Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
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Newspaper
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English
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s.n.
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Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
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UF00028307:02086


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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, APRIL 17, 2014 I I D E VP-26 COC Smith to Relieve Sohaney Page 3 PERFECT PAINT FRCSE Super Hornet Program CARNIVAL! Fun For Military Children Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com By MC3 Jason KofonowDefense Media ActivityFleet Challenge 2014 wrapped up its annual anti-submarine warfare (ASW) competition April 10 at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. This years winners were the allied P-8A Poseidon aircrew from the Pros Nest of Patrol Squadron (VP) 30, followed closely by the VP-4 Skinny Dragons flying the P-3C, with third place taken by a VP-5 Mad Foxes crew in a P-8A. Fleet Challenge was a great testing experience and a superb opportunity to fly together as a British crew on a real sub marine target, said Royal Air Force Master Aircrewman Mark Utting from theVP-30 hangar. As with all anti-submarine warfare flights you have to remain flexible, and the sub marine never does what you think it will. That being said, we had planned for all eventuali ties and the sortie went well. By AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterOn April 10, NAS Jax was honored with the HandsOn Service in Uniform Award dur ing HandsOn Jacksonvilles annual Celebrate!Good awards ceremony at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts. The event takes place during National Volunteer Week and celebrates good on the First Coast and the power of volun teering. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander was present to accept the award on behalf of the station. Dr. Judith Smith, presi dent and CEO of HandsOn Jacksonville, and Kathy Orr, Chair, HandsOn Jacksonville Board of Directors, welcomed the volunteers. Our vision is that one day every person will discover their power to make a difference and act on it to create a better community and a better world, said Orr. We are here to celebrate those who created real change and the good that their generosity of spirit and willingness to take action has created, con tinued Smith. Kent Justice, Anchor/Reporter for WJXT Channel 4 was the emcee for the evening. Im very excited to celebrate the inspir ing work the volunteers are doing in our community, he said before introducing a video, which showcased the work of the 13 award recipients. In the NAS Jax segment, Undersander said, There are over 10,000 active and reserve sailors and roughly 10,000 civilians aboard NAS Jax and I am humbled to be here to represent all the good they contribute to the community. In 2013 alone, more than 600 volunteers from NAS Jax com pleted nearly 12,000 hours of volunteer service in their com munity, through command and base-sponsored activities. Undersander added, Our people reach out in so many dif ferent ways, from boy scouts, to church groups, to our annual shoreline clean up. There are several squadrons aboard NAS Jax that have adopted schools and I cant think of a better role model for these young children than a Sailor in uniform. According to the award cita tion, As a result of their efforts, NAS Jax has cultivated a cul ture of service, built on mutu al respect with the City of Jacksonville, and received mul tiple Navy wide recognitions. Our sailors at NAS Jax over whelm the community with so much goodness, support, and help that people cant help but be drawn in by these folks. I think that makes us a stronger community overall. Undersander said proudly. All those honored at the event have been nominated to receive the Presidents Volunteer Service Award. Photo by MC3 Jason KofonowRoyal Air Force aircrewmen, assigned to the "Pros Nest" of Patrol Squadron (VP) 30, track a live submarine on April 7 from their P-8A Poseidon during Fleet Challenge 2014. The allied crew won the annual anti-submarine warfare (ASW) competition, that put seven of the Navys best aircrews against each other, in both simulator scenarios and flight operations, to locate and track aggressor submarines. Fleet Challenge 2014 winners announcedDr. Judith Smith (left), president and CEO of HandsOn Jacksonville, her husband retired Capt. Chet Smith and LeAnn Daddario (right), senior vice president and COO of HandsOn Jacksonville, congratulate NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander on the culture of community service that has been cultivated aboard NAS Jax. Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (sec ond from right) along with the 12 other recipients of a 2014 HandsOn Award receive a standing ovation from the audience during the Celebrate!GOOD ceremony held at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts on April 10.NAS Jacksonville honored for exceptional volunteerism By AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterNAS Jacksonville Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd and his family will bid farewell to the station April 17 at 2 p.m. at his retire ment ceremony in Hangar 117. Originally from Akron, Ohio, Shepherd entered the Navy through the Delayed Entry Program after graduat ing from high school in March 1984. Three months later, he began active service. By September 1984 he had completed recruit training and apprenticeship training as an aviation store keeper/storekeeper at Recruit Training Command, San Diego. During his 30 years in the Navy, Shepherd completed 10 deployments while on sea duty and worked a variety of assignments while stationed on shore but says his tour as command mas ter chief of NAS Jax has been the best opportunity hes had in the Navy. This base is like a carrier on steroids. Together weve been able to hit the target and get the job done every time. Weve never turned a mission away, he said. Shepherd took over as command master chief with the goal of building NAS Jax into one of the best bases in the Navy. Obviously weve done that, Shepherd said. During my tenure here, weve won the installation excellence award for two years in a row. And not because of me, but because of our people. That was a benchmark of what NAS Jax does and what it brings to the Navy, the defense and readiness, he added. Shepherd went on to note this installations resilience during more trying times, The fact that we were able to keep our operations in support of the 14 operational squadrons and more than 100 tenant commands going through sequestration and the government shutdown is testament to our ability to overcome just about anything through process planning, financial forecasting and reprogramming our funding. According to Shepherd, one of his most memorable events was the bases initiation of CPO 365. The program started off with four people doing a little PT on the grinder and evolved into a group of over 700. We built in leadership training and community service outreach into the program and it ended up becoming the model for the Navy. It started at the MCPONs office but we morphed it into what he wanted it to become, he added proudly. He went on to express his apprecia tion for the manner in which the active and reserve components aboard this base work hand in hand. There are no barriers. The lines become blurred between who is active and who is reserve, he noted. Shepherd takes pride in the forward thinking and forward progression of this installation. Weve come a long way at NAS Jax. Ive watched this command go Jax Air News photoOutgoing NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd highlights some of the achievements made by chief petty officers (CPO) during the CPO Birthday Celebration at the Building 1 flag pole in 2012. NAS Jax team bids farewell to CMC ShepherdSee Page 7 See CMC EXIT, Page 6

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)5487789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorIn more ways than one, the military has sometimes been an institution that change forgot. Some people refer to military life as living in a bubble. Some people have worse names for it. But for generations, the experience has remained the same: once inside that front gate the one with an armed guard out front its like entering a different world. What applies to the outside does not necessarily apply on the inside. Visually, I picture it as an underwater setting. The civilian world exists loosely and without an anchor. Elements bump into each other and sometimes become one. The media changes parenting norms, and changing ideas about parenthood affects the marketing industry and how things like food are packaged and sold. A movie stars new haircut ignites a trend. New trends create new ideas about whats acceptable and whats not in public schools. Art imitates life and vice versa. But the military is like an air-tight container anchored to the ground. It doesnt sway or bob. Things on the outside hit its windows, but it takes years of changing tides and salt water for the container to even realize something is knocking. The obvious parallel here is women in combat. There are few segments of the civilian world to which women dont at least have access. While the womens movement cheered Youve come a long way, Baby, a few generations ago, that message has taken its dear, sweet time to reach the military. The military is like a slow, careful grandfather who looks four times before crossing an intersection and always wears comfortable shoes. Sometimes Grandpa is deaf and losing his sight. It would take an act of congress to get him to change his breakfast routine. I mean, where else in society is it still permissible to regulate employees haircuts, right down to a quarter of an inch? Sure, civilian employers have dress stan dards, but the Navys grooming standards read like something out of another era: [Hair] shall be tapered from the lower natural hairline upwards at least 3/4 inch and outward not greater than 3/4 inch . the bulk of the hair shall not exceed approximately two inches . the length of an indi vidual mustache hair fully extended shall not exceed approximately inch . eyeliner shall be shades of black, brown, blue or green that matches the indi viduals natural eye color and shall not extend past the natural corner of the eye. If you think the military doesnt regularly inspect for infractions of the above grooming standards, youd be wrong. While civilian industries are subject to whats fair, the military largely continues to operate outside of traditional, civilian democracy. In fact, there is this common, half-joking phrase: The military is protecting democracy, not practicing it. Sometimes, the outside world seems to simply give up the hope that the military will ever change. But for all the ways in which the military can be frustrating, even stifling, its insulation is oddly com forting and familiar on base. I know what to expect when Im at a military commissary or exchange, even when that expectation includes an awareness that otherwise simple things, like arranging a book sign ing, will be as difficult as if I were asking for top secret clearance. I have never felt safer than when Im on a base. After September 11th, when our base at NAS Jacksonville in Florida was shut down for security reasons to out side access, I actually felt left behind. I wanted to be trapped on the base, not loose and floating in the less predictable civilian world. The military base feels like a small town. As a child, when my mom had spouse club meetings or was shopping at the exchange, she let me play on the play ground without her supervision. Bad things didnt happen on base. We were all family there. And we were protected by the armed guards out front. All of the above is why the shooting at Fort Hood hits military families in a vulnerable place. It gets us in the gut. It feels as violating as someone breaking into our home. It shatters everything we know about security. Except, the shooter at Fort Hood both in 2009 and 2014, as well as in the shooting at the Navy Yard was one of us, and that shakes us even more. In a place where change happens at a snails pace, relatively overnight, the military base became just as unsettling as the outside world. People say that mass shootings are becoming the expected. It stuns us less and less each time we here about a new one. Its hard to believe its become that From StaffApril 17 1778 The 18-gun Continental Navy sloop-of-war Ranger, with Capt. John Paul Jones in command, captures a British brig and sends the prize to France. April 18 1848 U.S. Navy expedition to explore the Dead Sea and the River Jordan, commanded by Lt. William Lynch, reaches the Dead Sea. 1906 Navy assists in relief operations during San Francisco earthquake and fire. 1942 USS Hornet CV-8) launches 16 of Lt. Col. James Doolittles B-25 Army Air Force bombers in the first attack on mainland Japan in World War II. 1988 Navy destroys two Iranian surveillance platforms, sinks one frigate and one patrol ship, and severely damages a second frigate in retaliation for attack on guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58). April 19 1783 George Washington proclaims end of hostilities with Great Britain. 1861 President Lincoln orders blockade of Southern ports from South Carolina to Texas. 1917 Naval Armed Guard crew on board SS Mongolia engage and dam age a German U-boat. This was the first engagement of U.S. naval personnel against the enemy in World War I. 1955 Heavy cruiser USS Albany (CA 123) and destroyer USS William M. Wood (DD 715) provide disaster relief to citizens of Volos, Greece, after cata strophic earthquake. April 20 1796 Congress authorizes comple tion of three frigates. 1861 Norfolk Navy Yard abandoned and burned by Union forces. 1914 In first call to action of naval aviators, a detachment on cruiser USS Birmingham (CL-2) sailed to Tampico, Mexico. 1915 First Navy contract for lighterthan-air craft awarded. 1942 USS Wasp (CV-7) launches 47 British aircraft to reinforce Malta. 1947 Navy Capt. L.O. Fox, supported by 80 Marines, accepted the surren der of Lt. Yamaguchi and 26 Japanese soldiers and sailors, two and one half years after the occupation of Peleliu and nearly 20 months after the surrender of Japan. 1953 USS New Jersey shells Wonsan, Korea, from inside the harbor. 1964 USS Henry Clay (SSBN-625) launches a Polaris A-2 missile from the surface in first demonstration that Polaris submarines could launch mis siles from the surface as well as from beneath the ocean. Just 30 minutes later, the submarine launched another Polaris missile while submerged. April 21 1861 USS Saratoga captures slaver Nightingale. 1898 U.S. at war against Spain. 1906 Cmdr. Robert Peary discovered that supposed Arctic Continent did not exist. 1972 Moonwalk in the Descartes Highlands by Navy Capt. John Young, commander of Apollo 16. He was the ninth man to walk on the moon. Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Mattingly II, was the Command Module Pilot. Charles Duke was the Lunar Module Pilot. During the 11-day, one-hour and 51-minute mis sion, 213 lbs. of lunar material was col lected. Recovery was accomplished by HC-1 helicopters from USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14). April 22 1778 Capt. John Paul Jones of the Continental Navy Sloop Ranger led landing party raid on Whitehaven, England. 1898 U.S. warships begin blockade of Cuba. 1987 U.S. Navy ordered to provide assistance requested by neutral vessels under Iranian attack outside the exclu sion zone. April 23 1917 Launching of USS New Mexico, first dreadnought with turboelectric drive. 1918 USS Stewart destroys German submarine off France. 1945 In only U.S. use of guided missiles in World War II, two BAT missiles release at Balikiapan, Borneo. U.S. Navy photosDoolittle Raid on Japan, April 1942 Sixteen USAAF B-25B Mitchell medium bombers are tied down on the flight deck of USS Hornet (CV-8), while the aircraft carrier was en route to the mission's launch point. View looks aft from Hornet's island. These aircraft were stripped of their defensive guns and given extra fuel tanks to extend their range. Each B-25 carried four 500-pound bombs on the mission. Navy launch officers, timed the start of each B-25's take off roll to ensure it reached the forward end of the flight deck as the ship pitched up in the heavy seas, thus giving extra lift at a critical time. A U.S. Navy Lockheed EC-121M Warning Star of the fleet air reconnaissance squadron VQ-1 "World Watchers" is accompanied by an F-4B Phanton II of the VF-151 "Vigilantes." An EC-121M of VQ-1 was shot down by North Korean MiG21s on April 14, 1969, killing all 31 crewmembers. VQ-1 had flown the route and orbit for two years, and the mission had been graded as being of "minimal risk." During the first three months of 1969 nearly 200 similar missions had been flown by both Navy and U.S. Air Force reconnaissance aircraft off North Korea's east coast without incident. The Nixon administration chose not to retaliate against North Korea for the loss, apart from staging a naval demonstration in the Sea of Japan. The U.S. military resumed the reconnaissance flights within a week. This Week in Navy History From the HomefrontBase mass shootings violate sense of securitySee HOMEFRONT, Page 3

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way, even harder to believe its reached the military. For all the ways in which the mili tary has been slow to change, for all the ways it has been for better or worse impervious to societal change, I guess I had hoped that an institu tion where they still measure mus tache hairs and have been consider ing women for combat for years now would be the one institution that would remain untouched, unchanged for gotten by this disturbing new reality of American life. HOMEFRONTFrom Page 2 VP-26 change of command April 24By Lt. j.g. Joseph Bayo VP-26 Public Affairs OfficerThe Tridents of Patrol Squadron (VP) 26 will pause from operations and training at 10 a.m. on April 24 to for mally transfer command of the squad ron from Cmdr. Mark Sohaney to Cmdr. Gregory Smith at Hangar 117 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Sohaney, who hails from Emmaus, Pa., joined the Tridents as executive officer in May 2012, while VP-26 was deployed to Bahrain. He assumed command of the squad ron in April 2013. Since then, he led the squadron through the completion of the 2013 inter-deployment readiness cycle (IDRC), followed by an extremely suc cessful U.S. 7th Fleet deployment. Under Sohaneys leadership, VP-26 surpassed 51 years and 342,908 hours of Class A mishap-free flying. The squad ron also earned the Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic 2013 Maritime Patrol Battle Efficiency Award for the sec ond year in a row as well as the 2013 Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy. Cmdr. Smith, who hails from Parkville, Md., graduated with dis tinction from the U.S. Naval Academy (1997), and was designated a naval flight officer (NFO) in April 1999. Upon the completion of flight train ing, he reported to the Fighting Marlins of VP-40. His other tours included shore duty at VP-30, a disassociated sea tour aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) and a department head tour with VP-26 at NAS Brunswick, Maine. Prior to reporting aboard VP-26 as executive officer in April of 2013, he was assigned to the Office of the Secretary of Defense at the Pentagon where he served as Pakistan and Afghanistan Counter-narcotics Policy Officer. Smith will be the 69th command ing officer of VP-26 and will lead the squadron through an extensive IDRC in preparation for deployment in 2015 as the final active duty P-3C Orion deployment from NAS Jacksonville. Upon returning from deployment VP-26 will transition to flying the P-8A Poseidon. By Yan KennonNH Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles American Red Cross is looking for volunteers to help support the nations heroes and their families. The Red Cross has a long and success ful history of assist ing wherever and whenever it can, said Mary Miciano, NH Jacksonville Red Cross volunteer program chairperson and volun teer. We are constant ly seeking dedicated and compassionate vol unteers to join our staff of good-will ambas sadors here at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, and encourage those who may be interested to join our efforts. The Red Crosss sup port of NH Jacksonville military members and their families at its hospital and five branch health clinics, enhances morale and contrib utes to increased operational capa bilities by linking military families during emergencies, connecting families with local resources (infor mation and referral services), provid ing resiliency training (deployment services) and supporting wounded warriors at military hospitals. The hospital is currently seeking volunteers for general office assis tant duties such as filing and phone answering in various clinics throughout the hospital. Volunteers for general patient greeting, shut tle driving and the hospitals liaison desk are also needed. Becoming a Red Cross volunteer is easy, but requires a desire to help and assist those in need, American citizenship, military base access, completion of an online application and successful security background check. Due to extensive require ments, which could take several months to complete, it is recom mended that interested volunteers be commit ted to long-term volun teer service to prevent placement gaps that could affect the Red Crosss mission. Once accepted, vol unteers attend an ori entation, complete required safety and patient confidential ity training and must maintain annual vac cinations and screen ingssuch as influenza and tuberculosis. Each year, volunteers contribute between 100 and 1,000 hours of vol unteer service at the hospital alone. Whether a person is in a career transition, a full-time worker, retired or has a few extra hours in the day, volunteers can make a difference in the lives of our heroespast and pres entand their families. The American Red Crosss unwav ering commitment to members of the U.S. military, its veterans and their families continues to grow and develop more than a century after Clara Barton first recruited nurses to support the U.S. Army in 1881.For more information call 904-5427525 or visit the Northeast Florida Red Cross Chapter at www.nefloridared cross.org and click volunteer to get started. Cmdr. Mark Sohaney Cmdr. Gregory Smith Help wanted: Red Cross seeks volunteers at Naval Hospital JacksonvillePhoto by Jacob SippelAmerican Red Cross volunteer Constance Seelye delivers cookies and snacks April 3 to patients at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsArtisans at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) are hard at work stripping and painting F/A-18E/F Super Hornets while collecting data to attain declaration of capa bility to establish a Super Hornet paint program. The program will establish a set interval schedule after 20 aircraft have gone through the process. FRCSE artisans have stripped, primed and painted six Super Hornets here since the project began with the first prototype in August 2011. Another Super Hornet will undergo the process later this month. This is a fairly new tasking for FRCSE restoring coat ings on all exterior surfaces of the Super Hornets, said John Bandor, FRCSE Cecil F/A-18 site manager, who is oversee ing the project. We stripped and painted our first two pro totypes in fiscal year (FY) 2012 and two more in FY-13. We anticipate a significant increase of workload in the near future. As part of the stripping, priming and painting process, artisans are collecting data on each aircraft to help deter mine a required paint cycle. Fleet Support Team (FST) engineers at Fleet Readiness Center Southwest (FRCSW) at Naval Air Station (NAS) North Island analyze the data and make paint procedure recommendations to the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) F/A-18 and EA-18G Program Manager Air (PMA) 265 maintenance planning coordinator. When we get an aircraft in, the first thing we do is preserve it before towing it over to the strip ramp, explained FRCSE Materials Engineer Brad Youngers. Then it is washed before we inspect it to docu ment material condition of the aircraft. We look for corrosion, composite and coating dam age, measure coating thick ness, and record and submit all our data. During the week of March 10-14, NAVAIR F/A-18 and EA-18G PMA-265 hosted an Integrated Logistics Support Management Team working meeting at NAS Jacksonville. The team, comprised of mili tary, federal and industry logisticians, also chose to get a glimpse of the ongoing stripping/painting project at the FRCSE paint hangar. Paint Hangar Supervisor Rick Heffner led the tour for PMA-265 staff, FRCSW FST engineers, and Commander, Strike Fighter Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet staff explain ing the processes he manages when an aircraft arrives at his shop. Were on a fact finding mission to determine what the cycle would be for striping and painting the Super Hornets, said PMA-265 Maintenance Program Coordinator Bill Lotzmann. He continued, Our engi neers have projected a 12-year cycle which works well with the aircrafts second planned maintenance interval (PMI) event. For every PMI on its second cycle, we would bring the aircraft in for strip and paint. We are currently collecting data on the aircraft on the East and West Coasts to see if this is feasible. This reliabilitycentered maintenance data is then analyzed by the fleet support team at NAS North Island to determine the best paint cycle. We are receiving candi dates that are 11 years or older, Bandor explained. The Super Hornets are flown into NAS Jacksonville and remain 99 percent assembled through out the process. Our processes vary based on the type of air craft structural surfaces that are being restored whether it be aluminum, graphite com posites, stainless steel or tita nium material. According to Bandor, responsible shops from induction to the point of delivery are striv ing to complete their project orders as efficiently as possible. We started with a 45-calen dar-day schedule with a goal to improve down to 30 calendar days as an effort to minimize impact of fleet readiness, he explained. We reached that goal when we flew our fifth aircraft produced on its 30th day during the first week of March. We could have delivered it on that day if weather was per mitting on the receiving end. We are going to keep trying to accomplish this goal for each and every aircraft, or at least get close to it. He also stressed that this effort has been successful through teamwork. Our hard working artisans are producing quality workmanship both on and behind the scenes, stated Bandor. This program incorporates all the integrated logistic ele ments while leveraging on existing facilities and equip ment. It would not be successful without the talents and skills of hard working indi viduals. Kudos to a fine team of professionals who help pro duce and deliver this product back to the warfighting customer. FRCSE Paint Shop Supervisor Rick Heffner echoed that sentiment. We have an awesome, dedicated bunch of people on all three shifts, who take great pride in what they do. Super Hornet gets new look at Fleet Readiness Center SoutheastOn March 20, a freshly painted F/A-18E/F Super Hornet sits in the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) paint booth after being stripped, primed and painted by FRCSE artisans. This is the sixth Super Hornet to undergo the process at FRCSE. Aircraft painters in the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Paint Hangar prime an F/A-18E/F Super Hornet on March 14 before giving it a fresh coat of paint. An aircraft painter at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast sprays a coat of primer on the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet to protect the aircraft from corrosion and help paint adhere to the aircraft panel surfaces. Kenny Goodwin, an aircraft painter at the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast paint hangar, sprays a coat of primer on an F/A18E/F Super Hornet. Frank Icban, a painter at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, unmasks the left landing gear of the F/A18E/F Super Hornet after the painting process. Shayne Campbell, a painter with Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, preps a non-skid mat prior to applying it on the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet on March 20. Dean Taylor, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast painter work leader, applies the Navy stencil to the left aft fuselage of the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Painter Jerry McCutcheon sands one of the wings of an F/A-18E/F Super Hornet in FRCSE Paint Hangar 868 on Feb. 24. The artisans completely strip the aircraft, check for corrosion and repaint it to its original specifications.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 5 Artisans from the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast paint hangar gather on March 27 in front of one of the FA-18E/F Super Hornets March 27 that the team recently refurbished with a new coat of paint. Photos by Kaylee LaRocque and Victor PittsMichael Teel, a painter at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), carefully sands under the wing of an F/A-18E/F Super Hornet in FRCSE Paint Hangar 868. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast aircraft painter Michael Teel ensures a surface on the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet is clean before applying conductive coating on March 17. Jennifer Nunez, a materials engineer with Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, uses a surface coding tester to detect the presence of conductive coating on an F/A-18E/F Super Hornet during the stripping process on March 12. Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Program Manager Air (PMA) 265 Senior Aerospace Materials Engineer Chris Eveland, center, discusses corrosion issues on the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet with Brad Youngers, a materials engineer with Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), front, and NAVAIR PMA265 Maintenance Program Coordinator Bill Lotzmann during a site visit to the FRCSE paint hangar. Commander, Strike Fighter Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (COMSTRKFIGHTWINGLANT) Mod Manager Todd Ingold (front) and Lt. Cmdr. Tony Barber, COMSTRKFIGHTWINGLANT readiness officer, evaluate corrosion areas on a stripped F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) F/A-18 Cecil Site Manager John Bandor (left) explains the stripping inspection process of the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet to Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Program Manager Air (PMA) 265 Senior Aerospace Materials Engineer Chris Eveland (right) and NAVAIR PMA-265 F/A-18 Integrated Maintenance Concept Lead Eric Geilenkirchen during a site visit to the military maintenance depot.

