Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
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Newspaper
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English
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s.n.
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Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
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30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
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UF00028307:02085


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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 2014 I I D E VP-5 COC Looking To The Future Page 3 NAVY RUN Hundreds Compete In 10K MILITARY CHILD Free Carnival April 12 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com War Eagles bring P-8A By MC1(SW/EXW/AW) Joshua Bryce BrunsCommander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea Public AffairsThe U.S. and Republic of Korea (ROK) navies enhanced their combined and joint maritime capabilities after com pleting a series of drills and exercises ashore and at sea from March 8-31 in support of exercise Foal Eagle 2014. Exercise Foal Eagle in an umbrella of regularly scheduled, annual exer cises that are the culmination of many months of planning and based on realistic training scenarios. The naval portion of the Foal Eagle exercises took place in international waters around South Korea and fea tured a full spectrum of joint maritime operations designed to strengthen the interoperability and teamwork between U.S. and ROK military forces. By MC3 Jason KofonowDefense Media ActivityNavy P-3C Orion and P-8A Poseidon aircrews from around the maritime patrol and reconnaissance fleet are competing April 4-10 in the annual Fleet Challenge anti-submarine war fare (ASW) exercise at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. Fleet Challenge 2014 includes seven combat aircrew (CAC) from the three maritime patrol and reconnaissance wings, a fleet replacement squadron and a reserve squadron from the United Kingdom. In the annual ASW rodeo, as the exercise is also known, each CAC is graded in a simulator scenario, as well as actual flight operations against USS Springfield (SSN 761), which acts as an opposing force. We bring the best of the best together to compete in the ASW rodeo so that we can highlight the training thats been going on across the fleet, said Cmdr. Mike Granger, the officer in charge of the Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapons School. Crews are assessed on mission plan ning, optimized tactics, crew training, as well as implementation of past les sons learned in determining the most effective maritime patrol and recon By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public AffairsNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast envi ronmental teams contributions were recognized recently as two Navy installations received prestigious U.S. Navy environmental honors. Vice Adm. Phil Cullom, deputy chief of naval operations for fleet readiness and logistics (N4), announced the win ners of the fiscal year (FY) 2013 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Environmental Awards competition, March 18. 2013 award winners included the Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville, Fla. Environmental Restoration Partnering Team and NAS Meridian, Miss. in the Environmental Restoration (ER), Installation category. I commend NAS Jax Restoration Advisory Board team leader Tim Curtin and the restoration team members on winning this award. They have proven to be leaders and are deserv ing of this recognition. Their leader ship in the ongoing and multifaceted restoration projects truly supports the Navys commitment to be a good environmental steward, stated NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Undersander, upon learning of the award. The NAS Jacksonville Team was formed to navigate a path forward to successfully investigate, remediate, and manage the risks posed by contami nated waste sites located on the instal lation. They have worked together since 1992. During the past year, the team implemented several cutting edge, state-of-the-art investigations in an industrial area including vapor intru sion in multiple industrial buildings and bio-remediation in a former dry cleaners area, said Tim Curtin, NAS Jacksonville ER Program Manager. This included injecting emulsified vegetable oil in the sand and conduct ing an electro-kinetic process in the clay. Curtin explained that the installa tions hydrogeological, industrial, and ecological settings present unique opportunities to protect human health and the environment through the use of innovative technologies and method ologies for site restoration. The pace and expanded scope of cleanup efforts at NAS Jacksonville industrial sites have been possible through cooperation and collaboration of the restoration team with its regu latory and community stakeholders, including the federal and state regula tory agencies, the local citizens group, and the local redevelopment authority, Undersander added. The second installation recognized was NAS Meridian. I would like to congratulate all of the personnel in the Public Works Environmental Department for their efforts leading to NAS Meridians selection as the 2013 CNO Environmental Restoration, Installation category, award winner, said NAS Meridian Command Officer Capt. Charles C. Moore II. Bravo Zulu and best of luck to NAS Meridian Environmental at the next level, the Secretary of the Navy Environmental Awards Competition. The most significant restoration project completed at NAS Meridian would be the Site 3B Metals Landfill off the South Runway, said NAS Meridian Environmental Director Steve Wade. In earlier years, this site was used to store metals and construction debris. The restoration process used at Site 3B was a total remediation of the entire area. The Navy conducted four subsur face ground and water sampling events following the cleanup to confirm no contamination was left behind. As a department it is a great accom plishment for our staff to be recognized US, ROK navies complete Foal Eagle exercise Photo by MC1 Joshua Bryce BrunsPatrol squadrons participate in ASW challengePhoto by MC2 Gulianna DunnA P-8A Poseidon rests on the flight line at Naval Air Station Jacksonville in 2013 as a P-3C Orion approaches the runway. Aircrews flying both platforms are competing in the ASW Fleet Challenge 2014. NAS Jacksonville and Meridian recognized for environmental stewardshipOfficial Navy photoNAS Jax Environmental Restoration Partnering Team (from left) Peter Dao (US EPA); Mike Singletary (NAVFAC Southeast); Julie Johnson; (TetraTech); Jennifer Conklin (FDEP); Tim Curtin (NAS Jacksonville); Tim Flood (Management Edge); Adrienne Wilson (NAVFAC Southeast); Todd Haverkost (Resolution Consultants); Eric Davis (CH2MHill) and Mark Peterson (TetraTech).See Page 7 See Page 6 See Page 6

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-7789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley From StaffApril 10 1941 USS Niblack (DD-424), used depth charges against a German U-boat while conducting rescue operations for a torpedoed Dutch freighter. This was the first action by an American naval vessel against the Axis Powers. 1963 During diving tests, USS Thresher (SSN-593) was lost with all hands (112 crew and 12 civilians) east of Cape Cod, Mass. 1966 River Patrol Boats of River Patrol Force commenced operations on inland waters of South Vietnam. April 11 1783 Congress declares end of war with Great Britain. 1900 Navy accepts its first subma rine, USS Holland. 1970 Launch of Apollo 13, com manded by Navy Capt. James Lovell Jr. Former naval aviator Fred Haise Jr. was the Lunar Module Pilot. While 200,000 miles from Earth there was an explo sion on board which forced Apollo 13 to circle the moon without landing. Mission duration was 5 days, 22 hours and 54 minutes. Recovery was by HS-4 helicopters from USS Iwo Jima (LPH-2). 1991 U.N. ceasefire ends Persian Gulf War. April 12 1861 Civil War begins when Confederates fire on Fort Sumter, S.C. 1911 Lt. Theodore Ellyson qualifies as first naval aviator. 1962 U.S. Navy demonstrates new landing craft with retractable hydro foils, LCVP(H). 1975 Operation Eagle Pull evacua tion from Cambodia. 1981 First launch of re-useable Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-1) with all-Navy crew. Retired Capt. John Young com manded and Lt. Cmdr. Robert Crippen was the pilot. Mission duration was two days, six hours and 20 minutes. Sixteen of the shuttles heat-shielding silicon tiles were lost and 148 damaged during reentry. 1993 Aircraft from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) and NATO forces begin enforcing the no-fly zone over Bosnia in Operation Deny Flight. April 13 1847 Naval forces begin five-day battle to capture several towns in Mexico. 1861 Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. 1960 Navy navigation satellite, Transit, placed into orbit from Cape Canaveral, Fla. and demonstrates abil ity to launch another satellite. April 14 1898 Commissioning of USS Solace, the first post-Civil War hospital ship. 1969 Over the Sea of Japan, North Korean aircraft shoots down a Navy EC-121 reconnaissance aircraft assigned to VQ-1. 1988 USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) strikes Iranian mine off Qatar. 1989 First Navy ship arrives to assist in Exxon Valdez oil spill cleanup. April 15 1885 Naval forces land at Panama to protect American interests during revolution. 1912 Scout cruisers USS Chester (CL-1) and USS Salem (CL-3) sail from Massachusetts to assist RMS Titanic survivors. 1918 First Marine Aviation Force formed at Marine Flying Field, Miami, Fla. 1961 Launch of first nuclear-pow ered frigate, USS Bainbridge (DDG 96), at Quincy, Mass. 1962 USS Princeton (LPH-5) deliv ers first Marine Corps helicopters to Vietnam. This was first Marine advisory unit to arrive in South Vietnam. 1986 Navy aircraft from USS America (CV-66) and USS Coral Sea (CV-43) attack Libya in conjunction with USAF aircraft after Libya was linked to the terrorist bombing of a West Berlin discotheque that killed one American and injured 78 people. April 16 1863 Union gunboats pass Confederate batteries at Vicksburg. 1924 Navy supports relief operations during Mississippi Valley floods, lasting until June 16. 1947 Act of Congress gives Navy Nurse Corps members commissioned rank. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorOn the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, I took a picture of you standing next to the window in your nursery. The sun illumi nated half your face, and you were holding a wooden train in one hand. When you heard my footsteps, you turned around, threw back your head and gig gled. Your smile was all gums. You had no idea what had just happened in New York City. Ive kept that picture on my desk ever since. It reminds me of a time when I could solve all your problems simply by walking into a room. It reminds me of a time when your world was our home. It reminds me of a time when everything you were tired, hungry, happy was usually apparent to me. Back then, you liked to line up your trains in a row. Sometimes you sorted them from biggest to smallest, and then smallest to biggest again. You organized them by color or by the shininess of their wheels. You were always industrious like that. Even at 1 year old. I wonder if hell be an engineer like his dad? I said. Hes very systematic. A few years later, you wore your Superman pajamas with Velcro cape to the grocery store and preschool. When other kids laughed at your choice of clothes, you convinced them that Superman is cool. Soon, all the other kids wanted a Superman cape, too. You have never caved to peer pressure. Hes a natural leader, I said. I wonder if hell go into poli tics? By kindergarten, you were showing great interest in sci ence and math. The teacher gave you extra assignments to satisfy your curiosity. Uncle Will got a kick out of watching you do puzzles. You were so serious and determined. Maybe hell be a scientist, I said. Hes very good at math. Just like his dad. Later, in elementary school, you got involved in sports. Baseball was your favorite. You read all the history, and your bank of ready-to-answer trivia rivaled Dads. Maybe hell work for a baseball team, I said. Hes so good at player stats and strategy. Oh, the strategy! By fourth grade, you were beating dad at chess and your favorite passtime was Axis and Allies. Woe was the person who thought you didnt know every major player in World War II. You memorized all the battleships, countries, leaders and out comes. You kept maps tacked to your wall and went over the war strategies again and again. Maybe hell join the Navy, I said. Just like his dad and grandfathers. You made lists and more lists. Foreign countries were a fascination, and you ranked all the nations in the world by land mass and population. Then you ranked languages of the world according to how many people speak them. Hes a natural historian, I said. Maybe hell be a professor. All along, though, the one thing I knew for sure was that you got all your traits from Dad. One day, while I was wash City of Jacksonville Official PhotoCorrectionThe caption of this photo in the April 3 edition of Jax Air News omitted Col. Brian Simpler (third from left). Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown (center) and area base commanders shared lunch and a few laughs. Around the table from left, NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker, Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville Commander Capt. Tom Allan, 125th Fighter Wing Commander Col. Brian Simpler, Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Wess McCall, Brown, City of Jacksonville (COJ) Director of Military and Veterans Affairs Vic Guillory, Marine Corps Blount Island Command Deputy Commander Jim Hooks and COJ Deputy of Military and Veterans Affairs Harrison Conyers. U.S. Navy photos The Apollo 13 crew is safely on board USS Iwo Jima (LPH-2) after aborting their moon landing mission after an oxygen tank exploded, crippling the service module. Despite great hardship caused by limited power, loss of cabin heat, shortage of potable water, and the critical need to jury rig the carbon dioxide removal system, the crew returned safely to Earth. An HS-4 helicopter recovered the capsule after splash down. On April 21, 1950, VC-5 Commanding Officer Capt. John Hayward made the first takeoff of the AJ-1 heavy attack plane from the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea (CV-43). His pilots completed carrier qualifications in August and become the first operational AJ-1 Savage squadron. The AJ-1 aircraft above is landing aboard USS Wasp (CV-18) in March of 1952. This Week in Navy History From the HomefrontOldest son, Ford, shows what hes becomingSee HOMEFRONT, Page 3

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NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander was welcomed March 19 by retired Capt. Frank Brough at the monthly meeting of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) Northeast Florida Chapter. Undersander presented information about topics of interest to MOAA mem bers. Brough said, "We are grate ful for Capt. Undersanders brief on the major changes occurring now, as well as in the future, for this outstanding naval air station. ing dishes, you came up behind me and began read ing aloud about the unrest in Ukraine. I thought you were reading from the newspaper. But when I turned around, I saw that you were reading from your own writing. Light from the kitchen window illuminated half your face and highlighted your broadening shoulders. Your voice is deeper than I ever remembered it being. I struggled to hear the words you read, distracted as I was thinking about your toddler self standing by the nursery window. I could tell, however, that each of your words were carefully chosen and fit into the sentences like puzzle pieces. You paused occasionally to fix something this word would be better if I moved it here and I could see the concentration on your face. I have that same far-away stare when Im working with words. You started talking about submitting some of your writing for publication. I remembered the first time I sent an essay to Chicken Soup for the Soul. I told you how to format your submission. When you walked away, your younger broth er, Owen, said, Wow, hes like the next Charles Krauthammer, isnt he, Mom? I didnt answer. I had learned by then not to try to guess what you will become. I had never really known. (And since when does Owen know about Charles Krauthammer?) But to connect with you over writing was better than any Mothers Day gift. Ever. That day in the kitchen, I saw that you are not just like dad or just like me. You are Ford. I realized that joy would come not from guessing at what youll become, but from watching you show us what youre becoming. And I knew that in any case, what I wish for you is more success and happiness than your dad and I ever could achieve. HOMEFRONTFrom Page 2 Station briefingPhoto by Clark Pierce VP-5 Mad Foxes look to future after change of commandBy Lt. j.g. John BellezzaVP-5 Public AffairsOn March 20, Cmdr. Gregory Petrovic assumed command of the VP-5 Mad Foxes from Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh during a change of command ceremony held in Hangar 117 at NAS Jacksonville. The ceremonys guest speaker, Rear Adm. Kyle Cozad, discussed the tremendous legacy Pottenburgh will leave behind. He also reminded Petrovic to, Enjoy every day because time goes by much too quickly. Pottenburgh gave farewell remarks to the squadron in which he stated, You went home each day tired, but with your integrity intact. Continue to raise the bar at NAS Jacksonville, as well as in Japan. Petrovic urged the squadron to continue to be humble, be bold and be decisive. Pottenburgh took command in May 2013 as VP-5 became the second operational Navy squadron to transition from the P-3C Orion to the new P-8A Poseidon aircraft. Under his leadership, the squadron achieved Safe-for-Flight certification in the P-8A and has participated in numerous exercises, including the first-ever P-8A support of a Carrier Strike Group Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX). The Mad Foxes accomplished those feats while flying in support of USS George H.W. Bush Strike Group deployment certification. Pottenburghs next assignment will be at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., serving as a Naval Aviation Program Analyst in the Programming Division (N80) of the Chief of Naval Operations staff. Petrovic is from New Bern, N.C. and graduated from the U. S. Naval Academy in 1996. His naval career has included tours at VP-9 in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, CTF67 and C6F in Naples, Italy, aboard the USS George Washington (CVN 73) in Norfolk, Va., VP-30 and VP-45 at NAS Jacksonville, and in the J8 Division of the Joint Staff in at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. Later this year, Petrovic will lead VP-5 on deploy ment as the Mad Foxes will relieve VP-16 War Eagles in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility and become only the second P-8A squadron to operate overseas. Photo by Lt. j.g. John Bellezza(From left) Outgoing VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh, incoming VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Greg Petrovic, and incoming VP-5 Executive Officer Cmdr. Alan D'Jock look to the future after the "Mad Foxes" change of command ceremony March 20 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Annual Navy Run attracts hundreds of athletesBy Shannon LeonardMWR Marketing DirectorOn a warm overcast morning more than 400 ser vice members, retirees, civilians and family members turned out for the ninth annual Capt. Chuck Cornett 10K Run and 5K Walk April 5 at NAS Jacksonville. Originally called the Navy Run, the event was renamed after the 2004 death of Cornett, a former NAS Jax executive officer and avid runner. Cornetts family members, Mike and his grandson Michael, and Kathy and Mike Ray traveled to take part in this years run. It is such an honor for us to be here for my dad and for our family to be recognized each year. This year, were wearing t-shirts honoring his phrase, Jog, run, love it. His goal was to inspire people to start running or walking and to stay healthy and fit, she said. Navy run events kicked-off April 3 with a Zumba and kickboxing Jam. On Friday there was a health fair in the Navy Exchange parking lot. The Naval Hospital Jacksonville Wellness Center provided free blood pressure checks and information on breast cancer awareness, including how to administer a breast selfexam. The Fleet & Family Support Center provided information on sexual assault awareness. On Saturday, in addition to the 10-kilometer com petitive run and five-kilometer walk, there was a runners shoes and apparel fair in the Navy Exchange parking lot. Once the runners received their packages with their numbers and timing chips, they stretched and min gled with friends and family. After observing morning colors, NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker welcomed the runners and then joined them to await the starting gun. It is a great day for a run and to promote navy fitness. I would like to thank the Cornett Family for attending and Ken Bandy for being an announcer for the past 25 years. This should be a great race and I am looking forward to it, said Wanamaker. With a shotgun start, the runners headed down Child Street with Capt. Chuck Cornetts radar blue and yellow Corvette leading the way. This is such a wonderful event and great for our community to come together and promote physi cal fitness, said NAS Jax Athletic Director Tanya Henigman, who coordinated the run. More than 400 runners participated in the 9th annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run on April 5 in front of cheering spectators at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. Noi Freeman, volunteer fitness instructor for MWR, instructs over 50 people at the outdoor Navy Run Zumba class held on April 3 in the Navy Exchange parking lot. More than 40 volunteers gather early Saturday morning in support of the annual NAS Jax Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run on April 5 in the Navy Exchange parking lot. John Metzgar, 51, finished second place overall (35:44) in the annual 10K Navy Run. A line formed early Saturday morning as runners register and pick-up their race packets at the annual Captain Chuck Cornett 10K Navy Run. Nine-year-old twins Kip and Kirby Truitt are all smiles after placing second and third in the 5K event on Saturday.See NAVY RUN, Page 5

