOQ was your leadership. Part of leadership is being a good steward a good steward to your people, the equipment entrusted to you, and the environment, he continued. Stewardship is a continuous process. Your selec tion as SOQ is not the end of a journey, but an affirma tion that we believe in your capabilities. You should feel great about your accomplishment, but also feel a sense of increased responsibility to lead by example, live our core values and make our motto Americas Navy, A Global Force for Good more than a slo gan. Make it your mission at home and abroad, said Undersander. Again, congratulations to you and your family members. Its ourteam effort on the home front that makes us successful. Undersander then presented each SOQ an award envelope containing a $25 gift card from VyStar Credit Union, a letter of recognition, and First Command Coin. The Navy Band Southeast Brass Quintet performed the national anthem and NAS Jacksonville Chaplain (Lt.) Andrew Hayler delivered the invocation. The guest speaker was VP-5 Senior Sailor of the Quarter AWO1 James Reisen. Sponsors included USAA, First Command Financial Planning, USA Discounters, University of Phoenix, and Columbia College who covered the cost of the buffet for the SOQs and their family members. Neither the U.S. Navy nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesVP-5 Senior Sailor of the Quarter, AWO1 James Reisen (left), shakes hands with NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander before receiving a letter of recognition, a $25 gift card, and First Command Coin during the Sailor of the Quarter luncheon. CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre expresses her admi ration for the accomplishments of the Sailors of the Quarter (SOQ) during the SOQ luncheon held on April 16. Sailors of the Quarter See SOQ LIST, Page 5 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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Sailor of the Quarter AC2 Vladimir Kurenyshev Junior Sailor of the Quarter Blue Jacket of the Quarter ACAN April GregoryWilliams Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Jax Senior Sailor of the Quarter IT1 Breanna Schneider Junior Sailor of the Quarter IT2 Marcus Thomas Blue Jacket of the Quarter ET3 Rebekah Ray Naval Hospital Jacksonville Senior Sail of the Quarter CS1 Joseph Cook Sailor of the Quarter Junior Sailor of the Quarter HM3 John Williams Blue Jacket of the Quarter HN Kelsey Hudson Navy Operational Support Center Sailor of the Quarter HM1 Charla Joesph Junior Sailor of the Quarter HM2 Michael Bruns Blue Jacket of the Quarter PSSN Bon Ryan Pecaoco Navy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command Sailor of the Quarter YN1 Dawn Achane Junior Sailor of the Quarter South East Regional Calibration Center Senior Sailor of the Quarter AZ1 Steven Guarnieri Junior Sailor of the Quarter EM2 John Prokop Blue Jacket of the Quarter EM3 Racquel Gunnell Transient Personnel Unit/ Sailor of the Quarter STS1 Stephan Raines Junior Sailor of the Quarter QM2 Shante Dickerson Tactical Support Center Sailor of the Quarter STG1 Daniel Dye Junior Sailor of the Quarter OS2 Andrew Vu VP-5 Senior Sailor of the Quarter AWO1(NAC/AW) James Reisen Junior Sailor of the Quarter IT2(AW/IDW) Elijah Brimmer Mad Fox of the Quarter AE3(AW) Peter Bowen VP-8 DEPLOYED Senior Sailor of the Quarter AD1 Shaun A. Kilpatrick Junior Sailor of the Quarter Blue Jacket of the Quarter AOAN Samantha R Taylor VP-10 Senior Sailor of the Quarter AWO1 Chad M. Bowles Junior Sailor of the Quarter AWO2 Victor J. Romancharriez Blue Jacket of the Quarter VP-16 (DEPLOYED) Senior Sailor of the Quarter NC1 Daniela Pradon Junior Sailor of the Quarter AE2 Crystal A. Ybarra Blue Jacket of the Quarter AT3 Austin K. Gwin VP-26 Senior Senior Sail of the Quarter AM1 Daniel Mendezmauricio Sailor of the Quarter Junior Sailor of the Quarter AT3 Eric O. Gonzalez Blue Jacket of the Quarter PRAN Alex J. Abhold VP-30 Senior Sail of the Quarter AWO1 Johnathan Rumage Sailor of the Quarter Junior Sailor of the Quarter AM3 Christopher Sabella Blue Jacket of the Quarter VP-45 Senior Sailor of the Quarter AM1 John R. Ernest Junior Sailor of the Quarter AT2 Christopher E. Riley Blue Jacket of the Quarter AOAN Joshua M. Whitney VP-62 Full Time Support Sailor of the Quarter AWF1 Stephen Ryczek Junior Sailor of the Quarter AWO2 Jacob Mora Blue Jacket of the Quarter Selected Reserves Junior Sailor of the Quarter AM2 Ray Turrentine Blue Jacket of the Quarter AE3 Theodore Chancellor VR-58 Full Time Support Sailor of the Quarter AZ1(AW) Toby Saine Junior Sailor of the Quarter AZ2(AW) Menell Bonn Blue Jacket of the Quarter AWF3(NAC/AW) Joshua Brown Selected Reserves Sailor of the Quarter AWF1(NAC/AW) Misty Ward Junior Sailor of the Quarter Blue Jacket of the Quarter AEAN Samantha Nunez SOQ List (from Page 4) Expect relatively quiet hurricane season, researchers sayFrom StaffThe 2014 Atlantic hurricane season (June 1 through Nov. 30) will be less active than in the past 20 years, but still in line with overall averages from 1950 to the present, according to researchers at North Carolina State University. Eight to 11 named storms should form in 2014 in the Atlantic basin, which includes the entire Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea, according to Dr. Lian Xie, professor of marine, earth and atmospheric sciences (MEAS), and collaborators Dr. Montserrat Fuentes, professor of statistics, Marcela Alfaro-Cordoba, graduate research assistant in statis tics and Bin Liu, research assistant professor in MEAS. This number is slightly lower than but within the margin of error for the (1950-2013) 63-year average of 10.8 named storms. Of those named storms, four to six may grow strong enough to become hurricanes, and one to three may become major hurricanes. This years numbers for the Gulf are in keeping with historic averages: Xies data indicate the likelihood of three to four named storms forming, and one to two becoming hurricanes. In the Caribbean, Xies numbers are as follows: three to five tropical cyclones forming, with one to two becoming hurricanes. In this scenario, the Caribbean may see one major hurricane this season. Xies methodology evaluates data from the last 100 years on Atlantic Ocean hurricane positions and intensity, as well as other variables including weather patterns and sea-surface temperatures, to predict how many storms will form and where they will make landfall. For more details concerning Xies methodology, input data and predictions, visit the research groups website at: http://cfdl.meas.ncsu.edu/research/ TCoutlook_2014.html. Photo by MCSN Justin DiNiroFC2 Dustin Gower, assigned to the PUMA unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) detachment on board the Military Sealift Command joint high-speed vessel USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1), throws a UAV during flight operations on March 27 as part of a U.S. and Ghana navy combined maritime law enforcement opera tion, under the African Maritime Law Enforcement Partnership program. Mini-UAV does SAR and more JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 to test our pre-planned response, as well as the interrelated roles of NAS Jacksonville first responders, in coordination with Duval County emergency manage ment and Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department (JFRD), said NAS Jax Training Officer Jim Butters. During his safety brief, Butters reminded drill observers and evaluators to call a safety time out whenever they see a potentially hazardous situation involving personnel or equipment. When a safety time out is communicated to the incident command post (ICP), the scenario will stop and the appropriate action will be taken to correct the unsafe condition. Only then will the ICP leader allow the drill to continue, said Butters. Jacksonville Navy Metro Fire & Emergency Services Fire Chief Mark Brusoe said the responders worked well to promptly bring the mock emergency under control. Our Incident Command Post did very well allocating resources in this multiple agency envi ronment. The communications network performed beyond expectations. Taking time to participate in an exercise like the one we are conducting is critical in understanding where and how the station personnel respond to and handle disaster response -and how we work jointly with our city counter parts, said NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. From E-1 to the most senior member aboard the station, we must understand our collective roles and responsi bilities when it comes to responding to and recovering from an emergency. This type of exercise enables us to achieve more effective and efficient responses, pro cesses and procedures in order to emerge as a cohe sive and solid team