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 CMC EXITFrom Page 1from helicopters, P-3s, and S-3s only, to P-8s, the MH-60R Romeo helicopters, the MQ-8B Fire Scout Training Facility and now the MQ-4C Triton program, Shepherd stated. The P-8 and MH-60 Romeo transitions were huge for our base. The Romeos have left a foot print on the seawall and the P-8 program is doing Americas work as we speak, he continued. When the Triton Command and Control Center opens in late fall 2014, NAS Jax will be home to the newest Navy manned and unmanned technologies. Shepherd was quick to recognize the bases human resources, which he says is the installa tions most valuable asset. You can have the best technology, but without the people, its just a piece of land or machinery, he stated. The military/civilian team here is the best Ive witnessed in the Navy. Military come and go, but the continuity of NAS Jax civilians is the glue that keeps this base together. The civilians here are the most professional Ive encountered and they know their programs like the back of their hand, Shepherd continued. He stressed his appreciation for the support Jacksonville and surrounding communities have shown to our NAS Jax team. Ive been to just about every fleet concentration area and I can tell you the relationship the community of Jacksonville has built with our military is the best. We should be thankful for their willingness to assist us with open arms, he stated. During his tenure, Shepherd worked hard to break down barriers and forge a unity between different sectors of the base and surrounding communities. People aboard NAS Jax will continue to partner with our civilian community and as a result of this wonderful partnership, they will continue to make this base the best in the Navy. NAS Jax will continue to be the mainstay of Navy professionalism and readiness at all times, he added. NAS Jax will always be near and dear to me. The people here have received my family with open arms. I just hope I fulfilled everybodys needs and requirements. I will miss everyone. From the E2 standing watch to the senior civilians, they have been my extended family and I salute each one of them, said Shepherd. Shepherd is followed by CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre, who assumed the duties of NAS Jacksonville Command Master Chief earlier this month. By Clark PierceEditorA detachment from the VAW125 Greyhawks deployed to NAS Jacksonville April 7-17, to conduct Field Carrier Landing Practice (FCLP) operations at Outlying Landing Field (OLF) Whitehouse. Based at Chambers Field aboard Naval Station Norfolk, Va., VAW-125 is the Navys fleet replacement squadron for carrier airborne early warn ing squadrons flying the E-2 Hawkeye, and fleet logistics support squadrons flying the C-2 Greyhound aircraft. VAW-120 Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. Mike Ferrara was the detachments officer in charge. He explained, Before they are assigned to an operational fleet squadron, VAW-120 trains pilots, naval flight officers and air crewmen to fly and operate the carrier-based airborne early warning and battle manage ment systems. He added, This pilot detachment for FCLP at OLF Whitehouse prepares them for carrier qualifications which is one of their final flying events before being assigned to an operational fleet squadron. During our time at NAS Jax, well complete about 2,000 FCLP passes at OLF Whitehouse with each student pilot aver aging about 250 bounces dur ing the 10-day detachment. A major part of the training is ball flying that involves the Improved Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System (IFLOLS) at OLF Whitehouse. IFLOLS is a system consist ing of 12 vertical light cells and 10 horizontal datum lights that a pilot can see from about 1.5 nautical miles out, giving them time to make the neces sary final adjustments that will ensure their tail hook con nects with the arresting gear on board the aircraft carriers flight deck. For the squadrons landing signal officers (LSOs), every day (and some nights) was filled by grading each touch-and-go landing at Whitehouse. After flight ops, each student pilot was debriefed by their LSO. At OLF Whitehouse, our LSOs are focused on accurate FCLP landings without mis haps. The goal is to make sure each student pilot is safe for the ship, said Ferrara. According to its NAVAIR fact sheet, the E-2C Hawkeye pro vides all-weather airborne early warning, airborne battle man agement and command and control functions for the car rier strike group and joint force commander. Additional missions include surface surveillance coordina tion, air interdiction, offensive and defensive counter air con trol, close air support coordination, time critical strike coordination, search and rescue air borne coordination and com munications relay. The C-2A Greyhound pro vides critical logistics support to Carrier Strike Groups. Its primary mission is the transport of high-priority cargo, mail and passengers between carriers and shore bases. Priority cargo such as jet engines can be transported from shore to ship in a matter of hours. A cargo cage system or transport stand provides restraint for loads during launches and landings on the carrier. Photo by Lt. Kevin WendtStudent pilots assigned to VAW-120 conduct field carrier landing practice (FCLP) in an E-2C Hawkeye at Outlying Landing Field Whitehouse in 2013. FCLP is an important step in preparing students to safely conduct actual carrier operations.Photo by Clark Pierce A C-2A Greyhound taxis by three E-2C Hawkeyes on the flight line of NAS Jacksonville in 2013. All are assigned to fleet replacement squadron VAW-120, based at Chambers Field on Naval Station Norfolk, Va.Greyhawks conduct FCLP operations at OLF Whitehouse NAS Jax participates in Victims Rights Week By MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander participated in the Jacksonville Mayors Victim Assistance Advisory Council (VAAC) press conference for National Victims Rights Week held at City Hall April 7. Ann Dugger, executive director of the Justice Coalition welcomed the guests, then introduced Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown. Brown sincerely acknowledged the attendees for their commitment to Victims Rights Week. The city of Jacksonville joins with communities across the country to observe National Crime Victims Rights Week, April 6-12. This time is to allow us to reaffirm our citys commitment to help crime victims recover and rebuild their lives so they can live the American dream, and never be afraid to speak up and speak out for their loved ones, said Brown. Its also a special opportunity to promote public awareness for vic tims rights and highlight the assis tance available to victims of crimes. I dont want any one to be a victim of a crime in our community. I know the pain that it brings. I know the suffer ing, I see it. If someone is a victim, I want to make sure they have access to the support needed to deal with the impact of that crime whether its physical, emotional or financial, he continued. We know many crimes go unre ported, especially domestic violence and sexual assault. Many victims still dont get help even when they des perately need it. So we need to con tinue to fight against crime, against fear, shame and powerlessness often associated with being a crime victim, he added. We as a community must fight for those who feel hopeless and powerless in our community. During the press conference, Undersander praised Brown and the City of Jacksonville for the continued partnership and the observance of this very important week. Our steadfast support for all vic tims is imperative, and is an initiative the City of Jacksonville and NAS Jax will work together on, he said. The Navy is committed to caring and protecting the rights of victims by promoting trust in the chain of com mand and the military justice system. The Navys Victims Legal Counsel Program implemented last year sup ports and cares for victims by providing them with legal advice and assis tance throughout the military justice process, Undersander added. The following day, Undersander joined Brown and other officials for the annual City of Jacksonvilles Mayors VAAC Victims Rights Week awards celebration at the Jacksonville main library. This years theme was 30 Years: Restoring the Balance. Hundreds of crime survivors, law enforcement officials, business advocates, sponsors and the VAAC attended luncheon to celebrate the 30th anniversary of services and pro grams that help crime victims in Jacksonville. They listened attentive ly to Brown as he said, Showing our support for crime victims is what this week is all about. We are here to honor individuals in our community. I know we celebrate every year and acknowledge the victims for their advocacy and support. We know the crime vic tims are our community heroes for standing up for public safety, justice and unity. NAS Jacksonville Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Civilian Victim Advocate LaTresa Henderson from Fleet and Family Support Center said, Participating in victims rights week events honors victims and reminds the community that victims do have a voice -their voice lies in victim advocates and those agencies that support them. Justice Coalition Volunteer Frances Futrill, the mother of a murdered child spoke out about her loss. My daughter was murdered in 2002 and the case is still unsolved. I volunteer for victims rights and I am here for the victims to make sure we all have rights and we are recognized. The only way to overcome this situa tion is to stay busy and keep hope that justice will be served. In my heart it will happen and I think that is the hope for every parent that lose their children to cold cases, she said. Another mother, and founder of the John Rowan Jr. Foundation, Margaret Peg Rowan said, My son John has been missing since 2001. Everything the victims advocate does is to get our stories out there and to show our faces. We are hoping someone will tell us where our son is. We know Jacksonville is exactly where he is. Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander addresses the audience during the Mayors Victim Assistance Advisory Council press conference at Jacksonville City Hall on April 7. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown receives a standing ovation during his speech at the annual City of Jacksonville Victims Rights Week awards luncheon at the Jacksonville main library on April 8. Standing behind Brown from left; Mayors Victim Assistance Advisory Council Chair Richard Komando; NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander; CSX Vice President for Transportation Carl Gerhardstein; Councilman Reginald Brown and Victims Rights Attorney Jay Howell. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander convers es with (from left) Personal Life Coach Linley Newbold, Domestic Abuse Victim Advocate Erica Schneider from Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), and Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Civilian Victim Advocate LaTresa Henderson from FFSC about the importance of the National Victims Rights Week after a press conference. FIGHTA CFC participant provided as a public service. Deadly Childhood Disea ses.stjude.org

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Fleet Challenge 2014, also known as the ASW rodeo, saw seven air crews from the three maritime patrol and reconnaissance wings, the fleet replacement squadron, and the allied aircrew attached to VP-30, compete against each other in the seven-day event. This years competition marked the first time the P-8A Poseidon flew along with the P-3C Orion. Any time we have our foreign part ners able to compete with us, we learn something. They do things maybe a little bit differently, said Cmdr. Mike Granger, the officer in charge of the Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapons School. From maybe just the way that they coordinate a crew, to the way they mission plan or their actual procedures for tracking the submarine that is the biggest thing we learn by having them with us, and we throw in the camaraderie and the ability to talk across the water, if you will, with our partners. It builds those bonds that we can go and con tinue to learn from. Our allied crews often bring years of continuous ASW experience to the training equation, in the classroom and in the air, said Capt. Curt Phillips, the commanding officer of VP-30. This is precisely why we have them embedded in our fleet replacement squadron, training our newest opera tors in the art of ASW which is a per ishable skill without continuous honing in both simulators and on actual live targets. Fleet Challenge 2014 tested aircrews on mission planning, optimized tactics and crew training, as well as implementation of past lessons learned in deter mining the most effective maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircrew. Weve had the individual wings compete, so they hold their own local ASW rodeo against all their home squad rons and they take their best crew and they send them to NAS Jacksonville, said Granger. The wings in Hawaii, Whidbey Island and Jacksonville picked their best crew and they brought them here. The competition tested crews in a simulator scenario and actual flight operations against USS Springfield (SSN 761), which acted as an opposing force. What we try to incorporate are things that weve seen, things that have challenged our actual crews deployed around the world and we incorporate those into the scenarios, said Granger. We have the simulator scenarios built around recent world events. We task the submarine to challenge them in ways that weve seen actual submarines on deployment behave. Were able to put those together for these crews to experience, bring back to their home squad rons, their wings and spread that training out. Obviously, finding out we had won was just fantastic, but credit should be given to all the crews in all of the squadrons, said Utting. I hope we get to take part in the challenge next year. The Fleet Challenge exercise has been held every year since 2007, with the exception of 2013, when it was cancelled due to budgetary restraints. ASW RODEOFrom Page 1 Photo by Mark Faram, Navy Times2014 Fleet Challenge Royal Air Force winners (from left, standing) Sgt. Steve Dixon, MACR Keith Treece, MACR Mark Utting, Squadron Leader Mark Faulds, Sgt. Jon Brereton, Squadron Leader Andy Bull, (from left, kneeling) Flight Lt. Rob Butler, and Flight Lt. Ian Tuff. From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsPlanning ahead can be one of the biggest stress relievers when it comes to a permanent change of station (PCS) move, Fleet and Family Service Center (FFSC) officials said April 9. Preparation, communication and family involvement are keys to a less stressful PCS move, said Diane Brown, Work and Family Life specialist, Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). Sailors can use the Plan my Move tool on the Military OneSource website at www.mili taryonesource.mil to organize their move. It provides a threemonth calendar of steps a Sailor needs to take to ensure a smooth move. Brown says sponsors can also help reduce a Sailors stress by finding answers ahead of time to any questions they have about their new location. Sailors who have not been assigned a spon sor should contact their gaining unit, or they can request one on the Military OneSource website with the Electronic Sponsorship Application and Training tool. Sailors should also visit their local FFSC and meet with a Relocation Assistance Program specialist, then attend a Smooth Move class or Moving Overseas workshop to learn the basics about a PCS move and how to start the process. It doesnt matter whether its their first or fifth move, Brown said. Things change and one should be aware of those changes. Other helpful websites include: (HEAT) https://www.dko.mil/ heat/apply locator www.cnic.navy.mil/ HousingQuickReference www.move.mil Reduce stress when you PCS Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesFOD walkdown along seawallThe Proud Warriors of HSM-72 and the Royal Australian Navy's 725 Squadron teamed up to walk the NAS Jacksonville seawall in search of foreign object damage (FOD) during the base wide FOD walkdown on April 9. Both squadrons fly the MH-60R helicopter. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 7

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From StaffStudents in Jacksonville Universitys Sustainability Program have been hearing a lot of success stories these days concerning Naval Air Station Jacksonville. John Young, the stations storm water manager and a guest lecturer at JU, has been spreading the word. Young, who serves on the advisory board for the JU Sustainability Degree Program, is encouraged by the environmental interest shown by the universitys professors and students. For many of the students, said Young, green technology is still theory. Its a revelation for them to learn that the Navy is turning those theories into real facilities. And why? Because its good business and good for the Navys mission. One sustainability program to which Young exposes students is the Navys use of solar power to generate electricity and hot water. Other examples include energy conservation, smart management of drinking water, sani tary sewage and storm water. Navy initiatives are also exploring alterna tive fuels, using aircraft simulators to reduce flight hours, and using multi-mission aircraft to streamline operations. Dr. Ashley Johnson, department head for the JU Sustainability Program, appreciates the JU-NAS Jacksonville partnership. Were grateful for Johns time and the perspective he brings to our students, she said. They love hearing that last weeks lesson is already up and running at NAS Jax! Photo courtesy of Jacksonville UniversityNAS Jacksonville Storm Water Manager John Young shares information about the station's environmental programs with a sustainability class on April 3 at Jacksonville University.Spreading the word about sustainability Photos by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyCmdr. Mark Williams, commanding officer of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 14, speaks at the annual NMCB-14 Killed in Action Memorial Ceremony aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville on April 12. Annual NMCB-14 memorial serviceIn 2004, seven Seabees of NMCB-14 were killed and 33 were injured in two attacks in Al Anbar Province, Iraq, while in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. In honor of those courageous Seabees, NMCB-14 holds an annual memorial service to keep their spirits forever alive.Cmdr. Mark Williams, commanding officer of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 14, shakes hands with CM1 (retired) Pete Reid during the annual NMCB-14 Killed in Action Memorial Ceremony aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville. CM1 (retired) Pete Reid reads a poem he wrote for his fallen Seabees comrades during the annual NMCB-14 Killed in Action Memorial Ceremony aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville. While serving in Iraq in support of Iraqi Freedom in 2004, Reid was left paralyzed after two attacks in Al Anbar Province, Iraq that killed seven NMCB-14 members and injured 33 others. Cmdr. Mark Williams, commanding officer of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB)14, Ed Crenshaw, president of the NMCB-14 Alumni Association, and CM1 (retired) Pete Reid salute after laying a wreath at their NAS Jax compound. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014

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By MC1(SW) Greg JohnsonNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsTwenty-five members of the Cobb County Georgia Chamber of Commerce visited Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville and Naval Station (NS) Mayport April 9-11 to see first hand how the bases operate. The group toured each base as part of the Cobb County Chamber of Commerce Honorary Commanders Association (HCA), which partners civilian business leaders with military commanders from different branches in an effort to enhance the relation ship between the two. The chamber organized the HCA about 30 years ago in Atlanta to pro mote interaction between military personnel and local business and civic leaders, said Joe Gaskin, co-chairman of the Cobb County HCA and project manager with ARCADIS, U.S., Inc. This cooperative effort provides an insight into a variety of local benefits for armed forces personnel assigned to our area. It also gives the civilian personnel an opportunity to learn about military affairs and the resulting economic impact to the community. According to Gaskin, about 25 business and civic leaders of Cobb County are chosen each year to participate in the HCA. Each civilian is paired with a military counterpart who they work with to identify community and busi ness opportunities in support of the armed forces. In turn, civilians are provided opportunities for in-depth tours of local and out-of-town military installations. In addition, the HCA regularly supports a variety of official military functions, including changes of command, retirement ceremonies, unit deployments and military balls. During the visit, civilians and their military counterparts toured Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic, Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 72, the Ticonderoga class guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), the Surface Warfare Officer School Command Learning Site Mayport, and Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. While the group had the opportu nity to see a variety of aircraft, equipment and machinery, one HCA mem ber said it was the service members that really stood out. The entire trip in Jacksonville was amazing, said Tim Kelley, HCA member and owner of Blue Sky Exhibits, LLC. I have experienced things I could not even imagine, but what stood out were the incredible friend liness, passion and professionalism each military person has shown us. It is evident they truly love what they do; the enthusiasm is amazing. HCA members are appointed each year in January and hold their posi tion until November. During the year, the association typically visits several military bases throughout the region. NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport served as the first out-of-state loca tions for the group so far in 2014. According to Gaskin, the opportu nity to visit military installations is an invaluable experience. By understanding the wide vari ety of missions and responsibilities that our men in uniform are expected to perform for our nation, our appre ciation for their service and sacrifice becomes far clearer, Gaskin said. Seeing their commitment and dedi cation, observing the intense training, getting a firsthand look at the tech nology, as well as the human interest element I have to stand in awe and respect for every service member and thank God for what they mean to this great nation. The Cobb County HCA was estab lished in 1983 and has produced more than 700 alumni. Troops to Teachers program offered to SailorsBy MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsNAS Jax Sailors attended a Teaching as a Second Career Seminar (TASC) at the base chapel April 10 to learn about the Troops for Teachers (TTT) Program. The program is offered quarterly at various bases to allow personnel to gain information and register for the pro gram. Lt. Cmdr. Shannon Willits from Coastal Riverine Squadron 10 said, I am attending the seminar to help pre pare myself to transition from active duty to retiree in about a year and a half. I already have some educational experience, but I want to make sure that I am prepared when that transitional time comes. Al Wynn, associate regional drector for TTT Florida Caribbean Region, conducted the seminar and described to the service members the education needed for TTT. We are a Department of Defense transition assistance pro gram and we help all military personnel and spouses transition into a career in teaching by providing them with the certification process and helping them find employment as a teacher in every state, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, said Wynn. Wynn mentioned during the semi nar that service members and spouses could be eligible up to $10,000 in financial assistance aside from the G.I. Bill and $5,000 to pay for their certification to become a fully qualified teacher. We like helping our veterans and other military personnel, said Wynn. We want to inform the military of what is available to them so they can start making career choices before they get out of the military. According to Wynn the registration process should start at least a year before the service member leaves the military. VR-62 CMDCM(AW/SW) Freddy Pacheco said, I am here to get some information for my retirement in a year and a half. TTT program seems like a great transition into the civilian work force. According to Wynn, I suggest everyone in the military register for the pro gram. There is no obligation, but it will give you access to the funding if you choose to utilize it. According to the TTT website, the nationwide program was established in 1994 by the Department of Defense. It is managed by the Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support, in Pensacola. The purpose of TTT is to assist eli gible military personnel to transition to a new career as public school teachers in high-need schools. For addition al information, call the TTT National Office at 1-800-231-6242. Photos by MC1 Greg JohnsonLt. Cmdr. Jerimiah Binkley shows an MK 54 torpedo to members of the Cobb County Chamber of Commerce on April 9 during a tour of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 72 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Georgia chamber officials tour Jacksonville, Mayport Photo by MC2 Amanda CabasosAl Wynn, associate regional director for Troops to Teachers (TTT) Florida Caribbean Region, explains the pro cess and benefits of the TTT program to (from right) VR-62 CMDCM(AW/ SW) Freddy Pacheco, UTCA Johntaylor Delay from Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 Detachment Jacksonville and Lt. Cmdr. Shannon Willits from Coastal Riverine Squadron 10 during a Teaching as a Second Career seminar at NAS Jax Chapel on April 10. Here comes Peter Cottontail(From left) Dominick Hogan (4), Haileigh Hogan (1), their mother Kirstin Hogan, and Reighly Wise (3) laugh and play with the Easter Bunny during their visit to the NEX on April 11. Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha Jones JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 9