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 5 Open Men 1. Jordan Zwick, 27, (33:19) 2. John Metzgar, 51, (35:44) 3. Andy Shellgren, 24, (36:03) Open Women 2. Amy Purcell, 35, (45:48) 3. Jennifer Dominguez, 24, (46:25) Masters Men 1. Joe Rivera, 47, (38:38) 2. Jimmer Sullivan, 53, (42:00) 3. Anthony Truitt, 55, (42:23) Masters Women 1. Barbara Gowdy, 45, (46:33) 2. Colleen Bierbach, 40, (46:44) Women Under 11 1. Simone Wanamaker, 10, (1:03:23) 2. Grace Adams, 9, (1:10:58) 3. Addison Adams, 8, (1:11:48) Women 11 14 1. Jamie Averitt, 14, (1:13:12) Women 15 19 1. Alaina Pruitt, 19, (59:03) Women 20 24 1. Miranda Abbas, 20, (49:53) 2. Samantha Scalf, 23, (55:52) 3. Jennifer Ayala, 23, (59:12) Women 25 29 1. Yuka Segatto, 25, (49:14) 2. Michelle Bader, 29, (56:29) 3. Kaila Yetka, 25, (57:32) Women 30 34 1. Tammy Jenkins, 32, (48:16) 2. Nicole Magee, 30, (48:32) 3. Molly Major, 32, (48:36) Women 35 39 1. Michelle McCullough, 35, (51:25) 3. Charlotte Miller, 38, (51:32) Women 40 44 1. Amy Guthrie, 41, (51:35) 2. Cathy Ivancik, 40, (58:53) 3. Rowie Hardtke, 41, (59:01) Women 45 49 1. Dena Gaucher, 46, (57:30) 2. Joanie Barrett, 46, (1:00:34) 3. Benita Terry, 49, (1:04:30) Women 50 54 1. Anna Delhart, 50, (56:34) 2. Catherine Ferrell, 52, (57:18) 3. Theresa Hollis, 51, (1:01:53) Women 55 59 1. Kim Crist, 57, (53:25) 2. Sue Whitworth, 59, (55:19) 3. Joanne Harris, 55, (56:18) Women 60 64 1. Diane Wilkinson, 61, (1:10:26) 2. Jean Schubert, 63, (1:27:13) Women 70 74 1. Marie Bendy, 71, (1:18:03) Women 75 & Up 1. Patt McEvers, 75, (1:18:03) Men Under 11 1. Skykar Gray, 8, (59:28) 2. Chase Kirkland, 9, (1:16:26) 3. Ryan Nolen, 10, (1:24:20) Men 11 14 1. Stephen Sizemore, 14, (1:01:58) 2. Brandon Brown, 12, (1:05:38) Men 15 19 1. Jack Wanamaker, 17, (42:19) 2. Robert Fortune, 17, (43:51) 3. Steven Sauri, 18, (52:50) Men 20 24 1. Tyler Johnson, 21, (41:56) 2. Sean Roderick, 20, (43:50) 3. James Pressley, 21, (45:37) Men 25 29 1. Patrick Cooper, 25, (37:38) 3. Phillip Jenkins, 28, (41:26) Men 30 34 1. Devin Riley, 30, (42:20) 2. John Hallahan, 34, (47:16) 3. Ryan Murphy, 33, (47:48) Men 35 39 1. Jeremy Judernatz, 35, (39:28) 2. Kyle Beahan, 38, (39:50) 3. Tom Ivancik, 38, (4:07) Men 40 44 1. Jeffrey Owejan, 42, (48:21) 2. Gerald Ataiza, 43, (50:37) 3. James Miller, 41, (52:30) Men 45 49 3. Vincent Collogan, 45, (47:42) Men 50 54 1. Joseph McQuade, 53, (43:20) 2. Steven Damit, 52, (46:44) 3. Bradley Tippett, 53, (47:45) Men 55 59 1. Bradford Joseph, 55, (48:01) 3. Eliseo Rodriguez, 58, (51:29) Men 60 64 1. Paul Geiger, 61, (47:59) 2. Douglas Tillett, 60, (49:50) 3. Doug Hardt, 64, (50:46) Men 65 69 1. George White, 67, (47:21) 2. Michael Fitzsimmons, 65, (52:16) 3. Martin Wilkinson, 65, (55:44) Men 70 74 1. Paul Smith, 72, (53:05) 2. Frank Frazier, 71, (59:44) 3. John Fears, 70, (1:03:21) Men 75 & Up 1. Charles Wagner, 76, (1:22:39) 2. Bob Meister, 82, (1:23:33) 3. Pat Gallagher, 83, (1:28:07) Of course, we couldnt pull this off without the help of our volunteers and sponsors. Its a team effort to organize this event. We have about 40 volunteers out here helping out to ensure everything runs smoothly. This was the first year we had online reg istration and it went very well. Next years run promises to be even better. I am already working on new ideas. The first runner to cross the 5K finish line was 13-year-old Conner McQuade (24:31), followed by nine-year-old twin brothers Kirby Truitt (24:37) and Kip Truitt (24:48). The overall winner and first man to cross the 10K finish line was Jordan Zwick (33:10), followed by John Metzgar (35:44) and Lt. Andy Shellgren of VP-10 (36:03). The first woman to cross the 10K line was Lisa Adams (44:10). Amy Purcell placed second (45:48) and Jennifer Dminguez finished third (46:25). Following the awards presentation, run ners stayed around hoping to win a prize provided by Navy Run sponsors. Prizes included an ASICS shoe gift certificate, Jacksonville Suns admission tickets & mer chandise, TRX Force Kits, a Garmin watch and much more. Premier Beverage provided patrons free bottles of VOSS water for rehy drating. We really appreciate our Navy Run sponsors including the Navy Exchange, Columbia College, University of Phoenix, VyStar Credit Union, ASICS, USA Discounters, Mitchell Profitt, TRX, Life Fitness, USAA, Jacksonville Suns, Holiday Inn of Orange Park and Premier Beverage, said Henigman.Photo by Morgan Kehnert Rob Blazewick leads a Kickboxing class full of high intensity boxing moves set to fast pace and heart pumping music. Michael Cornett and Kathy Ray award the first place medal to 10-year-old Simone Wanamaker for winning her division. (From left) Kathy and Mike Ray along with Michael and Mike Cornett proudly stand in front of Captain Chuck Cornett's radar blue and yellow Corvette that led the April 5 Navy Run named aboard NAS Jax. Photo by Morgan Kehnert Tanya Henigman (left), MWR Fitness Center director, hands Capt. Mona Meaux (right), oral surgeon at NAS Jacksonville Dental Clinic her 2014 Capt. Chuck Cornett Navy Run race packet during registration on April 3. "I'm excited for the run and the fact that there is high command involvement."Photos by Shannon LeonardHM2 Charnele Punongbayon from Naval Hospital Jacksonville Wellness Center checks Ron Warners blood pressure during the Navy Run health fair. Dave and Samantha Scalf and Bri Pettit care fully secure their timing chips to their shoes. NAVY RUNFrom Page 4Jordan Zwick 33:19 Lisa Adams 44:10Captain Chuck Cornett 10K Navy Run Results

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naissance aircrew. Its the weapons schools chance to put them through their paces in the latest things that have devel oped over the previous year, said Granger. This year marks the first time P-8A Poseidon aircraft participate with P-3C Orion aircrews in the competition. There are P-3 crews out there who are determined to not get shown up, said Granger. I think with some of the advantages that the Poseidon brings, such as being able to bring more sonar buoys on station, and the training that the crews have gotten, it will be tough. It will be a close run. Both the simulator events and flight operations were designed based on real-world scenarios, so aircrews can experience what is happening out in the fleet and bring that knowledge home to their squadrons to share, said Granger. The Navys ASW Fleet Challenge 2014 exercise has been held every year since 2007, with the exception of 2013, when it was cancelled due to budgetary restraints. FLEET CHALLENGEFrom Page 1for the work that happens at the Environmental Department here on board NAS Meridian, said Wade. As an individual, it is a great feeling to know that you are a part of an excellent staff that is making a lasting improvement to the envi ronmen for future generations. The processes for remedial actions ultimately ends with no further action for a site to be clas sified as closed out. So site closeout would mean that the land goes back to the way it originally was before it was inhabited. Currently, the restoration team is planning a bioreactor for the remedial actions at Site 8 Old Jet Wash Area. This bioreactor system will allow microorganisms to break down active chemical contami nation naturally at an accelerated rate. Planning, communication, and team work are what it takes to have the work accomplished in a short amount of time, claimed Wade. The local environmental staff effectively coordinated and com municated with the partnering team to finish the work on time. The partnering team included the NAVFAC Southeast Region Program Manager Robert Fisher, Mississippi Environmental Quality Regulator Robert Merrell, CH2MHill Program Manager David Chung, and NAS Meridian Environmental staff. For the fiscal year 2013 compe tition, 54 nominations from com mands around the world were received in 10 award categories. Environmental experts for the Navy and representatives from non-government organizations evaluated nominations to deter mine winners for each of the award categories. The CNO Environmental Awards honor ships, installations, indi viduals, and teams for their out standing achievements in Navy environmental programs. The ten award categories include 1) Natural Resources Conservation, Small Installation; 2) Natural Resources Conservation, Individual or Team; 3) Environmental Quality, Non-Industrial Installation; 4) Environmental Quality, Individual or Team; 5) Environmental Quality, Large Ship; 6) Sustainability, Industrial Installation; 7) Environmental Restoration, Installation; 8) Environmental Restoration, Individual or Team; 9) Cultural Resources Management, Installation; and 10) Environmental Excellence in Weapon System Acquisition, Large Program, Individual or Team. All CNO winners now advance to the Secretary of the Navy level of competition. For more information on the CNO Environmental Awards pro gram, visit http://greenfleet.dod live.mil/environment/awards. NAVFAC ENVIRONMENTALFrom Page 1 By Amaani LyleAmerican Forces Press ServiceReadiness is critical to thwarting North Koreas effort to develop nuclear arms and long-range missiles, the commander of U.S. forces in Korea told the House Armed Services Committee April 2. Army Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti, who commands United Nations Command and Combined Forces Command, in addition to U.S. Forces Korea, said his organiza tions will work closely with the South Korean military to develop its capabili ties and stanch an increasing asymmetric threat on the Korean Peninsula. We will . combine [communica tions] systems, an alliance counter-missile defense strategy, and a procurement of precision-guided munitions, ballistic missile defense systems and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platforms, Scaparrotti said. The general noted that North Korea has the fourth-largest military in the world, with more than 70 percent of its ground forces deployed near the Korean Demilitarized Zone. [North Koreas] long-range artillery can strike targets in the Seoul metropolitan area, where over 23 million South Koreans and almost 50,000 Americans live, he said. In addition to violations of multiple U.N. Security Council resolutions, Kim Jong Uns regime also is aggressively investing in cyber warfare capabilities, the general reported. North Korea brings risk to the worlds fastest-growing economic region, which is responsible for 25 percent of the worlds gross domestic product and home to our largest trading partners, Scaparrotti said. Against this real threat, our nation is committed to the security of South Korea and to our national interests. The general pledged to transform and strengthen the alliance, maintain the armistice to deter and defeat aggression, and be ready to fight. Priorities, he added, also include sustaining the force and family readiness and enhancing the United Nations Command, Combined Forces Command and U.S. Forces Korea teams. An essential part of this is a positive command climate that focuses on the covenant between the leader and the led and our mission together, he said. At the core of mission success is the close relationship we share with our South Korean partners; we benefit from an important history forged on many battle fields, shared sacrifices and democratic principles. Over the past 60 years, the general said, the United States and South Korea have built one of the longest-standing alliances in modern history. We will continue to ensure strong and effective deterrence posture so that Pyongyang never misjudges our role, commitment or capability to respond as an alliance, he added.Countering North Korean threats 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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This years drills marked the 53rd Foal Eagle exercise, which includ ed participation of USS Lassen (DDG 82), USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG 54), USS Lake Erie (CG 70), USS Howard (DDG 83), USS Avenger (MCM 1), along with Korean Aegis destroyers ROKS Sejong the Great (DDG 991), ROKS Seoae Ryu (DDG 993), and ROKS Gwang Geon (DDH 978). Additionally, the exercise included the U.S. Navys P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft from VP-16 for its first training missions in Korea. Exercise Foal Eagle is important to the alliance because it brings units from other regions to Korea and allows them to work in a joint environment with our ROK navy counterparts, improving our joint fighting effectiveness, said Cmdr. David Suchyta, director of operations for Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea. The ROK and U.S. alliance is built on trust and that trust grows from working together. This exercise provided new generations of U.S. and ROK Sailors the opportunity to work together and build that trust. The training incorporated scenarios such as gunnery exercises, communication drills, dynamic ship maneuvers, logistical rehearsals, and liaison officer exchanges with the ROK navy. VP-16From Page 1 Sexual Assault Awareness MonthNAS Jax FFSC staff members look on as NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander signs a proclamation in support of Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) at the Officers Club on April 2. Joining Undersander (center) at the table were, from left, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna, VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips, VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. John Brabazon, and NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre. FFSC Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Coordinator Tina Vaughn said, SAAM is important because it allows time and opportunity to reflect on the SAPR program in a meaningful way to think about where we have come from and to envision where we want and need to go in the interest of better serving and supporting those who are victimized by this crime.Photo by MC2 Amanda Cabasos Photos by MC1 Joshua Bryce BurnsSailors from the Republic of Korea navy board a U.S. Navy P-8A Poseidon aircraft March 30 for a tour facilitated by crew members assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16 during a distinguished visitor static display event with senior members of the Republic of Korea navy. The U.S. Navy's P-8A Poseidon is con ducting its first training missions in the Republic of Korea in support of Exercise Foal Eagle 2014. VP-16 is deployed in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility support ing security and stability operations in the IndoAsia-Pacific region. AWO2 Borg Miller, an acoustic systems operator assigned to VP-16, describes the process of launching sonobuoys to Republic of Korea sailors during a tour of the U.S. Navy P-8A Poseidon aircraft. AOAN Nick Hoover, assigned to VP-16, collects fuel samples from a P-8A Poseidon aircraft prior to a training mission with patrol aircraft from the Republic of Korea navy. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 7