of professionals. Jacksonville Navy Metro Fire & Emergency Services Battalion Chief Mick McClain and Lt. John Rhoads delivered the Mobile Aircraft Firefighting Training Device (MAFTD) from Naval Station Mayport. The MAFTD, with its programmable smoke and flames, adds realism and challenge to the exercise scenario, said McClain. JFRD Fire Chief Martin Senterfitt was pleased with what he observed. Very well coordinated. The various teams showed excellent synergy and focus. So far, Id say the exercise went off without a hitch. CWO4 Keith Miltner observed the exercise for Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, where he is the aviation safety officer. In an aviation mishap, its important to establish effective coordina tion and communications between first responders, the RDC, the station EOC, the squadron and other tenant commands. VP-45 volunteered flight crew and acoustic operators for the exercise. An NAS Jax Firefighter carries a mannequin to safety from a burning aircraft during a drill on April 17. CRASH DRILLFrom Page 1 An NAS Jax crash vehicle responds quickly to a mock aircraft crash during the drill at Tillie Fowler Regional Park. Mock casualty AWO1(NAC/AW) Adam Corner of VP-45 waits for medical assistance from the City of Jacksonville Fire and Rescue team working with NAS Jax firefighters during the drill. NAS Jax Firefighter Alex Guerra transports Lt. j.g. Gregory Stewart from VP-45 on a gurney away from the scene of an aviation mishap drill held at Tillie Fowler Regional Park. Fire Inspector Angel Roman (right) and Incident Command Post Leader Chief Jeff Harrell review the action plan and allocate resources during the aviation mishap drill.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 7 Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax and City of Jacksonville firefighters extinguish a simulated fire on a Mobile Aircraft Firefighting Training Device as part of a drill held at Tillie Fowler Regional Park on April 17. A City of Jacksonville firefighter heaves a hose to allow for slack to the firefighter ahead of him during the aircraft mishap drill. A firefighter with Jacksonville Navy Metro Fire & Emergency Services checks pressure gauges on a tank truck supplying water for the exercise. NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker (left) dicusses communications issues with NAS Jacksonville Training Officer Jim Butters. NAS Jax OSHA Specialist Gregg Gillette (left) speaks with NAS Jax Training Officer Jim Butters after the exercise safety brief held at the Tillie Fowler Regional Park Nature Center. AWO2 Matthew Goebel from VP-45 portrays a mock causality while receiving assistance from a City of Jacksonville firefighter during the aviation mishap drill.

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VP-16 fly side by side with Orions from VP-46 in the same Pacific theatre, pav ing the way for continued transition . on station. The keystone event of the symposium, the heri tage dinner held in his toric Hangar 117, attracted a crowd of more than 300 active duty, retired and civilian guests. One of the many dis tinguished attendees, guest speaker Adm. Bill Gortney, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, spoke about the value of all U.S. Naval communities working together to bring power projection for our country and commended the MPRF for being inte gral to our national secu rity strategy. As the maritime com munity transitions from the P-3 to the P-8, youve set the gold standard for operational excellence, said Gortney. You have a worldwide reach, and the impact has not gone unnoticed. Gortney continued by congratulating the com munity for delivering the new platform under budget and faster than promised by managing the test and evaluation concept at the same time of transitioning and training. Now, youre proving yourself in an operational theater, said Gortney. Lately, I cant turn on CNN without seeing one of your Poseidons taking off, landing or patrolling the seas west of Australia. After commending the present leadership and members of maritime patrol for their dedication to the future of the MPRF, the dinner presentation turned toward the past to honor those individuals who built the foundation upon which the modern standards and practices of the community were developed. Included in that group of standouts were the two individuals inducted into the MPRF Hall of Honor for 2014. Retired Rear Adm. Paul Mulloy had a profound effect on the MPRF com munity as he pushed the force of newly arriving P-3Cs hard on tactics, readiness, safety and pro fessionalism ensuring all squadrons deployed com bat ready. He was instrumental in the development of antisurface warfare tactics utilizing the P-3C and was responsible for bringing the Harpoon missile capa bility to the maritime fleet. Attending the dinner with his three sons, Mulloy accepted his Hall of Honor recognition with humble ness. One constant through out my wonderful VP career was serving with VPs magnificent men and women. They, not the equipment, made the dif ference, he said. Retired Cmdr. David Weisbrod, who enlisted as an aviation radioman in 1951, was so skilled as an antisubmarine war fare (ASW) operator he was subsequently dubbed the ASW Wizard by his squadron CO. Throughout his career, Weisbrod was on the lead ing edge of ASW opera tions, culminating in his standing up and com manding the Naval Ocean Processing Facility, Ford Island, in Hawaii. Unable to attend the din ner, Weisbrod sent a video acceptance of his award expressing his gratitude for a rewarding career with lasting friendships. On April 11, the MPA Symposium turned to the future by hosting a twowave, 140-player golf tour nament to benefit the MPA Scholarship fund. At the end of the day, there were two winning foursomes and more than $6,000 was raised for the scholarship fund. In May, MPA will award $5,000 in scholarships to qualified dependents of past and present MPRF personnel a significant increase over the $2,000 awarded in 2013. Symposium guests wrapped up the event with a scholarship 5K run and a flight suit social, that brought nearly 300 guests together to reminisce and network with former and current shipmates and friends. Established in 2011 and headquartered in Jacksonville, the Maritime Patrol Association is a 501(c)(3) Florida non-profit corporation representing the U.S. Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance com munity by promoting the use of the patrol and reconnaissance aircraft in the U.S. Navy. The Maritime Patrol Association is a non-fed eral entity operated and controlled by individu als acting in their private capacities. It is not a part of the U.S. Department of Defense or any of its com ponents and has no gov ernmental status.For more information, contact Executive Director September Wilkerson at (904) 563-4036 or info@mar itimepatrolassociation.org. MPAFrom Page 1 Photos by Clark PierceThe sun sets behind a P-8 Poseidon and a P-3 Orion during the 2014 MPA Heritage Dinner held at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117. The awards banquet theme was, Transition: On Station. Accepting the MPA Hall of Honor award for retired Cmdr. David Weisbrod were longtime friends (from left) retired Capt. Peter Baxter and retired Capt. Tom Spink. They were joined on stage by retired Rear Adm. Paul Mulloy, Adm. Bill Gortney (Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces), Commodore Vince Segars (CPRW10), Rear Adm. Matt Carter (Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group) and Commodore Sean Liedman (CPRW-11). The VP-30 Allied Crew (Royal Air Force), winners of the 2014 ASW Fleet Challenge, (back row, from left): Sgt Jon Brereton, MACr Mark "Flash" Utting, Sqn Ldr Andy Bull, Sqn Ldr Mark Faulds, MACr Keith Treece, Sgt Steve Dixon, Flt Lt Rob Butler, Flt Lt Ian Tuff. Front row: Lt. Lindsey Sinnett (Fleet Challenge 2014 Coordinator) and Lt. Cmdr. Ron Rumfelt (Fleet Training Officer). 