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Daniel Diaz (14) goes for a slam dunk during the MWR-hosted "Month of the Military Child Carnival" on April 12 at Allegheny Softball Field. Thirteen-year-old Cailey Porter and 6-yearold Aaliyah Diaz climb the giant rock wall during the Month of the Military Child Carnival.Photos by Shannon LeonardShaylee Grovo strives to outreach her brother, Christian, on the Space Walk Bungee Run at NAS Jax.MWR carnival for military childrenA future champion at The Masters? Seven-year-old Jeremy Fox swings his golf club for 20 points as he plays the Chip Shot game during the carnival at NAS Jax Allegheny softball field. Military dependents of all ages had fun in the Bounce House during the April 12 carnival at NAS Jax. On a beautiful spring day, Lillian Acree, (3) enjoys her flight down the inflatible min-slide. an almost-centenarianRetired Navy Capt. Bill McCamy presents 99-year-old retired Cmdr. Robert Watkins with a "Quilt of Valor" on April 7 at the Life Care Center in Orange Park. The Quilt of Valor Foundation was founded by a Gold Star mother and its mission is to cover veterans touched by war with comforting and healing Quilts of Valor. Watkins flew 11,000 during his naval military service 7,000 hours in the PBY Catalina and 4,000 hours in transport planes supporting both World War II and the Korean War.Photo by Shannon Leonard 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014

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Advanced weight and balance training held at CNATTU Jax By Harley MontelongoA new update to Automated Weight and Balance Software (AWBS) is currently under certification for issue by Navy and Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI). In preparation for this, CNATTU Jax arranged for Lockheed-Martin Aeronautics representative Harold Smoot to provide advanced training in preparation for the issuance. The training was held Feb. 11 at CNATTU Jax, with 55 weight and balance officers/technicians from Navy Region Southeast attending. Aircraft weight and balance has always been a critical part of aircraft flight safety. An overloaded or improperly balanced aircraft can be hazardous to life and property. The U.S. Navy/U.S. Marine Corps Aircraft Weight and Balance Program is used ensure all aircraft are operated within established Gross Weight (GW) and Center of Gravity (CG) limitations. Aircraft must be certified for each flight. This process began with the Wright Brothers and has progressed to todays highly sophisticated and complex aircraft. Judicious management of GW and CG allows USN/USMC aircraft to operate at their highest capacity, whether delivering weapons, movement of passenger/cargo, or other assigned missions. The GW/CG of an aircraft begins with its initial weighing at the factory. This weight is ever evolving as the aircraft is configured, modified, loaded, etc., throughout its service life. This weight must be monitored by both maintenance and operations personnel to ensure that the aircraft remains within its estab lished limits during take off, in-flight, and landing. The process of certifying aircraft weight and bal ance required many man-hours by both mainte nance and aircrew when it was performed manu ally. Recognizing this, the service contracted with Lockheed-Martin to design a software package to reduce man-hours and simplify the complex process subject to human error. The outcome was the Automated Weight and Balance Software (AWBS) currently used by all mili tary services. AWBS reduced human error, increased the accuracy of the data and significantly reduced the man-hours involved in both calculating and docu menting an aircrafts GW/CG. AWBS must be periodically updated. These updates are performed to ensure all calculations are made correctly, performance enhancements are made as requested, and the increased functionalities of our newest aircraft are met. The use of AWBS is manda tory for all activities operating and/or maintaining USN/USMC aircraft. Aircraft are weighed, as required, by our organic depots and commercial contractors. FRCSE Jacksonville weighs many different TMS air craft and has a dedicated crew of weight and balance specialists on hand. CNATTU Jax is the Course Curriculum Model Manager and one of eight Maintenance Training Units authorized to teach the Aircraft Weight and Balance Course. Successful completion of this course is required for personnel to be designated as a Weight and Balance Officer/Technician. Photos by MCC Keith DeVinneyThree P-8A Poseidon aircraft from Patrol Squadron (VP) 16, are ready at Perth Airport to conduct search missions in support of the international effort to locate Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. VP-16 is deployed in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibil ity supporting security and stability in the Indo-AsiaPacific region. AWO2 Karl Shinn, assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16, searches out the window of a P-8A Poseidon while flying over the Indian Ocean during a search mission to locate Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. AWO2 Karl Shinn, assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16, unloads a Sonobuoy April 9 from the rack onboard a P-8A Poseidon, to prepare it for use during the search mission to locate Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. Sonobuoys are used to detect frequencies and signals in the water. Photos by Angela GlassLearning about reefsChristine Bauer, NAS Jax natural resources manag er, teaches third-grade classes from Gregory Drive Elementary and Chimney Lakes Elementary schools about coral reef structure. Christine Bauer shows the visiting third-grade student a shell collection from the local area. The third-graders from Gregory Drive Elementary and Chimney Lakes Elementary schools display the coral reef they constructed from candy and cake. Photos by Jacob SippelBono visits NH Jax(Above) Lt. Vincent Jones, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville pharmacy division officer (right), explains pharmacy procedures and operations to Rear Adm. Raquel Bono, chief, Navy Medical Corps, during a recent visit to the hospital. Bono commanded NH Jacksonville from 2005 to 2008. (At right) Rear Adm. Raquel Bono, chief, Navy Medical Corps, addresses NH Jacksonville medical corps officers during a recent tour. Bono visited various clin ics, including labor and delivery, physical therapy and the newly renovated endoscopy suite. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 11

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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 By Lisa FerdinandoArmy News ServiceArmy Spc. Natasha Schuette wants victims of sexual abuse in the military to know they are not alone and that help is available. She speaks from personal experience, sharing the ordeal she went through after being sexually assaulted by her drill sergeant at Fort Jackson, S.C., in 2012. I just want to . continue to encourage victims to come forward to change this culture that we have, she said. I know I am one of the very few who has an actual convic tion on their perpetrator. The Defense Department honored Schuette with a Lifetime Achievement Women of Character, Courage and Commitment award and a Womens History Month cer tificate of appreciation during a March 31 ceremony at the Pentagon. The Army is combating the culture of tolerance of sexual abuse, but it is a slow process, she said. Its important for victims to know there are avenues for them, she said, whether they want to pursue a convic tion or not. You need to come forward or at least talk to somebody. That way you can have it off of your chest, because [other wise] its going to eat you alive, Schuette said in an interview after the ceremony. Her chain of command didnt believe her when she report ed the crime, Schuette said. Other drill sergeants retaliated against her, and she faced a discharge for having a lack of integrity, she said. In talking with others in her company, she learned that other female trainees had been assaulted by the same male drill sergeant. Those women came forward. The drill sergeant was con victed on multiple counts, and is serving a four-year jail sen tence for sexual assault. I had to write three congressional inquiries. I really fought for this conviction, and having the other girls stand beside me was what actually got him convicted, she said. Being new to the military when the attack happened, Schuette said she was unsure who to report the crime to. The rank structure was unfamiliar; the basic training envi ronment was intimidating. However, there was no question that she would report the assault and fight for what was right, she said. Schuette said she found the strength to pursue the case from the other victims who came forward and stood beside her, and also from her fam ily. Her dad provided counsel and helped her when nobody would listen to me, she said. He said, You have two choices: you can stay in and fight it, or you can get out and not really have as much as a voice, Schuette said. At the Pentagon ceremony, Schuette was recognized for demonstrating one of the finest Army values, personal courage, by coming forward to share her experience. Her actions are credited with opening the door to the problems that exist in han dling reported cases of sexu al assault, and contributed to an increased effort by the Army to improve its Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention, or SHARP, program. The ceremony noted that her courageous actions have had a profound impact on report ing sexual assault and sexual harassment by both male and female soldiers. Schuette shared her story for a training video that was shown at a SHARP summit last year, hosted by Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno. Army leadership has made preventing sexual assault and effectively responding to reported cases a top priority. Schuette, who is stationed at Fort Bragg, N.C., said she is planning on leaving the mili tary. The uniform, she said, is kind of a reminder for me of everything thats happened. But, Schuette said she plans to continue to help victims of sexual assault in the military through speaking engagements with the SHARP program. She is pursuing her nursing degree and would like to work on an installation hospital and provide care to sexual assault victims. I want to encourage more people, not just females but males and females, to come forward and get these bad people in jail, she said, adding that Army values are not rep resented in those who commit sexual assault. By Manuel Marguy, directorPersonnel Support Detachment Jax While processing more than 40,000 travel claims annually, the Travel Process Center and Personnel Support Detachment (PSD) Jax are delivering comprehensive travel claim processing training during April. The goal is to provide timely and accurate pay and personnel services to the warfighter, and eliminate the bureaucratic travel claim process that can be so frustrating for both users and travel claim personnel. To shore up some of the back-andforth of rejected claims to Command Pass Coordinators (CPCs) and to reduce turnaround times, PSD Jax has retooled the Standing Operating Procedures, and repackaged them in customer speak, versus PSD speak. Like many warfare areas, the lan guage and jargon used can be foreign to new personnel or customers and PSD language is no different. Specifically, the training is broken out for each type of travel claim submitted, PCS/TDY/Advances, active and reserve, along with required documents for each type of claim. In addition, theres a list of most-common reasons for rejects for each type of claim submitted. Our goal is to ensure our users understand the process, language and termi nology, as well as how to troubleshoot and track claims more efficiently. PSD is also working on developing separate check-off sheets, versus just one sheet for all claims. For each type of claim submitted for liquidation, to more collaboratively undergird the vital link CPCs and Travel Claim personnel play in support of the warfighter. Moreover, we are committed to provide stand-down training twice a year, or more often if requested, to ensure we are all tracking from the same page and ultimately lead to the Travel Processing Center receiving actionable claims on the front end, versus the back-and-forth processing that increases turnaround times. The first training session was held April 8 and 10 and by all accounts, the CPCs and our staff were well motivated by the training. Additional training is scheduled for April 17 and 24 via video tele-confer ence. If your command would like to attend one of these sessions, contact Deputy Disbursing Officer David Tackett, 5422363, or email David.Tackett@navy.mil to reserve your place as seating is limited to 26 personnel. Attendees will receive a packet with glossary of terms, a toolkit book let listing required documents for each type of claim submitted, and an estab lished list of POCs for which to track and troubleshoot claims submitted to PSD for processing. With the busy season on the horizon, we are hopeful this investment will pay dividends all the way around. A new shady place for electric vehicles to get a charge By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public AffairsNaval Submarine Base (NSB) Kings Bay Public Works Department (PWD) completed construction on a 30-kilowatt (kW) solar carport and celebrated the event with a ribbon cutting ceremony April 3. The NSB Kings Bay array provides accommodations for eight electric vehicle charging stations and cover for four more vehicles. The carport is comprised of eight single axis photo-voltaic arrays. The 150-footlong panel structure of single axis arrays tilts auto matically to track the suns movement in one direction improving energy generation. The array includes several safety features to protect against high wind or lightning strikes. This investment provides the Navy a low cost energy solution for todays economic climate with monetary savings throughout the lifespan of the sys tem, said NSB Kings Bay PWD Construction Manager Ensign Ryan Harbaugh. Construction began on the $448,000 carport Dec. 17, 2013 and is the result of a larger project that was set to deliver three charging stations to the Navys Southeast region. The carport will enable NSB Kings Bay to recharge its current fleet of 63 electric vehicles with renew able electricity through either 110 or 220 volt outlets in approximately eight hours while reducing demand on the commercial power grid. The panels will gen erate excess electricity which is returned back to the electrical grid to help offset the energy consumed on the installation. The carport is expected to save about 50,000 kWh per year, or about $25,000 in annual utility costs. A similar system was contructed and recently came online at Naval Air Station Whiting Field in Floridas panhandle that provides a total of ten electric vehicle charging stations and covered parking for 12 total vehicles. Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City received a smaller array capable of charging three vehicles and providing parking for three more. These projects will help the Navy comply with the mandates of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the Energy Independence Security Act of 2007 and Presedential Executive Order 13423, which requires a 30-percent reduction in energy intensity by fiscal year 2015, said Brad Clark, Navy Region Southeast Energy Program Manager. They also support the Secretary of the Navys energy goals to further reduce the Navys reliance on fossil fuels. Sexual assault prevention advocate speaks outU.lS. Army photoArmy Spc. Natasha Schuette, a sexual assault prevention specialist, speaks about her experiences as a victim of sexual assault and encourages all victims male and female to talk to someone about their assault. She spoke at a Women's History Month event March 31 at the Pentagon. Personnel Support Detachment Jax travel claim stand-down training heldPhoto courtesy of PSD JaxCivilians and Sailors fill the for PSD Jax training room on April 8 for Travel Claim stand-down training. Photo by EM1 Mark TreenPWD Kings Bay Construction Manager Ensign Ryan Harbaugh, Engineering Technician Tom Laxton, Installation Energy Manager Leigh Adams, Equipment Specialist Mike Bessette and Contractor Chris Currier.

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: April 19, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: April 26, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open May 10 June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Kanapaha Botanical Gardens Trip May 3, $25 Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee April 19 at 9 a.m. Jacksonville Suns Game April 22 at 6 p.m. Barracks Bash April 24, 4 8 p.m. Free food, entertainment and prizesNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty April 22 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests April 24 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. Command Party Swing into savings & book your command golf tournamentMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Summer Camp Registration going on now! Sign-in at the youth center Operation: Megaphone Worldwide Lock-in April 25 at 8 p.m. Open to all CYP teens 13 18Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available including instrument, complex and commercial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.netSand Volleyball League forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Commands designated representative Cup points along with rules and required paperwork. Play begins in April. Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins in April. Intramural Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins in April. Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins in April. Kickball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Game play at lunch time. Contact the NAS Jacksonville Sports Department at 542-2930 for rules and the required paperwork. Open Singles Tennis Tournament April 28 Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25. Intramural Golf Summer League Meeting May 7 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at 11:30 a.m. at the golf course. Commands whose athletic representative attend points, along with rules and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Meeting May 14 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at noon designated representative Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork. Wallyball League Meeting May 21 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Commands whose athletic representative attend points, along with rules and required paperwork. Badminton Singles League Meeting May 28 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Commands whose athletic representative attend points, along with rules and required paperwork. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill. bonser@navy.mil StandingsAs of April 11Winter Golf Final Standings Teams Wins Losses NCTS 7 1 VP-45 7 1 VP-30 6 2 FRCSE 6 2 CV-TSC/PSD 5 3 CNATTU Blue 5 3 Navy Band 5 3 SERCC 2 6 FRCSE II 1 3 HS-11 1 4 VP-10 1 6 CNATTU Gold 1 7 Soccer Teams Wins Losses FRCSE 2 0 HITRON 2 0 HSM-72 2 0 BHC Jax 1 0 TPU/PCF 1 0 NAVFAC 1 1 HS-11 1 1 VP-26 1 1 VP-30 Students 1 1 NAVHOSP 0 0 VP-10 0 1 VP-62 0 1 Air Ops 0 2 FRCSE F-18 PMI 0 2 VP-45 0 2 VR-62 0 2 Intramural Spring Softball Teams Wins Losses FRCSE Rabid Possums 2 0 VP-30 2 0 CRS-10 1 0 NAVHOSP 1 0 AIR OPS 1 1 HS-11 1 1 CBMU202 0 0 CNRSE/Navy Band 0 0 FRCSE 900 0 0 See SPORTS, Page 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 13

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By Nick Simeone American Forces Press ServiceThe Navy and Marine Corps need to think about how to be more innovative, includ ing leveraging experiences learned from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, in the face of budget challenges that could become more acute, act ing Deputy Defense Secretary Christine H. Fox said April 7. Whether sequestration returns or not, the reality is were counting more than ever on your leadership and inno vation to solve problems and meet new and often unfamil iar challenges to our nations security, Fox told students at the U.S Naval War College in Newport, R.I., in one of a series of addresses she has delivered in recent days at war colleges around the nation. In each, Foxs theme has reflected warnings senior defense officials have been making since last years budget sequester and the likelihood of further spending cuts to come: that the Pentagon is going to have to re-examine priorities, reduce overhead and shrink the force while finding ways to continue vigilance in what officials describe as an increasingly unpredictable global envi ronment. Our Marines have excelled at everything weve asked of them in the [counterinsurgen cy] fight, . and they continue to do so in Afghanistan today, Fox said. So even as we make this transition, we need to cap ture as much of these hardwon experiences as possible, because well undoubtedly need it again in the future. Fox also challenged the stu dents to rediscover their ser vices core capabilities, even as you build from the lessons of the immediate past to take on new missions. There are now many young, battle-hardened Marines who have spent little time inside of a ship, much less practicing to conduct an assault from sea, she said. As you regain your sea legs, I also hope you will work to innovatively update your amphibious concepts of opera tions. Regarding the Navy, Fox said, we need to confront the real ity that theres more demand for ships than budgets allow, and I dont see this changing any time soon, emphasizing that no one is expecting the end of the Iraq war and the winding down of the conflict in Afghanistan to yield a peace dividend. Our naval forces need to think creatively about how to provide presence, getting more out of the ships we currently have, she said. Fox challenged the audi ence to determine whether to change deployment concepts and keep ships deployed lon ger. There must be some inno vating approaches out there that people like you, our future leaders, can find and adapt, she added. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is in the Asia-Pacific region, and just announced the addition of two ballistic mis sile defense ships to Japan, Fox noted. What other opportuni ties like that are out there that would help us meet the needs of our strategy? she asked the students. Ultimately, Fox said, its not about numbers but capabili ties. We need to make the financial and intellectual invest ments in technology and modernization programs now, she said, before we no longer have the massive technological advantages weve enjoyed over the past 60 years. By Lt. j.g. Shelby GreenFLCJ Corporate CommunicationsNAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville (FLCJ) recently launched its lunch and learn program as part of a three-phase command development program aimed at enhancing employ ees personal and professional skills, while fostering a positive work envi ronment that encourages growth and learning. The last Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute survey indicated that FLCJ employees wanted a concrete way to improve themselves and move forward in their career, which inspired the implementation of this program. Brown Bag Lunches are a common practice in the corporate world they create a space that senior level management can interact with their employees in a less formal setting, or can bring in an outside speaker to educate the employees on a topic in a way that fos ters a discussion. Since the kick-off at the start of 2014, two successful luncheons have been held with a total participation of 11 remote sites and 60-plus employees across the Enterprise. To date, the lunch and learn events have hosted Wanda Archer from the bases Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). Her series, Getting your Career Underway, has focused on starting a new career or keeping your current career on course and moving it forward. These resources included first, explor ing what you want to do, and secondly, how to market yourself and obtain the skills necessary for that job. By using the resources provided, one is able to maximize their potential in current or future careers and love what they do. Jose Santa, the catalyst and coordinator of this program, says, It is so cru cial that we continue to develop our selves whether we have been in a job one month or 30 years. We wanted to nurture an environment that promotes growth professionally and personally through these relaxed and interactive lunch sessions. The lunch and learn program will continue monthly and branch into other categories, such as resume writ ing, car maintenance, wreath making, home buying, and interviewing. The subject matter experts (SME) in these different areas are solicited from the workforce or external sources to present for 30-45 minutes while the employees eat lunch. Due to its regionally expansive workforce, NAVSUP FLCJ has created a system to include all sites by performing these luncheons via video teleconference (VTC), so every one can participate and see the pre senter. Additionally, each session is record ed and accessible for all employees to review at a later date. We want to empower our employees and set them up for success, whether that be in their current job or a future one. This program is a way to do just that through developing and exploring unique skills, remarked Capt. Duke Heinz, commanding officer of NAVSUP FLCJ. Brown bag lunches are just the first phase of a multi-phase program aimed at mentoring and developing employ ees for succession. The next phases include mentoring, job rotations, and job shadowing to expose employees to other aspects within the organiza tion. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, is one of eight fleet logistics centers under NAVSUP Global Logistics Support (GLS). They provide operational logis tics, business and support services to the fleet, shore, and industrial com mands of the Navy, Coast Guard, Military Sealift command, and other Joint Allied Forces. Services include contracting, region al transportation, fuel, material man agement, household goods movement support, postal and consolidated mail, warehousing, global logistics and husbanding, hazardous material manage ment and integrated logistics support. From FFSC The NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their fami lies. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handi capped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2014: May 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 18-19 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Aug. 20 (8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.), Nov. 17-20 (5:30-10 p.m.). (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) May 5-9, May 19-23, June 9-13, June 23-27, July 7-11, July 21-25, Aug. 11-15, Aug. 25-29, Sept. 15-19, Oct. 20-24, Nov. 3-7, Dec. 1-5. (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) May 12-16, June 16-20, July 14-18, Aug. 18-22, Sept. 22-26, Oct. 27-31, Nov. 17-21, Dec. 8-12. (8:30 a.m.-noon) May 2, June 30, June 30, July 29, Aug. 4, Sept. 2, Oct. 8, Nov. 14, Dec. 22. (8-9:30 a.m.) May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (9:40 a.m.-noon) May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) April 29-30, Aug. 5-6, Nov. 24-25. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) July 31. (1-4 p.m.) July 29, Oct.8. (1-3:30 p.m.) July 30, Oct. 7. (9-10:30 a.m.) July 30, Oct. 17. (1:30-3:30 p.m.) May 1, July 2, Aug. 7, Oct. 2, Nov. 6. (1:30-4 p.m.) May 8, July 10, Sept. 11, Nov. 13. July 29 (10-11:30 a.m.), Oct. 4 (1-2:30 p.m.) (9-11 a.m.) May 12, June 9, July 14, Aug. 11, Sept. 8, Oct. 6, Nov. 3, Dec. 8. (9-10:30 a.m.) May 13, June 10, July 8, Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 9. (8 a.m.-noon) May 20, 27, Sept. 23, 30. (8 a.m.-noon) April 28, May 19, June 30, July 28, Aug. 25, Sept. 29, Oct. 27, Nov. 24, Dec. 15. May 1 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), May 27 July 8 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no work shop June 3), July 29 Sept. 9 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop Aug. 19), Sept. 25 Oct. 30 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.). (11 a.m.1 p.m.) May 6, July 15, Sept. 9, Nov. 18. (1-3 p.m.) May 6, 13, 20, 27; July 1, 8, 15, 22; Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30; Nov. 4, 12, 18, 25. (1-4 p.m.) April 22; June 3, 10, 17, 24; Aug. 5, 12, 19, 26; Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28. (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) June 3, Sept. 16, Dec. 2. (10 a.m.-noon) April 29; May 13, 27; June 10, 24; July 15, 29; Aug. 12, 26; Sept. 9, 23; Oct. 7, 21; Nov. 4, 18; Dec. 2, 16. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) May. 15, July 17, Sept. 4, Nov. 5. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) June 12, Aug. 14, Oct. 9, Dec. 4.To register for any of the above work shops, please call 542-5745. Deputy Defense Secretary challenges Marines, Navy to innovateChristine H. FoxFleet Logistics Center Jacksonville implements lunch and learn programPhoto by Victor MangomeNAVSUP FLCJ employees evaluate their current skills and interests before using them to create goals for the future, during the command's first Lunch and Learn event. (From left) Ruth King, Nancy Enos, Jenelle Rankin and Sarah Jacobs.FFSC offers life skills workshops 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014