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Medications Q&AFrom Naval Hospital Jacksonville Q: What should I do if I have a bad reaction to my medication? A: Sometimes medications can cause unin tended reactions from minor to life-threatening. Minor reactions should be reported to your pro vider or pharmacist for advice. Pharmacy phone numbers are usually located on your prescription bottle. For serious or life-threatening reactions such as difficulty breathing, tightness in your chest, swelling, itching or con vulsions call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room. Q: Why do some medications warn me of sunburn? A: Some medica tions such as sulfa antibiotics, like septra or bactrim, can cause photo sensitivity to sun rays and likely skin burning. Even short exposure to sun rays or tanning booths can cause skin rash, itching, redness or even severe sunburn. If your prescription label cautions against sun exposure, try avoiding the highest burn index of the day, usually between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. If you must be out, wear protective clothing and accessories. In addition, apply sunscreen (SPF 30 or higher), use SPF lip balm and wear sunglasses to protect your eyes. Q: Is it important how I store my medications? A: Each medication has unique storage requirements. Because the effectiveness of your medica tion may be altered by temperature, light or humidity, many medications should be stored in a cool, dry place away from moisture, heat and sunlight. Always read medication labels for storage recom mendations. If in doubt, ask your pharmacist if special storage procedures are needed. Ask the Doc is written by Naval Hospital Jacksonville providers from its hospital and five branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. This column was written by Cmdr. Pamela OLoughlin, Naval Branch Health Clinic Key West pharmacist. If you have a question for a physician, dentist, pharmacist or optometrist, send it to jaxpublicaf fairs@med.navy.mil Ask the DocPharmacist Cmdr. Pamela O'Loughlin MilKidz Club at YACAt the NAS Jax Youth Activities Center (YAC), the Blue Star Families launched its MilKidz Club, a program that empowers military children through social activities, volunteer and educational opportunities regardless of rank, branch of service or military installation. At the writing and drawing activity on April 3, volunteer Marcie Lewis helps Caleb Harden, age 6, write a letter to another military child.Photos by Morgan KehnertAt the Blue Star Families MilKidz Club seed planting activity, each child was given a packet of seeds and taught about planting and watering seeds properly. Volunteer Avenicia Regino helps Jesse Coker, age 5, plant seeds in his egg carton container. Photos by Jacob Sippel Naval Hospital Jacksonville commanding officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer presents the Navy and MarineCorps Commendation Medal to Lt. Jeffrey Cook during an awards ceremony at the hospital on April 4. Capt. Gayle Shaffer (left), Naval Hospital Jacksonville commanding officer, presents the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal to Lt. Cmdr. William Bennett during an awards ceremony at the hos pital March 28. Other award recipients included: Lt. James White (Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal); HM1 Jason Julien (Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal); Hospitalman James Stevens (Joint Service Achievement Medal); Hospitalman Christopher Dooling (Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal); HM3 Daniel Anderson (Flag Letter of Commendation, Navy Medicine East); HM3 Jake McCardell (Letter of Appreciation, Commanding Officer HMSS 72); HM3 Emmanuel Washington (Letter of Appreciation, Edward White High School NJROTC); Charlene Johnson (20-year Civilian Length of Service Award); Beverly Taylor (10-year Civilian Length of Service Award).Hospital Awards Quarters 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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Naval Hospital Jacksonville invites you to get fit From NH JacksonvilleDid you know that Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles awardwinning Wellness Center offers individual and group classes that focus on improving your health? Classes include tobacco cessation, weight management, fitness and nutrition. The following classes are offered throughout the year: (appointment or walkin) basic nutritiononehour. Assessment (appoint ment only) body mass, exercise and basic nutri tion(two) one-hour classes (one individual session and one group session). (appointment or walkin): Cholesterol manage ment90-minutes. (appointment only) healthy lifestyle/weight management six weeks (one hour per week). ment only) weight man agementeight weeks (one hour per week) (appointment or walk-in): or to make an appoint ment, call (904) 542-5292 or visit NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center located at Building 867, adjacent fitness center. Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha Jones"Since 1893, Chief Petty Officers have been deckplate leaders, the foundation for setting standards and the backbone of our navy," said CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre to the Chiefs' Mess aboard NAS Jax as they gathered at Bldg. 1 in celebration of the 121st birthday of the U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer. On their 121st birthday, the Chiefs' Mess of NAS Jax joins in celebration of their rank's rich heritage and tradition. (First row from left) ACC Andre Chester, MAC Vanessa Henderson, NAS Jax CMDCM Teri McIntyre, (second row from left) EMC Jason Allen, YNC Mark Leet, MTCS Ronald Thomas, BMC Jose Arroyopaulin, CSC Charles Brown, (third row from left) CSC Keith Combo, BMC Robert Gibbs, NCCS Chad Geers, (back row from left) CSCS Wendell Heyward, ABCM Michael Coppola, ENCS Scott Vanhorn, ACCS Keven Sloan, ABHCS Fred Baxter. The Chiefs' Mess reflects as NAS Jax CMDCM(SW/ AW) Teri McIntyre requests that on the 121st birthday of the Chief Petty Officer, they "take a moment to honor our long-standing traditions, remember our heritage and what the anchors mean. Recommit to our guiding principles and reaffirm our dedication to one another and our mess." Goat Locker celebrates 121 yearsNAS Jax CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre (center) leads the Chiefs' Mess in reciting the Sailor's Creed as they join together to honor the 121st birthday of the CPO. (From left) BMC Jose Arroyopaulin, CSC Charles Brown and QMC Joseph Ziro stand at the ready for morning colors in honor of the 121st birthday of the U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer. With MUC Charity Barron directing, Navy Band Southeast performed patriotic music for the U.S. Navy Chiefs' birthday recognition held at Bldg. 1 aboard NAS Jax. The Chiefs' Mess aboard NAS Jax gives their attention to ACC Andre Chester as he recites an excerpt from the CPO Creed, "In the United States Navy and only in the United States Navy the rank of E7 carries with it unique responsibilities and privileges you are now bound to observe and fulfill. Your entire way of life is now changed. More will be expected of you; more will be demanded of you. Not because you are an E7, but because you are now a U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer." JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 9

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From U.S. 7th Fleet Public AffairsThe NAS Jacksonville-based VP-16 War Eagles P-8s in Perth are still flying search missions. Overall patrol air craft support to date includes 24 missions with 220 of flight time covering 336,000 square nautical miles. Additionally, the U.S. Navy team operating the towed pinger locator (TPL) onboard Australian defense vessel Ocean Shield detected pinging signals, April 6. The detected signals are consistent with sounds that would come from a black box. The TPL heard consecutive pings at one-second inter vals. At the time of detection the TPL was at a depth of 300 meters, which is well above the optimal search depth where a black box would typically be detected. Upon detection, the Ocean Shield crew turned off as much noise-producing equipment as possible to reduce the chance of false alarms, and the signal was again held for over two hours at a TPL depth of 1,400 meters. The signal stregnth increased and then faded, as would be expected with the ship moving toward then away from the signal. After the signal was lost the team reeled the TPL back in to prepare for a course change to a reciprocal course to get a better line of bearing in the con tact location. While traveling on the reciprocal course, the Ocean Shield team again detected a separate set of pings while with the TPL set to an optimal depth of 3,000 meters. On this course the detection time lasted for about 15 min utes. The TPL detected two signals at the same frequency but in different locations. This would be consistent with the MH370 black box because the plane had both a flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder. Since the current data remains inconclusive, the team is moving foward to reacquire the signal and use the Bluefin-21 Sidescan Sonar to get a picture of any potential wreckage. This is a 24-hour operation and the Navy team is working around the clock with their Australian partners to reacquire the black box signal. The search is currently tak ing place approximately 950 nautical miles northwest of Perth. Lt. j.g. Nick Horton (left), and Lt. Clayton Hunt, naval aviators assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16, perform preflight checks in the flight station of a P-8A Poseidon April 1 prior to a mission to assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. VP-16 is deployed in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. Search for MH370 continuesPhotos by MCC Keith DeVinneyTwo P-8A Poseidon aircraft from VP-16 rest on the tarmac of an air field in Perth, Australia. The pair of maritime patrol aircraft are being utilized for the international effort to locate Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. A P-8A Poseidon aircraft from VP-16 is parked next to a Royal Australian Air Force E-7A Wedgetail aircraft at Perth Airport. Both planes are being utilized for the international effort to locate Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. Special acoustic gear joins searchCapt. Mark Matthews, supervisor of salvage and diving, demonstrates to international media how the towed array listens for the signal emitted by a locator beacon like the one on Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. Joint Task Force 658 is currently supporting Operation Southern Indian Ocean, searching for the missing Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777.Photo by MC1 Peter D. Blair JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 11

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Walk for child abuse preventionBy AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterEvery April the NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center arranges several activities involving children at the NAS Jax Child Development Center (CDC) in support of child abuse awareness and prevention month. On April 2, NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker, along with Fleet and Family Support Center staff and children and staff from the CDC, stepped out on their annual Child Abuse Prevention Month Walk. Since 2008, the Pinwheels for Prevention campaign has established the pin wheel as the national symbol for child abuse and neglect prevention. The children proudly wielded the pinwheels they crafted as they walked around the perimeter of the CDC to raise awareness for the pro gram. I really enjoy any opportunity I have to partici pate in events with the children of military families. This walk makes such a positive impact on the chil dren and they seem to be having a great time, said Wanamaker. Watching them laugh as they waved their pin wheels reminded us all why this annual Child Abuse Prevention Walk is so important. We must always work together to prevent any kind of child abuse, he added. Even the childrens caretakers noticed the impres sion the walk leaves on the children. Kathy Wright, program assistant at the CDC, noted, this walk encourages the discussions we have with the children regarding abuse and makes the children feel impor tant. There are several classes provided at the Fleet and Family Support Center to reinforce the cause, including New Parent Support, that Emily Fox, a child councilor at Fleet and Family Support Center, says, its where prevention starts. By Barbie SmolinskiNMCRS Publicity AssistantStephanie Croan is a new volunteer at Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) Jacksonville. As a Navy spouse, she recently moved to Jacksonville from Pensacola and looks forward to providing active duty service members and their families with financial counseling and assistance. Croan is a native of Ketchikan, Alaska, the states first city and Salmon Capital of the World. She attended Western Washington University where she earned a bachelors degree in environmen tal science. After college, she lived in Seattle for one year where she enjoyed the culture and fast-paced life of the city. She then moved to Juneau, Alaska, where she worked as an environmental monitor for the Kensington gold mine located 40 miles north of the city. There she found her beloved dog, Marlee, who happened to show up one day at the mine. From Juneau she moved to Fairbanks, Alaska where she met her husband, Andrew, who is a naval flight officer in training at VP-30 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Theyve been married for one year. In her free time, Stephanie loves to deep-sea dive. She recently became a certified scuba diver and explored Floridas Barrier Reef in Key West. Her dream is to dive the Belize Barrier Reef and the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. Do you want to meet interesting people like Stephanie Croan? Then check out the volunteer opportu nities at NMCRS, by calling the chairman of volunteers at 904-5423515. Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesNAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker (left) along with Fleet and Family Support Center staff and more than 112 children of the base Child Development Center pause for a photograph before stepping off on their walk to raise awareness for child abuse prevention. NMCRS Volunteer Spotlight: Meet Stephanie CroanCroan Proclamation for childrenCommanding officers from tenant commands and FFSC staff join NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander during the signing of a proclamation in support of Child Abuse Prevention and the Month of the Military Child at the Officers Club on April 2. (Front row from left) Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna, VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips, Undersander, VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. John Brabazon Command and NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre. Photo by MC2 Amanda Cabasos 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: April 19, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: April 26, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open May 10 June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. One Spark Festival Trip April 12 at noon Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee April 19 at 9 a.m. Jacksonville Suns Game April 22 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty April 8 & 22 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests April 10 & 24 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. Command Party Swing into savings & book your command golf tournamentMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Month of the Military Family Carnival April 12, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Easter Egg Hunt April 16, 7 p.m. McCaffrey Softball ComplexFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available including instrument, complex and commercial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.netSand Volleyball League forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS designated representative attend receive Greybeard Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jax. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Intramural Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym for rules and required paperwork. Kickball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Game play at lunch time. Contact the NAS Jax Sports Department for rules and required paperwork. Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. Play starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25. Intramural Summer Golf Meets May 7 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at 11:30 a.m. at the golf or designated representative attend receive Intramural Basketball Meets May 14 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective designated representative attend receive Wallyball League Meets May 21 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet noon For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil StandingsAs of April 4Winter Golf NCTS 6 1 VP-45 6 1 CNATTU Blue 5 2 VP-30 5 2 FRCSE 5 2 CV-TSC/PSD 4 3 Navy Band 4 3 SERCC 2 5 FRCSE II 1 2 HS-11 1 3 VP-10 1 5 CNATTU Gold 1 6 Ultimate Frisbee VP-30 Students 4 1 CV-TSC Ashore 4 1 VP-62 Broadarrows 3 2 NAVFAC/PWD 2 2 FRCSE 1 0 NAS Jax 2 3 HS-11 2 3 VP-10 0 4 Soccer FRCSE 1 0 HITRON 1 0 HSM-72 1 0 NAVFAC 1 0 TPU/PCF 1 0 VP-30 Students 1 0 BHC Jax 0 0 NAVHOSP 0 0 VP-10 0 0 VP-62 0 0 Air Ops 0 1 FRCSE F-18 PMI 0 1 HS-11 0 1 VP-26 0 1 VP-45 0 1 VR-62 0 1 Badminton Doubles NAVHOSP MSU 9 0 NAVFAC Blue 6 1 NBHC Jax 4 2 MWR Dynamic Duo 5 3 NAVFAC Red 4 3 NAVFAC Orange 3 4 NAVFAC Gold 3 4 CV-TSC Ashore 2 5 FACSFAC 1 1 5 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 13