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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Truman (CVN 75), praised his crew for their dedica tion, professionalism, and like Wikoff, his commands ability to work as a team. Nine months at sea as a forward-deployed com bat team is an immense undertaking, he said. The days were long and the work was challenging, but Team Truman never missed a beat and we met every challenge. The teamwork between the ship and air wing was spectacular and a model for how it should be done. I couldnt be more proud to be a part of this combat-proven team. CVW-3 was embarked on board Harry S. Truman with its associated squadrons Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 32 Swordsmen, VFA-37 Ragin Bulls, and VFA-105 Gunslingers; Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 312 Checkerboards; Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 126 Seahawks; Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 130 Zappers; Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7 Dusty Dogs; and Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74 Swamp Foxes. HSM-74From Page 1 More than 100 shipmates, spouses, children, friends and retirees turned out April 17 to welcome home seven MH-60R Seahawk helicopters assigned to the "Swamp Foxes" of HSM-74. HSM-74 Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. Rob Elizondo was never happier to embrace his family wife, Elizabeth, and their children Jacob, Emma, William and Bobby.Photos by MC2 Amanda Cabasos Lt. j.g. Joe Granata of HSM-74 reunites with his wife, Christie as he is introduced to his twoweek-old daughter, Rosie, for the first time during the HSM-74 home coming celebration at NAS Jacksonville. (From left) Paige Shelton, 6, Hayley Shelton, 4, and Addison Shelton, 6, anxiously wait for the arrival of their father's airlift April 18 at NAS Jacksonville, after a nine-month deployment. As one Swamp Fox taxis to its spot on the seawall, two more fly over the St. Johns River and approach their landing zones. Intermittent rain showers didnt stop AD2(AW) Adam Dumbleton of HSM-74 from hugging his daughter Madison, 4, while his wife Julie and daughter Miley, 7, patiently wait for their turn during the squadrons April 18 home coming celebration. HSM-74 pilot Lt. j.g. A.J. Wich eagerly greets his wife, Jennifer, and their toddler, Emma, after landing on the seawall of NAS Jax Hangar 1122. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 9

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By Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe increase to Career Sea Pay (CSP) and Career Sea Pay Premium (CSP-P), announced in March by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, will be implemented May 1 and eligible Sailors will see the increase in their mid-month paycheck according to Navy officials. In addition to base pay, CSP and CSP-P compensate Sailors and Marines serving aboard ships whose primary mission is conducted at sea. CSP rates are based upon a members pay grade and cumulative years of sea duty. CSP-P is an additional incentive for members who exceed 36 consecu tive months at sea. The increase to both pays is part of a larger Navy-wide effort to reduce gaps at sea by incentivizing sea duty. Those Sailors and Marines on sea duty, deployed away from home around the world, are the backbone of the Navy and Marine Corps, and enable us to provide and maintain our global pres ence, said Mabus in March. This change to Career Sea Pay will both improve critical sea-duty manning and reward those who take these chal lenging sea-going assignments. This increase is long overdue and is meant to reward our Sailors and Marines for their continued sacrifices as part of Americas Away Team. All pay grades with at least three years of cumulative sea duty will receive a 25 percent increase in regu lar CSP, while service members who exceed 36 months of consecutive sea duty will receive an increase in CSP-P from $100 to $200 per month. Consistent with current policy, in lieu of receiving CSP-P, Sailors and Marines in grades E5-E9 with eight years of cumulative sea duty receive a higher CSP rate, equivalent to receiving CSP-P whenever assigned to a ship regardless of consecutive sea time. This is the first increase of CSP and CSP-P since 2001. Approximately 100,000 Sailors receive CSP and approx imately 13,000 receive CSP-P; this spe cial pay increase is expected to cost $66 million/year. CSP and CSP-P Increase begins May 1 Photos by Morgan KenhertAt only 15 months old, Levi Page is beyond ecstatic when the Easter Bunny gives him a hug just before the MWR Easter Egg Hunt begins on April 16 at the McCaffrey Softball Complex. Provided by the NAS Jax Yacht Club, the Easter Bunny led 900 excited chil dren and parents onto the fields.MWR Easter Egg HuntHannah Scott, 3, dashes onto the outfield with her Easter basket and starts collecting some of the 15,000 eggs scattered among the four softball fields. Getting ready to charge onto the field designated for ages 4-6, (from left) Carmelo Felix patiently stands with his friend Zyere Screen and sister Nai'layah Felix before they start filling their baskets with goodies. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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By MC1 Electa BerassaNavy Office of Community OutreachA 2008 Keystone Heights High School graduate and Keystone Heights, Fla., native boasts a unique distinction that of serving in the Navy as part of a pre mier Navy engineer unit. Seaman Sean Leverette, a logistics specialist, is assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 11, based in Gulfport, Miss., and recently returned from deployment to Guam. NMCB 11 is a Seabee battalion spe cializing in advance base construction, battle damage repair, contingency engi neering, humanitarian assistance and disaster recovery support to fleet and unified commanders. Naval Mobile Construction Battalions, more commonly known as the Seabees, are the premier military engineer units in the world today. Born out of necessity in the early days of World War II, their exploits are legend ary. This legacy is carried on today by the men and women of the Naval Construction Force who build and fight. For more than 70 years, the men and women of the Naval Construction Force have been deployed around the world, around the clock. Leverette and the rest of the battalion returned from their six-month deployment earlier this year, where they were in charge of providing engineering support to four combatant command are as of responsibility. While deployed, Leverette and the other Navy Seabees of NMCB 11 were responsible for exe cuting a countless number of projects, ranging from security improvements to bases in Africa to the construction of a submarine support facility in Guam. Leverette said it is an exciting time to be in the Navy. I have seen a lot of things I guarantee some people would not have been able to see. At age 24, Ive been around the world twice and would not have had that chance in the civilian world. It has all helped me develop a greater appreciation for the little things that can be taken for granted. This deployment was a huge success for the Naval Expeditionary Task Force Europe and Africa, and for us as a crew, said Cmdr. Steve Stasick, commander of NMCB 11. The Sailors did very well executing the mission. Weve been very pleased with the support of the Naval Station Rota community at large, said Stasick. It enabled us to operate in 19 countries in four COCOMS [combatant commands]. The Seabees are very team-orient ed, said Leverette. That makes the job easier when everyone pulls together. Through concentrated planning and operations, Leverette and other Seabees of NMCB 11 were able to assist local populations and add an unparalleled level of responsiveness and flexibility to the fleet and unified commanders in the area. Keystone Heights native serves with Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 11Seaman Sean Leverette NMCB-11 Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesNAS JAX the Turtle visited the Child Development Center as a part of the continual environmental conservation outreach program and to get the children excited about Earth Day on April 22.NAS Jax environmental outreachNAS JAX the Turtle steps out of NAS Jax Environmental Department solar powered vehicle and marches toward the Child Development Center during his visit April 15. Angela Glass, NAS Jax assistant natural resources manager, holds Lucy the Florida Box Turtle while McKenzy Thomason (5) gets a chance to feel the turtle's shell. "Lucy was so squishy! I'm glad both turtles came to visit us!" she said. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 11