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By MCC(SW/AW) Christopher TuckerAll Hands MagazineLets face it. The most any of us can hope to accomplish in the Navy is to master our craft, leave a command better than we found it, and to train our reliefs. However, in order to have reliefs to train someone has to initially find qualified young men and women and convince them to join the Navy. That job falls squarely on Navy Recruiting Command, which oper ates 1,450 recruiting stations around the country and also in Japan, Europe and Guam. With 5,000 Navy recruit ers working across Americas cities and small towns, NAVCRUITCOM is tasked with bringing in more than 33,000 people into the Navy for fiscal year 2014 alone. With most recruiters being fleet Sailors on a three-year tour of duty, it is imperative they receive the absolute best training possible. New recruiters attend a five-week course at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., to learn how to find quali fied future Sailors. NORU, or Navy Recruiting Orientation Unit, trains approximately 1,500 Sailors each year to serve in the field. My number one mission is to take Sailors and reenergize them, motivate them to love what they do to love the Navy, said NCCS(SS) Tim Corelli, a senior instructor at NORU. In five short weeks, these fleet Sailors learn everything from how to analyze a recruiting market to sales techniques. In fact, they learn a specific sales phi losophy called VALOR, which stands for value oriented recruiting. Essentially, it shows Sailors how to identify prospects pressures, plans and problems and teaches them how the Navy can help solve those, ultimately leading to that prospect raising their right hand to join. We teach them to take someone who is apathetic, and by the time theyre done with them they are ready to join the Navy, said Corelli. However, its more than just sales. The staff at NORU also emphasize standards, both Navy personal stan dards and ethics, as well as recruiting standards. On the first day of class, all new students are given a height-weight measurement to ensure they are within body fat standards. Those that arent are immediately enrolled in the commands fitness enhancement program. We are the face of the Navy out there as recruiters, said NCC Kevin Roux, an instructor at NORU and the command fitness leader. If a recruiter is out of standards, thats not the image that we want to have [in the public.] We really need to make sure that were on top of our game here. The staff uses the Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling System as their guideline for teaching fitness. They hold mandatory command group physical training twice a week in the morning and FEP sessions are held two additional days per week in the afternoon. Im a believer in the NOFFS program. I wasnt at first, but I know what its done for me, said Roux. You get out of it what you put into it. I find myself to be a better runner now. For some fleet Sailors, the transition to recruiting can be a bit of a shock to their system. Taking someone who is a technical expert in their rating and teaching them an entirely new set of skills presents its own unique chal lenge. This is a whole new experience, said BMC(SW) Christopher Haywood, a new recruiter. Being a boatswains mate, Im used to the fleet mentality. [Here] you learn new things about how to relate to people. The instructors said they usually see some myths about recruiting cleared up within the first week of the course. Most of the time were getting the top Sailors from the fleet, said NCCS(SW) Brian Banrey, a NORU instructor. They come to recruiting to be successful, but when they get here they figure out that its something different. They might be the best ET or best MM, but when they come here theyve never done [some thing like this] before. Theyre learning a different trade, which sometimes can be a challenge. The course culminates in a cap stone exercise during the final week. Instructors role play as potential future Sailors and the students work in a mock recruiting station. Students are evalu ated on how well they deal with a variety of situations, everything from an angry parent who doesnt want their child to join the Navy, to a prospect who changes his mind at the last minute and decides not to join. We deliberately make it chaotic, said NCCS(SW) Elissa Cook, a NORU instructor. One myth instructors were quick to dispel is that Navy recruiters must lie to be successful. The reality of it is . that its so easy to get caught and ruin your career, said Corelli. The last thing we want is for a bunch of Sailors in the fleet that cant do the job because theyre not quali fied. Eventually, I tell all these recruit ers, Guess what? One day, guess where youre going when your three years is up? Youre going back to work with those people that you put in. Do you want to work side-by-side with someone you lied about? Instructors and students alike said the intangible skills of building rela tionships and learning to relate to complete strangers are the most important tools recruiters walk away with. As a fire controlman, I actual ly ran an ET division for navigation al radar and GPS, said FC1(SW/AW) Christopher Campbell, who reported to NORU fresh off a tour aboard USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70). As far as recruiting, the job is completely different. Im interacting with people who arent Sailors. Recruiting boils down to helping these Sailors find qualified people that can ultimately make the Navy a better place, said Corelli. You do change peoples life, he said. From StaffTo raise awareness of vet eran homelessness in Duval, Clay and Nassau counties, Emergency Services and Homeless Coalition (ESHC) of Northeast Floridarecently unveiled three digital bill boards and a new landing page for a program that can provide help for local Veterans. The billboards bear the headline Vets Deserve Better and comple ment the new landing page, HomesForOurBrave.com, that provides crucial information about Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF), a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs program administered by the ESHC of Northeast Florida. Through this program, homeless or at-risk veterans and their families may receive services such as: tance for rent and other living expenses, tion, agencies. ESHC was awarded $1.78 million by the Department of Veteran Affairs to provide pre vention and rapid re-housing services, and has applied for an additional $5 million to con tinue its efforts. This campaign is a reflec tion of our commitment to end veteran homelessness in Duval, Clay and Nassau coun ties. Veterans deserve better. They deserve housing and the services necessary to sustain it, said Marti Johnson, SSVF program director for ESHC. We are committed to the goal of ending veteran home lessness by December 2015. Our community is on track to meet this target thanks to the resources available through the Department of Veteran Affairs, our partners, and other service providers in the community. According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Developments 2013 Homeless Assessment Report: highest rate of homeless veter ans in the nation, estimated at 5,505. the second highest decrease in veteran homelessness. erans are unsheltered (living in a place not meant for human habitation). Since the SSVF program was implemented locally in October 2012, we have assist ed more than 80 female veter ans and their families. Women are the fastest growing group of the veteran population and Northeast Florida. Its our pri ority to ensure these women have a home for their fami lies. Our partners are helping us to establish a strong safety net that can meet the unique needs of female veterans, says Johnson. Members of the commu nity are encouraged to learn more about the SSVF pro gram, including its eligibility requirements and resources for referring a potential client, at HomesForOurBrave.com. From Balfour Beatty CommunitiesThe first full week in April is desig nated as National Window Safety week to coincide with spring the time of the year when there is an urge to open windows and welcome the fresh air. National Window Safety Weeks goal is to raise awareness for what can be done to help keep families safe from the risk of accidental falls or injuries within the home. At Balfour Beatty Communities, safety is important to us, and we want to share some window safety knowledge with our residents in order to protect our communities. important as learning how to use one in an emergency. Unattended children run the greatest risk of falls and injuries, so the best first step is to carefully watch your children as they play. Nothing can substitute for careful supervision. locked when children are around. When opening windows for ventila tion, open windows that a child cannot reach. Do not rely on insect screens to pre vent a fall. Insect screens are designed to provide ventilation while keeping insects out, not to prevent a childs fall from a window. Set and enforce rules about keeping childrens play away from windows or patio doors. Falling through the glass can be fatal or cause serious injury. dren can climb, away from windows. Children may use such objects as a climbing aid. plans. While some falls occur from windows, it is important to realize that in the event of a fire, a window also can save a childs life. This is why windows play a critical role in home safety. means of escape from a burning home. Determine your familys emergency escape plan and practice it regularly. In the plan, include two elements of escape from every room. Remember that children may have to rely on a window to escape in a fire. Help them learn to safely use a window under these circumstances. To learn more about window safe ty, visit the Safety section on Balfour Beatty Communities website at http:// www.nasjacksonvillehomes.com/resi dent-resources/safety Veteran aid program launches Homes For Our BraveHow the Navys recruiting school turns fleet Sailors into recruitersBase residents: Window safety tips can save lives A CFC Participant provided as a public service.Do not accept defeat .Fight deadly childhood diseases. 800-8 22-6344 stjude.org JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 By MC1 Lewis HunsakerPre-Commissioning Unit America Public AffairsThe U.S. Navy officially accepted delivery of the amphibious assault ship America (LHA 6) from Huntington Ingalls Industries during a ship custody transfer ceremony in Pascagoula, Miss., April 10. More than 900 Sailors and Marines assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) America marched to the ship to take custody on the flight deck. During the event, Capt. Robert Hall Jr., commanding officer of America, signed the official paperwork, granting custody of the ship to the U.S. Navy. Hall said its a great day for the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps team, Huntington Ingalls Industries and our country. Since the keel was laid in 2009, lit erally thousands of proud patriotic men and women have been designing, building, installing, testing, outfitting and training the crew of America, and I would like to take this opportunity to personally thank them all, said Hall. Command Master Chief (SW/AW/ FMF) Chad Lunsford said that since the first Sailor reported in 2012, the command has been working dili gently to complete instructions, train ing and qualifications required for the command to operate successful ly. Establishing ship programs, such as maintenance, damage control and sponsorship, have also been essential throughout the pre-commissioning process. This is an awesome day, said Lunsford. We have been building this team for over two years, and today close to 1,100 Sailors and Marines come together as one team to take custody of our nations newest Navy ship. This is a proud moment for America, our ship, our country! America is the first ship of its class, replacing the Tarawa-class of amphibi ous assault ships. As the next gener ation big-deck amphibious ship, America will be optimized for aviation and capable of supporting current and future aircraft, such as the tilt-rotor MV-22 Osprey and the Joint Strike Fighter. America is 844 feet long, 106 feet wide and displaces 44,971 long tons. Her propulsion system will drive it to speeds in excess of 22 knots, and she will accommodate a crew size of more than 1,100 Sailors and nearly 1,900 embarked Marines. After a rigorous evaluation and cer tification cycle, the ship will depart Mississippi and transit around South America to her future homeport of San Diego, where the ship will be commis sioned late 2014. Intramural Spring Softball (contd.) Team Wins Losses NBHC Honey Badgers 0 0 VP-26 0 0 VP-45 Sluggers 0 0 VR-58 0 0 VR-62 0 0 FRCSE Tweaks & Geeks 0 1 FACSFAC 0 1 NCTS 0 1 VP-45 Scared Hitless 0 1 FRCSE Thrusters 0 2 Badminton Doubles Final Standings Team Wins Losses NAVHOSP MSU 10 0 NAVFAC Blue 8 1 NBHC Jax 6 3 MWR Dynamic Duo 7 3 NAVFAC Red 6 3 NAVFAC Orange 4 5 NAVFAC Gold 3 5 CV-TSC Ashore 3 7 FACSFAC-1 1 7 Sports and Standings (contd. from Page 13) By Claudette RouloAmerican Forces Press ServiceForward presence is the Navys mandate, the vice chief of naval operations told a House panel April 11. Naval forces remain on watch around the globe as more than a decade of conflict and extended stability operations draw to a close, Navy Adm. Mark Ferguson III told mem bers of the readiness subcom mittee of the House Armed Services Committee. Our forward-deployed forc es are where it matters, when it matters, he said. In the past year, Americas naval forces have helped shape events and provided immedi ate options to the president during times of crisis around the globe, Ferguson said. Our global presence reas sures our allies and partners, deters aggression and provides a ready response to humani tarian crises, he said. It con fronts piracy and supports counterterrorism operations from the sea. With the signing of the Bipartisan Budget Act, the Navy was able to improve its forward operations and readi ness in fiscal year 2014, the admiral said. Through the remainder of this fiscal year, we are restor ing fleet training, maintenance and operations, and well recover a substantial portion of our ship maintenance back log, he noted. If the Navys fiscal year 2015 budget request is fulfilled and if overseas contingency opera tions funds are approved Ferguson said, the service will have the resources necessary to train, maintain and operate its planned fleet structure. The combined funds will also sustain the required lev els of readiness to support the adjudicated Global Force Management Allocation Plan for naval forces, the admiral added. Even if the budget request is fully funded, he said, the Navy will make some cuts in light of reduced funding from its pro posed budget request last year, including a reduction of nearly 80 aircraft and 3,500 weapons. To remain a balanced and ready force across the Future Years Defense Plan, this bud get proposes slowing cost growth and compensation of benefits, maintaining the option to refuel or inactivate one aircraft carrier and a car rier air wing, Ferguson said. The proposed budget also puts 11 guided missile cruisers and three dock landing ships into a phased modernization period, the admiral told the committee. This phased modernization approach, while fiscally driv en, will reduce force structure risk in the 2030s and beyond by extending the service life of these ships, he noted. The Navy strove to reset while simultaneously conduct ing a decade of high-tempo operations, Ferguson said. It will take about five years beyond the end of Operation Enduring Freedom to complete the reset of the force, he said. The length of this period reflects unique ship depot maintenance demands, which are limited by operational schedules and the capacity of the Navys depot infrastructure, the admiral explained. Our budget request also proposes lower investment in our shore infrastructure, he said. We are mindful that this backlog will compound over time and must eventually be addressed. Accordingly, we will continue to aggressively pursue opportunities, such as repro gramming our realignment of funds in the year of execution to modernize and sustain our shore facilities, Ferguson said. As the Navy looks to the future, the specter of sequestration looms large, he said. A return to sequestration-level spending in fiscal year 2016 and beyond will lead to a Navy that would be insufficient in size and capability to meet the needs of the country, the admiral said. Under that scenario, addi tional force structure reduc tions would be required to fund adequate readiness of the remaining force. Under sequestration, further reductions in procurement, in maintenance training and operations would be required and damage to the industrial base would likely be severe, he said. Despite these challenges, the nation is fortunate to have the highest quality force in its his tory, Ferguson said. These outstanding men and women who serve our nation at sea make us the finest Navy in the world, he said. From Department of DefenseThe Navy christened the future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) April 12, during a ceremony at General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine. The lead ship and class are named in honor of former Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Admiral Elmo Bud Zumwalt Jr., who served as the 19th CNO from 1970-1974. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus delivered the ceremonys principal address. In accordance with Navy tradition, the ships co-sponsors Ann Zumwalt and Mouzetta Zumwalt-Weathers, daughters of Zumwalt, will break a bottle of sparkling wine across the ships bow. The christening of the future USS Zumwalt represents the beginning of another era of service for this great name, said Mabus. Just as Admiral Zumwalt helped shape our nations Navy as the 19th chief of naval operations, DDG 1000 will help shape the future of surface combatants. The sophisticated new technology incorporated aboard this ship, combined with its multi-mission capabilities, will ensure it is a relevant and integral part of our battle force for years to come. This day, however, would not be possible without the hard work and dedication of the hundreds of men and women of our nations industrial base who worked so diligently to help us reach this exciting moment. Zumwalt was a veteran of World War II, as well as the Korean and Vietnam Wars. Following the World War II Battle for Leyte Gulf, he was awarded the Bronze Star with Combat V for his valorous actions aboard the USS Robinson. During the Vietnam War, he served as commander naval forces, Vietnam before being nominated by President Richard Nixon to become CNO in July of 1970. He is credited with imple menting a series of policies intended to improve opportunities within the Navy for minorities and women during his tenure as CNO. Zumwalt died Jan. 2, 2000. During his eulogy, President Bill Clinton described Zumwalt as the conscience of the Navy. The Zumwalt-class destroyer rep resents the next-generation of multimission surface combatants and will enable access in the open ocean, litto ral and ashore. The Navy has procured three Zumwalt-class destroyers. Each can embark two MH-60R Seahawk helicopters. The ship includes new technologies that deliver capability now and serve as a springboard for incorporation into future ship classes. DDG 1000 is the first U.S. Navy surface combatant to employ an innovative and highly survivable Integrated Power System that will pro vide power to propulsion, ships service, and combat system loads from the same gas turbine prime movers. DDG 1000s power allocation flexibility allows for potentially significant energy savings and is well suited to enable future highenergy weapons and sensors. The ship features two advanced gun systems firing long-range land attack projectiles that reach up to 63 nautical miles, providing precision, high vol ume and persistent fire support to forces ashore, along with an approximate five-fold improvement in naval surface fire range. DDG 1000 will employ active and passive sensors, as well as a multi-func tion radar capable of conducting area air surveillance, including over-land, throughout the extremely difficult and cluttered sea-land interface. Construction on Zumwalt com menced in February 2009, with the keel laying ceremony held in November 2011, and ship launch successfully completed in October 2013. Zumwalt is 610 feet long is with a displacement of more than 15,000 tons when fully loaded. The ship is expected to join the fleet in 2016. Naval forces stand ready despite threat of sequestrationPhoto by Sgt. Courtney Ropp Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson III testi fies on April 10 before the House Armed Services Committee Subcommittee on Readiness.Navy christens future USS Zumwalt, new class of destroyerPhoto by MC1 Arif PataniSecretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus and other honored guests attend the April 12 christening ceremony for the Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG) 1000. The ship, the first of three Zumwalt-class destroy ers, will provide independent forward presence and deterrence, support special operations forces and operate as part of joint and combined expeditionary forces. Future USS America deliveredPhoto by MC1 Lewis HunsakerMore than 900 Sailors and Marines assigned to the amphibious assault ship PreCommissioning Unit (PCU) America (LHA 6) march to the ship to assume cus tody of it. The U.S. Navy officially accepted delivery of the amphibious assault ship from Huntington Ingalls Industries during a custody transfer ceremony in Pascagoula, Miss., April 10. America is the first ship of its class, replacing the Tarawa-class of amphibious assault ships and is scheduled to be commissioned in late 2014 in San Francisco.