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By Terri Moon Cronk American Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department believes military children serve their country alongside their service member parents, DoDs director of the office of family policy/children and youth said recently. When military children serve, they do so by making sacrifices when parents are deployed, through frequent moves, starting new schools and making new friends on a continuing basis, Barbara Thompson said in a recent interview with The Pentagon Channel for the Month of the Military Child thats cel ebrated in April. We feel its important for the nation to know that military children also serve their country, Thompson said. To honor military children for their sacrifices and service, DoD and the services have planned activities this month that range from installationbased fairs, parades, and literacy and art events, she said. Military Kids Day, April 15, marks the third-annual Purple Up! day when adults wear purple to show sup port of children from all the services, Thompson said. DoD has numerous year-round pro grams and awareness efforts to honor military children, and Thompson elab orated on some of those initiatives. To help children build their resil ience, DoD has coordinated programs with Sesame Street to help with ongo ing change in military childrens lives, Thompson noted. Sesame [Street] has been an out standing contributor to the well-being of military children, she said, naming a series of DVDs that cover such topics for military children as divorce, grief, separation and deployment, resilience skills, and visible or invisible injuries. Sesame Street also recently launched two new smartphone applications. One [app] covers relocation, and another is to help children learn selfregulation skills so they become more resilient, Thompson said. And every thing is free. Thompson emphasized that April also is Child Abuse Prevention Month and said awareness in this arena is important to DoD. Child Abuse Prevention Month is particularly important because its a social responsibility for all of us to make sure children are safe and their wellbeing is protected, she said. Giving parents the tools to make them strong supporters of their children and to keep them safe from predators and from violence within the family is crucial, she added. Parenting is tough, regardless of the situation and the age of the child. They each bring their nuances to the table, whether its children at [age] 2 who say no, or a teenager whos sometimes a little defiant, she said. DoD offers parenting skill resourc es, Thompson noted, such as the newly launched Parenting Course. The course, she explained, examines parenting from the context of the military life style, which revolves around deploy ments and parental separations from their children at different stages of their development. And an installation-based initia tive, the new Parent Support Program, involves home visitation for new par ents of children up to age 3, to help parents reach their full potential working with and being responsible for their children, Thompson said. The Marine Corps program supports parents with children up to age 5, she added. The New Parent Support Program is a part of the Family Advocacy Program, which has a prevention piece that offers courses and opportunities for sup port groups. We want to make sure we address the stressors in families lives before they escalate, Thompson said. Sometimes [certain] things really push our buttons, she added. So we need to have the tools, to know how to cope with those kinds of stressors and how we react to them.DoD salutes children during military child month 'Highlanders' at workAn HSM-72 Det.1 Seahawk helicopter works with hose handlers on the deck of guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) during a Helicopter In Flight Refuelling (HIFR) evolution while training in the Atlantic. The Highlanders are a detachment of two MH-60R helicopters certified for independent deployment.Photos courtesy of HSM-72HSM-72 Det.1 "Highlanders" stand with one of their two MH-60R Seahawk helicopters that will embark with guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) later this year in support of international exercises. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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Photo by Jacob SippelHospital CPOs party on(From left) Naval Hospital Jacksonville CMDCM Bennora Simmons, HMC Jamie Davis and HMCM Louis Ferraro cut the ceremonial cake April 3 com memorating 121 years of the U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer. Since 1893, Chiefs have been charged with the responsibility of ensuring our Sailors are the best in the world, ready to carry out the Navy's mission when called. Navy precision on displayThe U.S. Navy flight demonstration squadron, the Blue Angels, flies the diamond formation March 29 above Naval Air Station Kingsville, Texas. The air station is one of two that trains future Navy jet pilots, some of whom later join the Blue Angels team. The squadron is scheduled to perform at NAS Jacksonville Oct. 25-26.U.S. Navy photo by Richard StewartFRCSE returns HornetLt. Cmdr. Joshua Filbey, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) F/A-18 Hornet production officer and test pilot, climbs into the cockpit of a Blue Angels' Hornet March 31 to fly the aircraft from FRCSE at NAS Jacksonville to the Blue Angels' home base at NAS Pensacola. Photo by Kaylee LaRocque JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 15

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From Commander, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/ U.S. 10th Fleet Public AffairsU.S. Fleet Cyber Command/ U.S. 10th Fleet (FCC/C10F) conducted a change of command April 2 at the Frank B. Rowlett Building located at Fort George Meade, Md. Vice Adm. Jan Tighe relieved Adm. Michael Rogers as com mander in a ceremony held at fleet headquarters. With this appointment, Tighe becomes the third com mander of FCC/C10F and the first female commander of a numbered fleet in U.S. Navy history. It is an honor to take com mand of this outstanding warfighting organization and to be able to continue working with the tremendous team of uni formed and civilian professionals, said Tighe. Tighe has served as deputy commander of FCC/C10F since November 2013. Rogers takes the reigns as commander, U.S. Cyber Command and director, National Security Agency/ chief, Central Security Service. It has been a tremendous honor and privilege to serve as your commander for the last two and a half years. Your support of the nations maritime strategy by effectively employ ing our mission capabilities globally has been outstand ing, Rogers said. I now pass the conn of [FCC/ C10F] to Vice Adm. Jan Tighe. She is an exceptional leader, innovative thinker and stal wart warfighter who will con tinue our momentum of mission accomplishment and transformation. Tighe was promoted at the National Cryptologic Museum by Gen. Keith Alexander, who retired March 28 from his position as commander of U.S. Cyber Command and direc tor, National Security Agency/ chief, Central Security Service. I think the greatest honor and privilege Ive had is to work with great people, Alexander said, and Jan Tighe, you are one of the best people that our military has across all of the Services. You are exceptional in every category and you will do great with 10th Fleet, which I believe is just a stepping stone for future things for you, Alexander went on to say. Tighe was born in Bowling Green, Ky., and raised in Plantation, Fla. Her previous tours include duty with Naval Security Group Activities in Florida, Virginia, Japan, VQ-1 and Naval Information Warfare Activity. As a flag officer, Tighe has served as U.S. Cyber Command Deputy J3; OPNAV N2N6 Director, Decision Superiority; Naval Postgraduate School Interim President; and Deputy Commander, FCC/C10F. Tighe is a U.S. Naval Academy graduate and was commissioned as an ensign (special duty cryptology) in 1984. She attended the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, Calif., where she studied Russian. She also attended the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, Calif., and in 2001 was awarded a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and a M.S. in Applied Mathematics. Tighe wears both the Information Dominance Warfare insignia and Naval Aviation Observer wings, which she earned while deployed as an airborne spe cial evaluator aboard VQ-1 EP-3E aircraft in the Persian Gulf during Operation Desert Shield/Storm. U.S. Fleet Cyber Command serves as the Navy com ponent command to U.S. Strategic Command and U.S. Cyber Command, and the Navys Service Cryptologic Component commander under the National Security Agency/ Central Security Service. Fleet Cyber Command also reports directly to the Chief of Naval Operations as an Echelon II command. U.S. 10th Fleet is the oper ational arm of Fleet Cyber Command and executes its mission through a task force structure similar to other war fare commanders. By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsA new policy at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) now requires person nel to wear hearing protection in all marked industrial areas to help reduce the incidence of hearing loss from long-term exposure. The policy change is in accordance with the Navy Safety and Occupational Health Program Manual and Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers Occupational Safety and Health Policy requiring personal protective equipment at all centers to protect employees from injury and illness. Our policy was that for areas above 85 decibels, employees had to wear hearing protection based on guidelines of different noise hazards, said FRCSE Director of Safety Peter Gallant. This is not really feasible. We are revising our policy to state that if there are noise hazards above 85 or reason ably expected above 85 in an industrial area, then hearing protection will be worn at all times even for those transiting the area. The exception is dur ing breaks or lunch. According to Gallant, hear ing loss statistics are based using two methods the days away restricted transfer (DART) rate which is used by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration indus try-wide and the total case incident rate (TCIR) which combines DART cases and hearing loss cases. Our industrial site work ers are enrolled in a hearing conservation program based on noise levels within FRCSE shops, said Gallant. This program requires them to go through annual training and hearing check-ups at our base clinic. To carry out the new policy, an implementation team is identifying hearing protection zones, creating zone maps, displaying signage and providing hearing protection stations. We are working with shop managers to identify specific hearing protection zones and determine where additional signs and hearing protection stations are needed, said Gallant. The policy also requires most FRCSE employees to wear safety glasses and safety shoes while in and traveling through marked industrial production spaces including aisle ways. However, employees, vendors and visitors passing through marked aisle ways may wear, at a minimum, closed-toe shoes, if safety shoes are not required for their job function. From Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is cel ebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration dinner and program. This is an All Services event featuring a joint color guard, All Services Missing Person table, the Navy Band with all the service songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine.The keynote speak er is Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches who served in prior conflicts, as well as those currently serving are invited to attend. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emotional and patriotic, and provide an excel lent opportunity to connect with sur vivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/ dinner dress white jacket optional, and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., with dinner served at 6 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Tickets may be purchased from the following locations: NAVY LEAGUE MAYPORT Bob Price, 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 E-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net NAVY LEAGUE ST AUGUSTINE Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 E-mail: anuday00@aol.com US Fleet Cyber Command/US 10th Fleet change of commandPhoto by MC2 David Finlely Jr.Vice Adm. Jan E. Tighe smiles as she assumes command of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command and U.S. 10th Fleet during the April 2 ceremony conducted at fleet headquarters. Tighe relieved Adm. Michael Roger, who takes over as commander of U.S. Cyber Command and director of the National Security Agency and chief of the Central Security Service. Tighe is the third com mander of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command and U.S. 10th Fleet and the first female commander of a numbered fleet in U.S. Navy history. Photos by Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Director of Safety Peter Gallant (left) discusses where to place new hearing protection signs in work centers with hearing conservation team members. From right: Steve Simmons, FRCSE Mega Center supervisor; Steve Parker, International Federation of Professional Technical Engineers Union representative and Alison Sala-Brewer, industrial engineering technician during a meeting at the depot on March 18. On March 18, Alison SalaBrewer, a Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) industrial engineering techni cian and member of the FRCSE hearing conservation team, posts a sign to remind FRCSE employees and visitors that hearing protection is required in a designated work center. The team is identifying areas throughout FRCSE where hearing protection is required and identifying locations to install earplug dispensers.FRCSE establishes new hearing conservation zonesCNO is Battle of Midway keynote speaker June 7 Voting assistance availableNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander discussed the importance of voting in order to maintain a healthy and thriving democracy. He spoke at a recent Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP) workshop for voting assistance officers held at Deweys All Hands Club. For more info, visit www.FVAP.gov.Photo by Clark Pierce 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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By Lt. j.g. Torrey PlumVP-8 Public AffairsSeven Sailors from the VP-8 Fighting Tigers based at Cooperative Security Location Comalapa, El Salvador spent March 29 helping to build a home for a local Salvadoran family as part of a Habitat for Humanity project. The Fighting Tigers leveled floors, hauled dirt and erected scaffolding. It was a humbling experi ence to see how grateful the families were, said Lt. j.g. Paxie Cordova, a pilot with VP-8. Habitat for Humanity provides us with a wonderful opportunity to help the local community and leave a last ing mark from our time spent here. Hugo Rodriguez, the recipi ent of the new home, expressed appreciation for the volunteers time and effort. The experience allows us to create new relationships with people from other countries, he said. It means a great deal to us that these people, who weve never met, are willing to volunteer their time in order to provide us with a home. Habitat for Humanity El Salvador relies mostly on dona tions and volunteers to provide housing to families, many of whom have been displaced by natural disasters. Since they began aiding Latin America in 1979, Habitat for Humanity has helped provide more than 100,000 families with adequate housing. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 are deployed to the 4th and 5th fleet areas of responsibil ity, assisting in the Counter Transnational Organized Crime mission and providing humanitarian assistance. By GM2(SW) Camille PerezCSL Comalapa Public Affairs Members of the El Salvador air forces Segunda Brigada Aerea (Second Air Brigade) hosted a sports day March 28 at their base in Comalapa and invited Sailors from Cooperative Security Location (CSL) Comalapa and VP-8 to participate. Other participants includ ed Policia Nacional Civil (the national police), the Maseca corn company, Aeroman, Comision Ejecutiva Portuaria Autonoma and Grupo Conjunto Cuscastlan. Having a sports day like this helps the heath of relations between the U.S. Navy and Salvadorans, said Lt. Col. Saul Osorio of the Segunda Brigada Aerea. Friendly competition helps builds on the camara derie between CSL Sailors and Segunda Brigada Aerea. CSL and the VP-8 Fighting Tigers joined together to cre ate one soccer team, and while both commands had basketball teams, VP-8 fielded its own volleyball team. The teams played in a singleelimination tournament for each sport. VP-8 won the bas ketball championship, while the Segunda Brigada Aerea won in soccer and Maseca in volleyball. CSL Comalapa provided hot dogs and minutas (snow cones), and the Segunda Brigada pro vided water and sodas for everyone. Sports day was a great time, said Ensign Mark Baden, a basketball team member and naval flight officer with VP-8. It was an honor to participate in friendly competition against the El Salvadorans and experience their culture. For more news from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet, visit www.navy.mil/local/cusns/. Scholarship application deadline extended From staffBalfour Beatty Communities Foundation has extended accept ing scholarship applica tions from high school seniors and under graduate students who live in a Balfour Beatty Community and are attending or planning to attend an accredited educational/technical insti tution for the 2014 2015 academic year. To apply for these scholarships go to the Foundations web site, www.bbcommu nitiesfoundation.org/ scholarships.aspx, print out, complete, and submit the applica tion and all required materials to Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation at 10 Campus Boulevard, Newtown Square, Pa. 19073.Applications must be postmarked by May 2. Fighting Tigers help build home for Salvadoran familyPhoto courtesy of VP-8(From left) AWO2 Mark Willard, Lt. j.g. Paxie Cordova and (background) AECS Demetrius Brown of VP-8 invest some sweat in a Habitat For Humanity project for a Salvadoran family as they select concrete blocks at the construction site. CSL Comalapa, VP-8 Sailors compete in Salvadoran sports dayPhotos by GM2 Camille PerezEnsign Mark Baden, a naval flight officer with VP-8, looks for room under the basket during the Segunda Brigada Aerea (Second Air Brigade) sports day on March 28 at CSL Comalapa, El Salvador. The "Fighting Tigers" won the day's basket ball championship. AE3 Danielle Lindsay of VP-8 digs the ball during volleyball competition in the Segunda Brigada Aerea (Second Air Brigade) sports day as team mate AWO2 Blake Pockrandt looks on. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 17