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By MC2 Amanda Cabasos Staff WriterNAS Jacksonville Sailors participated in Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) training held at the base chapel April 15. It was to reinforce the necessity of all hands to work together to eliminate sexual misconduct within the Navys ranks. The session began when NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker told the audience, I want you all to know that this training is extremely important. There are some great new topics that will be covered today, so please lis ten closely. A three-person team con ducted the training: led by NAS Jacksonville SAPR Coordinator ACC(AW/SW) John Jones from Air Operations; Sexual Assault Response Coordinator Tina Vaughn from Fleet and Family Support Center; and Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions president AC3 Alexis Ray from Air Operations. Jones said, We are having this training to reinforce that April is Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness month. We want our Sailors to be aware that sexual assault is a problem in the mili tary and we want to reinforce the Navys Core Values to help emphasize to Sailors the impor tance of making the right deci sions. Jones utilized a PowerPoint presentation to emphasize how important this topic is in the Navy. He defined consent, and explained how Sailors can get help and support when a crime occurs and elaborated on how to prevent the crime in the first place. The Navy has a zero toler ance for sexual assault and you will be separated from the mili tary if convicted for this crime, he said. Vaughn said, These train ing opportunities are invaluable to genuinely engage personnel and to have serious conversa tions around this topic. SAPR is creating necessary tension and conversations around issues that relate. So we may better under stand the extent to which we have internalized beliefs, atti tudes and social norms that con tribute to a climate where sexual assault is possible. SAPR stand downs such as this, cast light into shadows and call bystand ers to action, she said. Several videos demonstrated to Sailors how to recognize a sexual assault case and to inter vene as a bystander before the crime occurs. Ray said, We need to be con tinuously reminded that sexual assault can happen every day. This training reminds us to keep our eyes open and recognize when to step in and to prevent a potential sexual assault case. Near the conclusion of the training, NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM (SW/AW) Teri McIntyre added her per spective. I know, its another training on SAPR. But, we must keep training because sexual assault keeps happening. I can stand here. The XO can stand here. The skipper can stand here. And we can all tell you that sexual assault cases are still From StaffRegistration is underway for military dependents ages 9 to 12 who want to engage in posi tive, healthy lifestyles as drugfree citizens. The free Drug Education For Youth (DEFY) program includes the resident summer camp at YMCA Camp McConnell in Micanopy, Fla., June 8 13. Our six-day, five-night Camp DEFY is free of charge to interested Department of Defense dependents, said AWOC Kraig Vavruska, who volunteered to coordinate the VP-30-sponsored regional DEFY program for 2014. Through application of the DEFY curriculum, we strength en military families by devel oping positive life skills in our youths. Camp McConnell has host ed Camp DEFY for the past four years and provides a host of activities including: class room activities, horseback rid ing, rock wall climbing, swim ming, archery and many other team building and confidence enhancing activities. Campers are provided with three meals a day in the YMCA dining facility, as well as daily snacks. If you are interested in attending Camp DEFY 2014, e-mail Kraig.vavruska@navy. mil for the necessary forms to fill out and sign. When complete, drop off your forms at the VP-30 Duty Office or scan and email by May 16. Apply early because space is limited. Sign up for free DEFY program summer camp by May 16Jax Air News photosIn 2013, DEFY mentors, AWO1(NAC/AW) Brett Aasen (front left), HN John Holland (front right), PR2(AW) Terrell Manigault (rear left), and AWO1(NAC/AW) Gerry Boysen demonstrated one of the camps team-building exercises the four-man push up. In 2013, DEFY mentor AD2(AW) Megan Kehoe, of VP-30, helped two DEFY campers design and decorate their team flags. DEFY camper Brooke Lankhorst was pleased with her choice of horse in 2013 as she prepared to start the Camp McConnell horseback riding activity. NAS Jax holds SAPR stand downPhotos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre stresses the importance of understanding the Sexual Assault and Response training to NAS Jax Sailors on April 15 at the base chapel.See SAPR, Page 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live enter tainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke Lunch bingo Monday through Friday begins at 11:15 a.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Scratch Sweeper: April 26, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open May 10 June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31 Outdoor pool opens for weekend recre ational swim on May 10 Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Dive-in Movie May 23 featuring LEGO Movie Pool opens at 7 p.m., movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free popcorn. Concession stand will be open.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Kanapaha Botanical Gardens Trip May 3, $25 Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while sup plies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Barracks Bash April 24, 4 8 p.m. Free food, entertainment and prizes Grill & Chill May 13 at 6 p.m. Free hamburgers and hotdogs Paintball Trip May 17 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. Command Party Swing into savings & book your com mand golf tournamentMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Summer Camp Registration going on now! Sign-in at the youth center Operation: Megaphone Worldwide Lock-in April 25 at 8 p.m. Open to all CYP teens 13 18Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available includ ing instrument, complex and commer cial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.netSand Volleyball League forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard Cup points along with rules and required paperwork. Greybeard Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Intramural Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Kickball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Game play at lunch time. Contact the NAS Jacksonville Sports Department at 542-2930 for rules and the required paperwork. Tournament April 28Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Intramural Golf Summer League Meeting May 7Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at 11:30 a.m. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Meeting May 14Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at noon at along with rules and required paperwork.Wallyball League Meeting May 21Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork.Badminton Singles League Meeting May 28Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork.Bean Bag Toss Singles Tournament June 23Tournament takes place at 5 p.m. in the NAS Jax Fitness, Sports and Aquatics Center. The tournament is open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Call the Fitness Center at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil to sign up by June 13. StandingsAs of April 18SoftballTeams Wins Losses CRS-10 3 0 NAVHOSP 3 0 VP-30 3 0 FRCSE 900 2 0 VP-26 2 0 VP-45 Sluggers 2 0 FRCSE Rabid Possums 2 1 AIR OPS 2 2 HS-11 2 2 CNRSE/NAVY BAND 1 1 VR-62 1 1 VR-58 1 1 FACSFAC 1 2 FRCSE Thrusters 1 3 CBMU 202 0 2 NBHC Honey Badgers 0 2 FRCSE Tweaks & Geeks 0 3 NCTS 0 3 VP-45 Scared Hitless 0 3Soccer Teams Wins Losses FRCSE 3 0 HITRON 3 0 TPU/PCF 2 0 HS-11 2 1 HSM-72 2 1 VP-26 2 1 VP-30 Students 2 1 BHC Jax 1 1 NAVFAC 1 2 VP-45 1 2 NAVHOSP 0 1 VP-10 0 1 Air Ops 0 2 VP-62 0 2 FRCSE F-18 PMI 0 3 VR-62 0 3 happening, so dont do it and watch each others backs. But this is not working. These crimes are hap pening around you right now. McIntyre continued, We need to treat our ship mates with respect, both on and off duty. We need to step up when we see something wrong. For example, if you see someone in the club and it looks like a per son is going to take advantage of them, have the cour age to step in and have the courage to report it. She continued, The best thing you can do is respect one another and look out for each other. This is how you can play your part in stopping sexual assault cases. Wanamaker wrapped up the event by saying, We want you all to be part of the solution by really think ing about this topic. If you see something, say some thing. Remember, sexual assault is a crime. We have these stand downs so we can talk, reflect and begin to fix this problem that we have in our military. Get more information and resources to combat sexual assault at http://www.sapr.navy.mil. SAPRFrom Page 13 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (left) and Pat Dooling (right), former Navy Region Southeast public affairs officer, pres ent the Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award to Kaylee LaRocque, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Public Affairs Specialist, for her invaluable performance and professionalism while serving as public affairs specialist at the NAS Jax Public Affairs Office from May 2008 to February 2014. "I