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, APRIL 17, 2014 I I D E VP-26 COC Smith to Relieve Sohaney Page 3 PERFECT PAINT FRCSE Super Hornet Program CARNIV AL! Fun For Military Children Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com By MC3 Jason KofonowDefense Media ActivityFleet Challenge 2014 wrapped up its annual anti-submarine warfare (ASW) competition April 10 at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. This years winners were the allied P-8A Poseidon aircrew from the Pros Nest of Patrol Squadron (VP) 30, followed closely by the VP-4 Skinny Dragons flying the P-3C, with third place taken by a VP-5 Mad Foxes crew in a P-8A. Fleet Challenge was a great testing experience and a superb opportunity to fly together as a British crew on a real sub marine target, said Royal Air Force Master Aircrewman Mark Utting from theVP-30 hangar. As with all anti-submarine warfare flights you have to remain flexible, and the sub marine never does what you think it will. That being said, we had planned for all eventuali ties and the sortie went well. By AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterOn April 10, NAS Jax was honored with the HandsOn Service in Uniform Award dur ing HandsOn Jacksonvilles annual Celebrate!Good awards ceremony at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts. The event takes place during National Volunteer Week and celebrates good on the First Coast and the power of volun teering. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander was present to accept the award on behalf of the station. Dr. Judith Smith, presi dent and CEO of HandsOn Jacksonville, and Kathy Orr, Chair, HandsOn Jacksonville Board of Directors, welcomed the volunteers. Our vision is that one day every person will discover their power to make a difference and act on it to create a better com munity and a better world, said Orr. We are here to celebrate those who created real change and the good that their generos ity of spirit and willingness to take action has created, con tinued Smith. Kent Justice, Anchor/Reporter for WJXT Channel 4 was the emcee for the evening. Im very excited to celebrate the inspir ing work the volunteers are doing in our community, he said before introducing a video, which showcased the work of the 13 award recipients. In the NAS Jax segment, Undersander said, There are over 10,000 active and reserve sailors and roughly 10,000 civil ians aboard NAS Jax and I am humbled to be here to represent all the good they contribute to the community. In 2013 alone, more than 600 volunteers from NAS Jax com pleted nearly 12,000 hours of volunteer service in their com munity, through command and base-sponsored activities. Undersander added, Our people reach out in so many dif ferent ways, from boy scouts, to church groups, to our annual shoreline clean up. There are several squadrons aboard NAS Jax that have adopted schools and I cant think of a better role model for these young children than a Sailor in uniform. According to the award cita tion, As a result of their efforts, NAS Jax has cultivated a cul ture of service, built on mutu al respect with the City of Jacksonville, and received mul tiple Navy wide recognitions. Our sailors at NAS Jax over whelm the community with so much goodness, support, and help that people cant help but be drawn in by these folks. I think that makes us a stronger community overall. Undersander said proudly. All those honored at the event have been nominated to receive the Presidents Volunteer Service Award. Photo by MC3 Jason KofonowRoyal Air Force aircrewmen, assigned to the "Pros Nest" of Patrol Squadron (VP) 30, track a live submarine on April 7 from their P-8A Poseidon during Fleet Challenge 2014. The allied crew won the annual anti-submarine warfare (ASW) competition, that put seven of the Navys best aircrews against each other, in both simulator scenarios and flight operations, to locate and track aggres sor submarines. Fleet Challenge 2014 winners announcedDr. Judith Smith (left), president and CEO of HandsOn Jacksonville, her husband retired Capt. Chet Smith and LeAnn Daddario (right), senior vice president and COO of HandsOn Jacksonville, congratulate NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander on the culture of community service that has been cultivated aboard NAS Jax. Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (sec ond from right) along with the 12 other recipients of a 2014 HandsOn Award receive a standing ovation from the audience during the Celebrate!GOOD ceremony held at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts on April 10.NAS Jacksonville honored for exceptional volunteerism By AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterNAS Jacksonville Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd and his family will bid farewell to the station April 17 at 2 p.m. at his retire ment ceremony in Hangar 117. Originally from Akron, Ohio, Shepherd entered the Navy through the Delayed Entry Program after graduat ing from high school in March 1984. Three months later, he began active service. By September 1984 he had completed recruit training and appren ticeship training as an aviation store keeper/storekeeper at Recruit Training Command, San Diego. During his 30 years in the Navy, Shepherd completed 10 deployments while on sea duty and worked a variety of assignments while stationed on shore but says his tour as command mas ter chief of NAS Jax has been the best opportunity hes had in the Navy. This base is like a carrier on steroids. Together weve been able to hit the tar get and get the job done every time. Weve never turned a mission away, he said. Shepherd took over as command master chief with the goal of building NAS Jax into one of the best bases in the Navy. Obviously weve done that, Shepherd said. During my tenure here, weve won the installation excellence award for two years in a row. And not because of me, but because of our people. That was a benchmark of what NAS Jax does and what it brings to the Navy, the defense and readiness, he added. Shepherd went on to note this instal lations resilience during more trying times, The fact that we were able to keep our operations in support of the 14 operational squadrons and more than 100 tenant commands going through sequestration and the government shut down is testament to our ability to over come just about anything through pro cess planning, financial forecasting and reprogramming our funding. According to Shepherd, one of his most memorable events was the bases initiation of CPO 365. The program started off with four people doing a little PT on the grinder and evolved into a group of over 700. We built in leadership training and community service outreach into the program and it ended up becoming the model for the Navy. It started at the MCPONs office but we morphed it into what he wanted it to become, he added proudly. He went on to express his apprecia tion for the manner in which the active and reserve components aboard this base work hand in hand. There are no barriers. The lines become blurred between who is active and who is reserve, he noted. Shepherd takes pride in the forward thinking and forward progression of this installation. Weve come a long way at NAS Jax. Ive watched this command go Jax Air News photoOutgoing NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd highlights some of the achievements made by chief petty officers (CPO) during the CPO Birthday Celebration at the Building 1 flag pole in 2012. NAS Jax team bids farewell to CMC ShepherdSee Page 7 See CMC EXIT, Page 6

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)5487789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorIn more ways than one, the military has sometimes been an institution that change forgot. Some people refer to military life as living in a bubble. Some peo ple have worse names for it. But for generations, the experience has remained the same: once inside that front gate the one with an armed guard out front its like entering a different world. What applies to the outside does not necessarily apply on the inside. Visually, I picture it as an underwater setting. The civilian world exists loosely and without an anchor. Elements bump into each other and sometimes become one. The media changes parenting norms, and changing ideas about parenthood affects the mar keting industry and how things like food are packaged and sold. A movie stars new haircut ignites a trend. New trends create new ideas about whats acceptable and whats not in public schools. Art imitates life and vice versa. But the military is like an air-tight container anchored to the ground. It doesnt sway or bob. Things on the outside hit its windows, but it takes years of changing tides and salt water for the container to even realize something is knocking. The obvious parallel here is women in combat. There are few segments of the civilian world to which women dont at least have access. While the womens movement cheered Youve come a long way, Baby, a few generations ago, that message has taken its dear, sweet time to reach the military. The military is like a slow, careful grandfather who looks four times before crossing an intersection and always wears comfortable shoes. Sometimes Grandpa is deaf and losing his sight. It would take an act of con gress to get him to change his breakfast routine. I mean, where else in society is it still permissible to regulate employees haircuts, right down to a quarter of an inch? Sure, civilian employers have dress stan dards, but the Navys grooming standards read like something out of another era: [Hair] shall be tapered from the lower natural hair line upwards at least 3/4 inch and outward not greater than 3/4 inch . the bulk of the hair shall not exceed approximately two inches . the length of an indi vidual mustache hair fully extended shall not exceed approximately inch . eyeliner shall be shades of black, brown, blue or green that matches the indi viduals natural eye color and shall not extend past the natural corner of the eye. If you think the military doesnt regularly inspect for infractions of the above grooming standards, youd be wrong. While civilian industries are subject to whats fair, the military largely continues to operate outside of traditional, civilian democracy. In fact, there is this common, half-joking phrase: The military is protect ing democracy, not practicing it. Sometimes, the outside world seems to simply give up the hope that the military will ever change. But for all the ways in which the military can be frustrating, even stifling, its insulation is oddly com forting and familiar on base. I know what to expect when Im at a military commissary or exchange, even when that expectation includes an awareness that otherwise simple things, like arranging a book sign ing, will be as difficult as if I were asking for top secret clearance. I have never felt safer than when Im on a base. After September 11th, when our base at NAS Jacksonville in Florida was shut down for security reasons to out side access, I actually felt left behind. I wanted to be trapped on the base, not loose and floating in the less predictable civilian world. The military base feels like a small town. As a child, when my mom had spouse club meetings or was shop ping at the exchange, she let me play on the play ground without her supervision. Bad things didnt happen on base. We were all family there. And we were protected by the armed guards out front. All of the above is why the shooting at Fort Hood hits military families in a vulnerable place. It gets us in the gut. It feels as violating as someone breaking into our home. It shatters everything we know about security. Except, the shooter at Fort Hood both in 2009 and 2014, as well as in the shooting at the Navy Yard was one of us, and that shakes us even more. In a place where change happens at a snails pace, relatively overnight, the military base became just as unsettling as the outside world. People say that mass shootings are becoming the expected. It stuns us less and less each time we here about a new one. Its hard to believe its become that From StaffApril 17 1778 The 18-gun Continental Navy sloop-of-war Ranger, with Capt. John Paul Jones in command, captures a British brig and sends the prize to France. April 18 1848 U.S. Navy expedition to explore the Dead Sea and the River Jordan, commanded by Lt. William Lynch, reaches the Dead Sea. 1906 Navy assists in relief operations during San Francisco earthquake and fire. 1942 USS Hornet CV-8) launches 16 of Lt. Col. James Doolittles B-25 Army Air Force bombers in the first attack on mainland Japan in World War II. 1988 Navy destroys two Iranian sur veillance platforms, sinks one frigate and one patrol ship, and severely dam ages a second frigate in retaliation for attack on guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58). April 19 1783 George Washington proclaims end of hostilities with Great Britain. 1861 President Lincoln orders blockade of Southern ports from South Carolina to Texas. 1917 Naval Armed Guard crew on board SS Mongolia engage and dam age a German U-boat. This was the first engagement of U.S. naval personnel against the enemy in World War I. 1955 Heavy cruiser USS Albany (CA 123) and destroyer USS William M. Wood (DD 715) provide disaster relief to citizens of Volos, Greece, after cata strophic earthquake. April 20 1796 Congress authorizes comple tion of three frigates. 1861 Norfolk Navy Yard abandoned and burned by Union forces. 1914 In first call to action of naval aviators, a detachment on cruiser USS Birmingham (CL-2) sailed to Tampico, Mexico. 1915 First Navy contract for lighterthan-air craft awarded. 1942 USS Wasp (CV-7) launches 47 British aircraft to reinforce Malta. 1947 Navy Capt. L.O. Fox, supported by 80 Marines, accepted the surren der of Lt. Yamaguchi and 26 Japanese soldiers and sailors, two and one half years after the occupation of Peleliu and nearly 20 months after the surrender of Japan. 1953 USS New Jersey shells Wonsan, Korea, from inside the harbor. 1964 USS Henry Clay (SSBN-625) launches a Polaris A-2 missile from the surface in first demonstration that Polaris submarines could launch mis siles from the surface as well as from beneath the ocean. Just 30 minutes later, the submarine launched another Polaris missile while submerged. April 21 1861 USS Saratoga captures slaver Nightingale. 1898 U.S. at war against Spain. 1906 Cmdr. Robert Peary discovered that supposed Arctic Continent did not exist. 1972 Moonwalk in the Descartes Highlands by Navy Capt. John Young, commander of Apollo 16. He was the ninth man to walk on the moon. Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Mattingly II, was the Command Module Pilot. Charles Duke was the Lunar Module Pilot. During the 11-day, one-hour and 51-minute mis sion, 213 lbs. of lunar material was col lected. Recovery was accomplished by HC-1 helicopters from USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14). April 22 1778 Capt. John Paul Jones of the Continental Navy Sloop Ranger led landing party raid on Whitehaven, England. 1898 U.S. warships begin blockade of Cuba. 1987 U.S. Navy ordered to provide assistance requested by neutral vessels under Iranian attack outside the exclu sion zone. April 23 1917 Launching of USS New Mexico, first dreadnought with turboelectric drive. 1918 USS Stewart destroys German submarine off France. 1945 In only U.S. use of guided mis siles in World War II, two BAT missiles release at Balikiapan, Borneo. U.S. Navy photosDoolittle Raid on Japan, April 1942 Sixteen USAAF B-25B Mitchell medium bombers are tied down on the flight deck of USS Hornet (CV-8), while the aircraft carrier was en route to the mission's launch point. View looks aft from Hornet's island. These aircraft were stripped of their defensive guns and given extra fuel tanks to extend their range. Each B-25 carried four 500-pound bombs on the mis sion. Navy launch officers, timed the start of each B-25's take off roll to ensure it reached the forward end of the flight deck as the ship pitched up in the heavy seas, thus giving extra lift at a critical time. A U.S. Navy Lockheed EC-121M Warning Star of the fleet air reconnaissance squadron VQ-1 "World Watchers" is accompanied by an F-4B Phanton II of the VF-151 "Vigilantes." An EC-121M of VQ-1 was shot down by North Korean MiG21s on April 14, 1969, killing all 31 crewmembers. VQ-1 had flown the route and orbit for two years, and the mission had been graded as being of "minimal risk." During the first three months of 1969 nearly 200 similar missions had been flown by both Navy and U.S. Air Force reconnaissance aircraft off North Korea's east coast without incident. The Nixon administration chose not to retaliate against North Korea for the loss, apart from staging a naval demonstration in the Sea of Japan. The U.S. military resumed the reconnaissance flights within a week. This Week in Navy History From the HomefrontBase mass shootings violate sense of securitySee HOMEFRONT, Page 3

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way, even harder to believe its reached the military. For all the ways in which the mili tary has been slow to change, for all the ways it has been for better or worse impervious to societal change, I guess I had hoped that an institu tion where they still measure mus tache hairs and have been consider ing women for combat for years now would be the one institution that would remain untouched, unchanged for gotten by this disturbing new reality of American life. HOMEFRONTFrom Page 2 VP-26 change of command April 24By Lt. j.g. Joseph Bayo VP-26 Public Affairs OfficerThe Tridents of Patrol Squadron (VP) 26 will pause from operations and training at 10 a.m. on April 24 to for mally transfer command of the squad ron from Cmdr. Mark Sohaney to Cmdr. Gregory Smith at Hangar 117 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Sohaney, who hails from Emmaus, Pa., joined the Tridents as executive officer in May 2012, while VP-26 was deployed to Bahrain. He assumed command of the squad ron in April 2013. Since then, he led the squadron through the completion of the 2013 inter-deployment readiness cycle (IDRC), followed by an extremely suc cessful U.S. 7th Fleet deployment. Under Sohaneys leadership, VP-26 surpassed 51 years and 342,908 hours of Class A mishap-free flying. The squad ron also earned the Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic 2013 Maritime Patrol Battle Efficiency Award for the sec ond year in a row as well as the 2013 Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy. Cmdr. Smith, who hails from Parkville, Md., graduated with dis tinction from the U.S. Naval Academy (1997), and was designated a naval flight officer (NFO) in April 1999. Upon the completion of flight train ing, he reported to the Fighting Marlins of VP-40. His other tours included shore duty at VP-30, a disasso ciated sea tour aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) and a department head tour with VP-26 at NAS Brunswick, Maine. Prior to reporting aboard VP-26 as executive officer in April of 2013, he was assigned to the Office of the Secretary of Defense at the Pentagon where he served as Pakistan and Afghanistan Counter-narcotics Policy Officer. Smith will be the 69th command ing officer of VP-26 and will lead the squadron through an extensive IDRC in preparation for deployment in 2015 as the final active duty P-3C Orion deploy ment from NAS Jacksonville. Upon returning from deployment VP-26 will transition to flying the P-8A Poseidon. By Yan KennonNH Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles American Red Cross is looking for volunteers to help support the nations heroes and their families. The Red Cross has a long and success ful history of assist ing wherever and whenever it can, said Mary Miciano, NH Jacksonville Red Cross volunteer program chairperson and volun teer. We are constant ly seeking dedicated and compassionate vol unteers to join our staff of good-will ambas sadors here at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, and encourage those who may be interested to join our efforts. The Red Crosss sup port of NH Jacksonville military members and their families at its hospital and five branch health clin ics, enhances morale and contrib utes to increased operational capa bilities by linking military families during emergencies, connecting families with local resources (infor mation and referral services), provid ing resiliency training (deployment services) and supporting wounded warriors at military hospitals. The hospital is currently seeking volunteers for general office assis tant duties such as filing and phone answering in various clinics throughout the hospital. Volunteers for general patient greeting, shut tle driving and the hospitals liaison desk are also needed. Becoming a Red Cross volunteer is easy, but requires a desire to help and assist those in need, American citizenship, military base access, completion of an online application and successful security background check. Due to extensive require ments, which could take several months to complete, it is recom mended that interested volunteers be commit ted to long-term volun teer service to prevent placement gaps that could affect the Red Crosss mission. Once accepted, vol unteers attend an ori entation, complete required safety and patient confidential ity training and must maintain annual vac cinations and screen ingssuch as influenza and tuberculosis. Each year, volunteers contribute between 100 and 1,000 hours of vol unteer service at the hospital alone. Whether a person is in a career tran sition, a full-time worker, retired or has a few extra hours in the day, vol unteers can make a difference in the lives of our heroespast and pres entand their families. The American Red Crosss unwav ering commitment to members of the U.S. military, its veterans and their families continues to grow and develop more than a century after Clara Barton first recruited nurses to support the U.S. Army in 1881.For more information call 904-5427525 or visit the Northeast Florida Red Cross Chapter at www.nefloridared cross.org and click volunteer to get started. Cmdr. Mark Sohaney Cmdr. Gregory Smith Help wanted: Red Cross seeks volunteers at Naval Hospital JacksonvillePhoto by Jacob SippelAmerican Red Cross vol unteer Constance Seelye delivers cookies and snacks April 3 to patients at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsArtisans at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) are hard at work stripping and painting F/A-18E/F Super Hornets while collecting data to attain declaration of capa bility to establish a Super Hornet paint program. The program will establish a set interval schedule after 20 aircraft have gone through the process. FRCSE artisans have stripped, primed and painted six Super Hornets here since the project began with the first prototype in August 2011. Another Super Hornet will undergo the process later this month. This is a fairly new tasking for FRCSE restoring coat ings on all exterior surfaces of the Super Hornets, said John Bandor, FRCSE Cecil F/A-18 site manager, who is oversee ing the project. We stripped and painted our first two pro totypes in fiscal year (FY) 2012 and two more in FY-13. We anticipate a significant increase of workload in the near future. As part of the stripping, priming and painting process, artisans are collecting data on each aircraft to help deter mine a required paint cycle. Fleet Support Team (FST) engi neers at Fleet Readiness Center Southwest (FRCSW) at Naval Air Station (NAS) North Island analyze the data and make paint procedure recommenda tions to the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) F/A-18 and EA-18G Program Manager Air (PMA) 265 maintenance planning coordinator. When we get an aircraft in, the first thing we do is preserve it before towing it over to the strip ramp, explained FRCSE Materials Engineer Brad Youngers. Then it is washed before we inspect it to docu ment material condition of the aircraft. We look for corrosion, composite and coating dam age, measure coating thick ness, and record and submit all our data. During the week of March 10-14, NAVAIR F/A-18 and EA-18G PMA-265 hosted an Integrated Logistics Support Management Team working meeting at NAS Jacksonville. The team, comprised of mili tary, federal and industry logisticians, also chose to get a glimpse of the ongoing strip ping/painting project at the FRCSE paint hangar. Paint Hangar Supervisor Rick Heffner led the tour for PMA-265 staff, FRCSW FST engineers, and Commander, Strike Fighter Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet staff explain ing the processes he manages when an aircraft arrives at his shop. Were on a fact finding mission to determine what the cycle would be for striping and painting the Super Hornets, said PMA-265 Maintenance Program Coordinator Bill Lotzmann. He continued, Our engi neers have projected a 12-year cycle which works well with the aircrafts second planned maintenance interval (PMI) event. For every PMI on its second cycle, we would bring the aircraft in for strip and paint. We are currently collecting data on the aircraft on the East and West Coasts to see if this is feasible. This reliabilitycentered maintenance data is then analyzed by the fleet sup port team at NAS North Island to determine the best paint cycle. We are receiving candi dates that are 11 years or older, Bandor explained. The Super Hornets are flown into NAS Jacksonville and remain 99 percent assembled through out the process. Our processes vary based on the type of air craft structural surfaces that are being restored whether it be aluminum, graphite com posites, stainless steel or tita nium material. According to Bandor, respon sible shops from induction to the point of delivery are striv ing to complete their project orders as efficiently as possible. We started with a 45-calen dar-day schedule with a goal to improve down to 30 calendar days as an effort to minimize impact of fleet readiness, he explained. We reached that goal when we flew our fifth air craft produced on its 30th day during the first week of March. We could have delivered it on that day if weather was per mitting on the receiving end. We are going to keep trying to accomplish this goal for each and every aircraft, or at least get close to it. He also stressed that this effort has been successful through teamwork. Our hard working artisans are producing quality workmanship both on and behind the scenes, stated Bandor. This program incorporates all the integrated logistic ele ments while leveraging on existing facilities and equip ment. It would not be success ful without the talents and skills of hard working indi viduals. Kudos to a fine team of professionals who help pro duce and deliver this product back to the warfighting customer. FRCSE Paint Shop Supervisor Rick Heffner echoed that senti ment. We have an awesome, dedicated bunch of people on all three shifts, who take great pride in what they do. Super Hornet gets new look at Fleet Readiness Center SoutheastOn March 20, a freshly painted F/A-18E/F Super Hornet sits in the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) paint booth after being stripped, primed and painted by FRCSE artisans. This is the sixth Super Hornet to undergo the process at FRCSE. Aircraft painters in the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Paint Hangar prime an F/A-18E/F Super Hornet on March 14 before giving it a fresh coat of paint. An aircraft painter at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast sprays a coat of primer on the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet to protect the aircraft from corrosion and help paint adhere to the aircraft panel surfaces. Kenny Goodwin, an aircraft painter at the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast paint hangar, sprays a coat of primer on an F/A18E/F Super Hornet. Frank Icban, a painter at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, unmasks the left landing gear of the F/A18E/F Super Hornet after the painting process. Shayne Campbell, a painter with Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, preps a non-skid mat prior to applying it on the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet on March 20. Dean Taylor, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast paint er work leader, applies the Navy stencil to the left aft fuselage of the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Painter Jerry McCutcheon sands one of the wings of an F/A-18E/F Super Hornet in FRCSE Paint Hangar 868 on Feb. 24. The artisans completely strip the aircraft, check for corrosion and repaint it to its original specifications.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 5 Artisans from the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast paint hangar gather on March 27 in front of one of the FA-18E/F Super Hornets March 27 that the team recently refurbished with a new coat of paint. Photos by Kaylee LaRocque and Victor PittsMichael Teel, a painter at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), carefully sands under the wing of an F/A-18E/F Super Hornet in FRCSE Paint Hangar 868. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast aircraft painter Michael Teel ensures a surface on the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet is clean before applying conductive coating on March 17. Jennifer Nunez, a materials engineer with Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, uses a surface coding tester to detect the presence of conductive coating on an F/A-18E/F Super Hornet during the stripping process on March 12. Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Program Manager Air (PMA) 265 Senior Aerospace Materials Engineer Chris Eveland, center, discusses corrosion issues on the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet with Brad Youngers, a materials engineer with Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), front, and NAVAIR PMA265 Maintenance Program Coordinator Bill Lotzmann during a site visit to the FRCSE paint hangar. Commander, Strike Fighter Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (COMSTRKFIGHTWINGLANT) Mod Manager Todd Ingold (front) and Lt. Cmdr. Tony Barber, COMSTRKFIGHTWINGLANT readiness officer, evaluate corrosion areas on a stripped F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) F/A-18 Cecil Site Manager John Bandor (left) explains the stripping inspection process of the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet to Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Program Manager Air (PMA) 265 Senior Aerospace Materials Engineer Chris Eveland (right) and NAVAIR PMA-265 F/A-18 Integrated Maintenance Concept Lead Eric Geilenkirchen during a site visit to the military maintenance depot.