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 2014 I I D E VP-5 COC Looking To The Future Page 3 NA V Y RUN Hundreds Compete In 10K MILITAR Y CHILD Free Carnival April 12 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com War Eagles bring P-8A By MC1(SW/EXW/AW) Joshua Bryce BrunsCommander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea Public AffairsThe U.S. and Republic of Korea (ROK) navies enhanced their combined and joint maritime capabilities after com pleting a series of drills and exercises ashore and at sea from March 8-31 in support of exercise Foal Eagle 2014. Exercise Foal Eagle in an umbrella of regularly scheduled, annual exer cises that are the culmination of many months of planning and based on real istic training scenarios. The naval portion of the Foal Eagle exercises took place in international waters around South Korea and fea tured a full spectrum of joint maritime operations designed to strengthen the interoperability and teamwork between U.S. and ROK military forces. By MC3 Jason KofonowDefense Media ActivityNavy P-3C Orion and P-8A Poseidon aircrews from around the maritime patrol and reconnaissance fleet are competing April 4-10 in the annual Fleet Challenge anti-submarine war fare (ASW) exercise at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. Fleet Challenge 2014 includes seven combat aircrew (CAC) from the three maritime patrol and reconnaissance wings, a fleet replacement squadron and a reserve squadron from the United Kingdom. In the annual ASW rodeo, as the exercise is also known, each CAC is graded in a simulator scenario, as well as actual flight operations against USS Springfield (SSN 761), which acts as an opposing force. We bring the best of the best together to compete in the ASW rodeo so that we can highlight the training thats been going on across the fleet, said Cmdr. Mike Granger, the officer in charge of the Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapons School. Crews are assessed on mission plan ning, optimized tactics, crew training, as well as implementation of past les sons learned in determining the most effective maritime patrol and recon By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public AffairsNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast envi ronmental teams contributions were recognized recently as two Navy instal lations received prestigious U.S. Navy environmental honors. Vice Adm. Phil Cullom, deputy chief of naval operations for fleet readiness and logistics (N4), announced the win ners of the fiscal year (FY) 2013 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Environmental Awards competition, March 18. 2013 award winners included the Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville, Fla. Environmental Restoration Partnering Team and NAS Meridian, Miss. in the Environmental Restoration (ER), Installation category. I commend NAS Jax Restoration Advisory Board team leader Tim Curtin and the restoration team members on winning this award. They have proven to be leaders and are deserv ing of this recognition. Their leader ship in the ongoing and multifaceted restoration projects truly supports the Navys commitment to be a good environmental steward, stated NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Undersander, upon learning of the award. The NAS Jacksonville Team was formed to navigate a path forward to successfully investigate, remediate, and manage the risks posed by contami nated waste sites located on the instal lation. They have worked together since 1992. During the past year, the team implemented several cutting edge, state-of-the-art investigations in an industrial area including vapor intru sion in multiple industrial buildings and bio-remediation in a former dry cleaners area, said Tim Curtin, NAS Jacksonville ER Program Manager. This included injecting emulsified vegetable oil in the sand and conduct ing an electro-kinetic process in the clay. Curtin explained that the installa tions hydrogeological, industrial, and ecological settings present unique opportunities to protect human health and the environment through the use of innovative technologies and method ologies for site restoration. The pace and expanded scope of cleanup efforts at NAS Jacksonville industrial sites have been possible through cooperation and collaboration of the restoration team with its regu latory and community stakeholders, including the federal and state regula tory agencies, the local citizens group, and the local redevelopment authority, Undersander added. The second installation recognized was NAS Meridian. I would like to congratulate all of the personnel in the Public Works Environmental Department for their efforts leading to NAS Meridians selec tion as the 2013 CNO Environmental Restoration, Installation category, award winner, said NAS Meridian Command Officer Capt. Charles C. Moore II. Bravo Zulu and best of luck to NAS Meridian Environmental at the next level, the Secretary of the Navy Environmental Awards Competition. The most significant restoration project completed at NAS Meridian would be the Site 3B Metals Landfill off the South Runway, said NAS Meridian Environmental Director Steve Wade. In earlier years, this site was used to store metals and construction debris. The restoration process used at Site 3B was a total remediation of the entire area. The Navy conducted four subsur face ground and water sampling events following the cleanup to confirm no contamination was left behind. As a department it is a great accom plishment for our staff to be recognized US, ROK navies complete Foal Eagle exercise Photo by MC1 Joshua Bryce BrunsPatrol squadrons participate in ASW challengePhoto by MC2 Gulianna DunnA P-8A Poseidon rests on the flight line at Naval Air Station Jacksonville in 2013 as a P-3C Orion approaches the runway. Aircrews flying both platforms are com peting in the ASW Fleet Challenge 2014. NAS Jacksonville and Meridian recognized for environmental stewardshipOfficial Navy photoNAS Jax Environmental Restoration Partnering Team (from left) Peter Dao (US EPA); Mike Singletary (NAVFAC Southeast); Julie Johnson; (TetraTech); Jennifer Conklin (FDEP); Tim Curtin (NAS Jacksonville); Tim Flood (Management Edge); Adrienne Wilson (NAVFAC Southeast); Todd Haverkost (Resolution Consultants); Eric Davis (CH2MHill) and Mark Peterson (TetraTech).See Page 7 See Page 6 See Page 6

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-7789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley From StaffApril 10 1941 USS Niblack (DD-424), used depth charges against a German U-boat while conducting rescue operations for a torpedoed Dutch freighter. This was the first action by an American naval vessel against the Axis Powers. 1963 During diving tests, USS Thresher (SSN-593) was lost with all hands (112 crew and 12 civilians) east of Cape Cod, Mass. 1966 River Patrol Boats of River Patrol Force commenced operations on inland waters of South Vietnam. April 11 1783 Congress declares end of war with Great Britain. 1900 Navy accepts its first subma rine, USS Holland. 1970 Launch of Apollo 13, com manded by Navy Capt. James Lovell Jr. Former naval aviator Fred Haise Jr. was the Lunar Module Pilot. While 200,000 miles from Earth there was an explo sion on board which forced Apollo 13 to circle the moon without landing. Mission duration was 5 days, 22 hours and 54 minutes. Recovery was by HS-4 helicopters from USS Iwo Jima (LPH-2). 1991 U.N. ceasefire ends Persian Gulf War. April 12 1861 Civil War begins when Confederates fire on Fort Sumter, S.C. 1911 Lt. Theodore Ellyson qualifies as first naval aviator. 1962 U.S. Navy demonstrates new landing craft with retractable hydro foils, LCVP(H). 1975 Operation Eagle Pull evacua tion from Cambodia. 1981 First launch of re-useable Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-1) with all-Navy crew. Retired Capt. John Young com manded and Lt. Cmdr. Robert Crippen was the pilot. Mission duration was two days, six hours and 20 minutes. Sixteen of the shuttles heat-shielding silicon tiles were lost and 148 damaged during reentry. 1993 Aircraft from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) and NATO forces begin enforcing the no-fly zone over Bosnia in Operation Deny Flight. April 13 1847 Naval forces begin five-day bat tle to capture several towns in Mexico. 1861 Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. 1960 Navy navigation satellite, Transit, placed into orbit from Cape Canaveral, Fla. and demonstrates abil ity to launch another satellite. April 14 1898 Commissioning of USS Solace, the first post-Civil War hospital ship. 1969 Over the Sea of Japan, North Korean aircraft shoots down a Navy EC-121 reconnaissance aircraft assigned to VQ-1. 1988 USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) strikes Iranian mine off Qatar. 1989 First Navy ship arrives to assist in Exxon Valdez oil spill cleanup. April 15 1885 Naval forces land at Panama to protect American interests during revolution. 1912 Scout cruisers USS Chester (CL-1) and USS Salem (CL-3) sail from Massachusetts to assist RMS Titanic survivors. 1918 First Marine Aviation Force formed at Marine Flying Field, Miami, Fla. 1961 Launch of first nuclear-pow ered frigate, USS Bainbridge (DDG 96), at Quincy, Mass. 1962 USS Princeton (LPH-5) deliv ers first Marine Corps helicopters to Vietnam. This was first Marine advisory unit to arrive in South Vietnam. 1986 Navy aircraft from USS America (CV-66) and USS Coral Sea (CV-43) attack Libya in conjunction with USAF aircraft after Libya was linked to the terrorist bombing of a West Berlin discotheque that killed one American and injured 78 people. April 16 1863 Union gunboats pass Confederate batteries at Vicksburg. 1924 Navy supports relief operations during Mississippi Valley floods, lasting until June 16. 1947 Act of Congress gives Navy Nurse Corps members commissioned rank. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorOn the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, I took a picture of you standing next to the window in your nursery. The sun illumi nated half your face, and you were holding a wooden train in one hand. When you heard my footsteps, you turned around, threw back your head and gig gled. Your smile was all gums. You had no idea what had just happened in New York City. Ive kept that picture on my desk ever since. It reminds me of a time when I could solve all your problems simply by walk ing into a room. It reminds me of a time when your world was our home. It reminds me of a time when everything you were tired, hungry, happy was usually apparent to me. Back then, you liked to line up your trains in a row. Sometimes you sorted them from biggest to smallest, and then smallest to biggest again. You organized them by color or by the shininess of their wheels. You were always indus trious like that. Even at 1 year old. I wonder if hell be an engi neer like his dad? I said. Hes very systematic. A few years later, you wore your Superman pajamas with Velcro cape to the grocery store and preschool. When other kids laughed at your choice of clothes, you convinced them that Superman is cool. Soon, all the other kids wanted a Superman cape, too. You have never caved to peer pressure. Hes a natural leader, I said. I wonder if hell go into poli tics? By kindergarten, you were showing great interest in sci ence and math. The teacher gave you extra assignments to satisfy your curiosity. Uncle Will got a kick out of watching you do puzzles. You were so serious and determined. Maybe hell be a scientist, I said. Hes very good at math. Just like his dad. Later, in elementary school, you got involved in sports. Baseball was your favorite. You read all the history, and your bank of ready-to-answer trivia rivaled Dads. Maybe hell work for a base ball team, I said. Hes so good at player stats and strategy. Oh, the strategy! By fourth grade, you were beating dad at chess and your favorite passtime was Axis and Allies. Woe was the person who thought you didnt know every major player in World War II. You memorized all the battleships, countries, leaders and out comes. You kept maps tacked to your wall and went over the war strategies again and again. Maybe hell join the Navy, I said. Just like his dad and grandfathers. You made lists and more lists. Foreign countries were a fascination, and you ranked all the nations in the world by land mass and population. Then you ranked languages of the world according to how many people speak them. Hes a natural historian, I said. Maybe hell be a professor. All along, though, the one thing I knew for sure was that you got all your traits from Dad. One day, while I was wash City of Jacksonville Official PhotoCorrectionThe caption of this photo in the April 3 edition of Jax Air News omitted Col. Brian Simpler (third from left). Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown (center) and area base commanders shared lunch and a few laughs. Around the table from left, NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker, Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville Commander Capt. Tom Allan, 125th Fighter Wing Commander Col. Brian Simpler, Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Wess McCall, Brown, City of Jacksonville (COJ) Director of Military and Veterans Affairs Vic Guillory, Marine Corps Blount Island Command Deputy Commander Jim Hooks and COJ Deputy of Military and Veterans Affairs Harrison Conyers. U.S. Navy photos The Apollo 13 crew is safely on board USS Iwo Jima (LPH-2) after aborting their moon landing mission after an oxygen tank exploded, crippling the service mod ule. Despite great hardship caused by limited power, loss of cabin heat, shortage of potable water, and the critical need to jury rig the carbon dioxide removal sys tem, the crew returned safely to Earth. An HS-4 helicopter recovered the capsule after splash down. On April 21, 1950, VC-5 Commanding Officer Capt. John Hayward made the first takeoff of the AJ-1 heavy attack plane from the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea (CV-43). His pilots completed carrier qualifications in August and become the first operational AJ-1 Savage squadron. The AJ-1 aircraft above is landing aboard USS Wasp (CV-18) in March of 1952. This Week in Navy History From the HomefrontOldest son, Ford, shows what hes becomingSee HOMEFRONT, Page 3

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NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander was welcomed March 19 by retired Capt. Frank Brough at the monthly meeting of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) Northeast Florida Chapter. Undersander presented information about topics of interest to MOAA mem bers. Brough said, "We are grate ful for Capt. Undersanders brief on the major changes occurring now, as well as in the future, for this outstanding naval air station. ing dishes, you came up behind me and began read ing aloud about the unrest in Ukraine. I thought you were reading from the newspaper. But when I turned around, I saw that you were reading from your own writing. Light from the kitchen window illuminated half your face and highlighted your broadening shoul ders. Your voice is deeper than I ever remembered it being. I struggled to hear the words you read, distracted as I was thinking about your toddler self standing by the nursery window. I could tell, however, that each of your words were carefully chosen and fit into the sen tences like puzzle pieces. You paused occasionally to fix something this word would be better if I moved it here and I could see the concentration on your face. I have that same far-away stare when Im working with words. You started talking about submitting some of your writing for publication. I remembered the first time I sent an essay to Chicken Soup for the Soul. I told you how to format your submission. When you walked away, your younger broth er, Owen, said, Wow, hes like the next Charles Krauthammer, isnt he, Mom? I didnt answer. I had learned by then not to try to guess what you will become. I had never really known. (And since when does Owen know about Charles Krauthammer?) But to connect with you over writing was better than any Mothers Day gift. Ever. That day in the kitchen, I saw that you are not just like dad or just like me. You are Ford. I realized that joy would come not from guessing at what youll become, but from watching you show us what youre becoming. And I knew that in any case, what I wish for you is more success and happiness than your dad and I ever could achieve. HOMEFRONTFrom Page 2 Station briefingPhoto by Clark Pierce VP-5 Mad Foxes look to future after change of commandBy Lt. j.g. John BellezzaVP-5 Public AffairsOn March 20, Cmdr. Gregory Petrovic assumed command of the VP-5 Mad Foxes from Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh during a change of command ceremony held in Hangar 117 at NAS Jacksonville. The ceremonys guest speaker, Rear Adm. Kyle Cozad, discussed the tremendous legacy Pottenburgh will leave behind. He also reminded Petrovic to, Enjoy every day because time goes by much too quickly. Pottenburgh gave farewell remarks to the squadron in which he stated, You went home each day tired, but with your integrity intact. Continue to raise the bar at NAS Jacksonville, as well as in Japan. Petrovic urged the squadron to continue to be humble, be bold and be decisive. Pottenburgh took command in May 2013 as VP-5 became the second operational Navy squadron to transition from the P-3C Orion to the new P-8A Poseidon aircraft. Under his leadership, the squadron achieved Safe-for-Flight certification in the P-8A and has participated in numerous exercises, including the first-ever P-8A support of a Carrier Strike Group Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX). The Mad Foxes accomplished those feats while flying in support of USS George H.W. Bush Strike Group deployment cer tification. Pottenburghs next assignment will be at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., serving as a Naval Aviation Program Analyst in the Programming Division (N80) of the Chief of Naval Operations staff. Petrovic is from New Bern, N.C. and graduated from the U. S. Naval Academy in 1996. His naval career has included tours at VP-9 in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, CTF67 and C6F in Naples, Italy, aboard the USS George Washington (CVN 73) in Norfolk, Va., VP-30 and VP-45 at NAS Jacksonville, and in the J8 Division of the Joint Staff in at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. Later this year, Petrovic will lead VP-5 on deploy ment as the Mad Foxes will relieve VP-16 War Eagles in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility and become only the second P-8A squadron to operate overseas. Photo by Lt. j.g. John Bellezza(From left) Outgoing VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh, incoming VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Greg Petrovic, and incoming VP-5 Executive Officer Cmdr. Alan D'Jock look to the future after the "Mad Foxes" change of command ceremony March 20 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Annual Navy Run attracts hundreds of athletesBy Shannon LeonardMWR Marketing DirectorOn a warm overcast morning more than 400 ser vice members, retirees, civilians and family members turned out for the ninth annual Capt. Chuck Cornett 10K Run and 5K Walk April 5 at NAS Jacksonville. Originally called the Navy Run, the event was renamed after the 2004 death of Cornett, a former NAS Jax executive officer and avid runner. Cornetts family members, Mike and his grandson Michael, and Kathy and Mike Ray traveled to take part in this years run. It is such an honor for us to be here for my dad and for our family to be recognized each year. This year, were wearing t-shirts honoring his phrase, Jog, run, love it. His goal was to inspire people to start running or walking and to stay healthy and fit, she said. Navy run events kicked-off April 3 with a Zumba and kickboxing Jam. On Friday there was a health fair in the Navy Exchange parking lot. The Naval Hospital Jacksonville Wellness Center provided free blood pressure checks and information on breast cancer awareness, including how to administer a breast selfexam. The Fleet & Family Support Center provided infor mation on sexual assault awareness. On Saturday, in addition to the 10-kilometer com petitive run and five-kilometer walk, there was a run ners shoes and apparel fair in the Navy Exchange parking lot. Once the runners received their packages with their numbers and timing chips, they stretched and min gled with friends and family. After observing morning colors, NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker welcomed the run ners and then joined them to await the starting gun. It is a great day for a run and to promote navy fitness. I would like to thank the Cornett Family for attending and Ken Bandy for being an announcer for the past 25 years. This should be a great race and I am looking forward to it, said Wanamaker. With a shotgun start, the runners headed down Child Street with Capt. Chuck Cornetts radar blue and yellow Corvette leading the way. This is such a wonderful event and great for our community to come together and promote physi cal fitness, said NAS Jax Athletic Director Tanya Henigman, who coordinated the run. More than 400 runners participated in the 9th annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run on April 5 in front of cheering spectators at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. Noi Freeman, volunteer fitness instructor for MWR, instructs over 50 people at the outdoor Navy Run Zumba class held on April 3 in the Navy Exchange parking lot. More than 40 volunteers gather early Saturday morning in support of the annual NAS Jax Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run on April 5 in the Navy Exchange parking lot. John Metzgar, 51, finished second place overall (35:44) in the annual 10K Navy Run. A line formed early Saturday morning as runners register and pick-up their race packets at the annual Captain Chuck Cornett 10K Navy Run. Nine-year-old twins Kip and Kirby Truitt are all smiles after placing second and third in the 5K event on Saturday.See NAVY RUN, Page 5