am extremely humbled to be presented this award," said LaRocque. "As a member of the NAS Jax Public Affairs Team for the past 13 years, my job has always been to promote and showcase base events and the accomplishments of our Sailors and civilians. I recently transferred to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Public Affairs and although I greatly miss working with the NAS Jax Team, I have not ventured far. My heartfelt thanks to every one for your tremendous support and friendship throughout the years!" Photo by Kaylee LaRocqueNAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd and his wife, Miranda are saluted by sideboys as they he goes ashore for the last time during his retirement cer emony on April 17 at Hangar 117. Hundreds of military officers and enlisted Sailors, civilian employees, City of Jacksonville personel, family and friends attended the retirement cer emony to pay tribute to Shepherd's distinguished career and recognize the contributions of his family to the U.S. Navy. Photo by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (left) presents NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd with the Navy and Marine Corps Meritorious Service Medal for his numerous contributions to NAS jax and 110 tenant commands dur ing his retirement ceremony at Hangar 117. Shepherd retired with 30 years of honorable naval service. NAS Jax CMC retires Photo by AE2 Samantha JonesSeawall FOD walk down The Proud Warriors of HSM-72 and Royal Australian Navy 725 Squadron team up and walk the seawall in search of foreign object damage (FOD) during the base wide FOD walkdown on April 9. Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesLaRocque recognized JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 15

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By Barbie SmolinskiNMCRS Publicity AssistantPauline Ebersolehas been a volunteer at Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) Jacksonville for seven years, where she has serves as a client services assistant (CSA). As a CSA, she is the first point of contact to greet and guide active-duty service members and their families toward the appropriate NMCRS services. She loves volunteering for NMCRS and is a valued volunteer with more than 1,000 hours of volunteer time. Ebersole is a native of North London, England. There she met her late husband, a Vietnam veteran and security service officer for the U.S. Air Force. She has two children. She and her family had the pleasure of being stationed in Texas and overseas. Her favorite duty stations were in Greece and Taiwan. While stationed in Greece for four years, Ebersole worked for the commissary. She loves the Greek culture, people and beautiful scenery. In Taiwan, she had furniture handmade that she still cherishes today. Ebersole splits her time between Maryland in the summer and Florida in the winter. Her hobbies are traveling and oil painting. Do you want to meet interesting people like Pauline Ebersole? Then check out the volunteer opportunities at NMCRS by calling the chairman of volunteers at 904-5423515. Please make the Society your first resource. From the Office of the Chief of InformationThe following reports the results of Special and General Courts-Martial tried within the United States Navy in March 2014. Cases are listed by the Navy region in which they were tried. Naval District Washington Navy Yard, Washington, D.C., a Midshipman was tried for sexual assault and false official statements. On March 20, the military judge returned a verdict of not guilty for aggravated sexual assault, and the Convening Authority dismissed the charge of false official statement. Yard, Washington, D.C., ET1 Robert Moriarty, USN pleaded guilty to a false official statement and wrong ful use of controlled substances. On March 4, the Military Judge sentenced him to be discharged with a Bad Conduct Discharge, reduction in rank to paygrade E-1, and confinement for 45 days. Yard, Washington, D.C., MM2 Charles Stamos, USN pleaded guilty to larceny. On March 11, the military judge sentenced him to a reprimand, reduction in rank to paygrade E-4, and hard labor without confine ment for 90 days. Navy Region Mid-Atlantic Hans Silvera, USN was tried for sexual assault and vio lating military protective orders. On March 26, a panel of members returned a verdict of guilty to all charges and sentenced him to reduction in rank to paygrade E-3 and confinement for 90 days. Brian Provorse, USN was tried for engaging in lewd acts and taking indecent liberties with a child. On March 26, a panel of members returned a verdict of guilty to all charges and sentenced him to be dis charged with a Dishonorable Discharge and confine ment for six years. Richard McKenney, USN pleaded guilty to theft of military property. On March 5, the military judge sen tenced him to reduction in rank to paygrade E-1, a fine of $5,000, and confinement for six months. Damien Donald, USN pleaded guilty to assault con summated by a battery and conduct unbecoming an officer and gentleman. On March 19, the military judge sentenced him to a reprimand, forfeit $2,500 pay for one month, and restriction for 30 days. Navy Region Southeast Gregory Mayo, USN pleaded guilty to receipt and possession of child pornography. On March 4, the military judge sentenced him to be discharged with a Dishonorable Discharge, reduction in rank to pay grade E-1, a fine of $2,000, and confinement for 20 months. AGAN Alexander Lopuchin, USN was tried for sexual assault. On March 20, the panel of members returned a verdict of guilty and sentenced him to be discharged with a Dishonorable Discharge, reduction in rank to paygrade E-1, and confinement for 60 days. Jason Robinson, USN pleaded guilty to dereliction of duty, false official statement, fraud against the govern ment, and uttering a worthless check. He was found guilty of larceny by the military judge. On March 5, the military judge sentenced him to be discharged with a Bad Conduct Discharge, reduction in rank to paygrade E-1, and confinement for four months. HN John Ragosta, USN pleaded guilty to violating an order, wrongful use of a controlled substance, unauthorized absence, and wrongful appropriation of military property. On March 11, the military judge sentenced him to reduction in rank to paygrade E-2, forfeit $800 pay per month for five months, and con finement for 165 days. Christopher Owens, USN pleaded guilty to assault consummated by a battery, unlawful entry, and mal treatment. On March 25, the military judge sentenced him to a reprimand, reduction in rank to paygrade E-4, confinement for 45 days, and restriction for 45 days. Clifford Holmes III, USN pleaded guilty to abusive sexual contact and violation of a general order. On March 26, the military judge sentenced him to be dis charged with a Bad Conduct Discharge, reduction in rank to paygrade E-1, and confinement for 50 days. Brian Mikolitch, USN pleaded guilty to assaults con summated by battery. On March 26, the military judge sentenced him to be discharged with a Bad Conduct Discharge, reduction in rank to paygrade E-1, and confinement for eight months. Special and General Courts-Martial for March NMCRS Volunteer Spotlight: Meet Pauline EbersolePauline Ebersole Photos courtesy of Navy Band SoutheastThe Navy Band Southeast Dixieland Brass Band performed on the Hemming Plaza stage April 12. (From left) MU3 Andrew Cummings, MU3 Fred Vaughan, MU2 Eric Sider, MU1 Justin Albritton, MU3 Richard Hanks and MU1 Chris Birkby.Navy Band Southeast performs at Jacksonville's One Spark crowdfunding festivalNBSE's rock band "Pride," performed on The Jacksonville Landing riverfront stage April 11. (From left) MU3 Chris Lapidas, MU2 Marc Heskett, MU3 David Estrada, MU1 Scott Verville and MU3 Luke Franco. NBSEs Rock Band, Pride, entertained with classic rock covers to an appreciative crowd. (From left) MU1 Scott Verville, MU3 Luke Franco and MU3 David Estrada. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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By Lt. Sarah Aguero, JAGC, USN RLSO SE Corpus Christi, TexasWhen it comes to renting property, remember Ben Franklins adage, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Most common problems can be prevented or minimized with just a few hours of care while selecting and moving into a property. If this step is neglected, it may be too late to fix issues without losing many more hours and hundreds or even thousands of dol lars. To protect yourself, follow the tips below. 