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 CMC EXITFrom Page 1from helicopters, P-3s, and S-3s only, to P-8s, the MH-60R Romeo helicopters, the MQ-8B Fire Scout Training Facility and now the MQ-4C Triton program, Shepherd stated. The P-8 and MH-60 Romeo transitions were huge for our base. The Romeos have left a foot print on the seawall and the P-8 program is doing Americas work as we speak, he continued. When the Triton Command and Control Center opens in late fall 2014, NAS Jax will be home to the newest Navy manned and unmanned technologies. Shepherd was quick to recognize the bases human resources, which he says is the installa tions most valuable asset. You can have the best technology, but without the people, its just a piece of land or machinery, he stated. The military/civilian team here is the best Ive witnessed in the Navy. Military come and go, but the continuity of NAS Jax civilians is the glue that keeps this base together. The civilians here are the most professional Ive encountered and they know their programs like the back of their hand, Shepherd continued. He stressed his appreciation for the support Jacksonville and surrounding communities have shown to our NAS Jax team. Ive been to just about every fleet concentration area and I can tell you the relationship the community of Jacksonville has built with our military is the best. We should be thankful for their willingness to assist us with open arms, he stated. During his tenure, Shepherd worked hard to break down barriers and forge a unity between different sectors of the base and surrounding com munities. People aboard NAS Jax will continue to partner with our civilian community and as a result of this wonderful partnership, they will con tinue to make this base the best in the Navy. NAS Jax will continue to be the mainstay of Navy profes sionalism and readiness at all times, he added. NAS Jax will always be near and dear to me. The people here have received my family with open arms. I just hope I fulfilled everybodys needs and requirements. I will miss everyone. From the E2 standing watch to the senior civilians, they have been my extended family and I salute each one of them, said Shepherd. Shepherd is followed by CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre, who assumed the duties of NAS Jacksonville Command Master Chief earlier this month. By Clark PierceEditorA detachment from the VAW125 Greyhawks deployed to NAS Jacksonville April 7-17, to conduct Field Carrier Landing Practice (FCLP) operations at Outlying Landing Field (OLF) Whitehouse. Based at Chambers Field aboard Naval Station Norfolk, Va., VAW-125 is the Navys fleet replacement squadron for carrier airborne early warn ing squadrons flying the E-2 Hawkeye, and fleet logistics support squadrons flying the C-2 Greyhound aircraft. VAW-120 Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. Mike Ferrara was the detachments officer in charge. He explained, Before they are assigned to an operational fleet squadron, VAW-120 trains pilots, naval flight officers and air crewmen to fly and operate the carrier-based airborne early warning and battle manage ment systems. He added, This pilot detachment for FCLP at OLF Whitehouse prepares them for carrier qualifications which is one of their final flying events before being assigned to an operational fleet squadron. During our time at NAS Jax, well complete about 2,000 FCLP passes at OLF Whitehouse with each student pilot aver aging about 250 bounces dur ing the 10-day detachment. A major part of the training is ball flying that involves the Improved Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System (IFLOLS) at OLF Whitehouse. IFLOLS is a system consist ing of 12 vertical light cells and 10 horizontal datum lights that a pilot can see from about 1.5 nautical miles out, giving them time to make the neces sary final adjustments that will ensure their tail hook con nects with the arresting gear on board the aircraft carriers flight deck. For the squadrons landing signal officers (LSOs), every day (and some nights) was filled by grading each touch-and-go landing at Whitehouse. After flight ops, each student pilot was debriefed by their LSO. At OLF Whitehouse, our LSOs are focused on accurate FCLP landings without mis haps. The goal is to make sure each student pilot is safe for the ship, said Ferrara. According to its NAVAIR fact sheet, the E-2C Hawkeye pro vides all-weather airborne early warning, airborne battle man agement and command and control functions for the car rier strike group and joint force commander. Additional missions include surface surveillance coordina tion, air interdiction, offensive and defensive counter air con trol, close air support coordina tion, time critical strike coordi nation, search and rescue air borne coordination and com munications relay. The C-2A Greyhound pro vides critical logistics support to Carrier Strike Groups. Its pri mary mission is the transport of high-priority cargo, mail and passengers between carriers and shore bases. Priority cargo such as jet engines can be transported from shore to ship in a matter of hours. A cargo cage system or trans port stand provides restraint for loads during launches and landings on the carrier. Photo by Lt. Kevin WendtStudent pilots assigned to VAW-120 conduct field carrier landing practice (FCLP) in an E-2C Hawkeye at Outlying Landing Field Whitehouse in 2013. FCLP is an important step in preparing stu dents to safely conduct actual carrier operations.Photo by Clark Pierce A C-2A Greyhound taxis by three E-2C Hawkeyes on the flight line of NAS Jacksonville in 2013. All are assigned to fleet replacement squadron VAW-120, based at Chambers Field on Naval Station Norfolk, Va.Greyhawks conduct FCLP operations at OLF Whitehouse NAS Jax participates in Victims Rights Week By MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander participated in the Jacksonville Mayors Victim Assistance Advisory Council (VAAC) press conference for National Victims Rights Week held at City Hall April 7. Ann Dugger, executive director of the Justice Coalition welcomed the guests, then introduced Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown. Brown sincerely acknowledged the attendees for their commitment to Victims Rights Week. The city of Jacksonville joins with communities across the country to observe National Crime Victims Rights Week, April 6-12. This time is to allow us to reaffirm our citys com mitment to help crime victims recover and rebuild their lives so they can live the American dream, and never be afraid to speak up and speak out for their loved ones, said Brown. Its also a special opportunity to promote public awareness for vic tims rights and highlight the assis tance available to victims of crimes. I dont want any one to be a victim of a crime in our community. I know the pain that it brings. I know the suffer ing, I see it. If someone is a victim, I want to make sure they have access to the support needed to deal with the impact of that crime whether its physical, emotional or financial, he continued. We know many crimes go unre ported, especially domestic violence and sexual assault. Many victims still dont get help even when they des perately need it. So we need to con tinue to fight against crime, against fear, shame and powerlessness often associated with being a crime victim, he added. We as a community must fight for those who feel hopeless and powerless in our community. During the press conference, Undersander praised Brown and the City of Jacksonville for the continued partnership and the observance of this very important week. Our steadfast support for all vic tims is imperative, and is an initiative the City of Jacksonville and NAS Jax will work together on, he said. The Navy is committed to caring and protecting the rights of victims by promoting trust in the chain of com mand and the military justice system. The Navys Victims Legal Counsel Program implemented last year sup ports and cares for victims by provid ing them with legal advice and assis tance throughout the military justice process, Undersander added. The following day, Undersander joined Brown and other officials for the annual City of Jacksonvilles Mayors VAAC Victims Rights Week awards celebration at the Jacksonville main library. This years theme was 30 Years: Restoring the Balance. Hundreds of crime survivors, law enforcement officials, business advocates, sponsors and the VAAC attended luncheon to celebrate the 30th anniversary of services and pro grams that help crime victims in Jacksonville. They listened attentive ly to Brown as he said, Showing our support for crime victims is what this week is all about. We are here to honor individuals in our community. I know we celebrate every year and acknowl edge the victims for their advocacy and support. We know the crime vic tims are our community heroes for standing up for public safety, justice and unity. NAS Jacksonville Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Civilian Victim Advocate LaTresa Henderson from Fleet and Family Support Center said, Participating in victims rights week events honors victims and reminds the community that victims do have a voice -their voice lies in victim advocates and those agencies that support them. Justice Coalition Volunteer Frances Futrill, the mother of a murdered child spoke out about her loss. My daughter was murdered in 2002 and the case is still unsolved. I volun teer for victims rights and I am here for the victims to make sure we all have rights and we are recognized. The only way to overcome this situa tion is to stay busy and keep hope that justice will be served. In my heart it will happen and I think that is the hope for every parent that lose their children to cold cases, she said. Another mother, and founder of the John Rowan Jr. Foundation, Margaret Peg Rowan said, My son John has been missing since 2001. Everything the victims advocate does is to get our stories out there and to show our faces. We are hoping someone will tell us where our son is. We know Jacksonville is exactly where he is. Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander addresses the audience during the Mayors Victim Assistance Advisory Council press conference at Jacksonville City Hall on April 7. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown receives a standing ovation during his speech at the annual City of Jacksonville Victims Rights Week awards luncheon at the Jacksonville main library on April 8. Standing behind Brown from left; Mayors Victim Assistance Advisory Council Chair Richard Komando; NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander; CSX Vice President for Transportation Carl Gerhardstein; Councilman Reginald Brown and Victims Rights Attorney Jay Howell. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander convers es with (from left) Personal Life Coach Linley Newbold, Domestic Abuse Victim Advocate Erica Schneider from Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), and Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Civilian Victim Advocate LaTresa Henderson from FFSC about the importance of the National Victims Rights Week after a press conference. FIGHTA CFC participant provided as a public service. Deadly Childhood Disea ses.stjude.org

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Fleet Challenge 2014, also known as the ASW rodeo, saw seven air crews from the three maritime patrol and reconnaissance wings, the fleet replacement squadron, and the allied aircrew attached to VP-30, compete against each other in the seven-day event. This years competition marked the first time the P-8A Poseidon flew along with the P-3C Orion. Any time we have our foreign part ners able to compete with us, we learn something. They do things maybe a little bit differently, said Cmdr. Mike Granger, the officer in charge of the Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapons School. From maybe just the way that they coordinate a crew, to the way they mis sion plan or their actual procedures for tracking the submarine that is the big gest thing we learn by having them with us, and we throw in the camaraderie and the ability to talk across the water, if you will, with our partners. It builds those bonds that we can go and con tinue to learn from. Our allied crews often bring years of continuous ASW experience to the training equation, in the classroom and in the air, said Capt. Curt Phillips, the commanding officer of VP-30. This is precisely why we have them embedded in our fleet replacement squadron, training our newest opera tors in the art of ASW which is a per ishable skill without continuous honing in both simulators and on actual live targets. Fleet Challenge 2014 tested aircrews on mission planning, optimized tactics and crew training, as well as implemen tation of past lessons learned in deter mining the most effective maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircrew. Weve had the individual wings com pete, so they hold their own local ASW rodeo against all their home squad rons and they take their best crew and they send them to NAS Jacksonville, said Granger. The wings in Hawaii, Whidbey Island and Jacksonville picked their best crew and they brought them here. The competition tested crews in a simulator scenario and actual flight operations against USS Springfield (SSN 761), which acted as an opposing force. What we try to incorporate are things that weve seen, things that have challenged our actual crews deployed around the world and we incorporate those into the scenarios, said Granger. We have the simulator scenarios built around recent world events. We task the submarine to challenge them in ways that weve seen actual submarines on deployment behave. Were able to put those together for these crews to experi ence, bring back to their home squad rons, their wings and spread that train ing out. Obviously, finding out we had won was just fantastic, but credit should be given to all the crews in all of the squad rons, said Utting. I hope we get to take part in the challenge next year. The Fleet Challenge exercise has been held every year since 2007, with the exception of 2013, when it was cancelled due to budgetary restraints. ASW RODEOFrom Page 1 Photo by Mark Faram, Navy Times2014 Fleet Challenge Royal Air Force winners (from left, standing) Sgt. Steve Dixon, MACR Keith Treece, MACR Mark Utting, Squadron Leader Mark Faulds, Sgt. Jon Brereton, Squadron Leader Andy Bull, (from left, kneeling) Flight Lt. Rob Butler, and Flight Lt. Ian Tuff. From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsPlanning ahead can be one of the biggest stress relievers when it comes to a permanent change of station (PCS) move, Fleet and Family Service Center (FFSC) offi cials said April 9. Preparation, communication and family involvement are keys to a less stressful PCS move, said Diane Brown, Work and Family Life specialist, Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). Sailors can use the Plan my Move tool on the Military OneSource website at www.mili taryonesource.mil to organize their move. It provides a threemonth calendar of steps a Sailor needs to take to ensure a smooth move. Brown says sponsors can also help reduce a Sailors stress by finding answers ahead of time to any questions they have about their new location. Sailors who have not been assigned a spon sor should contact their gaining unit, or they can request one on the Military OneSource website with the Electronic Sponsorship Application and Training tool. Sailors should also visit their local FFSC and meet with a Relocation Assistance Program specialist, then attend a Smooth Move class or Moving Overseas workshop to learn the basics about a PCS move and how to start the process. It doesnt matter whether its their first or fifth move, Brown said. Things change and one should be aware of those changes. Other helpful websites include: (HEAT) https://www.dko.mil/ heat/apply locator www.cnic.navy.mil/ HousingQuickReference www.move.mil Reduce stress when you PCS Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesFOD walkdown along seawallThe Proud Warriors of HSM-72 and the Royal Australian Navy's 725 Squadron teamed up to walk the NAS Jacksonville seawall in search of foreign object damage (FOD) during the base wide FOD walkdown on April 9. Both squadrons fly the MH-60R helicopter. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 7

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From StaffStudents in Jacksonville Universitys Sustainability Program have been hearing a lot of success stories these days concerning Naval Air Station Jacksonville. John Young, the stations storm water manager and a guest lecturer at JU, has been spreading the word. Young, who serves on the advisory board for the JU Sustainability Degree Program, is encouraged by the environmental interest shown by the universitys professors and stu dents. For many of the students, said Young, green technology is still theory. Its a revela tion for them to learn that the Navy is turning those theories into real facilities. And why? Because its good business and good for the Navys mission. One sustainability program to which Young exposes students is the Navys use of solar power to generate electricity and hot water. Other examples include energy conservation, smart management of drinking water, sani tary sewage and storm water. Navy initiatives are also exploring alterna tive fuels, using aircraft simulators to reduce flight hours, and using multi-mission aircraft to streamline operations. Dr. Ashley Johnson, department head for the JU Sustainability Program, appreciates the JU-NAS Jacksonville partnership. Were grateful for Johns time and the per spective he brings to our students, she said. They love hearing that last weeks lesson is already up and running at NAS Jax! Photo courtesy of Jacksonville UniversityNAS Jacksonville Storm Water Manager John Young shares information about the station's environmental programs with a sustainability class on April 3 at Jacksonville University.Spreading the word about sustainability Photos by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyCmdr. Mark Williams, commanding officer of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 14, speaks at the annual NMCB-14 Killed in Action Memorial Ceremony aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville on April 12. Annual NMCB-14 memorial serviceIn 2004, seven Seabees of NMCB-14 were killed and 33 were injured in two attacks in Al Anbar Province, Iraq, while in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. In honor of those courageous Seabees, NMCB-14 holds an annual memorial service to keep their spirits forever alive.Cmdr. Mark Williams, commanding officer of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 14, shakes hands with CM1 (retired) Pete Reid during the annu al NMCB-14 Killed in Action Memorial Ceremony aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville. CM1 (retired) Pete Reid reads a poem he wrote for his fallen Seabees comrades during the annual NMCB-14 Killed in Action Memorial Ceremony aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville. While serv ing in Iraq in support of Iraqi Freedom in 2004, Reid was left paralyzed after two attacks in Al Anbar Province, Iraq that killed seven NMCB-14 members and injured 33 others. Cmdr. Mark Williams, commanding officer of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB)14, Ed Crenshaw, president of the NMCB-14 Alumni Association, and CM1 (retired) Pete Reid salute after laying a wreath at their NAS Jax compound. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014

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By MC1(SW) Greg JohnsonNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsTwenty-five members of the Cobb County Georgia Chamber of Commerce visited Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville and Naval Station (NS) Mayport April 9-11 to see first hand how the bases operate. The group toured each base as part of the Cobb County Chamber of Commerce Honorary Commanders Association (HCA), which partners civilian business leaders with military commanders from different branches in an effort to enhance the relation ship between the two. The chamber organized the HCA about 30 years ago in Atlanta to pro mote interaction between military personnel and local business and civic leaders, said Joe Gaskin, co-chairman of the Cobb County HCA and project manager with ARCADIS, U.S., Inc. This cooperative effort provides an insight into a variety of local benefits for armed forces personnel assigned to our area. It also gives the civilian per sonnel an opportunity to learn about military affairs and the resulting economic impact to the community. According to Gaskin, about 25 busi ness and civic leaders of Cobb County are chosen each year to participate in the HCA. Each civilian is paired with a military counterpart who they work with to identify community and busi ness opportunities in support of the armed forces. In turn, civilians are provided opportunities for in-depth tours of local and out-of-town military installations. In addition, the HCA regularly supports a variety of official military functions, including changes of command, retirement ceremonies, unit deployments and military balls. During the visit, civilians and their military counterparts toured Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic, Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 72, the Ticonderoga class guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), the Surface Warfare Officer School Command Learning Site Mayport, and Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. While the group had the opportu nity to see a variety of aircraft, equip ment and machinery, one HCA mem ber said it was the service members that really stood out. The entire trip in Jacksonville was amazing, said Tim Kelley, HCA mem ber and owner of Blue Sky Exhibits, LLC. I have experienced things I could not even imagine, but what stood out were the incredible friend liness, passion and professionalism each military person has shown us. It is evident they truly love what they do; the enthusiasm is amazing. HCA members are appointed each year in January and hold their posi tion until November. During the year, the association typically visits several military bases throughout the region. NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport served as the first out-of-state loca tions for the group so far in 2014. According to Gaskin, the opportu nity to visit military installations is an invaluable experience. By understanding the wide vari ety of missions and responsibilities that our men in uniform are expected to perform for our nation, our appre ciation for their service and sacrifice becomes far clearer, Gaskin said. Seeing their commitment and dedi cation, observing the intense training, getting a firsthand look at the tech nology, as well as the human interest element I have to stand in awe and respect for every service member and thank God for what they mean to this great nation. The Cobb County HCA was estab lished in 1983 and has produced more than 700 alumni. Troops to Teachers program offered to SailorsBy MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsNAS Jax Sailors attended a Teaching as a Second Career Seminar (TASC) at the base chapel April 10 to learn about the Troops for Teachers (TTT) Program. The program is offered quarterly at vari ous bases to allow personnel to gain information and register for the pro gram. Lt. Cmdr. Shannon Willits from Coastal Riverine Squadron 10 said, I am attending the seminar to help pre pare myself to transition from active duty to retiree in about a year and a half. I already have some educational experience, but I want to make sure that I am prepared when that transitional time comes. Al Wynn, associate regional drec tor for TTT Florida Caribbean Region, conducted the seminar and described to the service members the education needed for TTT. We are a Department of Defense transition assistance pro gram and we help all military personnel and spouses transition into a career in teaching by providing them with the certification process and helping them find employment as a teacher in every state, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, said Wynn. Wynn mentioned during the semi nar that service members and spouses could be eligible up to $10,000 in finan cial assistance aside from the G.I. Bill and $5,000 to pay for their certification to become a fully qualified teacher. We like helping our veterans and other military personnel, said Wynn. We want to inform the military of what is available to them so they can start making career choices before they get out of the military. According to Wynn the registration process should start at least a year before the service member leaves the military. VR-62 CMDCM(AW/SW) Freddy Pacheco said, I am here to get some information for my retirement in a year and a half. TTT program seems like a great transition into the civilian work force. According to Wynn, I suggest every one in the military register for the pro gram. There is no obligation, but it will give you access to the funding if you choose to utilize it. According to the TTT website, the nationwide program was established in 1994 by the Department of Defense. It is managed by the Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support, in Pensacola. The purpose of TTT is to assist eli gible military personnel to transition to a new career as public school teachers in high-need schools. For addition al information, call the TTT National Office at 1-800-231-6242. Photos by MC1 Greg JohnsonLt. Cmdr. Jerimiah Binkley shows an MK 54 torpedo to members of the Cobb County Chamber of Commerce on April 9 during a tour of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 72 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Georgia chamber officials tour Jacksonville, Mayport Photo by MC2 Amanda CabasosAl Wynn, associate regional director for Troops to Teachers (TTT) Florida Caribbean Region, explains the pro cess and benefits of the TTT program to (from right) VR-62 CMDCM(AW/ SW) Freddy Pacheco, UTCA Johntaylor Delay from Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 Detachment Jacksonville and Lt. Cmdr. Shannon Willits from Coastal Riverine Squadron 10 during a Teaching as a Second Career seminar at NAS Jax Chapel on April 10. Here comes Peter Cottontail(From left) Dominick Hogan (4), Haileigh Hogan (1), their mother Kirstin Hogan, and Reighly Wise (3) laugh and play with the Easter Bunny during their visit to the NEX on April 11. Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha Jones JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 9