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 5 Open Men 1. Jordan Zwick, 27, (33:19) 2. John Metzgar, 51, (35:44) 3. Andy Shellgren, 24, (36:03) Open Women 2. Amy Purcell, 35, (45:48) 3. Jennifer Dominguez, 24, (46:25) Masters Men 1. Joe Rivera, 47, (38:38) 2. Jimmer Sullivan, 53, (42:00) 3. Anthony Truitt, 55, (42:23) Masters Women 1. Barbara Gowdy, 45, (46:33) 2. Colleen Bierbach, 40, (46:44) Women Under 11 1. Simone Wanamaker, 10, (1:03:23) 2. Grace Adams, 9, (1:10:58) 3. Addison Adams, 8, (1:11:48) Women 11 14 1. Jamie Averitt, 14, (1:13:12) Women 15 19 1. Alaina Pruitt, 19, (59:03) Women 20 24 1. Miranda Abbas, 20, (49:53) 2. Samantha Scalf, 23, (55:52) 3. Jennifer Ayala, 23, (59:12) Women 25 29 1. Yuka Segatto, 25, (49:14) 2. Michelle Bader, 29, (56:29) 3. Kaila Yetka, 25, (57:32) Women 30 34 1. Tammy Jenkins, 32, (48:16) 2. Nicole Magee, 30, (48:32) 3. Molly Major, 32, (48:36) Women 35 39 1. Michelle McCullough, 35, (51:25) 3. Charlotte Miller, 38, (51:32) Women 40 44 1. Amy Guthrie, 41, (51:35) 2. Cathy Ivancik, 40, (58:53) 3. Rowie Hardtke, 41, (59:01) Women 45 49 1. Dena Gaucher, 46, (57:30) 2. Joanie Barrett, 46, (1:00:34) 3. Benita Terry, 49, (1:04:30) Women 50 54 1. Anna Delhart, 50, (56:34) 2. Catherine Ferrell, 52, (57:18) 3. Theresa Hollis, 51, (1:01:53) Women 55 59 1. Kim Crist, 57, (53:25) 2. Sue Whitworth, 59, (55:19) 3. Joanne Harris, 55, (56:18) Women 60 64 1. Diane Wilkinson, 61, (1:10:26) 2. Jean Schubert, 63, (1:27:13) Women 70 74 1. Marie Bendy, 71, (1:18:03) Women 75 & Up 1. Patt McEvers, 75, (1:18:03) Men Under 11 1. Skykar Gray, 8, (59:28) 2. Chase Kirkland, 9, (1:16:26) 3. Ryan Nolen, 10, (1:24:20) Men 11 14 1. Stephen Sizemore, 14, (1:01:58) 2. Brandon Brown, 12, (1:05:38) Men 15 19 1. Jack Wanamaker, 17, (42:19) 2. Robert Fortune, 17, (43:51) 3. Steven Sauri, 18, (52:50) Men 20 24 1. Tyler Johnson, 21, (41:56) 2. Sean Roderick, 20, (43:50) 3. James Pressley, 21, (45:37) Men 25 29 1. Patrick Cooper, 25, (37:38) 3. Phillip Jenkins, 28, (41:26) Men 30 34 1. Devin Riley, 30, (42:20) 2. John Hallahan, 34, (47:16) 3. Ryan Murphy, 33, (47:48) Men 35 39 1. Jeremy Judernatz, 35, (39:28) 2. Kyle Beahan, 38, (39:50) 3. Tom Ivancik, 38, (4:07) Men 40 44 1. Jeffrey Owejan, 42, (48:21) 2. Gerald Ataiza, 43, (50:37) 3. James Miller, 41, (52:30) Men 45 49 3. Vincent Collogan, 45, (47:42) Men 50 54 1. Joseph McQuade, 53, (43:20) 2. Steven Damit, 52, (46:44) 3. Bradley Tippett, 53, (47:45) Men 55 59 1. Bradford Joseph, 55, (48:01) 3. Eliseo Rodriguez, 58, (51:29) Men 60 64 1. Paul Geiger, 61, (47:59) 2. Douglas Tillett, 60, (49:50) 3. Doug Hardt, 64, (50:46) Men 65 69 1. George White, 67, (47:21) 2. Michael Fitzsimmons, 65, (52:16) 3. Martin Wilkinson, 65, (55:44) Men 70 74 1. Paul Smith, 72, (53:05) 2. Frank Frazier, 71, (59:44) 3. John Fears, 70, (1:03:21) Men 75 & Up 1. Charles Wagner, 76, (1:22:39) 2. Bob Meister, 82, (1:23:33) 3. Pat Gallagher, 83, (1:28:07) Of course, we couldnt pull this off with out the help of our volunteers and sponsors. Its a team effort to organize this event. We have about 40 volunteers out here helping out to ensure everything runs smoothly. This was the first year we had online reg istration and it went very well. Next years run promises to be even better. I am already working on new ideas. The first runner to cross the 5K finish line was 13-year-old Conner McQuade (24:31), followed by nine-year-old twin brothers Kirby Truitt (24:37) and Kip Truitt (24:48). The overall winner and first man to cross the 10K finish line was Jordan Zwick (33:10), followed by John Metzgar (35:44) and Lt. Andy Shellgren of VP-10 (36:03). The first woman to cross the 10K line was Lisa Adams (44:10). Amy Purcell placed second (45:48) and Jennifer Dminguez finished third (46:25). Following the awards presentation, run ners stayed around hoping to win a prize provided by Navy Run sponsors. Prizes included an ASICS shoe gift certificate, Jacksonville Suns admission tickets & mer chandise, TRX Force Kits, a Garmin watch and much more. Premier Beverage provided patrons free bottles of VOSS water for rehy drating. We really appreciate our Navy Run sponsors including the Navy Exchange, Columbia College, University of Phoenix, VyStar Credit Union, ASICS, USA Discounters, Mitchell Profitt, TRX, Life Fitness, USAA, Jacksonville Suns, Holiday Inn of Orange Park and Premier Beverage, said Henigman.Photo by Morgan Kehnert Rob Blazewick leads a Kickboxing class full of high intensity boxing moves set to fast pace and heart pumping music. Michael Cornett and Kathy Ray award the first place medal to 10-year-old Simone Wanamaker for winning her division. (From left) Kathy and Mike Ray along with Michael and Mike Cornett proudly stand in front of Captain Chuck Cornett's radar blue and yellow Corvette that led the April 5 Navy Run named aboard NAS Jax. Photo by Morgan Kehnert Tanya Henigman (left), MWR Fitness Center director, hands Capt. Mona Meaux (right), oral surgeon at NAS Jacksonville Dental Clinic her 2014 Capt. Chuck Cornett Navy Run race packet during registration on April 3. "I'm excited for the run and the fact that there is high command involvement."Photos by Shannon LeonardHM2 Charnele Punongbayon from Naval Hospital Jacksonville Wellness Center checks Ron Warners blood pressure during the Navy Run health fair. Dave and Samantha Scalf and Bri Pettit care fully secure their timing chips to their shoes. NAVY RUNFrom Page 4Jordan Zwick 33:19 Lisa Adams 44:10Captain Chuck Cornett 10K Navy Run Results

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naissance aircrew. Its the weapons schools chance to put them through their paces in the latest things that have devel oped over the previous year, said Granger. This year marks the first time P-8A Poseidon aircraft participate with P-3C Orion aircrews in the competition. There are P-3 crews out there who are determined to not get shown up, said Granger. I think with some of the advantages that the Poseidon brings, such as being able to bring more sonar buoys on station, and the training that the crews have gotten, it will be tough. It will be a close run. Both the simulator events and flight operations were designed based on real-world scenarios, so aircrews can experience what is happening out in the fleet and bring that knowledge home to their squadrons to share, said Granger. The Navys ASW Fleet Challenge 2014 exercise has been held every year since 2007, with the exception of 2013, when it was cancelled due to budgetary restraints. FLEET CHALLENGEFrom Page 1for the work that happens at the Environmental Department here on board NAS Meridian, said Wade. As an individual, it is a great feeling to know that you are a part of an excellent staff that is making a lasting improvement to the envi ronmen for future generations. The processes for remedial actions ultimately ends with no further action for a site to be clas sified as closed out. So site close out would mean that the land goes back to the way it originally was before it was inhabited. Currently, the restoration team is planning a bioreactor for the reme dial actions at Site 8 Old Jet Wash Area. This bioreactor system will allow microorganisms to break down active chemical contami nation naturally at an accelerated rate. Planning, communication, and team work are what it takes to have the work accomplished in a short amount of time, claimed Wade. The local environmental staff effectively coordinated and com municated with the partnering team to finish the work on time. The partnering team included the NAVFAC Southeast Region Program Manager Robert Fisher, Mississippi Environmental Quality Regulator Robert Merrell, CH2MHill Program Manager David Chung, and NAS Meridian Environmental staff. For the fiscal year 2013 compe tition, 54 nominations from com mands around the world were received in 10 award categories. Environmental experts for the Navy and representatives from non-government organizations evaluated nominations to deter mine winners for each of the award categories. The CNO Environmental Awards honor ships, installations, indi viduals, and teams for their out standing achievements in Navy environmental programs. The ten award categories include 1) Natural Resources Conservation, Small Installation; 2) Natural Resources Conservation, Individual or Team; 3) Environmental Quality, Non-Industrial Installation; 4) Environmental Quality, Individual or Team; 5) Environmental Quality, Large Ship; 6) Sustainability, Industrial Installation; 7) Environmental Restoration, Installation; 8) Environmental Restoration, Individual or Team; 9) Cultural Resources Management, Installation; and 10) Environmental Excellence in Weapon System Acquisition, Large Program, Individual or Team. All CNO winners now advance to the Secretary of the Navy level of competition. For more information on the CNO Environmental Awards pro gram, visit http://greenfleet.dod live.mil/environment/awards. NAVFAC ENVIRONMENTALFrom Page 1 By Amaani LyleAmerican Forces Press ServiceReadiness is critical to thwarting North Koreas effort to develop nuclear arms and long-range missiles, the commander of U.S. forces in Korea told the House Armed Services Committee April 2. Army Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti, who com mands United Nations Command and Combined Forces Command, in addition to U.S. Forces Korea, said his organiza tions will work closely with the South Korean military to develop its capabili ties and stanch an increasing asymmetric threat on the Korean Peninsula. We will . combine [communica tions] systems, an alliance counter-missile defense strategy, and a procurement of precision-guided munitions, ballistic missile defense systems and intelligence, sur veillance and reconnaissance platforms, Scaparrotti said. The general noted that North Korea has the fourth-largest military in the world, with more than 70 percent of its ground forces deployed near the Korean Demilitarized Zone. [North Koreas] long-range artillery can strike targets in the Seoul metropolitan area, where over 23 million South Koreans and almost 50,000 Americans live, he said. In addition to violations of multiple U.N. Security Council resolutions, Kim Jong Uns regime also is aggressively investing in cyber warfare capabilities, the general reported. North Korea brings risk to the worlds fastest-growing economic region, which is responsible for 25 percent of the worlds gross domestic product and home to our largest trading partners, Scaparrotti said. Against this real threat, our nation is committed to the security of South Korea and to our national interests. The general pledged to transform and strengthen the alliance, maintain the armistice to deter and defeat aggression, and be ready to fight. Priorities, he added, also include sustaining the force and fam ily readiness and enhancing the United Nations Command, Combined Forces Command and U.S. Forces Korea teams. An essential part of this is a positive command climate that focuses on the cov enant between the leader and the led and our mission together, he said. At the core of mission success is the close relationship we share with our South Korean partners; we benefit from an important history forged on many battle fields, shared sacrifices and democratic principles. Over the past 60 years, the general said, the United States and South Korea have built one of the longest-standing alliances in modern history. We will continue to ensure strong and effective deterrence posture so that Pyongyang never misjudges our role, com mitment or capability to respond as an alliance, he added.Countering North Korean threats 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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This years drills marked the 53rd Foal Eagle exercise, which includ ed participation of USS Lassen (DDG 82), USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG 54), USS Lake Erie (CG 70), USS Howard (DDG 83), USS Avenger (MCM 1), along with Korean Aegis destroyers ROKS Sejong the Great (DDG 991), ROKS Seoae Ryu (DDG 993), and ROKS Gwang Geon (DDH 978). Additionally, the exercise included the U.S. Navys P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft from VP-16 for its first training missions in Korea. Exercise Foal Eagle is important to the alliance because it brings units from other regions to Korea and allows them to work in a joint environment with our ROK navy counterparts, improving our joint fighting effectiveness, said Cmdr. David Suchyta, director of opera tions for Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea. The ROK and U.S. alliance is built on trust and that trust grows from working together. This exercise provided new generations of U.S. and ROK Sailors the opportunity to work together and build that trust. The training incorporated scenarios such as gunnery exercises, communica tion drills, dynamic ship maneuvers, logistical rehearsals, and liaison officer exchanges with the ROK navy. VP-16From Page 1 Sexual Assault Awareness MonthNAS Jax FFSC staff members look on as NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander signs a proclamation in support of Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) at the Officers Club on April 2. Joining Undersander (center) at the table were, from left, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna, VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips, VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. John Brabazon, and NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre. FFSC Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Coordinator Tina Vaughn said, SAAM is important because it allows time and opportunity to reflect on the SAPR program in a meaningful way to think about where we have come from and to envision where we want and need to go in the interest of better serving and supporting those who are victimized by this crime.Photo by MC2 Amanda Cabasos Photos by MC1 Joshua Bryce BurnsSailors from the Republic of Korea navy board a U.S. Navy P-8A Poseidon aircraft March 30 for a tour facilitated by crew members assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16 during a distinguished visitor static display event with senior members of the Republic of Korea navy. The U.S. Navy's P-8A Poseidon is con ducting its first training missions in the Republic of Korea in support of Exercise Foal Eagle 2014. VP-16 is deployed in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility support ing security and stability operations in the IndoAsia-Pacific region. AWO2 Borg Miller, an acoustic systems operator assigned to VP-16, describes the process of launching sonobuoys to Republic of Korea sailors during a tour of the U.S. Navy P-8A Poseidon aircraft. AOAN Nick Hoover, assigned to VP-16, collects fuel samples from a P-8A Poseidon aircraft prior to a training mission with patrol aircraft from the Republic of Korea navy. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 7