1. Understand your contractual obligations. Your obligations as a tenant (a per son renting real property) should be described in your rental contract. They typically include paying rent by a cer tain date, registering vehicles parked on the premises, minimizing noise and disruption to other tenants, performing basic maintenance and upkeep, etc. If you do not perform these obligations, you may be evicted from the premises and charged unpaid rent for the rest of the contract term. Before signing the contract, ensure you understand your obligations. 2. Ensure the contract does NOT include a waiver of rights under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA). The SCRA gives you the right to ter minate a rental contract if you or your active-duty spouse receives permanent change of station orders or orders to deploy for at least 90 days. It prevents you from having to continue paying rent on a property that you had to move out of. You can voluntarily give up this right, by signing a contract including a waiver of SCRA protections. Make sure your contract does not include this waiver! 3. Complete a move-in inspection with the landlord. While the property is still empty of furniture, complete a move-in inspec tion with the landlord. Note all dam ages and discrepancies on a piece of paper, and have the landlord sign/date the sheet confirming agreement with the inspection results. Be thorough! Test switches, appliances, electrical outlets, windows, etc. A good move-in inspection will discourage the land lord from trying to charge you for prop erty damage when you finally move out. 4. Get help! Make an appointment with a legal assistance attorney to review the lease. If you have any questions about a rental agreement, contact your near est Region Legal Service Office to set up an appointment with a legal assis tance attorney. Office locations can be found online at http://www.jag.navy. mil/legal_services/legal_services_loca tor_rlso.htm The attorney will assist you with fully understanding not only the contract but also state-specific rent al laws and protections that may apply. By Amaani LyleAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe senior enlisted advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff met with Sailors at Naval Station Mayport April 14 to learn about the bases strategic home-porting and recapitalization plans and advise the Sailors about transi tion assistance resources. Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan Battaglia completed the first of a two-day command tour at the third-largest fleet concentration in the United States, with its 3,400 acres along the Atlantic Ocean and St. Johns River and 6,400 active duty Sailors. Weve been able to see some of the ships, capabili ties and potential growth of NS Mayport, where the litto ral combat ships will be, and weve been able to look at the recapitalization of real estate, Battaglia said. Its nice to see growth on a military installa tion when most of our conver sations are about base realign ment and closure. The arrival of the littoral combat ships USS Freedom (LCS 1) and USS Independence (LCS 2) and their accompany ing training and support facili ties are programmed into a cumulative $70 million budget through fiscal year 2017. Mayports Amphibious Readiness Group welcomed the arrival of amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) in December. Officials expect the amphibi ous dock landing ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43) and multi purpose amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) in August, Battaglia said. The sergeant major also con ducted an interactive all hands call to field questions and address concerns about qual ity-of-life improvements, ben efits, entitlements and deploy ments. He told the Sailors that DoD offers a free download able book entitled, The NonCommissioned Officer and Petty Officer Backbone of the Armed Forces, thats designed to help junior enlisted service members define their roles within the profession of arms. Every so often, we come together as a joint force, Battaglia said. There are times when you belong to a larger task force [or] a combat com mand in an operational the ater, so the more you know about what your peer group, subordinates and superiors do, the more helpful it is to your charter. He also emphasized the importance of resilience, which he described as the abil ity to build fitness and strength in psychological, behavioral, physical, nutritional domains to return the mind, body and spirit to an optimal level of per formance after facing adversity. Fitness is much more than just push-ups and running, Battaglia said to the Sailors. Its a total sense of well being and the ability to take care of ourselves and each other. The Fleet and Family Support Center here contin ues to provide life-enhancing programs such as Transition Goals, Plans, Success for more than 17,000 total force personnel and their families, Battaglia said. Id like to see people planning early getting into Transition GPS at least 12 months out and no later than 90 days before their dates of separation, he said. The program, he explained, involves enhanced network ing resources and exit surveys to better gauge the value of the class to departing service members. [Transition GPS] will prove its worth if that service mem ber who is separating walks off base enrolled in college, hired for a job or even starting his or her own business, the ser geant major said. Battaglia discusses growth, transition with Mayport SailorsDoD photo by Army Master Sgt. Terrence HayesA Navy chief petty officer talks with Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan Battaglia, senior enlisted advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, about the capabilities of USS Zephyr (PC-8), one of the patrol craft home-ported at Naval Station Mayport. During the SEAC's visit on April 14, he met Sailors, toured a patrol craft and discussed the benefits of the new Transition GPS curriculum for transitioning service members and their families.Entering into a Lease: Invest a little time now, save $ later JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 17

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By Ensign Mark BadenVP-8 Public Affairs OfficerTwelve Sailors from Patrol Squadron (VP)-8 at Cooperative Security Location Comalapa, El Salvador supported the Love and Hope Childrens Home in nearby San Salvador at an April 19 community outreach event. The VP-8 Sailors, also known as the Fighting Tigers, setup an Easter egg hunt for the chil dren, followed by sports con tests and smacking a piata filled with treats. The VP-8 per sonnel donated $1,118 for this special event. We value the opportunity to reach out to the local commu nity, especially with the chil dren from Love and Hope, said AWV2 Tony Willard. Seeing their smiling faces and interacting with them has been one of the most rewarding parts of our deployment here in El Salvador. Love and Hope Childrens Home was established in 2003 after outreach workers discov ered orphaned, abused, aban doned and neglected children with no where to live. Since then, the orphanage has pro vided food, shelter, safety, edu cation and love to more than 30 children. We are so grateful VP-8 decided to spend their Easter with us, said Rachel Sanson, director and founder of Love and Hope Childrens Home. Thanks so much to VP-8 for putting on such a fun event for the children! The children here at Love and Hope are a joy to visit, said Lt. j.g. Paxie Cordova, a pilot with VP-8. Weve been fortu nate to be able to visit the chil dren often, and the Easter egg hunt today will be a true high light of this deployment. The Fighting Tigers are cur rently deployed to the 4th and 5th Fleets areas of responsibil ity, assisting in counter-drug efforts and providing humani tarian assistance. By GM2(SW) Camille Perez Cooperative Security Location ComalapaThe military deputy com mander of U.S. Southern Command visited Cooperative Security Location (CSL) Comalapa and Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 on April 11. Lt. Gen. Kenneth Tovo and his staff came aboard CSL Comalapa for briefings and a tour of the compound. Tovo made several other stops while in El Salvador, including visits with the U.S. country team and key military and governmental leaders to discuss counter-illicit traffick ing efforts and other aspects of countering transnational orga nized crime. His visit demonstrates the U.S. commitment to El Salvador and reinforces the already strong relationship between our two govern ments, said Lt. Cmdr. Jose Gomez, the Navy section chief of U.S. Security Cooperation Office El Salvador. Tovo received updates from Cmdr. Odin Klug, command ing officer of CSL Comalapa, and from Lt. Cmdr. Charles Dennison, officer in charge of VP8. After the presentation, Klug escorted Tovo on a tour of the site, pointing out construc tion projects, opportunities for initiatives and other items of interest. Sharing our mission set and downrange perspective with Lt. General