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Daniel Diaz (14) goes for a slam dunk during the MWR-hosted "Month of the Military Child Carnival" on April 12 at Allegheny Softball Field. Thirteen-year-old Cailey Porter and 6-yearold Aaliyah Diaz climb the giant rock wall during the Month of the Military Child Carnival.Photos by Shannon LeonardShaylee Grovo strives to outreach her brother, Christian, on the Space Walk Bungee Run at NAS Jax.MWR carnival for military childrenA future champion at The Masters? Seven-year-old Jeremy Fox swings his golf club for 20 points as he plays the Chip Shot game during the carnival at NAS Jax Allegheny softball field. Military dependents of all ages had fun in the Bounce House during the April 12 carnival at NAS Jax. On a beautiful spring day, Lillian Acree, (3) enjoys her flight down the inflatible min-slide. an almost-centenarianRetired Navy Capt. Bill McCamy presents 99-year-old retired Cmdr. Robert Watkins with a "Quilt of Valor" on April 7 at the Life Care Center in Orange Park. The Quilt of Valor Foundation was founded by a Gold Star mother and its mission is to cover veterans touched by war with comforting and healing Quilts of Valor. Watkins flew 11,000 during his naval military service 7,000 hours in the PBY Catalina and 4,000 hours in transport planes supporting both World War II and the Korean War.Photo by Shannon Leonard 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014

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Advanced weight and balance training held at CNATTU Jax By Harley MontelongoA new update to Automated Weight and Balance Software (AWBS) is currently under certification for issue by Navy and Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI). In preparation for this, CNATTU Jax arranged for Lockheed-Martin Aeronautics representative Harold Smoot to provide advanced training in preparation for the issuance. The training was held Feb. 11 at CNATTU Jax, with 55 weight and balance officers/technicians from Navy Region Southeast attending. Aircraft weight and balance has always been a criti cal part of aircraft flight safety. An overloaded or improperly balanced aircraft can be hazardous to life and property. The U.S. Navy/U.S. Marine Corps Aircraft Weight and Balance Program is used ensure all aircraft are operated within established Gross Weight (GW) and Center of Gravity (CG) limitations. Aircraft must be certified for each flight. This process began with the Wright Brothers and has progressed to todays highly sophisticated and complex aircraft. Judicious management of GW and CG allows USN/USMC aircraft to operate at their high est capacity, whether delivering weapons, movement of passenger/cargo, or other assigned missions. The GW/CG of an aircraft begins with its initial weighing at the factory. This weight is ever evolving as the aircraft is configured, modified, loaded, etc., throughout its service life. This weight must be moni tored by both maintenance and operations personnel to ensure that the aircraft remains within its estab lished limits during take off, in-flight, and landing. The process of certifying aircraft weight and bal ance required many man-hours by both mainte nance and aircrew when it was performed manu ally. Recognizing this, the service contracted with Lockheed-Martin to design a software package to reduce man-hours and simplify the complex process subject to human error. The outcome was the Automated Weight and Balance Software (AWBS) currently used by all mili tary services. AWBS reduced human error, increased the accuracy of the data and significantly reduced the man-hours involved in both calculating and docu menting an aircrafts GW/CG. AWBS must be periodically updated. These updates are performed to ensure all calculations are made correctly, performance enhancements are made as requested, and the increased functionalities of our newest aircraft are met. The use of AWBS is manda tory for all activities operating and/or maintaining USN/USMC aircraft. Aircraft are weighed, as required, by our organic depots and commercial contractors. FRCSE Jacksonville weighs many different TMS air craft and has a dedicated crew of weight and balance specialists on hand. CNATTU Jax is the Course Curriculum Model Manager and one of eight Maintenance Training Units authorized to teach the Aircraft Weight and Balance Course. Successful completion of this course is required for personnel to be designated as a Weight and Balance Officer/Technician. Photos by MCC Keith DeVinneyThree P-8A Poseidon aircraft from Patrol Squadron (VP) 16, are ready at Perth Airport to conduct search missions in support of the international effort to locate Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. VP-16 is deployed in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibil ity supporting security and stability in the Indo-AsiaPacific region. AWO2 Karl Shinn, assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16, searches out the window of a P-8A Poseidon while flying over the Indian Ocean during a search mission to locate Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. AWO2 Karl Shinn, assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16, unloads a Sonobuoy April 9 from the rack onboard a P-8A Poseidon, to prepare it for use during the search mission to locate Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. Sonobuoys are used to detect frequencies and signals in the water. Photos by Angela GlassLearning about reefsChristine Bauer, NAS Jax natural resources manag er, teaches third-grade classes from Gregory Drive Elementary and Chimney Lakes Elementary schools about coral reef structure. Christine Bauer shows the visiting third-grade student a shell collection from the local area. The third-graders from Gregory Drive Elementary and Chimney Lakes Elementary schools display the coral reef they constructed from candy and cake. Photos by Jacob SippelBono visits NH Jax(Above) Lt. Vincent Jones, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville pharmacy division officer (right), explains pharmacy procedures and operations to Rear Adm. Raquel Bono, chief, Navy Medical Corps, during a recent visit to the hospital. Bono commanded NH Jacksonville from 2005 to 2008. (At right) Rear Adm. Raquel Bono, chief, Navy Medical Corps, addresses NH Jacksonville medical corps officers during a recent tour. Bono visited various clin ics, including labor and delivery, physical therapy and the newly renovated endoscopy suite. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 11

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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 By Lisa FerdinandoArmy News ServiceArmy Spc. Natasha Schuette wants victims of sexual abuse in the military to know they are not alone and that help is avail able. She speaks from personal experience, sharing the ordeal she went through after being sexually assaulted by her drill sergeant at Fort Jackson, S.C., in 2012. I just want to . continue to encourage victims to come forward to change this culture that we have, she said. I know I am one of the very few who has an actual convic tion on their perpetrator. The Defense Department honored Schuette with a Lifetime Achievement Women of Character, Courage and Commitment award and a Womens History Month cer tificate of appreciation during a March 31 ceremony at the Pentagon. The Army is combating the culture of tolerance of sexual abuse, but it is a slow process, she said. Its important for victims to know there are avenues for them, she said, whether they want to pursue a convic tion or not. You need to come forward or at least talk to somebody. That way you can have it off of your chest, because [other wise] its going to eat you alive, Schuette said in an interview after the ceremony. Her chain of command didnt believe her when she report ed the crime, Schuette said. Other drill sergeants retaliated against her, and she faced a discharge for having a lack of integrity, she said. In talking with others in her company, she learned that other female trainees had been assaulted by the same male drill sergeant. Those women came forward. The drill sergeant was con victed on multiple counts, and is serving a four-year jail sen tence for sexual assault. I had to write three congres sional inquiries. I really fought for this conviction, and having the other girls stand beside me was what actually got him con victed, she said. Being new to the military when the attack happened, Schuette said she was unsure who to report the crime to. The rank structure was unfa miliar; the basic training envi ronment was intimidating. However, there was no ques tion that she would report the assault and fight for what was right, she said. Schuette said she found the strength to pursue the case from the other victims who came forward and stood beside her, and also from her fam ily. Her dad provided counsel and helped her when nobody would listen to me, she said. He said, You have two choices: you can stay in and fight it, or you can get out and not really have as much as a voice, Schuette said. At the Pentagon ceremony, Schuette was recognized for demonstrating one of the finest Army values, personal courage, by coming forward to share her experience. Her actions are credited with opening the door to the problems that exist in han dling reported cases of sexu al assault, and contributed to an increased effort by the Army to improve its Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention, or SHARP, pro gram. The ceremony noted that her courageous actions have had a profound impact on report ing sexual assault and sexual harassment by both male and female soldiers. Schuette shared her story for a training video that was shown at a SHARP summit last year, hosted by Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno. Army leadership has made preventing sexual assault and effectively responding to reported cases a top priority. Schuette, who is stationed at Fort Bragg, N.C., said she is planning on leaving the mili tary. The uniform, she said, is kind of a reminder for me of everything thats happened. But, Schuette said she plans to continue to help victims of sexual assault in the military through speaking engagements with the SHARP program. She is pursuing her nursing degree and would like to work on an installation hospital and provide care to sexual assault victims. I want to encourage more people, not just females but males and females, to come forward and get these bad people in jail, she said, adding that Army values are not rep resented in those who commit sexual assault. By Manuel Marguy, directorPersonnel Support Detachment Jax While processing more than 40,000 travel claims annually, the Travel Process Center and Personnel Support Detachment (PSD) Jax are delivering comprehensive travel claim processing training during April. The goal is to provide timely and accurate pay and personnel services to the warfighter, and eliminate the bureaucratic travel claim process that can be so frustrating for both users and travel claim personnel. To shore up some of the back-andforth of rejected claims to Command Pass Coordinators (CPCs) and to reduce turnaround times, PSD Jax has retooled the Standing Operating Procedures, and repackaged them in customer speak, versus PSD speak. Like many warfare areas, the lan guage and jargon used can be foreign to new personnel or customers and PSD language is no different. Specifically, the training is broken out for each type of travel claim submitted, PCS/TDY/Advances, active and reserve, along with required documents for each type of claim. In addition, theres a list of most-common reasons for rejects for each type of claim submitted. Our goal is to ensure our users under stand the process, language and termi nology, as well as how to troubleshoot and track claims more efficiently. PSD is also working on developing separate check-off sheets, versus just one sheet for all claims. For each type of claim submitted for liquidation, to more collaboratively undergird the vital link CPCs and Travel Claim personnel play in support of the warfighter. Moreover, we are committed to provide stand-down training twice a year, or more often if requested, to ensure we are all tracking from the same page and ultimately lead to the Travel Processing Center receiving actionable claims on the front end, ver sus the back-and-forth processing that increases turnaround times. The first training session was held April 8 and 10 and by all accounts, the CPCs and our staff were well motivated by the training. Additional training is scheduled for April 17 and 24 via video tele-confer ence. If your command would like to attend one of these sessions, contact Deputy Disbursing Officer David Tackett, 5422363, or email David.Tackett@navy.mil to reserve your place as seating is lim ited to 26 personnel. Attendees will receive a packet with glossary of terms, a toolkit book let listing required documents for each type of claim submitted, and an estab lished list of POCs for which to track and troubleshoot claims submitted to PSD for processing. With the busy season on the horizon, we are hopeful this investment will pay dividends all the way around. A new shady place for electric vehicles to get a charge By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public AffairsNaval Submarine Base (NSB) Kings Bay Public Works Department (PWD) completed construction on a 30-kilowatt (kW) solar carport and celebrated the event with a ribbon cutting ceremony April 3. The NSB Kings Bay array provides accommodations for eight electric vehicle charging stations and cover for four more vehicles. The carport is comprised of eight single axis photo-voltaic arrays. The 150-footlong panel structure of single axis arrays tilts auto matically to track the suns movement in one direction improving energy generation. The array includes several safety features to protect against high wind or lightning strikes. This investment provides the Navy a low cost energy solution for todays economic climate with monetary savings throughout the lifespan of the sys tem, said NSB Kings Bay PWD Construction Manager Ensign Ryan Harbaugh. Construction began on the $448,000 carport Dec. 17, 2013 and is the result of a larger project that was set to deliver three charging stations to the Navys Southeast region. The carport will enable NSB Kings Bay to recharge its current fleet of 63 electric vehicles with renew able electricity through either 110 or 220 volt outlets in approximately eight hours while reducing demand on the commercial power grid. The panels will gen erate excess electricity which is returned back to the electrical grid to help offset the energy consumed on the installation. The carport is expected to save about 50,000 kWh per year, or about $25,000 in annual utility costs. A similar system was contructed and recently came online at Naval Air Station Whiting Field in Floridas panhandle that provides a total of ten electric vehicle charging stations and covered parking for 12 total vehicles. Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City received a smaller array capable of charging three vehicles and providing parking for three more. These projects will help the Navy comply with the mandates of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the Energy Independence Security Act of 2007 and Presedential Executive Order 13423, which requires a 30-percent reduction in energy intensity by fiscal year 2015, said Brad Clark, Navy Region Southeast Energy Program Manager. They also support the Secretary of the Navys energy goals to further reduce the Navys reli ance on fossil fuels. Sexual assault prevention advocate speaks outU.lS. Army photoArmy Spc. Natasha Schuette, a sexual assault prevention specialist, speaks about her experiences as a victim of sexual assault and encourages all victims male and female to talk to someone about their assault. She spoke at a Women's History Month event March 31 at the Pentagon. Personnel Support Detachment Jax travel claim stand-down training heldPhoto courtesy of PSD JaxCivilians and Sailors fill the for PSD Jax training room on April 8 for Travel Claim stand-down training. Photo by EM1 Mark TreenPWD Kings Bay Construction Manager Ensign Ryan Harbaugh, Engineering Technician Tom Laxton, Installation Energy Manager Leigh Adams, Equipment Specialist Mike Bessette and Contractor Chris Currier.

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live enter tainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: April 19, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: April 26, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open May 10 June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Kanapaha Botanical Gardens Trip May 3, $25 Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while sup plies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee April 19 at 9 a.m. Jacksonville Suns Game April 22 at 6 p.m. Barracks Bash April 24, 4 8 p.m. Free food, entertainment and prizesNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty April 22 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests April 24 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. Command Party Swing into savings & book your com mand golf tournamentMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Summer Camp Registration going on now! Sign-in at the youth center Operation: Megaphone Worldwide Lock-in April 25 at 8 p.m. Open to all CYP teens 13 18Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available includ ing instrument, complex and commer cial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.netSand Volleyball League forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Commands designated representative Cup points along with rules and required paperwork. Play begins in April. Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins in April. Intramural Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins in April. Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins in April. Kickball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Game play at lunch time. Contact the NAS Jacksonville Sports Department at 542-2930 for rules and the required paperwork. Open Singles Tennis Tournament April 28 Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25. Intramural Golf Summer League Meeting May 7 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at 11:30 a.m. at the golf course. Commands whose athletic representative attend points, along with rules and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Meeting May 14 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at noon designated representative Cup points, along with rules and required paperwork. Wallyball League Meeting May 21 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Commands whose athletic representative attend points, along with rules and required paperwork. Badminton Singles League Meeting May 28 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Commands whose athletic representative attend points, along with rules and required paperwork. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill. bonser@navy.mil StandingsAs of April 11Winter Golf Final Standings Teams Wins Losses NCTS 7 1 VP-45 7 1 VP-30 6 2 FRCSE 6 2 CV-TSC/PSD 5 3 CNATTU Blue 5 3 Navy Band 5 3 SERCC 2 6 FRCSE II 1 3 HS-11 1 4 VP-10 1 6 CNATTU Gold 1 7 Soccer Teams Wins Losses FRCSE 2 0 HITRON 2 0 HSM-72 2 0 BHC Jax 1 0 TPU/PCF 1 0 NAVFAC 1 1 HS-11 1 1 VP-26 1 1 VP-30 Students 1 1 NAVHOSP 0 0 VP-10 0 1 VP-62 0 1 Air Ops 0 2 FRCSE F-18 PMI 0 2 VP-45 0 2 VR-62 0 2 Intramural Spring Softball Teams Wins Losses FRCSE Rabid Possums 2 0 VP-30 2 0 CRS-10 1 0 NAVHOSP 1 0 AIR OPS 1 1 HS-11 1 1 CBMU202 0 0 CNRSE/Navy Band 0 0 FRCSE 900 0 0 See SPORTS, Page 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 13