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Medications Q&AFrom Naval Hospital Jacksonville Q: What should I do if I have a bad reaction to my medication? A: Sometimes medications can cause unin tended reactions from minor to life-threatening. Minor reactions should be reported to your pro vider or pharmacist for advice. Pharmacy phone numbers are usually located on your prescription bottle. For serious or life-threatening reactions such as difficulty breathing, tightness in your chest, swell ing, itching or con vulsions call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room. Q: Why do some medications warn me of sunburn? A: Some medica tions such as sulfa antibiotics, like septra or bactrim, can cause photo sensitivity to sun rays and likely skin burning. Even short exposure to sun rays or tanning booths can cause skin rash, itching, redness or even severe sunburn. If your prescription label cautions against sun exposure, try avoiding the highest burn index of the day, usually between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. If you must be out, wear protective clothing and accessories. In addition, apply sunscreen (SPF 30 or higher), use SPF lip balm and wear sunglasses to protect your eyes. Q: Is it important how I store my medications? A: Each medication has unique storage require ments. Because the effectiveness of your medica tion may be altered by temperature, light or humid ity, many medications should be stored in a cool, dry place away from moisture, heat and sunlight. Always read medication labels for storage recom mendations. If in doubt, ask your pharmacist if spe cial storage procedures are needed. Ask the Doc is written by Naval Hospital Jacksonville providers from its hospital and five branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. This column was written by Cmdr. Pamela OLoughlin, Naval Branch Health Clinic Key West pharmacist. If you have a question for a physician, dentist, pharmacist or optometrist, send it to jaxpublicaf fairs@med.navy.mil Ask the DocPharmacist Cmdr. Pamela O'Loughlin MilKidz Club at YACAt the NAS Jax Youth Activities Center (YAC), the Blue Star Families launched its MilKidz Club, a program that empowers military children through social activities, volunteer and educational opportunities regardless of rank, branch of service or military installation. At the writing and drawing activity on April 3, volunteer Marcie Lewis helps Caleb Harden, age 6, write a letter to another military child.Photos by Morgan KehnertAt the Blue Star Families MilKidz Club seed planting activity, each child was given a packet of seeds and taught about planting and watering seeds properly. Volunteer Avenicia Regino helps Jesse Coker, age 5, plant seeds in his egg carton container. Photos by Jacob Sippel Naval Hospital Jacksonville commanding officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer presents the Navy and MarineCorps Commendation Medal to Lt. Jeffrey Cook during an awards ceremony at the hospital on April 4. Capt. Gayle Shaffer (left), Naval Hospital Jacksonville commanding officer, presents the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal to Lt. Cmdr. William Bennett during an awards ceremony at the hos pital March 28. Other award recipients included: Lt. James White (Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal); HM1 Jason Julien (Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal); Hospitalman James Stevens (Joint Service Achievement Medal); Hospitalman Christopher Dooling (Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal); HM3 Daniel Anderson (Flag Letter of Commendation, Navy Medicine East); HM3 Jake McCardell (Letter of Appreciation, Commanding Officer HMSS 72); HM3 Emmanuel Washington (Letter of Appreciation, Edward White High School NJROTC); Charlene Johnson (20-year Civilian Length of Service Award); Beverly Taylor (10-year Civilian Length of Service Award).Hospital Awards Quarters 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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Naval Hospital Jacksonville invites you to get fit From NH JacksonvilleDid you know that Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles awardwinning Wellness Center offers individual and group classes that focus on improving your health? Classes include tobacco cessation, weight management, fitness and nutrition. The following classes are offered throughout the year: (appointment or walkin) basic nutritiononehour. Assessment (appoint ment only) body mass, exercise and basic nutri tion(two) one-hour classes (one individual session and one group session). (appointment or walkin): Cholesterol manage ment90-minutes. (appointment only) healthy lifestyle/weight management six weeks (one hour per week). ment only) weight man agementeight weeks (one hour per week) (appointment or walk-in): or to make an appoint ment, call (904) 542-5292 or visit NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center located at Building 867, adjacent fitness center. Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha Jones"Since 1893, Chief Petty Officers have been deckplate leaders, the foundation for setting standards and the backbone of our navy," said CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre to the Chiefs' Mess aboard NAS Jax as they gath ered at Bldg. 1 in celebration of the 121st birthday of the U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer. On their 121st birthday, the Chiefs' Mess of NAS Jax joins in celebration of their rank's rich heritage and tradition. (First row from left) ACC Andre Chester, MAC Vanessa Henderson, NAS Jax CMDCM Teri McIntyre, (second row from left) EMC Jason Allen, YNC Mark Leet, MTCS Ronald Thomas, BMC Jose Arroyopaulin, CSC Charles Brown, (third row from left) CSC Keith Combo, BMC Robert Gibbs, NCCS Chad Geers, (back row from left) CSCS Wendell Heyward, ABCM Michael Coppola, ENCS Scott Vanhorn, ACCS Keven Sloan, ABHCS Fred Baxter. The Chiefs' Mess reflects as NAS Jax CMDCM(SW/ AW) Teri McIntyre requests that on the 121st birth day of the Chief Petty Officer, they "take a moment to honor our long-standing traditions, remember our heritage and what the anchors mean. Recommit to our guiding principles and reaffirm our dedication to one another and our mess." Goat Locker celebrates 121 yearsNAS Jax CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre (center) leads the Chiefs' Mess in reciting the Sailor's Creed as they join together to honor the 121st birthday of the CPO. (From left) BMC Jose Arroyopaulin, CSC Charles Brown and QMC Joseph Ziro stand at the ready for morning colors in honor of the 121st birthday of the U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer. With MUC Charity Barron directing, Navy Band Southeast performed patriotic music for the U.S. Navy Chiefs' birthday recognition held at Bldg. 1 aboard NAS Jax. The Chiefs' Mess aboard NAS Jax gives their attention to ACC Andre Chester as he recites an excerpt from the CPO Creed, "In the United States Navy and only in the United States Navy the rank of E7 carries with it unique responsibilities and privileges you are now bound to observe and fulfill. Your entire way of life is now changed. More will be expected of you; more will be demanded of you. Not because you are an E7, but because you are now a U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer." JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 9

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From U.S. 7th Fleet Public AffairsThe NAS Jacksonville-based VP-16 War Eagles P-8s in Perth are still flying search missions. Overall patrol air craft support to date includes 24 missions with 220 of flight time covering 336,000 square nautical miles. Additionally, the U.S. Navy team operating the towed pinger locator (TPL) onboard Australian defense vessel Ocean Shield detected pinging signals, April 6. The detected signals are con sistent with sounds that would come from a black box. The TPL heard consecutive pings at one-second inter vals. At the time of detection the TPL was at a depth of 300 meters, which is well above the optimal search depth where a black box would typically be detected. Upon detection, the Ocean Shield crew turned off as much noise-producing equipment as possible to reduce the chance of false alarms, and the signal was again held for over two hours at a TPL depth of 1,400 meters. The signal stregnth increased and then faded, as would be expected with the ship moving toward then away from the signal. After the signal was lost the team reeled the TPL back in to prepare for a course change to a reciprocal course to get a bet ter line of bearing in the con tact location. While traveling on the recip rocal course, the Ocean Shield team again detected a separate set of pings while with the TPL set to an optimal depth of 3,000 meters. On this course the detection time lasted for about 15 min utes. The TPL detected two signals at the same frequency but in different locations. This would be consistent with the MH370 black box because the plane had both a flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder. Since the current data remains inconclusive, the team is moving foward to reac quire the signal and use the Bluefin-21 Sidescan Sonar to get a picture of any potential wreckage. This is a 24-hour operation and the Navy team is working around the clock with their Australian partners to reacquire the black box signal. The search is currently tak ing place approximately 950 nautical miles northwest of Perth. Lt. j.g. Nick Horton (left), and Lt. Clayton Hunt, naval aviators assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16, perform preflight checks in the flight station of a P-8A Poseidon April 1 prior to a mission to assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. VP-16 is deployed in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsi bility. Search for MH370 continuesPhotos by MCC Keith DeVinneyTwo P-8A Poseidon aircraft from VP-16 rest on the tarmac of an air field in Perth, Australia. The pair of maritime patrol aircraft are being utilized for the international effort to locate Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. A P-8A Poseidon aircraft from VP-16 is parked next to a Royal Australian Air Force E-7A Wedgetail aircraft at Perth Airport. Both planes are being utilized for the international effort to locate Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. Special acoustic gear joins searchCapt. Mark Matthews, supervisor of salvage and diving, demonstrates to international media how the towed array listens for the signal emitted by a locator beacon like the one on Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. Joint Task Force 658 is currently supporting Operation Southern Indian Ocean, searching for the missing Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777.Photo by MC1 Peter D. Blair JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 11

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Walk for child abuse preventionBy AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterEvery April the NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center arranges several activities involving children at the NAS Jax Child Development Center (CDC) in sup port of child abuse awareness and prevention month. On April 2, NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker, along with Fleet and Family Support Center staff and children and staff from the CDC, stepped out on their annual Child Abuse Prevention Month Walk. Since 2008, the Pinwheels for Prevention campaign has established the pin wheel as the national symbol for child abuse and neglect prevention. The children proudly wielded the pinwheels they crafted as they walked around the perimeter of the CDC to raise awareness for the pro gram. I really enjoy any opportunity I have to partici pate in events with the children of military families. This walk makes such a positive impact on the chil dren and they seem to be having a great time, said Wanamaker. Watching them laugh as they waved their pin wheels reminded us all why this annual Child Abuse Prevention Walk is so important. We must always work together to prevent any kind of child abuse, he added. Even the childrens caretakers noticed the impres sion the walk leaves on the children. Kathy Wright, program assistant at the CDC, noted, this walk encourages the discussions we have with the children regarding abuse and makes the children feel impor tant. There are several classes provided at the Fleet and Family Support Center to reinforce the cause, includ ing New Parent Support, that Emily Fox, a child coun cilor at Fleet and Family Support Center, says, its where prevention starts. By Barbie SmolinskiNMCRS Publicity AssistantStephanie Croan is a new volun teer at Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) Jacksonville. As a Navy spouse, she recently moved to Jacksonville from Pensacola and looks forward to providing active duty service members and their families with financial counseling and assistance. Croan is a native of Ketchikan, Alaska, the states first city and Salmon Capital of the World. She attended Western Washington University where she earned a bachelors degree in envi ronmen tal science. After college, she lived in Seattle for one year where she enjoyed the culture and fast-paced life of the city. She then moved to Juneau, Alaska, where she worked as an environmental monitor for the Kensington gold mine located 40 miles north of the city. There she found her beloved dog, Marlee, who happened to show up one day at the mine. From Juneau she moved to Fairbanks, Alaska where she met her husband, Andrew, who is a naval flight officer in training at VP-30 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Theyve been married for one year. In her free time, Stephanie loves to deep-sea dive. She recently became a certified scuba diver and explored Floridas Barrier Reef in Key West. Her dream is to dive the Belize Barrier Reef and the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. Do you want to meet interesting people like Stephanie Croan? Then check out the volunteer opportu nities at NMCRS, by calling the chairman of volunteers at 904-5423515. Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesNAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker (left) along with Fleet and Family Support Center staff and more than 112 children of the base Child Development Center pause for a photograph before stepping off on their walk to raise awareness for child abuse prevention. NMCRS Volunteer Spotlight: Meet Stephanie CroanCroan Proclamation for childrenCommanding officers from tenant commands and FFSC staff join NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander during the signing of a proclamation in support of Child Abuse Prevention and the Month of the Military Child at the Officers Club on April 2. (Front row from left) Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna, VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips, Undersander, VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. John Brabazon Command and NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Teri McIntyre. Photo by MC2 Amanda Cabasos 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live enter tainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: April 19, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: April 26, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open May 10 June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while sup plies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. One Spark Festival Trip April 12 at noon Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee April 19 at 9 a.m. Jacksonville Suns Game April 22 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty April 8 & 22 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests April 10 & 24 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. Command Party Swing into savings & book your com mand golf tournamentMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Month of the Military Family Carnival April 12, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Easter Egg Hunt April 16, 7 p.m. McCaffrey Softball ComplexFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available includ ing instrument, complex and commer cial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.netSand Volleyball League forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS designated representative attend receive Greybeard Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jax. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Intramural Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym for rules and required paperwork. Kickball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Game play at lunch time. Contact the NAS Jax Sports Department for rules and required paperwork. Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. Play starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25. Intramural Summer Golf Meets May 7 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at 11:30 a.m. at the golf or designated representative attend receive Intramural Basketball Meets May 14 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective designated representative attend receive Wallyball League Meets May 21 Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet noon For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil StandingsAs of April 4Winter Golf NCTS 6 1 VP-45 6 1 CNATTU Blue 5 2 VP-30 5 2 FRCSE 5 2 CV-TSC/PSD 4 3 Navy Band 4 3 SERCC 2 5 FRCSE II 1 2 HS-11 1 3 VP-10 1 5 CNATTU Gold 1 6 Ultimate Frisbee VP-30 Students 4 1 CV-TSC Ashore 4 1 VP-62 Broadarrows 3 2 NAVFAC/PWD 2 2 FRCSE 1 0 NAS Jax 2 3 HS-11 2 3 VP-10 0 4 Soccer FRCSE 1 0 HITRON 1 0 HSM-72 1 0 NAVFAC 1 0 TPU/PCF 1 0 VP-30 Students 1 0 BHC Jax 0 0 NAVHOSP 0 0 VP-10 0 0 VP-62 0 0 Air Ops 0 1 FRCSE F-18 PMI 0 1 HS-11 0 1 VP-26 0 1 VP-45 0 1 VR-62 0 1 Badminton Doubles NAVHOSP MSU 9 0 NAVFAC Blue 6 1 NBHC Jax 4 2 MWR Dynamic Duo 5 3 NAVFAC Red 4 3 NAVFAC Orange 3 4 NAVFAC Gold 3 4 CV-TSC Ashore 2 5 FACSFAC 1 1 5 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 13