Tovo is vitally important to help shape the comprehensive understand ing of what and how CSL Comalapa provides and con tributes to the broader counterillicit trafficking mission, Klug said. Dennison then took Tovo aboard one of VP-8s P-3C Orion aircraft, explaining its features and capabilities. It was truly an honor to have Lt. General Tovo visit our Fighting Tigers detachment, said Dennison. The opportunity to discuss what the P-3 brings to the fight with such a distinguished offi cer and give him a tour of our aircraft is definitely a high light of VP-8s deployment. CSL Comalapa provides criti cal logistics, infrastructure and operational support to for ward deployed U.S. and part ner nation aviation units par ticipating in Joint Interagency Task Force South assigned counter-illicit trafficking operations, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command-directed humanitarian missions, and search and rescue efforts. CSL Comalapa: VP-8 Sailors raise funds for childrens homeBy GM2(SW) Camille PerezCSL Comalapa Public AffairsSailors from Cooperative Security Location (CSL) Comalapa and Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 concluded two weeks of raising money for a local childrens home April 10 with an unusual activity: washing a P-3C Orion aircraft on the flight line. Participants raised more than $1,100 for an Easter meal and egg hunt that will be held at the Love and Hope Childrens Home in San Salvador. Money not spent on the celebration will be used to enhance the home. Sailors from the two com mands paid $1 per vote for peers to wash the aircraft, and every Sailor for whom votes were cast had the opportunity to buy him or herself out. In the end, the top 10 vote-getters were selected to assist the VP-8 Fighting Tigersmaintenance depart ment in washing the aircraft. MA2 Leslie Callejas was one of those selected to wash the plane. Raising money for the childrens home made me proud to be part of the CSL Comalapa/VP-8 team, Callejas said. I look forward to providing a fun Easter celebration for the children, but also for future events that will enhance quality of life for this group of youngsters, she said. CSL Comalapas plane washers included Callejas, YNC Joel De Los Santos, HM1 Isidro Avalos, MA1 Henry Ridgeway and MA3 Kenisha Dickson. They were joined by five Sailors from VP-8: Lt. j.g. Paxie Cordova, IS1Jorge Soldevilla, HM2 William Meyers, PS2 Michael Jones, and ITSN Thomas Steransky. Avalos was glad to be given the opportunity to help, saying, A little hard work for a good cause can go a long way. Photo courtesy of VP-8 VP-8 Sailors gather Love and Hope Children together prior to the April 19 Easter egg hunt and other events.VP-8 Easter outreach US Southern Command deputy commander visits CSL Comalapa, VP-8Photos by GM2 Camille PerezAt CSL Comalapa, El Salvador, Lt. Cmdr. Charles Dennison, officer in charge of the VP-8 detachment, and Lt. Gen. Kenneth Tovo, the military deputy commander of U.S. Southern Command, exit a P-3C Orion after a tour of the aircraft on April 11. (From left) Lt. Cmdr. Charles Dennison, the officer in charge of the VP-8 detachment and Cmdr. Odin Klug, the commanding officer of CSL Comalapa, escort Lt. Gen. Kenneth Tovo, the mili tary deputy commander of U.S. Southern Command, from the flight line after touring a P-3C Orion patrol and reconnaissance aircraft. Photo by GM2 Camille Perez Under the shade of a P-3C Orion wing, Sailors receive a safety brief on April 10 before beginning a volunteer plane wash at Cooperative Secuirty Location (CSL) Comalapa in El Salvador. AD2 Spencer Berg shows HM1 Isidro Avalos a trick to properly inspecting and cleaning a P-3C Orion during the VP-8 volunteer plane washing event on April 10 at Cooperative Secuirty Location (CSL) Comalapa in El Salvador. PS2 Michael Jones and MA2 Leslie Callejas scrub down the underside of a VP-8 "Fighting Tigers" P-3C Orion during a volunteer plane wash. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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From NH Jax Public AffairsNational Infant Immunization Week is April 26 May 3, an annual observance that promotes the importance of protecting infants and toddlers from vaccine-preventable dis eases. Myths and misinforma tion about vaccine safety often confuse parents. The bottom line: vaccines save lives. Each year, thousands of children become ill from diseases that could have been prevented by basic child hood immunizations, said Mary Buskohl-Coulton, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville immunizations supervisory nurse specialist. Vaccines are among the most successful and cost-effec tive public health tools avail able for preventing and reducing the spread of infectious dis eases. By law, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration con ducts years of testing before a vaccine is licensed, and once licensed, the vaccine is con tinually monitored for safety and effectiveness. Like any medication, vaccines can cause side effects, but the benefits of vaccines far outweigh possible side effects for almost all chil dren. Vaccines can protect infants and children from 14 diseases. And thanks to vaccines, some diseases are almost gone in the U.S. The elimination of polio and smallpox in the U.S. are powerful examples of why we vaccinate. Immunization can save fam ilies time and money. Children with vaccine-preventable dis eases may not be allowed to attend school or daycare. Some vaccine-preventable diseases require hospitalization that could result in permanent disabilities, causing a financial burden. Immunizing infants can also protect future generations. Birth defects associated with rubella (German measles) are no longer seen in the U.S. By continuing to vaccinate now, some of todays diseases will no longer be around to harm future generations. If vaccinations were to stop, the protection that has been built through years of vacci nations would cease to exist. Gradually, more and more people would become infected with disease, spread diseases to others and many may die. This would essentially undo the progress made over the years with the elimination of diseases. Because of the success of vaccines in preventing disease, parents may not have heard of some of todays vaccines or the serious diseases they prevent. These diseases can be espe cially serious for infants and young children. That is why it is important to follow recom mended immunization sched ules to protect them by pro viding immunity early in life, before exposure to potentially life-threatening diseases. Vaccine-preventable dis eases still circulate around the world, including in the U.S. Continued vaccination is nec essary to protect everyone from potential outbreaks. Even when rare in the U.S., diseases can be brought into the country, put ting unvaccinated children at risk. Just recently within the U.S. there have been two dis ease increases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Fortynine states and District of Columbia reported pertussis increases in 2012 compared to 2011, with 48,277 cases including 20 deaths. The incidence rate among infants exceeded that of all other age groups, with the majority of deaths occurring among infants younger than three months. In 2013, data showed a higher than nor mal number of measles cases nationally and in individual states, including an outbreak of 58 cases in New York City the largest reported outbreak of measles in the U.S. since 1996. Currently, the U.S. has the safest, most effective vaccine supply in its history. Its longstanding vaccine safety system ensures that vaccines are as safe as possible. And as new information and science become available, the system will continue to be updated and improved. Immunization is a shared responsibility. Families, health care professionals and public health officials must continue to work together to help protect the entire community. Parents are encouraged to talk to their childs primary care manager to ensure that their infant is up to date on immunizations. Remember to vaccinate. Its the single best way to be pro tected. For more information on vaccinations, call NH Jacksonvilles immunization clinic at 904-542-7810 or go to http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines. NH Jacksonvilles immuni zation clinic is open Monday to Wednesday and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saving childrens lives through vaccinationPhoto by Jacob SippelHospitalman Christian Snyder, assigned to Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Maternal Infant Unit, sterilizes the skin of 11-month old Cameron Kee prior to administering an annual influenza (flu) vaccination in this 2013 photo. It is recommend ed that everyone age six months and older get an annual flu vac cination. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 19