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By Nick Simeone American Forces Press ServiceThe Navy and Marine Corps need to think about how to be more innovative, includ ing leveraging experiences learned from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, in the face of budget challenges that could become more acute, act ing Deputy Defense Secretary Christine H. Fox said April 7. Whether sequestration returns or not, the reality is were counting more than ever on your leadership and inno vation to solve problems and meet new and often unfamil iar challenges to our nations security, Fox told students at the U.S Naval War College in Newport, R.I., in one of a series of addresses she has delivered in recent days at war colleges around the nation. In each, Foxs theme has reflected warnings senior defense officials have been making since last years budget sequester and the likelihood of further spending cuts to come: that the Pentagon is going to have to re-examine priorities, reduce overhead and shrink the force while finding ways to continue vigilance in what offi cials describe as an increasing ly unpredictable global envi ronment. Our Marines have excelled at everything weve asked of them in the [counterinsurgen cy] fight, . and they continue to do so in Afghanistan today, Fox said. So even as we make this transition, we need to cap ture as much of these hardwon experiences as possible, because well undoubtedly need it again in the future. Fox also challenged the stu dents to rediscover their ser vices core capabilities, even as you build from the lessons of the immediate past to take on new missions. There are now many young, battle-hardened Marines who have spent little time inside of a ship, much less practicing to conduct an assault from sea, she said. As you regain your sea legs, I also hope you will work to innovatively update your amphibious concepts of opera tions. Regarding the Navy, Fox said, we need to confront the real ity that theres more demand for ships than budgets allow, and I dont see this changing any time soon, emphasizing that no one is expecting the end of the Iraq war and the winding down of the conflict in Afghanistan to yield a peace dividend. Our naval forces need to think creatively about how to provide presence, getting more out of the ships we currently have, she said. Fox challenged the audi ence to determine whether to change deployment concepts and keep ships deployed lon ger. There must be some inno vating approaches out there that people like you, our future leaders, can find and adapt, she added. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is in the Asia-Pacific region, and just announced the addition of two ballistic mis sile defense ships to Japan, Fox noted. What other opportuni ties like that are out there that would help us meet the needs of our strategy? she asked the students. Ultimately, Fox said, its not about numbers but capabili ties. We need to make the finan cial and intellectual invest ments in technology and mod ernization programs now, she said, before we no longer have the massive technological advantages weve enjoyed over the past 60 years. By Lt. j.g. Shelby GreenFLCJ Corporate CommunicationsNAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville (FLCJ) recently launched its lunch and learn program as part of a three-phase command development program aimed at enhancing employ ees personal and professional skills, while fostering a positive work envi ronment that encourages growth and learning. The last Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute survey indicated that FLCJ employees wanted a concrete way to improve themselves and move forward in their career, which inspired the implementation of this program. Brown Bag Lunches are a common practice in the corporate world they create a space that senior level manage ment can interact with their employees in a less formal setting, or can bring in an outside speaker to educate the employees on a topic in a way that fos ters a discussion. Since the kick-off at the start of 2014, two successful luncheons have been held with a total participation of 11 remote sites and 60-plus employees across the Enterprise. To date, the lunch and learn events have hosted Wanda Archer from the bases Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). Her series, Getting your Career Underway, has focused on starting a new career or keeping your current career on course and moving it forward. These resources included first, explor ing what you want to do, and secondly, how to market yourself and obtain the skills necessary for that job. By using the resources provided, one is able to maximize their potential in current or future careers and love what they do. Jose Santa, the catalyst and coordina tor of this program, says, It is so cru cial that we continue to develop our selves whether we have been in a job one month or 30 years. We wanted to nurture an environment that promotes growth professionally and personally through these relaxed and interactive lunch sessions. The lunch and learn program will continue monthly and branch into other categories, such as resume writ ing, car maintenance, wreath making, home buying, and interviewing. The subject matter experts (SME) in these different areas are solicited from the workforce or external sources to present for 30-45 minutes while the employees eat lunch. Due to its region ally expansive workforce, NAVSUP FLCJ has created a system to include all sites by performing these luncheons via video teleconference (VTC), so every one can participate and see the pre senter. Additionally, each session is record ed and accessible for all employees to review at a later date. We want to empower our employees and set them up for success, whether that be in their current job or a future one. This program is a way to do just that through developing and exploring unique skills, remarked Capt. Duke Heinz, commanding officer of NAVSUP FLCJ. Brown bag lunches are just the first phase of a multi-phase program aimed at mentoring and developing employ ees for succession. The next phases include mentoring, job rotations, and job shadowing to expose employees to other aspects within the organiza tion. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, is one of eight fleet logistics centers under NAVSUP Global Logistics Support (GLS). They provide operational logis tics, business and support services to the fleet, shore, and industrial com mands of the Navy, Coast Guard, Military Sealift command, and other Joint Allied Forces. Services include contracting, region al transportation, fuel, material man agement, household goods movement support, postal and consolidated mail, warehousing, global logistics and hus banding, hazardous material manage ment and integrated logistics support. From FFSC The NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their fami lies. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handi capped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2014: May 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 18-19 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Aug. 20 (8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.), Nov. 17-20 (5:30-10 p.m.). (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) May 5-9, May 19-23, June 9-13, June 23-27, July 7-11, July 21-25, Aug. 11-15, Aug. 25-29, Sept. 15-19, Oct. 20-24, Nov. 3-7, Dec. 1-5. (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) May 12-16, June 16-20, July 14-18, Aug. 18-22, Sept. 22-26, Oct. 27-31, Nov. 17-21, Dec. 8-12. (8:30 a.m.-noon) May 2, June 30, June 30, July 29, Aug. 4, Sept. 2, Oct. 8, Nov. 14, Dec. 22. (8-9:30 a.m.) May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (9:40 a.m.-noon) May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) April 29-30, Aug. 5-6, Nov. 24-25. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) July 31. (1-4 p.m.) July 29, Oct.8. (1-3:30 p.m.) July 30, Oct. 7. (9-10:30 a.m.) July 30, Oct. 17. (1:30-3:30 p.m.) May 1, July 2, Aug. 7, Oct. 2, Nov. 6. (1:30-4 p.m.) May 8, July 10, Sept. 11, Nov. 13. July 29 (10-11:30 a.m.), Oct. 4 (1-2:30 p.m.) (9-11 a.m.) May 12, June 9, July 14, Aug. 11, Sept. 8, Oct. 6, Nov. 3, Dec. 8. (9-10:30 a.m.) May 13, June 10, July 8, Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 9. (8 a.m.-noon) May 20, 27, Sept. 23, 30. (8 a.m.-noon) April 28, May 19, June 30, July 28, Aug. 25, Sept. 29, Oct. 27, Nov. 24, Dec. 15. May 1 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), May 27 July 8 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no work shop June 3), July 29 Sept. 9 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop Aug. 19), Sept. 25 Oct. 30 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.). (11 a.m.1 p.m.) May 6, July 15, Sept. 9, Nov. 18. (1-3 p.m.) May 6, 13, 20, 27; July 1, 8, 15, 22; Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30; Nov. 4, 12, 18, 25. (1-4 p.m.) April 22; June 3, 10, 17, 24; Aug. 5, 12, 19, 26; Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28. (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) June 3, Sept. 16, Dec. 2. (10 a.m.-noon) April 29; May 13, 27; June 10, 24; July 15, 29; Aug. 12, 26; Sept. 9, 23; Oct. 7, 21; Nov. 4, 18; Dec. 2, 16. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) May. 15, July 17, Sept. 4, Nov. 5. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) June 12, Aug. 14, Oct. 9, Dec. 4.To register for any of the above work shops, please call 542-5745. Deputy Defense Secretary challenges Marines, Navy to innovateChristine H. FoxFleet Logistics Center Jacksonville implements lunch and learn programPhoto by Victor MangomeNAVSUP FLCJ employees evaluate their current skills and interests before using them to create goals for the future, during the command's first Lunch and Learn event. (From left) Ruth King, Nancy Enos, Jenelle Rankin and Sarah Jacobs.FFSC offers life skills workshops 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014

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By MCC(SW/AW) Christopher TuckerAll Hands MagazineLets face it. The most any of us can hope to accomplish in the Navy is to master our craft, leave a command bet ter than we found it, and to train our reliefs. However, in order to have reliefs to train someone has to initially find qualified young men and women and convince them to join the Navy. That job falls squarely on Navy Recruiting Command, which oper ates 1,450 recruiting stations around the country and also in Japan, Europe and Guam. With 5,000 Navy recruit ers working across Americas cities and small towns, NAVCRUITCOM is tasked with bringing in more than 33,000 peo ple into the Navy for fiscal year 2014 alone. With most recruiters being fleet Sailors on a three-year tour of duty, it is imperative they receive the absolute best training possible. New recruiters attend a five-week course at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., to learn how to find quali fied future Sailors. NORU, or Navy Recruiting Orientation Unit, trains approximately 1,500 Sailors each year to serve in the field. My number one mission is to take Sailors and reenergize them, motivate them to love what they do to love the Navy, said NCCS(SS) Tim Corelli, a senior instructor at NORU. In five short weeks, these fleet Sailors learn everything from how to analyze a recruiting market to sales techniques. In fact, they learn a specific sales phi losophy called VALOR, which stands for value oriented recruiting. Essentially, it shows Sailors how to identify prospects pressures, plans and problems and teaches them how the Navy can help solve those, ultimately leading to that prospect raising their right hand to join. We teach them to take someone who is apathetic, and by the time theyre done with them they are ready to join the Navy, said Corelli. However, its more than just sales. The staff at NORU also emphasize standards, both Navy personal stan dards and ethics, as well as recruiting standards. On the first day of class, all new students are given a height-weight measurement to ensure they are within body fat standards. Those that arent are immediately enrolled in the commands fitness enhancement program. We are the face of the Navy out there as recruiters, said NCC Kevin Roux, an instructor at NORU and the command fitness leader. If a recruiter is out of standards, thats not the image that we want to have [in the public.] We really need to make sure that were on top of our game here. The staff uses the Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling System as their guideline for teaching fitness. They hold mandatory command group physical training twice a week in the morning and FEP sessions are held two addition al days per week in the afternoon. Im a believer in the NOFFS program. I wasnt at first, but I know what its done for me, said Roux. You get out of it what you put into it. I find myself to be a better runner now. For some fleet Sailors, the transition to recruiting can be a bit of a shock to their system. Taking someone who is a technical expert in their rating and teaching them an entirely new set of skills presents its own unique chal lenge. This is a whole new experience, said BMC(SW) Christopher Haywood, a new recruiter. Being a boatswains mate, Im used to the fleet mentality. [Here] you learn new things about how to relate to people. The instructors said they usually see some myths about recruiting cleared up within the first week of the course. Most of the time were getting the top Sailors from the fleet, said NCCS(SW) Brian Banrey, a NORU instructor. They come to recruiting to be successful, but when they get here they figure out that its something different. They might be the best ET or best MM, but when they come here theyve never done [some thing like this] before. Theyre learning a different trade, which sometimes can be a challenge. The course culminates in a cap stone exercise during the final week. Instructors role play as potential future Sailors and the students work in a mock recruiting station. Students are evalu ated on how well they deal with a vari ety of situations, everything from an angry parent who doesnt want their child to join the Navy, to a prospect who changes his mind at the last minute and decides not to join. We deliberately make it chaotic, said NCCS(SW) Elissa Cook, a NORU instructor. One myth instructors were quick to dispel is that Navy recruiters must lie to be successful. The reality of it is . that its so easy to get caught and ruin your career, said Corelli. The last thing we want is for a bunch of Sailors in the fleet that cant do the job because theyre not quali fied. Eventually, I tell all these recruit ers, Guess what? One day, guess where youre going when your three years is up? Youre going back to work with those people that you put in. Do you want to work side-by-side with someone you lied about? Instructors and students alike said the intangible skills of building rela tionships and learning to relate to com plete strangers are the most important tools recruiters walk away with. As a fire controlman, I actual ly ran an ET division for navigation al radar and GPS, said FC1(SW/AW) Christopher Campbell, who reported to NORU fresh off a tour aboard USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70). As far as recruiting, the job is completely different. Im inter acting with people who arent Sailors. Recruiting boils down to helping these Sailors find qualified people that can ultimately make the Navy a better place, said Corelli. You do change peoples life, he said. From StaffTo raise awareness of vet eran homelessness in Duval, Clay and Nassau counties, Emergency Services and Homeless Coalition (ESHC) of Northeast Floridarecently unveiled three digital bill boards and a new landing page for a program that can provide help for local Veterans. The billboards bear the headline Vets Deserve Better and comple ment the new landing page, HomesForOurBrave.com, that provides crucial information about Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF), a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs program administered by the ESHC of Northeast Florida. Through this program, homeless or at-risk veterans and their families may receive services such as: tance for rent and other living expenses, tion, agencies. ESHC was awarded $1.78 million by the Department of Veteran Affairs to provide pre vention and rapid re-housing services, and has applied for an additional $5 million to con tinue its efforts. This campaign is a reflec tion of our commitment to end veteran homelessness in Duval, Clay and Nassau coun ties. Veterans deserve better. They deserve housing and the services necessary to sustain it, said Marti Johnson, SSVF program director for ESHC. We are committed to the goal of ending veteran home lessness by December 2015. Our community is on track to meet this target thanks to the resources available through the Department of Veteran Affairs, our partners, and other service providers in the community. According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Developments 2013 Homeless Assessment Report: highest rate of homeless veter ans in the nation, estimated at 5,505. the second highest decrease in veteran homelessness. erans are unsheltered (living in a place not meant for human habitation). Since the SSVF program was implemented locally in October 2012, we have assist ed more than 80 female veter ans and their families. Women are the fastest growing group of the veteran population and Northeast Florida. Its our pri ority to ensure these women have a home for their fami lies. Our partners are helping us to establish a strong safety net that can meet the unique needs of female veterans, says Johnson. Members of the commu nity are encouraged to learn more about the SSVF pro gram, including its eligibility requirements and resources for referring a potential client, at HomesForOurBrave.com. From Balfour Beatty CommunitiesThe first full week in April is desig nated as National Window Safety week to coincide with spring the time of the year when there is an urge to open windows and welcome the fresh air. National Window Safety Weeks goal is to raise awareness for what can be done to help keep families safe from the risk of accidental falls or injuries within the home. At Balfour Beatty Communities, safety is important to us, and we want to share some window safety knowledge with our residents in order to protect our communities. important as learning how to use one in an emergency. Unattended children run the greatest risk of falls and injuries, so the best first step is to carefully watch your children as they play. Nothing can substitute for careful supervision. locked when children are around. When opening windows for ventila tion, open windows that a child cannot reach. Do not rely on insect screens to pre vent a fall. Insect screens are designed to provide ventilation while keeping insects out, not to prevent a childs fall from a window. Set and enforce rules about keeping childrens play away from windows or patio doors. Falling through the glass can be fatal or cause serious injury. dren can climb, away from windows. Children may use such objects as a climbing aid. plans. While some falls occur from win dows, it is important to realize that in the event of a fire, a window also can save a childs life. This is why windows play a critical role in home safety. means of escape from a burning home. Determine your familys emergency escape plan and practice it regularly. In the plan, include two elements of escape from every room. Remember that children may have to rely on a window to escape in a fire. Help them learn to safely use a window under these circumstances. To learn more about window safe ty, visit the Safety section on Balfour Beatty Communities website at http:// www.nasjacksonvillehomes.com/resi dent-resources/safety Veteran aid program launches Homes For Our BraveHow the Navys recruiting school turns fleet Sailors into recruitersBase residents: Window safety tips can save lives A CFC Participant provided as a public service.Do not accept defeat .Fight deadly childhood diseases. 800-8 22-6344 stjude.org JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 17, 2014 By MC1 Lewis HunsakerPre-Commissioning Unit America Public AffairsThe U.S. Navy officially accepted delivery of the amphibious assault ship America (LHA 6) from Huntington Ingalls Industries during a ship custody transfer ceremony in Pascagoula, Miss., April 10. More than 900 Sailors and Marines assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) America marched to the ship to take custody on the flight deck. During the event, Capt. Robert Hall Jr., commanding officer of America, signed the official paperwork, granting custody of the ship to the U.S. Navy. Hall said its a great day for the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps team, Huntington Ingalls Industries and our country. Since the keel was laid in 2009, lit erally thousands of proud patriotic men and women have been designing, building, installing, testing, outfitting and training the crew of America, and I would like to take this opportunity to personally thank them all, said Hall. Command Master Chief (SW/AW/ FMF) Chad Lunsford said that since the first Sailor reported in 2012, the command has been working dili gently to complete instructions, train ing and qualifications required for the command to operate successful ly. Establishing ship programs, such as maintenance, damage control and sponsorship, have also been essential throughout the pre-commissioning process. This is an awesome day, said Lunsford. We have been building this team for over two years, and today close to 1,100 Sailors and Marines come together as one team to take custody of our nations newest Navy ship. This is a proud moment for America, our ship, our country! America is the first ship of its class, replacing the Tarawa-class of amphibi ous assault ships. As the next gener ation big-deck amphibious ship, America will be optimized for aviation and capable of supporting current and future aircraft, such as the tilt-rotor MV-22 Osprey and the Joint Strike Fighter. America is 844 feet long, 106 feet wide and displaces 44,971 long tons. Her pro pulsion system will drive it to speeds in excess of 22 knots, and she will accom modate a crew size of more than 1,100 Sailors and nearly 1,900 embarked Marines. After a rigorous evaluation and cer tification cycle, the ship will depart Mississippi and transit around South America to her future homeport of San Diego, where the ship will be commis sioned late 2014. Intramural Spring Softball (contd.) Team Wins Losses NBHC Honey Badgers 0 0 VP-26 0 0 VP-45 Sluggers 0 0 VR-58 0 0 VR-62 0 0 FRCSE Tweaks & Geeks 0 1 FACSFAC 0 1 NCTS 0 1 VP-45 Scared Hitless 0 1 FRCSE Thrusters 0 2 Badminton Doubles Final Standings Team Wins Losses NAVHOSP MSU 10 0 NAVFAC Blue 8 1 NBHC Jax 6 3 MWR Dynamic Duo 7 3 NAVFAC Red 6 3 NAVFAC Orange 4 5 NAVFAC Gold 3 5 CV-TSC Ashore 3 7 FACSFAC-1 1 7 Sports and Standings (contd. from Page 13) By Claudette RouloAmerican Forces Press ServiceForward presence is the Navys mandate, the vice chief of naval operations told a House panel April 11. Naval forces remain on watch around the globe as more than a decade of conflict and extended stability operations draw to a close, Navy Adm. Mark Ferguson III told mem bers of the readiness subcom mittee of the House Armed Services Committee. Our forward-deployed forc es are where it matters, when it matters, he said. In the past year, Americas naval forces have helped shape events and provided immedi ate options to the president during times of crisis around the globe, Ferguson said. Our global presence reas sures our allies and partners, deters aggression and provides a ready response to humani tarian crises, he said. It con fronts piracy and supports counterterrorism operations from the sea. With the signing of the Bipartisan Budget Act, the Navy was able to improve its forward operations and readi ness in fiscal year 2014, the admiral said. Through the remainder of this fiscal year, we are restor ing fleet training, maintenance and operations, and well recover a substantial portion of our ship maintenance back log, he noted. If the Navys fiscal year 2015 budget request is fulfilled and if overseas contingency opera tions funds are approved Ferguson said, the service will have the resources necessary to train, maintain and operate its planned fleet structure. The combined funds will also sustain the required lev els of readiness to support the adjudicated Global Force Management Allocation Plan for naval forces, the admiral added. Even if the budget request is fully funded, he said, the Navy will make some cuts in light of reduced funding from its pro posed budget request last year, including a reduction of nearly 80 aircraft and 3,500 weapons. To remain a balanced and ready force across the Future Years Defense Plan, this bud get proposes slowing cost growth and compensation of benefits, maintaining the option to refuel or inactivate one aircraft carrier and a car rier air wing, Ferguson said. The proposed budget also puts 11 guided missile cruisers and three dock landing ships into a phased modernization period, the admiral told the committee. This phased modernization approach, while fiscally driv en, will reduce force structure risk in the 2030s and beyond by extending the service life of these ships, he noted. The Navy strove to reset while simultaneously conduct ing a decade of high-tempo operations, Ferguson said. It will take about five years beyond the end of Operation Enduring Freedom to complete the reset of the force, he said. The length of this period reflects unique ship depot maintenance demands, which are limited by operational schedules and the capacity of the Navys depot infrastructure, the admiral explained. Our budget request also pro poses lower investment in our shore infrastructure, he said. We are mindful that this backlog will compound over time and must eventually be addressed. Accordingly, we will continue to aggressively pursue opportunities, such as repro gramming our realignment of funds in the year of execution to modernize and sustain our shore facilities, Ferguson said. As the Navy looks to the future, the specter of sequestration looms large, he said. A return to sequestration-lev el spending in fiscal year 2016 and beyond will lead to a Navy that would be insufficient in size and capability to meet the needs of the country, the admi ral said. Under that scenario, addi tional force structure reduc tions would be required to fund adequate readiness of the remaining force. Under seques tration, further reductions in procurement, in maintenance training and operations would be required and damage to the industrial base would likely be severe, he said. Despite these challenges, the nation is fortunate to have the highest quality force in its his tory, Ferguson said. These outstanding men and women who serve our nation at sea make us the finest Navy in the world, he said. From Department of DefenseThe Navy christened the future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) April 12, during a ceremony at General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine. The lead ship and class are named in honor of former Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Admiral Elmo Bud Zumwalt Jr., who served as the 19th CNO from 1970-1974. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus delivered the ceremonys principal address. In accordance with Navy tradition, the ships co-sponsors Ann Zumwalt and Mouzetta Zumwalt-Weathers, daughters of Zumwalt, will break a bot tle of sparkling wine across the ships bow. The christening of the future USS Zumwalt represents the beginning of another era of service for this great name, said Mabus. Just as Admiral Zumwalt helped shape our nations Navy as the 19th chief of naval operations, DDG 1000 will help shape the future of surface combatants. The sophisticated new technology incorporated aboard this ship, combined with its multi-mission capabilities, will ensure it is a relevant and integral part of our battle force for years to come. This day, however, would not be possible without the hard work and dedication of the hundreds of men and women of our nations industrial base who worked so diligently to help us reach this exciting moment. Zumwalt was a veteran of World War II, as well as the Korean and Vietnam Wars. Following the World War II Battle for Leyte Gulf, he was awarded the Bronze Star with Combat V for his val orous actions aboard the USS Robinson. During the Vietnam War, he served as commander naval forces, Vietnam before being nominated by President Richard Nixon to become CNO in July of 1970. He is credited with imple menting a series of policies intended to improve opportunities within the Navy for minorities and women during his tenure as CNO. Zumwalt died Jan. 2, 2000. During his eulogy, President Bill Clinton described Zumwalt as the conscience of the Navy. The Zumwalt-class destroyer rep resents the next-generation of multimission surface combatants and will enable access in the open ocean, litto ral and ashore. The Navy has procured three Zumwalt-class destroyers. Each can embark two MH-60R Seahawk heli copters. The ship includes new technologies that deliver capability now and serve as a springboard for incorporation into future ship classes. DDG 1000 is the first U.S. Navy surface combatant to employ an innovative and highly survivable Integrated Power System that will pro vide power to propulsion, ships service, and combat system loads from the same gas turbine prime movers. DDG 1000s power allocation flexibility allows for potentially significant energy savings and is well suited to enable future highenergy weapons and sensors. The ship features two advanced gun systems firing long-range land attack projectiles that reach up to 63 nautical miles, providing precision, high vol ume and persistent fire support to forc es ashore, along with an approximate five-fold improvement in naval surface fire range. DDG 1000 will employ active and pas sive sensors, as well as a multi-func tion radar capable of conducting area air surveillance, including over-land, throughout the extremely difficult and cluttered sea-land interface. Construction on Zumwalt com menced in February 2009, with the keel laying ceremony held in November 2011, and ship launch successfully com pleted in October 2013. Zumwalt is 610 feet long is with a displacement of more than 15,000 tons when fully loaded. The ship is expected to join the fleet in 2016. Naval forces stand ready despite threat of sequestrationPhoto by Sgt. Courtney Ropp Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson III testi fies on April 10 before the House Armed Services Committee Subcommittee on Readiness.Navy christens future USS Zumwalt, new class of destroyerPhoto by MC1 Arif PataniSecretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus and other honored guests attend the April 12 christening ceremony for the Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG) 1000. The ship, the first of three Zumwalt-class destroy ers, will provide independent forward presence and deterrence, support special operations forces and operate as part of joint and combined expeditionary forces. Future USS America deliveredPhoto by MC1 Lewis HunsakerMore than 900 Sailors and Marines assigned to the amphibious assault ship PreCommissioning Unit (PCU) America (LHA 6) march to the ship to assume cus tody of it. The U.S. Navy officially accepted delivery of the amphibious assault ship from Huntington Ingalls Industries during a custody transfer ceremony in Pascagoula, Miss., April 10. America is the first ship of its class, replacing the Tarawa-class of amphibious assault ships and is scheduled to be commissioned in late 2014 in San Francisco.

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