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By Terri Moon Cronk American Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department believes military children serve their country alongside their service member parents, DoDs director of the office of family policy/children and youth said recently. When military children serve, they do so by making sacrifices when parents are deployed, through frequent moves, starting new schools and making new friends on a continuing basis, Barbara Thompson said in a recent interview with The Pentagon Channel for the Month of the Military Child thats cel ebrated in April. We feel its important for the nation to know that military children also serve their country, Thompson said. To honor military children for their sacrifices and service, DoD and the services have planned activities this month that range from installationbased fairs, parades, and literacy and art events, she said. Military Kids Day, April 15, marks the third-annual Purple Up! day when adults wear purple to show sup port of children from all the services, Thompson said. DoD has numerous year-round pro grams and awareness efforts to honor military children, and Thompson elab orated on some of those initiatives. To help children build their resil ience, DoD has coordinated programs with Sesame Street to help with ongo ing change in military childrens lives, Thompson noted. Sesame [Street] has been an out standing contributor to the well-being of military children, she said, naming a series of DVDs that cover such topics for military children as divorce, grief, sepa ration and deployment, resilience skills, and visible or invisible injuries. Sesame Street also recently launched two new smartphone applications. One [app] covers relocation, and another is to help children learn selfregulation skills so they become more resilient, Thompson said. And every thing is free. Thompson emphasized that April also is Child Abuse Prevention Month and said awareness in this arena is important to DoD. Child Abuse Prevention Month is particularly important because its a social responsibility for all of us to make sure children are safe and their wellbeing is protected, she said. Giving parents the tools to make them strong supporters of their children and to keep them safe from predators and from violence within the family is cru cial, she added. Parenting is tough, regardless of the situation and the age of the child. They each bring their nuances to the table, whether its children at [age] 2 who say no, or a teenager whos sometimes a little defiant, she said. DoD offers parenting skill resourc es, Thompson noted, such as the newly launched Parenting Course. The course, she explained, examines parenting from the context of the military life style, which revolves around deploy ments and parental separations from their children at different stages of their development. And an installation-based initia tive, the new Parent Support Program, involves home visitation for new par ents of children up to age 3, to help parents reach their full potential work ing with and being responsible for their children, Thompson said. The Marine Corps program supports parents with children up to age 5, she added. The New Parent Support Program is a part of the Family Advocacy Program, which has a prevention piece that offers courses and opportunities for sup port groups. We want to make sure we address the stressors in families lives before they escalate, Thompson said. Sometimes [certain] things really push our buttons, she added. So we need to have the tools, to know how to cope with those kinds of stressors and how we react to them.DoD salutes children during military child month 'Highlanders' at workAn HSM-72 Det.1 Seahawk helicopter works with hose handlers on the deck of guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) during a Helicopter In Flight Refuelling (HIFR) evolution while training in the Atlantic. The Highlanders are a detachment of two MH-60R helicopters certified for independent deployment.Photos courtesy of HSM-72HSM-72 Det.1 "Highlanders" stand with one of their two MH-60R Seahawk helicopters that will embark with guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) later this year in support of international exercises. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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Photo by Jacob SippelHospital CPOs party on(From left) Naval Hospital Jacksonville CMDCM Bennora Simmons, HMC Jamie Davis and HMCM Louis Ferraro cut the ceremonial cake April 3 com memorating 121 years of the U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer. Since 1893, Chiefs have been charged with the responsibility of ensuring our Sailors are the best in the world, ready to carry out the Navy's mission when called. Navy precision on displayThe U.S. Navy flight demonstration squadron, the Blue Angels, flies the diamond formation March 29 above Naval Air Station Kingsville, Texas. The air station is one of two that trains future Navy jet pilots, some of whom later join the Blue Angels team. The squadron is scheduled to perform at NAS Jacksonville Oct. 25-26.U.S. Navy photo by Richard StewartFRCSE returns HornetLt. Cmdr. Joshua Filbey, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) F/A-18 Hornet production officer and test pilot, climbs into the cockpit of a Blue Angels' Hornet March 31 to fly the aircraft from FRCSE at NAS Jacksonville to the Blue Angels' home base at NAS Pensacola. Photo by Kaylee LaRocque JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 15

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From Commander, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/ U.S. 10th Fleet Public AffairsU.S. Fleet Cyber Command/ U.S. 10th Fleet (FCC/C10F) con ducted a change of command April 2 at the Frank B. Rowlett Building located at Fort George Meade, Md. Vice Adm. Jan Tighe relieved Adm. Michael Rogers as com mander in a ceremony held at fleet headquarters. With this appointment, Tighe becomes the third com mander of FCC/C10F and the first female commander of a numbered fleet in U.S. Navy history. It is an honor to take com mand of this outstanding warf ighting organization and to be able to continue working with the tremendous team of uni formed and civilian profession als, said Tighe. Tighe has served as deputy commander of FCC/C10F since November 2013. Rogers takes the reigns as commander, U.S. Cyber Command and director, National Security Agency/ chief, Central Security Service. It has been a tremendous honor and privilege to serve as your commander for the last two and a half years. Your sup port of the nations maritime strategy by effectively employ ing our mission capabilities globally has been outstand ing, Rogers said. I now pass the conn of [FCC/ C10F] to Vice Adm. Jan Tighe. She is an exceptional leader, innovative thinker and stal wart warfighter who will con tinue our momentum of mis sion accomplishment and transformation. Tighe was promoted at the National Cryptologic Museum by Gen. Keith Alexander, who retired March 28 from his posi tion as commander of U.S. Cyber Command and direc tor, National Security Agency/ chief, Central Security Service. I think the greatest honor and privilege Ive had is to work with great people, Alexander said, and Jan Tighe, you are one of the best people that our military has across all of the Services. You are exceptional in every category and you will do great with 10th Fleet, which I believe is just a stepping stone for future things for you, Alexander went on to say. Tighe was born in Bowling Green, Ky., and raised in Plantation, Fla. Her previous tours include duty with Naval Security Group Activities in Florida, Virginia, Japan, VQ-1 and Naval Information Warfare Activity. As a flag officer, Tighe has served as U.S. Cyber Command Deputy J3; OPNAV N2N6 Director, Decision Superiority; Naval Postgraduate School Interim President; and Deputy Commander, FCC/C10F. Tighe is a U.S. Naval Academy graduate and was commissioned as an ensign (special duty cryptology) in 1984. She attended the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, Calif., where she studied Russian. She also attended the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, Calif., and in 2001 was awarded a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and a M.S. in Applied Mathematics. Tighe wears both the Information Dominance Warfare insignia and Naval Aviation Observer wings, which she earned while deployed as an airborne spe cial evaluator aboard VQ-1 EP-3E aircraft in the Persian Gulf during Operation Desert Shield/Storm. U.S. Fleet Cyber Command serves as the Navy com ponent command to U.S. Strategic Command and U.S. Cyber Command, and the Navys Service Cryptologic Component commander under the National Security Agency/ Central Security Service. Fleet Cyber Command also reports directly to the Chief of Naval Operations as an Echelon II command. U.S. 10th Fleet is the oper ational arm of Fleet Cyber Command and executes its mission through a task force structure similar to other war fare commanders. By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsA new policy at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) now requires person nel to wear hearing protection in all marked industrial areas to help reduce the incidence of hearing loss from long-term exposure. The policy change is in accordance with the Navy Safety and Occupational Health Program Manual and Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers Occupational Safety and Health Policy requiring personal protective equipment at all centers to protect employ ees from injury and illness. Our policy was that for areas above 85 decibels, employees had to wear hearing protec tion based on guidelines of different noise hazards, said FRCSE Director of Safety Peter Gallant. This is not really feasible. We are revising our policy to state that if there are noise hazards above 85 or reason ably expected above 85 in an industrial area, then hearing protection will be worn at all times even for those transiting the area. The exception is dur ing breaks or lunch. According to Gallant, hear ing loss statistics are based using two methods the days away restricted transfer (DART) rate which is used by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration indus try-wide and the total case incident rate (TCIR) which combines DART cases and hearing loss cases. Our industrial site work ers are enrolled in a hearing conservation program based on noise levels within FRCSE shops, said Gallant. This program requires them to go through annual training and hearing check-ups at our base clinic. To carry out the new policy, an implementation team is identifying hearing protection zones, creating zone maps, dis playing signage and providing hearing protection stations. We are working with shop managers to identify specific hearing protection zones and determine where additional signs and hearing protection stations are needed, said Gallant. The policy also requires most FRCSE employees to wear safety glasses and safety shoes while in and traveling through marked industrial production spaces including aisle ways. However, employees, vendors and visitors passing through marked aisle ways may wear, at a minimum, closed-toe shoes, if safety shoes are not required for their job function. From Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is cel ebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration din ner and program. This is an All Services event featuring a joint color guard, All Services Missing Person table, the Navy Band with all the service songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine.The keynote speak er is Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches who served in prior conflicts, as well as those currently serving are invited to attend. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emotion al and patriotic, and provide an excel lent opportunity to connect with sur vivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jack et; O3 and below dinner dress white/ dinner dress white jacket optional, and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., with dinner served at 6 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Tickets may be purchased from the following locations: NAVY LEAGUE MAYPORT Bob Price, 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 E-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net NAVY LEAGUE ST AUGUSTINE Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 E-mail: anuday00@aol.com US Fleet Cyber Command/US 10th Fleet change of commandPhoto by MC2 David Finlely Jr.Vice Adm. Jan E. Tighe smiles as she assumes command of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command and U.S. 10th Fleet during the April 2 ceremony conducted at fleet headquarters. Tighe relieved Adm. Michael Roger, who takes over as commander of U.S. Cyber Command and director of the National Security Agency and chief of the Central Security Service. Tighe is the third com mander of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command and U.S. 10th Fleet and the first female commander of a numbered fleet in U.S. Navy history. Photos by Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Director of Safety Peter Gallant (left) discusses where to place new hearing protection signs in work centers with hearing conservation team members. From right: Steve Simmons, FRCSE Mega Center supervisor; Steve Parker, International Federation of Professional Technical Engineers Union representative and Alison Sala-Brewer, industrial engi neering technician during a meeting at the depot on March 18. On March 18, Alison SalaBrewer, a Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) industrial engineering techni cian and member of the FRCSE hearing conservation team, posts a sign to remind FRCSE employees and visitors that hearing protection is required in a designated work center. The team is identifying areas throughout FRCSE where hear ing protection is required and identifying locations to install earplug dispensers.FRCSE establishes new hearing conservation zonesCNO is Battle of Midway keynote speaker June 7 Voting assistance availableNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander discussed the importance of voting in order to maintain a healthy and thriving democracy. He spoke at a recent Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP) workshop for voting assistance officers held at Deweys All Hands Club. For more info, visit www.FVAP.gov.Photo by Clark Pierce 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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By Lt. j.g. Torrey PlumVP-8 Public AffairsSeven Sailors from the VP-8 Fighting Tigers based at Cooperative Security Location Comalapa, El Salvador spent March 29 helping to build a home for a local Salvadoran family as part of a Habitat for Humanity project. The Fighting Tigers leveled floors, hauled dirt and erected scaffolding. It was a humbling experi ence to see how grateful the families were, said Lt. j.g. Paxie Cordova, a pilot with VP-8. Habitat for Humanity provides us with a wonderful opportunity to help the local community and leave a last ing mark from our time spent here. Hugo Rodriguez, the recipi ent of the new home, expressed appreciation for the volunteers time and effort. The experience allows us to create new relationships with people from other countries, he said. It means a great deal to us that these people, who weve never met, are willing to volunteer their time in order to provide us with a home. Habitat for Humanity El Salvador relies mostly on dona tions and volunteers to provide housing to families, many of whom have been displaced by natural disasters. Since they began aiding Latin America in 1979, Habitat for Humanity has helped provide more than 100,000 families with adequate housing. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 are deployed to the 4th and 5th fleet areas of responsibil ity, assisting in the Counter Transnational Organized Crime mission and providing humanitarian assistance. By GM2(SW) Camille PerezCSL Comalapa Public Affairs Members of the El Salvador air forces Segunda Brigada Aerea (Second Air Brigade) hosted a sports day March 28 at their base in Comalapa and invited Sailors from Cooperative Security Location (CSL) Comalapa and VP-8 to participate. Other participants includ ed Policia Nacional Civil (the national police), the Maseca corn company, Aeroman, Comision Ejecutiva Portuaria Autonoma and Grupo Conjunto Cuscastlan. Having a sports day like this helps the heath of relations between the U.S. Navy and Salvadorans, said Lt. Col. Saul Osorio of the Segunda Brigada Aerea. Friendly competition helps builds on the camara derie between CSL Sailors and Segunda Brigada Aerea. CSL and the VP-8 Fighting Tigers joined together to cre ate one soccer team, and while both commands had basketball teams, VP-8 fielded its own vol leyball team. The teams played in a singleelimination tournament for each sport. VP-8 won the bas ketball championship, while the Segunda Brigada Aerea won in soccer and Maseca in volley ball. CSL Comalapa provided hot dogs and minutas (snow cones), and the Segunda Brigada pro vided water and sodas for every one. Sports day was a great time, said Ensign Mark Baden, a basketball team member and naval flight officer with VP-8. It was an honor to participate in friendly competition against the El Salvadorans and experience their culture. For more news from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet, visit www.navy.mil/local/cusns/. Scholarship application deadline extended From staffBalfour Beatty Communities Foundation has extended accept ing scholarship applica tions from high school seniors and under graduate students who live in a Balfour Beatty Community and are attending or planning to attend an accredited edu cational/technical insti tution for the 2014 2015 academic year. To apply for these scholarships go to the Foundations web site, www.bbcommu nitiesfoundation.org/ scholarships.aspx, print out, complete, and submit the applica tion and all required materials to Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation at 10 Campus Boulevard, Newtown Square, Pa. 19073.Applications must be postmarked by May 2. Fighting Tigers help build home for Salvadoran familyPhoto courtesy of VP-8(From left) AWO2 Mark Willard, Lt. j.g. Paxie Cordova and (background) AECS Demetrius Brown of VP-8 invest some sweat in a Habitat For Humanity project for a Salvadoran family as they select concrete blocks at the construction site. CSL Comalapa, VP-8 Sailors compete in Salvadoran sports dayPhotos by GM2 Camille PerezEnsign Mark Baden, a naval flight officer with VP-8, looks for room under the basket dur ing the Segunda Brigada Aerea (Second Air Brigade) sports day on March 28 at CSL Comalapa, El Salvador. The "Fighting Tigers" won the day's basket ball championship. AE3 Danielle Lindsay of VP-8 digs the ball during volleyball competition in the Segunda Brigada Aerea (Second Air Brigade) sports day as team mate AWO2 Blake Pockrandt looks on. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 10, 2014 17

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