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Family night out Gamin and GrillinBy MC2 Amanda CabasosStaff WriterMore than 60 Sailors and their families from various commands aboard NAS Jax attended the second annual Gamin and Grillin event held at the base chapel April 11. Sponsored by NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), the event was conduct ed as a way to promote aware ness for child abuse prevention month and also to encourage families to spend a fun outing together. Family Advocacy Program Educator Erika Clark from FFSC said, We want to bring children and their parents together here on base to rec ognize child abuse prevention and to also have a one big fam ily night. Its really important to get our military families together. Children, parents and spous es are often separated because of deployments and their daily busy schedules so our goal is to bring families together to eat and have some good fellow ship. I really believe it builds morale. At 6 p.m., the doors opened and the first guests arrived to be greeted by FFSC staff volun teers and free food fresh from the grill. Activities included finger printing, face painting, games and a demonstration by a Security Department Military Working Dog (MWD)team. A booth was set up with com plimentary handouts on child abuse prevention month and many other programs offered by FFSC. FFSC Counseling and Advocacy Supervisor Rose Ann Lickenbrock said, This event will increase awareness because we have a table full of different flyers and brochures we are handing out and also it will encourage people to visit FFSC. This is how we can edu cate families on what programs and classes FFSC offers. The guests displayed their enjoyment of the event. Navy Spouse Yuki Smiley said, I am really enjoying my time here, especially the food thats hot off the grill. Its been real special having family time and this event is always lots of fun for us. The MWD demonstration, conducted by MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich, MA2 Andrew Barnhart and their MWD dog, Doly, from NAS Jax Security Department, was a highlight for many of the families, espe cially the children. Navy dependent Emerson Smiley, 6, said, I really loved watching the security dog. She is so pretty. Colin Clark, 7, said, I am having a great time. I really enjoyed watching the MWD demonstration. It was awesome having the oppor tunity to try on handlers vest and helmet, even though it was kind of heavy. I want to be a police officer one day and work with the dogs. As dusk arrived, families slowly departed while the vol unteers cleaned and secured the chapel. A Home Visitor, with New Parent Support, Christine Williams from FFSC said, The event went well. We had a great turn out. Wonderful food. Every thing was just great and everyone seemed to have a fun time. We hope to do this event next year. It is in the planning. From StaffThe American Military Partner Association (AMPA), the nations premier organization for LGBT (les bian, gay, bisexual and transgender) military spouses and their families, recently announced in a news release that Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Military Community and Family Policy Rosemary Williams will keynote AMPAs inaugural national gala dinner May 17 in Washington, D.C. We are truly honored and excited to be welcoming Deputy Assistant Secretary Williams as the keynote speaker at AMPAs first national gala dinner, said Stephen Peters, president of AMPA and the husband of an active duty Marine Corps officer. Our community has benefited greatly from her openness, inclusion and support and we look forward to formally thanking her as we celebrate our progress and our modern military families at AMPAs inaugural gala din ner. In her role as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Military Community and Family Policy, Ms. Williams is responsible for policy, advocacy, and oversight of all commu nity support to service members and their families, as well as quality of life issues, family programs, and military spouse career advancement. Prior to her appointment, Williams served as Director for Communication and Public Liaison at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, and as Senior Advisor for Strategic Communications to the Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, where she also served as the Department of Veterans Affairs representative to the White House Council on Military Families. The American Military Partner Association (AMPA), a non-partisan and non-profit 501(c)3 organization based in Washington D.C., is the nations premier resource and support network for LGBT military spouses and their families. Founded and led by same-sex mili tary partners in 2009 as the Campaign for Military Partners, AMPA is com mitted to connecting, supporting, honoring and serving the partners and spouses of Americas LGBT service members and veterans. Clay County Philippine Festival May 3, from 9 a.m.5 p.m. at Orange Park Town Hall, at U.S. 17 and Kingsley Ave. Entertainment, food, arts & crafts. www. USS Iwo Jima (LPH2/LHD7) Reunion, Aug. 27-31 at Crowne Plaza Hotel in Jacksonville. Call 757-723-0317 or http:// ussiwojimashipmates.cfns.net/. (MOAA) Northeast Florida Chapter meets every third Wednesday, 6 p.m. at NAS Jax branches. Contact Johnnie.walsh@gmail. com or call 282-4650. (NNOA) meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. at Jacksonville Urban Paul Nix at 542-2518 or paul.nix@navy.mil. Association of Aviation Ordnancemen meets the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on Collins Road. For information, visit www.aao9.com. Orange Park Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 5968 and its Auxiliary located at 187 Aurora Blvd. meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. VFW composed of combat veterans and eligible service members from the Active, Guard or Reserve forces. Go to www.vfwpost5968. org or call 276-5968. at NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military retirees and dependents. Work four hours a day, one day per week. Call 542-5790 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays to volunteer. a breast cancer support group at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. Call 542-7857 for more info. Navy Jacksonville Yacht Club is open to active duty, reserve and retired military, plus, active or retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email commodore@njyc.org COMPASS Spouse-to-Spouse Military Mentoring Program. Helping others help themselves. Visit www.gocompass.org for more info. Navy Wives Clubs of America DID #300 meets the second Thursday of each month 2246 Blanding Blvd. Call 272-9489. Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 p.m., 390 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach. Call 246-6855. National Active and Retired Federal Employees Westside Jacksonville Chapter 1984 meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Murray Hill United Methodist Church, (Fellowship Hall Building) at 4101 College Street. Call 7867083. Retired Enlisted Association meets the fourth Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Hall at 7673 Blanding Blvd. Call 772-8622. Community CalendarAmerican Military Partner Association announces keynote speaker for annual gala Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosVolunteer Clown Larry Lickenbrock performs a special artistic design on the cheek of Eli Delgado, 3, during the Gamin and Grillin event held at the NAS Jax Chapel on April 11. MA2 Andrew Barnhart from NAS Jax Security Department performs a bite work demonstration with Military Working Dog, Doly, for families attending the Gamin and Grillin event held at the chapel. While guests stay clear of the hot grill, Direct Admin Assistant Jefry Klein, from Fleet and Family Support Center, volunteers as the grill master flipping hamburg ers and monitoring hot dogs during the family night occasion. Exceptional Family Member Liaison Shannon Klein, from Fleet and Family Support center, plays a game of Quoits with her son Joey, 13, during the Gamin and Grillin event. Jacksonville Special Agent Sabrina Friday from Naval Criminal Investigative Serivce assists Troy Barber Jr., 5, with fingerprinting for documenta tion purposes in support of the child abuse prevention month. MA2 Andrew Barnhart from NAS Jax Security Department allows Eli Delgado, 3, try on his Bomb Protection Gear after the Military Working Dog demonstration. Kaitlynn; 8; spins her Hula Hoop as part of one of the activities available for the children at the Gamin and Grillin event. Adrian, 2, throws a beanbag aiming to score during a game of Cornhole.

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